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Sample records for measured sample volumes

  1. New experimental procedure for measuring volume magnetostriction on powder samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rivero, G.; Multigner, M.; Valdes, J.; Crespo, P.; Martinez, A.; Hernando, A.

    2005-01-01

    Conventional techniques used for volume magnetostriction measurements, as strain gauge or cantilever method, are very useful for ribbons or thin films but cannot be applied when the samples are in powder form. To overcome this problem a new experimental procedure has been developed. In this work, the experimental set-up is described, together with the results obtained in amorphous FeCuZr powders, which exhibit a strong dependence of the magnetization on the strength of the applied magnetic field. The magnetostriction measurements presented in this work point out that this dependence is related to a magnetovolume effect

  2. National comparison on volume sample activity measurement methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sahagia, M.; Grigorescu, E.L.; Popescu, C.; Razdolescu, C.

    1992-01-01

    A national comparison on volume sample activity measurements methods may be regarded as a step toward accomplishing the traceability of the environmental and food chain activity measurements to national standards. For this purpose, the Radionuclide Metrology Laboratory has distributed 137 Cs and 134 Cs water-equivalent solid standard sources to 24 laboratories having responsibilities in this matter. Every laboratory has to measure the activity of the received source(s) by using its own standards, equipment and methods and report the obtained results to the organizer. The 'measured activities' will be compared with the 'true activities'. A final report will be issued, which plans to evaluate the national level of precision of such measurements and give some suggestions for improvement. (Author)

  3. Determination of air-loop volume and radon partition coefficient for measuring radon in water sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kil Yong; Burnett, William C

    A simple method for the direct determination of the air-loop volume in a RAD7 system as well as the radon partition coefficient was developed allowing for an accurate measurement of the radon activity in any type of water. The air-loop volume may be measured directly using an external radon source and an empty bottle with a precisely measured volume. The partition coefficient and activity of radon in the water sample may then be determined via the RAD7 using the determined air-loop volume. Activity ratios instead of absolute activities were used to measure the air-loop volume and the radon partition coefficient. In order to verify this approach, we measured the radon partition coefficient in deionized water in the temperature range of 10-30 °C and compared the values to those calculated from the well-known Weigel equation. The results were within 5 % variance throughout the temperature range. We also applied the approach for measurement of the radon partition coefficient in synthetic saline water (0-75 ppt salinity) as well as tap water. The radon activity of the tap water sample was determined by this method as well as the standard RAD-H 2 O and BigBottle RAD-H 2 O. The results have shown good agreement between this method and the standard methods.

  4. Determination of air-loop volume and radon partition coefficient for measuring radon in water sample

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kil Yong Lee; Burnett, W.C.

    2013-01-01

    A simple method for the direct determination of the air-loop volume in a RAD7 system as well as the radon partition coefficient was developed allowing for an accurate measurement of the radon activity in any type of water. The air-loop volume may be measured directly using an external radon source and an empty bottle with a precisely measured volume. The partition coefficient and activity of radon in the water sample may then be determined via the RAD7 using the determined air-loop volume. Activity ratios instead of absolute activities were used to measure the air-loop volume and the radon partition coefficient. In order to verify this approach, we measured the radon partition coefficient in deionized water in the temperature range of 10-30 deg C and compared the values to those calculated from the well-known Weigel equation. The results were within 5 % variance throughout the temperature range. We also applied the approach for measurement of the radon partition coefficient in synthetic saline water (0-75 ppt salinity) as well as tap water. The radon activity of the tap water sample was determined by this method as well as the standard RAD-H 2 O and BigBottle RAD-H 2 O. The results have shown good agreement between this method and the standard methods. (author)

  5. Measuring Blood Glucose Concentrations in Photometric Glucometers Requiring Very Small Sample Volumes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demitri, Nevine; Zoubir, Abdelhak M

    2017-01-01

    Glucometers present an important self-monitoring tool for diabetes patients and, therefore, must exhibit high accuracy as well as good usability features. Based on an invasive photometric measurement principle that drastically reduces the volume of the blood sample needed from the patient, we present a framework that is capable of dealing with small blood samples, while maintaining the required accuracy. The framework consists of two major parts: 1) image segmentation; and 2) convergence detection. Step 1 is based on iterative mode-seeking methods to estimate the intensity value of the region of interest. We present several variations of these methods and give theoretical proofs of their convergence. Our approach is able to deal with changes in the number and position of clusters without any prior knowledge. Furthermore, we propose a method based on sparse approximation to decrease the computational load, while maintaining accuracy. Step 2 is achieved by employing temporal tracking and prediction, herewith decreasing the measurement time, and, thus, improving usability. Our framework is tested on several real datasets with different characteristics. We show that we are able to estimate the underlying glucose concentration from much smaller blood samples than is currently state of the art with sufficient accuracy according to the most recent ISO standards and reduce measurement time significantly compared to state-of-the-art methods.

  6. Sampling artifacts in measurement of elemental and organic carbon: Low-volume sampling in indoor and outdoor environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, David A.; Norris, Gary A.

    Experiments were completed to determine the extent of artifacts from sampling elemental carbon (EC) and organic carbon (OC) under sample conditions consistent with personal sampling. Two different types of experiments were completed; the first examined possible artifacts from oils used in personal environmental monitor (PEM) impactor plates, and the second examined artifacts from microenvironmental sampling using different sampling media combinations (quartz, Teflon, XAD denuder, and electrostatic precipitator). The effectiveness of front and backup filters was evaluated for most sampling configurations. Mean total carbon concentrations from sampling configurations using impactor oils were not statistically different from the control case (using a sharp cut cyclone). Three microenvironments were tested (kitchen, library, and ambient); carbon concentrations were highest in the kitchen using a front quartz filter (mean OC of 16.4 μg m -3). The lowest front quartz filter concentrations were measured in the library using XAD denuders (mean OC of 3.6 μg m -3). Denuder removal efficiencies (average of 82% for total carbon) were lower compared with previous ambient studies and may indicate that indoor sources influenced denuder efficiency during sample collection. The highest carbon concentrations from backup quartz filters were measured using the Teflon-quartz combination.

  7. Technical Note: New methodology for measuring viscosities in small volumes characteristic of environmental chamber particle samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Renbaum-Wolff

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Herein, a method for the determination of viscosities of small sample volumes is introduced, with important implications for the viscosity determination of particle samples from environmental chambers (used to simulate atmospheric conditions. The amount of sample needed is < 1 μl, and the technique is capable of determining viscosities (η ranging between 10−3 and 103 Pascal seconds (Pa s in samples that cover a range of chemical properties and with real-time relative humidity and temperature control; hence, the technique should be well-suited for determining the viscosities, under atmospherically relevant conditions, of particles collected from environmental chambers. In this technique, supermicron particles are first deposited on an inert hydrophobic substrate. Then, insoluble beads (~1 μm in diameter are embedded in the particles. Next, a flow of gas is introduced over the particles, which generates a shear stress on the particle surfaces. The sample responds to this shear stress by generating internal circulations, which are quantified with an optical microscope by monitoring the movement of the beads. The rate of internal circulation is shown to be a function of particle viscosity but independent of the particle material for a wide range of organic and organic-water samples. A calibration curve is constructed from the experimental data that relates the rate of internal circulation to particle viscosity, and this calibration curve is successfully used to predict viscosities in multicomponent organic mixtures.

  8. Pore volume and pore size distribution of cement samples measured by a modified mercury intrusion porosimeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zamorani, E.; Blanchard, H.

    1987-01-01

    Important parameters for the characterization of cement specimens are mechanical properties and porosity. This work is carried out at the Ispra Establishment of the Joint Research Centre in the scope of the Radioactive Waste Management programme. A commercial Mercury Intrusion Porosimeter was modified in an attempt to improve the performance of the instrument and to provide fast processing of the recorded values: pressure-volume of pores. The dead volume of the instrument was reduced and the possibility of leakage from the moving parts eliminated. In addition, the modification allows an improvement of data acquisition thus increasing data accuracy and reproducibility. In order to test the improved performance of the modified instrument, physical characterizations of cement forms were carried out. Experimental procedures and results are reported

  9. Influence of mathematical filters in the volume measurement of a travertine sample using high resolution x-ray microtomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Machado, Alessandra S.; Lima, Inaya; Lopes, Ricardo T.

    2013-01-01

    X-ray transmission micro-computed tomography technique is a reality for characterization of pores spaces and fractures. Imaging rocks in three-dimensions this technique enables routine visualization of structures in samples, which can be spatially resolved down to the sub-micron scale. The image of micro-computed tomography is a mapping of the linear attenuation coefficient of one cross section of the sample in study. The main objective of this work is to describe the importance of using mathematical filters in the volume measurement of a travertine sample as, well as to evaluate the relevance of the filters, which were: Gaussian Blur, Unsharp Mask, Median, Uniform and Kuwahara. The results showed interesting differences both among the different filters and, mainly, in the same filter when using different radius and, also, for analysis of 2D space, as well as the resulting histograms. However the study showed that even with the evolution of the 'upgrades' of the image there is not a technique capable of solving 100% of the problems that a digital image might present and that the choice of filters must always determine the characteristics of the image emphasizing them within a specific application, always taking into consideration the image processing time. (author)

  10. Densidade global de solos medida com anel volumétrico e por cachimbagem de terra fina seca ao ar Bulk density of soil samples measured in the field and through volume measurement of sieved soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernardo Van Raij

    1989-01-01

    Full Text Available Em laboratórios de rotina de fertilidade do solo, a medida de quantidade de terra para análise é feita em volume, mediante utensílios chamados "cachimbos", que permitem medir volumes de terra. Admite-se que essas medidas reflitam a quantidade de terra existente em volume de solo similar em condições de campo. Essa hipótese foi avaliada neste trabalho, por doze amostras dos horizontes A e B de seis perfis de solos. A densidade em condições de campo foi avaliada por anel volumétrico e, no laboratório, por meio de cachimbos de diversos tamanhos. A cachimbagem revelou-se bastante precisa. Os valores de densidade global calculada variaram de 0,63 a 1,46g/cm³ para medidas de campo e de 0,91 a 1,33g/cm³ para medidas com cachimbos. Portanto, a medida de laboratório subestimou valores altos de densidade e deu resultados mais elevados para valores de campo mais baixos.In soil testing laboratories, soil samples for chemical analysis are usually measured by volume, using appropriate measuring spoons. It is tacitly assumed that such measurements would reflect amounts of soil existing in the same volume under field conditions. This hypothesis was tested, using 12 soil samples of the A and B horizons of six soil profiles. Bulk density in the field was evaluated through a cylindrical metal sampler of 50cm³ and in the laboratory using spoons of different sizes. Measurements of soil volumes by spoons were quite precise. Values of bulk density varied between 0.63 and 1.46g/cm³ for field measurements and between 0.91 and 1.33g/cm³ for laboratory measurements with spoons. Thus, laboratory measurements overestimated lower values of bulk densities and underestimated the higher ones.

  11. A compact time-of-flight SANS instrument optimised for measurements of small sample volumes at the European Spallation Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kynde, Søren, E-mail: kynde@nbi.ku.dk [Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen (Denmark); Hewitt Klenø, Kaspar [Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen (Denmark); Nagy, Gergely [SINQ, Paul Scherrer Institute (Switzerland); Mortensen, Kell; Lefmann, Kim [Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen (Denmark); Kohlbrecher, Joachim, E-mail: Joachim.kohlbrecher@psi.ch [SINQ, Paul Scherrer Institute (Switzerland); Arleth, Lise, E-mail: arleth@nbi.ku.dk [Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen (Denmark)

    2014-11-11

    The high flux at European Spallation Source (ESS) will allow for performing experiments with relatively small beam-sizes while maintaining a high intensity of the incoming beam. The pulsed nature of the source makes the facility optimal for time-of-flight small-angle neutron scattering (ToF-SANS). We find that a relatively compact SANS instrument becomes the optimal choice in order to obtain the widest possible q-range in a single setting and the best possible exploitation of the neutrons in each pulse and hence obtaining the highest possible flux at the sample position. The instrument proposed in the present article is optimised for performing fast measurements of small scattering volumes, typically down to 2×2×2 mm{sup 3}, while covering a broad q-range from about 0.005 1/Å to 0.5 1/Å in a single instrument setting. This q-range corresponds to that available at a typical good BioSAXS instrument and is relevant for a wide set of biomacromolecular samples. A central advantage of covering the whole q-range in a single setting is that each sample has to be loaded only once. This makes it convenient to use the fully automated high-throughput flow-through sample changers commonly applied at modern synchrotron BioSAXS-facilities. The central drawback of choosing a very compact instrument is that the resolution in terms of δλ/λ obtained with the short wavelength neutrons becomes worse than what is usually the standard at state-of-the-art SANS instruments. Our McStas based simulations of the instrument performance for a set of characteristic biomacromolecular samples show that the resulting smearing effects still have relatively minor effects on the obtained data and can be compensated for in the data analysis. However, in cases where a better resolution is required in combination with the large simultaneous q-range characteristic of the instrument, we show that this can be obtained by inserting a set of choppers.

  12. Novel system using microliter order sample volume for measuring arterial radioactivity concentrations in whole blood and plasma for mouse PET dynamic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Yuichi; Seki, Chie; Hashizume, Nobuya; Yamada, Takashi; Wakizaka, Hidekatsu; Nishimoto, Takahiro; Hatano, Kentaro; Kitamura, Keishi; Toyama, Hiroshi; Kanno, Iwao

    2013-11-21

    This study aimed to develop a new system, named CD-Well, for mouse PET dynamic study. CD-Well allows the determination of time-activity curves (TACs) for arterial whole blood and plasma using 2-3 µL of blood per sample; the minute sample size is ideal for studies in small animals. The system has the following merits: (1) measures volume and radioactivity of whole blood and plasma separately; (2) allows measurements at 10 s intervals to capture initial rapid changes in the TAC; and (3) is compact and easy to handle, minimizes blood loss from sampling, and delay and dispersion of the TAC. CD-Well has 36 U-shaped channels. A drop of blood is sampled into the opening of the channel and stored there. After serial sampling is completed, CD-Well is centrifuged and scanned using a flatbed scanner to define the regions of plasma and blood cells. The length measured is converted to volume because the channels have a precise and uniform cross section. Then, CD-Well is exposed to an imaging plate to measure radioactivity. Finally, radioactivity concentrations are computed. We evaluated the performance of CD-Well in in vitro measurement and in vivo (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose and [(11)C]2-carbomethoxy-3β-(4-fluorophenyl) tropane studies. In in vitro evaluation, per cent differences (mean±SE) from manual measurement were 4.4±3.6% for whole blood and 4.0±3.5% for plasma across the typical range of radioactivity measured in mouse dynamic study. In in vivo studies, reasonable TACs were obtained. The peaks were captured well, and the time courses coincided well with the TAC derived from PET imaging of the heart chamber. The total blood loss was less than 200 µL, which had no physiological effect on the mice. CD-Well demonstrates satisfactory performance, and is useful for mouse PET dynamic study.

  13. Tritium sampling and measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wood, M.J.; McElroy, R.G.; Surette, R.A.; Brown, R.M.

    1993-01-01

    Current methods for sampling and measuring tritium are described. Although the basic techniques have not changed significantly over the last 10 y, there have been several notable improvements in tritium measurement instrumentation. The design and quality of commercial ion-chamber-based and gas-flow-proportional-counter-based tritium monitors for tritium-in-air have improved, an indirect result of fusion-related research in the 1980s. For tritium-in-water analysis, commercial low-level liquid scintillation spectrometers capable of detecting tritium-in-water concentrations as low as 0.65 Bq L-1 for counting times of 500 min are available. The most sensitive method for tritium-in-water analysis is still 3He mass spectrometry. Concentrations as low as 0.35 mBq L-1 can be detected with current equipment. Passive tritium-oxide-in-air samplers are now being used for workplace monitoring and even in some environmental sampling applications. The reliability, convenience, and low cost of passive tritium-oxide-in-air samplers make them attractive options for many monitoring applications. Airflow proportional counters currently under development look promising for measuring tritium-in-air in the presence of high gamma and/or noble gas backgrounds. However, these detectors are currently limited by their poor performance in humidities over 30%. 133 refs

  14. Chemical Method of Urine Volume Measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrack, P.

    1967-01-01

    A system has been developed and qualified as flight hardware for the measurement of micturition volumes voided by crewmen during Gemini missions. This Chemical Urine Volume Measurement System (CUVMS) is used for obtaining samples of each micturition for post-flight volume determination and laboratory analysis for chemical constituents of physiological interest. The system is versatile with respect to volumes measured, with a capacity beyond the largest micturition expected to be encountered, and with respect to mission duration of inherently indefinite length. The urine sample is used for the measurement of total micturition volume by a tracer dilution technique, in which a fixed, predetermined amount of tritiated water is introduced and mixed into the voided urine, and the resulting concentration of the tracer in the sample is determined with a liquid scintillation spectrometer. The tracer employed does not interfere with the analysis for the chemical constituents of the urine. The CUVMS hardware consists of a four-way selector valve in which an automatically operated tracer metering pump is incorporated, a collection/mixing bag, and tracer storage accumulators. The assembled system interfaces with a urine receiver at the selector valve inlet, sample bags which connect to the side of the selector valve, and a flexible hose which carries the excess urine to the overboard drain connection. Results of testing have demonstrated system volume measurement accuracy within the specification limits of +/-5%, and operating reliability suitable for system use aboard the GT-7 mission, in which it was first used.

  15. VOLUMNECT: measuring volumes with Kinect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintino Ferreira, Beatriz; Griné, Miguel; Gameiro, Duarte; Costeira, João. Paulo; Sousa Santos, Beatriz

    2014-03-01

    This article presents a solution to volume measurement object packing using 3D cameras (such as the Microsoft KinectTM). We target application scenarios, such as warehouses or distribution and logistics companies, where it is important to promptly compute package volumes, yet high accuracy is not pivotal. Our application auto- matically detects cuboid objects using the depth camera data and computes their volume and sorting it allowing space optimization. The proposed methodology applies to a point cloud simple computer vision and image processing methods, as connected components, morphological operations and Harris corner detector, producing encouraging results, namely an accuracy in volume measurement of 8mm. Aspects that can be further improved are identified; nevertheless, the current solution is already promising turning out to be cost effective for the envisaged scenarios.

  16. Statistical sampling for holdup measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Picard, R.R.; Pillay, K.K.S.

    1986-01-01

    Nuclear materials holdup is a serious problem in many operating facilities. Estimating amounts of holdup is important for materials accounting and, sometimes, for process safety. Clearly, measuring holdup in all pieces of equipment is not a viable option in terms of time, money, and radiation exposure to personnel. Furthermore, 100% measurement is not only impractical but unnecessary for developing estimated values. Principles of statistical sampling are valuable in the design of cost effective holdup monitoring plans and in qualifying uncertainties in holdup estimates. The purpose of this paper is to describe those principles and to illustrate their use

  17. Volume and mass measurements of liquids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zander, M.

    1987-12-01

    The report comprises the 10 lectures given at the 74th PTB seminar, which represent the state of the art in the field of liquid flow measurement. The lectures deal with the overflow-pipette as the primary volume standard of PTB, gas elimination devices (compulsory in measuring assemblies with volume meters), measuring assemblies for the reception of milk, electromagnetic flowmeters, vortex-shedding meters, indirect mass measurement from volume and density, direct mass measurement (coriolis flowmeters), pipeline-measurements, level measurement at storage tanks with conventional and optical methods and a development aid project for the set up of test rigs in India. (orig.) [de

  18. Lung volumes: measurement, clinical use, and coding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flesch, Judd D; Dine, C Jessica

    2012-08-01

    Measurement of lung volumes is an integral part of complete pulmonary function testing. Some lung volumes can be measured during spirometry; however, measurement of the residual volume (RV), functional residual capacity (FRC), and total lung capacity (TLC) requires special techniques. FRC is typically measured by one of three methods. Body plethysmography uses Boyle's Law to determine lung volumes, whereas inert gas dilution and nitrogen washout use dilution properties of gases. After determination of FRC, expiratory reserve volume and inspiratory vital capacity are measured, which allows the calculation of the RV and TLC. Lung volumes are commonly used for the diagnosis of restriction. In obstructive lung disease, they are used to assess for hyperinflation. Changes in lung volumes can also be seen in a number of other clinical conditions. Reimbursement for measurement of lung volumes requires knowledge of current procedural terminology (CPT) codes, relevant indications, and an appropriate level of physician supervision. Because of recent efforts to eliminate payment inefficiencies, the 10 previous CPT codes for lung volumes, airway resistance, and diffusing capacity have been bundled into four new CPT codes.

  19. Volume Inequalities for Isotropic Measures

    OpenAIRE

    Lutwak, Erwin; Yang, Deane; Zhang, Gaoyong

    2006-01-01

    A direct approach to Ball's simplex inequality is presented. This approach, which does not use the Brascamp-Lieb inequality, also gives Barthe's characterization of the simplex for Ball's inequality and extends it from discrete to arbitrary measures. It also yields the dual inequality, along with equality conditions, and it does both for arbitrary measures.

  20. Volume Ray Casting with Peak Finding and Differential Sampling

    KAUST Repository

    Knoll, A.; Hijazi, Y.; Westerteiger, R.; Schott, M.; Hansen, C.; Hagen, H.

    2009-01-01

    classification. In this paper, we introduce a method for rendering such features by explicitly solving for isovalues within the volume rendering integral. In addition, we present a sampling strategy inspired by ray differentials that automatically matches

  1. TRU Waste Sampling Program: Volume I. Waste characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clements, T.L. Jr.; Kudera, D.E.

    1985-09-01

    Volume I of the TRU Waste Sampling Program report presents the waste characterization information obtained from sampling and characterizing various aged transuranic waste retrieved from storage at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory and the Los Alamos National Laboratory. The data contained in this report include the results of gas sampling and gas generation, radiographic examinations, waste visual examination results, and waste compliance with the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant-Waste Acceptance Criteria (WIPP-WAC). A separate report, Volume II, contains data from the gas generation studies

  2. Cerebrospinal fluid volume measurements in hydrocephalic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basati, Sukhraaj; Desai, Bhargav; Alaraj, Ali; Charbel, Fady; Linninger, Andreas

    2012-10-01

    Object Experimental data about the evolution of intracranial volume and pressure in cases of hydrocephalus are limited due to the lack of available monitoring techniques. In this study, the authors validate intracranial CSF volume measurements within the lateral ventricle, while simultaneously using impedance sensors and pressure transducers in hydrocephalic animals. Methods A volume sensor was fabricated and connected to a catheter that was used as a shunt to withdraw CSF. In vitro bench-top calibration experiments were created to provide data for the animal experiments and to validate the sensors. To validate the measurement technique in a physiological system, hydrocephalus was induced in weanling rats by kaolin injection into the cisterna magna. At 28 days after induction, the sensor was implanted into the lateral ventricles. After sealing the skull using dental cement, an acute CSF drainage/infusion protocol consisting of 4 sequential phases was performed with a pump. Implant location was confirmed via radiography using intraventricular iohexol contrast administration. Results Controlled CSF shunting in vivo with hydrocephalic rats resulted in precise and accurate sensor measurements (r = 0.98). Shunting resulted in a 17.3% maximum measurement error between measured volume and actual volume as assessed by a Bland-Altman plot. A secondary outcome confirmed that both ventricular volume and intracranial pressure decreased during CSF shunting and increased during infusion. Ventricular enlargement consistent with successful hydrocephalus induction was confirmed using imaging, as well as postmortem. These results indicate that volume monitoring is feasible for clinical cases of hydrocephalus. Conclusions This work marks a departure from traditional shunting systems currently used to treat hydrocephalus. The overall clinical application is to provide alternative monitoring and treatment options for patients. Future work includes development and testing of a chronic

  3. Automated force volume image processing for biological samples.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavel Polyakov

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Atomic force microscopy (AFM has now become a powerful technique for investigating on a molecular level, surface forces, nanomechanical properties of deformable particles, biomolecular interactions, kinetics, and dynamic processes. This paper specifically focuses on the analysis of AFM force curves collected on biological systems, in particular, bacteria. The goal is to provide fully automated tools to achieve theoretical interpretation of force curves on the basis of adequate, available physical models. In this respect, we propose two algorithms, one for the processing of approach force curves and another for the quantitative analysis of retraction force curves. In the former, electrostatic interactions prior to contact between AFM probe and bacterium are accounted for and mechanical interactions operating after contact are described in terms of Hertz-Hooke formalism. Retraction force curves are analyzed on the basis of the Freely Jointed Chain model. For both algorithms, the quantitative reconstruction of force curves is based on the robust detection of critical points (jumps, changes of slope or changes of curvature which mark the transitions between the various relevant interactions taking place between the AFM tip and the studied sample during approach and retraction. Once the key regions of separation distance and indentation are detected, the physical parameters describing the relevant interactions operating in these regions are extracted making use of regression procedure for fitting experiments to theory. The flexibility, accuracy and strength of the algorithms are illustrated with the processing of two force-volume images, which collect a large set of approach and retraction curves measured on a single biological surface. For each force-volume image, several maps are generated, representing the spatial distribution of the searched physical parameters as estimated for each pixel of the force-volume image.

  4. MRI volume measurement of basal ganglia volumes in patients with Tourette's syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Jie; Li Kuncheng; Cao Yanxiang; Zhang Miao; Sui Xin; Zhang Xiaohua

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate MRI measurement of basal ganglia volumes in patients with Tourette's syndrome. Methods: Ten patients with Tourette's syndrome (TS) and 10 healthy volunteers were studied. Volumes of bilateral caudate, putamen and pallidum were measured, and the results were analyzed using paired t test. The basal ganglia volume was normalized according to individual brain volume. The basal ganglia volumes of TS patients were compared with normal control group using independent-sample t test. Results: In 10 healthy volunteers, volumes of the left caudate, putamen, pallidum were significantly larger compared with those of the right side (P 0.05) in TS patients. After normalized processing, the volumes of the left caudate (7.06 ± 0.48) cm 3 , putamen (8.81±1.01) cm 3 , pallidum (2.64± 0.38) cm 3 were smaller than those of control group [caudate (11.05±1.86) cm 3 , putamen (9.97± 1.11) cm 3 , pallidum (3.04±0.37) cm 3 ] (t=-6.577, -2.457, -2.376, P 3 in TS patients was significantly smaller compared with the control group (9.81±1.83) cm 3 (t=-4.258, P 0.05). Conclusion: The basal ganglia volumes were significantly decreased in patients with TS. MRI volumetric measurement was an important tool for evaluating pathologic changes of TS. (authors)

  5. Measurable inhomogeneities in stock trading volume flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortines, A. A. G.; Riera, R.; Anteneodo, C.

    2008-08-01

    We investigate the statistics of volumes of shares traded in stock markets. We show that the stochastic process of trading volumes can be understood on the basis of a mixed Poisson process at the microscopic time level. The beta distribution of the second kind (also known as q-gamma distribution), that has been proposed to describe empirical volume histograms, naturally results from our analysis. In particular, the shape of the distribution at small volumes is governed by the degree of granularity in the trading process, while the exponent controlling the tail is a measure of the inhomogeneities in market activity. Furthermore, the present case furnishes empirical evidence of how power law probability distributions can arise as a consequence of a fluctuating intrinsic parameter.

  6. Flow rate measurement in a volume

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galvez, Cristhian

    2018-04-17

    A system for measuring flow rate within a volume includes one or more transmission devices that transmit one or more signals through fluid contained within the volume. The volume may be bounded, at least in part, by an outer structure and by an object at least partially contained within the outer structure. A transmission device located at a first location of the outer structure transmits a first signal to a second location of the outer structure. A second signal is transmitted through the fluid from the second location to a third location of the outer structure. The flow rate of the fluid within the volume may be determined based, at least in part, on the time of flight of both the first signal and the second signal.

  7. A low-volume cavity ring-down spectrometer for sample-limited applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stowasser, C.; Farinas, A. D.; Ware, J.; Wistisen, D. W.; Rella, C.; Wahl, E.; Crosson, E.; Blunier, T.

    2014-08-01

    In atmospheric and environmental sciences, optical spectrometers are used for the measurements of greenhouse gas mole fractions and the isotopic composition of water vapor or greenhouse gases. The large sample cell volumes (tens of milliliters to several liters) in commercially available spectrometers constrain the usefulness of such instruments for applications that are limited in sample size and/or need to track fast variations in the sample stream. In an effort to make spectrometers more suitable for sample-limited applications, we developed a low-volume analyzer capable of measuring mole fractions of methane and carbon monoxide based on a commercial cavity ring-down spectrometer. The instrument has a small sample cell (9.6 ml) and can selectively be operated at a sample cell pressure of 140, 45, or 20 Torr (effective internal volume of 1.8, 0.57, and 0.25 ml). We present the new sample cell design and the flow path configuration, which are optimized for small sample sizes. To quantify the spectrometer's usefulness for sample-limited applications, we determine the renewal rate of sample molecules within the low-volume spectrometer. Furthermore, we show that the performance of the low-volume spectrometer matches the performance of the standard commercial analyzers by investigating linearity, precision, and instrumental drift.

  8. Sample to moderator volume ratio effects in neutron yield from a PGNAA setup

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naqvi, A.A. [Department of Physics, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, KFUPM Box 1815, Dhahran-31261 (Saudi Arabia)]. E-mail: aanaqvi@kfupm.edu.sa; Fazal-ur-Rehman [Department of Physics, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, KFUPM Box 1815, Dhahran-31261 (Saudi Arabia); Nagadi, M.M. [Department of Physics, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, KFUPM Box 1815, Dhahran-31261 (Saudi Arabia); Khateeb-ur-Rehman [Department of Physics, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, KFUPM Box 1815, Dhahran-31261 (Saudi Arabia)

    2007-02-15

    Performance of a prompt gamma ray neutron activation analysis (PGNAA) setup depends upon thermal neutron yield at the PGNAA sample location. For a moderator, which encloses a sample, thermal neutron intensity depends upon the effective moderator volume excluding the void volume due to sample volume. A rectangular moderator assembly has been designed for the King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals (KFUPM) PGNAA setup. The thermal and fast neutron yield has been measured inside the sample cavity as a function of its front moderator thickness using alpha particle tracks density and recoil proton track density inside the CR-39 nuclear track detectors (NTDs). The thermal/fast neutron yield ratio, obtained from the alpha particle tracks density to proton tracks density ratio in the NTDs, shows an inverse correlation with sample to moderator volume ratio. Comparison of the present results with the previously published results of smaller moderators of the KFUPM PGNAA setup confirms the observation.

  9. Mounting Thin Samples For Electrical Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matus, L. G.; Summers, R. L.

    1988-01-01

    New method for mounting thin sample for electrical measurements involves use of vacuum chuck to hold a ceramic mounting plate, which holds sample. Contacts on mounting plate establish electrical connection to sample. Used to make electrical measurements over temperature range from 77 to 1,000 K and does not introduce distortions into magnetic field during Hall measurements.

  10. Liquid volumes measurements by isotopic dilution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herrera M, J.M.

    1981-01-01

    By the nuclear technique, isotopic dilution industrial liquid volumes may be measured in large size recipients of irregular shapes using radiotracers. In the present work laboratory and pilot test are made with 2 radiotracers for optimizing the technique and later done on an industrial scale, obtaining a maximum deviation of +-2%, some recommendations are given to improve the performance of the technique. (author)

  11. Comparison of uncertainties related to standardization of urine samples with volume and creatinine concentration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garde, Anne Helene; Hansen, Ase Marie; Kristiansen, Jesper

    2004-01-01

    When measuring biomarkers in urine, volume (and time) or concentration of creatinine are both accepted methods of standardization for diuresis. Both types of standardization contribute uncertainty to the final result. The aim of the present paper was to compare the uncertainty introduced when usi...... increase in convenience for the participants, when collecting small volumes rather than complete 24 h samples....... the two types of standardization on 24 h samples from healthy individuals. Estimates of uncertainties were based on results from the literature supplemented with data from our own studies. Only the difference in uncertainty related to the two standardization methods was evaluated. It was found...... that the uncertainty associated with creatinine standardization (19-35%) was higher than the uncertainty related to volume standardization (up to 10%, when not correcting for deviations from 24 h) for 24 h urine samples. However, volume standardization introduced an average bias of 4% due to missed volumes...

  12. Volume-weighted measure for eternal inflation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winitzki, Sergei

    2008-01-01

    I propose a new volume-weighted probability measure for cosmological 'multiverse' scenarios involving eternal inflation. The 'reheating-volume (RV) cutoff' calculates the distribution of observable quantities on a portion of the reheating hypersurface that is conditioned to be finite. The RV measure is gauge-invariant, does not suffer from the 'youngness paradox', and is independent of initial conditions at the beginning of inflation. In slow-roll inflationary models with a scalar inflaton, the RV-regulated probability distributions can be obtained by solving nonlinear diffusion equations. I discuss possible applications of the new measure to 'landscape' scenarios with bubble nucleation. As an illustration, I compute the predictions of the RV measure in a simple toy landscape.

  13. Method of measuring a liquid pool volume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, G.V.; Carlson, N.M.; Donaldson, A.D.

    1991-03-19

    A method of measuring a molten metal liquid pool volume and in particular molten titanium liquid pools is disclosed, including the steps of (a) generating an ultrasonic wave at the surface of the molten metal liquid pool, (b) shining a light on the surface of a molten metal liquid pool, (c) detecting a change in the frequency of light, (d) detecting an ultrasonic wave echo at the surface of the molten metal liquid pool, and (e) computing the volume of the molten metal liquid. 3 figures.

  14. Volume Ray Casting with Peak Finding and Differential Sampling

    KAUST Repository

    Knoll, A.

    2009-11-01

    Direct volume rendering and isosurfacing are ubiquitous rendering techniques in scientific visualization, commonly employed in imaging 3D data from simulation and scan sources. Conventionally, these methods have been treated as separate modalities, necessitating different sampling strategies and rendering algorithms. In reality, an isosurface is a special case of a transfer function, namely a Dirac impulse at a given isovalue. However, artifact-free rendering of discrete isosurfaces in a volume rendering framework is an elusive goal, requiring either infinite sampling or smoothing of the transfer function. While preintegration approaches solve the most obvious deficiencies in handling sharp transfer functions, artifacts can still result, limiting classification. In this paper, we introduce a method for rendering such features by explicitly solving for isovalues within the volume rendering integral. In addition, we present a sampling strategy inspired by ray differentials that automatically matches the frequency of the image plane, resulting in fewer artifacts near the eye and better overall performance. These techniques exhibit clear advantages over standard uniform ray casting with and without preintegration, and allow for high-quality interactive volume rendering with sharp C0 transfer functions. © 2009 IEEE.

  15. Absolute activity determinations on large volume geological samples independent of self-absorption effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, W.E.

    1980-01-01

    This paper describes a method for measuring the absolute activity of large volume samples by γ-spectroscopy independent of self-absorption effects using Ge detectors. The method yields accurate matrix independent results at the expense of replicative counting of the unknown sample. (orig./HP)

  16. The Use of Helmholtz Resonance for Measuring the Volume of Liquids and Solids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clive E. Davies

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available An experimental investigation was undertaken to ascertain the potential of using Helmholtz resonance for volume determination and the factors that may influence accuracy. The uses for a rapid non-interference volume measurement system range from agricultural produce and mineral sampling through to liquid fill measurements. By weighing the sample the density can also measured indirectly.

  17. Ocular volume measured by CT scans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hahn, F.J.; Wei-Kom Chu

    1984-01-01

    Newer CT scans have greatly enhanced oculometric research and made it possible to measure ocular dimensions. With these measurements, ocular volume can be more accurately estimated to understand its relationship with age and sex. One hundred CT orbit scans with presumed normal eyes were used for the data base. The mean values and normal variations of ocular volumes at various ages in both sexes are presented. Rapid growth of the eyeball was noted during the first 24 months of age. It reached its peak between the ages of 18 and 30 years of age, after which there was a reduction. Results may be of help in recognizing eye abnormalities such as microophthalmus and macrophthalmia. (orig.)

  18. Prostate volume measurement by TRUS using heights obtained by transaxial and midsagittal scaning: comparison with specimen volume following radical prostatectomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Bung Bin; Kim, Jae Kyun; Choi, Sung Hoon; Noh, Han Na; Ji, Eun Kyung; Cho, Kyoung Sik

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine, when measuring prostate volume by TRUS, whether height is more accurately determined by transaxial or midsagittal scanning. Sixteen patients who between March 1995 and March 1998 underwent both preoperative TRUS and radical prostatectomy for prostate cancer were included in this study. Using prolate ellipse volume calculation (height x length x width x π/6), TRUS prostate volume was determined, and was compared with the measured volume of the specimen. Prostate volume measured by TRUS, regardless of whether height was determined transaxially or midsagittally, correlated closely with real specimen volume. When height was measured in one of these planes, a paired t test revealed no significant difference between TRUS prostate volume and real specimen volume (p = .411 and p = .740, respectively), nor were there significant differences between the findings of transaxial and midsagittal scanning (p = .570). A paired sample test, however, indicated that TRUS prostate volumes determined transaxially showed a higher correlation coefficient (0.833) and a lower standard deviation (9.04) than those determined midsagittally (0.714 and 11.48, respectively). Prostate volume measured by TRUS closely correlates with real prostate volume. Furthermore, we suggest that when measuring prostate volume in this way, height is more accurately determined by transaxial than by midsagittal scanning

  19. Sample volume and alignment analysis for an optical particle counter sizer, and other applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holve, D.J.; Davis, G.W.

    1985-01-01

    Optical methods for particle size distribution measurements in practical high temperature environments are approaching feasibility and offer significant advantages over conventional sampling methods. A key requirement of single particle counting techniques is the need to know features of the sample volume intensity distribution which in general are a function of the particle scattering properties and optical system geometry. In addition, the sample volume intensity distribution is sensitive to system alignment and thus calculations of alignment sensitivity are required for assessment of practical alignment tolerances. To this end, an analysis of sample volume characteristics for single particle counters in general has been developed. Results from the theory are compared with experimental measurements and shown to be in good agreement. A parametric sensitivity analysis is performed and a criterion for allowable optical misalignment is derived for conditions where beam steering caused by fluctuating refractive-index gradients is significant

  20. Sampling soils for 137Cs using various field-sampling volumes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nyhan, J.W.; Schofield, T.G.; White, G.C.; Trujillo, G.

    1981-10-01

    The sediments from a liquid effluent receiving area at the Los Alamos National Laboratory and soils from intensive study area in the fallout pathway of Trinity were sampled for 137 Cs using 25-, 500-, 2500-, and 12 500-cm 3 field sampling volumes. A highly replicated sampling program was used to determine mean concentrations and inventories of 137 Cs at each site, as well as estimates of spatial, aliquoting, and counting variance components of the radionuclide data. The sampling methods were also analyzed as a function of soil size fractions collected in each field sampling volume and of the total cost of the program for a given variation in the radionuclide survey results. Coefficients of variation (CV) of 137 Cs inventory estimates ranged from 0.063 to 0.14 for Mortandad Canyon sediments, where CV values for Trinity soils were observed from 0.38 to 0.57. Spatial variance components of 137 Cs concentration data were usually found to be larger than either the aliquoting or counting variance estimates and were inversely related to field sampling volume at the Trinity intensive site. Subsequent optimization studies of the sampling schemes demonstrated that each aliquot should be counted once, and that only 2 to 4 aliquots out of an many as 30 collected need be assayed for 137 Cs. The optimization studies showed that as sample costs increased to 45 man-hours of labor per sample, the variance of the mean 137 Cs concentration decreased dramatically, but decreased very little with additional labor

  1. Gaseous radiocarbon measurements of small samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruff, M.; Szidat, S.; Gaeggeler, H.W.; Suter, M.; Synal, H.-A.; Wacker, L.

    2010-01-01

    Radiocarbon dating by means of accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) is a well-established method for samples containing carbon in the milligram range. However, the measurement of small samples containing less than 50 μg carbon often fails. It is difficult to graphitise these samples and the preparation is prone to contamination. To avoid graphitisation, a solution can be the direct measurement of carbon dioxide. The MICADAS, the smallest accelerator for radiocarbon dating in Zurich, is equipped with a hybrid Cs sputter ion source. It allows the measurement of both, graphite targets and gaseous CO 2 samples, without any rebuilding. This work presents experiences dealing with small samples containing 1-40 μg carbon. 500 unknown samples of different environmental research fields have been measured yet. Most of the samples were measured with the gas ion source. These data are compared with earlier measurements of small graphite samples. The performance of the two different techniques is discussed and main contributions to the blank determined. An analysis of blank and standard data measured within years allowed a quantification of the contamination, which was found to be of the order of 55 ng and 750 ng carbon (50 pMC) for the gaseous and the graphite samples, respectively. For quality control, a number of certified standards were measured using the gas ion source to demonstrate reliability of the data.

  2. A Volume-Limited Sample of L and T Dwarfs Defined by Parallaxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Best, William M. J.; Liu, Michael C.; Magnier, Eugene; Dupuy, Trent

    2018-01-01

    Volume-limited samples are the gold standard for stellar population studies, as they enable unbiased measurements of space densities and luminosity functions. Parallaxes are the most direct measures of distance and are therefore essential for defining high-confidence volume limited samples. Previous efforts to model the local brown dwarf population were hampered by samples based on a small number of parallaxes. We are using UKIRT/WFCAM to conduct the largest near-infrared program to date to measure parallaxes and proper motions of L and T dwarfs. For the past 3+ years we have monitored over 350 targets, ≈90% of which are too faint to be observed by Gaia. We present preliminary results from our observations. Our program more than doubles the number of known L and T dwarf parallaxes, defining a volume-limited sample of ≈400 L0-T6 dwarfs out to 25 parsecs, the first L and T dwarf sample of this size and depth based entirely on parallaxes. Our sample will combine with the upcoming stellar census from Gaia DR2 parallaxes to form a complete volume-limited sample of nearby stars and brown dwarfs.

  3. Pulsed Direct Current Electrospray: Enabling Systematic Analysis of Small Volume Sample by Boosting Sample Economy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Zhenwei; Xiong, Xingchuang; Guo, Chengan; Si, Xingyu; Zhao, Yaoyao; He, Muyi; Yang, Chengdui; Xu, Wei; Tang, Fei; Fang, Xiang; Zhang, Sichun; Zhang, Xinrong

    2015-11-17

    We had developed pulsed direct current electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (pulsed-dc-ESI-MS) for systematically profiling and determining components in small volume sample. Pulsed-dc-ESI utilized constant high voltage to induce the generation of single polarity pulsed electrospray remotely. This method had significantly boosted the sample economy, so as to obtain several minutes MS signal duration from merely picoliter volume sample. The elongated MS signal duration enable us to collect abundant MS(2) information on interested components in a small volume sample for systematical analysis. This method had been successfully applied for single cell metabolomics analysis. We had obtained 2-D profile of metabolites (including exact mass and MS(2) data) from single plant and mammalian cell, concerning 1034 components and 656 components for Allium cepa and HeLa cells, respectively. Further identification had found 162 compounds and 28 different modification groups of 141 saccharides in a single Allium cepa cell, indicating pulsed-dc-ESI a powerful tool for small volume sample systematical analysis.

  4. Device for radioactivity measurement of liquid samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lamaziere, J.

    1983-01-01

    The device for low activity gamma measurements comprises an automatic changer for sample transfer from a conveyor to a measuring chamber. The conveyor includes a horizontal table were are regularly distributed sample holders. A lift allows a vertical motion of a plate for the exposition in front of a detector [fr

  5. Advances in Radiocarbon Measurement of Water Samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janovics, R.; Molnar, M.; Major, I. [Institute of Nuclear Research (ATO MKI), Hungarian Academy of Sciences, H-4001 Debrecen (Hungary); Svetlik, I. [Department of Radiation Dosimetry, Nuclear Physics Institute AS CR, Prague (Czech Republic); Wacker, L. [Institute for Particle Physics, ETH Hoenggerberg, Zuerich (Switzerland)

    2013-07-15

    In this paper two very different and novel methods for the {sup 14}C measurement of water samples are presented. The first method uses direct absorption into a scintillation cocktail and a following liquid scintillation measurement. Typical sample size is 20-40 L and overall uncertainty is {+-} 2% for modern samples. It is a very cost effective and easy to use method based on a novel and simple static absorption process for the CO{sub 2} extracted from groundwater. The other very sensitive method is based on accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) using a gas ion source. With a MICADAS type AMS system we demonstrated that you can routinely measure the {sup 14}C content of 1 mL of water sample with better than 1% precision (for a modern sample). This direct {sup 14}C AMS measurement of water takes less than 20 minutes including sample preparation. (author)

  6. Measurement of neutron activation in concrete samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zagar, T.; Ravnik, M.

    2000-01-01

    The results of activation studies of ordinary and barytes concrete samples relevant for research reactor decommissioning are given. Five important long-lived radioactive isotopes ( 54 Mn, 60 Co, 65 Zn, 133 Ba, and 152 Eu) were identified from the gamma-ray spectra measured in the irradiated concrete samples. Activation of these samples was also calculated using ORIGEN2 code. Comparison of calculated and measured results is given. (author)

  7. Influence of volume of sample processed on detection of Chlamydia trachomatis in urogenital samples by PCR

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goessens, W H; Kluytmans, J A; den Toom, N; van Rijsoort-Vos, T H; Niesters, B G; Stolz, E; Verbrugh, H A; Quint, W G

    In the present study, it was demonstrated that the sensitivity of the PCR for the detection of Chlamydia trachomatis is influenced by the volume of the clinical sample which is processed in the PCR. An adequate sensitivity for PCR was established by processing at least 4%, i.e., 80 microliters, of

  8. An antithetic variate to facilitate upper-stem height measurements for critical height sampling with importance sampling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas B. Lynch; Jeffrey H. Gove

    2013-01-01

    Critical height sampling (CHS) estimates cubic volume per unit area by multiplying the sum of critical heights measured on trees tallied in a horizontal point sample (HPS) by the HPS basal area factor. One of the barriers to practical application of CHS is the fact that trees near the field location of the point-sampling sample point have critical heights that occur...

  9. An evaluation of soil sampling for 137Cs using various field-sampling volumes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyhan, J W; White, G C; Schofield, T G; Trujillo, G

    1983-05-01

    The sediments from a liquid effluent receiving area at the Los Alamos National Laboratory and soils from an intensive study area in the fallout pathway of Trinity were sampled for 137Cs using 25-, 500-, 2500- and 12,500-cm3 field sampling volumes. A highly replicated sampling program was used to determine mean concentrations and inventories of 137Cs at each site, as well as estimates of spatial, aliquoting, and counting variance components of the radionuclide data. The sampling methods were also analyzed as a function of soil size fractions collected in each field sampling volume and of the total cost of the program for a given variation in the radionuclide survey results. Coefficients of variation (CV) of 137Cs inventory estimates ranged from 0.063 to 0.14 for Mortandad Canyon sediments, whereas CV values for Trinity soils were observed from 0.38 to 0.57. Spatial variance components of 137Cs concentration data were usually found to be larger than either the aliquoting or counting variance estimates and were inversely related to field sampling volume at the Trinity intensive site. Subsequent optimization studies of the sampling schemes demonstrated that each aliquot should be counted once, and that only 2-4 aliquots out of as many as 30 collected need be assayed for 137Cs. The optimization studies showed that as sample costs increased to 45 man-hours of labor per sample, the variance of the mean 137Cs concentration decreased dramatically, but decreased very little with additional labor.

  10. Robust weak measurements on finite samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tollaksen, Jeff

    2007-01-01

    A new weak measurement procedure is introduced for finite samples which yields accurate weak values that are outside the range of eigenvalues and which do not require an exponentially rare ensemble. This procedure provides a unique advantage in the amplification of small nonrandom signals by minimizing uncertainties in determining the weak value and by minimizing sample size. This procedure can also extend the strength of the coupling between the system and measuring device to a new regime

  11. Witness sample preparation for measuring antireflection coatings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willey, Ronald R

    2014-02-01

    Measurement of antireflection coating of witness samples from across the worldwide industry has been shown to have excess variability from a sampling taken for the OSA Topical Meeting on Optical Interference Coatings: Measurement Problem. Various sample preparation techniques have been discussed with their limitations, and a preferred technique is recommended with its justification, calibration procedures, and limitations. The common practice of grinding the second side to reduce its reflection is less than satisfactory. One recommended practice is to paint the polished second side, which reduces its reflection to almost zero. A method to evaluate the suitability of given paints is also described.

  12. Sampling Criterion for EMC Near Field Measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Franek, Ondrej; Sørensen, Morten; Ebert, Hans

    2012-01-01

    An alternative, quasi-empirical sampling criterion for EMC near field measurements intended for close coupling investigations is proposed. The criterion is based on maximum error caused by sub-optimal sampling of near fields in the vicinity of an elementary dipole, which is suggested as a worst......-case representative of a signal trace on a typical printed circuit board. It has been found that the sampling density derived in this way is in fact very similar to that given by the antenna near field sampling theorem, if an error less than 1 dB is required. The principal advantage of the proposed formulation is its...

  13. 36Cl measurements of Hiroshima concrete samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuhiro, T.; Nagashima, Y.; Seki, R.; Takahashi, T.

    2002-01-01

    The 36 Cl AMS studies are reported. A new steps of procedure of a sample preparation is developed and a tremendous reduction of sulphur background has been achieved. The 36 Cl contents of two atomic bombed concrete samples, old Hiroshima Bank one and Gokoku Shrine one, have been measured as a function of 36 Cl to Cl ratio by the Tsukuba AMS system. The 36 Cl to Cl ratio of the old Hiroshima Bank sample shows very nice agreement with the result of γ measurement of 152 Eu. Otherwise, the ratio is about 20% smaller than an estimation by the DS86 dosimetry system. A result of the Gokoku Shrine sample is also smaller than a depth profile estimation by the same DS86. It might be clear that the DS86 has a tendency of overestimation. It seems that a calculation method and/or the parameters used in the calculation are requested to be improved. (author)

  14. Radon measurement in Malaysia water samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ibrahim, A.B.; Rosli Mahat; Yusof Md Amin

    1995-01-01

    This paper reported the results of the measurement of radon in local water. The water samples collected were rainwater, river water, seawater, well water or ground water at area of State of Selangor and Kuala Lumpur. The samples were collected in scintillation cell ZnS(Ag) through Radon Degassing Unit RDU 200. Alpha activity was counted with scintillation counters RD 200 at energy 5.5 MeV. (author)

  15. The effects of spatial sampling choices on MR temperature measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todd, Nick; Vyas, Urvi; de Bever, Josh; Payne, Allison; Parker, Dennis L

    2011-02-01

    The purpose of this article is to quantify the effects that spatial sampling parameters have on the accuracy of magnetic resonance temperature measurements during high intensity focused ultrasound treatments. Spatial resolution and position of the sampling grid were considered using experimental and simulated data for two different types of high intensity focused ultrasound heating trajectories (a single point and a 4-mm circle) with maximum measured temperature and thermal dose volume as the metrics. It is demonstrated that measurement accuracy is related to the curvature of the temperature distribution, where regions with larger spatial second derivatives require higher resolution. The location of the sampling grid relative temperature distribution has a significant effect on the measured values. When imaging at 1.0 × 1.0 × 3.0 mm(3) resolution, the measured values for maximum temperature and volume dosed to 240 cumulative equivalent minutes (CEM) or greater varied by 17% and 33%, respectively, for the single-point heating case, and by 5% and 18%, respectively, for the 4-mm circle heating case. Accurate measurement of the maximum temperature required imaging at 1.0 × 1.0 × 3.0 mm(3) resolution for the single-point heating case and 2.0 × 2.0 × 5.0 mm(3) resolution for the 4-mm circle heating case. Copyright © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  16. Measurement of synovial fluid volume using urea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraus, V B; Stabler, T V; Kong, S Y; Varju, G; McDaniel, G

    2007-10-01

    To examine the utility of using urea concentrations for determining Synovial Fluid (SF) joint volume in effused and non-effused joints. Knee joint SF was aspirated from 159 human study participants with symptomatic osteoarthritis of at least one knee either directly (165 knees) or by lavage (110 knees). Serum was obtained immediately prior to SF aspiration. Participants were asked to rate individual knee pain, aching or stiffness. SF and serum urea levels were determined using a specific enzymatic method run on an automated CMA600 analyzer. Cell counts were performed on direct SF aspirates when volume permitted. The formula for calculating SF joint volume was as follows: V(j)=C(D)(V(I))/(C-C(D)) with V(j)=volume of SF in entire joint, C(D)=concentration of urea in diluted (lavage) SF, V(I)=volume of saline injected into joint, and C=concentration of urea in undiluted (neat) SF derived below where C=0.897(C(S)) and C(s)=concentration of urea in serum. There was an excellent correlation (r(2)=0.8588) between SF and serum urea in the direct aspirates with a ratio of 0.897 (SF/serum). Neither urea levels nor the SF/serum ratio showed any correlation with Kellgren Lawrence (KL) grade, or cell count. While urea levels increased with age there was no change in the ratio. Intraarticular SF volumes calculated for the lavaged knees ranged from 0.555 to 71.71ml with a median volume of 3.048ml. There was no correlation of SF volume to KL grade but there was a positive correlation (P=0.001) between SF volume and self-reported individual knee pain. Our urea results for direct aspirates indicate an equilibrium state between serum and SF with regard to the water fraction. This equilibrium exists regardless of disease status (KL grade), inflammation (cell count), or age, making it possible to calculate intraarticular volume of lavaged joints based upon this urea method. Most of the joint volumes we calculated fell within the previously reported range for normal knees of 0.5-4.0ml

  17. Measurement of volume and flow in the digestive tract

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dixon, R.M.; Kennedy, P.M.; Milligan, L.P.

    1983-01-01

    Measurement of digesta volume and flow in the gastro-intestinal tract of ruminants may be achieved by either of two methods. The first involves total recovery of digesta through a cannula with gravimetric and physical (sieving) analysis. Alternatively, the flow of digesta may be estimated by reference to markers, with digesta samples taken through a T-shaped or re-entral intestinal cannula. The second approach assumes steady nutritional conditions, with the movement of digesta fractions estimated from the disappearance of specific markers. The adequacy of markers currently available for this purpose is discussed. Advantages of complementary techniques are emphasized. (author)

  18. Quantitative NMR measurements on core samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olsen, Dan

    1997-01-01

    Within the frame of an EFP-95 project NMR methods for porosity determination in 2D, and for fluid saturation determination in 1D and 2D have been developed. The three methods have been developed and tested on cleaned core samples of chalk from the Danish North Sea. The main restriction for the use of the methods is the inherently short T2 relaxation constants of rock samples. Referring to measurements conducted at 200 MHz, the 2D porosity determination method is applicable to sample material with T2 relaxation constants down to 5 ms. The 1D fluid saturation determination method is applicable to sample material with T2 relaxation constants down to 3 ms, while the 2D fluid saturation determination method is applicable to material with T2 relaxation constants down to 8 ms. In the case of the 2D methods these constraints as a minimum enables work on the majority of chalk samples of Maastrichtian age. The 1D fluid saturation determination method in addition is applicable to at least some chalk samples of Danian and pre-Maastrichtian age. The spatial resolution of the 2D porosity determination method, the 1D fluid saturation methods, and the 2D fluid saturation method is respectively 0.8 mm, 0.8 mm and 2 mm. Reproducibility of pixel values is for all three methods 2%- points. (au)

  19. Ice thickness measurements and volume estimates for glaciers in Norway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreassen, Liss M.; Huss, Matthias; Melvold, Kjetil; Elvehøy, Hallgeir; Winsvold, Solveig H.

    2014-05-01

    glacier units or entire ice caps with sufficient data to interpolate mean ice thickness. Scaling constants c and γ were fitted by least square regression for totally 86 glacier units and 8 ice caps. The ice volume results from scaling were sensitive to how the glaciers are divided and scaling applied to glaciers divided into glacier units gave best results. Scaling laws for ice caps did not work well, as the mean thickness of the ice caps varies less than their areas and the sample of ice caps with sufficient measurement coverage was small. Calculated ice volumes range from 280 to 305 km3, much higher than values obtained from the literature (134-184 km3). As measurements are biased towards outlets from the largest and thickest ice caps, more measurements are needed for a better estimate of the present ice volume of the smaller glaciers.

  20. Brain volume measurement using three-dimensional magnetic resonance images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishimaru, Yoshihiro

    1996-01-01

    This study was designed to validate accurate measurement method of human brain volume using three dimensional (3D) MRI data on a workstation, and to establish optimal correcting method of human brain volume on diagnosis of brain atrophy. 3D MRI data were acquired by fast SPGR sequence using 1.5 T MR imager. 3D MRI data were segmented by region growing method and 3D image was displayed by surface rendering method on the workstation. Brain volume was measured by the volume measurement function of the workstation. In order to validate the accurate measurement method, phantoms and a specimen of human brain were examined. Phantom volume was measured by changing the lower level of threshold value. At the appropriate threshold value, percentage of error of phantoms and the specimen were within 0.6% and 0.08%, respectively. To establish the optimal correcting method, 130 normal volunteers were examined. Brain volumes corrected with height weight, body surface area, and alternative skull volume were evaluated. Brain volume index, which is defined as dividing brain volume by alternative skull volume, had the best correlation with age (r=0.624, p<0.05). No gender differences was observed in brain volume index in contrast to in brain volume. The clinical usefulness of this correcting method for brain atrophy diagnosis was evaluated in 85 patients. Diagnosis by 2D spin echo MR images was compared with brain volume index. Diagnosis of brain atrophy by 2D MR image was concordant with the evaluation by brain volume index. These results indicated that this measurement method had high accuracy, and it was important to set the appropriate threshold value. Brain volume index was the appropriate indication for evaluation of human brain volume, and was considered to be useful for the diagnosis of brain atrophy. (author)

  1. Sampling-based motion planning with reachable volumes: Theoretical foundations

    KAUST Repository

    McMahon, Troy

    2014-05-01

    © 2014 IEEE. We introduce a new concept, reachable volumes, that denotes the set of points that the end effector of a chain or linkage can reach. We show that the reachable volume of a chain is equivalent to the Minkowski sum of the reachable volumes of its links, and give an efficient method for computing reachable volumes. We present a method for generating configurations using reachable volumes that is applicable to various types of robots including open and closed chain robots, tree-like robots, and complex robots including both loops and branches. We also describe how to apply constraints (both on end effectors and internal joints) using reachable volumes. Unlike previous methods, reachable volumes work for spherical and prismatic joints as well as planar joints. Visualizations of reachable volumes can allow an operator to see what positions the robot can reach and can guide robot design. We present visualizations of reachable volumes for representative robots including closed chains and graspers as well as for examples with joint and end effector constraints.

  2. Sampling-based motion planning with reachable volumes: Theoretical foundations

    KAUST Repository

    McMahon, Troy; Thomas, Shawna; Amato, Nancy M.

    2014-01-01

    © 2014 IEEE. We introduce a new concept, reachable volumes, that denotes the set of points that the end effector of a chain or linkage can reach. We show that the reachable volume of a chain is equivalent to the Minkowski sum of the reachable volumes of its links, and give an efficient method for computing reachable volumes. We present a method for generating configurations using reachable volumes that is applicable to various types of robots including open and closed chain robots, tree-like robots, and complex robots including both loops and branches. We also describe how to apply constraints (both on end effectors and internal joints) using reachable volumes. Unlike previous methods, reachable volumes work for spherical and prismatic joints as well as planar joints. Visualizations of reachable volumes can allow an operator to see what positions the robot can reach and can guide robot design. We present visualizations of reachable volumes for representative robots including closed chains and graspers as well as for examples with joint and end effector constraints.

  3. Measurements of plutonium in environmental samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D' Alberti, F; Risposi, L [Instituto di Fisica Applicata, University of Milan, Milan (Italy)

    1996-01-01

    Within the activities connected with the start up of the PETRA Laboratory (Processo per l'Estrazione di Terre Rare ed Attinidi, i.e. process for extraction of rare earths and actinides), the Radiation Protection Unit of the J.R.C.-Ispra has carried out a well planned set of experimental measurements aimed at evaluating the zero point of the isotopes of plutonium in environmental samples by alfa spectrometry. After the International Moratorium in 1963, no release of plutonium has occurred in the environment apart from the burn up of SNAP 9A satellite in April 1964. Since then the plutonium concentration in air and in fallout samples has been continuously decreasing requiring, therefore, optimization of both instrumentation and experimental measurement procedures in order to obtain better sensibilities. In this work, the experimental methodology followed at the J.R.C.-Ispra for measurements of plutonium concentration in air, deposition and soil is described and the plutonium behaviour in these samples is reported and discussed starting from 1961.

  4. Measurements of plutonium in environmental samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Alberti, F.; Risposi, L.

    1996-01-01

    Within the activities connected with the start up of the PETRA Laboratory (Processo per l'Estrazione di Terre Rare ed Attinidi, i.e. process for extraction of rare earths and actinides), the Radiation Protection Unit of the J.R.C.-Ispra has carried out a well planned set of experimental measurements aimed at evaluating the zero point of the isotopes of plutonium in environmental samples by alfa spectrometry. After the International Moratorium in 1963, no release of plutonium has occurred in the environment apart from the burn up of SNAP 9A satellite in April 1964. Since then the plutonium concentration in air and in fallout samples has been continuously decreasing requiring, therefore, optimization of both instrumentation and experimental measurement procedures in order to obtain better sensibilities. In this work, the experimental methodology followed at the J.R.C.-Ispra for measurements of plutonium concentration in air, deposition and soil is described and the plutonium behaviour in these samples is reported and discussed starting from 1961

  5. Known volume air sampling pump. Final summary report Jun 1975--Nov 1976

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCullough, J.E.; Peterson, A.

    1976-11-01

    The purpose of this development program was to design and develop a known volume air sampling pump for use in measuring the amount of radioactive material in the atmosphere of an underground uranium mine. The principal nuclear radiation hazard to underground uranium mines comes from the mine atmosphere. Daughter products of radon-222 are inhaled by the miner resulting in a relatively high lung cancer rate among these workers. Current exposure control practice employs spot sampling in working areas to measure working level values. Currently available personal air sampling pumps fail to deliver known volumes of air under widely changing differential pressures. A unique type of gas pump known as the scroll compressor, developed by Arthur D. Little, Inc., that has no values and few moving parts is expected to provide a practical, efficient, and dependable air pump for use in dosimeters. The three deliverable known volume air sampling pumps resulting from this work incorporate a scroll pump, drive motor, speed control electronics, and battery pack in a container suitable for attachment to a miner's belt

  6. Using Mobile Device Samples to Estimate Traffic Volumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-12-01

    In this project, TTI worked with StreetLight Data to evaluate a beta version of its traffic volume estimates derived from global positioning system (GPS)-based mobile devices. TTI evaluated the accuracy of average annual daily traffic (AADT) volume :...

  7. Sampling procedures for inventory of commercial volume tree species in Amazon Forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Netto, Sylvio P; Pelissari, Allan L; Cysneiros, Vinicius C; Bonazza, Marcelo; Sanquetta, Carlos R

    2017-01-01

    The spatial distribution of tropical tree species can affect the consistency of the estimators in commercial forest inventories, therefore, appropriate sampling procedures are required to survey species with different spatial patterns in the Amazon Forest. For this, the present study aims to evaluate the conventional sampling procedures and introduce the adaptive cluster sampling for volumetric inventories of Amazonian tree species, considering the hypotheses that the density, the spatial distribution and the zero-plots affect the consistency of the estimators, and that the adaptive cluster sampling allows to obtain more accurate volumetric estimation. We use data from a census carried out in Jamari National Forest, Brazil, where trees with diameters equal to or higher than 40 cm were measured in 1,355 plots. Species with different spatial patterns were selected and sampled with simple random sampling, systematic sampling, linear cluster sampling and adaptive cluster sampling, whereby the accuracy of the volumetric estimation and presence of zero-plots were evaluated. The sampling procedures applied to species were affected by the low density of trees and the large number of zero-plots, wherein the adaptive clusters allowed concentrating the sampling effort in plots with trees and, thus, agglutinating more representative samples to estimate the commercial volume.

  8. 36Cl AMS measurement of JCO samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arai, D.; Seki, R.; Nagashima, Y.; Takahashi, T.; Kume, H.; Mawatari, R.

    2000-01-01

    A critical nuclear accident occurred at the nuclear fuel processing facility, JCO, in Tokaimura, Ibaraki prefecture, Japan on 30 September 1999, and a lot of neutron particle were released in the environment. In order to estimate the total neutron flux, we measured the yield of 36 Cl radioisotopes in the samples being collected from the accident site. The neutron flux can be estimated from the ratio of 36 Cl to 35 Cl because the 36 Cl nuclei are created from 35 Cl through a thermal neutron capture process, 35 Cl(n,γ) 36 Cl. (author)

  9. Cosmological measure with volume averaging and the vacuum energy problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astashenok, Artyom V.; del Popolo, Antonino

    2012-04-01

    In this paper, we give a possible solution to the cosmological constant problem. It is shown that the traditional approach, based on volume weighting of probabilities, leads to an incoherent conclusion: the probability that a randomly chosen observer measures Λ = 0 is exactly equal to 1. Using an alternative, volume averaging measure, instead of volume weighting can explain why the cosmological constant is non-zero.

  10. Cosmological measure with volume averaging and the vacuum energy problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Astashenok, Artyom V; Del Popolo, Antonino

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we give a possible solution to the cosmological constant problem. It is shown that the traditional approach, based on volume weighting of probabilities, leads to an incoherent conclusion: the probability that a randomly chosen observer measures Λ = 0 is exactly equal to 1. Using an alternative, volume averaging measure, instead of volume weighting can explain why the cosmological constant is non-zero. (paper)

  11. Measurement of liver volume by emission computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kan, M.K.; Hopkins, G.B.

    1979-01-01

    In 22 volunteers without clinical or laboratory evidence of liver disease, liver volume was determined using single-photon emission computed tomography (ECT). This technique provided excellent object contrast between the liver and its surroundings and permitted calculation of liver volume without geometric assumptions about the liver's configuration. Reproducibility of results was satisfactory, with a root-mean-square error of less than 6% between duplicate measurements in 15 individuals. The volume measurements were validated by the use of phantoms

  12. Independent verification of tank volume measurements by pressure-volume authentication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suda, S.C.; Keisch, B.

    1992-01-01

    Brookhaven National Laboratory has developed a portable pressure-volume authenticator** as a standard and means of checking the functionality and quality of bubbler-probe volumetric devices. The pressure-volume authenticator (PVA) consists of an automated electromanometer system that is controlled by a laptop computer, and a transportable volumetric artifact. A portable pressure gage is connected, via a scanivalve, to the operator's bubbler-probe system and independently measures all bubbler probes. The transportable volumetric artifact is a one-meter high vessel equipped with bubble-probes, computer controlled air-purge rotameters, and platinum resistance (RTD) thermometer. High quality measurements are obtained by use of a fast sampling technique and sophisticated software developed under this program. The computer software performs the following functions: (a) instrument control, (b) data acquisition, (c) on-line graphical and numerical display of measurement data, and (d) detailed data analysis. The device also may provide hands-on training for inspectors and plant operators in high quality volumetric data collection and analysis. A field demonstration of the automated electromanometer system was conducted on the PETRA input accountancy tank, JRC-Ispra in November 1991

  13. Measurement of curium in marine samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, D. L.; Livingston, H. D.

    1984-06-01

    Measurement of environmentally small but detectable amounts of curium requires reliable, accureate, and sensitive analytical methods. The radiochemical separation developed at Woods Hole is briefly reviewed with specific reference to radiochemical interferences in the alpha spectrometric measurement of curium nuclides and to the relative amounts of interferences expected in different oceanic regimes and sample types. Detection limits for 242 Cm and 244 Cm are ultimately limited by their presence in the 243Am used as curium yield monitor. Environmental standard reference materials are evaluated with regard to curium. The marine literature is reviewed and curium measurements are discussed in relation to their source of introduction to the environment. Sources include ocean dumping of low-level radioactive wastes and discharges from nuclear fuel reporcessing activities, In particular, the question of a detectable presence of 244Cm in global fallout from nuclear weapons testing is addressed and shown to be essentially negligible. Analyses of Scottish coastal sedimantes show traces of 242Cm and 244Cm activity which are believed to originate from transport from sources in the Irish Sea.

  14. Relationship between LIBS Ablation and Pit Volume for Geologic Samples: Applications for in situ Absolute Geochronology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devismes, D.; Cohen, Barbara A.

    2014-01-01

    In planetary sciences, in situ absolute geochronology is a scientific and engineering challenge. Currently, the age of the Martian surface can only be determined by crater density counting. However this method has significant uncertainties and needs to be calibrated with absolute ages. We are developing an instrument to acquire in situ absolute geochronology based on the K-Ar method. The protocol is based on the laser ablation of a rock by hundreds of laser pulses. Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) gives the potassium content of the ablated material and a mass spectrometer (quadrupole or ion trap) measures the quantity of 40Ar released. In order to accurately measure the quantity of released 40Ar in cases where Ar is an atmospheric constituent (e.g., Mars), the sample is first put into a chamber under high vacuum. The 40Arquantity, the concentration of K and the estimation of the ablated mass are the parameters needed to give the age of the rocks. The main uncertainties with this method are directly linked to the measures of the mass (typically some µg) and of the concentration of K by LIBS (up to 10%). Because the ablated mass is small compared to the mass of the sample, and because material is redeposited onto the sample after ablation, it is not possible to directly measure the ablated mass. Our current protocol measures the ablated volume and estimates the sample density to calculate ablated mass. The precision and accuracy of this method may be improved by using knowledge of the sample's geologic properties to predict its response to laser ablation, i.e., understanding whether natural samples have a predictable relationship between laser energy deposited and resultant ablation volume. In contrast to most previous studies of laser ablation, theoretical equations are not highly applicable. The reasons are numerous, but the most important are: a) geologic rocks are complex, polymineralic materials; b) the conditions of ablation are unusual (for example

  15. [Measurement of maternal plasma volume during pregnancy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uzan, S; Beaufils, M; Uzan, M; Donsimoni, R; Mareck, A; Salat-Baroux, J; Sureau, C

    1988-02-01

    An increased maternal plasma volume (PV) is a characteristic phenomenon of normal pregnancy, which may be related to a physiological decrease of peripheral resistances. The authors have studied the plasma volume of 1,105 patients distributed as follows: normal (387), permanently hypertensive patients (84), hypertensive patients during pregnancy (390), patients with apparently isolated RCIU (154) or with a pathological past-history during previous pregnancies (90). It appears that the PV is a sign of a severe HBP, and presents a rather early and good predictive value regarding the weight of the fetus and some complications such as severe UCIU and fetal death in utero. In case of pathological past events or pre-existing hypertension, the PV enables to differentiate rather well patients who will be prone to a complicated pregnancy. In view of these results, utilization and interpretation criteria of this parameter during pregnancies with hypertension or pregnancies in which there is a suspicion or a risk of intra-uterine growth delay, are defined.

  16. Legacy sample disposition project. Volume 2: Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gurley, R.N.; Shifty, K.L.

    1998-02-01

    This report describes the legacy sample disposition project at the Idaho Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), which assessed Site-wide facilities/areas to locate legacy samples and owner organizations and then characterized and dispositioned these samples. This project resulted from an Idaho Department of Environmental Quality inspection of selected areas of the INEEL in January 1996, which identified some samples at the Test Reactor Area and Idaho Chemical Processing Plant that had not been characterized and dispositioned according to Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) requirements. The objective of the project was to manage legacy samples in accordance with all applicable environmental and safety requirements. A systems engineering approach was used throughout the project, which included collecting the legacy sample information and developing a system for amending and retrieving the information. All legacy samples were dispositioned by the end of 1997. Closure of the legacy sample issue was achieved through these actions

  17. In-Situ Systematic Error Correction for Digital Volume Correlation Using a Reference Sample

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, B.

    2017-11-27

    The self-heating effect of a laboratory X-ray computed tomography (CT) scanner causes slight change in its imaging geometry, which induces translation and dilatation (i.e., artificial displacement and strain) in reconstructed volume images recorded at different times. To realize high-accuracy internal full-field deformation measurements using digital volume correlation (DVC), these artificial displacements and strains associated with unstable CT imaging must be eliminated. In this work, an effective and easily implemented reference sample compensation (RSC) method is proposed for in-situ systematic error correction in DVC. The proposed method utilizes a stationary reference sample, which is placed beside the test sample to record the artificial displacement fields caused by the self-heating effect of CT scanners. The detected displacement fields are then fitted by a parametric polynomial model, which is used to remove the unwanted artificial deformations in the test sample. Rescan tests of a stationary sample and real uniaxial compression tests performed on copper foam specimens demonstrate the accuracy, efficacy, and practicality of the presented RSC method.

  18. In-Situ Systematic Error Correction for Digital Volume Correlation Using a Reference Sample

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, B.; Pan, B.; Lubineau, Gilles

    2017-01-01

    The self-heating effect of a laboratory X-ray computed tomography (CT) scanner causes slight change in its imaging geometry, which induces translation and dilatation (i.e., artificial displacement and strain) in reconstructed volume images recorded at different times. To realize high-accuracy internal full-field deformation measurements using digital volume correlation (DVC), these artificial displacements and strains associated with unstable CT imaging must be eliminated. In this work, an effective and easily implemented reference sample compensation (RSC) method is proposed for in-situ systematic error correction in DVC. The proposed method utilizes a stationary reference sample, which is placed beside the test sample to record the artificial displacement fields caused by the self-heating effect of CT scanners. The detected displacement fields are then fitted by a parametric polynomial model, which is used to remove the unwanted artificial deformations in the test sample. Rescan tests of a stationary sample and real uniaxial compression tests performed on copper foam specimens demonstrate the accuracy, efficacy, and practicality of the presented RSC method.

  19. High-speed volume measurement system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lane, Michael H.; Doyle, Jr., James L.; Brinkman, Michael J.

    2018-01-30

    Disclosed is a volume sensor having a first axis, a second axis, and a third axis, each axis including a laser source configured to emit a beam; a parallel beam generating assembly configured to receive the beam and split the beam into a first parallel beam and a second parallel beam, a beam-collimating assembly configured to receive the first parallel beam and the second parallel beam and output a first beam sheet and a second beam sheet, the first beam sheet and the second beam sheet being configured to traverse the object aperture; a first collecting lens and a second collecting lens; and a first photodetector and a second photodetector, the first photodetector and the second photodetector configured to output an electrical signal proportional to the object; wherein the first axis, the second axis, and the third axis are arranged at an angular offset with respect to each other.

  20. Fast and effective determination of strontium-90 in high volumes water samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basarabova, B.; Dulanska, S.

    2014-01-01

    A simple and fast method was developed for determination of 90 Sr in high volumes of water samples from vicinity of nuclear power facilities. Samples were taken from the environment near Nuclear Power Plants in Jaslovske Bohunice and Mochovce in Slovakia. For determination of 90 Sr was used solid phase extraction using commercial sorbent Analig R Sr-01 from company IBC Advanced Technologies, Inc.. Determination of 90 Sr was performed with dilute solution of HNO 3 (1.5-2 M) and also tested in base medium with NaOH. For elution of 90 Sr was used eluent EDTA with pH in range 8-9. To achieve fast determination, automation was applied, which brings significant reduction of separation time. Concentration of water samples with evaporation was not necessary. Separation was performed immediately after filtration of analyzed samples. The aim of this study was development of less expensive, time unlimited and energy saving method for determination of 90 Sr in comparison with conventional methods. Separation time for fast-flow with volume of 10 dm 3 of water samples was 3.5 hours (flow-rate approximately 3.2 dm 3 / 1 hour). Radiochemical strontium yield was traced by using radionuclide 85 Sr. Samples were measured with HPGe detector (High-purity Germanium detector) at energy E φ = 514 keV. By using Analig R Sr-01 yields in range 72 - 96 % were achieved. Separation based on solid phase extraction using Analig R Sr-01 employing utilization of automation offers new, fast and effective method for determination of 90 Sr in water matrix. After ingrowth of yttrium samples were measured by Liquid Scintillation Spectrometer Packard Tricarb 2900 TR with software Quanta Smart. (authors)

  1. Volume measurement study for large scale input accountancy tank

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uchikoshi, Seiji; Watanabe, Yuichi; Tsujino, Takeshi

    1999-01-01

    Large Scale Tank Calibration (LASTAC) facility, including an experimental tank which has the same volume and structure as the input accountancy tank of Rokkasho Reprocessing Plant (RRP) was constructed in Nuclear Material Control Center of Japan. Demonstration experiments have been carried out to evaluate a precision of solution volume measurement and to establish the procedure of highly accurate pressure measurement for a large scale tank with dip-tube bubbler probe system to be applied to the input accountancy tank of RRP. Solution volume in a tank is determined from substitution the solution level for the calibration function obtained in advance, which express a relation between the solution level and its volume in the tank. Therefore, precise solution volume measurement needs a precise calibration function that is determined carefully. The LASTAC calibration experiments using pure water showed good result in reproducibility. (J.P.N.)

  2. Automated measurement of local white matter lesion volume

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van der Lijn, Fedde; Verhaaren, Benjamin F. J.; Ikram, M. Arfan

    2012-01-01

    in a periventricular region close to the ventricles and a subcortical zone further away. In this work we present a novel automated method for local white matter lesion volume quantification in magnetic resonance images. The method segments and measures the white matter lesion volume in 43 regions defined...

  3. Measurement of normal ocular volume by the use of computed ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Reduction or increase in ocular volume may indicate ocular pathology. Unfortunately the reference values utilized for ocular volume had been that of non-Africans. It is therefore pertinent to have a reference value of normal for Africans. Objective: To document the computer tomography (CT) scan measured ...

  4. Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center Monitoring Manual Volume 2, Radiation Monitoring and Sampling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NSTec Aerial Measurement Systems

    2012-07-31

    The FRMAC Monitoring and Sampling Manual, Volume 2 provides standard operating procedures (SOPs) for field radiation monitoring and sample collection activities that are performed by the Monitoring group during a FRMAC response to a radiological emergency.

  5. Radioisotope Sample Measurement Techniques in Medicine and Biology. Proceedings of the Symposium on Radioisotope Sample Measurement Techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1965-01-01

    The medical and biological applications of radioisotopes depend on two basically different types of measurements, those on living subjects in vivo and those on samples in vitro. The International Atomic Energy Agency has in the past held several meetings on in vivo measurement techniques, notably whole-body counting and radioisotope scanning. The present volume contains the Proceedings of the first Symposium the Agency has organized to discuss the various aspects of techniques for sample measurement in vitro. The range of these sample measurement techniques is very wide. The sample may weigh a few milligrams or several hundred grams, and may be in the gaseous, liquid or solid state. Its radioactive content may consist of a single, known radioisotope or several unknown ones. The concentration of radioactivity may be low, medium or high. The measurements may be made manually or automatically and any one of the many radiation detectors now available may be used. The 53 papers presented at the Symposium illustrate the great variety of methods now in use for radioactive- sample measurements. The first topic discussed is gamma-ray spectrometry, which finds an increasing number of applications in sample measurements. Other sections of the Proceedings deal with: the use of computers in gamma-ray spectrometry and multiple tracer techniques; recent developments in activation analysis where both gamma-ray spectrometry and computing techniques are applied; thin-layer and paper radio chromatographic techniques for use with low energy beta-ray emitters; various aspects of liquid scintillation counting techniques in the measurement of alpha- and beta-ray emitters, including chemical and colour quenching; autoradiographic techniques; calibration of equipment; and standardization of radioisotopes. Finally, some applications of solid-state detectors are presented; this section may be regarded as a preview of important future developments. The meeting was attended by 203 participants

  6. Clinical significance of measurement of hepatic volume by computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Hiroyuki; Matsuda, Yoshiro; Takada, Akira

    1984-01-01

    Hepatic volumes were measured by computed tomography (CT) in 91 patients with chronic liver diseases. Mean hepatic volume in alcoholic liver disease was significantly larger than that in non-alcoholic liver disease. Hepatic volumes in the majority of decompensated liver cirrhosis were significantly smaller than those of compensated liver cirrhosis. In liver cirrhosis, significant correlations between hepatic volume and various hepatic tests which reflect the total functioning hepatic cell masses were found. Combinations of hepatic volume with ICG maximum removal rate and with serum cholinesterase activity were most useful for the assessment of prognosis in liver cirrhosis. These results indicated that estimation of hepatic volume by CT is useful for analysis of pathophysiology and prognosis of chronic liver diseases, and for diagnosis of alcoholic liver diseases. (author)

  7. Critical length sampling: a method to estimate the volume of downed coarse woody debris

    Science.gov (United States)

    G& #246; ran St& #229; hl; Jeffrey H. Gove; Michael S. Williams; Mark J. Ducey

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, critical length sampling for estimating the volume of downed coarse woody debris is presented. Using this method, the volume of downed wood in a stand can be estimated by summing the critical lengths of down logs included in a sample obtained using a relascope or wedge prism; typically, the instrument should be tilted 90° from its usual...

  8. Critical evaluation of blood volume measurements during hemodialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasselaar, Judith J; van der Sande, Frank M; Franssen, Casper F M

    2012-01-01

    Devices that continuously measure relative blood volume (RBV) changes during hemodialysis (HD) are increasingly used for the prevention of dialysis hypotension and fine-tuning of dry weight. However, RBV measurements are subject to various limitations. First, RBV devices provide information on relative blood volume changes but not on absolute blood volume. Since blood volume varies with the hydration status, identical reductions of RBV may result in very different absolute blood volumes at the end of HD. Second, RBV changes underestimate the change of total blood volume due to translocation of lower-hematocrit blood from the microcirculation to the central circulation. Third, changes in posture before and during HD, food intake, exercise, and administration of intravenous fluids may influence the validity of the RBV measurement. Fourth, results obtained by various RBV devices show large interdevice differences. Finally, although a fall in blood volume is an important factor in dialysis hypotension, frank dialysis hypotension only occurs when the cardiovascular compensatory mechanisms can no longer compensate for the reduction in blood volume. Therefore, the dialysis staff should not exclusively focus on RBV, but also search for opportunities in the dialysis prescription to facilitate cardiovascular compensatory mechanisms, e.g. by lowering dialysate temperature. In the opinion of the authors, routine RBV monitoring should be used with caution until the major conceptual and methodological problems that are inherent to the indirect RBV estimation are clarified. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  9. Critical point relascope sampling for unbiased volume estimation of downed coarse woody debris

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffrey H. Gove; Michael S. Williams; Mark J. Ducey; Mark J. Ducey

    2005-01-01

    Critical point relascope sampling is developed and shown to be design-unbiased for the estimation of log volume when used with point relascope sampling for downed coarse woody debris. The method is closely related to critical height sampling for standing trees when trees are first sampled with a wedge prism. Three alternative protocols for determining the critical...

  10. Measurement of lung fluid volumes and albumin exclusion in sheep

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pou, N.A.; Roselli, R.J.; Parker, R.E.; Clanton, J.A.; Harris, T.R.

    1989-01-01

    A radioactive tracer technique was used to determine interstitial diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA) and albumin distribution volume in sheep lungs. 125 I- and/or 131 I-labeled albumin were injected intravenously and allowed to equilibrate for 24 h. 99m Tc-labeled DTPA and 51 Cr-labeled erythrocytes were injected and allowed to equilibrate (2 h and 15 min, respectively) before a lethal dose of thiamylal sodium. Two biopsies (1-3 g) were taken from each lung and the remaining tissue was homogenized for wet-to-dry lung weight and volume calculations. Estimates of distribution volumes from whole lung homogenized samples were statistically smaller than biopsy samples for extravascular water, interstitial 99m Tc-DTPA, and interstitial albumin. The mean fraction of the interstitium (Fe), which excludes albumin, was 0.68 +/- 0.04 for whole lung samples compared with 0.62 +/- 0.03 for biopsy samples. Hematocrit may explain the consistent difference. To make the Fe for biopsy samples match that for homogenized samples, a mean hematocrit, which was 82% of large vessel hematocrit, was required. Excluded volume fraction for exogenous sheep albumin was compared with that of exogenous human albumin in two sheep, and no difference was found at 24 h

  11. Measurement of carbon-14 in hydrological samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hussain, S.D.

    1991-11-01

    Thermal neutrons produced by cosmic rays or nuclear weapon tests interact with atmospheric nitrogen resulting in the formation of radiocarbon which, after oxidation into carbon dioxide, follows the natural carbon cycle. The partial pressure of carbon dioxide in the soil is several times that in the atmosphere due to plant root respiration and decay of organic matter. Water absorbs biogenic carbon dioxide while percolating through the unsaturated zone. The carbon content of groundwater is mainly in the form of bicarbonate ions. The extraction of carbon from water sample as barium carbonate is carried out in the field. Benzene is synthesised from the carbonate sample. The activity of radiocarbon in the synthesised benzene is determined by using a liquid scintillation analyzer. Details of sampling procedure, benzene synthesis, counter calibration and treatment of sample data have been given. 7 figs. (author)

  12. Sampling of high amounts of bioaerosols using a high-volume electrostatic field sampler

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, A. M.; Sharma, Anoop Kumar

    2008-01-01

    For studies of the biological effects of bioaerosols, large samples are necessary. To be able to sample enough material and to cover the variations in aerosol content during and between working days, a long sampling time is necessary. Recently, a high-volume transportable electrostatic field...... and 315 mg dust (net recovery of the lyophilized dust) was sampled during a period of 7 days, respectively. The sampling rates of the electrostatic field samplers were between 1.34 and 1.96 mg dust per hour, the value for the Gravikon was between 0.083 and 0.108 mg dust per hour and the values for the GSP...... samplers were between 0.0031 and 0.032 mg dust per hour. The standard deviations of replica samplings and the following microbial analysis using the electrostatic field sampler and GSP samplers were at the same levels. The exposure to dust in the straw storage was 7.7 mg m(-3) when measured...

  13. New simple method for fast and accurate measurement of volumes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frattolillo, Antonio

    2006-01-01

    A new simple method is presented, which allows us to measure in just a few minutes but with reasonable accuracy (less than 1%) the volume confined inside a generic enclosure, regardless of the complexity of its shape. The technique proposed also allows us to measure the volume of any portion of a complex manifold, including, for instance, pipes and pipe fittings, valves, gauge heads, and so on, without disassembling the manifold at all. To this purpose an airtight variable volume is used, whose volume adjustment can be precisely measured; it has an overall capacity larger than that of the unknown volume. Such a variable volume is initially filled with a suitable test gas (for instance, air) at a known pressure, as carefully measured by means of a high precision capacitive gauge. By opening a valve, the test gas is allowed to expand into the previously evacuated unknown volume. A feedback control loop reacts to the resulting finite pressure drop, thus contracting the variable volume until the pressure exactly retrieves its initial value. The overall reduction of the variable volume achieved at the end of this process gives a direct measurement of the unknown volume, and definitively gets rid of the problem of dead spaces. The method proposed actually does not require the test gas to be rigorously held at a constant temperature, thus resulting in a huge simplification as compared to complex arrangements commonly used in metrology (gas expansion method), which can grant extremely accurate measurement but requires rather expensive equipments and results in time consuming methods, being therefore impractical in most applications. A simple theoretical analysis of the thermodynamic cycle and the results of experimental tests are described, which demonstrate that, in spite of its simplicity, the method provides a measurement accuracy within 0.5%. The system requires just a few minutes to complete a single measurement, and is ready immediately at the end of the process. The

  14. Measuring industrial energy efficiency: Physical volume versus economic value

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freeman, S.L.; Niefer, M.J.; Roop, J.M.

    1996-12-01

    This report examines several different measures of industrial output for use in constructing estimates of industrial energy efficiency and discusses some reasons for differences between the measures. Estimates of volume-based measures of output, as well as 3 value-based measures of output (value of production, value of shipments, and value added), are evaluated for 15 separate 4-digit industries. Volatility, simple growth rate, and trend growth rate estimates are made for each industry and each measure of output. Correlations are made between the volume- and value-based measures of output. Historical energy use data are collected for 5 of the industries for making energy- intensity estimates. Growth rates in energy use, energy intensity, and correlations between volume- and value-based measures of energy intensity are computed. There is large variability in growth trend estimates both long term and from year to year. While there is a high correlation between volume- and value-based measures of output for a few industries, typically the correlation is low, and this is exacerbated for estimates of energy intensity. Analysis revealed reasons for these low correlations. It appears that substantial work must be done before reliable measures of trends in the energy efficiency of industry can be accurately characterized.

  15. Methodological aspects on microdialysis sampling and measurements

    OpenAIRE

    Abrahamsson, Pernilla

    2010-01-01

    Background:     The microdialysis (MD) technique is widely spread and used both experi­mentally and in clinical practice. The MD technique allows continuous collection of small molecules such as glucose, lactate, pyruvate and glycerol. Samples are often analysed using the CMA 600 analyser, an enzymatic and colorimetric analyser.  Data evaluating the performance of the CMA 600 analysis system and associated sample han­dling are sparse. The aim of this work was to identify sources of variabilit...

  16. Micro analysis of fringe field formed inside LDA measuring volume

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghosh, Abhijit; Nirala, A K

    2016-01-01

    In the present study we propose a technique for micro analysis of fringe field formed inside laser Doppler anemometry (LDA) measuring volume. Detailed knowledge of the fringe field obtained by this technique allows beam quality, alignment and fringe uniformity to be evaluated with greater precision and may be helpful for selection of an appropriate optical element for LDA system operation. A complete characterization of fringes formed at the measurement volume using conventional, as well as holographic optical elements, is presented. Results indicate the qualitative, as well as quantitative, improvement of fringes formed at the measurement volume by holographic optical elements. Hence, use of holographic optical elements in LDA systems may be advantageous for improving accuracy in the measurement. (paper)

  17. Measurement of radioactivity in water samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richards, L.

    1990-01-01

    Public concern about the levels of radioactivity release to the environment whether authorised discharges or resulting from nuclear accident, has increased in recent years. Consequently there is increasing pressure for reliable data on the distribution of radioactivity and the extent of its intrusion into food chains and water supplies. As a result a number of laboratories not experienced in radioactivity measurements have acquired nucleonic counting equipment. These notes explore the underlying basics and indicate sources of essential data and information which are required for a better understanding of radioactivity measurements. Particular attention is directed to the screening tests which are usually designated ''gross'' alpha and ''gross'' beta activity measurement. (author)

  18. Critical Evaluation of Blood Volume Measurements during Hemodialysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dasselaar, Judith J.; van der Sande, Frank M.; Franssen, Casper F. M.

    2012-01-01

    Devices that continuously measure relative blood volume (RBV) changes during hemodialysis (HD) are increasingly used for the prevention of dialysis hypotension and fine-tuning of dry weight. However, RBV measurements are subject to various limitations. First, RBV devices provide information on

  19. Sampling based motion planning with reachable volumes: Application to manipulators and closed chain systems

    KAUST Repository

    McMahon, Troy

    2014-09-01

    © 2014 IEEE. Reachable volumes are a geometric representation of the regions the joints of a robot can reach. They can be used to generate constraint satisfying samples for problems including complicated linkage robots (e.g. closed chains and graspers). They can also be used to assist robot operators and to help in robot design.We show that reachable volumes have an O(1) complexity in unconstrained problems as well as in many constrained problems. We also show that reachable volumes can be computed in linear time and that reachable volume samples can be generated in linear time in problems without constraints. We experimentally validate reachable volume sampling, both with and without constraints on end effectors and/or internal joints. We show that reachable volume samples are less likely to be invalid due to self-collisions, making reachable volume sampling significantly more efficient for higher dimensional problems. We also show that these samples are easier to connect than others, resulting in better connected roadmaps. We demonstrate that our method can be applied to 262-dof, multi-loop, and tree-like linkages including combinations of planar, prismatic and spherical joints. In contrast, existing methods either cannot be used for these problems or do not produce good quality solutions.

  20. Sampling based motion planning with reachable volumes: Application to manipulators and closed chain systems

    KAUST Repository

    McMahon, Troy; Thomas, Shawna; Amato, Nancy M.

    2014-01-01

    © 2014 IEEE. Reachable volumes are a geometric representation of the regions the joints of a robot can reach. They can be used to generate constraint satisfying samples for problems including complicated linkage robots (e.g. closed chains and graspers). They can also be used to assist robot operators and to help in robot design.We show that reachable volumes have an O(1) complexity in unconstrained problems as well as in many constrained problems. We also show that reachable volumes can be computed in linear time and that reachable volume samples can be generated in linear time in problems without constraints. We experimentally validate reachable volume sampling, both with and without constraints on end effectors and/or internal joints. We show that reachable volume samples are less likely to be invalid due to self-collisions, making reachable volume sampling significantly more efficient for higher dimensional problems. We also show that these samples are easier to connect than others, resulting in better connected roadmaps. We demonstrate that our method can be applied to 262-dof, multi-loop, and tree-like linkages including combinations of planar, prismatic and spherical joints. In contrast, existing methods either cannot be used for these problems or do not produce good quality solutions.

  1. Machine vision for high-precision volume measurement applied to levitated containerless material processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bradshaw, R.C.; Schmidt, D.P.; Rogers, J.R.; Kelton, K.F.; Hyers, R.W.

    2005-01-01

    By combining the best practices in optical dilatometry with numerical methods, a high-speed and high-precision technique has been developed to measure the volume of levitated, containerlessly processed samples with subpixel resolution. Containerless processing provides the ability to study highly reactive materials without the possibility of contamination affecting thermophysical properties. Levitation is a common technique used to isolate a sample as it is being processed. Noncontact optical measurement of thermophysical properties is very important as traditional measuring methods cannot be used. Modern, digitally recorded images require advanced numerical routines to recover the subpixel locations of sample edges and, in turn, produce high-precision measurements

  2. Model for the radionuclide measurement of ascitic fluid volumes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaplan, W.D.; Davis, M.A.; Uren, R.F.; Wisotsky, T.; LaTegola, M.

    1978-01-01

    Technetium-99m phytate colloids formed in vitro and in vivo were examined as radioindicators for estimation of the volume of third-space fluid in an ovarian ascites model using C3HeB/FeJ mice. In double-label experiments, the accuracy of the colloids for dilution analysis was found to be equal or superior to that of I-125 HSA. Sampling times 3 to 5 min after intraperitoneal administration were found to produce the best volume estimates. Four needle-stopcock assemblies inserted sequentially into the quadrants of the peritoneal cavity were used for administration and sampling of the radioindicators. The stopcocks could be closed to prevent leakage of ascitic fluid during the procedure. In contrast to radiolabeled albumin, Tc-99m phytate colloids have clinical use for simultaneous imaging of radiotracer migration to assess potential occlusion of diaphragmatic lymphatics by neoplastic cells, and for dilution analysis to estimate volume of ascitic fluid

  3. Measurement of solid flow rates and sampling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caillot, A.

    1984-01-01

    Given the fact that very fine sediments are carriers of numerous pollutant products, in order to be able to ensure realistic and vigilant control of the aquatic environment we have to take into account sedimentary transport. The movement of sediments may be due to natural events (currents, swell, winds), or to human intervention (dredging, emptying of dam reservoirs, release of wastes and so forth). Their circulation, at times highly complex, especially in estuaries, may alternate with periods of rest - and therefore periods of accumulation of pollutants - which may be fairly long. Despite the plethora of available methods and techniques, the amounts of sediment transported by drift or in suspension are very difficult to assess. The physico-chemical nature and the behaviour of these substances in water makes it awkward to select samples, in space and time, for the purpose of analysis. The sampling should be carried out with the mechanical means suited to the circumstances and to the aim in mind. However, by taking into consideration the hydrosedimentary mechanisms known by the hydrologists and sedimentologists it is possible to improve the selection of the sites to be monitored as well as to choose more carefully (and therefore to limit) the samples to be analysed. Environmental monitoring may thus be performed more efficiently and at lower cost. (author)

  4. Effect of granulation of geological samples in neutron transport measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woznicka, Urszula; Drozdowicz, Krzysztof; Gabanska, Barbara; Krynicka, Ewa; Igielski, Andrzej

    2001-01-01

    The thermal neutron absorption cross section is one of the parameters describing the transport of thermal neutrons in a medium. Theoretical descriptions and experiments which determine the absorption cross section have a wide literature for homogeneous media. The situation comes true e.g. for fluids or amorphous solids. There are many other media which should be treated as heterogeneous. Among others - geological materials. The material heterogeneity for the thermal neutron transport in a considered volume is understood here as an existence of many small regions which differ significantly in their macroscopic neutron diffusion parameters (defined by the absorption and transport cross sections). The final difference, which influences the neutron transport, comes from a combination of the absolute differences between the parameters and of sizes of regions (related to the neutron mean free paths). A rock can be naturally heterogeneous in the above meaning. Besides, it can happen that a preparation of the rock sample for a neutron measurement can increase its natural heterogeneity. (For example, when the rock material is crushed and the measured sample consists of the obtained grains). The question is which granulation is allowed to treat the sample material as still homogeneous, and from which size of the rock grains we have to consider a two-component medium. It has been experimentally proved that the effective absorption of thermal neutrons in a heterogeneous two-component material can significantly differ from the absorption in a homogeneous one which consists of the same elements. The final effect is dependent on a few factors: the macroscopic absorption cross sections of the components, their total mass contributions, and the size of the grains. The ratio of the effective absorption cross section of the heterogeneous material to the cross section of the equivalent homogeneous, is a measure of the heterogeneity effect on the thermal neutron absorption

  5. Measurement of cell volume changes by fluorescence self-quenching

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hamann, Steffen; Kiilgaard, J.F.; Litman, Thomas

    2002-01-01

    At high concentrations, certain fluorophores undergo self-quenching, i.e., fluorescence intensity decreases with increasing fluorophore concentration. Accordingly, the self-quenching properties can be used for measuring water volume changes in lipid vesicles. In cells, quantitative determination...... concentrations of the fluorophore calcein suitable for measurement of changes in cell water volume by self-quenching. The relationship between calcein fluorescence intensity, when excited at 490 nm (its excitation maximum), and calcein concentration was investigated in vitro and in various cultured cell types...... to a decrease in calcein fluorescence with high signal-to-noise ratio (>15). Similar results were obtained with the fluorophore BCECF when excited at its isosbestic wavelength (436 nm). The present results demonstrate the usefulness of fluorescence self-quenching to measure rapid changes in cell water volume....

  6. Measurement of CSF volume with 3D-FASE MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanayama, Shoichi; Calderon, A.; Makita, Jun-ichi; Ohara, Yukou; Tsunoda, Akira; Sato, Kiyoshi.

    1997-01-01

    A noninvasive and fast cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) volume measurement method has been developed using 3D-FASE MRI and a semi-automatic segmentation process. Images with a high CSF/(gray and white matter) ratio (about 10-20) were obtained with a heavily T 2 weighted 3D-FASE sequence. The CSF region was segmented with a region growing method and the volume was calculated from the number of segmented voxels with a signal intensity weighted summation. Total measurement time was about 30 minutes for each study. The errors of the measured volumes were within 10% for the phantom experiments. Intracranial CSF volumes of normal volunteers ranged between about 100 and 200 cc and the ventricle/intracranial CSF ratio was about 10%. 3D display of the segmented intracranial and ventricle CSF regions was also carried out and proved to be useful to understand the anatomy. Increased intracranial and/or ventricle CSF volumes were obtained for a hydrocephalic patient and one patient with probable cerebral atrophy. The results suggest that the developed method could be used for the diagnosis of patients with neurological diseases. (author)

  7. Representative volume element of asphalt pavement for electromagnetic measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Terhi Pellinen

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The motivation for this study was to investigate the representative volume element (RVE needed to correlate the nondestructive electromagnetic (EM measurements with the conventional destructive asphalt pavement quality control measurements. A large pavement rehabilitation contract was used as the test site for the experiment. Pavement cores were drilled from the same locations where the stationary and continuous Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR measurements were obtained. Laboratory measurements included testing the bulk density of cores using two methods, the surface-saturated dry method and determining bulk density by dimensions. Also, Vector Network Analyzer (VNA and the through specimen transmission configuration were employed at microwave frequencies to measure the reference dielectric constant of cores using two different footprint areas and therefore volume elements. The RVE for EM measurements turns out to be frequency dependent; therefore in addition to being dependent on asphalt mixture type and method of obtaining bulk density, it is dependent on the resolution of the EM method used. Then, although the average bulk property results agreed with theoretical formulations of higher core air void content giving a lower dielectric constant, for the individual cores there was no correlation for the VNA measurements because the volume element seizes deviated. Similarly, GPR technique was unable to capture the spatial variation of pavement air voids measured from the 150-mm drill cores. More research is needed to determine the usable RVE for asphalt.

  8. Measurement of right ventricular volumes using 131I-MAA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sekimoto, T.; Grover, R.F.

    1975-01-01

    A method is presented for determining the right ventricular residual ratio, that is, the ratio of the end-systolic volume to the end-diastolic volume during each cardiac cycle. 131 I-MAA was injected as a bolus into the right ventricle, and the ratio of isotope remaining in the chamber during the succeeding cardiac cycles was determined with a collimated scintillation counter placed over the right ventricle. Since the counter detected the radioactivity from the entire right ventricular cavity, potential errors from incomplete mixing were minimized. The washout curve from the ventricle was distorted somewhat by the accumulation of isotope in intervening lung tissue. This distortion was eliminated by subtracting the build-up curve of radioactivity in the lung recorded simultaneously with a second scintillation counter positioned over the lateral chest wall. In 14 dogs anesthetized with chloralose, the right ventricular residual ratio was relatively constant at 40.4 +- 3.1 per cent. Duplicate measurements differed by less than 3 percent indicating the good reproducibility of the method. Right ventricular stroke volume was determined from cardiac output (dye dilution) and heart rate. With this and the simultaneously determined residual ratio ( 131 I-MAA), end-diastolic volume could be calculated. Stroke volume and stroke work were highly correlated with end-diastolic volume, in keeping with the Frank-Starling mechanism. (U.S.)

  9. Development of a magnetic measurement device for thin ribbon samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Yuta; Todaka, Takashi; Enokizono, Masato

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents a magnetic measurement device for thin ribbon samples, which are produced by rapid cooling technique. This device enables us to measure magnetic properties easily by only inserting a ribbon sample into a sample holder. The sample holder was made by bakelite to fix any width sample. A long solenoid coil was used to generate a uniform magnetic field and the sample holder was placed at the mid part of the solenoid. The magnetic field strength was measured using a shunt resistor and the magnetic flux density and magnetization in sample ribbons were evaluated by using search coils. The accuracy of measurement was verified with an amorphous metal ribbon sample. Next, we have measured magnetic properties of some magnetic shape memory alloys, which have different compositions. The measured results are compared and we clarified the effect of Sm contents on the magnetic properties

  10. Reliability and Accuracy of Brain Volume Measurement on MR Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yamagchii, Kechiro; Lassen, Anders; Ring, Poul

    1998-01-01

    Yamaguchi, K., Lassen, A. And Ring, P. Reliability and Accuracy of Brain Volume Measurement on MR Imaging. Abstract at ESMRMB98 European Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine and Biology, Geneva, Sept 17-20, 1998 Danish Research Center for Magnetic Resonance, Hvidovre University Hospital...

  11. Macular volume and central foveal thickness measurements in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To determine macular volume and central foveal thickness measurements in normal eyes of healthy. Nigerian adults using Stratus optical coherence tomography. Subjects and Methods: Consenting 100 adults Nigerians with normal eyes were recruited and examined using Carl. Zeiss Stratus Optical Coherence ...

  12. Ultrasound measurements of testicular volume: Comparing the three ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    T.U. Mbaeri

    The ultrasound measurements of the testicular volume were calculated using the following three formulas: (a) length ... ticular growth, development and function. Studies in ... of the components of a minimum full evaluation of male infertility is palpation of ... opted for orchidectomy after counseling in our center. Subjects and ...

  13. Measurement of normal ocular volume by the use of computed ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2012-09-03

    Sep 3, 2012 ... ocular axial length measurements from which ocular volume can be calculated. ... The CT scans were performed in axial planes at a thickness of 3 mm and a .... dimension assessing capability, it gives anatomic details .... have larger skeletal size and bone mass than females, despite comparable body size.

  14. 21 CFR 864.5950 - Blood volume measuring device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Blood volume measuring device. 864.5950 Section 864.5950 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Automated and Semi-Automated Hematology Devices...

  15. [Failure of static pulmonary volume measurements in mucoviscidosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haluszka, J; Zebrak, J

    1984-01-01

    With worsening of bronchial obstruction during the course of cystic fibrosis the functional residual capacity (CRF) measured by plethysmography increases progressively. The difference between values of CRF obtained by plethysmography or by Helium dilution increases even more. The difference between the two methods (for CRF) is supposed to show the volume of "trapped"' gas. A similar outcome, although less marked, is observed after physiotherapy. The extent of pulmonary distention and gas trapping is markedly overestimated by plethysmographic measurements, when one considers the anatomical and radiological anomalies. It was recently suggested that the rise in compliance of the walls of the extra-thoracic airways in the presence of bronchial obstruction may lead to an over-estimation of the pulmonary volumes measured by plethysmography. This may be the case during the course of mucoviscidosis, when repeated infections lead to a destruction of the bronchial walls. However, this anomaly does not explain this rise in CRF after mucolytic treatment and postural drainage. The CRF seems to reflect not only the volume of trapper gas in the lung, but equally the failure to equalize the interior pressures of the obstructed airways. In order to appreciate the effects of respiratory physiotherapy, different methods of measuring pulmonary volumes are necessary but the interpretation of the results take account of the complex meterology.

  16. Volume and leak measurements during neonatal CPAP in neonates

    OpenAIRE

    Fischer, Hendrik S.

    2011-01-01

    As yet, little is known about the effects of air leakages during CPAP in newborns. The present doctoral dissertation investigates tidal volume and leak measurements during nasal continuous positive airway pressure in neonates using a commercial ventilatory device. Investigations include in vitro studies, modelling and computer simulation as well as a clinical randomized cross-over trial in neonates.

  17. Measurement of lung volumes : usefulness of spiral CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Ho Yeong; Kwak, Byung Kook; Lee, Sang Yoon; Kim, Soo Ran; Lee, Shin Hyung; Lee, Chang Joon; Park, In Won

    1996-01-01

    To evaluate the usefulness of spiral CT in the measurement of lung volumes. Fifteen healthy volunteers were studied by both spirometer and spiral CT at full inspiration and expiration in order to correlated their results, including total lung capacity (TLC), vital capacity (VC) and residual volume (RV). 3-D images were reconstructed from spiral CT, and we measured lung volumes at a corresponding CT window range ; their volumes were compared with the pulmonary function test (paired t-test). The window range corresponding to TLC was from -1000HU to -150HU (p=0.279, r=0.986), and for VC from -910HU to -800HU (p=0.366, r=0.954) in full-inspiratory CT. The optimal window range for RV in full-expiratory CT was from -1000HU to -450HU (p=0.757, r=0.777), and TLC-VC in full-inspiratory CT was also calculated (p=0.843, r=0.847). Spiral CT at full inspiration can used to lung volumes such as TLC, VC and RV

  18. PROBES, POPULATIONS, SAMPLES, MEASUREMENTS AND RELATIONS IN STEREOLOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert T Dehoff

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available This summary paper provides an overview of the content of stereology. The typical problem at hand centers around some three dimensional object that has an internal structure that determines its function, performance, or response. To understand and quantify the geometry of that structure it is necessary to probe it with geometric entities: points, lines, planes volumes, etc. Meaningful results are obtained only if the set of probes chosen for use in the assessment is drawn uniformly from the population of such probes for the structure as a whole. This requires an understanding of the population of each kind of probe. Interaction of the probes with the structure produce geometric events which are the focus of stereological measurements. In almost all applications the measurement that is made is a simple count of the number of these events. Rigorous application of these requirements for sample design produce unbiased estimates of geometric properties of features in the structure no matter how complex are the features or what their arrangement in space. It is this assumption-free characteristic of the methodology that makes it a powerful tool for characterizing the internal structure of three dimensional objects.

  19. Excess free volume in metallic glasses measured by X-ray diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yavari, Alain Reza; Moulec, Alain Le; Inoue, Akihisa; Nishiyama, Nobuyuki; Lupu, Nicoleta; Matsubara, Eiichiro; Botta, Walter Jose; Vaughan, Gavin; Di Michiel, Marco; Kvick, Ake

    2005-01-01

    In crystalline materials, lattice expansion as measured by diffraction methods differs from the expansion of the sample dimensions as measured by dilatometry, due to the contribution of thermal vacancies to the latter. We have found that in glassy materials and metallic glasses in particular, this is not the case for the contribution of free volume. These findings are the first direct experimental confirmation of simulation results indicating that atomic size holes are unstable in glasses such that free volume is dispersed randomly. This allows direct measurement of excess free volume in glasses using diffraction methods in place of dilatometry, which is difficult to use once the sample softens at the glass transition temperature T g and above. Quenched-in and deformation-induced free-volume ΔV f were measured by X-ray diffraction in transmission during heating using synchrotron light. The measured thermal expansion coefficients α th were the same as in dilatometry. The glass transition T g appeared as a break in the value of α th at T g . The 'change-of-slope method' was applied to the kinetics of relaxation to derive the activation energy for the free-volume annihilation process

  20. Volume measurement of thalami in normal Chinese Han nationality adults by the high-resolution MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma Shuai; Chen Nan; Guo Yulin

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To measure the volume of thalamus in 1000 healthy Chinese Han nationality adults, and to analyze the relationship between thalamic volume and age, sex, weight and cerebral volume, to provide reliable data for the construction of database of Chinese adults' digital standard brain. Methods: Totally 1000 healthy Chinese adults of Han nationality aged from 18 to 80 years were recruited.They were divided into 5 groups by age: 18-30, 31-40, 41-50, 51-60 and 61-80 years. Each group included 100 males and 100 females. Brain images were obtained on a 1.5 T MR, and the outline of thalami was drawn with Aquariusws software. Then the thalamic volume was calculated automatically. The volumes of left and right thalamus were compared by paired sample t-test. Thalamic volumes of the same side were compared between males and females by independent sample t-test. And thalamic volumes of different age groups were compared by one-way ANOVA. The relationships between thalamic volume and age, sex, weight and cerebral volume were analyzed respectively. Results: The males' standardized volumes of left and right thalamus of healthy Chinese Han nationality adults were (5776 ± 780), (5655 ± 759) mm 3 , and they were (5464 ±573), (5360 ± 542) mm 3 for female. The males' thalamic volume was more than the females' on the same side (t=2.245, 2.200, P<0.01). The left thalamic volumes of various age groups were (6180 ± 534), (6047 ± 562), (5426 ± 471), (5552 ± 526), (4866 ± 552) mm 3 , respectively, while the right thalamic volumes of the 5 groups were (6069 ± 532), (5895 ± 539), (5357 ± 480), (5396 ± 445),(4791 ± 558)mm 3 , respectively. There were statistically significant difference among the 5 groups (F=165.686, 165.235, P<0.01). The left and right thalamic volume were all negatively correlated with age (r=-0.633, -0.645, P<0.05). Conclusions: With high resolution 1.5 T MR scanner,grey matter and white matter can be depicted clearly and the outline

  1. Gastric residual volume (GRV) and gastric contents measurement by refractometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Wei-Kuo; McClave, Stephen A; Hsieh, Chung-Bao; Chao, You-Chen

    2007-01-01

    Traditional use of gastric residual volumes (GRVs), obtained by aspiration from a nasogastric tube, is inaccurate and cannot differentiate components of the gastric contents (gastric secretion vs delivered formula). The use of refractometry and 3 mathematical equations has been proposed as a method to calculate the formula concentration, GRV, and formula volume. In this paper, we have validated these mathematical equations so that they can be implemented in clinical practice. Each of 16 patients receiving a nasogastric tube had 50 mL of water followed by 100 mL of dietary formula (Osmolite HN, Abbott Laboratories, Columbus, OH) infused into the stomach. After mixing, gastric content was aspirated for the first Brix value (BV) measurement by refractometry. Then, 50 mL of water was infused into the stomach and a second BV was measured. The procedure of infusion of dietary formula (100 mL) and then water (50 mL) was repeated and followed by subsequent BV measurement. The same procedure was performed in an in vitro experiment. Formula concentration, GRV, and formula volume were calculated from the derived mathematical equations. The formula concentrations, GRVs, and formula volumes calculated by using refractometry and the mathematical equations were close to the true values obtained from both in vivo and in vitro validation experiments. Using this method, measurement of the BV of gastric contents is simple, reproducible, and inexpensive. Refractometry and the derived mathematical equations may be used to measure formula concentration, GRV, and formula volume, and also to serve as a tool for monitoring the gastric contents of patients receiving nasogastric feeding.

  2. Measurement of radon daughters in air samples by alpha spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acena, M.L.; Crespo, M.T.

    1989-01-01

    The concentration of radon progeny in air has been determined by alpha spectrometry measurement of polonium 214 and polonium 218. A known volume of air was passed through a filter, then the alpha activity was directly measured on this filter (Author)

  3. A method of measuring a molten metal liquid pool volume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, G.V.; Carlson, N.M., Donaldson, A.D.

    1990-12-12

    A method of measuring a molten metal liquid pool volume and in particular molten titanium liquid pools, including the steps of (a) generating an ultrasonic wave at the surface of the molten metal liquid pool, (b) shining a light on the surface of a molten metal liquid pool, (c) detecting a change in the frequency of light, (d) detecting an ultrasonic wave echo at the surface of the molten metal liquid pool, and (e) computing the volume of the molten metal liquid. 3 figs.

  4. Fiber sample presentation system for spectrophotometer cotton fiber color measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Uster® High Volume Instrument (HVI) is used to class U.S. cotton for fiber color, yielding the industry accepted, cotton-specific color parameters Rd and +b. The HVI examines a 9 square inch fiber sample, and it is also used to test large AMS standard cotton “biscuits” or rectangles. Much inte...

  5. Modelling lidar volume-averaging and its significance to wind turbine wake measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer Forsting, A. R.; Troldborg, N.; Borraccino, A.

    2017-05-01

    Lidar velocity measurements need to be interpreted differently than conventional in-situ readings. A commonly ignored factor is “volume-averaging”, which refers to lidars not sampling in a single, distinct point but along its entire beam length. However, especially in regions with large velocity gradients, like the rotor wake, can it be detrimental. Hence, an efficient algorithm mimicking lidar flow sampling is presented, which considers both pulsed and continous-wave lidar weighting functions. The flow-field around a 2.3 MW turbine is simulated using Detached Eddy Simulation in combination with an actuator line to test the algorithm and investigate the potential impact of volume-averaging. Even with very few points discretising the lidar beam is volume-averaging captured accurately. The difference in a lidar compared to a point measurement is greatest at the wake edges and increases from 30% one rotor diameter (D) downstream of the rotor to 60% at 3D.

  6. Measurement of trace elements in liver biopsy samples from cattle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ouweltjes, W.; Zeeuw, de A.C.; Moen, A.; Counotte, G.H.M.

    2007-01-01

    Serum, plasma, or urine samples are usually used for the measurement of the trace elements copper, zinc, iron, selenium, because these samples are easy to obtain; however, these samples are not always appropriate. For example, it is not possible to measure molybdenum, the major antagonist of copper,

  7. The bigger, the better? Volume measurements of parasites and hosts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nagler, Christina; Hörnig, Marie K.; Haug, Joachim T.

    2017-01-01

    ), and a trophic, root like system situated inside the hosts body (the interna). Parasitism results in the castration of their hosts, achieved by absorbing the entire reproductive energy of the host. Thus, the ratio of the host and parasite sizes is crucial for the understanding of the parasite's energetic cost......Rhizocephala, a group of parasitic castrators of other crustaceans, shows remarkable morphological adaptations to their lifestyle. The adult female parasite consists of a body that can be differentiated into two distinct regions: a sac-like structure containing the reproductive organs (the externa....... Using advanced imaging methods (micro-CT in conjunction with 3D modeling), we measured the volume of parasitic structures (externa, interna, egg mass, egg number, visceral mass) and the volume of the entire host. Our results show positive correlations between the volume of (1) entire rhizocephalan...

  8. Measurement of maxillary sinus volume using Computed Tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Chang Hee; Kim, Kee Deog; Park, Chang Seo

    2000-01-01

    To propose a standard value for the maxillary sinus volume of a normal Korean adult by measuring the width and height of the sinus and analyzing their correlation and the difference of the sinus size respectively between sexes, and on the right and left sides. Fifty-two (95 maxillary sinuses) out of 20 years or over aged patients who had taken CT in the Department of Dental Radiology, Yonsei University, Dental Hospital, between February 1997 and July 1999 who were no specific symptom, prominent bony septa, pathosis, clinical asymmetry and history of surgery in the maxillary sinus were retrospectively analyzed. The mean transverse width, antero-posterior width, height and volume of the normal Korean adult's maxillary sinuses were 28.33 mm, 39.69 mm, 46.60 mm and 21.90 cm 3 , respectively. There was a significant sex difference in the sinus volume (p<0.05). In the mean antero-posterior width, height and volume of the sinus, no significant difference was observed between both sides. All four measurements showed a significant correlation between both sides (p<0.0001). The widths and height of the sinus all showed a significant correlation with the sinus volume (p<0.0001). In the Korean normal adult's maxillary sinus, males tended to be larger than females. Except for the transverse width, all of the measurements showed no significant difference between the right and left side, but significant correlations in the four measurements between both sides were observed. Thus, the overgrowth or undergrowth in the unilateral maxillary sinus may suggest a certain pathosis or developmental abnormalities in the maxillary sinus.

  9. Final report on Phase II remedial action at the former Middlesex Sampling Plant and associated properties. Volume 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-04-01

    Volume 2 presents the radiological measurement data taken after remedial action on properties surrounding the former Middlesex Sampling Plant during Phase II of the DOE Middlesex Remedial Action Program. Also included are analyses of the confirmatory radiological survey data for each parcel with respect to the remedial action criteria established by DOE for the Phase II cleanup and a discussion of the final status of each property. Engineering details of this project and a description of the associated health physics and environmental monitoring activities are presented in Volume 1

  10. Density and volume measurements of reprocessing plant feed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Platzer, R.; Carrier, M.; Neuilly, M.; Dedaldechamp, P.

    1985-05-01

    A theoretical study of the phenomenon of gas bubbles formation within a liquid led to an adaptation of the differential pressure bubbling technique for the measurement of liquid levels and densities in tanks. Experiments, carried out on a 800 liters tank with water and uranyl nitrate solutions had the double aim to study the precision attainable on volume and density measurements and to design a method for corrections of influencing factors. In parallel, procedures for transfer of known volumes through the use of siphons and for tank calibration by liquid level measurement are also investigated. The paper presents the first results obtained so far and the conclusions to be drawn for the elaboration of calibration and exploitation procedures suitables for use in reprocessing plants. The demonstration to transfer mass of solution with an accuracy of 0.1% is made [fr

  11. Volume Measurements of Laser-generated Pits for In Situ Geochronology using KArLE (Potassium-Argon Laser Experiment)

    Science.gov (United States)

    French, R. A.; Cohen, B. A.; Miller, J. S.

    2014-01-01

    The Potassium-Argon Laser Experiment( KArLE), is composed of two main instruments: a spectrometer as part of the Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) method and a Mass Spectrometer (MS). The LIBS laser ablates a sample and creates a plasma cloud, generating a pit in the sample. The LIBS plasma is measured for K abundance in weight percent and the released gas is measured using the MS, which calculates Ar abundance in mols. To relate the K and Ar measurements, total mass of the ablated sample is needed but can be difficult to directly measure. Instead, density and volume are used to calculate mass, where density is calculated based on the elemental composition of the rock (from the emission spectrum) and volume is determined by pit morphology. This study aims to reduce the uncertainty for KArLE by analyzing pit volume relationships in several analog materials and comparing methods of pit volume measurements and their associated uncertainties.

  12. A test of alternative estimators for volume at time 1 from remeasured point samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis A. Roesch; Edwin J. Green; Charles T. Scott

    1993-01-01

    Two estimators for volume at time 1 for use with permanent horizontal point samples are evaluated. One estimator, used traditionally, uses only the trees sampled at time 1, while the second estimator, originally presented by Roesch and coauthors (F.A. Roesch, Jr., E.J. Green, and C.T. Scott. 1989. For. Sci. 35(2):281-293). takes advantage of additional sample...

  13. Measurement of Gallbladder Volume with Ultrasonography in Pregnant Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sait Kapicioglu

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Fasting and postprandial gallbladder volumes were investigated using ultrasonography in three groups (10 subjects in each of healthy women: third trimester pregnant women, postpartum women up to 10 days after giving birth and nonpregnant controls. The scans were performed at 09:00 after a 12 h fast. After the basal measurement was taken, gallbladder volumes were rescanned in 15 min intervals for 60 mins. At the end of this period, all volunteers received a standard liquid test meal, and scans were performed again for 1 h. The mean basal gallbladder volume was 22.2±4.2 mL in the nonpregnant (control group. In the third trimester group, the basal volume was 37.8±10.5 mL – 70.5% higher than in the nonpregnant group (P<0.001. In the postpartum group, the mean basal volume was 37.9% lower (27.4±6.5 mL than that of the third trimester group (P<0.02. This basal volume was 23.6% greater than that of the control group (P<0.05. After administration of a test meal, the postprandial gallbladder volumes decreased during the first few minutes compared with baseline values. The volumes decreased by 10.2% to 39.8% (23.5±7.3 to 34.0±10.2; P<0.01 in the third trimester group, by 14.9% to 43.2% (16.6±4.3 to 23.3±5.5; P<0.01, 0.001 in the postpartum group and by 19.2% to 51.6% (11.9±3.5 to 17.9±3.6; P<0.02, 0.05, 0.01, 0.001 in the control group. Postprandial mean gallbladder volumes of the third trimester (P<0.02 and postpartum groups (P<0.02 to 0.01 were significantly different from those of the control group. In conclusion, incomplete emptying of the gallbladder after eating during the third trimester of pregnancy may contribute to cholesterol-gallstone formation, and pregnancy may thus increase the risk of gallstones.

  14. Study of accurate volume measurement system for plutonium nitrate solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hosoma, T. [Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corp., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Works

    1998-12-01

    It is important for effective safeguarding of nuclear materials to establish a technique for accurate volume measurement of plutonium nitrate solution in accountancy tank. The volume of the solution can be estimated by two differential pressures between three dip-tubes, in which the air is purged by an compressor. One of the differential pressure corresponds to the density of the solution, and another corresponds to the surface level of the solution in the tank. The measurement of the differential pressure contains many uncertain errors, such as precision of pressure transducer, fluctuation of back-pressure, generation of bubbles at the front of the dip-tubes, non-uniformity of temperature and density of the solution, pressure drop in the dip-tube, and so on. The various excess pressures at the volume measurement are discussed and corrected by a reasonable method. High precision-differential pressure measurement system is developed with a quartz oscillation type transducer which converts a differential pressure to a digital signal. The developed system is used for inspection by the government and IAEA. (M. Suetake)

  15. 21 CFR 876.1800 - Urine flow or volume measuring system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... volume measuring system. (a) Identification. A urine flow or volume measuring system is a device that measures directly or indirectly the volume or flow of urine from a patient, either during the course of... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Urine flow or volume measuring system. 876.1800...

  16. Gender moderates the association between dorsal medial prefrontal cortex volume and depressive symptoms in a subclinical sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Joshua M; Depetro, Emily; Maxwell, Joshua; Harmon-Jones, Eddie; Hajcak, Greg

    2015-08-30

    Major depressive disorder is associated with lower medial prefrontal cortex volumes. The role that gender might play in moderating this relationship and what particular medial prefrontal cortex subregion(s) might be implicated is unclear. Magnetic resonance imaging was used to assess dorsal, ventral, and anterior cingulate regions of the medial prefrontal cortex in a normative sample of male and female adults. The Depression, Anxiety, and Stress Scale (DASS) was used to measure these three variables. Voxel-based morphometry was used to test for correlations between medial prefrontal gray matter volume and depressive traits. The dorsal medial frontal cortex was correlated with greater levels of depression, but not anxiety and stress. Gender moderates this effect: in males greater levels of depression were associated with lower dorsal medial prefrontal volumes, but in females no relationship was observed. The results indicate that even within a non-clinical sample, male participants with higher levels of depressive traits tend to have lower levels of gray matter volume in the dorsal medial prefrontal cortex. Our finding is consistent with low dorsal medial prefrontal volume contributing to the development of depression in males. Future longitudinal work is needed to substantiate this possibility. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. MRI volume measurement of the brain in schizophrenia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Someya, Yasuhiro; Abe, Tetsuo; Asai, Kunihiko; Okubo, Yoshirou; Toru, Michio.

    1996-01-01

    The T1-weighted images of whole-brain three-dimensional MRI (thickness, 3 mm; interval, 3 mm) were obtained from schizophrenic patients and 20 healthy volunteers. Detailed volumetric measurement of each part in the brain was carried out. As the result, the volume of both ventricles and third ventriculus cerebri in the schizophrenic group was significantly larger than that of the control group. No significant difference was observed in terms of the volume of the bilateral frontal lobe, bilateral body of caudate nucleus division and right temporal lobe. The volume of bilateral hippocampus and left temporal lobe of the schizophrenic group was significantly smaller than that of the control group. Negative correlation was observed between symptoms and the right temporal lobe volume (r=-0.41) in the schizophrenic group. In the schizophrenic group, morphological abnormality was admitted in the hippocampus, ventriculus cerebri and left temporal lobe. The morphological abnormality of the right temporal lobe seemed to involve the expression of negative symptoms. (S.Y.)

  18. A cache-friendly sampling strategy for texture-based volume rendering on GPU

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junpeng Wang

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The texture-based volume rendering is a memory-intensive algorithm. Its performance relies heavily on the performance of the texture cache. However, most existing texture-based volume rendering methods blindly map computational resources to texture memory and result in incoherent memory access patterns, causing low cache hit rates in certain cases. The distance between samples taken by threads of an atomic scheduling unit (e.g. a warp of 32 threads in CUDA of the GPU is a crucial factor that affects the texture cache performance. Based on this fact, we present a new sampling strategy, called Warp Marching, for the ray-casting algorithm of texture-based volume rendering. The effects of different sample organizations and different thread-pixel mappings in the ray-casting algorithm are thoroughly analyzed. Also, a pipeline manner color blending approach is introduced and the power of warp-level GPU operations is leveraged to improve the efficiency of parallel executions on the GPU. In addition, the rendering performance of the Warp Marching is view-independent, and it outperforms existing empty space skipping techniques in scenarios that need to render large dynamic volumes in a low resolution image. Through a series of micro-benchmarking and real-life data experiments, we rigorously analyze our sampling strategies and demonstrate significant performance enhancements over existing sampling methods.

  19. Plasma volume changes during hypoglycaemia: the effect of arterial blood sampling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hilsted, J; Bendtsen, F; Christensen, N J

    1990-01-01

    To investigate whether previously reported changes in venous blood volume and composition induced by acute hypoglycaemia in humans are representative for the entire body we measured erythrocyte 51Cr content, haematocrit, plasma volume, intravascular albumin content and transcapillary escape rate...... hypoglycaemia. The magnitude of the changes in arterial and venous blood were not significantly different. These results indicate that the above changes in blood volume and composition are whole-body phenomena: furthermore, the major part of the changes are likely to occur in tissues other than upper extremity...

  20. Considerations for sampling nuclear materials for SNM accounting measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brouns, R.J.; Roberts, F.P.; Upson, U.L.

    1978-01-01

    This report presents principles and guidelines for sampling nuclear materials to measure chemical and isotopic content of the material. Development of sampling plans and procedures that maintain the random and systematic errors of sampling within acceptable limits for SNM accounting purposes are emphasized

  1. Drop size distribution measured by imaging: determination of the measurement volume by the calibration of the point spread function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fdida, Nicolas; Blaisot, Jean-Bernard

    2010-01-01

    Measurement of drop size distributions in a spray depends on the definition of the control volume for drop counting. For image-based techniques, this implies the definition of a depth-of-field (DOF) criterion. A sizing procedure based on an imaging model and associated with a calibration procedure is presented. Relations between image parameters and object properties are used to provide a measure of the size of the droplets, whatever the distance from the in-focus plane. A DOF criterion independent of the size of the drops and based on the determination of the width of the point spread function (PSF) is proposed. It allows to extend the measurement volume to defocused droplets and, due to the calibration of the PSF, to clearly define the depth of the measurement volume. Calibrated opaque discs, calibrated pinholes and an optical edge are used for this calibration. A comparison of the technique with a phase Doppler particle analyser and a laser diffraction granulometer is performed on an application to an industrial spray. Good agreement is found between the techniques when particular care is given to the sampling of droplets. The determination of the measurement volume is used to determine the drop concentration in the spray and the maximum drop concentration that imaging can support

  2. Activity measurements at a waste volume reduction facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richardson, J.; Lee, D.A.

    1979-01-01

    The monitoring program for Ontario Hydro's radioactive waste management site will be described, several aspects of which will be discussed in detail. The program at this facility includes categorization, volume reduction processing, and storage of solid radioactive wastes from nuclear generating stations of the CANDU type. At the present time, two types of volume reduction process are in operation - incineration and compaction. Following categorization and processing, wastes are stored in in-ground concrete trenches or tile-holes, or in above-ground quadricells. The monitoring program is divided into three areas: public safety, worker safety, and structural integrity. Development projects with respect to the monitoring program have been undertaken to achieve activity accounting for the total waste management program. In particular, a field measurement for the radioactivity content of radioactive ash containers and compacted waste drums

  3. Laser-induced incandescence: Towards quantitative soot volume fraction measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tzannis, A P; Wienbeucker, F; Beaud, P; Frey, H -M; Gerber, T; Mischler, B; Radi, P P [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1999-08-01

    Laser-Induced Incandescence has recently emerged as a versatile tool for measuring soot volume fraction in a wide range of combustion systems. In this work we investigate the essential features of the method. LII is based on the acquisition of the incandescence of soot when heated through a high power laser pulse. Initial experiments have been performed on a model laboratory flame. The behaviour of the LII signal is studied experimentally. By applying numerical calculations we investigate the possibility to obtain two-dimensional soot volume fraction distributions. For this purpose a combination of LII with other techniques is required. This part is discussed in some extent and the future work is outlined. (author) 4 figs., 3 refs.

  4. Gamma ray densitometry techniques for measuring of volume fractions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Affonso, Renato Raoni Werneck; Silva, Ademir Xavier da; Salgado, Cesar Marques, E-mail: raoniwa@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: ademir@nuclear.ufrj.br, E-mail: otero@ien.gov.br [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    Knowledge of the volume fraction in a multiphase flow is of key importance in predicting the performance of many systems and processes. It is therefore an important parameter to characterize such flows. In the context of nuclear techniques, the gamma ray densitometry is promising and this is due to its non-invasive characteristics and very reliable results. It is used in several applications for multiphase flows (water-oil-air), which are employed tools such as: computational fluid dynamics, artificial neural networks and statistical methods of radiation transport, such as the Monte Carlo method. Based on the gamma radiation techniques for measurements of volume fractions, the aim of this paper is to present several techniques developed for this purpose. (author)

  5. Gamma ray densitometry techniques for measuring of volume fractions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Affonso, Renato Raoni Werneck; Silva, Ademir Xavier da; Salgado, Cesar Marques

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge of the volume fraction in a multiphase flow is of key importance in predicting the performance of many systems and processes. It is therefore an important parameter to characterize such flows. In the context of nuclear techniques, the gamma ray densitometry is promising and this is due to its non-invasive characteristics and very reliable results. It is used in several applications for multiphase flows (water-oil-air), which are employed tools such as: computational fluid dynamics, artificial neural networks and statistical methods of radiation transport, such as the Monte Carlo method. Based on the gamma radiation techniques for measurements of volume fractions, the aim of this paper is to present several techniques developed for this purpose. (author)

  6. Bulk sample self-attenuation correction by transmission measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parker, J.L.; Reilly, T.D.

    1976-01-01

    Various methods used in either finding or avoiding the attenuation correction in the passive γ-ray assay of bulk samples are reviewed. Detailed consideration is given to the transmission method, which involves experimental determination of the sample linear attenuation coefficient by measuring the transmission through the sample of a beam of gamma rays from an external source. The method was applied to box- and cylindrically-shaped samples

  7. Results of tritium measurement in environmental samples and drainage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koike, Ryoji; Hirai, Yasuo

    1983-01-01

    In Ibaraki prefecture, the tritium concentration in the drainage from the nuclear facilities has been measured since 1974. Then, with the start of operation of the fuel reprocessing plant in 1977, the tritium concentration in environmental samples was to be measured also in order to examine the effect of the drainage on the environment. The results of the tritium measurement in Ibaraki prefecture up to about 1980 are described: sampling points, sampling and measuring methods, the tritium concentration in the drainage, air, inland water and seawater, respectively. The drainages have been taken from Japan Atomic Power Company, Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, and Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation (with the fuel reprocessing plant). The samples of air, inland water and seawater have been taken in the areas concerned. The tritium concentration was measured by a low-background liquid scintillation counter. The measured values in the environment have been generally at low level, not different from other areas. (Mori, K.)

  8. Hanford 67-series: a volume of atmospheric field diffusion measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nickola, P.W.

    1977-11-01

    This volume documents atmospheric diffusion experiments carried out at the Hanford reservation during the period 1967 to 1973. A total of 103 tracer releases during 54 release periods is tabulated. Multi-tracer releases (generally from different elevations) were made during most of the experimental periods. Release heights varied from ground level to an elevation of 111 m. Tracers were sampled simultaneously on as many as 10 arcs at distances of up to 12.8 km from the tracer release point. As many as 718 field sampling locations were employed during some of the experiments. Vertical profiles of concentration were monitored on towers during 23 of the 54 release periods. Concurrent vertical profiles of mean temperature, of mean wind speed and direction, and of direction standard deviation are also tabled for elevations up to 122 m

  9. Radiologic measurement of extraocular muscle volumes in patients with Graves' orbitopathy: a review and guideline

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bijlsma, Ward R.; Mourits, Maarten Ph

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate and compare techniques for extraocular muscle (EOM) volume measurement and to provide guidelines for future measurements. DESIGN: Systematic review. RESULTS: Existing techniques used to measure extraocular muscle volumes on radiologic scans can be divided into manual

  10. Generalized procedures for determining inspection sample sizes (related to quantitative measurements). Vol. 1: Detailed explanations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaech, J.L.; Lemaire, R.J.

    1986-11-01

    Generalized procedures have been developed to determine sample sizes in connection with the planning of inspection activities. These procedures are based on different measurement methods. They are applied mainly to Bulk Handling Facilities and Physical Inventory Verifications. The present report attempts (i) to assign to appropriate statistical testers (viz. testers for gross, partial and small defects) the measurement methods to be used, and (ii) to associate the measurement uncertainties with the sample sizes required for verification. Working papers are also provided to assist in the application of the procedures. This volume contains the detailed explanations concerning the above mentioned procedures

  11. Conservative Sample Size Determination for Repeated Measures Analysis of Covariance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Timothy M; Case, L Douglas

    2013-07-05

    In the design of a randomized clinical trial with one pre and multiple post randomized assessments of the outcome variable, one needs to account for the repeated measures in determining the appropriate sample size. Unfortunately, one seldom has a good estimate of the variance of the outcome measure, let alone the correlations among the measurements over time. We show how sample sizes can be calculated by making conservative assumptions regarding the correlations for a variety of covariance structures. The most conservative choice for the correlation depends on the covariance structure and the number of repeated measures. In the absence of good estimates of the correlations, the sample size is often based on a two-sample t-test, making the 'ultra' conservative and unrealistic assumption that there are zero correlations between the baseline and follow-up measures while at the same time assuming there are perfect correlations between the follow-up measures. Compared to the case of taking a single measurement, substantial savings in sample size can be realized by accounting for the repeated measures, even with very conservative assumptions regarding the parameters of the assumed correlation matrix. Assuming compound symmetry, the sample size from the two-sample t-test calculation can be reduced at least 44%, 56%, and 61% for repeated measures analysis of covariance by taking 2, 3, and 4 follow-up measures, respectively. The results offer a rational basis for determining a fairly conservative, yet efficient, sample size for clinical trials with repeated measures and a baseline value.

  12. Plasma volume changes during hypoglycaemia: the effect of arterial blood sampling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hilsted, J; Bendtsen, Flemming; Christensen, N J

    1990-01-01

    To investigate whether previously reported changes in venous blood volume and composition induced by acute hypoglycaemia in humans are representative for the entire body we measured erythrocyte 51Cr content, haematocrit, plasma volume, intravascular albumin content and transcapillary escape rate...... hypoglycaemia. The magnitude of the changes in arterial and venous blood were not significantly different. These results indicate that the above changes in blood volume and composition are whole-body phenomena: furthermore, the major part of the changes are likely to occur in tissues other than upper extremity...... of albumin in arterial and venous blood in seven healthy subjects before and during insulin-induced hypoglycaemia. In both vascular sites blood 51Cr content and the haematocrit increased, plasma volume and intravascular albumin content decreased and the transcapillary escape rate of albumin increased during...

  13. Measuring hydrophobic micropore volumes in geosorbents from trichloroethylene desorption data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Hefa; Reinhard, Martin

    2006-06-01

    Hydrophobic micropores can play a significant role in controlling the long-term release of organic contaminants from geosorbents. We describe a technique for quantifying the total and the hydrophobic mineral micropore volumes based on the mass of trichloroethylene (TCE) sorbed in the slow-releasing pores under dry and wet conditions, respectively. Micropore desorption models were used to differentiate the fast- and slow-desorbing fractions in desorption profiles. The micropore environment in which organic molecules were sorbed in the presence of water was probed by studying the transformation of a water-reactive compound (2,2-dichloropropane or 2,2-DCP). For sediment from an alluvial aquifer, the total and hydrophobic micropore volumes estimated using this technique were 4.65 microL/g and 0.027 microL/g (0.58% of total), respectively. In microporous silica gel A, a hydrophobic micropore volume of 0.038 microL/g (0.035% of reported total) was measured. The dehydrohalogenation rate of 2,2-DCP sorbed in hydrophobic micropores of the sediment was slower than that reported in bulk water, indicating an environment of low water activity. The results suggest that hydrolyzable organic contaminants sorbed in hydrophobic micropores react slower than in bulk water, consistent with the reported persistence of reactive contaminants in natural soils.

  14. Reheating-volume measure for random-walk inflation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winitzki, Sergei

    2008-01-01

    The recently proposed 'reheating-volume' (RV) measure promises to solve the long-standing problem of extracting probabilistic predictions from cosmological multiverse scenarios involving eternal inflation. I give a detailed description of the new measure and its applications to generic models of eternal inflation of random-walk type. For those models I derive a general formula for RV-regulated probability distributions that is suitable for numerical computations. I show that the results of the RV cutoff in random-walk type models are always gauge invariant and independent of the initial conditions at the beginning of inflation. In a toy model where equal-time cutoffs lead to the 'youngness paradox', the RV cutoff yields unbiased results that are distinct from previously proposed measures.

  15. Approximate determination of efficiency for activity measurements of cylindrical samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Helbig, W [Nuclear Engineering and Analytics Rossendorf, Inc. (VKTA), Dresden (Germany); Bothe, M [Nuclear Engineering and Analytics Rossendorf, Inc. (VKTA), Dresden (Germany)

    1997-03-01

    Some calibration samples are necessary with the same geometrical parameters but of different materials, containing known activities A homogeniously distributed. Their densities are measured, their mass absorption coefficients may be unknown. These calibration samples are positioned in the counting geometry, for instance directly on the detector. The efficiency function {epsilon}(E) for each sample is gained by measuring the gamma spectra and evaluating all usable gamma energy peaks. From these {epsilon}(E) the common valid {epsilon}{sub geom}(E) will be deduced. For this purpose the functions {epsilon}{sub mu}(E) for these samples have to be established. (orig.)

  16. Amplification volume reduction on DNA database samples using FTA™ Classic Cards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Hang Yee; Lim, Eng Seng Simon; Tan-Siew, Wai Fun

    2012-03-01

    The DNA forensic community always strives towards improvements in aspects such as sensitivity, robustness, and efficacy balanced with cost efficiency. Therefore our laboratory decided to study the feasibility of PCR amplification volume reduction using DNA entrapped in FTA™ Classic Card and to bring cost savings to the laboratory. There were a few concerns the laboratory needed to address. First, the kinetics of the amplification reaction could be significantly altered. Second, an increase in sensitivity might affect interpretation due to increased stochastic effects even though they were pristine samples. Third, statics might cause FTA punches to jump out of its allocated well into another thus causing sample-to-sample contamination. Fourth, the size of the punches might be too small for visual inspection. Last, there would be a limit to the extent of volume reduction due to evaporation and the possible need of re-injection of samples for capillary electrophoresis. The laboratory had successfully optimized a reduced amplification volume of 10 μL for FTA samples. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Improvement of 137Cs analysis in small volume seawater samples using the Ogoya underground facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirose, K.; Komura, K.; Kanazawa University, Ishikawa; Aoyama, M.; Igarashi, Y.

    2008-01-01

    137 Cs in seawater is one of the most powerful tracers of water motion. Large volumes of samples have been required for determination of 137 Cs in seawater. This paper describes improvement of separation and purification processes of 137 Cs in seawater, which includes purification of 137 Cs using hexachloroplatinic acid in addition to ammonium phosphomolybdate (AMP) precipitation. As a result, we succeeded the 137 Cs determination in seawater with a smaller sample volume of 10 liter by using ultra-low background gamma-spectrometry in the Ogoya underground facility. 137 Cs detection limit was about 0.1 mBq (counting time: 10 6 s). This method is applied to determine 137 Cs in small samples of the South Pacific deep waters. (author)

  18. Gamut Volume Index: a color preference metric based on meta-analysis and optimized colour samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qiang; Huang, Zheng; Xiao, Kaida; Pointer, Michael R; Westland, Stephen; Luo, M Ronnier

    2017-07-10

    A novel metric named Gamut Volume Index (GVI) is proposed for evaluating the colour preference of lighting. This metric is based on the absolute gamut volume of optimized colour samples. The optimal colour set of the proposed metric was obtained by optimizing the weighted average correlation between the metric predictions and the subjective ratings for 8 psychophysical studies. The performance of 20 typical colour metrics was also investigated, which included colour difference based metrics, gamut based metrics, memory based metrics as well as combined metrics. It was found that the proposed GVI outperformed the existing counterparts, especially for the conditions where correlated colour temperatures differed.

  19. Note: Development of a microfabricated sensor to measure thermal conductivity of picoliter scale liquid samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Byoung Kyoo; Yi, Namwoo; Park, Jaesung; Kim, Dongsik

    2012-10-01

    This paper presents a thermal analysis device, which can measure thermal conductivity of picoliter scale liquid sample. We employ the three omega method with a microfabricated AC thermal sensor with nanometer width heater. The liquid sample is confined by a micro-well structure fabricated on the sensor surface. The performance of the instrument was verified by measuring the thermal conductivity of 27-picoliter samples of de-ionized (DI) water, ethanol, methanol, and DI water-ethanol mixtures with accuracies better than 3%. Furthermore, another analytical scheme allows real-time thermal conductivity measurement with 5% accuracy. To the best of our knowledge, this technique requires the smallest volume of sample to measure thermal property ever.

  20. High-temperature ultrasonic measurements applied to directly heated samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moore, R.I.; Taylor, R.E.

    1984-01-01

    High-temperature ultrasonic measurements of Young's modulus were made of graphite samples heated directly. The samples were cylindrical rods of the same geometry as that used in the multiproperty apparatus for simultaneous/consecutive measurements of a number of thermophysical properties to high temperatures. The samples were resonated in simple longitudinal vibration modes. Measurements were performed up to 2000 K. Incorporation of ultrasonic measurements of Young's modulus in the capabilities of the multiproperty apparatus is valuable because (i) ultrasonic measurements can be related to normal destructive measurements of this property; (ii) they can be used for screening materials or acceptance testing of specimens; (iii) they can be used to increase the understanding of thermophysical properties and property correlations. (author)

  1. Optimizing human semen cryopreservation by reducing test vial volume and repetitive test vial sampling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Christian F S; Ohl, Dana A; Parker, Walter R

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate optimal test vial (TV) volume, utility and reliability of TVs, intermediate temperature exposure (-88°C to -93°C) before cryostorage, cryostorage in nitrogen vapor (VN2) and liquid nitrogen (LN2), and long-term stability of VN2 cryostorage of human semen. DESIGN......: Prospective clinical laboratory study. SETTING: University assisted reproductive technology (ART) laboratory. PATIENT(S): A total of 594 patients undergoing semen analysis and cryopreservation. INTERVENTION(S): Semen analysis, cryopreservation with different intermediate steps and in different volumes (50......-1,000 μL), and long-term storage in LN2 or VN2. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE(S): Optimal TV volume, prediction of cryosurvival (CS) in ART procedure vials (ARTVs) with pre-freeze semen parameters and TV CS, post-thaw motility after two- or three-step semen cryopreservation and cryostorage in VN2 and LN2. RESULT...

  2. A thermostat for precise measurements of thermoresistance of small samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rusinowski, Z.; Slowinski, B.; Winiewski, R.

    1996-01-01

    In the work a simple experimental set-up is described in which special attention is paid to the important problem of the thermal stability of thermoresistance measurements of small samples of manganin

  3. Measuring radioactive half-lives via statistical sampling in practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorusso, G.; Collins, S. M.; Jagan, K.; Hitt, G. W.; Sadek, A. M.; Aitken-Smith, P. M.; Bridi, D.; Keightley, J. D.

    2017-10-01

    The statistical sampling method for the measurement of radioactive decay half-lives exhibits intriguing features such as that the half-life is approximately the median of a distribution closely resembling a Cauchy distribution. Whilst initial theoretical considerations suggested that in certain cases the method could have significant advantages, accurate measurements by statistical sampling have proven difficult, for they require an exercise in non-standard statistical analysis. As a consequence, no half-life measurement using this method has yet been reported and no comparison with traditional methods has ever been made. We used a Monte Carlo approach to address these analysis difficulties, and present the first experimental measurement of a radioisotope half-life (211Pb) by statistical sampling in good agreement with the literature recommended value. Our work also focused on the comparison between statistical sampling and exponential regression analysis, and concluded that exponential regression achieves generally the highest accuracy.

  4. A self-sampling method to obtain large volumes of undiluted cervicovaginal secretions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boskey, Elizabeth R; Moench, Thomas R; Hees, Paul S; Cone, Richard A

    2003-02-01

    Studies of vaginal physiology and pathophysiology sometime require larger volumes of undiluted cervicovaginal secretions than can be obtained by current methods. A convenient method for self-sampling these secretions outside a clinical setting can facilitate such studies of reproductive health. The goal was to develop a vaginal self-sampling method for collecting large volumes of undiluted cervicovaginal secretions. A menstrual collection device (the Instead cup) was inserted briefly into the vagina to collect secretions that were then retrieved from the cup by centrifugation in a 50-ml conical tube. All 16 women asked to perform this procedure found it feasible and acceptable. Among 27 samples, an average of 0.5 g of secretions (range, 0.1-1.5 g) was collected. This is a rapid and convenient self-sampling method for obtaining relatively large volumes of undiluted cervicovaginal secretions. It should prove suitable for a wide range of assays, including those involving sexually transmitted diseases, microbicides, vaginal physiology, immunology, and pathophysiology.

  5. An instrumentation for control and measurement of activated mineral samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skaarup, P.

    1976-01-01

    A description is given of an instrumentation for control of a pneumatic tube system used to transport mineral samples for activation in a reactor and from there to a detector arrangement. A possible content of uranium in the samples can be seen from the radiation measured. The instrumentation includes a PDP-11 computer and a CAMAC crate

  6. Surface Resistance Measurements of LHC Dipole Beam Screen Samples

    CERN Document Server

    Caspers, Friedhelm; Ruggiero, F; Tan, J; Tsutsui, H

    2000-01-01

    An estimate of the resistive losses in the LHC dipole beam screen is given from cold surface resistance measurements using the shielded pair technique. Several beam screen samples have been evaluated, with different copper coating methods, including a sample with ribbed surface envisaged to reduce electron cloud losses thanks to its low reflectivity. Experimental data, derived by a proper analysis of the measured Q-factors and including error estimates are compared with theoretical predictions of the anomalous skin effect.

  7. Evaluation of right ventricular volumes measured by magnetic resonance imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møgelvang, J; Stubgaard, M; Thomsen, C

    1988-01-01

    stroke volume was calculated as the difference between end-diastolic and end-systolic volume and compared to left ventricular stroke volume and to stroke volume determined simultaneously by a classical indicator dilution technique. There was good agreement between right ventricular stroke volume......Right ventricular volumes were determined in 12 patients with different levels of right and left ventricular function by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) using an ECG gated multisection technique in planes perpendicular to the diastolic position of the interventricular septum. Right ventricular...... determined by MRI and by the indicator dilution method and between right and left ventricular stroke volume determined by MRI. Thus, MRI gives reliable values not only for left ventricular volumes, but also for right ventricular volumes. By MRI it is possible to obtain volumes from both ventricles...

  8. Volume measurement of multiple sclerosis lesions with magnetic resonance images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wicks, D.A.G.; Tofts, P.S.; Miller, D.H.; Du Boulay, G.H.; Feinstein, A.; Harvey, I.; Brenner, R.; McDonald, W.I.; Sacares, R.P.

    1992-01-01

    The ability to visualise multiple sclerosis lesions in vivo with magnetic resonance imaging suggests an important role in monitoring the course of the disease. In order to help the long-term assessment of prospective treatments, a semi-automated technique for measuring lesion volume has been developed to provide a quantitative index of disease progression. Results are presented from a preliminary study with a single patient and compared to measurements taken from lesion outlines traced by a neuroradiologist, two neurologists and a technician. The semi-automated technique achieved a precision of 6% compared to a range of 12-33% for the manual tracing method. It also reduced the human interaction time from at least 60 min to 15 min. (orig.)

  9. Intelligent sampling for the measurement of structured surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, J; Jiang, X; Blunt, L A; Scott, P J; Leach, R K

    2012-01-01

    Uniform sampling in metrology has known drawbacks such as coherent spectral aliasing and a lack of efficiency in terms of measuring time and data storage. The requirement for intelligent sampling strategies has been outlined over recent years, particularly where the measurement of structured surfaces is concerned. Most of the present research on intelligent sampling has focused on dimensional metrology using coordinate-measuring machines with little reported on the area of surface metrology. In the research reported here, potential intelligent sampling strategies for surface topography measurement of structured surfaces are investigated by using numerical simulation and experimental verification. The methods include the jittered uniform method, low-discrepancy pattern sampling and several adaptive methods which originate from computer graphics, coordinate metrology and previous research by the authors. By combining the use of advanced reconstruction methods and feature-based characterization techniques, the measurement performance of the sampling methods is studied using case studies. The advantages, stability and feasibility of these techniques for practical measurements are discussed. (paper)

  10. Idaho field experiment 1981. Volume 2: measurement data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Start, G E; Sagendorf, J F; Ackermann, G R; Cate, J H; Hukari, N F; Dickson, C R

    1984-04-01

    The 1981 Idaho Field Experiment was conducted in southeastern Idaho over the upper Snake River Plain. Nine test-day case studies were conducted between July 15 and 30, 1981. Releases of SF/sub 6/ gaseous tracer were made for 8-hour periods from 46m above ground. Tracer was sampled hourly, for 12 sequential hours, at about 100 locations within an area 24km square. Also, a single total integrated sample of about 30 hours duration was collected at approximately 100 sites within an area 48 by 72km square (using 6km spacings). Extensive tower profiles of meteorology at the release point were collected. RAWINSONDES, RABALS and PIBALS were collected at 3 to 5 sites. Horizontal, low-altitude winds were monitored using the INEL MESONET. SF/sub 6/ tracer plume releases were marked with co-located oil fog releases and bi-hourly sequential launches of tetroon pairs. Aerial LIDAR observations of the oil fog plume and airborne samples of SF/sub 6/ were collected. High altitude aerial photographs of daytime plumes were collected. Volume II lists the data in tabular form or cites the special supplemental reports by other participating contractors. While the primary user file and the data archive are maintained on 9 track/1600 cpi magnetic tapes, listings of the individual values are provided for the user who either cannot utilize the tapes or wishes to preview the data. The accuracies and quality of these data are described.

  11. Measurement properties and usability of non-contact scanners for measuring transtibial residual limb volume.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kofman, Rianne; Beekman, Anna M; Emmelot, Cornelis H; Geertzen, Jan H B; Dijkstra, Pieter U

    2018-06-01

    Non-contact scanners may have potential for measurement of residual limb volume. Different non-contact scanners have been introduced during the last decades. Reliability and usability (practicality and user friendliness) should be assessed before introducing these systems in clinical practice. The aim of this study was to analyze the measurement properties and usability of four non-contact scanners (TT Design, Omega Scanner, BioSculptor Bioscanner, and Rodin4D Scanner). Quasi experimental. Nine (geometric and residual limb) models were measured on two occasions, each consisting of two sessions, thus in total 4 sessions. In each session, four observers used the four systems for volume measurement. Mean for each model, repeatability coefficients for each system, variance components, and their two-way interactions of measurement conditions were calculated. User satisfaction was evaluated with the Post-Study System Usability Questionnaire. Systematic differences between the systems were found in volume measurements. Most of the variances were explained by the model (97%), while error variance was 3%. Measurement system and the interaction between system and model explained 44% of the error variance. Repeatability coefficient of the systems ranged from 0.101 (Omega Scanner) to 0.131 L (Rodin4D). Differences in Post-Study System Usability Questionnaire scores between the systems were small and not significant. The systems were reliable in determining residual limb volume. Measurement systems and the interaction between system and residual limb model explained most of the error variances. The differences in repeatability coefficient and usability between the four CAD/CAM systems were small. Clinical relevance If accurate measurements of residual limb volume are required (in case of research), modern non-contact scanners should be taken in consideration nowadays.

  12. Examining the effect of psychopathic traits on gray matter volume in a community substance abuse sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cope, Lora M; Shane, Matthew S; Segall, Judith M; Nyalakanti, Prashanth K; Stevens, Michael C; Pearlson, Godfrey D; Calhoun, Vince D; Kiehl, Kent A

    2012-11-30

    Psychopathy is believed to be associated with brain abnormalities in both paralimbic (i.e., orbitofrontal cortex, insula, temporal pole, parahippocampal gyrus, posterior cingulate) and limbic (i.e., amygdala, hippocampus, anterior cingulate) regions. Recent structural imaging studies in both community and prison samples are beginning to support this view. Sixty-six participants, recruited from community corrections centers, were administered the Hare psychopathy checklist-revised (PCL-R), and underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Voxel-based morphometry was used to test the hypothesis that psychopathic traits would be associated with gray matter reductions in limbic and paralimbic regions. Effects of lifetime drug and alcohol use on gray matter volume were covaried. Psychopathic traits were negatively associated with gray matter volumes in right insula and right hippocampus. Additionally, psychopathic traits were positively associated with gray matter volumes in bilateral orbital frontal cortex and right anterior cingulate. Exploratory regression analyses indicated that gray matter volumes within right hippocampus and left orbital frontal cortex combined to explain 21.8% of the variance in psychopathy scores. These results support the notion that psychopathic traits are associated with abnormal limbic and paralimbic gray matter volume. Furthermore, gray matter increases in areas shown to be functionally impaired suggest that the structure-function relationship may be more nuanced than previously thought. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Determination and optimization of spatial samples for distributed measurements.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huo, Xiaoming (Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA); Tran, Hy D.; Shilling, Katherine Meghan; Kim, Heeyong (Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA)

    2010-10-01

    There are no accepted standards for determining how many measurements to take during part inspection or where to take them, or for assessing confidence in the evaluation of acceptance based on these measurements. The goal of this work was to develop a standard method for determining the number of measurements, together with the spatial distribution of measurements and the associated risks for false acceptance and false rejection. Two paths have been taken to create a standard method for selecting sampling points. A wavelet-based model has been developed to select measurement points and to determine confidence in the measurement after the points are taken. An adaptive sampling strategy has been studied to determine implementation feasibility on commercial measurement equipment. Results using both real and simulated data are presented for each of the paths.

  14. Brachytherapy dose-volume histogram computations using optimized stratified sampling methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karouzakis, K.; Lahanas, M.; Milickovic, N.; Giannouli, S.; Baltas, D.; Zamboglou, N.

    2002-01-01

    A stratified sampling method for the efficient repeated computation of dose-volume histograms (DVHs) in brachytherapy is presented as used for anatomy based brachytherapy optimization methods. The aim of the method is to reduce the number of sampling points required for the calculation of DVHs for the body and the PTV. From the DVHs are derived the quantities such as Conformity Index COIN and COIN integrals. This is achieved by using partial uniform distributed sampling points with a density in each region obtained from a survey of the gradients or the variance of the dose distribution in these regions. The shape of the sampling regions is adapted to the patient anatomy and the shape and size of the implant. For the application of this method a single preprocessing step is necessary which requires only a few seconds. Ten clinical implants were used to study the appropriate number of sampling points, given a required accuracy for quantities such as cumulative DVHs, COIN indices and COIN integrals. We found that DVHs of very large tissue volumes surrounding the PTV, and also COIN distributions, can be obtained using a factor of 5-10 times smaller the number of sampling points in comparison with uniform distributed points

  15. Atomic force microscopy imaging to measure precipitate volume fraction in nickel-based superalloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bourhettar, A.; Troyon, M.; Hazotte, A.

    1995-01-01

    In nickel-based superalloys, quantitative analysis of scanning electron microscopy images fails in providing accurate microstructural data, whereas more efficient techniques are very time-consuming. As an alternative approach, the authors propose to perform quantitative analysis of atomic force microscopy images of polished/etched surfaces (quantitative microprofilometry). This permits the measurement of microstructural parameters and the depth of etching, which is the main source of measurement bias. Thus, nonbiased estimations can be obtained by extrapolation of the measurements up to zero etching depth. In this article, the authors used this approach to estimate the volume fraction of γ' precipitates in a nickel-based superalloy single crystal. Atomic force microscopy images of samples etched for different times show definition, homogeneity, and contrast high enough to perform image analysis. The result after extrapolation is in very good agreement with volume fraction values available from published reports

  16. Analytical techniques for measurement of 99Tc in environmental samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1979-01-01

    Three new methods have been developed for measuring 99 Tc in environmental samples. The most sensitive method is isotope dilution mass spectrometry, which allows measurement of about 1 x 10 -12 grams of 99 Tc. Results on analysis of five samples by this method compare very well with values obtained by a second independent method, which involves counting of beta particles from 99 Tc and internal conversion electrons from /sup 97m/Tc. A third method involving electrothermal atomic absorption has also been developed. Although this method is not as sensitive as the first two techniques, the cost per analysis is expected to be considerably less for certain types of samples

  17. Sampling and Control Circuit Board for an Inertial Measurement Unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chelmins, David T (Inventor); Powis, Richard T., Jr. (Inventor); Sands, Obed (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A circuit board that serves as a control and sampling interface to an inertial measurement unit ("IMU") is provided. The circuit board is also configured to interface with a local oscillator and an external trigger pulse. The circuit board is further configured to receive the external trigger pulse from an external source that time aligns the local oscillator and initiates sampling of the inertial measurement device for data at precise time intervals based on pulses from the local oscillator. The sampled data may be synchronized by the circuit board with other sensors of a navigation system via the trigger pulse.

  18. Effects of gauge volume on pseudo-strain induced in strain measurement using time-of-flight neutron diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Hiroshi; Harjo, Stefanus; Abe, Jun; Xu, Pingguang; Aizawa, Kazuya; Akita, Koichi

    2013-01-01

    Spurious or pseudo-strains observed in time-of-flight (TOF) neutron diffraction due to neutron attenuation, surface-effects and a strain distribution within the gauge volume were investigated. Experiments were carried out on annealed and bent ferritic steel bars to test these effects. The most representative position in the gauge volume corresponds to the neutron-weighted center of gravity (ncog), which takes into account variations in intensity within the gauge volume due to neutron attenuation and/or absence of material in the gauge volume. The average strain in the gauge volume was observed to be weighted towards the ncog position but following an increase in the size of the gauge volume the weighted average strain was changed because of the change in the ncog position when a strain gradient appeared within the gauge volume. On the other hand, typical pseudo-strains, which are well known, did appear in through-surface strain measurements when the gauge volume was incompletely filled by the sample. Tensile pseudo-strains due to the surface-effect increased near the sample surface and exhibited a similar trend regardless of the size of the gauge volume, while the pseudo-strains increased faster for the smaller gauge volume. Furthermore, a pseudo-strain due to a change in the ncog position was observed even when the gauge volume was perfectly filled in the sample, and it increased with an increase in the size of the gauge volume. These pseudo-strains measured were much larger than those simulated by the conventional modeling, whereas they were simulated by taking into account an incident neutron beam divergence additionally in the model. Therefore, the incident divergence of the incident neutron beam must be carefully designed to avoid pseudo-strains in time-of-flight neutron diffractometry

  19. The determination of chromium-50 in human blood and its utilization for blood volume measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeisler, R.; Young, I.

    1986-01-01

    Possible relationships between insufficient blood volume increases during pregnancy and infant mortality could be established with an adequate measurement procedure. An accurate and precise technique for blood volume measurements has been found in the isotope dilution technique using chromium-51 as a label for red blood cells. However, in a study involving pregnant women, only stable isotopes can be used for labeling. Stable chromium-50 can be determined in total blood samples before and after dilution experiments by neutron activation analysis (NAA) or mass spectrometry. However, both techniques may be affected by insufficient sensitivity and contamination problems at the inherently low natural chromium concentrations to be measured in the blood. NAA procedures involving irradiations with highly thermalized neutrons at a fluence rate of 2x10 13 n/cm 2 xs and low background gamma spectrometry are applied to the analysis of total blood. Natural levels of chromium-50 in human and animal blood have been found to be <0.1 ng/mL; i.e., total chromium levels of <3 ng/mL. Based on the NAA procedure, a new approach to the blood volume measurement via chromium-50 isotope dilution has been developed which utilizes the ratio of the induced activities of chromium-51 to the iron-59 in three blood samples taken from each individual, namely blank, labeled and diluted labeled blood. (author)

  20. Methods for Sampling and Measurement of Compressed Air Contaminants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stroem, L.

    1976-10-01

    In order to improve the technique for measuring oil and water entrained in a compressed air stream, a laboratory study has been made of some methods for sampling and measurement. For this purpose water or oil as artificial contaminants were injected in thin streams into a test loop, carrying dry compressed air. Sampling was performed in a vertical run, down-stream of the injection point. Wall attached liquid, coarse droplet flow, and fine droplet flow were sampled separately. The results were compared with two-phase flow theory and direct observation of liquid behaviour. In a study of sample transport through narrow tubes, it was observed that, below a certain liquid loading, the sample did not move, the liquid remaining stationary on the tubing wall. The basic analysis of the collected samples was made by gravimetric methods. Adsorption tubes were used with success to measure water vapour. A humidity meter with a sensor of the aluminium oxide type was found to be unreliable. Oil could be measured selectively by a flame ionization detector, the sample being pretreated in an evaporation- condensation unit

  1. Methods for Sampling and Measurement of Compressed Air Contaminants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stroem, L

    1976-10-15

    In order to improve the technique for measuring oil and water entrained in a compressed air stream, a laboratory study has been made of some methods for sampling and measurement. For this purpose water or oil as artificial contaminants were injected in thin streams into a test loop, carrying dry compressed air. Sampling was performed in a vertical run, down-stream of the injection point. Wall attached liquid, coarse droplet flow, and fine droplet flow were sampled separately. The results were compared with two-phase flow theory and direct observation of liquid behaviour. In a study of sample transport through narrow tubes, it was observed that, below a certain liquid loading, the sample did not move, the liquid remaining stationary on the tubing wall. The basic analysis of the collected samples was made by gravimetric methods. Adsorption tubes were used with success to measure water vapour. A humidity meter with a sensor of the aluminium oxide type was found to be unreliable. Oil could be measured selectively by a flame ionization detector, the sample being pretreated in an evaporation- condensation unit

  2. Non-Contact Conductivity Measurement for Automated Sample Processing Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beegle, Luther W.; Kirby, James P.

    2012-01-01

    A new method has been developed for monitoring and control of automated sample processing and preparation especially focusing on desalting of samples before analytical analysis (described in more detail in Automated Desalting Apparatus, (NPO-45428), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 34, No. 8 (August 2010), page 44). The use of non-contact conductivity probes, one at the inlet and one at the outlet of the solid phase sample preparation media, allows monitoring of the process, and acts as a trigger for the start of the next step in the sequence (see figure). At each step of the muti-step process, the system is flushed with low-conductivity water, which sets the system back to an overall low-conductivity state. This measurement then triggers the next stage of sample processing protocols, and greatly minimizes use of consumables. In the case of amino acid sample preparation for desalting, the conductivity measurement will define three key conditions for the sample preparation process. First, when the system is neutralized (low conductivity, by washing with excess de-ionized water); second, when the system is acidified, by washing with a strong acid (high conductivity); and third, when the system is at a basic condition of high pH (high conductivity). Taken together, this non-contact conductivity measurement for monitoring sample preparation will not only facilitate automation of the sample preparation and processing, but will also act as a way to optimize the operational time and use of consumables

  3. Variable screening and ranking using sampling-based sensitivity measures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Y-T.; Mohanty, Sitakanta

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents a methodology for screening insignificant random variables and ranking significant important random variables using sensitivity measures including two cumulative distribution function (CDF)-based and two mean-response based measures. The methodology features (1) using random samples to compute sensitivities and (2) using acceptance limits, derived from the test-of-hypothesis, to classify significant and insignificant random variables. Because no approximation is needed in either the form of the performance functions or the type of continuous distribution functions representing input variables, the sampling-based approach can handle highly nonlinear functions with non-normal variables. The main characteristics and effectiveness of the sampling-based sensitivity measures are investigated using both simple and complex examples. Because the number of samples needed does not depend on the number of variables, the methodology appears to be particularly suitable for problems with large, complex models that have large numbers of random variables but relatively few numbers of significant random variables

  4. Interval sampling methods and measurement error: a computer simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirth, Oliver; Slaven, James; Taylor, Matthew A

    2014-01-01

    A simulation study was conducted to provide a more thorough account of measurement error associated with interval sampling methods. A computer program simulated the application of momentary time sampling, partial-interval recording, and whole-interval recording methods on target events randomly distributed across an observation period. The simulation yielded measures of error for multiple combinations of observation period, interval duration, event duration, and cumulative event duration. The simulations were conducted up to 100 times to yield measures of error variability. Although the present simulation confirmed some previously reported characteristics of interval sampling methods, it also revealed many new findings that pertain to each method's inherent strengths and weaknesses. The analysis and resulting error tables can help guide the selection of the most appropriate sampling method for observation-based behavioral assessments. © Society for the Experimental Analysis of Behavior.

  5. Rapid methods for measuring radionuclides in food and environmental samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perkins, Richard W.

    1995-01-01

    The application of ICP/mass spectrometry for the isotopic analysis of environmental samples, the use of drum assayers for measuring radionuclides in food and a rapid procedure for the measurement of the transuranic elements and thorium, performed at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory are discussed

  6. Bioimpedance measurement of body water correlates with measured volume balance in injured patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosemurgy, A S; Rodriguez, E; Hart, M B; Kurto, H Z; Albrink, M H

    1993-06-01

    Bioimpedance technology is being used increasingly to determine drug volume of distribution, body water status, and nutrition repletion. Its accuracy in patients experiencing large volume flux is not established. To address this, we undertook this prospective study in 54 consecutive seriously injured adults who had emergency celiotomy soon after arrival in the emergency department. Bioimpedance measurements were obtained in the emergency department before the patient was transported to the operating room, on completion of celiotomy, and 24 hours and 48 hours after celiotomy. Bioimpedance measurements of body water were compared with measured fluid balance. If insensible losses are subtracted from measured fluid balance, the percentage of body weight, which is body water determined by bioimpedance, closely follows fluid flux. This study supports the use of bioimpedance measurements in determining total body water even during periods of surgery, blood loss, and vigorous resuscitation.

  7. Transportable aerosol sampling station with fixed volume (15 l) DMPA-15

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giolu, G.; Guta, V.

    1999-01-01

    The mobile installation is used for air-sampling operations with fixed intake volumes, to be analysed by laboratories of routine environmental air monitoring. The station consists of several units, installed on a two-wheel mobile carriage-type platform: - a double - diaphragm pump (ensuring oil separation) that provides air intake and its evacuation to the air-analysers. The sampling and control unit has the following functions: - intake ensured by the pump that aspirates fixed volumes of air from the ambient atmosphere and feeding with it an inflatable rubber chamber. Air intake is automatically stopped as the cushion is filled up completely. A separation clamp is provided to seal up the cushion; - exhaust - allows the residual air to be evacuated from the cushion, ensuring its 'self-cleaning'; - shut down, manually operated; - analyse, the aerosol containing sample is aspirated from the inflatable rubber chamber and evacuated through a flow regulator to the analyser; - stop, canceling any previous commands. A relay unit controls the pneumatic lines and a pressure relay provides automatic stop of air intake process. The following technical features are given: - The fixed air volume in the chamber, 15 l - the air flow at the exit from the flow-meter, 0 - 15 l/min; - power requirements, 220 V/ 50 Hz; - power consumption, max. 1,5 kW; - overall dimensions, 460 x 500 x 820 mm; - weight, 53 kg. (authors)

  8. Evaluation of the effects of insufficient blood volume samples on the performance of blood glucose self-test meters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfützner, Andreas; Schipper, Christina; Ramljak, Sanja; Flacke, Frank; Sieber, Jochen; Forst, Thomas; Musholt, Petra B

    2013-11-01

    Accuracy of blood glucose readings is (among other things) dependent on the test strip being completely filled with sufficient sample volume. The devices are supposed to display an error message in case of incomplete filling. This laboratory study was performed to test the performance of 31 commercially available devices in case of incomplete strip filling. Samples with two different glucose levels (60-90 and 300-350 mg/dl) were used to generate three different sample volumes: 0.20 µl (too low volume for any device), 0.32 µl (borderline volume), and 1.20 µl (low but supposedly sufficient volume for all devices). After a point-of-care capillary reference measurement (StatStrip, NovaBiomedical), the meter strip was filled (6x) with the respective volume, and the response of the meters (two devices) was documented (72 determinations/meter type). Correct response was defined as either an error message indicating incomplete filling or a correct reading (±20% compared with reference reading). Only five meters showed 100% correct responses [BGStar and iBGStar (both Sanofi), ACCU-CHEK Compact+ and ACCU-CHEK Mobile (both Roche Diagnostics), OneTouch Verio (LifeScan)]. The majority of the meters (17) had up to 10% incorrect reactions [predominantly incorrect readings with sufficient volume; Precision Xceed and Xtra, FreeStyle Lite, and Freedom Lite (all Abbott); GlucoCard+ and GlucoMen GM (both Menarini); Contour, Contour USB, and Breeze2 (all Bayer); OneTouch Ultra Easy, Ultra 2, and Ultra Smart (all LifeScan); Wellion Dialog and Premium (both MedTrust); FineTouch (Terumo); ACCU-CHEK Aviva (Roche); and GlucoTalk (Axis-Shield)]. Ten percent to 20% incorrect reactions were seen with OneTouch Vita (LifeScan), ACCU-CHEK Aviva Nano (Roche), OmniTest+ (BBraun), and AlphaChek+ (Berger Med). More than 20% incorrect reactions were obtained with Pura (Ypsomed), GlucoCard Meter and GlucoMen LX (both Menarini), Elite (Bayer), and MediTouch (Medisana). In summary, partial and

  9. Reheating-volume measure in the string theory landscape

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winitzki, Sergei

    2008-01-01

    I recently proposed the ''reheating-volume'' (RV) prescription as a possible solution to the measure problem in ''multiverse'' cosmology. The goal of this work is to extend the RV measure to scenarios involving bubble nucleation, such as the string theory landscape. In the spirit of the RV prescription, I propose to calculate the distribution of observable quantities in a landscape that is conditioned in probability to nucleate a finite total number of bubbles to the future of an initial bubble. A general formula for the relative number of bubbles of different types can be derived. I show that the RV measure is well defined and independent of the choice of the initial bubble type, as long as that type supports further bubble nucleation. Applying the RV measure to a generic landscape, I find that the abundance of Boltzmann brains is always negligibly small compared with the abundance of ordinary observers in the bubbles of the same type. As an illustration, I present explicit results for a toy landscape containing four vacuum states, and for landscapes with a single high-energy vacuum and a large number of low-energy vacua.

  10. Relativistic rise measurements with very fine sampling intervals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ludlam, T.; Platner, E.D.; Polychronakos, V.A.; Lindenbaum, S.J.; Kramer, M.A.; Teramoto, Y.

    1980-01-01

    The motivation of this work was to determine whether the technique of charged particle identification via the relativistic rise in the ionization loss can be significantly improved by virtue of very small sampling intervals. A fast-sampling ADC and a longitudinal drift geometry were used to provide a large number of samples from a single drift chamber gap, achieving sampling intervals roughly 10 times smaller than any previous study. A single layer drift chamber was used, and tracks of 1 meter length were simulated by combining together samples from many identified particles in this detector. These data were used to study the resolving power for particle identification as a function of sample size, averaging technique, and the number of discrimination levels (ADC bits) used for pulse height measurements

  11. Bulk-volume behavior of pressure-densified amorphous polymers and free-volume behavior by positron annihilation lifetime measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagiwara, K.; Ougizawa, T.; Inoue, T.; Hirata, K.; Kobayashi, Y.

    2001-01-01

    In order to study the nature of amorphous polymers, the free volume contribution on the bulk volume change was investigated on the basis of the relationship between the bulk volume behavior by PVT (pressure-volume-temperature) measurement and the free volume behavior by PALS (positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy) measurement. A densified glass, prepared by cooling at constant rate from the melt state temperature to room temperature under 200 MPa, showed smaller bulk volume and free volume than non-densified glass. And the densified glass showed not only the same glass transition temperature (Tg) as non-densified glass but also another transition at lower temperature around (Tg-30 C). In this glass-glass transition, both the bulk volume and free volume of densified glass recovered to those of non-densified glass. Moreover the densified glass showed different thermal behavior from the glass which was enthalpy-relaxed under atmospheric pressure. From those results, it was considered that the free volume behavior largely related to the behavior of amorphous polymers. (orig.)

  12. Improved wrist pannus volume measurement from contrast-enhanced MRI in rheumatoid arthritis using shuffle transform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xanthopoulos, Emily; Hutchinson, Charles E; Adams, Judith E; Bruce, Ian N; Nash, Anthony F P; Holmes, Andrew P; Taylor, Christopher J; Waterton, John C

    2007-01-01

    Contrast-enhanced MRI is of value in assessing rheumatoid pannus in the hand, but the images are not always easy to quantitate. To develop and evaluate an improved measurement of volume of enhancing pannus (VEP) in the hand in human rheumatoid arthritis (RA). MR images of the hand and wrist were obtained for 14 patients with RA at 0, 1 and 13 weeks. Volume of enhancing pannus was measured on images created by subtracting precontrast T1-weighted images from contrast-enhanced T1-weighted images using a shuffle transformation technique. Maximum intensity projection (MIP) and 3D volume rendering of the images were used as a guide to identify the pannus and any contrast-enhanced veins. Visualisation of pannus was much improved following the shuffle transform. Between 0 weeks and 1 week, the mean value of the within-subject coefficient of variation (CoV) was 0.13 and the estimated total CoV was 0.15. There was no evidence of significant increased variability within the 13-week interval for the complete sample of patients. Volume of enhancing pannus can be measured reproducibly in the rheumatoid hand using 3D contrast-enhanced MRI and shuffle transform.

  13. Accuracy of Prader orchidometer in measuring testicular volume

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2012-10-21

    Oct 21, 2012 ... testicular volumes were then determined by water displacement of the testis. ... tubules and germ cells. ... in a warm room after application of a heating pad (we used ... This mean difference in testicular volume between Prader.

  14. Traceability and measurement uncertainty in sample preparation (W5)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wegscheider, W.; Walner, U.; Moser, J.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: Very few chemical measurements are being made directly on the object of interest and sample preparation is thus the rule rather than the exception in daily practice. Unfortunately the operations undertaken in the course of sample preparation are prone to rendering a sample useless for the purpose of interpreting a measurement performed on it, as it might not represent the original and relevant status any longer. Sample preparation along with sampling itself constitutes therefore a procedure that leads to a loss of representation of the original specimen or population. On the other hand it is also not sufficient to confine aspects of traceability and measurement uncertainty to the ultimate measurement, as the key purpose of measuring is to supply adequate data for some kind of decision, be it in production, in health, in the environment, or indeed in any other circumstance. These considerations have led to severe confusion in the community as to what traceability really means in chemistry. CITAC and EURACHEM have only recently issued a preliminary document that clarifies these issues and gives a firm handle on the future development of quality assurance in analytical chemistry. In this talk it will be attempted to outline the general ideas and procedures that lead to traceability of analytical chemical results accompanied by valid statements of their uncertainty. It will be argued that the central element in achieving these goals is a well-designed validation study that frequently goes beyond those requirements currently laid out in official documents. (author)

  15. Plutonium measurements in Hanford DOE site waste samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dewberry, R.A.; Boyce, W.T.

    1999-01-01

    Development work to prepare a method to measure absolute 239 Pu content and Pu-isotopics by ICP-MS in acidified Hanford DOE-site samples which are very high in 90 Sr, 99 Tc, and 137 Cs radioactivity and which are frequently high in organic carbon content is described. Samples with very large 90 Sr and 137 Cs contents have historically been difficult to analyze for Pu content by each of three alpha-counting techniques in use at SRS, and analysis by ICP-MS in these samples is complicated by the high organics content. An ion exchange chemical preparation is reported to obtain fraction of Pu that does not contain any fission product contribution and no interfering organics to allow measure of absolute 239 Pu and of 239 Pu through 241 Pu isotopics by ICP-MS. The method uses a 242 Pu spike to measure Pu recovery and is demonstrated in this paper with three distinct commercially available resins and with over 300 samples. Measured absolute 239 Pu contents in sixty-three spiked/unspiked duplicates have agreed within 15% precision. Overall 242 Pu recoveries were near 90% with 25% precision. Comparisons of absolute 239 Pu contents measured directly on three samples agreed within the quoted 25% uncertainty. (author)

  16. Influence of tube volume on measurement uncertainty of GM counters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanković Koviljka Đ.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available GM counters are often used in radiation detection since they generate a strong signal which can be easily detected. The working principal of a GM counter is based on the interaction of ionizing radiation with the atoms and molecules of the gas present in the counter's tube. Free electrons created as a result of this interaction become initial electrons, i. e. start an avalanche process which is detected as a pulse of current. This current pulse is independent of the energy imparted on the gas, that being the main difference between a GM counter and the majority of other radiation detectors. In literature, the dependence on the incidence of radiation energy, tube's orientation and characteristics of the reading system are quoted as the main sources of measurement uncertainty of GM counters. The aim of this paper is to determine the dependence of measurement uncertainty of a GM counter on the volume of its counter's tube. The dependence of the pulse current on the size of the counter's tube has, therefore, been considered here, both in radial and parallel geometry. The initiation and expansion of the current pulse have been examined by means of elementary processes of electrical discharge such as the Markov processes, while the changes in the counter's tube volume were put to test by the space - time enlargement law. The random variable known as the 'current pulse in the counter's tube' (i. e. electrical breakdown of the electrode configuration has also been taken into account and an appropriate theoretical distribution statistically determined. Thus obtained theoretical results were then compared to corresponding experimental results established in controlled laboratory conditions.

  17. ESB application for effective synchronization of large volume measurements data

    CERN Document Server

    Wyszkowski, Przemysław Michał

    2011-01-01

    The TOTEM experiment at CERN aims at measurement of total cross section, elastic scattering and diffractive processes of colliding protons in the Large Hadron Collider. In order for the research to be possible, it is necessary to process huge amounts of data coming from variety of sources: TOTEM detectors, CMS detectors, measurement devices around the Large Hadron Collider tunnel and many other external systems. Preparing final results involves also calculating plenty of intermediate figures, which also need to be stored. In order for the work of the scientist to be effective and convenient it is crucial to provide central point for the data storage, where all raw and intermediate figures will be stored. This thesis aims at presenting the usage of Enterprise Service Bus concept in building software infrastructure for transferring large volume of measurements data. Topics discussed here include technologies and mechanisms realizing the concept of integration bus, model of data transferring system based on ...

  18. Measurement assurance program for LSC analyses of tritium samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levi, G.D. Jr.; Clark, J.P.

    1997-01-01

    Liquid Scintillation Counting (LSC) for Tritium is done on 600 to 800 samples daily as part of a contamination control program at the Savannah River Site's Tritium Facilities. The tritium results from the LSCs are used: to release items as radiologically clean; to establish radiological control measures for workers; and to characterize waste. The following is a list of the sample matrices that are analyzed for tritium: filter paper smears, aqueous, oil, oily rags, ethylene glycol, ethyl alcohol, freon and mercury. Routine and special causes of variation in standards, counting equipment, environment, operators, counting times, samples, activity levels, etc. produce uncertainty in the LSC measurements. A comprehensive analytical process measurement assurance program such as JTIPMAP trademark has been implemented. The process measurement assurance program is being used to quantify and control many of the sources of variation and provide accurate estimates of the overall measurement uncertainty associated with the LSC measurements. The paper will describe LSC operations, process improvements, quality control and quality assurance programs along with future improvements associated with the implementation of the process measurement assurance program

  19. Method to make accurate concentration and isotopic measurements for small gas samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, M. R.; Wahl, E.; Cunningham, K. L.

    2013-12-01

    Carbon isotopic ratio measurements of CO2 and CH4 provide valuable insight into carbon cycle processes. However, many of these studies, like soil gas, soil flux, and water head space experiments, provide very small gas sample volumes, too small for direct measurement by current constant-flow Cavity Ring-Down (CRDS) isotopic analyzers. Previously, we addressed this issue by developing a sample introduction module which enabled the isotopic ratio measurement of 40ml samples or smaller. However, the system, called the Small Sample Isotope Module (SSIM), does dilute the sample during the delivery with inert carrier gas which causes a ~5% reduction in concentration. The isotopic ratio measurements are not affected by this small dilution, but researchers are naturally interested accurate concentration measurements. We present the accuracy and precision of a new method of using this delivery module which we call 'double injection.' Two portions of the 40ml of the sample (20ml each) are introduced to the analyzer, the first injection of which flushes out the diluting gas and the second injection is measured. The accuracy of this new method is demonstrated by comparing the concentration and isotopic ratio measurements for a gas sampled directly and that same gas measured through the SSIM. The data show that the CO2 concentration measurements were the same within instrument precision. The isotopic ratio precision (1σ) of repeated measurements was 0.16 permil for CO2 and 1.15 permil for CH4 at ambient concentrations. This new method provides a significant enhancement in the information provided by small samples.

  20. Integrated sampling and analysis plan for samples measuring >10 mrem/hour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haller, C.S.

    1992-03-01

    This integrated sampling and analysis plan was prepared to assist in planning and scheduling of Hanford Site sampling and analytical activities for all waste characterization samples that measure greater than 10 mrem/hour. This report also satisfies the requirements of the renegotiated Interim Milestone M-10-05 of the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (the Tri-Party Agreement). For purposes of comparing the various analytical needs with the Hanford Site laboratory capabilities, the analytical requirements of the various programs were normalized by converting required laboratory effort for each type of sample to a common unit of work, the standard analytical equivalency unit (AEU). The AEU approximates the amount of laboratory resources required to perform an extensive suite of analyses on five core segments individually plus one additional suite of analyses on a composite sample derived from a mixture of the five core segments and prepare a validated RCRA-type data package

  1. Study of probe-sample distance for biomedical spectra measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Lei

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fiber-based optical spectroscopy has been widely used for biomedical applications. However, the effect of probe-sample distance on the collection efficiency has not been well investigated. Method In this paper, we presented a theoretical model to maximize the illumination and collection efficiency in designing fiber optic probes for biomedical spectra measurement. This model was in general applicable to probes with single or multiple fibers at an arbitrary incident angle. In order to demonstrate the theory, a fluorescence spectrometer was used to measure the fluorescence of human finger skin at various probe-sample distances. The fluorescence spectrum and the total fluorescence intensity were recorded. Results The theoretical results show that for single fiber probes, contact measurement always provides the best results. While for multi-fiber probes, there is an optimal probe distance. When a 400- μm excitation fiber is used to deliver the light to the skin and another six 400- μm fibers surrounding the excitation fiber are used to collect the fluorescence signal, the experimental results show that human finger skin has very strong fluorescence between 475 nm and 700 nm under 450 nm excitation. The fluorescence intensity is heavily dependent on the probe-sample distance and there is an optimal probe distance. Conclusions We investigated a number of probe-sample configurations and found that contact measurement could be the primary choice for single-fiber probes, but was very inefficient for multi-fiber probes. There was an optimal probe-sample distance for multi-fiber probes. By carefully choosing the probe-sample distance, the collection efficiency could be enhanced by 5-10 times. Our experiments demonstrated that the experimental results of the probe-sample distance dependence of collection efficiency in multi-fiber probes were in general agreement with our theory.

  2. Transfer function design based on user selected samples for intuitive multivariate volume exploration

    KAUST Repository

    Zhou, Liang; Hansen, Charles

    2013-01-01

    Multivariate volumetric datasets are important to both science and medicine. We propose a transfer function (TF) design approach based on user selected samples in the spatial domain to make multivariate volumetric data visualization more accessible for domain users. Specifically, the user starts the visualization by probing features of interest on slices and the data values are instantly queried by user selection. The queried sample values are then used to automatically and robustly generate high dimensional transfer functions (HDTFs) via kernel density estimation (KDE). Alternatively, 2D Gaussian TFs can be automatically generated in the dimensionality reduced space using these samples. With the extracted features rendered in the volume rendering view, the user can further refine these features using segmentation brushes. Interactivity is achieved in our system and different views are tightly linked. Use cases show that our system has been successfully applied for simulation and complicated seismic data sets. © 2013 IEEE.

  3. Transfer function design based on user selected samples for intuitive multivariate volume exploration

    KAUST Repository

    Zhou, Liang

    2013-02-01

    Multivariate volumetric datasets are important to both science and medicine. We propose a transfer function (TF) design approach based on user selected samples in the spatial domain to make multivariate volumetric data visualization more accessible for domain users. Specifically, the user starts the visualization by probing features of interest on slices and the data values are instantly queried by user selection. The queried sample values are then used to automatically and robustly generate high dimensional transfer functions (HDTFs) via kernel density estimation (KDE). Alternatively, 2D Gaussian TFs can be automatically generated in the dimensionality reduced space using these samples. With the extracted features rendered in the volume rendering view, the user can further refine these features using segmentation brushes. Interactivity is achieved in our system and different views are tightly linked. Use cases show that our system has been successfully applied for simulation and complicated seismic data sets. © 2013 IEEE.

  4. Impact of the time window on plasma volume measurement with indocyanine green

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacob, M; Chappell, D; Conzen, P; Finsterer, U; Rehm, M; Krafft, A; Becker, B F

    2008-01-01

    Recent reports have questioned the accuracy of the indocyanine green dilution technique for measuring plasma volume. Our objective was to evaluate the impact of different time windows for monoexponential extrapolation. We retrospectively analysed 31 indocyanine green decay curves to investigate the problem in principle (group 1) and prospectively performed another 21 plasma volume measurements to estimate its practical impact (group 2). To monoexponentially extrapolate back to the specific extinction at the time of dye injection, two different time windows were applied to each decay curve, comparing the plasma volumes resulting from sampling within a short (≤5 min) versus a longer (>5 min) period of time. Extrapolating back from the longer period led to a higher apparent plasma volume relative to the shorter period in both groups, the difference being 348 ± 171 ml (group 1) and 384 ± 131 ml (group 2; mean ± SD; p < 0.05 each). This result was due to a reliable monoexponentiality of decay only up to the 5th min after dye injection. Thus, to estimate the initial distribution space of indocyanine green via monoexponential extrapolation, the first linear kinetic of indocyanine green decay should be taken

  5. Measurements of astrophysical reaction rates for radioactive samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koehler, P.E.; O'Brien, H.A.; Bowman, C.D.

    1987-01-01

    Reaction rates for both big-bang and stellar nucleosynthesis can be obtained from the measurement of (n,p) and (n,γ) cross sections for radioactive nuclei. In the past, large backgrounds associated with the sample activity limited these types of measurements to radioisotopes with very long half lives. The advent of the low-energy, high-intensity neutron source at the Los Alamos Neutron Scattering CEnter (LANSCE) has greatly increased the number of nuclei which can be studied. Results of (n,p) measurements on samples with half lives as short as fifty-three days will be given. The astrophysics to be learned from these data will be discussed. Additional difficulties are encountered when making (n,γ) rather than (n,p) measurements. However, with a properly designed detector, and with the high peak neutron intensities now available, (n,γ) measurements can be made for nuclei with half lives as short as several weeks. Progress on the Los Alamos (n,γ) cross-section measurement program for radioactive samples will be discussed. 25 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab

  6. Dilatometric measurement of the partial molar volume of water sorbed to durum wheat flour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Ayako; Ogawa, Takenobu; Adachi, Shuji

    2013-01-01

    Moisture sorption isotherms were measured at 25 °C for untreated, dry-heated and pre-gelatinized durum wheat flour samples. The isotherms could be expressed by the Guggenheim-Anderson-de Boer equation. The amount of water sorbed to the untreated flour was highest for low water activity, with water sorbed to the pre-gelatinized and dry-heated flour samples following. The dry-heated and pregelatinized flour samples exhibited the same dependence of the moisture content on the partial molar volume of water at 25 °C as the untreated flour. The partial molar volume of water was ca. 9 cm(3)/mol at a moisture content of 0.03 kg-H2O/kg-d.m. The volume increased with increasing moisture content, and reached a constant value of ca. 17.5 cm(3)/mol at a moisture content of 0.2 kg-H2O/kg-d.m. or higher.

  7. Authentication Assurance Level Application to the Inventory Sampling Measurement System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devaney, Mike M.; Kouzes, Richard T.; Hansen, Randy R.; Geelhood, Bruce D.

    2001-01-01

    This document concentrates on the identification of a standardized assessment approach for the verification of security functionality in specific equipment, the Inspection Sampling Measurement System (ISMS) being developed for MAYAK. Specifically, an Authentication Assurance Level 3 is proposed to be reached in authenticating the ISMS

  8. GY SAMPLING THEORY IN ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES 2: SUBSAMPLING ERROR MEASUREMENTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampling can be a significant source of error in the measurement process. The characterization and cleanup of hazardous waste sites require data that meet site-specific levels of acceptable quality if scientifically supportable decisions are to be made. In support of this effort,...

  9. Radiocarbon measurements of tree-ring samples from Japanese woods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ozaki, Hiromasa; Sakamoto, Minoru; Imamura, Mineo; Mitsutani, Takumi

    2008-01-01

    Since radiocarbon age is a model age based on constancy of atmospheric radiocarbon concentration and a provisional value of 5568 years for the 14 C half-life, calibration to calendar age is required for practical dating. The dataset, called IntCal, used for the calibration has been constructed by international consortium. Most parts of the IntCal have been based on the measurement of radiocarbon in dendrochronologically dated tree-ring samples from woods in Europe and North America. Regional offsets, which are designed as differences of local atmospheric radiocarbon from IntCal, have been pointed out based on recent radiocarbon measurements for tree-ring samples from a few regions. We have also measured radiocarbon of tree-ring samples from Japanese woods in order to investigate regional offsets in Japan. In this study, radiocarbon measurements for tree-ring samples from three different Japanese woods at around AD500 were carried out. Consequently, differences from IntCal04 at around AD500 were confirmed, although no systematic offset are found. However, the results obtained in this study agree with the raw data used for construction of IntCal04. This could pose a question to calculation method of IntCal04. (author)

  10. Determination of a normogram for testicular volume measured by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    4.67years, 1.18±0.29m, 24.79±14.76kg and 15.82±2.63kg/m2. The mean testicular volume in the study population was 1.93±3.31ml. The right and left mean testicular volume were 2.27±+3.66ml and 2.23±3.61ml, respectively. Testicular volume ...

  11. A rapid method for estimation of Pu-isotopes in urine samples using high volume centrifuge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Ranjeet; Rao, D D; Dubla, Rupali; Yadav, J R

    2017-07-01

    The conventional radio-analytical technique used for estimation of Pu-isotopes in urine samples involves anion exchange/TEVA column separation followed by alpha spectrometry. This sequence of analysis consumes nearly 3-4 days for completion. Many a times excreta analysis results are required urgently, particularly under repeat and incidental/emergency situations. Therefore, there is need to reduce the analysis time for the estimation of Pu-isotopes in bioassay samples. This paper gives the details of standardization of a rapid method for estimation of Pu-isotopes in urine samples using multi-purpose centrifuge, TEVA resin followed by alpha spectrometry. The rapid method involves oxidation of urine samples, co-precipitation of plutonium along with calcium phosphate followed by sample preparation using high volume centrifuge and separation of Pu using TEVA resin. Pu-fraction was electrodeposited and activity estimated using 236 Pu tracer recovery by alpha spectrometry. Ten routine urine samples of radiation workers were analyzed and consistent radiochemical tracer recovery was obtained in the range 47-88% with a mean and standard deviation of 64.4% and 11.3% respectively. With this newly standardized technique, the whole analytical procedure is completed within 9h (one working day hour). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Automated high-volume aerosol sampling station for environmental radiation monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toivonen, H.; Honkamaa, T.; Ilander, T.; Leppaenen, A.; Nikkinen, M.; Poellaenen, R.; Ylaetalo, S.

    1998-07-01

    An automated high-volume aerosol sampling station, known as CINDERELLA.STUK, for environmental radiation monitoring has been developed by the Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority (STUK), Finland. The sample is collected on a glass fibre filter (attached into a cassette), the airflow through the filter is 800 m 3 /h at maximum. During the sampling, the filter is continuously monitored with Na(I) scintillation detectors. After the sampling, the large filter is automatically cut into 15 pieces that form a small sample and after ageing, the pile of filter pieces is moved onto an HPGe detector. These actions are performed automatically by a robot. The system is operated at a duty cycle of 1 d sampling, 1 d decay and 1 d counting. Minimum detectable concentrations of radionuclides in air are typically 1Ae10 x 10 -6 Bq/m 3 . The station is equipped with various sensors to reveal unauthorized admittance. These sensors can be monitored remotely in real time via Internet or telephone lines. The processes and operation of the station are monitored and partly controlled by computer. The present approach fulfils the requirements of CTBTO for aerosol monitoring. The concept suits well for nuclear material safeguards, too

  13. Analysis of biological samples by x-ray attenuation measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cesareo, R.

    1988-01-01

    Over the last few years there has been an increasing interest in X-ray attenuation measurements, mainly due to the enormous development of computer assisted tomography (CAT). With CAT, analytical information concerning the density and the mean atomic number distributions in a sample is deduced from a large number of attenuation measurements. Particular transmission methods developed, based on the differential attenuation method are discussed. The theoretical background for attenuation of radiation and for differential attenuation of radiation is given. Details about the generation of monoenergetic X-rays are discussed. Applications of attenuation measurements in the field of Medicine are presented

  14. Evaluation of pharyngeal volume and compliance of OSAHS patients using 3D CT and volume measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lan, Zhijie

    2004-01-01

    The intrinsic properties such as baseline caliber and compliance of the upper airway are thought to be important in the pathogenesis of obstructive sleep apnea hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS).The author attempted using imaging methods to evaluate both baseline caliber and compliance in normal individuals and OSAHS patients, and to localize the obstructive sites in OSAHS patients. Critical closing pressure (P crit ) and minimally effective therapeutical pressure (P eff ) were measured and computed tomography (CT) scan of pharynx was performed during wakefulness and drug-induced sleep with P crit , 0 cm H 2 O and P eff being given through a nose mask system. 7 normal individuals (age, 32.2±6.5 y's and body mass index, 23.6±5.4 kg/m 2 ) and 13 OSAHS patients (age, 33.3±6.4 y's and body mass index, 25.9±6.0 kg/m 2 ) were studied. 3D images of pharyngeal airway were reconstructed, and volume of each subdivision of pharynx was measured. Volume, average area and compliance of each subdivision were compared between the two groups. On an air-mode view of 3D image, the outline of pharynx was shown as transparent tubal structure, on which the narrowing collapse of airway at any level or any direction can be easily identified. Anatomy of pharynx could be easily understood on the virtual endoscopic mode. During wakefulness, the average area of the upper (1.20±0.26 cm 2 vs. 1.57±0.17 cm 2 , P 2 vs. 2.58±0.27 cm 2 , P 2 vs. 1.45±0.18 cm 2 , P 2 vs. 2.44±0.26 cm 2 ). The compliance of the middle part (0.28±0.15/cmH 2 O vs. 0.13±0.07/cmH 2 O, P<0.05) of pharynx was significantly higher in OSAHS patients than in normal individuals. The data suggested that OSAHS patients have a narrower and more collapsible pharynx compared to the normal subjects. The method of the present study is valid to evaluate both morphology and function of the upper airway. (author)

  15. Nuclear waste calorimeter for very large drums with 385 litres sample volume

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jossens, G.; Mathonat, C. [SETARAM Instrumentation, Caluire (France); Bachelet, F. [CEA Valduc, Is sur Tille (France)

    2015-03-15

    Calorimetry is a very precise and well adapted tool for the classification of drums containing nuclear waste material depending on their level of activities (low, medium, high). A new calorimeter has been developed by SETARAM Instrumentation and the CEA Valduc in France. This new calorimeter is designed for drums having a volume bigger than 100 liters. It guarantees high operator safety by optimizing drum handling and air circulation for cooling, and optimized software for direct measurement of the quantity of nuclear material. The LVC1380 calorimeter makes it possible to work over the range 10 to 3000 mW, which corresponds to approximately 0.03 to 10 g of tritium or 3 to 955 g of {sup 241}Pu in a volume up to 385 liters. This calorimeter is based on the heat flow measurement using Peltier elements which surround the drum in the 3 dimensions and therefore measure all the heat coming from the radioactive stuff whatever its position inside the drum. Calorimeter's insulating layers constitute a thermal barrier designed to filter disturbances until they represent less than 0.001 Celsius degrees and to eliminate long term disturbances associated, for example, with laboratory temperature variations between day and night. A calibration device based on Joule effect has also been designed. Measurement time has been optimized but remains long compared with other methods of measurement such as gamma spectrometry but its main asset is to have a good accuracy for low level activities.

  16. Sampling Approaches for Multi-Domain Internet Performance Measurement Infrastructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calyam, Prasad

    2014-09-15

    The next-generation of high-performance networks being developed in DOE communities are critical for supporting current and emerging data-intensive science applications. The goal of this project is to investigate multi-domain network status sampling techniques and tools to measure/analyze performance, and thereby provide “network awareness” to end-users and network operators in DOE communities. We leverage the infrastructure and datasets available through perfSONAR, which is a multi-domain measurement framework that has been widely deployed in high-performance computing and networking communities; the DOE community is a core developer and the largest adopter of perfSONAR. Our investigations include development of semantic scheduling algorithms, measurement federation policies, and tools to sample multi-domain and multi-layer network status within perfSONAR deployments. We validate our algorithms and policies with end-to-end measurement analysis tools for various monitoring objectives such as network weather forecasting, anomaly detection, and fault-diagnosis. In addition, we develop a multi-domain architecture for an enterprise-specific perfSONAR deployment that can implement monitoring-objective based sampling and that adheres to any domain-specific measurement policies.

  17. Volume measurement of the leg with the depth camera for quantitative evaluation of edema

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiyomitsu, Kaoru; Kakinuma, Akihiro; Takahashi, Hiroshi; Kamijo, Naohiro; Ogawa, Keiko; Tsumura, Norimichi

    2017-02-01

    Volume measurement of the leg is important in the evaluation of leg edema. Recently, method for measurement by using a depth camera is proposed. However, many depth cameras are expensive. Therefore, we propose a method using Microsoft Kinect. We obtain a point cloud of the leg by Kinect Fusion technique and calculate the volume. We measured the volume of leg for three healthy students during three days. In each measurement, the increase of volume was confirmed from morning to evening. It is known that the volume of leg is increased in doing office work. Our experimental results meet this expectation.

  18. Computational methods and modeling. 1. Sampling a Position Uniformly in a Trilinear Hexahedral Volume

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urbatsch, Todd J.; Evans, Thomas M.; Hughes, H. Grady

    2001-01-01

    Monte Carlo particle transport plays an important role in some multi-physics simulations. These simulations, which may additionally involve deterministic calculations, typically use a hexahedral or tetrahedral mesh. Trilinear hexahedrons are attractive for physics calculations because faces between cells are uniquely defined, distance-to-boundary calculations are deterministic, and hexahedral meshes tend to require fewer cells than tetrahedral meshes. We discuss one aspect of Monte Carlo transport: sampling a position in a tri-linear hexahedron, which is made up of eight control points, or nodes, and six bilinear faces, where each face is defined by four non-coplanar nodes in three-dimensional Cartesian space. We derive, code, and verify the exact sampling method and propose an approximation to it. Our proposed approximate method uses about one-third the memory and can be twice as fast as the exact sampling method, but we find that its inaccuracy limits its use to well-behaved hexahedrons. Daunted by the expense of the exact method, we propose an alternate approximate sampling method. First, calculate beforehand an approximate volume for each corner of the hexahedron by taking one-eighth of the volume of an imaginary parallelepiped defined by the corner node and the three nodes to which it is directly connected. For the sampling, assume separability in the parameters, and sample each parameter, in turn, from a linear pdf defined by the sum of the four corner volumes at each limit (-1 and 1) of the parameter. This method ignores the quadratic portion of the pdf, but it requires less storage, has simpler sampling, and needs no extra, on-the-fly calculations. We simplify verification by designing tests that consist of one or more cells that entirely fill a unit cube. Uniformly sampling complicated cells that fill a unit cube will result in uniformly sampling the unit cube. Unit cubes are easily analyzed. The first problem has four wedges (or tents, or A frames) whose

  19. Porosity, Bulk Density, and Volume Reduction During Drying: Review of Measurement Methods and Coefficient Determinations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Qiu, J.; Khalloufi, S.; Martynenko, A.; Dalen, van G.; Schutyser, M.A.I.; Almeida-Rivera, C.

    2015-01-01

    Several experimental methods for measuring porosity, bulk density and volume reduction during drying of foodstuff are available. These methods include among others geometric dimension, volume displacement, mercury porosimeter, micro-CT, and NMR. However, data on their accuracy, sensitivity, and

  20. Tracer techniques for urine volume determination and urine collection and sampling back-up system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, R. V.

    1971-01-01

    The feasibility, functionality, and overall accuracy of the use of lithium were investigated as a chemical tracer in urine for providing a means of indirect determination of total urine volume by the atomic absorption spectrophotometry method. Experiments were conducted to investigate the parameters of instrumentation, tracer concentration, mixing times, and methods for incorporating the tracer material in the urine collection bag, and to refine and optimize the urine tracer technique to comply with the Skylab scheme and operational parameters of + or - 2% of volume error and + or - 1% accuracy of amount of tracer added to each container. In addition, a back-up method for urine collection and sampling system was developed and evaluated. This back-up method incorporates the tracer technique for volume determination in event of failure of the primary urine collection and preservation system. One chemical preservative was selected and evaluated as a contingency chemical preservative for the storage of urine in event of failure of the urine cooling system.

  1. Considerations on measurements of radioactivity in biological samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mascanzoni, D.

    1986-01-01

    Radioactivity in biological samples and particularly in foodstuffs can be measured with several procedures, depending on the type of sample and radiation. In case of a radioactive fallout like the one from Chernobyl 1986, contamination in biological samples varies with time, being high immediately after the accident and decreasing successively with time. During the first stage, accurate measurements of gamma-emission should be made with high-resolution instruments, like HPGe-detectors coupled to multichannel analyzers in order to be able to assess the fallout's composition and separate the different nuclides. Even portable GM-counters and NaI(Tl)-detectors can be used, but they provide very limited information and the resolution of NaI(Tl) is too poor to make them suitable for other than survey purposes. In this case, they can be used for monitoring the activity in a certain area, or scanning a large amount of samples. After some months, when the activity has decayed and only a few nuclides are still active, the most important parameter is not resolution any longer, but sensitivity, since the content of radionuclides has decreased. At this stage NaI(Tl)-detectors assume greater importance and their sensitivity can permit the detection of low activity levels in relatively short time. The laboratory procedures for sample handling and preparation is also very important: established routines concentrated upon reducing the risk of contamination and minimizing sources of error must be used

  2. The measurement of radioactive microspheres in biological samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mernagh, J.R.; Spiers, E.W.; Adiseshiah, M.

    1976-01-01

    Measurements of the distribution of radioactive microspheres are used in investigations of regional coronary blood flow, but the size and shape of the heart varies for different test animals, and the organ is frequently divided into smaller pieces for studies of regional perfusion. Errors are introduced by variations in the distribution of the radioactive source and the amount of Compton scatter in different samples. A technique has therefore been developed to allow the counting of these tissue samples in their original form, and correction factors have been derived to inter-relate the various counting geometries thus encountered. Dogs were injected with microspheres labelled with 141 Ce, 51 Cr or 85 Sr. The tissue samples did not require remodelling to fit a standard container, and allowance was made for the inhomogeneous distribution in the blood samples. The activities in the centrifuged blood samples were correlated with those from the tissue samples by a calibration procedure involving comparisons of the counts from samples of microspheres embedded in sachets of gelatine, and similar samples mixed with blood and then centrifuged. The calibration data have indicated that 51 Cr behaves anomalously, and its use as a label for microspheres may introduce unwarranted errors. A plane cylindrical 10 x 20 cm NaI detector was used, and a 'worst case' correction of 20% was found to be necessary for geometry effects. The accuracy of this method of correlating different geometries was tested by remodelling the same tissue sample into different sizes and comparing the results, and the validity of the technique was supported by agreement of the final results with previously published data. (U.K.)

  3. Sampling and measurement of long-lived radionuclides in environmental samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brauer, F.P.; Goles, R.W.; Kaye, J.H.; Rieck, H.G. Jr.

    1977-01-01

    The volatile and semivolatile long-lived man-made radionuclides 3 H, 14 C, 79 Se, 85 Kr, 99 Tc, 129 I, 135 Cs, and 137 Cs are of concern in operation of nuclear facilities because they are difficult and expensive to contain and once emitted to the environment they become permanent ecological constituents with both local and global distributions. Species-selective sampling and analytical methods (radiochemical, neutron activation, and mass spectrometric) have been developed for many of these nuclides with sensitivities well below those required for radiation protection. These sampling and analytical methods have been applied to the measurement of current environmental levels of some of the more ecologically important radionuclides. The detection and tracing of long-lived radionuclides is being conducted in order to establish base-line values and to study environmental behavior. This paper describes detection and measurement techniques and summarizes current measurement results

  4. Three-dimensional reconstruction volume: a novel method for volume measurement in kidney cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durso, Timothy A; Carnell, Jonathan; Turk, Thomas T; Gupta, Gopal N

    2014-06-01

    The role of volumetric estimation is becoming increasingly important in the staging, management, and prognostication of benign and cancerous conditions of the kidney. We evaluated the use of three-dimensional reconstruction volume (3DV) in determining renal parenchymal volumes (RPV) and renal tumor volumes (RTV). We compared 3DV with the currently available methods of volume assessment and determined its interuser reliability. RPV and RTV were assessed in 28 patients who underwent robot-assisted laparoscopic partial nephrectomy for kidney cancer. Patients with a preoperative creatinine level of kidney pre- and postsurgery overestimated 3D reconstruction volumes by 15% to 102% and 12% to 101%, respectively. In addition, volumes obtained from 3DV displayed high interuser reliability regardless of experience. 3DV provides a highly reliable way of assessing kidney volumes. Given that 3DV takes into account visible anatomy, the differences observed using previously published methods can be attributed to the failure of geometry to accurately approximate kidney or tumor shape. 3DV provides a more accurate, reproducible, and clinically useful tool for urologists looking to improve patient care using analysis related to volume.

  5. The preliminary exploration of 64-slice volume computed tomography in the accurate measurement of pleural effusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Zhi-Jun; Lin, Qiang; Liu, Hai-Tao; Lu, Jun-Ying; Zeng, Yan-Hong; Meng, Fan-Jie; Cao, Bin; Zi, Xue-Rong; Han, Shu-Ming; Zhang, Yu-Huan

    2013-09-01

    Using computed tomography (CT) to rapidly and accurately quantify pleural effusion volume benefits medical and scientific research. However, the precise volume of pleural effusions still involves many challenges and currently does not have a recognized accurate measuring. To explore the feasibility of using 64-slice CT volume-rendering technology to accurately measure pleural fluid volume and to then analyze the correlation between the volume of the free pleural effusion and the different diameters of the pleural effusion. The 64-slice CT volume-rendering technique was used to measure and analyze three parts. First, the fluid volume of a self-made thoracic model was measured and compared with the actual injected volume. Second, the pleural effusion volume was measured before and after pleural fluid drainage in 25 patients, and the volume reduction was compared with the actual volume of the liquid extract. Finally, the free pleural effusion volume was measured in 26 patients to analyze the correlation between it and the diameter of the effusion, which was then used to calculate the regression equation. After using the 64-slice CT volume-rendering technique to measure the fluid volume of the self-made thoracic model, the results were compared with the actual injection volume. No significant differences were found, P = 0.836. For the 25 patients with drained pleural effusions, the comparison of the reduction volume with the actual volume of the liquid extract revealed no significant differences, P = 0.989. The following linear regression equation was used to compare the pleural effusion volume (V) (measured by the CT volume-rendering technique) with the pleural effusion greatest depth (d): V = 158.16 × d - 116.01 (r = 0.91, P = 0.000). The following linear regression was used to compare the volume with the product of the pleural effusion diameters (l × h × d): V = 0.56 × (l × h × d) + 39.44 (r = 0.92, P = 0.000). The 64-slice CT volume-rendering technique can

  6. The preliminary exploration of 64-slice volume computed tomography in the accurate measurement of pleural effusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo, Zhi-Jun; Lin, Qiang; Liu, Hai-Tao

    2013-01-01

    Background: Using computed tomography (CT) to rapidly and accurately quantify pleural effusion volume benefits medical and scientific research. However, the precise volume of pleural effusions still involves many challenges and currently does not have a recognized accurate measuring. Purpose: To explore the feasibility of using 64-slice CT volume-rendering technology to accurately measure pleural fluid volume and to then analyze the correlation between the volume of the free pleural effusion and the different diameters of the pleural effusion. Material and Methods: The 64-slice CT volume-rendering technique was used to measure and analyze three parts. First, the fluid volume of a self-made thoracic model was measured and compared with the actual injected volume. Second, the pleural effusion volume was measured before and after pleural fluid drainage in 25 patients, and the volume reduction was compared with the actual volume of the liquid extract. Finally, the free pleural effusion volume was measured in 26 patients to analyze the correlation between it and the diameter of the effusion, which was then used to calculate the regression equation. Results: After using the 64-slice CT volume-rendering technique to measure the fluid volume of the self-made thoracic model, the results were compared with the actual injection volume. No significant differences were found, P = 0.836. For the 25 patients with drained pleural effusions, the comparison of the reduction volume with the actual volume of the liquid extract revealed no significant differences, P = 0.989. The following linear regression equation was used to compare the pleural effusion volume (V) (measured by the CT volume-rendering technique) with the pleural effusion greatest depth (d): V = 158.16 X d - 116.01 (r = 0.91, P = 0.000). The following linear regression was used to compare the volume with the product of the pleural effusion diameters (l X h X d): V = 0.56 X (l X h X d) + 39.44 (r = 0.92, P = 0

  7. The preliminary exploration of 64-slice volume computed tomography in the accurate measurement of pleural effusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Zhi-Jun [Dept. of Radiology, North China Petroleum Bureau General Hospital, Renqiu, Hebei (China)], e-mail: Gzj3@163.com; Lin, Qiang [Dept. of Oncology, North China Petroleum Bureau General Hospital, Renqiu, Hebei (China); Liu, Hai-Tao [Dept. of General Surgery, North China Petroleum Bureau General Hospital, Renqiu, Hebei (China)] [and others])

    2013-09-15

    Background: Using computed tomography (CT) to rapidly and accurately quantify pleural effusion volume benefits medical and scientific research. However, the precise volume of pleural effusions still involves many challenges and currently does not have a recognized accurate measuring. Purpose: To explore the feasibility of using 64-slice CT volume-rendering technology to accurately measure pleural fluid volume and to then analyze the correlation between the volume of the free pleural effusion and the different diameters of the pleural effusion. Material and Methods: The 64-slice CT volume-rendering technique was used to measure and analyze three parts. First, the fluid volume of a self-made thoracic model was measured and compared with the actual injected volume. Second, the pleural effusion volume was measured before and after pleural fluid drainage in 25 patients, and the volume reduction was compared with the actual volume of the liquid extract. Finally, the free pleural effusion volume was measured in 26 patients to analyze the correlation between it and the diameter of the effusion, which was then used to calculate the regression equation. Results: After using the 64-slice CT volume-rendering technique to measure the fluid volume of the self-made thoracic model, the results were compared with the actual injection volume. No significant differences were found, P = 0.836. For the 25 patients with drained pleural effusions, the comparison of the reduction volume with the actual volume of the liquid extract revealed no significant differences, P = 0.989. The following linear regression equation was used to compare the pleural effusion volume (V) (measured by the CT volume-rendering technique) with the pleural effusion greatest depth (d): V = 158.16 X d - 116.01 (r = 0.91, P = 0.000). The following linear regression was used to compare the volume with the product of the pleural effusion diameters (l X h X d): V = 0.56 X (l X h X d) + 39.44 (r = 0.92, P = 0

  8. Radiocarbon measurements of small gaseous samples at CologneAMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolz, A.; Dewald, A.; Altenkirch, R.; Herb, S.; Heinze, S.; Schiffer, M.; Feuerstein, C.; Müller-Gatermann, C.; Wotte, A.; Rethemeyer, J.; Dunai, T.

    2017-09-01

    A second SO-110 B (Arnold et al., 2010) ion source was installed at the 6 MV CologneAMS for the measurement of gaseous samples. For the gas supply a dedicated device from Ionplus AG was connected to the ion source. Special effort was devoted to determine optimized operation parameters for the ion source, which give a high carbon current output and a high 14C- yield. The latter is essential in cases when only small samples are available. Additionally a modified immersion lens and modified target pieces were tested and the target position was optimized.

  9. The Complete Local Volume Groups Sample - I. Sample selection and X-ray properties of the high-richness subsample

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Sullivan, Ewan; Ponman, Trevor J.; Kolokythas, Konstantinos; Raychaudhury, Somak; Babul, Arif; Vrtilek, Jan M.; David, Laurence P.; Giacintucci, Simona; Gitti, Myriam; Haines, Chris P.

    2017-12-01

    We present the Complete Local-Volume Groups Sample (CLoGS), a statistically complete optically selected sample of 53 groups within 80 Mpc. Our goal is to combine X-ray, radio and optical data to investigate the relationship between member galaxies, their active nuclei and the hot intra-group medium (IGM). We describe sample selection, define a 26-group high-richness subsample of groups containing at least four optically bright (log LB ≥ 10.2 LB⊙) galaxies, and report the results of XMM-Newton and Chandra observations of these systems. We find that 14 of the 26 groups are X-ray bright, possessing a group-scale IGM extending at least 65 kpc and with luminosity >1041 erg s-1, while a further three groups host smaller galaxy-scale gas haloes. The X-ray bright groups have masses in the range M500 ≃ 0.5-5 × 1013 M⊙, based on system temperatures of 0.4-1.4 keV, and X-ray luminosities in the range 2-200 × 1041 erg s-1. We find that ∼53-65 per cent of the X-ray bright groups have cool cores, a somewhat lower fraction than found by previous archival surveys. Approximately 30 per cent of the X-ray bright groups show evidence of recent dynamical interactions (mergers or sloshing), and ∼35 per cent of their dominant early-type galaxies host active galactic nuclei with radio jets. We find no groups with unusually high central entropies, as predicted by some simulations, and confirm that CLoGS is in principle capable of detecting such systems. We identify three previously unrecognized groups, and find that they are either faint (LX, R500 < 1042 erg s-1) with no concentrated cool core, or highly disturbed. This leads us to suggest that ∼20 per cent of X-ray bright groups in the local universe may still be unidentified.

  10. Characterization of hazardous waste sites: a methods manual. Volume 2. Available sampling methods (second edition)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ford, P.J.; Turina, P.J.; Seely, D.E.

    1984-12-01

    Investigations at hazardous waste sites and sites of chemical spills often require on-site measurements and sampling activities to assess the type and extent of contamination. This document is a compilation of sampling methods and materials suitable to address most needs that arise during routine waste site and hazardous spill investigations. The sampling methods presented in this document are compiled by media, and were selected on the basis of practicality, economics, representativeness, compatability with analytical considerations, and safety, as well as other criteria. In addition to sampling procedures, sample handling and shipping, chain-of-custody procedures, instrument certification, equipment fabrication, and equipment decontamination procedures are described. Sampling methods for soil, sludges, sediments, and bulk materials cover the solids medium. Ten methods are detailed for surface waters, groundwater and containerized liquids; twelve are presented for ambient air, soil gases and vapors, and headspace gases. A brief discussion of ionizing radiation survey instruments is also provided

  11. Technique for the Measurement of Low-Level Radioactivity of Organic Iodine in Large-Volume Urine Samples; Technique de Mesure de la Faible Radioactivite de l'Iode Organique Contenu dans des Echantillons d'Urine de Grand Volume; Metod izmereniya nizkikh aktivnostej organicheskogo joda v krupnykh obraztsakh mochi; Tecnicas de Medicion de Bajas Actividades de Yodo Organico Contenido en Muestras de Orina de Gran Volumen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nicolesco-Zinca, D.; Matei, I. [Institut d' Endocrinologie de l' Academie Roumaine, Bucarest (Romania)

    1965-10-15

    In nuclear endocrinology there are two major problems connected with the determination of renal excretion of iodine in the form of organic compounds labelled in vitro, namely: (a) their quantitative separation from the iodide also present in urine, even if the concentration of the iodide is twenty times greater; and (b) the determination of their low-level radioactivity in large-volume urine samples, their concentration per millilitre of urine being approximately 10{sup -5} of the dose administered which, in turn, must be as low as possible. Classically, separation is carried- out by paper chromatography, for which only small samples of urine are used. This technique is laborious and requires time and equipment for chromatography. Determination of radioactivity on paper involves contamination of the entire band. In spite of correction, only 89.9% of the radioactivity is recovered, and even less when an extract of butanol is used. With the technique described by the authors, a large volume of urine sample is passed through a microcolumn of H{sup +} cation-exchange resin. The organic compounds of the radioiodine remain fixed on the cation- exchange resin and their radioactivity is measured by means of a Nal(Tl) crystal well-type scintillator. On verification for the given conditions, we found the recovery of the urine diiodotyrosine complete, with a standard error averaging 0.42% for 10 experiments. This method has been used for determining the deiodation of diiodotyrosine in 11 patients with normal deiodation and in 10 cretins with goitre, of whom five showed a deficiency of deiodation. The dose administered was 1 {mu}Ci of diiodotyrosine{sup -131}L The method allows for the administration of a radioactive dose at least 50 times lower than in classical methods, and makes possible the separation of diiodotyrosine and its recovery from a sample of 40-50 ml of urine (with a standard error of 0.42% in a period of a few hours) using Nal(Tl) well-type crystal

  12. Trace-element measurement in human blood samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamidian, M.R.; Ebrahimi-Fakhar, F.

    1992-01-01

    It is conceivable that some essential elements such as zinc, iron, calcium, copper, phosphorus, selenium, etc., have a major impact on biological and metabolical functions in the human body. The concentration of these elements is normally very minute and changes within a naturally set tolerance. The accurate measurement of these elements in biological samples, such as in blood, is one of the objectives of medical physics in diagnosis. There are many sophisticated methods to measure the accurate amount of each element in biological samples. The methods used in this project are a combination of proton-induced X-ray emission (PIXE) and neutron activation analysis (NAA). The PIXE and NAA are fast and reliable techniques for multielement analysis at the level of parts per million and less

  13. Resonance ionization mass spectrometry system for measurement of environmental samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pibida, L.; McMahon, C.A.; Noertershaeuser, W.; Bushaw, B.A.

    2002-01-01

    A resonance ionization mass spectrometry (RIMS) system has been developed at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) for sensitive and selective determination of radio-cesium in the environment. The overall efficiency was determined to be 4x10-7 with a combined (laser and mass spectrometer) selectivity of 108 for both 135Cs and 137Cs with respect to 133Cs. RIMS isotopic ratio measurements of 135Cs/ 137Cs were performed on a nuclear fuel burn-up sample and compared to measurements on a similar system at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and to conventional thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS). Results of preliminary RIMS investigations on a freshwater lake sediment sample are also discussed

  14. Measuring Radionuclides in the environment: radiological quantities and sampling designs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voigt, G.

    1998-10-01

    One aim of the workshop was to support and provide an ICRU report committee (International Union of Radiation Units) with actual information on techniques, data and knowledge of modern radioecology when radionuclides are to be measured in the environment. It has been increasingly recognised that some studies in radioecology, especially those involving both field sampling and laboratory measurements, have not paid adequate attention to the problem of obtaining representative, unbiased samples. This can greatly affect the quality of scientific interpretation, and the ability to manage the environment. Further, as the discipline of radioecology has developed, it has seen a growth in the numbers of quantities and units used, some of which are ill-defined and which are non-standardised. (orig.)

  15. passive and active measurements for some ceramic samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassan, M.F.; Said, S.A.; Ali, M.A.; Szegedi, S.

    2004-01-01

    passive measurements for an imported natural ore (zirconium silicate) used in ceramic industries were carried out to identify its radioactivity . this work was done for ceramic quality control purposes. accurate gamma spectrometers with 30% and 70% detector efficiencies were used in the measurements. the 235 U, 238 U and 232 Th radioactivity were determined . for the sake of comparison already manufactured different ceramic samples were investigated applying fast neutrons activation analysis (FNAA) and X-Ray florescence (XRF) techniques. the obtained results were discussed with the tabulated international radioactivity levels for building materials

  16. Heat capacity measurements of sub-nanoliter volumes of liquids using bimaterial microchannel cantilevers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, M. F.; Miriyala, N.; Hassanpourfard, M.; Thundat, T.; Lee, J.; Kumar, A.

    2016-01-01

    Lab-on-a-Chip compatible techniques for thermal characterization of miniaturized volumes of liquid analytes are necessary in applications such as protein blotting, DNA melting, and drug development, where samples are either rare or volume-limited. We developed a closed-chamber calorimeter based on a bimaterial microchannel cantilever (BMC) for sub-nanoliter level thermal analysis. When the liquid-filled BMC is irradiated with infrared (IR) light at a specific wavelength, the IR absorption by the liquid analyte results in localized heat generation and the subsequent deflection of the BMC, due to a thermal expansion mismatch between the constituent materials. The time constant of the deflection, which is dependent upon the heat capacity of the liquid analyte, can be directly measured by recording the time-dependent bending of the BMC. We have used the BMC to quantitatively measure the heat capacity of five volatile organic compounds. With a deflection noise level of ∼10 nm and a signal-to-noise ratio of 68:1, the BMC offers a sensitivity of 30.5 ms/(J g"−"1" K"−"1) and a resolution of 23 mJ/(g K) for ∼150 pl liquid for heat capacity measurements. This technique can be used for small-scale thermal characterization of different chemical and biological samples.

  17. Heat capacity measurements of sub-nanoliter volumes of liquids using bimaterial microchannel cantilevers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, M. F.; Miriyala, N.; Lee, J.; Hassanpourfard, M.; Kumar, A.; Thundat, T.

    2016-05-01

    Lab-on-a-Chip compatible techniques for thermal characterization of miniaturized volumes of liquid analytes are necessary in applications such as protein blotting, DNA melting, and drug development, where samples are either rare or volume-limited. We developed a closed-chamber calorimeter based on a bimaterial microchannel cantilever (BMC) for sub-nanoliter level thermal analysis. When the liquid-filled BMC is irradiated with infrared (IR) light at a specific wavelength, the IR absorption by the liquid analyte results in localized heat generation and the subsequent deflection of the BMC, due to a thermal expansion mismatch between the constituent materials. The time constant of the deflection, which is dependent upon the heat capacity of the liquid analyte, can be directly measured by recording the time-dependent bending of the BMC. We have used the BMC to quantitatively measure the heat capacity of five volatile organic compounds. With a deflection noise level of ˜10 nm and a signal-to-noise ratio of 68:1, the BMC offers a sensitivity of 30.5 ms/(J g-1 K-1) and a resolution of 23 mJ/(g K) for ˜150 pl liquid for heat capacity measurements. This technique can be used for small-scale thermal characterization of different chemical and biological samples.

  18. Extended depth measurement for a Stokes sample imaging polarimeter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, Alexander W.; Taberner, Andrew J.; Nash, Martyn P.; Nielsen, Poul M. F.

    2018-02-01

    A non-destructive imaging technique is required for quantifying the anisotropic and heterogeneous structural arrangement of collagen in soft tissue membranes, such as bovine pericardium, which are used in the construction of bioprosthetic heart valves. Previously, our group developed a Stokes imaging polarimeter that measures the linear birefringence of samples in a transmission arrangement. With this device, linear retardance and optic axis orientation; can be estimated over a sample using simple vector algebra on Stokes vectors in the Poincaré sphere. However, this method is limited to a single path retardation of a half-wave, limiting the thickness of samples that can be imaged. The polarimeter has been extended to allow illumination of narrow bandwidth light of controllable wavelength through achromatic lenses and polarization optics. We can now take advantage of the wavelength dependence of relative retardation to remove ambiguities that arise when samples have a single path retardation of a half-wave to full-wave. This effectively doubles the imaging depth of this method. The method has been validated using films of cellulose of varied thickness, and applied to samples of bovine pericardium.

  19. Aerial sampling using drones for measuring trace gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chih-Chung; Wang, Jia-Lin; Chang, Chih-Yuan; Lin, Ming-Ren; Ou-Yang, Chang-Feng; Pan, Xiang-Xu; Lin, Neng-Huei

    2017-04-01

    Aerial and ground-level samples were simultaneously collected at the northern tip of Taiwan, Cape Fuguei, which is commonly served as a receptor site to receive air parcels from East Asia, Asian continent, the northwest Pacific Ocean and the island of Taiwan itself. Both aerial and surface samples were analyzed for 106 volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and divided into three categories as follows: 1. the total concentrations of 106 VOC (T-VOC) at 300-m height that are lower than the T-VOC level at the surface (Category A), 2. T-VOC concentrations at 300-m that are higher than those at the surface (Category B), and 3. comparable concentrations (Category C). Ten VOCs were exploited as tracers for a variety of emission sources linking to possible sources and transport routes of airborne pollutants. The first two categories A and B showed significant differences in the observed composition and concentrations of tracers between aerial and ground-level samples, implying that the pollutants at different heights may have resulted from different sources and poor air mixing, despite only a 300-m difference in vertical height. In contrast, Category C showed good vertical mixing, as indicated by the comparable concentrations between the aerial and surface measurements. Since the three categories occurred in specific meteorological conditions (between, prior to, and after cold fronts), respectively, it suggests that varied prevailing meteorology controlled the distribution and transport of airborne pollutants. Unlike sampling commonly performed at the surface, this study uses aerial sampling to demonstrate that layered structures under different meteorological conditions. Sampling aloft in lower boundary layer avoids samples being over-influenced by the close-by surface sources such as traffic to reveal signatures of a broader region.

  20. Statistical shape modeling based renal volume measurement using tracked ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pai Raikar, Vipul; Kwartowitz, David M.

    2017-03-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is the fourth most common cause of kidney transplant worldwide accounting for 7-10% of all cases. Although ADPKD usually progresses over many decades, accurate risk prediction is an important task.1 Identifying patients with progressive disease is vital to providing new treatments being developed and enable them to enter clinical trials for new therapy. Among other factors, total kidney volume (TKV) is a major biomarker predicting the progression of ADPKD. Consortium for Radiologic Imaging Studies in Polycystic Kidney Disease (CRISP)2 have shown that TKV is an early, and accurate measure of cystic burden and likely growth rate. It is strongly associated with loss of renal function.3 While ultrasound (US) has proven as an excellent tool for diagnosing the disease; monitoring short-term changes using ultrasound has been shown to not be accurate. This is attributed to high operator variability and reproducibility as compared to tomographic modalities such as CT and MR (Gold standard). Ultrasound has emerged as one of the standout modality for intra-procedural imaging and with methods for spatial localization has afforded us the ability to track 2D ultrasound in physical space which it is being used. In addition to this, the vast amount of recorded tomographic data can be used to generate statistical shape models that allow us to extract clinical value from archived image sets. In this work, we aim at improving the prognostic value of US in managing ADPKD by assessing the accuracy of using statistical shape model augmented US data, to predict TKV, with the end goal of monitoring short-term changes.

  1. Real-time particle volume fraction measurement in centrifuges by wireless electrical resistance detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagae, Fumiya; Okawa, Kazuya; Matsuno, Shinsuke; Takei, Masahiro; Zhao Tong; Ichijo, Noriaki

    2015-01-01

    In this study, wireless electrical resistance detector is developed as first step in order to develop electrical resistance tomography (ERT) that are attached wireless communication, and miniaturized. And the particle volume fraction measurement results appropriateness is qualitatively examined. The real-time particle volume fraction measurement is essential for centrifuges, because rotational velocity and supply should be controlled based on the results in order to obtain the effective separation, shorten process time and save energy. However, a technique for the particle volume fraction measurement in centrifuges has not existed yet. In other words, the real-time particle volume fraction measurement in centrifuges becomes innovative technologies. The experiment device reproduces centrifugation in two-phase using particle and salt solution as measuring object. The particle concentration is measured changing rotational velocity, supply and measurement section position. The measured concentration changes coincide with anticipated tendency of concentration changes. Therefore the particle volume fraction measurement results appropriateness are qualitatively indicated. (author)

  2. Capillary ion chromatography with on-column focusing for ultra-trace analysis of methanesulfonate and inorganic anions in limited volume Antarctic ice core samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Estrella Sanz; Poynter, Sam; Curran, Mark; Haddad, Paul R; Shellie, Robert A; Nesterenko, Pavel N; Paull, Brett

    2015-08-28

    Preservation of ionic species within Antarctic ice yields a unique proxy record of the Earth's climate history. Studies have been focused until now on two proxies: the ionic components of sea salt aerosol and methanesulfonic acid. Measurement of the all of the major ionic species in ice core samples is typically carried out by ion chromatography. Former methods, whilst providing suitable detection limits, have been based upon off-column preconcentration techniques, requiring larger sample volumes, with potential for sample contamination and/or carryover. Here, a new capillary ion chromatography based analytical method has been developed for quantitative analysis of limited volume Antarctic ice core samples. The developed analytical protocol applies capillary ion chromatography (with suppressed conductivity detection) and direct on-column sample injection and focusing, thus eliminating the requirement for off-column sample preconcentration. This limits the total sample volume needed to 300μL per analysis, allowing for triplicate sample analysis with Application to composite ice-core samples is demonstrated, with coupling of the capillary ion chromatograph to high resolution mass spectrometry used to confirm the presence and purity of the observed methanesulfonate peak. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Free-volume study of ethylene - vinyl alcohol copolymer evaluated through positronium lifetime measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, K.; Hong-ling Li; Ujihira, Y.; Nomura, K.; Saito, Y.; Yamamoto, T.; Nishihara, Y.

    2003-01-01

    The free-volume, of size ranging from 0.2 to 0.4 nm in radius, in an ethylene-vinyl alcohol copolymer was estimated using positronium lifetime measurement to elucidate the dependence of oxygen permeability on the free-volume size and fraction, on the ethylene content and on the crystallinity. The permeability and the free-volume fraction with varying the ethylene content were well related and the relation was interpreted based on the free-volume theory near below and above the glass transition temperature. On the other hand, the crystallinity significantly influenced the fraction of the amorphous region, where the free-volume hole exists, along with a slight change of the free-volume size. The variation of the permeability with the crystalline degree cannot be explained from the averaged free-volume fraction estimated by the whole volume of the polymer, but the permeability correlated with the free-volume size apparently. (author)

  4. Effects of Measurement Errors on Individual Tree Stem Volume Estimates for the Austrian National Forest Inventory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambros Berger; Thomas Gschwantner; Ronald E. McRoberts; Klemens. Schadauer

    2014-01-01

    National forest inventories typically estimate individual tree volumes using models that rely on measurements of predictor variables such as tree height and diameter, both of which are subject to measurement error. The aim of this study was to quantify the impacts of these measurement errors on the uncertainty of the model-based tree stem volume estimates. The impacts...

  5. Volume measurement variability in three-dimensional high-frequency ultrasound images of murine liver metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wirtzfeld, L A; Graham, K C; Groom, A C; MacDonald, I C; Chambers, A F; Fenster, A; Lacefield, J C

    2006-01-01

    The identification and quantification of tumour volume measurement variability is imperative for proper study design of longitudinal non-invasive imaging of pre-clinical mouse models of cancer. Measurement variability will dictate the minimum detectable volume change, which in turn influences the scheduling of imaging sessions and the interpretation of observed changes in tumour volume. In this paper, variability is quantified for tumour volume measurements from 3D high-frequency ultrasound images of murine liver metastases. Experimental B16F1 liver metastases were analysed in different size ranges including less than 1 mm 3 , 1-4 mm 3 , 4-8 mm 3 and 8-70 mm 3 . The intra- and inter-observer repeatability was high over a large range of tumour volumes, but the coefficients of variation (COV) varied over the volume ranges. The minimum and maximum intra-observer COV were 4% and 14% for the 1-4 mm 3 and 3 tumours, respectively. For tumour volumes measured by segmenting parallel planes, the maximum inter-slice distance that maintained acceptable measurement variability increased from 100 to 600 μm as tumour volume increased. Comparison of free breathing versus ventilated animals demonstrated that respiratory motion did not significantly change the measured volume. These results enable design of more efficient imaging studies by using the measured variability to estimate the time required to observe a significant change in tumour volume

  6. Measuring the volume of cingulate cortex in Chinese normal adults of the Han nationality on the high-resolution MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Chao; Chen Nan; Wang Xing; Li Kuncheng; Zhou Xin; Zhuo Yan; Chen Lin

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To explore the normal range of cingulate cortex volumes of Chinese adults of the Han nationality and its relationship with age, which provide morphological data for the construction of database for Chinese Standard Brain. Methods: This is a clinical multi-center study. One thousand Chinese healthy volunteers (age range = 18 to 70) recruited from 15 hospitals were divided into 5 groups, i.e., Group A (age range = 18 to 30), B (age range =31 to 40), C (age range =41 to 50), D (age range =51 to 60), and E (age range =61 to 70). Each group contained 100 males and 100 females. All of the volunteers were scanned by MR using T 1 weighted three-dimensional magnetization prepared rapid acquisition gradient echo sequence. Cingulate cortex volume (including bulk volume and the left/right volume) was measured semi-manually using 3D volume analysis software. Cingulate cortex volumes among age groups were compared by one-way ANOVA. Right and left cingulate cortex volumes between sexualities were analyzed by paired samples t test. The relationship between cingulate cortex volume and age was analyzed by Pearson correlations and regression analysis. Results: Cingulate cortex volumes of male and female were (20 347 ± 2504) and (19 432 ± 2184) mm 3 respectively, and the male's was significantly larger than that of female's (two sample t'-test for independent samples, t'=6.156, P 3 respectively, and those of female's were (10 064 ± 1407) and (9368 ± 1441) mm 3 respectively. The volumes of cingulate cortex were significantly different between right and left in male or female (t=-12.960, -8.511, P 3 ; right: (11212±1442), (11 096±1602), (11 040±1403), (10633±1638), (9604±1522) mm 3 ] had statistical differences (F=16.738, 18.707, P 3 ; right: (10 558± 1325), (10 266 ±1463), (10 100 ± 1497), (9779 ± 1304), (9617 ± 1254) mm 3 ] also had significant differences (F=16.859,7.528,P<0.01). Bilateral cingulate cortex volume in both male and female were negatively

  7. Hall effect measurements on proton-irradiated ROSE samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biggeri, U.; Bruzzi, M.; Borchi, E.

    1997-01-01

    Bulk samples obtained from two wafers of a silicon monocrystal material produced by Float-Zone refinement have been analyzed using the four-point probe method. One of the wafers comes from an oxygenated ingot; two sets of pure and oxygenated samples have been irradiated with 24 GeV/c protons in the fluence range from 10 13 p/cm 2 to 2x10 14 p/cm 2 . Van der Pauw resistivity and Hall coefficient have been measured before and after irradiation as a function of the temperature. A thermal treatment (30 minutes at 100C) has been performed to accelerate the reverse annealing effect in the irradiated silicon. The irradiated samples show the same exponential dependence of the resistivity and of the Hall coefficient on the temperature from 370K to 100K, corresponding to the presence of radiation-induced deep energy levels around 0.6-0.7eV in the silicon gap. The free carrier concentrations (n, p) have been evaluated in the investigated fluence range. The inversion of the conductivity type from n to p occurred respectively at 7x10 13 p/cm 2 and at 4x10 13 p/cm 2 before and after the annealing treatment, for both the two sets. Only slight differences have been detected between the pure and oxygenated samples

  8. Air-deployable oil spill sampling devices review phase 2 testing. Volume 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hawke, L.; Dumouchel, A.; Fingas, M.; Brown, C.E.

    2007-01-01

    SAIC Canada tested air deployable oil sampling devices for the Emergencies Science and Technology Division of Environment Canada in order to determine the applicability and status of these devices. The 3 devices tested were: Canada's SABER (sampling autonomous buoy for evidence recovery), the United States' POPEIE (probe for oil pollution evidence in the environment); and, Sweden's SAR Floatation 2000. They were tested for buoyancy properties, drift behaviour and sampler sorbent pickup ratios. The SAR and SABER both had lesser draft and greater freeboard, while the POPEIE had much greater draft than freeboard. All 3 devices could be used for oil sample collection in that their drift characteristics would allow for the SABER and SAR devices to be placed upwind of the slick while the POPEIE device could be placed downwind of an oil spill. The sorbent testing revealed that Sefar sorbent and Spectra sorbent used in the 3 devices had negative pickup ratios for diesel but performance improved as oil viscosity increased. Both sorbents are inert and capable of collecting oil in sufficient volumes for consistent fingerprinting analysis. 10 refs., 8 tabs., 8 figs

  9. Solid-Phase Extraction and Large-Volume Sample Stacking-Capillary Electrophoresis for Determination of Tetracycline Residues in Milk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela Islas

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Solid-phase extraction in combination with large-volume sample stacking-capillary electrophoresis (SPE-LVSS-CE was applied to measure chlortetracycline, doxycycline, oxytetracycline, and tetracycline in milk samples. Under optimal conditions, the proposed method had a linear range of 29 to 200 µg·L−1, with limits of detection ranging from 18.6 to 23.8 µg·L−1 with inter- and intraday repeatabilities < 10% (as a relative standard deviation in all cases. The enrichment factors obtained were from 50.33 to 70.85 for all the TCs compared with a conventional capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE. This method is adequate to analyze tetracyclines below the most restrictive established maximum residue limits. The proposed method was employed in the analysis of 15 milk samples from different brands. Two of the tested samples were positive for the presence of oxytetracycline with concentrations of 95 and 126 µg·L−1. SPE-LVSS-CE is a robust, easy, and efficient strategy for online preconcentration of tetracycline residues in complex matrices.

  10. Rectal compliance as a routine measurement: extreme volumes have direct clinical impact and normal volumes exclude rectum as a problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felt-Bersma, R J; Sloots, C E; Poen, A C; Cuesta, M A; Meuwissen, S G

    2000-12-01

    The clinical impact of rectal compliance and sensitivity measurement is not clear. The aim of this study was to measure the rectal compliance in different patient groups compared with controls and to establish the clinical effect of rectal compliance. Anorectal function tests were performed in 974 consecutive patients (284 men). Normal values were obtained from 24 controls. Rectal compliance measurement was performed by filling a latex rectal balloon with water at a rate of 60 ml per minute. Volume and intraballoon pressure were measured. Volume and pressure at three sensitivity thresholds were recorded for analysis: first sensation, urge, and maximal toleration. At maximal toleration, the rectal compliance (volume/pressure) was calculated. Proctoscopy, anal manometry, anal mucosal sensitivity, and anal endosonography were also performed as part of our anorectal function tests. No effect of age or gender was observed in either controls or patients. Patients with fecal incontinence had a higher volume at first sensation and a higher pressure at maximal toleration (P = 0.03), the presence of a sphincter defect or low or normal anal pressures made no difference. Patients with constipation had a larger volume at first sensation and urge (P 500 ml had complaints of constipation. No correlation between rectal and anal mucosal sensitivity was found. Rectal compliance measurement with a latex balloon is easily feasible. In this series of 974 patients, some patient groups showed an abnormal rectal visceral sensitivity and compliance, but there was an overlap with controls. Rectal compliance measurement gave a good clinical impression about the contribution of the rectum to the anorectal problem. Patients with proctitis and pouchitis had the smallest rectal compliance. A maximal toleration volume 500 ml was only seen in constipated patients, and therapy should be given to prevent further damage to the pelvic floor. Values close to or within the normal range rule out the

  11. Measurement of Crystalline Lens Volume During Accommodation in a Lens Stretcher.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marussich, Lauren; Manns, Fabrice; Nankivil, Derek; Maceo Heilman, Bianca; Yao, Yue; Arrieta-Quintero, Esdras; Ho, Arthur; Augusteyn, Robert; Parel, Jean-Marie

    2015-07-01

    To determine if the lens volume changes during accommodation. The study used data acquired on 36 cynomolgus monkey lenses that were stretched in a stepwise fashion to simulate disaccommodation. At each step, stretching force and dioptric power were measured and a cross-sectional image of the lens was acquired using an optical coherence tomography system. Images were corrected for refractive distortions and lens volume was calculated assuming rotational symmetry. The average change in lens volume was calculated and the relation between volume change and power change, and between volume change and stretching force, were quantified. Linear regressions of volume-power and volume-force plots were calculated. The mean (± SD) volume in the unstretched (accommodated) state was 97 ± 8 mm3. On average, there was a small but statistically significant (P = 0.002) increase in measured lens volume with stretching. The mean change in lens volume was +0.8 ± 1.3 mm3. The mean volume-power and volume-load slopes were -0.018 ± 0.058 mm3/D and +0.16 ± 0.40 mm3/g. Lens volume remains effectively constant during accommodation, with changes that are less than 1% on average. This result supports a hypothesis that the change in lens shape with accommodation is accompanied by a redistribution of tissue within the capsular bag without significant compression of the lens contents or fluid exchange through the capsule.

  12. Clinical Relevance of Brain Volume Measures in Multiple Sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Stefano, Nicola; Airas, Laura; Grigoriadis, Nikolaos

    2014-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic disease with an inflammatory and neurodegenerative pathology. Axonal loss and neurodegeneration occurs early in the disease course and may lead to irreversible neurological impairment. Changes in brain volume, observed from the earliest stage of MS...... therefore have important clinical implications affecting treatment decisions, with several clinical trials now demonstrating an effect of disease-modifying treatments (DMTs) on reducing brain volume loss. In clinical practice, it may therefore be important to consider the potential impact of a therapy...

  13. On-chip polarimetry for high-throughput screening of nanoliter and smaller sample volumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachmann, Brian O. (Inventor); Bornhop, Darryl J. (Inventor); Dotson, Stephen (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A polarimetry technique for measuring optical activity that is particularly suited for high throughput screening employs a chip or substrate (22) having one or more microfluidic channels (26) formed therein. A polarized laser beam (14) is directed onto optically active samples that are disposed in the channels. The incident laser beam interacts with the optically active molecules in the sample, which slightly alter the polarization of the laser beam as it passes multiple times through the sample. Interference fringe patterns (28) are generated by the interaction of the laser beam with the sample and the channel walls. A photodetector (34) is positioned to receive the interference fringe patterns and generate an output signal that is input to a computer or other analyzer (38) for analyzing the signal and determining the rotation of plane polarized light by optically active material in the channel from polarization rotation calculations.

  14. Standardizing measurement, sampling and reporting for public exposure assessments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rochedo, Elaine R.R. [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria, Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear, Av. Salvador Allende s/No. CEP 22780-160 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)], E-mail: elaine@ird.gov.br

    2008-11-15

    UNSCEAR assesses worldwide public exposure from natural and man-made sources of ionizing radiation based on information submitted to UNSCEAR by United Nations Member States and from peer reviewed scientific literature. These assessments are used as a basis for radiation protection programs of international and national regulatory and research organizations. Although UNSCEAR describes its assessment methodologies, the data are based on various monitoring approaches. In order to reduce uncertainties and improve confidence in public exposure assessments, it would be necessary to harmonize the methodologies used for sampling, measuring and reporting of environmental results.

  15. Radioactivity measurements of soil samples from Raichur of Karnataka, India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajesh, S.; Kerur, B.R.; Anilkumar, S.

    2016-01-01

    Radiations present in environment comprise the terrestrial and extraterrestrial radiations. Natural radioactivity measurement, radiation monitoring of the region, dose assessment and interpretation of radiological related parameters are crucial aspects from the public awareness and environmental safety point of view. It is found that values of the radiological parameters obtained for samples in the study area were found within acceptable or permissible limits. The estimated gamma absorbed dose rate was found to be in the range 32 - 162 nGy h -1 . Higher dose rate than that of the normal dose rate were observed in the regions where granitic, granitic gneiss and schist outcrops were prominent area

  16. Chemical Composition Measurements of LAWA44 Glass Samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fox, K. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Edwards, T. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Riley, W. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-11-15

    DOE is building the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) at the Hanford Site in Washington to remediate 55 million gallons of radioactive waste that is temporarily stored in 177 underground tanks. Both low-activity and high-level wastes will then be vitrified into borosilicate glass using Joule-heated ceramic melters. Efforts are being made to increase the loading of Hanford tank wastes in the glass. One area of work is enhancing waste glass composition/property models and broadening the compositional regions over which those models are applicable. In this report, the Savannah River National Laboratory provides chemical analysis results for several samples of a simulated low-activity waste glass, LAWA44, provided by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory as part of an ongoing development task. The measured chemical composition data are reported and compared with the targeted values for each component for each glass. A detailed review showed no indications of errors in the preparation or measurement of the study glasses. All of the measured sums of oxides for the study glasses fell within the interval of 97.9 to 102.6 wt %, indicating acceptable recovery of the glass components. Comparisons of the targeted and measured chemical compositions showed that the measured values for the glasses met the targeted concentrations within 10% for those components present at more than 5 wt %. It was noted that the measured B2O3 concentrations are somewhat above the targeted values for the study glasses. No obvious trends were observed with regard to the multiple melting steps used to prepare the study glasses, indicating that any potential effects of volatility were below measurable thresholds.

  17. Density-viscosity product of small-volume ionic liquid samples using quartz crystal impedance analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McHale, Glen; Hardacre, Chris; Ge, Rile; Doy, Nicola; Allen, Ray W K; MacInnes, Jordan M; Bown, Mark R; Newton, Michael I

    2008-08-01

    Quartz crystal impedance analysis has been developed as a technique to assess whether room-temperature ionic liquids are Newtonian fluids and as a small-volume method for determining the values of their viscosity-density product, rho eta. Changes in the impedance spectrum of a 5-MHz fundamental frequency quartz crystal induced by a water-miscible room-temperature ionic liquid, 1-butyl-3-methylimiclazolium trifluoromethylsulfonate ([C4mim][OTf]), were measured. From coupled frequency shift and bandwidth changes as the concentration was varied from 0 to 100% ionic liquid, it was determined that this liquid provided a Newtonian response. A second water-immiscible ionic liquid, 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide [C4mim][NTf2], with concentration varied using methanol, was tested and also found to provide a Newtonian response. In both cases, the values of the square root of the viscosity-density product deduced from the small-volume quartz crystal technique were consistent with those measured using a viscometer and density meter. The third harmonic of the crystal was found to provide the closest agreement between the two measurement methods; the pure ionic liquids had the largest difference of approximately 10%. In addition, 18 pure ionic liquids were tested, and for 11 of these, good-quality frequency shift and bandwidth data were obtained; these 12 all had a Newtonian response. The frequency shift of the third harmonic was found to vary linearly with square root of viscosity-density product of the pure ionic liquids up to a value of square root(rho eta) approximately 18 kg m(-2) s(-1/2), but with a slope 10% smaller than that predicted by the Kanazawa and Gordon equation. It is envisaged that the quartz crystal technique could be used in a high-throughput microfluidic system for characterizing ionic liquids.

  18. Automatically measuring brain ventricular volume within PACS using artificial intelligence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yepes-Calderon, Fernando; Nelson, Marvin D; McComb, J Gordon

    2018-01-01

    The picture archiving and communications system (PACS) is currently the standard platform to manage medical images but lacks analytical capabilities. Staying within PACS, the authors have developed an automatic method to retrieve the medical data and access it at a voxel level, decrypted and uncompressed that allows analytical capabilities while not perturbing the system's daily operation. Additionally, the strategy is secure and vendor independent. Cerebral ventricular volume is important for the diagnosis and treatment of many neurological disorders. A significant change in ventricular volume is readily recognized, but subtle changes, especially over longer periods of time, may be difficult to discern. Clinical imaging protocols and parameters are often varied making it difficult to use a general solution with standard segmentation techniques. Presented is a segmentation strategy based on an algorithm that uses four features extracted from the medical images to create a statistical estimator capable of determining ventricular volume. When compared with manual segmentations, the correlation was 94% and holds promise for even better accuracy by incorporating the unlimited data available. The volume of any segmentable structure can be accurately determined utilizing the machine learning strategy presented and runs fully automatically within the PACS.

  19. Evaluation of left ventricular volumes measured by magnetic resonance imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møgelvang, J; Thomsen, C; Mehlsen, J

    1986-01-01

    Left ventricular end-diastolic and end-systolic volumes were determined in 17 patients with different levels of left ventricular function by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). A 1.5 Tesla Magnet was used obtaining ECG triggered single and multiple slices. Calculated cardiac outputs were compared...

  20. A high volume sampling system for isotope determination of volatile halocarbons and hydrocarbons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Bahlmann

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The isotopic composition of volatile organic compounds (VOCs can provide valuable information on their sources and fate not deducible from mixing ratios alone. In particular the reported carbon stable isotope ratios of chloromethane and bromomethane from different sources cover a δ13C-range of almost 100‰ making isotope ratios a very promising tool for studying the biogeochemistry of these compounds. So far, the determination of the isotopic composition of C1 and C2 halocarbons others than chloromethane is hampered by their low mixing ratios.

    In order to determine the carbon isotopic composition of C1 and C2 halocarbons with mixing ratios as low as 1 pptv (i a field suitable cryogenic high volume sampling system and (ii a chromatographic set up for processing these samples have been developed and validated. The sampling system was tested at two different sampling sites, an urban and a coastal location in Northern Germany. The average δ13C-values for bromomethane at the urban site were −42.9 ± 1.1‰ and agreed well with previously published results. But at the coastal site bromomethane was substantially enriched in 13C by almost 10‰. Less pronounced differences were observed for chlorodifluoromethane, 1,1,1-trichloroethane and chloromethane. We suggest that these differences are related to the turnover of these compounds in ocean surface waters. Furthermore we report first carbon isotope ratios for iodomethane (−40.4‰ to −79.8‰, bromoform (−13.8‰ to 22.9‰, and other halocarbons.

  1. Gene coexpression measures in large heterogeneous samples using count statistics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y X Rachel; Waterman, Michael S; Huang, Haiyan

    2014-11-18

    With the advent of high-throughput technologies making large-scale gene expression data readily available, developing appropriate computational tools to process these data and distill insights into systems biology has been an important part of the "big data" challenge. Gene coexpression is one of the earliest techniques developed that is still widely in use for functional annotation, pathway analysis, and, most importantly, the reconstruction of gene regulatory networks, based on gene expression data. However, most coexpression measures do not specifically account for local features in expression profiles. For example, it is very likely that the patterns of gene association may change or only exist in a subset of the samples, especially when the samples are pooled from a range of experiments. We propose two new gene coexpression statistics based on counting local patterns of gene expression ranks to take into account the potentially diverse nature of gene interactions. In particular, one of our statistics is designed for time-course data with local dependence structures, such as time series coupled over a subregion of the time domain. We provide asymptotic analysis of their distributions and power, and evaluate their performance against a wide range of existing coexpression measures on simulated and real data. Our new statistics are fast to compute, robust against outliers, and show comparable and often better general performance.

  2. Multi-slice CT three dimensional volume measurement of tumors and livers in hepatocellular carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Yuanlong; Li Liangcai; Tang Binghang; Hu Zemin

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To examine the accuracy of multi-slice CT (MSCT) three dimensional (3D) volume measurement of tumors and livers in hepatocellular carcinoma cases by using immersion method as the standard. Methods: (1) The volume of 25 porkling livers was measured using immersion method in experiment group in vitro. Then the models were built according to Matsumoto's method and CT scanning and special software were used to measure the volume of the livers. (2) The volume of the tumors in 25 cases of hepatocellular carcinoma was measured using diameter measurement method and special volume measurement software (tissue measurements). Two tumors of them were measured respectively using MSCT 3D measurement, diameter measurement before the operation and immersion method after the operation. The data of the two groups were examined using pairing t test. Results: (1) The volume range of 25 porkling livers was 68.50-1150.10 ml using immersion method and 69.78-1069.97 ml using MSCT 3D measurement. There was no significant difference of the data in these two groups using t-test (t=1.427, P>0.05). (2) The volume range of 25 hepatocellular tumors was 395.16-2747.7 ml using diameter measurement and 203.10-1463.19 ml using MSCT 3D measurement before the operation. There was significant difference of the data in these two groups using t-test (t=7.689, P<0.001). In 2 ablated tumors, 1 case's volume was (21.75±0.60) ml using MSCT 3D measurement and 33.73 ml using diameter measurement before the operation and 21.50 ml using immersion measurement after the operation. The other case's volume was (696.13±5.30) ml using MSCT 3D measurement and 1323.51 ml using diameter measurement before the operation and 685.50 ml using immersion measurement after the operation. Conclusion: MSCT 3D volume measurement can accurately measure the volume of tumor and liver and has important clinical application value. There is no significant difference between MSCT 3D volume measurement and immersion method

  3. Calibration of a solid state nuclear track detector for the measurements of volumic activity of Radon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    HAKAM, O.K.; LFERDE, M.; BERRADA, M.

    1994-01-01

    Time - integrated measurements of environmental radiation activity are commonly carried out using solid state nuclear track detectors ( SSNTD ). These detectors should be calibrated of volumic activity of radon. This paper reports the results of experiments conducted to calibrate cellulose nitrate films LR - 115 type II used for measurements of volumic activity of radon in indoor air in dwellings and enclosed work areas in Morocco. Calibration measurements were made in laboratory using a calibration chamber and a radon source. The calibration chamber is a cylindric box ( 2613,6 cm sup 3)which we have manufactured of aluminium. The radon source is a natural sample rich of aluminium (17,29 + 0 ,12) Bq/g. The films are placed in detector holder with membrane and exposed inside the calibration chamber to varying concentrations of radon. Following the exposure, the films were chemically etched in sodium hydroxide (2,5 N) at 60 C for 120 minutes. The number of registered alpha particle tracks were counted with an optical microscope. In the used etching conditions, the removed mean thickness is in the order of 6 micro m. Therefore, we have normalized the track density to this value . We obtained a calibration factor of 0, 58 tracks . cm sup -2/ K Bq . h . m sup -3 . 1 tab.; 1 fig.; 2 refs. (author)

  4. High mechanical Q-factor measurements on silicon bulk samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nawrodt, R; Zimmer, A; Koettig, T; Schwarz, C; Heinert, D; Hudl, M; Neubert, R; Thuerk, M; Nietzsche, S; Vodel, W; Seidel, P [Friedrich-Schiller-Universitaet, Institut fuer Festkoerperphysik, Helmholtzweg 5, D-07743 Jena (Germany); Tuennermann, A [Friedrich-Schiller-Universitaet, Institut fuer Angewandte Physik, Max-Wien-Platz 1, D-07743 Jena (Germany)], E-mail: ronny.nawrodt@uni-jena.de

    2008-07-15

    Future gravitational wave detectors will be limited by different kinds of noise. Thermal noise from the coatings and the substrate material will be a serious noise contribution within the detection band of these detectors. Cooling and the use of a high mechanical Q-factor material as a substrate material will reduce the thermal noise contribution from the substrates. Silicon is one of the most interesting materials for a third generation cryogenic detector. Due to the fact that the coefficient of thermal expansion vanishes at 18 and 125 K the thermoelastic contribution to the thermal noise will disappear. We present a systematic analysis of the mechanical Q-factor at low temperatures between 5 and 300 K on bulk silicon (100) samples which are boron doped. The thickness of the cylindrical samples is varied between 6, 12, 24, and 75mm with a constant diameter of 3 inches. For the 75mm substrate a comparison between the (100) and the (111) orientation is presented. In order to obtain the mechanical Q-factor a ring-down measurement is performed. Thus, the substrate is excited to resonant vibrations by means of an electrostatic driving plate and the subsequent ring-down is recorded using a Michelson-like interferometer. The substrate itself is suspended as a pendulum by means of a tungsten wire loop. All measurements are carried out in a special cryostat which provides a temperature stability of better than 0.1K between 5 and 300K during the experiment. The influence of the suspension on the measurements is experimentally investigated and discussed. At 5.8K a highest Q-factor of 4.5 x 10{sup 8} was achieved for the 14.9 kHz mode of a silicon (100) substrate with a diameter of 3 inches and a thickness of 12 mm.

  5. 3D thoracoscopic ultrasound volume measurement validation in an ex vivo and in vivo porcine model of lung tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hornblower, V D M; Yu, E; Fenster, A; Battista, J J; Malthaner, R A

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to validate the accuracy and reliability of volume measurements obtained using three-dimensional (3D) thoracoscopic ultrasound (US) imaging. Artificial 'tumours' were created by injecting a liquid agar mixture into spherical moulds of known volume. Once solidified, the 'tumours' were implanted into the lung tissue in both a porcine lung sample ex vivo and a surgical porcine model in vivo. 3D US images were created by mechanically rotating the thoracoscopic ultrasound probe about its long axis while the transducer was maintained in close contact with the tissue. Volume measurements were made by one observer using the ultrasound images and a manual-radial segmentation technique and these were compared with the known volumes of the agar. In vitro measurements had average accuracy and precision of 4.76% and 1.77%, respectively; in vivo measurements had average accuracy and precision of 8.18% and 1.75%, respectively. The 3D thoracoscopic ultrasound can be used to accurately and reproducibly measure 'tumour' volumes both in vivo and ex vivo

  6. 3D thoracoscopic ultrasound volume measurement validation in an ex vivo and in vivo porcine model of lung tumours

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hornblower, V D M [Canadian Surgical Technologies and Advanced Robotics, London, Ontario (Canada); Yu, E [Canadian Surgical Technologies and Advanced Robotics, London, Ontario (Canada); Fenster, A [Canadian Surgical Technologies and Advanced Robotics, London, Ontario (Canada); Battista, J J [Canadian Surgical Technologies and Advanced Robotics, London, Ontario (Canada); Malthaner, R A [Canadian Surgical Technologies and Advanced Robotics, London, Ontario (Canada)

    2007-01-07

    The purpose of this study was to validate the accuracy and reliability of volume measurements obtained using three-dimensional (3D) thoracoscopic ultrasound (US) imaging. Artificial 'tumours' were created by injecting a liquid agar mixture into spherical moulds of known volume. Once solidified, the 'tumours' were implanted into the lung tissue in both a porcine lung sample ex vivo and a surgical porcine model in vivo. 3D US images were created by mechanically rotating the thoracoscopic ultrasound probe about its long axis while the transducer was maintained in close contact with the tissue. Volume measurements were made by one observer using the ultrasound images and a manual-radial segmentation technique and these were compared with the known volumes of the agar. In vitro measurements had average accuracy and precision of 4.76% and 1.77%, respectively; in vivo measurements had average accuracy and precision of 8.18% and 1.75%, respectively. The 3D thoracoscopic ultrasound can be used to accurately and reproducibly measure 'tumour' volumes both in vivo and ex vivo.

  7. Three-dimensional sonographic measurement of normal fetal brain volume during the second half of pregnancy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N.M. Roelfsema; W.C.J. Hop (Wim); S.M. Boito; J.W. Wladimiroff (Juriy)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractObjectives: This study was undertaken to develop a three-dimensional (3D) ultrasound method of measuring fetal brain volume. Study design: Serial 3D sonographic measurements of fetal brain volume were made in 68 normal singleton pregnancies at 18 to 34 weeks of gestation. A comparison

  8. Accuracy of Standing-Tree Volume Estimates Based on McClure Mirror Caliper Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noel D. Cost

    1971-01-01

    The accuracy of standing-tree volume estimates, calculated from diameter measurements taken by a mirror caliper and with sectional aluminum poles for height control, was compared with volume estimates calculated from felled-tree measurements. Twenty-five trees which varied in species, size, and form were used in the test. The results showed that two estimates of total...

  9. Blood volume measurement with indocyanine green pulse spectrophotometry: dose and site of dye administration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Germans, Menno R.; de Witt Hamer, Philip C.; van Boven, Leonard J.; Zwinderman, Koos A. H.; Bouma, Gerrit J.

    2010-01-01

    (1) To determine the optimal administration site and dose of indocyanine green (ICG) for blood volume measurement using pulse spectrophotometry, (2) to assess the variation in repeated blood volume measurements for patients after subarachnoid hemorrhage and (3) to evaluate the safety and efficacy of

  10. Urban Run-off Volumes Dependency on Rainfall Measurement Method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, L.; Jensen, N. E.; Rasmussen, Michael R.

    2005-01-01

    Urban run-off is characterized with fast response since the large surface run-off in the catchments responds immediately to variations in the rainfall. Modeling such type of catchments is most often done with the input from very few rain gauges, but the large variation in rainfall over small areas...... resolutions and single gauge rainfall was fed to a MOUSE run-off model. The flow and total volume over the event is evaluated....

  11. Relationship between haemoglobin concentration and packed cell volume in cattle blood samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paa-Kobina Turkson

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available A convention that has been adopted in medicine is to estimate haemoglobin (HB concentration as a third of packed cell volume (PCV or vice versa. The present research set out to determine whether a proportional relationship exists between PCV and Hb concentration in cattle blood samples, and to assess the validity of the convention of estimating Hb concentration as a third of PCV. A total of 440 cattle in Ghana from four breeds (Ndama, 110; West African Short Horn, 110; Zebu, 110 and Sanga, 110 were bled for haematological analysis, specifically packed cell volume, using the microhaematocrit technique and haemoglobin concentration using the cyanmethaemoglobin method. Means, standard deviations, standard errors of mean and 95% confidence intervals were calculated. Trendline analyses generated linear regression equations from scatterplots. For all the cattle, a significant and consistent relationship (r = 0.74 was found between Hb concentration and PCV (%. This was expressed as Hb concentration (g/dL = 0.28 PCV + 3.11. When the Hb concentration was estimated by calculating it as a third of PCV, the relationship was expressed in linear regression as Hb concentration (g/dL = 0.83 calculated Hb + 3.11. The difference in the means of determined (12.2 g/dL and calculated (10.9 g/dL Hb concentrations for all cattle was significant (p < 0.001, whereas the difference in the means of determined Hb and corrected calculated Hb was not significant. In conclusion, a simplified relationship of Hb (g/dL = (0.3 PCV + 3 may provide a better estimate of Hb concentration from the PCV of cattle.

  12. Radiologic measurement of extraocular muscle volumes in patients with Graves' orbitopathy: a review and guideline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bijlsma, Ward R; Mourits, Maarten Ph

    2006-06-01

    To evaluate and compare techniques for extraocular muscle (EOM) volume measurement and to provide guidelines for future measurements. Systematic review. Existing techniques used to measure extraocular muscle volumes on radiologic scans can be divided into manual outlining, computer assisted and automated segmentation. Both computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) image datasets can be used. On CT scans, one best measures muscle volume using region grow segmentation, accepting an overestimation of true volume by inevitable inclusion of non-muscular tissue. On high resolution MRI scans, single muscles can be outlined manually, but measurements include only part of the muscle due to poor tissue contrast at the orbital apex. Measurement errors can be reduced 3.5% by exact horizontal repositioning. A measured volume change of at least 6-17% is required to demonstrate a significant difference. Currently the best choice for EOM volume measurements on CT images is computer assisted grey value segmentation and on MRI images is manual outlining of individual muscles. Because of the time required and the complexity of the measurements, present EOM volume measurement is as yet only suitable for research purposes.

  13. The evaluation of gallbladder contractibility for volume measurement by helical 3D-CT-cholangiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanaguri, Katsuro; Kimura, Hideaki; Kayashima, Yasuyo; Suemoto, Kouichiro; Makihata, Hiroshi; Maruhashi, Akira; Ohya, Toshihide; Ito, Katsuhide; Shen, Yun.

    1997-01-01

    As a new application of helical (spiral) scan, volume measurement has received a significant interest. Although it is important to evaluate gallbladder contractibility to decide on a treatment plan for a gallbladder lesion, qualitative analysis of gallbladder contractibility is very difficult owing to the fact that the volume of gallbladder can not be measured using usual DIC examination (plain X-P and tomography). In this study, the accuracy of volume measurement of helical CT was checked firstly by gallbladder phantom experiments. Then 128 cases of volume measurement of helical 3D CT Cholangiography (DIC-CT) were performed. Under the conditions of optimized scan technique (3 mm TH, 3 mm/s, 1 mm recon interval, Hispeed, GEMS), the difference of contractibility was obtained between clinical cases with and without thick wall. The experiment has shown that helical 3D CT volume measurement is very simple and highly accurate method which is useful for the evaluation of gallbladder contractibility. (author)

  14. A new site for 85Kr measurements on groundwater samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lange, T.; Hebert, D.

    2001-01-01

    As a part of a new 85 Kr laboratory, which is currently being established at the Institute of Applied Physics in Freiberg, Germany, a modified CO 2 extractor for krypton sampling is used. The operation principle is simple and contamination-safe with a reasonable effort. Continuously pumped under pressure, the water passes a Venturi-type nozzle and degasses due to relaxing. The extracted gas mixture then enters a recirculation system flowing through a CO 2 trap (NaOH), molecular sieves and a cooled charcoal trap, where krypton and other components are adsorbed. Remaining gases reenter the system at the Venturi-type nozzle. To keep the circulation alive an additional helium support is needed. In a simple field experiment, extraction efficiencies up to 0.8 for 222 Rn have been measured.

  15. A new site for 85Kr measurements on groundwater samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, T.; Hebert, D.

    2001-06-01

    As a part of a new 85Kr laboratory, which is currently being established at the Institute of Applied Physics in Freiberg, Germany, a modified CO 2 extractor for krypton sampling is used. The operation principle is simple and contamination-safe with a reasonable effort. Continuously pumped under pressure, the water passes a Venturi-type nozzle and degasses due to relaxing. The extracted gas mixture then enters a recirculation system flowing through a CO 2 trap (NaOH), molecular sieves and a cooled charcoal trap, where krypton and other components are adsorbed. Remaining gases reenter the system at the Venturi-type nozzle. To keep the circulation alive an additional helium support is needed. In a simple field experiment, extraction efficiencies up to 0.8 for 222Rn have been measured.

  16. Testing an ionization chamber with gaseous samples and measurements of the (n, alpha) reaction cross sections

    CERN Document Server

    Gledenov, Yu M; Salatskii, V I; Sedyshev, P V; Andrzejewski, J; Szalanski, P

    1999-01-01

    A new ionization chamber with gaseous samples (GIC) has been designed and tested on the thermal and resonance neutron beams of FLNP's neutron sources. The exposed gas volume serves as a target for neutrons. The obtained thermal cross sections for the sup 1 sup 7 O(n, alpha) sup 1 sup 4 C, sup 2 sup 1 Ne(n, alpha) sup 1 sup 8 O and sup 3 sup 6 Ar(n, alpha) sup 3 sup 3 S reactions are (233+-12) mb, (0.18+-0.09) mb and (5.43+-0.27) mb, respectively. These measurements have been performed on a pure beam of thermal neutrons from the high flux reactor IBR-2; and they demonstrated high efficiency and reliability of the method. Compared to samples on substrates, the application of gaseous samples makes the beam background essentially lower, and what is more important, the background component is totally absent due to the absence of Li and B microimpurities in gaseous samples while they do present in the samples on substrates. The method is also applicable to measurements with resonance neutrons. The recovery capabili...

  17. Accounting for sensor calibration, data validation, measurement and sampling uncertainties in monitoring urban drainage systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertrand-Krajewski, J L; Bardin, J P; Mourad, M; Béranger, Y

    2003-01-01

    Assessing the functioning and the performance of urban drainage systems on both rainfall event and yearly time scales is usually based on online measurements of flow rates and on samples of influent effluent for some rainfall events per year. In order to draw pertinent scientific and operational conclusions from the measurement results, it is absolutely necessary to use appropriate methods and techniques in order to i) calibrate sensors and analytical methods, ii) validate raw data, iii) evaluate measurement uncertainties, iv) evaluate the number of rainfall events to sample per year in order to determine performance indicator with a given uncertainty. Based an previous work, the paper gives a synthetic review of required and techniques, and illustrates their application to storage and settling tanks. Experiments show that, controlled and careful experimental conditions, relative uncertainties are about 20% for flow rates in sewer pipes, 6-10% for volumes, 25-35% for TSS concentrations and loads, and 18-276% for TSS removal rates. In order to evaluate the annual pollutant interception efficiency of storage and settling tanks with a given uncertainty, efforts should first be devoted to decrease the sampling uncertainty by increasing the number of sampled events.

  18. A new site for 85Kr measurements on groundwater samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lange, T.; Hebert, D.

    2000-01-01

    Analysis of stable and radioactive isotopes is essential as a complement to geochemistry and geohydraulic investigations on groundwater regimes and their genesis. This is widely acknowledged also for the determination of the specific activity of 85 Kr in groundwater. The geochemical inertness and well-defined input function of 85 Kr allow estimates of groundwater age and enhance characterization of groundwater flow and components in many aquifer systems. A new site for measurement of the 85 Kr specific activity has been established at the Institute of Applied Physics at the Freiberg University, Saxony. Under normal conditions ca. 80 μl krypton are dissolved in 1 m 3 of water in contact with air. Therefore gas extraction has to be most effectively. A modified CO 2 extractor of 45 cm x 10 cm was chosen. The water is continuously pumped under pressure (3 - 4 bar) passing a Venturi-type nozzle, which simultaneously operates as a water-jet pump. The extracted gas flows through a CO 2 trap (NaOH 10 %), a H 2 O cold trap, through molecular sieves (5, 3 A) and a charcoal column, cooled by liquid nitrogen, where krypton, nitrogene and other components are adsorbed. Remaining gases re-enter the extractor at the Venturi-type nozzle. A small membrane pump supports the circulation. Due to the special design of the water outlet, contamination of the sample is avoided. Optional a compact stove heats the water to improve the extraction efficiency. If pressure supply is high enough, additional extractors can be run simultaneously. In a test run the recovery for radon was around 65 to 70 %. Further preparation steps of the raw krypton sample is performed in the laboratory. To obtain a good first enrichment a tube furnace filled with chrome powder is used to separate nitrogen and oxygen from the sample at 900 deg C. The following enrichment steps are performed by a preparation setup developed at GSF-Institute for Hydrology, Neuherberg. (author)

  19. Determination of a representative volume element based on the variability of mechanical properties with sample size in bread.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez, Cristian; Young, Ashley; James, Bryony; Aguilera, José M

    2010-10-01

    Quantitative analysis of food structure is commonly obtained by image analysis of a small portion of the material that may not be the representative of the whole sample. In order to quantify structural parameters (air cells) of 2 types of bread (bread and bagel) the concept of representative volume element (RVE) was employed. The RVE for bread, bagel, and gelatin-gel (used as control) was obtained from the relationship between sample size and the coefficient of variation, calculated from the apparent Young's modulus measured on 25 replicates. The RVE was obtained when the coefficient of variation for different sample sizes converged to a constant value. In the 2 types of bread tested, the tendency of the coefficient of variation was to decrease as the sample size increased, while in the homogeneous gelatin-gel, it remained always constant around 2.3% to 2.4%. The RVE resulted to be cubes with sides of 45 mm for bread, 20 mm for bagels, and 10 mm for gelatin-gel (smallest sample tested). The quantitative image analysis as well as visual observation demonstrated that bread presented the largest dispersion of air-cell sizes. Moreover, both the ratio of maximum air-cell area/image area and maximum air-cell height/image height were greater for bread (values of 0.05 and 0.30, respectively) than for bagels (0.03 and 0.20, respectively). Therefore, the size and the size variation of air cells present in the structure determined the size of the RVE. It was concluded that RVE is highly dependent on the heterogeneity of the structure of the types of baked products.

  20. Time optimization of 90Sr measurements: Sequential measurement of multiple samples during ingrowth of 90Y

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holmgren, Stina; Tovedal, Annika; Björnham, Oscar; Ramebäck, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to contribute to a more rapid determination of a series of samples containing 90 Sr by making the Cherenkov measurement of the daughter nuclide 90 Y more time efficient. There are many instances when an optimization of the measurement method might be favorable, such as; situations requiring rapid results in order to make urgent decisions or, on the other hand, to maximize the throughput of samples in a limited available time span. In order to minimize the total analysis time, a mathematical model was developed which calculates the time of ingrowth as well as individual measurement times for n samples in a series. This work is focused on the measurement of 90 Y during ingrowth, after an initial chemical separation of strontium, in which it is assumed that no other radioactive strontium isotopes are present. By using a fixed minimum detectable activity (MDA) and iterating the measurement time for each consecutive sample the total analysis time will be less, compared to using the same measurement time for all samples. It was found that by optimization, the total analysis time for 10 samples can be decreased greatly, from 21 h to 6.5 h, when assuming a MDA of 1 Bq/L and at a background count rate of approximately 0.8 cpm. - Highlights: • An approach roughly a factor of three more efficient than an un-optimized method. • The optimization gives a more efficient use of instrument time. • The efficiency increase ranges from a factor of three to 10, for 10 to 40 samples.

  1. First experiences with model based iterative reconstructions influence on quantitative plaque volume and intensity measurements in coronary computed tomography angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Precht, H.; Kitslaar, P.H.; Broersen, A.; Gerke, O.; Dijkstra, J.; Thygesen, J.; Egstrup, K.; Lambrechtsen, J.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: Investigate the influence of adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR) and the model-based IR (Veo) reconstruction algorithm in coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA) images on quantitative measurements in coronary arteries for plaque volumes and intensities. Methods: Three patients had three independent dose reduced CCTA performed and reconstructed with 30% ASIR (CTDI vol at 6.7 mGy), 60% ASIR (CTDI vol 4.3 mGy) and Veo (CTDI vol at 1.9 mGy). Coronary plaque analysis was performed for each measured CCTA volumes, plaque burden and intensities. Results: Plaque volume and plaque burden show a decreasing tendency from ASIR to Veo as median volume for ASIR is 314 mm 3 and 337 mm 3 –252 mm 3 for Veo and plaque burden is 42% and 44% for ASIR to 39% for Veo. The lumen and vessel volume decrease slightly from 30% ASIR to 60% ASIR with 498 mm 3 –391 mm 3 for lumen volume and vessel volume from 939 mm 3 to 830 mm 3 . The intensities did not change overall between the different reconstructions for either lumen or plaque. Conclusion: We found a tendency of decreasing plaque volumes and plaque burden but no change in intensities with the use of low dose Veo CCTA (1.9 mGy) compared to dose reduced ASIR CCTA (6.7 mGy & 4.3 mGy), although more studies are warranted. - Highlights: • Veo decrease plaque volumes and plaque burden using low-dose CCTA. • Moving from ASIR 30%, ASIR 60% to Veo did not appear to influence the plaque intensities. • Studies including larger sample size are needed to investigate the effect on plaque.

  2. Adrenal gland volume measurement in septic shock and control patients: a pilot study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nougaret, Stephanie; Aufort, S.; Gallix, B. [Hopital Saint Eloi, Department of Abdominal Imaging, CHU Montpellier, Montpellier, Cedex 5 (France); Jung, B.; Chanques, G.; Jaber, S. [Hopital Saint Eloi, Intensive Care Unit, Department of Critical Care and Anesthesiology: DAR B, CHU Montpellier, Montpellier, Cedex 5 (France)

    2010-10-15

    To compare adrenal gland volume in septic shock patients and control patients by using semi-automated volumetry. Adrenal gland volume and its inter-observer variability were measured with tomodensitometry using semi-automated software in 104 septic shock patients and in 40 control patients. The volumes of control and septic shock patients were compared and the relationship between volume and outcome in intensive care was studied. The mean total volume of both adrenal glands was 7.2 {+-} 2.0 cm{sup 3} in control subjects and 13.3 {+-} 4.7 cm{sup 3} for total adrenal gland volume in septic shock patients (p < 0.0001). Measurement reproducibility was excellent with a concordance correlation coefficient value of 0.87. The increasing adrenal gland volume was associated with a higher rate of survival in intensive care. The present study reports that with semi-automated software, adrenal gland volume can be measured easily and reproducibly. Adrenal gland volume was found to be nearly double in sepsis compared with control patients. The absence of increased volume during sepsis would appear to be associated with a higher rate of mortality and may represent a prognosis factor which may help the clinician to guide their strategy. (orig.)

  3. Adrenal gland volume measurement in septic shock and control patients: a pilot study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nougaret, Stephanie; Aufort, S.; Gallix, B.; Jung, B.; Chanques, G.; Jaber, S.

    2010-01-01

    To compare adrenal gland volume in septic shock patients and control patients by using semi-automated volumetry. Adrenal gland volume and its inter-observer variability were measured with tomodensitometry using semi-automated software in 104 septic shock patients and in 40 control patients. The volumes of control and septic shock patients were compared and the relationship between volume and outcome in intensive care was studied. The mean total volume of both adrenal glands was 7.2 ± 2.0 cm 3 in control subjects and 13.3 ± 4.7 cm 3 for total adrenal gland volume in septic shock patients (p < 0.0001). Measurement reproducibility was excellent with a concordance correlation coefficient value of 0.87. The increasing adrenal gland volume was associated with a higher rate of survival in intensive care. The present study reports that with semi-automated software, adrenal gland volume can be measured easily and reproducibly. Adrenal gland volume was found to be nearly double in sepsis compared with control patients. The absence of increased volume during sepsis would appear to be associated with a higher rate of mortality and may represent a prognosis factor which may help the clinician to guide their strategy. (orig.)

  4. Clinical significance of computed tomography in the measurement of thyroid volume after operation for Basedow's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasuga, Yoshio; Miyakawa, Makoto; Sugenoya, Akira

    1986-01-01

    The postoperative volume of the thyroid glands was measured using computed tomography (CT) in 16 patients with Basedow's disease. In the group which had normal postoperative thyroid function and did not need to receive T 4 , CT showed increase of thyroid volume. In three of the four patients who needed to receive it, CT showed decreased thyroid volume, as compared with that immediately after operation. CT has proved to serve as a tool for measuring postoperative thyroid volume for Basedow's disease in relation to postoperative prognosis. (Namekawa, K.)

  5. Macular volume and central foveal thickness measurements in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The mean macula volume was 6.79 + 0.392 µm3. It was 6.861 , 0.297 in males, 6.496 , 0.520 in females and was statistically higher in males than females (P = 0.000). The mean central foveal thickness (MCFT) was 149.58±32.470 µm. It was 154.49 ± 34.652 µm in males and 133.33 ± 15.315 µm in females. MCFT was ...

  6. Preparing and measuring ultra-small radiocarbon samples with the ARTEMIS AMS facility in Saclay, France

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delque-Kolic, E., E-mail: emmanuelle.delque-kolic@cea.fr [LMC14, CEA Saclay, Batiment 450 Porte 4E, 91191 Gif sur Yvette (France); Comby-Zerbino, C.; Ferkane, S.; Moreau, C.; Dumoulin, J.P.; Caffy, I.; Souprayen, C.; Quiles, A.; Bavay, D.; Hain, S.; Setti, V. [LMC14, CEA Saclay, Batiment 450 Porte 4E, 91191 Gif sur Yvette (France)

    2013-01-15

    The ARTEMIS facility in Saclay France measures, on average, 4500 samples a year for French organizations working in an array of fields, including environmental sciences, archeology and hydrology. In response to an increasing demand for the isolation of specific soil compounds and organic water fractions, we were motivated to evaluate our ability to reduce microgram samples using our standard graphitization lines and to measure the graphite thus obtained with our 3MV NEC Pelletron AMS. Our reduction facility consists of two fully automated graphitization lines. Each line has 12 reduction reactors with a reduction volume of 18 ml for the first line and 12 ml for the second. Under routine conditions, we determined that we could reduce the samples down to 10 {mu}g of carbon, even if the graphitization yield is consequently affected by the lower sample mass. Our results when testing different Fe/C ratios suggest that an amount of 1.5 mg of Fe powder was ideal (instead of lower amounts of catalyst) to prevent the sample from deteriorating too quickly under the Cs+ beam, and to facilitate pressing procedures. Several sets of microsamples produced from HOxI standard, international references and backgrounds were measured. When measuring {sup 14}C-free wood charcoal and HOxI samples we determined that our modern and dead blanks, due to the various preparation steps, were of 1.1 {+-} 0.8 and 0.2 {+-} 0.1 {mu}g, respectively. The results presented here were obtained for IAEA-C1, {sup 14}C-free wood, IAEA-C6, IAEA-C2 and FIRI C.

  7. Preparing and measuring ultra-small radiocarbon samples with the ARTEMIS AMS facility in Saclay, France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delqué-Količ, E.; Comby-Zerbino, C.; Ferkane, S.; Moreau, C.; Dumoulin, J.P.; Caffy, I.; Souprayen, C.; Quilès, A.; Bavay, D.; Hain, S.; Setti, V.

    2013-01-01

    The ARTEMIS facility in Saclay France measures, on average, 4500 samples a year for French organizations working in an array of fields, including environmental sciences, archeology and hydrology. In response to an increasing demand for the isolation of specific soil compounds and organic water fractions, we were motivated to evaluate our ability to reduce microgram samples using our standard graphitization lines and to measure the graphite thus obtained with our 3MV NEC Pelletron AMS. Our reduction facility consists of two fully automated graphitization lines. Each line has 12 reduction reactors with a reduction volume of 18 ml for the first line and 12 ml for the second. Under routine conditions, we determined that we could reduce the samples down to 10 μg of carbon, even if the graphitization yield is consequently affected by the lower sample mass. Our results when testing different Fe/C ratios suggest that an amount of 1.5 mg of Fe powder was ideal (instead of lower amounts of catalyst) to prevent the sample from deteriorating too quickly under the Cs+ beam, and to facilitate pressing procedures. Several sets of microsamples produced from HOxI standard, international references and backgrounds were measured. When measuring 14 C-free wood charcoal and HOxI samples we determined that our modern and dead blanks, due to the various preparation steps, were of 1.1 ± 0.8 and 0.2 ± 0.1 μg, respectively. The results presented here were obtained for IAEA-C1, 14 C-free wood, IAEA-C6, IAEA-C2 and FIRI C.

  8. Study of Efficiency Calibrations of HPGe Detectors for Radioactivity Measurements of Environmental Samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harb, S.; Salahel Din, K.; Abbady, A.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we describe a method of calibrating of efficiency of a HPGe gamma-ray spectrometry of bulk environmental samples (Tea, crops, water, and soil) is a significant part of the environmental radioactivity measurements. Here we will discuss the full energy peak efficiency (FEPE) of three HPGe detectors it as a consequence, it is essential that the efficiency is determined for each set-up employed. Besides to take full advantage at gamma-ray spectrometry, a set of efficiency at several energies which covers the wide the range in energy, the large the number of radionuclides whose concentration can be determined to measure the main natural gamma-ray emitters, the efficiency should be known at least from 46.54 keV ( 210 Pb) to 1836 keV ( 88 Y). Radioactive sources were prepared from two different standards, a first mixed standard QC Y 40 containing 210 Pb, 241 Am, 109 Cd, and Co 57 , and the second QC Y 48 containing 241 Am, 109 Cd, 57 Co, 139 Ce, 113 Sn, 85 Sr, 137 Cs, 88 Y, and 60 Co is necessary in order to calculate the activity of the different radionuclides contained in a sample. In this work, we will study the efficiency calibration as a function of different parameters as:- Energy of gamma ray from 46.54 keV ( 210 Pb) to 1836 keV ( 88 Y), three different detectors A, B, and C, geometry of containers (point source, marinelli beaker, and cylindrical bottle 1 L), height of standard soil samples in bottle 250 ml, and density of standard environmental samples. These standard environmental sample must be measured before added standard solution because we will use the same environmental samples in order to consider the self absorption especially and composition in the case of volume samples.

  9. 3D-Laser-Scanning Technique Applied to Bulk Density Measurements of Apollo Lunar Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macke, R. J.; Kent, J. J.; Kiefer, W. S.; Britt, D. T.

    2015-01-01

    In order to better interpret gravimetric data from orbiters such as GRAIL and LRO to understand the subsurface composition and structure of the lunar crust, it is import to have a reliable database of the density and porosity of lunar materials. To this end, we have been surveying these physical properties in both lunar meteorites and Apollo lunar samples. To measure porosity, both grain density and bulk density are required. For bulk density, our group has historically utilized sub-mm bead immersion techniques extensively, though several factors have made this technique problematic for our work with Apollo samples. Samples allocated for measurement are often smaller than optimal for the technique, leading to large error bars. Also, for some samples we were required to use pure alumina beads instead of our usual glass beads. The alumina beads were subject to undesirable static effects, producing unreliable results. Other investigators have tested the use of 3d laser scanners on meteorites for measuring bulk volumes. Early work, though promising, was plagued with difficulties including poor response on dark or reflective surfaces, difficulty reproducing sharp edges, and large processing time for producing shape models. Due to progress in technology, however, laser scanners have improved considerably in recent years. We tested this technique on 27 lunar samples in the Apollo collection using a scanner at NASA Johnson Space Center. We found it to be reliable and more precise than beads, with the added benefit that it involves no direct contact with the sample, enabling the study of particularly friable samples for which bead immersion is not possible

  10. Relationship Between LIBS Ablation and Pit Volume for Geologic Samples: Applications for the In Situ Absolute Geochronology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devismes, Damien; Cohen, Barbara; Miller, J.-S.; Gillot, P.-Y.; Lefevre, J.-C.; Boukari, C.

    2014-01-01

    These first results demonstrate that LIBS spectra can be an interesting tool to estimate the ablated volume. When the ablated volume is bigger than 9.10(exp 6) cubic micrometers, this method has less than 10% of uncertainties. Far enough to be directly implemented in the KArLE experiment protocol. Nevertheless, depending on the samples and their mean grain size, the difficulty to have homogeneous spectra will increase with the ablated volume. Several K-Ar dating studies based on this approach will be implemented. After that, the results will be shown and discussed.

  11. Spectral BRDF measurements of metallic samples for laser processing applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vitali, L; Fustinoni, D; Gramazio, P; Niro, A

    2015-01-01

    The spectral bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) of metals plays an important role in industrial processing involving laser-surface interaction. In particular, in laser metal machining, absorbance is strongly dependent on the radiation incidence angle as well as on finishing and contamination grade of the surface, and in turn it can considerably affect processing results. Very recently, laser radiation is also used to structure metallic surfaces, in order to produce many particular optical effects, ranging from a high level polishing to angular color shifting. Of course, full knowledge of the spectral BRDF of these structured layers makes it possible to infer reflectance or color for any irradiation and viewing angles. In this paper, we present Vis-NIR spectral BRDF measurements of laser-polished metallic, opaque, flat samples commonly employed in such applications. The resulting optical properties seem to be dependent on the atmospheric composition during the polishing process in addition to the roughness. The measurements are carried out with a Perkin Elmer Lambda 950 double-beam spectrophotometer, equipped with the Absolute Reflectance/Transmittance Analyzer (ARTA) motorized goniometer. (paper)

  12. Automated Sampling and Extraction of Krypton from Small Air Samples for Kr-85 Measurement Using Atom Trap Trace Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hebel, S.; Hands, J.; Goering, F.; Kirchner, G.; Purtschert, R.

    2015-01-01

    Atom-Trap-Trace-Analysis (ATTA) provides the capability of measuring the Krypton-85 concentration in microlitre amounts of krypton extracted from air samples of about 1 litre. This sample size is sufficiently small to allow for a range of applications, including on-site spot sampling and continuous sampling over periods of several hours. All samples can be easily handled and transported to an off-site laboratory for ATTA measurement, or stored and analyzed on demand. Bayesian sampling methodologies can be applied by blending samples for bulk measurement and performing in-depth analysis as required. Prerequisite for measurement is the extraction of a pure krypton fraction from the sample. This paper introduces an extraction unit able to isolate the krypton in small ambient air samples with high speed, high efficiency and in a fully automated manner using a combination of cryogenic distillation and gas chromatography. Air samples are collected using an automated smart sampler developed in-house to achieve a constant sampling rate over adjustable time periods ranging from 5 minutes to 3 hours per sample. The smart sampler can be deployed in the field and operate on battery for one week to take up to 60 air samples. This high flexibility of sampling and the fast, robust sample preparation are a valuable tool for research and the application of Kr-85 measurements to novel Safeguards procedures. (author)

  13. Study of sample preparation in the measurement of 36Ar(n, p)36Cl reaction cross section

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang Songsheng; Hemick, T.K.

    1992-01-01

    The preparation of enriched 36 Ar gas samples and 36 Cl samples for the use in the AMS measurement of 36 Ar(n, p) 36 Cl reaction cross section was described. The 36 Ar samples prepared had the volumes of about 0.4 ml and the weights of about 0.5 mg. The uncertainty in atomic numbers of 36 Ar was (0.3∼0.4)%. The reaction product, 36 Cl, in the 36 Ar was collected and the AgCl samples were prepared

  14. Aerosol measurements on a metal waste volume reduction study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sehmel, G.A.; Schwendiman, L.C.; Lloyd, F.A.; Hodgson, W.H.

    1975-09-01

    Particulates generated in an experiment in which stainless steel scrap was melted by the exothermic reaction between silicon and oxygen were sampled. The objective of the sampling was to characterize the particles in the off-gas stream and to determine the total weight of particles airborne. The objective was only partially achieved since the mass of airborne particles was so large that full-flow sampling was possible only for a short period. The particles were analyzed and found to contain Si, Al, Na, and Ba, with Si representing the greatest component. The aerosol was characterized by being typically condensed fume with primary particles of submicron sizes

  15. Semiautomatic regional segmentation to measure orbital fat volumes in thyroid-associated ophthalmopathy. A validation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comerci, M; Elefante, A; Strianese, D; Senese, R; Bonavolontà, P; Alfano, B; Bonavolontà, B; Brunetti, A

    2013-08-01

    This study was designed to validate a novel semi-automated segmentation method to measure regional intra-orbital fat tissue volume in Graves' ophthalmopathy. Twenty-four orbits from 12 patients with Graves' ophthalmopathy, 24 orbits from 12 controls, ten orbits from five MRI study simulations and two orbits from a digital model were used. Following manual region of interest definition of the orbital volumes performed by two operators with different levels of expertise, an automated procedure calculated intra-orbital fat tissue volumes (global and regional, with automated definition of four quadrants). In patients with Graves' disease, clinical activity score and degree of exophthalmos were measured and correlated with intra-orbital fat volumes. Operator performance was evaluated and statistical analysis of the measurements was performed. Accurate intra-orbital fat volume measurements were obtained with coefficients of variation below 5%. The mean operator difference in total fat volume measurements was 0.56%. Patients had significantly higher intra-orbital fat volumes than controls (p<0.001 using Student's t test). Fat volumes and clinical score were significantly correlated (p<0.001). The semi-automated method described here can provide accurate, reproducible intra-orbital fat measurements with low inter-operator variation and good correlation with clinical data.

  16. Measurement of transplanted pancreatic volume using computed tomography: reliability by intra- and inter-observer variability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lundqvist, Eva; Segelsjoe, Monica; Magnusson, Anders; Andersson, Anna; Biglarnia, Ali-Reza

    2012-01-01

    Background Unlike other solid organ transplants, pancreas allografts can undergo a substantial decrease in baseline volume after transplantation. This phenomenon has not been well characterized, as there are insufficient data on reliable and reproducible volume assessments. We hypothesized that characterization of pancreatic volume by means of computed tomography (CT) could be a useful method for clinical follow-up in pancreas transplant patients. Purpose To evaluate the feasibility and reliability of pancreatic volume assessment using CT scan in transplanted patients. Material and Methods CT examinations were performed on 21 consecutive patients undergoing pancreas transplantation. Volume measurements were carried out by two observers tracing the pancreatic contours in all slices. The observers performed the measurements twice for each patient. Differences in volume measurement were used to evaluate intra- and inter-observer variability. Results The intra-observer variability for the pancreatic volume measurements of Observers 1 and 2 was found to be in almost perfect agreement, with an intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) of 0.90 (0.77-0.96) and 0.99 (0.98-1.0), respectively. Regarding inter-observer validity, the ICCs for the first and second measurements were 0.90 (range, 0.77-0.96) and 0.95 (range, 0.85-0.98), respectively. Conclusion CT volumetry is a reliable and reproducible method for measurement of transplanted pancreatic volume

  17. Measurement of transplanted pancreatic volume using computed tomography: reliability by intra- and inter-observer variability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lundqvist, Eva; Segelsjoe, Monica; Magnusson, Anders [Uppsala Univ., Dept. of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Section of Radiology, Uppsala (Sweden)], E-mail: eva.lundqvist.8954@student.uu.se; Andersson, Anna; Biglarnia, Ali-Reza [Dept. of Surgical Sciences, Section of Transplantation Surgery, Uppsala Univ. Hospital, Uppsala (Sweden)

    2012-11-15

    Background Unlike other solid organ transplants, pancreas allografts can undergo a substantial decrease in baseline volume after transplantation. This phenomenon has not been well characterized, as there are insufficient data on reliable and reproducible volume assessments. We hypothesized that characterization of pancreatic volume by means of computed tomography (CT) could be a useful method for clinical follow-up in pancreas transplant patients. Purpose To evaluate the feasibility and reliability of pancreatic volume assessment using CT scan in transplanted patients. Material and Methods CT examinations were performed on 21 consecutive patients undergoing pancreas transplantation. Volume measurements were carried out by two observers tracing the pancreatic contours in all slices. The observers performed the measurements twice for each patient. Differences in volume measurement were used to evaluate intra- and inter-observer variability. Results The intra-observer variability for the pancreatic volume measurements of Observers 1 and 2 was found to be in almost perfect agreement, with an intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) of 0.90 (0.77-0.96) and 0.99 (0.98-1.0), respectively. Regarding inter-observer validity, the ICCs for the first and second measurements were 0.90 (range, 0.77-0.96) and 0.95 (range, 0.85-0.98), respectively. Conclusion CT volumetry is a reliable and reproducible method for measurement of transplanted pancreatic volume.

  18. Accurate measurement of volume and shape of resting and activated blood platelets from light scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moskalensky, Alexander E; Yurkin, Maxim A; Konokhova, Anastasiya I; Strokotov, Dmitry I; Nekrasov, Vyacheslav M; Chernyshev, Andrei V; Tsvetovskaya, Galina A; Chikova, Elena D; Maltsev, Valeri P

    2013-01-01

    We introduce a novel approach for determination of volume and shape of individual blood platelets modeled as an oblate spheroid from angle-resolved light scattering with flow-cytometric technique. The light-scattering profiles (LSPs) of individual platelets were measured with the scanning flow cytometer and the platelet characteristics were determined from the solution of the inverse light-scattering problem using the precomputed database of theoretical LSPs. We revealed a phenomenon of parameter compensation, which is partly explained in the framework of anomalous diffraction approximation. To overcome this problem, additional a priori information on the platelet refractive index was used. It allowed us to determine the size of each platelet with subdiffraction precision and independent of the particular value of the platelet aspect ratio. The shape (spheroidal aspect ratio) distributions of platelets showed substantial differences between native and activated by 10 μM adenosine diphosphate samples. We expect that the new approach may find use in hematological analyzers for accurate measurement of platelet volume distribution and for determination of the platelet activation efficiency.

  19. Real-time viscosity and mass density sensors requiring microliter sample volume based on nanomechanical resonators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bircher, Benjamin A; Duempelmann, Luc; Renggli, Kasper; Lang, Hans Peter; Gerber, Christoph; Bruns, Nico; Braun, Thomas

    2013-09-17

    A microcantilever based method for fluid viscosity and mass density measurements with high temporal resolution and microliter sample consumption is presented. Nanomechanical cantilever vibration is driven by photothermal excitation and detected by an optical beam deflection system using two laser beams of different wavelengths. The theoretical framework relating cantilever response to the viscosity and mass density of the surrounding fluid was extended to consider higher flexural modes vibrating at high Reynolds numbers. The performance of the developed sensor and extended theory was validated over a viscosity range of 1-20 mPa·s and a corresponding mass density range of 998-1176 kg/m(3) using reference fluids. Separating sample plugs from the carrier fluid by a two-phase configuration in combination with a microfluidic flow cell, allowed samples of 5 μL to be sequentially measured under continuous flow, opening the method to fast and reliable screening applications. To demonstrate the study of dynamic processes, the viscosity and mass density changes occurring during the free radical polymerization of acrylamide were monitored and compared to published data. Shear-thinning was observed in the viscosity data at higher flexural modes, which vibrate at elevated frequencies. Rheokinetic models allowed the monomer-to-polymer conversion to be tracked in spite of the shear-thinning behavior, and could be applied to study the kinetics of unknown processes.

  20. Measuring the volume of caudate nucleus in healthy Chinese adults of the Han nationality on the high-resolution MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ni Mingfei; Chen Nan; Wang Xing; Wu Jianlin; Li Kuncheng; Zhou Xin; Zhou Yan; Chen Lin

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To explore the normal range of the caudate nucleus' volume in Chinese adults of the Han nationality and provide morphological data for the construction of database for Chinese Standard Brain. Methods: This was a clinical multi-center study. One thousand Chinese healthy volunteers (age range =18 to 70) recruited from 16 hospitals were divided into 5 groups, i.e, Group A (age range = 18 to 30), B (age range =31 to 40), C (age range =41 to 50), D (age range =51 to 60), and E (age range =61 to 70). Each group contained 100 males and 100 females. All of the volunteers were scanned by MR using T 1 weighted three-dimensional magnetization prepared rapid acquisition gradient echo sequence. The volume of caudate was measured manually using 3D volume analysis software. The difference of volumes of the caudate between male and female were analyzed by independent sample t-test, and among age groups by ANOVA. Pearson's correlation coefficient was used to characterize the relationship between volumes and age. The differences of measurements between left and right caudate nucleus were analyzed by paired t test. Results: (1) The mean volume of bilateral caudate nucleus in healthy Chinese adults was (10.973± 1.647) cm 3 . The mean volume of the the male's left and right caudate nucleus were (5.656±0.860) and (5.671±0.855) cm 3 respectively,no significant differences were found between the volume of left and right caudate nucleus (t=1.230, P>0.05). The mean volume of the the female's left and right caudate nucleus were (5.287±0.774) and (5.331±0.766) cm 3 respectively, and the right's was larger than the left's with significant differences (t=3.999, P<0.01); (2) Pearson correlation analysis showed a significant negative correlation between the nucleus volume and age (male and female's, left and right) (r=-0.561, -0.568, -0.548, -0.552, P<0.05). Conclusion: With high-resolution MRI and 3D volumetric analytic software (Midob), the volume of the caudate nucleus can be

  1. Automation of registration of sample weights for high-volume neutron activation analysis at the IBR-2 reactor of FLNP, JINR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dmitriev, A.Yu.; Dmitriev, F.A.

    2015-01-01

    The 'Weight' software tool was created at FLNP JINR to automate the reading of analytical balance readouts and saving these values in the NAA database. The analytical balance connected to the personal computer is used to measure weight values. The 'Weight' software tool controls the reading of weight values and the exchange of information with the NAA database. The weighing process of a large amount of samples is reliably provided during high-volume neutron activation analysis. [ru

  2. Evaluation of the accuracy of ventricular volume measurement by ultrafast CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cui Wei; Dai Ruping; Guo Yuyin

    1997-01-01

    The authors evaluated the accuracy of ventricular volume measured by ultrafast CT (UFCT); and (2) compared the value of ventricular volume derived from long- and short-axis view. Fourteen human left ventricular casts and 15 right ventricular casts were scanned by Imatron C-150 scanner along both the long- and short-axis. The scan protocol was similar to that used in vivo. Eight 7 mm-thick slices were obtained from each cast for both long- and short-axis views. Ventricular volume was determined by the modified Simpson's rule provided by Inamtron Inc. The actual volumes of the ventricular casts were determined by the amount of water displacement by the cast. The actual volumes for left and right ventricles were 55.57 +- 28.91 ml and 64.23 +- 24.51 ml, respectively, the left and right ventricular volumes determined by UFCT were 66.50 +- 33.04 ml and 76.47 +-28.70 ml from long-axis view, and 60.36 +- 29.90 ml and 75.36 +- 28.73 ml from short-axis view, respectively. The measurements by UFCT were significantly greater than the actual volumes of the casts, both for the left and right ventricles (P 0.990). Both left and right ventricular volumes can be determined by UFCT with identical accuracy for both long- and short-axis views in calculating ventricular volume; however, overestimation of ventricular volume by UFCT should be noted

  3. Monte Carlo Method with Heuristic Adjustment for Irregularly Shaped Food Product Volume Measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joko Siswantoro

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Volume measurement plays an important role in the production and processing of food products. Various methods have been proposed to measure the volume of food products with irregular shapes based on 3D reconstruction. However, 3D reconstruction comes with a high-priced computational cost. Furthermore, some of the volume measurement methods based on 3D reconstruction have a low accuracy. Another method for measuring volume of objects uses Monte Carlo method. Monte Carlo method performs volume measurements using random points. Monte Carlo method only requires information regarding whether random points fall inside or outside an object and does not require a 3D reconstruction. This paper proposes volume measurement using a computer vision system for irregularly shaped food products without 3D reconstruction based on Monte Carlo method with heuristic adjustment. Five images of food product were captured using five cameras and processed to produce binary images. Monte Carlo integration with heuristic adjustment was performed to measure the volume based on the information extracted from binary images. The experimental results show that the proposed method provided high accuracy and precision compared to the water displacement method. In addition, the proposed method is more accurate and faster than the space carving method.

  4. Monte Carlo method with heuristic adjustment for irregularly shaped food product volume measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siswantoro, Joko; Prabuwono, Anton Satria; Abdullah, Azizi; Idrus, Bahari

    2014-01-01

    Volume measurement plays an important role in the production and processing of food products. Various methods have been proposed to measure the volume of food products with irregular shapes based on 3D reconstruction. However, 3D reconstruction comes with a high-priced computational cost. Furthermore, some of the volume measurement methods based on 3D reconstruction have a low accuracy. Another method for measuring volume of objects uses Monte Carlo method. Monte Carlo method performs volume measurements using random points. Monte Carlo method only requires information regarding whether random points fall inside or outside an object and does not require a 3D reconstruction. This paper proposes volume measurement using a computer vision system for irregularly shaped food products without 3D reconstruction based on Monte Carlo method with heuristic adjustment. Five images of food product were captured using five cameras and processed to produce binary images. Monte Carlo integration with heuristic adjustment was performed to measure the volume based on the information extracted from binary images. The experimental results show that the proposed method provided high accuracy and precision compared to the water displacement method. In addition, the proposed method is more accurate and faster than the space carving method.

  5. IMPROVED SPECTROPHOTOMETER FIBER SAMPLING SYSTEM FOR COTTON FIBER COLOR MEASUREMENTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotton in the U.S. is classified for color using the Uster® High Volume Instrument (HVI), and the parameters Rd and +b are used to designate color grades for cotton fiber. However, Rd and +b are cotton-specific color parameters, and the need existed to demonstrate the relationships of Rd and +b to...

  6. Feasibility of the left ventricular volume measurement by acoustic quantification method. Comparison with ultrafast computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomimoto, Shigehiro; Nakatani, Satoshi; Tanaka, Norio; Uematsu, Masaaki; Beppu, Shintaro; Nagata, Seiki; Hamada, Seiki; Takamiya, Makoto; Miyatake, Kunio

    1995-01-01

    Acoustic quantification (AQ: the real-time automated boundary detection system) allows instantaneous measurement of cardiac chamber volumes. The feasibility of this method was evaluated by comparing the left ventricular (LV) volumes obtained with AQ to those derived from ultrafast computed tomography (UFCT), which enables accurate measurements of LV volumes even in the presence of LV asynergy, in 23 patients (8 with ischemic heart disease, 5 with cardiomyopathy, 3 with valvular heart disease). Both LV end-diastolic and end-systolic volumes obtained with the AQ method were in good agreement with those obtained with UFCT (y=1.04χ-16.9, r=0.95; y=0.87χ+15.7, r=0.91; respectively). AQ was reliable even in the presence of LV asynergy. Interobserver variability for the AQ measurement was 10.2%. AQ provides a new, clinically useful method for real-time accurate estimation of the left ventricular volume. (author)

  7. Feasibility of the left ventricular volume measurement by acoustic quantification method. Comparison with ultrafast computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tomimoto, Shigehiro; Nakatani, Satoshi; Tanaka, Norio; Uematsu, Masaaki; Beppu, Shintaro; Nagata, Seiki; Hamada, Seiki; Takamiya, Makoto; Miyatake, Kunio [National Cardiovascular Center, Suita, Osaka (Japan)

    1995-01-01

    Acoustic quantification (AQ: the real-time automated boundary detection system) allows instantaneous measurement of cardiac chamber volumes. The feasibility of this method was evaluated by comparing the left ventricular (LV) volumes obtained with AQ to those derived from ultrafast computed tomography (UFCT), which enables accurate measurements of LV volumes even in the presence of LV asynergy, in 23 patients (8 with ischemic heart disease, 5 with cardiomyopathy, 3 with valvular heart disease). Both LV end-diastolic and end-systolic volumes obtained with the AQ method were in good agreement with those obtained with UFCT (y=1.04{chi}-16.9, r=0.95; y=0.87{chi}+15.7, r=0.91; respectively). AQ was reliable even in the presence of LV asynergy. Interobserver variability for the AQ measurement was 10.2%. AQ provides a new, clinically useful method for real-time accurate estimation of the left ventricular volume. (author).

  8. Large-volume injection of sample diluents not miscible with the mobile phase as an alternative approach in sample preparation for bioanalysis: an application for fenspiride bioequivalence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medvedovici, Andrei; Udrescu, Stefan; Albu, Florin; Tache, Florentin; David, Victor

    2011-09-01

    Liquid-liquid extraction of target compounds from biological matrices followed by the injection of a large volume from the organic layer into the chromatographic column operated under reversed-phase (RP) conditions would successfully combine the selectivity and the straightforward character of the procedure in order to enhance sensitivity, compared with the usual approach of involving solvent evaporation and residue re-dissolution. Large-volume injection of samples in diluents that are not miscible with the mobile phase was recently introduced in chromatographic practice. The risk of random errors produced during the manipulation of samples is also substantially reduced. A bioanalytical method designed for the bioequivalence of fenspiride containing pharmaceutical formulations was based on a sample preparation procedure involving extraction of the target analyte and the internal standard (trimetazidine) from alkalinized plasma samples in 1-octanol. A volume of 75 µl from the octanol layer was directly injected on a Zorbax SB C18 Rapid Resolution, 50 mm length × 4.6 mm internal diameter × 1.8 µm particle size column, with the RP separation being carried out under gradient elution conditions. Detection was made through positive ESI and MS/MS. Aspects related to method development and validation are discussed. The bioanalytical method was successfully applied to assess bioequivalence of a modified release pharmaceutical formulation containing 80 mg fenspiride hydrochloride during two different studies carried out as single-dose administration under fasting and fed conditions (four arms), and multiple doses administration, respectively. The quality attributes assigned to the bioanalytical method, as resulting from its application to the bioequivalence studies, are highlighted and fully demonstrate that sample preparation based on large-volume injection of immiscible diluents has an increased potential for application in bioanalysis.

  9. Variation in Measurements of Transtibial Stump Model Volume A Comparison of Five Methods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bolt, A.; de Boer-Wilzing, V. G.; Geertzen, J. H. B.; Emmelot, C. H.; Baars, E. C. T.; Dijkstra, P. U.

    Objective: To determine the right moment for fitting the first prosthesis, it is necessary to know when the volume of the stump has stabilized. The aim of this study is to analyze variation in measurements of transtibial stump model volumes using the water immersion method, the Design TT system, the

  10. Assessment of volume and leak measurements during CPAP using a neonatal lung model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, H S; Roehr, C C; Proquitté, H; Wauer, R R; Schmalisch, G

    2008-01-01

    Although several commercial devices are available which allow tidal volume and air leak monitoring during continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) in neonates, little is known about their measurement accuracy and about the influence of air leaks on volume measurement. The aim of this in vitro study was the validation of volume and leak measurement under CPAP using a commercial ventilatory device, taking into consideration the clinical conditions in neonatology. The measurement accuracy of the Leoni ventilator (Heinen and Löwenstein, Germany) was investigated both in a leak-free system and with leaks simulated using calibration syringes (2–10 ml, 20–100 ml) and a mechanical lung model. Open tubes of variable lengths were connected for leak simulation. Leak flow was measured with the flow-through technique. In a leak-free system the mean relative volume error ±SD was 3.5 ± 2.6% (2–10 ml) and 5.9 ± 0.7% (20–60 ml), respectively. The influence of CPAP level, driving flow, respiratory rate and humidification of the breathing gas on the volume error was negligible. However, an increasing F i O 2 caused the measured tidal volume to increase by up to 25% (F i O 2 = 1.0). The relative error ±SD of the leak measurements was −0.2 ± 11.9%. For leaks >19%, measured tidal volume was underestimated by more than 10%. In conclusion, the present in vitro study showed that the Leoni allowed accurate volume monitoring under CPAP conditions similar to neonates. Air leaks of up to 90% of patient flow were reliably detected. For an F i O 2 >0.4 and for leaks >19%, a numerical correction of the displayed volume should be performed

  11. Assessment of volume and leak measurements during CPAP using a neonatal lung model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, H S; Roehr, C C; Proquitté, H; Wauer, R R; Schmalisch, G

    2008-01-01

    Although several commercial devices are available which allow tidal volume and air leak monitoring during continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) in neonates, little is known about their measurement accuracy and about the influence of air leaks on volume measurement. The aim of this in vitro study was the validation of volume and leak measurement under CPAP using a commercial ventilatory device, taking into consideration the clinical conditions in neonatology. The measurement accuracy of the Leoni ventilator (Heinen & Löwenstein, Germany) was investigated both in a leak-free system and with leaks simulated using calibration syringes (2-10 ml, 20-100 ml) and a mechanical lung model. Open tubes of variable lengths were connected for leak simulation. Leak flow was measured with the flow-through technique. In a leak-free system the mean relative volume error +/-SD was 3.5 +/- 2.6% (2-10 ml) and 5.9 +/- 0.7% (20-60 ml), respectively. The influence of CPAP level, driving flow, respiratory rate and humidification of the breathing gas on the volume error was negligible. However, an increasing F(i)O(2) caused the measured tidal volume to increase by up to 25% (F(i)O(2) = 1.0). The relative error +/- SD of the leak measurements was -0.2 +/- 11.9%. For leaks > 19%, measured tidal volume was underestimated by more than 10%. In conclusion, the present in vitro study showed that the Leoni allowed accurate volume monitoring under CPAP conditions similar to neonates. Air leaks of up to 90% of patient flow were reliably detected. For an F(i)O(2) > 0.4 and for leaks > 19%, a numerical correction of the displayed volume should be performed.

  12. Sample Size for Measuring Grammaticality in Preschool Children from Picture-Elicited Language Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenberg, Sarita L.; Guo, Ling-Yu

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate whether a shorter language sample elicited with fewer pictures (i.e., 7) would yield a percent grammatical utterances (PGU) score similar to that computed from a longer language sample elicited with 15 pictures for 3-year-old children. Method: Language samples were elicited by asking forty…

  13. Measuring stone volume - three-dimensional software reconstruction or an ellipsoid algebra formula?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finch, William; Johnston, Richard; Shaida, Nadeem; Winterbottom, Andrew; Wiseman, Oliver

    2014-04-01

    To determine the optimal method for assessing stone volume, and thus stone burden, by comparing the accuracy of scalene, oblate, and prolate ellipsoid volume equations with three-dimensional (3D)-reconstructed stone volume. Kidney stone volume may be helpful in predicting treatment outcome for renal stones. While the precise measurement of stone volume by 3D reconstruction can be accomplished using modern computer tomography (CT) scanning software, this technique is not available in all hospitals or with routine acute colic scanning protocols. Therefore, maximum diameters as measured by either X-ray or CT are used in the calculation of stone volume based on a scalene ellipsoid formula, as recommended by the European Association of Urology. In all, 100 stones with both X-ray and CT (1-2-mm slices) were reviewed. Complete and partial staghorn stones were excluded. Stone volume was calculated using software designed to measure tissue density of a certain range within a specified region of interest. Correlation coefficients among all measured outcomes were compared. Stone volumes were analysed to determine the average 'shape' of the stones. The maximum stone diameter on X-ray was 3-25 mm and on CT was 3-36 mm, with a reasonable correlation (r = 0.77). Smaller stones (15 mm towards scalene ellipsoids. There was no difference in stone shape by location within the kidney. As the average shape of renal stones changes with diameter, no single equation for estimating stone volume can be recommended. As the maximum diameter increases, calculated stone volume becomes less accurate, suggesting that larger stones have more asymmetric shapes. We recommend that research looking at stone clearance rates should use 3D-reconstructed stone volumes when available, followed by prolate, oblate, or scalene ellipsoid formulas depending on the maximum stone diameter. © 2013 The Authors. BJU International © 2013 BJU International.

  14. Molar Volume Analysis of Molten Ni-Al-Co Alloy by Measuring the Density

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIAO Feng; FANG Liang; FU Yuechao; YANG Lingchuan

    2004-01-01

    The density of molten Ni-Al-Co alloys was measured in the temperature range of 1714~1873K using a modified pycnometric method, and the molar volume of molten alloys was analyzed. The density of molten Ni-Al-Co alloys was found to decrease with increasing temperature and Co concentration in alloys. The molar volume of molten Ni-Al-Co alloys increases with increasing Co concentration in alloys. The molar volume of molten Ni-Al-Co alloys shows a negative deviation from the linear molar volume.

  15. Extravascular lung water: its measurement by simultaneous pulmonary and aortic sampling and iterative convolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giuntini, C.; Fazio, F.

    1975-01-01

    The inadequacy of the apparent distribution volume of THO during the first passage dilution curve (a) to account for the total lung water in in-vitro measurements in dogs and (b) to measure any increase in lung water, even in patients with obvious clinical pulmonary oedema, prompted the present investigation. Tritiated water, THO, as diffusible indicator, and human serum albumin labelled with 131 I, ALB, as intravascular tracer, are injected into the superior vena cava at the junction with the right atrium. In order to clear the aortic blood samples of recirculation, the recirculating tracers must be determined. This is accomplished by pulmonary artery sampling. Iterative convolution of the pulmonary artery dilution curves with suitable test functions eventually yields products of convolution that fit well the corresponding aortic dilution curves of THO and ALB. The test functions that yield the best fit are taken to represent the frequency functions of the transit time from pulmonary artery to aorta of THO and ALB, respectively. By applying the same procedure of iterative convolution to these frequency functions, we obtain the dilution curve of THO in the extravascular lung space. As a result of this analysis: (a) forward extrapolation is less subject to systematic errors such as overestimation of the mean transit time of ALB, i.e. of the tracer that recirculates more; and (b) the distribution volume of THO can be better defined since the dilution of THO in the extravascular lung space may be followed beyond the point of recirculation. The results indicate that both in normal subjects and in patients with left ventricular insufficiency the computed dilution curves of THO in the extravascular lung space have a long tail which is more pronounced in the patients. These findings suggest the existence in the lungs of extravascular water pools that are slowly exchanging with pulmonary water flow. This may depend both on inhomogeneities of perfusion, with lack of it at

  16. Metopic synostosis: Measuring intracranial volume change following fronto-orbital advancement using three-dimensional photogrammetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freudlsperger, Christian; Steinmacher, Sahra; Bächli, Heidi; Somlo, Elek; Hoffmann, Jürgen; Engel, Michael

    2015-06-01

    There is still disagreement regarding the intracranial volumes of patients with metopic synostosis compared with healthy patients. This study aimed to compare the intracranial volume of children with metopic synostosis before and after surgery to an age- and sex-matched control cohort using three-dimensional (3D) photogrammetry. Eighteen boys with metopic synostosis were operated on using standardized fronto-orbital advancement. Frontal, posterior and total intracranial volumes were measured exactly 1 day pre-operatively and 10 days post-operatively, using 3D photogrammetry. To establish an age- and sex-matched control group, the 3D photogrammetric data of 634 healthy boys between the ages of 3 and 13 months were analyzed. Mean age at surgery was 9 months (SD 1.7). Prior to surgery, boys with metopic synostosis showed significantly reduced frontal and total intracranial volumes compared with the reference group, but similar posterior volumes. After surgery, frontal and total intracranial volumes did not differ statistically from the control group. As children with metopic synostosis showed significantly smaller frontal and total intracranial volumes compared with an age- and sex-matched control group, corrective surgery should aim to achieve volume expansion. Furthermore, 3D photogrammetry provides a valuable alternative to CT scans in the measurement of intracranial volume in children with metopic synostosis, which significantly reduces the amount of radiation exposure to the growing brain. Copyright © 2015 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Measurement of liver and spleen volume by computed tomography using point counting technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuda, Yoshiro; Sato, Hiroyuki; Nei, Jinichi; Takada, Akira

    1982-01-01

    We devised a new method for measurement of liver and spleen volume by computed tomography using point counting technique. This method is very simple and applicable to any kind of CT scanner. The volumes of the livers and spleens estimated by this method were significantly correlated with the weights of the corresponding organs measured on autopsy or surgical operation, indicating clinical usefulness of this method. Hepatic and splenic volumes were estimated by this method in 43 patients with chronic liver disease and 9 subjects with non-hepatobiliary disease. The mean hepatic volume in non-alcoholic liver cirrhosis was significantly smaller than those in non-hepatobiliary disease and other chronic liver diseases. The mean hepatic volume in alcoholic cirrhosis and alcoholic fibrosis tended to be slightly larger than that in non-hepatobiliary disease. The mean splenic volume in liver cirrhosis was significantly larger than those in non-hepatobiliary disease and other chronic liver diseases. However, there was no significant difference of the mean splenic volume between alcoholic and non-alcoholic cirrhosis. Significantly positive correlation between hepatic and splenic volumes was found in alcoholic cirrhosis, but not in non-alcoholic cirrhosis. These results indicate that estimation of hepatic and splenic volumes by this method is useful for the analysis of the pathophysiological condition of chronic liver diseases. (author)

  18. SAMPL5: 3D-RISM partition coefficient calculations with partial molar volume corrections and solute conformational sampling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luchko, Tyler; Blinov, Nikolay; Limon, Garrett C; Joyce, Kevin P; Kovalenko, Andriy

    2016-11-01

    Implicit solvent methods for classical molecular modeling are frequently used to provide fast, physics-based hydration free energies of macromolecules. Less commonly considered is the transferability of these methods to other solvents. The Statistical Assessment of Modeling of Proteins and Ligands 5 (SAMPL5) distribution coefficient dataset and the accompanying explicit solvent partition coefficient reference calculations provide a direct test of solvent model transferability. Here we use the 3D reference interaction site model (3D-RISM) statistical-mechanical solvation theory, with a well tested water model and a new united atom cyclohexane model, to calculate partition coefficients for the SAMPL5 dataset. The cyclohexane model performed well in training and testing ([Formula: see text] for amino acid neutral side chain analogues) but only if a parameterized solvation free energy correction was used. In contrast, the same protocol, using single solute conformations, performed poorly on the SAMPL5 dataset, obtaining [Formula: see text] compared to the reference partition coefficients, likely due to the much larger solute sizes. Including solute conformational sampling through molecular dynamics coupled with 3D-RISM (MD/3D-RISM) improved agreement with the reference calculation to [Formula: see text]. Since our initial calculations only considered partition coefficients and not distribution coefficients, solute sampling provided little benefit comparing against experiment, where ionized and tautomer states are more important. Applying a simple [Formula: see text] correction improved agreement with experiment from [Formula: see text] to [Formula: see text], despite a small number of outliers. Better agreement is possible by accounting for tautomers and improving the ionization correction.

  19. SAMPL5: 3D-RISM partition coefficient calculations with partial molar volume corrections and solute conformational sampling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luchko, Tyler; Blinov, Nikolay; Limon, Garrett C.; Joyce, Kevin P.; Kovalenko, Andriy

    2016-11-01

    Implicit solvent methods for classical molecular modeling are frequently used to provide fast, physics-based hydration free energies of macromolecules. Less commonly considered is the transferability of these methods to other solvents. The Statistical Assessment of Modeling of Proteins and Ligands 5 (SAMPL5) distribution coefficient dataset and the accompanying explicit solvent partition coefficient reference calculations provide a direct test of solvent model transferability. Here we use the 3D reference interaction site model (3D-RISM) statistical-mechanical solvation theory, with a well tested water model and a new united atom cyclohexane model, to calculate partition coefficients for the SAMPL5 dataset. The cyclohexane model performed well in training and testing (R=0.98 for amino acid neutral side chain analogues) but only if a parameterized solvation free energy correction was used. In contrast, the same protocol, using single solute conformations, performed poorly on the SAMPL5 dataset, obtaining R=0.73 compared to the reference partition coefficients, likely due to the much larger solute sizes. Including solute conformational sampling through molecular dynamics coupled with 3D-RISM (MD/3D-RISM) improved agreement with the reference calculation to R=0.93. Since our initial calculations only considered partition coefficients and not distribution coefficients, solute sampling provided little benefit comparing against experiment, where ionized and tautomer states are more important. Applying a simple pK_{ {a}} correction improved agreement with experiment from R=0.54 to R=0.66, despite a small number of outliers. Better agreement is possible by accounting for tautomers and improving the ionization correction.

  20. Operational methods of thermodynamics. Volume 1 - Temperature measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eder, F. X.

    The principles of thermometry are examined, taking into account the concept of temperature, the Kelvin scale, the statistical theory of heat, negative absolute temperatures, the thermodynamic temperature scale, the thermodynamic temperature scale below 1 K, noise thermometry, temperature scales based on black-body radiation, acoustical thermometry, and the International Practical Temperature Scale 1968. Aspects of practical temperature measurement are discussed, giving attention to thermometers based on the expansion of a gas or a liquid, instruments utilizing the relative thermal expansion of two different metals, devices measuring the vapor pressure of a liquid, thermocouples, resistance thermometers, radiation pyrometers of various types, instruments utilizing the temperature dependence of a number of material characteristics, devices for temperature control, thermometer calibration, and aspects of thermometer installation and inertia. A description is presented of the approaches employed for the measurement of low temperatures.

  1. Validity of automated measurement of left ventricular ejection fraction and volume using the Philips EPIQ system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hovnanians, Ninel; Win, Theresa; Makkiya, Mohammed; Zheng, Qi; Taub, Cynthia

    2017-11-01

    To assess the efficiency and reproducibility of automated measurements of left ventricular (LV) volumes and LV ejection fraction (LVEF) in comparison to manually traced biplane Simpson's method. This is a single-center prospective study. Apical four- and two-chamber views were acquired in patients in sinus rhythm. Two operators independently measured LV volumes and LVEF using biplane Simpson's method. In addition, the image analysis software a2DQ on the Philips EPIQ system was applied to automatically assess the LV volumes and LVEF. Time spent on each analysis, using both methods, was documented. Concordance of echocardiographic measures was evaluated using intraclass correlation (ICC) and Bland-Altman analysis. Manual tracing and automated measurement of LV volumes and LVEF were performed in 184 patients with a mean age of 67.3 ± 17.3 years and BMI 28.0 ± 6.8 kg/m 2 . ICC and Bland-Altman analysis showed good agreements between manual and automated methods measuring LVEF, end-systolic, and end-diastolic volumes. The average analysis time was significantly less using the automated method than manual tracing (116 vs 217 seconds/patient, P Automated measurement using the novel image analysis software a2DQ on the Philips EPIQ system produced accurate, efficient, and reproducible assessment of LV volumes and LVEF compared with manual measurement. © 2017, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Laboratory analysis of soil hydraulic properties of TA-49 soil samples. Volume I: Report summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-04-01

    The Hydrologic Testing Laboratory at Daniel B. Stephens ampersand Associates, Inc. (DBS ampersand A) has completed laboratory tests on TA-49 soil samples as specified by Mr. Daniel A. James and summarized in Table 1. Tables 2 through 12 give the results of the specified analyses. Raw laboratory data and graphical plots of data (where appropriate) are contained in Appendices A through K. Appendix L lists the methods used in these analyses. A detailed description of each method is available upon request. Thermal properties were calculated using methods reviewed by Campbell and covered in more detail in Appendix K. Typically, soil thermal conductivities are determined using empirical fitting parameters (five in this case), Some assumptions are also made in the equations used to reduce the raw data. In addition to the requested thermal property measurements, calculated values are also presented as the best available internal check on data quality. For both thermal conductivities and specific heats, calculated and measured values are consistent and the functions often cross. Interestingly, measured thermal conductivities tend to be higher than calculated thermal conductivities around typically encountered in situ moisture contents (±5 percent). While we do not venture an explanation of the difference, sensitivity testing of any problem requiring nonisothermal modeling across this range is in order

  3. Errors during MRT measurements of the left ventricular volume using a multi-slice technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pitton, M.B.; Just, M.; Grebe, P.; Kreitner, K.F.; Erbel, R.; Thelen, M.

    1992-01-01

    A multi-slice technique for MRT measurements of the left ventricular volume is much faster than the use of single-slice methods and is therefore better tolerated, leaving time for additional measurements. The end-diastolic left ventricular volume can be reliably measured by this method (123.3±13.5 ml vs. 124.1±ml). The end-systolic volume is consistently overestimated by 23.7±18,3% compared with the reference value obtained by single slice measurements (47.9±8.9 ml vs 39.1±7.9 ml). Correspondingly, stroke volume and ejection fraction is underestimated on average by 10.6±9.7% and 10.6±7.6% respectively). (orig.) [de

  4. Measuring the volume of frontal lobe in healthy Chinese adults of the Han nationality on the high-resolution MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yin Lu; Liu Peifang; Ye Zhaoxiang; Chen Nan; Wang Xing; Li Kuncheng; Zhuo Yan; Chen Lin

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To explore the normal range of the volume of frontal lobe in Chinese adults of the Han nationality and provide morphological data for the construction of database for Chinese Standard Brain. Methods: This is a clinical multi-center study. Two hundred Chinese healthy volunteers (age range =18 to 70) recruited from 16 hospitals were divided into 5 groups, i.e., age range from 18 to 30, age range from 31 to 40, age range from 41 to 50, age range from 51 to 60, and age range from 61 to 70. Each group contained 20 males and 20 females. All of the volunteers were scanned by MR using T 1 weighted three- dimensional magnetization prepared rapid acquisition gradient echo sequence. We used the manual method to trace the region of interest and measured the left and right frontal lobe volumes separately. All the data were analyzed with SPSS (version 13.0). The sex differences in the frontal lobe volumes were analyzed by independent-samples t test, and the side differences were analyzed by paired-samples t test. Correlation and regression analysis was used between the age and the frontal lobe volumes. Results: In 200 healthy Chinese Han volunteers, the total frontal lobe volumes was (563±73) cm 3 . For male, the volumes of the left and the right frontal lobe were (288±42) cm 3 and (292±41) cm 3 , respectively. The volumes of the left and right frontal lobe in 100 women were (273±30)cm 3 and (274±30) cm 3 respectively. The differences of sex (t=3.334, P 0.05). There were negative correlations between the frontal lobe volumes and age in men and women (r=-0.586, -0.498, P< 0.01). Conclusions: The total frontal lobe volume of men was larger than that of women. The volume of the right frontal lobe was larger than the left frontal lobe in men, and the asymmetries didn't exist in women. The total frontal lobe volumes were both shrinking with age in men and women, which was more rapid in men than in women. (authors)

  5. Results of Long-term Measurement of 222Rn Volume Activity in Soil Air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holy, K.; Matos, M.; Boem, R.; Stanys, T.; Hola, O.; Polaskova, A.

    1999-01-01

    Radon in the soil air was continuously monitored for four years. The measured volume activities differ one from another even three times. On the basis of the measured data the annual and average daily courses of the 222 Rn volume activity were studied for individual months. In annual courses the winter and also summer maxima of the 222 Rn volume activity were found out. The study of the average daily courses revealed that the oscillation of the 222 Rn volume activity about its average value during a day is only a few percent. For dry summer months a linear relation was found out between the changes of the 222 Rn volume activity and the changes of the atmospheric pressure in their average daily courses (Authors)

  6. A NEW RECIPE FOR OBTAINING CENTRAL VOLUME DENSITIES OF PRESTELLAR CORES FROM SIZE MEASUREMENTS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tassis, Konstantinos; Yorke, Harold W.

    2011-01-01

    We propose a simple analytical method for estimating the central volume density of prestellar molecular cloud cores from their column density profiles. Prestellar cores feature a flat central part of the column density and volume density profiles of the same size indicating the existence of a uniform-density inner region. The size of this region is set by the thermal pressure force which depends only on the central volume density and temperature of the core, and can provide a direct measurement of the central volume density. Thus, a simple length measurement can immediately yield a central density estimate independent of any dynamical model for the core and without the need for fitting. Using the radius at which the column density is 90% of the central value as an estimate of the size of the flat inner part of the column density profile yields an estimate of the central volume density within a factor of two for well-resolved cores.

  7. Measurement of 90Sr in fresh water samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belanova, A.; Meresova, J.; Svetlik, I.; Tomaskova, L.

    2008-01-01

    This preliminary study show new experimental approach to the determination of the radionuclide 90 Sr in water samples. The new method of dynamic windows utilizing liquid scintillation counting was applied on model and surface water samples. Our results show the demand of separation technique with significantly higher yields. (authors)

  8. A study of toxic emissions from a coal-fired power plant utilizing an ESP/Wet FGD system. Volume 1, Sampling, results, and special topics: Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-07-01

    This was one of a group of assessments of toxic emissions from coal-fired power plants, conducted for DOE-PETC in 1993 as mandated by the 1990 Clean Air Act. It is organized into 2 volumes; Volume 1 describes the sampling effort, presents the concentration data on toxic chemicals in several power plant streams, and reports the results of evaluations and calculations. The study involved solid, liquid, and gaseous samples from input, output, and process streams at Coal Creek Station Unit No. 1, Underwood, North Dakota (1100 MW mine-mouth plant burning lignite from the Falkirk mine located adjacent to the plant). This plant had an electrostatic precipitator and a wet scrubber flue gas desulfurization unit. Measurements were conducted on June 21--24, 26, and 27, 1993; chemicals measured were 6 major and 16 trace elements (including Hg, Cr, Cd, Pb, Se, As, Be, Ni), acids and corresponding anions (HCl, HF, chloride, fluoride, phosphate, sulfate), ammonia and cyanide, elemental C, radionuclides, VOCs, semivolatiles (incl. PAH, polychlorinated dioxins, furans), and aldehydes. Volume 2: Appendices includes process data log sheets, field sampling data sheets, uncertainty calculations, and quality assurance results.

  9. Application of a Dual-Arm Robot in Complex Sample Preparation and Measurement Processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleischer, Heidi; Drews, Robert Ralf; Janson, Jessica; Chinna Patlolla, Bharath Reddy; Chu, Xianghua; Klos, Michael; Thurow, Kerstin

    2016-10-01

    Automation systems with applied robotics have already been established in industrial applications for many years. In the field of life sciences, a comparable high level of automation can be found in the areas of bioscreening and high-throughput screening. Strong deficits still exist in the development of flexible and universal fully automated systems in the field of analytical measurement. Reasons are the heterogeneous processes with complex structures, which include sample preparation and transport, analytical measurements using complex sensor systems, and suitable data analysis and evaluation. Furthermore, the use of nonstandard sample vessels with various shapes and volumes results in an increased complexity. The direct use of existing automation solutions from bioscreening applications is not possible. A flexible automation system for sample preparation, analysis, and data evaluation is presented in this article. It is applied for the determination of cholesterol in biliary endoprosthesis using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). A dual-arm robot performs both transport and active manipulation tasks to ensure human-like operation. This general robotic concept also enables the use of manual laboratory devices and equipment and is thus suitable in areas with a high standardization grade. © 2016 Society for Laboratory Automation and Screening.

  10. Block Volume Estimation from the Discontinuity Spacing Measurements of Mesozoic Limestone Quarries, Karaburun Peninsula, Turkey

    OpenAIRE

    Elci, Hakan; Turk, Necdet

    2014-01-01

    Block volumes are generally estimated by analyzing the discontinuity spacing measurements obtained either from the scan lines placed over the rock exposures or the borehole cores. Discontinuity spacing measurements made at the Mesozoic limestone quarries in Karaburun Peninsula were used to estimate the average block volumes that could be produced from them using the suggested methods in the literature. The Block Quality Designation (BQD) ratio method proposed by the authors has been found to ...

  11. Recommended procedures for performance testing of radiobioassay laboratories: Volume 2, In vitro samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fenrick, H.W.; MacLellan, J.A.

    1988-11-01

    Draft American National Standards Institute (ANSI) Standard N13.30 (Performance Criteria for Radiobioassay) was developed for the US Department of Energy and the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission to help ensure that bioassay laboratories provide accurate and consistent results. The draft standard specifies the criteria for defining the procedures necessary to establish a bioassay performance-testing laboratory and program. The bioassay testing laboratory will conduct tests to evaluate the performance of service laboratories. Pacific Northwest Laboratory helped develop testing procedures as part of an effort to evaluate the performance criteria by testing the existing measurement capabilities of various bioassay laboratories. This report recommends guidelines for the preparation, handling, storage, distribution, shipping, and documentation of in vitro test samples (artificial urine and fecal matter) for indirect bioassay. The data base and recommended records system for documenting radiobioassay performance at the service laboratories are also presented. 8 refs., 3 tabs

  12. Special Properties of Coherence Scanning Interferometers for large Measurement Volumes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bauer, W

    2011-01-01

    In contrast to many other optical methods the uncertainty of Coherence Scanning Interferometer (CSI) in vertical direction is independent from the field of view. Therefore CSIs are ideal instruments for measuring 3D-profiles of larger areas (36x28mm 2 , e.g.) with high precision. This is of advantage for the determination of form parameters like flatness, parallelism and steps heights within a short time. In addition, using a telecentric beam path allows measurements of deep lying surfaces (<70mm) and the determination of form parameters with large step-heights. The lateral and spatial resolution, however, are reduced. In this presentation different metrological characteristics together with their potential errors are analyzed for large-scale measuring CSIs. Therefore these instruments are ideal tools in quality control for good/bad selections, e.g. The consequences for the practical use in industry and for standardization are discussed by examples of workpieces of automotive suppliers or from the steel industry.

  13. Measurement of the airway surface liquid volume with simple light refraction microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, Peter R; Tarran, Robert; Garoff, Stephen; Myerburg, Mike M

    2011-09-01

    In the cystic fibrosis (CF) lung, the airway surface liquid (ASL) volume is depleted, impairing mucus clearance from the lung and leading to chronic airway infection and obstruction. Several therapeutics have been developed that aim to restore normal airway surface hydration to the CF airway, yet preclinical evaluation of these agents is hindered by the paucity of methods available to directly measure the ASL. Therefore, we sought to develop a straightforward approach to measure the ASL volume that would serve as the basis for a standardized method to assess mucosal hydration using readily available resources. Primary human bronchial epithelial (HBE) cells cultured at an air-liquid interface develop a liquid meniscus at the edge of the culture. We hypothesized that the size of the fluid meniscus is determined by the ASL volume, and could be measured as an index of the epithelial surface hydration status. A simple method was developed to measure the volume of fluid present in meniscus by imaging the refraction of light at the ASL interface with the culture wall using low-magnification microscopy. Using this method, we found that primary CF HBE cells had a reduced ASL volume compared with non-CF HBE cells, and that known modulators of ASL volume caused the predicted responses. Thus, we have demonstrated that this method can detect physiologically relevant changes in the ASL volume, and propose that this novel approach may be used to rapidly assess the effects of airway hydration therapies in high-throughput screening assays.

  14. Sonographic measurement of thyroid gland volume: A comparison of 2D and 3D ultrasound

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ying, Michael [Department of Optometry and Radiography, Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hung Hom, Kowloon, Hong Kong (China)]. E-mail: ormying@polyu.edu.hk; Sin Manhong [Department of Optometry and Radiography, Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hung Hom, Kowloon, Hong Kong (China); Pang, Shuk-fan [Department of Optometry and Radiography, Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hung Hom, Kowloon, Hong Kong (China)

    2005-11-01

    Aims: This study was undertaken to investigate the inter-observer reproducibility of 2D and 3D ultrasound in the measurement of thyroid gland volume. The symmetry of thyroid lobes in healthy subjects was also investigated. Materials and methods: The volume of the left and right lobes of the thyroid gland was measured in 20 healthy subjects (10 men and 10 women) using 2D and 3D ultrasound. On 2D ultrasound, the thyroid lobe volume was calculated by ellipsoid equation (volume = {pi}/6 x craniocaudal x mediolateral x anteroposterior dimensions), whereas 3D ultrasound volumetric measurements were performed with a 3D add-on system. In each subject, the thyroid gland was scanned by two operators to investigate inter-observer variability. Results: There was a moderate agreement between 2D and 3D ultrasound in the measurement of thyroid volume (r = 0.77). 3D ultrasound (90%) had a higher inter-observer reproducibility than 2D ultrasound (85%) in the measurements. About 74% of healthy subjects had the right thyroid lobe larger than the left lobe. Conclusion: 3D ultrasound is useful in the measurement of thyroid volume with a higher reproducibility than 2D ultrasound. Asymmetry of thyroid lobes was noted in healthy subjects.

  15. Sonographic measurement of thyroid gland volume: A comparison of 2D and 3D ultrasound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ying, Michael; Sin Manhong; Pang, Shuk-fan

    2005-01-01

    Aims: This study was undertaken to investigate the inter-observer reproducibility of 2D and 3D ultrasound in the measurement of thyroid gland volume. The symmetry of thyroid lobes in healthy subjects was also investigated. Materials and methods: The volume of the left and right lobes of the thyroid gland was measured in 20 healthy subjects (10 men and 10 women) using 2D and 3D ultrasound. On 2D ultrasound, the thyroid lobe volume was calculated by ellipsoid equation (volume = π/6 x craniocaudal x mediolateral x anteroposterior dimensions), whereas 3D ultrasound volumetric measurements were performed with a 3D add-on system. In each subject, the thyroid gland was scanned by two operators to investigate inter-observer variability. Results: There was a moderate agreement between 2D and 3D ultrasound in the measurement of thyroid volume (r = 0.77). 3D ultrasound (90%) had a higher inter-observer reproducibility than 2D ultrasound (85%) in the measurements. About 74% of healthy subjects had the right thyroid lobe larger than the left lobe. Conclusion: 3D ultrasound is useful in the measurement of thyroid volume with a higher reproducibility than 2D ultrasound. Asymmetry of thyroid lobes was noted in healthy subjects

  16. Remedial investigation sampling and analysis plan for J-Field, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland. Volume 1: Field Sampling Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benioff, P.; Biang, R.; Dolak, D.; Dunn, C.; Martino, L.; Patton, T.; Wang, Y.; Yuen, C.

    1995-03-01

    The Environmental Management Division (EMD) of Aberdeen Proving Ground (APG), Maryland, is conducting a remedial investigation and feasibility study (RI/FS) of the J-Field area at APG pursuant to the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA), as amended. J-Field is within the Edgewood Area of APG in Harford County, Maryland (Figure 1. 1). Since World War II activities in the Edgewood Area have included the development, manufacture, testing, and destruction of chemical agents and munitions. These materials were destroyed at J-Field by open burning and open detonation (OB/OD). Considerable archival information about J-Field exists as a result of efforts by APG staff to characterize the hazards associated with the site. Contamination of J-Field was first detected during an environmental survey of the Edgewood Area conducted in 1977 and 1978 by the US Army Toxic and Hazardous Materials Agency (USATHAMA) (predecessor to the US Army Environmental Center [AEC]). As part of a subsequent USATHAMA -environmental survey, 11 wells were installed and sampled at J-Field. Contamination at J-Field was also detected during a munitions disposal survey conducted by Princeton Aqua Science in 1983. The Princeton Aqua Science investigation involved the installation and sampling of nine wells and the collection and analysis of surficial and deep composite soil samples. In 1986, a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) permit (MD3-21-002-1355) requiring a basewide RCRA Facility Assessment (RFA) and a hydrogeologic assessment of J-Field was issued by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). In 1987, the US Geological Survey (USGS) began a two-phased hydrogeologic assessment in data were collected to model, groundwater flow at J-Field. Soil gas investigations were conducted, several well clusters were installed, a groundwater flow model was developed, and groundwater and surface water monitoring programs were established that continue today.

  17. ARPA-E Impacts: A Sampling of Project Outcomes, Volume II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rohlfing, Eric [Dept. of Energy (DOE), Washington DC (United States). Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy (ARPA-E)

    2017-02-27

    The Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy (ARPA-E) is demonstrating that a collaborative model has the power to deliver real value. The Agency’s first compilation booklet of impact sheets, published in 2016, began to tell the story of how ARPA-E has already made an impact in just seven years—funding a diverse and sophisticated research portfolio on advanced energy technologies that enable the United States to tackle our most pressing energy challenges. One year later our research investments continue to pay off, with a number of current and alumni project teams successfully commercializing their technologies and advancing the state of the art in transformative areas of energy science and engineering. There is no single measure that can fully illustrate ARPA-E’s success to date, but several statistics viewed collectively begin to reveal the Agency’s impact. Since 2009, ARPA-E has provided more than $1.5 billion in funding for 36 focused programs and three open funding solicitations, totaling over 580 projects. Of those, 263 are now alumni projects. Many teams have successfully leveraged ARPA-E’s investment: 56 have formed new companies, 68 have partnered with other government agencies to continue their technology development, and 74 teams have together raised more than $1.8 billion in reported funding from the private sector to bring their technologies to market. However, even when viewed together, those measures do not capture ARPA-E’s full impact. To best understand the Agency’s success, the specific scientific and engineering challenges that ARPA-E project teams have overcome must be understood. This booklet provides concrete examples of those successes, ranging from innovations that will bear fruit in the future to ones that are beginning to penetrate the market as products today. Importantly, half of the projects highlighted in this volume stem from OPEN solicitations, which the agency has run in 2009, 2012, and 2015. ARPA-E’s OPEN programs

  18. Measurement of residual stresses in welded sample of dissimilar materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mansur, Tanius Rodrigues; Gomes, Paulo de Tarso Vida; Scaldaferri, Denis Henrique Bianchi; Martins, Geraldo Antonio Scoralick; Atanazio Filho, Nelson do Nascimento

    2008-01-01

    reactors, what can generate significant residual stresses due so much to the welding procedure as for the difference of the coefficients of thermal expansion of the involved materials. In this work, are shown the results of the measurement of residual tensions in welded sample of steel carbon SA 508 Cl 3 and stainless steel 316L. The Inconel 182 was used as weld metal. (author)

  19. Precision Measurement and Calibration. Volume 1. Statistical Concepts and Procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    1969-02-01

    1950. When Both Variables are Subject to 11. R. D. Stiehler, G. G. Richey, and J. Man- Error," Biometrics , Vol. 5, No. 3, pp. del, "Measurement of...34Analysis of extreme values," Ann. Math. Stat., 21 (1950), 488-506. 3. W. J. DixoN, "Processing data for outliers," Biometrics , 9 (1953), 74-89. 4...standards written by John Perry-" and Figure 1-- hematic Riepesentatitl of Hierarhies ml lftarRalph W. Smith ( ’. Staldards Laberatorles Using

  20. Validation of tomographic measurement of cerebral blood volume with C-11-labeled carboxyhemoglobin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phelps, M.E.; Huang, S.C.; Hoffman, E.J.; Kuhl, D.E.

    1979-01-01

    Red blood cells, tagged with C-11 administration of 11 CO gas, have been used to portray the distribution of blood in the brain. To date, however, the accuracy of this approach has not been validated. We have performed in vitro measurements of regional cerebral blood volume (CBV) with red blood cells labeled with C-11 and Cr-51 in four dogs and two rhesus monkeys. These studies yielded a ratio of CBV/sub C-1/ to CBV/sub Cr-11/ of 1.02 +- 0.03 (s.d.) from 92 samples. A least-squares fit to these data showed CBV/sub C-11/ = 1.01 CBV/sub Cr-51/ + 0.037; P much 11 CO-RBC gave coefficients of variation of +- 2.8% and +- 4.8% for cross-sectional CBV and regional (approx.4 cm 2 ) CBV over an 80-min period. The average human CBV was found to be 4.2 +- 0.4 cc blood per 100 g tissue. Clear tomographic delineation of the distribution of CBV in human subjects is achieved with ECT, which provides a ''live'' measurement of this parameter of cerebral hemodynamics. These data demonstrate that 11 CO administered by single-breath inhalation is a reliable and accurate blood tracer for measurement of CBV with ECT

  1. Planck/SDSS Cluster Mass and Gas Scaling Relations for a Volume-Complete redMaPPer Sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimeno, Pablo; Diego, Jose M.; Broadhurst, Tom; De Martino, I.; Lazkoz, Ruth

    2018-04-01

    Using Planck satellite data, we construct Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) gas pressure profiles for a large, volume-complete sample of optically selected clusters. We have defined a sample of over 8,000 redMaPPer clusters from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), within the volume-complete redshift region 0.100 trend towards larger break radius with increasing cluster mass. Our SZ-based masses fall ˜16% below the mass-richness relations from weak lensing, in a similar fashion as the "hydrostatic bias" related with X-ray derived masses. Finally, we derive a tight Y500-M500 relation over a wide range of cluster mass, with a power law slope equal to 1.70 ± 0.07, that agrees well with the independent slope obtained by the Planck team with an SZ-selected cluster sample, but extends to lower masses with higher precision.

  2. Rapid determination of benzene derivatives in water samples by trace volume solvent DLLME prior to GC-FID

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diao, Chun Peng; Wei, Chao Hai; Feng, Chun Hua [South China Univ. of Technology, Guangzhou Higher Education Mega Center (China). College of Environmental Science and Engineering; Guangdong Regular Higher Education Institutions, Guangzhou (China). Key Lab. of Environmental Protection and Eco-Remediation

    2012-05-15

    An inexpensive, simple and environmentally friendly method based on dispersive liquid liquid microextraction (DLLME) for rapid determination of benzene derivatives in water samples was proposed. A significant improvement of DLLME procedure was achieved. Trace volume ethyl acetate (60 {mu}L) was exploited as dispersion solvent instead of common ones such as methanol and acetone, the volume of which was more than 0.5 mL, and the organic solvent required in DLLME was reduced to a great extent. Only 83-{mu}L organic solvent was consumed in the whole analytic process and the preconcentration procedure was less than 10 min. The advantageous approach coupled with gas chromatograph-flame ionization detector was proposed for the rapid determination of benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylene isomers in water samples. Results showed that the proposed approach was an efficient method for rapid determination of benzene derivatives in aqueous samples. (orig.)

  3. [Effects of the volume and shape of voxels on the measurement of phantom volume using three-dimensional magnetic resonance imaging].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Koichi; Hagino, Hirofumi; Saitou, Osamu; Yotsutsuji, Takashi; Tonami, Syuichi; Nakamura, Mamoru; Kuranishi, Makoto

    2002-01-01

    Recently, an increasing number of volumetric studies of the human brain have been reported, using three-dimensional magnetic resonance imaging (3D-MRI). To our knowledge, however, there are few investigations on the relation of the volume and shape of voxels which constitute an MR image to the accuracy in volume measurement of an imaged object. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of a different shape of voxel, that is, isotropic or anisotropic, as well as the volume of a voxel on the volume measurement based on the original image data and multiplanar reconstruction (MPR) data, respectively. In the experiment, we repeatedly acquired contiguous sagittal images of a single globe phantom with a known volume under the condition in which the volume and shape of voxels varied, on a 1.5T MR scanner. We used a gradient echo sequence (3D FLASH). The volume of the globe phantom from both original images and MPR ones was measured on workstations employing a semi-automated local thresholding technique. As a result, the smaller volume of voxels tended to give us the more correct measurement, and an isotropic voxel reduced measurement errors as compared to an anisotropic one. Therefore, it is concluded that the setting of voxel with both an isotropic shape and small volume, e.g., a voxel of 1 mm x 1 mm x 1 mm at present, is recommended in order to get a precise volume measurement using 3D-MRI.

  4. Effects of the volume and shape of voxels on the measurement of phantom volume using three-dimensional magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mori, Koichi; Tonami, Syuichi; Nakamura, Mamoru; Kuranishi, Makoto; Hagino, Hirofumi; Saitou, Osamu; Yotsutsuji, Takashi

    2002-01-01

    Recently, an increasing number of volumetric studies of the human brain have been reported, using three-dimensional magnetic resonance imaging (3D-MRI). To our knowledge, however, there are few investigations on the relation of the volume and shape of voxels which constitute and MR image to the accuracy in volume measurement of an imaged object. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of a different shape of voxel, that is, isotropic or anisotropic, as well as the volume of a voxel on the volume measurement based on the original image data and multiplanar reconstruction (MPR) data, respectively. In the experiment, we repeatedly acquired contiguous sagittal images of a single globe phantom with a known volume under the condition in which the volume and shape of voxels varied, on a 1.5 T MR scanner. We used a gradient echo sequence (3D FLASH). The volume of the globe phantom from both original images and MPR ones was measured on workstations employing a semi-automated local thresholding technique. As a result, the smaller volume of voxels tended to give us the more correct measurement, and an isotropic voxel reduced measurement errors as compared to an anisotropic one. Therefore, it is concluded that the setting of voxel with both an isotropic shape and small volume, e.g., a voxel of 1 mm x 1 mm x 1 mm at present, is recommended in order to get a precise volume measurement using 3D-MRI. (author)

  5. Left ventricular ejection fraction and volumes as measured by 3D echocardiography and ultrafast computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vieira, Marcelo Luiz Campos; Nomura, Cesar H.; Tranchesi Junior, Bernardino; Oliveira, Wercules A. de; Naccarato, Gustavo; Serpa, Bruna S.; Passos, Rodrigo B.D.; Funari, Marcelo B. G.; Fischer, Claudio H.; Morhy, Samira S.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Real-time three-dimensional echocardiography (RT-3D-Echo) and ultrafast computed tomography (CT) are two novel methods for the analysis of LV ejection fraction and volumes. Objective: To compare LVEF and volume measurements as obtained using RT-3D-Echo and ultrafast CT. Methods: Thirty nine consecutive patients (27 men, mean age of 57+- 12 years) were studied using RT-3D-Echo and 64-slice ultrafast CT. LVEF and LV volumes were analyzed. Statistical analysis: coefficient of correlation (r: Pearson), Bland-Altman analysis, linear regression analysis, 95% CI, p 5 .58)%; end-diastolic volume ranged from 49.6 to 178.2 (87+-27.8) ml; end-systolic volume ranged from 11.4 to 78 (33.1+-13.6) ml. CT scan measurements: LVEF ranged from 53 to 86% (67.8+-7.78); end-diastolic volume ranged from 51 to 186 (106.5+-30.3) ml; end-systolic volume ranged from 7 to 72 (35.5+-13.4)ml. Correlations between RT-3D-Echo and CT were: LVEF (r: 0.7888, p<0.0001, 95% CI 0.6301 to 0.8843); end-diastolic volume (r: 0.7695, p<0.0001, 95% CI 0.5995 to 0.8730); end-systolic volume (r: 0.8119, p<0.0001, 95% CI 0.6673 to 0.8975). Conclusion: Good correlation between LVEF and ventricular volume parameters as measured by RT-3D-Echo and 64-slice ultrafast CT was found in the present case series. (author)

  6. Total and regional brain volumes in a population-based normative sample from 4 to 18 years: the NIH MRI Study of Normal Brain Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Using a population-based sampling strategy, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Magnetic Resonance Imaging Study of Normal Brain Development compiled a longitudinal normative reference database of neuroimaging and correlated clinical/behavioral data from a demographically representative sample of healthy children and adolescents aged newborn through early adulthood. The present paper reports brain volume data for 325 children, ages 4.5-18 years, from the first cross-sectional time point. Measures included volumes of whole-brain gray matter (GM) and white matter (WM), left and right lateral ventricles, frontal, temporal, parietal and occipital lobe GM and WM, subcortical GM (thalamus, caudate, putamen, and globus pallidus), cerebellum, and brainstem. Associations with cross-sectional age, sex, family income, parental education, and body mass index (BMI) were evaluated. Key observations are: 1) age-related decreases in lobar GM most prominent in parietal and occipital cortex; 2) age-related increases in lobar WM, greatest in occipital, followed by the temporal lobe; 3) age-related trajectories predominantly curvilinear in females, but linear in males; and 4) small systematic associations of brain tissue volumes with BMI but not with IQ, family income, or parental education. These findings constitute a normative reference on regional brain volumes in children and adolescents.

  7. SPECT measurements of cerebral blood volume before and after acetazolamide in occlusive cerebrovascular diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, Yusuke; Momose, Toshimitsu; Machida, Kikuo; Honda, Norinari; Nishikawa, Junichi; Sasaki, Yasuhito.

    1994-01-01

    Cerebral blood volume before and after acetazolamide was measured by SPECT to evaluate cerebral vasodilatory capacity in eight patients with cerebrovascular disease and five control subjects. Two SPECT measurements were performed serially, and acetazolamide was administered between them. The ratio of increase in hemispheric blood volume was calculated, and it was compared with the results of cerebral blood flow and cerebral blood volume measurements. A cerebral vasodilatory capacity map, the image after acetazolamide minus the baseline image, was also produced. Acetazolamide increased hemispheric blood volume in all subjects. The ratio of increase was lower in the involved hemispheres of the patients with unilateral carotid disease than in the uninvolved hemispheres of the patients and control subjects. The ratio of concordance with blood flow and blood volume measurements was approximated at 80%. Cerebral vasodilatory capacity mapping revealed three defects compatible with the clinical data. SPECT measurements of cerebral blood volume after acetazolamide can be performed following baseline SPECT with no additional radiotracer, and may be helpful to assess hemodynamic status. (author)

  8. Measurement of lung volume by lung perfusion scanning using SPECT and prediction of postoperative respiratory function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andou, Akio; Shimizu, Nobuyosi; Maruyama, Shuichiro

    1992-01-01

    Measurement of lung volume by lung perfusion scanning using single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and its usefulness for the prediction of respiratory function after lung resection were investigated. The lung volumes calculated in 5 patients by SPECT (threshold level 20%) using 99m Tc-macroaggregated albumin (MAA), related very closely to the actually measured lung volumes. This results prompted us to calculate the total lung volume and the volume of the lobe to be resected in 18 patients with lung cancer by SPECT. Based on the data obtained, postoperative respiratory function was predicted. The predicted values of forced vital capacity (FVC), forced expiratory volume (FEV 1.0 ), and maximum vital volume (MVV) showed closer correlations with the actually measured postoperative values (FVC, FEV 1.0 , MVV : r=0.944, r=0.917, r=0.795 respectively), than the values predicted by the ordinary lung perfusion scanning. This method facilitates more detailed evaluation of local lung function on a lobe-by-lobe basis, and can be applied clinically to predict postoperative respiratory function. (author)

  9. Thigh muscle volume predicted by anthropometric measurements and correlated with physical function in the older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, B B; Shih, T T F; Hsu, C Y; Yu, C W; Wei, S Y; Chen, C Y; Wu, C H; Chen, C Y

    2011-06-01

    (1) to correlate thigh muscle volume measured by magnetic resonance image (MRI) with anthropometric measurements and physical function in elderly subjects; (2) to predict MRI-measured thigh muscle volume using anthropometric measurements and physical functional status in elderly subjects. Cross-sectional, nonrandomized study. Outpatient clinic in Taiwan. Sixty-nine elderly subjects (33 men and 36 women) aged 65 and older. The anthropometric data (including body height, body weight, waist size, and thigh circumference), physical activity and function (including grip strength, bilateral quadriceps muscle power, the up and go test, chair rise, and five meters walk time) and bioelectrical impedance analysis data (including total body fat mass, fat-free mass, and predictive muscle size) were measured. MRI-measured muscle volume of both thighs was used as the reference standard. The MRI-measured thigh volume was positively correlated with all anthropometric data, quadriceps muscle power and the up and go test as well as fat-free mass and predictive muscle mass, whereas it was negatively associated with age and walk time. In predicting thigh muscle volume, the variables of age, gender, body weight, and thigh circumference were significant predictors in the linear regression model: Muscle volume (cm3) =4226.3-42.5 × Age (year)-955.7 × gender (male=1, female=2) + 45.9 × body weight(kg) + 60.0 × thigh circumference (cm) (r2 = 0.745, P estimate = 581.6 cm3). The current work provides evidence of a strong relationship between thigh muscle volume and physical function in the elderly. We also developed a prediction equation model using anthropometric measurements. This model is a simple and noninvasive method for everyday clinical practice and follow-up.

  10. Measurement assurance program for FTIR analyses of deuterium oxide samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, S.R.; Clark, J.P.

    1997-01-01

    Analytical chemistry measurements require an installed criterion based assessment program to identify and control sources of error. This program should also gauge the uncertainty about the data. A self- assessment was performed of long established quality control practices against the characteristics of a comprehensive measurement assurance program. Opportunities for improvement were identified. This paper discusses the efforts to transform quality control practices into a complete measurement assurance program. The resulting program heightened the laboratory's confidence in the data it generated, by providing real-time statistical information to control and determine measurement quality

  11. Measuring the volume of insula in healthy Chinese adults of the Han nationality on the high-resolution MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qi Guangrui; Guo Yulin; Lai Yanbo; Gong Rui; Zhu Kai; Zhao Dan; Chen Nan; Wang Xing; Li Kuncheng; Zhuo Yan; Chen Lin

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To explore the normal range of the insula volume of Chinese adults of the Hah nationality and its relationship with age, which provide morphological data for the construction of database for Chinese Standard Brain. Methods: This is a clinical multi-center study. One thousand Chinese healthy volunteers (age range = 18 to 70) recruited from 16 hospitals were divided into 5 groups, i.e., Group A (age range =18 to 30), B (age range =31 to 40), C (age range =41 to 50), D (age range = 51 to 60), and E (age range = 61 to 70). Each group contained 100 males and 100 females. All of the volunteers were scanned by MR using T 1 weighted three-dimensional magnetization prepared rapid acquisition gradient echo sequence. After three dimension data reconstruction, the volumes of bilateral insula were manually measured. The volume of bilateral insula were compared by paired sample t test. The insula volumes were compared between male and female by independent sample t test, and the differences among 5 age groups were compared by one-way ANNOVA. The relationship between the volumes of insula and age, sex or cerebral volume were analyzed using bivariate correlation, respectively. Results: The left and right side volume of insula before standarized were (7764 ± 1165) and (7387 ± 1128) mm 3 respectively, after standarized were (8413 ± 1201) and (7871 ± 1140) mm 3 respectively. The left insula volume were significant larger than that of fight (t=-10.565, -16.014, P 3 for male, and (7393 ± 1022) mm 3 and (7050 ± 1038) mm for female. The left and right insula volumes for male were larger than the female's (t=10.934,9.945,P 3 , female were (8043± 1054) and (7515 ± 1091 ) mm 3 , the left and right insula volume of male were larger than the female's(t=4.858,4.632,P 3 respectively, the right were (8028 ± 1156), (7636 ± 1075), (7294 ± 986) (7249 ± 1068), (6717 ± 916) mm 3 respectively, there were significant differences among 5 groups between left and right insula

  12. The measure of radiocarbon in the drating of environmental samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruiz Pessenda, L.C.; Camargo, P.B. de

    1990-01-01

    An analytical system for radiocarbon dating of environmental samples (charcoal, shell, wood, etc.) using low level liquid scintillation spectrometry has been developed and optimized at Center for Nuclear Energy in Agriculture of the University of Sao Paulo. Physical and chemical pretreatment of samples to remove oils, resins, carbonates and fulvic and humic acids; the benzene synthesis of NBS oxalic acid standard, calcium carbonate P.A. and marble and the results of benzene yield; the optimization of radiocarbon counting window; the effect of scintillators PPO-POPOP and butyl PBD on the efficiency of detection and background of radiocarbon, are described. Samples of charcoal, shell and wood, previously dated at the radiocarbon laboratories of Centre des Faibles Radioactives, France, and Instituto de Geociencias of USP, are analysed for preliminary laboratory intercomparison. (author) [pt

  13. Hanford Environmental Information System (HEIS). Volume 7: Sample and Data Tracking subject area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-06-01

    The Hanford Environmental Information System (HEIS) Sample and Data Tracking subject area allows insertion of tracking information into a central repository where the data is immediately available for viewing. For example, a technical coordinator is able to view the current status of a particular sampling effort, from sample collection to data package validation dates. Four major types of data comprise the Sample and Data Tracking subject area: data about the mechanisms that groups a set of samples for a particular sampling effort; data about how constituents are grouped and assigned to a sample; data about when, where, and how samples are sent to a laboratory for analysis; and data bout the status of a sample's constituent analysis requirements, i.e., whether the analysis results have been returned from the laboratory

  14. A device for fresh water sampling before radioactive measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maubert, Henri; Picat, Philippe.

    1982-06-01

    On account of the many field operations carried out by the laboratory, a water sampling device has been developed. This portable autonomous device performs in situ water filtration and concentration on ion exchange resins and activated carbon columns. The device is described and the trapping performance for 8 radionuclides is given. A comparison is made with the so-called evaporation method. The effects of the treatment of the filtrating elements on the radioactive results are studied. This sampling method is very sensitive [fr

  15. Volume of Structures in the Fetal Brain Measured with a New Semiautomated Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ber, R; Hoffman, D; Hoffman, C; Polat, A; Derazne, E; Mayer, A; Katorza, E

    2017-11-01

    Measuring the volume of fetal brain structures is challenging due to fetal motion, low resolution, and artifacts caused by maternal tissue. Our aim was to introduce a new, simple, Matlab-based semiautomated method to measure the volume of structures in the fetal brain and present normal volumetric curves of the structures measured. The volume of the supratentorial brain, left and right hemispheres, cerebellum, and left and right eyeballs was measured retrospectively by the new semiautomated method in MR imaging examinations of 94 healthy fetuses. Four volume ratios were calculated. Interobserver agreement was calculated with the intraclass correlation coefficient, and a Bland-Altman plot was drawn for comparison of manual and semiautomated method measurements of the supratentorial brain. We present normal volumetric curves and normal percentile values of the structures measured according to gestational age and of the ratios between the cerebellum and the supratentorial brain volume and the total eyeball and the supratentorial brain volume. Interobserver agreement was good or excellent for all structures measured. The Bland-Altman plot between manual and semiautomated measurements showed a maximal relative difference of 7.84%. We present a technologically simple, reproducible method that can be applied prospectively and retrospectively on any MR imaging protocol, and we present normal volumetric curves measured. The method shows results like manual measurements while being less time-consuming and user-dependent. By applying this method on different cranial and extracranial structures, anatomic and pathologic, we believe that fetal volumetry can turn from a research tool into a practical clinical one. © 2017 by American Journal of Neuroradiology.

  16. Measurement of orbital volume by computed tomography. Especially on the growth of orbit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furuta, Minoru [Fukushima Medical Coll. (Japan)

    2000-10-01

    Using reconstructed X-ray computed tomography (CT) images of serial coronal sections, we measured the orbital volume and studied its changes with age. The subjects consisted of 109 patients (74 males, 35 females) who had undergone X-ray CT. After the reproducibility of orbital volume measurements and laterality in individuals were confirmed, the relation between the orbital volume and the age, sex, weight, and interlateral orbital rim distance were examined. The difference between two measurements in the same patients was 0.4% for measured volume, which showed the reproducibility of this measurement to be good. The laterality in individuals was 0.06 cm{sup 3}: this difference was very small and not significant. The orbital volume showed no unbalance between the right and left at any stage of growth. Both the height and the interlateral orbital rim distance had a strong correlation with the orbital volume. Referring to the relation between age and orbital volume, a strong correlation with an almost identical approximate equation was obtained for both sexes under 12 years of age. Presumably, the rapid growth of the orbit comes to an end by 15 years of age in males and 11 years in females. This means that more than 95% growth of adults has already been completed in the first half of the teens. The mean orbital volume in adult Japanese is 23.6{+-}2.0 (mean{+-}standard deviation) cm{sup 3} in males and 20.9{+-}1.3 cm{sup 3} in females. (author)

  17. Measurement of orbital volume by computed tomography. Especially on the growth of orbit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furuta, Minoru

    2000-01-01

    Using reconstructed X-ray computed tomography (CT) images of serial coronal sections, we measured the orbital volume and studied its changes with age. The subjects consisted of 109 patients (74 males, 35 females) who had undergone X-ray CT. After the reproducibility of orbital volume measurements and laterality in individuals were confirmed, the relation between the orbital volume and the age, sex, weight, and interlateral orbital rim distance were examined. The difference between two measurements in the same patients was 0.4% for measured volume, which showed the reproducibility of this measurement to be good. The laterality in individuals was 0.06 cm 3 : this difference was very small and not significant. The orbital volume showed no unbalance between the right and left at any stage of growth. Both the height and the interlateral orbital rim distance had a strong correlation with the orbital volume. Referring to the relation between age and orbital volume, a strong correlation with an almost identical approximate equation was obtained for both sexes under 12 years of age. Presumably, the rapid growth of the orbit comes to an end by 15 years of age in males and 11 years in females. This means that more than 95% growth of adults has already been completed in the first half of the teens. The mean orbital volume in adult Japanese is 23.6±2.0 (mean±standard deviation) cm 3 in males and 20.9±1.3 cm 3 in females. (author)

  18. Block volume estimation from the discontinuity spacing measurements of mesozoic limestone quarries, Karaburun Peninsula, Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elci, Hakan; Turk, Necdet

    2014-01-01

    Block volumes are generally estimated by analyzing the discontinuity spacing measurements obtained either from the scan lines placed over the rock exposures or the borehole cores. Discontinuity spacing measurements made at the Mesozoic limestone quarries in Karaburun Peninsula were used to estimate the average block volumes that could be produced from them using the suggested methods in the literature. The Block Quality Designation (BQD) ratio method proposed by the authors has been found to have given in the same order of the rock block volume to the volumetric joint count (J(v)) method. Moreover, dimensions of the 2378 blocks produced between the years of 2009 and 2011 in the working quarries have been recorded. Assuming, that each block surfaces is a discontinuity, the mean block volume (V(b)), the mean volumetric joint count (J(vb)) and the mean block shape factor of the blocks are determined and compared with the estimated mean in situ block volumes (V(in)) and volumetric joint count (J(vi)) values estimated from the in situ discontinuity measurements. The established relations are presented as a chart to be used in practice for estimating the mean volume of blocks that can be obtained from a quarry site by analyzing the rock mass discontinuity spacing measurements.

  19. Block Volume Estimation from the Discontinuity Spacing Measurements of Mesozoic Limestone Quarries, Karaburun Peninsula, Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hakan Elci

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Block volumes are generally estimated by analyzing the discontinuity spacing measurements obtained either from the scan lines placed over the rock exposures or the borehole cores. Discontinuity spacing measurements made at the Mesozoic limestone quarries in Karaburun Peninsula were used to estimate the average block volumes that could be produced from them using the suggested methods in the literature. The Block Quality Designation (BQD ratio method proposed by the authors has been found to have given in the same order of the rock block volume to the volumetric joint count (Jv method. Moreover, dimensions of the 2378 blocks produced between the years of 2009 and 2011 in the working quarries have been recorded. Assuming, that each block surfaces is a discontinuity, the mean block volume (Vb, the mean volumetric joint count (Jvb and the mean block shape factor of the blocks are determined and compared with the estimated mean in situ block volumes (Vin and volumetric joint count (Jvi values estimated from the in situ discontinuity measurements. The established relations are presented as a chart to be used in practice for estimating the mean volume of blocks that can be obtained from a quarry site by analyzing the rock mass discontinuity spacing measurements.

  20. Leak rate measurements on bimetallic transition samples for ILC cryomodules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Budagov, Yu.; Chernikov, A.; Sabirov, B.

    2008-01-01

    The results of leak test of bimetallic (titanium-stainless steel) transition elements produced by explosion welding are presented. Vacuum and high-pressure tests of the sample for leakage were carried out at room temperature and liquid nitrogen temperature. Similar tests were also carried out under thermal cycling conditions

  1. Measuring Student Achievement in Travel and Tourism. Sample Test Questions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    New York State Education Dept., Albany. Bureau of Business Education.

    The sample test items included in this document are intended as a resource for teachers of Marketing and Distributive Education programs with emphasis on hospitality and recreation marketing, and tourism and travel services marketing. The related curriculum material has been published in the Travel and Tourism syllabus, an advanced-level module in…

  2. An immunomagnetic separator for concentration of pathogenic micro-organisms from large volume samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rotariu, Ovidiu; Ogden, Iain D.; MacRae, Marion; Badescu, Vasile; Strachan, Norval J.C.

    2005-01-01

    The standard method of immunomagnetic separation of pathogenic bacteria from food and environmental matrices processes 1 ml volumes. Pathogens present at low levels ( 50 ml). Preliminary results show that between 70 and 113 times more Escherchia coli O157 are recovered compared with the standard 1 ml method

  3. Curvature computation in volume-of-fluid method based on point-cloud sampling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassar, Bruno B. M.; Carneiro, João N. E.; Nieckele, Angela O.

    2018-01-01

    This work proposes a novel approach to compute interface curvature in multiphase flow simulation based on Volume of Fluid (VOF) method. It is well documented in the literature that curvature and normal vector computation in VOF may lack accuracy mainly due to abrupt changes in the volume fraction field across the interfaces. This may cause deterioration on the interface tension forces estimates, often resulting in inaccurate results for interface tension dominated flows. Many techniques have been presented over the last years in order to enhance accuracy in normal vectors and curvature estimates including height functions, parabolic fitting of the volume fraction, reconstructing distance functions, coupling Level Set method with VOF, convolving the volume fraction field with smoothing kernels among others. We propose a novel technique based on a representation of the interface by a cloud of points. The curvatures and the interface normal vectors are computed geometrically at each point of the cloud and projected onto the Eulerian grid in a Front-Tracking manner. Results are compared to benchmark data and significant reduction on spurious currents as well as improvement in the pressure jump are observed. The method was developed in the open source suite OpenFOAM® extending its standard VOF implementation, the interFoam solver.

  4. Transverse micro-erosion meter measurements; determining minimum sample size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trenhaile, Alan S.; Lakhan, V. Chris

    2011-11-01

    Two transverse micro-erosion meter (TMEM) stations were installed in each of four rock slabs, a slate/shale, basalt, phyllite/schist, and sandstone. One station was sprayed each day with fresh water and the other with a synthetic sea water solution (salt water). To record changes in surface elevation (usually downwearing but with some swelling), 100 measurements (the pilot survey), the maximum for the TMEM used in this study, were made at each station in February 2010, and then at two-monthly intervals until February 2011. The data were normalized using Box-Cox transformations and analyzed to determine the minimum number of measurements needed to obtain station means that fall within a range of confidence limits of the population means, and the means of the pilot survey. The effect on the confidence limits of reducing an already small number of measurements (say 15 or less) is much greater than that of reducing a much larger number of measurements (say more than 50) by the same amount. There was a tendency for the number of measurements, for the same confidence limits, to increase with the rate of downwearing, although it was also dependent on whether the surface was treated with fresh or salt water. About 10 measurements often provided fairly reasonable estimates of rates of surface change but with fairly high percentage confidence intervals in slowly eroding rocks; however, many more measurements were generally needed to derive means within 10% of the population means. The results were tabulated and graphed to provide an indication of the approximate number of measurements required for given confidence limits, and the confidence limits that might be attained for a given number of measurements.

  5. Numerical simulation of homogenization time measurement by probes with different volume size

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thyn, J.; Novy, M.; Zitny, R.; Mostek, M.; Jahoda, M.

    2004-01-01

    Results of continuous homogenization time measurement of liquid in a stirred tank depend on the scale of scrutiny. Experimental techniques use a probe, which is situated inside as a conductivity method, or outside of the tank as in the case of gamma-radiotracer methods. Expected value of homogenization time evaluated for a given degree of homogenization is higher when using the conductivity method because the conductivity probe measures relatively small volume in contrast to application of radiotracer, when the volume is much greater. Measurement through the wall of tank is a great advantage of radiotracer application but a comparison of the results with another method supposes a determination of measured volume, which is not easy. Simulation of measurement by CFD code can help to solve the problem. Methodology for CFD simulation of radiotracer experiments was suggested. Commercial software was used for simulation of liquid homogenization in mixed vessel with Rushton turbine. Numerical simulation of liquid homogenization time by CFD for different values of detected volume was confronted with measurement of homogenization time with conductivity probe and with different radioisotopes 198 Au, 82 Br and 24 Na. Detected size of the tank volume was affected by different energy of radioisotope used. (author)

  6. Implementation of Energy Strategies in Communities (Annex 63) Volume 2: Development of strategic measures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kellenberger, Daniel; Schmid, Christian; Quitzau, Maj-Britt

    This report describes the further development of the analysed measures from Volume 1 into strategic measures. As with the term measure, a strategic measure refers to an essential measure in concept that can be used to develop individual implementation strategies on a local level for part...... or the whole life cycle of a project (from the first vision to monitoring of the implemented solution). The developed strategic measures deal with the following topics: Setting Vision and Targets Developing Renewable Energy Strategies Making Full use of Legal Frameworks Designing an Urban Competition Processes...... a summary of each strategic measure supported by nine appendices, each a detailed description of each strategic measure....

  7. Significance of left ventricular volume measurement after heart transplantation using radionuclide techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novitzky, D.; Cooper, D.; Boniaszczuk, J.

    1985-01-01

    Multigated equilibrium blood pool scanning using Technetium 99m labeled red blood cells was used to measure left ventricular volumes in three heterotopic and one orthotopic heart transplant recipient(s). Simultaneously, an endomyocardial biopsy was performed and the degree of acute rejection was assessed by a histological scoring system. The scores were correlated to changes in ejection fraction and heart rate. Technetium 99m scanning data were pooled according to the endomyocardial biopsy score: no rejection; mild rejection; moderate rejection, and severe rejection. In each group, the median of the left ventricular volume parameters was calculated and correlated with the endomyocardial biopsy score, using a non-parametric one-way analysis of variance. A decrease in stroke volume correlated best with the endomyocardial biopsy score during acute rejection. A decrease in end-diastolic left ventricular volumes did not correlate as well. Changes in the end-systolic left ventricular volumes were not statistically significant, but using a simple correlation between end-systolic left ventricular volumes and endomyocardial biopsy the correlation reached significance. Changes in left ventricular volumes measured by Technetium 99m scanning may be useful to confirm the presence or absence of acute rejection in patients with heart grafts

  8. Measurement of breast volume is a useful supplement to select candidates for surgical breast reduction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ikander, Peder; Drejøe, Jennifer Berg; Lumholt, Pavia

    2014-01-01

    for breast reduction surgery, thus establishing a standard decision basis that can be shared by surgeons and departments to secure patients fair and equal treatment opportunities. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A total of 427 patients who were referred to three Danish public hospitals with breast hypertrophy...... in the period from January 2007 to March 2011 were included prospectively in the study. The patients' subjective complaints, height, weight and standard breast measurements were registered as well as the decision for or against surgery. Breast volume was measured using transparent plastic cups. RESULTS: Cut......-off values for breast volume were calculated based on whether or not the patients were offered reduction surgery. Most patients (93%) with a breast volume below 800 cc were not offered surgery, while most with a volume exceeding 900 cc were offered surgery (94%). In the grey zone between 800 and 900 cc...

  9. Accuracy of cancellous bone volume fraction measured by micro-CT scanning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ding, Ming; Odgaard, A; Hvid, I

    1999-01-01

    Volume fraction, the single most important parameter in describing trabecular microstructure, can easily be calculated from three-dimensional reconstructions of micro-CT images. This study sought to quantify the accuracy of this measurement. One hundred and sixty human cancellous bone specimens...... which covered a large range of volume fraction (9.8-39.8%) were produced. The specimens were micro-CT scanned, and the volume fraction based on Archimedes' principle was determined as a reference. After scanning, all micro-CT data were segmented using individual thresholds determined by the scanner...

  10. Axially perpendicular offset Raman scheme for reproducible measurement of housed samples in a noncircular container under variation of container orientation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duy, Pham K; Chang, Kyeol; Sriphong, Lawan; Chung, Hoeil

    2015-03-17

    An axially perpendicular offset (APO) scheme that is able to directly acquire reproducible Raman spectra of samples contained in an oval container under variation of container orientation has been demonstrated. This scheme utilized an axially perpendicular geometry between the laser illumination and the Raman photon detection, namely, irradiation through a sidewall of the container and gathering of the Raman photon just beneath the container. In the case of either backscattering or transmission measurements, Raman sampling volumes for an internal sample vary when the orientation of an oval container changes; therefore, the Raman intensities of acquired spectra are inconsistent. The generated Raman photons traverse the same bottom of the container in the APO scheme; the Raman sampling volumes can be relatively more consistent under the same situation. For evaluation, the backscattering, transmission, and APO schemes were simultaneously employed to measure alcohol gel samples contained in an oval polypropylene container at five different orientations and then the accuracies of the determination of the alcohol concentrations were compared. The APO scheme provided the most reproducible spectra, yielding the best accuracy when the axial offset distance was 10 mm. Monte Carlo simulations were performed to study the characteristics of photon propagation in the APO scheme and to explain the origin of the optimal offset distance that was observed. In addition, the utility of the APO scheme was further demonstrated by analyzing samples in a circular glass container.

  11. Atmospheric Gas Tracers in Groundwater: Theory, Sampling. Measurement and Interpretation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bayari, C.S.

    2002-01-01

    Some of the atmospheric gasses posses features that are sought in an environmental tracer of hydrogeologic interest. Among these, chlorofluorocarbons, sulfur hegzafluoride, carbon tetrachloride, methyl chloroform, krypton-85 etc. have found increasing use in groundwater age dating studies during the last ten years. This paper explains the theory of their use as tracer and discusses the major concerns as related to their sampling and analyses. Factors affecting their applicability and the approach to interpret tracer gas data is briefly outlined

  12. Self-weight effect in the measurement of the volume of silicon spheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mari, D.; Massa, E.; Kuramoto, N.; Mana, G.

    2018-04-01

    The volume of 28Si spheres about 94 mm in diameter is an input datum for the determination of the Avogadro constant. We report a finite element analysis of the self-weight effect on the volume determination via optical interferometric measurements of the sphere diameters. The self-weight expansion or shrinkage of the equatorial diameters, which ranges from  -31 pm to  +180 pm, depends on the southern latitude of the supports.

  13. Optimized measurement of radium-226 concentration in liquid samples with radon-222 emanation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perrier, Frédéric; Aupiais, Jean; Girault, Frédéric; Przylibski, Tadeusz A.; Bouquerel, Hélène

    2016-01-01

    Measuring radium-226 concentration in liquid samples using radon-222 emanation remains competitive with techniques such as liquid scintillation, alpha or mass spectrometry. Indeed, we show that high-precision can be obtained without air circulation, using an optimal air to liquid volume ratio and moderate heating. Cost-effective and efficient measurement of radon concentration is achieved by scintillation flasks and sufficiently long counting times for signal and background. More than 400 such measurements were performed, including 39 dilution experiments, a successful blind measurement of six reference test solutions, and more than 110 repeated measurements. Under optimal conditions, uncertainties reach 5% for an activity concentration of 100 mBq L"−"1 and 10% for 10 mBq L"−"1. While the theoretical detection limit predicted by Monte Carlo simulation is around 3 mBq L"−"1, a conservative experimental estimate is rather 5 mBq L"−"1, corresponding to 0.14 fg g"−"1. The method was applied to 47 natural waters, 51 commercial waters, and 17 wine samples, illustrating that it could be an option for liquids that cannot be easily measured by other methods. Counting of scintillation flasks can be done in remote locations in absence of electricity supply, using a solar panel. Thus, this portable method, which has demonstrated sufficient accuracy for numerous natural liquids, could be useful in geological and environmental problems, with the additional benefit that it can be applied in isolated locations and in circumstances when samples cannot be transported. - Highlights: • Radium-226 concentration measured with optimized accumulation in a container. • Radon-222 in air measured precisely with scintillation flasks and long countings. • Method tested by repetition tests, dilution experiments, and successful blind tests. • Estimated conservative detection limit without pre-concentration is 5 mBq L"−"1. • Method is portable, cost

  14. Water pollution screening by large-volume injection of aqueous samples and application to GC/MS analysis of a river Elbe sample

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, S.; Efer, J.; Engewald, W. [Leipzig Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Analytische Chemie

    1997-03-01

    The large-volume sampling of aqueous samples in a programmed temperature vaporizer (PTV) injector was used successfully for the target and non-target analysis of real samples. In this still rarely applied method, e.g., 1 mL of the water sample to be analyzed is slowly injected direct into the PTV. The vaporized water is eliminated through the split vent. The analytes are concentrated onto an adsorbent inside the insert and subsequently thermally desorbed. The capability of the method is demonstrated using a sample from the river Elbe. By means of coupling this method with a mass selective detector in SIM mode (target analysis) the method allows the determination of pollutants in the concentration range up to 0.01 {mu}g/L. Furthermore, PTV enrichment is an effective and time-saving method for non-target analysis in SCAN mode. In a sample from the river Elbe over 20 compounds were identified. (orig.) With 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. W-Band Transmission MeasurementS and X-Band Dielectric Properties Measurements for a Radome Material Sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cravey, Robin L.; Tiemsin, Pacita I.

    1997-01-01

    This paper describes measurements which were performed on a sample of radome material in the Electromagnetic Properties Measurements Laboratory (EPML). The purpose of the measurements described in this paper was to determine the one-way transmission loss through the flat panel of radome material for a frequency range of 84 to 94 GHz, for varying incidence angles. The panel, which was manufactured by Norton Performance Plastics Corporation, was provided to the EPML by TRW. The size of the panel is 40 in x 36 in x 0.422 in and consists of a foam material with one side coated with a smooth white coating (this side will be referred to as the front side). The dielectric properties of the foam material from the inside of the panel were also determined at X-band (8.2-12.4 GHz). The W-band free space measurements are presented first, followed by the X-band dielectric properties measurements.

  16. Measuring air layer volumes retained by submerged floating-ferns Salvinia and biomimetic superhydrophobic surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias J. Mayser

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Some plants and animals feature superhydrophobic surfaces capable of retaining a layer of air when submerged under water. Long-term air retaining surfaces (Salvinia-effect are of high interest for biomimetic applications like drag reduction in ship coatings of up to 30%. Here we present a novel method for measuring air volumes and air loss under water. We recorded the buoyancy force of the air layer on leaf surfaces of four different Salvinia species and on one biomimetic surface using a highly sensitive custom made strain gauge force transducer setup. The volume of air held by a surface was quantified by comparing the buoyancy force of the specimen with and then without an air layer. Air volumes retained by the Salvinia-surfaces ranged between 0.15 and 1 L/m2 depending on differences in surface architecture. We verified the precision of the method by comparing the measured air volumes with theoretical volume calculations and could find a good agreement between both values. In this context we present techniques to calculate air volumes on surfaces with complex microstructures. The introduced method also allows to measure decrease or increase of air layers with high accuracy in real-time to understand dynamic processes.

  17. Precision of gated equilibrium radioventriculography in measuring left ventricular stroke volume

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bourguignon, M.H.; Wise, R.A.; Ehrlich, W.E.; Douglas, K.H.; Camargo, E.E.; Harrison, K.E.; Wagner, H.N. Jr.

    1983-01-01

    We have demonstrated that relative changes of small amplitude in ventricular stroke volume can be measured accurately in dogs when a fully automated technique for delineation of end diastolic and end systolic region of interest (ROI) is used. Consequently, we expect such a technique to be very sensitive in measuring relative changes of any ventricular quantitative parameter from gated equilibrium radio ventriculography in humans

  18. Miniature nanoparticle sensors for exposure measurement and TEM sampling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fierz, Martin; Meier, Dominik; Steigmeier, Peter; Burtscher, Heinz

    2015-01-01

    Nanoparticles in workplaces may pose a threat to the health of the workers involved. With the general boom in nanotechnology, an increasing number of workers is potentially exposed, and therefore a comprehensive risk management with respect to nanoparticles appears necessary. One (of many) components of such a risk management is the measurement of personal exposure. Traditional nanoparticle detectors are often cumbersome to use, large, heavy and expensive. We have developed small, reliable and easy to use devices that can be used for routine personal exposure measurement in workplaces. (paper)

  19. Comparison of bone volume measurements using conventional single and dual energy computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Yung Kyoon; Park, Sang Hoon; Kim, Yon Min

    2017-01-01

    The study examines changes in calcium volume on born by comparing two figures; one is measured by dual energy computed tomography(DECT) followed by applying variation in monochromatic energy selection( keV), material decomposition(MD), and material suppressed iodine(MSI) analysis, and the other is measured by conventional single source computed tomography(CSCT). For this study, based on CSCT images taken by using human mimicked phantom, 70, 100, 140 keV and MSI, MD material calcium weighting( MCW) and MD material iodine weighting(MIW) of DECT were applied respectively. Then calculated calcium volume was converted to Agatston score for comparison. Volume of human mimicked phantom was in inverse proportion to keV. The volume decreased while keV increased(p<0.05). The most similar DECT volumes were reconstructed at 70 keV, the difference was showed 35.8±12.2 for rib, femur (16.1±24.1), pelvis(13.7±18.8), and spine(179.0±61.8). However, the volume of MSI was down for each organ; the volume of rib was 5.55%, femur(76.34%), pelvis(55.16%) and spine(87.58%). The volume of MSI decreased 55.9% for rib, femur(80.7%), pelvis(69.6%) and spine(54.2%) while MD MIW reduced for rib(83.51%), femur(87.68%), pelvis(86.64%), and spine(82.62%). With the results, the study found that outcomes were affected by the method which examiners employed. When using DECT, calcium volume of born dropped with keV increased. It also found that the most similar DECT images were reconstructed at 70 keV. The results of experiments implied that the users of MSI and MD should be cautious of errors as there are big differences in scores between those two methods

  20. Comparison of bone volume measurements using conventional single and dual energy computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Yung Kyoon; Park, Sang Hoon [Dept. of Radiology, Samsung Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Yon Min [Dept. of Radiotechnology, Wonkwang Health Science University, Iksan (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-06-15

    The study examines changes in calcium volume on born by comparing two figures; one is measured by dual energy computed tomography(DECT) followed by applying variation in monochromatic energy selection( keV), material decomposition(MD), and material suppressed iodine(MSI) analysis, and the other is measured by conventional single source computed tomography(CSCT). For this study, based on CSCT images taken by using human mimicked phantom, 70, 100, 140 keV and MSI, MD material calcium weighting( MCW) and MD material iodine weighting(MIW) of DECT were applied respectively. Then calculated calcium volume was converted to Agatston score for comparison. Volume of human mimicked phantom was in inverse proportion to keV. The volume decreased while keV increased(p<0.05). The most similar DECT volumes were reconstructed at 70 keV, the difference was showed 35.8±12.2 for rib, femur (16.1±24.1), pelvis(13.7±18.8), and spine(179.0±61.8). However, the volume of MSI was down for each organ; the volume of rib was 5.55%, femur(76.34%), pelvis(55.16%) and spine(87.58%). The volume of MSI decreased 55.9% for rib, femur(80.7%), pelvis(69.6%) and spine(54.2%) while MD MIW reduced for rib(83.51%), femur(87.68%), pelvis(86.64%), and spine(82.62%). With the results, the study found that outcomes were affected by the method which examiners employed. When using DECT, calcium volume of born dropped with keV increased. It also found that the most similar DECT images were reconstructed at 70 keV. The results of experiments implied that the users of MSI and MD should be cautious of errors as there are big differences in scores between those two methods.

  1. Measurement of radioactivity in the environment - Soil - Part 2: Guidance for the selection of the sampling strategy, sampling and pre-treatment of samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    This part of ISO 18589 specifies the general requirements, based on ISO 11074 and ISO/IEC 17025, for all steps in the planning (desk study and area reconnaissance) of the sampling and the preparation of samples for testing. It includes the selection of the sampling strategy, the outline of the sampling plan, the presentation of general sampling methods and equipment, as well as the methodology of the pre-treatment of samples adapted to the measurements of the activity of radionuclides in soil. This part of ISO 18589 is addressed to the people responsible for determining the radioactivity present in soil for the purpose of radiation protection. It is applicable to soil from gardens, farmland, urban or industrial sites, as well as soil not affected by human activities. This part of ISO 18589 is applicable to all laboratories regardless of the number of personnel or the range of the testing performed. When a laboratory does not undertake one or more of the activities covered by this part of ISO 18589, such as planning, sampling or testing, the corresponding requirements do not apply. Information is provided on scope, normative references, terms and definitions and symbols, principle, sampling strategy, sampling plan, sampling process, pre-treatment of samples and recorded information. Five annexes inform about selection of the sampling strategy according to the objectives and the radiological characterization of the site and sampling areas, diagram of the evolution of the sample characteristics from the sampling site to the laboratory, example of sampling plan for a site divided in three sampling areas, example of a sampling record for a single/composite sample and example for a sample record for a soil profile with soil description. A bibliography is provided

  2. Comparison of the accuracy of three angiographic methods for calculating left ventricular volume measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu Lin; Cui Wei; Shi Hanwen; Tian Yingping; Wang Weigang; Feng Yanguang; Huang Xueyan; Liu Zhisheng

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To compare the relative accuracy of three methods measuring left ventricular volume by X-ray ventriculography: single plane area-length method, biplane area-length method, and single-plane Simpson's method. Methods: Left ventricular casts were obtained within 24 hours after death from 12 persons who died from non-cardiac causes. The true left ventricular cast volume was measured by water displacement. The calculated volume of the casts was obtained with 3 angiographic methods, i.e., single-plane area-length method, biplane area-length method, and single-plane Simpson's method. Results: The actual average volume of left ventricular casts was (61.17±26.49) ml. The left ventricular volume was averagely (97.50±35.56) ml with single plane area-length method, (90.51±36.33) ml with biplane area-length method, and (65.00± 23.63) ml with single-plane Simpson's method. The left ventricular volumes calculated with single-plane and biplane area-length method were significantly larger than that the actual volumes (P 0.05). The left ventricular volumes calculated with single-plane and biplane area-length method were significantly larger than those calculated with single-plane Simpson's method (P 0.05). The over-estimation of left ventricular volume by single plane area-length method (36.34±17.98) ml and biplane area-length method (29.34±15.59) ml was more obvious than that calculated by single-plane Simpson's method (3.83±8.48) ml. Linear regression analysis showed that there was close correlations between left ventricular volumes calculated with single plane area-length method, biplane area-length method, Simpson's method and the true volume (all r>0.98). Conclusion: Single-plane Simpson's method is more accurate than single plane area-length method and biplane area-length method for left ventricular volume measurement; however, both the single-plane and biplane area-length methods could be used in clinical practice, especially in those imaging modality

  3. Intercomparison of radionuclide measurements in marine sediment sample IAEA-368

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ballestra, S.; Lopez, J.J.; Gastaud, J.; Parsi, P.; Vas, D.; Noshkin, V.

    1991-08-01

    The results of an intercomparison exercise on a Pacific Ocean sediment sample, IAEA-368, designed for the determination of artificial and natural radionuclides levels, are reported. The data from 89 laboratories representing 37 countries have been evaluated. The following are the recommended values, with confidence intervals, for 60 Co, 155 Eu, 210 7Pb, 226 Ra, 238 U, 238 Pu and 239+240 Pu (Reference date: 1 January 1990). Information values for 40 K, 90 Sr, 137 Cs, 228 Th, 230 Th, 232 Th, 234 U, 235 U and 241 Am are also reported. (author)

  4. Intercomparison of radionuclide measurements in marine sediment sample IAEA-367

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ballestra, S.; Lopez, J.J.; Gastaud, J.; Vas, D.; Noshkin, V.

    1991-08-01

    The results of an intercomparison exercise on a Pacific Ocean sediment sample, IAEA-367, designed for the determination of artificial and natural radionuclides levels, are reported. The data from 81 laboratories representing 37 countries have been evaluated. The following are the recommended values, with confidence intervals, for 60 Co, 90 Sr, 137 Cs, 239+240 Pu (Reference date: 1 January 1990). Information values for 155 Eu, 238 Pu, 241 Am, and 241 Pu are reported. Information values for the following natural radionuclides 40 K, 226 Ra, 228 Th, 230 Th, 234 U, 235 U and 238 U are also reported. (author)

  5. Macular thickness and macular volume measurements using spectral domain optical coherence tomography in normal Nepalese eyes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pokharel A

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Amrit Pokharel,1 Gauri Shankar Shrestha,2 Jyoti Baba Shrestha2 1Department of Ophthalmology, Kathmandu Medical College Teaching Hospital, 2B P Koirala Lions Centre for Ophthalmic Studies, Institute of Medicine, Kathmandu, Nepal Purpose: To record the normative values for macular thickness and macular volume in normal Nepalese eyes. Methods: In all, 126 eyes of 63 emmetropic subjects (mean age: 21.17±6.76 years; range: 10–37 years were assessed for macular thickness and macular volume, using spectral domain-optical coherence tomography over 6×6 mm2 in the posterior pole. A fast macular thickness protocol was employed. Statistics such as the mean, median, standard deviation, percentiles, and range were used, while a P-value was set at 0.05 to test significance. Results: Average macular thickness and total macular volume were larger in males compared to females. With each year of increasing age, these variables decreased by 0.556 µm and 0.0156 mm3 for average macular thickness and total macular volume, respectively. The macular thickness was greatest in the inner superior section and lowest at the center of the fovea. The volume was greatest in the outer nasal section and thinnest in the fovea. The central subfield thickness (r=-0.243, P=0.055 and foveal volume (r=0.216, P=0.09 did not correlate with age. Conclusion: Males and females differ significantly with regard to macular thickness and macular volume measurements. Reports by other studies that the increase in axial length reduced thickness and volume, were negated by this study which found a positive correlation among axial length, thickness, and volume. Keywords: macular thickness, macular volume, optical coherence tomography, Nepal

  6. Measuring Thermal Conductivity of a Small Insulation Sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Robert A.; Kuczmarski, Maria A.

    2009-01-01

    A multiple-throat venturi system has been invented for measuring laminar flow of air or other gas at low speed (1 to 30 cm/s) in a duct while preserving the laminar nature of the flow and keeping the velocity profile across the duct as nearly flat as possible. While means for measuring flows at higher speeds are well established, heretofore, there have been no reliable means for making consistent, accurate measurements in this speed range. In the original application for which this system was invented, the duct leads into the test section of a low-speed wind tunnel wherein uniform, low-speed, laminar flow is required for scientific experiments. The system could also be used to monitor a slow flow of gas in an industrial process like chemical vapor deposition. In the original application, the multiple- throat venturi system is mounted at the inlet end of the duct having a rectangular cross section of 19 by 14 cm, just upstream of an assembly of inlet screens and flow straighteners that help to suppress undesired flow fluctuations (see Figure 1). The basic venturi measurement principle is well established: One measures the difference in pressure between (1) a point just outside the inlet, where the pressure is highest and the kinetic energy lowest; and (2) the narrowest part (the throat) of the venturi passage, where the kinetic energy is highest and the pressure is lowest. Then by use of Bernoulli s equation for the relationship between pressure and kinetic energy, the volumetric flow speed in the duct can be calculated from the pressure difference and the inlet and throat widths. The design of this system represents a compromise among length, pressure recovery, uniformity of flow, and complexity of assembly. Traditionally, venturis are used to measure faster flows in narrower cross sections, with longer upstream and downstream passages to maintain accuracy. The dimensions of the passages of the present venturi system are sized to provide a readily measurable

  7. Probabilistic Requirements (Partial) Verification Methods Best Practices Improvement. Variables Acceptance Sampling Calculators: Empirical Testing. Volume 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Kenneth L.; White, K. Preston, Jr.

    2012-01-01

    The NASA Engineering and Safety Center was requested to improve on the Best Practices document produced for the NESC assessment, Verification of Probabilistic Requirements for the Constellation Program, by giving a recommended procedure for using acceptance sampling by variables techniques as an alternative to the potentially resource-intensive acceptance sampling by attributes method given in the document. In this paper, the results of empirical tests intended to assess the accuracy of acceptance sampling plan calculators implemented for six variable distributions are presented.

  8. Automated cross-sectional and longitudinal hippocampal volume measurement in mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Kelvin K; Barnes, Josephine; Ridgway, Gerard R; Bartlett, Jonathan W; Clarkson, Matthew J; Macdonald, Kate; Schuff, Norbert; Fox, Nick C; Ourselin, Sebastien

    2010-07-15

    Volume and change in volume of the hippocampus are both important markers of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Delineation of the structure on MRI is time-consuming and therefore reliable automated methods are required. We describe an improvement (multiple-atlas propagation and segmentation (MAPS)) to our template library-based segmentation technique. The improved technique uses non-linear registration of the best-matched templates from our manually segmented library to generate multiple segmentations and combines them using the simultaneous truth and performance level estimation (STAPLE) algorithm. Change in volume over 12months (MAPS-HBSI) was measured by applying the boundary shift integral using MAPS regions. Methods were developed and validated against manual measures using subsets from Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI). The best method was applied to 682 ADNI subjects, at baseline and 12-month follow-up, enabling assessment of volumes and atrophy rates in control, mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and AD groups, and within MCI subgroups classified by subsequent clinical outcome. We compared our measures with those generated by Surgical Navigation Technologies (SNT) available from ADNI. The accuracy of our volumes was one of the highest reported (mean(SD) Jaccard Index 0.80(0.04) (N=30)). Both MAPS baseline volume and MAPS-HBSI atrophy rate distinguished between control, MCI and AD groups. Comparing MCI subgroups (reverters, stable and converters): volumes were lower and rates higher in converters compared with stable and reverter groups (pmethods give accurate and reliable volumes and atrophy rates across the clinical spectrum from healthy aging to AD. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Effect of malaria on placental volume measured using three-dimensional ultrasound: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rijken Marcus J

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The presence of malaria parasites and histopathological changes in the placenta are associated with a reduction in birth weight, principally due to intrauterine growth restriction. The aim of this study was to examine the feasibility of studying early pregnancy placental volumes using three-dimensional (3D ultrasound in a malaria endemic area, as a small volume in the second trimester may be an indicator of intra-uterine growth restriction and placental insufficiency. Methods Placenta volumes were acquired using a portable ultrasound machine and a 3D ultrasound transducer and estimated using the Virtual Organ Computer-aided AnaLysis (VOCAL image analysis software package. Intra-observer reliability and limits of agreement of the placenta volume measurements were calculated. Polynomial regression models for the mean and standard deviation as a function of gestational age for the placental volumes of uninfected women were created and tested. Based on these equations each measurement was converted into a z -score. The z-scores of the placental volumes of malaria infected and uninfected women were then compared. Results Eighty-four women (uninfected = 65; infected = 19 with a posterior placenta delivered congenitally normal, live born, single babies. The mean placental volumes in the uninfected women were modeled to fit 5th, 10th, 50th, 90th and 95th centiles for 14-24 weeks' gestation. Most placenta volumes in the infected women were below the 50th centile for gestational age; most of those with Plasmodium falciparum were below the 10th centile. The 95% intra-observer limits of agreement for first and second measurements were ± 37.0 mL and ± 25.4 mL at 30 degrees and 15 degrees rotation respectively. Conclusion The new technique of 3D ultrasound volumetry of the placenta may be useful to improve our understanding of the pathophysiological constraints on foetal growth caused by malaria infection in early pregnancy.

  10. Comparison between CT volume measurement and histopathological assessment of response to neoadjuvant therapy in rectal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pomerri, Fabio, E-mail: fabio.pomerri@unipd.it [Veneto Institute of Oncology IOV-IRCCS, via Gattamelata 64, 35128 Padua (Italy); Department of Medicine, University of Padua, via Giustiniani 2, 35128 Padua (Italy); Pucciarelli, Salvatore, E-mail: puc@unipd.it [Department of Oncological and Surgical Sciences, University of Padua, via Giustiniani 2, 35128 Padua (Italy); Gennaro, Gisella, E-mail: gisella.gennaro@pd.infn.it [Veneto Institute of Oncology IOV-IRCCS, via Gattamelata 64, 35128 Padua (Italy); Maretto, Isacco, E-mail: isac77@gmail.com [Veneto Institute of Oncology IOV-IRCCS, via Gattamelata 64, 35128 Padua (Italy); Nitti, Donato, E-mail: donato.nitti@unipd.it [Department of Oncological and Surgical Sciences, University of Padua, via Giustiniani 2, 35128 Padua (Italy); Muzzio, Pier Carlo, E-mail: pcmuzzio@unipd.it [Veneto Institute of Oncology IOV-IRCCS, via Gattamelata 64, 35128 Padua (Italy)

    2012-12-15

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to compare volume measurements on computed tomography (CT) images with histopathological assessments of chemoradiotherapy (CRT)-induced tumor regression in locally advanced rectal cancer (RC). Methods: In 25 patients (13 males, 12 females; median age, 63 years; age range, 44–79 years) with locally advanced RC treated with preoperative CRT and surgery, two radiologists measured tumor volume on CT images before and after CRT. CT-based tumor volumetry and the modified response evaluation criteria in solid tumors (mRECISTs) were compared with T and N downstaging after CRT, and with the tumor regression grade (TRG). Results: Tumor volumes were significantly smaller on CT images after CRT. The tumors regressed in 52% (13/25), 36% (9/25) and 40% (10/25) of patients, based on T downstaging, TRG and mRECIST findings, respectively. In terms of T downstaging, the pre- and post-CRT tumor volumes of responders and non-responders to the treatment differed statistically, while their tumor volume reduction rates and volume reductions according to the 65% mRECIST threshold did not. In terms of N downstaging and TRG, the differences between the responders’ and the non-responders’ pre- and post-CRT tumor volumes, tumor volume reduction rates, and mRECIST thresholds were never statistically significant. Conclusion: Measuring tumor size on CT images is of limited value in predicting the histopathological response to preoperative CRT in RC patients, so it may be unwise to select surgical treatment strategies based on CT volumetry.

  11. MRI markers for mild cognitive impairment: comparisons between white matter integrity and gray matter volume measurements.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Zhang

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to evaluate the value of assessing white matter integrity using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI for classification of mild cognitive impairment (MCI and prediction of cognitive impairments in comparison to brain atrophy measurements using structural MRI. Fifty-one patients with MCI and 66 cognitive normal controls (CN underwent DTI and T1-weighted structural MRI. DTI measures included fractional anisotropy (FA and radial diffusivity (DR from 20 predetermined regions-of-interest (ROIs in the commissural, limbic and association tracts, which are thought to be involved in Alzheimer's disease; measures of regional gray matter (GM volume included 21 ROIs in medial temporal lobe, parietal cortex, and subcortical regions. Significant group differences between MCI and CN were detected by each MRI modality: In particular, reduced FA was found in splenium, left isthmus cingulum and fornix; increased DR was found in splenium, left isthmus cingulum and bilateral uncinate fasciculi; reduced GM volume was found in bilateral hippocampi, left entorhinal cortex, right amygdala and bilateral thalamus; and thinner cortex was found in the left entorhinal cortex. Group classifications based on FA or DR was significant and better than classifications based on GM volume. Using either DR or FA together with GM volume improved classification accuracy. Furthermore, all three measures, FA, DR and GM volume were similarly accurate in predicting cognitive performance in MCI patients. Taken together, the results imply that DTI measures are as accurate as measures of GM volume in detecting brain alterations that are associated with cognitive impairment. Furthermore, a combination of DTI and structural MRI measurements improves classification accuracy.

  12. Measurement of thermal properties of soil and concrete samples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pagola, Maria Alberdi; Jensen, Rasmus Lund; Madsen, Søren

    February 2016 and February 2017. The presented work mainly consists of thermal property measurements. They become important as they form the basis for dimensioning a planned ground source heat pump installation based on closed loop vertical ground heat exchangers. This report complements the report......, the measurements of the properties of the concrete are treated. The work is extended in appendixes.......This document aims to present the laboratory work undertaken to analyse the thermal properties of the soil at two test sites in Denmark and the concrete produced by Centrum Pæle A/S, used to produce the pile heat exchangers studied in the present PhD project. The tasks have been carried out between...

  13. Magnetoacoustic measurements on steel samples at low magnetizing frequencies

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Perevertov, Oleksiy; Stupakov, Alexandr

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 66, č. 7 (2015), s. 58-61 ISSN 1335-3632 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-18993S; GA ČR GB14-36566G Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : magneto-acoustic emission * surface magnetic field * steel * magnetic hysteresis Subject RIV: JB - Sensors, Measurment, Regulation Impact factor: 0.407, year: 2015

  14. Intercomparison of radionuclide measurements in marine sediment sample IAEA-367

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ballestra, S; Lopez, J J; Gastaud, J; Vas, D; Noshkin, V

    1991-08-01

    The results of an intercomparison exercise on a Pacific Ocean sediment sample, IAEA-367, designed for the determination of artificial and natural radionuclides levels, are reported. The data from 81 laboratories representing 37 countries have been evaluated. The following are the recommended values, with confidence intervals, for {sup 60}Co, {sup 90}Sr, {sup 137}Cs, {sup 239+240}Pu (Reference date: 1 January 1990). Information values for {sup 155}Eu, {sup 238}Pu, {sup 241}Am, and {sup 241}Pu are reported. Information values for the following natural radionuclides {sup 40}K, {sup 226}Ra, {sup 228}Th, {sup 230}Th, {sup 234}U, {sup 235}U and {sup 238}U are also reported. (author)

  15. Intercomparison of radionuclide measurements in marine sediment sample IAEA-368

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ballestra, S; Lopez, J J; Gastaud, J; Parsi, P; Vas, D; Noshkin, V

    1991-08-01

    The results of an intercomparison exercise on a Pacific Ocean sediment sample, IAEA-368, designed for the determination of artificial and natural radionuclides levels, are reported. The data from 89 laboratories representing 37 countries have been evaluated. The following are the recommended values, with confidence intervals, for {sup 60}Co, {sup 155}Eu, {sup 210}7Pb, {sup 226}Ra, {sup 238}U, {sup 238}Pu and{sup 239+240}Pu (Reference date: 1 January 1990). Information values for {sup 40}K, {sup 90}Sr, {sup 137}Cs, {sup 228}Th, {sup 230}Th, {sup 232}Th, {sup 234}U, {sup 235}U and {sup 241}Am are also reported. (author)

  16. Measurement of phthalates in small samples of mammalian tissue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acott, P.D.; Murphy, M.G.; Ogborn, M.R.; Crocker, J.F.S.

    1987-01-01

    Di-(2-ethylhexyl)-phthalate (DEHP) is a phthalic acid ester that is used as a plasticizer in polyvinyl chloride products, many of which have widespread medical application. DEHP has been shown to be leached from products used for storage and delivery of blood transfusions during procedures such as plasmaphoresis, hemodialysis and open heart surgery. Results of studies in this laboratory have suggested that there is an association between the absorption and deposition of DEHP (and/or related chemicals) in the kidney and the acquired renal cystic disease (ACD) frequently seen in patients who have undergone prolonged dialysis treatment. In order to determine the relationship between the two, it has been necessary to establish a method for extracting and accurately quantitating minute amounts of these chemicals in small tissue samples. The authors have now established such a method using kidneys from normal rats and from a rat model for ACD

  17. Reliability of a Cryoscopic Micro-Osmometer Using 15-µL Plasma Samples to Measure Hydration Status in Varied Environmental Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scanlan, Aaron T.; Richter-Stretton, Gina L.; Madueno, Maria C.; Borges, Nattai R.; Fenning, Andrew S.

    2017-01-01

    Measurement of plasma osmolality (P[subscript osm]) remains popular for assessing hydration status in exercise science. However, a controlled reliability assessment of micro-osmometry using small sample volumes to measure Posm remains to be performed. This study aimed to examine the reliability of a cryoscopic micro-osmometer requiring 15-µL…

  18. Method of phase-Doppler anemometry free from the measurement-volume effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, H; Hsu, C T

    1999-05-01

    A novel method is developed to improve the accuracy of particle sizing in laser phase-Doppler anemometry (PDA). In this method the vector sum of refractive and reflective rays is taken into consideration in describing a dual-mechanism-scattering model caused by a nonuniformly illuminated PDA measurement volume. The constraint of the single-mechanism-scattering model in the conventional PDA is removed. As a result the error caused by the measurement-volume effect, which consists of a Gaussian-beam defect and a slit effect, can be eliminated. This new method can be easily implemented with minimal modification of the conventional PDA system. The results of simulation based on the generalized Lorenz-Mie theory show that the new method can provide a PDA system free from the measurement-volume effect.

  19. MRI-Based Measurement of Hippocampal Volume in Patients With Combat-Related Posttraumatic Stress Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bremner, J. Douglas; Randall, Penny; Scott, Tammy M.; Bronen, Richard A.; Seibyl, John P.; Southwick, Steven M.; Delaney, Richard C.; McCarthy, Gregory; Charney, Dennis S.; Innis, Robert B.

    2011-01-01

    Objective Studies in nonhuman primates suggest that high levels of cortisol associated with stress have neurotoxic effects on the hippocampus, a brain structure involved in memory. The authors previously showed that patients with combat-related posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) had deficits in short-term memory. The purpose of this study was to compare the hippocampal volume of patients with PTSD to that of subjects without psychiatric disorder. Method Magnetic resonance imaging was used to measure the volume of the hippocampus in 26 Vietnam combat veterans with PTSD and 22 comparison subjects selected to be similar to the patients in age, sex, race, years of education, socioeconomic status, body size, and years of alcohol abuse. Results The PTSD patients had a statistically significant 8% smaller right hippocampal volume relative to that of the comparison subjects, but there was no difference in the volume of other brain regions (caudate and temporal lobe). Deficits in short-term verbal memory as measured with the Wechsler Memory Scale were associated with smaller right hippocampal volume in the PTSD patients only. Conclusions These findings are consistent with a smaller right hippocampal volume in PTSD that is associated with functional deficits in verbal memory. PMID:7793467

  20. Non-Invasive Electromagnetic Skin Patch Sensor to Measure Intracranial Fluid–Volume Shifts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacob Griffith

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Elevated intracranial fluid volume can drive intracranial pressure increases, which can potentially result in numerous neurological complications or death. This study’s focus was to develop a passive skin patch sensor for the head that would non-invasively measure cranial fluid volume shifts. The sensor consists of a single baseline component configured into a rectangular planar spiral with a self-resonant frequency response when impinged upon by external radio frequency sweeps. Fluid volume changes (10 mL increments were detected through cranial bone using the sensor on a dry human skull model. Preliminary human tests utilized two sensors to determine feasibility of detecting fluid volume shifts in the complex environment of the human body. The correlation between fluid volume changes and shifts in the first resonance frequency using the dry human skull was classified as a second order polynomial with R2 = 0.97. During preliminary and secondary human tests, a ≈24 MHz and an average of ≈45.07 MHz shifts in the principal resonant frequency were measured respectively, corresponding to the induced cephalad bio-fluid shifts. This electromagnetic resonant sensor may provide a non-invasive method to monitor shifts in fluid volume and assist with medical scenarios including stroke, cerebral hemorrhage, concussion, or monitoring intracranial pressure.

  1. SyPRID sampler: A large-volume, high-resolution, autonomous, deep-ocean precision plankton sampling system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billings, Andrew; Kaiser, Carl; Young, Craig M.; Hiebert, Laurel S.; Cole, Eli; Wagner, Jamie K. S.; Van Dover, Cindy Lee

    2017-03-01

    The current standard for large-volume (thousands of cubic meters) zooplankton sampling in the deep sea is the MOCNESS, a system of multiple opening-closing nets, typically lowered to within 50 m of the seabed and towed obliquely to the surface to obtain low-spatial-resolution samples that integrate across 10 s of meters of water depth. The SyPRID (Sentry Precision Robotic Impeller Driven) sampler is an innovative, deep-rated (6000 m) plankton sampler that partners with the Sentry Autonomous Underwater Vehicle (AUV) to obtain paired, large-volume plankton samples at specified depths and survey lines to within 1.5 m of the seabed and with simultaneous collection of sensor data. SyPRID uses a perforated Ultra-High-Molecular-Weight (UHMW) plastic tube to support a fine mesh net within an outer carbon composite tube (tube-within-a-tube design), with an axial flow pump located aft of the capture filter. The pump facilitates flow through the system and reduces or possibly eliminates the bow wave at the mouth opening. The cod end, a hollow truncated cone, is also made of UHMW plastic and includes a collection volume designed to provide an area where zooplankton can collect, out of the high flow region. SyPRID attaches as a saddle-pack to the Sentry vehicle. Sentry itself is configured with a flight control system that enables autonomous survey paths to low altitudes. In its verification deployment at the Blake Ridge Seep (2160 m) on the US Atlantic Margin, SyPRID was operated for 6 h at an altitude of 5 m. It recovered plankton samples, including delicate living larvae, from the near-bottom stratum that is seldom sampled by a typical MOCNESS tow. The prototype SyPRID and its next generations will enable studies of plankton or other particulate distributions associated with localized physico-chemical strata in the water column or above patchy habitats on the seafloor.

  2. Limitations of intraoperative adrenal remnant volume measurement in patients undergoing subtotal adrenalectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brauckhoff, Michael; Stock, Karsten; Stock, Susanne; Lorenz, Kerstin; Sekulla, Carsten; Brauckhoff, Katrin; Thanh, Phuong Nguyen; Gimm, Oliver; Spielmann, Rolf Peter; Dralle, Henning

    2008-05-01

    Recent studies have shown that a minimum of approximately one-third of one normal adrenal gland is required for sufficient adrenocortical stress capacity. Correlation between intraoperative measurement, determination of remnant size by computed tomography (CT), and adrenocortical stress capacity has not been examined so far. Twenty-two patients with familial pheochromocytoma (n=13), sporadic pheochromocytoma (n=3), and adrenocortical tumors (n=6) who underwent unilateral or bilateral subtotal adrenalectomy (STAE, 28 adrenal remnants) were prospectively studied. Patients were examined in a multi-slice CT to determine residual adrenal tissue and by ACTH test 4 days and 3 months postoperatively. There was a slight significant correlation between intraoperative and CT calculated volumes (r=0.77; pSTAE has limitations. CT gives larger volumes compared with intraoperative determination. For calculation of a volume-function correlation of residual adrenal tissue, in clinical practice, the determination of relative adrenal residual volume is acceptable.

  3. Revisiting the returns-volume relationship: Time variation, alternative measures and the financial crisis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Steve; Watson, Duncan

    2017-03-01

    Following its introduction in the seminal study of Osborne (1959), a voluminous literature has emerged examining the returns-volume relationship for financial assets. The present paper revisits this relationship in an examination of the FTSE100 which extends the existing literature in two ways. First, alternative daily measures of the FTSE100 index are used to create differing returns and absolute returns series to employ in an examination of returns-volume causality. Second, rolling regression analysis is utilised to explore potential time variation in the returns-volume relationship. The findings obtained depict a hitherto unconsidered complexity in this relationship with the type of returns series considered and financial crisis found to be significant underlying factors. The implications of the newly derived results for both the understanding of the nature of the returns-volume relationship and the development of theories in connection to it are discussed.

  4. Estimating retained gas volumes in the Hanford tanks using waste level measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whitney, P.D.; Chen, G.; Gauglitz, P.A.; Meyer, P.A.; Miller, N.E.

    1997-09-01

    The Hanford site is home to 177 large, underground nuclear waste storage tanks. Safety and environmental concerns surround these tanks and their contents. One such concern is the propensity for the waste in these tanks to generate and trap flammable gases. This report focuses on understanding and improving the quality of retained gas volume estimates derived from tank waste level measurements. While direct measurements of gas volume are available for a small number of the Hanford tanks, the increasingly wide availability of tank waste level measurements provides an opportunity for less expensive (than direct gas volume measurement) assessment of gas hazard for the Hanford tanks. Retained gas in the tank waste is inferred from level measurements -- either long-term increase in the tank waste level, or fluctuations in tank waste level with atmospheric pressure changes. This report concentrates on the latter phenomena. As atmospheric pressure increases, the pressure on the gas in the tank waste increases, resulting in a level decrease (as long as the tank waste is open-quotes softclose quotes enough). Tanks with waste levels exhibiting fluctuations inversely correlated with atmospheric pressure fluctuations were catalogued in an earlier study. Additionally, models incorporating ideal-gas law behavior and waste material properties have been proposed. These models explicitly relate the retained gas volume in the tank with the magnitude of the waste level fluctuations, dL/dP. This report describes how these models compare with the tank waste level measurements

  5. Measurement of Irradiated Pyroprocessing Samples via Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phongikaroon, Supathorn [Virginia Commonwealth Univ., Richmond, VA (United States)

    2016-10-31

    The primary objective of this research is to develop an applied technology and provide an assessment to remotely measure and analyze the real time or near real time concentrations of used nuclear fuel (UNF) dissolute in electrorefiners. Here, Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS), in UNF pyroprocessing facilities will be investigated. LIBS is an elemental analysis method, which is based on the emission from plasma generated by focusing a laser beam into the medium. This technology has been reported to be applicable in the media of solids, liquids (includes molten metals), and gases for detecting elements of special nuclear materials. The advantages of applying the technology for pyroprocessing facilities are: (i) Rapid real-time elemental analysis|one measurement/laser pulse, or average spectra from multiple laser pulses for greater accuracy in < 2 minutes; (ii) Direct detection of elements and impurities in the system with low detection limits|element specific, ranging from 2-1000 ppm for most elements; and (iii) Near non-destructive elemental analysis method (about 1 g material). One important challenge to overcome is achieving high-resolution spectral analysis to quantitatively analyze all important fission products and actinides. Another important challenge is related to accessibility of molten salt, which is heated in a heavily insulated, remotely operated furnace in a high radiation environment with an argon atmosphere.

  6. Neutron multicounter detector for investigation of content and spatial distribution of fission materials in large volume samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swiderska-Kowalczyk, M.; Starosta, W.; Zoltowski, T.

    1998-01-01

    The experimental device is a neutron coincidence well counter. It can be applied for passive assay of fissile - especially for plutonium bearing - materials. It consist of a set of 3 He tubes placed inside a polyethylene moderator; outputs from the tubes, first processed by preamplifier/amplifier/discriminator circuits, are then analysed using neutron correlator connected with a PC, and correlation techniques implemented in software. Such a neutron counter allows for determination of plutonium mass ( 240 Pu effective mass) in nonmultiplying samples having fairly big volume (up to 0.14 m 3 ). For determination of neutron sources distribution inside the sample, the heuristic methods based on hierarchical cluster analysis are applied. As an input parameters, amplitudes and phases of two-dimensional Fourier transformation of the count profiles matrices for known point sources distributions and for the examined samples, are taken. Such matrices are collected by means of sample scanning by detection head. During clustering process, counts profiles for unknown samples fitted into dendrograms using the 'proximity' criterion of the examined sample profile to standard samples profiles. Distribution of neutron sources in an examined sample is then evaluated on the basis of comparison with standard sources distributions. (author)

  7. Automated digital volume measurement of melanoma metastases in sentinel nodes predicts disease recurrence and survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riber-Hansen, Rikke; Nyengaard, Jens R; Hamilton-Dutoit, Stephen J

    2011-01-01

    statistics (categorical data). In addition, disease-free and melanoma-specific survivals were calculated. Mean metastatic volume per patient was 10.6 mm(3) (median 0.05 mm(3); range 0.0001-621.3 mm(3)) and 9.62 mm(3) (median 0.05 mm(3); range 0.00001-564.3 mm(3)) with manual and digital measurement......, respectively. The Bland-Altman plot showed an even distribution of the differences, and the kappa statistic was 0.84. In multivariate analysis, both manual and digital metastasis volume measurements were independent progression markers when corrected for primary tumour thickness [manual: hazard ratio (HR): 1...

  8. Using gas blow methods to realize accurate volume measurement of radioactivity liquid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Caiyun

    2010-01-01

    For liquid which has radioactivity, Realized the accurate volume measurement uncertainty less than 0.2% (k=2) by means of gas blow methods presented in the 'American National Standard-Nuclear Material Control-Volume Calibration Methods(ANSI N15.19-1989)' and the 'ISO Committee Drafts (ISO/TC/85/SC 5N 282 )' and Explored a set methods of Data Processing. In the article, the major problems is to solve data acquisition and function foundation and measurement uncertainty estimate. (authors)

  9. Characterizing functional lung heterogeneity in COPD using reference equations for CT scan-measured lobar volumes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Come, Carolyn E; Diaz, Alejandro A; Curran-Everett, Douglas; Muralidhar, Nivedita; Hersh, Craig P; Zach, Jordan A; Schroeder, Joyce; Lynch, David A; Celli, Bartolome; Washko, George R

    2013-06-01

    CT scanning is increasingly used to characterize COPD. Although it is possible to obtain CT scan-measured lung lobe volumes, normal ranges remain unknown. Using COPDGene data, we developed reference equations for lobar volumes at maximal inflation (total lung capacity [TLC]) and relaxed exhalation (approximating functional residual capacity [FRC]). Linear regression was used to develop race-specific (non-Hispanic white [NHW], African American) reference equations for lobar volumes. Covariates included height and sex. Models were developed in a derivation cohort of 469 subjects with normal pulmonary function and validated in 546 similar subjects. These cohorts were combined to produce final prediction equations, which were applied to 2,191 subjects with old GOLD (Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease) stage II to IV COPD. In the derivation cohort, women had smaller lobar volumes than men. Height positively correlated with lobar volumes. Adjusting for height, NHWs had larger total lung and lobar volumes at TLC than African Americans; at FRC, NHWs only had larger lower lobes. Age and weight had no effect on lobar volumes at TLC but had small effects at FRC. In subjects with COPD at TLC, upper lobes exceeded 100% of predicted values in GOLD II disease; lower lobes were only inflated to this degree in subjects with GOLD IV disease. At FRC, gas trapping was severe irrespective of disease severity and appeared uniform across the lobes. Reference equations for lobar volumes may be useful in assessing regional lung dysfunction and how it changes in response to pharmacologic therapies and surgical or endoscopic lung volume reduction.

  10. Compressed sampling for boundary measurements in three-dimensional electrical impedance tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Javaherian, Ashkan; Soleimani, Manuchehr

    2013-01-01

    Electrical impedance tomography (EIT) utilizes electrodes on a medium's surface to produce measured data from which the conductivity distribution inside the medium is estimated. For the cases that relocation of electrodes is impractical or no a priori assumptions can be made to optimize the electrodes placement, a large number of electrodes may be needed to cover all possible imaging volume. This may occur in dynamically varying conductivity distribution in 3D EIT. Three-dimensional EIT then requires inverting very large linear systems to calculate the conductivity field, which causes significant problems regarding storage space and reconstruction time in addition to that data acquisition for a large number of electrodes will reduce the achievable frame rate, which is considered as major advantage of EIT imaging. This study proposes an idea to reduce the reconstruction complexity based on the well-known compressed sampling theory. By applying the so-called model-based CoSaMP algorithm to large size data collected by a 256 channel system, the size of forward operator and data acquisition time is reduced to those of a 32 channel system, while accuracy of reconstruction is significantly improved. The results demonstrate great capability of compressed sampling for overriding the challenges arising in 3D EIT. (paper)

  11. Assessing the precision of a time-sampling-based study among GPs: balancing sample size and measurement frequency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Hassel, Daniël; van der Velden, Lud; de Bakker, Dinny; van der Hoek, Lucas; Batenburg, Ronald

    2017-12-04

    Our research is based on a technique for time sampling, an innovative method for measuring the working hours of Dutch general practitioners (GPs), which was deployed in an earlier study. In this study, 1051 GPs were questioned about their activities in real time by sending them one SMS text message every 3 h during 1 week. The required sample size for this study is important for health workforce planners to know if they want to apply this method to target groups who are hard to reach or if fewer resources are available. In this time-sampling method, however, standard power analyses is not sufficient for calculating the required sample size as this accounts only for sample fluctuation and not for the fluctuation of measurements taken from every participant. We investigated the impact of the number of participants and frequency of measurements per participant upon the confidence intervals (CIs) for the hours worked per week. Statistical analyses of the time-use data we obtained from GPs were performed. Ninety-five percent CIs were calculated, using equations and simulation techniques, for various different numbers of GPs included in the dataset and for various frequencies of measurements per participant. Our results showed that the one-tailed CI, including sample and measurement fluctuation, decreased from 21 until 3 h between one and 50 GPs. As a result of the formulas to calculate CIs, the increase of the precision continued and was lower with the same additional number of GPs. Likewise, the analyses showed how the number of participants required decreased if more measurements per participant were taken. For example, one measurement per 3-h time slot during the week requires 300 GPs to achieve a CI of 1 h, while one measurement per hour requires 100 GPs to obtain the same result. The sample size needed for time-use research based on a time-sampling technique depends on the design and aim of the study. In this paper, we showed how the precision of the

  12. Thermal neutron absorption cross-section measured on rock samples and brines in the Institute of Nuclear Physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Czubek, J.A.; Drozdowicz, K.; Krynicka-Drozdowicz, E.; Igielski, A.; Woznicka, U.

    1983-01-01

    In consecutive measurements the rock sample (having a fixed and well known shape -in our case it is a sphere or a cylinder and the sample is powdered or liquid) is enveloped in shells of a plexiglass moderator (the neutron parameters of which are known) of variable thickness and irradiated with the pulsed beam of fast neutrons. The die-away rate of thermal neutrons escaping from the whole system is measured. The absorption cross-section of the sample is found as the intersection of the experimental curve (i.e. die -away rate vs thickness of the moderator) with the theoretical one. The theoretical curve is calculated for a given moderator under the assumption of a constant value of the neutron flux inside the sample. This method is independent of the value of the transport cross-section of the sample. It has been checked on artificial materials with a well known elemental composition (liquid or solid) and on the natural brines and rock samples (basalts and dolomite). A special method of calculation of the variance of the measurement has been established. It is based on the multiple computer simulations of all experimental data used in the computation. The one standard deviation of our methods is of the order of 1 up to 3 capture units (1 c.u. = 10 -3 cm -1 ). The volume of the sample needed is of the order of 500ccm. (author)

  13. Measurement of the volume of internal capsule in healthy Chinese adults of the Han nationality on the high-resolution MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qin Yuan; Guo Yulin; Zhu Kai; Lai Yanbo; Ma Shuai; Chen Nan; Wang Xing; Li Kuncheng; Zhu Yan; Chen Lin

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To explore the normal range of the volume of internal capsules in Chinese adults of the Han nationality and its relationship with age, body habitus, and craniocerebral volume. Methods: One thousand healthy volunteers (age range =18 to 80 years) were divided into 5 groups according to their age; Group A (18 to 30 years old), group B (31 to 40 years), group C (41 to 50 years), group D (51 to 60 years), and group E (61 to 80 years). Each group consisted of 100 males and 100 females. MR imaging was performed in all of the volunteers using T 1 weighted three-dimensional magnetization prepared rapid acquisition gradient echo sequence. After three dimension data reconstruction, the volumes of bilateral internal capsules were manually measured. The volumes of bilateral internal capsules were compared by paired sample t test. The internal capsule volumes were compared between male and female by independent sample t test, and the differences among 5 age groups were compared by one-way ANOVA. The relationship between the volumes of internal capsule and age, body habitus or cerebral volume were analyzed using bivariate correlation. Results: The left and right internal capsule volumes were (2809 ± 393) and (2677 ± 343 ) mm 3 respectively. The left internal capsule volumes were significantly larger than that of right (t=12.078, P<0.05). The left and right side of internal capsule volumes in male were (2863 ± 396) and (2744 ±358) mm 3 respectively, and (2754 ±385) and (2609 ±314) mm 3 in female. The left and right internal capsule volumes were larger in males than in female (t=1.982, 2.851; P<0.05). The left internal capsule volume of the 5 age groups were (3273 ± 361), (2943 ± 299), (2777 ± 255), (2607 ± 199), (2444 ±213) mm 3 , and the right were (2993 ± 361), (2814 ± 270), (2682 ± 239), (2543 ± 219), (2351 ±210) mm 3 . There were significant differences among 5 age groups between left and right internal capsule volume (F=55.244, 34.493; P<0

  14. Planar measurements of soot volume fraction and OH in a JP-8 pool fire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henriksen, Tara L.; Ring, Terry A.; Eddings, Eric G. [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 (United States); Nathan, Graham J. [School of Mechanical Engineering, University of Adelaide, SA 5005 (Australia); Alwahabi, Zeyad T.; Qamar, Nader [School of Chemical Engineering, University of Adelaide, SA 5005 (Australia)

    2009-07-15

    The simultaneous measurement of soot volume fraction by laser induced incandescence (LII) and qualitative imaging of OH by laser induced fluorescence (LIF) was performed in a JP-8 pool fire contained in a 152 mm diameter pan. Line of sight extinction was used to calibrate the LII system in a laminar flame, and to provide an independent method of measuring average soot volume fraction in the turbulent flame. The presence of soot in the turbulent flame was found to be approximately 50% probable, resulting in high levels of optical extinction, which increased slightly through the flame from approximately 30% near the base, to approximately 50% at the tip. This high soot loading pushes both techniques toward their detection limit. Nevertheless, useful accuracy was obtained, with the LII measurement of apparent extinction in the turbulent flame being approximately 21% lower than a direct measurement, consistent with the influence of signal trapping. The axial and radial distributions of soot volume fraction are presented, along with PDFs of volume fraction, and new insight into the behavior of soot sheets in pool fires are sought from the simultaneous measurements of OH and LII. (author)

  15. MR measurement of the basal ganglia volume in the tourette syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liao Kaibing; Li Guiping; Yang Bo; Feng Gansheng

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To compare the volume of the basal ganglia in patients with Tourette syndrome (TS) and the normal volunteers and to explore the underlying anatomical basis of TS. Methods: Thirty-one cases of TS (TS subjects), 31 gender and age-matched subjects (the control subjects) were examined on a 3.0 T MRI system. The volume of the caudate nucleus, globus pallidus, putamen of the two sides and the brain volume were measured with volume analysis software, and the data were normalized according to the individual brain volume. Statistical analysis was performed using t test to compare between the TS subjects and the controls. Results: The volume of the both sides of the caudate nucleus, putamen and globus pallidus of TS subjects were (4.11 ±0.12) and (3.76 ±0.11), (2.28 ±0.12) and (2.35 ±0.28), (4.98 ±0.20) and (4.89 ±0.31) cm 3 , while they were (4.88 ±0.19) and (4.30 ±0.12), (2.28 ±0.12) and (2.35 ±0.28), (4.98 ±0.20) and (4.89 ±0.31) cm 3 in the controls, respectively. There were significant differences in the bilateral caudate nucleus and globus pallidus between the TS subjects and control subjects (t=2.97, 1.74, 3.72, 3.93, P<0.05), but there were no significant differences of the volume in the bilateral putamen between the TS and control subjects (t=0.47, 1.31, P>0.05). The volume was not significantly different between the left and right caudate nucleus in the TS subjects (t=1.81, P>0.05), but the left volume of the caudate nucleus was bigger in the control subjects compared with the right volume, however, there was significant difference between the bilateral caudate nucleus in the control subjects (t=2.34, P<0.05). There were no differences of volume between the bilateral globus pallidus and putamen in both the TS and control subjects (t=1.12, 1.44, 1.68, 0.38, P>0.05). Conclusion: The abnormal volume of caudate nucleus, putamen, and the globus pallidus may be involved in the pathogenesis of TS. (authors)

  16. Metabolic tumour volumes measured at staging in lymphoma: methodological evaluation on phantom experiments and patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meignan, Michel; Sasanelli, Myriam; Itti, Emmanuel; Casasnovas, Rene Olivier; Luminari, Stefano; Fioroni, Federica; Coriani, Chiara; Masset, Helene; Gobbi, Paolo G.; Merli, Francesco; Versari, Annibale

    2014-01-01

    The presence of a bulky tumour at staging on CT is an independent prognostic factor in malignant lymphomas. However, its prognostic value is limited in diffuse disease. Total metabolic tumour volume (TMTV) determined on 18 F-FDG PET/CT could give a better evaluation of the total tumour burden and may help patient stratification. Different methods of TMTV measurement established in phantoms simulating lymphoma tumours were investigated and validated in 40 patients with Hodgkin lymphoma and diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. Data were processed by two nuclear medicine physicians in Reggio Emilia and Creteil. Nineteen phantoms filled with 18 F-saline were scanned; these comprised spherical or irregular volumes from 0.5 to 650 cm 3 with tumour-to-background ratios from 1.65 to 40. Volumes were measured with different SUVmax thresholds. In patients, TMTV was measured on PET at staging by two methods: volumes of individual lesions were measured using a fixed 41 % SUVmax threshold (TMTV 41 ) and a variable visually adjusted SUVmax threshold (TMTV var ). In phantoms, the 41 % threshold gave the best concordance between measured and actual volumes. Interobserver agreement was almost perfect. In patients, the agreement between the reviewers for TMTV 41 measurement was substantial (ρ c = 0.986, CI 0.97 - 0.99) and the difference between the means was not significant (212 ± 218 cm 3 for Creteil vs. 206 ± 219 cm 3 for Reggio Emilia, P = 0.65). By contrast the agreement was poor for TMTV var . There was a significant direct correlation between TMTV 41 and normalized LDH (r = 0.652, CI 0.42 - 0.8, P 41 , but high TMTV 41 could be found in patients with stage 1/2 or nonbulky tumour. Measurement of baseline TMTV in lymphoma using a fixed 41% SUVmax threshold is reproducible and correlates with the other parameters for tumour mass evaluation. It should be evaluated in prospective studies. (orig.)

  17. Measuring the volume of the hippocampus in healthy Chinese adults of the Han nationality on the high-resolution MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Yong; Chen Nan; Wang Xing; Li Kuncheng; Zhuo Yan; Chen Lin

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To measure the volume of hippocampal formation (HPF) in healthy Chinese Han adults and provide database for researching on a variety of diseases associated with alteration of hippocampal structure. Methods: This is a clinical multi-center study. One thousand Chinese healthy volunteers (age range=18 to 70) recruited from 15 hospitals were divided into 5 groups, i. e., Group A (age range=18 to 30), B (age range=31 to 40), C (age range =41 to 50), D (age range =51 to 60), and E (age range = 61 to 70). Each group contained 100 males and 100 females. All of the volunteers were scanned by MR using T 1 weighted three-dimensional magnetization prepared rapid acquisition gradient echo sequence. The margin of HPF were outlined manually for each side. Using multiple linear regression, relationships between hippocampal volume and sex, age, weight and height were analyzed respectively. Independent two sample t test was used to study the differences between male and female and between left and right. The differences of hippocampal volume among age groups were analyzed by ANOVA. Results: Hippocampal volume for left and right side were (4752±659) and (5032±660) mm 3 respectively. The volume of HPF is significant correlated with gender and age, but without relevance to height and weight (left and right r=0.283,0.311, F=30.127,37.050,P 3 respectively for men, and (4647±624) and (4904±630) mm 3 for women. The right hippocampal volume was larger than the left (t=7.030,6.696, P 3 respectively, while the volumes of the fight hippocampus were (5340± 647), (5276±582), (5264±620), (5133±661), (4894±699) mm 3 respectively. Among age groups, the differences were statistically significant (left and right F=5.737,7.607, P 0.05). There was no significant difference of hippocampal among different groups in women (P>0.05). Conclusions: With high-resolution MRI, the volume of the HPF was accurately measured, so as to provide the basic data for research of the hippocampus

  18. Versatile, ultra-low sample volume gas analyzer using a rapid, broad-tuning ECQCL and a hollow fiber gas cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kriesel, Jason M.; Makarem, Camille N.; Phillips, Mark C.; Moran, James J.; Coleman, Max L.; Christensen, Lance E.; Kelly, James F.

    2017-05-01

    We describe a versatile mid-infrared (Mid-IR) spectroscopy system developed to measure the concentration of a wide range of gases with an ultra-low sample size. The system combines a rapidly-swept external cavity quantum cascade laser (ECQCL) with a hollow fiber gas cell. The ECQCL has sufficient spectral resolution and reproducibility to measure gases with narrow features (e.g., water, methane, ammonia, etc.), and also the spectral tuning range needed to measure volatile organic compounds (VOCs), (e.g., aldehydes, ketones, hydrocarbons), sulfur compounds, chlorine compounds, etc. The hollow fiber is a capillary tube having an internal reflective coating optimized for transmitting the Mid-IR laser beam to a detector. Sample gas introduced into the fiber (e.g., internal volume = 0.6 ml) interacts strongly with the laser beam, and despite relatively modest path lengths (e.g., L 3 m), the requisite quantity of sample needed for sensitive measurements can be significantly less than what is required using conventional IR laser spectroscopy systems. Example measurements are presented including quantification of VOCs relevant for human breath analysis with a sensitivity of 2 picomoles at a 1 Hz data rate.

  19. Versatile, ultra-low sample volume gas analyzer using a rapid, broad-tuning ECQCL and a hollow fiber gas cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kriesel, Jason M.; Makarem, Camille N.; Phillips, Mark C.; Moran, James J.; Coleman, Max; Christensen, Lance; Kelly, James F.

    2017-05-05

    We describe a versatile mid-infrared (Mid-IR) spectroscopy system developed to measure the concentration of a wide range of gases with an ultra-low sample size. The system combines a rapidly-swept external cavity quantum cascade laser (ECQCL) with a hollow fiber gas cell. The ECQCL has sufficient spectral resolution and reproducibility to measure gases with narrow features (e.g., water, methane, ammonia, etc.), and also the spectral tuning range needed to measure volatile organic compounds (VOCs), (e.g., aldehydes, ketones, hydrocarbons), sulfur compounds, chlorine compounds, etc. The hollow fiber is a capillary tube having an internal reflective coating optimized for transmitting the Mid-IR laser beam to a detector. Sample gas introduced into the fiber (e.g., internal volume = 0.6 ml) interacts strongly with the laser beam, and despite relatively modest path lengths (e.g., L ~ 3 m), the requisite quantity of sample needed for sensitive measurements can be significantly less than what is required using conventional IR laser spectroscopy systems. Example measurements are presented including quantification of VOCs relevant for human breath analysis with a sensitivity of ~2 picomoles at a 1 Hz data rate.

  20. The error analysis of Lobular and segmental division of right liver by volume measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jianfei; Lin, Weigang; Chi, Yanyan; Zheng, Nan; Xu, Qiang; Zhang, Guowei; Yu, Shengbo; Li, Chan; Wang, Bin; Sui, Hongjin

    2017-07-01

    The aim of this study is to explore the inconsistencies between right liver volume as measured by imaging and the actual anatomical appearance of the right lobe. Five healthy donated livers were studied. The liver slices were obtained with hepatic segments multicolor-infused through the portal vein. In the slices, the lobes were divided by two methods: radiological landmarks and real anatomical boundaries. The areas of the right anterior lobe (RAL) and right posterior lobe (RPL) on each slice were measured using Photoshop CS5 and AutoCAD, and the volumes of the two lobes were calculated. There was no statistically significant difference between the volumes of the RAL or RPL as measured by the radiological landmarks (RL) and anatomical boundaries (AB) methods. However, the curves of the square error value of the RAL and RPL measured using CT showed that the three lowest points were at the cranial, intermediate, and caudal levels. The U- or V-shaped curves of the square error rate of the RAL and RPL revealed that the lowest value is at the intermediate level and the highest at the cranial and caudal levels. On CT images, less accurate landmarks were used to divide the RAL and RPL at the cranial and caudal layers. The measured volumes of hepatic segments VIII and VI would be less than their true values, and the measured volumes of hepatic segments VII and V would be greater than their true values, according to radiological landmarks. Clin. Anat. 30:585-590, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Sample preparation method for ICP-MS measurement of 99Tc in a large amount of environmental samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kondo, M.; Seki, R.

    2002-01-01

    Sample preparation for measurement of 99 Tc in a large amount of soil and water samples by ICP-MS has been developed using 95m Tc as a yield tracer. This method is based on the conventional method for a small amount of soil samples using incineration, acid digestion, extraction chromatography (TEVA resin) and ICP-MS measurement. Preliminary concentration of Tc has been introduced by co-precipitation with ferric oxide. The matrix materials in a large amount of samples were more sufficiently removed with keeping the high recovery of Tc than previous method. The recovery of Tc was 70-80% for 100 g soil samples and 60-70% for 500 g of soil and 500 L of water samples. The detection limit of this method was evaluated as 0.054 mBq/kg in 500 g soil and 0.032 μBq/L in 500 L water. The determined value of 99 Tc in the IAEA-375 (soil sample collected near the Chernobyl Nuclear Reactor) was 0.25 ± 0.02 Bq/kg. (author)

  2. Novel gravimetric measurement technique for quantitative volume calibration in the sub-microliter range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liang, Dong; Zengerle, Roland; Steinert, Chris; Ernst, Andreas; Koltay, Peter; Bammesberger, Stefan; Tanguy, Laurent

    2013-01-01

    We present a novel measurement method based on the gravimetric principles adapted from the ASTM E542 and ISO 4787 standards for quantitative volume determination in the sub-microliter range. Such a method is particularly important for the calibration of non-contact micro dispensers as well as other microfluidic devices. The novel method is based on the linear regression analysis of continuously monitored gravimetric results and therefore is referred to as ‘gravimetric regression method (GRM)’. In this context, the regression analysis is necessary to compensate the mass loss due to evaporation that is significant for very small dispensing volumes. A full assessment of the measurement uncertainty of GRM is presented and results in a standard measurement uncertainty around 6 nl for dosage volumes in the range from 40 nl to 1 µl. The GRM has been experimentally benchmarked with a dual-dye ratiometric photometric method (Artel Inc., Westbrook, ME, USA), which can provide traceability of measurement to the International System of Units (SI) through reference standards maintained by NIST. Good precision (max. CV = 2.8%) and consistency (bias around 7 nl in the volume range from 40 to 400 nl) have been observed comparing the two methods. Based on the ASTM and ISO standards on the one hand and the benchmark with the photometric method on the other hand, two different approaches for establishing traceability for the GRM are discussed. (paper)

  3. Effect of cigarette smoke on the measured equivalent volume activity of 222Rn in air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tuckova, S.; Tykva, R.

    1994-01-01

    The effect of cigarette smoke in air on the increase of the measured equivalent volume activity of 222 Rn is demonstrated. After introduction of the smoke from one cigarette into 1 m 3 of air, this value increased up to ten times as shown be the method of sucking air through a filter. (author) 5 refs.; 1 fig

  4. Technical Note: Stored grain volume measurement using a low density point cloud

    Science.gov (United States)

    The mass of stored grain is often determined from volume measurements by crop insurers, government auditors, and stored grain managers conducting inventories. Recent increases in bin size have accentuated the difficulty of accounting for irregularities and variations in surface conditions in calcula...

  5. Color structured light system of chest wall motion measurement for respiratory volume evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Huijun; Cheng, Yuan; Liu, Dongdong; Zhang, Xiaodong; Zhang, Jue; Que, Chengli; Wang, Guangfa; Fang, Jing

    2010-03-01

    We present a structured light system to dynamically measure human chest wall motion for respiratory volume estimation. Based on a projection of an encoded color pattern and a few active markers attached to the trunk, respiratory volumes are obtained by evaluating the 3-D topographic changes of the chest wall in an anatomically consistent measuring region during respiration. Three measuring setups are established: a single-sided illuminating-recording setup for standing posture, an inclined single-sided setup for supine posture, and a double-sided setup for standing posture. Results are compared with the pneumotachography and show good agreement in volume estimations [correlation coefficient: R>0.99 (Pvolume during the isovolume maneuver (standard deviationpulmonary functional differences between the diseased and the contralateral sides of the thorax, and subsequent improvement of this imbalance after drainage. These results demonstrate the proposed optical method is capable of not only whole respiratory volume evaluation with high accuracy, but also regional pulmonary function assessment in different chest wall behaviors, with the advantage of whole-field measurement.

  6. Residual volume measurements in CAPD patients with exogenous and endogenous solutes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Imholz, A. L.; Koomen, G. C.; Struijk, D. G.; Arisz, L.; Krediet, R. T.

    1992-01-01

    Accurate residual volume (RV) measurements are needed in studies on fluid kinetics during CAPD. In this study 10 stable CAPD patients were examined twice within 1 week. On both occasions RV after drainage was calculated by the indicator dilution method. Exogenous (dextran 70, inulin) and endogenous

  7. Legacy tree data: A national database of detailed tree measurements for volume, weight, and physical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    P.J. Radtke; D.M. Walker; A.R. Weiskittel; J. Frank; J.W. Coulston; J.A. Westfall

    2015-01-01

    Forest mensurationists in the United States have expended considerable effort over the past century making detailed observations of trees’ dimensions. In recent decades efforts have focused increasingly on weights and physical properties. Work is underway to compile original measurements from past volume, taper, and weight or biomass studies for North American tree...

  8. The Self-Concept. Volume 1, A Review of Methodological Considerations and Measuring Instruments. Revised Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wylie, Ruth C.

    This volume of the revised edition describes and evaluates measurement methods, research designs, and procedures which have been or might appropriately be used in self-concept research. Working from the perspective that self-concept or phenomenal personality theories can be scientifically investigated, methodological flaws and questionable…

  9. Hippocampal volume measurement in patients with Meniere's disease : a pilot study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Cruijsen, Nynke; Hiemstra, Wilma M.; Meiners, Linda C.; Wit, Hero P.; Albers, Frans W. J.

    2007-01-01

    Conclusion. No signs of chronic stress as in hippocampal atrophy were present in patients with Meniere's disease. Objective. To evaluate the effect of chronic stress (allostatic load) by measuring hippocampal volume in patients with Meniere's disease. Subjects and methods. Ten patients with

  10. Cerebral blood volume measurement using radioactive carboxyhemoglobin and positron emission tomography. Chapter 26

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanno, Iwao; Murakami, Matsutaro; Miura, Shuichi; Iida, Hidehiro; Takahashi, Kazuhiro; Sasaki, Hiroshi; Uemura, Kazuo

    1988-01-01

    This paper aims to describe the technical basis for this simplest cerebral blood volume (CBV) measurement using CO-labelled red blood cells and PET and to clarify the error sources in the technique which will become critical when we perform studies on physiological activation of CBV. 17 refs.; 6 figs.; 2 tabs

  11. Automatic sampling technology in wide belt conveyor with big volume of coal flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, J. [China Coal Research Institute, Beijing (China)

    2008-06-15

    The principle and technique of sampling in a wide belt conveyor with high coal flow was studied. The design method of the technology, the key parameters, the collection efficiency, the mechanical unit, power supply and control system and worksite facility were ascertained. 3 refs., 5 figs.

  12. Casingless down-hole for sealing an ablation volume and obtaining a sample for analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noble, Donald T.; Braymen, Steven D.; Anderson, Marvin S.

    1996-10-01

    A casing-less down hole sampling system for acquiring a subsurface sample for analysis using an inductively coupled plasma system is disclosed. The system includes a probe which is pushed into the formation to be analyzed using a hydraulic ram system. The probe includes a detachable tip member which has a soil point mad a barb, with the soil point aiding the penetration of the earth, and the barb causing the tip member to disengage from the probe and remain in the formation when the probe is pulled up. The probe is forced into the formation to be tested, and then pulled up slightly, to disengage the tip member and expose a column of the subsurface formation to be tested. An instrumentation tube mounted in the probe is then extended outward from the probe to longitudinally extend into the exposed column. A balloon seal mounted on the end of the instrumentation tube allows the bottom of the column to be sealed. A source of laser radiation is emitted from the instrumentation tube to ablate a sample from the exposed column. The instrumentation tube can be rotated in the probe to sweep the laser source across the surface of the exposed column. An aerosol transport system carries the ablated sample from the probe to the surface for testing in an inductively coupled plasma system. By testing at various levels in the down-hole as the probe is extracted from the soil, a profile of the subsurface formation may be obtained.

  13. In situ sampling of small volumes of soil solution using modified micro-suction cups

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shen, Jianbo; Hoffland, E.

    2007-01-01

    Two modified designs of micro-pore-water samplers were tested for their capacity to collect unbiased soil solution samples containing zinc and citrate. The samplers had either ceramic or polyethersulfone (PES) suction cups. Laboratory tests of the micro-samplers were conducted using (a) standard

  14. Gastrointestinal tract volume measurement method using a compound eye type endoscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshimoto, Kayo; Yamada, Kenji; Watabe, Kenji; Kido, Michiko; Nagakura, Toshiaki; Takahashi, Hideya; Nishida, Tsutomu; Iijima, Hideki; Tsujii, Masahiko; Takehara, Tetsuo; Ohno, Yuko

    2015-03-01

    We propose an intestine volume measurement method using a compound eye type endoscope. This method aims at assessment of the gastrointestinal function. Gastrointestinal diseases are mainly based on morphological abnormalities. However, gastrointestinal symptoms are sometimes apparent without visible abnormalities. Such diseases are called functional gastrointestinal disorder, for example, functional dyspepsia, and irritable bowel syndrome. One of the major factors for these diseases is abnormal gastrointestinal motility. For the diagnosis of the gastrointestinal tract, both aspects of organic and functional assessment is important. While endoscopic diagnosis is essential for assessment of organic abnormalities, three-dimensional information is required for assessment of the functional abnormalities. Thus, we proposed the three dimensional endoscope system using compound eye. In this study, we forces on the volume of gastrointestinal tract. The volume of the gastrointestinal tract is thought to related its function. In our system, we use a compound eye type endoscope system to obtain three-dimensional information of the tract. The volume can be calculated by integrating the slice data of the intestine tract shape using the obtained three-dimensional information. First, we evaluate the proposed method by known-shape tube. Then, we confirm that the proposed method can measure the tract volume using the tract simulated model. Our system can assess the wall of gastrointestinal tract directly in a three-dimensional manner. Our system can be used for examination of gastric morphological and functional abnormalities.

  15. Adaptive B-spline volume representation of measured BRDF data for photorealistic rendering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyungjun Park

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Measured bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF data have been used to represent complex interaction between lights and surface materials for photorealistic rendering. However, their massive size makes it hard to adopt them in practical rendering applications. In this paper, we propose an adaptive method for B-spline volume representation of measured BRDF data. It basically performs approximate B-spline volume lofting, which decomposes the problem into three sub-problems of multiple B-spline curve fitting along u-, v-, and w-parametric directions. Especially, it makes the efficient use of knots in the multiple B-spline curve fitting and thereby accomplishes adaptive knot placement along each parametric direction of a resulting B-spline volume. The proposed method is quite useful to realize efficient data reduction while smoothing out the noises and keeping the overall features of BRDF data well. By applying the B-spline volume models of real materials for rendering, we show that the B-spline volume models are effective in preserving the features of material appearance and are suitable for representing BRDF data.

  16. Pleural liquid clearance rate measured in awake sheep by the volume of dilution method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broaddus, V.C.; Wiener-Kronish, J.P.; Berthiaume, Y.; Staub, N.C.

    1986-01-01

    The authors reported 24h clearance of mock pleural effusions measured terminally in sheep. To measure effusion volume at different times in the same sheep, they injected 111 In-transferrin and measured its dilution. In 5 sheep with effusions of known sizes, the method was accurate to +/-10%. In 5 awake sheep, the authors injected 10 ml/kg of a 1% protein solution via a non-penetrating rib capsule. At 6h, the authors measured the volume by the dilution method and at 24h by direct recovery. The clearance rate in each animal was constant at 2.9-6.0%/h (average 4.8 +/- 1.3%/h). This new method gives a reliable two point clearance rate and requires fewer animals

  17. Relations between various measures of iodine intake and thyroid volume, thyroid nodularity, and serum thyroglobulin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Lone Banke; Ovesen, L.; Bulow, I.

    2002-01-01

    sought to identify, if possible, groups at risk of thyroid disease because of their food choices. Design: This cohort study included 4649 randomly selected subjects with mild-to-moderate iodine deficiency; the subjects lived in 2 cities in Denmark. Iodine intake was estimated by using a food...... some measures of iodine intake were significantly related to the prevalence of thyroid nodules. Conclusions: Even in a geographic area where mild iodine deficiency is common, a significant relation between iodine intake and thyroid volume was found. All measures of iodine intake, except iodine......Background: Iodine intake can be measured in various ways, and each method may have advantages and disadvantages. Objective: We sought to investigate the potential associations of various measures of iodine intake with thyroid volume, prevalence of thyroid nodules, and serum thyroglobulin. We also...

  18. A sampling device for counting insect egg clusters and measuring vertical distribution of vegetation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert L. Talerico; Robert W., Jr. Wilson

    1978-01-01

    The use of a vertical sampling pole that delineates known volumes and position is illustrated and demonstrated for counting egg clusters of N. sertifer. The pole can also be used to estimate vertical and horizontal coverage, distribution or damage of vegetation or foliage.

  19. Quality control for measurement of soil samples containing 237Np and 241Am as radiotracer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sha Lianmao; Zhang Caihong; Song Hailong; Ren Xiaona; Han Yuhu; Zhang Aiming; Chu Taiwei

    2003-01-01

    This paper reports quality control (QC) for the measurement of soil samples containing 237 Np and 241 Am as radiotracers in migration test of transuranic nuclides. All of the QC were done independently by the QA members of analytical work. It mainly included checking 5%-10% of the total analyzed samples; preparing blank samples, blind replicate sample and spiked samples used as quality control samples to check the quality of analytical work

  20. Sampling

    CERN Document Server

    Thompson, Steven K

    2012-01-01

    Praise for the Second Edition "This book has never had a competitor. It is the only book that takes a broad approach to sampling . . . any good personal statistics library should include a copy of this book." —Technometrics "Well-written . . . an excellent book on an important subject. Highly recommended." —Choice "An ideal reference for scientific researchers and other professionals who use sampling." —Zentralblatt Math Features new developments in the field combined with all aspects of obtaining, interpreting, and using sample data Sampling provides an up-to-date treat

  1. Hidden measurements, hidden variables and the volume representation of transition probabilities

    OpenAIRE

    Oliynyk, Todd A.

    2005-01-01

    We construct, for any finite dimension $n$, a new hidden measurement model for quantum mechanics based on representing quantum transition probabilities by the volume of regions in projective Hilbert space. For $n=2$ our model is equivalent to the Aerts sphere model and serves as a generalization of it for dimensions $n \\geq 3$. We also show how to construct a hidden variables scheme based on hidden measurements and we discuss how joint distributions arise in our hidden variables scheme and th...

  2. Evaluation of sampling inhalable PM10 particulate matter (≤ 10 μm) using co-located high volume samplers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajoy, R R S; Dias, J W C; Rego, E C P; Netto, A D Pereira

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the results of the determination of the concentrations of atmospheric particulate matter ≤ 10 μm (PM10), collected simultaneously by six PM10 high volume samplers from two different manufacturers installed in the same location. Fifteen samples of 24 h were obtained with each equipment at a selected urban area of Rio de Janeiro city. The concentration of PM10 ranged between 10.73 and 54.04 μg m −3 . The samplers were considered comparable to each other, as the adopted methodology presented good repeatability

  3. LOFT experimental measurements uncertainty analyses. Volume XX. Fluid-velocity measurement using pulsed-neutron activation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lassahn, G.D.; Taylor, D.J.N.

    1982-08-01

    Analyses of uncertainty components inherent in pulsed-neutron-activation (PNA) measurements in general and the Loss-of-Fluid-Test (LOFT) system in particular are given. Due to the LOFT system's unique conditions, previously-used techniques were modified to make the volocity measurement. These methods render a useful, cost-effective measurement with an estimated uncertainty of 11% of reading

  4. Mexico City air quality research initiative. Volume IV. Characterization and measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mauzy, A. [ed.

    1994-04-01

    This volume describes the methods and the data gathered in an attempt to measure and characterize the meteorological factors and the concentration of different pollutants in the Mexico City Metropolitan Area. The main objective of this document was to provide input for the simulation models and to obtain information that could be used to test and improve the models` performance. Four field campaigns were conducted, as well as routine monitoring, in order to obtain a database of atmospheric dynamics and air pollution characteristics. Sections include Airborne measurements, Remote sensing measurements, and Traditional (in situ) measurements.

  5. Reduction of Powerplex(®) Y23 reaction volume for genotyping buccal cell samples on FTA(TM) cards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raziel, Aliza; Dell'Ariccia-Carmon, Aviva; Zamir, Ashira

    2015-01-01

    PowerPlex(®) Y23 is a novel kit for Y-STR typing that includes new highly discriminating loci. The Israel DNA Database laboratory has recently adopted it for routine Y-STR analysis. This study examined PCR amplification from 1.2-mm FTA punch in reduced volumes of 5 and 10 μL. Direct amplification and washing of the FTA punches were examined in different PCR cycle numbers. One short robotically performed wash was found to improve the quality and the percent of profiles obtained. The optimal PCR cycle number was determined for 5 and 10 μL reaction volumes. The percent of obtained profiles, color balance, and reproducibility were examined. High-quality profiles were achieved in 90% and 88% of the samples amplified in 5 and 10 μL, respectively, in the first attempt. Volume reduction to 5 μL has a vast economic impact especially for DNA database laboratories. © 2014 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  6. Are tidal volume measurements in neonatal pressure-controlled ventilation accurate?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, Lily C; Vanderhal, Andre; Raber, Jorge; Sola, Augusto

    2002-09-01

    Bedside pulmonary mechanics monitors (PMM) have become useful in ventilatory management in neonates. These monitors are used more frequently due to recent improvements in data-processing capabilities. PMM devices are often part of the ventilator or are separate units. The accuracy and reliability of these systems have not been carefully evaluated. We compared a single ventilatory parameter, tidal volume (V(t)), as measured by several systems. We looked at two freestanding PMMs: the Ventrak Respiratory Monitoring System (Novametrix, Wallingford, CT) and the Bicore CP-100 Neonatal Pulmonary Monitor (Allied Health Care Products, Riverside, CA), and three ventilators with built-in PMM: the VIP Bird Ventilator (Bird Products Corp., Palm Springs, CA), Siemens Servo 300A (Siemens-Elema AB, Solna, Sweden), and Drager Babylog 8000 (Drager, Inc., Chantilly, VA). A calibrated syringe (Hans Rudolph, Inc., Kansas City, MO) was used to deliver tidal volumes of 4, 10, and 20 mL to each ventilator system coupled with a freestanding PMM. After achieving steady state, six consecutive V(t) readings were taken simultaneously from the freestanding PMM and each ventilator. In a second portion of the bench study, we used pressure-control ventilation and measured exhaled tidal volume (V(te)) while ventilating a Bear Test Lung with the same three ventilators. We adjusted peak inspiratory pressure (PIP) under controlled conditions to achieve the three different targeted tidal volumes on the paired freestanding PMM. Again, six V(te) measurements were recorded for each tidal volume. Means and standard deviations were calculated.The percentage difference in measurement of V(t) delivered by calibrated syringe varied greatly, with the greatest discrepancy seen in the smallest tidal volumes, by up to 28%. In pressure control mode, V(te) as measured by the Siemens was significantly overestimated by 20-95%, with the biggest discrepancy at the smallest V(te), particularly when paired with the Bicore

  7. Developing a Relationship Between LIBS Ablation and Pit Volume for In Situ Dating of Geologic Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devismes, D.; Cohen, B. A.; Gillot, P.-Y.

    2015-01-01

    In planetary exploration, in situ absolute geochronology is an important measurement. Thus far, on Mars, the age of the surface has largely been determined by crater density counting, which gives relative ages. These ages can have significant uncertainty as they depend on many poorly constrained parameters. More than that, the curves must be tied to absolute ages to relate geologic timescales on Mars to the rest of the solar system. Thus far, only the lost lander Beagle 2 was designed to conduct absolute geochronology measurements, though some recent attempts using MSL Curiosity show that this investigation is feasible (Reference Farley here) and should be strongly encouraged for future flight.

  8. Methods of pre-concentration of radionuclides from large volume samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olahova, K.; Matel, L.; Rosskopfova, O.

    2006-01-01

    The development of radioanalytical methods for low level radionuclides in environmental samples is presented. In particular, emphasis is placed on the introduction of extraction chromatography as a tool for improving the quality of results as well as reducing the analysis time. However, the advantageous application of extraction chromatography often depends on the effective use of suitable preconcentration techniques, such as co-precipitation, to reduce the amount of matrix components which accompany the analysis interest. On-going investigations in this field relevant to the determination of environmental levels of actinides and 90 Sr are discussed. (authors)

  9. /sup 3/H-dextran method for measurements of the blood volume in the rat choroid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsusaka, T [Osaka Prefectural Center for Adult Diseases (Japan); Morimoto, K; Kikkawa, Y

    1980-01-01

    A new method was developed using /sup 3/H-dextran for measuring the blood volume in the choroid. Under pentobarbital-anesthesia, albino rats weighing 200 grams were perfused through the left ventricle with a 2.5 percent glutaraldehyde solution containing the radioactive dextran. The procedure allowed exchange of the choroidal blood with the /sup 3/H-dextran solution with a simultaneous fixation of the choroid. The blood volume in the choroid was calculated from the radioactivity count, which is estimated to be 1.690 x 10/sup -4/ ml per mg wet weight and 5.070 x 10/sup -4/ ml per mg dry weight. Epinephrine subconjunctivally injected diminished the blood volume in the choroid by 68 percent. Pretreatment with lidocaine almost nullified the effect of epinephrine. Applicability of this method to the analytical study of the choroidal circulation is discussed.

  10. 3H-dextran method for measurements of the blood volume in the rat choroid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsusaka, Toshihiko; Morimoto, Kazuhiro; Kikkawa, Yoshizo.

    1980-01-01

    A new method was developed using 3 H-dextran for measuring the blood volume in the choroid. Under pentobarbital-anesthesia, albino rats weighing 200 grams were perfused through the left ventricle with a 2.5 percent glutaraldehyde solution containing the radioactive dextran. The procedure allowed exchange of the choroidal blood with the 3 H-dextran solution with a simultaneous fixation of the choroid. The blood volume in the choroid was calculated from the radioactivity count, which is estimated to be 1.690 x 10 -4 ml per mg wet weight and 5.070 x 10 -4 ml per mg dry weight. Epinephrine subconjunctivally injected diminished the blood volume in the choroid by 68 percent. Pretreatment with lidocaine almost nullified the effect of epinephrine. Applicability of this method to the analytical study of the choroidal circulation is discussed. (author)

  11. Pulsed TV holography measurement and digital reconstruction of compression acoustic wave fields: application to nondestructive testing of thick metallic samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trillo, C; Doval, A F; Deán-Ben, X L; López-Vázquez, J C; Fernández, J L; Hernández-Montes, S

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes a technique that numerically reconstructs the complex acoustic amplitude (i.e. the acoustic amplitude and phase) of a compression acoustic wave in the interior volume of a specimen from a set of full-field optical measurements of the instantaneous displacement of the surface. The volume of a thick specimen is probed in transmission mode by short bursts of narrowband compression acoustic waves generated at one of its faces. The temporal evolution of the displacement field induced by the bursts emerging at the opposite surface is measured by pulsed digital holographic interferometry (pulsed TV holography). A spatio-temporal 3D Fourier transform processing of the measured data yields the complex acoustic amplitude at the plane of the surface as a sequence of 2D complex-valued maps. Finally, a numerical implementation of the Rayleigh–Sommerfeld diffraction formula is employed to reconstruct the complex acoustic amplitude at other planes in the interior volume of the specimen. The whole procedure can be regarded as a combination of optical digital holography and acoustical holography methods. The technique was successfully tested on aluminium specimens with and without an internal artificial defect and sample results are presented. In particular, information about the shape and position of the defect was retrieved in the experiment performed on the flawed specimen, which indicates the potential applicability of the technique for the nondestructive testing of materials

  12. Measurement of tidal volume using respiratory ultrasonic plethysmography in anaesthetized, mechanically ventilated horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russold, Elena; Ambrisko, Tamas D; Schramel, Johannes P; Auer, Ulrike; Van Den Hoven, Rene; Moens, Yves P

    2013-01-01

    To compare tidal volume estimations obtained from Respiratory Ultrasonic Plethysmography (RUP) with simultaneous spirometric measurements in anaesthetized, mechanically ventilated horses. Prospective randomized experimental study. Five experimental horses. Five horses were anaesthetized twice (1 week apart) in random order in lateral and in dorsal recumbency. Nine ventilation modes (treatments) were scheduled in random order (each lasting 4 minutes) applying combinations of different tidal volumes (8, 10, 12 mL kg(-1)) and positive end-expiratory pressures (PEEP) (0, 10, 20 cm H(2)O). Baseline ventilation mode (tidal volume=15 mL kg(-1), PEEP=0 cm H(2)O) was applied for 4 minutes between all treatments. Spirometry and RUP data were downloaded to personal computers. Linear regression analyses (RUP versus spirometric tidal volume) were performed using different subsets of data. Additonally RUP was calibrated against spirometry using a regression equation for all RUP signal values (thoracic, abdominal and combined) with all data collectively and also by an individually determined best regression equation (highest R(2)) for each experiment (horse versus recumbency) separately. Agreement between methods was assessed with Bland-Altman analyses. The highest correlation of RUP and spirometric tidal volume (R(2)=0.81) was found with the combined RUP signal in horses in lateral recumbency and ventilated without PEEP. The bias ±2 SD was 0±2.66 L when RUP was calibrated for collective data, but decreased to 0±0.87 L when RUP was calibrated with individual data. A possible use of RUP for tidal volume measurement during IPPV needs individual calibration to obtain limits of agreement within ±20%. © 2012 The Authors. Veterinary Anaesthesia and Analgesia. © 2012 Association of Veterinary Anaesthetists and the American College of Veterinary Anesthesiologists.

  13. Measurement and correlation of excess molar volumes for mixtures of 1-propanol and aromatic hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gahlyan, Suman; Rani, Manju; Maken, Sanjeev Kumar [Deenbandhu Chhotu Ram University of Science and Technology, Murthal (India); Lee, Inkyu; Moon, Il [Yonsei University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-01-15

    Excess molar volumes (V{sub m}{sup E} ) have been measured at 303.15 K for 1-propanol+benzene or toluene or o- or m- or p-xylene mixtures using V-shape dilatometer. The V{sub m}{sup E} values, for an equimolar composition, vary in the order: benzene>toluene-m-xylene>o-xylene>p-xylene. The V{sub m}{sup E} data have been used to calculate partial molar volumes, excess partial molar volumes, and apparent molar volumes of 1-propanol and aromatic hydrocarbons over the entire range of composition. The excess volume data have also been interpreted in terms of graph-theoretical approach and Prigogine-Flory-Patterson theory (PFP). While PFP theory fails to predict the V{sub m}{sup E} values for systems with s-shaped V{sub m}{sup E} versus x{sub 1} graph, the V{sub m}{sup E} values calculated by graph theory compare reasonably well with the corresponding experimental values. This graph theory analysis has further yielded information about the state of aggregation of pure components as well as of the mixtures.

  14. Decreased left temporal lobe volume of panic patients measured by magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uchida, R.R.; Del-Ben, C.M.; Araujo, D.; Crippa, J.A.; Graeff, F.G. [Sao Paulo Univ., Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil). Dept. de Neurologia e Psicologia Medica]. E-mail: fgraeff@keynet.com.br; Santos, A.C. [Sao Paulo Univ., Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil). Dept. de Clinica Medica; Guimaraes, F.S. [Sao Paulo Univ., Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil). Dept. de Farmacologia

    2003-07-01

    Reported neuroimaging studies have shown functional and morphological changes of temporal lobe structures in panic patients, but only one used a volumetric method. The aim of the present study was to determine the volume of temporal lobe structures in patients with panic disorder, measured by magnetic resonance imaging. Eleven panic patients and eleven controls matched for age, sex, handedness, socioeconomic status and years of education participated in the study. The mean volume of the left temporal lobe of panic patients was 9% smaller than that of controls (t{sub 21} = 2.37, P = 0.028). In addition, there was a trend (P values between 0.05 and 0.10) to smaller volumes of the right temporal lobe (7%, t{sub 21} = 1.99, P = 0.06), right amygdala (8%, t{sub 21} = 1.83, P = 0.08), left amygdala (5%, t{sub 21} = 1.78, P 0.09) and left hippocampus (9%, t{sub 21} = 1.93, P = 0.07) in panic patients compared to controls. There was a positive correlation between left hippocampal volume and duration of panic disorder (r = 0.67, P = 0.025), with recent cases showing more reduction than older cases. The present results show that panic patients have a decreased volume of the left temporal lobe and indicate the presence of volumetric abnormalities of temporal lobe structures. (author)

  15. Measurement and correlation of excess molar volumes for mixtures of 1-propanol and aromatic hydrocarbons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gahlyan, Suman; Rani, Manju; Maken, Sanjeev Kumar; Lee, Inkyu; Moon, Il

    2015-01-01

    Excess molar volumes (V m E ) have been measured at 303.15 K for 1-propanol+benzene or toluene or o- or m- or p-xylene mixtures using V-shape dilatometer. The V m E values, for an equimolar composition, vary in the order: benzene>toluene-m-xylene>o-xylene>p-xylene. The V m E data have been used to calculate partial molar volumes, excess partial molar volumes, and apparent molar volumes of 1-propanol and aromatic hydrocarbons over the entire range of composition. The excess volume data have also been interpreted in terms of graph-theoretical approach and Prigogine-Flory-Patterson theory (PFP). While PFP theory fails to predict the V m E values for systems with s-shaped V m E versus x 1 graph, the V m E values calculated by graph theory compare reasonably well with the corresponding experimental values. This graph theory analysis has further yielded information about the state of aggregation of pure components as well as of the mixtures

  16. Decreased left temporal lobe volume of panic patients measured by magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uchida, R.R.; Del-Ben, C.M.; Araujo, D.; Crippa, J.A.; Graeff, F.G.; Santos, A.C.; Guimaraes, F.S.

    2003-01-01

    Reported neuroimaging studies have shown functional and morphological changes of temporal lobe structures in panic patients, but only one used a volumetric method. The aim of the present study was to determine the volume of temporal lobe structures in patients with panic disorder, measured by magnetic resonance imaging. Eleven panic patients and eleven controls matched for age, sex, handedness, socioeconomic status and years of education participated in the study. The mean volume of the left temporal lobe of panic patients was 9% smaller than that of controls (t 21 = 2.37, P = 0.028). In addition, there was a trend (P values between 0.05 and 0.10) to smaller volumes of the right temporal lobe (7%, t 21 = 1.99, P = 0.06), right amygdala (8%, t 21 = 1.83, P = 0.08), left amygdala (5%, t 21 = 1.78, P 0.09) and left hippocampus (9%, t 21 = 1.93, P = 0.07) in panic patients compared to controls. There was a positive correlation between left hippocampal volume and duration of panic disorder (r = 0.67, P = 0.025), with recent cases showing more reduction than older cases. The present results show that panic patients have a decreased volume of the left temporal lobe and indicate the presence of volumetric abnormalities of temporal lobe structures. (author)

  17. Device to investigate samples by means of flameless atomic absorption measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sperling, K.R.

    1977-01-01

    An improvement on a device to investigate samples by means of flameless atomic absorption measurement is suggested in which one aims to produce a most complete possible atomic clond from the sample to be investigated within the sample space defined by the beam bundle, through which the measuring beam bundle is passed. According to the invention, the tubular sample space should be closed by an optically penetrable window on one side. (RW) [de

  18. Saturation and porosity measurements of different soil samples by gamma ray transmission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akbal, S.; Filiz Baytas, A.

    2000-01-01

    Gamma-ray transmission methods have been used accurately for the study of the properties of soil samples. In this study, the soil samples were collected from various regions of Turkey and a Nal (TI) detector measured the attenuation of strongly collimated monoenergetic gamma beam (from Cs-137) through soil samples. The water saturation and porosity were therefore calculated from the transmission measurements for each soil sample. (authors)

  19. Analysis of plant hormones by microemulsion electrokinetic capillary chromatography coupled with on-line large volume sample stacking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zongbao; Lin, Zian; Zhang, Lin; Cai, Yan; Zhang, Lan

    2012-04-07

    A novel method of microemulsion electrokinetic capillary chromatography (MEEKC) coupled with on-line large volume sample stacking was developed for the analysis of six plant hormones including indole-3-acetic acid, indole-3-butyric acid, indole-3-propionic acid, 1-naphthaleneacetic acid, abscisic acid and salicylic acid. Baseline separation of six plant hormones was achieved within 10 min by using the microemulsion background electrolyte containing a 97.2% (w/w) 10 mM borate buffer at pH 9.2, 1.0% (w/w) ethyl acetate as oil droplets, 0.6% (w/w) sodium dodecyl sulphate as surfactant and 1.2% (w/w) 1-butanol as cosurfactant. In addition, an on-line concentration method based on a large volume sample stacking technique and multiple wavelength detection was adopted for improving the detection sensitivity in order to determine trace level hormones in a real sample. The optimal method provided about 50-100 fold increase in detection sensitivity compared with a single MEEKC method, and the detection limits (S/N = 3) were between 0.005 and 0.02 μg mL(-1). The proposed method was simple, rapid and sensitive and could be applied to the determination of six plant hormones in spiked water samples, tobacco leaves and 1-naphthylacetic acid in leaf fertilizer. The recoveries ranged from 76.0% to 119.1%, and good reproducibilities were obtained with relative standard deviations (RSDs) less than 6.6%.

  20. Green Ocean Amazon 2014/15 High-Volume Filter Sampling: Atmospheric Particulate Matter of an Amazon Tropical City and its Relationship to Population Health Field Campaign Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Machado, C. M. [Federal Univ. of Amazonas (Brazil); Santos, Erickson O. [Federal Univ. of Amazonas (Brazil); Fernandes, Karenn S. [Federal Univ. of Amazonas (Brazil); Neto, J. L. [Federal Univ. of Amazonas (Brazil); Souza, Rodrigo A. [Univ. of the State of Amazonas (Brazil)

    2016-08-01

    Manaus, the capital of the Brazilian state of Amazonas, is developing very rapidly. Its pollution plume contains aerosols from fossil fuel combustion mainly due to vehicular emission, industrial activity, and a thermal power plant. Soil resuspension is probably a secondary source of atmospheric particles. The plume transports from Manaus to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility ARM site at Manacapuru urban pollutants as well as pollutants from pottery factories along the route of the plume. Considering the effects of particulate matter on health, atmospheric particulate matter was evaluated at this site as part of the ARM Facility’s Green Ocean Amazon 2014/15 (GoAmazon 2014/15) field campaign. Aerosol or particulate matter (PM) is typically defined by size, with the smaller particles having more health impact. Total suspended particulate (TSP) are particles smaller than 100 μm; particles smaller than 2.5 μm are called PM2.5. In this work, the PM2.5 levels were obtained from March to December of 2015, totaling 34 samples and TSP levels from October to December of 2015, totaling 17 samples. Sampling was conducted with PM2.5 and TSP high-volume samplers using quartz filters (Figure 1). Filters were stored during 24 hours in a room with temperature (21,1ºC) and humidity (44,3 %) control, in order to do gravimetric analyses by weighing before and after sampling. This procedure followed the recommendations of the Brazilian Association for Technical Standards local norm (NBR 9547:1997). Mass concentrations of particulate matter were obtained from the ratio between the weighted sample and the volume of air collected. Defining a relationship between particulate matter (PM2.5 and TSP) and respiratory diseases of the local population is an important goal of this project, since no information exists on that topic.

  1. Liquid-chromatographic analysis for cyclosporine with use of a microbore column and small sample volume.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annesley, T; Matz, K; Balogh, L; Clayton, L; Giacherio, D

    1986-07-01

    This liquid-chromatographic assay requires 0.2 to 0.5 mL of whole blood, avoids the use of diethyl ether, and consumes only 10 to 20% of the solvents used in prior methods. Sample preparation involves an acidic extraction with methyl-t-butyl ether, performed in a 13 X 100 mm disposable glass tube, then a short second extraction of the organic phase with sodium hydroxide. After evaporation of the methyl-t-butyl ether, chromatography is performed on an "Astec" 2.0-mm (i.d.) octyl column. We compared results by this procedure with those by use of earlier larger-scale extractions and their respective 4.6-mm (i.d.) columns; analytical recoveries of cyclosporins A and D were comparable with previous findings and results for patients' specimens were equivalent, but the microbore columns provided greatly increased resolution and sensitivity.

  2. Method of estimating maximum VOC concentration in void volume of vented waste drums using limited sampling data: Application in transuranic waste drums

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liekhus, K.J.; Connolly, M.J.

    1995-01-01

    A test program has been conducted at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory to demonstrate that the concentration of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) within the innermost layer of confinement in a vented waste drum can be estimated using a model incorporating diffusion and permeation transport principles as well as limited waste drum sampling data. The model consists of a series of material balance equations describing steady-state VOC transport from each distinct void volume in the drum. The primary model input is the measured drum headspace VOC concentration. Model parameters are determined or estimated based on available process knowledge. The model effectiveness in estimating VOC concentration in the headspace of the innermost layer of confinement was examined for vented waste drums containing different waste types and configurations. This paper summarizes the experimental measurements and model predictions in vented transuranic waste drums containing solidified sludges and solid waste

  3. A contact-free volumetric measurement of facial volume after third molar osteotomy: proof of concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brüllmann, Dan; Jürchott, Lena Marie; John, Christoph; Trempler, Christina; Schwanecke, Ulrich; Schulze, Ralf K W

    2014-01-01

    The present study tested the reliability of an optical scanning device for the objective assessment of postoperative facial swelling. Twenty control subjects bearing a defined volume of water (10-30 mL) in an intraorally carried balloon were tested to assess the measurement accuracy of the device. As a proof of concept, facial volumes of 59 surgical cases were recorded before osteotomy and 1 and 7 days after intervention with the use of a structured light scanner. The median difference between the applied and the measured volumes was 0.67 mL for the control test with the artificial swelling simulated using water balloons. For subjects having third molar osteotomy, extraoral volume increased to 5.29 cm(3) 1 day after surgery (95% CI 5.22-8.52) and decreased to 0.00 mL (95% CI 0.85-2.55) after 7 days. Contact-free visible-light 3-dimensional scanning is reliable for the objective assessment of postoperative facial swelling. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Human cerebral blood volume measurements using dynamic contrast enhancement in comparison to dynamic susceptibility contrast MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Artzi, Moran [Tel Aviv Sourasky Medical Center, Functional Brain Center, The Wohl Institute for Advanced Imaging, Tel Aviv (Israel); Tel Aviv University, Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv (Israel); Liberman, Gilad; Vitinshtein, Faina; Aizenstein, Orna [Tel Aviv Sourasky Medical Center, Functional Brain Center, The Wohl Institute for Advanced Imaging, Tel Aviv (Israel); Nadav, Guy [Tel Aviv Sourasky Medical Center, Functional Brain Center, The Wohl Institute for Advanced Imaging, Tel Aviv (Israel); Tel Aviv University, Faculty of Engineering, Tel Aviv (Israel); Blumenthal, Deborah T.; Bokstein, Felix [Tel Aviv Sourasky Medical Center, Neuro-Oncology Service, Tel Aviv (Israel); Bashat, Dafna Ben [Tel Aviv Sourasky Medical Center, Functional Brain Center, The Wohl Institute for Advanced Imaging, Tel Aviv (Israel); Tel Aviv University, Sackler Faculty of Medicine and Sagol School of Neuroscience, Tel Aviv (Israel)

    2015-07-15

    Cerebral blood volume (CBV) is an important parameter for the assessment of brain tumors, usually obtained using dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC) MRI. However, this method often suffers from low spatial resolution and high sensitivity to susceptibility artifacts and usually does not take into account the effect of tissue permeability. The plasma volume (v{sub p}) can also be extracted from dynamic contrast enhancement (DCE) MRI. The aim of this study was to investigate whether DCE can be used for the measurement of cerebral blood volume in place of DSC for the assessment of patients with brain tumors. Twenty-eight subjects (17 healthy subjects and 11 patients with glioblastoma) were scanned using DCE and DSC. v{sub p} and CBV values were measured and compared in different brain components in healthy subjects and in the tumor area in patients. Significant high correlations were detected between v{sub p} and CBV in healthy subjects in the different brain components; white matter, gray matter, and arteries, correlating with the known increased tissue vascularity, and within the tumor area in patients. This work proposes the use of DCE as an alternative method to DSC for the assessment of blood volume, given the advantages of its higher spatial resolution, its lower sensitivity to susceptibility artifacts, and its ability to provide additional information regarding tissue permeability. (orig.)

  5. Measurement of thyroid volume, iodine concentration and total iodine content by CT and its clinical significance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakaji, Shunsuke; Imanishi, Yoshimasa; Okamoto, Kyouko; Shinagawa, Toshihito

    2007-01-01

    Recently, Imanishi et al have developed new CT software for quantitative in vivo measurement of thyroid iodine. Using a CT system with the software, we measured volume, iodine concentration and total iodine content of thyroids in 63 controls and 435 patients with various diffuse thyroid diseases and thyroid nodules. In controls, all of them showed no difference between the sexes. Although the iodine concentration of the thyroid showed no difference among children, adults and seniles, the volume and total iodine content of the thyroid appeared smaller in children and seniles than in adults. In addition, although the volume and iodine concentration of the thyroid had two peaks in distribution, the total iodine content had almost normal distribution. Normal range of volume, iodine concentration and total iodine content in adults were 5.2-15.5 cm 3 , 0.28831-0.85919 mg/cm 3 and 2.35-11.69 mg, respectively. In thyroid nodule, there is no significant difference in volume, iodine concentration and total iodine content between benign and malignant nodules. All nodules with iodine concentration of less than 0.00007 mg/cm 3 were benign. No thyroid was higher in iodine concentration than the normal range although the thyroid was lower in 78.7% of patients with diffuse thyroid diseases. In all thyroids with increasing iodine concentration and total iodine content in medication course, thyroidal symptoms and signs were uncontrollable by the medication. In 43.8% of patients with long-period systemic diseases, the thyroid showed abnormality in any of the three. We concluded that quantitative in vivo measurement of thyroid iodine by CT could assist the diagnosis of thyroid diseases and decision of therapeutic methods. (author)

  6. Fetal lung volume measurement by MRI with high-speed imaging systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osada, Hisao; Kaku, Kenshi [Chiba Univ. (Japan). Hospital

    2002-08-01

    Although ultrasonography is widely used for fetal morphologic observation, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has gained popularity as a new prenatal diagnostic method with recent introduction of high-speed imaging systems. Infants with lung hypoplasia affecting respiratory function require intensive management starting immediately after birth. Therefore, accurate prenatal differential diagnosis and severity evaluation are extremely important for these fetuses. The aim of this study is to measure fetal lung volume using a computer-based, three-dimensional MRI imaging system and to evaluate the possibility of clinical applications of this procedure. A total of 96 fetuses were evaluated, all were morphologically abnormal, and MRI was done for advanced assessment from 24 to 39 weeks gestation. Three-directional views of fetal chest were imaged by Signa Horizon, 1.5 Tesla, version 5.6 (General Electronics) with the following conditions; coil: TORSO coil, sequence: SSFSE (single shot fast spin echo), slice thickness: 5 mm, and imaging speed: 2 seconds/slice. To calculate the lung volume and create three-dimensional image, the lung area in each slice was traced out, then multiplied using computer image processing. Simultaneously, the volumes of all slices were summed to give the volume of each lung. Linear regression analysis and analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) were used for statistical analyses. In all cases, clear images were obtained, and were adequate for three-dimensional evaluation of the fetal lung. Thirty-five fetuses had poor outcomes, such as intrauterine fetal death, neonatal death, and intensive respiratory care. Regression lines of lung volume versus gestational week were calculated for these fetuses with poor outcome and 61 other fetuses with good outcome. ANCOVA, with gestational week as a covariant, revealed a significant intergroup difference in the lung volume (p<0.001). Similarly, regression lines of lung volume versus fetal body weight estimated by

  7. A framework to measure myocardial extracellular volume fraction using dual-phase low dose CT images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Yixun; Summers, Ronald M.; Yao, Jianhua; Liu, Songtao; Sibley, Christopher T.; Bluemke, David A.; Nacif, Marcelo S.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Myocardial extracellular volume fraction (ECVF) is a surrogate imaging biomarker of diffuse myocardial fibrosis, a hallmark of pathologic ventricular remodeling. Low dose cardiac CT is emerging as a promising modality to detect diffuse interstitial myocardial fibrosis due to its fast acquisition and low radiation; however, the insufficient contrast in the low dose CT images poses great challenge to measure ECVF from the image. Methods: To deal with this difficulty, the authors present a complete ECVF measurement framework including a point-guided myocardial modeling, a deformable model-based myocardium segmentation, nonrigid registration of pre- and post-CT, and ECVF calculation. Results: The proposed method was evaluated on 20 patients by two observers. Compared to the manually delineated reference segmentations, the accuracy of our segmentation in terms of true positive volume fraction (TPVF), false positive volume fraction (FPVF), and average surface distance (ASD), were 92.18% ± 3.52%, 0.31% ± 0.10%, 0.69 ± 0.14 mm, respectively. The interobserver variability measured by concordance correlation coefficient regarding TPVF, FPVF, and ASD were 0.95, 0.90, 0.94, respectively, demonstrating excellent agreement. Bland-Altman method showed 95% limits of agreement between ECVF at CT and ECVF at MR. Conclusions: The proposed framework demonstrates its efficiency, accuracy, and noninvasiveness in ECVF measurement and dramatically advances the ECVF at cardiac CT toward its clinical use

  8. Portal blood flow volume measurement in schistosomal patients: evaluation of Doppler ultrasonography reproducibility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leao, Alberto Ribeiro de Souza; Santos, Jose Eduardo Mourao; Moulin, Danilo Sales; Shigueoka, David Carlos; D'Ippolito, Giuseppe; Colleoni, Ramiro

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the reproducibility of Doppler ultrasonography in the measurement of portal blood flow volume in schistosomal patients. Materials and methods: Prospective, transversal, observational and self-paired study evaluating 21 patients with hepatosplenic schistosomiasis submitted to Doppler ultrasonography performed by three independent observers for measurement of portal blood flow. Pairwise interobserver agreement was calculated by means of the intraclass correlation coefficient, paired t-test and Pearson's correlation coefficient. Results: Interobserver agreement was excellent. Intraclass correlation ranged from 80.6% to 93.0% (IC at 95% [65.3% ; 95.8%]), with the Pearson's correlation coefficient ranging between 81.6% and 92.7% with no statistically significant interobserver difference regarding the mean portal blood flow volume measured by Doppler ultrasonography (p = 0.954 / 0.758 / 0.749). Conclusion: Doppler ultrasonography has demonstrated to be a reliable method for measuring the portal blood flow volume in patients with portal hypertension secondary to schistosomiasis, with a good interobserver agreement. (author)

  9. A framework to measure myocardial extracellular volume fraction using dual-phase low dose CT images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Yixun; Summers, Ronald M.; Yao, Jianhua, E-mail: JYao@cc.nih.gov [Clinical Image Processing Service, Radiology and Imaging Sciences, NIH Clinical Center, Bethesda, Maryland 20892 (United States); Liu, Songtao; Sibley, Christopher T.; Bluemke, David A. [Radiology and Imaging Sciences, NIH Clinical Center, Bethesda, Maryland 20892-1182 and Molecular Biomedical Imaging Laboratory, National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering, NIH Clinical Center, Bethesda, Maryland 20892 (United States); Nacif, Marcelo S. [Radiology and Imaging Sciences, NIH Clinical Center, Bethesda, Maryland 20892-1182 (United States)

    2013-10-15

    Purpose: Myocardial extracellular volume fraction (ECVF) is a surrogate imaging biomarker of diffuse myocardial fibrosis, a hallmark of pathologic ventricular remodeling. Low dose cardiac CT is emerging as a promising modality to detect diffuse interstitial myocardial fibrosis due to its fast acquisition and low radiation; however, the insufficient contrast in the low dose CT images poses great challenge to measure ECVF from the image. Methods: To deal with this difficulty, the authors present a complete ECVF measurement framework including a point-guided myocardial modeling, a deformable model-based myocardium segmentation, nonrigid registration of pre- and post-CT, and ECVF calculation. Results: The proposed method was evaluated on 20 patients by two observers. Compared to the manually delineated reference segmentations, the accuracy of our segmentation in terms of true positive volume fraction (TPVF), false positive volume fraction (FPVF), and average surface distance (ASD), were 92.18% ± 3.52%, 0.31% ± 0.10%, 0.69 ± 0.14 mm, respectively. The interobserver variability measured by concordance correlation coefficient regarding TPVF, FPVF, and ASD were 0.95, 0.90, 0.94, respectively, demonstrating excellent agreement. Bland-Altman method showed 95% limits of agreement between ECVF at CT and ECVF at MR. Conclusions: The proposed framework demonstrates its efficiency, accuracy, and noninvasiveness in ECVF measurement and dramatically advances the ECVF at cardiac CT toward its clinical use.

  10. Portal blood flow volume measurement in schistosomal patients: evaluation of Doppler ultrasonography reproducibility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leao, Alberto Ribeiro de Souza; Santos, Jose Eduardo Mourao; Moulin, Danilo Sales; Shigueoka, David Carlos; D' Ippolito, Giuseppe [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (UNIFESP/EPM), SP (Brazil). Escola Paulista de Medicina. Dept. de Diagnostico por Imagem]. E-mail: ar.leao@uol.com.br; Colleoni, Ramiro [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (UNIFESP/EPM), SP (Brazil). Escola Paulista de Medicina. Dept. de Gastroenterologia

    2008-09-15

    Objective: To evaluate the reproducibility of Doppler ultrasonography in the measurement of portal blood flow volume in schistosomal patients. Materials and methods: Prospective, transversal, observational and self-paired study evaluating 21 patients with hepatosplenic schistosomiasis submitted to Doppler ultrasonography performed by three independent observers for measurement of portal blood flow. Pairwise interobserver agreement was calculated by means of the intraclass correlation coefficient, paired t-test and Pearson's correlation coefficient. Results: Interobserver agreement was excellent. Intraclass correlation ranged from 80.6% to 93.0% (IC at 95% [65.3% ; 95.8%]), with the Pearson's correlation coefficient ranging between 81.6% and 92.7% with no statistically significant interobserver difference regarding the mean portal blood flow volume measured by Doppler ultrasonography (p = 0.954 / 0.758 / 0.749). Conclusion: Doppler ultrasonography has demonstrated to be a reliable method for measuring the portal blood flow volume in patients with portal hypertension secondary to schistosomiasis, with a good interobserver agreement. (author)

  11. A comparative study of linear measurement of the brain and three-dimensional measurement of brain volume using CT scans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamano, K.; Iwasaki, N.; Takeya, T.; Takita, H.

    1993-01-01

    Parameters of linear measurement were compared with actual brain volume to assess the significance of linear measurements as indices of atrophy in 31 neurologically normal children and 22 neurologically abnormal children. Brain volume was established by means of an image-analyzing system using contiguous CT scans. The parameters or indices estimated were: (1) the maximum transverse width of both hemispheres, (2) the maximum longitudinal length of both hemispheres, (3) the maximum frontal subarachnoid space, (4) the maximum width of the interhemispheric fissure, (5) the maximum width of the Sylvian fissure, (6) Evans' ratio, (7) the maximum width of the third ventricle, (8) the cella media index, (9) the maximum width of the fourth ventricle. In neurologically normal children, the maximum transverse width of both hemispheres, the maximum longitudinal length of both hemispheres, the maximum width of the interhemispheric fissure and the maximum width of the Sylvian fissure correlated significantly with the combined volume (CV) of both hemipheres and basal ganglia. In particular, the maximum transverse width of both hemispheres and the maximum longitudinal length of both hemispheres had a high correlation. In neurologically abnormal children the maximum transverse width of both hemispheres and the maximum width of the interhemispheric fissure were significantly correlated with the CV of both hemispheres and basal ganglia. (orig.)

  12. Analysis of Three Compounds in Flos Farfarae by Capillary Electrophoresis with Large-Volume Sample Stacking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hai-xia Yu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to develop a method combining an online concentration and high-efficiency capillary electrophoresis separation to analyze and detect three compounds (rutin, hyperoside, and chlorogenic acid in Flos Farfarae. In order to get good resolution and enrichment, several parameters such as the choice of running buffer, pH and concentration of the running buffer, organic modifier, temperature, and separation voltage were all investigated. The optimized conditions were obtained as follows: the buffer of 40 mM NaH2P04-40 mM Borax-30% v/v methanol (pH 9.0; the sample hydrodynamic injection of up to 4 s at 0.5 psi; 20 kV applied voltage. The diode-array detector was used, and the detection wavelength was 364 nm. Based on peak area, higher levels of selective and sensitive improvements in analysis were observed and about 14-, 26-, and 5-fold enrichment of rutin, hyperoside, and chlorogenic acid were achieved, respectively. This method was successfully applied to determine the three compounds in Flos Farfarae. The linear curve of peak response versus concentration was from 20 to 400 µg/ml, 16.5 to 330 µg/mL, and 25 to 500 µg/mL, respectively. The regression coefficients were 0.9998, 0.9999, and 0.9991, respectively.

  13. Model-based segmentation in orbital volume measurement with cone beam computed tomography and evaluation against current concepts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Maximilian E H; Gellrich, Nils-Claudius; Friese, Karl-Ingo; Becker, Matthias; Wolter, Franz-Erich; Lichtenstein, Juergen T; Stoetzer, Marcus; Rana, Majeed; Essig, Harald

    2016-01-01

    Objective determination of the orbital volume is important in the diagnostic process and in evaluating the efficacy of medical and/or surgical treatment of orbital diseases. Tools designed to measure orbital volume with computed tomography (CT) often cannot be used with cone beam CT (CBCT) because of inferior tissue representation, although CBCT has the benefit of greater availability and lower patient radiation exposure. Therefore, a model-based segmentation technique is presented as a new method for measuring orbital volume and compared to alternative techniques. Both eyes from thirty subjects with no known orbital pathology who had undergone CBCT as a part of routine care were evaluated (n = 60 eyes). Orbital volume was measured with manual, atlas-based, and model-based segmentation methods. Volume measurements, volume determination time, and usability were compared between the three methods. Differences in means were tested for statistical significance using two-tailed Student's t tests. Neither atlas-based (26.63 ± 3.15 mm(3)) nor model-based (26.87 ± 2.99 mm(3)) measurements were significantly different from manual volume measurements (26.65 ± 4.0 mm(3)). However, the time required to determine orbital volume was significantly longer for manual measurements (10.24 ± 1.21 min) than for atlas-based (6.96 ± 2.62 min, p < 0.001) or model-based (5.73 ± 1.12 min, p < 0.001) measurements. All three orbital volume measurement methods examined can accurately measure orbital volume, although atlas-based and model-based methods seem to be more user-friendly and less time-consuming. The new model-based technique achieves fully automated segmentation results, whereas all atlas-based segmentations at least required manipulations to the anterior closing. Additionally, model-based segmentation can provide reliable orbital volume measurements when CT image quality is poor.

  14. Extended two-photon microscopy in live samples with Bessel beams: steadier focus, faster volume scans, and simpler stereoscopic imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thériault, Gabrielle; Cottet, Martin; Castonguay, Annie; McCarthy, Nathalie; De Koninck, Yves

    2014-01-01

    Two-photon microscopy has revolutionized functional cellular imaging in tissue, but although the highly confined depth of field (DOF) of standard set-ups yields great optical sectioning, it also limits imaging speed in volume samples and ease of use. For this reason, we recently presented a simple and retrofittable modification to the two-photon laser-scanning microscope which extends the DOF through the use of an axicon (conical lens). Here we demonstrate three significant benefits of this technique using biological samples commonly employed in the field of neuroscience. First, we use a sample of neurons grown in culture and move it along the z-axis, showing that a more stable focus is achieved without compromise on transverse resolution. Second, we monitor 3D population dynamics in an acute slice of live mouse cortex, demonstrating that faster volumetric scans can be conducted. Third, we acquire a stereoscopic image of neurons and their dendrites in a fixed sample of mouse cortex, using only two scans instead of the complete stack and calculations required by standard systems. Taken together, these advantages, combined with the ease of integration into pre-existing systems, make the extended depth-of-field imaging based on Bessel beams a strong asset for the field of microscopy and life sciences in general.

  15. Volume Measurement Algorithm for Food Product with Irregular Shape using Computer Vision based on Monte Carlo Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joko Siswantoro

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Volume is one of important issues in the production and processing of food product. Traditionally, volume measurement can be performed using water displacement method based on Archimedes’ principle. Water displacement method is inaccurate and considered as destructive method. Computer vision offers an accurate and nondestructive method in measuring volume of food product. This paper proposes algorithm for volume measurement of irregular shape food product using computer vision based on Monte Carlo method. Five images of object were acquired from five different views and then processed to obtain the silhouettes of object. From the silhouettes of object, Monte Carlo method was performed to approximate the volume of object. The simulation result shows that the algorithm produced high accuracy and precision for volume measurement.

  16. The X-Ray Weakness of GPS Radio Galaxies: A Volume-Limited Complete Sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mushotzky, Richard F. (Technical Monitor); Siemiginowska, Aneta (Principal Investigator)

    2004-01-01

    The XMM observations of Mkn 668 have been analyzed. We found soft X-ray signatures of a hot plasma (kT approximately 10^7 approximately K) and a hard X-ray emission from the nucleus. The X-ray spectrum above 2.5 approximately keV is characterized by a very flat (observed photon index, Gamma approximately 0.5) power-law continuum, alongside with a strong Fe-K-alpha neutral iron fluorescent line (EW approximately 600 approximately eV). The best explanation for the origin of this high energy X-ray emission is in terms of the Compton-reflection of the nuclear emission. The primary X-ray emission is obscured by a Compton-thick (N_H approximately 10^24 approximately cm-2) matter which becomes transparent at higher energies. The observed above 2.5-keV X-rays are mostly due to reflection which is indicated by a strong Fe-K-alpha line. This represents the second hard X-ray detection of the GPS galaxy ever (the first one being 1345+125; O Dea et al. 2000). Interestingly, the both such trend is confirmed by our on going XMM-Newton observations of a larger GPS sample, it would lead us to looking into the question on how the dense nuclear environment impacts the nature and evolution of a GPS source, and more generally, on the history of radio power in the universe. The paper summarizing the results has been submitted to Astronomy and Astrophysics in December 2003.

  17. Stroke Volume estimation using aortic pressure measurements and aortic cross sectional area: Proof of concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamoi, S; Pretty, C G; Chiew, Y S; Pironet, A; Davidson, S; Desaive, T; Shaw, G M; Chase, J G

    2015-08-01

    Accurate Stroke Volume (SV) monitoring is essential for patient with cardiovascular dysfunction patients. However, direct SV measurements are not clinically feasible due to the highly invasive nature of measurement devices. Current devices for indirect monitoring of SV are shown to be inaccurate during sudden hemodynamic changes. This paper presents a novel SV estimation using readily available aortic pressure measurements and aortic cross sectional area, using data from a porcine experiment where medical interventions such as fluid replacement, dobutamine infusions, and recruitment maneuvers induced SV changes in a pig with circulatory shock. Measurement of left ventricular volume, proximal aortic pressure, and descending aortic pressure waveforms were made simultaneously during the experiment. From measured data, proximal aortic pressure was separated into reservoir and excess pressures. Beat-to-beat aortic characteristic impedance values were calculated using both aortic pressure measurements and an estimate of the aortic cross sectional area. SV was estimated using the calculated aortic characteristic impedance and excess component of the proximal aorta. The median difference between directly measured SV and estimated SV was -1.4ml with 95% limit of agreement +/- 6.6ml. This method demonstrates that SV can be accurately captured beat-to-beat during sudden changes in hemodynamic state. This novel SV estimation could enable improved cardiac and circulatory treatment in the critical care environment by titrating treatment to the effect on SV.

  18. Fluid Vessel Quantity using Non-Invasive PZT Technology Flight Volume Measurements Under Zero G Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garofalo, Anthony A.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the project is to perform analysis of data using the Systems Engineering Educational Discovery (SEED) program data from 2011 and 2012 Fluid Vessel Quantity using Non-Invasive PZT Technology flight volume measurements under Zero G conditions (parabolic Plane flight data). Also experimental planning and lab work for future sub-orbital experiments to use the NASA PZT technology for fluid volume measurement. Along with conducting data analysis of flight data, I also did a variety of other tasks. I provided the lab with detailed technical drawings, experimented with 3d printers, made changes to the liquid nitrogen skid schematics, and learned how to weld. I also programmed microcontrollers to interact with various sensors and helped with other things going on around the lab.

  19. Analysis of Fringe Field Formed Inside LDA Measurement Volume Using Compact Two Hololens Imaging Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Abhijit; Nirala, A. K.; Yadav, H. L.

    2018-03-01

    We have designed and fabricated four LDA optical setups consisting of aberration compensated four different compact two hololens imaging systems. We have experimentally investigated and realized a hololens recording geometry which is interferogram of converging spherical wavefront with mutually coherent planar wavefront. Proposed real time monitoring and actual fringe field analysis techniques allow complete characterizations of fringes formed at measurement volume and permit to evaluate beam quality, alignment and fringe uniformity with greater precision. After experimentally analyzing the fringes formed at measurement volume by all four imaging systems, it is found that fringes obtained using compact two hololens imaging systems get improved both qualitatively and quantitatively compared to that obtained using conventional imaging system. Results indicate qualitative improvement of non-uniformity in fringe thickness and micro intensity variations perpendicular to the fringes, and quantitative improvement of 39.25% in overall average normalized standard deviations of fringe width formed by compact two hololens imaging systems compare to that of conventional imaging system.

  20. Measurement of Atmospheric Neutrino Oscillations with Very Large Volume Neutrino Telescopes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. P. Yáñez

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Neutrino oscillations have been probed during the last few decades using multiple neutrino sources and experimental set-ups. In the recent years, very large volume neutrino telescopes have started contributing to the field. First ANTARES and then IceCube have relied on large and sparsely instrumented volumes to observe atmospheric neutrinos for combinations of baselines and energies inaccessible to other experiments. Using this advantage, the latest result from IceCube starts approaching the precision of other established technologies and is paving the way for future detectors, such as ORCA and PINGU. These new projects seek to provide better measurements of neutrino oscillation parameters and eventually determine the neutrino mass ordering. The results from running experiments and the potential from proposed projects are discussed in this review, emphasizing the experimental challenges involved in the measurements.

  1. In-line gas chromatographic apparatus for measuring the hydrophobic micropore volume (HMV) and contaminant transformation in mineral micropores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng Hefa; Reinhard, Martin

    2010-01-01

    Desorption of hydrophobic organic compounds from micropores is characteristically slow compared to surface adsorption and partitioning. The slow-desorbing mass of a hydrophobic probe molecule can be used to calculate the hydrophobic micropore volume (HMV) of microporous solids. A gas chromatographic apparatus is described that allows characterization of the sorbed mass with respect to the desorption rate. The method is demonstrated using a dealuminated zeolite and an aquifer sand as the model and reference sorbents, respectively, and trichloroethylene (TCE) as the probe molecule. A glass column packed with the microporous sorbent is coupled directly to a gas chromatograph that is equipped with flame ionization and electron capture detectors. Sorption and desorption of TCE on the sorbent was measured by sampling the influent and effluent of the column using a combination of switching and injection valves. For geosorbents, the HMV is quantified based on Gurvitsch's rule from the mass of TCE desorbed at a rate that is characteristic for micropores. Instrumental requirements, design considerations, hardware details, detector calibration, performance, and data analysis are discussed along with applications. The method is novel and complements traditional vacuum gravimetric and piezometric techniques, which quantify the total pore volume under vacuum conditions. The HMV is more relevant than the total micropore volume for predicting the fate and transport of organic contaminants in the subsurface. Sorption in hydrophobic micropores strongly impacts the mobility of organic contaminants, and their chemical and biological transformations. The apparatus can serve as a tool for characterizing microprous solids and investigating contaminant-solid interactions.

  2. Metabolic tumour volumes measured at staging in lymphoma: methodological evaluation on phantom experiments and patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meignan, Michel [Hopital Henri Mondor and Paris-Est University, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Creteil (France); Paris-Est University, Service de Medecine Nucleaire, EAC CNRS 7054, Hopital Henri Mondor AP-HP, Creteil (France); Sasanelli, Myriam; Itti, Emmanuel [Hopital Henri Mondor and Paris-Est University, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Creteil (France); Casasnovas, Rene Olivier [CHU Le Bocage, Department of Hematology, Dijon (France); Luminari, Stefano [University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Department of Diagnostic, Clinic and Public Health Medicine, Modena (Italy); Fioroni, Federica [Santa Maria Nuova Hospital-IRCCS, Department of Medical Physics, Reggio Emilia (Italy); Coriani, Chiara [Santa Maria Nuova Hospital-IRCCS, Department of Radiology, Reggio Emilia (Italy); Masset, Helene [Henri Mondor Hospital, Department of Radiophysics, Creteil (France); Gobbi, Paolo G. [University of Pavia, Department of Internal Medicine and Gastroenterology, Fondazione IRCCS Policlinico San Matteo, Pavia (Italy); Merli, Francesco [Santa Maria Nuova Hospital-IRCCS, Department of Hematology, Reggio Emilia (Italy); Versari, Annibale [Santa Maria Nuova Hospital-IRCCS, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Reggio Emilia (Italy)

    2014-06-15

    The presence of a bulky tumour at staging on CT is an independent prognostic factor in malignant lymphomas. However, its prognostic value is limited in diffuse disease. Total metabolic tumour volume (TMTV) determined on {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT could give a better evaluation of the total tumour burden and may help patient stratification. Different methods of TMTV measurement established in phantoms simulating lymphoma tumours were investigated and validated in 40 patients with Hodgkin lymphoma and diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. Data were processed by two nuclear medicine physicians in Reggio Emilia and Creteil. Nineteen phantoms filled with {sup 18}F-saline were scanned; these comprised spherical or irregular volumes from 0.5 to 650 cm{sup 3} with tumour-to-background ratios from 1.65 to 40. Volumes were measured with different SUVmax thresholds. In patients, TMTV was measured on PET at staging by two methods: volumes of individual lesions were measured using a fixed 41 % SUVmax threshold (TMTV{sub 41}) and a variable visually adjusted SUVmax threshold (TMTV{sub var}). In phantoms, the 41 % threshold gave the best concordance between measured and actual volumes. Interobserver agreement was almost perfect. In patients, the agreement between the reviewers for TMTV{sub 41} measurement was substantial (ρ {sub c} = 0.986, CI 0.97 - 0.99) and the difference between the means was not significant (212 ± 218 cm{sup 3} for Creteil vs. 206 ± 219 cm{sup 3} for Reggio Emilia, P = 0.65). By contrast the agreement was poor for TMTV{sub var}. There was a significant direct correlation between TMTV{sub 41} and normalized LDH (r = 0.652, CI 0.42 - 0.8, P <0.001). Higher disease stages and bulky tumour were associated with higher TMTV{sub 41}, but high TMTV{sub 41} could be found in patients with stage 1/2 or nonbulky tumour. Measurement of baseline TMTV in lymphoma using a fixed 41% SUVmax threshold is reproducible and correlates with the other parameters for tumour mass evaluation

  3. Measuring nanocurie quantities of tritium bred in metallic lithium and lithium oxide samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertone, P.C.

    1985-01-01

    The LBM program requires that nanocurie quantities of tritium, bred in both lithium oxide pellets and lithium samples, be measured with an uncertainty not exceeding + or - 6%. Two methods of accurately measuring nanocurie quantities of tritium bred in LBM lithium oxide pellets and one method of accurately measuring nanocurie quantities of tritium bred in lithium samples are described. Potential errors associated with these tritium measurement techniques are also discussed

  4. First Transmitted Hyperspectral Light Measurements and Cloud Properties from Recent Field Campaign Sampling Clouds Under Biomass Burning Aerosol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leblanc, S.; Redemann, Jens; Shinozuka, Yohei; Flynn, Connor J.; Segal Rozenhaimer, Michal; Kacenelenbogen, Meloe Shenandoah; Pistone, Kristina Marie Myers; Schmidt, Sebastian; Cochrane, Sabrina

    2016-01-01

    We present a first view of data collected during a recent field campaign aimed at measuring biomass burning aerosol above clouds from airborne platforms. The NASA ObseRvations of CLouds above Aerosols and their intEractionS (ORACLES) field campaign recently concluded its first deployment sampling clouds and overlying aerosol layer from the airborne platform NASA P3. We present results from the Spectrometer for Sky-Scanning, Sun-Tracking Atmospheric Research (4STAR), in conjunction with the Solar Spectral Flux Radiometers (SSFR). During this deployment, 4STAR sampled transmitted solar light either via direct solar beam measurements and scattered light measurements, enabling the measurement of aerosol optical thickness and the retrieval of information on aerosol particles in addition to overlying cloud properties. We focus on the zenith-viewing scattered light measurements, which are used to retrieve cloud optical thickness, effective radius, and thermodynamic phase of clouds under a biomass burning layer. The biomass burning aerosol layer present above the clouds is the cause of potential bias in retrieved cloud optical depth and effective radius from satellites. We contrast the typical reflection based approach used by satellites to the transmission based approach used by 4STAR during ORACLES for retrieving cloud properties. It is suspected that these differing approaches will yield a change in retrieved properties since light transmitted through clouds is sensitive to a different cloud volume than reflected light at cloud top. We offer a preliminary view of the implications of these differences in sampling volumes to the calculation of cloud radiative effects (CRE).

  5. Sample-size effects in fast-neutron gamma-ray production measurements: solid-cylinder samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, D.L.

    1975-09-01

    The effects of geometry, absorption and multiple scattering in (n,Xγ) reaction measurements with solid-cylinder samples are investigated. Both analytical and Monte-Carlo methods are employed in the analysis. Geometric effects are shown to be relatively insignificant except in definition of the scattering angles. However, absorption and multiple-scattering effects are quite important; accurate microscopic differential cross sections can be extracted from experimental data only after a careful determination of corrections for these processes. The results of measurements performed using several natural iron samples (covering a wide range of sizes) confirm validity of the correction procedures described herein. It is concluded that these procedures are reliable whenever sufficiently accurate neutron and photon cross section and angular distribution information is available for the analysis. (13 figures, 5 tables) (auth)

  6. Brain tissues volume measurements from 2D MRI using parametric approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    L'vov, A. A.; Toropova, O. A.; Litovka, Yu. V.

    2018-04-01

    The purpose of the paper is to propose a fully automated method of volume assessment of structures within human brain. Our statistical approach uses maximum interdependency principle for decision making process of measurements consistency and unequal observations. Detecting outliers performed using maximum normalized residual test. We propose a statistical model which utilizes knowledge of tissues distribution in human brain and applies partial data restoration for precision improvement. The approach proposes completed computationally efficient and independent from segmentation algorithm used in the application.

  7. Know your tools - concordance of different methods for measuring brain volume change after ischemic stroke

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yassi, Nawaf; Campbell, Bruce C.V.; Davis, Stephen M.; Bivard, Andrew [The University of Melbourne, Departments of Medicine and Neurology, Melbourne Brain Centre rate at The Royal Melbourne Hospital, Parkville, Victoria (Australia); Moffat, Bradford A.; Steward, Christopher; Desmond, Patricia M. [The University of Melbourne, Department of Radiology, The Royal Melbourne Hospital, Parkville (Australia); Churilov, Leonid [The University of Melbourne, The Florey Institute of Neurosciences and Mental Health, Parkville (Australia); Parsons, Mark W. [University of Newcastle and Hunter Medical Research Institute, Priority Research Centre for Translational Neuroscience and Mental Health, Newcastle (Australia)

    2015-07-15

    Longitudinal brain volume changes have been investigated in a number of cerebral disorders as a surrogate marker of clinical outcome. In stroke, unique methodological challenges are posed by dynamic structural changes occurring after onset, particularly those relating to the infarct lesion. We aimed to evaluate agreement between different analysis methods for the measurement of post-stroke brain volume change, and to explore technical challenges inherent to these methods. Fifteen patients with anterior circulation stroke underwent magnetic resonance imaging within 1 week of onset and at 1 and 3 months. Whole-brain as well as grey- and white-matter volume were estimated separately using both an intensity-based and a surface watershed-based algorithm. In the case of the intensity-based algorithm, the analysis was also performed with and without exclusion of the infarct lesion. Due to the effects of peri-infarct edema at the baseline scan, longitudinal volume change was measured as percentage change between the 1 and 3-month scans. Intra-class and concordance correlation coefficients were used to assess agreement between the different analysis methods. Reduced major axis regression was used to inspect the nature of bias between measurements. Overall agreement between methods was modest with strong disagreement between some techniques. Measurements were variably impacted by procedures performed to account for infarct lesions. Improvements in volumetric methods and consensus between methodologies employed in different studies are necessary in order to increase the validity of conclusions derived from post-stroke cerebral volumetric studies. Readers should be aware of the potential impact of different methods on study conclusions. (orig.)

  8. Know your tools - concordance of different methods for measuring brain volume change after ischemic stroke

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yassi, Nawaf; Campbell, Bruce C.V.; Davis, Stephen M.; Bivard, Andrew; Moffat, Bradford A.; Steward, Christopher; Desmond, Patricia M.; Churilov, Leonid; Parsons, Mark W.

    2015-01-01

    Longitudinal brain volume changes have been investigated in a number of cerebral disorders as a surrogate marker of clinical outcome. In stroke, unique methodological challenges are posed by dynamic structural changes occurring after onset, particularly those relating to the infarct lesion. We aimed to evaluate agreement between different analysis methods for the measurement of post-stroke brain volume change, and to explore technical challenges inherent to these methods. Fifteen patients with anterior circulation stroke underwent magnetic resonance imaging within 1 week of onset and at 1 and 3 months. Whole-brain as well as grey- and white-matter volume were estimated separately using both an intensity-based and a surface watershed-based algorithm. In the case of the intensity-based algorithm, the analysis was also performed with and without exclusion of the infarct lesion. Due to the effects of peri-infarct edema at the baseline scan, longitudinal volume change was measured as percentage change between the 1 and 3-month scans. Intra-class and concordance correlation coefficients were used to assess agreement between the different analysis methods. Reduced major axis regression was used to inspect the nature of bias between measurements. Overall agreement between methods was modest with strong disagreement between some techniques. Measurements were variably impacted by procedures performed to account for infarct lesions. Improvements in volumetric methods and consensus between methodologies employed in different studies are necessary in order to increase the validity of conclusions derived from post-stroke cerebral volumetric studies. Readers should be aware of the potential impact of different methods on study conclusions. (orig.)

  9. Ultra-trace plutonium determination in small volume seawater by sector field inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry with application to Fukushima seawater samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bu, Wenting; Zheng, Jian; Guo, Qiuju; Aono, Tatsuo; Tagami, Keiko; Uchida, Shigeo; Tazoe, Hirofumi; Yamada, Masatoshi

    2014-04-11

    Long-term monitoring of Pu isotopes in seawater is required for assessing Pu contamination in the marine environment from the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant accident. In this study, we established an accurate and precise analytical method based on anion-exchange chromatography and SF-ICP-MS. This method was able to determine Pu isotopes in seawater samples with small volumes (20-60L). The U decontamination factor was 3×10(7)-1×10(8), which provided sufficient removal of interfering U from the seawater samples. The estimated limits of detection for (239)Pu and (240)Pu were 0.11fgmL(-1) and 0.08fgmL(-1), respectively, which corresponded to 0.01mBqm(-3) for (239)Pu and 0.03mBqm(-3) for (240)Pu when a 20L volume of seawater was measured. We achieved good precision (2.9%) and accuracy (0.8%) for measurement of the (240)Pu/(239)Pu atom ratio in the standard Pu solution with a (239)Pu concentration of 11fgmL(-1) and (240)Pu concentration of 2.7fgmL(-1). Seawater reference materials were used for the method validation and both the (239+240)Pu activities and (240)Pu/(239)Pu atom ratios agreed well with the expected values. Surface and bottom seawater samples collected off Fukushima in the western North Pacific since March 2011 were analyzed. Our results suggested that there was no significant variation of the Pu distribution in seawater in the investigated areas compared to the distribution before the accident. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Volume measurement of the horizontal extraocular muscles using magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishida, Yasuhiro; Hayashi, Osamu; Nishida, Eri; Murata, Toyotaka; Aoki, Yoshiko; Inatomi, Akihiro; Kani, Kazutaka (Shiga Univ. of Medical Science, Otsu (Japan)); Mabuchi, Norihisa; Furutani, Yoshiaki

    1993-07-01

    The volume of the horizontal extraocular muscles of 11 normal adults and three patients with ophthalmoplegia was measured using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The MRI examinations were carried out with a Signa Advantage, 1.5 tesla superconductive magnetic system manufactured by General Electric. This method employs the spin echo technique with a 3.0 mm gapless slice, a 350 ms. repetition time, and a 17.0 ms. echo time. The MRI films were projected and magnified on Kent paper using an overhead projector. Then the shapes of the horizontal extraocular muscles were traced. The volume of the muscles was measured as the total weight of Kent papers which were cut out from muscle shapes in all the slices. The average volume of the normal medial and lateral rectus muscles was 690[+-]87 mm[sup 3] and 734[+-]77 mm[sup 3], respectively. Two cases of peripheral nerve palsy showed typical atrophy of the paretic muscles. A case of orbital myositis showed typical hypertrophy of the inflamed muscles. This measurement may prove useful in the analysis and evaluation of extraocular muscles, especially in ophthalmoplesia.(author).

  11. Volume Recovery of Polymeric Glasses: Application of a Capacitance-based Measurement Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakib, Nazam; Simon, Sindee

    Glasses, including polymeric glasses, are inherently non-equilibrium materials. As a consequence, the volume and enthalpy of a glass evolve towards equilibrium in a process termed structural recovery. Several open questions and new controversies remain unanswered in the field. Specifically, the presence of intermediate plateaus during isothermal structural recovery has been reported in recent enthalpy work. In addition, the dependence of the relaxation time on state variables and thermal history is unclear. Dilatometry is particularly useful for structural recovery studies because volume is an absolute quantity and volumetric measurements can be done in-situ. A capillary dilatometer, fitted with a linear variable differential transducer, was used previously to measure volume recovery of polymeric glass formers in our laboratory. To improve on the limitations associated with that methodology, including competition between the range of measurements versus the sensitivity, a capacitance-based technique has been developed following the work of Richert, 2010. The modification is performed by converting the glass capillary dilatometer into a cylindrical capacitor. For precision in capacitance data acquisition, an Andeen-Hagerling ultra-precision capacitance bridge (2550A, 1 kHz) is used. The setup will be tested by performing the signatures of structural recovery as described by Kovacs, 1963. Experiments are also planned to address the open questions in the field.

  12. Considerations for sampling nuclear materials for SNM accounting measurements. Special nuclear material accountability report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brouns, R.J.; Roberts, F.P.; Upson, U.L.

    1978-05-01

    This report presents principles and guidelines for sampling nuclear materials to measure chemical and isotopic content of the material. Development of sampling plans and procedures that maintain the random and systematic errors of sampling within acceptable limits for SNM(Special Nuclear Materials) accounting purposes are emphasized

  13. Evaluation of a lower-powered analyzer and sampling system for eddy-covariance measurements of nitrous oxide fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Shannon E.; Sargent, Steve; Wagner-Riddle, Claudia

    2018-03-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) fluxes measured using the eddy-covariance method capture the spatial and temporal heterogeneity of N2O emissions. Most closed-path trace-gas analyzers for eddy-covariance measurements have large-volume, multi-pass absorption cells that necessitate high flow rates for ample frequency response, thus requiring high-power sample pumps. Other sampling system components, including rain caps, filters, dryers, and tubing, can also degrade system frequency response. This field trial tested the performance of a closed-path eddy-covariance system for N2O flux measurements with improvements to use less power while maintaining the frequency response. The new system consists of a thermoelectrically cooled tunable diode laser absorption spectrometer configured to measure both N2O and carbon dioxide (CO2). The system features a relatively small, single-pass sample cell (200 mL) that provides good frequency response with a lower-powered pump ( ˜ 250 W). A new filterless intake removes particulates from the sample air stream with no additional mixing volume that could degrade frequency response. A single-tube dryer removes water vapour from the sample to avoid the need for density or spectroscopic corrections, while maintaining frequency response. This eddy-covariance system was collocated with a previous tunable diode laser absorption spectrometer model to compare N2O and CO2 flux measurements for two full growing seasons (May 2015 to October 2016) in a fertilized cornfield in Southern Ontario, Canada. Both spectrometers were placed outdoors at the base of the sampling tower, demonstrating ruggedness for a range of environmental conditions (minimum to maximum daily temperature range: -26.1 to 31.6 °C). The new system rarely required maintenance. An in situ frequency-response test demonstrated that the cutoff frequency of the new system was better than the old system (3.5 Hz compared to 2.30 Hz) and similar to that of a closed-path CO2 eddy-covariance system (4

  14. Measurement of regional extravascular lung density and of pulmonary blood volume with positron emitting isotopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larock, M.P.; Quaglia, L.; Lamotte, D.; De Landsheere, C.; Del Fiore, G.; Chevigne, M.; Peters, J.M.; Rigo, P. (Universite de Liege (Belgium))

    1982-01-01

    Studies of pulmonary blood volume changes with exercise can be performed after labelling of the blood pool by /sup 11/CO inhalation. Positron transaxial tomography permits the quantitative study of density distribution of the chest and of the pulmonary blood volume. This paper represents our preliminary experience with these techniques on models and control patients. We have first verified the linearity of transmission for density distribution below one. The tomographic examination first records a transmission image, then an emission image on the same section. We next normalize emission and transmission values on a region of unit density corresponding to blood: then we substract the emission from the transmission values to measure the extravascular pulmonary density. With crystal probes we record pulmonary blood volume variations before, during and after exercise. Peripheral hemodynamic variations explain the change recorded at the begining and at the end of exercise. Combination of these two techniques should help us to better study the importance of the acute changes in the ''formation'' of pulmonary oedema and its influence on regional pulmonary blood volume.

  15. Clinical evaluation of preoperative measurement of liver volume by CT volumetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Masahiro; Sasaki, Ryoko; Kato, Kenichi

    2003-01-01

    The utility of measuring liver volume by CT volumetry prior to hepatectomy for treatment of hepatobiliary diseases was assessed by investigating the relationship between liver volume and perioperative hepatic function, and some perioperative factors. Both residual liver volume (RLV) and functional residual liver volume rate (%FRLV) had a significant negative correlation with maximum postoperative total bilirubin (T. Bil) (r=-0.318, r=-0.477, respectively). Further, RLV and %FRLV exhibited a negative correlation with length of intensive care unit (ICU) stay (r=-0.297, r=-0.397, respectively). The ratio of patients with maximum postoperative T. Bil≥10 mg/dl among patients with RLV<500 ml was significantly higher than that among patients with RLV≥500 ml (p<0.05). Similarly, the ratio of patients with maximum postoperative T. Bil≥10 mg/dl among patients with %FRLV<40% was significantly higher than that among patients with %FRLV≥40% (p<0.05). Among patients with %FRLV<40%, maximum T. Bil for patients who underwent portal vein embolization (PVE) was significantly lower than that for patients who did not undergo PVE (p<0.05). When performing hepatectomy, the risk of severe postoperative liver failure is low as long as %FRLV and RLV are above 40% and 500 ml, respectively, and PVE is useful for performing extended hepatectomy when %FRLV is <40%. (author)

  16. Relative strengths of the calf muscles based on MRI volume