WorldWideScience

Sample records for measuring low-frequency noise

  1. Measuring low-frequency noise indoors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Steffen; Møller, Henrik; Persson-Waye, Kerstin

    2008-01-01

    that is exceeded in 10% of the volume of a room (L10) is proposed as a rational and objective target for a measurement method. In Sweden and Denmark rules exist for measuring low-frequency noise indoors. The performance of these procedures was investigated in three rooms. The results from the Swedish method were...

  2. Low frequency noise study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-04-01

    This report documents a study to investigate human response to the low-frequency : content of aviation noise, or low-frequency noise (LFN). The study comprised field : measurements and laboratory studies. The major findings were: : 1. Start-of-takeof...

  3. Measurement of low-frequency noise in rooms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Steffen; Møller, Henrik; Persson-Waye, Kerstin

    2006-01-01

    Measurement of low-frequency noise in rooms is problematic due to standing wave patterns. The spatial variation in the sound pressure level can typically be as much as 20-30 dB. For assessment of annoyance from low-frequency noise in dwellings, it is important to measure a level close...... rooms. The sound pressure level was measured 1) in three-dimensional corners and 2) according to current Swedish and Danish measurement methods. Furthermore, the entire sound pressure distributions were measured by scanning. The Swedish and Danish measurement methods include a corner measurement...... to the highest level present in a room, rather than a room average level. In order to ensure representative noise measurements, different positions were investigated based on theoretical considerations and observations from numerical room simulations. In addition measurements were performed in three different...

  4. Cross correlation measurement of low frequency conductivity noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Aditya Kumar; Nigudkar, Himanshu; Chakraborti, Himadri; Udupa, Aditi; Gupta, Kantimay Das

    2018-04-01

    In order to study the low frequency noise(1/f noise)an experimental technique based on cross correlation of two channels is presented. In this method the device under test (DUT)is connected to the two independently powered preamplifiers in parallel. The amplified signals from the two preamplifiers are fed to two channels of a digitizer. Subsequent data processing largelyeliminates the uncorrelated noise of the two channels. This method is tested for various commercial carbon/metal film resistors by measuring equilibrium thermal noise (4kBTR). The method is then modified to study the non-equilibrium low frequency noise of heterostructure samples using fiveprobe configuration. Five contact probes allow two parts of the sample to become two arms of a balanced bridge. This configuration helps in suppressing the effect of power supply fluctuations, bath temperature fluctuations and contact resistances.

  5. Simple programmable voltage reference for low frequency noise measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, V. E.; Chye, En Un

    2018-05-01

    The paper presents a circuit design of a low-noise voltage reference based on an electric double-layer capacitor, a microcontroller and a general purpose DAC. A large capacitance value (1F and more) makes it possible to create low-pass filter with a large time constant, effectively reducing low-frequency noise beyond its bandwidth. Choosing the optimum value of the resistor in the RC filter, one can achieve the best ratio between the transient time, the deviation of the output voltage from the set point and the minimum noise cut-off frequency. As experiments have shown, the spectral density of the voltage at a frequency of 1 kHz does not exceed 1.2 nV/√Hz the maximum deviation of the output voltage from the predetermined does not exceed 1.4 % and depends on the holding time of the previous value. Subsequently, this error is reduced to a constant value and can be compensated.

  6. Indoor measurements of low-frequency noise for annoyance assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Steffen; Møller, Henrik; Persson-Waye, Kerstin

    2007-01-01

    The sound pressure level within a room may vary as much as 20-30 dB at low frequencies. Mainly the highest levels are of concern with regards to annoyance assessment, rather than a room average. The highest levels can however be very difficult to find. Sound fields in rooms were investigated using......) in an attempt to ensure high levels. The sound pressure level that is exceeded in only 10% of the space of a room (L10) is proposed as a reasonable target for a measurement method. The Swedish method showed good results, however its inclusion of C-weighting can potentially be problematic. The Danish method...... numerical simulations and scanning measurements of the entire sound pressure distributions in three different rooms. Measurements were also performed in three-dimensional corners as well as according to Swedish and Danish guidelines, which include positions close to corners in the floor plane (0.5 to 1 m...

  7. Measurement of the Low Frequency Noise of MOSFETs under Large Signal RF Excitation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Wel, A.P.; Klumperink, Eric A.M.; Nauta, Bram

    2002-01-01

    A measurement technique [1] is presented that allows measurement of MOSFET low frequency (LF) noise under large signal RF (Radio Frequency) excitation. Measurements indicate that MOSFETS exhibit a reduction in LF noise when they are cycled from inversion to accummulation and that this reduction does

  8. Measurements of Low Frequency Noise of Infrared Photo-Detectors with Transimpedance Detection System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ciura Łukasz

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the method and results of low-frequency noise measurements of modern mid-wavelength infrared photodetectors. A type-II InAs/GaSb superlattice based detector with nBn barrier architecture is compared with a high operating temperature (HOT heterojunction HgCdTe detector. All experiments were made in the range 1 Hz - 10 kHz at various temperatures by using a transimpedance detection system, which is examined in detail. The power spectral density of the nBn’s dark current noise includes Lorentzians with different time constants while the HgCdTe photodiode has more uniform 1/f - shaped spectra. For small bias, the low-frequency noise power spectra of both devices were found to scale linearly with bias voltage squared and were connected with the fluctuations of the leakage resistance. Leakage resistance noise defines the lower noise limit of a photodetector. Other dark current components give raise to the increase of low-frequency noise above this limit. For the same voltage biasing devices, the absolute noise power densities at 1 Hz in nBn are 1 to 2 orders of magnitude lower than in a MCT HgCdTe detector. In spite of this, low-frequency performance of the HgCdTe detector at ~ 230K is still better than that of InAs/GaSb superlattice nBn detector.

  9. First evaluation of low frequency noise measurements of in core detector signals in the measuring assembly Rheinsberg

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collatz, S.

    1982-01-01

    Reactor noise spectra of in core neutron detectors are measured in the low frequency range (0.03 Hz to 1 Hz) and evaluated. The increase of the effective noise signal value is due to pressure oscillations or oscillations of special steam volume portions. Thus boiling monitoring of reactor cores in PWR type reactors may be possible, if the low frequency noise of the whole set of in core detectors is taken into account

  10. Development of a rating procedure for low frequency noise : Results of measurements near runways

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buikema, E.; Vercammen, M.; Ploeg, F. van der; Granneman, J.; Vos, J.

    2010-01-01

    Recent issues concerning low frequency aircraft noise around airports (groundnoise) and a legal verdict about the application of low frequency noise criteria in the Netherlands have been the motivation to start a research commissioned by the Dutch Ministry of Housing, Spatial Planning and the

  11. Low-frequency-noise complaints

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Christian Sejer; Møller, Henrik; Persson-Waye, Kerstin

    2008-01-01

    From 203 cases of low-frequency complaints a random selection of twenty-one cases were investigated. The main aim of the investigation was to answer the question whether the annoyance is caused by an external physical sound or by a physically non-existing sound, i.e. low-frequency tinnitus. Noise...... of the complainants are annoyed by a physical sound (20-180 Hz), while others suffer from low-frequency tinnitus (perceived frequency 40-100 Hz). Physical sound at frequencies below 20 Hz (infrasound) is not responsible for the annoyance - or at all audible - in any of the investigated cases, and none...... of the complainants has extraordinary hearing sensitivity at low frequencies. For comparable cases of low-frequency noise complaints in general, it is anticipated that physical sound is responsible in a substantial part of the cases, while low-frequency tinnitus is responsible in another substantial part of the cases....

  12. Low-frequency noise complaints

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Christian Sejer; Møller, Henrik; Persson-Waye, Kerstin

    2006-01-01

    is only heard by a single person in the household. This raises the fundamental question whether the complainants are annoyed by an external physical sound, or if other explanations such as low-frequency tinnitus must be sought. The main aim of this study is to answer this fundamental question...

  13. Signals and noise in measurements of low-frequency geomagnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nichols, E.A.; Morrison, H.F.; Clarke, J.

    1988-01-01

    The apparent magnetic noise, obtained from the coherency function for two parallel magnetic sensors, generally overstimates sensor noise because the sensors do not measure the same signal. The different signals result from the nonparallel alignment of the sensors and from the additional magnetic signal induced in each sensor by its motion in the Earth's magnetic field. A magnetometer array experiment was completed in Grass Valley, Nevada, to determine the minimum magnetic signal that could be detected in the presence of background natural field variations and motion of the sensor. Superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometers with interval biaxial tiltmeters were used to record the magnetic fields and the motion of the sensors

  14. Challenges and limitations in retrofitting facilities for low frequency noise

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wierzba, P. [ATCO Noise Management, Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2007-07-01

    The trend to revise and increase environmental regulations regarding low frequency noise emissions from oil and gas facilities was discussed. Noise related complaints can often be traced to low frequency noise, which is the unwanted sound with a frequency range falling within 31.5-Hz, 63-Hz, and 125-Hz octave bands. This paper also discussed the challenges and limitations of field retrofits of the facilities aimed at reducing low frequency noise. The main sources of low frequency noise associated with a compression facility are the radiator cooler, engine exhaust and the building envelope. Regulators are paying close attention not only to the overall noise exposure as measured by the A-weighted levels, but also to the quality of noise emitted by the particular frequency spectrum. The Alberta Energy and Utilities Board recently issued Noise Control Directive 38 and made it a requirement to perform low frequency noise impact assessment for permitting of all new energy facilities. Under Directive 38, the low frequency noise assessment is to be performed using the C-weighted scale as a measure in addition to the previously used A-weighted scale. Directive 38 recommends that in order to avoid low frequency noise problems the difference between the C-weighted and A-weighted levels at the residential locations should be lower than 20 dB. This implies that noise should be limited to 60 dBC for Category 1 residences of low dwelling density. Small upgrades and changes can be made to lower low frequency noise emissions. These may include upgrading building wall insulation, providing wall-to-skid isolation system, upgrading the fan blades, or reducing the rpm of the fans. It was concluded that these upgrades should be considered for facilities in close proximity to residential areas. 3 refs., 2 tabs., 7 figs.

  15. Annoyance of low frequency noise and traffic noise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, F.R.; Poulsen, Torben

    2001-01-01

    The annoyance of different low frequency noise sources was determined and compared to the annoyance from traffic noise. Twenty-two subjects participated in laboratory listening tests. The sounds were presented by loudspeakers in a listening room and the spectra of the low frequency noises were...

  16. Characterization and Impact of Low Frequency Wind Turbine Noise Emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finch, James

    Wind turbine noise is a complex issue that requires due diligence to minimize any potential impact on quality of life. This study enhances existing knowledge of wind turbine noise through focused analyses of downwind sound propagation, directionality, and the low frequency component of the noise. Measurements were conducted at four wind speeds according to a design of experiments at incremental distances and angles. Wind turbine noise is shown to be highly directional, while downwind sound propagation is spherical with limited ground absorption. The noise is found to have a significant low frequency component that is largely independent of wind speed over the 20-250 Hz range. The generated low frequency noise is shown to be audible above 40 Hz at the MOE setback distance of 550 m. Infrasound levels exhibit higher dependency on wind speed, but remain below audible levels up to 15 m/s.

  17. Low-frequency excess flux noise in superconducting devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kempf, Sebastian; Ferring, Anna; Fleischmann, Andreas; Enss, Christian [Kirchhoff-Institute for Physics, Heidelberg University (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    Low-frequency noise is a rather universal phenomenon and appears in physical, chemical, biological or even economical systems. However, there is often very little known about the underlying processes leading to its occurrence. In particular, the origin of low-frequency excess flux noise in superconducting devices has been an unresolved puzzle for many decades. Its existence limits, for example, the coherence time of superconducting quantum bits or makes high-precision measurements of low-frequency signals using SQUIDs rather challenging. Recent experiments suggest that low-frequency excess flux noise in Josephson junction based devices might be caused by the random reversal of interacting spins in surface layer oxides and in the superconductor-substrate interface. Even if it turns out to be generally correct, the underlying physical processes, i.e. the origin of these spins, their physical nature as well as the interaction mechanisms, have not been resolved so far. In this contribution we discuss recent measurements of low-frequency SQUID noise which we performed to investigate the origin of low-frequency excess flux noise in superconducting devices. Within this context we give an overview of our measurement techniques and link our data with present theoretical models and literature data.

  18. Indoor measurements of sound at low frequencies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Steffen; Møller, Henrik; Persson-Waye, Kerstin

    2006-01-01

    Due to standing waves, the sound pressure level within a room may vary as much as 20-30 dB with low-frequency tonal noise, somewhat less with noise bands. For assessment of annoyance from low-frequency noise it is relevant to measure a level close to the highest level of the room, rather than a r...

  19. Interface studies of N2 plasma-treated ZnSnO nanowire transistors using low-frequency noise measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Seongmin; Janes, David B; Kim, Hwansoo; Ju, Sanghyun

    2013-01-01

    Due to the large surface-to-volume ratio of nanowires, the quality of nanowire–insulator interfaces as well as the nanowire surface characteristics significantly influence the electrical characteristics of nanowire transistors (NWTs). To improve the electrical characteristics by doping or post-processing, it is important to evaluate the interface characteristics and stability of NWTs. In this study, we have synthesized ZnSnO (ZTO) nanowires using the chemical vapor deposition method, characterized the composition of ZTO nanowires using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and fabricated ZTO NWTs. We have characterized the current–voltage characteristics and low-frequency noise of ZTO NWTs in order to investigate the effects of interface states on subthreshold slope (SS) and the noise before and after N 2 plasma treatments. The as-fabricated device exhibited a SS of 0.29 V/dec and Hooge parameter of ∼1.20 × 10 −2 . Upon N 2 plasma treatment with N 2 gas flow rate of 40 sccm (20 sccm), the SS improved to 0.12 V/dec (0.21 V/dec) and the Hooge parameter decreased to ∼4.99 × 10 −3 (8.14 × 10 −3 ). The interface trap densities inferred from both SS and low-frequency noise decrease upon plasma treatment, with the highest flow rate yielding the smallest trap density. These results demonstrate that the N 2 plasma treatment decreases the interface trap states and defects on ZTO nanowires, thereby enabling the fabrication of high-quality nanowire interfaces. (paper)

  20. Low frequency noise in semiconductor detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stojanovic, M.; Marjanovic, N.

    1998-01-01

    Noise characteristics of surface-barrier detectors based on Au contacts on n-Si were measured and analyzed. The metal layers were deposited by evaporation to 40-100 nm thickness. Standard surface-barrier detectors based on Au/Si structures are known to have favorable characteristics, but they tend to degrade with aging and under severe working conditions. Degradation is particularly related to the increase in noise level, leakage current and the reduction of detector efficiency and resolution. Therefore, practical applications of surface-barrier detectors demand their constant upgrading. Improvements of detector properties are concentrated mainly on the front surface and front (rectifying) contact. The aim was to improve the noise characteristics of the surface-barrier structures and retain the favorable detector properties of the Au/Si system. (authors)

  1. Probing in-plane anisotropy in few-layer ReS2 using low frequency noise measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitra, Richa; Jariwala, Bhakti; Bhattacharya, Arnab; Das, Anindya

    2018-04-01

    ReS2, a layered two-dimensional material popular for its in-plane anisotropic properties, is emerging as one of the potential candidates for flexible electronics and ultrafast optical applications. It is an n-type semiconducting material having a layer independent bandgap of 1.55 eV. In this paper we have characterized the intrinsic electronic noise level of few-layer ReS2 for the first time. Few-layer ReS2 field effect transistor devices show a 1/f nature of noise for frequency ranging over three orders of magnitude. We have also observed that not only the electrical response of the material is anisotropic; the noise level is also dependent on direction. In fact the noise is found to be more sensitive towards the anisotropy. This fact has been explained by evoking the theory where the Hooge parameter is not a constant quantity, but has a distinct power law dependence on mobility along the two-axes direction. The anisotropy in 1/f noise measurement will pave the way to quantify the anisotropic nature of two-dimensional (2D) materials, which will be helpful for the design of low-noise transistors in future.

  2. A procedure for the assessment of low frequency noise complaints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moorhouse, Andy T; Waddington, David C; Adams, Mags D

    2009-09-01

    The development and application of a procedure for the assessment of low frequency noise (LFN) complaints are described. The development of the assessment method included laboratory tests addressing low frequency hearing threshold and the effect on acceptability of fluctuation, and field measurements complemented with interview-based questionnaires. Environmental health departments then conducted a series of six trials with genuine "live" LFN complaints to test the workability and usefulness of the procedure. The procedure includes guidance notes and a pro-forma report with step-by-step instructions. It does not provide a prescriptive indicator of nuisance but rather gives a systematic procedure to help environmental health practitioners to form their own opinion. Examples of field measurements and application of the procedure are presented. The procedure and examples are likely to be of particular interest to environmental health practitioners involved in the assessment of LFN complaints.

  3. Twenty-two cases of low-frequency noise complaints

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Christian Sejer; Møller, Henrik; Persson-Waye, Kerstin

    2006-01-01

    In Denmark and in other industrialized countries there are cases where people complain about annoying low-frequency or infrasonic noise in their homes. Besides noise annoyance people often report other adverse effects such as insomnia, headache, lack of concentration etc. In many cases the noise...

  4. Low-frequency noise from large wind turbines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Møller, Henrik; Pedersen, Christian Sejer

    2011-06-01

    As wind turbines get larger, worries have emerged that the turbine noise would move down in frequency and that the low-frequency noise would cause annoyance for the neighbors. The noise emission from 48 wind turbines with nominal electric power up to 3.6 MW is analyzed and discussed. The relative amount of low-frequency noise is higher for large turbines (2.3-3.6 MW) than for small turbines (≤ 2 MW), and the difference is statistically significant. The difference can also be expressed as a downward shift of the spectrum of approximately one-third of an octave. A further shift of similar size is suggested for future turbines in the 10-MW range. Due to the air absorption, the higher low-frequency content becomes even more pronounced, when sound pressure levels in relevant neighbor distances are considered. Even when A-weighted levels are considered, a substantial part of the noise is at low frequencies, and for several of the investigated large turbines, the one-third-octave band with the highest level is at or below 250 Hz. It is thus beyond any doubt that the low-frequency part of the spectrum plays an important role in the noise at the neighbors. © 2011 Acoustical Society of America

  5. Low-frequency noise in planar Hall effect bridge sensors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Persson, Anders; Bejhedb, R.S.; Bejhed, R.S.

    2011-01-01

    The low-frequency characteristics of planar Hall effect bridge sensors are investigated as function of the sensor bias current and the applied magnetic field. The noise spectra reveal a Johnson-like spectrum at high frequencies, and a 1/f-like excess noise spectrum at lower frequencies, with a kn...

  6. Low frequency noise reduction using stiff light composite panels

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DENG Yongchang; LIN Weizheng

    2003-01-01

    The experiment presented in this paper is to investigate and analyze the noise reduction at low frequency using stiff light composite panels. Since these composite panels are made of lightweight and stiff materials, this actuation strategy will enable the creation of composite panels for duct noise control without using traditional heavy structural mass. The results suggest that the mass-spring resonance absorption in the case of a comparatively stiff thick panel with a thin flexible plate is more efficient with minimum weight, when subjected to low-frequency (<500 Hz). The efficiency of the panel absorber depends on the mass of the thin flexible plate and the stiffness of the panel.

  7. Low-frequency noise from large wind turbines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Henrik; Pedersen, Christian Sejer

    2011-01-01

    As wind turbines get larger, worries have emerged that the turbine noise would move down in frequency and that the low-frequency noise would cause annoyance for the neighbors. The noise emission from 48 wind turbines with nominal electric power up to 3.6 MW is analyzed and discussed. The relative...... amount of low-frequency noise is higher for large turbines (2.3–3.6 MW) than for small turbines (≤ 2 MW), and the difference is statistically significant. The difference can also be expressed as a downward shift of the spectrum of approximately one-third of an octave. A further shift of similar size...... is suggested for future turbines in the 10-MW range. Due to the air absorption, the higher low-frequency content becomes even more pronounced, when sound pressure levels in relevant neighbor distances are considered. Even when A-weighted levels are considered, a substantial part of the noise is at low...

  8. Low-frequency 1/f noise in graphene devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balandin, Alexander A.

    2013-08-01

    Low-frequency noise with a spectral density that depends inversely on frequency has been observed in a wide variety of systems including current fluctuations in resistors, intensity fluctuations in music and signals in human cognition. In electronics, the phenomenon, which is known as 1/f noise, flicker noise or excess noise, hampers the operation of numerous devices and circuits, and can be a significant impediment to the development of practical applications from new materials. Graphene offers unique opportunities for studying 1/f noise because of its two-dimensional structure and widely tunable two-dimensional carrier concentration. The creation of practical graphene-based devices will also depend on our ability to understand and control the low-frequency noise in this material system. Here, the characteristic features of 1/f noise in graphene and few-layer graphene are reviewed, and the implications of such noise for the development of graphene-based electronics including high-frequency devices and sensors are examined.

  9. An analysis of low frequency noise from large wind turbines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Christian Sejer; Møller, Henrik

    2010-01-01

    As wind turbines get larger, worries have emerged, that the noise emitted by the turbines would move down in frequency, and that the contents of low-frequency noise would be enough to cause significant annoyance for the neighbors. The sound emission from 48 wind turbines with nominal electric power......-third-octave-band spectra shows that the relative noise emission is higher in the 63-250 Hz frequency range from turbines above 2 MW than from smaller turbines. The observations confirm a downward shift of the spectrum....

  10. Extreme Low Frequency Acoustic Measurement System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shams, Qamar A. (Inventor); Zuckerwar, Allan J. (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    The present invention is an extremely low frequency (ELF) microphone and acoustic measurement system capable of infrasound detection in a portable and easily deployable form factor. In one embodiment of the invention, an extremely low frequency electret microphone comprises a membrane, a backplate, and a backchamber. The backchamber is sealed to allow substantially no air exchange between the backchamber and outside the microphone. Compliance of the membrane may be less than ambient air compliance. The backplate may define a plurality of holes and a slot may be defined between an outer diameter of the backplate and an inner wall of the microphone. The locations and sizes of the holes, the size of the slot, and the volume of the backchamber may be selected such that membrane motion is substantially critically damped.

  11. Low frequency noise from large wind turbines - updated 2011; Lavfrekvent stoej fra store vindmoeller - opdateret 2011

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moeller, H.; Sejer Pedersen, C.; Pedersen, Steffen

    2011-07-01

    The study analyzed measurements of noise from 65 wind turbines, 25 large turbines (2.3 to 3.6 MW) and 40 small ones (up to 2 MW). The large mills (2.3 to 3.6 MW) emit relatively more low frequency noise than the small ones (up to 2 MW). The difference is statistically significant for the frequency range 63-250 Hz, regardless of whether calculations are performed on all the large mills or only on new wind turbines. There are no significant differences between prototype turbines and the new mills. Because of wind noise in the measurements of the small mills, it is not possible to determine whether the difference between small and large turbines continues further down in frequency. Looking at the A-weighted sound pressure in relevant neighbor distances, the lower frequencies constitute an essential part of the noise from the large mills, and there is no doubt that the low frequency noise is both audible and annoying. When the total A-weighted sound pressure level is the same, there will on average be about 3 dB more low frequency noise from large turbines than from small ones. At large distances the noise character becomes yet more low frequency because atmospheric absorption reduces the high frequencies more than the low frequencies. Depending on the sound insulation the low frequency noise can also be annoying indoors. If the total A-weighted sound pressure level outdoors is 44 dB, the low frequency noise can be heard indoors in all the houses and for all the large turbines. The sound pressure level will in many cases exceed the indoor limit for evening night at 20 dB. (ln)

  12. Low frequency noise in resonant Josephson soliton oscillators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jørn Bindslev; Holst, T.; Wellstood, Frederick C.

    1991-01-01

    The noise in the resonant soliton mode of long and narrow Josephson tunnel junctions (Josephson transmission lines or JTLs) have been measured in the frequency range from 0.1 Hz to 25 kHz by means of a DC SQUID. The measured white noise was found, to within a factor of two, to be equal...... to the Nyquist voltage noise in a resistance equal to the dynamic resistance RD of the current-voltage characteristic of the bias point. In contrast, measurements of the linewidth of the microwave radiation from the same JTL showed that the spectral density of the underlying noise voltage scaled as R D2/RS where...

  13. Comparison of objective methods for assessment of annoyance of low frequency noise with the results of a laboratory listening test

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Torben

    2003-01-01

    Subjective assessments made by test persons were compared to results from a number of objective measurement and calculation methods for the assessment of low frequency noise. Eighteen young persons with normal hearing listened to eight environmental low frequency noises and evaluated the annoyance...

  14. The Noisiness of Low Frequency Bands of Noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawton, B. W.

    1975-01-01

    The relative noisiness of low frequency 1/3-octave bands of noise was examined. The frequency range investigated was bounded by the bands centered at 25 and 200 Hz, with intensities ranging from 50 to 95 db (SPL). Thirty-two subjects used a method of adjustment technique, producing comparison band intensities as noisy as 100 and 200 Hz standard bands at 60 and 72 db. The work resulted in contours of equal noisiness for 1/3-octave bands, ranging in intensity from approximately 58 to 86 db (SPL). These contours were compared with the standard equal noisiness contours; in the region of overlap, between 50 and 200 Hz, the agreement was good.

  15. The assessment and evaluation of low-frequency noise near the region of infrasound

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanislav Ziaran

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The main aim of this paper is to present recent knowledge about the assessment and evaluation of low-frequency sounds (noise and infrasound, close to the threshold of hearing, and identify their potential effect on human health and annoyance. Low-frequency noise generated by air flowing over a moving car with an open window was chosen as a typical scenario which can be subjectively assessed by people traveling by automobile. The principle of noise generated within the interior of the car and its effects on the comfort of the driver and passengers are analyzed at different velocities. An open window of a car at high velocity behaves as a source of specifically strong tonal low-frequency noise which is generally perceived as annoying. The interior noise generated by an open window of a passenger car was measured under different conditions: Driving on a highway and driving on a typical roadway. First, an octave-band analysis was used to assess the noise level and its impact on the driver′s comfort. Second, a fast Fourier transform (FFT analysis and one-third octave-band analysis were used for the detection of tonal low-frequency noise. Comparison between two different car makers was also done. Finally, the paper suggests some possibilities for scientifically assessing and evaluating low-frequency sounds in general, and some recommendations are introduced for scientific discussion, since sounds with strong low-frequency content (but not only strong engender greater annoyance than is predicted by an A-weighted sound pressure level.

  16. Measurement of low-frequency base and collector current noise and coherence in SiGe heterojunction bipolar transistors using transimpedance amplifiers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruce, S.P.O.; Vandamme, L.K.J.; Rydberg, A.

    1999-01-01

    Transimpedance amplifiers have been used for direct study of current noise in silicon germanium (SiGe) heterojunction bipolar transistors (HBT's) at different biasing conditions. This has facilitated a wider range of resistances in the measurement circuit around the transistor than is possible when

  17. Infrasound and low frequency noise from wind turbines: exposure and health effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bolin, Karl [Marcus Wallenberg Laboratory, Department of Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Kungliga Tekniska Hoegskolan (Sweden); Bluhm, Goesta; Nilsson, Mats E [Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet (Sweden); Eriksson, Gabriella, E-mail: kbolin@kth.se [Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute and Linkoeping University (Sweden)

    2011-07-15

    Wind turbines emit low frequency noise (LFN) and large turbines generally generate more LFN than small turbines. The dominant source of LFN is the interaction between incoming turbulence and the blades. Measurements suggest that indoor levels of LFN in dwellings typically are within recommended guideline values, provided that the outdoor level does not exceed corresponding guidelines for facade exposure. Three cross-sectional questionnaire studies show that annoyance from wind turbine noise is related to the immission level, but several explanations other than low frequency noise are probable. A statistically significant association between noise levels and self-reported sleep disturbance was found in two of the three studies. It has been suggested that LFN from wind turbines causes other, and more serious, health problems, but empirical support for these claims is lacking.

  18. Techniques for the reduction of low frequency noise in buildings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zuada Coelho, B.A.; Koopman, A.

    2012-01-01

    Vibration isolation of buildings is often achieved by introducing spring systems at the foundation level. This can be an effective measure, especially against vibrations induced by noise, but it is also very costly. Due to the current usage of the cities space, where buildings and infrastructures

  19. Impact of self-assembled monolayer on low frequency noise of organic thin film transistors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ke Lin; Dolmanan, Surani Bin; Shen Lu; Vijila, Chellappan; Chua, Soo Jin; Png, R.-Q.; Chia, P.-J.; Chua, L.-L.; Ho, Peter K-H.

    2008-01-01

    Bottom-contact organic field-effect transistors (FETs) based on regioregular poly(3-hexylthiophene) were fabricated with different surface treatments and were evaluated using a low frequency noise (LFN) spectroscopy. The oxygen-plasma (OP) treated device shows the highest mobility with the lowest current fluctuation. Octadecyltrichlorosilane and perfluorodecyldimetylchlorosilane treated device gives a higher noise compared with the OP treated device. Hexamethyldisilazane treated devices show the highest noise but the lowest mobility. The LFN results are correlated with organic FET device mobility and stability, proved by channel material crystallinity and degree of dislocations analysis. LFN measurement provides a nondisruptive and direct methodology to characterize device performance

  20. Low frequency noise in p-InAsSbP/n-InAs infrared photodiodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyakonova, N.; Karandashev, S. A.; Levinshtein, M. E.; Matveev, B. A.; Remennyi, M. A.

    2018-06-01

    We report the first experimental study of low-frequency noise in p-InAsSbP/n-InAs infrared photodiodes. For forward bias, experiments have been carried out at 300 and 77 K, in the photovoltaic regime the measurements have been done at 300 K. At room temperature the current noise spectral density, SI , exhibits the ∼1/f frequency dependence. For low currents, I ≤ I 0 ∼ 4 × 10‑5 A, S I is proportional to I 2, at higher currents this dependence changes to S I ∼ I. At 77 K the noise spectral density is significantly higher than at 300 K, and Lorentzian contributions to noise are observed. The current dependences of spectral noise density can be approximately described as S I ∼ I 1.5 and show particularities suggesting the contribution of defects.

  1. An acoustic vector based approach to locate low frequency noise sources in 3D

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bree, H.-E. de; Ostendorf, C.; Basten, T.

    2009-01-01

    Although low frequency noise is an issue of huge societal importance, traditional acoustic testing methods have limitations in finding the low frequency source. It is hard to determine the direction of the noise using traditional microphones. Three dimensional sound probes capturing the particle

  2. An investigation of twenty-one cases of low-frequency noise complaints

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Christian Sejer; Møller, Henrik; Persson-Waye, Kerstin

    2007-01-01

    Twenty-one cases of low-frequency noise complaints were thoroughly investigated with the aim of answering the question whether it is real physical sound or low-frequency tinnitus that causes the annoyance. Noise recordings were made in the homes of the complainants taking the spatial variation...

  3. Low frequency noise and air vibration generated by a simple cycle gas turbine installation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giesbrecht, C.; Hertil, S. [ATCO Noise Management, Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2005-07-01

    Low-frequency noise refers to infrasound whose frequency is lower than the minimum human audible frequency of about 20 Hz. Recently, there have been serious complaints on noise pollution in the frequency range of 1-100 Hz. This presentation outlined ASHRAE noise criteria regions and discussed human perceptions to vibration. It also presented methods that ATCO used for measuring noise at a simple gas turbine installation, inside the site at the administration buildings, at the paths of vibration and noise propagation, and at noise sensitive receptors. A 70 dBC at the closes noise-sensitive receptor was used as a noise limit to minimize annoyance. In addition, 96 dBC was measured at 400 feet. It was noted that reducing the C-weighted sound level depends on reducing the stack noise emissions in the 16 and 31.5 band levels. ATCO evaluated silencer designs and recommended reactive silencers to achieve a 10 dB reduction in noise emitted by the 3 exhaust stacks. 6 figs.

  4. Continuous exposure to low-frequency noise and carbon disulfide: Combined effects on hearing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venet, Thomas; Carreres-Pons, Maria; Chalansonnet, Monique; Thomas, Aurélie; Merlen, Lise; Nunge, Hervé; Bonfanti, Elodie; Cosnier, Frédéric; Llorens, Jordi; Campo, Pierre

    2017-09-01

    Carbon disulfide (CS 2 ) is used in industry; it has been shown to have neurotoxic effects, causing central and distal axonopathies.However, it is not considered cochleotoxic as it does not affect hair cells in the organ of Corti, and the only auditory effects reported in the literature were confined to the low-frequency region. No reports on the effects of combined exposure to low-frequency noise and CS 2 have been published to date. This article focuses on the effects on rat hearing of combined exposure to noise with increasing concentrations of CS 2 (0, 63,250, and 500ppm, 6h per day, 5 days per week, for 4 weeks). The noise used was a low-frequency noise ranging from 0.5 to 2kHz at an intensity of 106dB SPL. Auditory function was tested using distortion product oto-acoustic emissions, which mainly reflects the cochlear performances. Exposure to noise alone caused an auditory deficit in a frequency area ranging from 3.6 to 6 kHz. The damaged area was approximately one octave (6kHz) above the highest frequency of the exposure noise (2.8kHz); it was a little wider than expected based on the noise spectrum.Consequently, since maximum hearing sensitivity is located around 8kHz in rats, low-frequency noise exposure can affect the cochlear regions detecting mid-range frequencies. Co-exposure to CS 2 (250-ppm and over) and noise increased the extent of the damaged frequency window since a significant auditory deficit was measured at 9.6kHz in these conditions.Moreover, the significance at 9.6kHz increased with the solvent concentrations. Histological data showed that neither hair cells nor ganglion cells were damaged by CS 2 . This discrepancy between functional and histological data is discussed. Like most aromatic solvents, carbon disulfide should be considered as a key parameter in hearing conservation régulations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Band-gap tunable dielectric elastomer filter for low frequency noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Kun; Wang, Mian; Lu, Tongqing; Zhang, Jinhua; Wang, Tiejun

    2016-05-01

    In the last decades, diverse materials and technologies for sound insulation have been widely applied in engineering. However, suppressing the noise radiation at low frequency still remains a challenge. In this work, a novel membrane-type smart filter, consisting of a pre-stretched dielectric elastomer membrane with two compliant electrodes coated on the both sides, is presented to control the low frequency noise. Since the stiffness of membrane dominates its acoustic properties, sound transmission band-gap of the membrane filter can be tuned by adjusting the voltage applied to the membrane. The impedance tube experiments have been carried out to measure the sound transmission loss (STL) of the filters with different electrodes, membrane thickness and pre-stretch conditions. The experimental results show that the center frequency of sound transmission band-gap mainly depends on the stress in the dielectric elastomer, and a large band-gap shift (more than 60 Hz) can be achieved by tuning the voltage applied to the 85 mm diameter VHB4910 specimen with pre-stretch {λ }0=3. Based on the experimental results and the assumption that applied electric field is independent of the membrane behavior, 3D finite element analysis has also been conducted to calculate the membrane stress variation. The sound filter proposed herein may provide a promising facility to control low frequency noise source with tonal characteristics.

  6. Nanoscale MOS devices: device parameter fluctuations and low-frequency noise (Invited Paper)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Hei; Iwai, Hiroshi; Liou, J. J.

    2005-05-01

    It is well-known in conventional MOS transistors that the low-frequency noise or flicker noise is mainly contributed by the trapping-detrapping events in the gate oxide and the mobility fluctuation in the surface channel. In nanoscale MOS transistors, the number of trapping-detrapping events becomes less important because of the large direct tunneling current through the ultrathin gate dielectric which reduces the probability of trapping-detrapping and the level of leakage current fluctuation. Other noise sources become more significant in nanoscale devices. The source and drain resistance noises have greater impact on the drain current noise. Significant contribution of the parasitic bipolar transistor noise in ultra-short channel and channel mobility fluctuation to the channel noise are observed. The channel mobility fluctuation in nanoscale devices could be due to the local composition fluctuation of the gate dielectric material which gives rise to the permittivity fluctuation along the channel and results in gigantic channel potential fluctuation. On the other hand, the statistical variations of the device parameters across the wafer would cause the noise measurements less accurate which will be a challenge for the applicability of analytical flicker noise model as a process or device evaluation tool for nanoscale devices. Some measures for circumventing these difficulties are proposed.

  7. Low frequency noise peak near magnon emission energy in magnetic tunnel junctions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Liang; Xiang, Li; Guo, Huiqiang; Wei, Jian, E-mail: weijian6791@pku.edu.cn [International Center for Quantum Materials, School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871, China and Collaborative Innovation Center of Quantum Matter, Beijing (China); Li, D. L.; Yuan, Z. H.; Feng, J. F., E-mail: jiafengfeng@iphy.ac.cn; Han, X. F. [Beijing National Laboratory of Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Coey, J. M. D. [CRANN and School of Physics, Trinity College, Dublin 2 (Ireland)

    2014-12-15

    We report on the low frequency (LF) noise measurements in magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) below 4 K and at low bias, where the transport is strongly affected by scattering with magnons emitted by hot tunnelling electrons, as thermal activation of magnons from the environment is suppressed. For both CoFeB/MgO/CoFeB and CoFeB/AlO{sub x}/CoFeB MTJs, enhanced LF noise is observed at bias voltage around magnon emission energy, forming a peak in the bias dependence of noise power spectra density, independent of magnetic configurations. The noise peak is much higher and broader for unannealed AlO{sub x}-based MTJ, and besides Lorentzian shape noise spectra in the frequency domain, random telegraph noise (RTN) is visible in the time traces. During repeated measurements the noise peak reduces and the RTN becomes difficult to resolve, suggesting defects being annealed. The Lorentzian shape noise spectra can be fitted with bias-dependent activation of RTN, with the attempt frequency in the MHz range, consistent with magnon dynamics. These findings suggest magnon-assisted activation of defects as the origin of the enhanced LF noise.

  8. Low frequency noise peak near magnon emission energy in magnetic tunnel junctions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Liu

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available We report on the low frequency (LF noise measurements in magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs below 4 K and at low bias, where the transport is strongly affected by scattering with magnons emitted by hot tunnelling electrons, as thermal activation of magnons from the environment is suppressed. For both CoFeB/MgO/CoFeB and CoFeB/AlOx/CoFeB MTJs, enhanced LF noise is observed at bias voltage around magnon emission energy, forming a peak in the bias dependence of noise power spectra density, independent of magnetic configurations. The noise peak is much higher and broader for unannealed AlOx-based MTJ, and besides Lorentzian shape noise spectra in the frequency domain, random telegraph noise (RTN is visible in the time traces. During repeated measurements the noise peak reduces and the RTN becomes difficult to resolve, suggesting defects being annealed. The Lorentzian shape noise spectra can be fitted with bias-dependent activation of RTN, with the attempt frequency in the MHz range, consistent with magnon dynamics. These findings suggest magnon-assisted activation of defects as the origin of the enhanced LF noise.

  9. Seabed Scattering from Low Frequency Reverberation Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-30

    attenuation are consistent with the SAX99 measurement at 25 Hz and 1000 Hz. The results are helpful for the analysis of shear wave effects on long-range...answers to the second question. Carey et al. hypothesized that “The discrepancy can be explained because the inverse analysis inferences were made with the...introduced by an imaginary ideal pressure- release boundary located a distance of P= 4p wavelength below the true seabed boundary, i.e., a “hidden depth” DH

  10. Low-frequency noise in single electron tunneling transistor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tavkhelidze, A.N.; Mygind, Jesper

    1998-01-01

    The noise in current biased aluminium single electron tunneling (SET) transistors has been investigated in the frequency range of 5 mHz ..., we find the same input charge noise, typically QN = 5 × 10–4 e/Hz1/2 at 10 Hz, with and without the HF shielding. At lower frequencies, the noise is due to charge trapping, and the voltage noise pattern superimposed on the V(Vg) curve (voltage across transistor versus gate voltage) strongly depends...... when ramping the junction voltage. Dynamic trapping may limit the high frequency applications of the SET transistor. Also reported on are the effects of rf irradiation and the dependence of the SET transistor noise on bias voltage. ©1998 American Institute of Physics....

  11. Effects on Performance and Work Quality due to Low Frequency Ventilation Noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persson Waye, K.; Rylander, R.; Benton, S.; Leventhall, H. G.

    1997-08-01

    A pilot study was carried out to assess method evaluating effects of low frequency noise on performance. Of special interest was to study objective and subjective effects over time. Two ventilation noises were used, one of a predominantly mid frequency character and the other of a predominantly low frequency character. Both had an NC value of 35. For the study, 50 students were recruited and 30 selected on the basis of subjective reports of pressure on the eardrum after exposure to a low frequency noise. Of these, 14 randomly selected subjects aged 21 and 34 took part. The subjects performed three computerized cognitive tests in the mid frequency or the low frequency noise condition alternatively. Tests I and II were performed together with a secondary task.Questionnaires were used to evaluate subjective symptoms, effects on mood and estimated interference with the test results due to temperature, light and noise. The results showed that the subjective estimations of noise interference with performance were higher for the low frequency noise (psocial orientation (pstudied. The results further indicate that the NC curves do not fully assess the negative effects of low frequency noise on work performance.

  12. Subjective evaluation of noise from neighbours with focus on low frequencies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Frank Rysgaard

    1999-01-01

    There is a growing tendency to use lightweight constructions in the building industry. One unwanted side effect of this tendency is poor sound insulation at low frequencies. The purpose of this investigation has been to examine the subjective effects of the resulting increase of low frequency noise...

  13. Potential health effects of standing waves generated by low frequency noise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanislav Ziaran

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The main aim is to present the available updated knowledge regarding the potential health effects of standing waves generated by low frequency noise (LFN from an open window in a moving car where the negative effects of LFN induced by heating components and/or heating, ventilation and air-conditioning are assessed. Furthermore, the assessment of noise in chosen enclosed spaces, such as rooms, offices, and classrooms, or other LFN sources and their effect on the human being were investigated. These types of noise are responsible for disturbance during relaxation, sleep, mental work, education, and concentration, which may reflect negatively on the comfort and health of the population and on the mental state of people such as scientific staff and students. The assessment points out the most exposed areas, and analyzes the conditions of standing wave generation in these rooms caused by outdoor and/or indoor sources. Measurements were made for three different enclosed spaces (office, flat, and passenger car and sources (traffic specific noise at intersections, noise induced by pipe vibration, and aerodynamic noise and their operating conditions. For the detection of LFN, the A-weighted sound pressure level and vibration were measured and a fast Fourier transform analysis was used. The LFN sources are specified and the direct effects on the human are reported. Finally, this paper suggests the possibilities for the assessment of LFN and some possible measures that can be taken to prevent or reduce them.

  14. Schottky barrier parameters and low frequency noise characteristics of graphene-germanium Schottky barrier diode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khurelbaatar, Zagarzusem; Kil, Yeon-Ho; Shim, Kyu-Hwan; Cho, Hyunjin; Kim, Myung-Jong; Lee, Sung-Nam; Jeong, Jae-chan; Hong, Hyobong; Choi, Chel-Jong

    2016-03-01

    We investigated the electrical properties of chemical vapor deposition-grown monolayer graphene/n-type germanium (Ge) Schottky barrier diodes (SBD) using current-voltage (I-V) characteristics and low frequency noise measurements. The Schottky barrier parameters of graphene/n-type Ge SBDs, such as Schottky barrier height (VB), ideality factor (n), and series resistance (Rs), were extracted using the forward I-V and Cheung's methods. The VB and n extracted from the forward ln(I)-V plot were found to be 0.63 eV and 1.78, respectively. In contrast, from Cheung method, the VB and n were calculated to be 0.53 eV and 1.76, respectively. Such a discrepancy between the values of VB calculated from the forward I-V and Cheung's methods indicated a deviation from the ideal thermionic emission of graphene/n-type Ge SBD associated with the voltage drop across graphene. The low frequency noise measurements performed at the frequencies in the range of 10 Hz-1 kHz showed that the graphene/n-type Ge SBD had 1/f γ frequency dependence, with γ ranging from 1.09 to 1.12, regardless of applied forward biases. Similar to forward-biased SBDs operating in the thermionic emission mode, the current noise power spectral density of graphene/n-type Ge SBD was linearly proportional to the forward current.

  15. Decoherence in qubits due to low-frequency noise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergli, J; Galperin, Y M; Altshuler, B L

    2009-01-01

    The efficiency of the future devices for quantum information processing will be limited mostly by the finite decoherence rates of the qubits. Recently, substantial progress was achieved in enhancing the time within which a solid-state qubit demonstrates coherent dynamics. This progress is based mostly on a successful isolation of the qubits from external decoherence sources. Under these conditions, the material-inherent sources of noise start to play a crucial role. In most cases, the noise that the quantum device demonstrates has a 1/f spectrum. This suggests that the environment that destroys the phase coherence of the qubit can be thought of as a system of two-state fluctuators, which experience random hops between their states. In this short review, the current state of the theory of the decoherence due to the qubit interaction with the fluctuators is discussed. The effect of such an environment on two different protocols of the qubit manipulations, free induction and echo signal, is described. It turns out that in many important cases the noise produced by the fluctuators is non-Gaussian. Consequently, the results of the interaction of the qubit with the fluctuators are not determined by the pair correlation function alone. We describe the effect of the fluctuators using the so-called spin-fluctuator model. Being quite realistic, this model allows one to exactly evaluate the qubit dynamics in the presence of one fluctuator. This solution is found, and its features, including non-Gaussian effects, are analyzed in detail. We extend this consideration to systems of large numbers of fluctuators, which interact with the qubit and lead to the 1/f noise. We discuss existing experiments on the Josephson qubit manipulation and try to identify non-Gaussian behavior.

  16. Annoyance of Low Frequency Noise (LFN) in the laboratory assessed by LFN-sufferers and non-sufferers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Torben

    2003-01-01

    In a series of listening tests, test subjects listened to eight different environmental low frequency noises to evaluate their loudness and annoyance. The noises were continuous noise with and without tones, intermittent noise, music, traffic noise and low frequency noises with an impulsive...

  17. On low-frequency errors of uniformly modulated filtered white-noise models for ground motions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safak, Erdal; Boore, David M.

    1988-01-01

    Low-frequency errors of a commonly used non-stationary stochastic model (uniformly modulated filtered white-noise model) for earthquake ground motions are investigated. It is shown both analytically and by numerical simulation that uniformly modulated filter white-noise-type models systematically overestimate the spectral response for periods longer than the effective duration of the earthquake, because of the built-in low-frequency errors in the model. The errors, which are significant for low-magnitude short-duration earthquakes, can be eliminated by using the filtered shot-noise-type models (i. e. white noise, modulated by the envelope first, and then filtered).

  18. Subjective annoyance caused by indoor low-level and low frequency noise and control method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DI Guo-qing; ZHANG Bang-jun; SHANG Qi

    2005-01-01

    The influence of low-level noise has not been widely noticed. This paper discovered that low-level and low frequency noise(Aweighted equivalent level Leq < 45 dB) causes higher probability of subjective annoyance. The fuzzy mathematic principle was applied to deal with the threshold level of subjective annoyance from noise in this study; there is preferable relationship between the indoor noise and noise annoyance at low frequency noise level. Study indicated at the same centered noise level, the change of annoyance probability is mainly caused by the change of the frequency spectrum characteristic of the indoor noise. Under low noise level environment, without change of the medium-low frequency noise, the slight increase of medium-high frequency noise level with the help of noise sheltering effect can significantly reduce the noise annoyance. This discovery brings a new resolution on how to improve the environmental quality of working or living places. A noise control model is given in this study according to the acoustic analysis.

  19. Effects of large pressure amplitude low frequency noise in the parotid gland perivasculo-ductal connective tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Pedro; Brito, José; Mendes, João; da Fonseca, Jorge; Águas, Artur; Martins dos Santos, José

    2013-01-01

    In tissues and organs exposed to large pressure amplitude low frequency noise fibrosis occurs in the absence of inflammatory signs, which is thought to be a protective response. In the parotid gland the perivasculo-ductal connective tissue surrounds arteries, veins and the ductal tree. Perivasculo-ductal connective tissue is believed to function as a mechanical stabilizer of the glandular tissue. In order to quantify the proliferation of perivasculo-ductal connective tissue in large pressure amplitude low frequency noise-exposed rats we used sixty Wistar rats which were equally divided into 6 groups. One group kept in silence, and the remaining five exposed to continuous large pressure amplitude low frequency noise: g1-168h (1 week); g2-504h (3 weeks); g3-840h (5 weeks); g4-1512h (9 weeks); and g5-2184h (13 weeks). After exposure, parotid glands were removed and the perivasculo-ductal connective tissue area was measured in all groups. We applied ANOVA statistical analysis, using SPSS 13.0. The global trend is an increase in the average perivasculo-ductal connective tissue areas, that develops linearly and significantly with large pressure amplitude low frequency noise exposure time (p connective tissue. Hence, these results show that in response to large pressure amplitude low frequency noise exposure, rat parotid glands increase their perivasculo-ductal connective tissue.

  20. Nonlinear Microstructured Material to Reduce Noise and Vibrations at Low Frequencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lavazec, Deborah; Cumunel, Gwendal; Duhamel, Denis; Soize, Christian; Batou, Anas

    2016-01-01

    At low frequencies, for which the wavelengths are wide, the acoustic waves and the mechanical vibrations cannot easily be reduced in the structures at macroscale by using dissipative materials, contrarily to the middle- and high-frequency ranges. The final objective of this work is to reduce the vibrations and the induced noise on a broad low-frequency band by using a microstructured material by inclusions that are randomly arranged in the material matrix. The dynamical regimes of the inclusions will be imposed in the nonlinear domain in order that the energy be effectively pumped over a broad frequency band around the resonance frequency, due to the nonlinearity. The first step of this work is to design and to analyze the efficiency of an inclusion, which is made up of a hollow frame including a point mass centered on a beam. This inclusion is designed in order to exhibit nonlinear geometric effects in the low-frequency band that is observed. For this first step, the objective is to develop the simplest mechanical model that has the capability to roughly predict the experimental results that are measured. The second step, which is not presented in the paper, will consist in developing a more sophisticated nonlinear dynamical model of the inclusion. In this paper, devoted to the first step, it is proved that the nonlinearity induces an attenuation on a broad frequency band around the resonance, contrarily to its linear behavior for which the attenuation is only active in a narrow frequency band around the resonance. We will present the design in terms of geometry, dimension and materials for the inclusion, the experimental manufacturing of this system realized with a 3D printing system, and the experimental measures that have been performed. We compare the prevision given by the stochastic computational model with the measurements. The results obtained exhibit the physical attenuation over a broad low-frequency band, which were expected. (paper)

  1. Adaptive Feed-Forward Control of Low Frequency Interior Noise

    CERN Document Server

    Kletschkowski, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    This book presents a mechatronic approach to Active Noise Control (ANC). It describes the required elements of system theory, engineering acoustics, electroacoustics and adaptive signal processing in a comprehensive, consistent and systematic manner using a unified notation. Furthermore, it includes a design methodology for ANC-systems, explains its application and describes tools to be used for ANC-system design. From the research point of view, the book presents new approaches to sound source localization in weakly damped interiors. One is based on the inverse finite element method, the other is based on a sound intensity probe with an active free field. Furthermore, a prototype of an ANC-system able to reach the physical limits of local (feed-forward) ANC is described. This is one example for applied research in ANC-system design. Other examples are given for (i) local ANC in a semi-enclosed subspace of an aircraft cargo hold and (ii) for the combination of audio entertainment with ANC.

  2. Spectropolarimetric Observations of Solar Noise Storms at Low Frequencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mugundhan, V.; Ramesh, R.; Kathiravan, C.; Gireesh, G. V. S.; Hegde, Aathira

    2018-03-01

    A new high-resolution radio spectropolarimeter instrument operating in the frequency range of 15 - 85 MHz has recently been commissioned at the Radio Astronomy Field Station of the Indian Institute of Astrophysics at Gauribidanur, 100 km north of Bangalore, India. We describe the design and construction of this instrument. We present observations of a solar radio noise storm associated with Active Region (AR) 12567 in the frequency range of {≈} 15 - 85 MHz during 18 and 19 July 2016, observed using this instrument in the meridian-transit mode. This is the first report that we are aware of in which both the burst and continuum properties are derived simultaneously. Spectral indices and degree of polarization of both the continuum radiation and bursts are estimated. It is found that i) Type I storm bursts have a spectral index of {≈} {+}3.5, ii) the spectral index of the background continuum is ≈+2.9, iii) the transition frequency between Type I and Type III storms occurs at ≈55 MHz, iv) Type III bursts have an average spectral index of ≈-2.7, v) the spectral index of the Type III continuum is ≈-1.6, and vi) the degree of circular polarization of all Type I (Type III) bursts is ≈90% (30%). The results obtained here indicate that the continuum emission is due to bursts occurring in rapid succession. We find that the derived parameters for Type I bursts are consistent with suprathermal electron acceleration theory and those of Type III favor fundamental plasma emission.

  3. Characterisation of hole traps in GaAs Fets by DLTS, low frequency noise and g sub M dispersion methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iqbal, M.A.; Kaya, L.; Jones, B.K.

    1997-01-01

    Deep level effects in GaAs MOSFET have been characterised in the ohmic channel using DLTS, low frequency excess noise and dispersion technique. An isothermal multi exponential curve fitting method has been devised and implanted into the DLTS system. Multi exponential curve fitting method used to decompose a multi exponential transient into its constituents so that the peak signature can be better characterised for the case whereas several peaks are closely spaced. Low frequency excess noise and dispersion techniques also confirm the trap in signature of the same traps observed in the DLTS measurements. (author)

  4. Low-frequency flux noise in YBCO dc SQUIDs cooled in static magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sager, M.P.; Bindslev Hansen, J.; Petersen, P.R.E.; Holst, T.; Shen, Y.Q.

    1999-01-01

    The low-frequency flux noise in bicrystal and step-edge YBa 2 Cu 3 O x dc SQUIDs has been investigated. The width, w, of the superconducting strips forming the SQUID frame was varied from 4 to 42 μm. The SQUIDs were cooled in static magnetic fields up to 150 μT. Two types of low-frequency noise dominated, namely 1/f-like noise and random telegraph noise giving a Lorentzian frequency spectrum. The 1/f noise performance of the w = 4, 6 and 7 μm SQUIDs was almost identical, while the SQUIDs with w = 22 and 42 μm showed an order of magnitude higher noise level. Our analysis of the data suggests an exponential increase of the 1/f noise versus the cooling field, exhibiting a characteristic magnetic field around 40 μT. (author)

  5. Low-Frequency Noise Reduction by Earmuffs with Flax Fibre-Reinforced Polypropylene Ear Cups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linus Yinn Leng Ang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Soldiers and supporting engineers are frequently exposed to high low-frequency (<500 Hz cabin noise in military vehicles. Despite the use of commercial hearing protection devices, the risk of auditory damage is still imminent because the devices may not be optimally customised for such applications. This study considers flax fibre-reinforced polypropylene (Flax-PP as an alternative to the material selection for the ear cups of commercial earmuffs, which are typically made of acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS. Different weaving configurations (woven and nonwoven and various noise environments (pink noise, cabin booming noise, and firing noise were considered to investigate the feasibility of the proposed composite earmuffs for low-frequency noise reduction. The remaining assembly components of the earmuff were kept consistent with those of a commercial earmuff, which served as a benchmark for results comparison. In contrast to the commercial earmuff, the composite earmuffs were shown to be better in mitigating low-frequency noise by up to 16.6 dB, while compromising midfrequency acoustical performance. Consequently, the proposed composite earmuffs may be an alternative for low-frequency noise reduction in vehicle cabins, at airports, and at construction sites involving heavy machineries.

  6. Low-frequency noise characterization of single CuO nanowire gas sensor devices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steinhauer, S.; Köck, A.; Gspan, C.; Grogger, W.; Vandamme, L.K.J.; Pogany, D.

    2015-01-01

    Low-frequency noise properties of single CuO nanowire devices were investigated under gas sensor operation conditions in dry and humid synthetic air at 350¿°C. A 1/f noise spectrum was found with the normalized power spectral density of current fluctuations typically a factor of 2 higher for humid

  7. Individual differences in low-frequency noise perception

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Christian Sejer; Marquardt, Torsten

    2009-01-01

    in the FMETF where the slope changes approx. 6 dB/octave (around 40-65 Hz depending on person). The change in slope is attributed to the shunting effect of the helicotrema. A preliminary study has been carried out in order to see if this resonance feature measured objectively is also found in perceptual data...

  8. Reduced In-Plane, Low Frequency Helicopter Noise of an Active Flap Rotor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sim, Ben W.; Janakiram, Ram D.; Barbely, Natasha L.; Solis, Eduardo

    2009-01-01

    Results from a recent joint DARPA/Boeing/NASA/Army wind tunnel test demonstrated the ability to reduce in-plane, low frequency noise of the full-scale Boeing-SMART rotor using active flaps. Test data reported in this paper illustrated that acoustic energy in the first six blade-passing harmonics could be reduced by up to 6 decibels at a moderate airspeed, level flight condition corresponding to advance ratio of 0.30. Reduced noise levels were attributed to selective active flap schedules that modified in-plane blade airloads on the advancing side of the rotor, in a manner, which generated counteracting acoustic pulses that partially offset the negative pressure peaks associated with in-plane, steady thickness noise. These favorable reduced-noise operating states are a strong function of the active flap actuation amplitude, frequency and phase. The associated noise reductions resulted in reduced aural detection distance by up to 18%, but incurred significant vibratory load penalties due to increased hub shear forces. Small reductions in rotor lift-to-drag ratios, of no more than 3%, were also measured

  9. A study of twenty-one cases of low-frequency noise complaints

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Christian Sejer; Møller, Henrik; Persson-Waye, Kerstin

    2008-01-01

    -frequency tinnitus. Noise recordings were made in the homes of the complainants, and the complainants were exposed to these in blind test listening experiments. Furthermore, the low-frequency hearing function of the complainants was investigated, and characteristics of the annoying sound was matched. The results...... showed that some of the complainants are annoyed by a physical sound (20-180 Hz), while others suffer from low-frequency tinnitus (perceived frequency 40-100 Hz). Physical sound at frequencies below 20 Hz (infrasound) is not responsible for the annoyance - or at all audible - in any of the investigated...... cases, and none of the complainants has extraordinary hearing sensitivity at low frequencies. For comparable cases of low-frequency noise complaints in general, it is anticipated that physical sound is responsible in a substantial part of the cases, while lowfrequency tinnitus is responsible in another...

  10. Static and low frequency noise characterization of ultra-thin body InAs MOSFETs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karatsori, T. A.; Pastorek, M.; Theodorou, C. G.; Fadjie, A.; Wichmann, N.; Desplanque, L.; Wallart, X.; Bollaert, S.; Dimitriadis, C. A.; Ghibaudo, G.

    2018-05-01

    A complete static and low frequency noise characterization of ultra-thin body InAs MOSFETs is presented. Characterization techniques, such as the well-known Y-function method established for Si MOSFETs, are applied in order to extract the electrical parameters and study the behavior of these research grade devices. Additionally, the Lambert-W function parameter extraction methodology valid from weak to strong inversion is also used in order to verify its applicability in these experimental level devices. Moreover, a low-frequency noise characterization of the UTB InAs MOSFETs is presented, revealing carrier trapping/detrapping in slow oxide traps and remote Coulomb scattering as origin of 1/f noise, which allowed for the extraction of the oxide trap areal density. Finally, Lorentzian-like noise is also observed in the sub-micron area devices and attributed to both Random Telegraph Noise from oxide individual traps and g-r noise from the semiconductor interface.

  11. Application of phased array technology for identification of low frequency noise sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hugo E. Camargo; Patricio A. Ravetta; Ricardo A. Burdisso; Adam K. Smith [NIOSH (United States)

    2009-12-15

    A study conducted by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) revealed that 90% of coal miners have hearing impairment by age 50, compared to only 10% of those not exposed to occupational noise. According to the Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA), Continuous Mining Machine (CM) operators account for 30% of workers exposed to noise doses exceeding the Permissible Exposure Level (PEL). In this context, NIOSH is conducting research to identify and control dominant noise sources in CMs. Previous noise source identification was performed using a Bruel & Kjaer (B&K) 1.92-m diameter, 42-microphone phased array. These measurements revealed that the impacts from the conveyor chain onto the tail roller, and the impacts from the conveyor chain onto the upper deck are the dominant noise sources at the tail-section of the CM. The objectives of the work presented in this paper were: (1) To rank the noise radiated by the different sections of the conveyor, and (2) to determine the effect of a urethane-coated tail roller on the noise radiated by the tail-section. This test was conducted using an Acoustical and Vibrations Engineering Consultants (AVEC) 3.5-m diameter, 121-microphone phased array. The results from this new test show that a urethane-coated tail roller yields reductions in the tail-section of 2 to 8 dB in Sound Pressure Level in the frequency range of 1 kHz to 5 kHz. However, integration of the acoustic maps shows that the front-section and mid-section of the conveyor also contain dominant noise sources. Therefore, a urethane-coated tail roller in combination with a chain with urethane-coated flights that reduces the noise sources in the front and mid sections of the conveyor is required to yield a significant noise reduction on the CM operator's overall exposure. These results show the applicability of phased array technology for low frequency noise source identification.

  12. Observations of a low-frequency cutoff in magnetospheric radio noise received on Imp 6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vesecky, J.F.; Frankel, M.S.

    1975-01-01

    Observations of magnetospheric radio noise by the Goddard Space Flight Center radio experiment on the Imp 6 spacecraft have revealed a quasi-continuous component at frequencies between 30 and 110 kHz. When the spacecraft is in the interplanetary medium or the magnetosheath, a low-frequency cutoff often characterizes the otherwise power law (f - /sup alpha/) spectrum of this noise. A positive correlation is observed between this cutoff frequency f) and the solar wind plasma frequency f), deduced from the Los Alamos plasma experiment on the same spacecraft; on the average, f)approx. =1.3f). If one pictures the magnetosheath as a homogeneous layer of plasma lying between the radio noise source (at Lapprox.4--7) and the spacecraft in the interplanetary medium and having an electron density 2--3 times that of the solar wind, then one will expect f)approximately-greater-than2 1 / 2 f)--3 1 / 2 f). Within the limits of experimental error this simple model correctly accounts for the observations. A rough calculation shows that radio wave scattering by electron density fluctuations in the magnetosheath plasma is likely to be important for frequencies below 200 kHz. However, the effects of such scattering cannot be detected in the Imp 6 observations considered here because neither concurrent measurements nor sufficiently accurate models of the necessar []magnetosheath plasma parameters are presently available

  13. The influence of low frequencies on the assessment of noise from neighbours

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rindel, Jens Holger; Rasmussen, Birgit; Nielsen, Jesper Rye

    1996-01-01

    Lightweight building constructions often suffer from insufficient sound insulation at low frequencies. In order to investigate the degree of the problems, a laboratory experiment has been carried out. Twenty test persons have been asked to evaluate series of typical noise from neighbours, ie, two...

  14. Low frequency noise from wind turbines mechanisms of generation and its modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aagaard Madsen, Helge

    2010-01-01

    competitive designs compared with the upwind threebladed rotor. The simulation package comprises an aeroelastic time simulation code HAWC2 and an acoustic low frequency noise (LFN) prediction model. Computed time traces of rotor thrust and rotor torque from the aeroelastic model are input to the acoustic...

  15. Wind Turbine Acoustic Investigation: Infrasound and Low-Frequency Noise--A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrose, Stephen E.; Rand, Robert W.; Krogh, Carmen M. E.

    2012-01-01

    Wind turbines produce sound that is capable of disturbing local residents and is reported to cause annoyance, sleep disturbance, and other health-related impacts. An acoustical study was conducted to investigate the presence of infrasonic and low-frequency noise emissions from wind turbines located in Falmouth, Massachusetts, USA. During the…

  16. Double-gated Si NW FET sensors: Low-frequency noise and photoelectric properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gasparyan, F.; Khondkaryan, H.; Arakelyan, A.; Zadorozhnyi, I.; Pud, S.; Vitusevich, S.

    2016-01-01

    The transport, noise, and photosensitivity properties of an array of silicon nanowire (NW) p"+-p-p"+ field-effect transistors (FETs) are investigated. The peculiarities of photosensitivity and detectivity are analyzed over a wide spectrum range. The absorbance of p-Si NW shifts to the short wavelength region compared with bulk Si. The photocurrent and photosensitivity reach increased values in the UV range of the spectrum at 300 K. It is shown that sensitivity values can be tuned by the drain-source voltage and may reach record values of up to 2–4 A/W at a wavelength of 300 nm at room temperature. Low-frequency noise studies allow calculating the photodetectivity values, which increase with decreasing wavelength down to 300 nm. We show that the drain current of Si NW biochemical sensors substantially depends on pH value and the signal-to-noise ratio reaches the high value of 10"5. Increasing pH sensitivity with gate voltage is revealed for certain source-drain currents of pH-sensors based on Si NW FETs. The noise characteristic index decreases from 1.1 to 0.7 with the growth of the liquid gate voltage. Noise behavior is successfully explained in the framework of the correlated number-mobility unified fluctuation model. pH sensitivity increases as a result of the increase in liquid gate voltage, thus giving the opportunity to measure very low proton concentrations in the electrolyte medium at certain values of the liquid gate voltage.

  17. Decoherence of coupled Josephson charge qubits due to partially correlated low-frequency noise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, Yong; Zhou, Zheng-Wei; Cai, Jian-Ming; Guo, Guang-Can

    2007-01-01

    Josephson charge qubits are promising candidates for scalable quantum computing. However, their performances are strongly degraded by decoherence due to low-frequency background noise, typically with a 1/f spectrum. In this paper, we investigate the decoherence process of two Cooper pair boxes (CPBs) coupled via a capacitor. Going beyond the common and uncorrelated noise models and the Bloch-Redfield formalism of previous works, we study the coupled system's quadratic dephasing under the condition of partially correlated noise sources. Based on reported experiments and generally accepted noise mechanisms, we introduce a reasonable assumption for the noise correlation, with which the calculation of multiqubit decoherence can be simplified to a problem on the single-qubit level. For the conventional Gaussian 1/f noise case, our results demonstrate that the quadratic dephasing rates are not very sensitive to the spatial correlation of the noises. Furthermore, we discuss the feasibility and efficiency of dynamical decoupling in the coupled CPBs

  18. The subjective effect of low frequency content in road traffic noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torija, Antonio J; Flindell, Ian H

    2015-01-01

    Based on subjective listening trials, Torija and Flindell [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 135, 1-4 (2014)] observed that low frequency content in typical urban main road traffic noise appeared to make a smaller contribution to reported annoyance than might be inferred from its objective or physical dominance. This paper reports a more detailed study which was aimed at (i) identifying the difference in sound levels at which low frequency content becomes subjectively dominant over mid and high frequency content and (ii) investigating the relationship between loudness and annoyance under conditions where low frequency content is relatively more dominant, such as indoors where mid and high frequency content is reduced. The results suggested that differences of at least +30 dB between the low frequency and the mid/high frequency content are needed for changes in low frequency content to have as much subjective effect as equivalent changes in mid and high frequency content. This suggests that common criticisms of the A-frequency weighting based on a hypothesized excessive downweighting of the low frequency content may be relatively unfounded in this application area.

  19. The effects of low frequency noise on mental performance and annoyance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alimohammadi, Iraj; Sandrock, Stephan; Gohari, Mahmoud Reza

    2013-08-01

    Low frequency noise (LFN) as background noise in urban and work environments is emitted from many artificial sources such as road vehicles, aircraft, and air movement machinery including wind turbines, compressors, and ventilation or air conditioning units. In addition to objective effects, LFN could also cause noise annoyance and influence mental performance; however, there are no homogenous findings regarding this issue. The purpose of this research was to study the effects of LFN on mental performance and annoyance, as well as to consider the role of extraversion and neuroticism on the issue. This study was conducted on 90 students of Iran University of Medical Sciences (54 males and 36 females). The mean age of the students was 23.46 years (SD = 1.97). Personality traits and noise annoyance were measured by using Eysenck Personality Inventory and a 12-scale self-reported questionnaire, respectively. Stroop and Cognitrone computerized tests measured mental performance of participants each exposed to 50 and 70 dBA of LFN and silence. LFNs were produced by Cool Edit Pro 2.1 software. There was no significant difference between mental performance parameters under 50 and 70 dBA of LFN, whereas there were significant differences between most mental performance parameters in quiet and under LFN (50 and 70 dBA). This research showed that LFN, compared to silence, increased the accuracy and the test performance speed (p  0.01). Introverts conducted the tests faster than extraverts (p mental performance. It seems that LFN has increased arousal level of participants, and extraversion has a considerable impact on mental performance.

  20. Health-based audible noise guidelines account for infrasound and low-frequency noise produced by wind turbines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Robert G; Ashtiani, Payam; Ollson, Christopher A; Whitfield Aslund, Melissa; McCallum, Lindsay C; Leventhall, Geoff; Knopper, Loren D

    2015-01-01

    Setbacks for wind turbines have been established in many jurisdictions to address potential health concerns associated with audible noise. However, in recent years, it has been suggested that infrasound (IS) and low-frequency noise (LFN) could be responsible for the onset of adverse health effects self-reported by some individuals living in proximity to wind turbines, even when audible noise limits are met. The purpose of this paper was to investigate whether current audible noise-based guidelines for wind turbines account for the protection of human health, given the levels of IS and LFN typically produced by wind turbines. New field measurements of indoor IS and outdoor LFN at locations between 400 and 900 m from the nearest turbine, which were previously underrepresented in the scientific literature, are reported and put into context with existing published works. Our analysis showed that indoor IS levels were below auditory threshold levels while LFN levels at distances >500 m were similar to background LFN levels. A clear contribution to LFN due to wind turbine operation (i.e., measured with turbines on in comparison to with turbines off) was noted at a distance of 480 m. However, this corresponded to an increase in overall audible sound measures as reported in dB(A), supporting the hypothesis that controlling audible sound produced by normally operating wind turbines will also control for LFN. Overall, the available data from this and other studies suggest that health-based audible noise wind turbine siting guidelines provide an effective means to evaluate, monitor, and protect potential receptors from audible noise as well as IS and LFN.

  1. Health-Based Audible Noise Guidelines Account for Infrasound and Low-Frequency Noise Produced by Wind Turbines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Robert G.; Ashtiani, Payam; Ollson, Christopher A.; Whitfield Aslund, Melissa; McCallum, Lindsay C.; Leventhall, Geoff; Knopper, Loren D.

    2015-01-01

    Setbacks for wind turbines have been established in many jurisdictions to address potential health concerns associated with audible noise. However, in recent years, it has been suggested that infrasound (IS) and low-frequency noise (LFN) could be responsible for the onset of adverse health effects self-reported by some individuals living in proximity to wind turbines, even when audible noise limits are met. The purpose of this paper was to investigate whether current audible noise-based guidelines for wind turbines account for the protection of human health, given the levels of IS and LFN typically produced by wind turbines. New field measurements of indoor IS and outdoor LFN at locations between 400 and 900 m from the nearest turbine, which were previously underrepresented in the scientific literature, are reported and put into context with existing published works. Our analysis showed that indoor IS levels were below auditory threshold levels while LFN levels at distances >500 m were similar to background LFN levels. A clear contribution to LFN due to wind turbine operation (i.e., measured with turbines on in comparison to with turbines off) was noted at a distance of 480 m. However, this corresponded to an increase in overall audible sound measures as reported in dB(A), supporting the hypothesis that controlling audible sound produced by normally operating wind turbines will also control for LFN. Overall, the available data from this and other studies suggest that health-based audible noise wind turbine siting guidelines provide an effective means to evaluate, monitor, and protect potential receptors from audible noise as well as IS and LFN. PMID:25759808

  2. MD1271: Effect of low frequency noise on the evolution of the emittance and halo population

    CERN Document Server

    Fitterer, Miriam; Valishev, Alexander; Bruce, Roderik; Hofle, Wolfgang; Hostettler, Michi; Papadopoulou, Parthena Stefania; Papotti, Giulia; Papaphilippou, Yannis; Pellegrini, Dario; Trad, Georges; Valuch, Daniel; Valentino, Gianluca; Wagner, Joschka; Cai, Xu; CERN. Geneva. ATS Department

    2018-01-01

    For the High Luminosity upgrade the β* in IR1 and IR5 will be further reduced compared to the current LHC. As the β* decreases the β-functions in the inner triplet (IT) increase resulting in a higher sensitivity of the HL-LHC to ground motion in the IT region or to increases of the low frequency noise. Noise can in general lead to emittance growth and higher halo population and diffusion rate. However, it is usually assumed in the literature that only frequencies close to the betatron frequencies and sidebands have an effect on the emittance and tail population. To test this theory, an MD was carried out to observe if also low frequency noise can lead to emittance growth and stronger halo population and diffusion. This MD conducted on 24.08.2016 follows a previous MD on 05.11.2015/06.11.2015

  3. Effect of low frequency noise on the evolution of the emittance and halo population

    CERN Document Server

    Fitterer, Miriam; Antoniou, Fanouria; Bravin, Enrico; Bruce, Roderik; Fartoukh, Stephane; Fuchsberger, Kajetan; Hofle, Wolfgang; Gasior, Marek; Jaussi, Michael; Jacquet, Delphine; Kotzian, Gerd; Olexa, Jakub; Papadopoulou, Parthena Stefania; Papotti, Giulia; Papaphilippou, Yannis; Redaelli, Stefano; Salvachua Ferrando, Belen Maria; Stancari, Giulio; Trad, Georges; Valuch, Daniel; Valentino, Gianluca; Wagner, Joschka; Wenninger, Jorg; CERN. Geneva. ATS Department

    2016-01-01

    For the High Luminosity upgrade the β* in IR1 and IR5 will be further reduced compared to the current LHC. As the β* decreases the β-functions in the inner triplet (IT) increase resulting in a higher sensitivity of the HL-LHC to ground motion in the IT region or to increases of the low frequency noise. Noise can in general lead to emittance growth and higher halo population and diffusion rate. However, it is usually assumed in the literature that only frequencies close to the betatron frequencies and sidebands have an effect on the emittance and tail population. To test this theory, an MD was carried out to observe if also low frequency noise can lead to emittance growth and stronger halo population and diffusion.

  4. Investigation and reduction of excess low-frequency noise in rf superconducting quantum interference devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueck, M.; Heiden, C.; Clarke, J.

    1994-01-01

    A detailed study has been made of the low-frequency excess noise of rf superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs), fabricated from thin niobium films and operated at 4.2 K, with rf bias frequencies of 0.15, 1.7, and 3 GHz. When the SQUIDs were operated in an open-loop configuration in the absence of low-frequency flux modulation, the demodulated rf voltage exhibited a substantial level 1/f noise, which was essentially independent of the rf bias frequency. As the rf bias frequency was increased, the crossover frequency at which the 1/f noise power was equal to the white noise power moved to higher frequencies, because of the reduction in white noise. On the other hand, when the SQUID was flux modulated at 50 kHz and operated in a flux locked loop, no 1/f noise was observed at frequencies above 0.5 Hz. A detailed description of how the combination of rf bias and flux modulation removes 1/f noise due to critical current fluctuations is given. Thus, the results demonstrate that the 1/f noise observed in these SQUIDs is generated by critical current fluctuations, rather than by the hopping of flux vortices in the niobium films

  5. Low frequency phase signal measurement with high frequency squeezing

    OpenAIRE

    Zhai, Zehui; Gao, Jiangrui

    2011-01-01

    We calculate the utility of high-frequency squeezed-state enhanced two-frequency interferometry for low-frequency phase measurement. To use the high-frequency sidebands of the squeezed light, a two-frequency intense laser is used in the interferometry instead of a single-frequency laser as usual. We find that the readout signal can be contaminated by the high-frequency phase vibration, but this is easy to check and avoid. A proof-of-principle experiment is in the reach of modern quantum optic...

  6. MASER: Measuring, Analysing, Simulating low frequency Radio Emissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cecconi, B.; Le Sidaner, P.; Savalle, R.; Bonnin, X.; Zarka, P. M.; Louis, C.; Coffre, A.; Lamy, L.; Denis, L.; Griessmeier, J. M.; Faden, J.; Piker, C.; André, N.; Genot, V. N.; Erard, S.; King, T. A.; Mafi, J. N.; Sharlow, M.; Sky, J.; Demleitner, M.

    2017-12-01

    The MASER (Measuring, Analysing and Simulating Radio Emissions) project provides a comprehensive infrastructure dedicated to low frequency radio emissions (typically Radioastronomie de Nançay and the CDPP deep archive. These datasets include Cassini/RPWS, STEREO/Waves, WIND/Waves, Ulysses/URAP, ISEE3/SBH, Voyager/PRA, Nançay Decameter Array (Routine, NewRoutine, JunoN), RadioJove archive, swedish Viking mission, Interball/POLRAD... MASER also includes a Python software library for reading raw data.

  7. Low-frequency noise behavior of polysilicon emitter bipolar junction transistors: a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deen, M. Jamal; Pascal, Fabien

    2003-05-01

    For many analog integrated circuit applications, the polysilicon emitter bipolar junction transistor (PE-BJT) is still the preferred choice because of its higher operational frequency and lower noise performance characteristics compared to MOS transistors of similar active areas and at similar biasing currents. In this paper, we begin by motivating the reader with reasons why bipolar transistors are still of great interest for analog integrated circuits. This motivation includes a comparison between BJT and the MOSFET using a simple small-signal equivalent circuit to derive important parameters that can be used to compare these two technologies. An extensive review of the popular theories used to explain low frequency noise results is presented. However, in almost all instances, these theories have not been fully tested. The effects of different processing technologies and conditions on the noise performance of PE-BJTs is reviewed and a summary of some of the key technological steps and device parameters and their effects on noise is discussed. The effects of temperature and emitter geometries scaling is reviewed. It is shown that dispersion of the low frequency noise in ultra-small geometries is a serious issue since the rate of increase of the noise dispersion is faster than the noise itself as the emitter geometry is scaled to smaller values. Finally, some ideas for future research on PE-BJTs, some of which are also applicable to SiGe heteorjunction bipolar transistors and MOSFETs, are presented after the conclusions.

  8. Simulation of low frequency noise from a downwind wind turbine rotor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen Aagaard, Helge; Johansen, Jeppe; Sørensen, Niels N.

    2007-01-01

    in the period from around 1980 to 1990. One of the common characteristics of this low frequency noise, emerging from analysis of the phenomenon, was that the sound pressure level is strongly varying in time. We have investigated this phenomenon using a model package by which the low frequency noise...... to the aero acoustic model. The results for a 5 MW two-bladed turbine with a downwind rotor showed an increase in the sound pressure level of 5-20 dB due to the unsteadiness in the wake caused mainly by vortex shedding. However, in some periods the sound pressure level can increase additionally 0-10 dB when...... the blades directly pass through the discrete shed vortices behind the tower. The present numerical results strongly confirm the experiences with full scale turbines showing big variations of sound pressure level in time due to the wake unsteadiness, as well as a considerable increase in sound pressure level...

  9. Spatial Vertical Directionality and Correlation of Low-Frequency Ambient Noise in Deep Ocean Direct-Arrival Zones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiulong Yang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Wind-driven and distant shipping noise sources contribute to the total noise field in the deep ocean direct-arrival zones. Wind-driven and distant shipping noise sources may significantly and simultaneously affect the spatial characteristics of the total noise field to some extent. In this work, a ray approach and parabolic equation solution method were jointly utilized to model the low-frequency ambient noise field in a range-dependent deep ocean environment by considering their calculation accuracy and efficiency in near-field wind-driven and far-field distant shipping noise fields. The reanalysis databases of National Center of Environment Prediction (NCEP and Volunteer Observation System (VOS were used to model the ambient noise source intensity and distribution. Spatial vertical directionality and correlation were analyzed in three scenarios that correspond to three wind speed conditions. The noise field was dominated by distant shipping noise sources when the wind speed was less than 3 m/s, and then the spatial vertical directionality and vertical correlation of the total noise field were nearly consistent with those of distant shipping noise field. The total noise field was completely dominated by near field wind generated noise sources when the wind speed was greater than 12 m/s at 150 Hz, and then the spatial vertical correlation coefficient and directionality pattern of the total noise field was approximately consistent with that of the wind-driven noise field. The spatial characteristics of the total noise field for wind speeds between 3 m/s and 12 m/s were the weighted results of wind-driven and distant shipping noise fields. Furthermore, the spatial characteristics of low-frequency ambient noise field were compared with the classical Cron/Sherman deep water noise field coherence function. Simulation results with the described modeling method showed good agreement with the experimental measurement results based on the vertical line

  10. Spatial Vertical Directionality and Correlation of Low-Frequency Ambient Noise in Deep Ocean Direct-Arrival Zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Qiulong; Yang, Kunde; Cao, Ran; Duan, Shunli

    2018-01-01

    Wind-driven and distant shipping noise sources contribute to the total noise field in the deep ocean direct-arrival zones. Wind-driven and distant shipping noise sources may significantly and simultaneously affect the spatial characteristics of the total noise field to some extent. In this work, a ray approach and parabolic equation solution method were jointly utilized to model the low-frequency ambient noise field in a range-dependent deep ocean environment by considering their calculation accuracy and efficiency in near-field wind-driven and far-field distant shipping noise fields. The reanalysis databases of National Center of Environment Prediction (NCEP) and Volunteer Observation System (VOS) were used to model the ambient noise source intensity and distribution. Spatial vertical directionality and correlation were analyzed in three scenarios that correspond to three wind speed conditions. The noise field was dominated by distant shipping noise sources when the wind speed was less than 3 m/s, and then the spatial vertical directionality and vertical correlation of the total noise field were nearly consistent with those of distant shipping noise field. The total noise field was completely dominated by near field wind generated noise sources when the wind speed was greater than 12 m/s at 150 Hz, and then the spatial vertical correlation coefficient and directionality pattern of the total noise field was approximately consistent with that of the wind-driven noise field. The spatial characteristics of the total noise field for wind speeds between 3 m/s and 12 m/s were the weighted results of wind-driven and distant shipping noise fields. Furthermore, the spatial characteristics of low-frequency ambient noise field were compared with the classical Cron/Sherman deep water noise field coherence function. Simulation results with the described modeling method showed good agreement with the experimental measurement results based on the vertical line array deployed near

  11. Development of Lightweight, Compact, Structurally-Integrated Acoustic Liners for Broadband Low-Frequency Noise Mitigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambers, Andrew T.

    Airborne noise with a low dominant frequency content (scope of conventional acoustic noise mitigation techniques using liners, foams or claddings owing to mass and volume considerations. Its low evanescence contributes significantly to environmental noise pollution, and unwanted structural vibrations causing diminished efficiency, comfort, payload integrity and mission capabilities. An alternative approach using liner configurations with realistic mass and volume constraints having innovative 'folded' core geometries is investigated to ascertain its low-frequency noise absorption characteristics. In contrast to mass-driven approaches, the folded core approach relies on tailoring interactions between acoustic resonances to tune the liner's impedance to suit the dominant low-frequency content of the source. This allows to keep non-structural mass-addition to a minimum, while retaining an overall thickness comparable to conventional liners for these low-frequency liner designs. The relative acoustic performance of various candidate folded core designs is evaluated by means of a new composite metric termed the Low-Frequency Performance (LFP) factor, which is educed from the absorption coefficient spectrum obtained using Zwikker-Kosten Transmission Line (ZKTL) theory-based numerical studies. An LFP-based software tool is developed to determine optimal 3D cavity packing for a prescribed liner volume and target frequency range. ZKTL-based parametric studies on core dimensions and face sheet porosity are utilized for detailed design of test articles. Experimental verification of absorption coefficient spectra conducted using 3D printed test articles in a normal incidence acoustic impedance tube yield good correlation with simulations. More than 100 Hz of continuous bandwidth with an absorption coefficient greater than 0.6 is shown to be possible in the 300 to 400 Hz range with a 38.1-mm (1.5-inch) thick liner. Further, the influence of face sheet type, Mach number, and

  12. Low-frequency noise properties in Pt-indium gallium zinc oxide Schottky diodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Jiawei; Zhang, Linqing; Ma, Xiaochen; Wilson, Joshua [School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Jin, Jidong [Department of Electrical Engineering and Electronics, University of Liverpool, Liverpool L69 3GJ (United Kingdom); Du, Lulu; Xin, Qian [School of Physics, Shandong University, Jinan 250100 (China); Song, Aimin, E-mail: A.Song@manchester.ac.uk [School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); School of Physics, Shandong University, Jinan 250100 (China)

    2015-08-31

    The low-frequency noise properties of Pt-indium gallium zinc oxide (IGZO) Schottky diodes at different forward biases are investigated. The IGZO layer and Pt contact were deposited by RF sputtering at room temperature. The diode showed an ideality factor of 1.2 and a barrier height of 0.94 eV. The current noise spectral density exhibited 1/f behavior at low frequencies. The analysis of the current dependency of the noise spectral density revealed that for the as-deposited diode, the noise followed Luo's mobility and diffusivity fluctuation model in the thermionic-emission-limited region and Hooge's empirical theory in the series-resistance-limited region. A low Hooge's constant of 1.4 × 10{sup −9} was found in the space-charge region. In the series-resistance-limited region, the Hooge's constant was 2.2 × 10{sup −5}. After annealing, the diode showed degradation in the electrical performance. The interface-trap-induced noise dominated the noise spectrum. By using the random walk model, the interface-trap density was obtained to be 3.6 × 10{sup 15 }eV{sup −1 }cm{sup −2}. This work provides a quantitative approach to analyze the properties of Pt-IGZO interfacial layers. These low noise properties are a prerequisite to the use of IGZO Schottky diodes in switch elements in memory devices, photosensors, and mixer diodes.

  13. Spots of Seismic Danger Extracted by Properties of Low-Frequency Seismic Noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyubushin, Alexey

    2013-04-01

    A new method of seismic danger estimate is presented which is based on using properties of low-frequency seismic noise from broadband networks. Two statistics of noise waveforms are considered: multi-fractal singularity spectrum support width D and minimum normalized entropy En of squared orthogonal wavelet coefficients. The maps of D and En are plotted in the moving time window. Let us call the regions extracted by low values of D and high values of En as "spots of seismic danger" - SSD. Mean values of D and En are strongly anti-correlated - that is why statistics D and En extract the same SSD. Nevertheless their mutual considering is expedient because these parameters are based on different approaches. The physical mechanism which underlies the method is consolidation of small blocks of the Earth's crust into the large one before the strong earthquake. This effect has a consequence that seismic noise does not include spikes which are connected with mutual movements of small blocks. The absence of irregular spikes in the noise follows the decreasing of D and increasing of entropy En. The stability in space and size of the SSD provides estimates of the place and energy of the probable future earthquake. The increasing or decreasing of SSD size and minimum or maximum values of D and En within SSD allows estimate the trend of seismic danger. The method is illustrating by the analysis of seismic noise from broadband seismic network F-net in Japan [1-5]. Statistically significant decreasing of D allowed a hypothesis about approaching Japan to a future seismic catastrophe to be formulated at the middle of 2008. The peculiarities of correlation coefficient estimate within 1 year time window between median values of D and generalized Hurst exponent allowed to make a decision that starting from July of 2010 Japan come to the state of waiting strong earthquake [3]. The method extracted a huge SSD near Japan which includes the region of future Tohoku mega-earthquake and the

  14. Low frequency noise as a control test for spacial solar panels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orsal, B.; Alabedra, R.; Ruas, R.

    1986-07-01

    The present study of low frequency noise in a forward-biased dark solar cell, in order to develop an NDE test method for solar panels, notes that a single cell with a given defect is thus detectable under dark conditions. The test subject was a space solar panel consisting of five cells in parallel and five in series; these cells are of the n(+)-p monocrystalline Si junction type. It is demonstrated that the noise associated with the defective cell is 10-15 times higher than that of a good cell. Replacement of a good cell by a defective one leads to a 30-percent increase in the noise level of the panel as a whole.

  15. Active noise cancellation of low frequency noise propagating in a duct

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farhad Forouharmajd

    2012-01-01

    Conclusions: With regard to the wide range of frequencies of different noise sources, having optimized circumstances in the duct, microphone location on the duct body or even the distance of the speakers may be important in signal processing, noise sampling and anti noise production.

  16. The Influence of High-Frequency Envelope Information on Low-Frequency Vowel Identification in Noise.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wiebke Schubotz

    Full Text Available Vowel identification in noise using consonant-vowel-consonant (CVC logatomes was used to investigate a possible interplay of speech information from different frequency regions. It was hypothesized that the periodicity conveyed by the temporal envelope of a high frequency stimulus can enhance the use of the information carried by auditory channels in the low-frequency region that share the same periodicity. It was further hypothesized that this acts as a strobe-like mechanism and would increase the signal-to-noise ratio for the voiced parts of the CVCs. In a first experiment, different high-frequency cues were provided to test this hypothesis, whereas a second experiment examined more closely the role of amplitude modulations and intact phase information within the high-frequency region (4-8 kHz. CVCs were either natural or vocoded speech (both limited to a low-pass cutoff-frequency of 2.5 kHz and were presented in stationary 3-kHz low-pass filtered masking noise. The experimental results did not support the hypothesized use of periodicity information for aiding low-frequency perception.

  17. The Influence of High-Frequency Envelope Information on Low-Frequency Vowel Identification in Noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schubotz, Wiebke; Brand, Thomas; Kollmeier, Birger; Ewert, Stephan D

    2016-01-01

    Vowel identification in noise using consonant-vowel-consonant (CVC) logatomes was used to investigate a possible interplay of speech information from different frequency regions. It was hypothesized that the periodicity conveyed by the temporal envelope of a high frequency stimulus can enhance the use of the information carried by auditory channels in the low-frequency region that share the same periodicity. It was further hypothesized that this acts as a strobe-like mechanism and would increase the signal-to-noise ratio for the voiced parts of the CVCs. In a first experiment, different high-frequency cues were provided to test this hypothesis, whereas a second experiment examined more closely the role of amplitude modulations and intact phase information within the high-frequency region (4-8 kHz). CVCs were either natural or vocoded speech (both limited to a low-pass cutoff-frequency of 2.5 kHz) and were presented in stationary 3-kHz low-pass filtered masking noise. The experimental results did not support the hypothesized use of periodicity information for aiding low-frequency perception.

  18. A mathematical model of extremely low frequency ocean induced electromagnetic noise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dautta, Manik; Faruque, Rumana Binte; Islam, Rakibul

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic Anomaly Detection (MAD) system uses the principle that ferromagnetic objects disturb the magnetic lines of force of the earth. These lines of force are able to pass through both water and air in similar manners. A MAD system, usually mounted on an aerial vehicle, is thus often employed to confirm the detection and accomplish localization of large ferromagnetic objects submerged in a sea-water environment. However, the total magnetic signal encountered by a MAD system includes contributions from a myriad of low to Extremely Low Frequency (ELF) sources. The goal of the MAD system is to detect small anomaly signals in the midst of these low-frequency interfering signals. Both the Range of Detection (R_d) and the Probability of Detection (P_d) are limited by the ratio of anomaly signal strength to the interfering magnetic noise. In this paper, we report a generic mathematical model to estimate the signal-to-noise ratio or SNR. Since time-variant electro-magnetic signals are affected by conduction losses due to sea-water conductivity and the presence of air-water interface, we employ the general formulation of dipole induced electromagnetic field propagation in stratified media [1]. As a first step we employ a volumetric distribution of isolated elementary magnetic dipoles, each having its own dipole strength and orientation, to estimate the magnetic noise observed by a MAD system. Numerical results are presented for a few realizations out of an ensemble of possible realizations of elementary dipole source distributions.

  19. Investigation and optimization of low-frequency noise performance in readout electronics of dc superconducting quantum interference device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, Jing; Zhang, Yi; Krause, Hans-Joachim; Lee, Yong-Ho

    2014-01-01

    We investigated and optimized the low-frequency noise characteristics of a preamplifier used for readout of direct current superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs). When the SQUID output was detected directly using a room-temperature low-voltage-noise preamplifier, the low-frequency noise of a SQUID system was found to be dominated by the input current noise of the preamplifiers in case of a large dynamic resistance of the SQUID. To reduce the current noise of the preamplifier in the low-frequency range, we investigated the dependence of total preamplifier noise on the collector current and source resistance. When the collector current was decreased from 8.4 mA to 3 mA in the preamplifier made of 3 parallel SSM2220 transistor pairs, the low-frequency total voltage noise of the preamplifier (at 0.1 Hz) decreased by about 3 times for a source resistance of 30 Ω whereas the white noise level remained nearly unchanged. Since the relative contribution of preamplifier's input voltage and current noise is different depending on the dynamic resistance or flux-to-voltage transfer of the SQUID, the results showed that the total noise of a SQUID system at low-frequency range can be improved significantly by optimizing the preamplifier circuit parameters, mainly the collector current in case of low-noise bipolar transistor pairs

  20. Investigation and optimization of low-frequency noise performance in readout electronics of dc superconducting quantum interference device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jing; Zhang, Yi; Lee, Yong-Ho; Krause, Hans-Joachim

    2014-05-01

    We investigated and optimized the low-frequency noise characteristics of a preamplifier used for readout of direct current superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs). When the SQUID output was detected directly using a room-temperature low-voltage-noise preamplifier, the low-frequency noise of a SQUID system was found to be dominated by the input current noise of the preamplifiers in case of a large dynamic resistance of the SQUID. To reduce the current noise of the preamplifier in the low-frequency range, we investigated the dependence of total preamplifier noise on the collector current and source resistance. When the collector current was decreased from 8.4 mA to 3 mA in the preamplifier made of 3 parallel SSM2220 transistor pairs, the low-frequency total voltage noise of the preamplifier (at 0.1 Hz) decreased by about 3 times for a source resistance of 30 Ω whereas the white noise level remained nearly unchanged. Since the relative contribution of preamplifier's input voltage and current noise is different depending on the dynamic resistance or flux-to-voltage transfer of the SQUID, the results showed that the total noise of a SQUID system at low-frequency range can be improved significantly by optimizing the preamplifier circuit parameters, mainly the collector current in case of low-noise bipolar transistor pairs.

  1. Low frequency noise case study : identification and mitigation of a severe infrasonic tone from a mine shaft ventilation fan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stevens, R.D. [HGC Engineering, Mississauga, ON (Canada)

    2007-07-01

    This paper presented a solution for a severe low frequency infrasound problem experienced at a home near a large mine shaft ventilation fan in Dallas, West Virginia. Strong low frequency acoustic pulsations were detected as far as 200 metres from the fan. HGC Engineering was retained by the coal mine company to investigate the source of the problem and to find solutions. Controlling low frequency sound is a challenge because the wavelengths of sound are long at low frequencies. The relatively high level of acoustic energy of a low frequency sound or infrasound that is loud enough to be heard also presents a problem for noise control. In order to be effective, low frequency noise control measures must usually be large, bulky and expensive. In this study, HGC Engineering readily identified acoustic pulsations in the order of 75 dB at 15 Hz outside the residences. At 15 Hz, the infrasound was not audible at the residence, but was causing rattling of lightweight furnishings inside the home. The measured sound pressure level at 15 Hz was approximately 10 dB greater than the onset of risk for rattling and perceptible vibration. The vibration was also perceptible on the walls and windows of the dwellings. The vibration of the dwelling structure had a high measured coherence with the air-borne pulsations at 15 Hz, suggesting that the vibration was induced by the air-borne infrasonic pulsations. HGC Engineering determined that 15 Hz corresponded to the rotational speed of the fan. A reduction of 15 dB at 15 Hz was targeted, in order to reduce the perceptibility and risk of rattling at the residence. A tuned acoustic plenum was considered to be a viable method to silence the fan. In order to investigate the effectiveness of this approach, HGC Engineering conducted a preliminary analytical design and parametric study of an acoustic plenum tuned to 15 Hz. An analytical model was developed to determine the acoustic behaviour of the plenum. In addition, a numerical boundary

  2. Localized, Non-Harmonic Active Flap Motions for Low Frequency In-Plane Rotor Noise Reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sim, Ben W.; Potsdam, Mark; Kitaplioglu, Cahit; LeMasurier, Philip; Lorber, Peter; Andrews, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    A first-of-its-kind demonstration of the use of localized, non-harmonic active flap motions, for suppressing low frequency, in-plane rotor noise, is reported in this paper. Operational feasibility is verified via testing of the full-scale AATD/Sikorsky/UTRC active flap demonstration rotor in the NFAC's 40- by 80-Foot anechoic wind tunnel. Effectiveness of using localized, non-harmonic active flap motions are compared to conventional four-per-rev harmonic flap motions, and also active flap motions derived from closed-loop acoustics implementations. All three approaches resulted in approximately the same noise reductions over an in-plane three-by-three microphone array installed forward and near in-plane of the rotor in the nearfield. It is also reported that using an active flap in this localized, non-harmonic manner, resulted in no more that 2% rotor performance penalty, but had the tendency to incur higher hub vibration levels.

  3. Research Plans for Improving Understanding of Effects of Very Low-Frequency Noise of Heavy Lift Rotorcraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fidell, Sanford; Horonieff, Richard D.; Schmitz, Fredric H.

    2010-01-01

    This report reviews the English-language technical literature on infrasonic and low-frequency noise effects; identifies the most salient effects of noise produced by a future large civil tiltrotor aircraft on crew, passengers, and communities near landing areas; and recommends research needed to improve understanding of the effects of such noise on passengers, crew, and residents of areas near landing pads.

  4. Measurement of Noise in Supercapacitors

    OpenAIRE

    Szewczyk Arkadiusz

    2017-01-01

    A developed method and measurement setup for measurement of noise generated in a supercapacitor is presented. The requirements for noise data recording are considered and correlated with working modes of supercapacitors. An example of results of low-frequency noise measurements in commercially available supercapacitors are presented. The ability of flicker noise measurements suggests that they can be used to assess quality of tested supercapacitors.

  5. Measurement of Noise in Supercapacitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szewczyk Arkadiusz

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available A developed method and measurement setup for measurement of noise generated in a supercapacitor is presented. The requirements for noise data recording are considered and correlated with working modes of supercapacitors. An example of results of low-frequency noise measurements in commercially available supercapacitors are presented. The ability of flicker noise measurements suggests that they can be used to assess quality of tested supercapacitors.

  6. A mathematical model of extremely low frequency ocean induced electromagnetic noise

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dautta, Manik, E-mail: manik.dautta@anyeshan.com; Faruque, Rumana Binte, E-mail: rumana.faruque@anyeshan.com; Islam, Rakibul, E-mail: rakibul.islam@anyeshan.com [Research & Development Engineer, Anyeshan Limited, Dhaka (Bangladesh)

    2016-07-12

    Magnetic Anomaly Detection (MAD) system uses the principle that ferromagnetic objects disturb the magnetic lines of force of the earth. These lines of force are able to pass through both water and air in similar manners. A MAD system, usually mounted on an aerial vehicle, is thus often employed to confirm the detection and accomplish localization of large ferromagnetic objects submerged in a sea-water environment. However, the total magnetic signal encountered by a MAD system includes contributions from a myriad of low to Extremely Low Frequency (ELF) sources. The goal of the MAD system is to detect small anomaly signals in the midst of these low-frequency interfering signals. Both the Range of Detection (R{sub d}) and the Probability of Detection (P{sub d}) are limited by the ratio of anomaly signal strength to the interfering magnetic noise. In this paper, we report a generic mathematical model to estimate the signal-to-noise ratio or SNR. Since time-variant electro-magnetic signals are affected by conduction losses due to sea-water conductivity and the presence of air-water interface, we employ the general formulation of dipole induced electromagnetic field propagation in stratified media [1]. As a first step we employ a volumetric distribution of isolated elementary magnetic dipoles, each having its own dipole strength and orientation, to estimate the magnetic noise observed by a MAD system. Numerical results are presented for a few realizations out of an ensemble of possible realizations of elementary dipole source distributions.

  7. Low-frequency 1/f noise in MoS2 transistors: Relative contributions of the channel and contacts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Renteria, J.; Jiang, C.; Samnakay, R.; Rumyantsev, S. L.; Goli, P.; Balandin, A. A.; Shur, M. S.

    2014-01-01

    We report on the results of the low-frequency (1/f, where f is frequency) noise measurements in MoS 2 field-effect transistors revealing the relative contributions of the MoS 2 channel and Ti/Au contacts to the overall noise level. The investigation of the 1/f noise was performed for both as fabricated and aged transistors. It was established that the McWhorter model of the carrier number fluctuations describes well the 1/f noise in MoS 2 transistors, in contrast to what is observed in graphene devices. The trap densities extracted from the 1/f noise data for MoS 2 transistors, are 2 × 10 19  eV −1 cm −3 and 2.5 × 10 20  eV −1 cm −3 for the as fabricated and aged devices, respectively. It was found that the increase in the noise level of the aged MoS 2 transistors is due to the channel rather than the contact degradation. The obtained results are important for the proposed electronic applications of MoS 2 and other van der Waals materials

  8. Low-frequency 1/f noise in MoS{sub 2} transistors: Relative contributions of the channel and contacts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Renteria, J.; Jiang, C. [Nano-Device Laboratory, Department of Electrical Engineering, Bourns College of Engineering, University of California – Riverside, Riverside, California 92521 (United States); Samnakay, R. [Materials Science and Engineering Program, Bourns College of Engineering, University of California – Riverside, Riverside, California 92521 (United States); Rumyantsev, S. L. [Department of Electrical, Computer, and Systems Engineering, Center for Integrated Electronics, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, New York 12180 (United States); Ioffe Physical-Technical Institute, St. Petersburg 194021 (Russian Federation); Goli, P.; Balandin, A. A., E-mail: balandin@ee.ucr.edu [Nano-Device Laboratory, Department of Electrical Engineering, Bourns College of Engineering, University of California – Riverside, Riverside, California 92521 (United States); Materials Science and Engineering Program, Bourns College of Engineering, University of California – Riverside, Riverside, California 92521 (United States); Shur, M. S. [Department of Electrical, Computer, and Systems Engineering, Center for Integrated Electronics, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, New York 12180 (United States)

    2014-04-14

    We report on the results of the low-frequency (1/f, where f is frequency) noise measurements in MoS{sub 2} field-effect transistors revealing the relative contributions of the MoS{sub 2} channel and Ti/Au contacts to the overall noise level. The investigation of the 1/f noise was performed for both as fabricated and aged transistors. It was established that the McWhorter model of the carrier number fluctuations describes well the 1/f noise in MoS{sub 2} transistors, in contrast to what is observed in graphene devices. The trap densities extracted from the 1/f noise data for MoS{sub 2} transistors, are 2 × 10{sup 19} eV{sup −1}cm{sup −3} and 2.5 × 10{sup 20} eV{sup −1}cm{sup −3} for the as fabricated and aged devices, respectively. It was found that the increase in the noise level of the aged MoS{sub 2} transistors is due to the channel rather than the contact degradation. The obtained results are important for the proposed electronic applications of MoS{sub 2} and other van der Waals materials.

  9. Low-frequency 1/f noise in MoS2 transistors: Relative contributions of the channel and contacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renteria, J.; Samnakay, R.; Rumyantsev, S. L.; Jiang, C.; Goli, P.; Shur, M. S.; Balandin, A. A.

    2014-04-01

    We report on the results of the low-frequency (1/f, where f is frequency) noise measurements in MoS2 field-effect transistors revealing the relative contributions of the MoS2 channel and Ti/Au contacts to the overall noise level. The investigation of the 1/f noise was performed for both as fabricated and aged transistors. It was established that the McWhorter model of the carrier number fluctuations describes well the 1/f noise in MoS2 transistors, in contrast to what is observed in graphene devices. The trap densities extracted from the 1/f noise data for MoS2 transistors, are 2 × 1019 eV-1cm-3 and 2.5 × 1020 eV-1cm-3 for the as fabricated and aged devices, respectively. It was found that the increase in the noise level of the aged MoS2 transistors is due to the channel rather than the contact degradation. The obtained results are important for the proposed electronic applications of MoS2 and other van der Waals materials.

  10. Liquid-phase exfoliated graphene self-assembled films: Low-frequency noise and thermal-electric characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tubon Usca, G.; Hernandez-Ambato, J.; Pace, C.; Caputi, L.S.; Tavolaro, A.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Graphene was exfoliated in liquid phase also in the presence of zeolite 4A. • Films were obtained by drop-casting. • SEM, Raman, low-frequency noise and thermal electric measurements show that the presence of zeolite improves the quality of the FLG films. - Abstract: In few years, graphene has become a revolutionary material, leading not only to applications in various fields such as electronics, medicine and environment, but also to the production of new types of 2D materials. In this work, Liquid Phase Exfoliation (LPE) was applied to natural graphite by brief sonication or mixer treatment in suitable solvents, in order to produce Few Layers Graphene (FLG) suspensions. Additionally, zeolite 4A (Z4A) was added during the production of FLG flakes-based inks, with the aim of aiding the exfoliation process. Conductive films were obtained by drop casting three types of suspensions over Al 2 O 3 substrates with interdigitated electrodes, with total channel surface of 1.39 mm 2 . The morphology characterization resulted in the verification of the presence of thin self-assembled flakes. Raman studies gave evidence of 4 to 10 layers graphene flakes. Electrical measurements were performed to state the Low-Frequency Noise and Thermal-Electric characteristics of the samples. We observe interesting relations between sample preparation procedures and electrical properties.

  11. Simultaneously Suppressing Low-Frequency and Relaxation Oscillation Intensity Noise in a DBR Single-Frequency Phosphate Fiber Laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiao Yu; Li Can; Xu Shan-Hui; Feng Zhou-Ming; Yang Chang-Sheng; Zhao Qi-Lai; Yang Zhong-Min

    2015-01-01

    Effective multiple optoelectronic feedback circuits for simultaneously suppressing low-frequency and relaxation oscillation intensity noise in a single-frequency phosphate fiber laser are demonstrated. The forward transfer function, which relates the laser output intensity to the pump modulations, is measured and analyzed. A custom two-path feedback system operating at different frequency bands is designed to adjust the pump current directly. The relative intensity noise is decreased by 20 dB from 0.2 to 5kHz and over 10 dB from 5 to 10 kHz. The relaxation oscillation peak is suppressed by 22 dB. In addition, a long term (24 h) laser instability of less than 0.05% is achieved. (paper)

  12. Low-frequency noise from large wind turbines – additional data and assessment of new Danish regulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Christian Sejer; Møller, Henrik; Pedersen, Steffen

    2012-01-01

    turbines in Denmark. In this study, the data material has been increased to include more data on noise from modern production turbines up to 5 MW. In addition, the new Danish regulations are assessed. The previous result that the relative amount of low-frequency noise is higher for large turbines (> 2 MW...... frequencies, and for several of the investigated large turbines, the one-third-octave band with the highest level is at or below 250 Hz. It is thus beyond any doubt that the low-frequency part of the spectrum plays an important role in the noise at the neighbors. The new Danish regulation is based...

  13. Chronic exposure to low frequency noise at moderate levels causes impaired balance in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haruka Tamura

    Full Text Available We are routinely exposed to low frequency noise (LFN; below 0.5 kHz at moderate levels of 60-70 dB sound pressure level (SPL generated from various sources in occupational and daily environments. LFN has been reported to affect balance in humans. However, there is limited information about the influence of chronic exposure to LFN at moderate levels for balance. In this study, we investigated whether chronic exposure to LFN at a moderate level of 70 dB SPL affects the vestibule, which is one of the organs responsible for balance in mice. Wild-type ICR mice were exposed for 1 month to LFN (0.1 kHz and high frequency noise (HFN; 16 kHz at 70 dB SPL at a distance of approximately 10-20 cm. Behavior analyses including rotarod, beam-crossing and footprint analyses showed impairments of balance in LFN-exposed mice but not in non-exposed mice or HFN-exposed mice. Immunohistochemical analysis showed a decreased number of vestibular hair cells and increased levels of oxidative stress in LFN-exposed mice compared to those in non-exposed mice. Our results suggest that chronic exposure to LFN at moderate levels causes impaired balance involving morphological impairments of the vestibule with enhanced levels of oxidative stress. Thus, the results of this study indicate the importance of considering the risk of chronic exposure to LFN at a moderate level for imbalance.

  14. Characterization of a low frequency magnetic noise from a two stage pulse tube cryocooler

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eshraghi, Mohamad Javad; Sasada, Ichiro; Kim, Jin Mok; Lee, Yong Ho

    2008-01-01

    Magnetic noise of a two stage pulse tube cryocooler(PT) has been measured by a fundamental mode orthogonal fluxgate magnetometer and by a LTS SQUID gradiometer. The magnetometer was installed in a Dewar made of aluminum at 12 cm apart from a section containing magnetic regenerative materials of the PT. The magnetic noise shows a clear peak at 1.8 Hz which is the fundamental frequency of the He gas pumping rate. The 1.8 Hz magnetic noise took a peak, during the cooling process, when the cold stage temperature was at (or close to) 12 K, which resembles the variation of the temperature of the second cold stage of 1.8 Hz. Hence we attributed the main source of this magnetic noise to the temperature dependency of magnetic susceptibility of magnetic regenerative materials such as Er3Ni and HoCu2 used at the second stage. We pointed out that the superconducting magnetic shield by lead sheets reduced the interfering magnetic noise generated from this part. With this scheme, the magnetic noise amplitude measured with the first order gradiometer DROS, mounted in the vicinity of the magnetic regenerator, when the noise amplitude is minimum, which could be found from the fluxgate measurement results, was less than 500 pT peak to peak. Whereas without lead shielding the noise level was higher than the dynamic range of SQUID instrumentations which is around ±10nT. (author)

  15. Prediction and analysis of infra and low-frequency noise of upwind horizontal axis wind turbine using statistical wind speed model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Gwang-Se; Cheong, Cheolung, E-mail: ccheong@pusan.ac.kr [School of Mechanical Engineering, Pusan National University, Busan, 609-745, Rep. of Korea (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-12-15

    Despite increasing concern about low-frequency noise of modern large horizontal-axis wind turbines (HAWTs), few studies have focused on its origin or its prediction methods. In this paper, infra- and low-frequency (the ILF) wind turbine noise are closely examined and an efficient method is developed for its prediction. Although most previous studies have assumed that the ILF noise consists primarily of blade passing frequency (BPF) noise components, these tonal noise components are seldom identified in the measured noise spectrum, except for the case of downwind wind turbines. In reality, since modern HAWTs are very large, during rotation, a single blade of the turbine experiences inflow with variation in wind speed in time as well as in space, breaking periodic perturbations of the BPF. Consequently, this transforms acoustic contributions at the BPF harmonics into broadband noise components. In this study, the ILF noise of wind turbines is predicted by combining Lowson’s acoustic analogy with the stochastic wind model, which is employed to reproduce realistic wind speed conditions. In order to predict the effects of these wind conditions on pressure variation on the blade surface, unsteadiness in the incident wind speed is incorporated into the XFOIL code by varying incident flow velocities on each blade section, which depend on the azimuthal locations of the rotating blade. The calculated surface pressure distribution is subsequently used to predict acoustic pressure at an observing location by using Lowson’s analogy. These predictions are compared with measured data, which ensures that the present method can reproduce the broadband characteristics of the measured low-frequency noise spectrum. Further investigations are carried out to characterize the IFL noise in terms of pressure loading on blade surface, narrow-band noise spectrum and noise maps around the turbine.

  16. Prediction and analysis of infra and low-frequency noise of upwind horizontal axis wind turbine using statistical wind speed model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gwang-Se Lee

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Despite increasing concern about low-frequency noise of modern large horizontal-axis wind turbines (HAWTs, few studies have focused on its origin or its prediction methods. In this paper, infra- and low-frequency (the ILF wind turbine noise are closely examined and an efficient method is developed for its prediction. Although most previous studies have assumed that the ILF noise consists primarily of blade passing frequency (BPF noise components, these tonal noise components are seldom identified in the measured noise spectrum, except for the case of downwind wind turbines. In reality, since modern HAWTs are very large, during rotation, a single blade of the turbine experiences inflow with variation in wind speed in time as well as in space, breaking periodic perturbations of the BPF. Consequently, this transforms acoustic contributions at the BPF harmonics into broadband noise components. In this study, the ILF noise of wind turbines is predicted by combining Lowson’s acoustic analogy with the stochastic wind model, which is employed to reproduce realistic wind speed conditions. In order to predict the effects of these wind conditions on pressure variation on the blade surface, unsteadiness in the incident wind speed is incorporated into the XFOIL code by varying incident flow velocities on each blade section, which depend on the azimuthal locations of the rotating blade. The calculated surface pressure distribution is subsequently used to predict acoustic pressure at an observing location by using Lowson’s analogy. These predictions are compared with measured data, which ensures that the present method can reproduce the broadband characteristics of the measured low-frequency noise spectrum. Further investigations are carried out to characterize the IFL noise in terms of pressure loading on blade surface, narrow-band noise spectrum and noise maps around the turbine.

  17. Low-frequency noise suppression of a fiber laser based on a round-trip EDFA power stabilizer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pan, Z Q; Zhou, J; Yang, F; Ye, Q; Cai, H W; Qu, R H; Fang, Z J

    2013-01-01

    We have designed a power stabilizer based on a round-trip erbium-doped fiber amplifier (EDFA) structure to suppress the low-frequency relative intensity noise (RIN) for a narrow linewidth fiber laser. The noise suppressor is analyzed theoretically and its feasibility is verified experimentally. For a short-cavity single-frequency fiber laser with this device, about 20 dB low-frequency RIN improvement is achieved (down to −120 dB Hz −1 at 10 Hz). The corresponding frequency noise is also reduced by a factor of 1.6. The proposed method is an effective solution to achieve a low-frequency low RIN laser source for highly coherent detection applications. (paper)

  18. Low-frequency Electronic Transport Noise in La2-xBaxCuO4 Nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weis, Adam; Xin, Yizhou; van Harlingen, Dale

    2013-03-01

    In the pseudogap regime, high temperature superconductors often exhibit electronic structure, such as charge stripes. Charge stripes pinned to disorder have been predicted to contribute to low-frequency resistance fluctuations when sample dimensions are comparable to the size of stripe domains (Carlson, 2006). We are extending our previous studies of resistance fluctuations in YBa2Cu3O7-δ (Bonetti, 2004; Caplan, 2010) to thin films of La-based cuprates expected to have a more stable stripe phase, particularly in the regime near 1/8-filling. We present measurements of the low-frequency electronic transport in La2-xBaxCuO4 nanowires fabricated by pulsed laser deposition and lithographic techniques. We discuss temperature dependence of the power spectral density and its relevance to correlated electron phases above Tc. This research was supported by the DOE-DMS under grant DE-FG02-07ER46453, through the Frederick Seitz Materials Research Laboratory at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

  19. A study on the contribution of body vibrations to the vibratory sensation induced by high-level, complex low-frequency noise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yukio Takahashi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available To investigate the contribution of body vibrations to the vibratory sensation induced by high-level, complex low-frequency noise, we conducted two experiments. In Experiment 1, eight male subjects were exposed to seven types of low-frequency noise stimuli: two pure tones [a 31.5-Hz, 100-dB(SPL tone and a 50-Hz, 100-dB(SPL tone] and five complex noises composed of the pure tones. For the complex noise stimuli, the sound pressure level of one tonal component was 100 dB(SPL and that of another one was either 90, 95, or 100 dB(SPL. Vibration induced on the body surface was measured at five locations, and the correlation with the subjective rating of the vibratory sensation at each site of measurement was examined. In Experiment 2, the correlation between the body surface vibration and the vibratory sensation was similarly examined using seven types of noise stimuli composed of a 25-Hz tone and a 50-Hz tone. In both the experiments, we found that at the chest and the abdomen, the rating of the vibratory sensation was in close correlation with the vibration acceleration level (VAL of the body surface vibration measured at each corresponding location. This was consistent with our previous results and suggested that at the trunk of the body (the chest and the abdomen, the mechanoreception of body vibrations plays an important role in the experience of the vibratory sensation in persons exposed to high-level low-frequency noise. At the head, however, no close correlation was found between the rating of the vibratory sensation and the VAL of body surface vibration. This suggested that at the head, the perceptual mechanisms of vibration induced by high-level low-frequency noise were different from those in the trunk of the body.

  20. Low-Frequency Acoustic Noise Mitigation Characteristics of Metamaterials-Inspired Vibro-Impact Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rekhy, Anuj

    Acoustic absorbers like foams, fiberglass or liners have been used commonly in structures for infrastructural, industrial, automotive and aerospace applications to mitigate noise. However, these conventional materials have limited effectiveness to mitigate low-frequency (LF) acoustic waves with frequency less than 400 Hz owing to the need for impractically large mass or volume. LF acoustic waves contribute significantly towards environmental noise pollution as well as unwanted structural responses. Therefore, there is a need to develop lightweight, compact, structurally-integrated solutions to mitigate LF noise in several applications. Inspired by metamaterials, which are man-made structural materials that derive their unique dynamic behavior not just from material constituents but more so from engineered configurations, tuned mass-loaded membranes as vibro-impact attachments on a baseline structure are investigated to determine their performance as a LF acoustic barrier. The hypothesis is that the LF incident waves are up-converted via impact to higher modes in the baseline structure which are far more evanescent and may then be effectively mitigated using conventional means. Such Metamaterials-Inspired Vibro-Impact Structures (MIVIS) could be tuned to match the dominant frequency content of LF acoustic sources in specific applications. Prototype MIVIS unit cells were designed and tested to study the energy transfer mechanism via impact-induced frequency up-conversion, and the consequent sound transmission loss. Structural acoustic simulations were done to predict responses using models based on normal incidence transmission loss tests. Experimental proof-of-concept was achieved and further correlations to simulations were utilized to optimize the energy up-conversion mechanism using parametric studies. Up to 36 dB of sound transmission loss increase is obtained at the anti-resonance frequency (326 Hz) within a tunable LF bandwidth of about 200 Hz while impact

  1. Impact of interface manipulation of oxide on electrical transport properties and low-frequency noise in MgO/NiFe/MgO heterojunctions

    OpenAIRE

    Jian-wei Li; Chong-jun Zhao; Chun Feng; Zhongfu Zhou; Guang-hua Yu

    2015-01-01

    Low-frequency noise and magnetoresistance in sputtered-deposited Ta(5 nm)/MgO (3 nm)/NiFe(10 nm)/MgO(3 nm)/Ta(3 nm) films have been measured as a function of different annealing times at 400°C. These measurements did not change synchronously with annealing time. A significant increase in magnetoresistance is observed for short annealing times (of the order of minutes) and is correlated with a relatively small reduction in 1/f noise. In contrast, a significant reduction in 1/f noise is observe...

  2. Low frequency noise in the unstable contact region of Au-to-Au microcontact for microelectromechanical system switches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Haodong; Wang, Hong; Ke, Feixiang

    2014-06-01

    The noise behavior of Au-to-Au microcontact for microelectromechanical system switches has been experimentally studied in the unstable contact region. The results suggest that the electrical conduction remains nonmetallic at the initial stage during contact formation due to the existence of alien films, and traps in the alien layer located at the contact interface could play an important role in determining the conduction noise. The conduction fluctuation induced by electron trapping-detrapping associated with the hydrocarbon layer is found to be an intrinsic noise source contributing to the low frequency noise in the unstable contact region.

  3. Low frequency noise in the unstable contact region of Au-to-Au microcontact for microelectromechanical system switches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qiu, Haodong; Wang, Hong, E-mail: ewanghong@ntu.edu.sg [NOVITAS, Nanoelectronics Centre of Excellence, School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Ke, Feixiang [Temasek Laboratories at Nanyang Technological University, Research Techno Plaza, Singapore 637553 (Singapore)

    2014-06-23

    The noise behavior of Au-to-Au microcontact for microelectromechanical system switches has been experimentally studied in the unstable contact region. The results suggest that the electrical conduction remains nonmetallic at the initial stage during contact formation due to the existence of alien films, and traps in the alien layer located at the contact interface could play an important role in determining the conduction noise. The conduction fluctuation induced by electron trapping-detrapping associated with the hydrocarbon layer is found to be an intrinsic noise source contributing to the low frequency noise in the unstable contact region.

  4. Low frequency noise in the unstable contact region of Au-to-Au microcontact for microelectromechanical system switches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qiu, Haodong; Wang, Hong; Ke, Feixiang

    2014-01-01

    The noise behavior of Au-to-Au microcontact for microelectromechanical system switches has been experimentally studied in the unstable contact region. The results suggest that the electrical conduction remains nonmetallic at the initial stage during contact formation due to the existence of alien films, and traps in the alien layer located at the contact interface could play an important role in determining the conduction noise. The conduction fluctuation induced by electron trapping-detrapping associated with the hydrocarbon layer is found to be an intrinsic noise source contributing to the low frequency noise in the unstable contact region.

  5. Design of a SiGe BiCMOS canceller for low frequency noise reduction in direct conversion receivers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Squartecchia, Michele; Johansen, Tom Keinicke; Michaelsen, Rasmus Schandorph

    of the local oscillator (LO) toward the RF port of the mixer (Figure 1(a)). This causes the LO self-mixing phenomenon, which is responsible of a significant DC offset at the output of the receiver (Figure 1(b)). In turn, this DC offset gives rise to a high level of low frequency noise affecting the signal...

  6. Low-frequency noise as a diagnostic tool for OLED reliability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rocha, P.R.F.; Vandamme, L.K.J.; Meskers, S.C.J.; Gomes, H.L.; Leeuw, de D.M.; Weijer, van de P.

    2013-01-01

    Organic light emitting diodes (OLED), either based on polymers or small molecules, suffer from early failure: an unpredictable sudden increase in current with a total loss of light output. This work addresses this problem using small-signal impedance measurements and electrical noise techniques.

  7. An automatic measuring system of internal friction at low frequency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwasaki, K.

    1979-01-01

    An inverted torsion pendulum is automatized by means of Tectanel electronic system. Internal friction and the period of vibration are measured fully automatically as a function of temperature and the data obtained are analysed with a computer. (Author) [pt

  8. Low-frequency noise in high-Tc superconducting thick films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aponte, J.M.; Gutierrez, G.; Octavio, M.

    1990-01-01

    In this paper experimental results on the resistance noise in thick films of YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7-δ in the vicinity of the superconducting transition are reported. The measurements were performed in samples with broad resistive transitions and in the frequency range from 1Hz to 100 Hz. The power spectral density S v /V 2 of the excess noise is obtained by subtracting the current-independent background noise from the total measured noise. The authors observed that at the transition, the magnitude of S v /V 2 rises above its level at room temperature exhibiting peaks at the same temperatures at which R -1 dR/dT has maxima. The authors performed measurements of S v /V 2 as a function of the current through the sample and the authors found that it diverges as the critical current is approached from above and that it is zero below the critical current. This transition is found to be described quite well by a percolation model

  9. Low-frequency Periodic Error Identification and Compensation for Star Tracker Attitude Measurement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Jiongqi; XIONG Kai; ZHOU Haiyin

    2012-01-01

    The low-frequency periodic error of star tracker is one of the most critical problems for high-accuracy satellite attitude determination.In this paper an approach is proposed to identify and compensate the low-frequency periodic error for star tracker in attitude measurement.The analytical expression between the estimated gyro drift and the low-frequency periodic error of star tracker is derived firstly.And then the low-frequency periodic error,which can be expressed by Fourier series,is identified by the frequency spectrum of the estimated gyro drift according to the solution of the first step.Furthermore,the compensated model of the low-frequency periodic error is established based on the identified parameters to improve the attitude determination accuracy.Finally,promising simulated experimental results demonstrate the validity and effectiveness of the proposed method.The periodic error for attitude determination is eliminated basically and the estimation precision is improved greatly.

  10. Low frequency seismic noise acquisition and analysis in the Homestake Mine with tunable monolithic horizontal sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acernese, Fausto; De Rosa, Rosario; DeSalvo, Riccardo; Giordano, Gerardo; Harms, Jan; Mandic, Vuk; Sajeva, Angelo; Trancynger, Thomas; Barone, Fabrizio

    2010-04-01

    In this paper we describe the scientific data recorded along one month of data taking of two mechanical monolithic horizontal sensor prototypes located in a blind-ended (side) tunnel 2000 ft deep in the Homestake (South Dakota, USA) mine chosen to host the Deep Underground Science and Engineering Laboratory (DUSEL). The two mechanical monolithic sensors, developed at the University of Salerno, are placed, in thermally insulating enclosures, onto concrete slabs connected to the bedrock, and behind a sound-proofing wall. The main goal of this experiment is to characterize the Homestake site in the frequency band 10-4 - 30Hz and to estimate the level of Newtonian noise in a deep underegropund laboratory. The horizontal semidiurnal Earth tide and the Peterson's New Low Noise Model have been measured.

  11. Low-frequency noise reduction of fans using the acoustically treated duct; Kyuon duct ni yoru fan soon no teishuhaiki teigen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaneko, K; Fujii, S [University of Osaka Prefecture, Osaka (Japan). Faculty of Engineering; Shirasaya, H [Kawasaki Heavy Industries, Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    1994-12-25

    Reducing noise in a low frequency region of 1 kHz or less has become an important problem as a result of emergence of an ultra-high bypass engine in aircraft engines. Therefore, an attempt was made of experimenting and analyzing noise absorption characteristics in low-frequency noises. In the experiment, a low-frequency flow with an air volume of about 3 m{sup 3}/minute was made at a stable operating point of a fan device consisting of moving blades and static blades, with a sound absorbing duct disposed in the forward section. The duct is a 500-mm long steel box with an oblong cross section, in which the top and the bottom parts can move vertically, and a variable air layer was formed between a sound absorbing material (a sheet material made of microfine spherical resin powders solidified to a thickness of 6 mm) and a rigid wall made of iron plate. Noise waves and sound absorption amount were measured on different air layer thicknesses, and analyzed theoretically. As a result, such findings were obtained as: the sound absorption amount is affected by the main stream direction mode of sound pressures in cavity; valleys are formed where the sound absorption amount decreases remarkably in a specific cycle; and peaks are built where the sound absorption amount increases in other regions. 7 refs., 12 figs.

  12. A measurement of the low frequency spectrum of the cosmic microwave background radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levin, S.M.

    1987-04-01

    As part of a larger effort to measure the spectrum of the Cosmic Background Radiation (CBR) at low frequencies, the intensity of the CBR has been measured at a frequency of 1.410 GHz. The measurement was made by comparing the power received from the sky with the power received from a specially designed cooled calibration target with known properties. Sources of radiation other than the CBR were then identified and subtracted to calculate the antenna temperature of the CBR at 1.410 GHz. The instrument used to measure the CBR was a total-power microwave radiometer with a 25 MHz bandwidth centered at 1.410 GHz. The radiometer had a noise temperature of 80 K, and sufficient data were taken that radiometer noise did not contribute significantly to the total measurement error. The sources of error were predominantly systematic in nature, and the largest error was due to uncertainty in the reflection characteristics of the cold-load calibrator. Identification and subtraction of signals from the Galaxy (0.7 K) and the Earth's atmosphere (0.8 K) were also significant parts of the data reduction and error analysis. The brightness temperature of the Cosmic Background Radiation at 1.410 GHz is 222. +- 0.55 Kelvin. The spectrum of the CBR, as determined by this measurement and other published results, is consistent with a blackbody spectrum of temperature 2.741 +- 0.016. Constraints on the amount by which the CBR spectrum deviates from Planck spectrum are used to place limits on energy releases early in the history of the universe. 55 refs., 25 figs., 8 tabs

  13. Active Low-frequency Vertical Vibration Isolation System for Precision Measurements

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Kang; LI Gang; HU Hua; WANG Lijun

    2017-01-01

    Low-frequency vertical vibration isolation systems play important roles in precision measurements to reduce seismic and environmental vibration noise.Several types of active vibration isolation systems have been developed.However,few researches focus on how to optimize the test mass install position in order to improve the vibration transmissibility.An active low-frequency vertical vibration isolation system based on an earlier instrument,the Super Spring,is designed and implemented.The system,which is simple and compact,consists of two stages:a parallelogram-shaped linkage to ensure vertical motion,and a simple spring-mass system.The theoretical analysis of the vibration isolation system is presented,including terms erroneously ignored before.By carefully choosing the mechanical parameters according to the above analysis and using feedback control,the resonance frequency of the system is reduced from 2.3 to 0.03 Hz,a reduction by a factor of more than 75.The vibration isolation system is installed as an inertial reference in an absolute gravimeter,where it improved the scatter of the absolute gravity values by a factor of 5.The experimental results verifies the improved performance of the isolation system,making it particularly suitable for precision experiments.The improved vertical vibration isolation system can be used as a prototype for designing high-performance active vertical isolation systems.An improved theoretical model of this active vibration isolation system with beam-pivot configuration is proposed,providing fundamental guidelines for vibration isolator design and assembling.

  14. Trend extraction of rail corrugation measured dynamically based on the relevant low-frequency principal components reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Yanfu; Liu, Hongli; Ma, Ziji

    2016-01-01

    Rail corrugation dynamic measurement techniques are critical to guarantee transport security and guide rail maintenance. During the inspection process, low-frequency trends caused by rail fluctuation are usually superimposed on rail corrugation and seriously affect the assessment of rail maintenance quality. In order to extract and remove the nonlinear and non-stationary trends from original mixed signals, a hybrid model based ensemble empirical mode decomposition (EEMD) and modified principal component analysis (MPCA) is proposed in this paper. Compared with the existing de-trending methods based on EMD, this method first considers low-frequency intrinsic mode functions (IMFs) thought to be underlying trend components that maybe contain some unrelated components, such as white noise and low-frequency signal itself, and proposes to use PCA to accurately extract the pure trends from the IMFs containing multiple components. On the other hand, due to the energy contribution ratio between trends and mixed signals is prior unknown, and the principal components (PCs) decomposed by PCA are arranged in order of energy reduction without considering frequency distribution, the proposed method modifies traditional PCA and just selects relevant low-frequency PCs to reconstruct the trends based on the zero-crossing numbers (ZCN) of each PC. Extensive tests are presented to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed method. The results show the proposed EEMD-PCA-ZCN is an effective tool for trend extraction of rail corrugation measured dynamically. (paper)

  15. Low-frequency electromagnetic measurements as a zero-time discriminant of nuclear and chemical explosions - OSI research final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sweeney, J.J.

    1996-12-01

    This is the final report on a series of investigations of low frequency (1-40 Hz) electromagnetic signals produced by above ground and underground chemical explosions and their use for confidence building under the Comprehensive Test-Ban Treaty. I conclude that low frequency electromagnetic measurements can be a very powerful tool for zero-time discrimination of chemical and nuclear explosions for yields of 1 Kt or greater, provided that sensors can be placed within 1-2 km of the suspected detonation point in a tamper-proof, low noise environment. The report includes descriptions and analyses of low frequency electromagnetic measurements associated with chemical explosions carried out in a variety of settings (shallow borehole, open pit mining, underground mining). I examine cavity pressure data from the Non-Proliferation Experiment (underground chemical explosion) and present the hypothesis that electromagnetic signals produced by underground chemical explosions could be produced during rock fracturing. I also review low frequency electromagnetic data from underground nuclear explosions acquired by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory during the late 1980s. (author)

  16. A numerical model for ocean ultra-low frequency noise: wave-generated acoustic-gravity and Rayleigh modes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardhuin, Fabrice; Lavanant, Thibaut; Obrebski, Mathias; Marié, Louis; Royer, Jean-Yves; d'Eu, Jean-François; Howe, Bruce M; Lukas, Roger; Aucan, Jerome

    2013-10-01

    The generation of ultra-low frequency acoustic noise (0.1 to 1 Hz) by the nonlinear interaction of ocean surface gravity waves is well established. More controversial are the quantitative theories that attempt to predict the recorded noise levels and their variability. Here a single theoretical framework is used to predict the noise level associated with propagating pseudo-Rayleigh modes and evanescent acoustic-gravity modes. The latter are dominant only within 200 m from the sea surface, in shallow or deep water. At depths larger than 500 m, the comparison of a numerical noise model with hydrophone records from two open-ocean sites near Hawaii and the Kerguelen islands reveal: (a) Deep ocean acoustic noise at frequencies 0.1 to 1 Hz is consistent with the Rayleigh wave theory, in which the presence of the ocean bottom amplifies the noise by 10 to 20 dB; (b) in agreement with previous results, the local maxima in the noise spectrum support the theoretical prediction for the vertical structure of acoustic modes; and (c) noise level and variability are well predicted for frequencies up to 0.4 Hz. Above 0.6 Hz, the model results are less accurate, probably due to the poor estimation of the directional properties of wind-waves with frequencies higher than 0.3 Hz.

  17. Low frequency noise and electrical transport properties of pseudomorphic Si/Si1-xGex heterostructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prest, Martin James

    2001-01-01

    . Low frequency (1/f) electrical noise measurements were performed in the linear region of operation for the above devices. 1/f noise was found to be about a decade lower in SiGe devices than in a Si control, with the greatest noise reduction for strong inversion. A number fluctuation model with a variation in the oxide trap density provided the best explanation of the observed results. Oxide trap densities determined from noise measurements were found to fall at the band edge towards mid-gap in accordance with the common 'U-shaped' distribution of trap states. Lower noise in SiGe devices was attributed to the valence band offset which caused a displacement of the Fermi level towards mid-gap, where the density of trap states is lower, resulting in lower noise. (author)

  18. Measurement of weak low frequency pressure signal using stretchable polyurethane fiber sensor for application in wearables

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaysir, Md Rejvi; Stefani, Alessio; Lwin, Richard

    2017-01-01

    .e. a capillary) to measure a weak low frequency signal comparable to respiration/heart rate. We characterized the fiber and measured the sensitivity of a PU capillary using a speaker connected to a function generator. The frequency of the modulated signal was recovered using Fourier Transform (FT). This bodes...

  19. Flextensional fiber Bragg grating-based accelerometer for low frequency vibration measurement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jinghua Zhang; Xueguang Qiao; Manli Hu; Zhongyao Feng; Hong Gao; Yang Yang; Rui Zhou

    2011-01-01

    @@ The intelligent structural health monitoring method,which uses a fiber Bragg grating(FBG)sensor,is a new approach in the field of civil engineering.However,it lacks a reliable FBG-based accelerometer for taking structural low frequency vibration measurements.In this letter,a flextensional FBG-based accelerometer is proposed and demonstrated.The experimental results indicate that the natural frequency of the developed accelerometer is 16.7 Hz,with a high sensitivity of 410.7 pm/g.In addition,it has a broad and flat response over low frequencies ranging from 1 to 10 Hz.The natural frequency and sensitivity of the accelerometer can be tuned by adding mass to tailor the sensor performance to specific applications.Experimental results are presented to demonstrate the good performance of the proposed FBG-based accelerometer.These results show that the proposed accelerometer is satisfactory for low frequency vibration measurements.%The intelligent structural health monitoring method, which uses a fiber Bragg grating {FBG} sensor, ie a new approach in the field of civil engineering. However, it lacks a reliable FBG-based accelerometer for taking structural low frequency vibration measurements. In this letter, a flextensional FBG-based accelerometer is proposed and demonstrated. The experimental results indicate that the natural frequency of the developed accelerometer is 16.7 Hz, with a high sensitivity of 410.7 pm/g. In addition, it has a broad and flat response over low frequencies ranging from 1 to 10 Hz. The natural frequency and sensitivity of the accelerometer can be tuned by adding mass to tailor the sensor performance to specific applications. Experimental results are presented to demonstrate the good performance of the proposed FBG-based accelerometer. These results show that the proposed accelerometer is satisfactory for low frequency vibration measurements.

  20. Low frequency noise in asymmetric double barrier magnetic tunnel junctions with a top thin MgO layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Hui-Qiang; Tang Wei-Yue; Liu Liang; Wei Jian; Li Da-Lai; Feng Jia-Feng; Han Xiu-Feng

    2015-01-01

    Low frequency noise has been investigated at room temperature for asymmetric double barrier magnetic tunnel junctions (DBMTJs), where the coupling between the top and middle CoFeB layers is antiferromagnetic with a 0.8-nm thin top MgO barrier of the CoFeB/MgO/CoFe/CoFeB/MgO/CoFeB DBMTJ. At enough large bias, 1/f noise dominates the voltage noise power spectra in the low frequency region, and is conventionally characterized by the Hooge parameter α mag . With increasing external field, the top and bottom ferromagnetic layers are aligned by the field, and then the middle free layer rotates from antiparallel state (antiferromagnetic coupling between top and middle ferromagnetic layers) to parallel state. In this rotation process α mag and magnetoresistance-sensitivity-product show a linear dependence, consistent with the fluctuation dissipation relation. With the magnetic field applied at different angles (θ) to the easy axis of the free layer, the linear dependence persists while the intercept of the linear fit satisfies a cos(θ) dependence, similar to that for the magnetoresistance, suggesting intrinsic relation between magnetic losses and magnetoresistance. (rapid communication)

  1. Comparison of objective methods for assessment of annoyance of low frequency noise with the results of a laboratory listening test

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Torben

    2007-01-01

    The effect of low frequency noise and vibration on people is an important issue for communities around many industrial facilities and an transportation systems. There are a number of research groups throughout the world which have been actively researching these effects. This book brings together...... and vibration on people is widespread; thus this work will appeal to researchers in disciplines as diverse as acoustics, vibration, psychology, occupational health and environmental health It will also appeal to researchers in academia and designers of all kinds of industrial equipment, in terms of its...

  2. Low-Frequency Noise in High-T Superconductor Josephson Junctions, Squids, and Magnetometers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miklich, Andrew Hostetler

    The design and performance of high-T_ {rm c} dc superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs), the junctions that comprise them, and magnetometers made from them are described, with special attention paid to sources of 1/f noise. Biepitaxial junctions are found to have large levels of critical current fluctuations which make them unsuitable for low-noise SQUIDs. This noise suggests a poorly connected interface at the grain boundary junction. SQUIDs from bicrystal junctions, in contrast, have levels of critical current noise that are controllable using bias current reversal techniques which leave the noise white down to frequencies of a few Hz. A SQUID with an energy resolution of 1.5times 10^{-30} J Hz^ {-1} at 1 Hz is reported. Magnetometers in which a (9 mm)^2 pickup loop is directly coupled to a SQUID body have achieved field resolutions of 93 fT Hz^{-1/2} down to frequencies below 1 Hz, improving to 39 fT Hz^{-1/2} at 1 Hz with the addition of a 50 mm-diameter single-turn flux transformer. Although the performance of these devices is sufficient for single -channel biomagnetometry or geophysical studies, their relatively poor coupling to the pickup loop makes it difficult to satisfy the competing goals of high field resolution and small detector size necessary for multichannel biomagnetic imaging. Improved coupling is demonstrated by the use of multiturn-input-coil flux transformers, and a resolution of 35 fT Hz^{-1/2} in the white noise region is reported with a (10 mm) ^2 pickup loop. However, additional 1/f noise from the processed multilayer structures in the transformer limits the resolution at 1 Hz to 114 fT Hz^ {-1/2}. High-T_{ rm c} SQUIDs are shown to exhibit additional 1/f noise when they are cooled in a nonzero static magnetic field because of the additional flux vortices trapped in the film, with the noise power at 1 Hz typically increasing by a factor of 10-20 in a field of 0.05 mT (0.5 G). Finally, a SQUID-based voltmeter with a resolution

  3. Low-frequency noise in high-(Tc) superconductor Josephson junctions, SQUIDs, and magnetometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miklich, A. H.

    1994-05-01

    Design and performance of high-T(sub c) dc superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUID's), junctions that comprise them, and magnetometers made from them are described, with attention to sources of 1/f noise. Biepitaxial junctions are found to have large levels of critical current fluctuations which make them unsuitable for low-noise SQUID's; this suggests a poorly connected interface at the grain boundary junction. SQUID's from bicrystal junctions have levels of critical current noise controllable using bias current reversal techniques which leave the noise white down to frequencies of a few Hz. A SQUID with an energy resolution of 1.5 x 10(exp -30) J Hz(exp -1) at 1 Hz is reported. Magnetometers in which a (9 mm)(exp 2) pickup loop is directly coupled to a SQUID body have achieved field resolutions of 93 fT Hz(exp -1/2) down to frequencies below 1 Hz, improving to 39 fT Hz(exp -1/2) at 1 Hz with the addition of a 50mm-diameter single-turn flux transformer. Poor coupling to pickup loop makes it difficult to satisfy competing goals of high field resolution and small detector size necessary for multichannel biomagnetic imaging. Improved coupling is demonstrated by the use of multiturn-input-coil flux transformers, and a resolution of 35 fT Hz(exp -1/2) in the white noise region is reported with a (10 mm)(exp 2) pickup loop. However, additional 1/f noise from processed multilayer structures in the transformer limits the resolution at 1 Hz to 114 fT Hz(exp -1/2). High-T(sub c) SQUID's exhibit additional 1/f noise when cooled in a nonzero static magnetic field because of additional flux vortices trapped in the film, with the noise power at 1 Hz typically increasing by a factor of 10-20 in a field of 0.05mT (0.5 G). Finally, a SQUID-based voltmeter with a resolution of 9.2 pV Hz(exp -1/2) at 10 Hz (24 pV Hz(exp -1/2) at 1 Hz) is described.

  4. Low frequency noise fiber delay stabilized laser with reduced sensitivity to acceleration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argence, B.; Clivati, C.; Dournaux, J.-L.; Holleville, D.; Faure, B.; Lemonde, P.; Santarelli, G.

    2017-11-01

    Lasers with sub-hertz line-width and fractional frequency instability around 1×10-15 for 0.1 s to 10 s averaging time are currently realized by locking onto an ultra-stable Fabry-Perot cavity using the Pound-Drever-Hall method. This powerful method requires tight alignment of free space optical components, precise polarization adjustment and spatial mode matching. To circumvent these issues, we use an all-fiber Michelson interferometer with a long fiber spool as a frequency reference and a heterodyne detection technique with a fibered acousto optical modulator (AOM)1. At low Fourier frequencies, the frequency noise of our system is mainly limited by mechanical vibrations, an issue that has already been explored in the field of optoelectronic oscillators.2,3,4

  5. Temporal step fluctuations on a conductor surface: electromigration force, surface resistivity and low-frequency noise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, E D; Bondarchuk, O; Tao, C G; Yan, W; Cullen, W G; Rous, P J; Bole, T

    2007-01-01

    Scattering of charge carriers from surface structures will become an increasing factor in the resistivity as the structure decreases in size to the nanoscale. The effects of scattering at the most basic surface defect, a kink in a step edge, are here analyzed using the continuum step model. Using a Langevin analysis, it has been shown that the electromigration force on the atoms at the step edge causes changes in the temporal evolution of the step-edge. For an electromigration force acting perpendicular to the average step edge and mass-transport dominated by step-edge diffusion, significant deviations from the usual t 1/4 scaling of the displacement correlation function occur dependent on a critical time τ and the direction of the force relative to the step edge (i.e. uphill or downhill). Experimental observations of step fluctuations on Ag(111) show the predicted changes among step fluctuations without current, and with current in the up- and down-hill directions for a current density of order 10 5 A cm -2 . The results yield the magnitude of the electromigration force acting on kinked sites at the step-edge. This in turn yields the contribution of the fluctuating steps to the surface resistivity, which exceeds 1% of the bulk resistivity as wire diameters decrease below 10s of nanometres. The temporal fluctuations of kink density can thus also be related to resistivity noise. Relating the known fluctuation spectrum of the step displacements to fluctuations in their lengths, the corresponding resistivity noise is predicted to show spectral signatures of ∼f -1/2 for step fluctuations governed by random attachment/detachment, and ∼f -3/4 for step fluctuations governed by step-edge diffusion

  6. Enroute NASA/FAA low-frequency propfan test in Alabama (October 1987): A versatile atmospheric aircraft long-range noise prediction system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsouka, Despina G.

    In order to obtain a flight-to-static noise prediction of an advanced Turboprop (propfan) Aircraft, FAA went on an elaboration of the data that were measured during a full scale measuring program that was conducted by NASA and FAA/DOT/TSC on October 1987 in Alabama. The elaboration process was based on aircraft simulation to a point source, on an atmospheric two dimensional noise model, on the American National Standard algorithm for the calculation of atmospheric absortion, and on the DOT/TSC convention for ground reflection effects. Using the data of the Alabama measurements, the present paper examines the development of a generalized, flexible and more accurate process for the evaluation of the static and flight low-frequency long-range noise data. This paper also examines the applicability of the assumptions made by the Integrated Noise Model about linear propagation, of the three dimensional Hamiltonian Rays Tracing model and of the Weyl-Van der Pol model. The model proposes some assumptions in order to increase the calculations flexibility without significant loss of accuracy. In addition, it proposes the usage of the three dimensional Hamiltonian Rays Tracing model and the Weyl-Van der Pol model in order to increase the accuracy and to ensure the generalization of noise propagation prediction over grounds with variable impedance.

  7. A fiber-optic interferometer with subpicometer resolution for dc and low-frequency displacement measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, D. T.; Pratt, J. R.; Howard, L. P.

    2009-01-01

    We have developed a fiber-optic interferometer optimized for best performance in the frequency range from dc to 1 kHz, with displacement linearity of 1% over a range of ± 25 nm, and noise-limited resolution of 2 pm. The interferometer uses a tunable infrared laser source (nominal 1550 nm wavelength) with high amplitude and wavelength stability, low spontaneous self-emission noise, high sideband suppression, and a coherence control feature that broadens the laser linewidth and dramatically lowers the low-frequency noise in the system. The amplitude stability of the source, combined with the use of specially manufactured ''bend-insensitive'' fiber and all-spliced fiber construction, results in a robust homodyne interferometer system, which achieves resolution of 40 fm Hz -1/2 above 20 Hz and approaches the shot-noise-limit of 20 fm Hz -1/2 at 1 kHz for an optical power of 10 μW, without the need for differential detection. Here we describe the design and construction of the interferometer, as well as modes of operation, and demonstrate its performance.

  8. Control of low-frequency noise for piping systems via the design of coupled band gap of acoustic metamaterials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Yanfei [College of Power Engineering, Naval University of Engineering, Wuhan, 430033 (China); Shen, Huijie, E-mail: shj588@163.com [College of Power Engineering, Naval University of Engineering, Wuhan, 430033 (China); Zhang, Linke [School of Energy and Power Engineering, Wuhan University of Technology, Wuhan, 430063 (China); Su, Yongsheng, E-mail: suyongsheng1981@163.com [College of Power Engineering, Naval University of Engineering, Wuhan, 430033 (China); Yu, Dianlong [Key Laboratory of Science and Technology on Integrated Logistics Support, National University of Defense Technology, Changsha 410073 (China)

    2016-07-01

    Acoustic wave propagation and sound transmission in a metamaterial-based piping system with Helmholtz resonator (HR) attached periodically are studied. A transfer matrix method is developed to conduct the investigation. Calculational results show that the introduction of periodic HRs in the piping system could generate a band gap (BG) near the resonant frequency of the HR, such that the bandwidth and the attenuation effect of HR improved notably. Bragg type gaps are also exist in the system due to the systematic periodicity. By plotting the BG as functions of HR parameters, the effect of resonator parameters on the BG behavior, including bandwidth, location and attenuation performance, etc., is examined. It is found that Bragg-type gap would interplay with the resonant-type gap under some special situations, thereby giving rise to a super-wide coupled gap. Further, explicit formulation for BG exact coupling is extracted and some key parameters on modulating the width and the attenuation coefficient of coupled gaps are investigated. The coupled gap can be located to any frequency range as one concerned, thus rendering the low-frequency noise control feasible in a broad band range. - Highlights: • A metamaterial-type pipe system with Bragg and resonant acoustic gaps. • A low-frequency acoustic coupled gap. • Exact coupling condition for Bragg and resonant gaps. • Effects of resonant parameters on coupled gaps.

  9. Power system low frequency oscillation mode estimation using wide area measurement systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Papia Ray

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Oscillations in power systems are triggered by a wide variety of events. The system damps most of the oscillations, but a few undamped oscillations may remain which may lead to system collapse. Therefore low frequency oscillations inspection is necessary in the context of recent power system operation and control. Ringdown portion of the signal provides rich information of the low frequency oscillatory modes which has been taken into analysis. This paper provides a practical case study in which seven signal processing based techniques i.e. Prony Analysis (PA, Fast Fourier Transform (FFT, S-Transform (ST, Wigner-Ville Distribution (WVD, Estimation of Signal Parameters by Rotational Invariance Technique (ESPRIT, Hilbert-Huang Transform (HHT and Matrix Pencil Method (MPM were presented for estimating the low frequency modes in a given ringdown signal. Preprocessing of the signal is done by detrending. The application of the signal processing techniques is illustrated using actual wide area measurement systems (WAMS data collected from four different Phasor Measurement Unit (PMU i.e. Dadri, Vindyachal, Kanpur and Moga which are located near the recent disturbance event at the Northern Grid of India. Simulation results show that the seven signal processing technique (FFT, PA, ST, WVD, ESPRIT, HHT and MPM estimates two common oscillatory frequency modes (0.2, 0.5 from the raw signal. Thus, these seven techniques provide satisfactory performance in determining small frequency modes of the signal without losing its valuable property. Also a comparative study of the seven signal processing techniques has been carried out in order to find the best one. It was found that FFT and ESPRIT gives exact frequency modes as compared to other techniques, so they are recommended for estimation of low frequency modes. Further investigations were also carried out to estimate low frequency oscillatory mode with another case study of Eastern Interconnect Phasor Project

  10. The Noisiness of Low-Frequency One-Third Octave Bands of Noise. M.S. Thesis - Southampton Univ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawton, B. W.

    1975-01-01

    This study examined the relative noisiness of low frequency one-third octave bands of noise bounded by the bands centered at 25 Hz and 200 Hz, with intensities ranging from 50 db sound pressure level (SPL) to 95 db SPL. The thirty-two subjects used a method-of-adjustment technique, producing comparison-band intensities as noisy as standard bands centered at 100 Hz and 200 Hz with intensities of 60 db SPL and 72 db SPL. Four contours of equal noisiness were developed for one-third octave bands, extending down to 25 Hz and ranging in intensity from approximately 58 db SPL to 86 db SPL. These curves were compared with the contours of equal noisiness of Kryter and Pearsons. In the region of overlap (between 50 Hz and 200 Hz) the agreement was good.

  11. Thickness Measurement of a Film on a Substrate by Low-Frequency Ultrasound

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Ming-Xuan; WANG Xiao-Min; MAO Jie

    2004-01-01

    @@ We describe a new simple technique for the low-frequency ultrasonic thickness measurement of an air-backed soft thin layer attached on a hard substrate of finite thickness through the frequency-shifts of the substrate resonances by the substrate-side insonification. A plane compressive wave impinging normally on the substrate surface from a liquid is studied. Low frequency here means an interrogating acoustical wave frequency of less than half of coating to the substrate. Equations for the frequency-shifts are derived and solved by the Newton iterative method and the Taylor expansion method, respectively, indicating satisfactory agreement within the range of interest of thickness ratio of the thin layer to the substrate for a polymer-aluminium structure. An experimental setup is constructed to verify the validity of the technique.

  12. Relationship Between Psychomotor Efficiency and Sensation Seeking of People Exposed to Noise and Low Frequency Vibration Stimuli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korchut, Aleksander; Kowalska-Koczwara, Alicja; Romanska – Zapała, Anna; Stypula, Krzysztof

    2017-10-01

    At the workplace of the machine operator, low frequency whole body and hand- arm vibrations are observed. They occur together with noise. Whole body vibration in the range of 3-25 Hz are detrimental to the human body due to the location of the resonant frequency of large organs of the human body in this range. It can be assumed that for this reason people working every day in such conditions can have reduced working efficiency. The influence of low frequency vibration and noise on the human body leads to both physiological and functional changes. The result of the impact of noise and vibration stimuli depends largely on the specific characteristics of the objects, which include among other personality traits, temperament and emotional factor. The pilot study conducted in the laboratory was attended by 30 young men. The aim of the study was to look for correlations between the need for stimulation of the objects and their psychomotor efficiency in case of vibration exposure and vibration together with noise exposure in variable conditions task. The need for stimulation of the objects as defined in the study is based on theoretical assumptions of one dimensional model of temperament developed by Marvin Zuckerman. This theory defines the need for stimulation as the search for different, new, complex and intense sensations, as well as the willingness to take risks. The aim of research was to verify if from four factors such as: the search for adventure and horror, sensation seeking, disinhibition and susceptibility to boredom, we can choose the ones that in conjunction with varying operating conditions, may significantly determine the efficiency of the task situation. The objects performed the test evaluation of their motor skills which consisted in keeping the cursor controlled by a joystick through the path. The number of exceeds of the cursor beyond the path and its maximum deviation was recorded. The collected data were used to determine the correlation between the

  13. Optimization of vehicle compartment low frequency noise based on Radial Basis Function Neuro-Network Approximation Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HU Qi-guo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available For reducing the vehicle compartment low frequency noise, the Optimal Latin hypercube sampling method was applied to perform experimental design for sampling in the factorial design space. The thickness parameters of the panels with larger acoustic contribution was considered as factors, as well as the vehicle mass, seventh rank modal frequency of body, peak sound pressure of test point and sound pressure root-mean-square value as responses. By using the RBF(radial basis function neuro-network method, an approximation model of four responses about six factors was established. Further more, error analysis of established approximation model was performed in this paper. To optimize the panel’s thickness parameter, the adaptive simulated annealing algorithm was im-plemented. Optimization results show that the peak sound pressure of driver’s head was reduced by 4.45dB and 5.47dB at frequency 158HZ and 134Hz respec-tively. The test point pressure were significantly reduced at other frequency as well. The results indicate that through the optimization the vehicle interior cavity noise was reduced effectively, and the acoustical comfort of the vehicle was im-proved significantly.

  14. Panama City 2003 Acoustic Coherence Experiments: Low Frequency Bottom Penetration Fluctuation Measurements in a Multipath Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meredith, Roger W.; Kennedy, E. Ted; Malley, Dexter; Fisher, Robert A.; Brown, Robert; Stanic, Steve

    2004-11-01

    This paper is part of a series of papers describing acoustic coherence and fluctuations measurements made by the Naval Research Laboratory in the Gulf of Mexico near Panama City Beach, FL during June 2003. This paper presents low frequency (1-10 kHz) buried hydrophone measurements and preliminary results for two source-receiver ranges with grazing angles less than two degrees (realtive to the direct-path to the seafloor at the receiver location). Results focus on fluctuations after acoustic penetration into the sediment. These fluctuations are correlated with environmental influences.

  15. Impact of interface manipulation of oxide on electrical transport properties and low-frequency noise in MgO/NiFe/MgO heterojunctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Jian-wei; Zhao, Chong-jun; Feng, Chun; Yu, Guang-hua; Zhou, Zhongfu

    2015-01-01

    Low-frequency noise and magnetoresistance in sputtered-deposited Ta(5 nm)/MgO (3 nm)/NiFe(10 nm)/MgO(3 nm)/Ta(3 nm) films have been measured as a function of different annealing times at 400°C. These measurements did not change synchronously with annealing time. A significant increase in magnetoresistance is observed for short annealing times (of the order of minutes) and is correlated with a relatively small reduction in 1/f noise. In contrast, a significant reduction in 1/f noise is observed for long annealing times (of the order of hours) accompanied by a small change in magnetoresistance. After annealing for 2 hours, the 1/f noise decreases by three orders of magnitude. Transmission electron microscopy and slow positron annihilation results implicate the cause being micro-structural changes in the MgO layers and interfaces following different annealing times. The internal vacancies in the MgO layers gather into vacancy clusters to reduce the defect density after short annealing times, whereas the MgO/NiFe and the NiFe/MgO interfaces improve significantly after long annealing times with the amorphous MgO layers gradually crystallizing following the release of interfacial stress

  16. Impact of interface manipulation of oxide on electrical transport properties and low-frequency noise in MgO/NiFe/MgO heterojunctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jian-wei; Zhao, Chong-jun; Feng, Chun; Zhou, Zhongfu; Yu, Guang-hua

    2015-08-01

    Low-frequency noise and magnetoresistance in sputtered-deposited Ta(5 nm)/MgO (3 nm)/NiFe(10 nm)/MgO(3 nm)/Ta(3 nm) films have been measured as a function of different annealing times at 400°C. These measurements did not change synchronously with annealing time. A significant increase in magnetoresistance is observed for short annealing times (of the order of minutes) and is correlated with a relatively small reduction in 1/f noise. In contrast, a significant reduction in 1/f noise is observed for long annealing times (of the order of hours) accompanied by a small change in magnetoresistance. After annealing for 2 hours, the 1/f noise decreases by three orders of magnitude. Transmission electron microscopy and slow positron annihilation results implicate the cause being micro-structural changes in the MgO layers and interfaces following different annealing times. The internal vacancies in the MgO layers gather into vacancy clusters to reduce the defect density after short annealing times, whereas the MgO/NiFe and the NiFe/MgO interfaces improve significantly after long annealing times with the amorphous MgO layers gradually crystallizing following the release of interfacial stress.

  17. Impact of interface manipulation of oxide on electrical transport properties and low-frequency noise in MgO/NiFe/MgO heterojunctions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Jian-wei [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200072 (China); School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Zhao, Chong-jun; Feng, Chun; Yu, Guang-hua [School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Zhou, Zhongfu [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200072 (China)

    2015-08-15

    Low-frequency noise and magnetoresistance in sputtered-deposited Ta(5 nm)/MgO (3 nm)/NiFe(10 nm)/MgO(3 nm)/Ta(3 nm) films have been measured as a function of different annealing times at 400°C. These measurements did not change synchronously with annealing time. A significant increase in magnetoresistance is observed for short annealing times (of the order of minutes) and is correlated with a relatively small reduction in 1/f noise. In contrast, a significant reduction in 1/f noise is observed for long annealing times (of the order of hours) accompanied by a small change in magnetoresistance. After annealing for 2 hours, the 1/f noise decreases by three orders of magnitude. Transmission electron microscopy and slow positron annihilation results implicate the cause being micro-structural changes in the MgO layers and interfaces following different annealing times. The internal vacancies in the MgO layers gather into vacancy clusters to reduce the defect density after short annealing times, whereas the MgO/NiFe and the NiFe/MgO interfaces improve significantly after long annealing times with the amorphous MgO layers gradually crystallizing following the release of interfacial stress.

  18. Compensation of the skin effect in low-frequency potential drop measurements

    OpenAIRE

    Corcoran, J; Nagy, PB

    2016-01-01

    Potential drop measurements are routinely used in the non-destructive evaluation of component integrity. Potential drop measurements use either direct current (DC) or alternating current (AC), the latter will have superior noise performance due to the ability to perform phase sensitive detection and the reduction of flicker noise. AC measurements are however subject to the skin effect where the current is electromagnetically constricted to the surface of the component. Unfortunately, the skin...

  19. A case study of interior low-frequency noise from box-shaped bridge girders induced by running trains: Its mechanism, prediction and countermeasures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xun; Li, Xiaozhen; Hao, Hong; Wang, Dangxiong; Li, Yadong

    2016-04-01

    A side effect of high-speed railway and urban rail transit systems is the associated vibration and noise. Since the use of concrete viaducts is predominant in railway construction due to scarce land resources, low-frequency (20-200 Hz) structure-radiated noise from concrete bridges is a principal concern. Although it is the most commonly used bridge type, the mechanism of noise emission from box-shaped bridge girders when subjected to impact forces from moving trains, which sounds like beating a drum, has not been well studied. In this study, a field measurement was first made on a simply-supported box-shaped bridge to record the acceleration of the slabs and the associated sound pressures induced by running trains. These data indicated that a significant beat-wave noise occurred in the box-shaped cavity when the train speed was around 340 km/h, which arose from the interference between two sound waves of 75.0 Hz and 78.8 Hz. The noise leakage from the bridge expansion joint was serious and resulted in obvious noise pollution near the bridge once the beat-wave noise was generated in the cavity. The dominant frequency of the interior noise at 75.0 Hz was confirmed from the spectrum of the data and the modal analysis results, and originated from the peak vibration of the top slab due to resonance and the first-order vertical acoustic mode, which led to cavity resonance, amplifying the corresponding noise. The three-dimensional acoustic modes and local vibration modes of the slab were calculated by using the finite element method. A simplified vehicle-track-bridge coupling vibration model was then developed to calculate the wheel-rail interaction force in a frequency range of 20-200 Hz. Numerical simulations using the boundary element method confirmed the cavity resonance effect and the numerical results agreed well with the data. Based on the calibrated numerical model, three noise reduction measures, i.e., adding a horizontal baffle in the interior cavity, narrowing

  20. The impact of human perception of simultaneous exposure to thermal load, low-frequency ventilation noise and indoor air pollution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alm, Ole; Witterseh, Thomas; Clausen, Geo

    1999-01-01

    Human perception of simultaneous exposure to combinations of three different levels of operative temperature, low-frequency ventilation noise and indoor air pollution (27 combinations) was studied in climate chambers. The operative temperatures studied were: 26.0 deg.C, 27.6 deg.C and 29.6 deg.......C, and the sound pressure levels were: 45 dB(A), 48 dB(A) and 51 dB(A). The air pollution corresponding to these three levels of perceived air quality (at 26 deg.C) was: 1.1 decipol (dp), 2.4 dp and 4.5 dp. A 1 deg.C change in operative temperature had the same impact on the human perception of the overall...... conditions as a change of 3.8 dB(A) in sound pressure level or a change of 7 dp in air pollution (at 26 deg.C). The percentage of dissatisfied with the perceived air quality increased with increasing temperature. An elevated temperature had a dominant impact on the human perception of the indoor environment...

  1. A 2.5-dimensional method for the prediction of structure-borne low-frequency noise from concrete rail transit bridges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qi; Song, Xiaodong; Wu, Dingjun

    2014-05-01

    Predicting structure-borne noise from bridges subjected to moving trains using the three-dimensional (3D) boundary element method (BEM) is a time consuming process. This paper presents a two-and-a-half dimensional (2.5D) BEM-based procedure for simulating bridge-borne low-frequency noise with higher efficiency, yet no loss of accuracy. The two-dimensional (2D) BEM of a bridge with a constant cross section along the track direction is adopted to calculate the spatial modal acoustic transfer vectors (MATVs) of the bridge using the space-wave number transforms of its 3D modal shapes. The MATVs calculated using the 2.5D method are then validated by those computed using the 3D BEM. The bridge-borne noise is finally obtained through the MATVs and modal coordinate responses of the bridge, considering time-varying vehicle-track-bridge dynamic interaction. The presented procedure is applied to predict the sound pressure radiating from a U-shaped concrete bridge, and the computed results are compared with those obtained from field tests on Shanghai rail transit line 8. The numerical results match well with the measured results in both time and frequency domains at near-field points. Nevertheless, the computed results are smaller than the measured ones for far-field points, mainly due to the sound radiation from adjacent spans neglected in the current model.

  2. Measurement of quasi-static and low frequency electric fields on the Viking satellite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Block, L.P.; Faelthammar, C.G.; Lindqvist, P.A.; Marklund, G.T.; Mozer, F.S.; Pedersen, A.

    1987-03-01

    The instrument for measurement of quasi-static and low frequency (dc and slow varying) electric fields on the Viking satellite is described. The instrument uses three spherical probe pairs to measure the full three-dimensional electric field vector with 18.75 ms time resolution. The probes are kept near plasma potential by means of a controllable bias current. A guard covering part of the booms is biased to a negative voltage to prevent photoelectrons escaping from the probes from reaching the satellite body. Current-voltage sweeps are performed to determine the plasma density and temperature and to select the optimal bias current. The bias currents to the probes and the voltage offset on the guards as well as the current-voltage sweeps are controlled by an on-board microprocessor which can be programmed from the ground and allows great flexibility. (authors)

  3. Structure-borne low-frequency noise from multi-span bridges: A prediction method and spatial distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, X. D.; Wu, D. J.; Li, Q.; Botteldooren, D.

    2016-04-01

    Structure-borne noise from railway bridges at far-field points is an important indicator in environmental noise assessment. However, studies that predict structure-borne noise tend to model only single-span bridges, thus ignoring the sound pressure radiating from adjacent spans. To simulate the noise radiating from multi-span bridges induced by moving vehicles, the vibrations of a multi-span bridge are first obtained from a three-dimensional (3D) vehicle-track-bridge dynamic interaction simulation using the mode superposition method. A procedure based on the 2.5-dimensional (2.5D) boundary element method (BEM) is then presented to promote the efficiency of acoustical computation compared with the 3D BEM. The simulated results obtained from both the single-span and multi-span bridge models are compared with the measured results. The sound predictions calculated from the single-span model are accurate only for a minority of near-field points. In contrast, the sound pressures calculated from the multi-span bridge model match the measured results in both the time and frequency domains for all of the near-field and far-field points. The number of bridge spans required in the noise simulation is then recommended related to the distance between the track center and the field points of interest. The spatial distribution of multi-span structure-borne noise is also studied. The variation in sound pressure levels is insignificant along the length of the bridge, which validates the finding that the sound test section can be selected at an arbitrary plane perpendicular to the multi-span bridge.

  4. Children’s Personal Exposure Measurements to Extremely Low Frequency Magnetic Fields in Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilaria Liorni

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Extremely low frequency magnetic fields (ELF-MFs exposure is still a topic of concern due to their possible impact on children’s health. Although epidemiological studies claimed an evidence of a possible association between ELF-MF above 0.4 μT and childhood leukemia, biological mechanisms able to support a causal relationship between ELF-MF and this disease were not found yet. To provide further knowledge about children’s ELF-MF exposure correlated to children’s daily activities, a measurement study was conducted in Milan (Italy. Eighty-six children were recruited, 52 of whom were specifically chosen with respect to the distance to power lines and built-in transformers to oversample potentially highly exposed children. Personal and bedroom measurements were performed for each child in two different seasons. The major outcomes of this study are: (1 median values over 24-h personal and bedroom measurements were <3 μT established by the Italian law as the quality target; (2 geometric mean values over 24-h bedroom measurements were mostly <0.4 μT; (3 seasonal variations did not significantly influence personal and bedroom measurements; (4 the highest average MF levels were mostly found at home during the day and outdoors; (5 no significant differences were found in the median and geometric mean values between personal and bedroom measurements, but were found in the arithmetic mean.

  5. Measurement procedure to assess exposure to extremely low-frequency fields: A primary school case study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alonso, A.; Bahillo, A.; De la Rosa, R.; Carrera, A.; Duran, R. J.; Fernandez, P.

    2012-01-01

    How to correctly measure the exposure of general public to extremely low-frequency (ELF) radiation is a key issue for ELF epidemiological studies. This paper proposes a measurement procedure to accurately assess the exposure of people to electric and magnetic field in the frequency band from 5 Hz to 100 kHz in buildings and their premises. As ELF radiation could be particularly harmful to children, the measurement procedure is focused on exposure to ELF in schools. Thus, the students' exposure to ELF fields can be assessed by correlating the ELF measurements to the hours of school activity. In this paper, the measurement protocol was applied to study the ELF exposure on students from Garcia Quintana primary school in Valladolid, Spain. The campaign of measurements for ELF exposure assessment in this primary school was of great interest for the Regional Council of Public Health because of the social alarm generated by the presence of a significant number cancer cases in children. (authors)

  6. Numerical simulation and analysis for low-frequency rock physics measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Chunhui; Tang, Genyang; Wang, Shangxu; He, Yanxiao

    2017-10-01

    In recent years, several experimental methods have been introduced to measure the elastic parameters of rocks in the relatively low-frequency range, such as differential acoustic resonance spectroscopy (DARS) and stress-strain measurement. It is necessary to verify the validity and feasibility of the applied measurement method and to quantify the sources and levels of measurement error. Relying solely on the laboratory measurements, however, we cannot evaluate the complete wavefield variation in the apparatus. Numerical simulations of elastic wave propagation, on the other hand, are used to model the wavefield distribution and physical processes in the measurement systems, and to verify the measurement theory and analyze the measurement results. In this paper we provide a numerical simulation method to investigate the acoustic waveform response of the DARS system and the quasi-static responses of the stress-strain system, both of which use axisymmetric apparatus. We applied this method to parameterize the properties of the rock samples, the sample locations and the sensor (hydrophone and strain gauges) locations and simulate the measurement results, i.e. resonance frequencies and axial and radial strains on the sample surface, from the modeled wavefield following the physical experiments. Rock physical parameters were estimated by inversion or direct processing of these data, and showed a perfect match with the true values, thus verifying the validity of the experimental measurements. Error analysis was also conducted for the DARS system with 18 numerical samples, and the sources and levels of error are discussed. In particular, we propose an inversion method for estimating both density and compressibility of these samples. The modeled results also showed fairly good agreement with the real experiment results, justifying the effectiveness and feasibility of our modeling method.

  7. Extremely low frequency magnetic field measurements in buildings with transformer stations in Switzerland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Röösli, Martin; Jenni, Daniela; Kheifets, Leeka; Mezei, Gabor

    2011-08-15

    The aim of this study was to evaluate an exposure assessment method that classifies apartments in three exposure categories of extremely low frequency magnetic fields (ELF-MF) based on the location of the apartment relative to the transformer room. We completed measurements in 39 apartments in 18 buildings. In each room of the apartments ELF-MF was concurrently measured with 5 to 6 EMDEX II meters for 10 min. Measured arithmetic mean ELF-MF was 0.59 μT in 8 apartments that were fully adjacent to a transformer room, either directly above the transformer or touching the transformer room wall-to-wall. In apartments that only partly touched the transformer room at corners or edges, average ELF-MF level was 0.14 μT. Average exposure in the remaining apartments was 0.10 μT. Kappa coefficient for exposure classification was 0.64 (95%-CI: 0.45-0.82) if only fully adjacent apartments were considered as highly exposed (>0.4 μT). We found a distinct ELF-MF exposure gradient in buildings with transformer. Exposure classification based on the location of the apartment relative to the transformer room appears feasible. Such an approach considerably reduces effort for exposure assessment and may be used to eliminate selection bias in future epidemiologic studies. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Measurement of misalignment in a journal bearing with low frequency ultrasound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Noh Nu

    1998-01-01

    Misalignment of a shaft in journal bearing of rotary compressor was measured and analyzed for the study on the effect of misalignment on the performance of the rotary compressor using a new ultrasonic pulse-echo technique. Two low-frequency ultrasonic transducers(10Mhz) were mounted on the outer surface of the bearing in X and Y axis to receive the reflection signals from each axis and to obtain the amplitude of a modified reflection wave defined as the total reflection wave minus the first reflection wave from a thin layer which is inversely proportional to the thickness of the layer in the region where h/λ is approximately less than 1/4. The relationship of the amplitude of the modified reflection wave to the thickness of the oil layer was shown both in mathematical form and in graph. Gap clearances between the bearing and the shaft in the horizontal and vertical axis were determined directly by the relationship and used to evaluate the misalignment of the journal bearing. Several intentional misalignments in a test compressor were made to measure and show the misalignment and the effect of the misalignment on the efficiency of the rotary compressor. A fast quantitative evaluation of the misalignment of journal bearing was possible using the amplitude of the modified reflection signal without any inversion process to extract thickness information from waveforms of the reflected waves.

  9. Low-frequency electromagnetic measurements at the NPE and Hunter`s Trophy: A comparison

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sweeney, J.J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1994-12-31

    Sensors and recorders were deployed for both the Non-Proliferative Experiment (NPE) and Hunter`s Trophy to measure low-frequency (1-30 Hz) electric and magnetic fields accompanying the detonation. Two stations were used for each event, located at a slant range of about 500 m, with measurements of orthogonal horizontal electric field and orthogonal horizontal and vertical magnetic field. Signals were recorded digitally with at 200 Hz sampling rate. Separate magnetic and electric signals were recorded which can be related both to the detonation and the arrival of the shock wave. The detonation time signal from the nuclear explosion is a relatively short pulse occurring with no detectable delay (within 0.5 ms) ranging from 11-19 ms after the detonation time. The cause of the initial electromagnetic signal for both chemical and nuclear explosions is unknown; the differences between the NPE and Hunter`s Trophy results may be related to the different mechanisms involved with plasma generation between nuclear and chemical explosions.

  10. Phase measurements of very-low-frequency signals from the magnetosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paschal, E.V.

    1988-01-01

    The usual methods of spectrum analysis applied to analog tape recordings of very low frequency (VLF) signals extract only magnitude information and ignore phase information. A digital signal-processing system using a recorded constant-frequency pilot tone was developed that can correct tape errors due to wow and flutter, and reconstruct the signal phases. Frequency shifts are corrected during analysis by interpolating between spectral points in the windowed Fourier transform, and the output phases of the synthesized filters are corrected for timing errors. Having signal-component phases as well as magnitudes doubles the available information. Whistler-mode signals from the VLF transmitter at Siple Station, Antarctica, were analyzed as received at Roberval, Quebec. The phase of a non-growing signal is found to give a less-noisy measure of duct motion than Doppler frequency shift, with improved time resolution. Correlations are seen between variations in the whistler-mode phase delay and the earth's magnetic field component D. They are interpreted as Pc 2 micropulsation transients, short compared to the length of the field line, which propagate from equator to ground as Alfven waves

  11. Interpretation of incore noise measurements in BWR's

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dam, H. van

    1983-01-01

    A survey is given of the main incentives for power reactor noise research, and the differences and similarities of noise in power and zero power systems are shown. After a short outline of historical developments the basic characteristics of the adjoint method in reactor noise theory are dealt with. The detector adjoint functions describe the transfer functions between spatially distributed noise sources and a (neutron or gamma) detector. In particular, the spatial dependence of these functions explains the 'local' and 'global' effects in BWR noise measurements. By including thermal hydraulic feedback effects in the adjoint analysis, it is shown that the common idea of a dominant global effect at low frequencies, which should result in point kinetic behaviour, is erroneous. The same analysis provides a method for nonperturbing on-line measurements on a BWR in The Netherlands. In the final part of the paper some ideas are given for further research in the field of BWR noise. (author)

  12. Characterization of low-frequency noise in molecular beam epitaxy-grown GaN epilayers deposited on double buffer layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fong, W.K.; Ng, S.W.; Leung, B.H.; Surya, Charles

    2003-01-01

    We report the growth of high-mobility Si-doped GaN epilayers utilizing unique double buffer layer (DBL) structures, which consist of a thin buffer layer and a thick GaN intermediate-temperature buffer layer (ITBL). In this study, three types of DBL were investigated: (i) thin GaN low-temperature buffer layer/GaN ITBL (type I); (ii) nitridated Ga metal film/GaN ITBL (type II); and (iii) thin AlN high-temperature buffer layer/GaN ITBL (type III). Systematic measurements were conducted on the electron mobilities and the low-frequency noise over a wide range of temperatures. It is found that the electron mobilities of the GaN films are substantially improved with the use of DBLs, with the sample using type III DBL which exhibits the highest low-temperature mobility. Furthermore, the same sample also demonstrates the elimination of deep levels at 91 and 255 meV below the conduction band. This is believed to result from the relaxation of tensile stress during growth with the use of type III DBLs

  13. The Measurement of Low Frequency Magnetic Field of Two Kinds of GSM900 Mobile Phone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehri Kaviani Moghadam

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction:  The  use  of  mobile  communication  systems  has  dramatically  increased  over  the  past  decade. Although many studies have been performed to determine the effect of radio frequency (RF but  less attention has been paid to the possible biological impact of exposure to extremely low frequency  (ELF components.   The objective of this study is two folds. One is to design the equipments needed for the measurement of  the ELF fields of two types of GSM900 mobile phone. Secondly, use a protocol suitable for an accurate  assessment of the ELF fields.  Materials  and Methods:  First  a  home-made  search  coil  was  provided  and  calibrated precisely  under  several experiments. Using Fast Fourier Transform, the power spectrum density of the induced voltage in  the search coil was analyzed and the amplitudes of 217 Hz and its harmonics were extracted and then the  distribution of magnetic field in the back side of mobile phones was determined.  Results: The values of B-field on the back side of the two kinds of GSM mobile phone were different.  They  were  between  50  to  160  µT in  Nokia  3310  and  14  to  30  µT in  Nokia  8310.  Considering  the  difference between the amplitudes of frequency components at 217 Hz and its harmonics in the two kinds  of mobile phone, a range of magnetic flux density at different times in a five day period was measured.  Discussion and Conclusion: These findings emphasize the need for considering the distribution of low  frequency magnetic field from mobile phone when biological effects of magnetic fields are studied. To  determine  the  intensity  windowing  effect,  one  must  consider  the  physical  characteristics  of  the  fundamental  frequency  component  wave  (217  Hz  and  its  harmonics  produced  by  the  mobile  phone  similar to the one generated under a real situation.

  14. Modeling and characterization of the low frequency noise behavior for amorphous InGaZnO thin film transistors in the subthreshold region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Minxi; Yao, Ruohe

    2017-10-01

    An analytical model of the low-frequency noise (LFN) for amorphous InGaZnO (a-IGZO) thin film transistors (TFTs) in the subthreshold region is developed. For a-IGZO TFTs, relations between the device noise and the subgap defects are characterized based on the dominant multiple trapping and release (MTR) mechanism. The LFN is considered to be contributed from trapping/detrapping of carriers both into the border traps and the subgap density of states (DOS). It is revealed that the LFN behavior of a-IGZO TFTs in the subthreshold region is significantly influenced by the distribution of tail states, where MTR process prevails. The 1/f α (with α < 1) spectrum of the drain current noise is also related to the characteristic temperature of the tail states. The new method is introduced to calculate the LFN of devices by extracting the LFN-related DOS parameters from the current-voltage characteristics.

  15. Simulation and Measurement of Through-the-Earth, Extremely Low-Frequency Signals Using Copper-Clad Steel Ground Rods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damiano, Nicholas William; Yan, Lincan; Whisner, Bruce; Zhou, Chenming

    2017-01-01

    The underground mining environment can greatly affect radio signal propagation. Understanding how the earth affects signal propagation is a key to evaluating communications systems used during a mine emergency. One type of communication system is through-the-earth, which can utilize extremely low frequencies (ELF). This paper presents the simulation and measurement results of recent National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) research aimed at investigating current injection at ELF, and in particular, ground contact impedance. Measurements were taken at an outside surface testing location. The results obtained from modeling and measurement are characterized by electrode impedance, and the voltage received between two distant electrodes. This paper concludes with a discussion of design considerations found to affect low-frequency communication systems utilizing ground rods to inject a current into the earth.

  16. Examination of the low frequency limit for helicopter noise data in the Federal Aviation Administration's Aviation Environmental Design Tool and Integrated Noise Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-19

    The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) aircraft noise modeling tools Aviation Environmental Design Tool (AEDTc) and Integrated Noise Model (INM) do not currently consider noise below 50 Hz in their computations. This paper describes a preliminary ...

  17. The low-frequency sound power measuring technique for an underwater source in a non-anechoic tank

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yi-Ming; Tang, Rui; Li, Qi; Shang, Da-Jing

    2018-03-01

    In order to determine the radiated sound power of an underwater source below the Schroeder cut-off frequency in a non-anechoic tank, a low-frequency extension measuring technique is proposed. This technique is based on a unique relationship between the transmission characteristics of the enclosed field and those of the free field, which can be obtained as a correction term based on previous measurements of a known simple source. The radiated sound power of an unknown underwater source in the free field can thereby be obtained accurately from measurements in a non-anechoic tank. To verify the validity of the proposed technique, a mathematical model of the enclosed field is established using normal-mode theory, and the relationship between the transmission characteristics of the enclosed and free fields is obtained. The radiated sound power of an underwater transducer source is tested in a glass tank using the proposed low-frequency extension measuring technique. Compared with the free field, the radiated sound power level of the narrowband spectrum deviation is found to be less than 3 dB, and the 1/3 octave spectrum deviation is found to be less than 1 dB. The proposed testing technique can be used not only to extend the low-frequency applications of non-anechoic tanks, but also for measurement of radiated sound power from complicated sources in non-anechoic tanks.

  18. Direct measurements of damping rates and stability limits for low frequency MHD modes and Alfven Eigenmodes in the JET tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fasoli, A.F.; Testa, D.; Jaun, A.; Sharapov, S.; Gormezano, C.

    2001-01-01

    The linear stability properties of global modes that can be driven by resonant energetic particles or by the bulk plasma are studied using an external excitation method based on the JET saddle coil antennas. Low toroidal mode number, stable plasma modes are driven by the saddle coils and detected by magnetic probes to measure their structure, frequency and damping rate, both in the Alfven Eigenmode (AE) frequency range and in the low frequency Magneto-Hydro-Dynamic (MHD) range. For AEs, the dominant damping mechanisms are identified for different plasma conditions of relevance for reactors. Spectra and damping rates of low frequency MHD modes that are localized at the foot of the internal transport barrier and can affect the plasma performance in advanced tokamak scenarios have been directly measured for the first time. This gives the possibility of monitoring in real time the approach to the instability boundary. (author)

  19. Simulation and Measurement of Through-the-Earth, Extremely Low-Frequency Signals Using Copper-Clad Steel Ground Rods

    OpenAIRE

    Damiano, Nicholas William; Yan, Lincan; Whisner, Bruce; Zhou, Chenming

    2017-01-01

    The underground mining environment can greatly affect radio signal propagation. Understanding how the earth affects signal propagation is a key to evaluating communications systems used during a mine emergency. One type of communication system is through-the-earth, which can utilize extremely low frequencies (ELF). This paper presents the simulation and measurement results of recent National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) research aimed at investigating current injection...

  20. Effects of Weekly Low-Frequency rTMS on Autonomic Measures in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Fernando Casanova

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The term autism spectrum disorder (ASD describes a range of conditions characterized by impairments in social interactions, communication, and by restricted and repetitive behaviors. ASD may also present with symptoms suggestive of autonomic nervous system (ANS dysfunction. The objective of this study was to determine the effect of 18 sessions of low frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS on autonomic function in children with ASD by recording electrocardiogram (EKG and electrodermal activity pre-, post- and during each rTMS session. The autonomic measures of interest in this study were R-R cardiointervals in EKG (R-R, time and frequency domain measures of heart rate variability (HRV and skin conductance level (SCL. HRV measures such as R-R intervals, standard deviation of cardiac intervals, pNN50 (percentage of cardiointervals>50 ms different from preceding interval, power of high frequency (HF and low frequency (LF components of HRV spectrum, LF/HF ratio, were then derived from the recorded EKG. We expected that the course of 18 weekly inhibitory low-frequency rTMS applied to the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC would enhance autonomic balance by facilitating frontal inhibition of limbic activity thus resulting in decreased overall heart rate, increased HRV (in a form of increased HF power, decreased LF power (resulting in decreased LF/HF ratio, and decreased SCL. Behavioral evaluations post-18 TMS showed decreased irritability, hyperactivity, stereotype behavior and compulsive behavior ratings while autonomic measures indicated a significant increase in cardiac interval variability and a decrease of tonic SCL. The results suggest that 18 sessions of low frequency rTMS in ASD results in increased cardiac vagal control and reduced sympathetic arousal.

  1. Statistics and vertical directionality of low-frequency ambient noise at the North Pacific Acoustics Laboratory site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baggeroer, Arthur B.; NPAL Group; Colosi, J. A.; Cornuelle, B. D.; Dushaw, B. D.; Dzieciuch, M. A.; Howe, B. M.; Mercer, J. A.; Munk, W. H.; Spindel, R. C.; Worcester, P. F.

    2005-03-01

    We examine statistical and directional properties of the ambient noise in the 10-100 Hz frequency band from the NPAL array. Marginal probability densities are estimated as well as mean square levels, skewness and kurtoses in third octave bands. The kurotoses are markedly different from Gaussian except when only distant shipping is present. Extremal levels reached ~150 dB re 1 μ Pa, suggesting levels 60dB greater than the mean ambient were common in the NPAL data sets. Generally, these were passing ships. We select four examples: i) quiescent noise, ii) nearby shipping, iii) whale vocalizations and iv) a micro earthquake for the vertical directional properties of the NPAL noise since they are representative of the phenomena encountered. We find there is modest broadband coherence for most of these cases in their occupancy band across the NPAL aperture. Narrowband coherence analysis from VLA to VLA was not successful due to ambiguities. Examples of localizing sources based upon this coherence are included. kw diagrams allow us to use data above the vertical aliasing frequency. Ducted propagation for both the quiescent and micro earthquake (T phase) are identified and the arrival angles of nearby shipping and whale vocalizations. MFP localizations were modestly successful for nearby sources, but long range ones could not be identified, most likely because of signal mismatch in the MFP replica. .

  2. Measurement of correlations between low-frequency vibrational modes and particle rearrangements in quasi-two-dimensional colloidal glasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ke; Manning, M L; Yunker, Peter J; Ellenbroek, Wouter G; Zhang, Zexin; Liu, Andrea J; Yodh, A G

    2011-09-02

    We investigate correlations between low-frequency vibrational modes and rearrangements in two-dimensional colloidal glasses composed of thermosensitive microgel particles, which readily permit variation of the sample packing fraction. At each packing fraction, the particle displacement covariance matrix is measured and used to extract the vibrational spectrum of the "shadow" colloidal glass (i.e., the particle network with the same geometry and interactions as the sample colloid but absent damping). Rearrangements are induced by successive, small reductions in the packing fraction. The experimental results suggest that low-frequency quasilocalized phonon modes in colloidal glasses, i.e., modes that present low energy barriers for system rearrangements, are spatially correlated with rearrangements in this thermal system.

  3. Suspension for the low frequency facility

    CERN Document Server

    Cella, G; Di Virgilio, A; Gaddi, A; Viceré, A

    2000-01-01

    We introduce the working principles of the VIRGO Low Frequency Facility (LFF), whose main aim is the measurement of the thermal noise in the VIRGO suspension system. We evaluate the displacement thermal noise of a mirror, which is an intermediate element of a double pendulum suspension system. This double pendulum will be suspended to the last stage of a VIRGO Super-Attenuator (SA), the prototype VIRGO suspension system being tested at the Pisa section of INFN. In the proposed configuration, we evaluate the spectrum of the thermal noise for different choices of the parameters: based on this study, we comment on the future directions to be undertaken in the LFF experiment.

  4. Low frequency radioastronomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zarka, Philippe; Cecconi, Baptiste; Tagger, Michel; Torchinsky, Steve; Picard, Philippe; Pezzani, Jacques; Cognard, Ismael; Boone, Frederic; Woan, Graham; Weber, Rodolphe; Gousset, Thierry; Lautridou, Pascal; Dallier, Richard

    2011-07-01

    Low frequency radioastronomy deals with the direct detection (below 100 MHz) and heterodyne detection (up to few GHz) of electromagnetic waves (phase and amplitude) followed by a time or spectral analysis. The 30. Goutelas school covered several aspects of radioastronomy involving various aspects of physics: non-thermal phenomena in plasmas and physics of magnetized plasmas, atomic and molecular physics, and particle physics. These proceedings comprise 17 lectures dealing with: 1 - Low-Frequency Radioastronomy Basics (P. Zarka); 2 - Radioastronomy Historical Highlights (S. A. Torchinsky); 3 - Antennas (P. Picard, J. Pezzani); 4 - Receptors (P. Picard, J. Pezzani); 5 - Pulsars chronometry: metrology in radioastronomy (I. Cognard); 6 - Interferometry as imaging technique (F. Boone); 7 - Radio propagation and scintillation (G. Woan); 8 - Square Kilometer Array (S. A. Torchinsky); 9 - Techniques against radio-electrical interferences in low-frequency radioastronomy (R. Weber); 10 - Introduction to poly-phase filtering (R. Weber); 11 - Three decades of Jupiter's radio-emission studies: from the Nancay deca-meter network to LOFAR (P. Zarka); 12 - Atmospheric showers and their radio counterpart (T. Gousset); 13 - From cosmic rays radio-detection to pulse radioastronomy (P. Lautridou, R. Dallier); 14 - The CODALEMA project (R. Dallier, P. Lautridou); 15 - Space-based radio measurements: Gonio-polarimetry (B. Cecconi); 16 - Radio astronomy from space (G. Woan); 17 - LOFAR: the Low Frequency Array and the French FLOW consortium (M. Tagger, P. Zarka)

  5. Noise measurement at wind power plants; Geraeuschmessung an Windenergieanlagen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schoene, Ralph [Cirrus Research plc, Frankfurt am Main (Germany)

    2012-09-15

    Wind energy is a supporting pillar of the energy transition. For further expansion, it is important to reduce prejudices, for example by measurements as precise as possible and assessments of the often unobjectively discussed noise emissions. These measurements are based on instruments which can analyze and measure low-frequency sound.

  6. Low-Frequency Noise in Layered ReS2 Field Effect Transistors on HfO2 and Its Application for pH Sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Wugang; Wei, Wei; Tong, Yu; Chim, Wai Kin; Zhu, Chunxiang

    2018-02-28

    Layered rhenium disulfide (ReS 2 ) field effect transistors (FETs), with thickness ranging from few to dozens of layers, are demonstrated on 20 nm thick HfO 2 /Si substrates. A small threshold voltage of -0.25 V, high on/off current ratio of up to ∼10 7 , small subthreshold swing of 116 mV/dec, and electron carrier mobility of 6.02 cm 2 /V·s are obtained for the two-layer ReS 2 FETs. Low-frequency noise characteristics in ReS 2 FETs are analyzed for the first time, and it is found that the carrier number fluctuation mechanism well describes the flicker (1/f) noise of ReS 2 FETs with different thicknesses. pH sensing using a two-layer ReS 2 FET with HfO 2 as a sensing oxide is then demonstrated with a voltage sensitivity of 54.8 mV/pH and a current sensitivity of 126. The noise characteristics of the ReS 2 FET-based pH sensors are also examined, and a corresponding detection limit of 0.0132 pH is obtained. Our studies suggest the high potential of ReS 2 for future low-power nanoelectronics and biosensor applications.

  7. Surprisingly low frequency attenuation effects in long tubes when measuring turbulent fluxes at tall towers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ibrom, Andreas; Brændholt, Andreas; Pilegaard, Kim

    2016-01-01

    The eddy covariance technique relies on the fast and accurate measurement of gas concentration fluctuations. While for some gasses robust and compact sensors are available, measurement of, e.g., non CO2 greenhouse gas fluxes is often performed with sensitive equipment that cannot be run on a tower...... without massively disturbing the wind field. To measure CO and N2O fluxes, we installed an eddy covariance system at a 125 m mast, where the gas analyser was kept in a laboratory close to the tower and the sampling was performed using a 150 m long tube with a gas intake at 96 m height. We investigated...... by reducing both the water vapour dilution correction and the cross sensitivity effects on the N2O and CO flux measurements. Here we present the set-up of the concentration step change experiment and its results and compare them with recently developed theories for the behaviour of gases in turbulent tube...

  8. Comparison between laboratory measurements, simulations, and analytical predictions of the transverse wall impedance at low frequencies

    CERN Document Server

    Roncarolo, F; Kroyer, T; Metral, E; Mounet, N; Salvant, B; Zotter, B

    2009-01-01

    The prediction of the transverse wall beam impedance at the first unstable betatron line (8 kHz) of the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is of paramount importance for understanding and controlling the related coupled-bunch instabilities. Until now only novel analytical formulas were available at this frequency. Recently, laboratory measurements and numerical simulations were performed to cross-check the analytical predictions. The experimental results based on the measurement of the variation of a probe coil inductance in the presence of (i) sample graphite plates, (ii) stand-alone LHC collimator jaws, and (iii) a full LHC collimator assembly are presented in detail. The measurement results are compared to both analytical theories and simulations. In addition, the consequences for the understanding of the LHC impedance are discussed.

  9. Interpretation of incore noise measurements in BWR's

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dam, H. van

    1982-01-01

    A survey is given of the main incentives for power reactor noise research and the differences and similarities of noise in power and zero power systems are touched on. The basic characteristics of the adjoint method in reactor noise theory are treated. The detector adjoint functions describe the transfer functions between spatially distributed noise sources and a (neutron or gamma) detector. In particular, the spatial dependence of these functions explains the 'local' and 'global' effects in BWR noise measurements. By including thermal hydraulic feedback effects in the adjoint analysis, it is shown that the common idea of a dominant global effect at low frequencies which should result in point kinetic behaviour, is erroneous. The same analysis provides a method for nonperturbing on-line measurement of the reactor transfer function, which is demonstrated by results from measurements on a BWR in the Netherlands. In the final part of the paper some ideas are given for further research in the field of BWR noise. (author)

  10. The low-frequency dielectric properties of octopus arm muscle measured in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hart, F.X.; Toll, R.B.; Berner, N.J.; Bennett, N.H.

    1996-01-01

    The conductance and capacitance of octopus arm are measured in vivo over the frequency range 5 Hz to 1 MHz. Measurement of these parameters for a number of electrode separations permits the determination of the variations in tissue conductivity and dielectric constant with frequency. In the range 1-100 kHz the conductivity is independent of the frequency f and the dielectric constant varies as f -1 . These results, in conjunction with those reported previously for frog skeletal muscle, are consistent with the fractal model for the dielectric properties of animal tissue proposed by Dissado. Transformation of the results to complex impedance spectra indicates the presence of a dispersion above 100 kHz. (author)

  11. Measuring saccade peak velocity using a low-frequency sampling rate of 50 Hz.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wierts, Roel; Janssen, Maurice J A; Kingma, Herman

    2008-12-01

    During the last decades, small head-mounted video eye trackers have been developed in order to record eye movements. Real-time systems-with a low sampling frequency of 50/60 Hz-are used for clinical vestibular practice, but are generally considered not to be suited for measuring fast eye movements. In this paper, it is shown that saccadic eye movements, having an amplitude of at least 5 degrees, can, in good approximation, be considered to be bandwidth limited up to a frequency of 25-30 Hz. Using the Nyquist theorem to reconstruct saccadic eye movement signals at higher temporal resolutions, it is shown that accurate values for saccade peak velocities, recorded at 50 Hz, can be obtained, but saccade peak accelerations and decelerations cannot. In conclusion, video eye trackers sampling at 50/60 Hz are appropriate for detecting the clinical relevant saccade peak velocities in contrast to what has been stated up till now.

  12. Low-frequency noise in multilayer MoS2 field-effect transistors: the effect of high-k passivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Na, Junhong; Joo, Min-Kyu; Shin, Minju; Huh, Junghwan; Kim, Jae-Sung; Piao, Mingxing; Jin, Jun-Eon; Jang, Ho-Kyun; Choi, Hyung Jong; Shim, Joon Hyung; Kim, Gyu-Tae

    2014-01-07

    Diagnosing of the interface quality and the interactions between insulators and semiconductors is significant to achieve the high performance of nanodevices. Herein, low-frequency noise (LFN) in mechanically exfoliated multilayer molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) (~11.3 nm-thick) field-effect transistors with back-gate control was characterized with and without an Al2O3 high-k passivation layer. The carrier number fluctuation (CNF) model associated with trapping/detrapping the charge carriers at the interface nicely described the noise behavior in the strong accumulation regime both with and without the Al2O3 passivation layer. The interface trap density at the MoS2-SiO2 interface was extracted from the LFN analysis, and estimated to be Nit ~ 10(10) eV(-1) cm(-2) without and with the passivation layer. This suggested that the accumulation channel induced by the back-gate was not significantly influenced by the passivation layer. The Hooge mobility fluctuation (HMF) model implying the bulk conduction was found to describe the drain current fluctuations in the subthreshold regime, which is rarely observed in other nanodevices, attributed to those extremely thin channel sizes. In the case of the thick-MoS2 (~40 nm-thick) without the passivation, the HMF model was clearly observed all over the operation regime, ensuring the existence of the bulk conduction in multilayer MoS2. With the Al2O3 passivation layer, the change in the noise behavior was explained from the point of formation of the additional top channel in the MoS2 because of the fixed charges in the Al2O3. The interface trap density from the additional CNF model was Nit = 1.8 × 10(12) eV(-1) cm(-2) at the MoS2-Al2O3 interface.

  13. Non-intrusive load monitoring based on low frequency active power measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chinthaka Dinesh

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available A Non-Intrusive Load Monitoring (NILM method for residential appliances based on active power signal is presented. This method works effectively with a single active power measurement taken at a low sampling rate (1 s. The proposed method utilizes the Karhunen Loéve (KL expansion to decompose windows of active power signals into subspace components in order to construct a unique set of features, referred to as signatures, from individual and aggregated active power signals. Similar signal windows were clustered in to one group prior to feature extraction. The clustering was performed using a modified mean shift algorithm. After the feature extraction, energy levels of signal windows and power levels of subspace components were utilized to reduce the number of possible appliance combinations and their energy level combinations. Then, the turned on appliance combination and the energy contribution from individual appliances were determined through the Maximum a Posteriori (MAP estimation. Finally, the proposed method was modified to adaptively accommodate the usage patterns of appliances at each residence. The proposed NILM method was validated using data from two public databases: tracebase and reference energy disaggregation data set (REDD. The presented results demonstrate the ability of the proposed method to accurately identify and disaggregate individual energy contributions of turned on appliance combinations in real households. Furthermore, the results emphasise the importance of clustering and the integration of the usage behaviour pattern in the proposed NILM method for real households.

  14. Can Low Frequency Measurements Be Good Enough? - A Statistical Assessment of Citizen Hydrology Streamflow Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davids, J. C.; Rutten, M.; Van De Giesen, N.

    2016-12-01

    Hydrologic data has traditionally been collected with permanent installations of sophisticated and relatively accurate but expensive monitoring equipment at limited numbers of sites. Consequently, the spatial coverage of the data is limited and costs are high. Achieving adequate maintenance of sophisticated monitoring equipment often exceeds local technical and resource capacity, and permanently deployed monitoring equipment is susceptible to vandalism, theft, and other hazards. Rather than using expensive, vulnerable installations at a few points, SmartPhones4Water (S4W), a form of Citizen Hydrology, leverages widely available mobile technology to gather hydrologic data at many sites in a manner that is repeatable and scalable. However, there is currently a limited understanding of the impact of decreased observational frequency on the accuracy of key streamflow statistics like minimum flow, maximum flow, and runoff. As a first step towards evaluating the tradeoffs between traditional continuous monitoring approaches and emerging Citizen Hydrology methods, we randomly selected 50 active U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) streamflow gauges in California. We used historical 15 minute flow data from 01/01/2008 through 12/31/2014 to develop minimum flow, maximum flow, and runoff values (7 year total) for each gauge. In order to mimic lower frequency Citizen Hydrology observations, we developed a bootstrap randomized subsampling with replacement procedure. We calculated the same statistics, along with their respective distributions, from 50 subsample iterations with four different subsampling intervals (i.e. daily, three day, weekly, and monthly). Based on our results we conclude that, depending on the types of questions being asked, and the watershed characteristics, Citizen Hydrology streamflow measurements can provide useful and accurate information. Depending on watershed characteristics, minimum flows were reasonably estimated with subsample intervals ranging from

  15. Prototype fiber Bragg Grattings (FBG) sensor based on intensity modulation of the laser diode low frequency vibrations measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setiono, Andi; Ula, Rini Khamimatul; Hanto, Dwi; Widiyatmoko, Bambang; Purnamaningsih, Retno Wigajatri

    2016-02-01

    In general, Fiber Bragg Grating (FBG) sensor works based on observation of spectral response characteristic to detect the desired parameter. In this research, we studied intensity response characteristic of FBG to detect the dynamic strain. Experiment result show that the reflected intensity had linier relationships with dynamic strain. Based on these characteristics, we developed the FBG sensor to detect low frequency vibration. This sensor is designed by attaching the FBG on the bronze cantilever with dimensions of 85×3×0.5 mm. Measurement results showed that the sensor was able to detect vibrations in the frequency range of 7-10 Hz at temperature range of 25-45 ˚C. The measured frequency range is still within the frequency range of digging activity, therefore this vibration sensor can be applied for oil pipelines vandalisation detection system.

  16. Low-frequency noise in AlTiO/AlGaN/GaN metal-insulator-semiconductor heterojunction field-effect transistors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le, Son Phuong; Ui, Toshimasa; Nguyen, Tuan Quy; Shih, Hong-An; Suzuki, Toshi-kazu, E-mail: tosikazu@jaist.ac.jp [Center for Nano Materials and Technology, Japan Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (JAIST), 1-1 Asahidai, Nomi, Ishikawa 923-1292 (Japan)

    2016-05-28

    Using aluminum titanium oxide (AlTiO, an alloy of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and TiO{sub 2}) as a high-k gate insulator, we fabricated and investigated AlTiO/AlGaN/GaN metal-insulator-semiconductor heterojunction field-effect transistors. From current low-frequency noise (LFN) characterization, we find Lorentzian spectra near the threshold voltage, in addition to 1/f spectra for the well-above-threshold regime. The Lorentzian spectra are attributed to electron trapping/detrapping with two specific time constants, ∼25 ms and ∼3 ms, which are independent of the gate length and the gate voltage, corresponding to two trap level depths of 0.5–0.7 eV with a 0.06 eV difference in the AlTiO insulator. In addition, gate leakage currents are analyzed and attributed to the Poole-Frenkel mechanism due to traps in the AlTiO insulator, where the extracted trap level depth is consistent with the Lorentzian LFN.

  17. Measurement and control of occupational noise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elammari, Muftah Faraj

    2007-01-01

    High level of environmental and occupational noise remain a problem all over the world. As problems and complaints increased dramatically by the end of the 19th and beginning of the 20th centuries focusing on the problem was intensified. In this thesis occupational noise levels at different places were measured and compared with the international permissible levels using the integrating sound level meter (Quest 2800). The calibration of the instrument was carried out before and after each measurement using the acoustic calibrator (Quest CA-12B calibrator). The method which was followed was measuring the sound pressure level of the different noise sources over a broad frequency band covering the audible frequency range using the (octave band filter, model OB-100), disregrading variation with time. Since the human ear is most sensitive in the 2-5 khz range of frequencies and least sensitive at extremely high and low frequencies the instrument was adjusted on the A weighting net work which varies with frequencies in a very similar way as that of the human ear. From the obtained results, some noise levels which were recorded were within the permissible levels i.e. below 90 dba and some noise levels were higher than the permissible limit as in janzour textile factory (95 dba), The welding workshop (120 dba), Benghazi Macaroni factory (100 dba), and near the air blowers at Zletin cement factory, Benghazi cement factory (97-10-dba) in these cases suggestions were made to minimize the problem. Concerning the noise control, four methods of noise control were tested, these methods were: reducing noise by sound absorbing material at Sirt local broadcasting radio, reducing noise by keeping a distance from the noise source, at the Boilers hall at REWDC, reducing noise by enclosures, at the compressors room at Zletin cement factory, and finally reducing noise by performing regular maintenance at Garabolli photo development centre. The percentage of noise reduction was 21%, 12

  18. Measurement of correlations between low-frequency vibrational modes and particle rearrangements in quasi-two-dimensional colloidal glasses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, K.; Manning, M.L.; Yunker, P.J.; Ellenbroek, W.G.; Zhang, Zexin; Liu, Andrea J.; Yodh, A.G.

    2011-01-01

    We investigate correlations between low-frequency vibrational modes and rearrangements in two-dimensional colloidal glasses composed of thermosensitive microgel particles, which readily permit variation of the sample packing fraction. At each packing fraction, the particle displacement covariance

  19. Status of the low frequency facility experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bracci, L; Calamai, G; Cuoco, E; Dominici, P; Fabbroni, L; Guidi, G; Losurdo, G; Martelli, F; Mazzoni, M; Stanga, R; Vetrano, F; Porzio, A; Ricciardi, I; Solimeno, S; Ballardin, G; Braccini, S; Bradaschia, C; Casciano, C; Cavalieri, R; Cecchi, R; Cella, G; Dattilo, V; Virgilio, A Di; Fazzi, M; Ferrante, I; Fidecaro, F; Frasconi, F; Gennaro, G; Giazotto, A; Holloway, L; Penna, P La; Lomtadze, T; Nenci, F; Nicolosi, L; Lelli, F; Paoletti, F; Pasqualetti, A; Passaquieti, R; Passuello, D; Poggiani, R; Raffaelli, F; Taddei, R; Vicere, A; Zhang, Z; Frasca, S; Majorana, E; Palomba, C; Perciballi, M; Puppo, P; Rapagnani, P; Ricci, F

    2002-01-01

    The low frequency facility is a VIRGO R and D experiment having the goal of performing a direct measurement of the thermal noise of the VIRGO suspensions by means of a two-mirror Fabry-Perot cavity suspended to the last stage of the attenuating chain. The present status of advancement of this experiment is reported: the apparatus, including mechanical and optical parts, has been completely built and put into operation. Vacuum facilities and the first control loops are active. First measurements on the suspended cavity are in progress

  20. Status of the low frequency facility experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bracci, L [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Firenze, Florence (Italy); Calamai, G [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sez Firenze/Urbino (Italy); Cuoco, E [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sez Firenze/Urbino (Italy); Dominici, P [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Firenze, Firenze (Italy); Fabbroni, L [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sez Firenze/Urbino (Italy); Guidi, G [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Urbino, Urbino (Italy); Losurdo, G [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sez Firenze/Urbino (Italy); Martelli, F [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sez Firenze/Urbino (Italy); Mazzoni, M [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sez Firenze/Urbino (Italy); Stanga, R [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sez Firenze/Urbino (Italy); Vetrano, F [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Urbino, Urbino (Italy); Porzio, A [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sez Naples (Italy); Ricciardi, I [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sez Naples (Italy); Solimeno, S [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sez Naples (Italy); Ballardin, G [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sez Pisa (Italy); Braccini, S [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sez Pisa (Italy); Bradaschia, C [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sez Pisa (Italy); Casciano, C [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sez Pisa (Italy); Cavalieri, R [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sez Pisa (Italy); Cecchi, R [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sez Pisa (Italy); Cella, G [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sez Pisa (Italy); Dattilo, V [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sez Pisa (Italy); Virgilio, A Di [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sez Pisa (Italy); Fazzi, M [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sez Pisa (Italy); Ferrante, I [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sez Pisa (Italy); Fidecaro, F [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sez Pisa (Italy)] [and others

    2002-04-07

    The low frequency facility is a VIRGO R and D experiment having the goal of performing a direct measurement of the thermal noise of the VIRGO suspensions by means of a two-mirror Fabry-Perot cavity suspended to the last stage of the attenuating chain. The present status of advancement of this experiment is reported: the apparatus, including mechanical and optical parts, has been completely built and put into operation. Vacuum facilities and the first control loops are active. First measurements on the suspended cavity are in progress.

  1. LOW FREQUENCY DAMPER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radu BOGATEANU

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The low frequency damper is an autonomous equipment for damping vibrations with the 1-20Hz range.Its autonomy enables the equipment to be located in various mechanical systems, without requiring special hydraulic installations.The low frequency damper was designed for damping the low frequency oscillations occurring in the circuit controls of the upgraded IAR-99 Aircraft.The low frequency damper is a novelty in the aerospace field ,with applicability in several areas as it can be built up in an appropriate range of dimensions meeting the requirements of different beneficiaries. On this line an equipment able to damp an extended frequency range was performed for damping oscillations in the pipes of the nuclear power plants.This damper, tested in INCAS laboratories matched the requirements of the beneficiary.The low frequency damper is patented – the patent no. 114583C1/2000 is held by INCAS.

  2. Measurements techniques for transportation noise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brambilla, G.

    2001-01-01

    The noise from transport systems (roads, railways and aircraft) are increasing more and more both in space and in time and, therefore, they are still the major factor responsible for environmental noise pollution. The population exposed to transport noise is also increasing, and the corresponding health effects on people (i.e. annoyance and sleep disturbance) become more severe. Due to this current situation international and national legislation has been issued and implemented to reduce the harmful effects of such noise. This paper describes the techniques prescribed by recent Italian legislation to measure road, railway and aircraft noise. (author)

  3. High-Tc Superconducting Bolometer Noise Measurement Using Low Noise Transformers - Theory and Optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslam, Shahid; Jones, Hollis H.

    2011-01-01

    Care must always be taken when performing noise measurements on high-Tc superconducting materials to ensure that the results are not from the measurement system itself. One situation likely to occur is with low noise transformers. One of the least understood devices, it provides voltage gain for low impedance inputs (< 100 ), e.g., YBaCuO and GdBaCuO thin films, with comparatively lower noise levels than other devices for instance field effect and bipolar junction transistors. An essential point made in this paper is that because of the complex relationships between the transformer ports, input impedance variance alters the transformer s transfer function in particular, the low frequency cutoff shift. The transfer of external and intrinsic transformer noise to the output along with optimization and precautions are treated; all the while, we will cohesively connect the transfer function shift, the load impedance, and the actual noise at the transformer output.

  4. Audible Noise Measurement and Analysis of the Main Power Apparatus in UHV GIS Substations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Nian Guang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Investigation of audible noise characteristics of the main power apparatus in UHV GIS substations provides essential statistics for the noise prediction and control. Noise pressure level, spectrum and attenuation characteristics of the main transformers and high voltage (HV reactors are measured and analyzed in this paper. The result shows that the main transformer and HV reactor have identical A-weighted equivalent sound pressure level. The medium- and low-frequency noises are the primary components in the spectral. More attention should be paid to the low-frequency bands in the noise control process. The noise of cooling fan has a large influence on that of the main transformer. Without the consideration of corona noise, the average A-weighted sound pressure level shows an overall decreasing trend with the increase of the propagation distance. Obvious interference phenomenon of the noises at 100 and 200Hz exists in the noise propagation process.

  5. Low frequency sounds in dwellings : A case control study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Berg, Frits (G P)

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to systematically assess the level and spectral distribution of low frequency (LF) sounds in dwellings. Measurements of broad and narrow hand sound levels have been made in 36 Dutch dwellings in 1998. In 19 dwellings there were complaints about LF noise, in 17 others no

  6. Automated system for noise-measurements on low-ohmic samples and magnetic sensors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jonker, R.J.W.; Briaire, J.; Vandamme, L.K.J.

    1999-01-01

    An automated system for electronic noise measurements on metal films is presented. This new system, controlled by a personal computer which utilizes National Instruments' LabVIEW software, is designed to measure low frequency noise as a function of an externally imposed magnetic field and as a

  7. Low frequency electromagnetic field sensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Min; Zhou Yan; He Yicheng; Zheng Zhenxing; Liu Sunkun

    2000-01-01

    The measurement technique of low frequency electromagnetic field is reported. According to this principle, the authors have designed a sensor, which is used to measure the natural electromagnetic field, SLEMP and electromagnetic signals generated by some explosions. The frequency band of this sensor is from 0.08 Hz to 2 MHz

  8. Analysis of mode-hopping effect in Fabry–Pérot multiple-quantum well laser diodes via low frequency noise investigation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pralgauskaitė, Sandra; Palenskis, Vilius; Matukas, Jonas

    2013-01-01

    Comprehensive investigation of noise characteristics and radiation spectrum with special attention to the mode-hopping effect of Fabry–Pérot (FP) multiple quantum well laser diodes (LDs) have been carried out: laser radiation spectra, optical and electrical fluctuations and cross-correlation factor...... between them have been measured under stable and mode-hopping operation. At the mode-hopping that occurs at particular operation conditions (injection current and temperature) LD radiation spectrum is unstable in time, very intensive and highly correlated Lorentzian-type optical and electrical...

  9. Audiovisual Perception of Noise Vocoded Speech in Dyslexic and Non-Dyslexic Adults: The Role of Low-Frequency Visual Modulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Megnin-Viggars, Odette; Goswami, Usha

    2013-01-01

    Visual speech inputs can enhance auditory speech information, particularly in noisy or degraded conditions. The natural statistics of audiovisual speech highlight the temporal correspondence between visual and auditory prosody, with lip, jaw, cheek and head movements conveying information about the speech envelope. Low-frequency spatial and…

  10. The isolation of low frequency impact sounds in hotel construction

    Science.gov (United States)

    LoVerde, John J.; Dong, David W.

    2002-11-01

    One of the design challenges in the acoustical design of hotels is reducing low frequency sounds from footfalls occurring on both carpeted and hard-surfaced floors. Research on low frequency impact noise [W. Blazier and R. DuPree, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 96, 1521-1532 (1994)] resulted in a conclusion that in wood construction low frequency impact sounds were clearly audible and that feasible control methods were not available. The results of numerous FIIC (Field Impact Insulation Class) measurements performed in accordance with ASTM E1007 indicate the lack of correlation between FIIC ratings and the reaction of occupants in the room below. The measurements presented include FIIC ratings and sound pressure level measurements below the ASTM E1007 low frequency limit of 100 Hertz, and reveal that excessive sound levels in the frequency range of 63 to 100 Hertz correlate with occupant complaints. Based upon this history, a tentative criterion for maximum impact sound level in the low frequency range is presented. The results presented of modifying existing constructions to reduce the transmission of impact sounds at low frequencies indicate that there may be practical solutions to this longstanding problem.

  11. Validation of an Aero-Acoustic Wind Turbine Noise Model Using Advanced Noise Source Measurements of a 500kW Turbine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertagnolio, Franck; Aagaard Madsen, Helge; Fischer, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    rotor noise model is presented. It includes the main sources of aeroacoustic noise from wind turbines: turbulent inflow, trailing edge and stall noise. The noise measured by one microphone located directly downstream of the wind turbine is compared to the model predictions at the microphone location....... A good qualitative agreement is found. When wind speed increases, the rotor noise model shows that at high frequencies the stall noise becomes dominant. It also shows that turbulent inflow noise is dominant at low frequencies for all wind speeds and that trailing edge noise is dominant at low wind speeds...

  12. Pavement noise measurements in Poland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zofka, Ewa; Zofka, Adam; Mechowski, Tomasz

    2017-09-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the feasibility of the On-Board Sound Intensity (OBSI) system to measure tire-pavement noise in Poland. In general, sources of noise emitted by the modern vehicles are the propulsion noise, aerodynamic resistance and noise generated at the tire-pavement interface. In order to capture tire-pavement noise, the OBSI system uses a noise intensity probe installed in the close proximity of that interface. In this study, OBSI measurements were performed at different types of pavement surfaces such as stone mastic asphalt (SMA), regular asphalt concrete (HMA) as well as Portland cement concrete (PCC). The influence of several necessary OBSI measurement conditions were recognized as: testing speed, air temperature, tire pressure and tire type. The results of this study demonstrate that the OBSI system is a viable and robust tool that can be used for the quality evaluation of newly built asphalt pavements in Poland. It can be also applied to generate reliable input parameters for the noise propagation models that are used to assess the environmental impact of new and existing highway corridors.

  13. LOFAR - low frequency array

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bentum, Marinus Jan; Gunst, André

    Nog een paar maanden en dan wordt de grootste radiotelescoop ter wereld officieel geopend: LOFAR, de ‘Low Frequency Arraÿ'.LOFAR is een nieuwe radiotelescoop die in Nederland gebouwd wordt door ASTRON, de Stichting Astronomisch Onderzoek in Nederland. Met LOFAR heeft Nederland er straks een uniek

  14. Low Frequency Space Array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dennison, B.; Weiler, K.W.; Johnston, K.J.

    1987-01-01

    The Low Frequency Space Array (LFSA) is a conceptual mission to survey the entire sky and to image individual sources at frequencies between 1.5 and 26 MHz, a frequency range over which the earth's ionosphere transmits poorly or not at all. With high resolution, high sensitivity observations, a new window will be opened in the electromagnetic spectrum for astronomical investigation. Also, extending observations down to such low frequencies will bring astronomy to the fundamental limit below which the galaxy becomes optically thick due to free-free absorption. A number of major scientific goals can be pursued with such a mission, including mapping galactic emission and absorption, studies of individual source spectra in a frequency range where a number of important processes may play a role, high resolution imaging of extended sources, localization of the impulsive emission from Jupiter, and a search for coherent emission processes. 19 references

  15. Scheme for efficient extraction of low-frequency signal beyond the quantum limit by frequency-shift detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, R G; Zhang, J; Zhai, Z H; Zhai, S Q; Liu, K; Gao, J R

    2015-08-10

    Low-frequency (Hz~kHz) squeezing is very important in many schemes of quantum precision measurement. But it is more difficult than that at megahertz-frequency because of the introduction of laser low-frequency technical noise. In this paper, we propose a scheme to obtain a low-frequency signal beyond the quantum limit from the frequency comb in a non-degenerate frequency and degenerate polarization optical parametric amplifier (NOPA) operating below threshold with type I phase matching by frequency-shift detection. Low-frequency squeezing immune to laser technical noise is obtained by a detection system with a local beam of two-frequency intense laser. Furthermore, the low-frequency squeezing can be used for phase measurement in Mach-Zehnder interferometer, and the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) can be enhanced greatly.

  16. Uncorrelated Noise in Turbulence Measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Leif; Lenschow, D. H.

    1985-01-01

    of atmospheric variability. The authors assume that the measured signal is a representation of a variable that is continuous on the scale of interest in the atmosphere. Uncorrelated noise affects the autovariance function (or, equivalently, the structure function) only between zero and the first lag, while its...... effect is smeared across the entire power spectrum. For this reason, quantities such as variance dissipation may be more conveniently estimated from the structure function than from the spectrum. The modeling results are confirmed by artificially modifying a test time series with Poisson noise...

  17. Noise measurements on proximity effect bridges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Decker, S.K.; Mercereau, J.E.

    1975-01-01

    Audio frequency noise density measurements were performed on weakly superconducting proximity effect bridges on using a cooled transformer and room temperature low noise preamplifier. The noise temperature of the measuring system is approximately 4 0 K for a 0.9 Ω resistor. Noise density was measured as a function of bias current and temperature for the bridges. Excess noise above that expected from Johnson noise for a resistor equal to the dynamic resistance of the bridges was observed in the region near the critical current of the device. At high currents compared to the critical current, the noise density closely approaches that given by Johnson noise

  18. Low frequency electric and magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spaniol, Craig

    1989-01-01

    Following preliminary investigations of the low frequency electric and magnetic fields that may exists in the Earth-ionospheric cavity, measurements were taken with state-of-the art spectrum analyzers. As a follow up to this activity, an investigation was initiated to determine sources and values for possible low frequency signal that would appear in the cavity. The lowest cavity resonance is estimated at about 8 Hz, but lower frequencies may be an important component of our electromagnetic environment. The potential field frequencies produced by the electron were investigated by a classical model that included possible cross coupling of the electric and gravitation fields. During this work, an interesting relationship was found that related the high frequency charge field with the extremely low frequency of the gravitation field. The results of numerical calculations were surprisingly accurate and this area of investigation is continuing. The work toward continued development of a standardized monitoring facility is continuing with the potential of installing the prototype at West Virginia State College early in 1990. This installation would be capable of real time monitoring of ELF signals in the Earth-ionoshpere cavity and would provide some directional information. A high gain, low noise, 1/f frequency corrected preamplifier was designed and tested for the ferrite core magnetic sensor. The potential application of a super conducting sensor for the ELF magnetic field detection is under investigation. It is hoped that a fully operational monitoring network could pinpoint the location of ELF signal sources and provide new information on where these signals originate and what causes them, assuming that they are natural in origin.

  19. An instantaneous spatiotemporal model to predict a bicyclist's Black Carbon exposure based on mobile noise measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dekoninck, Luc; Botteldooren, Dick; Int Panis, Luc

    2013-11-01

    Several studies have shown that a significant amount of daily air pollution exposure, in particular Black Carbon (BC), is inhaled during trips. Assessing this contribution to exposure remains difficult because on the one hand local air pollution maps lack spatio-temporal resolution, at the other hand direct measurement of particulate matter concentration remains expensive. This paper proposes to use in-traffic noise measurements in combination with geographical and meteorological information for predicting BC exposure during commuting trips. Mobile noise measurements are cheaper and easier to perform than mobile air pollution measurements and can easily be used in participatory sensing campaigns. The uniqueness of the proposed model lies in the choice of noise indicators that goes beyond the traditional overall A-weighted noise level used in previous work. Noise and BC exposures are both related to the traffic intensity but also to traffic speed and traffic dynamics. Inspired by theoretical knowledge on the emission of noise and BC, the low frequency engine related noise and the difference between high frequency and low frequency noise that indicates the traffic speed, are introduced in the model. In addition, it is shown that splitting BC in a local and a background component significantly improves the model. The coefficients of the proposed model are extracted from 200 commuter bicycle trips. The predicted average exposure over a single trip correlates with measurements with a Pearson coefficient of 0.78 using only four parameters: the low frequency noise level, wind speed, the difference between high and low frequency noise and a street canyon index expressing local air pollution dispersion properties.

  20. A Baseband Ultra-Low Noise SiGe:C BiCMOS 0.25 µm Amplifier And Its Application For An On-Chip Phase-Noise Measurement Circuit

    OpenAIRE

    Godet , Sylvain; Tournier , Éric; Llopis , Olivier; Cathelin , Andreia; Juyon , Julien

    2009-01-01

    4 pages; International audience; The design and realization of an ultra-low noise operational amplifier is presented. Its applications are integrated low-frequency noise measurements in electronic devices and on-chip phase-noise measurement circuit. This paper discusses the SiGe:C BiCMOS 0.25 µm design improvements used for low noise applications. The proposed three-stage operational amplifier uses parallel bipolar transistor connection as input differential pair for low noise behavior. This ...

  1. RF Shot Noise Measurements in Au Atomic-scale Junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ruoyu

    Conduction electrons are responsible for many physical or chemical phenomena in condensed matter systems, and their behavior can be directly studied by electronic transport measurements. In conventional transport measurements, conductance or resistance is usually the focus. Such a measurement can be as simple as a quick two terminal DC check by a multi-meter, or a more sophisticated lock-in measurement of multiple higher harmonic signals synchronized to different frequencies. Conductance carries direct information about the quasi-particle density of states and the local electronic distributions, which are usually Fermi-Dirac distribution. Conductance is modified or dominated by scattering from defacts or interfaces, and could also reflect the spin-spin exchange interactions or inelastic couplings with phonons and photons. Naturally one can ask the question: is there anything else we can measure electronically, which carries extra information that a conductance measurement does not provide? One answer to this question is the electronic noise. While the conductance reflects the average charge conduction ability of a system, noise describes how the physical quantities fluctuate around their average values. Some of the fluctuations carry information about their physical origins. This thesis will focus on one particular type of the electronic noise shot noise, but other types of noise will also be introduced and discussed. We choose to measure the radio frequency component of shot noise, combining with a modulated lock-in detection technique, which provides a method to largely get rid of other unwanted low-frequency noise signals. Au atomic-scale junctions are the systems we studied here. Au is relatively well understood and will not generate too many complications, so it's ideal as the first platform for us to understand both shot noise itself and our RF technique. On the other hand, the atomic scale raises fundamental questions about electronic transport and local

  2. Measurement system for the determination of the individual exposure of low frequency electric and magnetic fields on humans (personal dosimeter)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huber, E.

    1998-07-01

    The current doctorate introduces a free body electronic personal dosimeter for measuring the vector components of ELF-fields. In contrast to a conventional field strength meter not the undisturbed fields are used as a measure, but the inhomogeneous fields near the human body, measured over a long time (dosimetric concept). Based on an analytical and numerical 'dosimetric' model, the field signal together with the frequency information can be transformed for further evaluation in the average inner body current density. Here the current density is considered as a dose relevant measure. According to demands in industrial safety, requirements for a dosimeter are derived and developmental goals defined. These goals are realized by investigations and proficiency testings of electric and magnetic highly sensitive field sensors, the development of low-power electronics with good performance and the implementation of digital data processing on different platforms. The characterization of the influence of possible environmental variables on the realized prototype, the determination of the technical characteristics under various boundary conditions and an error analysis are further important parts of this work. The calibration of the INPEDO (individual personal dosimeter) measurement system in special calibration facilities (three axis Helmholtz coils for the magnetic and parallel plates according to the IEEE833-standard for the electric field) as well as first measurements taken under real operating conditions conclude this report. (orig.) [de

  3. A neural measure of behavioral engagement: task-residual low-frequency blood oxygenation level-dependent activity in the precuneus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Sheng; Li, Chiang-Shan Ray

    2010-01-15

    Brain imaging has provided a useful tool to examine the neural processes underlying human cognition. A critical question is whether and how task engagement influences the observed regional brain activations. Here we highlighted this issue and derived a neural measure of task engagement from the task-residual low-frequency blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) activity in the precuneus. Using independent component analysis, we identified brain regions in the default circuit - including the precuneus and medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) - showing greater activation during resting as compared to task residuals in 33 individuals. Time series correlations with the posterior cingulate cortex as the seed region showed that connectivity with the precuneus was significantly stronger during resting as compared to task residuals. We hypothesized that if the task-residual BOLD activity in the precuneus reflects engagement, it should account for a certain amount of variance in task-related regional brain activation. In an additional experiment of 59 individuals performing a stop signal task, we observed that the fractional amplitude of low-frequency fluctuation (fALFF) of the precuneus but not the mPFC accounted for approximately 10% of the variance in prefrontal activation related to attentional monitoring and response inhibition. Taken together, these results suggest that task-residual fALFF in the precuneus may be a potential indicator of task engagement. This measurement may serve as a useful covariate in identifying motivation-independent neural processes that underlie the pathogenesis of a psychiatric or neurological condition.

  4. Low noise constant current source for bias dependent noise measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Talukdar, D.; Bose, Suvendu; Bardhan, K. K.; Chakraborty, R. K.

    2011-01-01

    A low noise constant current source used for measuring the 1/f noise in disordered systems in ohmic as well as nonohmic regime is described. The source can supply low noise constant current starting from as low as 1 μA to a few tens of milliampere with a high voltage compliance limit of around 20 V. The constant current source has several stages, which can work in a standalone manner or together to supply the desired value of load current. The noise contributed by the current source is very low in the entire current range. The fabrication of a low noise voltage preamplifier modified for bias dependent noise measurements and based on the existing design available in the MAT04 data sheet is also described.

  5. Estimating the Permittivity of Rogers 4003C Substrate at Low Frequencies for Application in a Superdirective First-Order Probe for SNF Measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kim, Oleksiy S.

    2016-01-01

    The bulk permittivity of Rogers 4003C substrate is estimated in the lower UHF frequency band by comparing the simulated and measured return loss for a bandpass filter based on a coplanar waveguide and a capacitively loaded loop. The obtained value, which deviates from that specified by Rogers at ...... GHz, is subsequently utilized for accurate design of a new light-weight superdirective first-order probe for spherical near-field (SNF) antenna measurements at low frequencies.......The bulk permittivity of Rogers 4003C substrate is estimated in the lower UHF frequency band by comparing the simulated and measured return loss for a bandpass filter based on a coplanar waveguide and a capacitively loaded loop. The obtained value, which deviates from that specified by Rogers at 10...

  6. A Measurement of the Millimeter Emission and the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich Effect Associated with Low-Frequency Radio Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gralla, Megan B.; Crichton, Devin; Marriage, Tobias; Mo, Wenli; Aguirre, Paula; Addison, Graeme E.; Asboth, V.; Battaglia, Nick; Bock, James; Bond, J. Richard; hide

    2014-01-01

    We present a statistical analysis of the millimeter-wavelength properties of 1.4 GHz-selected sources and a detection of the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect associated with the halos that host them. We stack data at 148, 218 and 277 GHz from the Atacama Cosmology Telescope at the positions of a large sample of radio AGN selected at 1.4 GHz. The thermal Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) effect associated with the halos that host the AGN is detected at the 5 sigma level through its spectral signature, representing a statistical detection of the SZ effect in some of the lowest mass halos (average M(sub 200) approximately equals 10(sup 13) solar mass h(sub 70)(exp -1) ) studied to date. The relation between the SZ effect and mass (based on weak lensing measurements of radio galaxies) is consistent with that measured by Planck for local bright galaxies. In the context of galaxy evolution models, this study confirms that galaxies with radio AGN also typically support hot gaseous halos. Adding Herschel observations allows us to show that the SZ signal is not significantly contaminated by dust emission. Finally, we analyze the contribution of radio sources to the angular power spectrum of the cosmic microwave background.

  7. Stress Recovery Effects of High- and Low-Frequency Amplified Music on Heart Rate Variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, Yoshie; Tanaka, Naofumi; Mima, Tatsuya; Izumi, Shin-Ichi

    Sounds can induce autonomic responses in listeners. However, the modulatory effect of specific frequency components of music is not fully understood. Here, we examined the role of the frequency component of music on autonomic responses. Specifically, we presented music that had been amplified in the high- or low-frequency domains. Twelve healthy women listened to white noise, a stress-inducing noise, and then one of three versions of a piece of music: original, low-, or high-frequency amplified. To measure autonomic response, we calculated the high-frequency normalized unit (HFnu), low-frequency normalized unit, and the LF/HF ratio from the heart rate using electrocardiography. We defined the stress recovery ratio as the value obtained after participants listened to music following scratching noise, normalized by the value obtained after participants listened to white noise after the stress noise, in terms of the HFnu, low-frequency normalized unit, LF/HF ratio, and heart rate. Results indicated that high-frequency amplified music had the highest HFnu of the three versions. The stress recovery ratio of HFnu under the high-frequency amplified stimulus was significantly larger than that under the low-frequency stimulus. Our results suggest that the high-frequency component of music plays a greater role in stress relief than low-frequency components.

  8. 14 CFR 36.801 - Noise measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Noise measurement. 36.801 Section 36.801 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT NOISE STANDARDS: AIRCRAFT TYPE AND AIRWORTHINESS CERTIFICATION Helicopters § 36.801 Noise measurement. For primary, normal...

  9. Noise measurements of highway pavements in Texas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-10-01

    This report presents the results of noise testing performed on Texas pavements between May of 2006 and the : summer of 2008. Two field test methodologies were used: roadside noise measurement with SPL meters and onvehicle : sound intensity measuremen...

  10. Noise in the Measurement of Light with Photomultipliers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robben, F

    1968-05-15

    In order to be able to compare measurements derived from the anode current of a photomultiplier with measurement derived from photoelectron pulse counting, a systematic investigation of the properties of some photomultiplier tubes has been made. This has led to a correlation of the properties of a photomultiplier based on the quantum efficiency {eta}, the gain G, a photoelectron loss factor S and an effective dark rate D. In terms of these quantities the signal to noise ratio of an experimental measurement can be calculated, given the light flux and measurement technique. The fluctuations in a photomultiplier output are divided into two parts; Poisson fluctuations, and those due to excess noise. It is experimentally shown, from measurements on a 931A photomultiplier, that the excess noise exceeds the Poisson fluctuations only at very low frequencies, or long DC measurement times (> 10 s), for both pulse counting and anode current measurements. The Poisson fluctuations are found to be approximately the same for both pulse counting and anode current measurements, at both high light levels where the dark current, or dark pulses, are negligible, as well as at low light levels where the dark current is dominant. The excess noise is found to be somewhat greater in the case of anode current measurements. Thus both pulse counting and anode current measurement techniques have nearly identical noise properties, as far as the photomultiplier is concerned, and selection of either experimental technique depends primarily on the properties of the electronic equipment. By use of a synchronous detection technique, the variance of the pulse count was measured experimentally to an accuracy of {+-} 4 %, and was shown to be in agreement with that predicted by Poisson statistics.

  11. Noise measurements during high-frequency oscillatory and conventional mechanical ventilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berens, R J; Weigle, C G

    1995-10-01

    To evaluate the noise levels with high-frequency oscillatory ventilation and conventional mechanical ventilation. An observational, prospective study. Pediatric intensive care unit. The caretakers and environment of the pediatric intensive care unit. High-frequency oscillatory and conventional mechanical ventilation. Caretakers evaluated noise using a visual analog scale. Noise was measured with a decibel meter and an octave band frequency filter. There was twice as much noise perceived by the caretakers and as measured on the decibel A scale. All measures showed significantly greater noise, especially at low frequencies, with high-frequency oscillatory ventilation. High-frequency oscillatory ventilation exposes the patient to twice as much noise as does the use of conventional mechanical ventilation.

  12. Measurement of differences in pO2 in response to perfluorocarbon/carbogen in FSa and NFSa murine fibrosarcomas with low-frequency electron paramagnetic resonance oximetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halpern, H J; Yu, C; Peric, M; Barth, E D; Karczmar, G S; River, J N; Grdina, D J; Teicher, B A

    1996-05-01

    We have used very low-frequency electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) oximetry to measure the change in oxygen concentration (delta pO2) due to change in breathing atmosphere in FSa and NFSa fibrosarcomas implanted in the legs of C3H mice infused with perfluoro-octylbromine (PFOB). Measurements in each tumor were made before and after the administration of the high-density (47% v/v) perfluorocarbon PFOB, perflubron (Alliance Pharmaceutical Corporation, San Diego, CA). Measurements in each tumor were also made, after the administration of the PFOB, both before (PFOB/air) and after the administration of carbogen (95% O2 + 5% CO2, PFOB/carbogen). Large changes (delta p02) relative to PFOB/air oxygenation were seen with the administration of PFOB/carbogen. No significant difference in oxygen concentration was seen between air-breathing mice with and without PFOB. The mean delta pO2 for FSa tumors was 13 +/- 6 torr, while the mean for NFSa fibrosarcomas was 28 +/- 7 torr. There were such large intertumor differences that the trend toward a smaller change in the more hypoxic FSa tumors was not significant (P = 0.13). This paper describes a novel method of measuring differences in oxygenation in tumor tissues. The results of such measurements indicate large differences in pO2 response to different breathing atmospheres in PFOB-infused tumors of similar histology. The intertumor delta pO2 differences may correlate with differences in radiation response.

  13. Low-frequency characteristics extension for vibration sensors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨学山; 高峰; 候兴民

    2004-01-01

    Traditional magneto-electric vibration sensors and servo accelerometers have severe shortcomings when used to measure vibration where low frequency components predominate. A low frequency characteristic extension for velocity vibration sensors is presented in this paper. The passive circuit technology, active compensation technology and the closedcycle pole compensation technology are used to extend the measurable range and to improve low frequency characteristics of sensors. Thses three types of low frequency velocity vibration sensors have been developed and widely adopted in China.

  14. Misure in laboratorio di acustica edilizia a bassa frequenza: un approccio modale - Laboratory measurements of building acoustics at low frequency: a modal approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Prato

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Nei tipici ambienti ordinari e di laboratorio (40-80 m3 e a bassa frequenza (50-100 Hz, il campo acustico risulta non diffuso a causa della presenza dei modi. In tali condizioni, le misure classiche di acustica edilizia (isolamento acustico per via aerea e da impatto, tempi di riverbera-zione sono inadeguate per caratterizzare correttamente le proprietà acustiche di partizioni, si-stemi di pavimentazioni e spazi chiusi. L’approccio modale permette di valutare tali proprietà studiando il comportamento dei modi. Sulla base di ciò, appropriate procedure di misura e nuovi descrittori sono proposti e discussi in modo da fornire possibili soluzioni per tali problematiche. ------ In typical laboratory and ordinary rooms (40-80 m3 and at low frequencies (50-100 Hz, the acoustic field is non-diffuse due to the presence of room modes. Under such conditions, standard building acoustics measurements (airborne and impact sound insulation, reverberation time and descriptors are not adequate to correctly characterize the acoustic property of partitions, flooring systems and rooms. The modal approach allows to evaluate such properties by studying the behavior of modes. On the basis of this, proper measurement procedures and new descriptors are proposed and discussed in order to provide possible solutions for such issues.

  15. Regional homogeneity, resting-state functional connectivity and amplitude of low frequency fluctuation associated with creativity measured by divergent thinking in a sex-specific manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, Hikaru; Taki, Yasuyuki; Nouchi, Rui; Yokoyama, Ryoichi; Kotozaki, Yuka; Nakagawa, Seishu; Sekiguchi, Atsushi; Iizuka, Kunio; Yamamoto, Yuki; Hanawa, Sugiko; Araki, Tsuyoshi; Makoto Miyauchi, Carlos; Shinada, Takamitsu; Sakaki, Kohei; Nozawa, Takayuki; Ikeda, Shigeyuki; Yokota, Susumu; Daniele, Magistro; Sassa, Yuko; Kawashima, Ryuta

    2017-05-15

    Brain connectivity is traditionally thought to be important for creativity. Here we investigated the associations of creativity measured by divergent thinking (CMDT) with resting-state functional magnetic imaging (fMRI) measures and their sex differences. We examined these relationships in the brains of 1277 healthy young adults. Whole-brain analyses revealed a significant interaction between verbal CMDT and sex on (a) regional homogeneity within an area from the left anterior temporal lobe (b) on the resting state functional connectivity (RSFC) between the mPFC and the left inferior frontal gyrus and (c) on fractional amplitude of low frequency fluctuations (fALFF) in several distinct areas, including the precuneus and middle cingulate gyrus, left middle temporal gyrus, right middle frontal gyrus, and cerebellum. These interactions were mediated by positive correlations in females and negative correlations in males. These findings suggest that greater CMDT in females is reflected by (a) regional coherence (regional homogeneity) of brain areas responsible for representing and combining concepts as well as (b) the efficient functional connection (RSFC) between the key areas for the default state of cognitive activity and speech production, and (c) greater spontaneous neural activity (fALFF) during the resting of brain areas involved in frontal lobe functions, default cognitive activities, and language functions. Furthermore, these findings suggest that the associations between creativity and resting state brain connectivity patterns are different between males and females. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Spin noise measurement with diamagnetic atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeuchi, M.; Ichihara, S.; Takano, T.; Kumakura, M.; Takahashi, Y.

    2007-01-01

    We report the measurement of the atomic spin noise of the diamagnetic atom ytterbium (Yb). Yb has various merits for utilizing the quantum nature of the atomic spin ensemble compared with the paramagnetic atoms used in all previous experiments. From the magnitude of the noise level and dependence on the detuning, we concluded that we succeeded in the measurement of 171 Yb atomic spin noise in an atomic beam

  17. Measurement of reactivity temperature coefficient by noise method in a power reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aguilar, O.

    1986-07-01

    The temperature reactivity coefficient was estimated on the basis of noise measurements performed in a PWR. The magnitude of the coefficient was evaluated by relating the values of the APSD and CPSD between ex-core neutron detector signals and fuel assembly outlet thermocouple in the low frequency range. Comparison with δρ/δT measurements performed in PWR by standard methods supports the validity of the results. (author)

  18. Simple and portable low frequency lock-in amplifier designed for photoacoustic measurements and its application to thermal effusivity determination in liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega-Robles, Emmanuel; Cruz-Orea, Alfredo; Elías-Viñas, David

    2018-03-01

    The lock-in amplifier is a very useful instrument for observing very small signals under adverse signal-to-noise conditions. In this work, we describe a simple and portable lock-in amplifier designed to be used in photoacoustic measurements. The device was used to measure the thermal effusivity of eight different liquid samples (distilled water, glycerol, acetone, ethanol, 2-propanol, chloroform, hexane, and methanol), as well as the effusivity of acetone in aqueous solution at distinct concentrations, giving good results. The instrument has a bandwidth of 10 Hz-10 kHz and a sensitivity of 1 μV.

  19. High temperature measurement by noise thermometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Decreton, M.C.

    1982-06-01

    Noise thermometry has received a lot of attention for measurements of temperatures in the high range around 1000-2000 deg. K. For these measurements, laboratory type experiments have been mostly performed. These have shown the interest of the technique when long term stability, high precision and insensibility to external conditions are concerned. This is particularly true for measurements in nuclear reactors where important drifts due to irradiation effects are experienced with other measurement techniques, as thermocouple for instance. Industrial noise thermometer experiments have not been performed extensively up to now. The subject of the present study is the development of a 1800 deg. K noise thermometer for nuclear applications. The measurement method is based on a generalized noise power approach. The rms noise voltage (Vsub(s)) and noise current (Isub(s)) are successively measured on the resistive sensor. The same quantities are also measured on a dummy short circuited probe (Vsub(d) and Isub(d)). The temperature is then deduced from these measured values by the following formula: cTsub(s) = (Vsub(s) 2 - Vsub(d) 2 )(Vsub(s)/Isub(s) - Vsub(d)/Isub(d)) - 1 , where c is a constant and Tsub(s) the absolute temperature of the sensor. This approach has the particular advantage of greatly reducing the sensibility to environmental perturbations on the leads and to the influence of amplifier noise sources. It also eliminates the necessity of resistance measurement and keeps the electronic circuits as simple as possible

  20. Ocean Ambient Noise Measurement and Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Carey, William M

    2011-01-01

    This book develops the theory of ocean ambient noise mechanisms and measurements, and also describes general noise characteristics and computational methods.  It concisely summarizes the vast ambient noise literature using theory combined with key representative results.  The air-sea boundary interaction zone is described in terms of non-dimensional variables requisite for future experiments.  Noise field coherency, rare directional measurements, and unique basin scale computations and methods are presented.  The use of satellite measurements in these basin scale models is demonstrated.  Finally, this book provides a series of appendices giving in-depth mathematical treatments.  With its complete and careful discussions of both theory and experimental results, this book will be of the greatest interest to graduate students and active researchers working in fields related to ambient noise in the ocean.

  1. How Far Is Quasar UV/Optical Variability from a Damped Random Walk at Low Frequency?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo Hengxiao; Wang Junxian; Cai Zhenyi; Sun Mouyuan, E-mail: hengxiaoguo@gmail.com, E-mail: jxw@ustc.edu.cn [CAS Key Laboratory for Research in Galaxies and Cosmology, Department of Astronomy, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China)

    2017-10-01

    Studies have shown that UV/optical light curves of quasars can be described using the prevalent damped random walk (DRW) model, also known as the Ornstein–Uhlenbeck process. A white noise power spectral density (PSD) is expected at low frequency in this model; however, a direct observational constraint to the low-frequency PSD slope is difficult due to the limited lengths of the light curves available. Meanwhile, quasars show scatter in their DRW parameters that is too large to be attributed to uncertainties in the measurements and dependence on the variation of known physical factors. In this work we present simulations showing that, if the low-frequency PSD deviates from the DRW, the red noise leakage can naturally produce large scatter in the variation parameters measured from simulated light curves. The steeper the low-frequency PSD slope, the larger scatter we expect. Based on observations of SDSS Stripe 82 quasars, we find that the low-frequency PSD slope should be no steeper than −1.3. The actual slope could be flatter, which consequently requires that the quasar variabilities should be influenced by other unknown factors. We speculate that the magnetic field and/or metallicity could be such additional factors.

  2. Noise thermometry - a new temperature measuring method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brixy, H.; Hecker, R.; Rittinghaus, K.F.

    1975-01-01

    The thermal Johnson-Niquist noise is the basis of noise thermometry. This temperature measuring method is, e.g., of interest insofar as the noise thermometer gives absolute values as a primary thermometer and is in principle extensively independent of environmental influences and material properties. The resistance values of the measuring probe are about 10 Ohm to a few kOhm. The demands of electronics are high, the self-noise of the measuring apparatus must be as small as possible; a comparative measuring method is advantageous. 1 to 2,500 K are given as a possible temperature range. An accuracy of 0.1% could be achieved in laboratory measurements. Temperature measurements to be used in operation in a few nuclear reactors are mentioned. (HP/LH) [de

  3. Understanding the amplitudes of noise correlation measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Victor C.

    2011-01-01

    Cross correlation of ambient seismic noise is known to result in time series from which station-station travel-time measurements can be made. Part of the reason that these cross-correlation travel-time measurements are reliable is that there exists a theoretical framework that quantifies how these travel times depend on the features of the ambient noise. However, corresponding theoretical results do not currently exist to describe how the amplitudes of the cross correlation depend on such features. For example, currently it is not possible to take a given distribution of noise sources and calculate the cross correlation amplitudes one would expect from such a distribution. Here, we provide a ray-theoretical framework for calculating cross correlations. This framework differs from previous work in that it explicitly accounts for attenuation as well as the spatial distribution of sources and therefore can address the issue of quantifying amplitudes in noise correlation measurements. After introducing the general framework, we apply it to two specific problems. First, we show that we can quantify the amplitudes of coherency measurements, and find that the decay of coherency with station-station spacing depends crucially on the distribution of noise sources. We suggest that researchers interested in performing attenuation measurements from noise coherency should first determine how the dominant sources of noise are distributed. Second, we show that we can quantify the signal-to-noise ratio of noise correlations more precisely than previous work, and that these signal-to-noise ratios can be estimated for given situations prior to the deployment of seismometers. It is expected that there are applications of the theoretical framework beyond the two specific cases considered, but these applications await future work.

  4. Mitigation of low-frequency groundnoise from runways

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eerden, F.J.M. van der; Salomons, E.M.; Beeks, A.A.F.M.

    2007-01-01

    With the extra runway at Amsterdam Schiphol Airport, introduced in 2003, the noise nuisance for local residents increased due to increased groundnoise. In a case study the effect of enhanced ground absorption on the propagation of low-frequency noise from aircraft ground operations, e.g. departing

  5. Measuring of noise emitted by moving vehicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Skrúcaný Tomáš

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The article aims to measure the intensity of the exterior noise of a vehicle in motion. It provides the results of the measurements of the external noise of selected vehicles in motion and the impact of selected factors on the sound level of driving. There are done two measurements in the paper. Results from the first one are comparing noise level of 9 passenger cars according to the Directive 71/157/EEC. The second one shows the road surface influence on the exterior noise of moving vehicle where the sound level was measured by a road whose surface was made of slightly degraded concrete, and at a different place of the same road, where the surface was renovated by applying asphalt mix onto it.

  6. Direct CFD Predictions of Low Frequency Sounds Generated by a Helicopter Main Rotor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sim, Ben W.; Potsdam, Mark A.; Conner, Dave A.; Conner, Dave A.; Watts, Michael E.

    2010-01-01

    The use of CFD to directly predict helicopter main rotor noise is shown to be quite promising as an alternative mean for low frequency source noise evaluation. Results using existing state-of-the-art grid structures and finite-difference schemes demonstrated that small perturbation pressures, associated with acoustics radiation, can be extracted with some degree of fidelity. Accuracy of the predictions are demonstrated via comparing to predictions from conventional acoustic analogy-based models, and with measurements obtained from wind tunnel and flight tests for the MD-902 helicopter at several operating conditions. Findings show that the direct CFD approach is quite successfully in yielding low frequency results due to thickness and steady loading noise mechanisms. Mid-to-high frequency contents, due to blade-vortex interactions, are not predicted due to CFD modeling and grid constraints.

  7. Determination of the energy gap in photoconducting insulators through current noise measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbone, A.; Demichelis, F.; Mazzetti, P.

    1989-01-01

    Measurements of the current noise power spectrum of the photoconducting insulators CdS and CdSe irradiated with monochromatic light of different wavelength λ are reported. It is shown that there is an abrupt change of about one order of magnitude in the low frequency power density of the noise when λ crosses the photoconductor gap value λ and the photocurrent and the device conductance are kept constant by varying the light intensity. The effect is explained in terms of an abrupt increase of the carrier recombination rate when the photon energy becomes larger than the energy gap of the photoconductor. Possible applications of these results are briefly discussed

  8. Power reactor noise measurements in Hungary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pallagi, D.; Horanyi, S.; Hargitai, T.

    1975-01-01

    An outline is given of the history of reactor noise research in Hungary. A brief description is given of studies in the WWR-SM reactor, a modified version of the original WWR-S thermal reactor, for the detection of in-core simulated boiling by analysis of the noise of out-of-core ionization chambers. Coolant velocity measurements by transit time analysis of temperature fluctuations are described. (U.K.)

  9. LOFAR, the low frequency array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermeulen, R. C.

    2012-09-01

    LOFAR, the Low Frequency Array, is a next-generation radio telescope designed by ASTRON, with antenna stations concentrated in the north of the Netherlands and currently spread into Germany, France, Sweden and the United Kingdom; plans for more LOFAR stations exist in several other countries. Utilizing a novel, phased-array design, LOFAR is optimized for the largely unexplored low frequency range between 30 and 240 MHz. Digital beam-forming techniques make the LOFAR system agile and allow for rapid re-pointing of the telescopes as well as the potential for multiple simultaneous observations. Processing (e.g. cross-correlation) takes place in the LOFAR BlueGene/P supercomputer, and associated post-processing facilities. With its dense core (inner few km) array and long (more than 1000 km) interferometric baselines, LOFAR reaches unparalleled sensitivity and resolution in the low frequency radio regime. The International LOFAR Telescope (ILT) is now issuing its first call for observing projects that will be peer reviewed and selected for observing starting in December. Part of the allocations will be made on the basis of a fully Open Skies policy; there are also reserved fractions assigned by national consortia in return for contributions from their country to the ILT. In this invited talk, the gradually expanding complement of operationally verified observing modes and capabilities are reviewed, and some of the exciting first astronomical results are presented.

  10. Low-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) affects event-related potential measures of novelty processing in autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokhadze, Estate; Baruth, Joshua; Tasman, Allan; Mansoor, Mehreen; Ramaswamy, Rajesh; Sears, Lonnie; Mathai, Grace; El-Baz, Ayman; Casanova, Manuel F

    2010-06-01

    In our previous study on individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) (Sokhadze et al., Appl Psychophysiol Biofeedback 34:37-51, 2009a) we reported abnormalities in the attention-orienting frontal event-related potentials (ERP) and the sustained-attention centro-parietal ERPs in a visual oddball experiment. These results suggest that individuals with autism over-process information needed for the successful differentiation of target and novel stimuli. In the present study we examine the effects of low-frequency, repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (rTMS) on novelty processing as well as behavior and social functioning in 13 individuals with ASD. Our hypothesis was that low-frequency rTMS application to dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLFPC) would result in an alteration of the cortical excitatory/inhibitory balance through the activation of inhibitory GABAergic double bouquet interneurons. We expected to find post-TMS differences in amplitude and latency of early and late ERP components. The results of our current study validate the use of low-frequency rTMS as a modulatory tool that altered the disrupted ratio of cortical excitation to inhibition in autism. After rTMS the parieto-occipital P50 amplitude decreased to novel distracters but not to targets; also the amplitude and latency to targets increased for the frontal P50 while decreasing to non-target stimuli. Low-frequency rTMS minimized early cortical responses to irrelevant stimuli and increased responses to relevant stimuli. Improved selectivity in early cortical responses lead to better stimulus differentiation at later-stage responses as was made evident by our P3b and P3a component findings. These results indicate a significant change in early, middle-latency and late ERP components at the frontal, centro-parietal, and parieto-occipital regions of interest in response to target and distracter stimuli as a result of rTMS treatment. Overall, our preliminary results show that rTMS may prove to

  11. Modulation of low-frequency oscillations in GaAs MESFETs' channel current by sidegating bias

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DING Yong; LU Shengli; ZHAO Fuchuan

    2005-01-01

    Low-frequency oscillations in channel current are usually observed when measuring the GaAs MESFET's output characteristics. This paper studies the oscillations by testing the MESFET's output characteristics under different sidegate bias conditions. It is shown that the low-frequency oscillations of channel current are directly related to the sidegate bias. In other words, the sidegate bias can modulate the oscillations. Whether the sidegate bias varies positively or negatively, there will inevitably be a threshold voltage after which the low-frequency oscillations disappear. The observation is strongly dependent upon the peculiarities of channel-substrate (C-S) junction and impact ionization of traps-EL2 under high field. This conclusion is of particular pertinence to the design of low-noise GaAs IC's.

  12. Measuring the Noise Caused by Tehran Metro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majid Abbas Pour

    1999-03-01

    Full Text Available One of the most common and important sources of noise in the residential environments are vehicles such as airplanes and subways. Trafficking of vehicles in streets and highways, psychologically, have damaging impacts on people living close to such areas. The development and expansion of the trading and industrial units is another factor that causes more and more exposure to noise.We have aimed at measuring the noises caused by vibration of subways of the Line of Karaj-Tehran-Mehrshahr and its effect on its surrounding area.To study this effect we designed a mathematical model and put the information of this subway line in the mentioned model. Then we analyzed the findings.This model demonstrated that we can control the harsh noise of the subway by reducing the speed of the train to 60Km/h in some points and increase in other parts to 130Km/h.

  13. Noise in position measurement by centroid calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volkov, P.

    1996-01-01

    The position of a particle trajectory in a gaseous (or semiconductor) detector can be measured by calculating the centroid of the induced charge on the cathode plane. The charge amplifiers attached to each cathode strip introduce noise which is added to the signal. This noise broadens the position resolution line. Our article gives an analytical tool to estimate the resolution broadening due to the noise per strip and the number of strips involved in the centroid calculation. It is shown that the position resolution increases faster than the square root of the number of strips involved. We also consider the consequence of added interstrip capacitors, intended to diminish the differential nonlinearity. It is shown that the position error increases slower than linearly with the interstrip capacities, due to the cancellation of correlated noise. The estimation we give, can be applied to calculations of position broadening other than the centroid finding. (orig.)

  14. Squeezed noise in precision force measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bocko, M.F.; Bordoni, F.; Fuligni, F.; Johnson, W.W.

    1986-01-01

    The effort to build gravitational radiation antennae with sensitivity sufficient to detect bursts of radiation from supernovae in the Virgo cluster of galaxies has caused a consideration of the fundamental limits for the detection of weak forces. The existing Weber bar detectors will be eventually limited, by the phase insensitive transducers now used, to noise temperatures no better than that of the first amplifier which follows the transducer. Even for a quantum limited amplifier this may not give the sensitivity required to definitively detect gravitational radiation. In a 'back action evasion' measurement a specific phase sensitive transducer would be used. It is believed that by the technique of measuring one of the two antenna phases it is possible to reach an effective noise temperature for the measured phase which is far below the amplifier noise temperature. This is at the expense of an infinite noise temperature in the unmeasured antenna phase and is thus described as squeezing the noise. The authors outline the theoretical model for the behavior of such systems and present data from several experiments which demonstrate the main features of a back action evasion measurement. (Auth.)

  15. Measured Noise from Small Unmanned Aerial Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabell, Randolph; McSwain, Robert; Grosveld, Ferdinand

    2016-01-01

    Proposed uses of small unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs), including home package delivery, have the potential to expose large portions of communities to a new noise source. This paper discusses results of flyover noise measurements of four small UAVs, including an internal combustion-powered model airplane and three battery-powered multicopters. Basic noise characteristics of these vehicles are discussed, including spectral properties and sound level metrics such as sound pressure level, effective perceived noise level, and sound exposure level. The size and aerodynamic characteristics of the multicopters in particular make their flight path susceptible to atmospheric disturbances such as wind gusts. These gusts, coupled with a flight control system that varies rotor speed to maintain vehicle stability, create an unsteady acoustic signature. The spectral variations resulting from this unsteadiness are explored, in both hover and flyover conditions for the multicopters. The time varying noise, which differs from the relatively steady noise generated by large transport aircraft, may complicate the prediction of human annoyance using conventional sound level metrics.

  16. Evaluating noise abatement measures using strategic noise maps

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borst, H.C.; Miedema, H.M.E.; Laan, W.P.N. van der; Lohman, W.J.A.

    2006-01-01

    Noise annoyance due to transportation is widespread in industrialized countries and in urban areas in the developing countries. The European Noise Directive (END) requires an assessment of the noise situation as well as the formulation of action plans for the reduction of the number of people

  17. Development of a procedure to model high-resolution wind profiles from smoothed or low-frequency data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camp, D. W.

    1977-01-01

    The derivation of simulated Jimsphere wind profiles from low-frequency rawinsonde data and a generated set of white noise data are presented. A computer program is developed to model high-resolution wind profiles based on the statistical properties of data from the Kennedy Space Center, Florida. Comparison of the measured Jimsphere data, rawinsonde data, and the simulated profiles shows excellent agreement.

  18. Low frequency sound field enhancement system for rectangular rooms using multiple low frequency loudspeakers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Celestinos, Adrian; Nielsen, Sofus Birkedal

    2006-01-01

    an enhancement system with extra loudspeakers the sound pressure level distribution along the listening area presents a significant improvement in the subwoofer frequency range. The system is simulated and implemented on the three different rooms and finally verified by measurements on the real rooms.......Rectangular rooms have strong influence on the low frequency performance of loudspeakers. Simulations of three different room sizes have been carried out using finite-difference time-domain method (FDTD) in order to predict the behaviour of the sound field at low frequencies. By using...

  19. Low-Frequency Temporal Variability in Mira and Semiregular Variables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Templeton, Matthew R.; Karovska, M.; Waagen, E. O.

    2012-01-01

    We investigate low-frequency variability in a large sample of Mira and semiregular variables with long-term visual light curves from the AAVSO International Database. Our aim is to determine whether we can detect and measure long-timescale variable phenomena in these stars, for example photometric variations that might be associated with supergranular convection. We analyzed the long-term light curves of 522 variable stars of the Mira and SRa, b, c, and d classes. We calculated their low-frequency time-series spectra to characterize rednoise with the power density spectrum index, and then correlate this index with other observable characteristics such as spectral type and primary pulsation period. In our initial analysis of the sample, we see that the semiregular variables have a much broader range of spectral index than the Mira types, with the SRb subtype having the broadest range. Among Mira variables we see that the M- and S-type Miras have similarly wide ranges of index, while the C-types have the narrowest with generally shallower slopes. There is also a trend of steeper slope with larger amplitude, but at a given amplitude, a wide range of slopes are seen. The ultimate goal of the project is to identify stars with strong intrinsic red noise components as possible targets for resolved surface imaging with interferometry.

  20. Noise measurement on Preshower Si sensors

    CERN Document Server

    Evangelou, Ioannis; Barney, David; Bloch, Philippe; Elsha, Vladimir; Go, Apollo; Kloukinas, Kostas; Kokkas, Panagiotis; Manthos, Nikolaos; Peisert, Anna; Prouskas, C; Reynaud, Serge; Triantis, Frixos A; Tzoulis, Nikolaos; Zub, E

    2002-01-01

    Throughout the past couple of years when we were designing the Preshower silicon sensors we have noticed that some of them have strips with a noise higher than the average and not correlated to the leakage current. In order to investigate this effect we have developed a set-up for noise measurement on wafers and diced sensors that does not require bonding. The set-up is based on the DeltaStream chip coupled to a probe card with 32 pins at a pitch of 1.9 mm. All the digital electronics, including the analogue-to-digital converter and a microprocessor, is placed on a motherboard which communicates with a PC via an RS232 line. We have tested 45 sensors and found that some strips which have an above average noise, also have a higher relative current increase as a function of voltage, deltaI/(I deltaV), even though their leakage current is below 50 nA. We also observed that on these strips th e breakdown occurs within about 60 V from the onset of the noise. The source of this noise is not yet clear and the investi...

  1. Sensitivity of the Low Frequency Facility experiment around 10 Hz

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Di Virgilio, A.; Braccini, S.; Ballardin, G.; Bradaschia, C.; Cella, G.; Cuoco, E.; Dattilo, V.; Ferrante, I.; Fidecaro, F.; Frasconi, F.; Giazotto, A.; Gennai, A.; Holloway, L.H.; La Penna, P.; Losurdo, G.; Paoletti, F.; Pasqualetti, A.; Passaquieti, R.; Passuello, D.; Porzio, A.; Puppo, P.; Raffaelli, F.; Rapagnani, P.; Ricci, F.; Ricciardi, J.; Solimeno, S.; Stanga, R.; Vetrano, F.; Zhang, Z.

    2004-01-01

    The reduction of thermal noise is a fundamental issue for the improvement of future gravitational wave antennas. The main purpose of the Low Frequency Facility (LFF) is to study pendulum thermal noise in the region of 10 Hz. Data at the LFF has been taking since the beginning of 2003 and has been analyzed in order to thoroughly understand the region around 10 Hz. Above 7 Hz, the displacement noise floor is at the level of 10 -14 m/√Hz, decreasing with frequency approximately as 1/ν. Seismic noise contamination is not observed above a few Hz

  2. Sensitivity of the Low Frequency Facility experiment around 10 Hz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Di Virgilio, A.; Braccini, S.; Ballardin, G.; Bradaschia, C.; Cella, G.; Cuoco, E.; Dattilo, V.; Ferrante, I.; Fidecaro, F.; Frasconi, F.; Giazotto, A.; Gennai, A.; Holloway, L.H.; La Penna, P.; Losurdo, G.; Paoletti, F.; Pasqualetti, A.; Passaquieti, R.; Passuello, D.; Porzio, A.; Puppo, P.; Raffaelli, F.; Rapagnani, P.; Ricci, F.; Ricciardi, J.; Solimeno, S.; Stanga, R.; Vetrano, F.; Zhang, Z

    2004-02-23

    The reduction of thermal noise is a fundamental issue for the improvement of future gravitational wave antennas. The main purpose of the Low Frequency Facility (LFF) is to study pendulum thermal noise in the region of 10 Hz. Data at the LFF has been taking since the beginning of 2003 and has been analyzed in order to thoroughly understand the region around 10 Hz. Above 7 Hz, the displacement noise floor is at the level of 10{sup -14} m/{radical}Hz, decreasing with frequency approximately as 1/{nu}. Seismic noise contamination is not observed above a few Hz.

  3. Common, low-frequency, and rare genetic variants associated with lipoprotein subclasses and triglyceride measures in Finnish men from the METSIM study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James P Davis

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Lipid and lipoprotein subclasses are associated with metabolic and cardiovascular diseases, yet the genetic contributions to variability in subclass traits are not fully understood. We conducted single-variant and gene-based association tests between 15.1M variants from genome-wide and exome array and imputed genotypes and 72 lipid and lipoprotein traits in 8,372 Finns. After accounting for 885 variants at 157 previously identified lipid loci, we identified five novel signals near established loci at HIF3A, ADAMTS3, PLTP, LCAT, and LIPG. Four of the signals were identified with a low-frequency (0.005

  4. Low-frequency fields - sources and exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kunsch, B.

    1993-01-01

    The author briefly discusses definition of terms, gives an introduction to measurement techniques and describes the characteristics of various low-frequency fields and their causes using typical examples: natural electric fields (thunderstroms), natural magnetic fields, technical electric constant fields (urban transportation, households), static magnetic fields (urban transportation, nuclear magnetic resonance imaging), technical electric alternating fields (high-voltage transmission lines, households), and magnetic alternating fields (high-voltage transmission lines). The author discusses both occupational exposure and that of the general public while underpinning his statements by numerous tables, measurement diagrams and charts. (Uhe) [de

  5. Considerations on collected data with the Low Frequency Facility experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Di Virgilio, A [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Pisa, Polo Fibonacci Ed. C, via F. Buonarrori 2, Pisa (Italy); Cella, G [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Pisa, Polo Fibonacci Ed. C, via F. Buonarrori 2, Pisa (Italy); Dattilo, V [EGO, European, Gravitational Observatory, Cascina (Italy); Frasconi, F [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Pisa, Polo Fibonacci Ed. C, via F. Buonarrori 2, Pisa (Italy); Gennai, A [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Pisa, Polo Fibonacci Ed. C, via F. Buonarrori 2, Pisa (Italy); Penna, P La [EGO, European, Gravitational Observatory, Cascina (Italy); Losurdo, G [INFN Sezione di Firenze, Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); Pasqualetti, A [EGO, European, Gravitational Observatory, Cascina (Italy); Passuello, D [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Pisa, Polo Fibonacci Ed. C, via F. Buonarrori 2, Pisa (Italy); Piergiovanni, F [Universita di Urbino, Urbino (Italy); Porzio, A [Coherentia, CNR-INFM Napoli (Italy); Raffaelli, F [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Pisa, Polo Fibonacci Ed. C, via F. Buonarrori 2, Pisa (Italy); Rapagnani, P [Universita di Roma, Roma1, Rome (Italy); Ricci, F [Universita di Roma, Roma1, Rome (Italy); Solimeno, S [Coherentia, CNR-INFM Napoli (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sez. Napoli, and Dipartimento di Scienze Fisiche, Universita di Napoli ' Federico II' (Italy); Zhang, Z [EGO, European, Gravitational Observatory, Cascina (Italy)

    2006-03-02

    The Low Frequency Facility consists of a 1 cm Fabry-Perot cavity suspended to a single SuperAttenuator, which is the mechanical system adopted to isolate the test masses of the Virgo interferometer. In this paper we present the preliminary results of measurements performed with a cavity of finesse 4000 and lasting 1-2 hours in different working conditions. The analysis presented here is focused mainly on the region below 100 Hz, and uses data collected with longitudinal control bandwidth below 150 Hz. A calibration test confirmed that the collected data are in good agreement with the model of the longitudinal control loop based on the open loop measurements. In addition to this, above 2 Hz the power spectrum of the two mirrors relative displacement shows a stationary noise floor and few peaks with high mechanical quality factor. Studying these peaks in the time domain, it has been observed that the energy associated with a single peak is Boltzman distributed, whether the oscillations are not excited. The measured upper limit of the seismic noise contamination at 10 Hz is around 2 x 10{sup -14} m/{radical}Hz.

  6. Noise measurements in 4 wind turbine farms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Zuylen, E.J.; Koerts, M.

    1993-02-01

    The title wind turbine arrays are situated in Herbayum (Newinco 23PI250), Callantsoog (Bouma 160/20), Noordoostpolder (Windmaster WM300), and Ulketocht (Newinco 500 kW). Measurements were carried out by means of the so-called Ecofys Correlating Noise Meter to determine the source level of the wind turbines. The resulting source level as a function of the wind speed is interpolated to a source level for a wind speed of 8 m/s at 10 m height, on the basis of which the noise contours can be calculated. The noise contours are determined to analyze the noise load for people living in the neighbourhood of the wind parks. The source levels are compared with values as indicated in certificates, which are granted on the basis of a so-called Restricted Quality Certificate (BKC, abbreviated in Dutch) or the new standard NNI 6096/2 for the above-mentioned wind turbines. In general the results of this study agree quite well with the certified values. 12 figs., 7 tabs., 6 refs

  7. Measurement noise of a point autofocus surface topography instrument

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feng, Xiaobing; Quagliotti, Danilo; Maculotti, Giacomo

    Optical instruments for areal topography measurement can be especially sensitive to noise when scanning is required. Such noise has different sources, including those internally generated and external sources from the environment.......Optical instruments for areal topography measurement can be especially sensitive to noise when scanning is required. Such noise has different sources, including those internally generated and external sources from the environment....

  8. Measuring Variability in the Presence of Noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welsh, W. F.

    Quantitative measurements of a variable signal in the presence of noise requires very careful attention to subtle affects which can easily bias the measurements. This is not limited to the low-count rate regime, nor is the bias error necessarily small. In this talk I will mention some of the dangers in applying standard techniques which are appropriate for high signal to noise data but fail in the cases where the S/N is low. I will discuss methods for correcting the bias in the these cases, both for periodic and non-periodic variability, and will introduce the concept of the ``filtered de-biased RMS''. I will also illustrate some common abuses of power spectrum interpretation. All of these points will be illustrated with examples from recent work on CV and AGN variability.

  9. Noise Measurements of the VAIIPR Fan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza, Jeff; Weir, Don

    2012-01-01

    This final report has been prepared by Honeywell Aerospace, Phoenix, Arizona, a unit of Honeywell International, Inc., documenting work performed during the period September 2004 through November 2005 for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Glenn Research Center, Cleveland, Ohio, under the Revolutionary Aero-Space Engine Research (RASER) Program, Contract No. NAS3- 01136, Task Order 6, Noise Measurements of the VAIIPR Fan. The NASA Task Manager was Dr. Joe Grady, NASA Glenn Research Center, Mail Code 60-6, Cleveland, Ohio 44135. The NASA Contract Officer was Mr. Albert Spence, NASA Glenn Research Center, Mail Code 60-6, Cleveland, Ohio 44135. This report focuses on the evaluation of internal fan noise as generated from various inflow disturbances based on measurements made from a circumferential array of sensors located near the fan and sensors upstream of a serpentine inlet.

  10. MOSFET LF noise under Large Signal Excitation: Measurement, Modelling and Application

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Wel, A.P.

    2005-01-01

    Regarding LF noise in MOSFETs, it is noted that the MOSFET is a surface channel device. Both n and p-channel devices exhibit similar low frequency (LF) noise behaviour that can be explained by a carrier number fluctuation model (section 3.5). LF noise in MOSFETs is predominantly caused by Random

  11. Minimization of nanosatellite low frequency magnetic fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belyayev, S. M., E-mail: belyayev@isr.lviv.ua [Lviv Centre of Institute for Space Research, Lviv 79060 (Ukraine); Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm 11428 (Sweden); Dudkin, F. L. [Lviv Centre of Institute for Space Research, Lviv 79060 (Ukraine)

    2016-03-15

    Small weight and dimensions of the micro- and nanosatellites constrain researchers to place electromagnetic sensors on short booms or on the satellite body. Therefore the electromagnetic cleanliness of such satellites becomes a central question. This paper describes the theoretical base and practical techniques for determining the parameters of DC and very low frequency magnetic interference sources. One of such sources is satellite magnetization, the reduction of which improves the accuracy and stability of the attitude control system. We present design solutions for magnetically clean spacecraft, testing equipment, and technology for magnetic moment measurements, which are more convenient, efficient, and accurate than the conventional ones.

  12. Apparatus for dynamic and static measurements of mechanical properties of solids and of flux-lattice in type-II superconductors at low frequency (10 - 5-10 Hz) and temperature (4.7-500 K)

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Anna, G.; Benoit, W.

    1990-12-01

    A forced torsional pendulum which permits us to examine anelastic mechanical properties of solids as well as for flux-lattice in type-II superconductors, has been built to explore the low frequency and low temperature range. It works on the principle of dynamic frequency response function measurement and appears to be a powerful instrument for studying structural defect motions as well as flux line dynamics. As an additional quantity, the magnetization or the plastic strain can be statically measured by the same apparatus.

  13. Distortion-product otoacoustic emission at low frequencies in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Anders Tornvig

    -frequency hearing has not yet been characterized by measurement of low-frequency emissions from the cochlea. Low-frequency emissions are expected to be covered in sounds of breathing, blood circulation, and so on, if they exist at all at measurable levels. The present study shows, in essence, that the human ear...... emits distortion at least 1-2 octaves lower in frequency than has previously been shown. The emission is promising for further exploratory and clinical assessment of cochlear activity associated with low-frequency hearing. Anders received his M.Sc. degree in acoustics in 2012 from Aalborg University...

  14. Low-frequency oscillations in Hall thrusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei Li-Qiu; Han Liang; Yu Da-Ren; Guo Ning

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we summarize the research development of low-frequency oscillations in the last few decades. The findings of physical mechanism, characteristics and stabilizing methods of low-frequency oscillations are discussed. It shows that it is unreasonable and incomplete to model an ionization region separately to analyze the physical mechanism of low-frequency oscillations. Electro-dynamics as well as the formation conditions of ionization distribution play an important role in characteristics and stabilizing of low-frequency oscillations. Understanding the physical mechanism and characteristics of low- frequency oscillations thoroughly and developing a feasible method stabilizing this instability are still important research subjects. (review)

  15. Comparison of measured and predicted airfoil self-noise with application to wind turbine noise reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dassen, T.; Parchen, R.; Guidati, G.; Wagner, S.; Kang, S.; Khodak, A.E.

    1998-01-01

    In the ongoing JOULE-III project 'Development of Design Tools for Reduced Aerodynamic Noise Wind Turbines (DRAW)', prediction codes for inflow-turbulence (IT) noise and turbulent boundary layer trailing-edge (TE) noise, are developed and validated. It is shown that the differences in IT noise radiation between airfoils having a different shape, are correctly predicted. The first, preliminary comparison made between predicted and measured TE noise spectra yields satisfactory results. 17 refs

  16. Source modelling of train noise - Literature review and some initial measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Xuetao; Jonasson, Hans; Holmberg, Kjell

    2000-07-01

    A literature review of source modelling of railway noise is reported. Measurements on a special test rig at Surahammar and on the new railway line between Arlanda and Stockholm City are reported and analyzed. In the analysis the train is modelled as a number of point sources with or without directivity and each source is combined with analytical sound propagation theory to predict the sound propagation pattern best fitting the measured data. Wheel/rail rolling noise is considered to be the most important noise source. The rolling noise can be modelled as an array of moving point sources, which have a dipole-like horizontal directivity and some kind of vertical directivity. In general it is necessary to distribute the point sources on several heights. Based on our model analysis the source heights for the rolling noise should be below the wheel axles and the most important height is about a quarter of wheel diameter above the railheads. When train speeds are greater than 250 km/h aerodynamic noise will become important and even dominant. It may be important for low frequency components only if the train speed is less than 220 km/h. Little data are available for these cases. It is believed that aerodynamic noise has dipole-like directivity. Its spectrum depends on many factors: speed, railway system, type of train, bogies, wheels, pantograph, presence of barriers and even weather conditions. Other sources such as fans, engine, transmission and carriage bodies are at most second order noise sources, but for trains with a diesel locomotive engine the engine noise will be dominant if train speeds are less than about 100 km/h. The Nord 2000 comprehensive model for sound propagation outdoors, together with the source model that is based on the understandings above, can suitably handle the problems of railway noise propagation in one-third octave bands although there are still problems left to be solved.

  17. Spatial Release From Masking in Simulated Cochlear Implant Users With and Without Access to Low-Frequency Acoustic Hearing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ben Williges

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available For normal-hearing listeners, speech intelligibility improves if speech and noise are spatially separated. While this spatial release from masking has already been quantified in normal-hearing listeners in many studies, it is less clear how spatial release from masking changes in cochlear implant listeners with and without access to low-frequency acoustic hearing. Spatial release from masking depends on differences in access to speech cues due to hearing status and hearing device. To investigate the influence of these factors on speech intelligibility, the present study measured speech reception thresholds in spatially separated speech and noise for 10 different listener types. A vocoder was used to simulate cochlear implant processing and low-frequency filtering was used to simulate residual low-frequency hearing. These forms of processing were combined to simulate cochlear implant listening, listening based on low-frequency residual hearing, and combinations thereof. Simulated cochlear implant users with additional low-frequency acoustic hearing showed better speech intelligibility in noise than simulated cochlear implant users without acoustic hearing and had access to more spatial speech cues (e.g., higher binaural squelch. Cochlear implant listener types showed higher spatial release from masking with bilateral access to low-frequency acoustic hearing than without. A binaural speech intelligibility model with normal binaural processing showed overall good agreement with measured speech reception thresholds, spatial release from masking, and spatial speech cues. This indicates that differences in speech cues available to listener types are sufficient to explain the changes of spatial release from masking across these simulated listener types.

  18. Noise and Vibrations Measurements. External noise and vibrations measurements for offshore SODAR application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ormel, F.T.; Eecen, P.J.; Herman, S.A.

    2003-10-01

    The partners in the WISE project investigate whether application of the SODAR (sonic detection and ranging) measurement technique in wind energy experimental work is feasible as a replacement for cup anemometers, wind direction sensors and tall meteorological masts. In Work Package 2 of the WISE project extensive controlled experiments with the SODAR are performed. For example SODAR measurements are compared with measurements from nearby masts and different brands of SODARs are compared. Part of the work package is the measurement of vibration and noise on an offshore SODAR system. The results of these measurements are presented in this report. ECN performed measurements at an offshore location to investigate the influence of noise and vibrations on the performance of a MiniSODAR measurement system. The aim of the measurements is to quantify the effect of these external noise and vibrations disturbances on the MiniSODAR's performance. Measurements on an identical SODAR system onshore are carried out to compare the disturbances of offshore and onshore external conditions. The effect of background noise on SODAR operation has clearly been established in literature. Therefore, measurements have been performed only to establish the absolute sound pressure levels. This is done at the Measuring Platform Noordwijk (MPN) located in the North Sea, nine kilometres out of the coast at Noordwijk, The Netherlands, and at two locations onshore. At the MPN-platform, the SODAR has been moved from the middle deck to the upper deck to diminish the influence of the diesel generator needed for the electric powering of the island. Although the absolute sound pressure level became higher at the new location, this level became lower at the most important frequencies inside the SODAR, due to the use of absorbing foam. With regards to the sound pressure level the move improved the situation. The sound pressure levels measured offshore were 6 to 15 dB higher than for the two locations

  19. Relations between perceptual measures of temporal processing, auditory-evoked brainstem responses and speech intelligibility in noise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Papakonstantinou, Alexandra; Strelcyk, Olaf; Dau, Torsten

    2011-01-01

    This study investigates behavioural and objective measures of temporal auditory processing and their relation to the ability to understand speech in noise. The experiments were carried out on a homogeneous group of seven hearing-impaired listeners with normal sensitivity at low frequencies (up to 1...... kHz) and steeply sloping hearing losses above 1 kHz. For comparison, data were also collected for five normalhearing listeners. Temporal processing was addressed at low frequencies by means of psychoacoustical frequency discrimination, binaural masked detection and amplitude modulation (AM......) detection. In addition, auditory brainstem responses (ABRs) to clicks and broadband rising chirps were recorded. Furthermore, speech reception thresholds (SRTs) were determined for Danish sentences in speechshaped noise. The main findings were: (1) SRTs were neither correlated with hearing sensitivity...

  20. Increase in effectiveness of low frequency acoustic liners by use of coupled Helmholtz resonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, L. W.

    1977-01-01

    Coupling of Helmholtz resonators in a low-frequency absorber array was studied as a means for increasing the effectiveness for absorbing low-frequency core engine noise. The equations for the impedance of the coupled-resonator systems were developed in terms of uncoupled-resonator parameters, and the predicted impedance for a parallel-coupled scheme is shown to compare favorably with measurements from a test model. In addition, attenuation measurements made in a flow duct on test coupled-resonator panels are shown to compare favorably with predicted values. Finally, the parallel-coupled concept is shown to give significantly more attenuation than that of a typical uncoupled resonator array of the same total volume.

  1. Measures of the zero power nuclear reactor's kinetic parameters with application of noise analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martins, F.R.

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to establish an experimental technique based on noise analysis for measuring the ratio of kinetic parameters β/ Λ and the power of the Zero Power Nuclear Reactor IPEN-MB 01. A through study of the microscopic and macroscopic noise analysis techniques has been carried out. The Langevin technique and the point kinetic model were chosen to describe the stochastic phenomena that occur in the zero power reactor. Measurements have been made using two compensated ionization chambers localized in the water reflector at symmetric positions in order to minimize spatial effects on the neutron flux fluctuation. Power calibrations based on the low frequency plateau of the cross-power spectral density has also been carried out. (author)

  2. Inverted pendulum as low-frequency pre-isolation for advanced gravitational wave detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takamori, A.; Raffai, P.; Marka, S.; DeSalvo, R.; Sannibale, V.; Tariq, H.; Bertolini, A.; Cella, G.; Viboud, N.; Numata, K.; Takahashi, R.; Fukushima, M.

    2007-01-01

    We have developed advanced seismic attenuation systems for Gravitational Wave (GW) detectors. The design consists of an Inverted Pendulum (IP) holding stages of Geometrical Anti-Spring Filters (GASF) and pendula, which isolate the test mass suspension from ground noise. The ultra-low-frequency IP suppresses the horizontal seismic noise, while the GASF suppresses the vertical ground vibrations. The three legs of the IP are supported by cylindrical maraging steel flexural joints. The IP can be tuned to very low frequencies by carefully adjusting its load. As a best result, we have achieved an ultra low, ∼12 mHz pendulum frequency for the system prototype made for Advanced LIGO (Laser Interferometer Gravitational Wave Observatory). The measured quality factor, Q, of this IP, ranging from Q∼2500 (at 0.45 Hz) to Q∼2 (at 12 mHz), is compatible with structural damping, and is proportional to the square of the pendulum frequency. Tunable counterweights allow for precise center-of-percussion tuning to achieve the required attenuation up to the first leg internal resonance (∼60 Hz for advanced LIGO prototype). All measurements are in good agreement with our analytical models. We therefore expect good attenuation in the low-frequency region, from ∼0.1to ∼50 Hz, covering the micro-seismic peak. The extremely soft IP requires minimal control force, which simplifies any needed actuation

  3. A numerical technique to design blast noise mitigation measures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berg, F. van den; Eerden, F.J.M. van der

    2007-01-01

    Large weapons, such as armor, artillery or demolitions, create a high-energy blast wave. It has a low frequency content, typically between 15 and 125 Hz, and can propagate over large distances. As a result it is a relative important cause for annoyance. Mitigation measures need to be close to the

  4. Boundary layer measurements of the NACA0015 and implications for noise modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertagnolio, F.

    2011-01-15

    A NACA0015 airfoil section instrumented with an array of high frequency microphones flush-mounted beneath its surface was measured in the wind tunnel at LM Wind Power in Lunderskov. Various inflow speeds and angles of attack were investigated. In addition, a hot-wire device system was used to measure the velocity profiles and turbulence characteristics in the boundary layer near the trailing edge of the airfoil. The measured boundary layer data are presented in this report and compared with CFD results. A relative good agreement is observed, though a few discrepancies also appear. Comparisons of surface pressure fluctuations spectra are used to analyze and improve trailing edge noise modeling by the so-called TNO model. Finally, a pair of hot-wires were placed on each side of the trailing edge in order to measure the radiated trailing edge noise. However, there is no strong evidence that such noise could be measured in the higher frequency range. Nevertheless, low-frequency noise could be measured and related to the presence of the airfoil but its origin is unclear. (Author)

  5. Mechanical characterisation of the TorPeDO: a low frequency gravitational force sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    McManus, D. J.; Forsyth, P. W. F.; Yap, M. J.; Ward, R. L.; Shaddock, D. A.; McClelland, D. E.; Slagmolen, B. J. J.

    2017-07-01

    Newtonian noise is likely to be a future challenge at low frequencies for Advanced LIGO and other second generation gravitational wave detectors. We present the TorPeDO system: a dual torsion pendulum sensor designed to measure local gravitational forces to high precision. Gravitational forces induce a differential rotation between the two torsion beams, which is measured with an optical read-out. Both torsion pendulums have a common suspension point, tunable centre of mass, and resonant frequency. This produces a high level of mechanical common mode noise cancellation. We report on a controls prototype of the TorPeDO system, presenting the frequency response and tuning range of both pendulums. A noise budget and mechanical cross-coupling model for this system are also presented. We demonstrate frequency tuning of the two torsion pendulums to a difference of 4.3 μHz.

  6. Mechanical spectra of glass-forming liquids. I. Low-frequency bulk and shear moduli of DC704 and 5-PPE measured by piezoceramic transducers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hecksher, Tina; Olsen, Niels Boye; Nelson, Keith Adam

    2013-01-01

    We present dynamic shear and bulk modulus measurements of supercooled tetraphenyl-tetramethyl-trisiloxane (DC704) and 5-phenyl-4-ether over a range of temperatures close to their glass transition. The data are analyzed and compared in terms of time-temperature superposition (TTS), the relaxation ...

  7. In-Situ Measurement of Soil Permittivity at Various Depths for the Calibration and Validation of Low-Frequency SAR Soil Moisture Models by Using GPR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian N. Koyama

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available At radar frequencies below 2 GHz, the mismatch between the 5 to 15 cm sensing depth of classical time domain reflectometry (TDR probe soil moisture measurements and the radar penetration depth can easily lead to unreliable in situ data. Accurate quantitative measurements of soil water contents at various depths by classical methods are cumbersome and usually highly invasive. We propose an improved method for the estimation of vertical soil moisture profiles from multi-offset ground penetrating radar (GPR data. A semi-automated data acquisition technique allows for very fast and robust measurements in the field. Advanced common mid-point (CMP processing is applied to obtain quantitative estimates of the permittivity and depth of the reflecting soil layers. The method is validated against TDR measurements using data acquired in different environments. Depth and soil moisture contents of the reflecting layers were estimated with root mean square errors (RMSE on the order of 5 cm and 1.9 Vol.-%, respectively. Application of the proposed technique for the validation of synthetic aperture radar (SAR soil moisture estimates is demonstrated based on a case study using airborne L-band data and ground-based P-band data. For the L-band case we found good agreement between the near-surface GPR estimates and extended integral equation model (I2EM based SAR retrievals, comparable to those obtained by TDR. At the P-band, the GPR based method significantly outperformed the TDR method when using soil moisture estimates at depths below 30 cm.

  8. A novel approach to reduce environmental noise in microgravity measurements using a Scintrex CG5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boddice, Daniel; Atkins, Phillip; Rodgers, Anthony; Metje, Nicole; Goncharenko, Yuriy; Chapman, David

    2018-05-01

    worse than static measurement results, possibly due to the actions of moving the Scintrex during the survey which caused instability and elastic relaxation in the sensor, or the liquid tilt sensors, which generated additional low frequency instrument noise. However, the technique will result in significant improvements to accuracy and a reduction of measurement time, both for static measurements, for example at reference sites and observatories, and for field measurements using the next generation of instruments based on new technology, such as atom interferometry, resulting in time and cost savings.

  9. Measurement and analysis of noise power spectrum of computerized tomography in images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castro Tejero, P.; Garayoa Roca, J.

    2013-01-01

    This paper examines the implementation of the spectrum of powers of the noise, NPS, as metric to characterize the noise, both in magnitude and in texture, for CT scans. The NPS found show that you for convolution filters that assume a greater softening in the reconstructed image, spectrum is concentrated in the low frequencies, while for filters sharp, the spectrum extends to high frequencies. In the analyzed cases, there is a low frequency component, largely due to the structure-borne noise, which can be a potential negative effect on the detectability of injuries. (Author)

  10. Evaluation of noise pollution in urban traffic hubs—Noise maps and measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fiedler, Paulo Eduardo Kirrian; Zannin, Paulo Henrique Trombetta

    2015-01-01

    A study was made of some of the main traffic hubs in a Latin American metropolis, in order to determine the presence or absence of noise by means of noise measurements and acoustic mapping. To characterize noise in the evaluated road stretches, 232 measurements were taken at different points. The Predictor software package was used for the noise mapping calculations. Noise sensitive areas, e.g., hospitals, were identified in the evaluated road stretches. Noise maps were calculated for two hospitals, showing the current levels of noise that reach their facades. Hypothetical scenarios were simulated by making changes in the composition of traffic and total number of vehicles, and an assessment was made of the potential influence of these modifications in reducing the noise levels reaching the facades of the buildings in question. The simulations indicated that a 50% reduction in total traffic flow, or a 50% reduction in heavy vehicle traffic flow, would reduce the noise levels by about 3 dB(A). - Highlights: • Evaluation of noise pollution in urban traffic hubs • Street systems • Environmental noise impacts • Noise mapping

  11. Evaluation of noise pollution in urban traffic hubs—Noise maps and measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fiedler, Paulo Eduardo Kirrian; Zannin, Paulo Henrique Trombetta, E-mail: paulo.zannin@pesquisador.cnpq.br

    2015-02-15

    A study was made of some of the main traffic hubs in a Latin American metropolis, in order to determine the presence or absence of noise by means of noise measurements and acoustic mapping. To characterize noise in the evaluated road stretches, 232 measurements were taken at different points. The Predictor software package was used for the noise mapping calculations. Noise sensitive areas, e.g., hospitals, were identified in the evaluated road stretches. Noise maps were calculated for two hospitals, showing the current levels of noise that reach their facades. Hypothetical scenarios were simulated by making changes in the composition of traffic and total number of vehicles, and an assessment was made of the potential influence of these modifications in reducing the noise levels reaching the facades of the buildings in question. The simulations indicated that a 50% reduction in total traffic flow, or a 50% reduction in heavy vehicle traffic flow, would reduce the noise levels by about 3 dB(A). - Highlights: • Evaluation of noise pollution in urban traffic hubs • Street systems • Environmental noise impacts • Noise mapping.

  12. Planck 2013 results. II. The Low Frequency Instrument data processing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aghanim, N.; Armitage-Caplan, C.; Arnaud, M.

    2013-01-01

    We describe the data processing pipeline of the Planck Low Frequency Instrument (LFI) data processing centre (DPC) to create and characterize full-sky maps based on the first 15.5 months of operations at 30, 44, and 70 GHz. In particular, we discuss the various steps involved in reducing the data......) is employed to combine radiometric data and pointing information into sky maps, minimizing the variance of correlated noise. Noise covariance matrices, required to compute statistical uncertainties on LFI and Planck products, are also produced. Main beams are estimated down to the approximate to-20 dB level...

  13. Theory and Measurement of Signal-to-Noise Ratio in Continuous-Wave Noise Radar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stec, Bronisław; Susek, Waldemar

    2018-05-06

    Determination of the signal power-to-noise power ratio on the input and output of reception systems is essential to the estimation of their quality and signal reception capability. This issue is especially important in the case when both signal and noise have the same characteristic as Gaussian white noise. This article considers the problem of how a signal-to-noise ratio is changed as a result of signal processing in the correlation receiver of a noise radar in order to determine the ability to detect weak features in the presence of strong clutter-type interference. These studies concern both theoretical analysis and practical measurements of a noise radar with a digital correlation receiver for 9.2 GHz bandwidth. Firstly, signals participating individually in the correlation process are defined and the terms signal and interference are ascribed to them. Further studies show that it is possible to distinguish a signal and a noise on the input and output of a correlation receiver, respectively, when all the considered noises are in the form of white noise. Considering the above, a measurement system is designed in which it is possible to represent the actual conditions of noise radar operation and power measurement of a useful noise signal and interference noise signals—in particular the power of an internal leakage signal between a transmitter and a receiver of the noise radar. The proposed measurement stands and the obtained results show that it is possible to optimize with the use of the equipment and not with the complex processing of a noise signal. The radar parameters depend on its prospective application, such as short- and medium-range radar, ground-penetrating radar, and through-the-wall detection radar.

  14. A stochastic model with a low-frequency amplification feedback for the stratospheric northern annular mode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yueyue; Cai, Ming; Ren, Rongcai

    2017-08-01

    We consider three indices to measure the polar stratospheric mass and stratospheric meridional mass circulation variability: anomalies of (1) total mass in the polar stratospheric cap (60-90°N, above the isentropic surface 400 K, PSM), (2) total adiabatic mass transport across 60°N into the polar stratosphere cap (AMT), (3) and total diabetic mass transport across 400 K from the polar stratosphere into the troposphere below (DMT). It is confirmed that the negative stratospheric Northern Annular Mode (NAM) and PSM indices have a nearly indistinguishable temporal evolution and a similar red-noise-like spectrum with a de-correlation timescale of 4 weeks. This enables us to examine the low-frequency nature of the NAM in the framework of mass circulation, namely, d/{dt}{PSM}={AMT} - {DMT} . The DMT index tends to be positively correlated with the PSM with a red-noise-like spectrum, representing slow radiative cooling processes giving rise to a de-correlation timescale of 3-4 weeks. The AMT is nearly perfectly correlated with the day-to-day tendency of PSM, reflecting a robust quasi 90° out-of-phase relation between the AMT and PSM at all frequency bands. Variations of vertically westward tilting of planetary waves contribute mainly to the high-frequency portion of AMT. It is the wave amplitude's slow vacillation that plays the leading role in the quasi 90° out-of-phase relation between the AMT and PSM. Based on this, we put forward a linear stochastic model with a low-frequency amplification feedback from low-frequency amplitude vacillations of planetary waves to explain the amplified low-frequency response of PSM/NAM to a stochastic forcing from the westward tilting variability.

  15. Low-frequency Wiener spectra for homogenity analysis of image-forming films at imaging with film-foils systems in radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolf, M.; Angerstein, W.

    1986-01-01

    A special photometer for the measurement of image Wiener spectra below spatial frequencies of 1 mm -1 is described. These low-frequency Wiener spectra allow a quantitative assessment of inhomogeneities of screens and films (such as clouds and coarse structures) introduced in the production process. Noise with frequencies below the usually measured frequency range of 1 to 7 mm -1 is decisive for the detection of the diagnostically important details greater than 1 mm. It appears, that the noise amplitudes and their differences between screens of the same type can be relatively high. This in accordance with the visual noise impression indicates, that low frequency noise is an important image quality factor for screen-film systems. (author)

  16. Status report of the low frequency facility experiment, Virgo R and D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Di Virgilio, A.; Ballardin, G.; Braccini, S.; Bradaschia, C.; Calamai, G.; Casciano, C.; Cavalieri, R.; Cecchi, R.; Cella, G.; Chen, Sheng-Jui; Cuoco, E.; Dattilo, V.; Dominici, P.; Fabbroni, L.; Fazzi, M.; Frasca, S.; Ferrante, I.; Fidecaro, F.; Frasconi, F.; Gennaro, G.; Giazotto, A.; Guidi, G.; Holloway, L.; La Penna, P.; Lomtadze, T.; Losurdo, G.; Majorana, E.; Martelli, F.; Mazzoni, M.; Nenci, F.; Ni, Wei-Tou; Lelli, F.; Paoletti, F.; Pasqualetti, A.; Passaquieti, R.; Passuello, D.; Perciballi, M.; Poggiani, R.; Porzio, A.; Puppo, P.; Raffaelli, F.; Rapagnani, P.; Ricci, F.; Ricciardi, I.; Solimeno, S.; Stanga, R.; Taddei, R.; Vetrano, F.; Vicere, A.; Zhang, Z

    2003-11-10

    The low frequency facility, a Virgo R and D experiment, is composed by a Fabry-Perot cavity attached and controlled by the Virgo suspension; the goal is to measure the thermal noise of the apparatus above 10 Hz, with a displacement sensitivity as high as 10{sup -18} m/{radical}Hz. Since September 2001 the apparatus, located inside the INFN-Pisa experimental area, has been completely built and put into operation. Vacuum facilities and the control loops have been set up. Transfer functions, necessary to control the cavity, absolute test mass displacement and the first demonstration of the cavity locking are reported.

  17. Charting environmental pollution. [by noise measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halpert, E.; Bizo, F.; Karacsonyi, Z.

    1974-01-01

    It is found that areas affected by different noxious agents are within the limits traced for high noise level areas; consequently, it is suggested that high noise pressure levels should be used as the primary indication of environmental pollution. A complex methodology is reported for charting environmental pollution due to physical, chemical and biological noxious agents on the scale of an industrial district.

  18. Measurement of macroscopic plasma parameters with a radio experiment: Interpretation of the quasi-thermal noise spectrum observed in the solar wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couturier, P.; Hoang, S.; Meyer-Vernet, N.; Steinberg, J. L.

    1983-01-01

    The ISEE-3 SBH radio receiver has provided the first systematic observations of the quasi-thermal (plasma waves) noise in the solar wind plasma. The theoretical interpretation of that noise involves the particle distribution function so that electric noise measurements with long antennas provide a fast and independent method of measuring plasma parameters: densities and temperatures of a two component (core and halo) electron distribution function have been obtained in that way. The polarization of that noise is frequency dependent and sensitive to the drift velocity of the electron population. Below the plasma frequency, there is evidence of a weak noise spectrum with spectral index -1 which is not yet accounted for by the theory. The theoretical treatment of the noise associated with the low energy (thermal) proton population shows that the moving electrical antenna radiates in the surrounding plasma by Carenkov emission which becomes predominant at the low frequencies, below about 0.1 F sub P.

  19. Searching for chaos on low frequency

    OpenAIRE

    Nicolas Wesner

    2004-01-01

    A new method for detecting low dimensional chaos in small sample sets is presented. The method is applied to financial data on low frequency (annual and monthly) for which few observations are available.

  20. Measuring Tyre Rolling Noise at the Contact Patch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozak, P.; Matuszkova, R.; Radimsky, M.; Kudrna, J.

    2017-06-01

    This paper deals with noise generated by road traffic. A focus is concentrated solely on one of its sources related to tyre/road interaction referred as rolling noise. The paper states brief overview of various approaches and methods used to measure this particular source of road traffic noise. On the basis of literature reviews, a unique device has been designed. Development of the measuring device and possibilities of its usage are described in detail in this paper. Obtained results of noise measurements can then be used to design measures that increase safety and a lead to better comfort on the road.

  1. Measurement of MOSFET LF Noise Under Large Signal RF Excitation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Wel, A.P.; Klumperink, Eric A.M.; Nauta, Bram

    A new measurement technique is presented that allows measurement of MOSFET LF noise under large signal RF excitation. Measurements indicate that MOSFETS exhibit a reduction in LF noise when they are cycled from inversion to accummulation and that this reduction does not depend on the frequency of

  2. Noise Reduction of Measurement Data using Linear Digital Filters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hitzmann B.

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper Butterworth, Chebyshev (Type I and II and Elliptic digital filters are designed for signal noise reduction. On-line data measurements of substrate concentration from E. coli fed-batch cultivation process are used. Application of the designed filters leads to a successful noise reduction of on-line glucose measurements. The digital filters presented here are simple, easy to implement and effective - the used filters allow for a smart compromise between signal information and noise corruption.

  3. Measurement and analyses of spectral noise power in computed tomography; Medida y analisis del espectro de potencias del ruido en imagenes de tomografia computarizada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castro Tejero, P.; Garayoa Roca, J.

    2014-07-01

    Noise is an important feature of image quality. The standard deviation of pixel value in a uniform region has been frequently used as a metric to characterize noise. However, this measure does not provide any information about the noise spatial distribution. A more complete description is given by the Noise Power Spectrum (NPS) which provides both the amount and the spatial correlation of noise. The objective of the present work is to present a methodology and a computing tool to obtain the NPS, in order to analyze its components and study their behaviour for computed tomography (TC) images. Our results show that the major contribution to NPS is a random source for all the explored working conditions. The structural component is constrained to the low frequency region, where it can be as important as the random component. Moreover, we observe that the reconstruction filter and the acquisition technique, axial or helical, have a clear impact on the image noise. (Author)

  4. DATA ACQUISITION AND ANALYSIS OF LOW FREQUENCY ELECTROMAGNETIC FIELD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PETRICA POPOV

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In recent years more and more studies have shown that, the low frequency field strength (particularly magnetic, 50 / 60Hz are a major risk factor; according to some specialists - even more important as the radiation field. As a result, the personnel serving equipment and facilities such as: electric generators, synchronous, the motors, the inverters or power transformers is subjected continually to intense fields, in their vicinity, with possible harmful effects in the long term by affecting metabolism cell, espectively, the biological mechanisms.Therefore, finding new methods and tools for measurement and analysis of low frequency electromagnetic fields may lead to improved standards for exposure limits of the human body.

  5. Sound quality measures for speech in noise through a commercial hearing aid implementing digital noise reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricketts, Todd A; Hornsby, Benjamin W Y

    2005-05-01

    This brief report discusses the affect of digital noise reduction (DNR) processing on aided speech recognition and sound quality measures in 14 adults fitted with a commercial hearing aid. Measures of speech recognition and sound quality were obtained in two different speech-in-noise conditions (71 dBA speech, +6 dB SNR and 75 dBA speech, +1 dB SNR). The results revealed that the presence or absence of DNR processing did not impact speech recognition in noise (either positively or negatively). Paired comparisons of sound quality for the same speech in noise signals, however, revealed a strong preference for DNR processing. These data suggest that at least one implementation of DNR processing is capable of providing improved sound quality, for speech in noise, in the absence of improved speech recognition.

  6. What Do Contrast Threshold Equivalent Noise Studies Actually Measure? Noise vs. Nonlinearity in Different Masking Paradigms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex S Baldwin

    Full Text Available The internal noise present in a linear system can be quantified by the equivalent noise method. By measuring the effect that applying external noise to the system's input has on its output one can estimate the variance of this internal noise. By applying this simple "linear amplifier" model to the human visual system, one can entirely explain an observer's detection performance by a combination of the internal noise variance and their efficiency relative to an ideal observer. Studies using this method rely on two crucial factors: firstly that the external noise in their stimuli behaves like the visual system's internal noise in the dimension of interest, and secondly that the assumptions underlying their model are correct (e.g. linearity. Here we explore the effects of these two factors while applying the equivalent noise method to investigate the contrast sensitivity function (CSF. We compare the results at 0.5 and 6 c/deg from the equivalent noise method against those we would expect based on pedestal masking data collected from the same observers. We find that the loss of sensitivity with increasing spatial frequency results from changes in the saturation constant of the gain control nonlinearity, and that this only masquerades as a change in internal noise under the equivalent noise method. Part of the effect we find can be attributed to the optical transfer function of the eye. The remainder can be explained by either changes in effective input gain, divisive suppression, or a combination of the two. Given these effects the efficiency of our observers approaches the ideal level. We show the importance of considering these factors in equivalent noise studies.

  7. Preamplifier with ultra low frequency cutoff for infrasonic condenser microphone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kinnerup, Rasmus Trock; Marbjerg, Kresten; Rasmussen, Per

    2012-01-01

    low frequencies becomes a challenge. The electric preamplifier presented in this paper together with a prepolarized condenser microphone form a measurement system. The developed preamplifier connects the microphone signal directly to the input of an operational amplifier with ultra high input...

  8. Spontaneous low-frequency oscillations in cerebral vessels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schytz, Henrik W; Hansson, Andreas; Phillip, Dorte

    2010-01-01

    ). Analysis of CA by measurement of spontaneous oscillations in the low-frequency spectrum in cerebral vessels might be a useful tool for assessing risk and investigating different treatment strategies in carotid artery disease (CAD) and stroke. We reviewed studies exploring spontaneous oscillations...

  9. Resonant magnetic pumping at very low frequency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canobbio, Ernesto

    1978-01-01

    We propose to exploit for plasma heating purposes the very low frequency limit of the Alfven wave resonance condition, which reduces essentially to safety factor q=m/n, a rational number. It is shown that a substantial fraction of the total RF-energy can be absorbed by the plasma. The lowest possible frequency value is determined by the maximum tolerable width of the RF-magnetic islands which develop near the singular surface. The obvious interest of the proposed scheme is the low frequency value (f<=10 KHz) which allows the RF-coils to be protected by stainless steel or even to be put outside the liner

  10. Auditory filters at low-frequencies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Orellana, Carlos Andrés Jurado; Pedersen, Christian Sejer; Møller, Henrik

    2009-01-01

    -ear transfer function), the asymmetry of the auditory filter changed from steeper high-frequency slopes at 1000 Hz to steeper low-frequency slopes below 100 Hz. Increasing steepness at low-frequencies of the middle-ear high-pass filter is thought to cause this effect. The dynamic range of the auditory filter...... was found to steadily decrease with decreasing center frequency. Although the observed decrease in filter bandwidth with decreasing center frequency was only approximately monotonic, the preliminary data indicates the filter bandwidth does not stabilize around 100 Hz, e.g. it still decreases below...

  11. Gravity and low-frequency geodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Teisseyre, Roman

    1989-01-01

    This fourth volume in the series Physics and Evolution of the Earth's Interior, provides a comprehensive review of the geophysical and geodetical aspects related to gravity and low-frequency geodynamics. Such aspects include the Earth's gravity field, geoid shape theory, and low-frequency phenomena like rotation, oscillations and tides.Global-scale phenomena are treated as a response to source excitation in spherical Earth models consisting of several shells: lithosphere, mantle, core and sometimes also the inner solid core. The effect of gravitation and rotation on the Earth's shape is anal

  12. Integral methods in low-frequency electromagnetics

    CERN Document Server

    Solin, Pavel; Karban, Pavel; Ulrych, Bohus

    2009-01-01

    A modern presentation of integral methods in low-frequency electromagnetics This book provides state-of-the-art knowledge on integral methods in low-frequency electromagnetics. Blending theory with numerous examples, it introduces key aspects of the integral methods used in engineering as a powerful alternative to PDE-based models. Readers will get complete coverage of: The electromagnetic field and its basic characteristics An overview of solution methods Solutions of electromagnetic fields by integral expressions Integral and integrodifferential methods

  13. High-efficiency ventilated metamaterial absorber at low frequency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiaoxiao; Au-Yeung, Ka Yan; Li, Xin; Roberts, Robert Christopher; Tian, Jingxuan; Hu, Chuandeng; Huang, Yingzhou; Wang, Shuxia; Yang, Zhiyu; Wen, Weijia

    2018-03-01

    We demonstrate a ventilated metamaterial absorber operating at low frequency (90%) has been achieved in both simulations and experiments. This high-efficiency absorption under the ventilation condition originates from the weak coupling of two identical split tube resonators constituting the absorber, which leads to the hybridization of the degenerate eigenmodes and breaks the absorption upper limit of 50% for conventional transmissive symmetric acoustic absorbers. The absorber can also be extended to an array and work in free space. The absorber should have potential applications in acoustic engineering where both noise reduction and ventilation are required.

  14. Measurement of luminance noise and chromaticity noise of LCDs with a colorimeter and a color camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roehrig, H.; Dallas, W. J.; Krupinski, E. A.; Redford, Gary R.

    2007-09-01

    This communication focuses on physical evaluation of image quality of displays for applications in medical imaging. In particular we were interested in luminance noise as well as chromaticity noise of LCDs. Luminance noise has been encountered in the study of monochrome LCDs for some time, but chromaticity noise is a new type of noise which has been encountered first when monochrome and color LCDs were compared in an ROC study. In this present study one color and one monochrome 3 M-pixel LCDs were studied. Both were DICOM calibrated with equal dynamic range. We used a Konica Minolta Chroma Meter CS-200 as well as a Foveon color camera to estimate luminance and chrominance variations of the displays. We also used a simulation experiment to estimate luminance noise. The measurements with the colorimeter were consistent. The measurements with the Foveon color camera were very preliminary as color cameras had never been used for image quality measurements. However they were extremely promising. The measurements with the colorimeter and the simulation results showed that the luminance and chromaticity noise of the color LCD were larger than that of the monochrome LCD. Under the condition that an adequate calibration method and image QA/QC program for color displays are available, we expect color LCDs may be ready for radiology in very near future.

  15. Prediction of Landing Gear Noise Reduction and Comparison to Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Leonard V.

    2010-01-01

    Noise continues to be an ongoing problem for existing aircraft in flight and is projected to be a concern for next generation designs. During landing, when the engines are operating at reduced power, the noise from the airframe, of which landing gear noise is an important part, is equal to the engine noise. There are several methods of predicting landing gear noise, but none have been applied to predict the change in noise due to a change in landing gear design. The current effort uses the Landing Gear Model and Acoustic Prediction (LGMAP) code, developed at The Pennsylvania State University to predict the noise from landing gear. These predictions include the influence of noise reduction concepts on the landing gear noise. LGMAP is compared to wind tunnel experiments of a 6.3%-scale Boeing 777 main gear performed in the Quiet Flow Facility (QFF) at NASA Langley. The geometries tested in the QFF include the landing gear with and without a toboggan fairing and the door. It is shown that LGMAP is able to predict the noise directives and spectra from the model-scale test for the baseline configuration as accurately as current gear prediction methods. However, LGMAP is also able to predict the difference in noise caused by the toboggan fairing and by removing the landing gear door. LGMAP is also compared to far-field ground-based flush-mounted microphone measurements from the 2005 Quiet Technology Demonstrator 2 (QTD 2) flight test. These comparisons include a Boeing 777-300ER with and without a toboggan fairing that demonstrate that LGMAP can be applied to full-scale flyover measurements. LGMAP predictions of the noise generated by the nose gear on the main gear measurements are also shown.

  16. Noise, air pollutants and traffic: continuous measurement and correlation at a high-traffic location in New York City.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Zev; Kheirbek, Iyad; Clougherty, Jane E; Ito, Kazuhiko; Matte, Thomas; Markowitz, Steven; Eisl, Holger

    2011-11-01

    Epidemiological studies have linked both noise and air pollution to common adverse health outcomes such as increased blood pressure and myocardial infarction. In urban settings, noise and air pollution share important sources, notably traffic, and several recent studies have shown spatial correlations between noise and air pollution. The temporal association between these exposures, however, has yet to be thoroughly investigated despite the importance of time series studies in air pollution epidemiology and the potential that correlations between these exposures could at least partly confound statistical associations identified in these studies. An aethelometer, for continuous elemental carbon measurement, was co-located with a continuous noise monitor near a major urban highway in New York City for six days in August 2009. Hourly elemental carbon measurements and hourly data on overall noise levels and low, medium and high frequency noise levels were collected. Hourly average concentrations of fine particles and nitrogen oxides, wind speed and direction and car, truck and bus traffic were obtained from nearby regulatory monitors. Overall temporal patterns, as well as day-night and weekday-weekend patterns, were characterized and compared for all variables. Noise levels were correlated with car, truck, and bus traffic and with air pollutants. We observed strong day-night and weekday-weekend variation in noise and air pollutants and correlations between pollutants varied by noise frequency. Medium and high frequency noise were generally more strongly correlated with traffic and traffic-related pollutants than low frequency noise and the correlation with medium and high frequency noise was generally stronger at night. Correlations with nighttime high frequency noise were particularly high for car traffic (Spearman rho=0.84), nitric oxide (0.73) and nitrogen dioxide (0.83). Wind speed and direction mediated relationships between pollutants and noise. Noise levels are

  17. Analysis and reduction of thermal magnetic noise in liquid-He dewar for sensitive low-field nuclear magnetic resonance measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, S. M.; Yu, K. K.; Lee, Y. H.; Kang, C. S.; Kim, K.; Lee, S. J.

    2013-01-01

    For sensitive measurements of micro-Tesla nuclear magnetic resonance (μT-NMR) signal, a low-noise superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) system is needed. We have fabricated a liquid He dewar for an SQUID having a large diameter for the pickup coil. The initial test of the SQUID system showed much higher low-frequency magnetic noise caused by the thermal magnetic noise of the aluminum plates used for the vapor-cooled thermal shield material. The frequency dependence of the noise spectrum showed that the noise increases with the decrease of frequency. This behavior could be explained from a two-layer model; one generating the thermal noise and the other one shielding the thermal noise by eddy-current shielding. And the eddy-current shielding effect is strongly dependent on the frequency through the skin-depth. To minimize the loop size for the fluctuating thermal noise current, we changed the thermal shield material into insulated thin Cu mesh. The magnetic noise of the SQUID system became flat down to 0.1 Hz with a white noise of 0.3 fT√ Hz, including the other noise contributions such as SQUID electronics and magnetically shielded room, etc, which is acceptable for low-noise μT-NMR experiments.

  18. A generalized formulation for noise-based seismic velocity change measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-García, C.; Brenguier, F.; Boué, P.; Shapiro, N.; Droznin, D.; Droznina, S.; Senyukov, S.; Gordeev, E.

    2017-12-01

    The observation of continuous seismic velocity changes is a powerful tool for detecting seasonal variations in crustal structure, volcanic unrest, co- and post-seismic evolution of stress in fault areas or the effects of fluid injection. The standard approach for measuring such velocity changes relies on comparison of travel times in the coda of a set of seismic signals, usually noise-based cross-correlations retrieved at different dates, and a reference trace, usually a averaged function over dates. A good stability in both space and time of the noise sources is then the main assumption for reliable measurements. Unfortunately, these conditions are often not fulfilled, as it happens when ambient-noise sources are non-stationary, such as the emissions of low-frequency volcanic tremors.We propose a generalized formulation for retrieving continuous time series of noise-based seismic velocity changes without any arbitrary reference cross-correlation function. We set up a general framework for future applications of this technique performing synthetic tests. In particular, we study the reliability of the retrieved velocity changes in case of seasonal-type trends, transient effects (similar to those produced as a result of an earthquake or a volcanic eruption) and sudden velocity drops and recoveries as the effects of transient local source emissions. Finally, we apply this approach to a real dataset of noise cross-correlations. We choose the Klyuchevskoy volcanic group (Kamchatka) as a case study where the recorded wavefield is hampered by loss of data and dominated by strongly localized volcanic tremor sources. Despite the mentioned wavefield contaminations, we retrieve clear seismic velocity drops associated with the eruptions of the Klyuchevskoy an the Tolbachik volcanoes in 2010 and 2012, respectively.

  19. Planck early results. III. First assessment of the Low Frequency Instrument in-flight performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poutanen, T.; Lähteenmäki, A.; León-Tavares, J.

    2011-01-01

    The scientific performance of the Planck Low Frequency Instrument (LFI) after one year of in-orbit operation is presented. We describe the main optical parameters and discuss photometric calibration, white noise sensitivity, and noise properties. A preliminary evaluation of the impact of the main...

  20. Measurement and modelling of noise emission of road vehicles for use in prediction models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jonasson, H.G.

    2000-07-01

    The road vehicle as sound source has been studied within a wide frequency range. Well defined measurements have been carried out on moving and stationary vehicles. Measurement results have been checked against theoretical simulations. A Nordtest measurement method to obtain input data for prediction methods has been proposed and tested in four different countries. The effective sound source of a car has its centre close to the nearest wheels. For trucks this centre seems to be closer to the centre of the car. The vehicle as sound source is directional both in the vertical and the horizontal plane. The difference between SEL and L{sub pFmax} during a pass-by varies with frequency. At low frequencies interference effects between correlated sources may be the problem. At high frequencies the directivity of tyre/road noise affects the result. The time when L{sub pFmax} is obtained varies with frequency. Thus traditional maximum measurements are not suitable for frequency band applications. The measurements support the fact that the tyre/road noise source is very low. Measurements on a stationary vehicle indicate that the engine source is also very low. Engine noise is screened by the body of the car. The ground attenuation, also at short distances, will be significant whenever we use low microphone positions and have some 'soft' ground in between. Unless all measurements are restricted to propagation over 'hard' surfaces only it is necessary to use rather high microphone positions. The Nordtest method proposed will yield a reproducibility standard deviation of 1-3 dB depending on frequency. High frequencies are more accurate. In order to get accurate results at low frequencies large numbers of vehicles are required. To determine the sound power level from pass-by measurement requires a proper source and propagation model. As these models may change it is recommended to measure and report both SEL and L{sub pFmax} normalized to a specified distance.

  1. Neurally based measurement and evaluation of environmental noise

    CERN Document Server

    Soeta, Yoshiharu

    2015-01-01

    This book deals with methods of measurement and evaluation of environmental noise based on an auditory neural and brain-oriented model. The model consists of the autocorrelation function (ACF) and the interaural cross-correlation function (IACF) mechanisms for signals arriving at the two ear entrances. Even when the sound pressure level of a noise is only about 35 dBA, people may feel annoyed due to the aspects of sound quality. These aspects can be formulated by the factors extracted from the ACF and IACF. Several examples of measuring environmental noise—from outdoor noise such as that of aircraft, traffic, and trains, and indoor noise such as caused by floor impact, toilets, and air-conditioning—are demonstrated. According to the noise measurement and evaluation, applications for sound design are discussed. This book provides an excellent resource for students, researchers, and practitioners in a wide range of fields, such as the automotive, railway, and electronics industries, and soundscape, architec...

  2. Low-frequency fields - health risk assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernhardt, J.

    1993-01-01

    The author briefly reviews the biological actions and effects of low-frequency fields, epidemiological studies and discusses health risks in detail. He describes the assessment principles of the International Commission on Non-ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP), medical principles for risk assessment, determination of limits and thesholds, and aspects of prevention. This is supplemented to by several fables and literature list. (Uhe) [de

  3. Orbiting low frequency array for radio astronomy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rajan, Rai Thilak; Rajan, Raj; Engelen, Steven; Bentum, Marinus Jan; Verhoeven, Chris

    2011-01-01

    Recently new and interesting science drivers have emerged for very low frequency radio astronomy from 0.3 MHz to 30 MHz. However Earth bound radio observations at these wavelengths are severely hampered by ionospheric distortions, man made interference, solar flares and even complete reflection

  4. Nonlinear Modelling of Low Frequency Loudspeakers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Erling Sandermann

    1997-01-01

    In the Danish LoDist project on distortion from dynamic low frequency loudspeakers a detailed nonlinear model of loudspeakers has been developed. The model has been implemented in a PC program so that it can be used to create signals for listening tests and analysis. Also, different methods...

  5. Nonlinear Modelling of Low Frequency Loudspeakers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Erling Sandermann

    1997-01-01

    In the Danish LoDist project on distortion from dynamic low-frequency loudspeakers, a detailed nonlinear model of loudspeakers has been developed. The model has been implemented in a PC program so that it can be used to create signals for listening tests and analysis. Also, different methods...

  6. Digital Filters for Low Frequency Equalization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tyril, Marni; Abildgaard, J.; Rubak, Per

    2001-01-01

    Digital filters with high resolution in the low-frequency range are studied. Specifically, for a given computational power, traditional IIR filters are compared with warped FIR filters, warped IIR filters, and modified warped FIR filters termed warped individual z FIR filters (WizFIR). The results...

  7. Digitally controlled active noise reduction with integrated speech communication

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steeneken, H.J.M.; Verhave, J.A.

    2004-01-01

    Active noise reduction is a successful addition to passive ear-defenders for improvement of the sound attenuation at low frequencies. Design and assessment methods are discussed, focused on subjective and objective attenuation measurements, stability, and high noise level applications. Active noise

  8. Noise evaluation of a point autofocus surface topography measuring instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maculotti, Giacomo; Feng, Xiaobing; Galetto, Maurizio; Leach, Richard

    2018-06-01

    In this work, the measurement noise of a point autofocus surface topography measuring instrument is evaluated, as the first step towards establishing a route to traceability for this type of instrument. The evaluation is based on the determination of the metrological characteristics for noise as outlined in draft ISO specification standards by using a calibrated optical flat. The static noise and repeatability of the autofocus sensor are evaluated. The influence of environmental disturbances on the measured surface topography and the built-in software to compensate for such influences are also investigated. The instrument was found to have a measurement noise of approximately 2 nm or, when expressed with the measurement bandwidth, 0.4 nm for a single-point measurement.

  9. Measurement time and statistics for a noise thermometer with a synthetic-noise reference

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, D. R.; Benz, S. P.; Labenski, J. R.; Nam, S. W.; Qu, J. F.; Rogalla, H.; Tew, W. L.

    2008-08-01

    This paper describes methods for reducing the statistical uncertainty in measurements made by noise thermometers using digital cross-correlators and, in particular, for thermometers using pseudo-random noise for the reference signal. First, a discrete-frequency expression for the correlation bandwidth for conventional noise thermometers is derived. It is shown how an alternative frequency-domain computation can be used to eliminate the spectral response of the correlator and increase the correlation bandwidth. The corresponding expressions for the uncertainty in the measurement of pseudo-random noise in the presence of uncorrelated thermal noise are then derived. The measurement uncertainty in this case is less than that for true thermal-noise measurements. For pseudo-random sources generating a frequency comb, an additional small reduction in uncertainty is possible, but at the cost of increasing the thermometer's sensitivity to non-linearity errors. A procedure is described for allocating integration times to further reduce the total uncertainty in temperature measurements. Finally, an important systematic error arising from the calculation of ratios of statistical variables is described.

  10. Vibration Isolation Study in Scanning Probe Microscopy Part I: Low Frequency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliva, A.I.; Espinosa-Faller, F.J.; Aguilar, M.

    1998-01-01

    A study of a low frequency isolation device based in a pneumatic system is presented. It consists of four cylinders which are closed and sealed with an elastic membrane on which the load is applied. Each cylinder made of PVC is formed by two chambers divided by a plate with a small hole for communication and damping. Air contained into chambers acts, in combination with the the elastic membranes, as a damper. Scanning probe techniques can be supported by this device in order to reduce the low frequency noises that affects them. Advantages of this isolator are discussed and compared. A theoretical approximation for this model is presented and compared with the experimental results obtained and show that it can isolate noises up to ∼ 2 Hz. The low frequency isolator has stability and fast response to external perturbations. This simple and economical low frequency isolator can be reproduced easily and its design depends on the work specific requirements. (Author) 9 refs

  11. Mobile Communication Devices, Ambient Noise, and Acoustic Voice Measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maryn, Youri; Ysenbaert, Femke; Zarowski, Andrzej; Vanspauwen, Robby

    2017-03-01

    The ability to move with mobile communication devices (MCDs; ie, smartphones and tablet computers) may induce differences in microphone-to-mouth positioning and use in noise-packed environments, and thus influence reliability of acoustic voice measurements. This study investigated differences in various acoustic voice measures between six recording equipments in backgrounds with low and increasing noise levels. One chain of continuous speech and sustained vowel from 50 subjects with voice disorders (all separated by silence intervals) was radiated and re-recorded in an anechoic chamber with five MCDs and one high-quality recording system. These recordings were acquired in one condition without ambient noise and in four conditions with increased ambient noise. A total of 10 acoustic voice markers were obtained in the program Praat. Differences between MCDs and noise condition were assessed with Friedman repeated-measures test and posthoc Wilcoxon signed-rank tests, both for related samples, after Bonferroni correction. (1) Except median fundamental frequency and seven nonsignificant differences, MCD samples have significantly higher acoustic markers than clinical reference samples in minimal environmental noise. (2) Except median fundamental frequency, jitter local, and jitter rap, all acoustic measures on samples recorded with the reference system experienced significant influence from room noise levels. Fundamental frequency is resistant to recording system, environmental noise, and their combination. All other measures, however, were impacted by both recording system and noise condition, and especially by their combination, often already in the reference/baseline condition without added ambient noise. Caution is therefore warranted regarding implementation of MCDs as clinical recording tools, particularly when applied for treatment outcomes assessments. Copyright © 2017 The Voice Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. An excess noise measurement system for weak responsivity avalanche photodiodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Liang; Dimler, Simon J.; Baharuddin, Aina N. A. P.; Green, James E.; David, John P. R.

    2018-06-01

    A system for measuring, with reduced photocurrent, the excess noise associated with the gain in avalanche photodiodes (APDs), using a transimpedance amplifier front-end and based on phase-sensitive detection is described. The system can reliably measure the excess noise power of devices, even when the un-multiplied photocurrent is low (~10 nA). This is more than one order of magnitude better than previously reported systems and represents a significantly better noise signal to noise ratio. This improvement in performance has been achieved by increasing the value of the feedback resistor and reducing the op-amp bandwidth. The ability to characterise APD performance with such low photocurrents enables the use of low power light sources such as light emitting diode rather than lasers to investigate the APD noise performance.

  13. Ionic screening effect on low-frequency drain current fluctuations in liquid-gated nanowire FETs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, Ming-Pei; Vire, Eric; Montès, Laurent

    2015-01-01

    The ionic screening effect plays an important role in determining the fundamental surface properties within liquid–semiconductor interfaces. In this study, we investigated the characteristics of low-frequency drain current noise in liquid-gated nanowire (NW) field effect transistors (FETs) to obtain physical insight into the effect of ionic screening on low-frequency current fluctuation. When the NW FET was operated close to the gate voltage corresponding to the maximum transconductance, the magnitude of the low-frequency noise for the NW exposed to a low-ionic-strength buffer (0.001 M) was approximately 70% greater than that when exposed to a high-ionic-strength buffer (0.1 M). We propose a noise model, considering the charge coupling efficiency associated with the screening competition between the electrolyte buffer and the NW, to describe the ionic screening effect on the low-frequency drain current noise in liquid-gated NW FET systems. This report not only provides a physical understanding of the ionic screening effect behind the low-frequency current noise in liquid-gated FETs but also offers useful information for developing the technology of NW FETs with liquid-gated architectures for application in bioelectronics, nanosensors, and hybrid nanoelectronics. (paper)

  14. Quantum noise, quantum measurement, and squeezing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haus, Herman A

    2004-01-01

    This is the edited text of the Keynote Speech that Professor Haus had been invited to give at the Conference on Fluctuations and Noise in Photonics and Quantum Optics, held at Santa Fe, NM, on 1-4 June 2003. He introduces it as partly an overview, partly a retrospective, finishing with some remarks about the future, addressing the topics as he knew them best, from his own perspective. Sadly, Professor Haus died shortly before he was due to present this speech to conference delegates. (keynote speech)

  15. Improving the accuracy of smart devices to measure noise exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Benjamin; Kardous, Chucri; Neitzel, Richard

    2016-11-01

    Occupational noise exposure is one of the most frequent hazards present in the workplace; up to 22 million workers have potentially hazardous noise exposures in the U.S. As a result, noise-induced hearing loss is one of the most common occupational injuries in the U.S. Workers in manufacturing, construction, and the military are at the highest risk for hearing loss. Despite the large number of people exposed to high levels of noise at work, many occupations have not been adequately evaluated for noise exposure. The objective of this experiment was to investigate whether or not iOS smartphones and other smart devices (Apple iPhones and iPods) could be used as reliable instruments to measure noise exposures. For this experiment three different types of microphones were tested with a single model of iPod and three generations of iPhones: the internal microphones on the device, a low-end lapel microphone, and a high-end lapel microphone marketed as being compliant with the International Electrotechnical Commission's (IEC) standard for a Class 2-microphone. All possible combinations of microphones and noise measurement applications were tested in a controlled environment using several different levels of pink noise ranging from 60-100 dBA. Results were compared to simultaneous measurements made using a Type 1 sound level measurement system. Analysis of variance and Tukey's honest significant difference (HSD) test were used to determine if the results differed by microphone or noise measurement application. Levels measured with external microphones combined with certain noise measurement applications did not differ significantly from levels measured with the Type 1 sound measurement system. Results showed that it may be possible to use iOS smartphones and smart devices, with specific combinations of measurement applications and calibrated external microphones, to collect reliable, occupational noise exposure data under certain conditions and within the limitations of the

  16. Data Quality Assurance for Supersonic Jet Noise Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Clifford A.; Henderson, Brenda S.; Bridges, James E.

    2010-01-01

    The noise created by a supersonic aircraft is a primary concern in the design of future high-speed planes. The jet noise reduction technologies required on these aircraft will be developed using scale-models mounted to experimental jet rigs designed to simulate the exhaust gases from a full-scale jet engine. The jet noise data collected in these experiments must accurately predict the noise levels produced by the full-scale hardware in order to be a useful development tool. A methodology has been adopted at the NASA Glenn Research Center s Aero-Acoustic Propulsion Laboratory to insure the quality of the supersonic jet noise data acquired from the facility s High Flow Jet Exit Rig so that it can be used to develop future nozzle technologies that reduce supersonic jet noise. The methodology relies on mitigating extraneous noise sources, examining the impact of measurement location on the acoustic results, and investigating the facility independence of the measurements. The methodology is documented here as a basis for validating future improvements and its limitations are noted so that they do not affect the data analysis. Maintaining a high quality jet noise laboratory is an ongoing process. By carefully examining the data produced and continually following this methodology, data quality can be maintained and improved over time.

  17. Low-frequency plasmons in metallic carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, M.F.; Chuu, D.S.; Shung, K.W.

    1997-01-01

    A metallic carbon nanotube could exhibit a low-frequency plasmon, while a semiconducting carbon nanotube or a graphite layer could not. This plasmon is due to the free carriers in the linear subbands intersecting at the Fermi level. The low-frequency plasmon, which corresponds to the vanishing transferred angular momentum, belongs to an acoustic plasmon. For a smaller metallic nanotube, it could exist at larger transferred momenta, and its frequency is higher. Such a plasmon behaves as that in a one-dimensional electron gas (EGS). However, it is very different from the π plasmons in all carbon nanotubes. Intertube Coulomb interactions in a metallic multishell nanotube and a metallic nanotube bundle have been included. They have a strong effect on the low-frequency plasmon. The intertube coupling among coaxial nanotubes markedly modifies the acoustic plasmons in separate metallic nanotubes. When metallic carbon nanotubes are packed in the bundle form, the low-frequency plasmon would change into an optical plasmon, and behave like that in a three-dimensional EGS. Experimental measurements could be used to distinguish metallic and semiconducting carbon nanotubes. copyright 1997 The American Physical Society

  18. The Engineering Development Array: A Low Frequency Radio Telescope Utilising SKA Precursor Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wayth, Randall; Sokolowski, Marcin; Booler, Tom; Crosse, Brian; Emrich, David; Grootjans, Robert; Hall, Peter J.; Horsley, Luke; Juswardy, Budi; Kenney, David; Steele, Kim; Sutinjo, Adrian; Tingay, Steven J.; Ung, Daniel; Walker, Mia; Williams, Andrew; Beardsley, A.; Franzen, T. M. O.; Johnston-Hollitt, M.; Kaplan, D. L.; Morales, M. F.; Pallot, D.; Trott, C. M.; Wu, C.

    2017-08-01

    We describe the design and performance of the Engineering Development Array, which is a low-frequency radio telescope comprising 256 dual-polarisation dipole antennas working as a phased array. The Engineering Development Array was conceived of, developed, and deployed in just 18 months via re-use of Square Kilometre Array precursor technology and expertise, specifically from the Murchison Widefield Array radio telescope. Using drift scans and a model for the sky brightness temperature at low frequencies, we have derived the Engineering Development Array's receiver temperature as a function of frequency. The Engineering Development Array is shown to be sky-noise limited over most of the frequency range measured between 60 and 240 MHz. By using the Engineering Development Array in interferometric mode with the Murchison Widefield Array, we used calibrated visibilities to measure the absolute sensitivity of the array. The measured array sensitivity matches very well with a model based on the array layout and measured receiver temperature. The results demonstrate the practicality and feasibility of using Murchison Widefield Array-style precursor technology for Square Kilometre Array-scale stations. The modular architecture of the Engineering Development Array allows upgrades to the array to be rolled out in a staged approach. Future improvements to the Engineering Development Array include replacing the second stage beamformer with a fully digital system, and to transition to using RF-over-fibre for the signal output from first stage beamformers.

  19. Uncertainty In Measuring Noise Parameters Of a Communication Receiver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korcz, Karol; Palczynska, Beata; Spiralski, Ludwik

    2005-01-01

    The paper presents the method of assessing uncertainty in measuring the usable sensitivity Es of communication receiver. The influence of partial uncertainties of measuring the noise factor F and the energy pass band of the receiver Δf on the combined standard uncertainty level is analyzed. The method to assess the uncertainty in measuring the noise factor on the basis of the systematic component of uncertainty, assuming that the main source of measurement uncertainty is the hardware of the measuring system, is proposed. The assessment of uncertainty in measuring the pass band of the receiver is determined with the assumption that input quantities of the measurement equation are not correlated. They are successive, discrete values of the spectral power density of the noise on the output of receiver. The results of the analyses of particular uncertainties components of measuring the sensitivity, which were carried out for a typical communication receiver, are presented

  20. Very-low-frequency magnetic plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pendry, J.B.; O'Brien, S.

    2002-01-01

    We show that a set of current-carrying wires can exhibit an effective magnetic permeability at very low frequencies of a few hertz. The resonant permeability, which is negative above the resonance frequency, arises from the oscillations of the wires driven by the applied magnetic field. We show that a large, frequency-specific and tunable effective permeability can be realized for a wide range of strengths of the applied field. (author)

  1. Measurements of noise from rotary coal unloading operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adams, T.S.; Bilello, M.A.

    1991-01-01

    In the licensing effort for a coal-fired power plant in the northeast United States, noise related to delivery and unloading of coal by train was identified as a significant concern to the nearby community. Specific issues included locomotive noise, the banging noises caused by railcar couplings during the start and stop cycles of the unloading operation, wheel squeal in the curves of the rail loop, and rotary coal unloader noises. This paper reports that a literature review provided adequate information on idling locomotive noise but very little on the other noise sources. Coupling impact noise was well documented for railcars actually being coupled at various speeds but not for coupled trains during start and stop operations. Wheel squeal was well documented by subway trains travelling at normal speeds, but nothing could be found for wheel squeal during very slow train movement as occurs during unloading. Similarly, adequate information was available for unenclosed rotary unloaders but not for enclosed unloaders. Consequently, actual noise measurements of a similar enclosed facility, and the associated train movements, were undertaken to obtain data more directly applicable to the planned facility

  2. Compressed Sensing with Linear Correlation Between Signal and Measurement Noise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arildsen, Thomas; Larsen, Torben

    2014-01-01

    reconstruction algorithms, but is not known in existing literature. The proposed technique reduces reconstruction error considerably in the case of linearly correlated measurements and noise. Numerical experiments confirm the efficacy of the technique. The technique is demonstrated with application to low......Existing convex relaxation-based approaches to reconstruction in compressed sensing assume that noise in the measurements is independent of the signal of interest. We consider the case of noise being linearly correlated with the signal and introduce a simple technique for improving compressed...... sensing reconstruction from such measurements. The technique is based on a linear model of the correlation of additive noise with the signal. The modification of the reconstruction algorithm based on this model is very simple and has negligible additional computational cost compared to standard...

  3. Dynamic subcriticality measurements using the CF neutron noise method: Videotape

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mihalczo, J.T.; Blakeman, E.D.; Ragan, G.E.; Johnson, E.B.

    1987-01-01

    The capability to measure the subcriticality for a multiplying system with k-effective values as low as 0.3 was demonstrated for measurement times of approximately 10 s; the measured k-effective values obtained do not depend on the speed with which the solution height is changed or on whether the tank is filling or draining. As in previous experiments, the low-frequency ratios of spectral densities are all that are needed to obtain the k-effective value. This method's effectiveness for systems where conditions are changing with time as demonstrated, probably exceeds the dynamic requirements for most nuclear fuel plant processing applications. The calculated k-effective values using the KENO code and Hansen-Roach cross-sections compare well with the experimental values. Before the dynamic capability of the method can be considered fully explored, additional dynamic experiments are required for other geometries and fuel concentrations.

  4. Electrochemical noise measurements under pressurized water reactor conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Nieuwenhove, R.

    2000-01-01

    Electrochemical potential noise measurements on sensitized stainless steel pressure tubes under pressurized water reactor (PWR) conditions were performed for the first time. Very short potential spikes, believed to be associated to crack initiation events, were detected when stressing the sample above the yield strength and increased in magnitude until the sample broke. Sudden increases of plastic deformation, as induced by an increased tube pressure, resulted in slower, high-amplitude potential transients, often accompanied by a reduction in noise level

  5. Determination of low-frequency vibrational states in glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad, N.; Hasan, M.M.

    1996-01-01

    It is shown that density of low frequency (v < 1 THz) vibrational states g(v) in glasses can be determined from heat capacities measured at low temperature. These g(v) are identical to those determined from inelastic neutron scattering studies. The form of g(v) is non quadratic and therefore the Debye density of states may not be used to interpret the Raman, and infrared absorption in glasses. (author)

  6. The reduction of low frequency fluctuations in RFP experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillips, J.A.; Baker, D.A.; Gribble, R.F.

    1998-01-01

    The low frequency fluctuations seen in RFP experiments are found to be correlated with changes in the toroidal flux measured by diamagnetic loops surrounding the discharge. The correlation of the onset of impurity radiation and x-rays with the crash seen in experiments is caused by plasma bombarding the metal liner associated with this loss of flux. Efforts should be made to design improved stabilizing shells that will reduce the loss of flux and give improved RFP energy confinement times

  7. Nonmonotonic low frequency losses in HTSCs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castro, H; Gerber, A; Milner, A

    2007-01-01

    A calorimetric technique has been used in order to study ac-field dissipation in ceramic BSCCO samples at low frequencies between 0.05 and 250 Hz, at temperatures from 65 to 90 K. In contrast to previous studies, where ac losses have been reported with a linear dependence on magnetic field frequency, we find a nonmonotonic function presenting various maxima. Frequencies corresponding to local maxima of dissipation depend on the temperature and the amplitude of the ac magnetic field. Flux creep is argued to be responsible for this behaviour. A simple model connecting the characteristic vortex relaxation times (flux creep) and the location of dissipation maxima versus frequency is proposed

  8. Simulation model for studying low frequency microinstabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, W.W.; Okuda, H.

    1976-03-01

    A 2 1 / 2 dimensional, electrostatic particle code in a slab geometry has been developed to study low frequency oscillations such as drift wave and trapped particle instabilities in a nonuniform bounded plasma. A drift approximation for the electron transverse motion is made which eliminates the high frequency oscillations at the electron gyrofrequency and its multiples. It is, therefore, possible to study the nonlinear effects such as the anomalous transport of plasmas within a reasonable computing time using a real mass ratio. Several examples are given to check the validity and usefulness of the model

  9. Child leukaemia and low frequency electromagnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clavel, J.

    2009-01-01

    The author discusses the possible causes of child leukaemia: exposure to natural ionizing radiation (notably radon), to pesticides, and to hydrocarbons emitted by road traffic. Some studies suggested that an inadequate reaction of the immune system to an ordinary infection could result in leukaemia. Other factors are suspected, notably extremely low frequency electromagnetic fields, the influence of which is then discussed by the author. She evokes and discusses results of different investigations on this topic which have been published since the end of the 1970's. It appears that a distance less than 50 meters from high voltage lines or the vicinity of transformation stations may double the risk of child leukaemia

  10. Noise Measurements of High Aspect Ratio Distributed Exhaust Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridges, James E.

    2015-01-01

    This paper covers far-field acoustic measurements of a family of rectangular nozzles with aspect ratio 8, in the high subsonic flow regime. Several variations of nozzle geometry, commonly found in embedded exhaust systems, are explored, including bevels, slants, single broad chevrons and notches, and internal septae. Far-field acoustic results, presented previously for the simple rectangular nozzle, showed that increasing aspect ratio increases the high frequency noise, especially directed in the plane containing the minor axis of the nozzle. Detailed changes to the nozzle geometry generally made little difference in the noise, and the differences were greatest at low speed. Having an extended lip on one broad side (bevel) did produce up to 3 decibels more noise in all directions, while extending the lip on the narrow side (slant) produced up to 2 decibels more noise, primarily on the side with the extension. Adding a single, non-intrusive chevron, made no significant change to the noise, while inverting the chevron (notch) produced up to 2decibels increase in the noise. Having internal walls (septae) within the nozzle, such as would be required for structural support or when multiple fan ducts are aggregated, reduced the noise of the rectangular jet, but could produce a highly directional shedding tone from the septae trailing edges. Finally, a nozzle with both septae and a beveled nozzle, representative of the exhaust system envisioned for a distributed electric propulsion aircraft with a common rectangular duct, produced almost as much noise as the beveled nozzle, with the septae not contributing much reduction in noise.

  11. A study of 1/f noise in InP grown by CBE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, X.Y.; Leijs, M.R.

    1996-01-01

    The origin of low-frequency noise in InP was studied experimentally by measuring the noise of InP layers grown by chemical beam epitaxy (CBE). Such InP layers are unintentionally doped, but of varying purity and always of n-type conductivity. We performed noise measurements at temperatures from 77

  12. MICROWAVE NOISE MEASUREMENT OF ELECTRON TEMPERATURES IN AFTERGLOW PLASMAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leiby, Jr., C. C.; McBee, W. D.

    1963-10-15

    Transient electron temperatures in afterglow plasmas were determined for He (5 and 10 torr), Ne, and Ne plus or minus 5% Ar (2.4 and 24 torr) by combining measurements of plasma microwave noise power, and plasma reflectivity and absorptivity. Use of a low-noise parametric preamplifier permitted continuous detection during the afterglow of noise power at 5.5 Bc in a 1 Mc bandwidth. Electron temperature decays were a function of pressure and gas but were slower than predicted by electron energy loss mechanisms. The addition of argon altered the electron density decay in the neon afterglow but the electron temperature decay was not appreciably changed. Resonances in detected noise power vs time in the afterglow were observed for two of the three plasma waveguide geometries studied. These resonances correlate with observed resonances in absorptivity and occur over the same range of electron densities for a given geometry independent of gas type and pressure. (auth)

  13. ARMA modelling of neutron stochastic processes with large measurement noise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zavaljevski, N.; Kostic, Lj.; Pesic, M.

    1994-01-01

    An autoregressive moving average (ARMA) model of the neutron fluctuations with large measurement noise is derived from langevin stochastic equations and validated using time series data obtained during prompt neutron decay constant measurements at the zero power reactor RB in Vinca. Model parameters are estimated using the maximum likelihood (ML) off-line algorithm and an adaptive pole estimation algorithm based on the recursive prediction error method (RPE). The results show that subcriticality can be determined from real data with high measurement noise using much shorter statistical sample than in standard methods. (author)

  14. Structureborne noise measurements on a small twin-engine aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, J. E., III; Martini, K. F.

    1988-01-01

    Structureborne noise measurements performed on a twin-engine aircraft (Beechcraft Baron) are reported. There are two overall objectives of the test program. The first is to obtain data to support the development of analytical models of the wing and fuselage, while the second is to evaluate effects of structural parameters on cabin noise. Measurements performed include structural and acoustic responses to impact excitation, structural and acoustic loss factors, and modal parameters of the wing. Path alterations include added mass to simulate fuel, variations in torque of bolts joining wing and fuselage, and increased acoustic absorption. Conclusions drawn regarding these measurements are presented.

  15. Sampling methods for low-frequency electromagnetic imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gebauer, Bastian; Hanke, Martin; Schneider, Christoph

    2008-01-01

    For the detection of hidden objects by low-frequency electromagnetic imaging the linear sampling method works remarkably well despite the fact that the rigorous mathematical justification is still incomplete. In this work, we give an explanation for this good performance by showing that in the low-frequency limit the measurement operator fulfils the assumptions for the fully justified variant of the linear sampling method, the so-called factorization method. We also show how the method has to be modified in the physically relevant case of electromagnetic imaging with divergence-free currents. We present numerical results to illustrate our findings, and to show that similar performance can be expected for the case of conducting objects and layered backgrounds

  16. Measurement and Analysis of the Noise Radiated by Low Mach Number Centrifugal Blowers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeager, David Marvin

    showed that radiation from the single blade was dominated by the effects of the incident turbulence. Normalized correlations areas of approximately 25% were measured at low frequencies. While the noise generation was more efficient at the trailing edge of the isolated blade, more noise was radiated from the region near the leading edge.

  17. Low-Frequency Gravitational Wave Searches Using Spacecraft Doppler Tracking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armstrong J. W.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses spacecraft Doppler tracking, the current-generation detector technology used in the low-frequency (~millihertz gravitational wave band. In the Doppler method the earth and a distant spacecraft act as free test masses with a ground-based precision Doppler tracking system continuously monitoring the earth-spacecraft relative dimensionless velocity $2 Delta v/c = Delta u/ u_0$, where $Delta u$ is the Doppler shift and $ u_0$ is the radio link carrier frequency. A gravitational wave having strain amplitude $h$ incident on the earth-spacecraft system causes perturbations of order $h$ in the time series of $Delta u/ u_0$. Unlike other detectors, the ~1-10 AU earth-spacecraft separation makes the detector large compared with millihertz-band gravitational wavelengths, and thus times-of-flight of signals and radio waves through the apparatus are important. A burst signal, for example, is time-resolved into a characteristic signature: three discrete events in the Doppler time series. I discuss here the principles of operation of this detector (emphasizing transfer functions of gravitational wave signals and the principal noises to the Doppler time series, some data analysis techniques, experiments to date, and illustrations of sensitivity and current detector performance. I conclude with a discussion of how gravitational wave sensitivity can be improved in the low-frequency band.

  18. A low frequency RFI monitoring system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amiri, Shahram; Shankar, N. Udaya; Girish, B. S.; Somashekar, R.

    Radio frequency interference (RFI) is a growing problem for research in radio astronomy particularly at wavelengths longer than 2m. For satisfactory operation of a radio telescope, several bands have been protected for radio astronomy observations by the International Telecommunication Union. Since the radiation from cosmic sources are typically 40 to 100 dB below the emission from services operating in unprotected bands, often the out-of-band emission limits the sensitivity of astronomical observations. Moreover, several radio spectral emissions from cosmic sources are present in the frequency range outside the allocated band for radio astronomy. Thus monitoring of RFI is essential before building a receiver system for low frequency radio astronomy. We describe the design and development of an RFI monitoring system operating in the frequency band 30 to 100 MHz. This was designed keeping in view our proposal to extend the frequency of operation of GMRT down to 40 MHz. The monitor is a PC based spectrometer recording the voltage output of a receiver connected to an antenna, capable of digitizing the low frequency RF directly with an 8 bit ADC and sampling bandwidths up to 16 MHz. The system can operate continuously in almost real-time with a loss of only 2% of data. Here we will present the systems design aspects and the results of RFI monitoring carried out at the Raman Research Institute, Bangalore and at the GMRT site in Khodad.

  19. A lightweight low-frequency sound insulation membrane-type acoustic metamaterial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Kuan; Wu, Jiu Hui; Guan, Dong; Gao, Nansha; Jing, Li

    2016-02-01

    A novel membrane-type acoustic metamaterial with a high sound transmission loss (STL) at low frequencies (⩽500Hz) was designed and the mechanisms were investigated by using negative mass density theory. This metamaterial's structure is like a sandwich with a thin (thickness=0.25mm) lightweight flexible rubber material within two layers of honeycomb cell plates. Negative mass density was demonstrated at frequencies below the first natural frequency, which results in the excellent low-frequency sound insulation. The effects of different structural parameters of the membrane on the sound-proofed performance at low frequencies were investigated by using finite element method (FEM). The numerical results show that, the STL can be modulated to higher value by changing the structural parameters, such as the membrane surface density, the unite cell film shape, and the membrane tension. The acoustic metamaterial proposed in this study could provide a potential application in the low-frequency noise insulation.

  20. Gender Identification Using High-Frequency Speech Energy: Effects of Increasing the Low-Frequency Limit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donai, Jeremy J; Halbritter, Rachel M

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the ability of normal-hearing listeners to use high-frequency energy for gender identification from naturally produced speech signals. Two experiments were conducted using a repeated-measures design. Experiment 1 investigated the effects of increasing high-pass filter cutoff (i.e., increasing the low-frequency spectral limit) on gender identification from naturally produced vowel segments. Experiment 2 studied the effects of increasing high-pass filter cutoff on gender identification from naturally produced sentences. Confidence ratings for the gender identification task were also obtained for both experiments. Listeners in experiment 1 were capable of extracting talker gender information at levels significantly above chance from vowel segments high-pass filtered up to 8.5 kHz. Listeners in experiment 2 also performed above chance on the gender identification task from sentences high-pass filtered up to 12 kHz. Cumulatively, the results of both experiments provide evidence that normal-hearing listeners can utilize information from the very high-frequency region (above 4 to 5 kHz) of the speech signal for talker gender identification. These findings are at variance with current assumptions regarding the perceptual information regarding talker gender within this frequency region. The current results also corroborate and extend previous studies of the use of high-frequency speech energy for perceptual tasks. These findings have potential implications for the study of information contained within the high-frequency region of the speech spectrum and the role this region may play in navigating the auditory scene, particularly when the low-frequency portion of the spectrum is masked by environmental noise sources or for listeners with substantial hearing loss in the low-frequency region and better hearing sensitivity in the high-frequency region (i.e., reverse slope hearing loss).

  1. Theoretical and experimental investigation into structural and fluid motions at low frequencies in water distribution pipes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yan; Liu, Yuyou

    2017-06-01

    Vibrational energy is transmitted in buried fluid-filled pipes in a variety of wave types. Axisymmetric (n = 0) waves are of practical interest in the application of acoustic techniques for the detection of leaks in underground pipelines. At low frequencies n = 0 waves propagate longitudinally as fluid-dominated (s = 1) and shell-dominated (s = 2) waves. Whilst sensors such as hydrophones and accelerometers are commonly used to detect leaks in water distribution pipes, the mechanism governing the structural and fluid motions is not well documented. In this paper, the low-frequency behaviour of the pipe wall and the contained fluid is investigated. For most practical pipework systems, these two waves are strongly coupled; in this circumstance the ratios of the radial pipe wall displacements along with the internal pressures associated with these two wave types are obtained. Numerical examples show the relative insensitivity of the structural and fluid motions to the s = 2 wave for both metallic and plastic pipes buried in two typical soils. It is also demonstrated that although both acoustic and vibration sensors at the same location provide the identical phase information of the transmitted signals, pressure responses have significantly higher levels than acceleration responses, and thus hydrophones are better suited in a low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) environment. This is supported by experimental work carried out at a leak detection facility. Additional pressure measurements involved excitation of the fluid and the pipe fitting (hydrant) on a dedicated water pipe. This work demonstrates that the s = 1 wave is mainly responsible for the structural and fluid motions at low frequencies in water distribution pipes as a result of water leakage and direct pipe excitation.

  2. Planck 2013 results. II. Low Frequency Instrument data processing

    CERN Document Server

    Aghanim, N; Arnaud, M; Ashdown, M; Atrio-Barandela, F; Aumont, J; Baccigalupi, C; Banday, A J; Barreiro, R B; Battaner, E; Benabed, K; Benoît, A; Benoit-Lévy, A; Bernard, J -P; Bersanelli, M; Bielewicz, P; Bobin, J; Bock, J J; Bonaldi, A; Bonavera, L; Bond, J R; Borrill, J; Bouchet, F R; Bridges, M; Bucher, M; Burigana, C; Butler, R C; Cappellini, B; Cardoso, J -F; Catalano, A; Chamballu, A; Chen, X; Chiang, L -Y; Christensen, P R; Church, S; Colombi, S; Colombo, L P L; Crill, B P; Cruz, M; Curto, A; Cuttaia, F; Danese, L; Davies, R D; Davis, R J; de Bernardis, P; de Rosa, A; de Zotti, G; Delabrouille, J; Dickinson, C; Diego, J M; Dole, H; Donzelli, S; Doré, O; Douspis, M; Dupac, X; Efstathiou, G; Enßlin, T A; Eriksen, H K; Falvella, M C; Finelli, F; Forni, O; Frailis, M; Franceschi, E; Gaier, T C; Galeotta, S; Ganga, K; Giard, M; Giardino, G; Giraud-Héraud, Y; Gjerløw, E; González-Nuevo, J; Górski, K M; Gratton, S; Gregorio, A; Gruppuso, A; Hansen, F K; Hanson, D; Harrison, D; Henrot-Versillé, S; Hernández-Monteagudo, C; Herranz, D; Hildebrandt, S R; Hivon, E; Hobson, M; Holmes, W A; Hornstrup, A; Hovest, W; Huffenberger, K M; Jaffe, T R; Jaffe, A H; Jewell, J; Jones, W C; Juvela, M; Kangaslahti, P; Keihänen, E; Keskitalo, R; Kiiveri, K; Kisner, T S; Knoche, J; Knox, L; Kunz, M; Kurki-Suonio, H; Lagache, G; Lähteenmäki, A; Lamarre, J -M; Lasenby, A; Lattanzi, M; Laureijs, R J; Lawrence, C R; Leach, S; Leahy, J P; Leonardi, R; Lesgourgues, J; Liguori, M; Lilje, P B; Lindholm, V; Linden-Vørnle, M; López-Caniego, M; Lubin, P M; Macías-Pérez, J F; Maggio, G; Maino, D; Mandolesi, N; Maris, M; Marshall, D J; Martin, P G; Martínez-González, E; Masi, S; Matarrese, S; Matthai, F; Mazzotta, P; Meinhold, P R; Melchiorri, A; Mendes, L; Mennella, A; Migliaccio, M; Mitra, S; Moneti, A; Montier, L; Morgante, G; Mortlock, D; Moss, A; Munshi, D; Naselsky, P; Natoli, P; Netterfield, C B; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H U; Novikov, D; Novikov, I; O'Dwyer, I J; Osborne, S; Paci, F; Pagano, L; Paladini, R; Paoletti, D; Partridge, B; Pasian, F; Patanchon, G; Peel, M; Perdereau, O; Perotto, L; Perrotta, F; Pierpaoli, E; Pietrobon, D; Plaszczynski, S; Platania, P; Pointecouteau, E; Polenta, G; Ponthieu, N; Popa, L; Poutanen, T; Pratt, G W; Prézeau, G; Prunet, S; Puget, J -L; Rachen, J P; Reach, W T; Rebolo, R; Reinecke, M; Remazeilles, M; Ricciardi, S; Riller, T; Rocha, G; Rosset, C; Rossetti, M; Roudier, G; Rubiño-Martín, J A; Rusholme, B; Salerno, E; Sandri, M; Santos, D; Scott, D; Seiffert, M D; Shellard, E P S; Spencer, L D; Starck, J -L; Stolyarov, V; Stompor, R; Sureau, F; Sutton, D; Suur-Uski, A -S; Sygnet, J -F; Tauber, J A; Tavagnacco, D; Terenzi, L; Toffolatti, L; Tomasi, M; Tristram, M; Tucci, M; Tuovinen, J; Türler, M; Umana, G; Valenziano, L; Valiviita, J; Van Tent, B; Varis, J; Vielva, P; Villa, F; Vittorio, N; Wade, L A; Wandelt, B D; Watson, R; Wehus, I K; White, S D M; Wilkinson, A; Yvon, D; Zacchei, A; Zonca, A

    2014-01-01

    We describe the data processing pipeline of the Planck Low Frequency Instrument (LFI) data processing centre (DPC) to create and characterize full-sky maps based on the first 15.5 months of operations at 30, 44 and 70 GHz. In particular, we discuss the various steps involved in reducing the data, starting from telemetry packets through to the production of cleaned, calibrated timelines and calibrated frequency maps. Data are continuously calibrated using the modulation induced on the mean temperature of the cosmic microwave background radiation by the proper motion of the spacecraft. Sky signals other than the dipole are removed by an iterative procedure based on simultaneous fitting of calibration parameters and sky maps. Noise properties are estimated from time-ordered data after the sky signal has been removed, using a generalized least square map-making algorithm. A destriping code (Madam) is employed to combine radiometric data and pointing information into sky maps, minimizing the variance of correlated...

  3. Coupling of relative intensity noise and pathlength noise to the length measurement in the optical metrology system of LISA Pathfinder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittchen, Andreas; the LPF Collaboration

    2017-05-01

    LISA Pathfinder is a technology demonstration mission for the space-based gravitational wave observatory, LISA. It demonstrated that the performance requirements for the interferometric measurement of two test masses in free fall can be met. An important part of the data analysis is to identify the limiting noise sources. [1] This measurement is performed with heterodyne interferometry. The performance of this optical metrology system (OMS) at high frequencies is limited by sensing noise. One such noise source is Relative Intensity Noise (RIN). RIN is a property of the laser, and the photodiode current generated by the interferometer signal contains frequency dependant RIN. From this electric signal the phasemeter calculates the phase change and laser power, and the coupling of RIN into the measurement signal depends on the noise frequency. RIN at DC, at the heterodyne frequency and at two times the heterodyne frequency couples into the phase. Another important noise at high frequencies is path length noise. To reduce the impact this noise is suppressed with a control loop. Path length noise not suppressed will couple directly into the length measurement. The subtraction techniques of both noise sources depend on the phase difference between the reference signal and the measurement signal, and thus on the test mass position. During normal operations we position the test mass at the interferometric zero, which is optimal for noise subtraction purposes. This paper will show results from an in-flight experiment where the test mass position was changed to make the position dependant noise visible.

  4. Relativistic runaway breakdown in low-frequency radio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Füllekrug, Martin; Roussel-Dupré, Robert; Symbalisty, Eugene M. D.; Chanrion, Olivier; Odzimek, Anna; van der Velde, Oscar; Neubert, Torsten

    2010-01-01

    The electromagnetic radiation emitted by an electron avalanche beam resulting from relativistic runaway breakdown within the Earth's atmosphere is investigated. It is found from theoretical modeling with a computer simulation that the electron beam emits electromagnetic radiation which is characterized by consecutive broadband pulses in the low-frequency radio range from ˜10 to 300 kHz at a distance of ˜800 km. Experimental evidence for the existence of consecutive broadband pulses is provided by low-frequency radio observations of sprite-producing lightning discharges at a distance of ˜550 km. The measured broadband pulses occur ˜4-9 ms after the sprite-producing lightning discharge, they exhibit electromagnetic radiation which mainly spans the frequency range from ˜50 to 350 kHz, and they exhibit complex waveforms without the typical ionospheric reflection of the first hop sky wave. Two consecutive pulses occur ˜4.5 ms and ˜3 ms after the causative lightning discharge and coincide with the sprite luminosity. It is concluded that relativistic runaway breakdown within the Earth's atmosphere can emit broadband electromagnetic pulses and possibly generates sprites. The source location of the broadband pulses can be determined with an interferometric network of wideband low-frequency radio receivers to lend further experimental support to the relativistic runaway breakdown theory.

  5. Debuncher Momentum Cooling Systems Signal to Noise Measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pasquinelli, Ralph J.; /Fermilab

    2001-12-18

    The Debuncher Momentum cooling systems were carefully measured for signal to noise. It was observed that cooling performance was not optimum. Closer inspection shows that the installed front-end bandpass filters are wider than the pickup response. (The original filters were specified to be wider so that none of the available bandwidth would be clipped.) The end result is excess noise is amplified and passed onto the kickers unimpeded, hence, reducing the achievable system gain. From this data, new filters should be designed to improve performance. New system bandwidths are specified on the data figures. Also included are the transfer function measurements that clearly show adjacent band response. In band 4 upper, the adjacent lobes are strong and out of phase. This is also degrading the system performance. The correlation between spectrum analyzer signal to noise and network analyzer system transfer functions is very strong. The table below has a calculation of expected improvement of front noise reduction by means of building new front-end bandpass filters. The calculation is based on a flat input noise spectrum and is a linear estimation of improvement. The listed 3dB bandwidths of the original filters are from measured data. The expected bandwidth is taken from the linear spectrum analyzer plots and is closer to a 10 dB bandwidth making the percentage improvement conservative. The signal to noise measurements are taken with circulating pbars in the Debuncher. One cooling system was measured at a time with all others off. Beam currents are below ten microamperes.

  6. Debuncher Momentum Cooling Systems Signal to Noise Measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pasquinelli, Ralph J.

    2001-01-01

    The Debuncher Momentum cooling systems were carefully measured for signal to noise. It was observed that cooling performance was not optimum. Closer inspection shows that the installed front-end bandpass filters are wider than the pickup response. (The original filters were specified to be wider so that none of the available bandwidth would be clipped.) The end result is excess noise is amplified and passed onto the kickers unimpeded, hence, reducing the achievable system gain. From this data, new filters should be designed to improve performance. New system bandwidths are specified on the data figures. Also included are the transfer function measurements that clearly show adjacent band response. In band 4 upper, the adjacent lobes are strong and out of phase. This is also degrading the system performance. The correlation between spectrum analyzer signal to noise and network analyzer system transfer functions is very strong. The table below has a calculation of expected improvement of front noise reduction by means of building new front-end bandpass filters. The calculation is based on a flat input noise spectrum and is a linear estimation of improvement. The listed 3dB bandwidths of the original filters are from measured data. The expected bandwidth is taken from the linear spectrum analyzer plots and is closer to a 10 dB bandwidth making the percentage improvement conservative. The signal to noise measurements are taken with circulating pbars in the Debuncher. One cooling system was measured at a time with all others off. Beam currents are below ten microamperes.

  7. Design and initial characterization of a compact, ultra high vacuum compatible, low frequency, tilt accelerometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O’Toole, A.; Peña Arellano, F. E.; Rodionov, A. V.; Kim, C.; Shaner, M.; Asadoor, M.; Sobacchi, E.; Dergachev, V.; DeSalvo, R.; Bhawal, A.; Gong, P.; Lottarini, A.; Minenkov, Y.; Murphy, C.

    2014-01-01

    A compact tilt accelerometer with high sensitivity at low frequency was designed to provide low frequency corrections for the feedback signal of the Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational Wave Observatory active seismic attenuation system. It has been developed using a Tungsten Carbide ceramic knife-edge hinge designed to avoid the mechanical 1/f noise believed to be intrinsic in polycrystalline metallic flexures. Design and construction details are presented; prototype data acquisition and control limitations are discussed. The instrument's characterization reported here shows that the hinge is compatible with being metal-hysteresis-free, and therefore also free of the 1/f noise generated by the dislocation Self-Organized Criticality in the metal. A tiltmeter of this kind will be effective to separate the ground tilt component from the signal of horizontal low frequency seismometers, and to correct the ill effects of microseismic tilt in advanced seismic attenuation systems

  8. Increasing low frequency sound attenuation using compounded single layer of sonic crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulia, Preeti; Gupta, Arpan

    2018-05-01

    Sonic crystals (SC) are man-made periodic structures where sound hard scatterers are arranged in a crystalline manner. SC reduces noise in a particular range of frequencies called as band gap. Sonic crystals have a promising application in noise shielding; however, the application is limited due to the size of structure. Particularly for low frequencies, the structure becomes quite bulky, restricting its practical application. This paper presents a compounded model of SC, which has the same overall area and filling fraction but with increased low frequency sound attenuation. Two cases have been considered, a three layer SC and a compounded single layer SC. Both models have been analyzed using finite element simulation and plane wave expansion method. Band gaps for periodic structures have been obtained using both methods which are in good agreement. Further, sound transmission loss has been evaluated using finite element method. The results demonstrate the use of compounded model of Sonic Crystal for low frequency sound attenuation.

  9. Design and initial characterization of a compact, ultra high vacuum compatible, low frequency, tilt accelerometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O’Toole, A., E-mail: amandajotoole@gmail.com, E-mail: riccardo.desalvo@gmail.com [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of California, Los Angeles, 405 Hilgard Ave, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); Peña Arellano, F. E. [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Rodionov, A. V.; Kim, C. [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States); Shaner, M.; Asadoor, M. [Mayfield Senior School, 500 Bellefontaine Street Pasadena, California 91105 (United States); Sobacchi, E. [Scuola Normale Superiore, Piazza dei Cavalieri 7, 56126 Pisa (Italy); Dergachev, V.; DeSalvo, R., E-mail: amandajotoole@gmail.com, E-mail: riccardo.desalvo@gmail.com [LIGO Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, MS 100-36, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States); Bhawal, A. [Arcadia High School, 180 Campus Drive, Arcadia, California 91007 (United States); Gong, P. [Department of Precision Instrument, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Lottarini, A. [Department of Computer Science, University of Pisa, Largo B. Pontecorvo 3, 56127 Pisa (Italy); Minenkov, Y. [Sezione INFN Tor Vergata, via della Ricerca Scientfica 1, 00133 Roma (Italy); Murphy, C. [School of Physics, The University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Highway, Crawley, Perth, Western Australia 6009 (Australia)

    2014-07-15

    A compact tilt accelerometer with high sensitivity at low frequency was designed to provide low frequency corrections for the feedback signal of the Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational Wave Observatory active seismic attenuation system. It has been developed using a Tungsten Carbide ceramic knife-edge hinge designed to avoid the mechanical 1/f noise believed to be intrinsic in polycrystalline metallic flexures. Design and construction details are presented; prototype data acquisition and control limitations are discussed. The instrument's characterization reported here shows that the hinge is compatible with being metal-hysteresis-free, and therefore also free of the 1/f noise generated by the dislocation Self-Organized Criticality in the metal. A tiltmeter of this kind will be effective to separate the ground tilt component from the signal of horizontal low frequency seismometers, and to correct the ill effects of microseismic tilt in advanced seismic attenuation systems.

  10. Low frequency temperature forcing of chemical oscillations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novak, Jan; Thompson, Barnaby W; Wilson, Mark C T; Taylor, Annette F; Britton, Melanie M

    2011-07-14

    The low frequency forcing of chemical oscillations by temperature is investigated experimentally in the Belousov-Zhabotinsky (BZ) reaction and in simulations of the Oregonator model with Arrhenius temperature dependence of the rate constants. Forcing with temperature leads to modulation of the chemical frequency. The number of response cycles per forcing cycle is given by the ratio of the natural frequency to the forcing frequency and phase locking is only observed in simulations when this ratio is a whole number and the forcing amplitude is small. The global temperature forcing of flow-distributed oscillations in a tubular reactor is also investigated and synchronisation is observed in the variation of band position with the external signal, reflecting the periodic modulation of chemical oscillations by temperature.

  11. Wind noise under a pine tree canopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raspet, Richard; Webster, Jeremy

    2015-02-01

    It is well known that infrasonic wind noise levels are lower for arrays placed in forests and under vegetation than for those in open areas. In this research, the wind noise levels, turbulence spectra, and wind velocity profiles are measured in a pine forest. A prediction of the wind noise spectra from the measured meteorological parameters is developed based on recent research on wind noise above a flat plane. The resulting wind noise spectrum is the sum of the low frequency wind noise generated by the turbulence-shear interaction near and above the tops of the trees and higher frequency wind noise generated by the turbulence-turbulence interaction near the ground within the tree layer. The convection velocity of the low frequency wind noise corresponds to the wind speed above the trees while the measurements showed that the wind noise generated by the turbulence-turbulence interaction is near stationary and is generated by the slow moving turbulence adjacent to the ground. Comparison of the predicted wind noise spectrum with the measured wind noise spectrum shows good agreement for four measurement sets. The prediction can be applied to meteorological estimates to predict the wind noise under other pine forests.

  12. Vibration measurement with nonlinear converter in the presence of noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mozuras, Almantas

    2017-10-01

    Conventional vibration measurement methods use the linear properties of physical converters. These methods are strongly influenced by nonlinear distortions, because ideal linear converters are not available. Practically, any converter can be considered as a linear one, when an output signal is very small. However, the influence of noise increases significantly and signal-to-noise ratio decreases at lower signals. When the output signal is increasing, the nonlinear distortions are also augmenting. If the wide spectrum vibration is measured, conventional methods face a harmonic distortion as well as intermodulation effects. Purpose of this research is to develop a measurement method of wide spectrum vibration by using a converter described by a nonlinear function of type f(x), where x =x(t) denotes the dependence of coordinate x on time t due to the vibration. Parameter x(t) describing the vibration is expressed as Fourier series. The spectral components of the converter output f(x(t)) are determined by using Fourier transform. The obtained system of nonlinear equations is solved using the least squares technique that permits to find x(t) in the presence of noise. This method allows one to carry out the absolute or relative vibration measurements. High resistance to noise is typical for the absolute vibration measurement, but it is necessary to know the Taylor expansion coefficients of the function f(x). If the Taylor expansion is not known, the relative measurement of vibration parameters is also possible, but with lower resistance to noise. This method allows one to eliminate the influence of nonlinear distortions to the measurement results, and consequently to eliminate harmonic distortion and intermodulation effects. The use of nonlinear properties of the converter for measurement gives some advantages related to an increased frequency range of the output signal (consequently increasing the number of equations) that allows one to decrease the noise influence on

  13. Wind Turbine Infra and Low-Frequency Sound: Warning Signs that Were Not Heard

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Richard R.

    2012-01-01

    Industrial wind turbines are frequently thought of as benign. However, the literature is reporting adverse health effects associated with the implementation of industrial-scale wind developments. This article explores the historical evidence about what was known regarding infra and low-frequency sound from wind turbines and other noise sources…

  14. Bistability and low-frequency fluctuations in semiconductor lasers with optical feedback: a theoretical analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørk, Jesper; Tromborg, Bjarne; Christiansen, Peter Leth

    1988-01-01

    Near-threshold operation of a semiconductor laser exposed to moderate optical feedback may lead to low-frequency fluctuations. In the same region, a kink is observed in the light-current characteristic. Here it is demonstrated that these nonlinear phenomena are predicted by a noise driven multimode...

  15. Measuring test mass acceleration noise in space-based gravitational wave astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Congedo, Giuseppe

    2015-03-01

    The basic constituent of interferometric gravitational wave detectors—the test-mass-to-test-mass interferometric link—behaves as a differential dynamometer measuring effective differential forces, comprising an integrated measure of gravity curvature, inertial effects, as well as nongravitational spurious forces. This last contribution is going to be characterized by the LISA Pathfinder mission, a technology precursor of future space-borne detectors like eLISA. Changing the perspective from displacement to acceleration can benefit the data analysis of LISA Pathfinder and future detectors. The response in differential acceleration to gravitational waves is derived for a space-based detector's interferometric link. The acceleration formalism can also be integrated into time delay interferometry by building up the unequal-arm Michelson differential acceleration combination. The differential acceleration is nominally insensitive to the system's free evolution dominating the slow displacement dynamics of low-frequency detectors. Working with acceleration also provides an effective way to subtract measured signals acting as systematics, including the actuation forces. Because of the strong similarity with the equations of motion, the optimal subtraction of systematic signals, known within some amplitude and time shift, with the focus on measuring the noise provides an effective way to solve the problem and marginalize over nuisance parameters. The F statistic, in widespread use throughout the gravitation waves community, is included in the method and suitably generalized to marginalize over linear parameters and noise at the same time. The method is applied to LPF simulator data and, thanks to its generality, can also be applied to the data reduction and analysis of future gravitational wave detectors.

  16. Low frequency vibration tests on a floating slab track in an underground laboratory

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    De-yun DING; Wei-ning LIU; Ke-fei LI; Xiao-jing SUN; Wei-feng LIU

    2011-01-01

    Low frequency vibrations induced by underground railways have attracted increasing attention in recent years. To obtain the characteristics of low frequency vibrations and the low frequency performance of a floating slab track (FST), low frequency vibration tests on an FST in an underground laboratory at Beijing Jiaotong University were carried out. The FST and an unbalanced shaker SBZ30 for dynamic simulation were designed for use in low frequency vibration experiments. Vibration measurements were performed on the bogie of the unbalanced shaker, the rail, the slab, the tunnel invert, the tunnel wall, the tunnel apex, and on the ground surface at distances varying from 0 to 80 m from the track. Measurements were also made on several floors of an adjacent building. Detailed results of low frequency vibration tests were reported. The attenuation of low frequency vibrations with the distance from the track was presented, as well as the responses of different floors of the building. The experimental results could be regarded as a reference for developing methods to control low frequency vibrations and for adopting countermeasures.

  17. Noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noise is all around you, from televisions and radios to lawn mowers and washing machines. Normally, you ... sensitive structures of the inner ear and cause noise-induced hearing loss. More than 30 million Americans ...

  18. Urban traffic noise assessment by combining measurement and model results

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eerden, F.J.M. van der; Graafland, F.; Wessels, P.W.; Basten, T.G.H.

    2013-01-01

    A model based monitoring system is applied on a local scale in an urban area to obtain a better understanding of the traffic noise situation. The system consists of a scalable sensor network and an engineering model. A better understanding is needed to take appropriate and cost efficient measures,

  19. Using Smart Devices to Measure Intermittent Noise in the Workplace

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Roberts

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To determine the accuracy of smart devices (iPods to measure intermittent noise and integrate a noise dose in the workplace. Materials and Methods: In experiment 1, four iPods were each paired with a Larson Davis Spark dosimeter and exposed to randomly fluctuating pink noise in a reverberant sound chamber. Descriptive statistics and the mean difference between the iPod and its paired dosimeter were calculated for the 1-s data logged measurements. The calculated time weighted average (TWA was also compared between the devices. In experiment 2, 15 maintenance workers and 14 office workers wore an iPod and dosimeter during their work-shift for a maximum of five workdays. A mixed effects linear regression model was used to control for repeated measures and to determine the effect of the device type on the projected 8-h TWA. Results: In experiment 1, a total of 315,306 1-s data logged measurements were made. The interquartile range of the mean difference fell within ±2.0 A-weighted decibels (dBA, which is the standard used by the American National Standards Institute to classify a type 2 sound level meter. The mean difference of the calculated TWA was within ±0.5 dBA except for one outlier. In experiment 2, the results of the mixed effects model found that, on average, iPods measured an 8-h TWA 1.7 dBA higher than their paired dosimeters. Conclusion: This study shows that iPods have the ability to make reasonably accurate noise measurements in the workplace, but they are not as accurate as traditional noise dosimeters.

  20. An Analysis of FM Jamming and Noise Quality Measures

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-12-01

    equipment setup is shown in figure 6. For reasons of practicality and manageability , all equipment was chosen to be commercially available and of a fairly...bins based on the size of the parameter F. It computes a smoothed "Turner Noise Qaulity " similar to the noise quality measure employed by Daly in his...recý.orate for :nf-,aton Doe,A-,ým5 1o- A c-t•s. )2 15 efferso Oarts H,9gPay, Srte 1204. ArtOngton, VA 222024302 and to the Of"ce of Management and aucige

  1. Estimation of noise-free variance to measure heterogeneity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tilo Winkler

    Full Text Available Variance is a statistical parameter used to characterize heterogeneity or variability in data sets. However, measurements commonly include noise, as random errors superimposed to the actual value, which may substantially increase the variance compared to a noise-free data set. Our aim was to develop and validate a method to estimate noise-free spatial heterogeneity of pulmonary perfusion using dynamic positron emission tomography (PET scans. On theoretical grounds, we demonstrate a linear relationship between the total variance of a data set derived from averages of n multiple measurements, and the reciprocal of n. Using multiple measurements with varying n yields estimates of the linear relationship including the noise-free variance as the constant parameter. In PET images, n is proportional to the number of registered decay events, and the variance of the image is typically normalized by the square of its mean value yielding a coefficient of variation squared (CV(2. The method was evaluated with a Jaszczak phantom as reference spatial heterogeneity (CV(r(2 for comparison with our estimate of noise-free or 'true' heterogeneity (CV(t(2. We found that CV(t(2 was only 5.4% higher than CV(r2. Additional evaluations were conducted on 38 PET scans of pulmonary perfusion using (13NN-saline injection. The mean CV(t(2 was 0.10 (range: 0.03-0.30, while the mean CV(2 including noise was 0.24 (range: 0.10-0.59. CV(t(2 was in average 41.5% of the CV(2 measured including noise (range: 17.8-71.2%. The reproducibility of CV(t(2 was evaluated using three repeated PET scans from five subjects. Individual CV(t(2 were within 16% of each subject's mean and paired t-tests revealed no difference among the results from the three consecutive PET scans. In conclusion, our method provides reliable noise-free estimates of CV(t(2 in PET scans, and may be useful for similar statistical problems in experimental data.

  2. Objective measures of listening effort: effects of background noise and noise reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarampalis, Anastasios; Kalluri, Sridhar; Edwards, Brent; Hafter, Ervin

    2009-10-01

    This work is aimed at addressing a seeming contradiction related to the use of noise-reduction (NR) algorithms in hearing aids. The problem is that although some listeners claim a subjective improvement from NR, it has not been shown to improve speech intelligibility, often even making it worse. To address this, the hypothesis tested here is that the positive effects of NR might be to reduce cognitive effort directed toward speech reception, making it available for other tasks. Normal-hearing individuals participated in 2 dual-task experiments, in which 1 task was to report sentences or words in noise set to various signal-to-noise ratios. Secondary tasks involved either holding words in short-term memory or responding in a complex visual reaction-time task. At low values of signal-to-noise ratio, although NR had no positive effect on speech reception thresholds, it led to better performance on the word-memory task and quicker responses in visual reaction times. Results from both dual tasks support the hypothesis that NR reduces listening effort and frees up cognitive resources for other tasks. Future hearing aid research should incorporate objective measurements of cognitive benefits.

  3. 1/f Noise Characterization in CMOS Transistors in 0.13μm Technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Citakovic, J.; Stenberg, L J; Andreani, Pietro

    2006-01-01

    Low-frequency noise has been studied on a set of n- and p-channel CMOS transistors fabricated in a 0.13μm technology. Noise measurements have been performed on transistors with different gate lengths operating under wide bias conditions, ranging from weak to strong inversion. Noise origin has been...

  4. MEASUREMENT OF LOW SIGNAL-TO-NOISE RATIO SOLAR p-MODES IN SPATIALLY RESOLVED HELIOSEISMIC DATA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salabert, D.; Leibacher, J.; Hill, F.; Appourchaux, T.

    2009-01-01

    We present an adaptation of the rotation-corrected, m-averaged spectrum technique designed to observe low signal-to-noise ratio (S/N), low-frequency solar p-modes. The frequency shift of each of the 2l + 1 m spectra of a given (n, l) multiplet is chosen that maximizes the likelihood of the m-averaged spectrum. A high S/N can result from combining individual low S/N, individual-m spectra, none of which would yield a strong enough peak to measure. We apply the technique to Global Oscillation Network Group and Michelson Doppler Imager data and show that it allows us to measure modes with lower frequencies than those obtained with classic peak-fitting analysis of the individual-m spectra. We measure their central frequencies, splittings, asymmetries, lifetimes, and amplitudes. The low frequency, low- and intermediate-angular degrees rendered accessible by this new method correspond to modes that are sensitive to the deep solar interior down to the core (l ≤ 3) and to the radiative interior (4 ≤ l ≤ 35). Moreover, the low-frequency modes have deeper upper turning points, and are thus less sensitive to the turbulence and magnetic fields of the outer layers, as well as uncertainties in the nature of the external boundary condition. As a result of their longer lifetimes (narrower linewidths) at the same S/N the determination of the frequencies of lower frequency modes is more accurate, and the resulting inversions should be more precise.

  5. Effects of measurement noise on modal parameter identification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dorvash, S; Pakzad, S N

    2012-01-01

    In the past decade, much research has been conducted on data-driven structural health monitoring (SHM) algorithms with use of sensor measurements. A fundamental step in this SHM application is to identify the dynamic characteristics of structures. Despite the significant efforts devoted to development and enhancement of the modal parameter identification algorithms, there are still substantial uncertainties in the results obtained in real-life deployments. One of the sources of uncertainties in the results is the existence of noise in the measurement data. Depending on the subsequent application of the system identification, the level of uncertainty in the results and, consequently, the level of noise contamination can be very important. As an effort towards understanding the effect of measurement noise on the modal identification, this paper presents parameters that quantify the effects of measurement noise on the modal identification process and determine their influence on the accuracy of results. The performance of these parameters is validated by a numerically simulated example. They are then used to investigate the accuracy of identified modal properties of the Golden Gate Bridge using ambient data collected by wireless sensors. The vibration monitoring tests of the Golden Gate Bridge provided two synchronized data sets collected by two different sensor types. The influence of the sensor noise level on the accuracy of results is investigated throughout this work and it is shown that high quality sensors provide more accurate results as the physical contribution of response in their measured data is significantly higher. Additionally, higher purity and consistency of modal parameters, identified by higher quality sensors, is observed in the results. (paper)

  6. J-85 jet engine noise measured in the ONERA S1 wind tunnel and extrapolated to far field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soderman, Paul T.; Julienne, Alain; Atencio, Adolph, Jr.

    1991-01-01

    simulation was complicated by wind-tunnel background noise and the propagation of low frequency sound around the circuit.

  7. Noise And Charge Transport In Carbon Nanotube Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reza, Shahed; Huynh, Quyen T.; Bosman, Gijs; Sippel, Jennifer; Rinzler, Andrew G.

    2005-11-01

    The charge transport and noise properties of three terminal, gated devices containing multiple, single wall, metallic and semiconductor carbon nanotubes have been measured as a function of gate and drain bias at 300K. Using pulsed bias the metallic tubes could be burned sequentially enabling the separation of measured conductance and low frequency excess noise into metallic and semiconductor contributions. The relative low frequency excess noise of the metallic tubes was about a factor 100 lower than that of the semiconductor tubes, whereas the conductance of the metallic tubes was significantly higher (10 to 50 times) than that of the semiconductor tubes.

  8. Broadband low-frequency sound isolation by lightweight adaptive metamaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Yunhong; Chen, Yangyang; Huang, Guoliang; Zhou, Xiaoming

    2018-03-01

    Blocking broadband low-frequency airborne noises is highly desirable in lots of engineering applications, while it is extremely difficult to be realized with lightweight materials and/or structures. Recently, a new class of lightweight adaptive metamaterials with hybrid shunting circuits has been proposed, demonstrating super broadband structure-borne bandgaps. In this study, we aim at examining their potentials in broadband sound isolation by establishing an analytical model that rigorously combines the piezoelectric dynamic couplings between adaptive metamaterials and acoustics. Sound transmission loss of the adaptive metamaterial is investigated with respect to both the frequency and angular spectrum to demonstrate their sound-insulation effects. We find that efficient sound isolation can indeed be pursued in the broadband bi-spectrum for not only the case of the small resonator's periodicity where only one mode relevant to the mass-spring resonance exists, but also for the large-periodicity scenario, so that the total weight can be even lighter, in which the multiple plate-resonator coupling modes appear. In the latter case, the negative spring stiffness provided by the piezoelectric stack has been utilized to suppress the resonance-induced high acoustic transmission. Such kinds of adaptive metamaterials could open a new approach for broadband noise isolation with extremely lightweight structures.

  9. Configuration Considerations for Low Frequency Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lonsdale, C. J.

    2005-12-01

    The advance of digital signal processing capabilities has spurred a new effort to exploit the lowest radio frequencies observable from the ground, from ˜10 MHz to a few hundred MHz. Multiple scientifically and technically complementary instruments are planned, including the Mileura Widefield Array (MWA) in the 80-300 MHz range, and the Long Wavelength Array (LWA) in the 20-80 MHz range. The latter instrument will target relatively high angular resolution, and baselines up to a few hundred km. An important practical question for the design of such an array is how to distribute the collecting area on the ground. The answer to this question profoundly affects both cost and performance. In this contribution, the factors which determine the anticipated performance of any such array are examined, paying particular attention to the viability and accuracy of array calibration. It is argued that due to the severity of ionospheric effects in particular, it will be difficult or impossible to achieve routine, high dynamic range imaging with a geographically large low frequency array, unless a large number of physically separate array stations is built. This conclusion is general, is based on the need for adequate sampling of ionospheric irregularities, and is independent of the calibration algorithms and techniques that might be employed. It is further argued that array configuration figures of merit that are traditionally used for higher frequency arrays are inappropriate, and a different set of criteria are proposed.

  10. On absorption of low frequency electromagnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brunner, S.; Vaclavik, J.

    1993-03-01

    The drift kinetic equation (DKE) is used to establish a formula for power absorption of small amplitude, low frequency electromagnetic (EM) fields in a hot toroidal axisymmetric plasma. The stationary plasma is first considered. Electrons and ions are described by local Maxwellian distributions, alpha particles by a local slowing-down distribution. The fluctuating part of the distribution function for each species is then evaluated from the linearized DKE in terms of the EM fields using a perturbation method. The parameter b p =B p /B o , where B p is the poloidal component of the magnetostatic field B o , and the parameter v d /λω, where v d is the magnetic curvature drift, λ the wavelength perpendicular to B o and ω the frequency of the EM fields, are considered to be small. By integrating the resulting distribution function over velocity space, an explicit formula for the power absorbed by each species is obtained. To obtain an expression suitable for direct implementation in an ideal-MHD code, the electric field component parallel to the magnetostatic field is evaluated using the quasi-neutrality equation. (author) 4 refs

  11. A low frequency rotational energy harvesting system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Febbo, M; Machado, S P; Ramirez, J M; Gatti, C D

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a rotary power scavenging unit comprised of two systems of flexible beams connected by two masses which are joined by means of a spring, considering a PZT (QP16N, Midé Corporation) piezoelectric sheet mounted on one of the beams. The energy harvesting (EH) system is mounted rigidly on a rotating hub. The gravitational force on the masses causes sustained oscillatory motion in the flexible beams as long as there is rotary motion. The intention is to use the EH system in the wireless autonomous monitoring of wind turbines under different wind conditions. Specifically, the development is oriented to monitor the dynamic state of the blades of a wind generator of 30 KW which rotates between 50 and 150 rpm. The paper shows a complete set of experimental results on three devices, modifying the amount of beams in the frame supporting the system. The results show an acceptable sustained voltage generation for the expected range, in the three proposed cases. Therefore, it is possible to use this system for generating energy in a low-frequency rotating environment. As an alternative, the system can be easily adapted to include an array of piezoelectric sheets to each of the beams, to provide more power generation. (paper)

  12. Low-frequency oscillations at high density in JFT-2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maeno, Masaki; Katagiri, Masaki; Suzuki, Norio; Fujisawa, Noboru

    1977-12-01

    Low-frequency oscillations in a plasma were measured with magnetic probes and Si surface-barrier detectors, and behaviour of the high density plasmas was studied. The plasma current profile in the phase of decreasing density after the interruption of gas input is more peaked than during gas input. The introduction of hydrogen during a discharge results in a reduction of the impurities flux. The increase of density by fast gas input is limited with a negative voltage spike. Immediately before a negative voltage spike, oscillations of m=1,2 grow, leading to the spike. (auth.)

  13. Dielectric response of KCN crystals at ultra-low frequencies

    OpenAIRE

    Ziemath, Ervino C.; Aegerter, Michel A.; Slaets, J.

    1987-01-01

    We describe an ultra low frequency equipment employing programmable digital technique. The system is used to measure the dielectric parameters et, en and tg d or pure KCN crystals as a function of temperature in the frequency range 10-2 Hz to 40 Hz. The relaxation time of the Cn dipoles presents a classical temperature activated reorientation behaviour characterized by an Arrhenius law t=to exp (U/kT) with t0=7,26 x 10-15 s and U = 0,147 eV.

  14. Flow measurements using noise signals of axially displaced thermocouples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kozma, R.; Hoogenboom, J.E. (Interuniversitair Reactor Inst., Delft (Netherlands))

    1990-01-01

    Determination of the flow rate of the coolant in the cooling channels of nuclear reactors is an important aspect of core monitoring. It is usually impossible to measure the flow by flowmeters in the individual channels due to the lack of space and safety reasons. An alternative method is based on the analysis of noise signals of the available in-core detectors. In such a noise method, a transit time which characterises the propagation of thermohydraulic fluctuations (density or temperature fluctuations) in the coolant is determined from the correlation between the noise signals of axially displaced detectors. In this paper, the results of flow measurements using axially displaced thermocouples in the channel wall will be presented. The experiments have been performed in a simulated MRT-type fuel assembly located in the research reactor HOR of the Interfaculty Reactor Institute, Delft. It was found that the velocities obtained via temperature noise correlation methods are significantly larger than the area-averaged velocity in the single-phase coolant flow. Model calculations show that the observed phenomenon can be explained by effects due to the radial velocity distribution in the channel. (author).

  15. Extracting Earth's Elastic Wave Response from Noise Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snieder, Roel; Larose, Eric

    2013-05-01

    Recent research has shown that noise can be turned from a nuisance into a useful seismic source. In seismology and other fields in science and engineering, the estimation of the system response from noise measurements has proven to be a powerful technique. To convey the essence of the method, we first treat the simplest case of a homogeneous medium to show how noise measurements can be used to estimate waves that propagate between sensors. We provide an overview of physics research—dating back more than 100 years—showing that random field fluctuations contain information about the system response. This principle has found extensive use in surface-wave seismology but can also be applied to the estimation of body waves. Because noise provides continuous illumination of the subsurface, the extracted response is ideally suited for time-lapse monitoring. We present examples of time-lapse monitoring as applied to the softening of soil after the 2011 Tohoku-oki earthquake, the detection of a precursor to a landslide, and temporal changes in the lunar soil.

  16. Noise Measurement and Frequency Analysis of Commercially Available Noisy Toys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shohreh Jalaie

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Noise measurement and frequency analysis of commercially available noisy toys were the main purposes of the study. Materials and Methods: 181 noisy toys commonly found in toy stores in different zones of Tehran were selected and categorized into 10 groups. Noise measurement were done at 2, 25, and 50 cm from toys in dBA. The noisiest toy of each group was frequency analyzed in octave bands. Results: The highest and the lowest intensity levels belonged to the gun (mean=112 dBA and range of 100-127 dBA and to the rattle-box (mean=84 dBA and range of 74-95 dBA, respectively. Noise intensity levels significantly decreased with increasing distance except for two toys. Noise frequency analysis indicated energy in effective hearing frequencies. Most of the toys energies were in the middle and high frequency region. Conclusion: As intensity level of the toys is considerable, mostly more than 90 dBA, and also their energy exist in the middle and high frequency region, toys should be considered as a cause of the hearing impairment.

  17. On the low frequency characteristics of head-related transfer function

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIE Bosun

    2009-01-01

    A method to correct the measured head-related transfer functions (HRTFs) at low frequency was proposed. By analyzing the HRTFs from the spherical head model at low frequency, it is proved that below the frequency of 400 Hz, magnitude of HRTF is nearly constant and the phase is a linear function of frequency both for the far and near field. Therefore, if the HRTFs above 400 Hz are accurately measured by experiment, it is able to correct the HRTFs at low frequency by the theoretical model. The results of calculation and subjective experiment show that the feasibility of the proposed method.

  18. Low-frequency fluctuation in multimode semiconductor laser subject to optical feedback

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xu Zhang; Huiying Ye; Zhaoxin Song

    2008-01-01

    Dynamics of a semiconductor laser subject to moderate optical feedback operating in the low-frequency fluctuation regime is numerically investigated.Multimode Lang-Kobayashi(LK)equations show that the low-frequency intensity dropout including the total intensity and sub-modes intensity is accompanied by sudden dropout simultaneously,which is in good agreement with experimental observation.The power fluctuation is quite annoying in practical applications,therefore it becomes important to study the mechanism of power fluctuation.It is also shown that many factors,such as spontaneous emission noise and feedback parameter,may influence power fluctuation larger than previously expected.

  19. Borehole strain observations of very low frequency earthquakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawthorne, J. C.; Ghosh, A.; Hutchinson, A. A.

    2016-12-01

    We examine the signals of very low frequency earthquakes (VLFEs) in PBO borehole strain data in central Cascadia. These MW 3.3 - 4.1 earthquakes are best observed in seismograms at periods of 20 to 50 seconds. We look for the strain they produce on timescales from about 1 to 30 minutes. First, we stack the strain produced by 13 VLFEs identified by a grid search moment tensor inversion algorithm by Ghosh et. al. (2015) and Hutchinson and Ghosh (2016), as well as several thousand VLFEs detected through template matching these events. The VLFEs are located beneath southernmost Vancouver Island and the eastern Olympic Peninsula, and are best recorded at co-located stations B005 and B007. However, even at these stations, the signal to noise in the stack is often low, and the records are difficult to interpret. Therefore we also combine data from multiple stations and VLFE locations, and simply look for increases in the strain rate at the VLFE times, as increases in strain rate would suggest an increase in the moment rate. We compare the background strain rate in the 12 hours centered on the VLFEs with the strain rate in the 10 minutes centered on the VLFEs. The 10-minute duration is chosen as a compromise that averages out some instrumental noise without introducing too much longer-period random walk noise. Our results suggest a factor of 2 increase in strain rate--and thus moment rate--during the 10-minute VLFE intervals. The increase gives an average VLFE magnitude around M 3.5, within the range of magnitudes obtained with seismology. Further analyses are currently being carried out to better understand the evolution of moment release before, during, and after the VLFEs.

  20. Low frequency electromagnetic fields and health problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zahedi, A.; Cosic, I.

    1996-01-01

    Full text: Electromagnetic fields developed around the electric circuits are considered as magnetic pollution and these fields are produced wherever electric appliances or machinery are used at home as well as at workplace. Electric fields and magnetic fields around the home are produced by anything with electric current flowing through it including: the street power lines, the home wiring system, electric ovens, refrigerators, washing machines, electric clothes dryers, vacuum cleaners, television sets, video cassette recorders, toasters, light bulbs, clock radios, electric blankets, mobile phones, etc. In the workplace they would be produced by: nearby power lines, factory machinery, computers/video display units, lights, photocopiers, electrical cabling etc. As one can see, human life is strongly dependent on using-electric appliance. A large number of studies have been undertaken to find out the correlation between electromagnetic fields and health problems. The following significant results have been reported [Lerner E.J., IEEE Spectrum, 57-67, May 1984]: (a) Induction of chromosomal defects in mice spermatogenetic cells following microwave radiation in the Ghz range; (b) Changes in the calcium balance of living cats' brains exposed to microwaves modulated at extremely low frequencies; (c) Alternation of nerve and bone cells exposed to extremely low frequency fields; (d) Decreased activity of the immune cells of mice exposed to modulated microwaves; (e) Apparent increase in deformed foetuses among miniature swine exposed to intense power-line frequency fields. The mostly investigated effect is the effect of electromagnetic irradiation in particular one produced by power lines, and cancer. More than 100 epidemiological studies have been reported but no conclusive result was achieved. A number of studies with laboratory animals were also inconclusive. However, some of these experiments have shown improvements in immune system and tumour suppression when

  1. Investigation and measures to noise on spectroscopic measurement system in JT-60U

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagaya, Susumu; Kubo, Hirotaka; Sugie, Tatsuo; Onizawa, Masami; Kawai, Isao; Nakata, Hisao.

    1997-11-01

    Breakdown of a negative-ion-based neutral beam injection (N-NBI) has caused noise trouble to several systems. The control circuit of a spectroscopic measurement system had not well worked because of the noise. The noise has been measured by an optical-fiber isolation system during operation of JT-60U. The amplitude and the frequency were 15-18 V and 15 MHz respectively. The transmission noise has been reduced by putting ferrite cores to all cables connecting with the control circuits. As a result, the trouble with the spectroscopic measurement system has completely been solved. Adding condensers and resistors to the circuit was not effective to reduce the noise. (author)

  2. Analysis of a Shock-Associated Noise Prediction Model Using Measured Jet Far-Field Noise Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahl, Milo D.; Sharpe, Jacob A.

    2014-01-01

    A code for predicting supersonic jet broadband shock-associated noise was assessed using a database containing noise measurements of a jet issuing from a convergent nozzle. The jet was operated at 24 conditions covering six fully expanded Mach numbers with four total temperature ratios. To enable comparisons of the predicted shock-associated noise component spectra with data, the measured total jet noise spectra were separated into mixing noise and shock-associated noise component spectra. Comparisons between predicted and measured shock-associated noise component spectra were used to identify deficiencies in the prediction model. Proposed revisions to the model, based on a study of the overall sound pressure levels for the shock-associated noise component of the measured data, a sensitivity analysis of the model parameters with emphasis on the definition of the convection velocity parameter, and a least-squares fit of the predicted to the measured shock-associated noise component spectra, resulted in a new definition for the source strength spectrum in the model. An error analysis showed that the average error in the predicted spectra was reduced by as much as 3.5 dB for the revised model relative to the average error for the original model.

  3. Measurement of Acceptable Noise Level with Background Music.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Hyun-Jung; Bahng, Junghwa; Lee, Jae Hee

    2015-09-01

    Acceptable noise level (ANL) is a measure of the maximum background noise level (BNL) that a person is willing to tolerate while following a target story. Although researchers have used various sources of target sound in ANL measures, a limited type of background noise has been used. Extending the previous study of Gordon-Hickey & Moore (2007), the current study determined the effect of music genre and tempo on ANLs as possible factors affecting ANLs. We also investigated the relationships between individual ANLs and the familiarity of music samples and between music ANLs and subjective preference. Forty-one participants were seperated into two groups according to their ANLs, 29 low-ANL listeners and 12 high-ANL listeners. Using Korean ANL material, the individual ANLs were measured based on the listeners' most comfortable listening level and BNL. The ANLs were measured in six conditions, with different music tempo (fast, slow) and genre (K-pop, pop, classical) in a counterbalanced order. Overall, ANLs did not differ by the tempo of background music, but music genre significantly affected individual ANLs. We observed relatively higher ANLs with K-pop music and relatively lower ANLs with classical music. This tendency was similar in both low-ANL and high-ANL groups. However, the subjective ratings of music familiarity and preference affected ANLs differently for low-ANL and high-ANL groups. In contrast to the low-ANL listeners, the ANLs of the high-ANL listeners were significantly affected by music familiarity and preference. The genre of background music affected ANLs obtained using background music. The degree of music familiarity and preference appears to be associated with individual susceptibility to background music only for listeners who are greatly annoyed by background noise (high-ANL listeners).

  4. 1/f noise in metallic and semiconducting carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reza, Shahed; Huynh, Quyen T.; Bosman, Gijs; Sippel-Oakley, Jennifer; Rinzler, Andrew G.

    2006-11-01

    The charge transport and noise properties of three terminal, gated devices containing multiple single-wall metallic and semiconducting carbon nanotubes were measured at room temperature. Applying a high voltage pulsed bias at the drain terminal the metallic tubes were ablated sequentially, enabling the separation of measured conductance and 1/f noise into metallic and semiconducting nanotube contributions. The relative low frequency excess noise of the metallic tubes was observed to be two orders of magnitude lower than that of the semiconductor tubes.

  5. Electroconvulsive therapy changes the regional resting state function measured by regional homogeneity (ReHo) and amplitude of low frequency fluctuations (ALFF) in elderly major depressive disorder patients: An exploratory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Xiao-Ming; Xu, Shu-Xian; Sun, Yan; Wang, Ke-Yong; Wang, Chen; Zhang, Ji; Xia, Jin-Xiang; Zhang, Li; Tan, Bo-Jian; Xie, Xin-Hui

    2017-06-30

    Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is the most effective and rapid treatment for severe major depressive disorder (MDD) in elderly patients. The mechanism of ECT is unclear, and studies on ECT in elderly MDD patients by resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging are rare. Thirteen elderly MDD patients were scanned before and after ECT using a 3.0T MRI scanner. Regional homogeneity (ReHo) and amplitude of low-frequency fluctuations (ALFF) were processed to compare resting-state function before and after treatment. Depression and anxiety symptoms of all patients abated after ECT. Decreased ReHo values in the bilateral superior frontal gyrus (SFG) were observed after ECT, and the values of right SFG significantly correlated with an altered Hamilton depression rating scale score. Increased ALFF values in the left middle frontal gyrus, right middle frontal gyrus, orbital part, and decreased ALFF values in the left midcingulate area, left precentral gyrus, right SFG/middle frontal gyrus after ECT were also observed. These results support the hypothesis that ECT may affect the regional resting state brain function in geriatric MDD patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Electrochemical corrosion potential and noise measurement in high temperature water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fong, Clinton; Chen, Yaw-Ming; Chu, Fang; Huang, Chia-Shen

    2000-01-01

    Hydrogen water chemistry (HWC) is one of the most important methods in boiling water reactor(BWR) system to mitigate and prevent stress corrosion cracking (SCC) problems of stainless steel components. Currently, the effectiveness of HWC in each BWR is mainly evaluated by the measurement of electrochemical corrosion potentials (ECP) and on-line monitoring of SCC behaviors of stainless steels. The objective of this work was to evaluate the characteristics and performance of commercially available high temperature reference electrodes. In addition, SCC monitoring technique based on electrochemical noise analysis (ECN) was also tested to examine its crack detection capability. The experimental work on electrochemical corrosion potential (ECP) measurements reveals that high temperature external Ag/AgCl reference electrode of highly dilute KCl electrolyte can adequately function in both NWC and HWC environments. The high dilution external Ag/AgCl electrode can work in conjunction with internal Ag/AgCl reference electrode, and Pt electrode to ensure the ECP measurement reliability. In simulated BWR environment, the electrochemical noise tests of SCC were carried out with both actively and passively loaded specimens of type 304 stainless steel with various electrode arrangements. From the coupling current and corrosion potential behaviors of the passive loading tests during immersion test, it is difficult to interpret the general state of stress corrosion cracking based on the analytical results of overall current and potential variations, local pulse patterns, statistical characteristics, or power spectral density of electrochemical noise signals. However, more positive SCC indication was observed in the power spectral density analysis. For aqueous environments of high solution impedance, successful application of electrochemical noise technique for SCC monitoring may require further improvement in specimen designs and analytical methods to enhance detection sensitivity

  7. Measurements and analysis of neutron and gamma noise in BWR's

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dam, H. van; Kleiss, E.B.J.

    1985-01-01

    Neutron and gamma sensitive collectrons (self-powered detectors) have been designed for incore noise measurements in BWRs. A so-called twin-type has been developed for measurements of two-phase flow characteristics and detailed axial velocity distributions. Construction aspects of the twin detectors are discussed. An analysis is presented of the response of both detector types to incore parametric fluctuations. This analysis is based on detector response functions which provide an insight into the 'field of view' of the two types. The results are supported by experimental verifications; it is shown that incore gamma detectors provide useful additional information about two-phase flow in a BWR. (author)

  8. Do our reconstructions of ENSO have too much low-frequency variability?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loope, G. R.; Overpeck, J. T.

    2017-12-01

    Reconstructing the spectrum of Pacific SST variability has proven to be difficult both because of complications with proxy systems such as tree rings and the relatively small number of records from the tropical Pacific. We show that the small number of long coral δ18O and Sr/Ca records has caused a bias towards having too much low-frequency variability in PCR, CPS, and RegEM reconstructions of Pacific variability. This occurs because the individual coral records used in the reconstructions have redder spectra than the shared signal (e.g. ENSO). This causes some of the unshared, low-frequency signal from local climate, salinity and possibly coral biology to bleed into the reconstruction. With enough chronologies in a reconstruction, this unshared noise cancels out but the problem is exacerbated in our longest reconstructions where fewer records are available. Coral proxies tend to have more low-frequency variability than SST observations so this problem is smaller but can still be seen in pseudoproxy experiments using observations and reanalysis data. The identification of this low-frequency bias in coral reconstructions helps bring the spectra of ENSO reconstructions back into line with both models and observations. Although our analysis is mostly constrained to the 20th century due to lack of sufficient data, we expect that as more long chronologies are developed, the low-frequency signal in ENSO reconstructions will be greatly reduced.

  9. Neutron noise measurements at the Delphi subcritical assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szieberth, M.; Klujber, G.; Kloosterman, J. L.; De Haas, D.

    2012-01-01

    The paper presents the results and evaluations of a comprehensive set of neutron noise measurements on the Delphi subcritical assembly of the Delft Univ. of Technology. The measurements investigated the effect of different source distributions (inherent spontaneous fission and 252 Cf) and the position of the detectors applied (both radially and vertically). The evaluation of the measured data has been performed by the variance-to-mean ratio (VTMR, Feynman-α), the autocorrelation (ACF, Rossi-α) and the cross-correlation (CCF) methods. The values obtained for the prompt decay constant show a strong bias, which depends both on the detector position and on the source distribution. This is due to the presence of higher modes in the system. It has been observed that the α value fitted is higher when the detector is close to the boundary of the core or to the 252 Cf point-source. The higher alpha-modes have also been observed by fitting functions describing two alpha-modes. The successful set of measurement also provides a good basis for further theoretical investigations including the Monte Carlo simulation of the noise measurements and the calculation of the alpha-modes in the Delphi subcritical assembly. (authors)

  10. Phase Noise and Intensity Noise of the Pulse Train Generated from Mode-locked Lasers in the Demodulation Measurement

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Kan; Shum, Ping

    2010-01-01

    The phase noise and intensity noise of a pulse train are theoretically analyzed in the demodulation measurement. The effect of pulse asymmetry is discussed for the first time using Fourier series. Experimentally, photodetectors with different bandwidth and incident power levels are compared to achieve minimum pulse distortion.

  11. Field-Deployable Acoustic Digital Systems for Noise Measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shams, Qamar A.; Wright, Kenneth D.; Lunsford, Charles B.; Smith, Charlie D.

    2000-01-01

    Langley Research Center (LaRC) has for years been a leader in field acoustic array measurement technique. Two field-deployable digital measurement systems have been developed to support acoustic research programs at LaRC. For several years, LaRC has used the Digital Acoustic Measurement System (DAMS) for measuring the acoustic noise levels from rotorcraft and tiltrotor aircraft. Recently, a second system called Remote Acquisition and Storage System (RASS) was developed and deployed for the first time in the field along with DAMS system for the Community Noise Flight Test using the NASA LaRC-757 aircraft during April, 2000. The test was performed at Airborne Airport in Wilmington, OH to validate predicted noise reduction benefits from alternative operational procedures. The test matrix was composed of various combinations of altitude, cutback power, and aircraft weight. The DAMS digitizes the acoustic inputs at the microphone site and can be located up to 2000 feet from the van which houses the acquisition, storage and analysis equipment. Digitized data from up to 10 microphones is recorded on a Jaz disk and is analyzed post-test by microcomputer system. The RASS digitizes and stores acoustic inputs at the microphone site that can be located up to three miles from the base station and can compose a 3 mile by 3 mile array of microphones. 16-bit digitized data from the microphones is stored on removable Jaz disk and is transferred through a high speed array to a very large high speed permanent storage device. Up to 30 microphones can be utilized in the array. System control and monitoring is accomplished via Radio Frequency (RF) link. This paper will present a detailed description of both systems, along with acoustic data analysis from both systems.

  12. Low-frequency quadrupole impedance of undulators and wigglers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Blednykh

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available An analytical expression of the low-frequency quadrupole impedance for undulators and wigglers is derived and benchmarked against beam-based impedance measurements done at the 3 GeV NSLS-II storage ring. The adopted theoretical model, valid for an arbitrary number of electromagnetic layers with parallel geometry, allows to calculate the quadrupole impedance for arbitrary values of the magnetic permeability μ_{r}. In the comparison of the analytical results with the measurements for variable magnet gaps, two limit cases of the permeability have been studied: the case of perfect magnets (μ_{r}→∞, and the case in which the magnets are fully saturated (μ_{r}=1.

  13. On measurement noise in the European TWSTFT network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piester, Dirk; Bauch, Andreas; Becker, Jürgen; Staliuniene, Egle; Schlunegger, Christian

    2008-09-01

    Two-way satellite time and frequency transfer (TWSTFT) using geostationary telecommunication satellites is widely used in the timing community today and has also been chosen as the primary means to effect synchronization of elements of the ground segment of the European satellite navigation system Galileo. We investigated the link performance in a multistation network based on operational parameters such as the number of simultaneously transmitting stations, transmit and receive power, and chip rates of the pseudorandom noise modulation of the transmitted signals. Our work revealed that TWSTFT through a "quiet" transponder channel (2 stations transmitting only) leads to a measurement noise, expressed by the 1 pps jitter, reduced by a factor of 1.4 compared with a busy transponder carrying signals of 12 stations. The frequency transfer capability expressed by the Allan deviation is reduced at short averaging times by the same amount. At averaging times of >1 d, no such reduction could be observed, which points to the fact that other noise sources dominate at such averaging times. We also found that higher transmit power increases the carrier-to-noise density ratio at the receive station and thus entails lower jitter but causes interference with other station's signals. In addition, the use of lower chip rates, which could be accommodated by a reduced assigned bandwidth on the satellite transponder, is not recommended. The 1 pps jitter would go up by a factor of 2.5 when going from 2.5 MCh/s to 1 MCh/s. The 2 Galileo precise timing facilities (PTFs) can be included in the currently operated network of 12 stations in Europe and all requirements on the TWSTFT performance can be met, provided that suitable ground equipment will be installed in the Galileo ground segment.

  14. Measurement and simulation of laser power noise in GEO 600

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, J R; Degallaix, J; Freise, A; Grote, H; Hewitson, M; Hild, S; Lueck, H; Strain, K A; Willke, B

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes measurements and simulations related to power fluctuations of the laser light in the GEO 600 laser-interferometric gravitational wave detector. Measurements of the relative fluctuations of the light power at three different ports of the main interferometer are presented. In addition, measurements and simulations of the coupling transfer functions from power fluctuations at the input laser to these ports are shown. The transfer function from the input laser to the output port of the interferometer is found to be non-trivial. Despite this, the numerical simulation produces an excellent match to it and gives insight to the mechanisms leading to the complicated shape. Furthermore, the coupling transfer functions of power fluctuations to the main (heterodyne) detector outputs are measured and simulated. These are used to evaluate the level with which laser power fluctuations contribute to the overall noise level of the instrument

  15. Practical Ranges of Loudness Levels of Various Types of Environmental Noise, Including Traffic Noise, Aircraft Noise, and Industrial Noise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabine A. Janssen

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available In environmental noise control one commonly employs the A-weighted sound level as an approximate measure of the effect of noise on people. A measure that is more closely related to direct human perception of noise is the loudness level. At constant A-weighted sound level, the loudness level of a noise signal varies considerably with the shape of the frequency spectrum of the noise signal. In particular the bandwidth of the spectrum has a large effect on the loudness level, due to the effect of critical bands in the human hearing system. The low-frequency content of the spectrum also has an effect on the loudness level. In this note the relation between loudness level and A-weighted sound level is analyzed for various environmental noise spectra, including spectra of traffic noise, aircraft noise, and industrial noise. From loudness levels calculated for these environmental noise spectra, diagrams are constructed that show the relation between loudness level, A‑weighted sound level, and shape of the spectrum. The diagrams show that the upper limits of the loudness level for broadband environmental noise spectra are about 20 to 40 phon higher than the lower limits for narrowband spectra, which correspond to the loudness levels of pure tones. The diagrams are useful for assessing limitations and potential improvements of environmental noise control methods and policy based on A-weighted sound levels.

  16. Low frequency acoustic properties of bilayer membrane acoustic metamaterial with magnetic oscillator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nansha Gao

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available A bilayer membrane acoustic metamaterial was proposed to overcome the influence of the mass law on traditional acoustic materials and obtain a lightweight thin-layer structure that can effectively isolate low frequency noise. The finite element analysis (FEA results agree well with the experimental results. It is proved that the sound transmission losses (STLs of the proposed structures are higher than those of same surface density acoustic materials. The introduction of the magnetic mass block is different from the traditional design method, in which only a passive mass block is fixed on the membrane. The magnetic force will cause tension in the membrane, increase membrane prestress, and improve overall structural stiffness. The effects of the geometry size on the STLs are discussed in detail. The kind of method presented in this paper can provide a new means for engineering noise control. Keywords: Bilayer membrane acoustic metamaterial, Low frequency sound insulation, Sound transmission loss, Magnet oscillator

  17. Power system low frequency oscillation monitoring and analysis based on multi-signal online identification

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    The advance in the wide-area measurement system (WAMS) is driving the power system to the trend of wide-area monitoring and control.The Prony method is usually used for low frequency oscillation online identification.However,the identified amplitude and phase information is not sufficiently used.In this paper,the amplitude is adopted to detect the occurrence of the oscillation and to obtain the mode observability of the sites.The phase is adopted to identify the oscillation generator grouping and to obtain the mode shapes.The time varying characteristics of low frequency oscillations are studied.The behaviors and the characters of low frequency oscillations are displayed by dynamic visual techniques.Demonstrations on the "11.9" low frequency oscillation of the Guizhou Power Grid substantiate the feasibility and the validation of the proposed methods.

  18. Active low frequency sound field control in a listening room using CABS (Controlled Acoustic Bass System) will also reduce the sound transmitted to neighbour rooms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Sofus Birkedal; Celestinos, Adrian

    2012-01-01

    Sound in rooms and transmission of sound between rooms gives the biggest problems at low frequencies. Rooms with rectangular boundaries have strong resonance frequencies and will give big spatial variations in sound pressure level (SPL) in the source room, and an increase in SPL of 20 dB at a wall...... Bass System) is a time based room correction system for reproduced sound using loudspeakers. The system can remove room modes at low frequencies, by active cancelling the reflection from at the rear wall to a normal stereo setup. Measurements in a source room using CABS and in two neighbour rooms have...... shown a reduction in sound transmission of up to 10 dB at resonance frequencies and a reduction at broadband noise of 3 – 5 dB at frequencies up to 100 Hz. The ideas and understanding of the CABS system will also be given....

  19. Joint Neutron Noise Measurements on Metallic Reactor Caliban

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chapelle, Amaury; Authier, Nicolas; Pierre, Casoli; Richard, Benoit; Myers, Will; Hutchinson, Jesson; Sood, Avneet; Rooney, Brian

    2013-06-01

    The aim of the experiments concerning neutron noise measurements presented in this article is to compare the measured parameters to the simulated ones. The results of these measurements must therefore be very accurate, with controlled uncertainties. To determine the relative contribution of uncertainties to the final result, a table presents the prompt multiplication obtained by a French Team and a U.S. team. The different sources of uncertainties are then explored, distinguishing them between three categories, those linked to the experimental configuration, to the detection process and finally to the analysis process. These experiments improve the safety task of reactivity control far from criticality, with static methods, and the knowledge of the behaviour of a subcritical reactor. (authors)

  20. Dissipative elastic metamaterial with a low-frequency passband

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongquan Liu

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available We design and experimentally demonstrate a dissipative elastic metamaterial structure that functions as a bandpass filter with a low-frequency passband. The mechanism of dissipation in this structure is well described by a mass-spring-damper model that reveals that the imaginary part of the wavenumber is non-zero, even in the passband of dissipative metamaterials. This indicates that transmittance in this range can be low. A prototype for this viscoelastic metamaterial model is fabricated by 3D printing techniques using soft and hard acrylics as constituent materials. The transmittance of the printed metamaterial is measured and shows good agreement with theoretical predictions, demonstrating its potential in the design of compact waveguides, filters and other advanced devices for controlling mechanical waves.

  1. Method for imaging with low frequency electromagnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ki H.; Xie, Gan Q.

    1994-01-01

    A method for imaging with low frequency electromagnetic fields, and for interpreting the electromagnetic data using ray tomography, in order to determine the earth conductivity with high accuracy and resolution. The imaging method includes the steps of placing one or more transmitters, at various positions in a plurality of transmitter holes, and placing a plurality of receivers in a plurality of receiver holes. The transmitters generate electromagnetic signals which diffuse through a medium, such as earth, toward the receivers. The measured diffusion field data H is then transformed into wavefield data U. The traveltimes corresponding to the wavefield data U, are then obtained, by charting the wavefield data U, using a different regularization parameter .alpha. for each transform. The desired property of the medium, such as conductivity, is then derived from the velocity, which in turn is constructed from the wavefield data U using ray tomography.

  2. Observation of low frequency electromagnetic activity at 1000 km altitude

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Ivchenko

    Full Text Available We present a statistical study of low frequency fluctuations of electric and magnetic fields, commonly interpreted as Alfvénic activity. The data base consists of six months of electric and magnetic field measurements by the Astrid-2 microsatellite. The occurrence of the events is studied with respect to the location and general activity. Large regions of broadband Alfvénic activity are persistently observed in the cusp/cleft and, during the periods of high geo-magnetic activity, also in the pre-midnight sector of the auroral oval.

    Key words. Ionosphere (auroral ionosphere – Space plasma physics (waves and instabilities – Magnetospheric physics (magnetosphere-ionosphere interactions

  3. Relativistic runaway breakdown in low-frequency radio

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fullekrug, M.; Roussel-Dupre, R.; Symbalisty, E.M.D.

    2011-01-01

    at a distance of similar to 550 km. The measured broadband pulses occur similar to 4-9 ms after the sprite-producing lightning discharge, they exhibit electromagnetic radiation which mainly spans the frequency range from similar to 50 to 350 kHz, and they exhibit complex waveforms without the typical...... electromagnetic pulses and possibly generates sprites. The source location of the broadband pulses can be determined with an interferometric network of wideband low-frequency radio receivers to lend further experimental support to the relativistic runaway breakdown theory.......The electromagnetic radiation emitted by an electron avalanche beam resulting from relativistic runaway breakdown within the Earth's atmosphere is investigated. It is found from theoretical modeling with a computer simulation that the electron beam emits electromagnetic radiation which...

  4. Low-frequency radio absorption in Cassiopeia A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arias, M.; Vink, J.; de Gasperin, F.; Salas, P.; Oonk, J. B. R.; van Weeren, R. J.; van Amesfoort, A. S.; Anderson, J.; Beck, R.; Bell, M. E.; Bentum, M. J.; Best, P.; Blaauw, R.; Breitling, F.; Broderick, J. W.; Brouw, W. N.; Brüggen, M.; Butcher, H. R.; Ciardi, B.; de Geus, E.; Deller, A.; van Dijk, P. C. G.; Duscha, S.; Eislöffel, J.; Garrett, M. A.; Grießmeier, J. M.; Gunst, A. W.; van Haarlem, M. P.; Heald, G.; Hessels, J.; Hörandel, J.; Holties, H. A.; van der Horst, A. J.; Iacobelli, M.; Juette, E.; Krankowski, A.; van Leeuwen, J.; Mann, G.; McKay-Bukowski, D.; McKean, J. P.; Mulder, H.; Nelles, A.; Orru, E.; Paas, H.; Pandey-Pommier, M.; Pandey, V. N.; Pekal, R.; Pizzo, R.; Polatidis, A. G.; Reich, W.; Röttgering, H. J. A.; Rothkaehl, H.; Schwarz, D. J.; Smirnov, O.; Soida, M.; Steinmetz, M.; Tagger, M.; Thoudam, S.; Toribio, M. C.; Vocks, C.; van der Wiel, M. H. D.; Wijers, R. A. M. J.; Wucknitz, O.; Zarka, P.; Zucca, P.

    2018-05-01

    Context. Cassiopeia A is one of the best-studied supernova remnants. Its bright radio and X-ray emission is due to shocked ejecta. Cas A is rather unique in that the unshocked ejecta can also be studied: through emission in the infrared, the radio-active decay of 44Ti, and the low-frequency free-free absorption caused by cold ionised gas, which is the topic of this paper. Aims: Free-free absorption processes are affected by the mass, geometry, temperature, and ionisation conditions in the absorbing gas. Observations at the lowest radio frequencies can constrain a combination of these properties. Methods: We used Low Frequency Array (LOFAR) Low Band Antenna observations at 30-77 MHz and Very Large Array (VLA) L-band observations at 1-2 GHz to fit for internal absorption as parametrised by the emission measure. We simultaneously fit multiple UV-matched images with a common resolution of 17″ (this corresponds to 0.25 pc for a source at the distance of Cas A). The ample frequency coverage allows us separate the relative contributions from the absorbing gas, the unabsorbed front of the shell, and the absorbed back of the shell to the emission spectrum. We explored the effects that a temperature lower than the 100-500 K proposed from infrared observations and a high degree of clumping can have on the derived physical properties of the unshocked material, such as its mass and density. We also compiled integrated radio flux density measurements, fit for the absorption processes that occur in the radio band, and considered their effect on the secular decline of the source. Results: We find a mass in the unshocked ejecta of M = 2.95 ± 0.48 M⊙ for an assumed gas temperatureof T = 100 K. This estimate is reduced for colder gas temperatures and, most significantly, if the ejecta are clumped. We measure the reverse shock to have a radius of 114″± 6″ and be centred at 23:23:26, +58:48:54 (J2000). We also find that a decrease in the amount of mass in the unshocked ejecta

  5. Assessing the effects of noise abatement measures on health risks: A case study in Istanbul

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ongel, Aybike; Sezgin, Fatih

    2016-01-01

    In recent decades, noise pollution caused by industrialization and increased motorization has become a major concern around the world because of its adverse effects on human well-being. Therefore, transportation agencies have been implementing noise abatement measures in order to reduce road traffic noise. However, limited attention is given to noise in environmental assessment of road transportation systems. This paper presents a framework for a health impact assessment model for road transportation noise emissions. The model allows noise impacts to be addressed with the health effects of air pollutant and greenhouse gas emissions from road transportation. The health damages assessed in the model include annoyance, sleep disturbance, and cardiovascular disease in terms of acute myocardial infarction. The model was applied in a case study in Istanbul in order to evaluate the change in health risks from the implementation of noise abatement strategies. The noise abatement strategies evaluated include altering pavement surfaces in order to absorb noise and introducing speed limits. It was shown that significant improvements in health risks can be achieved using open graded pavement surfaces and introducing speed limits on highways. - Highlights: • Transportation noise has a significant effect on health. • Noise should be included in the environmental assessment of transportation systems. • Traffic noise abatement measures include noise reducing pavements and speed limits. • Noise abatement measures help reduce the health risks of transportation noise. • Speed limit reduction on uncongested roads is an effective way to reduce health risks.

  6. Assessing the effects of noise abatement measures on health risks: A case study in Istanbul

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ongel, Aybike, E-mail: aybike.ongel@eng.bahcesehir.edu.tr [Bahcesehir University, Department of Civil Engineering, Istanbul 34353 (Turkey); Sezgin, Fatih, E-mail: fatih.sezgin@ibb.gov.tr [Istanbul Metropolitan Municipality, Environmental Protection Agency, Istanbul 34169 (Turkey)

    2016-01-15

    In recent decades, noise pollution caused by industrialization and increased motorization has become a major concern around the world because of its adverse effects on human well-being. Therefore, transportation agencies have been implementing noise abatement measures in order to reduce road traffic noise. However, limited attention is given to noise in environmental assessment of road transportation systems. This paper presents a framework for a health impact assessment model for road transportation noise emissions. The model allows noise impacts to be addressed with the health effects of air pollutant and greenhouse gas emissions from road transportation. The health damages assessed in the model include annoyance, sleep disturbance, and cardiovascular disease in terms of acute myocardial infarction. The model was applied in a case study in Istanbul in order to evaluate the change in health risks from the implementation of noise abatement strategies. The noise abatement strategies evaluated include altering pavement surfaces in order to absorb noise and introducing speed limits. It was shown that significant improvements in health risks can be achieved using open graded pavement surfaces and introducing speed limits on highways. - Highlights: • Transportation noise has a significant effect on health. • Noise should be included in the environmental assessment of transportation systems. • Traffic noise abatement measures include noise reducing pavements and speed limits. • Noise abatement measures help reduce the health risks of transportation noise. • Speed limit reduction on uncongested roads is an effective way to reduce health risks.

  7. Remote tracking of a magnetic receiver using low frequency beacons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheinker, Arie; Ginzburg, Boris; Salomonski, Nizan; Frumkis, Lev; Kaplan, Ben-Zion

    2014-01-01

    Low frequency magnetic fields feature high penetration ability, which allows communication, localization, and tracking in environments where radio or acoustic waves are blocked or distorted by multipath interferences. In the present work, we propose a method for tracking a magnetic receiver using beacons of low frequency magnetic field, where the receiver includes a tri-axial search-coil magnetometer. Measuring the beacons’ magnetic fields and calculating the total-field signals enables localization without restrictions on magnetometer orientation, allowing on-the-move tracking. The total-field signals are used by a global search method, e.g., simulated annealing (SA) algorithm, to localize the receiver. The magnetic field produced by each beacon has a dipole structure and is governed by the beacon’s position and magnetic moment. We have investigated two different methods for estimating beacons’ magnetic moments prior to localization. The first method requires directional measurements, whereas for the second method the total-field signal is used. Effectiveness of these methods has been proved in numerous field tests. In the present work, we introduce a method for tracking a moving receiver by successive localizations. Using previous localization as a starting point of the search method for the next localization can reduce execution time and chances for divergence. The proposed method has been tested using numerous computer simulations. Successful system operation has been verified in field conditions. The good tracking capability together with simple implementation makes the proposed method attractive for real-time, low power field applications, such as mobile robots navigation. (paper)

  8. The Radio And Very Low Frequency (VLF) Electromagnetic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Radio And Very Low Frequency (VLF) Electromagnetic Response Of A Layered Earth Media With Variable Dielectric Permittivity. ... A radio frequency of 125 KHz and a very low frequency (VLF) of 20 KHz were used in the computations and the field parameters studied over a dimensionless induction number, B. The ...

  9. Low frequency astronomy - the challenge in a crowded RFI environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bentum, Marinus Jan; Boonstra, Albert Jan

    2011-01-01

    Low frequency radio astronomy is a hot topic at the moment. Many large arrays of antennas are built to facilitate the astronomical research on low frequencies. Building an instrument for the frequency band below 30 MHz on Earth will run into some problems. One of the issues is the instable and

  10. Noise and its application to neutron flux measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabate Puigmal, Pedro.

    1984-08-01

    Fission Counter's (FC) fundamental principles were studied, operating this neutron detector as pulses generator (AC modes) and fluctuant current (DC modes). Power spectral series were obtained in DC modes, corresponding to: alpha activity of the FC neutron converter, gamma exposition in Co 60 radiation field, and only neutronic field. These noise spectra were correlated with those obtained from the FC in RA-3 critical facility, at different reactor power levels. These experiments allow to verify that, in DC mode, the power noise is very weakly dependent of the reactor gamma field, over a wide range of reactor working power, and that this range is strongly dependent of the detector's position with respect to the core's position. The frequency band of measurement is not critical. The results suggest that it is possible to develop a simple and compact measurement chain for nuclear reactors control. This would be obtained with an adequate combination of the FC operation ranges in AC and DC modes. Approximately ten decades in working power would be thus controlled with this unique type of detector (Campbellian method). A locally devised commercial detector (CFPT9) was used in these tests, and several of the most useful positions of the FC were determined. Frequency band from 150 Hz to 150 KHz was investigated. (M.E.L.) [es

  11. Time response measurements of pressure sensors using pink noise technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pereira, Iraci Martinez; Santos, Roberto Carlos dos

    2009-01-01

    This work presents an experimental setup for Pink Noise method application on pressure transmitters' response times. The Pink Noise method consists on injecting artificial pressure noise into the pressure transmitter. The artificial pressure noise is generated using a current-to-pressure (I-to-P) converter, which is driven by a random noise signal generator. The output pressure transmitter noise is then analyzed using conventional Noise Analysis Technique. Noise signals may be interpreted using spectral techniques or empirical time series models. The frequency domain method consists of evaluating the Power Spectral Density (PSD) function. The information needed for time constant estimation can be obtained by fitting an all-pole transfer function to this power spectral density. (author)

  12. Vibration Noise Modeling for Measurement While Drilling System Based on FOGs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunxi Zhang

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Aiming to improve survey accuracy of Measurement While Drilling (MWD based on Fiber Optic Gyroscopes (FOGs in the long period, the external aiding sources are fused into the inertial navigation by the Kalman filter (KF method. The KF method needs to model the inertial sensors’ noise as the system noise model. The system noise is modeled as white Gaussian noise conventionally. However, because of the vibration while drilling, the noise in gyros isn’t white Gaussian noise any more. Moreover, an incorrect noise model will degrade the accuracy of KF. This paper developed a new approach for noise modeling on the basis of dynamic Allan variance (DAVAR. In contrast to conventional white noise models, the new noise model contains both the white noise and the color noise. With this new noise model, the KF for the MWD was designed. Finally, two vibration experiments have been performed. Experimental results showed that the proposed vibration noise modeling approach significantly improved the estimated accuracies of the inertial sensor drifts. Compared the navigation results based on different noise model, with the DAVAR noise model, the position error and the toolface angle error are reduced more than 90%. The velocity error is reduced more than 65%. The azimuth error is reduced more than 50%.

  13. Vibration Noise Modeling for Measurement While Drilling System Based on FOGs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chunxi; Wang, Lu; Gao, Shuang; Lin, Tie; Li, Xianmu

    2017-10-17

    Aiming to improve survey accuracy of Measurement While Drilling (MWD) based on Fiber Optic Gyroscopes (FOGs) in the long period, the external aiding sources are fused into the inertial navigation by the Kalman filter (KF) method. The KF method needs to model the inertial sensors' noise as the system noise model. The system noise is modeled as white Gaussian noise conventionally. However, because of the vibration while drilling, the noise in gyros isn't white Gaussian noise any more. Moreover, an incorrect noise model will degrade the accuracy of KF. This paper developed a new approach for noise modeling on the basis of dynamic Allan variance (DAVAR). In contrast to conventional white noise models, the new noise model contains both the white noise and the color noise. With this new noise model, the KF for the MWD was designed. Finally, two vibration experiments have been performed. Experimental results showed that the proposed vibration noise modeling approach significantly improved the estimated accuracies of the inertial sensor drifts. Compared the navigation results based on different noise model, with the DAVAR noise model, the position error and the toolface angle error are reduced more than 90%. The velocity error is reduced more than 65%. The azimuth error is reduced more than 50%.

  14. High Resolution Viscosity Measurement by Thermal Noise Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felipe Aguilar Sandoval

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available An interferometric method is implemented in order to accurately assess the thermal fluctuations of a micro-cantilever sensor in liquid environments. The power spectrum density (PSD of thermal fluctuations together with Sader’s model of the cantilever allow for the indirect measurement of the liquid viscosity with good accuracy. The good quality of the deflection signal and the characteristic low noise of the instrument allow for the detection and corrections of drawbacks due to both the cantilever shape irregularities and the uncertainties on the position of the laser spot at the fluctuating end of the cantilever. Variation of viscosity below 0.03 mPa·s was detected with the alternative to achieve measurements with a volume as low as 50 µL.

  15. The effect of noise in a performance measure on work motivation: A real effort laboratory experiment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sloof, R.; van Praag, C.M.

    2008-01-01

    This paper reports the results of an individual real effort laboratory experiment where subjects are paid for measured performance. Measured performance equals actual performance plus noise. We compare a stable environment where the noise is small with a volatile environment where the noise is

  16. The effect of noise in a performance measure on work motivation: A real effort laboratory experiment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sloof, R.; van Praag, C.M.

    2010-01-01

    This paper reports the results of an individual real effort laboratory experiment where subjects are paid for measured performance. Measured performance equals actual performance plus noise. We compare a stable environment where the noise is small with a volatile environment where the noise is

  17. Planck 2013 results. IV. Low Frequency Instrument beams and window functions

    CERN Document Server

    Aghanim, N; Arnaud, M; Ashdown, M; Atrio-Barandela, F; Aumont, J; Baccigalupi, C; Banday, A J; Barreiro, R B; Battaner, E; Benabed, K; Benoît, A; Benoit-Lévy, A; Bernard, J -P; Bersanelli, M; Bielewicz, P; Bobin, J; Bock, J J; Bonaldi, A; Bond, J R; Borrill, J; Bouchet, F R; Bridges, M; Bucher, M; Burigana, C; Butler, R C; Cardoso, J -F; Catalano, A; Chamballu, A; Chiang, L -Y; Christensen, P R; Church, S; Colombi, S; Colombo, L P L; Crill, B P; Curto, A; Cuttaia, F; Danese, L; Davies, R D; Davis, R J; de Bernardis, P; de Rosa, A; de Zotti, G; Delabrouille, J; Dickinson, C; Diego, J M; Dole, H; Donzelli, S; Doré, O; Douspis, M; Dupac, X; Efstathiou, G; Enßlin, T A; Eriksen, H K; Finelli, F; Forni, O; Frailis, M; Franceschi, E; Gaier, T C; Galeotta, S; Ganga, K; Giard, M; Giraud-Héraud, Y; González-Nuevo, J; Górski, K M; Gratton, S; Gregorio, A; Gruppuso, A; Hansen, F K; Hanson, D; Harrison, D; Henrot-Versillé, S; Hernández-Monteagudo, C; Herranz, D; Hildebrandt, S R; Hivon, E; Hobson, M; Holmes, W A; Hornstrup, A; Hovest, W; Huffenberger, K M; Jaffe, T R; Jaffe, A H; Jewell, J; Jones, W C; Juvela, M; Kangaslahti, P; Keihänen, E; Keskitalo, R; Kiiveri, K; Kisner, T S; Knoche, J; Knox, L; Kunz, M; Kurki-Suonio, H; Lagache, G; Lähteenmäki, A; Lamarre, J -M; Lasenby, A; Laureijs, R J; Lawrence, C R; Leahy, J P; Leonardi, R; Lesgourgues, J; Liguori, M; Lilje, P B; Lindholm, V; Linden-Vørnle, M; López-Caniego, M; Lubin, P M; Macías-Pérez, J F; Maino, D; Mandolesi, N; Maris, M; Marshall, D J; Martin, P G; Martínez-González, E; Masi, S; Matarrese, S; Matthai, F; Mazzotta, P; Meinhold, P R; Melchiorri, A; Mendes, L; Mennella, A; Migliaccio, M; Mitra, S; Moneti, A; Montier, L; Morgante, G; Mortlock, D; Moss, A; Munshi, D; Naselsky, P; Natoli, P; Netterfield, C B; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H U; Novikov, D; Novikov, I; O'Dwyer, I J; Osborne, S; Paci, F; Pagano, L; Paoletti, D; Partridge, B; Pasian, F; Patanchon, G; Perdereau, O; Perotto, L; Perrotta, F; Pierpaoli, E; Pietrobon, D; Plaszczynski, S; Platania, P; Pointecouteau, E; Polenta, G; Ponthieu, N; Popa, L; Poutanen, T; Pratt, G W; Prézeau, G; Prunet, S; Puget, J -L; Rachen, J P; Rebolo, R; Reinecke, M; Remazeilles, M; Ricciardi, S; Riller, T; Rocha, G; Rosset, C; Roudier, G; Rubiño-Martín, J A; Rusholme, B; Sandri, M; Santos, D; Scott, D; Seiffert, M D; Shellard, E P S; Spencer, L D; Starck, J -L; Stolyarov, V; Stompor, R; Sureau, F; Sutton, D; Suur-Uski, A -S; Sygnet, J -F; Tauber, J A; Tavagnacco, D; Terenzi, L; Toffolatti, L; Tomasi, M; Tristram, M; Tucci, M; Tuovinen, J; Türler, M; Umana, G; Valenziano, L; Valiviita, J; Van Tent, B; Varis, J; Vielva, P; Villa, F; Vittorio, N; Wade, L A; Wandelt, B D; Zacchei, A; Zonca, A

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the characterization of the in-flight beams, the beam window functions and the associated uncertainties for the Planck Low Frequency Instrument (LFI). Knowledge of the beam profiles is necessary for determining the transfer function to go from the observed to the actual sky anisotropy power spectrum. The main beam distortions affect the beam window function, complicating the reconstruction of the anisotropy power spectrum at high multipoles, whereas the sidelobes affect the low and intermediate multipoles. The in-flight assessment of the LFI main beams relies on the measurements performed during Jupiter observations. By stacking the data from multiple Jupiter transits, the main beam profiles are measured down to -20 dB at 30 and 44 GHz, and down to -25 dB at 70 GHz. The main beam solid angles are determined to better than 0.2% at each LFI frequency band. The Planck pre-launch optical model is conveniently tuned to characterize the main beams independently of any noise effects. This approac...

  18. The Relationship Between Low-Frequency Motions and Community Structure of Residue Network in Protein Molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Weitao

    2018-01-01

    The global shape of a protein molecule is believed to be dominant in determining low-frequency deformational motions. However, how structure dynamics relies on residue interactions remains largely unknown. The global residue community structure and the local residue interactions are two important coexisting factors imposing significant effects on low-frequency normal modes. In this work, an algorithm for community structure partition is proposed by integrating Miyazawa-Jernigan empirical potential energy as edge weight. A sensitivity parameter is defined to measure the effect of local residue interaction on low-frequency movement. We show that community structure is a more fundamental feature of residue contact networks. Moreover, we surprisingly find that low-frequency normal mode eigenvectors are sensitive to some local critical residue interaction pairs (CRIPs). A fair amount of CRIPs act as bridges and hold distributed structure components into a unified tertiary structure by bonding nearby communities. Community structure analysis and CRIP detection of 116 catalytic proteins reveal that breaking up of a CRIP can cause low-frequency allosteric movement of a residue at the far side of protein structure. The results imply that community structure and CRIP may be the structural basis for low-frequency motions.

  19. Quantitative Measures of Anthropogenic Noise on Harbor Porpoises

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wisniewska, Danuta Maria; Teilmann, Jonas; Hermannsen, Line

    2016-01-01

    -animal recordings as proxies for actual exposure. Here, we quantify sound exposure levels recorded with a DTAG-3 tag on a captive harbor porpoise exposed to vessel noise in a controlled acoustic environment. Results show that fl ow noise is limiting onboard noise recordings, whereas no evidence of body shading has...

  20. Measurement of tonal-noise characteristics and periodic flow structure around NACA0018 airfoil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakano, T.; Fujisawa, N. [Niigata University, Department Mechanical Engineering, Niigata (Japan); Lee, S. [Inha University, Department Mechanical Engineering, Incheon (Korea)

    2006-03-15

    The characteristics of tonal noise and the variations of flow structure around NACA0018 airfoil in a uniform flow are studied by means of simultaneous measurement of noise and velocity field by particle-image velocimetry to understand the generation mechanism of tonal noise. Measurements are made on the noise characteristics, the phase-averaged velocity field with respect to the noise signal, and the cross-correlation contour of velocity fluctuations and noise signal. These experimental results indicate that the tonal noise is generated from the periodic vortex structure on the pressure surface of the airfoil near the trailing edge of the airfoil. It is found that the vortex structure is highly correlated with the noise signal, which indicates the presence of noise-source distribution on the pressure surface. The vorticity distribution on the pressure surface breaks down near the trailing edge of the airfoil and forms a staggered vortex street in the wake of the airfoil. (orig.)

  1. Compact Polarimetry in a Low Frequency Spaceborne Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truong-Loi, M-L.; Freeman, A.; Dubois-Fernandez, P.; Pottier, E.

    2011-01-01

    Compact polarimetry has been shown to be an interesting alternative mode to full polarimetry when global coverage and revisit time are key issues. It consists on transmitting a single polarization, while receiving on two. Several critical points have been identified, one being the Faraday rotation (FR) correction and the other the calibration. When a low frequency electromagnetic wave travels through the ionosphere, it undergoes a rotation of the polarization plane about the radar line of sight for a linearly polarized wave, and a simple phase shift for a circularly polarized wave. In a low frequency radar, the only possible choice of the transmit polarization is the circular one, in order to guaranty that the scattering element on the ground is illuminated with a constant polarization independently of the ionosphere state. This will allow meaningful time series analysis, interferometry as long as the Faraday rotation effect is corrected for the return path. In full-polarimetric (FP) mode, two techniques allow to estimate the FR: Freeman method using linearly polarized data, and Bickel and Bates theory based on the transformation of the measured scattering matrix to a circular basis. In CP mode, an alternate procedure is presented which relies on the bare surface scattering properties. These bare surfaces are selected by the conformity coefficient, invariant with FR. This coefficient is compared to other published classifications to show its potential in distinguishing three different scattering types: surface, doublebounce and volume. The performances of the bare surfaces selection and FR estimation are evaluated on PALSAR and airborne data. Once the bare surfaces are selected and Faraday angle estimated over them, the correction can be applied over the whole scene. The algorithm is compared with both FP techniques. In the last part of the paper, the calibration of a CP system from the point of view of classical matrix transformation methods in polarimetry is

  2. An autocorrelation method to detect low frequency earthquakes within tremor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, J.R.; Beroza, G.C.; Shelly, D.R.

    2008-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that deep tremor in the Nankai Trough under western Shikoku consists of a swarm of low frequency earthquakes (LFEs) that occur as slow shear slip on the down-dip extension of the primary seismogenic zone of the plate interface. The similarity of tremor in other locations suggests a similar mechanism, but the absence of cataloged low frequency earthquakes prevents a similar analysis. In this study, we develop a method for identifying LFEs within tremor. The method employs a matched-filter algorithm, similar to the technique used to infer that tremor in parts of Shikoku is comprised of LFEs; however, in this case we do not assume the origin times or locations of any LFEs a priori. We search for LFEs using the running autocorrelation of tremor waveforms for 6 Hi-Net stations in the vicinity of the tremor source. Time lags showing strong similarity in the autocorrelation represent either repeats, or near repeats, of LFEs within the tremor. We test the method on an hour of Hi-Net recordings of tremor and demonstrates that it extracts both known and previously unidentified LFEs. Once identified, we cross correlate waveforms to measure relative arrival times and locate the LFEs. The results are able to explain most of the tremor as a swarm of LFEs and the locations of newly identified events appear to fill a gap in the spatial distribution of known LFEs. This method should allow us to extend the analysis of Shelly et al. (2007a) to parts of the Nankai Trough in Shikoku that have sparse LFE coverage, and may also allow us to extend our analysis to other regions that experience deep tremor, but where LFEs have not yet been identified. Copyright 2008 by the American Geophysical Union.

  3. Kalman filtering techniques for reducing variance of digital speckle displacement measurement noise

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Donghui Li; Li Guo

    2006-01-01

    @@ Target dynamics are assumed to be known in measuring digital speckle displacement. Use is made of a simple measurement equation, where measurement noise represents the effect of disturbances introduced in measurement process. From these assumptions, Kalman filter can be designed to reduce variance of measurement noise. An optical and analysis system was set up, by which object motion with constant displacement and constant velocity is experimented with to verify validity of Kalman filtering techniques for reduction of measurement noise variance.

  4. Low-Frequency Beacon Signal Strength Determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-01-01

    Radio Frequency List , RIS AF-6050-12 [141. Using this value and assum- ing performance for these facilities as indicatcd in FAA Handbook 6050.10, ERP...FAA Handbook 6050. 10 for facilities of appropriate transmitter power, determined from FAA Master Radio Frequency List 6050-12, April 1979...these facilities has not been directly measured and, therefore, values corresponding to transmitter powers given in FAA Master Radio Frequency List , RIS

  5. Low-frequency electrical properties of peat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comas, Xavier; Slater, Lee

    2004-12-01

    Electrical resistivity/induced polarization (0.1-1000 Hz) and vertical hydraulic conductivity (Kv) measurements of peat samples extracted from different depths (0-11 m) in a peatland in Maine were obtained as a function of pore fluid conductivity (σw) between 0.001 and 2 S/m. Hydraulic conductivity increased with σw (Kv ∝ σw0.3 between 0.001 and 2 S/m), indicating that pore dilation occurs due to the reaction of NaCl with organic functional groups as postulated by previous workers. Electrical measurements were modeled by assuming that "bulk" electrolytic conduction through the interconnected pore space and surface conduction in the electrical double layer (EDL) at the organic sediment-fluid interface act in parallel. This analysis suggests that pore space dilation causes a nonlinear relationship between the "bulk" electrolytic conductivity (σel) and σw (σel ∝ σw1.3). The Archie equation predicts a linear dependence of σel on σw and thus appears inappropriate for organic sediments. Induced polarization (IP) measurements of the imaginary part (σ″surf) of the surface conductivity (σ*surf) show that σ″surf is greater and more strongly σw-dependent (σ″surf ∝ σw0.5 between 0.001 and 2 S/m) than observed for inorganic sediments. By assuming a linear relationship between the real (σ'surf) and the imaginary part (σ″surf) of the surface conductivity, we develop an empirical model relating the resistivity and induced polarization measurements to σw in peat. We demonstrate the use of this model to predict (a) σw and (b) the change in Kv due to an incremental change in σw from resistivity and induced polarization measurements on organic sediments. Our study has implications for noninvasive geophysical characterization of σw and Kv with potential to benefit studies of carbon cycling and greenhouse gas fluxes as well as nutrient supply dynamics in peatlands.

  6. Lifetime measurement of prompt neutrons using the neutronic noise analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ortiz Servin, J.J.

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to estimate the life of the prompt neutrons, i, of a nuclear reactor utilizing the neutron noise analysis. This technique carry to development of mathematical model that is valid for lower powers reactor. The equation resulting convey to the observation about power spectrum behaviour respect to the frecquency. In this case, the reactor in study is the Triga Mark III of Nuclear Center of Mexico that it was provided of fission chambers for register the neutron fluxes. These fluxes was digitized and storage in computer disc as signals dependents of time, for later apply the Fourier Transformation and obtain the spectras. The spectras measured to different reactor powers were adjusted to the development equation before, using the method of square minimum and so estimate the parameter i. The analysis of results throw a value of 22.73 +/- 0.92 μs. On the other hand, the calculate value to the resolve the kinetic equation of reactor defer in lower than 4 % about the estimate. Of this, it concludes that the model utilized is trusty with a good mistake margin, moreover of that the technique of Neutron Noise analysis demonstrate be competitive (Author)

  7. Solar system radio astronomy at low frequencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Desch, M.D.

    1987-01-01

    The planetary radio-astronomy observations obtained with the two Voyager spacecraft since their launch in 1977 are briefly characterized and illustrated with graphs, diagrams, and sample spectra. Topics addressed include the spacecraft designs and trajectories, the wavelength coverage of the radio instruments, the Io-controlled LF emission of Jupiter, the solar-wind effect on the Saturn kilometric radiation, the Saturn electrostatic discharges, and the use of the clocklike feature of the Uranus emission to measure the planet's rotation period. 23 references

  8. Active control of the noise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez V, Luis Alfonso; Lopez Q, Jose German

    2001-01-01

    The problems of acoustic noise are more and more preponderant in the measure in that the amount of equipment and industrial machinery is increased such as fans, transformers, compressors etc. the use of devices passive mechanics for the reduction of the noise is effective and very appreciated because its effects embrace a wide range of acoustic frequency. However, to low frequencies, such devices become too big and expensive besides that present a tendency to do not effective. The control of active noise, CAN, using the electronic generation anti-noise, constitutes an interesting solution to the problem because their operation principle allows achieving an appreciable reduction of the noise by means of the use of compact devices. The traditional techniques for the control of acoustic noise like barriers and silenced to attenuate it, are classified as passive and their works has been accepted as norm as for the treatment of problems of noise it refers. Such techniques are considered in general very effective in the attenuation of noise of wide band. However, for low frequency, the required passive structures are too big and expensive; also, their effectiveness diminishes flagrantly, that which makes them impractical in many applications. The active suppression is profiled like a practical alternative for the reduction of acoustic noise. The idea in the active treatment of the noise it contemplates the use of a device electro-acoustic, like a speaker for example that it cancels to the noise by the generation of sounds of Same width and of contrary phase (anti-noise). The cancellation phenomenon is carried out when the ant-noise combines acoustically with the noise, what is in the cancellation of both sounds. The effectiveness of the cancellation of the primary source of noise depends on the precision with which the width and the phase of the generated ant-noise are controlled. The active control of noise, ANC (activates noise control), it is being investigated for

  9. Low frequency fluctuations in resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging and their applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Küblböck, M.

    2015-01-01

    Over the course of the last two decades, functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) has emerged as a widely used, highly accepted and very popular method for the assessment of neuronal activity in the human brain. It is a completely non-invasive imaging technique with high temporal resolution, which relies on the measurement of local differences in magnetic susceptibility between oxygenated and deoxygenated blood. Therefore, fMRI can be regarded as an indirect measure of neuronal activity via measurement of localised changes in cerebral blood flow and cerebral oxygen consumption. Maps of neuronal activity are calculated from fMRI data acquired either in the presence of an explicit task (task-based fMRI) or in absence of a task (resting-state fMRI). While in task-based fMRI task-specific patterns of brain activity are subject to research, resting-state fMRI reveals fundamental networks of intrinsic brain activity. These networks are characterized by low-frequency oscillations in the power spectrum of resting-state fMRI data. In the present work, we first introduce the physical principles and the technical background that allow us to measure these changes in blood oxygenation, followed by an introduction to the blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) effect and to analysis methods for both task-based and resting-state fMRI data. We also analyse the temporal signal-to-noise ratio (tSNR) of a novel 2D-EPI sequence, which allows the experimenter to acquire several slices simultaneously in order to assess the optimal parameter settings for this sequence at 3T. We then proceed to investigate the temporal properties of measures for the amplitude of low-frequency oscillations in resting-state fMRI data, which are regarded as potential biomarkers for a wide range of mental diseases in various clinical studies and show the high stability and robustness of these data, which are important prerequisites for application as a biomarker as well as their dependency on head motion

  10. Measurement and analysis of noise power spectrum of computerized tomography in images; Medida y analysis del espectro de potencias del ruido en imagenes de tomografia computarizada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castro Tejero, P.; Garayoa Roca, J.

    2013-07-01

    This paper examines the implementation of the spectrum of powers of the noise, NPS, as metric to characterize the noise, both in magnitude and in texture, for CT scans. The NPS found show that you for convolution filters that assume a greater softening in the reconstructed image, spectrum is concentrated in the low frequencies, while for filters sharp, the spectrum extends to high frequencies. In the analyzed cases, there is a low frequency component, largely due to the structure-borne noise, which can be a potential negative effect on the detectability of injuries. (Author)

  11. Low frequency oscillatory flow in a rotating curved pipe

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈华军; 章本照; 苏霄燕

    2003-01-01

    The low frequency oscillatory flow in a rotating curved pipe was studied by using the method of bi-parameter perturbation. Perturbation solutions up to the second order were obtained and the effects of rotationon the low frequency oscillatory flow were examined in detail, The results indicated that there exists evident difference between the low frequency oscillatory flow in a rotating curved pipe and in a curved pipe without ro-tation. During a period, four secondary vortexes may exist on the circular cross-section and the distribution of axial velocity and wall shear stress are related to the ratio of the Coriolis foree to centrifugal foree and the axial pressure gradient.

  12. Low frequency oscillatory flow in a rotating curved pipe

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈华军; 章本照; 苏霄燕

    2003-01-01

    The low frequency oscillatory flow in a rotating curved pipe was studied by using the method of bi-parameter perturbation. Perturbation solutions up to the second order were obtained and the effects of rotation on the low frequency oscillatory flow were examined in detail. The results indicated that there exists evident difference between the low frequency oscillatory flow in a rotating curved pipe and in a curved pipe without rotation. During a period, four secondary vortexes may exist on the circular cross-section and the distribution of axial velocity and wall shear stress are related to the ratio of the Coriolis force to centrifugal force and the axial pressure gradient.

  13. A lightweight low-frequency sound insulation membrane-type acoustic metamaterial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuan Lu

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available A novel membrane-type acoustic metamaterial with a high sound transmission loss (STL at low frequencies (⩽500Hz was designed and the mechanisms were investigated by using negative mass density theory. This metamaterial’s structure is like a sandwich with a thin (thickness=0.25mm lightweight flexible rubber material within two layers of honeycomb cell plates. Negative mass density was demonstrated at frequencies below the first natural frequency, which results in the excellent low-frequency sound insulation. The effects of different structural parameters of the membrane on the sound-proofed performance at low frequencies were investigated by using finite element method (FEM. The numerical results show that, the STL can be modulated to higher value by changing the structural parameters, such as the membrane surface density, the unite cell film shape, and the membrane tension. The acoustic metamaterial proposed in this study could provide a potential application in the low-frequency noise insulation.

  14. HERA Broadband Feed Design for Low-Frequency Radio Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garza, Sierra; Trung, Vincent; Ewall-Wice, Aaron Michael; Li, Jianshu; Hewitt, Jacqueline; Riley, Daniel; Bradley, Richard F.; Makhija, Krishna

    2018-01-01

    As part of the Hydrogen Epoch of Reionization Array (HERA) project, we are designing a broadband low-frequency radio feed to extend the bandwidth from 100-200 MHz to 50-220 MHz. By extending the lower-limit to 50 MHz, we hope to detect the signatures of the first black holes heating the hydrogen gas in the intergalactic medium.The isolation of a very faint signal from vastly brighter foregrounds sets strict requirements on antenna spectral smoothness, polarization purity, forward gain, and internal reflections. We are currently working to meet these requirements with a broad-band sinuous antenna feed suspended over the 14-m parabolic HERA dish, using a combination of measurements and simulations to verify the performance of our design.A sinuous feed has been designed and simulated with Computer Simulation Technology (CST) software. We will present the construction of a prototype sinuous antenna and measurements of its reflection coefficient, S11, including laboratory characterization of baluns. Our measurements agree well with the CST simulations of the antenna’s performance, giving us confidence in our ability to model the feed and ensure that it meets the requirements of a 21cm cosmology measurement.

  15. Study of extremely low frequency electromagnetic fields in infant incubators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cermáková, Eleonora

    2003-01-01

    The aim of the work was to present the results of measurements of extremely low frequency electromagnetic fields (ELF EMF), namely the magnetic flux density, inside infant incubators, and to compare these results with the data published by other authors who point out to a possible association between leukemia or other diseases observed in newborns kept in incubators after the birth and the ELF EMF exposure in the incubator. The measured magnetic flux densities were compared with the reference values for this frequency range indicated in the European Union (EU) recommendations. The repeated measurements in incubators were made with a calibrated magnetometer EFA 300 in the frequency range of 5-30 kHz. Effective values of magnetic flux densities of ELF EMF were determined taking account of the reference values. The results of many repeated measurements showing the values of magnetic flux density in modern incubators with plastic supporting frame, were compared with those obtained in old type incubators with iron skeleton. A power frequency of 50 Hz was detected in the incubator and the ELF EMF values were by over two orders lower than the EU reference values. The paper emphasizes the need to take a special care of newborns kept in incubators even if only the sub-reference values are detected. The EU reference values are intended for the adult human population. A baby in an incubator has much smaller dimensions, higher electric conductivity and maybe trigger another mechanism of response to ELF EMF than that indicated in this paper.

  16. Effect of Wind Farm Noise on Local Residents' Decision to Adopt Mitigation Measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botelho, Anabela; Arezes, Pedro; Bernardo, Carlos; Dias, Hernâni; Pinto, Lígia M Costa

    2017-07-11

    Wind turbines' noise is frequently pointed out as the reason for local communities' objection to the installation of wind farms. The literature suggests that local residents feel annoyed by such noise and that, in many instances, this is significant enough to make them adopt noise-abatement interventions on their homes. Aiming at characterizing the relationship between wind turbine noise, annoyance, and mitigating actions, we propose a novel conceptual framework. The proposed framework posits that actual sound pressure levels of wind turbines determine individual homes' noise-abatement decisions; in addition, the framework analyzes the role that self-reported annoyance, and perception of noise levels, plays on the relationship between actual noise pressure levels and those decisions. The application of this framework to a particular case study shows that noise perception and annoyance constitutes a link between the two. Importantly, however, noise also directly affects people's decision to adopt mitigating measures, independently of the reported annoyance.

  17. Effect of Wind Farm Noise on Local Residents’ Decision to Adopt Mitigation Measures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botelho, Anabela; Bernardo, Carlos; Dias, Hernâni; Pinto, Lígia M. Costa

    2017-01-01

    Wind turbines’ noise is frequently pointed out as the reason for local communities’ objection to the installation of wind farms. The literature suggests that local residents feel annoyed by such noise and that, in many instances, this is significant enough to make them adopt noise-abatement interventions on their homes. Aiming at characterizing the relationship between wind turbine noise, annoyance, and mitigating actions, we propose a novel conceptual framework. The proposed framework posits that actual sound pressure levels of wind turbines determine individual homes’ noise-abatement decisions; in addition, the framework analyzes the role that self-reported annoyance, and perception of noise levels, plays on the relationship between actual noise pressure levels and those decisions. The application of this framework to a particular case study shows that noise perception and annoyance constitutes a link between the two. Importantly, however, noise also directly affects people’s decision to adopt mitigating measures, independently of the reported annoyance. PMID:28696404

  18. A model for measurement of noise in CCD digital-video cameras

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Irie, K; Woodhead, I M; McKinnon, A E; Unsworth, K

    2008-01-01

    This study presents a comprehensive measurement of CCD digital-video camera noise. Knowledge of noise detail within images or video streams allows for the development of more sophisticated algorithms for separating true image content from the noise generated in an image sensor. The robustness and performance of an image-processing algorithm is fundamentally limited by sensor noise. The individual noise sources present in CCD sensors are well understood, but there has been little literature on the development of a complete noise model for CCD digital-video cameras, incorporating the effects of quantization and demosaicing

  19. Ground noise measurements during static and flyby operations of the Cessna 02-T turbine powered airplane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilton, D. A.; Henderson, H. R.; Lawton, B. W.

    1975-01-01

    The field noise measurements on the Cessna 02-T turbine powered propeller aircraft are presented. The objective of the study was to obtain the basic noise characteristics of the aircraft during static ground runs and flyover tests, to identify the sources of the noise, and to correlate the noises with the aircraft operating conditions. The results are presented in the form of a overall noise levels, radiation patterns, and frequency spectra. The noise characteristics of the turbine powered aircraft are compared with those of the reciprocating engine powered aircraft.

  20. Annealing of proton-damaged GaAs and 1/f noise

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, X.Y.; Folter, de L.C.

    1997-01-01

    GaAs layers were grown by MBE. The layers were then damaged by 3 MeV proton irradiation and later annealed. We performed Hall effect and low-frequency noise measurements at temperatures between 77 K and 300 K after each step. Several generation - recombination noise components created by proton

  1. Low-Frequency Gravitational-Wave Science with eLISA/ NGO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaro-Seoane, Pau; Aoudia, Sofiane; Babak, Stanislav; Binetruy, Pierre; Berti, Emanuele; Bohe, Alejandro; Caprini, Chiara; Colpi, Monica; Cornish, Neil J.; Danzmann, Karsten; hide

    2011-01-01

    We review the expected science performance of the New Gravitational-Wave Observatory (NGO, a.k.a. eLISA), a mission under study by the European Space Agency for launch in the early 2020s. eLISA will survey the low-frequency gravitational-wave sky (from 0.1 mHz to 1 Hz), detecting and characterizing a broad variety of systems and events throughout the Universe, including the coalescences of massive black holes brought together by galaxy mergers; the inspirals of stellar-mass black holes and compact stars into central galactic black holes; several millions of ultracompact binaries, both detached and mass transferring, in the Galaxy; and possibly unforeseen sources such as the relic gravitational-wave radiation from the early Universe. eLISA's high signal-to-noise measurements will provide new insight into the structure and history of the Universe, and they will test general relativity in its strong-field dynamical regime.

  2. Cross-validation of independent ultra-low-frequency magnetic recording systems for active fault studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Can; Bin, Chen; Christman, Lilianna E.; Glen, Jonathan M. G.; Klemperer, Simon L.; McPhee, Darcy K.; Kappler, Karl N.; Bleier, Tom E.; Dunson, J. Clark

    2018-04-01

    When working with ultra-low-frequency (ULF) magnetic datasets, as with most geophysical time-series data, it is important to be able to distinguish between cultural signals, internal instrument noise, and natural external signals with their induced telluric fields. This distinction is commonly attempted using simultaneously recorded data from a spatially remote reference site. Here, instead, we compared data recorded by two systems with different instrumental characteristics at the same location over the same time period. We collocated two independent ULF magnetic systems, one from the QuakeFinder network and the other from the United States Geological Survey (USGS)-Stanford network, in order to cross-compare their data, characterize data reproducibility, and characterize signal origin. In addition, we used simultaneous measurements at a remote geomagnetic observatory to distinguish global atmospheric signals from local cultural signals. We demonstrated that the QuakeFinder and USGS-Stanford systems have excellent coherence, despite their different sensors and digitizers. Rare instances of isolated signals recorded by only one system or only one sensor indicate that caution is needed when attributing specific recorded signal features to specific origins.[Figure not available: see fulltext.

  3. Moderate temperature-dependent surface and volume resistivity and low-frequency dielectric constant measurements of pure and multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) doped polyvinyl alcohol thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Matthew; Guggilla, Padmaja; Reedy, Angela; Ijaz, Quratulann; Janen, Afef; Uba, Samuel; Curley, Michael

    2017-08-01

    Previously, we have reported measurements of temperature-dependent surface resistivity of pure and multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWNCT) doped amorphous Polyvinyl Alcohol (PVA) thin films. In the temperature range from 22 °C to 40 °C with humidity-controlled environment, we found the surface resistivity to decrease initially, but to rise steadily as the temperature continued to increase. Moreover, electric surface current density (Js) was measured on the surface of pure and MWCNT doped PVA thin films. In this regard, the surface current density and electric field relationship follow Ohm's law at low electric fields. Unlike Ohmic conduction in metals where free electrons exist, selected captive electrons are freed or provided from impurities and dopants to become conduction electrons from increased thermal vibration of constituent atoms in amorphous thin films. Additionally, a mechanism exists that seemingly decreases the surface resistivity at higher temperatures, suggesting a blocking effect for conducting electrons. Volume resistivity measurements also follow Ohm's law at low voltages (low electric fields), and they continue to decrease as temperatures increase in this temperature range, differing from surface resistivity behavior. Moreover, we report measurements of dielectric constant and dielectric loss as a function of temperature and frequency. Both the dielectric constant and dielectric loss were observed to be highest for MWCNT doped PVA compared to pure PVA and commercial paper, and with frequency and temperature for all samples.

  4. Residual phase noise measurements of the input section in a receiver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mavric, Uros; Chase, Brian; Fermilab

    2007-01-01

    If not designed properly, the input section of an analog down-converter can introduce phase noise that can prevail over other noise sources in the system. In the paper we present residual phase noise measurements of a simplified input section of a classical receiver that is composed of various commercially available mixers and driven by an LO amplifier

  5. Oscillographic Chronopotentiometry with High and Low Frequency Current

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    A novel electroanalytical method, oscillographic chronopotentiometry with high and low frequency current, is presented in this paper. With this method, the sensitivity of almost all kinds of oscillographic chronopotentiometry can be enhanced about one order.

  6. Plate-type metamaterials for extremely broadband low-frequency sound insulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaopeng; Guo, Xinwei; Chen, Tianning; Yao, Ge

    2018-01-01

    A novel plate-type acoustic metamaterial with a high sound transmission loss (STL) in the low-frequency range ( ≤1000 Hz) is designed, theoretically proven and then experimentally verified. The thin plates with large modulus used in this paper mean that we do not need to apply tension to the plates, which is more applicable to practical engineering, the achievement of noise reduction is better and the installation of plates is more user-friendly than that of the membranes. The effects of different structural parameters of the plates on the sound-proofed performance at low-frequencies were also investigated by experiment and finite element method (FEM). The results showed that the STL can be modulated effectively and predictably using vibration theory by changing the structural parameters, such as the radius and thickness of the plate. Furthermore, using unit cells of different geometric sizes which are responsible for different frequency regions, the stacked panels with thickness ≤16 mm and weight ≤5 kg/m2 showed high STL below 2000 Hz. The acoustic metamaterial proposed in this study could provide a potential application in the low-frequency noise insulation.

  7. Contribution of low-frequency harmonics to Mandarin Chinese tone identification in quiet and six-talker babble background.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chang; Azimi, Behnam; Bhandary, Moulesh; Hu, Yi

    2014-01-01

    The goal of this study was to investigate Mandarin Chinese tone identification in quiet and multi-talker babble conditions for normal-hearing listeners. Tone identification was measured with speech stimuli and stimuli with low and/or high harmonics that were embedded in three Mandarin vowels with two fundamental frequencies. There were six types of stimuli: all harmonics (All), low harmonics (Low), high harmonics (High), and the first (H1), second (H2), and third (H3) harmonic. Results showed that, for quiet conditions, individual harmonics carried frequency contour information well enough for tone identification with high accuracy; however, in noisy conditions, tone identification with individual low harmonics (e.g., H1, H2, and H3) was significantly lower than that with the Low, High, and All harmonics. Moreover, tone identification with individual harmonics in noise was lower for a low F0 than for a high F0, and was also dependent on vowel category. Tone identification with individual low-frequency harmonics was accounted for by local signal-to-noise ratios, indicating that audibility of harmonics in noise may play a primary role in tone identification.

  8. Static and low frequency electric and magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thommesen, G.; Tynes, T.

    1994-01-01

    The biological effects of exposure to low frequency electric and magnetic fields are reviewed with the objective of summarizing effects directly relevant to considerations of the health and safety of exposed people. Static and low frequency electric and magnetic fields may elicit biological reactions. Whether exposure to such fields may affect human health at field strengths present in everyday or occupational life is still unsettled. There is unsufficient knowledge to establish any dose concept relevant to health risk. 196 refs., 6 tabs

  9. Maintenance of extratropical low-frequency variabilities in the atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ting, M.

    1994-01-01

    The extratropical low-frequency variability is one of the most important components in extratropical dynamics. While there are some understanding of the high-frequency, synoptic scale storm track eddy development due to baroclinic instability theory, its low-frequency counterpart is poorly understood and the theory for that is slowly evolving. The main difficulty seems to be lying on the fact that the problem is three dimensional in nature

  10. [Measures of occupational exposure to time-varying low frequency magnetic fields of non-uniform spatial distribution in the light of international guidelines and electrodynamic exposure effects in the human body].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpowicz, Jolanta; Zradziński, Patryk; Gryz, Krzysztof

    2012-01-01

    The aim of study was to analyze by computer simulations the electrodynamic effects of magnetic field (MF) on workers, to harmonize the principles of occupational hazards assessment with international guidelines. Simulations involved 50 Hz MF of various spatial distributions, representing workers' exposure in enterprises. Homogeneous models of sigma = 0.2 S/m conductivity and dimensions of body parts - palm, head and trunk - were located at 50 cm ("hand-distance") or 5 cm (adjacent) from the source (circle conductor of 20 cm or 200 cm in diameter). Parameters of magnetic flux density (B(i)) affecting the models were the exposure measures, and the induced electric field strength (E(in)) was the measure of MF exposure effects. The ratio E(in)/B(i) in the analyzed cases ranged from 2.59 to 479 (V/m)/T. The strongest correlation (p assessing the effects of non-uniform fields exposure, resulting from a strong dependence of the E(in)/B(i) ratio on the conditions of exposure and its applied measures, requires special caution when defining the permissible MF levels and the principles of exposure assessment at workplace.

  11. The systematic error of temperature noise correlation measurement method and self-calibration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tian Hong; Tong Yunxian

    1993-04-01

    The turbulent transport behavior of fluid noise and the nature of noise affect on the velocity measurement system have been studied. The systematic error of velocity measurement system is analyzed. A theoretical calibration method is proposed, which makes the velocity measurement of time-correlation as an absolute measurement method. The theoretical results are in good agreement with experiments

  12. Electrochemical measurements of mass transfer in RTILs (Room Temperature Ionic Liquids) medium under low frequency ultrasound irradiation; Mesures electrochimiques de transfert de matiere en milieu RTIL's (Room Temperature Ionic Liquids) sous irradiation ultrasonore basse frequence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costa, C.; Hihn, J.Y.; Rebetez, M.; Doche, M.L. [Universite de Franche Comte - IUT Dept. Chimie, Institut UTINAM-UMR CNRS 6213, 25 - Montbeliard (France); Costa, C.; Bisel, I. [CEA Valrho, Dir. de l' Energie Nucleaire (DEN/DRCP/SCPS/LPCP), 30 - Marcoule (France); Moisy, Ph. [CEA Valrho, Dir. de l' Energie Nucleaire (DEN/DRCP/SCPS/LCA), 30 - Marcoule (France)

    2007-07-01

    The aim of this work is to measure the influence of ultrasounds on the mass transfer at the electrode. The electro diffusional method which consists to measure the limit diffusion current on the polarization curve i=f(E) of a reversible couple in diluted solution in the electrolyte. The used couple changes with the electrolytic medium: potassium ferro/ferricyanide in water, ferrocene/ferricinium for acetonitrile and for the ionic liquid 1-butyl-3-methyl-imidazolium bis(tri-fluoro-methyl-sulfonyl)imide [BuMIm][CF{sub 3}SO{sub 2}){sub 2}N]). The limit diffusion currents are converted into mass transfer coefficients and then into a dimensional Sherwood numbers to allow an easier comparison of the results between the different research teams participating to this study. Recent tests, carried out in partner laboratories (LCMI-UFC, LPCP-CEA and LCA-CEA) have demonstrated the interest of the use of power ultrasounds in Room Temperature Ionic Liquids (RTILs) but revealed too a lot of experimental difficulties. Nevertheless, it appears that the ultrasounds are an aging mode particularly adapted to the RTILs because the mass transfer to the electrode is there 5 times more efficient than in presence of an electrode turning at 4500 tr.min{sup -1}, while limiting their re-hydration. (O.M.)

  13. Latitudinal beaming of Jupiter's low frequency radio emissions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexander, J.K.; Desch, M.D.; Kaiser, M.L.; Thieman, J.R.

    1979-01-01

    By comparing Rae 1 and Imp 6 satelite measurements of Jupiter's radio emissions near 1 MHz with recent Voyager 1 and 2 observations in the same frequency range it is now possible to study the properties of the low frequency radiation pattern over a 10 0 range of latitudes with respect to the Jovian rotation equator. These observations, which cover a wider latitudinal range than is possible from the earth, are consistent with many aspect of earlier ground-based measurements that have been used to infer a sharp beaming pattern for the decameter wavelength emissions. We find marked, systematic changes in the statistical occurrence probability distributions with system III central meridian longitude as the Jovigraphic latitude of the observer changes over this range. Moreover, simultaneous observations by the two Voyager spacecraft, which are separated by up to 3 0 in Jovigraphic latitude, suggest that the instantaneous beam width may be no more than a few degrees at times. The new hectometer wave results can be interpreted in terms of a narrow, curved sheet at a fixed magnetic latitude into which the emission is beamed to escape the planet

  14. Retrieval of reflections from seismic background?noise measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Draganov, D.S.; Wapenaar, K.; Mulder, W.; Singer, J.; Verdel, A.

    2007-01-01

    The retrieval of the earth's reflection response from cross?correlations of seismic noise recordings can provide valuable information, which may otherwise not be available due to limited spatial distribution of seismic sources. We cross?correlated ten hours of seismic background?noise data acquired

  15. Simulated dose reduction by adding artificial noise to measured raw data: A validation study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soederberg, M.; Gunnarsson, M.; Nilsson, M.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to verify and validate a noise simulation tool called Dose Tutor (VAMP GmbH) in terms of level and texture of the simulated noise. By adding artificial noise to measured computed tomography (CT) raw data, a scan acquired with a lower dose (mAs) than the actual one can be simulated. A homogeneous polyethylene phantom and an anthropomorphic chest phantom were scanned for different mAs levels, tube voltages, slice thicknesses and reconstruction kernels. The simulated noise levels were compared with the noise levels in real transverse slice images actually acquired with corresponding mAs values. In general, the noise comparisons showed acceptable agreement in magnitude (<20% deviation in pixel standard deviation). Also, the calculated noise power spectra were similar, which indicates that the noise texture is correctly reproduced. In conclusion, this study establishes that the Dose Tutor might be a useful tool for estimating the dose reduction potential for CT protocols. (authors)

  16. Magnetic Barkhausen Noise Measurements Using Tetrapole Probe Designs

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNairnay, Paul

    A magnetic Barkhausen noise (MBN) testing system was developed for Defence Research and Development Canada (DRDC) to perform MBN measurements on the Royal Canadian Navy's Victoria class submarine hulls that can be correlated with material properties, including residual stress. The DRDC system was based on the design of a MBN system developed by Steven White at Queen's University, which was capable of performing rapid angular dependent measurements through the implementation of a flux controlled tetrapole probe. In tetrapole probe designs, the magnetic excitation field is rotated in the surface plane of the sample under the assumption of linear superposition of two orthogonal magnetic fields. During the course of this work, however, the validity of flux superposition in ferromagnetic materials, for the purpose of measuring MBN, was brought into question. Consequently, a study of MBN anisotropy using tetrapole probes was performed. Results indicate that MBN anisotropy measured under flux superposition does not simulate MBN anisotropy data obtained through manual rotation of a single dipole excitation field. It is inferred that MBN anisotropy data obtained with tetrapole probes is the result of the magnetic domain structure's response to an orthogonal magnetization condition and not necessarily to any bulk superposition magnetization in the sample. A qualitative model for the domain configuration under two orthogonal magnetic fields is proposed to describe the results. An empirically derived fitting equation, that describes tetrapole MBN anisotropy data, is presented. The equation describes results in terms of two largely independent orthogonal fields, and includes interaction terms arising due to competing orthogonally magnetized domain structures and interactions with the sample's magnetic easy axis. The equation is used to fit results obtained from a number of samples and tetrapole orientations and in each case correctly identifies the samples' magnetic easy axis.

  17. Measurements of effective noise temperature in fused silica fiber violin modes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bilenko, I.A.; Lourie, S.L

    2002-11-25

    The results of measurements of the effective noise temperature in fused silica fiber violin modes are presented. In these measurements the fibers were stressed and value of the effective noise temperature was obtained by direct observation of oscillations in the fundamental violin modes of several samples. Measured values indicate that effective noise temperature does not exceed the room temperature significantly. This result is important for the design of the advanced gravitational wave antennae.

  18. Low-frequency nuclear quadrupole resonance with a dc SQUID

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, J.W.

    1991-07-01

    Conventional pure nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) is a technique well suited for the study of very large quadrupolar interactions. Numerous nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques have been developed for the study of smaller quadrupolar interactions. However, there are many nuclei which have quadrupolar interactions of intermediate strength. Quadrupolar interactions in this region have traditionally been difficult or unfeasible to detect. This work describes the development and application of a SQUID NQR technique which is capable of measuring intermediate strength quadrupolar interactions, in the range of a few hundred kilohertz to several megahertz. In this technique, a dc SQUID (Superconducting QUantum Interference Device) is used to monitor the longitudinal sample magnetization, as opposed to the transverse magnetization, as a rf field is swept in frequency. This allows the detection of low-frequency nuclear quadrupole resonances over a very wide frequency range with high sensitivity. The theory of this NQR technique is discussed and a description of the dc SQUID system is given. In the following chapters, the spectrometer is discussed along with its application to the study of samples containing half-odd-integer spin quadrupolar nuclei, in particular boron-11 and aluminum-27. The feasibility of applying this NQR technique in the study of samples containing integer spin nuclei is discussed in the last chapter. 140 refs., 46 figs., 6 tabs

  19. Noise in NC-AFM measurements with significant tip–sample interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jannis Lübbe

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The frequency shift noise in non-contact atomic force microscopy (NC-AFM imaging and spectroscopy consists of thermal noise and detection system noise with an additional contribution from amplitude noise if there are significant tip–sample interactions. The total noise power spectral density DΔf(fm is, however, not just the sum of these noise contributions. Instead its magnitude and spectral characteristics are determined by the strongly non-linear tip–sample interaction, by the coupling between the amplitude and tip–sample distance control loops of the NC-AFM system as well as by the characteristics of the phase locked loop (PLL detector used for frequency demodulation. Here, we measure DΔf(fm for various NC-AFM parameter settings representing realistic measurement conditions and compare experimental data to simulations based on a model of the NC-AFM system that includes the tip–sample interaction. The good agreement between predicted and measured noise spectra confirms that the model covers the relevant noise contributions and interactions. Results yield a general understanding of noise generation and propagation in the NC-AFM and provide a quantitative prediction of noise for given experimental parameters. We derive strategies for noise-optimised imaging and spectroscopy and outline a full optimisation procedure for the instrumentation and control loops.

  20. Quality and noise measurements in mobile phone video capture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrescu, Doina; Pincenti, John

    2011-02-01

    The quality of videos captured with mobile phones has become increasingly important particularly since resolutions and formats have reached a level that rivals the capabilities available in the digital camcorder market, and since many mobile phones now allow direct playback on large HDTVs. The video quality is determined by the combined quality of the individual parts of the imaging system including the image sensor, the digital color processing, and the video compression, each of which has been studied independently. In this work, we study the combined effect of these elements on the overall video quality. We do this by evaluating the capture under various lighting, color processing, and video compression conditions. First, we measure full reference quality metrics between encoder input and the reconstructed sequence, where the encoder input changes with light and color processing modifications. Second, we introduce a system model which includes all elements that affect video quality, including a low light additive noise model, ISP color processing, as well as the video encoder. Our experiments show that in low light conditions and for certain choices of color processing the system level visual quality may not improve when the encoder becomes more capable or the compression ratio is reduced.

  1. Robust shot-noise measurement for continuous-variable quantum key distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunz-Jacques, Sébastien; Jouguet, Paul

    2015-02-01

    We study a practical method to measure the shot noise in real time in continuous-variable quantum key distribution systems. The amount of secret key that can be extracted from the raw statistics depends strongly on this quantity since it affects in particular the computation of the excess noise (i.e., noise in excess of the shot noise) added by an eavesdropper on the quantum channel. Some powerful quantum hacking attacks relying on faking the estimated value of the shot noise to hide an intercept and resend strategy were proposed. Here, we provide experimental evidence that our method can defeat the saturation attack and the wavelength attack.

  2. Measuring the background acoustic noise in the BN-600 steam generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yugaj, V.S.; Zhukovets, V.N.; Ivannikov, V.I.; Vylomov, V.V.; Ryabinin, F.; Chernykh, P.G.; Flejsher, Yu.V.

    1987-01-01

    Acoustic noises in the lower chambers of evaporation and intermediate overheating moduli of the BN-600 reactor steam generator are measured. Bachground noises are registered in the whole range of frequencies studied, from 0.63 to 160 kHz. The comparison of noise spectra in evaporator and overheater has revealed a certain difference. However the general tendency is the reduction of the noise level at high frequencies > 8 kHz. The increase of the noise level at low steam content is observed only in a narrow of frequency range of 3-6 kHz

  3. Objective Measures of Listening Effort: Effects of Background Noise and Noise Reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarampalis, Anastasios; Kalluri, Sridhar; Edwards, Brent; Hafter, Ervin

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: This work is aimed at addressing a seeming contradiction related to the use of noise-reduction (NR) algorithms in hearing aids. The problem is that although some listeners claim a subjective improvement from NR, it has not been shown to improve speech intelligibility, often even making it worse. Method: To address this, the hypothesis…

  4. Dual fiber Bragg gratings configuration-based fiber acoustic sensor for low-frequency signal detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Dong; Wang, Shun; Lu, Ping; Liu, Deming

    2014-11-01

    We propose and fabricate a new type fiber acoustic sensor based on dual fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs) configuration. The acoustic sensor head is constructed by putting the sensing cells enclosed in an aluminum cylinder space built by two Cband FBGs and a titanium diaphragm of 50 um thickness. One end of each FBG is longitudinally adhered to the diaphragm by UV glue. Both of the two FBGs are employed for reflecting light. The dual FBGs play roles not only as signal transmission system but also as sensing component, and they demodulate each other's optical signal mutually during the measurement. Both of the two FBGs are pre-strained and the output optical power experiences fluctuation in a linear relationship along with a variation of axial strain and surrounding acoustic interference. So a precise approach to measure the frequency and sound pressure of the acoustic disturbance is achieved. Experiments are performed and results show that a relatively flat frequency response in a range from 200 Hz to 1 kHz with the average signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) above 21 dB is obtained. The maximum sound pressure sensitivity of 11.35mV/Pa is achieved with the Rsquared value of 0.99131 when the sound pressure in the range of 87.7-106.6dB. It has potential applications in low frequency signal detection. Owing to its direct self-demodulation method, the sensing system reveals the advantages of easy to demodulate, good temperature stability and measurement reliability. Besides, performance of the proposed sensor could be improved by optimizing the parameters of the sensor, especially the diaphragm.

  5. Circuit Models and Experimental Noise Measurements of Micropipette Amplifiers for Extracellular Neural Recordings from Live Animals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang Hao Chen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Glass micropipettes are widely used to record neural activity from single neurons or clusters of neurons extracellularly in live animals. However, to date, there has been no comprehensive study of noise in extracellular recordings with glass micropipettes. The purpose of this work was to assess various noise sources that affect extracellular recordings and to create model systems in which novel micropipette neural amplifier designs can be tested. An equivalent circuit of the glass micropipette and the noise model of this circuit, which accurately describe the various noise sources involved in extracellular recordings, have been developed. Measurement schemes using dead brain tissue as well as extracellular recordings from neurons in the inferior colliculus, an auditory brain nucleus of an anesthetized gerbil, were used to characterize noise performance and amplification efficacy of the proposed micropipette neural amplifier. According to our model, the major noise sources which influence the signal to noise ratio are the intrinsic noise of the neural amplifier and the thermal noise from distributed pipette resistance. These two types of noise were calculated and measured and were shown to be the dominating sources of background noise for in vivo experiments.

  6. Present and Future Modes of Low Frequency Climate Variability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cane, Mark A.

    2014-02-20

    This project addressed area (1) of the FOA, “Interaction of Climate Change and Low Frequency Modes of Natural Climate Variability”. Our overarching objective is to detect, describe and understand the changes in low frequency variability between model simulations of the preindustrial climate and simulations of a doubled CO2 climate. The deliverables are a set of papers providing a dynamical characterization of interannual, decadal, and multidecadal variability in coupled models with attention to the changes in this low frequency variability between pre-industrial concentrations of greenhouse gases and a doubling of atmospheric concentrations of CO2. The principle mode of analysis, singular vector decomposition, is designed to advance our physical, mechanistic understanding. This study will include external natural variability due to solar and volcanic aerosol variations as well as variability internal to the climate system. An important byproduct is a set of analysis tools for estimating global singular vector structures from the archived output of model simulations.

  7. Sizing of intergranular stress corrosion cracking using low frequency ultrasound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuller, M.D.; Avioli, M.J.; Rose, J.L.

    1985-01-01

    Based upon the work thus far accomplished on low frequency sizing, the following conclusions can be drawn: the potential of low frequency ultrasound for the sizing of IGSCC seams encouraging as demonstrated in this work. If minimal walking is expected, larger values of crack height/wavelength ratios should not affect the reliability of estimates; notch data points out the validity of signal amplitude for sizing. With care in frequency consideration, the technique can be extended to cracks; when wavelength is greater than flaw size, importance of orientation and reflector shape diminishes although less so for deeper cracks; when beam profile is larger than the defect size, echo amplitude is proportional to defect area when using shear wave probes and corner reflectors; other factors, in addition to crack size, affect signal amplitude. Reference data to compensate for depth and material (HAZ) is a must; additional crack samples should be studied in order to further develop and characterize the use of low frequency ultrasonics

  8. Low frequency electric and magnetic fields - the topic of cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thommesen, G.

    1988-01-01

    A review is made of the literature about the biological effects of low frequency electric and magnetic fields. It is still an unsettled question whether extremely low frequency magnetic fields may increase the incidence of cancer. Experimental data arise mainly from exposure to field strengths or frequencies seldom or never encountered by people. The results give no clear explanation to the increase in cancer incidence reported in epidemiological works. The spectre of possible mechanisms imply that no simple dose/effect relationship should be expected, as conflicting mechanisms may dominate at different exposure levels. There is therefore no basis at present for giving numerical value to cancer risk from exposure to low frequency electric or magnetic fields

  9. Low frequency electrostatic modes in a magnetized dusty plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salimullah, M.; Hassan, M.H.A.

    1991-09-01

    The dispersion properties of low frequency electrostatic modes in a dusty plasma in the presence of a static homogeneous magnetic field are examined. It is found that the presence of the dust particles and the static magnetic field have significant effects on the dispersion relations. For the parallel propagation the electrostatic mode is slightly modified by the magnetic field for the ion acoustic branch. A new longitudinal mode arises at the extreme low frequency limit, which is unaffected by the magnetic field for the parallel propagation. For the transverse propagation the ion acoustic mode is not affected by the magnetic field. However, the undamped extreme low frequency mode is significantly modified by the presence of the magnetic field for the propagation transverse to the direction of the magnetic field. (author). 23 refs

  10. Atomic Oxygen Energy in Low Frequency Hyperthermal Plasma Ashers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, Bruce A.; Miller, Sharon K R.; Kneubel, Christian A.

    2014-01-01

    Experimental and analytical analysis of the atomic oxygen erosion of pyrolytic graphite as well as Monte Carlo computational modeling of the erosion of Kapton H (DuPont, Wilmington, DE) polyimide was performed to determine the hyperthermal energy of low frequency (30 to 35 kHz) plasma ashers operating on air. It was concluded that hyperthermal energies in the range of 0.3 to 0.9 eV are produced in the low frequency air plasmas which results in texturing similar to that in low Earth orbit (LEO). Monte Carlo computational modeling also indicated that such low energy directed ions are fully capable of producing the experimentally observed textured surfaces in low frequency plasmas.

  11. Radiative cooling and broadband phenomenon in low-frequency waves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    In this paper, we analyze the effects of radiative cooling on the pure baroclinic low-frequency waves under the approximation of equatorial -plane and semi-geostrophic condition. The results show that radiative cooling does not, exclusively, provide the damping effects on the development of low-frequency waves. Under the delicate radiative-convective equilibrium, radiative effects will alter the phase speed and wave period, and bring about the broadband of phase velocity and wave period by adjusting the vertical profiles of diabatic heating. when the intensity of diabatic heating is moderate and appropriate, it is conductive to the development and sustaining of the low-frequency waves and their broadband phenomena, not the larger, the better. The radiative cooling cannot be neglected in order to reach the moderate and appropriate intensity of diabatic heating.

  12. Automated measurement of CT noise in patient images with a novel structure coherence feature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chun, Minsoo; Kim, Jong Hyo; Choi, Young Hun

    2015-01-01

    While the assessment of CT noise constitutes an important task for the optimization of scan protocols in clinical routine, the majority of noise measurements in practice still rely on manual operation, hence limiting their efficiency and reliability. This study presents an algorithm for the automated measurement of CT noise in patient images with a novel structure coherence feature. The proposed algorithm consists of a four-step procedure including subcutaneous fat tissue selection, the calculation of structure coherence feature, the determination of homogeneous ROIs, and the estimation of the average noise level. In an evaluation with 94 CT scans (16 517 images) of pediatric and adult patients along with the participation of two radiologists, ROIs were placed on a homogeneous fat region at 99.46% accuracy, and the agreement of the automated noise measurements with the radiologists’ reference noise measurements (PCC  =  0.86) was substantially higher than the within and between-rater agreements of noise measurements (PCC within   =  0.75, PCC between   =  0.70). In addition, the absolute noise level measurements matched closely the theoretical noise levels generated by a reduced-dose simulation technique. Our proposed algorithm has the potential to be used for examining the appropriateness of radiation dose and the image quality of CT protocols for research purposes as well as clinical routine. (paper)

  13. Measurements and Predictions of the Noise from Three-Stream Jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Brenda S.; Leib, Stewart J.; Wernet, Mark P.

    2015-01-01

    An experimental and numerical investigation of the noise produced by high-subsonic and supersonic three-stream jets was conducted. The exhaust system consisted of externally-mixed-convergent nozzles and an external plug. Bypass- and tertiary-to-core area ratios between 1.0 and 2.5, and 0.4 and 1.0, respectively, were studied. Axisymmetric and offset tertiary nozzles were investigated for heated and unheated conditions. For axisymmetric configurations, the addition of the third stream was found to reduce peak- and high-frequency acoustic levels in the peak-jet-noise direction, with greater reductions at the lower bypass-to-core area ratios. For the offset configurations, an offset duct was found to decrease acoustic levels on the thick side of the tertiary nozzle relative to those produced by the simulated two-stream jet with up to 8 dB mid-frequency noise reduction at large angles to the jet inlet axis. Noise reduction in the peak-jet-noise direction was greater for supersonic core speeds than for subsonic core speeds. The addition of a tertiary nozzle insert used to divert the third-stream jet to one side of the nozzle system provided no noise reduction. Noise predictions are presented for selected cases using a method based on an acoustic analogy with mean flow interaction effects accounted for using a Green's function, computed in terms of its coupled azimuthal modes for the offset cases, and a source model previously used for round and rectangular jets. Comparisons of the prediction results with data show that the noise model predicts the observed increase in low-frequency noise with the introduction of a third, axisymmetric stream, but not the high-frequency reduction. For an offset third stream, the model predicts the observed trend of decreased sound levels on the thick side of the jet compared with the thin side, but the predicted azimuthal variations are much less than those seen in the data. Also, the shift of the spectral peak to lower frequencies with

  14. Coolant flow monitoring in a PWR core using noise analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kostic, Lj.

    1992-01-01

    Experimental investigations of the neutron and temperature noise field have been performed in the 1350 MW PWR nuclear power plant. Evaluation in the low frequency range, where both feedback effects and different thermohydraulics phenomena are dominant, succeeded in measuring the coolant velocity. This is important for determination and localization of essential deviations and possible anomalies. (author)

  15. Assessment of extremely low frequency magnetic field exposure from GSM mobile phones

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Calderón, Carolina; Addison, Darren; Mee, Terry; Findlay, Richard; Maslanyj, Myron; Conil, Emmanuelle; Kromhout, Hans; Lee, Ae Kyoung; Sim, Malcolm R.; Taki, Masao; Varsier, Nadège; Wiart, Joe; Cardis, Elisabeth

    2014-01-01

    Although radio frequency (RF) electromagnetic fields emitted by mobile phones have received much attention, relatively little is known about the extremely low frequency (ELF) magnetic fields emitted by phones. This paper summarises ELF magnetic flux density measurements on global system for mobile

  16. Creating poloidal flux in a tokamak plasma with low frequency waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirkwood, R.K.; Capewell, D.L.; Bellan, P.M.

    1993-01-01

    Using a fully toroidal, collisionless, low frequency model, we show that low amplitude, circularly polarized waves can, depending on antenna geometry (i) drive the toroidal EMF necessary to sustain a tokamak reactor, or (ii) shift the internal current profile. Measurements on a small tokamak to test (ii) agree with the model predictions. (orig.)

  17. Results and interpretation of noise measurements using in-core self powered neutron detector strings at Unit 2 of the Paks Nuclear Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gloeckler, O.; Por, G.; Valko, J.

    1986-11-01

    In-core neutron noise and fuel assembly outlet temperature noise measurements were performed at Unit 2 of Paks Nuclear Power Plant. Characteristics of the reactor and the noise measuring equipment are briefly described. The in-core Rhodium emitter selfpowered neutron detector strings positioned axially above the other show high coherence and linear phase at low frequencies indicating a marked transport effect, not regularly measured in PWRs. The coherence between horizontally placed neutron detectors is small and the phase is zero. A transport effect of different nature is obtained between neutron detectors (in-core and ex-core) and fuel assembly outlet thermocouples. The observed characteristics depend on reactor and fuel assembly power in a way supporting interpretation in terms of coolant density and void content changes and power feedback effects. During routine analysis vibration of 1.1 Hz appeared as a strong peak in the power spectra. The control assembly that was responsible for the observed behaviour could be localized with high certainty. (author)

  18. Effect of low-frequency vibrations on speckle interferometry fringes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vikram, C.S.; Pechersky, M.J.

    1998-01-01

    The effects of low-frequency vibrations on speckle correlation fringes have been investigated. The relatively short capture time of the camera in the low-frequency case may yield usable fringe contrast in spite of vibration. It has been shown that the fringes also shift due to the vibration. The study is in agreement with experimental observations of good-contrast correlation fringes even if the object is not on a vibration-isolated table. Some such experimental observations are also presented. copyright 1998 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers

  19. Improvement of the low frequency oscillation model for Hall thrusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Chunsheng, E-mail: wangcs@hit.edu.cn; Wang, Huashan [Yanshan University, College of Vehicles and Energy, Qinhuangdao 066004, Hebei (China)

    2016-08-15

    The low frequency oscillation of the discharge current in Hall thrusters is a major aspect of these devices that requires further study. While the existing model captures the ionization mechanism of the low frequency oscillation, it unfortunately fails to express the dynamic characteristics of the ion acceleration. The analysis in this paper shows this is because of the simplification of the electron equation, which affects both the electric field distribution and the ion acceleration process. Additionally, the electron density equation is revised and a new model that is based on the physical properties of ion movement is proposed.

  20. Mixed Discretization of the Time Domain MFIE at Low Frequencies

    KAUST Repository

    Ulku, Huseyin Arda

    2017-01-10

    Solution of the magnetic field integral equation (MFIE), which is obtained by the classical marching on-in-time (MOT) scheme, becomes inaccurate when the time step is large, i.e., under low-frequency excitation. It is shown here that the inaccuracy stems from the classical MOT scheme’s failure to predict the correct scaling of the current’s Helmholtz components for large time steps. A recently proposed mixed discretization strategy is used to alleviate the inaccuracy problem by restoring the correct scaling of the current’s Helmholtz components under low-frequency excitation.