WorldWideScience

Sample records for measuring nanopore size

  1. Hydrophilic and size-controlled graphene nanopores for protein detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goyal, Gaurav; Bok Lee, Yong; Darvish, Armin; Ahn, Chi Won; Kim, Min Jun

    2016-12-01

    This paper describes a general approach for transferring clean single-layer graphene onto silicon nitride nanopore devices and the use of the electron beam of a transmission electron microscope (TEM) to drill size-controlled nanopores in freely suspended graphene. Besides nanopore drilling, we also used the TEM to heal and completely close the unwanted secondary holes formed by electron beam damage during the drilling process. We demonstrate electron beam assisted shrinking of irregularly shaped 40-60 nm pores down to 2 nm, exhibiting an exquisite control of graphene nanopore diameter. Our fabrication workflow also rendered graphene nanopores hydrophilic, allowing easy wetting and use of the pores for studying protein translocation and protein-protein interaction with a high signal to noise ratio.

  2. Fine-tuning the feature size of nanoporous silver

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Detsi, Eric; Vukovic, Zorica; Punzhin, Sergey; Bronsveld, Paul M.; Onck, Patrick R.; De Hosson, Jeff Th M.

    2012-01-01

    We show that the characteristic ligament size of nanoporous Ag synthesized by chemical dissolution of Al from Ag-Al alloys can be tuned from the current submicrometer size (similar to 100-500 nm) down to a much smaller length scale (similar to 30-60 nm). This is achieved by suppressing the formation

  3. Simultaneous Size Control of Microcapsule and Its Nanopores Using Polymer Concentration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jemyung Cha,; Eun Ho Jeong,; Arakawa Takahiro,; Kyung Chun Kim,; Shuich Shoji,; Jeung Sang Go,

    2010-03-01

    Polymeric microcapsules with nanopores are produced using the droplet-based self-assembly of a block copolymer in the microfluidic channel. Differently from the conventional wise, the sizes of the microcapsule and its nanopores are controlled by changing the concentration of the block copolymer dissolved in an organic solvent. The increase in the polymer concentration shows the increase in the size of the microcapsule and the decrease of the size and number of the nanopores. Also, to obtain the optimal morphology of the nanopores in the microcapsule, the removal process of a surfactant is newly developed by using a microporous metal mesh.

  4. Size selective sampling using mobile, 3D nanoporous membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randall, Christina L; Gillespie, Aubri; Singh, Siddarth; Leong, Timothy G; Gracias, David H

    2009-02-01

    We describe the fabrication of 3D membranes with precisely patterned surface nanoporosity and their utilization in size selective sampling. The membranes were self-assembled as porous cubes from lithographically fabricated 2D templates (Leong et al., Langmuir 23:8747-8751, 2007) with face dimensions of 200 microm, volumes of 8 nL, and monodisperse pores ranging in size from approximately 10 microm to 100 nm. As opposed to conventional sampling and filtration schemes where fluid is moved across a static membrane, we demonstrate sampling by instead moving the 3D nanoporous membrane through the fluid. This new scheme allows for straightforward sampling in small volumes, with little to no loss. Membranes with five porous faces and one open face were moved through fluids to sample and retain nanoscale beads and cells based on pore size. Additionally, cells retained within the membranes were subsequently cultured and multiplied using standard cell culture protocols upon retrieval.

  5. Effects of nanopore size on the flow-induced star polymer translocation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qiaoyue; Zhang, Lili; Ding, Mingming; Duan, Xiaozheng; Huang, Yineng; Shi, Tongfei

    2016-11-01

    We study the effects of the nanopore size on the flow-induced capture of the star polymer by a nanopore and the afterward translocation, using a hybrid simulation method that couples point particles into a fluctuating lattice-Boltzmann fluid. Our simulation demonstrates that the optimal forward arm number decreases slowly with the increase of the length of the nanopore. Compared to the minor effect of the length of the nanopore, the optimal forward arm number obviously increases with the increase of the width of the nanopore, which can clarify the current controversial issue for the optimal forward arm number between the theory and experiments. In addition, our results indicate that the critical velocity flux of the star polymer is independent of the nanopore size. Our work bridges the experimental results and the theoretical understanding, which can provide comprehensive insights for the characterization and the purification of the star polymers.

  6. Tuning the size and properties of ClyA nanopores assisted by directed evolution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Soskine, Mikhael; Biesemans, Annemie; De Maeyer, Marc; Maglia, Giovanni

    2013-01-01

    Nanopores have recently emerged as powerful tools in single-molecule investigations. Biological nanopores, however, have drawbacks, including a fixed size and limited stability in lipid bilayers. Inspired by the great success of directed evolution approaches in tailoring enzyme properties, in this w

  7. Nanoporous carbide-derived carbon with tunable pore size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gogotsi, Yury; Nikitin, Alexei; Ye, Haihui; Zhou, Wei; Fischer, John E.; Yi, Bo; Foley, Henry C.; Barsoum, Michel W.

    2003-09-01

    Porous solids are of great technological importance due to their ability to interact with gases and liquids not only at the surface, but throughout their bulk. Although large pores can be produced and well controlled in a variety of materials, nanopores in the range of 2 nm and below (micropores, according to IUPAC classification) are usually achieved only in carbons or zeolites. To date, major efforts in the field of porous materials have been directed towards control of the size, shape and uniformity of the pores. Here we demonstrate that porosity of carbide-derived carbons (CDCs) can be tuned with subångström accuracy in a wide range by controlling the chlorination temperature. CDC produced from Ti3SiC2 has a narrower pore-size distribution than single-wall carbon nanotubes or activated carbons; its pore-size distribution is comparable to that of zeolites. CDCs are produced at temperatures from 200-1,200 °C as a powder, a coating, a membrane or parts with near-final shapes, with or without mesopores. They can find applications in molecular sieves, gas storage, catalysts, adsorbents, battery electrodes, supercapacitors, water/air filters and medical devices.

  8. Large apparent electric size of solid-state nanopores due to spatially extended surface conduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Choongyeop; Joly, Laurent; Siria, Alessandro; Biance, Anne-Laure; Fulcrand, Rémy; Bocquet, Lydéric

    2012-08-08

    Ion transport through nanopores drilled in thin membranes is central to numerous applications, including biosensing and ion selective membranes. This paper reports experiments, numerical calculations, and theoretical predictions demonstrating an unexpectedly large ionic conduction in solid-state nanopores, taking its origin in anomalous entrance effects. In contrast to naive expectations based on analogies with electric circuits, the surface conductance inside the nanopore is shown to perturb the three-dimensional electric current streamlines far outside the nanopore in order to meet charge conservation at the pore entrance. This unexpected contribution to the ionic conductance can be interpreted in terms of an apparent electric size of the solid-state nanopore, which is much larger than its geometric counterpart whenever the number of charges carried by the nanopore surface exceeds its bulk counterpart. This apparent electric size, which can reach hundreds of nanometers, can have a major impact on the electrical detection of translocation events through nanopores, as well as for ionic transport in biological nanopores.

  9. Crystal-Size-Dependent Structural Transitions in Nanoporous Crystals: Adsorption-Induced Transitions in ZIF-8

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Chen

    2014-09-04

    © 2014 American Chemical Society. Understanding the crystal-size dependence of both guest adsorption and structural transitions of nanoporous solids is crucial to the development of these materials. We find that nano-sized metal-organic framework (MOF) crystals have significantly different guest adsorption properties compared to the bulk material. A new methodology is developed to simulate the adsorption and transition behavior of entire MOF nanoparticles. Our simulations predict that the transition pressure significantly increases with decreasing particle size, in agreement with crystal-size-dependent experimental measurements of the N2-ZIF-8 system. We also propose a simple core-shell model to examine this effect on length scales that are inaccessible to simulations and again find good agreement with experiments. This study is the first to examine particle size effects on structural transitions in ZIFs and provides a thermodynamic framework for understanding the underlying mechanism.

  10. The Effect of Pore Size of Nanoporous Material for Lithium Ion Batteries

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    L.J.Fu; G.J.Wang; Y.P.Wu

    2007-01-01

    1 Results 3-dimensionally ordered mesoporous materials have been used as electrode materials for lithium ion batteries to improve their electrochemical performance by decreasing the polarization during cycling.Our synthesize nanoporous TiO2 particles without substrate present enhanced cycle performance compared with that of previous reports[1]. Here we report our results referring to that nanoporous TiO2 materials with different pore sizes exhibit different electrochemical performance.The detail procedu...

  11. Size and functional tuning of solid state nanopores by chemical functionalization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mussi, Valentina; Fanzio, Paola; Firpo, Giuseppe; Repetto, Luca; Valbusa, Ugo

    2012-11-01

    We demonstrate the possibility of using a simple functionalization procedure, based on an initial vapour-phase silanization, to control the size and functionality of solid state nanopores. The presented results show that, by varying the silanization time, it is possible to modify the efficiency of probe molecule attachment, thus shrinking the pore to the chosen size, while introducing a specific sensing selectivity. The proposed method allows us to tune the nanopore biosensor adapting it to the specific final application, and it can be efficiently applied when the pore initial diameter does not exceed a limit dimension related to the mean free path of the silane molecules at the working pressure.

  12. Reconstructing solid state nanopore shape from electrical measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebes, Yael; Drozdov, Maria; Avital, Yotam Y.; Kauffmann, Yaron; Rapaport, Hanna; Kaplan, Wayne D.; Ashkenasy, Nurit

    2010-11-01

    The dependence of nanopore biosensor conductance signal on the nanopore shape makes it important to decipher the latter with high precision. We show here that the three dimensional shape of a nanopore, extracted from electron microscopy analysis, allows for modeling the conductance of the nanopore over a wide range of ionic strengths. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the dependence of the nanopore conductance on ionic strength can be used to accurately extract the nanopore shape, eliminating the need for lengthy electron microscopy analysis. The suggested methodology can be used to monitor changes in the nanopore shape and evaluate them during electrical characterization.

  13. Thermal Investigations of Periodically Nanoporous Si Films -- The Impact of Structure Sizes and Pore-Edge Amorphization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Dongchao; Zhao, Hongbo; Hao, Qing

    In recent years, nanoporous Si films have been intensively studied as promising thermoelectric materials, which mainly benefits from their dramatically reduced lattice thermal conductivity kL and bulk-like electrical properties.1,2 Despite many encouraging results, challenges still exist in the theoretical explanation of the observed low kL.3 Existing studies mainly attribute the low kL to 1) phonon bandstructure modification by coherent phonon processes in a periodic structure (phononic effects), and/or 2) pore-edge defects. In this work, temperature-dependent kL is measured for nanoporous Si films with different pore sizes and spacing to compare with model predictions. For systematic studies, two fabrication techniques are used to drill the nanopores: 1) reactive ion etching, and 2) a focus ion beam to introduce more pore-edge defects. The results from this work will provide guidance for phonon engineering in general materials with periodic interfaces or boundaries. References: 1. Tang et al., Nano Letters 10, 4279-4283 (2010). 2. Yu et al., Nature Nanotechnology 5, 718-721 (2010). 3. Cahill et al., Applied Physics Reviews 1, 011305/1-45 (2014) Nanoscale thermal transport. II. 2003-2012.

  14. Manipulation of Protein Translocation through Nanopores by Flow Field Control and Application to Nanopore Sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Wei-Lun; Daiguji, Hirofumi

    2016-09-20

    The control of biomolecule translocation through nanopores is important in nanopore protein detection. Improvement in current nanopore molecule control is desired to enhance capture rates, extend translocation times, and ensure the effective detection of various proteins in the same solutions. We present a method that simultaneously resolves these issues through the use of a gate-modulated conical nanopore coupled with solutions of varying salt concentration. Simulation results show that the presence of an induced reverse electroosmotic flow (IREOF) results in inlet flows from the two ends of the nanopore centerline entering into the nanopore in opposite directions, which simultaneously elevates the capture rate and immobilizes the protein in the nanopore, thus enabling steady current blockage measurements for a range of proteins. In addition, it is shown that proteins with different size/charge ratios can be trapped by a gate modulation intensified flow field at a similar location in the nanopore in the same solution conditions.

  15. Advanced structural analysis of nanoporous materials by thermal response measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oschatz, Martin; Leistner, Matthias; Nickel, Winfried; Kaskel, Stefan

    2015-04-07

    Thermal response measurements based on optical adsorption calorimetry are presented as a versatile tool for the time-saving and profound characterization of the pore structure of porous carbon-based materials. This technique measures the time-resolved temperature change of an adsorbent during adsorption of a test gas. Six carbide and carbon materials with well-defined nanopore architecture including micro- and/or mesopores are characterized by thermal response measurements based on n-butane and carbon dioxide as the test gases. With this tool, the pore systems of the model materials can be clearly distinguished and accurately analyzed. The obtained calorimetric data are correlated with the adsorption/desorption isotherms of the materials. The pore structures can be estimated from a single experiment due to different adsorption enthalpies/temperature increases in micro- and mesopores. Adsorption/desorption cycling of n-butane at 298 K/1 bar with increasing desorption time allows to determine the pore structure of the materials in more detail due to different equilibration times. Adsorption of the organic test gas at selected relative pressures reveals specific contributions of particular pore systems to the increase of the temperature of the samples and different adsorption mechanisms. The use of carbon dioxide as the test gas at 298 K/1 bar provides detailed insights into the ultramicropore structure of the materials because under these conditions the adsorption of this test gas is very sensitive to the presence of pores smaller than 0.7 nm.

  16. Asymmetric ion track nanopores for sensor technology. Reconstruction of pore profile from conductometric measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apel, Pavel Yu; Blonskaya, Irina V.; Orelovitch, Oleg L.; Sartowska, Bozena A.; Spohr, Reimar

    2012-06-01

    We reconstruct the profile of asymmetric ion track nanopores from an algorithm developed for conductometric measurements of symmetric nanopores. The validity of the reconstruction is supported by FESEM observations. Our analysis reveals that asymmetric pores fabricated by one-sided etching are funnel-like and not conical. The analysis provides the constriction diameter and the pore profile as a function of etching time. The reconstruction of the pore profile defines the starting conditions of asymmetric nanopores at breakthrough. The deviation from the conical shape is most pronounced at the pore tip. This critical zone dominates transport properties relevant to ion conductance, selectivity, current rectification, resistive pulse sensing and biosensors. The classical cone approximation used until now underestimates the tip diameter by a factor of two. As transport processes in nanopores depend in a highly nonlinear way on the constriction diameter the presented reconstruction must be taken into account when studying ionic and molecular transport processes in asymmetric pores.

  17. Effect of Porosity and Concentration Polarization on Electrolyte Diffusive Transport Parameters through Ceramic Membranes with Similar Nanopore Size

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virginia Romero

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Diffusive transport through nanoporous alumina membranes (NPAMs produced by the two-step anodization method, with similar pore size but different porosity, is studied by analyzing membrane potential measured with NaCl solutions at different concentrations. Donnan exclusion of co-ions at the solution/membrane interface seem to exert a certain control on the diffusive transport of ions through NPAMs with low porosity, which might be reduced by coating the membrane surface with appropriated materials, as it is the case of SiO2. Our results also show the effect of concentration polarization at the membrane surface on ionic transport numbers (or diffusion coefficients for low-porosity and high electrolyte affinity membranes, which could mask values of those characteristic electrochemical parameters.

  18. Nanopore Sequencing: Electrical Measurements of the Code of Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timp, Winston; Mirsaidov, Utkur M; Wang, Deqiang; Comer, Jeff; Aksimentiev, Aleksei; Timp, Gregory

    2010-05-01

    Sequencing a single molecule of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) using a nanopore is a revolutionary concept because it combines the potential for long read lengths (>5 kbp) with high speed (1 bp/10 ns), while obviating the need for costly amplification procedures due to the exquisite single molecule sensitivity. The prospects for implementing this concept seem bright. The cost savings from the removal of required reagents, coupled with the speed of nanopore sequencing places the $1000 genome within grasp. However, challenges remain: high fidelity reads demand stringent control over both the molecular configuration in the pore and the translocation kinetics. The molecular configuration determines how the ions passing through the pore come into contact with the nucleotides, while the translocation kinetics affect the time interval in which the same nucleotides are held in the constriction as the data is acquired. Proteins like α-hemolysin and its mutants offer exquisitely precise self-assembled nanopores and have demonstrated the facility for discriminating individual nucleotides, but it is currently difficult to design protein structure ab initio, which frustrates tailoring a pore for sequencing genomic DNA. Nanopores in solid-state membranes have been proposed as an alternative because of the flexibility in fabrication and ease of integration into a sequencing platform. Preliminary results have shown that with careful control of the dimensions of the pore and the shape of the electric field, control of DNA translocation through the pore is possible. Furthermore, discrimination between different base pairs of DNA may be feasible. Thus, a nanopore promises inexpensive, reliable, high-throughput sequencing, which could thrust genomic science into personal medicine.

  19. Direct measurements reveal non-Markovian fluctuations of DNA threading through a solid-state nanopore

    CERN Document Server

    Bell, Nicholas A W

    2016-01-01

    The threading of a polymer chain through a small pore is a classic problem in polymer dynamics and underlies nanopore sensing technology. However important experimental aspects of the polymer motion in a solid-state nanopore, such as an accurate measurement of the velocity variation during translocation, have remained elusive. In this work we analysed the translocation through conical quartz nanopores of a 7 kbp DNA double-strand labelled with six markers equally spaced along its contour. These markers, constructed from DNA hairpins, give direct experimental access to the translocation dynamics. On average we measure a 5% reduction in velocity during the translocation. We also find a striking correlation in velocity fluctuations with a decay constant of 100s of {\\mu}s. These results shed light on hitherto unresolved problems in the dynamics of DNA translocation and provide guidance for experiments seeking to determine positional information along a DNA strand.

  20. The Influence of Pore Size on the Indentation Behavior of Metallic Nanoporous Materials: A Molecular Dynamics Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Esqué-de los Ojos

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In general, the influence of pore size is not considered when determining the Young’s modulus of nanoporous materials. Here, we demonstrate that the pore size needs to be taken into account to properly assess the mechanical properties of these materials. Molecular dynamics simulations of spherical indentation experiments on single crystalline nanoporous Cu have been undertaken in systems with: (i a constant degree of porosity and variable pore diameter; and (ii a constant pore diameter and variable porosity degree. The classical Gibson and Ashby expression relating Young’s modulus with the relative density of the nanoporous metal is modified to include the influence of the pore size. The simulations reveal that, for a fixed porosity degree, the mechanical behavior of materials with smaller pores differs more significantly from the behavior of the bulk, fully dense counterpart. This effect is ascribed to the increase of the overall surface area as the pore size is reduced, together with the reduced coordination number of the atoms located at the pores edges.

  1. The Influence of Pore Size on the Indentation Behavior of Metallic Nanoporous Materials: A Molecular Dynamics Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esqué-de Los Ojos, Daniel; Pellicer, Eva; Sort, Jordi

    2016-05-11

    In general, the influence of pore size is not considered when determining the Young's modulus of nanoporous materials. Here, we demonstrate that the pore size needs to be taken into account to properly assess the mechanical properties of these materials. Molecular dynamics simulations of spherical indentation experiments on single crystalline nanoporous Cu have been undertaken in systems with: (i) a constant degree of porosity and variable pore diameter; and (ii) a constant pore diameter and variable porosity degree. The classical Gibson and Ashby expression relating Young's modulus with the relative density of the nanoporous metal is modified to include the influence of the pore size. The simulations reveal that, for a fixed porosity degree, the mechanical behavior of materials with smaller pores differs more significantly from the behavior of the bulk, fully dense counterpart. This effect is ascribed to the increase of the overall surface area as the pore size is reduced, together with the reduced coordination number of the atoms located at the pores edges.

  2. DNA origami nanopores for controlling DNA translocation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Ainsa, Silvia; Bell, Nicholas A W; Thacker, Vivek V; Göpfrich, Kerstin; Misiunas, Karolis; Fuentes-Perez, Maria Eugenia; Moreno-Herrero, Fernando; Keyser, Ulrich F

    2013-07-23

    We combine DNA origami structures with glass nanocapillaries to reversibly form hybrid DNA origami nanopores. Trapping of the DNA origami onto the nanocapillary is proven by imaging fluorescently labeled DNA origami structures and simultaneous ionic current measurements of the trapping events. We then show two applications highlighting the versatility of these DNA origami nanopores. First, by tuning the pore size we can control the folding of dsDNA molecules ("physical control"). Second, we show that the specific introduction of binding sites in the DNA origami nanopore allows selective detection of ssDNA as a function of the DNA sequence ("chemical control").

  3. Synergetic effect of carbon nanopore size and surface oxidation on CO2 capture from CO2/CH4 mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furmaniak, Sylwester; Kowalczyk, Piotr; Terzyk, Artur P; Gauden, Piotr A; Harris, Peter J F

    2013-05-01

    We have studied the synergetic effect of confinement (carbon nanopore size) and surface chemistry (the number of carbonyl groups) on CO2 capture from its mixtures with CH4 at typical operating conditions for industrial adsorptive separation (298 K and compressed CO2-CH4 mixtures). Although both confinement and surface oxidation have an impact on the efficiency of CO2/CH4 adsorptive separation at thermodynamics equilibrium, we show that surface functionalization is the most important factor in designing an efficient adsorbent for CO2 capture. Systematic Monte Carlo simulations revealed that adsorption of CH4 either pure or mixed with CO2 on oxidized nanoporous carbons is only slightly increased by the presence of functional groups (surface dipoles). In contrast, adsorption of CO2 is very sensitive to the number of carbonyl groups, which can be examined by a strong electric quadrupolar moment of CO2. Interestingly, the adsorbed amount of CH4 is strongly affected by the presence of the co-adsorbed CO2. In contrast, the CO2 uptake does not depend on the molar ratio of CH4 in the bulk mixture. The optimal carbonaceous porous adsorbent used for CO2 capture near ambient conditions should consist of narrow carbon nanopores with oxidized pore walls. Furthermore, the equilibrium separation factor was the greatest for CO2/CH4 mixtures with a low CO2 concentration. The maximum equilibrium separation factor of CO2 over CH4 of ~18-20 is theoretically predicted for strongly oxidized nanoporous carbons. Our findings call for a review of the standard uncharged model of carbonaceous materials used for the modeling of the adsorption separation processes of gas mixtures containing CO2 (and other molecules with strong electric quadrupolar moment or dipole moment).

  4. Sub-angstrom single-molecule measurements of motor proteins using a nanopore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derrington, Ian M; Craig, Jonathan M; Stava, Eric; Laszlo, Andrew H; Ross, Brian C; Brinkerhoff, Henry; Nova, Ian C; Doering, Kenji; Tickman, Benjamin I; Ronaghi, Mostafa; Mandell, Jeffrey G; Gunderson, Kevin L; Gundlach, Jens H

    2016-01-01

    Present techniques for measuring the motion of single motor proteins, such as FRET and optical tweezers, are limited to a resolution of ~300 pm. We use ion current modulation through the protein nanopore MspA to observe translocation of helicase Hel308 on DNA with up to ~40 picometer sensitivity. This approach should be applicable to any protein that translocates on DNA or RNA, including helicases, polymerases, recombinases and DNA repair enzymes. PMID:26414351

  5. Effect of Pore Size and Film Thickness on Gold-Coated Nanoporous Anodic Aluminum Oxide Substrates for Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering Sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassu, Aschalew; Farley, Carlton; Sharma, Anup; Kim, Wonkyu; Guo, Junpeng

    2015-11-30

    A sensitive surface enhanced Raman scattering chemical sensor is demonstrated by using inexpensive gold-coated nanoporous anodic aluminum oxide substrates. To optimize the performance of the substrates for sensing by the Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) technique, the size of the nanopores is varied from 18 nm to 150 nm and the gold film thickness is varied from 30 nm to 120 nm. The sensitivity of gold-coated nanoporous surface enhanced Raman scattering sensor is characterized by detecting low concentrations of Rhodamine 6G laser dye molecules. The morphology of the SERS substrates is characterized by atomic force microscopy. Optical properties of the nanoporous SERS substrates including transmittance, reflectance, and absorbance are also investigated. Relative signal enhancement is plotted for a range of substrate parameters and a detection limit of 10(-6) M is established.

  6. Improved Algorithms for Nanopore Signal Processing

    CERN Document Server

    Arjmandi, Nima; Lagae, Liesbet; Borghs, Gustaaf

    2012-01-01

    Nanopore resistive pulse techniques are based on analysis of current or voltage spikes in the recorded signal. These spikes result from translocation of nanometer sized analytes through a nanopore. The most important information that needs to be extracted is the duration, amplitude and number of the translocation spikes. The recorded signal is usually considerably noisy, with a huge baseline drift and hundreds of translocation spikes. Thus, incorporation of suitable signal processing algorithms is necessary for correct and fast detection of all the translocation spikes and to accurately measure their amplitude and duration. Generally, low-pass filtering is used for denoising, averaging is used for baseline detection, and thresholding is used for spike detection and measurement. Here we present novel algorithms and specifically developed software for nanopore signal processing that are significantly improving the accuracy of the nanopore measurements. It includes an improved method for baseline removing, an op...

  7. Ultra-sensitive flow measurement in individual nanopores through pressure--driven particle translocation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadaleta, Alessandro; Biance, Anne-Laure; Siria, Alessandro; Bocquet, Lyderic

    2015-05-07

    A challenge for the development of nanofluidics is to develop new instrumentation tools, able to probe the extremely small mass transport across individual nanochannels. Such tools are a prerequisite for the fundamental exploration of the breakdown of continuum transport in nanometric confinement. In this letter, we propose a novel method for the measurement of the hydrodynamic permeability of nanometric pores, by diverting the classical technique of Coulter counting to characterize a pressure-driven flow across an individual nanopore. Both the analysis of the translocation rate, as well as the detailed statistics of the dwell time of nanoparticles flowing across a single nanopore, allow us to evaluate the permeability of the system. We reach a sensitivity for the water flow down to a few femtoliters per second, which is more than two orders of magnitude better than state-of-the-art alternative methods.

  8. Charge-specific size-dependent separation of water-soluble organic molecules by fluorinated nanoporous networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byun, Jeehye; Patel, Hasmukh A.; Thirion, Damien; Yavuz, Cafer T.

    2016-11-01

    Molecular architecture in nanoscale spaces can lead to selective chemical interactions and separation of species with similar sizes and functionality. Substrate specific sorbent chemistry is well known through highly crystalline ordered structures such as zeolites, metal organic frameworks and widely available nanoporous carbons. Size and charge-dependent separation of aqueous molecular contaminants, on the contrary, have not been adequately developed. Here we report a charge-specific size-dependent separation of water-soluble molecules through an ultra-microporous polymeric network that features fluorines as the predominant surface functional groups. Treatment of similarly sized organic molecules with and without charges shows that fluorine interacts with charges favourably. Control experiments using similarly constructed frameworks with or without fluorines verify the fluorine-cation interactions. Lack of a σ-hole for fluorine atoms is suggested to be responsible for this distinct property, and future applications of this discovery, such as desalination and mixed matrix membranes, may be expected to follow.

  9. Optical observation of DNA translocation through Al2O3 sputtered silicon nanopores in porous membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamazaki, Hirohito; Ito, Shintaro; Esashika, Keiko; Taguchi, Yoshihiro; Saiki, Toshiharu

    2016-03-01

    Nanopore sensors are being developed as a platform for analyzing single DNA, RNA, and protein. In nanopore sensors, ionic current measurement is widely used and proof-of-concept of nanopore DNA sequencing by it has been demonstrated by previous studies. Recently, we proposed an alternative platform of nanopore DNA sequencing that incorporates ultraviolet light and porous silicon membrane to perform high-throughput measurement. In the development of our DNA sequencing platform, controlling nanopore size in porous silicon membrane is essential but remains a challenge. Here, we report on observation of DNA translocation through Al2O3 sputtered silicon nanopores (Al2O3 nanopores) by our optical scheme. Electromagnetic wave simulation was performed to analyze the excitation volume on Al2O3 nanopores generated by focused ultraviolet light. In the experiment, DNA translocation time through Al2O3 nanopores was compared with that of silicon nanopores and we examined the effect of nanopore density and thickness of membrane by supplementing the static electric field simulation.

  10. Numerical and Experimental Study of the Structural Color by Widening the Pore Size of Nanoporous Anodic Alumina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiawen Li

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The structural color originated from the nanoporous anodic alumina (NAA film is related to the structural characteristics. This paper aimed to obtain different structural colors which can cover the whole visible range by widening the pore size of metal-coated NAA. First, we used the Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD method to analyze the relationship between the physical structure and optical properties. Then, we fabricated different colors and expected color pattern by widening the pore diameter of NAA. Numerical and experimental study shows that the colors can cover the whole visible range by widening the pore diameter. This work can not only lead to better understanding of the mechanism of tuning color on NAA film, but also help us to fabricate expected color in the whole light range.

  11. Nanoparticle mechanics: deformation detection via nanopore resistive pulse sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darvish, Armin; Goyal, Gaurav; Aneja, Rachna; Sundaram, Ramalingam V. K.; Lee, Kidan; Ahn, Chi Won; Kim, Ki-Bum; Vlahovska, Petia M.; Kim, Min Jun

    2016-07-01

    Solid-state nanopores have been widely used in the past for single-particle analysis of nanoparticles, liposomes, exosomes and viruses. The shape of soft particles, particularly liposomes with a bilayer membrane, can greatly differ inside the nanopore compared to bulk solution as the electric field inside the nanopores can cause liposome electrodeformation. Such deformations can compromise size measurement and characterization of particles, but are often neglected in nanopore resistive pulse sensing. In this paper, we investigated the deformation of various liposomes inside nanopores. We observed a significant difference in resistive pulse characteristics between soft liposomes and rigid polystyrene nanoparticles especially at higher applied voltages. We used theoretical simulations to demonstrate that the difference can be explained by shape deformation of liposomes as they translocate through the nanopores. Comparing our results with the findings from electrodeformation experiments, we demonstrated that the rigidity of liposomes can be qualitatively compared using resistive pulse characteristics. This application of nanopores can provide new opportunities to study the mechanics at the nanoscale, to investigate properties of great value in fundamental biophysics and cellular mechanobiology, such as virus deformability and fusogenicity, and in applied sciences for designing novel drug/gene delivery systems.Solid-state nanopores have been widely used in the past for single-particle analysis of nanoparticles, liposomes, exosomes and viruses. The shape of soft particles, particularly liposomes with a bilayer membrane, can greatly differ inside the nanopore compared to bulk solution as the electric field inside the nanopores can cause liposome electrodeformation. Such deformations can compromise size measurement and characterization of particles, but are often neglected in nanopore resistive pulse sensing. In this paper, we investigated the deformation of various

  12. Effect of nanopore size distributions on trichloroethylene adsorption and desorption on carbogenic adsorbents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kane, M.S.; Bushong, J.H.; Foley, H.C. [Univ. of Delaware, Newark, DE (United States); Brendley, W.H. Jr. [Philadelphia Coll. of Textiles, Philadelphia, PA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

    1998-06-01

    Two carbon adsorbents, Ambersorb-600 and Ambersorb-563 (A-600 and A-563), were compared for vapor-phase trichloroethylene (TCE) adsorption from humid air streams. These adsorbents retained capacity for TCE in humid environments and were regenerable in situ. Enhanced desorption, and hence, increased working capacities, were achieved with bimodal pore size distributions and hydrophobic surface chemistry. Vapor-phase TCE isotherms confirmed that both of these adsorbents have high capacities for TCE. Only a small difference between the micropore size distributions of A-563 and A-600 was determined by room-temperature methyl chloride adsorption and the modified Horvath-Kawazoe model. Besides differences in particle size and pore volume there was a measurable, but small change, in the fraction of the pores in the ultramicropore range (5 {angstrom} or smaller) of the A-600 adsorbent versus that of A-563. In packed-bed breakthrough curve experiments, A-600 displayed a sharper mass-transfer zone than A-563, but maintained essentially the same capacity for TCE in a humid environment. Both materials were amenable to in-situ regeneration, and the A-600 provided higher overall working capacity than that of A-563.

  13. SEM-induced shrinkage and site-selective modification of single-crystal silicon nanopores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qi; Wang, Yifan; Deng, Tao; Liu, Zewen

    2017-07-01

    Solid-state nanopores with feature sizes around 5 nm play a critical role in bio-sensing fields, especially in single molecule detection and sequencing of DNA, RNA and proteins. In this paper we present a systematic study on shrinkage and site-selective modification of single-crystal silicon nanopores with a conventional scanning electron microscope (SEM). Square nanopores with measurable sizes as small as 8 nm × 8 nm and rectangle nanopores with feature sizes (the smaller one between length and width) down to 5 nm have been obtained, using the SEM-induced shrinkage technique. The analysis of energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy and the recovery of the pore size and morphology reveal that the grown material along with the edge of the nanopore is the result of deposition of hydrocarbon compounds, without structural damage during the shrinking process. A simplified model for pore shrinkage has been developed based on observation of the cross-sectional morphology of the shrunk nanopore. The main factors impacting on the task of controllably shrinking the nanopores, such as the accelerating voltage, spot size, scanned area of e-beam, and the initial pore size have been discussed. It is found that single-crystal silicon nanopores shrink linearly with time under localized irradiation by SEM e-beam in all cases, and the pore shrinkage rate is inversely proportional to the initial equivalent diameter of the pore under the same e-beam conditions.

  14. A nanoporous thin-film miniature interdigitated capacitive impedance sensor for measuring humidity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Islam

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a development of a low-cost miniature humidity sensor with an interdigitated aluminium electrode connected in parallel on quartz substrate. Interdigitated capacitive device has been fabricated using the photolithography method. The aluminium electrode was covered with sensitive film of a nanoporous thin film of γ-Al2O3 made from novel sol–gel technique. Nanostructured thin film offers very high surface to volume ratio with distribution of micro pores for moisture detection. Pore morphologies of the film have been studied by field emission electron microscope and X-ray diffraction methods. Impedance measurement of the miniature capacitive humidity sensor toward relative humidity was investigated at room temperature by Agilent 4294A impedance analyzer (Agilent, Santa Clara, CA, USA. The device exhibits short response and recovery times and good repeatability.

  15. Blood clot initiation by mesocellular foams: dependence on nanopore size and enzyme immobilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Sarah E; Sawvel, April M; Fan, Jie; Shi, Qihui; Strandwitz, Nicholas; Stucky, Galen D

    2008-12-16

    Porous silica materials are attractive for hemorrhage control because of their blood clot promoting surface chemistry, the wide variety of surface topologies and porous structures that can be created, and the potential ability to achieve high loading of therapeutic proteins within the silica support. We show that silica cell-window size variation in the nanometers to tens of nanometers range greatly affects the rate at which blood clots are formed in human plasma, indicating that window sizes in this size range directly impact the accessibility and diffusion of clotting-promoting proteins to and from the interior surfaces and pore volume of mesocellular foams (MCFs). These studies point toward a critical window size at which the clotting speed is minimized and serve as a model for the design of more effective wound-dressing materials. We demonstrate that the clotting times of plasma exposed to MCF materials are dramatically reduced by immobilizing thrombin in the pores of the MCF, validating the utility of enzyme-immobilized mesoporous silicas in biomedical applications.

  16. Multiplexed ionic current sensing with glass nanopores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Nicholas A W; Thacker, Vivek V; Hernández-Ainsa, Silvia; Fuentes-Perez, Maria E; Moreno-Herrero, Fernando; Liedl, Tim; Keyser, Ulrich F

    2013-05-21

    We report a method for simultaneous ionic current measurements of single molecules across up to 16 solid state nanopore channels. Each device, costing less than $20, contains 16 glass nanopores made by laser assisted capillary pulling. We demonstrate simultaneous multichannel detection of double stranded DNA and trapping of DNA origami nanostructures to form hybrid nanopores.

  17. Atomic layer deposition of nanoporous biomaterials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roger J Narayan

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Due to its chemical stability, uniform pore size, and high pore density, nanoporous alumina is being investigated for use in biosensing, drug delivery, hemodialysis, and other medical applications. In recent work, we have examined the use of atomic layer deposition for coating the surfaces of nanoporous alumina membranes. Zinc oxide coatings were deposited on nanoporous alumina membranes using atomic layer deposition. The zinc oxide-coated nanoporous alumina membranes demonstrated antimicrobial activity against Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus bacteria. These results suggest that atomic layer deposition is an attractive technique for modifying the surfaces of nanoporous alumina membranes and other nanostructured biomaterials.

  18. Nanopore-CMOS Interfaces for DNA Sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magierowski, Sebastian; Huang, Yiyun; Wang, Chengjie; Ghafar-Zadeh, Ebrahim

    2016-08-06

    DNA sequencers based on nanopore sensors present an opportunity for a significant break from the template-based incumbents of the last forty years. Key advantages ushered by nanopore technology include a simplified chemistry and the ability to interface to CMOS technology. The latter opportunity offers substantial promise for improvement in sequencing speed, size and cost. This paper reviews existing and emerging means of interfacing nanopores to CMOS technology with an emphasis on massively-arrayed structures. It presents this in the context of incumbent DNA sequencing techniques, reviews and quantifies nanopore characteristics and models and presents CMOS circuit methods for the amplification of low-current nanopore signals in such interfaces.

  19. Effect of Etching Parameter on Pore Size and Porosity of Electrochemically Formed Nanoporous Silicon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pushpendra Kumar

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The most common fabrication technique of porous silicon (PS is electrochemical etching of a crystalline silicon wafer in a hydrofluoric (HF acid-based solution. The electrochemical process allows for precise control of the properties of PS such as thickness of the porous layer, porosity, and average pore diameter. The control of these properties of PS was shown to depend on the HF concentration in the used electrolyte, the applied current density, and the thickness of PS. The change in pore diameter, porosity, and specific surface area of PS was investigated by measuring nitrogen sorption isotherms.

  20. Mechanical properties of nanoporous graphene membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yilun; Chen, Xi

    2014-01-01

    Nanoporous graphene holds great promise in the application of filtration such as seawater desalination, gas separation, and ionic channels. In this paper, we study the mechanical properties of nanoporous graphene with different size, shape, and density of nanopore. The strength decreases as the size and porosity of the nanopore increases. However, the rough edges of the nanopore has significant influence to the strength where the blunt tip perpendicular to the loading direction has higher strength. The effective tensile modulus is only determined by porosity of the nanopore as ΔE ˜ -p0.64, while the strength is determined by the size, shape, and porosity of the nanopore, for the same type of nanopore the strength scales with the porosity as Δσs ˜ -p. In contrast, the effective fracture strain increases as porosity increases for small and moderate porosities. The work is a first study of the relation between mechanical properties and porosity of nanoporous graphene and is helpful to the design of high performance nanoporous graphene membrane.

  1. Atomic layer deposition of nanoporous biomaterials.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Narayan, R. J.; Adiga, S. P.; Pellin, M. J.; Curtiss, L. A.; Stafslien, S.; Chisholm, B.; Monteiro-Riviere, N. A.; Brigmon, R. L.; Elam, J. W.; Univ. of North Carolina; North Carolina State Univ.; Eastman Kodak Co.; North Dakota State Univ.; SRL

    2010-03-01

    Due to its chemical stability, uniform pore size, and high pore density, nanoporous alumina is being investigated for use in biosensing, drug delivery, hemodialysis, and other medical applications. In recent work, we have examined the use of atomic layer deposition for coating the surfaces of nanoporous alumina membranes. Zinc oxide coatings were deposited on nanoporous alumina membranes using atomic layer deposition. The zinc oxide-coated nanoporous alumina membranes demonstrated antimicrobial activity against Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus bacteria. These results suggest that atomic layer deposition is an attractive technique for modifying the surfaces of nanoporous alumina membranes and other nanostructured biomaterials. Nanoporous alumina, also known as anodic aluminum oxide (AAO), is a nanomaterial that exhibits several unusual properties, including high pore densities, straight pores, small pore sizes, and uniform pore sizes. In 1953, Keller et al. showed that anodizing aluminum in acid electrolytes results in a thick layer of nearly cylindrical pores, which are arranged in a close-packed hexagonal cell structure. More recently, Matsuda & Fukuda demonstrated preparation of highly ordered platinum and gold nanohole arrays using a replication process. In this study, a negative structure of nanoporous alumina was initially fabricated and a positive structure of a nanoporous metal was subsequently fabricated. Over the past fifteen years, nanoporous alumina membranes have been used as templates for growth of a variety of nanostructured materials, including nanotubes, nanowires, nanorods, and nanoporous membranes.

  2. Effect size for dichotomous outcome measures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuanjia WANG; Naihua DUAN

    2011-01-01

    @@ Effect size for continuous outcome measures was discussed in our previous column[1].In this column we discuss several widely used effect size measures for dichotomous (Yes/No) outcome measures such as mortality,relapse,cure,discontinuation of treatment,and so forth.

  3. DNA-Based Nanopore Sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lei; Wu, Hai-Chen

    2016-12-05

    Nanopore sensing is an attractive, label-free approach that can measure single molecules. Although initially proposed for rapid and low-cost DNA sequencing, nanopore sensors have been successfully employed in the detection of a wide variety of substrates. Early successes were mostly achieved based on two main strategies by 1) creating sensing elements inside the nanopore through protein mutation and chemical modification or 2) using molecular adapters to enhance analyte recognition. Over the past five years, DNA molecules started to be used as probes for sensing rather than substrates for sequencing. In this Minireview, we highlight the recent research efforts of nanopore sensing based on DNA-mediated characteristic current events. As nanopore sensing is becoming increasingly important in biochemical and biophysical studies, DNA-based sensing may find wider applications in investigating DNA-involving biological processes. © 2016 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Kinetics of T3-DNA Ligase-Catalyzed Phosphodiester Bond Formation Measured Using the α-Hemolysin Nanopore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Cherie S; Riedl, Jan; Fleming, Aaron M; Burrows, Cynthia J; White, Henry S

    2016-12-27

    The latch region of the wild-type α-hemolysin (α-HL) protein channel can be used to distinguish single base modifications in double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) via ion channel measurements upon electrophoretic capture of dsDNA in the vestibule of α-HL. Herein, we investigated the use of the latch region to detect a nick in the phosphodiester DNA backbone. The presence of a nick in the phosphodiester backbone of one strand of the duplex results in a significant increase in both the blockade current and noise level relative to the intact duplex. Differentiation between the nicked and intact duplexes based on blockade current or noise, with near baseline resolution, allows real-time monitoring of the rate of T3-DNA ligase-catalyzed phosphodiester bond formation. Under low ionic strength conditions containing divalent cations and a molecular crowding agent (75 mg mL(-1) PEG), the rate of enzyme-catalyzed reaction in the bulk solution was continuously monitored by electrophoretically capturing reaction substrate or product dsDNA in the α-HL protein channel vestibule. Enzyme kinetic results obtained from the nanopore experiments match those from gel electrophoresis under the same reaction conditions, indicating the α-HL nanopore measurement provides a viable approach for monitoring enzymatic DNA repair activity.

  5. Industrial Particle Size Measurement Using Light Scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muly, E. C.; Frock, H. N.

    1980-12-01

    The precise knowledge of particle size and particle size distribution is fundamental to the control of a wide variety of industrial processes. Processing steps as diverse as crystallization, grinding, emulsification, and atomization, produce particles in the size range .1 to 1000 micrometers in diameter. While the object of some processes may be the production of particles of specified sizes, e.g., abrasives and glass beads, other processes may require particle size control for process efficiency, e.g., crystallization, and still others for control of final product quality, e.g., minerals, cement, and ceramics. In many processes more than one of these reasons may be important. A line of instruments has been developed using light scattering to measure various parameters of particulate distributions. These instruments employ laser illumination of a flowing stream of particles, producing Fraunhofer diffraction patterns which are processed both optically and electronically with unique, proprietary techniques. Various parameters of the particle size distribution are measured. The measurement is both rapid and precise. This paper will cover the importance of particle size measurements in various processes, different types of measurement methods, and the application of light scattering technology to size determinations in wet slurries and dry powders. A number of specific applications will be discussed encompassing minerals grinding, Portland cement, and rolling mill emulsions. Some references will be made to energy savings through automation.

  6. Localized functionalization of single nanopores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nilsson, J; Lee, J I; Ratto, T V; Letant, S E

    2005-09-12

    We demonstrate the localization of chemical functionality at the entrance of single nanopores for the first time by using the controlled growth of an oxide ring. Nanopores were fabricated by Focused Ion Beam machining on silicon platforms, locally derivatized by ion beam assisted oxide deposition, and further functionalized with DNA probes via silane chemistry. Ionic current recorded through single nanopores at various stages of the fabrication process demonstrated that the apertures can be locally functionalized with DNA probes. Future applications for this functional platform include the selective detection of biological organisms and molecules by ionic current blockade measurements.

  7. Nanoporous anodic aluminum oxide with a long-range order and tunable cell sizes by phosphoric acid anodization on pre-patterned substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surawathanawises, Krissada; Cheng, Xuanhong

    2014-01-01

    Nanoporous anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) has been explored for various applications due to its regular cell arrangement and relatively easy fabrication processes. However, conventional two-step anodization based on self-organization only allows the fabrication of a few discrete cell sizes and formation of small domains of hexagonally packed pores. Recent efforts to pre-pattern aluminum followed with anodization significantly improve the regularity and available pore geometries in AAO, while systematic study of the anodization condition, especially the impact of acid composition on pore formation guided by nanoindentation is still lacking. In this work, we pre-patterned aluminium thin films using ordered monolayers of silica beads and formed porous AAO in a single-step anodization in phosphoric acid. Controllable cell sizes ranging from 280 nm to 760 nm were obtained, matching the diameters of the silica nanobead molds used. This range of cell size is significantly greater than what has been reported for AAO formed in phosphoric acid in the literature. In addition, the relationships between the acid concentration, cell size, pore size, anodization voltage and film growth rate were studied quantitatively. The results are consistent with the theory of oxide formation through an electrochemical reaction. Not only does this study provide useful operational conditions of nanoindentation induced anodization in phosphoric acid, it also generates significant information for fundamental understanding of AAO formation. PMID:24535886

  8. Nanoporous anodic aluminum oxide with a long-range order and tunable cell sizes by phosphoric acid anodization on pre-patterned substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surawathanawises, Krissada; Cheng, Xuanhong

    2014-01-20

    Nanoporous anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) has been explored for various applications due to its regular cell arrangement and relatively easy fabrication processes. However, conventional two-step anodization based on self-organization only allows the fabrication of a few discrete cell sizes and formation of small domains of hexagonally packed pores. Recent efforts to pre-pattern aluminum followed with anodization significantly improve the regularity and available pore geometries in AAO, while systematic study of the anodization condition, especially the impact of acid composition on pore formation guided by nanoindentation is still lacking. In this work, we pre-patterned aluminium thin films using ordered monolayers of silica beads and formed porous AAO in a single-step anodization in phosphoric acid. Controllable cell sizes ranging from 280 nm to 760 nm were obtained, matching the diameters of the silica nanobead molds used. This range of cell size is significantly greater than what has been reported for AAO formed in phosphoric acid in the literature. In addition, the relationships between the acid concentration, cell size, pore size, anodization voltage and film growth rate were studied quantitatively. The results are consistent with the theory of oxide formation through an electrochemical reaction. Not only does this study provide useful operational conditions of nanoindentation induced anodization in phosphoric acid, it also generates significant information for fundamental understanding of AAO formation.

  9. Nanopore DNA sequencing and epigenetic detection with a MspA nanopore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laszlo, Andrew H.

    DNA forms the molecular basis for all known life. Widespread DNA sequencing has the potential to revolutionize healthcare and our understanding of the life sciences. Sequencing has already had a profound effect on our understanding of the molecular basis of life and underpinnings of disease. Current DNA sequencing technologies require costly reagents, can sequence only short DNA strands, and take too long to complete entire genomes. Furthermore, the required DNA sample size limits the types of experiments that can be run. For instance sequencing single cells is extremely difficult. New technologies are key to making DNA sequencing as cheap and accessible as possible and for making new experiments possible. One such new technology is nanopore sequencing. In nanopore sequencing, a thin membrane is used to divide a salt solution into two wells: cis and trans. This membrane contains a single nanometer sized hole that forms the only electrical connection between the two wells. When a voltage is applied across the membrane, ion current flows through the nanopore. This ion current is the primary signal for nanopore sequencing. DNA is negatively charged and can be pulled into the pore. When DNA is pulled into the pore, it occludes the pore and reduces the ion current that can pass through the pore. Individual DNA nucleotides along the DNA strand block the pore to varying degrees. One can measure the degree to which the pore is blocked as DNA passes through the pore and use the ion current signal to read off the DNA sequence. This thesis chronicles recent advances in the Gundlach laboratory in which I have played a leading role. It describes our work testing the biological nanopore Mycobacterium smegmatis porin A (MspA) for nanopore sequencing. The thesis consists of five chapters and three appendices which contain supplemental information for Chapters 2, 3, and 4. Chapter 1 begins with some motivation and defines the current challenges in DNA sequencing. I also introduce

  10. Nanoelectronic devices and measurements toward nanocrystal-based optoelectronics and DNA sequencing with solid-state nanopores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willis, Lauren J.

    Nanoelectronics are critical to exploring nanoscale materials: including nanocrystals, which could revolutionize optoelectronics, and DNA, which could revolutionize medicine. Our suspended silicon nitride membranes combined with electron beam lithography and transmission electron microscopy have been essential to our device fabrication and measurements. Nanocyrstal-based optoelectronics have garnered much interest, and thus new ways of increasing their transport are constantly being researched. We used ligand exchanges to decrease the interparticle spacing of nanocrystal films, which is known to augment transport. Using gaps only a few nanoparticles-wide, we measured transport and found that current could be controlled with annealing, hydrazine treatment, and voltage-sweeping. Annealing destroyed the insulating ligand surrounding each nanocrystal and allowed the particles to move closer. This usually increased the photocurrent, without significantly increasing the dark current. However, this was ineffective on sub-monolayers. Hydrazine was similar, except it replaced the ligand, rather than destroying it, and it was effective on sub-monolayers; however, it caused a large increase in the dark current as well as the photocurrent. Sweeping the voltage overnight could increase or decrease the photocurrent of a sample depending on whether the sample was illuminated or in the dark, corresponding to traps being emptied or filled. In addition to nanocrystals, our devices were used in solution to sense DNA. We fabricated nanelectrodes and nanowires next to nanopores and showed DNA translocations ionically. We also developed methods to make the pores hydrophilic without the use of piranha; we instead used rapid thermal annealing, heated ozone treatments, and oxygen/hydrogen plasmas. While high rates of device failure was a challenge, recommendations for future experiments are presented, including grounding of all equipment and an extreme focus on sample cleanliness. We have

  11. A QM/MM study to investigate selectivity of nanoporous graphene membrane for arsenate and chromate removal from water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riyaz, Mohd; Goel, Neetu

    2017-10-01

    Density functional calculations have been performed within the QM/MM approach to investigate the permeability and selectivity of N-passivated nanoporous graphene towards chromate and arsenate removal from water. The passage of three target molecules namely water, arsenate and chromate from the four different sized nanoporous sheet has been elucidated in detail by treating the porous area of the sheet within the formalism of DFT, while molecular mechanics has been applied to the remaining sheet. The selectivity of the nanoporous sheet towards the passage of target molecules has been measured in terms of their diffusion energy barrier.

  12. Measuring wage effects of plant size

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albæk, Karsten; Arai, Mahmood; Asplund, Rita

    1998-01-01

    There are large plant size–wage effects in the Nordic countries after taking into account individual and job characteristics as well as systematical sorting of the workers into various plant-sizes. The plant size–wage elasticities we obtain are, in contrast to other dimensions of the wage distrib......–wage elasticity. Our results indicate that using size–class midpoints yields essentially the same results as using exact measures of plant size...

  13. Measurements of radon daughter particle size

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knutson, E.O.; George, A.C.; Knuth, R.H.; Koh, B.R. (Department of Energy, New York (USA). Environmental Measurements Lab.)

    1984-01-01

    Measurements using three types and sizes of diffusion batteries and two cascade impactors showed that the particle size distribution of the potential alpha energy concentration (PAEC) is usually bimodal. The major mode, comprising 85-100% of the PAEC, is well defined and centred at about 100 nm in diameter. The minor mode, comprising the balance of the PAEC, varies in location from below 5 nm to about 10 nm. The particle size of the minor mode appears to correlate to the 'age' of the /sup 218/Po. The impactor tests conducted showed that < 16% of the PAEC resides on particles > 0.6 ..mu..m in diameter.

  14. Disruption effects on the beam size measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raimondi, P.; Decker, F.J.; Chen, P.

    1995-06-01

    At the SLC Final Focus with higher currents and smaller beam sizes, the disruption parameter D{sub y} is close to one and so the pinch effect should produce a luminosity enhancement. Since a flat beam-beam function is fit to deflection scan data to measure the beam size, disruption can affect the measurement. Here the authors discuss the quantitative effects of disruption for typical SLC beam parameters. With 3.5 10{sup 10} particles per pulse, bunch length of 0.8 mm and beam sizes of 2.1 {mu}m horizontally and 0.55 {mu}m vertically, the measured vertical size can be as much as 25% bigger than the real one. Furthermore during the collision the spot size actually decrease, producing an enhancement factor H{sub D} of about 1.25. This would yield to a true luminosity which is 1.6 times that which is estimated from the beam-beam deflection fit.

  15. Relationship between space charge and effective pore size of nanoporous electrode in electric double-layer capacitor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Daisuke Tashima; Masahisa Otsubo

    2011-01-01

    The space-charge distributions of electric double-layer capacitors (EDLCs),which are energy storage devices,were examined with the pulsed electroacoustic (PEA) method. It was found that the experimental results could be influenced by the reflection and penetration of sound waves when the space-charge distributions of EDLCs were measured with the PEA method. This is because EDLCs have a five-layer structure consisting of three materials (aluminum,cellulose,and activated carbon). We calculated the reflection wave components that influenced the charge density through the acoustic impedance and the relative permittivity of the materials. In this way,we found that the changes in the space-charge distributions of EDLCs and their charge characteristics corresponded closely. We determined that measuring the spacecharge distributions with the PEA method was effective for evaluating the charge accumulation of EDLCs.In this study,a polarized electrode was prepared for use in EDLCs. The ratio of the surface area to the average pore diameter of the polarized electrode was measured with the nitrogen adsorption method at 77 K. The relationship between the ratio of the surface area to the average pore size and the space-charge distributions of EDLCs is also discussed in this paper.

  16. Method and apparatus for measuring particle size

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willemse, A.W.; Merkus, H.G.

    1998-01-01

    Described is a method for measuring the particle size of ultra-small particles (202) which are suspended in a fluid. Laser light (121, 123) is guided via a first optical path (160) to a suspension (201), and light (125) scattered by the particles (202) in the suspension (201) is guided to an optical

  17. USE OF ATOMIC LAYER DEPOSITION OF FUNCTIONALIZATION OF NANOPOROUS BIOMATERIALS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brigmon, R.; Narayan, R.; Adiga, S.; Pellin, M.; Curtiss, L.; Stafslien, S.; Chisholm, B.; Monteiro-Riviere, N.; Elam, J.

    2010-02-08

    Due to its chemical stability, uniform pore size, and high pore density, nanoporous alumina is being investigated for use in biosensing, drug delivery, hemodialysis, and other medical applications. In recent work, we have examined the use of atomic layer deposition for coating the surfaces of nanoporous alumina membranes. Zinc oxide coatings were deposited on nanoporous alumina membranes using atomic layer deposition. The zinc oxide-coated nanoporous alumina membranes demonstrated antimicrobial activity against Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus bacteria. These results suggest that atomic layer deposition is an attractive technique for modifying the surfaces of nanoporous alumina membranes and other nanostructured biomaterials.

  18. Optimized nanoporous materials.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braun, Paul V. (University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL); Langham, Mary Elizabeth; Jacobs, Benjamin W.; Ong, Markus D.; Narayan, Roger J. (North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC); Pierson, Bonnie E. (North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC); Gittard, Shaun D. (North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC); Robinson, David B.; Ham, Sung-Kyoung (Korea Basic Science Institute, Gangneung, South Korea); Chae, Weon-Sik (Korea Basic Science Institute, Gangneung, South Korea); Gough, Dara V. (University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL); Wu, Chung-An Max; Ha, Cindy M.; Tran, Kim L.

    2009-09-01

    Nanoporous materials have maximum practical surface areas for electrical charge storage; every point in an electrode is within a few atoms of an interface at which charge can be stored. Metal-electrolyte interfaces make best use of surface area in porous materials. However, ion transport through long, narrow pores is slow. We seek to understand and optimize the tradeoff between capacity and transport. Modeling and measurements of nanoporous gold electrodes has allowed us to determine design principles, including the fact that these materials can deplete salt from the electrolyte, increasing resistance. We have developed fabrication techniques to demonstrate architectures inspired by these principles that may overcome identified obstacles. A key concept is that electrodes should be as close together as possible; this is likely to involve an interpenetrating pore structure. However, this may prove extremely challenging to fabricate at the finest scales; a hierarchically porous structure can be a worthy compromise.

  19. Size-controlled synthesis of hierarchical nanoporous iron based fluorides and their high performances in rechargeable lithium ion batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yan; Wen, Zhao-yin; Jin, Jun; Wu, Xiang-wei; Rui, Kun

    2014-06-21

    High performance nanostructured iron fluorides with controllable sizes were successfully synthesized using oleylamine as a size tuning agent for the first time. They exhibited excellent cathode performances with large retensive capacities exceeding 200 mA h g(-1) after 50 cycles and outstanding rate performances of nearly 100 mA h g(-1) even at 10 C.

  20. Nanopore DNA sequencing using kinetic proofreading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Xinsheng

    We propose a method of DNA sequencing by combining the physical method of nanopore electrical measurements and Southern's sequencing-by-hybridization. The new key ingredient, essential to both lowering the costs and increasing the precision, is an asymmetric nanopore sandwich device capable of measuring the DNA hybridization probe twice separated by a designed waiting time. Those incorrect probes appearing only once in nanopore ionic current traces are discriminated from the correct ones that appear twice. This method of discrimination is similar to the principle of kinetic proofreading proposed by Hopfield and Ninio in gene transcription and translation processes. An error analysis is of this nanopore kinetic proofreading (nKP) technique for DNA sequencing is carried out in comparison with the most precise 3' dideoxy termination method developed by Sanger. Nanopore DNA sequencing using kinetic proofreading.

  1. Measurement of nonvolatile particle number size distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gkatzelis, G. I.; Papanastasiou, D. K.; Florou, K.; Kaltsonoudis, C.; Louvaris, E.; Pandis, S. N.

    2016-01-01

    An experimental methodology was developed to measure the nonvolatile particle number concentration using a thermodenuder (TD). The TD was coupled with a high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer, measuring the chemical composition and mass size distribution of the submicrometer aerosol and a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS) that provided the number size distribution of the aerosol in the range from 10 to 500 nm. The method was evaluated with a set of smog chamber experiments and achieved almost complete evaporation (> 98 %) of secondary organic as well as freshly nucleated particles, using a TD temperature of 400 °C and a centerline residence time of 15 s. This experimental approach was applied in a winter field campaign in Athens and provided a direct measurement of number concentration and size distribution for particles emitted from major pollution sources. During periods in which the contribution of biomass burning sources was dominant, more than 80 % of particle number concentration remained after passing through the thermodenuder, suggesting that nearly all biomass burning particles had a nonvolatile core. These remaining particles consisted mostly of black carbon (60 % mass contribution) and organic aerosol (OA; 40 %). Organics that had not evaporated through the TD were mostly biomass burning OA (BBOA) and oxygenated OA (OOA) as determined from AMS source apportionment analysis. For periods during which traffic contribution was dominant 50-60 % of the particles had a nonvolatile core while the rest evaporated at 400 °C. The remaining particle mass consisted mostly of black carbon with an 80 % contribution, while OA was responsible for another 15-20 %. Organics were mostly hydrocarbon-like OA (HOA) and OOA. These results suggest that even at 400 °C some fraction of the OA does not evaporate from particles emitted from common combustion processes, such as biomass burning and car engines, indicating that a fraction of this type of OA

  2. Switchable Imbibition in Nanoporous Gold

    CERN Document Server

    Xue, Yahui; Duan, Huiling; Weissmueller, Joerg; Huber, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    Spontaneous imbibition enables the elegant propelling of nano-flows because of the dominance of capillarity at small length scales. The imbibition kinetics are, however, solely determined by the static geometry of the porous host, the capillarity, and the fluidity of the imbibed liquid. This makes active control particularly challenging. Here, we show for aqueous electrolyte imbibition in nanoporous gold that the fluid flow can be reversibly switched on and off through electric potential control of the solid-liquid interfacial tension, i.e. we can accelerate the imbibition front, stop it, and have it proceed at will. Simultaneous measurements of the mass flux and the electrical current allow us to document simple scaling laws for the imbibition kinetics, and to explore the charge flow dynamics in the metallic nanopores. Our findings demonstrate that the high electric conductivity along with the pathways for ionic and/or fluid transport render nanoporous elemental gold a versatile, accurately controllable elec...

  3. In situ heavy ion irradiation studies of nanopore shrinkage and enhanced radiation tolerance of nanoporous Au

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jin; Fan, C.; Ding, J.; Xue, S.; Chen, Y.; Li, Q.; Wang, H.; Zhang, X.

    2017-01-01

    High energy particle radiations induce severe microstructural damage in metallic materials. Nanoporous materials with a giant surface-to-volume ratio may alleviate radiation damage in irradiated metallic materials as free surface are defect sinks. Here we show, by using in situ Kr ion irradiation in a transmission electron microscope at room temperature, that nanoporous Au indeed has significantly improved radiation tolerance comparing with coarse-grained, fully dense Au. In situ studies show that nanopores can absorb and eliminate a large number of radiation-induced defect clusters. Meanwhile, nanopores shrink (self-heal) during radiation, and their shrinkage rate is pore size dependent. Furthermore, the in situ studies show dose-rate-dependent diffusivity of defect clusters. This study sheds light on the design of radiation-tolerant nanoporous metallic materials for advanced nuclear reactor applications.

  4. Preparation of Fe3O4Spherical Nanoporous Particles Facilitated by Polyethylene Glycol 4000

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Li-Li

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Much interest has been attracted to the magnetic materials with porous structure because of their unique properties and potential applications. In this report, Fe3O4nanoporous particles assembled from small Fe3O4nanoparticles have been prepared by thermal decomposition of iron acetylacetonate in the presence of polyethylene glycol 4000. The size of the spherical nanoporous particles is 100–200 nm. Surface area measurement shows that these Fe3O4nanoporous particles have a high surface area of 87.5 m2/g. Magnetization measurement and Mössbauer spectrum indicate that these particles are nearly superparamagnetic at room temperature. It is found that the morphology of the products is greatly influenced by polyethylene glycol concentration and the polymerization degree of polyethylene glycol. Polyethylene glycol molecules are believed to facilitate the formation of the spherical assembly.

  5. Electrical pulse fabrication of graphene nanopores in electrolyte solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuan, Aaron T.; Szalay, Tamas [School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138 (United States); Lu, Bo [Department of Physics, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138 (United States); Xie, Ping [Oxford Nanopore Technologies, One Kendall Square, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Golovchenko, Jene A., E-mail: golovchenko@physics.harvard.edu [School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138 (United States); Department of Physics, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138 (United States)

    2015-05-18

    Nanopores in graphene membranes can potentially offer unprecedented spatial resolution for single molecule sensing, but their fabrication has thus far been difficult, poorly scalable, and prone to contamination. We demonstrate an in-situ fabrication method that nucleates and controllably enlarges nanopores in electrolyte solution by applying ultra-short, high-voltage pulses across the graphene membrane. This method can be used to rapidly produce graphene nanopores with subnanometer size accuracy in an apparatus free of nanoscale beams or tips.

  6. Study of polymer molecules and conformations with a nanopore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golovchenko, Jene A.; Li, Jiali; Stein, Derek; Gershow, Marc H.

    2010-12-07

    The invention features methods for evaluating the conformation of a polymer, for example, for determining the conformational distribution of a plurality of polymers and to detect binding or denaturation events. The methods employ a nanopore which the polymer, e.g., a nucleic acid, traverses. As the polymer traverses the nanopore, measurements of transport properties of the nanopore yield data on the conformation of the polymer.

  7. Nanoporous TiO2/polyion thin-film-coated long-period grating sensors for the direct measurement of low-molecular-weight analytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Rui-Zhu; Dong, Wen-Fei; Meng, Xiang; Zhang, Xu-Lin; Sun, Yun-Lu; Hao, Ya-Wei; Guo, Jing-Chun; Zhang, Wen-Yi; Yu, Yong-Sen; Song, Jun-Feng; Qi, Zhi-Mei; Sun, Hong-Bo

    2012-06-12

    We present novel nanoporous TiO(2)/polyion thin-film-coated long-period fiber grating (LPFG) sensors for the direct measurement of low-molecular-weight chemicals by monitoring the resonance wavelength shift. The hybrid overlay films are prepared by a simple layer-by-layer deposition approach, which is mainly based on the electrostatic interaction of TiO(2) nanoparticles and polyions. By the alternate immersion of LPFG into dispersions of TiO(2) nanoparticles and polyions, respectively, the so-formed TiO(2)/polyion thin film exhibits a unique nanoporous internal structure and has a relative higher refractive index than LPFG cladding. In particular, the porosity of the thin film reduces the diffusion coefficient and enhances the permeability retention of low-molecular-weight analytes within the porous film. The increases in the refractive index of the LPFG overlay results in a distinguished modulation of the resonance wavelength. Therefore, the detection sensitivity of LPFG sensors has been greatly improved, according to theoretical simulation. After the structure of the TiO(2)/polyion thin film was optimized, glucose solutions as an example with a low concentration of 10(-7) M was easily detected and monitored at room temperature.

  8. Structure-dependent water transport across nanopores of carbon nanotubes: toward selective gating upon temperature regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Kuiwen; Wu, Huiying

    2015-04-28

    Determining water structure in nanopores and its influence on water transport behaviour is of great importance for understanding and regulating the transport across nanopores. Here we report an ultrafast-slow flow transition phenomenon for water transport across nanopores of carbon nanotubes owing to the change in water structure in nanopores induced by temperature. By performing extensive molecular dynamics simulations, we show the dependence of water transport behaviours on water structures. Our results indicate that owing to the change in water structure in nanopores, water flux across nanopores with certain pore sizes decreases sharply (nearly 3 orders of magnitude) with the decreasing temperature. This phenomenon is very sensitive to the pore size. The threshold temperatures for the occurrence of the ultrafast-slow flow transition for water transport are also determined for various pore sizes. These findings suggest a novel protocol for selective gating of water and proton conduction across nanopores and temperature-controlled drug release.

  9. Preparation of nanoporous titania spherical nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiba, Kota; Sato, Soh; Matsushita, Takayuki; Ogawa, Makoto

    2013-03-01

    Preparation of nanoporous titania particles from well-defined titania-octadecylamine (titania-ODA) hybrid spherical particles with 450 nm in size, which were prepared by the method reported previously (Chem. Commun., 2009, pp. 6851-6853 [39]; RSC Adv., 2012, vol. 2, pp. 1343-1349 [40]), was studied. ODA was removed by solvent extraction with acidic ethanol to obtain nanoporous titania particles and subsequent calcination led to the formation of nanoporous titania particles with the nanopore size ranging from 2 to 4 nm depending on the calcination temperature. The as-synthesized titania was amorphous and was transformed into anatase (at around 300 °C) and rutile (at around 600 °C) by the heat treatment. The phase transition behavior was discussed in comparison with that of as-synthesized titania-ODA particles without ODA removal. Spherical particles of titania-ODA hybrids with 70 nm in size were also transformed into nanoporous titania particles composed of anatase crystallites by the washing and calcination at 500 °C for 1 h.

  10. Size and shape as linear combinations of untransformed measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Bruin, R.; Steerneman, A.G.M.; van Vark, G.N.

    2001-01-01

    A numerical specification of 'size' and 'shape' is of interest for making interpretations in morphometrics. Starting from a, possibly large, set m(1), ..., m(r) of size measurements, e.g. m(1) = height, m(2) = sitting height, etc., a preliminary analysis provides the set x(1),...,x(p) of size measur

  11. Surface effects on the mechanical properties of nanoporous materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xia Re [School of Power and Mechanical Engineering, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Li Xide; Feng Xiqiao [AML, Department of Engineering Mechanics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Qin Qinghua [School of Engineering, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200 (Australia); Liu Jianlin, E-mail: fengxq@tsinghua.edu.cn [Department of Engineering Mechanics, China University of Petroleum, Qingdao 266555 (China)

    2011-07-01

    Using the theory of surface elasticity, we investigate the mechanical properties of nanoporous materials. The classical theory of porous materials is modified to account for surface effects, which become increasingly important as the characteristic sizes of microstructures shrink to nanometers. First, a refined Timoshenko beam model is presented to predict the effective elastic modulus of nanoporous materials. Then the surface effects on the elastic microstructural buckling behavior of nanoporous materials are examined. In particular, nanoporous gold is taken as an example to illustrate the application of the proposed model. The results reveal that both the elastic modulus and the critical buckling behavior of nanoporous materials exhibit a distinct dependence on the characteristic sizes of microstructures, e.g. the average ligament width.

  12. Deformation Behavior of Nanoporous Metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biener, J; Hodge, A M; Hamza, A V

    2007-11-28

    Nanoporous open-cell foams are a rapidly growing class of high-porosity materials (porosity {ge} 70%). The research in this field is driven by the desire to create functional materials with unique physical, chemical and mechanical properties where the material properties emerge from both morphology and the material itself. An example is the development of nanoporous metallic materials for photonic and plasmonic applications which has recently attracted much interest. The general strategy is to take advantage of various size effects to introduce novel properties. These size effects arise from confinement of the material by pores and ligaments, and can range from electromagnetic resonances to length scale effects in plasticity. In this chapter we will focus on the mechanical properties of low density nanoporous metals and how these properties are affected by length scale effects and bonding characteristics. A thorough understanding of the mechanical behavior will open the door to further improve and fine-tune the mechanical properties of these sometimes very delicate materials, and thus will be crucial for integrating nanoporous metals into products. Cellular solids with pore sizes above 1 micron have been the subject of intense research for many years, and various scaling relations describing the mechanical properties have been developed.[4] In general, it has been found that the most important parameter in controlling their mechanical properties is the relative density, that is, the density of the foam divided by that of solid from which the foam is made. Other factors include the mechanical properties of the solid material and the foam morphology such as ligament shape and connectivity. The characteristic internal length scale of the structure as determined by pores and ligaments, on the other hand, usually has only little effect on the mechanical properties. This changes at the submicron length scale where the surface-to-volume ratio becomes large and the effect

  13. Measuring bacterial cells size with AFM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osiro, Denise; Filho, Rubens Bernardes; Assis, Odilio Benedito Garrido; Jorge, Lúcio André de Castro; Colnago, Luiz Alberto

    2012-01-01

    Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) can be used to obtain high-resolution topographical images of bacteria revealing surface details and cell integrity. During scanning however, the interactions between the AFM probe and the membrane results in distortion of the images. Such distortions or artifacts are the result of geometrical effects related to bacterial cell height, specimen curvature and the AFM probe geometry. The most common artifact in imaging is surface broadening, what can lead to errors in bacterial sizing. Several methods of correction have been proposed to compensate for these artifacts and in this study we describe a simple geometric model for the interaction between the tip (a pyramidal shaped AFM probe) and the bacterium (Escherichia coli JM-109 strain) to minimize the enlarging effect. Approaches to bacteria immobilization and examples of AFM images analysis are also described.

  14. Nanopore formation on Au coated pyramid under electron beam irradiations (plasmonic nanopore on pyramid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seong Soo Choi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available There have been tremendous interests about the single molecule analysis using a sold-state nanopore. The solid-state nanopore can be fabricated either by drilling technique, or diffusion technique by using electron beam irradiations. The solid-state SiN nanopore device with electrical detection technique recently fabricated, however, the solid-state Au nanopore with optical detection technique can be better utilized as the next generation single molecule sensor. In this report, the nanometer size openings with its size less than 10 nm on the diffused membrane on the 200 nm Au pyramid were fabricated by using field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM electron beam irradiations, transmission electron microscopy (TEM, etc. After the sample was being kept under a room environment for several months, several Au (111 clusters with ~6 nm diameter formed via Ostwald ripening are observed using a high resolution TEM imaging. The nanopore with Au nanoclusters on the diffused membrane can be utilized as an optical nanopore device.

  15. Tailored nanoporous gold for ultrahigh fluorescence enhancement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, X Y; Guan, P F; Fujita, T; Chen, M W

    2011-03-07

    We report molecular fluorescence enhancement of free-standing nanoporous gold in which the nanoporosity can be arbitrarily tailored by the combination of dealloying and electroless gold plating. The nanoporous gold fabricated by this facile method possesses unique porous structures with large gold ligaments and very small pores, and exhibits significant improvements in surface enhanced fluorescence as well as structure rigidity. It demonstrates that the confluence effect of improved quantum yield and excitation of fluorophores is responsible for the large fluorescence enhancement due to the near-field enhancement of nanoporous gold, which arises from the strong electromagnetic coupling between neighboring ligaments and the weakening of plasmon damping of the large ligaments because of the small pore size and large ligament size, respectively.

  16. Adsorption hysteresis in nanopores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neimark; Ravikovitch; Vishnyakov

    2000-08-01

    Capillary condensation hysteresis in nanopores is studied by Monte Carlo simulations and the nonlocal density functional theory. Comparing the theoretical results with the experimental data on low temperature sorption of nitrogen and argon in cylindrical channels of mesoporous siliceous molecular sieves of MCM-41 type, we have revealed four qualitatively different sorption regimes depending on the temperature and pore size. As the pore size increases at a given temperature, or as the temperature decreases at a given pore size, the following regimes are consequently observed: volume filling without phase separation, reversible stepwise capillary condensation, irreversible capillary condensation with developing hysteresis, and capillary condensation with developed hysteresis. We show that, in the regime of developed hysteresis (pores wider than 5 nm in the case of nitrogen sorption at 77 K), condensation occurs spontaneously at the vaporlike spinodal while desorption takes place at the equilibrium. A quantitative agreement is found between the modeling results and the experimental hysteresis loops formed by the adsorption-desorption isotherms. The results obtained provide a better understanding of the general behavior of confined fluids and the specifics of sorption and phase transitions in nanomaterials.

  17. Oxford Nanopore MinION Sequencing and Genome Assembly

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hengyun Lu; Francesca Giordano; Zemin Ning

    2016-01-01

    The revolution of genome sequencing is continuing after the successful second-generation sequencing (SGS) technology. The third-generation sequencing (TGS) technology, led by Pacific Biosciences (PacBio), is progressing rapidly, moving from a technology once only capable of providing data for small genome analysis, or for performing targeted screening, to one that pro-mises high quality de novo assembly and structural variation detection for human-sized genomes. In 2014, the MinION, the first commercial sequencer using nanopore technology, was released by Oxford Nanopore Technologies (ONT). MinION identifies DNA bases by measuring the changes in electrical conductivity generated as DNA strands pass through a biological pore. Its portability, affordability, and speed in data production makes it suitable for real-time applications, the release of the long read sequencer MinION has thus generated much excitement and interest in the geno-mics community. While de novo genome assemblies can be cheaply produced from SGS data, assem-bly continuity is often relatively poor, due to the limited ability of short reads to handle long repeats. Assembly quality can be greatly improved by using TGS long reads, since repetitive regions can be easily expanded into using longer sequencing lengths, despite having higher error rates at the base level. The potential of nanopore sequencing has been demonstrated by various studies in gen-ome surveillance at locations where rapid and reliable sequencing is needed, but where resources are limited.

  18. Preparation of three-dimensional nanoporous Si using dealloying by metallic melt and application as a lithium-ion rechargeable battery negative electrode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wada, Takeshi; Yamada, Junpei; Kato, Hidemi

    2016-02-01

    Silicon is a promising material for negative electrode in Li-ion batteries because of high gravimetric capacity. A Si nanomaterial that can accommodate volume expansion accompanied by lithiation is needed for practical application in Li-ion batteries. We prepare three-dimensional nanoporous interconnected silicon material with controlled pore and ligament sizes by dealloying using an Mg-Si precursor and Bi melt. The Mg atoms in the precursor selectively dissolve into Bi, and the remaining Si atoms self-organize into a nanoporous structure with characteristic length ranging from several ten to hundred nanometer. The Li-ion battery electrodes made from nanoporous silicon exhibit higher capacities, increased cycle lives, and improved rate performances compared with those made from commercial Si nanoparticles. Measurements on the electrical resistivity and electrode thickness change by lithiation/delithiation suggest that the superior performance of nanoporous Si electrode originates from the following: (1) The nanoporous Si has much lower electrical resistivity compared with that of the nanoparticle Si owing to the n-type dopant incorporated during dealloying. (2) The nanoporous Si-based electrode has higher porosity owing to the presence of intra-particle pores, which can accommodate Si expansion up to higher levels of lithiation.

  19. Nanoporous polymer electrolyte

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Brian [Wheat Ridge, CO; Nguyen, Vinh [Wheat Ridge, CO

    2012-04-24

    A nanoporous polymer electrolyte and methods for making the polymer electrolyte are disclosed. The polymer electrolyte comprises a crosslinked self-assembly of a polymerizable salt surfactant, wherein the crosslinked self-assembly includes nanopores and wherein the crosslinked self-assembly has a conductivity of at least 1.0.times.10.sup.-6 S/cm at 25.degree. C. The method of making a polymer electrolyte comprises providing a polymerizable salt surfactant. The method further comprises crosslinking the polymerizable salt surfactant to form a nanoporous polymer electrolyte.

  20. Nanopore formation in neuroblastoma cells following ultrashort electric pulse exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Caleb C.; Payne, Jason A.; Wilmink, Gerald J.; Ibey, Bennett L.

    2011-03-01

    Ultrashort or nanosecond electrical pulses (USEP) cause repairable damage to the plasma membranes of cells through formation of nanopores. These nanopores are able to pass small ions such as sodium, calcium, and potassium, but remain impermeable to larger molecules like trypan blue and propidium iodide. What remains uncertain is whether generation of nanopores by ultrashort electrical pulses can inhibit action potentials in excitable cells. In this paper, we explored the sensitivity of excitable cells to USEP using Calcium Green AM 1 ester fluorescence to measure calcium uptake indicative of nanopore formation in the plasma membrane. We determined the threshold for nanopore formation in neuroblastoma cells for three pulse parameters (amplitude, pulse width, and pulse number). Measurement of such thresholds will guide future studies to determine if USEP can inhibit action potentials without causing irreversible membrane damage.

  1. Water behaviour in nanoporous aluminosilicates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smirnov, Konstantin S; Bougeard, Daniel, E-mail: Konstantin.Smirnov@univ-lille1.f [Laboratoire de Spectrochimie Infrarouge et Raman, Universite Lille 1, Sciences et Technologie, CNRS, Batiment C5, 59655 Villeneuve d' Ascq (France)

    2010-07-21

    This paper briefly reviews results of molecular dynamics simulation studies of water confined in nanoporous aluminosilicates. The behaviour of confined molecules is shown to be influenced by the nature of the host structure, and the size and the topology of the voids. For some of the systems discussed the ambiguity in results of different modelling studies call for the use of extended potential and structural models. Thus, the use of polarizable force fields was shown to be necessary to take into account the variation of the molecular dipole of confined molecules in different environments.

  2. Vibrational spectra of molecular fluids in nanopores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arakcheev, V. G.; Morozov, V. B.

    2012-12-01

    Coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS) is applied for quantitative analysis of carbon dioxide phase composition in pores of nanoporous glass samples at nearcritical temperatures. Measurements of the 1388 1/cm Q-branch were made in a wide pressure range corresponding to coexistence of gas (gas-like), adsorbed and condensed phases within pores. At temperatures several degrees below the critical value, CARS spectra behavior is easy to interpret in terms of thermodynamic model of surface adsorption and capillary condensation. It allows estimating mass fractions of different phase components. Moreover, spectra measured at near critical temperatures 30.5 and 33°C have pronounced inhomogeneous shapes and indicate the presence of condensed phase in the volume of pores. The effect obviously reflects the fluid behaviour near the critical point in nanopores. Pores with smaller radii are filled with condensed phase at lower pressures. The analysis of the CARS spectra is informative for quantitative evaluation of phase composition in nanopores.

  3. Weakened Flexural Strength of Nanocrystalline Nanoporous Gold by Grain Refinement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gwak, Eun-Ji; Kim, Ju-Young

    2016-04-13

    High density of grain boundaries in solid materials generally leads to high strength because grain boundaries act as strong obstacles to dislocation activity. We find that the flexural strength of nanoporous gold of grain size 206 nm is 33.6% lower than that of grain size 238 μm. We prepared three gold-silver precursor alloys, well-annealed, prestrained, and high-energy ball-milled, from which nanoporous gold samples were obtained by the same free-corrosion dealloying process. Ligaments of the same size are formed regardless of precursor alloys, and microstructural aspects of precursor alloys such as crystallographic orientation and grain size is preserved in the dealloying process. While the nanoindentation hardness of three nanoporous golds is independent of microstructural variation, flexural strength of nanocrystalline nanoporous gold is significantly lower than that of nanoporous golds with much larger grain size. We investigate weakening mechanisms of grain boundaries in nanocrystalline nanoporous gold, leading to weakening of flexural strength.

  4. Measuring Compartment Size and Gas Solubility in Marine Mammals

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-30

    1 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Measuring Compartment Size and Gas Solubility in Marine...relative size of different tissues in various marine mammal species, as well as our understanding of their different morphological and physiological...available for the relative size of different tissues in various marine mammal species, as well as our understanding of the different morphological and

  5. Characteristic length of phonon transport within periodic nanoporous thin films and two-dimensional materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Qing; Xiao, Yue; Zhao, Hongbo

    2016-08-01

    In the past two decades, phonon transport within nanoporous thin films has attracted enormous attention for their potential applications in thermoelectrics and thermal insulation. Various computational studies have been carried out to explain the thermal conductivity reduction within these thin films. Considering classical phonon size effects, the lattice thermal conductivity can be predicted assuming diffusive pore-edge scattering of phonons and bulk phonon mean free paths. Following this, detailed phonon transport can be simulated for a given porous structure to find the lattice thermal conductivity [Hao et al., J. Appl. Phys. 106, 114321 (2009)]. However, such simulations are intrinsically complicated and cannot be used for the data analysis of general samples. In this work, the characteristic length Λ P o r e of periodic nanoporous thin films is extracted by comparing the predictions of phonon Monte Carlo simulations and the kinetic relationship using bulk phonon mean free paths modified by Λ P o r e . Under strong ballistic phonon transport, Λ P o r e is also extracted by the Monte Carlo ray-tracing method for graphene with periodic nanopores. The presented model can be widely used to analyze the measured thermal conductivities of such nanoporous structures.

  6. Song repertoire size correlates with measures of body size in Eurasian blackbirds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hesler, Nana; Mundry, Roger; Sacher, Thomas;

    2012-01-01

    organisation. Here we investigated whether repertoire size in Eurasian blackbirds correlates with measures of body size, namely length of wing, 8th primary, beak and tarsus. So far, very few studies have investigated species with large repertoires and a flexible song organisation in this context. We found...... positive correlations, meaning that larger males had larger repertoires. Larger males may have better fighting abilities and, thus, advantages in territorial defence. Larger structural body size may also reflect better conditions during early development. Therefore, under the assumption that body size...

  7. Multimodal Dispersion of Nanoparticles: A Comprehensive Evaluation of Size Distribution with 9 Size Measurement Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varenne, Fanny; Makky, Ali; Gaucher-Delmas, Mireille; Violleau, Frédéric; Vauthier, Christine

    2016-05-01

    Evaluation of particle size distribution (PSD) of multimodal dispersion of nanoparticles is a difficult task due to inherent limitations of size measurement methods. The present work reports the evaluation of PSD of a dispersion of poly(isobutylcyanoacrylate) nanoparticles decorated with dextran known as multimodal and developed as nanomedecine. The nine methods used were classified as batch particle i.e. Static Light Scattering (SLS) and Dynamic Light Scattering (DLS), single particle i.e. Electron Microscopy (EM), Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM), Tunable Resistive Pulse Sensing (TRPS) and Nanoparticle Tracking Analysis (NTA) and separative particle i.e. Asymmetrical Flow Field-Flow Fractionation coupled with DLS (AsFlFFF) size measurement methods. The multimodal dispersion was identified using AFM, TRPS and NTA and results were consistent with those provided with the method based on a separation step prior to on-line size measurements. None of the light scattering batch methods could reveal the complexity of the PSD of the dispersion. Difference between PSD obtained from all size measurement methods tested suggested that study of the PSD of multimodal dispersion required to analyze samples by at least one of the single size particle measurement method or a method that uses a separation step prior PSD measurement.

  8. Easy-to-Fabricate and High-Sensitivity LSPR Type Specific Protein Detection Sensor Using AAO Nano-Pore Size Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sae-Wan; Lee, Jae-Sung; Lee, Sang-Won; Kang, Byoung-Ho; Kwon, Jin-Beom; Kim, Ok-Sik; Kim, Ju-Seong; Kim, Eung-Soo; Kwon, Dae-Hyuk; Kang, Shin-Won

    2017-04-13

    In this study, we developed a pore size/pore area-controlled optical biosensor-based anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) nanostructure. As the pore size of AAO increases, the unit cell of AAO increases, which also increases the non-pore area to which the antibody binds. The increase in the number of antibodies immobilized on the surface of the AAO enables effective detection of trace amounts of antigen, because increased antigen-antibody bonding results in a larger surface refractive index change. High sensitivity was thus achieved through amplification of the interference wave of two vertically-incident reflected waves through the localized surface plasmon resonance phenomenon. The sensitivity of the fabricated sensor was evaluated by measuring the change in wavelength with the change in the refractive index of the device surface, and sensitivity was increased with increasing pore-size and non-pore area. The sensitivity of the fabricated sensor was improved and up to 11.8 ag/mL serum amyloid A1 antigen was detected. In addition, the selectivity of the fabricated sensor was confirmed through a reaction with a heterogeneous substance, C-reactive protein antigen. By using hard anodization during fabrication of the AAO, the fabrication time of the device was reduced and the AAO chip was fabricated quickly and easily.

  9. A tip-attached tuning fork sensor for the control of DNA translocation through a nanopore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyun, Changbae; Kaur, Harpreet; Huang, Tao; Li, Jiali

    2017-02-01

    In this work, we demonstrate that a tuning fork can be used as a force detecting sensor for manipulating DNA molecules and for controlling the DNA translocation rate through a nanopore. One prong of a tuning fork is glued with a probe tip which DNA molecules can be attached to. To control the motion and position of the tip, the tuning fork is fixed to a nanopositioning system which has sub-nanometer position control. A fluidic chamber is designed to fulfill many requirements for the experiment: for the access of a DNA-attached tip approaching to a nanopore, for housing a nanopore chip, and for measuring ionic current through a solid-state nanopore with a pair of electrodes. The location of a nanopore is first observed by transmission electron microscopy, and then is determined inside the liquid chambers with an optical microscope combined with local scanning the probe tip on the nanopore surface. When a DNA-immobilized tip approaches a membrane surface near a nanopore, free ends of the immobilized DNA strings can be pulled and trapped into the pore by an applied voltage across the nanopore chip, resulting in an ionic current reduction through the nanopore. The trapped DNA molecules can be lifted up from the nanopore at a user controlled speed. This integrated apparatus allows manipulation of biomolecules (DNA, RNA, and proteins) attached to a probe tip with sub-nanometer precision, and simultaneously allows measurement of the biomolecules by a nanopore device.

  10. Conservative Sample Size Determination for Repeated Measures Analysis of Covariance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Timothy M; Case, L Douglas

    2013-07-05

    In the design of a randomized clinical trial with one pre and multiple post randomized assessments of the outcome variable, one needs to account for the repeated measures in determining the appropriate sample size. Unfortunately, one seldom has a good estimate of the variance of the outcome measure, let alone the correlations among the measurements over time. We show how sample sizes can be calculated by making conservative assumptions regarding the correlations for a variety of covariance structures. The most conservative choice for the correlation depends on the covariance structure and the number of repeated measures. In the absence of good estimates of the correlations, the sample size is often based on a two-sample t-test, making the 'ultra' conservative and unrealistic assumption that there are zero correlations between the baseline and follow-up measures while at the same time assuming there are perfect correlations between the follow-up measures. Compared to the case of taking a single measurement, substantial savings in sample size can be realized by accounting for the repeated measures, even with very conservative assumptions regarding the parameters of the assumed correlation matrix. Assuming compound symmetry, the sample size from the two-sample t-test calculation can be reduced at least 44%, 56%, and 61% for repeated measures analysis of covariance by taking 2, 3, and 4 follow-up measures, respectively. The results offer a rational basis for determining a fairly conservative, yet efficient, sample size for clinical trials with repeated measures and a baseline value.

  11. Image processing applied to measurement of particle size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vega, Fabio; Lasso, Willian; Torres, Cesar

    2015-01-01

    Five different types of aggregates have been analyzed, and the size of particles on samples immersed in distilled water as silicon dioxide, titanium dioxide, styrenes and crushed silica particles is made; an attempt at applying the digital image processing (DIP) technique to analyze the particle size, we developed a system of measures microparticles using a microscope, a CCD camera and acquisition software and video processing developed in MATLAB. These studies are combined with laser light using measurements by diffractometry and obtain calibration in the system implemented, in this work we achievement measurement particle size on the order of 4 to 6 micrometers. The study demonstrates that DIP is a fast, convenient, versatile, and accurate technique for particle size analysis; the limitations of implemented setup too will be discussed.

  12. Up and down translocation events and electric double-layer formation inside solid-state nanopores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanjani, Mehdi B; Engelke, Rebecca E; Lukes, Jennifer R; Meunier, Vincent; Drndić, Marija

    2015-08-01

    We present a theoretical study of nanorod translocation events through solid-state nanopores of different sizes which result in positive or negative ion conductance changes. Using theoretical models, we show that positive conductance changes or up events happen for nanopore diameters smaller than a transition diameter dt, and negative conductance changes or down events occur for nanopore diameters larger than dt. We investigate the underlying physics of such translocation phenomena and describe the significance of the electric double-layer effects for nanopores with small diameters. Furthermore, for nanopores with large diameters, it is shown that a geometric model, formulated based on the nanoparticle blockade inside the nanopore, provides a straightforward and reasonably accurate prediction of ion conductance change. Based on this concept, we also implement a method to distinguish and detect nanorods of different sizes by focusing solely on the sign and not the exact value of the conductance change.

  13. Observation of ionic Coulomb blockade in nanopores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Jiandong; Liu, Ke; Graf, Michael; Dumcenco, Dumitru; Kis, Andras; di Ventra, Massimiliano; Radenovic, Aleksandra

    2016-08-01

    Emergent behaviour from electron-transport properties is routinely observed in systems with dimensions approaching the nanoscale. However, analogous mesoscopic behaviour resulting from ionic transport has so far not been observed, most probably because of bottlenecks in the controlled fabrication of subnanometre nanopores for use in nanofluidics. Here, we report measurements of ionic transport through a single subnanometre pore junction, and the observation of ionic Coulomb blockade: the ionic counterpart of the electronic Coulomb blockade observed for quantum dots. Our findings demonstrate that nanoscopic, atomically thin pores allow for the exploration of phenomena in ionic transport, and suggest that nanopores may also further our understanding of transport through biological ion channels.

  14. Size distribution measurements and chemical analysis of aerosol components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pakkanen, T.A.

    1995-12-31

    The principal aims of this work were to improve the existing methods for size distribution measurements and to draw conclusions about atmospheric and in-stack aerosol chemistry and physics by utilizing size distributions of various aerosol components measured. A sample dissolution with dilute nitric acid in an ultrasonic bath and subsequent graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometric analysis was found to result in low blank values and good recoveries for several elements in atmospheric fine particle size fractions below 2 {mu}m of equivalent aerodynamic particle diameter (EAD). Furthermore, it turned out that a substantial amount of analyses associated with insoluble material could be recovered since suspensions were formed. The size distribution measurements of in-stack combustion aerosols indicated two modal size distributions for most components measured. The existence of the fine particle mode suggests that a substantial fraction of such elements with two modal size distributions may vaporize and nucleate during the combustion process. In southern Norway, size distributions of atmospheric aerosol components usually exhibited one or two fine particle modes and one or two coarse particle modes. Atmospheric relative humidity values higher than 80% resulted in significant increase of the mass median diameters of the droplet mode. Important local and/or regional sources of As, Br, I, K, Mn, Pb, Sb, Si and Zn were found to exist in southern Norway. The existence of these sources was reflected in the corresponding size distributions determined, and was utilized in the development of a source identification method based on size distribution data. On the Finnish south coast, atmospheric coarse particle nitrate was found to be formed mostly through an atmospheric reaction of nitric acid with existing coarse particle sea salt but reactions and/or adsorption of nitric acid with soil derived particles also occurred. Chloride was depleted when acidic species reacted

  15. PREFACE New developments in nanopore research—from fundamentals to applications New developments in nanopore research—from fundamentals to applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albrecht, Tim; Edel, Joshua B.; Winterhalter, Mathias

    2010-11-01

    refereeing process, and Ms Natalia Goehring for the beautiful cover artwork. Finally, to the readers, we hope you find this special issue a valuable source of information and insight into the field of nanopores. New developments in nanopore research—from fundamentals to applications contents Mathematical modeling and simulation of nanopore blocking by precipitation M-T Wolfram, M Burger and Z S Siwy Protein conducting nanopores Anke Harsman, Vivien Krüger, Philipp Bartsch, Alf Honigmann, Oliver Schmidt, Sanjana Rao, Christof Meisinger and Richard Wagner Electrically sensing protease activity with nanopores Mikiembo Kukwikila and Stefan Howorka Electrical characterization of DNA-functionalized solid state nanopores for bio-sensing V Mussi, P Fanzio, L Repetto, G Firpo, P Scaruffi, S Stigliani, M Menotta, M Magnani, G P Tonini and U Valbusa Automatable lipid bilayer formation and ion channel measurement using sessile droplets J L Poulos, S A Portonovo, H Bang and J J Schmidt Critical assessment of OmpF channel selectivity: merging information from different experimental protocols M L López, E García-Giménez, V M Aguilella and A Alcaraz Chemically modified solid state nanopores for high throughput nanoparticle separation Anmiv S Prabhu, Talukder Zaki N Jubery, Kevin J Freedman, Rafael Mulero, Prashanta Dutta and Min Jun Kim Changes in ion channel geometry resolved to sub-ångström precision via single molecule mass spectrometry Joseph W F Robertson, John J Kasianowicz and Joseph E Reiner Entropic transport of finite size particles W Riefler, G Schmid, P S Burada and P Hänggi Osmotic stress regulates the strength and kinetics of sugar binding to the maltoporin channel Philip A Gurnev, Daniel Harries, V Adrian Parsegian and Sergey M Bezrukov Detection of urea-induced internal denaturation of dsDNA using solid-state nanoporesn Alon Singer, Heiko Kuhn, Maxim Frank-Kamenetskii and Amit Meller Translocation events in a single-walled carbon nanotube Jin He, Hao Liu, Pei Pang

  16. Causality in Statistical Power: Isomorphic Properties of Measurement, Research Design, Effect Size, and Sample Size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidel, R. Eric

    2016-01-01

    Statistical power is the ability to detect a significant effect, given that the effect actually exists in a population. Like most statistical concepts, statistical power tends to induce cognitive dissonance in hepatology researchers. However, planning for statistical power by an a priori sample size calculation is of paramount importance when designing a research study. There are five specific empirical components that make up an a priori sample size calculation: the scale of measurement of the outcome, the research design, the magnitude of the effect size, the variance of the effect size, and the sample size. A framework grounded in the phenomenon of isomorphism, or interdependencies amongst different constructs with similar forms, will be presented to understand the isomorphic effects of decisions made on each of the five aforementioned components of statistical power. PMID:27073717

  17. Causality in Statistical Power: Isomorphic Properties of Measurement, Research Design, Effect Size, and Sample Size

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Eric Heidel

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Statistical power is the ability to detect a significant effect, given that the effect actually exists in a population. Like most statistical concepts, statistical power tends to induce cognitive dissonance in hepatology researchers. However, planning for statistical power by an a priori sample size calculation is of paramount importance when designing a research study. There are five specific empirical components that make up an a priori sample size calculation: the scale of measurement of the outcome, the research design, the magnitude of the effect size, the variance of the effect size, and the sample size. A framework grounded in the phenomenon of isomorphism, or interdependencies amongst different constructs with similar forms, will be presented to understand the isomorphic effects of decisions made on each of the five aforementioned components of statistical power.

  18. Method and apparatus for measuring particle size at low concentration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marijnissen, J.C.M.; Willemse, A.W.; Roos, R.A.

    1997-01-01

    Described is an improved method for measuring the particle size of ultrasmall particles (111) which are suspended in a fluid. Laser light (121) is scattered by the particles, and the scattered light (122) is received by a light detector (131) which provides an electrical measuring signal (Sm) which

  19. Electrostatic Method to Measure the Size of the Sprayed Droplets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuna-Broniowski, M.

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available In the paper is presented the new method the measurement of the main parameters the atomised stream of liquid. This method base on the measurement of the electric charge carried by water drops charged by high voltage. The electrostatic sensor to measure of the droplets size, is associated with precision mechanic system scanning the sprayed surface. The amplified and conditioned signals from electrostatic sensor are send to the computer system equipped in virtual instrument to analyse the size and spatial distribution of droplets. The virtual instrument control also the scanning system.

  20. Hydrophilic nanoporous materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2010-01-01

    The present application discloses a method for preparing and rendering hydrophilic a nanoporous material of a polymer matrix which has a porosity of 0.1-90 percent (v/v), such that the ratio between the final water absorption (percent (w/w)) and the porosity (percent (v/v)) is at least 0.05, the ......The present application discloses a method for preparing and rendering hydrophilic a nanoporous material of a polymer matrix which has a porosity of 0.1-90 percent (v/v), such that the ratio between the final water absorption (percent (w/w)) and the porosity (percent (v/v)) is at least 0.......05, the method comprising the steps of: (a) preparing a precursor material comprising at least one polymeric component and having a first phase and a second phase; (b) removal of at least a part of the first phase of the precursor material prepared in step (a) so as to leave behind a nanoporous material...... of the polymer matrix; (c) irradiating at least a part of said nanoporous material with light of a wave length of in the range of 250-400 nm (or 200-700 nm) in the presence of oxygen and/or ozone. Corresponding hydrophilic nanoporous materials are also disclosed. L...

  1. Ordered arrays of nanoporous gold nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Wang

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available A combination of a “top-down” approach (substrate-conformal imprint lithography and two “bottom-up” approaches (dewetting and dealloying enables fabrication of perfectly ordered 2-dimensional arrays of nanoporous gold nanoparticles. The dewetting of Au/Ag bilayers on the periodically prepatterned substrates leads to the interdiffusion of Au and Ag and the formation of an array of Au–Ag alloy nanoparticles. The array of alloy nanoparticles is transformed into an array of nanoporous gold nanoparticles by a following dealloying step. Large areas of this new type of material arrangement can be realized with this technique. In addition, this technique allows for the control of particle size, particle spacing, and ligament size (or pore size by varying the period of the structure, total metal layer thickness, and the thickness ratio of the as-deposited bilayers.

  2. Accuracy of the photogrametric measuring system for large size elements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Grzelka

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to present methods of estimating and guidelines for verifying the accuracy of optical photogrammetric measuringsystems, using for measurement of large size elements. Measuring systems applied to measure workpieces of a large size which oftenreach more than 10000mm require use of appropriate standards. Those standards provided by the manufacturer of photogrammetricsystems are certified and are inspected annually. To make sure that these systems work properly there was developed a special standardVDI / VDE 2634, "Optical 3D measuring systems. Imaging systems with point - by - point probing. " According to recommendationsdescribed in this standard research on accuracy of photogrametric measuring system was conducted using K class gauge blocks dedicatedto calibrate and test accuracy of classic CMMs. The paper presents results of research of estimation the actual error of indication for sizemeasurement MPEE for photogrammetric coordinate measuring system TRITOP.

  3. Application of Laser Correlation Spectroscopy for Measuring Virus Size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikiforov, V N; Vinogradov, S E; Ivanov, A V; Efremova, E V; Kalnina, L B; Bychenko, A B; Tentsov, Yu Yu; Manykin, A A

    2016-05-01

    Dynamic light scattering method or laser correlation spectroscopy was applied to evaluation of the size of viruses. We measured correlation functions of the light scattered by human immunodeficiency viruses (HIV) and hepatitis A viruses (HAV) and found that size of HIV-1 (subtype A and B) and HAV virions were 104 nm and 28 nm, respectively. Comparison of these findings with electron microscopy data for fixed samples of the same viruses showed good agreement of the results.

  4. Measurements of Protein-Protein Interactions by Size Exclusion Chromatography

    OpenAIRE

    Bloustine, J.; Berejnov, V.; Fraden, S

    2003-01-01

    A method is presented for determining second virial coefficients (B2) of protein solutions from retention time measurements in size exclusion chromatography. We determine B2 by analyzing the concentration dependence of the chromatographic partition coefficient. We show the ability of this method to track the evolution of B2 from positive to negative values in lysozyme and bovine serum albumin solutions. Our size exclusion chromatography results agree quantitatively with data obtained by light...

  5. Counting and measuring particles sized from soot to pollen

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    For number concentration measurements of superfine particles a condensation nucleus counter (CNC) is frequently used. The combination of a new CNC module with a white light aerosol spectrometer and a passive collector makes possible accurate time-resolved determination of particle number within the overall size range of 10 nm to 40 μm and at concentrations up to 105 particles/cm3. With the aerosol spectrometer a high time-resolved particle size determination is also possible in the size range of 0.3-40 μm up to the same high number concentrations of 105 particles/cm3.

  6. How to measure breast cancer tumoral size at MR imaging?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomassin-Naggara, I., E-mail: isabelle.thomassin@tnn.aphp.fr [Department of Radiology, Hôpital Tenon, Assistance Publique Hôpitaux de Paris, Institut Universitaire de Cancérologie (IUC) Pierre et Marie Curie, Cancer Est, Paris (France); Siles, Pascale [Department of Radiology, Hôpital Tenon, Assistance Publique Hôpitaux de Paris, Institut Universitaire de Cancérologie (IUC) Pierre et Marie Curie, Cancer Est, Paris (France); Trop, I. [Department of Radiology, Centre de recherche et d’investigation des maladies du sein (CRID), Hôtel Dieu, Centre Hospitalo-Universitaire de Montréal (CHUM) (Canada); Chopier, J. [Department of Radiology, Hôpital Tenon, Assistance Publique Hôpitaux de Paris, Institut Universitaire de Cancérologie (IUC) Pierre et Marie Curie, Cancer Est, Paris (France); Darai, E. [Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Hôpital Tenon, Assistance Publique Hôpitaux de Paris, Institut Universitaire de Cancérologie (IUC) Pierre et Marie Curie, Cancer Est, Paris (France); Bazot, M. [Department of Radiology, Hôpital Tenon, Assistance Publique Hôpitaux de Paris, Institut Universitaire de Cancérologie (IUC) Pierre et Marie Curie, Cancer Est, Paris (France); and others

    2013-12-01

    Objective: To compare the accuracy of different MR sequences to measure tumor size. Methods: Eighty-six women (mean age: 53 years (30–78)) who underwent preoperative MRI for breast cancer were included. Maximal diameters of the index tumor (IT) and of the whole extent of the tumor (WET) were measured on T2-weighted (T2W) sequences, on dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) T1-weighted (T1W) sequences and on Maximal Intensity Projection (MIP) reconstructions. Agreements with pathological size were evaluated using concordance correlation coefficient (k). Results: Median pathological size of IT was 20 mm (13–25 mm, interquartile range). Median pathological size of the WET was 29 mm (16–50 mm, interquartile range). Measurement of IT showed a good concordance with pathological size, with best results using T2W (k = 0.690) compared to MIP (k = 0.667), early-subtracted DCE frame (k = 0.630) and early-native DCE frame (k = 0.588). IT was visible on T2W in 83.7% and accurately measured within 5 mm in 69.9%. Measurement of WET was superior using early-subtracted DCE frame (k = 0.642) compared to late-native frame (k = 0.635), early-native frame (k = 0.631), late-subtracted frame (k = 0.620) and MIP (k = 0.565). However, even using early-subtracted frame, WET was accurately measured within 5 mm only 39.3%. Conclusion: If visible, IT size is best measured on T2W with a good accuracy (69%) whereas WET is best estimated on early-subtracted DCE frame. However, when adjacent additional sites exist around IT, suspected surrounding disease components need to be proved by pathological analysis.

  7. Observation and analysis of the Coulter effect through carbon nanotube and graphene nanopores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Kumar Varoon; Drahushuk, Lee W; Strano, Michael S

    2016-02-13

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and graphene are the rolled and flat analogues of graphitic carbon, respectively, with hexagonal crystalline lattices, and show exceptional molecular transport properties. The empirical study of a single isolated nanopore requires, as evidence, the observation of stochastic, telegraphic noise from a blocking molecule commensurate in size with the pore. This standard is used ubiquitously in patch clamp studies of single, isolated biological ion channels and a wide range of inorganic, synthetic nanopores. In this work, we show that observation and study of stochastic fluctuations for carbon nanopores, both CNTs and graphene-based, enable precision characterization of pore properties that is otherwise unattainable. In the case of voltage clamp measurements of long (0.5-1 mm) CNTs between 0.9 and 2.2 nm in diameter, Coulter blocking of cationic species reveals the complex structuring of the fluid phase for confined water in this diameter range. In the case of graphene, we have pioneered the study and the analysis of stochastic fluctuations in gas transport from a pressurized, graphene-covered micro-well compartment that reveal switching between different values of the membrane permeance attributed to chemical rearrangements of individual graphene pores. This analysis remains the only way to study such single isolated graphene nanopores under these realistic transport conditions of pore rearrangements, in keeping with the thesis of this work. In summary, observation and analysis of Coulter blocking or stochastic fluctuations of permeating flux is an invaluable tool to understand graphene and graphitic nanopores including CNTs.

  8. Building membrane nanopores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howorka, Stefan

    2017-07-01

    Membrane nanopores--hollow nanoscale barrels that puncture biological or synthetic membranes--have become powerful tools in chemical- and biosensing, and have achieved notable success in portable DNA sequencing. The pores can be self-assembled from a variety of materials, including proteins, peptides, synthetic organic compounds and, more recently, DNA. But which building material is best for which application, and what is the relationship between pore structure and function? In this Review, I critically compare the characteristics of the different building materials, and explore the influence of the building material on pore structure, dynamics and function. I also discuss the future challenges of developing nanopore technology, and consider what the next-generation of nanopore structures could be and where further practical applications might emerge.

  9. Nanoporous metal oxides with tunable and nanocrystalline frameworks via conversion of metal-organic frameworks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Tae Kyung; Lee, Kyung Joo; Cheon, Jae Yeong; Lee, Jae Hwa; Joo, Sang Hoon; Moon, Hoi Ri

    2013-06-19

    Nanoporous metal oxide materials are ubiquitous in the material sciences because of their numerous potential applications in various areas, including adsorption, catalysis, energy conversion and storage, optoelectronics, and drug delivery. While synthetic strategies for the preparation of siliceous nanoporous materials are well-established, nonsiliceous metal oxide-based nanoporous materials still present challenges. Herein, we report a novel synthetic strategy that exploits a metal-organic framework (MOF)-driven, self-templated route toward nanoporous metal oxides via thermolysis under inert atmosphere. In this approach, an aliphatic ligand-based MOF is thermally converted to nanoporous metal oxides with highly nanocrystalline frameworks, in which aliphatic ligands act as the self-templates that are afterward evaporated to generate nanopores. We demonstrate this concept with hierarchically nanoporous magnesia (MgO) and ceria (CeO2), which have potential applicability for adsorption, catalysis, and energy storage. The pore size of these nanoporous metal oxides can be readily tuned by simple control of experimental parameters. Significantly, nanoporous MgO exhibits exceptional CO2 adsorption capacity (9.2 wt %) under conditions mimicking flue gas. This MOF-driven strategy can be expanded to other nanoporous monometallic and multimetallic oxides with a multitude of potential applications.

  10. Quantitative size measurement of features viewed through a video endoscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatnagar, Vipul; Poret, Jay C.; Suter, Joseph J.; Ravich, William J.; Giannini, Judith A.

    1994-07-01

    Quantitative size measurements of gastrointestinal tract lesions (i.e., ulcers and polyps) viewed during endoscopy are helpful in assessing the rate of healing or growth. We report a novel technique for quantitatively measuring the two-dimensional size of a feature viewed remotely via a video imager. Our instrument's small size makes it a suitable candidate for use in endoscopes. Computing the size of a feature displayed on a two-dimensional video monitor necessitates measuring the distance between the imager and the surface under observation because an undistorted video image preserves the angular content of a scene. We have developed a prototype ranging system that exploits the tendency of light emerging from the tip of an optical fiber to diverge. Our device uses two fibers with different divergence characteristics. The separation between the imaging sensor and the viewed surface is determined by inspecting the relative sizes of the spots cast by each of the fibers. Our device, which measures distances between 2 and 8 cm, is sufficiently small to be accommodated in an endoscope's accessory channel.

  11. Computerized mouse pupil size measurement for pupillary light reflex analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Wei; Tan, Jinglu; Zhang, Keqing; Lei, Bo

    2008-06-01

    Accurate measurement of pupil size is essential for pupillary light reflex (PLR) analysis in clinical diagnosis and vision research. Low pupil-iris contrast, corneal reflection, artifacts and noises in infrared eye imaging pose challenges for automated pupil detection and measurement. This paper describes a computerized method for pupil detection or identification. After segmentation by a region-growing algorithm, pupils are detected by an iterative randomized Hough transform (IRHT) with an elliptical model. The IRHT iteratively suppresses the effects of extraneous structures and noise, yielding reliable measurements. Experimental results with 72 images showed a mean absolute difference of 3.84% between computerized and manual measurements. The inter-run variation for the computerized method (1.24%) was much smaller than the inter-observer variation for the manual method (7.45%), suggesting a higher level of consistency of the former. The computerized method could facilitate PLR analysis and other non-invasive functional tests that require pupil size measurements.

  12. Graphene nanopore with a self-integrated optical antenna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, SungWoo; Choi, Inhee; Fu, Chi-cheng; Kim, Kwanpyo; Hong, SoonGweon; Choi, Yeonho; Zettl, Alex; Lee, Luke P

    2014-10-08

    We report graphene nanopores with integrated optical antennae. We demonstrate that a nanometer-sized heated spot created by photon-to-heat conversion of a gold nanorod resting on a graphene membrane forms a nanoscale pore with a self-integrated optical antenna in a single step. The distinct plasmonic traits of metal nanoparticles, which have a unique capability to concentrate light into nanoscale regions, yield the significant advantage of parallel nanopore fabrication compared to the conventional sequential process using an electron beam. Tunability of both the nanopore dimensions and the optical characteristics of plasmonic nanoantennae are further achieved. Finally, the key optical function of our self-integrated optical antenna on the vicinity of graphene nanopore is manifested by multifold fluorescent signal enhancement during DNA translocation.

  13. Wound size measurement of lower extremity ulcers using segmentation algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dadkhah, Arash; Pang, Xing; Solis, Elizabeth; Fang, Ruogu; Godavarty, Anuradha

    2016-03-01

    Lower extremity ulcers are one of the most common complications that not only affect many people around the world but also have huge impact on economy since a large amount of resources are spent for treatment and prevention of the diseases. Clinical studies have shown that reduction in the wound size of 40% within 4 weeks is an acceptable progress in the healing process. Quantification of the wound size plays a crucial role in assessing the extent of healing and determining the treatment process. To date, wound healing is visually inspected and the wound size is measured from surface images. The extent of wound healing internally may vary from the surface. A near-infrared (NIR) optical imaging approach has been developed for non-contact imaging of wounds internally and differentiating healing from non-healing wounds. Herein, quantitative wound size measurements from NIR and white light images are estimated using a graph cuts and region growing image segmentation algorithms. The extent of the wound healing from NIR imaging of lower extremity ulcers in diabetic subjects are quantified and compared across NIR and white light images. NIR imaging and wound size measurements can play a significant role in potentially predicting the extent of internal healing, thus allowing better treatment plans when implemented for periodic imaging in future.

  14. Multichannel detection of ionic currents through two nanopores fabricated on integrated Si3N4 membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanagi, Itaru; Akahori, Rena; Aoki, Mayu; Harada, Kunio; Takeda, Ken-Ichi

    2016-08-16

    Integration of solid-state nanopores and multichannel detection of signals from each nanopore are effective measures for realizing high-throughput nanopore sensors. In the present study, we demonstrated fabrication of Si3N4 membrane arrays and the simultaneous measurement of ionic currents through two nanopores formed in two adjacent membranes. Membranes with thicknesses as low as 6.4 nm and small nanopores with diameters of less than 2 nm could be fabricated using the poly-Si sacrificial-layer process and multilevel pulse-voltage injection. Using the fabricated nanopore membranes, we successfully achieved simultaneous detection of clear ionic-current blockades when single-stranded short homopolymers (poly(dA)60) passed through two nanopores. In addition, we investigated the signal crosstalk and leakage current among separated chambers. When two nanopores were isolated on the front surface of the membrane, there was no signal crosstalk or leakage current between the chambers. However, when two nanopores were isolated on the backside of the Si substrate, signal crosstalk and leakage current were observed owing to high-capacitance coupling between the chambers and electrolysis of water on the surface of the Si substrate. The signal crosstalk and leakage current could be suppressed by oxidizing the exposed Si surface in the membrane chip. Finally, the observed ionic-current blockade when poly(dA)60 passed through the nanopore in the oxidized chip was approximately half of that observed in the non-oxidized chip.

  15. Method and apparatus for measuring particle size at low concentration

    OpenAIRE

    Marijnissen, J.C.M.; Willemse, A.W.; Roos, R A

    1997-01-01

    Described is an improved method for measuring the particle size of ultrasmall particles (111) which are suspended in a fluid. Laser light (121) is scattered by the particles, and the scattered light (122) is received by a light detector (131) which provides an electrical measuring signal (Sm) which is representative of the intensity of the scattered light (122). According to the present invention, signal components with a relatively low characteristic frequency are removed from the electrical...

  16. Performance measuring of tourism small medium-sized enterprises

    OpenAIRE

    Anca Borza; Ovidiu Bordean

    2006-01-01

    The article analyzes the performance measurement processes within the small medium-sized enterprises that run businesses in Romania's tourism sector. Related to contemporary approaches to improving business performance in the management literature, performance measurement approaches are analyzed using the balanced scorecard framework. Balanced scorecards proved to be a powerful tool that can inform the managers about the things that are working or not within a company, what is to be improved ...

  17. Measuring Spray Droplet Size from Agricultural Nozzles Using Laser Diffraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritz, Bradley K; Hoffmann, W Clint

    2016-09-16

    When making an application of any crop protection material such as an herbicide or pesticide, the applicator uses a variety of skills and information to make an application so that the material reaches the target site (i.e., plant). Information critical in this process is the droplet size that a particular spray nozzle, spray pressure, and spray solution combination generates, as droplet size greatly influences product efficacy and how the spray moves through the environment. Researchers and product manufacturers commonly use laser diffraction equipment to measure the spray droplet size in laboratory wind tunnels. The work presented here describes methods used in making spray droplet size measurements with laser diffraction equipment for both ground and aerial application scenarios that can be used to ensure inter- and intra-laboratory precision while minimizing sampling bias associated with laser diffraction systems. Maintaining critical measurement distances and concurrent airflow throughout the testing process is key to this precision. Real time data quality analysis is also critical to preventing excess variation in the data or extraneous inclusion of erroneous data. Some limitations of this method include atypical spray nozzles, spray solutions or application conditions that result in spray streams that do not fully atomize within the measurement distances discussed. Successful adaption of this method can provide a highly efficient method for evaluation of the performance of agrochemical spray application nozzles under a variety of operational settings. Also discussed are potential experimental design considerations that can be included to enhance functionality of the data collected.

  18. An overview of aerosol particle sensors for size distribution measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panich Intra

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Fine aerosols are generally referred to airborne particles of diameter in submicron or nanometer size range. Measurement capabilities are required to gain understanding of these particle dynamics. One of the most important physical and chemical parameters is the particle size distribution. The aim of this article is to give an overview of recent development of already existing sensors for particle size distribution measurement based on electrical mobility determination. Available instruments for particle size measurement include a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS, an electrical aerosol spectrometer (EAS, an engine exhaust particle sizer (EEPS, a bipolar charge aerosol classifier (BCAC, a fast aerosol spectrometer (FAS a differential mobility spectrometer (DMS, and a CMU electrical mobility spectrometer (EMS. The operating principles, as well as detailed physical characteristics of these instruments and their main components consisting of a particle charger, a mobility classifier, and a signal detector, are described. Typical measurements of aerosol from various sources by these instruments compared with an electrical low pressure impactor (ELPI are also presented.

  19. The Detection and Measurement of the Activity Size Distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramamurthi, Mukund

    The infiltration of radon into the indoor environment may cause the exposure of the public to excessive amounts of radioactivity and has spurred renewed research interest over the past several years into the occurrence and properties of radon and its decay products in indoor air. The public health risks posed by the inhalation and subsequent lung deposition of the decay products of Rn-222 have particularly warranted the study of their diffusivity and attachment to molecular cluster aerosols in the ultrafine particle size range (0.5-5 nm) and to accumulation mode aerosols. In this research, a system for the detection and measurement of the activity size distributions and concentration levels of radon decay products in indoor environments has been developed. The system is microcomputer-controlled and involves a combination of multiple wire screen sampler -detector units operated in parallel. The detection of the radioactivity attached to the aerosol sampled in these units permits the determination of the radon daughter activity -weighted size distributions and concentration levels in indoor air on a semi-continuous basis. The development of the system involved the design of the detection and measurement system, its experimental characterization and testing in a radon-aerosol chamber, and numerical studies for the optimization of the design and operating parameters of the system. Several concepts of utility to aerosol size distribution measurement methods sampling the ultrafine cluster size range evolved from this study, and are discussed in various chapters of this dissertation. The optimized multiple wire screen (Graded Screen Array) system described in this dissertation is based on these concepts. The principal facet of the system is its ability to make unattended measurements of activity size distributions and concentration levels of radon decay products on a semi-continuous basis. Thus, the capability of monitoring changes in the activity concentrations and size

  20. Hydrophilic nanoporous materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2010-01-01

    .05, the method comprising the steps of: (a) preparing a precursor material comprising at least one polymeric component and having a first phase and a second phase; (b) removal of at least a part of the first phase of the precursor material prepared in step (a) so as to leave behind a nanoporous material...

  1. Nanocrystalline and Nanoporous Ceramics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verweij, Henk

    1996-01-01

    Nanocrystalline and nanoporous ceramics, renowned for their special transport properties, have typical applications in the fields of energy, the environment, and separation technology. One example is a solid oxide fuel cell, where an anode with improved characteristics was obtained by an optimized n

  2. Electrically actuatable smart nanoporous membrane for pulsatile drug release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Gumhye; Yang, Seung Yun; Byun, Jinseok; Kim, Jin Kon

    2011-03-09

    We report on the fabrication of electrically responsive nanoporous membrane based on polypyrrole doped with dodecylbenzenesulfonate anion (PPy/DBS) that was electropolymerized on the upper part of anodized aluminum oxide membrane. The membrane has regular pore size and very high pore density. Utilizing a large volume change of PPy/DBS depending on electrochemical state, the pore size was acutated electrically. The actuation of the pores was experimentally confirmed by in situ atomic force microscopy and in situ flux measurement. We also demonstrated successfully pulsatile (or on-demand) drug release by using fluorescently labeled protein as a model drug. Because of a fast switching time (less than 10 s) and high flux of the drugs, this membrane could be used for emergency therapy of angina pectoris and migraine, which requires acute and on-demand drug delivery, and hormone-related disease and metabolic syndrome.

  3. Particle sizing of airborne radioactivity field measurements at Olympic Dam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solomon, S.B.; Wilkis, M.; O`Brein, R.; Ganakas, G.

    1993-12-01

    On July 1, 1991 the Australian Radiation Laboratory (ARL) commenced a two year project entitled - Particle sizing of airborne radioactivity, funded by a Mining and Quarrying Occupational Health and Safety Committee - grant (submission No. 9138). This study was set out to measure airborne radioactivity size distributions in an underground uranium mine, in order to provide better estimates of the health risks associated with inhalation of airborne radiation in the work place. These measurements included both active and passive measurement of radon gas, continuous and spot sample of radon daughter levels, as well as wire screen diffusion battery measurements of the radon daughter size distributions. The results of measurements at over 50 sites within the mine are reported, together with the calculated dose conversion factors derived from the older dosimetric models and from the new ICRP lung model using the computer code RADEP. The results showed that the ventilation is relatively uniform within the mine and the radon daughter concentrations are kept to less than 20% of the equilibrium concentration. The radon and radon daughter concentrations showed marked variability with both time and position within the mine. It is concluded that the present radiation protection methods and dose conversion factors used in Australia provide a good estimate of the radiation risk for the inhalation of radon progeny. 29 refs., 8 tabs., 9 figs.

  4. Measurement of particle size based on digital imaging technique

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Hong; TANG Hong-wu; LIU Yun; WANG Hao; LIU Gui-ping

    2013-01-01

    To improve the analysis methods for the measurement of the sediment particle sizes with a wide distribution and of irregular shapes,a sediment particle image measurement,an analysis system,and an extraction algorithm of the optimal threshold based on the gray histogram peak values are proposed.Recording the pixels of the sediment particles by labeling them,the algorithm can effectively separate the sediment particle images from the background images using the equivalent pixel circles with the same diameters to represent the sediment particles.Compared with the laser analyzer for the case of blue plastic sands,the measurement results of the system are shown to be reasonably similar.The errors are mainly due to the small size of the particles and the limitation of the apparatus.The measurement accuracy can be improved by increasing the Charge-Coupled Devices (CCD) camera resolution.The analysis method of the sediment particle images can provide a technical support for the rapid measurement of the sediment particle size and its distribution.

  5. Method for measuring the size distribution of airborne rhinovirus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russell, M.L.; Goth-Goldstein, R.; Apte, M.G.; Fisk, W.J.

    2002-01-01

    About 50% of viral-induced respiratory illnesses are caused by the human rhinovirus (HRV). Measurements of the concentrations and sizes of bioaerosols are critical for research on building characteristics, aerosol transport, and mitigation measures. We developed a quantitative reverse transcription-coupled polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assay for HRV and verified that this assay detects HRV in nasal lavage samples. A quantitation standard was used to determine a detection limit of 5 fg of HRV RNA with a linear range over 1000-fold. To measure the size distribution of HRV aerosols, volunteers with a head cold spent two hours in a ventilated research chamber. Airborne particles from the chamber were collected using an Andersen Six-Stage Cascade Impactor. Each stage of the impactor was analyzed by quantitative RT-PCR for HRV. For the first two volunteers with confirmed HRV infection, but with mild symptoms, we were unable to detect HRV on any stage of the impactor.

  6. Agreement assessment in size measurement of hepatic metastases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yangchen; Karademir, Ibrahim; Wise, Leon; Oto, Aytekin; Peng, Yahui

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to investigate patient-wise agreement among multiparametric magnetic resonance (MR) imaging sequences and radiologists, respectively, in the size assessment of hepatic metastases. A total of 30 liver metastases were identified from 20 patients and three radiologists independently measured the long and short axes for all metastases in T1-weighted, T2-weighted, diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) with b of 0 and 800 s/mm2, and the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) map. We calculated the patient-wise intraclass correlation coefficient (ICCs) to estimate the interobserver and intersequence agreement in measured lesion size. Interobserver ICCs were 0.92-0.98 for different MR sequences and intersequence ICCs were 0.93-0.98. In conclusion, multiparametric MR imaging is a reliable tool for hepatic metastatic lesion measurement.

  7. Measurements of Hygroscopicity- and Size-Resolved Sea Spray Aerosol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, B.; Dawson, K. W.; Royalty, T. M.; Reed, R. E.; Petters, M.; Meskhidze, N.

    2015-12-01

    Atmospheric aerosols play a central role in many environmental processes by influencing the Earth's radiative balance, tropospheric chemistry, clouds, biogeochemical cycles, and visibility as well as adversely impacting human health. Based on their origin, atmospheric aerosols can be defined as anthropogenic or natural. Recent studies have shown that a large fraction of uncertainty in the radiative effects of anthropogenic aerosols is related to uncertainty in natural—background—aerosols. Marine aerosols are of particular interest due to the abundance of oceans covering the Earth's surface. Despite their importance, limited information is currently available for size- and composition-resolved marine aerosol emission fluxes. Our group has designed and built an instrument for measuring the size- and hygroscopicity-resolved sea spray aerosol fluxes. The instrument was first deployed during spring 2015 at the end of the 560 m pier of the US Army Corps of Engineers' Field Research Facility in Duck, NC. Measurements include 200 nm-sized diameter growth factor (hygroscopicity) distributions, sea spray particle flux measurements, and total sub-micron sized aerosol concentration. Ancillary ocean data includes salinity, pH, sea surface temperature, dissolved oxygen content, and relative fluorescence (proxy for [Chl-a]). Hygroscopicity distribution measurements show two broad peaks, one indicative of organics and sulfates and another suggestive of sea salt. The fraction of 200 nm-sized salt particles having hygroscopicity similar to that of sea-spray aerosol contributes up to ~24% of the distribution on days with high-speed onshore winds and up to ~3% on calm days with winds blowing from the continent. However, the total concentration of sea-spray-like particles originating from offshore versus onshore winds was relatively similar. Changes in the relative contribution of sea-salt to number concentration were caused by a concomitant changes in total aerosol concentration

  8. Physically-synthesized gold nanoparticles containing multiple nanopores for enhanced photothermal conversion and photoacoustic imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jisoo; Kang, Heesung; Kim, Young Heon; Lee, Sang-Won; Lee, Tae Geol; Wi, Jung-Sub

    2016-08-25

    Physically-synthesized gold nanoparticles having a narrow size distribution and containing multiple nanopores have been utilized as photothermal converters and imaging contrast agents. Nanopores within the gold nanoparticles make it possible to increase the light-absorption cross-section and consequently exhibit distinct improvements in photothermal conversion and photoacoustic imaging efficiencies.

  9. Effects of electrons on the shape of nanopores prepared by focused electron beam induced etching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebes, Yael; Hadad, Binyamin; Ashkenasy, Nurit

    2011-07-01

    The fabrication of nanometric pores with controlled size is important for applications such as single molecule detection. We have recently suggested the use of focused electron beam induced etching (FEBIE) for the preparation of such nanopores in silicon nitride membranes. The use of a scanning probe microscope as the electron beam source makes this technique comparably accessible, opening the way to widespread fabrication of nanopores. Since the shape of the nanopores is critically important for their performance, in this work we focus on its analysis and study the dependence of the nanopore shape on the electron beam acceleration voltage. We show that the nanopore adopts a funnel-like shape, with a central pore penetrating the entire membrane, surrounded by an extended shallow-etched region at the top of the membrane. While the internal nanopore size was found to depend on the electron acceleration voltage, the nanopore edges extended beyond the primary electron beam spot size due to long-range effects, such as radiolysis and diffusion. Moreover, the size of the peripheral-etched region was found to be less dependent on the acceleration voltage. We also found that chemical etching is the rate-limiting step of the process and is only slightly dependent on the acceleration voltage. Furthermore, due to the chemical etch process the chemical composition of the nanopore rims was found to maintain the bulk membrane composition.

  10. Effects of electrons on the shape of nanopores prepared by focused electron beam induced etching

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liebes, Yael; Ashkenasy, Nurit [Department of Materials Engineering, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, PO Box 653 Beer-Sheva (Israel); Hadad, Binyamin, E-mail: nurita@bgu.ac.il [The Ilze Kaz Institute for Nanoscale Science and Technology, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, PO Box 653 Beer-Sheva (Israel)

    2011-07-15

    The fabrication of nanometric pores with controlled size is important for applications such as single molecule detection. We have recently suggested the use of focused electron beam induced etching (FEBIE) for the preparation of such nanopores in silicon nitride membranes. The use of a scanning probe microscope as the electron beam source makes this technique comparably accessible, opening the way to widespread fabrication of nanopores. Since the shape of the nanopores is critically important for their performance, in this work we focus on its analysis and study the dependence of the nanopore shape on the electron beam acceleration voltage. We show that the nanopore adopts a funnel-like shape, with a central pore penetrating the entire membrane, surrounded by an extended shallow-etched region at the top of the membrane. While the internal nanopore size was found to depend on the electron acceleration voltage, the nanopore edges extended beyond the primary electron beam spot size due to long-range effects, such as radiolysis and diffusion. Moreover, the size of the peripheral-etched region was found to be less dependent on the acceleration voltage. We also found that chemical etching is the rate-limiting step of the process and is only slightly dependent on the acceleration voltage. Furthermore, due to the chemical etch process the chemical composition of the nanopore rims was found to maintain the bulk membrane composition.

  11. Nanoporous AAO: A platform for regular heterogeneous nanostructures and energy storage devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Israel

    Nanoporous anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) has vast implications as a tool for nanoscience research and as a nanostructure in which nanoscale devices can be fabricated because of its regular and ordered nanopores. Self-assembly plays a critical role in pore ordering, causing nanopores to grow parallel with one another in high density. The mild electrochemical conditions in which porous AAO grows along with its relatively cheap starting materials makes this nanomaterial a cost effective alternative to advanced photolithography techniques for forming high surface area nanostructures over large areas. In this research, atomic layer deposition (ALD) was used to deposit conformal films within in nanoporous AAO with hopes to (1) develop methodologies to characterize ALD depositions within its high aspect ratio nanopores and (2) to better understand how to use nanoporous AAO templates as a scaffold for energy devices, specifically Metal-Insulator-Metal (MIM) capacitors. Using the nanotube template synthesis method, ALD films were deposited onto nanoporous AAO, later removing the films deposited within the templates nanopores for characterization in TEM. This nanotube metrology characterization involves first obtaining images of full length ALD-AAO nanotubes, and then measuring wall thickness as a function of depth within the nanopore. MIM nanocapacitors were also constructed in vertical AAO nanopores by deposition of multilayer ALD films. MIM stacks were patterned into micro-scale capacitors for electrical characterization.

  12. Instantaneous translocation statuses on the fluctuation of ionic current for DNA through graphene nanopore

    CERN Document Server

    Lv, Wenping

    2013-01-01

    Graphene nanopore has the ultra-high DNA sequencing sensitivity for the atomic thickness and excellent electronic properties. Extracting the sequence information of DNA from the blocked ionic current is the crucial step for the ionic current based sequencing technology on nanopores. In this letter, the investigation of the effect of measurement induced noise of ionic current as well as the instantaneous translocation statuses from the fluctuation of ionic current signals for DNA through a graphene nanopore was carried out based on molecular dynamics simulations. We found that the molecular thermal noise of ionic current in a graphene nanopore was related with the time interval of measurement, and the tiny conformational and dynamical variations of DNA could be revealed from the fluctuation of the denoised ionic current through a graphene nanopore. Additionally, the neighborhood effect of ionic current blockage for DNA near a graphene nanopore (within 1.5 nm) was observed. These findings suggest that the ionic...

  13. Predicting hydrogen and methane adsorption in carbon nanopores for energy storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ihm, Yungok; Morris, James; Cooper, Valentino; Morris Lab, U. tennessee Collaboration; Advanced material Group, ORNL Collaboration

    2013-03-01

    There are increasing demands for alternate fuels for transportation, which requires safe, high energy density, lightweight storage materials. Experimental measurements and theoretical predictions show relatively low hydrogen storage capacities in various porous materials, limiting hydrogen as a viable alternative for automobiles. In this work, we use a continuum model based on van der Waals density functional (vdW-DF) calculations to elucidate the role that long-range interactions play in the hydrogen adsorption properties of model slit nanopores in carbon. The proper treatment of long-range interactions gives an optimal pore size for hydrogen storage of 8-9 Å (larger than previously predicted). Remarkably, we find a peak hydrogen density close to that of liquid H2 at ambient temperatures, in agreement with recent experimental results on pore-size dependent adsorption in nanoporous carbon. We then show that such nanopores would be better suited to storing methane, possibly providing an alternative to fill the gap between the capacity required by DOE goals and that attainable with current hydrogen storage technology. Research supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Basic Energy Sciences, Materials Sciences and Engineering Division.

  14. Imaging Systems for Size Measurements of Debrisat Fragments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiotani, B.; Scruggs, T.; Toledo, R.; Fitz-Coy, N.; Liou, J. C.; Sorge, M.; Huynh, T.; Opiela, J.; Krisko, P.; Cowardin, H.

    2017-01-01

    The overall objective of the DebriSat project is to provide data to update existing standard spacecraft breakup models. One of the key sets of parameters used in these models is the physical dimensions of the fragments (i.e., length, average-cross sectional area, and volume). For the DebriSat project, only fragments with at least one dimension greater than 2 mm are collected and processed. Additionally, a significant portion of the fragments recovered from the impact test are needle-like and/or flat plate-like fragments where their heights are almost negligible in comparison to their other dimensions. As a result, two fragment size categories were defined: 2D objects and 3D objects. While measurement systems are commercially available, factors such as measurement rates, system adaptability, size characterization limitations and equipment costs presented significant challenges to the project and a decision was made to develop our own size characterization systems. The size characterization systems consist of two automated image systems, one referred to as the 3D imaging system and the other as the 2D imaging system. Which imaging system to use depends on the classification of the fragment being measured. Both imaging systems utilize point-and-shoot cameras for object image acquisition and create representative point clouds of the fragments. The 3D imaging system utilizes a space-carving algorithm to generate a 3D point cloud, while the 2D imaging system utilizes an edge detection algorithm to generate a 2D point cloud. From the point clouds, the three largest orthogonal dimensions are determined using a convex hull algorithm. For 3D objects, in addition to the three largest orthogonal dimensions, the volume is computed via an alpha-shape algorithm applied to the point clouds. The average cross-sectional area is also computed for 3D objects. Both imaging systems have automated size measurements (image acquisition and image processing) driven by the need to quickly

  15. Use of nanoporous columnar thin film in the wafer-level packaging of MEMS devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Byung-Kee; Choi, Dong-Hoon; Yoon, Jun-Bo

    2010-04-01

    This paper presents a new packaging technology that uses a nanoporous columnar thin film to seal microelectromechanical system (MEMS) devices at the wafer level. In the proposed packaging process, the processing temperature is 350 °C. The process is relatively inexpensive compared to wafer level packaging processes, because the wafer-bonding step is eliminated and the die size is shrunk. In the suggested approach, a sputtered columnar thin film at room temperature forms vertical nanopores as etch holes, and an air cavity is formed by the removal of a sacrificial layer through the nanopores in the columnar membrane. Subsequent hermetic vacuum packaging of the cavity is achieved by depositing thin films over the membrane under low pressure. The hermeticity of the packaging was verified by using an optical surface morphology microscope to measure the deflection change of the sealing membrane before and after breaking of the vacuum through an interconnected membrane. The long-term hermeticity was monitored by measuring the maximum central deflection of the PECVD sealing layer over a period of 170 days. The precise pressure (0.7 Torr) and short-term (30 days) pressure change inside the cavity were measured by encapsulated Ni Pirani gauges, representing packaged freestanding MEMS devices.

  16. Ion selectivity of graphene nanopores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rollings, Ryan C.; Kuan, Aaron T.; Golovchenko, Jene A.

    2016-04-01

    As population growth continues to outpace development of water infrastructure in many countries, desalination (the removal of salts from seawater) at high energy efficiency will likely become a vital source of fresh water. Due to its atomic thinness combined with its mechanical strength, porous graphene may be particularly well-suited for electrodialysis desalination, in which ions are removed under an electric field via ion-selective pores. Here, we show that single graphene nanopores preferentially permit the passage of K+ cations over Cl- anions with selectivity ratios of over 100 and conduct monovalent cations up to 5 times more rapidly than divalent cations. Surprisingly, the observed K+/Cl- selectivity persists in pores even as large as about 20 nm in diameter, suggesting that high throughput, highly selective graphene electrodialysis membranes can be fabricated without the need for subnanometer control over pore size.

  17. Biomimetic solution against dewetting in a highly hydrophobic nanopore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picaud, Fabien; Paris, Guillaume; Gharbi, Tijani; Balme, Sébastien; Lepoitevin, Mathilde; Tangaraj, Vidhyadevi; Bechelany, Mikhael; Janot, Jean Marc; Balanzat, Emmanuel; Henn, François

    2016-06-14

    A water molecule is the foundation of life and is the primary compound in every living system. While many of its properties are understood in a bulk solvent, its behavior in a small hydrophobic nanopore still raises fundamental questions. For instance, a wetting/dewetting transition in a hydrophobic solid-state or a polymer nanopore occurs stochastically and can only be prevented by external physical stimuli. Controlling these transitions would be a primary requirement to improve many applications. Some biological channels, such as gramicidin A (gA) proteins, show a high rate of water and ion diffusion in their central subnanochannel while their external surface is highly hydrophobic. The diameter of this channel is significantly smaller than the inner size of the lowest artificial nanopore in which water drying occurs (i.e. 1.4 nm). In this paper, we propose an innovative idea to generate nanopore wetting as a result of which the application of an external field is no longer required. In a nanopore, the drying or wetting of the inner walls occurs randomly (in experiments and in simulations). However, we have shown how the confinement of gA, in a dried hydrophobic nanopore, rapidly generates a stable wetting of the latter. We believe that this simple idea, based on biomimetism, could represent a real breakthrough that could help to improve and develop new nanoscale applications.

  18. Changes in morphology and ionic transport induced by ALD SiO₂ coating of nanoporous alumina membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, Virginia; Vega, Víctor; García, Javier; Zierold, Robert; Nielsch, Kornelius; Prida, Víctor M; Hernando, Blanca; Benavente, Juana

    2013-05-01

    Nanoporous anodic alumina membranes (NPAMs) were produced by the two-step anodization method in sulphuric, oxalic and phosphoric acidic electrolytes displaying a hexagonally ordered spatial arrangement of pores with well controlled nanopore size distribution and low porosity. Some selected NPAMs were further modified by conformal coating their surface and inner pore walls with a thin layer of SiO2 by means of atomic layer deposition (ALD), which reduces both the pore radii and porosity but it also seems to affect to the electric fixed charge on the membranes surface. A comparative study about the influence of silica modification of NPAMs surfaces on the ionic transport through the nanoporous membranes has been performed by measuring membrane potentials and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy with NaCl solutions. According to these results, a direct correlation between the membrane effective fixed charge and the NaCl diffusion coefficient can be established. The coating with a SiO2 thin layer causes a reduction of 75% in the positive effective fixed charge of the NPAMs independently of their pore radii and the increase in counterion transport (cation transport number and diffusion coefficient) even through constrained nanopores, which can be of interest in several applications (microfluidics, drug delivery, nanofilter devices, etc.). Moreover, slight changes in the membrane/solution interface due to the SiO2 cover layer are also indicated.

  19. Bivalent ion transport through graphene/PET nanopore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Huijun; Cheng, Yaxiong; Zeng, Jian; Mo, Dan; Duan, Jinglai; Liu, Jiande; Zhai, Pengfei; Sun, Youmei; Liu, Jie

    2016-05-01

    The PET suspended single graphene nanopore (G/PET) was produced by heavy ion irradiation and asymmetric chemical etching. The solutions of NiSO4, NiCl2, CuSO4 and CuCl2 with different concentration were adopted to study the transport properties of bivalent ion in single G/PET nanopore by measuring the I-V curves. The perfect "diode effect" and excellent rectification effect of G/PET nanopore were observed, and the huge rectification ratio up to 43.3 was obtained in NiSO4 solution. The great solution selectivity and ion current magnification effect of graphene/PET nanopore were also confirmed in our study.

  20. Voltage-controlled metal binding on polyelectrolyte-functionalized nanopores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Actis, Paolo; Vilozny, Boaz; Seger, R Adam; Li, Xiang; Jejelowo, Olufisayo; Rinaudo, Marguerite; Pourmand, Nader

    2011-05-17

    Most of the research in the field of nanopore-based platforms is focused on monitoring ion currents and forces as individual molecules translocate through the nanopore. Molecular gating, however, can occur when target analytes interact with receptors appended to the nanopore surface. Here we show that a solid state nanopore functionalized with polyelectrolytes can reversibly bind metal ions, resulting in a reversible, real-time signal that is concentration dependent. Functionalization of the sensor is based on electrostatic interactions, requires no covalent bond formation, and can be monitored in real time. Furthermore, we demonstrate how the applied voltage can be employed to tune the binding properties of the sensor. The sensor has wide-ranging applications and, its simplest incarnation can be used to study binding thermodynamics using purely electrical measurements with no need for labeling.

  1. Nanopore sensors for DNA analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Solovyeva, Vita; Venkatesan, B.M.; Shim, Jeong

    2012-01-01

    Solid-state nanopore sensors are promising devices for single DNA molecule detection and sequencing. This paper presents a review of our work on solid-state nanopores performed over the last decade. In particular, here we discuss atomic-layer-deposited (ALD)-based, graphene-based, and functionali......Solid-state nanopore sensors are promising devices for single DNA molecule detection and sequencing. This paper presents a review of our work on solid-state nanopores performed over the last decade. In particular, here we discuss atomic-layer-deposited (ALD)-based, graphene...

  2. Droplet size measurements for spray dryer scale-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thybo, Pia; Hovgaard, Lars; Andersen, Sune Klint; Lindeløv, Jesper Saederup

    2008-01-01

    This study was dedicated to facilitate scale-up in spray drying from an atomization standpoint. The purpose was to investigate differences in operating conditions between a pilot and a production scale nozzle. The intension was to identify the operating ranges in which the two nozzles produced similar droplet size distributions. Furthermore, method optimization and validation were also covered. Externally mixing two-fluid nozzles of similar designs were used in this study. Both nozzles are typically used in commercially available spray dryers, and they have been characterized with respect to droplet size distributions as a function of liquid type, liquid flow rate, atomization gas flow rate, liquid orifice diameter, and atomization gas orifice diameter. All droplet size measurements were carried out by using the Malvern Spraytec with nozzle operating conditions corresponding to typical settings for spray drying. This gave droplets with Sauter Mean Diameters less than 40 microm and typically 5-20 microm. A model previously proposed by Mansour and Chigier was used to correlate the droplet size to the operating parameters. It was possible to make a correlation for water incorporating the droplet sizes for both the pilot scale and the production scale nozzle. However, a single correlation was not able to account properly for the physical properties of the liquid to be atomized. Therefore, the droplet size distributions of ethanol could not be adequately predicted on the basis of the water data. This study has shown that it was possible to scale up from a pilot to production scale nozzle in a systematic fashion. However, a prerequisite was that the nozzles were geometrically similar. When externally mixing two-fluid nozzles are used as atomizers, the results obtained from this study could be a useful guideline for selecting appropriate operating conditions when scaling up the spray-drying process.

  3. Tailoring of nanoporous TiO2 spheres with 100-200 nm sizes for efficient dye-sensitized solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Sora; You, Ji Su; Yang, In Seok; Kang, Paul; Rawal, Sher Bahadur; Sung, Sang Do; Lee, Wan In

    2016-09-01

    Highly porous and monodispersed TiO2 spheres (SPs) with diameters in the range of 100-200 nm, notably smaller than the conventional SPs reported thus far, were selectively controlled, and found to be an outstanding building block for the mesoporous TiO2 layer in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSCs). The prepared TiO2 films employing these SPs are highly transparent, and the fabricated DSCs exhibit significantly enhanced photovoltaic performances. Particularly, the 100 nm-sized TiO2 SP (SP100) provides a photovoltaic conversion efficiency (PCE) of 10.66% with a JSC of 17.98 mA/cm2, VOC of 808 mV, and FF of 0.734, which is higher than the PCE of DSCs with the typical 20 nm-sized TiO2 nanoparticle (NP20) or conventional 250 nm-sized SP (SP250). Transient photoelectron spectroscopic analyses revealed that both the electron diffusion coefficient and electron lifetime of the TiO2 layer increase as the size of the SPs decreases. The tiny TiO2 SPs prepared in this work offer distinct advantages in electron transport as well as dye-soaking and electrolyte diffusion.

  4. Automatic classification and accurate size measurement of blank mask defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhamidipati, Samir; Paninjath, Sankaranarayanan; Pereira, Mark; Buck, Peter

    2015-07-01

    complexity of defects encountered. The variety arises due to factors such as defect nature, size, shape and composition; and the optical phenomena occurring around the defect. This paper focuses on preliminary characterization results, in terms of classification and size estimation, obtained by Calibre MDPAutoClassify tool on a variety of mask blank defects. It primarily highlights the challenges faced in achieving the results with reference to the variety of defects observed on blank mask substrates and the underlying complexities which make accurate defect size measurement an important and challenging task.

  5. Measuring the Sizes of Stars: Fringe Benefits of Interferometry

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Rajaram Nityananda

    2017-07-01

    Stars, other than the Sun, appear to our unaided eyes aspoints of light. Large telescopes show an image whose sizeis dictated by refractive index irregularities in the Earth’s atmosphere.The size of this blurring is much greater than thatof the star, and hence it is difficult to measure the stellar size.Fizeau showed how one might overcome this limitation usingthe two-slit interference technique. It was Michelson whocarried out this programme and made the first direct measurementof the giant star Betelguse in the constellation ofOrion. His value for the angular diameter, 47 milliarcsecondsor 2.6×10−7 radians, was completely confirmed by laterwork following his methods. The key concept introduced was ‘fringe visibility’, which turned out to be very fruitful in thelater development of optics as well as astronomy.

  6. Tokamak dust particle size and surface area measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carmack, W.J.; Smolik, G.R.; Anderl, R.A.; Pawelko, R.J.; Hembree, P.B.

    1998-07-01

    The INEEL has analyzed a variety of dust samples from experimental tokamaks: General Atomics` DII-D, Massachusetts Institute of Technology`s Alcator CMOD, and Princeton`s TFTR. These dust samples were collected and analyzed because of the importance of dust to safety. The dust may contain tritium, be activated, be chemically toxic, and chemically reactive. The INEEL has carried out numerous characterization procedures on the samples yielding information useful both to tokamak designers and to safety researchers. Two different methods were used for particle characterization: optical microscopy (count based) and laser based volumetric diffraction (mass based). Surface area of the dust samples was measured using Brunauer, Emmett, and Teller, BET, a gas adsorption technique. The purpose of this paper is to present the correlation between the particle size measurements and the surface area measurements for tokamak dust.

  7. Surface area and pore size characteristics of nanoporous gold subjected to thermal, mechanical, or surface modification studied using gas adsorption isotherms, cyclic voltammetry, thermogravimetric analysis, and scanning electron microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Yih Horng; Davis, Jason A.; Fujikawa, Kohki; Ganesh, N. Vijaya; Demchenko, Alexei V.

    2012-01-01

    Nitrogen adsorption/desorption isotherms are used to investigate the Brunauer, Emmett, and Teller (BET) surface area and Barrett-Joyner-Halenda (BJH) pore size distribution of physically modified, thermally annealed, and octadecanethiol functionalized np-Au monoliths. We present the full adsorption-desorption isotherms for N2 gas on np-Au, and observe type IV isotherms and type H1 hysteresis loops. The evolution of the np-Au under various thermal annealing treatments was examined using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The images of both the exterior and interior of the thermally annealed np-Au show that the porosity of all free standing np-Au structures decreases as the heat treatment temperature increases. The modification of the np-Au surface with a self-assembled monolayer (SAM) of C18-SH (coverage of 2.94 × 1014 molecules cm−2 based from the decomposition of the C18-SH using thermogravimetric analysis (TGA)), was found to reduce the strength of the interaction of nitrogen gas with the np-Au surface, as reflected by a decrease in the ‘C’ parameter of the BET equation. From cyclic voltammetry studies, we found that the surface area of the np-Au monoliths annealed at elevated temperatures followed the same trend with annealing temperature as found in the BET surface area study and SEM morphology characterization. The study highlights the ability to control free-standing nanoporous gold monoliths with high surface area, and well-defined, tunable pore morphology. PMID:22822294

  8. Measuring coral size-frequency distribution using stereo video technology, a comparison with in situ measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Joseph A; Polunin, Nicholas V C; Field, Stuart N; Wilson, Shaun K

    2015-05-01

    Coral colony size-frequency distribution data offer valuable information about the ecological status of coral reefs. Such data are usually collected by divers in situ, but stereo video is being increasingly used for monitoring benthic marine communities and may be used to collect size information for coral colonies. This study compared the size-frequency distributions of coral colonies obtained by divers measuring colonies 'in situ' with digital video imagery collected using stereo video and later processed using computer software. The size-frequency distributions of the two methods were similar for corymbose colonies, although distributions were different for massive, branching and all colonies combined. The differences are mainly driven by greater abundance of colonies >50 cm and fewer colonies 5 cm and was able to record measurements on 87% of the colonies detected. However, stereo video only detected 57% of marked colonies coral recruits. Estimates of colony size made with the stereo video were smaller than the in situ technique for all growth forms, particularly for massive morphologies. Despite differences in size distributions, community assessments, which incorporated genera, growth forms and size, were similar between the two techniques. Stereo video is suitable for monitoring coral community demographics and provided data similar to in situ measure for corymbose corals, but the ability to accurately measure massive and branching coral morphologies appeared to decline with increasing colony size.

  9. Imparting functionality to biocatalysts via embedding enzymes into nanoporous materials by a de novo approach: size-selective sheltering of catalase in metal-organic framework microcrystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shieh, Fa-Kuen; Wang, Shao-Chun; Yen, Chia-I; Wu, Chang-Cheng; Dutta, Saikat; Chou, Lien-Yang; Morabito, Joseph V; Hu, Pan; Hsu, Ming-Hua; Wu, Kevin C-W; Tsung, Chia-Kuang

    2015-04-01

    We develop a new concept to impart new functions to biocatalysts by combining enzymes and metal-organic frameworks (MOFs). The proof-of-concept design is demonstrated by embedding catalase molecules into uniformly sized ZIF-90 crystals via a de novo approach. We have carried out electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, nitrogen sorption, electrophoresis, thermogravimetric analysis, and confocal microscopy to confirm that the ~10 nm catalase molecules are embedded in 2 μm single-crystalline ZIF-90 crystals with ~5 wt % loading. Because catalase is immobilized and sheltered by the ZIF-90 crystals, the composites show activity in hydrogen peroxide degradation even in the presence of protease proteinase K.

  10. Measurement of non-volatile particle number size distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gkatzelis, G. I.; Papanastasiou, D. K.; Florou, K.; Kaltsonoudis, C.; Louvaris, E.; Pandis, S. N.

    2015-06-01

    An experimental methodology was developed to measure the non-volatile particle number concentration using a thermodenuder (TD). The TD was coupled with a high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer, measuring the chemical composition and mass size distribution of the submicrometer aerosol and a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS) that provided the number size distribution of the aerosol in the range from 10 to 500 nm. The method was evaluated with a set of smog chamber experiments and achieved almost complete evaporation (> 98 %) of secondary organic as well as freshly nucleated particles, using a TD temperature of 400 °C and a centerline residence time of 15 s. This experimental approach was applied in a winter field campaign in Athens and provided a direct measurement of number concentration and size distribution for particles emitted from major pollution sources. During periods in which the contribution of biomass burning sources was dominant, more than 80 % of particle number concentration remained after passing through the thermodenuder, suggesting that nearly all biomass burning particles had a non-volatile core. These remaining particles consisted mostly of black carbon (60 % mass contribution) and organic aerosol, OA (40 %). Organics that had not evaporated through the TD were mostly biomass burning OA (BBOA) and oxygenated OA (OOA) as determined from AMS source apportionment analysis. For periods during which traffic contribution was dominant 50-60 % of the particles had a non-volatile core while the rest evaporated at 400 °C. The remaining particle mass consisted mostly of black carbon (BC) with an 80 % contribution, while OA was responsible for another 15-20 %. Organics were mostly hydrocarbon-like OA (HOA) and OOA. These results suggest that even at 400 °C some fraction of the OA does not evaporate from particles emitted from common combustion processes, such as biomass burning and car engines, indicating that a fraction of this type

  11. Impedance nanopore biosensor: influence of pore dimensions on biosensing performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kant, Krishna; Yu, Jingxian; Priest, Craig; Shapter, Joe G; Losic, Dusan

    2014-03-07

    Knowledge about electrochemical and electrical properties of nanopore structures and the influence of pore dimensions on these properties is important for the development of nanopore biosensing devices. The aim of this study was to explore the influence of nanopore dimensions (diameter and length) on biosensing performance using non-faradic electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). Nanoporous alumina membranes (NPAMs) prepared by self-ordered electrochemical anodization of aluminium were used as model nanopore sensing platforms. NPAMs with different pore diameters (25-65 nm) and lengths (4-18 μm) were prepared and the internal pore surface chemistry was modified by covalently attaching streptavidin and biotin. The performance of this antibody nanopore biosensing platform was evaluated using various concentrations of biotin as a model analyte. EIS measurements of pore resistivity and conductivity were carried out for pores with different diameters and lengths. The results showed that smaller pore dimensions of 25 nm and pore lengths up to 10 μm provide better biosensing performance.

  12. Transport behavior of water molecules through two-dimensional nanopores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Chongqin; Li, Hui; Meng, Sheng, E-mail: smeng@iphy.ac.cn [Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics and Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China)

    2014-11-14

    Water transport through a two-dimensional nanoporous membrane has attracted increasing attention in recent years thanks to great demands in water purification and desalination applications. However, few studies have been reported on the microscopic mechanisms of water transport through structured nanopores, especially at the atomistic scale. Here we investigate the microstructure of water flow through two-dimensional model graphene membrane containing a variety of nanopores of different size by using molecular dynamics simulations. Our results clearly indicate that the continuum flow transits to discrete molecular flow patterns with decreasing pore sizes. While for pores with a diameter ≥15 Å water flux exhibits a linear dependence on the pore area, a nonlinear relationship between water flux and pore area has been identified for smaller pores. We attribute this deviation from linear behavior to the presence of discrete water flow, which is strongly influenced by the water-membrane interaction and hydrogen bonding between water molecules.

  13. Transport behavior of water molecules through two-dimensional nanopores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Chongqin; Li, Hui; Meng, Sheng

    2014-11-01

    Water transport through a two-dimensional nanoporous membrane has attracted increasing attention in recent years thanks to great demands in water purification and desalination applications. However, few studies have been reported on the microscopic mechanisms of water transport through structured nanopores, especially at the atomistic scale. Here we investigate the microstructure of water flow through two-dimensional model graphene membrane containing a variety of nanopores of different size by using molecular dynamics simulations. Our results clearly indicate that the continuum flow transits to discrete molecular flow patterns with decreasing pore sizes. While for pores with a diameter ≥15 Å water flux exhibits a linear dependence on the pore area, a nonlinear relationship between water flux and pore area has been identified for smaller pores. We attribute this deviation from linear behavior to the presence of discrete water flow, which is strongly influenced by the water-membrane interaction and hydrogen bonding between water molecules.

  14. On determining the spot size for laser fluence measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farkas, B. [Department of Optics and Quantum Electronics, University of Szeged, P.O. Box 406, H-6701 Szeged (Hungary)]. E-mail: bfarkas@titan.physx.u-szeged.hu; Geretovszky, Zs. [Department of Optics and Quantum Electronics, University of Szeged, P.O. Box 406, H-6701 Szeged (Hungary)

    2006-04-30

    Energy fluence, defined as pulse energy over irradiated area, is a key parameter of pulsed laser processing. Nevertheless, most of the authors using this term routinely do not realize the problems related to the accurate measurement of the spot size. In the present paper we are aiming to approach this problem by ablating crystalline Si wafers with pulses of a commercial KrF excimer laser ({lambda} = 248 nm, {tau} = 15 ns) both in vacuum and at ambient atmosphere. For any pulse energy, the size of the ablated area monotonously increases with increasing number of pulses. The difference in the ablated area could be as high as a factor of three when 2000 consecutive pulses impinge on the surface. The existence and extent of the gradual lowering of multi-pulse ablation threshold queries the applicability of routinely used procedure of dividing the pulse energy with the size of the ablated area exposed into either carbon-paper or a piece of Si with one or a few pulses when determining the fluence. A more quantitative way is proposed allowing comparison of results originating from different laboratories.

  15. Adjusting wheal size measures to correct atopy misclassification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang H

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Hongmei Zhang1,*, Wilfried Karmaus1,*, Jianjun Gan2, Weichao Bao1,*, Yan D Zhao3, Dewi Rahardja3, John W Holloway5, Martha Scott4,5, Syed Hasan Arshad4,51Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, The University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC, USA; 2GlaxoSmithKline, Research Triangle Park, NC, USA; 3Department of Clinical Science and Simmons Cancer Center, UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX, USA; 4The David Hide Asthma and Allergy Research Center, St Mary’s Hospital, Newport, Isle of Wight, UK; 5School of Medicine, University of Southampton, Southampton, UK *These authors contributed equally to this articlePurpose: Skin prick testing (SPT is fundamental to the practice of clinical allergy identifying relevant allergens and predicting the clinical expression of disease. Wheal sizes on SPT are used to identify atopic cases, and the cut-off value for a positive test is commonly set at 3 mm. However, the measured wheal sizes do not solely reflect the magnitude of skin reaction to allergens, but also skin reactivity (reflected in the size of histamine reaction and other random or non-random factors. We sought to estimate wheal sizes exclusively due to skin response to allergens and propose gender-specific cutoff points of atopy.Methods: We developed a Bayesian method to adjust observed wheal sizes by excluding histamine and other factor effects, based on which revised cutoff points are proposed for males and females, respectively. The method is then applied to and intensively evaluated using a study population aged 18, at a location on the Isle of Wight in the United Kingdom. To evaluate the proposed approach, two sample t-tests for population means and proportion tests are applied.Results: Four common aeroallergens, house dust mite (HDM, grass pollen, dog dander, and alternaria are considered in the study. Based on 3 mm cutoff, males tend to be more atopic than females (P-values are between 0.00087 and 0.062. After applying the

  16. Direct observation of DNA knots using a solid-state nanopore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plesa, Calin; Verschueren, Daniel; Pud, Sergii; van der Torre, Jaco; Ruitenberg, Justus W.; Witteveen, Menno J.; Jonsson, Magnus P.; Grosberg, Alexander Y.; Rabin, Yitzhak; Dekker, Cees

    2016-12-01

    Long DNA molecules can self-entangle into knots. Experimental techniques for observing such DNA knots (primarily gel electrophoresis) are limited to bulk methods and circular molecules below 10 kilobase pairs in length. Here, we show that solid-state nanopores can be used to directly observe individual knots in both linear and circular single DNA molecules of arbitrary length. The DNA knots are observed as short spikes in the nanopore current traces of the traversing DNA molecules and their detection is dependent on a sufficiently high measurement resolution, which can be achieved using high-concentration LiCl buffers. We study the percentage of molecules with knots for DNA molecules of up to 166 kilobase pairs in length and find that the knotting occurrence rises with the length of the DNA molecule, consistent with a constant knotting probability per unit length. Our experimental data compare favourably with previous simulation-based predictions for long polymers. From the translocation time of the knot through the nanopore, we estimate that the majority of the DNA knots are tight, with remarkably small sizes below 100 nm. In the case of linear molecules, we also observe that knots are able to slide out on application of high driving forces (voltage).

  17. Capture of formaldehyde by adsorption on nanoporous materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellat, Jean-Pierre; Bezverkhyy, Igor; Weber, Guy; Royer, Sébastien; Averlant, Remy; Giraudon, Jean-Marc; Lamonier, Jean-François

    2015-12-30

    The aim of this work is to assess the capability of a series of nanoporous materials to capture gaseous formaldehyde by adsorption in order to develop air treatment process and gas detection in workspaces or housings. Adsorption-desorption isotherms have been accurately measured at room temperature by TGA under very low pressure (pmesoporous silica (SBA15), activated carbon (AC NORIT RB3) and metal organic framework (MOF, Ga-MIL-53), exhibiting a wide range of pore sizes and surface properties. Results reveal that the NaX, NaY and CuX faujasite (FAU) zeolites are materials which show strong adsorption capacity and high affinity toward formaldehyde. In addition, these materials can be completely regenerated by heating at 200°C under vacuum. These cationic zeolites are therefore promising candidates as adsorbents for the design of air depollution process or gas sensing applications.

  18. Airborne Measurements of Aerosol Size Distributions During PACDEX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, D. C.; Gandrud, B.; Campos, T.; Kok, G.; Stith, J.

    2007-12-01

    The Pacific Dust Experiment (PACDEX) is an airborne project that attempts to characterize the indirect aerosol effect by tracing plumes of dust and pollution across the Pacific Ocean. This project occurred during April-May 2007 and used the NSF/NCAR HIAPER research aircraft. When a period of strong generation of dust particles and pollution was detected by ground-based and satellite sensors, then the aircraft was launched from Colorado to Alaska, Hawaii, and Japan. Its mission was to intercept and track these plumes from Asia, across the Pacific Ocean, and ultimately to the edges of North America. For more description, see the abstract by Stith and Ramanathan (this conference) and other companion papers on PACDEX. The HIAPER aircraft carried a wide variety of sensors for measuring aerosols, cloud particles, trace gases, and radiation. Sampling was made in several weather regimes, including clean "background" air, dust and pollution plumes, and regions with cloud systems. Altitude ranges extended from 100 m above the ocean to 13.4 km. This paper reports on aerosol measurements made with a new Ultra-High Sensitivity Aerosol Spectrometer (UHSAS), a Radial Differential Mobility Analyzer (RDMA), a water-based CN counter, and a Cloud Droplet Probe (CDP). These cover the size range 10 nm to 10 um diameter. In clear air, dust was detected with the UHSAS and CDP. Polluted air was identified with high concentrations of carbon monoxide, ozone, and CN. Aerosol size distributions will be presented, along with data to define the context of weather regimes.

  19. Water adsorption in ion-bearing nanopores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakatos, G.; Patey, G. N.

    2007-01-01

    Grand canonical Monte Carlo simulations are used to examine the adsorption of water into cylindrical nanopores containing single ions. The isotherms for water adsorbing into nanopores with radii of 0.44, 0.54, 0.64, and 0.74nm and containing Na+, K+, Ca2+, Cl-, or F- at 298K are computed. In all cases the nanopores are found to fill at reservoir chemical potentials below the chemical potential of saturated water vapor at 298K. The threshold chemical potential is found to be sensitive to both the size of the channel and the ion species, with the anion-bearing pores filling at lower chemical potentials. Additionally, the filling threshold chemical potential is found to decrease as the radius of the pores is decreased. Pores with K+ and Cl- are compared, and the Cl- pores are found to exhibit higher water densities in the filled states and a more energetically favorable water structure while yielding lower per particle entropies. Sample simulation configurations are also examined and indicate that at low chemical potentials, the adsorbed water forms a cluster around the ion. Finally, the influence of the choice of water model on the adsorption isotherms is examined.

  20. Crosstalk between adjacent nanopores in a solid-state membrane array for multi-analyte high-throughput biomolecule detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raza, Muhammad Usman; Saleem, Sajid; Ali, Waqas; Iqbal, Samir M.

    2016-08-01

    Single nanopores are used to detect a variety of biological molecules. The modulations in ionic current under applied bias across the nanopore contain important information about translocating species, thus providing single analyte detection. These systems are, however, challenged in practical situations where multiple analytes have to be detected at high throughput. This paper presents the analysis of a multi-nanopore system that can be used for the detection of analytes with high throughput. As a scalable model, two nanopores were simulated in a single solid-state membrane. The interactions of the electric fields at the mouths of the individual nanopores were analyzed. The data elucidated the electrostatic properties of the nanopores from a single membrane and provided a framework to calculate the -3 dB distance, akin to the Debye length, from one nanopore to the other. This distance was the minimum distance between the adjacent nanopores such that their individual electric fields did not significantly interact with one another. The results can help in the optimal experimental design to construct solid-state nanopore arrays for any given nanopore size and applied bias.

  1. Detection of a single enzyme molecule based on a solid-state nanopore sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, ShengWei; Gu, DeJian; Liu, Hang; Liu, QuanJun

    2016-04-01

    The nanopore sensor as a high-throughput and low-cost technology can detect a single molecule in a solution. In the present study, relatively large silicon nitride (Si3N4) nanopores with diameters of ∼28 and ∼88 nm were fabricated successfully using a focused Ga ion beam. We have used solid-state nanopores with various sizes to detect the single horseradish peroxidase (HRP) molecule and for the first time analyzed single HRP molecular translocation events. In addition, a real-time monitored single enzyme molecular biochemical reaction and a translocation of the product of enzyme catalysis substrates were investigated by using a Si3N4 nanopore. Our nanopore system showed a high sensitivity in detecting single enzyme molecules and a real-time monitored single enzyme molecular biochemical reaction. This method could also be significant for studying gene expression or enzyme dynamics at the single-molecule level.

  2. Visual Measurements of Droplet Size in Gas Liquid Annular Flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fore, L.B.; Ibrahim, B.B.; Beus, S.G.

    2000-07-01

    Drop size distributions have been measured for nitrogen-water annular flow in a 9.67 mm hydraulic diameter duct, at system pressures of 3.4 and 17 atm and a temperature of 38 C. These new data extend the range of conditions represented by existing data in the open literature, primarily through an increase in system pressure. Since most existing correlations were developed from data obtained at lower pressures, it should be expected that the higher-pressure data presented in this paper would not necessarily follow those correlations. The correlation of Tatterson, et al. (1977) does not predict the new data very well, while the correlation of Kataoka, et al. (1983) only predicts those data taken at the lower pressure of 3.4 atm. However, the maximum drop size correlation of Kocamustafaogullari, et al. (1994) does predict the current data to a reasonable approximation. Similarly, their correlation for the Sauter mean diameter can predict the new data, provided the coefficient in the equation is adjusted.

  3. Impedance spectroscopy of highly ordered nano-porous electrodes based on Au-AAO (anodic aluminum oxide) structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Jaehwan; Cho, Sungbo; Min, Junhong

    2013-11-01

    Electrochemical measurements using the microelectrodes are increasingly utilized for the label-free detection of the small amount of biological materials such as DNA, protein, and cells. However, the interfacial electrode impedance increases and may hinder the detection of weak signals as the size of electrode decreases. To enhance the measurement sensitivity while reducing the electrode size, in this study, microelectrodes employing a nanoporous structure were fabricated and characterized by using electrical impedance spectroscopy. We made the highly ordered honeycomb nanoporous structure of Anodic Aluminum Oxide (AAO) by electrochemical anodizing and formed Au layer on the surface of AAO (Au/AAO) by electroless Au plating method. The electrical characteristics of the fabricated Au/AAO electrodes were evaluated by using de Levie's model derived for the pore electrodes. As a result, the interfacial electrode impedance of the fabricated Au/AAO electrodes was 2-3 order lower than the value of the planar electrodes at frequencies below 1 kHz. It implies this nanoporous electrode could be directly applied to label free detection of biomaterials.

  4. Highly efficient shrinkage of inverted-pyramid silicon nanopores by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yifan; Deng, Tao; Chen, Qi; Liang, Feng; Liu, Zewen

    2016-06-01

    Solid-state nanopore-based analysis systems are currently one of the most attractive and promising platforms in sensing fields. This work presents a highly efficient method to shrink inverted-pyramid silicon nanopores using plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) technology by the deposition of SiN x onto the surface of the nanopore. The contraction of the inverted-pyramid silicon nanopores when subjected to the PECVD process has been modeled and carefully analyzed, and the modeling data are in good agreement with the experimental results within a specific PECVD shrinkage period (˜0-600 s). Silicon nanopores within a 50-400 nm size range contract to sub-10 nm dimensions. Additionally, the inner structure of the nanopores after the PECVD process has been analyzed by focused ion beam cutting process. The results show an inner structure morphology change from inverted-pyramid to hourglass, which may enhance the spatial resolution of sensing devices.

  5. Highly efficient shrinkage of inverted-pyramid silicon nanopores by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yifan; Deng, Tao; Chen, Qi; Liang, Feng; Liu, Zewen

    2016-06-24

    Solid-state nanopore-based analysis systems are currently one of the most attractive and promising platforms in sensing fields. This work presents a highly efficient method to shrink inverted-pyramid silicon nanopores using plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) technology by the deposition of SiN x onto the surface of the nanopore. The contraction of the inverted-pyramid silicon nanopores when subjected to the PECVD process has been modeled and carefully analyzed, and the modeling data are in good agreement with the experimental results within a specific PECVD shrinkage period (∼0-600 s). Silicon nanopores within a 50-400 nm size range contract to sub-10 nm dimensions. Additionally, the inner structure of the nanopores after the PECVD process has been analyzed by focused ion beam cutting process. The results show an inner structure morphology change from inverted-pyramid to hourglass, which may enhance the spatial resolution of sensing devices.

  6. Ion selection of charge-modified large nanopores in a graphene sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Shijun; Xue, Jianming; Kang, Wei

    2013-09-01

    Water desalination becomes an increasingly important approach for clean water supply to meet the rapidly growing demand of population boost, industrialization, and urbanization. The main challenge in current desalination technologies lies in the reduction of energy consumption and economic costs. Here, we propose to use charged nanopores drilled in a graphene sheet as ion exchange membranes to promote the efficiency and capacity of desalination systems. Using molecular dynamics simulations, we investigate the selective ion transport behavior of electric-field-driven KCl electrolyte solution through charge modified graphene nanopores. Our results reveal that the presence of negative charges at the edge of graphene nanopore can remarkably impede the passage of Cl- while enhance the transport of K+, which is an indication of ion selectivity for electrolytes. We further demonstrate that this selectivity is dependent on the pore size and total charge number assigned at the nanopore edge. By adjusting the nanopore diameter and electric charge on the graphene nanopore, a nearly complete rejection of Cl- can be realized. The electrical resistance of nanoporous graphene, which is a key parameter to evaluate the performance of ion exchange membranes, is found two orders of magnitude lower than commercially used membranes. Our results thus suggest that graphene nanopores are promising candidates to be used in electrodialysis technology for water desalinations with a high permselectivity.

  7. Preparation, structural and electrical properties of zinc oxide grown on silicon nanoporous pillar array

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Polycrystalline thick film of zinc oxide (ZnO) is grown on a unique silicon substrate with a hierarchical structure,silicon nanoporous pillar array (Si-NPA), by using a vapour phase transport method. It is found that as-grown ZnO film is composed of closely packed ZnO crystallites with an average size of ~10 μm. The film resistivity of ZnO/Siheterostructure is measured. Theoretical analysis shows that the carrier transport across ZnO/Si-NPA heterojunction is dominated by two mechanisms, i.e. a thermionic process at high voltages and a quantum tunnelling process at low voltages.

  8. Ion current rectification, limiting and overlimiting conductances in nanopores.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liesbeth van Oeffelen

    Full Text Available Previous reports on Poisson-Nernst-Planck (PNP simulations of solid-state nanopores have focused on steady state behaviour under simplified boundary conditions. These are Neumann boundary conditions for the voltage at the pore walls, and in some cases also Donnan equilibrium boundary conditions for concentrations and voltages at both entrances of the nanopore. In this paper, we report time-dependent and steady state PNP simulations under less restrictive boundary conditions, including Neumann boundary conditions applied throughout the membrane relatively far away from the nanopore. We simulated ion currents through cylindrical and conical nanopores with several surface charge configurations, studying the spatial and temporal dependence of the currents contributed by each ion species. This revealed that, due to slow co-diffusion of oppositely charged ions, steady state is generally not reached in simulations or in practice. Furthermore, it is shown that ion concentration polarization is responsible for the observed limiting conductances and ion current rectification in nanopores with asymmetric surface charges or shapes. Hence, after more than a decade of collective research attempting to understand the nature of ion current rectification in solid-state nanopores, a relatively intuitive model is retrieved. Moreover, we measured and simulated current-voltage characteristics of rectifying silicon nitride nanopores presenting overlimiting conductances. The similarity between measurement and simulation shows that overlimiting conductances can result from the increased conductance of the electric double-layer at the membrane surface at the depletion side due to voltage-induced polarization charges. The MATLAB source code of the simulation software is available via the website http://micr.vub.ac.be.

  9. Ion current rectification, limiting and overlimiting conductances in nanopores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Oeffelen, Liesbeth; Van Roy, Willem; Idrissi, Hosni; Charlier, Daniel; Lagae, Liesbet; Borghs, Gustaaf

    2015-01-01

    Previous reports on Poisson-Nernst-Planck (PNP) simulations of solid-state nanopores have focused on steady state behaviour under simplified boundary conditions. These are Neumann boundary conditions for the voltage at the pore walls, and in some cases also Donnan equilibrium boundary conditions for concentrations and voltages at both entrances of the nanopore. In this paper, we report time-dependent and steady state PNP simulations under less restrictive boundary conditions, including Neumann boundary conditions applied throughout the membrane relatively far away from the nanopore. We simulated ion currents through cylindrical and conical nanopores with several surface charge configurations, studying the spatial and temporal dependence of the currents contributed by each ion species. This revealed that, due to slow co-diffusion of oppositely charged ions, steady state is generally not reached in simulations or in practice. Furthermore, it is shown that ion concentration polarization is responsible for the observed limiting conductances and ion current rectification in nanopores with asymmetric surface charges or shapes. Hence, after more than a decade of collective research attempting to understand the nature of ion current rectification in solid-state nanopores, a relatively intuitive model is retrieved. Moreover, we measured and simulated current-voltage characteristics of rectifying silicon nitride nanopores presenting overlimiting conductances. The similarity between measurement and simulation shows that overlimiting conductances can result from the increased conductance of the electric double-layer at the membrane surface at the depletion side due to voltage-induced polarization charges. The MATLAB source code of the simulation software is available via the website http://micr.vub.ac.be.

  10. Understanding the shape of the Earth and measuring its size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baltatzis, Evangelos; Galanaki, Angeliki

    2016-04-01

    Most elementary students have problems and misconceptions regarding the shape of the Earth. Teachers often contribute to this confusion telling the students that the Earth is almost spherical, but not explaining to them, how the Earth can be spherical while it appears. It would be helpful for students to understand how humanity came with the idea of the spherical Earth (to be precise the Earth is ellipsoid). Historically, most cultures describe the Earth as flat. That changes with the ancient Greek culture. We don't know exactly how the Greeks first understood the spherical shape of the Earth, but some Greek philosophers give some arguments why the Earth must be a sphere. We can discuss these arguments and observations with the students. First, if someone travels in the south, he can see the southern constellations rise higher above the horizon. We can give students pictures of the night sky in southern regions and compare them with observations of ''their'' night sky. Second, in the lunar eclipse we can see the round shadow of the Earth. Third, whenever a ship is on the horizon, his low part is invisible . This is known as "hull-down". Moreover, the low part of mountains is invisible from the sea, due to the curvature of the Earth. It is always better to make these observations in real life but it can also be done via videos and pictures. The realization of the spherical shape of the Earth was sine qua non for the first good measurement of its size. In the second part of the project, following the ancient mathematician Eratosthenes's steps, students can measure the size of the Earth, , find pleasure in doing experimental work and realize how important mathematics is in everyday life. Two sticks, situated a long distance away from each other, can give us approximately the circumference , the radius and the diameter of the Earth. Eratosthenes used geometry combined to the knowledge of ancient Greek culture that the Earth is spherical (360°). He knew the distance

  11. Ultrathin suspended nanopores with surface plasmon resonance fabricated by combined colloidal lithography and film transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junesch, Juliane; Sannomiya, Takumi

    2014-05-14

    Suspended plasmonic nanopores in ultrathin film layers were fabricated through a simple and widely applicable method combining colloidal lithography and thin film transfer, which allows mass production of short-range ordered nanopore arrays on a large scale. By this combined method, mechanically stable and flexible free-standing nanopore membranes with a thickness down to 15-30 nm were produced. The plasmon resonances of the ultrathin plasmonic nanopores fabricated in AlN/Au/AlN trilayer and single layer Au membranes were tuned to lie in the vis-NIR wavelength range by properly designing their dimensions. The optical responses to the refractive index changes were tested and applied to adlayer sensing. The trilayer nanopore membrane showed a unique property to support water only on one side of the membrane, which was confirmed by the resonance shift and comparison with numerical simulation. Pore size reduction down to 10 nm can be achieved through additional material deposition. The filtering function of such pore-size-reduced conical shaped nanofunnels has also been demonstrated. The presented nanopore fabrication method offers new platforms for ultrathin nanopore sensing or filtering devices with controlled pore-size and optical properties. The film transfer technique employed in this work would enable the transformation of any substrate-based nanostructures to free-standing membrane based devices without complicated multiple etching processes.

  12. Single molecule transistor based nanopore for the detection of nicotine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ray, S. J., E-mail: ray.sjr@gmail.com [Institute of Materials Science, Technical University of Darmstadt, Alarich-Weiss-Str. 2, 64287 Darmstadt (Germany)

    2014-12-28

    A nanopore based detection methodology was proposed and investigated for the detection of Nicotine. This technique uses a Single Molecular Transistor working as a nanopore operational in the Coulomb Blockade regime. When the Nicotine molecule is pulled through the nanopore area surrounded by the Source(S), Drain (D), and Gate electrodes, the charge stability diagram can detect the presence of the molecule and is unique for a specific molecular structure. Due to the weak coupling between the different electrodes which is set by the nanopore size, the molecular energy states stay almost unaffected by the electrostatic environment that can be realised from the charge stability diagram. Identification of different orientation and position of the Nicotine molecule within the nanopore area can be made from specific regions of overlap between different charge states on the stability diagram that could be used as an electronic fingerprint for detection. This method could be advantageous and useful to detect the presence of Nicotine in smoke which is usually performed using chemical chromatography techniques.

  13. Structure and adsorption of water in nonuniform cylindrical nanopores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrie, G. M.; Lakatos, G.; Patey, G. N.

    2010-12-01

    Grand canonical Monte Carlo simulations are used to examine the adsorption and structure of water in the interior of cylindrical nanopores in which the axial symmetry is broken either by varying the radius as a function of position along the pore axis or by introducing regions where the characteristic strength of the water-nanopore interaction is reduced. Using the extended simple point charge (SPC/E) model for water, nanopores with a uniform radius of 6.0 Å are found to fill with water at chemical potentials approximately 0.5 kJ/mol higher than the chemical potential of the saturated vapor. The water in these filled pores exists in either a weakly structured fluidlike state or a highly structured uniformly polarized state composed of a series of stacked water clusters with pentagonal cross sections. This highly structured state can be disrupted by creating hydrophobic regions on the surface of the nanopore, and the degree of disruption can be systematically controlled by adjusting the size of the hydrophobic regions. In particular, hydrophobic banded regions with lengths larger than 9.2 Å result in a complete loss of structure and the formation of a liquid-vapor coexistence in the tube interior. Similarly, the introduction of spatial variation in the nanopore radius can produce two condensation transitions at distinct points along the filling isotherm.

  14. Antibacterial hemostatic dressings with nanoporous bioglass containing silver

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hu G

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Gangfeng Hu,1 Luwei Xiao,2 Peijian Tong,2 Dawei Bi,1 Hui Wang,1 Haitao Ma,1 Gang Zhu,1 Hui Liu21The First People’s Hospital of Xiaoshan, Hangzhou, China; 2Zhejiang Traditional Chinese Medical University, Hangzhou, ChinaAbstract: Nanoporous bioglass containing silver (n-BGS was fabricated using the sol-gel method, with cetyltrimethyl ammonium bromide as template. The results showed that n-BGS with nanoporous structure had a surface area of 467 m2/g and a pore size of around 6 nm, and exhibited a significantly higher water absorption rate compared with BGS without nanopores. The n-BGS containing small amounts of silver (Ag had a slight effect on its surface area. The n-BGS containing 0.02 wt% Ag, without cytotoxicity, had a good antibacterial effect on Escherichia coli, and its antibacterial rate reached 99% in 12 hours. The n-BGS’s clotting ability significantly decreased prothrombin time (PT and activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT, indicating n-BGS with a higher surface area could significantly promote blood clotting (by decreasing clotting time compared with BGS without nanopores. Effective hemostasis was achieved in skin injury models, and bleeding time was reduced. It is suggested that n-BGS could be a good dressing, with antibacterial and hemostatic properties, which might shorten wound bleeding time and control hemorrhage.Keywords: antibacterial, bioglass, cytotoxicity, dressing, hemostasis, nanopore, silver

  15. Nanopore Sequencing as a Rapidly Deployable Ebola Outbreak Tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoenen, Thomas; Groseth, Allison; Rosenke, Kyle; Fischer, Robert J; Hoenen, Andreas; Judson, Seth D; Martellaro, Cynthia; Falzarano, Darryl; Marzi, Andrea; Squires, R Burke; Wollenberg, Kurt R; de Wit, Emmie; Prescott, Joseph; Safronetz, David; van Doremalen, Neeltje; Bushmaker, Trenton; Feldmann, Friederike; McNally, Kristin; Bolay, Fatorma K; Fields, Barry; Sealy, Tara; Rayfield, Mark; Nichol, Stuart T; Zoon, Kathryn C; Massaquoi, Moses; Munster, Vincent J; Feldmann, Heinz

    2016-02-01

    Rapid sequencing of RNA/DNA from pathogen samples obtained during disease outbreaks provides critical scientific and public health information. However, challenges exist for exporting samples to laboratories or establishing conventional sequencers in remote outbreak regions. We successfully used a novel, pocket-sized nanopore sequencer at a field diagnostic laboratory in Liberia during the current Ebola virus outbreak.

  16. Nanoporous Pirani sensor based on anodic aluminum oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Gwang-Jae; Kim, Woo Young; Shim, Hyun Bin; Lee, Hee Chul

    2016-09-01

    A nanoporous Pirani sensor based on anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) is proposed, and the quantitative relationship between the performance of the sensor and the porosity of the AAO membrane is characterized with a theoretical model. The proposed Pirani sensor is composed of a metallic resistor on a suspended nanoporous membrane, which simultaneously serves as the sensing area and the supporting structure. The AAO membrane has numerous vertically-tufted nanopores, resulting in a lower measurable pressure limit due to both the increased effective sensing area and the decreased effective thermal loss through the supporting structure. Additionally, the suspended AAO membrane structure, with its outer periphery anchored to the substrate, known as a closed-type design, is demonstrated using nanopores of AAO as an etch hole without a bulk micromachining process used on the substrate. In a CMOS-compatible process, a 200 μm × 200 μm nanoporous Pirani sensor with porosity of 25% was capable of measuring the pressure from 0.1 mTorr to 760 Torr. With adjustment of the porosity of the AAO, the measurable range could be extended toward lower pressures of more than one decade compared to a non-porous membrane with an identical footprint.

  17. Investigation and Characterisation of Resizeable Nanopores in an Elastomeric Membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willmott, Geoff

    2008-03-01

    Experimental and theoretical work relating to the development of resizeable synthetic nanopores will be presented. The nanopores, which are roughly conical, are formed by puncturing a relatively thick (˜250 μm) elastomeric membrane with an STM tip. The aperture can be closed and the size can be dynamically controlled by stretching the elastomer [1]. Use of this technology presents a collection of interesting physical problems, covering topics that include the failure and mechanical properties of the elastomer, flow of ionic current through the aperture and particle sensing using the resistive pulse technique. Synthetic nanopores have potential applications in many fields, but especially relating to nanoscale sensing and diagnostic devices, and replication of ion channels in living cells. [1] S. J. Sowerby, M. F. Broom, G. B. Petersen, Dynamically Resizable Nanometre-Scale Apertures for Molecular Sensing, Sensors and Actuators B: Chemical 123 (1), pp. 325-330 (2007)

  18. Solid-State Nanopore-Based DNA Sequencing Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zewen Liu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The solid-state nanopore-based DNA sequencing technology is becoming more and more attractive for its brand new future in gene detection field. The challenges that need to be addressed are diverse: the effective methods to detect base-specific signatures, the control of the nanopore’s size and surface properties, and the modulation of translocation velocity and behavior of the DNA molecules. Among these challenges, the realization of the high-quality nanopores with the help of modern micro/nanofabrication technologies is a crucial one. In this paper, typical technologies applied in the field of solid-state nanopore-based DNA sequencing have been reviewed.

  19. Theory of Sorption Hysteresis in Nanoporous Solids: II. Molecular condensation

    CERN Document Server

    Bazant, Martin Z

    2011-01-01

    Motivated by the puzzle of sorption hysteresis in Portland cement concrete or cement paste, we develop in Part II of this study a general theory of vapor sorption and desorption from nanoporous solids, which attributes hysteresis to hindered molecular condensation with attractive lateral interactions. The classical mean-field theory of van der Waals is applied to predict the dependence of hysteresis on temperature and pore size, using the regular solution model and gradient energy of Cahn and Hilliard. A simple "hierarchical wetting" model for thin nanopores is developed to describe the case of strong wetting by the first monolayer, followed by condensation of nanodroplets and nanobubbles in the bulk. The model predicts a larger hysteresis critical temperature and enhanced hysteresis for molecular condensation across nanopores at high vapor pressure than within monolayers at low vapor pressure. For heterogeneous pores, the theory predicts sorption/desorption sequences similar to those seen in molecular dynami...

  20. Experimental analysis of particle sizes for PIV measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Overbrüggen, Timo; Klaas, Michael; Soria, Julio; Schröder, Wolfgang

    2016-09-01

    The right choice of seeding particles strongly influences the outcome of a particle-image velocimetry (PIV) measurement. Particles have to scatter enough light to be seen by cameras and follow the flow faithfully. As the flow following behavior depends on the inertia and therefore the size of the particle, smaller particles are desirable. Unfortunately, larger particles possess better light scattering behavior, which is especially important for volumetric PIV measurements. In this paper, the particle response of two exemplary solid particles to an oscillatory air flow created by a piston movement is analyzed and compared to analytic results by Hjelmfelt and Mockros (1966 Appl. Sci. Res. 16 149-61) concerning phase lag and amplitude ratio between particle movement and flow field. To achieve realistic experimental boundary conditions, polydispersed particles are used for the analysis. The analytic results show a strong dependence on the diameter. That is, using the volumetric mean diameter an overestimation of the phase lag of the particles is determined, whereas an underestimation of phase lag is computed for the number mean diameter. Hence, for polydispersed particles a more general analysis than that based on the particle mean diameter is required to determine in detail the particle following behavior.

  1. Nanopore and nanoparticle catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, J M; Raja, R

    2001-01-01

    The design, atomic characterization, performance, and relevance to clean technology of two distinct categories of new nanocatalysts are described and interpreted. Exceptional molecular selectivity and high activity are exhibited by these catalysts. The first category consists of extended, crystallographically ordered inorganic solids possessing nanopores (apertures, cages, and channels), the diameters of which fall in the range of about 0.4 to about 1.5 nm, and the second of discrete bimetallic nanoparticles of diameter 1 to 2 nm, distributed more or less uniformly along the inner walls of mesoporous (ca. 3 to 10 nm diameter) silica supports. Using the principles and practices of solid-state and organometallic chemistry and advanced physico-chemical techniques for in situ and ex situ characterization, a variety of powerful new catalysts has been evolved. Apart from those that, inter alia, simulate the behavior of enzymes in their specificity, shape selectivity, regio-selectivity, and ability to function under ambient conditions, many of these new nanocatalysts are also viable as agents for effecting commercially significant processes in a clean, benign, solvent-free, single-step fashion. In particular, a bifunctional, molecular sieve nanopore catalyst is described that converts cyclohexanone in air and ammonia to its oxime and caprolactam, and a bimetallic nanoparticle catalyst that selectively converts cyclic polyenes into desirable intermediates. Nanocatalysts in the first category are especially effective in facilitating highly selective oxidations in air, and those in the second are well suited to effecting rapid and selective hydrogenations of a range of organic compounds.

  2. Size histograms of gold nanoparticles measured by gravitational sedimentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Colleen M; Goodisman, Jerry

    2014-03-15

    Sedimentation curves of gold nanoparticles in water were obtained by measuring the optical density of a suspension over time. The results are not subject to sampling errors, and refer to the particles in situ. Curves obtained simultaneously at several wave lengths were analyzed together to derive the size histogram of the sedimenting particles. The bins in the histogram were 5 nm wide and centered at diameters 60, 65, …, 110 nm. To get the histogram, we weighted previously calculated solutions to the Mason-Weaver sedimentation-diffusion equation for various particle diameters with absorption/scattering coefficients and size (diameter) abundances {c(j)}, and found the {c(j)} which gave the best fit to all the theoretical sedimentation curves. The effects of changing the number of bins and the wave lengths used were studied. Going to smaller bins would mean determining more parameters and require more wave lengths. The histograms derived from sedimentation agreed quite well in general with the histogram derived from TEM. Differences found for the smallest particle diameters are partly due to statistical fluctuations (TEM found only 1-2 particles out of 103 with these diameters). More important is that the TEM histogram indicates 12% of the particles have diameters of 75±2.5 nm, and the sedimentation histogram shows none. We show that this reflects the difference between the particles in situ, which possess a low-density shell about 1 nm thick, and the bare particles on the TEM stage. Correcting for this makes agreement between the two histograms excellent. Comparing sedimentation-derived with TEM-derived histograms thus shows differences between the particles in situ and on the TEM stage.

  3. Conical nanopore membranes. Preparation and transport properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Naichao; Yu, Shufang; Harrell, C Chad; Martin, Charles R

    2004-04-01

    We have been investigating applications of nanopore membranes in analytical chemistry-specifically in membrane-based bioseparations, in electroanalytical chemistry, and in the development of new approaches to biosensor design. Membranes that have conically shaped pores (as opposed to the more conventional cylindrical shape) may offer some advantages for these applications. We describe here a simple plasma-etch method that converts cylindrical nanopores in track-etched polymeric membranes into conically shaped pores. This method allows for control of the shape of the resulting conical nanopores. For example, the plasma-etched pores may be cylindrical through most of the membrane thickness blossoming into cones at one face of the membrane (trumpet-shaped), or they may be nearly perfect cones. The key advantage of the conical pore shape is a dramatic enhancement in the rate of transport through the membrane, relative to an analogous cylindrical pore membrane. We demonstrate this here by measuring the ionic resistances of the plasma-etched conical pore membranes.

  4. Aerosol size distribution seasonal characteristics measured in Tiksi, Russian Arctic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Asmi

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Four years of continuous aerosol number size distribution measurements from an Arctic Climate Observatory in Tiksi Russia are analyzed. Source region effects on particle modal features, and number and mass concentrations are presented for different seasons. The monthly median total aerosol number concentration in Tiksi ranges from 184 cm-3 in November to 724 cm-3 in July with a local maximum in March of 481 cm-3. The total mass concentration has a distinct maximum in February–March of 1.72–2.38 μg m-3 and two minimums in June of 0.42 μg m-3 and in September–October of 0.36–0.57 μg m-3. These seasonal cycles in number and mass concentrations are related to isolated aerosol sources such as Arctic haze in early spring which increases accumulation and coarse mode numbers, and biogenic emissions in summer which affects the smaller, nucleation and Aitken mode particles. The impact of temperature dependent natural emissions on aerosol and cloud condensation nuclei numbers was significant. Therefore, in addition to the precursor emissions of biogenic volatile organic compounds, the frequent Siberian forest fires, although far are suggested to play a role in Arctic aerosol composition during the warmest months. During calm and cold months aerosol concentrations were occasionally increased by nearby aerosol sources in trapping inversions. These results provide valuable information on inter-annual cycles and sources of Arctic aerosols.

  5. Synthesis of Nanoporous Metals, Oxides, Carbides, and Sulfides: Beyond Nanocasting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luc, Wesley; Jiao, Feng

    2016-07-19

    metal oxides with bimodal pore size distributions can be obtained. Combining nanocasting with chemical etching, a cobalt oxide with a hierarchical porous structure was synthesized, which possessed a surface area up to 250 m(2) g(-1), representing the highest surface area reported to date for nanoporous cobalt oxides. Lastly, this Account also covers the syntheses of nanoporous metal carbides and sulfides. The combination of in situ carburization and nanocasting enabled the syntheses of two ordered nanoporous metal carbides, Mo2C and W2C. For nanoporous metal sulfides, an "oxide-to-sulfide" synthetic strategy was proposed to address the large volume change issue of converting metal nitrate precursors to metal sulfide products in nanocasting. The successful syntheses of ordered nanoporous FeS2, CoS2, and NiS2 demonstrated the feasibility of the "oxide-to-sulfide" method. Concluding remarks include a summary of recent advances in the syntheses of nanoporous metal-based solids and a brief discussion of future opportunities in the hope of stimulating new interests and ideas.

  6. Precise fabrication of a 5 nm graphene nanopore with a helium ion microscope for biomolecule detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Yunsheng; Huang, Qimeng; Zhao, Yue; Zhou, Daming; Ying, Cuifeng; Wang, Deqiang

    2017-01-01

    We report a scalable method to fabricate high-quality graphene nanopores for biomolecule detection using a helium ion microscope (HIM). HIM milling shows promising capabilities for precisely controlling the size and shape, and may allow for the potential production of nanopores at wafer scale. Nanopores could be fabricated at different sizes ranging from 5 to 30 nm in diameter in few minutes. Compared with the current solid-state nanopore fabrication techniques, e.g. transmission electron microscopy, HIM is fast. Furthermore, we investigated the exposure-time dependence of graphene nanopore formation: the rate of pore expansion did not follow a simple linear relationship with exposure time, but a fast expansion rate at short exposure time and a slow rate at long exposure time. In addition, we performed biomolecule detection with our patterned graphene nanopore. The ionic current signals induced by 20-base single-stranded DNA homopolymers could be used as a basis for homopolymer differentiation. However, the charge interaction of homopolymer chains with graphene nanopores, and the conformations of homopolymer chains need to be further considered to improve the accuracy of discrimination.

  7. Measuring Effect Sizes: The Effect of Measurement Error. Working Paper 19

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, Donald; Grossman, Pamela; Lankford, Hamilton; Loeb, Susanna; Wyckoff, James

    2008-01-01

    Value-added models in education research allow researchers to explore how a wide variety of policies and measured school inputs affect the academic performance of students. Researchers typically quantify the impacts of such interventions in terms of "effect sizes", i.e., the estimated effect of a one standard deviation change in the variable…

  8. Nanoporous polymer liquid core waveguides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gopalakrishnan, Nimi; Christiansen, Mads Brøkner; Ndoni, Sokol

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrate liquid core waveguides defined by UV to enable selective water infiltration in nanoporous polymers, creating an effective refractive index shift Δn=0.13. The mode confinement and propagation loss in these waveguides are presented.......We demonstrate liquid core waveguides defined by UV to enable selective water infiltration in nanoporous polymers, creating an effective refractive index shift Δn=0.13. The mode confinement and propagation loss in these waveguides are presented....

  9. Self-reported clothing size as a proxy measure for body size

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hughes, L.A.E.; Schouten, L.J.; Goldbohm, R.A.; Brandt, P.A. van den; Weijenberg, M.P.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Few studies have considered the potential utility of clothing size as a predictor of diseases associated with body weight. METHODS: We used data on weight-stable men and women from a subcohort of the Netherlands Cohort Study to assess the correlation of clothing size with other

  10. Nanoporous polymers for hydrogen storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Germain, Jonathan; Fréchet, Jean M J; Svec, Frantisek

    2009-05-01

    The design of hydrogen storage materials is one of the principal challenges that must be met before the development of a hydrogen economy. While hydrogen has a large specific energy, its volumetric energy density is so low as to require development of materials that can store and release it when needed. While much of the research on hydrogen storage focuses on metal hydrides, these materials are currently limited by slow kinetics and energy inefficiency. Nanostructured materials with high surface areas are actively being developed as another option. These materials avoid some of the kinetic and thermodynamic drawbacks of metal hydrides and other reactive methods of storing hydrogen. In this work, progress towards hydrogen storage with nanoporous materials in general and porous organic polymers in particular is critically reviewed. Mechanisms of formation for crosslinked polymers, hypercrosslinked polymers, polymers of intrinsic microporosity, and covalent organic frameworks are discussed. Strategies for controlling hydrogen storage capacity and adsorption enthalpy via manipulation of surface area, pore size, and pore volume are discussed in detail.

  11. Procoagulant behavior and platelet microparticle generation on nanoporous alumina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferraz, Natalia; Hong, Jaan; Karlsson Ott, Marjam

    2010-05-01

    In the present work, we have investigated platelet microparticle (PMP) generation in whole blood after contact with nanoporous alumina. Alumina membranes with pore sizes of 20 and 200 nm in diameter were incubated with whole blood and the number of PMP in the fluid phase was determined by flow cytometry. The role of the complement system in PMP generation was investigated using an analog of the potent complement inhibitor compstatin. Moreover, the procoagulant activity of the two pore size membranes were compared by measuring thrombin formation. Results indicated that PMP were not present in the fluid phase after whole blood contact with either of the alumina membranes. However, scanning electron microscope micrographs clearly showed the presence of PMP clusters on the 200 nm pore size alumina, while PMP were practically absent on the 20 nm membrane. We probed no influence of complement activation in PMP generation and adhesion and we hypothesize that other specific material-related protein-platelet interactions are taking place. A clear difference in procoagulant activity between the membranes could also be seen, 20 nm alumina showed 100% higher procoagulant activity than 200 nm membrane. By combining surface evaluation and flow cytometry analyses of the fluid phase, we are able to conclude that 200 nm pore size alumina promotes PMP generation and adhesion while the 20 nm membrane does not appreciably cause any release or adhesion of PMP, thus indicating a direct connection between PMP generation and nanoporosity.

  12. Noise Properties of Rectifying Nanopores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Powell, M R; Sa, N; Davenport, M; Healy, K; Vlassiouk, I; Letant, S E; Baker, L A; Siwy, Z S

    2011-02-18

    Ion currents through three types of rectifying nanoporous structures are studied and compared for the first time: conically shaped polymer nanopores, glass nanopipettes, and silicon nitride nanopores. Time signals of ion currents are analyzed by power spectrum. We focus on the low-frequency range where the power spectrum magnitude scales with frequency, f, as 1/f. Glass nanopipettes and polymer nanopores exhibit non-equilibrium 1/f noise, thus the normalized power spectrum depends on the voltage polarity and magnitude. In contrast, 1/f noise in rectifying silicon nitride nanopores is of equilibrium character. Various mechanisms underlying the voltage-dependent 1/f noise are explored and discussed, including intrinsic pore wall dynamics, and formation of vortices and non-linear flow patterns in the pore. Experimental data are supported by modeling of ion currents based on the coupled Poisson-Nernst-Planck and Navier Stokes equations. We conclude that the voltage-dependent 1/f noise observed in polymer and glass asymmetric nanopores might result from high and asymmetric electric fields inducing secondary effects in the pore such as enhanced water dissociation.

  13. Vertical profile and aerosol size distribution measurements in Iceland (LOAC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagsson Waldhauserova, Pavla; Olafsson, Haraldur; Arnalds, Olafur; Renard, Jean-Baptiste; Vignelles, Damien; Verdier, Nicolas

    2014-05-01

    Cold climate and high latitudes regions contain important dust sources where dust is frequently emitted, foremost from glacially-derived sediments of riverbeds or ice-proximal areas (Arnalds, 2010; Bullard, 2013). Iceland is probably the most active dust source in the arctic/sub-arctic region (Dagsson-Waldhauserova, 2013). The frequency of days with suspended dust exceeds 34 dust days annually. Icelandic dust is of volcanic origin; it is very dark in colour and contains sharp-tipped shards with bubbles. Such properties allow even large particles to be easily transported long distances. Thus, there is a need to better understand the spatial and temporal variability of these dusts. Two launch campaigns of the Light Optical Aerosols Counter (LOAC) were conducted in Iceland with meteorological balloons. LOAC use a new optical design that allows to retrieve the size concentrations in 19 size classes between 0.2 and 100 microm, and to provide an estimate of the main nature of aerosols. Vertical stratification and aerosol composition of the subarctic atmosphere was studied in detail. The July 2011 launch represented clean non-dusty season with low winds while the November 2013 launch was conducted during the high winds after dusty period. For the winter flight (performed from Reykjavik), the nature of aerosols strongly changed with altitude. In particular, a thin layer of volcanic dust was observed at an altitude of 1 km. Further LOAC measurements are needed to understand the implication of Icelandic dust to the Arctic warming and climate change. A new campaign of LAOC launches is planned for May 2014. Reference: Arnalds, O., 2010. Dust sources and deposition of aeolian materials in Iceland. Icelandic Agricultural Sciences 23, 3-21. Bullard, J.E., 2013. Contemporary glacigenic inputs to the dust cycle. Earth Surface Processes and Landforms 38, 71-89. Dagsson-Waldhauserova, P., Arnalds O., Olafsson H. 2013. Long-term frequency and characteristics of dust storm events in

  14. Differentiation of Short Single-Stranded DNA Homopolymers in Solid-State Nanopores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venta, Kimberly; Shemer, Gabriel; Puster, Matthew; Rodríguez-Manzo, Julio A.; Balan, Adrian; Rosenstein, Jacob K.; Shepard, Ken; Drndić, Marija

    2013-01-01

    In the last two decades, new techniques that monitor ionic current modulations as single molecules pass through a nanoscale pore have enabled numerous single-molecule studies. While biological nanopores have recently shown the ability to resolve single nucleotides within individual DNA molecules, similar developments with solid-state nanopores have lagged, due to challenges both in fabricating stable nanopores of similar dimensions as biological nanopores and in achieving sufficiently low-noise and high-bandwidth recordings. Here we show that small silicon nitride nanopores (0.8 to 2-nm-diameter in 5 to 8-nm-thick membranes) can resolve differences between ionic current signals produced by short (30 base) ssDNA homopolymers (poly(dA), poly(dC), poly(dT)), when combined with measurement electronics that allow a signal-to-noise ratio of better than 10 to be achieved at 1 MHz bandwidth. While identifying intramolecular DNA sequences with silicon nitride nanopores will require further improvements in nanopore sensitivity and noise levels, homopolymer differentiation represents an important milestone in the development of solid-state nanopores. PMID:23621759

  15. Surface Modification of Nanoporous 1,2-Polybutadiene by Atom Transfer Radical Polymerization or Click Chemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guo, Fengxiao; Jankova Atanasova, Katja; Schulte, Lars;

    2010-01-01

    ATRP-grafting of hydrophilic polyacrylates and click of MPEG, the originally hydrophobic samples transformed into hydrophilic nanoporous materials. The successful modification was confirmed by infrared spectroscopy, contact angle measurements and measurements of spontaneous water uptake, while...

  16. Measuring the size of an airport's catchment area

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lieshout, R.

    2012-01-01

    Although much empirical research exists on the factors that drive passenger airport choice, not much is known about the related topic of airport catchment area size. This paper presents a novel methodology to assess the size of airport catchment areas and the airport’s market shares therein using a

  17. Progress in nanoparticles characterization:Sizing and zeta potential measurement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Renliang Xu

    2008-01-01

    Characterization of various nanoparticles is on the center stage in nanotechnology development. The subjects for nanoparticles characterization are focused on particle size and particle surface charge determinations. This article summarizes the latest development in particle size analysis using dynamic light scattering and surface charge determination using electrophoretic light scattering for nano- or even sub-nanoparticles in concentrated suspensions.

  18. Raman fingerprinting of single dielectric nanoparticles in plasmonic nanopores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerman, Sarp; Chen, Chang; Li, Yi; van Roy, Wim; Lagae, Liesbet; van Dorpe, Pol

    2015-11-01

    Plasmonic nano-apertures are commonly used for the detection of small particles such as nanoparticles and proteins by exploiting electrical and optical techniques. Plasmonic nanopores are metallic nano-apertures sitting on a thin membrane with a tiny hole. It has been shown that plasmonic nanopores with a given geometry identify internal molecules using Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy (SERS). However, label-free identification of a single dielectric nanoparticle requires a highly localized field comparable to the size of the particle. Additionally, the particle's Brownian motion can jeopardize the amount of photons collected from a single particle. Here, we demonstrate that the combination of optical trapping and SERS can be used for the detection and identification of 20 nm polystyrene nanoparticles in plasmonic nanopores. This work is anticipated to contribute to the detection of small bioparticles, optical trapping and nanotribology studies.Plasmonic nano-apertures are commonly used for the detection of small particles such as nanoparticles and proteins by exploiting electrical and optical techniques. Plasmonic nanopores are metallic nano-apertures sitting on a thin membrane with a tiny hole. It has been shown that plasmonic nanopores with a given geometry identify internal molecules using Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy (SERS). However, label-free identification of a single dielectric nanoparticle requires a highly localized field comparable to the size of the particle. Additionally, the particle's Brownian motion can jeopardize the amount of photons collected from a single particle. Here, we demonstrate that the combination of optical trapping and SERS can be used for the detection and identification of 20 nm polystyrene nanoparticles in plasmonic nanopores. This work is anticipated to contribute to the detection of small bioparticles, optical trapping and nanotribology studies. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Fig. S1: The

  19. ARTICLES: Effect of Interaction upon Translocation of Confined Polymer Chain Through Nanopore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yao; Xie, Yong-jun; Yang, Hai-yang; Zhang, Xing-yuan

    2010-06-01

    The effect of the interaction between nanopore and chain monomer on the translocation of a single polymer chain confined in a finite size square through an interacting nanopore to a large space has been studied by two-dimensional bond fluctuation model with Monte Carlo simulation. Results indicate that the free energy barrier before the successful translocation of the chain depends linearly on the chain length as well as the nanopore length for different pore-polymer interaction, and the attractive interaction reduces the free energy barrier, leading to the reduction of the average trapping time.

  20. Aerosol mobility imaging for rapid size distribution measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jian; Hering, Susanne Vera; Spielman, Steven Russel; Kuang, Chongai

    2016-07-19

    A parallel plate dimensional electrical mobility separator and laminar flow water condensation provide rapid, mobility-based particle sizing at concentrations typical of the remote atmosphere. Particles are separated spatially within the electrical mobility separator, enlarged through water condensation, and imaged onto a CCD array. The mobility separation distributes particles in accordance with their size. The condensation enlarges size-separated particles by water condensation while they are still within the gap of the mobility drift tube. Once enlarged the particles are illuminated by a laser. At a pre-selected frequency, typically 10 Hz, the position of all of the individual particles illuminated by the laser are captured by CCD camera. This instantly records the particle number concentration at each position. Because the position is directly related to the particle size (or mobility), the particle size spectra is derived from the images recorded by the CCD.

  1. Measures of cardiorespiratory fitness in relation to measures of body size and composition among children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tompuri, Tuomo; Lintu, Niina; Savonen, Kai; Laitinen, Tomi; Laaksonen, David; Jääskeläinen, Jarmo; Lakka, Timo A

    2015-11-01

    In the exercise testing measures of cardiorespiratory fitness need to be scaled by body size or composition to enable comparison between individuals. Traditionally used weight-proportional measures are potentially confounded by body adiposity that hampers their interpretation and applicability in the clinical assessment of cardiorespiratory fitness. We aimed to find the most appropriate measure of body size or composition for scaling of measures of cardiorespiratory fitness among children. We assessed body weight and height, maximal workload (W MAX ) and maximal oxygen uptake (VO2 MAX ) using cycle ergometer exercise test with respiratory gas analysis and body lean mass (LM) and fat mass (FM) by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry and by bioimpedance analysis among 38 children. The data were analysed using Pearson's coefficients for correlation and stepwise linear regression models. Lean mass (r > 0.54) and height (r > 0.51) had stronger positive correlations with absolute W MAX and VO2 MAX than weight (r > 0.30) in girls and boys. None of the measures of body size or composition correlated with LM-proportional W MAX or VO2 MAX in girls or boys. Only LM correlated positively with height-proportional W MAX (r = 0.65) and VO2 MAX (r = 0.71) in boys. FM correlated negatively with weight-proportional W MAX (r VO2 MAX (r MAX (β = -0.68) and VO2 MAX (β = -0.61) than exercise performance in multivariate linear regression models. While assessing cardiorespiratory fitness, LM is the most appropriate measure of body size or composition for scaling of W MAX and VO2 MAX, because scaling by body weight introduces confounding by body adiposity. © 2014 Scandinavian Society of Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. DNA nanopore translocation in glutamate solutions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plesa, C.; Van Loo, N.; Dekker, C.

    2015-01-01

    Nanopore experiments have traditionally been carried out with chloride-based solutions. Here we introduce silver/silver-glutamate-based electrochemistry as an alternative, and study the viscosity, conductivity, and nanopore translocation characteristics of potassium-, sodium-, and lithium-glutamate

  3. Preparation of nanoporous Ni and Ni-Cu by dealloying of rolled Ni-Mn and Ni-Cu-Mn alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hakamada, Masataka, E-mail: masataka-hakamada@aist.go.j [Materials Research Institute for Sustainable Development, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 2266-98 Anagahora, Shimosihidami, Moriyama, Nagoya 463-8560 (Japan); Mabuchi, Mamoru [Department of Energy Science and Technology, Graduate School of Energy Science, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan)

    2009-10-19

    Nanoporous Ni, Ni-Cu and Cu with ligament sizes of 10-20 nm were fabricated by dealloying rolled Ni-Mn, Cu-Ni-Mn and Cu-Mn alloys, respectively. Unlike conventional Raney nickel composed of brittle Ni-Al intermetallic compounds, the initial alloys had good workability. Ni and Cu atoms formed a homogeneous solid solution in the nanoporous architecture. The ligament sizes of nanoporous Ni and Ni-Cu were smaller than that of nanoporous Cu, reflecting the difference between the surface diffusivities of Ni and Cu.

  4. Nanofluidic control by nanoporous materials using electrocapillary effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Yahui; Duan, Huiling; Markmann, Juergen; Huber, Patrick; Weissmueller, Joerg

    2014-11-01

    Electrocapillary techniques exhibit great advantages in nonmechanical electrofluidic manipulation, e.g., flow actuation in micro-/nano-channels. One issue of interest is the spontaneous imbibition of fluids in bodies with a nanoscale pores size. Contrary to previous studies we here use a metallic nanoporous body. This allows us to control the electrode potential at the solid-fluid interface. Nanoporous gold (NPG) with uniform pore- and ligament size of 45 nm was fabricated by dealloying an Ag75Au25 alloy. Spontaneous imbibition of aqueous electrolytes obeys the Lucas-Washburn law. Interestingly, the estimated tortuosity has the low value of 3.2 (3 is expected for an isotropic sponge). Electrocapillary effects were then used to manipulate the imbibition dynamics. As a result of the enhanced wetting by the electrocapillary effects, we observed an acceleration of the imbibition by 30%. When air as the pore fluid is replaced with cyclohexane, we show for aqueous electrolyte imbibition in nanoporous gold that the fluid flow can be reversibly switched on and off through electric potential control of the solid-liquid interfacial tension. Our findings demonstrate that the high electric conductivity along with the pathways for fluid/ionic transport render nanoporous gold a versatile, accurately controllable electrocapillary pump and flow sensor for minute amounts of liquids with exceptionally low operating voltages.

  5. A Comprehensive Numerical Model for Simulating Fluid Transport in Nanopores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuan; Yu, Wei; Sepehrnoori, Kamy; di, Yuan

    2017-01-01

    Since a large amount of nanopores exist in tight oil reservoirs, fluid transport in nanopores is complex due to large capillary pressure. Recent studies only focus on the effect of nanopore confinement on single-well performance with simple planar fractures in tight oil reservoirs. Its impacts on multi-well performance with complex fracture geometries have not been reported. In this study, a numerical model was developed to investigate the effect of confined phase behavior on cumulative oil and gas production of four horizontal wells with different fracture geometries. Its pore sizes were divided into five regions based on nanopore size distribution. Then, fluid properties were evaluated under different levels of capillary pressure using Peng-Robinson equation of state. Afterwards, an efficient approach of Embedded Discrete Fracture Model (EDFM) was applied to explicitly model hydraulic and natural fractures in the reservoirs. Finally, three fracture geometries, i.e. non-planar hydraulic fractures, non-planar hydraulic fractures with one set natural fractures, and non-planar hydraulic fractures with two sets natural fractures, are evaluated. The multi-well performance with confined phase behavior is analyzed with permeabilities of 0.01 md and 0.1 md. This work improves the analysis of capillarity effect on multi-well performance with complex fracture geometries in tight oil reservoirs.

  6. Synthesis of Nanoporous TiO2 and Its Potential Applicability for Dye-Sensitized Solar Cell Using Antocyanine Black Rice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian Yuliarto

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanoporous mesostructure TiO2 powders were synthesized by sol-gel method, with TiCl4 as a precursor in methanol solution. The Pluronic PE 6200 of block copolymer was used as the pores template. It was found from XRD measurements, both at 400∘C and 450∘C calcination temperatures, that the sol-gel technique yielded the nanoporous TiO2 with anatase phase. Based on N2 adsorption characterization using BET method, the TiO2 samples have surface area of 108 m2/g and 88 m2/g for calcination temperatures of 400∘C and of 450∘C, respectively. From small-angle neutron scattering (SANS patterns, TiO2 samples were observed to have nanoporous structures with pore sizes between 22–24 nm. The TiO2 also have order degree which depends on the calcination temperature. The potential applicability of the resulting TiO2 is confirmed for dye-sensitized solar cell (DSSC, composed of nanoporous anatase TiO2 and natural dye from antocyanine black rice. UV-Vis measurement of dye extracted from the black rice indicated that the antocyanine chelate can propagate into the TiO2 nanoporous network. The short circuit photocurrent density (Jsc under 100 mWcm−2 reached 1.287 mAcm−2 with open circuit photovoltage (Voc of 550 mV and the fill factor of 33.4%. The results show that the hybrid organic-inorganic structures are very attractive for future low-cost devices.

  7. Direct laser writing for nanoporous liquid core laser sensors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grossmann, Tobias; Christiansen, Mads Brøkner; Peterson, Jeffrey

    2012-01-01

    We report the fabrication of nanoporous liquid core lasers via direct laser writing based on two-photon absorption in combination with thiolene-chemistry. As gain medium Rhodamine 6G was embedded in the nanoporous polybutadiene matrix. The lasing devices with thresholds of 19 µJ/mm2 were measured...... to have bulk refractive index sensitivities of 169 nm/RIU at a laser wavelength of 600 nm, demonstrating strongly increased overlap of the modes with the analyte in comparison to solid state evanescent wave sensors....

  8. Highly active thermally stable nanoporous gold catalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biener, Juergen; Wittstock, Arne; Biener, Monika M.; Bagge-Hansen, Michael; Baeumer, Marcus; Wichmann, Andre; Neuman, Bjoern

    2016-12-20

    In one embodiment, a system includes a nanoporous gold structure and a plurality of oxide particles deposited on the nanoporous gold structure; the oxide particles are characterized by a crystalline phase. In another embodiment, a method includes depositing oxide nanoparticles on a nanoporous gold support to form an active structure and functionalizing the deposited oxide nanoparticles.

  9. Highly active thermally stable nanoporous gold catalyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biener, Juergen; Wittstock, Arne; Biener, Monika M.; Bagge-Hansen, Michael; Baeumer, Marcus; Wichmann, Andre; Neuman, Bjoern

    2016-12-20

    In one embodiment, a system includes a nanoporous gold structure and a plurality of oxide particles deposited on the nanoporous gold structure; the oxide particles are characterized by a crystalline phase. In another embodiment, a method includes depositing oxide nanoparticles on a nanoporous gold support to form an active structure and functionalizing the deposited oxide nanoparticles.

  10. Characterization of nanopores ordering in anodic alumina

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mátéfi-Tempfli, Stefan; Mátéfi-Tempfli, M.; Piraux, L.

    2008-01-01

    A simple characterization method of the ordering of the nanopores is described for nanoporous anodized aluminium oxides. The method starts with image analysis on scanning electron microscopy representations for the purpose to find repetitive shapes and their centres, i.e. nanopores. Then triangles...

  11. Kinetics of nanopore fabrication during controlled breakdown of dielectric membranes in solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briggs, Kyle; Charron, Martin; Kwok, Harold; Le, Timothea; Chahal, Sanmeet; Bustamante, José; Waugh, Matthew; Tabard-Cossa, Vincent

    2015-02-01

    Nanopore fabrication by controlled breakdown (CBD) overcomes many of the challenges of traditional nanofabrication techniques, by reliably forming solid-state nanopores sub-2 nm in size in a low-cost and scalable way for nucleic acid analysis applications. Herein, the breakdown kinetics of thin dielectric membranes immersed in a liquid environment are investigated in order to gain deeper insights into the mechanism of solid-state nanopore formation by high electric fields. For various fabrication conditions, we demonstrate that nanopore fabrication time is Weibull-distributed, in support of the hypothesis that the fabrication mechanism is a stochastic process governed by the probability of forming a connected path across the membrane (i.e. a weakest-link problem). Additionally, we explore the roles that various ions and solvents play in breakdown kinetics, revealing that asymmetric pH conditions across the membrane can significantly affect nanopore fabrication time for a given voltage polarity. These results, characterizing the stochasticity of the nanopore fabrication process and highlighting the parameters affecting it, should assist researchers interested in exploiting the potential of CBD for nanofluidic channel fabrication, while also offering guidance towards the conceivable manufacturing of solid-state nanopore-based technologies for DNA sequencing applications.

  12. Structure and adsorption of water in non-uniform cylindrical nanopores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakatos, Greg; Torrie, Glenn; Patey, Gren

    2010-03-01

    Grand canonical Monte Carlo simulations are used to examine the adsorption and structure of water in the interior of cylindrical nanopores with non-uniform surfaces. Nanopores with radii in the range of 0.45 to 1.2nm are considered, and the axial symmetry of the nanopores is broken by varying the radius as a function of position along the pore axis, or by introducing regions where the strength of the water-nanopore interaction is reduced. Water in filled pores with a 0.6nm radius, exists in either a weakly structured fluid-like state, or a structured polarized state, with a pentagonal cross section. This structured state can be disrupted by creating hydrophobic regions on the nanopore surface, and the degree of disruption can be controlled by adjusting the size of these regions. Similarly, spatial variation in the nanopore radius can produce two condensation transitions, and vapor-liquid, and solid-liquid co-existences at points along the filling isotherm. This ability to control water structure through nanopore surface modification holds promise for the development of tunable nanoscale fluid conduits and storage devices.

  13. Low-dielectric, nanoporous polyimide thin films prepared from block copolymer templating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Wang

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a new method to the preparation of low-dielectric nanoporous polyimide (PI films was addressed, based on the self-assembly structures of PS-b-P4VP/poly(amic acid (PAA, precursor of PI blends. It is found the microphase-separation structure of PS-b-P4VP/PAA is a precondition of the formation of nanoporous structures, which could be achieved by solvent annealing. Nanoporous PI films with spherical pore size of ~11 nm were obtained by thermal imidization followed by the removal of the PS-b-P4VP block copolymer. The porosity of the nanoporous PI films could be controlled by the weight fraction of the PS-b-P4VP block copolymer. The dielectric properties of the nanoporous PI films were studied, and it was found that the introduction of nanopores could effectively reduce the dielectric constant from 3.60 of dense PI films to 2.41 of nanoporous PI films with a porosity of 26%, making it promising in microelectronic devices. The fabrication method described here could be extended to other polymer systems.

  14. Controllable shrinking of inverted-pyramid silicon nanopore arrays by dry-oxygen oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Tao; Chen, Jian; Li, Mengwei; Wang, Yifan; Zhao, Chenxu; Zhang, Zhonghui; Liu, Zewen

    2013-12-20

    A novel and simple technique for the controllable shrinkage of inverted-pyramid silicon (Si) nanopore arrays is reported. The Si nanopore arrays with sizes from 60 to 150 nm, made using a combination of dry and wet etching, were shrunk to sub 10 nm, or even closed, using direct dry-oxygen oxidation at 900 ° C. The shrinkage process of the pyramidal nanopore induced by oxidation was carefully modeled and simulated. The simulation was found to be in good agreement with the experimental data within most of the oxidation time range. Using this method, square nanopore arrays with an average size of 30 nm, and rectangular nanopores and nanoslits with feature sizes as small as 8 nm, have been obtained. Furthermore, focused ion beam cutting experiments revealed that the inner structure of the nanopore after the shrinkage kept its typical inverted-pyramid shape, which is of importance in many fields such as biomolecular sensors and ionic analogs of electronic devices, as well as nanostencils for surface nano-patterning.

  15. A flexible microprocessor system for the measurement of cell size.

    OpenAIRE

    1982-01-01

    A flexible system for the measurement of length and area is described. The system consists of the Reichert Jung MOP-1 area measuring device interfaced with a Commodore PET computer. Its use is illustrated by the planimetric measurement of cross sectional areas in histochemical preparations of normal and diseased muscle. While measurements are being made data can be displayed on the computer screen either in numerical form or as a frequency histogram together with simple statistical analyses. ...

  16. Measurement of joint space width and erosion size

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sharp, JI; van der Heijde, D; Angwin, J; Duryea, J; Moens, HJB; Jacobs, JWG; Maillefert, JF; Strand, CV

    2005-01-01

    Measurement of radiographic abnormalities in metric units has been reported by several investigators during the last 15 years. Measurement of joint space in large joints has been employed in a few trials to evaluate therapy in osteoarthritis. Measurement of joint space width in small joints has been

  17. Measurement of joint space width and erosion size

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sharp, JI; van der Heijde, D; Angwin, J; Duryea, J; Moens, HJB; Jacobs, JWG; Maillefert, JF; Strand, CV

    2005-01-01

    Measurement of radiographic abnormalities in metric units has been reported by several investigators during the last 15 years. Measurement of joint space in large joints has been employed in a few trials to evaluate therapy in osteoarthritis. Measurement of joint space width in small joints has been

  18. Nanopores formed by DNA origami: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Nicholas A W; Keyser, Ulrich F

    2014-10-01

    Nanopores have emerged over the past two decades to become an important technique in single molecule experimental physics and biomolecule sensing. Recently DNA nanotechnology, in particular DNA origami, has been used for the formation of nanopores in insulating materials. DNA origami is a very attractive technique for the formation of nanopores since it enables the construction of 3D shapes with precise control over geometry and surface functionality. DNA origami has been applied to nanopore research by forming hybrid architectures with solid state nanopores and by direct insertion into lipid bilayers. This review discusses recent experimental work in this area and provides an outlook for future avenues and challenges.

  19. Ergodicity of a single particle confined in a nanopore

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bernardi, S.; Hansen, Jesper Schmidt; Frascolli, F.;

    2012-01-01

    We analyze the dynamics of a gas particle moving through a nanopore of adjustable width with particular emphasis on ergodicity. We give a measure of the portion of phase space that is characterized by quasiperiodic trajectories which break ergodicity. The interactions between particle and wall at...

  20. Numerical modeling of bi-polar (AC) pulse electroporation of single cell in microchannel to create nanopores on its membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Movahed, Saeid; Bazargan-Lari, Yousef; Daneshmad, Farhang; Mashhoodi, Mashhood

    2014-12-01

    AC electroporation of a single cell in a microchannel was numerically studied. A 15 μm diameter cell was considered in a microchannel 25 μm in height and the influences of AC electric pulse on its membrane were numerically investigated. The cell was assumed to be suspended between two electroporative electrodes embedded on the walls of a microchannel. An amplitude and a time span of applied electric pulse were chosen to be 80 kV/m and 10 μs, respectively. For different frequency values (50, 100, 200, and 500 kHz), simulations were performed to show how the cell membrane was electroporated and the creation of nanopores. Obtained numerical results show that the most and the largest nanopores are created around poles of cell (nearest points of cell membrane to the electrodes). The numerical simulations also demonstrate that increased frequency will slightly decrease electroporated area of the cell membrane; additionally, growth of the created nanopores will be stabilized. It has also been proven that size and number of the created nanopores will be decreased by moving from the poles to the equator of the cell. There is almost no nanopore created in the vicinity of the equator. Frequency affects the rate of generation of nanopores. In case of AC electroporation, creation of nanopores has two phases that periodically repeat over time. In each period, the pore density sharply increases and then becomes constant. Enhancement of the frequency will result in decrease in time span of the periods. In each period, size of the created nanopores sharply increases and then slightly decreases. However, until the AC electric pulse is present, overall trends of creation and development of nanopores will be ascending. Variation of the size and number of created nanopores can be explained by considering time variation of transmembrane potential (difference of electric potential on two sides of cell membrane) which is clear in the results presented in this study.

  1. Measuring Compartment Size and Gas Solubility in Marine Mammals

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-30

    understand better the health status of marine mammals . OBJECTIVE 2 Aim 1: Design of anaerobic grinder. The device was tested in three deceased... Mammals Michael Moore Biology Department Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution Woods Hole, MA 02543 phone: (508) 289-3228 fax: (508) 457...study is to develop methods to estimate marine mammal tissue compartment sizes, and tissue gas solubility. We aim to improve the data available for

  2. Measuring Technique of Bubble Size Distributions in Dough

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Tatsurou; Do, Gab-Soo; Sugiyama, Junichi; Oguchi, Kosei; Tsuta, Mizuki

    A novel technique to recognize bubbles in bread dough and analyze their size distribution was developed by using a Micro-Slicer Image Processing System (MSIPS). Samples were taken from the final stage of the mixing process of bread dough which generally consists of four distinctive stages. Also, to investigate the effect of freeze preservation on the size distribution of bubbles, comparisons were made between fresh dough and the dough that had been freeze preserved at .30°C for three months. Bubbles in the dough samples were identified in the images of MSIPS as defocusing spots due to the difference in focal distance created by vacant spaces. In case of the fresh dough, a total of 910 bubbles were recognized and their maximum diameter ranged from 0.4 to 70.5μm with an average of 11.1μm. On the other hand, a total of 1,195 bubbles were recognized from the freeze-preserved sample, and the maximum diameter ranged from 0.9 to 32.7μm with an average of 6.7μm. Small bubbles with maximum diameters less than 10μm comprised approximately 59% and 78% of total bubbles for fresh and freeze-preserved dough samples, respectively. The results indicated that the bubble size of frozen dough is smaller than that of unfrozen one. The proposed method can provide a novel tool to investigate the effects of mixing and preservation treatments on the size, morphology and distribution of bubbles in bread dough.

  3. DNA Translocation through Graphene Nanopores

    CERN Document Server

    Schneider, Grégory F; Calado, Victor E; Pandraud, Grégory; Zandbergen, Henny W; Vandersypen, Lieven M K; Dekker, Cees

    2010-01-01

    Nanopores -- nanosized holes that can transport ions and molecules -- are very promising devices for genomic screening, in particular DNA sequencing. Both solid-state and biological pores suffer from the drawback, however, that the channel constituting the pore is long, viz. 10-100 times the distance between two bases in a DNA molecule (0.5 nm for single-stranded DNA). Here, we demonstrate that it is possible to realize and use ultrathin nanopores fabricated in graphene monolayers for single-molecule DNA translocation. The pores are obtained by placing a graphene flake over a microsize hole in a silicon nitride membrane and drilling a nanosize hole in the graphene using an electron beam. As individual DNA molecules translocate through the pore, characteristic temporary conductance changes are observed in the ionic current through the nanopore, setting the stage for future genomic screening.

  4. Nanoporous silicon oxide memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Gunuk; Yang, Yang; Lee, Jae-Hwang; Abramova, Vera; Fei, Huilong; Ruan, Gedeng; Thomas, Edwin L; Tour, James M

    2014-08-13

    Oxide-based two-terminal resistive random access memory (RRAM) is considered one of the most promising candidates for next-generation nonvolatile memory. We introduce here a new RRAM memory structure employing a nanoporous (NP) silicon oxide (SiOx) material which enables unipolar switching through its internal vertical nanogap. Through the control of the stochastic filament formation at low voltage, the NP SiOx memory exhibited an extremely low electroforming voltage (∼ 1.6 V) and outstanding performance metrics. These include multibit storage ability (up to 9-bits), a high ON-OFF ratio (up to 10(7) A), a long high-temperature lifetime (≥ 10(4) s at 100 °C), excellent cycling endurance (≥ 10(5)), sub-50 ns switching speeds, and low power consumption (∼ 6 × 10(-5) W/bit). Also provided is the room temperature processability for versatile fabrication without any compliance current being needed during electroforming or switching operations. Taken together, these metrics in NP SiOx RRAM provide a route toward easily accessed nonvolatile memory applications.

  5. Functional Nanoporous Polymers from Block Copolymer Precursors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guo, Fengxiao

    functionalities remains a great challenge due to the limitation of available polymer synthesis and the nanoscale confinement of the porous cavities. The main topic of this thesis is to develop methods for fabrication of functional nanoporous polymers from block copolymer precursors. A method has been developed...... functional nanoporous polymers based on nanoporous 1,2- polybuatdiene 1,2-PB, which is derived from a 1,2-PB-b-PDMS diblock copolymer precursor. As a result, nanoporous 1,2-PB with pores decorated of polyacrylates, sulfonated polymers and poly(ethylene glycol) are created. A method of vapor phase deposition...... has also been generated to obtain nanoporous polymers with functional coatings on pore walls. Vapor phase polymerization of pyrrole is performed to incorporate an ultra thin film of polypyrrole into nanoporous 1,2-PB. The preliminary test shows that nanoporous 1,2-PB gains conductivity. Generally...

  6. Anisotropic diffusion of water molecules in hydroxyapatite nanopores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakash, Muthuramalingam; Lemaire, Thibault; Caruel, Matthieu; Lewerenz, Marius; de Leeuw, Nora H.; Di Tommaso, Devis; Naili, Salah

    2017-07-01

    New insights into the dynamical properties of water in hydroxyapatite (HAP) nanopores, a model system for the fluid flow within nanosize spaces inside the collagen-apatite structure of bone, were obtained from molecular dynamics simulations of liquid water confined between two parallel HAP surfaces of different sizes (20 Å ≤ H ≤ 240 Å). Calculations were conducted using a core-shell interatomic potential for HAP together with the extended simple point charge model for water. This force field gives an activation energy for water diffusion within HAP nanopores that is in excellent agreement with available experimental data. The dynamical properties of water within the HAP nanopores were quantified in terms of the second-order water diffusion tensor. Results indicate that water diffuses anisotropically within the HAP nanopores, with the solvent molecules moving parallel to the surface twice as fast as the perpendicular direction. This unusual dynamic behaviour is linked to the strong polarizing effect of calcium ions, and the synergic interactions between the water molecules in the first hydration layer of HAP with the calcium, hydroxyl, and phosphate ions, which facilitates the flow of water molecules in the directions parallel to the HAP surface.

  7. High-density nanopore array for selective biomolecule transport.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patel, Kamlesh D.

    2011-11-01

    Development of sophisticated tools capable of manipulating molecules at their own length scale enables new methods for chemical synthesis and detection. Although nanoscale devices have been developed to perform individual tasks, little work has been done on developing a truly scalable platform: a system that combines multiple components for sequential processing, as well as simultaneously processing and identifying the millions of potential species that may be present in a biological sample. The development of a scalable micro-nanofluidic device is limited in part by the ability to combine different materials (polymers, metals, semiconductors) onto a single chip, and the challenges with locally controlling the chemical, electrical, and mechanical properties within a micro or nanochannel. We have developed a unique construct known as a molecular gate: a multilayered polymer based device that combines microscale fluid channels with nanofluidic interconnects. Molecular gates have been demonstrated to selectively transport molecules between channels based on size or charge. In order to fully utilize these structures, we need to develop methods to actively control transport and identify species inside a nanopore. While previous work has been limited to creating electrical connections off-channel or metallizing the entire nanopore wall, we now have the ability to create multiple, separate conductive connections at the interior surface of a nanopore. These interior electrodes will be used for direct sensing of biological molecules, probing the electrical potential and charge distribution at the surface, and to actively turn on and off electrically driven transport of molecules through nanopores.

  8. Cavitation and pore blocking in nanoporous glasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichenbach, C; Kalies, G; Enke, D; Klank, D

    2011-09-06

    In gas adsorption studies, porous glasses are frequently referred to as model materials for highly disordered mesopore systems. Numerous works suggest that an accurate interpretation of physisorption isotherms requires a complete understanding of network effects upon adsorption and desorption, respectively. The present article deals with nitrogen and argon adsorption at different temperatures (77 and 87 K) performed on a series of novel nanoporous glasses (NPG) with different mean pore widths. NPG samples contain smaller mesopores and significantly higher microporosity than porous Vycor glass or controlled pore glass. Since the mean pore width of NPG can be tuned sensitively, the evolution of adsorption characteristics with respect to a broadening pore network can be investigated starting from the narrowest nanopore width. With an increasing mean pore width, a H2-type hysteresis develops gradually which finally transforms into a H1-type. In this connection, a transition from a cavitation-induced desorption toward desorption controlled by pore blocking can be observed. Furthermore, we find concrete hints for a pore size dependence of the relative pressure of cavitation in highly disordered pore systems. By comparing nitrogen and argon adsorption, a comprehensive insight into adsorption mechanisms in novel disordered materials is provided.

  9. An Effect Size Measure for Raju's Differential Functioning for Items and Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Keith D.; Oshima, T. C.

    2015-01-01

    This study established an effect size measure for differential functioning for items and tests' noncompensatory differential item functioning (NCDIF). The Mantel-Haenszel parameter served as the benchmark for developing NCDIF's effect size measure for reporting moderate and large differential item functioning in test items. The effect size of…

  10. Theoretical comparison of optical and electronic properties of uniformly and randomly arranged nano-porous ultra-thin layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubarevich, Aliaksandr; Marus, Mikita; Fan, Weijun; Smirnov, Aliaksandr; Sun, Xiao Wei; Wang, Hong

    2015-07-13

    The theoretical comparison of optical and electronic properties of aluminum and silver nano-porous ultra-thin layers in terms of the arrangement and size of the pores was presented. The uniform nano-porous layers exhibit a slightly higher average transmittance (up to 10%) in the wavelength range of the plasmonic response in comparison to the randomly arranged ones. Compared to uniform nano-porous layers, a much larger sheet resistance (up to 12 times) for random nano-porous layers is observed. The uniform and random Ag nano-porous layers possessing the strong plasmonic response over whole visible range can reach an average transmittance of 90 and 80% at the sheet resistance of 10 and 20 Ohm/sq, respectively, which is comparable to widely used ITO electrodes.

  11. Affinity transformation from hydrophilicity to hydrophobicity of water molecules on the basis of adsorption of water in graphitic nanopores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohba, Tomonori; Kanoh, Hirofumi; Kaneko, Katsumi

    2004-02-11

    The interaction of water with hydrophobic surfaces is quite important in a variety of chemical and biochemical phenomena. The coexistence of water and oil can be realized by introduction of surfactants. In the case of water vapor adsorption on graphitic nanopores, plenty of water can be adsorbed in graphitic nanopores without surfactants, although the graphitic surface is not hydrophilic. Why are water molecules adsorbed in hydrophobic nanopores remarkably? This work can give an explicit insight to water adsorption in hydrophobic graphite nanopores using experimental and theoretical approaches. Water molecules are associated with each other to form the cluster of 1 nm in size, leading to a significant stabilization of the cluster in the graphitic nanopores. This mechanism can be widely applied to interfacial phenomena relating to coexistence of water and nanostructural materials of hydrophobicity.

  12. (Sample) Size Matters: Defining Error in Planktic Foraminiferal Isotope Measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowery, C.; Fraass, A. J.

    2015-12-01

    Planktic foraminifera have been used as carriers of stable isotopic signals since the pioneering work of Urey and Emiliani. In those heady days, instrumental limitations required hundreds of individual foraminiferal tests to return a usable value. This had the fortunate side-effect of smoothing any seasonal to decadal changes within the planktic foram population, which generally turns over monthly, removing that potential noise from each sample. With the advent of more sensitive mass spectrometers, smaller sample sizes have now become standard. This has been a tremendous advantage, allowing longer time series with the same investment of time and energy. Unfortunately, the use of smaller numbers of individuals to generate a data point has lessened the amount of time averaging in the isotopic analysis and decreased precision in paleoceanographic datasets. With fewer individuals per sample, the differences between individual specimens will result in larger variation, and therefore error, and less precise values for each sample. Unfortunately, most workers (the authors included) do not make a habit of reporting the error associated with their sample size. We have created an open-source model in R to quantify the effect of sample sizes under various realistic and highly modifiable parameters (calcification depth, diagenesis in a subset of the population, improper identification, vital effects, mass, etc.). For example, a sample in which only 1 in 10 specimens is diagenetically altered can be off by >0.3‰ δ18O VPDB or ~1°C. Additionally, and perhaps more importantly, we show that under unrealistically ideal conditions (perfect preservation, etc.) it takes ~5 individuals from the mixed-layer to achieve an error of less than 0.1‰. Including just the unavoidable vital effects inflates that number to ~10 individuals to achieve ~0.1‰. Combining these errors with the typical machine error inherent in mass spectrometers make this a vital consideration moving forward.

  13. Nanoporous Activated Carbon Derived from Rice Husk for High Performance Supercapacitor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huaxing Xu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanoporous activated carbon material was produced from the waste rice husks (RHs by precarbonizing RHs and activating with KOH. The morphology, structure, and specific surface area were investigated. The nanoporous carbon has the average pore size of 2.2 nm and high specific area of 2523.4 m2 g−1. The specific capacitance of the nanoporous carbon is calculated to be 250 F g−1 at the current density of 1 A g−1 and remains 80% for 198 F g−1 at the current density of 20 A g−1. The nanoporous carbon electrode exhibits long-term cycle life and could keep stable capacitance till 10,000 cycles. The consistently high specific capacitance, rate capacity, and long-term cycle life ability makes it a potential candidate as electrode material for supercapacitor.

  14. Planarization of a surface of nanoporous silica-titania composition by atomic-molecular chemical assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luchinin, V. V.; Panov, M. F.; Romanov, A. A.

    2017-05-01

    The processes involved in the planarization of the surface of nanoporous SiO2 by the atomicmolecular deposition of nanoscale TiO2 films were studied in regimes with different degrees of penetration of TiO2 into SiO2 nanopores. The technological process parameters that correspond to different regimes of surface planarization were examined. The degree of penetration of TiO2 into SiO2 nanopores was monitored using reflection ellipsometry by measuring the depth distribution of the refraction index within the two-layer model.

  15. Translocation of single-wall carbon nanotubes through solid-state nanopores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Adam R; Keegstra, Johannes M; Duch, Matthew C; Hersam, Mark C; Dekker, Cees

    2011-06-08

    We report the translocation of individual single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) through solid-state nanopores. Single-strand DNA oligomers are used to both disperse the SWNTs in aqueous solution and to provide them with a net charge, allowing them to be driven through the nanopores by an applied electric field. The resulting temporary interruptions in the measured nanopore conductance provide quantitative information on the diameter and length of the translocated nanotubes at a single-molecule level. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the technique can be utilized to monitor bundling of SWNT in solution by using complementary nucleotides to induce tube-tube agglomeration.

  16. Surface-modified silica colloidal crystals: nanoporous films and membranes with controlled ionic and molecular transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zharov, Ilya; Khabibullin, Amir

    2014-02-18

    Nanoporous membranes are important for the study of the transport of small molecules and macromolecules through confined spaces and in applications ranging from separation of biomacromolecules and pharmaceuticals to sensing and controlled release of drugs. For many of these applications, chemists need to gate the ionic and molecular flux through the nanopores, which in turn depends on the ability to control the nanopore geometry and surface chemistry. Most commonly used nanoporous membrane materials are based on polymers. However, the nanostructure of polymeric membranes is not well-defined, and their surface is hard to modify. Inorganic nanoporous materials are attractive alternatives for polymers in the preparation of nanoporous membranes. In this Account, we describe the preparation and surface modification of inorganic nanoporous films and membranes self-assembled from silica colloidal spheres. These spheres form colloidal crystals with close-packed face centered cubic lattices upon vertical deposition from colloidal solutions. Silica colloidal crystals contain ordered arrays of interconnected three dimensional voids, which function as nanopores. We can prepare silica colloidal crystals as supported thin films on various flat solid surfaces or obtain free-standing silica colloidal membranes by sintering the colloidal crystals above 1000 °C. Unmodified silica colloidal membranes are capable of size-selective separation of macromolecules, and we can surface-modify them in a well-defined and controlled manner with small molecules and polymers. For the surface modification with small molecules, we use silanol chemistry. We grow polymer brushes with narrow molecular weight distribution and controlled length on the colloidal nanopore surface using atom transfer radical polymerization or ring-opening polymerization. We can control the flux in the resulting surface-modified nanoporous films and membranes by pH and ionic strength, temperature, light, and small molecule

  17. Recent progress in molecular simulation of nanoporous graphene membranes for gas separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatemi, S. Mahmood; Baniasadi, Aminreza; Moradi, Mahrokh

    2017-07-01

    If an ideal membrane for gas separation is to be obtained, the following three characteristics should be considered: the membrane should be as thin as possible, be mechanically robust, and have welldefined pore sizes. These features will maximize its solvent flux, preserve it from fracture, and guarantee its selectivity. Graphene is made up of a hexagonal honeycomb lattice of carbon atoms with sp 2 hybridization state forming a one-atom-thick sheet of graphite. Following conversion of the honeycomb lattices into nanopores with a specific geometry and size, a nanoporous graphene membrane that offers high efficiency as a separation membrane because of the ultrafast molecular permeation rate as a result of its one-atom thickness is obtained. Applications of nanoporous graphene membranes for gas separation have been receiving remarkably increasing attention because nanoporous graphene membranes show promising results in this area. This review focuses on the recent advances in nanoporous graphene membranes for applications in gas separation, with a major emphasis on theoretical works. The attractive properties of nanoporous graphene membranes introduce make them appropriate candidates for gas separation and gas molecular-sieving processes in nanoscale dimensions.

  18. Ultrafine nanoporous palladium-aluminum film fabricated by citric acid-assisted hot-water-treatment of aluminum-palladium alloy film

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harumoto, Takashi; Tamura, Yohei; Ishiguro, Takashi, E-mail: ishiguro@rs.noda.tus.ac.jp [Department of Materials Science and Technology, Tokyo University of Science, 6-3-1 Niijyuku, Katsushika-ku, Tokyo, 125-8585 (Japan)

    2015-01-15

    Hot-water-treatment has been adapted to fabricate ultrafine nanoporous palladium-aluminum film from aluminum-palladium alloy film. Using citric acid as a chelating agent, a precipitation of boehmite (aluminum oxide hydroxide, AlOOH) on the nanoporous palladium-aluminum film was suppressed. According to cross-sectional scanning transmission electron microscopy observations, the ligament/pore sizes of the prepared nanoporous film were considerably small (on the order of 10 nm). Since this fabrication method only requires aluminum alloy film and hot-water with chelating agent, the ultrafine nanoporous film can be prepared simply and environmentally friendly.

  19. Surface Diffusion Effect on Gas Transport in Nanoporous Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hori, Takuma; Yoshimoto, Yuta; Takagi, Shu; Kinefuchi, Ikuya

    2016-11-01

    Polymer electrolyte fuel cells are one of the promising candidates for power sources of electric vehicles. For further improvement of their efficiency in high current density operation, a better understanding of oxygen flow inside the cells, which have micro- or nanoporous structures, is necessary. Molecular simulations such as the direct simulation of Monte Carlo (DSMC) are necessary to elucidate flow phenomena in micro- or nanostructures since the Knudsen number is close to unity. Our previous report showed that the oxygen diffusion resistance in porous structures with a characteristic pore size of 100 nm calculated by DSMC agrees well with that measured experimentally. On the other hand, when it comes to the transport in structures with much smaller pore sizes, it is expected that the surface diffusion has a significant impact on gas transport because of their higher specific surface area. Here we present the calculation of gas transport in porous structures with considering surface diffusion. The numerical porous structure models utilized in our simulations are constructed from three-dimensional imaging of materials. The effect of the distance of random walk on the total diffusion resistance in the structures is discussed. This paper is based on results obtained from a project commissioned by the New Energy and Industrial Development Organization (NEDO).

  20. A flexible microprocessor system for the measurement of cell size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Round, J M; Jones, D A; Edwards, R H

    1982-06-01

    A flexible system for the measurement of length and area is described. The system consists of the Reichert Jung MOP-1 area measuring device interfaced with a Commodore PET computer. Its use is illustrated by the planimetric measurement of cross sectional areas in histochemical preparations of normal and diseased muscle. While measurements are being made data can be displayed on the computer screen either in numerical form or as a frequency histogram together with simple statistical analyses. Hard copy can be obtained from an attached printer. Mean values for fibre area in normal human skeletal muscle are reported. An alternative, widely used method of calculating fibre area from the lesser diameter was found to give a consistent underestimate of approximately 30% when compared with our planimetric method. In diseased muscle with abnormally shaped fibres the discrepancy is even larger; such fibres can be identified using a "form factor" which relates the area of a cell to its perimeter. This rapid, accurate and flexible system is also suitable for the measurement of many different types of graphical record.

  1. Measuring Economic Freedom: Better Without Size of Government

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.C. Ott (Jan Cornelis)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractThe Heritage Foundation and the Fraser Institute measure economic freedom in nations using indices with ten and five indicators respectively. Eight of the Heritage-indicators and four of the Fraser-indicators are about specific types of institutional quality, like rule of law, the

  2. Measuring Economic Freedom: Better Without Size of Government

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.C. Ott (Jan Cornelis)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractThe Heritage Foundation and the Fraser Institute measure economic freedom in nations using indices with ten and five indicators respectively. Eight of the Heritage indicators and four of the Fraser-indicators are about specific types of institutional quality, like rule of law, the protec

  3. Measuring Economic Freedom: Better Without Size of Government

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.C. Ott (Jan Cornelis)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractThe Heritage Foundation and the Fraser Institute measure economic freedom in nations using indices with ten and five indicators respectively. Eight of the Heritage-indicators and four of the Fraser-indicators are about specific types of institutional quality, like rule of law, the protec

  4. Nanoporous membranes with electrochemically switchable, chemically stabilized ionic selectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Small, Leo J; Wheeler, David R; Spoerke, Erik D

    2015-10-28

    Nanopore size, shape, and surface charge all play important roles in regulating ionic transport through nanoporous membranes. The ability to control these parameters in situ provides a means to create ion transport systems tunable in real time. Here, we present a new strategy to address this challenge, utilizing three unique electrochemically switchable chemistries to manipulate the terminal functional group and control the resulting surface charge throughout ensembles of gold plated nanopores in ion-tracked polycarbonate membranes 3 cm(2) in area. We demonstrate the diazonium mediated surface functionalization with (1) nitrophenyl chemistry, (2) quinone chemistry, and (3) previously unreported trimethyl lock chemistry. Unlike other works, these chemistries are chemically stabilized, eliminating the need for a continuously applied gate voltage to maintain a given state and retain ionic selectivity. The effect of surface functionalization and nanopore geometry on selective ion transport through these functionalized membranes is characterized in aqueous solutions of sodium chloride at pH = 5.7. The nitrophenyl surface allows for ionic selectivity to be irreversibly switched in situ from cation-selective to anion-selective upon reduction to an aminophenyl surface. The quinone-terminated surface enables reversible changes between no ionic selectivity and a slight cationic selectivity. Alternatively, the trimethyl lock allows ionic selectivity to be reversibly switched by up to a factor of 8, approaching ideal selectivity, as a carboxylic acid group is electrochemically revealed or hidden. By varying the pore shape from cylindrical to conical, it is demonstrated that a controllable directionality can be imparted to the ionic selectivity. Combining control of nanopore geometry with stable, switchable chemistries facilitates superior control of molecular transport across the membrane, enabling tunable ion transport systems.

  5. Superdiffusive gas recovery from nanopores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Haiyi; He, Yadong; Qiao, Rui

    2016-11-01

    Understanding the recovery of gas from reservoirs featuring pervasive nanopores is essential for effective shale gas extraction. Classical theories cannot accurately predict such gas recovery and many experimental observations are not well understood. Here we report molecular simulations of the recovery of gas from single nanopores, explicitly taking into account molecular gas-wall interactions. We show that, in very narrow pores, the strong gas-wall interactions are essential in determining the gas recovery behavior both quantitatively and qualitatively. These interactions cause the total diffusion coefficients of the gas molecules in nanopores to be smaller than those predicted by kinetic theories, hence slowing down the rate of gas recovery. These interactions also lead to significant adsorption of gas molecules on the pore walls. Because of the desorption of these gas molecules during gas recovery, the gas recovery from the nanopore does not exhibit the usual diffusive scaling law (i.e., the accumulative recovery scales as R ˜t1 /2 ) but follows a superdiffusive scaling law R ˜tn (n >0.5 ), which is similar to that observed in some field experiments. For the system studied here, the superdiffusive gas recovery scaling law can be captured well by continuum models in which the gas adsorption and desorption from pore walls are taken into account using the Langmuir model.

  6. An innovative method for exosome quantification and size measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehdiani, Arash; Maier, Anatol; Pinto, Antonio; Barth, Mareike; Akhyari, Payam; Lichtenberg, Artur

    2015-01-17

    Although the biological importance of exosomes has recently gained an increasing amount of scientific and clinical attention, much is still unknown about their complex pathways, their bioavailability and their diverse functions in health and disease. Current work focuses on the presence and the behavior of exosomes (in vitro as well as in vivo) in the context of different human disorders, especially in the fields of oncology, gynecology and cardiology. Unfortunately, neither a consensus regarding a gold standard for exosome isolation exists, nor is there an agreement on such a method for their quantitative analysis. As there are many methods for the purification of exosomes and also many possibilities for their quantitative and qualitative analysis, it is difficult to determine a combination of methods for the ideal approach. Here, we demonstrate nanoparticle tracking analysis (NTA), a semi-automated method for the characterization of exosomes after isolation from human plasma by ultracentrifugation. The presented results show that this approach for isolation, as well as the determination of the average number and size of exosomes, delivers reproducible and valid data, as confirmed by other methods, such as scanning electron microscopy (SEM).

  7. A method of extending DPIV and its application in spray droplet size measurements

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    A field method for measuring particle size distribution within a spray was developed based on extending of digital particle image velocimetry (DPIV) in this note. The size distribution of a water mist was successfully measured with this method, and the measured results were compared with the simply calculated ones.

  8. Comparison of optical particle sizing and cascade impaction for measuring the particle size of a suspension metered dose inhaler.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pu, Yu; Kline, Lukeysha C; Khawaja, Nazia; Van Liew, Melissa; Berry, Julianne

    2015-05-01

    Optical techniques for the particle size characterization of metered dose inhaler (MDI) suspensions have been developed as an alternative to the labor-intensive and time-consuming impaction method. In this study, a laser diffraction (LD) apparatus with a liquid cell ("wet cell" method) and a "time-of-flight" apparatus named aerodynamic particle sizer (APS) were utilized to assess MDI suspensions with varied formulation compositions and storage conditions. The results were compared with the conventional Anderson cascade impaction (ACI) data. The two optical methods were able to detect the changes in particle size distributions between formulations, yet to a lesser extent than those observed using the cascade impaction methodology. The median aerodynamic particle size measured by the APS method and the median geometric particle size obtained from the LD method were linearly correlated with the corresponding ACI results in the range of 2-5 µm. It was also found that the APS measurement was biased towards the finer particle size region and resulted in overestimated fine particle fraction (FPF) values which were 2-3 times folds of the ACI results. In conclusion, the optical particle sizing techniques may, under some circumstances, be viable techniques for the rapid assessment of MDI suspensions. The "wet cell" LD method, in particular, is found to be a valuable means of detecting active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) particle size changes in an MDI suspension. Using both the LD and the APS methods in early formulation screening followed by a final assessment with cascade impaction analysis can improve the efficiency of MDI formulation development.

  9. Decoding long nanopore sequencing reads of natural DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laszlo, Andrew H; Derrington, Ian M; Ross, Brian C; Brinkerhoff, Henry; Adey, Andrew; Nova, Ian C; Craig, Jonathan M; Langford, Kyle W; Samson, Jenny Mae; Daza, Riza; Doering, Kenji; Shendure, Jay; Gundlach, Jens H

    2014-08-01

    Nanopore sequencing of DNA is a single-molecule technique that may achieve long reads, low cost and high speed with minimal sample preparation and instrumentation. Here, we build on recent progress with respect to nanopore resolution and DNA control to interpret the procession of ion current levels observed during the translocation of DNA through the pore MspA. As approximately four nucleotides affect the ion current of each level, we measured the ion current corresponding to all 256 four-nucleotide combinations (quadromers). This quadromer map is highly predictive of ion current levels of previously unmeasured sequences derived from the bacteriophage phi X 174 genome. Furthermore, we show nanopore sequencing reads of phi X 174 up to 4,500 bases in length, which can be unambiguously aligned to the phi X 174 reference genome, and demonstrate proof-of-concept utility with respect to hybrid genome assembly and polymorphism detection. This work provides a foundation for nanopore sequencing of long, natural DNA strands.

  10. Thermal characterization of nanoporous 'black silicon' surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, Logan; Duan, Wenqi; Toor, Fatima

    2016-09-01

    In this work we characterize the thermal conductivity properties of nanoprous `black silicon' (bSi). We fabricate the nanoporous bSi using the metal assisted chemical etching (MACE) process utilizing silver (Ag) metal as the etch catalyst. The MACE process steps include (i) electroless deposition of Ag nanoparticles on the Si surface using silver nitrate (AgNO3) and hydrofluoric acid (HF), and (ii) a wet etch in a solution of HF and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). The resulting porosity of bSi is dependent on the ratio of the concentration of HF to (HF + H2O2); the ratio is denoted as rho (ρ). We find that as etch time of bSi increases the thermal conductivity of Si increases as well. We also analyze the absorption of the bSi samples by measuring the transmission and reflection using IR spectroscopy. This study enables improved understanding of nanoporous bSi surfaces and how they affect the solar cell performance due to the porous structures' thermal properties.

  11. Nanoporous Aluminium Oxide Membranes as Cell Interfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorothea Brüggemann

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanoporous anodic aluminium oxide (AAO has become increasingly important in biomedical applications over the past years due to its biocompatibility, increased surface area, and the possibility to tailor this nanomaterial with a wide range of surface modifications. AAO nanopores are formed in an inexpensive anodisation process of pure aluminium, which results in the self-assembly of highly ordered, vertical nanochannels with well-controllable pore diameters, depths, and interpore distances. Because of these outstanding properties AAO nanopores have become excellent candidates as nanostructured substrates for cell-interface studies. In this comprehensive review previous surveys on cell adhesion and proliferation on different AAO nanopore geometries and surface modifications are highlighted and summarised tabularly. Future applications of nanoporous alumina membranes in biotechnology and medicine are also outlined, for instance, the use of nanoporous AAO as implant modifications, coculture substrates, or immunoisolation devices.

  12. Davisson-Germer Prize Talk: Hydrogen storage in nanoporous materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chabal, Yves

    2009-03-01

    To develop a hydrogen-based energy technology, several classes of materials are being considered to achieve the DOE targets for gravimetric and volumetric hydrogen densities for hydrogen storage, including liquids (e.g. ammonium borohydrides), clathrate structures, complex metal hydrides, nanostructured (e.g. carbon) an nanoporous materials. Fundamental studies are necessary to determine the ultimate hydrogen capacity of each system. Nanoporous Metal-organic Framework (MOF) materials are promising candidates for hydrogen storage because the chemical nature and size of their unit cell can be tailored to weakly attract and incorporate H2 molecules, with good volumetric and mass density. In this talk, we consider the structure M2(BDC)2(TED), where M is a metal atom (Zn, Ni, Cu), BDC is benzenedicarboxylate and TED triethylenediamine, to determine the location and interaction of H2 molecules within the MOF. These compounds are isostructural and crystallize in the tetragonal phase (space group P4/ncc), they construct 3D porous structures with relatively large pore size (˜7-8 A ), pore volume (˜0.63-0.84 cc/g) and BET surface area (˜1500-1900 m^2/g). At high pressures (300-800 psi), the perturbation of the H-H stretching mode can be measured with IR absorption spectroscopy, showing a 35 cm-1 redshift from the unperturbed ortho (4155 cm-1 ) and para (4161 cm-1 ) frequencies. Using a newly developed non empirical van der Waals DFT method vdW-DFT),ootnotetextJ.Y. Lee, D.H. Olson, L. Pan, T.J. Emge, J. Li, Adv. Func. Mater. 17, 1255 (2007) it can be shown that the locus of the deepest H2 binding positions lies within to types of narrow channels. The energies of the most stable binding sites, as well as the number of such binding sites, are consistent with the values obtained from experimental adsorption isotherms, and heat of adsorption) data.ootnotetextM. Dion, H. Ryberg, E. Schroder, D. C. Langreth, B.I. Lundqvist, Phys. Rev. Lett. 92, 246401 (2004). Importantly, the

  13. Computational and experimental study of nanoporous membranes for water desalination and decontamination.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hickner, Michael A. (Penn State University, University Park, PA); Chinn, Douglas Alan (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); Adalsteinsson, Helgi; Long, Kevin R. (Texas Tech University, Lubbock, TX); Kent, Michael Stuart (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); Debusschere, Bert J.; Zendejas, Frank J.; Tran, Huu M.; Najm, Habib N.; Simmons, Blake Alexander

    2008-11-01

    Fundamentals of ion transport in nanopores were studied through a joint experimental and computational effort. The study evaluated both nanoporous polymer membranes and track-etched nanoporous polycarbonate membranes. The track-etched membranes provide a geometrically well characterized platform, while the polymer membranes are more closely related to ion exchange systems currently deployed in RO and ED applications. The experimental effort explored transport properties of the different membrane materials. Poly(aniline) membranes showed that flux could be controlled by templating with molecules of defined size. Track-etched polycarbonate membranes were modified using oxygen plasma treatments, UV-ozone exposure, and UV-ozone with thermal grafting, providing an avenue to functionalized membranes, increased wettability, and improved surface characteristic lifetimes. The modeling effort resulted in a novel multiphysics multiscale simulation model for field-driven transport in nanopores. This model was applied to a parametric study of the effects of pore charge and field strength on ion transport and charge exclusion in a nanopore representative of a track-etched polycarbonate membrane. The goal of this research was to uncover the factors that control the flux of ions through a nanoporous material and to develop tools and capabilities for further studies. Continuation studies will build toward more specific applications, such as polymers with attached sulfonate groups, and complex modeling methods and geometries.

  14. Fabrication of nanopores with ultrashort single-walled carbon nanotubes inserted in a lipid bilayer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lei; Xie, Jiani; Li, Ting; Wu, Hai-Chen

    2015-11-01

    We describe a protocol for the insertion of ultrashort single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) to form nanopores in a Montal-Mueller lipid bilayer. The SWCNTs are designed to bind to a specific analyte of interest; binding will result in the reduction of current in single-channel recording experiments. The first stage of the PROCEDURE is to cut and separate the SWCNTs. We cut long, purified SWCNTs with sonication in concentrated sulfuric acid/nitric acid (3/1). Isolation of ultrashort SWCNTs is carried out by size-exclusion HPLC separation. The second stage is to insert these short SWCNTs into the lipid bilayer. This step requires a microinjection probe made from a glass capillary. The setup for protein nanopore research can be adopted for the single-channel recording experiments without any special treatment. The obtained current traces are of very high quality, showing stable baselines and little background noise. Example procedures are shown for investigating ion transport and DNA translocation through these SWCNT nanopores. This nanopore has potential applications in molecular sensing, nanopore DNA sequencing and early disease diagnosis. For example, we have selectively detected modified 5-hydroxymethylcytosine in single-stranded DNA (ssDNA), which may have implications in screening specific genomic DNA sequences. The protocol takes ∼15 d, including SWCNT purification, cutting and separation, as well as the formation of SWCNT nanopores for DNA analyses.

  15. Nanoporous Polymeric Grating-Based Biosensors

    KAUST Repository

    Gao, Tieyu

    2012-05-02

    We demonstrate the utilization of an interferometrically created nanoporous polymeric gratings as a platform for biosensing applications. Aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES)-functionalized nanoporous polymeric gratings was fabricated by combining holographic interference patterning and APTES-functionalization of pre-polymer syrup. The successful detection of multiple biomolecules indicates that the biofunctionalized nanoporous polymeric gratings can act as biosensing platforms which are label-free, inexpensive, and applicable as high-throughput assays. Copyright © 2010 by ASME.

  16. Improved Catalysts for Heavy Oil Upgrading Based on Zeolite Y Nanoparticles Encapsulated Stable Nanoporous Host

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conrad Ingram; Mark Mitchell

    2007-09-30

    The objective of this project is to synthesize nanocrystals of highly acidic zeolite Y nanoclusters, encapsulate them within the channels of mesoporous (nanoporous) silicates or nanoporous organosilicates, and evaluate the 'zeolite Y/Nanoporous host' composites as catalysts for the upgrading of heavy petroleum feedstocks. In comparison to conventionally-used zeolite Y catalysts of micron size particles, the nanocrystals (< 100 nm particle size) which contain shorter path lengths, are expected to allow faster diffusion of large hydrocarbon substrates and the catalysis products within and out of the zeolite's channels and cages (<1 nm size). This is expected to significantly reduce deactivation of the catalyst and to prolong their period of reactivity. Encapsulating zeolite Y nanocrystals within the nanoporous materials is expected to protect its external surfaces and pore entrances from being blocked by large hydrocarbon substrates, since these substrates will initially be converted to small molecules by the nanoporous host (a catalyst in its own right). The project consisted of four major tasks as follows: (1) synthesis of the nanoparticles of zeolite Y (of various chemical compositions) using various techniques such as the addition of organic additives to conventional zeolite Y synthesis mixtures to suppress zeolite Y crystal growth; (2) synthesis of nanoporous silicate host materials of up to 30 nm pore diameter, using poly (alkylene oxide) copolymers which when removed will yield a mesoporous material; (3) synthesis of zeolite Y/Nanoporous Host composite materials as potential catalysts; and (4) evaluation of the catalyst for the upgrading of heavy petroleum feedstocks.

  17. InGaN light-emitting diodes with embedded nanoporous GaN distributed Bragg reflectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shieh, Bing-Cheng; Jhang, Yuan-Chang; Huang, Kun-Pin; Huang, Wan-Chun; Dai, Jing-Jie; Lai, Chun-Feng; Lin, Chia-Feng

    2015-08-01

    InGaN-based light-emitting diodes (LEDs) with embedded conductive nanoporous GaN/undoped GaN (NP-GaN/u-GaN) distributed Bragg reflectors (DBRs) were demonstrated. Nanoporous GaN DBR structures were fabricated by pulsed 355 nm laser scribing and electrochemical etching processes. Heavily Si-doped n-type GaN:Si layers (n+-GaN) in an eight-period n+-GaN/u-GaN stack structure were transformed into a low-refractive-index, conductive nanoporous GaN structure. The measured center wavelength, peak reflectivity, and bandwidth of the nanoporous GaN DBR structure were 417 nm, 96.7%, and 34 nm, respectively. Resonance cavity modes of the photoluminescence spectra were observed in the treated LED structure with the nanoporous DBR structure.

  18. Measuring spatiotemporal variation in snow optical grain size under a subalpine forest canopy using contact spectroscopy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Molotch, Noah P; Barnard, David M; Burns, Sean P; Painter, Thomas H

    2016-01-01

    .... In this study, we address one of many measurement gaps by using contact spectroscopy to measure snow optical grain size at high spatial resolution in trenches dug between tree boles in a subalpine forest...

  19. New algorithm and system for measuring size distribution of blood cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cuiping Yao(姚翠萍); Zheng Li(李政); Zhenxi Zhang(张镇西)

    2004-01-01

    In optical scattering particle sizing, a numerical transform is sought so that a particle size distribution can be determined from angular measurements of near forward scattering, which has been adopted in the measurement of blood cells. In this paper a new method of counting and classification of blood cell, laser light scattering method from stationary suspensions, is presented. The genetic algorithm combined with nonnegative least squared algorithm is employed to inverse the size distribution of blood cells. Numerical tests show that these techniques can be successfully applied to measuring size distribution of blood cell with high stability.

  20. Nanopore analytics: sensing of single molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howorka, Stefan; Siwy, Zuzanna

    2009-08-01

    In nanopore analytics, individual molecules pass through a single nanopore giving rise to detectable temporary blockades in ionic pore current. Reflecting its simplicity, nanopore analytics has gained popularity and can be conducted with natural protein as well as man-made polymeric and inorganic pores. The spectrum of detectable analytes ranges from nucleic acids, peptides, proteins, and biomolecular complexes to organic polymers and small molecules. Apart from being an analytical tool, nanopores have developed into a general platform technology to investigate the biophysics, physicochemistry, and chemistry of individual molecules (critical review, 310 references).

  1. New approach to fabricate nanoporous gold film

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hui Zhou; Lan Jin; Wei Xu

    2007-01-01

    A simple preparation of ultrathin nanoporous gold film was described. Copper and gold were used to fabricate Cu-Au alloy films through vacuum deposition. The formation of nanoporous gold films from the alloy films involved thermal process and chemical etch by hydrochloric acid or by nitric acid. The free-standing nanoporous gold films have been analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray photoelectron spectrometer (XPS) and surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). It was noted that the nanoporous gold film etched by hydrochloric acid is uniform with a cover of fog-like moieties.

  2. Threading DNA through nanopores for biosensing applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fyta, Maria

    2015-07-01

    This review outlines the recent achievements in the field of nanopore research. Nanopores are typically used in single-molecule experiments and are believed to have a high potential to realize an ultra-fast and very cheap genome sequencer. Here, the various types of nanopore materials, ranging from biological to 2D nanopores are discussed together with their advantages and disadvantages. These nanopores can utilize different protocols to read out the DNA nucleobases. Although, the first nanopore devices have reached the market, many still have issues which do not allow a full realization of a nanopore sequencer able to sequence the human genome in about a day. Ways to control the DNA, its dynamics and speed as the biomolecule translocates the nanopore in order to increase the signal-to-noise ratio in the reading-out process are examined in this review. Finally, the advantages, as well as the drawbacks in distinguishing the DNA nucleotides, i.e., the genetic information, are presented in view of their importance in the field of nanopore sequencing.

  3. Methods for obtaining true particle size distributions from cross section measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lord, Kristina Alyse [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Sectioning methods are frequently used to measure grain sizes in materials. These methods do not provide accurate grain sizes for two reasons. First, the sizes of features observed on random sections are always smaller than the true sizes of solid spherical shaped objects, as noted by Wicksell [1]. This is the case because the section very rarely passes through the center of solid spherical shaped objects randomly dispersed throughout a material. The sizes of features observed on random sections are inversely related to the distance of the center of the solid object from the section [1]. Second, on a plane section through the solid material, larger sized features are more frequently observed than smaller ones due to the larger probability for a section to come into contact with the larger sized portion of the spheres than the smaller sized portion. As a result, it is necessary to find a method that takes into account these reasons for inaccurate particle size measurements, while providing a correction factor for accurately determining true particle size measurements. I present a method for deducing true grain size distributions from those determined from specimen cross sections, either by measurement of equivalent grain diameters or linear intercepts.

  4. Utilisation of GaN and InGaN/GaN with nanoporous structures for water splitting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benton, J.; Bai, J.; Wang, T., E-mail: t.wang@sheffield.ac.uk [Department of Electronic and Electrical Engineering, University of Sheffield, Mappin Street, Sheffield S1 3JD (United Kingdom)

    2014-12-01

    We report a cost-effective approach to the fabrication of GaN based nanoporous structure for applications in renewable hydrogen production. Photoelectrochemical etching in a KOH solution has been employed to fabricate both GaN and InGaN/GaN nanoporous structures with pore sizes ranging from 25 to 60 nm, obtained by controlling both etchant concentration and applied voltage. Compared to as-grown planar devices the nanoporous structures have exhibited a significant increase of photocurrent with a factor of up to four times. An incident photon conversion efficiency of up to 46% around the band edge of GaN has been achieved.

  5. Measuring Bubble, Drop and Particle Sizes in Multiphase Systems with Ultrasound

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cents, A.H.G.; Brilman, D.W.F.; Versteeg, G.F.; Wijnstra, P.J.; Regtien, P.P.L.

    2004-01-01

    A technique is developed for measurement of bubble, droplet and particle-size distributions in multiphase systems, based on the propagation speed and attenuation of ultrasound. The measurement of the size distribution of the dispersed phase in multiphase systems was desired to analyze the mass-trans

  6. A simple algorithm for measuring particle size distributions on an uneven background from TEM images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gontard, Lionel Cervera; Ozkaya, Dogan; Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E.

    2011-01-01

    Nanoparticles have a wide range of applications in science and technology. Their sizes are often measured using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) or X-ray diffraction. Here, we describe a simple computer algorithm for measuring particle size distributions from TEM images in the presence of a...

  7. Density hysteresis of heavy water confined in a nanoporous silica matrix

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yang [ORNL; Faraone, Antonio [National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST); Kamitakahara, William [ORNL; Liu, Kao-Hsiang [National Taiwan University; Mou, Chung-Yuan [National Taiwan University; Leao, Juscelino B [ORNL; Chang, Sung C [ORNL; Chen, Sow-hsin H [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    A neutron scattering technique was developed to measure the density of heavy water confined in a nanoporous silica matrix in a temperature-pressure range, from 300 to 130 K and from 1 to 2,900 bars, where bulk water will crystalize. We observed a prominent hysteresis phenomenon in the measured density profiles between warming and cooling scans above 1,000 bars. We inter- pret this hysteresis phenomenon as support (although not a proof) of the hypothetical existence of a first-order liquid liquid phase transition of water that would exist in the macroscopic system if crystallization could be avoided in the relevant phase region. Moreover, the density data we obtained for the confined heavy water under these conditions are valuable to large communities in biology and earth and planetary sciences interested in phenomena in which nanometer-sized water layers are involved.

  8. Highly sensitive detection using microring resonator and nanopores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bougot-Robin, K.; Hoste, J. W.; Le Thomas, N.; Bienstman, P.; Edel, J. B.

    2016-04-01

    One of the most significant challenges facing physical and biological scientists is the accurate detection and identification of single molecules in free-solution environments. The ability to perform such sensitive and selective measurements opens new avenues for a large number of applications in biological, medical and chemical analysis, where small sample volumes and low analyte concentrations are the norm. Access to information at the single or few molecules scale is rendered possible by a fine combination of recent advances in technologies. We propose a novel detection method that combines highly sensitive label-free resonant sensing obtained with high-Q microcavities and position control in nanoscale pores (nanopores). In addition to be label-free and highly sensitive, our technique is immobilization free and does not rely on surface biochemistry to bind probes on a chip. This is a significant advantage, both in term of biology uncertainties and fewer biological preparation steps. Through combination of high-Q photonic structures with translocation through nanopore at the end of a pipette, or through a solid-state membrane, we believe significant advances can be achieved in the field of biosensing. Silicon microrings are highly advantageous in term of sensitivity, multiplexing, and microfabrication and are chosen for this study. In term of nanopores, we both consider nanopore at the end of a nanopipette, with the pore being approach from the pipette with nanoprecise mechanical control. Alternatively, solid state nanopores can be fabricated through a membrane, supporting the ring. Both configuration are discussed in this paper, in term of implementation and sensitivity.

  9. IMPROVED CATALYSTS FOR HEAVY OIL UPGRADING BASED ON ZEOLITE Y NANOPARTICLES ENCAPSULATED STABLE NANOPOROUS HOST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conrad Ingram; Mark Mitchell

    2005-03-21

    The objectives of this project are to synthesis nanocrystals of highly acidic zeolite Y, encapsulate them within the channels of mesoporous (nanoporous) silicates or nanoporous organosilicates and evaluate the ''zeolite Y/Nanoporous host'' composites as catalysts for the upgrading of heavy petroleum feedstocks. Our results to date are summarized as follows. The synthesis of high surface ordered nanoporous silica of expanded pore diameter of 25 nm (larger than the standard size of 8.4 nm) using trimethylbenzene as a pore size expander was accomplished. The synthesis of zeolite Y nanoparticles with median pore size of approximately 50 nm (smaller than the 80 nm typically obtained with TMAOH) using combined TMABr/TMAOH as organic additives was also accomplished. The successful synthesis of zeoliteY/Nanoporous host composite materials by sequential combination of zeolite precursors and nanoporous material precursor mixtures was implied based on results from various characterization techniques such as X-Ray diffraction, infrared spectra, thermal analysis, porosimetry data. The resulting materials showed pore sizes up to 11 nm, and infrared band at 570 cm{sup -1} suggesting the presence of both phases. Work in the immediate future will be focused on the following three areas: (1) Further characterization of all-silica and aluminosilicate mesoporous materials with expanded pore sizes up to 30 nm will continue; (2) Research efforts to reduce the average particle size of zeolite nanoparticles down to 35-30 nm will continue; (3) Further synthesis of polymer-SBA15 nanocomposites will be conducted by changing the amount and chemistry of the zeolitic precursors added; and (4) Investigation on the catalytic properties of the materials using probe catalytic reactions (such as cumene cracking), followed by catalytic testing for heavy oil conversion.

  10. Single-crystalline nanoporous Nb2O5 nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Jun

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Single-crystalline nanoporous Nb2O5 nanotubes were fabricated by a two-step solution route, the growth of uniform single-crystalline Nb2O5 nanorods and the following ion-assisted selective dissolution along the [001] direction. Nb2O5 tubular structure was created by preferentially etching (001 crystallographic planes, which has a nearly homogeneous diameter and length. Dense nanopores with the diameters of several nanometers were created on the shell of Nb2O5 tubular structures, which can also retain the crystallographic orientation of Nb2O5 precursor nanorods. The present chemical etching strategy is versatile and can be extended to different-sized nanorod precursors. Furthermore, these as-obtained nanorod precursors and nanotube products can also be used as template for the fabrication of 1 D nanostructured niobates, such as LiNbO3, NaNbO3, and KNbO3.

  11. Capacitance-Power-Hysteresis Trilemma in Nanoporous Supercapacitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alpha A. Lee

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Nanoporous supercapacitors are an important player in the field of energy storage that fill the gap between dielectric capacitors and batteries. The key challenge in the development of supercapacitors is the perceived trade-off between capacitance and power delivery. Current efforts to boost the capacitance of nanoporous supercapacitors focus on reducing the pore size so that they can only accommodate a single layer of ions. However, this tight packing compromises the charging dynamics and hence power density. We show via an analytical theory and Monte Carlo simulations that charging is sensitively dependent on the affinity of ions to the pores, and that high capacitances can be obtained for ionophobic pores of widths significantly larger than the ion diameter. Our theory also predicts that charging can be hysteretic with a significant energy loss per cycle for intermediate ionophilicities. We use these observations to explore the parameter regimes in which a capacitance-power-hysteresis trilemma may be avoided.

  12. Nanoporous poly(lactide) by olefin metathesis degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertrand, Arthur; Hillmyer, Marc A

    2013-07-31

    We describe an approach to ordered nanoporous poly(lactide) that relies on self-assembly of poly(butadiene)-poly(lactide) (PB-PLA) diblock copolymers followed by selective degradation of PB using olefin metathesis. The block copolymers were obtained by a combination of anionic and ring-opening transesterification polymerizations. The molar mass of each block was tailored to target materials with either a lamellar or cylindrical microphase-separated morphology. Orientation of these nanoscale domains was induced in thin films and monolithic samples through solvent annealing and mechanical deformation, respectively. Selective degradation of PB was achieved by immersing the samples in a solution of Grubbs first-generation catalyst in cyclohexane, a nonsolvent for PLA. Successful elimination of PB was confirmed by size-exclusion chromatography and (1)H NMR spectroscopy. Direct imaging of the resulting nanoporous PLA was obtained by scanning electron microscopy.

  13. Uncertainties of size measurements in electron microscopy characterization of nanomaterials in foods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dudkiewicz, Agnieszka; Boxall, Alistair B. A.; Chaudhry, Qasim;

    2015-01-01

    Electron microscopy is a recognized standard tool for nanomaterial characterization, and recommended by the European Food Safety Authority for the size measurement of nanomaterials in food. Despite this, little data have been published assessing the reliability of the method, especially for size...... measurement of nanomaterials characterized by a broad size distribution and/or added to food matrices. This study is a thorough investigation of the measurement uncertainty when applying electron microscopy for size measurement of engineered nanomaterials in foods. Our results show that the number of measured...... particles was only a minor source of measurement uncertainty for nanomaterials in food, compared to the combined influence of sampling, sample preparation prior to imaging and the image analysis. The main conclusion is that to improve the measurement reliability, care should be taken to consider...

  14. A liposome-based size calibration method for measuring microvesicles by flow cytometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonsen, J B

    2016-01-01

    ESSENTIALS: A gold standard to determine the sizes of microvesicles by flow cytometry is needed. We used fluorescently labeled liposomes to estimate the size of microvesicles with flow cytometry. We suggest that liposomes are more accurate size calibrators than the commonly used polystyrene beads. The liposome-based size calibrators improve the size assessment of microvesicle made with flow cytometry. During the past years, the need for a gold standard to determine the sizes of extracellular vesicles including microvesicles by flow cytometry has been emphasized. This work suggests that artificial vesicles can be used as calibrators to estimate the size of microvesicles from the side scattering (SSC) measured with flow cytometry. We prepared fluorescently labeled liposomes with different maximum sizes defined by the pore size (200, 400, 800, and 1000 nm) of the membrane used for the extrusion. The fluorescence strengths from the largest liposomes pertaining to each pore size enabled us to verify the correlation between the SSC from a liposome and the corresponding size. This study indicates that artificial vesicles are more accurate size calibrators compared to the commonly used polystyrene calibrator beads illustrated by the SSC from 110 nm polystyrene beads corresponds to the scattering from ~400 nm vesicle-like particles. We also show that this method of size assessment based on SSC has a low resolution that is roughly estimated to be between 60 and 200 nm, dependent on the vesicle size. © 2015 International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis.

  15. A practical and theoretical definition of very small field size for radiotherapy output factor measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Charles, P. H., E-mail: p.charles@qut.edu.au; Crowe, S. B.; Langton, C. M.; Trapp, J. V. [School of Chemistry, Physics and Mechanical Engineering, Queensland University of Technology, GPO Box 2434, Brisbane, QLD 4001 (Australia); Cranmer-Sargison, G. [Department of Medical Physics, Saskatchewan Cancer Agency, 20 Campus Dr., Saskatoon, Saskatchewan S7L 3P6, Canada and Academic Unit of Medical Physics, Faculty of Medicine and Health, University of Leeds, 8.001 Worsley Building, Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom); Thwaites, D. I. [Institute of Medical Physics, School of Physics, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Kairn, T. [School of Chemistry, Physics and Mechanical Engineering, Queensland University of Technology, GPO Box 2434, Brisbane, QLD 4001, Australia and Premion, The Wesley Medical Centre, Suite 1, 40 Chasely St, Auchenflower, Brisbane, QLD 4066 (Australia); Knight, R. T. [Premion, The Wesley Medical Centre, Suite 1, 40 Chasely St, Auchenflower, Brisbane, QLD 4066 (Australia); Kenny, J. [The Australian Clinical Dosimetry Service, Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Agency, 619 Lower Plenty Road, Yallambie, VIC 3085, Australia and Radiation Oncology Queensland, St Andrew' s Toowoomba Hospital, Toowoomba, QLD 4350 (Australia)

    2014-04-15

    Purpose: This work introduces the concept of very small field size. Output factor (OPF) measurements at these field sizes require extremely careful experimental methodology including the measurement of dosimetric field size at the same time as each OPF measurement. Two quantifiable scientific definitions of the threshold of very small field size are presented. Methods: A practical definition was established by quantifying the effect that a 1 mm error in field size or detector position had on OPFs and setting acceptable uncertainties on OPF at 1%. Alternatively, for a theoretical definition of very small field size, the OPFs were separated into additional factors to investigate the specific effects of lateral electronic disequilibrium, photon scatter in the phantom, and source occlusion. The dominant effect was established and formed the basis of a theoretical definition of very small fields. Each factor was obtained using Monte Carlo simulations of a Varian iX linear accelerator for various square field sizes of side length from 4 to 100 mm, using a nominal photon energy of 6 MV. Results: According to the practical definition established in this project, field sizes ≤15 mm were considered to be very small for 6 MV beams for maximal field size uncertainties of 1 mm. If the acceptable uncertainty in the OPF was increased from 1.0% to 2.0%, or field size uncertainties are 0.5 mm, field sizes ≤12 mm were considered to be very small. Lateral electronic disequilibrium in the phantom was the dominant cause of change in OPF at very small field sizes. Thus the theoretical definition of very small field size coincided to the field size at which lateral electronic disequilibrium clearly caused a greater change in OPF than any other effects. This was found to occur at field sizes ≤12 mm. Source occlusion also caused a large change in OPF for field sizes ≤8 mm. Based on the results of this study, field sizes ≤12 mm were considered to be theoretically very small for 6

  16. Measurement of particle size distribution of soil and selected aggregate sizes using the hydrometer method and laser diffractometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzmán, G.; Gómez, J. A.; Giráldez, J. V.

    2010-05-01

    Soil particle size distribution has been traditionally determined by the hydrometer or the sieve-pipette methods, both of them time consuming and requiring a relatively large soil sample. This might be a limitation in situations, such as for instance analysis of suspended sediment, when the sample is small. A possible alternative to these methods are the optical techniques such as laser diffractometry. However the literature indicates that the use of this technique as an alternative to traditional methods is still limited, because the difficulty in replicating the results obtained with the standard methods. In this study we present the percentages of soil grain size determined using laser diffractometry within ranges set between 0.04 - 2000 μm. A Beckman-Coulter ® LS-230 with a 750 nm laser beam and software version 3.2 in five soils, representative of southern Spain: Alameda, Benacazón, Conchuela, Lanjarón and Pedrera. In three of the studied soils (Alameda, Benacazón and Conchuela) the particle size distribution of each aggregate size class was also determined. Aggregate size classes were obtained by dry sieve analysis using a Retsch AS 200 basic ®. Two hundred grams of air dried soil were sieved during 150 s, at amplitude 2 mm, getting nine different sizes between 2000 μm and 10 μm. Analyses were performed by triplicate. The soil sample preparation was also adapted to our conditions. A small amount each soil sample (less than 1 g) was transferred to the fluid module full of running water and disaggregated by ultrasonication at energy level 4 and 80 ml of sodium hexametaphosphate solution during 580 seconds. Two replicates of each sample were performed. Each measurement was made for a 90 second reading at a pump speed of 62. After the laser diffractometry analysis, each soil and its aggregate classes were processed calibrating its own optical model fitting the optical parameters that mainly depends on the color and the shape of the analyzed particle. As a

  17. Confinement of MgH2 nanoclusters within nanoporous aerogel scaffold materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Thomas K; Manickam, Kandavel; Hirscher, Michael; Besenbacher, Flemming; Jensen, Torben R

    2009-11-24

    Nanoparticles of magnesium hydride were embedded in nanoporous carbon aerogel scaffold materials in order to explore the kinetic properties of hydrogen uptake and release. A new modified procedure for the synthesis of magnesium hydride nanoparticles is presented. The procedure makes use of monoliths (approximately 0.4 cm(3)) of two distinct types of nanoporous resorcinol-formaldehyde carbon aerogels loaded with dibutylmagnesium, MgBu(2). Excess MgBu(2) was removed mechanically, and the increase in mass was used as a measure of the amount of embedded MgH(2). Energy-dispersive spectrometry revealed that MgH(2) was uniformly distributed within the aerogel material. In situ synchrotron radiation powder X-ray diffraction showed that MgBu(2) transformed directly to MgH(2) at T approximately 137 degrees C and p(H(2)) = 50 bar. Two distinct aerogel samples, denoted X1 and X2, with pore volumes of 1.27 and 0.65 mL/g and average pore sizes of 22 and 7 nm, respectively, were selected. In these samples, the uptake of magnesium hydride was found to be proportional to the pore volume, and aerogels X1 and X2 incorporated 18.2 and 10.0 wt % of MgH(2), respectively. For the two samples, the volumetric MgH(2) uptake was similar, approximately 12 vol %. The hydrogen storage properties of nanoconfined MgH(2) were studied by Sieverts' measurements and thermal desorption spectroscopy, which clearly demonstrated that the dehydrogenation kinetics of the confined hydride depends on the pore size distribution of the scaffold material; that is, smaller pores mediated faster desorption rates possibly due to a size reduction of the confined magnesium hydride.

  18. Electrochemical tuning of the optical properties of nanoporous gold

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalas, D.; Shao, L.-H.; Canchi, R.; Okuma, T.; Lang, S.; Petrov, A.; Weissmüller, J.; Eich, M.

    2017-03-01

    Using optical in-situ measurements in an electrochemical environment, we study the electrochemical tuning of the transmission spectrum of films from the nanoporous gold (NPG) based optical metamaterial, including the effect of the ligament size. The long wavelength part of the transmission spectrum around 800 nm can be reversibly tuned via the applied electrode potential. The NPG behaves as diluted metal with its transition from dielectric to metallic response shifted to longer wavelengths. We find that the applied potential alters the charge carrier density to a comparable extent as in experiments on gold nanoparticles. However, compared to nanoparticles, a NPG optical metamaterial, due to its connected structure, shows a much stronger and more broadband change in optical transmission for the same change in charge carrier density. We were able to tune the transmission through an only 200 nm thin sample by 30%. In combination with an electrolyte the tunable NPG based optical metamaterial, which employs a very large surface-to-volume ratio is expected to play an important role in sensor applications, for photoelectrochemical water splitting into hydrogen and oxygen and for solar water purification.

  19. Electrochemical tuning of the optical properties of nanoporous gold

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalas, D.; Shao, L.-H.; Canchi, R.; Okuma, T.; Lang, S.; Petrov, A.; Weissmüller, J.; Eich, M.

    2017-01-01

    Using optical in-situ measurements in an electrochemical environment, we study the electrochemical tuning of the transmission spectrum of films from the nanoporous gold (NPG) based optical metamaterial, including the effect of the ligament size. The long wavelength part of the transmission spectrum around 800 nm can be reversibly tuned via the applied electrode potential. The NPG behaves as diluted metal with its transition from dielectric to metallic response shifted to longer wavelengths. We find that the applied potential alters the charge carrier density to a comparable extent as in experiments on gold nanoparticles. However, compared to nanoparticles, a NPG optical metamaterial, due to its connected structure, shows a much stronger and more broadband change in optical transmission for the same change in charge carrier density. We were able to tune the transmission through an only 200 nm thin sample by 30%. In combination with an electrolyte the tunable NPG based optical metamaterial, which employs a very large surface-to-volume ratio is expected to play an important role in sensor applications, for photoelectrochemical water splitting into hydrogen and oxygen and for solar water purification. PMID:28276516

  20. Ion selectivity of graphene nanopores

    OpenAIRE

    Rollings, Ryan C.; Kuan, Aaron T.; Golovchenko, Jene A.

    2016-01-01

    As population growth continues to outpace development of water infrastructure in many countries, desalination (the removal of salts from seawater) at high energy efficiency will likely become a vital source of fresh water. Due to its atomic thinness combined with its mechanical strength, porous graphene may be particularly well-suited for electrodialysis desalination, in which ions are removed under an electric field via ion-selective pores. Here, we show that single graphene nanopores prefer...

  1. Fracture and fatigue of ultrathin nanoporous polymer films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kearney, Andrew V.

    Nanoporous polymer layers are being considered for a range of emerging nanoscale applications, from low permittivity materials for interlayer dielectrics in microelectronics and anti-reflective coatings in optical technologies, to biosensors and size-selective membranes for biological applications. Polymer thin films have inherently low elastic modulus, strength and hardness, but exhibit fracture properties that are higher than those reported for glass, ceramic, and even some metal layers. However, constraint of a ductile polymer between two elastic layers is expected to affect the local plasticity ahead of a crack tip and its contribution to the film adhesion with films below a micron in thickness. Additionally, nanoporosity would be expected to have a deleterious effect on mechanical properties, producing materials and layers that are structurally weaker than fully dense versions they replace. Therefore, the integration of these nanoporous polymer layer at nanometer thicknesses would present significantly processing and mechanical reliability challenges. In this dissertation, surprising evidence is presented that nanoporous polymer films exhibit increasing fracture energy with increasing porosity. Such behavior is in stark contrast to a wide range of reported behavior for porous solids. A ductile nano-void growth and coalescence fracture mechanics-based model is presented to rationalize the increase in fracture toughness of the voided polymer film. The model is shown to explain the behavior in terms of a specific scaling of the size of the pores with pore volume fraction. It is demonstrated that the pore size must increase with close to a linear dependence on the volume fraction in order to increase rather than decrease the fracture energy. Independent characterization of the pore size as a function of volume fraction is shown to confirm predictions made by the model. The fracture behavior of these constrained polymer films are also examined with film thickness

  2. Size measurement of radioactive aerosol particles in intense radiation fields using wire screens and imaging plates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oki, Yuichi; Tanaka, Toru; Takamiya, Koichi; Ishi, Yoshihiro; UesugI, Tomonori; Kuriyama, Yasutoshi; Sakamoto, Masaaki; Ohtsuki, Tsutomu [Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute, Osaka (Japan); Nitta, Shinnosuke [Graduate School of Engineering, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Osada, Naoyuki [Advanced Science Research Center, Okayama University, Okayama (Japan)

    2016-09-15

    Very fine radiation-induced aerosol particles are produced in intense radiation fields, such as high-intensity accelerator rooms and containment vessels such as those in the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant (FDNPP). Size measurement of the aerosol particles is very important for understanding the behavior of radioactive aerosols released in the FDNPP accident and radiation safety in high-energy accelerators. A combined technique using wire screens and imaging plates was developed for size measurement of fine radioactive aerosol particles smaller than 100 nm in diameter. This technique was applied to the radiation field of a proton accelerator room, in which radioactive atoms produced in air during machine operation are incorporated into radiation-induced aerosol particles. The size of 11C-bearing aerosol particles was analyzed using the wire screen technique in distinction from other positron emitters in combination with a radioactive decay analysis. The size distribution for 11C-bearing aerosol particles was found to be ca. 70 μm in geometric mean diameter. The size was similar to that for 7Be-bearing particles obtained by a Ge detector measurement, and was slightly larger than the number-based size distribution measured with a scanning mobility particle sizer. The particle size measuring method using wire screens and imaging plates was successfully applied to the fine aerosol particles produced in an intense radiation field of a proton accelerator. This technique is applicable to size measurement of radioactive aerosol particles produced in the intense radiation fields of radiation facilities.

  3. Thickness-dependent dielectric breakdown and nanopore creation on sub-10-nm-thick SiN membranes in solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanagi, Itaru; Fujisaki, Koji; Hamamura, Hirotaka; Takeda, Ken-ichi

    2017-01-01

    Recently, dielectric breakdown of solid-state membranes in solution has come to be known as a powerful method for fabricating nanopore sensors. This method has enabled a stable fabrication of nanopores down to sub-2 nm in diameter, which can be used to detect the sizes and structures of small molecules. Until now, the behavior of dielectric breakdown for nanopore creation in SiN membranes with thicknesses of less than 10 nm has not been studied, while the thinner nanopore membranes are preferable for nanopore sensors in terms of spatial resolution. In the present study, the thickness dependence of the dielectric breakdown of sub-10-nm-thick SiN membranes in solution was investigated using gradually increased voltage pulses. The increment in leakage current through the membrane at the breakdown was found to become smaller with a decrease in the thickness of the membrane, which resulted in the creation of smaller nanopores. In addition, the electric field for dielectric breakdown drastically decreased when the thickness of the membrane was less than 5 nm. These breakdown behaviors are quite similar to those observed in gate insulators of metal-oxide-semiconductor devices. Finally, stable ionic-current blockades were observed when single-stranded DNA passed through the nanopores created on the membranes with thicknesses of 3-7 nm.

  4. Technical note: A method for measuring size-resolved CCN in the atmosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. P. Frank

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available We present a method to investigate cloud condensation nuclei (CCN concentrations and activation efficiencies as a function of two independent variables, aerosol particle size and water vapor supersaturation. To date, most ambient CCN measurements have been made as the integral (total CCN concentration as a function of water vapor supersaturation only. However, since CCN properties of aerosol particles are strongly dependent on particle size, as well as on chemical composition, which commonly varies with particle size, more detailed measurements can provide additional important information about the CCN activation. With size-resolved measurements, the effect of particle size on CCN activity can be kept constant, which makes it possible to directly assess the influence of particle chemistry.

    The instrumental set-up consists of a differential mobility analyzer (DMA to select particles of a known size, within a narrow size range. A condensation nuclei (CN counter (condensation particle counter, CPC is used to count the total number of particles in that size range, and a CCN counter is used to count the number of CCN as a function of supersaturation, in that same size range. The activation efficiency, expressed as CCN/CN ratios, can thus directly be calculated as a function of particle size and supersaturation. We present examples of the application of this technique, using salt and smoke aerosols produced in the laboratory as well as ambient aerosols.

  5. Nanoporous bimetallic Pt-Au alloy nanocomposites with superior catalytic activity towards electro-oxidation of methanol and formic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhonghua; Wang, Yan; Wang, Xiaoguang

    2011-04-01

    We present a facile route to fabricate novel nanoporous bimetallic Pt-Au alloy nanocomposites by dealloying a rapidly solidified Al(75)Pt(15)Au(10) precursor under free corrosion conditions. The microstructure of the precursor and the as-dealloyed sample was characterized using X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, and energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) analysis. The Al(75)Pt(15)Au(10) precursor is composed of a single-phase Al(2)(Au,Pt) intermetallic compound, and can be fully dealloyed in a 20 wt.% NaOH or 5 wt.% HCl aqueous solution. The dealloying leads to the formation of the nanoporous Pt(60)Au(40) nanocomposites (np-Pt(60)Au(40) NCs) with an fcc structure. The morphology, size and crystal orientation of grains in the precursor can be conserved in the resultant nanoporous alloy. The np-Pt(60)Au(40) NCs consist of two zones with distinct ligament/channel sizes and compositions. The formation mechanism of these np-Pt(60)Au(40) NCs can be rationalized based upon surface diffusion of more noble elements and spinodal decomposition during dealloying. Electrochemical measurements demonstrate that the np-Pt(60)Au(40) NCs show superior catalytic activity towards the electro-oxidation of methanol and formic acid in the acid media compared to the commercial JM-Pt/C catalyst. This material can find potential applications in catalysis related areas, such as direct methanol or formic acid fuel cells. Our findings demonstrate that dealloying is an effective and simple strategy to realize the alloying of immiscible systems under mild conditions, and to fabricate novel nanostructures with superior performance.

  6. Solid-state Nanopore for Detecting Individual Biopolymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jiali; Golovchenko, Jene A.

    2011-01-01

    Solid-state nanopores have been fabricated and used to characterize single DNA and protein molecules. Here we describe the details on how these nanopores were fabricated and characterized, the nanopore sensing system setup, and the protocols of using these nanopores to characterize DNA and protein molecules. PMID:19488695

  7. Optical characteristics of wet-thermally oxidized bulk and nanoporous GaN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sinjae; Kadam, Mahadev; Kang, Jin-Ho; Ryu, Sang-Wan

    2016-09-01

    Gallium nitride (GaN) films deposited on sapphire substrates by metal organic chemical vapor deposition were successfully transformed into bulk and nanoporous gallium oxide (Ga2O3) using a wet thermal oxidation technique. Oxidation depth measurements confirmed that the oxide growth appeared to be faster in the case of nanoporous GaN than that of bulk GaN. Spectroscopic ellipsometry was used to evaluate and compare the optical properties of nanoporous and bulk Ga2O3 films, such as refractive index and extinction coefficient, which revealed improved optical properties for nanoporous Ga2O3 compared to the bulk. The simulations conducted on the ellipsometric spectra for bulk and nanoporous Ga2O3 using the Forouhi-Bloomer model and the Bruggeman effective medium approximation revealed the best fit with a low mean square error value. In the case of nanoporous Ga2O3, zero absorption was observed in the wavelength range of 300 nm to 840 nm, supporting the use of this material as a transparent coating in optoelectronic devices.

  8. Ordering and defects in self-assembled monolayers on nanoporous gold

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Dipna A.; Weller, Andrew M.; Chevalier, Robert B.; Karos, Constantine A.; Landis, Elizabeth C.

    2016-11-01

    Self-assembled monolayers are commonly used to tailor nanoporous structures for applications, and they also provide a model system for determining the effects of nanoscale structure on self-assembly. We have investigated the ordering and defects in alkanethiol self-assembled monolayers on nanoporous gold, a high surface area mesoporous material. Infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy was used to characterize the effects of alkyl chain length and nanoporous gold pore size on molecular layer ordering. Cyclic voltammetry was used to characterize the monolayer density and ordering, with ferrocenylalkylthiolates used to quantify and characterize defect sites. We find that dense and well-ordered molecular layers form quickly with low defect levels. However, we do not observe differences in molecular layer ordering or defects with changes in pore size.

  9. Direct access to primary amines and particle morphology control in nanoporous CO2 sorbents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dogan, Nesibe A; Ozdemir, Ercan; Yavuz, Cafer T

    2017-03-13

    Chemical tuning of nanoporous, solid sorbents for an ideal CO2 binding requires unhindered amine functional groups on the pore walls. Although common for soluble organics, post-synthetic reduction of nitriles in porous networks often fail due to the insufficient and irreversible metal hydride penetration. Here, we synthesized a nanoporous network with pendant nitrile groups, microsphere morphology and in large scale. The hollow microspheres were easily decorated with primary amines through in situ reduction by widely available boranes. CO2 capture capacity of the modified sorbent was increased up to an eight times of the starting nanoporous network with a high heat of adsorption (98 kJ/mol). Surface area can be easily tuned between 1 and 354 m2/g. Average particle size (~50 µm) is also quite suitable for CO2 capture applications where processes like fluidized bed require spheres of micron sizes.

  10. Method to fabricate functionalized conical nanopores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Small, Leo J.; Spoerke, Erik David; Wheeler, David R.

    2016-07-12

    A pressure-based chemical etch method is used to shape polymer nanopores into cones. By varying the pressure, the pore tip diameter can be controlled, while the pore base diameter is largely unaffected. The method provides an easy, low-cost approach for conically etching high density nanopores.

  11. Gyroid nanoporous scaffold for conductive polymers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guo, Fengxiao; Schulte, Lars; Zhang, Weimin

    2011-01-01

    Conductive nanoporous polymers with interconnected large surface area have been prepared by depositing polypyrrole onto nanocavity walls of nanoporous 1,2-polybutadiene films with gyroid morphology. Vapor phase polymerization of pyrrole was used to generate ultrathin films and prevent pore blocking...

  12. Nanopore sensors : From hybrid to abiotic systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kocer, Armagan; Tauk, Lara; Dejardin, Philippe

    2012-01-01

    The use of nanopores of well controlled geometry for sensing molecules in solution is reviewed. Focus is concentrated especially on synthetic track-etch pores in polymer foils and on biological nanopores, i.e. ion channels. After a brief section about multipore sensors, specific attention is provide

  13. UV Defined Nanoporous Liquid Core Waveguides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Mads Brøkner; Gopalakrishnan, Nimi; Ndoni, Sokol

    2011-01-01

    Nanoporous liquid core waveguides, where both core and cladding are made from the same material, are presented. The nanoporous polymer used is intrinsically hydrophobic, but selective UV exposure enables it to infiltrate with an aqueous solution, thus raising the refractive index from 1.26 to 1...

  14. Capillary rise of water in hydrophilic nanopores

    CERN Document Server

    Gruener, Simon; Wallacher, Dirk; Kityk, Andriy V; Huber, Patrick; 10.1103/PhysRevE.79.067301

    2009-01-01

    We report on the capillary rise of water in three-dimensional networks of hydrophilic silica pores with 3.5nm and 5nm mean radii, respectively (porous Vycor monoliths). We find classical square root of time Lucas-Washburn laws for the imbibition dynamics over the entire capillary rise times of up to 16h investigated. Provided we assume two preadsorbed strongly bound layers of water molecules resting at the silica walls, which corresponds to a negative velocity slip length of -0.5nm for water flow in silica nanopores, we can describe the filling process by a retained fluidity and capillarity of water in the pore center. This anticipated partitioning in two dynamic components reflects the structural-thermodynamic partitioning in strongly silica bound water layers and capillary condensed water in the pore center which is documented by sorption isotherm measurements.

  15. Vertical Beam Size Measurement by Streak Camera under Colliding and Single Beam Conditions in KEKB

    CERN Document Server

    Ikeda, Hitomi; Fukuma, Hitoshi; Funakoshi, Yoshihiro; Hiramatsu, Shigenori; Mitsuhashi, Toshiyuki; Ohmi, Kazuhito; Uehara, Sadaharu

    2005-01-01

    Beam behavior of KEKB was studied by measurement of the beam size using a streak camera. Effect of the electron-cloud and the parasitic collision on the vertical beam size was examined in beam collision. We intentionally injected a test bunch of positrons after 2 rf buckets of a bunch to enhance the electron cloud effect and changed electron beam conditions to see the beam-beam effect. The beam size was also measured with a single positron beam and compared with that during collision. The result of the measurement is reported in this paper.

  16. Using Amazon's Mechanical Turk website to measure accuracy of body size estimation and body dissatisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Rick M; Brown, Dana L; Boice, Russell

    2012-09-01

    This study investigated Amazon.com's website Mechanical Turk (MTurk) as a research tool for measuring body size estimation and dissatisfaction. 160 U.S. participants completed the BIAS-BD figural drawing scale and demographic questions posted on the MTurk website. The BIAS-BD consists of 17 drawings of various male and female body sizes based on anthropometric data corresponding to a range of 60% below to 140% above the average U.S. adult. Respondents selected a drawing that best reflected their current size and ideal size. Results revealed that respondents overestimated their body size by 6% and desired an ideal size 9.2% smaller than their perceived size. Findings are compared with three previous studies using the BIAS-BD scale. A general correspondence in findings between the four studies was found. We conclude that the MTurk can serve as a viable method for collecting data on the perceptual and attitudinal aspects of body image quickly and inexpensively.

  17. Graphene nanopore devices for DNA sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merchant, Chris A; Drndić, Marija

    2012-01-01

    We describe here a method for detecting the translocation of individual DNA molecules through nanopores created in graphene membranes. The devices consist of 1-5-nm thick graphene membranes with electron-beam sculpted nanopores from 5 to 10 nm in diameter. Due to the thin nature of the graphene membranes, and the reduced electrical resistance, we observe larger blocked currents than for traditional solid-state nanopores. We also show how ionic current noise levels can be reduced with the atomic-layer deposition of a few nanometers of titanium dioxide over the graphene surface. Unlike traditional solid-state nanopore materials that are insulating, graphene is an excellent electrical conductor, and its use opens the door to a new future class of nanopore devices in which electronic sensing and control is performed directly at the pore.

  18. Nanoporous metals for advanced energy technologies

    CERN Document Server

    Ding, Yi

    2016-01-01

    This book covers the state-of-the-art research in nanoporous metals for potential applications in advanced energy fields, including proton exchange membrane fuel cells, Li batteries (Li ion, Li-S, and Li-O2), and supercapacitors. The related structural design and performance of nanoporous metals as well as possible mechanisms and challenges are fully addressed. The formation mechanisms of nanoporous metals during dealloying, the microstructures of nanoporous metals and characterization methods, as well as miscrostructural regulation of nanoporous metals through alloy design of precursors and surface diffusion control are also covered in detail. This is an ideal book for researchers, engineers, graduate students, and government/industry officers who are in charge of R&D investments and strategy related to energy technologies.

  19. Determining sexual dimorphism in frog measurement data: integration of statistical significance, measurement error, effect size and biological significance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hayek Lee-Ann C.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Several analytic techniques have been used to determine sexual dimorphism in vertebrate morphological measurement data with no emergent consensus on which technique is superior. A further confounding problem for frog data is the existence of considerable measurement error. To determine dimorphism, we examine a single hypothesis (Ho = equal means for two groups (females and males. We demonstrate that frog measurement data meet assumptions for clearly defined statistical hypothesis testing with statistical linear models rather than those of exploratory multivariate techniques such as principal components, correlation or correspondence analysis. In order to distinguish biological from statistical significance of hypotheses, we propose a new protocol that incorporates measurement error and effect size. Measurement error is evaluated with a novel measurement error index. Effect size, widely used in the behavioral sciences and in meta-analysis studies in biology, proves to be the most useful single metric to evaluate whether statistically significant results are biologically meaningful. Definitions for a range of small, medium, and large effect sizes specifically for frog measurement data are provided. Examples with measurement data for species of the frog genus Leptodactylus are presented. The new protocol is recommended not only to evaluate sexual dimorphism for frog data but for any animal measurement data for which the measurement error index and observed or a priori effect sizes can be calculated.

  20. IMPROVED CATALYSTS FOR HEAVY OIL UPGRADING BASED ON ZEOLITE Y NANOPARTICLES ENCAPSULATED IN STABLE NANOPOROUS HOST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conrad Ingram; Mark Mitchell

    2005-03-31

    The objectives of this project are to synthesis nanocrystals of highly acidic zeolite Y, encapsulate them within the channels of mesoporous (nanoporous) silicates or nanoporous organosilicates and evaluate the ''zeolite Y/Nanoporous host'' composites as catalysts for the upgrading of heavy petroleum feedstocks. Our results to date are summarized as follows. The synthesis of high surface ordered nanoporous silica of expanded pore diameter of 25 nm (larger than the standard size of 8.4 nm) using trimethylbenzene as a pore size expander was accomplished. The synthesis of zeolite Y nanoparticles with median pore size of approximately 50 nm (smaller than the 80 nm typically obtained with TMAOH) using combined TMABr/TMAOH as organic additives was also accomplished. The successful synthesis of zeoliteY/Nanoporous host composite materials by sequential combination of zeolite precursors and nanoporous material precursor mixtures was implied based on results from various characterization techniques such as X-Ray diffraction, infrared spectra, thermal analysis, porosimetry data. The resulting materials showed pore sizes up to 11 nm, and infrared band at 570 cm{sup -1} suggesting the presence of both phases. New results indicated that good quality highly ordered nanoporous silica host can be synthesized in the presence of zeolite Y seed precursor depending on the amount of precursor added. Preliminary research on the catalytic performance of the materials is underway. Probe acid catalyzed reactions, such as the cracking of cumene is currently being conducted. Work in the immediate future will be focused on the following three areas: (1) Further characterization of all-silica and aluminosilicate mesoporous materials with expanded pore sizes up to 30 nm will continue; (2) Research efforts to reduce the average particle size of zeolite nanoparticles down to 35-30 nm will continue; (3) Further synthesis of ZeoliteY/Nanoporous host composite catalysts of

  1. Measurement of object structure from size-encoded images generated by optically-implemented Gabor filters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sierra, Heidy; Zheng, Jing-Yi; Rabin, Bryan; Boustany, Nada N

    2012-12-17

    We use optical Fourier processing based on two dimensional (2D) Gabor filters to obtain size-encoded images which depict with 20nm sensitivity to size while preserving a 0.36μm spatial resolution, the spatial distribution of structural features within transparent objects. The size of the object feature measured at each pixel in the encoded image is determined by the optimal Gabor filter period, S(max), that maximizes the scattering signal from that location in the object. We show that S(max) (in μm) depends linearly on feature size (also in μm) over a size range from 0.11μm to 2μm. This linear response remains largely unchanged when the refractive index ratio is varied and can be predicted from numerical simulations of Gabor-filtered light scattering. Pixel histograms of the size-encoded images of isolated spheres and diatoms were used to generate highly resolved size distributions ("size spectra") exhibiting sharp peaks characterizing the known major structural features within the studied objects. Dynamic signal associated with changes in selected feature sizes within living cells is also demonstrated. Taken together, our data suggest that a label-free, direct and objective measurement of sample structure is enabled by the size-encoded images and associated pixel histograms generated from a calibrated optical processing microscope based on Gabor filtering.

  2. Non-functional requirements: size measurement and testing with COSMIC-FFP

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kassab, M.; Ormandjieva, O.; Daneva, M.; Abran, A.; Abran, A.; Dumke, R.; Mas, A.

    2007-01-01

    The non-functional requirements (NFRs) of software systems are well known to add a degree of uncertainty to process of estimating the cost of any project. This paper contributes to the achievement of more precise project size measurement through incorporating NFRs into the functional size quantifica

  3. Protein interactions with nanoporous sol-gel derived bioactive glasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Sen; Van den Bergh, Wouter; Baker, Simon; Jones, Julian R

    2011-10-01

    Sol-gel derived bioactive glasses are excellent candidates for bone regenerative implant materials as they bond with bone, stimulate bone growth and degrade in the body. Their interactions with proteins are critical to understanding their performance after implantation. This study focuses on the interactions between fibrinogen and sol-gel glass particles of the 70S30C (70 mol.% SiO(2), 30 mol.% CaO composition). Sol-gel silica and melt-derived Bioglass® were also used for comparison. Fibrinogen penetration into the nanoporous glasses was observed by live tracking the fluorescent-labelled fibrinogen with confocal microscopy. The effect of pore size on protein penetration was investigated. Nanoporous networks with modal pore diameters larger than 6 nm were accessible to fibrinogen. When the modal nanopore diameter was decreased to 2 nm or less, the penetration of fibrinogen was inhibited. The surface properties of the glasses, which can be modulated by media pH, glass composition and final stabilisation temperature in the sol-gel process, have effects on fibrinogen adsorption via long-range Coulombic forces before the adsorption and via short-range interactions such as hydrogen bonding after the adsorption.

  4. Influence of concentration polarization on DNA translocation through a nanopore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Shengjie; Zhao, Hui

    2016-05-01

    Concentration polarization can be induced by the unique ion-perm selectivity of small nanopores, leading to a salt concentration gradient across nanopores. This concentration gradient can create diffusio-osmosis and induce an electric field, affecting ionic currents on DNA that translocates through a nanopore. Here this influence is theoretically investigated by solving the continuum Poisson-Nernst-Planck model for different salt concentrations, DNA surface charge densities, and pore properties. By implementing the perturbation method, we can explicitly compute the contribution of concentration polarization to the ionic current. The induced electric field by concentration polarization is opposite to the imposed electric field and decreases the migration current, and the induced diffusio-osmosis can decrease the convection current as well. Our studies suggest that the importance of the concentration polarization can be determined by the parameter λ /G where λ is the double-layer thickness and G is the gap size. When λ /G is larger than a critical value, the influence of concentration polarization becomes more prominent. This conclusion is supported by the studies on the dependence of the ionic current on salt concentration and pore properties, showing that the difference between two models with and without accounting for concentration polarization is larger for low salts and small pores, which correspond to larger λ /G .

  5. Measurements of displacement and trapping force on micron-sized particles in optical tweezers system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭红莲; 姚新程; 李兆霖; 程丙英; 韩学海; 张道中

    2002-01-01

    A high-stability optical tweezers equipped with a high-precision measurement system of displacement and force is set up. The results show that this combination can be used to carry out quantitative measurements of small displacements and forces for micron-sized spheres. The precision of measurements has reached nanometers and piconewtons, respectively.

  6. Surfactant phosphatidylcholine half-life and pool size measurements in premature baboons developing bronchopulmonary dysplasia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.J. Janssen; V.P. Carnielli (Virgilio); P.E. Cogo (Paola); S.R. Seidner; I.H.I. Luijendijk; J.L.D. Wattimena (Josias); A.H. Jobe (Alan); L.J.I. Zimmermann (Luc)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractBecause minimal information is available about surfactant metabolism in bronchopulmonary dysplasia, we measured half-lives and pool sizes of surfactant phosphatidylcholine in very preterm baboons recovering from respiratory distress syndrome and developing

  7. A generalization of the inhomogeneity measure for point distributions to the case of finite size objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piasecki, Ryszard

    2008-09-01

    The statistical measure of spatial inhomogeneity for n points placed in χ cells each of size k×k is generalized to incorporate finite size objects like black pixels for binary patterns of size L×L. As a function of length scale k, the measure is modified in such a way that it relates to the smallest realizable value for each considered scale. To overcome the limitation of pattern partitions to scales with k being integer divisors of L, we use a sliding cell-sampling approach. For given patterns, particularly in the case of clusters polydispersed in size, the comparison between the statistical measure and the entropic one reveals differences in detection of the first peak while at other scales they well correlate. The universality of the two measures allows both a hidden periodicity traces and attributes of planar quasi-crystals to be explored.

  8. Measuring the size of biological nanostructures with spatially modulated illumination microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Sonya; Failla, Antonio Virgilio; Spöri, Udo; Cremer, Christoph; Pombo, Ana

    2004-05-01

    Spatially modulated illumination fluorescence microscopy can in theory measure the sizes of objects with a diameter ranging between 10 and 200 nm and has allowed accurate size measurement of subresolution fluorescent beads ( approximately 40-100 nm). Biological structures in this size range have so far been measured by electron microscopy. Here, we have labeled sites containing the active, hyperphosphorylated form of RNA polymerase II in the nucleus of HeLa cells by using the antibody H5. The spatially modulated illumination-microscope was compared with confocal laser scanning and electron microscopes and found to be suitable for measuring the size of cellular nanostructures in a biological setting. The hyperphosphorylated form of polymerase II was found in structures with a diameter of approximately 70 nm, well below the 200-nm resolution limit of standard fluorescence microscopes.

  9. Noninvasive measurement of micron electron beam size of high energy using diffraction radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Naumenko, G A

    2003-01-01

    Treatments of the usage of diffraction radiation from the relativistic electrons moving though a conductive slit for the transverse beam size measurement encounter hard limitation of the method sensitivity for the electron energy larger than 1 GeV. We consider in this article a possibility of application of the artificial phase shift, which can take place when transverse electron position varies. This allows us to realize the measurements of transverse size of supper-relativistic electron beams with the small emittance.

  10. Tumor size measured by preoperative ultrasonography and postoperative pathologic examination in papillary thyroid carcinoma: relative differences according to size, calcification and coexisting thyroiditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Young Hoon; Kwon, Ki Ryun; Kwak, Seo Young; Ryu, Kyeung A; Choi, Bobae; Kim, Jin-Man; Koo, Bon Seok

    2014-05-01

    Ultrasonography (US) is a useful diagnostic modality for evaluation of the size and features of thyroid nodules. Tumor size is a key indicator of the surgical extent of thyroid cancer. We evaluated the difference in tumor sizes measured by preoperative US and postoperative pathologic examination in papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC). We reviewed the medical records of 172 consecutive patients, who underwent thyroidectomy for PTC treatment. We compared tumor size, as measured by preoperative US, with that in postoperative specimens. And we analyzed a number of factors potentially influencing the size measurement, including cancer size, calcification and coexisting thyroiditis. The mean size of the tumor measured by preoperative US was 11.4, and 10.2 mm by postoperative pathologic examination. The mean percentage difference (US-pathology/US) of tumor sizes measured by preoperative US and postoperative pathologic examination was 9.9 ± 19.3%, which was statistically significant (p 20.0 mm) and the presence of calcification or coexisting thyroiditis on the tumor size discrepancy between the two measurements was analyzed, the mean percentage differences according to tumor size (9.1 vs. 11.2% vs. 9.8%, p = 0.842), calcification (9.2 vs. 10.2%, p = 0.756) and coexisting thyroiditis (17.6 vs. 9.5%, p = 0.223) did not show statistical significance. Tumor sizes measured in postoperative pathology were ~90% of those measured by preoperative US in PTC; this was not affected by tumor size, the presence of calcification or coexisting thyroiditis. When the surgical extent of PTC treatment according to tumor size measured by US is determined, the relative difference between tumor sizes measured by preoperative US and postoperative pathologic examination should be considered.

  11. Nucleobase recognition at alkaline pH and apparent pK(a) of single DNA bases immobilised within a biological nanopore

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fransceschini, Lorenzo; Mikhailova, Ellina; Bayley, Hagan; Maglia, Giovanni

    2012-01-01

    The four DNA bases are recognized in immobilized DNA strands at high alkaline pH by nanopore current recordings. Ionic currents through the biological nanopores are also employed to measure the apparent pK(a) values of single nucleobases within the immobilised DNA strands.

  12. Cuff size influences blood pressure measurement in obese children and adolescents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Muhamed, P. K.; Olsen, M. H.; Holm, Jens-Christian

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Recently, we established that a group ofobese children and adolescents had a higher blood pressure(BP) than a healthy control group. In the present study, weinvestigate whether the higher BP in the obese group wasinfluenced by BP cuff sizes.Methods: A total of 104 obese patients aged...... sizes had a significant impact on BP measurements.Despite the influence of cuff size, multiple regressionanalyses revealed that systolic BP was 68 mmHg higherand diastolic BP 32 mmHg higher in the obese groupthan in the control group. A step function, i.e. a sudden fallin BP, was seen at the point...... of switching from small to mediumcuff size in the control group, which suggests that systolicBP was overestimated when using small cuff size andunderestimated when using medium cuff size in subjectswith an AC near 23 cm.Conclusions: BP was higher in the obese group than inthe control group although BP...

  13. Measurement of bubble and pellet size distributions: past and current image analysis technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junker, Beth

    2006-08-01

    Measurements of bubble and pellet size distributions are useful for biochemical process optimizations. The accuracy, representation, and simplicity of these measurements improve when the measurement is performed on-line and in situ rather than off-line using a sample. Historical and currently available measurement systems for photographic methods are summarized for bubble and pellet (morphology) measurement applications. Applications to cells, mycelia, and pellets measurements have driven key technological developments that have been applied for bubble measurements. Measurement trade-offs exist to maximize accuracy, extend range, and attain reasonable cycle times. Mathematical characterization of distributions using standard statistical techniques is straightforward, facilitating data presentation and analysis. For the specific application of bubble size distributions, selected bioreactor operating parameters and physicochemical conditions alter distributions. Empirical relationships have been established in some cases where sufficient data have been collected. In addition, parameters and conditions with substantial effects on bubble size distributions were identified and their relative effects quantified. This information was used to guide required accuracy and precision targets for bubble size distribution measurements from newly developed novel on-line and in situ bubble measurement devices.

  14. A uniform measurement expression for cross method comparison of nanoparticle aggregate size distributions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dudkiewicz, Agnieszka; Wagner, Stephan; Lehner, Angela

    2015-01-01

    Available measurement methods for nanomaterials are based on very different measurement principles and hence produce different values when used on aggregated nanoparticle dispersions. This paper provides a solution for relating measurements of nanomaterials comprised of nanoparticle aggregates...... by increased retention of smaller nanomaterials (SEM). This study thereby presents a successful and conclusive cross-method comparison of size distribution measurements of aggregated nanomaterials. The authors recommend the uniform MED size expression for application in nanomaterial risk assessment studies...... determined by different techniques using a uniform expression of a mass equivalent diameter (MED). The obtained solution is used to transform into MED the size distributions of the same sample of synthetic amorphous silica (nanomaterial comprising aggregated nanoparticles) measured by six different...

  15. Real-time retrieval of submicron aerosol size distributions from multi-wavelength spectral extinction measurements

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN; Jiawei; YANG; Mu; FENG; Haibao; NI; Qijun

    2016-01-01

    The real-time retrieval of submicron aerosol size distributions is of major interest for applications. Based on the Mie theory,the spectral extinction method offers a simple measurement principle and a convenient optical arrangement. In contrast to the relative simplicity of the experimental measurement the retrieval of the particles size distribution and particle concentration from the spectral extinction method is difficult. Mie scattering Equation is a Fredholm Integral Equation of the First Kind. This paper develops a hybrid iterative model-dependent algorithm for on-line particle sizing from extinction spectra which is both computationally efficient and accurate. Applying the refined Mie diagnostic iterative procedures within some candidate solutions can identify the unique result accurately and rapidly enough for real time measurement. With the addition of added Gaussian noise,an average tolerance up to 5% of noise level is kept for particle size from submicron to micrometer under moderate polydispersity.

  16. Computing Effect Size Measures with ViSta-The Visual Statistics System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuria Cortada de Kohan

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Effect size measures are recognized as a necessary complement to statistical hypothesis testing because they provide important information that such tests alone cannot offer. In this paper we: a briefly review the importance of effect size measures, b describe some calculation algorithms for the case of the difference between two means, and c provide a new and easy-to-use computer program to perform these calculations within ViSta “The Visual Statistics System”. A worked example is also provided to illustrate some practical issues concerning the interpretation and limits of effect size computation. The audience for this paper includes novice researchers as well as ViSta’s user interested on applying effect size measures.

  17. Nanoporous gold as a highly active substrate for surface-enhanced Raman scattering spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kucheyev, S O; Hayes, J R; Biener, J; Hamza, A V

    2006-03-28

    Colloidal solutions of metal nanoparticles are currently among most studied substrates for sensors based on surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). However, such substrates often suffer from not being cost-effective, reusable, or stable. Here, we develop nanoporous Au as a highly active, tunable, a.ordable, stable, bio-compatible, and reusable SERS substrate. Nanoporous Au is prepared by a facile process of free corrosion of AgAu alloys followed by annealing. Results show that nanofoams with average pore sizes of {approx} 250 nm exhibit the largest SERS signal for 632.8 nm excitation. This is attributed to the electromagnetic SERS enhancement mechanism with additional field localization within pores.

  18. Escape of DNA from a weakly biased thin nanopore: Experimental evidence for a universal diffusive behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoogerheide, David P.; Albertorio, Fernando; Golovchenko, Jene A.

    2014-01-01

    We report experimental escape time distributions of double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) molecules initially threaded halfway through a thin solid-state nanopore. We find a universal behavior of the escape time distributions consistent with a one-dimensional first passage formulation notwithstanding the geometry of the experiment and the potential role of complex molecule-liquid-pore interactions. Diffusion constants that depend on the molecule length and pore size are determined. Also discussed are the practical implications of long time diffusive molecule trapping in the nanopore. PMID:24483704

  19. Reporting unit size and measurement uncertainty: current Australian practice in clinical chemistry and haematology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkins, Robert C; Badrick, Tony

    2015-08-01

    In this study we aimed to compare the reporting unit size used by Australian laboratories for routine chemistry and haematology tests to the unit size used by learned authorities and in standard laboratory textbooks and to the justified unit size based on measurement uncertainty (MU) estimates from quality assurance program data. MU was determined from Royal College of Pathologists of Australasia (RCPA) - Australasian Association of Clinical Biochemists (AACB) and RCPA Haematology Quality Assurance Program survey reports. The reporting unit size implicitly suggested in authoritative textbooks, the RCPA Manual, and the General Serum Chemistry program itself was noted. We also used published data on Australian laboratory practices.The best performing laboratories could justify their chemistry unit size for 55% of analytes while comparable figures for the 50% and 90% laboratories were 14% and 8%, respectively. Reporting unit size was justifiable for all laboratories for red cell count, >50% for haemoglobin but only the top 10% for haematocrit. Few, if any, could justify their mean cell volume (MCV) and mean cell haemoglobin concentration (MCHC) reporting unit sizes.The reporting unit size used by many laboratories is not justified by present analytical performance. Using MU estimates to determine the reporting interval for quantitative laboratory results ensures reporting practices match local analytical performance and recognises the inherent error of the measurement process.

  20. Grain size of loess and paleosol samples: what are we measuring?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varga, György; Kovács, János; Szalai, Zoltán; Újvári, Gábor

    2017-04-01

    Particle size falling into a particularly narrow range is among the most important properties of windblown mineral dust deposits. Therefore, various aspects of aeolian sedimentation and post-depositional alterations can be reconstructed only from precise grain size data. Present study is aimed at (1) reviewing grain size data obtained from different measurements, (2) discussing the major reasons for disagreements between data obtained by frequently applied particle sizing techniques, and (3) assesses the importance of particle shape in particle sizing. Grain size data of terrestrial aeolian dust deposits (loess and paleosoil) were determined by laser scattering instruments (Fritsch Analysette 22 Microtec Plus, Horiba Partica La-950 v2 and Malvern Mastersizer 3000 with a Hydro Lv unit), while particles size and shape distributions were acquired by Malvern Morphologi G3-ID. Laser scattering results reveal that the optical parameter settings of the measurements have significant effects on the grain size distributions, especially for the fine-grained fractions (Innovation Office (Hungary) under contract NKFI 120620 is gratefully acknowledged. It was additionally supported (for G. Varga) by the Bolyai János Research Scholarship of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences.

  1. Tunable, Strain-Controlled Nanoporous MoS₂ Filter for Water Desalination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Weifeng; Yang, Yanmei; Weber, Jeffrey K; Zhang, Gang; Zhou, Ruhong

    2016-02-23

    The deteriorating state of global fresh water resources represents one of the most serious challenges that scientists and policymakers currently face. Desalination technologies, which are designed to extract potable water from the planet's bountiful stores of seawater, could serve to alleviate much of the stress that presently plagues fresh water supplies. In recent decades, desalination methods have improved via water-filtering architectures based on nanoporous graphene filters and artificial membranes integrated with biological water channels. Here, we report the auspicious performance (in simulations) of an alternative nanoporous desalination filter constructed from a MoS2 nanosheet. In striking contrast to graphene-based filters, we find that the "open" and "closed" states of the MoS2 filter can be regulated by the introduction of mechanical strain, yielding a highly tunable nanopore interface. By applying lateral strain to the MoS2 filter in our simulations, we see that the transition point between "open" and "closed" states occurs under tension that induces about 6% cross-sectional expansion in the membrane (6% strain); the open state of the MoS2 filter demonstrates high water transparency and a strong salt filtering capability even under 12% strain. Our results thus demonstrate the promise of a controllable nanoporous MoS2 desalination filter, wherein the morphology and size of the central nanopore can be precisely regulated by tensile strain. These findings support the design and proliferation of tunable nanodevices for filtration and other applications.

  2. Nanoporous hybrid electrolytes

    KAUST Repository

    Schaefer, Jennifer L.

    2011-01-01

    Oligomer-suspended SiO2-polyethylene glycol nanoparticles are studied as porous media electrolytes. At SiO2 volume fractions, , bracketing a critical value y ≈ 0.29, the suspensions jam and their mechanical modulus increase by more than seven orders. For >y, the mean pore diameter is close to the anion size, yet the ionic conductivity remains surprisingly high and can be understood, at all , using a simple effective medium model proposed by Maxwell. SiO 2-polyethylene glycol hybrid electrolytes are also reported to manifest attractive electrochemical stability windows (0.3-6.3 V) and to reach a steady-state interfacial impedance when in contact with metallic lithium. © 2010 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  3. Additional acoustic attenuation of coastal turbid water -- Measurements compared with predictions using particle size di

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WEN Hongtao; YANG Yanming; LIU Zhenwen; NIU Fuqiang

    2011-01-01

    Based on reverberation method, the viscous absorptions of 0.2-2.0 kg/m3 sediment and glass bead turbid seawater were measured. It is shown that the measurement results were more consistent with the prediction results using particle size distributions tech

  4. Nanoporous silica membranes with high hydrothermal stability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boffa, Vittorio; Magnacca, Giualiana; Yue, Yuanzheng

    Despite the use of sol-gel derived nanoporous silica membranes in substitution of traditional separation processes is expected leading to vast energy savings, their intrinsic poor steam-stability hampers their application at an industrial level. Transition metal ions can be used as dopant...... to improve the stability of nanoporous silica structure. This work is a quantitative study on the impact of type and concentration of transition metal ions on the microporous structure and stability of amorphous silica-based membranes, which provides information on how to design chemical compositions...... and synthetic paths for the fabrication of silica-based membranes with a well accessible and highly stabile nanoporous structure...

  5. Measuring Left Ventricular Size in Non-Electrocardiographic-gated Chest Computed Tomography: What Radiologists Should Know.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Felipe S; Folador, Luciano; Eifer, Diego A; Foppa, Murilo; Hanneman, Kate

    2017-06-15

    Non-electrocardiographic (ECG)-gated computed tomography (CT) of the chest is one of the most commonly performed imaging studies. Although the heart is included in every CT study, cardiac findings are commonly underreported in radiology reports. Left ventricular size is one of the most important prognostic markers in multiple cardiac diseases and can be measured on almost all non-ECG-gated multidetector chest CT studies. This review will discuss the available evidence on different measurements of left ventricular size obtained on non-ECG-gated CT of the chest. Measurement thresholds, technical issues, and potential problems are emphasized, with practical recommendations.

  6. In situ exhaust cloud measurements. [particle size distribution and cloud physics of rocket exhaust clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wornom, D.

    1980-01-01

    Airborne in situ exhaust cloud measurements were conducted to obtain definitions of cloud particle size range, Cl2 content, and HCl partitioning. Particle size distribution data and Cl2 measurements were made during the May, August, and September 1977 Titan launches. The measurements of three basic effluents - HCl, NO sub X, and particles - against minutes after launch are plotted. The maximum observed HCl concentration to the maximum Cl2 concentration are compared and the ratios of the Cl2 to the HCl is calculated.

  7. Particle Size, Number Density, And Velocity Measurements In A 2800 K Combustion System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farmer, W. M.; Schwartz, F. A.; Stallings, E. S.; Belz, R. A.

    1983-10-01

    Particle size and velocity measurements have been obtained in a low-speed (6 to 10 m/s), 2800 K combustor 30 cm in diameter. The measurements were obtained using a particle-sizing interferometer coupled to a 0.5 m spectrometer for background light rejection from radiant particles. Results obtained for the combustion of powdered coke clearly indicate the capabilities of this type of instrument to estimate combustor efficiency as a function of temperature. Comparison of the optically sampled measurements with other sampling techniques shows reasonable agreement.

  8. Nanoporous Polymer Films of Cyanate Ester Resins Designed by Using Ionic Liquids as Porogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fainleib, Alexander; Vashchuk, Alina; Starostenko, Olga; Grigoryeva, Olga; Rogalsky, Sergiy; Nguyen, Thi-Thanh-Tam; Grande, Daniel

    2017-02-01

    Novel nanoporous film materials of thermostable cyanate ester resins (CERs) were generated by polycyclotrimerization of dicyanate ester of bisphenol E in the presence of varying amounts (from 20 to 40 wt%) of an ionic liquid (IL), i.e., 1-heptylpyridinium tetrafluoroborate, followed by its quantitative extraction after complete CER network formation. The completion of CER formation and IL extraction was assessed using gel fraction content determination, FTIR, 1H NMR, and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX). SEM and DSC-based thermoporometry analyses demonstrated the formation of nanoporous structures after IL removal from CER networks, thus showing the effective role of IL as a porogen. Pore sizes varied from 20 to 180 nm with an average pore diameter of around 45-60 nm depending on the initial IL content. The thermal stability of nanoporous CER-based films was investigated by thermogravimetric analysis.

  9. Bimetallic Metal-Organic Frameworks for Controlled Catalytic Graphitization of Nanoporous Carbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Jing; Salunkhe, Rahul R.; Zhang, Huabin; Malgras, Victor; Ahamad, Tansir; Alshehri, Saad M.; Kobayashi, Naoya; Tominaka, Satoshi; Ide, Yusuke; Kim, Jung Ho; Yamauchi, Yusuke

    2016-07-01

    Single metal-organic frameworks (MOFs), constructed from the coordination between one-fold metal ions and organic linkers, show limited functionalities when used as precursors for nanoporous carbon materials. Herein, we propose to merge the advantages of zinc and cobalt metals ions into one single MOF crystal (i.e., bimetallic MOFs). The organic linkers that coordinate with cobalt ions tend to yield graphitic carbons after carbonization, unlike those bridging with zinc ions, due to the controlled catalytic graphitization by the cobalt nanoparticles. In this work, we demonstrate a feasible method to achieve nanoporous carbon materials with tailored properties, including specific surface area, pore size distribution, degree of graphitization, and content of heteroatoms. The bimetallic-MOF-derived nanoporous carbon are systematically characterized, highlighting the importance of precisely controlling the properties of the carbon materials. This can be done by finely tuning the components in the bimetallic MOF precursors, and thus designing optimal carbon materials for specific applications.

  10. Adhesion and osteogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells on titanium nanopores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Lavenus

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Titanium implants are widely used in orthopaedic and dental surgery. Surface properties play a major role in cell and tissue interactions. The adhesion and differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells were studied as a function of nanostructures. Titanium surfaces with nanopores 30, 150 and 300 nm in diameter were prepared by physical vapour deposition. PCR arrays indicated that the expression of integrins was modulated by the nanopore size. Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells (hMSCs exhibited more branched cell morphology on Ti30 than on other surfaces. Ti30 and Ti150 induced osteoblastic differentiation while Ti300 had a limited effect. Overall, nanopores of 30 nm may promote early osteoblastic differentiation and, consequently, rapid osseointegration of titanium implants.

  11. Nanoporous characteristics of sol-gel-derived ZnO thin film

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Anees A. Ansari; M. A. M. Khan; M. Alhoshan; S. A. Alrokayan; M. S. Alsalhi

    2012-01-01

    Sol-gel-derived nanoporous ZnO film has been successfully deposited on glass substrate at 200 ℃ and subsequently annealed at different temperatures of 300,400 and 600 ℃.Atomic force micrographs demonstrated that the film was crack-free,and that granular nanoparticles were homogenously distributed on the film surface.The average grain size of the nanoparticles and RMS roughness of the scanned surface area was 10 nm and 13.6nm,respectively,which is due to the high porosity of the film.Photoluminescence (PL) spectra of the nanoporous ZnO film at room temperature show a diffused band,which might be due to an increased amount of oxygen vacancies on the lattice surface.The observed results of the nanoporous ZnO film indicates a promising applicationin the development of electrochemical biosensors due to the porosity of film enhancing the higher loading of biomacromolecules (enzyme and proteins).

  12. Facile Synthesis of Nanoporous Pt-Y alloy with Enhanced Electrocatalytic Activity and Durability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Rongjing; Mei, Ling; Han, Guangjie; Chen, Jiyun; Zhang, Genhua; Quan, Ying; Gu, Ning; Zhang, Lei; Fang, Yong; Qian, Bin; Jiang, Xuefan; Han, Zhida

    2017-02-01

    Recently, Pt-Y alloy has displayed an excellent electrocatalytic activity for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR), and is regarded as a promising cathode catalyst for fuel cells. However, the bulk production of nanoscaled Pt-Y alloy with outstanding catalytic performance remains a great challenge. Here, we address the challenge through a simple dealloying method to synthesize nanoporous Pt-Y alloy (NP-PtY) with a typical ligament size of ~5 nm. By combining the intrinsic superior electrocatalytic activity of Pt-Y alloy with the special nanoporous structure, the NP-PtY bimetallic catalyst presents higher activity for ORR and ethanol oxidation reaction, and better electrocatalytic stability than the commercial Pt/C catalyst and nanoporous Pt alloy. The as-made NP-PtY holds great application potential as a promising electrocatalyst in proton exchange membrane fuel cells due to the advantages of facile preparation and excellent catalytic performance.

  13. Measuring the size and charge of single nanoscale objects in solution using an electrostatic fluidic trap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mojarad, Nassiredin; Krishnan, Madhavi

    2012-07-01

    Measuring the size and charge of objects suspended in solution, such as dispersions of colloids or macromolecules, is a significant challenge. Measurements based on light scattering are inherently biased to larger entities, such as aggregates in the sample, because the intensity of light scattered by a small object scales as the sixth power of its size. Techniques that rely on the collective migration of species in response to external fields (electric or hydrodynamic, for example) are beset with difficulties including low accuracy and dispersion-limited resolution. Here, we show that the size and charge of single nanoscale objects can be directly measured with high throughput by analysing their thermal motion in an array of electrostatic traps. The approach, which is analogous to Millikan's oil drop experiment, could in future be used to detect molecular binding events with high sensitivity or carry out dynamic single-charge resolved measurements at the solid/liquid interface.

  14. Plasmonic devices and sensors built from ordered nanoporous materials.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacobs, Benjamin W.; Kobayashi, Yoji (University of California, Berkeley); Houk, Ronald J. T.; Allendorf, Mark D.; Long, Jeffrey R. (University of California, Berkeley); Robertson, Ian M. (University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL); House, Stephen D. (University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL); Graham, Dennis D. (University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL); Talin, Albert Alec (National Institute of Standards & Technology, Gaithersburg, MD); Chang, Noel N. (University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL); El Gabaly Marquez, Farid

    2009-09-01

    The objective of this project is to lay the foundation for using ordered nanoporous materials known as metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) to create devices and sensors whose properties are determined by the dimensions of the MOF lattice. Our hypothesis is that because of the very short (tens of angstroms) distances between pores within the unit cell of these materials, enhanced electro-optical properties will be obtained when the nanopores are infiltrated to create nanoclusters of metals and other materials. Synthetic methods used to produce metal nanoparticles in disordered templates or in solution typically lead to a distribution of particle sizes. In addition, creation of the smallest clusters, with sizes of a few to tens of atoms, remains very challenging. Nanoporous metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) are a promising solution to these problems, since their long-range crystalline order creates completely uniform pore sizes with potential for both steric and chemical stabilization. We report results of synthetic efforts. First, we describe a systematic investigation of silver nanocluster formation within MOFs using three representative MOF templates. The as-synthesized clusters are spectroscopically consistent with dimensions {le} 1 nm, with a significant fraction existing as Ag{sub 3} clusters, as shown by electron paramagnetic resonance. Importantly, we show conclusively that very rapid TEM-induced MOF degradation leads to agglomeration and stable, easily imaged particles, explaining prior reports of particles larger than MOF pores. These results solve an important riddle concerning MOF-based templates and suggest that heterostructures composed of highly uniform arrays of nanoparticles within MOFs are feasible. Second, a preliminary study of methods to incorporate fulleride (K{sub 3}C{sub 60}) guest molecules within MOF pores that will impart electrical conductivity is described.

  15. Using the ratio of means as the effect size measure in combining results of microarray experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Greenwood Celia MT

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Development of efficient analytic methodologies for combining microarray results is a major challenge in gene expression analysis. The widely used effect size models are thought to provide an efficient modeling framework for this purpose, where the measures of association for each study and each gene are combined, weighted by the standard errors. A significant disadvantage of this strategy is that the quality of different data sets may be highly variable, but this information is usually neglected during the integration. Moreover, it is widely known that the estimated standard deviations are probably unstable in the commonly used effect size measures (such as standardized mean difference when sample sizes in each group are small. Results We propose a re-parameterization of the traditional mean difference based effect measure by using the log ratio of means as an effect size measure for each gene in each study. The estimated effect sizes for all studies were then combined under two modeling frameworks: the quality-unweighted random effects models and the quality-weighted random effects models. We defined the quality measure as a function of the detection p-value, which indicates whether a transcript is reliably detected or not on the Affymetrix gene chip. The new effect size measure is evaluated and compared under the quality-weighted and quality-unweighted data integration frameworks using simulated data sets, and also in several data sets of prostate cancer patients and controls. We focus on identifying differentially expressed biomarkers for prediction of cancer outcomes. Conclusion Our results show that the proposed effect size measure (log ratio of means has better power to identify differentially expressed genes, and that the detected genes have better performance in predicting cancer outcomes than the commonly used effect size measure, the standardized mean difference (SMD, under both quality-weighted and quality

  16. Surface modification of graphene nanopores for protein translocation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Y. P.; Tiwari, P. B.; Krishnakumar, P.; Vlassiouk, I.; Li, W.Z.; Wang, X.W.; Darici, Y.; Lindsay, S.M.; Wang, H. D.; Smirnov, S.; He, J.

    2014-01-01

    Studies of DNA translocation through graphene nanopores have revealed their potential for DNA sequencing. Here we report a study of protein translocation through chemically modified graphene nanopores. A transmission electron microscope (TEM) was used to cut nanopores with diameters between 5-20 nm in multilayer graphene prepared by chemical vapor deposition (CVD). After oxygen plasma treatment, the dependence of the measured ionic current on salt concentration and pH was consistent with a small surface charge induced by the formation of carboxyl groups. While translocation of gold nanoparticles (10 nm) was readily detected through such treated pores of a larger diameter, translocation of protein ferritin was not observed either for oxygen plasma treated pores, or for pores modified with mercaptohexadecanoic acid. Ferritin translocation events were reliably observed after the pores were modified with the phospholipid-PEG (DPPE-PEG750) amphiphile. The ion current signature of translocation events was complex, suggesting that a series of interactions between the protein and pore occur during the process. PMID:24231385

  17. Confined Nystatin Polyenes in Nanopore Induce Biologic Ionic Selectivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khaoula Boukari

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Antifungal polyenes such as nystatin (or amphotericin B molecules play an important role in regulating ions permeability through membrane cell. The creation of self-assembled nanopores into the fungal lipid membranes permits the leakage and the selectivity of ions (i.e., blockage of divalent cations that cause the cell death. These abilities are thus of first interest to promote new biomimetic membranes with improved ionic properties. In the present work, we will use molecular dynamic simulations to interpret recent experimental data that showed the transfer of the nystatin action inside artificial nanopore in terms of ion permeability and selectivity. We will demonstrate that nystatin polyenes can be stabilized in a hydrophobic carbon nanotube, even at high concentration. The high potential interaction between the polyenes and the hydrophobic pore wall ensures the apparition of a hole inside the biomimetic nanopore that changes its intrinsic properties. The probability ratios of cation versus anion show interesting reproducibility of experimental measurements and, to a certain extent, opened the way for transferring biological properties in synthetic membranes.

  18. Antibody immobilization on a nanoporous aluminum surface for immunosensor development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, Changhoon; Lee, Jooyoung; Park, Jiyong; Takhistov, Paul

    2012-12-01

    A method of antibody (Ab) immobilization on a nanoporous aluminum surface for an electrochemical immunosensor is presented. To achieve good attachment and stability of Ab on an aluminum surface, aluminum was silanized with 3-aminopropyltryethoxysilane (APTES), and then covalently cross-linked to self-assembled layers (SALs) of APTES. Both the APTES concentration and the silanization time affected the formation of APTES-SALs as Ab immobilization. The formation of APTES-SALs was confirmed using the water contact angle on the APTES-SALs surface. The reactivity of APTES-SALs with Ab was investigated by measuring the fluorescence intensity of fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled Ab-immobilized on the aluminum surface. Silanization of aluminum in 2% APTES for 4 h resulted in higher water contact angles and greater amounts of immobilized Ab than other APTES concentrations or silanization times. More Ab was immobilized on the nanoporous surface than on a planar aluminum surface. Electrochemical immunosensors developed on the nanoporous aluminum via the Ab immobilization method established in this study responded functionally to the antigen concentration in the diagnostic solution.

  19. Nanoporous ultra-high specific surface inorganic fibres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanehata, Masaki; Ding, Bin; Shiratori, Seimei

    2007-08-01

    Nanoporous inorganic (silica) nanofibres with ultra-high specific surface have been fabricated by electrospinning the blend solutions of poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) and colloidal silica nanoparticles, followed by selective removal of the PVA component. The configurations of the composite and inorganic nanofibres were investigated by changing the average silica particle diameters and the concentrations of colloidal silica particles in polymer solutions. After the removal of PVA by calcination, the fibre shape of pure silica particle assembly was maintained. The nanoporous silica fibres were assembled as a porous membrane with a high surface roughness. From the results of Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) measurements, the BET surface area of inorganic silica nanofibrous membranes was increased with the decrease of the particle diameters. The membrane composed of silica particles with diameters of 15 nm showed the largest BET surface area of 270.3 m2 g-1 and total pore volume of 0.66 cm3 g-1. The physical absorption of methylene blue dye molecules by nanoporous silica membranes was examined using UV-vis spectrometry. Additionally, the porous silica membranes modified with fluoroalkylsilane showed super-hydrophobicity due to their porous structures.

  20. Nanoporous ultra-high specific surface inorganic fibres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanehata, Masaki [Faculty of Science and Technology, Keio University, Yokohama 223-8522 (Japan); Ding Bin [Fiber and Polymer Science, University of California, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Shiratori, Seimei [Faculty of Science and Technology, Keio University, Yokohama 223-8522 (Japan)

    2007-08-08

    Nanoporous inorganic (silica) nanofibres with ultra-high specific surface have been fabricated by electrospinning the blend solutions of poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) and colloidal silica nanoparticles, followed by selective removal of the PVA component. The configurations of the composite and inorganic nanofibres were investigated by changing the average silica particle diameters and the concentrations of colloidal silica particles in polymer solutions. After the removal of PVA by calcination, the fibre shape of pure silica particle assembly was maintained. The nanoporous silica fibres were assembled as a porous membrane with a high surface roughness. From the results of Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) measurements, the BET surface area of inorganic silica nanofibrous membranes was increased with the decrease of the particle diameters. The membrane composed of silica particles with diameters of 15 nm showed the largest BET surface area of 270.3 m{sup 2} g{sup -1} and total pore volume of 0.66 cm{sup 3} g{sup -1}. The physical absorption of methylene blue dye molecules by nanoporous silica membranes was examined using UV-vis spectrometry. Additionally, the porous silica membranes modified with fluoroalkylsilane showed super-hydrophobicity due to their porous structures.

  1. Simultaneous measurement of droplet size and velocity field by an interferometric imaging technique in spray combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujisawa, N.; Hosokawa, A.; Tomimatsu, S. [Niigata Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Mechanical and Production Engineering

    2003-08-01

    The present paper describes an experimental technique of droplet sizing and velocity measurement for application to a luminous flame in spray combustion. The size measurement of unburnt fuel droplets in combustion is carried out by using an interferometric imaging method, while the corresponding velocity field is measured by particle tracking velocimetry (PTV) in combination with the rotary shutter to avoid the high intensity noise of the luminous flame in spray combustion. The measurements are successfully applied to the spray flow from a gun-type burner with and without combustion. The experimental results in spray combustion indicate that the smaller size of fuel droplets are almost burnt in the centre of the flame and the unburnt droplets of larger size remain in the outer region of the burner flow. It was found that the mean droplet velocity measured by the present PTV technique in combustion is almost independent of the droplet size and agrees closely with the gas velocity. However, the velocity magnitude with combustion is increased in comparison with the case without combustion, which suggests the influence of gas expansion at high temperatures. (author)

  2. Comparison of aerosol volume size distributions between column and surface measurements downwind of Seoul, Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, J. S.; Choi, Y.; Ghim, Y. S.

    2015-12-01

    The aerosol volume size distribution is one of the most important parameters in retrieving aerosol optical properties and studying radiative forcing. The column-integrated aerosol volume size distribution for AERONET was obtained from inversion product level 1.5 (22 bins between 0.1 and 30 μm in diameter) from the measurements of CIMEL sunphotometer (CE-318); that for SKYNET was obtained using skyrad.pack V5 (20 bins, 0.02-33 μm) from the measurements of PREDE skyradiometer (POM-02). The aerosol volume size distribution at the surface was measured using a wide range aerosol spectrometer system consisting of a scanning mobility particle scanner (Grimm, Model 5.419; 89 bins, 0.005-0.35 μm) and an optical particle counter (Grimm, Model 1.109; 31 bins, 0.27-34 μm). The measurement was conducted in Yongin, downwind of Seoul, Korea, from April 30 to June 27, 2015. The measurement site is located on the rooftop of a five-story building on the hill (37.34°N, 127.27°E, 167 m above sea level) in the global campus of Hankuk University of Foreign Studies. To investigate the discrepancy in effective diameter and fine mode volume fraction, we compared the volume size distributions when the measurement time coincided within 5 minutes because the measurement intervals were different between instruments.

  3. A novel methodology to measure methane bubble sizes in the water column

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemond, H.; Delwiche, K.; Senft-Grupp, S.; Manganello, T.

    2014-12-01

    The fate of methane ebullition from lake sediments is dependent on initial bubble size. Rising bubbles are subject to dissolution, reducing the fraction of methane that ultimately enters the atmosphere while increasing concentrations of aqueous methane. Smaller bubbles not only rise more slowly, but dissolve more rapidly larger bubbles. Thus, understanding methane bubble size distributions in the water column is critical to predicting atmospheric methane emissions from ebullition. However, current methods of measuring methane bubble sizes in-situ are resource-intensive, typically requiring divers, video equipment, sonar, or hydroacoustic instruments. The complexity and cost of these techniques points to the strong need for a simple, autonomous device that can measure bubble size distributions and be deployed unattended over long periods of time. We describe a bubble sizing device that can be moored in the subsurface and can intercept and measure the size of bubbles as they rise. The instrument uses a novel optical measurement technique with infrared LEDs and IR-sensitive photodetectors combined with a custom-designed printed circuit board. An on-board microcomputer handles raw optical signals and stores the relevant information needed to calculate bubble volume. The electronics are housed within a pressure case fabricated from standard PVC fittings and are powered by size C alkaline batteries. The bill of materials cost is less than $200, allowing us to deploy multiple sensors at various locations within Upper Mystic Lake, MA. This novel device will provide information on how methane bubble sizes may vary both spatially and temporally. We present data from tests under controlled laboratory conditions and from deployments in Upper Mystic Lake.

  4. Synthesis and mechanical behavior of nanoporous nanotwinned copper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Ran; Antoniou, Antonia [The Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, 801 Ferst Drive, Atlanta, Georgia 30332 (United States); Zheng, Shijian; Kevin Baldwin, Jon; Mara, Nathan [Materials Physics and Applications Division, Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies, MPA-CINT, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Kuthuru, Mary [Cross Keys High School, 1626 N Druid Hills Rd NE, Atlanta, Georgia 30319 (United States)

    2013-12-09

    We synthesize nanoporous copper (NP Cu) through electrochemical dealloying of amorphous Cu{sub 0.41}Si{sub 0.59} under compressive residual stress. Transmission Electron Microscopy reveals that struts are nanocrystalline with grain size equal to the strut thickness. Moreover, a significant population of twins with spacing ∼7 nm is present within each imaged grain. The hardness of this nanocrystalline, nanotwinned NP Cu is approximately one order of magnitude greater than reports on NP Cu in the literature. The yield strength of individual struts inferred through dimensional analysis is approximately an order of magnitude greater than bulk copper and compares well with other nanostructured copper systems.

  5. Size measurement of nano-particles using self-mixing effect

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huarui Wang; Jianqi Shen

    2008-01-01

    In this letter, the technique of laser self-mixing effect is employed for nano-particle size analysis. In contrast to the photon correlation spectroscopy (PCS) and photon cross correlation spectroscopy (PCCS),the main advantages of this technique are sensitive, compact, low-cost, and simple experimental setup etc.An improved Kaczmarz projection method is developed in the inversion problem to extract the particle size distribution. The experimental results prove that nano-particle size can be measured reasonably by using the self-mixing effect technique combined with the improved projection algorithm.

  6. Inference of stratospheric aerosol composition and size distribution from SAGE II satellite measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Pi-Huan; Mccormick, M. P.; Fuller, W. H.; Yue, G. K.; Swissler, T. J.; Osborn, M. T.

    1989-01-01

    A method for inferring stratospheric aerosol composition and size distribution from the water vapor concentration and aerosol extinction measurements obtained in the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE) II and the associated temperature from the NMC. The aerosols are assumed to be sulfuric acid-water droplets. A modified Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm is used to determine model size distribution parameters based on the SAGE II multiwavelength aerosol extinctions. It is found that the best aerosol size information is contained in the aerosol radius range between about 0.25 and 0.80 micron.

  7. Size distribution of a metallic polydispersion through capacitive measurements in a sedimentation experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salazar-Neumann, E.; Nahmad-Molinari, Y.; Ruiz-Suárez, J. C.; Ardisson, P.-L.; Arancibia-Bulnes, C. A.; Rechtman, R.

    2001-07-01

    We present a simple experimental technique to determine size distributions of metallic polydispersions. The particles are first suspended in a viscous fluid-like glycerol and then their sedimentation is followed by measuring the effective dielectric constant in a cylindrical cell at a fixed frequency. Thereafter, an inversion procedure of the data, based on the Maxwell-Garnett effective medium theory and Stokes law, is used to directly obtain the size distribution. The technique is applied to three different stainless steel dispersions and compares very well with a traditional sizing method based in microphotography.

  8. Geometric measures of multipartite entanglement in finite-size spin chains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blasone, M; Dell' Anno, F; De Siena, S; Giampaolo, S M; Illuminati, F, E-mail: illuminati@sa.infn.i [Dipartimento di Matematica e Informatica, Universita degli Studi di Salerno, Via Ponte don Melillo, I-84084 Fisciano (Italy)

    2010-09-01

    We investigate the behaviour of multipartite entanglement in finite-size quantum spin systems, resorting to a hierarchy of geometric measures of multipartite entanglement recently introduced in the literature. In particular, we investigate the ground-state entanglement in the XY model defined on finite chains of N sites with periodic boundary conditions. We analyse the behaviour of the geometric measures of (N- 1)-partite and (N/2)-partite entanglement and compare them with the Wei-Goldbart geometric measure of global entanglement.

  9. Particle Size Distributions Measured in the Stratospheric Plumes of Three Rockets During the ACCENT Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiedinmyer, C.; Brock, C. A.; Reeves, J. M.; Ross, M. N.; Schmid, O.; Toohey, D.; Wilson, J. C.

    2001-12-01

    The global impact of particles emitted by rocket engines on stratospheric ozone is not well understood, mainly due to the lack of comprehensive in situ measurements of the size distributions of these emitted particles. During the Atmospheric Chemistry of Combustion Emissions Near the Tropopause (ACCENT) missions in 1999, the NASA WB-57F aircraft carried the University of Denver N-MASS and FCAS instruments into the stratospheric plumes from three rockets. Size distributions of particles with diameters from 4 to approximately 2000 nm were calculated from the instrument measurements using numerical inversion techniques. The data have been averaged over 30-second intervals. The particle size distributions observed in all of the rocket plumes included a dominant mode near 60 nm diameter, probably composed of alumina particles. A smaller mode at approximately 25 nm, possibly composed of soot particles, was seen in only the plumes of rockets that used liquid oxygen and kerosene as a propellant. Aircraft exhaust emitted by the WB-57F was also sampled; the size distributions within these plumes are consistent with prior measurements in aircraft plumes. The size distributions for all rocket intercepts have been fitted to bimodal, lognormal distributions to provide input for global models of the stratosphere. Our data suggest that previous estimates of the solid rocket motor alumina size distributions may underestimate the alumina surface area emission index, and so underestimate the particle surface area available for heterogeneous chlorine activation reactions in the global stratosphere.

  10. Theoretical models for electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and local ζ-potential of unfolded proteins in nanopores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitarelli, Michael J.; Talaga, David S.

    2013-01-01

    Single solid-state nanopores find increasing use for electrical detection and/or manipulation of macromolecules. These applications exploit the changes in signals due to the geometry and electrical properties of the molecular species found within the nanopore. The sensitivity and resolution of such measurements are also influenced by the geometric and electrical properties of the nanopore. This paper continues the development of an analytical theory to predict the electrochemical impedance spectra of nanopores by including the influence of the presence of an unfolded protein using the variable topology finite Warburg impedance model previously published by the authors. The local excluded volume of, and charges present on, the segment of protein sampled by the nanopore are shown to influence the shape and peak frequency of the electrochemical impedance spectrum. An analytical theory is used to relate the capacitive response of the electrical double layer at the surface of the protein to both the charge density at the protein surface and the more commonly measured zeta potential. Illustrative examples show how the theory predicts that the varying sequential regions of surface charge density and excluded volume dictated by the protein primary structure may allow for an impedance-based approach to identifying unfolded proteins. PMID:24050368

  11. Retrieval of cloud droplet size distribution parameters from polarized reflectance measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Alexandrov

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available We present an algorithm for retrieval of cloud droplet size distribution parameters (effective radius and variance from the Research Scanning Polarimeter (RSP measurements. The RSP is an airborne prototype for the Aerosol Polarimetery Sensor (APS, which is due to be launched as part of the NASA Glory Project. This instrument measures both polarized and total reflectances in 9 spectral channels with center wavelengths ranging from 410 to 2250 nm. For cloud droplet size retrievals we utilize the polarized reflectances in the scattering angle range between 140 and 170 degrees where they exhibit rainbow. The shape of the rainbow is determined mainly by single-scattering properties of the cloud particles, that simplifies the inversions and reduces retrieval uncertainties. The retrieval algorithm was tested using realistically simulated cloud radiation fields. Our retrievals of cloud droplet sizes from actual RSP measurements made during two recent field campaigns were compared with the correlative in situ observations.

  12. A simple algorithm for measuring particle size distributions on an uneven background from TEM images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cervera Gontard, Lionel, E-mail: lionelcg@gmail.com [Center for Electron Nanoscopy, Technical University of Denmark, DK-2800 Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark); Ozkaya, Dogan [Johnson Matthey Technology Centre, Blount' s Court, Sonning Common, Reading RG4 9NH (United Kingdom); Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E. [Center for Electron Nanoscopy, Technical University of Denmark, DK-2800 Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark)

    2011-01-15

    Nanoparticles have a wide range of applications in science and technology. Their sizes are often measured using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) or X-ray diffraction. Here, we describe a simple computer algorithm for measuring particle size distributions from TEM images in the presence of an uneven background. The approach is based on adaptive thresholding, making use of local threshold values that change with spatial coordinate. The algorithm allows particles to be detected and characterized with greater accuracy than using more conventional methods, in which a global threshold is used. Its application to images of heterogeneous catalysts is presented. -- Research Highlights: {yields}The paper describes a novel algorithm for segmenting TEM images of nanoparticles which is simple but robust. {yields}A Graphical User Interface allows interactivity during the processing of images. This allows maximise the success of local thresholding. {yields}The method described can be used to provide more accurate measurements of particle size distributions.

  13. Spot size measurement of flash-radiography source utilizing the pinhole imaging method

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Yi; Chen, Nan; Cheng, Jinming; Xie, Yutong; Liu, Yulong; Long, Quanhong

    2015-01-01

    The spot size of the x-ray source is a key parameter of a flash-radiography facility, which is usually quoted as an evaluation of the resolving power. The pinhole imaging technique is applied to measure the spot size of the Dragon-I linear induction accelerator, by which a two-dimensional spatial distribution of the source spot is obtained. Experimental measurements are performed to measure the spot image when the transportation and focusing of the electron beam is tuned by adjusting the currents of solenoids in the downstream section. The spot size of full-width at half maximum and that defined from the spatial frequency at half peak value of the modulation transfer function are calculated and discussed.

  14. Spot size measurement of a flash-radiography source using the pinhole imaging method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yi; Li, Qin; Chen, Nan; Cheng, Jin-Ming; Xie, Yu-Tong; Liu, Yun-Long; Long, Quan-Hong

    2016-07-01

    The spot size of the X-ray source is a key parameter of a flash-radiography facility, and is usually quoted as an evaluation of the resolving power. The pinhole imaging technique is applied to measure the spot size of the Dragon-I linear induction accelerator, by which a two-dimensional spatial distribution of the source spot is obtained. Experimental measurements are performed to measure the spot image when the transportation and focusing of the electron beam are tuned by adjusting the currents of solenoids in the downstream section. The spot size of full-width at half maximum and that defined from the spatial frequency at half peak value of the modulation transfer function are calculated and discussed.

  15. Very small beam-size measurement by a reflective synchrotron radiation interferometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Naito

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available A synchrotron radiation (SR interferometer with Herschelian reflective optics has been developed for the measurement of beams of several μm in size. In a conventional refractive SR interferometer, the dispersion effect of the objective lens limits the instrument to a smaller range of beam-size measurements. To avoid this problem, we designed a Herschelian arrangement of reflective optics for the interferometer. The effectiveness of the reflective SR interferometer was confirmed at the KEK Accelerator Test Facility (ATF damping ring. The measured vertical beam size obtained using the reflective SR interferometer was 4.7   μm and the estimated vertical emittance was 0.97×10^{-11}   m.

  16. Super-Diffusive Gas Recovery from Nanopores

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Haiyi; Qiao, Rui

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the recovery of gas from reservoirs featuring pervasive nanopores is essential for effective shale gas extraction. Classical theories cannot accurately predict such gas recovery and many experimental observations are not well understood. Here we report molecular simulations of the recovery of gas from single nanopores, explicitly taking into account molecular gas-wall interactions. We show that, in very narrow pores, the strong gas-wall interactions are essential in determining the gas recovery behavior both quantitatively and qualitatively. These interactions cause the total diffusion coefficients of the gas molecules in nanopores to be smaller than those predicted by kinetic theories, hence slowing down the rate of gas recovery. These interactions also lead to significant adsorption of gas molecules on the pore walls. Because of the desorption of these gas molecules during gas recovery, the gas recovery from the nanopore does not exhibit the usual diffusive scaling law (i.e., the accumulative ...

  17. DNA sequencing by nanopores: advances and challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agah, Shaghayegh; Zheng, Ming; Pasquali, Matteo; Kolomeisky, Anatoly B.

    2016-10-01

    Developing inexpensive and simple DNA sequencing methods capable of detecting entire genomes in short periods of time could revolutionize the world of medicine and technology. It will also lead to major advances in our understanding of fundamental biological processes. It has been shown that nanopores have the ability of single-molecule sensing of various biological molecules rapidly and at a low cost. This has stimulated significant experimental efforts in developing DNA sequencing techniques by utilizing biological and artificial nanopores. In this review, we discuss recent progress in the nanopore sequencing field with a focus on the nature of nanopores and on sensing mechanisms during the translocation. Current challenges and alternative methods are also discussed.

  18. DNA nanopore translocation in glutamate solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plesa, C.; van Loo, N.; Dekker, C.

    2015-08-01

    Nanopore experiments have traditionally been carried out with chloride-based solutions. Here we introduce silver/silver-glutamate-based electrochemistry as an alternative, and study the viscosity, conductivity, and nanopore translocation characteristics of potassium-, sodium-, and lithium-glutamate solutions. We show that it has a linear response at typical voltages and can be used to detect DNA translocations through a nanopore. The glutamate anion also acts as a redox-capable thickening agent, with high-viscosity solutions capable of slowing down the DNA translocation process by up to 11 times, with a corresponding 7 time reduction in signal. These results demonstrate that glutamate can replace chloride as the primary anion in nanopore resistive pulse sensing.

  19. Time-domain thermoreflectance (TDTR) measurements of anisotropic thermal conductivity using a variable spot size approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Puqing; Qian, Xin; Yang, Ronggui

    2017-07-01

    It is challenging to characterize thermal conductivity of materials with strong anisotropy. In this work, we extend the time-domain thermoreflectance (TDTR) method with a variable spot size approach to simultaneously measure the in-plane (Kr) and the through-plane (Kz) thermal conductivity of materials with strong anisotropy. We first determine Kz from the measurement using a larger spot size, when the heat flow is mainly one-dimensional along the through-plane direction, and the measured signals are only sensitive to Kz. We then extract the in-plane thermal conductivity Kr from a second measurement using the same modulation frequency but with a smaller spot size, when the heat flow becomes three-dimensional, and the signal is sensitive to both Kr and Kz. By choosing the same modulation frequency for the two sets of measurements, we can avoid potential artifacts introduced by the frequency-dependent Kz, which we have found to be non-negligible, especially for some two-dimensional layered materials like MoS2. After careful evaluation of the sensitivity of a series of hypothetical samples, we provided guidelines on choosing the most appropriate laser spot size and modulation frequency that yield the smallest uncertainty, and established a criterion for the range of thermal conductivity that can be measured reliably using our proposed variable spot size TDTR approach. We have demonstrated this variable spot size TDTR approach on samples with a wide range of in-plane thermal conductivity, including fused silica, rutile titania (TiO2 [001]), zinc oxide (ZnO [0001]), molybdenum disulfide (MoS2), hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN), and highly ordered pyrolytic graphite.

  20. Modeling and simulation of nanoparticle separation through a solid-state nanopore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jubery, Talukder Z; Prabhu, Anmiv S; Kim, Min J; Dutta, Prashanta

    2012-01-01

    Recent experimental studies show that electrokinetic phenomena such as electroosmosis and electrophoresis can be used to separate nanoparticles on the basis of their size and charge using nanopore-based devices. However, the efficient separation through a nanopore depends on a number of factors such as externally applied voltage, size and charge density of particle, size and charge density of membrane pore, and the concentration of bulk electrolyte. To design an efficient nanopore-based separation platform, a continuum-based mathematical model is used for fluid. The model is based on Poisson-Nernst-Planck equations along with Navier-Stokes equations for fluid flow and on the Langevin equation for particle translocation. Our numerical study reveals that membrane pore surface charge density is a vital parameter in the separation through a nanopore. In this study, we have simulated high-density lipoprotein (HDL) and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) as the sample nanoparticles to demonstrate the capability of such a platform. Numerical results suggest that efficient separation of HDL from LDL in a 0.2 M KCL solution (resembling blood buffer) through a 150 nm pore is possible if the pore surface charge density is ∼ -4.0 mC/m(2). Moreover, we observe that pore length and diameter are relatively less important in the nanoparticle separation process considered here.

  1. Effects of drop size and measuring condition on static contact angle measurement on a superhydrophobic surface with goniometric technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Kwangseok; Kim, Minyoung; Kim, Do Hyun [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Ahn, Jeong Keun [Chungnam National University, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-12-15

    It is not a simple task to measure a contact angle of a water drop on a superhydrophobic surface with sessile drop method, because a roll-off angle is very low. Usually contact angle of a water drop on a superhydrophobic surface is measured by fixing a drop with intentional defects on the surface or a needle. We examined the effects of drop size and measuring condition such as the use of a needle or defects on the static contact angle measurement on superhydrophobic surface. Results showed that the contact angles on a superhydrophobic surface remain almost constant within intrinsic measurement errors unless there is a wetting transition during the measurement. We expect that this study will provide a deeper understanding on the nature of the contact angle and convenient measurement of the contact angle on the superhydrophobic surface.

  2. Measuring the mass, density, and size of particles and cells using a suspended microchannel resonator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godin, Michel; Bryan, Andrea K.; Burg, Thomas P.; Babcock, Ken; Manalis, Scott R.

    2007-09-01

    We demonstrate the measurement of mass, density, and size of cells and nanoparticles using suspended microchannel resonators. The masses of individual particles are quantified as transient frequency shifts, while the particles transit a microfluidic channel embedded in the resonating cantilever. Mass histograms resulting from these data reveal the distribution of a population of heterogeneously sized particles. Particle density is inferred from measurements made in different carrier fluids since the frequency shift for a particle is proportional to the mass difference relative to the displaced solution. We have characterized the density of polystyrene particles, Escherichia coli, and human red blood cells with a resolution down to 10-4g/cm3.

  3. Electrode size and boundary condition independent measurement of the effective piezoelectric coefficient of thin films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Stewart

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The determination of the piezoelectric coefficient of thin films using interferometry is hindered by bending contributions. Using finite element analysis (FEA simulations, we show that the Lefki and Dormans approximations using either single or double-beam measurements cannot be used with finite top electrode sizes. We introduce a novel method for characterising piezoelectric thin films which uses a differential measurement over the discontinuity at the electrode edge as an internal reference, thereby eliminating bending contributions. This step height is shown to be electrode size and boundary condition independent. An analytical expression is derived which gives good agreement with FEA predictions of the step height.

  4. One-step synthesis of zero-dimensional hollow nanoporous gold nanoparticles with enhanced methanol electrooxidation performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedireddy, Srikanth; Lee, Hiang Kwee; Tjiu, Weng Weei; Phang, In Yee; Tan, Hui Ru; Chua, Shu Quan; Troadec, Cedric; Ling, Xing Yi

    2014-09-17

    Nanoporous gold with networks of interconnected ligaments and highly porous structure holds stimulating technological implications in fuel cell catalysis. Current syntheses of nanoporous gold mainly revolve around de-alloying approaches that are generally limited by stringent and harsh multistep protocols. Here we develop a one-step solution phase synthesis of zero-dimensional hollow nanoporous gold nanoparticles with tunable particle size (150-1,000 nm) and ligament thickness (21-54 nm). With faster mass diffusivity, excellent specific electroactive surface area and large density of highly active surface sites, our zero-dimensional nanoporous gold nanoparticles exhibit ~1.4 times enhanced catalytic activity and improved tolerance towards carbonaceous species, demonstrating their superiority over conventional nanoporous gold sheets. Detailed mechanistic study also reveals the crucial heteroepitaxial growth of gold on the surface of silver chloride templates, implying that our synthetic protocol is generic and may be extended to the synthesis of other nanoporous metals via different templates.

  5. Correlation of the structure and applications of dealloyed nanoporous metals in catalysis and energy conversion/storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, H-J; Xu, Hai-Tao; Liu, Li; Wang, Yu

    2015-01-14

    Nanoporous metals produced by dealloying have shown great promise in many areas such as catalysis/electrocatalysis, energy conversion/storage, sensing/biosensing, actuation, and surface-enhanced Raman scattering. Particularly, nanoscale metal ligaments with high electronic conductivity, tunable size and rich surface chemistry make nanoporous metals very promising as catalysts/electrocatalysts for energy conversion applications such as fuel cells and also as versatile three-dimensional substrates for energy-storage in supercapacitors and lithium ion batteries. In this review, we focus on the recent developments of dealloyed nanoporous metals in both catalysis/electrocatalysis and energy storage. In particular, based on the state-of-the-art electron microscopy characterization, we explain the atomic origin of the high catalytic activity of nanoporous gold. We also highlight the recent advances in rationally designing nanoporous metal-based composites and hierarchical structures for enhanced energy storage. Finally, we conclude with some outlook and perspectives with respect to future research on dealloyed nanoporous metals in catalysis- and energy-related applications.

  6. Enzyme Reactions in Nanoporous, Picoliter Volume Containers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siuti, Piro; Retterer, Scott T.; Choi, Chang-Kyoung; Doktycz, Mitchel J.

    2012-01-01

    Advancements in nanoscale fabrication allow creation of small volume reaction containers that can facilitate the screening and characterization of enzymes. A porous, ~19 pL volume vessel has been used in this work to carry out enzyme reactions under varying substrate concentrations. Assessment of small molecule and Green Fluorescent Protein diffusion from the vessels indicates that pore sizes on order of 10 nm can be obtained, allowing capture of proteins and diffusive exchange of small molecules. Glucose oxidase and horseradish peroxidase can be contained in these structures and diffusively fed with a solution containing glucose and the fluorogenic substrate Amplex Red™ through the engineered nanoscale pore structure. Fluorescent microscopy was used to monitor the reaction, which was carried out under microfluidic control. Kinetic characteristics of the enzyme (Km and Vmax) were evaluated and compared with results from conventional scale reactions. These picoliter, nanoporous containers can facilitate quick determination of enzyme kinetics in microfluidic systems without the requirement of surface tethering and can be used for applications in drug discovery, clinical diagnostics and high-throughput screening. PMID:22148720

  7. Diffusive Silicon Nanopore Membranes for Hemodialysis Applications.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven Kim

    Full Text Available Hemodialysis using hollow-fiber membranes provides life-sustaining treatment for nearly 2 million patients worldwide with end stage renal disease (ESRD. However, patients on hemodialysis have worse long-term outcomes compared to kidney transplant or other chronic illnesses. Additionally, the underlying membrane technology of polymer hollow-fiber membranes has not fundamentally changed in over four decades. Therefore, we have proposed a fundamentally different approach using microelectromechanical systems (MEMS fabrication techniques to create thin-flat sheets of silicon-based membranes for implantable or portable hemodialysis applications. The silicon nanopore membranes (SNM have biomimetic slit-pore geometry and uniform pores size distribution that allow for exceptional permeability and selectivity. A quantitative diffusion model identified structural limits to diffusive solute transport and motivated a new microfabrication technique to create SNM with enhanced diffusive transport. We performed in vitro testing and extracorporeal testing in pigs on prototype membranes with an effective surface area of 2.52 cm2 and 2.02 cm2, respectively. The diffusive clearance was a two-fold improvement in with the new microfabrication technique and was consistent with our mathematical model. These results establish the feasibility of using SNM for hemodialysis applications with additional scale-up.

  8. Phonon bottleneck identification in disordered nanoporous materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romano, Giuseppe; Grossman, Jeffrey C.

    2017-09-01

    Nanoporous materials are a promising platform for thermoelectrics in that they offer high thermal conductivity tunability while preserving good electrical properties, a crucial requirement for high-efficiency thermal energy conversion. Understanding the impact of the pore arrangement on thermal transport is pivotal to engineering realistic materials, where pore disorder is unavoidable. Although there has been considerable progress in modeling thermal size effects in nanostructures, it has remained a challenge to screen such materials over a large phase space due to the slow simulation time required for accurate results. We use density functional theory in connection with the Boltzmann transport equation to perform calculations of thermal conductivity in disordered porous materials. By leveraging graph theory and regressive analysis, we identify the set of pores representing the phonon bottleneck and obtain a descriptor for thermal transport, based on the sum of the pore-pore distances between such pores. This approach provide a simple tool to estimate phonon suppression in realistic porous materials for thermoelectric applications and enhance our understanding of heat transport in disordered materials.

  9. Fabrication and Modification of Nanoporous Silicon Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari, Mauro; Liu, Xuewu

    2010-01-01

    Silicon-based nanoporous particles as biodegradable drug carriers are advantageous in permeation, controlled release, and targeting. The use of biodegradable nanoporous silicon and silicon dioxide, with proper surface treatments, allows sustained drug release within the target site over a period of days, or even weeks, due to selective surface coating. A variety of surface treatment protocols are available for silicon-based particles to be stabilized, functionalized, or modified as required. Coated polyethylene glycol (PEG) chains showed the effective depression of both plasma protein adsorption and cell attachment to the modified surfaces, as well as the advantage of long circulating. Porous silicon particles are micromachined by lithography. Compared to the synthesis route of the nanomaterials, the advantages include: (1) the capability to make different shapes, not only spherical particles but also square, rectangular, or ellipse cross sections, etc.; (2) the capability for very precise dimension control; (3) the capacity for porosity and pore profile control; and (4) allowance of complex surface modification. The particle patterns as small as 60 nm can be fabricated using the state-of-the-art photolithography. The pores in silicon can be fabricated by exposing the silicon in an HF/ethanol solution and then subjecting the pores to an electrical current. The size and shape of the pores inside silicon can be adjusted by the doping of the silicon, electrical current application, the composition of the electrolyte solution, and etching time. The surface of the silicon particles can be modified by many means to provide targeted delivery and on-site permanence for extended release. Multiple active agents can be co-loaded into the particles. Because the surface modification of particles can be done on wafers before the mechanical release, asymmetrical surface modification is feasible. Starting from silicon wafers, a treatment, such as KOH dipping or reactive ion

  10. Overview of Measuring Effect Sizes: The Effect of Measurement Error. Brief 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, Don; Grossman, Pam; Lankford, Hamp; Loeb, Susanna; Wyckoff, Jim

    2008-01-01

    The use of value-added models in education research has expanded rapidly. These models allow researchers to explore how a wide variety of policies and measured school inputs affect the academic performance of students. An important question is whether such effects are sufficiently large to achieve various policy goals. Judging whether a change in…

  11. Measurement of Size-dependent Dynamic Shape Factors of Quartz Particles in Two Flow Regimes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alexander, Jennifer M.; Bell, David M.; Imre, D.; Kleiber, Paul; Grassian, Vicki H.; Zelenyuk, Alla

    2016-08-02

    Understanding and modeling the behavior of quartz dust particles, commonly found in the atmosphere, requires knowledge of many relevant particles properties, including particle shape. This study uses a single particle mass spectrometer, a differential mobility analyzer, and an aerosol particle mass analyzer to measure quartz aerosol particles mobility, aerodynamic, and volume equivalent diameters, mass, composition, effective density, and dynamic shape factor as a function of particle size, in both the free molecular and transition flow regimes. The results clearly demonstrate that dynamic shape factors can vary significantly as a function of particle size. For the quartz samples studied here, the dynamic shape factors increase with size, indicating that larger particles are significantly more aspherical than smaller particles. In addition, dynamic shape factors measured in the free-molecular (χv) and transition (χt) flow regimes can be significantly different, and these differences vary with the size of the quartz particles. For quartz, χv of small (d < 200 nm) particles is 1.25, while χv of larger particles (d ~ 440 nm) is 1.6, with a continuously increasing trend with particle size. In contrast χt, of small particles starts at 1.1 increasing slowly to 1.34 for 550 nm diameter particles. The multidimensional particle characterization approach used here goes beyond determination of average properties for each size, to provide additional information about how the particle dynamic shape factor may vary even for particles with the same mass and volume equivalent diameter.

  12. Simultaneous measurement of particle velocity and size based on gray difference and autocorrelation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    The gray of two images of a same particle taken by a digital camera with different exposure times is different too. Based on the gray difference of particle images in a double-exposed photo and autocorrelation processing of digital images,this paper proposes a method for measuring particle velocities and sizes simultaneously. This paper also introduces the theoretical foundation of this method,the process of particle imaging and image processing,and the simultaneous measurement of velocity and size of a low speed flow field with 35 μm and 75 μm standard particles. The graphical measurement results can really reflect the flow characteristics of the flow field. In addition,although the measured velocity and size histograms of these two kinds of standard particles are slightly wider than the theoretical ones,they are all still similar to the normal distribution,and the peak velocities and diameters of the histograms are consistent with the default values. Therefore,this measurement method is capable of providing moderate measurement accuracy,and it can be further developed for high-speed flow field measurements.

  13. Synthetic measure of association to determinate the business size of SMEs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerardo Reyes Ruiz

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available SMEs play a major role in today’s economy all contributing both to the generation of wealth and the creation of jobs, so it makes sense this study to show the level of association between financial ratios to construct a synthetic measure that explains the size business for a sample of Catalan SMEs. To do three techniques of data analysis were used; Technical Cluster was first used in two phases (CDF to define a correspondence with firm size, after obtaining the optimal number of clusters was estimated through a fuzzy analysis clustering, business size most likely for each company. The results yield evidence that the initial groups should not be three but two for 12,658 SMEs in Catalonia where a large proportion of small businesses called present financial information that might well classify as medium enterprises. The study provides a different way to consider business size.

  14. Interferometric measurement of the beam size in the compact storage ring

    CERN Document Server

    Yamamoto, Y; Mitsuhashi, T; Amano, D; Iwasaki, H

    2001-01-01

    The beam size in the compact superconducting storage ring AURORA at Ritsumeikan University was measured using the SR-interferometer. The radiation beam from the bending magnet was passed through the double-slit and an interferogram formed in the visible spectral region was recorded using a CCD camera. The spatial coherence of the beam was derived from the analysis of the intensity profile and its dependence on the spatial frequency has yielded the beam size of 10.5 mu m in the vertical direction. It is unexpectedly small, indicating a high accuracy in the design of magnetic field in the magnet. The beam size could be varied by applying an rf kick electric field and the dependence of the beam lifetime on the size has shown that it is primarily governed by the Tauschek effect.

  15. A nano-frost array technique to prepare nanoporous PVDF membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Min Kyung; Lee, Jonghwi

    2014-07-01

    Frost, the solid deposition of water vapor from humid air, forms on the surface of a solid substrate when its temperature drops below the freezing point of water. In this study, we demonstrate how this natural phenomenon can be applied to develop novel nanoporous materials. The solvent annealing of polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) infiltrated into nanopores induced template-directed dewetting thus preparing nanoembossing films. Then, water nanodroplets formed on the cold polymer nanopatterned surfaces following the embossing patterns, similar to dew formation on the ground. Subsequently, the nanodroplets were frozen and then removed by freeze-drying. This nano-frost array technique produced nanoporous PVDF membranes with an average thickness of 250 (+/-48) nm. It was revealed that the nanopatterned surface formed by solvent annealing played an important role in achieving a nano-frost array with an adjustable size. Additionally, the freezing process led to significant changes of the PVDF crystallinity and polymorphism. Our results prove that the nano-frost array technique can be broadly used to design ordered nanoporous structures and provide new prospects in nanomaterial fields.Frost, the solid deposition of water vapor from humid air, forms on the surface of a solid substrate when its temperature drops below the freezing point of water. In this study, we demonstrate how this natural phenomenon can be applied to develop novel nanoporous materials. The solvent annealing of polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) infiltrated into nanopores induced template-directed dewetting thus preparing nanoembossing films. Then, water nanodroplets formed on the cold polymer nanopatterned surfaces following the embossing patterns, similar to dew formation on the ground. Subsequently, the nanodroplets were frozen and then removed by freeze-drying. This nano-frost array technique produced nanoporous PVDF membranes with an average thickness of 250 (+/-48) nm. It was revealed that the

  16. Effect of annealing temperature on electrochemical luminescence properties of nanoporous fluorine-doped tin oxide films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joo, Bong-Hyun; Yoon, Seog-Young; Sung, Youl-Moon

    2013-04-01

    Nanoporous Fluorine-doped tin oxide (FTO) materials were synthesized by sol-gel combustion method for electrochemical luminescence (ECL) application. The influence of annealing temperature on the structures and morphology of the nanoporous FTO films was examined by X-ray diffraction (XRD), atomic force microscopy (AFM), optical transmittance and BET specific surface measurements. The naoporous FTO-based ECL cell is composed of FTO glass/nanoporous FTO/Ru(bpy)2+ electrolyte/FTO glass. The peak intensity of emitting light from the cell was obtained at the wavelength of about 615 nm, which corresponds to dark orange color. At 5 V bias, ECL efficiency of the cell using the 550 degrees C annealed FTO was about 975 cd/m2, which is much higher than those of other cells. The result shows that the nanoporous FTO layer was more effective for increasing ECL intensities. The sol-gel combustion method at annealing temperature of 550 degrees C could be employed to synthesize the nanoporous FTO materials with high porosity and ECL performance.

  17. Preparation and characterization of superhydrophobic surfaces based on hexamethyldisilazane-modified nanoporous alumina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanli Deniz

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Superhydrophobic nanoporous anodic aluminum oxide (alumina surfaces were prepared using treatment with vapor-phase hexamethyldisilazane (HMDS. Nanoporous alumina substrates were first made using a two-step anodization process. Subsequently, a repeated modification procedure was employed for efficient incorporation of the terminal methyl groups of HMDS to the alumina surface. Morphology of the surfaces was characterized by scanning electron microscopy, showing hexagonally ordered circular nanopores with approximately 250 nm in diameter and 300 nm of interpore distances. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy-attenuated total reflectance analysis showed the presence of chemically bound methyl groups on the HMDS-modified nanoporous alumina surfaces. Wetting properties of these surfaces were characterized by measurements of the water contact angle which was found to reach 153.2 ± 2°. The contact angle values on HMDS-modified nanoporous alumina surfaces were found to be significantly larger than the average water contact angle of 82.9 ± 3° on smooth thin film alumina surfaces that underwent the same HMDS modification steps. The difference between the two cases was explained by the Cassie-Baxter theory of rough surface wetting.

  18. Effects of cutting and specimen size on neutron measurement of residual stresses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, M.; Luzin, V.; Kirstein, O.

    2010-11-01

    To perform neutron residual stress measurements it is often necessary to cut samples to a manageable size. The effects of cutting a girth welded pipe were investigated with analytical methods and finite element analysis. The effect of cutting on measured stresses was calculated. A simplified method of modelling residual stresses in welds, "chill modelling", is introduced. In ring slitting a cut is made in the axial direction and the deformation is maeesured. The change in elastic stress can be calculated and added to neutron diffraction measurements made on a cut ring to calculate the original stresses. Residual stress measurements were performed to validate the ring slitting correction using ANSTO's residual stress diffractometer Kowari.

  19. Distribution of carbon nanotube sizes from adsorption measurements and computer simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalczyk, Piotr; Hołyst, Robert; Tanaka, Hideki; Kaneko, Katsumi

    2005-08-04

    The method for the evaluation of the distribution of carbon nanotube sizes from the static adsorption measurements and computer simulation of nitrogen at 77 K is developed. We obtain the condensation/evaporation pressure as a function of pore size of a cylindrical carbon tube using Gauge Cell Monte Carlo Simulation (Gauge Cell MC). To obtain the analytical form of the relationships mentioned above we use Derjaguin-Broekhoff-deBoer theory. Finally, the pore size distribution (PSD) of the single-walled carbon nanohorns (SWNHs) is determined from a single nitrogen adsorption isotherm measured at 77 K. We neglect the conical part of an isolated SWNH tube and assume a structureless wall of a carbon nanotube. We find that the distribution of SWNH sizes is broad (internal pore radii varied in the range 1.0-3.6 nm with the maximum at 1.3 nm). Our method can be used for the determination of the pore size distribution of the other tubular carbon materials, like, for example, multiwalled or double-walled carbon nanotubes. Besides the applicable aspect of the current work the deep insight into the problem of capillary condensation/evaporation in confined carbon cylindrical geometry is presented. As a result, the critical pore radius in structureless single-walled carbon tubes is determined as being equal to three nitrogen collision diameters. Below that size the adsorption-desorption isotherm is reversible (i.e., supercritical in nature). We show that the classical static adsorption measurements combined with the proper modeling of the capillary condensation/evaporation phenomena is a powerful method that can be applied for the determination of the distribution of nanotube sizes.

  20. Engineered nanoporous and nanostructured films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joel L. Plawsky

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Nanoporous and nanostructured films have become increasingly important to the microelectronics and photonics industries. They provide a route to low dielectric constant materials that will enable future generations of powerful microprocessors. They are the only route to achieving materials with refractive indices less than 1.2, a key feature for the future development of photonic crystal devices, enhanced omni-directional reflectors, enhanced anti-reflection coatings and black-body absorbers. In addition, these films exhibit tremendous potential for separations, catalytic, biomedical and heat transfer applications. This article will review two primary techniques for manufacturing these films, evaporation induced self-assembly and oblique or glancing angle deposition, and will discuss some of the film properties critical to their use in the microelectronics and photonics industries.

  1. How Robust Are the Size Measurements of High-redshift Compact Galaxies?

    CERN Document Server

    Davari, Roozbeh; Peng, Chien Y; Huang, Song

    2014-01-01

    Massive quiescent galaxies at $z \\approx 2$ are apparently much more compact than galaxies of comparable mass today. How robust are these size measurements? We perform comprehensive simulations to determine possible biases and uncertainties in fitting single-component light distributions to real galaxies. In particular, we examine the robustness of the measurements of the luminosity, size, and other structural parameters. We devise simulations with increasing realism to systematically disentangle effects due to the technique (specifically using GALFIT) and the intrinsic structures of the galaxies. By accurately capturing the detailed substructures of nearby elliptical galaxies and then rescaling their sizes and signal-to-noise to mimic galaxies at different redshifts, we confirm that the massive quiescent galaxies at $z \\approx 2$ are significantly more compact intrinsically than their local counterparts. Their observed compactness is not a result of missing faint outer light due to systematic errors in model...

  2. Generalized eta and omega squared statistics: measures of effect size for some common research designs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olejnik, Stephen; Algina, James

    2003-12-01

    The editorial policies of several prominent educational and psychological journals require that researchers report some measure of effect size along with tests for statistical significance. In analysis of variance contexts, this requirement might be met by using eta squared or omega squared statistics. Current procedures for computing these measures of effect often do not consider the effect that design features of the study have on the size of these statistics. Because research-design features can have a large effect on the estimated proportion of explained variance, the use of partial eta or omega squared can be misleading. The present article provides formulas for computing generalized eta and omega squared statistics, which provide estimates of effect size that are comparable across a variety of research designs.

  3. Projections for measuring the size of the solar core with neutrino-electron scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Davis, Jonathan H

    2016-01-01

    We quantify the amount of data needed in order to measure the size of the solar core with future experiments looking at elastic scattering between electrons and solar neutrinos. The directions of the electrons immediately after scattering are strongly correlated with the incident directions of the neutrinos, however this is degraded significantly by the subsequent scattering of these electrons in the detector medium. We generate distributions of such electrons for different sizes of the solar core, and use a maximum likelihood analysis to make projections for future experimental sensitivity. We find that after approximately 5 years of data-taking an experiment the size of Hyper Kamiokande could measure the solar core radius with an uncertainty of 20% of the total solar radius at 95% confidence, and could exclude the scenario where the neutrinos are produced throughout the entire sun at 3 $\\sigma$.

  4. The equilibrium velocity of spherical particles in rectangular microfluidic channels for size measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommer, Christian; Quint, Stephan; Spang, Peter; Walther, Thomas; Bassler, Michael

    2014-07-01

    According to the Segré-Silberberg effect, spherical particles migrate to a lateral equilibrium position in parabolic flow profiles. Here, for the first time, the corresponding equilibrium velocity is studied experimentally for micro particles in channels with rectangular cross section. Micro channels are fabricated in PMMA substrate based on a hot embossing process. To measure individual particle velocities at very high precision, the technique of spatially modulated emission is applied. It is found that the equilibrium velocity is size-dependent and the method offers a new way to measure particle size in microfluidic systems. The method is of particular interest for microfluidic flow cytometry as it delivers an alternative to the scatter signal for cell size determination.

  5. Particle concentrations and number size distributions in the planetary boundary layer derived from airship based measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tillmann, Ralf; Zhao, Defeng; Ehn, Mikael; Hofzumahaus, Andreas; Holland, Frank; Rohrer, Franz; Kiendler-Scharr, Astrid; Wahner, Andreas

    2014-05-01

    Atmospheric particles play a key role for regional and global climate due to their direct and indirect radiative forcing effects. The concentration and size of the particles are important variables to these effects. Within the continental planetary boundary layer (PBL) the particle number size distribution is influenced by meteorological parameters, local sinks and sources resulting in variable spatial distributions. However, measurements of particle number size distributions over a broad vertical range of the PBL are rare. The airship ZEPPELIN NT is an ideal platform to measure atmospheric aerosols on a regional scale within an altitude range up to 1000 m. For campaigns in the Netherlands, Northern Italy and South Finland in 2012 and 2013 the airship was deployed with a wide range of instruments, including measurements of different trace gases, short lived radicals, solar radiation, aerosols and meteorological parameters. Flights were carried out at different times of the day to investigate the influence of the diurnal evolution of the PBL on atmospheric trace gases and aerosols. During night and early morning hours the concentration and size distribution of atmospheric particles were found to be strongly influenced by the layered structure of the PBL, i.e. the nocturnal boundary layer and the residual layer. Within the residual layer particle concentrations stay relatively constant as this layer is decoupled from ground sources. The particles persist in the accumulation mode as expected for an aged aerosol. In the nocturnal boundary layer particle concentrations and size are more dynamic with higher concentrations than in the residual layer. A few hours after sunrise, the layered structure of the PBL intermixes. During daytime the PBL is well mixed and a negative concentration gradient with increasing height is observed. Several height profiles at different times of the day and at different locations in Europe were measured. The aerosol measurements will be

  6. The Influence of Nanopore Dimensions on the Electrochemical Properties of Nanopore Arrays Studied by Impedance Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krishna Kant

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The understanding of the electrochemical properties of nanopores is the key factor for better understanding their performance and applications for nanopore-based sensing devices. In this study, the influence of pore dimensions of nanoporous alumina (NPA membranes prepared by an anodization process and their electrochemical properties as a sensing platform using impedance spectroscopy was explored. NPA with four different pore diameters (25 nm, 45 nm and 65 nm and lengths (5 μm to 20 μm was used and their electrochemical properties were explored using different concentration of electrolyte solution (NaCl ranging from 1 to 100 μM. Our results show that the impedance and resistance of nanopores are influenced by the concentration and ion species of electrolytes, while the capacitance is independent of them. It was found that nanopore diameters also have a significant influence on impedance due to changes in the thickness of the double layer inside the pores.

  7. The Influence of Nanopore Dimensions on the Electrochemical Properties of Nanopore Arrays Studied by Impedance Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kant, Krishna; Priest, Craig; Shapter, Joe G.; Losic, Dusan

    2014-01-01

    The understanding of the electrochemical properties of nanopores is the key factor for better understanding their performance and applications for nanopore-based sensing devices. In this study, the influence of pore dimensions of nanoporous alumina (NPA) membranes prepared by an anodization process and their electrochemical properties as a sensing platform using impedance spectroscopy was explored. NPA with four different pore diameters (25 nm, 45 nm and 65 nm) and lengths (5 μm to 20 μm) was used and their electrochemical properties were explored using different concentration of electrolyte solution (NaCl) ranging from 1 to 100 μM. Our results show that the impedance and resistance of nanopores are influenced by the concentration and ion species of electrolytes, while the capacitance is independent of them. It was found that nanopore diameters also have a significant influence on impedance due to changes in the thickness of the double layer inside the pores. PMID:25393785

  8. Pixel size and pitch measurements of liquid crystal spatial light modulator by optical diffraction

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ravinder Kumar Banyal; B Raghavendra Prasad

    2005-08-01

    We present a simple technique for the determination of pixel size and pitch of liquid crystal (LC) based spatial light modulator (SLM). The proposed method is based on optical diffraction from pixelated LC panel that has been modeled as a two-dimensional array of rectangular apertures. A novel yet simple, two-plane measurement technique is implemented to circumvent the difficulty in absolute distance measurement. Experimental results are presented for electrically addressed twisted nematic LC-SLM removed from the display projector.

  9. Application of porous foams for size-selective measurements of airborne wheat allergen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bogdanovic, J.; Pater, A.J. de; Doekes, G.; Wouters, I.M.; Heederik, D.J.J.

    2006-01-01

    Background: Exposure to airborne wheat allergen is a well-known cause of bakers' allergy and asthma. Airborne wheat allergen can be measured by enzyme immunoassays (EIAs) in extracts of inhalable dust samples, but only limited knowledge is available on the size distribution of wheat allergen-carryin

  10. Status report on cross-organizational functional size measurement and cost estimation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Daneva, Maia; Abran, A.; Bundschuh, M.; Dumke, R.

    2006-01-01

    Measurement is a fundamental part of any managed activity and functional size of software is the core to successful management of any software work of any magnitude [10,12,15,16]. It is crucial for estimating project team efforts and normalizing quality attributes such as defect rates, defect densit

  11. Application of porous foams for size-selective measurements of airborne wheat allergen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bogdanovic, J.; Pater, A.J. de; Doekes, G.; Wouters, I.M.; Heederik, D.J.J.

    2006-01-01

    Background: Exposure to airborne wheat allergen is a well-known cause of bakers' allergy and asthma. Airborne wheat allergen can be measured by enzyme immunoassays (EIAs) in extracts of inhalable dust samples, but only limited knowledge is available on the size distribution of wheat

  12. Standardized Effect Size Measures for Mediation Analysis in Cluster-Randomized Trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stapleton, Laura M.; Pituch, Keenan A.; Dion, Eric

    2015-01-01

    This article presents 3 standardized effect size measures to use when sharing results of an analysis of mediation of treatment effects for cluster-randomized trials. The authors discuss 3 examples of mediation analysis (upper-level mediation, cross-level mediation, and cross-level mediation with a contextual effect) with demonstration of the…

  13. Status report on cross-organizational functional size measurement and cost estimation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Daneva, M.; Abran, A.; Bundschuh, M.; Dumke, R.

    2006-01-01

    Measurement is a fundamental part of any managed activity and functional size of software is the core to successful management of any software work of any magnitude [10,12,15,16]. It is crucial for estimating project team efforts and normalizing quality attributes such as defect rates, defect densit

  14. Measurements of bubble size spectra within leads in the Arctic summer pack ice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Norris, S.J.; Brooks, I.M.; Leeuw, G. de; Sirevaag, A.; Leck, C.; Brooks, B.J.; Birch, C.E.; Tjernstrom, M.

    2010-01-01

    The first measurements of bubble size spectra within the near-surface waters of open leads in the central Arctic pack ice were obtained during the Artic Summer Cloud-Ocean Study (ASCOS) in August 2008 at 87-87.6° N, 1-11° W. A significant number of small bubbles (30-100 μm diameter) were present, wi

  15. Measurements of bubble size spectra within leads in the Arctic summer pack ice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Norris, S.J.; Brooks, I.M.; Leeuw, G. de; Sirevaag, A.; Leck, C.; Brooks, B.J.; Birch, C.E.; Tjernström, M.

    2011-01-01

    The first measurements of bubble size spectra within the near-surface waters of open leads in the central Arctic pack ice were obtained during the Arctic Summer Cloud-Ocean Study (ASCOS) in August 2008 at 87-87.6° N, 1-11° W. A significant number of small bubbles (30-100 μm diameter) were present, w

  16. Comparison of sprinkler droplet size and velocity measurements using a laser precipitation meter and photographic method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinetic energy of water droplets has a substantial effect on development of a soil surface seal and infiltration rate of bare soil. Methods for measuring sprinkler droplet size and velocity needed to calculate droplet kinetic energy have been developed and tested over the past 50 years, each with ad...

  17. Measuring nanoparticles size distribution in food and consumer products: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calzolai, L; Gilliland, D; Rossi, F

    2012-08-01

    Nanoparticles are already used in several consumer products including food, food packaging and cosmetics, and their detection and measurement in food represent a particularly difficult challenge. In order to fill the void in the official definition of what constitutes a nanomaterial, the European Commission published in October 2011 its recommendation on the definition of 'nanomaterial'. This will have an impact in many different areas of legislation, such as the European Cosmetic Products Regulation, where the current definitions of nanomaterial will come under discussion regarding how they should be adapted in light of this new definition. This new definition calls for the measurement of the number-based particle size distribution in the 1-100 nm size range of all the primary particles present in the sample independently of whether they are in a free, unbound state or as part of an aggregate/agglomerate. This definition does present great technical challenges for those who must develop valid and compatible measuring methods. This review will give an overview of the current state of the art, focusing particularly on the suitability of the most used techniques for the size measurement of nanoparticles when addressing this new definition of nanomaterials. The problems to be overcome in measuring nanoparticles in food and consumer products will be illustrated with some practical examples. Finally, a possible way forward (based on the combination of different measuring techniques) for solving this challenging analytical problem is illustrated.

  18. Nanopore biosensors for detection of proteins and nucleic acids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maglia, Giovanni; Soskine, Mikhael

    2014-01-01

    Described herein are nanopore biosensors based on a modified cytolysin protein. The nanopore biosensors accommodate macromoiecules including proteins and nucleic acids, and may additionally comprise ligands with selective binding properties.

  19. Nanopore biosensors for detection of proteins and nucleic acids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maglia, Giovanni; Soskine, Mikhael

    2014-01-01

    Described herein are nanopore biosensors based on a modified cytolysin protein. The nanopore biosensors accommodate macromoiecules including proteins and nucleic acids, and may additionally comprise ligands with selective binding properties.

  20. Simplified product value measurement framework for small and medium sized enterprises

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Parkash

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: The emergences of global markets have increased competition worldwide. For Small Medium Sized Enterprises with limited resources to sustain in what is already a very competitive market there is a need for strong and continuously increasing Product Value to reduce business risks and revenue losses and to increase market share and customer satisfaction. To fulfill this need, Product Value Measurement is necessary to characterize the current status and further improvement. It is not easy to obtain the measures about the Product Value because its many features have qualitative characteristics. We need simplified but result oriented systematic framework to measure it while considering the measurement purpose and how to measure and why do it. Methods: How to design this is the main aim of this research paper. In this paper, GQM (Goal-Question-Metric method as a measurement framework is introduced to measure the Product Value for Small Medium Sized Enterprises along with case study to represent that this framework was effective. Results and conclusions: The proposed Model was effective for focusing on the essence of measurement and for avoiding extra excessive data not necessary for doing the effective measurement.

  1. Electroanalysis using modified hierarchical nanoporous carbon materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Rusbel Coneo; Moncada, Angelica Baena; Acevedo, Diego F; Planes, Gabriel A; Miras, Maria C; Barbero, Cesar A

    2013-01-01

    The role of the electrode nanoporosity in electroanalytical processes is discussed and specific phenomena (slow double layer charging, local pH effects) which can be present in porous electrode are described. Hierarchical porous carbon (HPC) materials are synthesized using a hard template method. The three dimensional carbon porosity is examined using scanning electron microscopy on flat surfaces cut using a focused ion beam (FIB-SEM). The electrochemical properties of the HPC are measured using cyclic voltammetry, AC impedance, chronoamperometry and Probe Beam Deflection (PBD) techniques. Chronoamperometry measurements of HPC seems to fit a transmission line model. PBD data show evidence of local pH changes inside the pores, during double layer charging. The HPC are modified by in situ (chemical or electrochemical) formation of metal (Pt/Ru) or metal oxide (CoOx, Fe3O4) nanoparticles. Additionally, HPC loaded with Pt decorated magnetite (Fe3O4) nanoparticles is produced by galvanic displacement. The modified HPC materials are used for the electroanalysis of different substances (CO, O2, AsO3(-3)). The role of the nanoporous carbon substrate in the electroanalytical data is evaluated.

  2. Longitudinal measurements of syrinx size in a rat model of posttraumatic syringomyelia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najafi, Elmira; Bilston, Lynne E; Song, Xin; Bongers, Andre; Stoodley, Marcus A; Cheng, Shaokoon; Hemley, Sarah J

    2016-06-01

    OBJECTIVE Syringomyelia pathophysiology is commonly studied using rodent models. However, in vivo studies of posttraumatic syringomyelia have been limited by the size of animals and lack of reliable noninvasive evaluation techniques. Imaging the rat spinal cord is particularly challenging because the spinal cord diameter is approximately 1-3 mm, and pathological lesions within the spinal cord parenchyma are even smaller. The standard technique has been histological evaluation, but this has its limitations. The aim of the present study was to determine whether syrinx size could be reliably measured using a preclinical high-field MRI animal system in a rat model of posttraumatic syringomyelia. METHODS The authors used an existing rat model of posttraumatic syringomyelia, which was created using a controlled pneumatic compression device to produce the initial spinal cord injury, followed by a subarachnoid injection of kaolin to produce arachnoiditis. T2-weighted MRI was performed on each animal using a 9.4-T scanner at 7, 10, and 13 weeks after injury. Animals were killed and syrinx sizes were calculated from in vivo MRI and histological studies. RESULTS MRI measurements of syrinx volume and length were closely correlated to histological measurements across all time points (Pearson product moment correlation coefficient r = ± 0.93 and 0.79, respectively). CONCLUSIONS This study demonstrates that high-field T2-weighted MRI can be used to measure syrinx size, and data correlate well with syrinx size measured using histological methods. Preclinical MRI may be a valuable noninvasive technique for tracking syrinx formation and enlargement in animal models of syringomyelia.

  3. How robust are the size measurements of high-redshift compact galaxies?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davari, Roozbeh [University of California, Riverside 900 University Avenue, Riverside, CA 92521 (United States); Ho, Luis C. [The Observatories of the Carnegie Institution for Science 813 Santa Barbara Street, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Peng, Chien Y. [Giant Magellan Telescope Organization 251 South Lake Avenue, Suite 300 Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Huang, Song [School of Space Science and Astronomy, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China)

    2014-05-20

    Massive quiescent galaxies at z ≈ 2 are apparently much more compact than galaxies of comparable mass today. How robust are these size measurements? We perform comprehensive simulations to determine possible biases and uncertainties in fitting single-component light distributions to real galaxies. In particular, we examine the robustness of the measurements of the luminosity, size, and other structural parameters. We devise simulations with increasing realism to systematically disentangle effects due to the technique (specifically using GALFIT) and the intrinsic structures of the galaxies. By accurately capturing the detailed substructures of nearby elliptical galaxies and then rescaling their sizes and signal-to-noise to mimic galaxies at different redshifts, we confirm that the massive quiescent galaxies at z ≈ 2 are significantly more compact intrinsically than their local counterparts. Their observed compactness is not a result of missing faint outer light due to systematic errors in modeling. In fact, we find that fitting multi-component galaxies with a single Sérsic profile, the procedure most commonly adopted in the literature, biases the inferred sizes higher by up to 10%-20%, which accentuates the amount of size evolution required. If the sky estimation has been done robustly and the model for the point-spread function is fairly accurate, GALFIT can retrieve the properties of single-component galaxies over a wide range of signal-to-noise ratios without introducing any systematic errors.

  4. Fixation duration surpasses pupil size as a measure of memory load in free viewing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meghanathan, Radha Nila; van Leeuwen, Cees; Nikolaev, Andrey R

    2014-01-01

    Oculomotor behavior reveals, not only the acquisition of visual information at fixation, but also the accumulation of information in memory across subsequent fixations. Two candidate measures were considered as indicators of such dynamic visual memory load: fixation duration and pupil size. While recording these measures, we displayed an arrangement of 3, 4 or 5 targets among distractors. Both occurred in various orientations. Participants searched for targets and reported whether in a subsequent display one of them had changed orientation. We determined to what extent fixation duration and pupil size indicate dynamic memory load, as a function of the number of targets fixated during the search. We found that fixation duration reflects the number of targets, both when this number is within and above the limit of working memory capacity. Pupil size reflects the number of targets only when it exceeds the capacity limit. Moreover, the duration of fixations on successive targets but not on distractors increases whereas pupil size does not. The increase in fixation duration with number of targets both within and above working memory capacity suggests that in free viewing fixation duration is sensitive to actual memory load as well as to processing load, whereas pupil size is indicative of processing load only. Two alternative models relating visual attention and working memory are considered relevant to these results. We discuss the results as supportive of a model which involves a temporary buffer in the interaction of attention and working memory.

  5. Soot particle size measurements in ethylene diffusion flames at elevated pressures

    KAUST Repository

    Steinmetz, Scott

    2016-05-07

    Soot particle size is investigated in laminar nitrogen-diluted ethylene coflow diffusion flames at 4, 8, 12 and 16 atm. Line of sight attenuation and scattering are used to measure two-dimensional soot volume fraction and particle size fields for the first time at elevated pressures. Soot volume fraction dependence on pressure is consistent with the observations of similar studies, scaling approximately with the square of pressure. Scattering intensity is analyzed through Rayleigh and Rayleigh-Debye-Gans polydisperse fractal aggregate theories to provide two estimates of particle size. An increase in overall particle sizes with pressure is found, consistent with similar one-dimensional studies. Particle diameters in the annulus of the flame increase faster with pressure than those on centerline. Contrary to previous studies, the dependence of particle size on pressure was found to taper off between 8 and 12 atm, with little observed growth beyond 12 atm. The measurements provide additional data for one of the International Sooting Flame (ISF) workshop\\'s target pressurized flames.

  6. On-line digital holographic measurement of size and shape of microparticles for crystallization processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanam, Taslima; Darakis, Emmanouil; Rajendran, Arvind; Kariwala, Vinay; Asundi, Anand K.; Naughton, Thomas J.

    2008-09-01

    Crystallization is a widely used chemical process that finds applications in pharmaceutical industries. In an industrial crystallization process, it is not only important to produce pure crystals but also to control the shape and size of the crystals, as they affect the efficiency of downstream processes and the dissolution property of the drug. The effectiveness of control algorithms depend on the availability of on-line, real-time information about these critical properties. In this paper, we investigate the use of lens-less in-line digital holographic microscopy for size and shape measurements for crystallization processes. For this purpose, we use non-crystalline spherical microparticles and carbon fibers with known sizes present in a liquid suspension as test systems. We propose an algorithm to extract size and shape information for a population of microparticles from the experimentally recorded digital holograms. The measurements obtained from the proposed method show good agreement with the corresponding known size and shape of the particles.

  7. Measurement of eye size illusion caused by eyeliner, mascara, and eye shadow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsushita, Soyogu; Morikawa, Kazunori; Yamanami, Haruna

    2015-01-01

    Do eyeliner, mascara, and eye shadow actually make the eyes appear larger than they really are? If so, by what percentage? To answer these questions, we used psychophysical experiments. Experiment 1 manipulated the degree of eyeliner (four levels) and mascara (five levels), and measured perceived eye size using a psychophysical procedure called the staircase method. The results showed that both eyeliner and mascara make the eyes appear larger than they really are by up to 6% (13% in area), but their effects are not additive. Eyeliner increased perceived eye size only in the absence of mascara. In the presence of mascara, however, eyeliner has no additional effect. Experiment 2 measured perceived eye size with or without eye shadow and demonstrated that eye shadow increases perceived eye size by about 5% (10% in area). These findings indicate that one mechanism by which makeup and cosmetics alter facial appearances involves inducing visual illusions. In addition, it is suggested that the eye size illusion caused by eyeliner, mascara, and eye shadow uses the same mechanism as that of the Delboeuf illusion, a geometric illusion of assimilation.

  8. Computational nanomaterials for novel desalination membrane design: Nanoporous graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen-Tanugi, David; Grossman, Jeffrey C.

    2012-02-01

    We describe a novel approach for desalination based on nanoporous graphene. Our molecular dynamics calculations show that freestanding graphene patterned with nanometer-sized pores can act as an ultra-thin filtration membrane. Due to size exclusion and chemical interactions with the confining pores, salt ions can be blocked from permeating the membrane at sufficiently small pore diameters. Notably, the pore diameter and the chemical interactions at the water-membrane interface are most important criteria for this system's desalination performance. We will share insights from Molecular Dynamics calculations regarding the theoretical performance of this membrane system and the effects of chemical passivation of the graphene pores on the filtration dynamics. Although the narrow range of acceptable pore sizes suggests that further design innovations will be necessary at the molecular scale before large-scale applications are possible, our existing results predict that pressure requirements for this system can be made roughly competitive with commercial Reverse Osmosis.

  9. Nanoporous anti-fouling silicon membranes for biosensor applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, T A; Hansford, D J; Leoni, L; Essenpreis, M; Ferrari, M

    2000-01-01

    The ability to create biocompatible well-controlled membranes has been an area of great interest over the last few years, particularly for biosensor applications. The present study describes the fabrication and characterization of novel nanoporous micromachined membranes that exhibit selective permeability and low biofouling. Results indicate that such membranes can be fabricated with uniform pore sizes capable of the simultaneous exclusion of albumin and diffusion of glucose. Compared to polymeric membranes of similar pore size, micromachined silicon membranes allowed more than twice the amount of glucose diffusion after 240 min and complete albumin exclusion. Moreover, membranes exhibit no morphological change or degradability in the presence of biological proteins and fluids at 37 degrees C. The results point to the potential of using such membranes for implantable biosensor applications. With monodisperse pores sizes as small as 10 nm, these membranes offer advantages in their reproducibility, stability, and ability to be integrated in silicon-based biosensing technology.

  10. Pore-size-dependent calcium carbonate precipitation controlled by surface chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stack, Andrew G; Fernandez-Martinez, Alejandro; Allard, Lawrence F; Bañuelos, José L; Rother, Gernot; Anovitz, Lawrence M; Cole, David R; Waychunas, Glenn A

    2014-06-03

    Induced mineral precipitation is potentially important for the remediation of contaminants, such as during mineral trapping during carbon or toxic metal sequestration. The prediction of precipitation reactions is complicated by the porous nature of rocks and soils and their interaction with the precipitate, introducing transport and confinement effects. Here X-ray scattering measurements, modeling, and electron microscopies were used to measure the kinetics of calcium carbonate precipitation in a porous amorphous silica (CPG) that contained two discrete distributions of pore sizes: nanopores and macropores. To examine the role of the favorability of interaction between the substrate and precipitate, some of the CPG was functionalized with a self-assembled monolayer (SAM) similar to those known to enhance nucleation densities on planar substrates. Precipitation was found to occur exclusively in macropores in the native CPG, while simultaneous precipitation in nanopores and macropores was observed in the functionalized CPG. The rate of precipitation in the nanopores estimated from the model of the X-ray scattering matched that measured on calcite single crystals. These results suggest that the pore-size distribution in which a precipitation reaction preferentially occurs depends on the favorability of interaction between substrate and precipitate, something not considered in most studies of precipitation in porous media.

  11. Poretools: a toolkit for analyzing nanopore sequence data

    OpenAIRE

    Loman, Nicholas J.; Quinlan, Aaron R.

    2014-01-01

    Motivation: Nanopore sequencing may be the next disruptive technology in genomics, owing to its ability to detect single DNA molecules without prior amplification, lack of reliance on expensive optical components, and the ability to sequence long fragments. The MinION™ from Oxford Nanopore Technologies (ONT) is the first nanopore sequencer to be commercialized and is now available to early-access users. The MinION™ is a USB-connected, portable nanopore sequencer that permits real-time analysi...

  12. Self-assembled nanowire arrays as three-dimensional nanopores for filtration of DNA molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahong, Sakon; Yasui, Takao; Yanagida, Takeshi; Nagashima, Kazuki; Kanai, Masaki; Meng, Gang; He, Yong; Zhuge, Fuwei; Kaji, Noritada; Kawai, Tomoji; Baba, Yoshinobu

    2015-01-01

    Molecular filtration and purification play important roles for biomolecule analysis. However, it is still necessary to improve efficiency and reduce the filtration time. Here, we show self-assembled nanowire arrays as three-dimensional (3D) nanopores embedded in a microfluidic channel for ultrafast DNA filtration. The 3D nanopore structure was formed by a vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) nanowire growth technique, which allowed us to control pore size of the filtration material by varying the number of growth cycles. λ DNA molecules (48.5 kbp) were filtrated from a mixture of T4 DNA (166 kbp) at the entrance of the 3D nanopore structure within 1 s under an applied electric field. Moreover, we observed single DNA molecule migration of T4 and λ DNA molecules to clarify the filtration mechanism. The 3D nanopore structure has simplicity of fabrication, flexibility of pore size control and reusability for biomolecule filtration. Consequently it is an excellent material for biomolecular filtration.

  13. Development of a DNA Sensor Based on Nanoporous Pt-Rich Electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Hao, Pham; Thanh, Pham Duc; Xuan, Chu Thi; Hai, Nguyen Hoang; Tuan, Mai Anh

    2017-02-01

    Nanoporous Pt-rich electrodes with 72 at.% Pt composition were fabricated by sputtering a Pt-Ag alloy, followed by an electrochemical dealloying process to selectively etch away Ag atoms. The surface properties of nanoporous membranes were investigated by energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), a documentation system, and a gel image system (Gel Doc Imager). A single strand of probe deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) was immobilized onto the electrode surface by physical adsorption. The DNA probe and target hybridization were measured using a lock-in amplifier and an electrochemical impedance spectroscope (EIS). The nanoporous Pt-rich electrode-based DNA sensor offers a fast response time of 3.7 s, with a limit of detection (LOD) of 4.35 × 10-10 M of DNA target.

  14. The heat science of the nano-porous materials; La thermique des materiaux nanoporeux

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Volz, S. [CNRS, Lab. d' Energetique Moleculaire et Macroscopique, Combustion, 92 - Chatenay Malabry (France); Quintard, M. [CNRS, Institut de Mecanique des Fluides, 31 - Toulouse (France); Rochais, D. [CEA Centre d' Etudes du Ripault, Lab. Microstructures et Comportements, 37 - Tours (France); Enguehard, F. [CEA Centre d' Etudes du Ripault, Lab. Ingenierie des Materiaux Optiques, 37 - Tours (France); Domingues, G. [Ecole Nationale Superieure de Mecanique et d' Aerotechnique (ENSMA), Lab. d' Etudes Thermiques, 86 - Poitiers (France); Quenard, D. [CSTB, Div. Caracterisation Physique des Materiaux, 38 - Grenoble (France); Rigacci, A. [Ecole des Mines de Paris, Centre Energetique et Procedes, 75 - Paris (France); Bourdin, V. [CNRS, Lab. d' Informatique pour la Mecanique et les Sciences pour l' Ingenieur, 91 - Orsay (France); Chantrenne, P. [Centre de Thermique de Lyon, INSA, 69 - Lyon (France)

    2005-07-01

    In this work are gathered the transparencies of the lecture presented at the conference 'the heat science of the nano-porous materials'. The titles of the different lectures are: 1)modelling of the transfers in nano-porous media 2)modelling of the transfers inside nano-porous super-insulators part I: conduction part II: radiation 3)heat transfers between two silicon oxide nano-crystallite 4)thermo-physical properties of two pyro-micro-nano-porous silicon oxides: humidity and temperature effect 5)adsorption kinetics by a thermal frequency method: an indirect measurement method of the effective conductivity of the granulated adsorbents 6)the aerogels materials: nano-structured thermal super-insulators 7)anticipation of the nano-structured silicon thermal conductivity. (O.M.)

  15. Measuring proteins with greater speed and resolution while reducing sample size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Vincent H; Wyatt, Philip J

    2017-08-30

    A multi-angle light scattering (MALS) system, combined with chromatographic separation, directly measures the absolute molar mass, size and concentration of the eluate species. The measurement of these crucial properties in solution is essential in basic macromolecular characterization and all research and production stages of bio-therapeutic products. We developed a new MALS methodology that has overcome the long-standing, stubborn barrier to microliter-scale peak volumes and achieved the highest resolution and signal-to-noise performance of any MALS measurement. The novel design simultaneously facilitates online dynamic light scattering (DLS) measurements. As National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) new protein standard reference material (SRM 8671) is becoming the benchmark molecule against which many biomolecular analytical techniques are assessed and evaluated, we present its measurement results as a demonstration of the unique capability of our system to swiftly resolve and measure sharp (20~25 µL full-width-half-maximum) chromatography peaks. Precise measurements of protein mass and size can be accomplished 10 times faster than before with improved resolution. In the meantime the sample amount required for such measurements is reduced commensurately. These abilities will have far-reaching impacts at every stage of the development and production of biologics and bio-therapeutic formulations.

  16. An experimental study on the conversion between IFPUG and UCP functional size measurement units#

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Juan J.CUADRADO-GALLEGO; Alain ABRAN; Pablo RODRGUEZ-SORIA; Miguel A.LARA

    2014-01-01

    The use of functional size measurement (FSM) methods in software development organizations is growing during the years. Also, object oriented (OO) techniques have become quite a standard to design the software and, in particular, Use Cases is one of the most used techniques to specify functional requirements. Main FSM methods do not include specific rules to measure the software functionality from its Use Cases analysis. To deal with this issue some other methods like Kramer’s functional measurement method have been developed. Therefore, one of the main issues for those organizations willing to use OO functional measurement method in order to facilitate the use cases count procedure is how to convert their portfolio functional size from the previously adopted FSM method towards the new method. The objective of this research is to find a statistical relationship for converting the software functional size units measured by the International Function Point Users Group (IFPUG) function point analysis (FPA) method into Kramer-Smith’s use cases points (UCP) method and vice versa. Methodologies for a correct data gathering are proposed and results obtained are analyzed to draw the linear and non-linear equations for this correlation. Finally, a conversion factor and corresponding conversion intervals are given to establish the statistical relationship.

  17. An inverse modeling procedure to determine particle growth and nucleation rates from measured aerosol size distributions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Verheggen

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Classical nucleation theory is unable to explain the ubiquity of nucleation events observed in the atmosphere. This shows a need for an empirical determination of the nucleation rate. Here we present a novel inverse modeling procedure to determine particle nucleation and growth rates based on consecutive measurements of the aerosol size distribution. The particle growth rate is determined by regression analysis of the measured change in the aerosol size distribution over time, taking into account the effects of processes such as coagulation, deposition and/or dilution. This allows the growth rate to be determined with a higher time-resolution than can be deduced from inspecting contour plots ('banana-plots''. Knowing the growth rate as a function of time enables the evaluation of the time of nucleation of measured particles of a certain size. The nucleation rate is then obtained by integrating the particle losses from time of measurement to time of nucleation. The regression analysis can also be used to determine or verify the optimum value of other parameters of interest, such as the wall loss or coagulation rate constants. As an example, the method is applied to smog chamber measurements. This program offers a powerful interpretive tool to study empirical aerosol population dynamics in general, and nucleation and growth in particular.

  18. Optical Flow Cell for Measuring Size, Velocity and Composition of Flowing Droplets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sammer-ul Hassan

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Here an optical flow cell with two light paths is reported that can accurately quantify the size and velocity of droplets flowing through a microchannel. The flow cell can measure the time taken for droplets to pass between and through two conjoined light paths, and thereby is capable of measuring the velocities (0.2–5.45 mm/s and sizes of droplets (length > 0.8 mm. The composition of the droplet can also be accurately quantified via optical absorption measurements. The device has a small footprint and uses low-powered, low-cost components, which make it ideally suited for use in field-deployable and portable analytical devices.

  19. Effects of Spot Size on Neutron-Star Radius Measurements from Pulse Profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauböck, Michi; Psaltis, Dimitrios; Özel, Feryal

    2015-10-01

    We calculate the effects of spot size on pulse profiles of moderately rotating neutron stars. Specifically, we quantify the bias introduced in radius measurements from the common assumption that spots are infinitesimally small. We find that this assumption is reasonable for spots smaller than 10°-18° and leads to errors that are ≤10% in the radius measurement, depending on the location of the spot and the inclination of the observer. We consider the implications of our results for neutron star radius measurements with the upcoming and planned X-ray missions NICER and LOFT. We calculate the expected spot size for different classes of sources and investigate the circumstances under which the assumption of a small spot is justified.

  20. Effects of Spot Size on Neutron-Star Radius Measurements from Pulse Profiles

    CERN Document Server

    Baubock, Michi; Ozel, Feryal

    2015-01-01

    We calculate the effects of spot size on pulse profiles of moderately rotating neutron stars. Specifically, we quantify the bias introduced in radius measurements from the common assumption that spots are infinitesimally small. We find that this assumption is reasonable for spots smaller than 10-18$^\\circ$ and leads to errors that are $\\le$10% in the radius measurement, depending on the location of the spot and the inclination of the observer. We consider the implications of our results for neutron star radius measurements with the upcoming and planned X-ray missions NICER and LOFT. We calculate the expected spot size for different classes of sources and investigate the circumstances under which the assumption of a small spot is justified.

  1. Retrieval of snow albedo and grain size using reflectance measurements in Himalayan basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. S. Negi

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available In the present paper spectral reflectance measurements of Himalayan seasonal snow were carried out and analysed to retrieve the snow albedo and effective grain size. The asymptotic radiative transfer (ART theory was applied to retrieve the plane and spherical albedo. The retrieved plane albedo was compared with the measured spectral albedo and a good agreement was observed with ±10% measured error accuracy. Retrieved integrated albedo was found within ±6% difference with ground observed broadband albedo. The snow grain sizes retrieved using different models based on ART theory are compared for different snow types and it was observed that presently grain size model using two channel method (one in visible and another in NIR region can work well for Himalayan seasonal snow and it was found consistence with temporal increased grain size. This method can work very well for clean dry snow like in upper Himalaya but sometime due to low reflectances (<0.2 using wavelength 1.24 μm ART theory can not be applied, which is common in lower and middle Himalayan old snow. This study is of importance for monitoring the Himalayan cryosphere using air-borne or space-borne sensors.

  2. On the repeated measures designs and sample sizes for randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tango, Toshiro

    2016-04-01

    For the analysis of longitudinal or repeated measures data, generalized linear mixed-effects models provide a flexible and powerful tool to deal with heterogeneity among subject response profiles. However, the typical statistical design adopted in usual randomized controlled trials is an analysis of covariance type analysis using a pre-defined pair of "pre-post" data, in which pre-(baseline) data are used as a covariate for adjustment together with other covariates. Then, the major design issue is to calculate the sample size or the number of subjects allocated to each treatment group. In this paper, we propose a new repeated measures design and sample size calculations combined with generalized linear mixed-effects models that depend not only on the number of subjects but on the number of repeated measures before and after randomization per subject used for the analysis. The main advantages of the proposed design combined with the generalized linear mixed-effects models are (1) it can easily handle missing data by applying the likelihood-based ignorable analyses under the missing at random assumption and (2) it may lead to a reduction in sample size, compared with the simple pre-post design. The proposed designs and the sample size calculations are illustrated with real data arising from randomized controlled trials.

  3. On-line non-intrusive particle size measurement of pulverised fuel through digital imaging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents the basic principles of particle size measurement and latest industrial results recorded using an innovative optical instrumentation system designed to measure the size distribution of particles in a pneumatic suspension. The system is non-intrusive and cost-effective. A low-cost CCD camera is used to capture images of the particulate flow field, which is illuminated by a low-cost pulsed laser sheet generator. The particle size distribution is then determined by processing the particle images through the use of novel processing algorithms. Experimental results obtained in the past on a small scale particle flow test rig have demonstrated that the system is capable of measuring the size distribution of pneumatically conveyed particles with an accuracy of a few percent. For the present paper results obtained when testing the system at a 4 MW industrial test facility are presented. Comparisons are made with both off-line reference data achieved through sieving and on-line laser diffraction data recorded using an intrusive, extractive, Malvern Instruments system. In general there is good agreement between results when considering the characteristics and limitations of the individual methodologies. The novel imaging system shows itself to be rugged, practical and useful under genuine industrial conditions.

  4. Proton source size measurements in the eA->e'ppX reaction

    CERN Document Server

    Stavinsky, A V; Lednicky, R; Vlassov, A V; Adams, G; Ambrozewicz, P; Anciant, E; Anghinolfi, M; Asavapibhop, B; Asryan, G; Audit, G; Auger, T; Avakian, H; Bagdasaryan, H; Ball, J P; Barrow, S; Batourine, V; Battaglieri, M; Beard, K; Bektasoglu, M; Bellis, M; Benmouna, N; Bianchi, N; Biselli, A S; Boiarinov, S; Bonner, B E; Bouchigny, S; Bradford, R; Branford, D; Brooks, W K; Burkert, V D; Butuceanu, C; Calarco, J R; Carman, D S; Cetina, C; Chen, S; Cole, P L; Cords, D; Coleman, A; Corvisiero, P; Crabb, D; Cummings, J P; Dashyan, N B; De Sanctis, E; De Vita, R; Degtyarenko, P V; Denizli, H; Dennis, L; Deur, A; Dharmawardane, K V; Djalali, C; Dodge, G E; Doughty, D; Dragovitsch, P; Dugger, M; Dytman, S; Dzyubak, O P; Egiyan, H; Egiyan, K S; Elouadrhiri, L; Empl, A; Eugenio, P; Fatemi, R; Fersch, R G; Feuerbach, R J; Forest, T A; Funsten, H; Garçon, M; Gavalian, G; Gilad, S; Gilfoyle, G P; Giovanetti, K L; Girard, P; Gordon, C I O; Gothe, R W; Griffioen, K; Guidal, M; Guillo, M; Guler, N; Guo, L; Gyurjyan, V; Hadjidakis, C; Hakobyan, R S; Hardie, J; Heddle, D; Hersman, F W; Hicks, K; Hleiqawi, I; Holtrop, M; Hu, J; Hyde-Wright, C E; Ireland, D G; Ito, M M; Jenkins, D; Joo, K; Jüngst, H G; Kelley, J H; Kellie, J D; Khandaker, M; Kim, D H; Kim, K Y; Kim, K; Kim, M S; Kim, W; Klein, A; Klein, F J; Klimenko, A V; Klusman, M; Kossov, M; Kramer, L H; Kubarovski, V; Kuhn, S E; Kühn, J; Lachniet, J; Laget, J M; Langheinrich, J; Lawrence, D; Leksin, G A; Lee, T; Ji Li; Livingston, K; Lukashin, K; Manak, J J; Marchand, C; McAleer, S; McNabb, J W C; Mecking, B A; Mehrabyan, S S; Melone, J J; Mestayer, M D; Meyer, C A; Mirazita, M; Miskimen, R; Mokeev, V; Morand, L; Morrow, S A; Muccifora, V; Müller, J; Mutchler, G S; Napolitano, J; Nasseripour, R; Nelson, S O; Niccolai, S; Niculescu, G; Niculescu, I; Niczyporuk, B B; Niyazov, R A; Nozar, M; O'Rielly, G V; Osipenko, M; Ostrovidov, A I; Park, K; Pasyuk, E A; Peterson, G; Philips, S A; Pivnyuk, N A; Pocanic, D; Pogorelko, O I; Polli, E; Pozdniakov, S; Preedom, B M; Price, J W; Prok, Y; Protopopescu, D; Qin, L M; Raue, B A; Riccardi, G; Ricco, G; Ripani, M; Ritchie, B G; Ronchetti, F; Rosner, G; Rossi, P; Rowntree, D; Rubin, P D; Sabatie, F; Sabourov, K; Salgado, C; Santoro, J P; Sapunenko, V; Schumacher, R A; Serov, V S; Sharabyan, Yu G; Shaw, J; Simionatto, S; Skabelin, A V; Smith, E S; Smith, L C; Sober, D I; Spraker, M; Stepanyan, S; Stokes, B E; Stoler, P; Strakovsky, I I; Taiuti, M; Taylor, S; Tedeschi, D J; Thoma, U; Thompson, R; Tkabladze, A; Todor, L; Tur, C; Ungaro, M; Vineyard, M F; Vorobeyev, L S; Wang, K; Weinstein, L B; Weller, H; Weygand, D P; Whisnant, C S; Williams, M; Wolin, E; Wood, M H; Yegneswaran, A; Yun, J; Zana, L

    2004-01-01

    Two-proton correlations at small relative momentum q were studied in the eA(3He, 4He, C, Fe)-> e'ppX reaction at E_0 = 4.46 GeV using the CLAS detector at Jefferson Lab. The enhancement of the correlation function at small q was found to be in accordance with theoretical expectation. Emission region sizes were extracted and proved to be dependent on A and proton momentum. The size of the two-proton emission region on the lightest possible nucleus, He, was measured for the first time.

  5. Proton Source Size Measurements in the eA→e'ppX Reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stavinsky, A. V.; Mikhailov, K. R.; Lednicky, R.; Vlassov, A. V.; Adams, G.; Ambrozewich, P.; Anciant, E.; Anghinolfi, M.; Asavapibhop, B.; Asryan, G.; Audit, G.; Auger, T.; Avakian, H.; Bagdasaryan, H.; Ball, J. P.; Barrow, S.; Batourine, V.; Battaglieri, M.; Beard, K.; Bektasoglu, M.; Bellis, M.; Benmouna, N.; Bianchi, N.; Biselli, A. S.; Boiarinov, S.; Bonner, B. E.; Bouchigny, S.; Bradford, R.; Branford, D.; Brooks, W. K.; Burkert, V. D.; Butuceanu, C.; Calarco, J. R.; Carman, D. S.; Cetina, C.; Chen, S.; Cole, P. L.; Cords, D.; Coleman, A.; Corvisiero, P.; Crabb, D.; Cummings, J. P.; Dashyan, N.; Sanctis, E. De; Vita, R. De; Degtyarenko, P. V.; Denizli, H.; Dennis, L.; Deur, A.; Dharmawardane, K. V.; Djalali, C.; Dodge, G. E.; Doughty, D.; Dragovitsch, P.; Dugger, M.; Dytman, S.; Dzyubak, O. P.; Egiyan, H.; Egiyan, K. S.; Elouadrhiri, L.; Empl, A.; Eugenio, P.; Fatemi, R.; Fersch, R. G.; Feuerbach, R. J.; Forest, T. A.; Funsten, H.; Garçon, M.; Gavalian, G.; Gilad, S.; Gilfoyle, G. P.; Giovanetti, K. L.; Girard, P.; Gordon, C. I.; Gothe, R. W.; Griffioen, K.; Guidal, M.; Guillo, M.; Guler, N.; Guo, L.; Gyurjyan, V.; Hadjidakis, C.; Hakobyan, R. S.; Hardie, J.; Heddle, D.; Hersman, F. W.; Hicks, K.; Hleiqawi, I.; Holtrop, M.; Hu, J.; Hyde-Wright, C. E.; Ireland, D. G.; Ito, M. M.; Jenkins, D.; Joo, K.; Juengst, H. G.; Kelley, J. H.; Kellie, J. D.; Khandaker, M.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, K. Y.; Kim, K.; Kim, M. S.; Kim, W.; Klein, A.; Klein, F. J.; Klimenko, A. V.; Klusman, M.; Kossov, M. V.; Kramer, L. H.; Kubarovski, V.; Kuhn, S. E.; Kuhn, J.; Lachniet, J.; Laget, J. M.; Langheinrich, J.; Lawrence, D.; Leksin, G. A.; Lee, T.; Li, Ji; Livingston, K.; Lukashin, K.; Manak, J. J.; Marchand, C.; McAleer, S.; McNabb, J. W.; Mecking, B. A.; Mehrabyan, S.; Melone, J. J.; Mestayer, M. D.; Meyer, C. A.; Mirazita, M.; Miskimen, R.; Mokeev, V.; Morand, L.; Morrow, S. A.; Muccifora, V.; Mueller, J.; Mutchler, G. S.; Napolitano, J.; Nasseripour, R.; Nelson, S. O.; Niccolai, S.; Niculescu, G.; Niculescu, I.; Niczyporuk, B. B.; Niyazov, R. A.; Nozar, M.; O'Rielly, G. V.; Osipenko, M.; Ostrovidov, A. I.; Park, K.; Pasyuk, E.; Peterson, G.; Philips, S. A.; Pivnyuk, N. A.; Pocanic, D.; Pogorelko, O.; Polli, E.; Pozdniakov, S.; Preedom, B. M.; Price, J. W.; Prok, Y.; Protopopescu, D.; Qin, L. M.; Raue, B. A.; Riccardi, G.; Ricco, G.; Ripani, M.; Ritchie, B. G.; Ronchetti, F.; Rosner, G.; Rossi, P.; Rowntree, D.; Rubin, P. D.; Sabatié, F.; Sabourov, K.; Salgado, C.; Santoro, J. P.; Sapunenko, V.; Schumacher, R. A.; Serov, V. S.; Sharabian, Y. G.; Shaw, J.; Simionatto, S.; Skabelin, A. V.; Smith, E. S.; Smith, L. C.; Sober, D. I.; Spraker, M.; Stepanyan, S.; Stepanyan, S. S.; Stokes, B. E.; Stoler, P.; Strakovsky, I. I.; Taiuti, M.; Taylor, S.; Tedeschi, D. J.; Thoma, U.; Thompson, R.; Tkabladze, A.; Todor, L.; Tur, C.; Ungaro, M.; Vineyard, M. F.; Vorobeyev, L. S.; Wang, K.; Weinstein, L. B.; Weller, H.; Weygand, D. P.; Whisnant, C. S.; Williams, M.; Wolin, E.; Wood, M. H.; Yegneswaran, A.; Yun, J.; Zana, L.

    2004-11-01

    Two-proton correlations at small relative momentum q were studied in the eA(3He,4He,C,Fe)→e'ppX reaction at E0=4.46 GeV using the CLAS detector at Jefferson Lab. The enhancement of the correlation function at small q was found to be in accordance with theoretical expectations. Sizes of the emission region were extracted, and proved to be dependent on A and on the proton momentum. The size of the two-proton emission region for He was measured in eA reactions for the first time.

  6. Translocation frequency of double-stranded DNA through a solid-state nanopore

    CERN Document Server

    Bell, Nicholas A W; Keyser, Ulrich F

    2015-01-01

    Solid-state nanopores are single molecule sensors that measure changes in ionic current as charged polymers such as DNA pass through. Here, we present comprehensive experiments on the length, voltage and salt dependence of the frequency of double-stranded DNA translocations through conical quartz nanopores with mean opening diameter 15 nm. We observe an entropic barrier limited, length dependent translocation frequency at 4M LiCl salt concentration and a drift-dominated, length independent translocation frequency at 1M KCl salt concentration. These observations are described by a unifying convection-diffusion equation which includes the contribution of an entropic barrier for polymer entry.

  7. The contraction of granules of nanoporous super-cross-linked polystyrene sorbents as a result of the exclusion of large-sized mineral electrolyte ions from the polymer phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastukhov, A. V.; Davankov, V. A.; Tsyurupa, M. P.; Blinnikova, Z. K.; Kavalerskaya, N. E.

    2009-03-01

    The deformation of neutral super-cross-linked polystyrene sorbents and ionites based on styrene-divinylbenzene gel-type copolymers brought in contact with concentrated solutions of HCl, H3PO4, NaOH, NH4Cl, (NH4)2SO4, and LiCl electrolytes was studied by dilatometry for separate spherical granules. Considerable contraction of super-cross-linked polystyrene matrices swollen in water was observed in concentrated solutions containing large-sized lithium, sulfate, and phosphate ions. Volume compressive strain correlated with the size of excluded hydrated ions. The contraction effect was caused by the difference in the osmotic pressure of water in thin pores and water in concentrated solutions filling large pores. The exclusion effect ignored earlier should also influence the degree of ion exchange and volume deformation of standard ion-exchange resins brought in contact with solutions of various electrolytes.

  8. In vivo lateral blood flow velocity measurement using speckle size estimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Tiantian; Hozan, Mohsen; Bashford, Gregory R

    2014-05-01

    In previous studies, we proposed blood measurement using speckle size estimation, which estimates the lateral component of blood flow within a single image frame based on the observation that the speckle pattern corresponding to blood reflectors (typically red blood cells) stretches (i.e., is "smeared") if blood flow is in the same direction as the electronically controlled transducer line selection in a 2-D image. In this observational study, the clinical viability of ultrasound blood flow velocity measurement using speckle size estimation was investigated and compared with that of conventional spectral Doppler of carotid artery blood flow data collected from human patients in vivo. Ten patients (six male, four female) were recruited. Right carotid artery blood flow data were collected in an interleaved fashion (alternating Doppler and B-mode A-lines) with an Antares Ultrasound Imaging System and transferred to a PC via the Axius Ultrasound Research Interface. The scanning velocity was 77 cm/s, and a 4-s interval of flow data were collected from each subject to cover three to five complete cardiac cycles. Conventional spectral Doppler data were collected simultaneously to compare with estimates made by speckle size estimation. The results indicate that the peak systolic velocities measured with the two methods are comparable (within ±10%) if the scan velocity is greater than or equal to the flow velocity. When scan velocity is slower than peak systolic velocity, the speckle stretch method asymptotes to the scan velocity. Thus, the speckle stretch method is able to accurately measure pure lateral flow, which conventional Doppler cannot do. In addition, an initial comparison of the speckle size estimation and color Doppler methods with respect to computational complexity and data acquisition time indicated potential time savings in blood flow velocity estimation using speckle size estimation. Further studies are needed for calculation of the speckle stretch method

  9. Real-time single-molecule electronic DNA sequencing by synthesis using polymer-tagged nucleotides on a nanopore array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, Carl W; Kumar, Shiv; Porel, Mintu; Chien, Minchen; Bibillo, Arek; Stranges, P Benjamin; Dorwart, Michael; Tao, Chuanjuan; Li, Zengmin; Guo, Wenjing; Shi, Shundi; Korenblum, Daniel; Trans, Andrew; Aguirre, Anne; Liu, Edward; Harada, Eric T; Pollard, James; Bhat, Ashwini; Cech, Cynthia; Yang, Alexander; Arnold, Cleoma; Palla, Mirkó; Hovis, Jennifer; Chen, Roger; Morozova, Irina; Kalachikov, Sergey; Russo, James J; Kasianowicz, John J; Davis, Randy; Roever, Stefan; Church, George M; Ju, Jingyue

    2016-05-10

    DNA sequencing by synthesis (SBS) offers a robust platform to decipher nucleic acid sequences. Recently, we reported a single-molecule nanopore-based SBS strategy that accurately distinguishes four bases by electronically detecting and differentiating four different polymer tags attached to the 5'-phosphate of the nucleotides during their incorporation into a growing DNA strand catalyzed by DNA polymerase. Further developing this approach, we report here the use of nucleotides tagged at the terminal phosphate with oligonucleotide-based polymers to perform nanopore SBS on an α-hemolysin nanopore array platform. We designed and synthesized several polymer-tagged nucleotides using tags that produce different electrical current blockade levels and verified they are active substrates for DNA polymerase. A highly processive DNA polymerase was conjugated to the nanopore, and the conjugates were complexed with primer/template DNA and inserted into lipid bilayers over individually addressable electrodes of the nanopore chip. When an incoming complementary-tagged nucleotide forms a tight ternary complex with the primer/template and polymerase, the tag enters the pore, and the current blockade level is measured. The levels displayed by the four nucleotides tagged with four different polymers captured in the nanopore in such ternary complexes were clearly distinguishable and sequence-specific, enabling continuous sequence determination during the polymerase reaction. Thus, real-time single-molecule electronic DNA sequencing data with single-base resolution were obtained. The use of these polymer-tagged nucleotides, combined with polymerase tethering to nanopores and multiplexed nanopore sensors, should lead to new high-throughput sequencing methods.

  10. Experimental comparison of various techniques for spot size measurement of high-energy X-ray

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yi; Li, Qin; Chen, Nan; Cheng, Jin-Ming; Li, Cheng-Gang; Li, Hong; Long, Quan-Hong; Shi, Jin-Shui; Deng, Jian-Jun

    2016-08-01

    In flash-radiography experiments, the quality of the acquired image strongly depends on the focal size of the X-ray source spot. A variety of techniques based on imaging of the pinhole, the slit and the rollbar are adopted to measure the focal spot size of the Dragon-I linear induction accelerator. The image of the pinhole provides a two-dimensional distribution of the X-ray spot, while those of the slit and the rollbar give a line-spread distribution and an edge-spread distribution, respectively. The spot size characterized by the full-width at half-maximum and that characterized by the LANL definition are calculated for comparison.

  11. Information Measure for Size Distribution of Avalanches in the Bak-Sneppen Evolution Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Wei; CAI Xu

    2003-01-01

    Information of avalanche size distribution is measured by calculating information entropy (IE) in the Bak-Sneppen evolution model. It is found that the IE increases as the model evolves. Specifically, we establish the relation between the IE and the self-organized threshold fc ? The variation of the IE near the critical point yields an exponent entropy index E = (T - l)/size distribution and avalanche size cutoff, respectively. A new quantity DT(g) (g = 1 - (fc - G)'r-1' , where G is the gap of the current state), denned as 1 - IT(g)/IT(l), with IT(g) and /T(l) being the IE for the current state and the critical one respectively, is suggested that it represents the distance between the state with gap G and the critical one.

  12. Nanofluidic Size-Exclusion Chromatograph

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldman, Sabrina; Svehla, Danielle; Grunthaner, Frank; Feldman, Jason; Shakkottai, P.

    2004-01-01

    Efforts are under way to develop a nanofluidic size-exclusion chromatograph (SEC), which would be a compact, robust, lightweight instrument for separating molecules of interest according to their sizes and measuring their relative abundances in small samples. About as large as a deck of playing cards, the nanofluidic SEC would serve, in effect, as a laboratory on a chip that would perform the functions of a much larger, conventional, bench-top SEC and ancillary equipment, while consuming much less power and much smaller quantities of reagent and sample materials. Its compactness and low power demand would render it attractive for field applications in which, typically, it would be used to identify and quantitate a broad range of polar and nonpolar organic compounds in soil, ice, and water samples. Size-exclusion chromatography is a special case of high-performance liquid chromatography. In a conventional SEC, a sample plug is driven by pressure along a column packed with silica or polymer beads that contain uniform nanopores. The interstices between, and the pores in, the beads collectively constitute a size-exclusion network. Molecules follow different paths through the size-exclusion network, such that characteristic elution times can be related to sizes of molecules: basically, smaller molecules reach the downstream end of the column after the larger ones do because the smaller ones enter minor pores and stay there for a while, whereas the larger ones do not enter the pores. The volume accessible to molecules gradually diminishes as their size increases. All molecules bigger than a pore size elute together. For most substances, the elution times and sizes of molecules can be correlated directly with molecular weights. Hence, by measuring the flux of molecules arriving at the downstream end as a function of time, one can obtain a liquid mass spectrum for the molecules present in a sample over a broad range of molecular weights.

  13. Thermal Stability of Nanoporous Raney Gold Catalyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew C. Tai

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Nanoporous “Raney gold” sponge was prepared by de-alloying an Au-Al precursor alloy. Catalytic tests using a micro-reactor confirmed that Raney gold can serve as an active heterogeneous catalyst for CO oxidation, reduction of NO to N2, and oxidation of NO to NO2. In general, the specific surface area of a heterogeneous catalyst has an influence on its catalytic efficacy. Unfortunately, gold sponges coarsen readily, leading to sintering of their structure and reduction in surface area. This potentially places constraints on their upper operating temperature in catalytic reactors. Here we analyzed the behavior of Raney gold when the temperature was raised. We examined the kinetics and mechanism of coarsening of the sponge using a combination of in situ optical measurements and Metropolis Monte Carlo modeling with a Lennard-Jones interatomic potential. Modeling showed that the sponges started with an isotropic “foamy” morphology with negative average “mean curvature” but that subsequent thermally activated coarsening will drive the morphology through a bi-continuous fibrous state and on, eventually, to a sponge consisting of sintered blobs of predominantly positive “mean curvature”.

  14. Size segregated aerosol mass concentration measurements over the Arabian Sea during ICARB

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Vijayakumar S Nair; K Krishna Moorthy; S Suresh Babu; K Narasimhulu; L Siva Sankara Reddy; R Ramakrishna Reddy; K Rama Gopal; V Sreekanth; B L Madhavan; K Niranjan

    2008-07-01

    Mass concentration and mass size distribution of total (composite) aerosols near the surface are essential inputs needed in developing aerosol models for radiative forcing estimation as well as to infer the environment and air quality. Using extensive measurements onboard the oceanographic research vessel, Sagar Kanya, during its cruise SK223B in the second phase of the ocean segment of the Integrated Campaign for Aerosols, gases and Radiation Budget (ICARB), the spatial distribution of the mass concentration and mass size distribution of near-surface aerosols are examined for the first time over the entire Arabian Sea, going as far as 58°E and 22°N, within a span of 26 days. In general, the mass concentrations () were found to be low with the mean value for the entire Arabian Sea being 16.7 ± 7 g m−3; almost 1/2 of the values reported in some of the earlier campaigns. Coarse mode aerosols contributed, on an average, 58% to the total mass, even though at a few pockets accumulation mode contribution dominated. Spatially, significant variations were observed over central and northern Arabian Sea as well as close to the west coast of India. In central Arabian Sea, even though the was quite low, contribution of accumulation aerosols to the total mass concentration was greater than 50%. Effective radius, a parameter important in determining scattering properties of aerosol size distribution, varied between 0.07 and 0.4 m with a mean value of 0.2 m. Number size distributions, deduced from the mass size distributions, were approximated to inverse power-law form and the size indices () were estimated. It was found to vary in the range 3.9 to 4.2 with a mean value of 4.0 for the entire oceanic region. Extinction coefficients, estimated using the number-size distributions, were well-correlated with the accumulation mode mass concentration with a correlation coefficient of 0.82.

  15. Size-resolved measurements of ice nucleating particles at North American and European sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, R.; Si, M.; Chou, C.; Irish, V.; Dickie, R.; Elizondo, P.; Wong, R.; Brintnell, M.; Elsasser, M.; Lassar, W.; Pierce, K.; Leaitch, W. R.; Macdonald, A. M.; Platt, A.; Desiree, T. S.; Sarda Esteve, R.; Schiller, C. L.; Suski, K. J.; Hill, T. C. J.; Abbatt, J.; Huffman, J. A.; DeMott, P. J.; Bertram, A. K.

    2015-12-01

    Ice nucleating particles (INPs) are a small fraction of the total aerosol population capable of catalyzing ice formation under atmospheric conditions, and may therefore influence the albedo and lifetime of mixed-phase and ice clouds. Compared to ambient measurements of the total number concentration of INPs, relatively little data exists on the size distribution of INPs in the atmosphere. Information on the size of INPs may be useful in source identification, modeling their transport in the atmosphere, and determining the degree to which common INP instrumentation captures the full atmospheric INP population. Measured using the micro-orifice uniform deposit impactor-droplet freezing technique (MOUDI-DFT), we report immersion-mode INP number concentrations as a function of particle size at ground-level sites in North America and Europe, including Arctic, alpine, coastal, marine, agricultural, and suburban environments. On average, more than 91 % of INPs active at -15 °C were found to be supermicron in size and 62 % were in the coarse mode (> 2.5 μm). While these percentages decreased with decreasing freezing temperature, many INPs remained in the supermicron with nearly half of those active at -25 °C belonging to the coarse mode.

  16. Bubble size measurement in three-phase system using photograph technology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Wei; HU Yue-hua; LIU Run-qing

    2005-01-01

    A special experiment setup was designed to observe the interaction between bubbles and particle in flotation cell and to analyze the bubble characteristics such as bubble size, distribution and bubble-loading efficiency. Bubbles in water-gas system and three-phase system were measured. The results indicate that with the current setup the bubbles as small as 10 μm can be easily distinguished. The average size of the bubbles generated under the given conditions in two-phase system is 410 μm at frother concentration of 0.004%, which is in good correspondence with the results of other works. The effect of frother on bubble size was probed. Increasing frother concentration from 0 to 0.004% causes a reduction of bubble size from 700 to 400 μm. The bubble loading efficiency was reported. The result indicates that the fine particle is more easily entrapped than the coarse particle. Some factors, which have effect on measurement accuracy were discussed. The aeration speed has a significant effect on the accuracy of results, if it surpasses 30 mL/s, and the image becomes unclear due to the entrapment of fine particle. Another factor, which can affect observing results, is the sampling position. At a wrong sampling position, the images become unclear.

  17. Retrieval of snow albedo and grain size using reflectance measurements in Himalayan basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. S. Negi

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available In the present paper, spectral reflectance measurements of Himalayan seasonal snow were carried out and analysed to retrieve the snow albedo and effective grain size. The asymptotic radiative transfer (ART theory was applied to retrieve the plane and spherical albedo. The retrieved plane albedo was compared with the measured spectral albedo and a good agreement was observed with ±10% differences. Retrieved integrated albedo was found within ±6% difference with ground observed broadband albedo. The retrieved snow grain sizes using different models based on the ART theory were compared for various snow types and it was observed that the grain size model using two channel method (one in visible and another in NIR region can work well for the Himalayan seasonal snow and it was found consistent with temporal changes in grain size. This method can work very well for clean, dry snow as in the upper Himalaya, but sometimes, due to the low reflectances (<20% using wavelength 1.24 μm, the ART theory cannot be applied, which is common in lower and middle Himalayan old snow. This study is important for monitoring the Himalayan cryosphere using air-borne or space-borne sensors.

  18. The impact of homogeniser speed, dispersing aggregate size and centrifugation on particle size analyses of pork as a measure of myofibrillar fragmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngapo, T M; Vachon, L

    2017-11-01

    Particle size analysis has been proposed as a measure of myofibrillar fragmentation resulting from post-mortem proteolysis in meat. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of homogenisation speed, dispersing aggregate size and centrifugation on particle size characteristics of pork loin. Particle size characteristics were significantly (P≤0.023) greater for samples aged 2 than 8d for all but the 80 and 90% quantiles. Differentiation with ageing was only achieved when homogenised at 11,000rpm using the smaller dispersing aggregate (9 vs 13mm rotor diameters). Centrifugation had no effect on particle size characteristics. Significant correlations with MFI (r=-0.40 to -0.81, Psize analyses as a method of tenderness classification unlikely. Rather, value lies in the detailed profiles of particle size distributions with meat ageing. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  19. Fluids and their Effect on Measurements on Lunar Soil Particle size Distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, B. L.; McKay, D. S.; Wallace, W. T.; Gonzalex, C. P.

    2011-01-01

    From the late 1960s until now, lunar soil particle size distributions have typically been determined by sieving sometimes dry, and at other times with fluids such as water or Freon. Laser diffraction instruments allow rapid assessment of particle size distribution, and eventually may replace sieve measurements. However, when measuring lunar soils with laser diffraction instruments, care must be taken in choosing a carrier fluid that is compatible with lunar material. Distilled water is the fluid of choice for laser diffraction measurements of substances when there is no concern about adverse effects of water on the material being measured. When we began our analyses of lunar soils using laser diffraction, our first measurements were made with distilled water. Although the medians that we measured were comparable to earlier sieve data, the means tended to be significantly larger than expected. The effect of water vapor on lunar soil has been studied extensively. The particles interact strongly with water vapor, and subsequent adsorptions of nitrogen showed that the specific surface area increased as much as threefold after exposure to moisture. It was observed that significant porosity had been generated by this exposure to water vapor. The possibility of other physical changes in the surfaces of the grains was not studied.

  20. Fabrication of nanoporous silver by de-alloying Cu-Zr-Ag amorphous alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hui; Xiao, Shang-gang; Zhang, Tao

    2016-07-01

    Nanoporous silver (NPS) with a ligament size ranging from 15 to 40 nm was fabricated by de-alloying (Cu50Zr50)100- x Ag x ( x = 10at%, 20at%, 30at%, and 40at%) amorphous ribbons in a mixed aqueous solution of hydrofluoric (HF) acid and nitric acid under free corrosion conditions. Nanoporous silver ligaments and pore sizes were able to be fine-tuned through tailoring the chemical composition, corrosion conditions, and de-alloying time. The ligament size increases with an increase in Ag content and de-alloying time, but decreases with an increase in HF concentration. This phenomenon may be attributed to the dissolution of Zr/Cu and the diffusion, aggregation, nucleation, and recrystallization of Ag, leading to an oriented attachment of adjacent nanocrystals as revealed by TEM analysis.

  1. Fabrication of nanoporous silver by de-alloying CuZrAg amorphous alloys

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hui Wang; Shang-gang Xiao; Tao Zhang

    2016-01-01

    Nanoporous silver (NPS) with a ligament size ranging from 15 to 40 nm was fabricated by de-alloying (Cu50Zr50)100-xAgx (x = 10at%, 20at%, 30at%, and 40at%) amorphous ribbons in a mixed aqueous solution of hydrofluoric (HF) acid and nitric acid under free cor-rosion conditions. Nanoporous silver ligaments and pore sizes were able to be fine-tuned through tailoring the chemical composition, corro-sion conditions, and de-alloying time. The ligament size increases with an increase in Ag content and de-alloying time, but decreases with an increase in HF concentration. This phenomenon may be attributed to the dissolution of Zr/Cu and the diffusion, aggregation, nucleation, and recrystallization of Ag, leading to an oriented attachment of adjacent nanocrystals as revealed by TEM analysis.

  2. A method for measuring precipitation parameters and raindrop size distributions using radar reflectivity and optical extinction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulbrich, C. W.; Atlas, D.

    1977-01-01

    A method of determining precipitation parameters from two remotely measurable quantities, the radar reflectivity factor and the optical extinction, is described. The raindrop size spectrum is approximated by a two-parameter exponential form; when these parameters are evaluated in terms of the radar reflectivity factor and the optical extinction, an exponential spectrum is obtained that is generally in very good agreement with the observed size spectrum. Other calculated precipitation parameters, such as rainfall rate and liquid water content, which are derived from the exponential approximation, also agree with experimental data. It is indicated that other combinations of two remote measurables can also be used to obtain more accurate estimates of precipitation parameters than can be obtained by the use of an empirical relationship.

  3. Is radiographic measurement of bony landmarks reliable for lateral meniscal sizing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Jung-Ro; Kim, Taik-Seon; Lim, Hong-Chul; Lim, Hyung-Tae; Yang, Jae-Hyuk

    2011-03-01

    radiologic measurement showed good reliability (intraclass correlation coefficients, .823 to .973). The authors tried to determine the best-fit equation for predicting meniscal size from Pollard's method of bone size, as follows: anatomic length = 0.52 × plateau length (according to Pollard's method) + 5.2, not as Pollard suggested (0.7 × Pollard's plateau length). Based on this equation-namely, the modified Pollard method-the percentage difference decreased, and the accuracy increased to 92%. Lateral meniscal length dimension can be accurately predicted from the authors' radiographic tibial plateau measurements. This study may provide valuable information in preoperative sizing of lateral meniscus in meniscal allograft transplantation.

  4. Bra band size measurements derived from three-dimensional scans are not accurate in women with large, ptotic breasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGhee, Deirdre E; Ramsay, Lauren G; Coltman, Celeste E; Gho, Sheridan A; Steele, Julie R

    2017-07-12

    This study investigated differences in standard measurements used to determine bra size, under-bust chest circumference (UBCC) and over-bust chest circumference (OBCC), measured from a three-dimensional scan (hand-held scanner) compared to the direct measurement in 111 women (age 21-56 years; right breast volume 57-1672 mL; bra size 10A-18G). Bland-Altman plots of UBCC measurements showed a large positive bias and wide limits of agreement (12 cm; -4.6 to 28 cm), which increased as band size increased but decreased when the breasts were digitally removed from the scan prior to the UBCC measurement. The difference in UBCC measurements determined from scans compared to direct measurement had a strong positive correlation with breast volume and breast ptotis. The OBCC measurements showed a small positive bias (2.4 cm; -3.4 to 8.4), consistent across the range of bra sizes. Bra band size measurements determined from three-dimensional scans can be inaccurate in women with large, ptotic breasts. Practitioner Summary: We investigated potential errors in anthropometric data derived from three-dimensional scans used for bra design and fit. Bra band size measurements taken from three-dimensional scans were over-estimated in women with large breasts, whereas bra cup size measurements were accurate to within one-cup size across the entire range of bra sizes.

  5. Five-years of atmospheric aerosol number size distribution measurements in Eastern Mediterranean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalivitis, Nikolaos; Kouvarakis, Giorgos; Bougiatioti, Aikaterini; Stavroulas, Iasonas; Wiedensohler, Alfred; Mihalopoulos, Nikolaos

    2014-05-01

    The first long term measurements of atmospheric particle size distributions from the Eastern Mediterranean region are reported. Atmospheric aerosol number size distributions have been measured at the environmental research station of University of Crete at Finokalia, Crete, Greece (35° 20' N, 25° 40' E, 250m a.s.l) on a continuous base since 2008. A custom built (TROPOS type) scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS) is used covering size ranges from 8 to 900 nm. The system is humidity controlled so that relative humidity is kept below 40% most of the time. Throughout the measuring period the average number concentration of the particles in the studied size range was found to be 2354 ± 1332 cm-3 (median of 2098 cm-3). Maximum concentrations are observed during summer while minimum during winter, reflecting the effectiveness of the removal processes in the region. Clear annual circles are found for the number concentrations of nucleation, Aitken and accumulation mode particles. Nucleation mode is presenting different pattern from the other two modes, with the highest concentrations during winter (and March) and the lowest during summer. New particle formation events are more frequently observed during March and October. The number size distributions present different seasonal patterns. During summer, unimodal distributions centering on the lower end of the accumulation mode size range are dominant in our observations. The prevailing meteorology characterized by the Etesian winds (Meltemi) and the lack of precipitation along the trajectory results to the arrival of well mixed air masses at Finokalia, carrying aged aerosol mainly from central and Eastern Europe. Regarding the other seasons, the shape of the distributions is more variable and strongly dependent on the air mass history: When the air masses are of marine origin or precipitation has affected them, the size distributions are mainly bimodal (peaking both in Aitken and in Accumulation mode). These

  6. Robust Cross-correlation-based Measurement of Clump Sizes in Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Kamran; Obreschkow, Danail; Fisher, David B.; Glazebrook, Karl; Damjanov, Ivana; Abraham, Roberto G.; Bassett, Robert

    2017-08-01

    Stars form in molecular complexes that are visible as giant clouds (˜ {10}5-6 {M}⊙ ) in nearby galaxies and as giant clumps (˜ {10}8-9 {M}⊙ ) in galaxies at redshifts z≈ 1-3. Theoretical inferences on the origin and evolution of these complexes often require robust measurements of their characteristic size, which is hard to measure at limited resolution and often ill-defined due to overlap and quasi-fractal substructure. We show that maximum and luminosity-weighted sizes of clumps seen in star formation maps (e.g., Hα) can be recovered statistically using the two-point correlation function (2PCF) if an approximate stellar surface density map is taken as the normalizing random field. After clarifying the link between Gaussian clumps and the 2PCF analytically, we design a method for measuring the diameters of Gaussian clumps with realistic quasi-fractal substructure. This method is tested using mock images of clumpy disk galaxies at different spatial resolutions and perturbed by Gaussian white noise. We find that the 2PCF can recover the input clump scale at ˜ 20 % accuracy, as long as this scale is larger than the spatial resolution. We apply this method to the local spiral galaxy NGC 5194, as well as to three clumpy turbulent galaxies from the DYNAMO-HST sample. In both cases, our statistical measurements of Hα clump size agree with previous measurements and with the estimated Jeans lengths. However, the new measurements are free from subjective choices when fitting individual clumps.

  7. Confidence intervals for single-case effect size measures based on randomization test inversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michiels, Bart; Heyvaert, Mieke; Meulders, Ann; Onghena, Patrick

    2017-02-01

    In the current paper, we present a method to construct nonparametric confidence intervals (CIs) for single-case effect size measures in the context of various single-case designs. We use the relationship between a two-sided statistical hypothesis test at significance level α and a 100 (1 - α) % two-sided CI to construct CIs for any effect size measure θ that contain all point null hypothesis θ values that cannot be rejected by the hypothesis test at significance level α. This method of hypothesis test inversion (HTI) can be employed using a randomization test as the statistical hypothesis test in order to construct a nonparametric CI for θ. We will refer to this procedure as randomization test inversion (RTI). We illustrate RTI in a situation in which θ is the unstandardized and the standardized difference in means between two treatments in a completely randomized single-case design. Additionally, we demonstrate how RTI can be extended to other types of single-case designs. Finally, we discuss a few challenges for RTI as well as possibilities when using the method with other effect size measures, such as rank-based nonoverlap indices. Supplementary to this paper, we provide easy-to-use R code, which allows the user to construct nonparametric CIs according to the proposed method.

  8. The effects of focused transducer geometry and sample size on the measurement of ultrasonic transmission properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atkins, T J; Duck, F A; Tooley, M A [Department of Medical Physics and Bioengineering, Royal United Hospital, Combe Park, Bath BA1 3NG (United Kingdom); Humphrey, V F, E-mail: timothy.atkins@nhs.net [Institute of Sound and Vibration Research, University of Southampton, Southampton SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom)

    2011-02-01

    The response of two coaxially aligned weakly focused ultrasonic transducers, typical of those employed for measuring the attenuation of small samples using the immersion method, has been investigated. The effects of the sample size on transmission measurements have been analyzed by integrating the sound pressure distribution functions of the radiator and receiver over different limits to determine the size of the region that contributes to the system response. The results enable the errors introduced into measurements of attenuation to be estimated as a function of sample size. A theoretical expression has been used to examine how the transducer separation affects the receiver output. The calculations are compared with an experimental study of the axial response of three unpaired transducers in water. The separation of each transducer pair giving the maximum response was determined, and compared with the field characteristics of the individual transducers. The optimum transducer separation, for accurate estimation of sample properties, was found to fall between the sum of the focal distances and the sum of the geometric focal lengths as this reduced diffraction errors.

  9. IN SITU MEASUREMENTS OF THE SIZE AND DENSITY OF TITAN AEROSOL ANALOGS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoerst, S. M.; Tolbert, M. A, E-mail: sarah.horst@colorado.edu [Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States)

    2013-06-10

    The organic haze produced from complex CH{sub 4}/N{sub 2} chemistry in the atmosphere of Titan plays an important role in processes that occur in the atmosphere and on its surface. The haze particles act as condensation nuclei and are therefore involved in Titan's methane hydrological cycle. They also may behave like sediment on Titan's surface and participate in both fluvial and aeolian processes. Models that seek to understand these processes require information about the physical properties of the particles including their size and density. Although measurements obtained by Cassini-Huygens have placed constraints on the size of the haze particles, their densities remain unknown. We have conducted a series of Titan atmosphere simulation experiments and measured the size, number density, and particle density of Titan aerosol analogs, or tholins, for CH{sub 4} concentrations from 0.01% to 10% using two different energy sources, spark discharge and UV. We find that the densities currently in use by many Titan models are higher than the measured densities of our tholins.

  10. Simultaneous measurement of lateral and vertical size of nanoparticles using transmission scanning electron microscopy (TSEM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buhr, E.; Bug, M. U.; Bergmann, D.; Cizmar, P.; Frase, C. G.

    2017-03-01

    A scanning electron microscope operated in transmission mode (TSEM) enables both the measurement of the lateral and vertical size (thickness) of nanoparticles. The lateral size is measured with a previously described technique where the particle boundary is determined in the TSEM image. Particle thickness is deduced from the TSEM signal level measured at the centre of the particle, which requires prior knowledge of the expected TSEM signal level. We applied different and well-known Monte-Carlo based simulation tools (Geant4 and MCSEM) to describe the electron diffusion in solid states and to calculate the expected TSEM signals taking into account particle and instrument properties. The simulation results of the different simulation models differ slightly revealing current limits of small-angle and low-energy electron scattering modelling in solid states. Nonetheless, the method allows one to correlate lateral and vertical particle thickness and thus to obtain additional information about the 3D morphology of nanoparticles. We demonstrate the method for silica particles with sizes in the range of about 10 nm–100 nm.

  11. Floc size distributions of suspended kaolinite in an advection transport dominated tank: measurements and modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Xiaoteng; Maa, Jerome P.-Y.

    2017-09-01

    In estuaries and coastal waters, floc size and its statistical distributions of cohesive sediments are of primary importance, due to their effects on the settling velocity and thus deposition rates of cohesive aggregates. The development of a robust flocculation model that includes the predictions of floc size distributions (FSDs), however, is still in a research stage. In this study, a one-dimensional longitudinal (1-DL) flocculation model along a streamtube is developed. This model is based on solving the population balance equation to find the FSDs by using the quadrature method of moments. To validate this model, a laboratory experiment is carried out to produce an advection transport-dominant environment in a cylindrical tank. The flow field is generated by a marine pump mounted at the bottom center, with its outlet facing upward. This setup generates an axially symmetric flow which is measured by an acoustic Doppler velocimeter (ADV). The measurement results provide the hydrodynamic input data required for this 1-DL model. The other measurement results, the FSDs, are acquired by using an automatic underwater camera system and the resulting images are analyzed to validate the predicted FSDs. This study shows that the FSDs as well as their representative sizes can be efficiently and reasonably simulated by this 1-DL model.

  12. Design and construction of small sized pencil probe to measure bio-impedance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keshtkar, Ahmad

    2007-11-01

    Currently, bio-impedance measurements are performed with relatively large probes which are not suitable for all in vivo studies. These are typically designed and constructed for different uses, such as for cervical and oesophagus tissues and are too large for many investigations, including those involving the bladder. Therefore, it was decided to design and construct a small sized pencil probe, using a microscope to solder very small wires to a tiny tip (about 2mm in diameter). In addition, different approaches were used to construct, treat, and perform the safety tests and calibration procedure on the probe before taking impedance measurements of the urinary bladder.

  13. Verification measurements of the IRMM-1027 and the IAEA large-sized dried (LSD) spikes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakopič, R; Aregbe, Y; Richter, S; Zuleger, E; Mialle, S; Balsley, S D; Repinc, U; Hiess, J

    2017-01-01

    In the frame of the accountancy measurements of the fissile materials, reliable determinations of the plutonium and uranium content in spent nuclear fuel are required to comply with international safeguards agreements. Large-sized dried (LSD) spikes of enriched (235)U and (239)Pu for isotope dilution mass spectrometry (IDMS) analysis are routinely applied in reprocessing plants for this purpose. A correct characterisation of these elements is a pre-requirement for achieving high accuracy in IDMS analyses. This paper will present the results of external verification measurements of such LSD spikes performed by the European Commission and the International Atomic Energy Agency.

  14. An electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy investigation of the retention mechanisms of Mn and Cu in the nanopore channels of three zeolite minerals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreira, Daniel R.; Schulthess, Cristian P.; Amonette, James E.; Walter, Eric D.

    2012-12-01

    The adsorption mechanisms of divalent cations in zeolite nanopore channels can vary as a function of their pore dimensions. The nanopore inner-sphere enhancement (NISE) theory predicts that ions may dehydrate inside small nanopore channels in order to adsorb more closely to the mineral surface if the nanopore channel is sufficiently small. The results of an electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy study of Mn and Cu adsorption on the zeolite minerals zeolite Y (large nanopores), ZSM-5 (intermediate nanopores), and mordenite (small nanopores) are presented. The Cu and Mn cations both adsorbed via an outer-sphere mechanism on zeolite Y based on the similarity between the adsorbed spectra and the aqueous spectra. Conversely, Mn and Cu adsorbed via an inner-sphere mechanism on mordenite based on spectrum asymmetry and peak broadening of the adsorbed spectra. However, Mn adsorbed via an outer-sphere mechanism on ZSM-5, whereas Cu adsorbed on ZSM-5 shows a high degree of surface interaction that indicates that it is adsorbed closer to the mineral surface. Evidence of dehydration and immobility was more readily evident in the spectrum of mordenite than ZSM-5, indicating that Cu was not as close to the surface on ZSM-5 as it was when adsorbed on mordenite. Divalent Mn cations are strongly hydrated and are held strongly only in zeolites with small nanopore channels. Divalent Cu cations are also strongly hydrated, but can dehydrate more easily, presumably due to the Jahn-Teller effect, and are held strongly in zeolites with medium sized nanopore channels or smaller.

  15. Real-time measurements of suspended sediment concentration and particle size using five techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felix, D.; Albayrak, I.; Abgottspon, A.; Boes, R. M.

    2016-11-01

    Fine sediments are important in the design and operation of hydropower plants (HPPs), in particular with respect to sediment management and hydro-abrasive erosion in hydraulic machines. Therefore, there is a need for reliable real-time measurements of suspended sediment mass concentration (SSC) and particle size distribution (PSD). The following instruments for SSC measurements were investigated in a field study during several years at the HPP Fieschertal in the Swiss Alps: (1) turbidimeters, (2) a Laser In-Situ Scattering and Trans- missometry instrument (LISST), (3) a Coriolis Flow and Density Meter (CFDM), (4) acoustic transducers, and (5) pressure sensors. LISST provided PSDs in addition to concentrations. Reference SSCs were obtained by gravimetrical analysis of automatically taken water samples. In contrast to widely used turbidimeters and the single-frequency acoustic method, SSCs obtained from LISST, the CFDM or the pressure sensors were less or not affected by particle size variations. The CFDM and the pressure sensors allowed measuring higher SSC than the optical or the acoustic techniques (without dilution). The CFDM and the pressure sensors were found to be suitable to measure SSC ≥ 2 g/l. In this paper, the measuring techniques, instruments, setup, methods for data treatment, and selected results are presented and discussed.

  16. Measurement of the aortic annulus size by real-time three-dimensional transesophageal echocardiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jánosi, Rolf Alexander; Kahlert, Philipp; Plicht, Björn; Wendt, Daniel; Eggebrecht, Holger; Erbel, Raimund; Buck, Thomas

    2011-04-01

    We sought to determine the level of agreement and the reproducibility of two-dimensional (2D) transthoracic (2D-TTE), 2D transesophageal (2D-TEE) and real-time three-dimensional (3D) transesophageal echocardiography (RT3D-TEE) for measurement of aortic annulus size in patients referred for transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI). Accurate preoperative assessment of the dimensions of the aortic annulus is critical for patient selection and successful implantation in those undergoing TAVI for severe aortic stenosis (AS). Annulus size was measured using 2D-TTE, 2D-TEE and RT3D-TEE in 105 patients with severe AS referred for TAVI. Agreement between echocardiographic methods and interobserver variability was assessed using the Bland-Altman method and regression analysis, respectively. The mean aortic annuli were 21,7 ± 3 mm measured with 2D-TTE, 22,6 ± 2,8 mm with 2D-TEE and 22,3 ± 2,9 mm with RT3D-TEE. The results showed a small but significant mean difference and a strong correlation between the three measurement techniques (2D-TTE vs. 2D-TEE mean difference 0,84 ± 1,85 mm, r = 0,8, p annulus measured by 2D-TTE, 2D-TEE and RT3D-TEE. Thus, in patients referred for TAVI, the echocardiographic method used may have an impact on TAVI strategy.

  17. Use of an electrical aerosol detector (EAD) for nanoparticle size distribution measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lin; Chen, Da-Ren; Tsai, Perng-Jy

    2009-01-01

    Recently, Nanoparticle Surface Area Monitor (NSAM, TSI model 3550) and EAD (EAD, TSI Model 3070A) have been commercially available to measure the integral parameters (i.e., total particle surface area and total particle length) of nanoparticles. By comparison, the configuration of the EAD or NSAM is similar to that of electrical mobility analyzer of the early generation for particle size distribution measurement. It is therefore possible to use the EAD or NSAM as a particle sizer. To realize the objective of using the EAD as a sizer, we characterized the average electrical charges of monodisperse particles passing through the EAD particle charger and ion trap set at voltages ranging from 20 to 2500 V. The average charge data collected at different ion-trap voltages were then summarized by the empirical correlation using the parameter of Z p *V, where Z p is the particle electrical mobility and V is the ion-trap voltage. A data-reduction scheme was further proposed to retrieve the size distribution of sampled particles from the EAD readout at different ion-trap voltages. In the scheme, the functional format of each mode in a number size distribution of particles was assumed as log-normal, but the number of modes in an entire size distribution is not limited. A criterion was used to best fit the simulated EAD readouts with experimental ones by varying the count median diameter (CMD), geometric standard deviation ( σ g), and total particle number ( N t ) of each mode in a particle size distribution. Experiments were performed to verify the proposed scheme.

  18. Relationship between Spectral Induced Polarization Measurements and Grain Size of Sandstones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seleznev, N. V.; Hou, C. Y.; Freed, D.; Fellah, K.; Feng, L.; Xu, G.; Slater, L. D.

    2016-12-01

    Frequency dependence of the complex conductivity of ion-conductive soils and sediments in the range from millihertz to kilohertz can exhibit what is called the spectral induced polarization (SIP) effect, in which the impedance phase shows a near-resonance peak at a characteristic frequency as a result of a strong polarization response. Because the conventional Maxwell-Wagner interfacial polarization related to rock texture cannot provide an adequate explanation, the electrochemical polarization related to the electrical double layer formed in the presence of grains with surface charge is often invoked as a main mechanism for the SIP effect. Several studies demonstrating the link between SIP effect and the dominant grain size have previously been conducted on loose sands. Although loose sands provide good control of the grain size, they are not entirely representative of the consolidated sedimentary rocks common in the subsurface. In the present study we investigate the relationship between SIP effect and dominant grain size of well-characterized quarried consolidated sandstones. The choice of samples minimizes the influence of other factors, such as the presence of clays, on the SIP effect. Dominant grain size was determined using digital image analysis of scanning electron microscope (SEM) images obtained on thin sections. SIP spectra were measured on a collection of quarried clay-free sandstones saturated with brines. All rocks displayed a distinct peak in the imaginary conductivity dispersion curve. Also, we establish a rock model based on differential effective medium approach that accounts for both the interfacial polarization and electrochemical polarization due to the presence of charged grains. Experimental data is inverted with the model to obtain the dominant grain size. The model is shown to be capable of reproducing experimental data, and the inverted dominant grain size compares favorably with values determined from image analysis.

  19. ELECTROCHEMICAL PROPERTIES OF NANOPOROUS CARBON ELECTRODES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.Nigu

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Electrical double layer and electrochemical characteristics at the nanoporous carbon | (C2H54NBF4 + acetonitrile interface have been studied by the cyclic voltammetry and impedance spectroscopy methods. The value of zero charge potential (0.23 V vs. SCE in H2O, the region of ideal polarizability and other characteristics have been established. Analysis of complex plane plots shows that the nanoporous carbon | x M (C2H54NBF4 + acetonitrile interface can be simulated by the equivalent circuit, in which the two parallel conduction parts in the solid and liquid phases are interconnected by the double layer capacitance in parallel with the complex admittance of hindered reaction of the charge transfer process. The values of the characteristic frequency depend on the electrolyte concentration and on the electrode potential, i.e. on the nature of ions adsorbed at the surface of nanoporous carbon electrode.

  20. Ion transport through a graphene nanopore

    CERN Document Server

    Hu, Guohui; Ghosal, Sandip; 10.1088/0957-4484/23/39/395501

    2013-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulation is utilized to investigate the ionic transport of NaCl in solution through a graphene nanopore under an applied electric field. Results show the formation of concentration polarization layers in the vicinity of the graphene sheet. The non-uniformity of the ion distribution gives rise to an electric pressure which drives vortical motions in the fluid if the electric field is sufficiently strong to overcome the influence of viscosity and thermal fluctuations. The relative importance of hydrodynamic transport and thermal fluctuations in determining the pore conductivity is investigated. A second important effect that is observed is the mass transport of water through the nanopore, with an average velocity proportional to the applied voltage and independent of the pore diameter. The flux arises as a consequence of the asymmetry in the ion distribution with respect to reflection about the plane of the graphene sheet. The accumulation of liquid molecules in the vicinity of the nanopore...

  1. Effects of particle optical properties on grain size measurements of aeolian dust deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varga, György; Újvári, Gábor; Kovács, János; Szalai, Zoltán

    2015-04-01

    Particle size data are holding crucial information on the sedimentary environment at the time the aeolian dust deposits were accumulated. Various aspects of aeolian sedimentation (wind strength, distance to source(s), possible secondary source regions and modes of sedimentation and transport) can be reconstructed from proper grain size distribution data. Laser diffraction methods provide much more accurate and reliable information on the major granulometric properties of wind-blown sediments compared to the sieve and pipette methods. The Fraunhofer and Mie scattering theories are generally used for laser diffraction grain size measurements. () The two different approaches need different 'background' information on the medium measured. During measurements following the Fraunhofer theory, the basic assumption is that parcticles are relatively large (over 25-30 µm) and opaque. The Mie theory could offer more accurate data on smaller fractions (clay and fine silt), assuming that a proper, a'priori knowledge on refraction and absorption indices exists, which is rarely the case for polymineral samples. This study is aimed at determining the effects of different optical parameters on grain size distributions (e.g. clay-content, median, mode). Multiple samples collected from Hungarian red clay and loess-paleosol records have been analysed using a Malvern Mastersizer 3000 laser diffraction particle sizer (with a Hydro LV unit). Additional grain size measurements have been made on a Fritsch Analysette 22 Microtec and a Horiba Partica La-950 v2 instrument to investigate possible effects of the used laser sources with different wavelengths. XRF and XRD measurements have also been undertaken to gain insight into the geochemical/mineralogical compositions of the samples studied. Major findings include that measurements using the Mie theory provide more accurate data on the grain size distribution of aeolian dust deposits, when we use a proper optical setting. Significant

  2. Polyelectrolyte Threading through a Nanopore

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pai-Yi Hsiao

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Threading charged polymers through a nanopore, driven by electric fields E, is investigated by means of Langevin dynamics simulations. The mean translocation time 〈 τ 〉 is shown to follow a scaling law Nα, and the exponent α increases monotonically from 1.16 (4 to 1.40 (3 with E. The result is double-checked by the calculation of mean square displacement of translocation coordinate, which asserts a scaling behavior tβ (for t near τ with β complying with the relation αβ = 2. At a fixed chain length N, 〈τ〉 displayed a reciprocal scaling behavior E−1 in the weak and also in the strong fields, connected by a transition E−1.64(5 in the intermediate fields. The variations of the radius of gyration of chain and the positions of chain end are monitored during a translocation process; far-from-equilibrium behaviors are observed when the driving field is strong. A strong field can strip off the condensed ions on the chain when it passes the pore. The total charges of condensed ions are hence decreased. The studies for the probability and density distributions reveal that the monomers in the trans-region are gathered near the wall and form a pancake-like density profile with a hump cloud over it in the strong fields, due to fast translocation.

  3. Simple area-based measurement for multidetector computed tomography to predict left ventricular size

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schlett, Christopher L.; Kwait, Dylan C.; Mahabadi, Amir A.; Hoffmann, Udo [Massachusetts General Hospital, and Harvard Medical School, Cardiac MR PET CT Program, Boston, MA (United States); Bamberg, Fabian [Massachusetts General Hospital, and Harvard Medical School, Cardiac MR PET CT Program, Boston, MA (United States); University Hospitals Munich, and Ludwig Maximilians University, Department of Clinical Radiology, Munich (Germany); O' Donnell, Christopher J. [Lung and Blood Institute' s Framingham Heart Study, National Heart, Framingham (United States); Fox, Caroline S. [Lung and Blood Institute' s Framingham Heart Study, National Heart, Framingham (United States); Brigham and Women' s Hospital, and Harvard Medical School, Division of Endocrinology, Metabolism, and Diabetes, Department of Medicine, Boston, MA (United States)

    2010-07-15

    Measures of left ventricular (LV) mass and dimensions are independent predictors of morbidity and mortality. We determined whether an axial area-based method by computed tomography (CT) provides an accurate estimate of LV mass and volume. A total of 45 subjects (49% female, 56.0 {+-} 12 years) with a wide range of LV geometry underwent contrast-enhanced 64-slice CT. LV mass and volume were derived from 3D data. 2D images were analysed to determine LV area, the direct transverse cardiac diameter (dTCD) and the cardiothoracic ratio (CTR). Furthermore, feasibility was confirmed in 100 Framingham Offspring Cohort subjects. 2D measures of LV area, dTCD and CTR were 47.3 {+-} 8 cm{sup 2}, 14.7 {+-} 1.5 cm and 0.54 {+-} 0.05, respectively. 3D-derived LV volume (end-diastolic) and mass were 148.9 {+-} 45 cm{sup 3} and 124.2 {+-} 34 g, respectively. Excellent inter- and intra-observer agreement were shown for 2D LV area measurements (both intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC) = 0.99, p < 0.0001) and could be confirmed on non-contrast CT. The measured 2D LV area was highly correlated to LV volume, mass and size (r = 0.68; r = 0.73; r = 0.82; all p < 0.0001, respectively). On the other hand, CTR was not correlated to LV volume, mass, size or 2D LV area (all p > 0.27). Compared with traditionally used CTR, LV size can be accurately predicted based on a simple and highly reproducible axial LV area-based measurement. (orig.)

  4. DNA translocations through solid-state plasmonic nanopores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicoli, Francesca; Verschueren, Daniel; Klein, Misha; Dekker, Cees; Jonsson, Magnus P

    2014-12-10

    Nanopores enable label-free detection and analysis of single biomolecules. Here, we investigate DNA translocations through a novel type of plasmonic nanopore based on a gold bowtie nanoantenna with a solid-state nanopore at the plasmonic hot spot. Plasmonic excitation of the nanopore is found to influence both the sensor signal (nanopore ionic conductance blockade during DNA translocation) and the process that captures DNA into the nanopore, without affecting the duration time of the translocations. Most striking is a strong plasmon-induced enhancement of the rate of DNA translocation events in lithium chloride (LiCl, already 10-fold enhancement at a few mW of laser power). This provides a means to utilize the excellent spatiotemporal resolution of DNA interrogations with nanopores in LiCl buffers, which is known to suffer from low event rates. We propose a mechanism based on plasmon-induced local heating and thermophoresis as explanation of our observations.

  5. How effective is graphene nanopore geometry on DNA sequencing?

    CERN Document Server

    Satarifard, Vahid; Ejtehadi, Mohammad Reza

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we investigate the effects of graphene nanopore geometry on homopolymer ssDNA pulling process through nanopore using steered molecular dynamic (SMD) simulations. Different graphene nanopores are examined including axially symmetric and asymmetric monolayer graphene nanopores as well as five layer graphene polyhedral crystals (GPC). The pulling force profile, moving fashion of ssDNA, work done in irreversible DNA pulling and orientations of DNA bases near the nanopore are assessed. Simulation results demonstrate the strong effect of the pore shape as well as geometrical symmetry on free energy barrier, orientations and dynamic of DNA translocation through graphene nanopore. Our study proposes that the symmetric circular geometry of monolayer graphene nanopore with high pulling velocity can be used for DNA sequencing.

  6. An investigation of strong sodium retention mechanisms in nanopore environments using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Daniel R; Schulthess, Cristian P; Giotto, Marcus V

    2012-01-03

    Recent experimental research into the adsorption of various cations on zeolite minerals has shown that nanopore channels of approximately 0.5 nm or less can create an effect whereby the adsorption of ions, especially those that are weakly hydrated, can be significantly enhanced. This enhanced adsorption occurs due to the removal of hydrating water molecules which in turn is caused by the nanopore channel's small size. A new adsorption model, called the nanopore inner-sphere enhancement (NISE) effect, has been proposed that explains this unusual adsorption mechanism. To further validate this model a series of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy studies is presented here. NMR spectra were gathered for Na adsorbed on three zeolite minerals of similar chemical composition but differing nanoporosities: zeolite Y with a limiting dimension of 0.76 nm, ZSM-5 with a limiting dimension of 0.51 nm, and mordenite with a limiting dimension of 0.26 nm. The NMR experiments validated the predictions of the NISE model whereby Na adsorbed via outer-sphere on zeolite Y, inner-sphere on ZSM-5, and a combination of both mechanisms on mordenite. The strong Na adsorption observed in these nanoporous minerals conflicts with sodium's general designation as a weak electrolyte.

  7. Nanoporous nanocomposite membranes via hybrid twin-screw extrusion—multijet electrospinning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senturk-Ozer, Semra; Aktas, Seda; He, Jing; Fisher, Frank T.; Kalyon, Dilhan M.

    2017-01-01

    Non-woven nanoporous membranes of poly(caprolactone), PCL, incorporated with multi-walled carbon nanotubes, CNTs, could be fabricated via an industrially-scalable hybrid twin screw extrusion and electrospinning process. The utilization of a spinneret with multiple nozzles allowed the increase of the flow rate beyond what is possible with conventional electrospinning using a single nozzle, albeit at the expense of difficulties in the control of the thickness distributions of the nanofibrous membranes. The thickness and orientation distributions and the resulting mechanical properties of the membranes could be modified via changes in voltage, angular velocity of the collector mandrel and separation distance of the collector from the spinneret. The increases in crystallinity due to the presence of the CNTs and the preferential alignment of the nanofibers via rotation of the collecting mandrel led to increases in the tensile properties of the nanoporous membranes. The use of poly(ethylene oxide), PEO, together with PCL, followed by the dissolution of the PEO, rendered the nanofibers themselves nanoporous with typical surface porosity values of around 50% and pore sizes of about 220 nm. The demonstrated versatility of the hybrid twin screw extrusion and electrospinning process and the manipulation of mesh dimensions and properties are indicative of the applicability of the hybrid process for fabrication of nanoporous membranes for myriad diverse industrial applications ranging from water treatment to tissue engineering applications.

  8. Nanoporous nanocomposite membranes via hybrid twin-screw extrusion-multijet electrospinning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senturk-Ozer, Semra; Aktas, Seda; He, Jing; Fisher, Frank T; Kalyon, Dilhan M

    2017-01-13

    Non-woven nanoporous membranes of poly(caprolactone), PCL, incorporated with multi-walled carbon nanotubes, CNTs, could be fabricated via an industrially-scalable hybrid twin screw extrusion and electrospinning process. The utilization of a spinneret with multiple nozzles allowed the increase of the flow rate beyond what is possible with conventional electrospinning using a single nozzle, albeit at the expense of difficulties in the control of the thickness distributions of the nanofibrous membranes. The thickness and orientation distributions and the resulting mechanical properties of the membranes could be modified via changes in voltage, angular velocity of the collector mandrel and separation distance of the collector from the spinneret. The increases in crystallinity due to the presence of the CNTs and the preferential alignment of the nanofibers via rotation of the collecting mandrel led to increases in the tensile properties of the nanoporous membranes. The use of poly(ethylene oxide), PEO, together with PCL, followed by the dissolution of the PEO, rendered the nanofibers themselves nanoporous with typical surface porosity values of around 50% and pore sizes of about 220 nm. The demonstrated versatility of the hybrid twin screw extrusion and electrospinning process and the manipulation of mesh dimensions and properties are indicative of the applicability of the hybrid process for fabrication of nanoporous membranes for myriad diverse industrial applications ranging from water treatment to tissue engineering applications.

  9. Nanoporous structured submicrometer carbon fibers prepared via solution electrospinning of polymer blends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Mao; Li, Dasong; Shen, Lie; Chen, Ying; Zheng, Qiang; Wang, Huijun

    2006-10-24

    A facile means for obtaining submicrometer carbon fibers with a nanoporous structure is presented. A mixture of polyacrylonitrile (PAN) and a copolymer of acrylonitrile and methyl methacrylate (poly(AN-co-MMA)) in dimethylformamide was electrospun into submicrometer fibers with a microphase-separated structure. During the followed oxidation process, the copolymer domains were pyrolyzed, resulting in a nanoporous structure that was preserved after carbonization. The microphase-separated structure of the PAN/poly(AN-co-MMA) electrospun fibers, the morphology, and porous structure of both the oxidized and the carbonized fibers were observed with scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The carbon fibers have diameters ranging from several hundred nanometers to about 1 microm. The nanopores or nanoslits throughout the fiber surface and interior with diameters of several tens of nanometers are interconnected and oriented along the longitudinal axis of the fibers. This unique nanoporous morphology similar to the microphase-separated structure in the PAN/poly(AN-co-MMA) fibers is attributed to the rapid phase separation, solidification, as well as the stretching of the fibers during electrospinning. The pore volume and pore size distribution of the carbonized fibers were investigated by nitrogen adsorption and desorption.

  10. Which factors influence MRI-pathology concordance of tumour size measurements in breast cancer?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rominger, M.; Frauenfelder, T. [University Hospital Zurich, Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Zurich (Switzerland); Berg, D. [Urbankrankenhaus Berlin, Anesthesiology, Berlin (Germany); Ramaswamy, A. [University Hospital Marburg, Pathology, Marburg (Germany); Timmesfeld, N. [Philipps University Marburg, Institute for Medical Biometry and Epidemiology, Marburg (Germany)

    2016-05-15

    To assess MRI-pathology concordance and factors influencing tumour size measurement in breast cancer. MRI tumour size (greatest diameter in anatomical planes (MRI-In-Plane) and greatest diameter along main tumour axis (MRI-MPR)) of 115 consecutive breast lesions (59 invasive lobular carcinoma, 46 invasive ductal carcinoma, and 10 ductal carcinoma in situ) was retrospectively compared to size measured at histopathology (pT size (Path-TNM) and greatest tumour diameter as relevant for excision (Path-Diameter; reference standard)). Histopathological tumour types, preoperative palpability, surgical management, additional high-risk lesions, and BI-RADS lesion type (mass versus non-mass enhancements) were assessed as possible influencing factors. Systematic errors were most pronounced between MRI-MPR and Path-TNM (7.1 mm, limits of agreement (LoA) [-21.7; 35.9]), and were lowest between MRI-In-Plane and Path-Diameter (0.2 mm, LoA [-19.7; 20.1]). Concordance rate of MRI-In-Plane with Path-Diameter was 86 % (97/113), overestimation 9 % (10/113) and underestimation 5 % (6/113); BI-RADS mass lesions were overestimated in 7 % (6/81) versus 41 % (13/32) for non-mass enhancements. On multivariate analysis only BI-RADS lesion type significantly influenced MRI-pathology concordance (p < 0.001). 2/59 (3 %) ILC did not enhance. Concordance rate varies according to the execution of MRI and histopathological measurements. Beyond this only non-mass enhancement significantly predicted discordance. (orig.)

  11. Enhanced microcontact printing of proteins on nanoporous silica surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blinka, Ellen; Loeffler, Kathryn; Hu, Ye; Gopal, Ashwini; Hoshino, Kazunori; Lin, Kevin; Liu, Xuewu; Ferrari, Mauro; Zhang, John X. J.

    2010-10-01

    We demonstrate porous silica surface modification, combined with microcontact printing, as an effective method for enhanced protein patterning and adsorption on arbitrary surfaces. Compared to conventional chemical treatments, this approach offers scalability and long-term device stability without requiring complex chemical activation. Two chemical surface treatments using functionalization with the commonly used 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES) and glutaraldehyde (GA) were compared with the nanoporous silica surface on the basis of protein adsorption. The deposited thickness and uniformity of porous silica films were evaluated for fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-labeled rabbit immunoglobulin G (R-IgG) protein printed onto the substrates via patterned polydimethlysiloxane (PDMS) stamps. A more complete transfer of proteins was observed on porous silica substrates compared to chemically functionalized substrates. A comparison of different pore sizes (4-6 nm) and porous silica thicknesses (96-200 nm) indicates that porous silica with 4 nm diameter, 57% porosity and a thickness of 96 nm provided a suitable environment for complete transfer of R-IgG proteins. Both fluorescence microscopy and atomic force microscopy (AFM) were used for protein layer characterizations. A porous silica layer is biocompatible, providing a favorable transfer medium with minimal damage to the proteins. A patterned immunoassay microchip was developed to demonstrate the retained protein function after printing on nanoporous surfaces, which enables printable and robust immunoassay detection for point-of-care applications.

  12. Enhanced microcontact printing of proteins on nanoporous silica surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blinka, Ellen; Loeffler, Kathryn; Hu, Ye; Gopal, Ashwini; Hoshino, Kazunori; Lin, Kevin; Liu, Xuewu; Ferrari, Mauro; Zhang, John X J

    2010-10-15

    We demonstrate porous silica surface modification, combined with microcontact printing, as an effective method for enhanced protein patterning and adsorption on arbitrary surfaces. Compared to conventional chemical treatments, this approach offers scalability and long-term device stability without requiring complex chemical activation. Two chemical surface treatments using functionalization with the commonly used 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES) and glutaraldehyde (GA) were compared with the nanoporous silica surface on the basis of protein adsorption. The deposited thickness and uniformity of porous silica films were evaluated for fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-labeled rabbit immunoglobulin G (R-IgG) protein printed onto the substrates via patterned polydimethlysiloxane (PDMS) stamps. A more complete transfer of proteins was observed on porous silica substrates compared to chemically functionalized substrates. A comparison of different pore sizes (4-6 nm) and porous silica thicknesses (96-200 nm) indicates that porous silica with 4 nm diameter, 57% porosity and a thickness of 96 nm provided a suitable environment for complete transfer of R-IgG proteins. Both fluorescence microscopy and atomic force microscopy (AFM) were used for protein layer characterizations. A porous silica layer is biocompatible, providing a favorable transfer medium with minimal damage to the proteins. A patterned immunoassay microchip was developed to demonstrate the retained protein function after printing on nanoporous surfaces, which enables printable and robust immunoassay detection for point-of-care applications.

  13. Bacteria repelling on highly-ordered alumina-nanopore structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sunghan; Zhou, Yan; Cirillo, Jeffrey D.; Polycarpou, Andreas A.; Liang, Hong

    2015-04-01

    Bacteria introduce diseases and infections to humans by their adherence to biomaterials, such as implants and surgical tools. Cell desorption is an effective step to reduce such damage. Here, we report mechanisms of bacteria desorption. An alumina nanopore structure (ANS) with pore size of 35 nm, 55 nm, 70 nm, and 80 nm was used as substrate to grow Escherichia coli (E. coli) cells. A bacteria repelling experimental method was developed to quantitatively evaluate the area percentage of adherent bacterial cells that represent the nature of cell adhesion as well as desorption. Results showed that there were two crucial parameters: contact angle and contact area that affect the adhesion/desorption. The cells were found to be more easily repelled when the contact angle increased. The area percentage of adherent bacterial cells decreased with the decrease in the contact area of a cell on ANS. This means that cell accessibility on ANS depends on the contact area. This research reveals the effectiveness of the nanopored structures in repelling cells.

  14. Stepwise Nanopore Evolution in One-Dimensional Nanostructures

    KAUST Repository

    Choi, Jang Wook

    2010-04-14

    We report that established simple lithium (Li) ion battery cycles can be used to produce nanopores inside various useful one-dimensional (1D) nanostructures such as zinc oxide, silicon, and silver nanowires. Moreover, porosities of these 1D nanomaterials can be controlled in a stepwise manner by the number of Li-battery cycles. Subsequent pore characterization at the end of each cycle allows us to obtain detailed snapshots of the distinct pore evolution properties in each material due to their different atomic diffusion rates and types of chemical bonds. Also, this stepwise characterization led us to the first observation of pore size increases during cycling, which can be interpreted as a similar phenomenon to Ostwald ripening in analogous nanoparticle cases. Finally, we take advantage of the unique combination of nanoporosity and 1D materials and demonstrate nanoporous silicon nanowires (poSiNWs) as excellent supercapacitor (SC) electrodes in high power operations compared to existing devices with activated carbon. © 2010 American Chemical Society.

  15. Thermal diffusivity measurement of spherical gold nanofluids of different sizes/concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Muñoz, Gerardo A.; Pescador-Rojas, José A.; Ortega-Lopez, Jaime; Salazar, Jaime Santoyo; Balderas-López, J. Abraham

    2012-07-01

    In recent times, nanofluids have been studied by their thermal properties due to their variety of applications that range from photothermal therapy and radiofrequency hyperthermia (which have proven their potential use as coadjutants in these medical treatments for cancer diseases) to next-generation thermo-fluids. In this work, photoacoustic spectroscopy for a specific study of thermal diffusivity, as a function of particle size and concentration, on colloidal water-based gold nanofluids is reported. Gold nanoparticles were synthetized in the presence of hydroquinone through a seed-mediated growth with homogenous sizes and shapes in a range of 16 to 125 nm. The optical response, size and morphology of these nanoparticles were characterized using ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy, respectively. Thermal characterizations show a decrease in the thermal diffusivity ratio as the nanoparticle size is increased and an enhancement in thermal diffusivity ratio as nanoparticle concentration is added into the nanofluids. Compared with other techniques in the literature such as thermal lens and hot wire method, this photoacoustic technique shows an advantage in terms of precision, and with a small amount of sample required (500 μl), this technique might be suitable for the thermal diffusivity measurement of nanofluids. It is also a promising alternative to classical techniques.

  16. Thermal diffusivity measurement of spherical gold nanofluids of different sizes/concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Muñoz, Gerardo A; Pescador-Rojas, José A; Ortega-Lopez, Jaime; Salazar, Jaime Santoyo; Balderas-López, J Abraham

    2012-07-30

    In recent times, nanofluids have been studied by their thermal properties due to their variety of applications that range from photothermal therapy and radiofrequency hyperthermia (which have proven their potential use as coadjutants in these medical treatments for cancer diseases) to next-generation thermo-fluids. In this work, photoacoustic spectroscopy for a specific study of thermal diffusivity, as a function of particle size and concentration, on colloidal water-based gold nanofluids is reported. Gold nanoparticles were synthetized in the presence of hydroquinone through a seed-mediated growth with homogenous sizes and shapes in a range of 16 to 125 nm. The optical response, size and morphology of these nanoparticles were characterized using ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy, respectively. Thermal characterizations show a decrease in the thermal diffusivity ratio as the nanoparticle size is increased and an enhancement in thermal diffusivity ratio as nanoparticle concentration is added into the nanofluids. Compared with other techniques in the literature such as thermal lens and hot wire method, this photoacoustic technique shows an advantage in terms of precision, and with a small amount of sample required (500 μl), this technique might be suitable for the thermal diffusivity measurement of nanofluids. It is also a promising alternative to classical techniques.

  17. Size of lumbar disc hernias measured using computed tomography and related to sciatic symptoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fagerlund, M.K.J.; Thelander, U.; Friberg, S. (Umeaa Univ. Hospital (Sweden). Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology Umeaa Univ. Hospital (Sweden). Dept. of Orthopedics)

    1990-11-01

    The change in the relative size of lumbar disc hernias and its relation to sciatic symptoms was investigated in 30 consecutive patients after conservative treatment of CT verified lumbar disc herniations. CT and clinical examination were performed before the start of therapy (CT1), as well as 3 months (CT2) and 24 months (CT3) after institution of treatment. In each patient the size of the lumbar disc herniation in relation to the size of the spinal canal was measured on identical CT slices and expressed as an index. The disc herniation index decreased markedly from CT1 to CT2 (p<0.001). Between CT2 and CT3 the reduction of the hernias was less pronounced and not significant for hernias located centrally but still significant for intermediate (p=0.03) and lateral (p=0.04) hernias. The degree of sciatic symptoms also decreased markedly between CT1 and CT2 (p=0.001) while no further improvement occurred from CT2 to CT3. There was a significant positive correlation between the improvement from sciatic pain and the reduction in the size of the individual hernia (CT1-CT2 p=0.02, CT2-CT3 p<0.001). Thus, the disc herniation index provided a method to study the anatomic effect of conservative treatment as well as a method to evaluate sciatic symptoms in relation to anatomic changes. (orig.).

  18. LDA measurements on the turbulent flow characteristics of a small-sized axial fan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jang Kweon [Kunsan National Univ., Kunsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-07-01

    The operating point of a small-sized axial fan for refrigerator is strongly dependent upon the system resistance. Therefore, the turbulent flow characteristics around a small-sized axial fan may change significantly according to the operating point. This study represents three-dimensional turbulent flow characteristics around a small-sized axial fan measured at the four operating points such as {phi}=0.1, 0.18, 0.25 and 0.32 by using fiber-optic type LDA system. This LDA system is composed of a 5 W Argon-ion laser, two optics in back-scatter mode, three BSA's, a PC, and a three-dimensional automatic traversing system. A kind of paraffin fluid is utilized for supplying particles by means of fog generator. Mean velocity profiles downstream of a small--sized axial fan along the radial distance show that both the streamwise and the tangential components exist predominantly in downstream except {phi}=0.1 and have a maximum value at the radial distance ratio of about 0.8, but the radial component, which its velocity is relatively small, is acting role that only turns flow direction to the outside or the central part of axial fan. Moreover, all of the velocity components downstream at {phi}=0.1 show much smaller than those upstream due to the static pressure rise at the low-flowrate region.

  19. New fabrication technique for nanoporous gold nanoparticles (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Fusheng; Arnob, Md Masud Parvez; Shih, Wei-Chuan

    2017-02-01

    Nanoporous gold nanoparticles (NPG-NP) showcase tunable pore and ligament sizes ranging from nanometers to microns. The nanoporous structure and sub-wavelength nanoparticle shape contribute to its unique LSPR properties. NPG-NP features large specific surface area and high-density plasmonic field enhancement known as "hot-spots". Hence, NPG-NP has found many applications in nanoplasmonic sensor development. In our recent studies, we have shown that NPG-NP array chip can be utilized for high-sensitivity detection by various enhanced spectroscopic modalities, as photothermal agents, and for disease biomarker detection. To date, array-format, substrate-bound NPGN has been fabricated by either colloidal nanosphere lithography or random nucleation during the sputtering deposition process. Although highly cost-effective, these techniques cannot provide precise control of individual particle size and location. In this paper, we report the development of a new fabrication technique based on electron-beam lithography (EBL). Herein, a customized EBL technique is utilized to pattern larger areas (several square millimeters) of randomly distributed NPGN by careful design of the shot pattern, which limits the writing time to the acceptable level. Since the position, size, and shape of a huge number of features need to be generated and stored individually, memory limitations of this unique EBL technique constitutes an additional challenge, which is normally not present if small areas are to be patterned with features on an ordered lattice. This issue is solved by programmatically generating random feature positions within a simulation cell of carefully chosen size and implementing periodic boundary conditions.

  20. Monolithic aerogels with nanoporous crystalline phases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel, Christophe; Guerra, Gaetano

    2015-05-01

    High porosity monolithic aerogels with nanoporous crystalline phases can be obtained from syndiotactic polystyrene and poly(2,6-dimethyl-1,4-phenylene)oxide thermoreversible gels by removing the solvent with supercritical CO2. The presence of crystalline nanopores in the aerogels based on these polymers allows a high uptake associated with a high selectivity of volatile organic compounds from vapor phase or aqueous solutions even at very low activities. The sorption and the fast kinetics make these materials particularly suitable as sorption medium to remove traces of pollutants from water and moist air.

  1. Nanoporous Gold: Fabrication, Characterization, and Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael L. Reed

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Nanoporous gold (np-Au has intriguing material properties that offer potential benefits for many applications due to its high specific surface area, well-characterized thiol-gold surface chemistry, high electrical conductivity, and reduced stiffness. The research on np-Au has taken place on various fronts, including advanced microfabrication and characterization techniques to probe unusual nanoscale properties and applications spanning from fuel cells to electrochemical sensors. Here, we provide a review of the recent advances in np-Au research, with special emphasis on microfabrication and characterization techniques. We conclude the paper with a brief outline of challenges to overcome in the study of nanoporous metals.

  2. Ultrafiltration by gyroid nanoporous polymer membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Li; Szewczykowski, Piotr Przemyslaw; Clausen, Lydia D.;

    2011-01-01

    Gyroid nanoporous cross-linked 1,2-polybutadiene membranes with uniform pores were developed for ultrafiltration applications. The gyroid porosity has the advantage of isotropic percolation with no need for structure pre-alignment. The effects of solvent and surface photo-hydrophilization on perm......Gyroid nanoporous cross-linked 1,2-polybutadiene membranes with uniform pores were developed for ultrafiltration applications. The gyroid porosity has the advantage of isotropic percolation with no need for structure pre-alignment. The effects of solvent and surface photo...

  3. Nanoporous thin film platform for biophotonic sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alla, Suresh; Solanki, Rina; Mattley, Yvette D.; Dabhi, Harish; Shahriari, Mahmoud R.

    2009-02-01

    A Nanoporous glass matrix is developed to encapsulate molecular probes for monitoring important biological parameters such as DO. The hydrophobic nanoporous host matrix is designed and fabricated using room temperature sol gel technique. The doped sol gel is then coated on biocompatible self adhesive patches or directly coated on the biocontainers. We demonstrate the application of this technique in non-invasive monitoring DO as well as oxygen partial pressure in a closed fermentation process as well as in a cell culture plate during bacterial growth. Dynamic response of sensor, sensitivity and accuracy is also demonstrated in this paper.

  4. Method for making nanoporous hydrophobic coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Hongyou; Sun, Zaicheng

    2013-04-23

    A simple coating method is used to form nanoporous hydrophobic films that can be used as optical coatings. The method uses evaporation-induced self-assembly of materials. The coating method starts with a homogeneous solution comprising a hydrophobic polymer and a surfactant polymer in a selective solvent. The solution is coated onto a substrate. The surfactant polymer forms micelles with the hydrophobic polymer residing in the particle core when the coating is dried. The surfactant polymer can be dissolved and selectively removed from the separated phases by washing with a polar solvent to form the nanoporous hydrophobic film.

  5. A laser extinction based sensor for simultaneous droplet size and vapor measurement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xueqiang Sun; David J. Ewing; Lin Ma

    2012-01-01

    Multiphase flows involving liquid droplets in association with gas flow occur in many industrial and scientific applications.Recent work has demonstrated the feasibility of using optical techniques based on laser extinction to simultaneously measure vapor concentration and temperature and droplet size and loading.This work introduces the theoretical background for the optimal design of such laser extinction techniques,termed WMLE (wavelength-multiplexed laser extinction).This paper focuses on the development of WMLE and presents a systematic methodology to guide the selection of suitable wavelengths and optimize the performance of WMLE for specific applications.WMLE utilizing wavelengths from 0.5to 10 μm is illustrated for droplet size and vapor concentration measurements in an example of water spray,and is found to enable unique and sensitive Sauter mean diameter measurement in the range of ~1-15μm along with accurate vapor detection.A vapor detection strategy based on differential absorption is developed to extend accurate measurement to a significantly wider range of droplet loading and vapor concentration as compared to strategies based on direct fixed-wavelength absorption.Expected performance of the sensor is modeled for an evaporating spray.This work is expected to lay the groundwork for implementing optical sensors based on WMLE in a variety of research and industrial applications involving multi-phase flows.

  6. Measurement of an electronic cigarette aerosol size distribution during a puff

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belka, Miloslav; Lizal, Frantisek; Jedelsky, Jan; Jicha, Miroslav; Pospisil, Jiri

    Electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes) have become very popular recently because they are marketed as a healthier alternative to tobacco smoking and as a useful tool to smoking cessation. E-cigarettes use a heating element to create an aerosol from a solution usually consisting of propylene glycol, glycerol, and nicotine. Despite the wide spread of e-cigarettes, information about aerosol size distributions is rather sparse. This can be caused by the relative newness of e-cigarettes and by the difficulty of the measurements, in which one has to deal with high concentration aerosol containing volatile compounds. Therefore, we assembled an experimental setup for size measurements of e-cigarette aerosol in conjunction with a piston based machine in order to simulate a typical puff. A TSI scanning mobility particle sizer 3936 was employed to provide information about particle concentrations and sizes. An e-cigarette commercially available on the Czech Republic market was tested and the results were compared with a conventional tobacco cigarette. The particles emitted from the e-cigarette were smaller than those of the conventional cigarette having a CMD of 150 and 200 nm. However, the total concentration of particles from e-cigarette was higher.

  7. Measurement of an electronic cigarette aerosol size distribution during a puff

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belka Miloslav

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes have become very popular recently because they are marketed as a healthier alternative to tobacco smoking and as a useful tool to smoking cessation. E-cigarettes use a heating element to create an aerosol from a solution usually consisting of propylene glycol, glycerol, and nicotine. Despite the wide spread of e-cigarettes, information about aerosol size distributions is rather sparse. This can be caused by the relative newness of e-cigarettes and by the difficulty of the measurements, in which one has to deal with high concentration aerosol containing volatile compounds. Therefore, we assembled an experimental setup for size measurements of e-cigarette aerosol in conjunction with a piston based machine in order to simulate a typical puff. A TSI scanning mobility particle sizer 3936 was employed to provide information about particle concentrations and sizes. An e-cigarette commercially available on the Czech Republic market was tested and the results were compared with a conventional tobacco cigarette. The particles emitted from the e-cigarette were smaller than those of the conventional cigarette having a CMD of 150 and 200 nm. However, the total concentration of particles from e-cigarette was higher.

  8. Word knowledge in the crowd: Measuring vocabulary size and word prevalence in a massive online experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keuleers, Emmanuel; Stevens, Michaël; Mandera, Paweł; Brysbaert, Marc

    2015-01-01

    We use the results of a large online experiment on word knowledge in Dutch to investigate variables influencing vocabulary size in a large population and to examine the effect of word prevalence-the percentage of a population knowing a word-as a measure of word occurrence. Nearly 300,000 participants were presented with about 70 word stimuli (selected from a list of 53,000 words) in an adapted lexical decision task. We identify age, education, and multilingualism as the most important factors influencing vocabulary size. The results suggest that the accumulation of vocabulary throughout life and in multiple languages mirrors the logarithmic growth of number of types with number of tokens observed in text corpora (Herdan's law). Moreover, the vocabulary that multilinguals acquire in related languages seems to increase their first language (L1) vocabulary size and outweighs the loss caused by decreased exposure to L1. In addition, we show that corpus word frequency and prevalence are complementary measures of word occurrence covering a broad range of language experiences. Prevalence is shown to be the strongest independent predictor of word processing times in the Dutch Lexicon Project, making it an important variable for psycholinguistic research.

  9. Repeatability of cardiac-MRI-measured right ventricular size and function in congenital heart disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walsh, Rowan; Salem, Yishay [Mount Sinai School of Medicine, Division of Pediatric Cardiology, New York, NY (United States); Shah, Amee; Lai, Wyman W. [Morgan Stanley Children' s Hospital of New York Presbyterian, New York, NY (United States); Nielsen, James C. [Mount Sinai School of Medicine, Division of Pediatric Cardiology, New York, NY (United States); Mount Sinai Children' s Heart Center, Box 1201, New York, NY (United States)

    2011-08-15

    The measurement error for right ventricular (RV) size and function assessed by cardiac MRI (CMRI) in congenital heart disease has not been fully characterized. As CMRI parameters are being increasingly utilized to make clinical decisions, defining error in the clinical setting is critical. This investigation examines the repeatability of CMRI for RV size and function. Forty consecutive people with congenital heart disease involving the RV were retrospectively identified. Contouring of RV volumes was performed by two expert CMRI clinicians. The coefficient of variability and repeatability coefficients were calculated. Repeatability coefficients were multiplied by the mean value for each group studied to define a threshold beyond which measurement error was unlikely to be responsible. The variability for indexed RV end-diastolic volume = 3.2% and 3.3% for intra- and interobserver comparisons, respectively. The repeatability coefficients were 13.2% and 14.9% for intra- and interobserver comparisons, which yielded threshold values of 15.1 ml/m{sup 2} and 20.2 ml/m{sup 2}, respectively. For RV ejection fraction (EF), the repeatability coefficients for intra- and interobserver comparisons were 5.0% and 6.0%, which resulted in threshold values of 2.6 EF% and 3.0 EF%. The threshold values generated can be used during serial assessment of RV size and function. (orig.)

  10. Latitudinal aerosol size distribution variation in the Eastern Atlantic Ocean measured aboard the FS-Polarstern

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. W. Gallagher

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Aerosol size distribution measurements from 0.03 µm to 25 µm diameter were taken at ambient humidity aboard the German research vessel, FS-Polarstern, during a transect from Bremerhaven in northern Germany, to Cape Town in South Africa across latitudes 53°32' N to 33°55' S, denoted cruise number ANT XXI/1. The data were segregated according to air mass history, wind speed and latitude. Under clean marine conditions, the averaged size distributions were generally in good agreement with those reported previously for diameters less than 0.5 µm and can be approximated by two log-normal modes, with significant variation in the mean modal diameters. Two short periods of tri-modal behaviour were observed. Above 0.5 µm, there is indication of a limit to the mechanical generation of marine aerosol over the range of wind speeds observed (~1.7–14.7 m s−1. A new technique to determine the errors associated with aerosol size distribution measurements using Poisson statistics has been applied to the dataset, providing a tool to determine the necessary sample or averaging times for correct interpretation of such data. Finally, the data were also used to investigate the loss rate of condensing gases with potentially important consequences for heterogeneous marine photochemical cycles.

  11. Latitudinal aerosol size distribution variation in the Eastern Atlantic Ocean measured aboard the FS-Polarstern

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. I. Williams

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Aerosol size distribution measurements from 0.03 μm to 25 μm diameter were taken at ambient humidity aboard the German research vessel, FS-Polarstern, during a transect from Bremerhaven in northern Germany, to Cape Town in South Africa across latitudes 53°32' N to 33°55' S, denoted cruise number ANT XXI/1. The data were segregated according to air mass history, wind speed and latitude. Under clean marine conditions, the averaged size distributions were generally in good agreement with those reported previously for diameters less than 0.5 μm and can be approximated by two log-normal modes, with significant variation in the mean modal diameters. Two short periods of tri-modal behaviour were observed. Above 0.5 μm, there is indication of a limit to the mechanical generation of marine aerosol over the range of wind speeds observed. A new technique to determine the errors associated with aerosol size distribution measurements using Poisson statistics has been applied to the dataset, providing a tool to determine the necessary sample or averaging times for correct interpretation of such data. Finally, the data were also used to investigate the loss rate of condensing gases with potentially important consequences for heterogeneous marine photochemical cycles.

  12. Measuring various sizes of H-reflex while monitoring the stimulus condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiraoka, Koichi

    2002-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the usefulness of a new technique that measured various sizes of the soleus H-reflex, while monitoring the stimulus condition. Eight healthy volunteers participated in this experiment. In the new technique, an above-motor-threshold conditioning stimulus was given to the tibial nerve 10-12 ms after a below-motor-threshold test stimulus. The conditioning stimulus evoked a direct M-wave, which was followed by a test-stimulus-evoked H-reflex. This reflex was followed by a conditioning stimulus-evoked H-reflex. The amount of the voluntary-contraction-induced facilitation of the H-reflex was similar for both the new technique and conventional technique, in which an above-motor-threshold test stimulus was given without a conditioning stimulus. Using the new technique, we found that the amount of facilitation increased linearly with the size of the test H-reflex. This technique allows us to evoke various sizes of H-reflex while monitoring a stimulus condition, and is useful for measuring H-reflexes during voluntary movement.

  13. Measurement of the Beam Size and Emittance for the CRC Cyclotron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Sae Hoon; Kim, Yu Seok [Dongguk University, Gyeongju (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-05-15

    The purpose of the present study was to confirm beam property for regional Cyclotron Research Center (CRC) installed at Chosun University Hospital. The regional CRC has been developed to produce radioisotope for positron emission tomography (PET). The original radioisotope production cyclotron had a large beam size, which need to be reduced by collimator. In order to construct the proton-induced X-ray emission and proton-induced gamma-ray emission (PIXE-PIGE) beam line, ion beam will be transported to PIXE-PIGE chamber that we have identified the beam size decreased by collimator and beam emittance. There are several methods to measure the emittace, such as the slit and collector method, the pepper-pot method, and the quad scan method. These methods use a slit and monitor to measure the beam profiles, which depend on the field gradient of the quadrupole magnet. In this study, we did not use magnet and monitor. The emittance calculation based on simulated data by previously proven program is approached to consider various methods. Beam emittance was calculated in two methods. The two methods were classical method and ion beam position with divergence method. We found that the beam sizes of x, y-direction are reduced very well

  14. In Situ Measurements of the Size and Density of Titan Aerosol Analogues

    CERN Document Server

    Horst, Sarah M

    2013-01-01

    The organic haze produced from complex CH4/N2 chemistry in the atmosphere of Titan plays an important role in processes that occur in the atmosphere and on its surface. The haze particles act as condensation nuclei and are therefore involved in Titan's methane hydrological cycle. They also may behave like sediment on Titan's surface and participate in both fluvial and aeolian processes. Models that seek to understand these processes require information about the physical properties of the particles including their size and density. Although measurements obtained by Cassini-Huygens have placed constraints on the size of the haze particles, their densities remain unknown. We have conducted a series of Titan atmosphere simulation experiments and measured the size, number density, and particle density of Titan aerosol analogues, or tholins, for CH4 concentrations from 0.01% to 10% using two different energy sources, spark discharge and UV. We find that the densities currently in use by many Titan models are highe...

  15. Mobility and carrier density in nanoporous indium tin oxide films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weissbon, Jaqueline; Gondorf, Andreas; Geller, Martin; Lorke, Axel [Fakultaet fuer Physik and CeNIDE, Universitaet Duisburg-Essen, D-47048 Duisburg (Germany); Inhester, Martina; Prodi-Schwab, Anna; Adam, Dieter [Evonik Degussa GmbH, D-45772 Marl (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    Indium tin oxide (ITO) has become an indispensable material for a range of electronic devices. It is transparent in the entire visible range and electrically conducting, hence, a well suited material for transparent electrodes. An interesting possibility to realize transparent, conducting films without the use of vacuum techniques is the printing of dispersions containing ITO nanoparticles. We study here the charge carrier concentration and mobility of various nanoporous indium tin oxide (ITO) films, using Hall measurements and optical spectroscopy. For the carrier density inside the particles (2-4 . 10{sup 20} cm{sup -3}), the results of these complementary measurement techniques are in good agreement with each other and suggest that even in highly porous materials the common equations for the Hall resistance can be applied. However, for the mobilities in these layers the results differ very strongly: from 50 (cm{sup 2})/(Vs) in optical spectroscopy (which is comparable to bulk ITO) to 0.4 (cm{sup 2})/(Vs) in Hall measurements.This suggests that the mobility for electrical transport in nanoporous ITO films is strongly suppressed by scattering at interparticle boundaries.

  16. Size-resolved flux measurement of sub-micrometer particles over an urban area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malte Julian Deventer

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available From April 11th to May 27th, 2011, the turbulent exchange of sub-micrometer particles between the urban surface and the urban boundary-layer was measured above the city area of Münster (NW Germany. The scope of the study is to examine the contributions of particles of different size classes to the total measured fluxes. Eddy-covariance measurements were performed at 65 m above ground. The particle concentrations in 99 size bins with particle diameters ranging from 55 to 1000 nm were measured with an optical particle spectrometer. For flux calculations we grouped these 99 original bins into 18 wider channels with an upper cut-off of 320 nm, and a further rather coarse channel for particles up to 1 ?m. The overall results reveal that Münster is a relevant source of about 2.8 · 108 particles m?2 d?1 on weekdays and 1.8 · 108 particles m?2 d?1 on Sundays within the indicated size range. These emissions are predominantly driven by secondary particles of the Aitken mode, which are most likely caused by traffic. Hence traffic hotspots are a major contribution to the net fluxes. On the other hand, considering the mass fluxes, Münster is a sink of 0.53 ?g m?2 d?1 on weekdays and 0.08 ?g m?2 d?1 on Sundays. Here, mainly particles of the accumulation mode with diameters above 167 nm lead to deposition fluxes. Number and mass fluxes exhibit distinct daily and weekly patterns.

  17. Osmylated DNA, a novel concept for sequencing DNA using nanopores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanavarioti, Anastassia

    2015-03-01

    Saenger sequencing has led the advances in molecular biology, while faster and cheaper next generation technologies are urgently needed. A newer approach exploits nanopores, natural or solid-state, set in an electrical field, and obtains base sequence information from current variations due to the passage of a ssDNA molecule through the pore. A hurdle in this approach is the fact that the four bases are chemically comparable to each other which leads to small differences in current obstruction. ‘Base calling’ becomes even more challenging because most nanopores sense a short sequence and not individual bases. Perhaps sequencing DNA via nanopores would be more manageable, if only the bases were two, and chemically very different from each other; a sequence of 1s and 0s comes to mind. Osmylated DNA comes close to such a sequence of 1s and 0s. Osmylation is the addition of osmium tetroxide bipyridine across the C5-C6 double bond of the pyrimidines. Osmylation adds almost 400% mass to the reactive base, creates a sterically and electronically notably different molecule, labeled 1, compared to the unreactive purines, labeled 0. If osmylated DNA were successfully sequenced, the result would be a sequence of osmylated pyrimidines (1), and purines (0), and not of the actual nucleobases. To solve this problem we studied the osmylation reaction with short oligos and with M13mp18, a long ssDNA, developed a UV-vis assay to measure extent of osmylation, and designed two protocols. Protocol A uses mild conditions and yields osmylated thymidines (1), while leaving the other three bases (0) practically intact. Protocol B uses harsher conditions and effectively osmylates both pyrimidines, but not the purines. Applying these two protocols also to the complementary of the target polynucleotide yields a total of four osmylated strands that collectively could define the actual base sequence of the target DNA.

  18. Effect of solvent and silicon substrate surface on the size of iron nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newman, Phillip; Milev, Adriyan, E-mail: A.Milev@uws.edu.au; Kannangara, Kamali [University of Western Sydney, School of Science and Health (Australia); Martin, Philip [CSIRO Lindfield, Materials Science and Engineering (Australia)

    2015-04-15

    The diameter of carbon nanotubes is strongly related the geometric sizes of the metal particles upon which they are nucleated. To improve the control over the nanoparticle sizes derived from iron acetate and deposited on Si substrates, two different approaches were employed; manipulation of the solvent chemistry and manipulation of the Si substrate surface. The iron acetate was dissolved separately in pure water and ethanol and in binary ethanol/water mixtures. Silicon substrates, with either smooth surface or nano-porous surface, were dip coated using these solutions. The dip-coated substrates were first thermally oxidised at 400 °C in air followed by reduction at 800 °C in an Ar/H{sub 2} gas mixture. As derived particles were measured by scanning electron microscopy, and the average size and size distribution were determined by statistical analysis. Electron microscopy and statistical analyses demonstrated that metal particles deposited onto the smooth Si wafer have sizes ranging from 18 to 160 nm based on the solvent used, where the pure solvents resulted in a narrower size distribution when compared to the water/ethanol mixtures. When nano-porous Si wafer is used as a substrate, the metal particle diameter distributions are reduced to a range from 11 to 17 nm contingent upon the solvent used. The role of the ethanol/water interactions investigated by vibrational (IR and Raman) and {sup 1}H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy on nanoparticle sizes and size distributions is discussed.

  19. {sup 10}Be measurements at MALT using reduced-size samples of bulk sediments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horiuchi, Kazuho, E-mail: kh@cc.hirosaki-u.ac.jp [Graduate School of Science and Technology, Hirosaki University, 3, Bunkyo-chou, Hirosaki, Aomori 036-8561 (Japan); Oniyanagi, Itsumi [Graduate School of Science and Technology, Hirosaki University, 3, Bunkyo-chou, Hirosaki, Aomori 036-8561 (Japan); Wasada, Hiroshi [Institute of Geology and Paleontology, Graduate school of Science, Tohoku University, 6-3, Aramaki Aza-Aoba, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8578 (Japan); Matsuzaki, Hiroyuki [MALT, School of Engineering, University of Tokyo, 2-11-16, Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0032 (Japan)

    2013-01-15

    In order to establish {sup 10}Be measurements on reduced-size (1-10 mg) samples of bulk sediments, we investigated four different pretreatment designs using lacustrine and marginal-sea sediments and the AMS system of the Micro Analysis Laboratory, Tandem accelerator (MALT) at University of Tokyo. The {sup 10}Be concentrations obtained from the samples of 1-10 mg agreed within a precision of 3-5% with the values previously determined using corresponding ordinary-size ({approx}200 mg) samples and the same AMS system. This fact demonstrates reliable determinations of {sup 10}Be with milligram levels of recent bulk sediments at MALT. On the other hand, a clear decline of the BeO{sup -} beam with tens of micrograms of {sup 9}Be carrier suggests that the combination of ten milligrams of sediments and a few hundred micrograms of the {sup 9}Be carrier is more convenient at this stage.

  20. Measurement of the environmental broadband electromagnetic waves in a mid-size European city.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-García, R; Gil, I

    2017-10-01

    In this paper, the level of exposure to broadband radiofrequency electromagnetic field in a mid-size European city was evaluated in accordance with the International Commission on Non-ionizing Radiation Protection guidelines from 1998. With the aim to analyse all the potential electromagnetic waves present in the city up to 18GHz, a total of 271 locations distributed along Terrassa (Spain) have been measured. To show the results in an easy-to-interpret way by the citizen, the results have been represented in a set of raster maps. The measurement results obtained showed that the electromagnetic wave measured in all broadband frequency range along the city is much lower than the safety level according to the international regulations for both public and occupational sectors. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.