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Sample records for maximum boundary range

  1. The maximum intelligible range of the human voice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boren, Braxton

    This dissertation examines the acoustics of the spoken voice at high levels and the maximum number of people that could hear such a voice unamplified in the open air. In particular, it examines an early auditory experiment by Benjamin Franklin which sought to determine the maximum intelligible crowd for the Anglican preacher George Whitefield in the eighteenth century. Using Franklin's description of the experiment and a noise source on Front Street, the geometry and diffraction effects of such a noise source are examined to more precisely pinpoint Franklin's position when Whitefield's voice ceased to be intelligible. Based on historical maps, drawings, and prints, the geometry and material of Market Street is constructed as a computer model which is then used to construct an acoustic cone tracing model. Based on minimal values of the Speech Transmission Index (STI) at Franklin's position, Whitefield's on-axis Sound Pressure Level (SPL) at 1 m is determined, leading to estimates centering around 90 dBA. Recordings are carried out on trained actors and singers to determine their maximum time-averaged SPL at 1 m. This suggests that the greatest average SPL achievable by the human voice is 90-91 dBA, similar to the median estimates for Whitefield's voice. The sites of Whitefield's largest crowds are acoustically modeled based on historical evidence and maps. Based on Whitefield's SPL, the minimal STI value, and the crowd's background noise, this allows a prediction of the minimally intelligible area for each site. These yield maximum crowd estimates of 50,000 under ideal conditions, while crowds of 20,000 to 30,000 seem more reasonable when the crowd was reasonably quiet and Whitefield's voice was near 90 dBA.

  2. Maximum Principles and Boundary Value Problems for First-Order Neutral Functional Differential Equations

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    Domoshnitsky Alexander

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We obtain the maximum principles for the first-order neutral functional differential equation where , and are linear continuous operators, and are positive operators, is the space of continuous functions, and is the space of essentially bounded functions defined on . New tests on positivity of the Cauchy function and its derivative are proposed. Results on existence and uniqueness of solutions for various boundary value problems are obtained on the basis of the maximum principles.

  3. An Approximate Optimal Maximum Range Guidance Scheme for Subsonic Unpowered Gliding Vehicles

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    Dao-Chi Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates the maximum gliding range problems of subsonic unpowered gliding vehicles and proposes an approximate optimal maximum range guidance scheme. First, the gliding flight path angle corresponding to constant dynamic pressure is derived. A lift-to-drag ratio (L/D inversely proportional to the dynamic pressure is then proven. On this basis, the calculation method of an optimal dynamic pressure (ODP profile with a maximum L/D throughout the flight is presented. A guidance scheme for tracking the ODP profile, which uses the flight path angle as control variable, is then designed. The maximum ranges of the unpowered gliding vehicle obtained by the proposed guidance scheme and pseudospectral method are compared. Results show that the guidance scheme provides an accurate approximation of the optimal results, and the errors are less than 2%. The proposed guidance scheme is easy to implement and is not influenced by wind compared with numerical schemes.

  4. Finite element method for neutron transport. 7. Completely boundary-free maximum principle for the first-order Boltzmann equation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ackroyd, R.T. (UKAEA Risley Nuclear Power Development Establishment. Process Technology and Safety Directorate)

    1983-01-01

    A completely boundary-free maximum principle for the first-order Boltzmann equation is derived from the completely boundary-free maximum principle for the mixed-parity Boltzmann equation. When continuity is imposed on the trial function for directions crossing interfaces the completely boundary-free principle for the first-order Boltzmann equation reduces to a maximum principle previously established directly from first principles and indirectly by the Euler-Lagrange method. Present finite element methods for the first-order Boltzmann equation are based on a weighted-residual method which permits the use of discontinuous trial functions. The new principle for the first-order equation can be used as a basis for finite-element methods with the same freedom from boundary conditions as those based on the weighted-residual method. The extremum principle as the parent of the variationally-derived weighted-residual equations ensures their good behaviour.

  5. Maximum Range of a Projectile Thrown from Constant-Speed Circular Motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poljak, Nikola

    2016-01-01

    The problem of determining the angle ? at which a point mass launched from ground level with a given speed v[subscript 0] will reach a maximum distance is a standard exercise in mechanics. There are many possible ways of solving this problem, leading to the well-known answer of ? = p/4, producing a maximum range of D[subscript max] = v[superscript…

  6. Spreading to a limit: the time required for a neophyte to reach its maximum range

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Gassó, N.; Pyšek, Petr; Vila, M.; Williamson, M.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 16, č. 2 (2010), s. 310-311 ISSN 1366-9516 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC06073 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60050516 Keywords : plant invasions * maximum range * residence time Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 4.248, year: 2010

  7. Boundary value problem of Pontryagin's maximum principle in a two-sector economy model with an integral utility function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiselev, Yu. N.; Orlov, M. V.; Orlov, S. M.

    2015-11-01

    An infinite-horizon two-sector economy model with a Cobb-Douglas production function and a utility function that is an integral functional with discounting and a logarithmic integrand is investigated. The application of Pontryagin's maximum principle yields a boundary value problem with special conditions at infinity. The search for the solution of the maximum-principle boundary value problem is complicated by singular modes in its optimal solution. In the construction of the solution to the problem, they are described in analytical form. Additionally, a special version of the sweep method in continuous form is proposed, which is of interest from theoretical and computational points of view. An important result is the proof of the optimality of the extremal solution obtained by applying the maximum-principle boundary value problem.

  8. Completely boundary-free minimum and maximum principles for neutron transport and their least-squares and Galerkin equivalents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ackroyd, R.T. (UKAEA Risley Nuclear Power Development Establishment. Technical Services and Planning Directorate)

    1982-01-01

    Some minimum and maximum variational principles for even-parity neutron transport are reviewed and the corresponding principles for odd-parity transport are derived by a simple method to show why the essential boundary conditions associated with these maximum principles have to be imposed. The method also shows why both the essential and some of the natural boundary conditions associated with these minimum principles have to be imposed. These imposed boundary conditions for trial functions in the variational principles limit the choice of the finite element used to represent trial functions. The reasons for the boundary conditions imposed on the principles for even- and odd-parity transport point the way to a treatment of composite neutron transport, for which completely boundary-free maximum and minimum principles are derived from a functional identity. In general a trial function is used for each parity in the composite neutron transport, but this can be reduced to one without any boundary conditions having to be imposed.

  9. Continuity and boundary conditions in thermodynamics: From Carnot's efficiency to efficiencies at maximum power

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouerdane, H.; Apertet, Y.; Goupil, C.; Lecoeur, Ph.

    2015-07-01

    object of the article is thus to cover some of the milestones of thermodynamics, and show through the illustrative case of thermoelectric generators, our model heat engine, that the shift from Carnot's efficiency to efficienc ies at maximum power explains itself naturally as one considers continuity and boundary conditions carefully; indeed, as an adaptation of Friedrich Nietzche's quote, we may say that the thermodynamic demon is in the details. This article is supplemented with comments by J.M.R. Parrondo and a final reply by the authors.

  10. Maximum principles for a class of nonlinear second-order elliptic boundary value problems in divergence form

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    Cristian Enache

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available For a class of nonlinear elliptic boundary value problems in divergence form, we construct some general elliptic inequalities for appropriate combinations of u(x and |∇u|2, where u(x are the solutions of our problems. From these inequalities, we derive, using Hopf's maximum principles, some maximum principles for the appropriate combinations of u(x and |∇u|2, and we list a few examples of problems to which these maximum principles may be applied.

  11. Comparing methods to estimate Reineke’s maximum size-density relationship species boundary line slope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis L. VanderSchaaf; Harold E. Burkhart

    2010-01-01

    Maximum size-density relationships (MSDR) provide natural resource managers useful information about the relationship between tree density and average tree size. Obtaining a valid estimate of how maximum tree density changes as average tree size changes is necessary to accurately describe these relationships. This paper examines three methods to estimate the slope of...

  12. Maximum likelihood inference of geographic range evolution by dispersal, local extinction, and cladogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ree, Richard H; Smith, Stephen A

    2008-02-01

    In historical biogeography, model-based inference methods for reconstructing the evolution of geographic ranges on phylogenetic trees are poorly developed relative to the diversity of analogous methods available for inferring character evolution. We attempt to rectify this deficiency by constructing a dispersal-extinction-cladogenesis (DEC) model for geographic range evolution that specifies instantaneous transition rates between discrete states (ranges) along phylogenetic branches and apply it to estimating likelihoods of ancestral states (range inheritance scenarios) at cladogenesis events. Unlike an earlier version of this approach, the present model allows for an analytical solution to probabilities of range transitions as a function of time, enabling free parameters in the model, rates of dispersal, and local extinction to be estimated by maximum likelihood. Simulation results indicate that accurate parameter estimates may be difficult to obtain in practice but also show that ancestral range inheritance scenarios nevertheless can be correctly recovered with high success if rates of range evolution are low relative to the rate of cladogenesis. We apply the DEC model to a previously published, exemplary case study of island biogeography involving Hawaiian endemic angiosperms in Psychotria (Rubiaceae), showing how the DEC model can be iteratively refined from inspecting inferences of range evolution and also how geological constraints involving times of island origin may be imposed on the likelihood function. The DEC model is sufficiently similar to character models that it might serve as a gateway through which many existing comparative methods for characters could be imported into the realm of historical biogeography; moreover, it might also inspire the conceptual expansion of character models toward inclusion of evolutionary change as directly coincident, either as cause or consequence, with cladogenesis events. The DEC model is thus an incremental advance

  13. Impact of Wide-Ranging Nanoscale Chemistry on Band Structure at Cu(In, Ga)Se2 Grain Boundaries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stokes, Adam; Al-Jassim, Mowafak; Diercks, David; Clarke, Amy; Gorman, Brian

    2017-10-26

    The relative chemistry from grain interiors to grain boundaries help explain why grain boundaries may be beneficial, detrimental or benign towards device performance. 3D Nanoscale chemical analysis extracted from atom probe tomography (APT) (10's of parts-per-million chemical sensitivity and sub-nanometer spatial resolution) of twenty grain boundaries in a high-efficiency Cu(In, Ga)Se2 solar cell shows the matrix and alkali concentrations are wide-ranging. The concentration profiles are then related to band structure which provide a unique insight into grain boundary electrical performance. Fluctuating Cu, In and Ga concentrations result in a wide distribution of potential barriers at the valence band maximum (VBM) (-10 to -160 meV) and the conduction band minimum (CBM) (-20 to -70 meV). Furthermore, Na and K segregation is not correlated to hampering donors, (In, Ga)Cu and VSe, contrary to what has been previously reported. In addition, Na and K are predicted to be n-type dopants at grain boundaries. An overall band structure at grain boundaries is presented.

  14. BMRC: A Bitmap-Based Maximum Range Counting Approach for Temporal Data in Sensor Monitoring Networks

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    Bin Cao

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Due to the rapid development of the Internet of Things (IoT, many feasible deployments of sensor monitoring networks have been made to capture the events in physical world, such as human diseases, weather disasters and traffic accidents, which generate large-scale temporal data. Generally, the certain time interval that results in the highest incidence of a severe event has significance for society. For example, there exists an interval that covers the maximum number of people who have the same unusual symptoms, and knowing this interval can help doctors to locate the reason behind this phenomenon. As far as we know, there is no approach available for solving this problem efficiently. In this paper, we propose the Bitmap-based Maximum Range Counting (BMRC approach for temporal data generated in sensor monitoring networks. Since sensor nodes can update their temporal data at high frequency, we present a scalable strategy to support the real-time insert and delete operations. The experimental results show that the BMRC outperforms the baseline algorithm in terms of efficiency.

  15. Paleoglacier reconstruction of the central massif of Gredos range during Last Glacial Maximum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos, Néstor; Tanarro, Luis Miguel

    2017-04-01

    The accurate reconstruction of paleoglaciers require a well determined extent and morphology of them, one of the main problems is the absence of glacial geomorphic evidences which made possible the delimitation of the ice limits, for this reason physical-based models are useful for ice surface reconstruction in areas where geomorphological information is incomplete. A paleoglacier reconstruction during its maximum extension is presented for a high mountain area of the western part of the central massif of Gredos range, in the center of Iberian Peninsula, this area is located 30 km west of Almanzor (40˚ 14' 48? N; 5˚ 17' 52? W; 2596 m a.s.l.), the highest peak of Iberian Central System (ICS) and covers five gorges: La Nava, Taheña- Honda, La Vega, San Martín and Los Infiernos, the first three facing North, San Martin facing Northwest and Los Infiernos facing West. Despite the existence of some works analyzing the extension of paleoglaciers in the ICS during its maximum extension, there is still a need to improve the understanding of this zone, to provide a more detailed knowlegde of the evolution of the range and to know more in detail the full extent of paleoglaciers in this area. For delimitate the glaciated area the most distant frontal moraines with a larger geomorphological entity that indicates a great advance or a prolonged stay and stabilization which would presumably correspond with the maximum advance of the glaciers have been mapped, for that, photo interpretation of digital aerial photographs (25 cm resolution) has been done, in some areas where the location or limits of the moraines were not clear 3D images were used, all the work was complemented with detailed field surveys. Once the ice limits have been determined is necessary to estimate the topography of the paleoglaciers, for that purpose a simple steady-state models that assume a perfectly plastic ice rheology have been used, reconstructing the theoretical ice profiles and obtaining the extent

  16. Experimental study on influence of boundary on location of maximum velocity in open channel flows

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    Jing Yan

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The velocity dip phenomenon may occur in a part of or in the whole flow field of open channel flows due to the secondary flow effect. Based on rectangular flume experiments and the laser Doppler velocimetry, the influence of the distance to the sidewall and the aspect ratio on the velocity dip is investigated. Through application of statistical methods to the experimental results, it is proposed that the flow field may be divided into two regions, the relatively strong sidewall region and the relatively weak sidewall region. In the former region, the distance to the sidewall greatly affects the location of maximum velocity, and, in the latter region, both the distance to the sidewall and the aspect ratio influence the location of the maximum velocity.

  17. Reliability of speaking and maximum voice range measures in screening for dysphonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Estella; Robertson, Jennie; Radford, Claire; Vagne, Sarah; El-Halabi, Ruba; Yiu, Edwin

    2007-07-01

    Speech range profile (SRP) is a graphical display of frequency-intensity occurring interactions during functional speech activity. Few studies have suggested the potential clinical applications of SRP. However, these studies are limited to qualitative case comparisons and vocally healthy participants. The present study aimed to examine the effects of voice disorders on speaking and maximum voice ranges in a group of vocally untrained women. It also aimed to examine whether voice limit measures derived from SRP were as sensitive as those derived from voice range profile (VRP) in distinguishing dysphonic from healthy voices. Ninety dysphonic women with laryngeal pathologies and 35 women with normal voices, who served as controls, participated in this study. Each subject recorded a VRP for her physiological vocal limits. In addition, each subject read aloud the "North Wind and the Sun" passage to record SRP. All the recordings were captured and analyzed by Soundswell's computerized real-time phonetogram Phog 1.0 (Hitech Development AB, Täby, Sweden). The SRPs and the VRPs were compared between the two groups of subjects. Univariate analysis results demonstrated that individual SRP measures were less sensitive than the corresponding VRP measures in discriminating dysphonic from normal voices. However, stepwise logistic regression analyses revealed that the combination of only two SRP measures was almost as effective as a combination of three VRP measures in predicting the presence of dysphonia (overall prediction accuracy: 93.6% for SRP vs 96.0% for VRP). These results suggest that in a busy clinic where quick voice screening results are desirable, SRP can be an acceptable alternate procedure to VRP.

  18. Habitat Preferences and Growth of Ruditapes bruguieri (Bivalvia: Veneridae at the Northern Boundary of Its Range

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    Alla V. Silina

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This work is the first attempt to study growth and some morphological parameters of the clam Ruditapes bruguieri, as well as its habitat preferences. It is found that R. bruguieri lives on bottom sediments including pebble and coarse- and medium-grained sand with a slight admixture of silt. At the study area, this bivalve inhabits sea waters with good aeration, stable oceanic water salinity, and a high oxygen concentration. The annual fluctuations of the water temperature from 13-14°C (in winter to 22–29°C (in summer are close to the threshold temperature values, within which the species can exist. Near the boundary of the species range, along the Jeju Island coasts, south of Republic of Korea, 83.8% of all clams die during the coldest period of the year. Here, annual rings are formed on R. bruguieri shells during winter. The maximum age of R. bruguieri, determined during the study, is 6.5 years, but the clam samples contain mainly individuals at 3.0–3.5 years of age (34%. The largest clam dimensions are 36.0 × 26.5 mm (length × height of shell. At the study area, a usual shell length is 20.0–32.0 mm (75% of all the collected individuals.

  19. 40 CFR Table C-1 to Subpart C of... - Test Concentration Ranges, Number of Measurements Required, and Maximum Discrepancy Specification

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Test Concentration Ranges, Number of... Reference Methods Pt. 53, Subpt. C, Table C-1 Table C-1 to Subpart C of Part 53—Test Concentration Ranges, Number of Measurements Required, and Maximum Discrepancy Specification Pollutant Concentration range...

  20. Influence of Last Glacial Maximum boundary conditions on the global water isotope distribution in an atmospheric general circulation model

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    T. Tharammal

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available To understand the validity of δ18O proxy records as indicators of past temperature change, a series of experiments was conducted using an atmospheric general circulation model fitted with water isotope tracers (Community Atmosphere Model version 3.0, IsoCAM. A pre-industrial simulation was performed as the control experiment, as well as a simulation with all the boundary conditions set to Last Glacial Maximum (LGM values. Results from the pre-industrial and LGM simulations were compared to experiments in which the influence of individual boundary conditions (greenhouse gases, ice sheet albedo and topography, sea surface temperature (SST, and orbital parameters were changed each at a time to assess their individual impact. The experiments were designed in order to analyze the spatial variations of the oxygen isotopic composition of precipitation (δ18Oprecip in response to individual climate factors. The change in topography (due to the change in land ice cover played a significant role in reducing the surface temperature and δ18Oprecip over North America. Exposed shelf areas and the ice sheet albedo reduced the Northern Hemisphere surface temperature and δ18Oprecip further. A global mean cooling of 4.1 °C was simulated with combined LGM boundary conditions compared to the control simulation, which was in agreement with previous experiments using the fully coupled Community Climate System Model (CCSM3. Large reductions in δ18Oprecip over the LGM ice sheets were strongly linked to the temperature decrease over them. The SST and ice sheet topography changes were responsible for most of the changes in the climate and hence the δ18Oprecip distribution among the simulations.

  1. Boundary Associated Long Noncoding RNA Mediates Long-Range Chromosomal Interactions.

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    Ifeoma Jane Nwigwe

    Full Text Available CCCTC binding factor (CTCF is involved in organizing chromosomes into mega base-sized, topologically associated domains (TADs along with other factors that define sub-TAD organization. CTCF-Cohesin interactions have been shown to be critical for transcription insulation activity as it stabilizes long-range interactions to promote proper gene expression. Previous studies suggest that heterochromatin boundary activity of CTCF may be independent of Cohesin, and there may be additional mechanisms for defining topological domains. Here, we show that a boundary site we previously identified known as CTCF binding site 5 (CBS5 from the homeotic gene cluster A (HOXA locus exhibits robust promoter activity. This promoter activity from the CBS5 boundary element generates a long noncoding RNA that we designate as boundary associated long noncoding RNA-1 (blncRNA1. Functional characterization of this RNA suggests that the transcript stabilizes long-range interactions at the HOXA locus and promotes proper expression of HOXA genes. Additionally, our functional analysis also shows that this RNA is not needed in the stabilization of CTCF-Cohesin interactions however CTCF-Cohesin interactions are critical in the transcription of blncRNA1. Thus, the CTCF-associated boundary element, CBS5, employs both Cohesin and noncoding RNA to establish and maintain topologically associated domains at the HOXA locus.

  2. Method for computing short-range forces between solid-liquid interfaces driving grain boundary premelting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoyt, J. J.; Olmsted, David; Jindal, Saryu; Asta, Mark; Karma, Alain

    2009-02-01

    We present a molecular dynamics based method for accurately computing short-range structural forces resulting from the overlap of spatially diffuse solid-liquid interfaces at wetted grain boundaries close to the melting point. The method is based on monitoring the fluctuations of the liquid layer width at different temperatures to extract the excess interfacial free energy as a function of this width. The method is illustrated for a high-energy Σ9 twist boundary in pure Ni. The short-range repulsion driving premelting is found to be dominant in comparison to long-range dispersion and entropic forces and consistent with previous experimental findings that nanometer-scale layer widths may be observed only very close to the melting point.

  3. Predicting transition ranges to fully turbulent viscous boundary layers in low Prandtl number convection flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheel, Janet D.; Schumacher, Jörg

    2017-12-01

    We discuss two aspects of turbulent Rayleigh-Bénard convection (RBC) on the basis of high-resolution direct numerical simulations in a unique setting: a closed cylindrical cell of aspect ratio of one. First, we present a comprehensive comparison of statistical quantities such as energy dissipation rates and boundary layer thickness scales. Data are used from three simulation run series at Prandtl numbers Pr that cover two orders of magnitude. In contrast to most previous studies in RBC the focus of the present work is on convective turbulence at very low Prandtl numbers including Pr=0.021 for liquid mercury or gallium and Pr=0.005 for liquid sodium. In this parameter range of RBC, inertial effects cause a dominating turbulent momentum transport that is in line with highly intermittent fluid turbulence both in the bulk and in the boundary layers and thus should be able to trigger a transition to the fully turbulent boundary layers of the ultimate regime of convection for higher Rayleigh number. Second, we predict the ranges of Rayleigh numbers for which the viscous boundary layer will transition to turbulence and the flow as a whole will cross over into the ultimate regime. These transition ranges are obtained by extrapolation from our simulation data. The extrapolation methods are based on the large-scale properties of the velocity profile. Two of the three methods predict similar ranges for the transition to ultimate convection when their uncertainties are taken into account. All three extrapolation methods indicate that the range of critical Rayleigh numbers Rac is shifted to smaller magnitudes as the Prandtl number becomes smaller.

  4. Study on evaluation of normal range of maximum mouth opening among Indian adults using three finger index: A descriptive study

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    Ravleen Nagi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Early recognition of decreased or limited mouth opening in many pathological conditions is necessary for prompt diagnosis and to plan the treatment options judiciously. Therefore, it is essential to establish what constitutes normal opening for the population. Aim: This study was designed with an aim to consider the applicability of this method as an index to measure the maximum mouth opening (MMO among different age groups in an Indian population. Materials and Methods: Total 400 healthy participants were studied in the age range of 17 to 60 years and stratified into four groups according to their age ranges. The maximum interincisal distance and width of three fingers (index, middle, and ring fingers at the first distal interphalangeal folds of both right and left hand were measured using Vernier caliper. Statistical analysis was done using SPSS version 21 software package. Results: Results suggested that mean value and range of MMO for males was 51.00 mm (33.0–68.0 mm and for females it was 46.3 mm (39.0–58.0 mm. Mean values of MMO correlated significantly with the width of three fingers of left and right hand as shown by Pearson correlation test. Conclusion: The study suggested that three finger index is a convenient and reliable tool for assessing normal MMO and is a most appropriate method to normal from restricted mouth opening.

  5. Long-range topological insulators and weakened bulk-boundary correspondence

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    Lepori, L.; Dell’Anna, L.

    2017-10-01

    We investigate the appearance of new types of insulators and superconductors in long-range (LR) fermionic quantum systems. These phases are not included in the famous ‘ten-fold way classification’ (TWC), valid in the short-range (SR) limit. This conclusion is obtained analysing at first specific one-dimensional models, in particular their phase diagrams and entanglement properties. The LR phases are signalled, for instance, by the violation of the area-law for the von Neumann entropy and by a corresponding peculiar entanglement spectrum (ES). Later on, the origin of the deviations from the TWC is investigated from a more general point of view and in any dimension, showing that it is related with the presence of divergences occurring in the spectrum, due to the LR couplings. A satisfying characterization for the LR phases can be achieved, at least for one-dimensional quantum systems, as well as the definition of a nontrivial topology for them, resulting in the presence of massive edge states, provided a careful evaluation of the LR contributions. Our results allows to infer, at least for one-dimensional models, the weakening of the bulk-boundary correspondence, due to the important correlations between bulk and edges, and consequently to clarify the nature of the massive edge states. The emergence of this peculiar edge structure is signalled again by the bulk ES. The stability of the LR phases against local disorder is also discussed, showing notably that this ingredient can even strengthen the effect of the LR couplings. Finally, we analyse the entanglement content of the paradigmatic LR Ising chain, inferring again important deviations from the SR regime, as well as the limitations of bulk-boundary (tensor-network based) approaches to classify LR spin models.

  6. Spinal flexibility affects range of trunk flexion during performance of a maximum voluntary trunk curl-up.

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    Gidaris, Dimitrios; Hatzitaki, Vassilia; Mandroukas, Konstantinos

    2009-01-01

    The present study investigated the relationship between spinal flexibility and range of trunk flexion during curl-up performance. Fifty young adult men (age: 18.93 +/- 1.31 years; height: 179.4 +/- 5.7 cm; mass: 73.95 +/- 7.8 kg) performed a spinal flexibility measurement test and a maximum voluntary trunk curl-up from the supine position. The 2 tests were paced to the beat of a metronome and had a constant movement duration set to 5 seconds. Spinal and pelvic motions were recorded with the help of 2 electromagnetic tracking sensors (Flock of Birds, Ascension Technologies, Inc., Burlington, Vt; sampling rate 100 Hz) attached to the seventh cervical (C7) and first sacral (S1) vertebrae, respectively. Correlation and linear regression analyses revealed a significant relationship between spinal flexibility and curl-up performance, with spinal flexibility accounting for 18% of the variance in the range of trunk flexion during performance of the voluntary trunk curl-up. No significant anterior tilt of the pelvis was noted during performance of the trunk curl-up. On the other hand, a minor posterior pelvic rotation depicted during the initial phase of the trunk curl-up was negatively correlated with spinal flexibility. It is concluded that a normal range of spinal flexibility is critical for the optimal performance of abdominal strength training exercises such as trunk curl-ups from the supine position. The results of the present study are relevant to the design and evaluation of training programs for improving strength and function of the abdominal muscles in rehabilitation and sports contexts.

  7. How disturbance, competition, and dispersal interact to prevent tree range boundaries from keeping pace with climate change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Yu; Duveneck, Matthew J; Gustafson, Eric J; Serra-Diaz, Josep M; Thompson, Jonathan R

    2018-01-01

    Climate change is expected to cause geographic shifts in tree species' ranges, but such shifts may not keep pace with climate changes because seed dispersal distances are often limited and competition-induced changes in community composition can be relatively slow. Disturbances may speed changes in community composition, but the interactions among climate change, disturbance and competitive interactions to produce range shifts are poorly understood. We used a physiologically based mechanistic landscape model to study these interactions in the northeastern United States. We designed a series of disturbance scenarios to represent varied disturbance regimes in terms of both disturbance extent and intensity. We simulated forest succession by incorporating climate change under a high-emissions future, disturbances, seed dispersal, and competition using the landscape model parameterized with forest inventory data. Tree species range boundary shifts in the next century were quantified as the change in the location of the 5th (the trailing edge) and 95th (the leading edge) percentiles of the spatial distribution of simulated species. Simulated tree species range boundary shifts in New England over the next century were far below (usually change (usually more than 110 km over 100 years) under a high-emissions scenario. Simulated species` ranges shifted northward at both the leading edge (northern boundary) and trailing edge (southern boundary). Disturbances may expedite species' recruitment into new sites, but they had little effect on the velocity of simulated range boundary shifts. Range shifts at the trailing edge tended to be associated with photosynthetic capacity, competitive ability for light and seed dispersal ability, whereas shifts at the leading edge were associated only with photosynthetic capacity and competition for light. This study underscores the importance of understanding the role of interspecific competition and disturbance when studying tree range

  8. Modelling the spring ozone maximum and the interhemispheric asymmetry in the remote marine boundary layer 1. Comparison with surface and ozonesonde measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Kuo-Ying; Pyle, John A

    2008-01-01

    Here we report a modelling study of the spring ozone maximum and its interhemispheric asymmetry in the remote marine boundary layer (MBL). The modelled results are examined at the surface and on a series of time-height cross sections at several locations spread over the Atlantic, the Indian, and the Pacific Oceans. Comparison of model with surface measurements at remote MBL stations indicate a close agreement. The most striking feature of the hemispheric spring ozone maximum in the MBL can be most easily identified at the NH sites of Westman Island, Bermuda, and Mauna Loa, and at the SH site of Samoa. Modelled ozone vertical distributions in the troposphere are compared with ozone profiles. For the Atlantic and the Indian sites, the model generally produces a hemispheric spring ozone maximum close to those of the measurements. The model also produces a spring ozone maximum in the northeastern and tropical north Pacific close to those measurements, and at sites in the NH high latitudes. The good agreement betw...

  9. Disentangling climatic versus biotic drivers of tree range constraints: Broad scale tradeoffs between climate and competion rarely explain local range boundaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderegg, L. D. L.; Hillerislambers, J.

    2016-12-01

    Accurate prediction of climatically-driven range shifts requires knowledge of the dominant forces constraining species ranges, because climatically controlled range boundaries will likely behave differently from biotically controlled range boundaries in a changing climate. Yet the roles of climatic constraints (due to species physiological tolerance) versus biotic constraints (caused by species interactions) on geographic ranges are largely unknown, infusing large uncertainty into projections of future range shifts. Plant species ranges across strong climatic gradients such as elevation gradients are often assumed to represent a tradeoff between climatic constraints on the harsh side of the range and biotic constraints (often competitive constraints) on the climatically benign side. To test this assumption, we collected tree cores from across the elevational range of the three dominant tree species inhabiting each of three climatically disparate mountain slopes and assessed climatic versus competitive constraints on growth at each species' range margins. Across all species and mountains, we found evidence for a tradeoff between climatic and competitve growth constraints. We also found that some individual species did show an apparent trade-off between a climatic constraint at one range margin and a competitive constraint at the other. However, even these simple elevation gradients resulted in complex interactions between temperature, moisture, and competitive constraints such that a climate-competition tradeoff did not explain range constraints for many species. Our results suggest that tree species can be constrained by a simple trade-off between climate and competition, but that the intricacies of real world climate gradients complicate the application of this theory even in apparently harsh environments, such as near high elevation tree line.

  10. Multi-Temporal Independent Component Analysis and Landsat 8 for Delineating Maximum Extent of the 2013 Colorado Front Range Flood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen M. Chignell

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Maximum flood extent—a key data need for disaster response and mitigation—is rarely quantified due to storm-related cloud cover and the low temporal resolution of optical sensors. While change detection approaches can circumvent these issues through the identification of inundated land and soil from post-flood imagery, their accuracy can suffer in the narrow and complex channels of increasingly developed and heterogeneous floodplains. This study explored the utility of the Operational Land Imager (OLI and Independent Component Analysis (ICA for addressing these challenges in the unprecedented 2013 Flood along the Colorado Front Range, USA. Pre- and post-flood images were composited and transformed with an ICA to identify change classes. Flooded pixels were extracted using image segmentation, and the resulting flood layer was refined with cloud and irrigated agricultural masks derived from the ICA. Visual assessment against aerial orthophotography showed close agreement with high water marks and scoured riverbanks, and a pixel-to-pixel validation with WorldView-2 imagery captured near peak flow yielded an overall accuracy of 87% and Kappa of 0.73. Additional tests showed a twofold increase in flood class accuracy over the commonly used modified normalized water index. The approach was able to simultaneously distinguish flood-related water and soil moisture from pre-existing water bodies and other spectrally similar classes within the narrow and braided channels of the study site. This was accomplished without the use of post-processing smoothing operations, enabling the important preservation of nuanced inundation patterns. Although flooding beneath moderate and sparse riparian vegetation canopy was captured, dense vegetation cover and paved regions of the floodplain were main sources of omission error, and commission errors occurred primarily in pixels of mixed land use and along the flood edge. Nevertheless, the unsupervised nature of ICA

  11. The Emsian - Eifelian (Lower - Middle Devonian) boundary occurs in a 100-kyr eccentricity maximum: A potentially useful secondary marker for the GSSP section (Wetteldorf Richtschnitt, Germany).

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Vleeschouwer, D.; Makarona, C.; Linnemann, U.; Königshof, P.; Claeys, P. F.

    2015-12-01

    . We observe a mixed forcing of obliquity and eccentricity-modulated precession. Moreover, the Emsian - Eifelian boundary clearly occurs shortly after a 100-kyr eccentricity maximum. This cyclostratigraphic observation can be used as an additional mean in future long-distance correlations between Emsian - Eifelian boundary sections.

  12. Evaluation of simulated climatological diurnal temperature range in CMIP5 models from the perspective of planetary boundary layer turbulent mixing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Nan; Zhou, Liming; Dai, Yongjiu

    2017-07-01

    This study examines the effects of modeled planetary boundary layer (PBL) mixing on the simulated temperature diurnal cycle climatology over land in 20 CMIP5 models with AMIP simulations. When compared with observations, the magnitude of diurnal temperature range (DTR) is systematically underestimated over almost all land areas due to a widespread warm bias of daily minimum temperature (Tmin) and mostly a cold bias of daily maximum temperature (Tmax). Analyses of the CMIP5 multi-model ensemble means suggest that the biases of the simulated PBL mixing could very likely contribute to the temperature biases. For the regions with the cold bias in Tmax, the daytime PBL mixing is generally underestimated. The consequent more dry air entrainment from the free atmosphere could help maintain the surface humidity gradient, and thus produce more surface evaporation and potentially lower the Tmax. The opposite situation holds true for the regions with the warm bias of Tmax. This mechanism could be particularly applicable to the regions with moderate and wet climate conditions where surface evaporation depends more on the surface humidity gradient, but less on the available soil moisture. For the widespread warm bias of Tmin, the widely-recognized overestimated PBL mixing at nighttime should play a dominant role by transferring more heat from the atmosphere to the near-surface to warm the Tmin. Further analyses using the high resolution CFMIP2 output also support the CMIP5 results about the connections of the biases between the simulated turbulent mixing and the temperature diurnal cycle. The large inter-model variations of the simulated temperature diurnal cycle primarily appear over the arid and semi-arid regions and boreal arctic regions where the model differences in the PBL turbulence mixing could make equally significant contributions to the inter-model variations of DTR, Tmax and Tmin compared to the model differences in surface radiative processes. These results

  13. Climate change velocity since the Last Glacial Maximum and its importance for patterns of species richness and range size

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandel, Brody Steven; Arge, Lars Allan; Svenning, J.-C.

    these predictions using global data on mammal and amphibian distributions. Consistent with our predictions, richness of small-ranged species of both groups was negatively associated with velocity. Velocity generally explained more variation in richness than did the simple climate anomaly. Climate velocity appears...... to capture an important historical signal on current mammal and amphibian distributions....

  14. A Boundary Scattering Strength Extraction Algorithm for the Analysis of Long-Range Reverberation Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-03-29

    range reverberation time series and will enable us to corroborate the scattering strengths deduced from short-range measurements with those from long...System Performance Prediction Model (RASP), which generates reverberation time series that are used in active system performance prediction. Reference 2...strength function is selected, and its parameters are varied to obtain an cptimumn fit to the measured reverberation time series. The critical aspects of

  15. Vegetation history across the Permian-Triassic boundary in Pakistan (Amb section, Salt Range)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schneebeli-Hermann, E.; Kurschner, W.M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/14915268X; Kerp, H.; Bomfleur, B.; Hochuli, P.A.; Bucher, H.; Ware, D.; Roohi, G.

    2015-01-01

    Hypotheses about the Permian–Triassic floral turnover range from a catastrophic extinction of terrestrial plant communities to a gradual change in floral composition punctuated by intervals indicating dramatic changes in the plant communities. The shallow marine Permian–Triassic succession in the

  16. The abiotic and biotic factors limiting establishment of predatory fishes at their expanding northern range boundaries in Ontario, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alofs, Karen M; Jackson, Donald A

    2015-06-01

    There is a poor understanding of the importance of biotic interactions in determining species distributions with climate change. Theory from invasion biology suggests that the success of species introductions outside of their historical ranges may be either positively (biotic acceptance) or negatively (biotic resistance) related to native biodiversity. Using data on fish community composition from two survey periods separated by approximately 28 years during which climate was warming, we examined the factors influencing the establishment of three predatory centrarchids: Smallmouth Bass (Micropterus dolomieu), Largemouth Bass (M. salmoides), and Rock Bass (Ambloplites rupestris) in lakes at their expanding northern range boundaries in Ontario. Variance partitioning demonstrated that, at a regional scale, abiotic factors play a stronger role in determining the establishment of these species than biotic factors. Pairing lakes within watersheds where each species had established with lakes sharing similar abiotic conditions where the species had not established revealed both positive and negative relationships between the establishment of centrarchids and the historical presence of other predatory species. The establishment of these species near their northern range boundaries is primarily determined by abiotic factors at a regional scale; however, biotic factors become important at the lake-to-lake scale. Studies of exotic species invasions have previously highlighted how spatial scale mediates the importance of abiotic vs. biotic factors on species establishment. Our study demonstrates how concepts from invasion biology can inform our understanding of the factors controlling species distributions with changing climate. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Species boundaries and host range of tortoise mites (Uropodoidea phoretic on bark beetles (Scolytinae, using morphometric and molecular markers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wayne Knee

    Full Text Available Understanding the ecology and evolutionary history of symbionts and their hosts requires accurate taxonomic knowledge, including clear species boundaries and phylogenies. Tortoise mites (Mesostigmata: Uropodoidea are among the most diverse arthropod associates of bark beetles (Curculionidae: Scolytinae, but their taxonomy and host associations are largely unstudied. We tested the hypotheses that (1 morphologically defined species are supported by molecular data, and that (2 bark beetle uropodoids with a broad host range comprise cryptic species. To do so, we assessed the species boundaries of uropodoid mites collected from 51 host species, across 11 countries and 103 sites, using morphometric data as well as partial cytochrome oxidase I (COI and nuclear large subunit ribosomal DNA (28S. Overall, morphologically defined species were confirmed by molecular datasets, with a few exceptions. Twenty-nine of the 36 uropodoid species (Trichouropoda, Nenteria and Uroobovella collected in this study had narrow host ranges, while seven species had putative broad host ranges. In all but one species, U. orri, our data supported the existence of these host generalists, which contrasts with the typical finding that widespread generalists are actually complexes of cryptic specialists.

  18. Species boundaries and host range of tortoise mites (Uropodoidea) phoretic on bark beetles (Scolytinae), using morphometric and molecular markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knee, Wayne; Beaulieu, Frédéric; Skevington, Jeffrey H; Kelso, Scott; Cognato, Anthony I; Forbes, Mark R

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the ecology and evolutionary history of symbionts and their hosts requires accurate taxonomic knowledge, including clear species boundaries and phylogenies. Tortoise mites (Mesostigmata: Uropodoidea) are among the most diverse arthropod associates of bark beetles (Curculionidae: Scolytinae), but their taxonomy and host associations are largely unstudied. We tested the hypotheses that (1) morphologically defined species are supported by molecular data, and that (2) bark beetle uropodoids with a broad host range comprise cryptic species. To do so, we assessed the species boundaries of uropodoid mites collected from 51 host species, across 11 countries and 103 sites, using morphometric data as well as partial cytochrome oxidase I (COI) and nuclear large subunit ribosomal DNA (28S). Overall, morphologically defined species were confirmed by molecular datasets, with a few exceptions. Twenty-nine of the 36 uropodoid species (Trichouropoda, Nenteria and Uroobovella) collected in this study had narrow host ranges, while seven species had putative broad host ranges. In all but one species, U. orri, our data supported the existence of these host generalists, which contrasts with the typical finding that widespread generalists are actually complexes of cryptic specialists.

  19. Dynamism in the upstream invasion edge of a freshwater fish exposes range boundary constraints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubenson, Erika S; Olden, Julian D

    2017-06-01

    Studying the dynamics of species' borders can provide insight into the mechanisms limiting or promoting range expansion in response to environmental change. In the John Day River, Oregon (USA), rising stream temperatures are facilitating the upstream expansion of invasive smallmouth bass Micropterus dolomieu. Here, where smallmouth bass occupy the upstream limit of its thermal tolerance, we explore population structure and seasonal movement patterns to elucidate the environmental conditions and individual traits that define front edge (where individuals reside year-round) and leading edge (where individuals colonize, but may not establish) limits to its upstream distribution. Reporting on a multi-year, spatially extensive riverscape survey, our results show dramatic ebbs and flows of seasonal occupancies due to individual movement with an overall trend of upstream expansion. We revealed distinct front and leading edge invasion extents, each constrained by different ecological conditions. The front edge is largely constrained by the ability for juveniles to survive an overwinter starvation period, whereas the leading edge is associated with adult growth potential and seasonal hydrological conditions. We also found key morphological traits associated with more mobile individuals. By providing mechanistic insight into the factors that promote or limit range expansion of an invasive riverine species, our study enhances the ability to predict future range shifts and provides critical information to managers tasked with restricting further expansion.

  20. A Distributed Air Index Based on Maximum Boundary Rectangle over Grid-Cells for Wireless Non-Flat Spatial Data Broadcast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seokjin Im

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In the pervasive computing environment using smart devices equipped with various sensors, a wireless data broadcasting system for spatial data items is a natural way to efficiently provide a location dependent information service, regardless of the number of clients. A non-flat wireless broadcast system can support the clients in accessing quickly their preferred data items by disseminating the preferred data items more frequently than regular data on the wireless channel. To efficiently support the processing of spatial window queries in a non-flat wireless data broadcasting system, we propose a distributed air index based on a maximum boundary rectangle (MaxBR over grid-cells (abbreviated DAIM, which uses MaxBRs for filtering out hot data items on the wireless channel. Unlike the existing index that repeats regular data items in close proximity to hot items at same frequency as hot data items in a broadcast cycle, DAIM makes it possible to repeat only hot data items in a cycle and reduces the length of the broadcast cycle. Consequently, DAIM helps the clients access the desired items quickly, improves the access time, and reduces energy consumption. In addition, a MaxBR helps the clients decide whether they have to access regular data items or not. Simulation studies show the proposed DAIM outperforms existing schemes with respect to the access time and energy consumption.

  1. A distributed air index based on maximum boundary rectangle over grid-cells for wireless non-flat spatial data broadcast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Im, Seokjin; Choi, JinTak

    2014-06-17

    In the pervasive computing environment using smart devices equipped with various sensors, a wireless data broadcasting system for spatial data items is a natural way to efficiently provide a location dependent information service, regardless of the number of clients. A non-flat wireless broadcast system can support the clients in accessing quickly their preferred data items by disseminating the preferred data items more frequently than regular data on the wireless channel. To efficiently support the processing of spatial window queries in a non-flat wireless data broadcasting system, we propose a distributed air index based on a maximum boundary rectangle (MaxBR) over grid-cells (abbreviated DAIM), which uses MaxBRs for filtering out hot data items on the wireless channel. Unlike the existing index that repeats regular data items in close proximity to hot items at same frequency as hot data items in a broadcast cycle, DAIM makes it possible to repeat only hot data items in a cycle and reduces the length of the broadcast cycle. Consequently, DAIM helps the clients access the desired items quickly, improves the access time, and reduces energy consumption. In addition, a MaxBR helps the clients decide whether they have to access regular data items or not. Simulation studies show the proposed DAIM outperforms existing schemes with respect to the access time and energy consumption.

  2. On the Trend of the Annual Mean, Maximum, and Minimum Temperature and the Diurnal Temperature Range in the Armagh Observatory, Northern Ireland, Dataset, 1844 -2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Robert M.

    2013-01-01

    Examined are the annual averages, 10-year moving averages, decadal averages, and sunspot cycle (SC) length averages of the mean, maximum, and minimum surface air temperatures and the diurnal temperature range (DTR) for the Armagh Observatory, Northern Ireland, during the interval 1844-2012. Strong upward trends are apparent in the Armagh surface-air temperatures (ASAT), while a strong downward trend is apparent in the DTR, especially when the ASAT data are averaged by decade or over individual SC lengths. The long-term decrease in the decadaland SC-averaged annual DTR occurs because the annual minimum temperatures have risen more quickly than the annual maximum temperatures. Estimates are given for the Armagh annual mean, maximum, and minimum temperatures and the DTR for the current decade (2010-2019) and SC24.

  3. Feature extraction of micro-motion frequency and the maximum wobble angle in a small range of missile warhead based on micro-Doppler effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, M.; Jiang, Y. S.

    2014-11-01

    Micro-Doppler effect is induced by the micro-motion dynamics of the radar target itself or any structure on the target. In this paper, a simplified cone-shaped model for ballistic missile warhead with micro-nutation is established, followed by the theoretical formula of micro-nutation is derived. It is confirmed that the theoretical results are identical to simulation results by using short-time Fourier transform. Then we propose a new method for nutation period extraction via signature maximum energy fitting based on empirical mode decomposition and short-time Fourier transform. The maximum wobble angle is also extracted by distance approximate approach in a small range of wobble angle, which is combined with the maximum likelihood estimation. By the simulation studies, it is shown that these two feature extraction methods are both valid even with low signal-to-noise ratio.

  4. Orders of Magnitude Extension of the Effective Dynamic Range of TDC-Based TOFMS Data Through Maximum Likelihood Estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ipsen, Andreas; Ebbels, Timothy M. D.

    2014-10-01

    In a recent article, we derived a probability distribution that was shown to closely approximate that of the data produced by liquid chromatography time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LC/TOFMS) instruments employing time-to-digital converters (TDCs) as part of their detection system. The approach of formulating detailed and highly accurate mathematical models of LC/MS data via probability distributions that are parameterized by quantities of analytical interest does not appear to have been fully explored before. However, we believe it could lead to a statistically rigorous framework for addressing many of the data analytical problems that arise in LC/MS studies. In this article, we present new procedures for correcting for TDC saturation using such an approach and demonstrate that there is potential for significant improvements in the effective dynamic range of TDC-based mass spectrometers, which could make them much more competitive with the alternative analog-to-digital converters (ADCs). The degree of improvement depends on our ability to generate mass and chromatographic peaks that conform to known mathematical functions and our ability to accurately describe the state of the detector dead time—tasks that may be best addressed through engineering efforts.

  5. Characteristic dielectric behaviour of the wide temperature range twist grain boundary phases of unsymmetrical liquid crystal dimers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pandey, M B [Physics Department, University of Allahabad, Allahabad-211 002 (India); Dhar, R [Physics Department, University of Allahabad, Allahabad-211 002 (India); Achalkumar, A S [Centre for Liquid Crystal Research, Jalahalli, Bangalore-560 103 (India); Yelamaggad, C V [Centre for Liquid Crystal Research, Jalahalli, Bangalore-560 103 (India)

    2007-10-31

    The investigated optically active dimeric compound, 4-n-undecyloxy-4{sup '}-(cholesteryloxycarbonyl-1-butyloxy)chalcone, shows wide temperature ranges of two twist grain boundary (TGB) phases, TGBA and TGBC*. Comprehensive dielectric studies have been carried out for this compound in the frequency range 1 Hz-10 MHz for different conditions of molecular anchoring. This compound shows negative dielectric anisotropy ({delta}{epsilon}'={epsilon}{sub parallel}'-{epsilon}{sub perpendicul=} a{sub r}'<0). Various electrical parameters, namely the dielectric permittivity, dielectric anisotropy, DC conductivity and activation energy, have been determined for these TGB phases. Weak relaxation processes have been detected in the TGBA and TGBC* phases, presumably due to amplitude (soft mode) and phase (Goldstone mode) fluctuations.

  6. Evolutionary dynamics of a rapidly receding southern range boundary in the threatened California red-legged frog (Rana draytonii)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richmond, Jonathan Q.; Barr, Kelly R.; Backlin, Adam R.; Vandergast, Amy G.; Fisher, Robert N.

    2013-01-01

    Populations forming the edge of a species range are often imperiled by isolation and low genetic diversity, with proximity to human population centers being a major determinant of edge stability in modern landscapes. Since the 1960s, the California red-legged frog (Rana draytonii) has undergone extensive declines in heavily urbanized southern California, where the range edge has rapidly contracted northward while shifting its cardinal orientation to an east-west trending axis. We studied the genetic structure and diversity of these frontline populations, tested for signatures of contemporary disturbance, specifically fire, and attempted to disentangle these signals from demographic events extending deeper into the past. Consistent with the genetic expectations of the ‘abundant-center’ model, we found that diversity, admixture, and opportunity for random mating increases in populations sampled successively further away from the range boundary. Demographic simulations indicate that bottlenecks in peripheral isolates are associated with processes extending tens to a few hundred generations in the past, despite the demographic collapse of some due to recent fire-flood events. While the effects of recent disturbance have left little genetic imprint on these populations, they likely contribute to an extinction debt that will lead to continued range contraction unless management intervenes to stall or reverse the process.

  7. Incorporation of planetary boundary layer dynamics in a numerical model of long-range air-pollutant transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syrakov, D.; Djolov, G.; Yordanov, D.

    1983-05-01

    A numerical model of long-range air-pollutant transport is developed, in which a simple planetary boundary layer (PBL) is incorporated. The pollution field results from the superposition of discrete ‘puffs’ of pollutants which are emitted periodically in different regions. The instantaneous sources in the different cells are approximated by rotational ellipsoids with Gaussian concentration distributions. The puff movement due to the external flow is followed by the displacement of the centroid. The expansion of the puff is modelled by nonisotropic Fickian diffusion. A simple barotropic PBL model is used to study the PBL influence. This model gives the flow velocity and the vertical turbulent exchange coefficient, which depend on the external parameters Ro and S — Rossby number and stratification parameter. The model performance is investigated by special test runs. The dependence of the pollution field on source height, stability conditions and vertical motions is shown.

  8. The effect of entrainment through atmospheric boundary layer growth on observed and modeled surface ozone in the Colorado Front Range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaser, L.; Patton, E. G.; Pfister, G. G.; Weinheimer, A. J.; Montzka, D. D.; Flocke, F.; Thompson, A. M.; Stauffer, R. M.; Halliday, H. S.

    2017-06-01

    Ozone concentrations at the Earth's surface are controlled by meteorological and chemical processes and are a function of advection, entrainment, deposition, and net chemical production/loss. The relative contributions of these processes vary in time and space. Understanding the relative importance of these processes controlling surface ozone concentrations is an essential component for designing effective regulatory strategies. Here we focus on the diurnal cycle of entrainment through atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) growth in the Colorado Front Range. Aircraft soundings and surface observations collected in July/August 2014 during the DISCOVER-AQ/FRAPPÉ (Deriving Information on Surface conditions from Column and Vertically Resolved Observations Relevant to Air Quality/Front Range Air Pollution and Photochemistry Éxperiment) campaigns and equivalent data simulated by a regional chemical transport model are analyzed. Entrainment through ABL growth is most important in the early morning, fumigating the surface at a rate of 5 ppbv/h. The fumigation effect weakens near noon and changes sign to become a small dilution effect in the afternoon on the order of -1 ppbv/h. The chemical transport model WRF-Chem (Weather Research and Forecasting Model with chemistry) underestimates ozone at all altitudes during this study on the order of 10-15 ppbv. The entrainment through ABL growth is overestimated by the model in the order of 0.6-0.8 ppbv/h. This results from differences in boundary layer growth in the morning and ozone concentration jump across the ABL top in the afternoon. This implicates stronger modeled fumigation in the morning and weaker modeled dilution after 11:00 LT.

  9. Characterization and Evaluation of 600 V Range Devices for Active Power Factor Correction in Boundary and Continuous Conduction Modes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hernandez Botella, Juan Carlos; Petersen, Lars Press; Andersen, Michael A. E.

    2015-01-01

    Traditional characterization of semiconductors switching dynamics is performed based on clamped inductive load measurements using the double pulse tester (DPT) configuration. This approach is valid for converters operating in continuous conduction mode (CCM), however in boundary conduction mode (...

  10. Variability of the planktonic foraminifera community across the Eocene/Oligocene boundary, Fuente Caldera Section, Baetic Ranges (Spain)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legarda-Lisarri, A.

    2013-12-01

    During the Eocene/Oligocene transition, in a massive extinction event that took place about 33.7 million years ago, the current high resolution study analyzes qualitatively and quantitatively the community structure of the planktonic foraminifera that were preserved in the hemipelagic sediments of the Tethys Sea. The sampled section of the Fuente Caldera column, located in the Baetic mountain ranges, spans a register of 396,551.7 years. Based in the identification of 27 species, that belong to 13 genera and 2 families of foraminifera, there have been found three biozones of Gonzalvo Zonation (Gonzalvo, 2002) in the studied stratigraphic interval: Turborotalia cocoaensis and Cribrohantkenina lazzarii Biozones (Rupelian), and Paragloborotalia increbescens (Priabonian). The planktonic foraminifera associations variability patterns are defined by paleoecologic indexes (diversity index, high and low latitude species index and planktonic and benthic foraminifera index), by geochemical proxies: δ18O and δ13C and by 'Q' Mode Factor Analysis. They prove that the deposition environment is outer platform and also, they suggest that the studied area in the Tethys Sea underwent many thermal pulses, during which some species extinct or appear. In the first extinction event the species Turborotalia cocoaensis and Turborotalia cunialensis became extinct. In the second one, Hantkenina alabamensis, Hantkenina brevispina, Cribrohantkenina lazzarii and Pseudohastigerina micra became extinct while a succession occured; Globigerina officinalis, Globoturborotalita anguliofficinalis and Tenuitellinata angustiumbilicata appeared. The cooling event that finished in the Lower Oligocene was the biggest of these pulses, which was extremely abrupt and corresponds to the Oi-1 event that was described by Miller (Miller, 1991). All this evidences that the planktonic foraminifera extinction in the Upper Eocene was a gradual and fast event, what is supported by the Factor Analysis application. Key

  11. Lithosphere-Asthenosphere Boundary Beneath Regions of Recent Volcanism in the Basin and Range Province and Mojave Desert

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forsyth, D. W.; Rau, C. J.; Plank, T.; Gazel, E.; Bendersky, C.

    2010-12-01

    Melt in the asthenosphere may contribute strongly to the development of the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary (LAB) in some settings. We have compiled a set of vertical shear-velocity profiles beneath centers of recent (Hill and Amboy in the southern Mojave, the lithospheric lid extends to a depth of ~ 90 km. Minimum velocities in the LVZs beneath the higher velocity lids typically are 4.00-4.05 km/s, similar to that beneath the East Pacific Rise and too low to be caused by temperature alone without unreasonably high attenuation. Beneath other centers, like Big Pine, Lathrop Wells and Tahoe, there is no resolvable lid. The lid is either missing or too thin to resolve, but the absence of the lid/LVZ pattern seems to be due to a combination of lower velocities immediately beneath the Moho and higher velocities in the LVZ. Petrological indicators of temperature and depth of melting from basalt composition are in general agreement with the seismological observations, with the depth of last equilibration typically occurring near the top of the LVZ. Beneath Big Pine, for example, the equilibration temperatures are unusually low and the equilibration depth is 40 to 50 km, just below the Moho, in agreement with the lack of a distinct lid. Beneath Cima, equilibration depths are 60-70 km. Beneath Coso, equilibration depths are only slightly deeper than Big Pine, but the temperatures are higher, in agreement with the more pronounced LVZ and the presence of a thin lid. Beneath the Tabernacle Hill/Black Rock volcanic field in west-central Utah, there is a well-developed lid/LVZ structure, but the "high" velocity lid is only ~ 4.10 km/s while the underlying LVZ reaches as low as 3.90 km/s. This observation points to the importance of melt concentration or distribution controlling the velocities. Lid velocities are often relatively low (4.2-4.4 km/s) in the Basin and Range, indicating high temperatures, but here there is probably melt within the lid as well, with higher

  12. A Comparison between Boundary and Continuous Conduction Modes in Single Phase PFC Using 600V Range Devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hernandez Botella, Juan Carlos; Petersen, Lars Press; Andersen, Michael A. E.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents an analysis and comparison of boundary conduction mode (BCM) and continuous conduction mode (CCM) in single phase power factor correction (PFC) applications. The comparison is based on double pulse tester (DPT) characterization results of state-of-the-art superjunction devices...

  13. Ozone sonde measurements aboard long-range boundary-layer pressurized balloons over the western Mediterranean basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gheusi, François; Barret, Brice; Verdier, Nicolas; Dulac, François; Durand, Pierre; Jambert, Corinne

    Since few years, the French space agency CNES has developed boundary-layer pressurized balloons (BLPBs) with the capability to transport scientific payloads at isopicnic level over very long distances and durations (up to several weeks in absence of navigation limits). However, the autonomy of conventional electro-chemical cell (ECC) ozone sondes, that are widely used for tropospheric and stratospheric soundings, is limited to few hours due to power consumption and electrolyte evaporation (due to air bubbling in the cathode solution). In collaboration with the French research community, CNES has developed a new ozone payload suited for long duration flights aboard BLPBs. The mechanical elements (Teflon pump and motor) and the electro-chemical cell of conventional ECC sondes have been kept but the electronic implementation is entirely new. The main feature is the possibility of programming periodic measurement sequences -- with possible remote control during the flight. To increase the ozone sonde autonomy, the strategy has been adopted of short measurement sequences (typically 3 min) regularly spaced in time (e.g. every 15 min, which is usually sufficient for air quality studies). The rest of the time, the sonde is left at rest (pump motor off). The response time of an ECC sonde to an ozone concentration step is below one minute. Therefore, the typical measurement sequence is composed of a one-minute spin-up period after the pump has been turned on, followed by a two-minute acquisition period. (Note that the time intervals given here are indicative. All can be adjusted before and during the flight.) Results of a preliminary ground-based test in spring 2012 will be first presented. The sonde provided correct ozone concentrations against a reference UV analyzer every 15 minutes during 4 days. Then, we will illustrate results from 16 BLBP flights launched in the low troposphere over the Mediterranean during the three summer field campaings of the coordinated project

  14. Areal-averaged trace gas emission rates from long-range open-path measurements in stable boundary layer conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Schäfer

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Measurements of land-surface emission rates of greenhouse and other gases at large spatial scales (10 000 m2 are needed to assess the spatial distribution of emissions. This can be readily done using spatial-integrating micro-meteorological methods like flux-gradient methods which were evaluated for determining land-surface emission rates of trace gases under stable boundary layers. Non-intrusive path-integrating measurements are utilized. Successful application of a flux-gradient method requires confidence in the gradients of trace gas concentration and wind, and in the applicability of boundary-layer turbulence theory; consequently the procedures to qualify measurements that can be used to determine the flux is critical. While there is relatively high confidence in flux measurements made under unstable atmospheres with mean winds greater than 1 m s−1, there is greater uncertainty in flux measurements made under free convective or stable conditions. The study of N2O emissions of flat grassland and NH3 emissions from a cattle lagoon involves quality-assured determinations of fluxes under low wind, stable or night-time atmospheric conditions when the continuous "steady-state" turbulence of the surface boundary layer breaks down and the layer has intermittent turbulence. Results indicate that following the Monin-Obukhov similarity theory (MOST flux-gradient methods that assume a log-linear profile of the wind speed and concentration gradient incorrectly determine vertical profiles and thus flux in the stable boundary layer. An alternative approach is considered on the basis of turbulent diffusivity, i.e. the measured friction velocity as well as height gradients of horizontal wind speeds and concentrations without MOST correction for stability. It is shown that this is the most accurate of the flux-gradient methods under stable conditions.

  15. Broad-scale latitudinal variation in female reproductive success contributes to the maintenance of a geographic range boundary in bagworms (Lepidoptera: Psychidae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Rhainds

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Geographic range limits and the factors structuring them are of great interest to biologists, in part because of concerns about how global change may shift range boundaries. However, scientists lack strong mechanistic understanding of the factors that set geographic range limits in empirical systems, especially in animals. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Across dozens of populations spread over six degrees of latitude in the American Midwest, female mating success of the evergreen bagworm Thyridopteryx ephemeraeformis (Lepidoptera: Psychidae declines from ∼100% to ∼0% near the edge of the species range. When coupled with additional latitudinal declines in fecundity and in egg and pupal survivorship, a spatial gradient of bagworm reproductive success emerges. This gradient is associated with a progressive decline in local abundance and an increased risk of local population extinction, up to a latitudinal threshold where extremely low female fitness meshes spatially with the species' geographic range boundary. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The reduction in fitness of female bagworms near the geographic range limit, which concords with the abundant centre hypothesis from biogeography, provides a concrete, empirical example of how an Allee effect (increased pre-reproductive mortality of females in sparsely populated areas may interact with other demographic factors to induce a geographic range limit.

  16. [The data on helminth infestation of the Siberian tree frog (Rana amurensis Boulenger, 1886) in the western boundary of the range].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhigileva, O N; Kirina, I Iu

    2014-01-01

    Helminth species composition and infection rates of the Siberian tree frog Rana amurensis in Western Siberia were studied. Four species of helminthes--nematodes Rhabdias bufonis, Oswaldocruzia filiformis, Cosmocerca ornata and the trematode Haplometra cylindracea were found. Prevalence of helminths in the Siberian tree frog is 100%, and mean abundance is 27.5 +/- 4.8. Helminth species richness in the Siberian tree frog in the western periphery of their distribution area is lower than in the center of the range, in Yakutia and Transbaikalia, and is approximately equal to that in the northeastern boundary of the range, in Magadan Province. R. bufonis, a highly pathogenic nematode species, dominates in prevalence and abundance in the Siberian tree frog in Western Siberia as well as in other parts of the geographical range of this species.

  17. Alpine lakes preserve mineral dust signatures: Implications for long-range mineral dust transport and Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) tornado frequency in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, A.; Lora, J. M.; Pollen, A.; Vollmer, T.; Thomas, M.; Leithold, E. L.; Mitchell, J.; Tripati, A.

    2016-12-01

    contribution. Most importantly, we find that during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) the Great Plains may not have witnessed an increase in the incidence of tornado frequency. Acknowledgements: James Sigman, Jacob Ashford, Jason Neff and Amato Evan

  18. Crop and field boundary influences on the activity of a wide range of beneficial invertebrate groups on a split conventional/organic farm in northern England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eyre, M D; Leifert, C

    2011-04-01

    Activity of 12 beneficial invertebrate groups was assessed in 2005 and 2006 on a farm in northern England split into conventional and organic management halves, using pitfall and pan traps set in both crops and field boundaries. Management, crop and boundary structure influences on invertebrate activity were assessed, as was the relationship between crop and boundary type. Classification of crop and boundary assemblages produced three and two groups, respectively, in both years. Organic arable crops had well-defined assemblages in both years; and, while grass and grass/clover fields were separated from conventional arable fields in 2005, there was mixing in 2006. One boundary group, in both years, was dominated by conventional arable fields with tall herbaceous boundary vegetation. The other group had more organic arable and grassy fields with shorter boundary vegetation. Redundancy analyses showed that a number of groups (Cantharidae, Coccinellidae, Syrphidae, Ichneumonidae, Braconidae, Proctotrupoidea, Lycosidae) were more active in organic arable fields with more Staphylinidae in conventional arable crops and no obvious trend with Carabidae, Hemiptera, Neuroptera and Linyphiidae. Activity of some groups, especially Coccinellidae, Syrphidae and parasitic wasps, was strongly related to weed cover. Staphylinidae were most active in tall herbaceous boundaries by conventional arable crops with more of a number of groups (Cantharidae, Coccinellidae, parasitic wasps) in short herbaceous boundaries by organic arable crops. Organic management produced most differences in aerially-dispersed invertebrates, and management had a profound effect on activity in field boundaries. Possible management prescriptions to increase invertebrate activity include changing sowing times, weed cover manipulation and field boundary and margin management.

  19. Geochemical evidences for palaeoclimatic fluctuations at the Triassic-Jurassic boundary: southwestern margin of the Neotethys in the Salt Range, Pakistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iqbal, Shahid; Wagreich, Michael; Jan, Irfanullah; Kürschner, Wolfram Michael; Gier, Susanne

    2017-04-01

    The Triassic-Jurassic boundary interval reveals a change from warm-arid to a warm and humid climate in the Tethyan domain. Sea-level reconstruction records across the European basins during this interval reveal an end-Triassic global regression event and is linked to the Central Atlantic Magmatic Province (CAMP) activity and Pangaea breakup. In the Tethyan Salt Range of Pakistan a succession of Upper Triassic dolomites/green-black mudstones (Kingriali Formation), overlying quartzose sandstone, mudstones, laterites and Lower Jurassic conglomerates/pebbly sandstones (Datta Formation) provides information on the palaeoclimatic evolution of the area. Preliminary palynological results from the mudstones indicate a Rhaetian age for the Kingriali Formation and a Hettangian age for the Datta Formation. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis of the mudstones (upper part of the Kingriali Formation) indicates the presence of mainly illite while kaolinite is a minor component. The kaolinite content, a reflection of the advanced stage of chemical weathering and hence warm-humid conditions, increases up-section in the overlying sandstone-mudstone succession. The overlying laterite-bauxite horizons lack illite/smectite and are entirely composed of kaolinite, boehmite and haematite. At places these kaolinite rich horizons are mined in the area (Western Salt Range). The bulk rock geochemistry of the succession confirms a similar trend. The Chemical Index of Alteration (CIA) displays an increasing trend from the Upper Triassic shales (CIA 75-80) through the overlying sandstones/mudstones-laterites to the overlying quartz rich sandstones and mudstones (CIA 90-97). The overall results for the succession reveal an increasing chemical maturity trend (increase in the intensity of chemical weathering) from Rhaetian to Hettangian thereby supporting a change from warm-arid to a warm-humid palaeoclimate, probably extreme greenhouse conditions.

  20. Structure and properties of grain boundaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balluffi, R. W.; Bristowe, P. D.

    1984-03-01

    Results were obtained in the following areas: determination of relative grain boundary energies by the rotating crystallite method; simple structural unit model for core dependent properties of tilt boundaries; twist boundary energies for metals with long ranged pairwise interatomic potentials; structural unit/grain boundary dislocation model for grain boundary structure; detection of expansion of boundaries using diffraction; effect of secondary relaxations on diffraction from high-(SIGMA) 001 twist boundaries; and mechanism of grain boundary migration.

  1. Ground boundaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balluffi, R. W.; Bristowe, P. D.

    The present document is a progress report describing the work accomplished on the study of grain boundaries in Ag, Au, Ni, Si, and Ge. Research was focused on the following four major efforts: study of the atomic structure of grain boundaries by means of x-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy and computer modeling; grain boundary migration; short-circuit diffusion along grain boundaries; and development of Thin-Film Deposition/Bonding Apparatus for the manufacture of high purity bicrystals.

  2. Maximum Autocorrelation Factorial Kriging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Allan Aasbjerg; Conradsen, Knut; Pedersen, John L.

    2000-01-01

    This paper describes maximum autocorrelation factor (MAF) analysis, maximum autocorrelation factorial kriging, and its application to irregularly sampled stream sediment geochemical data from South Greenland. Kriged MAF images are compared with kriged images of varimax rotated factors from...

  3. Boundary issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend, Alan R.; Porder, Stephen

    2011-03-01

    -centric boundary (Filippelli 2008, Handoh and Lenton 2003). However, human alteration of the P cycle has multiple potential boundaries (figure 1), including P-driven freshwater eutrophication (Smith and Schindler 2009), the potential for world P supply to place an ultimate limit on food production (Smil 2000, Childers et al 2011), and depletion of soil P stocks in some world regions (MacDonald et al 2011). Carpenter and Bennett revisit the P boundary from the freshwater eutrophication perspective. Given the extraordinary variation in freshwater ecosystems across the globe, this is a challenging task, but the authors strengthen their analysis by using three different boundaries with relevance to eutrophication, along with two water quality targets and a range of estimates of P flow to the sea. In doing so, they make a compelling case that if freshwater eutrophication is indeed a Rubicon, we have already crossed it. Importantly, Carpenter and Bennett go beyond the calculation of new boundaries to make broader points about humanity's relationship with the P cycle. Disruptions of both the P and N cycles are mostly about our need for food (Galloway et al 2008, Cordell et al 2009), but unlike N, P supplies are finite and irreplaceable. Environmental concerns aside, we can fix all the N2 from the atmosphere we want—but deplete our economically viable P reserves and we're in trouble. Figure 1 Figure 1. Human alteration of the global P cycle has multiple possible boundaries. These include the environmental risks posed by freshwater eutrophication and marine anoxic events, and the food security risks that come from depletion of soil P stocks in some world regions, as well as finite global supplies of high-value mineral P reserves. Photo credits beyond authors: upper left, Shelby Riskin; upper right, Pedro Sanchez. In effect, Carpenter and Bennett argue that among P's multiple boundaries, the one for freshwaters is less forgiving of our current activities (but no less important) than is

  4. Minnesota Pheasant Range

    Data.gov (United States)

    Minnesota Department of Natural Resources — This dataset delineates the spatial range of wild pheasant populations in Minnesota as of 2002 by dividing the MN state boundary into 2 units: pheasant range and...

  5. Ground boundaries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balluffi, R.W.; Bristowe, P.D.

    1990-01-01

    The present document is a progress report describing the work accomplished on the study of grain boundaries in Ag, Au, Ni, Si, and Ge. Research was focused on the following four major efforts: study of the atomic structure of grain boundaries by means of x-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy and computer modeling; grain boundary migration; short-circuit diffusion along grain boundaries; and development of Thin-Film Deposition/Bonding Apparatus for the manufacture of high purity bicrystals. 10 refs., 1 fig.

  6. Negotiating boundaries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aarhus, Rikke; Ballegaard, Stinne Aaløkke

    2010-01-01

    to maintain the order of the home when managing disease and adopting new healthcare technology. In our analysis we relate this boundary work to two continuums of visibility-invisibility and integration-segmentation in disease management. We explore five factors that affect the boundary work: objects......To move treatment successfully from the hospital to that of technology assisted self-care at home, it is vital in the design of such technologies to understand the setting in which the health IT should be used. Based on qualitative studies we find that people engage in elaborate boundary work......, activities, places, character of disease, and collaboration. Furthermore, the processes are explored of how boundary objects move between social worlds pushing and shaping boundaries. From this we discuss design implications for future healthcare technologies for the home....

  7. Boundary Spanning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zølner, Mette

    The paper explores how locals span boundaries between corporate and local levels. The aim is to better comprehend potentialities and challenges when MNCs draws on locals’ culture specific knowledge. The study is based on an in-depth, interpretive case study of boundary spanning by local actors...... in the period of post-acquisition when their organization is being integrated into the acquiring MNC. The paper contributes to the literature on boundary spanning in three ways: First, by illustrating that boundary spanning is performed by numerous organizational actors in a variety of positions in MNCs......, inclusively by locals in subsidiaries. Second, by showing that boundary spanning is ‘situated’ in the sense that its result depends on the kind of knowledge to be transmitted and the attitude of the receivers. A third contribution is methodological. The study illustrates that combining bottom-up grounded...

  8. Determination of grain boundary geometry using TEM

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jang, H.; Farkas, D.; Hosson, J.T.M. De

    An experimental method to obtain the grain boundary geometry using the transmission electron microscope is presented. The method allows Σ determination including grain boundary plane orientation. In order to determine the specialness of the grain boundary, three different criteria for maximum

  9. Grain boundaries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balluffi, R.W.; Bristowe, P.D.

    1991-01-01

    The present document is a progress report describing the work accomplished to date during the second year of our four-year grant (February 15, 1990--February 14, 1994) to study grain boundaries. The research was focused on the following three major efforts: Study of the atomic structure of grain boundaries by means of x-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy and computer modeling; study of short-circuit diffusion along grain boundaries; and development of a Thin-film Deposition/Bonding Apparatus for the manufacture of high purity bicrystals.

  10. Grain boundaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balluffi, R. W.; Bristowe, P. D.

    The present document is a progress report describing the work accomplished to date during the second year of our four-year grant (February 15, 1990 to February 14, 1994) to study grain boundaries. The research was focused on the following three major efforts: study of the atomic structure of grain boundaries by means of x-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy and computer modeling; study of short-circuit diffusion along grain boundaries; and development of a Thin-film Deposition/Bonding Apparatus for the manufacture of high purity bicrystals.

  11. A classification of ecological boundaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strayer, D.L.; Power, M.E.; Fagan, W.F.; Pickett, S.T.A.; Belnap, J.

    2003-01-01

    Ecologists use the term boundary to refer to a wide range of real and conceptual structures. Because imprecise terminology may impede the search for general patterns and theories about ecological boundaries, we present a classification of the attributes of ecological boundaries to aid in communication and theory development. Ecological boundaries may differ in their origin and maintenance, their spatial structure, their function, and their temporal dynamics. A classification system based on these attributes should help ecologists determine whether boundaries are truly comparable. This system can be applied when comparing empirical studies, comparing theories, and testing theoretical predictions against empirical results.

  12. Heterogeneous Boundary Layers through the Diurnal Cycle: Evaluation of the WRF Wind Farm Parameterization using Scanning Lidar Observations and Wind Turbine Power Measurements during a Range of Stability Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundquist, J. K.

    2015-12-01

    As wind energy deployment increases, questions arise regarding impacts on local climates and how these impacts evolve with the diurnal cycle of the boundary layer. Satellite observations suggest nocturnal increases of surface temperatures, and measurements of turbine wakes document stronger and more persistent reductions of wind speed and increases in turbulence downwind of turbines during stable conditions. Validations of mesoscale parameterizations of these effects have been constrained to idealized conditions defined by neutrally-stratified conditions and/or limited wind directions and wind speeds, or by comparison to idealized large-eddy simulations. Synthesis of conventional meteorological measurements and unconventional measurements can offer unique insights for validating models over a large heterogeneous domain. The CWEX-13 field experiment provides an extensive dataset for such validation at spatial scales on the order of 10 km in a range of atmospheric stability and wind conditions. CWEX-13 took place within a 300 MW wind farm in central Iowa during summer 2013 and featured strong diurnal cycles. The wind turbines are sited irregularly, creating a heterogenous "canopy". Three profiling lidars, numerous surface flux stations, and a scanning lidar sampled wakes from multiple turbines. Further, the wind farm owner/operator has provided access to turbine power production and wind speed measurement data for model validation, providing ~ 200 measurements of proxies that integrate the wind profile over the rotor disk, from 40 m to 120 m above the surface. Building on previous work that identified optimal physics options, grid configurations, and boundary condition data sets by comparison to lidar wind profile measurements, we execute simulations with the WRF Wind Farm Parameterization for a ten-day period featuring moderate winds and strong diurnal cycles. We evaluate simulations with different modeling choices (e.g., vertical resolution, approaches to

  13. Boundary Transgressions: An Issue In Psychotherapeutic Encounter ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Boundary transgressions tend to be conceptualized on a continuum ranging from boundary crossings to boundary violations. Boundary crossings (e.g. accepting an inexpensive holiday gift from a client, unintentionally encountering a client in public, or attending a client's special event) are described in the literature as ...

  14. Maximum likely scale estimation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Loog, Marco; Pedersen, Kim Steenstrup; Markussen, Bo

    2005-01-01

    A maximum likelihood local scale estimation principle is presented. An actual implementation of the estimation principle uses second order moments of multiple measurements at a fixed location in the image. These measurements consist of Gaussian derivatives possibly taken at several scales and...

  15. Maximum modular graphs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trajanovski, S.; Wang, H.; Van Mieghem, P.

    2012-01-01

    Modularity has been explored as an important quantitative metric for community and cluster detection in networks. Finding the maximum modularity of a given graph has been proven to be NPcomplete and therefore, several heuristic algorithms have been proposed. We investigate the problem of finding the

  16. Blurring Boundaries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Neergaard, Ulla; Nielsen, Ruth

    2010-01-01

    This article builds on the results obtained in the so-called Blurring Boundaries project which was undertaken at the Law Department, Copenhagen Business School, in the period from 2007 to 2009. It looks at the sustainability of the Danish welfare state in an EU law context and on the integration...... of welfare functions into EU law both from an internal market law and a constitutional law perspective. The main problem areas covered by the Blurring Boundaries project were studied in sub-projects on: 1) Internal market law and welfare services; 2) Fundamental rights and non-discrimination law aspects......; and 3) Services of general interest. In the Blurring Boundaries project, three aspects of the European Social Model have been particularly highlighted: the constitutionalisation of the European Social Model, its multi-level legal character, and the clash between market access justice at EU level...

  17. Maximum Entropy Moment Systems and Galilean Invariance

    OpenAIRE

    Junk, Michael; Unterreiter, Andreas

    2001-01-01

    In this article, we investigate the maximum entropy moment closure in gas dynamics. We show that the usual choice of polynomial weight functions may lead to hyperbolic systems with an unpleasant state space: equilibrium states are boundary points with possibly singular fluxes. In order to avoid singularities, the necessary arises to find weight functions which growing sub-quadratically at infinity. Unfortunately, this requirement leads to a conflict with Galilean invariance of the moment syst...

  18. Grain boundary melting in ice

    OpenAIRE

    Thomson, E. S.; Hansen-Goos, Hendrik; Wilen, L. A.; Wettlaufer, J. S.

    2012-01-01

    We describe an optical scattering study of grain boundary premelting in water ice. Ubiquitous long ranged attractive polarization forces act to suppress grain boundary melting whereas repulsive forces originating in screened Coulomb interactions and classical colligative effects enhance it. The liquid enhancing effects can be manipulated by adding dopant ions to the system. For all measured grain boundaries this leads to increasing premelted film thickness with increasing electrolyte concentr...

  19. Maximum Likelihood Fusion Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-09

    Symposium of Robotics Re- search. Sienna, Italy: Springer, 2003. [12] D. Hall and J. Llinas, “An introduction to multisensor data fusion ,” Proceed- ings of...a data fusion approach for combining Gaussian metric models of an environment constructed by multiple agents that operate outside of a global... data fusion , hypothesis testing,maximum likelihood estimation, mobile robot navigation REPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE 11. SPONSOR/MONITOR’S REPORT

  20. Geochemistry and geochronology of the Late Permian mafic intrusions along the boundary area of Jiamusi and Songnen-Zhangguangcai Range massifs and adjacent regions, northeastern China: Petrogenesis and implications for the tectonic evolution of the Mudanjiang Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Yu; Ge, Wen-chun; Yang, Hao; Xu, Wen-liang; Bi, Jun-hui; Wang, Zhi-hui

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents zircon U-Pb ages, whole-rock major and trace element data, and Hf isotope data for the metagabbros from the Zhushan pluton and gabbros from the Taiping pluton along the boundary area of Jiamusi and Songnen-Zhangguangcai Range massifs and adjacent regions, which will not only place important constraints on the rock-forming ages, source characteristics and tectonic setting of these gabbros, but will also provide insights into understanding the Permian tectonic evolution between the Jiamusi Massif and the Songnen-Zhangguangcai Range Massif. Zircon U-Pb dating, determined using laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry and secondary-ion mass spectrometry, indicates that the magmatic zircons from the Zhushan and Taiping plutons yield 206Pb/238U ages of 256 ± 2 Ma and 259 ± 3 Ma, respectively, interpreted as the emplacement ages of the intrusions. The metagabbros from the Zhushan pluton display the geochemical characteristics of calc-alkaline series rocks, and are enriched in light rare earth and large ion lithophile elements, and depleted in Nb, Ta, P, Zr and Hf. The εHf(t) values of magmatic zircons in these metagabbros vary from - 5.47 to + 0.74. All these geochemical features indicate that the primary magma of the Zhushan pluton was derived from an enriched lithospheric mantle source that was metasomatized by subducted slab-derived fluids. The gabbros from the Taiping pluton are also enriched in large ion lithophile elements (e.g., Rb, Ba and U) relative to high field strength elements, and have negative Nb-Ta-P anomalies, with εHf(t) values of - 4.02 to - 1.70. It is inferred that they also formed from a primary magma generated by the partial melting of enriched lithospheric mantle that was metasomatized by subducted slab-derived fluids. The rocks from the Zhushan and Taiping plutons have similar petrogenetic processes, but their primary magmas are likely to be derived from two distinct magma sources based on geochemical and

  1. Maximum Interconnectedness and Availability for Directional Airborne Range Extension Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-29

    affecting the design and management of the network topology [2][3]. In particular, such blockages can cause significant periods of unavailability of the...a standard definition in graph theoretic and networking literature that is related to, but different from, the metric we consider. August 29, 2016...of their flightpaths are assumed to be small compared to the distance between the aircraft. A representative node layout is illustrated in Fig. 5

  2. The threshold and the maximum range of pharmacological response ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The need for further studies on the factors responsible for occurrence of anatomical or regional differences in the sensitivity of the gastrointestinal tract to the neurotransmitters was also stressed. Keywords:Pharmacological sensitivity, gastrointestinal smooth muscle, acetylcholine, histamine, adrenaline, Nigerian duck.

  3. Albedo Boundary

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    MGS MOC Release No. MOC2-510, 11 October 2003The sharp, nearly straight line that runs diagonally across the center of this April 2003 Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image is an albedo boundary. Albedois a term that refers to reflectance of sunlight. A surface with a low albedo is one that appears dark because it reflects less light than a high albedo (bright) surface. On Mars, albedo boundaries occur between two materials of differing texture, particle size, or composition, or some combination of these three factors. The boundary shown here is remarkable because it is so sharp and straight. This is caused by wind. Most likely, the entire surface was once covered with the lower-albedo (darker) material that is now seen in the upper half of the image. At some later time, wind stripped away this darker material from the surfaces in the lower half of the image. The difference in albedo here might be related to composition, and possibly particle size. This picture is located near the southwest rim of Schiaparelli Basin at 5.5oS, 345.9oW. The picture covers an area 3 km (1.9 mi) wide and is illuminated by sunlight from the left.

  4. PLSS Townships and Sections, Sections-The data set is a polygon feature consisting of 221 polygons representing section boundaries. It was created to maintain the location of township and range sections., Published in 1995, Davis County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Local Govt | GIS Inventory — PLSS Townships and Sections dataset current as of 1995. Sections-The data set is a polygon feature consisting of 221 polygons representing section boundaries. It was...

  5. Maximum Entropy Fundamentals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Topsøe

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: In its modern formulation, the Maximum Entropy Principle was promoted by E.T. Jaynes, starting in the mid-fifties. The principle dictates that one should look for a distribution, consistent with available information, which maximizes the entropy. However, this principle focuses only on distributions and it appears advantageous to bring information theoretical thinking more prominently into play by also focusing on the "observer" and on coding. This view was brought forward by the second named author in the late seventies and is the view we will follow-up on here. It leads to the consideration of a certain game, the Code Length Game and, via standard game theoretical thinking, to a principle of Game Theoretical Equilibrium. This principle is more basic than the Maximum Entropy Principle in the sense that the search for one type of optimal strategies in the Code Length Game translates directly into the search for distributions with maximum entropy. In the present paper we offer a self-contained and comprehensive treatment of fundamentals of both principles mentioned, based on a study of the Code Length Game. Though new concepts and results are presented, the reading should be instructional and accessible to a rather wide audience, at least if certain mathematical details are left aside at a rst reading. The most frequently studied instance of entropy maximization pertains to the Mean Energy Model which involves a moment constraint related to a given function, here taken to represent "energy". This type of application is very well known from the literature with hundreds of applications pertaining to several different elds and will also here serve as important illustration of the theory. But our approach reaches further, especially regarding the study of continuity properties of the entropy function, and this leads to new results which allow a discussion of models with so-called entropy loss. These results have tempted us to speculate over

  6. Maximum Entropy Fundamentals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harremoeës, P.; Topsøe, F.

    2001-09-01

    In its modern formulation, the Maximum Entropy Principle was promoted by E.T. Jaynes, starting in the mid-fifties. The principle dictates that one should look for a distribution, consistent with available information, which maximizes the entropy. However, this principle focuses only on distributions and it appears advantageous to bring information theoretical thinking more prominently into play by also focusing on the "observer" and on coding. This view was brought forward by the second named author in the late seventies and is the view we will follow-up on here. It leads to the consideration of a certain game, the Code Length Game and, via standard game theoretical thinking, to a principle of Game Theoretical Equilibrium. This principle is more basic than the Maximum Entropy Principle in the sense that the search for one type of optimal strategies in the Code Length Game translates directly into the search for distributions with maximum entropy. In the present paper we offer a self-contained and comprehensive treatment of fundamentals of both principles mentioned, based on a study of the Code Length Game. Though new concepts and results are presented, the reading should be instructional and accessible to a rather wide audience, at least if certain mathematical details are left aside at a rst reading. The most frequently studied instance of entropy maximization pertains to the Mean Energy Model which involves a moment constraint related to a given function, here taken to represent "energy". This type of application is very well known from the literature with hundreds of applications pertaining to several different elds and will also here serve as important illustration of the theory. But our approach reaches further, especially regarding the study of continuity properties of the entropy function, and this leads to new results which allow a discussion of models with so-called entropy loss. These results have tempted us to speculate over the development of natural

  7. Estimating landscape carrying capacity through maximum clique analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donovan, Therese; Warrington, Greg; Schwenk, W. Scott; Dinitz, Jeffrey H.

    2012-01-01

    Habitat suitability (HS) maps are widely used tools in wildlife science and establish a link between wildlife populations and landscape pattern. Although HS maps spatially depict the distribution of optimal resources for a species, they do not reveal the population size a landscape is capable of supporting--information that is often crucial for decision makers and managers. We used a new approach, "maximum clique analysis," to demonstrate how HS maps for territorial species can be used to estimate the carrying capacity, N(k), of a given landscape. We estimated the N(k) of Ovenbirds (Seiurus aurocapillus) and bobcats (Lynx rufus) in an 1153-km2 study area in Vermont, USA. These two species were selected to highlight different approaches in building an HS map as well as computational challenges that can arise in a maximum clique analysis. We derived 30-m2 HS maps for each species via occupancy modeling (Ovenbird) and by resource utilization modeling (bobcats). For each species, we then identified all pixel locations on the map (points) that had sufficient resources in the surrounding area to maintain a home range (termed a "pseudo-home range"). These locations were converted to a mathematical graph, where any two points were linked if two pseudo-home ranges could exist on the landscape without violating territory boundaries. We used the program Cliquer to find the maximum clique of each graph. The resulting estimates of N(k) = 236 Ovenbirds and N(k) = 42 female bobcats were sensitive to different assumptions and model inputs. Estimates of N(k) via alternative, ad hoc methods were 1.4 to > 30 times greater than the maximum clique estimate, suggesting that the alternative results may be upwardly biased. The maximum clique analysis was computationally intensive but could handle problems with clustered distributions (where the problem can be broken into several, smaller problems), or for species with large home ranges relative to grid scale where resampling the points to

  8. Regularized maximum correntropy machine

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Jim Jing-Yan

    2015-02-12

    In this paper we investigate the usage of regularized correntropy framework for learning of classifiers from noisy labels. The class label predictors learned by minimizing transitional loss functions are sensitive to the noisy and outlying labels of training samples, because the transitional loss functions are equally applied to all the samples. To solve this problem, we propose to learn the class label predictors by maximizing the correntropy between the predicted labels and the true labels of the training samples, under the regularized Maximum Correntropy Criteria (MCC) framework. Moreover, we regularize the predictor parameter to control the complexity of the predictor. The learning problem is formulated by an objective function considering the parameter regularization and MCC simultaneously. By optimizing the objective function alternately, we develop a novel predictor learning algorithm. The experiments on two challenging pattern classification tasks show that it significantly outperforms the machines with transitional loss functions.

  9. boundary dissipation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Camurdan

    1998-01-01

    are coupled by appropriate trace operators. This overall model differs from those previously studied in the literature in that the elastic chamber floor is here more realistically modeled by a hyperbolic Kirchoff equation, rather than by a parabolic Euler-Bernoulli equation with Kelvin-Voight structural damping, as in past literature. Thus, the hyperbolic/parabolic coupled system of past literature is replaced here by a hyperbolic/hyperbolic coupled model. The main result of this paper is a uniform stabilization of the coupled PDE system by a (physically appealing boundary dissipation.

  10. Three dimensional winds: A maximum cross-correlation application to elastic lidar data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buttler, William Tillman [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States)

    1996-05-01

    Maximum cross-correlation techniques have been used with satellite data to estimate winds and sea surface velocities for several years. Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is currently using a variation of the basic maximum cross-correlation technique, coupled with a deterministic application of a vector median filter, to measure transverse winds as a function of range and altitude from incoherent elastic backscatter lidar (light detection and ranging) data taken throughout large volumes within the atmospheric boundary layer. Hourly representations of three-dimensional wind fields, derived from elastic lidar data taken during an air-quality study performed in a region of complex terrain near Sunland Park, New Mexico, are presented and compared with results from an Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) approved laser doppler velocimeter. The wind fields showed persistent large scale eddies as well as general terrain-following winds in the Rio Grande valley.

  11. Breaking Boundaries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    produce desperate attempts to maintain old or create new differences. Political and sociological research into these complex processes has been mainly guided by structural and normative concerns. Faced with growing evidence about the instability of world order and domestic social structures alike, policy....... As a fundamental human experience, liminality transmits cultural practices, codes, rituals, and meanings in-between aggregate structures and uncertain outcomes. As a methodological tool it is well placed to overcome disciplinary boundaries, which often direct attention to specific structures or sectors of society....... Its capacity to provide explanatory accounts of seemingly unstructured situations provides an opportunity to link experience-based and culture-oriented approaches not only to contemporary problems but also to undertake comparisons across historical periods. From a perspective of liminality...

  12. Retinal-image quality and maximum disparity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, José J.; Jiménez, J. R.; Ortiz, Carolina; Alarcón, Aixa

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to evaluate the role of interocular differences in retinal-image quality in stereoscopic depth perception. To characterize retinal-image quality, we took the Strehl ratio from a double-pass device. Stereopsis was quantified through maximum disparity using random-dot stereograms (RDS). Data were taken for 25 observers with ages ranging from 21 to 61 years. The results show a significant correlation between maximum disparity and interocular differences in the Strehl ratio: the lower interocular differences, the higher maximum disparity. No significant dependence with age was found.

  13. Conductivity maximum in a charged colloidal suspension

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bastea, S

    2009-01-27

    Molecular dynamics simulations of a charged colloidal suspension in the salt-free regime show that the system exhibits an electrical conductivity maximum as a function of colloid charge. We attribute this behavior to two main competing effects: colloid effective charge saturation due to counterion 'condensation' and diffusion slowdown due to the relaxation effect. In agreement with previous observations, we also find that the effective transported charge is larger than the one determined by the Stern layer and suggest that it corresponds to the boundary fluid layer at the surface of the colloidal particles.

  14. Influence of boundary conditions on the Southern Hemisphere atmospheric circulation during the last glacial maximum Influência das condições de fronteira na circulação atmosférica do Hemisfério Sul durante o último máximo glacial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Justino

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Based upon coupled climate simulations driven by present day and glacial boundary conditions, we demonstrate that although the ice sheet topography modifications during the glacial period are primarily placed in the Northern Hemisphere (NH, a climate simulation that employs the ICE-5G glacial topography delivers significantly enhanced climate anomalies in the Southern Hemisphere (SH as well. These conditions, in association with climate anomalies produced by the modification of the atmospheric CO² concentration characteristic of the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM interval, are shown to be the primary forcing of the SH climate during this epoch. Climate anomalies up to -6°C over the Antarctic region and -4°C over South America are predicted to occur in respect to present day conditions. Accompanying the SH cooling in the LGM simulation there exists a remarkable reduction in the specific humidity, which in turn enforces the overall Southern Hemisphere cooling due to the weaker greenhouse capacity of the dry atmosphere.Com base em simulações numéricas conduzidas com condições de fronteiras características dos períodos glaciais e atual, demonstra-se que embora as maiores anomalias da topografia da Terra no período glacial estejam no Hemisfério Norte, esta inclusão dos blocos de gelo leva a substanciais mudanças na circulação atmosférica austral para aquela época, indicando uma forte teleconexão inter-hemisférica. Em associação com a redução nos níveis de carbono atmosférico para 200 ppm, anomalias de temperatura de -6°C em torno da região antártica, e -4°C no continente sul-americano são simuladas para o último máximo glacial (UMG em relação a condições atuais. Concomitantemente, o UMG é caracterizado por uma drástica redução na umidade específica, que por sua vez intensifica o esfriamento inicial devido à mais fraca capacidade de estufa da atmosfera mais seca.

  15. Numerical Experiments in Error Control for Sound Propagation Using a Damping Layer Boundary Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodrich, John W.

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents results from numerical experiments for controlling the error caused by a damping layer boundary treatment when simulating the propagation of an acoustic signal from a continuous pressure source. The computations are with the 2D Linearized Euler Equations (LEE) for both a uniform mean flow and a steady parallel jet. The numerical experiments are with algorithms that are third, fifth, seventh and ninth order accurate in space and time. The numerical domain is enclosed in a damping layer boundary treatment. The damping is implemented in a time accurate manner, with simple polynomial damping profiles of second, fourth, sixth and eighth power. At the outer boundaries of the damping layer the propagating solution is uniformly set to zero. The complete boundary treatment is remarkably simple and intrinsically independant from the dimension of the spatial domain. The reported results show the relative effect on the error from the boundary treatment by varying the damping layer width, damping profile power, damping amplitude, propagtion time, grid resolution and algorithm order. The issue that is being addressed is not the accuracy of the numerical solution when compared to a mathematical solution, but the effect of the complete boundary treatment on the numerical solution, and to what degree the error in the numerical solution from the complete boundary treatment can be controlled. We report maximum relative absolute errors from just the boundary treatment that range from O[10-2] to O[10-7].

  16. Dislocation nucleation governed softening and maximum strength in nano-twinned metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaoyan; Wei, Yujie; Lu, Lei; Lu, Ke; Gao, Huajian

    2010-04-08

    In conventional metals, there is plenty of space for dislocations-line defects whose motion results in permanent material deformation-to multiply, so that the metal strengths are controlled by dislocation interactions with grain boundaries and other obstacles. For nanostructured materials, in contrast, dislocation multiplication is severely confined by the nanometre-scale geometries so that continued plasticity can be expected to be source-controlled. Nano-grained polycrystalline materials were found to be strong but brittle, because both nucleation and motion of dislocations are effectively suppressed by the nanoscale crystallites. Here we report a dislocation-nucleation-controlled mechanism in nano-twinned metals in which there are plenty of dislocation nucleation sites but dislocation motion is not confined. We show that dislocation nucleation governs the strength of such materials, resulting in their softening below a critical twin thickness. Large-scale molecular dynamics simulations and a kinetic theory of dislocation nucleation in nano-twinned metals show that there exists a transition in deformation mechanism, occurring at a critical twin-boundary spacing for which strength is maximized. At this point, the classical Hall-Petch type of strengthening due to dislocation pile-up and cutting through twin planes switches to a dislocation-nucleation-controlled softening mechanism with twin-boundary migration resulting from nucleation and motion of partial dislocations parallel to the twin planes. Most previous studies did not consider a sufficient range of twin thickness and therefore missed this strength-softening regime. The simulations indicate that the critical twin-boundary spacing for the onset of softening in nano-twinned copper and the maximum strength depend on the grain size: the smaller the grain size, the smaller the critical twin-boundary spacing, and the higher the maximum strength of the material.

  17. Technology for Boundaries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bødker, Susanne; Kristensen, Jannie Friis; Nielsen, Christina

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents a study of an organisation, which is undergoing a process transforming organisational and technological boundaries. In particular, we shall look at three kinds of boundaries: the work to maintain and change the boundary between the organisation and its customers; boundaries.......After analysing the history and the current boundary work, the paper will propose new technological support for boundary work. In particular the paper will suggest means of supporting boundaries when these are productive and for changing boundaries when this seems more appropriate. In total, flexible technologies...... seem a core issue when dealing with technology for boundaries....

  18. On some problems of the maximum entropy ansatz

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    aforesaid problems are put forward. Pilot calculations involving the ground quantum eigenenergy states of the quartic oscillator, the particle-in-a-box model, and the classical Maxwellian speed and energy distributions lend credence to our approach. Keywords. Maximum entropy ansatz; Padй-type approximants; boundary ...

  19. Continuity of the Maximum-Entropy Inference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephan, Weis

    2014-09-01

    We study the inverse problem of inferring the state of a finite-level quantum system from expected values of a fixed set of observables, by maximizing a continuous ranking function. We have proved earlier that the maximum-entropy inference can be a discontinuous map from the convex set of expected values to the convex set of states because the image contains states of reduced support, while this map restricts to a smooth parametrization of a Gibbsian family of fully supported states. Here we prove for arbitrary ranking functions that the inference is continuous up to boundary points. This follows from a continuity condition in terms of the openness of the restricted linear map from states to their expected values. The openness condition shows also that ranking functions with a discontinuous inference are typical. Moreover it shows that the inference is continuous in the restriction to any polytope which implies that a discontinuity belongs to the quantum domain of non-commutative observables and that a geodesic closure of a Gibbsian family equals the set of maximum-entropy states. We discuss eight descriptions of the set of maximum-entropy states with proofs of accuracy and an analysis of deviations.

  20. Grain boundary melting in ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomson, E. S.; Hansen-Goos, Hendrik; Wettlaufer, J. S.; Wilen, L. A.

    2013-03-01

    We describe an optical scattering study of grain boundary premelting in water ice. Ubiquitous long ranged attractive polarization forces act to suppress grain boundary melting whereas repulsive forces originating in screened Coulomb interactions and classical colligative effects enhance it. The liquid enhancing effects can be manipulated by adding dopant ions to the system. For all measured grain boundaries this leads to increasing premelted film thickness with increasing electrolyte concentration. Although we understand that the interfacial surface charge densities qs and solute concentrations can potentially dominate the film thickness, we cannot directly measure them within a given grain boundary. Therefore, as a framework for interpreting the data we consider two appropriate qs dependent limits; one is dominated by the colligative effect and other is dominated by electrostatic interactions.

  1. Linear baroclinic instability in the presence of heat inflow from the lower boundary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Fantini

    1995-04-01

    Full Text Available A linear Eady model with a parameterization of heat influx from the lower boundary is studied analytically in order to obtain the characteristics of baroclinic normal modes modified by this non-adiabatic source. The results display a secondary maximum of growth rate at high wave numbers and a range of absolutely unstable waves, thus suggesting that the property observed among mid-latitude explosive cyclones of being near-stationary in the phase of maximum growth may be captured by this representation of the air-sea energy exchange.

  2. Maximum Principles for Discrete and Semidiscrete Reaction-Diffusion Equation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petr Stehlík

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We study reaction-diffusion equations with a general reaction function f on one-dimensional lattices with continuous or discrete time ux′  (or  Δtux=k(ux-1-2ux+ux+1+f(ux, x∈Z. We prove weak and strong maximum and minimum principles for corresponding initial-boundary value problems. Whereas the maximum principles in the semidiscrete case (continuous time exhibit similar features to those of fully continuous reaction-diffusion model, in the discrete case the weak maximum principle holds for a smaller class of functions and the strong maximum principle is valid in a weaker sense. We describe in detail how the validity of maximum principles depends on the nonlinearity and the time step. We illustrate our results on the Nagumo equation with the bistable nonlinearity.

  3. Single ion heat engine with maximum efficiency at maximum power

    OpenAIRE

    Abah, Obinna; Rossnagel, Johannes; Jacob, Georg; Deffner, Sebastian; Schmidt-Kaler, Ferdinand; Singer, Kilian; Lutz, Eric

    2012-01-01

    We propose an experimental scheme to realize a nano heat engine with a single ion. An Otto cycle may be implemented by confining the ion in a linear Paul trap with tapered geometry and coupling it to engineered laser reservoirs. The quantum efficiency at maximum power is analytically determined in various regimes. Moreover, Monte Carlo simulations of the engine are performed that demonstrate its feasibility and its ability to operate at maximum efficiency of 30% under realistic conditions.

  4. Structure and properties of grain boundaries. Progress report, 15 July 1983-14 July 1984

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balluffi, R.W.; Bristowe, P.D.

    1984-03-01

    Results were obtained in the following areas: determination of relative grain boundary energies by the rotating crystallite method; simple structural unit model for core-dependent properties of tilt boundaries; twist boundary energies for metals with long-ranged pairwise interatomic potentials; structural unit/grain boundary dislocation model for grain boundary structure; detection of expansion of boundaries using diffraction; effect of secondary relaxations on diffraction from high-..sigma.. (001) twist boundaries; and mechanism of grain boundary migration.

  5. Attempts to improve the fatigue characteristics of the austenitic steel X5CrNi18-10 in the temperature range of 25-600 C by mechanical boundary layer hardening; Zur Verbesserung des Ermuedungsverhaltens des austenitischen Stahls X5CrNi18-10 im Temperaturbereich 25-600 C durch mechanische Randschichtverfestigungsverfahren

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nikitin, Ivan

    2007-01-31

    Pieces of the austenitic steel X5CrNi18-10 whose boundary layers had been hardened by different methods were investigated with a view to their fatigue deformation characteristics in the temperature range of 25-600 degC. Parallel to this, microstructural and X-ray analyses provided deeper understanding of fatigue deformation. The microstructure was characterized, among others, by TEM. Boundary layers were solidified by rolling, by a combination of mechanical and thermal processes, by high-temperature rolling, and by laser shock solidification. The analyses focused on microstructural processes and on the intrinsic stress stability and provided important information on the fabrication of structural components with optimised life. (orig.)

  6. Grain boundaries: Progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balluffi, R.W.; Bristowe, P.D.

    1988-02-01

    Quantitative measurements of grain boundary structure factors using x-ray diffraction have been performed on low angle (001) twist boundaries in gold. Also, a computer atomistic simulation program is being implemented to examine the equilibrium properties of a series of boundaries in gold. Simulation of boundaries at room temperature have been performed. Electron microscopy of grain boundary melting in aluminum was also performed. Results indicated an absence of melting. (CBS)

  7. On Boundaries in Linguistic Continua.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorgensen, J. Normann; Kristensen, Kjeld

    1995-01-01

    Discusses the notion of regional standards of a language with regard to modern Danish. Regional and national standards of a language as well as local dialect are defined. The article shows that, for a geographical entity, a statistically determined boundary can be established in the range between the extremes of a regional dialect and national…

  8. Principles of maximum entropy and maximum caliber in statistical physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pressé, Steve; Ghosh, Kingshuk; Lee, Julian; Dill, Ken A.

    2013-07-01

    The variational principles called maximum entropy (MaxEnt) and maximum caliber (MaxCal) are reviewed. MaxEnt originated in the statistical physics of Boltzmann and Gibbs, as a theoretical tool for predicting the equilibrium states of thermal systems. Later, entropy maximization was also applied to matters of information, signal transmission, and image reconstruction. Recently, since the work of Shore and Johnson, MaxEnt has been regarded as a principle that is broader than either physics or information alone. MaxEnt is a procedure that ensures that inferences drawn from stochastic data satisfy basic self-consistency requirements. The different historical justifications for the entropy S=-∑ipilog⁡pi and its corresponding variational principles are reviewed. As an illustration of the broadening purview of maximum entropy principles, maximum caliber, which is path entropy maximization applied to the trajectories of dynamical systems, is also reviewed. Examples are given in which maximum caliber is used to interpret dynamical fluctuations in biology and on the nanoscale, in single-molecule and few-particle systems such as molecular motors, chemical reactions, biological feedback circuits, and diffusion in microfluidics devices.

  9. Investigation of Maximum Blade Loading Capability of Lift-Offset Rotors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeo, Hyeonsoo; Johnson, Wayne

    2013-01-01

    Maximum blade loading capability of a coaxial, lift-offset rotor is investigated using a rotorcraft configuration designed in the context of short-haul, medium-size civil and military missions. The aircraft was sized for a 6600-lb payload and a range of 300 nm. The rotor planform and twist were optimized for hover and cruise performance. For the present rotor performance calculations, the collective pitch angle is progressively increased up to and through stall with the shaft angle set to zero. The effects of lift offset on rotor lift, power, controls, and blade airloads and structural loads are examined. The maximum lift capability of the coaxial rotor increases as lift offset increases and extends well beyond the McHugh lift boundary as the lift potential of the advancing blades are fully realized. A parametric study is conducted to examine the differences between the present coaxial rotor and the McHugh rotor in terms of maximum lift capabilities and to identify important design parameters that define the maximum lift capability of the rotor. The effects of lift offset on rotor blade airloads and structural loads are also investigated. Flap bending moment increases substantially as lift offset increases to carry the hub roll moment even at low collective values. The magnitude of flap bending moment is dictated by the lift-offset value (hub roll moment) but is less sensitive to collective and speed.

  10. Boundary layer thickness effect on boattail drag

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaha, B. J.; Chamberlain, R.; Bober, L. J.

    1976-01-01

    A combined experimental and analytical program was conducted to investigate the effects of boundary layer changes on the flow over high angle boattail nozzles. The tests were run on an isolated axisymmetric sting mounted model. Various boattail geometries were investigated at high subsonic speeds over a range of boundary layer thicknesses. In general, boundary layer effects were small at speeds up to Mach 0.8. However, at higher speeds significant regions of separated flow were present on the boattail. When separation was present large reductions in boattail drag resulted with increasing boundary layer thickness. The analysis predicts both of these trends.

  11. Dimension of Fractal Basin Boundaries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Bae-Sig

    In many dynamical systems, multiple attractors coexist for certain parameter ranges. The set of initial conditions that asymptotically approach each attractor is its basin of attraction. These basins can be intertwined on arbitrary small scales. Basin boundary can be either smooth or fractal. Dynamical systems that have fractal basin boundary show "final state sensitivity" of the initial conditions. A measure of this sensitivity (uncertainty exponent alpha) is related to the dimension of the basin boundary d = D - alpha , where D is the dimension of the phase space and d is the dimension of the basin boundary. At metamorphosis values of the parameter, there might happen a conversion from smooth to fractal basin boundary (smooth-fractal metamorphosis) or a conversion from fractal to another fractal basin boundary characteristically different from the previous fractal one (fractal-fractal metamorphosis). The dimension changes continuously with the parameter except at the metamorphosis values where the dimension of the basin boundary jumps discontinuously. We chose the Henon map and the forced damped pendulum to investigate this. Scaling of the basin volumes near the metamorphosis values of the parameter is also being studied for the Henon map. Observations are explained analytically by using low dimensional model map. We look for universal scalings of the dimension of fractal basin boundaries near type I and type III intermittency transitions to chaos. Type I intermittency can occur as the system experiences a saddle-node (tangent) bifurcation and type III intermittency can occur as the system experiences an inverted period doubling bifurcation. At these bifurcations, multiple attractors with fractal basin boundaries can be created. It is found the dimension scales, with the parameter, according to the power law d = d_{o } - k| p - p_{c}| ^{beta} with beta = 1/2, where p is the system parameter, p _{c} is the bifurcation value, k is a scaling constant, and d_{o} is

  12. State Agency Administrative Boundaries

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — This database comprises 28 State agency boundaries and point of contact. The Kansas Geological Survey collected legal descriptions of the boundaries for various...

  13. Allegheny County Municipal Boundaries

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — This dataset demarcates the municipal boundaries in Allegheny County. Data was created to portray the boundaries of the 130 Municipalities in Allegheny County the...

  14. HUD GIS Boundary Files

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Housing and Urban Development — The HUD GIS Boundary Files are intended to supplement boundary files available from the U.S. Census Bureau. The files are for community planners interested in...

  15. Political State Boundary (National)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Transportation — State boundaries with political limit - boundaries extending into the ocean (NTAD). The TIGER/Line Files are shapefiles and related database files (.dbf) that are an...

  16. Z-contrast imaging and grain boundaries in semiconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chisholm, M.F.; Pennycook, S.J.

    1996-03-01

    Interest in grain boundaries in semiconductors is linked to the application of polycrystalline semiconductors as photovoltaic and interconnect materials. In real devices such as solar cells and MOS structures as well as future devices such as flat-panel displays, the intergranular regions of the polycrystalline solid have a significant effect on the flow of electronic current. These grain boundary barriers exist because the chemical potential of the boundary atoms are shifted from the bulk value by the change in local symmetry. The chemical potential is also changed by impurities, other structural defects, and other phases in the boundary. The lack of knowledge on the atomic structure of grain boundaries is, at present, the greatest barrier to advancements in the understanding of the electrical properties of these defects. The advances of the last few years have provided the tools with which to probe these interfaces at the true atomic scale. One such tool is the high-resolution scanning transmission electron microscope installed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (VG Microscopes HB603) that can form a 1.27 {Angstrom} electron probe. Images are formed by scanning the probe across a thin sample and using an annular detector to collect electrons scattered to high angles. Because the annular detector collects electrons scattered over a wide range of angles, phase correlation and dynamical diffraction effects are averaged by this annular integration. Thus, an image with incoherent characteristics is produced and retained to relatively large specimen thickness. The key advantage of incoherent imaging is that when the microscope is focused to produce maximum image contrast, the bright image features directly correspond to the positions of the atomic columns.

  17. Experimental investigation of wave boundary layer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sumer, B. Mutlu

    2003-01-01

    A review is presented of experimental investigation of wave boundary layer. The review is organized in six main sections. The first section describes the wave boundary layer in a real-life environment and its simulation in the laboratory in an oscillating water tunnel and in a water tank...... with an oscillating seabed. A brief account is given of measured quantities, measurement techniques (LDA, PIV, flow visualization) and limitations/constraints in the experimental investigation of the wave boundary layer in the laboratory. The second section concentrates on uniform oscillating boundary layers...... with a smooth bed. The boundary layer process is described over the entire range of the Reynolds number (Re from practically nil to Re = O(107)), from the laminar regime to the transitional regime and to the fully developed turbulent regime. The third section focuses on the effect of the boundary roughness...

  18. ENUGU USING MAXIMUM TEMPERATURE DATA

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2008-01-28

    Jan 28, 2008 ... daily global solar radiation on a horizontal surface for some towns in Nigeria. For example, Sanusi and Aliyu (2005) used maximum temperature data to predict for. Sokoto. lheonu (2001) did the same for lbadan. Badmus and Momoh(2005) did likewise for Birnin Kebbi. So did Awachie and Okeke(1 990) for ...

  19. Maximum stellar iron core mass

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. An analytical method of estimating the mass of a stellar iron core, just prior to core collapse, is .... approximately as an ideal gas, the mean kinetic energies of the free electrons and atomic nuclei will be equal. .... whose density varies from a maximum at the core's center to a minimum at its 'surface'. The dimensional ...

  20. Abolishing the maximum tension principle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariusz P. Da̧browski

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available We find the series of example theories for which the relativistic limit of maximum tension Fmax=c4/4G represented by the entropic force can be abolished. Among them the varying constants theories, some generalized entropy models applied both for cosmological and black hole horizons as well as some generalized uncertainty principle models.

  1. maXImum medical aid

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1990-08-04

    Aug 4, 1990 ... the passage of time. S Afr Med J 1990; 78: 147-151. Medicine prices have increased significantly in recent years. Over the past 5 years, the medicines price .... Maximum. "- dispensed. No. in. Approved price before. Product list name. Strength. Form. Pack prof. fee (R) examples. Allopurinol. 100 mg. Tablets.

  2. Efeito da massagem clássica na percepção subjetiva de dor, edema, amplitude articular e força máxima após dor muscular tardia induzida pelo exercício Effect of classical massage on subjective perceived soreness, edema, range of motion and maximum strength after delayed onset muscle soreness induced by exercise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    César Cavinato Cal Abad

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available O treino de força com cargas elevadas tem induzido indivíduos a apresentarem sintomas de dano muscular que incluem a dor muscular tardia. Na tentativa de diminuir sintomas e desconforto da DOMS, estratégias têm sido utilizadas, entre elas, a massagem. O objetivo do presente estudo foi verificar os efeitos da massagem clássica na percepção subjetiva de dor (DOMS, circunferência do braço (CIR, amplitude de movimento (ADM e força máxima (1RM após protocolo para indução de DOMS. Para isso, 18 adultos jovens saudáveis do gênero masculino foram divididos em três grupos (G1 = massagem; G2 = protocolo; G3 = protocolo + massagem equalizados pelo teste de uma força máxima de flexão de cotovelo no banco Scott. O protocolo de indução de DOMS consistiu de 30 ações excêntricas musculares supramáximas (seis séries de cinco repetições a 110% de 1RM. A massagem foi realizada no grupo G3 imediatamente após o protocolo durante seis minutos. As variáveis dependentes (DOMS, CIR, ADM foram avaliadas 24, 48, 72 e 96 horas após o protocolo, enquanto a força máxima, apenas após 48 e 96 horas. Os resultados indicaram aumento na DOMS e diminuição na ADM e 1RM, similar aos de outros estudos que utilizaram protocolos semelhantes. No entanto, não houve diferenças entre os grupos G2 e G3 em nenhuma das variáveis analisadas. Pode-se concluir que com esse design experimental o protocolo utilizado foi eficaz para provocar as alterações nas variáveis analisadas e a massagem não causou nenhum benefício na recuperação das funções musculares nem na percepção subjetiva de dor.Heavy resistance training induces to symptoms of muscle damage which include delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS. Some strategies (i.e. massage have been used to attenuate these symptoms and to reduce discomfort associated with DOMS. This study aimed to investigate the effects of classical massage on DOMS perception, limb girth (CIR, range of motion (ADM and

  3. Efeito da amplitude de movimento no número máximo de repetições no exercício supino livre Efectos de la amplitud de movimiento em el número máximo de repeticiones em el ejercicio de supino libre Effect of range of motion in the maximum number of repetitions in the bench press exercise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Vitor Lima

    2012-12-01

    about increases in strength using different ranges of motion (ROM. The aim of this study was to compare the maximum number of repetitions (MNR in bench press with two different ROM. Fourteen subjects performed familiarization and one repetition maximum (1 RM tests in sessions 1 and 2. MNR in four sets at 50% of 1 RM, one-minute rest with partial (ROMP and complete ROM (ROMC were performed in the third and fourth sessions. The ROMP used half of the bar vertical displacement compared to ROMC. Two-way ANOVA with repeated measures was used to compare the experimental conditions, followed by post hoc Scheffe. There was a significant decrease of the MNR among sets, except from third to fourth sets in both ROM. MNR in all sets was higher in ROMP than ROMC. The reduction of ROM allow to perform higher number of repetitions.

  4. Pareto versus lognormal: a maximum entropy test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bee, Marco; Riccaboni, Massimo; Schiavo, Stefano

    2011-08-01

    It is commonly found that distributions that seem to be lognormal over a broad range change to a power-law (Pareto) distribution for the last few percentiles. The distributions of many physical, natural, and social events (earthquake size, species abundance, income and wealth, as well as file, city, and firm sizes) display this structure. We present a test for the occurrence of power-law tails in statistical distributions based on maximum entropy. This methodology allows one to identify the true data-generating processes even in the case when it is neither lognormal nor Pareto. The maximum entropy approach is then compared with other widely used methods and applied to different levels of aggregation of complex systems. Our results provide support for the theory that distributions with lognormal body and Pareto tail can be generated as mixtures of lognormally distributed units.

  5. A Maximum Radius for Habitable Planets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alibert, Yann

    2015-09-01

    We compute the maximum radius a planet can have in order to fulfill two constraints that are likely necessary conditions for habitability: 1- surface temperature and pressure compatible with the existence of liquid water, and 2- no ice layer at the bottom of a putative global ocean, that would prevent the operation of the geologic carbon cycle to operate. We demonstrate that, above a given radius, these two constraints cannot be met: in the Super-Earth mass range (1-12 Mearth), the overall maximum that a planet can have varies between 1.8 and 2.3 Rearth. This radius is reduced when considering planets with higher Fe/Si ratios, and taking into account irradiation effects on the structure of the gas envelope.

  6. SNOWY RANGE WILDERNESS, WYOMING.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houston, Robert S.; Bigsby, Philip R.

    1984-01-01

    A mineral survey of the Snowy Range Wilderness in Wyoming was undertaken and was followed up with more detailed geologic and geochemical surveys, culminating in diamond drilling of one hole in the Snowy Range Wilderness. No mineral deposits were identified in the Snowy Range Wilderness, but inasmuch as low-grade uranium and associated gold resources were identified in rocks similar to those of the northern Snowy Range Wilderness in an area about 5 mi northeast of the wilderness boundary, the authors conclude that the northern half of the wilderness has a probable-resource potential for uranium and gold. Closely spaced drilling would be required to completely evaluate this mineral potential. The geologic terrane precludes the occurrence of fossil fuels.

  7. Maximum Entropy Discrimination Markov Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Zhu, Jun; Xing, Eric P.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we present a novel and general framework called {\\it Maximum Entropy Discrimination Markov Networks} (MaxEnDNet), which integrates the max-margin structured learning and Bayesian-style estimation and combines and extends their merits. Major innovations of this model include: 1) It generalizes the extant Markov network prediction rule based on a point estimator of weights to a Bayesian-style estimator that integrates over a learned distribution of the weights. 2) It extends the ...

  8. Maximum power operation of interacting molecular motors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Golubeva, Natalia; Imparato, Alberto

    2013-01-01

    , as compared to the non-interacting system, in a wide range of biologically compatible scenarios. We furthermore consider the case where the motor-motor interaction directly affects the internal chemical cycle and investigate the effect on the system dynamics and thermodynamics.......We study the mechanical and thermodynamic properties of different traffic models for kinesin which are relevant in biological and experimental contexts. We find that motor-motor interactions play a fundamental role by enhancing the thermodynamic efficiency at maximum power of the motors...

  9. Detonation Shock Dynamics Modelling with Arbitrary Boundaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodgson, Alexander

    2017-06-01

    The Detonation Shock Dynamics (DSD) model can be used to predict detonation wave propagation in a high explosive (HE). The detonation wave is prescribed a velocity that depends on its curvature. Additionally, the angle between the wave and the HE boundary may not exceed a specified ``boundary angle'', the value of which depends on the HE and its confining material(s). The level-set method is commonly used to drive DSD computation. Boundary conditions are applied to the level-set field at the charge edges to maintain the explosive boundary angle criteria. The position of the boundary must be accurate and continuous across adjacent cells to achieve accurate and robust results. This is mainly an issue for mixed material meshes where the boundary does not coincide with the cell boundaries. For such meshes, a set of volume fractions defines the amount of material in each cell. The boundary is defined implicitly by the volume fractions, and must be reconstructed to an explicit form for use in DSD. This work describes a novel synthesis of the level-set method and simulated annealing, an optimisation method used to reconstruct the boundary. The accuracy and robustness of the resulting DSD calculation are evaluated with a range of test problems.

  10. Decomposition using Maximum Autocorrelation Factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Rasmus

    2002-01-01

    are organised in a two-dimensional grid. Another example is biological shape analysis. Here each observation (e.g. human bone, cerebral ventricle) is represented by a number of landmarks the coordinates of which are the variables. Here we do not have an ordering of the observations (individuals). However......, normally we have an ordering of landmarks (variables) along the contour of the objects. For the case with observation ordering the maximum autocorrelation factor (MAF) transform was proposed for multivariate imagery in\\verb+~+\\$\\backslash\\$cite{switzer85}. This corresponds to a R-mode analyse of the data...

  11. Generic maximum likely scale selection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Kim Steenstrup; Loog, Marco; Markussen, Bo

    2007-01-01

    in this work is on applying this selection principle under a Brownian image model. This image model provides a simple scale invariant prior for natural images and we provide illustrative examples of the behavior of our scale estimation on such images. In these illustrative examples, estimation is based......The fundamental problem of local scale selection is addressed by means of a novel principle, which is based on maximum likelihood estimation. The principle is generally applicable to a broad variety of image models and descriptors, and provides a generic scale estimation methodology. The focus...

  12. Carbon Equivalent and Maximum Hardness

    OpenAIRE

    Haruyoshi, Suzuki; Head Office, Nippon Steel Corporation

    1984-01-01

    The accuracy of formulae for estimating the maximum hardness values of the HAZ from chemical composition and cooling time for welds in high strength steel is discussed and a new formula. NSC-S, is proposed which uses only C%, Pcm% and cooling time for the purpose of satisfactory accuracy. IIW CE and Ito-Bessyo Pcm carbon equivalent alone are not satisfactory in establishing Hmax values. The former is good only for slow cooling, t8/5 longer than 10 seconds, while the latter is good only for fa...

  13. Boundary layer polarization and voltage in the 14 MLT region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundin, R.; Yamauchi, M.; Woch, J.; Marklund, G.

    1995-05-01

    Viking midlatitude observations of ions and electrons in the postnoon auroral region show that field-aligned acceleration of electrons and ions with energies up to a few kiloelectron volts takes place. The characteristics of the upgoing ion beams and the local transverse electric field observed by Viking indicate that parallel ion acceleration is primarily due to a quasi-electrostatic field-aligned acceleration process below Viking altitudes, i.e., below 10,000-13,500 km. A good correlation is found between the maximum upgoing ion beam energy and the depth of the local potential well determined by the Viking electric field experiment within dayside 'ion inverted Vs.' The total transverse potential throughout the entire region near the ion inverted Vs. is generally much higher than the field-aligned potential and may reach well above 10 kV. However, the detailed mapping of the transverse potential out to the boundary layer, a fundamental issue which remains controversial, was not attempted here. An important finding in this study is the strong correlation between the maximum up going ion beam energy of dayside ion inverted Vs and the solar wind velocity. This suggests a direct coupling of the solar wind plasma dynamo/voltage generator to the region of field-aligned particle acceleration. The fact that the center of dayside ion inverted Vs coincide with convection reversals/flow stagnation and upward Birkeland currents on what appears to be closed field lines (Woch et al., 1993), suggests that field-aligned potential structures connect to the inner part of an MHD dyanmo in the low-latitude boundary layer. Thus the Viking observations substantiate the idea of a solar wind induced boundary layer polarization where negatively charged perturbations in the postnoon sector persistently develops along the magnetic field lines, establishing accelerating potential drops along the geomagnetic field lines in the 0.5-10 kV range.

  14. Characterizations of boundary pluripolar hulls

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Djire, I.K.; Wiegerinck, J.

    2016-01-01

    We present some basic properties of the so-called boundary relative extremal function and discuss boundary pluripolar sets and boundary pluripolar hulls. We show that for B-regular domains the boundary pluripolar hull is always trivial on the boundary of the domain and present a “boundary version”

  15. Grain Boundary Complexions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-05-01

    deter- mine bulk materials behavior and properties such as superplasticity, creep, fatigue, corrosion , strength and conductivity [2]. Grain boundary...interface (i.e. lattice mismatch accommodated by interface dislocations ), wetting transitions will not occur. A wetting transition is possible in the case...melting only starts around dislocations at low- angle grain boundaries; the grain boundary structure con- sists of isolated liquid pools separated by

  16. Stable Boundary Layer Issues

    OpenAIRE

    Steeneveld, G.J.

    2012-01-01

    Understanding and prediction of the stable atmospheric boundary layer is a challenging task. Many physical processes are relevant in the stable boundary layer, i.e. turbulence, radiation, land surface coupling, orographic turbulent and gravity wave drag, and land surface heterogeneity. The development of robust stable boundary layer parameterizations for use in NWP and climate models is hampered by the multiplicity of processes and their unknown interactions. As a result, these models suffer ...

  17. Oxygen boundary crossing probabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busch, N A; Silver, I A

    1987-01-01

    The probability that an oxygen particle will reach a time dependent boundary is required in oxygen transport studies involving solution methods based on probability considerations. A Volterra integral equation is presented, the solution of which gives directly the boundary crossing probability density function. The boundary crossing probability is the probability that the oxygen particle will reach a boundary within a specified time interval. When the motion of the oxygen particle may be described as strongly Markovian, then the Volterra integral equation can be rewritten as a generalized Abel equation, the solution of which has been widely studied.

  18. Last Glacial Maximum in Poland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marks, Leszek

    2002-01-01

    The Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) in Poland is represented by the Leszno Phase and occurred after 21 ka radiocarbon years. In turn the deglacial Poznań Phase is estimated at 18.4 ka, the Pomeranian Phase at 15.2 ka, the Gardno Phase at about 14.0-13.8 ka, the Słupsk Bank Phase at 13.5-13.2 ka and the Southern Middle Bank Phase at 12.7-12.5 ka BP. The ice sheet limit at LGM was not synchronous everywhere in Poland but occurred as several major and minor ice lobes that reflected a stream-like structure of the ice body that radiated southwards from the Baltic Basin. Meltwater runoff during the LGM created a complex system of sandur trains and ice-marginal spillways, with numerous intervening proglacial lakes.

  19. Objects of maximum electromagnetic chirality

    CERN Document Server

    Fernandez-Corbaton, Ivan

    2015-01-01

    We introduce a definition of the electromagnetic chirality of an object and show that it has an upper bound. The upper bound is attained if and only if the object is transparent for fields of one handedness (helicity). Additionally, electromagnetic duality symmetry, i.e. helicity preservation upon scattering, turns out to be a necessary condition for reciprocal scatterers to attain the upper bound. We use these results to provide requirements for the design of such extremal scatterers. The requirements can be formulated as constraints on the polarizability tensors for dipolar scatterers or as material constitutive relations. We also outline two applications for objects of maximum electromagnetic chirality: A twofold resonantly enhanced and background free circular dichroism measurement setup, and angle independent helicity filtering glasses.

  20. Maximum mutual information regularized classification

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Jim Jing-Yan

    2014-09-07

    In this paper, a novel pattern classification approach is proposed by regularizing the classifier learning to maximize mutual information between the classification response and the true class label. We argue that, with the learned classifier, the uncertainty of the true class label of a data sample should be reduced by knowing its classification response as much as possible. The reduced uncertainty is measured by the mutual information between the classification response and the true class label. To this end, when learning a linear classifier, we propose to maximize the mutual information between classification responses and true class labels of training samples, besides minimizing the classification error and reducing the classifier complexity. An objective function is constructed by modeling mutual information with entropy estimation, and it is optimized by a gradient descend method in an iterative algorithm. Experiments on two real world pattern classification problems show the significant improvements achieved by maximum mutual information regularization.

  1. System for Memorizing Maximum Values

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozeman, Richard J., Jr. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    The invention discloses a system capable of memorizing maximum sensed values. The system includes conditioning circuitry which receives the analog output signal from a sensor transducer. The conditioning circuitry rectifies and filters the analog signal and provides an input signal to a digital driver, which may be either liner or logarithmic. The driver converts the analog signal to discrete digital values, which in turn triggers an output signal on one of a plurality of driver output lines n. The particular output lines selected is dependent on the converted digital value. A microfuse memory device connects across the driver output lines, with n segments. Each segment is associated with one driver output line, and includes a microfuse that is blown when a signal appears on the associated driver output line.

  2. On the structural unit/grain boundary dislocation model for grain boundary structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balluffi, R. W.; Bristowe, P. D.

    1984-08-01

    The applicability of the structural unit/grain boundary dislocation (GBD) model to the atomistic structures of [001] and [011] tilt boundary series recently calculated by Sutton, Vitek and Wang is studied in detail. It is found that a hierarchy of structural unit/GBD descriptions exists which may be used to describe such boundaries. Each description corresponds to a different choice of "delimiting boundary" structural units which are mixed together to make up all boundaries in the series. In all cases the structural units exhibit systematic distortions as the tilt angle changes. As the number of delimiting boundaries in a series is increased, and the range of structures is "quantized" on a finer scale, the distortions of the structural units decreases, but the amount of information regarding the GBD structure is decreased. It is pointed out that different members of the hierarchy of descriptions can be used advantageously for different purposes.

  3. Stable Boundary Layer Issues

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steeneveld, G.J.

    2012-01-01

    Understanding and prediction of the stable atmospheric boundary layer is a challenging task. Many physical processes are relevant in the stable boundary layer, i.e. turbulence, radiation, land surface coupling, orographic turbulent and gravity wave drag, and land surface heterogeneity. The

  4. The power and robustness of maximum LOD score statistics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Y J; Mendell, N R

    2008-07-01

    The maximum LOD score statistic is extremely powerful for gene mapping when calculated using the correct genetic parameter value. When the mode of genetic transmission is unknown, the maximum of the LOD scores obtained using several genetic parameter values is reported. This latter statistic requires higher critical value than the maximum LOD score statistic calculated from a single genetic parameter value. In this paper, we compare the power of maximum LOD scores based on three fixed sets of genetic parameter values with the power of the LOD score obtained after maximizing over the entire range of genetic parameter values. We simulate family data under nine generating models. For generating models with non-zero phenocopy rates, LOD scores maximized over the entire range of genetic parameters yielded greater power than maximum LOD scores for fixed sets of parameter values with zero phenocopy rates. No maximum LOD score was consistently more powerful than the others for generating models with a zero phenocopy rate. The power loss of the LOD score maximized over the entire range of genetic parameters, relative to the maximum LOD score calculated using the correct genetic parameter value, appeared to be robust to the generating models.

  5. Boundary value problems and partial differential equations

    CERN Document Server

    Powers, David L

    2005-01-01

    Boundary Value Problems is the leading text on boundary value problems and Fourier series. The author, David Powers, (Clarkson) has written a thorough, theoretical overview of solving boundary value problems involving partial differential equations by the methods of separation of variables. Professors and students agree that the author is a master at creating linear problems that adroitly illustrate the techniques of separation of variables used to solve science and engineering.* CD with animations and graphics of solutions, additional exercises and chapter review questions* Nearly 900 exercises ranging in difficulty* Many fully worked examples

  6. Well posedness and maximum entropy approximation for the dynamics of quantitative traits

    KAUST Repository

    Boďová, Katarína

    2017-11-06

    We study the Fokker–Planck equation derived in the large system limit of the Markovian process describing the dynamics of quantitative traits. The Fokker–Planck equation is posed on a bounded domain and its transport and diffusion coefficients vanish on the domain’s boundary. We first argue that, despite this degeneracy, the standard no-flux boundary condition is valid. We derive the weak formulation of the problem and prove the existence and uniqueness of its solutions by constructing the corresponding contraction semigroup on a suitable function space. Then, we prove that for the parameter regime with high enough mutation rate the problem exhibits a positive spectral gap, which implies exponential convergence to equilibrium.Next, we provide a simple derivation of the so-called Dynamic Maximum Entropy (DynMaxEnt) method for approximation of observables (moments) of the Fokker–Planck solution, which can be interpreted as a nonlinear Galerkin approximation. The limited applicability of the DynMaxEnt method inspires us to introduce its modified version that is valid for the whole range of admissible parameters. Finally, we present several numerical experiments to demonstrate the performance of both the original and modified DynMaxEnt methods. We observe that in the parameter regimes where both methods are valid, the modified one exhibits slightly better approximation properties compared to the original one.

  7. Seeking the boundary of boundary extension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDunn, Benjamin A; Siddiqui, Aisha P; Brown, James M

    2014-04-01

    Boundary extension (BE) is a remarkably consistent visual memory error in which participants remember seeing a more wide-angle image of a scene than was actually viewed (Intraub & Richardson, Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition 15:179-187, 1989). Multiple stimulus factors are thought to contribute to the occurrence of BE, including object recognition, conceptual knowledge of scenes, and amodal perception at the view boundaries (Intraub, Wiley Interdisciplinary Reviews: Cognitive Science 3:117-127, 2012). In the present study, we used abstract scenes instead of images of the real world, in order to remove expectations based on semantic associations with objects and the schematic context of the view. Close-angle and wide-angle scenes were created using irregular geometric shapes rated by independent observers as lacking any easily recognizable structure. The abstract objects were tested on either a random-dot or a blank background in order to assess the influence of implied continuation of the image beyond its boundaries. The random-dot background conditions had background occlusion cues either present or absent at the image border, in order to test their influence on BE in the absence of high-level information about the scenes. The results indicate that high-level information about objects and schematic context is unnecessary for BE to occur, and that occlusion information at the image boundary also has little influence on BE. Contrary to previous studies, we also found clear BE for all conditions, despite using scenes depicting undetailed objects on a blank white background. The results highlighted the ubiquitous nature of BE and the adaptability of scene perception processes.

  8. A Boundary Property for Upper Domination

    KAUST Repository

    AbouEisha, Hassan M.

    2016-08-08

    An upper dominating set in a graph is a minimal (with respect to set inclusion) dominating set of maximum cardinality.The problem of finding an upper dominating set is generally NP-hard, but can be solved in polynomial time in some restricted graph classes, such as P4-free graphs or 2K2-free graphs.For classes defined by finitely many forbidden induced subgraphs, the boundary separating difficult instances of the problem from polynomially solvable ones consists of the so called boundary classes.However, none of such classes has been identified so far for the upper dominating set problem.In the present paper, we discover the first boundary class for this problem.

  9. Administrative Area Boundaries 2 (State Boundaries), Region 9, 2010, NAVTEQ

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — NAVTEQ Administrative Area Boundaries 2 (State Boundaries) for Region 9. There are five Administrative Area Boundaries layers (1, 2, 3, 4, 5). These layers contain...

  10. Administrative Area Boundaries 4 (City Boundaries), Region 9, 2010, NAVTEQ

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — NAVTEQ Administrative Area Boundaries 4 (City Boundaries) for Region 9. There are five Administrative Area Boundaries layers (1, 2, 3, 4, 5). These layers contain...

  11. Improved boundary layer height measurement using a fuzzy logic method: Diurnal and seasonal variabilities of the convective boundary layer over a tropical station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allabakash, S.; Yasodha, P.; Bianco, L.; Venkatramana Reddy, S.; Srinivasulu, P.; Lim, S.

    2017-09-01

    This paper presents the efficacy of a "tuned" fuzzy logic method at determining the height of the boundary layer using the measurements from a 1280 MHz lower atmospheric radar wind profiler located in Gadanki (13.5°N, 79°E, 375 mean sea level), India, and discusses the diurnal and seasonal variations of the measured convective boundary layer over this tropical station. The original fuzzy logic (FL) method estimates the height of the atmospheric boundary layer combining the information from the range-corrected signal-to-noise ratio, the Doppler spectral width of the vertical velocity, and the vertical velocity itself, measured by the radar, through a series of thresholds and rules, which did not prove to be optimal for our radar system and geographical location. For this reason the algorithm was tuned to perform better on our data set. Atmospheric boundary layer heights obtained by this tuned FL method, the original FL method, and by a "standard method" (that only uses the information from the range-corrected signal-to-noise ratio) are compared with those obtained from potential temperature profiles measured by collocated Global Positioning System Radio Sonde during years 2011 and 2013. The comparison shows that the tuned FL method is more accurate than the other methods. Maximum convective boundary layer heights are observed between 14:00 and 15:00 local time (LT = UTC + 5:30) for clear-sky days. These daily maxima are found to be lower during winter and postmonsoon seasons and higher during premonsoon and monsoon seasons, due to net surface radiation and convective processes over this region being more intense during premonsoon and monsoon seasons and less intense in winter and postmonsoon seasons.

  12. Inverse boundary spectral problems

    CERN Document Server

    Kachalov, Alexander; Lassas, Matti

    2001-01-01

    Inverse boundary problems are a rapidly developing area of applied mathematics with applications throughout physics and the engineering sciences. However, the mathematical theory of inverse problems remains incomplete and needs further development to aid in the solution of many important practical problems.Inverse Boundary Spectral Problems develop a rigorous theory for solving several types of inverse problems exactly. In it, the authors consider the following: ""Can the unknown coefficients of an elliptic partial differential equation be determined from the eigenvalues and the boundary value

  13. Beyond the Boundary

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gorm Hansen, Birgitte

    2011-01-01

    Whether celebratory or critical, STS research on science-industry relations has focused on the blurring of boundaries and hybridization of codes and practices. However, the vocabulary of boundary and hybrid tends to reify science and industry as separate in the attempt to map their relation...... as the negotiation of a preexisting science-industry boundary. Rather, viability is obtained through a strategy of "circumventing" the science-industry food chain and "sequestering" biotech components within the research center. Symbiosis allows academic scientists to do biology while at the same time demonstrating...

  14. Beyond the Boundary

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gorm Hansen, Birgitte

    2012-01-01

    Whether celebratory or critical, STS research on science-industry relations has focused on the blurring of boundaries and hybridization of codes and practices. However, the vocabulary of boundary and hybrid tends to reify science and industry as separate in the attempt to map their relation...... as the negotiation of a preexisting science-industry boundary. Rather, viability is obtained through a strategy of circumventing the science-industry food chain and sequestering biotech components within the research center. Symbiosis allows academic scientists to do biology while at the same time demonstrating...

  15. Vestige: Maximum likelihood phylogenetic footprinting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maxwell Peter

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Phylogenetic footprinting is the identification of functional regions of DNA by their evolutionary conservation. This is achieved by comparing orthologous regions from multiple species and identifying the DNA regions that have diverged less than neutral DNA. Vestige is a phylogenetic footprinting package built on the PyEvolve toolkit that uses probabilistic molecular evolutionary modelling to represent aspects of sequence evolution, including the conventional divergence measure employed by other footprinting approaches. In addition to measuring the divergence, Vestige allows the expansion of the definition of a phylogenetic footprint to include variation in the distribution of any molecular evolutionary processes. This is achieved by displaying the distribution of model parameters that represent partitions of molecular evolutionary substitutions. Examination of the spatial incidence of these effects across regions of the genome can identify DNA segments that differ in the nature of the evolutionary process. Results Vestige was applied to a reference dataset of the SCL locus from four species and provided clear identification of the known conserved regions in this dataset. To demonstrate the flexibility to use diverse models of molecular evolution and dissect the nature of the evolutionary process Vestige was used to footprint the Ka/Ks ratio in primate BRCA1 with a codon model of evolution. Two regions of putative adaptive evolution were identified illustrating the ability of Vestige to represent the spatial distribution of distinct molecular evolutionary processes. Conclusion Vestige provides a flexible, open platform for phylogenetic footprinting. Underpinned by the PyEvolve toolkit, Vestige provides a framework for visualising the signatures of evolutionary processes across the genome of numerous organisms simultaneously. By exploiting the maximum-likelihood statistical framework, the complex interplay between mutational

  16. Vestige: maximum likelihood phylogenetic footprinting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakefield, Matthew J; Maxwell, Peter; Huttley, Gavin A

    2005-05-29

    Phylogenetic footprinting is the identification of functional regions of DNA by their evolutionary conservation. This is achieved by comparing orthologous regions from multiple species and identifying the DNA regions that have diverged less than neutral DNA. Vestige is a phylogenetic footprinting package built on the PyEvolve toolkit that uses probabilistic molecular evolutionary modelling to represent aspects of sequence evolution, including the conventional divergence measure employed by other footprinting approaches. In addition to measuring the divergence, Vestige allows the expansion of the definition of a phylogenetic footprint to include variation in the distribution of any molecular evolutionary processes. This is achieved by displaying the distribution of model parameters that represent partitions of molecular evolutionary substitutions. Examination of the spatial incidence of these effects across regions of the genome can identify DNA segments that differ in the nature of the evolutionary process. Vestige was applied to a reference dataset of the SCL locus from four species and provided clear identification of the known conserved regions in this dataset. To demonstrate the flexibility to use diverse models of molecular evolution and dissect the nature of the evolutionary process Vestige was used to footprint the Ka/Ks ratio in primate BRCA1 with a codon model of evolution. Two regions of putative adaptive evolution were identified illustrating the ability of Vestige to represent the spatial distribution of distinct molecular evolutionary processes. Vestige provides a flexible, open platform for phylogenetic footprinting. Underpinned by the PyEvolve toolkit, Vestige provides a framework for visualising the signatures of evolutionary processes across the genome of numerous organisms simultaneously. By exploiting the maximum-likelihood statistical framework, the complex interplay between mutational processes, DNA repair and selection can be evaluated both

  17. International boundary experiences by the United Nations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagawa, A.

    2013-12-01

    Over the last few decades, the United Nations (UN) has been approached by Security Council and Member States on international boundary issues. The United Nations regards the adequate delimitation and demarcation of international boundaries as a very important element for the maintenance of peace and security in fragile post-conflict situations, establishment of friendly relationships and cross-border cooperation between States. This paper will present the main principles and framework the United Nations applies to support the process of international boundary delimitation and demarcation activities. The United Nations is involved in international boundary issues following the principle of impartiality and neutrality and its role as mediator. Since international boundary issues are multi-faceted, a range of expertise is required and the United Nations Secretariat is in a good position to provide diverse expertise within the multiple departments. Expertise in different departments ranging from legal, political, technical, administrative and logistical are mobilised in different ways to provide support to Member States depending on their specific needs. This presentation aims to highlight some of the international boundary projects that the United Nations Cartographic Section has been involved in order to provide the technical support to different boundary requirements as each international boundary issue requires specific focus and attention whether it be in preparation, delimitation, demarcation or management. Increasingly, the United Nations is leveraging geospatial technology to facilitate boundary delimitation and demarcation process between Member States. Through the presentation of the various case studies ranging from Iraq - Kuwait, Israel - Lebanon (Blue Line), Eritrea - Ethiopia, Cyprus (Green Line), Cameroon - Nigeria, Sudan - South Sudan, it will illustrate how geospatial technology is increasingly used to carry out the support. In having applied a range

  18. Co-Clustering under the Maximum Norm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurent Bulteau

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Co-clustering, that is partitioning a numerical matrix into “homogeneous” submatrices, has many applications ranging from bioinformatics to election analysis. Many interesting variants of co-clustering are NP-hard. We focus on the basic variant of co-clustering where the homogeneity of a submatrix is defined in terms of minimizing the maximum distance between two entries. In this context, we spot several NP-hard, as well as a number of relevant polynomial-time solvable special cases, thus charting the border of tractability for this challenging data clustering problem. For instance, we provide polynomial-time solvability when having to partition the rows and columns into two subsets each (meaning that one obtains four submatrices. When partitioning rows and columns into three subsets each, however, we encounter NP-hardness, even for input matrices containing only values from {0, 1, 2}.

  19. Maximum and minimum solutions for a nonlocal p-Laplacian fractional differential system from eco-economical processes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ren, Teng; Li, Sidi; Zhang, Xinguang; Liu, Lishan

    2017-01-01

    This paper focuses on the maximum and minimum solutions for a fractional order differential system, involving a p-Laplacian operator and nonlocal boundary conditions, which arises from many complex...

  20. HUC 8 Boundaries

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — This data set is a digital hydrologic unit boundary that is at the 4-digit, 6-digit, 8-digit, and 11-digit level. The data set was developed by delineating the...

  1. FWS Approved Acquisition Boundaries

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This data layer depicts the external boundaries of lands and waters that are approved for acquisition by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) in North America,...

  2. National Forest Boundaries

    Data.gov (United States)

    Minnesota Department of Natural Resources — This theme shows the USFS national forest boundaries in the state. This data was acquired from the GIS coordinators at both the Chippewa National Forest and the...

  3. VT Telephone Exchange Boundaries

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — (Link to Metadata) The UtilityTelecom_EXCHANGE represents Vermont Telephone Exchange boundaries as defined by the VT Public Service Board. The original data was...

  4. State Park Statutory Boundaries

    Data.gov (United States)

    Minnesota Department of Natural Resources — Legislative statutory boundaries for sixty six state parks, six state recreation areas, and eight state waysides. These data are derived principally from DNR's...

  5. 500 Cities: City Boundaries

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — This city boundary shapefile was extracted from Esri Data and Maps for ArcGIS 2014 - U.S. Populated Place Areas. This shapefile can be joined to 500 Cities...

  6. Allegheny County Parcel Boundaries

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — This dataset contains parcel boundaries attributed with county block and lot number. Use the Property Information Extractor for more control downloading a filtered...

  7. Watershed Boundary Areas

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — This map layer contains hydrologic unit boundaries and codes for the United States, Puerto Rico, and the U.S. Virgin Islands. It was revised for inclusion in the...

  8. NM School District Boundaries

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The dataset represents the boundaries of all public school districts in the state of New Mexico. The source for the data layer is the New Mexico Public Education...

  9. Allegheny County Boundary

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — This dataset contains the Allegheny County boundary. If viewing this description on the Western Pennsylvania Regional Data Center’s open data portal...

  10. Boundary representation modelling techniques

    CERN Document Server

    2006-01-01

    Provides the most complete presentation of boundary representation solid modelling yet publishedOffers basic reference information for software developers, application developers and users Includes a historical perspective as well as giving a background for modern research.

  11. Site Area Boundaries

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This dataset consists of site boundaries from multiple Superfund sites in U.S. EPA Region 8. These data were acquired from multiple sources at different times and...

  12. Tax Unit Boundaries

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — The Statewide GIS Tax Unit boundary file was created through a collaborative partnership between the State of Kansas Department of Revenue Property Valuation...

  13. Laser beam propagation through an atmospheric transitional and turbulent boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Richard A.; Manzur, Tariq

    2015-05-01

    This study investigates laser beam propagation through an atmospheric boundary layer near the ocean surface. Objectives of this research are to ascertain feasibility limits for achieving maximum energy efficiency at extended ranges in the face of atmospheric and other distortions as the laser beam penetrates through transitional (anisotropic) and turbulent (isotropic) boundary layer regimes. Various aspects of turbulence modeling of laser beam propagation near the ocean surface are discussed including: Kolmogorov's model of atmospheric turbulence, parameterized structure functions (e.g., velocity and temperature gradients, gradients in refractive index) and other important factors affecting near surface propagation such as humidity, aerosols, and wave slap. Various preliminary modeled propagation results are shown, and a new methodology is proposed for improving existing model estimates with new time domain measurement procedures.

  14. VT Federal Aid Urban Boundaries

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — Federal Aid Urban boundaries are defined based on US Census data. The roadways within these boundaries have urban classifications. These FAU boundaries were updated...

  15. Optimal control and optimal trajectories of regional macroeconomic dynamics based on the Pontryagin maximum principle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulgakov, V. K.; Strigunov, V. V.

    2009-05-01

    The Pontryagin maximum principle is used to prove a theorem concerning optimal control in regional macroeconomics. A boundary value problem for optimal trajectories of the state and adjoint variables is formulated, and optimal curves are analyzed. An algorithm is proposed for solving the boundary value problem of optimal control. The performance of the algorithm is demonstrated by computing an optimal control and the corresponding optimal trajectories.

  16. Wavelet Based Analysis of Airborne Gravity Data For Interpretation of Geological Boundaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leblanc, George E.; Ferguson, Stephen

    Airborne gravimeters have only very recently been developed with the sensitivity necessary for useful exploration geophysics. In this study, an airborne gravimeter - an inertially-stabilized platform which converts accelerometer readings into gravity values - has been installed aboard the NRC's Convair 580 research aircraft and a survey performed over the Geological Survey of Canada's gravity test area. These data are used in a new wavelet transform methodology that quickly analyses and locates geological boundaries of various spatial extents within real aerogravity data. The raw aerogravity data were GPS corrected and then noise minimised - to reduce high frequency random noise - with a separate wavelet transform denoising algorithm. The multi-resolution nature of the wavelet transform was then used to investigate the presence of boundaries at various scales. Examination of each wavelet detail scale shows that there is a coherent and localizable signal that conforms to geological boundaries over the entire range of scales. However, the boundaries are more apparent in the lower wavelet scales (corresponding to higher frequencies). The location of the local maximum values of the wavelet coefficents on each wavelet level provides a means to quickly determine and evaluate regional and/or local boundaries. The boundaries that are determined as a function of wavelet scale are able to be well-localized with the wavelet transform, and provides a method to locate, in ground coordinates, the edges of the boundary. In this study it is clear that wavelet methodologies are very well suited to being used effectively with aerogravity data due to the non-stationary nature of these data. Using these same methods on the horizontal and vertical derivatives of the data can provide visually clearer boundary definition, however, thus far there has not been any new boundaries identified in the derivative data. It is also possible to draw potential structural information, such as general

  17. Confronting unknown planetary boundary threats from chemical pollution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persson, Linn M; Breitholtz, Magnus; Cousins, Ian T; de Wit, Cynthia A; MacLeod, Matthew; McLachlan, Michael S

    2013-11-19

    Rockström et al. proposed a set of planetary boundaries that delimitate a "safe operating space for humanity". One of the planetary boundaries is determined by "chemical pollution", however no clear definition was provided. Here, we propose that there is no single chemical pollution planetary boundary, but rather that many planetary boundary issues governed by chemical pollution exist. We identify three conditions that must be simultaneously met for chemical pollution to pose a planetary boundary threat. We then discuss approaches to identify chemicals that could fulfill those conditions, and outline a proactive hazard identification strategy that considers long-range transport and the reversibility of chemical pollution.

  18. Development of normal-suction boundary control method based on inflow cannula pressure waveform for the undulation pump ventricular assist device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, Kohei; Saito, Itsuro; Isoyama, Takashi; Nakagawa, Hidemoto; Emiko, Nakano; Ono, Toshiya; Shi, Wei; Inoue, Yusuke; Abe, Yusuke

    2012-09-01

    It is desirable to obtain the maximum assist without suction in ventricular assist devices (VADs). However, high driving power of a VAD may cause severe ventricle suction that can induce arrhythmia, hemolysis, and pump damage. In this report, an appropriate VAD driving level that maximizes the assist effect without severe systolic suction was explored. The target driving level was set at the boundary between low driving power without suction and high driving power with frequent suction. In the boundary range, intermittent mild suction may occur. Driving power was regulated by the suction occurrence. The normal-suction boundary control method was evaluated in a female goat implanted with an undulation pump ventricular assist device (UPVAD). The UPVAD was driven in a semipulsatile mode with heartbeat synchronization control. Systolic driving power was adjusted using a normal-suction boundary control method developed for this study. We confirmed that driving power could be maintained in the boundary range. Occurrences of suction were evaluated using the suction ratio. We defined this ratio as the number of suction occurrences divided by the number of heartbeats. The suction ratio decreased by 70% when the normal-suction boundary control method was used. © 2012, Copyright the Authors. Artificial Organs © 2012, International Center for Artificial Organs and Transplantation and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Home range and travels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stickel, L.F.; King, John A.

    1968-01-01

    The concept of home range was expressed by Seton (1909) in the term 'home region,' which Burr (1940, 1943) clarified with a definition of home range and exemplified in a definitive study of Peromyscus in the field. Burt pointed out the ever-changing characteristics of home-range area and the consequent absence of boundaries in the usual sense--a finding verified by investigators thereafter. In the studies summarized in this paper, sizes of home ranges of Peromyscus varied within two magnitudes, approximately from 0.1 acre to ten acres, in 34 studies conducted in a variety of habitats from the seaside dunes of Florida to the Alaskan forests. Variation in sizes of home ranges was correlated with both environmental and physiological factors; with habitat it was conspicuous, both in the same and different regions. Food supply also was related to size of home range, both seasonally and in relation to habitat. Home ranges generally were smallest in winter and largest in spring, at the onset of the breeding season. Activity and size also were affected by changes in weather. Activity was least when temperatures were low and nights were bright. Effects of rainfall were variable. Sizes varied according to sex and age; young mice remained in the parents' range until they approached maturity, when they began to travel more widely. Adult males commonly had larger home ranges than females, although there were a number of exceptions. An inverse relationship between population density and size of home range was shown in several studies and probably is the usual relationship. A basic need for activity and exploration also appeared to influence size of home range. Behavior within the home range was discussed in terms of travel patterns, travels in relation to home sites and refuges, territory, and stability of size of home range. Travels within the home range consisted of repeated use of well-worn trails to sites of food, shelter, and refuge, plus more random exploratory travels

  20. Efficiency at maximum power of motor traffic on networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golubeva, N.; Imparato, A.

    2014-06-01

    We study motor traffic on Bethe networks subject to hard-core exclusion for both tightly coupled one-state machines and loosely coupled two-state machines that perform work against a constant load. In both cases we find an interaction-induced enhancement of the efficiency at maximum power (EMP) as compared to noninteracting motors. The EMP enhancement occurs for a wide range of network and single-motor parameters and is due to a change in the characteristic load-velocity relation caused by phase transitions in the system. Using a quantitative measure of the trade-off between the EMP enhancement and the corresponding loss in the maximum output power we identify parameter regimes where motor traffic systems operate efficiently at maximum power without a significant decrease in the maximum power output due to jamming effects.

  1. Adaptive Sentence Boundary Disambiguation

    CERN Document Server

    Palmer, D D; Palmer, David D.; Hearst, Marti A.

    1994-01-01

    Labeling of sentence boundaries is a necessary prerequisite for many natural language processing tasks, including part-of-speech tagging and sentence alignment. End-of-sentence punctuation marks are ambiguous; to disambiguate them most systems use brittle, special-purpose regular expression grammars and exception rules. As an alternative, we have developed an efficient, trainable algorithm that uses a lexicon with part-of-speech probabilities and a feed-forward neural network. After training for less than one minute, the method correctly labels over 98.5\\% of sentence boundaries in a corpus of over 27,000 sentence-boundary marks. We show the method to be efficient and easily adaptable to different text genres, including single-case texts.

  2. The Bottom Boundary Layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trowbridge, John H; Lentz, Steven J

    2018-01-03

    The oceanic bottom boundary layer extracts energy and momentum from the overlying flow, mediates the fate of near-bottom substances, and generates bedforms that retard the flow and affect benthic processes. The bottom boundary layer is forced by winds, waves, tides, and buoyancy and is influenced by surface waves, internal waves, and stratification by heat, salt, and suspended sediments. This review focuses on the coastal ocean. The main points are that (a) classical turbulence concepts and modern turbulence parameterizations provide accurate representations of the structure and turbulent fluxes under conditions in which the underlying assumptions hold, (b) modern sensors and analyses enable high-quality direct or near-direct measurements of the turbulent fluxes and dissipation rates, and (c) the remaining challenges include the interaction of waves and currents with the erodible seabed, the impact of layer-scale two- and three-dimensional instabilities, and the role of the bottom boundary layer in shelf-slope exchange.

  3. Maximum Power from a Solar Panel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Miller

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Solar energy has become a promising alternative to conventional fossil fuel sources. Solar panels are used to collect solar radiation and convert it into electricity. One of the techniques used to maximize the effectiveness of this energy alternative is to maximize the power output of the solar collector. In this project the maximum power is calculated by determining the voltage and the current of maximum power. These quantities are determined by finding the maximum value for the equation for power using differentiation. After the maximum values are found for each time of day, each individual quantity, voltage of maximum power, current of maximum power, and maximum power is plotted as a function of the time of day.

  4. Molecular dynamics study on the effect of boundary heating rate on the phase change characteristics of thin film liquid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hasan, Mohammad Nasim, E-mail: nasim@me.buet.ac.bd.com; Morshed, A. K. M. Monjur, E-mail: shavik@me.buet.ac.bd.com; Rabbi, Kazi Fazle, E-mail: rabbi35.me10@gmail.com; Haque, Mominul, E-mail: mominulmarup@gmail.com [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Bangladesh University of Engineering and Technology (BUET) Dhaka-1000 (Bangladesh)

    2016-07-12

    In this study, theoretical investigation of thin film liquid phase change phenomena under different boundary heating rates has been conducted with the help of molecular dynamics simulation. To do this, the case of argon boiling over a platinum surface has been considered. The study has been conducted to get a better understanding of the nano-scale physics of evaporation/boiling for a three phase system with particular emphasis on the effect of boundary heating rate. The simulation domain consisted of liquid and vapor argon atoms placed over a platinum wall. Initially the whole system was brought to an equilibrium state at 90 K with the help of equilibrium molecular dynamics and then the temperature of the bottom wall was increased to a higher temperature (250 K/130 K) over a finite heating period. Depending on the heating period, the boundary heating rate has been varied in the range of 1600×10{sup 9} K/s to 8×10{sup 9} K/s. The variations of argon region temperature, pressure, net evaporation number with respect to time under different boundary heating rates have been determined and discussed. The heat fluxes normal to platinum wall for different cases were also calculated and compared with theoretical upper limit of maximum possible heat transfer to elucidate the effect of boundary heating rate.

  5. Molecular markers linked to apomixis in Panicum maximum Jacq ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A bulked segregant analysis was performed using 184 random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) primers in an F1 population of P. maximum segregating for reproductive mode. Four RAPD markers linked to apomixis were identified and mapped in this population. These markers showed good selection efficiency, ranging ...

  6. Minnesota County Boundaries - lines

    Data.gov (United States)

    Minnesota Department of Natural Resources — Minnesota county boundaries derived from a combination of 1:24,000 scale PLS lines, 1:100,000 scale TIGER, 1:100,000 scale DLG, and 1:24,000 scale hydrography lines....

  7. Knowledge production at boundaries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stange, Kari

    2017-01-01

    This thesis addresses how knowledge is used and produced in stakeholder-led collaborations to make long-term management plans for European fishery management. Boundary object theory is applied and developed to explain how stakeholders from the fishing industry interact with each other, and with

  8. Environmentalists without Boundaries

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    GREGORY

    2009-03-16

    Mar 16, 2009 ... African Journal of Environmental Science and Technology Vol. ... The most fruitful scientific endeavors invariably cross boundaries – across ... The White Man's Burden: Why the West's Efforts to Aid the Rest Have Done So Much ... cooperation and capacity (7)stimulating economic development and growth, ...

  9. Environmentalists without Boundaries

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    GREGORY

    2009-03-16

    Mar 16, 2009 ... Hence, this is a laudable project, but Coca Cola should also be cognizant of the growing African environmental pollution problems associated with plastics disposal as they market bottled water and other juices on the continent. This is an example of a challenge associated with advertent boundary crossing ...

  10. Minnesota County Boundaries

    Data.gov (United States)

    Minnesota Department of Natural Resources — Minnesota county boundaries derived from a combination of 1:24,000 scale PLS lines, 1:100,000 scale TIGER, 1:100,000 scale DLG, and 1:24,000 scale hydrography lines....

  11. Boundaries of the universe

    CERN Document Server

    Glasby, John S

    2013-01-01

    The boundaries of space exploration are being pushed back constantly, but the realm of the partially understood and the totally unknown is as great as ever. Among other things this book deals with astronomical instruments and their application, recent discoveries in the solar system, stellar evolution, the exploding starts, the galaxies, quasars, pulsars, the possibilities of extraterrestrial life and relativity.

  12. Dual boundary spanning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li-Ying, Jason

    2016-01-01

    The extant literature runs short in understanding openness of innovation regarding and the different pathways along which internal and external knowledge resources can be combined. This study proposes a unique typology for outside-in innovations based on two distinct ways of boundary spanning...

  13. Environmentalists without Boundaries

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    GREGORY

    2009-03-16

    Mar 16, 2009 ... idea that development and environmental sustainability require poverty eradication is not a shocking one, but many scholars remain skeptical about the ... in developing countries has potentially solved this boundary problem by asking for donations through the purchase of bottled water at a price that will ...

  14. Density maximum and polarizable models of water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiss, Péter T.; Baranyai, András

    2012-08-01

    To estimate accurately the density of water over a wide range of temperatures with a density maximum at 4 °C is one of the most stringent tests of molecular models. The shape of the curve influences the ability to describe critical properties and to predict the freezing temperature. While it was demonstrated that with a proper parameter fit nonpolarizable models can approximate this behavior accurately, it is much more difficult to do this for polarizable models. We provide a short overview of ρ-T diagrams for existing models, then we give an explanation of this difficulty. We present a version of the BK model [A. Baranyai and P. T. Kiss, J. Chem. Phys. 133, 144109 (2010), 10.1063/1.3490660; A. Baranyai and P. T. Kiss, J. Chem. Phys. 135, 234110 (2011)], 10.1063/1.3670962 which is capable to predict the density of water over a wide range of temperature. The BK model uses the charge-on-spring method with three Gaussian charges. Since the experimental dipole moment and the geometry is fixed, and the quadrupole moment is approximated by a least mean square procedure, parameters of the repulsion and dispersive attraction forces remained as free tools to match experimental properties. Relying on a simplified but plausible justification, the new version of the model uses repulsion and attraction as functions of the induced dipole moment of the molecule. The repulsive force increases, while the attractive force decreases with the size of the molecular dipole moment. At the same time dipole moment dependent dispersion forces are taking part in the polarization of the molecule. This scheme iterates well and, in addition to a reasonable density-temperature function, creates dipole distributions with accurate estimation of the dielectric constant of the liquid.

  15. Theoretical Estimate of Maximum Possible Nuclear Explosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bethe, H. A.

    1950-01-31

    The maximum nuclear accident which could occur in a Na-cooled, Be moderated, Pu and power producing reactor is estimated theoretically. (T.R.H.) 2O82 Results of nuclear calculations for a variety of compositions of fast, heterogeneous, sodium-cooled, U-235-fueled, plutonium- and power-producing reactors are reported. Core compositions typical of plate-, pin-, or wire-type fuel elements and with uranium as metal, alloy, and oxide were considered. These compositions included atom ratios in the following range: U-23B to U-235 from 2 to 8; sodium to U-235 from 1.5 to 12; iron to U-235 from 5 to 18; and vanadium to U-235 from 11 to 33. Calculations were performed to determine the effect of lead and iron reflectors between the core and blanket. Both natural and depleted uranium were evaluated as the blanket fertile material. Reactors were compared on a basis of conversion ratio, specific power, and the product of both. The calculated results are in general agreement with the experimental results from fast reactor assemblies. An analysis of the effect of new cross-section values as they became available is included. (auth)

  16. Towards realistic molecular dynamics simulations of grain boundary mobility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, J., E-mail: zhou@imm.rwth-aachen.de [Institut fuer Metallkunde und Metallphysik, Rheinisch-Westfaelische Technische Hochschule (RWTH), Aachen (Germany); Mohles, V. [Institut fuer Metallkunde und Metallphysik, Rheinisch-Westfaelische Technische Hochschule (RWTH), Aachen (Germany)

    2011-09-15

    In order to investigate grain boundary migration by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations a new approach involving a crystal orientation-dependent driving force has been developed by imposing an appropriate driving force on grain boundary atoms and enlarging the effective range of driving force. The new approach has been validated by the work of the driving force associated with the motion of grain boundaries. With the new approach the relation between boundary migration velocity and driving force is found to be nonlinear, as was expected from rate theory for large driving forces applied in MD simulations. By evaluating grain boundary mobility nonlinearly for a set of symmetrical <1 1 1> tilt boundaries in aluminum at high temperature, high-angle grain boundaries were shown to move much faster than low-angle grain boundaries. This agrees well with experimental findings for recrystallization and grain growth. In comparison with the available data the simulated mobility of a 38.21{sup o{Sigma}}7 boundary was found to be significantly lower than other MD simulation results and comparable with the experimental values. Furthermore, the average volume involved during atomic jumps for boundary migration is determined in MD simulations for the first time. The large magnitude of the volume indicates that grain boundary migration is accomplished by the correlated motion of atom groups.

  17. 50 CFR 259.34 - Minimum and maximum deposits; maximum time to deposit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Minimum and maximum deposits; maximum time to deposit. 259.34 Section 259.34 Wildlife and Fisheries NATIONAL MARINE FISHERIES SERVICE, NATIONAL... Capital Construction Fund Agreement § 259.34 Minimum and maximum deposits; maximum time to deposit. (a...

  18. PLSS Townships and Sections, Public Land Survey square-mile section boundaries within Sedgwick County. Layer was developed interactively by GIS staff. Primary attribues include section, township, and range identifiers, and x-y coordinates, and Public Safety (ortho) map numbers., Published in 2008, 1:1200 (1in=100ft) scale, Sedgwick County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Local Govt | GIS Inventory — PLSS Townships and Sections dataset current as of 2008. Public Land Survey square-mile section boundaries within Sedgwick County. Layer was developed interactively...

  19. Cities, Towns and Villages, Public Land Survey township boundaries within Sedgwick County. Layer was developed interactively by GIS staff. Primary attribues include township, and range identifiers, and x-y coordinates., Published in 2008, 1:1200 (1in=100ft) scale, Sedgwick County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Local Govt | GIS Inventory — Cities, Towns and Villages dataset current as of 2008. Public Land Survey township boundaries within Sedgwick County. Layer was developed interactively by GIS staff....

  20. The turning of the wind in the atmospheric boundary layer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pena Diaz, Alfredo; Gryning, Sven-Erik; Floors, Rogier Ralph

    2014-01-01

    Here we use accurate observations of the wind speed vector to analyze the behavior with height of the wind direction. The observations are a combination of tall meteorological mast and long-range wind lidar measurements covering the entire atmospheric boundary layer. The observations were performed...... winds underpredict the turning of the wind and the boundary-layer winds in general....

  1. Global environmental governance and planetary boundaries: An introduction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Galaz, V.; Biermann, F.; Folke, C.; Nilsson, M.; Olsson, P.

    2012-01-01

    The notion of 'planetary boundaries' is rapidly diffusing into a range of policy arenas and has clearly stimulated a discussion on the need to reform international environmental governance. This article summarizes the special section "Global Environmental Governance and Planetary Boundaries". The

  2. Grain Boundary Segregation in Metals

    CERN Document Server

    Lejcek, Pavel

    2010-01-01

    Grain boundaries are important structural components of polycrystalline materials used in the vast majority of technical applications. Because grain boundaries form a continuous network throughout such materials, their properties may limit their practical use. One of the serious phenomena which evoke these limitations is the grain boundary segregation of impurities. It results in the loss of grain boundary cohesion and consequently, in brittle fracture of the materials. The current book deals with fundamentals of grain boundary segregation in metallic materials and its relationship to the grain boundary structure, classification and other materials properties.

  3. Maximum length scale in density based topology optimization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lazarov, Boyan Stefanov; Wang, Fengwen

    2017-01-01

    The focus of this work is on two new techniques for imposing maximum length scale in topology optimization. Restrictions on the maximum length scale provide designers with full control over the optimized structure and open possibilities to tailor the optimized design for broader range...... of manufacturing processes by fulfilling the associated technological constraints. One of the proposed methods is based on combination of several filters and builds on top of the classical density filtering which can be viewed as a low pass filter applied to the design parametrization. The main idea...

  4. Parametric optimization of thermoelectric elements footprint for maximum power generation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rezania, A.; Rosendahl, Lasse; Yin, Hao

    2014-01-01

    The development studies in thermoelectric generator (TEG) systems are mostly disconnected to parametric optimization of the module components. In this study, optimum footprint ratio of n- and p-type thermoelectric (TE) elements is explored to achieve maximum power generation, maximum cost......-performance, and variation of efficiency in the uni-couple over a wide range of the heat transfer coefficient on the cold junction. The three-dimensional (3D) governing equations of the thermoelectricity and the heat transfer are solved using the finite element method (FEM) for temperature dependent properties of TE...

  5. Maximum daily rainfall in South Korea

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    sponding datasets are described in section 2. The data used are the annual maximum daily rainfall from 1961 to 2001. The models and the fitting procedures are described in section 3. We use the method of maximum likelihood for estimation and the profile likelihood method for the corresponding confidence intervals.

  6. Location specific forecasting of maximum and minimum ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    But, accurate forecasting of surface param- eters, particularly maximum and minimum tem- peratures over India, is a difficult task due to. Keywords. Statistical bias correction; location specific forecast; DMO; Numerical Weather Prediction; maximum and minimum temperature forecast. J. Earth Syst. Sci. 123, No. 5, July 2014 ...

  7. 24 CFR 200.15 - Maximum mortgage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Maximum mortgage. 200.15 Section... Generally Applicable to Multifamily and Health Care Facility Mortgage Insurance Programs; and Continuing Eligibility Requirements for Existing Projects Eligible Mortgage § 200.15 Maximum mortgage. Mortgages must not...

  8. Modelling maximum canopy conductance and transpiration in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    There is much current interest in predicting the maximum amount of water that can be transpired by Eucalyptus trees. It is possible that industrial waste water may be applied as irrigation water to eucalypts and it is important to predict the maximum transpiration rates of these plantations in an attempt to dispose of this ...

  9. Boundary-layer theory

    CERN Document Server

    Schlichting (Deceased), Hermann

    2017-01-01

    This new edition of the near-legendary textbook by Schlichting and revised by Gersten presents a comprehensive overview of boundary-layer theory and its application to all areas of fluid mechanics, with particular emphasis on the flow past bodies (e.g. aircraft aerodynamics). The new edition features an updated reference list and over 100 additional changes throughout the book, reflecting the latest advances on the subject.

  10. The Arctic Circumpolar Boundary Current

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aksenov, Yevgeny; Ivanov, Vladimir V.; Nurser, A. J. George; Bacon, Sheldon; Polyakov, Igor V.; Coward, Andrew C.; Naveira-Garabato, Alberto C.; Beszczynska-Moeller, Agnieszka

    2011-09-01

    We present high-resolution simulations and observational data as evidence of a fast current flowing along the shelf break of the Siberian and Alaskan shelves in the Arctic Ocean. Thus far, the Arctic Circumpolar Boundary Current (ACBC) has been seen as comprising two branches: the Fram Strait and Barents Sea Branches (FSB and BSB, respectively). Here we describe a new third branch, the Arctic Shelf Break Branch (ASBB). We show that the forcing mechanism for the ASBB is a combination of buoyancy loss and non-local wind, creating high pressure upstream in the Barents Sea. The potential vorticity influx through the St. Anna Trough dictates the cyclonic direction of flow of the ASBB, which is the most energetic large-scale circulation structure in the Arctic Ocean. It plays a substantial role in transporting Arctic halocline waters and exhibits a robust seasonal cycle with a summer minimum and winter maximum. The simulations show the continuity of the FSB all the way around the Arctic shelves and the uninterrupted ASBB between the St. Anna Trough and the western Fram Strait. The BSB flows continuously along the Siberian shelf as far as the Chukchi Plateau, where it partly diverges from the continental slope into the ocean interior. The Alaskan Shelf break Current (ASC) is the analog of the ASBB in the Canadian Arctic. The ASC is forced by the local winds and high upstream pressure in Bering Strait, caused by the drop in sea surface height between the Pacific and Arctic Oceans.

  11. Duality of Maximum Entropy and Minimum Divergence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinto Eguchi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available We discuss a special class of generalized divergence measures by the use of generator functions. Any divergence measure in the class is separated into the difference between cross and diagonal entropy. The diagonal entropy measure in the class associates with a model of maximum entropy distributions; the divergence measure leads to statistical estimation via minimization, for arbitrarily giving a statistical model. The dualistic relationship between the maximum entropy model and the minimum divergence estimation is explored in the framework of information geometry. The model of maximum entropy distributions is characterized to be totally geodesic with respect to the linear connection associated with the divergence. A natural extension for the classical theory for the maximum likelihood method under the maximum entropy model in terms of the Boltzmann-Gibbs-Shannon entropy is given. We discuss the duality in detail for Tsallis entropy as a typical example.

  12. Measuring the Substellar Boundary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancino, Adolfo Andrew; Dupuy, Trent

    2018-01-01

    Brown dwarfs are not massive enough to undergo hydrogen fusion and therefore constantly lose heat and change luminosity over their lifetime. Because of this, brown dwarfs do not follow the same pattern that stars on the main sequence follow. Brown dwarfs can have similar luminosities but widely differing masses, or vice versa, while stars follow a tight relationship between mass and luminosity. In principle, mass and luminosity measurements straddling the boundary between stars and brown dwarfs could be used to directly measure this dividing line in mass. We present a method for determining this boundary accurately given a limited sample size. We tested our method with Monte Carlo simulated samples of brown dwarfs and stars with randomly drawn masses and ages, using evolutionary models to infer luminosities. In our simulation designed to mimic the largest current sample of such mass measurements (37 objects; Dupuy & Liu 2017), we find that the uncertainty in the dividing line that can be inferred from the data is ± 4 MJup. This implies that distinguishing between competing evolutionary model predictions for the boundary (~70-80 MJup) will be difficult given the current sample size of mass measurements.

  13. Seismic Detectability of the Postperovskite Boundary (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shim, S.; Catalli, K.; Prakapenka, V.

    2009-12-01

    The depth range where both perovskite (Pv) and postperovskite (PPv) phases exist (mixed phase region or boundary thickness) strongly influence the seismic detectability of the PPv boundary and convection in the D" layer. We measured the thickness of the postperovskite (PPv) boundary in (Mg0.91Fe0.09)SiO3, (Mg0.9Fe0.1)(Al0.1Si0.9)O3, and (Mg0.91Fe0.09)(Fe0.09Si0.91)O3 in the laser-heated diamond-anvil cell at in situ high pressure-temperature conditions up to 3000 K and 145 GPa. Both Fe2+ and Fe3++Al increase the PPv boundary thickness to 400~600±100 km which is substantially larger than the thickness of the D" discontinuity (<30 km) [Lay 2008], while Fe3+ alone does not increase the thickness. Calculations using our PPv boundary results and recent element partitioning studies show that the Fe2+ buffering effect of ferropericlase (Fp) may increase the PPv transition pressure and decrease the PPv boundary thickness in an Al-free system. However, the magnitude of the buffering effect is not sufficient to fit the PPv boundary thickness to the thickness of the D" discontinuity for pyrolite. Furthermore, Al increases the PPv boundary thickness, and the rapid temperature increase in the D" layer suppresses the nonlinearity in the PPv phase fraction profile and prevents the completion of the PPv transition in Earth's mantle. The PPv boundary will be particularly thick in regions with elevated Al content and/or low Mg/Si ratio (such as basaltic materials), reducing the effects of the large positive Clapeyron slope of the PPv boundary on the buoyancy of thermal anomalies and stabilizing the compositional heterogeneities at the lowermost mantle. If the PPv transition is the source of the D" discontinuity, regions with sharp discontinuities require distinct compositions, such as a higher Mg/Si ratio or low Al content.

  14. Boundary issues and personality disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutheil, Thomas G

    2005-03-01

    The author first presents an overview of the basic elements of boundary theory and clarifies the distinction between boundary crossings and boundary violations. The concepts of context dependence, power asymmetry, and fiduciary duty as they relate to boundary problems are also discussed. The intrinsic and extrinsic consequences of boundary problems are reviewed. The extrinsic consequences fall into three major categories: civil lawsuits, complaints to the board of registration, and complaints to professional societies. The author then reviews types of boundary issues that arise in relation to histrionic, dependent, antisocial, and borderline personality disorders. Countertransference issues that arise in working with patients with personality disorders are discussed, as well as cultural differences that may affect the perception of boundary problems. The article ends with a list of risk management principles and recommendations for avoiding boundary problems in the therapeutic relationship.

  15. Allegheny County Zip Code Boundaries

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — This dataset demarcates the zip code boundaries that lie within Allegheny County. These are not clipped to the Allgeheny County boundary. If viewing this...

  16. An Optical Study of Ice Grain Boundaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomson, Erik S.

    The equilibrium phase geometry and evolution of polycrystals underlies the nature of materials. In particular, grain boundaries dominate the total interfacial area within polycrystalline materials. Our experimental studies are motivated by the importance of the structure, evolution, and thermodynamic behavior of grain boundaries near bulk melting temperatures. Ice is singled out as a material of interest due to its geophysical importance and its advantageous optical properties. An experimental apparatus and light reflection technique is designed to measure grain boundary melting in ice bicrystals, in thermodynamic equilibrium The technique allows continuous monitoring of reflected light intensity from the grain boundary as the temperature and solutal composition are systematically varied. For each sample the individual crystal orientations are also measured. The type and concentration of impurity in the liquid is controlled and the temperature is continuously recorded and controlled over a range near the melting point. An optical model of the interface is developed in order to convert experimental reflection data into a physical measurement of the liquidity of the grain boundary. Solutions are found for reflection and transmission amplitude coefficients for waves propagating from an arbitrarily oriented uniaxial anisotropic material into an isotropic material. This general model is used to determine solutions for three layer, ice/water/ice, systems with crystals of arbitrary orientation, and is broadly applicable to layered materials. Experimental results show thicker grain boundary liquid layers than expected from classical colligative effects. A physically realistic model of intermolecular interactions succeeds in bounding the measurements. These measurements may have important implications for understanding a wide range of effects in polycrystalline materials. Likewise, the experimental techniques and optical theory may be applied to other systems of broad

  17. The role of boundary layer momentum advection in the mean ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A simple three-way balance between the pressure gradients, Coriolis force and effective Rayleigh friction has been classically used to diagnose the location of maximum boundary layer convergence in the near equatorial ITCZ. If such a balance can capture the dynamics of off-equatorial convergence was not known.

  18. Progress report on grain boundaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balluffi, R. W.; Bristowe, P. D.

    1989-06-01

    The research was focused on the following three major areas: (1) study of the atomic structure of grain boundaries by means of X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy and computer modeling; (2) study of grain boundary phase transitions by electron microscopy and computer modeling; (3) investigation of the mechanism of high angle grain boundary migration. Results are briefly discussed.

  19. Progress report on grain boundaries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balluffi, R.W.; Bristowe, P.D.

    1989-06-01

    The research was focused on the following three major areas: (1) study of the atomic structure of grain boundaries by means of x-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy and computer modeling; (2) study of grain boundary phase transitions by electron microscopy and computer modeling; (3) investigation of the mechanism of high angle grain boundary migration. Results are briefly discussed. 20 refs.

  20. Maximum Recoverable Gas from Hydrate Bearing Sediments by Depressurization

    KAUST Repository

    Terzariol, Marco

    2017-11-13

    The estimation of gas production rates from hydrate bearing sediments requires complex numerical simulations. This manuscript presents a set of simple and robust analytical solutions to estimate the maximum depressurization-driven recoverable gas. These limiting-equilibrium solutions are established when the dissociation front reaches steady state conditions and ceases to expand further. Analytical solutions show the relevance of (1) relative permeabilities between the hydrate free sediment, the hydrate bearing sediment, and the aquitard layers, and (2) the extent of depressurization in terms of the fluid pressures at the well, at the phase boundary, and in the far field. Close form solutions for the size of the produced zone allow for expeditious financial analyses; results highlight the need for innovative production strategies in order to make hydrate accumulations an economically-viable energy resource. Horizontal directional drilling and multi-wellpoint seafloor dewatering installations may lead to advantageous production strategies in shallow seafloor reservoirs.

  1. Maximum Torque and Momentum Envelopes for Reaction Wheel Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markley, F. Landis; Reynolds, Reid G.; Liu, Frank X.; Lebsock, Kenneth L.

    2009-01-01

    Spacecraft reaction wheel maneuvers are limited by the maximum torque and/or angular momentum that the wheels can provide. For an n-wheel configuration, the torque or momentum envelope can be obtained by projecting the n-dimensional hypercube, representing the domain boundary of individual wheel torques or momenta, into three dimensional space via the 3xn matrix of wheel axes. In this paper, the properties of the projected hypercube are discussed, and algorithms are proposed for determining this maximal torque or momentum envelope for general wheel configurations. Practical strategies for distributing a prescribed torque or momentum among the n wheels are presented, with special emphasis on configurations of four, five, and six wheels.

  2. Boundaries and Boundary Marks - Substantive Cultural Heritage of Extensive Importance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldhaeusl, P.; Koenig, H.; Mansberger, R.

    2015-08-01

    The Austrian Society for surveying and Geoinformation (ASG) has proposed to submit "Boundaries and Boundary Marks" for the UNESCO World Heritage title. It was time that boundaries, borders and limits of all types as well as ownership rights would find the proper attention in the global public. Landmarks symbolize the real property and the associated rights and obligations, in a figurative sense, the property generally and all legal limits. A democratic state of law is impossible at today's population density without a functioning land administration system with surveying and jurisdiction. As monumental World Heritage representatives of the geodetic artwork "Boundaries and Boundary Marks" are specifically proposed: remaining monuments of the original cadastral geodetic network, the first pan-Austrian surveying headquarters in Vienna, and a specific selection of outstanding boundary monuments. Landmarks are monuments to the boundaries which separate rights and obligations, but also connect the neighbors peacefully after written agreement. "And cursed be he who does not respect the boundaries" you wrote already 3000 years ago. Boundaries and Boundary Marks are a real thing; they all belong to the tangible or material heritage of human history. In this context also the intangible heritage is discussed. This refers to oral tradition and expressions, performing arts; social practices, rituals and festive events; as well as to knowledge and practices handling nature and the universe. "Boundaries and Boundary Marks" do not belong to it, but clearly to the material cultural world heritage. "Boundary and Boundary Marks" is proposed to be listed according to the criteria (ii),(iv),(vi).

  3. Study on flow of power-law fluid through an infinite array of circular cylinders with immersed boundary-lattice Boltzmann method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Ye-Long

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A direct forcing method for the simulation of particulate flows based on immersed boundary-lattice Boltzmann method is used to study the flow of power-law fluid through an infinite array of circular cylinders with cylinder separations of 20a (a is the cylinder radius with laminar shedding behind cylinders. Time averaged drag coefficient, maximum of lift coefficient and Strouhal number are given out with the power-law index in the range of 0.4 ≤ n ≤ 1.8 and Re in the range of 50 ≤ Re ≤ 140.

  4. pH gradients in the diffusive boundary layer of subarctic macrophytes

    KAUST Repository

    Hendriks, Iris E.

    2017-06-20

    Highly productive macrophytes produce diurnal and seasonal cycles in CO concentrations modulated by metabolic activity, which cause discrepancies between pH in the bulk water and near seaweed blades, especially when entering the diffusion boundary layer (DBL). Calcifying epiphytic organisms living in this environment are therefore exposed to a different pH environment than that of the water column. To evaluate the actual pH environment on blade surfaces, we measured the thickness of the DBL and pH gradients within it for six subarctic macrophytes: Fucus vesiculosus, Ascophyllum nodosum, Ulva lactuca, Zostera marina, Saccharina longicruris, and Agarum clathratum. We measured pH under laboratory conditions at ambient temperatures (2–3 °C) and slow, stable flow over the blade surface at five light intensities (dark, 30, 50, 100 and 200 µmol photons m s). Boundary layer thickness ranged between 511 and 1632 µm, while the maximum difference in pH (∆pH) between the blade surface and the water column ranged between 0.4 ± 0.14 (average ± SE; Zostera) and 1.2 ± 0.13 (average ± SE; Ulva) pH units. These differences in pH are larger than predictions for pH changes in the bulk water by the end of the century. A simple quadratic model best described the relationship between light intensity and maximum ∆pH, pointing at relatively low optimum PAR of between 28 and 139 µmol photons m s to reach maximum ∆pH. Elevated pH at the blade surface may provide chemical “refugia” for calcifying epiphytic organisms, especially during summer at higher latitudes where photoperiods are long.

  5. Transcending Organizational Boundaries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kringelum, Louise Tina Brøns

    This thesis explores how processes of business model innovation can unfold in a port authority by transcending organizational boundaries through inter-organizational collaboration. The findings contribute to two fields of academic inquiry: the study of business model innovation and the study of how...... by applying the engaged scholarship approach, thereby providing a methodological contribution to both port and business model research. Emphasizing the interplay of intra- and inter-organizational business model innovation, the thesis adds insight into the roles of port authorities, business model trends...

  6. 5 CFR 1600.22 - Maximum contributions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 1600.22 Administrative Personnel FEDERAL RETIREMENT THRIFT INVESTMENT BOARD EMPLOYEE CONTRIBUTION ELECTIONS AND CONTRIBUTION ALLOCATIONS Program of Contributions § 1600.22 Maximum contributions. (a) Regular employee contributions. A participant's regular TSP contributions are subject the following limitations: (1...

  7. Recursive utility using the stochastic maximum principle

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Aase, Knut K

    2016-01-01

    .... We use the stochastic maximum principle to analyze the model. This method uses forward/backward stochastic differential equations, and works when the economy is not Markovian, which can be the case with recursive utility...

  8. Maximum phytoplankton concentrations in the sea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jackson, G.A.; Kiørboe, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    A simplification of plankton dynamics using coagulation theory provides predictions of the maximum algal concentration sustainable in aquatic systems. These predictions have previously been tested successfully against results from iron fertilization experiments. We extend the test to data collect...

  9. The maximum flow in dynamic networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria A. Fonoberova

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The dynamic maximum flow problem that generalizes the static maximum flow problem is formulated and studied. We consider the problem on a network with capacities depending on time, fixed transit times on the arcs, and a given time horizon. The corresponding algorithm to solve this problem is proposed and some details concerning its complexity are discussed. Mathematics Subject Classification 2000: 90B10, 90C35, 90C27.

  10. Grain Boundary Energies in Copper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omar, Ramli

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. Requires signed TDF. The dependence of grain boundary energy on boundary orientation was studied in copper annealed at 1000 ^circC. Grain boundary orientations and the disorientations across the boundaries were measured. A rotation matrix notation is used to interpret selected area electron channelling patterns observed in a scanning electron microscope. The Herring and Shewmon torque terms were investigated using wire specimens having a "bamboo" structure. The Herring torque terms were determined using the Hess relation. The (110) section of the Sigma 11 gamma-plot (i.e. the variation of grain boundary energy with boundary orientation) was evaluated. In this plot, minima in energies were found at the (311) and (332) mirror planes. Sigma 3 and Sigma9 boundaries were investigated in sheet specimens. The (110) and (111) sections of the Sigma3 gamma -plot were evaluated. In addition to the sharp cusps occurring at the Sigma3 {111} planes, the further shallower cusps occur at the incoherent Sigma 3 boundaries with the interfacial planes approximately parallel to {322} in one crystal and {11.44} in the other crystal. Flat and curved Sigma9 boundaries were investigated. The break up of Sigma9 boundaries into two Sigma3 boundaries and the relation between the Sigma3 and Sigma 9 gamma-plots was also examined. The (110) section of the Sigma9 gamma-plot was constructed.

  11. Maximum Entropy Approaches to Living Neural Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John M. Beggs

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Understanding how ensembles of neurons collectively interact will be a key step in developing a mechanistic theory of cognitive processes. Recent progress in multineuron recording and analysis techniques has generated tremendous excitement over the physiology of living neural networks. One of the key developments driving this interest is a new class of models based on the principle of maximum entropy. Maximum entropy models have been reported to account for spatial correlation structure in ensembles of neurons recorded from several different types of data. Importantly, these models require only information about the firing rates of individual neurons and their pairwise correlations. If this approach is generally applicable, it would drastically simplify the problem of understanding how neural networks behave. Given the interest in this method, several groups now have worked to extend maximum entropy models to account for temporal correlations. Here, we review how maximum entropy models have been applied to neuronal ensemble data to account for spatial and temporal correlations. We also discuss criticisms of the maximum entropy approach that argue that it is not generally applicable to larger ensembles of neurons. We conclude that future maximum entropy models will need to address three issues: temporal correlations, higher-order correlations, and larger ensemble sizes. Finally, we provide a brief list of topics for future research.

  12. A creep rupture model accounting for cavitation at sliding grain boundaries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Giessen, Erik van der; Tvergaard, Viggo

    1991-01-01

    An axisymmetric cell model analysis is used to study creep failure by grain boundary cavitation at facets normal to the maximum principal tensile stress, taking into account the influence of cavitation and sliding at adjacent inclined grain boundaries. It is found that the interaction between the

  13. Reweighting twisted boundary conditions

    CERN Document Server

    Bussone, Andrea; Hansen, Martin; Pica, Claudio

    2015-01-01

    Imposing twisted boundary conditions on the fermionic fields is a procedure extensively used when evaluating, for example, form factors on the lattice. Twisting is usually performed for one flavour and only in the valence, and this causes a breaking of unitarity. In this work we explore the possibility of restoring unitarity through the reweighting method. We first study some properties of the approach at tree level and then we stochastically evaluate ratios of fermionic determinants for different boundary conditions in order to include them in the gauge averages, avoiding in this way the expensive generation of new configurations for each choice of the twisting angle, $\\theta$. As expected the effect of reweighting is negligible in the case of large volumes but it is important when the volumes are small and the twisting angles are large. In particular we find a measurable effect for the plaquette and the pion correlation function in the case of $\\theta=\\pi/2$ in a volume $16\\times 8^3$, and we observe a syst...

  14. Maximum Entropy Estimation of Transition Probabilities of Reversible Markov Chains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erik Van der Straeten

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we develop a general theory for the estimation of the transition probabilities of reversible Markov chains using the maximum entropy principle. A broad range of physical models can be studied within this approach. We use one-dimensional classical spin systems to illustrate the theoretical ideas. The examples studied in this paper are: the Ising model, the Potts model and the Blume-Emery-Griffiths model.

  15. Nonuniform Moving Boundary Method for Computational Fluid Dynamics Simulation of Intrathecal Cerebrospinal Flow Distribution in a Cynomolgus Monkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khani, Mohammadreza; Xing, Tao; Gibbs, Christina; Oshinski, John N; Stewart, Gregory R; Zeller, Jillynne R; Martin, Bryn A

    2017-08-01

    A detailed quantification and understanding of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) dynamics may improve detection and treatment of central nervous system (CNS) diseases and help optimize CSF system-based delivery of CNS therapeutics. This study presents a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model that utilizes a nonuniform moving boundary approach to accurately reproduce the nonuniform distribution of CSF flow along the spinal subarachnoid space (SAS) of a single cynomolgus monkey. A magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) protocol was developed and applied to quantify subject-specific CSF space geometry and flow and define the CFD domain and boundary conditions. An algorithm was implemented to reproduce the axial distribution of unsteady CSF flow by nonuniform deformation of the dura surface. Results showed that maximum difference between the MRI measurements and CFD simulation of CSF flow rates was flow along the entire spine was laminar with a peak Reynolds number of ∼150 and average Womersley number of ∼5.4. Maximum CSF flow rate was present at the C4-C5 vertebral level. Deformation of the dura ranged up to a maximum of 134 μm. Geometric analysis indicated that total spinal CSF space volume was ∼8.7 ml. Average hydraulic diameter, wetted perimeter, and SAS area were 2.9 mm, 37.3 mm and 27.24 mm2, respectively. CSF pulse wave velocity (PWV) along the spine was quantified to be 1.2 m/s.

  16. Negotiating Cluster Boundaries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Giacomin, Valeria

    2017-01-01

    Palm oil was introduced to Malay(si)a as an alternative to natural rubber, inheriting its cluster organizational structure. In the late 1960s, Malaysia became the world’s largest palm oil exporter. Based on archival material from British colonial institutions and agency houses, this paper focuses...... on the governance dynamics that drove institutional change within this cluster during decolonization. The analysis presents three main findings: (i) cluster boundaries are defined by continuous tug-of-war style negotiations between public and private actors; (ii) this interaction produces institutional change...... within the cluster, in the form of cumulative ‘institutional rounds’ – the correction or disruption of existing institutions or the creation of new ones; and (iii) this process leads to a broader inclusion of local actors in the original cluster configuration. The paper challenges the prevalent argument...

  17. Repeated judgment sampling: Boundaries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johannes Muller-Trede

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the boundaries of the recent result that eliciting more than one estimate from the same person and averaging these can lead to accuracy gains in judgment tasks. It first examines its generality, analysing whether the kind of question being asked has an effect on the size of potential gains. Experimental results show that the question type matters. Previous results reporting potential accuracy gains are reproduced for year-estimation questions, and extended to questions about percentage shares. On the other hand, no gains are found for general numerical questions. The second part of the paper tests repeated judgment sampling's practical applicability by asking judges to provide a third and final answer on the basis of their first two estimates. In an experiment, the majority of judges do not consistently average their first two answers. As a result, they do not realise the potential accuracy gains from averaging.

  18. Superfluid Boundary Layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stagg, G W; Parker, N G; Barenghi, C F

    2017-03-31

    We model the superfluid flow of liquid helium over the rough surface of a wire (used to experimentally generate turbulence) profiled by atomic force microscopy. Numerical simulations of the Gross-Pitaevskii equation reveal that the sharpest features in the surface induce vortex nucleation both intrinsically (due to the raised local fluid velocity) and extrinsically (providing pinning sites to vortex lines aligned with the flow). Vortex interactions and reconnections contribute to form a dense turbulent layer of vortices with a nonclassical average velocity profile which continually sheds small vortex rings into the bulk. We characterize this layer for various imposed flows. As boundary layers conventionally arise from viscous forces, this result opens up new insight into the nature of superflows.

  19. Public Computation & Boundary Play

    CERN Document Server

    Sengupta, Pratim

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we introduce 'public computation' as a genre of learning environments that can be used to radically broaden public participation in authentic, computation-enabled STEM disciplinary practices. Our paradigmatic approach utilizes open source software designed for professional scientists, engineers and digital artists, and situates them in an undiluted form, alongside live and archived expert support, in a public space. We present a case study of DigiPlay, a prototypical public computation space we designed at the University of Calgary, where users can interact directly with scientific simulations as well as the underlying open source code using an array of massive multi- touch screens. We argue that in such a space, public interactions with the code can be thought of as boundary work and play, through which public participation becomes legitimate scientific act, as the public engages in scientific creation through truly open-ended explorations with the code.

  20. Challenging the Boundaries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgaard, Nina

    2004-01-01

    to explore in the study and teaching of foreign languages. Not only may linguistics and literature be employed to shed light on each other, the insights gained may furthermore prove useful in a broader context in our foreign language studies. The article begins with a brief introduction to literary...... linguistics in general and to Hallidayan linguistics in particular. The theoretical framework thus laid out, it is exemplified how Halliday's theory of language may be employed in the analysis of literature. The article concludes by considering the possible status of literary linguistics in a broader......To many people, challenging the boundaries between the traditional disciplines in foreign language studies means doing cultural studies. The aim of this article is to pull in a different direction by suggesting how the interface between linguistics and literature may be another fertile field...

  1. The Plasmasphere Boundary Layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. L. Carpenter

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available As an inner magnetospheric phenomenon the plasmapause region is of interest for a number of reasons, one being the occurrence there of geophysically important interactions between the plasmas of the hot plasma sheet and of the cool plasmasphere. There is a need for a conceptual framework within which to examine and discuss these interactions and their consequences, and we therefore suggest that the plasmapause region be called the Plasmasphere Boundary Layer, or PBL. Such a term has been slow to emerge because of the complexity and variability of the plasma populations that can exist near the plasmapause and because of the variety of criteria used to identify the plasmapause in experimental data. Furthermore, and quite importantly in our view, a substantial obstacle to the consideration of the plasmapause region as a boundary layer has been the longstanding tendency of textbooks on space physics to limit introductory material on the plasmapause phenomenon to zeroth order descriptions in terms of ideal MHD theory, thus implying that the plasmasphere is relatively well understood. A textbook may introduce the concept of shielding of the inner magnetosphere from perturbing convection electric fields, but attention is not usually paid to the variety of physical processes reported to occur in the PBL, such as heating, instabilities, and fast longitudinal flows, processes which must play roles in plasmasphere dynamics in concert with the flow regimes associated with the major dynamo sources of electric fields. We believe that through the use of the PBL concept in future textbook discussions of the plasmasphere and in scientific communications, much progress can be made on longstanding questions about the physics involved in the formation of the plasmapause and in the cycles of erosion and recovery of the plasmasphere. Key words. Magnetospheric physics (plasmasphere; plasma convection; MHD waves and instabilities

  2. The Plasmasphere Boundary Layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. L. Carpenter

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available As an inner magnetospheric phenomenon the plasmapause region is of interest for a number of reasons, one being the occurrence there of geophysically important interactions between the plasmas of the hot plasma sheet and of the cool plasmasphere. There is a need for a conceptual framework within which to examine and discuss these interactions and their consequences, and we therefore suggest that the plasmapause region be called the Plasmasphere Boundary Layer, or PBL. Such a term has been slow to emerge because of the complexity and variability of the plasma populations that can exist near the plasmapause and because of the variety of criteria used to identify the plasmapause in experimental data. Furthermore, and quite importantly in our view, a substantial obstacle to the consideration of the plasmapause region as a boundary layer has been the longstanding tendency of textbooks on space physics to limit introductory material on the plasmapause phenomenon to zeroth order descriptions in terms of ideal MHD theory, thus implying that the plasmasphere is relatively well understood. A textbook may introduce the concept of shielding of the inner magnetosphere from perturbing convection electric fields, but attention is not usually paid to the variety of physical processes reported to occur in the PBL, such as heating, instabilities, and fast longitudinal flows, processes which must play roles in plasmasphere dynamics in concert with the flow regimes associated with the major dynamo sources of electric fields. We believe that through the use of the PBL concept in future textbook discussions of the plasmasphere and in scientific communications, much progress can be made on longstanding questions about the physics involved in the formation of the plasmapause and in the cycles of erosion and recovery of the plasmasphere.

    Key words. Magnetospheric physics (plasmasphere; plasma convection; MHD waves and instabilities

  3. Entropy generation: Minimum inside and maximum outside

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucia, Umberto

    2014-02-01

    The extremum of entropy generation is evaluated for both maximum and minimum cases using a thermodynamic approach which is usually applied in engineering to design energy transduction systems. A new result in the thermodynamic analysis of the entropy generation extremum theorem is proved by the engineering approach. It follows from the proof that the entropy generation results as a maximum when it is evaluated by the exterior surroundings of the system and a minimum when it is evaluated within the system. The Bernoulli equation is analyzed as an example in order to evaluate the internal and external dissipations, in accordance with the theoretical results obtained.

  4. New times of maximum of CY Aquarii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuvikene, T.; Sterken, C.; Brogt, E.; Cont, D.; Henden, A.; Papadaki, C.; Volkov, I.; Wiedemair, C.

    2010-04-01

    We present a collection of 102 new times of maximum of the SX Phoenicis star CY Aquarii. These times, together with 20 times of maximum taken from the literature, lead to a new local linear ephemeris for 2003--2009 with a formally slightly shorter period than the one for 1996--2002. It will require at least another half decade of additional monitoring before any significant update to any model can be considered. Such monitoring should preferably occur at regular intervals, be done in a consistent photometric band, and at high time resolution.

  5. Maximum Entropy Learning with Deep Belief Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Payton Lin

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Conventionally, the maximum likelihood (ML criterion is applied to train a deep belief network (DBN. We present a maximum entropy (ME learning algorithm for DBNs, designed specifically to handle limited training data. Maximizing only the entropy of parameters in the DBN allows more effective generalization capability, less bias towards data distributions, and robustness to over-fitting compared to ML learning. Results of text classification and object recognition tasks demonstrate ME-trained DBN outperforms ML-trained DBN when training data is limited.

  6. Density estimation by maximum quantum entropy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silver, R.N.; Wallstrom, T.; Martz, H.F.

    1993-11-01

    A new Bayesian method for non-parametric density estimation is proposed, based on a mathematical analogy to quantum statistical physics. The mathematical procedure is related to maximum entropy methods for inverse problems and image reconstruction. The information divergence enforces global smoothing toward default models, convexity, positivity, extensivity and normalization. The novel feature is the replacement of classical entropy by quantum entropy, so that local smoothing is enforced by constraints on differential operators. The linear response of the estimate is proportional to the covariance. The hyperparameters are estimated by type-II maximum likelihood (evidence). The method is demonstrated on textbook data sets.

  7. Revealing the Maximum Strength in Nanotwinned Copper

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lu, L.; Chen, X.; Huang, Xiaoxu

    2009-01-01

    The strength of polycrystalline materials increases with decreasing grain size. Below a critical size, smaller grains might lead to softening, as suggested by atomistic simulations. The strongest size should arise at a transition in deformation mechanism from lattice dislocation activities to grain...... boundary–related processes. We investigated the maximum strength of nanotwinned copper samples with different twin thicknesses. We found that the strength increases with decreasing twin thickness, reaching a maximum at 15 nanometers, followed by a softening at smaller values that is accompanied by enhanced...

  8. Maximum entropy analysis of EGRET data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pohl, M.; Strong, A.W.

    1997-01-01

    EGRET data are usually analysed on the basis of the Maximum-Likelihood method \\cite{ma96} in a search for point sources in excess to a model for the background radiation (e.g. \\cite{hu97}). This method depends strongly on the quality of the background model, and thus may have high systematic...... uncertainties in region of strong and uncertain background like the Galactic Center region. Here we show images of such regions obtained by the quantified Maximum-Entropy method. We also discuss a possible further use of MEM in the analysis of problematic regions of the sky....

  9. Conformal boundaries of warped products

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kokkendorff, Simon Lyngby

    2006-01-01

    In this note we prove a result on how to determine the conformal boundary of a type of warped product of two length spaces in terms of the individual conformal boundaries. In the situation, that we treat, the warping and conformal distortion functions are functions of distance to a base point....... The result is applied to produce examples of CAT(0)-spaces, where the conformal and ideal boundaries differ in interesting ways....

  10. A maximum-likelihood estimation of pairwise relatedness for autopolyploids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, K; Guo, S T; Shattuck, M R; Chen, S T; Qi, X G; Zhang, P; Li, B G

    2015-02-01

    Relatedness between individuals is central to ecological genetics. Multiple methods are available to quantify relatedness from molecular data, including method-of-moment and maximum-likelihood estimators. We describe a maximum-likelihood estimator for autopolyploids, and quantify its statistical performance under a range of biologically relevant conditions. The statistical performances of five additional polyploid estimators of relatedness were also quantified under identical conditions. When comparing truncated estimators, the maximum-likelihood estimator exhibited lower root mean square error under some conditions and was more biased for non-relatives, especially when the number of alleles per loci was low. However, even under these conditions, this bias was reduced to be statistically insignificant with more robust genetic sampling. We also considered ambiguity in polyploid heterozygote genotyping and developed a weighting methodology for candidate genotypes. The statistical performances of three polyploid estimators under both ideal and actual conditions (including inbreeding and double reduction) were compared. The software package POLYRELATEDNESS is available to perform this estimation and supports a maximum ploidy of eight.

  11. The Boundary Function Method. Fundamentals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kot, V. A.

    2017-03-01

    The boundary function method is proposed for solving applied problems of mathematical physics in the region defined by a partial differential equation of the general form involving constant or variable coefficients with a Dirichlet, Neumann, or Robin boundary condition. In this method, the desired function is defined by a power polynomial, and a boundary function represented in the form of the desired function or its derivative at one of the boundary points is introduced. Different sequences of boundary equations have been set up with the use of differential operators. Systems of linear algebraic equations constructed on the basis of these sequences allow one to determine the coefficients of a power polynomial. Constitutive equations have been derived for initial boundary-value problems of all the main types. With these equations, an initial boundary-value problem is transformed into the Cauchy problem for the boundary function. The determination of the boundary function by its derivative with respect to the time coordinate completes the solution of the problem.

  12. Analysis of turbulent boundary layers

    CERN Document Server

    Cebeci, Tuncer

    1974-01-01

    Analysis of Turbulent Boundary Layers focuses on turbulent flows meeting the requirements for the boundary-layer or thin-shear-layer approximations. Its approach is devising relatively fundamental, and often subtle, empirical engineering correlations, which are then introduced into various forms of describing equations for final solution. After introducing the topic on turbulence, the book examines the conservation equations for compressible turbulent flows, boundary-layer equations, and general behavior of turbulent boundary layers. The latter chapters describe the CS method for calculati

  13. Connection between maximum-work and maximum-power thermal cycles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Ayala, Julian; Arias-Hernandez, L A; Angulo-Brown, F

    2013-11-01

    A new connection between maximum-power Curzon-Ahlborn thermal cycles and maximum-work reversible cycles is proposed. This linkage is built through a mapping between the exponents of a class of heat transfer laws and the exponents of a family of heat capacities depending on temperature. This connection leads to the recovery of known results and to a wide and interesting set of results for a class of thermal cycles. Among other results it was found that it is possible to use analytically closed expressions for maximum-work efficiencies to calculate good approaches to maximum-power efficiencies. Behind the proposed connection is an interpretation of endoreversibility hypothesis. Additionally, we suggest that certain reversible maximum-work cycles depending on working substance can be used as reversible landmarks for FTT maximum-power cycles, which also depend on working substance properties.

  14. Multiple regression models for the prediction of the maximum obtainable thermal efficiency of organic Rankine cycles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Ulrik; Pierobon, Leonardo; Wronski, Jorrit

    2014-01-01

    to power. In this study we propose four linear regression models to predict the maximum obtainable thermal efficiency for simple and recuperated ORCs. A previously derived methodology is able to determine the maximum thermal efficiency among many combinations of fluids and processes, given the boundary...... conditions of the process. Hundreds of optimised cases with varied design parameters are used as observations in four multiple regression analyses. We analyse the model assumptions, prediction abilities and extrapolations, and compare the results with recent studies in the literature. The models...

  15. Symbolic Boundary Work in Schools: Demarcating and Denying Ethnic Boundaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabib-Calif, Yosepha; Lomsky-Feder, Edna

    2014-01-01

    This article examines the symbolic boundary work that is carried out at a school whose student population is heterogeneous in terms of ethnicity and class. Based on ethnography, the article demonstrates how the school's staff seeks to neutralize ethnic boundaries and their accompanying discourse, while the pupils try to bring ethnic…

  16. Maximum potential preventive effect of hip protectors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Schoor, N.M.; Smit, J.H.; Bouter, L.M.; Veenings, B.; Asma, G.B.; Lips, P.T.A.M.

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To estimate the maximum potential preventive effect of hip protectors in older persons living in the community or homes for the elderly. DESIGN: Observational cohort study. SETTING: Emergency departments in the Netherlands. PARTICIPANTS: Hip fracture patients aged 70 and older who

  17. 7 CFR 1778.11 - Maximum grants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... quantity of potable water, or an anticipated acute shortage or significant decline, cannot exceed $150,000... (CONTINUED) EMERGENCY AND IMMINENT COMMUNITY WATER ASSISTANCE GRANTS § 1778.11 Maximum grants. (a) Grants not to exceed $500,000 may be made to alleviate a significant decline in quantity or quality of water...

  18. Hard graphs for the maximum clique problem

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoede, C.

    1988-01-01

    The maximum clique problem is one of the NP-complete problems. There are graphs for which a reduction technique exists that transforms the problem for these graphs into one for graphs with specific properties in polynomial time. The resulting graphs do not grow exponentially in order and number.

  19. Maximum gain of Yagi-Uda arrays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bojsen, J.H.; Schjær-Jacobsen, Hans; Nilsson, E.

    1971-01-01

    Numerical optimisation techniques have been used to find the maximum gain of some specific parasitic arrays. The gain of an array of infinitely thin, equispaced dipoles loaded with arbitrary reactances has been optimised. The results show that standard travelling-wave design methods are not optimum....... Yagi–Uda arrays with equal and unequal spacing have also been optimised with experimental verification....

  20. Efficient Algorithms for the Maximum Sum Problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung Eun Bae

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We present efficient sequential and parallel algorithms for the maximum sum (MS problem, which is to maximize the sum of some shape in the data array. We deal with two MS problems; the maximum subarray (MSA problem and the maximum convex sum (MCS problem. In the MSA problem, we find a rectangular part within the given data array that maximizes the sum in it. The MCS problem is to find a convex shape rather than a rectangular shape that maximizes the sum. Thus, MCS is a generalization of MSA. For the MSA problem, O ( n time parallel algorithms are already known on an ( n , n 2D array of processors. We improve the communication steps from 2 n − 1 to n, which is optimal. For the MCS problem, we achieve the asymptotic time bound of O ( n on an ( n , n 2D array of processors. We provide rigorous proofs for the correctness of our parallel algorithm based on Hoare logic and also provide some experimental results of our algorithm that are gathered from the Blue Gene/P super computer. Furthermore, we briefly describe how to compute the actual shape of the maximum convex sum.

  1. Global characterization of the Holocene Thermal Maximum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Renssen, H.; Seppä, H.; Crosta, X.; Goosse, H.; Roche, D.M.V.A.P.

    2012-01-01

    We analyze the global variations in the timing and magnitude of the Holocene Thermal Maximum (HTM) and their dependence on various forcings in transient simulations covering the last 9000 years (9 ka), performed with a global atmosphere-ocean-vegetation model. In these experiments, we consider the

  2. Multi-Channel Maximum Likelihood Pitch Estimation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Mads Græsbøll

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, a method for multi-channel pitch estimation is proposed. The method is a maximum likelihood estimator and is based on a parametric model where the signals in the various channels share the same fundamental frequency but can have different amplitudes, phases, and noise characteristi...

  3. Neonatal Maximum Thigh Circumference Tape: An Alternative ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conclusion: Using the cut-off values obtained, the neonates were categorized into three risk groups (“high risk”, “moderate risk”, and “low risk”), and a tricoloured MTC Tape was subsequently designed, using these inferences. Key words: Maximum thigh circumference, low birth weight, indicator. Nigerian Journal of ...

  4. Comparing maximum pressures in internal combustion engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparrow, Stanwood W; Lee, Stephen M

    1922-01-01

    Thin metal diaphragms form a satisfactory means for comparing maximum pressures in internal combustion engines. The diaphragm is clamped between two metal washers in a spark plug shell and its thickness is chosen such that, when subjected to explosion pressure, the exposed portion will be sheared from the rim in a short time.

  5. 5 CFR 9701.312 - Maximum rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Maximum rates. 9701.312 Section 9701.312 Administrative Personnel DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT SYSTEM (DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY-OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT) DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY HUMAN RESOURCES...

  6. Location specific forecasting of maximum and minimum ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Statistical bias correction; location specific forecast; DMO; Numerical Weather Prediction; maximum and minimum temperature forecast. Abstract. The output from Global Forecasting System (GFS) T574L64 operational at India Meteorological Department (IMD), New Delhi is used for obtaining location specific quantitative ...

  7. PARTICLE SWARM OPTIMIZATION BASED OF THE MAXIMUM ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2010-06-30

    Jun 30, 2010 ... systems from one hand and because of the instantaneous change of both insulation and temperature ... dealing accurately with these optimization problems and to overcome the incapacities of the traditional ... Series resistance RS, which gives a more accurate shape between the maximum power point ...

  8. Positivity for perturbations of polyharmonic operators with Dirichlet boundary conditions in two dimensions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grunau, H.-Ch.; Sweers, G.

    1995-01-01

    Higher order elliptic partial dierential equations with Dirichlet boundary conditions in general do not satisfy a maximum principle. Polyharmonic operators on balls are an exception. Here it is shown that in IR2 small perturbations of polyharmonic operators and of the domain preserve the maximum

  9. Climate Change Impacts on Probable Maximum Precipitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunkel, K.; Easterling, D. R.

    2011-12-01

    The estimation of the potential impacts of anthropogenic forcing of the climate system on extreme weather events relies heavily on the direct output of global and regional climate models, combined perhaps with extreme value statistical techniques. In this study, we use these tools along with physical and theoretical considerations to examine the potential impacts on Probable Maximum Precipitation estimates. Probable Maximum Precipitation (PMP) is the theoretically greatest depth of precipitation for a given duration that is physically possible over a particular drainage basin at a particular time of year. PMP values are used in the design of long-lived structures with lifetimes of many decades, such as dams. Climate change is an unavoidable consideration on those time scales. Many studies have documented an upward temporal trend in the frequency and intensity of extreme precipitation events. As the globe warms in response to increasing greenhouse gas concentrations, there is the potential for further changes in precipitation extremes. There are reasons why warming could lead to increased PMP values. One, the Clausius-Clapeyron relationship indicates that the saturation water vapor pressure increases with temperature; thus, precipitation-producing systems could have more "fuel" to precipitate. Two, warming may lead to an increase in the length of the convective season, when most of the extreme precipitation events occur. The methodology for estimation of PMP values has changed little over the last 30-40 years. The basic approach is to consider the factors that contribute to heavy precipitation and then consider the potential precipitation rates if all of those factors were simultaneously maximized. Convergence and vertical motion is one factor. Past work has assumed that there no empirical or satisfactory theoretical basis for assigning maximum values to this factor. The approach has been to use observed rainfall in notable storms as an indirect measure of maximum

  10. Upper Domination: Towards a Dichotomy Through Boundary Properties

    KAUST Repository

    AbouEisha, Hassan M.

    2017-07-14

    An upper dominating set in a graph is a minimal dominating set of maximum cardinality. The problem of finding an upper dominating set is generally NP-hard. We study the complexity of this problem in finitely defined classes of graphs and conjecture that the problem admits a complexity dichotomy in this family. A helpful tool to study the complexity of an algorithmic problem is the notion of boundary classes. However, none of such classes has been identified so far for the upper dominating set problem. We discover the first boundary class for this problem and prove the dichotomy for monogenic classes.

  11. Collaboration in Healthcare Through Boundary Work and Boundary Objects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meier, Ninna

    2015-01-01

    This article contributes to our understanding of how boundary work is practiced in healthcare settings. Previous studies have shown how boundaries are constantly changing, multiple, and co-existing, and can also be relatively stable cognitive and social distinctions between individuals and groups....... In highly specialized, knowledge-intensive organizations such as healthcare organizations, organizational, professional, and disciplinary boundaries mark the formal structure and division of work. Collaboration and coordination across these boundaries are essential to minimizing gaps in patient care......, but also may be challenging to achieve in practice. By drawing on data from an ethnographic study of two hospital wards, this article investigates practices of cross-disciplinary and professional collaboration and adds to our knowledge of how this kind of boundary work is produced in context. Moreover...

  12. Boundary-Layer & health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costigliola, V.

    2010-09-01

    It has long been known that specific atmospheric processes, such as weather and longer-term climatic fluctuations, affect human health. The biometeorological literature refers to this relationship as meteorotropism, defined as a change in an organism that is correlated with a change in atmospheric conditions. Plenty of (patho)physiological functions are affected by those conditions - like the respiratory diseases - and currently it is difficult to put any limits for pathologies developed in reply. Nowadays the importance of atmospheric boundary layer and health is increasingly recognised. A number of epidemiologic studies have reported associations between ambient concentrations of air pollution, specifically particulate pollution, and adverse health effects, even at the relatively low concentrations of pollution found. Since 1995 there have been over twenty-one studies from four continents that have explicitly examined the association between ambient air pollutant mixes and daily mortality. Statistically significant and positive associations have been reported in data from various locations around the world, all with varying air pollutant concentrations, weather conditions, population characteristics and public health policies. Particular role has been given to atmospheric boundary layer processes, the impact of which for specific patient-cohort is, however, not well understood till now. Assessing and monitoring air quality are thus fundamental to improve Europe's welfare. One of current projects run by the "European Medical Association" - PASODOBLE will develop and demonstrate user-driven downstream information services for the regional and local air quality sectors by combining space-based and in-situ data with models in 4 thematic service lines: - Health community support for hospitals, pharmacies, doctors and people at risk - Public information for regions, cities, tourist industry and sporting event organizers - Compliance monitoring support on particulate

  13. Efficiency at maximum power of thermally coupled heat engines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apertet, Y; Ouerdane, H; Goupil, C; Lecoeur, Ph

    2012-04-01

    We study the efficiency at maximum power of two coupled heat engines, using thermoelectric generators (TEGs) as engines. Assuming that the heat and electric charge fluxes in the TEGs are strongly coupled, we simulate numerically the dependence of the behavior of the global system on the electrical load resistance of each generator in order to obtain the working condition that permits maximization of the output power. It turns out that this condition is not unique. We derive a simple analytic expression giving the relation between the electrical load resistance of each generator permitting output power maximization. We then focus on the efficiency at maximum power (EMP) of the whole system to demonstrate that the Curzon-Ahlborn efficiency may not always be recovered: The EMP varies with the specific working conditions of each generator but remains in the range predicted by irreversible thermodynamics theory. We discuss our results in light of nonideal Carnot engine behavior.

  14. The maximum growth rate of life on Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corkrey, Ross; McMeekin, Tom A.; Bowman, John P.; Olley, June; Ratkowsky, David

    2018-01-01

    Life on Earth spans a range of temperatures and exhibits biological growth rates that are temperature dependent. While the observation that growth rates are temperature dependent is well known, we have recently shown that the statistical distribution of specific growth rates for life on Earth is a function of temperature (Corkrey et al., 2016). The maximum rates of growth of all life have a distinct limit, even when grown under optimal conditions, and which vary predictably with temperature. We term this distribution of growth rates the biokinetic spectrum for temperature (BKST). The BKST possibly arises from a trade-off between catalytic activity and stability of enzymes involved in a rate-limiting Master Reaction System (MRS) within the cell. We develop a method to extrapolate quantile curves for the BKST to obtain the posterior probability of the maximum rate of growth of any form of life on Earth. The maximum rate curve conforms to the observed data except below 0°C and above 100°C where the predicted value may be positively biased. The deviation below 0°C may arise from the bulk properties of water, while the degradation of biomolecules may be important above 100°C. The BKST has potential application in astrobiology by providing an estimate of the maximum possible growth rate attainable by terrestrial life and perhaps life elsewhere. We suggest that the area under the maximum growth rate curve and the peak rate may be useful characteristics in considerations of habitability. The BKST can serve as a diagnostic for unusual life, such as second biogenesis or non-terrestrial life. Since the MRS must have been heavily conserved the BKST may contain evolutionary relics. The BKST can serve as a signature summarizing the nature of life in environments beyond Earth, or to characterize species arising from a second biogenesis on Earth.

  15. Seismic link at plate boundary

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    transfer between two major faults, and parallel to the geothermal area extension. 1. Introduction. Plate boundaries are the zones where most earth dynamics are focussed. The complexity of tectonic boundaries draws attention to them as the largest earthquakes are felt in these areas and they elicit the natural hazard of ...

  16. Exclusion Process with Slow Boundary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldasso, Rangel; Menezes, Otávio; Neumann, Adriana; Souza, Rafael R.

    2017-06-01

    We study the hydrodynamic and the hydrostatic behavior of the simple symmetric exclusion process with slow boundary. The term slow boundary means that particles can be born or die at the boundary sites, at a rate proportional to N^{-θ }, where θ > 0 and N is the scaling parameter. In the bulk, the particles exchange rate is equal to 1. In the hydrostatic scenario, we obtain three different linear profiles, depending on the value of the parameter θ ; in the hydrodynamic scenario, we obtain that the time evolution of the spatial density of particles, in the diffusive scaling, is given by the weak solution of the heat equation, with boundary conditions that depend on θ . If θ \\in (0,1), we get Dirichlet boundary conditions, (which is the same behavior if θ =0, see Farfán in Hydrostatics, statical and dynamical large deviations of boundary driven gradient symmetric exclusion processes, 2008); if θ =1, we get Robin boundary conditions; and, if θ \\in (1,∞), we get Neumann boundary conditions.

  17. Fuzzy Boundary and Fuzzy Semiboundary

    OpenAIRE

    Athar, M.; Ahmad, B.

    2008-01-01

    We present several properties of fuzzy boundary and fuzzy semiboundary which have been supported by examples. Properties of fuzzy semi-interior, fuzzy semiclosure, fuzzy boundary, and fuzzy semiboundary have been obtained in product-related spaces. We give necessary conditions for fuzzy continuous (resp., fuzzy semicontinuous, fuzzy irresolute) functions. Moreover, fuzzy continuous (resp., fuzzy semicontinuous, fuzzy irresolute) functions have been characterized via fuzzy...

  18. Nucleation of small angle boundaries

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Nabarro, FRN

    1996-12-01

    Full Text Available The internal stresses induced by the strain gradients in an array of lattice cells delineated by low-angle dislocation boundaries are partially relieved by the creation of new low-angle boundaries. This is shown to be a first-order transition...

  19. How Firms Make Boundary Decisions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dobrajska, Magdalena; Billinger, Stephan; Becker, Markus

    2014-01-01

    We report findings from an analysis of 234 firm boundary decisions that a manufacturing firm has made during a 10 year period. Extensive interviews with all major decision makers located both at the headquarters and subsidiaries allow us to examine (a) who was involved in each boundary decision...

  20. Interactive Prosodic Marking of Focus, Boundary and Newness in Mandarin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bei; Xu, Yi; Ding, Qifan

    2017-06-09

    The current study investigates whether and how focus, phrase boundary and newness can be simultaneously marked in speech prosody in Mandarin Chinese. Homophones were used to construct three syntactic structures that differed only in boundary condition, focus was elicited by preceding questions, while newness of postboundary words was manipulated as whether they had occurred in the previous text. Systematic analysis of F0 and duration showed that (1) duration was a reliable correlate of boundary strength regardless of focus location, while involvement of F0 was only in terms of lowering of phrase-final F0 minima and raising of phrase-initial F0 minima at a relatively strong boundary, (2) postfocus compression (PFC) of F0 was applied across all boundaries, including those with long silent pauses (over 200 ms), and postfocus F0 was lowered to almost the same degree in all boundary conditions, and (3) newness of postfocus words had no systematic effect on F0 or duration. These results indicate that not only functionally focus is independent of prosodic structure and newness, but also phonetically its realization is separate from boundary marking. Focus is signaled mainly through pitch range adjustments, which can occur even across phrase breaks, whereas boundaries are mostly signaled by duration adjustments. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  1. Diffusive boundary layers over varying topography

    KAUST Repository

    Dell, R. W.

    2015-03-25

    Diffusive bottom boundary layers can produce upslope flows in a stratified fluid. Accumulating observations suggest that these boundary layers may drive upwelling and mixing in mid-ocean ridge flank canyons. However, most studies of diffusive bottom boundary layers to date have concentrated on constant bottom slopes. We present a study of how diffusive boundary layers interact with various idealized topography, such as changes in bottom slope, slopes with corrugations and isolated sills. We use linear theory and numerical simulations in the regional ocean modeling system (ROMS) model to show changes in bottom slope can cause convergences and divergences within the boundary layer, in turn causing fluid exchanges that reach far into the overlying fluid and alter stratification far from the bottom. We also identify several different regimes of boundary-layer behaviour for topography with oceanographically relevant size and shape, including reversing flows and overflows, and we develop a simple theory that predicts the regime boundaries, including what topographies will generate overflows. As observations also suggest there may be overflows in deep canyons where the flow passes over isolated bumps and sills, this parameter range may be particularly significant for understanding the role of boundary layers in the deep ocean.

  2. The Future of Boundary Plasma and Material Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whyte, Dennis

    2012-03-01

    The boundary of magnetic confinement devices, from the pedestal through to the surrounding surfaces, encompasses an enormous range of plasma and material physics, and their integrated coupling. It is becoming clear that due to fundamental limits of plasma stability and material response the boundary will largely define the viability of an MFE reactor. However we face an enormous knowledge deficit in stepping from present devices and ITER towards a demonstration power plant. We outline the future of boundary research required to address this deficit. The boundary should be considered a multi-scale system of coupled plasma and material science regulated through the non-linear interface of the sheath. Measurement, theory and modeling across these scales are assessed. Dimensionless parameters, often used to organized core plasma transport on similarity arguments, can be extended to the boundary plasma, plasma-surface interactions and material response. This methodology suggests an intriguing way forward to prescribe and understand the boundary issues of an eventual reactor in intermediate devices. A particularly critical issue is that the physical chemistry of the material, which is mostly determined by the material temperature, has been too neglected; pointing to the requirement for boundary plasma experiments at appropriate material temperatures. Finally the boundary plasma requirements for quiescent heat exhaust and control of transient events, such as ELMs, will be examined.

  3. Science at the interface : grain boundaries in nanocrystalline metals.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez, Mark Andrew; Follstaedt, David Martin; Knapp, James Arthur; Brewer, Luke N.; Holm, Elizabeth Ann; Foiles, Stephen Martin; Hattar, Khalid M.; Clark, Blythe B.; Olmsted, David L.; Medlin, Douglas L.

    2009-09-01

    Interfaces are a critical determinant of the full range of materials properties, especially at the nanoscale. Computational and experimental methods developed a comprehensive understanding of nanograin evolution based on a fundamental understanding of internal interfaces in nanocrystalline nickel. It has recently been shown that nanocrystals with a bi-modal grain-size distribution possess a unique combination of high-strength, ductility and wear-resistance. We performed a combined experimental and theoretical investigation of the structure and motion of internal interfaces in nanograined metal and the resulting grain evolution. The properties of grain boundaries are computed for an unprecedented range of boundaries. The presence of roughening transitions in grain boundaries is explored and related to dramatic changes in boundary mobility. Experimental observations show that abnormal grain growth in nanograined materials is unlike conventional scale material in both the level of defects and the formation of unfavored phases. Molecular dynamics simulations address the origins of some of these phenomena.

  4. Prediction of dislocation boundary characteristics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winther, Grethe

    Plastic deformation of both fcc and bcc metals of medium to high stacking fault energy is known to result in dislocation patterning in the form of cells and extended planar dislocation boundaries. The latter align with specific crystallographic planes, which depend on the crystallographic....... Crystal plasticity calculations combined with the hypothesis that these boundaries separate domains with local differences in the slip system activity are introduced to address precise prediction of the experimentally observed boundaries. The presentation will focus on two cases from fcc metals...... orientation of the grain [1]. For selected boundaries it has been experimentally verified that the boundaries consist of fairly regular networks of dislocations, which come from the active slip systems [2]. The networks have been analyzed within the framework of Low-Energy-Dislocation-Structures (LEDS...

  5. Boundary Drawing in Clinical Work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meier, Ninna

    The aim of this paper is to show how health care professionals temporarily dissolve and redraw boundaries in their everyday work, in order to coordinate clinical work and facilitate collaboration in patient pathways. Boundaries are social constructions that help us make sense of our complex, social...... world. In health care, formal boundaries are important distinctions that separate health care practitioners into medical specialties, professions and organizational departments. But clinical work also relies on the ability of health care practitioners to collaborate around patients in formal...... arrangements or emergent, temporary teams. Focusing on the cognitive and social boundaries we draw to establish identity and connection (to a profession, team or person) the paper shows how health care professionals can use inter-personal relationships to temporarily dismiss formal boundaries. By redrawing...

  6. Distributed Tuning of Boundary Resources

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eaton, Ben; Elaluf-Calderwood, Silvia; Sørensen, Carsten

    2015-01-01

    in the context of a paradoxical tension between the logic of generative and democratic innovations and the logic of infrastructural control. Boundary resources play a critical role in managing the tension as a firm that owns the infrastructure can secure its control over the service system while independent...... firms can participate in the service system. In this study, we explore the evolution of boundary resources. Drawing on Pickering’s (1993) and Barrett et al.’s (2012) conceptualizations of tuning, the paper seeks to forward our understanding of how heterogeneous actors engage in the tuning of boundary...... resources within Apple’s iOS service system. We conduct an embedded case study of Apple’s iOS service system with an in-depth analysis of 4,664 blog articles concerned with 30 boundary resources covering 6 distinct themes. Our analysis reveals that boundary resources of service systems enabled by digital...

  7. Brain response to prosodic boundary cues depends on boundary position

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia eHolzgrefe

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Prosodic information is crucial for spoken language comprehension and especially for syntactic parsing, because prosodic cues guide the hearer’s syntactic analysis. The time course and mechanisms of this interplay of prosody and syntax are not yet well understood. In particular, there is an ongoing debate whether local prosodic cues are taken into account automatically or whether they are processed in relation to the global prosodic context in which they appear. The present study explores whether the perception of a prosodic boundary is affected by its position within an utterance. In an event-related potential (ERP study we tested if the brain response evoked by the prosodic boundary differs when the boundary occurs early in a list of three names connected by conjunctions (i.e., after the first name as compared to later in the utterance (i.e., after the second name. A closure positive shift (CPS — marking the processing of a prosodic phrase boundary — was elicited only for stimuli with a late boundary, but not for stimuli with an early boundary. This result is further evidence for an immediate integration of prosodic information into the parsing of an utterance. In addition, it shows that the processing of prosodic boundary cues depends on the previously processed information from the preceding prosodic context.

  8. Evaluation of the maximum isometric tongue force of healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulrich Sommer, J; Birk, Richard; Hörmann, Karl; Stuck, Boris A

    2014-11-01

    The forces of specific muscle groups have been well described for nearly all parts of the human body. Interestingly, data for the tongue and its forces are rare. In light of ongoing development of systems for managing the tongue (retaining, advancing, suspending or stabilizing), especially in patients with obstructive sleep apnea, knowledge of the maximum tongue force is important for the conceptual design of those systems. The maximum tongue force in a sagittal direction was documented using a custom-built device that included a tongue clamp and a piezoelectric sensor to capture force measurements. Once positioned securely in the device, participants were asked to move the tongue in a posterior sagittal direction, with maximum force, in each of three test positions. Forty-nine healthy volunteers (29 male) were included in the study. Tongue force measurements were collected three times in three different tongue positions. Thirty-three participants had repeated measurements to investigate any potential learning effect. The maximum force of the human tongue in a posterior sagittal direction showed high inter-individual variation and ranged from 3.2 to 52.4 Newton (N; mean 14.1 ± 7.5 N), when measured from a "neutral protrusion or resting" tongue position. The "retracted" and "maximal protrusion" testing positions yielded lower maximum tongue forces. Men (m) showed statistically significantly higher tongue forces than women (w) (m: 16.0 ± 8.4 N, w: 11.0 ± 4.3 N), and there was a positive correlation with BMI and a negative correlation with age. Comparing the first measurement session with the second session (per patient) showed higher mean maximum forces in the second session, but with no statistical significance. The maximum tongue force data showed substantial inter- and intra-individual variability and gender dependency. Some male individuals produced very high forces. These forces should be considered for the future conception and development of tongue

  9. Training Concept, Evolution Time, and the Maximum Entropy Production Principle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexey Bezryadin

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The maximum entropy production principle (MEPP is a type of entropy optimization which demands that complex non-equilibrium systems should organize such that the rate of the entropy production is maximized. Our take on this principle is that to prove or disprove the validity of the MEPP and to test the scope of its applicability, it is necessary to conduct experiments in which the entropy produced per unit time is measured with a high precision. Thus we study electric-field-induced self-assembly in suspensions of carbon nanotubes and realize precise measurements of the entropy production rate (EPR. As a strong voltage is applied the suspended nanotubes merge together into a conducting cloud which produces Joule heat and, correspondingly, produces entropy. We introduce two types of EPR, which have qualitatively different significance: global EPR (g-EPR and the entropy production rate of the dissipative cloud itself (DC-EPR. The following results are obtained: (1 As the system reaches the maximum of the DC-EPR, it becomes stable because the applied voltage acts as a stabilizing thermodynamic potential; (2 We discover metastable states characterized by high, near-maximum values of the DC-EPR. Under certain conditions, such efficient entropy-producing regimes can only be achieved if the system is allowed to initially evolve under mildly non-equilibrium conditions, namely at a reduced voltage; (3 Without such a “training” period the system typically is not able to reach the allowed maximum of the DC-EPR if the bias is high; (4 We observe that the DC-EPR maximum is achieved within a time, Te, the evolution time, which scales as a power-law function of the applied voltage; (5 Finally, we present a clear example in which the g-EPR theoretical maximum can never be achieved. Yet, under a wide range of conditions, the system can self-organize and achieve a dissipative regime in which the DC-EPR equals its theoretical maximum.

  10. Maximum Variance Hashing via Column Generation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Luo

    2013-01-01

    item search. Recently, a number of data-dependent methods have been developed, reflecting the great potential of learning for hashing. Inspired by the classic nonlinear dimensionality reduction algorithm—maximum variance unfolding, we propose a novel unsupervised hashing method, named maximum variance hashing, in this work. The idea is to maximize the total variance of the hash codes while preserving the local structure of the training data. To solve the derived optimization problem, we propose a column generation algorithm, which directly learns the binary-valued hash functions. We then extend it using anchor graphs to reduce the computational cost. Experiments on large-scale image datasets demonstrate that the proposed method outperforms state-of-the-art hashing methods in many cases.

  11. Solar Maximum Mission - A systems overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guha, A. K.

    1981-01-01

    The Solar Maximum Mission (SMM), or the central effort of the Solar Maximum Year research endeavor is discussed. The mission's attempt to exploit the synergistic advantages of correlated data to obtain a complete picture of solar phenomena is stressed, as is the coordination provided by a world-wide network of ground-based observations. The prominent features of the SMM observatory, including the payload module and the solar-array system, are shown diagramatically and the science instruments (coronagraph/polarimeter, ultraviolet spectrometer/polarimeter, soft X-ray polychromater) are discussed. Descriptions of the spacecraft's electrical power system, attitude determination and control systems and communications systems are also included. The Experiment Operations Facility, which provides quick response to rapidly changing solar conditions and permits coordination with a multitude of ground observatories and coordinated experiments, is described.

  12. Model fit after pairwise maximum likelihood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. T. eBarendse

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Maximum likelihood factor analysis of discrete data within the structural equation modeling framework rests on the assumption that the observed discrete responses are manifestations of underlying continuous scores that are normally distributed. As maximizing the likelihood of multivariate response patterns is computationally very intensive, the sum of the log--likelihoods of the bivariate response patterns is maximized instead. Little is yet known about how to assess model fit when the analysis is based on such a pairwise maximum likelihood (PML of two--way contingency tables. We propose new fit criteria for the PML method and conduct a simulation study to evaluate their performance in model selection. With large sample sizes (500 or more, PML performs as well the robust weighted least squares analysis of polychoric correlations.

  13. Zipf's law, power laws and maximum entropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visser, Matt

    2013-04-01

    Zipf's law, and power laws in general, have attracted and continue to attract considerable attention in a wide variety of disciplines—from astronomy to demographics to software structure to economics to linguistics to zoology, and even warfare. A recent model of random group formation (RGF) attempts a general explanation of such phenomena based on Jaynes' notion of maximum entropy applied to a particular choice of cost function. In the present paper I argue that the specific cost function used in the RGF model is in fact unnecessarily complicated, and that power laws can be obtained in a much simpler way by applying maximum entropy ideas directly to the Shannon entropy subject only to a single constraint: that the average of the logarithm of the observable quantity is specified.

  14. Maximum likelihood estimation of fractionally cointegrated systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lasak, Katarzyna

    In this paper we consider a fractionally cointegrated error correction model and investigate asymptotic properties of the maximum likelihood (ML) estimators of the matrix of the cointe- gration relations, the degree of fractional cointegration, the matrix of the speed of adjustment to the equilib......In this paper we consider a fractionally cointegrated error correction model and investigate asymptotic properties of the maximum likelihood (ML) estimators of the matrix of the cointe- gration relations, the degree of fractional cointegration, the matrix of the speed of adjustment...... to the equilibrium parameters and the variance-covariance matrix of the error term. We show that using ML principles to estimate jointly all parameters of the fractionally cointegrated system we obtain consistent estimates and provide their asymptotic distributions. The cointegration matrix is asymptotically mixed...

  15. A finite difference method for free boundary problems

    KAUST Repository

    Fornberg, Bengt

    2010-04-01

    Fornberg and Meyer-Spasche proposed some time ago a simple strategy to correct finite difference schemes in the presence of a free boundary that cuts across a Cartesian grid. We show here how this procedure can be combined with a minimax-based optimization procedure to rapidly solve a wide range of elliptic-type free boundary value problems. © 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Mammographic image restoration using maximum entropy deconvolution

    OpenAIRE

    Jannetta, Adrian; Jackson, John; Birch, Ian; Kotre, John; Robson, Kevin; Padgett, Rod

    2004-01-01

    An image restoration approach based on a Bayesian maximum entropy method (MEM) has been applied to a radiological image deconvolution problem, that of reduction of geometric blurring in magnification mammography. The aim of the work is to demonstrate an improvement in image spatial resolution in realistic noisy radiological images with no associated penalty in terms of reduction in the signal-to-noise ratio perceived by the observer. Images of the TORMAM mammographic image quality phantom wer...

  17. Maximum Metric Spanning Tree made Byzantine Tolerant

    OpenAIRE

    Dubois, Swan; Masuzawa, Toshimitsu; Tixeuil, Sébastien

    2011-01-01

    Self-stabilization is a versatile approach to fault-tolerance since it permits a distributed system to recover from any transient fault that arbitrarily corrupts the contents of all memories in the system. Byzantine tolerance is an attractive feature of distributed systems that permits to cope with arbitrary malicious behaviors. This paper focus on systems that are both self-stabilizing and Byzantine tolerant. We consider the well known problem of constructing a maximum metric tree in this co...

  18. Shape Modelling Using Maximum Autocorrelation Factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Rasmus

    2001-01-01

    of Active Shape Models by Timothy Cootes and Christopher Taylor by building new information into the model. This new information consists of two types of prior knowledge. First, in many situation we will be given an ordering of the shapes of the training set. This situation occurs when the shapes....... Both these types of knowledge may be used to defined Shape Maximum Autocorrelation Factors. The resulting point distribution models are compared to ordinary principal components analysis using leave-one-out validation....

  19. [Maximum entropy principle and population genetic equilibrium].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiao-Long; Yuan, Zhi-Fa; Guo, Man-Cai; Song, Shi-De; Zhang, Quan-Qi; Bao, Zhen-Min

    2002-06-01

    A general mathematic model of population genetic equilibrium was constructed based on the maximum entropy principle. We proved that the maximum entropy probability distribution was equivalent to the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium law. A population reached genetic equilibrium when the genotype entropy of the population reached the maximal possible value. In information theory, the entropy or the information content is used to measure the uncertainty of a system. In population genetics, we can use entropy to measure the uncertainty of the genotype of a population. The agreement of the maximum entropy principle and the hardy-Weinberg equilibrium law indicated that random crossing is an irreversible process, which increases the genotype entropy of the population, while inbreeding and selection decrease the genotype entropy of the population. In animal or plant breeding, we often use selection and/or inbreeding to decrease the entropy of a population, and use intercrossing to increase the entropy of the population. In this point of view, breeding is actually regulating the entropy of population. By applying the basic principle of informatics in population genetics, we revealed the biological significance of the genotype entropy and demonstrated that we can work over population genetic problems with the principles and methods of informatics and cybernetics.

  20. A Maximum Resonant Set of Polyomino Graphs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Heping

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available A polyomino graph P is a connected finite subgraph of the infinite plane grid such that each finite face is surrounded by a regular square of side length one and each edge belongs to at least one square. A dimer covering of P corresponds to a perfect matching. Different dimer coverings can interact via an alternating cycle (or square with respect to them. A set of disjoint squares of P is a resonant set if P has a perfect matching M so that each one of those squares is M-alternating. In this paper, we show that if K is a maximum resonant set of P, then P − K has a unique perfect matching. We further prove that the maximum forcing number of a polyomino graph is equal to the cardinality of a maximum resonant set. This confirms a conjecture of Xu et al. [26]. We also show that if K is a maximal alternating set of P, then P − K has a unique perfect matching.

  1. The maximum rate of mammal evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Alistair R.; Jones, David; Boyer, Alison G.; Brown, James H.; Costa, Daniel P.; Ernest, S. K. Morgan; Fitzgerald, Erich M. G.; Fortelius, Mikael; Gittleman, John L.; Hamilton, Marcus J.; Harding, Larisa E.; Lintulaakso, Kari; Lyons, S. Kathleen; Okie, Jordan G.; Saarinen, Juha J.; Sibly, Richard M.; Smith, Felisa A.; Stephens, Patrick R.; Theodor, Jessica M.; Uhen, Mark D.

    2012-03-01

    How fast can a mammal evolve from the size of a mouse to the size of an elephant? Achieving such a large transformation calls for major biological reorganization. Thus, the speed at which this occurs has important implications for extensive faunal changes, including adaptive radiations and recovery from mass extinctions. To quantify the pace of large-scale evolution we developed a metric, clade maximum rate, which represents the maximum evolutionary rate of a trait within a clade. We applied this metric to body mass evolution in mammals over the last 70 million years, during which multiple large evolutionary transitions occurred in oceans and on continents and islands. Our computations suggest that it took a minimum of 1.6, 5.1, and 10 million generations for terrestrial mammal mass to increase 100-, and 1,000-, and 5,000-fold, respectively. Values for whales were down to half the length (i.e., 1.1, 3, and 5 million generations), perhaps due to the reduced mechanical constraints of living in an aquatic environment. When differences in generation time are considered, we find an exponential increase in maximum mammal body mass during the 35 million years following the Cretaceous-Paleogene (K-Pg) extinction event. Our results also indicate a basic asymmetry in macroevolution: very large decreases (such as extreme insular dwarfism) can happen at more than 10 times the rate of increases. Our findings allow more rigorous comparisons of microevolutionary and macroevolutionary patterns and processes.

  2. Boundaries of dreams, boundaries of dreamers: thin and thick boundaries as a new personality measure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, E

    1989-11-01

    Previous work by the author and his collaborators on frequent nightmare sufferers demonstrated that these people had striking personality characteristics which could be called "thin boundaries" in a number of different senses. In order to measure thin and thick boundaries, a 145-item questionnaire, the Boundary Questionnaire, has been developed which has now been taken by over 1,000 persons. Preliminary results are presented indicating that, as predicted a priori, several new groups of nightmare sufferers and groups of art students scored usually "thin," whereas a group of naval officers had usually "thick" boundaries. Overall, thinness on the Boundary Questionnaire correlated highly positively (r = .40) with frequency of dream recall and also significantly (r = .16) with length of sleep.

  3. Initializing a Mesoscale Boundary-Layer Model with Radiosonde Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berri, Guillermo J.; Bertossa, Germán

    2018-01-01

    A mesoscale boundary-layer model is used to simulate low-level regional wind fields over the La Plata River of South America, a region characterized by a strong daily cycle of land-river surface-temperature contrast and low-level circulations of sea-land breeze type. The initial and boundary conditions are defined from a limited number of local observations and the upper boundary condition is taken from the only radiosonde observations available in the region. The study considers 14 different upper boundary conditions defined from the radiosonde data at standard levels, significant levels, level of the inversion base and interpolated levels at fixed heights, all of them within the first 1500 m. The period of analysis is 1994-2008 during which eight daily observations from 13 weather stations of the region are used to validate the 24-h surface-wind forecast. The model errors are defined as the root-mean-square of relative error in wind-direction frequency distribution and mean wind speed per wind sector. Wind-direction errors are greater than wind-speed errors and show significant dispersion among the different upper boundary conditions, not present in wind speed, revealing a sensitivity to the initialization method. The wind-direction errors show a well-defined daily cycle, not evident in wind speed, with the minimum at noon and the maximum at dusk, but no systematic deterioration with time. The errors grow with the height of the upper boundary condition level, in particular wind direction, and double the errors obtained when the upper boundary condition is defined from the lower levels. The conclusion is that defining the model upper boundary condition from radiosonde data closer to the ground minimizes the low-level wind-field errors throughout the region.

  4. Initializing a Mesoscale Boundary-Layer Model with Radiosonde Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berri, Guillermo J.; Bertossa, Germán

    2017-08-01

    A mesoscale boundary-layer model is used to simulate low-level regional wind fields over the La Plata River of South America, a region characterized by a strong daily cycle of land-river surface-temperature contrast and low-level circulations of sea-land breeze type. The initial and boundary conditions are defined from a limited number of local observations and the upper boundary condition is taken from the only radiosonde observations available in the region. The study considers 14 different upper boundary conditions defined from the radiosonde data at standard levels, significant levels, level of the inversion base and interpolated levels at fixed heights, all of them within the first 1500 m. The period of analysis is 1994-2008 during which eight daily observations from 13 weather stations of the region are used to validate the 24-h surface-wind forecast. The model errors are defined as the root-mean-square of relative error in wind-direction frequency distribution and mean wind speed per wind sector. Wind-direction errors are greater than wind-speed errors and show significant dispersion among the different upper boundary conditions, not present in wind speed, revealing a sensitivity to the initialization method. The wind-direction errors show a well-defined daily cycle, not evident in wind speed, with the minimum at noon and the maximum at dusk, but no systematic deterioration with time. The errors grow with the height of the upper boundary condition level, in particular wind direction, and double the errors obtained when the upper boundary condition is defined from the lower levels. The conclusion is that defining the model upper boundary condition from radiosonde data closer to the ground minimizes the low-level wind-field errors throughout the region.

  5. Probabilistic maximum-value wind prediction for offshore environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Staid, Andrea; Pinson, Pierre; Guikema, Seth D.

    2015-01-01

    High wind speeds can pose a great risk to structures and operations conducted in offshore environments. When forecasting wind speeds, most models focus on the average wind speeds over a given period, but this value alone represents only a small part of the true wind conditions. We present......, convective available potential energy, Charnock, mean sea-level pressure and temperature, as given by the European Center for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts forecasts. The models are trained to predict the mean value of maximum wind speed, and the residuals from training the models are used to develop...

  6. Advanced Pressure Boundary Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santella, Michael L [ORNL; Shingledecker, John P [ORNL

    2007-01-01

    Increasing the operating temperatures of fossil power plants is fundamental to improving thermal efficiencies and reducing undesirable emissions such as CO{sub 2}. One group of alloys with the potential to satisfy the conditions required of higher operating temperatures is the advanced ferritic steels such as ASTM Grade 91, 9Cr-2W, and 12Cr-2W. These are Cr-Mo steels containing 9-12 wt% Cr that have martensitic microstructures. Research aimed at increasing the operating temperature limits of the 9-12 wt% Cr steels and optimizing them for specific power plant applications has been actively pursued since the 1970's. As with all of the high strength martensitic steels, specifying upper temperature limits for tempering the alloys and heat treating weldments is a critical issue. To support this aspect of development, thermodynamic analysis was used to estimate how this critical temperature, the A{sub 1} in steel terminology, varies with alloy composition. The results from the thermodynamic analysis were presented to the Strength of Weldments subgroup of the ASME Boiler & Pressure Vessel Code and are being considered in establishing maximum postweld heat treatment temperatures. Experiments are also being planned to verify predictions. This is part of a CRADA project being done with Alstom Power, Inc.

  7. Optimal boundary control and boundary stabilization of hyperbolic systems

    CERN Document Server

    Gugat, Martin

    2015-01-01

    This brief considers recent results on optimal control and stabilization of systems governed by hyperbolic partial differential equations, specifically those in which the control action takes place at the boundary.  The wave equation is used as a typical example of a linear system, through which the author explores initial boundary value problems, concepts of exact controllability, optimal exact control, and boundary stabilization.  Nonlinear systems are also covered, with the Korteweg-de Vries and Burgers Equations serving as standard examples.  To keep the presentation as accessible as possible, the author uses the case of a system with a state that is defined on a finite space interval, so that there are only two boundary points where the system can be controlled.  Graduate and post-graduate students as well as researchers in the field will find this to be an accessible introduction to problems of optimal control and stabilization.

  8. Improved boundary layer heat transfer calculations near a stagnation point

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Kyung Hwan

    1990-01-01

    A thermal design of a solar receiver has been developed for the solutions of problems involving phase-change thermal energy storage and natural convection loss. Two dimensional axisymmetrical solidification and melting of materials contained between two concentric cylinders of finite length has been studied for thermal energy storage analysis. For calculation of free convection loss inside receiver cavity, two dimensional axisymmetrical, laminar, transient free convection including radiation effects has been studied using integral/finite difference method. Finite difference equations are derived for the above analysis subject to constant or variable material properties, initial conditions, and boundary conditions. The validity of the analyses has been substantiated by comparing results of the present general method with available analytic solutions or numerical results reported in the literature. Both explicit and implicit schemes are tested in phase change analysis with different number of nodes ranging from 4 to 18. The above numerical methods have been applied to the existing solar receiver analyzing computer code as additional subroutines. The results were computed for one of the proposed Brayton cycle solar receiver models running under the actual environmental conditions. Effect of thermal energy storage on the thermal behavior of the receiver has been estimated. Due to the thermal energy storage, about 65% reduction on working gas outlet temperature fluctuation has been obtained; however, maximum temperature of thermal energy storage containment has been increased about 18%. Also, effect of natural convection inside a receiver cavity on the receiver heat transfer has been analyzed. The finding indicated that thermal stratification occurs during the sun time resulting in higher receiver temperatures at the outlet section of the gas tube, and lower temperatures at the inlet section of the gas tube when compared with the results with no natural convection. Due

  9. Global correlations between maximum magnitudes of subduction zone interface thrust earthquakes and physical parameters of subduction zones

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schellart, W. P.; Rawlinson, N.

    2013-01-01

    The maximum earthquake magnitude recorded for subduction zone plate boundaries varies considerably on Earth, with some subduction zone segments producing giant subduction zone thrust earthquakes (e.g. Chile, Alaska, Sumatra-Andaman, Japan) and others producing relatively small earthquakes (e.g.

  10. Maximum Aerodynamic Force on an Ascending Space Vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Backman, Philip

    2012-03-01

    The March 2010 issue of The Physics Teacher includes a great article by Metz and Stinner on the kinematics and dynamics of a space shuttle launch. Within those pages is a brief mention of an event known in the language of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) as "maximum dynamic pressure" (called simply "Max.AirPressure" in the article), where the combined effect of air density and the shuttles speed produce the greatest aerodynamic stress on the vehicle as it ascends through the atmosphere toward orbit. Official commentary during a launch2 refers to this point in the ascent with language such as "space shuttle main engines throttling back as vehicle enters area of maximum dynamic pressure" and occurs in a range between 45 and 60 s after launch. (In dealing with this stress, the space shuttles main engines reduce their thrust at approximately 45 s to reduce acceleration, and return to normal levels again some 15 s later as maximum dynamic pressure is traversed.) This paper presents an analysis, accessible to introductory-level students, that predicts the time of Max. AirPressure for a given ascending spacecraft.

  11. The Moho as a magnetic boundary. [Earth crust-mantle boundary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasilewski, P. J.; Thomas, H. H.; Mayhew, M. A.

    1979-01-01

    Magnetism in the crust and the upper mantle and magnetic results indicating that the seismic Moho is a magnetic boundary are considered. Mantle derived rocks - peridotites from St. Pauls rocks, dunite xenoliths from the Kaupulehu flow, and peridotite, dunite, and eclogite xenoliths from Roberts Victor and San Carlos diatremes - are weakly magnetic with saturation magnetization values from 0.013 emu/gm to less than 0.001 emu/gm which is equivalent to 0.01 to 0.001 wt% Fe304. Literature on the minerals in mantle xenoliths shows that metals and primary Fe304 are absent, and that complex Cr, Mg, Al, and Fe spinels are dominant. These spinels are non-magnetic at mantle temperatures, and the crust/mantle boundary can be specified as a magnetic mineralogy discontinuity. The new magnetic results indicate that the seismic Moho is a magnetic boundary, the source of magnetization is in the crust, and the maximum Curie isotherm depends on magnetic mineralogy and is located at depths which vary with the regional geothermal gradient.

  12. Optimal Growth in Hypersonic Boundary Layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paredes, Pedro; Choudhari, Meelan M.; Li, Fei; Chang, Chau-Lyan

    2016-01-01

    The linear form of the parabolized linear stability equations is used in a variational approach to extend the previous body of results for the optimal, nonmodal disturbance growth in boundary-layer flows. This paper investigates the optimal growth characteristics in the hypersonic Mach number regime without any high-enthalpy effects. The influence of wall cooling is studied, with particular emphasis on the role of the initial disturbance location and the value of the spanwise wave number that leads to the maximum energy growth up to a specified location. Unlike previous predictions that used a basic state obtained from a self-similar solution to the boundary-layer equations, mean flow solutions based on the full Navier-Stokes equations are used in select cases to help account for the viscous- inviscid interaction near the leading edge of the plate and for the weak shock wave emanating from that region. Using the full Navier-Stokes mean flow is shown to result in further reduction with Mach number in the magnitude of optimal growth relative to the predictions based on the self-similar approximation to the base flow.

  13. Maximum caliber inference of nonequilibrium processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otten, Moritz; Stock, Gerhard

    2010-07-01

    Thirty years ago, Jaynes suggested a general theoretical approach to nonequilibrium statistical mechanics, called maximum caliber (MaxCal) [Annu. Rev. Phys. Chem. 31, 579 (1980)]. MaxCal is a variational principle for dynamics in the same spirit that maximum entropy is a variational principle for equilibrium statistical mechanics. Motivated by the success of maximum entropy inference methods for equilibrium problems, in this work the MaxCal formulation is applied to the inference of nonequilibrium processes. That is, given some time-dependent observables of a dynamical process, one constructs a model that reproduces these input data and moreover, predicts the underlying dynamics of the system. For example, the observables could be some time-resolved measurements of the folding of a protein, which are described by a few-state model of the free energy landscape of the system. MaxCal then calculates the probabilities of an ensemble of trajectories such that on average the data are reproduced. From this probability distribution, any dynamical quantity of the system can be calculated, including population probabilities, fluxes, or waiting time distributions. After briefly reviewing the formalism, the practical numerical implementation of MaxCal in the case of an inference problem is discussed. Adopting various few-state models of increasing complexity, it is demonstrated that the MaxCal principle indeed works as a practical method of inference: The scheme is fairly robust and yields correct results as long as the input data are sufficient. As the method is unbiased and general, it can deal with any kind of time dependency such as oscillatory transients and multitime decays.

  14. Maximum entropy and Bayesian methods. Proceedings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fougère, P. F.

    Bayesian probability theory and maximum entropy are the twin foundations of consistent inductive reasoning about the physical world. This volume contains thirty-two papers which are devoted to both foundations and applications and combine tutorial presentations and more research oriented contributions. Together these provide a state of the art account of latest developments in such diverse areas as coherent imaging, regression analysis, tomography, neural networks, plasma theory, quantum mechanics, and others. The methods described will be of great interest to mathematicians, physicists, astronomers, crystallographers, engineers and those involved in all aspects of signal processing.

  15. Maximum Probability Domains for Hubbard Models

    CERN Document Server

    Acke, Guillaume; Claeys, Pieter W; Van Raemdonck, Mario; Poelmans, Ward; Van Neck, Dimitri; Bultinck, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    The theory of Maximum Probability Domains (MPDs) is formulated for the Hubbard model in terms of projection operators and generating functions for both exact eigenstates as well as Slater determinants. A fast MPD analysis procedure is proposed, which is subsequently used to analyse numerical results for the Hubbard model. It is shown that the essential physics behind the considered Hubbard models can be exposed using MPDs. Furthermore, the MPDs appear to be in line with what is expected from Valence Bond Theory-based knowledge.

  16. On the maximum drawdown during speculative bubbles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotundo, Giulia; Navarra, Mauro

    2007-08-01

    A taxonomy of large financial crashes proposed in the literature locates the burst of speculative bubbles due to endogenous causes in the framework of extreme stock market crashes, defined as falls of market prices that are outlier with respect to the bulk of drawdown price movement distribution. This paper goes on deeper in the analysis providing a further characterization of the rising part of such selected bubbles through the examination of drawdown and maximum drawdown movement of indices prices. The analysis of drawdown duration is also performed and it is the core of the risk measure estimated here.

  17. Delta-Nabla Type Maximum Principles for Second-Order Dynamic Equations on Time Scales and Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiang Zhu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Some delta-nabla type maximum principles for second-order dynamic equations on time scales are proved. By using these maximum principles, the uniqueness theorems of the solutions, the approximation theorems of the solutions, the existence theorem, and construction techniques of the lower and upper solutions for second-order linear and nonlinear initial value problems and boundary value problems on time scales are proved, the oscillation of second-order mixed delat-nabla differential equations is discussed and, some maximum principles for second order mixed forward and backward difference dynamic system are proved.

  18. Morphology of quantified ionospheric range spread-F over a wide range of midlatitudes in the Australian longitudinal sector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. A. Hajkowicz

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Ionograms from a standard vertical-incidence ionosonde chain (nine stations, obtained over a wide range of southern latitudes (in geom.lat. range: 23°–52° S, were digitally scanned at 5-min intervals at nighttime (18:00–06:00 LT for 13 months (January 2004–January 2005. An important parameter of the F-region, so-called range spread-F (Sr, was for the first time quantified in km. Maximum in Sr was recorded at a sounding frequency of 1.8 MHz for each night and for each ionosonde station. A distinct pattern in the magnitude (in km and in the percentage occurrence of the range spread-F was present in southern winter only (the June solstice. The sub-auroral region (geom. lat. ≥52° S is characterised by consistently high spread-F (average Sr≈100 km on 80–100 per cent of the observed nights. There is a sharp equatorward boundary in the spread-F activity in a latitudinal range: 52°–48° S followed by a midlatitude region (44°–48° S which exhibits a peak in Sr (≈50 km in winter only, observed on half of the nights. The midlatitude activity reaches its minimum at 42°–43° S, with Sr less than 20 km on one third of the nights. The low midlatitudes (23°–36° S are characterised by a strong peak in Sr again in winter, centred at about 30° S (average Sr≈70 km on 80 per cent of the nights. The pattern becomes largely absent during other seasons particularly in southern summer (the December solstice when spread-F activity shifts to sub-auroral latitudes. The pattern in the occurrence of spread-F appears to have a global character as the enhanced spread-F activity is observed in the Japanese sector in local summer (i.e. the June solstice. It appears that the midlatitude spread-F minimum is only apparent but not real. It delineates the boundary between aurorally generated spread-F (due to travelling ionospheric disturbances, TIDs and low midlatitude spread-F whose origin is not known.

  19. Morphology of quantified ionospheric range spread-F over a wide range of midlatitudes in the Australian longitudinal sector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. A. Hajkowicz

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Ionograms from a standard vertical-incidence ionosonde chain (nine stations, obtained over a wide range of southern latitudes (in geom.lat. range: 23°–52° S, were digitally scanned at 5-min intervals at nighttime (18:00–06:00 LT for 13 months (January 2004–January 2005. An important parameter of the F-region, so-called range spread-F (Sr, was for the first time quantified in km. Maximum in Sr was recorded at a sounding frequency of 1.8 MHz for each night and for each ionosonde station. A distinct pattern in the magnitude (in km and in the percentage occurrence of the range spread-F was present in southern winter only (the June solstice. The sub-auroral region (geom. lat. ≥52° S is characterised by consistently high spread-F (average Sr≈100 km on 80–100 per cent of the observed nights. There is a sharp equatorward boundary in the spread-F activity in a latitudinal range: 52°–48° S followed by a midlatitude region (44°–48° S which exhibits a peak in Sr (≈50 km in winter only, observed on half of the nights. The midlatitude activity reaches its minimum at 42°–43° S, with Sr less than 20 km on one third of the nights. The low midlatitudes (23°–36° S are characterised by a strong peak in Sr again in winter, centred at about 30° S (average Sr≈70 km on 80 per cent of the nights. The pattern becomes largely absent during other seasons particularly in southern summer (the December solstice when spread-F activity shifts to sub-auroral latitudes. The pattern in the occurrence of spread-F appears to have a global character as the enhanced spread-F activity is observed in the Japanese sector in local summer (i.e. the June solstice.

    It appears that the midlatitude spread-F minimum is only apparent but not real. It delineates the boundary between aurorally generated spread-F (due to travelling ionospheric disturbances, TIDs and low midlatitude spread-F whose origin is not known.

  20. Allegheny County School District Boundaries

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — This dataset demarcates the school district boundaries within Allegheny County If viewing this description on the Western Pennsylvania Regional Data Center’s open...

  1. Boundary Layer Control on Airfoils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerhab, George; Eastlake, Charles

    1991-01-01

    A phenomena, boundary layer control (BLC), produced when visualizing the fluidlike flow of air is described. The use of BLC in modifying aerodynamic characteristics of airfoils, race cars, and boats is discussed. (KR)

  2. County Boundaries with Shorelines (National)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Transportation — County boundaries with shorelines cut in (NTAD). The TIGER/Line Files are shapefiles and related database files (.dbf) that are an extract of selected geographic and...

  3. HUC 8-11 Boundaries

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — This data set is a digital hydrologic unit boundary that is at the 4-digit, 6-digit, 8-digit, and 11-digit level. The data set was developed by delineating the...

  4. The laminar boundary layer equations

    CERN Document Server

    Curle, N

    2017-01-01

    Thorough introduction to boundary layer problems offers an ordered, logical presentation accessible to undergraduates. The text's careful expositions of the limitations and accuracy of various methods will also benefit professionals. 1962 edition.

  5. State Highway District Boundaries - 2004

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — This data represents the NM Department of Transportation District boundaries as legislatively defined (i.e. these are not maintenance defined districts).

  6. Boundary Spanners in Global Partnerships

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søderberg, Anne-Marie; Romani, Laurence

    2017-01-01

    client relationships and coordinating highly complex projects. We analyze vendor managers’ narratives of their collaboration with a European client in a long-term project, which is presented as a strategic partnership in an outsourcing 3.0 mode. The study offers a rich and conceptualized account of those...... technology (IT) development projects from the rare perspective of Indian vendor managers in one of the world’s largest IT service companies. It draws on a qualitative study of a collaborative partnership and focuses on the key boundary spanners who are responsible for developing trustful and sustainable...... managers’ boundary-spanning activities and a context-sensitive understanding of their boundary work. The study applies Bourdieu’s concept of capital (economic, cultural, social, and symbolic) not only in its analysis of the two powerful partners but also in its discussion of the boundary...

  7. Boundary-Layer Transition on Hollow Cylinders in Supersonic Free Flight as Affected by Mach Number and a Screwthread Type of Surface Roughness

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Carlton S.

    1959-01-01

    The effects of Mach number and surface-roughness variation on boundary-layer transition were studied using fin-stabilized hollow-tube models in free flight. The tests were conducted over the Mach number range from 2.8 to 7 at a nominally constant unit Reynolds number of 3 million per inch, and with heat transfer to the model surface. A screwthread type of distributed two-dimensional roughness was used. Nominal thread heights varied from 100 microinches to 2100 microinches. Transition Reynolds number was found to increase with increasing Mach number at a rate depending simultaneously on Mach number and roughness height. The laminar boundary layer was found to tolerate increasing amounts of roughness as Mach number increased. For a given Mach number an optimum roughness height was found which gave a maximum laminar run greater than was obtained with a smooth surface.

  8. The Maximum Resource Bin Packing Problem

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boyar, J.; Epstein, L.; Favrholdt, L.M.

    2006-01-01

    Usually, for bin packing problems, we try to minimize the number of bins used or in the case of the dual bin packing problem, maximize the number or total size of accepted items. This paper presents results for the opposite problems, where we would like to maximize the number of bins used...... or minimize the number or total size of accepted items. We consider off-line and on-line variants of the problems. For the off-line variant, we require that there be an ordering of the bins, so that no item in a later bin fits in an earlier bin. We find the approximation ratios of two natural approximation...... algorithms, First-Fit-Increasing and First-Fit-Decreasing for the maximum resource variant of classical bin packing. For the on-line variant, we define maximum resource variants of classical and dual bin packing. For dual bin packing, no on-line algorithm is competitive. For classical bin packing, we find...

  9. Maximum Likelihood Analysis in the PEN Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehman, Martin

    2013-10-01

    The experimental determination of the π+ -->e+ ν (γ) decay branching ratio currently provides the most accurate test of lepton universality. The PEN experiment at PSI, Switzerland, aims to improve the present world average experimental precision of 3 . 3 ×10-3 to 5 ×10-4 using a stopped beam approach. During runs in 2008-10, PEN has acquired over 2 ×107 πe 2 events. The experiment includes active beam detectors (degrader, mini TPC, target), central MWPC tracking with plastic scintillator hodoscopes, and a spherical pure CsI electromagnetic shower calorimeter. The final branching ratio will be calculated using a maximum likelihood analysis. This analysis assigns each event a probability for 5 processes (π+ -->e+ ν , π+ -->μ+ ν , decay-in-flight, pile-up, and hadronic events) using Monte Carlo verified probability distribution functions of our observables (energies, times, etc). A progress report on the PEN maximum likelihood analysis will be presented. Work supported by NSF grant PHY-0970013.

  10. Efficient heuristics for maximum common substructure search.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Englert, Péter; Kovács, Péter

    2015-05-26

    Maximum common substructure search is a computationally hard optimization problem with diverse applications in the field of cheminformatics, including similarity search, lead optimization, molecule alignment, and clustering. Most of these applications have strict constraints on running time, so heuristic methods are often preferred. However, the development of an algorithm that is both fast enough and accurate enough for most practical purposes is still a challenge. Moreover, in some applications, the quality of a common substructure depends not only on its size but also on various topological features of the one-to-one atom correspondence it defines. Two state-of-the-art heuristic algorithms for finding maximum common substructures have been implemented at ChemAxon Ltd., and effective heuristics have been developed to improve both their efficiency and the relevance of the atom mappings they provide. The implementations have been thoroughly evaluated and compared with existing solutions (KCOMBU and Indigo). The heuristics have been found to greatly improve the performance and applicability of the algorithms. The purpose of this paper is to introduce the applied methods and present the experimental results.

  11. Thermodynamic hardness and the maximum hardness principle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco-Pérez, Marco; Gázquez, José L.; Ayers, Paul W.; Vela, Alberto

    2017-08-01

    An alternative definition of hardness (called the thermodynamic hardness) within the grand canonical ensemble formalism is proposed in terms of the partial derivative of the electronic chemical potential with respect to the thermodynamic chemical potential of the reservoir, keeping the temperature and the external potential constant. This temperature dependent definition may be interpreted as a measure of the propensity of a system to go through a charge transfer process when it interacts with other species, and thus it keeps the philosophy of the original definition. When the derivative is expressed in terms of the three-state ensemble model, in the regime of low temperatures and up to temperatures of chemical interest, one finds that for zero fractional charge, the thermodynamic hardness is proportional to T-1(I -A ) , where I is the first ionization potential, A is the electron affinity, and T is the temperature. However, the thermodynamic hardness is nearly zero when the fractional charge is different from zero. Thus, through the present definition, one avoids the presence of the Dirac delta function. We show that the chemical hardness defined in this way provides meaningful and discernible information about the hardness properties of a chemical species exhibiting integer or a fractional average number of electrons, and this analysis allowed us to establish a link between the maximum possible value of the hardness here defined, with the minimum softness principle, showing that both principles are related to minimum fractional charge and maximum stability conditions.

  12. Maximum height and minimum time vertical jumping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domire, Zachary J; Challis, John H

    2015-08-20

    The performance criterion in maximum vertical jumping has typically been assumed to simply raise the center of mass as high as possible. In many sporting activities minimizing movement time during the jump is likely also critical to successful performance. The purpose of this study was to examine maximum height jumps performed while minimizing jump time. A direct dynamics model was used to examine squat jump performance, with dual performance criteria: maximize jump height and minimize jump time. The muscle model had activation dynamics, force-length, force-velocity properties, and a series of elastic component representing the tendon. The simulations were run in two modes. In Mode 1 the model was placed in a fixed initial position. In Mode 2 the simulation model selected the initial squat configuration as well as the sequence of muscle activations. The inclusion of time as a factor in Mode 1 simulations resulted in a small decrease in jump height and moderate time savings. The improvement in time was mostly accomplished by taking off from a less extended position. In Mode 2 simulations, more substantial time savings could be achieved by beginning the jump in a more upright posture. However, when time was weighted more heavily in these simulations, there was a more substantial reduction in jump height. Future work is needed to examine the implications for countermovement jumping and to examine the possibility of minimizing movement time as part of the control scheme even when the task is to jump maximally. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Maximum preheating in the liquid phase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1944-03-31

    This report dealt with the formation of hydrocarbons from CO or CO/sub 2/ to solve the problem of maximum preheating. Kroenig's old idea of operations with CO in the hydrogen was being tested to achieve increased temperatures in the converters. Dr. Kroenig tried to reduce the hydrogen consumption in the liquid phase when operating with oxygen-rich coals by the addition of a few percent CO to the fresh gas. This CO was supposed to compete with hydrogen for the oxygen of the coal, becoming converted to CO/sub 2/, which was stable at the relatively low temperatures of the converters. These experiments were discontinued. However, the idea of using the heat of reaction of the reaction of oxygen products with hydrogen to raise the temperature of the heater in the liquid phase was considered. It was known that the presence of even a few percent of CO in the fresh gas raised the converter temperature in the vapor phase dangerously, while the increase in the temperature of the preheater and the liquid phase converters amounted to but a few tenths of a millivolt. The reduction of CO with hydrogen was relatively slow but could be affected by catalysts. The heats of reactions for the various systems which could be utilized for heating were given. It was determined that from a standpoint of heat technology the formation of hydrocarbons from CO or CO/sub 2/ could be adapted to solve the problem of maximum preheating.

  14. Morfogênese de cultivares de Panicum maximum jacq. Morphogenesis of Panicum maximum jacq. cultivars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Augusto Miranda Gomide

    2000-04-01

    Full Text Available Quatro cultivares de Panicum maximum, Mombaça, Tanzânia, Vencedor e Centenário, foram cultivados em vasos, sob cobertura plástica transparente, para estudo da dinâmica do crescimento de folhas e perfilhos, em dois tipos de perfilho, o principal e o primário, e dois crescimentos, o de estabelecimento, logo após a emergência das plântulas, e o de rebrota, após corte, a 8 cm do solo, aos 21 dias. Os tratamentos foram estudados, em arranjo fatorial 4 x 2 x 2, segundo delineamento de blocos completamente casualizados com quatro repetições. O comprimento da lâmina foliar cresceu com o nível de inserção até a folha de número 9 ou 10, tornando-se menor nas folhas subseqüentes. O perfilhamento teve início na segunda semana de idade e se estendeu até 22 dias de idade, quando o número de perfilhos por planta se estabilizou. O cultivar Tanzânia apresentou maior número de perfilhos por planta (15, enquanto em Mombaça e Vencedor foram observados apenas 10 perfilhos. Maiores taxas de aparecimento e alongamento de folhas foram observadas durante o crescimento de estabelecimento. Em ambos os crescimentos, o cultivar Vencedor exibiu a maior taxa de aparecimento de folhas. O número médio de folhas verdes por perfilho estabilizou-se em 6,5 no cultivar Vencedor e 3,5 nos demais cultivares, no crescimento de rebrota, em que a vida útil das folhas foi de 29 dias para o cultivar Centenário e 36 dias para os demais.Four cultivars of Panicum maximum: Mombaça, Tanzânia, Centenário and Vencedor were grown in pots, under a transparent plastic cover, to evaluate the dynamic of leaf and tillers growth. Two growths, the establishment and the aftermath, after clipping at the age of 21 days, and two types of tiller, main and primary tillers, were studied. A completely randomized design with four replicates was used to compare the treatments resulting from a 4 x 2 x 2 factorial arrangement. The leaf blade length increased with insertion level until

  15. Recognition of boundary feedback systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Michael

    1989-01-01

    A system that has been the object of intense research is outlined. In view of that and recent progress of the theory of pseudodifferential boundary operator calculus, the author describes some features that could prove to be interesting in connection with the problems of boundary feedback...... stabilizability. It is shown that it is possible to use the calculus to consider more general feedback systems in a variational setup....

  16. Searching for the nanoscopic–macroscopic boundary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Velásquez, E.A. [GICM and GES Groups, Instituto de Física-FCEN, Universidad de Antioquia UdeA, Calle 70 No. 52-21 Medellín (Colombia); Grupo de Investigación en Modelamiento y Simulación Computacional, Universidad de San Buenaventura Sec. Medellín, A.A. 5222, Medellín (Colombia); Altbir, D. [Departamento de Física, Universidad de Santiago de Chile (USACH), CEDENNA, Santiago (Chile); Mazo-Zuluaga, J. [GICM and GES Groups, Instituto de Física-FCEN, Universidad de Antioquia UdeA, Calle 70 No. 52-21 Medellín (Colombia); Duque, L.F. [GICM and GES Groups, Instituto de Física-FCEN, Universidad de Antioquia UdeA, Calle 70 No. 52-21 Medellín (Colombia); Grupo de Física Teórica, Aplicada y Didáctica, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Aplicadas Instituto Tecnológico Metropolitano, Medellín (Colombia); Mejía-López, J., E-mail: jmejia@puc.cl [Facultad de Física, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, CEDENNA, Santiago (Chile)

    2013-12-15

    Several studies have focused on the size-dependent properties of elements, looking for a unique definition of the nanoscopic–macroscopic boundary. By using a novel approach consisting of an energy variational method combined with a quantum Heisenberg model, here we address the size at which the ordering temperature of a magnetic nanoparticle reaches its bulk value. We consider samples with sizes in the range 1–500 nm, as well as several geometries and crystalline lattices and observe that, contrarily to what is commonly argued, the nanoscopic-microscopic boundary depends on both factors: shape and crystalline structure. This suggests that the surface-to-volume ratio is not the unique parameter that defines the behavior of a nanometric sample whenever its size increases reaching the bulk dimension. Comparisons reveal very good agreement with experimental evidence with differences less than 2%. Our results have broad implications for practical issues in measurements on systems at the nanometric scale. - Highlights: • A novel quantum-Heisenberg variational energy method is implemented. • The asymptotic behavior toward the thermodynamic limit is explored. • An important dependence of the nano-bulk boundary on the geometry is found. • And also an important dependence on the crystalline lattice. • We obtain a very good agreement with experimental evidence with differences <2%.

  17. Phase boundary of hot dense fluid hydrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohta, Kenji; Ichimaru, Kota; Einaga, Mari; Kawaguchi, Sho; Shimizu, Katsuya; Matsuoka, Takahiro; Hirao, Naohisa; Ohishi, Yasuo

    2015-11-09

    We investigated the phase transformation of hot dense fluid hydrogen using static high-pressure laser-heating experiments in a laser-heated diamond anvil cell. The results show anomalies in the heating efficiency that are likely to be attributed to the phase transition from a diatomic to monoatomic fluid hydrogen (plasma phase transition) in the pressure range between 82 and 106 GPa. This study imposes tighter constraints on the location of the hydrogen plasma phase transition boundary and suggests higher critical point than that predicted by the theoretical calculations.

  18. Scalar boundary conditions in hyperscaling violating geometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian-Pin Wu

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available We study the possible boundary conditions of scalar field modes in a hyperscaling violation (HV geometry with Lifshitz dynamical exponent z (z≥1 and hyperscaling violation exponent θ (θ≠0. For the case with θ>0, we show that in the parameter range 1≤z≤2, −z+d−12, −z+d−10, which has been addressed in Ref. [1]. Meanwhile, we also carry out the parallel investigation in the case with θ0, only one type is available.

  19. Lake Basin Fetch and Maximum Length/Width

    Data.gov (United States)

    Minnesota Department of Natural Resources — Linear features representing the Fetch, Maximum Length and Maximum Width of a lake basin. Fetch, maximum length and average width are calcuated from the lake polygon...

  20. Hydraulic Limits on Maximum Plant Transpiration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzoni, S.; Vico, G.; Katul, G. G.; Palmroth, S.; Jackson, R. B.; Porporato, A. M.

    2011-12-01

    Photosynthesis occurs at the expense of water losses through transpiration. As a consequence of this basic carbon-water interaction at the leaf level, plant growth and ecosystem carbon exchanges are tightly coupled to transpiration. In this contribution, the hydraulic constraints that limit transpiration rates under well-watered conditions are examined across plant functional types and climates. The potential water flow through plants is proportional to both xylem hydraulic conductivity (which depends on plant carbon economy) and the difference in water potential between the soil and the atmosphere (the driving force that pulls water from the soil). Differently from previous works, we study how this potential flux changes with the amplitude of the driving force (i.e., we focus on xylem properties and not on stomatal regulation). Xylem hydraulic conductivity decreases as the driving force increases due to cavitation of the tissues. As a result of this negative feedback, more negative leaf (and xylem) water potentials would provide a stronger driving force for water transport, while at the same time limiting xylem hydraulic conductivity due to cavitation. Here, the leaf water potential value that allows an optimum balance between driving force and xylem conductivity is quantified, thus defining the maximum transpiration rate that can be sustained by the soil-to-leaf hydraulic system. To apply the proposed framework at the global scale, a novel database of xylem conductivity and cavitation vulnerability across plant types and biomes is developed. Conductivity and water potential at 50% cavitation are shown to be complementary (in particular between angiosperms and conifers), suggesting a tradeoff between transport efficiency and hydraulic safety. Plants from warmer and drier biomes tend to achieve larger maximum transpiration than plants growing in environments with lower atmospheric water demand. The predicted maximum transpiration and the corresponding leaf water

  1. Lifestyle Journalism: Blurring boundaries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    From, Unni

    2013-01-01

    Lifestyle journalism has experienced enormous growth in the media over the past two decades, but scholars in the fields of journalism and communication studies have so far paid relatively little attention to a field that is still sometimes seen as "not real journalism". There is now an urgent need...... for in-depth exploration and contextualisation of this field, with its increasing relevance for 21st century consumer cultures. For the first time, this book presents a wide range of studies which have engaged with the field of lifestyle journalism in order to outline the various political, economic......, social and cultural tensions within it. Taking a comparative view, the collection includes studies covering four continents, including countries such as Australia, China, Norway, Denmark, Singapore, the UK and the USA. While keeping the broader lifestyle field in mind, the chapters focus on a variety...

  2. Maximum Profit Configurations of Commercial Engines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yiran Chen

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available An investigation of commercial engines with finite capacity low- and high-price economic subsystems and a generalized commodity transfer law [n ∝ Δ (P m] in commodity flow processes, in which effects of the price elasticities of supply and demand are introduced, is presented in this paper. Optimal cycle configurations of commercial engines for maximum profit are obtained by applying optimal control theory. In some special cases, the eventual state—market equilibrium—is solely determined by the initial conditions and the inherent characteristics of two subsystems; while the different ways of transfer affect the model in respects of the specific forms of the paths of prices and the instantaneous commodity flow, i.e., the optimal configuration.

  3. Maximum Spectral Luminous Efficacy of White Light

    CERN Document Server

    Murphy, T W

    2013-01-01

    As lighting efficiency improves, it is useful to understand the theoretical limits to luminous efficacy for light that we perceive as white. Independent of the efficiency with which photons are generated, there exists a spectrally-imposed limit to the luminous efficacy of any source of photons. We find that, depending on the acceptable bandpass and---to a lesser extent---the color temperature of the light, the ideal white light source achieves a spectral luminous efficacy of 250--370 lm/W. This is consistent with previous calculations, but here we explore the maximum luminous efficacy as a function of photopic sensitivity threshold, color temperature, and color rendering index; deriving peak performance as a function of all three parameters. We also present example experimental spectra from a variety of light sources, quantifying the intrinsic efficacy of their spectral distributions.

  4. Maximum spectral luminous efficacy of white light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Thomas W.

    2012-05-01

    As lighting efficiency improves, it is useful to understand the theoretical limits to luminous efficacy for light that we perceive as white. Independent of the efficiency with which photons are generated, there exists a spectrally imposed limit to the luminous efficacy of any source of photons. We find that, depending on the acceptable bandpass and—to a lesser extent—the color temperature of the light, the ideal white light source achieves a spectral luminous efficacy of 250-370 lm/W. This is consistent with previous calculations, but here we explore the maximum luminous efficacy as a function of photopic sensitivity threshold, color temperature, and color rendering index; deriving peak performance as a function of all three parameters. We also present example experimental spectra from a variety of light sources, quantifying the intrinsic efficacy of their spectral distributions.

  5. Maximum screening fields of superconducting multilayer structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurevich, Alex

    2015-01-01

    It is shown that a multilayer comprised of alternating thin superconducting and insulating layers on a thick substrate can fully screen the applied magnetic field exceeding the superheating fields Hs of both the superconducting layers and the substrate, the maximum Meissner field is achieved at an optimum multilayer thickness. For instance, a dirty layer of thickness ˜0.1 μm at the Nb surface could increase Hs ≃ 240 mT of a clean Nb up to Hs ≃ 290 mT. Optimized multilayers of Nb3Sn, NbN, some of the iron pnictides, or alloyed Nb deposited onto the surface of the Nb resonator cavities could potentially double the rf breakdown field, pushing the peak accelerating electric fields above 100 MV/m while protecting the cavity from dendritic thermomagnetic avalanches caused by local penetration of vortices.

  6. MLDS: Maximum Likelihood Difference Scaling in R

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth Knoblauch

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The MLDS package in the R programming language can be used to estimate perceptual scales based on the results of psychophysical experiments using the method of difference scaling. In a difference scaling experiment, observers compare two supra-threshold differences (a,b and (c,d on each trial. The approach is based on a stochastic model of how the observer decides which perceptual difference (or interval (a,b or (c,d is greater, and the parameters of the model are estimated using a maximum likelihood criterion. We also propose a method to test the model by evaluating the self-consistency of the estimated scale. The package includes an example in which an observer judges the differences in correlation between scatterplots. The example may be readily adapted to estimate perceptual scales for arbitrary physical continua.

  7. Emitter frequency refinement based on maximum likelihood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xin; Wang, Huijuan

    2015-07-01

    Frequency estimation via signal sorting is widely recognized as one of the most practical technologies in signal processing. However, the estimated frequencies via signal sorting may be inaccurate and biased due to signal fluctuation under different emitter working modes, problems of transmitter circuit, environmental noises or certain unknown interference sources. Therefore, it has become an important issue to further analyze and refine signal frequencies after signal sorting. To address the above problem, we have brought forward an iterative frequency refinement method based on maximum likelihood. Iteratively, the initial estimated signal frequency values are refined. Experimental results indicate that the refined signal frequencies are more informative than the initial ones. As another advantage of our method, noises and interference sources could be filtered out simultaneously. The efficiency and flexibility enables our method to apply in a wide application area, i.e., communication, electronic reconnaissance and radar intelligence analysis.

  8. The Federal Administrative Maximum Penitentiary, Florence, Colorado.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coid, J W

    2001-10-01

    Policies for the control of dangerous and disruptive prisoners in European penal institutions depend upon social regimes managed by prison staff. These contrast with certain US regimes where there is increasing use of the incapacitation approach. This paper describes an incapacitation regime developed in the US Federal Administrative Maximum Penitentiary (ADX), Florence, Colorado which is complemented by an architectural design minimizing contact between prisoners and staff. This is reported to have been highly effective in controlling violent and predatory behaviour, escapes, drug-taking, and the influence of members of criminal gangs and notorious prisoners transferred to the ADX. Despite a shift of policy from therapeutic intervention towards deterrence of problem behaviour in prisons in some European countries, such as the UK, it is unlikely that such a regime would be acceptable in Europe.

  9. Spacecraft Maximum Allowable Concentrations for Airborne Contaminants

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, John T.

    2008-01-01

    The enclosed table lists official spacecraft maximum allowable concentrations (SMACs), which are guideline values set by the NASA/JSC Toxicology Group in cooperation with the National Research Council Committee on Toxicology (NRCCOT). These values should not be used for situations other than human space flight without careful consideration of the criteria used to set each value. The SMACs take into account a number of unique factors such as the effect of space-flight stress on human physiology, the uniform good health of the astronauts, and the absence of pregnant or very young individuals. Documentation of the values is given in a 5 volume series of books entitled "Spacecraft Maximum Allowable Concentrations for Selected Airborne Contaminants" published by the National Academy Press, Washington, D.C. These books can be viewed electronically at http://books.nap.edu/openbook.php?record_id=9786&page=3. Short-term (1 and 24 hour) SMACs are set to manage accidental releases aboard a spacecraft and permit risk of minor, reversible effects such as mild mucosal irritation. In contrast, the long-term SMACs are set to fully protect healthy crewmembers from adverse effects resulting from continuous exposure to specific air pollutants for up to 1000 days. Crewmembers with allergies or unusual sensitivity to trace pollutants may not be afforded complete protection, even when long-term SMACs are not exceeded. Crewmember exposures involve a mixture of contaminants, each at a specific concentration (C(sub n)). These contaminants could interact to elicit symptoms of toxicity even though individual contaminants do not exceed their respective SMACs. The air quality is considered acceptable when the toxicity index (T(sub grp)) for each toxicological group of compounds is less than 1, where T(sub grp), is calculated as follows: T(sub grp) = C(sub 1)/SMAC(sub 1) + C(sub 2/SMAC(sub 2) + ...+C(sub n)/SMAC(sub n).

  10. Nonlinear Dynamics of Vortices in Different Types of Grain Boundaries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheikhzada, Ahmad [Old Dominion Univ., Norfolk, VA (United States)

    2017-05-01

    As a major component of linear particle accelerators, superconducting radio-frequency (SRF) resonator cavities are required to operate with lowest energy dissipation and highest accelerating gradient. SRF cavities are made of polycrystalline materials in which grain boundaries can limit maximum RF currents and produce additional power dissipation sources due to local penetration of Josephson vortices. The essential physics of vortex penetration and mechanisms of dissipation of vortices driven by strong RF currents along networks of grain boundaries and their contribution to the residual surface resistance have not been well understood. To evaluate how GBs can limit the performance of SRF materials, particularly Nb and Nb3Sn, we performed extensive numerical simulations of nonlinear dynamics of Josephson vortices in grain boundaries under strong dc and RF fields. The RF power due to penetration of vortices both in weakly-coupled and strongly-coupled grain boundaries was calculated as functions of the RF field and frequency. The result of this calculation manifested a quadratic dependence of power to field amplitude at strong RF currents, an illustration of resistive behavior of grain boundaries. Our calculations also showed that the surface resistance is a complicated function of field controlled by penetration and annihilation of vortices and antivortices in strong RF fields which ultimately saturates to normal resistivity of grain boundary. We found that Cherenkov radiation of rapidly moving vortices in grain boundaries can produce a new instability causing generation of expanding vortex-antivortex pair which ultimately drives the entire GB in a resistive state. This effect is more pronounced in polycrystalline thin film and multilayer coating structures in which it can cause significant increase in power dissipation and results in hysteresis effects in I-V characteristics, particularly at low temperatures.

  11. Evaluation of pliers' grip spans in the maximum gripping task and sub-maximum cutting task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dae-Min; Kong, Yong-Ku

    2016-12-01

    A total of 25 males participated to investigate the effects of the grip spans of pliers on the total grip force, individual finger forces and muscle activities in the maximum gripping task and wire-cutting tasks. In the maximum gripping task, results showed that the 50-mm grip span had significantly higher total grip strength than the other grip spans. In the cutting task, the 50-mm grip span also showed significantly higher grip strength than the 65-mm and 80-mm grip spans, whereas the muscle activities showed a higher value at 80-mm grip span. The ratios of cutting force to maximum grip strength were also investigated. Ratios of 30.3%, 31.3% and 41.3% were obtained by grip spans of 50-mm, 65-mm, and 80-mm, respectively. Thus, the 50-mm grip span for pliers might be recommended to provide maximum exertion in gripping tasks, as well as lower maximum-cutting force ratios in the cutting tasks.

  12. Boundary slip from the immersed boundary lattice Boltzmann models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Guigao; Zhang, Junfeng

    2009-02-01

    We report an interesting and important observation of the velocity fields from immersed boundary lattice Boltzmann methods (IB-LBM). The computed velocity profiles can deviate from theoretical predictions greatly even for very simple flow situations, both in the immersed boundary layer and the bulk region. A rigorous analysis of the IB-LBM simulated velocity for a symmetric shear flow is carried out, and the analytical solutions indicate a strong dependence of velocity on the relaxation parameter (kinetic viscosity). Also our simulations demonstrate that simply increasing the immersed boundary layer thickness is not an efficient approach to reduce such velocity discrepancy. We hope this work will bring the awareness of this essential issue to people using IB-LBM for various flow situations.

  13. Improved maximum likelihood reconstruction of complex multi-generational pedigrees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheehan, Nuala A; Bartlett, Mark; Cussens, James

    2014-11-01

    The reconstruction of pedigrees from genetic marker data is relevant to a wide range of applications. Likelihood-based approaches aim to find the pedigree structure that gives the highest probability to the observed data. Existing methods either entail an exhaustive search and are hence restricted to small numbers of individuals, or they take a more heuristic approach and deliver a solution that will probably have high likelihood but is not guaranteed to be optimal. By encoding the pedigree learning problem as an integer linear program we can exploit efficient optimisation algorithms to construct pedigrees guaranteed to have maximal likelihood for the standard situation where we have complete marker data at unlinked loci and segregation of genes from parents to offspring is Mendelian. Previous work demonstrated efficient reconstruction of pedigrees of up to about 100 individuals. The modified method that we present here is not so restricted: we demonstrate its applicability with simulated data on a real human pedigree structure of over 1600 individuals. It also compares well with a very competitive approximate approach in terms of solving time and accuracy. In addition to identifying a maximum likelihood pedigree, we can obtain any number of pedigrees in decreasing order of likelihood. This is useful for assessing the uncertainty of a maximum likelihood solution and permits model averaging over high likelihood pedigrees when this would be appropriate. More importantly, when the solution is not unique, as will often be the case for large pedigrees, it enables investigation into the properties of maximum likelihood pedigree estimates which has not been possible up to now. Crucially, we also have a means of assessing the behaviour of other approximate approaches which all aim to find a maximum likelihood solution. Our approach hence allows us to properly address the question of whether a reasonably high likelihood solution that is easy to obtain is practically as

  14. Injection in the lower stratosphere of biomass fire emissions followed by long-range transport: a MOZAIC case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.-P. Cammas

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyses a stratospheric injection by deep convection of biomass fire emissions over North America (Alaska, Yukon and Northwest Territories on 24 June 2004 and its long-range transport over the eastern coast of the United States and the eastern Atlantic. The case study is based on airborne MOZAIC observations of ozone, carbon monoxide, nitrogen oxides and water vapour during the crossing of the southernmost tip of an upper level trough over the Eastern Atlantic on 30 June and on a vertical profile over Washington DC on 30 June, and on lidar observations of aerosol backscattering at Madison (University of Wisconsin on 28 June. Attribution of the observed CO plumes to the boreal fires is achieved by backward simulations with a Lagrangian particle dispersion model (FLEXPART. A simulation with the Meso-NH model for the source region shows that a boundary layer tracer, mimicking the boreal forest fire smoke, is lofted into the lowermost stratosphere (2–5 pvu layer during the diurnal convective cycle at isentropic levels (above 335 K corresponding to those of the downstream MOZAIC observations. It is shown that the order of magnitude of the time needed by the parameterized convective detrainment flux to fill the volume of a model mesh (20 km horizontal, 500 m vertical above the tropopause with pure boundary layer air would be about 7.5 h, i.e. a time period compatible with the convective diurnal cycle. Over the area of interest, the maximum instantaneous detrainment fluxes deposited about 15 to 20% of the initial boundary layer tracer concentration at 335 K. According to the 275-ppbv carbon monoxide maximum mixing ratio observed by MOZAIC over Eastern Atlantic, such detrainment fluxes would be associated with a 1.4–1.8 ppmv carbon monoxide mixing ratio in the boundary layer over the source region.

  15. Scalings for unsteady natural convection boundary layers on an evenly heated plate with time-dependent heating flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Wenxian; Armfield, S. W.

    2013-12-01

    It is of fundamental significance, especially with regard to application, to fully understand the flow behavior of unsteady natural convection boundary layers on a vertical plate heated by a time-dependent heat flux. Such an understanding is currently scarce. In this paper, the scaling analysis by Lin et al. [Phys. Rev. E 79, 066313 (2009), 10.1103/PhysRevE.79.066313] using a simple three-region structure for the unsteady natural convection boundary layer of a homogeneous Newtonian fluid with Pr >1 under isothermal heating was substantially extended for the case when the heating is due to a time-varying sinusoidal heat flux. A series of scalings was developed for the thermal boundary thickness, the plate temperature, the viscous boundary thicknesses, and the maximum vertical velocity within the boundary layer, which are the major parameters representing the flow behavior, in terms of the governing parameters of the flow, i.e., the Rayleigh number Ra, the Prandtl number Pr, and the dimensionless natural frequency fn of the time-varying sinusoidal heat flux, at the start-up stage, at the transition time scale which represents the ending of the start-up stage and the beginning of the transitional stage of the boundary-layer development, and at the quasi-steady stage. These scalings were validated by comparison to 10 full numerical solutions of the governing equations with Ra, Pr, and fn in the ranges 106≤Ra≤109, 3≤Pr≤100, and 0.01≤fn≤0.1 and were shown in general to provide an accurate description of the flow at different development stages, except for high-Pr runs in which a further, although weak, Pr dependence is present, which cannot be accurately predicted by the current scaling analysis using the simple three-region structure, attributed to the non-boundary-layer nature of the velocity field with high-Pr fluids. Some scalings at the transition time scale and at the quasi-steady stage also produce noticeable deviations from the numerical results when

  16. The boundary-scan handbook

    CERN Document Server

    Parker, Kenneth P

    2016-01-01

    Aimed at electronics industry professionals, this 4th edition of the Boundary Scan Handbook describes recent changes to the IEEE1149.1 Standard Test Access Port and Boundary-Scan Architecture. This updated edition features new chapters on the possible effects of the changes on the work of the practicing test engineers and the new 1149.8.1 standard. Anyone needing to understand the basics of boundary scan and its practical industrial implementation will need this book. Provides an overview of the recent changes to the 1149.1 standard and the effect of the changes on the work of test engineers;   Explains the new IEEE 1149.8.1 subsidiary standard and applications;   Describes the latest updates on the supplementary IEEE testing standards. In particular, addresses: IEEE Std 1149.1                      Digital Boundary-Scan IEEE Std 1149.4                      Analog Boundary-Scan IEEE Std 1149.6                      Advanced I/O Testing IEEE Std 1149.8.1           �...

  17. Undulatory microswimming near solid boundaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulman, R. D.; Backholm, M.; Ryu, W. S.; Dalnoki-Veress, K.

    2014-10-01

    The hydrodynamic forces involved in the undulatory microswimming of the model organism C. elegans are studied in proximity to solid boundaries. Using a micropipette deflection technique, we attain direct and time-resolved force measurements of the viscous forces acting on the worm near a single planar boundary as well as confined between two planar boundaries. We observe a monotonic increase in the lateral and propulsive forces with increasing proximity to the solid interface. We determine normal and tangential drag coefficients for the worm, and find these to increase with confinement. The measured drag coefficients are compared to existing theoretical models. The ratio of normal to tangential drag coefficients is found to assume a constant value of 1.5 ± 0.1(5) at all distances from a single boundary, but increases significantly as the worm is confined between two boundaries. In response to the increased drag due to confinement, we observe a gait modulation of the nematode, which is primarily characterized by a decrease in the swimming amplitude.

  18. Connection between maximum-work and maximum-power thermal cycles

    OpenAIRE

    Gonzalez-Ayala, Julian; Arias-Hernandez, L. A.; Angulo-Brown, F.

    2013-01-01

    We propose a new connection between maximum-power Curzon-Ahlborn thermal cycles and maximum-work reversible cycles. This linkage is built through a mapping between the exponents of a class of heat transfer laws and the exponents of a family of heat capacities depending on temperature. This connection leads to the recovery of known results and to a wide and interesting set of new results for a class of thermal cycles. Among other results we find that it is possible to use analytically closed e...

  19. Range management visual impacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruce R. Brown; David Kissel

    1979-01-01

    Historical overgrazing of western public rangelands has resulted in the passage of the Public Rangeland Improvement Act of 1978. The main purpose of this Act is to improve unsatisfactory range conditions. A contributing factor to unfavorable range conditions is adverse visual impacts. These visual impacts can be identified in three categories of range management: range...

  20. Applications of the Remotely Piloted Aircraft (RPA) 'MASC' in Atmospheric Boundary Layer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wildmann, Norman; Platis, Andreas; Tupman, David-James; Bange, Jens

    2015-04-01

    The remotely piloted aircraft (RPA) MASC (Multipurpose Airborne Sensor Carrier) was developed at the University of Tübingen in cooperation with the University of Stuttgart, University of Applied Sciences Ostwestfalen-Lippe and 'ROKE-Modelle'. Its purpose is the investigation of thermodynamic processes in the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL), including observations of temperature, humidity and wind profiles, as well as the measurement of turbulent heat, moisture and momentum fluxes. The aircraft is electrically powered, has a maximum wingspan of 3.40~m and a total weight of 5-8~kg, depending on the battery- and payload. The standard meteorological payload consists of two temperature sensors, a humidity sensor, a flow probe, an inertial measurement unit and a GNSS. The sensors were optimized for the resolution of small-scale turbulence down to length scales in the sub-meter range. In normal operation, the aircraft is automatically controlled by the ROCS (Research Onboard Computer System) autopilot to be able to fly predefined paths at constant altitude and airspeed. Only take-off and landing are carried out by a human RC pilot. Since 2012, the system is operational and has since then been deployed in more than ten measurement campaigns, with more than 100 measurement flights. The fields of research that were tackled in these campaigns include sensor validation, fundamental boundary-layer research and wind-energy research. In 2014, for the first time, two MASC have been operated at the same time within a distance of a few kilometres, in order to investigate the wind field over an escarpment in the Swabian Alb. Furthermore, MASC was first deployed off-shore in October 2014, starting from the German island Heligoland in the North Sea, for the purpose of characterization of the marine boundary layer for offshore wind parks. Detailed descriptions of the experimental setup and first preliminary results will be presented.

  1. Asymptotic analysis and boundary layers

    CERN Document Server

    Cousteix, Jean

    2007-01-01

    This book presents a new method of asymptotic analysis of boundary-layer problems, the Successive Complementary Expansion Method (SCEM). The first part is devoted to a general comprehensive presentation of the tools of asymptotic analysis. It gives the keys to understand a boundary-layer problem and explains the methods to construct an approximation. The second part is devoted to SCEM and its applications in fluid mechanics, including external and internal flows. The advantages of SCEM are discussed in comparison with the standard Method of Matched Asymptotic Expansions. In particular, for the first time, the theory of Interactive Boundary Layer is fully justified. With its chapter summaries, detailed derivations of results, discussed examples and fully worked out problems and solutions, the book is self-contained. It is written on a mathematical level accessible to graduate and post-graduate students of engineering and physics with a good knowledge in fluid mechanics. Researchers and practitioners will estee...

  2. Free boundary ballooning mode representation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Linjin

    2012-03-01

    Considerable efforts have been made in this field to develop a free boundary ballooning mode representation, which can incorporate the peeling mode stability criterion. Those efforts have not succeeded, simply because the so-called ballooning mode invariance is broken toward plasma edge. This makes 1D description of high n modes at plasma edge become impossible, where n is toroidal mode number. Nevertheless, we prove that the existence of ``half" ballooning mode invariance toward plasma core enables an 1.δ-dimentional representation of the modes, where δ˜O(1/n). This considerably reduces the complicity in investigating high n modes at plasma edge and can be used to study peeling-ballooning modes. This technique can also be useful to extend the 1D calculation of fixed boundary ballooning modes for free boundary ballooning modes. Numerical example will also be presented together with the topological symmetry analysis.

  3. Bubble dynamics in a compressible liquid in contact with a rigid boundary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qianxi; Liu, Wenke; Zhang, A M; Sui, Yi

    2015-10-06

    A bubble initiated near a rigid boundary may be almost in contact with the boundary because of its expansion and migration to the boundary, where a thin layer of water forms between the bubble and the boundary thereafter. This phenomenon is modelled using the weakly compressible theory coupled with the boundary integral method. The wall effects are modelled using the imaging method. The numerical instabilities caused by the near contact of the bubble surface with the boundary are handled by removing a thin layer of water between them and joining the bubble surface with its image to the boundary. Our computations correlate well with experiments for both the first and second cycles of oscillation. The time history of the energy of a bubble system follows a step function, reducing rapidly and significantly because of emission of shock waves at inception of a bubble and at the end of collapse but remaining approximately constant for the rest of the time. The bubble starts being in near contact with the boundary during the first cycle of oscillation when the dimensionless stand-off distance γ = s/R m bubble centre from the boundary and R m is the maximum bubble radius. This leads to (i) the direct impact of a high-speed liquid jet on the boundary once it penetrates through the bubble, (ii) the direct contact of the bubble at high temperature and high pressure with the boundary, and (iii) the direct impingement of shock waves on the boundary once emitted. These phenomena have clear potential to damage the boundary, which are believed to be part of the mechanisms of cavitation damage.

  4. Maximum likelihood continuity mapping for fraud detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hogden, J.

    1997-05-01

    The author describes a novel time-series analysis technique called maximum likelihood continuity mapping (MALCOM), and focuses on one application of MALCOM: detecting fraud in medical insurance claims. Given a training data set composed of typical sequences, MALCOM creates a stochastic model of sequence generation, called a continuity map (CM). A CM maximizes the probability of sequences in the training set given the model constraints, CMs can be used to estimate the likelihood of sequences not found in the training set, enabling anomaly detection and sequence prediction--important aspects of data mining. Since MALCOM can be used on sequences of categorical data (e.g., sequences of words) as well as real valued data, MALCOM is also a potential replacement for database search tools such as N-gram analysis. In a recent experiment, MALCOM was used to evaluate the likelihood of patient medical histories, where ``medical history`` is used to mean the sequence of medical procedures performed on a patient. Physicians whose patients had anomalous medical histories (according to MALCOM) were evaluated for fraud by an independent agency. Of the small sample (12 physicians) that has been evaluated, 92% have been determined fraudulent or abusive. Despite the small sample, these results are encouraging.

  5. Visual tracking by separability-maximum boosting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Jie; Mao, Yao-bin; Sun, Jin-sheng

    2013-10-01

    Recently, visual tracking has been formulated as a classification problem whose task is to detect the object from the scene with a binary classifier. Boosting based online feature selection methods, which adopt the classifier to appearance changes by choosing the most discriminative features, have been demonstrated to be effective for visual tracking. A major problem of such online feature selection methods is that an inaccurate classifier may give imprecise tracking windows. Tracking error accumulates when the tracker trains the classifier with misaligned samples and finally leads to drifting. Separability-maximum boosting (SMBoost), an alternative form of AdaBoost which characterizes the separability between the object and the scene by their means and covariance matrices, is proposed. SMBoost only needs the means and covariance matrices during training and can be easily adopted to online learning problems by estimating the statistics incrementally. Experiment on UCI machine learning datasets shows that SMBoost is as accurate as offline AdaBoost, and significantly outperforms Oza's online boosting. Accurate classifier stabilizes the tracker on challenging video sequences. Empirical results also demonstrate improvements in term of tracking precision and speed, comparing ours to those state-of-the-art ones.

  6. Maximum Margin Clustering of Hyperspectral Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niazmardi, S.; Safari, A.; Homayouni, S.

    2013-09-01

    In recent decades, large margin methods such as Support Vector Machines (SVMs) are supposed to be the state-of-the-art of supervised learning methods for classification of hyperspectral data. However, the results of these algorithms mainly depend on the quality and quantity of available training data. To tackle down the problems associated with the training data, the researcher put effort into extending the capability of large margin algorithms for unsupervised learning. One of the recent proposed algorithms is Maximum Margin Clustering (MMC). The MMC is an unsupervised SVMs algorithm that simultaneously estimates both the labels and the hyperplane parameters. Nevertheless, the optimization of the MMC algorithm is a non-convex problem. Most of the existing MMC methods rely on the reformulating and the relaxing of the non-convex optimization problem as semi-definite programs (SDP), which are computationally very expensive and only can handle small data sets. Moreover, most of these algorithms are two-class classification, which cannot be used for classification of remotely sensed data. In this paper, a new MMC algorithm is used that solve the original non-convex problem using Alternative Optimization method. This algorithm is also extended for multi-class classification and its performance is evaluated. The results of the proposed algorithm show that the algorithm has acceptable results for hyperspectral data clustering.

  7. MAXIMUM MARGIN CLUSTERING OF HYPERSPECTRAL DATA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Niazmardi

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available In recent decades, large margin methods such as Support Vector Machines (SVMs are supposed to be the state-of-the-art of supervised learning methods for classification of hyperspectral data. However, the results of these algorithms mainly depend on the quality and quantity of available training data. To tackle down the problems associated with the training data, the researcher put effort into extending the capability of large margin algorithms for unsupervised learning. One of the recent proposed algorithms is Maximum Margin Clustering (MMC. The MMC is an unsupervised SVMs algorithm that simultaneously estimates both the labels and the hyperplane parameters. Nevertheless, the optimization of the MMC algorithm is a non-convex problem. Most of the existing MMC methods rely on the reformulating and the relaxing of the non-convex optimization problem as semi-definite programs (SDP, which are computationally very expensive and only can handle small data sets. Moreover, most of these algorithms are two-class classification, which cannot be used for classification of remotely sensed data. In this paper, a new MMC algorithm is used that solve the original non-convex problem using Alternative Optimization method. This algorithm is also extended for multi-class classification and its performance is evaluated. The results of the proposed algorithm show that the algorithm has acceptable results for hyperspectral data clustering.

  8. Boundary Value Problems and Approximate Solutions ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this paper, we discuss about some basic things of boundary value problems. Secondly, we study boundary conditions involving derivatives and obtain finite difference approximations of partial derivatives of boundary value problems. The last section is devoted to determine an approximate solution for boundary value ...

  9. Boundary Spanners as supports of social capital

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vincenti, Gordon

    2016-01-01

    Boundary Spanners are important agenets of supporting the capacity building of local neighbourhoods and of sustainable social captial the article focuses on the skills and competnces adn role of Boundary Spanners.......Boundary Spanners are important agenets of supporting the capacity building of local neighbourhoods and of sustainable social captial the article focuses on the skills and competnces adn role of Boundary Spanners....

  10. 49 CFR 230.24 - Maximum allowable stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Maximum allowable stress. 230.24 Section 230.24... Allowable Stress § 230.24 Maximum allowable stress. (a) Maximum allowable stress value. The maximum allowable stress value on any component of a steam locomotive boiler shall not exceed 1/4 of the ultimate...

  11. Future changes over the Himalayas: Maximum and minimum temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimri, A. P.; Kumar, D.; Choudhary, A.; Maharana, P.

    2018-03-01

    An assessment of the projection of minimum and maximum air temperature over the Indian Himalayan region (IHR) from the COordinated Regional Climate Downscaling EXperiment- South Asia (hereafter, CORDEX-SA) regional climate model (RCM) experiments have been carried out under two different Representative Concentration Pathway (RCP) scenarios. The major aim of this study is to assess the probable future changes in the minimum and maximum climatology and its long-term trend under different RCPs along with the elevation dependent warming over the IHR. A number of statistical analysis such as changes in mean climatology, long-term spatial trend and probability distribution function are carried out to detect the signals of changes in climate. The study also tries to quantify the uncertainties associated with different model experiments and their ensemble in space, time and for different seasons. The model experiments and their ensemble show prominent cold bias over Himalayas for present climate. However, statistically significant higher warming rate (0.23-0.52 °C/decade) for both minimum and maximum air temperature (Tmin and Tmax) is observed for all the seasons under both RCPs. The rate of warming intensifies with the increase in the radiative forcing under a range of greenhouse gas scenarios starting from RCP4.5 to RCP8.5. In addition to this, a wide range of spatial variability and disagreements in the magnitude of trend between different models describes the uncertainty associated with the model projections and scenarios. The projected rate of increase of Tmin may destabilize the snow formation at the higher altitudes in the northern and western parts of Himalayan region, while rising trend of Tmax over southern flank may effectively melt more snow cover. Such combined effect of rising trend of Tmin and Tmax may pose a potential threat to the glacial deposits. The overall trend of Diurnal temperature range (DTR) portrays increasing trend across entire area with

  12. Unification of field theory and maximum entropy methods for learning probability densities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinney, Justin B

    2015-09-01

    The need to estimate smooth probability distributions (a.k.a. probability densities) from finite sampled data is ubiquitous in science. Many approaches to this problem have been described, but none is yet regarded as providing a definitive solution. Maximum entropy estimation and Bayesian field theory are two such approaches. Both have origins in statistical physics, but the relationship between them has remained unclear. Here I unify these two methods by showing that every maximum entropy density estimate can be recovered in the infinite smoothness limit of an appropriate Bayesian field theory. I also show that Bayesian field theory estimation can be performed without imposing any boundary conditions on candidate densities, and that the infinite smoothness limit of these theories recovers the most common types of maximum entropy estimates. Bayesian field theory thus provides a natural test of the maximum entropy null hypothesis and, furthermore, returns an alternative (lower entropy) density estimate when the maximum entropy hypothesis is falsified. The computations necessary for this approach can be performed rapidly for one-dimensional data, and software for doing this is provided.

  13. Drawing boundaries : boundary arrangements of the IPCC working groups

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Christel van Eck

    2016-01-01

    The present research investigates how the IPCC’s Working Groups safeguard their scientific character while communicating with policymakers. Due to the different nature of Working Groups’ assessments, all Working Groups make different boundary arrangements of how science is defined; what is

  14. Mandibular movement range in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, Barbara Cristina Zanandréa; Medeiros, Ana Paula Magalhães; Felício, Cláudia Maria de

    2009-01-01

    identification of the mandibular movement range is an important procedure in the evaluation of the stomatognathic system. However, there are few studies in children that focus on normal parameters or abnormalities. to determine the average range of mandibular movements in Brazilian children aged 6 to 12 years; to verify the difference between genders, in each age group, and between the different age groups: 6-8 years; 8.1-10 years; and 10.1-12 years. participants of the study were 240 healthy children selected among regular students from local schools of São Paulo State. The maximum mandibular opening, lateral excursion and protrusive movements, and deviation of the medium line, if present, were measured using a digital caliper. Student T test, Analysis of variance and Tukey test were considered significant for p mandibular opening; 7.71mm for lateral excursion to the right; 7.92mm for lateral excursion to the left; 7.45mm for protrusive movements. No statistical difference was observed between genders. There was a gradual increase in the range of mandibular movements, with significant differences mainly between the ages of 6-8 years and 10.1-12 years. during childhood the range of mandibular movements increases. Age should be considered in this analysis for a greater precision in the diagnosis.

  15. Maximum smoothed likelihood estimation and smoothed maximum likelihood estimation in the current status model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groeneboom, P.; Jongbloed, G.; Witte, B.I.

    2010-01-01

    We consider the problem of estimating the distribution function, the density and the hazard rate of the (unobservable) event time in the current status model. A well studied and natural nonparametric estimator for the distribution function in this model is the nonparametric maximum likelihood

  16. Half-width at half-maximum, full-width at half-maximum analysis for ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In the present study, HWHM (half-width at half-maximum) of the resultant PSF has been defined to characterize the resolution of the detection system. ... Department of Physics, University College of Science, Osmania University, Hyderabad 500 007, India; Department of Humanities & Sciences, C.M.R. Institute of Technology ...

  17. Boundary works of Grindr research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Kristian Møller

    . It can be understood as arising from boundary works (Jamieson 2005, [Auhor of this paper] forthcoming) and thus be ontologically entangled with the meeting of the prospect of boundary transgression that marks the end of intimacy. Lauren Berlant on the other hand sees intimacy as: …the processes by which....... Communications, 36(1), 91–111. Lundby, K. (ed.) (2014). Mediatization of Communication: Handbooks of Communication Science, vol. 21. Berlin: De Gruyter Mouton. Marwick, A., & Boyd, D. (2014). Networked privacy: How teenagers negotiate context in social media. New Media & Society. Markham, A., & Buchanan, E...

  18. Boundary effect in electrorheological fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, X L; Yang, F; Xuan, S H; Zong, L H; Zhu, W; Jiang, W Q

    2011-12-01

    The effect of the boundary friction coefficient on the rheological properties of the electrorheological (ER) fluids in quasistatic and dynamic states is investigated by computer simulation. The relation between the shear stress and the boundary friction coefficient in quasistatic and dynamic states is discussed qualitatively and quantitatively, and the trend matches the previously reported experimental results well. The flow curves of ER fluids, under different friction coefficients, are calculated, and it is found that the friction coefficient affects the flow curves. In two dimensions, the transitions in structure corresponding to the shear stress variations are presented to understand the mechanism of ER fluids.

  19. Information dynamics of boundary perception

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kragness, Haley; Hansen, Niels Christian; Vuust, Peter

    It has long been noted that expert musicians lengthen notes at phrase boundaries in expressive performance. Recently, we have extended research on this phenomenon by showing that undergraduates with no formal musical training and children as young as 3 years lengthen phrase boundaries during self......-paced listening to chord sequences in a lab setting (the musical dwell-time effect). However, the origin of the musical dwell-time effect is still unknown. Recent work has demonstrated that musicians and non-musicians are sensitive to entropy in musical sequences, experiencing high-entropy contexts as more...

  20. Tropical cyclone boundary layer shocks

    OpenAIRE

    Slocum, Christopher J.; Williams, Gabriel J.; Taft, Richard K.; Wayne H. Schubert

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents numerical solutions and idealized analytical solutions of axisymmetric, $f$-plane models of the tropical cyclone boundary layer. In the numerical model, the boundary layer radial and tangential flow is forced by a specified pressure field, which can also be interpreted as a specified gradient balanced tangential wind field $v_{\\rm gr}(r)$ or vorticity field $\\zeta_{\\rm gr}(r)$. When the specified $\\zeta_{\\rm gr}(r)$ field is changed from one that is radially concentrated i...

  1. Cosmic shear measurement with maximum likelihood and maximum a posteriori inference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Alex; Taylor, Andy

    2017-06-01

    We investigate the problem of noise bias in maximum likelihood and maximum a posteriori estimators for cosmic shear. We derive the leading and next-to-leading order biases and compute them in the context of galaxy ellipticity measurements, extending previous work on maximum likelihood inference for weak lensing. We show that a large part of the bias on these point estimators can be removed using information already contained in the likelihood when a galaxy model is specified, without the need for external calibration. We test these bias-corrected estimators on simulated galaxy images similar to those expected from planned space-based weak lensing surveys, with promising results. We find that the introduction of an intrinsic shape prior can help with mitigation of noise bias, such that the maximum a posteriori estimate can be made less biased than the maximum likelihood estimate. Second-order terms offer a check on the convergence of the estimators, but are largely subdominant. We show how biases propagate to shear estimates, demonstrating in our simple set-up that shear biases can be reduced by orders of magnitude and potentially to within the requirements of planned space-based surveys at mild signal-to-noise ratio. We find that second-order terms can exhibit significant cancellations at low signal-to-noise ratio when Gaussian noise is assumed, which has implications for inferring the performance of shear-measurement algorithms from simplified simulations. We discuss the viability of our point estimators as tools for lensing inference, arguing that they allow for the robust measurement of ellipticity and shear.

  2. Discovering the Role of Grain Boundary Complexions in Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harmer, Martin P. [Lehigh Univ., Bethlehem, PA (United States)

    2015-03-19

    Grain boundaries are inherently an area of disorder in polycrystalline materials which define the transport and various other material properties. The relationship between the interfacial chemistry, structure and the material properties is not well understood. Among the various taxonomies for grain boundaries, Grain Boundary Complexion is a relatively new conceptual scheme that relates the structure and kinetic properties of grain boundaries. In this classification scheme, grain boundaries are considered to be distinct three dimensional (the thickness being considerably smaller as compared to the other two dimensions but nonetheless discernible) equilibrium thermodynamic phases abutted between two crystalline phases. The stability and structure of these interfacial phases are dictated by various thermodynamic variables such as temperature, stress (pressure), interfacial chemistry (chemical potential) and most importantly by the energies of the adjoining crystal surfaces. These phases are only stable within the constraint of the adjoining grains. Although these interfacial phases are not stable in bulk form, they can transform from one complexion to another as a function of various thermodynamic variables analogous to the behavior of bulk phases. Examples of different complexions have been reported in various publications. However, a systematic investigation exploring the existence of grain boundary complexions in material systems other than alumina remains to be done. Although the role of interfacial chemistry on grain boundary complexions in alumina has been addressed, a clear understanding of the underlying thermodynamics governing complexion formation is lacking. Finally, the effects of grain boundary complexions in bulk material properties are widely unknown. Factors above urge a thorough exploration of grain boundary complexions in a range of different materials systems The purpose of the current program is to verify the existence of grain boundary complexion

  3. Changes in thermocline structure in the Eastern Equatorial Pacific since the Last Glacial Maximum: A comparative study

    Science.gov (United States)

    McChesney, C. L.; Ford, H. L.; McManus, J. F.

    2016-12-01

    The Eastern Equatorial Pacific (EEP) is an important region of study due to its dynamic nature and role in El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO), which is the biggest source of global interannual variability. The EEP is characterized by cool sea surface temperatures that are tightly coupled to a shallow thermocline. Variability in the depth of the EEP thermocline is important in initiating and propagating El Niño events. Here, we investigate changes in thermocline depth during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) to gain insight into how conditions within the EEP changed in the context of different boundary conditions (e.g., low CO2, greater ice volume). Using the stable oxygen isotope values of planktonic foraminifera from a range of calcification depths in the water column, we show that the thermocline was deep during the LGM relative to the Holocene at Ocean Drilling Program Site 849 (0°N, 110°W, 3839 m water depth). In comparison to previous studies that have been done in the region, site 849 has the smallest change of δ18O surface values, indicating less glacial cooling. However, site 849 displays even less apparent cooling in subsurface isotopic values, with a difference of -0.39 ‰ when comparing the LGM to the Holocene, suggesting little temperature change. The δ18O values of site 849 during the LGM had a smaller range between subsurface and surface foraminifera of 1.64‰ compared to the Holocene range of 2.11‰. This difference indicates that the thermocline was deeper in the equatorial cold tongue during the LGM. A deep thermocline may have inhibited some of the thermocline related feedbacks in ENSO variability and led to reduced ENSO during the LGM. Future Mg/Ca data will be incorporated to verify temperature.

  4. Atomic structure and electronic properties of MgO grain boundaries in tunnelling magnetoresistive devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bean, Jonathan J.; Saito, Mitsuhiro; Fukami, Shunsuke; Sato, Hideo; Ikeda, Shoji; Ohno, Hideo; Ikuhara, Yuichi; McKenna, Keith P.

    2017-04-01

    Polycrystalline metal oxides find diverse applications in areas such as nanoelectronics, photovoltaics and catalysis. Although grain boundary defects are ubiquitous their structure and electronic properties are very poorly understood since it is extremely challenging to probe the structure of buried interfaces directly. In this paper we combine novel plan-view high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and first principles calculations to provide atomic level understanding of the structure and properties of grain boundaries in the barrier layer of a magnetic tunnel junction. We show that the highly [001] textured MgO films contain numerous tilt grain boundaries. First principles calculations reveal how these grain boundaries are associated with locally reduced band gaps (by up to 3 eV). Using a simple model we show how shunting a proportion of the tunnelling current through grain boundaries imposes limits on the maximum magnetoresistance that can be achieved in devices.

  5. 40 CFR 1042.140 - Maximum engine power, displacement, power density, and maximum in-use engine speed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Maximum engine power, displacement... Maximum engine power, displacement, power density, and maximum in-use engine speed. This section describes how to determine the maximum engine power, displacement, and power density of an engine for the...

  6. Substring Range Reporting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bille, Philip; Gørtz, Inge Li

    2014-01-01

    We revisit various string indexing problems with range reporting features, namely, position-restricted substring searching, indexing substrings with gaps, and indexing substrings with intervals. We obtain the following main results. We give efficient reductions for each of the above problems...... to a new problem, which we call substring range reporting. Hence, we unify the previous work by showing that we may restrict our attention to a single problem rather than studying each of the above problems individually. We show how to solve substring range reporting with optimal query time and little...... for substring range reporting generalize to substring range counting and substring range emptiness variants. We also obtain non-trivial time-space trade-offs for these problems. Our bounds for substring range reporting are based on a novel combination of suffix trees and range reporting data structures...

  7. Communication accross territory boundaries: distance dependent responses in nightingale

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sprau, P.; Roth, T.; Schmidt, Rouven; Amrhein, V.; Naguib, M.

    2010-01-01

    In communication, vocal signals are often used for long-range signaling. Yet, little experimental evidence is available on the role of territorial signals across territory boundaries and their effectiveness at different propagation distances. In many songbird species, song overlapping and rapid

  8. The Anglophone Cameroon-Nigeria boundary : opportunities and conflicts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Konings, P.J.J.

    2005-01-01

    Recent studies of African boundaries have tended to focus either on the growing number of border disputes between States or on frontier regions that are said to offer local inhabitants a wide range of economic opportunities. This article combines both approaches and demonstrates the ambiguous nature

  9. A western boundary current eddy characterisation study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribbe, Joachim; Brieva, Daniel

    2016-12-01

    The analysis of an eddy census for the East Australian Current (EAC) region yielded a total of 497 individual short-lived (7-28 days) cyclonic and anticyclonic eddies for the period 1993 to 2015. This was an average of about 23 eddies per year. 41% of the tracked individual cyclonic and anticyclonic eddies were detected off southeast Queensland between about 25 °S and 29 °S. This is the region where the flow of the EAC intensifies forming a swift western boundary current that impinges near Fraser Island on the continental shelf. This zone was also identified as having a maximum in detected short-lived cyclonic eddies. A total of 94 (43%) individual cyclonic eddies or about 4-5 per year were tracked in this region. The census found that these potentially displaced entrained water by about 115 km with an average displacement speed of about 4 km per day. Cyclonic eddies were likely to contribute to establishing an on-shelf longshore northerly flow forming the western branch of the Fraser Island Gyre and possibly presented an important cross-shelf transport process in the life cycle of temperate fish species of the EAC domain. In-situ observations near western boundary currents previously documented the entrainment, off-shelf transport and export of near shore water, nutrients, sediments, fish larvae and the renewal of inner shelf water due to short-lived eddies. This study found that these cyclonic eddies potentially play an important off-shelf transport process off the central east Australian coast.

  10. Phase-field crystal study of grain-boundary premelting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellenthin, Jesper; Karma, Alain; Plapp, Mathis

    2008-11-01

    We study the phenomenon of grain-boundary premelting for temperatures below the melting point in the phase-field crystal model of a pure material with hexagonal ordering in two dimensions. We investigate the structures of symmetric tilt boundaries as a function of misorientation θ for two different inclinations and compute in the grand canonical ensemble the “disjoining potential” V(w) that describes the fundamental interaction between crystal-melt interfaces as a function of the premelted layer width w , which is defined here in terms of the excess mass of the grain boundary via a Gibbs construction. The results reveal qualitatively different behaviors for high-angle grain boundaries that are uniformly wetted, with w diverging logarithmically as the melting point is approached from below, and low-angle boundaries that are punctuated by liquid pools surrounding dislocations, separated by solid bridges. The latter persist over a superheated range of temperature. This qualitative difference between high- and low-angle boundaries is reflected in the w dependence of the disjoining potential that is purely repulsive [ V'(w)<0 for all w ] for misorientations larger than a critical angle θc , but switches from repulsive at small w to attractive at large w for θ<θc . In the latter case, V(w) has a minimum that corresponds to a premelted boundary of finite width at the melting point. Furthermore, we find that the standard wetting condition γgb(θc)=2γsl gives a much too low estimate of θc when a low-temperature value of the grain-boundary energy γgb is used. In contrast, a reasonable lower-bound estimate can be obtained if γgb is extrapolated to the melting point, taking into account both the elastic softening of the material at high homologous temperature and local melting around dislocations.

  11. Seismic link at plate boundary

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... tested using the coherence of time series to determine the causality and related orientation. The resulting link orientations at the plate boundary conditions indicate that causal triggering seems to be localized along a major fault, as a stress transfer between two major faults, and parallel to the geothermal area extension.

  12. Current Sinkhole Boundaries in Iowa

    Data.gov (United States)

    Iowa State University GIS Support and Research Facility — This dataset is a polygon coverage of the sinkhole boundaries as determined by using LiDAR data. The polygons relate to the point coverage using the KPolyID field in...

  13. Humor styles and symbolic boundaries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuipers, G.

    2009-01-01

    Humor is strongly related to group boundaries. Jokes and other humorous utterances often draw on implicit references and inside knowledge; they tend to refer to sensitive topics which may offend people; and they ideally incite laughter, one of the strongest markers of social solidarity and emotional

  14. Boundaries of flat compact surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Røgen, Peter

    1999-01-01

    type. The number of $3$-singular points (points of zero curvature or if not then of zero torsion) on the boundary of a flat immersed compact surface is greater than or equal to twice the absolute value of the Euler characteristic of the surface. A set of necessary and, in a weakened sense, sufficient...

  15. 'Regime shopping' across (blurring) boundaries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Houwerzijl, M.S.; Evju, Stein

    2014-01-01

    This book chapter identifies and explores the (blurring) boundaries between the legal regimes for labour mobility across the EU. In the context of - what is sometimes called - 'regime shopping' a close look is taken into the law on freedom of movement within the EU. Several categories of

  16. the Martian atmospheric boundary layer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petrosyan, A.; Galperin, B.; Larsen, Søren Ejling

    2011-01-01

    The planetary boundary layer (PBL) represents the part of the atmosphere that is strongly influenced by the presence of the underlying surface and mediates the key interactions between the atmosphere and the surface. On Mars, this represents the lowest 10 km of the atmosphere during the daytime...

  17. BRIDGES ACROSS AFRICA'S INTERNATIONAL BOUNDARIES ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The empirical data for this paper is drawn from the ethnic minorities divided along and astride the Cross River borderlands with southern Cameroon. Scholars who have studied the Nigeria Cameroon Boundary tend to lay more emphasis on the state centric perspective that continues to operate largely within the framework ...

  18. Editorial: Environmentalists without Boundaries | Ogunseitan ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    African Journal of Environmental Science and Technology. Journal Home · ABOUT · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 3, No 3 (2009) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register. Editorial: Environmentalists without Boundaries.

  19. The analysis of bainitic ferrite microstructure in microalloyed plate steels through quantitative characterization of intervariant boundaries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Singon, E-mail: sikang@mines.edu [Advanced Steel Processing and Products Research Center, Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO 80401 (United States); Speer, John G.; Regier, Ryan W. [Advanced Steel Processing and Products Research Center, Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO 80401 (United States); Nako, Hidenori [Advanced Steel Processing and Products Research Center, Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO 80401 (United States); Materials Research Laboratory, Kobe Steel Ltd., Kobe, Hyogo 651-2271 (Japan); Kennett, Shane C. [Advanced Steel Processing and Products Research Center, Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO 80401 (United States); Exponent Failure Analysis Associates, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Findley, Kip O. [Advanced Steel Processing and Products Research Center, Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO 80401 (United States)

    2016-07-04

    Electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) measurements were performed to investigate the bainitic ferrite microstructure in low-carbon, microalloyed steels with varying C and Mn contents. Fully austenitized samples were isothermally heat treated at temperatures ranging from 450 to 550 °C to form bainitic ferrite. The bainitic ferrite microstructures and boundary characteristics obtained from the EBSD measurements were analyzed based on an inferred Kurdjumov-Sachs (K-S) orientation relationship. The heat treated samples exhibit a microstructure composed of laths and the lath aspect ratio tends to increase at lower isothermal heat treatment temperatures. High fractions of boundary misorientation angles below 5° are observed, which are due to lath boundaries in the microstructure. Additionally, misorientations of approximately 7°, 53° and 60° are observed, which are related to the sub-block, packet, and block boundaries, respectively. With decreasing isothermal heat treatment temperature, there is an increase of block boundaries; these boundaries are intervariant boundaries between different blocks within a packet, most of which have the misorientation angle of 60°. The specimens with a higher carbon level contained increased length of block boundaries, whereas the addition of Mn moderated the dependence of block boundary length on the heat treatment temperature within the experimental temperature range. Meanwhile, the length of intervariant boundaries of both packet and sub-block character did not vary much with heat treatment temperature and alloy composition.

  20. Stepwise iterative maximum likelihood clustering approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Alok; Shigemizu, Daichi; Boroevich, Keith A; López, Yosvany; Kamatani, Yoichiro; Kubo, Michiaki; Tsunoda, Tatsuhiko

    2016-08-24

    Biological/genetic data is a complex mix of various forms or topologies which makes it quite difficult to analyze. An abundance of such data in this modern era requires the development of sophisticated statistical methods to analyze it in a reasonable amount of time. In many biological/genetic analyses, such as genome-wide association study (GWAS) analysis or multi-omics data analysis, it is required to cluster the plethora of data into sub-categories to understand the subtypes of populations, cancers or any other diseases. Traditionally, the k-means clustering algorithm is a dominant clustering method. This is due to its simplicity and reasonable level of accuracy. Many other clustering methods, including support vector clustering, have been developed in the past, but do not perform well with the biological data, either due to computational reasons or failure to identify clusters. The proposed SIML clustering algorithm has been tested on microarray datasets and SNP datasets. It has been compared with a number of clustering algorithms. On MLL datasets, SIML achieved highest clustering accuracy and rand score on 4/9 cases; similarly on SRBCT dataset, it got for 3/5 cases; on ALL subtype it got highest clustering accuracy for 5/7 cases and highest rand score for 4/7 cases. In addition, SIML overall clustering accuracy on a 3 cluster problem using SNP data were 97.3, 94.7 and 100 %, respectively, for each of the clusters. In this paper, considering the nature of biological data, we proposed a maximum likelihood clustering approach using a stepwise iterative procedure. The advantage of this proposed method is that it not only uses the distance information, but also incorporate variance information for clustering. This method is able to cluster when data appeared in overlapping and complex forms. The experimental results illustrate its performance and usefulness over other clustering methods. A Matlab package of this method (SIML) is provided at the web-link http://www.riken.jp/en/research/labs/ims/med_sci_math/ .

  1. Determination of grain boundary mobility during recrystallization by statistical evaluation of electron backscatter diffraction measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Basu, I., E-mail: basu@imm.rwth-aachen.de; Chen, M.; Loeck, M.; Al-Samman, T.; Molodov, D.A.

    2016-07-15

    One of the key aspects influencing microstructural design pathways in metallic systems is grain boundary motion. The present work introduces a method by means of which direct measurement of grain boundary mobility vs. misorientation dependence is made possible. The technique utilizes datasets acquired by means of serial electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) measurements. The experimental EBSD measurements are collectively analyzed, whereby datasets were used to obtain grain boundary mobility and grain aspect ratio with respect to grain boundary misorientation. The proposed method is further validated using cellular automata (CA) simulations. Single crystal aluminium was cold rolled and scratched in order to nucleate random orientations. Subsequent annealing at 300 °C resulted in grains growing, in the direction normal to the scratch, into a single deformed orientation. Growth selection was observed, wherein the boundaries with misorientations close to Σ7 CSL orientation relationship (38° 〈111〉) migrated considerably faster. The obtained boundary mobility distribution exhibited a non-monotonic behavior with a maximum corresponding to misorientation of 38° ± 2° about 〈111〉 axes ± 4°, which was 10–100 times higher than the mobility values of random high angle boundaries. Correlation with the grain aspect ratio values indicated a strong growth anisotropy displayed by the fast growing grains. The observations have been discussed in terms of the influence of grain boundary character on grain boundary motion during recrystallization. - Highlights: • Statistical microstructure method to measure grain boundary mobility during recrystallization • Method implementation independent of material or crystal structure • Mobility of the Σ7 boundaries in 5N Al was calculated as 4.7 × 10{sup –8} m{sup 4}/J ⋅ s. • Pronounced growth selection in the recrystallizing nuclei in Al • Boundary mobility values during recrystallization 2–3 orders of

  2. Grain Boundary Engineering of Electrodeposited Thin Films

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alimadadi, Hossein

    of the favorable boundaries that break the network of general grain boundaries. Successful dedicated synthesis of a textured nickel film fulfilling the requirements of grain boundary engineered materials, suggests improved boundary specific properties. However, the textured nickel film shows fairly low......Grain boundary engineering aims for a deliberate manipulation of the grain boundary characteristics to improve the properties of polycrystalline materials. Despite the emergence of some successful industrial applications, the mechanism(s) by which the boundary specific properties can be improved...... to engineer new materials. In this study, one of the most widely used electrolytes for electrodeposition is chosen for the synthesis of nickel films and based on thorough characterization of the boundaries the potentials in grain boundary engineering are outlined. The internal structure of the nickel films...

  3. Dynamic Programming and Error Estimates for Stochastic Control Problems with Maximum Cost

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bokanowski, Olivier, E-mail: boka@math.jussieu.fr [Laboratoire Jacques-Louis Lions, Université Paris-Diderot (Paris 7) UFR de Mathématiques - Bât. Sophie Germain (France); Picarelli, Athena, E-mail: athena.picarelli@inria.fr [Projet Commands, INRIA Saclay & ENSTA ParisTech (France); Zidani, Hasnaa, E-mail: hasnaa.zidani@ensta.fr [Unité de Mathématiques appliquées (UMA), ENSTA ParisTech (France)

    2015-02-15

    This work is concerned with stochastic optimal control for a running maximum cost. A direct approach based on dynamic programming techniques is studied leading to the characterization of the value function as the unique viscosity solution of a second order Hamilton–Jacobi–Bellman (HJB) equation with an oblique derivative boundary condition. A general numerical scheme is proposed and a convergence result is provided. Error estimates are obtained for the semi-Lagrangian scheme. These results can apply to the case of lookback options in finance. Moreover, optimal control problems with maximum cost arise in the characterization of the reachable sets for a system of controlled stochastic differential equations. Some numerical simulations on examples of reachable analysis are included to illustrate our approach.

  4. The collapse of turbulence in the atmospheric boundary layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van de Wiel, B J H; Clercx, H J H [Department of Physics, Eindhoven University of Technology (Netherlands); Moene, A F [Department of Meteorology and Air Quality, Wageningen University and Research Centre (Netherlands); Jonker, H J J, E-mail: b.j.h.v.d.wiel@tue.nl [Department of Multi-scale Pysics, Delft University of Technology (Netherlands)

    2011-12-22

    A well-known phenomenon in the atmospheric boundary layer is the fact that winds may become very weak in the evening after a clear sunny day. In these quiet conditions usually hardly any turbulence is present. Consequently this type of boundary layer is referred to as the quasi-laminar boundary layer. In spite of its relevance, the appearance of laminar boundary layers is poorly understood and forms a long standing problem in meteorological research. Here we investigate an analogue problem in the form of a stably stratified channel flow. The flow is studied with a simplified atmospheric model as well as with Direct Numerical Simulations. Both models show remarkably similar behaviour with respect to the mean variables such as temperature and wind speed. The similarity between both models opens new way for understanding and predicting the laminarization process. Mathematical analysis on the simplified model shows that relaminarization can be understood from the existence of a definite limit in the maximum sustainable heat flux under stably stratified conditions. This fascinating aspect will be elaborated in future work.

  5. Recommended Maximum Temperature For Mars Returned Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaty, D. W.; McSween, H. Y.; Czaja, A. D.; Goreva, Y. S.; Hausrath, E.; Herd, C. D. K.; Humayun, M.; McCubbin, F. M.; McLennan, S. M.; Hays, L. E.

    2016-01-01

    The Returned Sample Science Board (RSSB) was established in 2015 by NASA to provide expertise from the planetary sample community to the Mars 2020 Project. The RSSB's first task was to address the effect of heating during acquisition and storage of samples on scientific investigations that could be expected to be conducted if the samples are returned to Earth. Sample heating may cause changes that could ad-versely affect scientific investigations. Previous studies of temperature requirements for returned mar-tian samples fall within a wide range (-73 to 50 degrees Centigrade) and, for mission concepts that have a life detection component, the recommended threshold was less than or equal to -20 degrees Centigrade. The RSSB was asked by the Mars 2020 project to determine whether or not a temperature requirement was needed within the range of 30 to 70 degrees Centigrade. There are eight expected temperature regimes to which the samples could be exposed, from the moment that they are drilled until they are placed into a temperature-controlled environment on Earth. Two of those - heating during sample acquisition (drilling) and heating while cached on the Martian surface - potentially subject samples to the highest temperatures. The RSSB focused on the upper temperature limit that Mars samples should be allowed to reach. We considered 11 scientific investigations where thermal excursions may have an adverse effect on the science outcome. Those are: (T-1) organic geochemistry, (T-2) stable isotope geochemistry, (T-3) prevention of mineral hydration/dehydration and phase transformation, (T-4) retention of water, (T-5) characterization of amorphous materials, (T-6) putative Martian organisms, (T-7) oxidation/reduction reactions, (T-8) (sup 4) He thermochronometry, (T-9) radiometric dating using fission, cosmic-ray or solar-flare tracks, (T-10) analyses of trapped gasses, and (T-11) magnetic studies.

  6. Morphological Instability of Grain Boundaries in Two-Phase Coherent Solids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geslin, Pierre-Antoine; Xu, Yechuan; Karma, Alain

    2015-03-01

    We show both computationally and analytically that grain boundaries that exhibit shear-coupled motion become morphologically unstable in solid alloys that phase separate into coherent domains of distinct chemical compositions. We carry out simulations of continuum models demonstrating that this instability is mediated by long-range elastic interaction between compositional domains and grain boundaries. In addition, we perform a linear stability analysis that predicts the range of unstable wavelengths in good quantitative agreement with simulations. In nonlinear stages, this pattern-forming instability leads to the breakup of low-angle grain boundaries, thereby strongly impacting microstructural evolution in a wide range of phase-separating materials.

  7. Radio pill antenna range test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cummins, W. F.; Kane, R. J.

    1992-05-01

    In order to investigate the potential of a proposed 'radio pill' beacon transmitter, a range test experiment was devised and carried out in the VHF frequency range. Calculations and previous work indicated that optimum sensitivity and, thus, distance would be obtained in this frequency range provided body radio-frequency (RF) absorption was not too great. A ferrite-core loop antenna is compatible with a pill geometry and has better radiation efficiency than an air core loop. The ferrite core may be a hollow cylinder with the electronics and batteries placed inside. However, this range test was only concerned with experimentally developing test range data on the ferrite core antenna itself. A one turn strap loop was placed around a 9.5 mm diameter by 18.3 mm long stack of ferrite cores. This was coupled to a 50 Omega transmission line by 76 mm of twisted pair line and a capacitive matching section. This assembly was excited by a signal generator at output levels of -10 to +10 dBm. Signals were received on a VHF receiver and tape recorder coupled to a 14 element, circularly polarized Yagi antenna at a height of 2.5 m. Field strength measurements taken at ranges of 440, 1100, and 1714 m. Maximum field strengths referenced to 0 dBm transmitter level were -107 to -110 dB at 440 m, -124 to -127 dBm at 1100 m, and -116 to -119 dBm at 1714 m when the antenna cylinder was horizontal. Field strengths with a vertical antenna were about 6 dB below these values. The latter transmit site was elevated and had a clear line-of-site path to the receiving site. The performance of this test antenna was better than that expected from method-of-moment field calculations. When this performance data is scaled to a narrow bandwidth receiving system, ground level receiving ranges of a few to 10 km can be expected. Clear line-of-sight ranges where either or both the transmitter and receiver are elevated could vary from several km to 100 km.

  8. Controlling electromagnetic fields at boundaries of arbitrary geometries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teo, Jonathon Yi Han; Wong, Liang Jie; Molardi, Carlo; Genevet, Patrice

    2016-08-01

    Rapid developments in the emerging field of stretchable and conformable photonics necessitate analytical expressions for boundary conditions at metasurfaces of arbitrary geometries. Here, we introduce the concept of conformal boundary optics: a design theory that determines the optical response for designer input and output fields at such interfaces. Given any object, we can realize coatings to achieve exotic effects like optical illusions and anomalous diffraction behavior. This approach is relevant to a broad range of applications from conventional refractive optics to the design of the next-generation of wearable optical components. This concept can be generalized to other fields of research where designer interfaces with nontrivial geometries are encountered.

  9. Marine boundary layer investigations in the False Bay, supported by optical refraction and scintillation measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong, A.N. de; Eijk, A.M.J. van; Benoist, K.W.; Gunter, W.H.; Vrahimis, G.; October, F.J.

    2011-01-01

    Knowledge on the marine boundary layer is of importance for the prediction of the optical image quality obtained from long range targets. One property of the boundary layer, that can be studied rather easily by means of optical refraction measurements, is the vertical temperature profile. This

  10. Turbulent boundary layer under the control of different schemes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Z. X.; Zhou, Y.; Wu, Z.

    2017-06-01

    This work explores experimentally the control of a turbulent boundary layer over a flat plate based on wall perturbation generated by piezo-ceramic actuators. Different schemes are investigated, including the feed-forward, the feedback, and the combined feed-forward and feedback strategies, with a view to suppressing the near-wall high-speed events and hence reducing skin friction drag. While the strategies may achieve a local maximum drag reduction slightly less than their counterpart of the open-loop control, the corresponding duty cycles are substantially reduced when compared with that of the open-loop control. The results suggest a good potential to cut down the input energy under these control strategies. The fluctuating velocity, spectra, Taylor microscale and mean energy dissipation are measured across the boundary layer with and without control and, based on the measurements, the flow mechanism behind the control is proposed.

  11. Turbulent boundary layer under the control of different schemes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Z X; Zhou, Y; Wu, Z

    2017-06-01

    This work explores experimentally the control of a turbulent boundary layer over a flat plate based on wall perturbation generated by piezo-ceramic actuators. Different schemes are investigated, including the feed-forward, the feedback, and the combined feed-forward and feedback strategies, with a view to suppressing the near-wall high-speed events and hence reducing skin friction drag. While the strategies may achieve a local maximum drag reduction slightly less than their counterpart of the open-loop control, the corresponding duty cycles are substantially reduced when compared with that of the open-loop control. The results suggest a good potential to cut down the input energy under these control strategies. The fluctuating velocity, spectra, Taylor microscale and mean energy dissipation are measured across the boundary layer with and without control and, based on the measurements, the flow mechanism behind the control is proposed.

  12. Substring Range Reporting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bille, Philip; Gørtz, Inge Li

    2011-01-01

    We revisit various string indexing problems with range reporting features, namely, position-restricted substring searching, indexing substrings with gaps, and indexing substrings with intervals. We obtain the following main results. – We give efficient reductions for each of the above problems...... to a new problem, which we call substring range reporting. Hence, we unify the previous work by showing that we may restrict our attention to a single problem rather than studying each of the above problems individually. – We show how to solve substring range reporting with optimal query time and little...... range reporting are based on a novel combination of suffix trees and range reporting data structures. The reductions are simple and general and may apply to other combinations of string indexing with range reporting....

  13. Compact Antenna Range

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Facility consists of a folded compact antenna range including a computer controlled three axis position table, parabolic reflector and RF sources for the measurement...

  14. Dryden Aeronautical Test Range

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Recently redesignated to honor Dr. Hugh L. Dryden, NASA's Dryden Aeronautical Test Range (DATR) supports aerospace flight research and technology integration, space...

  15. Nitrogen Isotope Profiles Through the Cretaceous-Paleogene Boundary: Comparing Records from the New Jersey Coastal Plain and Demerara Rise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quan, T. M.; Nelson, A. J.

    2011-12-01

    The Cretaceous-Paleogene Boundary (K-Pg) mass extinction (~65 Mya) resulted in the loss of a wide range of terrigenous and marine organisms. Several lines of evidence, including negative δ13C excursions in sedimentary organic and inorganic carbon profiles, indicate that the marine carbon cycle was altered across the K-Pg, but little information is known about the marine nitrogen cycle. There are also indications that post-boundary water column anoxia may have occurred, but the degree and extent of this anoxic period has not yet been determined. Since the sedimentary δ15N record can provide information on bottom water oxygen levels as well as nitrogen cycling, we have chosen to measure nitrogen isotopes across the boundary to learn more about the environmental water column conditions at the K-Pg. On geological time scales, the nitrogen cycle consists of three main processes: nitrogen fixation, nitrification, and denitrification/anammox, all of which are affected by the amount of oxygen present in the water column. The balance between nitrogen fixation and denitrification/anammox controls the pool of fixed inorganic nitrogen, and can be traced using nitrogen isotopes. If the sediment is well-preserved, the nitrogen isotopic profile can be used to assess the relative changes of denitrification/anammox and nitrogen fixation through time at a particular location. Since the sedimentary δ15N signal is also related to the deep water oxygen concentration via a simple non-linear curve, the δ15N profile can also be used to evaluate the past redox environment at a site. We have measured bulk sediment δ15N profiles from two cores: a borehole core from Bass River on the New Jersey coast (ODP 174AX) and a deep sea core from the Demerara Rise in the Western Tropical Atlantic (ODP 207). Although the two cores differ in proximity to the Chicxulub impact site as well as water depth, both δ15N records become relatively more enriched starting at the K-Pg boundary and progressing

  16. The Middle Carboniferous Boundary in the North of Pay-Khoy – Correlation between the Shallow- and Deep-Water Sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.V. Zhuravlev

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper considers the Lower-Middle Carboniferous boundary interval in the sections of the Pay-Khoy carbonate parautochthone (shallow-water facies and the Kara slate allochthone (deep-water facies with respect to the boundary tracing criteria. The boundary interval has been studied in the sections of the North-Eastern Pay-Khoy (Peschanaya River, Khardto Lake, Barents Sea shore near the Chaika Cape, and Lymbad”yakha River. The boundary recognition has been based on data for the conodonts and foraminifers. The boundary is not directly characterized by fauna in either deep- or shallow-water facies. The boundary interval has been recognized by the latest findings of the Early Carboniferous foraminifers and conodonts (Parastaffella cf. angulata, Gnathodus bollandensis, as well as the first findings of Declinognathodus noduliferus in the upper part of the Bolvanskiy Formation of the carbonate parautochthone. The transgression maximum has been detected in the boundary interval. In the sections of the slate allochthone, the boundary may coincide with the base of the Karasilova Formation. The lower part of the formation is characterized by condensed sequence (transgression maximum, and the first findings of the Middle Carboniferous conodonts (Rhachistognathus minutus correspond to the upper part of the Syuransk Substage. The transgression maximum is considered as the reliable boundary marker. The traces of the transgression maximum have been detected in the upper part of the Bolvanskiy Formation and in the base of the Karasilova Formation.

  17. Losing reduces maximum bite performance in house cricket contests

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Condon, Catriona; Lailvaux, Simon P; Patek, Sheila

    2016-01-01

    ... of any change in underlying maximum performance capacity. To test the effect of fight experience on performance, we measured the maximum bite force of male Acheta domesticus crickets that were pitted against size...

  18. Free boundary ballooning mode representation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, L. J.

    2012-10-01

    A new type of ballooning mode invariance is found in this paper. Application of this invariance is shown to be able to reduce the two-dimensional problem of free boundary high n modes, such as the peeling-ballooning modes, to a one-dimensional problem. Here, n is toroidal mode number. In contrast to the conventional ballooning representation, which requires the translational invariance of the Fourier components of the perturbations, the new invariance reflects that the independent solutions of the high n mode equations are translationally invariant from one radial interval surrounding a single singular surface to the other intervals. The conventional ballooning mode invariance breaks down at the vicinity of plasma edge, since the Fourier components with rational surfaces in vacuum region are completely different from those with rational surfaces in plasma region. But, the new type of invariance remains valid. This overcomes the limitation of the conventional ballooning mode representation for studying free boundary modes.

  19. Social Entrepreneurship: Definition and Boundaries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samer Abu-Saifan

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available While individuals may be publicly recognized as social entrepreneurs for their contributions to improve the welfare of communities, the field of social entrepreneurship continues to struggle to gain academic legitimacy. Social entrepreneurship is a term in search of a good definition. The current use of the term seems vague and limitless; it needs boundaries to demarcate its function. The lack of a common definition hinders research and raises questions about which social or profit-making activities fall within the spectrum of social entrepreneurship. To become an important stream in the entrepreneurship literature, social entrepreneurship needs to be properly defined and it requires a theoretical framework that links it to the theory of entrepreneurship. This article builds on the literature to define social entrepreneurship, discusses the boundaries of socially-oriented entrepreneurial activities, and positions the social entrepreneur in the spectrum of entrepreneurship.

  20. Helmholtz bright and boundary solitons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christian, J M [Joule Physics Laboratory, School of Computing, Science and Engineering, Institute for Materials Research, University of Salford, Salford M5 4WT (United Kingdom); McDonald, G S [Joule Physics Laboratory, School of Computing, Science and Engineering, Institute for Materials Research, University of Salford, Salford M5 4WT (United Kingdom); Chamorro-Posada, P [Departmento de TeorIa de la Senal y Comunicaciones e IngenierIa Telematica, Universidad de Valladolid, ETSI Telecomunicacion, Campus Miguel Delibes s/n, 47011 Valladolid (Spain)

    2007-02-16

    We report, for the first time, exact analytical boundary solitons of a generalized cubic-quintic nonlinear Helmholtz (NLH) equation. These solutions have a linked-plateau topology that is distinct from conventional dark soliton solutions; their amplitude and intensity distributions are spatially delocalized and connect regions of finite and zero wave-field disturbances (suggesting also the classification as 'edge solitons'). Extensive numerical simulations compare the stability properties of recently derived Helmholtz bright solitons, for this type of polynomial nonlinearity, to those of the new boundary solitons. The latter are found to possess a remarkable stability characteristic, exhibiting robustness against perturbations that would otherwise lead to the destabilizing of their bright-soliton counterparts.

  1. Defining Our National Cyberspace Boundaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-17

    took place within our national cyberspace boundaries. 14. ABSTRACT Cyber Borders, Cyberspace National Policy, Convention On The Law Of Cyberspace... The Law Of Cyberspace, Cyberspace Law, Cyberspace Theory CLASSIFICATION: Unclassified In February 2009, the Obama Administration...Justinian” to the more recent United Nations “Convention on the Law of the Sea” approved in 1982 by 150 12 countries.22 Risk is an area that is not as

  2. Equilibrium composition of interphase boundaries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wynblatt, P.

    1990-01-01

    Two modeling approaches have been used to investigate segregation effects at interphase boundaries. The first approach is based on the nearest neighbor bond model, used in conjunction with the regular solution approximation, and is an extension of an earlier framework developed to address segregation phenomena at free surfaces. In order to model a semicoherent interphase boundary, we have employed a second modeling approach, based on Monte Carol simulation, in conjunction with the embedded atom method (EAM). The EAM is a powerful new method for describing interatomic interactions in metallic systems. It includes certain many-body interactions that depend on the local environment of an atom. The Monte Carol approach has been applied to semicoherent interphase boundaries in Cu-Ag-Au alloys dilute in Au. These alloys consist of coexisting Cu-rich and Ag-rich phases, which differ in lattice constant by about 12%, such that good matching across in interface occurs when nine structural units of the Cu-rich phase are opposed to eight structural units of the Ag-rich phase. Thus far, interfaces with two different orientations have been studied: {l brace}001{r brace}-Cu//{l brace}001{r brace}-Ag, {l angle}110{r angle}-Cu//{l angle}110{r angle}-Ag; and {l brace}111{r brace}-Cu//{l brace}111{r brace}-Ag, {l angle}110{r angle}-Cu//{l angle}110{r angle}-Ag. These two interfaces will be referred to as the (001) and (111) interphase boundaries, for short. 18 refs.

  3. Bridging boundaries: CORBA in perspective.

    OpenAIRE

    Cahill, Vinny; Baker, Sean; Nixon, Paddy

    1997-01-01

    peer-reviewed peer-reviewed applications that cross the boundaries of different computing machines, operating systems, and programming languages are increasingly the norm. As a result, the need for what might be called ???bridging technologies??? to develop software that works across heterogeneous environments has become more compelling. The Common Object Request Broker Architecture is one such technology that is both robust and commercially available. CORBA essentially describes...

  4. Bridging boundaries: CORBA in perspective.

    OpenAIRE

    Cahill, Vinny

    1997-01-01

    PUBLISHED pplications that cross the boundaries of different computing machines, operating systems, and programming languages are increasingly the norm. As a result, the need for what might be called ?bridging technologies? to develop software that works across heterogeneous environments has become more compelling. The Common Object Request Broker Architecture is one such technology that is both robust and commercially available. CORBA essentially describes how client app...

  5. Working across Boundaries in Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Christian; Yoshinaka, Yutaka

    The paper addresses how insights from the social shaping tradition and political process theory may contribute to an understanding of design as staging of sociotechnical relations and processes cutting across boundaries of diverse organisational, political and knowledge domains. This idea is purs...... organisational practices. One implication of this approach includes an attention towards what (and how) ar-eas may be rendered open to negotiation and transformation in technological design, implementation, and change processes....

  6. Teacher professional boundaries: online & offline

    OpenAIRE

    Morris, Zoe Anna

    2017-01-01

    The 21st century has emerged as an era of accountability and standardisation for the teaching profession (Mikulec & Miller, 2012). The current research is comprised of 4 interrelated empirical studies which measure and explore individual differences in perceptions of teacher-student boundaries in the secondary school context from an ethical perspective. This research is timely given it has been 8 years since the Teacher Code of Conduct was introduced in Victoria (The Institute, 2008). While t...

  7. A quenched study of the Schroedinger functional with chirally rotated boundary conditions. Non-preturbative tuning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez, J. Gonzalez [Humboldt-Universitaet, Berlin (Germany). Inst. fuer Physik; Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany); Jansen, K. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany); Renner, D.B. [Jefferson Lab, Newport News, VA (United States); Shindler, A. [Humboldt-Universitaet, Berlin (Germany). Inst. fuer Physik

    2012-08-23

    The use of chirally rotated boundary conditions provides a formulation of the Schroedinger functional that is compatible with automatic O(a) improvement of Wilson fermions up to O(a) boundary contributions. The elimination of bulk O(a) effects requires the non-perturbative tuning of the critical mass and one additional boundary counterterm. We present the results of such a tuning in a quenched setup for several values of the renormalized gauge coupling, from perturbative to nonperturbative regimes, and for a range of lattice spacings. We also check that the correct boundary conditions and symmetries are restored in the continuum limit. (orig.)

  8. Boundary layer thickness effect on boattail drag. [wind tunnel tests for drag reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaha, B. J.; Chamberlin, R.; Bober, L. J.

    1976-01-01

    A combined experimental and analytical program has been conducted at the NASA Lewis Research Center, to investigate the effects of boundary layer changes on the flow over high angle boattail nozzles. The tests were run on an isolated axisymmetric sting mounted model. Various boattail geometries were investigated at high subsonic speeds over a range of boundary layer thicknesses. In general, boundary layer effects were small at speeds up to Mach 0.8. However, at higher speeds significant regions of separated flow were present on the boattail. When separation was present large reductions in boattail drag resulted with increasing boundary layer thickness. The analysis predicts both of these trends.

  9. Western boundary upwelling dynamics off Oman

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vic, Clément; Capet, Xavier; Roullet, Guillaume; Carton, Xavier

    2017-05-01

    Despite its climatic and ecosystemic significance, the coastal upwelling that takes place off Oman is not well understood. A primitive-equation, regional model forced by climatological wind stress is used to investigate its dynamics and to compare it with the better-known Eastern Boundary Upwellings (EBUs). The solution compares favorably with existing observations, simulating well the seasonal cycles of thermal structure, surface circulation (mean and turbulent), and sea-surface temperature (SST). There is a 1.5-month lag between the maximum of the upwelling-favorable wind-stress-curl forcing and the oceanic response (minima in sea-surface height and SST), which we attribute to onshore-propagating Rossby waves. A southwestward-flowing undercurrent (opposite to the direction of the near-surface flow) is also simulated with a core depth of 1000 m, much deeper than found in EBUs (150-200 m). An EKE budget reveals that, in contrast to EBUs, the upwelling jet is more prone to barotropic than baroclinic instability and the contribution of locally-generated instabilities to EKE is higher by an order of magnitude. Advection and redistribution of EKE by standing mesoscale features also play a significant role in EKE budget.

  10. Borders, boundaries and desirable wishes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Pinciaroli

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available “Borders, boundaries and desirable wishes” is the title of the residential workshop offered to a group of young adults (aged 18-25 of the Centro di Salute Mentale (Mental Health Center of the DSM Basaglia of ASL TO2 in Turin. The idea of the workshop, the definition of the objectives and the topics, which are clearly expressed in the title, come from the work of the team dedicated to group psychotherapies, which has been offering group psychodrama sessions to young adults of this age since 2008. In the delicate move to the adult age, these young adults are lost and stuck in static realities where it is not possible to open up to the dimension of desire nor to the transforming encounter with the Other, since they didn’t have the experience of boundaries and lack. These two elements are necessary to acquire the ability to make projects for oneself. During the workshop the following instruments were used: group, psychodrama and art therapy. The group, as a paternal function, ensured the presence of safe boundaries enabling individuals to experiment; psychodrama and art therapy enabled the bodies to experience encounters and transformations, using doing as a metaphor for the movement against the inhibition of doing and as a way to show oneself to the Other and be able to see the Other. 

  11. Boundary detection via dynamic programming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udupa, Jayaram K.; Samarasekera, Supun; Barrett, William A.

    1992-09-01

    This paper reports a new method for detecting optimal boundaries in multidimensional scene data via dynamic programming (DP). In its current form the algorithm detects 2-D contours on slices and differs from other reported DP-based algorithms in an essential way in that it allows freedom in 2-D for finding optimal contour paths (as opposed to a single degree of freedom in the published methods). The method is being successfully used in segmenting object boundaries in a variety of medical applications including orbital volume from CT images (for craniofacial surgical planning), segmenting bone in MR images for kinematic analysis of the joints of the foot, segmenting the surface of the brain from the inner surface of the cranial vault, segmenting pituitary gland tumor for following the effect of a drug on the tumor, segmenting the boundaries of the heart in MR images, and segmenting the olfactory bulb for verifying hypotheses related to the size of this bulb in certain disease states.

  12. Morality and boundaries in Paul

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bert Jan Lietaert Peerbolte

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In the Pauline communities, ethics, ethos and identity were closely intertwined. This essay analyses the way in which Paul emphasised the mental boundaries of the Christ communities to turn them into moral boundaries. In this process, the fencing off of these communities over against their past and their present was a fundamental feature of Paul’s reasoning. The communities thus became fenced off from their past, because the Christ event was seen as causing a major change in history. This change affected both Gentile and Jewish believers. At the same time, Paul stressed the boundaries with the outside world: he characterised the inside world as the loyal remnant of Israel, consisting of Jews and Gentiles alike, and pointed out that this group is the group of the elect ‘saints’. The perspective with which Paul looked at ethics and morality inside this group was strongly coloured by the assumed identity of this group as ‘Israel’. Even though the Mosaic Law was no longer the focal point for the identity of this eschatological Israel, the ethical demands Paul mentioned over against the members of this new Israel were highly influenced by the morality of the law. For Paul, sanctification was a fundamental ideal, and this ideal reflected the spirituality of the Holiness Code of Leviticus. This particular ethical model was framed by the awareness that Paul (and Christ before him was ‘sent’ by God, much in the same way the prophets of Israel themselves had been sent.

  13. Maximum speeds and alpha angles of flowing avalanches

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClung, David; Gauer, Peter

    2016-04-01

    um/√H0--; um/√S0- are greater than 2.0 and 1.3 respectively. In addition, to: um/√H0--; um/√S0--, we collected 105 companion values of the αangle for runout positions defined by tanα = H0/X0where X0is horizontal reach calculated from start position to stop position of the tip of the avalanches. The αangle is a very simple measure of runout introduced by Scheidegger (1973) for rock avalanches. McClung and Mears (1991) collected αangles from more than 500 paths with maximum runout estimated for return periods on the order of 100 years and the range of values was: 18o - 42owhich is close to that here: (20o - 45o). The results showed that runout increases(α decreases) with maximum speed but there is considerable scatter in the relationship. The Spearman rank correlation is -0.54 (p < 0.005).Rank correlations of α vs. um/√S0-;um/√H0- are - 0.44;.- 0.56 (both with p < 0.005

  14. 5 CFR 550.106 - Annual maximum earnings limitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Annual maximum earnings limitation. 550.106 Section 550.106 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS PAY ADMINISTRATION (GENERAL) Premium Pay Maximum Earnings Limitations § 550.106 Annual maximum...

  15. 5 CFR 550.105 - Biweekly maximum earnings limitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Biweekly maximum earnings limitation. 550.105 Section 550.105 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS PAY ADMINISTRATION (GENERAL) Premium Pay Maximum Earnings Limitations § 550.105 Biweekly maximum...

  16. 20 CFR 617.14 - Maximum amount of TRA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Maximum amount of TRA. 617.14 Section 617.14... FOR WORKERS UNDER THE TRADE ACT OF 1974 Trade Readjustment Allowances (TRA) § 617.14 Maximum amount of TRA. (a) General rule. Except as provided under paragraph (b) of this section, the maximum amount of...

  17. 16 CFR 1505.7 - Maximum acceptable surface temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Maximum acceptable surface temperatures... ARTICLES INTENDED FOR USE BY CHILDREN Regulations § 1505.7 Maximum acceptable surface temperatures. The maximum acceptable surface temperatures for electrically operated toys shall be as follows: Surface type...

  18. 7 CFR 3565.210 - Maximum interest rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Maximum interest rate. 3565.210 Section 3565.210... AGRICULTURE GUARANTEED RURAL RENTAL HOUSING PROGRAM Loan Requirements § 3565.210 Maximum interest rate. The interest rate for a guaranteed loan must not exceed the maximum allowable rate specified by the Agency in...

  19. On Range of Skill

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Thomas Dueholm; Miltersen, Peter Bro; Sørensen, Troels Bjerre

    2008-01-01

    size (and doubly exponential in its depth). We also provide techniques that yield concrete bounds for unbalanced game trees and apply these to estimate the Range of Skill of Tic-Tac-Toe and Heads-Up Limit Texas Hold'em Poker. In particular, we show that the Range of Skill of Tic-Tac-Toe is more than...

  20. Range Scheduling Aid (RSA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logan, J. R.; Pulvermacher, M. K.

    1991-01-01

    Range Scheduling Aid (RSA) is presented in the form of the viewgraphs. The following subject areas are covered: satellite control network; current and new approaches to range scheduling; MITRE tasking; RSA features; RSA display; constraint based analytic capability; RSA architecture; and RSA benefits.

  1. The Moho as a magnetic boundary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasilewski, P. J.; Thomas, H. H.; Mayhew, M. A.

    1979-01-01

    Magnetic data are presented for mantle derived rocks: peridtites from St. Pauls rocks, dunite xenoliths from the kaupulehu flow in Hawaii, as well as peridolite, dunite and eclogite xenoliths from Roberts Victor, Dutoitspan, Kilbourne Hole, and San Carlos diatremes. The rocks are paramagnetic or very weakly ferromagnetic at room temperature. Saturation magnetization values range from 0.013 emu/gm to less than 0.001 emu/gm. A review of pertinent literature dealing with analysis of the minerals in mantle xenoliths provides evidence that metals and primary Fe3O4 are absent, and that complex CR, Mg, Al, and Fe spinels dominate the oxide mineralogy. All of the available evidence supports the magnetic results, indicating that the seismic MOHO is a magnetic boundary.

  2. Stability and boundary stabilization of 1-D hyperbolic systems

    CERN Document Server

    Bastin, Georges

    2016-01-01

    This monograph explores the modeling of conservation and balance laws of one-dimensional hyperbolic systems using partial differential equations. It presents typical examples of hyperbolic systems for a wide range of physical engineering applications, allowing readers to understand the concepts in whichever setting is most familiar to them. With these examples, it also illustrates how control boundary conditions may be defined for the most commonly used control devices. The authors begin with the simple case of systems of two linear conservation laws and then consider the stability of systems under more general boundary conditions that may be differential, nonlinear, or switching. They then extend their discussion to the case of nonlinear conservation laws and demonstrate the use of Lyapunov functions in this type of analysis. Systems of balance laws are considered next, starting with the linear variety before they move on to more general cases of nonlinear ones. They go on to show how the problem of boundary...

  3. Boundary layer effects on particle impaction and capture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosner, D. E.; Fernandez De La Mora, J.

    1984-01-01

    The inertial impaction and deposition of small particles on larger bodies with viscous boundary layers are considered theoretically, in a detailed comment on a paper by Menguturk et al. (1983). Topics addressed include cushion effects, the dimensionless groups corresponding to the diameter range (3-6 microns) examined by Menguturk et al. in a numerical example, analogous effects of particle-gas energy and mass exchange in boundary layers, and the combined effects of particle inertia and diffusion. It is argued that the inertial effects can be characterized in terms of a body, boundary-layer, or sublayer Stokes number. In a reply by Menguturk et al., the focus is on the application of the theoretical model to the erosion of blade surfaces in large gas turbines; the Stokes number is found to be of limited practical value in these cases, because the particle motion is not primarily normal to the blade surfaces.

  4. Numerical simulation of tsunami-scale wave boundary layers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Williams, Isaac A.; Fuhrman, David R.

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a numerical study of the boundary layer flow and properties induced by tsunami-scalewaves. For this purpose, an existing one-dimensional vertical (1DV) boundary layer model, based on the horizontal component of the incompressible Reynolds-averaged Navier–Stokes (RANS) equations...... demonstrating the ability to reproduce accurate velocity profiles, turbulence, and bed shear stresses on both smooth and rough beds.The validated model is then employed for the study of transient wave boundary layers at full tsunami scales,covering a wide and realistic geophysical range in terms of the flow...... duration, bottom roughness, and associated Reynolds numbers. For this purpose, three different “synthetic” (idealised) tsunami wave descriptions are considered i.e., invoking: (1) single wave (solitary-like, but with independent period and wave height),(2) sinusoidal, and (3) N-wave descriptions. The flow...

  5. Simultaneous maximum a posteriori longitudinal PET image reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Sam; Reader, Andrew J.

    2017-09-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is frequently used to monitor functional changes that occur over extended time scales, for example in longitudinal oncology PET protocols that include routine clinical follow-up scans to assess the efficacy of a course of treatment. In these contexts PET datasets are currently reconstructed into images using single-dataset reconstruction methods. Inspired by recently proposed joint PET-MR reconstruction methods, we propose to reconstruct longitudinal datasets simultaneously by using a joint penalty term in order to exploit the high degree of similarity between longitudinal images. We achieved this by penalising voxel-wise differences between pairs of longitudinal PET images in a one-step-late maximum a posteriori (MAP) fashion, resulting in the MAP simultaneous longitudinal reconstruction (SLR) method. The proposed method reduced reconstruction errors and visually improved images relative to standard maximum likelihood expectation-maximisation (ML-EM) in simulated 2D longitudinal brain tumour scans. In reconstructions of split real 3D data with inserted simulated tumours, noise across images reconstructed with MAP-SLR was reduced to levels equivalent to doubling the number of detected counts when using ML-EM. Furthermore, quantification of tumour activities was largely preserved over a variety of longitudinal tumour changes, including changes in size and activity, with larger changes inducing larger biases relative to standard ML-EM reconstructions. Similar improvements were observed for a range of counts levels, demonstrating the robustness of the method when used with a single penalty strength. The results suggest that longitudinal regularisation is a simple but effective method of improving reconstructed PET images without using resolution degrading priors.

  6. Sage-grouse Conservation Assessment Boundary

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Boundary of the conservation assessment of Greater Sage-grouse and sagebrush habitat conducted by the Western Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies. The boundary...

  7. Boundary of the State of Iowa

    Data.gov (United States)

    Iowa State University GIS Support and Research Facility — This coverage contains polygons representing the Iowa Boundary, it was derived from a coverage of county boundaries, called COUNTIES, of the state of Iowa. COUNTIES...

  8. Cal State Park Boundaries 2011/2012

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — This is a GIS version of California State Park (CSP) operational boundaries and does not represent official property boundary determinations. This GIS version is...

  9. Practical boundary surveying legal and technical principles

    CERN Document Server

    Gay, Paul

    2015-01-01

    This guide to boundary surveying provides landowners, land surveyors, students and others with the necessary foundation to understand boundary surveying techniques and the common legal issues that govern boundary establishment.  Boundary surveying is sometimes mistakenly considered a strictly technical discipline with simple and straightforward technical solutions.  In reality, boundary establishment is often a difficult and complex matter, requiring years of experience and a thorough understanding of boundary law.  This book helps readers to understand the challenges often encountered by boundary surveyors and some of the available solutions. Using only simple and logically explained mathematics, the principles and practice of boundary surveying are demystified for those without prior experience, and the focused coverage of pivotal issues such as easements and setting lot corners will aid even licensed practitioners in untangling thorny cases. Practical advice on using both basic and advanced instruments ...

  10. On filter boundary conditions in topology optimization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Anders; Andreassen, Erik

    2017-01-01

    Most research papers on topology optimization involve filters for regularization. Typically, boundary effects from the filters are ignored. Despite significant drawbacks the inappropriate homogeneous Neumann boundary conditions are used, probably because they are trivial to implement. In this paper...

  11. Model analysis of soil dust impacts on the boundary layer meteorology and air quality over East Asia in April 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lei; Zhang, Meigen; Zhu, Jia; Skorokhod, Andrei

    2017-05-01

    An online coupled meteorology-chemistry-aerosol model (WRF-Chem) is used to quantify the impact of soil dust on radiative forcing, boundary layer meteorology and air quality over East Asia. The simulation is conducted from 14 to 17 April 2015, when an intense dust storm originated in the Gobi Desert and moved through North China. An integrated comparison analysis using surface observations, satellite, and lidar measurements demonstrates the excellent performance of the WRF-Chem model for meteorological parameters, pollutant concentrations, aerosol optical characteristics, and the spatiotemporal evolution of the dust storm. The maximum aerosol optical depth induced by dust aerosols is simulated to exceed 3.0 over the dust source areas and 1.5 over the downwind regions. Dust has a cooling effect (- 1.19 W m- 2) at the surface, a warming effect (+ 0.90 W m- 2) in the atmosphere and a relatively small forcing (- 0.29 W m- 2) at the top of the atmosphere averaged over East Asia from 14 to 17 April 2015. Due to the impact of dust aerosols, the near-surface air temperature is decreased by 0.01 °C and 0.06 °C in the daytime and increased by 0.13 °C and 0.14 °C at night averaged over the dust sources and the North China Plain (NCP), respectively. The changes in relative humidity are in the range of - 0.38% to + 0.04% for dust sources and - 0.40% to + 0.27% for NCP. The maximum decrease in wind speed of 0.1 m s- 1 is found over NCP. The planetary boundary layer height during the daytime exhibits maximum decreases of 16.34 m and 41.70 m over dust sources and NCP, respectively. The pollutant concentrations are significantly influenced by dust-related heterogeneous chemical reactions, with a maximum decrease of 1.66 ppbV for SO2, 7.15 ppbV for NOy, 35.04 μg m- 3 for NO3-, and a maximum increase of 9.47 μg m- 3 for SO42 - over the downwind areas.

  12. Plasma boundaries at Mars: a 3-D simulation study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Bößwetter

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available The interaction of the solar wind with the ionosphere of planet Mars is studied using a three-dimensional hybrid model. Mars has only a weak intrinsic magnetic field, and consequently its ionosphere is directly affected by the solar wind. The gyroradii of the solar wind protons are in the range of several hundred kilometers and therefore comparable with the characteristic scales of the interaction region. Different boundaries emerge from the interaction of the solar wind with the continuously produced ionospheric heavy-ion plasma, which could be identified as a bow shock (BS, ion composition boundary (ICB and magnetic pile up boundary (MPB, where the latter both turn out to coincide. The simulation results regarding the shape and position of these boundaries are in good agreement with the measurements made by Phobos-2 and MGS spacecraft. It is shown that the positions of these boundaries depend essentially on the ionospheric production rate, the solar wind ram pressure, and the often unconsidered electron temperature of the ionospheric heavy ion plasma. Other consequences are rays of planetary plasma in the tail and heavy ion plasma clouds, which are stripped off from the dayside ICB region by some instability.

    Key words. Magnetospheric physics (solar wind interactions with unmagnetized bodies – Space plasma physics (discontinuities; numerical simulation studies

  13. Plasma boundaries at Mars: a 3-D simulation study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Bößwetter

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available The interaction of the solar wind with the ionosphere of planet Mars is studied using a three-dimensional hybrid model. Mars has only a weak intrinsic magnetic field, and consequently its ionosphere is directly affected by the solar wind. The gyroradii of the solar wind protons are in the range of several hundred kilometers and therefore comparable with the characteristic scales of the interaction region. Different boundaries emerge from the interaction of the solar wind with the continuously produced ionospheric heavy-ion plasma, which could be identified as a bow shock (BS, ion composition boundary (ICB and magnetic pile up boundary (MPB, where the latter both turn out to coincide. The simulation results regarding the shape and position of these boundaries are in good agreement with the measurements made by Phobos-2 and MGS spacecraft. It is shown that the positions of these boundaries depend essentially on the ionospheric production rate, the solar wind ram pressure, and the often unconsidered electron temperature of the ionospheric heavy ion plasma. Other consequences are rays of planetary plasma in the tail and heavy ion plasma clouds, which are stripped off from the dayside ICB region by some instability. Key words. Magnetospheric physics (solar wind interactions with unmagnetized bodies – Space plasma physics (discontinuities; numerical simulation studies

  14. Impact of metric and sample size on determining malaria hotspot boundaries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stresman, G.H.; Giorgi, E.; Baidjoe, A.Y.; Knight, P.; Odongo, W.; Owaga, C.; Shagari, S.; Makori, E.; Stevenson, J.; Drakeley, C.; Cox, J.; Bousema, T.; Diggle, P.J.

    2017-01-01

    The spatial heterogeneity of malaria suggests that interventions may be targeted for maximum impact. It is unclear to what extent different metrics lead to consistent delineation of hotspot boundaries. Using data from a large community-based malaria survey in the western Kenyan highlands, we

  15. Uniqueness in some higher order elliptic boundary value problems in n dimensional domains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.-P. Danet

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available We develop maximum principles for several P functions which are defined on solutions to equations of fourth and sixth order (including a equation which arises in plate theory and bending of cylindrical shells. As a consequence, we obtain uniqueness results for fourth and sixth order boundary value problems in arbitrary n dimensional domains.

  16. Effect of maximum lift to drag ratio on optimal aeroassisted plane change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johannesen, J. R.; Vinh, N. X.; Mease, K. D.

    1985-01-01

    The influence of the maximum lift-to-drag ratio on the turning performance of an Orbital Transfer Vehicle is analyzed. Chapman's variables are used to formulate the equations of motion which are valid for both atmospheric flight and flight in a vacuum in a Newtonian gravitational field. Of the six adjoint variables involved in the variational formulation, four exact integrals and two approximate relations are obtained. This leads to an approximate but explicit control law for the lift and bank control. The control law is tested numerically for a whole range of entry speeds, from parabolic entry to near-circular entry with several values of maximum lift-to-drag ratio. The extensive numerical results, which are very accurate as compared to the exact optimal values, show that the maximum plane change for any speed ratio V(entry)/V(final) is simply proportional to the maximum lift-to-drag ratio, and depends solely on this parameter.

  17. Boundary induced nonlinearities at small Reynolds numbers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sbragaglia, M.; Sugiyama, K.

    2007-01-01

    We investigate the importance of boundary slip at finite Reynolds numbers for mixed boundary conditions. Nonlinear effects are induced by the non-homogeneity of the boundary condition and change the symmetry properties of the flow with an overall mean flow reduction. To explain the observed drag

  18. Boundary controllability of integrodifferential systems in Banach ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    the regularity of optimal boundary controls for parabolic equations with quadratic cost criterion. Recently Han and Park [7] derived a set of sufficient conditions for the boundary controllability of a semilinear system with a nonlocal condition. The purpose of this paper is to study the boundary controllability of nonlinear ...

  19. Boundary crossings and violations in clinical settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aravind, V K; Krishnaram, V D; Thasneem, Z

    2012-01-01

    Principles of beneficence, autonomy, and nonmaleficence, compassion along with fiduciary partnership are the core concepts in the doctor-patient relationship in therapeutic settings. There are varieties of reasons for boundary problems. Physicians ignorance, exploitative character, emotional vulnerability moral weakness and similar factors may pave the way for boundary issues resulting in nonsexual or sexual boundary crossings and violations.

  20. Free-Boundary Resistive Modes in Tokamaks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huysmans, G. T. A.; Goedbloed, J. P.; Kerner, W.

    1993-01-01

    There exist a number of observations of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) activity that can be related to resistive MHD modes localized near the plasma boundary. To study the stability of these modes, a free boundary description of the plasma is essential. The resistive plasma-vacuum boundary conditions

  1. Working with boundaries in systems psychodynamic consulting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henk Struwig

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Orientation: The researcher described the systems psychodynamics of boundary management in organisations. The data showed how effective boundary management leads to good holding environments that, in turn, lead to containing difficult emotions.Research purpose: The purpose of the research was to produce a set of theoretical assumptions about organisational boundaries and boundary management in organisations and, from these, to develop a set of hypotheses as a thinking framework for practising consulting psychologists when they work with boundaries from a systems psychodynamic stance.Motivation for the study: The researcher used the belief that organisational boundaries reflect the essence of organisations. Consulting to boundary managers could facilitate a deep understanding of organisational dynamics.Research design, approach and method: The researcher followed a case study design. He used systems psychodynamic discourse analysis. It led to six working hypotheses.Main findings: The primary task of boundary management is to hold the polarities of integration and differentiation and not allow the system to become fragmented or overly integrated. Boundary management is a primary task and an ongoing activity of entire organisations.Practical/managerial implications: Organisations should work actively at effective boundary management and at balancing integration and differentiation. Leaders should become aware of how effective boundary management leads to good holding environments that, in turn, lead to containing difficult emotions in organisations.Contribution/value-add: The researcher provided a boundary-consulting framework in order to assist consultants to balance the conceptual with the practical when they consult.

  2. Alpine vegetation communities and the alpine-treeline ecotone boundary in New England as biomonitors for climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenneth D. Kimball; Douglas M. Weihrauch

    2000-01-01

    This study mapped and analyzed the alpine-treeline ecotone (ATE) boundary and alpine plant communities on the Presidential Range, New Hampshire and Mount Katahdin, Maine. These are sensitive biomonitoring parameters for plant community responses to climatic change. The ATE boundary spans a considerable elevational range, suggesting that shorter growing seasons with...

  3. Bioessential element-depleted ocean following the euxinic maximum of the end-Permian mass extinction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Satoshi; Yamasaki, Shin-ichi; Ogawa, Yasumasa; Kimura, Kazuhiko; Kaiho, Kunio; Yoshida, Takeyoshi; Tsuchiya, Noriyoshi

    2014-05-01

    We describe variations in trace element compositions that occurred on the deep seafloor of palaeo-superocean Panthalassa during the end-Permian mass extinction based on samples of sedimentary rock from one of the most continuous Permian-Triassic boundary sections of the pelagic deep sea exposed in north-eastern Japan. Our measurements revealed low manganese (Mn) enrichment factor (normalised by the composition of the average upper continental crust) and high cerium anomaly values throughout the section, suggesting that a reducing condition already existed in the depositional environment in the Changhsingian (Late Permian). Other redox-sensitive trace-element (vanadium [V], chromium [Cr], molybdenum [Mo], and uranium [U]) enrichment factors provide a detailed redox history ranging from the upper Permian to the end of the Permian. A single V increase (representing the first reduction state of a two-step V reduction process) detected in uppermost Changhsingian chert beds suggests development into a mildly reducing deep-sea condition less than 1 million years before the end-Permian mass extinction. Subsequently, a more reducing condition, inferred from increases in Cr, V, and Mo, developed in overlying Changhsingian grey siliceous claystone beds. The most reducing sulphidic condition is recognised by the highest peaks of Mo and V (second reduction state) in the uppermost siliceous claystone and overlying lowermost black claystone beds, in accordance with the end-Permian mass extinction event. This significant increase in Mo in the upper Changhsingian led to a high Mo/U ratio, much larger than that of modern sulphidic ocean regions. This trend suggests that sulphidic water conditions developed both at the sediment-water interface and in the water column. Above the end-Permian mass extinction horizon, Mo, V and Cr decrease significantly. On this trend, we provide an interpretation of drawdown of these elements in seawater after the massive element precipitation event

  4. Long range image enhancement

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Duvenhage, B

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available and Vision Computing, Auckland, New Zealand, 23-24 November 2015 Long Range Image Enhancement Bernardt Duvenhage Council for Scientific and Industrial Research South Africa Email: bduvenhage@csir.co.za Abstract Turbulent pockets of air...

  5. Atlantic Test Range (ATR)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — ATR controls fully-instrumented and integrated test ranges that provide full-service support for cradle-to-grave testing. Airspace and surface target areas are used...

  6. Light Detection And Ranging

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — LiDAR (Light Detection and Ranging) discrete-return point cloud data are available in the American Society for Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing (ASPRS) LAS format....

  7. Investigation of Boundary-Layer Control to Improve the Lift and Drag Characteristics of the NACA 652-415 Airfoil Section with Double Slotted and Plain Flaps

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Horton, Elmer

    1950-01-01

    A two-dimensional wind-tunnel investigation has been made of the relative effectiveness of two methods of boundary-layer control in increasing the maximum lift coefficient of an NACA airfoil section...

  8. Evaluating foot kinematics using magnetic resonance imaging: from maximum plantar flexion, inversion, and internal rotation to maximum dorsiflexion, eversion, and external rotation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fassbind, Michael J; Rohr, Eric S; Hu, Yangqiu; Haynor, David R; Siegler, Sorin; Sangeorzan, Bruce J; Ledoux, William R

    2011-10-01

    The foot consists of many small bones with complicated joints that guide and limit motion. A variety of invasive and noninvasive means [mechanical, X-ray stereophotogrammetry, electromagnetic sensors, retro-reflective motion analysis, computer tomography (CT), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)] have been used to quantify foot bone motion. In the current study we used a foot plate with an electromagnetic sensor to determine an individual subject's foot end range of motion (ROM) from maximum plantar flexion, internal rotation, and inversion to maximum plantar flexion, inversion, and internal rotation to maximum dorsiflexion, eversion, and external rotation. We then used a custom built MRI-compatible device to hold each subject's foot during scanning in eight unique positions determined from the end ROM data. The scan data were processed using software that allowed the bones to be segmented with the foot in the neutral position and the bones in the other seven positions to be registered to their base positions with minimal user intervention. Bone to bone motion was quantified using finite helical axes (FHA). FHA for the talocrural, talocalcaneal, and talonavicular joints compared well to published studies, which used a variety of technologies and input motions. This study describes a method for quantifying foot bone motion from maximum plantar flexion, inversion, and internal rotation to maximum dorsiflexion, eversion, and external rotation with relatively little user processing time.

  9. On Range of Skill

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Thomas Dueholm; Miltersen, Peter Bro; Sørensen, Troels Bjerre

    2008-01-01

    is a small number, but only gave heuristic arguments for this. In this paper, we provide the first methods for rigorously estimating the Range of Skill of a given game. We provide some general, asymptotic bounds that imply that the Range of Skill of a perfectly balanced game tree is almost exponential in its......At AAAI'07, Zinkevich, Bowling and Burch introduced the Range of Skill measure of a two-player game and used it as a parameter in the analysis of the running time of an algorithm for finding approximate solutions to such games. They suggested that the Range of Skill of a typical natural game...... size (and doubly exponential in its depth). We also provide techniques that yield concrete bounds for unbalanced game trees and apply these to estimate the Range of Skill of Tic-Tac-Toe and Heads-Up Limit Texas Hold'em Poker. In particular, we show that the Range of Skill of Tic-Tac-Toe is more than...

  10. Wide boundaries of microbial life as due to anabiosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abyzov, S. A.; Mulyukin, A. L.; Mitskevich, I. N.; Ivanov, M. V.

    Gaining more insights to the boundaries in which microbial life can exist came from comprehensive studies of various especially extreme terrestrial environments They differ in their origin age temperature salinity energy flux and many other factors that are of paramount importance for life sustenance Microbiological studies of ancient Antarctic glaciers gave experimentally substantiated information on time and the lowest boundary of temperature in which viable pro- and eukaryotic microbial cells survived Noticeably the total number of viable microorganisms that are present in Antarctic ice horizons with temperature varying from -50 oC to -2 4 oC and the age range from 0 2 to 500 thousands of years The existence of microbial cells in so widely ranging temperature and age is regarded as due to super-long anabiosis Theoretically there is no difference between microorganisms that existed in the anabiotic state for tens of hundreds to millennia of years if they faced to low temperatures Hence wide boundaries of microbial life are associated to the state of anabiosis and this is true not only for deep cold environments such as Antarctic glaciers Indeed sensational findings of viable microorganisms in a variety of terrestrial ancient objects extend our knowledge of life boundaries Revelations of ancient microbial cells especially in those habitats where the number of microorganisms is very low unavoidably concerns the problem of authentication Therefore it is great importance to develop and use the methods that exclude contamination of studied samples by

  11. A simple parameterization for the height of maximum ozone heating rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Feng; Hou, Can; Li, Jiangnan; Liu, Renqiang; Liu, Cuiping

    2017-12-01

    It is well-known that the height of the maximum ozone heating rate is much higher than the height of the maximum ozone concentration in the stratosphere. However, it lacks an analytical expression to explain it. A simple theoretical model has been proposed to calculate the height of maximum ozone heating rate and further understand this phenomenon. Strong absorption of ozone causes the incoming solar flux to be largely attenuated before reaching the location of the maximum ozone concentration. By comparing with the exact radiative transfer calculations, the heights of the maximum ozone heating rate produced by the theoretical model are generally very close to the true values. When the cosine of solar zenith angle μ0 = 1.0 , in US Standard atmosphere, the heights of the maximum ozone heating rate by the theoretical model are 41.4 km in the band 0.204-0.233 μm, 47.9 km in the band 0.233-0.270 μm, 44.5 km in the band 0.270-0.286 μm, 37.1 km in the band 0.286-0.303 μm, and 30.2 km in the band 0.303-0.323 μm, respectively. The location of the maximum ozone heating rate is sensitive to the solar spectral range. In band 1, the heights of the maximum ozone heating rate by the theoretical model are 52.3 km for μ0 = 0.1 , 47.1 km for μ0 = 0.3 , 44.6 km for μ0 = 0.5 , 43.1 km for μ0 = 0.7 , 41.9 km for μ0 = 0.9 , 41.4 km for μ0 = 1.0 in US Standard atmosphere, respectively. This model also illustrates that the location of the maximum ozone heating rate is sensitive to the solar zenith angle.

  12. 33 CFR 183.35 - Maximum weight capacity: Outboard boats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... use one or more outboard motors for propulsion must be a number that does not exceed one-fifth of the... vertical centerline plane and the aft point where the sheer intersects the upper boundary of the transom...

  13. Continuous Cropping Systems Reduce Near-Surface Maximum Compaction in No-Till Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Because of increased concerns over compaction in NT soils, it is important to assess how continuous cropping systems influence risks of soil compaction across a range of soils and NT management systems. We quantified differences in maximum bulk density (BDmax) and critical water content (CWC) by the...

  14. The Community Boundary De-paradoxifyed

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dragsdahl Lauritzen, Ghita; Salomo, Søren

    2012-01-01

    . In order to improve connections and collaborations across interfaces, it is therefore necessary to improve our understanding of the community boundary construct. Existing studies of community boundaries within the user innovation literature predominantly describe boundaries as incentives for user...... participation without a clear distinction of what is part of the community and what is not. This gap is intensified by the emergence of virtual communities, where the notion of boundary is even more distorted. The paper suggests a new construct of virtual community boundaries that sets up the distinction...... between community and its environment differently from existing studies of virtual communities. Instead of taking its starting point in the users, the paper takes an organizational approach and focuses on the function of the community boundary construct. Hereby, the paper shows how community boundaries...

  15. Quantitative Characterization of Boundary Roughness in Metals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sun, Jun

    The boundary migration during recrystallization is by nature a heterogeneous process and local structural variations form on recrystallization boundaries, as revealed from modern techniques such as synchrotron X-rays and advanced electron microscopy. The local structural variations, in the form...... of protrusions and retrusions, can provide a dragging/driving force due to the local boundary curvature and affect the further migration of recrystallization boundaries through the deformed matrix. In order to develop new understandings and models for boundary migration that take the heterogeneous local...... structural aspects into account, a detailed characterization is essential of partly recrystallized microstructures focusing on the local shapes of the boundaries, in particular on whether protrusions and retrusions are formed or not. Quantification of the “amount” of boundary roughness in the form...

  16. Rough-wall turbulent boundary layers with constant skin friction

    KAUST Repository

    Sridhar, A.

    2017-03-28

    A semi-empirical model is presented that describes the development of a fully developed turbulent boundary layer in the presence of surface roughness with length scale ks that varies with streamwise distance x . Interest is centred on flows for which all terms of the von Kármán integral relation, including the ratio of outer velocity to friction velocity U+∞≡U∞/uτ , are streamwise constant. For Rex assumed large, use is made of a simple log-wake model of the local turbulent mean-velocity profile that contains a standard mean-velocity correction for the asymptotic fully rough regime and with assumed constant parameter values. It is then shown that, for a general power-law external velocity variation U∞∼xm , all measures of the boundary-layer thickness must be proportional to x and that the surface sand-grain roughness scale variation must be the linear form ks(x)=αx , where x is the distance from the boundary layer of zero thickness and α is a dimensionless constant. This is shown to give a two-parameter (m,α) family of solutions, for which U+∞ (or equivalently Cf ) and boundary-layer thicknesses can be simply calculated. These correspond to perfectly self-similar boundary-layer growth in the streamwise direction with similarity variable z/(αx) , where z is the wall-normal coordinate. Results from this model over a range of α are discussed for several cases, including the zero-pressure-gradient ( m=0 ) and sink-flow ( m=−1 ) boundary layers. Trends observed in the model are supported by wall-modelled large-eddy simulation of the zero-pressure-gradient case for Rex in the range 108−1010 and for four values of α . Linear streamwise growth of the displacement, momentum and nominal boundary-layer thicknesses is confirmed, while, for each α , the mean-velocity profiles and streamwise turbulent variances are found to collapse reasonably well onto z/(αx) . For given α , calculations of U+∞ obtained from large-eddy simulations are streamwise

  17. Function Substitution in Partial Differential Equations: Nonhomogeneous Boundary Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. V. Oblakova

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper considers a mixed initial-boundary value problem for a parabolic equation with nonhomogeneous boundary conditions. The classical approach to search for analytical solution of such problems in the first phase involves variable substitution, leading to a problem with homogeneous boundary conditions. Reference materials [1] give, as a rule, the simplest types of variable substitutions where new and old unknown functions differ by a term, linear in the spatial variable. The form of this additive term depends on the type of the boundary conditions, but is in no way related to the equation under consideration. Moreover, in the case of the second boundary-value problem, it is necessary to use a quadratic additive, since a linear substitution for this type of conditions may be unavailable. The courseware [2] - [4], usually, ends only with the first boundary-value problem generally formulated.The paper considers a substitution that takes into account, in principle, the form of a linear differential operator. Namely, as an additive term, it is proposed to use the parametrically time-dependent solution of the boundary value problem for an ordinary differential equation obtained from the original partial differential equation by the method of separation of the Fourier variables.The existence of the proposed substitution for boundary conditions of any type is proved by the example of a non-stationary heat-transfer equation with the heat exchange available with the surrounding medium. In this case, the additive term is a linear combination of hyperbolic functions. It is shown that, in addition to the "insensitivity" to the type of boundary conditions, the advantages of a new substitution in comparison with the traditional linear (or quadratic one include a much simpler structure of the solution obtained. Just the described approach allows us to obtain a solution with a clearly distinguished stationary component, in case a stationarity occurs, for

  18. Control Parameters for Boundary-Layer Instabilities in Unsteady Shock Interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LaVar King Isaacson

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This article presents the computation of a set of control parameters for the deterministic prediction of laminar boundary-layer instabilities induced by an imposed unsteady shock interaction. The objective of the study is exploratory in nature by computing a supersonic flight environment for flow over a blunt body and the deterministic prediction of the spectral entropy rates for the boundary layer subjected to an unsteady pressure disturbance. The deterministic values for the spectral entropy rate within the instabilities are determined for each control parameter. Computational results imply that the instabilities are of a span-wise vortex form, that the maximum vertical velocity wave vector components are produced in the region nearest the wall and that extended transient coherent structures are produced in the boundary layer at a vertical location slightly below the mid-point of the boundary layer.

  19. A preliminary investigation of boundary-layer transition along a flat plate with adverse pressure gradient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Von Doenhoff, Albert E

    1938-01-01

    Boundary-layer surveys were made throughout the transition region along a smooth flat plate placed in an airstream of practically zero turbulence and with an adverse pressure gradient. The boundary-layer Reynolds number at the laminar separation point was varied from 1,800 to 2,600. The test data, when considered in the light of certain theoretical deductions, indicated that transition probably began with separation of the laminar boundary layer. The extent of the transition region, defined as the distance from a calculated laminar separation point to the position of the first fully developed turbulent boundary-layer profile, could be expressed as a constant Reynolds number run of approximately 70,000. Some speculations are presented concerning the application of the foregoing concepts, after certain assumptions have been made, to the problem of the connection between transition on the upper surface of an airfoil at high angles of attack and the maximum lift.

  20. Boundary breaking for interdisciplinary learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adi Kidron

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this work is to contribute to the body of knowledge on processesby which students develop interdisciplinary understanding of contents, as well as to suggest technology-enhanced means for supporting them in these processes in the context of higher education. In doing so, we suggest a rethinking of three traditional practices that tend to characterise typical higher education instruction: (1 compartmentalisation of disciplines; (2 traditional pedagogy; and (3 traditional hierarchies based on levels of expertise. Our high-level conjecture was that meaningful dialogue with peers and experts supports both the deepening of ideas in one knowledge domain and the formation of connections between ideas from several domains, both of which are required for the development of interdisciplinary understanding. We developed the Boundary Breaking for Interdisciplinary Learning (BBIL model, which harnesses technology to break boundaries between disciplines, learners and organisational levels of hierarchy. Findings indicate that 36 undergraduate students who participated in an interdisciplinary online course that implemented the BBIL model have significantly improved their interdisciplinary understanding of the course contents. This study illustrates how innovative use of available, free and low-cost technology can produce a ‘positive disruption’ in higher education instruction.

  1. Maximum physical capacity testing in cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knutsen, L.; Quist, M; Midtgaard, J

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Over the past few years there has been a growing interest in the field of physical exercise in rehabilitation of cancer patients, leading to requirements for objective maximum physical capacity measurement (maximum oxygen uptake (VO(2max)) and one-repetition maximum (1RM)) to determine...... dose-response levels in different cancer diagnoses. AIM: To explore the patients' experiences of maximum physical capacity testing while concurrently undergoing chemotherapy and participating in a 6-week, 9 h weekly multidimensional exercise program. DESIGN AND METHOD: Prospective, exploratory study...... in performing maximum physical capacity tests as these motivated them through self-perceived competitiveness and set a standard that served to encourage peak performance. CONCLUSION: The positive attitudes in this sample towards maximum physical capacity open the possibility of introducing physical testing...

  2. Maximum expiration activates the abdominal muscles during side bridge exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishida, Hiroshi; Watanabe, Susumu

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies have indicated that maximum expiration could be a useful way of performing challenging exercises that include coactivation of the deep and superficial abdominal muscles. However, little is known about the effect of maximum expiration on the activity of the abdominal muscles during lumbar stabilizing exercise. The purpose of our study was to quantify changes in the activities of the abdominal muscles during side bridge exercise in combination with maximum expiration. Experimental laboratory study. The activities of the rectus abdominis (RA), external oblique (EO), and internal oblique (IO) muscles were measured using electromyography in 12 healthy men performing 3 tasks: holding the breath after maximum expiration in the prone position, holding the breath after resting expiration during side bridge exercise, and holding the breath after maximum expiration during side bridge exercise. Significant increases in the activities of the abdominal muscles (RA, EO, and IO) occurred with maximum expiration when compared with resting expiration during side bridge exercise (P core training.

  3. Range Selection and Median

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Allan Grønlund; Larsen, Kasper Green

    2011-01-01

    that supports queries in constant time, needs n1+ (1) space. For data structures that uses n logO(1) n space this matches the best known upper bound. Additionally, we present a linear space data structure that supports range selection queries in O(log k= log log n + log log n) time. Finally, we prove that any...

  4. Electric vehicles: Driving range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kempton, Willett

    2016-09-01

    For uptake of electric vehicles to increase, consumers' driving-range needs must be fulfilled. Analysis of the driving patterns of personal vehicles in the US now shows that today's electric vehicles can meet all travel needs on almost 90% of days from a single overnight charge.

  5. Emission of dislocations from grain boundaries by grain boundary dissociation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoagland, Richard G.; Valone, Steven M.

    2015-01-01

    In this article, we examine the conditions that favour the emission of Shockley partial dislocations (SPDs) that standoff from a grain boundary (GB) plane by a few lattice parameters as part of the atomic structure of some GBs. To do so, we consider GBs to be formed by the operation of arrays of intrinsic grain boundary dislocations (GBDs) that create the tilt and twist misorientation, and the lattice mismatch between the two crystal grains adjoining the GB. The conditions to be considered that favour SPDs are the following: (1) Frank's rule, (2) the proper sequential arrangement of partial dislocations to bound an intrinsic stacking fault and (3) the equilibrium stand-off distance (ESD). We apply an isotropic elasticity analysis to compute the ESD, in the absence of an applied stress, for SPDs emerging from asymmetric tilt GBs in two FCC metals, Cu and Al. The ESD is shown to be dependent on the glide plane orientation relative to the GB plane and on the position of the glide planes, relative to the position of the GBDs. An applied stress increases the ESD up to a critical stress that removes the SPDs without limit from the GB. We examine the effect of the stacking fault energy on the ESD and critical stress. The critical stress is effectively linearly dependent on the stacking fault energy. Finally, we present results of atomistic simulations of asymmetric tilt Σ11[1 0 1]{4 1 4}||{2 5 2} GBs in Cu bicrystal models subject to shock loading that behave in a manner similar to the elasticity predictions. The atomistic simulations reveal additional behaviour associated with elastic incompatibility between the two grains in the bicrystal models.

  6. Maximum Relative Entropy of Coherence: An Operational Coherence Measure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bu, Kaifeng; Singh, Uttam; Fei, Shao-Ming; Pati, Arun Kumar; Wu, Junde

    2017-10-01

    The operational characterization of quantum coherence is the cornerstone in the development of the resource theory of coherence. We introduce a new coherence quantifier based on maximum relative entropy. We prove that the maximum relative entropy of coherence is directly related to the maximum overlap with maximally coherent states under a particular class of operations, which provides an operational interpretation of the maximum relative entropy of coherence. Moreover, we show that, for any coherent state, there are examples of subchannel discrimination problems such that this coherent state allows for a higher probability of successfully discriminating subchannels than that of all incoherent states. This advantage of coherent states in subchannel discrimination can be exactly characterized by the maximum relative entropy of coherence. By introducing a suitable smooth maximum relative entropy of coherence, we prove that the smooth maximum relative entropy of coherence provides a lower bound of one-shot coherence cost, and the maximum relative entropy of coherence is equivalent to the relative entropy of coherence in the asymptotic limit. Similar to the maximum relative entropy of coherence, the minimum relative entropy of coherence has also been investigated. We show that the minimum relative entropy of coherence provides an upper bound of one-shot coherence distillation, and in the asymptotic limit the minimum relative entropy of coherence is equivalent to the relative entropy of coherence.

  7. Asymptotic Behavior of the Maximum Entropy Routing in Computer Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milan Tuba

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Maximum entropy method has been successfully used for underdetermined systems. Network design problem, with routing and topology subproblems, is an underdetermined system and a good candidate for maximum entropy method application. Wireless ad-hoc networks with rapidly changing topology and link quality, where the speed of recalculation is of crucial importance, have been recently successfully investigated by maximum entropy method application. In this paper we prove a theorem that establishes asymptotic properties of the maximum entropy routing solution. This result, besides being theoretically interesting, can be used to direct initial approximation for iterative optimization algorithms and to speed up their convergence.

  8. Evidence for renoxification in the tropical marine boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Chris; Evans, Mathew J.; Crilley, Leigh R.; Bloss, William J.; Sherwen, Tomás; Read, Katie A.; Lee, James D.; Carpenter, Lucy J.

    2017-03-01

    We present 2 years of NOx observations from the Cape Verde Atmospheric Observatory located in the tropical Atlantic boundary layer. We find that NOx mixing ratios peak around solar noon (at 20-30 pptV depending on season), which is counter to box model simulations that show a midday minimum due to OH conversion of NO2 to HNO3. Production of NOx via decomposition of organic nitrogen species and the photolysis of HNO3 appear insufficient to provide the observed noontime maximum. A rapid photolysis of nitrate aerosol to produce HONO and NO2, however, is able to simulate the observed diurnal cycle. This would make it the dominant source of NOx at this remote marine boundary layer site, overturning the previous paradigm according to which the transport of organic nitrogen species, such as PAN, is the dominant source. We show that observed mixing ratios (November-December 2015) of HONO at Cape Verde (˜ 3.5 pptV peak at solar noon) are consistent with this route for NOx production. Reactions between the nitrate radical and halogen hydroxides which have been postulated in the literature appear to improve the box model simulation of NOx. This rapid conversion of aerosol phase nitrate to NOx changes our perspective of the NOx cycling chemistry in the tropical marine boundary layer, suggesting a more chemically complex environment than previously thought.

  9. Does the Budyko curve reflect a maximum-power state of hydrological systems? A backward analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westhoff, M.; Zehe, E.; Archambeau, P.; Dewals, B.

    2016-01-01

    Almost all catchments plot within a small envelope around the Budyko curve. This apparent behaviour suggests that organizing principles may play a role in the evolution of catchments. In this paper we applied the thermodynamic principle of maximum power as the organizing principle. In a top-down approach we derived mathematical formulations of the relation between relative wetness and gradients driving run-off and evaporation for a simple one-box model. We did this in an inverse manner such that, when the conductances are optimized with the maximum-power principle, the steady-state behaviour of the model leads exactly to a point on the asymptotes of the Budyko curve. Subsequently, we added dynamics in forcing and actual evaporation, causing the Budyko curve to deviate from the asymptotes. Despite the simplicity of the model, catchment observations compare reasonably well with the Budyko curves subject to observed dynamics in rainfall and actual evaporation. Thus by constraining the model that has been optimized with the maximum-power principle with the asymptotes of the Budyko curve, we were able to derive more realistic values of the aridity and evaporation index without any parameter calibration. Future work should focus on better representing the boundary conditions of real catchments and eventually adding more complexity to the model.

  10. MEGA5: Molecular Evolutionary Genetics Analysis Using Maximum Likelihood, Evolutionary Distance, and Maximum Parsimony Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamura, Koichiro; Peterson, Daniel; Peterson, Nicholas; Stecher, Glen; Nei, Masatoshi; Kumar, Sudhir

    2011-01-01

    Comparative analysis of molecular sequence data is essential for reconstructing the evolutionary histories of species and inferring the nature and extent of selective forces shaping the evolution of genes and species. Here, we announce the release of Molecular Evolutionary Genetics Analysis version 5 (MEGA5), which is a user-friendly software for mining online databases, building sequence alignments and phylogenetic trees, and using methods of evolutionary bioinformatics in basic biology, biomedicine, and evolution. The newest addition in MEGA5 is a collection of maximum likelihood (ML) analyses for inferring evolutionary trees, selecting best-fit substitution models (nucleotide or amino acid), inferring ancestral states and sequences (along with probabilities), and estimating evolutionary rates site-by-site. In computer simulation analyses, ML tree inference algorithms in MEGA5 compared favorably with other software packages in terms of computational efficiency and the accuracy of the estimates of phylogenetic trees, substitution parameters, and rate variation among sites. The MEGA user interface has now been enhanced to be activity driven to make it easier for the use of both beginners and experienced scientists. This version of MEGA is intended for the Windows platform, and it has been configured for effective use on Mac OS X and Linux desktops. It is available free of charge from http://www.megasoftware.net. PMID:21546353

  11. Stable Voice Clusters Identified When Using the Maximum versus Minimum Intensity Curve in the Phonetogram.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camarrone, Flavio; Ivanova, Anna; Decoster, Wivine; de Jong, Felix; van Hulle, Marc M

    2015-01-01

    To examine whether the minimum as well as the maximum voice intensity (i.e. sound pressure level, SPL) curves of a voice range profile (VRP) are required when discovering different voice groups based on a clustering analysis. In this approach, no a priori labeling of voice types is used. VRPs of 194 (84 male and 110 female) professional singers were registered and processed. Cluster analysis was performed with the use of features related to (1) both the maximum and minimum SPL curves and (2) the maximum SPL curve only. Features related to the maximum as well as the minimum SPL curves showed three clusters in both male and female voices. These clusters, or voice groups, are based on voice types with similar VRP features. However, when using features related only to the maximum SPL curve, the clusters became less obvious. Features related to the maximum and minimum SPL curves of a VRP are both needed in order to identify the three voice clusters. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  12. Structural disjoining potential for grain-boundary premelting and grain coalescence from molecular-dynamics simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fensin, Saryu J.; Olmsted, David; Buta, Dorel; Asta, Mark; Karma, Alain; Hoyt, J. J.

    2010-03-01

    We describe a molecular-dynamics framework for the direct calculation of the short-ranged structural forces underlying grain-boundary premelting and grain coalescence in solidification. The method is applied in a comparative study of (i) a Σ9⟨115⟩120° twist and (ii) a Σ9⟨110⟩{411} symmetric tilt boundary in a classical embedded-atom model of elemental Ni. Although both boundaries feature highly disordered structures near the melting point, the nature of the temperature dependence of the width of the disordered regions in these boundaries is qualitatively different. The former boundary displays behavior consistent with a logarithmically diverging premelted layer thickness as the melting temperature is approached from below, while the latter displays behavior featuring a finite grain-boundary width at the melting point. It is demonstrated that both types of behavior can be quantitatively described within a sharp-interface thermodynamic formalism involving a width-dependent interfacial free energy, referred to as the disjoining potential. The disjoining potential for boundary (i) is calculated to display a monotonic exponential dependence on width, while that of boundary (ii) features a weak attractive minimum. The results of this work are discussed in relation to recent simulation and theoretical studies of the thermodynamic forces underlying grain-boundary premelting.

  13. The new boundaries of the "boundaryless" company.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirschhorn, L; Gilmore, T

    1992-01-01

    In an economy founded on innovation and change, one of the premier challenges of management is to design more flexible organizations. For many executives, a single metaphor has come to embody this managerial challenge and to capture the kind of organization they want to create: the "corporation without boundaries." According to Larry Hirschhorn and Thomas Gilmore of the Wharton Center for Applied Research, managers are right to break down the boundaries that make organizations rigid and unresponsive. But they are wrong if they think that doing so eliminates the need for boundaries altogether. Once the traditional boundaries of hierarchy, function, and geography disappear, a new set of boundaries becomes important. These new boundaries are more psychological than organizational. They aren't drawn on a company's organizational chart but in the minds of its managers and employees. And instead of being reflected in a company's structure, they must be "enacted" over and over again in a manager's relationships with bosses, subordinates, and peers. In this article, Hirschhorn and Gilmore provide a guide to the boundaries that matter in the "boundaryless" company. They explain how these new boundaries are essential for both managers and employees in coping with the demands of flexible work. They describe the typical mistakes that managers make in their boundary relationships. And they show how executives can become effective boundary managers by paying attention to a source of data they have often overlooked in the past: their own gut feelings about work and the people with whom they do it.

  14. A framework for solving atomistic phonon-structure scattering problems in the frequency domain using perfectly matched layer boundaries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kakodkar, Rohit R.; Feser, Joseph P., E-mail: jpfeser@udel.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Delaware, Newark, Delaware 19716 (United States)

    2015-09-07

    We present a numerical approach to the solution of elastic phonon-interface and phonon-nanostructure scattering problems based on a frequency-domain decomposition of the atomistic equations of motion and the use of perfectly matched layer (PML) boundaries. Unlike molecular dynamic wavepacket analysis, the current approach provides the ability to simulate scattering from individual phonon modes, including wavevectors in highly dispersive regimes. Like the atomistic Green's function method, the technique reduces scattering problems to a system of linear algebraic equations via a sparse, tightly banded matrix regardless of dimensionality. However, the use of PML boundaries enables rapid absorption of scattered wave energies at the boundaries and provides a simple and inexpensive interpretation of the scattered phonon energy flux calculated from the energy dissipation rate in the PML. The accuracy of the method is demonstrated on connected monoatomic chains, for which an analytic solution is known. The parameters defining the PML are found to affect the performance and guidelines for selecting optimal parameters are given. The method is used to study the energy transmission coefficient for connected diatomic chains over all available wavevectors for both optical and longitudinal phonons; it is found that when there is discontinuity between sublattices, even connected chains of equivalent acoustic impedance have near-zero transmission coefficient for short wavelengths. The phonon scattering cross section of an embedded nanocylinder is calculated in 2D for a wide range of frequencies to demonstrate the extension of the method to high dimensions. The calculations match continuum theory for long-wavelength phonons and large cylinder radii, but otherwise show complex physics associated with discreteness of the lattice. Examples include Mie oscillations which terminate when incident phonon frequencies exceed the maximum available frequency in the embedded nanocylinder

  15. Outer Magnetospheric Boundaries Cluster Results

    CERN Document Server

    Paschmann, Goetz; Schwartz, S J

    2006-01-01

    When the stream of plasma emitted from the Sun (the solar wind) encounters Earth's magnetic field, it slows down and flows around it, leaving behind a cavity, the magnetosphere. The magnetopause is the surface that separates the solar wind on the outside from the Earth's magnetic field on the inside. Because the solar wind moves at supersonic speed, a bow shock must form ahead of the magnetopause that acts to slow the solar wind to subsonic speeds. Magnetopause, bow shock and their environs are rich in exciting processes in collisionless plasmas, such as shock formation, magnetic reconnection, particle acceleration and wave-particle interactions. They are interesting in their own right, as part of Earth's environment, but also because they are prototypes of similar structures and phenomena that are ubiquitous in the universe, having the unique advantage that they are accessible to in situ measurements. The boundaries of the magnetosphere have been the target of direct in-situ measurements since the beginning ...

  16. Boundaries of a complex world

    CERN Document Server

    Ludu, Andrei

    2016-01-01

    The central theme of this book is the extent to which the structure of the free dynamical boundaries of a system controls the evolution of the system as a whole. Applying three orthogonal types of thinking - mathematical, constructivist and morphological, it illustrates these concepts using applications to selected problems from the social and life sciences, as well as economics. In a broader context, it introduces and reviews some modern mathematical approaches to the science of complex systems. Standard modeling approaches (based on non-linear differential equations, dynamic systems, graph theory, cellular automata, stochastic processes, or information theory) are suitable for studying local problems. However they cannot simultaneously take into account all the different facets and phenomena of a complex system, and new approaches are required to solve the challenging problem of correlations between phenomena at different levels and hierarchies, their self-organization and memory-evolutive aspects, the grow...

  17. Plasma transport near material boundaries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singer, C.E.

    1985-06-01

    The fluid theory of two-dimensional (2-d) plasma transport in axisymmetric devices is reviewed. The forces which produce flow across the magnetic field in a collisional plasma are described. These flows may lead to up-down asymmetries in the poloidal rotation and radial fluxes. Emphasis is placed on understanding the conditions under which the known 2-d plasma fluid equations provide a valid description of these processes. Attempts to extend the fluid treatment to less collisional, turbulent plasmas are discussed. A reduction to the 1-d fluid equations used in many computer simulations is possible when sources or boundary conditions provide a large enough radial scale length. The complete 1-d fluid equations are given in the text, and 2-d fluid equations are given in the Appendix.

  18. Modelling highly variable daily maximum water temperatures in a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... hourly water temperatures were used to calculate daily maximum water temperatures for nine sites within the Sabie-Sand River system, Mpumalanga Province, South Africa. A suite of statistical models for simulating daily maximum water temperatures, of differing complexity and using inputs of air temperature, flow rates, ...

  19. 24 CFR 242.7 - Maximum mortgage amounts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Maximum mortgage amounts. 242.7... URBAN DEVELOPMENT MORTGAGE AND LOAN INSURANCE PROGRAMS UNDER NATIONAL HOUSING ACT AND OTHER AUTHORITIES MORTGAGE INSURANCE FOR HOSPITALS General Eligibility Requirements § 242.7 Maximum mortgage amounts. The...

  20. 50 CFR 648.20 - Maximum optimum yield (OYs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Maximum optimum yield (OYs). 648.20 Section 648.20 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND... Measures for the Atlantic Mackerel, Squid, and Butterfish Fisheries § 648.20 Maximum optimum yield (OYs...