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Sample records for maximum fusion cross

  1. Maximum neutron yeidls in experimental fusion devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jassby, D.L.

    1979-02-01

    The optimal performances of 12 types of fusion devices are compared with regard to neutron production rate, neutrons per pulse, and fusion energy multiplication, Q/sub p/ (converted to the equivalent value in D-T operation). The record values in all categories are held by the beam-injected tokamak plasma, followed by other beam-target systems. The achieved values of Q/sub p/ for nearly all laboratory plasma fusion devices (magnetically or inertially confined) are found to roughly satisfy a common empirical scaling, Q/sub p/ approx. 10 -6 E/sub in//sup 3/2/, where E/sub in/ is the energy (in kilojoules) injected into the plasma during one or two energy confinement times, or the total energy delivered to the target for inertially confined systems. Fusion energy break-even (Q/sub p/ = 1) in any system apparently requires E/sub in/ approx. 10,000 kJ

  2. Neutron cross sections for fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haight, R.C.

    1979-10-01

    First generation fusion reactors will most likely be based on the 3 H(d,n) 4 He reaction, which produces 14-MeV neutrons. In these reactors, both the number of neutrons and the average neutron energy will be significantly higher than for fission reactors of the same power. Accurate neutron cross section data are therefore of great importance. They are needed in present conceptual designs to calculate neutron transport, energy deposition, nuclear transmutation including tritium breeding and activation, and radiation damage. They are also needed for the interpretation of radiation damage experiments, some of which use neutrons up to 40 MeV. In addition, certain diagnostic measurements of plasma experiments require nuclear cross sections. The quality of currently available data for these applications will be reviewed and current experimental programs will be outlined. The utility of nuclear models to provide these data also will be discussed. 65 references

  3. Origin of a maximum of the astrophysical S factor in heavy-ion fusion reactions at deep subbarrier energies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagino, K.; Balantekin, A. B.; Lwin, N. W.; Thein, Ei Shwe Zin

    2018-03-01

    The hindrance phenomenon of heavy-ion fusion cross sections at deep subbarrier energies often accompanies a maximum of an astrophysical S factor at a threshold energy for fusion hindrance. We argue that this phenomenon can naturally be explained when the fusion excitation function is fitted with two potentials, with a larger (smaller) logarithmic slope at energies lower (higher) than the threshold energy. This analysis clearly suggests that the astrophysical S factor provides a convenient tool to analyze the deep subbarrier hindrance phenomenon, even though the S factor may have a strong energy dependence for heavy-ion systems unlike that for astrophysical reactions.

  4. Statistical data fusion for cross-tabulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kamakura, W.A.; Wedel, M.

    The authors address the situation in which a researcher wants to cross-tabulate two sets of discrete variables collected in independent samples, but a subset of the variables is common to both samples. The authors propose a statistical data-fusion model that allows for statistical tests of

  5. Maximum Power Training and Plyometrics for Cross-Country Running.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebben, William P.

    2001-01-01

    Provides a rationale for maximum power training and plyometrics as conditioning strategies for cross-country runners, examining: an evaluation of training methods (strength training and maximum power training and plyometrics); biomechanic and velocity specificity (role in preventing injury); and practical application of maximum power training and…

  6. New neutron cross sections for fusion materials studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greenwood, L.R.; Smither, R.K.

    1985-01-01

    Neutron cross sections are being developed for a variety of fusion-related applications including neutron dosimetry, fusion plasma diagnostics, the activation of very long-lived isotopes, and high-energy accelerator neutron sources

  7. Maximum entropy restoration of laser fusion target x-ray photographs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brolley, J.E.; Lazarus, R.B.; Suydam, B.R.

    1976-01-01

    Maximum entropy principles were used to analyze the microdensitometer traces of a laser-fusion target photograph. The object is a glowing laser-fusion target microsphere 0.95 cm from a pinhole of radius 2 x 10 -4 cm, the image is 7.2 cm from the pinhole and the photon wavelength is likely to be 6.2 x 10 -8 cm. Some computational aspects of the problem are also considered

  8. Graphs of neutron cross section data for fusion reactor development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asami, Tetsuo; Tanaka, Shigeya

    1979-03-01

    Graphs of neutron cross section data relevant to fusion reactor development are presented. Nuclides and reaction types in the present compilation are based on a WRENDA request list from Japan for fusion reactor development. The compilation contains various partial cross sections for 55 nuclides from 6 Li to 237 Np in the energy range up to 20 MeV. (author)

  9. A Bayes-Maximum Entropy method for multi-sensor data fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beckerman, M.

    1991-01-01

    In this paper we introduce a Bayes-Maximum Entropy formalism for multi-sensor data fusion, and present an application of this methodology to the fusion of ultrasound and visual sensor data as acquired by a mobile robot. In our approach the principle of maximum entropy is applied to the construction of priors and likelihoods from the data. Distances between ultrasound and visual points of interest in a dual representation are used to define Gibbs likelihood distributions. Both one- and two-dimensional likelihoods are presented, and cast into a form which makes explicit their dependence upon the mean. The Bayesian posterior distributions are used to test a null hypothesis, and Maximum Entropy Maps used for navigation are updated using the resulting information from the dual representation. 14 refs., 9 figs.

  10. C+C Fusion Cross Sections Measurements for Nuclear Astrophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almaraz-Calderon, S.; Carnelli, P. F. F.; Rehm, K. E.; Albers, M.; Alcorta, M.; Bertone, P. F.; Digiovine, B.; Esbensen, H.; Fernandez Niello, J. O.; Jiang, C. L.; Lai, J.; Nusair, O.; Palchan-Hazan, T.; Pardo, R. C.; Paul, M.; Giardina, G.; Eidelman, S.; Venanzoni, G.; Battaglieri, M.; Mandaglio, G.

    2015-01-01

    Total fusion cross section of carbon isotopes were obtained using the newly developed MUSIC detector. MUSIC is a highly efficient, active target-detector system designed to measure fusion excitation functions with radioactive beams. The present measurements are relevant for understanding x-ray superbursts. The results of the first MUSIC campaign as well as the astrophysical implications are presented in this work

  11. C+C Fusion Cross Sections Measurements for Nuclear Astrophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almaraz-Calderon, S.; Carnelli, P. F. F.; Rehm, K. E.; Albers, M.; Alcorta, M.; Bertone, P. F.; Digiovine, B.; Esbensen, H.; Fernandez Niello, J. O.; Henderson, D.; Jiang, C. L.; Lai, J.; Marley, S. T.; Nusair, O.; Palchan-Hazan, T.; Pardo, R. C.; Paul, M.; Ugalde, C.

    2015-06-01

    Total fusion cross section of carbon isotopes were obtained using the newly developed MUSIC detector. MUSIC is a highly efficient, active target-detector system designed to measure fusion excitation functions with radioactive beams. The present measurements are relevant for understanding x-ray superbursts. The results of the first MUSIC campaign as well as the astrophysical implications are presented in this work.

  12. A label field fusion bayesian model and its penalized maximum rand estimator for image segmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mignotte, Max

    2010-06-01

    This paper presents a novel segmentation approach based on a Markov random field (MRF) fusion model which aims at combining several segmentation results associated with simpler clustering models in order to achieve a more reliable and accurate segmentation result. The proposed fusion model is derived from the recently introduced probabilistic Rand measure for comparing one segmentation result to one or more manual segmentations of the same image. This non-parametric measure allows us to easily derive an appealing fusion model of label fields, easily expressed as a Gibbs distribution, or as a nonstationary MRF model defined on a complete graph. Concretely, this Gibbs energy model encodes the set of binary constraints, in terms of pairs of pixel labels, provided by each segmentation results to be fused. Combined with a prior distribution, this energy-based Gibbs model also allows for definition of an interesting penalized maximum probabilistic rand estimator with which the fusion of simple, quickly estimated, segmentation results appears as an interesting alternative to complex segmentation models existing in the literature. This fusion framework has been successfully applied on the Berkeley image database. The experiments reported in this paper demonstrate that the proposed method is efficient in terms of visual evaluation and quantitative performance measures and performs well compared to the best existing state-of-the-art segmentation methods recently proposed in the literature.

  13. Comparison of different Skyrme forces: Fusion barriers and fusion cross sections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puri, R.K.; Gupta, R.K.

    1995-01-01

    Fusion barriers and fusion cross sections are calculated using the Skyrme energy-density formalism. To study the role of different parametrizations of the Skyrme interaction, we use two typical forces, i.e., the original Skyrme force S and the widely used Skyrme force SIII. Our calculations show that, in the reactions considered here, the Skyrme force S gives higher fusion cross sections compared to that of the Skyrme force SIII. The main part of this difference can be associated with the presence of the spin-density contribution in the Skyrme force SIII

  14. Fusion cross sections from measurements of delayed X-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pacheco, A.J.; Gregorio, D.E. di; Fernandez Niello, J.O; Elgue, M.

    1988-01-01

    The program XRAY is a FORTRAN 77 computer code for the extraction of fusion cross sections from delayed X-ray measurements. This is accomplished by calculating the theoretical expressions of the time dependence of the evaporation-residue cross sections and taking them as adjustable parameters in a χ 2 minimization procedure. (orig.)

  15. Prospects of measuring gluon fusion and weak boson fusion cross sections at the LHC with CMS

    CERN Document Server

    Nicollerat, Anne-Sylvie

    2001-01-01

    The possibility to observe a Higgs boson having a mass between 300 and 600 GeV and to measure its couplings to vector bosons and top quark with CMS at the LHC is studied. Six different signatures are analyzed. The possibility to separate the Higgs events produced through weak boson fusion from the Higgs produced through gluon fusion using the forward going jets emitted in the weak boson fusion process is discussed for each of these different channels. The results are then used to determine the possible statistical errors on the ratio between the two Higgs decay branching fractions when it decays into Ws and into Zs and the possible statistical errors on the weak boson fusion and gluon fusion cross sections after one year of LHC running.

  16. Fusion cross sections measurement for 6Li + 159Tb

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pradhan, M.K.; Mukherjee, A.; Kshetri, R.; Roy, Subinit; Basu, P.; Goswami, A.; Saha Sarkar, M.; Ray, M.; Parkar, V.; Santra, S.; Kailas, S.; Palit, R.

    2009-01-01

    In order to investigate the effect of projectile breakup threshold energy on fusion in mass region around A∼170, we have carried out a systematic investigation of the fusion (both CF and ICF) cross sections for the systems 11 B, 10 B + 159 Tb and 7 Li + 159 Tb at energies near and close to the barrier where 11 B was considered to be a strongly bound nucleus. The nucleus 10 B has a α-separation energy of 4.5 MeV. The measurements show that the extent of suppression of CF cross sections is correlated with the α-separation energies of the projectiles. As a further continuation of this work, we have recently carried out fusion excitation function measurement for the system 6 Li + 159 Tb (Coulomb barrier 27 MeV) at energies near and close to the barrier

  17. Neutron cross section libraries for analysis of fusion neutronics experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kosako, Kazuaki; Oyama, Yukio; Maekawa, Hiroshi; Nakamura, Tomoo

    1988-03-01

    We have prepared two computer code systems producing neutron cross section libraries to analyse fusion neutronics experiments. First system produces the neutron cross section library in ANISN format, i.e., the multi-group constants in group independent format. This library can be obtained by using the multi-group constant processing code system MACS-N and the ANISN format cross section compiling code CROKAS. Second system is for the continuous energy cross section library for the MCNP code. This library can be obtained by the nuclear data processing system NJOY which generates pointwise energy cross sections and the cross section compiling code MACROS for the MCNP library. In this report, we describe the production procedures for both types of the cross section libraries, and show six libraries with different conditions in ANISN format and a library for the MCNP code. (author)

  18. Bayesian and maximum entropy methods for fusion diagnostic measurements with compact neutron spectrometers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reginatto, Marcel; Zimbal, Andreas

    2008-01-01

    In applications of neutron spectrometry to fusion diagnostics, it is advantageous to use methods of data analysis which can extract information from the spectrum that is directly related to the parameters of interest that describe the plasma. We present here methods of data analysis which were developed with this goal in mind, and which were applied to spectrometric measurements made with an organic liquid scintillation detector (type NE213). In our approach, we combine Bayesian parameter estimation methods and unfolding methods based on the maximum entropy principle. This two-step method allows us to optimize the analysis of the data depending on the type of information that we want to extract from the measurements. To illustrate these methods, we analyze neutron measurements made at the PTB accelerator under controlled conditions, using accelerator-produced neutron beams. Although the methods have been chosen with a specific application in mind, they are general enough to be useful for many other types of measurements

  19. Evaluation of fusion-evaporation cross-section calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blank, B.; Canchel, G.; Seis, F.; Delahaye, P.

    2018-02-01

    Calculated fusion-evaporation cross sections from five different codes are compared to experimental data. The present comparison extents over a large range of nuclei and isotopic chains to investigate the evolution of experimental and calculated cross sections. All models more or less overestimate the experimental cross sections. We found reasonable agreement by using the geometrical average of the five model calculations and dividing the average by a factor of 11.2. More refined analyses are made for example for the 100Sn region.

  20. Effect of Coulomb screening on deuterium-deuterium fusion cross-section

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Shunjin

    1991-01-01

    The popular Gamow formula for the deuterium-deuterium fusion cross-section is generalized to take into account the Coulomb screening effect. The generalized formula has been used to discuss the fusion process occurring in the metal medium

  1. Spatiotemporal fusion of multiple-satellite aerosol optical depth (AOD) products using Bayesian maximum entropy method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Qingxin; Bo, Yanchen; Zhu, Yuxin

    2016-04-01

    Merging multisensor aerosol optical depth (AOD) products is an effective way to produce more spatiotemporally complete and accurate AOD products. A spatiotemporal statistical data fusion framework based on a Bayesian maximum entropy (BME) method was developed for merging satellite AOD products in East Asia. The advantages of the presented merging framework are that it not only utilizes the spatiotemporal autocorrelations but also explicitly incorporates the uncertainties of the AOD products being merged. The satellite AOD products used for merging are the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) Collection 5.1 Level-2 AOD products (MOD04_L2) and the Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS) Deep Blue Level 2 AOD products (SWDB_L2). The results show that the average completeness of the merged AOD data is 95.2%,which is significantly superior to the completeness of MOD04_L2 (22.9%) and SWDB_L2 (20.2%). By comparing the merged AOD to the Aerosol Robotic Network AOD records, the results show that the correlation coefficient (0.75), root-mean-square error (0.29), and mean bias (0.068) of the merged AOD are close to those (the correlation coefficient (0.82), root-mean-square error (0.19), and mean bias (0.059)) of the MODIS AOD. In the regions where both MODIS and SeaWiFS have valid observations, the accuracy of the merged AOD is higher than those of MODIS and SeaWiFS AODs. Even in regions where both MODIS and SeaWiFS AODs are missing, the accuracy of the merged AOD is also close to the accuracy of the regions where both MODIS and SeaWiFS have valid observations.

  2. Recognition of Wheat Spike from Field Based Phenotype Platform Using Multi-Sensor Fusion and Improved Maximum Entropy Segmentation Algorithms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chengquan Zhou

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available To obtain an accurate count of wheat spikes, which is crucial for estimating yield, this paper proposes a new algorithm that uses computer vision to achieve this goal from an image. First, a home-built semi-autonomous multi-sensor field-based phenotype platform (FPP is used to obtain orthographic images of wheat plots at the filling stage. The data acquisition system of the FPP provides high-definition RGB images and multispectral images of the corresponding quadrats. Then, the high-definition panchromatic images are obtained by fusion of three channels of RGB. The Gram–Schmidt fusion algorithm is then used to fuse these multispectral and panchromatic images, thereby improving the color identification degree of the targets. Next, the maximum entropy segmentation method is used to do the coarse-segmentation. The threshold of this method is determined by a firefly algorithm based on chaos theory (FACT, and then a morphological filter is used to de-noise the coarse-segmentation results. Finally, morphological reconstruction theory is applied to segment the adhesive part of the de-noised image and realize the fine-segmentation of the image. The computer-generated counting results for the wheat plots, using independent regional statistical function in Matlab R2017b software, are then compared with field measurements which indicate that the proposed method provides a more accurate count of wheat spikes when compared with other traditional fusion and segmentation methods mentioned in this paper.

  3. Three dimensional winds: A maximum cross-correlation application to elastic lidar data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buttler, William Tillman [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States)

    1996-05-01

    Maximum cross-correlation techniques have been used with satellite data to estimate winds and sea surface velocities for several years. Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is currently using a variation of the basic maximum cross-correlation technique, coupled with a deterministic application of a vector median filter, to measure transverse winds as a function of range and altitude from incoherent elastic backscatter lidar (light detection and ranging) data taken throughout large volumes within the atmospheric boundary layer. Hourly representations of three-dimensional wind fields, derived from elastic lidar data taken during an air-quality study performed in a region of complex terrain near Sunland Park, New Mexico, are presented and compared with results from an Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) approved laser doppler velocimeter. The wind fields showed persistent large scale eddies as well as general terrain-following winds in the Rio Grande valley.

  4. Proceedings of a specialists' meeting on neutron activation cross sections for fission and fusion energy applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagner, M.; Vonach, H.

    1990-01-01

    These proceedings of a specialists' meeting on neutron activation cross sections for fission and fusion energy applications are divided into 4 sessions bearing on: - data needs: 4 conferences - experimental work: 11 conferences - theoretical work: 4 conferences - evaluation work: 5 conferences

  5. The Maximum Cross-Correlation approach to detecting translational motions from sequential remote-sensing images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, J.; Lythe, M. B.

    1996-06-01

    This paper presents the principle of the Maximum Cross-Correlation (MCC) approach in detecting translational motions within dynamic fields from time-sequential remotely sensed images. A C program implementing the approach is presented and illustrated in a flowchart. The program is tested with a pair of sea-surface temperature images derived from Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) images near East Cape, New Zealand. Results show that the mean currents in the region have been detected satisfactorily with the approach.

  6. Fusion cross-sections of 16O+16O reaction in pseudonucleon picture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mishra, R.C.; Waghmare, Y.R.

    1991-01-01

    Fusion cross-sections for 16 O+ 16 O reaction are calculated in classical equations of motion approach using the pseudonucleon picture. These calculated fusion cross-sections are very close to measured values than earlier calculated using the same NN interaction. The aim of the paper is to test the pseudonucleon picture. Use of this picture does not require one to consider the number of relative random orientations of the colliding clusters. (author). 22 refs., 2 tabs., 4 figs

  7. Determination of extra-push energies for fusion from differential fission cross-section measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramamurthy, V.S.; Kapoor, S.S.

    1993-01-01

    Apparent discrepancies between values of extra-push energies for fusion of two heavy nuclei derived through measurements of fusion evaporation residue cross sections and of differential fission cross sections have been reported by Keller et al. We show here that with the inclusion of the recently proposed preequilibrium fission decay channel in the analysis, there is no inconsistency between the two sets of data in terms of the deduced extra-push energies

  8. Hidden crossing theory of charge exchange in H+ + He+(1 s) collisions in vicinity of maximum of cross section

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grozdanov, Tasko P.; Solov'ev, Evgeni A.

    2018-04-01

    Within the framework of dynamical adiabatic approach the hidden crossing theory of inelastic transitions is applied to charge exchange in H+ + He+(1 s) collisions in the wide range of center of mass collision energies E cm = (1.6 -70) keV. The good agreement with experiment and molecular close coupling calculations is obtained. At low energies our 4-state results are closest to the experiment and correctly reproduce the shoulder in energy dependence of the cross section around E cm = 6 keV. The 2-state results correctly predict the position of the maximum of the cross section at E cm ≈ 40 keV, whereas 4-state results fail to correctly describe the region around the maximum. The reason for this is the fact that adiabatic approximation for a given two-state hidden crossing is applicable for values of the Schtueckelberg parameter >1. But with increase of principal quantum number N the Schtueckelberg parameter decreases as N -3. That is why the 4-state approach involving higher excited states fails at smaller collision energies E cm ≈ 15 keV, while the 2-state approximation which involves low lying states can be extended to higher collision energies.

  9. Fusion17 summary talk: windsurfing on a cross section profile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ackermann Dieter

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The spectrum of physics, discussed in the 7th edition of the “Fusion” conference series, included a number of topics, ranging from reaction dynamics to structure studies, from the lightest to the heaviest nuclei, from inelastic reactions to fusion and fission, with applications of astrophysical interest and the newest developments and findings in theory and experiment. With this paper we try to summarize the most relevant issues discussed during the five days of Fusion17.

  10. Energy dependence of fusion evaporation-residue cross sections in the 28Si+28Si reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vineyard, M.F.; Bauer, J.S.; Gosdin, C.H.; Trotter, R.S.; Kovar, D.G.; Beck, C.; Henderson, D.J.; Janssens, R.V.F.; Wilkins, B.D.; Rosner, G.; Chowdhury, P.; Ikezoe, H.; Kuhn, W.; Kolata, J.J.; Hinnefeld, J.D.; Maguire, C.F.; Mateja, J.F.; Prosser, F.W.; Stephans, G.S.F.

    1990-01-01

    Velocity distributions of mass-identified evaporation residues produced in the 28 Si+ 28 Si reaction have been measured at bombarding energies of 174, 215, 240, 309, 397, and 452 MeV using time-of-flight techniques. These distributions were used to identify evaporation residues and to separate the complete-fusion and incomplete-fusion components. Angular distributions and total cross sections were extracted at all six bombarding energies. The complete-fusion evaporation-residue cross sections and the deduced critical angular momenta are compared with lower energy data and the predictions of existing models

  11. Energy dependence of fusion evaporation-residue cross sections in the 28Si+12C reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vineyard, M.F.; Mateja, J.F.; Beck, C.; Atencio, S.E.; Dennis, L.C.; Frawley, A.D.; Henderson, D.J.; Janssens, R.V.F.; Kemper, K.W.; Kovar, D.G.; Maguire, C.F.; Padalino, S.J.; Prosser, F.W.; Stephans, G.S.F.; Tiede, M.A.; Wilkins, B.D.; Zingarelli, R.A.

    1993-01-01

    Fusion evaporation-residue cross sections for the 28 Si+ 12 C reaction have been measured in the energy range 18≤E c.m. ≤136 MeV using time-of-flight techniques. Velocity distributions of mass-identified reaction products were used to identify evaporation residues and to determine the complete-fusion cross sections at high energies. The data are in agreement with previously established systematics which indicate an entrance-channel mass-asymmetry dependence of the incomplete-fusion evaporation-residue process. The complete-fusion evaporation-residue cross sections and the deduced critical angular momenta are compared with earlier measurements and the predictions of existing models

  12. Multiple Coulomb excitation effects in heavy ion compound and fusion cross sections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlson, B.V.; Hussein, M.S.

    1981-11-01

    A simple model for the average S-matrix that describes heavy ion direct processes in the presence of absorption due to compound nucleus formation is developed. The fluctuation cross section and the fusion cross section are then calculated for deformed heavy ion systems where multiple Coulomb excitation is important. A simple expression for the fusion cross section valid for above-barrier energies is then obtained. The formula clearly displays the modification, due to Coulomb excitation, in the usual geometrical expression. (Author) [pt

  13. SHAMSI, 48 group cross-section library for fusion nucleonics analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ponti, C.; Abbas, Tayyab.

    1982-01-01

    A P 3 48 group coupled neutron gamma-ray (34 N - 14 G) cross-section library is produced and validated for neutronic studies in fusion reactor blanket/shield. This report describes the library content, the procedure adopted and the results of the calculations performed for testing the cross sections

  14. Fusion cross sections for 6,7Li + 24Mg reactions at energies below and above the barrier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ray, M.; Mukherjee, A.; Pradhan, M. K.; Kshetri, Ritesh; Sarkar, M. Saha; Dasmahapatra, B.; Palit, R.; Majumdar, I.; Joshi, P. K.; Jain, H. C.

    2008-01-01

    Measurement of fusion cross sections for the 6,7 Li + 24 Mg reactions by the characteristic γ-ray method has been done at energies from below to well above the respective Coulomb barriers. The fusion cross sections obtained from these γ-ray cross sections for the two systems are found to agree well with the total reaction cross sections at low energies. The relatively large difference between total cross sections and measured fusion cross sections at higher energies is consistent with the fact that other channels, in particular breakup, open up with an increase of bombarding energy. The breakup channel, however, appears not to have any influence on fusion cross sections. The critical angular momenta (l cr ) deduced from the fusion cross sections are found to have an energy dependence similar to other Li-induced reactions

  15. Effect of cross-correlation on track-to-track fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Rajat K.

    1994-07-01

    Since the advent of target tracking systems employing a diverse mixture of sensors, there has been increasing recognition by air defense system planners and other military system analysts of the need to integrate these tracks so that a clear air picture can be obtained in a command center. A popular methodology to achieve this goal is to perform track-to-track fusion, which performs track-to-track association as well as kinematic state vector fusion. This paper seeks to answer analytically the extent of improvement achievable by means of kinetic state vector fusion when the tracks are obtained from dissimilar sensors (e.g., Radar/ESM/IRST/IFF). It is well known that evaluation of the performance of state vector fusion algorithms at steady state must take into account the effects of cross-correlation between eligible tracks introduced by the input noise which, unfortunately, is often neglected because of added computational complexity. In this paper, an expression for the steady-state cross-covariance matrix for a 2D state vector track-to-track fusion is obtained. This matrix is shown to be a function of the parameters of the Kalman filters associated with the candidate tracks being fused. Conditions for positive definiteness of the cross-covariance matrix have been derived and the effect of positive definiteness on performance of track-to-track fusion is also discussed.

  16. Measurements of fusion cross sections of 16O+46,50Ti systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liguori Neto, R.

    1986-01-01

    Excitation functions for complete fusion of the systems 16 O + 46,50 Ti, with50)Ti, energies near and below the Coulomb barrier, were measured. With the use of the in-beam and out of beam γ spectroscopy, the formation of the compound nucleus was experimentally detected. The fusion cross was then attained by the sum of all observed compound nucleus decay channels. The limitation and advantages of measurements methods are discussed. Theoretical analysis of the experimental results using the semi-classical barrier penetration model allowed us to obtain the fusion barrier height and radius for the studied systems. These values are in good agreement with others reported for this mass range. Using the unidimensional barrier penetration model with different nuclear potentials, describing the heavy ion interactions gave theoretical fusion cross section values systematically smaller than our measured values in the energy region below the Coulomb barrier. The introduction of the nuclear surface zero point vibrations enhances the theoretical fusion cross sections in the sub-Coulomb region, but simultaneoulsy introduces an isotopic difference in the fusion excitation functions that is not observed experimentally. The statistical model predictions for the compound nucleous decay (calculated by the CASCADE program) show reasonable agreement for the more intense decay channels. (author) [pt

  17. Measurements of fusion cross sections of the 16O+46,50Ti systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liguori Neto, R.

    1986-01-01

    Excitation functions for complete fusion of the systems 16 O + 46,50 Ti, with energies near and below the Coulomb barrier, were measured. With the use of the in-beam and out of beam γ spectroscopy, the formation of the compound nucleus was experimentally detected. The fusion cross section was then attained by the sum of all observed compound nucleus decay channels. The limitation and advantages of measurements methods are discussed. Theoretical analysis of the experimental results using the semi-classical barrier penetration model allowed us to obtain the fusion barrier height and radius for the studied systems. These values are in good agreement with others reported for this mass range. Using the unidimensional barrier penetration model with different nuclear potentials, describing the heavy ion interactions gave theoretical fusion cross section values systematically smaller than our measured values in the energy region below the Coulomb barrier. The introduction of the nuclear surface zero point vibrations enhances the theoretical fusion cross sections in the sub-Coulomb region, but simultaneously introduces an isotopic difference in the fusion excitation functions that is not observed experimentally. The statistical model predictions for the compound nucleus decay (calculated by the CASCADE program) show reasonable agreement for the more intense decay channels [pt

  18. Towards a unified description of light ion fusion cross section excitation functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zimmer, K.W.

    1995-01-01

    A description of light heavy-ion fusion, taking into account both entrance-channel characteristics and compound-nucleus properties, is derived within a unified theory of nuclear reactions. The dependence of the imaginary fusion potential on the level density of the compound nucleus is revealed. The 12 C + 12 C, 12 C + 14 N, 10 B + 16 O and 16 O + 16 O fusion cross sections are calculated for E cm ≤ 120 MeV and compared with experimental data. The excitation energy dependence of the level-density parameter of 24 Mg, 26 Al and 32 S is inferred below 5 MeV/A. A realistic nuclear level-density model, describing the experimental level-density parameters of highly excited nuclei, is shown to be consistent with both the global features and details of the fusion cross section. 12 C + 12 C and 16 O + 16 O fusion cross section oscillations are predicted at large excitation energies, reflecting the structure of the level density of the highly excited light compound nuclei. Differences of the 12 C + 14 N and 10 B + 16 O fusion reaction mechanisms are discussed in terms of specific entrance-channel characteristics. (orig.)

  19. Towards a unified description of light ion fusion cross section excitation functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zimmer, K.W.; Rebel, H.

    1994-10-01

    A description of light heavy-ion fusion, taking into account both entrace-channel characteristics and compound-nucleus properties, is derived within a unified theory of nuclear reactions. The dependence of the imaginary fusion potential on the level density of the compound nucleus is revealed. The 12 C+ 12 C, 12 C+ 14 N, 10 B+ 16 O and 16 O+ 16 O fusion cross sections are calculated for E cm ≤120 MeV and compared with experimental data. The excitation energy dependence of the level-density parameter of 24 Mg, 26 Al and 32 S is inferred below 5 MeV/A. A realistic nuclear level-density model, describing the experimental level-density parameters of highly excited nuclei, is shown to be consistent with both the global features and details of the fusion cross section. 12 C+ 12 C and 16 O+ 16 O fusion cross section oscillations are predicted at large excitation energies, reflecting the structure of the level density of the highly excited light compound nuclei. Differences of the 12 C+ 14 N and 10 B+ 16 O fusion reaction mechanisms are discussed in terms of specific entrance-channel characteristics. (orig.)

  20. Fusion

    CERN Document Server

    Mahaffey, James A

    2012-01-01

    As energy problems of the world grow, work toward fusion power continues at a greater pace than ever before. The topic of fusion is one that is often met with the most recognition and interest in the nuclear power arena. Written in clear and jargon-free prose, Fusion explores the big bang of creation to the blackout death of worn-out stars. A brief history of fusion research, beginning with the first tentative theories in the early 20th century, is also discussed, as well as the race for fusion power. This brand-new, full-color resource examines the various programs currently being funded or p

  1. Measurements of fusion cross section for 12C +63,65 Cu systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rocha, C.A. da.

    1987-01-01

    Cross-section measurements for nuclear fusion in the 12 C+ 63.65 Cu system, at 12 C energy range from 0.9 to 1.8 times the Coulomb barrier are presented. In order to detect and to obtain the mass identification of the evaporation residues following the fusion process, the time of flight method was adopted in conjunction with an eletrostatic deflector capable of separating the evaporation residues from the beam particles. The limitation and advantadges of this method of measurement are discussed. The excitation functions were analysed using the unidimensional barrier penetration model with different nuclear potentials. Theoretical fusion cross-section values obtained from this analysis were systematically smaller than our measured values, in the energy region below the Coulomb barrier. In order to discover which channel enhances the fusion cross-section in this region, a coupled channel calculation was performed, with the CCFUS code. The experimental data for the above reactions were compared with the systems 16.18 O+ 63.65 Cu, measured by our group. In this comparison, it was noted that the systems 12 C+ 63.65 Cu, have greater fusion cross section below the Coulomb barrier. The comparison of velocity spectra of the evaporated residues for the two systems shows that 12 C+ 63 Cu has a strong reaction channel that was not present in the 12 C+ 65 Cu system. (author) [pt

  2. Collapsing of multigroup cross sections in optimization problems solved by means of the maximum principle of Pontryagin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anton, V.

    1979-05-01

    A new formulation of multigroup cross section collapsing based on the conservation of point or zone value of hamiltonian is presented. This attempt is proper to optimization problems solved by means of maximum principle of Pontryagin. (author)

  3. Quantitative analysis of the fusion cross sections using different microscopic nucleus-nucleus interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adel, A. [Cairo University, Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Giza (Egypt); Majmaah University, Physics Department, College of Science, Al-Zulfi (Saudi Arabia); Alharbi, T. [Majmaah University, Physics Department, College of Science, Al-Zulfi (Saudi Arabia)

    2017-01-15

    The fusion cross sections for reactions involving medium and heavy nucleus-nucleus systems are investigated near and above the Coulomb barrier using the one-dimensional barrier penetration model. The microscopic nuclear interaction potential is computed by four methods, namely: the double-folding model based on a realistic density-dependent M3Y NN interaction with a finite-range exchange part, the Skyrme energy density functional in the semiclassical extended Thomas-Fermi approximation, the generalized Proximity potential, and the Akyuez-Winther interaction. The comparison between the calculated and the measured values of the fusion excitation functions indicates that the calculations of the DFM give quite satisfactory agreement with the experimental data, being much better than the other methods. New parameterized forms for the fusion barrier heights and positions are presented. Furthermore, the effects of deformation and orientation degrees of freedom on the distribution of the Coulomb barrier characteristics as well as the fusion cross sections are studied for the reactions {sup 16}O + {sup 70}Ge and {sup 28}Si + {sup 100}Mo. The calculated values of the total fusion cross sections are compared with coupled channel calculations using the code CCFULL and compared with the experimental data. Our results reveal that the inclusion of deformations and orientation degrees of freedom improves the comparison with the experimental data. (orig.)

  4. A Novel DBN Feature Fusion Model for Cross-Corpus Speech Emotion Recognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zou Cairong

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The feature fusion from separate source is the current technical difficulties of cross-corpus speech emotion recognition. The purpose of this paper is to, based on Deep Belief Nets (DBN in Deep Learning, use the emotional information hiding in speech spectrum diagram (spectrogram as image features and then implement feature fusion with the traditional emotion features. First, based on the spectrogram analysis by STB/Itti model, the new spectrogram features are extracted from the color, the brightness, and the orientation, respectively; then using two alternative DBN models they fuse the traditional and the spectrogram features, which increase the scale of the feature subset and the characterization ability of emotion. Through the experiment on ABC database and Chinese corpora, the new feature subset compared with traditional speech emotion features, the recognition result on cross-corpus, distinctly advances by 8.8%. The method proposed provides a new idea for feature fusion of emotion recognition.

  5. Subbarrier fusion of 16O+112Cd: Cross sections and mean angular momenta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ackermann, D.; Corradi, L.; Napoli, D.R.; Petrache, C.M.; Spolaore, P.; Stefanini, A.M.; Scarlassara, F.; Beghini, S.; Montagnoli, G.; Segato, G.F.; Signorini, C.

    1994-01-01

    Fusion cross sections and mean angular momenta have been measured for 16 O+ 112 Cd around the Coulomb barrier. The experimental results are well reproduced by coupled-channels calculations, confirming the validity of this model for mass-asymmetric systems. The predicted asymptotic behaviour of the mean angular momentum at low energies has been observed. ((orig.))

  6. Two-dimensional cross-section sensitivity and uncertainty analysis for fusion reactor blankets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Embrechts, M.J.

    1982-02-01

    A two-dimensional sensitivity and uncertainty analysis for the heating of the TF coil for the FED (fusion engineering device) blanket was performed. The uncertainties calculated are of the same order of magnitude as those resulting from a one-dimensional analysis. The largest uncertainties were caused by the cross section uncertainties for chromium

  7. NNLO QCD corrections for the differential Higgs boson production cross-section in gluon fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anastasiou, Charalampos

    2006-01-01

    I describe a recent computation of the NNLO QCD corrections for the fully differential cross-section for Higgs boson production in the gluon fusion channel. This result is an application of a new method for calculating perturbative corrections beyond the next-to-leading order

  8. Elastic, excitation, ionization and charge transfer cross sections of current interest in fusion energy research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schultz, D.R.; Krstic, P.S. [Oak Ridge National Lab. TN (United States). Physics Div.

    1997-01-01

    Due to the present interest in modeling and diagnosing the edge and divertor plasma regions in magnetically confined fusion devices, we have sought to provide new calculations regarding the elastic, excitation, ionization, and charge transfer cross sections in collisions among relevant ions, neutrals, and isotopes in the low-to intermediate-energy regime. We summarize here some of our recent work. (author)

  9. Reaction and fusion cross sections for 32S on 27Al and 48Ti

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porto, F.; Sambataro, S.; Kusterer, K.; Liu Ken Pao; Doukellis, G.; Harney, H.L.

    1981-01-01

    Elastic scattering and evaporation residues have been measured for the system 32 S + 27 Al at Esub(c)sub(.)sub(m)sub(.) = 66.4, 73.2 MeV and 32 S + 48 Ti at Esub(c)sub(.)sub(m)sub(.) = 96.0 MeV. Reaction cross sections have been obtained by use of the optical theorem and are found to be about 60% larger than the fusion cross sections. (orig.)

  10. Cross-sections and average angular momenta in fusion reactions near the coulomb barrier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dasgupta, M.

    1992-01-01

    In recent years there has been an increasing interest in the study of heavy ion collisions near the Coulomb barrier. This has been triggered mainly by the observations of enhancements by factors of about one to two order of magnitude in sub-Coulomb barrier fusion (SBF) cross-sections between medium mass nuclei, as compared to predictions based on one-dimensional barrier penetration model (l-d BPM). Though, a considerable amount of work both theoretical and experimental has been done in this field, a complete understanding of the SBF phenomenon has not yet been achieved. The relation between fusion excitation function and angular momentum (l) distribution in SBF reactions is a topic of current interest. It is believed that l-distributions provide a more stringent test of SBF models that the excitation functions alone. Simultaneous measurement of l-distribution (or its moments) and fusion excitation function is expected to lead to a better understanding of the relationship between these two qualities. Such information has been obtained in experiments done at pelletron accelerator facility. In the present talk the measurement of fusion cross-sections and the method of determination of average l from partial evaporation residue cross-section has been elaborated. An analysis of the experimental data on the basis of some of the SBF models has been discussed briefly. (author). 13 refs

  11. Estimating Total Fusion Cross Sections by Using a Coupled-Channel Method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Ki-Seok; Cheoun, Myung-Ki [Soongsil University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, K. S. [Korea Aerospace University, Koyang (Korea, Republic of); Kim, T. H.; So, W. Y. [Kangwon National University at Dogye, Samcheok (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-01-15

    We calculate the total fusion cross sections for the {sup 6}He + {sup 209}Bi, {sup 6}Li + {sup 209}Bi,{sup 9}Be + {sup 208}Pb, {sup 10}Be + {sup 209}Bi, and {sup 11}Li + {sup 208}Pb systems by using a coupled-channel (CC) method and compare the results with the experimental data. In the CC approach for the total fusion cross sections, we exploit a globally determined Wood-Saxon potential with Aky¨uz-Winther parameters and couplings of the ground state to the low-lying excited states in the projectile and the target nuclei. The total fusion cross sections obtained with the CC are compared with those obtained without the CC couplings. The latter approach is tantamount to a one-dimensional barrier penetration model. Finally, our approach is applied to understand new data for the {sup 11}Li+{sup 208}Pb system. Possible ambiguities inherent in those approaches are discussed in detail for further applications to the fusion system of halo and/or neutron-rich nuclei.

  12. Actinide cross section data and inertial confinement fusion for long term waste disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meldner, H.

    1979-01-01

    Actinide cross section data at thermonuclear neutron energies are needed for the calculation of ICF pellet center burnup of fission reactor waste, viz. 14 MeV neutron fission of the very long-lived actinides that pose storage problems. A major advantage of pellet center burnup is safety: only milligrams of highly toxic and active material need to be present in the fusion chamber, whereas blanket burnup requires the continued presence of tons of actinides in a small volume. The actinide data tables required for Monte Carlo calculations of the burnup of 241 Am and 243 Am are discussed in connection with typical burnup reactor fusion and fission spectra. 2 figures

  13. Review of magnetic fusion energy neutron cross section needs: neutronics viewpoint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dudziak, D.J.; Muir, D.W.

    1977-01-01

    In the overall context of fusion nucleonic analysis, most cross section deficiencies lie in the energy range 14 MeV and below. This review deals not only with new data requirements generated by current interest in d-Li sources but also with the needs of conventional nucleonic studies (i.e., 14-MeV source calculations). The many compilations of requirements are referenced, and the current assessment of high-priority needs is succinctly summarized. Then typical methodology and results (sensitivity and uncertainty analysis) are given for quantitative data assessments of the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor and a fusion Experimental Power Reactor. Finally, a summary is presented of some probings into data above 14 MeV, which have potential applications for d-Li irradiation facilities, d-Be medical therapy sources, and electronuclear fuel production facilities. 2 figures, 9 tables

  14. Comparison of cross sections for C+O reactions in the second regime of complete fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beck, C.; Haas, F.; Freeman, R.M.; Heusch, B.; Coffin, J.P.; Guillaume, G.; Rami, F.; Wagner, P.

    1985-01-01

    Kinetic energy spectra, angular distributions, and elemental yield distributions have been measured for the 12 C + 16 O, 12 C + 18 O and 13 C + 17 O reaction products over an energy range from 2 to 7 times the Coulomb barrier energy. A careful kinematic analysis of the evaporation residues and comparisons with statistical model calculations show that fusion proceeds with full momentum transfer followed by a statistical decay of the compound nucleus. The competition between complete fusion process and peripheral reactions in the 12 C + 16 O system is less important than for the 12 C + 18 O and 13 C + 17 O reactions. The unexpectedly high 12 C + 16 O complete fusion cross sections are related to the possible occurence of a superdeformation of the 28 Si compound nucleus

  15. Fusion-fission probabilities, cross sections, and structure notes of superheavy nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kowal, Michał; Cap, Tomasz; Jachimowicz, Piotr; Skalski, Janusz; Siwek-Wilczyńska, Krystyna; Wilczyński, Janusz

    2016-01-01

    Fusion – fission probabilities in the synthesis of heaviest elements are discussed in the context of the latest experimental reports. Cross sections for superheavy nuclei are evaluated using the “Fusion by Diffusion” (FBD) model. Predictive power of this approach is shown for experimentally known Lv and Og isotopes and predictions given for Z = 119, 120. Ground state and saddle point properties as masses, shell corrections, pairing energies, and deformations necessary for cross-section estimations are calculated systematically within the multidimensional microscopic-macroscopic method based on the deformed Woods-Saxon single-particle potential. In the frame of the FBD approach predictions for production of elements heavier than Z = 118 are not too optimistic. For this reason, and because of high instability of superheavy nuclei, we comment on some structure effects, connected with the K-isomerism phenomenon which could lead to a significant increase in the stability of these systems.

  16. Fusion, reaction and break-up cross sections of weakly bound projectiles on 64Zn

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomes, P.R.S.; Padron, I.; Rodriguez, M.D.; Marti, G.V.; Anjos, R.M.; Lubian, J.; Veiga, R.; Liguori Neto, R.; Crema, E.; Added, N.; Chamon, L.C.; Fernandez Niello, J.O.; Capurro, O.A.; Pacheco, A.J.; Testoni, J.E.; Abriola, D.; Arazi, A.; Ramirez, M.; Hussein, M.S.

    2004-01-01

    We present new measurements and a general discussion of the behavior of the fusion, break-up and reaction cross sections of different projectiles on the same target 64 Zn, at near and above barrier energies. The projectiles are the tightly bound 16 O, the stable weakly bound 6 Li, 7 Li and 9 Be and the radioactive very weakly bound 6 He nuclei. We also compare the results with the ones for heavier targets

  17. Solar fusion cross sections II: the pp chain and CNO cycles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adelberger, E G; Bemmerer, D; Bertulani, C A; Chen, J -W; Costantini, H; Couder, M; Cyburt, R; Davids, B; Freedman, S J; Gai, M; Garcia, A; Gazit, D; Gialanella, L; Greife, U; Hass, M; Heeger, K; Haxton, W C; Imbriani, G; Itahashi, T; Junghans, A; Kubodera, K; Langanke, K; Leitner, D; Leitner, M; Marcucci, L E; Motobayashi, T; Mukhamedzhanov, A; Nollett, Kenneth M; Nunes, F M; Park, T -S; Parker, P D; Prati, P; Ramsey-Musolf, M J; Hamish Robertson, R G; Schiavilla, R; Simpson, E C; Snover, K A; Spitaleri, C; Strieder, F; Suemmerer, K; Trautvetter, R E; Tribble, R E; Typel, S; Uberseder, E; Vetter, P; Wiescher, M

    2011-04-01

    The available data on nuclear fusion cross sections important to energy generation in the Sun and other hydrogen-burning stars and to solar neutrino production are summarized and critically evaluated. Recommended values and uncertainties are provided for key cross sections, and a recommended spectrum is given for 8B solar neutrinos. Opportunities for further increasing the precision of key rates are also discussed, including new facilities, new experimental techniques, and improvements in theory. This review, which summarizes the conclusions of a workshop held at the Institute for Nuclear Theory, Seattle, in January 2009, is intended as a 10-year update and supplement to 1998, Rev. Mod. Phys. 70, 1265.

  18. 14N + 10B fusion and elastic scattering cross section measurements near the interaction barrier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, S.C.; Overley, J.C.; Barnes, C.A.; Switkowski, Z.E.

    1979-01-01

    The 14 N + 10 B fusion reactions were studied at c.m. energies between 2.9 and 7.5 MeV by measuring the yields of γ-rays from the residual nuclei formed by particle evaporation from the compound system. Cross sections for formation of the evaporation residues 16 O, 19 F, 19 Ne, 20 Ne, 21 Ne, 22 Ne, 22 Na, 23 Na and 23 Mg, as well as the total cross section, were deduced from these yields with the aid of statistical model calculations. 14 N + 10 B elastic scattering differential cross sections were measured from 4.3 to 9.1 MeV at THETA 74.4 degrees, and from 3.3 to 8.3 MeV at THETA = 90.0 degrees. The elastic scattering cross sections were analyzed within the framework of the incoming-wave boundary condition (IWBC) model. The fusion cross sections calculated for the real ion-ion potential deduced from the IWBC model fit to the elastic scattering are in good agreement with the measured values

  19. Measurement of 18O + 10B fusion cross section and construction of a position sensitive ionization chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Added, N.

    1987-01-01

    The 18 O + 10 B fusion reaction has been investigated within the bombarding energy range of 29,0 MeV lab 0 lab 0 angular range. For this purpose, a high resolution position sensitive ionization chamber has been developed and constructed. Experimental results compared to model predictions and experimental systematics found in the literature allows to reject compound nucleus limitation to the fusion cross section up to energies as high as five times the coulomb barrier. Statistical model fits to the residues elementary distributions reveal a quite difuse partial fusion cross section in the angular momentum space. Systematic analysis of fusion barrier height (V B ) and radius (R B ) for neighbouring nuclei point out the importance of the nuclear matter difuseness in the competition between the fusion and quasi-direct process. Calculations within this framework were performed. (author) [pt

  20. Analysis of fusion neutronics calculations and appraisal of UW cross-section library

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie Jianping; Li Xingzhong; Ying Chuntong

    1989-01-01

    A series of calculations for different cases (especially for the values of tritium breeding ratio T, and the fuel breeding ratio F in the blanket of a hybrid reactor) were carried out by using ANISN program and UW cross-section library. The comparison with other results in China and abroad kalso was done. It was shownwn that the installation and execution of ANISN program on ELXSI machine at Tsinghua University are successful, and the UW cross-section library is reliable. It may be used for fusion neutronics calculation in the future. The paper also points out that the difference between the calculations and by the authors are due to jthe different in cross-section data used

  1. Multineutron emission cross-sections of Pb-208 and Bi-209 for use in fusion technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garg, S.

    1995-01-01

    Pb-208 and Bi-209 are considered as promising materials for fusion blankets because of their superior neutron multiplying characteristics. In this paper, emission cross-sections for neutrons, protons, alpha-particles and gamma-rays are investigated for these nuclides in the energy range 8-30 MeV using the framework of the multistep Hauser-Feshbach statistical theory combined with the Kalbach exciton model for the pre-equilibrium decay and the Brink - Axel model of the giant dipole resonance to account for the radiative capture competition. Appropriate optical model potential parameters are selected to evaluate the compound nucleus reaction cross-sections at different neutron incident energies. (n,n'), (n,2n), (n,3n), (n,4n) and the total production cross-sections for neutrons, protons, alpha-particles and gamma-rays are inferred by performing consistent calculations. (author). 22 refs, 3 figs

  2. Breakup and fusion cross sections of the 6Li nucleus with targets of mass A = 58, 144 and 208

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukeru, B.; Rampho, G. J.; Lekala, M. L.

    2018-04-01

    We use the continuum discretized coupled channels method to investigate the effects of continuum-continuum coupling on the breakup and fusion cross sections of the weakly bound 6Li nucleus with the 58Ni, 144Sm and 208Pb nuclear targets. The cross sections were analyzed at incident energies E cm below, close to and above the Coulomb barrier V B. We found that for the medium and heavy targets, the breakup cross sections are enhanced at energies below the Coulomb barrier (E cm/V B ≤ 0.8) owing to these couplings. For the lighter target, relatively small enhancement of the breakup cross sections appear at energies well below the barrier (E cm/V B ≤ 0.6). At energies E cm/V B > 0.8 for medium and heavy targets, and E cm/V B > 0.6 for the light target, the continuum-continuum couplings substantially suppress the breakup cross sections. On the other hand, the fusion cross sections are enhanced at energies E cm/V B fusion cross sections. We also compared the breakup and fusion cross sections, and found that below the barrier, the breakup cross sections are more dominant regardless of whether continuum-continuum couplings are included.

  3. Universal antibodies against the highly conserved influenza fusion peptide cross-neutralize several subtypes of influenza A virus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hashem, Anwar M. [Centre for Vaccine Evaluation, Biologics and Genetic Therapies Directorate, HPFB, Health Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada); Department of Microbiology, Faculty of Medicine, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah (Saudi Arabia); Department of Biochemistry, Microbiology and Immunology, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON (Canada); Van Domselaar, Gary [National Microbiology Laboratory, Public Health Agency of Canada, Winnipeg, MB (Canada); Li, Changgui; Wang, Junzhi [National Institute for the Control of Pharmaceutical and Biological Products, Beijing (China); She, Yi-Min; Cyr, Terry D. [Centre for Vaccine Evaluation, Biologics and Genetic Therapies Directorate, HPFB, Health Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada); Sui, Jianhua [Department of Cancer Immunology and AIDS, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Department of Medicine, Harvard Medical School, 44 Binney Street, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); He, Runtao [National Microbiology Laboratory, Public Health Agency of Canada, Winnipeg, MB (Canada); Marasco, Wayne A. [Department of Cancer Immunology and AIDS, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Department of Medicine, Harvard Medical School, 44 Binney Street, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Li, Xuguang, E-mail: Sean.Li@hc-sc.gc.ca [Centre for Vaccine Evaluation, Biologics and Genetic Therapies Directorate, HPFB, Health Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada); Department of Biochemistry, Microbiology and Immunology, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON (Canada)

    2010-12-10

    Research highlights: {yields} The fusion peptide is the only universally conserved epitope in all influenza viral hemagglutinins. {yields} Anti-fusion peptide antibodies are universal antibodies that cross-react with all influenza HA subtypes. {yields} The universal antibodies cross-neutralize different influenza A subtypes. {yields} The universal antibodies inhibit the fusion process between the viruses and the target cells. -- Abstract: The fusion peptide of influenza viral hemagglutinin plays a critical role in virus entry by facilitating membrane fusion between the virus and target cells. As the fusion peptide is the only universally conserved epitope in all influenza A and B viruses, it could be an attractive target for vaccine-induced immune responses. We previously reported that antibodies targeting the first 14 amino acids of the N-terminus of the fusion peptide could bind to virtually all influenza virus strains and quantify hemagglutinins in vaccines produced in embryonated eggs. Here we demonstrate that these universal antibodies bind to the viral hemagglutinins in native conformation presented in infected mammalian cell cultures and neutralize multiple subtypes of virus by inhibiting the pH-dependant fusion of viral and cellular membranes. These results suggest that this unique, highly-conserved linear sequence in viral hemagglutinin is exposed sufficiently to be attacked by the antibodies during the course of infection and merits further investigation because of potential importance in the protection against diverse strains of influenza viruses.

  4. Universal antibodies against the highly conserved influenza fusion peptide cross-neutralize several subtypes of influenza A virus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashem, Anwar M.; Van Domselaar, Gary; Li, Changgui; Wang, Junzhi; She, Yi-Min; Cyr, Terry D.; Sui, Jianhua; He, Runtao; Marasco, Wayne A.; Li, Xuguang

    2010-01-01

    Research highlights: → The fusion peptide is the only universally conserved epitope in all influenza viral hemagglutinins. → Anti-fusion peptide antibodies are universal antibodies that cross-react with all influenza HA subtypes. → The universal antibodies cross-neutralize different influenza A subtypes. → The universal antibodies inhibit the fusion process between the viruses and the target cells. -- Abstract: The fusion peptide of influenza viral hemagglutinin plays a critical role in virus entry by facilitating membrane fusion between the virus and target cells. As the fusion peptide is the only universally conserved epitope in all influenza A and B viruses, it could be an attractive target for vaccine-induced immune responses. We previously reported that antibodies targeting the first 14 amino acids of the N-terminus of the fusion peptide could bind to virtually all influenza virus strains and quantify hemagglutinins in vaccines produced in embryonated eggs. Here we demonstrate that these universal antibodies bind to the viral hemagglutinins in native conformation presented in infected mammalian cell cultures and neutralize multiple subtypes of virus by inhibiting the pH-dependant fusion of viral and cellular membranes. These results suggest that this unique, highly-conserved linear sequence in viral hemagglutinin is exposed sufficiently to be attacked by the antibodies during the course of infection and merits further investigation because of potential importance in the protection against diverse strains of influenza viruses.

  5. Electron-detachment cross sections of halogen negative-ion projectiles for inertial confinement fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sant'Anna, M. M.; Zappa, F.; Santos, A. C. F.; de Barros, A. L. F.; Wolff, W.; Coelho, L. F. S.; de Castro Faria, N. V.

    2004-07-01

    Negative-ion beams have recently been suggested as sources of high-energy heavy atoms to be used as drivers for inertial confinement fusion (ICF). Owing to their electron affinities limited to a few eV, anions can be efficiently photo-detached in the vicinity of the fusion chamber, with the resulting high-velocity neutral projectiles following ballistic trajectories towards the hydrogen pellet target. Electron-detachment cross sections are needed as parameters to estimate the beam attenuation in the path from the ion source to the hydrogen pellet. Halogen anions are possible projectile choices. In this paper we present experimental data for total electron-detachment cross sections for F-, Cl-, Br- and I- ions incident on N2, in the 0.94-74 keV u-1 energy range. Our measurements can benchmark theory on anion electron detachment at intermediate to high velocities. Comparison between different projectiles shows very similar collision velocity dependencies. A simple geometrical scaling is presented, providing an estimate for electron-detachment cross sections at the MeV u-1 energy range. The presented scaling indicates that the vacuum requirements due to the use of halogen anions for ICF are less critical than previously suggested.

  6. Electron-detachment cross sections of halogen negative-ion projectiles for inertial confinement fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sant'Anna, M M; Zappa, F; Santos, A C F; Barros, A L F de; Wolff, W; Coelho, L F S; Faria, N V de Castro

    2004-01-01

    Negative-ion beams have recently been suggested as sources of high-energy heavy atoms to be used as drivers for inertial confinement fusion (ICF). Owing to their electron affinities limited to a few eV, anions can be efficiently photo-detached in the vicinity of the fusion chamber, with the resulting high-velocity neutral projectiles following ballistic trajectories towards the hydrogen pellet target. Electron-detachment cross sections are needed as parameters to estimate the beam attenuation in the path from the ion source to the hydrogen pellet. Halogen anions are possible projectile choices. In this paper we present experimental data for total electron-detachment cross sections for F - , Cl - , Br - and I - ions incident on N 2 , in the 0.94-74 keV u -1 energy range. Our measurements can benchmark theory on anion electron detachment at intermediate to high velocities. Comparison between different projectiles shows very similar collision velocity dependencies. A simple geometrical scaling is presented, providing an estimate for electron-detachment cross sections at the MeV u -1 energy range. The presented scaling indicates that the vacuum requirements due to the use of halogen anions for ICF are less critical than previously suggested

  7. FENDL/A-2.0. Neutron activation cross section data library for fusion applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pashchenko, A.B.; Wienke, H.; Kopecky, J.; Sublet, J.C. Sublet; Forrest, R.A.

    1997-01-01

    This document describes the contents of a comprehensive neutron cross section data library for 13,006 neutron activation reactions with 739 target nuclides from H (A=1,Z=1) to Cm (A=248,Z=96), in the incident energy range up to 20 MeV. FENDL/A-2 is a sublibrary of FENDL-2, the second revision of the evaluated nuclear data library for fusion applications. It is supplemented by a decay data library FENDL/D-2 in ENDF-6 format for 1867 nuclides. The data are available from the IAEA Nuclear Data Section online via INTERNET by FTP command, or on magnetic tape upon request. (author)

  8. FENDL/E-2.0. Evaluated nuclear data library of neutron-nucleus interaction cross sections and photon production cross sections and photon-atom interaction cross sections for fusion applications. Version 1, March 1997. Summary documentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pashchenko, A.B.; Wienke, H.

    1998-01-01

    This document presents the description of a physical tape containing the basic evaluated nuclear data library of neutron-nucleus interaction cross sections, photon production cross sections and photon-atom interaction cross sections for fusion applications. It is part of the evaluated nuclear data library for fusion applications FENDL-2. The data are available cost-free from the Nuclear Data Section upon request. The data can also be retrieved by the user via online access through international computer networks. (author)

  9. Comprehensive neutron cross-section and secondary energy distribution uncertainty analysis for a fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerstl, S.A.W.; LaBauve, R.J.; Young, P.G.

    1980-05-01

    On the example of General Atomic's well-documented Power Generating Fusion Reactor (PGFR) design, this report exercises a comprehensive neutron cross-section and secondary energy distribution (SED) uncertainty analysis. The LASL sensitivity and uncertainty analysis code SENSIT is used to calculate reaction cross-section sensitivity profiles and integral SED sensitivity coefficients. These are then folded with covariance matrices and integral SED uncertainties to obtain the resulting uncertainties of three calculated neutronics design parameters: two critical radiation damage rates and a nuclear heating rate. The report documents the first sensitivity-based data uncertainty analysis, which incorporates a quantitative treatment of the effects of SED uncertainties. The results demonstrate quantitatively that the ENDF/B-V cross-section data files for C, H, and O, including their SED data, are fully adequate for this design application, while the data for Fe and Ni are at best marginally adequate because they give rise to response uncertainties up to 25%. Much higher response uncertainties are caused by cross-section and SED data uncertainties in Cu (26 to 45%), tungsten (24 to 54%), and Cr (up to 98%). Specific recommendations are given for re-evaluations of certain reaction cross-sections, secondary energy distributions, and uncertainty estimates

  10. Two-dimensional cross-section and SED uncertainty analysis for the Fusion Engineering Device (FED)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Embrechts, M.J.; Urban, W.T.; Dudziak, D.J.

    1982-01-01

    The theory of two-dimensional cross-section and secondary-energy-distribution (SED) sensitivity was implemented by developing a two-dimensional sensitivity and uncertainty analysis code, SENSIT-2D. Analyses of the Fusion Engineering Design (FED) conceptual inboard shield indicate that, although the calculated uncertainties in the 2-D model are of the same order of magnitude as those resulting from the 1-D model, there might be severe differences. The more complex the geometry, the more compulsory a 2-D analysis becomes. Specific results show that the uncertainty for the integral heating of the toroidal field (TF) coil for the FED is 114.6%. The main contributors to the cross-section uncertainty are chromium and iron. Contributions to the total uncertainty were smaller for nickel, copper, hydrogen and carbon. All analyses were performed with the Los Alamos 42-group cross-section library generated from ENDF/B-V data, and the COVFILS covariance matrix library. The large uncertainties due to chromium result mainly from large convariances for the chromium total and elastic scattering cross sections

  11. Integral tests of coupled multigroup neutron and gamma cross sections with fission and fusion sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schriewer, J.; Hehn, G.; Mattes, M.; Pfister, G.; Keinert, J.

    1978-01-01

    Calculations were made for different benchmark experiments in order to test the coupled multigroup neutron and gamma library EURLIB-3 with 100 neutron groups and 20 gamma groups. In cooperation with EURATOM, Ispra, we produced this shielding library recently from ENDF/B-IV data for application in fission and fusion technology. Integral checks were performed for natural lithium, carbon, oxygen, and iron. Since iron is the most important structural material in nuclear technology, we started with calculations of iron benchmark experiments. Most of them are integral experiments of INR, Karlsruhe, but comparisons were also done with benchmark experiments from USA and Japan. For the experiments with fission sources we got satisfying results. All details of the resonances cannot be checked with flux measurements and multigroup cross sections used. But some averaged resonance behaviour of the measured and calculated fluxes can be compared and checked within the error limits given. We get greater differences in the calculations of benchmark experiments with 14 MeV neutron sources. For iron the group cross sections of EURLIB-3 produce an underestimation of the neutron flux in a broad energy region below the source energy. The conclusion is that the energy degradation by inelastic scattering is too strong. For fusion application the anisotropy of the inelastic scatter process must be taken into account, which isn't done by the processing codes at present. If this effect isn't enough, additional corrections have to be applied to the inelastic cross sections of iron in ENDF/B-IV. (author)

  12. Correlation between the 12C+12C, 12C+13C, and 13C+13C fusion cross sections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Notani, M.; Esbensen, H.; Fang, X.; Bucher, B.; Davies, P.; Jiang, C. L.; Lamm, L.; Lin, C. J.; Ma, C.; Martin, E.; Rehm, K. E.; Tan, W. P.; Thomas, S.; Tang, X. D.; Brown, E.

    2012-01-01

    The fusion cross section for 12C+13C has been measured down to Ec.m.=2.6 MeV, at which the cross section is of the order of 20 nb. By comparing the cross sections for the three carbon isotope systems, 12C+12C, 12C+13C, and 13C+13C, it is found that the cross sections for 12C+13C and 13C+13C provide an upper limit for the fusion cross section of 12C+12C over a wide energy range. After calibrating the effective nuclear potential for 12C+12C using the 12C+13C and 13C+13C fusion cross sections, it is found that a coupled-channels calculation with the ingoing wave boundary condition (IWBC) is capable of predicting the major peak cross sections in 12C+12C. A qualitative explanation for this upper limit is provided by the Nogami-Imanishi model and by level density differences among the compound nuclei. It is found that the strong resonance found at 2.14 MeV in 12C+12C exceeds this upper limit by a factor of more than 20. The preliminary result from the most recent measurement shows a much smaller cross section at this energy, which agrees with our predicted upper limit.

  13. Experimental measurement of the 12C+16O fusion cross sections at astrophysical energies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, X.; Tan, W. P.; Beard, M.; deBoer, R. J.; Gilardy, G.; Jung, H.; Liu, Q.; Lyons, S.; Robertson, D.; Setoodehnia, K.; Seymour, C.; Stech, E.; Vande Kolk, B.; Wiescher, M.; de Souza, R.; Hudan, S.; Singh, V.; Tang, X. D.; Uberseder, E.

    2018-05-01

    The total cross sections of the 12C+16O fusion have been experimentally determined at low energies to investigate the role of this reaction during late stellar evolution burning phases. A high-intensity oxygen beam was produced by the 5MV pelletron accelerator at the University of Notre Dame impinging on a thick ultra-pure graphite target. Protons and γ-rays were measured simultaneously in the center-of-mass energy range from 3.64 to 5.01 MeV, using strip silicon and HPGe detectors. Statistical model calculations were employed to interpret the experimental results. A new broad resonance-like structure is observed for the 12C+16O reaction, and a decreasing trend of its S-factor towards low energies is found.

  14. Neutronic calculation and cross section sensitivity analysis of the Livermore mirror fusion/fission hybrid reactor blanket

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ku, L.P.; Price, W.G. Jr.

    1977-08-01

    The neutronic calculation for the Livermore mirror fusion/fission hybrid reactor blanket was performed using the PPPL cross section library. Significant differences were found in the tritium breeding and plutonium production in comparison to the results of the LLL calculation. The cross section sensitivity study for tritium breeding indicates that the response is sensitive to the cross section of 238 U in the neighborhood of 14 MeV and 1 MeV. The response is also sensitive to the cross sections of iron in the vicinity of 14 MeV near the first wall. Neutron transport in the resonance region is not important in this reactor model

  15. 1st IAEA research co-ordination meeting on charge exchange cross section data for fusion plasma studies. Summary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janev, R.K.

    1999-02-01

    A brief description of the proceedings and the conclusions of the 1st Research Coordination Meeting on 'Charge Exchange Cross Section Data for Fusion Plasma Studies', held on September 24-25, 1999, at the IAEA Headquarters in Vienna, Austria, is provided. The conclusions of the Meeting regarding the data collection, assessment and generation priorities are also included in the report. (author)

  16. Mass spectra and fusion cross sections for 20Ne+24Mg interaction at 55 and 85 MeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grotowski, K.; Belery, P.; Delbar, T.; El Masri, Y.; Gregoire, G.; Janssens, R.; Vervier, J.; Paic, G.; Albinska, M.; Albinski, J.; Kopta, S.; Kozik, T.; Planeta, R.

    1981-01-01

    Inclusive γ spectra from the 20 Ne+ 24 Mg interaction have been measured using 55- and 85-MeV 20 Ne ions. The identification of γ lines allows the determination of mass spectra in the region 12< or =A< or =43. Experimental results are compared with statistical model calculations. The total reaction and fusion cross sections are extracted. Cross sections for inelastic scattering, few nucleon transfers, and deep inelastic scattering are estimated

  17. Remote Sensing of Three-dimensional Winds with Elastic Lidar: Explanation of Maximum Cross-correlation Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buttler, William T.; Soriano, Cecilia; Baldasano, Jose M.; Nickel, George H.

    Maximum cross-correlation provides a method toremotely de-ter-mine high-lyre-solved three-dimensional fields of horizontalwinds with e-las-tic li-darthrough-out large volumes of the planetaryboundary layer (PBL). This paperdetails the technique and shows comparisonsbetween elastic lidar winds, remotelysensed laser Doppler velocimeter (LDV) windprofiles, and radiosonde winds.Radiosonde wind data were acquired at Barcelona,Spain, during the BarcelonaAir-Quality Initiative (1992), and the LDVwind data were acquired at SunlandPark, New Mexico during the 1994 Border AreaAir-Quality Study. Comparisonsshow good agreement between the differentinstruments, and demonstrate the methoduseful for air pollution management at thelocal/regional scale. Elastic lidar windscould thus offer insight into aerosol andpollution transport within the PBL. Lidarwind fields might also be used to nudge orimprove initialization and evaluation ofatmospheric meteorological models.

  18. Prevalence of mental illness among inmates at Mukobeko maximum security prison in Zambia: A cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mweene T Mweene

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The objective of this study is to determine the prevalence and sociodemographic correlates for mental illness among inmates at Mukobeko Maximum Security Prison, Zambia. Materials and Methods: A cross sectional study was conducted to assess psychiatric disturbance using a Self-Reported Questionnaire (SRQ20. A cut off point of 7/8 was used. The Chi-square test and Fishers′ exact test were used to determine associations at the 5% significance level, and magnitude of association was estimated using the odds ratio and its 95% confidence interval. Results: Of the 394 inmates in prison, 29.2% had a current mental illness. Gender status was significantly associated with mental illness. Male participants were 35% (odds ratio = 0.65, 95% confidence interval [0.51, 0.82] less likely to have mental illness compared to female participants. Conclusions: The prevalence of mental illness is high in Mukobeko Maximum Security Prison in Zambia. Gender-specific interventions should be designed to reduce the level of mental illness in this prison.

  19. A cross-section sensitivity and uncertainty analysis on fusion reactor blankets with SAD/SED effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furuta, Kazuo; Oka, Yoshiaki; Kondo, Shunsuke

    1986-01-01

    A cross-section sensitivity and uncertainty analysis on four types of fusion reactor blankets has been performed, based on cross-section covariance matrices. The design parameters investigated in the analysis include the tritium breeding ratio, the neutron heating and the fast neutron leakage flux from the inboard shield. Uncertainities in Secondary Angular Distribution (SAD) and Secondary Energy Distribution (SED) of scattered neutrons have been considered for lithium. The collective standard deviation, due to uncertainties in the evaluated cross-section data presently available, is 2-4% in the tritium breeding ratio, 2-3% in the neutron heating, and 10-20% in the fast neutron leakage flux. Contributions from SAD/SED uncertainties are significant for some parameters, such as those investigated in the present study. SAD/SED uncertainties should be considered in the sensitivity and uncertainty analysis on nuclear design of fusion reactors. (orig.)

  20. FENDL/E. Evaluated nuclear data library of neutron nuclear interaction cross-sections and photon production cross-sections and photon-atom interaction cross sections for fusion applications. Version 1.1 of November 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pashchenko, A.B.; Wienke, H.; Ganesan, S.; McLaughlin, P.K.

    1996-01-01

    This document presents the description of a physical tape containing the basic evaluated nuclear data library of neutron nuclear interaction cross-sections and photon production cross-sections and photon-atom interaction cross-sections for fusion applications. It is part of FENDL, the evaluated nuclear data library for fusion applications. The nuclear data are available cost-free for distribution to interested scientists upon request. The data can also be retrieved by the user via online access through international computer networks. (author). 11 refs, 1 tab

  1. Measurements of fusion neutron yields by neutron activation technique: Uncertainty due to the uncertainty on activation cross-sections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stankunas, Gediminas, E-mail: gediminas.stankunas@lei.lt [Lithuanian Energy Institute, Laboratory of Nuclear Installation Safety, Breslaujos str. 3, LT-44403 Kaunas (Lithuania); EUROfusion Consortium, JET, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Batistoni, Paola [ENEA, Via E. Fermi, 45, 00044 Frascati, Rome (Italy); EUROfusion Consortium, JET, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Sjöstrand, Henrik; Conroy, Sean [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University, PO Box 516, SE-75120 Uppsala (Sweden); EUROfusion Consortium, JET, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom)

    2015-07-11

    The neutron activation technique is routinely used in fusion experiments to measure the neutron yields. This paper investigates the uncertainty on these measurements as due to the uncertainties on dosimetry and activation reactions. For this purpose, activation cross-sections were taken from the International Reactor Dosimetry and Fusion File (IRDFF-v1.05) in 640 groups ENDF-6 format for several reactions of interest for both 2.5 and 14 MeV neutrons. Activation coefficients (reaction rates) have been calculated using the neutron flux spectra at JET vacuum vessel, both for DD and DT plasmas, calculated by MCNP in the required 640-energy group format. The related uncertainties for the JET neutron spectra are evaluated as well using the covariance data available in the library. These uncertainties are in general small, but not negligible when high accuracy is required in the determination of the fusion neutron yields.

  2. Optimisation of sea surface current retrieval using a maximum cross correlation technique on modelled sea surface temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heuzé, Céline; Eriksson, Leif; Carvajal, Gisela

    2017-04-01

    Using sea surface temperature from satellite images to retrieve sea surface currents is not a new idea, but so far its operational near-real time implementation has not been possible. Validation studies are too region-specific or uncertain, due to the errors induced by the images themselves. Moreover, the sensitivity of the most common retrieval method, the maximum cross correlation, to the three parameters that have to be set is unknown. Using model outputs instead of satellite images, biases induced by this method are assessed here, for four different seas of Western Europe, and the best of nine settings and eight temporal resolutions are determined. For all regions, tracking a small 5 km pattern from the first image over a large 30 km region around its original location on a second image, separated from the first image by 6 to 9 hours returned the most accurate results. Moreover, for all regions, the problem is not inaccurate results but missing results, where the velocity is too low to be picked by the retrieval. The results are consistent both with limitations caused by ocean surface current dynamics and with the available satellite technology, indicating that automated sea surface current retrieval from sea surface temperature images is feasible now, for search and rescue operations, pollution confinement or even for more energy efficient and comfortable ship navigation.

  3. Cross-Cultural Comparative Analysis of Lay and Stake holder Reasoning about Fusion Energy in Spain and the UK

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prades, A; Horlick-Jones, T; Oltra, C; Navajas, J

    2009-07-01

    This report presents the results of a cross-cultural comparative analysis of two corpora of data from Spain and the UK on lay and stake holders understanding and reasoning about fusion energy. The very same novel methodological approach was applied in Spain and the UK to promote a learning and deliberative process about fusion energy. A brief description of the method is included first, followed by the description of the two corpora of data. Next the main Spanish findings data are discussed in the light of the UK data and then vice versa (in other words, we first interrogate the UK corpus of data to look for resonances or places of tension with the Spanish findings, and then the other way around). Then we present the results of evaluating the Spanish and UK group-based processes as engagement exercises. Finally, the key conclusions of this cross-cultural data analysis are summarized. (Author) 40 refs.

  4. Cross-Cultural Comparative Analysis of Lay and Stake holder Reasoning about Fusion Energy in Spain and the UK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prades, A.; Horlick-Jones, T.; Oltra, C.; Navajas, J.

    2009-01-01

    This report presents the results of a cross-cultural comparative analysis of two corpora of data from Spain and the UK on lay and stake holders understanding and reasoning about fusion energy. The very same novel methodological approach was applied in Spain and the UK to promote a learning and deliberative process about fusion energy. A brief description of the method is included first, followed by the description of the two corpora of data. Next the main Spanish findings data are discussed in the light of the UK data and then vice versa (in other words, we first interrogate the UK corpus of data to look for resonances or places of tension with the Spanish findings, and then the other way around). Then we present the results of evaluating the Spanish and UK group-based processes as engagement exercises. Finally, the key conclusions of this cross-cultural data analysis are summarized. (Author) 40 refs.

  5. Activation cross sections for the generation of long-lived radionuclides of importance in fusion reactor technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Dahai

    1990-01-01

    The proceedings contain the progress reports of the Coordinated Research Programme to measure and evaluate the activation cross sections for the generation of long-lived radionuclides of importance in fusion reactor technology and the contributed papers (9) presented at the Consultants' Meeting held at Argonne National Laboratory between 11-12 September 1989. A separate abstract was prepared for each paper. Refs, figs and tabs

  6. Electron stripping cross sections for light impurity ions in colliding with atomic hydrogens relevant to fusion research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tawara, H.

    1992-04-01

    Electron stripping (ionization) cross sections for impurity (carbon) ions with various charge states in collisions with atomic hydrogens have been surveyed. It has been found that these data are relatively limited both in collision energy and charge state and, in particular those necessary for high energy neutral beam injection (NBI) heating in fusion plasma research are scarce. Some relevant cross sections for carbon ions, C q+ (q = 0-5) have been estimated, based upon the existing data, empirical behavior and electron impact ionization data. (author)

  7. Social networks, leisure activities and maximum tongue pressure: cross-sectional associations in the Nagasaki Islands Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagayoshi, Mako; Higashi, Miho; Takamura, Noboru; Tamai, Mami; Koyamatsu, Jun; Yamanashi, Hirotomo; Kadota, Koichiro; Sato, Shimpei; Kawashiri, Shin-Ya; Koyama, Zenya; Saito, Toshiyuki; Maeda, Takahiro

    2017-12-06

    Social environment is often associated with health outcomes, but epidemiological evidence for its effect on oral frailty, a potential risk factor for aspiration, is sparse. This study aimed to assess the association between social environment and tongue pressure, as an important measure of oral function. The study focused on family structure, social networks both with and beyond neighbours, and participation in leisure activities. A population-based cross-sectional study. Annual health check-ups in a rural community in Japan. A total of 1982 participants, all over 40 years old. Anyone with missing data for the main outcome (n=14) was excluded. Tongue pressure was measured three times, and the maximum tongue pressure was used for analysis. A multivariable adjusted regression model was used to calculate parameter estimates (B) for tongue pressure. Having a social network involving neighbours (B=2.43, P=0.0001) and taking part in leisure activities (B=1.58, P=0.005) were independently associated with higher tongue pressure, but there was no link with social networks beyond neighbours (B=0.23, P=0.77). Sex-specific analyses showed that for men, having a partner was associated with higher tongue pressure, independent of the number of people in the household (B=2.26, P=0.01), but there was no association among women (B=-0.24, P=0.72; P-interaction=0.059). Having a social network involving neighbours and taking part in leisure activities were independently associated with higher tongue pressure. Marital status may be an important factor in higher tongue pressure in men. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  8. Activation cross sections for the generation of long-lived radionuclides of importance in fusion reactor technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pashchenko, A.B.

    1993-11-01

    The present report contains the Summary of the Second IAEA Research Co-ordination Meeting (RCM) on ''Activation Cross Sections for the Generation of Long-Lived Radionuclides of Importance in Fusion Reactor Technology'' which was hosted by TSI Research at Del Mar near San Diego and held from 29 to 30 April 1993. This RCM was organized by the IAEA Nuclear Data Section (NDS), with the cooperation and assistance of local organizers from TSI Research and Westinghouse Hanford Company. Tables of 14 MeV cross sections and cross sections below 14 MeV are included. The papers prepared and presented by the participants at the meeting has been published as separate report INDC(NDS)-286/L. 3 tabs

  9. Microscopic calculation of sub-barrier fusion cross section and barrier distribution using M3Y-type forces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ismail, M.; Ramadan, Kh.A.

    2000-01-01

    The heavy-ion (HI) potential between spherical and deformed nuclei is derived using an M3Y-type nucleon-nucleon (NN) interaction. The calculation of the exchange part of the HI potential was improved by using a finite-range NN exchange force instead of the zero-range pseudo-potential which is usually used in deriving the potential between deformed nuclei. We consider an 154 Sm- 16 O nuclear pair as an example to show the effect of finite range on the nucleus-nucleus potential for different deformation parameters and at different orientation angles of the deformed target nucleus. We calculated the fusion cross section and the barrier distribution in the WKB approximation and studied their dependence on the orientation and deformation of the target nucleus. The variations found due to improving the exchange part enhance the fusion cross section below the Coulomb barrier by a factor of about four. It has been found that both the cross section and the barrier distribution are very sensitive to the deformation parameters at energies below the Coulomb barrier. (author)

  10. Microscopic calculation of sub-barrier fusion cross section and barrier distribution using M3Y-type forces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ismail, M.; Ramadan, Kh.A. [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Cairo University, Giza (Egypt)

    2000-10-01

    The heavy-ion (HI) potential between spherical and deformed nuclei is derived using an M3Y-type nucleon-nucleon (NN) interaction. The calculation of the exchange part of the HI potential was improved by using a finite-range NN exchange force instead of the zero-range pseudo-potential which is usually used in deriving the potential between deformed nuclei. We consider an {sup 154}Sm-{sup 16}O nuclear pair as an example to show the effect of finite range on the nucleus-nucleus potential for different deformation parameters and at different orientation angles of the deformed target nucleus. We calculated the fusion cross section and the barrier distribution in the WKB approximation and studied their dependence on the orientation and deformation of the target nucleus. The variations found due to improving the exchange part enhance the fusion cross section below the Coulomb barrier by a factor of about four. It has been found that both the cross section and the barrier distribution are very sensitive to the deformation parameters at energies below the Coulomb barrier. (author)

  11. The cross sections of fusion-evaporation reactions: the most promising route to superheavy elements beyond Z=118

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jadambaa Khuyagbaatar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The synthesis of superheavy elements beyond oganesson (Og, which has atomic number Z = 118, is currently one of the main topics in nuclear physics. An absence of sufficient amounts of target material with atomic numbers heavier than californium (Z = 98 forces the use of projectiles heavier than 48Ca (Z = 20, which has been successfully used for the discoveries of elements with Z = 114 - 118 in complete fusion reactions. Experimental cross sections of 48Ca with actinide targets behave very differently to “cold” and “hot” fusion-evaporation reactions, where doubly-magic lead and deformed actinides are used as targets, respectively. The known cross sections of these reactions have been analysed compared to calculated fission barriers. It has been suggested that observed discrepancies between the cross sections of 48Ca-induced and other fusionevaporation reactions originate from the shell structure of the compound nucleus, which lies in the island of the stability. Besides scarcely known data on other reactions involving heavier projectiles, the most promising projectile for the synthesis of the elements beyond Og seems to be 50Ti. However, detailed studies of 50Ti, 54Cr, 58Fe and 64Ni-induced reactions are necessary to be performed in order to fully understand the complexities of superheavy element formation.

  12. The cross sections of fusion-evaporation reactions: the most promising route to superheavy elements beyond Z=118

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jadambaa, Khuyagbaatar

    2017-11-01

    The synthesis of superheavy elements beyond oganesson (Og), which has atomic number Z = 118, is currently one of the main topics in nuclear physics. An absence of sufficient amounts of target material with atomic numbers heavier than californium (Z = 98) forces the use of projectiles heavier than 48Ca (Z = 20), which has been successfully used for the discoveries of elements with Z = 114 - 118 in complete fusion reactions. Experimental cross sections of 48Ca with actinide targets behave very differently to "cold" and "hot" fusion-evaporation reactions, where doubly-magic lead and deformed actinides are used as targets, respectively. The known cross sections of these reactions have been analysed compared to calculated fission barriers. It has been suggested that observed discrepancies between the cross sections of 48Ca-induced and other fusionevaporation reactions originate from the shell structure of the compound nucleus, which lies in the island of the stability. Besides scarcely known data on other reactions involving heavier projectiles, the most promising projectile for the synthesis of the elements beyond Og seems to be 50Ti. However, detailed studies of 50Ti, 54Cr, 58Fe and 64Ni-induced reactions are necessary to be performed in order to fully understand the complexities of superheavy element formation.

  13. Nuclear data processing for cross-sections generation for fusion-fission, ADS, and IV generation reactors utilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Velasquez, Carlos E.; Fernandes, Lorena C.; Pereira, Claubia; Veloso, Maria Auxiliadora F.; Costa, Antonella L. [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Departamento de Engenharia Nuclear

    2017-11-01

    One of the mains topics about nuclear reactors is the microscopic cross section for incident neutrons. Therefore, in this work, it is evaluated the microscopic and macroscopic cross section for a nuclide and a material. One of the nuclides microscopic cross-section studied is the {sup 56}Fe which is the highest compound from the material macroscopic cross section studied SS316. On the other hand, it was studied the microscopic cross section of the {sup 242}Pu which is one of the nuclides that composes the nuclear fuel. The nuclear fuel chosen is a spent fuel reprocessed by UREX+ technique and spiked with thorium with 20% of fissile material. Therefore it was studied the macroscopic cross section from this nuclear fuel. Both of them were compared by using three different ways to reprocess the nuclides, one for LWR, another for ADS and the last one for Fusion reactors. The library used was JEFF-3.2 recommend for the reactors studied. The comparison was made at 1200 K for the nuclear fuel and 700K for the SS316.The results present differences due to the energy discretization, the number of groups chosen for each reactor and some nuclear reactions taken into consideration according to the neutron spectrum for each reactor. The nuclides were processed by NJOY99.364 and plotted with MCNP-Vised. (author)

  14. Nuclear data processing for cross-sections generation for fusion-fission, ADS, and IV generation reactors utilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Velasquez, Carlos E.; Fernandes, Lorena C.; Pereira, Claubia; Veloso, Maria Auxiliadora F.; Costa, Antonella L.

    2017-01-01

    One of the mains topics about nuclear reactors is the microscopic cross section for incident neutrons. Therefore, in this work, it is evaluated the microscopic and macroscopic cross section for a nuclide and a material. One of the nuclides microscopic cross-section studied is the 56 Fe which is the highest compound from the material macroscopic cross section studied SS316. On the other hand, it was studied the microscopic cross section of the 242 Pu which is one of the nuclides that composes the nuclear fuel. The nuclear fuel chosen is a spent fuel reprocessed by UREX+ technique and spiked with thorium with 20% of fissile material. Therefore it was studied the macroscopic cross section from this nuclear fuel. Both of them were compared by using three different ways to reprocess the nuclides, one for LWR, another for ADS and the last one for Fusion reactors. The library used was JEFF-3.2 recommend for the reactors studied. The comparison was made at 1200 K for the nuclear fuel and 700K for the SS316.The results present differences due to the energy discretization, the number of groups chosen for each reactor and some nuclear reactions taken into consideration according to the neutron spectrum for each reactor. The nuclides were processed by NJOY99.364 and plotted with MCNP-Vised. (author)

  15. Fusion evaporation-residue cross sections for 28Si+40Ca at E(28Si)=309, 397, and 452 MeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vineyard, M.F.; Bauer, J.S.; Crum, J.F.; Gosdin, C.H.; Trotter, R.S.; Kovar, D.G.; Beck, C.; Henderson, D.J.; Janssens, R.V.F.; Wilkins, B.D.; Maguire, C.F.; Mateja, J.F.; Prosser, F.W.; Stephans, G.S.F.

    1992-01-01

    Velocity distributions of mass-identified evaporation residues produced in the 28 Si+ 40 Ca reaction have been measured at bombarding energies of 309, 397, and 452 MeV using time-of-flight techniques. These distributions were used to identify evaporation residues and to separate the complete-fusion and incomplete-fusion components. Angular distributions and upper limits for the total evaporation-residue and complete-fusion evaporation-residue cross sections were extracted at all three bombarding energies. The complete-fusion evaporation-residue cross sections and the deduced critical angular momenta are compared with earlier measurements and the predictions of existing models. The ratios of the complete-fusion evaporation-residue cross section to the total evaporation-residue cross section, along with those measured for the 28 Si+ 12 C and 28 Si+ 28 Si systems at the same energies, support the entrance-channel mass-asymmetry dependence of the incomplete-fusion evaporation-residue process reported earlier

  16. Measurements of fusion cross sections in the systems {sup 58,64}Ni +, {sup 78,86}Kr

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rehm, K.E.; Jiang, C.L.; Esbensen, H. [and others

    1995-08-01

    We investigated the nuclear structure dependence of the sub-barrier fusion enhancement in heavy-ion induced reactions by studying the systems {sup 58,64}Ni + {sup 78,86}Kr at energies in the vicinity of the Coulomb barrier. These {sup 78,86}Kr selected because, similar to the Mo case discussed isotopes were above, there are strong changes in nuclear structure as a function of the neutron number. However, contrary to Mo, where the {open_quotes}softness{close_quotes} of the nucleus increases with higher neutron number, the most collective nucleus for the Kr case is the neutron-deficient {sup 78}Kr. The experiment was performed with Kr beams from the positive-ion injector using enriched {sup 78,86}Kr gas in the ECR ion source. The separation of evaporation residues from the elastically-scattered particles was achieved by using their difference in time-of-flight and magnetic rigidity in the gas-filled spectrograph. The excitation functions for the four systems were compared to coupled-channels calculations including inelastic excitations of one- and two-phonon states in projectile and target. For systems involving {sup 86}Kr, good agreement between theory and experiment is obtained, while for {sup 78}Kr + {sup 58,64}Ni an additional enhancement of the cross sections persisted at the lowest energies. It was found that this fusion enhancement correlates with the nuclear structure of the individual nucleus. Characterizing the structure of vibrational even-even nuclei by their restoring force parameter C{sub 2}, which can be calculated from the energy of the lowest 2{sup +} state and the associated B(E2) value, one observes that nuclei with small C{sub 2} values exhibit a large sub-barrier fusion enhancement, while nuclei with high values of C{sub 2} (usually closed-shell nuclei), show smaller fusion yields.

  17. Reference architecture and interoperability model for data mining and fusion in scientific cross-domain infrastructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haener, Rainer; Waechter, Joachim; Grellet, Sylvain; Robida, Francois

    2017-04-01

    Interoperability is the key factor in establishing scientific research environments and infrastructures, as well as in bringing together heterogeneous, geographically distributed risk management, monitoring, and early warning systems. Based on developments within the European Plate Observing System (EPOS), a reference architecture has been devised that comprises architectural blue-prints and interoperability models regarding the specification of business processes and logic as well as the encoding of data, metadata, and semantics. The architectural blueprint is developed on the basis of the so called service-oriented architecture (SOA) 2.0 paradigm, which combines intelligence and proactiveness of event-driven with service-oriented architectures. SOA 2.0 supports analysing (Data Mining) both, static and real-time data in order to find correlations of disparate information that do not at first appear to be intuitively obvious: Analysed data (e.g., seismological monitoring) can be enhanced with relationships discovered by associating them (Data Fusion) with other data (e.g., creepmeter monitoring), with digital models of geological structures, or with the simulation of geological processes. The interoperability model describes the information, communication (conversations) and the interactions (choreographies) of all participants involved as well as the processes for registering, providing, and retrieving information. It is based on the principles of functional integration, implemented via dedicated services, communicating via service-oriented and message-driven infrastructures. The services provide their functionality via standardised interfaces: Instead of requesting data directly, users share data via services that are built upon specific adapters. This approach replaces the tight coupling at data level by a flexible dependency on loosely coupled services. The main component of the interoperability model is the comprehensive semantic description of the information

  18. Fusion reaction cross-sections using the Wong model within Skyrme energy density based semiclassical extended Thomas Fermi approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Raj, E-mail: rajkumarfzr@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Panjab University, Chandigarh-160014 (India); School of Physics and Material Science, Thapar University, Patiala-147004 (India); Sharma, Manoj K. [School of Physics and Material Science, Thapar University, Patiala-147004 (India); Gupta, Raj K. [Department of Physics, Panjab University, Chandigarh-160014 (India)

    2011-11-15

    First, the nuclear proximity potential, obtained by using the semiclassical extended Thomas Fermi (ETF) approach in Skyrme energy density formalism (SEDF), is shown to give more realistic barriers in frozen density approximation, as compared to the sudden approximation. Then, taking advantage of the fact that, in ETF method, different Skyrme forces give different barriers (height, position and curvature), we use the l-summed extended-Wong model of Gupta and collaborators (2009) under frozen densities approximation for calculating the cross-sections, where the Skyrme force is chosen with proper barrier characteristics, not-requiring additional 'barrier modification' effects (lowering or narrowing, etc.), for a best fit to data at sub-barrier energies. The method is applied to capture cross-section data from {sup 48}Ca + {sup 238}U, {sup 244}Pu, and {sup 248}Cm reactions and to fusion-evaporation cross-sections from {sup 58}Ni + {sup 58}Ni, {sup 64}Ni + {sup 64}Ni, and {sup 64}Ni + {sup 100}Mo reactions, with effects of deformations and orientations of nuclei included, wherever required. Interestingly, whereas the capture cross-sections in Ca-induced reactions could be fitted to any force, such as SIII, SV and GSkI, by allowing a small change of couple of units in deduced l{sub max}-values at below-barrier energies, the near-barrier data point of {sup 48}Ca + {sup 248}Cm reaction could not be fitted to l{sub max}-values deduced for below-barrier energies, calling for a check of data. On the other hand, the fusion-evaporation cross-sections in Ni-induced reactions at sub-barrier energies required different Skyrme forces, representing 'modifications of the barrier', for the best fit to data at all incident center-of-mass energies E{sub c.m.}'s, displaying a kind of fusion hindrance at sub-barrier energies. This barrier modification effect is taken into care here by using different Skyrme forces for reactions belonging to different regions of

  19. Influence of mass asymmetry in fusion cross section of intermediate weight ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anjos, R.M. dos.

    1987-01-01

    The mass asymmetry degree effect on fusion, was investigated for different systems involving nucleus A projectie , A target ≤ 40, populating a compound nucleus. The following systems were studied: ( 19 F + 19 F), ( 12 C + 26 Mg) and ( 19 F + 12 C, 16 O, 27 Al, 40 Ca) in the energy range of 32 ≤ E lab ≤ 72 MeV and angular range 6 0 ≤ Θ lab ≤ 28 0 . The experimental method employed the time of flight technique, of the evaporation residuals. Analysis of excitation function indicate different behavior for symmetric and asymmetric systems suggesting that the presence of other more competitive processes is more pronounced in asymmetric entrance channels at high energies. These behaviors indicate that mass asymmetry is an important point in complete and incomplete fusion processes. (A.C.A.S.) [pt

  20. Fusion cross section measurements of astrophysical interest for light heavy ions systems within the STELLA project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fruet Guillaume

    2017-01-01

    The experimental setup composed of an ultra high vacuum reaction chamber, a set of 3 silicon strip detectors, up to 36 LaBr3(Ce scintillators from the UK FATIMA collaboration, and a fast rotating target system will be described. The 12C+12C fusion reaction has been studied from Elab = 11 to 5.6 MeV using STELLA at the Andromède facility in Orsay, France. Preliminary commissioning results are presented in this article.

  1. The systematic study of the influence of neutron excess on the fusion cross-sections using different proximity-type potentials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghodsi, O.N.; Gharaei, R.

    2012-01-01

    Using different types of proximity potentials, we have examined the trend of variations of barrier characteristics (barrier height and its position) as well as fusion cross-sections for 50 isotopic systems including various collisions of C, O, Mg, Si, S, Ca, Ar, Ti and Ni nuclei with the 1 ≤ N/Z < 1.6 condition for compound systems. The results of our studies reveal that the relationships between the increase of barrier positions and the decrease of barrier heights are both linear with the increase of the N/Z ratio. Moreover, fusion cross-sections also enhance linearly with the increase of this ratio. (orig.)

  2. Benchmarking of the FENDL-3 Neutron Cross-section Data Starter Library for Fusion Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, U., E-mail: ulrich.fischer@kit.edu [Association KIT-Euratom, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Angelone, M. [Associazione ENEA-Euratom, ENEA Fusion Division, Via E. Fermi 27, I-00044 Frascati (Italy); Bohm, T. [University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1500 Engineering Dr, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Kondo, K. [Association KIT-Euratom, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Konno, C. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai-mura, Naka-gun, Ibaraki-ken 319-1195 (Japan); Sawan, M. [University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1500 Engineering Dr, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Villari, R. [Associazione ENEA-Euratom, ENEA Fusion Division, Via E. Fermi 27, I-00044 Frascati (Italy); Walker, B. [University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1500 Engineering Dr, Madison, WI 53706 (United States)

    2014-06-15

    This paper summarizes the benchmark analyses performed in a joint effort of ENEA (Italy), JAEA (Japan), KIT (Germany), and the University of Wisconsin (USA) on a computational ITER benchmark and a series of 14 MeV neutron benchmark experiments. The computational benchmark revealed a modest increase of the neutron flux levels in the deep penetration regions and a substantial increase of the gas production in steel components. The comparison to experimental results showed good agreement with no substantial differences between FENDL-3.0 and FENDL-2.1 for most of the responses. In general, FENDL-3 shows an improved performance for fusion neutronics applications.

  3. Fusion systems engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1977-01-01

    Information is given on each of the following topics: (1) fusion reactor systems studies, (2) development of blanket processing technology for fusion reactors, (3) safety studies of CTR concepts, and (4) cross section measurements and techniques

  4. Benchmarking of the FENDL-3 Neutron Cross-Section Data Library for Fusion Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, U.; Kondo, K.; Angelone, M.; Batistoni, P.; Villari, R.; Bohm, T.; Sawan, M.; Walker, B.; Konno, C.

    2014-03-01

    This report summarizes the benchmark analyses performed in a joint effort of ENEA (Italy), JAEA (Japan), KIT (Germany), and the University of Wisconsin (USA) with the objective to test and qualify the neutron induced general purpose FENDL-3.0 data library for fusion applications. The benchmark approach consisted of two major steps including the analysis of a simple ITER-like computational benchmark, and a series of analyses of benchmark experiments conducted previously at the 14 MeV neutron generator facilities at ENEA Frascati, Italy (FNG) and JAEA, Tokai-mura, Japan (FNS). The computational benchmark revealed a modest increase of the neutron flux levels in the deep penetration regions and a substantial increase of the gas production in steel components. The comparison to experimental results showed good agreement with no substantial differences between FENDL-3.0 and FENDL-2.1 for most of the responses analysed. There is a slight trend, however, for an increase of the fast neutron flux in the shielding experiment and a decrease in the breeder mock-up experiments. The photon flux spectra measured in the bulk shield and the tungsten experiments are significantly better reproduced with FENDL-3.0 data. In general, FENDL-3, as compared to FENDL-2.1, shows an improved performance for fusion neutronics applications. It is thus recommended to ITER to replace FENDL-2.1 as reference data library for neutronics calculation by FENDL-3.0. (author)

  5. Fusion systems engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1978-01-01

    Research during this report period has covered the following areas: (1) fusion reactor systems studies, (2) development of blanket processing technology for fusion reactors, (3) safety studies of fusion concepts, (4) MACKLIB-IV, a new library of nuclear response functions, (5) energy storage and power supply requirements for commercial fusion reactors, (6) blanket/shield design evaluation for commercial fusion reactors, and (7) cross section measurements, evaluations, and techniques

  6. Cross-section data uncertainty and how such information is used in fusion analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kodeli, I.

    1999-01-01

    A sensitivity and uncertainty computer code package has been developed and already extensively used in the analyses for pressure vessel dosimetry and benchmark experiments. The procedure is based on the SUSD3D code and the VITAMIN-J/COVA covariance matrix library. The complete covariance matrices of secondary angular distribution (SAD-file MF=34), as available in the EFF-2 evaluation in ENDF/B-6 format can be treated. SAD effects can be important in particular for the fusion applications. An option to perform three-dimensional sensitivity and uncertainty analysis is included in the SUSD3D code. Use of angular moment files instead of bulky angular flux files produced by the discrete ordinates transport codes reduces considerably the size of the files required and represents an acceptable approximation for the problem types analysed here. The underlying perturbation theory is reviewed and some examples on the use are listed.(author)

  7. Effect of telescopic distal extension removable partial dentures on oral health related quality of life and maximum bite force: A preliminary cross over study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsyad, Moustafa Abdou; Mostafa, Aisha Zakaria

    2018-01-01

    This cross over study aimed to evaluate the effect of telescopic distal extension removable partial dentures on oral health related quality of life and maximum bite force MATERIALS AND METHODS: Twenty patients with complete maxillary edentulism and partially edentulous mandibles with anterior teeth only remaining were selected for this cross over study. All patients received complete maxillary dentures and mandibular partial removable dental prosthesis (PRDP, control). After 3 months of adaptation, PRDP was replaced with conventional telescopic partial dentures (TPD) or telescopic partial dentures with cantilevered extensions (TCPD) in a quasi-random method. Oral health related quality of life (OHRQoL) was measured using OHIP-14 questionnaire and Maximum bite force (MBF) was measured using a bite force transducer. Measurements were performed 3 months after using each of the following prostheses; PRDP, TPD, and TCPD. TCPD showed the OHIP-14 lowest scores (i.e., the highest patient satisfaction with their OHRQoL), followed by TPD, and PRDP showed the highest OHIP-14 scores (i.e., the lowest patient satisfaction with OHRQoL). TCPD showed the highest MBF (70.7 ± 3.71), followed by TPD (57.4 ± 3.43) and the lowest MBF (40.2 ± 2.20) was noted with PRDP. WITHIN The Limitations of This Study, Mandibular Telescopic Distal Extension Removable Partial Dentures with Cantilevered Extensions Were Associated with Improved Oral Health Related Quality of Life and Maximum Bite Force Compared to Telescopic or Conventional PRDP. Telescopic distal extension removable prostheses is an esthetic restoration in partially edentulous patients with free end saddle. This article describes the addition of cantilevered extensions of this prosthesis. The results showed that telescopic distal extension removable prostheses with cantilevered extensions were associated with improved oral health related quality of life and maximum bite force compared to telescopic or conventional RPDs

  8. Cross section sensitivity study for fusion blankets incorporating lead neutron multiplier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pelloni, S.; Cheng, E.T.

    1983-01-01

    In the recent European INTOR design, lead has been considered for incorporation in the blanket as either an explicit or implicit neutron multiplier. The blanket employs either Li 2 SiO 3 or Li 17 Pb 83 as tritium breeding material. Nucleonic analysis was performed for this blanket using the DLC37 and DLC41 cross section libraries. The reaction rates were estimated using the reaction cross sections provided with both libraries. In addition to that, they were estimated using the MACKLIB-IV response library. The calculated tritium breeding ratio was found to be 5% less and 15% more in the calculations with DLC41 and DLC41 plus MACKLIB-IV libraries, respectively, than in the calculation with the DLC37 library. The Fe, Pb, and Li cross sections given by the ENDF/B-IV and V were reviewed. A sensitivity study of these cross section uncertainties shows that the tritium breeding ratio is relatively insensitive to the above mentioned partial cross sections. The calculated tritium breeding ratio can be known within +-2%. (Auth.)

  9. Instrumental intelligent test of food sensory quality as mimic of human panel test combining multiple cross-perception sensors and data fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouyang, Qin; Zhao, Jiewen; Chen, Quansheng

    2014-09-02

    Instrumental test of food quality using perception sensors instead of human panel test is attracting massive attention recently. A novel cross-perception multi-sensors data fusion imitating multiple mammal perception was proposed for the instrumental test in this work. First, three mimic sensors of electronic eye, electronic nose and electronic tongue were used in sequence for data acquisition of rice wine samples. Then all data from the three different sensors were preprocessed and merged. Next, three cross-perception variables i.e., color, aroma and taste, were constructed using principal components analysis (PCA) and multiple linear regression (MLR) which were used as the input of models. MLR, back-propagation artificial neural network (BPANN) and support vector machine (SVM) were comparatively used for modeling, and the instrumental test was achieved for the comprehensive quality of samples. Results showed the proposed cross-perception multi-sensors data fusion presented obvious superiority to the traditional data fusion methodologies, also achieved a high correlation coefficient (>90%) with the human panel test results. This work demonstrated that the instrumental test based on the cross-perception multi-sensors data fusion can actually mimic the human test behavior, therefore is of great significance to ensure the quality of products and decrease the loss of the manufacturers. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Measurement and analysis of 14 MeV neutron-induced double-differential neutron emission cross sections needed for fission and fusion reactor technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Dahai.

    1990-10-01

    The main objectives of this IAEA Co-ordinated Research Programme are to improve the data on 14 MeV neutron-induced double-differential neutron emission cross sections for materials needed for fission and fusion reactor technology. This report summarizes the conclusions and recommendations which were agreed by all participants during the Second Research Co-ordination Meeting

  11. Study of the role of complete fusion in the reaction of /sup 48/Ca and /sup 56/Fe with cerium and terbium. [Cross sections, yield curves, tables

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morrissey, D.J.

    1978-05-01

    /sup 48/Ca and /sup 56/Fe beams from the Super HILAC accelerator were used to irradiate thick metal foils of cerium and terbium. Product gamma ray activities were detected offline and individual products were identified by half-life, gamma ray energy and gamma ray abundances. The production cross sections were iteratively fit to charge and mass dispersions to allow correction for parent decay and calculation of mass yields. From the mass yield curves contributions from quasielastic transfer, deep inelastic transfer and complete fusion reaction mechanisms were interred. Complete fusion was made up on contributions from both evaporation residue and fusion-fission products for the /sup 48/Ca induced reactions. However, only fusion-fission products were detected in the /sup 56/Fe induced reactions. Critical angular momenta for fusion were found to be 82 +- 8 h for /sup 48/Ca + /sup 159/Tb and 34 +- 5 h for /sup 56/Fe + /sup 140/Ce, which can be compared with 53 +- 8 h for /sup 12/C + /sup 197/Au (Natowitz, 1970) and 86 +- 5 h for /sup 40/Ar + /sup 165/Ho (Hanappe, 1973). All of these reactions lead to essentially the same compound nucleus and seem to show the dramatic decline in complete fusion for heavy ions larger than /sup 40/Ar. The prediction of this decline was found to be beyond the model calculations of Bass and the critical distance approach of Glas and Mosel.

  12. Fusion cross sections for 6,7Li + 24Mg at energies around the barrier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ray, Maitreyi; Pradhan, M.K.; Kshetri, R.; Mukherjee, A.; Saha Sarkar, M.; Biswas, M.; Roy, S.; Basu, P.; Majumdar, H.; Dasmahapatra, B.; Sinha, M.; Palit, R.; Mazumdar, I.; Joshi, P.K.; Jain, H.C.

    2006-01-01

    The 6,7 Li + 24 Mg reactions in the energy interval E lab = 11-32 MeV using 6,7 Li beams have been investigated from the 14 UD BARC-TIFR Pelletron accelerator at TIFR, Mumbai. The γ-ray cross sections were measured using a Compton suppressed clover detector, placed at 55 deg with respect to the beam direction

  13. Level crossings, excess times, and transient plasma–wall interactions in fusion plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Theodorsen, A., E-mail: audun.theodorsen@uit.no; Garcia, O. E., E-mail: odd.erik.garcia@uit.no [Department of Physics and Technology, UiT The Arctic University of Norway, N-9037 Tromsø (Norway)

    2016-04-15

    Based on a stochastic model for intermittent fluctuations in the boundary region of magnetically confined plasmas, an expression for the level crossing rate is derived from the joint distribution of the process and its derivative. From this the average time spent by the process above a certain threshold level is obtained. This provides novel predictions of plasma–wall interactions due to transient transport events associated with a radial motion of blob-like structures in the scrape-off layer.

  14. Stripping of two protons and one alpha particle transfer reactions for 16 O + A Sm and their influence on the fusion cross section

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maciel, A.M.M.; Gomes, P.R.S.

    1995-01-01

    Transfer cross section angular distribution data for the stripping of two protons and one alpha particle are studied for the 16 O + A Sm systems (A=144, 148, 150, 152 and 154), at near barrier energies. A semiclassical formalism is used to derive the corresponding transfer form factors. For only one channel the analysis shows evidences that the transfer reaction mechanism at backward angles - corresponding to small distances, may behave as a multi-step process leading to fusion. Simplified coupled channel calculations including transfer channels are performed for the study of the sub-barrier of these systems. The influence of short distance transfer reactions on the fusion is discussed. (author)

  15. Instrumental intelligent test of food sensory quality as mimic of human panel test combining multiple cross-perception sensors and data fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ouyang, Qin; Zhao, Jiewen; Chen, Quansheng

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • To develop a novel instrumental intelligent test methodology for food sensory analysis. • A novel data fusion was used in instrumental intelligent test methodology. • Linear and nonlinear tools were comparatively used for modeling. • The instrumental test methodology can be imitative of human test behavior. - Abstract: Instrumental test of food quality using perception sensors instead of human panel test is attracting massive attention recently. A novel cross-perception multi-sensors data fusion imitating multiple mammal perception was proposed for the instrumental test in this work. First, three mimic sensors of electronic eye, electronic nose and electronic tongue were used in sequence for data acquisition of rice wine samples. Then all data from the three different sensors were preprocessed and merged. Next, three cross-perception variables i.e., color, aroma and taste, were constructed using principal components analysis (PCA) and multiple linear regression (MLR) which were used as the input of models. MLR, back-propagation artificial neural network (BPANN) and support vector machine (SVM) were comparatively used for modeling, and the instrumental test was achieved for the comprehensive quality of samples. Results showed the proposed cross-perception multi-sensors data fusion presented obvious superiority to the traditional data fusion methodologies, also achieved a high correlation coefficient (>90%) with the human panel test results. This work demonstrated that the instrumental test based on the cross-perception multi-sensors data fusion can actually mimic the human test behavior, therefore is of great significance to ensure the quality of products and decrease the loss of the manufacturers

  16. Instrumental intelligent test of food sensory quality as mimic of human panel test combining multiple cross-perception sensors and data fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ouyang, Qin; Zhao, Jiewen; Chen, Quansheng, E-mail: qschen@ujs.edu.cn

    2014-09-02

    Highlights: • To develop a novel instrumental intelligent test methodology for food sensory analysis. • A novel data fusion was used in instrumental intelligent test methodology. • Linear and nonlinear tools were comparatively used for modeling. • The instrumental test methodology can be imitative of human test behavior. - Abstract: Instrumental test of food quality using perception sensors instead of human panel test is attracting massive attention recently. A novel cross-perception multi-sensors data fusion imitating multiple mammal perception was proposed for the instrumental test in this work. First, three mimic sensors of electronic eye, electronic nose and electronic tongue were used in sequence for data acquisition of rice wine samples. Then all data from the three different sensors were preprocessed and merged. Next, three cross-perception variables i.e., color, aroma and taste, were constructed using principal components analysis (PCA) and multiple linear regression (MLR) which were used as the input of models. MLR, back-propagation artificial neural network (BPANN) and support vector machine (SVM) were comparatively used for modeling, and the instrumental test was achieved for the comprehensive quality of samples. Results showed the proposed cross-perception multi-sensors data fusion presented obvious superiority to the traditional data fusion methodologies, also achieved a high correlation coefficient (>90%) with the human panel test results. This work demonstrated that the instrumental test based on the cross-perception multi-sensors data fusion can actually mimic the human test behavior, therefore is of great significance to ensure the quality of products and decrease the loss of the manufacturers.

  17. Measurements of activation cross sections for some long-lived nuclides important in fusion reactor technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blinov, M.V.; Filatenkov, A.A.; Chuvaev, S.V.

    1992-01-01

    The Ag-109(n,2n)Ag-108m, Eu-151(n,2n)Eu-150 and Eu-153(n,2n)Eu-152 cross sections have been measured in the neutron energy interval of 13.7-14.9 MeV. The measurements were performed at the neutron generator NG-400 of the Radium Institute using (D-T) neutrons. At the same facility the upper limit has been obtained for the W-182(n,n'a)Hf-178m 2 cross section. Neutron capture of the Mo-98 that lead ultimately to the production of the long-lived Tc-99 has been studied at neutron energies 0.7-2.0 MeV. For these purposes, the Van de Graaf accelerator (EG-5) was employed that produced monochromatic neutrons in the (p-T) reaction. Both at EG-5 and NG-400 measurements, special efforts were made to minimize neutron spectrum impurities which unavoidably arise in irradiation environments. (author). 15 refs, 6 figs, 1 tab

  18. Fusion events

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aboufirassi, M; Angelique, J.C.; Bizard, G.; Bougault, R.; Brou, R.; Buta, A.; Colin, J.; Cussol, D.; Durand, D.; Genoux-Lubain, A.; Horn, D.; Kerambrun, A.; Laville, J.L.; Le Brun, C.; Lecolley, J.F.; Lefebvres, F.; Lopez, O.; Louvel, M.; Meslin, C.; Metivier, V.; Nakagawa, T.; Peter, J.; Popescu, R.; Regimbart, R.; Steckmeyer, J.C.; Tamain, B.; Vient, E.; Wieloch, A.; Yuasa-Nakagawa, K.

    1998-01-01

    The fusion reactions between low energy heavy ions have a very high cross section. First measurements at energies around 30-40 MeV/nucleon indicated no residue of either complete or incomplete fusion, thus demonstrating the disappearance of this process. This is explained as being due to the high amount o energies transferred to the nucleus, what leads to its total dislocation in light fragments and particles. Exclusive analyses have permitted to mark clearly the presence of fusion processes in heavy systems at energies above 30-40 MeV/nucleon. Among the complete events of the Kr + Au reaction at 60 MeV/nucleon the majority correspond to binary collisions. Nevertheless, for the most considerable energy losses, a class of events do occur for which the detected fragments appears to be emitted from a unique source. These events correspond to an incomplete projectile-target fusion followed by a multifragmentation. Such events were singled out also in the reaction Xe + Sn at 50 MeV/nucleon. For the events in which the energy dissipation was maximal it was possible to isolate an isotropic group of events showing all the characteristics of fusion nuclei. The fusion is said to be incomplete as pre-equilibrium Z = 1 and Z = 2 particles are emitted. The cross section is of the order of 25 mb. Similar conclusions were drown for the systems 36 Ar + 27 Al and 64 Zn + nat Ti. A cross section value of ∼ 20 mb was determined at 55 MeV/nucleon in the first case, while the measurement of evaporation light residues in the last system gave an upper limit of 20-30 mb for the cross section at 50 MeV/nucleon

  19. The IAEA co-ordinated research programme on activation cross sections for the generation of long-lived radionuclides of importance in fusion reactor technology. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pashchenko, A.B.

    1997-07-01

    The present report summarizes the final results of the IAEA Co-ordinated Research Programme on ''Activation Cross Section for the Generator of Long-lived Radionuclides of Importance in Fusion Reactor Technology''. The goal of the CRP was to obtain reliable information (experimental and evaluated) for 16 long-lived activation reactions of special importance to fusion reactor technology. By limiting the scope of the CRP to just 16 reactions it was possible to establish a very effective focus to the joint effort of many laboratories that has led to the generation of a set of valuable new data which provide satisfactory answers to several questions of technological concern to fusion. (author). 11 refs, 5 tabs

  20. Analysis of antigenic cross-reactivity between subgroup C avian pneumovirus and human metapneumovirus by using recombinant fusion proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, L; Sabara, M I; Li, Y

    2009-10-01

    Avian pneumovirus subgroup C (APV/C) has recently been reported to be more closely related to human metapneumovirus (hMPV) as determined by sequence analysis. To examine the antigenic relationship between APV/C and hMPV, the APV/C fusion (F) gene was cloned and expressed as an uncleaved glycoprotein in a baculovirus system. The reactivity of the APV/C F protein with antibodies against APV subgroups A, B, C, and hMPV was examined by Western blot analysis. The results showed that the expressed APV/C F protein was not only recognized by APV/C-specific antibodies but also by antibodies raised against hMPV. Previously expressed recombinant hMPV F protein also reacted with APV/C-specific antibodies, suggesting that there was significant antigenic cross-reactivity and a potential evolutionary relationship between hMPV and APV/C. Interestingly, the recombinant F proteins from APV/C and hMPV were not recognized by polyclonal antibodies specific to APV subgroups A and B.

  1. Considerations for Achieving Cross-Platform Point Cloud Data Fusion across Different Dryland Ecosystem Structural States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swetnam, Tyson L; Gillan, Jeffrey K; Sankey, Temuulen T; McClaran, Mitchel P; Nichols, Mary H; Heilman, Philip; McVay, Jason

    2017-01-01

    Remotely sensing recent growth, herbivory, or disturbance of herbaceous and woody vegetation in dryland ecosystems requires high spatial resolution and multi-temporal depth. Three dimensional (3D) remote sensing technologies like lidar, and techniques like structure from motion (SfM) photogrammetry, each have strengths and weaknesses at detecting vegetation volume and extent, given the instrument's ground sample distance and ease of acquisition. Yet, a combination of platforms and techniques might provide solutions that overcome the weakness of a single platform. To explore the potential for combining platforms, we compared detection bias amongst two 3D remote sensing techniques (lidar and SfM) using three different platforms [ground-based, small unmanned aerial systems (sUAS), and manned aircraft]. We found aerial lidar to be more accurate for characterizing the bare earth (ground) in dense herbaceous vegetation than either terrestrial lidar or aerial SfM photogrammetry. Conversely, the manned aerial lidar did not detect grass and fine woody vegetation while the terrestrial lidar and high resolution near-distance (ground and sUAS) SfM photogrammetry detected these and were accurate. UAS SfM photogrammetry at lower spatial resolution under-estimated maximum heights in grass and shrubs. UAS and handheld SfM photogrammetry in near-distance high resolution collections had similar accuracy to terrestrial lidar for vegetation, but difficulty at measuring bare earth elevation beneath dense herbaceous cover. Combining point cloud data and derivatives (i.e., meshes and rasters) from two or more platforms allowed for more accurate measurement of herbaceous and woody vegetation (height and canopy cover) than any single technique alone. Availability and costs of manned aircraft lidar collection preclude high frequency repeatability but this is less limiting for terrestrial lidar, sUAS and handheld SfM. The post-processing of SfM photogrammetry data became the limiting factor

  2. Stimulated cold fusion by positronium atoms, cross sections, and wall interactions in plasmas, used to diagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emami, Z.

    2005-01-01

    Because of the technical complexities, involved in the controlled thermonuclear, reactions, a simple vicegerent agent cold plasma, stimulated by positronium atoms (achieved through a ring storage) as stimulus, introduced by this author in ITC 12 conference. In the present paper, the interaction between γ rays emitted through positronium atoms annihilation (in the forms of doublet and triplet electromagnetic photonic radiation) with plasma particles (including electrons, ions and neutral particles) investigated. Proper lifetime of singlet γ rays τs are about 100 ns and from that of triplet γ rays, i.e τt about 100 fems, reside in the following transition times in Ne and Argon elements in He-Ne and Ar lasers respectively: Ne*(3S2) [transition time τ = 105 ns] -> Ne*(2P4); Ar+*(3P4 4S) [transition time τ = 105 fems] -> Ar+(3P5). Then the interactions of γ rays with mater in plasma could follow up as treated from that of the laser and mater in one extreme while the comparison of this situation with normal plasmas in other extreme could serve as diagnostics key role in magnetically confined plasmas reactors. Collisions between charge and neutral species in plasma with electromagnetic radiation (γ photonic radiation) including the energy loss and scattering lead to different consequences. Light electrons can take up appreciably amounts of energy from the incident rays, lead to heating cold plasma, whereas massive ions absorb very little energy. Thus loss of incident energy in radiation occurs almost entirely in collisions with electrons , which, referred to the γ rays energy this would led to plasma heating about thermonuclear reaction ( Eγ = hν = 0.5 MeV). The heavy ions and neutral species in interaction with electromagnetic γ radiation, result on the other hand in scattering, in turn may increase the ionization level of the cold plasma, toward fully ionized plasma. Although all the essential features of these different interaction cross sections deduced

  3. Cross sections and average angular momenta in the fusion of 28Si+94,100Mo and 58,64Ni+64Ni

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ackermann, D.; Beghini, S.; Montagnoli, G.; Mueller, L.; Segato, G.F.; Soramel, F.; Signorini, C.

    1996-01-01

    Fusion cross sections and mean angular momenta have been measured for the four systems 28 Si+ 94,100 Mo and 58,64 Ni+ 64 Ni and can be explained in the framework of the coupled-channel (CC) approach. In particular the influence of 2n-transfer channels with positive Q-values shows up. The direct relation between excitation function and angular momenta has been verified. (orig.)

  4. Excitation cross sections for Li3+, Ne10+ and Ar18++H(1s) collisions of interest in fusion plasma diagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suarez, J; Errea, L F; Guzman, F; Pons, B

    2013-01-01

    We have calculated state-selective excitation cross sections in fully stripped Li 3+ , Ne 10+ and Ar 18+ +H(1s) collisions from low (1 keV/amu) to high (1000 keV/amu) impact energies, relevant in fusion plasma diagnostics. In order to cover this broad impact energy range, three different theoretical methods have been employed: the semi-classical molecular and one-centre atomic-orbital close-coupling approaches, and the classical trajectory Monte Carlo method. Recommended partial excitation cross sections are provided by merging the results obtained with each method in the energy range where they are the most accurate. (paper)

  5. Nuclear Landau-Zener phenomena and the fusion cross sections in the system 13C + 16O → 12C + 17O

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imanishi, B.; Oertzen, W. von.

    1990-07-01

    Reaction mechanism of the system 13 C+ 16 O- 12 C+ 17 O is investigated with the use of the nucleon molecular-orbital model in the framework of the orthogonalized coupled-reaction-channel (OCRC) theory. The adiabatic potentials obtained are quite different from the diagonal potentials of the original OCRC basis. The Landau-Zener radial coupling explains the backward enhancement of measured differential cross sections of the transfer reaction 13 C( 16 O, 17 O) 12 C. In the OCRC calculation the fusion cross sections of the channel 13 C+ 16 O is enhanced at low bombarding energies, in agreement with the experimental data. (author)

  6. Cold fusion reactions with 48Ca

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaeggeler, H.W.; Jost, D.T.; Tuerler, A.

    1989-04-01

    Cold fusion reactions with 48 Ca on the targets 208 Pb, 209 Bi, 197 Au, 184 W, 180 Hf are reported. The experiments were performed at the velocity filter SHIP of GSI. The maximum cross sections show a steep descent by about four orders of magnitude when going from 224 Th to 228 U as compound nuclei. Between uranium and einsteinium the cross sections stay rather low and increase by about two orders of magnitude for nobelium. For lawrencium the cross section decrease again. 7 figs., 1 tab., 38 refs

  7. Coupled-channel calculation for cross section of fusion and barrier distribution of {}^{16,17,18}O + {}^{16}O reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fereidonnejad, R.; Sadeghi, H.; Ghambari, M.

    2018-03-01

    In this work, the effect of multi-phonon excitation on heavy-ion fusion reactions has been studied and fusion barrier distributions of energy intervals near and below the Coulomb barrier have been studied for 16,17,18O + 16O reactions. The structure and deformation of nuclear projectiles have been studied. Given the adaptation of computations to experimental data, our calculations predict the behavior of reactions in intervals of energy in which experimental measurements are not available. In addition the S-factor for these reactions has been calculated. The results showed that the structure and deformation of a nuclear projectile are important factors. The S-factor, obtained in the coupled-channel calculations for the {}^{16}O + {}^{16}O, {}^{17}O +{}^{16}O and {}^{18}O +{}^{16}O reactions, showed good agreement with the experimental data and had a maximum value at an energy near 5, 4.5 and 4 MeV, respectively.

  8. Study of fusion cross-sections of 16O + 208Pb and 28Si + 208Pb reactions by effective soft-core nucleon-nucleon interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghodsi, O. N.; Mahmodi, M.; Ariai, J.; O. N. Ghodsi)

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, the cross-sections of fusion reactions 16 O + 208 Pb, 28 Si + 208 Pb, 40 C + 40 Ca, 40 Ca + 48 Ca, 58 Ni + 58 Ni, and 16 O + 154 Sm at bombarding energies above and near the fusion barrier have been investigated. The fusion cross-sections have been studied by means of the Monte Carlo method and effective soft-core nucleon-nucleon interaction. One adjustable parameter was used in these calculations. This parameter can change the strength and repulsive parts of soft-core potential values. It has to be adjusted, so that the analytical results are in acceptable agreement with the experimental data. In our calculations, we have taken the range of the nucleon-nucleon soft-core interaction to be constant and equal to that of the M3Y-Raid potential. Results show that the higher values for the diffusion parameter in the Woods-Saxon potential obtained from a careful analysis of 16 O + 208 Pb and 28 Si + 208 Pb reactions are due to the many particle effects on the nucleon-nucleon potential. (author)

  9. Study of fusion cross-sections of 16O + 208Pb and 28Si + 208Pb reactions by effective soft-core nucleon-nucleon interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghodsi Omid N.

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the cross-sections of fusion reactions 16O + 208Pb, 28Si + 208Pb, 40C + + 40Ca, 40Ca + 48Ca, 58Ni + 58Ni, and 16O + 154Sm at bombarding energies above and near the fusion barrier have been investigated. The fusion cross-sections have been studied by means of the Monte Carlo method and effective soft-core nucleon-nucleon interaction. One adjustable parameter was used in these calculations. This parameter can change the strength and repulsive parts of soft-core potential values. It has to be adjusted, so that the analytical results are in acceptable agreement with the experimental data. In our calculations, we have taken the range of the nucleon-nucleon soft-core interaction to be constant and equal to that of the M3Y-Raid potential. Results show that the higher values for the diffusion parameter in the Woods-Saxon potential obtained from a careful analysis of 16O + 208Pb and 28Si + 208Pb reactions are due to the many particle effects on the nucleon-nucleon potential.

  10. Maximum entropy beam diagnostic tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mottershead, C.T.

    1985-01-01

    This paper reviews the formalism of maximum entropy beam diagnostic tomography as applied to the Fusion Materials Irradiation Test (FMIT) prototype accelerator. The same formalism has also been used with streak camera data to produce an ultrahigh speed movie of the beam profile of the Experimental Test Accelerator (ETA) at Livermore. 11 refs., 4 figs

  11. Maximum entropy beam diagnostic tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mottershead, C.T.

    1985-01-01

    This paper reviews the formalism of maximum entropy beam diagnostic tomography as applied to the Fusion Materials Irradiation Test (FMIT) prototype accelerator. The same formalism has also been used with streak camera data to produce an ultrahigh speed movie of the beam profile of the Experimental Test Accelerator (ETA) at Livermore

  12. Stripping of two protons and one alpha particle transfer reactions for {sup 16} O + {sup A} Sm and their influence on the fusion cross section

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maciel, A.M.M.; Gomes, P.R.S

    1995-12-31

    Transfer cross section angular distribution data for the stripping of two protons and one alpha particle are studied for the {sup 16} O + {sup A} Sm systems (A=144, 148, 150, 152 and 154), at near barrier energies. A semiclassical formalism is used to derive the corresponding transfer form factors. For only one channel the analysis shows evidences that the transfer reaction mechanism at backward angles - corresponding to small distances, may behave as a multi-step process leading to fusion. Simplified coupled channel calculations including transfer channels are performed for the study of the sub-barrier of these systems. The influence of short distance transfer reactions on the fusion is discussed. (author) 16 refs., 5 figs., 5 tabs.

  13. Evaluation of adaptation to visually induced motion sickness based on the maximum cross-correlation between pulse transmission time and heart rate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiba Shigeru

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Computer graphics and virtual reality techniques are useful to develop automatic and effective rehabilitation systems. However, a kind of virtual environment including unstable visual images presented to wide field screen or a head mounted display tends to induce motion sickness. The motion sickness induced in using a rehabilitation system not only inhibits effective training but also may harm patients' health. There are few studies that have objectively evaluated the effects of the repetitive exposures to these stimuli on humans. The purpose of this study is to investigate the adaptation to visually induced motion sickness by physiological data. Methods An experiment was carried out in which the same video image was presented to human subjects three times. We evaluated changes of the intensity of motion sickness they suffered from by a subjective score and the physiological index ρmax, which is defined as the maximum cross-correlation coefficient between heart rate and pulse wave transmission time and is considered to reflect the autonomic nervous activity. Results The results showed adaptation to visually-induced motion sickness by the repetitive presentation of the same image both in the subjective and the objective indices. However, there were some subjects whose intensity of sickness increased. Thus, it was possible to know the part in the video image which related to motion sickness by analyzing changes in ρmax with time. Conclusion The physiological index, ρmax, will be a good index for assessing the adaptation process to visually induced motion sickness and may be useful in checking the safety of rehabilitation systems with new image technologies.

  14. 2nd (final) IAEA research co-ordination meeting on 'charge exchange cross section data for fusion plasma studies'. Summary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, R.E.H.

    2001-11-01

    The proceedings and conclusions of the 2nd Research Co-ordination Meeting on 'Charge Exchange Cross Section Data for Fusion Plasma Studies', held on September 25 and 26, 2000 at the IAEA Headquarters in Vienna, are briefly described. This report includes a summary of the presentations made by the meeting participants and a review of the accomplishments of the Co-ordinated Research Project (CRP). In addition, short summaries from the participants are included indicating the specific research completed in support of this CRP. (author)

  15. Measurement and analysis of 14 MeV neutron-induced double-differential neutron emission cross sections needed for fission and fusion reactor technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Dahai; Mehta, M.K.

    1988-07-01

    The main objectives of this IAEA Co-ordinated Research Programme are to improve the current status of data for 14 MeV neutron-induced double-differential neutron emission cross sections for V, Cr, Fe, Nb, Ta and 238 U. The principal objectives of this first meeting were to report on the status of participants' work, to exchange experience in experimental work and to establish the future work. Considering the unsatisfactory status of the data for 6 Li, 7 Li, 9 Be, Mo, W and Bi and their importance in fusion reactor technology participants agreed to include these isotopes in the programme

  16. Selection of low activation materials for fusion power plants using ACAB system: the effect of computational methods and cross section uncertainties on waste management assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alonso, M.; Sanz, J.; Rodriguez, A.; Falquina, R. [Universidad Nacional de Educacion a Distancia (UNED), Dept. of Power Engineering, Madrid (Spain); Cabellos, O.; Sanz, J. [Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, Instituto de Fusion Nuclear (UPM) (Spain)

    2003-07-01

    The feasibility of nuclear fusion as a realistic option for energy generation depends on its radioactive waste management assessment. In this respect, the production of high level waste is to be avoided and the reduction of low level waste volumes is to be enhanced. Three different waste management options are commonly regarded in fusion plants: Hands-on Recycling, Remote Recycling and Shallow Land Burial (SLB). Therefore, important research work has been undertaken to find low activation structural materials. In performing this task, a major issue is to compute the concentration limits (CLs) for all natural elements, which will be used to select the intended constituent elements of a particular Low Activation Material (LAM) and assess how much the impurities can deteriorate the waste management properties. Nevertheless, the reliable computation of CLs depends on the accuracy of nuclear data (mainly activation cross-sections) and the suitability of the computational method both for inertial and magnetic fusion environments. In this paper the importance of nuclear data uncertainties and mathematical algorithms used in different activation calculations for waste management purposes will be studied. Our work is centred on the study of {sup 186}W activation under first structural wall conditions of Hylife-II inertial fusion reactor design. The importance of the dominant transmutation/decay sequence has been documented in several publications. From a practical point of view, W is used in low activation materials for fusion applications: Cr-W ferritic/martensitic steels, and the need to better compute its activation has been assessed, in particular in relation to the cross-section uncertainties for reactions leading to Ir isotopes. {sup 192n}Ir and {sup 192}Ir reach a secular equilibrium, and {sup 192n}Ir is the critical one for waste management, with a half life of 241 years. From a theoretical point of view, this is one of the most complex chains appearing in

  17. The collapsing of multigroup cross sections in optimization problems solved by means of the Pontryagin maximum principle in nuclear reactor dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anton, V.

    1979-12-01

    The collapsing formulae for the optimization problems solved by means of the Pontryagin maximum principle in nuclear reactor dynamics are presented. A comparison with the corresponding formulae of the static case is given too. (author)

  18. Evaluation of the 46Ti(n,2n)45Ti and 54Fe(n,2n)53m+gFe reaction cross sections for neutron dosimetry in fusion facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badikov, S.A.; Ignatyuk, A.V.; Zolotarev, K.I.; Pashchenko, A.B.

    1993-11-01

    The reaction cross-sections of 46 Ti(n,2n) 45 Ti and 54 Fe(n,2n) 53m+g Fe, which are important for fusion reactor neutron dosimetry, were evaluated using a generalized least squares method. The experimental cross-section data of all measurements performed up to January 1993, were critically reviewed. The evaluated cross-section data are presented in analytical form and in ENDF-6 format, including covariance data. (author)

  19. Fusion energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gross, R.A.

    1984-01-01

    This textbook covers the physics and technology upon which future fusion power reactors will be based. It reviews the history of fusion, reaction physics, plasma physics, heating, and confinement. Descriptions of commercial plants and design concepts are included. Topics covered include: fusion reactions and fuel resources; reaction rates; ignition, and confinement; basic plasma directory; Tokamak confinement physics; fusion technology; STARFIRE: A commercial Tokamak fusion power plant. MARS: A tandem-mirror fusion power plant; and other fusion reactor concepts

  20. The IGNITEX fusion project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carrera, R.

    1987-01-01

    The author discusses the recently proposed fusion ignition experiment, IGNITEX. He emphasizes the basic ideas of this concept rather than the specific details of the physics and engineering aspects of the experiment. This concept is a good example of the importance of maintaining an adequate balance between the basic scientific progress in fusion physics and the new technologies that are becoming available in order to make fusion work. The objective of the IGNITEX project is to produce and control ignited plasmas for scientific study in the simplest and least expensive way possible. Being able to study this not-yet-produced regime of plasma operation is essential to fusion research. Two years after the fission nuclear reaction was discovered, a non-self-sustained fission reaction was produced in a laboratory, and in one more year a self-sustained reaction was achieved at the University of Chicago. However, after almost forty years of fusion research, a self-sustained fusion reaction has yet not been produced in a laboratory experiment. This fact indicates the greater difficulty of the fusion experiment. Because of the difficulty involved in the production of a self-sustained fusion reaction, it is necessary to propose such an experiment with maximum ignition margins, maximum simplicity, and minimum financial risk

  1. Calculated cross sections for production and destruction of some long-lived nuclides of importance in fusion energy applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gardner, M.A.; Gardner, D.G.

    1993-01-01

    Knowledge of the production and destruction of long-lived species via neutrons, photons, and charged-particles is required in many fusion energy applications, such as reactor first-wall and blanket design, radioactive waste management, etc. Here we describe our calculational results for the production, via the (n,2n) reaction, of the following long-lived species: 150 Eu(t 1/2 = 36 y), 152 Eu(t 1/2 = 13 y), and 192m2 Ir(t 1/2 = 241 y). Some comments on calculations that we've made for destruction reactions of these species are also included

  2. Competition between peripheral and central emission in incomplete fusion reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tricoire, H.

    1984-01-01

    In the frame of a classical model we show that the emission of fast particles in incomplete fusion reactions may occur either from a PEP emission which happens preferentially at low angular momenta or from an inertial emission with a maximum of the cross section located near the critical angular momentum for complete fusion. The competition of these mechanisms depends crucialy of the interaction between the particle to be emitted and the target nucleus. Numerical calculations are performed with various particle target potentials. Using a proximity potential, one gets results in good agreement with experimental data

  3. First Observation of Cross-Beam Energy Transfer Mitigation for Direct-Drive Inertial Confinement Fusion Implosions Using Wavelength Detuning at the National Ignition Facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marozas, J A; Hohenberger, M; Rosenberg, M J; Turnbull, D; Collins, T J B; Radha, P B; McKenty, P W; Zuegel, J D; Marshall, F J; Regan, S P; Sangster, T C; Seka, W; Campbell, E M; Goncharov, V N; Bowers, M W; Di Nicola, J-M G; Erbert, G; MacGowan, B J; Pelz, L J; Yang, S T

    2018-02-23

    Cross-beam energy transfer (CBET) results from two-beam energy exchange via seeded stimulated Brillouin scattering, which detrimentally reduces ablation pressure and implosion velocity in direct-drive inertial confinement fusion. Mitigating CBET is demonstrated for the first time in inertial-confinement implosions at the National Ignition Facility by detuning the laser-source wavelengths (±2.3  Å UV) of the interacting beams. We show that, in polar direct-drive, wavelength detuning increases the equatorial region velocity experimentally by 16% and alters the in-flight shell morphology. These experimental observations are consistent with design predictions of radiation-hydrodynamic simulations that indicate a 10% increase in the average ablation pressure.

  4. Nuclear structure and heavy-ion fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stokstad, R.G.

    1980-10-01

    A series of lectures is presented on experimental studies of heavy-ion fusion reactions with emphasis on the role of nuclear structure in the fusion mechanism. The experiments considered are of three types: the fusion of lighter heavy ions at subcoulomb energies is studied with in-beam γ-ray techniques; the subbarrier fusion of 16 O and 40 Ar with the isotopes of samarium is detected out of beam by x-radiation from delayed activity; and measurements at very high energies, again for the lighter ions, employ direct particle identification of evaporation residues. The experimental data are compared with predictions based on the fusion of two spheres with the only degree of freedom being the separation of the centers, and which interact via potentials that vary smoothly with changes in the mass and charge of the projectile and target. The data exhibit with the isotopes of samarium, a portion of these deviations can be understood in terms of the changing deformation of the target nucleus, but an additional degree of freedom such as neck formation appears necessary. The results on 10 B + 16 O and 12 C + 14 N → 26 Al at high bombarding energies indicate a maximum limiting angular momentum characteristic of the compound nucleus. At lower energies the nuclear structure of the colliding ion seems to affect strongly the cross section for fusion. Measurements made at subbarrier energies for a variety of projectile-target combinations in the 1p and 2s - 1d shell also indicate that the valence nucleons can affect the energy dependence for fusion. About half the systems studied so far have structureless excitation functions which follow a standard prediction. The other half exhibit large variations from this prediction. The possible importance of neutron transfer is discussed. The two-center shell model appears as a promising approach for gaining a qualitative understanding of these phenomena. 95 references, 52 figures, 1 table

  5. Lower limb muscle volume estimation from maximum cross-sectional area and muscle length in cerebral palsy and typically developing individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanmechelen, Inti M; Shortland, Adam P; Noble, Jonathan J

    2018-01-01

    Deficits in muscle volume may be a significant contributor to physical disability in young people with cerebral palsy. However, 3D measurements of muscle volume using MRI or 3D ultrasound may be difficult to make routinely in the clinic. We wished to establish whether accurate estimates of muscle volume could be made from a combination of anatomical cross-sectional area and length measurements in samples of typically developing young people and young people with bilateral cerebral palsy. Lower limb MRI scans were obtained from the lower limbs of 21 individuals with cerebral palsy (14.7±3years, 17 male) and 23 typically developing individuals (16.8±3.3years, 16 male). The volume, length and anatomical cross-sectional area were estimated from six muscles of the left lower limb. Analysis of Covariance demonstrated that the relationship between the length*cross-sectional area and volume was not significantly different depending on the subject group. Linear regression analysis demonstrated that the product of anatomical cross-sectional area and length bore a strong and significant relationship to the measured muscle volume (R 2 values between 0.955 and 0.988) with low standard error of the estimates of 4.8 to 8.9%. This study demonstrates that muscle volume may be estimated accurately in typically developing individuals and individuals with cerebral palsy by a combination of anatomical cross-sectional area and muscle length. 2D ultrasound may be a convenient method of making these measurements routinely in the clinic. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Activation cross sections for the generation of long-lived radionuclides of importance in fusion reactor technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Dahai

    1992-07-01

    Following the recommendations of the International Nuclear Data Committee (INDC), the IAEA Nuclear Data Section has established a Co-ordinated Research Programme (CRP) on activation cross sections for the generation of long-lived radionuclides of importance in concentrating on the cross sections for the reactions suggested by the 16th INDC meeting. The first Research Co-ordination Meeting of the CRP was held at the IAEA Headquarters, Vienna, Austria, from 11 to 12 November 1991. The main objectives of the meeting were to review the results under the CRP and the status of long-lived activation cross section data and to fix the future working programme for the CRP. The proceedings contain the progress reports of the CRP and 12 contributed papers presented at the meeting as well as the summary of the conclusions and recommendations of the meeting. Refs, figs and tabs

  7. Enhancement of the neutral-beam stopping cross section in fusion plasmas due to multistep collision processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boley, C.D.; Janev, R.K.; Post, D.E.

    1983-10-01

    Multistep processes involving excited atomic states are found to produce a substantial increase in the stopping cross section for a neutral hydrogen beam injected into a plasma, and thus to reduce the beam penetration. For typical plasma and beam parameters of current large tokamak experiments, the stopping cross-sectional enhancement is found to vary from 25% to 50% depending on the beam energy, plasma density, and impurity level. For neutral hydrogen beams with energies greater than or equal to 500 keV, envisioned in tokamak amd mirror reactor designs, the enhancement can be as large as 80 to 90%

  8. Muon reactivation in muon-catalyzed d-t fusion from accurate p-He+ stripping and excitation cross sections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stodden, C.D.; Monkhorst, H.J.; Szalewicz, K.

    1990-01-01

    Accurate cross sections are obtained for the excitation and stripping of a muon from αμ in collisions with hydrogen atoms. This is done by calculating the excitation, ionization, and charge-transfer cross sections for the p-He + collision and scaling the results. An impact-parameter coupled-state method with a basis set of up to 51 Sturmian wave functions is used to obtain cross sections at center-of-mass energies ranging from 20 to 600 keV. Along with Stark, Auger, radiative, and stopping rates these cross sections are used to calculate the probability of stripping a muon from αμ by numerically solving a set of coupled differential equations that describe the kinetics of αμ as it travels through a mixture of D 2 and T 2 . An effort has been made to minimize the uncertainty in the value of the stripping probability resulting in error bars of 9% and 11% at densities of 1.2 and 0.05 times liquid-hydrogen density, respectively. X-ray yields belonging to K and L series transitions among αμ states have also been computed. The present results are compared with recent theoretical and experimental data

  9. EMP Fusion

    OpenAIRE

    KUNTAY, Isık

    2010-01-01

    This paper introduces a novel fusion scheme, called EMP Fusion, which has the promise of achieving breakeven and realizing commercial fusion power. The method is based on harnessing the power of an electromagnetic pulse generated by the now well-developed flux compression technology. The electromagnetic pulse acts as a means of both heating up the plasma and confining the plasma, eliminating intermediate steps. The EMP Fusion device is simpler compared to other fusion devices and this reduces...

  10. Determining clinical practice of expert physiotherapy for patients undergoing lumbar spinal fusion: a cross-sectional survey study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssen, Esther R C; Scheijen, Elle E M; van Meeteren, Nico L U; de Bie, Rob A; Lenssen, Anton F; Willems, Paul C; Hoogeboom, Thomas J

    2016-05-01

    To determine the content of current Dutch expert hospital physiotherapy practice for patients undergoing lumbar spinal fusion (LSF), to gain insight into expert-based clinical practice. At each hospital where LSF is performed, one expert physiotherapist received an e-mailed questionnaire, about pre- and postoperative physiotherapy and discharge after LSF. The level of uniformity in goals and interventions was graded on a scale from no uniformity (50-60 %) to very strong uniformity (91-100 %). LSF was performed at 34 of the 67 contacted hospitals. From those 34 hospitals, 28 (82 %) expert physiotherapists completed the survey. Twenty-one percent of the respondents saw patients preoperatively, generally to provide information. Stated postoperative goals and administered interventions focused mainly on performing transfers safely and keeping the patient informed. Outcome measures were scarcely used. There was no uniformity regarding advice on the activities of daily living. Dutch perioperative expert physiotherapy for patients undergoing LSF is variable and lacks structural outcome assessment. Studies evaluating the effectiveness of best-practice physiotherapy are warranted.

  11. Osteoclast Fusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marie Julie Møller, Anaïs; Delaissé, Jean-Marie; Søe, Kent

    2017-01-01

    on the nuclearity of fusion partners. While CD47 promotes cell fusions involving mono-nucleated pre-osteoclasts, syncytin-1 promotes fusion of two multi-nucleated osteoclasts, but also reduces the number of fusions between mono-nucleated pre-osteoclasts. Furthermore, CD47 seems to mediate fusion mostly through...... individual fusion events using time-lapse and antagonists of CD47 and syncytin-1. All time-lapse recordings have been studied by two independent observers. A total of 1808 fusion events were analyzed. The present study shows that CD47 and syncytin-1 have different roles in osteoclast fusion depending...... broad contact surfaces between the partners' cell membrane while syncytin-1 mediate fusion through phagocytic-cup like structure. J. Cell. Physiol. 9999: 1-8, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc....

  12. Concept evaluation of nuclear fusion driven symbiotic energy systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Renier, J.P.; Hoffman, T.J.

    1979-01-01

    This paper analyzes systems based on D-T and semi-catalyzed D-D fusion-powered U233 breeders. Two different blanket types were used: metallic thorium pebble-bed blankets with a batch reprocessing mode and a molten salt blanket with on-line continuous or batch reprocessing. All fusion-driven blankets are assumed to have spherical geometries, with a 85% closure. Neutronics depletion calculations were performed with a revised version of the discrete ordinates code XSDRN-PM, using multigroup (100 neutron, 21 gamma-ray groups) coupled cross-section libraries. These neutronics calculations are coupled with a scenario optimization and cost analysis code. Also, the fusion burn was shaped so as to keep the blanket maximum power density below a preset value, and to improve the performance of the fusion-driven systems. The fusion-driven symbiotes are compared with LMFBR-driven energy systems. The nuclear fission breeders that were used as drivers have parameters characteristic of heterogeneous, oxide LMFBRs. They are net plutonium users - the plutonium is obtained from the discharges of LWRs - and U233 is bred in the fission breeder thorium blankets. The analyses of the symbiotic energy systems were performed at equilibrium, at maximum rate of grid expansion, and for a given nuclear power demand

  13. 3D Buried Utility Location Using A Marching-Cross-Section Algorithm for Multi-Sensor Data Fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dou, Qingxu; Wei, Lijun; Magee, Derek R; Atkins, Phil R; Chapman, David N; Curioni, Giulio; Goddard, Kevin F; Hayati, Farzad; Jenks, Hugo; Metje, Nicole; Muggleton, Jennifer; Pennock, Steve R; Rustighi, Emiliano; Swingler, Steven G; Rogers, Christopher D F; Cohn, Anthony G

    2016-11-02

    We address the problem of accurately locating buried utility segments by fusing data from multiple sensors using a novel Marching-Cross-Section (MCS) algorithm. Five types of sensors are used in this work: Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR), Passive Magnetic Fields (PMF), Magnetic Gradiometer (MG), Low Frequency Electromagnetic Fields (LFEM) and Vibro-Acoustics (VA). As part of the MCS algorithm, a novel formulation of the extended Kalman Filter (EKF) is proposed for marching existing utility tracks from a scan cross-section (scs) to the next one; novel rules for initializing utilities based on hypothesized detections on the first scs and for associating predicted utility tracks with hypothesized detections in the following scss are introduced. Algorithms are proposed for generating virtual scan lines based on given hypothesized detections when different sensors do not share common scan lines, or when only the coordinates of the hypothesized detections are provided without any information of the actual survey scan lines. The performance of the proposed system is evaluated with both synthetic data and real data. The experimental results in this work demonstrate that the proposed MCS algorithm can locate multiple buried utility segments simultaneously, including both straight and curved utilities, and can separate intersecting segments. By using the probabilities of a hypothesized detection being a pipe or a cable together with its 3D coordinates, the MCS algorithm is able to discriminate a pipe and a cable close to each other. The MCS algorithm can be used for both post- and on-site processing. When it is used on site, the detected tracks on the current scs can help to determine the location and direction of the next scan line. The proposed "multi-utility multi-sensor" system has no limit to the number of buried utilities or the number of sensors, and the more sensor data used, the more buried utility segments can be detected with more accurate location and orientation.

  14. Joint ICFRM-14 (14. international conference on fusion reactor materials) and IAEA satellite meeting on cross-cutting issues of structural materials for fusion and fission applications. PowerPoint presentations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    The Conference was devoted to the challenges in the development of new materials for advanced fission, fusion and hybrid reactors. The topics discussed include fuels and materials research under the high neutron fluence; post-irradiation examination; development of radiation resistant structural materials utilizing fission research reactors; core materials development for the advanced fuel cycle initiative; qualification of structural materials for fission and fusion reactor systems; application of charged particle accelerators for radiation resistance investigations of fission and fusion structural materials; microstructure evolution in structural materials under irradiation; ion beams and ion accelerators

  15. Fusion power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hancox, R.

    1981-01-01

    The principles of fusion power, and its advantages and disadvantages, are outlined. Present research programmes and future plans directed towards the development of a fusion power reactor, are summarized. (U.K.)

  16. Fusion rings and fusion ideals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Troels Bak

    by the so-called fusion ideals. The fusion rings of Wess-Zumino-Witten models have been widely studied and are well understood in terms of precise combinatorial descriptions and explicit generating sets of the fusion ideals. They also appear in another, more general, setting via tilting modules for quantum......This dissertation investigates fusion rings, which are Grothendieck groups of rigid, monoidal, semisimple, abelian categories. Special interest is in rational fusion rings, i.e., fusion rings which admit a finite basis, for as commutative rings they may be presented as quotients of polynomial rings...

  17. No difference in long-term trunk muscle strength, cross-sectional area, and density in patients with chronic low back pain 7 to 11 years after lumbar fusion versus cognitive intervention and exercises.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froholdt, Anne; Holm, Inger; Keller, Anne; Gunderson, Ragnhild B; Reikeraas, Olav; Brox, Jens I

    2011-08-01

    Reduced muscle strength and density observed at 1 year after lumbar fusion may deteriorate more in the long term. To compare the long-term effect of lumbar fusion and cognitive intervention and exercises on muscle strength, cross-sectional area, density, and self-rated function in patients with chronic low back pain (CLBP) and disc degeneration. Randomized controlled study with a follow-up examination at 8.5 years (range, 7-11 years). Patients with CLBP and disc degeneration randomized to either instrumented posterolateral fusion of one or both of the two lower lumbar levels or a 3-week cognitive intervention and exercise program were included. Isokinetic muscle strength was measured by a Cybex 6000 (Cybex-Lumex, Inc., Ronkonkoma, NY, USA). All patients had previous experience with the test procedure. The back extension (E) flexion (F) muscles were tested, and the E/F ratios were calculated. Cross-sectional area and density of the back muscles were measured at the L3-L4 segment by computed tomography. Patients rated their function by the General Function Score. Trunk muscle strength, cross-sectional area, density, and self-rated function. Fifty-five patients (90%) were included at long-term follow-up. There were no significant differences in cross-sectional area, density, muscle strength, or self-rated function between the two groups. The cognitive intervention and exercise group increased trunk muscle extension significantly (parea was reduced by 8.5%, and muscle density was reduced by 27%. Although this study did not assess the morphology of muscles likely damaged by surgery, trunk muscle strength and cross-sectional area above the surgical levels are not different between those who had lumbar fusion or cognitive intervention and exercises at 7- to 11-year follow-up. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Fusion: introduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Decreton, M.

    2006-01-01

    The article gives an overview and introduction to the activities of SCK-CEN's research programme on fusion. The decision to construct the ITER international nuclear fusion experiment in Cadarache is highlighted. A summary of the Belgian contributions to fusion research is given with particular emphasis on studies of radiation effects on diagnostics systems, radiation effects on remote handling sensing systems, fusion waste management and socio-economic studies

  19. Membrane fusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendix, Pól Martin

    2015-01-01

    At Stanford University, Boxer lab, I worked on membrane fusion of small unilamellar lipid vesicles to flat membranes tethered to glass surfaces. This geometry closely resembles biological systems in which liposomes fuse to plasma membranes. The fusion mechanism was studied using DNA zippering...... between complementary strands linked to the two apposing membranes closely mimicking the zippering mechanism of SNARE fusion complexes....

  20. Fusion Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-07-01

    This first issue of a quarterly newsletter announces the startup of the Tokamak de Varennes, describes Canada's national fusion program, and outlines the Canadian Fusion Fuels Technology Program. A map gives the location of the eleven principal fusion centres in Canada. (L.L.)

  1. Fusion neutronics

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Yican

    2017-01-01

    This book provides a systematic and comprehensive introduction to fusion neutronics, covering all key topics from the fundamental theories and methodologies, as well as a wide range of fusion system designs and experiments. It is the first-ever book focusing on the subject of fusion neutronics research. Compared with other nuclear devices such as fission reactors and accelerators, fusion systems are normally characterized by their complex geometry and nuclear physics, which entail new challenges for neutronics such as complicated modeling, deep penetration, low simulation efficiency, multi-physics coupling, etc. The book focuses on the neutronics characteristics of fusion systems and introduces a series of theories and methodologies that were developed to address the challenges of fusion neutronics, and which have since been widely applied all over the world. Further, it introduces readers to neutronics design’s unique principles and procedures, experimental methodologies and technologies for fusion systems...

  2. Pulsed power for fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, T.H.

    1976-01-01

    A review which traces the development of high power pulsed accelerators from the original inception at the Atomic Weapons Research Establishment, Aldermaston, England, for Bremsstrahlung output, through the low impedance accelerators, to the double-sided accelerators for fusion will be given. Proto II is presently being assembled at Sandia and preliminary testing on the Marx has been completed. Examples of various techniques will be shown from Sandia accelerators. Requirements for accelerators capable of achieving fusion levels will be developed and problem areas outlined. The diode insulator flashover problem presently limits the maximum current available from the accelerators

  3. Fusion Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kikuchi, Mitsuru; Lackner, Karl; Tran, Minh Quang [eds.

    2012-09-15

    Recreating the energy production process of the Sun - nuclear fusion - on Earth in a controlled fashion is one of the greatest challenges of this century. If achieved at affordable costs, energy supply security would be greatly enhanced and environmental degradation from fossil fuels greatly diminished. Fusion Physics describes the last fifty years or so of physics and research in innovative technologies to achieve controlled thermonuclear fusion for energy production. The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has been involved since its establishment in 1957 in fusion research. It has been the driving force behind the biennial conferences on Plasma Physics and Controlled Thermonuclear Fusion, today known as the Fusion Energy Conference. Hosted by several Member States, this biennial conference provides a global forum for exchange of the latest achievements in fusion research against the backdrop of the requirements for a net energy producing fusion device and, eventually, a fusion power plant. The scientific and technological knowledge compiled during this series of conferences, as well as by the IAEA Nuclear Fusion journal, is immense and will surely continue to grow in the future. It has led to the establishment of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER), which represents the biggest experiment in energy production ever envisaged by humankind.

  4. Cell-penetrating anti-GFAP VHH and corresponding fluorescent fusion protein VHH-GFP spontaneously cross the blood-brain barrier and specifically recognize astrocytes: application to brain imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tengfei; Bourgeois, Jean-Pierre; Celli, Susanna; Glacial, Fabienne; Le Sourd, Anne-Marie; Mecheri, Salah; Weksler, Babette; Romero, Ignacio; Couraud, Pierre-Olivier; Rougeon, François; Lafaye, Pierre

    2012-10-01

    Antibodies normally do not cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and cannot bind an intracellular cerebral antigen. We demonstrate here for the first time that a new class of antibodies can cross the BBB without treatment. Camelids produce native homodimeric heavy-chain antibodies, the paratope being composed of a single-variable domain called VHH. Here, we used recombinant VHH directed against human glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), a specific marker of astrocytes. Only basic VHHs (e.g., pI=9.4) were able to cross the BBB in vitro (7.8 vs. 0% for VHH with pI=7.7). By intracarotid and intravenous injections into live mice, we showed that these basic VHHs are able to cross the BBB in vivo, diffuse into the brain tissue, penetrate into astrocytes, and specifically label GFAP. To analyze their ability to be used as a specific transporter, we then expressed a recombinant fusion protein VHH-green fluorescent protein (GFP). These "fluobodies" specifically labeled GFAP on murine brain sections, and a basic variant (pI=9.3) of the fusion protein VHH-GFP was able to cross the BBB and to label astrocytes in vivo. The potential of VHHs as diagnostic or therapeutic agents in the central nervous system now deserves attention.

  5. Fusion of the positive Q-value system 36S+48Ca well below the Coulomb barrier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stefanini, A. M.; Silvestri, R.; Corradi, L.; Fioretto, E.; Guiot, B.; Montagnoli, G.; Beghini, S.; Mason, P.; Scarlassara, F.; Courtin, S.; Haas, F.; Lebhertz, D.; Marginean, N.; Sagaidak, R. N.; Szilner, S.

    2008-01-01

    The fusion excitation function of 36 S+ 48 Ca has been measured from well above the barrier down to very small cross sections at sub-barrier energies. A steady decrease of the fusion cross sections is observed below the barrier with no pronounced change of slope. The logarithmic derivative saturates and does not reach the value expected for a constant astrophysical S-factor. The S-factor does not show any maximum in the measured energy range. Coupled-channels calculations using a Woods-Saxon potential have been performed

  6. Liquid-metal MHD flow in a duct whose cross section changes from a rectangle to a trapezoid, with applications in fusion blanket designs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walker, J.S.

    1986-04-01

    This paper treats the liquid-metal MHD flow in a semi-infinite rectangular duct and a semi-infinite trapezoidal duct, which are connected by a finite-length transition duct. There is a strong, transverse, uniform magnetic field. The walls parallel to the magnetic field (sides) remain parallel, while the walls intersecting the magnetic field are twisted in the transition duct to provide the change in cross sectional shape. The left side has a constant height, while the height of the right side increases or decreases in the transition duct. This geometry gives a skewed velocity profile with a high velocity near the left side, provided the right side is relatively thick. All walls are thin and electrically conducting, but the sides are considerably thicker than the other walls. The application is to fusion-reactor blankets in which a high velocity near the first wall (separating the plasma chamber from the coolant) improves the thermal performance. Junctions of different ducts with walls parallel to the magnetic field are treated for the first time. In expansions, contractions and other geometric transition ducts, as well as in straight ducts with axially varying magnetic fields, the fluid flow and electric currents are concentrated in boundary layers adjacent to the sides and in the side. At a junction with a straight duct with a uniform magnetic field, the flow and current must transfer from the boundary layers adn sides to the core regions. These transfers at junctions play a key role in any three-dimensional flow

  7. Liquid-metal MHD flow in a duct whose cross section changes from a rectangle to a trapezoid, with applications in fusion blanket designs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walker, J.S.

    1986-04-01

    This paper treats the liquid-metal MHD flow in a semi-infinite rectangular duct and a semi-infinite trapezoidal duct, which are connected by a finite-length transition duct. There is a strong, transverse, uniform magnetic field. The walls parallel to the magnetic field (sides) remain parallel, while the walls intersecting the magnetic field are twisted in the transition duct to provide the change in cross sectional shape. The left side has a constant height, while the height of the right side increases or decreases in the transition duct. This geometry gives a skewed velocity profile with a high velocity near the left side, provided the right side is relatively thick. All walls are thin and electrically conducting, but the sides are considerably thicker than the other walls. The application is to fusion-reactor blankets in which a high velocity near the first wall (separating the plasma chamber from the coolant) improves the thermal performance. Junctions of different ducts with walls parallel to the magnetic field are treated for the first time. In expansions, contractions and other geometric transition ducts, as well as in straight ducts with axially varying magnetic fields, the fluid flow and electric currents are concentrated in boundary layers adjacent to the sides and in the side. At a junction with a straight duct with a uniform magnetic field, the flow and current must transfer from the boundary layers adn sides to the core regions. These transfers at junctions play a key role in any three-dimensional flow.

  8. Fusion breeder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moir, R.W.

    1982-01-01

    The fusion breeder is a fusion reactor designed with special blankets to maximize the transmutation by 14 MeV neutrons of uranium-238 to plutonium or thorium to uranium-233 for use as a fuel for fission reactors. Breeding fissile fuels has not been a goal of the US fusion energy program. This paper suggests it is time for a policy change to make the fusion breeder a goal of the US fusion program and the US nuclear energy program. The purpose of this paper is to suggest this policy change be made and tell why it should be made, and to outline specific research and development goals so that the fusion breeder will be developed in time to meet fissile fuel needs

  9. Fusion Implementation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, J.A.

    2002-01-01

    If a fusion DEMO reactor can be brought into operation during the first half of this century, fusion power production can have a significant impact on carbon dioxide production during the latter half of the century. An assessment of fusion implementation scenarios shows that the resource demands and waste production associated with these scenarios are manageable factors. If fusion is implemented during the latter half of this century it will be one element of a portfolio of (hopefully) carbon dioxide limiting sources of electrical power. It is time to assess the regional implications of fusion power implementation. An important attribute of fusion power is the wide range of possible regions of the country, or countries in the world, where power plants can be located. Unlike most renewable energy options, fusion energy will function within a local distribution system and not require costly, and difficult, long distance transmission systems. For example, the East Coast of the United States is a prime candidate for fusion power deployment by virtue of its distance from renewable energy sources. As fossil fuels become less and less available as an energy option, the transmission of energy across bodies of water will become very expensive. On a global scale, fusion power will be particularly attractive for regions separated from sources of renewable energy by oceans

  10. Atomic data for fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hunter, H.T.; Kirkpatrick, M.I.; Alvarez, I.; Cisneros, C.; Phaneuf, R.A. (eds.); Barnett, C.F.

    1990-07-01

    This report provides a handbook of recommended cross-section and rate-coefficient data for inelastic collisions between hydrogen, helium and lithium atoms, molecules and ions, and encompasses more than 400 different reactions of primary interest in fusion research. Published experimental and theoretical data have been collected and evaluated, and the recommended data are presented in tabular, graphical and parametrized form. Processes include excitation and spectral line emission, charge exchange, ionization, stripping, dissociation and particle interchange reactions. The range of collision energies is appropriate to applications in fusion-energy research.

  11. Atomic data for fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunter, H.T.; Kirkpatrick, M.I.; Alvarez, I.; Cisneros, C.; Phaneuf, R.A.; Barnett, C.F.

    1990-07-01

    This report provides a handbook of recommended cross-section and rate-coefficient data for inelastic collisions between hydrogen, helium and lithium atoms, molecules and ions, and encompasses more than 400 different reactions of primary interest in fusion research. Published experimental and theoretical data have been collected and evaluated, and the recommended data are presented in tabular, graphical and parametrized form. Processes include excitation and spectral line emission, charge exchange, ionization, stripping, dissociation and particle interchange reactions. The range of collision energies is appropriate to applications in fusion-energy research

  12. Approximate maximum parsimony and ancestral maximum likelihood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alon, Noga; Chor, Benny; Pardi, Fabio; Rapoport, Anat

    2010-01-01

    We explore the maximum parsimony (MP) and ancestral maximum likelihood (AML) criteria in phylogenetic tree reconstruction. Both problems are NP-hard, so we seek approximate solutions. We formulate the two problems as Steiner tree problems under appropriate distances. The gist of our approach is the succinct characterization of Steiner trees for a small number of leaves for the two distances. This enables the use of known Steiner tree approximation algorithms. The approach leads to a 16/9 approximation ratio for AML and asymptotically to a 1.55 approximation ratio for MP.

  13. Maximum permissible dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1979-01-01

    This chapter presents a historic overview of the establishment of radiation guidelines by various national and international agencies. The use of maximum permissible dose and maximum permissible body burden limits to derive working standards is discussed

  14. Fusion and nonfusion phenomena in the 6Li+40Ca reaction at 156 MeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brzychczyk, J.; Freindl, L.; Grotowski, K.

    1982-01-01

    Reaction products from 6 Li-induced reactions on 40 Ca at 156 MeV have been studied using the dE x E identification as well as the inclusive γ-ray method. The complete fusion cross-section has been found to be σsub(f)=(77 +- 11)mb. The Z distribution of fusion evaporation residues is compared with statistical model predictions. The Z spectrum of reaction products shows a maximum at 15 6 Li break-up. (author)

  15. Fusion and nonfusion phenomena in the 6Li+40Ca reaction at 156 MeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brzychczyk, J.; Freindl, L.; Grotowski, K.; Majka, Z.; Micek, S.; Planeta, R.; Uniwersytet Jagiellonski, Krakow; Albinska, M.; Buschmann, J.; Klewe-Nebenius, H.; Gils, H.J.; Rebel, H.; Zagromski, S.

    1984-01-01

    Reaction products from 6 Li-induced reactions on 40 Ca at 156 MeV have been studied using the dExE idenitification as well as the inclusive γ-ray method. The complete fusion cross section has been found to be sigmasub(F)=67 +- 20 mb. The Z-distribution of fusion evaporation residues is compared with statistical model predictions. The Z-spectrum of reaction products shows a maximum at 15 6 Li-break-up processes. (orig.)

  16. Thermonuclear fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weisse, J.

    2000-01-01

    This document takes stock of the two ways of thermonuclear fusion research explored today: magnetic confinement fusion and inertial confinement fusion. The basic physical principles are recalled first: fundamental nuclear reactions, high temperatures, elementary properties of plasmas, ignition criterion, magnetic confinement (charged particle in a uniform magnetic field, confinement and Tokamak principle, heating of magnetized plasmas (ohmic, neutral particles, high frequency waves, other heating means), results obtained so far (scale laws and extrapolation of performances, tritium experiments, ITER project), inertial fusion (hot spot ignition, instabilities, results (Centurion-Halite program, laser experiments). The second part presents the fusion reactor and its associated technologies: principle (tritium production, heat source, neutron protection, tritium generation, materials), magnetic fusion (superconducting magnets, divertor (role, principle, realization), inertial fusion (energy vector, laser adaptation, particle beams, reaction chamber, stresses, chamber concepts (dry and wet walls, liquid walls), targets (fabrication, injection and pointing)). The third chapter concerns the socio-economic aspects of thermonuclear fusion: safety (normal operation and accidents, wastes), costs (costs structure and elementary comparison, ecological impact and external costs). (J.S.)

  17. Fusion devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fowler, T.K.

    1977-01-01

    Three types of thermonuclear fusion devices currently under development are reviewed for an electric utilities management audience. Overall design features of laser fusion, tokamak, and magnetic mirror type reactors are described and illustrated. Thrusts and trends in current research on these devices that promise to improve performance are briefly reviewed. Twenty photographs and drawings are included

  18. Effect of breakup on near barrier fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dasgupta, M.; Berriman, A.C.; Butt, R.D.; Hinde, D.J.; Morton, C.R.; Newton, J.O.

    2000-01-01

    Full text: Unstable neutron-rich nuclei having very weakly bound neutrons exhibit characteristic features such as a neutron halo extending to large radii, and a low energy threshold for breakup. These features may dramatically affect fusion and other reaction processes. It is well accepted that the extended nuclear matter distribution will lead to an enhancement in fusion cross-sections over those for tightly bound nuclei. The effect of couplings to channels which act as doorways to breakup is, however, controversial, with model predictions differing in the relative magnitudes of enhancement and suppression. To investigate the effect on fusion of couplings specific to unstable neutron-rich nuclei, it is necessary to understand (and then predict) the cross-sections expected for their stable counterparts. This requires knowledge of the energy of the average fusion barrier, and information on the couplings. Experimentally all this information can be obtained from precisely measured fusion cross-sections. Such precision measurements of complete fusion cross-sections for 9 Be + 208 Pb and 6 Li, 7 Li + 209 Bi systems have been done at the Australian National University. The distribution of fusion barriers extracted from these data were used to reliably predict the expected fusion cross-sections. Comparison of the theoretical expectations with the experimentally measured cross-sections show conclusively that complete fusion, at above barrier energies, for all three systems is suppressed (by about 30%) compared with the fusion of more tightly bound nuclei. These measurements, in conjunction with incomplete fusion cross-sections, which were also measured, should encourage a complete theoretical description of fusion and breakup

  19. Atomic fusion, Gerrard atomic fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerrard, T.H.

    1980-01-01

    In the approach to atomic fusion described here the heat produced in a fusion reaction, which is induced in a chamber by the interaction of laser beams and U.H.F. electromagnetic beams with atom streams, is transferred to a heat exchanger for electricity generation by a coolant flowing through a jacket surrounding the chamber. (U.K.)

  20. Receiver function estimated by maximum entropy deconvolution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴庆举; 田小波; 张乃铃; 李卫平; 曾融生

    2003-01-01

    Maximum entropy deconvolution is presented to estimate receiver function, with the maximum entropy as the rule to determine auto-correlation and cross-correlation functions. The Toeplitz equation and Levinson algorithm are used to calculate the iterative formula of error-predicting filter, and receiver function is then estimated. During extrapolation, reflective coefficient is always less than 1, which keeps maximum entropy deconvolution stable. The maximum entropy of the data outside window increases the resolution of receiver function. Both synthetic and real seismograms show that maximum entropy deconvolution is an effective method to measure receiver function in time-domain.

  1. Peaceful fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Englert, Matthias [IANUS, TU Darmstadt (Germany)

    2014-07-01

    Like other intense neutron sources fusion reactors have in principle a potential to be used for military purposes. Although the use of fissile material is usually not considered when thinking of fusion reactors (except in fusion-fission hybrid concepts) quantitative estimates about the possible production potential of future commercial fusion reactor concepts show that significant amounts of weapon grade fissile materials could be produced even with very limited amounts of source materials. In this talk detailed burnup calculations with VESTA and MCMATH using an MCNP model of the PPCS-A will be presented. We compare different irradiation positions and the isotopic vectors of the plutonium bred in different blankets of the reactor wall with the liquid lead-lithium alloy replaced by uranium. The technical, regulatory and policy challenges to manage the proliferation risks of fusion power will be addressed as well. Some of these challenges would benefit if addressed at an early stage of the research and development process. Hence, research on fusion reactor safeguards should start as early as possible and accompany the current research on experimental fusion reactors.

  2. Results from transcranial Doppler examination on children and adolescents with sickle cell disease and correlation between the time-averaged maximum mean velocity and hematological characteristics: a cross-sectional analytical study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Hokazono

    Full Text Available CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE: Transcranial Doppler (TCD detects stroke risk among children with sickle cell anemia (SCA. Our aim was to evaluate TCD findings in patients with different sickle cell disease (SCD genotypes and correlate the time-averaged maximum mean (TAMM velocity with hematological characteristics. DESIGN AND SETTING: Cross-sectional analytical study in the Pediatric Hematology sector, Universidade Federal de São Paulo. METHODS: 85 SCD patients of both sexes, aged 2-18 years, were evaluated, divided into: group I (62 patients with SCA/Sß0 thalassemia; and group II (23 patients with SC hemoglobinopathy/Sß+ thalassemia. TCD was performed and reviewed by a single investigator using Doppler ultrasonography with a 2 MHz transducer, in accordance with the Stroke Prevention Trial in Sickle Cell Anemia (STOP protocol. The hematological parameters evaluated were: hematocrit, hemoglobin, reticulocytes, leukocytes, platelets and fetal hemoglobin. Univariate analysis was performed and Pearson's coefficient was calculated for hematological parameters and TAMM velocities (P < 0.05. RESULTS: TAMM velocities were 137 ± 28 and 103 ± 19 cm/s in groups I and II, respectively, and correlated negatively with hematocrit and hemoglobin in group I. There was one abnormal result (1.6% and five conditional results (8.1% in group I. All results were normal in group II. Middle cerebral arteries were the only vessels affected. CONCLUSION: There was a low prevalence of abnormal Doppler results in patients with sickle-cell disease. Time-average maximum mean velocity was significantly different between the genotypes and correlated with hematological characteristics.

  3. Comparison of activation cross section measurements and experimental techniques for fusion reactor technology. Summary report of the IAEA specialists' meeting held in St. Petersburg, Russia, 7 to 9 September 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pashchenko, A.B.

    1995-02-01

    The report contains the Summary of the IAEA Specialists' Meeting on ''Comparison of Activation Cross Section Measurements and Experimental Techniques for Fusion Reactor Technology''. The meeting was organized by the IAEA Nuclear Data Section (NDS) with co-operation and assistance of local organizers from the V.G. Khlopin Radium Institute, KRI, and held in St. Petersburg, Russia, from 7 to 9 September 1994. The aim of the meeting was to discuss and evaluate the preliminary results of the researches carried out in the framework of the international programme on Comparison of Activation Cross Section Measurements and Experimental Techniques for Fusion Reactor Technology coordinated by the IAEA Nuclear Data Section and to identify further measurements and actions of participating laboratories. The detailed conclusions and recommendations of the meeting are presented in Attachment 1 of the summary report. It was confirmed that for further comparison of experimental techniques the experimental groups at JAERI (Tokai, Japan), KRI (St. Petersburg, Russia), IPPE (Obninsk, Russia) and IEP (Debrecen, Hungary) will join in a collaborative program on comparing their measurement techniques and do measurements for reactions where discrepancies between their previous measurements exist. In cases where the JAERI results are the only existing data or deviate strongly from previous measurements, collaboration between KRI, IEP, IPPE and other institutions can consider measurements of these cross sections in order to clarify the situation. (author)

  4. Fusion barrier distributions and fission anisotropies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hinde, D.J.; Morton, C.R.; Dasgupta, M.; Leigh, J.R.; Lestone, J.P.; Lemmon, R.C.; Mein, J.C.; Newton, J.O.; Timmers, H.; Rowley, N.; Kruppa, A.T.

    1995-01-01

    Fusion excitation functions for 16,17 O+ 144 Sm have been measured to high precision. The extracted fusion barrier distributions show a double-peaked structure interpreted in terms of coupling to inelastic collective excitations of the target. The effect of the positive Q-value neutron stripping channel is evident in the reaction with 17 O. Fission and evaporation residue cross-sections and excitation functions have been measured for the reaction of 16 O+ 208 Pb and the fusion barrier distribution and fission anisotropies determined. It is found that the moments of the fusion l-distribution determined from the fusion and fission measurements are in good agreement. ((orig.))

  5. Cold fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suh, Suk Yong; Sung, Ki Woong; Kang, Joo Sang; Lee, Jong Jik

    1995-02-01

    So called 'cold fusion phenomena' are not confirmed yet. Excess heat generation is very delicate one. Neutron generation is most reliable results, however, the records are erratic and the same results could not be repeated. So there is no reason to exclude the malfunction of testing instruments. The same arguments arise in recording 4 He, 3 He, 3 H, which are not rich in quantity basically. An experiment where plenty of 4 He were recorded is attached in appendix. The problem is that we are trying to search cold fusion which is permitted by nature or not. The famous tunneling effect in quantum mechanics will answer it, however, the most fusion rate is known to be negligible. The focus of this project is on the theme that how to increase that negligible fusion rate. 6 figs, 4 tabs, 1512 refs. (Author)

  6. Cold fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suh, Suk Yong; Sung, Ki Woong; Kang, Joo Sang; Lee, Jong Jik [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-02-01

    So called `cold fusion phenomena` are not confirmed yet. Excess heat generation is very delicate one. Neutron generation is most reliable results, however, the records are erratic and the same results could not be repeated. So there is no reason to exclude the malfunction of testing instruments. The same arguments arise in recording {sup 4}He, {sup 3}He, {sup 3}H, which are not rich in quantity basically. An experiment where plenty of {sup 4}He were recorded is attached in appendix. The problem is that we are trying to search cold fusion which is permitted by nature or not. The famous tunneling effect in quantum mechanics will answer it, however, the most fusion rate is known to be negligible. The focus of this project is on the theme that how to increase that negligible fusion rate. 6 figs, 4 tabs, 1512 refs. (Author).

  7. Laser fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashby, D.E.T.F.

    1976-01-01

    A short survey is given on laser fusion its basic concepts and problems and the present theoretical and experimental methods. The future research program of the USA in this field is outlined. (WBU) [de

  8. Fusion energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1979-01-01

    The efforts of the Chemical Technology Division in fusion energy include the areas of fuel handling, processing, and containment. Current studies are concerned largely with the development of vacuum pumps for fusion reactors and experiments and with development and evaluation of techniques for recovering tritium from solid or liquid breeding blankets. In addition, a small effort is devoted to support of the ORNL design of a major Tokamak experiment, The Next Step (TNS)

  9. Laser fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Key, M.H.; Oxford Univ.

    1990-04-01

    The use of lasers to drive implosions for the purpose of inertially confined fusion is an area of intense activity where progress compares favourably with that made in magnetic fusion and there are significant prospects for future development. In this brief review the basic concept is summarised and the current status is outlined both in the area of laser technology and in the most recent results from implosion experiments. Prospects for the future are also considered. (author)

  10. Sub-Coulomb fusion with halo nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fekou-Youmbi, V.; Sida, J.L.; Alamanos, N.; Auger, F.; Bazin, D.; Borcea, C.; Cabot, C.; Cunsolo, A.; Foti, A.; Gillibert, A.; Lepine, A.; Lewitowicz, M.; Liguori-Neto, R.; Mittig, W.; Pollacco, E.; Roussel-Chomaz, P.; Volant, C.; Yong Feng, Y.

    1995-01-01

    The nuclear structure of halo nuclei may have strong influence on the fusion cross section at sub-barrier energies. The actual theoretical debate is briefly reviewed and sub-barrier fusion calculations for the system 11 Be+ 238 U are presented. An experimental program on sub-barrier fusion for the systems 7,9,10,11 Be+ 238 U is underway at GANIL. First results with 9 Be and 11 Be beams were obtained using the F.U.S.ION detector. Relative fission cross sections are presented. ((orig.))

  11. Nuclear fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-zaelic, M.M.

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear fusion can be relied on to solve the global energy crisis if the process of limiting the heat produced by the fusion reaction (Plasma) is successful. Currently scientists are progressively working on this aspect whereas there are two methods to limit the heat produced by fusion reaction, the two methods are auto-restriction using laser beam and magnetic restriction through the use of magnetic fields and research is carried out to improve these two methods. It is expected that at the end of this century the nuclear fusion energy will play a vital role in overcoming the global energy crisis and for these reasons, acquiring energy through the use of nuclear fusion reactors is one of the most urge nt demands of all mankind at this time. The conclusion given is that the source of fuel for energy production is readily available and inexpensive ( hydrogen atoms) and whole process is free of risks and hazards, especially to general health and the environment . Nuclear fusion importance lies in the fact that energy produced by the process is estimated to be about four to five times the energy produced by nuclear fission. (author)

  12. Nuclear physics for nuclear fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Xingzhong; Liu Bin; Wei Qingming; Ren Xianzhe

    2004-01-01

    The D-T fusion cross-section is calculated using quantum mechanics with the model of square nuclear potential well and Coulomb potential barrier. The agreement between ENDF data and the theoretically calculated results is well in the range of 0.2-280 keV. It shows that the application of Breit-Wigner formula is not suitable for the case of the light nuclei fusion reaction. When this model is applied to the nuclear reaction between the charged particles confined in a lattice, it explains the 'abnormal phenomena'. It implies a prospect of nuclear fusion energy without strong nuclear radiations

  13. Bubble fusion: Preliminary estimates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krakowski, R.A.

    1995-01-01

    The collapse of a gas-filled bubble in disequilibrium (i.e., internal pressure much-lt external pressure) can occur with a significant focusing of energy onto the entrapped gas in the form of pressure-volume work and/or acoustical shocks; the resulting heating can be sufficient to cause ionization and the emission of atomic radiations. The suggestion that extreme conditions necessary for thermonuclear fusion to occur may be possible has been examined parametrically in terms of the ratio of initial bubble pressure relative to that required for equilibrium. In this sense, the disequilibrium bubble is viewed as a three-dimensional ''sling shot'' that is ''loaded'' to an extent allowed by the maximum level of disequilibrium that can stably be achieved. Values of this disequilibrium ratio in the range 10 -5 --10 -6 are predicted by an idealized bubble-dynamics model as necessary to achieve conditions where nuclear fusion of deuterium-tritium might be observed. Harmonic and aharmonic pressurizations/decompressions are examined as means to achieve the required levels of disequilibrium required to create fusion conditions. A number of phenomena not included in the analysis reported herein could enhance or reduce the small levels of nuclear fusions predicted

  14. Maximum Acceleration Recording Circuit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozeman, Richard J., Jr.

    1995-01-01

    Coarsely digitized maximum levels recorded in blown fuses. Circuit feeds power to accelerometer and makes nonvolatile record of maximum level to which output of accelerometer rises during measurement interval. In comparison with inertia-type single-preset-trip-point mechanical maximum-acceleration-recording devices, circuit weighs less, occupies less space, and records accelerations within narrower bands of uncertainty. In comparison with prior electronic data-acquisition systems designed for same purpose, circuit simpler, less bulky, consumes less power, costs and analysis of data recorded in magnetic or electronic memory devices. Circuit used, for example, to record accelerations to which commodities subjected during transportation on trucks.

  15. Cold fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koster, J.

    1989-01-01

    In this contribution the author the phenomenom of so-called cold fusion, inspired by the memorable lecture of Moshe Gai on his own search for this effect. Thus much of what follows was presented by Dr. Gai; the rest is from independent reading. What is referred to as cold fusion is of course the observation of possible products of deuteron-deuteron (d-d) fusion within deuterium-loaded (dentended) electrodes. The debate over the two vanguard cold fusion experiments has raged under far more public attention than usually accorded new scientific phenomena. The clamor commenced with the press conference of M. Fleishmann and S. Pons on March 23, 1989 and the nearly simultaneous wide circulation of a preprint of S. Jones and collaborators. The majority of work attempting to confirm these observations has at the time of this writing yet to appear in published form, but contributions to conferences and electronic mail over computer networks were certainly filled with preliminary results. To keep what follows to a reasonable length the author limit this discussion to the searches for neutron (suggested by ref. 2) or for excessive heat production (suggested by ref. 1), following a synopsis of the hypotheses of cold fusion

  16. Maximum Quantum Entropy Method

    OpenAIRE

    Sim, Jae-Hoon; Han, Myung Joon

    2018-01-01

    Maximum entropy method for analytic continuation is extended by introducing quantum relative entropy. This new method is formulated in terms of matrix-valued functions and therefore invariant under arbitrary unitary transformation of input matrix. As a result, the continuation of off-diagonal elements becomes straightforward. Without introducing any further ambiguity, the Bayesian probabilistic interpretation is maintained just as in the conventional maximum entropy method. The applications o...

  17. Maximum power demand cost

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biondi, L.

    1998-01-01

    The charging for a service is a supplier's remuneration for the expenses incurred in providing it. There are currently two charges for electricity: consumption and maximum demand. While no problem arises about the former, the issue is more complicated for the latter and the analysis in this article tends to show that the annual charge for maximum demand arbitrarily discriminates among consumer groups, to the disadvantage of some [it

  18. Fusion enhancement in the reactions of neutron-rich nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bian Baoan; Zhang Fengshou; Zhou Hongyu

    2009-01-01

    The neutron-rich fusion reactions are investigated systematically using the improved isospin dependent quantum molecular dynamics model. By studying the systematic dependence of fusion barrier on neuron excess, we find the enhancement of the fusion cross sections for neutron-rich nuclear reactions that give the lowered static Coulomb barriers. The calculated fusion cross sections agree quantitatively with the experimental data. We further discuss the mechanism of the fusion enhancement of the cross sections for neutron-rich nuclear reactions by analyzing the dynamical lowering of the Coulomb barrier that is attributed to the enhancement of the N/Z ratio at the neck region.

  19. Fusion barrier distributions - What have we learned?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hinde, D. J.; Dasgupta, M.

    1998-01-01

    The study of nuclear fusion received a strong impetus from the realisation that an experimental fusion barrier distribution could be determined from precisely measured fusion cross-sections. Experimental data for different reactions have shown in the fusion barrier distributions clear signatures of a range of nuclear excitations, for example the effects of static quadrupole and hexadecapole deformations, single- and double-phonon states, transfer of nucleons, and high-lying excited states. The improved understanding of fusion barrier distributions allows more reliable prediction of fusion angular momentum distributions, which aids interpretation of fission probabilities and fission anisotropies, and understanding of the population of super-deformed bands for nuclear structure studies. Studies of the relationship between the fusion barrier distribution and the extra-push energy should improve our understanding of the mechanism of the extra-push effect, and may help to predict new ways of forming very heavy or super-heavy nuclei

  20. Small suppression of the complete fusion of {sup 6}Li + {sup 28}Si reaction at near barrier energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinha, Mandira [Bose Institute, Department of Physics, Kolkata (India); Lubian, J. [Universidade Federal Fluminense, Instituto de Fisica, Niteroi, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)

    2017-11-15

    The incomplete fusion cross section of the {sup 6}Li + {sup 28}Si weakly bound system at above barrier energies was deduced from the measured γ-ray cross sections. The complete fusion cross section was estimated from the measured total fusion and incomplete fusion cross section and is found to be 85-100% of the total fusion cross section. The coupled channel calculation has been performed considering ground and first excited states of {sup 28}Si target. The fusion cross section estimated from coupled channel calculation shows good agreement with measured total fusion cross section at higher energies. The suppression of about 15% of the fusion cross section predicted by coupled channel calculation shows good agreement with the complete fusion cross section. The effect of the channel couplings on the elastic scattering angular distribution is also investigated. (orig.)

  1. Measurement of fiducial differential cross sections of gluon-fusion production of Higgs bosons decaying to WW{sup ∗}→ eνμν with the ATLAS detector at √s=8 TeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aad, G. [CPPM, Aix-Marseille Université and CNRS/IN2P3, Marseille (France); Abbott, B. [Homer L. Dodge Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Oklahoma, Norman OK, United States of America (United States); Abdallah, J. [Institute of Physics, Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Abdinov, O. [Institute of Physics, Azerbaijan Academy of Sciences, Baku (Azerbaijan); Collaboration: The ATLAS collaboration; and others

    2016-08-17

    This paper describes a measurement of fiducial and differential cross sections of gluon-fusion Higgs boson production in the H→ WW{sup ∗}→ eνμν channel, using 20.3 fb{sup −1} of proton-proton collision data. The data were produced at a centre-of-mass energy of √s=8 TeV at the CERN Large Hadron Collider and recorded by the ATLAS detector in 2012. Cross sections are measured from the observed H→ WW{sup ∗}→ eνμν signal yield in categories distinguished by the number of associated jets. The total cross section is measured in a fiducial region defined by the kinematic properties of the charged leptons and neutrinos. Differential cross sections are reported as a function of the number of jets, the Higgs boson transverse momentum, the dilepton rapidity, and the transverse momentum of the leading jet. The jet-veto efficiency, or fraction of events with no jets above a given transverse momentum threshold, is also reported. All measurements are compared to QCD predictions from Monte Carlo generators and fixed-order calculations, and are in agreement with the Standard Model predictions.

  2. Measurement of fiducial differential cross sections of gluon-fusion production of Higgs bosons decaying to WW *→eνμν with the ATLAS detector at s = 8 $$ \\sqrt{s}=8 $$ TeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdinov, O.; Abeloos, B.; Aben, R.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; Abulaiti, Y.; Acharya, B. S.; Adamczyk, L.; Adams, D. L.; Adelman, J.; Adomeit, S.; Adye, T.; Affolder, A. A.; Agatonovic-Jovin, T.; Agricola, J.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahmadov, F.; Aielli, G.; Akerstedt, H.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akimov, A. V.; Alberghi, G. L.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Alconada Verzini, M. J.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alison, J.; Alkire, S. P.; Allbrooke, B. M. M.; Allen, B. W.; Allport, P. P.; Aloisio, A.; Alonso, A.; Alonso, F.; Alpigiani, C.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Álvarez Piqueras, D.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amadio, B. T.; Amako, K.; Amaral Coutinho, Y.; Amelung, C.; Amidei, D.; Amor Dos Santos, S. P.; Amorim, A.; Amoroso, S.; Amram, N.; Amundsen, G.; Anastopoulos, C.; Ancu, L. S.; Andari, N.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anders, G.; Anders, J. K.; Anderson, K. J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Angelidakis, S.; Angelozzi, I.; Anger, P.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anisenkov, A. V.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antonelli, M.; Antonov, A.; Antos, J.; Anulli, F.; Aoki, M.; Aperio Bella, L.; Arabidze, G.; Arai, Y.; Araque, J. P.; Arce, A. T. H.; Arduh, F. A.; Arguin, J-F.; Argyropoulos, S.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A. J.; Armitage, L. J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnold, H.; Arratia, M.; Arslan, O.; Artamonov, A.; Artoni, G.; Artz, S.; Asai, S.; Asbah, N.; Ashkenazi, A.; Åsman, B.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astalos, R.; Atkinson, M.; Atlay, N. B.; Augsten, K.; Avolio, G.; Axen, B.; Ayoub, M. K.; Azuelos, G.; Baak, M. A.; Baas, A. E.; Baca, M. J.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Backes, M.; Backhaus, M.; Bagiacchi, P.; Bagnaia, P.; Bai, Y.; Baines, J. T.; Baker, O. K.; Baldin, E. M.; Balek, P.; Balestri, T.; Balli, F.; Balunas, W. K.; Banas, E.; Banerjee, Sw.; Bannoura, A. A. E.; Barak, L.; Barberio, E. L.; Barberis, D.; Barbero, M.; Barillari, T.; Barisonzi, M.; Barklow, T.; Barlow, N.; Barnes, S. L.; Barnett, B. M.; Barnett, R. M.; Barnovska, Z.; Baroncelli, A.; Barone, G.; Barr, A. J.; Barranco Navarro, L.; Barreiro, F.; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, J.; Bartoldus, R.; Barton, A. E.; Bartos, P.; Basalaev, A.; Bassalat, A.; Basye, A.; Bates, R. L.; Batista, S. J.; Batley, J. R.; Battaglia, M.; Bauce, M.; Bauer, F.; Bawa, H. S.; Beacham, J. B.; Beattie, M. D.; Beau, T.; Beauchemin, P. H.; Bechtle, P.; Beck, H. P.; Becker, K.; Becker, M.; Beckingham, M.; Becot, C.; Beddall, A. J.; Beddall, A.; Bednyakov, V. A.; Bedognetti, M.; Bee, C. P.; Beemster, L. J.; Beermann, T. A.; Begel, M.; Behr, J. K.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bell, A. S.; Bell, W. H.; Bella, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Bellerive, A.; Bellomo, M.; Belotskiy, K.; Beltramello, O.; Belyaev, N. L.; Benary, O.; Benchekroun, D.; Bender, M.; Bendtz, K.; Benekos, N.; Benhammou, Y.; Benhar Noccioli, E.; Benitez, J.; Benitez Garcia, J. A.; Benjamin, D. P.; Bensinger, J. R.; Bentvelsen, S.; Beresford, L.; Beretta, M.; Berge, D.; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E.; Berger, N.; Berghaus, F.; Beringer, J.; Berlendis, S.; Bernard, N. R.; Bernius, C.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Berry, T.; Berta, P.; Bertella, C.; Bertoli, G.; Bertolucci, F.; Bertram, I. A.; Bertsche, C.; Bertsche, D.; Besjes, G. J.; Bessidskaia Bylund, O.; Bessner, M.; Besson, N.; Betancourt, C.; Bethke, S.; Bevan, A. J.; Bhimji, W.; Bianchi, R. M.; Bianchini, L.; Bianco, M.; Biebel, O.; Biedermann, D.; Bielski, R.; Biesuz, N. V.; Biglietti, M.; Bilbao De Mendizabal, J.; Bilokon, H.; Bindi, M.; Binet, S.; Bingul, A.; Bini, C.; Biondi, S.; Bjergaard, D. M.; Black, C. W.; Black, J. E.; Black, K. M.; Blackburn, D.; Blair, R. E.; Blanchard, J. -B.; Blanco, J. E.; Blazek, T.; Bloch, I.; Blocker, C.; Blum, W.; Blumenschein, U.; Blunier, S.; Bobbink, G. J.; Bobrovnikov, V. S.; Bocchetta, S. S.; Bocci, A.; Bock, C.; Boehler, M.; Boerner, D.; Bogaerts, J. A.; Bogavac, D.; Bogdanchikov, A. G.; Bohm, C.; Boisvert, V.; Bold, T.; Boldea, V.; Boldyrev, A. S.; Bomben, M.; Bona, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Borisov, A.; Borissov, G.; Bortfeldt, J.; Bortoletto, D.; Bortolotto, V.; Bos, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bosman, M.; Bossio Sola, J. D.; Boudreau, J.; Bouffard, J.; Bouhova-Thacker, E. V.; Boumediene, D.; Bourdarios, C.; Bousson, N.; Boutle, S. K.; Boveia, A.; Boyd, J.; Boyko, I. R.; Bracinik, J.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, G.; Brandt, O.; Bratzler, U.; Brau, B.; Brau, J. E.; Braun, H. M.; Breaden Madden, W. D.; Brendlinger, K.; Brennan, A. J.; Brenner, L.; Brenner, R.; Bressler, S.; Bristow, T. M.; Britton, D.; Britzger, D.; Brochu, F. M.; Brock, I.; Brock, R.; Brooijmans, G.; Brooks, T.; Brooks, W. K.; Brosamer, J.; Brost, E.; Broughton, J. H.; Bruckman de Renstrom, P. A.; Bruncko, D.; Bruneliere, R.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Brunt, BH; Bruschi, M.; Bruscino, N.; Bryant, P.; Bryngemark, L.; Buanes, T.; Buat, Q.; Buchholz, P.; Buckley, A. G.; Budagov, I. A.; Buehrer, F.; Bugge, M. K.; Bulekov, O.; Bullock, D.; Burckhart, H.; Burdin, S.; Burgard, C. D.; Burghgrave, B.; Burka, K.; Burke, S.; Burmeister, I.; Busato, E.; Büscher, D.; Büscher, V.; Bussey, P.; Butler, J. M.; Butt, A. I.; Buttar, C. M.; Butterworth, J. M.; Butti, P.; Buttinger, W.; Buzatu, A.; Buzykaev, A. R.; Cabrera Urbán, S.; Caforio, D.; Cairo, V. M.; Cakir, O.; Calace, N.; Calafiura, P.; Calandri, A.; Calderini, G.; Calfayan, P.; Caloba, L. P.; Calvet, D.; Calvet, S.; Calvet, T. P.; Camacho Toro, R.; Camarda, S.; Camarri, P.; Cameron, D.; Caminal Armadans, R.; Camincher, C.; Campana, S.; Campanelli, M.; Campoverde, A.; Canale, V.; Canepa, A.; Cano Bret, M.; Cantero, J.; Cantrill, R.; Cao, T.; Capeans Garrido, M. D. M.; Caprini, I.; Caprini, M.; Capua, M.; Caputo, R.; Carbone, R. M.; Cardarelli, R.; Cardillo, F.; Carli, T.; Carlino, G.; Carminati, L.; Caron, S.; Carquin, E.; Carrillo-Montoya, G. D.; Carter, J. R.; Carvalho, J.; Casadei, D.; Casado, M. P.; Casolino, M.; Casper, D. W.; Castaneda-Miranda, E.; Castelli, A.; Castillo Gimenez, V.; Castro, N. F.; Catinaccio, A.; Catmore, J. R.; Cattai, A.; Caudron, J.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavalli, D.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cavasinni, V.; Ceradini, F.; Cerda Alberich, L.; Cerio, B. C.; Cerqueira, A. S.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Cerutti, F.; Cerv, M.; Cervelli, A.; Cetin, S. A.; Chafaq, A.; Chakraborty, D.; Chalupkova, I.; Chan, S. K.; Chan, Y. L.; Chang, P.; Chapman, J. D.; Charlton, D. G.; Chatterjee, A.; Chau, C. C.; Chavez Barajas, C. A.; Che, S.; Cheatham, S.; Chegwidden, A.; Chekanov, S.; Chekulaev, S. V.; Chelkov, G. A.; Chelstowska, M. A.; Chen, C.; Chen, H.; Chen, K.; Chen, S.; Chen, S.; Chen, X.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, H. C.; Cheng, H. J.; Cheng, Y.; Cheplakov, A.; Cheremushkina, E.; Cherkaoui El Moursli, R.; Chernyatin, V.; Cheu, E.; Chevalier, L.; Chiarella, V.; Chiarelli, G.; Chiodini, G.; Chisholm, A. S.; Chitan, A.; Chizhov, M. V.; Choi, K.; Chomont, A. R.; Chouridou, S.; Chow, B. K. B.; Christodoulou, V.; Chromek-Burckhart, D.; Chudoba, J.; Chuinard, A. J.; Chwastowski, J. J.; Chytka, L.; Ciapetti, G.; Ciftci, A. K.; Cinca, D.; Cindro, V.; Cioara, I. A.; Ciocio, A.; Cirotto, F.; Citron, Z. H.; Ciubancan, M.; Clark, A.; Clark, B. L.; Clark, P. J.; Clarke, R. N.; Clement, C.; Coadou, Y.; Cobal, M.; Coccaro, A.; Cochran, J.; Coffey, L.; Colasurdo, L.; Cole, B.; Cole, S.; Colijn, A. P.; Collot, J.; Colombo, T.; Compostella, G.; Conde Muiño, P.; Coniavitis, E.; Connell, S. H.; Connelly, I. A.; Consorti, V.; Constantinescu, S.; Conta, C.; Conti, G.; Conventi, F.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, B. D.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Cornelissen, T.; Corradi, M.; Corriveau, F.; Corso-Radu, A.; Cortes-Gonzalez, A.; Cortiana, G.; Costa, G.; Costa, M. J.; Costanzo, D.; Cottin, G.; Cowan, G.; Cox, B. E.; Cranmer, K.; Crawley, S. J.; Cree, G.; Crépé-Renaudin, S.; Crescioli, F.; Cribbs, W. A.; Crispin Ortuzar, M.; Cristinziani, M.; Croft, V.; Crosetti, G.; Cuhadar Donszelmann, T.; Cummings, J.; Curatolo, M.; Cúth, J.; Cuthbert, C.; Czirr, H.; Czodrowski, P.; D’Auria, S.; D’Onofrio, M.; Da Cunha Sargedas De Sousa, M. J.; Da Via, C.; Dabrowski, W.; Dai, T.; Dale, O.; Dallaire, F.; Dallapiccola, C.; Dam, M.; Dandoy, J. R.; Dang, N. P.; Daniells, A. C.; Dann, N. S.; Danninger, M.; Dano Hoffmann, M.; Dao, V.; Darbo, G.; Darmora, S.; Dassoulas, J.; Dattagupta, A.; Davey, W.; David, C.; Davidek, T.; Davies, M.; Davison, P.; Davygora, Y.; Dawe, E.; Dawson, I.; Daya-Ishmukhametova, R. K.; De, K.; de Asmundis, R.; De Benedetti, A.; De Castro, S.; De Cecco, S.; De Groot, N.; de Jong, P.; De la Torre, H.; De Lorenzi, F.; De Pedis, D.; De Salvo, A.; De Sanctis, U.; De Santo, A.; De Vivie De Regie, J. B.; Dearnaley, W. J.; Debbe, R.; Debenedetti, C.; Dedovich, D. V.; Deigaard, I.; Del Peso, J.; Del Prete, T.; Delgove, D.; Deliot, F.; Delitzsch, C. M.; Deliyergiyev, M.; Dell’Acqua, A.; Dell’Asta, L.; Dell’Orso, M.; Della Pietra, M.; della Volpe, D.; Delmastro, M.; Delsart, P. A.; Deluca, C.; DeMarco, D. A.; Demers, S.; Demichev, M.; Demilly, A.; Denisov, S. P.; Denysiuk, D.; Derendarz, D.; Derkaoui, J. E.; Derue, F.; Dervan, P.; Desch, K.; Deterre, C.; Dette, K.; Deviveiros, P. O.; Dewhurst, A.; Dhaliwal, S.; Di Ciaccio, A.; Di Ciaccio, L.; Di Clemente, W. K.; Di Domenico, A.; Di Donato, C.; Di Girolamo, A.; Di Girolamo, B.; Di Mattia, A.; Di Micco, B.; Di Nardo, R.; Di Simone, A.; Di Sipio, R.; Di Valentino, D.; Diaconu, C.; Diamond, M.; Dias, F. A.; Diaz, M. A.; Diehl, E. B.; Dietrich, J.; Diglio, S.; Dimitrievska, A.; Dingfelder, J.; Dita, P.; Dita, S.; Dittus, F.; Djama, F.; Djobava, T.; Djuvsland, J. I.; do Vale, M. A. B.; Dobos, D.; Dobre, M.; Doglioni, C.; Dohmae, T.; Dolejsi, J.; Dolezal, Z.; Dolgoshein, B. A.; Donadelli, M.; Donati, S.; Dondero, P.; Donini, J.; Dopke, J.; Doria, A.; Dova, M. T.; Doyle, A. 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G.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, Y.; Zhuang, X.; Zhukov, K.; Zibell, A.; Zieminska, D.; Zimine, N. I.; Zimmermann, C.; Zimmermann, S.; Zinonos, Z.; Zinser, M.; Ziolkowski, M.; Živković, L.; Zobernig, G.; Zoccoli, A.; zur Nedden, M.; Zurzolo, G.; Zwalinski, L.

    2016-08-17

    This paper describes a measurement of fiducial and differential cross sections of gluon-fusion Higgs boson production in the H → W W*→ eνμν channel, using 20.3 fb-1 of proton-proton collision data. The data were produced at a centre-of-mass energy of √=8 TeV at the CERN Large Hadron Collider and recorded by the ATLAS detector in 2012. Cross sections are measured from the observed H→ W W*→ eνμν signal yield in categories distinguished by the number of associated jets. The total cross section is measured in a fiducial region defined by the kinematic properties of the charged leptons and neutrinos. Differential cross sections are reported as a function of the number of jets, the Higgs boson transverse momentum, the dilepton rapidity, and the transverse momentum of the leading jet. The jet-veto efficiency, or fraction of events with no jets above a given transverse momentum threshold, is also reported. All measurements are compared to QCD predictions from Monte Carlo generators and fixed-order calculations, and are in agreement with the Standard Model predictions.

  3. Nuclear fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huber, H.

    1978-01-01

    A comprehensive survey is presented of the present state of knowledge in nuclear fusion research. In the first part, potential thermonuclear reactions, basic energy balances of the plasma (Lawson criterion), and the main criteria to be observed in the selection of appropriate thermonuclear reactions are dealt with. This is followed by a discussion of the problems encountered in plasma physics (plasma confinement and heating, transport processes, plasma impurities, plasma instabilities and plasma diagnostics) and by a consideration of the materials problems involved, such as material of the first wall, fuel inlet and outlet, magnetic field generation, as well as repair work and in-service inspections. Two main methods have been developed to tackle these problems: reactor concepts using the magnetic pinch (stellarator, Tokamak, High-Beta reactors, mirror machines) on the one hand, and the other concept using the inertial confinement (laser fusion reactor). These two approaches and their specific problems as well as past, present and future fusion experiments are treated in detail. The last part of the work is devoted to safety and environmental aspects of the potential thermonuclear aspects of the potential thermonuclear reactor, discussing such problems as fusion-specific hazards, normal operation and potential hazards, reactor incidents, environmental pollution by thermal effluents, radiological pollution, radioactive wastes and their disposal, and siting problems. (orig./GG) [de

  4. Short fusion

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    French and UK researchers are perfecting a particle accelerator technique that could aid the quest for fusion energy or make X-rays that are safer and produce higher-resolution images. Led by Dr Victor Malka from the Ecole Nationale Superieure des Techniques Avancees in Paris, the team has developed a better way of accelerating electrons over short distances (1 page).

  5. Magnetic fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    This document is a detailed lecture on thermonuclear fusion. The basic physics principles are recalled and the technological choices that have led to tokamaks or stellarators are exposed. Different aspects concerning thermonuclear reactors such as safety, economy and feasibility are discussed. Tore-supra is described in details as well as the ITER project

  6. Cold fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seo, Suk Yong; You, Jae Jun

    1996-01-01

    Nearly every technical information is chased in the world. All of them are reviewed and analyzed. Some of them are chosen to study further more to review every related documents. And a probable suggestion about the excitonic process in deuteron absorbed condensed matter is proposed a way to cold fusion. 8 refs. (Author)

  7. Polarization: A Must for Fusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guidal M.

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Recent realistic simulations confirm that the polarization of the fuel would improve significantly the DT fusion efficiency. We have proposed an experiment to test the persistence of the polarization in a fusion process, using a terawatt laser hitting a polarized HD target. The polarized deuterons heated in the plasma induced by the laser can fuse producing a 3He and a neutron in the final state. The angular distribution of the neutrons and the change in the corresponding total cross section are related to the polarization persistence. The experimental polarization of DT fuel is a technological challenge. Possible paths for Magnetic Confinement Fusion (MCF and for Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF are reviewed. For MCF, polarized gas can be used. For ICF, cryogenic targets are required. We consider both, the polarization of gas and the polarization of solid DT, emphasizing the Dynamic Nuclear polarization (DNP of HD and DT molecules.

  8. On fusion/fission chain reactions in the Fleischmann-Pons cold fusion experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anghaie, S.; Froelich, P.; Monkhorst, H.J.

    1990-01-01

    In this paper the possibility of fusion/fission chain reactions following d-d source reactions in electrochemical cold fusion experiments have been investigated. The recycling factors for the charged particles in fusion reactions with consumable nuclei deuteron, 6 Li nd 7 Li, are estimated. It is concluded that, based on the established nuclear fusion cross sections and electronic stopping power, the recycling factor is four to five orders of magnitude less than required for close to critical conditions. It is argued that the cross generation of charged particles by neutrons does not play a significant role in this process, even if increased densities at the surface of electrodes do occur

  9. Quasi-elastic scattering an alternative tool for mapping the fusion barriers for heavy-ion induced fusion reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Behera, B.R.

    2016-01-01

    Heavy element synthesis through heavy-ion induced fusion reaction is an active field in contemporary nuclear physics. Exact knowledge of fusion barrier is one of the essential parameters for planning any experiments for heavy element production. Theoretically there are many models available to predict the exact barrier. Though these models are successful for predicting the fusion of medium mass nuclei, it somehow fails for predicting the exact location of barrier for fusion of heavy nuclei. Experimental determination of barrier for such reactions is required for future experiments for the synthesis of heavy elements. Traditionally fusion barrier is determined taking a double derivative of fusion excitation function. However, such method is difficult in case of fusion of heavy nuclei due to its very low fusion/capture cross section and its experimental complications. Alternatively fusion barrier can be determined by measuring the quasi-elastic cross section at backward angles. This method can be applied for determining the fusion barrier for the fusion of heavy nuclei. Experimental determination of fusion barrier by different methods and comparison of the fusion excitation function and quasi-elastic scattering methods for the determination of fusion barrier are reviewed. At IUAC, New Delhi recently a program has been started for the measurement of fusion barrier through quasi-elastic scattering methods. The experimental facility and the first results of the experiments carried out with this facility are presented. (author)

  10. Maximum likely scale estimation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Loog, Marco; Pedersen, Kim Steenstrup; Markussen, Bo

    2005-01-01

    A maximum likelihood local scale estimation principle is presented. An actual implementation of the estimation principle uses second order moments of multiple measurements at a fixed location in the image. These measurements consist of Gaussian derivatives possibly taken at several scales and/or ...

  11. Robust Maximum Association Estimators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Alfons (Andreas); C. Croux (Christophe); P. Filzmoser (Peter)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractThe maximum association between two multivariate variables X and Y is defined as the maximal value that a bivariate association measure between one-dimensional projections αX and αY can attain. Taking the Pearson correlation as projection index results in the first canonical correlation

  12. Cold fusion, Alchemist's dream

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clayton, E.D.

    1989-09-01

    In this report the following topics relating to cold fusion are discussed: muon catalysed cold fusion; piezonuclear fusion; sundry explanations pertaining to cold fusion; cosmic ray muon catalysed cold fusion; vibrational mechanisms in excited states of D 2 molecules; barrier penetration probabilities within the hydrogenated metal lattice/piezonuclear fusion; branching ratios of D 2 fusion at low energies; fusion of deuterons into 4 He; secondary D+T fusion within the hydrogenated metal lattice; 3 He to 4 He ratio within the metal lattice; shock induced fusion; and anomalously high isotopic ratios of 3 He/ 4 He

  13. Magnetic fusion; La fusion magnetique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-07-01

    This document is a detailed lecture on thermonuclear fusion. The basic physics principles are recalled and the technological choices that have led to tokamaks or stellarators are exposed. Different aspects concerning thermonuclear reactors such as safety, economy and feasibility are discussed. Tore-supra is described in details as well as the ITER project.

  14. Measurement of secondary gamma-ray production cross sections of structural materials for fusion reactor. Extraction of discrete and continuum components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kondo, Tetsuo; Morotomi, Ryutaro; Nishio, Takashi; Murata, Isao; Takahashi, Akito

    2000-01-01

    A new method to deal with measured spectrum of secondary gamma-rays induced by D-T neutrons with Ge detector is proposed. Subtracting background components and discrete peaks from the raw secondary gamma-ray spectrum, the continuum component of secondary gamma-ray was successfully extracted. By using unfolding process, the continuum component of the secondary gamma-ray production cross section was derived. The measured cross section data obtained by this method are very useful for precise evaluation of secondary gamma-ray production cross sections. (author)

  15. Comparison Of Quantum Mechanical And Classical Trajectory Calculations Of Cross Sections For Ion-Atom Impact Ionization of Negative - And Positive -Ions For Heavy Ion Fusion Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaganovich, Igor D.; Startsev, Edward A.; Davidson, Ronald C.

    2003-01-01

    Stripping cross sections in nitrogen have been calculated using the classical trajectory approximation and the Born approximation of quantum mechanics for the outer shell electrons of 3.2GeV I - and Cs + ions. A large difference in cross section, up to a factor of six, calculated in quantum mechanics and classical mechanics, has been obtained. Because at such high velocities the Born approximation is well validated, the classical trajectory approach fails to correctly predict the stripping cross sections at high energies for electron orbitals with low ionization potential

  16. Fusion Nuclear Data activities at FNL, IPR

    OpenAIRE

    P. M. Prajapati; B. Pandey; S. Jakhar; C.V. S. Rao; T. K. Basu; B. K. Nayak; S. V. Suryanarayana; A. Saxena

    2015-01-01

    This paper briefly describes the current fusion nuclear data activities at Fusion Neutronics Laboratory, Institute for Plasma Research. It consist of infrastructure development for the cross-section measurements of structural materials with an accelerator based 14 MeV neutron generator and theoretical study of the cross-section using advanced nuclear reaction modular codes EMPIRE and TALYS. It will also cover the proposed surrogate experiment to measure 55Fe (n, p) 55Mn using BARC-TIFR Pel...

  17. Splenogonadal Fusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung-Lang Chen

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Splenogonadal fusion (SGF is a rare congenital non-malignant anomaly characterized by fusion of splenic tissue to the gonad, and can be continuous or discontinuous. Very few cases have been diagnosed preoperatively, and many patients who present with testicular swelling undergo unnecessary orchiectomy under the suspicion of testicular neoplasm. A 16-year-old boy presented with a left scrotal mass and underwent total excision of a 1.6-cm tumor without damaging the testis, epididymis or its accompanying vessels. Pathologic examination revealed SFG (discontinuous type. If clinically suspected before surgery, the diagnosis may be confirmed by Tc-99m sulfur colloid imaging, which shows uptake in both the spleen and accessory splenic tissue within the scrotum. Frozen section should be considered if there remains any doubt regarding the diagnosis during operation.

  18. Maximum power point tracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Enslin, J.H.R.

    1990-01-01

    A well engineered renewable remote energy system, utilizing the principal of Maximum Power Point Tracking can be m ore cost effective, has a higher reliability and can improve the quality of life in remote areas. This paper reports that a high-efficient power electronic converter, for converting the output voltage of a solar panel, or wind generator, to the required DC battery bus voltage has been realized. The converter is controlled to track the maximum power point of the input source under varying input and output parameters. Maximum power point tracking for relative small systems is achieved by maximization of the output current in a battery charging regulator, using an optimized hill-climbing, inexpensive microprocessor based algorithm. Through practical field measurements it is shown that a minimum input source saving of 15% on 3-5 kWh/day systems can easily be achieved. A total cost saving of at least 10-15% on the capital cost of these systems are achievable for relative small rating Remote Area Power Supply systems. The advantages at larger temperature variations and larger power rated systems are much higher. Other advantages include optimal sizing and system monitor and control

  19. Laser fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eliezer, S.

    1982-02-01

    In this paper, the physics of laser fusion is described on an elementary level. The irradiated matter consists of a dense inner core surrounded by a less dense plasma corona. The laser radiation is mainly absorbed in the outer periphery of the plasma. The absorbed energy is transported inward to the ablation surface where plasma flow is created. Due to this plasma flow, a sequence of inward going shock waves and heat waves are created, resulting in the compression and heating of the core to high density and temperature. The interaction physics between laser and matter leading to thermonuclear burn is summarized by the following sequence of events: Laser absorption → Energy transport → Compression → Nuclear Fusion. This scenario is shown in particular for a Nd:laser with a wavelength of 1 μm. The wavelength scaling of the physical processes is also discussed. In addition to the laser-plasma physics, the Nd high power pulsed laser is described. We give a very brief description of the oscillator, the amplifiers, the spatial filters, the isolators and the diagnostics involved. Last, but not least, the concept of reactors for laser fusion and the necessary laser system are discussed. (author)

  20. Fusion spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peacock, N.J.

    1995-09-01

    This article traces developments in the spectroscopy of high temperature laboratory plasma used in controlled fusion research from the early 1960's until the present. These three and a half decades have witnessed many orders of magnitude increase in accessible plasma parameters such as density and temperature as well as particle and energy confinement timescales. Driven by the need to interpret the radiation in terms of the local plasma parameters, the thrust of fusion spectroscopy has been to develop our understanding of (i) the atomic structure of highly ionised atoms, usually of impurities in the hydrogen isotope fuel; (ii) the atomic collision rates and their incorporation into ionization structure and emissivity models that take into account plasma phenomena like plasma-wall interactions, particle transport and radiation patterns; (iii) the diagnostic applications of spectroscopy aided by increasingly sophisticated characterisation of the electron fluid. These topics are discussed in relation to toroidal magnetically confined plasmas, particularly the Tokamak which appears to be the most promising approach to controlled fusion to date. (author)

  1. Study of Cold Fusion Reactions Using Collective Clusterization Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Gurjit; Sandhu, Kirandeep; Sharma, Manoj K.

    2017-10-01

    Within the framework of the dynamical cluster decay model (DCM), the 1n evaporation cross-sections ({σ }1n) of cold fusion reactions (Pb and Bi targets) are calculated for {Z}{CN}=104-113 superheavy nuclei. The calculations are carried out in the fixed range of excitation energy {E}{CN}* =15+/- 1 {MeV}, so that the comparative analysis of reaction dynamics can be worked out. First of all, the fission barriers (B f ) and neutron separation energies ({S}1n) are estimated to account the decreasing cross-sections of cold fusion reactions. In addition to this, the importance of hot optimum orientations of β 2i-deformed nuclei over cold one is explored at fixed angular momentum and neck-length parameters. The hot optimum orientations support all the target-projectile (t,p) combinations, which are explored experimentally in the cold fusion reactions. Some new target-projectile combinations are also predicted for future exploration. Further, the 1n cross-sections are addressed for {Z}{CN}=104-113 superheavy nuclei at comparable excitation energies which show the decent agrement with experimental data upto {Z}{CN}=109 nuclei. Finally, to understand the dynamics of higher-Z superheavy nuclei, the cross-sections are also calculated at maximum available energies around the Coulomb barrier and the effect of non-sticking moment of inertia ({I}{NS}) is also investigated at these energies. Supported by the Council of Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR), in the Form of Research Project Grant No. 03(1341)/15/EMR-II, and to DST, New Delhi, for INSPIRE-Fellowship Grant No. DST/INSPIRE/03/2015/000199

  2. Investigating the degree of "stigma" associated with nuclear energy technologies: A cross-cultural examination of the case of fusion power.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horlick-Jones, Tom; Prades, Ana; Espluga, Josep

    2012-07-01

    The extent to which nuclear energy technologies are, in some sense, "stigmatised" by historical environmental and military associations is of particular interest in contemporary debates about sustainable energy policy. Recent claims in the literature suggest that despite such stigmatisation, lay views on such technologies may be shifting towards a "reluctant acceptance," in the light of concerns about issues like anthropogenic climate change. In this paper, we report on research into learning and reasoning processes concerned with a largely unknown nuclear energy technology; namely fusion power. We focus on the role of the nuclear label, or "brand," in informing how lay citizens make sense of the nature of this technology. Our findings derive from a comparative analysis of data generated in Spain and Britain, using the same methodology.

  3. Solenoidal fusion system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linlor, W.I.

    1980-01-01

    This invention discloses apparatus and methods to produce nuclear fusion utilizing fusible material in the form of high energy ion beams confined in magnetic fields. For example, beams of deuterons and tritons are injected in the same direction relative to the axis of a vacuum chamber. The ion beams are confined by the magnetic fields of long solenoids. The products of the fusion reactions, such as neutrons and alpha particles, escape to the wall surrounding the vacuum chamber, producing heat. The momentum of the deuterons is approximately equal to the momentum of the tritons, so that both types of ions follow the same path in the confining magnetic field. The velocity of the deuteron is sufficiently greater than the velocity of the triton so that overtaking collisions occur at a relative velocity which produces a high fusion reaction cross section. Electrons for space charge neutralization are obtained by ionization of residual gas in the vacuum chamber, and additionally from solid material (Irradiated with ultra-violet light or other energetic radiation) adjacent to the confinement region. For start-up operation, injected high-energy molecular ions can be dissociated by intense laser beam, producing trapping via change of charge state. When sufficiently intense deuteron and triton beams have been produced, the laser beam can be removed, and subsequent change of charge state can be achieved by collisions

  4. Maximum entropy methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ponman, T.J.

    1984-01-01

    For some years now two different expressions have been in use for maximum entropy image restoration and there has been some controversy over which one is appropriate for a given problem. Here two further entropies are presented and it is argued that there is no single correct algorithm. The properties of the four different methods are compared using simple 1D simulations with a view to showing how they can be used together to gain as much information as possible about the original object. (orig.)

  5. The last glacial maximum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, P.U.; Dyke, A.S.; Shakun, J.D.; Carlson, A.E.; Clark, J.; Wohlfarth, B.; Mitrovica, J.X.; Hostetler, S.W.; McCabe, A.M.

    2009-01-01

    We used 5704 14C, 10Be, and 3He ages that span the interval from 10,000 to 50,000 years ago (10 to 50 ka) to constrain the timing of the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) in terms of global ice-sheet and mountain-glacier extent. Growth of the ice sheets to their maximum positions occurred between 33.0 and 26.5 ka in response to climate forcing from decreases in northern summer insolation, tropical Pacific sea surface temperatures, and atmospheric CO2. Nearly all ice sheets were at their LGM positions from 26.5 ka to 19 to 20 ka, corresponding to minima in these forcings. The onset of Northern Hemisphere deglaciation 19 to 20 ka was induced by an increase in northern summer insolation, providing the source for an abrupt rise in sea level. The onset of deglaciation of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet occurred between 14 and 15 ka, consistent with evidence that this was the primary source for an abrupt rise in sea level ???14.5 ka.

  6. Fusion Machines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weynants, R.R.

    2004-01-01

    A concise overview is given of the principles of inertial and magnetic fusion, with an emphasis on the latter in view of the aim of this summer school. The basis of magnetic confinement in mirror and toroidal geometry is discussed and applied to the tokamak concept. A brief discussion of the reactor prospects of this configuration identifies which future developments are crucial and where alternative concepts might help in optimising the reactor design. The text also aims at introducing the main concepts encountered in tokamak research that will be studied and used in the subsequent lectures

  7. Maximum Entropy Fundamentals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Topsøe

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: In its modern formulation, the Maximum Entropy Principle was promoted by E.T. Jaynes, starting in the mid-fifties. The principle dictates that one should look for a distribution, consistent with available information, which maximizes the entropy. However, this principle focuses only on distributions and it appears advantageous to bring information theoretical thinking more prominently into play by also focusing on the "observer" and on coding. This view was brought forward by the second named author in the late seventies and is the view we will follow-up on here. It leads to the consideration of a certain game, the Code Length Game and, via standard game theoretical thinking, to a principle of Game Theoretical Equilibrium. This principle is more basic than the Maximum Entropy Principle in the sense that the search for one type of optimal strategies in the Code Length Game translates directly into the search for distributions with maximum entropy. In the present paper we offer a self-contained and comprehensive treatment of fundamentals of both principles mentioned, based on a study of the Code Length Game. Though new concepts and results are presented, the reading should be instructional and accessible to a rather wide audience, at least if certain mathematical details are left aside at a rst reading. The most frequently studied instance of entropy maximization pertains to the Mean Energy Model which involves a moment constraint related to a given function, here taken to represent "energy". This type of application is very well known from the literature with hundreds of applications pertaining to several different elds and will also here serve as important illustration of the theory. But our approach reaches further, especially regarding the study of continuity properties of the entropy function, and this leads to new results which allow a discussion of models with so-called entropy loss. These results have tempted us to speculate over

  8. Evaluation of Complete Fusion Excitation Functions for 42≤ZpZT≤2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Haydari, A.; Abdelghany, A.A.; Hassan, G. S.

    2011-01-01

    For fusion channels, there are two main parameters, namely the separating distance of the two colliding nuclei and the fusion barrier, which are aken as the more interest points guiding to fit the excitation functions of fusion. Interpretations and differentiations are made on different forms to deduce all concerned variables. On the other hand, the maximum values of angular momentum 1 m ax , represents the upper limit of summing all the partial parts for fusion cross section The effect of that limiting value as well as the effects of the two main parameters are checked along iwde range of energies for different heavy ion reacting pairs in comparison with the more recently measured data for sub-barrier and complete fusion channels . Also comparisons with both 1 f us and 1 c r, taken as limiting values were displayed. The effect of the nuclear part of the barrier height and approximation techniques have been checked point out the highly differentiated ones .parameterization that could be made on the imperical forms, are also displayed and tested.

  9. Fusion and transfer cross sections of He-3 induced reaction on Pt and Au in energy range 10-24.5 MeV

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Skobelev, N. K.; Penionzhkevich, Y. E.; Voskoboynik, E. I.; Kroha, Václav; Burjan, Václav; Hons, Zdeněk; Mrázek, Jaromír; Piskoř, Štěpán; Šimečková, Eva; Kugler, Andrej

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 11, č. 2 (2014), s. 114-120 ISSN 1547-4771 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(XE) LM2011019 Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : cross section * energy range * Coulomb barrier Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders

  10. Probable maximum flood control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeGabriele, C.E.; Wu, C.L.

    1991-11-01

    This study proposes preliminary design concepts to protect the waste-handling facilities and all shaft and ramp entries to the underground from the probable maximum flood (PMF) in the current design configuration for the proposed Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigation (NNWSI) repository protection provisions were furnished by the United States Bureau of Reclamation (USSR) or developed from USSR data. Proposed flood protection provisions include site grading, drainage channels, and diversion dikes. Figures are provided to show these proposed flood protection provisions at each area investigated. These areas are the central surface facilities (including the waste-handling building and waste treatment building), tuff ramp portal, waste ramp portal, men-and-materials shaft, emplacement exhaust shaft, and exploratory shafts facility

  11. Introduction to maximum entropy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sivia, D.S.

    1988-01-01

    The maximum entropy (MaxEnt) principle has been successfully used in image reconstruction in a wide variety of fields. We review the need for such methods in data analysis and show, by use of a very simple example, why MaxEnt is to be preferred over other regularizing functions. This leads to a more general interpretation of the MaxEnt method, and its use is illustrated with several different examples. Practical difficulties with non-linear problems still remain, this being highlighted by the notorious phase problem in crystallography. We conclude with an example from neutron scattering, using data from a filter difference spectrometer to contrast MaxEnt with a conventional deconvolution. 12 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab

  12. Solar maximum observatory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rust, D.M.

    1984-01-01

    The successful retrieval and repair of the Solar Maximum Mission (SMM) satellite by Shuttle astronauts in April 1984 permitted continuance of solar flare observations that began in 1980. The SMM carries a soft X ray polychromator, gamma ray, UV and hard X ray imaging spectrometers, a coronagraph/polarimeter and particle counters. The data gathered thus far indicated that electrical potentials of 25 MeV develop in flares within 2 sec of onset. X ray data show that flares are composed of compressed magnetic loops that have come too close together. Other data have been taken on mass ejection, impacts of electron beams and conduction fronts with the chromosphere and changes in the solar radiant flux due to sunspots. 13 references

  13. Introduction to maximum entropy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sivia, D.S.

    1989-01-01

    The maximum entropy (MaxEnt) principle has been successfully used in image reconstruction in a wide variety of fields. The author reviews the need for such methods in data analysis and shows, by use of a very simple example, why MaxEnt is to be preferred over other regularizing functions. This leads to a more general interpretation of the MaxEnt method, and its use is illustrated with several different examples. Practical difficulties with non-linear problems still remain, this being highlighted by the notorious phase problem in crystallography. He concludes with an example from neutron scattering, using data from a filter difference spectrometer to contrast MaxEnt with a conventional deconvolution. 12 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab

  14. Functional Maximum Autocorrelation Factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Rasmus; Nielsen, Allan Aasbjerg

    2005-01-01

    MAF outperforms the functional PCA in concentrating the interesting' spectra/shape variation in one end of the eigenvalue spectrum and allows for easier interpretation of effects. Conclusions. Functional MAF analysis is a useful methods for extracting low dimensional models of temporally or spatially......Purpose. We aim at data where samples of an underlying function are observed in a spatial or temporal layout. Examples of underlying functions are reflectance spectra and biological shapes. We apply functional models based on smoothing splines and generalize the functional PCA in......\\verb+~+\\$\\backslash\\$cite{ramsay97} to functional maximum autocorrelation factors (MAF)\\verb+~+\\$\\backslash\\$cite{switzer85,larsen2001d}. We apply the method to biological shapes as well as reflectance spectra. {\\$\\backslash\\$bf Methods}. MAF seeks linear combination of the original variables that maximize autocorrelation between...

  15. Regularized maximum correntropy machine

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Jim Jing-Yan; Wang, Yunji; Jing, Bing-Yi; Gao, Xin

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we investigate the usage of regularized correntropy framework for learning of classifiers from noisy labels. The class label predictors learned by minimizing transitional loss functions are sensitive to the noisy and outlying labels of training samples, because the transitional loss functions are equally applied to all the samples. To solve this problem, we propose to learn the class label predictors by maximizing the correntropy between the predicted labels and the true labels of the training samples, under the regularized Maximum Correntropy Criteria (MCC) framework. Moreover, we regularize the predictor parameter to control the complexity of the predictor. The learning problem is formulated by an objective function considering the parameter regularization and MCC simultaneously. By optimizing the objective function alternately, we develop a novel predictor learning algorithm. The experiments on two challenging pattern classification tasks show that it significantly outperforms the machines with transitional loss functions.

  16. Regularized maximum correntropy machine

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Jim Jing-Yan

    2015-02-12

    In this paper we investigate the usage of regularized correntropy framework for learning of classifiers from noisy labels. The class label predictors learned by minimizing transitional loss functions are sensitive to the noisy and outlying labels of training samples, because the transitional loss functions are equally applied to all the samples. To solve this problem, we propose to learn the class label predictors by maximizing the correntropy between the predicted labels and the true labels of the training samples, under the regularized Maximum Correntropy Criteria (MCC) framework. Moreover, we regularize the predictor parameter to control the complexity of the predictor. The learning problem is formulated by an objective function considering the parameter regularization and MCC simultaneously. By optimizing the objective function alternately, we develop a novel predictor learning algorithm. The experiments on two challenging pattern classification tasks show that it significantly outperforms the machines with transitional loss functions.

  17. Fusion Canada issue 10

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-02-01

    A short bulletin from the National Fusion Program. Included in this issue is a report on Fusion Materials Research, ITER physics research, fusion performance record at JET, and design options for reactor building. 4 figs

  18. Comprehensive sets of 124Xe(n ,γ )125Xe and 124Xe(n ,2 n )123Xe cross-section data for assessment of inertial-confinement deuterium-tritium fusion plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhike, Megha; Fallin, B.; Gooden, M. E.; Ludin, N.; Tornow, W.

    2015-01-01

    Measurements of the neutron radiative-capture cross section of 124Xe have been performed for the first time for neutron energies above 100 keV. In addition, data for the 124Xe(n ,2 n )123Xe reaction cross section have been obtained from threshold to 14.8 MeV to cover the entire energy range of interest, while previous data existed only at around 14 MeV. The results of these measurements provide the basis for an alternative and sensitive diagnostic tool for investigating properties of the inertial confinement fusion plasma in deuterium-tritium (DT) capsules at the National Ignition Facility located at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Here, areal density ρ R (density × radius) of the fuel, burn asymmetry, and fuel-ablator mix are of special interest. The 124Xe(n ,γ )125Xe reaction probes the down-scattered neutrons, while the 124Xe(n ,2 n )123Xe reaction provides a measure of the 14 MeV direct neutrons.

  19. Solar maximum mission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryan, J.

    1981-01-01

    By understanding the sun, astrophysicists hope to expand this knowledge to understanding other stars. To study the sun, NASA launched a satellite on February 14, 1980. The project is named the Solar Maximum Mission (SMM). The satellite conducted detailed observations of the sun in collaboration with other satellites and ground-based optical and radio observations until its failure 10 months into the mission. The main objective of the SMM was to investigate one aspect of solar activity: solar flares. A brief description of the flare mechanism is given. The SMM satellite was valuable in providing information on where and how a solar flare occurs. A sequence of photographs of a solar flare taken from SMM satellite shows how a solar flare develops in a particular layer of the solar atmosphere. Two flares especially suitable for detailed observations by a joint effort occurred on April 30 and May 21 of 1980. These flares and observations of the flares are discussed. Also discussed are significant discoveries made by individual experiments

  20. Common views of potentially attractive fusion concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piet, S.J.

    1986-01-01

    Fusion is viewed through three windows to help determine what constitutes a very attractive fusion concept. These windows are economics, maintenance and reliability, and safety and environment. Achievement of many desired features cannot yet be quantified. Although these differing perspectives can lead to some conflicting desires, five common desired features are apparent - (a) minimum failure rates, (b) minimum failure effects, (c) minimum complexity, (d) minimum short-term radioactivity, and (e) maximum mass power density. Some innovative fusion concepts are briefly examined in the light of these commonalities

  1. Revitalizing Fusion via Fission Fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manheimer, Wallace

    2001-10-01

    Existing tokamaks could generate significant nuclear fuel. TFTR, operating steady state with DT might generate enough fuel for a 300 MW nuclear reactor. The immediate goals of the magnetic fusion program would necessarily shift from a study of advanced plasma regimes in larger sized devices, to mostly known plasmas regimes, but at steady state or high duty cycle operation in DT plasmas. The science and engineering of breeding blankets would be equally important. Follow on projects could possibly produce nuclear fuel in large quantity at low price. Although today there is strong opposition to nuclear power in the United States, in a 21st century world of 10 billion people, all of whom will demand a middle class life style, nuclear energy will be important. Concern over greenhouse gases will also drive the world toward nuclear power. There are studies indicating that the world will need 10 TW of carbon free energy by 2050. It is difficult to see how this can be achieved without the breeding of nuclear fuel. By using the thorium cycle, proliferation risks are minimized. [1], [2]. 1 W. Manheimer, Fusion Technology, 36, 1, 1999, 2.W. Manheimer, Physics and Society, v 29, #3, p5, July, 2000

  2. Catalysed fusion

    CERN Document Server

    Farley, Francis

    2012-01-01

    A sizzling romance and a romp with subatomic particles at CERN. Love, discovery and adventure in the city where nations meet and beams collide. Life in a large laboratory. As always, the challenges are the same. Who leads? Who follows? Who succeeds? Who gets the credit? Who gets the women or the men? Young Jeremy arrives in CERN and joins the quest for green energy. Coping with baffling jargon and manifold dangers, he is distracted by radioactive rats, lovely ladies and an unscrupulous rival. Full of doubts and hesitations, he falls for a dazzling Danish girl, who leads him astray. His brilliant idea leads to a discovery and a new route to cold fusion. But his personal life is scrambled. Does it bring fame or failure? Tragedy or triumph?

  3. Fusion cuisine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peters, Chris; Broersma, Marcel

    2018-01-01

    JJournalism studies as an academic field is characterized by multidisciplinarity. Focusing on one object of study, journalism and the news, it established itself by integrating and synthesizing approaches from established disciplines – a tendency that lives on today. This constant gaze to the out......JJournalism studies as an academic field is characterized by multidisciplinarity. Focusing on one object of study, journalism and the news, it established itself by integrating and synthesizing approaches from established disciplines – a tendency that lives on today. This constant gaze...... to the outside for conceptual inspiration and methodological tools lends itself to a journalism studies that is a fusion cuisine of media, communication, and related scholarship. However, what happens when this object becomes as fragmented and multifaceted as the ways we study it? This essay addresses...

  4. Development of fine-group (315n/42γ) cross section library ENDL3.0/FG for fusion-fission hybrid systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeng Qin; Zou Jun; Xu Dezhen; Jiang Jieqiong; Wang Minghuang; Wu Yican; Qiu Yuefeng; Chen Zhong; Chen Yan

    2011-01-01

    To improve the accuracy of the neutron analyses for subcritical systems with thermal fission blanket, a coupled neutron and photon (315 n + 42γ) fine-group cross section library HENDL3.0/FG based on ENDF/B-Ⅶ. 0 has been produced by FDS team. In order to test the availability and reliability of the HENDL3.0/FG data library, shielding and critical safety benchmarks were performed with VisualBUS code. The testing results indicated that the discrepancy between calculation and experimental values of nuclear parameters fell in a reasonable range. (authors)

  5. Environmental aspects of fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coffman, F.E.; Williams, J.M.

    1975-01-01

    With the continued depletion of fossil and uranium resources in the coming decades, the U. S. will be forced to look more toward renewable energy resources (e.g., wind, tidal, geothermal, and solar power) and toward such longer-term and nondepletable energy resources as fissile fast breeder reactors and fusion power. Several reference reactor designs have been completed for full-scale fusion power reactors that indicate that the environmental impacts from construction, operation, and eventual decommissioning of fusion reactors will be quite small. The principal environmental impact from fusion reactor operation will be from thermal discharges. Some of the safety and environmental characteristics that make fusion reactors appear attractive include an effectively infinite fuel supply at low cost, inherent incapability for a ''nuclear explosion'' or a ''nuclear runaway,'' the absence of fission products, the flexibility of selecting low neutron-cross-section structural materials so that emergency core cooling for a loss-of-coolant or other accident will not be necesary, and the absence of special nuclear materials such as 235 U or 239 Pu, so that diversion of nuclear weapons materials will not be possible and nuclear blackmail will not be a serious concern

  6. Prospects for bubble fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nigmatulin, R.I. [Tyumen Institute of Mechanics of Multiphase Systems (TIMMS), Marx (Russian Federation); Lahey, R.T. Jr. [Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY (United States)

    1995-09-01

    In this paper a new method for the realization of fusion energy is presented. This method is based on the superhigh compression of a gas bubble (deuterium or deuterium/thritium) in heavy water or another liquid. The superhigh compression of a gas bubble in a liquid is achieved through forced non-linear, non-periodic resonance oscillations using moderate amplitudes of forcing pressure. The key feature of this new method is a coordination of the forced liquid pressure change with the change of bubble volume. The corresponding regime of the bubble oscillation has been called {open_quotes}basketball dribbling (BD) regime{close_quotes}. The analytical solution describing this process for spherically symmetric bubble oscillations, neglecting dissipation and compressibility of the liquid, has been obtained. This solution shown no limitation on the supercompression of the bubble and the corresponding maximum temperature. The various dissipation mechanisms, including viscous, conductive and radiation heat losses have been considered. It is shown that in spite of these losses it is possible to achieve very high gas bubble temperatures. This because the time duration of the gas bubble supercompression becomes very short when increasing the intensity of compression, thus limiting the energy losses. Significantly, the calculated maximum gas temperatures have shown that nuclear fusion may be possible. First estimations of the affect of liquid compressibility have been made to determine possible limitations on gas bubble compression. The next step will be to investigate the role of interfacial instability and breaking down of the bubble, shock wave phenomena around and in the bubble and mutual diffusion of the gas and the liquid.

  7. Optic disk localization by a robust fusion method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jielin; Yin, Fengshou; Wong, Damon W. K.; Liu, Jiang; Baskaran, Mani; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Wong, Tien Yin

    2013-02-01

    The optic disk localization plays an important role in developing computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) systems for ocular diseases such as glaucoma, diabetic retinopathy and age-related macula degeneration. In this paper, we propose an intelligent fusion of methods for the localization of the optic disk in retinal fundus images. Three different approaches are developed to detect the location of the optic disk separately. The first method is the maximum vessel crossing method, which finds the region with the most number of blood vessel crossing points. The second one is the multichannel thresholding method, targeting the area with the highest intensity. The final method searches the vertical and horizontal region-of-interest separately on the basis of blood vessel structure and neighborhood entropy profile. Finally, these three methods are combined using an intelligent fusion method to improve the overall accuracy. The proposed algorithm was tested on the STARE database and the ORIGAlight database, each consisting of images with various pathologies. The preliminary result on the STARE database can achieve 81.5%, while a higher result of 99% can be obtained for the ORIGAlight database. The proposed method outperforms each individual approach and state-of-the-art method which utilizes an intensity-based approach. The result demonstrates a high potential for this method to be used in retinal CAD systems.

  8. Towards nuclear fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-11-01

    The results of nuclear fusion researches in JAERI are summarized. In this report, following themes are collected: the concept of fusion reactor (including ITER), fusion reactor safety, plasma confinement, fusion reactor equipment, and so on. Includes glossary. (J.P.N.)

  9. Fusion Canada issue 28

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-06-01

    A short bulletin from the National Fusion Program highlighting in this issue the Canada - US fusion meeting in Montreal, fusion breeder work in Chile, new management at CFFTP, fast electrons in tokamaks: new data from TdeV, a program review of CCFM and Velikhov to address Montreal fusion meeting. 1 fig

  10. Fusion systems engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1977-01-01

    Summaries of research are included for each of the following topics: (1) fusion reactor systems studies, (2) development of blanket processing technology for fusion reactors, (3) safety studies of fusion concepts, (4) the MACK/MACKLIB system for nuclear response functions, and (5) energy storage and power supply systems for fusion reactors

  11. Fusion fuel and renewables

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Entler, Slavomir

    2015-01-01

    It is shown that fusion fuel meets all aspects applied when defining renewables. A table of definitions of renewables is presented. The sections of the paper are as follows: An industrial renewable source; Nuclear fusion; Current situation in research; Definitions of renewable sources; Energy concept of nuclear fusion; Fusion fuel; Natural energy flow; Environmental impacts; Fusion fuel assessment; Sustainable power; and Energy mix from renewables. (P.A.)

  12. Cold fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bush, R.T.

    1991-01-01

    The transmission resonance model (TRM) is combined with some electrochemistry of the cathode surface and found to provide a good fit to new data on excess heat. For the first time, a model for cold fusion not only fits calorimetric data but also predicts optimal trigger points. This suggests that the model is meaningful and that the excess heat phenomenon claimed by Fleischmann and Pons is genuine. A crucial role is suggested for the overpotential and, in particular, for the concentration overpotential, i.e., the hydrogen overvoltage. Self-similar geometry, or scale invariance, i.e., a fractal nature, is revealed by the relative excess power function. Heat bursts are predicted with a scale invariance in time, suggesting a possible link between the TRM and chaos theory. The model describes a near-surface phenomenon with an estimated excess power yield of ∼1 kW/cm 3 Pd, as compared to 50 W/cm 3 of reactor core for a good fission reactor. Transmission resonance-induced nuclear transmutation, a new type of nuclear reaction, is strongly suggested with two types emphasized: transmission resonance-induced neutron transfer reactions yielding essentially the same end result as Teller's hypothesized catalytic neutron transfer and a three-body reaction promoted by standing de Broglie waves. In this paper suggestions for the anomalous production of heat, particles, and radiation are given

  13. Fusion energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-09-01

    The main purpose of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) is to develop an experimental fusion reactor through the united efforts of many technologically advanced countries. The ITER terms of reference, issued jointly by the European Community, Japan, the USSR, and the United States, call for an integrated international design activity and constitute the basis of current activities. Joint work on ITER is carried out under the auspices of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), according to the terms of quadripartite agreement reached between the European Community, Japan, the USSR, and the United States. The site for joint technical work sessions is at the MaxPlanck Institute of Plasma Physics. Garching, Federal Republic of Germany. The ITER activities have two phases: a definition phase performed in 1988 and the present design phase (1989--1990). During the definition phase, a set of ITER technical characteristics and supporting research and development (R ampersand D) activities were developed and reported. The present conceptual design phase of ITER lasts until the end of 1990. The objectives of this phase are to develop the design of ITER, perform a safety and environmental analysis, develop site requirements, define future R ampersand D needs, and estimate cost, manpower, and schedule for construction and operation. A final report will be submitted at the end of 1990. This paper summarizes progress in the ITER program during the 1989 design phase

  14. Fusion and reactions of exotic nuclei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sánchez-Benítez A.M.

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Close to the drip lines, the scattering cross sections of halo nuclei show a different behaviour as compared to the tightly bound projectiles of the stability line. Several experiments carried out in the last decade have been dedicated to investigate the competition between transfer, breakup and fusion channels at energies around and below the Coulomb barrier. The rather complex scenario gives rise to conflicting conclusions concerning the effect of breakup and transfer on reaction dynamics and the sub-barrier fusion process. In this work we discuss recent experimental findings in fusion and reactions of 6He halo nucleus at energies around the Coulomb barrier.

  15. Fusion pumped light source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappas, Daniel S.

    1989-01-01

    Apparatus is provided for generating energy in the form of light radiation. A fusion reactor is provided for generating a long, or continuous, pulse of high-energy neutrons. The neutron flux is coupled directly with the lasing medium. The lasing medium includes a first component selected from Group O of the periodic table of the elements and having a high inelastic scattering cross section. Gamma radiation from the inelastic scattering reactions interacts with the first component to excite the first component, which decays by photon emission at a first output wavelength. The first output wavelength may be shifted to a second output wavelength using a second liquid component responsive to the first output wavelength. The light outputs may be converted to a coherent laser output by incorporating conventional optics adjacent the laser medium.

  16. Magnetic Induction Machines Embedded in Fusion-Bonded Silicon

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Arnold, David P; Cros, Florent; Zana, Iulica; Allen, Mark G; Das, Sauparna; Lang, Jeffrey H

    2004-01-01

    ...) within etched and fusion-bonded silicon to form the machine structure. The induction machines were characterized in motoring mode using tethered rotors, and exhibited a maximum measured torque...

  17. Fusion technology: The Iter fusion experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dietz, K.J.

    1994-01-01

    Plans for the Iter international fusion experiment, in which the European Union, Japan, Canada, Russia, Sweden, Switzerland, and the USA cooperate, were begun in 1985, and construction work started in early 1994. These activities serve for the preparation of the design and construction documents for a research reactor in which a stable fusion plasma is to be generated. This is to be the basis for the construction of a fusion reactor for electricity generation. Preparatory work was performed in the Tokamak experiments with JET and TFTR. The fusion power of 1.5 GW will be attained, thus enabling Iter to keep a deuterium-tritium plasma burning. (orig.) [de

  18. Review of fusion synfuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fillo, J.A.

    1980-01-01

    Thermonuclear fusion offers an inexhaustible source of energy for the production of hydrogen from water. Depending on design, electric generation efficiencies of approx. 40 to 60% and hydrogen production efficiencies by high-temperature electrolysis of approx. 50 to 65% are projected for fusion reactors using high-temperatures blankets. Fusion/coal symbiotic systems appear economically promising for the first generation of commercial fusion synfuels plants. Coal production requirements and the environmental effects of large-scale coal usage would be greatly reduced by a fusion/coal system. In the long term, there could be a gradual transition to an inexhaustible energy system based solely on fusion

  19. Barriers to fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berriman, A.C.; Butt, R.D.; Dasgupta, M.; Hinde, D.J.; Morton, C.R.; Newton, J.O.

    1999-01-01

    The fusion barrier is formed by the combination of the repulsive Coulomb and attractive nuclear forces. Recent research at the Australian National University has shown that when heavy nuclei collide, instead of a single fusion barrier, there is a set of fusion barriers. These arise due to intrinsic properties of the interacting nuclei such deformation, rotations and vibrations. Thus the range of barrier energies depends on the properties of both nuclei. The transfer of matter between nuclei, forming a neck, can also affect the fusion process. High precision data have been used to determine fusion barrier distributions for many nuclear reactions, leading to new insights into the fusion process

  20. Influence of projectile α-breakup threshold on complete fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukherjee, A.; Subinit Roy; Pradhan, M.K.; Saha Sarkar, M.; Basu, P.; Dasmahapatra, B.; Bhattacharya, T.; Bhattacharya, S.; Basu, S.K.; Chatterjee, A.; Tripathi, V.; Kailas, S.

    2006-01-01

    Complete fusion excitation functions for B11,10+Tb159 have been measured at energies around the respective Coulomb barriers, and the existing complete fusion measurements for Li7+Tb159 have been extended to higher energies. The measurements show significant reduction of complete fusion cross sections at above-barrier energies for both the reactions, B10+Tb159 and Li7+Tb159, when compared to those for B11+Tb159. The comparison shows that the extent of suppression of complete fusion cross sections is correlated with the α-separation energies of the projectiles. Also, the two reactions, B10+Tb159 and Li7+Tb159 were found to produce incomplete fusion products at energies near the respective Coulomb barriers, with the α-particle emitting channel being the favoured incomplete fusion process in both the cases

  1. On the maximum Q in feedback controlled subignited plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, D.; Hamnen, H.; Lisak, M.

    1990-01-01

    High Q operation in feedback controlled subignited fusion plasma requires the operating temperature to be close to the ignition temperature. In the present work we discuss technological and physical effects which may restrict this temperature difference. The investigation is based on a simplified, but still accurate, 0=D analytical analysis of the maximum Q of a subignited system. Particular emphasis is given to sawtooth ocsillations which complicate the interpretation of diagnostic neutron emission data into plasma temperatures and may imply an inherent lower bound on the temperature deviation from the ignition point. The estimated maximum Q is found to be marginal (Q = 10-20) from the point of view of a fusion reactor. (authors)

  2. Maximum home systolic blood pressure is a useful indicator of arterial stiffness in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus: post hoc analysis of a cross-sectional multicenter study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ushigome, Emi; Fukui, Michiaki; Hamaguchi, Masahide; Tanaka, Toru; Atsuta, Haruhiko; Mogami, Shin-ichi; Tsunoda, Sei; Yamazaki, Masahiro; Hasegawa, Goji; Nakamura, Naoto

    2014-09-01

    Maximum (max) home systolic blood pressure (HSBP) as well as mean HSBP or HSBP variability was reported to increase the predictive value of target organ damage. Yet, the association between max HSBP and target organ damage in patients with type 2 diabetes has never been reported. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between max HSBP and pulse wave velocity (PWV), a marker of arterial stiffness which in turn is a marker of target organ damage, in patients with type 2 diabetes. We assessed the relationship of mean HSBP or max HSBP to PWV, and compared area under the receiver-operating characteristic curve (AUC) of mean HSBP or max HSBP for arterial stiffness in 758 patients with type 2 diabetes. In the univariate analyses, age, duration of diabetes mellitus, body mass index, mean clinic systolic blood pressure (SBP), mean HSBP and max HSBP were associated with PWV. Multivariate linear regression analyses indicated that mean morning SBP (β=0.156, P=0.001) or max morning SBP (β=0.146, P=0.001) were significantly associated with PWV. AUC (95% CI) for arterial stiffness, defined as PWV equal to or more than 1800 cm per second, in mean morning SBP and max morning SBP were 0.622 (0.582-0.662; P<0.001) and 0.631 (0.591-0.670; P<0.001), respectively. Our findings implicate that max HSBP as well as mean HSBP was significantly associated with arterial stiffness in patients with type 2 diabetes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Disentangling complete and incomplete fusion for 9Be+187Re system at near barrier energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kharab, Rajesh; Chahal, Rajiv; Rajiv Kumar

    2015-01-01

    The breakup of projectile before fusion leads to some unusual fusion mechanisms like incomplete fusion (ICF) and sequential complete fusion (SCF). Experimentally, it is not possible to separate SCF events from direct complete fusion (DCF). However, the complete fusion and incomplete fusion can be measured separately. Theoretically it is very difficult to calculate the complete and incomplete fusion cross section separately using different models. Very recently A. Diaz-Torres has developed a computer code platypus based on classical dynamical model wherein the complete and incomplete fusion cross sections are calculated separately. But this model is found to work very well at energies above the barrier energy. Here we have attempted to extrapolate the results of the code platypus by using simple Wong's formula in conjunction with the energy dependent Woods-Saxon potential (EDWSP) in the below barrier energy region

  4. Credal Networks under Maximum Entropy

    OpenAIRE

    Lukasiewicz, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    We apply the principle of maximum entropy to select a unique joint probability distribution from the set of all joint probability distributions specified by a credal network. In detail, we start by showing that the unique joint distribution of a Bayesian tree coincides with the maximum entropy model of its conditional distributions. This result, however, does not hold anymore for general Bayesian networks. We thus present a new kind of maximum entropy models, which are computed sequentially. ...

  5. Present status of nuclear fusion research and development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Discussions are included on the following topics: (1) plasma confinement theoretical research, (2) torus plasma research, (3) plasma measurement research, (4) technical development of equipment, (5) plasma heating, (6) vacuum wall surface phenomena, (7) critical plasma test equipment design, (8) noncircular cross-sectional torus test equipment design, (9) nuclear fusion reactor design, (10) nuclear fusion reactor engineering, (11) summary of nuclear fusion research in foreign countries, and (12) long range plan in Japan

  6. Fusion power economy of scale

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dolan, T.J.

    1993-01-01

    In the next 50 yr, the world will need to develop hundreds of gigawatts of non-fossil-fuel energy sources for production of electricity and fuels. Nuclear fusion can probably provide much of the required energy economically, if large single-unit power plants are acceptable. Large power plants are more common than most people realize: There are already many multiple-unit power plants producing 2 to 5 GW(electric) at a single site. The cost of electricity (COE) from fusion energy is predicted to scale as COE ∼ COE 0 (P/P 0 ) -n , where P is the electrical power, the subscript zero denotes reference values, and the exponent n ∼ 0.36 to 0.7 in various designs. The validity ranges of these scalings are limited and need to be extended by future work. The fusion power economy of scale derives from four interrelated effects: improved operations and maintenance costs; scaling of equipment unit costs; a geometric effect that increases the mass power density; and reduction of the recirculating power fraction. Increased plasma size also relaxes the required confinement parameters: For the same neutron wall loading, larger tokamaks can use lower magnetic fields. Fossil-fuel power plants have a weaker economy of scale than fusion because the fuel costs constitute much of their COE. Solar and wind power plants consist of many small units, so they have little economy of scale. Fission power plants have a strong economy of scale but are unable to exploit it because the maximum unit size is limited by safety concerns. Large, steady-state fusion reactors generating 3 to 6 GW(electric) may be able to produce electricity for 4 to 5 cents/kW·h, which would be competitive with other future energy sources. 38 refs., 6 figs., 6 tabs

  7. Modified betatron for ion beam fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rostoker, N.; Fisher, A.

    1986-01-01

    An intense neutralized ion beam can be injected and trapped in magnetic mirror or tokamak geometry. The details of the process involve beam polarization so that the beam crosses the fringing fields without deflection and draining the polarization when the beam reaches the plasma. Equilibrium requires that a large betatron field be added in tokamak geometry. In mirror geometry a toroidal field must be added by means of a current along the mirror axis. In either case, the geometry becomes that of the modified betatron which has been studied experimentally and theoretically in recent years. We consider beams of d and t ions with a mean energy of 500 kev and a temperature of about 50 kev. The plasma may be a proton plasma with cold ions. It is only necessary for beam trapping or to carry currents. The ion energy for slowing down is initially 500 kev and thermonuclear reactions depend only on the beam temperature of 50 kev which changes very slowly. This new configuration for magnetic confinement fusion leads to an energy gain of 10--20 for d-t reactions whereas previous studies of beam target interaction predicted a maximum energy gain of 3--4. The high beam energy available with pulsed ion diode technology is also essential for advanced fuels. 16 refs., 3 figs

  8. Fusion reactor design studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emmert, G.A.; Kulcinski, G.L.; Santarius, J.F.

    1990-01-01

    This report discusses the following topics on the ARIES tokamak: systems; plasma power balance; impurity control and fusion ash removal; fusion product ripple loss; energy conversion; reactor fueling; first wall design; shield design; reactor safety; and fuel cost and resources

  9. Laser fusion: an overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyer, K.

    1975-01-01

    The laser fusion concept is described along with developments in neodymium and carbon dioxide lasers. Fuel design and fabrication are reviewed. Some spin-offs of the laser fusion program are discussed. (U.S.)

  10. Fusion Canada issue 23

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-01-01

    A short bulletin from the National Fusion Program highlighting in this issue TdeV tokamak updates, fusion research in Korea, CCFM program review, TdeV divertor plasma, and CFFTP program review. 4 figs.

  11. Fusion Canada issue 27

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-03-01

    A short bulletin from the National Fusion Program highlighting in this issue ITER reactor siting, a major upgrade for TdeV tokamak, Ceramic Breeders: new tritium mapping technique and Joint Fusion Symposium. 2 figs

  12. Fusion Canada issue 20

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-03-01

    Fusion Canada's publication of the National Fusion Program. Included in this issue is the CFFTP Industrial Impact Study, CCFM/TdeV Update:helium pumping, research funds, and deuterium in beryllium - high temperature behaviour. 3 figs

  13. Fusion Canada issue 23

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    A short bulletin from the National Fusion Program highlighting in this issue TdeV tokamak updates, fusion research in Korea, CCFM program review, TdeV divertor plasma, and CFFTP program review. 4 figs

  14. Canada's Fusion Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jackson, D. P.

    1990-01-01

    Canada's fusion strategy is based on developing specialized technologies in well-defined areas and supplying these technologies to international fusion projects. Two areas are specially emphasized in Canada: engineered fusion system technologies, and specific magnetic confinement and materials studies. The Canadian Fusion Fuels Technology Project focuses on the first of these areas. It tritium and fusion reactor fuel systems, remote maintenance and related safety studies. In the second area, the Centre Canadian de fusion magnetique operates the Tokamak de Varennes, the main magnetic fusion device in Canada. Both projects are partnerships linking the Government of Canada, represented by Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, and provincial governments, electrical utilities, universities and industry. Canada's program has extensive international links, through which it collaborates with the major world fusion programs, including participation in the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor project

  15. Fusion Canada issue 6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-02-01

    A short bulletin from the National Fusion Program. Included in this issue is a funding report for CFFTP, a technical update for Tokamak de Varennes and a network for university research by the National Fusion Program. 4 figs

  16. Dynamic treatment of fission and fusion in two dimensions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nazareth, R.A.M.S.

    1977-01-01

    The barrier penetrability in two dimensions for nuclear fusion and fission phenomena is studied. The equations of fission static trajectories (minimum potential) in Hofmann formalism are derived and the influence of inertia parameters on the penetrability is verified. For fusion case, a realistic potential for exactly penetrability calculation is proposed. The transverse momentum to the fusion and the unidimensional calculation in classical approximation by choose the trajectory which turn into maximum the penetrability are considered. The exact penetrability is compared with calculation in the classical approximation which takes in account the possibility of appearing discontinuity in the barrier along of fusion pathway. (M.C.K.) [pt

  17. Magneto-inertial Fusion: An Emerging Concept for Inertial Fusion and Dense Plasmas in Ultrahigh Magnetic Fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thio, Francis Y.C.

    2008-01-01

    An overview of the U.S. program in magneto-inertial fusion (MIF) is given in terms of its technical rationale, scientific goals, vision, research plans, needs, and the research facilities currently available in support of the program. Magneto-inertial fusion is an emerging concept for inertial fusion and a pathway to the study of dense plasmas in ultrahigh magnetic fields (magnetic fields in excess of 500 T). The presence of magnetic field in an inertial fusion target suppresses cross-field thermal transport and potentially could enable more attractive inertial fusion energy systems. A vigorous program in magnetized high energy density laboratory plasmas (HED-LP) addressing the scientific basis of magneto-inertial fusion has been initiated by the Office of Fusion Energy Sciences of the U.S. Department of Energy involving a number of universities, government laboratories and private institutions.

  18. Fusion and quasifission studies for the 40Ca+186W,192Os reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, E.; Hinde, D. J.; Williams, E.; Dasgupta, M.; Carter, I. P.; Cook, K. J.; Jeung, D. Y.; Luong, D. H.; Palshetkar, C. S.; Rafferty, D. C.; Ramachandran, K.; Simenel, C.; Wakhle, A.

    2017-09-01

    Background: All elements above atomic number 113 have been synthesized using hot fusion reactions with calcium beams on statically deformed actinide target nuclei. Quasifission and fusion-fission are the two major mechanisms responsible for the very low production cross sections of superheavy elements. Purpose: To achieve a quantitative measurement of capture and quasifission characteristics as a function of beam energy in reactions forming heavy compound systems using calcium beams as projectiles. Methods: Fission fragment mass-angle distributions were measured for the two reactions 40Ca+186W and 40C+192Os, populating 226Pu and 232Cm compound nuclei, respectively, using the Heavy Ion Accelerator Facility and CUBE spectrometer at the Australian National University. Mass ratio distributions, angular distributions, and total fission cross sections were obtained from the experimental data. Simulations to match the features of the experimental mass-angle distributions were performed using a classical phenomenological approach. Results: Both 40Ca+186W and 40C+192Os reactions show strong mass-angle correlations at all energies measured. A maximum fusion probability of 60 -70 % is estimated for the two reactions in the energy range of the present study. Coupled-channels calculations assuming standard Woods-Saxon potential parameters overpredict the capture cross sections. Large nuclear potential diffuseness parameters ˜1.5 fm are required to fit the total capture cross sections. The presence of a weak mass-asymmetric quasifission component attributed to the higher angular momentum events can be reproduced with a shorter average sticking time but longer mass-equilibration time constant. Conclusions: The deduced above-barrier capture cross sections suggest that the dissipative processes are already occurring outside the capture barrier. The mass-angle correlations indicate that a compact shape is not achieved for deformation aligned collisions with lower capture barriers

  19. Fusion Canada issue 18

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1992-08-01

    A short bulletin from the National Fusion Program. Included in this issue is a report on the ITER agreement signed with the EDA, the robotic maintenance for NET, the CFFTP Fusion Pilot Study, the new IEA joint programs on environment, safety and economic aspects of fusion power, and a review by the CCFM advisory committee. 3 figs.

  20. User's perspective on fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashworth, C.P.

    1976-01-01

    The need in fusion, from the electric utilities viewpoint, is for fusion to be a real option, not huge, complicated nuclear plants costing $10 billion each and requiring restructuring the energy industry to provide and use them. A course for future fusion reactor work in order to be a real option is discussed. The advantages of alternate concepts to the tokamak are presented

  1. Fusion Canada issue 17

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-05-01

    A short bulletin from the National Fusion Program. Included in this issue is a report on increased funding for the Canadian Fusion Program, news of the compact Toroid fuelling gun, an update on Tokamak de Varennes, the Canada - U.S. fusion meeting, measurements of plasma flow velocity, and replaceable Tokamak divertors. 4 figs

  2. Fusion Canada issue 18

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-08-01

    A short bulletin from the National Fusion Program. Included in this issue is a report on the ITER agreement signed with the EDA, the robotic maintenance for NET, the CFFTP Fusion Pilot Study, the new IEA joint programs on environment, safety and economic aspects of fusion power, and a review by the CCFM advisory committee. 3 figs

  3. CO2-laser fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stark, E.E. Jr.

    1978-01-01

    The basic concept of laser fusion is described, with a set of requirements on the laser system. Systems and applications concepts are presented and discussed. The CO 2 laser's characteristics and advantages for laser fusion are described. Finally, technological issues in the development of CO 2 laser systems for fusion applications are discussed

  4. Fusion Canada issue 9

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1989-11-01

    A short bulletin from the National Fusion Program. Included in this issue is a report on availability of Canadian Tritium, an ITER update, a CCFM update on Tokamak and the new team organization, an international report on Fusion in Canada and a Laser Fusion Project at the University of Toronto. 3 figs.

  5. Heavy ion fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bangerter, R.O.

    1986-01-01

    This report on the International Symposium on Heavy Ion Fusion held May 27-29, 1986 summarizes the problems and achievements in the areas of targets, accelerators, focussing, reactor studies, and system studies. The symposium participants recognize that there are large uncertainties in Heavy Ion Fusion but many of them are also optimistic that HIF may ultimately be the best approach to fusion

  6. Fusion Canada issue 17

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1992-05-01

    A short bulletin from the National Fusion Program. Included in this issue is a report on increased funding for the Canadian Fusion Program, news of the compact Toroid fuelling gun, an update on Tokamak de Varennes, the Canada - U.S. fusion meeting, measurements of plasma flow velocity, and replaceable Tokamak divertors. 4 figs.

  7. Fusion Canada issue 25

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-08-01

    A short bulletin from the National Fusion Program highlighting in this issue an economic impact study of the Canadian site for ITER, Harvey Skarsgard: fusion pioneer retires, NFP: Phillips and Holtslander exchange roles, Europe's fusion funding proposals and an update of CCFM/TdeV. 1 fig

  8. Fusion reactors - types - problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmitter, K.H.

    1979-07-01

    A short account is given of the principles of fusion reactions and of the expected advantages of fusion reactors. Descriptions are presented of various Tokamak experimental devices being developed in a number of countries and of some mirror machines. The technical obstacles to be overcome before a fusion reactor could be self-supporting are discussed. (U.K.)

  9. Cold fusion research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-11-01

    I am pleased to forward to you the Final Report of the Cold Fusion Panel. This report reviews the current status of cold fusion and includes major chapters on Calorimetry and Excess Heat, Fusion Products and Materials Characterization. In addition, the report makes a number of conclusions and recommendations, as requested by the Secretary of Energy

  10. Fusion Canada issue 9

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-11-01

    A short bulletin from the National Fusion Program. Included in this issue is a report on availability of Canadian Tritium, an ITER update, a CCFM update on Tokamak and the new team organization, an international report on Fusion in Canada and a Laser Fusion Project at the University of Toronto. 3 figs

  11. SU-F-T-140: Assessment of the Proton Boron Fusion Reaction for Practical Radiation Therapy Applications Using MCNP6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adam, D; Bednarz, B [University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: The proton boron fusion reaction is a reaction that describes the creation of three alpha particles as the result of the interaction of a proton incident upon a 11B target. Theoretically, the proton boron fusion reaction is a desirable reaction for radiation therapy applications in that, with the appropriate boron delivery agent, it could potentially combine the localized dose delivery protons exhibit (Bragg peak) and the local deposition of high LET alpha particles in cancerous sites. Previous efforts have shown significant dose enhancement using the proton boron fusion reaction; the overarching purpose of this work is an attempt to validate previous Monte Carlo results of the proton boron fusion reaction. Methods: The proton boron fusion reaction, 11B(p, 3α), is investigated using MCNP6 to assess the viability for potential use in radiation therapy. Simple simulations of a proton pencil beam incident upon both a water phantom and a water phantom with an axial region containing 100ppm boron were modeled using MCNP6 in order to determine the extent of the impact boron had upon the calculated energy deposition. Results: The maximum dose increase calculated was 0.026% for the incident 250 MeV proton beam scenario. The MCNP simulations performed demonstrated that the proton boron fusion reaction rate at clinically relevant boron concentrations was too small in order to have any measurable impact on the absorbed dose. Conclusion: For all MCNP6 simulations conducted, the increase of absorbed dose of a simple water phantom due to the 11B(p, 3α) reaction was found to be inconsequential. In addition, it was determined that there are no good evaluations of the 11B(p, 3α) reaction for use in MCNPX/6 and further work should be conducted in cross section evaluations in order to definitively evaluate the feasibility of the proton boron fusion reaction for use in radiation therapy applications.

  12. Fusion of a polarized projectile with a polarized target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christley, J.A.; Johnson, R.C.; Thompson, I.J.

    1995-01-01

    The fusion cross sections for a polarized target with both unpolarized and polarized projectiles are studied. Expressions for the observables are given for the case when both nuclei are polarized. Calculations for fusion of an aligned 165 Ho target with 16 O and polarized 7 Li beams are presented

  13. Nuclear fusion experimental study on 16 O + 60 Ni system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, C.P. da.

    1990-01-01

    Nuclear fusion cross section measurements were performed in the energy range near The Coulomb Barrier (E Lab -> 40-72 MeV), for the system 16 O + 60 Ni, aiming the study of Fusion Process involving heavy ions. (L.C.J.A.)

  14. Iodine laser for fusion research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dance, B.

    1988-01-01

    The most powerful iodine laser in the world, known as Asterix IV, is being prepared for operation at The Max Plank-Institut fuer Quantenoptik at Garching, near Munich, in West Germany. It is expected to produce 2kJ pulses of 1ns duration. Shorter pulses of about 200 ps duration should be obtainable at power levels of over 5 TW. Pulses of maximum power will be available every 20 minutes; this frequency is expected to be adequate for fusion experiments, although the short rate could be raised if necessary by greater gas circulation and cooling. (Author)

  15. Nuclear fusion and neutron processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orlov, V.V.; Shatalov, G.E.; Sherstnev, K.E.

    1984-01-01

    Problems of providing development of the design of an experimental fusion reactor with necessary neutron-physical data are discussed. Isotope composition of spent fuel in the blanket of a hybride fusion reactor (HFR) is given. Neutron balance of the reactor with Li-blanket and neutron balance of the reactor with Pb-multiplier are disclosed. A simplified scheme of neutron and energy balance in the HFR blanket is given. Development and construction of the experimental power reactor is shown to become the nearest problem of the UTS program. Alongside with other complex physical and technical problems solution of this problem requires realization of a wide program of neutron-physical investigations including measurements with required accuracy of neutron cross sections, development of methodical, program and constant basis of neutron calculations and macroscopic experiments on neutron sources

  16. Reaction mechanisms in heavy ion fusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lubian J.

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available We discuss the reaction mechanisms involved in heavy ion fusion. We begin with collisions of tightly bound systems, considering three energy regimes: energies above the Coulomb barrier, energies just below the barrier and deep sub-barrier energies. We show that channel coupling effects may influence the fusion process at above-barrier energies, increasing or reducing the cross section predicted by single barrier penetration model. Below the Coulomb barrier, it enhances the cross section, and this effect increases with the system’s size. It is argued that this behavior can be traced back to the increasing importance of Coulomb coupling with the charge of the collision partners. The sharp drop of the fusion cross section observed at deep sub-barrier energies is addressed and the theoretical approaches to this phenomenon are discussed. We then consider the reaction mechanisms involved in fusion reactions of weakly bound systems, paying particular attention to the calculations of complete and incomplete fusion available in the literature.

  17. Sub-barrier fusion of Si+Si systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colucci, G.; Montagnoli, G.; Stefanini, A. M.; Bourgin, D.; Čolović, P.; Corradi, L.; Courtin, S.; Faggian, M.; Fioretto, E.; Galtarossa, F.; Goasduff, A.; Haas, F.; Mazzocco, M.; Scarlassara, F.; Stefanini, C.; Strano, E.; Urbani, M.; Szilner, S.; Zhang, G. L.

    2017-11-01

    The near- and sub-barrier fusion excitation function has been measured for the system 30Si+30Si at the Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro of INFN, using the 30Si beam of the XTU Tandem accelerator in the energy range 47 - 90 MeV. A set-up based on a beam electrostatic deflector was used for detecting fusion evaporation residues. The measured cross sections have been compared to previous data on 28Si+28Si and Coupled Channels (CC) calculations have been performed using M3Y+repulsion and Woods-Saxon potentials, where the lowlying 2+ and 3- excitations have been included. A weak imaginary potential was found to be necessary to reproduce the low energy 28Si+28Si data. This probably simulates the effect of the oblate deformation of this nucleus. On the contrary, 30Si is a spherical nucleus, 30Si+30Si is nicely fit by CC calculations and no imaginary potential is needed. For this system, no maximum shows up for the astrophysical S-factor so that we have no evidence for hindrance, as confirmed by the comparison with CC calculations. The logarithmic derivative of the two symmetric systems highlights their different low energy trend. A difference can also be noted in the two barrier distributions, where the high-energy peak present in 28Si+28Si is not observed for 30Si+30Si, probably due to the weaker couplings in last case.

  18. Sub-barrier fusion of Si+Si systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colucci G.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The near- and sub-barrier fusion excitation function has been measured for the system 30Si+30Si at the Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro of INFN, using the 30Si beam of the XTU Tandem accelerator in the energy range 47 - 90 MeV. A set-up based on a beam electrostatic deflector was used for detecting fusion evaporation residues. The measured cross sections have been compared to previous data on 28Si+28Si and Coupled Channels (CC calculations have been performed using M3Y+repulsion and Woods-Saxon potentials, where the lowlying 2+ and 3− excitations have been included. A weak imaginary potential was found to be necessary to reproduce the low energy 28Si+28Si data. This probably simulates the effect of the oblate deformation of this nucleus. On the contrary, 30Si is a spherical nucleus, 30Si+30Si is nicely fit by CC calculations and no imaginary potential is needed. For this system, no maximum shows up for the astrophysical S-factor so that we have no evidence for hindrance, as confirmed by the comparison with CC calculations. The logarithmic derivative of the two symmetric systems highlights their different low energy trend. A difference can also be noted in the two barrier distributions, where the high-energy peak present in 28Si+28Si is not observed for 30Si+30Si, probably due to the weaker couplings in last case.

  19. Viral membrane fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harrison, Stephen C.

    2015-01-01

    Membrane fusion is an essential step when enveloped viruses enter cells. Lipid bilayer fusion requires catalysis to overcome a high kinetic barrier; viral fusion proteins are the agents that fulfill this catalytic function. Despite a variety of molecular architectures, these proteins facilitate fusion by essentially the same generic mechanism. Stimulated by a signal associated with arrival at the cell to be infected (e.g., receptor or co-receptor binding, proton binding in an endosome), they undergo a series of conformational changes. A hydrophobic segment (a “fusion loop” or “fusion peptide”) engages the target-cell membrane and collapse of the bridging intermediate thus formed draws the two membranes (virus and cell) together. We know of three structural classes for viral fusion proteins. Structures for both pre- and postfusion conformations of illustrate the beginning and end points of a process that can be probed by single-virion measurements of fusion kinetics. - Highlights: • Viral fusion proteins overcome the high energy barrier to lipid bilayer merger. • Different molecular structures but the same catalytic mechanism. • Review describes properties of three known fusion-protein structural classes. • Single-virion fusion experiments elucidate mechanism

  20. Viral membrane fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harrison, Stephen C., E-mail: harrison@crystal.harvard.edu

    2015-05-15

    Membrane fusion is an essential step when enveloped viruses enter cells. Lipid bilayer fusion requires catalysis to overcome a high kinetic barrier; viral fusion proteins are the agents that fulfill this catalytic function. Despite a variety of molecular architectures, these proteins facilitate fusion by essentially the same generic mechanism. Stimulated by a signal associated with arrival at the cell to be infected (e.g., receptor or co-receptor binding, proton binding in an endosome), they undergo a series of conformational changes. A hydrophobic segment (a “fusion loop” or “fusion peptide”) engages the target-cell membrane and collapse of the bridging intermediate thus formed draws the two membranes (virus and cell) together. We know of three structural classes for viral fusion proteins. Structures for both pre- and postfusion conformations of illustrate the beginning and end points of a process that can be probed by single-virion measurements of fusion kinetics. - Highlights: • Viral fusion proteins overcome the high energy barrier to lipid bilayer merger. • Different molecular structures but the same catalytic mechanism. • Review describes properties of three known fusion-protein structural classes. • Single-virion fusion experiments elucidate mechanism.

  1. Fusion technology 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferro, C.; Gasparatto, M.; Knoepfel, H.

    1993-01-01

    The aim of the biennial series of symposia on the title subject, organized by the European Fusion Laboratories, is the exchange of information on the design, construction and operation of fusion experiments and on the technology being developed for the next step devices and fusion reactors. The coverage of the volume includes the technological aspects of fusion reactors in relation to new developments, this forming a guideline for the definition of future work. These proceedings comprise three volumes and contain both the invited lectures and contributed papers presented at the symposium which was attended by 569 participants from around the globe. The 343 papers, including 12 invited papers, characterize the increasing interest of industry in the fusion programme, giving a broad and current overview on the progress and trends fusion technology is experiencing now, as well as indicating the future for fusion devices

  2. Angular momentum effects in the fusion of "2"8Si+"2"8Si system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choudhary, Atul; Verma, Dalip Singh

    2016-01-01

    In the heavy ion fusion reactions the interaction potential plays an important role as it provides the characteristics like barrier height, barrier position and barrier width in the calculations of fusion cross section. This means different types of interaction potential gives different fusion cross sections or potential parameters are predicted w.r.t the experimental data. In the literature, number of formalism for the calculation of fusion cross sections assumes that the potential barrier position and width is independent of angular momentum (ℓ). However, all the three potential characteristics are ℓ-dependent and are used in the calculation the fusion cross section for a positive Q-value system, "2"8Si+"2"8Si (Q = 10.9 MeV) and is compared with the recently measured fusion cross section

  3. Argus Laser Fusion Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Speck, D.R.; Simmons, W.W.

    1976-01-01

    ARGUS is a two-beam Nd: glass laser system built for laser fusion irradiation experiments. It is the first glass laser system planned and built with the understanding that small-scale beam break-up is the dominant performance limiting factor in obtaining high output power. Accordingly, five vacuum spatial filters are located at strategic intervals along each chain to eliminate the accumulated small-scale filamentation. This strategy permits cascading of amplifiers to obtain a focusable output of more than one terawatt per arm in a spatially clean beam of 20 centimeter diameter. Beam diagnostics which characterize each shot include the time-integrated spatial profile and the time resolved intensity/power at the target. Demonstrated performance to date includes: (1) Peak power in excess of 2 TW at the target is achieved with regularity. (2) Maximum system brightness is in excess of 10 17 watts/cm 2 ster. (3) Shot-to-shot pointing stability within 50 μ radians is achieved over periods of days. (4) Successful target experiments have been performed with pulses of from 30 to 500 ps duration

  4. Anato-metabolic fusion of PET, CT and MRI images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Przetak, C.; Baum, R.P.; Niesen, A.; Slomka, P.; Proeschild, A.; Leonhardi, J.

    2000-01-01

    The fusion of cross-sectional images - especially in oncology - appears to be a very helpful tool to improve the diagnostic and therapeutic accuracy. Though many advantages exist, image fusion is applied routinely only in a few hospitals. To introduce image fusion as a common procedure, technical and logistical conditions have to be fulfilled which are related to long term archiving of digital data, data transfer and improvement of the available software in terms of usefulness and documentation. The accuracy of coregistration and the quality of image fusion has to be validated by further controlled studies. (orig.) [de

  5. Ectopia renal cruzada con fusión, reflujo vesicoureteral y riñón ectópico afuncional:: informe de un caso Crossed renal ectopia with fusion, vesicoureteral reflux and dysfunctional ectopic kidney:: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandalio Durán Álvarez

    2010-03-01

    due to the no-obstructive pelvic dilation or right kidney, crossed renal ectopia with fusion of dysfunctional left kidney and II degree bilateral vesicoureteral reflux from right kidney and of V degree from the crossed ectopic left kidney. At eleven months life he undergoes a lumbotomy and the hydronephrosis big sac was fused with lower pole of the right kidney. This big sac was resected and a low ureter ligature was carried out.

  6. Economics of fusion research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    This report provides the results of a study of methods of economic analysis applied to the evaluation of fusion research. The study recognizes that a hierarchy of economic analyses of research programs exists: standard benefit-cost analysis, expected value of R and D information, and expected utility analysis. It is shown that standard benefit-cost analysis, as commonly applied to research programs, is inadequate for the evaluation of a high technology research effort such as fusion research. A methodology for performing an expected value analysis is developed and demonstrated and an overview of an approach to perform an expected utility analysis of fusion research is presented. In addition, a potential benefit of fusion research, not previously identified, is discussed and rough estimates of its magnitude are presented. This benefit deals with the effect of a fusion research program on optimal fossil fuel consumption patterns. The results of this study indicate that it is both appropriate and possible to perform an expected value analysis of fusion research in order to assess the economics of a fusion research program. The results indicate further that the major area of benefits of fusion research is likely due to the impact of a fusion research program on optimal fossil fuel consumption patterns and it is recommended that this benefit be included in future assessments of fusion research economics

  7. Economics of fusion research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    1977-10-15

    This report provides the results of a study of methods of economic analysis applied to the evaluation of fusion research. The study recognizes that a hierarchy of economic analyses of research programs exists: standard benefit-cost analysis, expected value of R and D information, and expected utility analysis. It is shown that standard benefit-cost analysis, as commonly applied to research programs, is inadequate for the evaluation of a high technology research effort such as fusion research. A methodology for performing an expected value analysis is developed and demonstrated and an overview of an approach to perform an expected utility analysis of fusion research is presented. In addition, a potential benefit of fusion research, not previously identified, is discussed and rough estimates of its magnitude are presented. This benefit deals with the effect of a fusion research program on optimal fossil fuel consumption patterns. The results of this study indicate that it is both appropriate and possible to perform an expected value analysis of fusion research in order to assess the economics of a fusion research program. The results indicate further that the major area of benefits of fusion research is likely due to the impact of a fusion research program on optimal fossil fuel consumption patterns and it is recommended that this benefit be included in future assessments of fusion research economics.

  8. Fusion enhancement/suppression and irreversibility in reactions induced by weakly bound nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomes, P.R.S.; Lubian, J.; Canto, L.F.; Chamon, L.C.; Crema, E.; Hussein, M.S.

    2011-01-01

    We show that halo effects enhance fusion cross sections of weakly bound systems, comparing with the situation when there is no-halo. We introduce dimensionless fusion functions and energy variable quantity to investigate systematical trends in the fusion cross sections of weakly bound nuclei at near-barrier energies. We observe very clearly complete fusion suppression at energies above the barrier due to dynamic effects of the breakup on fusion. We explain this suppression in terms of the repulsive polarization potential produced by the breakup. (author)

  9. Disentangling effects of breakup coupling and incomplete fusion in 6Li + 232Th reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jha, V.; Parkar, V.V.; Mohanty, A.K.; Kailas, S.

    2014-01-01

    A component of fusion that is very important but quite difficult to evaluate is the incomplete fusion (ICF), in which only a part of the nucleus fuses with the target. ICF occurs together with the usual complete fusion (CF), in which the whole projectile fuses or all the projectile fragments after breakup fuse with the target nucleus. The ICF leads to the flux removal from the fusion channel and its calculation is essential for a comprehensive description of the fusion process. In the present work, a recently developed method of calculating the ICF cross-section (σ ICF ) is used in a novel way to disentangle the ICF effect on the fusion process from those due to breakup couplings. The total fusion cross-section σ TF and σ ICF for the 6 Li + 232 Th system are calculated at energies above and below the Coulomb barrier, where the measured fusion-fission data is available

  10. Elastic scattering, fusion, and breakup of light exotic nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kolata, J.J. [University of Notre Dame, Physics Department, Notre Dame, IN (United States); Guimaraes, V. [Universidade de Sao Paulo, Instituto de Fisica, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Aguilera, E.F. [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, Departamento de Aceleradores, Mexico, Distrito Federal (Mexico)

    2016-05-15

    The present status of fusion reactions involving light (A< 20) radioactive projectiles at energies around the Coulomb barrier (E<10 MeV per nucleon) is reviewed, emphasizing measurements made within the last decade. Data on elastic scattering (providing total reaction cross section information) and breakup channels for the involved systems, demonstrating the relationship between these and the fusion channel, are also reviewed. Similarities and differences in the behavior of fusion and total reaction cross section data concerning halo nuclei, weakly-bound but less exotic projectiles, and strongly-bound systems are discussed. One difference in the behavior of fusion excitation functions near the Coulomb barrier seems to emerge between neutron-halo and proton-halo systems. The role of charge has been investigated by comparing the fusion excitation functions, properly scaled, for different neutron- and proton-rich systems. Possible physical explanations for the observed differences are also reviewed. (orig.)

  11. The fusion of heavy ions in an interaction potential model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zipper, W.

    1980-01-01

    The paper contains the problems connected with fusion processes in heavy ions collision. Results of experimental fusion data for reactions: 9 Be + 12 C, 6 Li + 28 Si, 9 Be + 28 Si, 12 C + 28 Si, 12 C + 16 O and 16 O + 16 O are presented. Comparison of measured fusion cross sections with predictions of the fusion potential model have been made. The validity of this model for both light systems, like 9 Be + 12 C and heavy systems, like 35 Cl + 62 Ni, have been discussed. In conclusion, it should be stated that fusion cross sections could be correctly predicted by the potential model with a potential describing the elastic scattering data. (author)

  12. Cold fusion in symmetric 90Zr induced reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keller, J.G.; Schmidt, K.H.; Hessberger, F.P.; Muenzenberg, G.; Reisdorf, W.; Clerc, H.G.; Sahm, C.C.

    1985-08-01

    Excitation functions for evaporation residues were measured for the reactions 90 Zr+ 89 Y, 90 Zr, 92 Zr, 96 Zr, and 94 Mo. Deexcitation only by γ radiation was found for the compound nuclei 179 Au, 180 Hg, 182 Hg, and 184 Pb. The cross sections for this process were found to be considerably larger than predicted by a statistical-model calculation using standard parameters for the γ-strength function. Fusion probabilities as well as fusion-barrier distributions were deduced from the measured cross sections. There are strong nuclear structure effects in subbarrier fusion. For energies far below the fusion barrier the increase of the fusion probabilities with increasing energy is found to be much steeper than predicted by WKB calculations. As a by-product of this work new α-spectroscopic information could be obtained for neutron deficient isotopes between Ir and Pb. (orig.)

  13. Maximum Entropy in Drug Discovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Yuan Tseng

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Drug discovery applies multidisciplinary approaches either experimentally, computationally or both ways to identify lead compounds to treat various diseases. While conventional approaches have yielded many US Food and Drug Administration (FDA-approved drugs, researchers continue investigating and designing better approaches to increase the success rate in the discovery process. In this article, we provide an overview of the current strategies and point out where and how the method of maximum entropy has been introduced in this area. The maximum entropy principle has its root in thermodynamics, yet since Jaynes’ pioneering work in the 1950s, the maximum entropy principle has not only been used as a physics law, but also as a reasoning tool that allows us to process information in hand with the least bias. Its applicability in various disciplines has been abundantly demonstrated. We give several examples of applications of maximum entropy in different stages of drug discovery. Finally, we discuss a promising new direction in drug discovery that is likely to hinge on the ways of utilizing maximum entropy.

  14. Recycling fusion materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ooms, L.

    2005-01-01

    The inherent safety and environmental advantages of fusion power in comparison with other energy sources play an important role in the public acceptance. No waste burden for future generations is therefore one of the main arguments to decide for fusion power. The waste issue has thus been studied in several documents and the final conclusion of which it is stated that there is no permanent disposal waste needed if recycling is applied. But recycling of fusion reactor materials is far to be obvious regarding mostly the very high specific activity of the materials to be handled, the types of materials and the presence of tritium. The main objective of research performed by SCK-CEN is to study the possible ways of recycling fusion materials and analyse the challenges of the materials management from fusion reactors, based on current practices used in fission reactors and the requirements for the manufacture of fusion equipment

  15. The controlled thermonuclear fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barre, Bertrand

    2014-01-01

    After some generalities on particle physics, and on fusion and fission reactions, the author outlines that the fission reaction is easier to obtain than the fusion reaction, evokes the fusion which takes place in stars, and outlines the difficulty to manage and control this reaction: one of its application is the H bomb. The challenge is therefore to find a way to control this reaction and make it a steady and continuous source of energy. The author then presents the most promising way: the magnetic confinement fusion. He evokes its main issues, the already performed experiments (tokamak), and gives a larger presentation of the ITER project. Then, he evokes another way, the inertial confinement fusion, and the two main experimental installations (National Ignition Facility in Livermore, and the Laser Megajoule in Bordeaux). Finally, he gives a list of benefits and drawbacks of an industrial nuclear fusion

  16. Laser fusion overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuckolls, J.

    1976-01-01

    Because of recent breakthroughs in the target area, and in the glass laser area, the scientific feasibility of laser fusion--and of inertial fusion--may be demonstrated in the early 1980's. Then the development in that time period of a suitable laser (or storage ring or other driving source) would make possible an operational inertial fusion reactor in this century. These are roughly the same time scales as projected by the Tokamak magnetic confinement approach. It thus appears that the 15-20 year earlier start by magnetic confinement fusion may be overcome. Because inertial confinement has been demonstrated, and inertial fusion reactors may operate on smaller scales than Tokamaks, laser fusion may have important technical and economic advantages

  17. Synthetic fuels and fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fillo, J A; Powell, J; Steinberg, M [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (USA)

    1981-03-01

    The decreasing availability of fossil fuels emphasizes the need to develop systems which will produce synthetic fuel to substitute for and supplement the natural supply. An important first step in the synthesis of liquid and gaseous fuels is the production of hydrogen. Thermonuclear fusion offers an inexhaustible source of energy for the production of hydrogen from water. Depending on design, electric generation efficiencies of approx. equal to 40-60% and hydrogen production efficiencies by high temperature electrolysis of approx. equal to 50-70% are projected for fusion reactors using high temperature blankets. Fusion/coal symbiotic systems appear economically promising for the first generation of commercial fusion synfuels plants. Coal production requirements and the environmental effects of large-scale coal usage would be greatly reduced by a fusion/coal system. In the long-term, there could be a gradual transition to an inexhaustible energy system based solely on fusion.

  18. Fusion technology projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elen, J.D.

    1986-05-01

    The protection of the first wall by ceramic coatings against melting by plasma disruptions, was studied by computational heat transfer analysis. The compilation of a European Fusion File of nuclear data in its first version is presented. A specific contribution is the revision of the lead cross sections for (n,n 1 ), (n,2n) and (n,3n) reactions. The activations of neutron flux monitors for the JET neutron diagnostics system were recalculated using a 3D model of the torus and its D-shaped plasma. Calculations of nuclear heating and radiation damage parameters were performed for the lithium-lead blanket concept in the NET-II torus geometry, using a simplified blanket model. Results of low cycle fatigue and tensile testing of the reference heat of stainless steel 316 L is reported. The latter including the effect of a HFR-irradiation to 5 dpa and 40 appm helium. The design of a 12 Tesla niobium-tin insert coil for the SULTAN test facility is presented, including the start of its conductor development. The next step will be the development of a 32 kA (11 Tesla) conductor for the toroidal field coils of NET, as regulated under magnet system studies. The results are presented of two EXOTIC experiments: irradiation of ceramic lithium compounds for tritium breeding. (Auth.)

  19. Magnetic-fusion program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-08-01

    In February 1980, the Director of Energy Research requested that the Energy Research Advisory Board (ERAB) review the Department of Energy (DOE) Magnetic Fusion Program. Of particular concern to the DOE was the judicious choice of the next major steps toward demonstration of economic power production from fusion. Of equal concern was the overall soundness of the DOE Magnetic Fusion Program: its pace, scope, and funding profiles. Their finding and recommendations are included

  20. Magnetic fusion technology

    CERN Document Server

    Dolan, Thomas J

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic Fusion Technology describes the technologies that are required for successful development of nuclear fusion power plants using strong magnetic fields. These technologies include: ? magnet systems, ? plasma heating systems, ? control systems, ? energy conversion systems, ? advanced materials development, ? vacuum systems, ? cryogenic systems, ? plasma diagnostics, ? safety systems, and ? power plant design studies. Magnetic Fusion Technology will be useful to students and to specialists working in energy research.

  1. Status of fusion maintenance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuller, G.M.

    1984-01-01

    Effective maintenance will be an essential ingredient in determining fusion system productivity. This level of productivity will result only after close attention is paid to the entire system as an entity and appropriate integration of the elements is made. The status of fusion maintenance is reviewed in the context of the entire system. While there are many challenging developmental tasks ahead in fusion maintenance, the required technologies are available in several high-technology industries, including nuclear fission

  2. Membrane fusion and exocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahn, R; Südhof, T C

    1999-01-01

    Membrane fusion involves the merger of two phospholipid bilayers in an aqueous environment. In artificial lipid bilayers, fusion proceeds by means of defined transition states, including hourglass-shaped intermediates in which the proximal leaflets of the fusing membranes are merged whereas the distal leaflets are separate (fusion stalk), followed by the reversible opening of small aqueous fusion pores. Fusion of biological membranes requires the action of specific fusion proteins. Best understood are the viral fusion proteins that are responsible for merging the viral with the host cell membrane during infection. These proteins undergo spontaneous and dramatic conformational changes upon activation. In the case of the paradigmatic fusion proteins of the influenza virus and of the human immunodeficiency virus, an amphiphilic fusion peptide is inserted into the target membrane. The protein then reorients itself, thus forcing the fusing membranes together and inducing lipid mixing. Fusion of intracellular membranes in eukaryotic cells involves several protein families including SNAREs, Rab proteins, and Sec1/Munc-18 related proteins (SM-proteins). SNAREs form a novel superfamily of small and mostly membrane-anchored proteins that share a common motif of about 60 amino acids (SNARE motif). SNAREs reversibly assemble into tightly packed helical bundles, the core complexes. Assembly is thought to pull the fusing membranes closely together, thus inducing fusion. SM-proteins comprise a family of soluble proteins that bind to certain types of SNAREs and prevent the formation of core complexes. Rab proteins are GTPases that undergo highly regulated GTP-GDP cycles. In their GTP form, they interact with specific proteins, the effector proteins. Recent evidence suggests that Rab proteins function in the initial membrane contact connecting the fusing membranes but are not involved in the fusion reaction itself.

  3. Fusion facility siting considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bussell, G.T.

    1985-01-01

    Inherent in the fusion program's transition from hydrogen devices to commercial power machines is a general increase in the size and scope of succeeding projects. This growth will lead to increased emphasis on safety, environmental impact, and the external effects of fusion in general, and of each new device in particular. A critically important consideration in this regard is site selection. The purpose of this paper is to examine major siting issues that may affect the economics, safety, and environmental impact of fusion

  4. Fusion research principles

    CERN Document Server

    Dolan, Thomas James

    2013-01-01

    Fusion Research, Volume I: Principles provides a general description of the methods and problems of fusion research. The book contains three main parts: Principles, Experiments, and Technology. The Principles part describes the conditions necessary for a fusion reaction, as well as the fundamentals of plasma confinement, heating, and diagnostics. The Experiments part details about forty plasma confinement schemes and experiments. The last part explores various engineering problems associated with reactor design, vacuum and magnet systems, materials, plasma purity, fueling, blankets, neutronics

  5. Nuclear fusion power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dinghee, D.A.

    1983-01-01

    In this chapter, fusion is compared with other inexhaustible energy sources. Research is currently being conducted both within and outside the USA. The current confinement principles of thermonuclear reactions are reveiwed with the discussion of economics mainly focusing on the magnetic confinement concepts. Environmental, health and safety factors are of great concern to the public and measures are being taken to address them. The magnetic fusion program logic and the inertial fusion program logic are compared

  6. Inertial confinement fusion (ICF)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuckolls, J.

    1977-01-01

    The principal goal of the inertial confinement fusion program is the development of a practical fusion power plant in this century. Rapid progress has been made in the four major areas of ICF--targets, drivers, fusion experiments, and reactors. High gain targets have been designed. Laser, electron beam, and heavy ion accelerator drivers appear to be feasible. Record-breaking thermonuclear conditions have been experimentally achieved. Detailed diagnostics of laser implosions have confirmed predictions of the LASNEX computer program. Experimental facilities are being planned and constructed capable of igniting high gain fusion microexplosions in the mid 1980's. A low cost long lifetime reactor design has been developed

  7. Inertial fusion energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Decroisette, M.; Andre, M.; Bayer, C.; Juraszek, D.; Le Garrec, B.; Deutsch, C.; Migus, A.

    2005-01-01

    We first recall the scientific basis of inertial fusion and then describe a generic fusion reactor with the different components: the driver, the fusion chamber, the material treatment unit, the target factory and the turbines. We analyse the options proposed at the present time for the driver and for target irradiation scheme giving the state of art for each approach. We conclude by the presentation of LMJ (laser Megajoule) and NIF (national ignition facility) projects. These facilities aim to demonstrate the feasibility of laboratory DT ignition, first step toward Inertial Fusion Energy. (authors)

  8. Laser fusion program overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emmett, J.L.

    1977-01-01

    This program is structured to proceed through a series of well defined fusion milestones to proof of the scientific feasibility, of laser fusion with the Shiva Nova system. Concurrently, those key technical areas, such as advanced lasers, which are required to progress beyond proof of feasibility, are being studied. We have identified and quantified the opportunities and key technical issues in military applications, such as weapons effects simulations, and in civilian applications, such as central-station electric power production. We summarize the current status and future plans for the laser fusion program at LLL, emphasizing the civilian applications of laser fusion

  9. Frontiers in fusion research

    CERN Document Server

    Kikuchi, Mitsuru

    2011-01-01

    Frontiers in Fusion Research provides a systematic overview of the latest physical principles of fusion and plasma confinement. It is primarily devoted to the principle of magnetic plasma confinement, that has been systematized through 50 years of fusion research. Frontiers in Fusion Research begins with an introduction to the study of plasma, discussing the astronomical birth of hydrogen energy and the beginnings of human attempts to harness the Sun's energy for use on Earth. It moves on to chapters that cover a variety of topics such as: * charged particle motion, * plasma kinetic theory, *

  10. Fusion of Nonionic Vesicles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bulut, Sanja; Oskolkova, M. Z.; Schweins, R.

    2010-01-01

    We present an experimental study of vesicle fusion using light and neutron scattering to monitor fusion events. Vesicles are reproducibly formed with an extrusion procedure using an single amphiphile triethylene glycol mono-n-decyl ether in water. They show long-term stability for temperatures ar...... a barrier to fusion changing from 15 k(B)T at T = 26 degrees C to 10k(H) T at T = 35 degrees C. These results are compatible with the theoretical predictions using the stalk model of vesicle fusion....

  11. Fusion reactor safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-12-01

    Nuclear fusion could soon become a viable energy source. Work in plasma physics, fusion technology and fusion safety is progressing rapidly in a number of Member States and international collaboration continues on work aiming at the demonstration of fusion power generation. Safety of fusion reactors and technological and radiological aspects of waste management are important aspects in the development and design of fusion machines. In order to provide an international forum to review and discuss the status and the progress made since 1983 in programmes related to operational safety aspects of fusion reactors, their waste management and decommissioning concepts, the IAEA had organized the Technical Committee on ''Fusion Reactor Safety'' in Culham, 3-7 November 1986. All presentations of this meeting were divided into four sessions: 1. Statements on National-International Fusion Safety Programmes (5 papers); 2. Operation and System Safety (15 papers); 3. Waste Management and Decommissioning (5 papers); 4. Environmental Impacts (6 papers). A separate abstract was prepared for each of these 31 papers. Refs, figs, tabs

  12. Magnetic fusion reactor economics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krakowski, R.A.

    1995-01-01

    An almost primordial trend in the conversion and use of energy is an increased complexity and cost of conversion systems designed to utilize cheaper and more-abundant fuels; this trend is exemplified by the progression fossil fission → fusion. The present projections of the latter indicate that capital costs of the fusion ''burner'' far exceed any commensurate savings associated with the cheapest and most-abundant of fuels. These projections suggest competitive fusion power only if internal costs associate with the use of fossil or fission fuels emerge to make them either uneconomic, unacceptable, or both with respect to expensive fusion systems. This ''implementation-by-default'' plan for fusion is re-examined by identifying in general terms fusion power-plant embodiments that might compete favorably under conditions where internal costs (both economic and environmental) of fossil and/or fission are not as great as is needed to justify the contemporary vision for fusion power. Competitive fusion power in this context will require a significant broadening of an overly focused program to explore the physics and simbiotic technologies leading to more compact, simplified, and efficient plasma-confinement configurations that reside at the heart of an attractive fusion power plant

  13. Impact of an integrated core/SOL description on the R and B T optimization of tokamak fusion reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siccinio, M.; Fable, E.; Angioni, C.; Saarelma, S.; Scarabosio, A.; Zohm, H.

    2018-01-01

    An updated and improved version of the 0D divertor and scrape-off layer (SOL) model published in Siccinio et al (2016 Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 58 125011) was coupled with the 1.5D transport code ASTRA (Pereverzev 1991 IPP Report 5/42, Pereverzev and Yushmanov 2002 IPP Report 5/98 and Fable et al 2013 Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 55 124028). The resulting numerical tool was employed for various scans in the major radius R and in the toroidal magnetic field B T—for different safety factors q, allowable loop voltages V loop and H factors—in order to identify the most convenient choices for an electricity producing tokamak. Such a scenario analysis was carried out evaluating self-consistently, and simultaneously, the core profile and transport effects, which significantly impact on the fusion power outcome, and the divertor heat loads, which represent one of the most critical issues in view of the realization of fusion power plants (Zohm et al 2013 Nucl. Fusion 53 073019 and Wenninger et al 2017 Nucl. Fusion 57 046002). The main result is that, when divertor limits are enforced, the curves at constant electrical power output are closed on themselves in the R-BT plane, and a maximum achievable power exists—i.e. no benefits would be obtained from a further increase in R and B T once the optimum is reached. This result appears as an intrinsic physical limit for all those devices where a radiative SOL is needed to deal with the power exhaust, and where a lower limit on the power crossing the separatrix (e.g. because of the L-H transition) is present.

  14. Integral test of JENDL fusion file

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maekawa, Fujio [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1997-03-01

    Integral test of JENDL Fusion File (J-FF) is performed through analyses of available benchmark experiments. As a result, good agreement between the calculated results with J-FF and the measured data is observed as a whole. Thus, J-FF is qualified to be used for nuclear design of fusion reactors. Owing to the high quality evaluation of J-FF, cross section data in J-FF for many nuclides are recommended to be assigned as data in FENDL/E-2.0 in the IAEA Consultants` Meeting held at Karlsruhe, Germany, 24-28 June, 1996. (author)

  15. Maximum stellar iron core mass

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    60, No. 3. — journal of. March 2003 physics pp. 415–422. Maximum stellar iron core mass. F W GIACOBBE. Chicago Research Center/American Air Liquide ... iron core compression due to the weight of non-ferrous matter overlying the iron cores within large .... thermal equilibrium velocities will tend to be non-relativistic.

  16. A portable storage maximum thermometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fayart, Gerard.

    1976-01-01

    A clinical thermometer storing the voltage corresponding to the maximum temperature in an analog memory is described. End of the measurement is shown by a lamp switch out. The measurement time is shortened by means of a low thermal inertia platinum probe. This portable thermometer is fitted with cell test and calibration system [fr

  17. Neutron spectra unfolding with maximum entropy and maximum likelihood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itoh, Shikoh; Tsunoda, Toshiharu

    1989-01-01

    A new unfolding theory has been established on the basis of the maximum entropy principle and the maximum likelihood method. This theory correctly embodies the Poisson statistics of neutron detection, and always brings a positive solution over the whole energy range. Moreover, the theory unifies both problems of overdetermined and of underdetermined. For the latter, the ambiguity in assigning a prior probability, i.e. the initial guess in the Bayesian sense, has become extinct by virtue of the principle. An approximate expression of the covariance matrix for the resultant spectra is also presented. An efficient algorithm to solve the nonlinear system, which appears in the present study, has been established. Results of computer simulation showed the effectiveness of the present theory. (author)

  18. Incomplete fusion studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, B.P.

    2011-01-01

    In order to study the incomplete fusion reaction dynamics at energies ≅ 4-7 MeV/nucleon, several experiments have been carried out using accelerator facilities available in India. The measurements presented here cover a wide range of projectile-target combinations and enhance significantly our knowledge about incomplete fusion reaction dynamics. Here, the three sets of measurements have been presented; (i) excitation functions, (ii) forward recoil range distributions and (iii) the spin distributions. The first evidence of these reactions has been obtained from the measurement and analysis of excitation functions for xn/αxn/2αxn-channels. The measured excitation functions have been analyzed within the framework of compound nucleus model. The results obtained indicate the occurrence of fusion incompleteness at low beam energies. However, in order to determine the relative contribution of complete and incomplete fusion reaction processes, the recoil range distributions of the heavy residues have also been measured and analyzed within the framework of breakup fusion model which confirmed the fusion incompleteness in several heavy ion reactions involving α-emitting reaction channels. Further, in order to study the role of l-values in these reactions the spin distributions of the residues populated in case of complete and incomplete channels have been measured and are found to be distinctly different. The analysis of the data on spin distribution measurements indicate that the mean values of driving input angular momenta associated with direct-α-emitting (incomplete fusion) channels are higher than that observed for fusion-evaporation xn or α-emitting (complete fusion) channels, and is found to increase with direct α-multiplicity in the forward cone. One of the important conclusions drawn in the present work is that, there is significant incomplete fusion contribution even at energies slightly above the barrier. Further, the projectile structure has been found to

  19. Mirror fusion--fission hybrids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, J.D.

    1978-01-01

    The fusion-fission concept and the mirror fusion-fission hybrid program are outlined. Magnetic mirror fusion drivers and blankets for hybrid reactors are discussed. Results of system analyses are presented and a reference design is described

  20. Cell fusion and nuclear fusion in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruyama, Daisuke; Ohtsu, Mina; Higashiyama, Tetsuya

    2016-12-01

    Eukaryotic cells are surrounded by a plasma membrane and have a large nucleus containing the genomic DNA, which is enclosed by a nuclear envelope consisting of the outer and inner nuclear membranes. Although these membranes maintain the identity of cells, they sometimes fuse to each other, such as to produce a zygote during sexual reproduction or to give rise to other characteristically polyploid tissues. Recent studies have demonstrated that the mechanisms of plasma membrane or nuclear membrane fusion in plants are shared to some extent with those of yeasts and animals, despite the unique features of plant cells including thick cell walls and intercellular connections. Here, we summarize the key factors in the fusion of these membranes during plant reproduction, and also focus on "non-gametic cell fusion," which was thought to be rare in plant tissue, in which each cell is separated by a cell wall. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Numerical study of neutron beam divergence in a beam-fusion scenario employing laser driven ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alejo, A.; Green, A.; Ahmed, H.; Robinson, A. P. L.; Cerchez, M.; Clarke, R.; Doria, D.; Dorkings, S.; Fernandez, J.; McKenna, P.; Mirfayzi, S. R.; Naughton, K.; Neely, D.; Norreys, P.; Peth, C.; Powell, H.; Ruiz, J. A.; Swain, J.; Willi, O.; Borghesi, M.; Kar, S.

    2016-09-01

    The most established route to create a laser-based neutron source is by employing laser accelerated, low atomic-number ions in fusion reactions. In addition to the high reaction cross-sections at moderate energies of the projectile ions, the anisotropy in neutron emission is another important feature of beam-fusion reactions. Using a simple numerical model based on neutron generation in a pitcher-catcher scenario, anisotropy in neutron emission was studied for the deuterium-deuterium fusion reaction. Simulation results are consistent with the narrow-divergence (∼ 70 ° full width at half maximum) neutron beam recently served in an experiment employing multi-MeV deuteron beams of narrow divergence (up to 30° FWHM, depending on the ion energy) accelerated by a sub-petawatt laser pulse from thin deuterated plastic foils via the Target Normal Sheath Acceleration mechanism. By varying the input ion beam parameters, simulations show that a further improvement in the neutron beam directionality (i.e. reduction in the beam divergence) can be obtained by increasing the projectile ion beam temperature and cut-off energy, as expected from interactions employing higher power lasers at upcoming facilities.

  2. Tritium handling facility at KMS Fusion Inc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowman, C.C.; Vis, V.A.

    1990-01-01

    The tritium facility at KMS Fusion, Inc. supports the inertial confinement fusion research program. The main function of the facility is to fill glass and polymer Microshell (TM) capsules (small fuel containers) to a maximum pressure of 100 atm with tritium (T 2 ) or deuterium--tritium (DT). The recent upgrade of the facility allows us to fill Microshell capsules to a maximum pressure of 200 atm. A second fill port allows us to run long term fills of Macroshell (TM) capsules (large fuel containers) concurrently. The principle processes of the system are: (1) storage of the tritium as a uranium hydride; (2) pressure intensification using cryogenics; and (3) filling of the shells by permeation at elevated temperatures. The design of the facility was centered around a NRC license limit of 6000 Ci

  3. The fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brennan, M.H.

    1974-01-01

    Basic principles of the fusion reactor are outlined. Plasma heating and confinement schemes are described. These confinement systems include the linear Z pinch, magnetic mirrors and Tokamaks. A fusion reactor is described and a discussion is given of its environmental impact and its fuel situation. (R.L.)

  4. Fusion Canada issue 8

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-08-01

    A short bulletin from the National Fusion Program. Included in this issue are Canada-ITER contributions, NET Fuel Processing Loop, Bilateral Meeting for Canada-Europe, report from Tokamak de Varennes and a report from the University of Toronto on materials research for Fusion Reactors. 3 figs

  5. Fusion Canada issue 15

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-10-01

    A short bulletin from the National Fusion Program. Included in this issue is a report on the 1996 IAEA Fusion Conference site, operations at the Tokamak de Varennes including divertor pumping of impurities and pumping of carbon monoxide and methane, a discussion of the CFFTP and it's role. 1 fig

  6. Energy by nuclear fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buende, R.; Daenner, W.; Herold, H.; Raeder, J.

    1976-12-01

    This report reviews the state of knowledge in a number of fields of fusion research up to autumn 1976. Section 1 gives a very brief presentation of the elementary fusion reactions, the energies delivered by them and the most basic energy balances leading to Lawson-type diagrams. Section 2 outlines the reserves and cost of lithium and deuterium, gives estimates of the total energy available from DT fusion and comments on production technology, availlability and handling of the fuels. In section 3 a survey is given of the different concepts of magnetic confinement (stellarators, tokamaks, toroidal pinches, mirror machines, two-component plasmas), of confinement by walls, gas blankets and imploding liners and, finally, of the concepts of interial confinement (laser fusion, beam fusion). The reactors designed or outlined on the basis of the tokamak, high-β, mirror, and laser fusion concepts are presented in section 4, which is followed in section 5 by a discussion of the key problems of fusion power plants. The present-day knowledge of the cost structure of fusion power plants and the sensitivity of this structure with respect to the physical and technical assumptions made is analysed in section 6. Section 7 and 8 treat the aspects of safety and environment. The problems discussed include the hazard potentials of different designs (radiological, toxicological, and with respect to stored energies), release of radioactivity, possible kinds of malfunctioning, and the environmental impact of waste heat, radiation and radioactive waste (orig.) [de

  7. Fusion helps diversification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liang, S.; Ren, Z.; de Rijke, M.

    2014-01-01

    A popular strategy for search result diversification is to first retrieve a set of documents utilizing a standard retrieval method and then rerank the results. We adopt a different perspective on the problem, based on data fusion. Starting from the hypothesis that data fusion can improve performance

  8. Fusion Canada issue 22

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-10-01

    A short bulletin from the National Fusion Program highlighting in this issue a bi-lateral meeting between Canada and Japan, water and hydrogen detritiation, in-situ tokamak surface analysis, an update of CCFM/TdeV and tritium accounting Industry guidance in Fusion, fast probe for plasma-surface interaction. 4 figs

  9. International fusion research council

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belozerov, A.N.

    1977-01-01

    A brief history of the International Fusion Research Council (IFRC) is given and the minutes of the 1976 meeting in Garching are summarized. At the Garching meeting, the IFRC evaluated the quality of papers presented at recent IAEA conferences on plasma physics and controlled thermonuclear research, and made recommendations on the organization and timing of future meetings on nuclear fusion

  10. Fusion Canada issue 15

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1991-10-01

    A short bulletin from the National Fusion Program. Included in this issue is a report on the 1996 IAEA Fusion Conference site, operations at the Tokamak de Varennes including divertor pumping of impurities and pumping of carbon monoxide and methane, a discussion of the CFFTP and it`s role. 1 fig.

  11. Magnetic Fusion Program Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-02-01

    This Plan reflects the present conditions of the energy situation and is consistent with national priorities for the support of basic and applied research. It is realistic in taking advantage of the technical position that the United States has already established in fusion research to make cost-effective progress toward the development of fusion power as a future energy option

  12. Fusion Canada issue 8

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1989-08-01

    A short bulletin from the National Fusion Program. Included in this issue are Canada-ITER contributions, NET Fuel Processing Loop, Bilateral Meeting for Canada-Europe, report from Tokamak de Varennes and a report from the University of Toronto on materials research for Fusion Reactors. 3 figs.

  13. Sensor Data Fusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plascencia, Alfredo; Stepán, Petr

    2006-01-01

    The main contribution of this paper is to present a sensor fusion approach to scene environment mapping as part of a Sensor Data Fusion (SDF) architecture. This approach involves combined sonar array with stereo vision readings.  Sonar readings are interpreted using probability density functions...

  14. Coatings for laser fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lowdermilk, W.H.

    1981-01-01

    Optical coatings are used in lasers systems for fusion research to control beam propagation and reduce surface reflection losses. The performance of coatings is important in the design, reliability, energy output, and cost of the laser systems. Significant developments in coating technology are required for future lasers for fusion research and eventual power reactors

  15. Fusion reactor materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sethi, V.K.; Scholz, R.; Nolfi, F.V. Jr.; Turner, A.P.L.

    1980-01-01

    Data are given for each of the following areas: (1) effects of irradiation on fusion reactor materials, (2) hydrogen permeation and materials behavior in alloys, (3) carbon coatings for fusion applications, (4) surface damage of TiB 2 coatings under energetic D + and 4 He + irradiations, and (5) neutron dosimetry

  16. Controlled thermonuclear fusion

    CERN Document Server

    Bobin, Jean Louis

    2014-01-01

    The book is a presentation of the basic principles and main achievements in the field of nuclear fusion. It encompasses both magnetic and inertial confinements plus a few exotic mechanisms for nuclear fusion. The state-of-the-art regarding thermonuclear reactions, hot plasmas, tokamaks, laser-driven compression and future reactors is given.

  17. Fusion Power Deployment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, J.A.; Ogden, J.M.

    2002-01-01

    Fusion power plants could be part of a future portfolio of non-carbon dioxide producing energy supplies such as wind, solar, biomass, advanced fission power, and fossil energy with carbon dioxide sequestration. In this paper, we discuss key issues that could impact fusion energy deployment during the last half of this century. These include geographic issues such as resource availability, scale issues, energy storage requirements, and waste issues. The resource needs and waste production associated with fusion deployment in the U.S. should not pose serious problems. One important feature of fusion power is the fact that a fusion power plant should be locatable within most local or regional electrical distribution systems. For this reason, fusion power plants should not increase the burden of long distance power transmission to our distribution system. In contrast to fusion power, regional factors could play an important role in the deployment of renewable resources such as wind, solar and biomass or fossil energy with CO2 sequestration. We examine the role of these regional factors and their implications for fusion power deployment

  18. Fusion Canada issue 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-05-01

    A short bulletin from the National Fusion Program. Included in this issue is a technical update on Tokamak de Varennes, a report on the Beatrix II Breeding Materials Test Program, the Tritium glovebox system for UPM, Saudi Arabia, a broad update of the Canadian Fusion Fuels Technology Project is also included. 1 fig

  19. Fusion Canada issue 12

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1990-10-01

    A short bulletin from the National Fusion Program. Included in this issue is a report on Darlington`s Tritium Removal Facility, work at universities on Deuterium Diffusivity in Beryllium, Fusion Studies, confinement research and the operation of divertors at Tokamak de Varennes. 5 figs.

  20. Fusion Canada issue 22

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1993-10-01

    A short bulletin from the National Fusion Program highlighting in this issue a bi-lateral meeting between Canada and Japan, water and hydrogen detritiation, in-situ tokamak surface analysis, an update of CCFM/TdeV and tritium accounting Industry guidance in Fusion, fast probe for plasma-surface interaction. 4 figs.

  1. Fusion Canada issue 4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1988-05-01

    A short bulletin from the National Fusion Program. Included in this issue is a technical update on Tokamak de Varennes, a report on the Beatrix II Breeding Materials Test Program, the Tritium glovebox system for UPM, Saudi Arabia, a broad update of the Canadian Fusion Fuels Technology Project is also included. 1 fig.

  2. Fusion Canada issue 19

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-12-01

    A short bulletin from the National Fusion Program. Included in this issue is a report on the IAEA Plasma Biasing Meeting, the new IEA program -Nuclear Technology of Fusion reactors, TFTR tritium purification system, an update by CCFM on machine additions and modifications, and news of a new compact Toroid injector at the University of Saskatchewan. 1 fig

  3. Fusion Canada issue 14

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-05-01

    A short bulletin from the National Fusion Program. Included in this issue is a report on a fusion cooperation agreement between Japan and Canada, an update at Tokamak de Varennes on plasma biasing experiments and boronization tests and a collaboration between Canada and the U.S. on a compact toroid fuelling gun. 4 figs

  4. Fusion Canada issue 12

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-10-01

    A short bulletin from the National Fusion Program. Included in this issue is a report on Darlington's Tritium Removal Facility, work at universities on Deuterium Diffusivity in Beryllium, Fusion Studies, confinement research and the operation of divertors at Tokamak de Varennes. 5 figs

  5. Controlled Nuclear Fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glasstone, Samuel

    This publication is one of a series of information booklets for the general public published by The United States Atomic Energy Commission. Among the topics discussed are: Importance of Fusion Energy; Conditions for Nuclear Fusion; Thermonuclear Reactions in Plasmas; Plasma Confinement by Magnetic Fields; Experiments With Plasmas; High-Temperature…

  6. An FPGA-based heterogeneous image fusion system design method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Le; Lin, Yu-chi; Chen, Yan-hua; Zhao, Mei-rong

    2011-08-01

    Taking the advantages of FPGA's low cost and compact structure, an FPGA-based heterogeneous image fusion platform is established in this study. Altera's Cyclone IV series FPGA is adopted as the core processor of the platform, and the visible light CCD camera and infrared thermal imager are used as the image-capturing device in order to obtain dualchannel heterogeneous video images. Tailor-made image fusion algorithms such as gray-scale weighted averaging, maximum selection and minimum selection methods are analyzed and compared. VHDL language and the synchronous design method are utilized to perform a reliable RTL-level description. Altera's Quartus II 9.0 software is applied to simulate and implement the algorithm modules. The contrast experiments of various fusion algorithms show that, preferably image quality of the heterogeneous image fusion can be obtained on top of the proposed system. The applied range of the different fusion algorithms is also discussed.

  7. Industry's role in inertial fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glass, A.J.

    1983-01-01

    This paper is an address to the Tenth Symposium on Fusion Engineering. The speaker first addressed the subject of industry's role in inertial fusion three years earlier in 1980, outlining programs that included participation in the Shiva construction project, and the industrial participants' program set up in the laser fusion program to bring industrial scientists and engineers into the laboratory to work on laser fusion. The speaker is now the president of KMS Fusion, Inc., the primary industrial participant in the inertial fusion program. The outlook for fusion energy and the attitude of the federal government toward the fusion program is discussed

  8. Fusion-reactor blanket and coolant material compatibility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeppson, D.W.; Keough, R.F.

    1981-01-01

    Fusion reactor blanket and coolant compatibility tests are being conducted to aid in the selection and design of safe blanket and coolant systems for future fusion reactors. Results of scoping compatibility tests to date are reported for blanket material and water interactions at near operating temperatures. These tests indicate the quantitative hydrogen release, the maximum temperature and pressures produced and the rates of interactions for selected blanket materials

  9. Towards fusion power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venkataraman, G.

    1975-01-01

    An attempt has been made to present general but broad review of the recent developments in the field of plasma physics and its application to fusion power. The first chapter describes the fusion reactions and fusion power systems. The second chapter deals in detail with production and behaviour of plasma, screening, oscillations, instability, energy losses, temperature effects, etc. Magnetic confinements, including pinch systems, toroidal systems such as Tokamac and stellarator, minor machine, etc. are discussed in detail in chapter III. Laser produced plasma, laser implosion and problems associated with it and future prospects are explained in chapter IV. Chapter V is devoted entirely to the various aspects of hybrid systems. The last chapter throws light on problems of fusion technology, such as plasma heating, vacuum requirements, radiation damage, choice of materials, blanket problems, hazards of fusion reactions, etc. (K.B.)

  10. Fusion fuel blanket technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hastings, I.J.; Gierszewski, P.

    1987-05-01

    The fusion blanket surrounds the burning hydrogen core of a fusion reactor. It is in this blanket that most of the energy released by the nuclear fusion of deuterium-tritium is converted into useful product, and where tritium fuel is produced to enable further operation of the reactor. As fusion research turns from present short-pulse physics experiments to long-burn engineering tests in the 1990's, energy removal and tritium production capabilities become important. This technology will involve new materials, conditions and processes with applications both to fusion and beyond. In this paper, we introduce features of proposed blanket designs and update and status of international research. In focusing on the Canadian blanket technology program, we discuss the aqueous lithium salt blanket concept, and the in-reactor tritium recovery test program

  11. Decomposition of incomplete fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sobotka, L.B.; Sarantities, D.G.; Stracener, D.W.; Majka, Z.; Abenante, V.; Semkow, T.M.; Hensley, D.C.; Beene, J.R.; Halbert, M.L.

    1989-01-01

    The velocity distribution of fusion-like products formed in the reaction 701 MeV 28 Si+ 100 Mo is decomposed into 26 incomplete fusion channels. The momentum deficit of the residue per nonevaporative mass unit is approximately equal to the beam momentum per nucleon. The yields of the incomplete fusion channels correlate with the Q-value for projectile fragmentation rather than that for incomplete fusion. The backward angle multiplicities of light particles and heavy ions increase with momentum transfer, however, the heavy ion multiplicities also depend on the extent of the fragmentation of the incomplete fusion channel. These data indicate that at fixed linear momentum transfer, increased fragmentation of the unfused component is related to a reduced transferred angular momentum. 22 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab

  12. Nuclear fusion: The issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griffin, R.D.

    1993-01-01

    The taming of fusion energy, has proved one of the most elusive quests of modern science. For four decades, the United States has doggedly pursued energy's holy grail, pumping more than $9 billion into research and reactor prototypes. This year, the federal government is slated to spend $339 million on fusion, more than the combined amount the government will spend for research on oil, natural gas, solar power, wind power, geothermal energy, biofuels and conservation. This article summarizes the technical, political in terms of international cooperation, economic, planning, etc. issues surrounding the continued development of fusion as a possible power source for the next century. Brief descriptions of how fusion works and of the design of a tokamak fusion machine are included

  13. Fusion safety data base

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laats, E.T.; Hardy, H.A.

    1983-01-01

    The purpose of this Fusion Safety Data Base Program is to provide a repository of data for the design and development of safe commercial fusion reactors. The program is sponsored by the United States Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Fusion Energy. The function of the program is to collect, examine, permanently store, and make available the safety data to the entire US magnetic-fusion energy community. The sources of data will include domestic and foreign fusion reactor safety-related research programs. Any participant in the DOE Program may use the Data Base Program from his terminal through user friendly dialog and can view the contents in the form of text, tables, graphs, or system diagrams

  14. Compact fusion reactors

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2015-01-01

    Fusion research is currently to a large extent focused on tokamak (ITER) and inertial confinement (NIF) research. In addition to these large international or national efforts there are private companies performing fusion research using much smaller devices than ITER or NIF. The attempt to achieve fusion energy production through relatively small and compact devices compared to tokamaks decreases the costs and building time of the reactors and this has allowed some private companies to enter the field, like EMC2, General Fusion, Helion Energy, Lawrenceville Plasma Physics and Lockheed Martin. Some of these companies are trying to demonstrate net energy production within the next few years. If they are successful their next step is to attempt to commercialize their technology. In this presentation an overview of compact fusion reactor concepts is given.

  15. Some fusion perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McNally, J.R. Jr.

    1977-01-01

    Some of the concepts of nuclear fusion reactions, advanced fusion fuels, environmental impacts, etc., are explored using the following general outline: I. Principles of Fusion (Nuclear Fuels and Reactions, Lawson Condition, n tau vs T, Nuclear Burn Characteristics); II. Magnetic Mirror Possibilities (the Ion Layer and Electron Layer, Exponential Build-up at MeV energies, Lorentz trapping at GeV energies); III. Pellet Fuel Fusion Prospects (Advanced Pellet Fuel Fusion Prospects, Burn Characteristics and Applications, Excitation-heating Prospects for Runaway Ion Temperatures). Inasmuch as the outline is very skeletal, a significant research and development effort may be in order to evaluate these prospects in more detail and hopefully ''harness the H-bomb'' for peaceful applications, the author concludes. 28 references

  16. On Maximum Entropy and Inference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luigi Gresele

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Maximum entropy is a powerful concept that entails a sharp separation between relevant and irrelevant variables. It is typically invoked in inference, once an assumption is made on what the relevant variables are, in order to estimate a model from data, that affords predictions on all other (dependent variables. Conversely, maximum entropy can be invoked to retrieve the relevant variables (sufficient statistics directly from the data, once a model is identified by Bayesian model selection. We explore this approach in the case of spin models with interactions of arbitrary order, and we discuss how relevant interactions can be inferred. In this perspective, the dimensionality of the inference problem is not set by the number of parameters in the model, but by the frequency distribution of the data. We illustrate the method showing its ability to recover the correct model in a few prototype cases and discuss its application on a real dataset.

  17. Maximum Water Hammer Sensitivity Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Jalil Emadi; Abbas Solemani

    2011-01-01

    Pressure waves and Water Hammer occur in a pumping system when valves are closed or opened suddenly or in the case of sudden failure of pumps. Determination of maximum water hammer is considered one of the most important technical and economical items of which engineers and designers of pumping stations and conveyance pipelines should take care. Hammer Software is a recent application used to simulate water hammer. The present study focuses on determining significance of ...

  18. Maximum Gene-Support Tree

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunfeng Shan

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Genomes and genes diversify during evolution; however, it is unclear to what extent genes still retain the relationship among species. Model species for molecular phylogenetic studies include yeasts and viruses whose genomes were sequenced as well as plants that have the fossil-supported true phylogenetic trees available. In this study, we generated single gene trees of seven yeast species as well as single gene trees of nine baculovirus species using all the orthologous genes among the species compared. Homologous genes among seven known plants were used for validation of the finding. Four algorithms—maximum parsimony (MP, minimum evolution (ME, maximum likelihood (ML, and neighbor-joining (NJ—were used. Trees were reconstructed before and after weighting the DNA and protein sequence lengths among genes. Rarely a gene can always generate the “true tree” by all the four algorithms. However, the most frequent gene tree, termed “maximum gene-support tree” (MGS tree, or WMGS tree for the weighted one, in yeasts, baculoviruses, or plants was consistently found to be the “true tree” among the species. The results provide insights into the overall degree of divergence of orthologous genes of the genomes analyzed and suggest the following: 1 The true tree relationship among the species studied is still maintained by the largest group of orthologous genes; 2 There are usually more orthologous genes with higher similarities between genetically closer species than between genetically more distant ones; and 3 The maximum gene-support tree reflects the phylogenetic relationship among species in comparison.

  19. Investigations of image fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhong

    1999-12-01

    The objective of image fusion is to combine information from multiple images of the same scene. The result of image fusion is a single image which is more suitable for the purpose of human visual perception or further image processing tasks. In this thesis, a region-based fusion algorithm using the wavelet transform is proposed. The identification of important features in each image, such as edges and regions of interest, are used to guide the fusion process. The idea of multiscale grouping is also introduced and a generic image fusion framework based on multiscale decomposition is studied. The framework includes all of the existing multiscale-decomposition- based fusion approaches we found in the literature which did not assume a statistical model for the source images. Comparisons indicate that our framework includes some new approaches which outperform the existing approaches for the cases we consider. Registration must precede our fusion algorithms. So we proposed a hybrid scheme which uses both feature-based and intensity-based methods. The idea of robust estimation of optical flow from time- varying images is employed with a coarse-to-fine multi- resolution approach and feature-based registration to overcome some of the limitations of the intensity-based schemes. Experiments show that this approach is robust and efficient. Assessing image fusion performance in a real application is a complicated issue. In this dissertation, a mixture probability density function model is used in conjunction with the Expectation- Maximization algorithm to model histograms of edge intensity. Some new techniques are proposed for estimating the quality of a noisy image of a natural scene. Such quality measures can be used to guide the fusion. Finally, we study fusion of images obtained from several copies of a new type of camera developed for video surveillance. Our techniques increase the capability and reliability of the surveillance system and provide an easy way to obtain 3-D

  20. LCLS Maximum Credible Beam Power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clendenin, J.

    2005-01-01

    The maximum credible beam power is defined as the highest credible average beam power that the accelerator can deliver to the point in question, given the laws of physics, the beam line design, and assuming all protection devices have failed. For a new accelerator project, the official maximum credible beam power is determined by project staff in consultation with the Radiation Physics Department, after examining the arguments and evidence presented by the appropriate accelerator physicist(s) and beam line engineers. The definitive parameter becomes part of the project's safety envelope. This technical note will first review the studies that were done for the Gun Test Facility (GTF) at SSRL, where a photoinjector similar to the one proposed for the LCLS is being tested. In Section 3 the maximum charge out of the gun for a single rf pulse is calculated. In Section 4, PARMELA simulations are used to track the beam from the gun to the end of the photoinjector. Finally in Section 5 the beam through the matching section and injected into Linac-1 is discussed

  1. INTEGRATED FUSION METHOD FOR MULTIPLE TEMPORAL-SPATIAL-SPECTRAL IMAGES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Shen

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Data fusion techniques have been widely researched and applied in remote sensing field. In this paper, an integrated fusion method for remotely sensed images is presented. Differently from the existed methods, the proposed method has the performance to integrate the complementary information in multiple temporal-spatial-spectral images. In order to represent and process the images in one unified framework, two general image observation models are firstly presented, and then the maximum a posteriori (MAP framework is used to set up the fusion model. The gradient descent method is employed to solve the fused image. The efficacy of the proposed method is validated using simulated images.

  2. US fusion community discussion on fusion strategies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marton, W.A.

    1998-01-01

    On April 26 - May 1, 1998, a US Fusion Community Forum for Major Next-Step Experiments was held at Madison, Wisconsin, USA. Both the Single Integrated Step strategy and the Multiple Machine strategy have substantial support from the about 180 scientists and engineers who participated

  3. A search for parameters of universal sub-barrier fusion excitation function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qu, W.W. [Medical College of Soochow University, School of Radiation Medicine and Protection, Soochow (China); Zhang, G.L. [Beihang University, School of Physics and Nuclear Energy Engineering, Beijing (China); Wolski, R. [Henryk Niewodniczanski Institute of Nuclear Physics PAS, Cracow (Poland)

    2016-11-15

    Many fusion experimental data have been analyzed in terms of a simple universal function which could be used for predictions of fusion cross section below the barrier for arbitrary systems. Sub-barrier fusions based on the concept of Q -fusion value dependence were studied. It is attempted to parameterize the energy-reduced fusion excitation functions around the Coulomb barriers by an analytical phenomenological function. It was found that the speed of driving nuclei towards fusion is faster with the increase of mass asymmetry of colliding systems and those systems with a large difference of the ratio of neutrons to protons. However, a general trend with respect to total mass has not been observed. An exposition of more qualitative conclusions is hindered by apparent inconsistencies of measured fusion cross sections. (orig.)

  4. Fusion technology programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elen, J.D.

    1981-10-01

    In the water cooled INTOR blanket modules a loss of coolant accident will result in melting of the lead rods after 1 minute and of the ss first wall after 3 minutes. Also partial melting and evaporization of the ss first wall as caused by plasma disruption was analysed. Part of the UKCTR-IIIA neutron reaction cross section data library is based on calculations using the nuclear-model code THRES-2. Results of a revision using the modified THRES-F code are reported. A combined preequilibrium and equilibrium model was applied for calculation of neutron emission spectra and of their angular distributions. Neutron transport calculations are reported to determine the polodial distribution of activation of various threshold detectors, which will be placed on the plasma chamber of JET as part of the diagnostic system. In vanadium the preinjection of helium by means of cyclotron irradiation is shown to lead to a lower cavity concentration and a slightly larger cavity size as a result of a following fast neutron irradiation in the core of the HFR reactor. In the V - 1% Cr - 0.1% Ti alloy preinjected helium has the opposite effect on cavity concentration and size. The ratio between helium production and displacement damage in ss 316 by irradiation in the HFR is shown to meet the fusion reactor condition. The development of high current superconducting niobium-tin cables is introduced as a new activity at ECN. Results are shown of a technique for welding multifilament wires. The conductor concept for a small prototype toroidal field coil is presented. Progress is reported of fabrication of a 8 Tesla niobium-titanium insert coil for the SULTAN conductor test facility

  5. Materials for fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehrlich, K.; Kaletta, D.

    1978-03-01

    The following report describes five papers which were given during the IMF seminar series summer 1977. The purpose of this series was to discuss especially the irradiation behaviour of materials intended for the first wall of future fusion reactors. The first paper deals with the basic understanding of plasma physics relating to the fusion reactor and presents the current state of art of fusion technology. The next two talks discuss the metals intended for the first wall and structural components of a fusion reactor. Since 14 MeV neutrons play an important part in the process of irradiation damage their role is discussed in detail. The question which machines are presently available to simulate irradiation damage under conditions similar to the ones found in a fusion reactor are investigated in the fourth talk which also presents the limitations of the different methods of simulation. In this context also discussed is the importance future intensive neutron sources and materials test reactors will have for this problem area. The closing paper has as a theme the review of the present status of research of metallic and non-metallic materials in view of the quite different requirements for different fusion systems; a closing topic is the world supply on rare materials required for fusion reactors. (orig) [de

  6. Influence of the mass asymmetry on the incomplete fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, D.; Ali, R.; Pachouri, Dipti; Afzal Ansari, M.; Rashid, M.H.

    2007-01-01

    In the present work, a ratio of the incomplete fusion cross-section to the total cross-section (CF + ICF) has been measured, fraction for the 16 O + 45 Sc, 16 O + 74 Ge, 20 Ne + 59 Co and 20 Ne + 165 Ho systems at ≅ 3-8 MeV/ nucleon

  7. Dynamical limitations to heavy-ion fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Back, B.B.

    1983-01-01

    In spite of the many attempts to synthesize superheavy elements in recent years, these efforts have not yet been successful. Recent improved theoretical models of heavy-ion fusion reactions suggest that the formation of super-heavy elements is hindered by the dynamics of the process. Several recent experiments lend support to these theories. The necessity of an excess radial velocity (extra push) over the Coulomb barrier in order to induce fusion is observed experimentally as predicted by the theory. So is a new reaction mechanism, called quasi-fission which tend to exhaust the part of the reaction cross section, which would otherwise lead to fusion. The present study shows that the angular distribution of fragments from quasi-fission processes are very sensitive to the occurrence of this reaction mechanism. A slight modification of one parameter in the theory demanded by the observation of quasi-fission for lighter projectiles via the angular distributions, has the consequence of posing even more-stringent limitations on heavy-ion-fusion reactions. This reduces even further the possibility for synthesizing and identifying superheavy elements in heavy-ion-fusion reactions

  8. Fusion research in Hungary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zoletnik, S.

    2004-01-01

    Hungarian fusion research started in the 1970s, when the idea of installing a small tokamak experiment emerged. In return to computer equipment a soviet tokamak was indeed sent to Hungary and started to operate as MT-1 at the Central Research Institute for Physics (KFKI) in 1979. Major research topics included diagnostic development, edge plasma studies and investigation of disruptions. Following a major upgrade in 1992 (new vacuum vessel, active position control and PC network based data acquisition system) the MT-1M tokamak was used for the study of transport processes with trace impurity injection, micropellet ablation studies, X-ray tomography and laser blow-off diagnostic development. Although funding ceased in the middle of the 90's the group was held alive by collaborations with EU fusion labs: FZ -Juelich, IPP-Garching and CRPP-EPFL Lausanne. In 1998 the machine was dismantled due to reorganization of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences. New horizons opened to fusion research from 1999, when Hungary joined EURATOM and a fusion Association was formed. Since then fusion physics studies are done in collaboration with major EU fusion laboratories, Hungarian researchers also play an active role in JET diagnostics upgrade and ITER design. Major topics are pellet ablation studies, plasma turbulence diagnosis using Beam Emission Spectroscopy and other techniques, tomography and plasma diagnostics using various neutral beams. In fusion relevant technology R and D Hungary has less records. Before joining EURATOM some materials irradiation studies were done at the Budapest Research Reactor at KFKI-AEKI. The present day fusion technology programme focuses still on irradiation studies, nuclear material database and electromagnetic testing techniques. Increasing the fusion technology research activities is a difficult task, as the competition in Hungarian industry is very strong and the interest of organizations in long-term investments into R and D is rather weak and

  9. Generic maximum likely scale selection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Kim Steenstrup; Loog, Marco; Markussen, Bo

    2007-01-01

    in this work is on applying this selection principle under a Brownian image model. This image model provides a simple scale invariant prior for natural images and we provide illustrative examples of the behavior of our scale estimation on such images. In these illustrative examples, estimation is based......The fundamental problem of local scale selection is addressed by means of a novel principle, which is based on maximum likelihood estimation. The principle is generally applicable to a broad variety of image models and descriptors, and provides a generic scale estimation methodology. The focus...

  10. Low activation materials for fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rowcliffe, A.F.; Bloom, E.E.; Doran, D.G.; Smith, D.L.; Reuther, T.C.

    1988-01-01

    The viability of fusion as a future energy source may eventually be determined by safety and environmental factors. Control of the induced radioactivity characteristics of the materials used in the first wall and blanket could have a major favorable impact on these issues. In the United States, materials program efforts are focused on developing new structural alloys with radioactive decay characteristics which would greatly simplify long-term waste disposal of reactor components. A range of alloy systems is being explored in order to maintain the maximum number of design options. Significant progress has been made, and it now appears probable that reduced-activation engineering alloys with properties at least equivalent to conventional alloys can be successfully developed and commercialized. 10 refs., 1 fig

  11. Mirror fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1978-01-01

    Conceptual design studies were made of fusion reactors based on the three current mirror-confinement concepts: the standard mirror, the tandem mirror, and the field-reversed mirror. Recent studies of the standard mirror have emphasized its potential as a fusion-fission hybrid reactor, designed to produce fuel for fission reactors. We have designed a large commercial hybrid and a small pilot-plant hybrid based on standard mirror confinement. Tandem mirror designs include a commercial 1000-MWe fusion power plant and a nearer term tandem mirror hybrid. Field-reversed mirror designs include a multicell commercial reactor producing 75 MWe and a single-cell pilot plant

  12. Mirror fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlson, G.A.; Moir, R.W.

    1978-01-01

    We have carried out conceptual design studies of fusion reactors based on the three current mirror confinement concepts: the standard mirror, the tandem mirror, and the field-reversed mirror. Recent studies of the standard mirror have emphasized its potential as a fusion-fission hybrid reactor, designed to produce fission fuel for fission reactors. We have designed a large commercial hybrid based on standard mirror confinement, and also a small pilot plant hybrid. Tandem mirror designs include a commercial 1000 MWe fusion power plant and a nearer term tandem mirror hybrid. Field-reversed mirror designs include a multicell commercial reactor producing 75 MWe and a single cell pilot plant

  13. Fusion Reactor Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Decreton, M.

    2002-01-01

    The objective of SCK-CEN's programme on fusion reactor materials is to contribute to the knowledge on the radiation-induced behaviour of fusion reactor materials and components as well as to help the international community in building the scientific and technical basis needed for the construction of the future reactor. Ongoing projects include: the study of the mechanical and chemical (corrosion) behaviour of structural materials under neutron irradiation and water coolant environment; the investigation of the characteristics of irradiated first wall material such as beryllium; investigations on the management of materials resulting from the dismantling of fusion reactors including waste disposal. Progress and achievements in these areas in 2001 are discussed

  14. Remote sensing image fusion

    CERN Document Server

    Alparone, Luciano; Baronti, Stefano; Garzelli, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    A synthesis of more than ten years of experience, Remote Sensing Image Fusion covers methods specifically designed for remote sensing imagery. The authors supply a comprehensive classification system and rigorous mathematical description of advanced and state-of-the-art methods for pansharpening of multispectral images, fusion of hyperspectral and panchromatic images, and fusion of data from heterogeneous sensors such as optical and synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images and integration of thermal and visible/near-infrared images. They also explore new trends of signal/image processing, such as

  15. Beam dancer fusion device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maier, H.B.

    1984-01-01

    To accomplish fusion of two or more fusion fuel elements numerous minute spots of energy or laser light are directed to a micro target area, there to be moved or danced about by a precision mechanical controlling apparatus at the source of the laser light or electromagnetic energy beams, so that merging and coinciding patterns of light or energy beams can occur around the area of the fuel atoms or ions. The projecting of these merging patterns may be considered as target searching techniques to locate responsive clusters of fuel elements and to compress such elements into a condition in which fusion may occur. Computerized programming may be used

  16. Fusion Reactor Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Decreton, M.

    2001-01-01

    The objective of SCK-CEN's programme on fusion reactor materials is to contribute to the knowledge on the behaviour of fusion reactor materials and components during and after irradiation. Ongoing projects include: the study of the mechanical behaviour of structural materials under neutron irradiation; the investigation of the characteristics of irradiated first wall material such as beryllium; the detection of abrupt electrical degradation of insulating ceramics under high temperature and neutron irradiation; and the study of dismantling and waste disposal strategy for fusion reactors. Progress and achievements in these areas in 2000 are discussed

  17. Japanese fusion research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uchida, T.

    1987-01-01

    The Japan experience during thirty years in nuclear fusion research is reported, after attending the 1st Geneva Conference in 1955, Osaka University, immedeately began linear pinch study using capacitor bank discharge. Subsequently to his trial several groups were organized to ward fusion R and D at universities in Tokyo, Nagoya, Kyoto, Sendai and son on. Based upon the recommendation of Japan Science Council, Institut of Plasma Physics (IPP) was established at Nagoya University in 1961 When the 1st International Conference on Plasma Physics and Controlled Nuclear Fusion Research was held in Saltzburg. The gloomy Bohm barrier had stood in front of many of experiments at that time. (author) [pt

  18. Extreme Maximum Land Surface Temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garratt, J. R.

    1992-09-01

    There are numerous reports in the literature of observations of land surface temperatures. Some of these, almost all made in situ, reveal maximum values in the 50°-70°C range, with a few, made in desert regions, near 80°C. Consideration of a simplified form of the surface energy balance equation, utilizing likely upper values of absorbed shortwave flux (1000 W m2) and screen air temperature (55°C), that surface temperatures in the vicinity of 90°-100°C may occur for dry, darkish soils of low thermal conductivity (0.1-0.2 W m1 K1). Numerical simulations confirm this and suggest that temperature gradients in the first few centimeters of soil may reach 0.5°-1°C mm1 under these extreme conditions. The study bears upon the intrinsic interest of identifying extreme maximum temperatures and yields interesting information regarding the comfort zone of animals (including man).

  19. Inertial thermonuclear fusion by laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watteau, J.P.

    1993-12-01

    The principles of deuterium tritium (DT) magnetic or inertial thermonuclear fusion are given. Even if results would be better with heavy ions beams, most of the results on fusion are obtained with laser beams. Technical and theoretical aspects of the laser fusion are presented with an extrapolation to the future fusion reactor. (A.B.). 34 refs., 17 figs

  20. Inertial fusion commercial power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Logan, B.G.

    1994-01-01

    This presentation discusses the motivation for inertial fusion energy, a brief synopsis of five recently-completed inertial fusion power plant designs, some general conclusions drawn from these studies, and an example of an IFE hydrogen synfuel plant to suggest that future fusion studies consider broadening fusion use to low-emission fuels production as well as electricity

  1. Why and how of fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miley, G.H.

    1977-01-01

    The potential advantages of fusion power are listed. The approaches to plasma containment are mentioned and the status of the fusion program is described. The ERDA and EPRI programs are discussed. The Fusion Energy Foundation's activities are mentioned. Fusion research at the U. of Ill. is described briefly

  2. Fusion in the energy system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fusion energy is the fundamental energy source of the Universe, as the energy of the Sun and the stars are produced by fusion of e.g. hydrogen to helium. Fusion energy research is a strongly international endeavor aiming at realizing fusion energy production in power plants on Earth. Reaching...... of integration into the future electricity system and socio-economic studies of fusion energy will be presented, referring to the programme of Socio-Economic Research on Fusion (SERF) under the European Fusion Energy Agreement (EFDA)....

  3. Recent results on fusion and direct reactions with weakly bound stable nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shrivastava, A.

    2011-01-01

    Recent measurements of fusion and direct reactions in case of weakly bound stable nuclei at extreme sub-barrier energies using a sensitive off beam technique are presented. First section deals with deep sub-barrier fusion cross-section measurement for 67 Li + 198 Pt followed by the study of fragment capture reaction of 7 Li + 198 Pt. Deviation in the slope of the fusion excitation function, as observed in case of medium heavy systems, is absent in the present asymmetric systems at these low energies. This study shows the absence of fusion hindrance, suggesting modifications in models that explain deep sub-barrier fusion data to incorporate weakly bound asymmetric systems

  4. Fusion-power demonstration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henning, C.D.; Logan, B.G.; Carlson, G.A.; Neef, W.S.; Moir, R.W.; Campbell, R.B.; Botwin, R.; Clarkson, I.R.; Carpenter, T.J.

    1983-01-01

    As a satellite to the MARS (Mirror Advanced Reactor Study) a smaller, near-term device has been scoped, called the FPD (Fusion Power Demonstration). Envisioned as the next logical step toward a power reactor, it would advance the mirror fusion program beyond MFTF-B and provide an intermediate step toward commercial fusion power. Breakeven net electric power capability would be the goal such that no net utility power would be required to sustain the operation. A phased implementation is envisioned, with a deuterium checkout first to verify the plasma systems before significant neutron activation has occurred. Major tritium-related facilities would be installed with the second phase to produce sufficient fusion power to supply the recirculating power to maintain the neutral beams, ECRH, magnets and other auxiliary equipment

  5. International aspects of fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stacey, W.M. Jr.

    1979-12-01

    International collaborative efforts in magnetic confinement fusion in which the USA is involved are reviewed. These efforts are carried under the auspices of international agencies and through bilateral agreements

  6. Magnetic fusion energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1978-01-01

    The efforts of the Chemical Technology Division in the area of fusion energy include fuel handling, processing, and containment. These studies are closely coordinated with the ORNL Fusion Energy Division. Current experimental studies are concerned with the development of vacuum pumps for fusion reactors, the evaluation and development of techniques for recovering tritium (fuel) from either solid or liquid lithium containing blankets, and the use of deep beds of sorbents as roughing pumps and/or transfer operations. In addition, a small effort is devoted to the support of the ORNL design of The Next Step (TNS) in tokamak reactor development. The more applied studies--vacuum pump development and TNS design--are funded by the DOE/Magnetic Fusion Energy, and the more fundamental studies--blanket recovery and sorption in deep beds--are funded by the DOE/Basic Energy Sciences

  7. Fusion technology programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finken, D.

    1984-04-01

    KfK participates to the Fusion Technology Programme of the European Community. Most of the work in progress addresses the Next European Torus (NET) and the long term technology aspects as defined in the 82/86 programme. A minor part serves to preparation of future contributions and to design studies on fusion concepts in a wider perspective. The Fusion Technology Programme of Euratom covers mainly aspects of nuclear engineering. Plasma engineering, heating, refueling and vacuum technology are at present part of the Physics Programme. In view of NET, integration of the different areas of work will be mandatory. KfK is therefore prepared to address technical aspects beyond the actual scope of the physics experiments. The technology tasks are reported project wise under title and code of the Euratom programme. Most of the projects described here are shared with other European fusion laboratories as indicated in the table annexed to this report. (orig./GG)

  8. Fusion-breeder program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moir, R.W.

    1982-01-01

    The various approaches to a combined fusion-fission reactor for the purpose of breeding 239 Pu and 233 U are described. Design aspects and cost estimates for fuel production and electricity generation are discussed

  9. Cold nuclear fusion device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogino, Shinji.

    1991-01-01

    Selection of cathode material is a key to the attainment of cold nuclear fusion. However, there are only few reports on the cathode material at present and an effective development has been demanded. The device comprises an anode and a cathode and an electrolytic bath having metal salts dissolved therein and containing heavy water in a glass container. The anode is made of gold or platinum and the cathode is made of metals of V, Sr, Y, Nb, Hf or Ta, and a voltage of 3-25V is applied by way of a DC power source between them. The metal comprising V, Sr, Y, Nb, Hf or Ta absorbs deuterium formed by electrolysis of heavy water effectively to cause nuclear fusion reaction at substantially the same frequency and energy efficiency as palladium and titanium. Accordingly, a cold nuclear fusion device having high nuclear fusion generation frequency can be obtained. (N.H.)

  10. Cell fusions in mammals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsson, Lars-Inge; Bjerregaard, Bolette; Talts, Jan Fredrik

    2008-01-01

    Cell fusions are important to fertilization, placentation, development of skeletal muscle and bone, calcium homeostasis and the immune defense system. Additionally, cell fusions participate in tissue repair and may be important to cancer development and progression. A large number of factors appear...... to regulate cell fusions, including receptors and ligands, membrane domain organizing proteins, proteases, signaling molecules and fusogenic proteins forming alpha-helical bundles that bring membranes close together. The syncytin family of proteins represent true fusogens and the founding member, syncytin-1......, has been documented to be involved in fusions between placental trophoblasts, between cancer cells and between cancer cells and host ells. We review the literature with emphasis on the syncytin family and propose that syncytins may represent universal fusogens in primates and rodents, which work...

  11. Fusion Canada issue 11

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1990-06-01

    A short bulletin from the National Fusion Program. Included in this issue is a report on operation at Tokamak de Varennes, CRITIC irradiations at AECL, Tritium systems at TFTR, physics contribution at ITER. 4 figs.

  12. Fusion technology (FT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-01-01

    The annual report of tha fusion technology (FT) working group discusses the projects carried out by the participating institutes in the fields of 1) fuel injection and plasma heating, 2) magnetic field technology, and 3) systems investigations. (HK) [de

  13. Fusion technology development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-08-01

    This report includes information on the following chapters: (1) conceptual design studies, (2) magnetics, (3) plasma heating, fueling, and exhaust, (4) materials for fusion reactors, (5) alternate applications, and (6) environment and safety

  14. Fusion reactor materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rowcliffe, A.F.; Burn, G.L.; Knee', S.S.; Dowker, C.L.

    1994-02-01

    This is the fifteenth in a series of semiannual technical progress reports on fusion reactor materials. This report combines research and development activities which were previously reported separately in the following progress reports: Alloy Development for Irradiation Performance; Damage Analysis and Fundamental Studies; Special purpose Materials. These activities are concerned principally with the effects of the neutronic and chemical environment on the properties and performance of reactor materials; together they form one element of the overall materials programs being conducted in support of the Magnetic Fusion Energy Program of the U.S. Department of Energy. The Fusion Reactor Materials Program is a national effort involving several national laboratories, universities, and industries. The purpose of this series of reports is to provide a working technical record for the use of the program participants, and to provide a means of communicating the efforts of materials scientists to the rest of the fusion community, both nationally and worldwide

  15. Fusion cost normalization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulte, S.C.; Willke, T.L.

    1978-01-01

    The categorization and accounting methods described in this paper provide a common format that can be used to assess the economic character of magnetically confined fusion reactor design concepts. The format was developed with assistance from the fusion economics community, thus ensuring that the methods meet with the approval of potential users. The format will aid designers in the preparation of design concept cost estimates and also provide policy makers with a tool to assist in appraising which design concepts may be economically promising. Adherence to the format when evaluating prospective fusion reactor design concepts will result in the identification of the more promising concepts, thus enabling the fusion power alternatives with better economic potential to be quickly and efficiently developed

  16. Complimentary Advanced Fusion Exploration

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Alford, Mark G; Jones, Eric C; Bubalo, Adnan; Neumann, Melissa; Greer, Michael J

    2005-01-01

    .... The focus areas were in the following regimes: multi-tensor homographic computer vision image fusion, out-of-sequence measurement and track data handling, Nash bargaining approaches to sensor management, pursuit-evasion game theoretic modeling...

  17. Fusion plasma physics

    CERN Document Server

    Stacey, Weston M

    2012-01-01

    This revised and enlarged second edition of the popular textbook and reference contains comprehensive treatments of both the established foundations of magnetic fusion plasma physics and of the newly developing areas of active research. It concludes with a look ahead to fusion power reactors of the future. The well-established topics of fusion plasma physics -- basic plasma phenomena, Coulomb scattering, drifts of charged particles in magnetic and electric fields, plasma confinement by magnetic fields, kinetic and fluid collective plasma theories, plasma equilibria and flux surface geometry, plasma waves and instabilities, classical and neoclassical transport, plasma-materials interactions, radiation, etc. -- are fully developed from first principles through to the computational models employed in modern plasma physics. The new and emerging topics of fusion plasma physics research -- fluctuation-driven plasma transport and gyrokinetic/gyrofluid computational methodology, the physics of the divertor, neutral ...

  18. Fusion power demonstration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henning, C.D.; Logan, B.G.

    1983-01-01

    As a satellite to the MARS (Mirror Advanced Reactor Study) a smaller, near-term device has been scoped, called the FPD (Fusion Power Demonstration). Envisioned as the next logical step toward a power reactor, it would advance the mirror fusion program beyond MFTF-B and provide an intermediate step toward commercial fusion power. Breakeven net electric power capability would be the goal such that no net utility power would be required to sustain the operation. A phased implementation is envisioned, with a deuterium checkout first to verify the plasma systems before significant neutron activation has occurred. Major tritium-related facilities would be installed with the second phase to produce sufficient fusion power to supply the recirculating power to maintain the neutral beams, ECRH, magnets and other auxiliary equipment

  19. Optical Fiber Fusion Splicing

    CERN Document Server

    Yablon, Andrew D

    2005-01-01

    This book is an up-to-date treatment of optical fiber fusion splicing incorporating all the recent innovations in the field. It provides a toolbox of general strategies and specific techniques that the reader can apply when optimizing fusion splices between novel fibers. It specifically addresses considerations important for fusion splicing of contemporary specialty fibers including dispersion compensating fiber, erbium-doped gain fiber, polarization maintaining fiber, and microstructured fiber. Finally, it discusses the future of optical fiber fusion splicing including silica and non-silica based optical fibers as well as the trend toward increasing automation. Whilst serving as a self-contained reference work, abundant citations from the technical literature will enable readers to readily locate primary sources.

  20. Controlled thermonuclear fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakanaka, P.H.

    1984-01-01

    A simplified review on the status of the controlled thermonuclear fusion research aiming to present the motivation, objective, necessary conditions and adopted methods to reach the objective. (M.C.K.) [pt

  1. Fusion safety program plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crocker, J.G.; Holland, D.F.; Herring, J.S.

    1980-09-01

    The program plan consists of research that has been divided into 13 different areas. These areas focus on the radioactive inventories that are expected in fusion reactors, the energy sources potentially available to release a portion of these inventories, and analysis and design techniques to assess and ensure that the safety risks associated with operation of magnetic fusion facilities are acceptably low. The document presents both long-term program requirements that must be fulfilled as part of the commercialization of fusion power and a five-year plan for each of the 13 different program areas. Also presented is a general discussion of magnetic fusion reactor safety, a method for establishing priorities in the program, and specific priority ratings for each task in the five-year plan

  2. Fusion Revisits CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    It's going to be a hot summer at CERN. At least in the Main Building, where from 13 July to 20 August an exhibition is being hosted on nuclear fusion, the energy of the Stars. Nuclear fusion is the engine driving the stars but also a potential source of energy for mankind. The exhibition shows the different nuclear fusion techniques and research carried out on the subject in Europe. Inaugurated at CERN in 1993, following collaboration between Lausanne's CRPP-EPFL and CERN, with input from Alessandro Pascolini of Italy's INFN, this exhibition has travelled round Europe before being revamped and returning to CERN. 'Fusion, Energy of the Stars', from 13 July onwards, Main Building

  3. Fusion Simulation Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greenwald, Martin

    2011-01-01

    Many others in the fusion energy and advanced scientific computing communities participated in the development of this plan. The core planning team is grateful for their important contributions. This summary is meant as a quick overview the Fusion Simulation Program's (FSP's) purpose and intentions. There are several additional documents referenced within this one and all are supplemental or flow down from this Program Plan. The overall science goal of the DOE Office of Fusion Energy Sciences (FES) Fusion Simulation Program (FSP) is to develop predictive simulation capability for magnetically confined fusion plasmas at an unprecedented level of integration and fidelity. This will directly support and enable effective U.S. participation in International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) research and the overall mission of delivering practical fusion energy. The FSP will address a rich set of scientific issues together with experimental programs, producing validated integrated physics results. This is very well aligned with the mission of the ITER Organization to coordinate with its members the integrated modeling and control of fusion plasmas, including benchmarking and validation activities. (1). Initial FSP research will focus on two critical Integrated Science Application (ISA) areas: ISA1, the plasma edge; and ISA2, whole device modeling (WDM) including disruption avoidance. The first of these problems involves the narrow plasma boundary layer and its complex interactions with the plasma core and the surrounding material wall. The second requires development of a computationally tractable, but comprehensive model that describes all equilibrium and dynamic processes at a sufficient level of detail to provide useful prediction of the temporal evolution of fusion plasma experiments. The initial driver for the whole device model will be prediction and avoidance of discharge-terminating disruptions, especially at high performance, which are a critical

  4. The fusion dilemma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carruthers, R.

    1981-01-01

    The present position in fusion research is reviewed and discussed with relation to the requirements of an economic reactor. Meeting these requirements calls for a mission-oriented project of interdisciplinary character whose timely evolution from one with a research orientation, is a challenging management problem. The cost-effectiveness of future expenditure on fusion research is dependent upon acknowledging this challenge and realistically facing the difficult tasks which it presents. (U.K.)

  5. Possible fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshikawa, S.

    1976-05-01

    A scheme to improve performance characteristics of a tokamak-type fusion reactor is proposed. Basically, the tokamak-type plasma could be moved around so that the plasma could be heated by compression, brought to the region where the blanket surrounds the plasma, and moved so as to keep wall loading below the acceptable limit. This idea should be able to help to economize a fusion reactor

  6. Fusion power plant economics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, R.L.

    1996-01-01

    The rationale, methodology, and updated comparative results of cost projections for magnetic-fusion-energy central-station electric power plants are considered. Changing market and regulatory conditions, particularly in the U.S., prompt fundamental reconsideration of what constitutes a competitive future energy-source technology and has implications for the direction and emphasis of appropriate near-term research and development programs, for fusion and other advanced generation systems. 36 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs

  7. Sonoluminescence and bubble fusion

    OpenAIRE

    Arakeri, Vijay H

    2003-01-01

    Sonoluminescence (SL), the phenomenon of light emission from nonlinear motion of a gas bubble, involves an extreme degree of energy focusing. The conditions within the bubble during the last stages of the nearly catastrophic implosion are thought to parallel the efforts aimed at developing inertial confinement fusion. A limited review on the topic of SL and its possible connection to bubble nuclear fusion is presented here. The emphasis is on looking for a link between the various forms o...

  8. Fusion reactor materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1977-01-01

    The following topics are briefly discussed: (1) surface blistering studies on fusion reactor materials, (2) TFTR design support activities, (3) analysis of samples bombarded in-situ in PLT, (4) chemical sputtering effects, (5) modeling of surface behavior, (6) ion migration in glow discharge tube cathodes, (7) alloy development for irradiation performance, (8) dosimetry and damage analysis, and (9) development of tritium migration in fusion devices and reactors

  9. Bringing together fusion research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leiser, M.

    1982-01-01

    The increasing involvement of the IAEA in fusion, together with the growing efforts devoted to this area, are described. The author puts forward the idea that one of the most important aspects of this involvement is in providing a world-wide forum for scientists. The functions of the IFRC (International Fusion Research Council) as an advisory group are outlined, and the role played by IFRC in the definition and objectives of INTOR (International Tokamak Reactor) are briefly described

  10. Fusion Canada issue 13

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    A short bulletin from the National Fusion Program. Included in this issue is a report on Canada's plans to participate in the Engineering Design Activities (EDA), bilateral meetings with Canada and the U.S., committee meeting with Canada-Europe, an update at Tokamak de Varennes on Plasma Biasing experiments and boronized graphite tests, fusion materials research at the University of Toronto using a dual beam accelerator and a review of the CFFTP and the CCFM. 2 figs

  11. Conference on Norwegian fusion research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The question of instituting a systematic research programme in Norway on aspects of thermonuclear and plasma physics has been raised. The conference here reported was intended to provide basic information on the status of fusion research internationally and to discuss a possible Norwegian programme. The main contributions covered the present status of fusion research, international cooperation, fusion research in small countries and minor laboratories, fusion research in Denmark and Sweden, and a proposed fusion experiment in Bergen. (JIW)

  12. System for memorizing maximum values

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozeman, Richard J., Jr.

    1992-08-01

    The invention discloses a system capable of memorizing maximum sensed values. The system includes conditioning circuitry which receives the analog output signal from a sensor transducer. The conditioning circuitry rectifies and filters the analog signal and provides an input signal to a digital driver, which may be either linear or logarithmic. The driver converts the analog signal to discrete digital values, which in turn triggers an output signal on one of a plurality of driver output lines n. The particular output lines selected is dependent on the converted digital value. A microfuse memory device connects across the driver output lines, with n segments. Each segment is associated with one driver output line, and includes a microfuse that is blown when a signal appears on the associated driver output line.

  13. Remarks on the maximum luminosity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardoso, Vitor; Ikeda, Taishi; Moore, Christopher J.; Yoo, Chul-Moon

    2018-04-01

    The quest for fundamental limitations on physical processes is old and venerable. Here, we investigate the maximum possible power, or luminosity, that any event can produce. We show, via full nonlinear simulations of Einstein's equations, that there exist initial conditions which give rise to arbitrarily large luminosities. However, the requirement that there is no past horizon in the spacetime seems to limit the luminosity to below the Planck value, LP=c5/G . Numerical relativity simulations of critical collapse yield the largest luminosities observed to date, ≈ 0.2 LP . We also present an analytic solution to the Einstein equations which seems to give an unboundedly large luminosity; this will guide future numerical efforts to investigate super-Planckian luminosities.

  14. Maximum mutual information regularized classification

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Jim Jing-Yan

    2014-09-07

    In this paper, a novel pattern classification approach is proposed by regularizing the classifier learning to maximize mutual information between the classification response and the true class label. We argue that, with the learned classifier, the uncertainty of the true class label of a data sample should be reduced by knowing its classification response as much as possible. The reduced uncertainty is measured by the mutual information between the classification response and the true class label. To this end, when learning a linear classifier, we propose to maximize the mutual information between classification responses and true class labels of training samples, besides minimizing the classification error and reducing the classifier complexity. An objective function is constructed by modeling mutual information with entropy estimation, and it is optimized by a gradient descend method in an iterative algorithm. Experiments on two real world pattern classification problems show the significant improvements achieved by maximum mutual information regularization.

  15. Scintillation counter, maximum gamma aspect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thumim, A.D.

    1975-01-01

    A scintillation counter, particularly for counting gamma ray photons, includes a massive lead radiation shield surrounding a sample-receiving zone. The shield is disassembleable into a plurality of segments to allow facile installation and removal of a photomultiplier tube assembly, the segments being so constructed as to prevent straight-line access of external radiation through the shield into radiation-responsive areas. Provisions are made for accurately aligning the photomultiplier tube with respect to one or more sample-transmitting bores extending through the shield to the sample receiving zone. A sample elevator, used in transporting samples into the zone, is designed to provide a maximum gamma-receiving aspect to maximize the gamma detecting efficiency. (U.S.)

  16. Maximum mutual information regularized classification

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Jim Jing-Yan; Wang, Yi; Zhao, Shiguang; Gao, Xin

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, a novel pattern classification approach is proposed by regularizing the classifier learning to maximize mutual information between the classification response and the true class label. We argue that, with the learned classifier, the uncertainty of the true class label of a data sample should be reduced by knowing its classification response as much as possible. The reduced uncertainty is measured by the mutual information between the classification response and the true class label. To this end, when learning a linear classifier, we propose to maximize the mutual information between classification responses and true class labels of training samples, besides minimizing the classification error and reducing the classifier complexity. An objective function is constructed by modeling mutual information with entropy estimation, and it is optimized by a gradient descend method in an iterative algorithm. Experiments on two real world pattern classification problems show the significant improvements achieved by maximum mutual information regularization.

  17. Effects of successive critical distances in heavy ion fusion reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, S.M.; Nakagawa, T.; Matsuse, T.

    1984-01-01

    The concept of Successive Critical Distances is presented. It appears that whether the fusion cross section is limited by compound nucleus or entrance channel properties depends on the degree of asymmetry of the fusing nuclei. Only in the near to symmetry case does the Statistical Yrast Line emerge as a limiting factor. Otherwise, the critical angular momentum for fusion is restricted by a critical distance

  18. Study of fusion probabilities with halo nuclei using different proximity based potentials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumari, Raj

    2013-01-01

    We study fusion of halo nuclei with heavy targets using proximity based potentials due to Aage Winther (AW) 95, Bass 80 and Proximity 2010. In order to consider the extended matter distribution of halo nuclei, the nuclei radii borrowed from cross section measurements are included in these potentials. Our study reveals that the barrier heights are effectively reduced and fusion cross sections are appreciably enhanced by including extended radii of these nuclei. We also find that the extended sizes of halos contribute towards enhancement of fusion probabilities in case of proton halo nuclei, but, contribute to transfer or break-up process rather than fusion yield in case of neutron halo nuclei

  19. Status of fusion technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohan, Ashok

    1978-01-01

    The current status of fusion technology is surveyed. Limited reserves of fossil fuel and dangers of proliferation from nuclear reactors have brought into focus the need to develop an optional energy source. Fusion is being looked upon as an optional energy source which is free from environmental hazards unlike fossil fuels and nuclear reactors. Investments in R and D of fusion energy have increased rapidly in USA, Japan, USSR and European countries. Out of the various fusion fuels known, a mixture of D and T is widely chosen. The main problem in fusion technology is the confinement of plasma for a time sufficient to start the fusion reaction. This can be done magnetically or inertially. The three approaches to magnetic confinement are : (1) tokamak, (2) mirror and (3) pinch. Inertial confinement makes use of lasers or electron beams or ion beams. Both the methods of confinement i.e. magnetic and inertial have problems which are identified and their nature is discussed. (M.G.B.)

  20. Energy from inertial fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-03-01

    This book contains 22 articles on inertial fusion energy (IFE) research and development written in the framework of an international collaboration of authors under the guidance of an advisory group on inertial fusion energy set up in 1991 to advise the IAEA. It describes the actual scientific, engineering and technological developments in the field of inertial confinement fusion (ICF). It also identifies ways in which international co-operation in ICF could be stimulated. The book is intended for a large audience and provides an introduction to inertial fusion energy and an overview of the various technologies needed for IFE power plants to be developed. It contains chapters on (i) the fundamentals of IFE; (ii) inertial confinement target physics; (iii) IFE power plant design principles (requirements for power plant drivers, solid state laser drivers, gas laser drivers, heavy ion drivers, and light ion drivers, target fabrication and positioning, reaction chamber systems, power generation and conditioning and radiation control, materials management and target materials recovery), (iv) special design issues (radiation damage in structural materials, induced radioactivity, laser driver- reaction chamber interfaces, ion beam driver-reaction chamber interfaces), (v) inertial fusion energy development strategy, (vi) safety and environmental impact, (vii) economics and other figures of merit; (viii) other uses of inertial fusion (both those involving and not involving implosions); and (ix) international activities. Refs, figs and tabs

  1. Perspectives of fusion power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jensen, V.O.

    1984-01-01

    New and practically inexhaustible sources of energy must be developed for the period when oil, coal and uranium will become scarce and expensive. Nuclear fusion holds great promise as one of these practically inexhaustible energy sources. Based on the deuteriumtritium reaction with tritium obtained from naturally occuring lithium, which is also widely available in Europe, the accessible energy resources in the world are 3.10 12 to 3.10 16 toe; based on the deuterium-deuterium reaction, the deuterium content of the oceans corresponds to 10 20 toe. It is presently envisaged that in order to establish fusion as a large-scale energy source, three major thresholds must be reached: - Scientific feasibility, - Technical feasibility, i.e. the proof that the basic technical problems of the fusion reactor can be solved. - Commercial feasibility, i.e. proof that fusion power reactors can be built on an industrial scale, can be operated reliably and produce usable energy at prices competitive with other energy sources. From the above it is clear that the route to commercial fusion will be long and costly and involve the solution of extremely difficult technical problems. In view of the many steps which have to be taken, it appears unlikely that commercial fusion power will be in general use within the next 50 years and by that time world-wide expenditure on research, development and demonstration may well have exceeded 100 Bio ECU. (author)

  2. Fusion of 110Pd with 110Pd

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morawek, W.

    1991-07-01

    In the framework of this thesis the excitation functions of the systems 110 Pd + 110 Pd and 110 Pd + 104 Ru could be measured. The evaporation-residual-nucleus cross sections is deviating from lighter systems dominated by channels, which arise from evaporation of α particles. In the reaction 110 Pd + 110 Pd no xn channels were observed. In comparison to other reactions qualitatively a strong fusion hindrance of this system is shown. (orig./HSI) [de

  3. Atomic resonances in nuclear fusion plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clauser, C. F.; Barrachina, R. O.

    2013-01-01

    We present a study of zero energy resonances of photoionization and radiative recombination cross section for the different species in a fusion reactor. In this context, the interaction potential is screened and its typical length depends on the plasma density and temperature. Due to the nature of these resonances, we propose other atomic processes in which they can take place. Finally, we show the density and temperature conditions where these resonances occur and their probable consequence on the reactor performance. (author)

  4. Polarization: A must for fusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Didelez J.-P.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The complete polarization of DT fuel would increase the fusion reactivity by 50% in magnetic as well as in inertial confinements. The persistence of polarization in a fusion process could be tested, using a terawatt laser hitting a polarized HD target. The polarized deuterons heated in the plasma induced by the laser can fuse producing a 3He and a neutron in the final state. The angular distribution of the emitted neutrons and the change in the corresponding total Cross Section (CS can sign the polarization persistence. The polarization of solid H2, D2 or T2 Hydrogen isotopes is very difficult. However, it has been possible to polarize HD, a hetero-molecular form of Hydrogen, by static polarization, at very low temperature and very high field. The radioactivity of DT molecules forbids there high polarization by the static method, therefore one has to develop the Dynamic Nuclear Polarization (DNP by RF transitions. The DNP of HD has been investigated in the past. The magnetic properties of HD and DT molecules are very similar, it is therefore expected that any polarization result obtained with HD could be extrapolated to DT.

  5. Controlled thermonuclear fusion: research on magnetic fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paris, P.J.

    1988-12-01

    Recent progress in thermonuclear fusion research indicates that the scientists' schedule for the demonstration of the scientific feasibility will be kept and that break-even will be attained in the course of the next decade. To see the implementation of ignition, however, the generation of future experiments must be awaited. These projects are currently under study. With technological research going on in parallel, they should at the same time contribute to the design of a reactor. Fusion reactors will be quite different from the fission nuclear reactors we know, and the waste of the plants will also be of a different nature. It is still too early to define the precise design of a fusion reactor. On the basis of a toric machine concept like that of the tokamak, we can, however, envisage that the problems with which we are confronted will be solved one after the other. As we have just seen, these will be the objectives of the future experimental installations where ignition will be possible and where the flux of fast neutrons will be so strong that they will allow the study of low-activation materials which will be used in the structure of the reactor. But this is also a task in which from now onwards numerous laboratories in Europe and in the world participate. The works are in fact punctiform, and often the mutual incidences can only be determined by an approach simulated by numerical codes. (author) 19 figs., 6 tabs., 8 refs

  6. Multifocus Image Fusion in Q-Shift DTCWT Domain Using Various Fusion Rules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yingzhong Tian

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Multifocus image fusion is a process that integrates partially focused image sequence into a fused image which is focused everywhere, with multiple methods proposed in the past decades. The Dual Tree Complex Wavelet Transform (DTCWT is one of the most precise ones eliminating two main defects caused by the Discrete Wavelet Transform (DWT. Q-shift DTCWT was proposed afterwards to simplify the construction of filters in DTCWT, producing better fusion effects. A different image fusion strategy based on Q-shift DTCWT is presented in this work. According to the strategy, firstly, each image is decomposed into low and high frequency coefficients, which are, respectively, fused by using different rules, and then various fusion rules are innovatively combined in Q-shift DTCWT, such as the Neighborhood Variant Maximum Selectivity (NVMS and the Sum Modified Laplacian (SML. Finally, the fused coefficients could be well extracted from the source images and reconstructed to produce one fully focused image. This strategy is verified visually and quantitatively with several existing fusion methods based on a plenty of experiments and yields good results both on standard images and on microscopic images. Hence, we can draw the conclusion that the rule of NVMS is better than others after Q-shift DTCWT.

  7. Parameter study toward economical magnetic fusion power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Tomoaki; Okano, Kunihiko; Nanahara, Toshiya; Hatayama, Akiyoshi; Yamaji, Kenji; Takuma, Tadashi.

    1996-01-01

    Although the R and D of nuclear fusion reactors has made a steady progress as seen in ITER project, it has become of little doubt that fusion power reactors require hugeness and enormous amount of construction cost as well as surmounting the physics and engineering difficulties. Therefore, it is one of the essential issues to investigate the prospect of realizing fusion power reactors. In this report we investigated the effects of physics and engineering improvements on the economics of ITER-like steady state tokamak fusion reactors using our tokamak system and costing analysis code. With the results of this study, we considered what is the most significant factor for realizing economical competitive fusion reactors. The results show that with the conventional TF coil maximum field (12T), physics progress in β-value (or Troyon coefficient) has the most considerable effect on the reduction of fusion plant COE (Cost of Electricity) while the achievement of H factor = 2-3 and neutron wall load =∼5MW/m 2 is necessary. The results also show that with the improvement of TF coil maximum field, reactors with a high aspect ratio are economically advantageous because of low plasma current driving power while the improvement of current density in the conductors and yield strength of support structures is indispensable. (author)

  8. Advanced fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomita, Yukihiro

    2003-01-01

    The main subjects on fusion research are now on D-T fueled fusion, mainly due to its high fusion reaction rate. However, many issues are still remained on the wall loading by the 14 MeV neutrons. In the case of D-D fueled fusion, the neutron wall loading is still remained, though the technology related to tritium breeding is not needed. The p- 6 Li and p- 11 B fueled fusions are not estimated to be the next generation candidate until the innovated plasma confinement technologies come in useful to achieve the high performance plasma parameters. The fusion reactor of D- 3 He fuels has merits on the smaller neutron wall loading and tritium handling. However, there are difficulties on achieving the high temperature plasma more than 100 keV. Furthermore the high beta plasma is needed to decrease synchrotron radiation loss. In addition, the efficiency of the direct energy conversion from protons coming out from fusion reaction is one of the key parameters in keeping overall power balance. Therefore, open magnetic filed lines should surround the plasma column. In this paper, we outlined the design of the commercial base reactor (ARTEMIS) of 1 GW electric output power configured by D- 3 He fueled FRC (Field Reversed Configuration). The ARTEMIS needs 64 kg of 3 He per a year. On the other hand, 1 million tons of 3 He is estimated to be in the moon. The 3 He of about 10 23 kg are to exist in gaseous planets such as Jupiter and Saturn. (Y. Tanaka)

  9. Ion beam inertial fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bangerter, R.O.

    1995-01-01

    About twenty years ago, A. W. Maschke of Brookhaven National Laboratory and R. L. Martin of Argonne National Laboratory recognized that the accelerators that have been developed for high energy and nuclear physics are, in many ways, ideally suited to the requirements of inertial fusion power production. These accelerators are reliable, they have a long operating life, and they can be efficient. Maschke and Martin noted that they can focus ion beams to small focal spots over distances of many meters and that they can readily operate at the high pulse repetition rates needed for commercial power production. Fusion, however, does impose some important new constraints that are not important for high energy or nuclear physics applications. The most challenging new constraint from a scientific standpoint is the requirement that the accelerator deliver more than 10 14 W of beam power to a small quantity (less than 100 mg) of matter. The most challenging constraint from an engineering standpoint is accelerator cost. Maschke showed theoretically that accelerators could produce adequate work. Heavy-ion fusion is widely recognized to be a promising approach to inertial fusion power production. It provides an excellent opportunity to apply methods and technology developed for basic science to an important societal need. The pulsed-power community has developed a complementary, parallel approach to ion beam fusion known as light-ion fusion. The talk will discuss both heavy-ion and light-ion fusion. It will explain target physics requirements and show how they lead to constraints on the usual accelerator parameters such as kinetic energy, current, and emittance. The talk will discuss experiments that are presently underway, specifically experiments on high-current ion sources and injectors, pulsed-power machines recirculating induction accelerators, and transverse beam combining. The talk will give a brief description of a proposed new accelerator called Elise

  10. Fusion Canada issue 29

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-10-01

    A short bulletin from the National Fusion Program highlighting in this issue Canada-Europe Accords: 5 year R and D collaboration for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) AECL is designated to arrange and implement the Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) and the ITER Engineering Design Activities (EDA) while EUROTAM is responsible for operating Europe's Fusion R and D programs plus MOU and EDA. The MOU includes tokamaks, plasma physics, fusion technology, fusion fuels and other approaches to fusion energy (as alternatives to tokamaks). STOR-M Tokamak was restarted at the University of Saskatchewan following upgrades to the plasma chamber to accommodate the Compact Toroid (CT) injector. The CT injector has a flexible attachment thus allowing for injection angle adjustments. Real-time video images of a single plasma discharge on TdeV showing that as the plasma density increases, in a linear ramp divertor, the plasma contact with the horizontal plate decreases while contact increases with the oblique plate. Damage-resistant diffractive optical elements (DOE) have been developed for Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) research by Gentac Inc. and the National Optics Institute, laser beam homogeniser and laser harmonic separator DOE can also be made using the same technology. Studies using TdeV indicate that a divertor will be able to pump helium from the tokamak with a detached-plasma divertor but helium extraction performance must first be improved, presently the deuterium:helium retention radio-indicates that in order to pump enough helium through a fusion reactor, too much deuterium-tritium fuel would be pumped out. 2 fig

  11. Advanced fusion reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tomita, Yukihiro [National Inst. for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu (Japan)

    2003-04-01

    The main subjects on fusion research are now on D-T fueled fusion, mainly due to its high fusion reaction rate. However, many issues are still remained on the wall loading by the 14 MeV neutrons. In the case of D-D fueled fusion, the neutron wall loading is still remained, though the technology related to tritium breeding is not needed. The p-{sup 6}Li and p-{sup 11}B fueled fusions are not estimated to be the next generation candidate until the innovated plasma confinement technologies come in useful to achieve the high performance plasma parameters. The fusion reactor of D-{sup 3}He fuels has merits on the smaller neutron wall loading and tritium handling. However, there are difficulties on achieving the high temperature plasma more than 100 keV. Furthermore the high beta plasma is needed to decrease synchrotron radiation loss. In addition, the efficiency of the direct energy conversion from protons coming out from fusion reaction is one of the key parameters in keeping overall power balance. Therefore, open magnetic filed lines should surround the plasma column. In this paper, we outlined the design of the commercial base reactor (ARTEMIS) of 1 GW electric output power configured by D-{sup 3}He fueled FRC (Field Reversed Configuration). The ARTEMIS needs 64 kg of {sup 3}He per a year. On the other hand, 1 million tons of {sup 3}He is estimated to be in the moon. The {sup 3}He of about 10{sup 23} kg are to exist in gaseous planets such as Jupiter and Saturn. (Y. Tanaka)

  12. Maximum entropy and Bayesian methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, C.R.; Erickson, G.J.; Neudorfer, P.O.

    1992-01-01

    Bayesian probability theory and Maximum Entropy methods are at the core of a new view of scientific inference. These 'new' ideas, along with the revolution in computational methods afforded by modern computers allow astronomers, electrical engineers, image processors of any type, NMR chemists and physicists, and anyone at all who has to deal with incomplete and noisy data, to take advantage of methods that, in the past, have been applied only in some areas of theoretical physics. The title workshops have been the focus of a group of researchers from many different fields, and this diversity is evident in this book. There are tutorial and theoretical papers, and applications in a very wide variety of fields. Almost any instance of dealing with incomplete and noisy data can be usefully treated by these methods, and many areas of theoretical research are being enhanced by the thoughtful application of Bayes' theorem. Contributions contained in this volume present a state-of-the-art overview that will be influential and useful for many years to come

  13. Comparison of instrumented anterior interbody fusion with instrumented circumferential lumbar fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madan, S S; Boeree, N R

    2003-12-01

    Posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) restores disc height, the load bearing ability of anterior ligaments and muscles, root canal dimensions, and spinal balance. It immobilizes the painful degenerate spinal segment and decompresses the nerve roots. Anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF) does the same, but could have complications of graft extrusion, compression and instability contributing to pseudarthrosis in the absence of instrumentation. The purpose of this study was to assess and compare the outcome of instrumented circumferential fusion through a posterior approach [PLIF and posterolateral fusion (PLF)] with instrumented ALIF using the Hartshill horseshoe cage, for comparable degrees of internal disc disruption and clinical disability. It was designed as a prospective study, comparing the outcome of two methods of instrumented interbody fusion for internal disc disruption. Between April 1994 and June 1998, the senior author (N.R.B.) performed 39 instrumented ALIF procedures and 35 instrumented circumferential fusion with PLIF procedures. The second author, an independent assessor (S.M.), performed the entire review. Preoperative radiographic assessment included plain radiographs, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and provocative discography in all the patients. The outcome in the two groups was compared in terms of radiological improvement and clinical improvement, measured on the basis of improvement of back pain and work capacity. Preoperatively, patients were asked to fill out a questionnaire giving their demographic details, maximum walking distance and current employment status in order to establish the comparability of the two groups. Patient assessment was with the Oswestry Disability Index, quality of life questionnaire (subjective), pain drawing, visual analogue scale, disability benefit, compensation status, and psychological profile. The results of the study showed a satisfactory outcome (scorelife questionnaire) score of 71.8% (28 patients) in

  14. Study of 9 Be + 29 Si system nuclear fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva Figueira, M.C. da.

    1991-01-01

    Fusion cross sections for the 9 Be + 29 Si system have been measured in the energy range between 17 and 38 MeV (lab) by detecting the evaporation residues with the time of flight technique. Angular distributions have been measured from 7.5 0 C to 35 0 C in the laboratory frame at E( 9 Be) = 26 and 38 MeV. The measured fusion cross sections are significantly smaller than the total reaction cross sections obtained from fits to the elastic scattering data in the same energy range. Comparison with existing data for compound systems with A= 38 shows that this effect can not be understood in terms of the statistical yrast line of the formed compound nucleus. A systematic analysis of the energy dependence of the ratio between the fusion cross section and the total reaction cross section, for the system 9 Be + 29 Si and many other available in the literature has been performed. The saturation value can be associated to the nucleon or cluster separation energy of the light nuclei participant in the collision, leading to an hindrance of the fusion cross section. (author)

  15. Myoblast fusion in Drosophila

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haralalka, Shruti [Stowers Institute for Medical Research, Kansas City, MO 64110 (United States); Abmayr, Susan M., E-mail: sma@stowers.org [Stowers Institute for Medical Research, Kansas City, MO 64110 (United States); Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, MO 66160 (United States)

    2010-11-01

    The body wall musculature of a Drosophila larva is composed of an intricate pattern of 30 segmentally repeated muscle fibers in each abdominal hemisegment. Each muscle fiber has unique spatial and behavioral characteristics that include its location, orientation, epidermal attachment, size and pattern of innervation. Many, if not all, of these properties are dictated by founder cells, which determine the muscle pattern and seed the fusion process. Myofibers are then derived from fusion between a specific founder cell and several fusion competent myoblasts (FCMs) fusing with as few as 3-5 FCMs in the small muscles on the most ventral side of the embryo and as many as 30 FCMs in the larger muscles on the dorsal side of the embryo. The focus of the present review is the formation of the larval muscles in the developing embryo, summarizing the major issues and players in this process. We have attempted to emphasize experimentally-validated details of the mechanism of myoblast fusion and distinguish these from the theoretically possible details that have not yet been confirmed experimentally. We also direct the interested reader to other recent reviews that discuss myoblast fusion in Drosophila, each with their own perspective on the process . With apologies, we use gene nomenclature as specified by Flybase (http://flybase.org) but provide Table 1 with alternative names and references.

  16. Fusion, magnetic confinement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berk, H.L.

    1992-01-01

    An overview is presented of the principles of magnetic confinement of plasmas for the purpose of achieving controlled fusion conditions. Sec. 1 discusses the different nuclear fusion reactions which can be exploited in prospective fusion reactors and explains why special technologies need to be developed for the supply of tritium or 3 He, the probable fuels. In Sec. 2 the Lawson condition, a criterion that is a measure of the quality of confinement relative to achieving fusion conditions, is explained. In Sec. 3 fluid equations are used to describe plasma confinement. Specific confinement configurations are considered. In Sec. 4 the orbits of particle sin magneti and electric fields are discussed. In Sec. 5 stability considerations are discussed. It is noted that confinement systems usually need to satisfy stability constraints imposed by ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) theory. The paper culminates with a summary of experimental progress in magnetic confinement. Present experiments in tokamaks have reached the point that the conditions necessary to achieve fusion are being satisfied

  17. Fusion technology programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finken, D.

    1986-05-01

    In 1982, KfK joined the fusion programme of EURATOM as a further association introducing its experience in nuclear technology. KfK closely cooperates with IPP Garching, the two institutions forming a research unit aiming at planning and realization of future development steps of fusion. KfK has combined its forces in the Nuclear Fusion Project (PKF) with participation of several KfK departments to the project tasks. Previous work of KfK in magnetic fusion has addressed mainly superconducting magnets, plasma heating by cluster ions and studies on structural materials. At present, emphasis of our work has concentrated increasingly on the nuclear part, i.e. the first wall and blanket structures and the elements of the tritium extraction and purification system. Associated to this component development are studies of remote maintenance and safety. Most of the actual work addresses NET, the next step to a demonstration of fusion feasibility. NET is supposed to follow JET, the operating plasma physics experiment of Euratom, on the 1990's. Detailed progress of the work in the past half year is described in this report. (orig./GG)

  18. Challenges of nuclear fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kunkel, W.B.

    1987-01-01

    After 30 years of research and development in many countries, the magnetic confinement fusion experiments finally seem to be getting close to the original first goal: the point of ''scientific break-even''. Plans are being made for a generation of experiments and tests with actual controlled thermonuclear fusion conditions. Therefore engineers and material scientists are hard at work to develop the required technology. In this paper the principal elements of a generic fusion reactor are described briefly to introduce the reader to the nature of the problems at hand. The main portion of the presentation summarises the recent advances made in this field and discusses the major issues that still need to be addressed in regard to materials and technology for fusion power. Specific examples are the problems of the first wall and other components that come into direct contact with the plasma, where both lifetime and plasma contamination are matters of concern. Equally challenging are the demands on structural materials and on the magnetic-field coils, particularly in connection with the neutron-radiation environment of fusion reactors. Finally, the role of ceramics must be considered, both for insulators and for fuel breeding purposes. It is evident that we still have a formidable task before us, but at this point none of the problems seem to be insoluble. (author)

  19. The need for fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Llewellyn Smith, Chris

    2005-01-01

    World energy use is predicted to double in the next 40 years. Currently 80% is provided by burning fossil fuels, but this is not sustainable indefinitely because (i) it is driving climate change, and (ii) fossil fuels will eventually be exhausted (starting with oil). The resulting potential energy crisis requires increased investment in energy research and development (which is currently very small on the scale of the $3 trillion p.a. energy market, and falling). The wide portfolio of energy work that should be supported must include fusion, which is one of the very few options that are capable in principle of supplying a large fraction of need. The case for fusion has been strengthened by recent advances in plasma physics and fusion technology that are reflected in the forthcoming European Fusion Power Plant Conceptual Study, which addresses safety and cost issues. The big questions are - How can we deliver fusion power as fast as possible? How long is it likely to take? I argue for a fast track programme, and describe a fast-track model developed at Culham, which is intended to stimulate debate on the way ahead and the resources that are needed

  20. Myoblast fusion in Drosophila

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haralalka, Shruti; Abmayr, Susan M.

    2010-01-01

    The body wall musculature of a Drosophila larva is composed of an intricate pattern of 30 segmentally repeated muscle fibers in each abdominal hemisegment. Each muscle fiber has unique spatial and behavioral characteristics that include its location, orientation, epidermal attachment, size and pattern of innervation. Many, if not all, of these properties are dictated by founder cells, which determine the muscle pattern and seed the fusion process. Myofibers are then derived from fusion between a specific founder cell and several fusion competent myoblasts (FCMs) fusing with as few as 3-5 FCMs in the small muscles on the most ventral side of the embryo and as many as 30 FCMs in the larger muscles on the dorsal side of the embryo. The focus of the present review is the formation of the larval muscles in the developing embryo, summarizing the major issues and players in this process. We have attempted to emphasize experimentally-validated details of the mechanism of myoblast fusion and distinguish these from the theoretically possible details that have not yet been confirmed experimentally. We also direct the interested reader to other recent reviews that discuss myoblast fusion in Drosophila, each with their own perspective on the process . With apologies, we use gene nomenclature as specified by Flybase (http://flybase.org) but provide Table 1 with alternative names and references.

  1. Material for fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abhishek, Anuj; Ranjan, Prem

    2011-01-01

    To make nuclear fusion power a reality, the scientists are working restlessly to find the materials which can confine the power generated by the fusion of two atomic nuclei. A little success in this field has been achieved, though there are still miles to go. Fusion reaction is a special kind of reaction which must occur at very high density and temperature to develop extremely large amount of energy, which is very hard to control and confine within using the present techniques. As a whole it requires the physical condition that rarely exists on the earth to carry out in an efficient manner. As per the growing demand and present scenario of the world energy, scientists are working round the clock to make effective fusion reactions to real. In this paper the work presently going on is considered in this regard. The progress of the Joint European Torus 2010, ITER 2005, HiPER and minor works have been studied to make the paper more object oriented. A detailed study of the technological and material requirement has been discussed in the paper and a possible suggestion is provided to make a contribution in the field of building first ever nuclear fusion reactor

  2. Coatings for fusion reactor environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mattox, D.M.

    1979-01-01

    The internal surfaces of a tokamak fusion reactor control the impurity injection and gas recycling into the fusion plasma. Coating of internal surfaces may provide a desirable and possibly necessary design flexibility for achieving the temperatures, ion densities and containment times necessary for net energy production from fusion reactions to take place. In this paper the reactor environments seen by various componentare reviewed along with possible materials responses. Characteristics of coating-substrate systems, important to fusion applications, are delineated and the present status of coating development for fusion applications is reviewed. Coating development for fusion applications is just beginning and poses a unique and important challenge for materials development

  3. Fusion: Energy for the future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-05-01

    Fusion, which occurs in the sun and the stars, is a process of transforming matter into energy. If we can harness the fusion process on Earth, it opens the way to assuring that future generations will not want for heat and electric power. The purpose of this booklet is to introduce the concept of fusion energy as a viable, environmentally sustainable energy source for the twenty-first century. The booklet presents the basic principles of fusion, the global research and development effort in fusion, and Canada's programs for fusion research and development

  4. Fusion and particle transfer around the Coulomb-Barrier in intermediate systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pascholati, P.R.

    1989-01-01

    The most important characteristics of fusion reactions below and around the Coulomb-barrier are summarized. Experimental fusion cross sections for typical systems are discussed and compared with current formulae obtained from semi-classical and quantum tunneling approaches. The influence of nucleons transfer in the enhancement of the fusion cross section below the Coulomb-barrier is also shown. Sub-barrier fusion cross sections for the systems 35,37 Cl + 58,64 Ni and 33 S + 90,91,92 Zr, and near-barrier cross sections of all important transfer channels have been measured using the XTU-TANDEM at Legnaro, Italy. In 35,37 Cl + 58,64 Ni systems, the motivation further investigated was the influence of the valence proton in the enhancement of the sub-barrier fusion cross section. The data are discussed in comparison with the similar data of 34,36 S + 58,64 Ni with the aim of revealing the influence of coupled proton transfer channels. Calculations were performed using the simplified coupled channel code CCFUS including ''pick-up'' of one and two neutrons and ''stripping'' of two neutrons channels. Signatures of positive Q-values transfer channels coupled to fusion were clearly identified. For the 33 S + 90,91,92 Zr systems taking into account the coupling effects between transfer and fusion and using the semi-classical approach, transfer form-factors were extracted and succesfully employed to described the isotopic effects in fusion enhancement. (Author) [es

  5. Maximum entropy principal for transportation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bilich, F.; Da Silva, R.

    2008-01-01

    In this work we deal with modeling of the transportation phenomenon for use in the transportation planning process and policy-impact studies. The model developed is based on the dependence concept, i.e., the notion that the probability of a trip starting at origin i is dependent on the probability of a trip ending at destination j given that the factors (such as travel time, cost, etc.) which affect travel between origin i and destination j assume some specific values. The derivation of the solution of the model employs the maximum entropy principle combining a priori multinomial distribution with a trip utility concept. This model is utilized to forecast trip distributions under a variety of policy changes and scenarios. The dependence coefficients are obtained from a regression equation where the functional form is derived based on conditional probability and perception of factors from experimental psychology. The dependence coefficients encode all the information that was previously encoded in the form of constraints. In addition, the dependence coefficients encode information that cannot be expressed in the form of constraints for practical reasons, namely, computational tractability. The equivalence between the standard formulation (i.e., objective function with constraints) and the dependence formulation (i.e., without constraints) is demonstrated. The parameters of the dependence-based trip-distribution model are estimated, and the model is also validated using commercial air travel data in the U.S. In addition, policy impact analyses (such as allowance of supersonic flights inside the U.S. and user surcharge at noise-impacted airports) on air travel are performed.

  6. Research on spherically converging ion-beam fusion neutron source for the fundamental research of atomic energy. JAERI's nuclear research promotion program, H10-050. Contract research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshikawa, Kiyoshi; Inoue, Nobuyuki; Yamazaki, Tetsuo

    2002-03-01

    Potential well formation due to space charge associated with spherically converging ion beams plays a key and essential role in the beam-beam colliding fusion, which is the major mechanism of the Inertial Electrostatic Confinement Fusion (IECF) devices. Many theoretical results so far predicted strongly localized potential well formation, and actually for the past 30 years, many experiments were dedicated to clarify this mechanism, but neither could provide definitive evidence. In this study, we succeeded for the first time in the world in observing the double-well potential profile by use of the laser-induced fluorescence method that makes use of Stark effects, which put a period to the controverse for 30 years on the existence of the double-well potential profile. Furthermore, aiming at demonstrating a numerical prediction of a strongly nonlinear dependence of the fusion reaction rate on the discharge current on negligence of the charge exchange processes, triple-grid auxiliary system was introduced in order to reduce the operating gas pressure, with a successful result of reducing the pressure down to 1/5 of the conventional one required for glow discharge with single-grid system. Also, we measured accelerated atoms' kinetic energies through Doppler shift spectroscopy, and found the maximum energy increases proportionally to the applied voltage, which implies an enhancement of the fusion reaction cross-section with an increasing applied voltage in the near future. (author)

  7. Nuclear fusion in a solid body

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romodanov, V.A.; Savin, V.I.; Shakhurin, M.V.; Chernyavskij, V.T.; Pustovit, A.E.

    1991-01-01

    The present work was aimed at investigating a possibility to have a fusion reaction during the interaction of gaseous deuterium with various metals under conditions of glow discharge. It is shown that neutron flux which presumably occurs due to the reaction of nuclear fusion exceeded the background level two times maximum for such materials as Cr, Pd, B, Li. A conclusion is made that for the recording of neutrons which can be generated under bombardment of material surfaces with accelerated ions an additional shielding of standard recorders is required against electromagnetic oscillations both in the input circuits and power supply circuits. A significant increase of tritium concentration in deuterium was recorded (by mass spectrometry and β activity measurement) during the passage of the latter through the metal being bombarded with accelerated ions from glow discharge plasma

  8. Vacuum engineering for fusion research and fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pittenger, L.C.

    1976-01-01

    The following topics are described: (1) surface pumping by cryogenic condensation, (2) operation of large condensing cryopumps, (3) pumping for large fusion experiments, and (4) vacuum technology for fusion reactors

  9. Controlled thermonuclear fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trocheris, M.

    1975-01-01

    An outline is given of the present position of research into controlled fusion. After a brief reminder of the nuclear reactions of fusion and the principle of their use as a source of energy, the results obtained by the method of magnetic confinement are summarized. Among the many solutions that have been imagined and tried out to achieve a magnetic containing vessel capable of holding the thermonuclear plasma, the devices of the Tokamak type have a good lead and that is why they are described in greater detail. An idea is then given of the problems that arise when one intends conceiving the thermonuclear reactor based on the principle of the Tokamaks. The last section deals with fusion by lasers which is a new and most attractive alternative, at least from the viewpoint of basis physics. The report concludes with an indication of the stages to be passed through to reach production of energy on an industrial scale [fr

  10. Peaceful Uses of Fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teller, E.

    1958-07-03

    Applications of thermonuclear energy for peaceful and constructive purposes are surveyed. Developments and problems in the release and control of fusion energy are reviewed. It is pointed out that the future of thermonuclear power reactors will depend upon the construction of a machine that produces more electric energy than it consumes. The fuel for thermonuclear reactors is cheap and practically inexhaustible. Thermonuclear reactors produce less dangerous radioactive materials than fission reactors and, when once brought under control, are not as likely to be subject to dangerous excursions. The interaction of the hot plasma with magnetic fields opens the way for the direct production of electricity. It is possible that explosive fusion energy released underground may be harnessed for the production of electricity before the same feat is accomplished in controlled fusion processes. Applications of underground detonations of fission devices in mining and for the enhancement of oil flow in large low-specific-yield formations are also suggested.

  11. Ceramics for fusion applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clinard, F.W. Jr.

    1987-01-01

    Ceramics are required for a variety of uses in both near-term fusion devices and in commercial powerplants. These materials must retain adequate structural and electrical properties under conditions of neutron, particle and ionizing irradiation; thermal and applied stresses; and physical and chemical sputtering. Ceramics such as Al 2 O 3 , MgAl 2 O 4 , BeO, Si 3 N 4 and SiC are currently under study for fusion applications, and results to date show widely-varying responses to the fusion environment. Materials can be identified today that will meet initial operating requirements, but improvements in physical properties are needed to achieve satisfactory lifetimes for critical applications. (author)

  12. Inverse fusion PCR cloning.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus Spiliotis

    Full Text Available Inverse fusion PCR cloning (IFPC is an easy, PCR based three-step cloning method that allows the seamless and directional insertion of PCR products into virtually all plasmids, this with a free choice of the insertion site. The PCR-derived inserts contain a vector-complementary 5'-end that allows a fusion with the vector by an overlap extension PCR, and the resulting amplified insert-vector fusions are then circularized by ligation prior transformation. A minimal amount of starting material is needed and experimental steps are reduced. Untreated circular plasmid, or alternatively bacteria containing the plasmid, can be used as templates for the insertion, and clean-up of the insert fragment is not urgently required. The whole cloning procedure can be performed within a minimal hands-on time and results in the generation of hundreds to ten-thousands of positive colonies, with a minimal background.

  13. Laser for fusion energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holzrichter, J.F.

    1995-01-01

    Solid state lasers have proven to be very versatile tools for the study and demonstration of inertial confinement fusion principles. When lasers were first contemplated to be used for the compression of fusion fuel in the late 1950s, the laser output energy levels were nominally one joule and the power levels were 10 3 watts (pulse duration's of 10 -3 sec). During the last 25 years, lasers optimized for fusion research have been increased in power to typically 100,000 joules with power levels approaching 10 14 watts. As a result of experiments with such lasers at many locations, DT target performance has been shown to be consistent with high gain target output. However, the demonstration of ignition and gain requires laser energies of several megajoules. Laser technology improvements demonstrated over the past decade appear to make possible the construction of such multimegajoule lasers at affordable costs. (author)

  14. Ceramics for fusion applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clinard, F.W. Jr.

    1986-01-01

    Ceramics are required for a variety of uses in both near-term fusion devices and in commercial powerplants. These materials must retain adequate structural and electrical properties under conditions of neutron, particle, and ionizing irradiation; thermal and applied stresses; and physical and chemical sputtering. Ceramics such as Al 2 O 3 , MgAl 2 O 4 , BeO, Si 3 N 4 and SiC are currently under study for fusion applications, and results to date show widely-varying response to the fusion environment. Materials can be identified today which will meet initial operating requirements, but improvements in physical properties are needed to achieve satisfactory lifetimes for critical applications

  15. Fusion Reactor Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Decreton, M

    2002-04-01

    The objective of SCK-CEN's programme on fusion reactor materials is to contribute to the knowledge on the radiation-induced behaviour of fusion reactor materials and components as well as to help the international community in building the scientific and technical basis needed for the construction of the future reactor. Ongoing projects include: the study of the mechanical and chemical (corrosion) behaviour of structural materials under neutron irradiation and water coolant environment; the investigation of the characteristics of irradiated first wall material such as beryllium; investigations on the management of materials resulting from the dismantling of fusion reactors including waste disposal. Progress and achievements in these areas in 2001 are discussed.

  16. Fusion reactor wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, J.R.

    1976-01-01

    The fusion reactor currently is being developed as a clean source of electricity with an essentially infinite source of fuel. These reactors are visualized as using a fusion reaction to generate large quantities of high temperature energy which can be used as process heat or for the generation of electricity. The energy would be created primarily as the kinetic energy of neutrons or other reaction products. Neutron energy could be converted to high-temperature heat by moderation and capture of the neutrons. The energy of other reaction products could be converted to high-temperature heat by capture, or directly to electricity by direct conversion electrostatic equipment. An analysis to determine the wastes released as a result of operation of fusion power plants is presented

  17. Heavy ion inertial fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keefe, D.; Sessler, A.M.

    1980-01-01

    Inertial fusion has not yet been as well explored as magnetic fusion but can offer certain advantages as an alternative source of electric energy for the future. Present experiments use high-power beams from lasers and light-ion diodes to compress the deuterium-tritium (D-T) pellets but these will probably be unsuitable for a power plant. A more promising method is to use intense heavy-ion beams from accelerator systems similar to those used for nuclear and high-energy physics; the present paper addresses itself to this alternative. As will be demonstrated the very high beam power needed poses new design questions, from the ion-source through the accelerating system, the beam transport system, to the final focus. These problems will require extensive study, both theoretically and experimentally, over the next several years before an optimum design for an inertial fusion driver can be arrived at. (Auth.)

  18. On impact fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winterberg, F.

    1997-01-01

    Impact fusion is a promising, but much less developed road towards inertial confinement fusion. It offers an excellent solution to the so-called stand-off problem for thermonuclear microexplosions but is confronted with the challenge to accelerate macroscopic particles to the needed high velocities of 10 2 -10 3 km/s. To reach these velocities, two ways have been studied in the past. The electric acceleration of a beam of microparticles, with the particles as small as large clusters, and the magnetic acceleration of gram-size ferromagnetic or superconducting projectiles. For the generation of an intense burst of soft X-rays used for the indirect drive, impact fusion may offer new promising possibilities

  19. Fusion research at ORNL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-03-01

    The ORNL Fusion Program includes the experimental and theoretical study of two different classes of magnetic confinement schemes - systems with helical magnetic fields, such as the tokamak and stellarator, and the ELMO Bumpy Torus (EBT) class of toroidally linked mirror systems; the development of technologies, including superconducting magnets, neutral atomic beam and radio frequency (rf) heating systems, fueling systems, materials, and diagnostics; the development of databases for atomic physics and radiation effects; the assessment of the environmental impact of magnetic fusion; and the design of advanced demonstration fusion devices. The program involves wide collaboration, both within ORNL and with other institutions. The elements of this program are shown. This document illustrates the program's scope; and aims by reviewing recent progress

  20. Canadian fusion program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, T.S.

    1982-06-01

    The National Research Council of Canada is establishing a coordinated national program of fusion research and development that is planned to grow to a total annual operating level of about $20 million in 1985. The long-term objective of the program is to put Canadian industry in a position to manufacture sub-systems and components of fusion power reactors. In the near term the program is designed to establish a minimum base of scientific and technical expertise sufficient to make recognized contributions and thereby gain access to the international effort. The Canadian program must be narrowly focussed on a few specializations where Canada has special indigenous skills or technologies. The programs being funded are the Tokamak de Varennes, the Fusion Fuels Technology Project centered on tritium management, and high-power gas laser technology and associated diagnostic instrumentation

  1. Ceramics for fusion devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clinard, F.W. Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Ceramics are required for a number of applications in fusion devices, among the most critical of which are magnetic coil insulators, windows for RF heating systems, and structural uses. Radiation effects dominate consideration of candidate materials, although good pre-irradiation properties are a requisite. Materials and components can be optimized by careful control of chemical and microstructural content, and application of brittle material design and testing techniques. Future directions for research and development should include further extension of the data base in the areas of electrical, structural, and thermal properties; establishment of a fission neutron/fusion neutron correlation including transmutation gas effects; and development of new materials tailored to meet the specific needs of fusion reactors

  2. Heavy ion inertial fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keefe, D.; Sessler, A.M.

    1980-07-01

    Inertial fusion has not yet been as well explored as magnetic fusion but can offer certain advantages as an alternative source of electric energy for the future. Present experiments use high-power beams from lasers and light-ion diodes to compress the deuterium-tritium (D-T) pellets but these will probably be unsuitable for a power plant. A more promising method is to use intense heavy-ion beams from accelerator systems similar to those used for nuclear and high-energy physics; the present paper addresses itself to this alternative. As will be demonstrated the very high beam power needed poses new design questions, from the ion source through the accelerating system, the beam transport system, to the final focus. These problems will require extensive study, both theoretically and experimentally, over the next several years before an optimum design for an inertial fusion driver can be arrived at

  3. Alternate laser fusion drivers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pleasance, L.D.

    1979-11-01

    One objective of research on inertial confinement fusion is the development of a power generating system based on this concept. Realization of this goal will depend on the availability of a suitable laser or other system to drive the power plant. The primary laser systems used for laser fusion research, Nd 3+ : Glass and CO 2 , have characteristics which may preclude their use for this application. Glass lasers are presently perceived to be incapable of sufficiently high average power operation and the CO 2 laser may be limited by and issues associated with target coupling. These general perceptions have encouraged a search for alternatives to the present systems. The search for new lasers has been directed generally towards shorter wavelengths; most of the new lasers discovered in the past few years have been in the visible and ultraviolet region of the spectrum. Virtually all of them have been advocated as the most promising candidate for a fusion driver at one time or another

  4. Advanced fuels for nuclear fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McNally, J.R. Jr.

    1974-01-01

    Should magnetic confinement of hot plasma prove satisfactory at high β (16 πnkT//sub B 2 / greater than 0.1), thermonuclear fusion fuels other than D.T may be contemplated for future fusion reactors. The prospect of the advanced fusion fuels D.D and 6 Li.D for fusion reactors is quite promising provided the system is large, well reflected and possesses a high β. The first generation reactions produce the very active, energy-rich fuels t and 3 He which exhibit a high burnup probability in very hot plasmas. Steady state burning of D.D can ensue in a 60 kG field, 5 m reactor for β approximately 0.2 and reflectivity R/sub mu/ = 0.9 provided the confinement time is about 38 sec. The feasibility of steady state burning of 6 Li.D has not yet been demonstrated but many important features of such systems still need to be incorporated in the reactivity code. In particular, there is a need for new and improved nuclear cross section data for over 80 reaction possibilities

  5. Angular-momentum effects in subbarrier fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halbert, M.L.; Beene, J.R.

    1993-01-01

    It has been known since about 1980 that fusion of heavy ions is greatly enhanced below the Coulomb barrier compared with normal barrier-penetration expectations. The excitation function for fusion of 64 Ni + 100 Mo measured in collaboration with a group at Washington University shows the effect clearly. The barrier energy is about 142 MeV; the lowest point is at about 90% of the barrier energy. The dotted curve is the prediction of a one-dimensional-barrier-penetration calculation of a type that reproduces the fusion of light projectiles very well. Several theoretical approaches have been successful in explaining the enhancement seen in much of the excitation-function data, but it cannot be said that a full understanding of the physics is in hand even after more than a decade of hard work. In fact, the reasonable success of several rather different models shows that the underlying phenomena are not well understood. Other types of data might be helpful in distinguishing among the many different theoretical approaches. An important kind of information not measured in most of the experiments is the dependence on ell, the angular momentum of the fusing system. We obtained such information on the cross sections, σ ell, as a function of ell for the fusion of 64 Ni and 100 Mo using the Spin Spectrometer. This paper will first review the experimental method and data and then present results from a more sophisticated analysis of the same data

  6. Fusion excitation functions involving transitional nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rehm, K.E.; Jiang, C.L.; Esbensen, H. [and others

    1995-08-01

    Measurements of fusion excitation functions involving transitional nuclei {sup 78}Kr and {sup 100}Mo showed a different behavior at low energies, if compared to measurements with {sup 86}Kr and {sup 92}Mo. This points to a possible influence of nuclear structure on the fusion process. One way to characterize the structure of vibrational nuclei is via their restoring force parameters C{sub 2} which can be calculated from the energy of the lowest 2{sup +} state and the corresponding B(E2) value. A survey of the even-even nuclei between A = 28-150 shows strong variations in C{sub 2} values spanning two orders of magnitude. The lowest values for C{sub 2} are observed for {sup 78}Kr, {sup 104}Ru and {sup 124}Xe followed by {sup 74,76}Ge, {sup 74,76}Se, {sup 100}Mo and {sup 110}Pd. In order to learn more about the influence of {open_quotes}softness{close_quotes} on the sub-barrier fusion enhancement, we measured cross sections for evaporation residue production for the systems {sup 78}Kr + {sup 104}Ru and {sup 78}Kr + {sup 76}Ge with the gas-filled magnet technique. For both systems, fusion excitation functions involving the closed neutron shell nucleus {sup 86}Kr were measured previously. The data are presently being analyzed.

  7. Detailed determination of the fusion nuclear radius in reactions involving weakly bound projectiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomez Camacho, A.; Aguilera, E. F.; Quiroz, E. M.

    2007-01-01

    A detailed determination of the fusion radius parameter is performed within the Distorted Wave Born Approximation for reactions involving weakly bound projectiles. Specifically, a simultaneous X 2- analysis of elastic and fusion cross section data is done using a Woods-Saxon potential with volume and surface parts. The volume part is assumed to be responsible for fusion reactions while the surface part for all other direct reactions. It is proved that in order to fit fusion data, particularly for energies below the Coulomb barrier where fusion is enhanced, it is necessary to have a value of around 1.4 fm for the fusion radial parameter of the fusion potential (W F ). This value is much higher than that frequently used in Barrier Penetration models (1.0 fm). The calculations are performed for reactions involving the weakly bound projectile 9 Be with several medium mass targets. (Author)

  8. Formation of a dinuclear complex in collisions between light nuclei and entrance channel limitations to fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shapira, D.; Shivakumar, B.; Ayik, S.; Harmon, B.A.

    1986-01-01

    A model for fusion of light nuclei has been proposed recently wherein fusion progresses through nucleus-nucleus capture via a dinuclear stage which acts as a doorway to fusion. While this model accounts for the fusion cross sections, it makes no attempt at predicting observables associated with the non-fusion part of the captured flux. A study of products from the decay of the dinuclear complex into non-fusion channels can provide a stringent test for such a model. In this contribution a model which addresses both the binary decay and the fusion of a dinuclear complex formed in the collision is described and model predictions are compared with data. Accompanying contributions discuss the formalism which is used to describe the evolution of the dinuclear complex and present new data which provide information that helps justify the approximations made in applying this model

  9. Last Glacial Maximum Salinity Reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homola, K.; Spivack, A. J.

    2016-12-01

    It has been previously demonstrated that salinity can be reconstructed from sediment porewater. The goal of our study is to reconstruct high precision salinity during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM). Salinity is usually determined at high precision via conductivity, which requires a larger volume of water than can be extracted from a sediment core, or via chloride titration, which yields lower than ideal precision. It has been demonstrated for water column samples that high precision density measurements can be used to determine salinity at the precision of a conductivity measurement using the equation of state of seawater. However, water column seawater has a relatively constant composition, in contrast to porewater, where variations from standard seawater composition occur. These deviations, which affect the equation of state, must be corrected for through precise measurements of each ion's concentration and knowledge of apparent partial molar density in seawater. We have developed a density-based method for determining porewater salinity that requires only 5 mL of sample, achieving density precisions of 10-6 g/mL. We have applied this method to porewater samples extracted from long cores collected along a N-S transect across the western North Atlantic (R/V Knorr cruise KN223). Density was determined to a precision of 2.3x10-6 g/mL, which translates to salinity uncertainty of 0.002 gms/kg if the effect of differences in composition is well constrained. Concentrations of anions (Cl-, and SO4-2) and cations (Na+, Mg+, Ca+2, and K+) were measured. To correct salinities at the precision required to unravel LGM Meridional Overturning Circulation, our ion precisions must be better than 0.1% for SO4-/Cl- and Mg+/Na+, and 0.4% for Ca+/Na+, and K+/Na+. Alkalinity, pH and Dissolved Inorganic Carbon of the porewater were determined to precisions better than 4% when ratioed to Cl-, and used to calculate HCO3-, and CO3-2. Apparent partial molar densities in seawater were

  10. Maximum Parsimony on Phylogenetic networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Phylogenetic networks are generalizations of phylogenetic trees, that are used to model evolutionary events in various contexts. Several different methods and criteria have been introduced for reconstructing phylogenetic trees. Maximum Parsimony is a character-based approach that infers a phylogenetic tree by minimizing the total number of evolutionary steps required to explain a given set of data assigned on the leaves. Exact solutions for optimizing parsimony scores on phylogenetic trees have been introduced in the past. Results In this paper, we define the parsimony score on networks as the sum of the substitution costs along all the edges of the network; and show that certain well-known algorithms that calculate the optimum parsimony score on trees, such as Sankoff and Fitch algorithms extend naturally for networks, barring conflicting assignments at the reticulate vertices. We provide heuristics for finding the optimum parsimony scores on networks. Our algorithms can be applied for any cost matrix that may contain unequal substitution costs of transforming between different characters along different edges of the network. We analyzed this for experimental data on 10 leaves or fewer with at most 2 reticulations and found that for almost all networks, the bounds returned by the heuristics matched with the exhaustively determined optimum parsimony scores. Conclusion The parsimony score we define here does not directly reflect the cost of the best tree in the network that displays the evolution of the character. However, when searching for the most parsimonious network that describes a collection of characters, it becomes necessary to add additional cost considerations to prefer simpler structures, such as trees over networks. The parsimony score on a network that we describe here takes into account the substitution costs along the additional edges incident on each reticulate vertex, in addition to the substitution costs along the other edges which are

  11. Fission-like decay of 20Ne: eccentric behavior in the B+B fusion processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toledo, A.S. de; Coimbra, M.M.; Added, N.; Anjos, R.M.; Carlin Filho, N.; Fante Junior, L.; Figueira, M.C.S.; Guimaraes, V.; Szanto, E.M.

    1988-08-01

    Cross sections for the fusion of 10,11 B+ 10,11 B have been measured in the energy range from 1.5 MeV/A to 5 MeV/A. The 10 B+ 10 B system unexpectedly presents a hindered fusion cross section when compared to the 10 B+ 11 B and 11 B+ 11 B reactions and to standard model predictions. The missing fusion cross section was diverted the 10 B exit channel with a total kinetic energy characteristic of strongly damped collisions. Q-values and kinematical analysis together with angular distributions suggest a binary symmetric decay of the composite 20 Ne system. (author) [pt

  12. Neutrons and fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maynard, C.W.

    1976-01-01

    The production of energy from fusion reactions does not require neutrons in the fundamental sense that they are required in a fission reactor. Nevertheless, the dominant fusion reaction, that between deuterium and tritium, yields a 14 MeV neutron. To contrast a fusion reactor based on this reaction with the fission case, 3 x 10 20 such neutrons produced per gigawatt of power. This is four times as many neutrons as in an equivalent fission reactor and they carry seven times the energy of the fission neutrons. Thus, they dominate the energy recovery problem and create technological problems comparable to the original plasma confinement problem as far as a practical power producing device is concerned. Further contrasts of the fusion and fission cases are presented to establish the general role of neutrons in fusion devices. Details of the energy deposition processes are discussed and those reactions necessary for producing additional tritium are outlined. The relatively high energy flux with its large intensity will activate almost any materials of which the reactor may be composed. This activation is examined from the point of view of decay heat, radiological safety, and long-term storage. In addition, a discussion of the deleterious effects of neutron interactions on materials is given in some detail; this includes the helium and hydrogen producing reactions and displacement rate of the lattice atoms. The various materials that have been proposed for structural purposes, for breeding, reflecting, and moderating neutrons, and for radiation shielding are reviewed from the nuclear standpoint. The specific reactions of interest are taken up for various materials and finally a report is given on the status and prospects of data for fusion studies

  13. Insulators for fusion applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-04-01

    Design studies for fusion devices and reactors have become more detailed in recent years and with this has come a better understanding of requirements and operating conditions for insulators in these machines. Ceramic and organic insulators are widely used for many components of fusion devices and reactors namely: radio frequency (RF) energy injection systems (BeO, Al 2 O 3 , Mg Al 2 O 4 , Si 3 N 4 ); electrical insulation for the torus structure (SiC, Al 2 O 3 , MgO, Mg Al 2 O 4 , Si 4 Al 2 O 2 N 6 , Si 3 N 4 , Y 2 O 3 ); lightly-shielded magnetic coils (MgO, MgAl 2 O 4 ); the toroidal field coil (epoxies, polyimides), neutron shield (B 4 C, TiH 2 ); high efficiency electrical generation; as well as the generation of very high temperatures for high efficiency hydrogen production processes (ZrO 2 and Al 2 O 3 - mat, graphite and carbon - felt). Timely development of insulators for fusion applications is clearly necessary. Those materials to be used in fusion machines should show high resistance to radiation damage and maintain their structural integrity. Now the need is urgent for a variety of radiation resistant materials, but much effort in these areas is required for insulators to be considered seriously by the design community. This document contains 14 papers from an IAEA meeting. It was the objective of this meeting to identify existing problems in analysing various situations of applications and requirements of electrical insulators and ceramics in fusion and to recommend strategies and different stages of implementation. This meeting was endorsed by the International Fusion Research Council

  14. International fusion research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pease, R.S.

    1983-01-01

    Nuclear energy of the light elements deuterium and lithium can be released if the 100 MK degree temperature required for deuterium-tritium thermonuclear fusion reactions can be achieved together with sufficient thermal insulation for a net energy yield. Progress of world-wide research shows good prospect for these physical conditions being achieved by the use of magnetic field confinement and of rapidly developing heating methods. Tokamak systems, alternative magnetic systems and inertial confinement progress are described. International co-operation features a number of bilateral agreements between countries: the Euratom collaboration which includes the Joint European Torus, a joint undertaking of eleven Western European nations of Euratom, established to build and operate a major confinement experiment; the development of co-operative projects within the OECD/IEA framework; the INTOR workshop, a world-wide study under IAEA auspices of the next major step in fusion research which might be built co-operatively; and assessments of the potential of nuclear fusion by the IAEA and the International Fusion Research Council. The INTOR (International Tokamak Reactor) studies have outlined a major plant of the tokamak type to study the engineering and technology of fusion reactor systems, which might be constructed on a world-wide basis to tackle and share the investment risks of the developments which lie ahead. This paper summarizes the recent progress of research on controlled nuclear fusion, featuring those areas where international co-operation has played an important part, and describes the various arrangements by which this international co-operation is facilitated. (author)

  15. Intense fusion neutron sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuteev, B. V.; Goncharov, P. R.; Sergeev, V. Yu.; Khripunov, V. I.

    2010-01-01

    The review describes physical principles underlying efficient production of free neutrons, up-to-date possibilities and prospects of creating fission and fusion neutron sources with intensities of 10 15 -10 21 neutrons/s, and schemes of production and application of neutrons in fusion-fission hybrid systems. The physical processes and parameters of high-temperature plasmas are considered at which optimal conditions for producing the largest number of fusion neutrons in systems with magnetic and inertial plasma confinement are achieved. The proposed plasma methods for neutron production are compared with other methods based on fusion reactions in nonplasma media, fission reactions, spallation, and muon catalysis. At present, intense neutron fluxes are mainly used in nanotechnology, biotechnology, material science, and military and fundamental research. In the near future (10-20 years), it will be possible to apply high-power neutron sources in fusion-fission hybrid systems for producing hydrogen, electric power, and technological heat, as well as for manufacturing synthetic nuclear fuel and closing the nuclear fuel cycle. Neutron sources with intensities approaching 10 20 neutrons/s may radically change the structure of power industry and considerably influence the fundamental and applied science and innovation technologies. Along with utilizing the energy produced in fusion reactions, the achievement of such high neutron intensities may stimulate wide application of subcritical fast nuclear reactors controlled by neutron sources. Superpower neutron sources will allow one to solve many problems of neutron diagnostics, monitor nano-and biological objects, and carry out radiation testing and modification of volumetric properties of materials at the industrial level. Such sources will considerably (up to 100 times) improve the accuracy of neutron physics experiments and will provide a better understanding of the structure of matter, including that of the neutron itself.

  16. Intense fusion neutron sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuteev, B. V.; Goncharov, P. R.; Sergeev, V. Yu.; Khripunov, V. I.

    2010-04-01

    The review describes physical principles underlying efficient production of free neutrons, up-to-date possibilities and prospects of creating fission and fusion neutron sources with intensities of 1015-1021 neutrons/s, and schemes of production and application of neutrons in fusion-fission hybrid systems. The physical processes and parameters of high-temperature plasmas are considered at which optimal conditions for producing the largest number of fusion neutrons in systems with magnetic and inertial plasma confinement are achieved. The proposed plasma methods for neutron production are compared with other methods based on fusion reactions in nonplasma media, fission reactions, spallation, and muon catalysis. At present, intense neutron fluxes are mainly used in nanotechnology, biotechnology, material science, and military and fundamental research. In the near future (10-20 years), it will be possible to apply high-power neutron sources in fusion-fission hybrid systems for producing hydrogen, electric power, and technological heat, as well as for manufacturing synthetic nuclear fuel and closing the nuclear fuel cycle. Neutron sources with intensities approaching 1020 neutrons/s may radically change the structure of power industry and considerably influence the fundamental and applied science and innovation technologies. Along with utilizing the energy produced in fusion reactions, the achievement of such high neutron intensities may stimulate wide application of subcritical fast nuclear reactors controlled by neutron sources. Superpower neutron sources will allow one to solve many problems of neutron diagnostics, monitor nano-and biological objects, and carry out radiation testing and modification of volumetric properties of materials at the industrial level. Such sources will considerably (up to 100 times) improve the accuracy of neutron physics experiments and will provide a better understanding of the structure of matter, including that of the neutron itself.

  17. Analysis of displacement damage in materials in nuclear fusion facilities (DEMO, IFMIF and TechnoFusion)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mota, F.; Vila, R.; Ortiz, C.; Garcia, A.; Casal, N.; Ibarra, A.; Rapisarda, D.; Queral, V.

    2011-01-01

    Present pathway to fusion reactors includes a rigorous material testing program. To reach this objective, irradiation facilities must produce the displacement damage per atom (dpa), primary knock-on atom (PKA) spectrum and gaseous elements by transmutation reactions (He, H) as closely as possible to the ones expected in the future fusion reactors (as DEMO).The irradiation parameters (PKA spectra and damage function) of some candidate materials for fusion reactors (Al 2 O 3 , SiC and Fe) have been studied and then, the suitability of some proposed experimental facilities, such as IFMIF and TechnoFusion, to perform relevant tests with these materials has been assessed.The following method has been applied: neutron fluxes present in different irradiation modules of IFMIF have been calculated by the neutron transport McDeLicious code. In parallel, the energy differential cross sections of PKA have been calculated by using the NJOY code. After that, the damage generated by the PKA spectra was analyzed using the MARLOWE code (binary collision approximation) and custom analysis codes. Finally, to analyze the ions effects in different irradiation conditions in the TechnoFusion irradiation area, the SRIM and Marlowe codes have been used. The results have been compared with the expected ones for a DEMO HCLL reactor.

  18. Analysis of displacement damage in materials in nuclear fusion facilities (DEMO, IFMIF and TechnoFusion)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mota, F., E-mail: fernando.mota@ciemat.es [Laboratorio Nacional de Fusion por Confinamiento Magnetico-CIEMAT, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Vila, R.; Ortiz, C.; Garcia, A.; Casal, N.; Ibarra, A.; Rapisarda, D.; Queral, V. [Laboratorio Nacional de Fusion por Confinamiento Magnetico-CIEMAT, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2011-10-15

    Present pathway to fusion reactors includes a rigorous material testing program. To reach this objective, irradiation facilities must produce the displacement damage per atom (dpa), primary knock-on atom (PKA) spectrum and gaseous elements by transmutation reactions (He, H) as closely as possible to the ones expected in the future fusion reactors (as DEMO).The irradiation parameters (PKA spectra and damage function) of some candidate materials for fusion reactors (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, SiC and Fe) have been studied and then, the suitability of some proposed experimental facilities, such as IFMIF and TechnoFusion, to perform relevant tests with these materials has been assessed.The following method has been applied: neutron fluxes present in different irradiation modules of IFMIF have been calculated by the neutron transport McDeLicious code. In parallel, the energy differential cross sections of PKA have been calculated by using the NJOY code. After that, the damage generated by the PKA spectra was analyzed using the MARLOWE code (binary collision approximation) and custom analysis codes. Finally, to analyze the ions effects in different irradiation conditions in the TechnoFusion irradiation area, the SRIM and Marlowe codes have been used. The results have been compared with the expected ones for a DEMO HCLL reactor.

  19. Is Self-Interacting Dark Matter Undergoing Dark Fusion?

    OpenAIRE

    McDermott, Samuel D.

    2018-01-01

    We suggest that two-to-two dark matter fusion may be the relaxation process that resolves the small-scale structure problems of the cold collisionless dark matter paradigm. In order for the fusion cross section to scale correctly across many decades of astrophysical masses from dwarf galaxies to galaxy clusters, we require the fractional binding energy released to be greater than vn∼(10−(2−3))n, where n=1, 2 depends on local dark sector chemistry. The size of the dark-sector interaction cross...

  20. Confinement inertial fusion. Power reactors of nuclear fusion by lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Velarde, G.; Ahnert, C.; Aragones, J.M.; Leira, G; Martinez-Val, J.M.

    1980-01-01

    The energy crisis and the need of the nuclear fusion energy are analized. The nuclear processes in the laser interation with the ablator material are studied, as well as the thermohydrodinamic processes in the implossion, and the neutronics of the fusion. The fusion reactor components are described and the economic and social impact of its introduction in the future energetic strategies.(author)