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Sample records for math298 warm-up excercises

  1. Active Movement Warm-Up Routines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, Teri; Quint, Ashleigh; Fischer, Kim; Kiger, Joy

    2011-01-01

    This article presents warm-ups that are designed to physiologically and psychologically prepare students for vigorous physical activity. An active movement warm-up routine is made up of three parts: (1) active warm-up movement exercises, (2) general preparation, and (3) the energy system. These warm-up routines can be used with all grade levels…

  2. Warm-up and performance in competitive swimming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neiva, Henrique P; Marques, Mário C; Barbosa, Tiago M; Izquierdo, Mikel; Marinho, Daniel A

    2014-03-01

    Warm-up before physical activity is commonly accepted to be fundamental, and any priming practices are usually thought to optimize performance. However, specifically in swimming, studies on the effects of warm-up are scarce, which may be due to the swimming pool environment, which has a high temperature and humidity, and to the complexity of warm-up procedures. The purpose of this study is to review and summarize the different studies on how warming up affects swimming performance, and to develop recommendations for improving the efficiency of warm-up before competition. Most of the main proposed effects of warm-up, such as elevated core and muscular temperatures, increased blood flow and oxygen delivery to muscle cells and higher efficiency of muscle contractions, support the hypothesis that warm-up enhances performance. However, while many researchers have reported improvements in performance after warm-up, others have found no benefits to warm-up. This lack of consensus emphasizes the need to evaluate the real effects of warm-up and optimize its design. Little is known about the effectiveness of warm-up in competitive swimming, and the variety of warm-up methods and swimming events studied makes it difficult to compare the published conclusions about the role of warm-up in swimming. Recent findings have shown that warm-up has a positive effect on the swimmer's performance, especially for distances greater than 200 m. We recommend that swimmers warm-up for a relatively moderate distance (between 1,000 and 1,500 m) with a proper intensity (a brief approach to race pace velocity) and recovery time sufficient to prevent the early onset of fatigue and to allow the restoration of energy reserves (8-20 min).

  3. The greenhouse effect and climate warming up

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leygonie, R.

    1992-01-01

    The present article is a follow-up to a previous article, under the same title, which describes the scientific bases of the greenhouse effect and the prospect, based on climatic global models, of a potential climate warming up. The conclusions of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC, August 1990) were summarized, predicting a mean global temperature increase between 2.4 and 5.1 deg C in 2070, among other changes. The recent IPCC work confirms 1990 conclusions but states that the decline of ozone in the lower stratosphere could neutralize the radiative forcing of chlorofluorocarbons. At least ten more years of investigation are needed to ascertain an increase of the greenhouse effect. Information is given on recent events which may be connected with the global climate problem, in particular the spectacular eruption of the Pinatubo volcano, in mid 1991, cause of a probable cooling of the atmosphere and a potential decrease of radiative forcing due to anthropogenic dioxide emissions. The most important recent events in the political field is a directive proposal by the European Commission aimed at a taxation of both energy in general and of carbon dioxide emissions by fossil fuels. Another event is the United Nations Convention on climate change, signed by 155 countries at the Rio de Janeiro Conference on Environment and Development, which pledges signatories to decrease their greenhouse gas - emissions but no figures are given on percentages and calendar of reduction. At last, a short chapter is devoted to the French ECLAT programme on climate change which consists both in participating in world programmes and in performing original investigations by French Scientists

  4. The Basketball warms-ups - theoretical assumptions and practical solutions

    OpenAIRE

    Sebastian Łubiński; Jan Kosendiak

    2017-01-01

    Many authors emphasize the importance of warm-up. Warm-up in team games aims at enhancing the body adaptation to the physical activity and to activate physiological functions from the rest state to the active state. Warm-up brings many different benefits, for example: physiological, psychological, and preventive, regardless of the classification of the above. From a psychological standpoint, the warm-up is performed to create the body "alertness", activity and readiness, and a willingness to ...

  5. Warm-up before laparoscopic surgery is not essential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weston, Maree K; Stephens, Jacqueline H; Schafer, Amy; Hewett, Peter J

    2014-03-01

    Several recent studies have suggested that warming up prior to surgery may improve surgical performance. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether warming up prior to laparoscopic surgery improves surgical performance or reduces surgery duration. Between August 2011 and January 2012, a randomized controlled trial was conducted to compare two warm-up modalities to no warm-up. The study was conducted at a single site, with nine surgeons performing 72 laparoscopic cholecystectomies and 37 laparoscopic appendicectomies. Prior to surgery, surgeons were randomized to either laparoscopic trainer box warm-up, PlayStation 2 warm-up or no warm-up. The activity was performed within 30 min of surgery commencing. Patients provided informed consent for the surgery to be digitally recorded. Digital videodiscs (DVDs) were reviewed by an independent and blinded assessor. Data were collected on duration of surgery, level of training and perceived surgical difficulty. Surgical performance was graded using a validated scoring system. From the 109 operations performed, there were 75 usable DVDs. Overall, there were no statistical differences in the demographics of patients and surgeons in the three treatment groups, nor in the subset that had useable DVDs. There were no statistical differences in the duration of surgery or surgeon's perceived surgical difficulty. There was no statistical difference in surgical performance. This study suggests that warm-up prior to laparoscopic cholecystectomy or appendicectomy is not essential, acknowledging that there are several study limitations that preclude definitive conclusion. © 2012 The Authors. ANZ Journal of Surgery © 2012 Royal Australasian College of Surgeons.

  6. The Basketball warms-ups - theoretical assumptions and practical solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Łubiński

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Many authors emphasize the importance of warm-up. Warm-up in team games aims at enhancing the body adaptation to the physical activity and to activate physiological functions from the rest state to the active state. Warm-up brings many different benefits, for example: physiological, psychological, and preventive, regardless of the classification of the above. From a psychological standpoint, the warm-up is performed to create the body "alertness", activity and readiness, and a willingness to act effectively. It was found that the players who perform the correct warm-up are better mentally prepared than those who do not perform it. After a well performed warm-up, the athlete is self-confident and has a positive attitude to the match. It is believed that the warm-up can also be the way to relieve tension and anxiety and to increase concentration and motivation before the match. Warm-up also improves the emotional states and reduces fear of failure. It has been verified that the warm-up, performed under appropriate conditions, improves focus, visual perception, action accuracy, self-confidence, speed and responsiveness, speed of processing and decision making. From the physiological point of view, the warm-up is an activity that adapts the basketball player’s body to an effort. It is an important factor that affects the effect of participation in the competition. Data from the literature suggest that the warm-up individualization is necessary in terms of duration and intensity. There are two types of warm-ups: passive and active. Passive warm-up is the one that is performed by using hot showers, baths, saunas, and steam baths or by using energetics massage. Active warm-up requires a lot of commitment and determination from the athlete during exercises that prepare the body and muscles for an effort. The training measures used during this part of warm-up are the general exercises that improve strength, stretch, coordination

  7. Choral Warm-Ups for Changing Adolescent Voices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freer, Patirck K.

    2009-01-01

    During two decades of observing and leading middle school choral rehearsals, the author has observed that teachers frequently repeat exactly the warm-ups they present to their young adolescent choirs at every rehearsal. If teachers know one thing about middle school students, they know that they are constantly changing--physically, intellectually,…

  8. Preoperative Warm-Up Using a Virtual Reality Simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Târcoveanu, Eugen; Dimofte, Gabriel; Lupaşcu, Cristian; Bradea, Costel

    2011-01-01

    Background and Objectives: All modern surgical procedures require a high level of cognitive and psychomotor skills achieved using different training methods, but could be influenced by fatigue and other psychological factors. We evaluated the effect of warm-up exercises on operative laparoscopic performances. Methods: The surgical team operated on a consecutive series of 20 patients with gallstones. Patients were randomly allocated in 2 groups: group A to be operated on without warm-up exercises and group B to be operated on after a short-term warm-up. All the patients were operated on by the same surgical team. The full-time records of the operation were analyzed by 2 independent reviewers. A modified simplified Global Rating Score (GRS) was used to assess the surgical procedures. A training module using the Lap Mentor simulator was designed for the warm-up. Results: Better performances were noted by both observers in group B only regarding “Respect for tissue” scores (3.75±0.16 vs 4.43±0.20, P=.021 and 3.87±0.22 vs 4.57±0.20, P=.041) achieving significant or marginally significant differences for all categories; GRS scores for “time and motion” and “overall impression” tend to be better after warm-up, but differences failed to reach statistical significance in our series. Conclusion: Surgeons, even the most experienced in laparoscopic surgery, can increase specific psychomotor skills associated with a laparoscopic environment by doing simple exercises on a virtual reality simulator, just before an operation. These improvements are reflected in more accurate handling of tissue during laparoscopic cholecystectomy. PMID:22643511

  9. Specific inspiratory muscle warm-up enhances badminton footwork performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hua; Tong, Tom Kwokkeung; Huang, Chuanye; Nie, Jinlei; Lu, Kui; Quach, Binh

    2007-12-01

    The effects of inspiratory muscle (IM) warm-up on IM function and on the maximum distance covered in a subsequent incremental badminton-footwork test (FWmax) were examined. Ten male badminton players were recruited to perform identical tests in three different trials in a random order. The control trial did not involve an IM warm-up, whereas the placebo and experimental trials did involve an IM warm-up consisting of two sets of 30-breath manoeuvres with an inspiratory pressure-threshold load equivalent to 15% (PLA) and 40% (IMW) maximum inspiratory mouth pressure, respectively. In the IMW trial, IM function was improved with 7.8%+/-4.0% and 6.9%+/-3.5% increases from control found in maximal inspiratory pressure at zero flow (P0) and maximal rate of P0 development (MRPD), respectively (pbadminton-footwork test. The improved footwork was partly attributable to the reduced breathless sensation resulting from the enhanced IM function, whereas the contribution of the concomitant reduction in [La-]b accumulation was relatively minor.

  10. The efficacy and characteristics of warm-up and re-warm-up practices in soccer players: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammami, Amri; Zois, James; Slimani, Maamer; Russel, Mark; Bouhlel, Ezdine

    2018-01-01

    This review aimed 1) to evaluate the current research that examines the efficacy of warm-up (WU) and re-warm-up (RWU) on physical performance; and 2) to highlight the WU and RWU characteristics that optimise subsequent performance in soccer players. A computerized search was performed in the PubMed, ScienceDirect and Google Scholar (from 1995 to December 2015) for English-language, peer-reviewed investigations using the terms "soccer" OR "football" AND "warm-up" OR "stretching" OR "post-activation potentiation" OR "pre-activity" OR "re-warm-up" AND "performance" OR "jump" OR "sprint" OR "running". Twenty seven articles were retrieved. Particularly, 22 articles examined the effects of WU on soccer performance and 5 articles focused on the effects of RWU. Clear evidence exists supporting the inclusion of dynamic stretching or postactivation potentiation-based exercises within a WU as acute performance enhancements were reported (pooled estimate changes of +3.46% and +4.21%, respectively). The FIFA 11+ WU also significantly increases strength, jump, speed and explosive performances (changes from 1% to 20%). At half-time, active RWU protocols including postactivation potentiation practices and multidirectional speed drills attenuate temperature and performance reductions induced by habitual practice. The data obtained in the present review showed that the level of play did not moderate the effectiveness of WU and RWU on soccer performance. This review demonstrated that a static stretching WU reduced acute subsequent performance, while WU activities that include dynamic stretching, PAP-based exercises, and the FIFA 11+ can elicit positive effects in soccer players. The efficacy of an active RWU during half-time is also justified.

  11. Prediction on global warming-up. Chikyu ondanka wo yosokusuru

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noda, A [Meteorological Research Institute, Tsukuba (Japan)

    1993-05-01

    This paper introduces models to predict global warming-up caused by greenhouse effect of the earth and increase in greenhouse effect gases, and the prediction results. As a result of CO2 doubling experiments using three-dimensional climate models in predicting the global warming-up, a model that predicted a sharp rise in annual average ground temperatures on the entire earth showed a larger increase in precipitation. According to the result of the CO2 doubling experiments using atmosphere-ocean coupling models, it was learned that the temperature rises higher in high latitude regions rather than rising uniformly over the earth on the whole. The fact that the temperature rise when CO2 has been doubled in a CO2 gradually increasing experiment is smaller than in the doubling experiment can be understood as a delaying effect of oceans generated from their thermal inertia. The former experiment showed a remarkable non-symmetry between the Southern and Northern hemispheres, reflecting the effect of the great oceanic circulation. Increase in cloud amount has an effect of either cooling or warming the earth, but the cooling effect surpasses the warming effect reportedly. Sulfuric acid aerosol in the troposphere is thought to influence the process of solar radiation transmitting through the atmosphere and have an effect to cool down the ground surface. 12 refs., 6 figs.

  12. Improving Engine Oil Warm Up through Waste Heat Recovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davide Di Battista

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In the transportation sector, engine oil thermal management has not yet received the attention it deserves in the path towards carbon dioxide and pollutants reduction. During the homologation cycle (which represents a typical daily trip, oil temperature reaches its thermal steady value, which insures best performances in terms of viscosity, only in the final part of the trip, when most part of the harmful emissions have been already emitted; therefore, a warm up acceleration would surely represent a strong beneficial action. In this paper, a faster warming up of the lubricant oil was done using the heat owned by the exhaust gases, which was almost immediately ready after the engine ignition, in the early part of a driving cycle. An experimental activity has been developed in a turbocharged engine (F1C 3L IVECO, modifying the oil circuit in order to heat up the oil during the cold phase of a homologation cycle by the exhaust gases. A significant reduction of fuel consumption and pollutant emissions savings has been experimentally demonstrated. Also, the interaction between the modified oil circuit, engine, coolant circuit, and exhaust line has been investigated in order to have a system view of the new heating oil technology.

  13. CARBON-CHAIN SPECIES IN WARM-UP MODELS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassel, George E.; Harada, Nanase; Herbst, Eric

    2011-01-01

    In previous warm-up chemical models of the low-mass star-forming region L1527, we investigated the evolution of carbon-chain unsaturated hydrocarbon species when the envelope temperature is slightly elevated to T ≈ 30 K. These models demonstrated that enhanced abundances of such species can be explained by gas-phase ion-molecule chemistry following the partial sublimation of methane from grain surfaces. We also concluded that the abundances of hydrocarbon radicals such as the C n H family should be further enhanced as the temperatures increase to higher values, but this conclusion stood in contrast with the lack of unambiguous detection of these species toward hot core and corino sources. Meanwhile, observational surveys have identified C 2 H, C 4 H, CH 3 CCH, and CH 3 OH toward hot corinos (especially IRAS 16293–2422) as well as toward L1527, with lower abundances for the carbon-chain radicals and higher abundances for the other two species toward the hot corinos. In addition, the Herschel Space Telescope has detected the bare linear chain C 3 in 50 K material surrounding young high-mass stellar objects. To understand these new results, we revisit previous warm-up models with an augmented gas-grain network that incorporated reactions from a gas-phase network that was constructed for use with increased temperature up to 800 K. Some of the newly adopted reactions between carbon-chain species and abundant H 2 possess chemical activation energy barriers. The revised model results now better reproduce the observed abundances of unsaturated carbon chains under hot corino (100 K) conditions and make predictions for the abundances of bare carbon chains in the 50 K regions observed by the Herschel HIFI detector.

  14. Effect of active warm-up duration on morning short-term maximal performance during Ramadan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baklouti, Hana; Chtourou, Hamdi; Aloui, Asma; Chaouachi, Anis; Souissi, Nizar

    2015-01-01

    To examine the effect of active warm-up duration on short-term maximal performance assessed during Ramadan in the morning. Twelve healthy active men performed four Wingate tests for measurement of peak power and mean power before and during Ramadan at 09:00 a.m. The tests were performed on separate days, after either a 5-min or a 15-min warm-up. The warm-up consisted in pedaling at 50% of the power output obtained at the last stage of a submaximal multistage cycling test. Oral temperature was measured at rest and after warming-up. Furthermore, ratings of perceived exertion were obtained immediately after the Wingate test. Oral temperature was higher after the 15-min warm-up than the 5-min warm-up throughout the study. Moreover, peak power and mean power were higher after the 15-min warm-up than the 5-min warm-up before Ramadan. However, during Ramadan, there was no significant difference between the two warm-up durations. In addition, ratings of perceived exertion were higher after the 15-min warm-up than the 5-min warm-up only during Ramadan. There is no need to prolong the warm-up period before short-term maximal exercise performed during Ramadan in the morning.

  15. Does increasing active warm-up duration affect afternoon short-term maximal performance during Ramadan?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baklouti, Hana; Aloui, Asma; Chtourou, Hamdi; Briki, Walid; Chaouachi, Anis; Souissi, Nizar

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of active warm-up duration on short-term maximal performance assessed during Ramadan in the afternoon. Twelve healthy active men took part in the study. The experimental design consisted of four test sessions conducted at 5 p.m., before and during Ramadan, either with a 5-minute or a 15-minute warm-up. The warm-up consisted in pedaling at 50% of the power output obtained at the last stage of a submaximal multistage cycling test. During each session, the subjects performed two vertical jump tests (squat jump and counter movement jump) for measurement of vertical jump height followed by a 30-second Wingate test for measurement of peak and mean power. Oral temperature was recorded at rest and after warming-up. Moreover, ratings of perceived exertion were obtained immediately after the Wingate test. Oral temperature was higher before Ramadan than during Ramadan at rest, and was higher after the 15-minute warm-up than the 5-minute warm-up both before and during Ramadan. In addition, vertical jump heights were not significantly different between the two warm-up conditions before and during Ramadan, and were lower during Ramadan than before Ramadan after both warm-up conditions. Peak and mean power were not significantly different between the two warm-up durations before Ramadan, but were significantly higher after the 5-minute warm-up than the 15-minute warm-up during Ramadan. Moreover, peak and mean power were lower during Ramadan than before Ramadan after both warm-up conditions. Furthermore, ratings of perceived exertion were higher after the 15-minute warm-up than the 5-minute warm-up only during Ramadan. The prolonged active warm-up has no effect on vertical jump height but impairs anaerobic power assessed during Ramadan in the afternoon.

  16. Warm-Up Exercises May Not Be So Important for Enhancing Submaximal Running Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takizawa, Kazuki; Yamaguchi, Taichi; Shibata, Keisuke

    2018-05-01

    Takizawa, K, Yamaguchi, T, and Shibata, K. Warm-up exercises may not be so important for enhancing submaximal running performance. J Strength Cond Res 32(5): 1383-1390, 2018-The purpose of this study was to determine an appropriate warm-up intensity for enhancing performance in submaximal running at 90% vV[Combining Dot Above]O2max (it assumes 3,000-5,000 m in track events). Seven trained male university athletes took part in this study (age: 21.3 ± 2.1 years, height: 169.3 ± 4.7 cm, body mass: 58.4 ± 5.6 kg, V[Combining Dot Above]O2max: 73.33 ± 5.46 ml·kg·min). Each subject ran on a treadmill at 90% vV[Combining Dot Above]O2max until exhaustion after 1 of 4 warm-up treatments. The 4 warm-up treatments were no warm-up, 15 minutes running at 60% vV[Combining Dot Above]O2max, at 70% vV[Combining Dot Above]O2max, and at 80% vV[Combining Dot Above]O2max. The running performance was evaluated by time to exhaustion (TTE). V[Combining Dot Above]O2, and vastus lateralis muscle temperature were also measured. There were no significant differences in TTE among the warm-up exercises (p > 0.05). V[Combining Dot Above]O2 in no warm-up showed slower reaction than the other warm-up exercises. Regarding, the vastus lateralis muscle temperature immediately after warm-up, no warm-up was significantly (p warm-up exercises. Our results suggested that submaximal running performance was not affected by the presence or absence of a warm-up or by warm-up intensity, although physiological changes occurred.

  17. Warm-Up Strategies for Sport and Exercise: Mechanisms and Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGowan, Courtney J; Pyne, David B; Thompson, Kevin G; Rattray, Ben

    2015-11-01

    It is widely accepted that warming-up prior to exercise is vital for the attainment of optimum performance. Both passive and active warm-up can evoke temperature, metabolic, neural and psychology-related effects, including increased anaerobic metabolism, elevated oxygen uptake kinetics and post-activation potentiation. Passive warm-up can increase body temperature without depleting energy substrate stores, as occurs during the physical activity associated with active warm-up. While the use of passive warm-up alone is not commonplace, the idea of utilizing passive warming techniques to maintain elevated core and muscle temperature throughout the transition phase (the period between completion of the warm-up and the start of the event) is gaining in popularity. Active warm-up induces greater metabolic changes, leading to increased preparedness for a subsequent exercise task. Until recently, only modest scientific evidence was available supporting the effectiveness of pre-competition warm-ups, with early studies often containing relatively few participants and focusing mostly on physiological rather than performance-related changes. External issues faced by athletes pre-competition, including access to equipment and the length of the transition/marshalling phase, have also frequently been overlooked. Consequently, warm-up strategies have continued to develop largely on a trial-and-error basis, utilizing coach and athlete experiences rather than scientific evidence. However, over the past decade or so, new research has emerged, providing greater insight into how and why warm-up influences subsequent performance. This review identifies potential physiological mechanisms underpinning warm-ups and how they can affect subsequent exercise performance, and provides recommendations for warm-up strategy design for specific individual and team sports.

  18. The Effect of Different Warm-up Protocols on young Soccer Players' Explosive Power

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamad Ali Mohamadi

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigating the effect of different Warm-up Protocols on young Soccer Players' Explosive Power. Methods: Twenty male soccer players (17.4 0.685 years volunteered to participate in this study. The participants were randomly selected, and in order to remove the effects of transmission and to observe the sequence of warm-up methods, they were cross-matched randomly e.g. 20 players in four categories; that is, 5 players in each category. The participants in each category experienced the 4 warm-up ways in four consecutive so that at the end 20 players performed each method of warm-up. Warm-up methods: 1. Static warm-up; 2. Dynamic warm-up plus 2 min active rest; 3. Dynamic warm-up plus 5 min passive rest and finally Dynamic warm-up plus 15 min passive rest. Participants in each category performed different warm-up methods which had been designed based on scientific and research-based sources in 48 hours intervals After performing each warm-up method, they were given a Long Jump. Results: Based on the results of analysis of variance between the effect of different warm-up methods on Explosive Power participants, significant difference was observed (p?0/05 so that Dynamic warm-up plus 5 min passive rest was more effective in Explosive Power performance than other methods(p?0/05. Discussion: The results of this study are in line with those of Roger (2008 and Faigenbaum et al (2006 who indicated in their studies that Dynamic or mixed method of warm-up are more effective than static ones. Conclusion: Therefore, with regard to the results of the study presented here and also the nature of football enjoying explosive power than the air blows, it is recommended that these types of protocols during warm-up program be employed.   Keywords: Warm up, Explosive Power , Soccer Players', Young  

  19. Comparison of isokinetic muscle strength and muscle power by types of warm-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sim, Young-Je; Byun, Yong-Hyun; Yoo, Jaehyun

    2015-05-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to clarify the influence of static stretching at warm-up on the isokinetic muscle torque (at 60°/sec) and muscle power (at 180°/sec) of the flexor muscle and extensor muscle of the knee joint. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects of this study were 10 healthy students with no medically specific findings. The warm-up group and warm-up with stretching group performed their respective warm-up prior to the isokinetic muscle torque evaluation of the knee joint. One-way ANOVA was performed by randomized block design for each variable. [Results] The results were as follows: First, the flexor peak torque and extensor peak torque of the knee joint tended to decrease at 60°/sec in the warm-up with stretching group compared with the control group and warm-up group, but without statistical significance. Second, extensor power at 180°/sec was also not statistically significant. However, it was found that flexor power increased significantly in the warm-up with stretching group at 180°/sec compared with the control group and warm-up group in which stretching was not performed. [Conclusion] Therefore, it is considered that in healthy adults, warm-up including two sets of stretching for 20 seconds per muscle group does not decrease muscle strength and muscle power.

  20. Does Vibration Warm-up Enhance Kinetic and Temporal Sprint Parameters?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cochrane, D J; Cronin, M J; Fink, P W

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the efficacy of vibration warm-up to enhance sprint performance. 12 males involved in representative team sports performed 4 warm-up conditions in a randomised order performed at least 24 h apart; VbX warm-up (VbX-WU); Neural activation warm-up (Neu-WU); Dynamic warm-up (Dyn-WU) and Control (No VbX). Participants completed 5 m sprint at 30 s, 2:30 min and 5 min post warm-up where sprint time, kinetics, and temporal components were recorded. There was no significant (p>0.05) main effect or interaction effect between the split sprint times of 1 m, 2.5 m, and 5 m. There was a condition effect where vertical mean force was significantly higher (p0.05) main and interaction effects in sprint kinetic and temporal parameters existed. Overall, all 4 warm-up conditions produced comparable results for sprint performance, and there was no detrimental effect on short-duration sprint performance using VbX-WU. Therefore, VbX could be useful for adding variety to the training warm-up or be included into the main warm-up routine as a supplementary modality. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  1. EFFECTS OF DYNAMIC AND STATIC STRETCHING WITHIN GENERAL AND ACTIVITY SPECIFIC WARM-UP PROTOCOLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Samson

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the study was to determine the effects of static and dynamic stretching protocols within general and activity specific warm-ups. Nine male and ten female subjects were tested under four warm-up conditions including a 1 general aerobic warm-up with static stretching, 2 general aerobic warm-up with dynamic stretching, 3 general and specific warm-up with static stretching and 4 general and specific warm-up with dynamic stretching. Following all conditions, subjects were tested for movement time (kicking movement of leg over 0.5 m distance, countermovement jump height, sit and reach flexibility and 6 repetitions of 20 metre sprints. Results indicated that when a sport specific warm-up was included, there was an 0.94% improvement (p = 0.0013 in 20 meter sprint time with both the dynamic and static stretch groups. No such difference in sprint performance between dynamic and static stretch groups existed in the absence of the sport specific warm-up. The static stretch condition increased sit and reach range of motion (ROM by 2.8% more (p = 0.0083 than the dynamic condition. These results would support the use of static stretching within an activity specific warm-up to ensure maximal ROM along with an enhancement in sprint performance

  2. Trunk sway analysis to quantify the warm-up phenomenon in myotonia congenita patients.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Horlings, G.C.; Drost, G.; Bloem, B.R.; Trip, J.; Pieterse, A.J.; Engelen, B.G.M. van; Allum, J.H.J.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Patients with autosomal recessive myotonia congenita display myotonia and transient paresis that diminish with repetitive muscle contractions (warm-up phenomenon). A new approach is presented to quantify this warm-up phenomenon under clinically relevant gait and balance tasks. METHODS:

  3. Warm-Ups: The Key to the Beginning of a Great Lesson

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Alisa R.; Collier, Douglas H.

    2011-01-01

    Historically, traditional pre-lesson warm-ups in physical education have consisted of callisthenic exercises such as jumping jacks, pushups, sit-ups, and running laps, as well as static stretching activities. These warm-ups are used to increase core body temperature and to assist blood flow to the working muscles. Although the traditional warm-up…

  4. From Static Stretching to Dynamic Exercises: Changing the Warm-Up Paradigm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Shawna

    2010-01-01

    In the United States, pre-exercise static stretching seems to have become common practice and routine. However, research suggests that it is time for a paradigm shift--that pre-exercise static stretching be replaced with dynamic warm-up exercises. Research indicates that a dynamic warm-up elevates body temperature, decreases muscle and joint…

  5. Vocal warm-up practices and perceptions in vocalists: a pilot survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gish, Allison; Kunduk, Melda; Sims, Loraine; McWhorter, Andrew J

    2012-01-01

    Investigated in a pilot study the type, duration, and frequency of vocal warm-up regimens in the singing community using a survey. One hundred seventeen participants completed an online survey. Participants included voice students from undergraduate, masters, and doctoral music programs and professional singers. Fifty-four percent of participants reported always using vocal warm-up before singing. Twenty-two percent of the participants used vocal cool down. The most preferred warm-up duration was of 5-10 minutes in duration. Despite using vocal warm-up, 26% of the participants reported experiencing voice problems. Females tended to use vocal warm-up more frequently than males. Females also tended to use longer warm-up sessions than males. Education of the participants did not appear to have any noticeable effect on the vocal warm-up practices. The most commonly used singing warm-up exercises were ascending/descending five-note scales, ascending/descending octave scales, legato arpeggios, and glissandi. Copyright © 2012 The Voice Foundation. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Comparing the Immediate Effects of a Total Motion Release Warm-up and a Dynamic Warm-up Protocol on the Dominant Shoulder in Baseball Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamma, Stephen C; Baker, Russell; May, James; Seegmiller, Jeff G; Nasypany, Alan; Iorio, Steven M

    2018-04-10

    Gamma, SC, Baker, R, May, J, Seegmiller, JG, Nasypany, A, and Iorio, SM. Comparing the immediate effects of a total motion release warm-up and a dynamic warm-up protocol on the dominant shoulder in baseball athletes. J Strength Cond Res XX(X): 000-000, 2017-A decrease in total range of motion (ROM) of the dominant shoulder may predispose baseball athletes to increased shoulder injury risk; the most effective technique for improving ROM is unknown. The purpose of this study was to compare the immediate effects of Total Motion Release (TMR) to a generic dynamic warm-up program in baseball athletes. Baseball athletes (n = 20) were randomly assigned to an intervention group: TMR group (TMRG; n = 10) or traditional warm-up group (TWG; n = 10). Shoulder ROM measurements were recorded for internal rotation (IR) and external rotation (ER), the intervention was applied, and postmeasurements were recorded. Each group then received the other intervention and postmeasurements were again recorded. The time main effect (p ≤ 0.001) and the time × group interaction effect were significant (p ≤ 0.001) for IR and ER. Post hoc analysis revealed that TMR produced significant increases in mean IR (p ≤ 0.005, d = 1.52) and ER (p ≤ 0.018, d = 1.22) of the dominant shoulder initially. When groups crossed-over, the TMRG experienced a decrease in mean IR and ER after the dynamic warm-up, whereas the TWG experienced a significant increase in mean IR (p ≤ 0.001, d = 3.08) and ER (p ≤ 0.001, d = 2.56) after TMR intervention. Total Motion Release increased IR and ER of the dominant shoulder more than a dynamic warm-up. Dynamic warm-up after TMR also resulted in decreased IR and ER; however, TMR after dynamic warm-up significantly improved IR and ER. Based on these results, TMR is more effective than a generic dynamic warm-up for improving dominant shoulder ROM in baseball players.

  7. Effect of various practical warm-up protocols on acute lower-body power.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buttifant, David; Hrysomallis, Con

    2015-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the acute effect of box squats with barbell (BBSquat), box squats with elastic resistance bands (BandSquat), and static stretches (SStretch) on external power during a 20-kg weighted jump squat. Twelve male athletes performed each of the 3 warm-up protocols on separate occasions in a randomized order. Weighted jump squat power was assessed using a linear position transducer attached to the bar of a Smith machine. Jump power was measured pre-warm-up and 5 and 10 minutes post-warm-up protocol. The BBSquat protocol involved 3 sets of 3RM, BandSquat involved 3 sets of 3 repetitions using highest resistance elastic bands, and the SStretch protocol comprises two 30-second stretches for muscles of the lower limbs. Jump power significantly increased from pre-warm-up to 5 and 10 minutes post-warm-up for both the BandSquat and BBSquat protocols. There was no statistical difference in power values between BandSquat and BBSquat. Power output significantly decreased from pre-warm-up to 5 and 10 minutes post-warm-up for the SStretch protocol. The BandSquat was just as effective as BBSquat in augmenting acute jump power. The SStretch was detrimental to jump performance. A practical warm-up using relatively inexpensive and portable equipment such as elastic resistance bands was just as effective as a warm-up protocol that requires more substantial and less transportable equipment such as a squat rack and associated free weights. The BandSquat warm-up may be considered more accessible for athletes at various competition levels.

  8. Effects of different re-warm up activities in football players' performance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Abade

    Full Text Available Warm up routines are commonly used to optimize football performance and prevent injuries. Yet, official pre-match protocols may require players to passively rest for approximately 10 to 15 minutes between the warm up and the beginning of the match. Therefore, the aim of this study was to explore the effect of different re-warm up activities on the physical performance of football players. Twenty-Two Portuguese elite under-19 football players participated in the study conducted during the competitive season. Different re-warm up protocols were performed 6 minutes after the same standardized warm up in 4 consecutive days in a crossover controlled approach: without, eccentric, plyometric and repeated changes of direction. Vertical jump and Sprint performances were tested immediately after warm up and 12 minutes after warm up. Results showed that repeated changes of direction and plyometrics presented beneficial effects to jump and sprint. Different practical implications may be taken from the eccentric protocol since a vertical jump impairment was observed, suggesting a possibly harmful effect. The absence of re-warm up activities may be detrimental to players' physical performance. However, the inclusion of re-warm up prior to match is a complex issue, since the manipulation of volume, intensity and recovery may positively or negatively affect the subsequent performance. In fact, this exploratory study shows that eccentric exercise may be harmful for physical performance when performed prior a football match. However, plyometric and repeated changes of direction exercises seem to be simple, quick and efficient activities to attenuate losses in vertical jump and sprint capacity after warm up. Coaches should aim to develop individual optimal exercise modes in order to optimize physical performance after re warm activities.

  9. The effect of warm-up on surgical performance: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdalla, Gamal; Moran-Atkin, Erin; Chen, Grace; Schweitzer, Michael A; Magnuson, Thomas H; Steele, Kimberley E

    2015-06-01

    The concept of warming-up before a performance has been accepted across many disciplines including sports and music. In contrast, it is uncommon for a surgeon to "warm-up" prior to operating. To date, few studies from various specialties have attempted to answer this question whether warm-up improved the intraoperative performance of the surgeon. However, there has not been a systematic review of these studies. The aim of our systematic review is to assess the effect of warming-up preoperatively on the laparoscopic performance of the surgeon. Pubmed and scopus were searched to identify all published prospective observational studies, which involved either residents, fellows or attending surgeons. We excluded case reports, reviews, non-English studies, and medical student participation. Study risk of bias were assessed regarding sequence generation, allocation concealment, blinding, incomplete outcome data, selective outcome reporting, and other biases, using a validated Cochrane Collaboration's tool. Out of 241 studies, 6 met the inclusion criteria. All included studies were randomized with half of them being randomized controlled studies and the rest randomized crossover studies. The total number of operative cases was 196, including 98 warm-up and 98 non warm-up. The total number of participants was 87, with the largest number in a single study being 38 and the average sample size of all studies was 14. All six studies assessed various aspects of laparoscopic surgical performances. Significant improvement in the intraoperative laparoscopic performance was observed with warming-up preoperatively in five out of six studies (p study failed to reach statistical significance (p > 0.05). Warming-up before an operative procedure improve a trainee's technical, cognitive, and psychomotor performance. Further studies are necessary to assess the ways in which warm-up could impact a surgeon's performance, and to identify the optimal timing and duration of warm-up prior to

  10. Influence of warm-up duration on physical performance and psychological perceptions in handball players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romaratezabala, Estibaliz; Nakamura, Fábio Yuzo; Castillo, Daniel; Gorostegi-Anduaga, Ilargi; Yanci, Javier

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to analyse the effect of two warm-up protocols of different duration on physical performance, perceived load and perception of being ready for a match in handball players. Eighteen handball players were randomly divided into two groups (Wup 34min , warm-up protocol of 34 min, Wup 17min , warm-up protocol of 17 min). Before and after the warm-up protocols, they performed a battery of physical tests and recorded their perception of feeling ready for a match. At the end of the warm-up protocols, all the players evaluated their differentiated perceived effort (dRPE). The results showed that neither of the protocols significantly modified (p > 0.05) the players' physical performance. However, the Wup 34min group showed higher values in the differentiated warm-up perceived load (dRPE-WL) (p warm-up protocols significantly modified the players' physical performance, a greater perceived muscular load may cause a greater decrease in acceleration capacity.

  11. Preoperative warm-up the key to improved resident technique: a randomized study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran-Atkin, Erin; Abdalla, Gamal; Chen, Grace; Magnuson, Thomas H; Lidor, Anne O; Schweitzer, Michael A; Steele, Kimberley E

    2015-05-01

    The ACGME has required that a skills lab be incorporated into the surgical residency curriculum. While the value of warm-up is generally accepted in other areas requiring complex motor skills, there is little evidence to support the benefits of warm-up prior to performing surgery. We are conducting this study in an attempt to identify whether a warm-up period prior to operating impacts operative technique. All general surgery residents and MIS fellows were included in this IRB-approved randomized study. Participants were randomized to either warm-up or no warm-up groups. Participants randomized to the warm-up group completed a 10 min practice session in the simulation lab within 1 h of starting the case, using an FLS training box. At the conclusion of the operation, the participant was evaluated by the attending surgeon using the validated global rating scales of Reznick and Vassiliou. The attending surgeons were blinded to the use of pre-procedure warm-up. The results of the questionnaire were analyzed using student's t test with p warm-up (19) or no warm-up (21). There was a statistically significant improvement in depth perception (p = 0.02), bimanual dexterity (p = 0.01), and efficiency of movements (p = 0.03) for those randomized to warm-up. There was statistical improvement when we preformed a composite scoring of the attending evaluations for each of the Reznick (p = 0.008) and the Vassiliou (p = 0.01) global rating scales. Preoperative warm-up significantly improves depth perception, bimanual dexterity, and efficiency of movements, as well as improvement in composite scores as judged by the attending surgeon. The lack of self-perceived improvement by the residents may be a reflection of the high standards and intense self-critique that is common among surgical trainees. We believe that our findings, while preliminary, reflect that surgical performance can be enhanced through structured warm-up activities.

  12. Warm-up for Sprint Swimming: Race-Pace or Aerobic Stimulation? A Randomized Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neiva, Henrique P; Marques, Mário C; Barbosa, Tiago M; Izquierdo, Mikel; Viana, João L; Teixeira, Ana M; Marinho, Daniel A

    2017-09-01

    Neiva, HP, Marques, MC, Barbosa, TM, Izquierdo, M, Viana, JL, Teixeira, AM, and Marinho, DA. Warm-up for sprint swimming: race-pace or aerobic stimulation? A randomized study. J Strength Cond Res 31(9): 2423-2431, 2017-The aim of this study was to compare the effects of 2 different warm-up intensities on 100-m swimming performance in a randomized controlled trial. Thirteen competitive swimmers performed two 100-m freestyle time-trials on separate days after either control or experimental warm-up in a randomized design. The control warm-up included a typical race-pace set (4 × 25 m), whereas the experimental warm-up included an aerobic set (8 × 50 m at 98-102% of critical velocity). Cortisol, testosterone, blood lactate ([La]), oxygen uptake (V[Combining Dot Above]O2), heart rate, core (Tcore and Tcorenet) and tympanic temperatures, and rating of perceived exertion (RPE) were monitored. Stroke length (SL), stroke frequency (SF), stroke index (SI), and propelling efficiency (ηp) were assessed for each 50-m lap. We found that V[Combining Dot Above]O2, heart rate, and Tcorenet were higher after experimental warm-up (d > 0.73), but only the positive effect for Tcorenet was maintained until the trial. Performance was not different between conditions (d = 0.07). Experimental warm-up was found to slow SF (mean change ±90% CL = 2.06 ± 1.48%) and increase SL (1.65 ± 1.40%) and ηp (1.87 ± 1.33%) in the first lap. After the time-trials, this warm-up had a positive effect on Tcorenet (d = 0.69) and a negative effect on [La] (d = 0.56). Although the warm-ups had similar outcomes in the 100-m freestyle, performance was achieved through different biomechanical strategies. Stroke length and efficiency were higher in the first lap after the experimental warm-up, whereas SF was higher after control warm-up. Physiological adaptations were observed mainly through an increased Tcore after experimental warm-up. In this condition, the lower [La] after the trial suggests lower

  13. Half-time re-warm up increases performance capacity in male elite soccer players

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edholm, P; Krustrup, Peter; Randers, Morten Bredsgaard

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the acute effects of a half-time re-warm up on performance and movement patterns in soccer match play. Using a crossover design, 22 professional male players performed traditional passive rest (CON) or a low-intensity re-warm up (RW) during the half-time period of two soccer.......01). Moreover, RW had more possession of the ball in the beginning of the second half. In conclusion, traditional passive half-time rest leads to impaired sprint and jump performance during the initial phase of the second half in professional soccer players whereas a re-warm up effectively attenuates...

  14. Warm Up and Cool Down: Reduce Risk of Injury and Improve Athletic Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... exercise, but more research is needed. Although there's controversy about whether warming up and cooling down can ... your agreement to the Terms and Conditions and Privacy Policy linked below. Terms and Conditions Privacy Policy ...

  15. The Effect of Traditional Singing Warm-Up Versus Semioccluded Vocal Tract Exercises on the Acoustic Parameters of Singing Voice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duke, Emily; Plexico, Laura W; Sandage, Mary J; Hoch, Matthew

    2015-11-01

    This study investigated the effect of traditional vocal warm-up versus semioccluded vocal tract exercises on the acoustic parameters of voice through three questions: does vocal warm-up condition significantly alter the singing power ratio of the singing voice? Is singing power ratio dependent upon vowel? Is perceived phonatory effort affected by warm-up condition? Hypotheses were that vocal warm-up would alter the singing power ratio, and that semioccluded vocal tract warm-up would affect the singing power ratio more than no warm-up or traditional warm-up, that singing power ratio would vary across vowel, and that perceived phonatory effort would vary with warm-up condition. This study was a within-participant repeated measures design with counterbalanced conditions. Thirteen male singers were recorded under three different conditions: no warm-up, traditional warm-up, and semioccluded vocal tract exercise warm-up. Recordings were made of these singers performing the Star Spangled Banner, and singing power ratio (SPR) was calculated from four vowels. Singers rated their perceived phonatory effort (PPE) singing the Star Spangled Banner after each warm-up condition. Warm-up condition did not significantly affect SPR. SPR was significantly different for /i/ and /e/. PPE was not significantly different between warm-up conditions. The present study did not find significant differences in SPR between warm-up conditions. SPR differences for /i/, support previous findings. PPE did not differ significantly across warm-up condition despite the expectation that traditional or semioccluded warm-up would cause a decrease. Copyright © 2015 The Voice Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Effect of various warm-up devices on bat velocity of intercollegiate softball players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szymanski, David J; Bassett, Kylie E; Beiser, Erik J; Till, Megan E; Medlin, Greg L; Beam, Jason R; Derenne, Coop

    2012-01-01

    Numerous warm-up devices are available for use by softball players while they are in the on-deck circle. It is difficult to know which warm-up device produces the greatest bat velocity (BV) in the batter's box for softball players because on-deck studies with these individuals are sparse. Because the majority of warm-up device research has been conducted with baseball players, the primary purpose of this study was to examine the effect of various warm-up devices on the BV of female intercollegiate softball players and compare the results with those of male baseball players. A secondary purpose was to evaluate 2 new commercially available resistance devices as warm-up aids. Nineteen Division I intercollegiate softball players (age = 19.8 ± 1.2 years, height = 167.0 ± 4.7 cm, body mass = 69.2 ± 8.6 kg, lean body mass = 49.6 ± 3.6 kg, % body fat = 27.9 ± 5.9) participated in a warm-up with 1 of 8 resistance devices on separate days. Each of the 8 testing sessions had players perform a standardized dynamic warm-up, 3 maximal dry swings mimicking their normal game swing with the assigned warm-up device, 2 comfortable dry swings with a standard 83.8-cm, 652-g (33-in., 23-oz) softball bat followed by 3 maximal game swings (20-second rest between swings) while hitting a softball off a batting tee with the same standard softball bat. Results indicated that there were no statistically significant differences in BV after using any of the 8 warm-up devices (510.3-2,721.5 g or 18-96 oz) similar to in previous baseball research. This indicates that the results for both male and female intercollegiate players are similar and that intercollegiate softball players can use any of the 8 warm-up devices in the on-deck circle and have similar BVs. However, similar to in other previous baseball research, it is not recommended that female intercollegiate softball players warm up with the popular commercial donut ring in the on-deck circle because it produced the slowest BV.

  17. Effect of Submaximal Warm-up Exercise on Exercise-induced Asthma in African School Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mtshali, B F; Mokwena, K; Oguntibeju, O O

    2015-03-01

    Regular physical activity has long been regarded as an important component of a healthy lifestyle. Exercise-induced asthma (EIA) is one of the major problems interfering with the performance of exercise. A warm-up exercise programme has been cited as a non-pharmacologic means of reducing EIA, but its effect has not been fully elucidated. The aims of this study were to determine the prevalence of unrecognized EIA in Pretoria primary school children, determine the effect of a warm-up exercise programme on EIA and to establish the relationship between history of allergy, family history of asthma and EIA. A random sample of 640 school children was selected. The study was divided into three phases. In phase one, a descriptive cross-sectional study was done using the standardized European Community Respiratory Health Survey (ECRHS) questionnaire. In phase two, non-asthmatic participants that returned a completed questionnaire were included in the field study. Pre-test and post-test experimental designs were used, where peak expiratory flow rate (PEFR) was measured at baseline and within ten minutes after exercise. A total of 340 subjects completed the Free Running Asthma Screening Test (FRAST); EIA was defined as a decrease in baseline PEFR ≥ 10% after exercise and 75 children (22%) had EIA. In phase three, 29 of the 75 subjects participated in the warm-up programme which was performed in the laboratory and subjects acted as their own controls. Predefined protocols for the study were followed. Seventy-five (22%) of the 340 participants had EIA. The mean age, height and weight were 10.51 years, 139.26 cm and 33.45 kg, respectively. Exercise-induced asthma symptoms were cough (25%), chest pain (16%), wheeze (12%) and chest tightness (12%). The history of allergy was 75%, family history of allergy 40% and positive history of allergy when near animals, feathers or in dusty areas 38%. Wheezing during or after exercise, wheezing when near animals, feathers or in dusty areas

  18. Acute Warm-up Effects in Submaximal Athletes: An EMG Study of Skilled Violinists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCrary, J Matt; Halaki, Mark; Sorkin, Evgeny; Ackermann, Bronwen J

    2016-02-01

    Warm-up is commonly recommended for injury prevention and performance enhancement across all activities, yet this recommendation is not supported by evidence for repetitive submaximal activities such as instrumental music performance. The objective of this study is to quantify the effects of cardiovascular, core muscle, and musical warm-ups on muscle activity levels, musical performance, and subjective experience in skilled violinists. Fifty-five undergraduate, postgraduate, or professional violinists performed five randomly ordered 45-s musical excerpts of varying physical demands both before and after a randomly assigned 15-min, moderate-intensity cardiovascular, core muscle, musical (technical violin exercises), or inactive control warm-up protocol. Surface EMG data were obtained for 16 muscles of the trunk, shoulders, and right arm during each musical performance. Sound recording and perceived exertion (RPE) data were also obtained. Sound recordings were randomly ordered and rated for performance quality by blinded adjudicators. Questionnaire data regarding participant pain sites and fitness levels were used to stratify participants according to pain and fitness levels. Data were analyzed using two- and three-factor ANCOVA (surface EMG and sound recording) and Wilcoxon matched pairs tests (RPE). None of the three warm-up protocols had significant effects on muscle activity levels (P ≥ 0.10). Performance quality did not significantly increase (P ≥ 0.21). RPE significantly decreased (P warm-up for each of the three experimental warm-ups; control condition RPE did not significantly decrease (P > 0.23). Acute physiological and musical benefits from cardiovascular, core muscle, and musical warm-ups in skilled violinists are limited to decreases in RPE. This investigation provides data from the performing arts in support of sports medical evidence suggesting that warm-up only effectively enhances maximal strength and power performance.

  19. Specific warm-up exercise is the best for vertical countermovement jump in young volleyball players

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Nazário de Rezende

    Full Text Available Abstract We evaluated the effect of performing various distinct warm-up exercises on vertical countermovement jump (VCMJ performance. Eight volleyball players (age 15.4 ± 0.5 yrs performed five different warm-up activities (in a counterbalanced, randomized crossover study over five days, at 24-h intervals: stretching (4 × 30 s, 30 s between sets, cycloergometer (5 min at 50 W + 5 min at 100 W, resistance exercise (leg press 45°, 3 × 5 repetitions maximum, 3-min pause between sets, specific vertical jumping (4 × 10 VCMJ, 2-min pause between sets, and no warm-up at all (control condition. Beginning 3 min after their warm-up, the players performed 3 attempts (at intervals of 3 min of VCMJ (on a contact carpet, and each player's best jump was considered in the analysis. All warm-up activities presented higher VCMJ performance (p< 0.05 than the control condition, with the exception of stretching. Vertical jumping revealed a large effect size(0.8 than other interventions. We conclude that in practical terms, vertical jumps are the best warm-up exercise (when applied by itself to acutely improve VCMJ performance in volleyball players, but that other exercises can make a complementary contribution.

  20. Modeling Resources Allocation in Attacker-Defender Games with "Warm Up" CSF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Peiqiu; Zhuang, Jun

    2016-04-01

    Like many other engineering investments, the attacker's and defender's investments may have limited impact without initial capital to "warm up" the systems. This article studies such "warm up" effects on both the attack and defense equilibrium strategies in a sequential-move game model by developing a class of novel and more realistic contest success functions. We first solve a single-target attacker-defender game analytically and provide numerical solutions to a multiple-target case. We compare the results of the models with and without consideration of the investment "warm up" effects, and find that the defender would suffer higher expected damage, and either underestimate the attacker effort or waste defense investment if the defender falsely believes that no investment "warm up" effects exist. We illustrate the model results with real data, and compare the results of the models with and without consideration of the correlation between the "warm up" threshold and the investment effectiveness. Interestingly, we find that the defender is suggested to give up defending all the targets when the attack or the defense "warm up" thresholds are sufficiently high. This article provides new insights and suggestions on policy implications for homeland security resource allocation. © 2015 Society for Risk Analysis.

  1. Warm-Up Effect in Panelist-Articulated-2-Alternative Forced Choice Test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloom, David J; Baik, Hwa-Young; Lee, Soo-Yeun

    2018-01-01

    Panelist performance in discrimination tests has been shown to increase when warm-up samples are provided prior to the actual test. Samples are used prior to the actual test for the attribute articulation process of a panelist-articulated-2-alternative forced choice (PA-2-AFC) procedure; however, it is yet unknown if the pretest articulation phase adds to the power of this testing method as with the warm-up. The goal of the study was to determine if a "warm-up" effect was displayed in the PA-2-AFC test resulting in greater power compared to the researcher-designated-2-AFC (RD-2-AFC) test. A RD-2-AFC test, with and without warm-up samples, and a PA-2-AFC test were performed by 61 panelists. A reduced calorie, citrus-flavored, and carbonated beverage was used in the tests. During RD-2-AFC testing, panelists were asked to identify which sample was more sour. For PA-2-AFC testing, panelists individually articulated the nature and direction of the difference between the 2 samples through a pretesting articulation procedure. The articulated difference was, then, used in standard 2-AFC test procedure. A warm-up effect was observed when comparing the standard RD-2-AFC with and without warm-up samples. The addition of warm up samples significantly increased the power of the test, in addition, the PA-2-AFC method had lower power than the RD-2-AFC method. The increase in power with the addition of warm-up samples for the RD-2-AFC procedure supports literature findings on the benefit of providing warm-up samples. No warm-up effect can be attributed to the PA-2-AFC method evidenced by the overall low power observed, which may be attributed to sample complexity. Selecting a specified discrimination testing method is advantageous and can reduce costs of sensory testing, but has been considered unpractical when samples may differ in unknown ways. This research explores the use of panelist derived terms to circumvent the need for researchers to identify these differences and

  2. The effect of warm-ups with stretching on the isokinetic moments of collegiate men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hyoung-Kil; Jung, Min-Kyung; Park, Eunkyung; Lee, Chang-Young; Jee, Yong-Seok; Eun, Denny; Cha, Jun-Youl; Yoo, Jaehyun

    2018-02-01

    Performing warm-ups increases muscle temperature and blood flow, which contributes to improved exercise performance and reduced risk of injuries to muscles and tendons. Stretching increases the range of motion of the joints and is effective for the maintenance and enhancement of exercise performance and flexibility, as well as for injury prevention. However, stretching as a warm-up activity may temporarily decrease muscle strength, muscle power, and exercise performance. This study aimed to clarify the effect of stretching during warm-ups on muscle strength, muscle power, and muscle endurance in a nonathletic population. The subjects of this study consisted of 13 physically active male collegiate students with no medical conditions. A self-assessment questionnaire regarding how well the subjects felt about their physical abilities was administered to measure psychological readiness before and after the warm-up. Subjects performed a non-warm-up, warm-up, or warm-up regimen with stretching prior to the assessment of the isokinetic moments of knee joints. After the measurements, the respective variables were analyzed using nonparametric tests. First, no statistically significant intergroup differences were found in the flexor and extensor peak torques of the knee joints at 60°/sec, which were assessed to measure muscle strength. Second, no statistically significant intergroup differences were found in the flexor and extensor peak torques of the knee joints at 180°/sec, which were assessed to measure muscle power. Third, the total work of the knee joints at 240°/sec, intended to measure muscle endurance, was highest in the aerobic-stretch-warm-ups (ASW) group, but no statistically significant differences were found among the groups. Finally, the psychological readiness for physical activity according to the type of warm-up was significantly higher in ASW. Simple stretching during warm-ups appears to have no effect on variables of exercise physiology in nonathletes

  3. Warm-up Optimizes Postural Control but Requires Some Minutes of Recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paillard, Thierry; Kadri, Mohamed Abdelhafid; Nouar, Merbouha Boulahbel; Noé, Frederic

    2018-05-02

    Paillard, T, Kadri, MA, Nouar, MB, and Noé, F. Warm-up optimizes postural control but requires some minutes of recovery. J Strength Cond Res XX(X): 000-000, 2018-The aim was to compare monopedal postural control between the dominant leg (D-Leg) and the nondominant leg (ND-Leg) in pre- and post-warm-up conditions. Thirty healthy male sports science students were evaluated before and after a warm-up exercise (12 minutes of pedaling with an incremental effort on a cycle ergometer with a controlled workload). Monopodal postural control was assessed for the D- and ND-Legs before and immediately, 2, 5, 10, and 15 minutes after the warm-up exercise, using a force platform and calculating the displacement velocity of the center of foot pressure on the mediolateral (COPML velocity) and anteroposterior (COPAP velocity) axes. No significant difference was observed between the D-Leg and ND-Leg for both COPML and COPAP velocity in all the periods. In comparison with pre-warm-up, COPML decreased after 15-minute and 10-minute recovery periods for the D-Leg and the ND-Leg, respectively (p warm-up optimized monopedal postural control but did not make it possible to distinguish a difference between the D-Leg and the ND-Leg. Some minutes of recovery are required between the end of the whole-body warm-up exercise and the beginning of the postural test to optimize postural control. The optimal duration of recovery turns out to be about 10-15 minutes.

  4. Warm-up Practices in Elite Boxing Athletes: Impact on Power Output.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunniffe, Brian; Ellison, Mark; Loosemore, Mike; Cardinale, Marco

    2017-01-01

    Cunniffe, B, Ellison, M, Loosemore, M, and Cardinale, M. Warm-up practices in elite boxing athletes: Iimpact on power output. J Strength Cond Res 31(1): 95-105, 2017-This study evaluated the performance impact of routine warm-up strategies in elite Olympic amateur boxing athletes and physiological implications of the time gap (GAP) between warm-up and boxing activity. Six male boxers were assessed while performing standardized prefight warm-up routines. Core and skin temperature measurements (Tcore and Tskin), heart rate, and upper- and lower-body power output (PO) were assessed before and after warm-up, during a 25-minutes GAP and after 3 × 2 minutes rounds of sparring. Reflected temperature (Tc) was also determined using high-resolution thermal images at fixed time-points to explore avenues for heat loss. Despite individual differences in warm-up duration (range 7.4-18.5 minutes), increases in Tcore and Tskin occurred (p ≤ 0.05). Corresponding increases (4.8%; p ≤ 0.05) in countermovement jump (CMJ) height and upward-rightward shifts in upper-body force-velocity and power-velocity curves were observed. Athletes remained inactive during the 25-minutes GAP with a gradual and significant increase in Tc occurring by the end of GAP suggesting the likelihood of heat loss. Decreases in CMJ height and upper-body PO were observed after 15 minutes and 25 minutes GAP (p ≤ 0.05). By the end of GAP period, all performance variables had returned to pre-warm-up values. Results suggest routine warm-ups undertaken by elite boxers have acute effects on power-generating capacity. Gradual decreases in performance variables are evident with inactivity and seem related to alterations in body temperature. Considering the constraints of major competitions and time spent in air conditioned holding areas before fights, practitioners should be aware of the potential of nullifying the warm-up effects.

  5. Acute effects of various weighted bat warm-up protocols on bat velocity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, G Francis; Dolny, Dennis

    2009-10-01

    Although research has provided evidence of increased muscular performance following a facilitation set of resistance exercise, this has not been established for use prior to measuring baseball bat velocity. The purpose of this study was to determine the effectiveness of selected weighted bat warm-up protocols to enhance bat velocity in collegiate baseball players. Nineteen collegiate baseball players (age = 20.15 +/- 1.46 years) were tested for upper-body strength by a 3-repetition maximum (RM) bench press (mean = 97.98 +/- 14.54 kg) and mean bat velocity. Nine weighted bat warm-up protocols, utilizing 3 weighted bats (light = 794 g; standard = 850 g; heavy = 1,531 g) were swung in 3 sets of 6 repetitions in different orders. A control trial involved the warm-up protocol utilizing only the standard bat. Pearson product correlation revealed a significant relationship between 3RM strength and pretest bat velocity (r = 0.51, p = 0.01). Repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA) revealed no significant treatment effects of warm-up protocol on bat velocity. However, the order of standard, light, heavy bat sequence resulted in the greatest increase in bat velocity (+6.03%). These results suggest that upper-body muscle strength influences bat velocity. It appears that the standard, light, heavy warm-up order may provide the greatest benefit to increase subsequent bat velocity and may warrant use in game situations.

  6. Comparison of Effects Produced by Physiological Versus Traditional Vocal Warm-up in Contemporary Commercial Music Singers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portillo, María Priscilla; Rojas, Sandra; Guzman, Marco; Quezada, Camilo

    2018-03-01

    The present study aimed to observe whether physiological warm-up and traditional singing warm-up differently affect aerodynamic, electroglottographic, acoustic, and self-perceived parameters of voice in Contemporary Commercial Music singers. Thirty subjects were asked to perform a 15-minute session of vocal warm-up. They were randomly assigned to one of two types of vocal warm-up: physiological (based on semi-occluded exercises) or traditional (singing warm-up based on open vowel [a:]). Aerodynamic, electroglottographic, acoustic, and self-perceived voice quality assessments were carried out before (pre) and after (post) warm-up. No significant differences were found when comparing both types of vocal warm-up methods, either in subjective or in objective measures. Furthermore, the main positive effect observed in both groups when comparing pre and post conditions was a better self-reported quality of voice. Additionally, significant differences were observed for sound pressure level (decrease), glottal airflow (increase), and aerodynamic efficiency (decrease) in the traditional warm-up group. Both traditional and physiological warm-ups produce favorable voice sensations. Moreover, there are no evident differences in aerodynamic and electroglottographic variables when comparing both types of vocal warm-ups. Some changes after traditional warm-up (decreased intensity, increased airflow, and decreased aerodynamic efficiency) could imply an early stage of vocal fatigue. Copyright © 2018 The Voice Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Dreaming on Mars: How Curiosity Performs Actuator Warm-Up While Sleeping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Gene Y.; Donaldson, James A.

    2013-01-01

    Before the Curiosity rover can perform its science activities for the day, such as driving, moving its robotic arm, or drilling, it first has to ensure that its actuators are within their allowable flight temperatures (AFTs). When the rover is awake, flight software uses heaters to warm up and maintain thermal zones at operational temperatures. However, Curiosity spends about 70% of its time sleeping, with the flight computer off, in order to conserve energy. Dream Mode is a special behavior that allows the rover to execute warm-up activities while sleeping. Using Dream Mode, actuators can be warmed up to their AFTs before the flight computer wakes up and uses them - saving power and improving operational efficiency. This paper describes the motivation behind Dream Mode, how it was implemented and tested on Curiosity, and the challenges and lessons learned along the way.

  8. Evaluation of the warm-up habits and knowledge levels in amateur athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasan Aykut Aysan

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the warm-up habit and level of knowledge in the amateur athletes.Materials and methods: A total of 510 amateur athletes aged between 17 and 30 years with the mean sport age of 6.2±3.4 years were included. There were 360 males (mean age 22.4±2.0 years and 150 females (mean age 21.2±2.1 years. Warm-up habits of athletes were obtained using by the Likert-type survey questionnaire consisting of 20 questions. The reliability coefficient of the survey had been calculated as cronbach alph=0.647, KMO=0.715, Barlett=1968.711 (p<0.05.Results: It was observed that 56.3% of the athletes had sportive success in elite level and 25% of the male athletes and 32% of the female athletes had never injured before. Item of “warm-up has no effect on the performance of the athlete” was rejected with the mean score of 2.70±0.93, item of “warm-up lessens the risk of being injured for the athletes” was accepted by majority (83.9%. Of all athletes, 83.9% of them had been injured more than once. The warm-up habit was found to be performed in 47.8% at pre-training or pre-competition periods, however cool-down habit was found in 17.3% of athletes at the end of activity.Conclusion: There was a common belief that warm-up had a positive effect on the performance of the athletes, reduced the risk of injury, increased the movement angle of joints. But it can be said that habits of the amateurs was not at a sufficient level. J Clin Exp Invest 2011;2(2:181-6

  9. ACUTE EFFECTS OF A RESISTED DYNAMIC WARM-UP PROTOCOL ON JUMPING PERFORMANCE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cilli, M; Yildiz, S; Saglam, T; Camur, MH

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the kinematic and kinetic changes when resistance is applied in horizontal and vertical directions, produced by using different percentages of body weight, caused by jumping movements during a dynamic warm-up. The group of subjects consisted of 35 voluntary male athletes (19 basketball and 16 volleyball players; age: 23.4 ± 1.4 years, training experience: 9.6 ± 2.7 years; height: 177.2 ± 5.7 cm, body weight: 69.9 ± 6.9 kg) studying Physical Education, who had a jump training background and who were training for 2 hours, on 4 days in a week. A dynamic warm-up protocol containing seven specific resistance movements with specific resistance corresponding to different percentages of body weight (2%, 4%, 6%, 8%, 10%) was applied randomly on non consecutive days. Effects of different warm-up protocols were assessed by pre-/post- exercise changes in jump height in the countermovement jump (CMJ) and the squat jump (SJ) measured using a force platform and changes in hip and knee joint angles at the end of the eccentric phase measured using a video camera. A significant increase in jump height was observed in the dynamic resistance warm-up conducted with different percentages of body weight (p 0.05). In jump movements before and after the warm-up, while no significant difference between the vertical ground reaction forces applied by athletes was observed (p > 0.05), in some cases of resistance, a significant reduction was observed in hip and knee joint angles (p jumping movements, as well as an increase in jump height values. As a result, dynamic warm-up exercises could be applicable in cases of resistance corresponding to 6-10% of body weight applied in horizontal and vertical directions in order to increase the jump performance acutely. PMID:25435670

  10. Post-warm-up muscle temperature maintenance: blood flow contribution and external heating optimisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raccuglia, Margherita; Lloyd, Alex; Filingeri, Davide; Faulkner, Steve H; Hodder, Simon; Havenith, George

    2016-02-01

    Passive muscle heating has been shown to reduce the drop in post-warm-up muscle temperature (Tm) by about 25% over 30 min, with concomitant sprint/power performance improvements. We sought to determine the role of leg blood flow in this cooling and whether optimising the heating procedure would further benefit post-warm-up T m maintenance. Ten male cyclists completed 15-min sprint-based warm-up followed by 30 min recovery. Vastus lateralis Tm (Tmvl) was measured at deep-, mid- and superficial-depths before and after the warm-up, and after the recovery period (POST-REC). During the recovery period, participants wore water-perfused trousers heated to 43 °C (WPT43) with either whole leg heating (WHOLE) or upper leg heating (UPPER), which was compared to heating with electrically heated trousers at 40 °C (ELEC40) and a non-heated control (CON). The blood flow cooling effect on Tmvl was studied comparing one leg with (BF) and without (NBF) blood flow. Warm-up exercise significantly increased Tmvl by ~3 °C at all depths. After the recovery period, BF Tmvl was lower (~0.3 °C) than NBF Tmvl at all measured depths, with no difference between WHOLE versus UPPER. WPT43 reduced the post-warm-up drop in deep-Tmvl (-0.12 °C ± 0.3 °C) compared to ELEC40 (-1.08 ± 0.4 °C) and CON (-1.3 ± 0.3 °C), whereas mid- and superficial-Tmvl even increased by 0.15 ± 0.3 and 1.1 ± 1.1 °C, respectively. Thigh blood flow contributes to the post-warm-up Tmvl decline. Optimising the external heating procedure and increasing heating temperature of only 3 °C successfully maintained and even increased T mvl, demonstrating that heating temperature is the major determinant of post-warm-up Tmvl cooling in this application.

  11. Effect of Preoperative Warm-up Exercise Before Laparoscopic Gynecological Surgery: A Randomized Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polterauer, Stephan; Husslein, Heinrich; Kranawetter, Marlene; Schwameis, Richard; Reinthaller, Alexander; Heinze, Georg; Grimm, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Laparoscopic surgical procedures require a high level of cognitive and psychomotoric skills. Thus, effective training methods to acquire an adequate level of expertise are crucial. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of preoperative warm up training on surgeon׳s performance during gynecologic laparoscopic surgery. In this randomized controlled trial, surgeons performed a preoperative warm up training using a virtual reality simulator before laparoscopic unilateral salpingo-oophorectomy. Serving as their own controls, each subject performed 2 pairs of laparoscopic cases, each pair consisting of 1 case with and 1 without warm up before surgery. Surgeries were videotaped and psychomotoric skills were rated using objective structured assessment of technical skills (OSATS) and the generic error rating tool by a masked observer. Perioperative complications were assessed. Statistical analysis was performed using a mixed model, and mean OSATS scores were compared between both the groups. In total, data of 10 surgeons and 17 surgeries were available for analysis. No differences between educational level and surgical experiences were observed between the groups. Mean standard error psychomotoric and task-specific OSATS scores of 19.8 (1.7) and 3.7 (0.2) were observed in the warm up group compared with 18.6 (1.7) and 3.8 (0.2) in the no warm up group, respectively (p = 0.51 and p = 0.29). Using generic error rating tool, the total number of errors was 8.75 (2.15) in the warm up group compared with 10.8 (2.18) in the no warm-up group (p = 0.53). Perioperative complications and operating time did not differ between both the groups. The present study suggests that warm-up before laparoscopic salpingo-oophorectomy does not increase psychomotoric skills during surgery. Moreover, it does not influence operating time and complication rates. (Medical University of Vienna-IRB approval number, 1072/2011, ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT01712607). Copyright © 2016

  12. Ankle Injuries: Reduce the Risk by Using a Soccer-Specific Warm-up Routine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Steven; Ellis, Margery; Combs, Sue; Hunt Long, Lynn

    2015-01-01

    Injuries to the ankle are among the most common injuries for soccer players at any age. Soccer coaches should be aware of current research and best practices that suggest it is possible to decrease the incidence of soccer players' ankle injuries by providing an appropriate warm-up to utilize prior to practices and games. This article introduces…

  13. The effect of video game "warm-up" on performance of laparoscopic surgery tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosser, James C; Gentile, Douglas A; Hanigan, Kevin; Danner, Omar K

    2012-01-01

    Performing laparoscopic procedures requires special training and has been documented as a significant source of surgical errors. "Warming up" before performing a task has been shown to enhance performance. This study investigates whether surgeons benefit from "warming up" using select video games immediately before performing laparoscopic partial tasks and clinical tasks. This study included 303 surgeons (249 men and 54 women). Participants were split into a control (n=180) and an experimental group (n=123). The experimental group played 3 previously validated video games for 6 minutes before task sessions. The Cobra Rope partial task and suturing exercises were performed immediately after the warm-up sessions. Surgeons who played video games prior to the Cobra Rope drill were significantly faster on their first attempt and across all 10 trials. The experimental and control groups were significantly different in their total suturing scores (t=2.28, df=288, Pvideo games prior to performing laparoscopic partial and clinical tasks (intracorporeal suturing) were faster and had fewer errors than participants not engaging in "warm-up." More study is needed to determine whether this translates into superior procedural execution in the clinical setting.

  14. Effect of active warm-up duration on morning short-term maximal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To examine the effect of active warm-up duration on short-term maximal performance assessed during Ramadan in the morning. Methods: Twelve healthy active men performed four Wingate tests for measurement of peak power and mean power before and during Ramadan at 09:00 a.m. The tests were performed ...

  15. Consequences of warm-up of a sector above 80K

    CERN Document Server

    Strubin, P

    2009-01-01

    There may be circumstances when a sector has to be partially or totally warmed-up to temperatures above 80 K, that is when thermal dilatation starts to play a role. Some equipment have been identify as presenting a risk, like the non-conform "plug-in" modules in the arcs. Because of motion induced by thermal dilatation, the electrical (ElQA) quality control may also have to be done again after cool-down. The main reason identified so far for partial warm-up is the required maintenance of the cooling towers and the cryogenics plants. There is also the request from the vacuum group to periodically warm-up the beam screen to temperatures in the 100 K region to release and pump-out the gas crysorbed on the surface of the beam screen. Observed and expected temperature conditions and statistics on failures of PIMs in sectors which have been warmed-up will be presented in this contribution. Methods to detect buckled PIMs will be described, as well as a recommended strategy for consolidation. Finally, the required el...

  16. Effects of Warming up with Music on Moods and Training Motivation among Athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Golnaz Khazdozi

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the present study is to review the effects of warming up with music on moods and training motivation among Kurdistan province’s female handball players0 for this purpose, 24 handball players of premier league of Kurdistan province were selected as the research subjects through a random sampling method. In this study a pretest-posttest design is applied by which 12 subjects have been selected as control group and 12 as experimental group. The latter group performed warm ups free from music. For the purpose of estimation of motivation of subjects, the questionnaire of sports motivation was made use of. In addition, for investigation of the moods variable, the questionnaire of athletes’ moods was used. Research results using the statistical test of Mann-Whitney showed that no significant difference existed between the experimental and control groups’ motivation and moods after performance of the warming up program (P: 0.124. This was while there was a statistically significant difference between the experimental and control groups’ moods prior and post to execution of Training program (P= 0.003. In general, it may be concluded that playing music doesn’t have any significant effects on athletes’ motivation while their moods can undergo significant changes through listening to music during warming up.

  17. Warm-up strategy and high-intensity endurance performance in trained cyclists

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Peter Møller; Bangsbo, Jens

    2015-01-01

    ; means±SD) performed three warm-up strategies lasting 20 min before a 4-min maximal performance test (PT). Strategies consisted of moderate intensity exercise (50%iPPO) followed by 6 min of recovery (MOD6) or progressive-high intensity exercise (10-100%iPPO and 2x20-s sprints) followed by recovery for 6...

  18. The Effects of Warm-Up Tasks on the Iranian EFL Students' Writing Ability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estalkhbijari, Zahra Pakdel; Khodareza, Mohammadreza

    2012-01-01

    This study aims to investigate the effects of warm up tasks as classroom activities on foreign language written production. For showing these effects, sixty out of one hundred forty Iranian sophomore EFL students from the Islamic Azad University of Lahijan branch, Iran were selected after following the Oxford Placement Test (OPT). Then, they were…

  19. The Effects on Soccer Passing Skills When Warming Up with Two Different Sized Soccer Balls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burcak, Keskin

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the present research is studying the effects of warm-up with two different sizes of balls on passing skills. Loughborough Soccer Passing Test (LSPT) was conducted on 28 non-elite football players, who participated in the present research for 10 training days. LSPT is a passing skill protocol established on completing 16 passes…

  20. Exercise Science Principles and the Vocal Warm-up: Implications for Singing Voice Pedagogy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoch, Matthew; Sandage, Mary J

    2018-01-01

    Principles from exercise science literature were applied to singing warm-up pedagogy as a method for examining parallels between athletic and voice training. Analysis of the use of exercise principles in vocal warm-up should illuminate aspects of voice training that may be further developed in the future. A selected canon of standard voice pedagogy texts and well-regarded warm-up methods were evaluated for use of exercise science principles for skill acquisition and fatigue resistance. Exercises were then categorized according to whether they were used for the purpose of skill acquisition (specificity), training up to tasks (overload), or detraining (reversibility). A preliminary review of well-established voice pedagogy programs reveals a strong bias toward the skill acquisition aspects of vocal warm-up, with little commentary on the fatigue management aspects. Further, the small number of vocalises examined that are not skill-acquisition oriented fall into a third "habilitative" category that likewise does not relate to overload but may play a role in offsetting reversibility. Although a systematic pedagogy for skill acquisition has emerged in the literature and practice of voice pedagogy, a parallel pedagogy for fatigue management has yet to be established. Identification of a systematic pedagogy for training up to specific singing genres and development of a singing maintenance program to avoid detraining may help the singer avoid injury. Copyright © 2018 The Voice Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. The Effect of Rehearsal Learning and Warm-up on the Speed of Different Swimming Strokes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magno, Carlo; Mascardo, Elizabeth

    2009-01-01

    The study investigated the effects of rehearsal learning and warm-up exercise on the time of performing different swimming strokes. The study was conducted among 202 college freshmen students taking up a course on physical education concentrated in swimming. The design employed is a mixed factorial (2 X 2) where time of swimming is measured before…

  2. Effects of Warming Up With Music on Moods and Training Motivation among Athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Golnaz Khazdozi

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the present study is to review the effects of warming up with music on moods and training motivation among Kurdistan province’s female handball players0 for this purpose, 24 handball players of premier league of Kurdistan province were selected as the research subjects through a random sampling method. In this study a pretest-posttest design is applied by which 12 subjects have been selected as control group and 12 as experimental group. The latter group performed warm ups free from music. For the purpose of estimation of motivation of subjects, the questionnaire of sports motivation was made use of. In addition, for investigation of the moods variable, the questionnaire of athletes’ moods was used. Research results using the statistical test of Mann-Whitney showed that no significant difference existed between the experimental and control groups’ motivation and moods after performance of the warming up program (P: 0.124. This was while there was a statistically significant difference between the experimental and control groups’ moods prior and post to execution of Training program (P= 0.003. In general, it may be concluded that playing music doesn’t have any significant effects on athletes’ motivation while their moods can undergo significant changes through listening to music during warming up.

  3. Precooling and Warm-Up Effects on Time Trial Cycling During Heat Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Horani, Ramzi A; Wingo, Jonathan E; Ng, Jason; Bishop, Phillip; Richardson, Mark

    2018-02-01

    Heat stress limits endurance exercise performance. Combining precooling and warm-up prior to endurance exercise in the heat may exploit the benefits of both strategies while avoiding the potential negative consequences of each. This study tested the hypothesis that precooling combined with warm-up improves time trial cycling performance in the heat relative to either treatment alone. Nine healthy men completed three 16.1-km time trials in 33°C after: 1) precooling (ice slurry and ice vest) alone (PREC); 2) warm-up alone (WU); or 3) PREC plus WU (COMBO). Tre was lower after PREC compared to WU throughout exercise and lower than COMBO for the first 12 km; COMBO was lower than WU for the first 4 km. Tsk during PREC was lower than COMBO and WU for the first 8 km, and lower in COMBO than WU for the first 4 km. PREC lowered pre-exercise heart rate relative to COMBO and WU (68 ± 10, 106 ± 12, 101 ± 13 bpm, respectively), but it increased similarly during exercise. Local sweat rate (SR) was lower in PREC (0.1 ± 0.1 mg · cm-2 · min-1) than COMBO (0.5 ± 0.2 mg · cm-2 · min-1) and WU (0.6 ± 0.2 mg · cm-2 · min-1) for the first 4 km. Treatments did not differentially affect performance (PREC = 31.9 ± 1.9 min, COMBO = 32.6 ± 2.7 min, WU = 33.1 ± 2.9 min). We conclude precooling alone or with warm-up mitigated thermal strain during exercise, but did not significantly improve 16.1-km cycling time trial performance.Al-horani RA, Wingo JE, Ng J, Bishop P, Richardson M. Precooling and warm-up effects on time trial cycling during heat stress. Aerosp Med Hum Perform. 2018; 89(2):87-93.

  4. Warm-up with weighted bat and adjustment of upper limb muscle activity in bat swinging under movement correction conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohta, Yoichi; Ishii, Yasumitsu; Ikudome, Sachi; Nakamoto, Hiroki

    2014-02-01

    The effects of weighted bat warm-up on adjustment of upper limb muscle activity were investigated during baseball bat swinging under dynamic conditions that require a spatial and temporal adjustment of the swinging to hit a moving target. Seven male college baseball players participated in this study. Using a batting simulator, the task was to swing the standard bat coincident with the arrival timing and position of a moving target after three warm-up swings using a standard or weighted bat. There was no significant effect of weighted bat warm-up on muscle activity before impact associated with temporal or spatial movement corrections. However, lower inhibition of the extensor carpi ulnaris muscle activity was observed in a velocity-changed condition in the weighted bat warm-up, as compared to a standard bat warm-up. It is suggested that weighted bat warm-up decreases the adjustment ability associated with inhibition of muscle activation under movement correction conditions.

  5. Acute effects of a loaded warm-up protocol on change of direction speed in professional badminton players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maloney, Sean J; Turner, Anthony N; Miller, Stuart

    2014-10-01

    It has previously been shown that a loaded warm-up may improve power performances. We examined the acute effects of loaded dynamic warm-up on change of direction speed (CODS), which had not been previously investigated. Eight elite badminton players participated in three sessions during which they performed vertical countermovement jump and CODS tests before and after undertaking the dynamic warm-up. The three warm-up conditions involved wearing a weighted vest (a) equivalent to 5% body mass, (b) equivalent to 10% body mass, and (c) a control where a weighted vest was not worn. Vertical jump and CODS performances were then tested at 15 seconds and 2, 4, and 6 minutes post warm-up. Vertical jump and CODS significantly improved following all warm-up conditions (P badminton players.

  6. The Effects of Three Physical and Vocal Warm-Up Procedures on Acoustic and Perceptual Measures of Choral Sound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook-Cunningham, Sheri L; Grady, Melissa L

    2018-03-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to assess the effects of three warm-up procedures (vocal-only, physical-only, physical/vocal combination) on acoustic and perceptual measures of choir sound. The researchers tested three videotaped, 5-minute, choral warm-up procedures on three university choirs. After participating in a warm-up procedure, each choir was recorded singing a folk song for long-term average spectra and pitch analysis. Singer participants responded to a questionnaire about preferences after each warm-up procedure. Warm-up procedures and recording sessions occurred during each choir's regular rehearsal time and in each choir's regular rehearsal space during three consecutive rehearsals. Long-term average spectra results demonstrated more resonant singing after the physical/vocal warm-up for two of the three choirs. Pitch analysis results indicate that all three choirs sang "in-tune" or with the least pitch deviation after participating in the physical/vocal warm-up. Singer questionnaire responses showed general preference for the physical/vocal combination warm-up, and singer ranking of the three procedures indicated the physical/vocal warm-up as the most favored for readiness to sing. In the context of this study with these three university choir participants, it seems that a combination choral warm-up that includes physical and vocal aspects is preferred by singers, enables more resonant singing, and more in-tune singing. Findings from this study could provide teachers and choral directors with important information as they structure and experiment with their choral warm-up procedures. Copyright © 2018 The Voice Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Video game as a preoperative warm-up for laparoscopic surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Fernando Korkes; Marcelo Langer Wroclawski; Alessandro  Tavares; Oseas de Castro-Neves Neto; Marcos  Tobias-Machado; Antonio Carlos Lima  Pompeo; Eric Roger Wroclawski

    2009-01-01

    Objective: The aim of the present study was to assess the influence of video game as warm-up before dry-lab laparoscopic activities. Methods: Eleven medical students participated in this prospective randomized crossover study. Students were divided into two groups. Students in Group 1 had to execute an interrupted suture with the dominant hand using a standardized technique (non-video game group). Students in Group 2 performed the same suture, but after playing a video game match (video game ...

  8. Games AS Warming Up Activities In Young Learners' Classrooms At An English Course

    OpenAIRE

    Aisyatin, Noviani

    2014-01-01

    The present research aimed at investigating types of games used by a teacher as warming-up activities in young learners' classrooms. The research involved a teacher of an English course and her young learner students. The data were collected by using observation and interview. The collected data were analyzed by using qualitative method. According to the result of data collection and data analysis, it was found that the teacher applied some types of games proposed by Hadfield (2001) and Evans...

  9. Chain-loaded variable resistance warm-up improves free-weight maximal back squat performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mina, Minas A; Blazevich, Anthony J; Giakas, Giannis; Seitz, Laurent B; Kay, Anthony D

    2016-11-01

    The acute influence of chain-loaded variable resistance exercise on subsequent free-weight one-repetition maximum (1-RM) back squat performance was examined in 16 recreationally active men. The participants performed either a free-weight resistance (FWR) or chain-loaded resistance (CLR) back squat warm-up at 85% 1-RM on two separate occasions. After a 5-min rest, the participants attempted a free-weight 1-RM back squat; if successful, subsequent 5% load additions were made until participants failed to complete the lift. During the 1-RM trials, 3D knee joint kinematics and knee extensor and flexor electromyograms (EMG) were recorded simultaneously. Significantly greater 1-RM (6.2 ± 5.0%; p  .05) was found in concentric EMG, eccentric or concentric knee angular velocity, or peak knee flexion angle. Performing a CLR warm-up enhanced subsequent free-weight 1-RM performance without changes in knee flexion angle or eccentric and concentric knee angular velocities; thus a real 1-RM increase was achieved as the mechanics of the lift were not altered. These results are indicative of a potentiating effect of CLR in a warm-up, which may benefit athletes in tasks where high-level strength is required.

  10. Effect of a submaximal half-squats warm-up program on vertical jumping ability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gourgoulis, Vassilios; Aggeloussis, Nickos; Kasimatis, Panagiotis; Mavromatis, Giorgos; Garas, Athanasios

    2003-05-01

    The purpose of the current research was to study the effect of a warm-up program including submaximal half-squats on vertical jumping ability. Twenty physically active men participated in the study. Each subject performed 5 sets of half-squats with 2 repetitions at each of the following intensities: 20, 40, 60, 80, and 90% of the 1 repetition maximum (1RM) load. Prior to the first set and immediately after the end of the last set, the subjects performed 2 countermovement jumps on a Kistler force platform; the primary goal was to jump as high as possible. The results showed that mean vertical jumping ability improved by 2.39% after the warm-up period. Subjects were then divided into 2 groups according to their 1RM values for the half-squat. Subjects with greater maximal strength ability improved their vertical jumping ability (4.01%) more than did subjects with lower maximal strength (0.42%). A warm-up protocol including half-squats with submaximal loads and explosive execution can be used for short-term improvements of vertical jumping performance, and this effect is greater in athletes with a relatively high strength ability.

  11. Acute effects of inspiratory muscle warm-up on pulmonary function in healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özdal, Mustafa

    2016-06-15

    The acute effects of inspiratory muscle warm-up on pulmonary functions were examined in 26 healthy male subjects using the pulmonary function test (PFT) in three different trials. The control trial (CON) did not involve inspiratory muscle warm-up, while the placebo (IMWp) and experimental (IMW) trials involved inspiratory muscle warm-up. There were no significant changes between the IMWp and CON trials (p>0.05). All the PFT measurements, including slow vital capacity, inspiratory vital capacity, forced vital capacity, forced expiratory volume in one second, maximal voluntary ventilation, and maximal inspiratory pressure were significantly increased by 3.55%, 12.52%, 5.00%, 2.75%, 2.66%, and 7.03% respectively, in the subjects in the IMW trial than those in the CON trial (pcooperation of the upper thorax, neck, and respiratory muscles, and increased level of reactive O2 species in muscle tissue, and potentially improvement of muscle O2 delivery-to-utilization. However, further investigation is required to determine the precise mechanisms responsible from among these candidates. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Warm-Up Activities of Middle and High School Band Directors Participating in State-Level Concert Band Assessments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Justin P.; Hancock, Carl B.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the warm-ups chosen by concert band directors participating in state-level performance assessments. We observed 29 middle and high school bands and coded the frequency and duration of warm-up activities and behaviors. Results indicated that most bands rehearsed music and played scales, long tones, and…

  13. Analysis of the piston ring/liner oil film development during warm-up for an SI-engine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frølund, Kent; Schramm, Jesper; Tian, T.

    2001-01-01

    A one-dimensional ring-pack lubrication model developed at MIT is applied to simulate the oil film behavior during the warm-up period of a Kohler spark ignition engine. This is done by making assumptions for the evolution of the ail temperatures during warm-up and that the oil control ring during...

  14. Effects of warm-up on hamstring muscles stiffness: Cycling vs foam rolling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales-Artacho, A J; Lacourpaille, L; Guilhem, G

    2017-12-01

    This study investigated the effects of active and/or passive warm-up tasks on the hamstring muscles stiffness through elastography and passive torque measurements. On separate occasions, fourteen males randomly completed four warm-up protocols comprising Control, Cycling, Foam rolling, or Cycling plus Foam rolling (Mixed). The stiffness of the hamstring muscles was assessed through shear wave elastography, along with the passive torque-angle relationship and maximal range of motion (ROM) before, 5, and 30 minutes after each experimental condition. At 5 minutes, Cycling and Mixed decreased shear modulus (-10.3% ± 5.9% and -7.7% ± 8.4%, respectively; P≤.0003, effect size [ES]≥0.24) and passive torque (-7.17% ± 8.6% and -6.2% ± 7.5%, respectively; P≤.051, ES≥0.28), and increased ROM (+2.9% ± 2.9% and +3.2% ± 3.5%, respectively; P≤.001, ES≥0.30); 30 minutes following Mixed, shear modulus (P=.001, ES=0.21) and passive torque (P≤.068, ES≥0.2) were still slightly decreased, while ROM increased (P=.046, ES=0.24). Foam rolling induced "small" immediate short-term decreases in shear modulus (-5.4% ± 5.7% at 5 minutes; P=.05, ES=0.21), without meaningful changes in passive torque or ROM at any time point (P≥.12, ES≤0.23). These results suggest that the combined warm-up elicited no acute superior effects on muscle stiffness compared with cycling, providing evidence for the key role of active warm-up to reduce muscle stiffness. The time between warm-up and competition should be considered when optimizing the effects on muscle stiffness. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Level of functional capacities following soccer-specific warm-up methods among elite collegiate soccer players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vazini Taher, Amir; Parnow, Abdolhossein

    2017-05-01

    Different methods of warm-up may have implications in improving various aspects of soccer performance. The present study aimed to investigate acute effects of soccer specific warm-up protocols on functional performance tests. This study using randomized within-subject design, investigated the performance of 22 collegiate elite soccer player following soccer specific warm-ups using dynamic stretching, static stretching, and FIFA 11+ program. Post warm-up examinations consisted: 1) Illinois Agility Test; 2) vertical jump; 3) 30 meter sprint; 4) consecutive turns; 5) flexibility of knee. Vertical jump performance was significantly lower following static stretching, as compared to dynamic stretching (P=0.005). Sprint performance declined significantly following static stretching as compared to FIFA 11+ (P=0.023). Agility time was significantly faster following dynamic stretching as compared to FIFA 11+ (P=0.001) and static stretching (P=0.001). Knee flexibility scores were significantly improved following the static stretching as compared to dynamic stretching (P=016). No significant difference was observed for consecutive turns between three warm-up protocol. The present finding showed that a soccer specific warm-up protocol relied on dynamic stretching is preferable in enhancing performance as compared to protocols relying on static stretches and FIFA 11+ program. Investigators suggest that while different soccer specific warm-up protocols have varied types of effects on performance, acute effects of dynamic stretching on performance in elite soccer players are assured, however application of static stretching in reducing muscle stiffness is demonstrated.

  16. Effect of prior warm-up duration on the time limit at peak speed in untrained men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Cruz, Victor H; Peserico, Cecília S; Machado, Fabiana A

    2017-10-01

    The peak speed (Vpeak) and its time limit (tlim) are variables used to prescribe training loads and the intervals durations during interval training, respectively. The aim of this study was to test different warm-up durations (5, 10 and 15 minutes), adapted from the protocol proposed by Billat et al.,1 to determine tlim in untrained men. Fifteen untrained men were submitted to the following laboratory evaluations: 1) an incremental running exercise test on a treadmill starting with a speed of 8 km/h, after a warm-up of walking at 6 km/h for three minutes, and increased by 1 km/h between each successive 3-minute stage until volitional exhaustion to determine Vpeak; 2) three rectangular tests, performed in randomized order, with warm-up durations of 5, 10, and 15 minutes at 60% of Vpeak to determine the tlim5, tlim10, and tlim15; after the warm-up the tests were performed at the speed of the individual Vpeak until volitional exhaustion. It was demonstrated that the duration of the warm-up affected the test duration (tlim). Significant differences were observed between tlim5 and tlim15, and between tlim10 and tlim15. However, tlim15 and tlim10 did not differ. Additionally, duration of the warm-up did not influence other variables (HRmax, RPEmax and post lactate concentrations). Therefore, it was concluded that the duration of the warm-up in tlim tests modifies the test duration in untrained men.

  17. Video game as a preoperative warm-up for laparoscopic surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Korkes

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of the present study was to assess the influence of video game as warm-up before dry-lab laparoscopic activities. Methods: Eleven medical students participated in this prospective randomized crossover study. Students were divided into two groups. Students in Group 1 had to execute an interrupted suture with the dominant hand using a standardized technique (non-video game group. Students in Group 2 performed the same suture, but after playing a video game match (video game group. After this initial task, groups were crossed. The time spent to complete each task was recorded, and the participants and observers had to judge the performance for each laparoscopic exercise. These variables were used as a measure of performance. Rresults: Mean time for laparoscopic surgery in this subset of inexperienced laparoscopic students was similar between non-video game versus video game groups (254.6 ± 187.7 versus 255.8 ± 183.6; p = 0.875. Subjective impression of observers regarding students’ performance was also similar (p = 0.662, but subjective impression of the participant about his own performance was different between both groups, with 64.7 versus 20.0% of participants that considered their performance good for video game versus non-video game groups (p = 0.044. Cconclusions: In conclusion, video games used as warm-up for laparoscopic practice seem to make inexperienced surgeons more confident and comfortable with the procedures, even though objective measures, as operative time and observers’ impression of surgeons’ performance do not seem to be affected by video game warm-up.

  18. The climatic warming up (the greenhouse effect); Le rechauffement climatique (l'effet de serre)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jancovici, J.M.; Jouzel, J. [CEA Saclay, Lab. des Sciences du Climat et de l' Environnement, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Lorius, C. [Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), Lab. de Glaciologie et Geophysique de l' Environnement, 38 - Grenoble (France)] [and others

    2000-05-01

    Facing the environmental and biological impacts of the climatic warming up, scientists and economists organized a debate on the subject. After a theoretical presentation of the greenhouse effect and the greenhouse gases, the climatic changes are discussed and simulation of the effects are presented. The today effects and tomorrow impacts on the agriculture and the public health are also presented. A synthesis is proposed to discuss the contribution of the energy policy and of the technological progress in measures of greenhouse effect control. (A.L.B.)

  19. The climatic warming up (the greenhouse effect); Le rechauffement climatique (l'effet de serre)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jancovici, J M; Jouzel, J [CEA Saclay, Lab. des Sciences du Climat et de l' Environnement, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Lorius, C [Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), Lab. de Glaciologie et Geophysique de l' Environnement, 38 - Grenoble (France); and others

    2000-05-01

    Facing the environmental and biological impacts of the climatic warming up, scientists and economists organized a debate on the subject. After a theoretical presentation of the greenhouse effect and the greenhouse gases, the climatic changes are discussed and simulation of the effects are presented. The today effects and tomorrow impacts on the agriculture and the public health are also presented. A synthesis is proposed to discuss the contribution of the energy policy and of the technological progress in measures of greenhouse effect control. (A.L.B.)

  20. Motivation and/or warm up games for third grade children Physical Education lesson

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margelia Bárbara Ramírez Blanco

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The Physical Education is an important element for the child’s multilateral and harmonic formation, its appropriate implementation is paramount for the development of the individual's physical performance capacity, the health preservation and for the moral and social values formation. The game is an important task for the children to  appropriate and correct physical, psychological and social development, they have as rights to enjoy fully the games and the recreation, which will be guided toward educational aims, their importance in the individual's integral development is universally recognized, they are also an effective aid in the Physical Education. Supported on theoretical and empiric research methods we could carry out our work offering motivational and warm up games like effective tool to be used by the professor in the Physical Education initial part lesson to work with the third grader boys and girls of “Camilo Cienfuegos” elementary school in Pinar del Rio municipality. The designed proposal is composed of ten games, which have the appropriate characteristics of the motivation and/or warm up games, that´s to say, games to increase the students´ motivation; easy to comprehend, of short duration, and to prepare the body to be worked with in the main part of the lesson, what implies the correct relationship whit the objective of it.

  1. Reduction of Harmful Emissions During Start and Warming Up of the Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volkov, N.; Chainikov, D.

    2018-01-01

    The question of decrease in harmful emissions when idling of a truck engine in the conditions of low temperatures is considered. The implementation of the thermogenerator for a power supply of electrical elements is offered in a design of the self-powered heater. The principle of the device operation is based on a thermoelectric effect at which there is heat absorption and thermo-EMF emergence. In a consequence of this process electricity is produced. The exhaust gases of the self-powered heater are the source of the absorbed heat and act as fuel for the thermogenerator. It allows developing energy for a power supply of electrical elements of the heater. It gives the chance not to start the engine for warming up during the long parking, thereby reducing harmful emissions.

  2. Mobile refrigeration system for precool and warm up of superconducting magnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandla, S. K.; Longsworth, R. C.

    2017-12-01

    Conservation of helium has become more important in recent years due to global shortages in supply. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) superconducting magnets use approximately 20% of the world’s helium reserves in liquid form to cool down and maintain operating temperatures at 4 K. This paper describes a mobile cryogenic refrigeration system, which has been developed by Sumitomo (SHI) Cryogenics of America, Inc. to conserve helium by shipping MRI magnets warm and cooling them down or servicing them on site at a medical facility. The system can cool a typical magnet from room temperature to below 40K in less than a week. The system consists of four single stage Displex®-type Gifford-McMahon (GM) expanders in a cryostat with heat exchangers integrated on the cold ends that cool the helium gas, which is circulated in a closed-loop system through the magnet by a cryogenic fan. The system is configured with heaters on the heat exchangers to effectively warm up a magnet. The system includes a scroll vacuum pump, which is used to evacuate the helium circuit with or without the magnet and turbo pump to evacuate the cryostat. Vacuum-jacketed transfer lines connect the cryostat to the magnet. The system is designed with its own controller for continuous operation of precool, warm up and evacuation processes with automatic and manual controls. The cryostat, pumps and gas controls are mounted on a dewar cart. One compressor and the system controller are mounted on a compressor and control cart, and the other three compressors are mounted on separate carts.

  3. Effects of Various Warm Up Protocol on Special Judo Fitness Test Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lum, Danny

    2017-02-13

    The purposed of this study was to compare the effects of postactivation potentiation (PAP) on Special Judo Fitness Test (SJFT) performance using explosive exercises that activates upper and lower limbs muscles. Eleven male judo athletes (mean ± SD, age, 16 - 29 years; height, 170 ± 7 cm; body mass, 73 ± 16 kg) attended four separate sessions. The first session was used to familiarise the subjects to the experimental procedure, the SJFT, the high pull test (HPT) and the two explosive exercises including resistance band pull and standing broad jump. Subsequently, subjects were randomly assigned in a counterbalanced manner to either perform the upper and lower body PAP (ULB), lower body PAP (LB) or usual competition (CON) warm up routine prior to performing the HPT and SJFT. The following variables were quantified: throws performed during series A, B, and C; total number of throws; heart rate immediately and 1 minute after the test; test index; peak power; and RPE after warm up. During series 1, number of throws performed in LB and ULB were significantly greater than CON (p < 0.05). Only ULB resulted in significantly greater number of total throws (p < 0.01) and higher peak power (p < 0.01) than CON. The RPE for both LB and ULB were significantly lower than CON (p < 0.01). Peak power was moderately correlated to total number of throws performed (r=0.4, p < 0.05). This study suggest that performing ULB before SJFT can result in improved performance and peak power.

  4. Heart-Rate Recovery After Warm-up in Swimming: A Useful Predictor of Training Heart-Rate Response?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganzevles, Sander P M; de Haan, Arnold; Beek, Peter J; Daanen, Hein A M; Truijens, Martin J

    2017-07-01

    For training to be optimal, daily training load has to be adapted to the momentary status of the individual athlete, which is often difficult to establish. Therefore, the current study investigated the predictive value of heart-rate recovery (HRR) during a standardized warm-up for training load. Training load was quantified by the variation in heart rate during standardized training in competitive swimmers. Eight female and 5 male Dutch national-level swimmers participated in the study. They all performed 3 sessions consisting of a 300-m warm-up test and a 10 × 100-m training protocol. Both protocols were swum in front crawl at individually standardized velocities derived from an incremental step test. Velocity was related to 75% and 85% heart-rate reserve (% HR res ) for the warm-up and training, respectively. Relative HRR during the first 60 s after the warm-up (HR Rw-up ) and differences between the actual and intended heart rate for the warm-up and the training (ΔHR w-up and ΔHR tr ) were determined. No significant relationship between HRR w-up and ΔHR tr was found (F 1,37 = 2.96, P = .09, R 2 = .07, SEE = 4.65). There was considerable daily variation in ΔHR tr at a given swimming velocity (73-93% HR res ). ΔHR w-up and ΔHR tr were clearly related (F 1,37 = 74.31, P warm-up does not predict heart rate during a directly subsequent and standardized training session. Instead, heart rate during the warm-up protocol seems a promising alternative for coaches to make daily individual-specific adjustments to training programs.

  5. The effect of warm-up, static stretching and dynamic stretching on hamstring flexibility in previously injured subjects.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Sullivan, Kieran

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Warm-up and stretching are suggested to increase hamstring flexibility and reduce the risk of injury. This study examined the short-term effects of warm-up, static stretching and dynamic stretching on hamstring flexibility in individuals with previous hamstring injury and uninjured controls. METHODS: A randomised crossover study design, over 2 separate days. Hamstring flexibility was assessed using passive knee extension range of motion (PKE ROM). 18 previously injured individuals and 18 uninjured controls participated. On both days, four measurements of PKE ROM were recorded: (1) at baseline; (2) after warm-up; (3) after stretch (static or dynamic) and (4) after a 15-minute rest. Participants carried out both static and dynamic stretches, but on different days. Data were analysed using Anova. RESULTS: Across both groups, there was a significant main effect for time (p < 0.001). PKE ROM significantly increased with warm-up (p < 0.001). From warm-up, PKE ROM further increased with static stretching (p = 0.04) but significantly decreased after dynamic stretching (p = 0.013). The increased flexibility after warm-up and static stretching reduced significantly (p < 0.001) after 15 minutes of rest, but remained significantly greater than at baseline (p < 0.001). Between groups, there was no main effect for group (p = 0.462), with no difference in mean PKE ROM values at any individual stage of the protocol (p > 0.05). Using ANCOVA to adjust for the non-significant (p = 0.141) baseline difference between groups, the previously injured group demonstrated a greater response to warm-up and static stretching, however this was not statistically significant (p = 0.05). CONCLUSION: Warm-up significantly increased hamstring flexibility. Static stretching also increased hamstring flexibility, whereas dynamic did not, in agreement with previous findings on uninjured controls. The effect of warm-up and static stretching on flexibility was greater in those with reduced

  6. Effect of static and dynamic muscle stretching as part of warm up procedures on knee joint proprioception and strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Gregory S

    2017-10-01

    The importance of warm up procedures prior to athletic performance is well established. A common component of such procedures is muscle stretching. There is conflicting evidence regarding the effect of static stretching (SS) as part of warm up procedures on knee joint position sense (KJPS) and the effect of dynamic stretching (DS) on KJPS is currently unknown. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of dynamic and static stretching as part warm up procedures on KJPS and knee extension and flexion strength. This study had a randomised cross-over design and ten healthy adults (20±1years) attended 3 visits during which baseline KJPS, at target angles of 20° and 45°, and knee extension and flexion strength tests were followed by 15min of cycling and either a rest period (CON), SS, or DS and repeat KJPS and strength tests. All participants performed all conditions, one condition per visit. There were warm up×stretching type interactions for KJPS at 20° (p=0.024) and 45° (p=0.018), and knee flexion (p=0.002) and extension (pwarm up procedures. However, the negative impact of SS on muscle strength limits the utility of SS before athletic performance. If stretching is to be performed as part of a warm up, DS should be favoured over SS. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. The effect of warm-up, static stretching and dynamic stretching on hamstring flexibility in previously injured subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murray Elaine

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Warm-up and stretching are suggested to increase hamstring flexibility and reduce the risk of injury. This study examined the short-term effects of warm-up, static stretching and dynamic stretching on hamstring flexibility in individuals with previous hamstring injury and uninjured controls. Methods A randomised crossover study design, over 2 separate days. Hamstring flexibility was assessed using passive knee extension range of motion (PKE ROM. 18 previously injured individuals and 18 uninjured controls participated. On both days, four measurements of PKE ROM were recorded: (1 at baseline; (2 after warm-up; (3 after stretch (static or dynamic and (4 after a 15-minute rest. Participants carried out both static and dynamic stretches, but on different days. Data were analysed using Anova. Results Across both groups, there was a significant main effect for time (p 0.05. Using ANCOVA to adjust for the non-significant (p = 0.141 baseline difference between groups, the previously injured group demonstrated a greater response to warm-up and static stretching, however this was not statistically significant (p = 0.05. Conclusion Warm-up significantly increased hamstring flexibility. Static stretching also increased hamstring flexibility, whereas dynamic did not, in agreement with previous findings on uninjured controls. The effect of warm-up and static stretching on flexibility was greater in those with reduced flexibility post-injury, but this did not reach statistical significance. Further prospective research is required to validate the hypothesis that increased flexibility improves outcomes. Trial Registration ACTRN12608000638336

  8. Effects of three warm-up regimens of equal distance on VO2 kinetics during supramaximal exercise in Thoroughbred horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukai, K; Hiraga, A; Takahashi, T; Ohmura, H; Jones, J H

    2010-11-01

    Several studies have indicated that even low-intensity warm-up increases O(2) transport kinetics and that high-intensity warm-up may not be needed in horses. However, conventional warm-up exercise for Thoroughbred races is more intense than those utilised in previous studies of equine warm-up responses. To test the hypothesis that warm-up exercise at different intensities alters the kinetics and total contribution of aerobic power to total metabolic power in subsequent supramaximal (sprint) exercise in Thoroughbred horses. Nine well-trained Thoroughbreds ran until fatigue at 115% of maximal oxygen consumption (VO2max) 10 min after warming-up under each of 3 protocols of equal running distance: 400 s at 30% VO2max (LoWU), 200 s at 60% VO2max (MoWU) and 120 s at 100% VO2max (HiWU). Variables measured during exercise were rates of O(2) and CO(2) consumption/production (VO2,VO2), respiratory exchange ratio (RER), heart rate, blood lactate concentration and accumulation rate and blood gas variables. VO2 was significantly higher in HiWU than in LoWU at the onset of the sprint exercise and HR was significantly higher in HiWU than in LoWU throughout the sprint. Accumulation of blood lactate, RER, P(a)CO(2) and PvCO2 in the first 60 s were significantly lower in HiWU than in LoWU and MoWU. There were no significant differences in stroke volume, run time or arterial-mixed venous O(2) concentration. These results suggest HiWU accelerates kinetics and reduces reliance on net anaerobic power compared with LoWU at the onset of the subsequent sprint. © 2010 EVJ Ltd.

  9. Enhancing vehicle’s engine warm up using integrated mechanical approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, T. M.; Syahir, A. Z.; Zulkifli, N. W. M.; Masjuki, H. H.; Osman, A.

    2017-06-01

    Transportation sector covers a large portion of the total energy consumption shares and is highly associated to global warming. Growing concern over the harmful gases being emitted from vehicles and their environmental implications has urged the need for pollutant reduction through more efficient engines. Good engine thermal management especially during cold-start warm up phase has been proven to enhance the engine efficiency in terms of fuel economy and greenhouse emissions specifically. In this study, the viability engine split cooling system was tested in two separate test. The parameters of interest include coolant and transmission temperature as these both parameters indicate the internal engine condition and highly associated with engine efficiency. In the first idle test, coolant temperature within the modified cooling configuration reached the optimum coolant temperature of 60 °C about 41.28% faster when compared to baseline configuration. The modified configuration also heat up the transmission oil around 4 times faster. In the second NEDC test which simulates the real time driving condition, the coolant of the modified vehicle reached the optimum temperature around 28.26% compared to the baseline.

  10. Joint-position sense is altered by football pre-participation warm-up exercise and match induced fatigue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salgado, Eduardo; Ribeiro, Fernando; Oliveira, José

    2015-06-01

    The demands to which football players are exposed during the match may augment the risk of injury by decreasing the sense of joint position. This study aimed to assess the effect of pre-participation warm-up and fatigue induced by an official football match on the knee-joint-position sense of football players. Fourteen semi-professional male football players (mean age: 25.9±4.6 years old) volunteered in this study. The main outcome measures were rate of perceived exertion and knee-joint-position sense assessed at rest, immediately after a standard warm-up (duration 25 min), and immediately after a competitive football match (90 minutes duration). Perceived exertion increased significantly from rest to the other assessments (rest: 8.6±2.0; after warm-up: 12.1±2.1; after football match: 18.5±1.3; pfootball match compared to both rest (pfootball match-induced fatigue. Warm-up exercises could contribute to knee injury prevention, whereas the deleterious effect of match-induced fatigue on the sensorimotor system could ultimately contribute to knee instability and injury. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. The “FIFA 11+” warm-up programme for preventing injuries in soccer players: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex de Andrade Fernandes

    Full Text Available Introduction Soccer is among the sports with the highest injury rate. A group of international experts from the Fédération Internationale de Football Association — FIFA’s Medical Assessment and Research Centre — have developed the “FIFA 11+”, a warm-up programme whose main goal is to reduce the risk of common injuries in both male and female soccer players. Objective To conduct a literature review in order to check the efficiency of the “FIFA 11 +” warm-up programme in preventing injuries in soccer players. Methods We conducted a systematic review of studies in the databases MEDLINE/PubMed, SciELO, ScienceDirect and SPORTDiscus, using the following keywords in combination with one another: “injury”, “prevention” and “warm-up”. Results Five studies met the inclusion criteria. In four studies, the authors conclude that the “FIFA 11 +” warm-up programme is effective for preventing injuries in soccer players. In one study, this protective effect was not observed. Conclusion The analyzed studies indicate that the FIFA 11+ warm-up programme for the prevention of sports injuries show positive signs that the use of the programme may help reduce the incidence of injuries in girls aged 13–17 years. In a male children population the results are inconclusive and further research is needed.

  12. Comparison of the effects of active, passive and mixed warm ups on swimming performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, S; Psycharakis, S G

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this paper was to compare the effects of an active (AWU), passive (PWU) and mixed warm up (MWU) on swimming performance. Eight male competitive swimmers completed each type of WU and, following a 20-minute rest, performed a maximum 100m test on their specialised stroke. The order of WUs was randomized and there was a 7-day period between subsequent testing sessions. The time taken to complete the 100m trial was the performance measure. The rating of perceived exertion (RPE) was measured immediately post WU, while heart rate (HR) was measured pre and post WU and pre and post the maximum swim. During the 20-minute rest, the swimmers' psychological state was assessed with the CSAI-2 questionnaire. Post WU HR and RPE had the lowest values following the AWU and the highest values following the PWU (Pperformance HR increased significantly relative to pre WU HR for all conditions (P≤0.01). Swimmers had relatively low levels of anxiety and modest to high levels of self confidence for all conditions. No WU appeared to be superior to the others with respect to swimming performance. The MWU produced nearly identical values to the AWU for most variables, and was therefore found to be an appropriate alternative WU type that swimmers may use before competition. The PWU also seemed to be appropriate, but the somewhat worse performance and lower cognitive anxiety and self confidence scores recorded, albeit non-significant, suggested that more swimmers and distances are tested before any firm conclusions regarding its effectiveness can be drawn.

  13. Effect of cluster set warm-up configurations on sprint performance in collegiate male soccer players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickerson, Brett S; Mangine, Gerald T; Williams, Tyler D; Martinez, Ismael A

    2018-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if back squat cluster sets (CS) with varying inter-repetition rest periods would potentiate greater sprint performance compared with a traditional set parallel back squat in collegiate soccer players. Twelve collegiate male soccer players (age, 21.0 ± 2.0 years; height, 180.0 ± 9.0 cm; body mass, 79.0 ± 9.5 kg) performed a 20-m sprint prior to a potentiation complex and at 1, 4, 7, and 10 min postexercise on 3 separate, randomized occasions. On each occasion, the potentiation complex consisted of 1 set of 3 repetitions at 85% 1-repetition maximum (1RM) for the traditional parallel back squat. However, on 1 occasion the 3-repetition set was performed in a traditional manner (i.e., continuously), whereas on the other 2 occasions, 30s (CS 30 ) and 60 s (CS 60 ) of rest were allotted between each repetition. Repeated-measures ANOVA revealed greater (p = 0.022) mean barbell velocity on CS 60 compared with the traditional set. However, faster (p < 0.040) 20-m sprint times were observed for CS 30 (3.15 ± 0.16 s) compared with traditional (3.20 ± 0.17 s) only at 10 min postexercise. No other differences were observed. These data suggest that a single cluster set of 3 repetitions with 30-s inter-repetition rest periods at 85% 1RM acutely improves 20-m sprinting performance. Strength and conditioning professionals and their athletes might consider its inclusion during the specific warm-up to acutely improve athletic performance during the onset (≤10 min) of training or competition.

  14. Effects of general, specific and combined warm-up on explosive muscular performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Cristobal Andrade

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to compare the acute effects of general, specific and combined warm-up (WU on explosive performance. Healthy male (n=10 subjects participated in six WU protocols in a crossover randomized study design. Protocols were: passive rest (PR; 15 min of passive rest, running (Run; 5 min of running at 70% of maximum heart rate, stretching (STR; 5 min of static stretching exercise, jumping [Jump; 5 min of jumping exercises – 3x8 countermovement jumps (CMJ and 3x8 drop jumps from 60 cm (DJ60], and combined (COM; protocols Run + STR + Jump combined. Immediately before and after each WU, subjects were assessed for explosive concentric-only (i.e. squat jump – SJ, slow stretch-shortening cycle (i.e. CMJ, fast stretch-shortening cycle (i.e. DJ60 and contact time (CT muscle performance. PR significantly reduced SJ performance (p =0.007. Run increased SJ (p =0.0001 and CMJ (p =0.002. STR increased CMJ (p =0.048. Specific WU (i.e. Jump increased SJ (p =0.001, CMJ (p =0.028 and DJ60 (p =0.006 performance. COM increased CMJ performance (p =0.006. Jump was superior in SJ performance vs. PR (p =0.001. Jump reduced (p =0.03 CT in DJ60. In conclusion, general, specific and combined WU increase slow stretch-shortening cycle (SSC muscle performance, but only specific WU increases fast SSC muscle performance. Therefore, to increase fast SSC performance, specific fast SSC muscle actions must be included during the WU.

  15. Virtual Reality Robotic Surgery Warm-Up Improves Task Performance in a Dry Lab Environment: A Prospective Randomized Controlled Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lendvay, Thomas S.; Brand, Timothy C.; White, Lee; Kowalewski, Timothy; Jonnadula, Saikiran; Mercer, Laina; Khorsand, Derek; Andros, Justin; Hannaford, Blake; Satava, Richard M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Pre-operative simulation “warm-up” has been shown to improve performance and reduce errors in novice and experienced surgeons, yet existing studies have only investigated conventional laparoscopy. We hypothesized a brief virtual reality (VR) robotic warm-up would enhance robotic task performance and reduce errors. Study Design In a two-center randomized trial, fifty-one residents and experienced minimally invasive surgery faculty in General Surgery, Urology, and Gynecology underwent a validated robotic surgery proficiency curriculum on a VR robotic simulator and on the da Vinci surgical robot. Once successfully achieving performance benchmarks, surgeons were randomized to either receive a 3-5 minute VR simulator warm-up or read a leisure book for 10 minutes prior to performing similar and dissimilar (intracorporeal suturing) robotic surgery tasks. The primary outcomes compared were task time, tool path length, economy of motion, technical and cognitive errors. Results Task time (-29.29sec, p=0.001, 95%CI-47.03,-11.56), path length (-79.87mm, p=0.014, 95%CI -144.48,-15.25), and cognitive errors were reduced in the warm-up group compared to the control group for similar tasks. Global technical errors in intracorporeal suturing (0.32, p=0.020, 95%CI 0.06,0.59) were reduced after the dissimilar VR task. When surgeons were stratified by prior robotic and laparoscopic clinical experience, the more experienced surgeons(n=17) demonstrated significant improvements from warm-up in task time (-53.5sec, p=0.001, 95%CI -83.9,-23.0) and economy of motion (0.63mm/sec, p=0.007, 95%CI 0.18,1.09), whereas improvement in these metrics was not statistically significantly appreciated in the less experienced cohort(n=34). Conclusions We observed a significant performance improvement and error reduction rate among surgeons of varying experience after VR warm-up for basic robotic surgery tasks. In addition, the VR warm-up reduced errors on a more complex task (robotic

  16. Time-dependent postural control adaptations following a neuromuscular warm-up in female handball players: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steib, Simon; Zahn, Peter; Zu Eulenburg, Christine; Pfeifer, Klaus; Zech, Astrid

    2016-01-01

    Female handball athletes are at a particular risk of sustaining lower extremity injuries. The study examines time-dependent adaptations of static and dynamic balance as potential injury risk factors to a specific warm-up program focusing on neuromuscular control. Fourty one (24.0 ± 5.9 years) female handball athletes were randomized to an intervention or control group. The intervention group implemented a 15-min specific neuromuscular warm-up program, three times per week for eleven weeks, whereas the control group continued with their regular warm-up. Balance was assessed at five time points. Measures included the star excursion balance test (SEBT), and center of pressure (COP) sway velocity during single-leg standing. No baseline differences existed between groups in demographic data. Adherence to neuromuscular warm-up was 88.7 %. Mean COP sway velocity decreased significantly over time in the intervention group (-14.4 %; p  control group (-6.2 %; p  = 0.056). However, these effects did not differ significantly between groups ( p  = .098). Mean changes over time in the SEBT score were significantly greater ( p  = .014) in the intervention group (+5.48) compared to the control group (+3.45). Paired t-tests revealed that the first significant balance improvements were observed after 6 weeks of training. A neuromuscular warm-up positively influences balance variables associated with an increased risk of lower extremity injuries in female handball athletes. The course of adaptations suggests that a training volume of 15 min, three times weekly over at least six weeks produces measurable changes. Retrospectively registered on 4th October 2016. Registry: clinicaltrials.gov. Trial number: NCT02925377.

  17. Influence of Whole Body Vibration and Specific Warm-ups on Force during an Isometric Mid-Thigh Pull

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa L. Cazás-Moreno

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of general and specific warm-up protocols on rate of force development (RFD, relative RFD (rRFD, ground reaction force (GRF and relative ground reaction force (rGRF during an isometric mid-thigh pull (IMTP, after WBV exposure. Methods: Fifteen healthy recreationally trained males  (age: 24.1 ± 2.3 yrs, height: 72.9 ± 7.8 cm; mass: 86.9 ± 8.3 completed five protocols: baseline, isometric vibration (iVib, isometric no vibration (iNV, dynamic vibration (dVib and dynamic no vibration (dNV. The baseline was completed without any warm-up prior to the IMTP. The intervention protocols had the same prescription of 4 sets of 30-second bouts of quarter squats (dynamic [DQS] and isometric [IQS] on the WBV platform with or without vibration. Following a one-minute rest period after each protocol, participants completed three maximal IMTPs. Results: Repeated measures ANOVA with a Bonferroni post hoc demonstrated that RFD in dNV (7657.8 ± 2292.5 N/s was significantly greater than iVib (7156.4 ± 2170.0 N/s. However, the other experimental trials for RFD demonstrated no significant differences (p>0.05. There were also no significant differences for rRFD, GRF or rGRF between protocols. Conclusion: These results demonstrate that a dynamic warm-up without WBV elicits greater RFD than an isometric warm-up with WBV prior to a maximal isometric exercise. Further research needs to be investigated utilizing dynamic and isometric warm-ups in conjunction with WBV and power output. Keywords: males, recreationally trained, power

  18. [Observation of the effects of warming-up and role-playing in psychodrama in terms of mood rating].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawai, S

    1993-04-01

    The purpose is to make an appropriate list of terms that describe person's moment-to-moment changes in moods during psychodrama sessions. Seventy nurse students participated in a series of psychodrama sessions, consisting of a session of warming-up and two sessions of role playing. They rated their moods at the beginning of the sessions and after each session, on a five-point scale for each of the 55 terms, which were supposed to cover all kinds of moods during psychodrama sessions. After analyzing variations (using factor analyses) of subjects' ratings, three factors were found to be sufficient for describing their moods, and the terms in the list were eventually reduced to sixteen. Changes of moods analyzed through the ratings of sixteen scales were related significantly with subjects' performances of warming-up and role playing.

  19. Designing self-monitoring warm-up strategy with blog-based learning system to support knowledge building

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Chan

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Preparing lessons before class is widely recognized as an effective means of increasing student motivation for classroom activities and learning outcome. However, the unclear status of lesson preparation generally discourages teachers and students from maintaining this effective learning strategy. This study applied the self-explanation theory and reading comprehension strategies to design a lesson warm-up mechanism that scaffolds knowledge building. A set of corresponding supporting tools were developed into a blog-based learning system (BBLS to implement the warm-up process. Results of a teaching experiment reveal positive effects of the tools on learning achievement, recall of old knowledge, connection between old and new knowledge, and understanding of new knowledge.

  20. Experimental and theoretical investigations on the warm-up of a high-pressure mercury discharge lamp

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zalach, J.; Franke, St.; Schoepp, H.; Araoud, Z.; Charrada, K.; Zissis, G.

    2011-01-01

    Modern high-pressure discharge lamps are forced to provide instant light and hot relight capabilities - if possible at lower power units. A detailed understanding of the warm-up of high-pressure discharge lamps is therefore required. Complex fluid model codes were developed for the past years including more and more processes like two-dimensional treatment of convection trying to provide a more comprehensive and consistent description of high-pressure discharge lamps. However, there is a lack of experimental data to examine the performance of these models. This work provides a very complete set of geometrical, electrical, spectroscopic, and thermographic data according to the warm-up of a high-pressure mercury discharge lamp that is compared to the results of a state of the art fluid code. Quantitative agreement is achieved for single parameters like wall temperatures. But the paper also reveals the need for further investigations and improvements of the code.

  1. USE OF WHOLE-BODY VIBRATION AS A MODE OF WARMING UP BEFORE COUNTER MOVEMENT JUMP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrique G. Artero

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Whole-body vibration (WBV has been suggested to be particularly effective on the stretch-shortening cycle-based movements, such as the counter movement jump (CMJ test (Issurin, 2005. Nevertheless, the literature on short-term vibration exposure and lower limb explosive performance (measured by CMJ test is contradictory. Either transient improvements (Bosco et al., 2000; Cochrane and Stannard, 2005; Torvinen et al., 2002a or no effects (Torvinen et al., 2002b; Rittweger et al., 2003; Cormie et al., 2006 have been reported after a single WBV exposure ranging from 30 s to 10 min. The present study aimed at better characterizing the use of a single short bout of WBV as a mode of warming up before a CMJ test.A total of 114 university students (37 men, 77 women, aged 19.6 ± 2.0 years signed an informed consent form and volunteered to participate in the study. The study protocol was approved by the Review Committee for Research Involving Human Subjects of our center. Participants were asked to come to the laboratory in three occasions three days apart. First visit: familiarization session aiming to learn the CMJ technique and to experience the vibration stimulus. Second visit: the participants performed three consecutive CMJ with one min rest interval. No significant differences were observed among the jumps, and the highest score was retained. Third visit: the participants were exposed to a single short bout of WBV and immediately after they performed three CMJ with one min rest interval.An infrared contact timing platform (ERGO JUMP Plus - BOSCO SYSTEM, Byomedic, S.C.P., Barcelona, Spain was used to measure "flight" time (t during the vertical jump (accuracy 0.001 s. Maximum height achieved by the body centre of gravity (h was then estimated, i.e. h = g · t2 / 8, where g = 9.81 m/s2. In all occasions, the participants were instructed to abstain from strenuous exercise for the preceding 24 hours.Whole-body vibration was carried out on an oscillating

  2. Beam stability and warm-up effects of Nd:YAG lasers used in particle image velocimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grayson, K; De Silva, C M; Hutchins, N; Marusic, I

    2017-01-01

    The characteristics and causes of Nd:YAG laser warm-up transients and steady state beam stability effects are investigated in this study. Dynamic laser performance has a particularly noticeable impact on particle image velocimetry (PIV) and other laser-based flow visualisation techniques, where changes in beam pointing can influence the overlap between laser light sheets and thereby degrade the correlation of PIV image pairs. Despite anecdotal knowledge or experience of laser warm-up effects, they have not been formally documented or quantified to date for PIV applications. In this study, the nature of these laser transients are analysed and compared among a selection of typical PIV laser equipment. An investigation into the cause of these transients during the laser warm-up sequence is also presented. Furthermore, the degree of dual cavity transient coupling within a PIV laser system is analysed to determine a practical limit to the laser light sheet overlap that can be expected from PIV experiments. Finally, the results from this study inform a series of recommendations for PIV best practice, which aim to minimise the impact of laser transients on experimental data. (paper)

  3. Influence of closed skill and open skill warm-ups on the performance of speed, change of direction speed, vertical jump, and reactive agility in team sport athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabbett, Tim J; Sheppard, Jeremy M; Pritchard-Peschek, Kellie R; Leveritt, Michael D; Aldred, Murry J

    2008-09-01

    In this study, we evaluated the efficacy of two different dynamic warm-up conditions, one that was inclusive of open skills (i.e., reactive movements) and one that included only preplanned dynamic activities (i.e., closed skills) on the performance of speed, change of direction speed, vertical jump, and reactive agility in team sport athletes. Fourteen (six male, eight female) junior (mean +/- SD age, 16.3 +/- 0.7 year) basketball players participated in this study. Testing was conducted on 2 separate days using a within-subjects cross-over study design. Each athlete performed a standardized 7-minute warm-up consisting of general dynamic movements and stretching. After the general warm-up, athletes were randomly allocated into one of two groups that performed a dynamic 15-minute warm-up consisting entirely of open or closed skills. Each of the warm-up conditions consisted of five activities of 3 minute duration. At the completion of the warm-up protocol, players completed assessments of reactive agility, speed (5-, 10-, and 20-m sprints), change of direction speed (T-test), and vertical jump. No significant differences (p > 0.05) were detected among warm-up conditions for speed, vertical jump, change of direction speed, and reactive agility performances. The results of this study demonstrate that either open skill or closed skill warm-ups can be used effectively for team sport athletes without compromising performance on open skill and closed skill tasks.

  4. Does Warm-Up Training in a Virtual Reality Simulator Improve Surgical Performance? A Prospective Randomized Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Cruz, José Arnaldo Shiomi; Dos Reis, Sabrina Thalita; Cunha Frati, Rodrigo Marcus; Duarte, Ricardo Jordão; Nguyen, Hiep; Srougi, Miguel; Passerotti, Carlo Camargo

    Virtual reality surgical simulators (VRSS) have been showing themselves as a valuable tool in laparoscopy training and education. Taking in consideration the effectiveness of the VRSS, new uses for this tool have been purposed. In sports, warming up before exercise clearly shows benefit in performance. It is hypothesized that warming up in the VRSS before going to the operating room may show benefit in surgical performance. Verify whether there is benefit in surgical performance with preoperatory warm-up using a VRSS. A total of 20 medical students with basic knowledge in laparoscopy were divided in 2 groups (I and II). Group I performed a laparoscopic cholecystectomy in a porcine model. Group II performed preoperative warm-up in a VRSS and then performed a laparoscopic cholecystectomy in a porcine model. The performance between both groups was compared regarding quantitative parameters (time for dissection of the gallbladder pedicle, time for clipping the pedicle, time for cutting the pedicle, time for gallbladder removal, total operative time, and aspirated blood loss) and qualitative parameters (depth perception, bimanual dexterity, efficiency, tissue handling, and autonomy) based on a previously validated score system, in which the higher the score, the better the result. Data were analyzed with level of significance of 5%. The group that underwent preoperative warm-up (group II) showed significantly superior results as to the time for dissection of the gallbladder pedicle (11.91 ± 9.85 vs. 4.52 ± 2.89min, p = 0.012), time for clipping the pedicle (5.51 ± 2.36 vs. 2.89 ± 2.76min, p = 0.004), time for cutting the pedicle (1.84 ± 0.7 vs. 1.13 ± 0.51, p = 0.019), aspirated blood loss (171 ± 112 vs. 57 ± 27.8ml, p = 0.006), depth perception (4.5 ± 0.7 vs. 3.3 ± 0.67, p = 0.004), bianual dexterity (4.2 ± 0.78 vs. 3.3 ± 0.67, p = 0.004), tissue handling (4.2 ± 0.91 vs. 3.6 ± 0.66, p = 0.012), and autonomy (4.9 ± 0.31 vs. 3.6 ± 0.96, p = 0.028). There

  5. Listening to Music during Warming-Up Counteracts the Negative Effects of Ramadan Observance on Short-Term Maximal Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baklouti, Hana; Chtourou, Hamdi; Driss, Tarak; Chaouachi, Anis; Chamari, Karim; Souissi, Nizar

    2015-01-01

    Aim The aim of the present study was to examine whether listening to music during warming-up might influence short-term maximal performance (STMP), cognitive anxiety, self-confidence, and enjoyment during Ramadan, and whether these affects might predict STMP. Methods Nine male physical education students (age: 21 ± 1.1 years; height: 1.8 ± 0.04 m; body mass: 83 ± 5 kg) volunteered to participate in the present study. A within-subjects design consisted of four experimental sessions: Two sessions occurred one week before Ramadan and two others took place during Ramadan. They were scheduled at 5 p.m. and were conducted as follows: After a 10-minute warm-up either with or without listening to music, each participant performed a 5-m multiple shuttle run test, after which he was asked to answer items intended to assess his affective state during the experimental task. Results Our findings revealed that STMP was lower during Ramadan than before Ramadan in the no-music condition. Additionally, it was found that STMP was higher in the music condition than in the no-music condition during Ramadan, and that STMP measured before Ramadan did not differ from that measured during Ramadan in the music condition. Regarding affects, the findings revealed that enjoyment was lower during Ramadan than before Ramadan in the music condition, and that cognitive anxiety was lower in the music condition than in the no-music condition before Ramadan. Self-confidence was not influenced by the experimental conditions. Conclusion This study showed that listening to music during warming-up not only would be beneficial for STMP in Ramadan fasters, but also would counteract the negative effects of Ramadan observance on STMP. PMID:26301508

  6. Unipedal Postural Balance and Countermovement Jumps After a Warm-up and Plyometric Training Session: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero-Franco, Natalia; Jiménez-Reyes, Pedro

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the immediate effects of a plyometric training protocol on unipedal postural balance and countermovement jumps. In addition, we analyzed the effects of a warm-up on these parameters. Thirty-two amateur male sprinters (24.9 ± 4.1 years; 72.3 ± 10.7 kg; 1.78 ± 0.05 m; 22.6 ± 3.3 kg·m) were randomly sorted into a control group (n = 16) (they did not perform any physical activity) and a plyometric training group (n = 16) (they performed a 15-minute warm-up and a high-intensity plyometric protocol consisting of 10 sets of 15 vertical jumps). Before and after the warm-up, and immediately after and 5 minutes after the plyometric protocol, all athletes indicated the perceived exertion on calf and quad regions on a scale from 0 (no exertion) to 10 (maximum exertion). They also carried out a maximum countermovement jump and a unipedal postural balance test (athletes would remain as still as possible for 15 seconds in a left leg and right leg support stance). Results showed that, in the plyometric group, length and velocity of center-of-pressure movement in right leg support stance increased compared with baseline (p = 0.001 and p = 0.004, respectively) and to the control group (p = 0.035 and p = 0.029, respectively) immediately after the plyometric protocol. In addition, the countermovement jump height decreased right after the plyometric protocol (p unipedal postural balance remained unaltered. As a conclusion, high-intensity plyometric exercises blunt unipedal postural balance and countermovement jump performance. The deterioration lasts at least 5 minutes, which may influence future exercises in the training session. Coaches should plan the training routine according to the immediate effects of plyometry on postural balance and vertical jumps, which play a role in injury prevention and sports performance.

  7. Passive heating following the prematch warm-up in soccer: examining the time-course of changes in muscle temperature and contractile function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Paul W M; Cross, Rebecca; Lovell, Ric

    2015-12-01

    This study examined changes in muscle temperature, electrically evoked muscle contractile properties, and voluntary power before and after a soccer specific active warm-up and subsequent rest period. Ten amateur soccer players performed two experimental sessions that involved performance of a modified FIFA 11+ soccer specific warm-up, followed by a 12.5-min rest period where participants were required to wear either normal clothing or a passive electrical heating garment was applied to the upper thigh muscles. Assessments around the warm-up and cool-down included measures of maximal torque, rate of torque development, muscle temperature (Tm), and electrically evoked measures of quadriceps contractile function. Tm was increased after the warm-up by 3.2 ± 0.7°C (P warm-up between 20% and 30% (P warm-up did not effect variables measured. While Tm was reduced by 1.4 ± 0.4°C after the rest period (P warm-up levels. Voluntary and evoked rate of torque development remained elevated from pre warm-up levels at the end of the cool-down (P warm-up elevated muscle temperature by 3.2°C and was associated with concomitant increases of between 20% and 30% in voluntary rate of torque development, which seems explained by elevations in rate-dependent measures of intrinsic muscle contractile function. Application of a passive heating garment did not attenuate declines in muscle temperature during a 12.5-min rest period. © 2015 The Authors. Physiological Reports published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American Physiological Society and The Physiological Society.

  8. The acoustic and perceptual differences to the non-singer's singing voice before and after a singing vocal warm-up

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeRosa, Angela

    The present study analyzed the acoustic and perceptual differences in non-singer's singing voice before and after a vocal warm-up. Experiments were conducted with 12 females who had no singing experience and considered themselves to be non-singers. Participants were recorded performing 3 tasks: a musical scale stretching to their most comfortable high and low pitches, sustained productions of the vowels /a/ and /i/, and singing performance of the "Star Spangled Banner." Participants were recorded performing these three tasks before a vocal warm-up, after a vocal warm-up, and then again 2-3 weeks later after 2-3 weeks of practice. Acoustical analysis consisted of formant frequency analysis, singer's formant/singing power ratio analysis, maximum phonation frequency range analysis, and an analysis of jitter, noise to harmonic ratio (NHR), relative average perturbation (RAP), and voice turbulence index (VTI). A perceptual analysis was also conducted with 12 listeners rating comparison performances of before vs. after the vocal warm-up, before vs. after the second vocal warm-up, and after both vocal warm-ups. There were no significant findings for the formant frequency analysis of the vowel /a/, but there was significance for the 1st formant frequency analysis of the vowel /i/. Singer's formant analyzed via Singing Power Ratio analysis showed significance only for the vowel /i/. Maximum phonation frequency range analysis showed a significant increase after the vocal warm-ups. There were no significant findings for the acoustic measures of jitter, NHR, RAP, and VTI. Perceptual analysis showed a significant difference after a vocal warm-up. The results indicate that a singing vocal warm-up can have a significant positive influence on the singing voice of non-singers.

  9. Efficacy of the FIFA 11+ Warm-Up Programme in Male Youth Football: A Cluster Randomised Controlled Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oluwatoyosi B. A. Owoeye

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The FIFA 11+ is a structured warm-up programme specially designed to prevent injuries among football players from age 14 years and above. However, studies to prove its efficacy are generally few and it is yet to be tested in male youth footballers and among African players. The purpose of the study was to examine the efficacy of the FIFA 11+ programme in reducing the risk of injuries among male youth football players of the Lagos Junior League. A cluster randomised controlled trial was conducted. All the 20 teams (414 players aged 14 -19 years in the Premier League division were block-randomised into either an intervention (INT or a control (CON group. The INT group performed the FIFA 11+ exercises as warm-up during training sessions and the CON group performed usual warm-up. Participating teams were prospectively followed through an entire league season of 6 months in which they were visited every week to assess injured players for time-loss injuries in both groups. The primary outcomes were any injury to the players, injuries by type of exposure and injuries specific to the lower extremities. The secondary outcomes were injuries reported by body location, aetiology, mechanism and severity. In total, 130 injuries were recorded affecting 104 (25% of the 416 players. Team and player compliance with the INT was 60% and 74% respectively. Based on the primary outcome measures of the study, the FIFA 11+ programme significantly reduced the overall rate of injury in the INT group by 41% [RR = 0.59 (95% CI: 0.40 – 0.86; p = 0.006] and all lower extremity injuries by 48% [RR = 0.52 (95% CI: 0.34 – 0.82; p = 0.004]. However, the rate of injury reduction based on secondary outcomes mostly did not reach the level of statistical significance. The FIFA 11+ programme is effective in reducing the rates of injuries in male youth football players.

  10. Efficacy of the FIFA 11+ Warm-Up Programme in Male Youth Football: A Cluster Randomised Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owoeye, Oluwatoyosi B. A.; Akinbo, Sunday R. A.; Tella, Bosede A.; Olawale, Olajide A.

    2014-01-01

    The FIFA 11+ is a structured warm-up programme specially designed to prevent injuries among football players from age 14 years and above. However, studies to prove its efficacy are generally few and it is yet to be tested in male youth footballers and among African players. The purpose of the study was to examine the efficacy of the FIFA 11+ programme in reducing the risk of injuries among male youth football players of the Lagos Junior League. A cluster randomised controlled trial was conducted. All the 20 teams (414 players aged 14 -19 years) in the Premier League division were block-randomised into either an intervention (INT) or a control (CON) group. The INT group performed the FIFA 11+ exercises as warm-up during training sessions and the CON group performed usual warm-up. Participating teams were prospectively followed through an entire league season of 6 months in which they were visited every week to assess injured players for time-loss injuries in both groups. The primary outcomes were any injury to the players, injuries by type of exposure and injuries specific to the lower extremities. The secondary outcomes were injuries reported by body location, aetiology, mechanism and severity. In total, 130 injuries were recorded affecting 104 (25%) of the 416 players. Team and player compliance with the INT was 60% and 74% respectively. Based on the primary outcome measures of the study, the FIFA 11+ programme significantly reduced the overall rate of injury in the INT group by 41% [RR = 0.59 (95% CI: 0.40 – 0.86; p = 0.006)] and all lower extremity injuries by 48% [RR = 0.52 (95% CI: 0.34 – 0.82; p = 0.004)]. However, the rate of injury reduction based on secondary outcomes mostly did not reach the level of statistical significance. The FIFA 11+ programme is effective in reducing the rates of injuries in male youth football players. Key points The FIFA 11+ has only been tested in randomised controlled trials conducted on female youth football players; this

  11. Acute and Time-Course Effects of Traditional and Dynamic Warm-Up Routines in Young Elite Junior Tennis Players.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Ayala

    Full Text Available Despite the large number of studies that have examined the acute effects of different warm up modalities (WU on physical performance, none of them have documented the time course of potential performance recovery in tennis players. The aim of this study was twofold: (a to analyze and compare the acute effects of two different WU modalities (traditional WU [TWU] and dynamic WU [DWU] on physical performance (i.e., CMJ, sprint, serve speed and accuracy in elite junior players, as well as (b to monitor the time course of any WU-induced changes after 30 and 60 min of simulated match-play. Twelve junior elite players completed both WUs modalities (TWU and DWU in a counterbalanced order on separate days. In each experimental session, counter movement jump (CMJ, 20-m sprint, tennis serve speed and accuracy tests were performed before (immediately after TWU or DWU during (30 min and after 60 min of a simulated match play. Measures were compared via four factorial (WU intervention and time repeated measures ANOVAs. There were main effects of WU (TWU and DWU throughout the time for all the variables analysed. The results indicate that DWU routine led to significantly faster 20 m sprint times and higher CMJs as well as faster and more accurate tennis serves at both post warm-up and 30 min match-play testing moments in comparison with the scores reported by the TWU routine (p 75-99%. No significant intergroup differences were found at 60-min match-play testing moment in any variable (except for the 20 m sprint. Therefore, the findings of this study recommend for optimal performance in these elite tennis players, DWU routines should be performed prior to formal training and competition rather than TWU routines.

  12. Thermal management for GDI engine. Ways to reduce warm up; Thermomanagement beim DI Ottomotor. Wege zur Verkuerzung des Warmlaufs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koch, F.; Haubner, F.; Schwaderlapp, M. [FEV Motorentechnik GmbH und Co KG, Aachen (Germany)

    2001-07-01

    The cooling system of modern engines has to fulfill demands which are for the engine fuel consumption, increase of efficiency, decrease of emissions and for the vehicle warm up characteristic and cabin heater power. Most of the potential to optimize the cooling system is found at low engine loads and during the warm up. For future systems a precise control of the cooling power is required. Parameters are the engine load and the control of coolant and component temperatures. This parameters are necessary to define the strategy of a thermal management system of the engine. Simulation models were developed to describe the thermal behavior and the interactions between cooling system and thermodynamic, thermal load of the components and Tribology. Based on this a concept was worked out which lead to a fuel consumption reduction of 3,8% in NEFZ. (orig.) [German] Das Kuehlsystem heutiger Motoren muss Anforderungen erfuellen, die sich motorseitig aus Verbrauchsreduzierung, Wirkungsgradoptimierung und gleichzeitiger Verschaerfung der Abgasnormen sowie fahrzeugseitig aus der Warmlaufdynamik insbesondere der fuer die Fahrzeugheizung benoetigten Leistung ergeben. Die Potenziale zur Optimierung des Kuehlsystems finden sich vorwiegend fuer den Motorbetrieb bei niedrigen Motorlasten und im Warmlauf. Fuer zukuenftige Systeme erfordert dies eine exaktere Regelung der Kuehlleistung, die sich am tatsaechlichen Bedarf des Motors orientiert. Als wesentliche Parameter sind die staerkere Beruecksichtigung der Motorlast und die gezielte Regelung der Kuehlmittel- sowie der Bauteiltemperaturen zu nennen. Besondere Bedeutung bekommt die Definition der Betriebsweise eines Thermomanagementsystems. Zur Auslegung wurden Simulationsmodelle entwickelt, die das thermische Verhalten und die wesentlichen Interaktionen des Kuehlsystems mit der Thermodynamik, der thermischen Bauteilbelastung und der Tribologie detailliert beschreiben und ein Konzept erarbeitet, das fuer ein Mittelklassefahrzeug 3

  13. Reliability and Validity of a Submaximal Warm-up Test for Monitoring Training Status in Professional Soccer Players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabbani, Alireza; Kargarfard, Mehdi; Twist, Craig

    2018-02-01

    Rabbani, A, Kargarfard, M, and Twist, C. Reliability and validity of a submaximal warm-up test for monitoring training status in professional soccer players. J Strength Cond Res 32(2): 326-333, 2018-Two studies were conducted to assess the reliability and validity of a submaximal warm-up test (SWT) in professional soccer players. For the reliability study, 12 male players performed an SWT over 3 trials, with 1 week between trials. For the validity study, 14 players of the same team performed an SWT and a 30-15 intermittent fitness test (30-15IFT) 7 days apart. Week-to-week reliability in selected heart rate (HR) responses (exercise heart rate [HRex], heart rate recovery [HRR] expressed as the number of beats recovered within 1 minute [HRR60s], and HRR expressed as the mean HR during 1 minute [HRpost1]) was determined using the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) and typical error of measurement expressed as coefficient of variation (CV). The relationships between HR measures derived from the SWT and the maximal speed reached at the 30-15IFT (VIFT) were used to assess validity. The range for ICC and CV values was 0.83-0.95 and 1.4-7.0% in all HR measures, respectively, with the HRex as the most reliable HR measure of the SWT. Inverse large (r = -0.50 and 90% confidence limits [CLs] [-0.78 to -0.06]) and very large (r = -0.76 and CL, -0.90 to -0.45) relationships were observed between HRex and HRpost1 with VIFT in relative (expressed as the % of maximal HR) measures, respectively. The SWT is a reliable and valid submaximal test to monitor high-intensity intermittent running fitness in professional soccer players. In addition, the test's short duration (5 minutes) and simplicity mean that it can be used regularly to assess training status in high-level soccer players.

  14. Effects of Different Post-Activation Potentiation Warm-Ups on Repeated Sprint Ability in Soccer Players from Different Competitive Levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez-Sanchez, Javier; Rodriguez, Alejandro; Petisco, Cristina; Ramirez-Campillo, Rodrigo; Martínez, Cristian; Nakamura, Fábio Y

    2018-03-01

    This study aimed to compare the effects of a traditional warm-up with two post-activation potentiation (PAP) warm-up strategies on the repeated sprint ability (RSA) of soccer players from national (NL) and regional (RL) competitive levels. Sixteen young players (NL, n = 8, age = 20.7 ± 1.4 y, body mass = 68.5 ± 7.0 kg, body height = 177.4 ± 5.2 cm; RL, n = 8, age = 20.8 ± 1.0 y, body mass = 68.7 ± 4.0 kg, body height = 176.6 ± 5.6 cm) were recruited to complete a traditional warm-up (CONTROL), a PAP warm-up incorporating squats with a load (~60% 1RM) that allowed a high speed (1 m/s) of movement and a high number of repetitions (PAP-1), and a PAP warm-up with a load (~90% 1RM) that allowed a moderate speed (0.5 m/s) of movement and a reduced number of repetitions (PAP-0.5). A RSA test (six 20-m sprints with 20 s of recovery) was performed 5 min after the PAP warm-up to assess the effects of the different protocols on the fastest sprint (RSAb) and the mean time of all sprints (RSAm). A meaningful improvement of RSA performance was observed with PAP-0.5, attaining a large effect on NL (RSAb, ES = -1.5; RSAm, ES = -1.3) and only a small effect on RL athletes (RSAb and RSAm, ES = -0.2). Moreover, when each RSA sprint performance was compared between NL and RL players, after PAP-0.5 greater performance for all sprints was observed in the NL players. Therefore, adding a heavy strength-based conditioning exercise during the warm-up prior to a RSA test may induce significant performance improvements in NL, but only small effects in RL players.

  15. Warming Up to Wireless

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milner, Jacob

    2005-01-01

    In districts big and small across the U.S., students, teachers, and administrators alike have come to appreciate the benefits of wireless technology. Because the technology delivers Internet signals on airborne radio frequencies, wireless networking allows users of all portable devices to move freely on a school's campus and stay connected to the…

  16. Warming up a nucleon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eletsky, V.L.

    1991-01-01

    The problem of temperature dependence of nucleon mass is addressed by considering a retarded correlator of two currents with quantum numbers of a nucleon at finite temperature T π in the chiral limit. It is shown that at Euclidean momenta the leading one-loop corrections arise from direct interaction of thermal pions with the currents. A dispersive representation for the correlator shows that this interaction smears the nucleon pole over frequency interval with width ∼ T. This interaction does not change the exponential fall-off of the correlator in Euclidean space but gives an O(T 2 /F π 2 ) contribution to the pre-exponential factor. 11 refs. (author)

  17. Warming up in Mongolia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, John D.; Richards, Jenny; Gawin, Luke; Kerby, Adam; Kyriacou, Sotira; Kelly, Brenda; Andoh, Adjoa; Environment., Television Trust for the; Ltd., BBC Worldwide; Films., Bullfrog

    2005-01-01

    Ulaan Baatar is the coldest capital city in the world, with winter lasting for seven months of the year. Following the collapse of communist rule in 1991, increasing numbers of Mongolians are moving into the city, where they mostly live in sprawling, polluted and unplanned slums. Today the Mongolian

  18. CALENTAMIENTO COMPETITIVO EN BALONCESTO: REVISIÓN BIBLIOGRÁFICA Y PROPUESTA Competitive warm-up in basketball: literature review and proposal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Berdejo-del-Fresno

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available

    Resumen

    El calentamiento es utilizado, aceptado y practicado previamente a la realización de una práctica deportiva por la totalidad de sus participantes. Además, es considerado imprescindible para alcanzar un rendimiento óptimo por la mayoría de deportistas. Sin embargo, existe poca evidencia científica que apoye su efectividad. Todo esto, junto con la diversidad de los deportes, hace necesario la estandarización de unas pautas comunes de calentamiento para cada deporte o disciplina deportiva. En cuanto al baloncesto de élite se refiere, hemos encontrado un gran vacío científico que nos gustaría cubrir. Por lo tanto, los objetivos de este artículo son, primero, la realización de una revisión bibliográfica sobre todos los aspectos relacionados con el calentamiento como pueden ser: definición de calentamiento, tipos de calentamientos, beneficios del mismo, estructura que debe seguir (intensidad, duración, recuperación y especificidad, factores que influyen sobre él, estiramientos si o estiramientos no y de qué tipo en el calentamiento. Y segundo, con las conclusiones obtenidas, describir y proponer una metodología de calentamiento competitivo adaptado al baloncesto de alto nivel, para que ésta se convierta en una guía de referencia justificada a la hora de realizar esta fase pre-partido.

     

    Palabras Clave: estiramientos estáticos, estiramientos dinámicos, calentamiento general, calentamiento específico, baloncesto

    Abstract

    Warm-up is used, accepted and performed by every participant before practising any sport. Warm-up is also considered by most sportmen as fundamental to achieve optimal performance. However, there is little scientific evidence supporting its effectiveness. This lack of evidence, together with the diversity of sports, requires the standardisation of common warm-up patterns for each sport activity. As elite basketball is concerned

  19. The Contribution of the Dyadic Parent-Child Interaction Coding System (DPICS) Warm-Up Segments in Assessing Parent-Child Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanley, Jenelle R.; Niec, Larissa N.

    2011-01-01

    This study evaluated the inclusion of uncoded segments in the Dyadic Parent-Child Interaction Coding System, an analogue observation of parent-child interactions. The relationships between warm-up and coded segments were assessed, as well as the segments' associations with parent ratings of parent and child behaviors. Sixty-nine non-referred…

  20. The effect of a preoperative warm-up with a custom-made Nintendo video game on the performance of laparoscopic surgeons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jalink, M. B.; Heineman, E.; Pierie, J. P. E. N.; Hoedemaker, H. O. ten Cate

    It has previously been shown that short, pre-operative practice with a simulator, box trainer, or certain video games can temporarily improve one's basic laparoscopic skills; the so-called warm-up effect. In this experiment, we tested the hypothesis that Underground video game made for training

  1. Comparing the Exposure-Response Relationships of Physiological and Traditional Vocal Warm-ups on Aerodynamic and Acoustic Parameters in Untrained Singers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Jing; Xue, Chao; Chou, Adriana; Scholp, Austin; Gong, Ting; Zhang, Yi; Chen, Zhen; Jiang, Jack J

    2018-02-05

    The aim of this study was to quantify the effects of traditional and physiological warm-up exercises and to determine the optimal duration of these methods using acoustic and aerodynamic metrics. Twenty-six subjects were recruited to participate in both straw phonation exercises (physiological vocal warm-up) and traditional singing exercises (traditional vocal warm-up) for 20 minutes each, 24 hours apart. Phonation threshold pressure (PTP), fundamental frequency, jitter, shimmer, and noise-to-harmonics ratio were measured before the intervention (m0), as well as after 5 minutes (m5), 10 minutes (m10), 15 minutes (m15), and 20 minutes (m20) of intervention. PTP decreased significantly after straw phonation and reached a minimum value at 10 minutes (P warm-up. Straw phonation improves the subjects' fatigue resistance and vocal economy, resulting in a reduced PTP, whereas traditional singing exercises focus on technical singing skills, leading to an improvement of acoustic variables. Copyright © 2018 The Voice Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Effects of warm-up on vertical jump performance and muscle electrical activity using half-squats at low and moderate intensity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotiropoulos, Konstantinos; Smilios, Ilias; Christou, Marios; Barzouka, Karolina; Spaias, Angelos; Douda, Helen; Tokmakidis, Savvas P

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of a specific warm-up using half-squats at low and moderate intensity on vertical jump performance and electromyographic activity of the thigh muscles. The subjects were 26 men who were divided into a low intensity group (LIG; n = 13) and a moderate intensity group (MIG; n = 13). The LIG performed a specific warm-up protocol that included the explosive execution of half-squats with loads 25 and 35% of the one repetition maximum (1RM) and the MIG with loads 45 and 65% of the 1RM. The two groups performed a countermovement jump (CMJ) before and three minutes after the specific warm-up protocols. During the concentric phase of the CMJ a linear encoder connected to an A/D converter interfaced to a PC with a software for data acquisition and analysis allowed the calculation of average mechanical power. The electromyographic (EMG) activity of the vastus lateralis (VL), vastus medialis (VM) and rectus femoris (RF) were recorded during the concentric phase of the jumps. The average quadriceps (Qc) activity (mean value of the VL, VM and RF) was also calculated. A two way ANOVA (protocols X time) with repeated measures on the second factor was used to analyze the data. Following the specific warm-up procedure both groups improved (p ≤ 0.05) CMJ performance and mechanical power by 3.5% and 6.3%, respectively, with no differences observed between the two groups. EMG activity of the Qc and VL increased (p ≤ 0.05) for both groups by 5.9% and 8.5%, respectively. It is concluded that the use of a specific warm-up that includes half-squats, performed explosively with low to moderate intensity, improves CMJ performance. This may be due to increased muscle activation as evaluated by the surface EMG. Key pointsThe inclusion of two sets of explosively performed half squats with low to moderate loads in the warm up procedure elicited an acute performance en-hancement.The performance was enhanced regardless of the load used in

  3. Effects of Different Post-Activation Potentiation Warm-Ups on Repeated Sprint Ability in Soccer Players from Different Competitive Levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanchez-Sanchez Javier

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to compare the effects of a traditional warm-up with two post-activation potentiation (PAP warm-up strategies on the repeated sprint ability (RSA of soccer players from national (NL and regional (RL competitive levels. Sixteen young players (NL, n = 8, age = 20.7 ± 1.4 y, body mass = 68.5 ± 7.0 kg, body height = 177.4 ± 5.2 cm; RL, n = 8, age = 20.8 ± 1.0 y, body mass = 68.7 ± 4.0 kg, body height = 176.6 ± 5.6 cm were recruited to complete a traditional warm-up (CONTROL, a PAP warm-up incorporating squats with a load (~60% 1RM that allowed a high speed (1 m/s of movement and a high number of repetitions (PAP-1, and a PAP warm-up with a load (~90% 1RM that allowed a moderate speed (0.5 m/s of movement and a reduced number of repetitions (PAP-0.5. A RSA test (six 20-m sprints with 20 s of recovery was performed 5 min after the PAP warm-up to assess the effects of the different protocols on the fastest sprint (RSAb and the mean time of all sprints (RSAm. A meaningful improvement of RSA performance was observed with PAP-0.5, attaining a large effect on NL (RSAb, ES = -1.5; RSAm, ES = -1.3 and only a small effect on RL athletes (RSAb and RSAm, ES = -0.2. Moreover, when each RSA sprint performance was compared between NL and RL players, after PAP-0.5 greater performance for all sprints was observed in the NL players. Therefore, adding a heavy strength-based conditioning exercise during the warm-up prior to a RSA test may induce significant performance improvements in NL, but only small effects in RL players.

  4. EFFECTS OF WARM-UP ON VERTICAL JUMP PERFORMANCE AND MUSCLE ELECTRICAL ACTIVITY USING HALF-SQUATS AT LOW AND MODERATE INTENSITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantinos Sotiropoulos

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of a specific warm-up using half-squats at low and moderate intensity on vertical jump performance and electromyographic activity of the thigh muscles. The subjects were 26 men who were divided into a low intensity group (LIG; n = 13 and a moderate intensity group (MIG; n = 13. The LIG performed a specific warm-up protocol that included the explosive execution of half-squats with loads 25 and 35% of the one repetition maximum (1RM and the MIG with loads 45 and 65% of the 1RM. The two groups performed a countermovement jump (CMJ before and three minutes after the specific warm-up protocols. During the concentric phase of the CMJ a linear encoder connected to an A/D converter interfaced to a PC with a software for data acquisition and analysis allowed the calculation of average mechanical power. The electromyographic (EMG activity of the vastus lateralis (VL, vastus medialis (VM and rectus femoris (RF were recorded during the concentric phase of the jumps. The average quadriceps (Qc activity (mean value of the VL, VM and RF was also calculated. A two way ANOVA (protocols X time with repeated measures on the second factor was used to analyze the data. Following the specific warm-up procedure both groups improved (p < 0.05 CMJ performance and mechanical power by 3.5% and 6.3%, respectively, with no differences observed between the two groups. EMG activity of the Qc and VL increased (p < 0.05 for both groups by 5.9% and 8.5%, respectively. It is concluded that the use of a specific warm-up that includes half-squats, performed explosively with low to moderate intensity, improves CMJ performance. This may be due to increased muscle activation as evaluated by the surface EMG

  5. The effect of a preoperative warm-up with a custom-made Nintendo video game on the performance of laparoscopic surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalink, M B; Heineman, E; Pierie, J P E N; ten Cate Hoedemaker, H O

    2015-08-01

    It has previously been shown that short, pre-operative practice with a simulator, box trainer, or certain video games can temporarily improve one's basic laparoscopic skills; the so-called warm-up effect. In this experiment, we tested the hypothesis that Underground video game made for training basic laparoscopic skills, can also be used for a pre-operative warm-up. 29 laparoscopic experts were randomized into two different groups, which were tested on two different days. Group 1 (n = 16) did a laparoscopic skill baseline measurement using the FLS peg transfer test and the Top Gun cobra rope drill on day 1, and did the same tests on day 2 after a 15 min session with the Underground game. Group 2 (n = 13) did the same, but started with the video game, followed by baseline measurement on day 2. This way, each participant served as its own control. Video recordings of both tasks were later analyzed by two blinded reviewers. On day 1, group 2 was 14.33 % (P = 0.037) faster in completing the peg transfer test. A trend toward better cobra rope scores is also seen. When comparing the average improvement between both days, group 1--which used the game as a warm-up on day 2--showed a 19.61 % improvement in cobra rope score, compared to a 0.77 % score decrease in group 2 (P = 0.002). This study shows that the Underground video game can be used as a pre-operative warm-up in an experimental setting.

  6. Selection of option of pregame warm-up in handball taking into account features of force of the nervous system of sportsmen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen Gant

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: to develop recommendations about the organization of warm-up for handball players of 13–14 years old taking into account force of the nervous system (NS of players. Material & Methods: 28 handball players of 13–14 years old of Kharkov and Ternovka took part in the research; methods were used: analysis of scientific and methodical literature, technique of "Tapping-test". Results: need of the search of new ways of the increase of efficiency of the competitive activity of young handball players is proved theoretically. Psychological characteristics of handball players of 13–14 years old with a different force of the nervous system are provided. Practical recommendations about the organization of pregame warm-up of handball players of 13–14 years old taking into account force of nervous system of sportsmen are developed. Conclusions: handball players of 13–14 years old can be divided into five groups, concerning force of their nervous system by the results of the conducted research: strong NS (28,57%, average (21,43%, weak (17,86% and average and weak (14,29%, average and strong (17,86%. Recommendations about the organization and carrying out pregame warm-up of handball players of 13–14 years old, taking into account force of the nervous system of sportsmen were developed, considering the results of the psychological research of sportsmen.

  7. Static stretching vs. dynamic warm-ups: a comparison of their effects on torque and electromyography output of the quadriceps and hamstring muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, N; Coburn, J; Gillum, T

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this paper was to determine if two different warm-up protocols differently affect torque of the quadriceps and hamstrings, and electromyography (EMG) output of the rectus femoris (RF) and vastus lateralis (VL) when completing 30 maximal leg extensions and curls. Twenty-one healthy male (N.=8) and female (N.=13) subjects volunteered to participate in a familiarization session and three testing sessions. The three testing sessions control, dynamic, and static were completed in a counterbalanced order on non-consecutive days. First, subjects warmed-up on a treadmill for five minutes before completing six dynamic movements, six static-stretches, or no stretches. They then rested for five minutes before completing 30 maximal leg extensions and curls at a speed of 60 s-1. A significant decrease in quadriceps torque output over time was determined for the dynamic protocol when compared to the control (Phamstring torque or EMG output of the RF and VL. Short duration static-stretching has the ability to increase peak and average torque of the leg extensors, while some types of anaerobic exercise involving maximal contractions to fatigue may be hindered by performing dynamic movements as part of the warm-up.

  8. The effectiveness of neuromuscular warm-up strategies, that require no additional equipment, for preventing lower limb injuries during sports participation: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herman, Katherine; Barton, Christian; Malliaras, Peter; Morrissey, Dylan

    2012-07-19

    Lower limb injuries in sport are increasingly prevalent and responsible for large economic as well as personal burdens. In this review we seek to determine which easily implemented functional neuromuscular warm-up strategies are effective in preventing lower limb injuries during sports participation and in which sporting groups they are effective. Seven electronic databases were searched from inception to January 2012 for studies investigating neuromuscular warm-up strategies and injury prevention. The quality of each included study was evaluated using a modified version of the van Tulder scale. Data were extracted from each study and used to calculate the risk of injury following application of each evaluated strategy. Nine studies were identified including six randomized controlled trials (RCT) and three controlled clinical trials (CCT). Heterogeneity in study design and warm-up strategies prevented pooling of results. Two studies investigated male and female participants, while the remaining seven investigated women only. Risk Ratio (RR) statistics indicated 'The 11+' prevention strategy significantly reduces overall (RR 0.67, confidence interval (CI) 0.54 to 0.84) and overuse (RR 0.45, CI 0.28 to 0.71) lower limb injuries as well as knee (RR 0.48, CI 0.32 to 0.72) injuries among young amateur female footballers. The 'Knee Injury Prevention Program' (KIPP) significantly reduced the risk of noncontact lower limb (RR 0.5, CI 0.33 to 0.76) and overuse (RR 0.44, CI 0.22 to 0.86) injuries in young amateur female football and basketball players. The 'Prevent Injury and Enhance Performance' (PEP) strategy reduces the incidence of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries (RR 0.18, CI 0.08 to 0.42). The 'HarmoKnee' programme reduces the risk of knee injuries (RR 0.22, CI 0.06 to 0.76) in teenage female footballers. The 'Anterior Knee Pain Prevention Training Programme' (AKP PTP) significantly reduces the incidence of anterior knee pain (RR 0.27, CI 0.14 to 0.54) in

  9. The effectiveness of neuromuscular warm-up strategies, that require no additional equipment, for preventing lower limb injuries during sports participation: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herman Katherine

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lower limb injuries in sport are increasingly prevalent and responsible for large economic as well as personal burdens. In this review we seek to determine which easily implemented functional neuromuscular warm-up strategies are effective in preventing lower limb injuries during sports participation and in which sporting groups they are effective. Methods Seven electronic databases were searched from inception to January 2012 for studies investigating neuromuscular warm-up strategies and injury prevention. The quality of each included study was evaluated using a modified version of the van Tulder scale. Data were extracted from each study and used to calculate the risk of injury following application of each evaluated strategy. Results Nine studies were identified including six randomized controlled trials (RCT and three controlled clinical trials (CCT. Heterogeneity in study design and warm-up strategies prevented pooling of results. Two studies investigated male and female participants, while the remaining seven investigated women only. Risk Ratio (RR statistics indicated 'The 11+' prevention strategy significantly reduces overall (RR 0.67, confidence interval (CI 0.54 to 0.84 and overuse (RR 0.45, CI 0.28 to 0.71 lower limb injuries as well as knee (RR 0.48, CI 0.32 to 0.72 injuries among young amateur female footballers. The 'Knee Injury Prevention Program' (KIPP significantly reduced the risk of noncontact lower limb (RR 0.5, CI 0.33 to 0.76 and overuse (RR 0.44, CI 0.22 to 0.86 injuries in young amateur female football and basketball players. The 'Prevent Injury and Enhance Performance' (PEP strategy reduces the incidence of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL injuries (RR 0.18, CI 0.08 to 0.42. The 'HarmoKnee' programme reduces the risk of knee injuries (RR 0.22, CI 0.06 to 0.76 in teenage female footballers. The 'Anterior Knee Pain Prevention Training Programme' (AKP PTP significantly reduces the incidence of anterior

  10. A Multinational Cluster Randomised Controlled Trial to Assess the Efficacy of '11+ Kids': A Warm-Up Programme to Prevent Injuries in Children's Football.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rössler, Roland; Junge, Astrid; Bizzini, Mario; Verhagen, Evert; Chomiak, Jiri; Aus der Fünten, Karen; Meyer, Tim; Dvorak, Jiri; Lichtenstein, Eric; Beaudouin, Florian; Faude, Oliver

    2018-06-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the efficacy of a newly developed warm-up programme ('11+ Kids') regarding its potential to reduce injuries in children's football. Children's football teams (under 9 years, under 11 years, and under 13 years age groups) from Switzerland, Germany, the Czech Republic and the Netherlands were invited. Clubs were randomised to an intervention group and a control group, and followed for one season. The intervention group replaced their usual warm-up by '11+ Kids', while the control group warmed up as usual. The primary outcome was the overall risk of football-related injuries. Secondary outcomes were the risks of severe and lower extremity injuries. We calculated hazard ratios using extended Cox models, and performed a compliance analysis. In total, 292,749 h of football exposure of 3895 players were recorded. The mean age of players was 10.8 (standard deviation 1.4) years. During the study period, 374 (intervention group = 139; control group = 235) injuries occurred. The overall injury rate in the intervention group was reduced by 48% compared with the control group (hazard ratio 0.52; 95% confidence interval 0.32-0.86). Severe (74% reduction, hazard ratio 0.26; 95% confidence interval 0.10-0.64) and lower extremity injuries (55% reduction, hazard ratio 0.45; 95% confidence interval 0.24-0.84) were also reduced. Injury incidence decreased with increasing compliance. '11+ Kids' is efficacious in reducing injuries in children's football. We observed considerable effects for overall, severe and lower extremity injuries. The programme should be performed at least once per week to profit from an injury preventive effect. However, two sessions per week can be recommended to further increase the protective benefit. ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT02222025.

  11. ACUTE EFFECTS OF TWO DIFFERENT WARM-UP PROTOCOLS ON FLEXIBILITY AND LOWER LIMB EXPLOSIVE PERFORMANCE IN MALE AND FEMALE HIGH LEVEL ATHLETES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charilaos Tsolakis

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This study examined the effects of two different warm-up protocols on lower limb power and flexibility in high level athletes. Twenty international level fencers (10 males and 10 females performed two warm-up protocols that included 5-min light jogging and either short (15s or long (45s static stretching exercises for each of the main leg muscle groups (quadriceps, hamstrings and triceps surae, followed by either 3 sets of 3 (short stretching treatment, or 3 sets of 5 tuck jumps (long stretching treatment, in a randomized crossover design with one week between treatments. Hip joint flexion was measured with a Lafayette goniometer before and after the 5-min warm-up, after stretching and 8 min after the tuck jumps, while counter movement jump (CMJ performance was evaluated by an Ergojump contact platform, before and after the stretching treatment, as well as immediately after and 8 minutes after the tuck jumps. Three way ANOVA (condition, time, gender revealed significant time (p < 0.001 and gender (p < 0.001 main effects for hip joint flexion, with no interaction between factors. Flexibility increased by 6. 8 ± 1.1% (p < 0.01 after warm-up and by another 5.8 ± 1.6% (p < 0.01 after stretching, while it remained increased 8 min after the tuck jumps. Women had greater ROM compared with men at all time points (125 ± 8° vs. 94 ± 4° p<0.01 at baseline, but the pattern of change in hip flexibility was not different between genders. CMJ performance was greater in men compared with women at all time points (38.2 ± 1.9 cm vs. 29.8 ± 1.2 cm p < 0.01 at baseline, but the percentage of change CMJ performance was not different between genders. CMJ performance remained unchanged throughout the short stretching protocol, while it decreased by 5.5 ± 0.9% (p < 0.01 after stretching in the long stretching protocol However, 8 min after the tuck jumps, CMJ performance was not different from the baseline value (p = 0.075. In conclusion, lower limb power may

  12. Mechanical Analysis of the Acute Effects of a Heavy Resistance Exercise Warm-Up on Agility Performance in Court-Sport Athletes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sole, Christopher J.; Moir, Gavin L.; Davis, Shala E.; Witmer, Chad A.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the acute effects of heavy resistance exercise on agility performance in court-sport athletes. Five men (age: 20.6 ± 1.9 years; body mass: 79.36 ± 11.74 kg; body height: 1.93 ± 0.09 m) and five women (age 21.2 ± 2.7 years; body mass: 65.8 ± 10.18 kg; body height 1.77 ± 0.08 m) volunteered to participate in the present study. All subjects were NCAA Division II athletes who currently participated in tennis or basketball and all had previous resistance training experience of at least one year. In a counterbalanced design, agility performance during a 10 m shuttle test was assessed following either a dynamic warm-up (DW) or heavy resistance warm-up (HRW) protocol. The HRW protocol consisted of three sets of squats at 50, 60, and 90% of 1-RM. Agility performance was captured using an eight camera motion analysis system and the mechanical variables of stride length, stride frequency, stance time, flight time, average ground reaction force, as well as agility time were recorded. No significant differences were reported for the HRW and DW protocols for any of the mechanical variables (p>0.05), although there was a trend towards the HRW protocol producing faster agility times compared to the control protocol (p = 0.074). Based on the trend towards a significant effect, as well as individual results it is possible that HRW protocols could be used as an acute method to improve agility performance in some court-sport athletes. PMID:24511350

  13. Mechanical analysis of the acute effects of a heavy resistance exercise warm-up on agility performance in court-sport athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sole, Christopher J; Moir, Gavin L; Davis, Shala E; Witmer, Chad A

    2013-12-18

    The purpose of this study was to determine the acute effects of heavy resistance exercise on agility performance in court-sport athletes. Five men (age: 20.6 ± 1.9 years; body mass: 79.36 ± 11.74 kg; body height: 1.93 ± 0.09 m) and five women (age 21.2 ± 2.7 years; body mass: 65.8 ± 10.18 kg; body height 1.77 ± 0.08 m) volunteered to participate in the present study. All subjects were NCAA Division II athletes who currently participated in tennis or basketball and all had previous resistance training experience of at least one year. In a counterbalanced design, agility performance during a 10 m shuttle test was assessed following either a dynamic warm-up (DW) or heavy resistance warm-up (HRW) protocol. The HRW protocol consisted of three sets of squats at 50, 60, and 90% of 1-RM. Agility performance was captured using an eight camera motion analysis system and the mechanical variables of stride length, stride frequency, stance time, flight time, average ground reaction force, as well as agility time were recorded. No significant differences were reported for the HRW and DW protocols for any of the mechanical variables (p>0.05), although there was a trend towards the HRW protocol producing faster agility times compared to the control protocol (p = 0.074). Based on the trend towards a significant effect, as well as individual results it is possible that HRW protocols could be used as an acute method to improve agility performance in some court-sport athletes.

  14. Warming up to cold fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Storms, E.

    1994-01-01

    The idea that tabletop equipment at room temperature could produce nuclear fusion was widely rejected five years ago by the scientific community. Nevertheless, recent results from numerous labs show that a novel phenomena of some kind may indeed be occurring, though theorist are still groping for an explanation. Many aspects of the cold fusion effect are now reproducible if known procedures are used. Palladium, when reacted with enough deuterium, apparently converts to a special condition of matter in which various nuclear reactions--including deuterium-deuterium fusion--can occur despite the repulsive force of the two positive charged nuclei. These reactions can be made to proceed rapidly enough to produce measurable heat. Scientist have published several dozen models, ranging from highly analytical approaches to pictorial representations, to explain these events. Most theories address only the problem of overcoming the coulombic barrier--how it is possible for nuclei to overcome their natural repulsion for each other without an infusion of massive amounts of energy from the outside. None of the proposed explanations accounts for the full range of experimental observations. Nevertheless a workable theory is crucial if we ever hope to apply cold fusion

  15. Are the Chesapeake Bay waters warming up

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brady, D.K.

    1976-01-01

    Apparently significant trends within moderately long (50-year) series of meteorological or hydrological data should be regarded with suspicion until justified on the basis of much longer term information. Extra efforts should be directed toward securing the continuance of routine observations at stations where long data histories are already available and where the termination of such records might be regretted at some future time. Mean annual air and water temperatures at different sites may be quite highly correlated even when the points of measurement are very widely separated. The annual average water temperature at one station close to the Chesapeake Bay appears to be normally distributed with a standard deviation of 0.7 0 C about a stationary overall mean value of 14.6 0 C. Its 1000-year departure is +- 2.2 0 C

  16. Warming up and cooling down (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for 5 to 10 minutes, one may avoid injury and build endurance over time. Cooling down after exercise by walking slowly, then stretching muscles, may also prevent strains and blood pressure fluctuation.

  17. Effects of static-stretching and whole-body-vibration during warm-ups on bench-press kinematics in males and females college-aged. [Efectos de los estiramientos estáticos y vibraciones durante el calentamiento en los parámetros cinemáticos del press banca en hombres y mujeres estudiantes].

    OpenAIRE

    Esperanza Martín-Santana; Sonsoles Hernández-Sánchez; zael J. Herrero-Alonso; David García-López

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to examine the effects of different specific warm-up protocols including static stretching (SS) and whole body vibrations (WBV) on kinematics and number of repetitions during a bench press set to failure in physically active male and female subjects. A secondary purpose was to analyze the role of sex on the warm-up induced effects. 24 participants (13 females and 11 males) were randomly assigned to complete 3 experimental conditions in a cross-over design: SS, WBV and SS+WBV...

  18. Efectos del calentamiento en el rendimiento físico y en la percepción psicológica en jugadores semi profesionales de fútbol. [Warm-up effects on physical performance and psychological perception in semi professional soccer players].

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Yanci

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available El objetivo principal de este estudio fue analizar los efectos de un protocolo de calentamiento de 25 minutos en el rendimiento físico y en la percepción de estar preparados para afrontar un partido en jugadores de fútbol. 15 jugadores de fútbol realizaron su calentamiento estándar pre-partido de 25 minutos y antes (pretest y después (postest del mismo realizaban una batería de test físicos. También se registró la percepción del sueño, del estrés, de la fatiga y del dolor muscular inicial del jugador. Los resultados muestran que los jugadores se sienten más preparados para afrontar el partido después de realizar el calentamiento. Sin embargo, empeoran su rendimiento en la capacidad de aceleración (sprint 10 m, p < 0,01, TE = 0,73 y sprint 20 m p < 0,05, TE = 0,53 y no mejoran ni la capacidad de salto vertical con contra movimiento (CMJ ni la capacidad de cambio de dirección (CODA. Los resultados obtenidos sugieren que el calentamiento de 25 minutos realizado induce a que los jugadores se sientan más preparados para afrontar el partido, pero disminuye su rendimiento físico, probablemente debido a la fatiga acumulada. Abstract The main aim of this study was to analyze the effects of a 25 minutes warm-up protocol in soccer player physical performance and in their perception of being prepared to play a game. 15 soccer players did their standard 25 minutes lasting pre-match warm-up and they performed a battery of physical test before (pretest and after (posttest it. Players’ starting perception of sleep, stress, fatigue and muscle pain was also recorded. Results show that players feel more prepared to face a match after performing the warm-up. However, their acceleration capacity decreases (sprint 10 m, p < 0,01, TE = 0,73 and sprint 20 m p < 0,05, TE = 0,53. There are no effects in counter-movement jump (CMJ or in change of direction ability (CODA. Results suggest that 25 minutes lasting warm-up routine induces players feel more

  19. Efecto de un calentamiento con estiramientos estáticos y dinámicos sobre el salto horizontal y la capacidad para repetir esprint con cambio de dirección. [Effect of warm-up with static and dynamic stretching on the horizontal jump and repeated sprint ability with changes of direction].

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Sánchez-Sánchez

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available El objetivo de este trabajo ha sido comparar el efecto de tres calentamientos diferentes (calentamiento aeróbico de baja intensidad, estiramiento estático y estiramiento dinámico sobre el salto horizontal y la capacidad de repetir esprint con cambios de dirección. Diecisiete practicantes de deportes de equipo de 20.8±1.1 años realizaron 3 tipos de calentamiento (10 min: ejercicio aeróbico sin estiramiento (CAE, con estiramiento estático (CAES y con estiramiento dinámico (CAED. Se estudió el efecto agudo de cada calentamiento sobre el rendimiento en una prueba de salto horizontal (SH y un test de repetición de esprint con cambio de dirección (RSCOD. No se obtuvieron diferencias significativas (p>0,05 en ninguna de las variables en función del calentamiento realizado. El tamaño del efecto (TE indicó que probablemente el RSCODmejor sea más sensible al CAE que al CAES (TE: 0,52 y al CAED (TE: 0,44. El escaso efecto de los estiramientos estáticos sobre el rendimiento en SH y RSCOD puede ser debido a la dosis, la intensidad y el tiempo de recuperación empleado. Los estiramientos dinámicos no mejoraron el rendimiento en SH y RSCOD. Abstract The purpose of this study was to compare the effect of three different warm-ups (low intensity aerobic warm-up, static stretching and dynamic stretching on the horizontal jump and repeated sprint ability with changes of direction. Seventeen players of team sports whose age was 20.8±1.1 years old performed three types of warm up (10 minutes: aerobic exercise without stretching (WU, with static stretching (WUSS and with dynamic stretching (WUDS. The acute effect of each warming over performance was studied in a test of horizontal jump (HJ and repeat sprint test with change of direction (RSCD. No significant differences were obtained (p>0.05 in any of the variables studied according to the warming developed. The effect size (ES indicated that probably RSCDbest was more sensitive to WU than WUDS (ES

  20. Stochastic upscaling in solid mechanics: An excercise in machine learning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koutsourelakis, P.S.

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents a consistent theoretical and computational framework for upscaling in random microstructures. We adopt an information theoretic approach in order to quantify the informational content of the microstructural details and find ways to condense it while assessing quantitatively the approximation introduced. In particular, we substitute the high-dimensional microscale description by a lower-dimensional representation corresponding for example to an equivalent homogeneous medium. The probabilistic characteristics of the latter are determined by minimizing the distortion between actual macroscale predictions and the predictions made using the coarse model. A machine learning framework is essentially adopted in which a vector quantizer is trained using data generated computationally or collected experimentally. Several parallels and differences with similar problems in source coding theory are pointed out and an efficient computational tool is employed. Various applications in linear and non-linear problems in solid mechanics are examined

  1. Excercises in diagnostic radiology. Vol. 8. 2. ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langston, C.S.; Squire, L.F.

    1982-01-01

    Diagnostic radiology in emergency patients as a supplement to anamnesis and examination has gained increasing importance in the last few years. Usually, the physician in charge has only few sigus to go by when a patient is gent to radiology. The most frequent sigus are pectoral pain, headache, dysponea, etc. The cases in this book have been selected accordingly. Although the names have been invented the case histories presented have not been greatly changed. The original 'negatives' of the anamnesis presented in most cases unless they would have taken up too much space. No important information has been omitted. Untypical and unusual cases are characterized as such. (orig./MG) [de

  2. [The benefits of doing excercise in the elderly].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avila-Funes, José Alberto; García-Mayo, Emilio José

    2004-01-01

    Advanced age is associated with changes in body composition such as muscular mass loss, which is defined as sarcopenia. The former term plays a key role in the frailty model, although its source is unknown. Myriad strategies have been used to improve and increase muscular mass and function in older persons. The muscle is a versatile system that owes its great capacity to adaption to regular exercise programs. Aerobic exercise and resistance training improve muscular function and can minimize and even reverse sarcopenia in the elderly (healthy, very elderly or frail). The main difference in prescribing exercise for healthy adults and elderly individuals is that intensity of training program is lower for the latter. This review is aimed toward the physiopathologic aspects and clinical implications regarding muscular mass loss and to programs directed toward increasing strength and/or endurance in the elderly.

  3. Warming up human body by nanoporous metallized polyethylene textile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Lili; Song, Alex Y; Wu, Peilin; Hsu, Po-Chun; Peng, Yucan; Chen, Jun; Liu, Chong; Catrysse, Peter B; Liu, Yayuan; Yang, Ankun; Zhou, Chenxing; Zhou, Chenyu; Fan, Shanhui; Cui, Yi

    2017-09-19

    Space heating accounts for the largest energy end-use of buildings that imposes significant burden on the society. The energy wasted for heating the empty space of the entire building can be saved by passively heating the immediate environment around the human body. Here, we demonstrate a nanophotonic structure textile with tailored infrared (IR) property for passive personal heating using nanoporous metallized polyethylene. By constructing an IR-reflective layer on an IR-transparent layer with embedded nanopores, the nanoporous metallized polyethylene textile achieves a minimal IR emissivity (10.1%) on the outer surface that effectively suppresses heat radiation loss without sacrificing wearing comfort. This enables 7.1 °C decrease of the set-point compared to normal textile, greatly outperforming other radiative heating textiles by more than 3 °C. This large set-point expansion can save more than 35% of building heating energy in a cost-effective way, and ultimately contribute to the relief of global energy and climate issues.Energy wasted for heating the empty space of the entire building can be saved by passively heating the immediate environment around the human body. Here, the authors show a nanophotonic structure textile with tailored infrared property for passive personal heating using nanoporous metallized polyethylene.

  4. Nuclear spin warm up in bulk n -GaAs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotur, M.; Dzhioev, R. I.; Vladimirova, M.; Jouault, B.; Korenev, V. L.; Kavokin, K. V.

    2016-08-01

    We show that the spin-lattice relaxation in n -type insulating GaAs is dramatically accelerated at low magnetic fields. The origin of this effect, which cannot be explained in terms of well-known diffusion-limited hyperfine relaxation, is found in the quadrupole relaxation, induced by fluctuating donor charges. Therefore, quadrupole relaxation, which governs low field nuclear spin relaxation in semiconductor quantum dots, but was so far supposed to be harmless to bulk nuclei spins in the absence of optical pumping, can be studied and harnessed in the much simpler model environment of n -GaAs bulk crystal.

  5. Warming up human body by nanoporous metallized polyethylene textile

    OpenAIRE

    Cai, Lili; Song, Alex Y.; Wu, Peilin; Hsu, Po-Chun; Peng, Yucan; Chen, Jun; Liu, Chong; Catrysse, Peter B.; Liu, Yayuan; Yang, Ankun; Zhou, Chenxing; Zhou, Chenyu; Fan, Shanhui; Cui, Yi

    2017-01-01

    Space heating accounts for the largest energy end-use of buildings that imposes significant burden on the society. The energy wasted for heating the empty space of the entire building can be saved by passively heating the immediate environment around the human body. Here, we demonstrate a nanophotonic structure textile with tailored infrared (IR) property for passive personal heating using nanoporous metallized polyethylene. By constructing an IR-reflective layer on an IR-transparent layer wi...

  6. Running Club Warm Up Staves Off Winter's Chill

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    Not deterred by winter's chill, over 900 runners met at the CERN Prévesin site for Escalade training. Think the sudden cold snap is a reason to stay indoors? Think again! The CERN running club has just recently had the honour of holding the November 11th Escalade training session, and with over 900 runners present at the Prévessin site it was clear that the chilly temperatures were no barrier whatsoever. The story behind Escalade training starts back in 1977 when a group of running enthusiasts from the Stade Genève club decided to organize a running race in the Old Town in conjunction with the Escalade festivities. They were told that no normal people would think of organizing a running race in the month of December, but fortunately they ignored the advice! From the initial 50 or so runners, these Escalade races have grown into an institution and now attract upwards of 15,000 people of all ages from 5 to over 80 each year. And with over 30% of each year's runners participat...

  7. Effects of static-stretching and whole-body-vibration during warm-ups on bench-press kinematics in males and females college-aged. [Efectos de los estiramientos estáticos y vibraciones durante el calentamiento en los parámetros cinemáticos del press banca en hombres y mujeres estudiantes].

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esperanza Martín-Santana

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to examine the effects of different specific warm-up protocols including static stretching (SS and whole body vibrations (WBV on kinematics and number of repetitions during a bench press set to failure in physically active male and female subjects. A secondary purpose was to analyze the role of sex on the warm-up induced effects. 24 participants (13 females and 11 males were randomly assigned to complete 3 experimental conditions in a cross-over design: SS, WBV and SS+WBV. After each condition, participants performed one bench-press set to volitional exhaustion with a load equivalent to the 60% of one-repetition maximum (1RM. No significant differences (P>0.05 were observed in number of repetitions, mean and maximal accelerative portion (AP, mean and maximal velocity, and lifting velocity time-course pattern. Males showed significantly higher values regarding number of repetitions achieved and maximal and mean lifting velocity. However, regarding the percentage of the concentric phase in which barbell is accelerated, there were no sex differences. In conclusion, no relevant difference in kinematics variables can be shown when applying any of these three different warm-up protocols, these results may be useful when designing training programs. We recommend the protocol SS due to the cost-benefit relationship. Resumen El objetivo de este estudio fue examinar el efecto de diferentes protocolos de calentamiento incluyendo estiramientos estáticos (EE y vibraciones de cuerpo entero (WBV en variables cinemáticas y número de repeticiones completadas en una serie de press banca realizada hasta el fallo muscular, en hombres y mujeres físicamente activos. Un segundo objetivo fue analizar el papel de la variable sexo en los efectos inducidos por el calentamiento. 24 participantes (13 mujeres y 11 hombres completaron, de forma aleatoria, 3 condiciones experimentales con un diseño cruzado: EE, WBV, y EE+WBV. Al terminar cada protocolo de

  8. Excercises in diagnostic radiology. Vol. 8. Uebungen in radiologischer Diagnostik. Bd. 8. Notfaelle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langston, C S; Squire, L F

    1982-01-01

    Diagnostic radiology in emergency patients as a supplement to anamnesis and examination has gained increasing importance in the last few years. Usually, the physician in charge has only few signs to go by when a patient is sent to radiology. The most frequent signs are pectoral pain, headache, dyspenea, etc. The cases in this book have been selected accordingly. Although the names have been invented the case histories presented have not been greatly changed. The original 'negatives' of the anamnesis are not presented in most cases as they would have taken up too much space. No important information has been omitted. A typical and unusual cases are characterized as such.

  9. Warming Up to Trade? Harnessing International Trade to Support Climate Change Objectives

    OpenAIRE

    World Bank

    2007-01-01

    This study on harnessing international trade to support climate change objectives assesses the following: 1) What are the main policy prescriptions for reducing greenhouse gases that are employed by OECD countries and how do they impact the competitiveness of their energy-intensive industries? 2) On account of the impact on competitiveness, is there is leakage of energy intensive industrie...

  10. WARMING UP FOR SLEEP - GROUND-SQUIRRELS SLEEP DURING AROUSALS FROM HIBERNATION

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DAAN, S; BARNES, BM; STRIJKSTRA, AM

    1991-01-01

    Hypothermia during mammalian hibernation is periodically interrupted by arousals to euthermy, the function of which is unknown. We report that arctic ground squirrels (Spermophilus parryii) consistently sleep during these arousals, and that their EEG shows the decrease in slow wave activity

  11. Powering tests before LHC warm-up, what is new from Chamonix 2011?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pojer, M.

    2012-01-01

    At the end of 2012, the Large Hadron Collider will enter its first programmed long stop (LS1). The problem at the origin of 2008 incident will be definitely treated and the main circuits will then be able to run at the design current value without protection issues. At Chamonix 2011, a proposal was done for a series of powering tests to be performed just before the LS1 to investigate other potential limitations in the machine, which could be fixed during the same maintenance period. A review of these powering tests is presented, together with the list of investigation to be performed by the electrical quality assurance (ElQA) team. A tentative planning is as well proposed. Moreover, following complementary activities during the LS1, a huge campaign of individual system tests will have to be as well performed during the shutdown. Attention will be put on the preliminary list of needed re-qualifications. (author)

  12. Aerobic Exercise as a Warm-up for Singing: Acoustic Impacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McHenry, Monica A; Evans, Joseph

    2017-07-01

    In a previous work, it was found that a 30-minute aerobic workout significantly increased singers' sound pressure level and airflow during voicing, suggesting a shift to flow phonation. This companion study was designed to assess the impact of the same workout on pitch accuracy, vibrato rate, extent and regularity, and the singing power ratio. This study is a cohort experimental study. Twenty-two students in an academic vocal performance program participated. They performed an aerobic workout for 30 minutes. Before and after the workout, they sang the first seven notes of the "Star-Spangled Banner" on /pa/, producing seven /pa/s on the last note. The students then sang an ascending and descending scale to the ninth on "ah." The following measures were obtained from the "Star-Spangled Banner": pitch accuracy calculated on the seventh note ("by"); and vibrato rate, regularity, and extent, calculated on the most sustained sixth note ("see"). For the scale, the following measures were calculated from each note: pitch accuracy; vibrato rate, regularity, and extent; and the singing power ratio. There were no significant differences from pre- to postworkout across any measures. It appears that an aerobic workout positively impacts the respiratory driving force for voice production but does little for phonation. Critical for performance is the fine tuning and balancing across the respiratory, laryngeal, and resonance systems. It appears that this can only be achieved with vocalization exercises, facilitating coordination within and across the physiological systems involved in the complex art of bel canto. Copyright © 2017 The Voice Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Hyperactivity in Anorexia Nervosa : Warming Up Not Just Burning-Off Calories

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carrera, Olaia; Adan, Roger A. H.; Gutierrez, Emilio; Danner, Unna N.; Hoek, Hans W.; van Elburg, Annemarie A.; Kas, Martien

    2012-01-01

    Excessive physical activity is a common feature in Anorexia Nervosa (AN) that interferes with the recovery process. Animal models have demonstrated that ambient temperature modulates physical activity in semi-starved animals. The aim of the present study was to assess the effect of ambient

  14. A Pilot Study of Using Jazz Warm Up Exercises in Primary School Choir in Hong Kong

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jason Chi Wai; Lee, Han Wai

    2013-01-01

    This pilot study is to examine whether it is valuable to implement jazz choral practice in Hong Kong primary school setting. The findings can serve as a reference to explore the possibilities of promoting jazz education in Asian countries or in China. The participants were 70 public primary school students from grade 2 to 5 in Hong Kong. All…

  15. Hyperactivity in anorexia nervosa: warming up not just burning-off calories.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olaia Carrera

    Full Text Available Excessive physical activity is a common feature in Anorexia Nervosa (AN that interferes with the recovery process. Animal models have demonstrated that ambient temperature modulates physical activity in semi-starved animals. The aim of the present study was to assess the effect of ambient temperature on physical activity in AN patients in the acute phase of the illness. Thirty-seven patients with AN wore an accelerometer to measure physical activity within the first week of contacting a specialized eating disorder center. Standardized measures of anxiety, depression and eating disorder psychopathology were assessed. Corresponding daily values for ambient temperature were obtained from local meteorological stations. Ambient temperature was negatively correlated with physical activity (p = -.405 and was the only variable that accounted for a significant portion of the variance in physical activity (p = .034. Consistent with recent research with an analogous animal model of the disorder, our findings suggest that ambient temperature is a critical factor contributing to the expression of excessive physical activity levels in AN. Keeping patients warm may prove to be a beneficial treatment option for this symptom.

  16. Warming up, turning sour, losing breath: ocean biogeochemistry under global change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruber, Nicolas

    2011-05-28

    In the coming decades and centuries, the ocean's biogeochemical cycles and ecosystems will become increasingly stressed by at least three independent factors. Rising temperatures, ocean acidification and ocean deoxygenation will cause substantial changes in the physical, chemical and biological environment, which will then affect the ocean's biogeochemical cycles and ecosystems in ways that we are only beginning to fathom. Ocean warming will not only affect organisms and biogeochemical cycles directly, but will also increase upper ocean stratification. The changes in the ocean's carbonate chemistry induced by the uptake of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO(2)) (i.e. ocean acidification) will probably affect many organisms and processes, although in ways that are currently not well understood. Ocean deoxygenation, i.e. the loss of dissolved oxygen (O(2)) from the ocean, is bound to occur in a warming and more stratified ocean, causing stress to macro-organisms that critically depend on sufficient levels of oxygen. These three stressors-warming, acidification and deoxygenation-will tend to operate globally, although with distinct regional differences. The impacts of ocean acidification tend to be strongest in the high latitudes, whereas the low-oxygen regions of the low latitudes are most vulnerable to ocean deoxygenation. Specific regions, such as the eastern boundary upwelling systems, will be strongly affected by all three stressors, making them potential hotspots for change. Of additional concern are synergistic effects, such as ocean acidification-induced changes in the type and magnitude of the organic matter exported to the ocean's interior, which then might cause substantial changes in the oxygen concentration there. Ocean warming, acidification and deoxygenation are essentially irreversible on centennial time scales, i.e. once these changes have occurred, it will take centuries for the ocean to recover. With the emission of CO(2) being the primary driver behind all three stressors, the primary mitigation strategy is to reduce these emissions. © 2011 The Royal Society

  17. Use of plasma creatine kinase pharmacokinetics to estimate the amount of excercise-induced muscle damage in Beagles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chanoit, G P; Lefebvre, H P; Orcel, K; Laroute, V; Toutain, P L; Braun, J P

    2001-09-01

    To assess the effects of moderate exercise on plasma creatine kinase (CK) pharmacokinetics and to estimate exercise-induced muscle damage in dogs. 6 untrained adult Beagles. The study was divided into 3 phases. In phase 1, dogs ran for 1 hour at a speed of 9 km/h, and samples were used to determine the area under the plasma CK activity versus time curve (AUC) induced by exercise. In phases 2 and 3, pharmacokinetics of CK were calculated in dogs during exercise and at rest, respectively. Values for AUC and plasma clearance (CI) were used to estimate muscle damage. At rest, values for Cl, steady-state volume of distribution (Vdss), and mean retention time (MRT) were 0.32+/-0.02 ml/kg of body weight/min, 57+/-173 ml/kg, and 3.0+/-0.57 h, respectively. During exercise, Cl decreased significantly (0.26+/-0.03 ml/kg/min), MRT increased significantly, (4.4+/-0.97 h), and Vdss remained unchanged. Peak of plasma CK activity (151+/-58.8 U/L) was observed 3 hours after completion of exercise. Estimated equivalent amount of muscle corresponding to the quantity of CK released was 41+/-29.3 mg/kg. These results revealed that exercise had a minor effect on CK disposition and that the equivalent amount of muscle damaged by moderate exercise was negligible. This study illustrates the relevance for use of the minimally invasive and quantitative pharmacokinetic approach when estimating muscle damage.

  18. The acute effect of static and dynamic stretching during warm-ups on anaerobic performance in trained women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    rouhollah haghshenas

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate effects of static stretching, dynamic stretching and no stretching methods on power and speed in volleyball players. Therefore, Twenty-four volleyball players (height: 173.29 ± 7.81 m; mass: 62.12 ± 8.73 kg; age: 22.66 ± 4.02 years; experience: 3.27 ± 6.37 were tested for speed performance using the 20 meter sprint test and also for power using vertical jump test after static stretching, dynamic stretching and no stretching. The results analyzed using ANOVA showed that There was a significant increase in height jump after dynamic stretching against static stretching. But, there were no significant differences between no stretching and static stretching groups. In addition, there was a significant decrease in time 20 meter sprint after dynamic stretching against static stretching and no stretching groups. The results of this study suggest that it may be desirable for volleyball players to perform dynamic exercises before the performance of activities that require a high power output.

  19. Protected Area Tourism in a Changing Climate: Will Visitation at US National Parks Warm Up or Overheat?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisichelli, Nicholas A; Schuurman, Gregor W; Monahan, William B; Ziesler, Pamela S

    2015-01-01

    Climate change will affect not only natural and cultural resources within protected areas but also tourism and visitation patterns. The U.S. National Park Service systematically collects data regarding its 270+ million annual recreation visits, and therefore provides an opportunity to examine how human visitation may respond to climate change from the tropics to the polar regions. To assess the relationship between climate and park visitation, we evaluated historical monthly mean air temperature and visitation data (1979-2013) at 340 parks and projected potential future visitation (2041-2060) based on two warming-climate scenarios and two visitation-growth scenarios. For the entire park system a third-order polynomial temperature model explained 69% of the variation in historical visitation trends. Visitation generally increased with increasing average monthly temperature, but decreased strongly with temperatures > 25°C. Linear to polynomial monthly temperature models also explained historical visitation at individual parks (R2 0.12-0.99, mean = 0.79, median = 0.87). Future visitation at almost all parks (95%) may change based on historical temperature, historical visitation, and future temperature projections. Warming-mediated increases in potential visitation are projected for most months in most parks (67-77% of months; range across future scenarios), resulting in future increases in total annual visits across the park system (8-23%) and expansion of the visitation season at individual parks (13-31 days). Although very warm months at some parks may see decreases in future visitation, this potential change represents a relatively small proportion of visitation across the national park system. A changing climate is likely to have cascading and complex effects on protected area visitation, management, and local economies. Results suggest that protected areas and neighboring communities that develop adaptation strategies for these changes may be able to both capitalize on opportunities and minimize detriment related to changing visitation.

  20. Mechanism of freeze-thaw injury and recovery: A cool retrospective and warming up to new ideas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, Rajeev

    2018-05-01

    Understanding cellular mechanism(s) of freeze-thaw injury (FTI) is key to the efforts for improving plant freeze-tolerance by cultural methods or molecular/genetic approaches. However, not much work has been done in the last 25+ years to advance our understanding of the nature and cellular loci of FTI. Currently, two FTI lesions are predominantly implicated: 1) structural and functional perturbations in plasma membrane; 2) ROS-induced oxidative damage. While both have stood the test of time, many questions remain unresolved and other potentially significant lesions need to be investigated. Additionally, molecular mechanism of post-thaw recovery (PTR), a critical component of frost-survival, has not been well investigated. Mechanistic understanding of repair after reversible injury could expand the options for strategies to improve frost-hardiness. In this review, without claiming to be exhaustive, I have attempted to synthesize major discoveries from last several decades on the mechanisms of FTI and the relatively little research conducted thus far on PTR mechanisms. It is followed by proposing of hypotheses for mechanism(s) for irreversible FTI or PTR involving cytosolic calcium and ROS signaling. Perspective is presented on some unresolved questions and research on new ideas to fill the knowledge gaps and advance the field. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Warmed up for ten-year test in the Boom Clay formation PRACLAY Heater Experiment is launched

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-01-01

    The article discusses latest developments concerning the PRACLAY Heater Experiment. The PRACLAY experiment investigates the impact of heat on the properties of clay adjacent to a repository for the geological disposal of radioactive waste. Results from the PRACLAY experiment will provide significant input for the NIRAS research programme on the disposal of high-level and long-lived radioactive waste in clay formations.The heating phase of the PRACLAY underground experiment was launched in 2014. The latest preparations comprised the improvement and installation of a back-up heating system. In the future, the control, monitoring, and analysis and interpretation of the measured data will receive the greatest attention in the PRACLAY Heater Experiment.

  2. The Effects of Gesture and Movement Training on the Intonation of Children's Singing in Vocal Warm-Up Sessions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Mei-Ying; Davidson, Jane W.

    2016-01-01

    The main purpose of the current study was to examine the effects of gesture and movement training for beginning children's choirs with regard to improving intonation. It was a between-subjects design with one independent variable Training Technique (TT). One dependent variable was measured: intonation in the singing of vocal pattern warm-up…

  3. The army put trust in wood fuel to warm-up its troops; L'armee fait confiance au bois-energie pour chauffer ses troupes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    2004-02-01

    The military camp of Valdahon (Doubs, France) is sited in a rude climate area. It comprises a hundred of buildings permanently occupied by about 1200 people. The old heavy-oil boiler plant has been replaced by two wood fueled boilers of 2.8 MW each. Two domestic fuel boilers with low-NO{sub x} burners of 4.1 MW each ensure the complement in case of acute coldness. The hydraulic network and its 60 supplied substations have been renovated too. The wood-fueled boilers ensure more than 80% of the needs. Both the wood-fueled and domestic fuel boilers have been over-dimensioned for safety reasons and for a possible complete substitution of one fuel by the other. Each wood-fueled boiler is equipped with a de-dusting system (multi-cyclone filter and bag filter). A centralized technical management system optimizes the regulation of the installation. (J.S.)

  4. WARMING UP THE “CHILLING EFFECT”: A COMMENT ON THE MOTIVE CLAUSE DISCUSSIONS IN R V KHAWAJA (2010 AND R V KHAWAJA (2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.L. Savarese

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Following the attacks on September 11, 2001, biased surveillance and discriminatory law enforcement approaches gained momentum. In 2003, Reem Bahdi published “No Exit: Racial Profiling and Canada‟s War Against Terrorism.” She analyzed the influence that the declaration of a war against terrorism by Western nations, including Canada, was having on Arabs and Muslims. Other scholars critiqued aspects of Canada‟s anti-terrorism response, including the incorporation of a motive clause into the Criminal Code sections prohibiting terrorist offences. In R. v. Khawaja (2006, the Superior Court reviewed the constitutionality of the motive element in the definition of terrorism. It held that the motive clause facilitated the targeted law enforcement practices that Bahdi and others advocated against. This paper reports on a review of the appellate decisions, R. v. Khawaja (2010 and (2012, which held that the motive clause was consistent with the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms. The appellate decisions are critiqued for their failure to adequately promote human dignity and equality in keeping with the Charter‘s spirit. As a result, the paper concludes by arguing for a return to the insights of Bahdi and others who encourage a rethinking of Canadian social policy after 9/11 to ensure commitment to human rights doctrines, particularly in regard to the racial profiling that the motive clause seemed to animate. Dans la foulée des attaques du 11 septembre 2001, des chercheurs ont observé que les activités de surveillance biaisées et les mesures discriminatoires d‟application de la loi se sont intensifiées. En 2003, Reem Bahdi a publié “No Exit: Racial Profiling and Canada‟s War Against Terrorism.” [« Sans issue : Profilage racial et guerre du Canada contre le terrorisme »]. Elle y analysait les répercussions de la déclaration de guerre contre le terrorisme par les pays occidentaux, y compris le Canada, sur les Arabes et les Musulmans. D‟autres chercheurs ont critiqué des aspects de la réponse antiterroriste du Canada, dont l‟incorporation d‟une disposition relative au mobile dans des articles du Code criminel portant sur des infractions de terrorisme. Dans l‟affaire R. v. Khawaja (2006, la Cour supérieure a accepté le point de vue selon lequel la disposition relative au mobile facilitait les mesures d‟application de la loi contestées par Reem Bahdi et les autres chercheurs. Le présent document fait état d‟une analyse de la décision rendue par la cour d‟appel dans l‟affaire R. v. Khawaja (2010 et portant que la disposition relative au mobile était conforme à la Charte canadienne des droits et libertés. La décision de la cour d‟appel est critiquée parce qu‟elle a négligé de promouvoir suffisamment la dignité et l‟égalité des personnes en respectant l‟esprit de la Charte. Finalement, le document conclut en plaidant un retour aux enseignements de Mme Bahdi et des autres chercheurs qui invitent à repenser la politique sociale canadienne après le 9/11 pour s‟assurer du respect des théories sur les droits de la personne, tout particulièrement en ce qui concerne le profilage racial auquel la disposition relative au mobile semble avoir donné vie.

  5. However, it is warmed up. What is about the debate about the climate change?; Und sie erwaermt sich doch. Was steckt hinter der Debatte um den Klimawandel?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lehmann, Harry; Mueschen, Klaus; Richter, Steffi; Maeder, Claudia

    2013-04-15

    The brochure under consideration provides answers to questions about the fundamentals of climate science. The first four questions discuss the basic concepts and relationships of climate science. The following questions are increasingly raised by people who are skeptical about the findings of climate science or do not accept the scientific results.

  6. Crewmember exercising on the mid deck ergometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    Mission Specialist Ellen Baker exercising on an excercise bike attached to the Isolated/Stabilized Exercise Platform (ISEP) on the shuttle middeck. The ISEP is intended to insulate sensitive micregravity experiments from vibration caused by crew excercise.

  7. Estímulos para la liberación de aldosterona durante una actividad física intensa y de larga duración Stimuli for aldosterone secretion during an intense, long duration physucak activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hilda Norha Jaramillo Londoño

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: establecer los posibles factores causales de la secreción de aldosterona durante una actividad física intensa y de larga duración, bajo condiciones ambientales neutras, en nueve corredores de fondo. Materiales y métodos: después de 10 minutos de calentamiento, en banda rodante con una pendiente del 1% y al 55% de la capacidad física de trabajo máxima (PWCmax, siguieron 90 minutos de carrera, al 80%; finalmente, 90 minutos de recuperación pasiva. No se hizo reposición hídrica durante DH (deshidratado; durante RH (rehidratado se repuso el 51% del peso corporal perdido en DH. Resultados: en DH hubo pérdida de peso corporal y reducción porcentual del volumen plasmático (%VP. Se observaron hiperosmolaridad, hipernatremia, hipercaliemia, hiperaldosteronemia, pero no hiperreninemia. Al hacer corrección por hemoconcentración y calcular el porcentaje de cambio de las variables en estudio, sólo se observaron hipercaliemia e hiperaldosteronemia. En RH la pérdida de peso corporal fue menor, pero la reducción %VP fue similar; se evitaron la hiperosmolaridad y la hipernatremia, pero no la hipercaliemia durante el ejercicio ni la hiperaldosteronemia durante todo el procedimiento, un comportamiento similar al observado al hacer corrección por hemoconcentración. Conclusiones: Durante la realización de una actividad física intensa la concentración plasmática de aldosterona presentó un incremento proporcional a la duración del ejercicio e independiente de la reducción porcentual del volumen plasmático. La hipersecreción de aldosterona es, al parecer, multicausal y el potasio es uno de los factores determinantes. Objective: To establish the possible causal factors of aldosterone secretion during an intense, long duration physical activity, under neutral environmental conditions in nine long-distance runners. Methods: After a 10-minute warm-up period on a treadmill, 1% grade and at 55% of PWCmax, followed by 90 minutes test in

  8. Exercises in statistics for HA & HA(dat.) & BSc(B), 3rd semester

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    The booklet contains excercises to be used for the tutorials related to the 3rd semester course in statistics on the bachelors progarmme at the Aarhus School of Business.......The booklet contains excercises to be used for the tutorials related to the 3rd semester course in statistics on the bachelors progarmme at the Aarhus School of Business....

  9. Our Changing Lifestyle: Its Effects on Child Nutrition and Dental Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanning, Elizabeth A.

    1980-01-01

    Discusses the general standard of health of Australians, the trend towards a lifestyle of fast foods and less excercise, and the relation between diet and three major diseases: heart disease, cancer, and stroke. (Author/SS)

  10. CME 2850.indd

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    (MMRC) Dyspnea Scale or the COPD Assessment Test (CAT); and ... and a lower incidence of pneumonia in ... Symptoms. Excercise tolerance. HRQL. ECOPD. Prognosis. Systemic e ects ... increased incidence of community-acquired.

  11. Exercises in Pro/Engineer Wildfire 4.0

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Georg Kronborg

    2009-01-01

    Excercises in the CAD system ProEngineer corresponding to an introduction covering basic functionality. The exercises take up 5 DTU-modules of 4 hours. Part- and assembly modelling. Drawing fabrication....

  12. Balance-related exercise as a preparation to cross-country skiing practice in visually impaired children

    OpenAIRE

    Chmelíčková, Hana

    2008-01-01

    Title: Balance-related excercise as a preparation to cross-country skiing practice in visually impaired children. Objectives of the Thesis: The goal of this thesis is to test the possibilitiy of implementation of selected balance- related excercise in visually impaired children. Method: The testing pool consisted of six pupils attending the Special school for Visually Impaired Children between 14 and 15 years of age. Over the period of ten weeks, selected exercise geared towards the cross-cou...

  13. Vertical dimonsion changes after muscle relaxation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahroodi MH

    1998-09-01

    Full Text Available In this study, 116 edentulous patients in the age group 37-90 yrs were selected. Out of the above,"n12 patients had visited the dept. Of prosthodontics for the first time for treatment. Other 34 of them were"npatients of the dental school and the rest were from Kahrizak and Nikan sanatoriums."nInitially, the V.D. of rest was measured as usual for all the patients. After subjecting them to the excercises of completely opening and closing of the mouth for 15 no. of times, the rest position was measured again. Results show that the changes in V.D.R. after, excercises, relaxing the elevator and depressor muscles and the duration of usage of prosthesis, the following conclusions are obtained."n1. There is an increase in V.D.R. after tiring out the elevator and depressor muscles of the jaws."n2. There is a direct co - relation between the increased V.D.R. and duration of use of prosthesis after excercises."n3. Change in the V.D.R. after excercise is notably more in women."n4. No definite conclusion is obtained in the relationship between changes in V.D.R. after excercises and use of prosthesis during sleep."n5. As above no conclusions as yet can be deduced between changes in V.D.R. and different operators.

  14. Comparability of data for natural radionuclides in marine sediment obtained by different analytical techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bojanowski, R.; Fukai, R.; Holm, E.

    1987-01-01

    The results of postassium, uranium, thorium and radium measurements performed on the natural marine sediment sample SD-N-1/2 in the framework of the IAEA-organized worldwide intercomparison excercise are presented. Analytical methods applied in this excercise were evaluated for performance, and significance of the observed discrepancies are discussed in the light of statistical and operative criteria. Possible sources of error were identified in alpha and gamma spectrometric measurements and suggestions are given about how to avoid them. Well characterized reference materials based on natural matrices are shown to be helpful in achieving better data comparability in low level measurements of environmental radioactivity. (author)

  15. Sonic Supremacy Sound, Space and Charisma in a Favela in Rio de Janeiro

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oosterbaan, Martijn

    This article discusses the soundscape of a favela in Rio de Janeiro. It argues that sounds, and music in particular, play an important part in the creation and maintenance of boundaries between groups in the dense urban space of the favela. The politics of presence excercised by different groups

  16. Psychometric properties of the exercise self-efficacy scale in Dutch primary care patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Heijden, M.M.P.; Pouwer, F.; Pop, V.J.M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Excercise self-efficacy is believed to influence physical activity bahavior. Purpose The purpose of this study is to assess the psychometric aspects of the Exercise Self-efficacy Scale (ESS) in a type 2 diabetes Dutch Primary care sample. Method Type 2 diabetes patients (n = 322; <80

  17. Leisure-time physical activity: Prevalence and psychosocial ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The wish to increase exercise participation was positively associated with exercise status and frequency of excercise. Multiple logistic regression for women identified health benefits and healthy diet and for men health benefits, healthy diet, non-drinking and internal health locus of control as independent predictors for ...

  18. Plasma mechanizm for auroral kilometer wave radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vlasov, V.G.

    1989-01-01

    The linear mechanism of auroral kilometer radiation (AKR) on the Cherenkov resonance is developed. The point is that plasma waves swinged by the electron beam in a dimer auroral plasma cavern on the Cherenkov resonance excercise 100% transformation under conventional and inconventional AKR modes under definite conditions

  19. Research on Secure Systems and Automatic Programming. Volume II

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-10-14

    flowchart form used for the ’inverse’ implementation. Their validity is established in this form which was thought to be an excercise of sufficient...the truth v.31t(: of a predicate is unknown, which is very useful in creatin - the -odel or solvinf the problen. For exarinle, in the blind hand nroble

  20. The Effect of an 8-week Aerobic Training and Weight-loss Diet on the Level of Serum Follistatin in Inactive Middle-aged Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Tajik

    2015-08-01

    conclusion: The method of aerobic excercise along with the step-by-step diet can lead to achieving a healthy weight loss by increasing follistatin level and stimulating the catabolic process of body fal mass. Moreover, it may cause no ersion of fat free mass.

  1. The effects of precompetition massage on the kinematic parameters of 20-m sprint performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, Iain M

    2010-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate what effect precompetition massage has on short-term sprint performance. Twenty male collegiate games players, with a minimum training/playing background of 3 sessions per week, were assigned to a randomized, counter-balanced, repeated-measures designed experiment used to analyze 20-m sprints performance. Three discrete warm-up modalities, consisting of precompetition massage, a traditional warm-up, and a precompetition massage combined with a traditional warm-up were used. Massage consisted of fast, superficial techniques designed to stimulate the main muscle groups associated with sprint running. Twenty-meter sprint performance and core temperature were assessed post warm-up interventions. Kinematic differences between sprints were assessed through a 2-dimensional computerized motion analysis system (alpha level p velocity were found to be significantly greater in the warm-up and massage combined with warm-up modalities when compared to massage alone. No significant differences were demonstrated in any measures when the warm-up and massage and warm-up combined conditions were compared. Massage as a preperformance preparation strategy seems to decrease 20-m sprint performance when compared to a traditional warm-up, although its combination with a normal active warm-up seems to have no greater benefit then active warm-up alone. Therefore, massage use prior to competition is questionable because it appears to have no effective role in improving sprint performance.

  2. Ruggedized Portable Instrumentation Package for Marine Mammal Evoked Potential Hearing Measurements (DURIP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-30

    NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) Hawaii Institute of Marine Biology,Marine Mammal...Program Hawaii Institute of Marine Biology P.O. Box 1106 Kailua, Hawaii 96734 phone: (808) 247-5297 fax: (808) 247-5831 email: nachtiga...portable equipment was used at the Hilo Stranding Center to obtain the audiograms. Ready and available for RIMPAC excercises. 2 IMPACT

  3. More efficient response to nuclear emergencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-12-01

    Three documents related to the first volume of this report are presented here. These are a description of the emergency provisions organisation, an analysis of the weaknesses in the present organisation and proposed improvements (with appendices on the information problem in excercises with the emergency provisions at Ringhals and attitudes to tasks connected with evacuation following a power reactor accident) and agreements with Denmark, Finland, Norway and the IAEA for mutual assistance. (JIW)

  4. Oral temperature and cardiovascular responses of apparently ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Oral temperature and cardiovascular responses of apparently healthy subjects to passive and active warm-up. BOA Adegoke, OO Ogwumike, FA Maruf. Abstract. This study investigated and compared the effects of active and passive warm-up on oral temperature and cardiovascular parameters of forty (20 males and 20 ...

  5. Effect of different stretching strategies on the kinetics of vertical jumping in female volleyball athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas T. Kruse

    2015-12-01

    Conclusion: Together these findings suggest that when training and competing to jump quickly and maximally the female athlete should incorporate DS instead of SS as part of their pre-competition warm-up, but conduct performance within 15 min of their warm-up to elicit maximal gains.

  6. Fiat Chrysler Application for Alternative Methodology for Off-Cycle Technology Credits: Engine and Transmission Warmup

    Science.gov (United States)

    FCA Group LLC request to the EPA regarding greenhouse gas, off-cycle CO2 credits for Active Engine Warm Up used in 2011-2013 model year vehicles and Active Transmission Warm Up Technologies used in 2013 model year vehicles.

  7. Teaching Beginning Trombone Players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fallis, Todd L.

    2001-01-01

    Discusses the process of introducing the trombone to beginning students and addresses the issue of warming-up. Provides resources for beginning trombone methods, band methods, and daily warm-up studies. Includes resources for scale studies and etudes for beginning to intermediate trombone players. (CMK)

  8. Training Patterns of Wheelchair Basketball Players in Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatar, Yasar

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze technical drills, warm-up and cool-down exercises used by wheelchair basketball players of the Turkish league in relation to training sessions. 33 male wheelchair basketball players participated in the study (mean age 26.6[plus or minus]5,95 years). All players reported that they used warm-up exercises before…

  9. Is There a Hemingway in the House?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Laurel

    2004-01-01

    Creative warm-up activities help most of the articulate students who hate writing and unblock the most reluctant writers. Some of the warm-up activities for students in elementary grades that help in taking the fright out of writing, or just reduce the initial resistance are described.

  10. A Complete Workout for All Runners: From the Novice to the Experienced

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews-Little, Donya; Crowley, Charles; Jackson, E. Newton

    2014-01-01

    Many people grew up on the principle that a good workout consists of three basic components: warm-up, conditioning bout/activity, and cool-down. For those who participated in competitive athletics, the warm-up period seemed just as long as the activity or workout itself; but it was and remains the most important part of any workout. This article…

  11. The Effects of Music on High-intensity Short-term Exercise in Well Trained Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarraya, Mohamed; Chtourou, Hamdi; Aloui, Asma; Hammouda, Omar; Chamari, Karim; Chaouachi, Anis; Souissi, Nizar

    2012-12-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to assess the effects of listening to music during warm-up on short-term supramaximal performances during the 30-s Wingate test in highly trained athletes. Twelve young male athletes (20.6±1.8 yrs, 177±4.4 cm and 72.3±5.3 kg) underwent two Wingate tests in separate sessions with a recovery period of 48 h in-between, either after a 10 min of warm-up with (MWU) or without (NMWU) music. High tempo music (>120 to 140bpm) was selected for the study. Heart rate (HR) and rate of perceived exertion (RPE) were recorded after the warm-up (for HR = average of warm-up) and immediately after the Wingate test. HR, RPE and the fatigue index during the Wingate test are not affected by the incorporation of music during warm-up. However, power output (P(peak) and P(mean)) was significantly higher after MWU than NMWU (Peffect of music during warm-up on short-term supramaximal performances. As it's a legal method and an additional aid, music may be used during warm-up before performing activities requiring powerful lower limbs' muscles contractions during short-term supramaximal exercises.

  12. IMPACT OF GRANT PROJECTS IMPLEMENTATION IN ROMANIAN HIGHER EDUCATION INSTITUTIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vlad S. PETCU

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Romanian Higher Education Institutions were one of the main beneficiaries of European funding in the 2007-2013 funding excercise, especially in the Sectoral Operational Programme Human Resources Development. Analyzing the data provided by 21 public universities in Romania, we find that Universities have accessed in a significant proportion two types of projects: those dedicated to transition from school to active life and those dedicated to doctoral studies. Also, the proportion of the European funds attracted by HEIs is an overwhelming part of the allocation of reference (over 40% since 2011, and also a significant proportion of total revenues universities (~15.5 % for 2011-2014.

  13. Gamma irradiator dose mapping simulation using the MCNP code and benchmarking with dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sohrabpour, M.; Hassanzadeh, M.; Shahriari, M.; Sharifzadeh, M.

    2002-01-01

    The Monte Carlo transport code, MCNP, has been applied in simulating dose rate distribution in the IR-136 gamma irradiator system. Isodose curves, cumulative dose values, and system design data such as throughputs, over-dose-ratios, and efficiencies have been simulated as functions of product density. Simulated isodose curves, and cumulative dose values were compared with dosimetry values obtained using polymethyle-methacrylate, Fricke, ethanol-chlorobenzene, and potassium dichromate dosimeters. The produced system design data were also found to agree quite favorably with those of the system manufacturer's data. MCNP has thus been found to be an effective transport code for handling of various dose mapping excercises for gamma irradiators

  14. [The social model of disability in Argentina: Paradigm of decision-making support and safeguards in the new Argentine Civil Code].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toro-Martínez, Esteban

    2015-01-01

    There has been a new framework with new laws and a new Code in Argentina in recent years in order to put its legal system in congruence with International Convenants on Human Rights and in particular with the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities. Through this new laws Argentina legal system recognize that persons with disabilities enjoy capacity on an equal basis with others in all aspects of life and the State shall take appropiate measures to provide access by persons with disabilities to the support they may require in excercising their legal capacity with safeguards.

  15. Corporate Social Responsibility in a Hospitality Organisation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Justenlund, Anders; Rebelo, Sofia

    the researchers with structures to set up an interview guide for future qualitative interviews. This research recognises the individual's motives for understanding and excercising CSR in the hospitality industry. The authors aim to construct an analytical framework taking as a starting point the understanding...... of implemented CSR-principles within an international hotel chain, recognised for its best practice. In the long term the intention is to learn how future hospitality professionals (present hospitality students) perceive CSR. The paper also includes refelctions on how different welfare state structures affect...

  16. Federal supervisory authorities' power to issue directives in nuclear licensing procedures (Kalkar reactor)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1990-01-01

    The Federal Constitutional Court (BVerfG) is concerned in its judgement with the legal instrument of Federal supervisory authorities' power to issue directives in nuclear licensing procedures (Kalkar reactor). Dealt with are questions concerning material and excercising competences, the Federal Government's right to issue directives and possible violation of Laender rights, as well as the legal position between Land and Federal Government, the necessity to issue clear directives, questions concerning the competence to issue directives and the Federal Government's duty to consider the overall interests (Federal Government and Laender interests), questions concerning constitutional state principles and the limits in the relations between Federal Government - Laender concerning legal competence. (RST) [de

  17. Stretching

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... after a workout. Stretching still can be a beneficial activity after you have sufficiently warmed up. The ... light aerobic activity and stretching. If you're running at a quick pace, you can slow down ...

  18. Frostbite

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... moisture and outermost layers that are windproof and waterproof are helpful. Make sure kids come indoors regularly to warm up. Change kids out of wet clothing or shoes as soon as possible. Watch for frostnip, frostbite's ...

  19. Right Writing (or Writing Right) for Creativity in Advertising.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearce, R. Charles

    1989-01-01

    Suggests techniques from Peter Elbow's book, "Writing with Power," for an advertising copywriting class. Describes in detail an eight-step procedure: warm-up, loop writing, sharing, revision, sharing, revision, editing group sharing, and revision. (MS)

  20. Rabarocki eelsoojendus. Meeleolukas kevadkontsert Estonias

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2008-01-01

    13. ja 14. juunil Järvakandis toimuva Rabarocki warm-up peost klubis Rockstars ja esimesest ETV saatest Rabarocki triloogiast 24. mail. Kevadkontserdist "Feeling Good" 26. mail Estonia kontserdisaalis

  1. Healthy Lifestyle: Women's Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... maintain a healthy weight. Try brisk walking, jogging, biking, swimming or water aerobics. If you're a ... as dancing and gardening, also can improve your health. Whatever you choose, take time to warm up ...

  2. Ballistic stretching increases flexibility and acute vertical jump height when combined with basketball activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woolstenhulme, Mandy T; Griffiths, Christine M; Woolstenhulme, Emily M; Parcell, Allen C

    2006-11-01

    Stretching is often included as part of a warm-up procedure for basketball activity. However, the efficacy of stretching with respect to sport performance has come into question. We determined the effects of 4 different warm-up protocols followed by 20 minutes of basketball activity on flexibility and vertical jump height. Subjects participated in 6 weeks (2 times per week) of warm-up and basketball activity. The warm-up groups participated in ballistic stretching, static stretching, sprinting, or basketball shooting (control group). We asked 3 questions. First, what effect does 6 weeks of warm-up exercise and basketball play have on both flexibility and vertical jump height? We measured sit and reach and vertical jump height before (week -1) and after (week 7) the 6 weeks. Flexibility increased for the ballistic, static, and sprint groups compared to the control group (p vertical jump height did not change for any of the groups. Our second question was what is the acute effect of each warm-up on vertical jump height? We measured vertical jump immediately after the warm-up on 4 separate occasions during the 6 weeks (at weeks 0, 2, 4, and 6). Vertical jump height was not different for any group. Finally, our third question was what is the acute effect of each warm-up on vertical jump height following 20 minutes of basketball play? We measured vertical jump height immediately following 20 minutes of basketball play at weeks 0, 2, 4, and 6. Only the ballistic stretching group demonstrated an acute increase in vertical jump 20 minutes after basketball play (p basketball play, as it is beneficial to vertical jump performance.

  3. Thermograpic study of upper extremities in patients with cerebral palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lampe, R.; Kawelke, S.; Mitternacht, J.; Turova, V.; Blumenstein, T.; Alves-Pinto, A.

    2015-03-01

    Trophic disorders like reduced skin blood circulation are well-known epiphenomenon of cerebral palsy (CP). They can influence quality of life and can lead to skin damages and, as a consequence, to decubitus. Therefore, it is important to analyse temperature regulation in patients with CP. Thermal imaging camera FLIR BCAM SD was used to study the dependency of skin blood circulation in upper extremities of patients with CP on hand dominance, hand force and hand volume. The hand force was evaluated using a conventional dynamometer. The hand volume was measured with a volumeter. A cold stress test for hands was applied in 22 patients with CP and 6 healthy subjects. The warming up process after the test was recorded with the thermal camera. It was confirmed that the hands of patients warm up slower comparing to healthy persons. The patients' working hands warm up faster than non-working ones. A slight correlation was established between the hand grip force of the working hands and their warm up time. No correlation was found between the warming up time and the volume of the hand. The results confirm our assumption that there is a connection of peripheral blood circulation to upper limb motor functions.

  4. Ventilation control for an efficient heating of the interior of vehicles; Belueftungsregelung zur effizienten Aufheizung des Fahrzeuginnenraums

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Markowitz, Markus [Ford-Werke GmbH, Koeln (Germany)

    2012-11-01

    Warming up the passenger compartment of a motor vehicle in winter, in the context of efficient engines and new powertrains with significantly reduced heat output, requires careful optimisation to facilitate the best usage of the remaining potentials. Part of this optimisation task is related to the ventilation controls, i.e. the airside warm-up strategy. Using recirculated air for cabin heating can increase the efficiency of the warm-up process. However, a moisture management has to be established in order to avoid window misting. For this reason, a humidity sensor is utilised. A few interesting aspects related to this approach shall be presented and discussed in this article: potential of heating performance improvement by using recirculated cabin air, effects on the cabin air distribution, limitations to the fraction of recirculated air, humidity assessment and control, verification of the improvement potential in the climatic windtunnel and on the road. (orig.)

  5. Challenges involved in the development of models describing the running hot of engines; Herausforderungen bei der Entwicklung von Motorwarmlaufmodellen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unterguggenberger, Peter; Salbrechter, Sebastian; Jauk, Thomas; Wimmer, Andreas [Technische Univ. Graz (Austria). Inst. fuer Verbrennungskraftmaschinen und Thermodynamik (IVT)

    2012-11-01

    Currently, all potential must be tapped in order to reach the increasingly tighter CO{sub 2} limits for vehicles. From the variety of possible options for reducing fuel consumption, the contribution of improved heat management should not be ignored since increased friction during warm-up results in greater fuel consumption. Engine warm-up models that calculate thermal behavior and fuel consumption are a relatively inexpensive alternative to empirical measures. In order to achieve satisfactory simulation results, the exact modeling of thermal behavior as well as friction conditions is necessary. This paper identifies the demands placed on the individual submodels based on the requirements for precision that thermal warm-up models must meet. Before treating the friction model it will explain the development of the heat input model in detail. In addition, it presents the test program needed to establish and validate the simulation model with the required measurement accuracy. (orig.)

  6. Geometric situation of points of division of regions of direct and return currency in channels with the presence of heating zone limited on the longitudinal coordinate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerasimov, A.; Kirpichnikov, A.; Sabirova, F.

    2018-03-01

    The analysis of energy balance equation for viscous laminar flow of fluid or gas in the cylindrical channel in the area (zone) of warm up bounded along the longitudinal coordinate is made. It was found that at laminar flow of fluid or gas in a round pipe, in each warm up area bounded along the longitudinal coordinate there are the areas of direct and reverse flows separated by a plane that is a locus of points where temperature is maximal for each fixed value of radial coordinate r.

  7. Development of super thin foil metal supported catalyst; Chousuhaku metal tantai shokubai no kaihatsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanji, F; Takada, T [Toyota Motor Corp., Aichi (Japan)

    1997-10-01

    In order to improve warm-up performance, high heat resistance and long life durability of catalysts, the reduction of the metal support heat capacity has been focused. The effects of both reducing foil thickness and lowering cell density on low heat capacity have been investigated. As a result of engine bench and vehicle test, it was apparent that the reduction of foil thickness has greater effects. Newly developed 30 {mu} m foil thickness metal supported catalyst has quicker warm-up performance, and its structural durability up to 950degC is confirmed. 3 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Low temperature safety of lithium-thionyl chloride cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subbarao, S.; Deligiannis, F.; Shen, D. H.; Dawson, S.; Halpert, G.

    The use of lithium thionyl chloride cells for low-temperature applications is presently restricted because of their unsafe behavior. An attempt is made in the present investigation to identify the safe/unsafe low temperature operating conditions and to understand the low temperature cell chemistry responsible for the unsafe behavior. Cells subjected to extended reversal at low rate and -40 C were found to explode upon warm-up. Lithium was found to deposit on the carbon cathodes during reversal. Warming up to room temperature may be accelerating the lithium corrosion in the electrolyte. This may be one of the reasons for the cell thermal runaway.

  9. Relocation tabletop exercise: federal radiological response in the post-accident phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grant, K.; Adler, M.V.; Wolff, W.F.

    1986-01-01

    The federal Radiological Emergency Response Plan (FRERP) was developed to provide the framework for coordinating federal radiological assistance to states and to local authorities faced with a large radiological accident. The Relocation Tabletop Exercise was conducted on December 9-11, 1985 at the Beaver Valley Power Station, the site of the simulated accident. The exercise scenario had postulated a substantial release of radioactive materials from a fuel handling accident at the Beaver Valley Power Station in Shippingport, Pennsylvania, leaving radioactive materisls deposited over part of the surrounding area. The exercise was structured as a sequential series of nice mini-scenarios, each of which focused on one problems. The exercise was intended to identify issues and problems which needed consideration or procedures which might need to be developed for this post-accident phase. It was a ''no-fault'' excercise

  10. Central Scientific and Research Institute of Nuclear Information as the branch centre of information on nuclear science and engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arkhangel'skij, I.A.; Sokolov, D.D.; Kalinin, V.F.; Nikiforov, V.S.

    1982-01-01

    The main tasks are considered in the scope of the Central Scientific-Research Institute for Information and Technological and Economic Studies on Nuclear Science and Technology. (TsNIIAtominform). The institute coordinates scientific research and information activity of information agencies of all the USSR organizations engaged in nuclear science and technology, excercises a centralized completion of their libraries, develops and puts into practice the most progressive methods for the information servicing. The institute is a national INIS center of the USSR. Here a system for the automatic information dissemination has been successfully elaborated and employed. Much of the institute activity is given to the estimation and analysis of information and to the determination of tendencies in the nuclear science and technology development. A conclusion is drawn to the effect that TsNIIAtominform, within 15 years of its existence, has formed as a center ensuring functioning of the system of scientific and technical information on nuclear science and technology

  11. The steam generator programme of PISC III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Birac, C.; Herkenrath, H.

    1990-12-01

    The PISC III Actions are intended to extend the results and methodologies of the previous PISC excercises, i.e. the validation of the capabilities of the various examination techniques when used on real defects in real components under real conditions of inspection. Being aware of the important safety role that steam generator tubes play as barrier between primary and secondary cooling system and of the industrial problems that the degradation of these tubes can create, the PISC III Management Board agreed to include in the PISC III Programme a special Action on Steam Generator Tubes Testing (SGT). It was decided to organize the programme in three phases, including Round Robin Tests (RRT): - capability tests on loose tubes, - capability tests on transportable mock-ups, - reliability tests on fixed mock-ups including some interesting SURRY tubes

  12. Estimation of default probability for corporate entities in Republic of Serbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vujnović Miloš

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper a quantitative PD model development has been excercised according to the Basel Capital Accord standards. The modeling dataset is based on the financial statements information from the Republic of Serbia. The goal of the paper is to develop a credit scoring model capable of producing PD estimate with high predictive power on the sample of corporate entities. The modeling is based on 5 years of end-of-year financial statements data of available Serbian corporate entities. Weight of evidence (WOE approach has been applied to quantitatively transform and prepare financial ratios. Correlation analysis has been utilized to reduce long list of variables and to remove highly interdependent variables from training and validation datasets. According to the best banking practice and academic literature, the final model is provided by using adjusted stepwise Logistic regression. The finally proposed model and its financial ratio constituents have been discussed and benchmarked against examples from relevant academic literature.

  13. CLOUD-BASED INTERACTIVE EDUCATIONAL AND METHODICAL COMPLEX FOR THE COURSE “INFORMATICS” IN INDEPENDENT WORK OF STUDENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    И Н Куринин

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This article concentrates on the basic materials of the educational and methodical complex of a modern format (cloud-based and interactive, used in the educational process of the course “Informatics”, which significantly expands the share of independent work of students according to the increased number of students’ practical work (laboratory work, educational projects, essays. This workshop focuses on mastering the methods of work with personal mobile and office computers, Office programs, Internet technologies by students and making students receive the competences to solve topical applied problems. Efficiency of students’ independent work is additionally ensured by educational and methodical tutorials (lecture notes and compilations of test tasks, excercises, models and examples of performing all tasks, developed by the authors of the article.

  14. Effects of exercise on fluid exchange and body composition in man during 14-day bed rest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenleaf, J. E.; Bernauer, E. M.; Juhos, L. T.; Young, H. L.; Morse, J. T.; Staley, R. W.

    1977-01-01

    A description is presented of an investigation in which body composition, fluid intake, and fluid and electrolyte losses were measured in seven normal, healthy men during three 2-wk bed-rest periods, separated by two 3-wk recovery periods. During bed rest the subjects remained in the horizontal position continuously. During the dietary control periods, body mass decreased significantly with all three regimens, including no exercise, isometric exercise, and isotonic excercise. During bed rest, body mass was essentially unchanged with no exercise, but decreased significantly with isotonic and isometric exercise. With one exception, there were no statistically significant changes in body density, lean body mass, or body fat content by the end of each of the three bed-rest periods.

  15. Total Protein of Whole Saliva as a Biomarker of Anaerobic Threshold

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bortolini, Miguel Junior Sordi; De Agostini, Guilherme Gularte; Reis, Ismair Teodoro; Lamounier, Romeu Paulo Martins Silva; Blumberg, Jeffrey B.; Espindola, Foued Salmen

    2009-01-01

    Saliva provides a convenient and noninvasive matrix for assessing specific physiological parameters, including some biomarkers of exercise. We investigated whether the total protein concentration of whole saliva (TPWS) would reflect the anaerobic threshold during an incremental exercise test. After a warm-up period, 13 nonsmoking men performed a…

  16. 40 CFR 1033.515 - Discrete-mode steady-state emission tests of locomotives and locomotive engines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Discrete-mode steady-state emission... Procedures § 1033.515 Discrete-mode steady-state emission tests of locomotives and locomotive engines. This... a warm-up followed by a sequence of nominally steady-state discrete test modes, as described in...

  17. Stress Management: A Rational Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeves, Cecil

    This workbook was designed for use as the primary resource tool during a l-day participatory stress management seminar in which participants identify stressful situations, conduct analyses, and develop approaches to manage the stressful situations more effectively. Small group warm-up activities designed to introduce participants, encourage…

  18. Thermodynamics in landscape ecology: The importance of integrating measurement and modeling of landscape entropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuel A. Cushman

    2015-01-01

    Entropy and the second law of thermodynamics are the central organizing principles of nature. Or perhaps more accurately, the second law is the central disorganizing principle. Hot things cool down. Cold things warm up. You cannot get something for nothing. You always pay more than you get. Things fall apart. You cannot repeat the past. We grow old and die. It is all...

  19. Just-in-Time Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novak, Gregor M.

    2011-01-01

    This chapter provides an overview and implementation guidelines of Just-in-Time Teaching (JiTT), an interactive engagement pedagogy used across disciplines and across the academy, now in its fourteenth year. The heart of JiTT pedagogy is Web-based pre-instruction assignments called warm-ups, with some colorful local variations, such as GeoBytes in…

  20. Facing the Music: Creative and Experiential Group Strategies for Working with Addiction Related Grief and Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haberstroh, Shane

    2005-01-01

    This article outlines how group practitioners can harness creative strategies to assist addicted clients in verbalizing and addressing the losses associated with addictive disorders. This article overviews the implementation of an experiential process that includes a warm up activity, a psychodrama, and utilization of empty chair techniques to…

  1. Strains and Sprains Are a Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... lot of pressure on a muscle or you push it too far, such as when lifting a heavy object. Strains can be more likely to happen if you haven't warmed up first to get blood circulating to the muscles. They're also common for someone returning to a sport after the off-season. That first time playing ...

  2. Strains and Sprains

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... lot of pressure on a muscle or you push it too far, such as when lifting a heavy object. Strains may be more likely to happen if you haven't warmed up first to get blood circulating to the muscles. They're also common for someone returning to a sport after the off-season. That first time playing ...

  3. Explore Your Universe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lloyd-Ronning, Nicole Marie [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-05-01

    This warm-up lab is intended to get students familiar with the large numbers encountered in astronomy (e.g. distances, times, numbers of stars and galaxies in the universe). Students will measure the dimensions of the classroom and/or the distance between objects in the classroom, and report their findings in units of millimeters, micrometers and nanometers.

  4. THE PROBLEM OF HOT-SPOTS IN MICROWAVE EQUIPMENT USED FOR PREPARATORY TECHNIQUES - THEORY AND PRACTICE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    KOK, LP; BOON, ME; SMID, HM

    1993-01-01

    Electron microscopists who wants to use a microwave (MW) oven to stimulate preparatory processes are sooner or later confronted with the problem of hot spots. It soon becomes clear to the user of any MW oven that the energy distribution-thus the speed of absorbing energy, and hence warming up-varies

  5. De virtuele magnetron

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luitjes, H.; Vollebregt, M.; Canters, R.

    2004-01-01

    The virtual microwave oven is computer software wich simulates the workings of the microwave oven. It can simplify the design of packaging for microwave meals which enables these meals to be warmed up in such a way the temperature differences (warm spots and cold spots) in the various food items

  6. Data analysis & probability drill sheets : grades 6-8

    CERN Document Server

    Forest, Chris

    2011-01-01

    For grades 6-8, our Common Core State Standards-based resource meets the data analysis & probability concepts addressed by the NCTM standards and encourages your students to review the concepts in unique ways. Each drill sheet contains warm-up and timed drill activities for the student to practice data analysis & probability concepts.

  7. Author Details

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Chaouachi, A. Vol 10, No 1 (2015) - Articles Effect of active warm-up duration on morning short-term maximal performance during Ramadan Abstract PDF. ISSN: 1819-6357. AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE AJOL... for Researchers · for Librarians · for Authors · FAQ's · More about AJOL · AJOL's Partners · Terms ...

  8. Libyan Journal of Medicine - Vol 10, No 1 (2015)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effect of active warm-up duration on morning short-term maximal performance during Ramadan · EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT. H Baklout, H Chtourou, A Aloui, A Chaouachi, N Souiss. http://dx.doi.org/10.3402/ljm.v10.26229 ...

  9. A new programme for monitoring the mass loss of the Greenland ice sheet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahlstrøm, Andreas P.; Gravesen, Peter; Bech Andersen, Signe

    2008-01-01

    ). The Arctic region as a whole is warming up much more rapidly than the globe at large (ACIA 2005) and it is desirable to quantify these changes in order to provide the decision-makers with a firm knowledge base. To cover this need, the Danish Ministry of Climate and Energy has now launched a new Programme...

  10. Ultrasonic instrument for continuous measurement of liquid levels in sodium systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boehmer, L.S.

    1975-01-01

    An ultrasonic level measurement system which provides a continuous digital readout over a range of 3-180 inches, was tested in 500 0 F liquid sodium. The system proved to be accurate and reliable, required no initial warm-up period and experienced no long term drift. Modifications can extend the present operating temperatures to greater than 1200 0 F

  11. Analysis of patient load data for teams competing in the 2003 cricket ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    teams taking part in 10 warm-up matches and 46 matches during the 2003 Cricket World Cup played in South Africa, .... Medical support was provided from the time that the teams arrived in the country, and the medical staff were ..... Melbourne: Blackwell, 1995, 674 - 8. 5. Orchard J, James T, Alcott E, Carter S, Farhart P.

  12. Rainfall Variability along the Southern Flank of the Bambouto ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2008-10-27

    . 2 - Univ. Yaoundé I, Faculty of Science, Department of Earth Science, P.O. Box 812 ..... hollow alveolar in the centre which is elevated at the borders. This situation entraps air inside that is warmed- up and creates rising ...

  13. The Tableau Vivant as Basic to Theatre Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dow, Marguerite R.

    1980-01-01

    Defines "tableaux vivant" as the three-dimensional enactment of still pictures. Describes its use in the theater and as a tool in theater study. Presents a series of warm-up and tableaux exercises for use in the classroom. (JMF)

  14. Inactivation of 12 viruses by heating steps applied during manufacture of a hepatitis B vaccine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lelie, P. N.; Reesink, H. W.; Lucas, C. J.

    1987-01-01

    The efficacy of two heating cycles (90 sec at 103 degrees C and 10 hr at 65 degrees C) used during manufacture of a plasma-derived hepatitis-B vaccine was validated for the inactivation of 12 virus families. A period of 15 min warming up to 65 degrees C had already completely inactivated

  15. Sports Medicine Concerns in Special Olympics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Low, Leslie J.; Sherrill, Claudine

    1988-01-01

    The article provides information on medical problems (including seizures, nutrition, atlantoaxia instability, and congenital heart disorders), and guidelines for training (including weight management, acclimation, heat related problems, and warm-up) for volunteers working with mentally retarded participants in Special Olympics. (DB)

  16. Effect of previous exhaustive exercise on metabolism and fatigue development during intense exercise in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iaia, F. M.; Perez-Gomez, J.; Nordsborg, Nikolai

    2010-01-01

    The present study examined how metabolic response and work capacity are affected by previous exhaustive exercise. Seven subjects performed an exhaustive cycle exercise ( approximately 130%-max; EX2) after warm-up (CON) and 2 min after an exhaustive bout at a very high (VH; approximately 30 s), high...

  17. Dissociation between lactate and proton exchange in muscle during intense exercise in man

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bangsbo, Jens; Juel, Carsten; Hellsten, Ylva

    1997-01-01

    1. Transport of lactate, H+ and fluid across muscle sarcolemma was studied in contracting muscles under varying blood acid-base conditions. 2. Subjects performed two-legged submaximal knee-extensor exercise for 29-35 min consisting of warming up for 5 min followed by 10 min of leg exercise (L1...

  18. Effects of evidence-based prevention training on neuromuscular and biomechanical risk factors for ACL injury in adolescent female athletes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zebis, Mette K.; Andersen, Lars L.; Brandt, Mikkel

    2016-01-01

    training 3 times weekly for 12 weeks. The CON group completed their regular warm-up exercise programme before training. Players were tested while performing a side cutting movement at baseline and 12-week follow-up, using surface electromyography (EMG) and three-dimensional movement analysis. We calculated...

  19. Softball Coaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopiano, Donna; And Others

    1981-01-01

    A collection of articles provides current instructional information to softball players and coaches. Topics discussed in the series include practice, basic skills, defense, pitching, catching, offense, and warm-up exercises to be used in conjunction with other conditioning drills. (JN)

  20. Teaching Softball. Steps to Success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter, Diane L.; Brockmeyer, Gretchen A.

    This handbook was written for the instructor of softball. It is a comprehensive guide for individualizing and improving instruction. Essential instructional resources are provided, including: (1) management and safety guidelines; (2) warm-up and cool-down exercises; (3) specification of equipment needs; (4) rating charts for identifying students'…

  1. The Importance of Physical Fitness in Academia | Olu | Lwati: A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Fitness activities include warm-up and cool-down activities. When these activities are properly done it does not only enhances one's health, alertness, but also promote the mental emotional, physical social and spiritual well-being of an academia. It brings about all round development of other body e.g. agility, strength, ...

  2. The epidemiology of golfrelated injuries in Australian amateur ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    the golf swing (44.8%). Age, warm-up status, conditioning habits, wearing a golf glove/s and injury acquired in other sports / activities were significantly associated with risk of golf injury (p < 0.05). Equipment use such as type of golf club shaft used, type of shoes used and other factors studied were not statistically significant.

  3. Dogs, Cats, and Kids: Integrating Yoga into Elementary Physical Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toscano, Lisa; Clemente, Fran

    2008-01-01

    This article describes the benefits of integrating yoga into elementary physical education classes. Taught as warm-up exercises or as an entire class, yoga offers children of any age and physical ability the opportunity to experience success in physical activity. Children need to experience joy while participating in physical activity in order to…

  4. The economy of the climatic change; Economie du changement climatique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marvillet, J.

    2011-01-15

    In his introduction, the author recalls that the climatic warming up is admitted by everybody and that the Total firm follows the recommendations of the main point of the scientific community to integrate it in a permanent way in its approach. (O.M.)

  5. 40 CFR 91.405 - Recorded information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...(s). (4) Number of hours of operation accumulated on the engine prior to beginning the warm-up... associated analyzer range(s). (2) Observed engine torque. (3) Observed engine rpm. (4) Engine intake air flow, if applicable. (5) Test cell temperature and humidity for each mode. (6) For raw gas testing; fuel...

  6. Summary of Session 5 and 6 'Long Shutdown 1'

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bordry, F; Foraz, K [European Organization for Nuclear Research, Geneva (Switzerland)

    2012-07-01

    This paper summarizes the sessions devoted to Long Shutdown 1 (LS1) in the LHC, injectors and experiments. The time frame and start date were discussed, with the main activities from powering tests prior to warm-up up to physics were presented. The session finished with a discussion on the maximum reasonable energy. (author)

  7. Measures to reduce construction time of high-rise buildings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolchedantsev, Leonid; Adamtsevich, Aleksey; Stupakova, Olga; Drozdov, Alexander

    2018-03-01

    The organizational and technological solutions for high-rise buildings construction efficiency increase are considered, primarily - decrease of typical floor construction time and improvement of bearing structures concrete quality. The essence of offered technology is: a concrete mixing station and a polygon mainly for load-bearing wall panels with starter bars casting are located on the building site; for reinforced concrete components manufacturing and butt joints grouting the warmed-up concrete mixtures are used. The results of researches and elaborations carried out by the SPSUACE in area of a preliminary warming-up of concrete mixtures are presented. The possibility and feasibility of their usage in high-rise buildings and of excess height buildings construction including cast-in-place and precast execution are shown. The essence of heat-vibro treating of concrete mixture is revealed as a kind of prior electroresistive curing, and the achieved results are: accelerated concrete strength gain, power inputs decrease, concrete quality improvement. It is shown that the location of a concrete mixing station on the building site enables to broaden possibilities of the "thermos" method use and to avoid concrete mixtures warming up in medium-mass structures erection (columns, girders) during the high-rise buildings construction. It is experimentally proved that the splice between precast elements encased with warmed-up concrete mixture is equal with conjugated elements in strength.

  8. The way to collisions, step by step

    CERN Multimedia

    2009-01-01

    While the LHC sectors cool down and reach the cryogenic operating temperature, spirits are warming up as we all eagerly await the first collisions. No reason to hurry, though. Making particles collide involves the complex manoeuvring of thousands of delicate components. The experts will make it happen using a step-by-step approach.

  9. EXERCISE-INDUCED ASTHMA

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Enrique

    to a repeat bout of intense exercise within 2 hours after an initial. EIA response. In this ... advantage of athletes, if the athlete then competes following a warm-up in this .... Diagnostic and therapeutic algorithm in the work-up of the athlete with EIA. .... Avoid exercise in excessively cold Reduced responsiveness of airways.

  10. Post-cold-storage conditioning time affects soil denitrifying enzyme activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chirinda, Ngonidzashe; Olesen, Jørgen Eivind; Porter, John Roy

    2011-01-01

    Soil denitrifying enzyme activity (DEA) is often assessed after cold storage. Previous studies using the short-term acetylene inhibition method have not considered conditioning time (post-cold-storage warm-up time prior to soil analysis) as a factor influencing results. We observed fluctuations...

  11. The Effect of Vocal Hygiene and Behavior Modification Instruction on the Self-Reported Vocal Health Habits of Public School Music Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hackworth, Rhonda S.

    2007-01-01

    This study examined the effects of vocal hygiene and behavior modification instruction on self-reported behaviors of music teachers. Subjects (N = 76) reported daily behaviors for eight weeks: water consumption, warm-up, talking over music/noise, vocal rest, nonverbal commands, and vocal problems. Subjects were in experimental group 1 or 2, or the…

  12. The influence of whole-body vs. torso pre-cooling on physiological strain and performance of high-intensity exercise in the heat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sleivert, G G; Cotter, J D; Roberts, W S; Febbraio, M A

    2001-04-01

    Little research has been reported examining the effects of pre-cooling on high-intensity exercise performance, particularly when combined with strategies to keep the working muscle warm. This study used nine active males to determine the effects of pre-cooling the torso and thighs (LC), pre-cooling the torso (ice-vest in 3 degrees C air) while keeping the thighs warm (LW), or no cooling (CON: 31 degrees C air), on physiological strain and high-intensity (45-s) exercise performance (33 degrees C, 60% rh). Furthermore, we sought to determine whether performance after pre-cooling was influenced by a short exercise warm-up. The 45-s test was performed at different (PForearm blood flow prior to exercise was also lower in LC (3.1+/-2.0 ml 100 ml tissue(-1) x min(-1)) than CON (8.2+/-2.5, P=0.01) but not LW (4.3+/-2.6, P=0.46). After an exercise warm-up, muscle temperature (Tm) was not significantly different between conditions (CON: 37.3+/-1.5, LW: 37.3+/-1.2, LC: 36.6+/-0.7 degrees C, P=0.16) but when warm-up was excluded, T(m) was lower in LC (34.5+/-1.9 degrees C, P=0.02) than in CON (37.3+/-1.0) and LW (37.1+/-0.9). Even when a warm-up was performed, torso+thigh pre-cooling decreased both peak (-3.4+/-3.8%, P=0.04) and mean power output (-4.1+/-3.8%, P=0.01) relative to the control, but this effect was markedly larger when warm-up was excluded (peak power -7.7+/-2.5%, P=0.01; mean power -7.6+/-1.2%, P=0.01). Torso-only pre-cooling did not reduce peak or mean power, either with or without warm-up. These data indicate that pre-cooling does not improve 45-s high-intensity exercise performance, and can impair performance if the working muscles are cooled. A short exercise warm-up largely removes any detrimental effects of a cold muscle on performance by increasing Tm.

  13. Absence of “Warm-Up” during Active Avoidance Learning in a Rat Model of Anxiety Vulnerability: Insights from Computational Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Catherine E.; Smith, Ian M.; Servatius, Richard J.; Beck, Kevin D.

    2014-01-01

    Avoidance behaviors, in which a learned response causes omission of an upcoming punisher, are a core feature of many psychiatric disorders. While reinforcement learning (RL) models have been widely used to study the development of appetitive behaviors, less attention has been paid to avoidance. Here, we present a RL model of lever-press avoidance learning in Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats and in the inbred Wistar Kyoto (WKY) rat, which has been proposed as a model of anxiety vulnerability. We focus on “warm-up,” transiently decreased avoidance responding at the start of a testing session, which is shown by SD but not WKY rats. We first show that a RL model can correctly simulate key aspects of acquisition, extinction, and warm-up in SD rats; we then show that WKY behavior can be simulated by altering three model parameters, which respectively govern the tendency to explore new behaviors vs. exploit previously reinforced ones, the tendency to repeat previous behaviors regardless of reinforcement, and the learning rate for predicting future outcomes. This suggests that several, dissociable mechanisms may contribute independently to strain differences in behavior. The model predicts that, if the “standard” inter-session interval is shortened from 48 to 24 h, SD rats (but not WKY) will continue to show warm-up; we confirm this prediction in an empirical study with SD and WKY rats. The model further predicts that SD rats will continue to show warm-up with inter-session intervals as short as a few minutes, while WKY rats will not show warm-up, even with inter-session intervals as long as a month. Together, the modeling and empirical data indicate that strain differences in warm-up are qualitative rather than just the result of differential sensitivity to task variables. Understanding the mechanisms that govern expression of warm-up behavior in avoidance may lead to better understanding of pathological avoidance, and potential pathways to modify these processes. PMID

  14. PERFORMANCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Cilli

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to investigate the kinematic and kinetic changes when resistance is applied in horizontal and vertical directions, produced by using different percentages of body weight, caused by jumping movements during a dynamic warm-up. The group of subjects consisted of 35 voluntary male athletes (19 basketball and 16 volleyball players; age: 23.4 ± 1.4 years, training experience: 9.6 ± 2.7 years; height: 177.2 ± 5.7 cm, body weight: 69.9 ± 6.9 kg studying Physical Education, who had a jump training background and who were training for 2 hours, on 4 days in a week. A dynamic warm-up protocol containing seven specific resistance movements with specific resistance corresponding to different percentages of body weight (2%, 4%, 6%, 8%, 10% was applied randomly on non consecutive days. Effects of different warm-up protocols were assessed by pre-/post- exercise changes in jump height in the countermovement jump (CMJ and the squat jump (SJ measured using a force platform and changes in hip and knee joint angles at the end of the eccentric phase measured using a video camera. A significant increase in jump height was observed in the dynamic resistance warm-up conducted with different percentages of body weight (p 0.05. In jump movements before and after the warm-up, while no significant difference between the vertical ground reaction forces applied by athletes was observed (p>0.05, in some cases of resistance, a significant reduction was observed in hip and knee joint angles (p<0.05. The dynamic resistance warm-up method was found to cause changes in the kinematics of jumping movements, as well as an increase in jump height values. As a result, dynamic warm-up exercises could be applicable in cases of resistance corresponding to 6-10% of body weight applied in horizontal and vertical directions in order to increase the jump performance acutely.

  15. Acute Effect of Different Combined Stretching Methods on Acceleration and Speed in Soccer Players

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amiri-Khorasani Mohammadtaghi

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate the acute effect of different stretching methods, during a warm-up, on the acceleration and speed of soccer players. The acceleration performance of 20 collegiate soccer players (body height: 177.25 ± 5.31 cm; body mass: 65.10 ± 5.62 kg; age: 16.85 ± 0.87 years; BMI: 20.70 ± 5.54; experience: 8.46 ± 1.49 years was evaluated after different warm-up procedures, using 10 and 20 m tests. Subjects performed five types of a warm-up: static, dynamic, combined static + dynamic, combined dynamic + static, and no-stretching. Subjects were divided into five groups. Each group performed five different warm-up protocols in five non-consecutive days. The warm-up protocol used for each group was randomly assigned. The protocols consisted of 4 min jogging, a 1 min stretching program (except for the no-stretching protocol, and 2 min rest periods, followed by the 10 and 20 m sprint test, on the same day. The current findings showed significant differences in the 10 and 20 m tests after dynamic stretching compared with static, combined, and no-stretching protocols. There were also significant differences between the combined stretching compared with static and no-stretching protocols. We concluded that soccer players performed better with respect to acceleration and speed, after dynamic and combined stretching, as they were able to produce more force for a faster execution.

  16. Effect of functional isometric squats on vertical jump in trained and untrained men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berning, Joseph M; Adams, Kent J; DeBeliso, Mark; Sevene-Adams, Patricia G; Harris, Chad; Stamford, Bryant A

    2010-09-01

    Functional isometrics (FIs) combine dynamic and isometric muscle actions and may hyperstimulate the nervous system leading to an enhanced postactivation potentiation (PAP) and improved subsequent performance. The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of an FI squat on the countermovement vertical jump (CMVJ) in resistance trained and untrained men. Thirteen trained men (age: 22.8 +/- 3.2 years, mass: 90.0 +/- 16.3 kg, and height: 178.9 +/- 7.1 cm) and 8 untrained men (age: 28.5 +/- 5.9 years, mass: 101.5 +/- 23.0 kg, and height: 177.0 +/- 4.8 cm) participated. On separate days, subjects performed CMVJs after 2 different warm-up conditions. The warm-up conditions consisted of either 5 minutes of low-intensity cycling or 5 minutes of low-intensity cycling plus a 3-second FI squat with 150% of their 1 repetition maximum (1RM). A 2 x 3 repeated-measures analysis of variance with Bonferroni post hoc revealed that when comparing the 2 warm-up conditions in the trained subjects, a significant increase (p squat. This increase was maintained when subjects were retested at 5 minutes post (2.6 cm, + 5.5%). No significant difference in CMVJ was detected in the untrained group (p = 0.49). Results support the addition of an FI squat performed at 150% of 1RM to a low-intensity cycling warm-up to enhance PAP in resistance trained but not in untrained men as measured by CMVJ. Practically, adding functional isometrics to a warm-up scheme may significantly enhance acute, short-term power output in resistance trained men.

  17. Performance Effects of Repetition Specific Gluteal Activation Protocols on Acceleration in Male Rugby Union Players

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barry Lorna

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Warm-up protocols have the potential to cause an acute enhancement of dynamic sprinting performance. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of three repetition specific gluteal activation warm-up protocols on acceleration performance in male rugby union players. Forty male academy rugby union players were randomly assigned to one of 4 groups (control, 5, 10 or 15 repetition gluteal activation group and performed 10 m sprints at baseline and 30 s, 2, 4, 6 and 8 min after their specific intervention protocol. Five and ten meter sprint times were the dependent variable and dual-beam timing gates were used to record all sprint times. Repeated measures analysis of variance found no significant improvement in 5 and 10 m sprint times between baseline and post warm-up scores (p ≥ 0.05 for all groups. There were no reported significant differences between groups at any of the rest interval time points (p ≥ 0.05. However, when individual responses to the warm-up protocols were analyzed, the 15 repetition gluteal activation group had faster 10 m times post-intervention and this improvement was significant (p = 0.021. These results would indicate that there is no specific rest interval for any of the gluteal interventions that results in a potentiation effect on acceleration performance. However, the individual response analysis would seem to indicate that a 15 repetition gluteal activation warm-up protocol has a potentiating effect on acceleration performance provided that the rest interval is adequately and individually determined.

  18. Hybrid vehicle control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shallvari, Iva; Velnati, Sashidhar; DeGroot, Kenneth P.

    2015-07-28

    A method and apparatus for heating a catalytic converter's catalyst to an efficient operating temperature in a hybrid electric vehicle when the vehicle is in a charge limited mode such as e.g., the charge depleting mode or when the vehicle's high voltage battery is otherwise charge limited. The method and apparatus determine whether a high voltage battery of the vehicle is incapable of accepting a first amount of charge associated with a first procedure to warm-up the catalyst. If it is determined that the high voltage battery is incapable of accepting the first amount of charge, a second procedure with an acceptable amount of charge is performed to warm-up the catalyst.

  19. How to Improve Pragmatic Competence of Students Learning Chinese as a Foreign Language

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Chun

      It is not an easy task for teachers to teach Chinese as a foreign language to the students who have completed the foundation levels of Chinese language and are embarking on more specialized work. The level of these students can be roughly characterized as 'advanced'. One of the most challenging...... tasks is how to improve the pragmatic competence in Chinese language for the 'advanced' students. The solution to the task is to develop language skills in the course of focusing on thinking about Chinese and cultures. This paper takes teaching practice and teaching examples as starting points......, elucidating the instructional framework in how to design warm-up activities for students, the theoretical basis of teaching, as well as design focus from the perspective of cognitive science. Aiming at the students at advanced level, the design of warm-up activities should not only emphasize language points...

  20. A Quantitative Measure of Handgrip Myotonia in Non-dystrophic Myotonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Statland, Jeffrey M; Bundy, Brian N; Wang, Yunxia; Trivedi, Jaya R; Rayan, Dipa Raja; Herbelin, Laura; Donlan, Merideth; McLin, Rhonda; Eichinger, Katy J; Findlater, Karen; Dewar, Liz; Pandya, Shree; Martens, William B; Venance, Shannon L; Matthews, Emma; Amato, Anthony A; Hanna, Michael G; Griggs, Robert C; Barohn, Richard J

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Non-dystrophic Myotonia (NDM) is characterized by myotonia without muscle wasting. A standardized quantitative myotonia assessment (QMA) is important for clinical trials. Methods Myotonia was assessed in 91 individuals enrolled in a natural history study using a commercially available computerized handgrip myometer and automated software. Average peak force and 90% to 5% relaxation times were compared to historical normal controls studied with identical methods. Results 30 subjects had chloride channel mutations, 31 sodium channel mutations, 6 DM2, and 24 no identified mutation. Chloride channel mutations were associated with prolonged 1st handgrip relaxation times, and warm up on subsequent handgrips. Sodium channel mutations were associated with prolonged 1st handgrip relaxation times and paradoxical myotonia or warm-up, depending on underlying mutations. DM2 subjects had normal relaxation times but decreased peak force. Sample size estimates are provided for clinical trial planning. Conclusion QMA is an automated, non-invasive technique for evaluating myotonia in NDM. PMID:22987687

  1. Optimization of treaining process in pre-start fencing training on the base of out-of-training means’ of mobilization orientation application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.O. Lopatenko

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: to show effectiveness of out-of- training means of mobilization orientation in pre-start preparation of elite fencers. Material: in the research 12 elite sportsmen-fencers participated. Results: it was found that under influence of the worked out pre-start complex (during 15-18 minutes, comparing with traditional warming up (40 minutes more expressed mobilization effect was registered. This effect also lasted longer time. Higher stimulating effects of pre-start complex are proved by confident differences in sportsmen’s special workability (p -0.05. Conclusions: the achieved stimulating effects reduced duration of general warming up to twenty minutes. It permits to more rationally organize pre-start training of fencers in comparison with application of traditional means.

  2. Thermal results of the Japanese LCT coil's domestic test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tada, Eisuke; Hiyama, Tadao; Kato, Takashi; Takahashi, Osamu; Shimamoto, Susumu

    1984-01-01

    This paper describes thermal results obtained in the domestic test of the Japanese LCT coil which was constructed at the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) in order to develop large superconducting coils for fusion in international collaboration proposed by the IEA. The domestic test was carried out from May 13 to June 17 in 1982 by using the test facility named as SETF (Superconducting Engineering Test Facility) which was composed of a 350-l/h helium cryogenic system, a vacuum system, a 30 KA-DC power supply and protection system, and a PDP-11/70 computer system. The cool-down characteristics, heat load, fast discharge characteristics, stability, and warm-up characteristics of the LCT coil were successfully measured in the test. The details of thermal test results acquired in the cool-down, heat load measurement, fast discharge, and warm-up, and the comparison between measurements and calculations are described in this paper. (author)

  3. Energy relaxation and heating of magnons in ferromagnetic semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korenblit, I.Ya.; Tankhilevich, B.G.

    1976-01-01

    The warming-up of electrons and magnons by a high electrical field in ferromagnetic semiconductors with wide conduction bands has been considered. The warming-up of magnons determines the dependence of the magnetic characteristics of the semiconductor (for example, its magnetization) on the electric field and leads to some interesting peculiarities in the current-voltage characteristic (CVC). In some cases, owing to a rapid decrease of electrical conductivity with the increasing temperature of magnons, the CVC may contain a descending part. Since the energy relaxation of magnons occurs very slowly, the time during which the stationary state sets in, although varying widely as a function of the lattice temperature T and the electron gas concentration n, may reach values of the order of milliseconds

  4. Stored energy in fusion magnet materials irradiated at low temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaplin, R.L.; Kerchner, H.R.; Klabunde, C.E.; Coltman, R.R.

    1989-08-01

    During the power cycle of a fusion reactor, the radiation reaching the superconducting magnet system will produce an accumulation of immobile defects in the magnet materials. During a subsequent warm-up cycle of the magnet system, the defects will become mobile and interact to produce new defect configurations as well as some mutual defect annihilations which generate heat-the release of stored energy. This report presents a brief qualitative discussion of the mechanisms for the production and release of stored energy in irradiated materials, a theoretical analysis of the thermal response of irradiated materials, theoretical analysis of the thermal response of irradiated materials during warm-up, and a discussion of the possible impact of stored energy release on fusion magnet operation 20 refs

  5. Coat of Arms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Bryan

    1998-01-01

    Describes an activity, the "coat of arms," that can serve as an ice-breaker or warm-up for the first day of an English-as-a-Second/Foreign-Language class, as a motivating start to the week, or act as an innovative segue between skill lessons. The technique can be adapted for students ranging from elementary school to adult language learners of all…

  6. The practice of active rest by workplace units improves personal relationships, mental health, and physical activity among workers

    OpenAIRE

    Michishita, Ryoma; Jiang, Ying; Ariyoshi, Daisuke; Yoshida, Marie; Moriyama, Hideko; Yamato, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Aim: This study was designed to clarify the effects of active rest, with a focus on the practice of short-time group exercise by workplace units, on personal relationships, mental health, physical activity, and work ability among workers. Methods: Fifty-nine white-collar workers (40 males and 19 females) performed our active rest (short-time exercise) program, which consists of warm-up, cognitive functional training, aerobic exercise, resistance training and cool-down for 10 minutes per day, ...

  7. Building the Method to Determine the Rate of Freezing Water in Penaeus monodon of the Freezing Process

    OpenAIRE

    Nguyen Tan Dzung; Trinh Van Dzung; Tran Duc Ba

    2012-01-01

    The method of determination the rate of freezing water in Penaeus monodon of freezing process was established on base the equation of energy balance in warming up process Penaeus monodon after freezing to determine specific heat of Penaeus monodon. The result obtained was built the mathematical model (19) to determine the rate of freezing water according to the freezing temperature of Penaeus monodon. The results indicated that when water was completely frozen (ω = 1 or 100%), the optimal fre...

  8. Problems of the heat transfer during the irradiation of solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jahn, G.

    1981-03-01

    This report deals with the thermal problems during the irradiation of solids. Analytical and constructive solutions are outlined by some examples. Two cases are looked at: 1) the samples and the equipment are warmed up during irradiation. Thus they have to be cooled which yields a negative heat flux direction. 2) The samples shall have a suitable temperature higher than room temperature. Thus they have to be heated which yields a positive heat flux direction. (BHO)

  9. Method for detecting radiation dose utilizing thermoluminescent material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, S.D.; McDonald, J.C.; Eichner, F.N.; Durham, J.S.

    1992-01-01

    The amount of ionizing radiation to which a thermoluminescent material has been exposed is determined by first cooling the thermoluminescent material and then optically stimulating the thermoluminescent material by exposure to light. Visible light emitted by the thermoluminescent material as it is allowed to warm up to room temperature is detected and counted. The thermoluminescent material may be annealed by exposure to ultraviolet light. 5 figs

  10. Effect of Postactivation Potentiation Induced by Elastic Resistance on Kinematics and Performance in a Roundhouse Kick of Trained Martial Arts Practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aandahl, Håkon S; Von Heimburg, Erna; Van den Tillaar, Roland

    2018-04-01

    Aandahl, HS, Von Heimburg, E, and Van den Tillaar, R. Effect of postactivation potentiation induced by elastic resistance on kinematics and performance in a roundhouse kick of trained martial arts practitioners. J Strength Cond Res 32(4): 990-996, 2018-The aim of this study was to examine whether kicking with elastic resistance during warm-up could initiate postactivation potentiation (PAP), and thereby positively influence kinematics and performance on subsequent explosive roundhouse kicking. Five women and 11 men (n = 16) with a background in kickboxing (n = 10) or taekwondo (n = 6) performed 2 warm-up strategies with 3 subsequent test kicks 5-8 minutes after a PAP-inducing exercise. Kicking performance, defined as roundhouse kicking velocity with the foot, was measured using 3D motion capture (500 Hz) with a 15 marker lower-body 3D model. In addition, electromyography of the prime movers-vastus lateralis, vastus medialis, and rectus femoris muscles-was measured to confirm the presence of PAP. Kicking velocity of the foot increased by 3.3% after performing a warming-up strategy including kicking with elastic resistance (p = 0.009, η = 0.32). Increases were also recorded in muscle activity in vastus medialis (35.2%, p = 0.05, η = 0.18) and rectus femoris (43.9%, p = 0.04, η = 0.20). These findings indicate that performing a warm-up strategy including kicking with elastic resistance can have a positive effect on kicking performance in a roundhouse kick.

  11. Number & operations task & drill sheets : grades 3-5

    CERN Document Server

    Reed, Nat

    2011-01-01

    For grades 3-5, our Common Core State Standards-based combined resource meets the number & operations concepts addressed by the NCTM standards and encourages the students to review the concepts in unique ways. The task sheets introduce the mathematical concepts to the students around a central problem taken from real-life experiences, while the drill sheets provide warm-up and timed practice questions for the students to strengthen their procedural proficiency skills.

  12. Five strands of math drills big book : grades 6-8

    CERN Document Server

    Reed, Nat; Forest, Chris

    2011-01-01

    For grades 6-8, our Common Core State Standards-based resource meets the five strands of math concepts addressed by the NCTM standards and encourages the students to review the concepts in unique ways. Included are warm-up and timed drill activities which will push the boundaries of critical thought and demonstrate to students the importance of mathematical problems in Number & Operations, Geometry, Measurement, Data Analysis & Probability and Algebra using real world situations.

  13. Five strands of math drills big book : grades 3-5

    CERN Document Server

    Reed, Nat; Forest, Chris

    2011-01-01

    For grades 3-5, our Common Core State Standards-based resource meets the five strands of math concepts addressed by the NCTM standards and encourages the students to review the concepts in unique ways. Included are warm-up and timed drill activities which will push the boundaries of critical thought and demonstrate to students the importance of mathematical problems in Number & Operations, Geometry, Measurement, Data Analysis & Probability and Algebra using real world situations.

  14. Geometry task & drill sheets : grades 6-8

    CERN Document Server

    Rosenberg, Mary

    2011-01-01

    For grades 6-8, our Common Core State Standards-based combined resource meets the geometry concepts addressed by the NCTM standards and encourages the students to review the concepts in unique ways. The task sheets introduce the mathematical concepts to the students around a central problem taken from real-life experiences, while the drill sheets provide warm-up and timed practice questions for the students to strengthen their procedural proficiency skills.

  15. Five strands of math drills big book : grades PK-2

    CERN Document Server

    Reed, Nat; Forest, Chris

    2011-01-01

    For grades PK-2, our Common Core State Standards-based resource meets the five strands of math concepts addressed by the NCTM standards and encourages the students to review the concepts in unique ways. Included are warm-up and timed drill activities which will push the boundaries of critical thought and demonstrate to students the importance of mathematical problems in Number & Operations, Geometry, Measurement, Data Analysis & Probability and Algebra using real world situations.

  16. Control of the Diameter and Chiral Angle Distributions during Production of Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolaev, Pavel

    2009-01-01

    Many applications of single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNT), especially in microelectronics, will benefit from use of certain (n,m) nanotube types (metallic, small gap semiconductor, etc.) Especially fascinating is the possibility of quantum conductors that require metallic armchair nanotubes. However, as produced SWCNT samples are polydisperse, with many (n,m) types present and typical approx.1:2 metal/semiconductor ratio. Nanotube nucleation models predict that armchair nuclei are energetically preferential due to formation of partial triple bonds along the armchair edge. However, nuclei can not reach any meaningful thermal equilibrium in a rapidly expanding and cooling plume of carbon clusters, leading to polydispersity. In the present work, SWCNTs were produced by a pulsed laser vaporization (PLV) technique. The carbon vapor plume cooling rate was either increased by change in the oven temperature (expansion into colder gas), or decreased via "warm-up" with a laser pulse at the moment of nucleation. The effect of oven temperature and "warm-up" on nanotube type population was studied via photoluminescence, UV-Vis-NIR absorption and Raman spectroscopy. It was found that reduced temperatures leads to smaller average diameters, progressively narrower diameter distributions, and some preference toward armchair structures. "Warm-up" shifts nanotube population towards arm-chair structures as well, but the effect is small. Possible improvement of the "warm-up" approach to produce armchair SWCNTs will be discussed. These results demonstrate that PLV production technique can provide at least partial control over the nanotube (n,m) population. In addition, these results have implications for the understanding the nanotube nucleation mechanism in the laser oven.

  17. Dynamics of superconductor bearings in a cryogenic failure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rastogi, Amit [Department of Engineering, Cambridge University, Cambridge CB2 1PZ (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: Amit.Rastogi@avizatechnology.com; Campbell, A.M. [Department of Engineering, Cambridge University, Cambridge CB2 1PZ (United Kingdom); Coombs, T.A. [Department of Engineering, Cambridge University, Cambridge CB2 1PZ (United Kingdom)

    2006-08-01

    The dynamics of superconductor bearings in a cryogenic failure scenario have been analyzed. As the superconductor warms up, the rotor goes through multiple resonance frequencies, begins to slow down and finally touches down when the superconductor goes through its transition temperature. The bearing can be modelled as a system of springs with axial, radial and cross stiffness. These springs go through various resonant modes as the temperature of the superconductor begins to rise. We have presented possible explanations for such behaviour.

  18. Failure analysis of superconducting bearings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rastogi, Amit; Campbell, A M; Coombs, T A [Department of Engineering, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB2 1PZ (United Kingdom)

    2006-06-01

    The dynamics of superconductor bearings in a cryogenic failure scenario have been analyzed. As the superconductor warms up, the rotor goes through multiple resonance frequencies, begins to slow down and finally touches down when the superconductor goes through its transition temperature. The bearing can be modelled as a system of springs with axial, radial and cross stiffness. These springs go through various resonant modes as the temperature of the superconductor begins to rise. We have presented possible explanations for such behavio0008.

  19. Quantum Fourier Transform Over Galois Rings

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Yong

    2009-01-01

    Galois rings are regarded as "building blocks" of a finite commutative ring with identity. There have been many papers on classical error correction codes over Galois rings published. As an important warm-up before exploring quantum algorithms and quantum error correction codes over Galois rings, we study the quantum Fourier transform (QFT) over Galois rings and prove it can be efficiently preformed on a quantum computer. The properties of the QFT over Galois rings lead to the quantum algorit...

  20. Impact of surgical case order on perioperative outcomes for robotic-assisted radical prostatectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anil A Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Conclusions: Surgical case order may influence perioperative outcomes for RARP with decreased operative times and increased length of hospital stay associated with later cases. These findings indicate that select perioperative factors may improve with ascending case order as the surgical team "warms up" during the day. In addition, 3 rd round cases can increase hospital costs associated with increased lengths of hospital stay. Knowledge of these differences may assist in surgical planning to improve outcomes and limit costs.

  1. Fault Tolerance Automotive Air-Ratio Control Using Extreme Learning Machine Model Predictive Controller

    OpenAIRE

    Pak Kin Wong; Hang Cheong Wong; Chi Man Vong; Tong Meng Iong; Ka In Wong; Xianghui Gao

    2015-01-01

    Effective air-ratio control is desirable to maintain the best engine performance. However, traditional air-ratio control assumes the lambda sensor located at the tail pipe works properly and relies strongly on the air-ratio feedback signal measured by the lambda sensor. When the sensor is warming up during cold start or under failure, the traditional air-ratio control no longer works. To address this issue, this paper utilizes an advanced modelling technique, kernel extreme learning machine (...

  2. Reduction in muscle glycogen and protein utilization with glucose feeding during exercise.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hamont, D. van; Harvey, C.R.; Massicotte, D.; Frew, R.; Peronnet, F.; Rehrer, N.J.

    2005-01-01

    Effects of feeding glucose on substrate metabolism during cycling were studied. Trained (60.0 +/- 1.9 mL x kg(-1) x min(-1)) males (N = 5) completed two 75 min, 80% VO(2max) trials: 125 g 13(C)-glucose CHO); 13(C)-glucose tracer, 10 g (C). During warm-up (30 min 30% VO2max) 2 . 2 g 13(C)-glucose was

  3. Investigation and Development of the Thermal Preparation System of the Trailbuilder Machinery Hydraulic Actuator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konev, V.; Polovnikov, E.; Krut, O.; Merdanov, Sh; Zakirzakov, G.

    2017-07-01

    It’s determined that the main part of trailbuilders operated in the North is the technology equipped by the hydraulic actuator. Further development of the northern territories will demand using of various means and ways machinery thermal preparation, and also the machinery of the northern fulfillment. On this basis problems in equipment operation are defined. One of the main is efficiency supplying of a hydraulic actuator. On the basis of the operating conditions’ analysis of trailbuilder hydraulic actuator operation it is determined, that under low negative temperatures the means of thermal preparation are necessary. The existing systems warm up only a hydraulic tank or warming up of the hydro equipment before the machinery operation is carried out under loading with intensive wears. Thus, with the purpose to raise the efficiency of thermal hydraulic actuator, operated far from stationary bases autonomous, energy saving, not expensive in creation and operation systems are necessary. In accordance with the analysis of means and ways of the thermal preparation of the hydraulic actuator and the thermal balance calculations of the (internal) combustion engine the system of the hydraulic actuator heating is offered and is being investigated. It contains a local hydraulic actuator warming up and the system of internal combustion engine heat utilization. Within research operation conditions of the local hydraulic actuator heating are viewed and determined, taking into account constructive changes to the local hydraulic actuator heating. Mathematical modelling of the heat technical process in the modernized hydraulic actuator is considered. As a result temperature changes of the heat-transfer and the hydraulic cylinder in time are determined. To check the theoretical researches and to define dependences on hydraulic actuator warming up, the experimental installation is made. It contains the measuring equipment, a small tank with the heat exchanger of the burnt gases

  4. An Investigation of Knee Injury Prevalence and its Mechanism among Premier League Soccer Referees in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Mahdavi Mohtasham

    2017-03-01

    Conclusion: The results of this study highlight the importance of including special training in warm-up programs such as interval training, proprioception exercises, strength training (e.g. Nordic hamstring, flexibility training, and muscular endurance training which have been designed to prevent knee injuries. The results help to design and set-up an injury prevention program for the Referees Committee of the Iranian Football Federation.

  5. Can Previewing Sport-Specific Video Influence Reactive-Agility Response Time?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holding, Ryan; Meir, Rudi; Zhou, Shi

    2017-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine whether a video-based warm-up could provide an acute performance benefit to response time for athletes in a sport-specific agility task. In addition, 2 learning strategies, explicit and implicit, were compared for their effectiveness in facilitating an improvement in sport-specific agility. Thirty representative male junior rugby union players (age 14-16 y, mean age 14.6 ± 1.09 y) were placed in 3 experimental groups (explicit, implicit, and control) and completed 2 intervention sessions. Testing sessions included preintervention testing, completion of the video-based warm-up intervention, and postintervention testing. A 3D motion-analysis system was used to assess response time in the testing battery. The athletes' response times on the pre- to postintervention tests were compared to determine the effectiveness of the video-based warm-up. A 2-way general linear model with repeated-measures analysis indicated that both the explicit (P = .030, d = 0.28) and implicit (P = .049, d = 0.33) groups significantly improved their response time by the intervention compared with the control group (P = .367, d = 0.08). The mean postintervention response time for the explicit group improved by 19.1% (from 0.246 s pre to 0.199 s post), and the implicit group improved by 15.7% (from 0.268 s to 0.226 s). Findings suggest that a video-based warm-up may provide an acute benefit to sport-specific agility performance for junior athletes.

  6. Pains and Injuries Caused by Practicing Martial Arts

    OpenAIRE

    Diviš, Ondřej

    2008-01-01

    Title: Pains and Injuries Caused by Practicing Martial Arts Objective: To ascertain, by the means of survey, the most common kinetic system pains and sports injuries as a result of practicing martial arts. Additionally, to collect the data about warm-up, compensation exercises and regeneration and determine the effectofthese on the frequency ofkinetic system pains and sport injuries. Methods: 81 respondents from 5 different martial arts took part in the survey. Each questionnaire illustrates ...

  7. Unaccounted Workload Factor: Game-Day Pitch Counts in High School Baseball Pitchers-An Observational Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaremski, Jason L; Zeppieri, Giorgio; Jones, Deborah L; Tripp, Brady L; Bruner, Michelle; Vincent, Heather K; Horodyski, MaryBeth

    2018-04-01

    Throwing injuries are common in high school baseball. Known risk factors include excessive pitch counts, year-round pitching, and pitching with arm pain and fatigue. Despite the evidence, the prevalence of pitching injuries among high school players has not decreased. One possibility to explain this pattern is that players accumulate unaccounted pitch volume during warm-up and bullpen activity, but this has not yet been examined. Our primary hypothesis was that approximately 30% to 40% of pitches thrown off a mound by high school pitchers during a game-day outing are unaccounted for in current data but will be revealed when bullpen sessions and warm-up pitches are included. Our secondary hypothesis was that there is wide variability among players in the number of bullpen pitches thrown per outing. Cross-sectional study; Level of evidence, 3. Researchers counted all pitches thrown off a mound during varsity high school baseball games played by 34 high schools in North Central Florida during the 2017 season. We recorded 13,769 total pitches during 115 varsity high school baseball starting pitcher outings. The mean ± SD pitch numbers per game were calculated for bullpen activity (27.2 ± 9.4), warm-up (23.6 ±8.0), live games (68.9 ±19.7), and total pitches per game (119.7 ± 27.8). Thus, 42.4% of the pitches performed were not accounted for in the pitch count monitoring of these players. The number of bullpen pitches thrown varied widely among players, with 25% of participants in our data set throwing fewer than 22 pitches and 25% throwing more than 33 pitches per outing. In high school baseball players, pitch count monitoring does not account for the substantial volume of pitching that occurs during warm-up and bullpen activity during the playing season. These extra pitches should be closely monitored to help mitigate the risk of overuse injury.

  8. Using strategic movement to calibrate a neural compass: a spiking network for tracking head direction in rats and robots.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Stratton

    Full Text Available The head direction (HD system in mammals contains neurons that fire to represent the direction the animal is facing in its environment. The ability of these cells to reliably track head direction even after the removal of external sensory cues implies that the HD system is calibrated to function effectively using just internal (proprioceptive and vestibular inputs. Rat pups and other infant mammals display stereotypical warm-up movements prior to locomotion in novel environments, and similar warm-up movements are seen in adult mammals with certain brain lesion-induced motor impairments. In this study we propose that synaptic learning mechanisms, in conjunction with appropriate movement strategies based on warm-up movements, can calibrate the HD system so that it functions effectively even in darkness. To examine the link between physical embodiment and neural control, and to determine that the system is robust to real-world phenomena, we implemented the synaptic mechanisms in a spiking neural network and tested it on a mobile robot platform. Results show that the combination of the synaptic learning mechanisms and warm-up movements are able to reliably calibrate the HD system so that it accurately tracks real-world head direction, and that calibration breaks down in systematic ways if certain movements are omitted. This work confirms that targeted, embodied behaviour can be used to calibrate neural systems, demonstrates that 'grounding' of modelled biological processes in the real world can reveal underlying functional principles (supporting the importance of robotics to biology, and proposes a functional role for stereotypical behaviours seen in infant mammals and those animals with certain motor deficits. We conjecture that these calibration principles may extend to the calibration of other neural systems involved in motion tracking and the representation of space, such as grid cells in entorhinal cortex.

  9. Using strategic movement to calibrate a neural compass: a spiking network for tracking head direction in rats and robots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stratton, Peter; Milford, Michael; Wyeth, Gordon; Wiles, Janet

    2011-01-01

    The head direction (HD) system in mammals contains neurons that fire to represent the direction the animal is facing in its environment. The ability of these cells to reliably track head direction even after the removal of external sensory cues implies that the HD system is calibrated to function effectively using just internal (proprioceptive and vestibular) inputs. Rat pups and other infant mammals display stereotypical warm-up movements prior to locomotion in novel environments, and similar warm-up movements are seen in adult mammals with certain brain lesion-induced motor impairments. In this study we propose that synaptic learning mechanisms, in conjunction with appropriate movement strategies based on warm-up movements, can calibrate the HD system so that it functions effectively even in darkness. To examine the link between physical embodiment and neural control, and to determine that the system is robust to real-world phenomena, we implemented the synaptic mechanisms in a spiking neural network and tested it on a mobile robot platform. Results show that the combination of the synaptic learning mechanisms and warm-up movements are able to reliably calibrate the HD system so that it accurately tracks real-world head direction, and that calibration breaks down in systematic ways if certain movements are omitted. This work confirms that targeted, embodied behaviour can be used to calibrate neural systems, demonstrates that 'grounding' of modelled biological processes in the real world can reveal underlying functional principles (supporting the importance of robotics to biology), and proposes a functional role for stereotypical behaviours seen in infant mammals and those animals with certain motor deficits. We conjecture that these calibration principles may extend to the calibration of other neural systems involved in motion tracking and the representation of space, such as grid cells in entorhinal cortex.

  10. Advanced thermal management of diesel engines; Neues Thermomanagement beim Dieselmotor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wenzel, Wolfgang; Becker, Michael [BorgWarner, Ludwigsburg (Germany). Konzernvorentwicklung fuer Pkw-Antriebssysteme; Shutty, John [BorgWarner, Auburn Hills (United States). Regelung und Simulation in der Konzernvorentwicklung

    2013-05-01

    The potential of thermal management with respect to CO{sub 2} reduction is given by faster warm-up of engine and drivetrain, reduced losses from water pump and fan and finally the operation of the engine in an optimal temperature range. In a new approach, BorgWarner applies a variable coolant pump and a controlled coolant valve to a conventional cooling system. Both components, as well as the viscous fan clutch, are controlled by a newly developed controls approach.

  11. Site and Type Assessments of Sports Injuries in Archers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gizem Kocaman

    2018-03-01

    Conclusion: Most archers are injured in the shoulder, neck and back areas. These injuries are mostly seen as muscle pain. The vast majority of injuries occur in training. In archers, shoulder, neck, and back areas should be more strengthened to reduce injuries. Extra warm-up programmes special to muscles in these sections should be especially applied in trainings and competitions. Shooting techniques are to be correctly applied.

  12. Superficial cooling does not decrease core body temperature before, during, or after exercise in an American football uniform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Rebecca M; Eberman, Lindsey E; Cleary, Michelle A

    2012-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the effects of superficial cooling on thermoregulatory responses while exercising in a hot humid environment while wearing an American football uniform. Nine male and female subjects wore a superficial cooling garment while in a cooling (CS) experimental condition or a no cooling (NCS) control condition during an exercise task consisting of warm-up (WU), exercise (EX), and recovery (R). The exercise task simulated an American football conditioning session with subjects wearing a full American football uniform and performing anaerobic and aerobic exercises in a hot humid environment. Subjects were allowed to drink water ad libitum during rest breaks. During the WU, EX, and R periods, core body temperature (T(c)) was measured to assess the effect of the cooling garment. Neither baseline resting before warm-up T(c) nor after warm-up T(c) was significantly different between trials. No significant differences in exercise T(c) between conditions were found. Time to return to baseline T(c) revealed no significant differences between the experimental and control conditions. The authors found that the volume of fluid consumed was 34% less in the experimental condition (711.1 ± 188.0 ml) compared with the control condition (1,077.8 ± 204.8 ml). The findings indicate that the cooling garment was not effective in blunting the rise in T(c) during warm-up, attenuating a rise in T(c) during intermittent exercise, or in increasing a return to baseline T(c) during a resting recovery period in a hot humid environment while wearing an American football uniform.

  13. Influence of prior intense exercise and cold water immersion in recovery for performance and physiological response during subsequent exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Peter Møller; Bangsbo, Jens

    2016-01-01

    ) and the influence from prior intense exercise on subsequent performance and physiological response to moderate and maximal exercise with and without the use of cold water immersion (CWI) in recovery (part B). In part A, performance times during eight World championships for male track cyclists were extracted from...... min preceded by an identical warm-up period in both a control setting (CON) and using cold water immersion in recovery (CWI; 15 min at 15°C). Performance was lowered (P

  14. Community therapy application in intervention with adolescents: new strategies for prevention and promotion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávia Cristina Zago

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Given adolescents vulnerability facing transformations and resistances, the group work used by Occupational Therapy through techniques and dynamics favors expression, anxiety control and biopsychosocial maturity in intervention. Currently, one strategy used with teenagers is Community Therapy (CT, because it provides a welcoming environment where all are equal and can share their sufferings, anxieties and affinities. Thus, this study examined the effectiveness of group activities used in occupational therapy as warm up strategies in Community Therapy circles. Eleven teenagers aged 12 to 14 years old participated in the research. The study was carried out in a social institution that aims to support children and youth in the municipality of Uberaba, Minas Gerais state. Video and photo images and handwritten records were used as data collection instruments during the application of the 12 strategies, divided into three categories: competition, cooperation, and self-knowledge/self-esteem, applied for warming up the CT circles. Data were analyzed and presented through the use of a chart for better visualization and understanding of the adolescents’ behavior during the warm up CT circles. The results obtained showed dispute, unrest, lack of attention and sociability; behaviors that are inherent to adolescence due to the several changes, emotional alterations and search for identity that these subjects experience. Based on the survey results, it was possible observe that the behaviors have triggered direct-indirect relationship with the strategies used as facilitators in the discussion development regarding the issues addressed in the CT circles.

  15. Unifying practice schedules in the timescales of motor learning and performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhoeven, F Martijn; Newell, Karl M

    2018-06-01

    In this article, we elaborate from a multiple time scales model of motor learning to examine the independent and integrated effects of massed and distributed practice schedules within- and between-sessions on the persistent (learning) and transient (warm-up, fatigue) processes of performance change. The timescales framework reveals the influence of practice distribution on four learning-related processes: the persistent processes of learning and forgetting, and the transient processes of warm-up decrement and fatigue. The superposition of the different processes of practice leads to a unified set of effects for massed and distributed practice within- and between-sessions in learning motor tasks. This analysis of the interaction between the duration of the interval of practice trials or sessions and parameters of the introduced time scale model captures the unified influence of the between trial and session scheduling of practice on learning and performance. It provides a starting point for new theoretically based hypotheses, and the scheduling of practice that minimizes the negative effects of warm-up decrement, fatigue and forgetting while exploiting the positive effects of learning and retention. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Acute effects of two different initial heart rates on testing the Repeated Sprint Ability in young soccer players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruscello, B; Briotti, G; Tozzo, N; Partipilo, F; Taraborelli, M; Zeppetella, A; Padulo, J; D'Ottavio, S

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this paper was to investigate the acute effects of two different initial heart rates intensities when testing the repeated sprint ability (RSA) performances in young soccer players. Since there are many kinds of pre-match warm-ups, we chose to take as an absolute indicator of internal load the heart rate reached at the end of two different warm-up protocols (60 vs. 90% HRmax) and to compare the respective RSA performances. The RSA tests were performed on fifteen male soccer players (age: 17.9±1.5 years) with two sets of ten shuttle-sprints (15+15 m) with a 1:3 exercise to rest ratio, in different days (randomized order) with different HR% (60 & 90% HRmax). In order to compare the different sprint performances a Fatigue Index (FI%) was computed, while the blood lactate concentrations (BLa-) were measured before and after testing, to compare metabolic demand. Significant differences among trials within each sets (Psoccer player operates during a real match. This background may be partially reproduced by warming up protocols that, by duration and metabolic commitment, can reproduce conveniently the physiological conditions encountered in a real game (e.g. HRmax≈85-95%; BLa->4 mmol/L(-1)).

  17. Changes in Passive Tension of the Hamstring Muscles During a Simulated Soccer Match.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Paul W; Lovell, Ric; Siegler, Jason C

    2016-07-01

    Passive muscle tension is increased after damaging eccentric exercise. Hamstring-strain injury is associated with damaging eccentric muscle actions, but no research has examined changes in hamstring passive muscle tension throughout a simulated sport activity. The authors measured hamstring passive tension throughout a 90-min simulated soccer match (SAFT90), including the warm-up period and every 15 min throughout the 90-min simulation. Passive hamstring tension of 15 amateur male soccer players was measured using the instrumented straight-leg-raise test. Absolute torque (Nm) and slope (Nm/°) of the recorded torque-angular position curve were used for data analysis, in addition to total leg range of motion (ROM). Players performed a 15-min prematch warm-up, then performed the SAFT90 including a 15-min halftime rest period. Reductions in passive stiffness of 20-50° of passive hip flexion of 22.1-29.2% (P hamstring ROM (P = .0009). The findings of this study imply that hamstring passive tension is reduced after an active warm-up that includes dynamic stretching but does not increase in a pattern suggestive of eccentric induced muscle damage during soccer-specific intermittent exercise. Hamstring ROM and passive tension increases are best explained by improved stretch tolerance.

  18. The effects of the contract-relax-antagonist-contract form of proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation stretching on postural stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Edwin E; Rossi, Mark D; Lopez, Richard

    2010-07-01

    To investigate the effects of the contract-relax-antagonist-contract (CRAC) form of proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation (PNF) stretching, with and without a warm-up, on postural stability. Thirty volunteers (15 men and 15 women, age: 25.17 +/- 5.4 years, height: 173.76 +/- 8.2 cm, and weight: 72.03 +/- 14.87 kg) were randomly assigned to 1 of 3 conditions: warm-up and stretch (WS), stretching only (SO), and a control condition (CON). Contract-relax-antagonist-contract PNF of the hamstrings, plantar flexors, and hip flexors was performed during WS and SO. A 6-minute treadmill warm-up was applied before CRAC in the WS condition. Measures of anterior/posterior and medial/lateral (M/L) postural stability were taken before and after treatment conditions. A 2 x 3 analysis of variance was used to assess for differences between conditions. Significance was set at p Contract-relax-antagonist-contract form of stretching is a useful protocol for improving M/L stability.

  19. Main activities and objectives of VKTA Rossendorf

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hieronymus, W.

    1996-01-01

    The Rossendorf Central Institute for Nuclear Research of the Academy of Science of the German Democratic Republic was disbanded on December 31, 1991. The existing nuclear installations, part of the real estate, and the personnel required to ensure nuclear safety and radiological protection were transferred to an institution of the Free State of Saxony, the Rossendorf Association for Nuclear Process Technology and Analysis (Verein fuer Kernverfahrenstechnik und Analytik Rossendorf e.V., VKTA). In connection with decommissioning the nuclear installations currently shut down, securing the extensive inventories of nuclear materials, managing existing radioactive waste in Rossendorf, and excercising duties in radiological protection and in nuclear licensing VKTA has functions extending beyond the Rossendorf premises. In this way, it also relieves the Rossendorf Research Center (Forschungszentrum Rossendorf e.V., FZR), which was established on the same research site at the same time and is financed 50% by the Federal Government, of all obligations in this respect. VKTA also holds a number of official functions on behalf of the Free State of Saxony, and it makes its comprehensive know-how available to third parties. (orig.) [de

  20. Using Dictogloss As An Interactive Method Of Teaching Listening Comprehension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramlatu Jibir-Daura

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Listening is one of the important language skills. Traditionally, listening skills have been taught in isolation or it is sometimes combined with speaking tasks. Dictogloss is an interactive method which promotes cooperative learning and can assist in the development of both the teacher and students’ listening skills. Unlike in the traditional method of dictation, in dictogloss only the gist of the text is expected to be produced by the students. To find the usefulness of the method in a second language learning context, twenty BA ED (Hausa one hundred level students from the Language Arts section of the Ahmadu Bello University were used. Two texts, one from ‘Oliver Twist’ and the other was ‘The Seven Voyages of Simbad’. These were dictated to the students, one for each day. The result of the second task was recorded. The first exercise served as practice for the students to become familiar with the procedure. Although it is a new procedure, the results showed an improvement from the results of the first task. The students enjoyed the excercise and were willing to continue the next day even though the first results were not very good. Recommendations were given on how second language teachers could use dictogloss to their advantage for cooperative learning in listening comprehension classes.

  1. Tatuajes y piercing: consideraciones sobre el alcance de una ordenanza municipal en la ciudad de Córdoba Tattoos and piercing: considerations about the scope of a municipal statue in Cordoba city

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J M Verduzco

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Las ordenanzas municipales son herramientas legales, a través de las cuales los municipios o comunas ejercen un control sobre diversas actividades, algunas de las cuales como el caso de la práctica de tatuajes y piercing, pueden ser nocivas para la salud. La Municipalidad de Córdoba a través de la Ordenanza Nº 10962, sancionada el 6 de Octubre de 2005, intenta controlar esta ancestral práctica realizada sobre la piel humana. El presente trabajo tiene como finalidad analizar el articulado de esta Ordenanza y hacer algunas consideraciones sobre su utilidad en la prevención de enfermedades.Municipal statues are legal tools ratified by the municipal legislative power, stablishing rules in the corresponding scope. This rules have the aim of regulating different activities, over which the Municipality police power is excercised. Many of this activities are related to public health, because they can cause diseases in the population exposed to them. The practice of tattoing and piercing is one of this activities able to cause diseases. Due to this fact, the Municipality of Córdoba has sanctioned statue 10962 in order to control this ancestral practice.

  2. Anti-Avoidance Rules di Indonesia Pasca Amandemen UU Pajak Penghasilan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrianto Dwi Nugroho

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The fourth amendment to the Indonesian Income Tax Act (UU PPh has inserted three new provisions encountering three newly-identified tax avoidance schemes. However, the previous regulations in respect of thin capitalization, CFC and interest stripping were not carefully be given attention and be made in conformity with their newest developments. As an illustration, the term “company” has never been defined in the Act. Instead, the Act introduces the same term in the conduit company rules. Another example involves the CFC rule which does not put additional provisions to define “control”. Another interesting development is the regulation of the International-hiring out of labor which instead of making it in conformity with the OECD MC, the rule empowers the country to increase the taxable income of an employee in respect of employment excercised abroad. This article attempts to demonstrate how the Indonesian anti-avoidance rules work out and prove how taxpayers may well, ironically, abuse those rules.

  3. Preliminary design of experiment ALVAND 1 and low beta plasma source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anvari, A.; Azodi, H.; Naraghi, M.; Taherzadeh, M.; Torabi-Fard, A.

    1975-12-01

    The ultimate goal of a two years program, namely ''ALVAND PROJECT'' and problems concerned with the achievement of controlled thermonuclear reactions in Iran is covered. The report consists of six sections. The introduction deals with the advantages of a linear theta pinch and its comparison with toroidal and mirror devices. Attention has been paid to two important properties of the ALVAND 1 device, namely, its property of carrying out important missions in support of high beta controlled thermonuclear research and also its acting as a source for developing different diagnostic apparatus and excercising different measurement techniques. Expected plasma parameters for ALVAND 1 are given in the third section. In the fourth section the low beta plasma source and the important diagnostic techniques that may be developed are discussed. References are given in the fifth section. The calculation of the minimum required radius of a toroidal theta pinch reactor has been given in an appendix, which covers at the same time 2 schematic figures. Finally a program schedule is presented in section six

  4. [Cardiovascular risk in children from 6 to 15 years with exogenous obesity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escudero-Lourdes, Gabriela Virginia; Morales-Romero, Luz Viridiana; Valverde-Ocaña, Concepción; Velasco-Chávez, José Fernando

    2014-01-01

    The cardiovascular risk (CVR) is increasing and it is related to life style and dietary habits; one of the age groups at risk of developing this disease are the obese children. The objective of this study was to assess the CVR in the obese pediatric population in a secondary care unit of the Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social in San Luis Potosí, México. A cross-sectional study, in which we used Alústiza's scale to measure CVR. We included the total of cases of pediatric obese population in a year. We performed the analysis by each of the variables included in the scale (age, sex, body mass index, family history of diabetes and obesity, alcohol, blood pressure, cholesterol). High CVR was correlated to HDL and glucose, through a statistical analysis with chi-squared. We reviewed a total of 100 medical records of children from 6 to 15 years (52 girls, 48 boys). CVR was low in 26 %, moderate in 14 % and higher in 60 %. A positive history of obesity was found in 26 %; obesity plus diabetes, 16 %; obesity and dyslipidemia, 13 %; hypertension, 11 %. None of the children practiced excercise. We found hypercholesterolemia in 46 %, and hyperglycemia in 34 %. By using chi-squared we found that all variables were statistically significant (p < 0.05). Validated scales are useful to measure CVR in children, in order to take action in a timely fashion and avoid the persistence of risk in adulthood.

  5. Ermeneutica letteraria ed esercizi spirituali: Wolfgang Iser e Pierre Hadot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Dell'Aversano

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to highlight some interesting convergences between the theory of the meaning-construction of the literary text proposed by Iser in The Act of Reading and Pierre Hadot’s work on the hermeneutics of the text in ancient philosophy. As we know, Hadot interprets the specificities of the ancient philosophical text as functional to guide the mind of the reader in a path that does not only have a cognitive purpose, but rather a spiritual one. The concept of «spiritual excercise», central to Hadot’s work, presents similarities ­– that are potentially very productive – to the model of the use of the literary text in Iser. Moreover, it is apt to show the extraordinary theoretical importance of a series of details, which are seemingly quite technical. In particular, a dialogue between the two approaches of Iser and Hadot allows posing in a new way a question that literary theory typically marginalizes: that of the pragmatics of the literary text.

  6. Safety and environmental impact of the dual coolant blanket concept. SEAL subtask 6.2, final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kleefeldt, K.; Dammel, F.; Gabel, K.; Jordan, T.; Schmuck, I.

    1996-03-01

    The European Union has been engaged since 1989 in a programme to develop tritium breeding blankets for application in a fusion power reactor. There are four concepts under development, namely two of the solid breeder type and two of the liquid breeder type. At the Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe one blanket concept of each line has been pursued so far with the so-called dual coolant type representing the liquid breeder line. In the dual coolant concept the breeder material (Pb-17Li) is circulated to external heat exchangers to carry away the bulk of the generated heat and to extract the tritium. Additionally, the heavily loaded first wall is cooled by high pressure helium gas. The safety and environmental impact of the dual coolant blanket concept has been assessed as part of the blanket concept selection excercise, a European concerted action, aiming at selecting the two most promising concepts for futher development. The topics investigated are: (a) Blanket materials and toxic materials inventory, (b) energy sources for mobilisation, (c) fault tolerance, (d) tritium and activation products release, and (e) waste generation and management. No insurmountable safety problems have been identified for the dual coolant blanket. The results of the assessment are described in this report. The information collected is also intended to serve as input to the EU 'Safety and Environmental Assessment of Fusion longterm Programme' (SEAL). The unresolved issues pertaining to the dual coolant blanket which would need further investigations in future programmes are outlined herein. (orig.) [de

  7. Heat- and exercise-induced hyperthermia: effects on high-energy phosphates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francesconi, R; Mager, M

    1979-08-01

    To assess the role of high-energy phosphate compounds in the etiology of heat injury with respect to the release of intracellular constituents, the susceptibility of selected tissues to heat injury, and the shock-like demise of the animals, rats were exercised on a treadmill (9.14 m/min) in a hot environment (34.5-35 degrees C) to a rectal temperature (Tre) of 42.5-43 degrees C. In the heart, kidney, left lateral lobe of the liver, and gastrocnemius muscle extricated from animals immediately upon termination of the treadmill run, levels of glucose-6-phosphate (G-6-P), adenosine triphosphate (ATP), and creatine phosphate (CP) were unchanged when compared with sedentary controls. In animals which had been resuscitated by infusion of isotonic saline into a jugular catheter, levels of CP were significantly (p less than 0.025) elevated in gastrocnemius muscle. In rats which were unconscious and succumbing to the effects of hyperthermic injury, levels of hepatic G-6-P and ATP were significantly reduced (p less than 0.05, p less than 0.02, respectively). These results indicate that the combination of exhaustive excercise/heat injury had the most deleterious effects upon hepatic metabolism. However, while resuscitation with physiological saline may be accompanied by an increased synthesis of CP, hyperthermic exhaustion and the concomitant efflux of cellular constituents cannot be attributed to a depletion or even a decrement of high-energy phosphates in vital tissues.

  8. Myocardial perfusion scintigraphy with thallium-201 - principle and method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dressler, J.

    1981-01-01

    Since from the cardiological and cardio-surgical aspects non-invasive methods practicable in the diagnostics of regional myocardial blood perfusion are claiming priority, the myocardial perfusion scintigraphy with thallium 201 has gained more and more importance in the diagnostics of coronary heart diseases. Although radiothallium because of its nucleo-physical characteristics is not regarded as ideal radiopharmaceutical, it is at present, because of its potassium-analogue biokinetics the best radiopharmaceutical to represent the regional coronary perfusion distribution, the vitality and configuration of the heart muscle non-invasively. With careful clinical indication and under consideration of the physico-technical limitations, the informative value provided by the serial scintigraphy with thallium 201 is greater than that provided by the excercise ECG. Various possibilities for solving the problem of quantitative analysis of the myocardial scintigrams have been given. Up to the present day a standardised evaluation procedure corresponding to that of the visual scintigram interpretation has not yet found general acceptance. (orig.) [de

  9. Tactical Vulnerability Assessment Training Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Ayat, R.A.; Judd, B.R.; Renis, T.A.; Paulus, W.K.; Winblad, A.E.; Graves, B.R.

    1987-01-01

    The Department of Energy sponsors a 9-day training program for individual who are responsible for evaluating and planning safeguards systems and for preparing DOE Master and Security Agreements (MSSAs). These agreements between DOE headquarters and operations offices establish required levels of protection. The curriculum includes: (1) the nature of potential insider and outsider threats involving theft or diversion of special nuclear material, (2) use of computerized tools for evaluating the effectiveness of physical protection and material control and acoountability systems, and (3) methods for analyzing the benefits and costs of safeguards improvements and for setting priorities among proposed upgrades. The training program is varied and highly interactive. Presentations are intermixed with class discussions and ''hands-on'' analysis using computer tools. At the end of the program, participants demonstrate what they have learned in a two-and-one-half day ''field excercise,'' which is conducted on a facility scale-model. The training programs has been conducted six times and has been attended by representatives of all DOE facilities. Additional sessions are planned at four-month intervals. This paper describes the training program, use of the tools in preparing MSSAs for various DOE sites, and recent extensions and refinements of the evaluation tools

  10. Some factors influencing the creep behaviour of alloy 800

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asbury, F.E.; Willoughby, G.

    1975-01-01

    Studies have been made of the stability of the creep behaviour of two commercial casts of Incoloy 800, one high carbon and the other low carbon. The effects of pre-ageing, of prolonged creep up to 10 4 hours duration, and of grain size were investigated. Three factors were found to excercise a major influence on creep behaviour. Firstly, when the high carbon alloy was heat treated at 1150degC super-saturation effects, ascribed principally to carbon, gave some initial strengthening which would not, however, persist for the duration of service life in nuclear power plant applications above 600degC. Secondly, a gamma-dash type phase precipitated readily at 550 to 600degC, giving a marked increase in creep strength. Nucleation was sluggish at higher temperatures but once established, this form of strengthening could persist up to at least 650degC. Creep under non-isothermal conditions at 600 to 700degC would be complex on account of the behaviour of this phase. The hardening associated with its precipitation was greater in the low carbon alloy. Finally it was demonstrated that, in spite of gamma-dash precipitation, fine grained low carbon material was weak in creep at low stresses and temperatures. This was ascribed to the occurrence of grain boundary diffusion creep. It appears that this source of weakening would persist in service, and severely restrict the maximum temperature of usage for fined grained high tensile material. (author)

  11. Auto-tuning systems for J-PARC LINAC RF cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fang, Z.; Kobayashi, T.; Fukui, Y.; Futatsukawa, K.; Michizono, S.; Yamaguchi, S.; Anami, S.; Suzuki, H.; Sato, F.; Shinozaki, S.; Chishiro, E.

    2014-01-01

    The 400-MeV proton linear accelerator (LINAC) at the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC) consists of 324-MHz low-β and 972-MHz high-β accelerator sections. From October 2006 to May 2013, only the 324-MHz low-β accelerator section was in operation. From the summer of 2013 the J-PARC LINAC was upgraded by installing the 972-MHz high-β accelerator section, and the proton beam was successfully accelerated to 400 MeV in January 2014. Auto-tuning systems for the J-PARC LINAC RF cavities have been successfully developed. A first generation design, an auto-tuning system using a mechanical tuner controller, was developed and operated for the first 3 years. Then the second-generation auto-tuning system was developed using a new approach to the RF cavity warm-up process, and this was applied to the accelerator operation for the subsequent 4 years. During the RF cavity warm-up process in this system, the mechanical tuner is constantly fixed and the input RF frequency is automatically tuned to the cavity resonance frequency using the FPGA (Field-Programmable Gate Array) of the digital feedback RF control system. After the input power level reaches the required value, input RF frequency tuning is stopped and it is switched to the operation frequency. Then, the mechanical tuner control begins operation. This second-generation auto-tuning system was extremely effective for the 324-MHz cavity operation. However, if we apply this approach to the 972-MHz RF cavities, an interlock due to the RF cavity reflection amplitude occasionally occurs at the end of the warm-up process. In order to solve this problem a third generation novel auto-tuning system was successfully developed in December 2013 and applied to the operation of the J-PARC LINAC, including the 972-MHz ACS RF cavities. During the warm-up process both the mechanical tuner controller and the input RF frequency tuning are in operation, and good matching between the input RF frequency and the RF cavity is

  12. Auto-tuning systems for J-PARC LINAC RF cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fang, Z., E-mail: fang@post.kek.jp [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Kobayashi, T.; Fukui, Y.; Futatsukawa, K.; Michizono, S.; Yamaguchi, S.; Anami, S. [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Suzuki, H.; Sato, F.; Shinozaki, S.; Chishiro, E. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), 2-4 Shirane Shirakata, Tokai-mura, Naka-gun, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan)

    2014-12-11

    The 400-MeV proton linear accelerator (LINAC) at the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC) consists of 324-MHz low-β and 972-MHz high-β accelerator sections. From October 2006 to May 2013, only the 324-MHz low-β accelerator section was in operation. From the summer of 2013 the J-PARC LINAC was upgraded by installing the 972-MHz high-β accelerator section, and the proton beam was successfully accelerated to 400 MeV in January 2014. Auto-tuning systems for the J-PARC LINAC RF cavities have been successfully developed. A first generation design, an auto-tuning system using a mechanical tuner controller, was developed and operated for the first 3 years. Then the second-generation auto-tuning system was developed using a new approach to the RF cavity warm-up process, and this was applied to the accelerator operation for the subsequent 4 years. During the RF cavity warm-up process in this system, the mechanical tuner is constantly fixed and the input RF frequency is automatically tuned to the cavity resonance frequency using the FPGA (Field-Programmable Gate Array) of the digital feedback RF control system. After the input power level reaches the required value, input RF frequency tuning is stopped and it is switched to the operation frequency. Then, the mechanical tuner control begins operation. This second-generation auto-tuning system was extremely effective for the 324-MHz cavity operation. However, if we apply this approach to the 972-MHz RF cavities, an interlock due to the RF cavity reflection amplitude occasionally occurs at the end of the warm-up process. In order to solve this problem a third generation novel auto-tuning system was successfully developed in December 2013 and applied to the operation of the J-PARC LINAC, including the 972-MHz ACS RF cavities. During the warm-up process both the mechanical tuner controller and the input RF frequency tuning are in operation, and good matching between the input RF frequency and the RF cavity is

  13. Testing of the IMRA Wattlite Laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biswal, S; Erbert, G

    2000-01-01

    Long term testing of the IMRA Wattlite oscillator began this month. The oscillator was operated for over 250 hours while monitoring the output power, the center wavelength and the pointing stability. Due to safety requirements, data was only collected during normal working hours. At night, the external shutter was closed so no data was collected, however, the laser continued to operate. In this mode of operation, approximately 80 hours of data was taken during the 250 hours of operation. The laser was turned off during the two weekend periods of this test series and restarted the following Monday. The warm-up period of the oscillator is most evident in the wavelength data shown in Figure 1. During the two cold start periods, the laser required about two hours for the wavelength to stabilize. Excluding the warm-up periods, the wavelength drift was approximately ± 0.1nm over the 250 hours of operation. The output power was monitored with a large area photo-diode. A plot of the output power as a function of time is shown in Figure 2. The two cold start periods are also evident in this data showing the same two-hour warm-up period for the power to stabilize. Once the laser was stable, the output power varied by only a few percent. It is also important to note that there is no degradation in the output power over the 250 hours of operation. The pointing error from the oscillator was monitored by focusing the output beam onto a video camera. The data acquisition program finds the centroid of the focused spot to the nearest pixel on the CCD array. The resolution of the system was 42 micro-radians/pixel in the horizontal axis and 49 micro-radians/pixel in the vertical axis. A plot of the pointing error as a function of time is shown in Figures 3 and 4. The pointing errors recorded are very small and are near the resolution of the diagnostic system. This is not surprising considering the output beam is from a single mode fiber. The pointing stability should only be related

  14. Acute effect of passive static stretching on lower-body strength in moderately trained men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gergley, Jeffrey C

    2013-04-01

    The purpose of this investigation was conducted to determine the acute effect of passive static stretching (PSS) of the lower-body musculature on lower-body strength in a 1 repetition maximum (1RM) squat exercise in young (18-24 years.) moderately trained men (n = 17). Two supervised warm-up treatments were applied before each performance testing session using a counterbalanced design on nonconsecutive days. The first treatment consisted of an active dynamic warm-up (AD) with resistance machines (i.e., leg extension/leg flexion) and free weights (i.e., barbell squat), whereas the second treatment added PSS of the lower body plus the AD treatment. One repetition maximum was determined using the maximum barbell squat following a progressive loading protocol. Subjects were also asked to subjectively evaluate their lower-body stability during 1RM testing sessions for both the AD and PSS treatments. A significant decrease in 1RM (8.36%) and lower-body stability (22.68%) was observed after the PSS treatment. Plausible explanations for this observation may be related to a more compliant muscle tendon unit and/or altered or impaired neurologic function in the active musculature. It is also possible that strength was impaired by the PSS because of joint instability. The findings of this study suggest that intensive stretching such as lower-body PSS should be avoided before training the lower body or performing the 1RM in the squat exercise in favor of an AD dynamic warm-up using resistance training equipment in the lower-body musculature.

  15. Ketone Diester Ingestion Impairs Time-Trial Performance in Professional Cyclists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jill J. Leckey

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the effect of pre- “race” ingestion of a 1,3-butanediol acetoacetate diester on blood ketone concentration, substrate metabolism and performance of a cycling time trial (TT in professional cyclists. In a randomized cross-over design, 10 elite male cyclists completed a ~31 km laboratory-based TT on a cycling ergometer programmed to simulate the 2017 World Road Cycling Championships course. Cyclists consumed a standardized meal [2 g/kg body mass (BM carbohydrate (CHO] the evening prior to a trial day and a CHO breakfast (2 g/kg BM CHO with 200 mg caffeine on the morning of a trial day. Cyclists were randomized to consume either the ketone diester (2 × 250 mg/kg or a placebo drink, followed immediately by 200 mL diet cola, given ~ 30 min before and immediately prior to commencing a 20 min incremental warm-up. Blood samples were collected prior to and during the warm-up, pre- and post- TT and at regular intervals after the TT. Urine samples were collected pre- and post- warm-up, immediately post TT and 60 min post TT. Pre-exercise ingestion of the diester resulted in a 2 ± 1% impairment in TT performance that was associated with gut discomfort and higher perception of effort. Serum β-hydroxybutyrate, serum acetoacetate, and urine ketone concentrations increased from rest following ketone ingestion and were higher than placebo throughout the trial. Ketone ingestion induces hyperketonemia in elite professional cyclists when in a carbohydrate fed state, and impairs performance of a cycling TT lasting ~50 min.

  16. The Impact of the FIFA 11+ Training Program on Injury Prevention in Football Players: A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noël C. Barengo

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The FIFA 11+ is a simple, and easy to implement, sports injury prevention program comprising a warm up of 10 conditioning exercises. The aim of this systematic review was to evaluate the impact of the FIFA 11+ on injury incidence, compliance and cost effectiveness when implemented among football players. MEDLINE, EMBASE and Scopus databases were searched using the search terms “FIFA 11+”, “football”, “soccer”, “injury prevention”, and “The 11”. The titles and abstracts were screened by two independent reviewers and the data were filtered by one reviewer using a standardized extraction form and thereafter checked by another one. The risk of bias and the methodological quality of the studies were evaluated through the PEDro score and Critical Appraisal Skills Programme (CASP. A total of 911 studies were identified, of which 12 met the inclusion criteria of the review. The FIFA 11+ has demonstrated how a simple exercise program completed as part of warm-up can decrease the incidence of injuries in amateur football players. In general, considerable reductions in the number of injured players, ranging between 30% and 70%, have been observed among the teams that implemented the FIFA 11+. In addition, players with high compliance to the FIFA 11+ program had an estimated risk reduction of all injuries by 35% and show significant improvements in components of neuromuscular and motor performance when participating in structured warm-up sessions at least 1.5 times/week. Most studies had high methodological quality and a low risk of bias. Given the large number of people who play football at amateur level and the detrimental impact of sports injuries on a personal and societal level, the FIFA 11+ can be considered as a fundamental tool to minimize the risks of participation in a sport with substantial health benefits.

  17. Acute effects of static and dynamic stretching on jump performance after 15 min of reconditioning shooting phase in basketball players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annino, Giuseppe; Ruscello, Bruno; Lebone, Pietro; Palazzo, Francesco; Lombardo, Mauro; Padua, Elvira; Verdecchia, Luca; Tancredi, Virginia; Iellamo, Ferdinando

    2017-04-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effects of static (SS) and dynamic stretching (DS) on vertical jump performance executed before, immediately after and at the end of the shooting phase (i.e., 15 min later), as to simulate the actual conditions preceding a match, in professional basketball players. Ten elite basketball players (age: 29±6.73 years, height: 194.67±7.75 cm, weight: 91±8.17 kg and BMI 23.8±7.91 kg.m-2) participated to the study. SS and DS protocols were administered during the first training session of the week, 48 hours after the championship match. Stretching protocols consisted in ~7 minutes of general warm-up phase followed by ~8 minutes of SS and DS, performed with a cross-over design., and ~15 minutes of a specific warm-up shooting phase (SP). Vertical jump tests consisted in counter movement jump (CMJ) and CMJ with arm swings (CMJas) and were performed immediately after the end of each stretching phase (preS, postS, postSP). A significant decrease (P=0.05; η2partial=0.29) in jumping tests height occurred in CMJas, when performed after the SS (i.e., PostS). However, no significant differences in jumping performances, occurred after the general warm phase and the specific warm-up shooting phase, between the two stretching protocols. These results would indicate that, overall, stretching routines either dynamic or static, performed before a basketball match are transient and affect only marginally leg muscles performance. Stretching routines, particularly the dynamic ones, may be useful to maintain muscle performance before a competition, provided that this latter begins shortly after.

  18. Effects of an 8-Week Body-Weight Neuromuscular Training on Dynamic Balance and Vertical Jump Performances in Elite Junior Skiing Athletes: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitale, Jacopo A; La Torre, Antonio; Banfi, Giuseppe; Bonato, Matteo

    2018-04-01

    Vitale, JA, La Torre, A, Banfi, G, and Bonato, M. Effects of an 8-week body-weight neuromuscular training on dynamic balance and vertical jump performances in elite junior skiing athletes: a randomized controlled trial. J Strength Cond Res 32(4): 911-920, 2018-The aim of the present randomized controlled trial was to evaluate the effects of an 8-week neuromuscular training program focused on core stability, plyometric, and body-weight strengthening exercises on dynamic postural control and vertical jump performance in elite junior skiers. Twenty-four Italian elite junior male skiers were recruited and randomized to either an experimental group (EG), performing neuromuscular warm-up exercises, (EG; n = 12; age 18 ± 1 years; body mass 66 ± 21 kg; height 1.70 ± 0.1 m) or a control group (CG) involved in a standard warm-up (CG; n = 12; age 18 ± 1 years; body mass 62 ± 14 kg; height 1.73 ± 0.1 m). lower quarter Y-Balance Test (YBT), countermovement jump (CMJ), and drop jump (DJ) at baseline (PRE) and at the end (POST) of the experimental procedures were performed. No significant differences between EG and CG were observed at baseline. Results showed that EG achieved positive effects from PRE to POST measures in the anterior, posteromedial, posterolateral directions, and composite score of YBT for both lower limbs, whereas no significant differences were detected for CG. Furthermore, 2-way analysis of variance with Bonferroni's multiple comparisons test did not reveal any significant differences in CMJ and DJ for both EG and CG. The inclusion of an 8-week neuromuscular warm-up program led to positive effects in dynamic balance ability but not in vertical jump performance in elite junior skiers. Neuromuscular training may be an effective intervention to specifically increase lower limb joint awareness and postural control.

  19. Cooling-water amounts, temperature, and the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koops, F.B.J.; Donze, M.; Hadderingh, R.H.

    1979-01-01

    The release of heat from power plants into a water can take place with relative small quantities of cooling water, highly warmed up accordingly, or with large quantities of cooling water slightly warmed up. The utilization of cooling water is bound to certain guidelines established by the authorities. With the intention to protect the environment, the admissable temperatures and warming-up have been strictly limited by the authorities. In the Netherlands, we have presently temporary cooling water guidelines which allow a max. temperature of the cooling water in the cooling cycle of 30 0 C and a maximum admissible temperature rise in the condenser between 7 0 C during summer and 15 0 C during winter. It has also been determined in these requirements how much cooling water at least has to be used to discharge a specified quantity of heat. Plankton, spawn and young fish are dragged with the cooling water. Harm to these organisms can be caused mechanically by pumps, sieves and the condenser or they can be harmed by the temperature rise in the condenser. Investigations showed that mechanical harm to spawn and young fish in the cooling water flow should not be ignored, and that detectable harm to plankton organisms takes place only at water temperatures above 32 0 C. The cooling water consumption can therefore be optimised as follows: The solution of a greater temperature increase and a slightly higher value for the temperature maximum can reduce the cooling water quantity. This reduction of the cooling water quantity reduces the destruction of the fish quantity, which gets into the cooling water system, especially during the summer. If the temperature rise and the temperature itself are not selected too high, the destruction of fish may be reduced without causing serious damage to the plankton. (orig.) [de

  20. Pentagon's secret report about climate change

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwartz, P.

    2006-01-01

    This book reveals the content of a secret report ordered by the department of defense of the Pentagon which aims at foreseeing the possible consequences of a rapid climatic change on the security of the USA. The report is based on the most recent studies about the general climate conditions at the worldwide scale. They foresee for 2010 a fast cooling following several years of increasing warming up. A realistic detailed scenario of the geopolitical consequences of this change is made: floods, conflicts, populations migration, lack of drinkable water, starvation, generalized riots etc. (J.S.)

  1. The Cooling of a Liquid Absorber using a Small Cooler

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baynham, D.E.; Bradshaw, T.W.; Green, M.A.; Ishimoto, S.; Liggins, N.

    2005-01-01

    This report discusses the use of small cryogenic coolers for cooling the Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) liquid cryogen absorbers. Since the absorber must be able contain liquid helium as well liquid hydrogen, the characteristics of the available 4.2 K coolers are used here. The issues associated with connecting two-stage coolers to liquid absorbers are discussed. The projected heat flows into an absorber and the cool-down of the absorbers using the cooler are presented. The warm-up of the absorber is discussed. Special hydrogen safety issues that may result from the use of a cooler on the absorbers are also discussed

  2. Lithium germanium detectors reactivation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicolai, J.A.; Marti, G.V.; Riso, J.M.; Gimenez, C.R.

    1981-01-01

    A convenient method to regenerate the characteristics of damaged Ge(li) detectors, that has been applied in the authors' laboratory, is described. The procedure consists in warming-up the crystal in its cryostat to temperatures between 10 deg C and 30 deg C above room temperature, in order to clean its surface. Subsequent cooling down to liquid nitrogen temperature, followed by one or more clean-up drifting processes, are applied to the crystals. This paper summarizes the results obtained with several detectors; this method was applied successfully to 15 detectors more. (author) [es

  3. A Cryogenic Test Stand for Large Superconducting Solenoid Magnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rabehl, R. [Fermilab; Carcagno, R. [Fermilab; Nogiec, J. [Fermilab; Orris, D. [Fermilab; Soyars, W. [Fermilab; Sylvester, C. [Fermilab

    2013-01-01

    A new test stand for testing large superconducting solenoid magnets at the Fermilab Central Helium Liquifier (CHL) has been designed, and operated. This test stand has been used to test a coupling coil for the Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE), and future uses include solenoids for the Fermilab mu2e experiment. This paper describes the test stand design and operation including controlled cool-down and warm-up. Overviews of the process controls system and the quench management system are also included.

  4. The climate manufacturers. Ways out of a global greenhouse. 3. ed. Wir Klimamacher. Auswege aus dem globalen Treibhaus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grassl, H [Hamburg Univ. (Germany, F.R.). Meteorologisches Inst. Max-Planck-Institut fuer Meteorologie, Hamburg (Germany, F.R.); Klingholz, R

    1990-01-01

    This book - which is written in a way the lay person can understand - describes the problem of the greenhouse effect e.g. the warming-up of the global climate as a result of emissions, especially CO{sub 2}. The composition of the earth's atmosphere and the present state of climate research is described. Suggestions are made to the politicians and the consumers with the aim to reduce the emissions of gases through energy saving and changes in the energy structure. (orig.).

  5. Synthesis and physicochemical analysis of Sm (II, III) acetylacetone chelate complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kostyuk, N.N.; Dik, T.A.; Trebnikov, A.G.

    2004-01-01

    Sm (II, III) acetylacetone chelate complexes were synthesized by electrochemical method. It was shown that anode dissolution of the metal samarium over acetylacetone leads to formation of the Sm (II, III) chelate complexes: xSm(acac)2 · ySm(acac)3 · zH(acac). Factors x, y and z depend on quantity of the electricity, which flew through the electrolysis cell. The compositions of the obtained substances were confirmed by the physicochemical analysis (ultimate analysis, IR-, mass spectroscopy and thermal analysis (thermogravimetric, isothermal warming-up and differential scanning colorimetry). (Authors)

  6. Effect of the Local Heat on the Pain of Vitamin K Injection in the Infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yadollah Zahed Pasha

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundThe absence of pain relief in infants can lead to harmful effects; so, this study aimed to investigate the effect of local heat on the pain of vitamin K injection in the infants.Materials and MethodsThis randomized clinical trial was conducted on 80 healthy infants. For the control group, 1 mg vitamin K was injected into the vastus lateralis muscle by a nurse. In the 3 intervention groups, respectively 5, 10 and 15 minutes before the injection, hot-water bag at 37 °C was placed on the quadriceps muscle and then injection was done with the same condition as in the control group. Immediately after the injection, the Neonatal Infant Pain Scale (NIPS was completed. Data analysis was done using SPSS version 21.0 software.Results41(51.25% girls and 39 (48.75% boys were participated. First-minute Apgar of all samples were 8.64±0.557. Birth weight was 3335.37±339.51 grams and the minimum gestational age 36.37±1.01 weeks. The mean pain score in the first minute in the control group was 3.6± 2.136, which was 3.3± 1.976 in the 5-minute warm-up group, and this amount was reached to 1.6± 1.569 in 10-minute warm up group, and 0.6± 0.821 in 15 minute warm-up group (P=0.008. The mean pain scores in the control group for the second minute was 1.0±1.835, which was reduced to 0.25± 0.716 in the 10-minute and 15-minute warm-up group (P=0.023.ConclusionLocal heating before the injection procedure can be effective in reducing pain in infants and the pain will reduce by increasing the local heating time (15 minutes.

  7. The Algebra Teacher's Activity-a-Day, Grades 6-12 Over 180 Quick Challenges for Developing Math and Problem-Solving Skills

    CERN Document Server

    Thompson, Frances McBroom

    2010-01-01

    Fun-filled math problems that put the emphasis on problem-solving strategies and reasoning. The Algebra Teacher's Activity-a-Day offers activities for test prep, warm-ups, down time, homework, or just for fun. These unique activities are correlated with national math education standards and emphasize problem-solving strategies and logical reasoning skills. In many of the activities, students are encouraged to communicate their different approaches to other students in the class.: Filled with dozens of quick and fun algebra activities that can be used inside and outside the classroom; Designed

  8. Leadership: What’s Love Got to Do With It?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-11

    would come over to announce the games when he could break away from school. Our next two sons were playing. The next one warmed up the goalies all the...Now I have my daughter involved as the physician’s assistant, and I’m saying, “Christina, you have to let me know when I can pull the trigger with...he has a grenade in his hand. The pin is already pulled , but he is holding the hand grip on it, and they begin to wrestle, Dunham and this insurgent

  9. Effects of 2 Types of Activation Protocols Based on Postactivation Potentiation on 50-m Freestyle Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuenca-Fernández, Francisco; Ruiz-Teba, Ana; López-Contreras, Gracia; Arellano, Raúl

    2018-06-14

    Cuenca-Fernández, F, Ruiz-Teba, A, López-Contreras, G, and Arellano, R. Effects of 2 types of activation protocols based on postactivation potentiation on 50-m freestyle performance. J Strength Cond Res XX(X): 000-000, 2018-Postactivation potentiation (PAP) is a phenomenon which improves muscle contractility, strength, and speed in sporting performances through previously applied maximal or submaximal loads on the muscle system. This study aimed to assess the effects of 2 types of activation protocols based on PAP, on sprint swimming performance. A repeated-measures design was used to compare 3 different scenarios before a 50-m race. First, all of the participants performed a standard warm-up (SWU), consisting of a 400-m swim followed by dynamic stretching. This protocol acted as the control. Subsequently, the swimmers were randomly assigned into 2 groups: the swimmers in the first group performed the SWU followed by a PAP one-repetition maximum warm-up (RMWU), consisting of 3 "lunge" and 3 "arm stroke" repetitions, both at 85% of the one-repetition maximum. The swimmers in the second group performed the SWU followed by a PAP eccentric flywheel warm-up (EWU), consisting of one set of 4 repetitions of exercises of both the lower and upper limbs on an adapted eccentric flywheel at the maximal voluntary contraction. The time required for the swimmers to swim 5 and 10 m was shorter with the PAP protocols. The swimming velocity of the swimmers who underwent the EWU and RMWU protocols was faster at 5 and 10 m. The best total swimming time was not influenced by any of the protocols. When isolating swimming (excluding start performance and turn), best time was achieved with the SWU and RMWU compared with EWU (SWU: 20.86 ± 0.95 seconds; EWU: 21.25 ± 1.12 seconds; RMWU: 20.97 ± 1.22 seconds). In conclusion, a warm-up based on PAP protocols might exert an influence on performance in the first meters of a 50-m race. Nevertheless, other factors, such as fatigue, could

  10. Sliding force measurements of the LHC RF contact Plug In Modules at 15 K and in UHV

    CERN Document Server

    Artoos, K; Renaglia, T; CERN. Geneva. TS Department

    2008-01-01

    Some sliding RF contacts mounted in the Plug In Modules in the LHC interconnects failed during a thermal cycle between 4.2 K and room temperature. Some of the gold-coated copper-beryllium RF fingers buckled during the warm up of the machine, indicating that one or more parameters during operation (e.g. the friction coefficient) could be different from what was used in the calculations. This report describes the measurement of the longitudinal forces acting on the sliding RF fingers at operating vacuum and temperatures.

  11. Sliding force measurements on the LHC RF contact Plug In Modules at 15 K and in UHV

    CERN Document Server

    Artoos, K; Renaglia, T

    2008-01-01

    Some sliding RF contacts mounted in the Plug In Modules in the LHC interconnects failed during a thermal cycle between 4.2 K and room temperature. Gold-coated copperberyllium RF fingers buckled during the warm up of the machine, indicating that one or more parameters during operation (e.g. the friction coefficient under vacuum) could be different from what was used in the calculations. This report describes the measurement of the longitudinal forces acting on the sliding RF fingers at operating vacuum and temperatures.

  12. Nb3Al insert experiment log book. 3rd experiment of CS model coil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugimoto, Makoto; Koizumi, Norikiyo; Isono, Takaaki

    2002-10-01

    The cool down of CS model coil and Nb 3 Al insert was started on March 4, 2002. It took almost one month and immediately started coil charge since April 3, 2002. The charge test of Nb 3 Al insert and CS model coil was completed on May 2, 2002. All of the experiments including the warm up was also completed on May 30, 2002. In this campaign, total shot numbers were 102 and the size of the data file in the DAS (Data Acquisition System) was about 5.2 GB. This report is a database that consists of the log list and the log sheets of every shot. (author)

  13. Process and apparatus for the distillation of shale and other bituminous substances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aitken, H

    1883-01-14

    The upper part of a vertical retort used for distillation is made of fire-resisting material, and the lower part of iron. The firing is carried out on the grate, so that the gases play over and under the retorts. The distillation products are carried off through a condenser. For raising the heat in the retorts and for increasing the yield of distillation proudcts the lower part of the exhausted shale is removed from the retort and it is filled up again. The exhaust gases serve to warm up the air for combustion.

  14. SPORT FOOD ADDITIVE CLASSIFICATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. P. Prokopenko

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Correctly organized nutritive and pharmacological support is an important component of an athlete's preparation for competitions, an optimal shape maintenance, fast recovery and rehabilitation after traumas and defatigation. Special products of enhanced biological value (BAS for athletes nutrition are used with this purpose. Easy-to-use energy sources are administered into athlete's organism, yielded materials and biologically active substances which regulate and activate exchange reactions which proceed with difficulties during certain physical trainings. The article presents sport supplements classification which can be used before warm-up and trainings, after trainings and in competitions breaks.

  15. PHENOECOLOGY STUDIES ON SOME ANEMOPHILE LIGNEOUS MAGNOLIATAE FROM TIMIŞOARA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Faur

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Evidence show that weather changes in the recent years manifested through warming-up conditions in the spring months in many European regions. Our researches focussed on the blooming phenophasic comparison in eight species of anemophile ligneous Magnoliatae (Acer, Alnus, Corylus, Fraxinus, Juglans, Morus, Tilia, Ulmus between years 1950-1959 and 2000-2002. Studies show that data of season start in ligneous Magnoliatae pollen progressively became more early in the last 50 years as a response to climate changes.

  16. THE EFFECTS OF ISOKINETIC KNEE STRENGTH ON THE PROMPTNESS OF SOCCER PLAYERS

    OpenAIRE

    Ali Kerim Yilmaz; Menderes Kabadayi; Muhammet Hakan Mayda; Murşit Ceyhun Birinci; Mustafa Özdal

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the effects of isokinetic knee strength on promptness. 15 soccer players with an average age of 22,80±2,14 years and 15 controls with an average age of 21,60±1,40 years participated in the study. Body composition, isokinetic knee strength measurement at angular speeds of 60o, 180o, 240o and 10 m sprint test were conducted respectively in the study. General warm-up procedure was carried out on the groups before measurements. In statistical analyses, Shap...

  17. World Cup fever? How different climates will affect performance

    OpenAIRE

    Ruddock, Alan

    2014-01-01

    No matter who’s playing, the first game of a World Cup is always special – full of excitement, anticipation and hope for tournament filled with skills, goals and drama. This time, hosts Brazil take on a solid Croatian side in Sao Paulo, in a match suited to Brazilian flair and, most importantly, a glut of goals. Around 20 hours later, Mexico and Cameroon will jog out onto the pitch 1,400 miles north in Natal to begin their warm-up.\\ud \\ud Despite the momentum created by the opening fixture, t...

  18. UV IRRADIATION OF AROMATIC NITROGEN HETEROCYCLES IN INTERSTELLAR ICE ANALOGS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsila, J. E.; Bernstein, M. P.; Sanford, S. A.

    2005-01-01

    Here, we present information on the properties of the ANH quinoline frozen in interstellar water-ice analogs. Quinoline is a two-ring compound structurally analogous to the PAH naphthalene. In this work, binary mixtures of water and quinoline were frozen to create interstellar ice analogs, which were then subjected to ultraviolet photolysis. We will present the infrared spectra of the resulting ices at various temperatures, as well as chromatographic analysis of the residues remaining upon warm-up of these ices to room temperature.

  19. Unaccounted Workload Factor: Game-Day Pitch Counts in High School Baseball Pitchers—An Observational Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaremski, Jason L.; Zeppieri, Giorgio; Jones, Deborah L.; Tripp, Brady L.; Bruner, Michelle; Vincent, Heather K.; Horodyski, MaryBeth

    2018-01-01

    Background: Throwing injuries are common in high school baseball. Known risk factors include excessive pitch counts, year-round pitching, and pitching with arm pain and fatigue. Despite the evidence, the prevalence of pitching injuries among high school players has not decreased. One possibility to explain this pattern is that players accumulate unaccounted pitch volume during warm-up and bullpen activity, but this has not yet been examined. Hypotheses: Our primary hypothesis was that approximately 30% to 40% of pitches thrown off a mound by high school pitchers during a game-day outing are unaccounted for in current data but will be revealed when bullpen sessions and warm-up pitches are included. Our secondary hypothesis was that there is wide variability among players in the number of bullpen pitches thrown per outing. Study Design: Cross-sectional study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods: Researchers counted all pitches thrown off a mound during varsity high school baseball games played by 34 high schools in North Central Florida during the 2017 season. Results: We recorded 13,769 total pitches during 115 varsity high school baseball starting pitcher outings. The mean ± SD pitch numbers per game were calculated for bullpen activity (27.2 ± 9.4), warm-up (23.6 ±8.0), live games (68.9 ±19.7), and total pitches per game (119.7 ± 27.8). Thus, 42.4% of the pitches performed were not accounted for in the pitch count monitoring of these players. The number of bullpen pitches thrown varied widely among players, with 25% of participants in our data set throwing fewer than 22 pitches and 25% throwing more than 33 pitches per outing. Conclusion: In high school baseball players, pitch count monitoring does not account for the substantial volume of pitching that occurs during warm-up and bullpen activity during the playing season. These extra pitches should be closely monitored to help mitigate the risk of overuse injury. PMID:29662911

  20. Feasibility study of applying an advanced composite structure technique to the fabrication of helicopter rotor blades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleich, D.

    1972-01-01

    The fabrication of helicopter rotary wings from composite materials is discussed. Two composite spar specimens consisting of compressively prestressed stainless steel liner over-wrapped with pretensioned fiberglass were constructed. High liner strength and toughness together with the prescribed prestresses and final sizing of the part are achieved by means of cryogenic stretch forming of the fiber wrapped composite spar at minus 320 F, followed by release of the forming pressure and warm up to room temperature. The prestresses are chosen to provide residual compression in the metal liner under operating loads.

  1. Study of microwave drying of wet materials based on one-dimensional two-phase model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salomatov, Vl V.; Karelin, V. A.

    2017-11-01

    Currently, microwave is one of the most interesting ways to conduct drying of dielectric materials, in particular coal. In this paper, two processes were considered - heating and drying. The temperature field of the coal semi-mass in the heating mode is found analytically strictly with the use of integral transformations. The drying process is formulated as a nonlinear Stephen problem with a moving boundary of the liquid-vapor phase transformation. The temperature distribution, speed and drying time in this mode are determined approximately analytically. Parametric analysis of the influence of the material and boundary conditions on the dynamics of warming up and drying is revealed.

  2. Unusual money

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bekbulatov D.R.

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available the article describes the energy as an integral part of our civilization, a harmonious development of society is impossible without it and you cannot feed, put on shoes and clothes, have anything warmed up and lit and delivered to the destination – hence the existence of the current number of the world's population is supported by produced energy. Authors considers that the sun is an inexhaustible source of energy, which is available in every country. Any country can now convert the sun light into electrical energy and get a single world currency.

  3. IL-6, Antioxidant Capacity and Muscle Damage Markers Following High-Intensity Interval Training Protocols

    OpenAIRE

    Cipryan, Lukas

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this study was to investigate changes of interleukin-6 (IL-6), total antioxidant capacity (TAC) and muscle damage markers (creatine kinase (CK), myoglobin and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH)) in response to three different high-intensity interval training (HIIT) protocols of identical external work. Twelve moderately-trained males participated in the three HIIT trials which consisted of a warm-up, followed by 12 min of 15 s, 30 s or 60 s HIIT sequences with the work/rest ratio...

  4. Superconducting Accelerating Cavity Pressure Sensitivity Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodnizki, J.; Horvits, Z.; Ben Aliz, Y.; Grin, A.; Weissman, L.

    2014-01-01

    The measured sensitivity of the cavity was evaluated and it is full consistent with the measured values. It was explored that the tuning system (the fog structure) has a significant contribution to the cavity sensitivity. By using ribs or by modifying the rigidity of the fog we may reduce the HWR sensitivity. During cool down and warming up we have to analyze the stresses on the HWR to avoid plastic deformation to the HWR since the Niobium yield is an order of magnitude lower in room temperature

  5. Ischemic Preconditioning of One Forearm Enhances Static and Dynamic Apnea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeld, Thomas; Rasmussen, Mads Reinholdt; Jattu, Timo

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Ischemic preconditioning enhances ergometer cycling and swimming performance. We evaluated whether ischemic preconditioning of one forearm (four times for 5 min) also affects static breath hold and underwater swimming, whereas the effect of similar preconditioning on ergometer rowing...... preconditioning reduced the forearm oxygen saturation from 65% ± 7% to 19% ± 7% (mean ± SD; P right thigh.......05). CONCLUSIONS: We conclude that while the effect of ischemic preconditioning (of one forearm) on ergometer rowing was minimal, probably because of reduced muscle oxygenation during the warm-up, ischemic preconditioning does enhance both static and dynamic apnea, supporting that muscle ischemia is an important...

  6. Two phase cooling for superconducting magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eberhard, P.H.; Gibson, G.A.; Green, M.A.; Ross, R.R.; Smits, R.G.; Taylor, J.D.; Watt, R.D.

    1985-08-01

    A closed circuit tubular cooling system for superconducting magnets offers advantages of limiting boiloff and containing high pressures during quenches. Proper location of automatic valves to lower pressures and protect the refrigerator in the event of quenches is described. Theoretical arguments and exprimental evidence are given against a previously suggested method to determine He two phase flow regimes. If loss of flow occurs due to some types of refrigeration failure and transfer lines have enough heat leak to warm up, quenches are induced when the flow is restored. Examples are taken from experience with the TPC magnet

  7. JLAB Hurricane recovery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A. Hutton; D. Arenius; J. Benesch; S. Chattopadhyay; E. F. Daly; O. Garza; R. Kazimi; R. Lauzi; L. Merminga; W. Merz; R. Nelson; W. Oren; M. Poelker; P. Powers; J. Preble; V. Ganni; C. R. Reece; R. Rimmer; M. Spata; S. Suhring

    2004-01-01

    Hurricane Isabel, originally a Category 5 storm, arrived at Jefferson Lab on September 18, 2003 with winds of only 75 mph, creating little direct damage to the infrastructure. However, electric power was lost for four days allowing the superconducting cryomodules to warm up and causing a total loss of the liquid helium. The subsequent recovery of the cryomodules and the impact of the considerable amount of opportunistic preventive maintenance provides important lessons for all accelerator complexes, not only those with superconducting elements. The details of how the recovery process was structured and the resulting improvement in accelerator availability will be discussed in detail

  8. Water types and their relaxation behavior in partially rehydrated CaFe-mixed binary oxide obtained from CaFe-layered double hydroxide in the 155-298 K temperature range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bugris, Valéria; Haspel, Henrik; Kukovecz, Ákos; Kónya, Zoltán; Sipiczki, Mónika; Sipos, Pál; Pálinkó, István

    2013-10-29

    Heat-treated CaFe-layered double hydroxide samples were equilibrated under conditions of various relative humidities (11%, 43% and 75%). Measurements by FT-IR and dielectric relaxation spectroscopies revealed that partial to full reconstruction of the layered structure took place. Water types taking part in the reconstruction process were identified via dielectric relaxation measurements either at 298 K or on the flash-cooled (to 155 K) samples. The dynamics of water molecules at the various positions was also studied by this method, allowing the flash-cooled samples to warm up to 298 K.

  9. Electrical strength of vacuum gap at repetitive breakdown

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dubinin, N.P.; Chistyakov, N.P.

    1983-01-01

    The investigation of repetitive pulse breakdown of vacuum space, which electrodes have been subjected to various treatment in vacuum and inert gas, is carried out. In case of electrode warm-up in vacuum up to 400 deg C as well as electronic heating up to 900 deg C the voltage in case of repetitive breakdown hasncreased approximately twice and in case of a through treatment, which is accomplished by a high-current glow discharge in inert gas, the maximum high voltage in case of the first breakdown at repetitive breakdown has decreased by 30...40%, remaining 2-3 times higher than in the first case

  10. Neue Technologien und Erziehung/Bildung

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norbert Meder

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Es wird gezeigt, dass Computertechnologie zur pädagogischen Aufgabe wird, weil es sich um eine Kulturtechnik handelt. Ausgehend vom Begriff der Bildung als Ausbildung eines Verhältnisses zu mir selbst, zu anderen und zur Welt wird Computertechnologie als Problemlösungsautomat, Sprachentwicklungsmaschine, Simulationsmaschine, Kommunikationsmaschine, Bildschirmgestaltungsmaschine, Schlüsselloch und Superzeichenmaschine analysiert. Die Analyse zeigt, daß Computertechnologie ein neues Bildungsideal erforderlich macht: Den Sprachspieler. Der Sprachspieler kennt sein doppelt reflexives Verhältnis zu sich selbst, zu anderen und zur Welt und beherrscht so das Spiel mit der Sprache zur Ausübung von Macht und Gewalt in der Informationsgesellschaft. Der Text geht in folgenden Schritten vor: Zunächst werden mit den Begriffen "Kulturtechnik" und "Bildung" die Prinzipien der Analyse bestimmt. Anschließend wird eine Sachanalyse der Computertechnologie durchgeführt und die gefundenen Eigenschaften jeweils in Relation zum Kulturtechnik- und Bildungsbegriff gesetzt. Computer technology becomes a challenge for education if it is understood as a cultural technology. Starting with the term bildung as the formation of relations to my self, to others and the world, computer technology is analysed as problem solving machine, language development machine, simulation machine, communication machine, screen design machine, keyhole, and super sign machine. It is shown, that computertechnology reqiures a new ideal for bildung: the language player. The language player knows his double reflective relation to his self, to others and the world and thus rules the game with language that is used to excercise power and force in the information society. The text argues in the following steps: At first the principles of the analyses are defined with the terms cultural technology and bildung. Susequently, computer technology is analysed. The identified qualities are finally

  11. SURGICAL TREATMENT OF MANDIBULAR CONDYLE FRACTURES USING THE TRANSPAROTID FACELIFT APPROACH – INTRODUCING A NEW METHOD OF TREATMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleš Vesnaver

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Background. In the past, fractures of the mandibular condylar process were treated almost exclusively conservatively at our institution, by means of a three week period of intermaxillary fixation (IMF, followed by excercises and a soft diet. In the last three years, we started treating these fractures surgically with increasing frequency by open reduction and internal fixation with mini plates and screws. Our goal was to determine the safety and efficiency of surgical treatment as the results of conservative treatment were often unsatisfactory.Patients and methods. So far, 34 patients with 36 extraarticular condyle fractures were treated surgically by a periauricular transparotid approach. The operative procedure is demanding. Namely, branches of the facial nerve have to be identified, dissected and retracted, in order to reach the fracture site. The fracture was reduced and fixed with one or two mini plates. Patients were carefully followed up and were asked to answer a survey paper, which was completed by 32 patients.Results. All of the patients were able to open their mouth immediately postoperatively. The postoperative IMF lasted 1 week at maximum and the facial symetry was achieved in all cases. Pre-traumatic occlusion was achieved in 31 out of 33 dentate patients (94%. Eight out of 36 cases (22% had transitory weakness of the facial nerve branches, most often the buccal and zygomatic branch. Of these, 5 resolved completely at 2–8 weeks, while a mild degree of weakness is still present in the lower eyelid and half of the upper lip in a female patient, 13 months postoperatively. The cosmetic effect is good as the periauricular facelift incision leaves a barely perceptible scar. According to the postoperative survey completed by 32 patients, 30 of them (94% were very satisfied with the outcome of treatment.Conclusion. The procedure is safe with a careful surgical technique and the results of operative treatment are excellent.

  12. Parálisis periódica hipocalémica familiar (PPHF: reporte de un caso y revisión del tema Periodic familial hypoaklemic paralysis: report of a case and review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José William Cornejo Ochoa

    2002-02-01

    Full Text Available La parálisis periódica hipocalémica familiar es una enfermedad que pertenece al grupo de las canalopatías. Consiste en la presentación de episodios de parálisis muscular progresivos en intensidad y frecuencia acompañada de hipocalemia. dos mutaciones explican la presencia de la enfermedad, la CACNA1S y la SCN4A, que afectan los canales de potasio mediados por calcio y los canales de sodio, respectivamente. Lo anterior repercute en la función de los canales para el potasio mediados por voltaje, llevando a una hipocalemia extracelular sostenida produciendo despolarización continua con parálisis. Los desencadenantes son el ejercicio, los carbohidratos, el frío, el estrés, entre otros, y las pruebas de provocación clínica se realizan con insulina, glucosa y ejercicio. La enfermedad se puede prevenir evitando estos factores y tiene alguna respuesta al tratamiento con acetazolamida. Se presenta el caso clínico de un niño que cumple con los criterios clínicos de paresia asociada a hipocalemia desencadenada por carbohidratos. Periodic hypokalemic familial paralysis (PHFP is a channel-mediated disease. Increasing focal or generalized muscular paralytic episodes are associated with low serum potassium levels. Two point mutations are described, CACNA1S and SCN4A. These mutations affect calcium and sodium mediated potassium channels. A continuous depolarization with low extracelular potassium promotes hypotonia. Known stressors are excercise, cold, stress and high carbohydrate intake. Control of stressors and azetazolamyde are the main treatment options. We describe one patient with clinical and laboratory characteristics of PHFP.

  13. Influence of variable resistance loading on subsequent free weight maximal back squat performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mina, Minas A; Blazevich, Anthony J; Giakas, Giannis; Kay, Anthony D

    2014-10-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine the potentiating effects of variable resistance (VR) exercise during a warm-up on subsequent free-weight resistance (FWR) maximal squat performance. In the first session, 16 recreationally active men (age = 26.0 ± 7.8 years; height = 1.7 ± 0.2 m; mass = 82.6 ± 12.7 kg) were familiarized with the experimental protocols and tested for 1 repetition maximum (1RM) squat lift. The subjects then visited the laboratory on 2 further occasions under either control or experimental conditions. During these conditions, 2 sets of 3 repetitions of either FWR (control) or VR (experimental) squat lifts at 85% of 1RM were performed; during the experimental condition, 35% of the load was generated from band tension. After a 5-minute rest, 1RM, 3D knee joint kinematics, and vastus medialis, vastus lateralis, rectus femoris, and semitendinosus electromyogram (EMG) signals were recorded simultaneously. No subject increased 1RM after FWR, however, 13 of 16 (81%) subjects increased 1RM after VR (mean = 7.7%; p 0.05) or EMG amplitudes (mean = 5.9%; p > 0.05) occurred. Preconditioning using VR significantly increased 1RM without detectable changes in knee extensor muscle activity or knee flexion angle, although eccentric and concentric velocities were reduced. Thus, VR seems to potentiate the neuromuscular system to enhance subsequent maximal lifting performance. Athletes could thus use VR during warm-up routines to maximize squat performance.

  14. Efficacy of hamstring stretching programs in schoolchildren. A systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos-Alberto BECERRA FERNANDEZ

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The main purpose of the present review was to examine the scientific literature on the effects of physical education-based stretching programs on hamstring extensibility in schoolchildren aged 6-11 years. For this purpose relevant studies were searched from ten electronic databases dated up through May 2015. Of the 25 potentially relevant articles identified and retrieved for more detailed evaluation, only eight studies were included in the present review because they met the inclusion criteria. The overall results showed that incorporating hamstring stretching as a part of physical education classes produces a significant improvement in the scores of the tests: straight leg raise and classic sit-and-reach, for the experimental groups, but not for control groups. Stretching programs can be included in Physical Education classes, specifically during the warm-up and the cool down periods in order to improve hamstring extensibility. Although it seems that the stretching exercises in the warm-up period could be less effective in gaining flexibility in school children. Studies that use a stretching volume between 4 and 7 minutes per session and 2-4 training classes per week, obtain statistically significant improvements on the levels of hamstring flexibility in the experimental groups. However, after a five-week detraining period, children revert back to their initial flexibility levels. Therefore, it seems appropriate that physical education teachers should implement stretching programs to improve the students´ flexibility during the Physical Education classes.

  15. Experimental study of self-balanced startup characteristics of density lock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gu Haifeng; Yan Changqi; Chen Wei

    2013-01-01

    With passive residual heat removal system which applies the density lock as background, combining the experimental study and theoretical analysis, researches on the operating characteristics and feasibility of self-balanced startup of density lock were made in this system. The results show that self-balanced startup can be divided into two stages: Warming up stage in which the valve is closed; self-balanced stage in which the valve is open. The two requisite conditions ensuring the closure of density lock can be realized respectively in these two stages, which ensure the separation of the passive residual heat removal system from the primary circuit system by the density lock. During the stage of warming up, with the help of special structure of the density lock, the position of the transition points of the heat transfer modes is controlled effectively, and the formation of interface between the cold and hot fluids is promoted. During the self-balanced stage, with the help of the characteristics of self-stability of the hydraulic balance, the motion of interface is controlled effectively, and the hydraulic balance is established automatically in the density lock. All of the results fully prove the feasibility of self-balanced startup. (authors)

  16. Physiological and ecological consequences of sleeping-site selection by the Galapagos land iguana (Conolophus pallidus)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christian, K.A.; Tracy, C.R.

    1984-01-01

    Field observations and biophysical models were combined to analyze sleeping-site selection by Galapagos land iguanas (Conolophus pallidus). Iguanas slept in different kinds of sleeping sites during different seasons. In the coolest season (garua), adult land iguanas were found in sleeping sites that were warmer than the coolest sites available. This may be because the garua season (cool, overcast, and foggy) is a time when environmental conditions mitigate against rapid warm-up in the mornings, so lizards may regulate nighttime body temperatures so that it is easier to warm up to preferred daytime body temperatures. In the warmest season, adult iguanas were found in the coolest sleeping sites available. This observation is consistent with hypotheses of voluntary hypothermia, which can be advantageous in energy conservation and in avoiding detrimental effects associated with maintenance of constant body temperatures throughout the day and night. Juvenile iguanas were found sleeping in rock crevices regardless of the ambient thermal environments. Such sites are likely to be important as refugia for this life stage, which, unlike the adult stage, is vulnerable to predation. It was concluded that selection of sleeping sites is a process that may help in avoidance of predation, optimization of body temperature at the end of the sleeping period, and reduction of metabolic costs during sleeping. The importance of some of these factors may change with the thermal milieu (e.g., season).

  17. Time course and dimensions of postural control changes following neuromuscular training in youth field hockey athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zech, Astrid; Klahn, Philipp; Hoeft, Jon; zu Eulenburg, Christine; Steib, Simon

    2014-02-01

    Injury prevention effects of neuromuscular training have been partly attributed to postural control adaptations. Uncertainty exists regarding the magnitude of these adaptations and on how they can be adequately monitored. The objective was to determine the time course of neuromuscular training effects on functional, dynamic and static balance measures. Thirty youth (14.9 ± 3 years) field hockey athletes were randomised to an intervention or control group. The intervention included a 20-min neuromuscular warm-up program performed twice weekly for 10 weeks. Balance assessments were performed at baseline, week three, week six and post-intervention. They included the star excursion balance test (SEBT), balance error scoring system (BESS), jump-landing time to stabilization (TTS) and center of pressure (COP) sway velocity during single-leg standing. No baseline differences were found between groups in demographic data and balance measures. Adherence was at 86%. All balance measures except the medial-lateral TTS improved significantly over time (p controls (31.8 ± 22.1%). There were no significant group by time interactions in the SEBT, TTS and COP sway velocity. Neuromuscular training was effective in improving postural control in youth team athletes. However, this effect was not reflected in all balance measures suggesting that the neuromuscular training did not influence all dimensions of postural control. Further studies are needed to confirm the potential of specific warm-up programs to improve postural control.

  18. The NTF Inlet Guide Vanes Thermal Gradient Problem and Its Mitigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkat, Venki S.; Paryz, Roman W.; Bissett, Owen W.; Kilgore, W.

    2013-01-01

    The National Transonic Facility (NTF) utilizes Inlet Guide Vanes (IGV) to provide precise, quick response Mach number control for the tunnel. During cryogenic operations, the massive IGV structure can experience large thermal gradients, measured as "Delta T or (Delta)T", between the IGV ring and its support structure called the transfer case. If these temperature gradients are too large, the IGV structure can be stressed beyond its safety limit and cease operation. In recent years, (Delta)T readings exceeding the prescribed safety limits were observed frequently during cryogenic operations, particularly during model access. The tactical operation methods of the tunnel to minimize (Delta)T did not always succeed. One obvious option to remedy this condition is to warm up the IGV structure by disabling the main drive operation, but this "natural" warm up method can takes days in some cases, resulting in productivity loss. This paper documents the thermal gradient problem associated with the IGV structure during cryogenic operation and how the facility has recently achieved an acceptable mitigation which has resulted in improved efficiency of operations.

  19. Optimisation and assessment of three modern touch screen tablet computers for clinical vision testing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Humza J Tahir

    Full Text Available Technological advances have led to the development of powerful yet portable tablet computers whose touch-screen resolutions now permit the presentation of targets small enough to test the limits of normal visual acuity. Such devices have become ubiquitous in daily life and are moving into the clinical space. However, in order to produce clinically valid tests, it is important to identify the limits imposed by the screen characteristics, such as resolution, brightness uniformity, contrast linearity and the effect of viewing angle. Previously we have conducted such tests on the iPad 3. Here we extend our investigations to 2 other devices and outline a protocol for calibrating such screens, using standardised methods to measure the gamma function, warm up time, screen uniformity and the effects of viewing angle and screen reflections. We demonstrate that all three devices manifest typical gamma functions for voltage and luminance with warm up times of approximately 15 minutes. However, there were differences in homogeneity and reflectance among the displays. We suggest practical means to optimise quality of display for vision testing including screen calibration.

  20. Optimisation and assessment of three modern touch screen tablet computers for clinical vision testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahir, Humza J; Murray, Ian J; Parry, Neil R A; Aslam, Tariq M

    2014-01-01

    Technological advances have led to the development of powerful yet portable tablet computers whose touch-screen resolutions now permit the presentation of targets small enough to test the limits of normal visual acuity. Such devices have become ubiquitous in daily life and are moving into the clinical space. However, in order to produce clinically valid tests, it is important to identify the limits imposed by the screen characteristics, such as resolution, brightness uniformity, contrast linearity and the effect of viewing angle. Previously we have conducted such tests on the iPad 3. Here we extend our investigations to 2 other devices and outline a protocol for calibrating such screens, using standardised methods to measure the gamma function, warm up time, screen uniformity and the effects of viewing angle and screen reflections. We demonstrate that all three devices manifest typical gamma functions for voltage and luminance with warm up times of approximately 15 minutes. However, there were differences in homogeneity and reflectance among the displays. We suggest practical means to optimise quality of display for vision testing including screen calibration.

  1. LHC: forwards and onwards

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    Following the recent incident in Sector 3-4, which has brought the start-up of the LHC to a halt, the various teams are working hard to establish the cause, evaluate the situation and plan the necessary repairs. The LHC will be started up again in spring 2009 following the winter shutdown for the maintenance of all the CERN installations. The LHC teams are at work on warming up Sector 3-4 and establishing the cause of the serious incident that occurred on Friday, 19 September. Preliminary investigations suggest that the likely cause of the problem was a faulty electrical connection between two magnets. The connections probably melted, leading to a mechanical failure and a large leak of helium into the tunnel. However, the teams will not be able to carry out a full evaluation and assess the repairs needed until the sector has been warmed up again and inspected. "We are not worried about repairing the magnets as spare parts are available", said Lyn Evans, the LHC Project Leade...

  2. Effects of an Education and Prevention Course for University Music Students on Their Body Awareness and Attitude Toward Health and Prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Árnason, Kári; Briem, Kristín; Árnason, Árni

    2018-06-01

    Studies show a high cumulative prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders among musicians. Increased emphasis is needed on studying the effectiveness of education and prevention courses in music schools. To investigate the effects on music students of an education and prevention course on body awareness and their attitude toward health and prevention. 23 music students participated in this prospective descriptive comparative study, with 13 students taking the course and serving as a prevention education group (PG) and 10 students serving as a comparison group (CG). The course met once weekly for 2 semesters and included lectures and practical sessions. Before and after the course, participants answered a questionnaire about their level of physical activity, warm-up exercises prior to musical performance, health-promoting activities, and subjective body awareness during musical performance and during activities of daily living (ADL). Over the 9-month study period, the PG group increased, and the CG lessened, the amount of warm-up prior to music performance, showing a significant group difference after the course (p=0.036). Significant interactions were seen for subjective body awareness scores (between groups over time) during practice (p=0.026) and during ADLs (p=0.004), as the PG group had greater positive change over time. No group differences were found in students' subjective rating of body awareness during live performance. Participation in a prevention and education course may be beneficial for music students due to improved subjective body awareness and attitude toward prevention strategies.

  3. The Acute Effects of Upper Extremity Stretching on Throwing Velocity in Baseball Throwers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Williams

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To examine the effects of static and proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation (PNF stretching of the shoulder internal rotators on throwing velocity. Subjects. 27 male throwers (mean age = 25.1 years old, SD = 2.4 with adequate knowledge of demonstrable throwing mechanics. Study Design. Randomized crossover trial with repeated measures. Methods. Subjects warmed up, threw 10 pitches at their maximum velocity, were randomly assigned to 1 of 3 stretching protocols (static, PNF, or no stretch, and then repeated their 10 pitches. Velocities were recorded after each pitch and average and peak velocities were recorded after each session. Results. Data were analyzed using a repeated measures ANOVA. No significant interaction between stretching and throwing velocity was observed. Main effects for time were not statistically significant. Main effects for the stretching groups were statistically significant. Discussion. Results suggest that stretching of the shoulder internal rotators did not significantly affect throwing velocity immediately after stretching. This may be due to the complexity of the throwing task. Conclusions. Stretching may be included in a thrower's warm-up without any effects on throwing velocity. Further research should be performed using a population with more throwing experience and skill.

  4. SHORT DURATIONS OF STATIC STRETCHING WHEN COMBINED WITH DYNAMIC STRETCHING DO NOT IMPAIR REPEATED SPRINTS AND AGILITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Del P. Wong

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to compare the effect of different static stretching durations followed by dynamic stretching on repeated sprint ability (RSA and change of direction (COD. Twenty-five participants performed the RSA and COD tests in a randomized order. After a 5 min aerobic warm up, participants performed one of the three static stretching protocols of 30 s, 60 s or 90 s total duration (3 stretches x 10 s, 20 s or 30 s. Three dynamic stretching exercises of 30 s duration were then performed (90 s total. Sit-and-reach flexibility tests were conducted before the aerobic warm up, after the combined static and dynamic stretching, and post- RSA/COD test. The duration of static stretching had a positive effect on flexibility with 36.3% and 85.6% greater sit-and-reach scores with the 60 s and 90 s static stretching conditions respectively than with the 30 s condition (p < 0.001. However there were no significant differences in RSA and COD performance between the 3 stretching conditions. The lack of change in RSA and COD might be attributed to a counterbalancing of static and dynamic stretching effects. Furthermore, the short duration (< 90 s static stretching may not have provided sufficient stimulus to elicit performance impairments

  5. Acute Effect of Static Stretching on Lower Limb Movement Performance by Using STABL Virtual Reality System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ameer, Mariam A; Muaidi, Qassim I

    2017-07-17

    The effect of acute static stretch (ASS) on the lower limb RT has been recently questioned to decrease the risk of falling and injuries in situations requiring a rapid reaction, as in the cases of balance disturbance. The main purpose of this study was to detect the effect of ASS on the lower limb RT by using virtual reality device. Two Group Control Group design. Research laboratory. The control and experimental groups were formed randomly from sixty female university students. Each participant in the experimental group was tested before and after ASS for the quadriceps, hamstrings and planter flexor muscles, and compared with the control group with warming-up exercise only. The stretching program involved warming-up in the form of circular running inside the lab for 5 minutes followed by stretching of each muscle group thrice, to the limit of discomfort of 45 s, with resting period of 15s between stretches. The measurements included the RT of the dominant lower extremity by using the dynamic stability program, STABL Virtual Reality System (Model No. DIZ 2709, Motek Medical and Force Link Merged Co., Amsterdam). There was statistically significant reduction (F = 162, P= .00) in post-test RT between the two groups, and significant decrease in RT after stretching, in the experimental group (7.5%) (P= .00). ASS of the lower limb muscles tends to decrease the lower limb RT and improve movement performance.

  6. Effect of Heart rate on Basketball Three-Point Shot Accuracy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca P. Ardigò

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The three-point shot (3S is a fundamental basketball skill used frequently during a game, and is often a main determinant of the final result. The aim of the study was to investigate the effect of different metabolic conditions, in terms of heart rates, on 3S accuracy (3S% in 24 male (Under 17 basketball players (age 16.3 ± 0.6 yrs. 3S performance was specifically investigated at different heart rates. All sessions consisted of 10 consecutive 3Ss from five different significant field spots just beyond the FIBA three-point line, i.e., about 7 m from the basket (two counter-clockwise “laps” at different heart rates: rest (0HR, after warm-up (50%HRMAX [50HR], and heart rate corresponding to 80% of its maximum value (80%HRMAX [80HR]. We found that 50HR does not significantly decrease 3S% (−15%, P = 0.255, while 80HR significantly does when compared to 0HR (−28%, P = 0.007. Given that 50HR does not decrease 3S% compared to 0HR, we believe that no preliminary warm-up is needed before entering a game in order to specifically achieve a high 3S%. Furthermore, 3S training should be performed in conditions of moderate-to-high fatigued state so that a high 3S% can be maintained during game-play.

  7. The reach and adoption of a coach-led exercise training programme in community football.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finch, Caroline F; Diamantopoulou, Kathy; Twomey, Dara M; Doyle, Tim L A; Lloyd, David G; Young, Warren; Elliott, Bruce C

    2014-04-01

    To determine the reach and adoption of a coach-led exercise training programme for lower limb injury prevention. Secondary analysis of data from a group-clustered randomised controlled trial. A periodised exercise training warm-up programme was delivered to players during training sessions over an 8-week preseason (weeks 1-8) and 18-week playing season. 1564 community Australian football players. Reach, measured weekly, was the number of players who attended training sessions. Adoption was the number of attending players who completed the programme in full, partially or not at all. Reasons for partial or non-participation were recorded. In week 1, 599 players entered the programme; 55% attended 1 training session and 45% attended > 1 session. By week 12, 1540 players were recruited but training attendance (reach) decreased to <50%. When players attended training, the majority adopted the full programme-ranging from 96% (week 1) to above 80% until week 20. The most common reasons for low adoption were players being injured, too sore, being late for training or choosing their own warm-up. The training programme's reach was highest preseason and halved at the playing season's end. However, when players attended training sessions, their adoption was high and remained close to 70% by season end. For sports injury prevention programmes to be fully effective across a season, attention also needs to be given to (1) encouraging players to attend formal training sessions and (2) considering the possibility of some form of programme delivery outside of formal training.

  8. Growing Pains

    CERN Multimedia

    Katarina Anthony

    2013-01-01

    Heat expands and cold contracts: it’s a simple thermodynamic rule. But when temperatures swing from 300 K to near-absolute zero, this rule can mean a contraction of more than 80 metres across the LHC’s 27-km-long cryogenic system. Keeping this growth in check are compensators (a.k.a. bellows), which shrink and stretch in response to thermodynamic changes. Leak tests and X-rays now underway in the tunnel have revealed that these “joints” might be suffering from growing pains…   This 25-μm weld crack is thought to be the cause of the helium leaks. Prior to the LS1 warm-up, CERN’s cryogenic experts knew of two points in the machine’s cryogenic distribution system that were leaking helium. Fortunately, these leaks were sufficiently small, confined to known sub-sectors of the cryogenic line and – with help from the vacuum team (TE-VSC) – could easily be compensated for. But as the machine warmed up f...

  9. LS1 Report: across the accelerator complex

    CERN Multimedia

    Simon Baird

    2013-01-01

    The warm-up of the first LHC sector (5-6) is now complete; it is at room temperature for the first time in over three years. Next week, the W bellows in this sector will be opened in preparation for the consolidation of the superconducting circuits, splices and interconnections (the SMACC project). Elsewhere in the LHC, the ELQA tests and the warm-up of the remaining seven sectors are proceeding as planned.   Vacuum leak tests are performed on the magnets before the LHC is brought up to ambient temperature. The SPS magnet test programme was completed on 26 March and work has already begun in the SPS tunnel. Among the activities being carried out is the installation of 16 specially coated vacuum chambers in the SPS main dipole magnets around BA5. The first of these dipole magnets were removed from the SPS tunnel today, Friday 5 April. By reducing the build-up of electron clouds around the LHC beam during acceleration in the SPS, this activity will play a key role in the increase of LHC beam in...

  10. The Effect of Proprioceptive Neuromuscular Facilitation on Learning Fine Motor Skills: A Preliminary Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Reza Shahabi Kaseb

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Preparation of neuromuscular system prior to performing motor skills affects the learning of motor skills. The present study was conducted to investigate the effects of Proprioceptive Neuromuscular Facilitation (PNF on limb coordination and accuracy in dart throwing skill. Methods: Thirty two male students were randomly selected as study sample. Based on the pretest scores, the participants were divided into three groups: experimental (proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation, first control (without warm-up, and second control (specific warm-up. During the acquisition phase, the participants first performed the preparation training related to their own group, then all groups performed the exercise program of dart throwing consisting of 6 blocks of 9 trials in 4 training sessions. Finally, 20 days following the last exercise session, the subjects took the retention and transfer tests. Results: The results of one-way ANOVA test for coordination variable in acquisition test showed no significant difference between the groups, while there was a statistically significant difference between groups regarding coordination variable in retention and transfer tests. Furthermore, the results of one-way ANOVA for the accuracy variable in acquisition and retention tests showed no statistically significant difference between the three groups, while there was a statistically significant difference between groups for accuracy variable in transfer test. Conclusion: It seems that proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation, as a preparation method before performance, can enhance the efficacy of training to better learn the coordination pattern of fine motor skills.

  11. Chemical Simulations of Prebiotic Molecules: Interstellar Ethanimine Isomers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quan, Donghui; Herbst, Eric; Corby, Joanna F.; Durr, Allison; Hassel, George

    2016-06-01

    The E- and Z-isomers of ethanimine (CH3CHNH) were recently detected toward the star-forming region Sagittarius (Sgr) B2(N) using the Green Bank Telescope PRIMOS cm-wave spectral data, and imaged by the Australia Telescope Compact Array. Ethanimine is not reported in the hot cores of Sgr B2, but only in gas that absorbs at +64 and +82 km s-1 in the foreground of continuum emission generated by H II regions. The ethanimine isomers can serve as precursors of the amino acid alanine and may play important roles in forming biological molecules in the interstellar medium. Here we present a study of the chemistry of ethanimine using a gas-grain simulation based on rate equations, with both isothermal and warm-up conditions. In addition, the density, kinetic temperature, and cosmic ray ionization rate have been varied. For a variety of physical conditions in the warm-up models for Sgr B2(N) and environs, the simulations show reasonable agreement with observationally obtained abundances. Isothermal models of translucent clouds along the same line of sight yield much lower abundances, so that ethanimine would be much more difficult to detect in these sources despite the fact that other complex molecules have been detected there.

  12. Computer aided diagnosis of diabetic peripheral neuropathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chekh, Viktor; Soliz, Peter; McGrew, Elizabeth; Barriga, Simon; Burge, Mark; Luan, Shuang

    2014-03-01

    Diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) refers to the nerve damage that can occur in diabetes patients. It most often affects the extremities, such as the feet, and can lead to peripheral vascular disease, deformity, infection, ulceration, and even amputation. The key to managing diabetic foot is prevention and early detection. Unfortunately, current existing diagnostic techniques are mostly based on patient sensations and exhibit significant inter- and intra-observer differences. We have developed a computer aided diagnostic (CAD) system for diabetic peripheral neuropathy. The thermal response of the feet of diabetic patients following cold stimulus is captured using an infrared camera. The plantar foot in the images from a thermal video are segmented and registered for tracking points or specific regions. The temperature recovery of each point on the plantar foot is extracted using our bio-thermal model and analyzed. The regions that exhibit abnormal ability to recover are automatically identified to aid the physicians to recognize problematic areas. The key to our CAD system is the segmentation of infrared video. The main challenges for segmenting infrared video compared to normal digital video are (1) as the foot warms up, it also warms up the surrounding, creating an ever changing contrast; and (2) there may be significant motion during imaging. To overcome this, a hybrid segmentation algorithm was developed based on a number of techniques such as continuous max-flow, model based segmentation, shape preservation, convex hull, and temperature normalization. Verifications of the automatic segmentation and registration using manual segmentation and markers show good agreement.

  13. CHEMICAL SIMULATIONS OF PREBIOTIC MOLECULES: INTERSTELLAR ETHANIMINE ISOMERS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quan, Donghui; Durr, Allison [Department of Chemistry, Eastern Kentucky University, Richmond, KY 40475 (United States); Herbst, Eric [Departments of Chemistry and Astronomy, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22904 (United States); Corby, Joanna F. [Department of Astronomy, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22904 (United States); Hassel, George [Physics and Astronomy Department, Siena College, Loudonville, NY 12211 (United States)

    2016-06-20

    The E- and Z- isomers of ethanimine (CH{sub 3}CHNH) were recently detected toward the star-forming region Sagittarius (Sgr) B2(N) using the Green Bank Telescope PRIMOS cm-wave spectral data, and imaged by the Australia Telescope Compact Array. Ethanimine is not reported in the hot cores of Sgr B2, but only in gas that absorbs at +64 and +82 km s{sup −1} in the foreground of continuum emission generated by H ii regions. The ethanimine isomers can serve as precursors of the amino acid alanine and may play important roles in forming biological molecules in the interstellar medium. Here we present a study of the chemistry of ethanimine using a gas-grain simulation based on rate equations, with both isothermal and warm-up conditions. In addition, the density, kinetic temperature, and cosmic ray ionization rate have been varied. For a variety of physical conditions in the warm-up models for Sgr B2(N) and environs, the simulations show reasonable agreement with observationally obtained abundances. Isothermal models of translucent clouds along the same line of sight yield much lower abundances, so that ethanimine would be much more difficult to detect in these sources despite the fact that other complex molecules have been detected there.

  14. Advanced Waste Heat Recovery Systems within Hybrid Powertrains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albert Boretti

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available A waste heat recovery system (WHRS is very well known to provide no advantage during the cold start driving cycles, such as the New European Driving Cycle (NEDC, which are used for certification of emissions and assessment of fuel economy. Here, we propose a novel integrated WHRS using the internal combustion engine (ICE coolant passages and an exchanger on the exhaust working as pre-heater / boiler / super-heater of a Rankine cycle. The expander is connected to an electric generator unit (GU, and the pump is connected to an electric motor unit (MU. The vehicle is also fitted with an electric, kinetic energy recovery system (KERS. The expander and condenser are bypassed during the first part of the NEDC when the vehicle covers the four ECE-15 (Economic Commission for Europe - 15 - UDC (Urban Drive Cycle segments where the engine warms-up.  Only after the engine is fully warmed up, during the last part of the NEDC, the extra urban driving cycle (EUDC segment, the expander and condenser are activated to recover part of the coolant and exhaust energy.

  15. Piston ring lubrication and hydrocarbon emissions from internal combustion engines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Froelund, K.

    1997-11-01

    Is it the intention with this project to improve the existing hydrocarbon emission model at the Institute by combining it with a model for predicting the piston ring lubrication. The piston ring lubrication model should be experimentally verified to ensure the validity of the model. The following items were the objectives of the current study: Develop a piston ring lubrication model. This implies the development of a ring-pack gas flow model; Examine the response of the piston ring lubrication model to changing engineer conditions. Especially, it would be interesting to look at the engine warm-up phase since this is the phase where the engine-out emissions are highest and where the commonly used three way catalyst is not capable of converting the engine-out emissions, thereby leading the engine-out emissions directly out in to the environment with the exhaust gases; In order to verify the piston ring lubrication model the lubricant distribution on the cylinder liner should be investigated experimentally. Here again it would be of great interesting to look at the engine warm-up phase; The piston ring lubrication model should be adjusted for application together with the new hydrocarbon emission model for SI-engines at the Institute in order to increase the accuracy of the latter; The piston ring lubrication model could be used for describing the transport of PAH`s in diesel engines. (EG)

  16. Neuromuscular training reduces lower limb injuries in elite female basketball players. A cluster randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonato, M; Benis, R; La Torre, A

    2018-04-01

    The study was a two-armed, parallel group, cluster randomized controlled trial in which 15 teams (160 players) were assigned to either an experimental group (EG, 8 teams n = 86), which warmed-up with bodyweight neuromuscular exercises, or a control group (CG, 7 teams, n = 74) that performed standard tactical-technical exercises before training. All injuries during the 2015-2016 regular season were counted. Epidemiologic incidence proportion and incidence rate were also calculated. Countermovement jump (CMJ) and composite Y-Excursion Balance test (YBT) were used to assess lower limb strength and postural control. A total of 111 injuries were recorded. Chi-square test detected statistically significant differences between EG and CG (32 vs 79, P = .006). Significant differences in the injuries sustained in the EG (21 vs 11, P = .024) and CG (52 vs 27, P = .0001) during training and matches, respectively, were observed. Significant differences in post-intervention injuries were observed between in EG and CG during training (21 vs 52, P training into warm-up routines reduced the incidence of serious lower limb injuries in elite female basketball players. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Session-RPE for quantifying the load of different youth basketball training sessions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C Lupo

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to evaluate youth basketball training, verifying the reliability of the session-RPE method in relation to session duration (< and ≥ 80 minutes and workout typology (reduced and high warm-up, conditioning, technical, tactical, game portions within a single session categories. Six male youth basketball players (age, 16.5±0.5 years; height, 195.5±6.75 cm; body mass, 93.9±10.9 kg; and body mass index, 23.6±2.8 kg.m-2 were monitored (HR, type and duration of workouts during 15 (66 individual training sessions (80±26 minutes. Edwards’ HR method was used as a reference measure of internal training load (ITL; the CR-10 RPE scale was administered 30 minutes after the end of each session. The results obtained showed that all comparisons between different session durations and workout portions revealed effects in term of Edwards’ ITLs except for warm-up portions. Moderate to strong relationships between Edwards’ and session- RPE methods emerged for all sessions (r = .85, P < .001, player’s sessions (r range = .79 - .95, P < .001, session durations (< 80 minutes: r = .67, P < .001; ≥ 80 minutes: r = .75, P < .001, and workout portions (r range = .78 - .89, P range = .002 - < .001. The findings indicated that coaches of youth basketball players can successfully use session-RPE to monitor the ITL, regardless of session durations and workout portions.

  18. Expectancy effects in tennis: the impact of opponents' pre-match non-verbal behaviour on male tennis players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buscombe, Richard; Greenlees, Iain; Holder, Tim; Thelwell, Richard; Rimmer, Matt

    2006-12-01

    In this study, we examined the impact of a male opponent's pre-match body language and clothing (general vs. sports-specific) on how his performances were judged by an observer. Forty male tennis players viewed videos of a male target tennis player warming up and then observed playing footage of the target. Each participant viewed the target player warming up displaying one of four combinations of body language and clothing (positive body language/tennis-specific clothing; positive body language/general sportswear; negative body language/tennis-specific clothing; negative body language/general sportswear). Participants rated the performance of the tennis player and gave their perceptions of the likely outcome of a tennis match with the target player. Analyses of variance indicated that clothing and body language had an interactive effect on both outcome expectations and ratings of performance. The findings support the contention that the initial impressions athletes form of their opponents can influence the way in which they judge the performances of opponents and their perceived likelihood of success against the same opponents.

  19. Heat management in a new modular transverse toolkit used by Volkswagen; Thermomanagement im neuen modularen Querbaukasten bei Volkswagen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaeckel, Tobias; Neusser, Heinz-Jakob; Metzner, Frank-Thomas; Herzog, Ralf [Volkswagen AG, Wolfsburg (Germany)

    2012-11-01

    Most trips in a passenger car are shorter than 15km. Especially at low temperatures the engine, gearbox and cabin occupants compete for their heat requirements. To solve this problem an intelligent cold start and warm up program is necessary. The Innovative Thermal Management (ITM) function reduces the engine warm up time after a cold start by a systematic management of the coolant flows in the engine. Hereby the engine and gearbox reach their consumption-optimal temperature quicker. The consequence is that heating up time for the cabin is also reduced. This uniform group managment software was implemented into the ECU's of different engines in the modular transverse engine range (MQB). In the early phase of development different control strategies and technologies where simulated via a Co-Simulation environment. The potential of the third thermal management generation (ITM3) can hereby be identified at an early stage and operating scenarios can be developed. The interaction of thermal management measures upon partly and fully electrified vehicles was respected during the development of the model range with the simulation environment. (orig.)

  20. Acute effect of different stretching methods on flexibility and jumping performance in competitive artistic gymnasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dallas, G; Smirniotou, A; Tsiganos, G; Tsopani, D; Di Cagno, A; Tsolakis, Ch

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the acute effects of 3 different warm up methods of stretching (static, proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation, and stretching exercises on a Vibration platform) on flexibility and legs power-jumping performance in competitive artistic gymnasts. Eighteen competitive artistic gymnasts were recruited to participate in this study. Subjects were exposed to each of 3 experimental stretching conditions: static stretching (SS), proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation stretching (PNF), and stretching exercises on a Vibration platform (S+V). Flexibility assessed with sit and reach test (S & R) and jumping performance with squat jump (SJ) and counter movement jump (CMJ) and were measured before, immediately after and 15 min after the interventions. Significant differences were observed for flexibility after all stretching conditions for S+V (+1.1%), SS (+5.7%) and PNF (+6.8%) (P=0.000), which remained higher 15 min after interventions (S+V (1.1%), SS (5.3%) and PNF (5.5%), respectively (P=0.000). PNF stretching increased flexibility in competitive gymnasts, while S+V maintained jumping performance when both methods were used as part of a warm-up procedure.

  1. Training in robotics: The learning curve and contemporary concepts in training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bach, Christian; Miernik, Arkadiusz; Schönthaler, Martin

    2014-03-01

    To define the learning curve of robot-assisted laparoscopic surgery for prostatectomy (RALP) and upper tract procedures, and show the differences between the classical approach to training and the new concept of parallel learning. This mini-review is based on the results of a Medline search using the keywords 'da Vinci', 'robot-assisted laparoscopic surgery', 'training', 'teaching' and 'learning curve'. For RALP and robot-assisted upper tract surgery, a learning curve of 8-150 procedures is quoted, with most articles proposing that 30-40 cases are needed to carry out the procedure safely. There is no consensus about which endpoints should be measured. In the traditional proctored training model, the surgeon learns the procedure linearly, following the sequential order of the surgical steps. A more recent approach is to specify the relative difficulty of each step and to train the surgeon simultaneously in several steps of equal difficulty. The entire procedure is only performed after all the steps are mastered in a timely manner. Recently, a 'warm-up' before robotic surgery has been shown to be beneficial for successful surgery in the operating room. There is no clear definition of the duration of the effective learning curve for RALP and robotic upper tract surgery. The concept of stepwise, parallel learning has the potential to accelerate the learning process and to make sure that initial cases are not too long. It can also be assumed that a preoperative 'warm up' could help significantly to improve the progress of the trainee.

  2. Migration of 90Sr in the cooling basin of the Ignalina atomic power plant and the Baltic sea ecosystems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dushauskiene-Duzh, R.

    1992-01-01

    On the basis of a long-time radiation monitoring of the Ignalina APP and the Baltic sea ecosystems determined regularities of the 90 Sr distribution in the main components of the ecosystems (water, bottom sediments, biota). It was established that 90 Sr accumulation coefficient in the aquatic plants of the warmed up water zone of the Ignalina APP is 2.6 lower than that of the stable water suction zone. The accumulation of 90 Sr in molluscs is higher in the warmed up water zone than in the stable water zone. It was determined that the mean concentration of 90 Sr in surface water of near-shore areas of the Baltic sea are higher than that in the open Baltic. Concentration of the 90 Sr in the biota in the Baltic sea is about 300-500 times higher than in the water. The accumulation level of 90 Sr in zoobenthos varies in different species being in organs and tissues of fishes consuming actively calcium for building up their skeletons. 90 Sr levels in bottom sediments of bays are higher than those in sediments of the open sea. Accumulation of 90 Sr in muds is about 11 times higher than in sands. (author). 5 figs., 3 refs

  3. Laboratory simulation of interstellar grain chemistry and the production of complex organic molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allamandola, L. J.; Sandford, S. A.; Valero, G. J.

    1990-01-01

    During the past 15 years considerable progress in observational techniques has been achieved in the middle infrared (5000 to 500 cm(-1), 2 to 20 microns m), the spectral region most diagnostic of molecular vibrations. Spectra of many different astronomical infrared sources, some deeply embedded in dark molecular clouds, are now available. These spectra provide a powerful probe, not only for the identification of interstellar molecules in both the gas solid phases, but also of the physical and chemical conditions which prevail in these two very different domains. By comparing these astronomical spectra with the spectra of laboratory ices one can determine the composition and abundance of the icy materials frozen on the cold (10K) dust grains present in the interior of molecular clouds. These grains and their ice mantles may well be the building blocks from which comets are made. As an illustration of the processes which can take place as an ice is irradiated and subsequently warmed, researchers present the infrared spectra of the mixture H2O:CH3OH:CO:NH3:C6H14 (100:50:10:10:10). Apart from the last species, the ratio of these compounds is representative of the simplest ices found in interstellar clouds. The last component was incorporated into this particular experiment as a tracer of the behavior of a non-aromatic hydrocarbon. The change in the composition that results from ultraviolet photolysis of this ice mixture using a UV lamp to simulate the interstellar radiation field is shown. Photolysis produces CO, CO2, CH4, HCO, H2CO, as well as a family of moderately volatile hydrocarbons. Less volatile carbonaceous materials are also produced. The evolution of the infrared spectrum of the ice as the sample is warmed up to room temperature is illustrated. Researchers believe that the changes are similar to those which occur as ice is ejected from a comet and warmed up by solar radiation. The warm-up sequence shows that the nitrile or iso-nitrile bearing compound

  4. Preventing knee injuries in adolescent female football players – design of a cluster randomized controlled trial [NCT00894595

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waldén Markus

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Knee injuries in football are common regardless of age, gender or playing level, but adolescent females seem to have the highest risk. The consequences after severe knee injury, for example anterior cruciate ligament (ACL injury, are well-known, but less is known about knee injury prevention. We have designed a cluster randomized controlled trial (RCT to evaluate the effect of a warm-up program aimed at preventing acute knee injury in adolescent female football. Methods In this cluster randomized trial 516 teams (309 clusters in eight regional football districts in Sweden with female players aged 13–17 years were randomized into an intervention group (260 teams or a control group (256 teams. The teams in the intervention group were instructed to do a structured warm-up program at two training sessions per week throughout the 2009 competitive season (April to October and those in the control group were informed to train and play as usual. Sixty-eight sports physical therapists are assigned to the clubs to assist both groups in data collection and to examine the players' acute knee injuries during the study period. Three different forms are used in the trial: (1 baseline player data form collected at the start of the trial, (2 computer-based registration form collected every month, on which one of the coaches/team leaders documents individual player exposure, and (3 injury report form on which the study therapists report acute knee injuries resulting in time loss from training or match play. The primary outcome is the incidence of ACL injury and the secondary outcomes are the incidence of any acute knee injury (except contusion and incidence of severe knee injury (defined as injury resulting in absence of more than 4 weeks. Outcome measures are assessed after the end of the 2009 season. Discussion Prevention of knee injury is beneficial for players, clubs, insurance companies, and society. If the warm-up program is proven to

  5. Changes in fatigue, multiplanar knee laxity, and landing biomechanics during intermittent exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shultz, Sandra J; Schmitz, Randy J; Cone, John R; Henson, Robert A; Montgomery, Melissa M; Pye, Michele L; Tritsch, Amanda J

    2015-05-01

    Knee laxity increases during exercise. However, no one, to our knowledge, has examined whether these increases contribute to higher-risk landing biomechanics during prolonged, fatiguing exercise. To examine associations between changes in fatigue (measured as sprint time [SPTIME]), multiplanar knee laxity (anterior-posterior [APLAX], varus-valgus [VVLAX] knee laxity, and internal-external rotation [IERLAX]) knee laxity and landing biomechanics during prolonged, intermittent exercise. Descriptive laboratory study. Laboratory and gymnasium. A total of 30 male (age = 20.3 ± 2.0 years, height = 1.79 ± 0.05 m, mass = 75.2 ± 7.2 kg) and 29 female (age = 20.5 ± 2.3 years, height = 1.67 ± 0.08 m, mass = 61.8 ± 9.0 kg) competitive athletes. A 90-minute intermittent exercise protocol (IEP) designed to simulate the physiologic and biomechanical demands of a soccer match. We measured SPTIME, APLAX, and landing biomechanics before and after warm-up, every 15 minutes during the IEP, and every 15 minutes for 1 hour after the IEP. We measured VVLAX and IERLAX before and after the warm-up, at 45 and 90 minutes during the IEP, and at 30 minutes after the IEP. We used hierarchical linear modeling to examine associations between exercise-related changes in SPTIME and knee laxity with exercise-related changes in landing biomechanics while controlling for initial (before warm-up) knee laxity. We found that SPTIME had a more global effect on landing biomechanics in women than in men, resulting in a more upright landing and a reduction in landing forces and out-of-plane motions about the knee. As APLAX increased with exercise, women increased their knee internal-rotation motion (P = .02), and men increased their hip-flexion motion and energy-absorption (P = .006) and knee-extensor loads (P = .04). As VVLAX and IERLAX increased, women went through greater knee-valgus motion and dorsiflexion and absorbed more energy at the knee (P ≤ .05), whereas men were positioned in greater hip

  6. Preventing knee injuries in adolescent female football players - design of a cluster randomized controlled trial [NCT00894595].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hägglund, Martin; Waldén, Markus; Atroshi, Isam

    2009-06-23

    Knee injuries in football are common regardless of age, gender or playing level, but adolescent females seem to have the highest risk. The consequences after severe knee injury, for example anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury, are well-known, but less is known about knee injury prevention. We have designed a cluster randomized controlled trial (RCT) to evaluate the effect of a warm-up program aimed at preventing acute knee injury in adolescent female football. In this cluster randomized trial 516 teams (309 clusters) in eight regional football districts in Sweden with female players aged 13-17 years were randomized into an intervention group (260 teams) or a control group (256 teams). The teams in the intervention group were instructed to do a structured warm-up program at two training sessions per week throughout the 2009 competitive season (April to October) and those in the control group were informed to train and play as usual. Sixty-eight sports physical therapists are assigned to the clubs to assist both groups in data collection and to examine the players' acute knee injuries during the study period. Three different forms are used in the trial: (1) baseline player data form collected at the start of the trial, (2) computer-based registration form collected every month, on which one of the coaches/team leaders documents individual player exposure, and (3) injury report form on which the study therapists report acute knee injuries resulting in time loss from training or match play. The primary outcome is the incidence of ACL injury and the secondary outcomes are the incidence of any acute knee injury (except contusion) and incidence of severe knee injury (defined as injury resulting in absence of more than 4 weeks). Outcome measures are assessed after the end of the 2009 season. Prevention of knee injury is beneficial for players, clubs, insurance companies, and society. If the warm-up program is proven to be effective in reducing the incidence of knee

  7. The effect of coach and player injury knowledge, attitudes and beliefs on adherence to the FIFA 11+ programme in female youth soccer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKay, Carly D; Steffen, Kathrin; Romiti, Maria; Finch, Caroline F; Emery, Carolyn A

    2014-09-01

    Injury knowledge and beliefs influence uptake of prevention programmes, but the relationship between knowledge, beliefs and adherence remains unclear. To describe injury knowledge and beliefs among youth female soccer coaches and players, and to identify the relationship between these factors, different delivery strategies of the FIFA 11+ programme and adherence. A subcohort analysis from a cluster-randomised controlled trial of 31 female soccer teams (coaches n=29, players (ages 13-18) n=258). Preseason and postseason questionnaires were used to assess knowledge and beliefs. Teams recorded FIFA 11+ adherence during the season. At baseline, 62.8% (95% CI 48.4% to 77.3%) of coaches and 75.8% (95% CI 71.5% to 80.1%) of players considered 'inadequate warm-up' a risk factor for injury. There was no effect of delivery method (OR=1.1; 95% CI 0.8 to 1.5) or adherence (OR=1.0; 95% CI 0.9 to 1.1) on this belief. At baseline, 13.8% (95% CI 1.3% to 26.4%) of coaches believed a warm-up could prevent muscle injuries, but none believed it could prevent knee and ankle injuries. For players, 9.7% (95% CI 6.1% to 13.3%), 4.7% (95% CI 2.1% to 7.3%) and 4.7% (95% CI 2.1% to 7.3%) believed a warm-up would prevent muscle, knee and ankle injuries, respectively. Years of playing experience were negatively associated with high adherence for coaches (OR=0.93; 0.88 to 0.99) and players (OR=0.92; 0.85 to 0.98). There were gaps in injury knowledge and beliefs, which differed for coaches and players. Beliefs did not significantly affect adherence to the FIFA 11+, suggesting additional motivational factors should be considered. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  8. Relationship of changing social atmosphere, lifestyle and bone mineral density in college students

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, In Ja; Ko, Yo Han; Kim, Chung Kyung; Kim, Hee Sol; Park, Da Jeong; Yoon, Hyeo Min; Jeong, Yu Jin [Dept. of Radiological Technology, Dongnam Health college, Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-12-15

    The decrease of bone mineral density gives rise to the outbreak of osteopenia and makes the possibility of a bone fracture. It makes health problems in society. It's very important to prevent osteopenia in advance. Also it's critical to prevent and take care of it in adolescent because it's the most developing period comparing to middle ages because that bone mineral density decreases. There are genetic, physical and environmental factors that affect bone mineral density. Recently, a lifestyle and eating habits are also changing as the society atmosphere is gradually doing. This study have shown that 134 women and 75 men was chosen and responded to the survey of measuring bone mineral density and investigating a lifestyle. The measure of bone mineral density is to use Dual energy X-ray absorptiometry(DEXA) and check femoral neck and lumbar spine. Also questionaries was required to pre-made survey about their lifestyles. Analysis of data was done with SPSS program. Multiple regression analysis was used for the relation of bone mineral density, the heigths and BMI. The sample of Groups are checked for drinking, smoking or excercising about differences by t-test. The results of the experiments were; first, there is statistically significant differences in the comparisons between BMD and BMD. But there isn't any special correlation between drinking, smoking and BMD. Secondly, bone mineral density becomes low related to an intake of caffeine. Particularly, this is statically significant on women. Also there is statically significant correlation between femoral neck and quantity of motion for both men and women. Third, there is significant relation between eating habits and bone mineral density on women's lumbar spine. However, there is no significant relation between men's lumbar spine and women's one. Therefore, to prevent osteopenia, it's good to abstain from intaking caffeine within an hour after a meal. In addition, it

  9. Prevalence of osteoporosis among postmenopausal females with diabetes mellitus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Maataoug, Mohamad A.; El-Desouki, Mahmoud I.; Othman, Saleh A.; Mattar, Essam H.; Babay, Zainab A.; Addar, Mohammad

    2004-01-01

    To assess the prevalence of osteopenia and osteoporosis among Saudi postmenopausal women with non-insulin dependent type-2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). The study was carried out at King Khalid University Hospital, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia from February 2000 to September 2002. bone mineral density (BMD) of lumbar spine and femoral neck using dual x-ray absorptionmetry (DXA; Lunar Wisconsin), were performed in 104 postmenopausal Saudi women with T2DM and 101postmenopausal non-diabetic women (control). Bone mineral density was measured in gm/cm and both T-score and Z-score were measured but only T-score ws used for analysis based on World Health Organization criteria. Bone profile, 25(OH) Vitamin D, 1.25(OH) Vitamin D, parathyroid harmone and urine deoxypyridinoline (DPD) were measured in both patients and controls. Body fit fat measurement aruond the biceps muscles using Futrex (body compostion analyzer) were performed in patients and controls. Years postmenopausal, duration of diabetes mellitus, parity, exercise, sun exposure and milk consumption were also recorded. In the diabetic group, the mean spine BMD was 0.928 gm/cm (T-score=2.28 SD) and for femoral neck the mean BMD was 0.817 gm/cm (T-score=-1.21SD). In control group, the mean spine BMD was 1.036 gm/cm (T-score=-1.2) and mean femoral neck BMD was 0.914 gm/cm (T-score=-0.608). In the diabetic group, there was 16(16.64%)patients with normal BMD of the spine, 42 patients (43.68%) with ostopenia (mean T-score=-1.8SD) and 45 (46.8%) with osteoporosis (mean T-score=-3.3 SD). Osteoporosis is most common among Type2 postmenopausal females in this ethnic group. Since both groups are postmenopausal, having equal percentage of Vitamin D deficiency, multi-parity, non exposure sun, lack of excercise and negligible milk intake, one can conlude that low BMD can be attributed to DM in the absence of other cause of osteoporosis. (author)

  10. Relationship of changing social atmosphere, lifestyle and bone mineral density in college students

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, In Ja; Ko, Yo Han; Kim, Chung Kyung; Kim, Hee Sol; Park, Da Jeong; Yoon, Hyeo Min; Jeong, Yu Jin

    2013-01-01

    The decrease of bone mineral density gives rise to the outbreak of osteopenia and makes the possibility of a bone fracture. It makes health problems in society. It's very important to prevent osteopenia in advance. Also it's critical to prevent and take care of it in adolescent because it's the most developing period comparing to middle ages because that bone mineral density decreases. There are genetic, physical and environmental factors that affect bone mineral density. Recently, a lifestyle and eating habits are also changing as the society atmosphere is gradually doing. This study have shown that 134 women and 75 men was chosen and responded to the survey of measuring bone mineral density and investigating a lifestyle. The measure of bone mineral density is to use Dual energy X-ray absorptiometry(DEXA) and check femoral neck and lumbar spine. Also questionaries was required to pre-made survey about their lifestyles. Analysis of data was done with SPSS program. Multiple regression analysis was used for the relation of bone mineral density, the heigths and BMI. The sample of Groups are checked for drinking, smoking or excercising about differences by t-test. The results of the experiments were; first, there is statistically significant differences in the comparisons between BMD and BMD. But there isn't any special correlation between drinking, smoking and BMD. Secondly, bone mineral density becomes low related to an intake of caffeine. Particularly, this is statically significant on women. Also there is statically significant correlation between femoral neck and quantity of motion for both men and women. Third, there is significant relation between eating habits and bone mineral density on women's lumbar spine. However, there is no significant relation between men's lumbar spine and women's one. Therefore, to prevent osteopenia, it's good to abstain from intaking caffeine within an hour after a meal. In addition, it

  11. A study of natural circulation cooling using a flow visualization rig

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowman, W.C.; Ferch, R.L.; Omar, A.M.

    1985-01-01

    A flow visualization rig has been built at Monserco Limited to provide visual insight into the thermalhydraulic phenomena which occur during single phase and two phase thermosyphoning in a figure-of-eight heat transport loop. Tests performed with the rig have provided design information for the scaling and instrumentation of a high pressure rig being investigated for simulating CANDU reactor conditions during natural circulation cooling. A videotape was produced, for viewing at this presentation, to show important thermalhydraulic features of the thermosyphoning process. The rig is a standard figure-of-eight loop with two steam generators and three heated channels per pass. An elevated surge tank open to atmosphere was used for pressure control. Two variable speed pumps provided forced circulation for warming up the rig, and for establishing the desired initial conditions for testing. Test rig power could be varied between 0 and 15 kW

  12. Related electrical, superconducting and structural characteristics of low temperature indium films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belevtsev, B.I.; Pilipenko, V.V.; Yatsuk, L.Ya.

    1981-01-01

    Reported are results of a complex study of electrical, superconducting and structural properties of indium films vacuum evaporated onto a liquid helium-cooled substrate. Structural electron diffraction investigations gave a better insight into the general features of the annealing during the warming-up of cold-deposited films. It is found that the annealing of indium films to about 80 to 100 K entails an irreversible growth of interplanar separations due to decreasing inhomogeneous microstresses. As the films are warmed from 100 to 300 K, the principal annealing processes are determined by crystallite growth and development of dominating orientation. The changes in the residual resistance and in Tsub(c) with warming the cold-deported films are explained on the base of structural data obtained. In particular, a direct relationship is revealed between the crystallite size and Tsub(c) [ru

  13. Accelerator vacuum system elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sivokon', V.V.; Kobets, A.F.; Shvetsov, V.A.; Sivokon', L.V.

    1980-01-01

    Some elements of vacuum systems are investigated. Considerable attention has been given to the investigation into peculiarities in pumping out of a ionoguide for transportation of an accelerated charged particles beam the spread of which often attains a considerable length. The number of pumps over the ionoguide length is experimentally determined. It is shown that as a result of ionoguide warm-up the pumping out time is considerably reduced maximum permissible pressure is decreased by two orders and lesser rate of pump pumping out is required. The investigations have shown that when operating the ionoguide there is no necessity in setting up seals between the ionoguide and magnetodischarged pump. The causes of the phenomenon in which the pressure near the pump is greater than in the end of the ionoguide, are impurities carried in by the pump into the ionoguide volume and the pumping out capacity of the pressure converter

  14. Evaluation of an optimized coolant circuit conception in a thermal whole vehicle environment with respect to the consumption of primary energy; Bewertung eines optimierten Kuehlmittelkreislaufkonzeptes in einer thermischen Gesamtfahrzeugumgebung hinsichtlich des Primaerenergieverbrauchs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schulze, Mirko; Neumann, Alexander; Tilch, Benjamin; Eilts, Peter [Technische Univ. Braunschweig (Germany). Inst. fuer Verbrennungskraftmaschinen; Niedersaechsisches Forschungszentrum Fahrzeugtechnik (NFF), Braunschweig (Germany)

    2012-11-01

    This work deals with a co-simulation vehicle environment developed by the institute of internal combustion engines (ivb) of the Technical University Braunschweig as a tool to analyze the thermal effects in the power train during the warm-up phase, especially on the fuel consumption. This allows evaluating new drive train concepts in early stages of development by using power train thermal management techniques (TMM). Therefore you are able to give an objective statement for these techniques by analyzing the changes in fuel consumption. The used simulation models will be introduced and the mechanical and thermal behavior is verified using test bench data. An optimized coolant circuit concept in GT Suite {sup registered}, developed at the institute is identified and coupled to a thermal engine model. In this paper, the potentials for reducing primary energy consumption in the New European Driving Cycle (NEDC) are presented. (orig.)

  15. Acute effects of massage or active exercise in relieving muscle soreness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lars L; Jay, Kenneth; Andersen, Christoffer H

    2013-01-01

    Massage is commonly believed to be the best modality for relieving muscle soreness. However, actively warming up the muscles with exercise may be an effective alternative. The purpose of this study was to compare the acute effect of massage with active exercise for relieving muscle soreness. Twenty...... healthy female volunteers (mean age 32 years) participated in this examiner-blind randomized controlled trial (ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01478451). The participants performed eccentric contractions for the upper trapezius muscle on a Biodex dynamometer. Delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS) presented 48 hours...... later, at which the participants (a) received 10 minutes of massage of the trapezius muscle or (b) performed 10 minutes of active exercise (shoulder shrugs 10 × 10 reps) with increasing elastic resistance (Thera-Band). First, 1 treatment was randomly applied to 1 shoulder while the contralateral...

  16. Underground pipe ventilation in horticulture; Grondbuisventilatie in de glastuinbouw

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raaphorst, M. [Wageningen UR Glastuinbouw, Bleiswijk (Netherlands)

    2012-09-15

    With earth air heat exchangers, greenhouse air or outside air is led through an underground pipe or course system, to exchange heat with the soil. This exploits the thermal storage capacity of the soil to buffer temperature fluctuations, which can save approximately 2 m{sup 3}/m{sup 2} annually on heat demand. With high temperature crops, the heat can preferably be used to warm up injected outside air [Dutch] Met grondbuisventilatie wordt kaslucht of buitenlucht door een ondergrondse buis of gangenstelsel geleid om daar warmte aan af te geven of op te nemen. Hiermee kan de thermische opslagcapaciteit van de bodem worden benut om temperatuurschommelingen op te vangen en daardoor jaarlijks ongeveer 2 m{sup 3}/m{sup 2} te besparen op de warmtevraag. Bij warme teelten is het aan te raden om deze opgeslagen warmte ook te gebruiken om aangezogen buitenlucht op te warmen.

  17. Effect of initialization time on application potentiality of a ZnO thin film based LPG sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parta Mitra

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available A prototype electronic LPG (Liquid Petroleum Gas sensor based on zinc oxide (ZnO film has been fabricated. The objective of the present work was to investigate the importance of initialization time (also called warm-up time on the application potentiality of the ZnO based alarm. The role of sensor geometry on initialization time is presented. The electronic circuitry of the prototype LPG device alarm is discussed. It is shown that that the initialization time depends on the switch off time (or the time for which the sensor was kept idle. The resistive mode sensors can be fixed at 40% LEL (Lower Explosive Limit of LPG for safe operation.

  18. Hydroelectricity and ecological considerations. Falsification of the environmental reality by the opponents of hydropower

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrzej Giziński

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Opponents of hydroelectricity claim falsely that hydrotechnical development of the Lower Vistula River constitutes implementation of Edward Gierek’s concept of bringing only environmental damage1. Statements on the negative environmental impact of constructing small hydroelectric power stations (SHPS are equally groundless. Permanent protests against the construction of dams and river damming, regardless of the motivations and will of protesters, increase energy dependence on Russia, and preserves the poor, post-Bierut hydrological situation2. The main fallacy made by hydropower opponents is the alternative treatment of power and environmental purposes. Environmental errors consist in continuous omission of even the most obvious positive ecological effects of constructing river dams and – what is especially reprehensible – inventing non-existent threats, e.g. lethal concentration of toxic heavy metals in deposits of the Włocławek Reservoir or the detrimental impact of warming up water in stage of falls on the fish population below the dam.

  19. Recovery of low temperature heat in oil mills

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carré Patrick

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Energy consumption in oil mills is a major item of costs and a sensitive point in the production of biofuels. To improve their performance, industrials can recover lowtemperature heat thanks to a new technology of heat exchangers suitable for treating granular solid materials. Information about the energy requirements of the rapeseed crushing being not readily available, the article gives a detailed assessment of consumption items (per ton of seed: 263 MJ for preparation operations and 284 MJ for solvent extraction. These exchangers used as pre-conditioners saves about 55 MJ.t−1 of heat by use of steam condensates. We could go further in use of these devices on the one hand to recover heat from press cake and meal, and secondly to use recovered energy to dry and warm up the seeds before pre-pressing. In this configuration, the energy savings could reach 38% of current needs.

  20. Self-corrected sensors based on atomic absorption spectroscopy for atom flux measurements in molecular beam epitaxy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Du, Y.; Liyu, A. V.; Droubay, T. C.; Chambers, S. A.; Li, G.

    2014-01-01

    A high sensitivity atom flux sensor based on atomic absorption spectroscopy has been designed and implemented to control electron beam evaporators and effusion cells in a molecular beam epitaxy system. Using a high-resolution spectrometer and a two-dimensional charge coupled device detector in a double-beam configuration, we employ either a non-resonant line or a resonant line with low cross section from the same hollow cathode lamp as the reference for nearly perfect background correction and baseline drift removal. This setup also significantly shortens the warm-up time needed compared to other sensor technologies and drastically reduces the noise coming from the surrounding environment. In addition, the high-resolution spectrometer allows the most sensitive resonant line to be isolated and used to provide excellent signal-to-noise ratio

  1. Aerobic exercises: their cardiovascular and other benefits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fatima, R.

    2004-01-01

    Aerobic exercise can help prevent ischemic heart disease and other diseases. Physical inactivity is a major factor for developing Coronary Artery Disease (CAD) which is characterized by deposit of cholesterol, calcium and other substances in the inner lining of the arteries, that supply to cardiac muscle. It also contributes to other risk factors including obesity, hypertension, increased triglycerides, low level of HDL cholesterol and diabetes. The essential components of a systematic individualized exercise prescription include the appropriate mode, intensity, duration, frequency and progression of physical activity. There are four components of exercise program; a warm up, an endurance phase, optional recreational activity and a cool down. For sedentary individuals, exercise should start at 60% of maximum heart rare. Benefits of physical activity depend on the total amount of exercise. Vigorous leisure time activity should be promoted in order to give way to healthy living. (author)

  2. X-RAY IRRADIATION OF H{sub 2}O + CO ICE MIXTURES WITH SYNCHROTRON LIGHT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiménez-Escobar, A.; Ciaravella, A.; Micela, G.; Cecchi-Pestellini, C. [INAF–Osservatorio Astronomico di Palermo, P.za Parlamento 1, I-90134 Palermo (Italy); Chen, Y.-J.; Huang, C.-H., E-mail: jimenezea@astropa.inaf.it, E-mail: ciarave@astropa.inaf.it, E-mail: giusi@astropa.inaf.it, E-mail: cecchi-pestellini@astropa.inaf.it, E-mail: asperchen@phy.ncu.edu.tw, E-mail: 101222023@cc.ncu.edu.tw [Department of Physics, National Central University, Jhongli District, Taoyuan City 32054, Taiwan (China)

    2016-03-20

    We irradiated a (4:1) mixture of water and carbon monoxide with soft X-rays of energies up to 1.2 keV. The experiments were performed using the spherical grating monochromator beamline at National Synchrotron Radiation Research Center in Taiwan. Both monochromatic (300 and 900 eV) and broader energy fluxes (250–1200 eV) were employed. During the irradiation, the H{sub 2}O + CO mixture was ionized, excited, and fragmented, producing a number of reactive species. The composition of the ice has been monitored throughout both the irradiation and warm-up phases. We identified several products, which can be related through a plausible chemical reaction scheme. Such chemistry is initiated by the injection of energetic photoelectrons that produce multiple ionization events generating a secondary electron cascade. The results have been discussed in light of a model for protoplanetary disks around young solar-type stars.

  3. NON-EQUILIBRIUM MOLECULAR DYNAMICS USED TO OBTAIN SORET COEFFICIENTS OF BINARY HYDROCARBON MIXTURES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. A. Furtado

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available AbstractThe Boundary Driven Non-Equilibrium Molecular Dynamics (BD-NEMD method is employed to evaluate Soret coefficients of binary mixtures. Using a n-decane/n-pentane mixture at 298 K, we study several parameters and conditions of the simulation procedure such as system size, time step size, frequency of perturbation, and the undesired warming up of the system during the simulation. The Soret coefficients obtained here deviated around 20% when comparing with experimental data and with simulated results from the literature. We showed that fluctuations in composition gradients and the consequent deviations of the Soret coefficient may be due to characteristic fluctuations of the composition gradient. Best results were obtained with the smallest time steps and without using a thermostat, which shows that there is room for improvement and/or development of new BD-NEMD algorithms.

  4. Geometrical position of the Large Hadron Collider main dipole inside the cryostat

    CERN Document Server

    La China, M; Gubello, G; Hauviller, Claude; Scandale, Walter; Todesco, Ezio

    2002-01-01

    The superconducting dipole of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is a cylindrical structure made of a shrinking cylinder containing iron laminations and collared coils. This 15 m long structure, weighing about 28 t, is horizontally bent by 5 mrad. Its geometrical shape should be preserved, from the assembly phase to the operational condition at cryogenic temperature. When inserted in its cryostat, the dipole cold mass is supported by three posts also providing the thermal insulation. Sliding interfaces should minimize the interference between the dipole and the cryostat during cooling down and warming up. Indeed, a possible non-linear response of the sliding interface can detrimentally affect the final dipole shape. This paper presents the results of dedicated tests investigating interferences and of specific simulations with a 3D finite element model (FEM) describing the mechanical behaviour of the dipole inside the cryostat. Comparison between measurements and FEM simulations is also discussed.

  5. Aerial infrared monitoring for nuclear fuel cycle facilities in Ukraine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stankevich, S.A.; Dudar, T.V.; Kovalenko, G.D.; Kartashov, V.V.

    2015-01-01

    The scientific research overall objective is rapid express detection and preliminary identification of pre-accidental conditions at nuclear fuel cycle facilities. We consider development of a miniature unmanned aerial vehicle equipped with high-precision infrared spectroradiometer able to detect remotely internal warming up of hazardous facilities by its thermal infrared radiation. The possibility of remote monitoring using unmanned aerial vehicle is considered at the example of the dry spent fuel storage facility of the Zaporizhzhya Nuclear Power Plant. Infrared remote monitoring is supposed to present additional information on the monitored facilities based on different physical principles rather than those currently in use. Models and specifications towards up-to-date samples of infrared surveying equipment and its small-sized unmanned vehicles are presented in the paper.

  6. Advanced tokamak burning plasma experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porkolab, M.; Bonoli, P.T.; Ramos, J.; Schultz, J.; Nevins, W.N.

    2001-01-01

    A new reduced size ITER-RC superconducting tokamak concept is proposed with the goals of studying burn physics either in an inductively driven standard tokamak (ST) mode of operation, or in a quasi-steady state advanced tokamak (AT) mode sustained by non-inductive means. This is achieved by reducing the radiation shield thickness protecting the superconducting magnet by 0.34 m relative to ITER and limiting the burn mode of operation to pulse lengths as allowed by the TF coil warming up to the current sharing temperature. High gain (Q≅10) burn physics studies in a reversed shear equilibrium, sustained by RF and NB current drive techniques, may be obtained. (author)

  7. Numerical simulation of impurity transport in Lake Baikal during the summer period

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsydenov, Bair O.

    2017-11-01

    The distributions of impurities obtained as a result of numerical modeling on the Srednyaya arm (Selenga River mouth)- Cape Golyi cross-section of Lake Baikal, Siberia, Russia, are presented. The data on the air temperature, relative humidity, atmospheric pressure, humidity, and cloudiness from the Babushkin meteorological station from 01.06.2016 to 30.06.2016 are used as the weather condition in the mathematical model. The results of simulation have shown that the impurities dissolved in water reach the bottom of the Selenga shallow basin of Lake Baikal. As the heat accumulation increases and the river waters warm up, the maximum concentrations of suspended substances tend to remain in the upper layers of the lake.

  8. Spallation Neutron Source Drift Tube Linac Resonance Control Cooling System Modeling

    CERN Document Server

    Tang, Johnny Y; Champion, Marianne M; Feschenko, Alexander; Gibson, Paul; Kiselev, Yuri; Kovalishin, A S; Kravchuk, Leonid V; Kvasha, Adolf; Schubert, James P

    2005-01-01

    The Resonance Control Cooling System (RCCS) for the warm linac of the Spallation Neutron Source was designed by Los Alamos National Laboratory. The primary design focus was on water cooling of individual component contributions. The sizing the RCCS water skid was accomplished by means of a specially created SINDA/FLUINT model tailored to these system requirements. A new model was developed in Matlab Simulink and incorporates actual operational values and control valve interactions. Included is the dependence of RF input power on system operation, cavity detuning values during transients, time delays that result from water flows through the heat exchanger, the dynamic process of water warm-up in the cooling system due to dissipated RF power on the cavity surface, differing contributions on the cavity detuning due to drift tube and wall heating, and a dynamic model of the heat exchanger with characteristics in close agreement to the real unit. Because of the Matlab Simulink model, investigation of a wide range ...

  9. Using a dual safeguard web-based interactive teaching approach in an introductory physics class

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lie-Ming Li

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available We modified the Just-in-Time Teaching approach and developed a dual safeguard web-based interactive (DGWI teaching system for an introductory physics course. The system consists of four instructional components that improve student learning by including warm-up assignments and online homework. Student and instructor activities involve activities both in the classroom and on a designated web site. An experimental study with control groups evaluated the effectiveness of the DGWI teaching method. The results indicate that the DGWI method is an effective way to improve students’ understanding of physics concepts, develop students’ problem-solving abilities through instructor-student interactions, and identify students’ misconceptions through a safeguard framework based on questions that satisfy teaching requirements and cover all of the course material. The empirical study and a follow-up survey found that the DGWI method increased student-teacher interaction and improved student learning outcomes.

  10. Development and Validation of Kid Tsu Chu Futbol Games for Character Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sulistiyono

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available This research aims to develop and validation games to develop character in the students Football School under 12 years age group. This study was conducted using R and D. This study produced a product in the form of games related to the process of training, but can be used to develop the student’s character. Games that resulted from this research given the name “Tsu Chu Kid Futbol Games For Character Development”. Games have the flexible nature can be placed at the warm-up, core, and cooling at a football training process. The game must have at least two training purposes with the provisions of the first objective should be able to develop the character, and the second objective can develop one component among the components of the physical, technical, or tactics.

  11. Analysis of threshold curves for superconducting interferometers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peterson, R.L.; Hamilton, C.A.

    1979-01-01

    Threshold curves for multijunction superconducting interferometers have been calculated previously, showing general agreement with observed features, especially in symmetric cases. We here add some more details to the analysis, paying particular attention to the effects of asymmetries in coupling, inductance, or critical currents. Feed-loop inductance and flux quantization in the feed loop can be important. A changing lobe pattern over many periods, asymmetries within a period, shifting patterns between runs spanning a warm-up, and sudden changes in pattern because of noise in the environment are all quantitatively explainable on the basis of this model. By use of a single ''calibration curve'', the inductance for symmetric two- or three-junction interferometers can be obtained immediately

  12. Monte-Carlo Tree Search for Simulated Car Racing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fischer, Jacob; Falsted, Nikolaj; Vielwerth, Mathias

    2015-01-01

    Monte Carlo Tree Search (MCTS) has recently seen considerable success in playing certain types of games, most of which are discrete, fully observable zero-sum games. Consequently there is currently considerable interest within the research community in investigating what other games this algorithm...... might play well, and how it can be modified to achieve this. In this paper, we investigate the application of MCTS to simulated car racing, in particular the open-source racing game TORCS. The presented approach is based on the development of an efficient forward model and the discretization...... of the action space. This combination allows the controller to effectively search the tree of potential future states. Results show that it is indeed possible to implement a competent MCTS-based racing controller. The controller generalizes to most road tracks as long as a warm-up period is provided....

  13. Cryogenic Design of the New High Field Magnet Test Facility at CERN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benda, V.; Pirotte, O.; De Rijk, G.; Bajko, M.; Craen, A. Vande; Perret, Ph.; Hanzelka, P.

    In the framework of the R&D program related to the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) upgrades, a new High Field Magnet (HFM) vertical test bench is required. This facility located in the SM18 cryogenic test hall shall allow testing of up to 15 tons superconducting magnets with energy up to 10 MJ in a temperature range between 1.9 K and 4.5 K. The article describes the cryogenic architecture to be inserted in the general infrastructure of SM18 including the process and instrumentation diagram, the different operating phases including strategy for magnet cool down and warm up at controlled speed and quench management as well as the design of the main components.

  14. Reaction of iminopropadienones with amines--formation of zwitterionic intermediates, ketenes, and ketenimines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veedu, Rakesh Naduvile; Kokas, Okanya J; Couturier-Tamburelli, Isabelle; Koch, Rainer; Aycard, Jean-Pierre; Borget, Fabien; Wentrup, Curt

    2008-10-09

    Five aryliminopropadienones 4a- d have been synthesized by flash vacuum thermolysis (FVT) by using two different precursors in each case. These compounds were deposited at 50 K at a pressure of ca. 10(-6) mbar together with three different nucleophiles, namely, trimethylamine (TMA), dimethylamine (DMA), and diethylamine (DEA), in order to study their reactions as neat solids during warm-up by FTIR spectroscopy. The reaction with TMA showed that a zwitterionic species (5 and/or 6) was formed in all the cases. With DMA and DEA, an alpha-oxoketenimine and/or an imidoylketene (7 and 8 or 9 and 10) was formed as the final product. In addition, several bands were observed, which can be assigned to zwitterionic intermediates (11 or 12). Optimized structures and vibrational spectra for all products were calculated at the B3LYP/6-31G(d) level of theory by using the polarizable continuum model (epsilon = 5).

  15. Using sociodrama and psychodrama to teach communication in end-of-life care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baile, Walter F; De Panfilis, Ludovica; Tanzi, Silvia; Moroni, Matteo; Walters, Rebecca; Biasco, Guido

    2012-09-01

    End-of-life discussions can be stressful and can elicit strong emotions in the provider as well as the patient and family. In palliative care, understanding and effectively addressing emotions is a key skill that can enhance professional competency and patient/family satisfaction with care. We illustrate how in coursework for a Master's degree in palliative medicine we used dramatic "action methods" derived from sociodrama and psychodrama in the portrayal of two challenging cases to train providers in the emotional aspects of caring for patients with advanced cancer. We describe the specific techniques of constructing and enacting case scenarios using warm-ups, role-creation, doubling and role-reversal. In particular, we illustrate how these techniques and others were used to reveal and address the "hidden" emotions, attitudes, and values that were central to the communication dilemma. Finally, we present an evaluation completed by the 26 participants who attended the course.

  16. Corrector/quadrupole/sextupole power leads for the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shutt, R.; Hornik, K.; Rehak, M.

    1993-01-01

    In RHIC (Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider), there are 492 CQS (Corrector/Quadrupole/Sextupole) assemblies which require leads to carry the current from the power supply to the magnet. The lead assemblies will contain these leads along with instrumentation voltage taps and current carrying wires that are used only for magnet warm-up. These lead assemblies are analyzed for two cooling schemes: (1) gas flow through the lead tube and (2) heat sinking the lead tube along a 40--70 K heat shield (without gas flow). The analysis was extended to include the modeling of the cold and warm ends and effects of superinsulation shielding the lead assembly against radiation (including heat conduction due to residual gas pressure in the surrounding vacuum). Extensive parametric studies of heat exchange areas, specific copper properties, length of the lead, etc. are also included in the analysis

  17. Radiotherapy with radiomodifying agents of carcinoma of the oral cavity organs and stomatopharynx

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vorob'ev, Yu.I.; Dzharadat, I.

    1992-01-01

    The results of radiotherapy are compared in three identical groups of patients with squamous-cell carcinoma of the oral cavity organs and stomatoparynx (a total of 149 patients). Metronidazole radiomodification was carried out in a dose of 2.5 g/m 2 body surface orally 3 hrs before hyperthermia or thermoradiotherapy with a 30 min warming up before radiation exposure. Radiotherapy with polyradiomodification had no advantages as against thermoradiotherapy. Thermoradiotherapy alone and polyradiomodification provided cure (as evidenced by an 18 month follow-up) in patients with stage 3 condition in 54.3±7.3 % of cases, wheras radiotherapy alone in but 21.9±5.3 % of cases. The results of treatment making use of radiomodifiers were no better than the results of radiotherapy alone in patients with stage 4 carcinomas of the oral cavity organs and stomatopharynx

  18. Greenhouse windows are closing;. and the ozone layer is still being depleted. Ozone and climate experts have worked in vain. Die Treibhaus-Fenster schliessen sich. ;. und die Ozonschicht versproedet weiter / Ozon- und Klimaforscher haben vergeblich 'Bringschuld' geleistet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frese, W

    1994-02-14

    Forecast dont change a thing: This is the resumee that Prof. Paul Crutzen, Director of the Mainz Max-Planck-Institut of Chemistry and Prof. Hartmut Grassl, Director of the Hamburg Max-Planck-Institut of Meteorology draw from their many year of public information work for the cause of the ozone layer and the climate. The earth's atmosphere is in greater danger today than ever before: The ground layers are gradually warming up beneath an ozone layer that is steadily getting thinner. The fate of the ozone layer is meanwhile beyond our influence. The climate could still grant us a reprieve if we succeed in containing the temperature rise. Should we fail to make us of this time, the worst of scientists' predictions will come fine. (orig.)

  19. Municipal solid waste management: identification and analysis of engineering indexes representing demand and costs generated in virtuous Italian communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamberini, R; Del Buono, D; Lolli, F; Rimini, B

    2013-11-01

    The definition and utilisation of engineering indexes in the field of Municipal Solid Waste Management (MSWM) is an issue of interest for technicians and scientists, which is widely discussed in literature. Specifically, the availability of consolidated engineering indexes is useful when new waste collection services are designed, along with when their performance is evaluated after a warm-up period. However, most published works in the field of MSWM complete their study with an analysis of isolated case studies. Conversely, decision makers require tools for information collection and exchange in order to trace the trends of these engineering indexes in large experiments. In this paper, common engineering indexes are presented and their values analysed in virtuous Italian communities, with the aim of contributing to the creation of a useful database whose data could be used during experiments, by indicating examples of MSWM demand profiles and the costs required to manage them. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Determinants of The Islamic Social Reporting Disclosure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uun Sunarsih

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The issue of corporate responsibility was a warm up for discussion. This study aimed to analyze the influence of company issuing sukuk, size, and profitability on the disclosure of Islamic Social Reporting. This study uses secondary data obtained through the site www.bapepam.go.id and www.idx.co.id by using purposive sampling. The results showed that only size that affect the disclosure of ISR, so the larger the total assets of the greater disclosure of Islamic Social Reporting. Sukuk issuance has no effect because the ownership structure of companies in Asia, including Indonesia tends to family ownership concentration. Profitability has no effect because the company has a perspective that is different to the Islamic Social Reporting.DOI: 10.15408/aiq.v9i1.3771

  1. Core stability training on lower limb balance strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dello Iacono, Antonio; Padulo, Johnny; Ayalon, Moshe

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to assess the effects of core stability training on lower limbs' muscular asymmetries and imbalances in team sport. Twenty footballers were divided into two groups, either core stability or control group. Before each daily practice, core stability group (n = 10) performed a core stability training programme, while control group (n = 10) did a standard warm-up. The effects of the core stability training programme were assessed by performing isokinetic tests and single-leg countermovement jumps. Significant improvement was found for knee extensors peak torque at 3.14 rad · s(-1) (14%; P core stability group. The jump tests showed a significant reduction in the strength asymmetries in core stability group (-71.4%; P = 0.02) while a concurrent increase was seen in the control group (33.3%; P core exercises for optimal lower limbs strength balance development in young soccer players.

  2. Tensile and shear fracture behavior of fiber reinforced plastics at 77K irradiated by various radiation sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Humer, K.; Weber, H.W.; Tschegg, E.K.; Gerstenberg, H.

    1993-08-01

    Influence of radiation damage (gamma, electron, neutron) on mechanical properties of fiber reinforced plastics (FRPs) has been investigated. Different types of FRPs (two or three dimensional E-, S- or T-glass fiber reinforcement, epoxy or bismaleimide resin) have been irradiated at room temperature with 2 MeV electrons and 6O Co γ-rays up to 1.8 x 1 0 8 Gy as well as with different reactor spectra up to a fast neutron fluence of 5 x lO 22 m -2 (E > 0.1 MeV). Tensile and intralaminar shear tests were carried out on the irradiated samples at 77 K. Some samples were irradiated at 5 K and tested at 77 K with and without an annealing cycle to room temperature. Results on the influence of these radiation conditions and of warm-up cycles on the mechanical properties of FRPs are compared and discussed

  3. Modeling of Spray System Operation under Hydrogen and Steam Emissions in NPP Containment during Severe Accident

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vadim E. Seleznev

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes one of the variants of mathematical models of a fluid dynamics process inside the containment, which occurs in the conditions of operation of spray systems in severe accidents at nuclear power plant. The source of emergency emissions in this case is the leak of the coolant or rupture at full cross-section of the main circulating pipeline in a reactor building. Leak or rupture characteristics define the localization and the temporal law of functioning of a source of emergency emission (or accrued operating of warmed up hydrogen and steam in the containment. Operation of this source at the course of analyzed accident models should be described by the assignment of the relevant Dirichlet boundary conditions. Functioning of the passive autocatalytic recombiners of hydrogen is described in the form of the complex Newton boundary conditions.

  4. Study of Transient Heat Transport Mechanisms in Superfluid Helium Cooled Rutherford-Cables

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2100615

    The Large Hadron Collider leverages superconducting magnets to focus the particle beam or keep it in its circular track. These superconducting magnets are composed of NbTi-cables with a special insulation that allows superfluid helium to enter and cool the superconducting cable. Loss mechanisms, e.g. continuous random loss of particles escaping the collimation system heating up the magnets. Hence, a local temperature increase can occur and lead to a quench of the magnets when the superconductor warms up above the critical temperature. A detailed knowledge about the temperature increases in the superconducting cable (Rutherford type) ensures a secure operation of the LHC. A sample of the Rutherford cable has been instrumented with temperature sensors. Experiments with this sample have been performed within this study to investigate the cooling performance of the helium in the cable due to heat deposition. The experiment uses a superconducting coil, placed in a cryostat, to couple with the magnetic field loss m...

  5. [Nurses and doctors in the management of arrhytmic complications: the case of electric storm in patients with an implantable cardioverter defibrillator].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plebani, Laura; Occhetta, Eraldo

    2006-01-01

    The evolution of arrhythmologic technology introduced new therapeutic opportunities for cardiology patients. Competence, continuity of care, integration and collaboration between medical doctors and nurses allow a safe management of short and long term complications. A typical example of a new arrhythmic complication is the "electrical storm" or "arrhythmic warm up" in patients implanted with a cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD). The definition and epidemiology of the electrical storm stress the relevance of this clinical situation; its dramatic emergency involves several aspects of nursing care, clinical, prognostic, ethical and deontological. The definition and implementation of an integrated protocol for the treatment of this condition is described and ethical and unresolved questions are rised. One of these problems is the recommendation to offer the patient the opportunity to receive information about the option of inactivating the ICD.

  6. Frequency tuning of the CEBAF upgrade cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    J.R. Delayen; L. Doolittle; E. Feldl; V. Nguyen; W. Sachleben

    1999-01-01

    Long-term plans for CEBAF at Jefferson Lab calls for achieving 12 GeV in the middle of the next decade and 24 GeV after 2010. In support of these plans, an Upgrade Cryomodule capable of providing more than twice the voltage of the existing ones is under development. One requirement is to operate the superconducting cavities, which are 40% longer than existing ones, at 2.5 times the original design gradient with the same amount of rf power. This puts stringent requirements on the accuracy of the frequency tuner: range of 400 kHz and resolution of 1 Hz. A new tuner design to meet these requirements is under development. This system avoids problem areas of previous designs by holding to the principles of not placing moving parts in the vacuum and/or low temperature space, and of having all drive components readily accessible for maintenance and replacement without cryomodule warm-up

  7. An energy and exergy study of a solar thermal air collector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohseni-Languri Ehsan

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A solar flat plate air collector was manufactured in the north of Iran, and connected to a room as the model to study the possibility of using such solar heating systems in the northern parts of Iran. This collector was tested as a solar air heater to see how good it could be for warming up the test room during the winter. The experimental data obtained through accurate measurements were analyzed using second law approach to find the optimum mass flow rate, which leads to the maximum exergy efficiency. It was found that for the test setup at the test location, a mass flow rate of 0.0011 kg/s is the optimum mass flow rate for tested conditions which leads to the highest second law efficiency.

  8. A Robust Model Predictive Control for efficient thermal management of internal combustion engines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pizzonia, Francesco; Castiglione, Teresa; Bova, Sergio

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • A Robust Model Predictive Control for ICE thermal management was developed. • The proposed control is effective in decreasing the warm-up time. • The control system reduces coolant flow rate under fully warmed conditions. • The control strategy operates the cooling system around onset of nucleate boiling. • Little on-line computational effort is required. - Abstract: Optimal thermal management of modern internal combustion engines (ICE) is one of the key factors for reducing fuel consumption and CO_2 emissions. These are measured by using standardized driving cycles, like the New European Driving Cycle (NEDC), during which the engine does not reach thermal steady state; engine efficiency and emissions are therefore penalized. Several techniques for improving ICE thermal efficiency were proposed, which range from the use of empirical look-up tables to pulsed pump operation. A systematic approach to the problem is however still missing and this paper aims to bridge this gap. The paper proposes a Robust Model Predictive Control of the coolant flow rate, which makes use of a zero-dimensional model of the cooling system of an ICE. The control methodology incorporates explicitly the model uncertainties and achieves the synthesis of a state-feedback control law that minimizes the “worst case” objective function while taking into account the system constraints, as proposed by Kothare et al. (1996). The proposed control strategy is to adjust the coolant flow rate by means of an electric pump, in order to bring the cooling system to operate around the onset of nucleate boiling: across it during warm-up and above it (nucleate or saturated boiling) under fully warmed conditions. The computationally heavy optimization is carried out off-line, while during the operation of the engine the control parameters are simply picked-up on-line from look-up tables. Owing to the little computational effort required, the resulting control strategy is suitable for

  9. Cryotrapping assisted mass spectrometry for the analysis of complex gas mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferreira, Jose A.; Tabares, Francisco L.

    2007-01-01

    A simple method is described for the unambiguous identification of the individual components in a gas mixture showing strong overlapping of their mass spectrometric cracking patterns. The method, herein referred to as cryotrapping assisted mass spectrometry, takes advantage of the different vapor pressure values of the individual components at low temperature (78 K for liquid nitrogen traps), and thus of the different depletion efficiencies and outgassing patterns during the fast cooling and slow warming up of the trap, respectively. Examples of the use of this technique for gas mixtures with application to plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition of carbon and carbon-nitrogen hard films are shown. Detection of traces of specific C 3 hydrocarbons ( 2 containing deposition plasmas are addressed as representative examples of specific applications of the technique

  10. Observations of Pronounced Greenland Ice Sheet Firn Warming and Implications for Runoff Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polashenski, Chris; Courville, Zoe; Benson, Carl; Wagner, Anna; Chen, Justin; Wong, Gifford; Hawley, Robert; Hall, Dorothy

    2014-01-01

    Field measurements of shallow borehole temperatures in firn across the northern Greenland ice sheet are collected during May 2013. Sites first measured in 19521955 are revisited, showing long-term trends in firn temperature. Results indicate a pattern of substantial firn warming (up to +5.7C) at midlevel elevations (1400-2500 m) and little temperature change at high elevations (2500 m). We find that latent heat transport into the firn due to meltwater percolation drives the observed warming. Modeling shows that heat is stored at depth for several years, and energy delivered from consecutive melt events accumulates in the firn. The observed warming is likely not yet in equilibrium with recent melt production rates but captures the progression of sites in the percolation facies toward net runoff production.

  11. Design and performance of a sealed CO2 laser for industrial applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Botero, G; Gomez, D; Nisperuza, D; Bastidas, A

    2011-01-01

    A large amount of materials processing is done using an industrial CO 2 laser operating in the mid-infrared (IR) spectrum. Their high efficiency and tremendous power output have made them one of the most commonly known transition wavelength at 10,6 microns facilitates laser cutting, drilling and marking of a wide variety of materials in the electronics and medical industries. Because lasers are feedback systems, many of their design parameters strongly interact with one another, and arriving at an optimum design requires a really thorough understanding of just how they interact. We report the construction of a sealed CO2 gas discharge laser with a glass laser tube design as well as clear acrylic housing makes this an excellent demonstrational tool. Sealed operation was characterized in mode, power, warm-up and stability over a long time. The results indicate a good operation, optimum wavelength, powers and beam quality will remove material more efficiently in effective industrial applications.

  12. An operating environment with multitasking capabilities for radiochemistry autosynthesizers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feliu, A.L.

    1991-01-01

    The proliferation of positron emission tomography centers during recent years has stimulated intensive efforts to develop reliable and efficient devices for automating radiopharmaceutical syntheses. In order to expedite the design and operation of fully automated synthesizers, a graphical process control scheme featuring a simple method for the end-user to reconfigure the software was recently suggested. The flexibility and user-friendliness of this scheme were demonstrated with an application package to operate a commercially-available autosynthesizer. This methodology is now extended to include multitasking capabilities. To evaluate the multitasking concept, the demonstration program AUTOMATE was created to simulate independent operation of four autosynthesizers. With AUTOMATE, a chemist could easily supervise one routine synthesis whole ''warming up'' another synthesizer or conducting a research experiment. The graphical approach provides the simplicity of manual control, instant status information, and a choice between ''hands-on'' or unattended operations. The potential utility of AUTOMATE in the laboratory is discussed. (author)

  13. Test results and operational characteristics of prototype SSCL half cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McInturff, A.D.; Burgett, W.; Carter, H.

    1994-01-01

    The SSCL Accelerator System's String Test (ASST) has had several cool down, subsequent operational test series, and warm up cycles. The first cycle of these was rather limited in scope as mandated by Congress. The subsequent tests have been performed to obtain more complete information about parameters of, or operating experience with, the ensemble of magnets and spools when operating serially as in accelerator operations. The tests and procedures performed to date have emphasized cryogenic, mechanical, and electrical operations. These have included running, as well as upset conditions, i.e., superconducting to normal transition of the string (quench). This paper represents a summary of the operational test results and characteristics seen to date. A limited discussion will be included as to their implications with respect to a successful accelerator operation

  14. Restaurant 1: dance theatre for a day

    CERN Document Server

    Caroline Duc

    2012-01-01

    On Tuesday 31 July, CERN’s Restaurant 1 transformed into a dance studio for the duration of a public rehearsal. The performers from the dance troupe of Geneva choreographer Gilles Jobin, CERN’s current artist in residence, presented their 2011 creation, Spider Galaxies. The result: a voyage of bodies suspended between art and science.   Just two months after the choreographer’s “Strangels” invaded the library, the same bodies returned to take over another iconic CERN space: Restaurant 1. While a black floor covering was spread over the dance floor, bordered on three sides by the glass partitions overlooking the terrace, the four dancers warmed up. Gilles Jobin, the first prize winner of the “Collide@CERN” competition held last March in the dance/performance category, briefly introduced the dance that would follow, called Spider Galaxies. The piece, created in 2011, features four dancers moving to music...

  15. TESLA & ILC Cryomodules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peterson, T. J. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Weisend, II, J. G. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States)

    2016-01-01

    The TESLA collaboration developed a unique variant of SRF cryomodule designs, the chief feature being use of the large, low pressure helium vapor return pipe as the structural support backbone of the cryomodule. Additional innovative features include all cryogenic piping within the cryomodule (no parallel external cryogenic transfer line), long strings of RF cavities within a single cryomodule, and cryomodules connected in series. Several projects, including FLASH and XFEL at DESY, LCLS-II at SLAC, and the ILC technical design have adopted this general design concept. Advantages include saving space by eliminating the external transfer line, relatively tight packing of RF cavities along the beamline due to fewer warm-cold transitions, and potentially lower costs. However, a primary disadvantage is the relative lack of independence for warm-up, replacement, and cool-down of individual cryomodules.

  16. Cryogenic tests of the first two LHC quadrupole prototypes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Genevey, P.; Deregel, J.; Perot, J.; Rifflet, J.M.; Vedrine, P.; Cortella, J.; Le Coroller, A.

    1994-01-01

    Two LHC (Large Hadron Collider) twin aperture quadrupole prototypes were constructed at CEA Saclay (a CERN-CEA collaboration agreement). Their main characteristics are: 3.05 m length, 56 mm coil aperture, 180 mm between the two apertures, 252 T/m nominal gradient at 15060 A. They have been tested and measured in the 1.8 K Saclay test facility in an horizontal cryostat. The magnets are instrumented in order to investigate their behaviour during cool-down, stand-by, powering and current ramping, quenching and warming-up. A summary of the cryogenic, mechanical, pressure and electrical measurements is presented. The quench protection heaters are efficient down to 3000 A. Losses during ramping up and down are reported. (from authors) 5 fig., 11 ref

  17. Catheter Ablation of Ectopic Atrial Tachycardia Originating from the Left Atrial Appendage using CARTOMERGE® System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masahiko Goya, MD

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available A 70-year-old woman was referred because of drug resistant and daily incessant palpitation attack. She had undergone two previous unsuccessful radiofrequency catheter ablations at another hospital. The physical examination, chest X-ray, and echocardiogram were all normal. The 12-lead ECG during tachycardia showed narrow QRS, short PR tachycardia and negative polarity of the P wave in leads I and aVL (Fig. 1A. The ECG monitor showed incessant tachycardia with warming-up phenomenon. Three dimensional electroanatomical map integrated with CT imaging (CARTOMERGE®, Biosense Webster Inc. clearly revealed the radial activation pattern originating from the basalo-postero-inferior aspect of the left atrial appendage. Radiofrequency energy application at this site eliminated tachycardia permanently.

  18. Cryogenic expansion joint for large superconducting magnet structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Robert L.

    1978-01-01

    An expansion joint is provided that accommodates dimensional changes occurring during the cooldown and warm-up of large cryogenic devices such as superconducting magnet coils. Flattened tubes containing a refrigerant such as gaseous nitrogen (N.sub.2) are inserted into expansion spaces in the structure. The gaseous N.sub.2 is circulated under pressure and aids in the cooldown process while providing its primary function of accommodating differential thermal contraction and expansion in the structure. After lower temperatures are reached and the greater part of the contraction has occured, the N.sub.2 liquefies then solidifies to provide a completely rigid structure at the cryogenic operating temperatures of the device.

  19. MRI and CT contrast media extravasation: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heshmatzadeh Behzadi, Ashkan; Farooq, Zerwa; Newhouse, Jeffery H; Prince, Martin R

    2018-03-01

    This systematic review combines data from multiple papers on contrast media extravasation to identify factors contributing to increased extravasation risk. Data were extracted from 17 papers reporting 2191 extravasations in 1,104,872 patients (0.2%) undergoing computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Extravasation rates were 0.045% for gadolinium-based contrast agents (GBCA) and nearly 6-fold higher, 0.26% for iodinated contrast agents. Factors associated with increased contrast media extravasations included: older age, female gender, using an existing intravenous (IV) instead of placing a new IV in radiology, in-patient status, use of automated power injection, high injection rates, catheter location, and failing to warm up the more viscous contrast media to body temperature. Contrast media extravasation is infrequent but nearly 6 times less frequent with GBCA for MRI compared with iodinated contrast used in CT.

  20. MRI and CT contrast media extravasation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heshmatzadeh Behzadi, Ashkan; Farooq, Zerwa; Newhouse, Jeffery H.; Prince, Martin R.

    2018-01-01

    Abstract Background: This systematic review combines data from multiple papers on contrast media extravasation to identify factors contributing to increased extravasation risk. Methods: Data were extracted from 17 papers reporting 2191 extravasations in 1,104,872 patients (0.2%) undergoing computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Results: Extravasation rates were 0.045% for gadolinium-based contrast agents (GBCA) and nearly 6-fold higher, 0.26% for iodinated contrast agents. Factors associated with increased contrast media extravasations included: older age, female gender, using an existing intravenous (IV) instead of placing a new IV in radiology, in-patient status, use of automated power injection, high injection rates, catheter location, and failing to warm up the more viscous contrast media to body temperature. Conclusion: Contrast media extravasation is infrequent but nearly 6 times less frequent with GBCA for MRI compared with iodinated contrast used in CT. PMID:29489663

  1. The additional greenhouse effect: Causes, effects, countermeasures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grassl, H.

    1992-01-01

    The carbon dioxide, ozone, nitrous oxide and methane influence through steam and all of them through the distribution of temperature and precipitation on earth. Since the beginning of the industrialisation, man has been destroying the composition of the atmosphere thus causing global changes in the climate. Due to the retardation of the warming up by oceans and ice regions and due to the strong natural variability, neither the heating-up observed during the measuring concentration of the above listed gases nor the rising sea level can be definitely traced back to man's activities. The results of complex climate models - supported by findings from climate history - forecast, with emissions continuing to rise, a continuing average heating-up by approximately 3 C up to the year 2100, i.e. a temperature rise in only 100 years which nearly equals to that of 10,000 years between the ice age and the warm age. (orig./KW) [de

  2. Powering the Future Data Centre

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Zhe

    2010-01-01

    of the characteristics of these two power sources: long warm-up stage and low dynamics for fuel cell, and variable terminal voltage for supercapacitors. The motivation for this project was to find ways which can overcome those limitations to integrate fuel cells and supercapcitors to the system with high efficiency......The extended run Uninterruptible Power Supply system (UPSs) which powered by fuel cells and supercapcitors, is a promising solution for future data centre to obtain environmentfriendly energy efficient and cost effective. There are many challenges in power electronic interface circuits, because......: • Optimized design method for dual active bridge (DAB) converter and its derived circuits; • A novel hybrid dc-dc converter and its corresponding optimal design method are proposed; • An improved dual input current-fed DC-DC converter with bidirectional power conversion ability is investigated; • Extend...

  3. Decontamination in the Electron Probe Microanalysis with a Peltier-Cooled Cold Finger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buse, Ben; Kearns, Stuart; Clapham, Charles; Hawley, Donovan

    2016-10-01

    A prototype Peltier thermoelectric cooling unit has been constructed to cool a cold finger on an electron microprobe. The Peltier unit was tested at 15 and 96 W, achieving cold finger temperatures of -10 and -27°C, respectively. The Peltier unit did not adversely affect the analytical stability of the instrument. Heat conduction between the Peltier unit mounted outside the vacuum and the cold finger was found to be very efficient. Under Peltier cooling, the vacuum improvement associated with water vapor deposition was not achieved; this has the advantage of avoiding severe degradation of the vacuum observed when warming up a cold finger from liquid nitrogen (LN2) temperatures. Carbon contamination rates were reduced as cooling commenced; by -27°C contamination rates were found to be comparable with LN2-cooled devices. Peltier cooling, therefore, provides a viable alternative to LN2-cooled cold fingers, with few of their associated disadvantages.

  4. Greenhouse windows are closing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frese, W.

    1994-01-01

    Forecast dont change a thing: This is the resumee that Prof. Paul Crutzen, Director of the Mainz Max-Planck-Institut of Chemistry and Prof. Hartmut Grassl, Director of the Hamburg Max-Planck-Institut of Meteorology draw from their many year of public information work for the cause of the ozone layer and the climate. The earth's atmosphere is in greater danger today than ever before: The ground layers are gradually warming up beneath an ozone layer that is steadily getting thinner. The fate of the ozone layer is meanwhile beyond our influence. The climate could still grant us a reprieve if we succeed in containing the temperature rise. Should we fail to make us of this time, the worst of scientists' predictions will come fine. (orig.) [de

  5. New high expansion ratio gasoline engine for the TOYOTA hybrid system. Improving engine efficiency with high expansion ratio cycle; Hybrid system yo kobochohi gasoline engine. Kobochohi cycle ni yoru engine no kokoritsuka

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirose, K; Takaoka, T; Ueda, T; Kobayashi, Y [Toyota Motor Corp., Aichi (Japan)

    1997-10-01

    50% reduction of CO2 and fuel consumption have been achieved with the newly developed gasoline engine for the Toyota Hybrid System. This is achieved due to the combination of electric motors and the internal combustion engine which is optimized in the size, swept volume and heat cycle. By delaying the intake valve close timing a high expansion ratio (13.5:1) cycle has been realized. Electricmotor assist enable to cut the maximum engine speed, and friction loss. A best fuel consumption figure better than 230 g/kWh has been achieved. Elimination of lightload firing, motor assisted quick start and improvement of catalyst warm up makes to achieve the clean emission level such as 1/10 of Japanese `78 regulation limit. 10 refs., 16 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Enterprise simulation analysis of the nylon jacket pipeline

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chandra, Charu [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Nastasi, Anthony [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Powell, Dennis R. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Ostic, James K. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    1996-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify ways in which time and cost might be removed from the production of L. L. Bean’s® Warm-up Jacket through systems analysis and the application of supply chain management principles such as coordination and integration. The first three sections of this report provide an introduction, study objectives and a definition of generic supply chain problems as well as those specific to the Nylon Jacket Pipeline (NJP) respectively. Section four outlines the supply chain design components that should be included in any pipeline analysis including a generic architecture and methodology. In section five, results specific to the NJP analysis are documented. Finally, the last three sections include the project’s activities, deliverables, recommendations and conclusions.

  7. Analysis of proton irradiation products in simulated interstellar dusts by mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasamatsu, Takashi; Kaneko, Takeo; Tsuchiya, Masahiko; Kobayashi, Kensei

    1996-01-01

    It is known that various kinds of organic compounds exist in space. In order to study the possibility of the formation of organic compounds in comets or their precursory bodies (interstellar dust grains), ice mixtures of carbon monoxide (or methane), ammonia and water made in a cryostat at 10 K ('simulated cometary ices') were irradiated with high energy protons. Irradiated ice products were warmed up to room temperature, while sublimed gases were analyzed with a quadrupole mass spectrometer. Some hydrocarbons and alcohols were detected. 'Amino acid precursors' (compounds yielding amino acids after hydrolysis) were detected in non-volatile products remaining on the substrate at room temperature. These results suggest the possible formation of organic compounds in interstellar dust grains by cosmic radiation. (author)

  8. Climate populism: Claude Allegre and Co., investigation on science enemies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foucart, St.

    2010-01-01

    Todays, there is no serious uncertainty about the fact that climate is warming up and that human activities are the main contribution to this global warming. However, in France, some learned scientists in connivance with influent think tanks have mounted a campaign against science with or without the tacit support of institutions. All along this book, the author dissects the 'arguments' (errors and lies) and the manipulations of climate-skeptics and explains how this disinformation can propagates and can be taken over by intellectuals who become in turn the spokesmen of climate-skeptics. The result is frightening: a whole domain of study is becoming discredited, the public opinion is demobilized, and the political inaction is encouraged. (J.S.)

  9. Total Dose Effects on Bipolar Integrated Circuits at Low Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, A. H.; Swimm, R. T.; Thorbourn, D. O.

    2012-01-01

    Total dose damage in bipolar integrated circuits is investigated at low temperature, along with the temperature dependence of the electrical parameters of internal transistors. Bandgap narrowing causes the gain of npn transistors to decrease far more at low temperature compared to pnp transistors, due to the large difference in emitter doping concentration. When irradiations are done at temperatures of -140 deg C, no damage occurs until devices are warmed to temperatures above -50 deg C. After warm-up, subsequent cooling shows that damage is then present at low temperature. This can be explained by the very strong temperature dependence of dispersive transport in the continuous-time-random-walk model for hole transport. For linear integrated circuits, low temperature operation is affected by the strong temperature dependence of npn transistors along with the higher sensitivity of lateral and substrate pnp transistors to radiation damage.

  10. Crazy climate: should we believe it?; Climat fou: faut-il y croire?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krauss, K.; Lee Myers, St.; Revkin, A.C.; Romero, S.; Rodeaud, M.A

    2006-02-15

    Is the Earth's warming up true? Despite any clear answer about it, some countries are investing lot of money to take advantage of the unfreezing of the Arctic ocean. Russians, Canadians and Americans are drawing new maritime routes to have access to new petroleum resources. However, the data about climate change, its causes and remedies are still the object of debates among scientists. This digest article analyzes the reality of the global warming through the true ideas (increase of greenhouse gases concentration and of the surface global temperature, reduction of the snow cover), and the false ideas (melting of ice caps, reliability of climate forecasts and models) generally put forward in the media, and the woolly ones that need to be analyzed more thoroughly (expansion of deserts surface, enhancement of extreme phenomena, changes in oceanic circulation..). An interview of M. Crichton about his last novel 'State of Fear' completes this analysis. (J.S.)

  11. Crazy climate: should we believe it?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krauss, K.; Lee Myers, St.; Revkin, A.C.; Romero, S.; Rodeaud, M.A.

    2006-01-01

    Is the Earth's warming up true? Despite any clear answer about it, some countries are investing lot of money to take advantage of the unfreezing of the Arctic ocean. Russians, Canadians and Americans are drawing new maritime routes to have access to new petroleum resources. However, the data about climate change, its causes and remedies are still the object of debates among scientists. This digest article analyzes the reality of the global warming through the true ideas (increase of greenhouse gases concentration and of the surface global temperature, reduction of the snow cover), and the false ideas (melting of ice caps, reliability of climate forecasts and models) generally put forward in the media, and the woolly ones that need to be analyzed more thoroughly (expansion of deserts surface, enhancement of extreme phenomena, changes in oceanic circulation..). An interview of M. Crichton about his last novel 'State of Fear' completes this analysis. (J.S.)

  12. Two-component air heating system. Final report. Zweikomponenten-Luftheizungs-System. Abschlussbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radtke, W; Thiel, D

    1986-01-01

    The two-component heating system consists of a combination of air-based floor heating and direct air heating, with ventilation and extraction and heat recovery. The direct airflow consists exclusively of heated outside air, the amount corresponding to the building's external air intake requirement. The control system comprises a two-step sequential control of the air throughput of the direct air heating system and of the air distribution for the floor heating airflow. A special heating switch makes it possible to switch off the direct air heating system separately, and to select rapid warm-up. The way in which the new heating system works has been tested in a pilot set-up and proven by comprehensive measurements. In addition, a simulation model was produced which gave substantial confirmation of the measurements. (orig.) With 9 refs., 37 tabs., 63 figs.

  13. Instability of the critical state in NdBa2Cu3O7-δ single crystals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koblischka, M.R.; Murakami, M.; Koishikawa, S.

    1999-01-01

    Instabilities of the critical state are observed in various NdBa2Cu3O7-delta single crystals by means of direct magneto-optic (MO) imaging while warming up flux states containing vortices of opposite polarity. Using the same samples as in the MO investigations, we observe for the first time......, and also in the orientations H-a parallel to c and H-a perpendicular to c. As a result, we find turbulence not only in a narrow window of temperatures (65 less than or equal to T less than or equal to 80 K), but also in a window of applied negative fields ranging between 30 and 80 mT....

  14. Operation of a forced two phase cooling system on a large superconducting magnet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, M.A.; Burns, W.A.; Eberhard, P.H.; Gibson, G.H.; Pripstein, M.; Ross, R.R.; Smits, R.G.; Taylor, J.D.; Van Slyke, H.

    1980-05-01

    This paper describes the operation of a forced two phase cooling system on a two meter diameter superconducting solenoid. The magnet is a thin high current density superconducting solenoid which is cooled by forced two phase helium in tubes around the coil. The magnet, which is 2.18 meters in diameter and 3.4 meters long, has a cold mass of 1700 kg. The two phase cooling system contains less than 300 liters of liquid helium, most of which is contained in a control dewar. This paper describes the operating characteristics of the LBL two phase forced cooling system during cooldown and warm up. The paper presents experimental data on operations of the magnet using either a helium pump or the refrigerator compressor to circulate two phase helium through the superconducting coil cooling tubes

  15. Radiation-induced polymerization of hydrogen cyanide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mozhaev, P.S.; Kichigina, G.A.; Kiryukhin, D.P.

    1995-01-01

    The chain reaction of HCN polymerization in a γ-radiation field does not occur at 77 K. When irradiated HCN is warmed up to ambient temperature, a polymer is formed. The heat of polymerization of HCN is 44.0±6.0 kJ/mol and the polymer yield reaches 2.5% for a dose of 725 kGy. Amorphous polymer products (with yields increasing up to 33.5%) and needle crystals (presumably HCN tetramer) are formed upon storage of irradiated HCN at room temperature. The polymer is stable below 700 K, has a conductivity of 3x10 -5 Ω -1 cm -f1 , and displays an EPR spectrum typical of polyconjugated systems. A radical mechanism of the formation of conjugated chain -C=N-C=N- is suggested. The tetramer is produced by a combination of aminocyanocarbene biradicals

  16. Experimental studies of thermal preparation of internal combustion engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karnaukhov, N. N.; Merdanov, Sh M.; V, Konev V.; Borodin, D. M.

    2018-05-01

    In conditions of autonomous functioning of road construction machines, it becomes necessary to use its internal sources. This can be done by using a heat recovery system of an internal combustion engine (ICE). For this purpose, it is proposed to use heat accumulators that accumulate heat of the internal combustion engine during the operation of the machine. Experimental studies have been carried out to evaluate the efficiency of using the proposed pre-start thermal preparation system, which combines a regular system based on liquid diesel fuel heaters and an ICE heat recovery system. As a result, the stages of operation of the preheating thermal preparation system, mathematical models and the dependence of the temperature change of the antifreeze at the exit from the internal combustion engine on the warm-up time are determined.

  17. High correlation between performance on a virtual-reality simulator and real-life cataract surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Ann Sofia Skou; Smith, Phillip; Subhi, Yousif

    2017-01-01

    -tracking software of cataract surgical videos with a Pearson correlation coefficient of -0.70 (p = 0.017). CONCLUSION: Performance on the EyeSi simulator is significantly and highly correlated to real-life surgical performance. However, it is recommended that performance assessments are made using multiple data......PURPOSE: To investigate the correlation in performance of cataract surgery between a virtual-reality simulator and real-life surgery using two objective assessment tools with evidence of validity. METHODS: Cataract surgeons with varying levels of experience were included in the study. All...... antitremor training, forceps training, bimanual training, capsulorhexis and phaco divide and conquer. RESULTS: Eleven surgeons were enrolled. After a designated warm-up period, the proficiency-based test on the EyeSi simulator was strongly correlated to real-life performance measured by motion...

  18. Recognition and Prevention of Rugby Injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomasin, J D; Martin, D F; Curl, W W

    1989-06-01

    In brief: Rugby is a popular, strenuous contact sport that demands almost continuous action by the players. Players, coaches, and physicians must be aware of the potential for and types of injuries that occur during matches and of ways to avoid, or at least reduce, this number and severity. Minor and moderate injuries are more frequent than severe injuries, but all must be regarded seriously. Concussions, although relatively rare, can have serious consequences, and cervical spine injuries can be catastrophic. Player fitness and conditioning and a pregame warm-up are all essential for preventing injuries. Equally important are coaching, adherence to the rules of the game, and avoidance of dangerous play. If these measures are practiced consistently, rugby will be safer.

  19. Chemical reactivity of hydrogen, nitrogen, and oxygen atoms at temperatures below 100 k

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcgee, H. A., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    The synthesis of unusual compounds by techniques employing cryogenic cooling to retard their very extreme reactivity was investigated. Examples of such species that were studied are diimide (N2H2), cyclobutadiene (C4H4), cyclopropanone (C3H4O), oxirene (C2H2O), and many others. Special purpose cryogenically cooled inlet arrangements were designed such that the analyses incurred no warm-up of the cold, and frequently explosively unstable, compounds. Controlled energy electron impact techniques were used to measure critical potentials and to develop the molecular energetics and thermodynamics of these molecules and to gain some insight into their kinetic characteristics as well. Three and four carbon strained ring molecules were studied. Several reactions of oxygen and hydrogen atoms with simple molecules of H, N, C, and O in hard quench configurations were studied. And the quench stabilization of BH3 was explored as a model system in cryochemistry.

  20. High-intensity interval running is perceived to be more enjoyable than moderate-intensity continuous exercise: implications for exercise adherence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartlett, Jonathan D; Close, Graeme L; MacLaren, Don P M; Gregson, Warren; Drust, Barry; Morton, James P

    2011-03-01

    The aim of this study was to objectively quantify ratings of perceived enjoyment using the Physical Activity Enjoyment Scale following high-intensity interval running versus moderate-intensity continuous running. Eight recreationally active men performed two running protocols consisting of high-intensity interval running (6 × 3 min at 90% VO(2max) interspersed with 6 × 3 min active recovery at 50% VO(2max) with a 7-min warm-up and cool down at 70% VO(2max)) or 50 min moderate-intensity continuous running at 70% VO(2max). Ratings of perceived enjoyment after exercise were higher (P running compared with continuous running (88 ± 6 vs. 61 ± 12) despite higher (P running may be relevant for improving exercise adherence, since running is a low-cost exercise intervention requiring no exercise equipment and similar relative exercise intensities have previously induced health benefits in patient populations.

  1. Raising of Operating a Motor Vehicle Effects on Environment in Winter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ertman, S. A.; Ertman, J. A.; Zakharov, D. A.

    2016-08-01

    Severe low-temperature conditions, in which considerable part of Russian Motor Park is operated, affect vehicles negatively. Cold weather causes higher fuel consumption and C02 emissions always. It is because of temperature profile changing of automobile motors, other systems and materials. For enhancement of car operation efficiency in severe winter environment the dependency of engine warm-up and cooling time on ambient air temperature and wind speed described by multifactorial mathematical models is established. -On the basis of experimental research it was proved that the coolant temperature constitutes the engine representative temperature and may be used as representative temperature of engine at large. The model of generation of integrated index for vehicle adaptability to winter operating conditions by temperature profile of engines was developed. the method for evaluation of vehicle adaptability to winter operating conditions by temperature profile of engines allows to decrease higher fuel consumption in cold climate.

  2. Software development kit for a compact cryo-refrigerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardiner, J.; Hamilton, J.; Lawton, J.; Knight, K.; Wilson, A.; Spagna, S.

    2017-12-01

    This paper introduces a Software Development Kit (SDK) that enables the creation of custom software applications that automate the control of a cryo-refrigerator (Quantum Design model GA-1) in third party instruments. A remote interface allows real time tracking and logging of critical system diagnostics such as pressures, temperatures, valve states and run modes. The helium compressor scroll capsule speed and Gifford-McMahon (G-M) cold head speed can be manually adjusted over a serial communication line via a CAN interface. This configuration optimizes cooling power, while reducing wear on moving components thus extending service life. Additionally, a proportional speed control mode allows for automated throttling of speeds based on temperature or pressure feedback from a 3rd party device. Warm up and cool down modes allow 1st and 2nd stage temperatures to be adjusted without the use of external heaters.

  3. Life cycle assessment as development and decision support tool for wastewater resource recovery technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fang, Linda L.; Valverde Perez, Borja; Damgaard, Anders

    2016-01-01

    resource recovery. The freshwater and nutrient content of wastewater are recognized as potential valuable resources that can be recovered for beneficial reuse. Both recovery and reuse are intended to address existing environmental concerns, for example, water scarcity and use of non-renewable phosphorus...... and water recovery system in its potential operating environment, we assess the potential environmental impacts of such a system using the EASETECH model. In the simulation, recovered water and nutrients are used in scenarios of agricultural irrigation-fertilization and aquifer recharge. In these scenarios......, TRENS reduces global warming up to 15% and marine eutrophication impacts up to 9% compared to conventional treatment. This is due to the recovery and reuse of nutrient resources, primarily nitrogen. The key environmental concerns obtained through the LCA are linked to increased human toxicity impacts...

  4. Learning Mathematics with Creative Drama

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baki Şahin

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available In this study, a mathematics activity that used creative drama method to teach the fifth grade standard “Expresses a position with respect to another point using direction and unit” under geometry and measurement was implemented. Twenty students attending the fifth grade of a public school participated in the study. The lesson plan involved four activities in warm-up, role-play, and evaluation stages. Activities include processes that will ensure active participation of students. The activity lasted two lesson hours. Two prospective mathematics teachers and a mathematics teacher were available in the class during the activity to observe student participation and reactions. Additionally, 10 students were interviewed to learn their views about the lesson. Comments of the observers and the responses of the students to the interview questions indicate that the lesson was successful.

  5. Energy breathing of nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dynich, Raman A., E-mail: dynich@solo.by [Institute of Social Educational Technologies (Belarus)

    2015-06-15

    The paper considers the energy exchange process of the electromagnetic wave with a spherical metal nanoparticle. Based on the account of the temporal dependencies of electric and magnetic fields, the author presents an analytical dependence of the energy flow passing through the spherical surface. It is shown that the electromagnetic energy, localized in metal nanoparticles, is not a stationary value and periodically varies with time. A consequence of the energy nonstationarity is a nonradiating exit of the electromagnetic energy out of the nanoparticle. During the time equal to the period of wave oscillations, the electromagnetic energy is penetrating twice into the particle and quits it twice. The particle warms up because of the difference in the incoming and outgoing energies. Such “energy breathing” is presented for spherical Ag and Au nanoparticles with radii of 10 and 33 nm, respectively. Calculations were conducted for these nanoparticles embedded into the cell cytoplasm near the frequencies of their surface plasmon resonances.

  6. Automated Sample Exchange Robots for the Structural Biology Beam Lines at the Photon Factory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hiraki, Masahiko; Watanabe, Shokei; Yamada, Yusuke; Matsugaki, Naohiro; Igarashi, Noriyuki; Gaponov, Yurii; Wakatsuki, Soichi

    2007-01-01

    We are now developing automated sample exchange robots for high-throughput protein crystallographic experiments for onsite use at synchrotron beam lines. It is part of the fully automated robotics systems being developed at the Photon Factory, for the purposes of protein crystallization, monitoring crystal growth, harvesting and freezing crystals, mounting the crystals inside a hutch and for data collection. We have already installed the sample exchange robots based on the SSRL automated mounting system at our insertion device beam lines BL-5A and AR-NW12A at the Photon Factory. In order to reduce the time required for sample exchange further, a prototype of a double-tonged system was developed. As a result of preliminary experiments with double-tonged robots, the sample exchange time was successfully reduced from 70 seconds to 10 seconds with the exception of the time required for pre-cooling and warming up the tongs

  7. Relationship of maternal parenting behaviors to preschool children's temperament.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonds, M P; Simonds, J F

    1981-01-01

    Mothers of 182 preschool nursery school children rated their own parenting responses on a "Parent's Report" questionnaire. At the same time the mothers responded to the "Behavior Style Questionnaire" (BSQ) from which scores were determined for nine categories of temperament. On the basis of category scores the children were grouped into one of five temperament clusters i.e. easy, difficult, slow to warm up, high intermediate, low intermediate. The children's membership in BSQ clusters was independent of sex, age, birth order, and mothers employment status but there was a significantly higher ratio of "easy" children from higher socioeconomic classes I and II. Mothers of children grouped in either the "difficult" or "slow to warmup"clusters were more likely to use "guilt inducing" and "temper-detachment" parenting styles than mothers of children grouped in the "easy" cluster.

  8. Global Warming Blame the Sun

    CERN Document Server

    Calder, N

    1997-01-01

    Concern about climate change reaches a political peak at a UN conference in Kyoto, 1-10 December, but behind the scenes the science is in turmoil. A challenge to the hypothesis that greenhouse gases are responsible for global warming comes from the discovery that cosmic rays from the Galaxy are involved in making clouds (Svensmark and Friis-Christensen, 1997). During the 20th Century the wind from the Sun has grown stronger and the count of cosmic rays has diminished. With fewer clouds, the EarthÕs surface has warmed up. This surprising mechanism explains the link between the Sun and climate change that astronomers and geophysicists have suspected for 200 years.

  9. Solar X-ray bursts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urnov, A.M.

    1980-01-01

    In the popular form the consideration is given to the modern state tasks and results of X-ray spectrometry of solar bursts. The operation of X-ray spectroheliograph is described. Results of spectral and polarization measurings of X-ray radiation of one powerful solar burst are presented. The conclusion has been drawn that in the process of burst development three characteristic stages may be distingwished: 1) the initial phase; just in this period processes which lead to observed consequences-electromagnetic and corpuscular radiation are born; 2) the impulse phase, or the phase of maximum, is characterised by sharp increase of radiation flux. During this phase the main energy content emanates and some volumes of plasma warm up to high temperatures; 3) the phase of burst damping, during which plasma cools and reverts to the initial condition

  10. Automated Cryocooler Monitor and Control System Software

    Science.gov (United States)

    Britchcliffe, Michael J.; Conroy, Bruce L.; Anderson, Paul E.; Wilson, Ahmad

    2011-01-01

    This software is used in an automated cryogenic control system developed to monitor and control the operation of small-scale cryocoolers. The system was designed to automate the cryogenically cooled low-noise amplifier system described in "Automated Cryocooler Monitor and Control System" (NPO-47246), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 35, No. 5 (May 2011), page 7a. The software contains algorithms necessary to convert non-linear output voltages from the cryogenic diode-type thermometers and vacuum pressure and helium pressure sensors, to temperature and pressure units. The control function algorithms use the monitor data to control the cooler power, vacuum solenoid, vacuum pump, and electrical warm-up heaters. The control algorithms are based on a rule-based system that activates the required device based on the operating mode. The external interface is Web-based. It acts as a Web server, providing pages for monitor, control, and configuration. No client software from the external user is required.

  11. The reduction of CO{sub 2} emissions from a turbocharged DI gasoline engine through optimised cooling system control; CO{sub 2}-Minderung bei einem Turbo-DI-Ottomotor durch optimiertes Thermomanagement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edwards, S.; Mueller, R.; Feldhaus, G. [Behr GmbH, Stuttgart (Germany); Finkeldei, T. [BHTC GmbH, Lippstadt (Germany); Neubauer, M. [AVL List GmbH, Graz (Austria)

    2008-01-15

    In a joint project Behr, Behr-Hella Thermocontrol (BHTC) and AVL List have investigated various thermomanagement technologies in order to reduce the CO{sub 2} emissions of a turbocharged direct injection gasoline engine. Through the use of cooled EGR the fuel consumption at part load was reduced by up to 5%; at full load the consumption was reduced by up to 18% since no enrichment was needed. Under real driving conditions a saving of 6% was achieved. A further reduction of about 3% in the NEDC was possible via coolant stand still during the engine warm-up. Additionally, it was shown that a change in the engine coolant temperature of 10 K, made possible by the application of a map controlled thermostat, has the potential for savings of up to 1.4%. (orig.)

  12. Intelligent thermal management of engine cooling systems; Intelligentes Thermomanagement bei der Motorkuehlung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ambros, P. [Behr GmbH und Co., Stuttgart (Germany). Produktcenter Kuehlung

    1997-09-01

    Under the general term `thermal management`, the firm of Behr is developing new types of actuators, system layouts and control methods which permit flows of coolant and heat to be controlled and directed to where they are needed. Depending on the priority assigned to the control system functions, it is possible through operation-related regulating processes to e.g. reduce fuel consumption and pollutant emissions, shorten the engine warm-up time or reduce thermal and mechanical stress on components. The achievable potential benefits have been determined and verified by simulated calculations and measurements on an actual vehicle. (orig.) [Deutsch] Behr entwickelt unter der Bezeichnung `Thermomanagement` neuartige Aktuatoren, Systemstrukturen und Regelungsstrategien, die eine bedarfsgerechte Regelung und Zuteilung der Stoff- und Waermestroeme fuer die Motorkuehlung erlauben. Je nach Prioritaet des Regelungszieles koennen durch betriebsabhaengige Regelungseingriffe der Kraftstoffverbrauch und die Schadstoffemissionen reduziert, die Kaltstartphase verkuerzt oder die thermischen und mechanischen Beanspruchungen von Komponenten verringert werden. (orig.)

  13. Tensile and shear fracture behavior of fiber reinforced plastics at 77K irradiated by various radiation sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Humer, K.; Weber, H.W. [Atominstitut der Oesterreichischen Hochschulen, Vienna (Austria); Tschegg, E.K. [Technische Univ., Vienna (Austria). Inst. fuer Angewandte und Technische Physik; Egusa, Shigenori [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Takasaki, Gunma (Japan). Takasaki Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment; Birtcher, R.C. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Gerstenberg, H. [Technische Univ. Muenchen, Garching (Germany). Fakultaet fuer Physik

    1993-08-01

    Influence of radiation damage (gamma, electron, neutron) on mechanical properties of fiber reinforced plastics (FRPs) has been investigated. Different types of FRPs (two or three dimensional E-, S- or T-glass fiber reinforcement, epoxy or bismaleimide resin) have been irradiated at room temperature with 2 MeV electrons and {sup 6O}Co {gamma}-rays up to 1.8 {times} 1 0{sup 8} Gy as well as with different reactor spectra up to a fast neutron fluence of 5 {times} lO{sup 22} m{sup {minus}2} (E > 0.1 MeV). Tensile and intralaminar shear tests were carried out on the irradiated samples at 77 K. Some samples were irradiated at 5 K and tested at 77 K with and without an annealing cycle to room temperature. Results on the influence of these radiation conditions and of warm-up cycles on the mechanical properties of FRPs are compared and discussed.

  14. Heat exchanges in a quenched ferromagnet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corberi, Federico; Zannetti, Marco [Dipartimento di Fisica ' E.R. Caianiello' , and CNISM, Unita di Salerno, Universita di Salerno, via Ponte don Melillo, I-84084 Fisciano, SA (Italy); Gonnella, Giuseppe; Piscitelli, Antonio [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Bari and INFN, Sezione di Bari, via Amendola 173, I-70126 Bari (Italy)

    2013-02-01

    The off-equilibrium probability distribution of the heat exchanged by a ferromagnet in a time interval after a quench below the critical point is calculated analytically in the large-N limit. The distribution is characterized by a singular threshold Q{sub C} < 0, below which a macroscopic fraction of heat is released by the k = 0 Fourier component of the order parameter. The mathematical structure producing this phenomenon is the same responsible for the order parameter condensation in the equilibrium low temperature phase. The heat exchanged by the individual Fourier modes follows a non-trivial pattern, with the unstable modes at small wave vectors warming up the modes around a characteristic finite wave vector k{sub M}. Two internal temperatures, associated with the k = 0 and k = k{sub M} modes, rule the heat currents through a fluctuation relation similar to the one for stationary systems in contact with two thermal reservoirs. (fast track communication)

  15. Effect of temperament on cortisol response to a single exercise bout in Thoroughbred racehorses - short communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohák, Zsófia; Szenci, Ottó; Harnos, Andrea; Kutasi, Orsolya; Kovács, Levente

    2017-12-01

    Temperament has not been taken into account in previous studies evaluating the stress response to exercise in horses. The aim of the present study was to investigate the cortisol response in Thoroughbred racehorses to a single exercise bout, and to analyse the results based on the basic personality of the horse examined. Twenty healthy Thoroughbred horses were selected for the study based on a 25-item rating questionnaire survey used for characterising equine temperament. Eight temperamental and twelve calm horses took part in the experiment. The horses trotted as a warm-up activity, and then galloped on a rounded sand track. Blood sampling was conducted four times for each horse. Horses with a more excitable temperament showed a higher cortisol response to the test (P = 0.036). In conclusion, cortisol levels in response to a mild intensive exercise can be affected by temperament in horses. Serum cortisol may be a relevant marker to quantify individual temperamental differences in racehorses.

  16. The effects of video games on laparoscopic simulator skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalink, Maarten B; Goris, Jetse; Heineman, Erik; Pierie, Jean-Pierre E N; ten Cate Hoedemaker, Henk O

    2014-07-01

    Recently, there has been a growth in studies supporting the hypothesis that video games have positive effects on basic laparoscopic skills. This review discusses all studies directly related to these effects. A search in the PubMed and EMBASE databases was performed using synonymous terms for video games and laparoscopy. All available articles concerning video games and their effects on skills on any laparoscopic simulator (box trainer, virtual reality, and animal models) were selected. Video game experience has been related to higher baseline laparoscopic skills in different studies. There is currently, however, no standardized method to assess video game experience, making it difficult to compare these studies. Several controlled experiments have, nevertheless, shown that video games cannot only be used to improve laparoscopic basic skills in surgical novices, but are also used as a temporary warming-up before laparoscopic surgery. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Field Equations for Lovelock Gravity: An Alternative Route

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sumanta Chakraborty

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available We present an alternative derivation of the gravitational field equations for Lovelock gravity starting from Newton’s law, which is closer in spirit to the thermodynamic description of gravity. As a warm up exercise, we have explicitly demonstrated that, projecting the Riemann curvature tensor appropriately and taking a cue from Poisson’s equation, Einstein’s equations immediately follow. The above derivation naturally generalizes to Lovelock gravity theories where an appropriate curvature tensor satisfying the symmetries as well as the Bianchi derivative properties of the Riemann tensor has to be used. Interestingly, in the above derivation, the thermodynamic route to gravitational field equations, suited for null hypersurfaces, emerges quiet naturally.

  18. Technical and economic aspects of oxygen separation for oxy-fuel purposes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chorowski Maciej

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Oxy combustion is the most promising technology for carbon dioxide, originated from thermal power plants, capture and storage. The oxygen in sufficient quantities can be separated from air in cryogenic installations. Even the state-of-art air separation units are characterized by high energy demands decreasing net efficiency of thermal power plant by at least 7%. This efficiency decrease can be mitigated by the use of waste nitrogen, e.g., as the medium for lignite drying. It is also possible to store energy in liquefied gases and recover it by liquid pressurization, warm-up to ambient temperature and expansion. Exergetic efficiency of the proposed energy accumulator may reach 85%.

  19. THE DYEING PROCESS OF KNITTED FABRICS AT DIFFERENT TEMPERATURES USING ULTRASOUND

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MITIC Jelena

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The dyeing of knitted fabrics made from 100 % cellulose using on-line procedure vinyl sulfonic reactive dye, with or without ultrasound energy, is carried out in this paper. The impact of temperature has been observed. The dye exhaustion is monitored using the method of absorption spectrophotometry, and the quality control of the coloration is monitored using color measurements. The acting of ultrasound on coloration consistency, as well as on some mechanical characteristics has also been examined. All examples of the ultrasound dyeing process show greater dye exhaustion in comparison to the conventional procedure. In addition, all the samples, which have been dyed with the ultrasound energy at 40°C, are significantly darker and have deeper color in comparison with the referent sample. The temperature has a great influence on kinetic energy of the dye molecules, and therefore on the diffusion processes in the dyeing system. The exhaustion chart indicates that when the temperature is lower the exhaustion degree drops. However, all the samples dyed with the ultrasound energy have bigger exhaustion. Besides that, ultrasound energy contributes to warming up the processing environment, so the additional warm up with the electricity is unnecessary, unlike the conventional way of dyeing. Since the reactive dyes chemically connect themselves with the cellulose substrate and in that way form covalent connection, the dyed fabrics have good washing consistency. Analysis results indicate that the consistencies are identical regardless the applied dyeing procedure. In other words, the dyeing method using the ultrasound energy produces the dyed fabric of the same quality. After analyzing the results of breaking force and elongation at break of knitted fabrics, it is noticeable that there is no degradation of previously mentioned knitted fabrics features (horizontally and vertically during the ultrasound wave’s activity.

  20. Chronic and acute inspiratory muscle loading augment the effect of a 6-week interval program on tolerance of high-intensity intermittent bouts of running.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Tom K; Fu, Frank H; Eston, Roger; Chung, Pak-Kwong; Quach, Binh; Lu, Kui

    2010-11-01

    This study examined the hypothesis that chronic (training) and acute (warm-up) loaded ventilatory activities applied to the inspiratory muscles (IM) in an integrated manner would augment the training volume of an interval running program. This in turn would result in additional improvement in the maximum performance of the Yo-Yo intermittent recovery test in comparison with interval training alone. Eighteen male nonprofessional athletes were allocated to either an inspiratory muscle loading (IML) group or control group. Both groups participated in a 6-week interval running program consisting of 3-4 workouts (1-3 sets of various repetitions of selected distance [100-2,400 m] per workout) per week. For the IML group, 4-week IM training (30 inspiratory efforts at 50% maximal static inspiratory pressure [P0] per set, 2 sets·d-1, 6 d·wk-1) was applied before the interval program. Specific IM warm-up (2 sets of 30 inspiratory efforts at 40% P0) was performed before each workout of the program. For the control group, neither IML was applied. In comparison with the control group, the interval training volume as indicated by the repeatability of running bouts at high intensity was approximately 27% greater in the IML group. Greater increase in the maximum performance of the Yo-Yo test (control: 16.9 ± 5.5%; IML: 30.7 ± 4.7% baseline value) was also observed after training. The enhanced exercise performance was partly attributable to the greater reductions in the sensation of breathlessness and whole-body metabolic stress during the Yo-Yo test. These findings show that the combination of chronic and acute IML into a high-intensity interval running program is a beneficial training strategy for enhancing the tolerance to high-intensity intermittent bouts of running.

  1. Current Techniques of Teaching and Learning in Bariatric Surgical Procedures: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaijser, Mirjam; van Ramshorst, Gabrielle; van Wagensveld, Bart; Pierie, Jean-Pierre

    The gastric sleeve resection and gastric bypass are the 2 most commonly performed bariatric procedures. This article provides an overview of current teaching and learning methods of those techniques in resident and fellow training. A database search was performed on Pubmed, Embase, and the Education Resources Information Center (ERIC) to identify the methods used to provide training in bariatric surgery worldwide. After exclusion based on titles and abstracts, full texts of the selected articles were assessed. Included articles were reviewed using the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) system. In total, 2442 titles were identified and 14 full text articles met inclusion criteria. Four publications described an ex vivo training course, and 6 focused on at least 1 step of the gastric bypass procedure. Two randomized controlled trials (RCT) provided high-quality evidence on training aspects. Surgical coaching caused significant improvement of Bariatric Objective Structured Assessment of Technical Skills (BOSATS) scores (3.60 vs. 3.90, p = 0.017) and reduction of technical errors (18 vs. 10, p = 0.003). A preoperative warm-up increased global rating scales (GRS) scores on depth perception (p = 0.02), bimanual dexterity (p = 0.01), and efficiency of movements (p = 0.03). Stepwise education, surgical coaching, warming up, Internet-based knowledge modules, and ex vivo training courses are effective in relation to bariatric surgical training of residents and fellows, possibly shortening their learning curves. Copyright © 2018 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Musculoskeletal injuries in break-dancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Chul Hyun; Song, Kwang Soon; Min, Byung Woo; Lee, Sung Moon; Chang, Hyuk Won; Eum, Dae Seup

    2009-11-01

    Since no epidemiologic studies have been reported about musculoskeletal injuries in break-dancers, there are no data on the rates and patterns of musculoskeletal injuries in this population that clinicians can use to find ways to decrease injury rate. We believe that the incidence of injuries in break-dancers is higher than assumed and that injury rates and patterns differ between professional and amateur dancers. Descriptive epidemiologic study. Of a total of 42 study subjects, 23 were professional dancers and 19 were amateur dancers. Injury frequency, site and type, along with the presence of supervised training, the use of protective devices and warm-up exercises done were recorded. Of the 42 study subjects, excluding two amateur dancers, 40 (95.2%) had had musculoskeletal injuries at more than one site. The mean number of sites per dancer was 4.60. The frequency of injury depended on the site and was as follows: wrist (69.0%), finger (61.9%), knee (61.9%), shoulder (52.4%), lumbar spine (50.0%), elbow (42.9%), cervical spine (38.1%), ankle (38.1%), foot (28.6%) and hip (16.7%). Sprain, strain and tendinitis were the most common injuries, accounting for the most cases. Of the 42 dancers, 13 (31%) had had fractures or dislocations. Eight (19.1%) learned break-dancing under supervised instruction, 17 (40.5%) used protective devices and 28 (66.7%) performed warm-up exercises before dancing. There were significant differences in age, dance career length, amount of dance training, mean number of injury sites and the presence of supervised training between professionals and amateurs (Pnature of the activities that result in both unusual and common injuries in break-dancers and educate them about safety. Careful screening, instruction and supervised training of break-dancers will help to prevent injuries.

  3. Experimental study on heat storage system using phase-change material in a diesel engine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Sangki; Woo, Seungchul; Shon, Jungwook; Lee, Kihyung

    2017-01-01

    Engines usually use only about 25% of the total fuel energy for power, and the rest is discarded to the cooling water and exhaust gas. Therefore, a technique for utilizing external waste heat is required to improve fuel efficiency in terms of total energy consumption. In this study, a heat storage system was built using a phase-change material in order to recover about 30% of the thermal energy wasted through engine cooling. The components of the heat storage system were divided into phase-change material, a heat exchanger, and a heat-insulating container. For each component, a phase-change material that is suitable for use in vehicles was selected based on the safety, thermal properties, and durability. As a result, a stearic acid of a fatty acid series with natural extracts was determined to be appropriate. In order to measure the reduction in engine fuel consumption, a thermal storage system designed for the actual engine was applied to realize a quick warm-up by releasing stored heat energy directly on the coolant during a cold start. This technique added about 95 calories of heat storage device warm-up time compared to the non-added state, which was reduced by about 18.1% to about 27.1%. - Highlights: • The diesel engine used phase-change material with heat storage system. • The thermal storage system designed for the actual engine. • A stearic acid of a fatty acid series was determined to be appropriate. • Applied heat storage system was reduced by about 18.1%–27.1%.

  4. Myths and errors in the x-ray practice in Bulgaria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kostova-Lefterova, D.; Spasova, P.

    2015-01-01

    Full text: Insufficient awareness and knowledge on radiation risk and radiation protection of the medical specialists leads to serious errors. Some interesting facts, as well as widely spread myths and common mistakes in the radiology practice in Bulgaria shall be reviewed. Part of them is related to the insufficient knowledge of the characteristics and the resources of the X-ray equipment. Practice example is the usage of an improperly set automatic exposure control, without consideration of the exposure parameters it selected. The result is an exposure with too low tube current and long exposure time, which increases the dynamic unsharpness of the image. The lack of communication and feedback between the servicing companies and the medical staff after a technical support interacts with the diagnostic and the therapeutic processes. This could lead to poor image quality and wrong interpretation. A dangerous example is the statement from the service engineers that during emergency warm-up of the X-ray tube of a CT, the patient could be within the CT gantry. Their claim is that the warm-up is implemented with the collimator closed - a statement, rejected upon additional measurements and leading to unnecessary exposure of patient and/or the personnel, with a risk for appearance of a deterministic effect. It is important to have good communication and team work between each of the specialists, engaged into the application of the ionising radiation for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes - radiographers, technical support engineers, radiologists, interventional cardiologists, medical physicists etc. Insufficient awareness and knowledge of the used x-ray equipment and the principles of radiation protection, as well as the bad communication between the different specialists, could lead to serious incidents and accidents

  5. Comprehensive particle characterization of modern gasoline and diesel passenger cars at low ambient temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathis, Urs; Mohr, Martin; Forss, Anna-Maria

    Particle measurements were performed in the exhaust of five light-duty vehicles (Euro-3) at +23, -7, and -20 °C ambient temperatures. The characterization included measurements of particle number, active surface area, number size distribution, and mass size distribution. We investigated two port-injection spark-ignition (PISI) vehicles, a direct-injection spark-ignition (DISI) vehicle, a compressed ignition (CI) vehicle with diesel particle filter (DPF), and a CI vehicle without DPF. To minimize sampling effects, particles were directly sampled from the tailpipe with a novel porous tube diluter at controlled sampling parameters. The diluted exhaust was split into two branches to measure either all or only non-volatile particles. Effect of ambient temperature was investigated on particle emission for cold and warmed-up engine. For the gasoline vehicles and the CI vehicle with DPF, the main portion of particle emission was found in the first minutes of the driving cycle at cold engine start. The particle emission of the CI vehicle without DPF was hardly affected by cold engine start. For the PISI vehicles, particle number emissions were superproportionally increased in the diameter size range from 0.1 to 0.3 μm during cold start at low ambient temperature. Based on the particle mass size distribution, the DPF removed smaller particles ( dpefficiently than larger particles ( dp>0.5μm). No significant effect of ambient temperature was observed when the engine was warmed up. Peak emission of volatile nanoparticles only took place at specific conditions and was poorly repeatable. Nucleation of particles was predominately observed during or after strong acceleration at high speed and during regeneration of the DPF.

  6. Salivary cortisol, alpha-amylase and immunoglobulin a responses to a morning session of basketball or volleyball training in boys aged 14-18 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruzda-Zwiech, A; Konieczka, M; Hilt, A; Daszkowska, M; Grzegorczyk, J; Szczepańska, J

    2017-01-01

    This study investigates whether a single session of routine morning basketball or volleyball training affects saliva levels of cortisol, alpha-amylase (sAA) and secretory immunoglobulin A (sIgA) in boys aged 14–18 years. Twenty-nine boys who participate in basketball or volleyball training, recruited from the Marcin Gortat’s Athletic Championship School in Lodz, were enrolled in the study. The 90-minute routine exercise program included 15 minutes of warm-up followed by basketball or volleyball practice. Unstimulated saliva samples were collected prior to and immediately after the exercise, and were analysed using ELISA. One training session resulted in a significant increase of sAA concentration in all participants, as well as in the volleyball and basketball subgroups (p=0.00022; p=0.0029; p=0.0011; respectively). Post-exercise cortisol levels were significantly lower than pre-exercise levels (p=0.00002) throughout the group, as well as in the volleyball and basketball subgroups (p=0.0048; p=0.0019; p=0.0048; respectively). The exercise protocol did not significantly affect sIgA level, either in the whole examined group or the volleyball subgroup, however a weak significant increase of sIgA was observed in the basketball subgroup (p=0.046). The routine morning training session comprising a warm-up followed by basketball or volleyball practice seems to activate the sympatho-adrenal-medullary system, with a subsequent increase of alpha-amylase, but does not affect oral immunity in 14-18-year-old boys.

  7. Formation and High-order Carboxylic Acids (RCOOH) in Interstellar Analogous Ices of Carbon Dioxide (CO2) and Methane(CH4)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Cheng; Turner, Andrew M.; Abplanalp, Matthew J.; Kaiser, Ralf I.

    2018-01-01

    This laboratory study simulated the abiotic formation of carboxylic acids (RCOOH) in interstellar analogous ices of carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4) at 10 K upon exposure to energetic electrons. The chemical processing of the ices and the subsequent warm-up phase were monitored online and in situ, exploiting Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrometry and quadrupole mass spectrometry. Characteristic absorptions of functional groups of carboxylic acids (RCOOH) were observed in the infrared spectra of the irradiated ice. Two proposed reaction mechanisms replicated the kinetic profiles of the carboxylic acids along with the decay profile of the precursors during the irradiation via hydrocarbon formation, followed by carboxylation and/or through acetic acid along with mass growth processes of the alkyl chain. Mass spectra recorded during the warm-up phase demonstrated that these acids are distributed from acetic acid (CH3COOH) up to decanoic acid (C9H19COOH). High-dose irradiation studies (91 ± 14 eV) converted low-molecular-weight acids such as acetic acid (CH3COOH) and propionic acid (C2H5COOH) to higher-molecular-weight carboxylic acids, compared to low-dose irradiation studies (18 ± 3 eV). The traces of the {{{H}}}2{{C}}= {{C}}({OH}{)}2+ (m/z = 60) fragment—a link to linear carboxylic acids—implied that higher-order acids (C n H2n+1COOH, n ≥ 5) are likely branched, which correlates with the recent analysis of the structures of the monocarboxylic acids in the Murchison meteorite.

  8. Cardiorespiratory responses of a dance session designed for older women: A cross sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues-Krause, Josianne; Farinha, Juliano Boufleur; Ramis, Thiago Rozales; Boeno, Francesco Pinto; Dos Santos, Gabriela Cristina; Krause, Mauricio; Reischak-Oliveira, Alvaro

    2018-06-04

    Dancing has been increasingly used as a type of exercise intervention to improve cardiovascular fitness of older people. However, it is unclear which may be the exercise intensity of the dance sessions. To describe cardiorespiratory responses of a dance session for older women, and to identify intensity zones in relation to peak oxygen consumption (VO 2 peak), first and second ventilatory thresholds (VT1 and VT2). Ten women (66 ± 5 yrs., BMI 27 ± 4) were examined on three occasions: Familiarization, maximum effort and dance sessions. Incremental treadmill test: 5 km/h, 2% slope each min, until maximum effort. Dance class (60 min): warm-up (20 min), across-the-floor (10 min), choreography (15 min), show (10 min) and cool-down (5 min). Ventilatory parameters were measured continuously (breath-by-breath). VO 2 (mL·kg -1 ·min -1 ): Maximum effort: VO 2 peak (23.3 ± 4.3), VT1 (17.2 ± 3.5) and VT2 (20.9 ± 3.4). Dancing: warm-up (12.8 ± 2.4, ~55%VO 2 peak), across-the-floor (14.2 ± 2.4 ~62%VO 2 peak), choreography (14.6 ± 3.2 ~63%VO 2 peak) and show (16.1 ± 3.3, ~69% VO 2 peak). Show was similar to VT1. Cardiorespiratory demands of a dance class for older women are at low aerobic intensity. Show was similar to VT1, indicating that a dance class may be modulated to improve aerobic fitness, at least at initial stages of training. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Effects of evidence-based prevention training on neuromuscular and biomechanical risk factors for ACL injury in adolescent female athletes: a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zebis, Mette K; Andersen, Lars L; Brandt, Mikkel; Myklebust, Grethe; Bencke, Jesper; Lauridsen, Hanne Bloch; Bandholm, Thomas; Thorborg, Kristian; Hölmich, Per; Aagaard, Per

    2016-05-01

    Adolescent female football and handball players are among the athletes with the highest risk of sustaining anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries. This study evaluated the effects of evidence-based lower extremity injury prevention training on neuromuscular and biomechanical risk factors for non-contact ACL injury. 40 adolescent female football and handball players (15-16 years) were randomly allocated to a control group (CON, n=20) or neuromuscular training group (NMT, n=20). The NMT group performed an injury prevention programme as a warm-up before their usual training 3 times weekly for 12 weeks. The CON group completed their regular warm-up exercise programme before training. Players were tested while performing a side cutting movement at baseline and 12-week follow-up, using surface electromyography (EMG) and three-dimensional movement analysis. We calculated: (1) EMG amplitude from vastus lateralis (VL), semitendinosus (ST) and biceps femoris 10 ms prior to initial contact (IC) normalised to peak EMG amplitude recorded during maximal voluntary isometric contraction and (2) VL-ST EMG preactivity difference during the 10 ms prior to foot contact (primary outcome). We measured maximal knee joint valgus moment and knee valgus angle at IC. There was a difference between groups at follow-up in VL-ST preactivity (43% between-group difference; 95% CI 32% to 55%). No between-group differences were observed for kinematic and kinetic variables. A 12-week injury prevention programme in addition to training and match play in adolescent females altered the pattern of agonist-antagonist muscle preactivity during side cutting. This may represent a more ACL-protective motor strategy. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  10. Voice Quality After a Semi-Occluded Vocal Tract Exercise With a Ventilation Mask in Contemporary Commercial Singers: Acoustic Analysis and Self-Assessments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fantini, Marco; Succo, Giovanni; Crosetti, Erika; Borragán Torre, Alfonso; Demo, Roberto; Fussi, Franco

    2017-05-01

    The current study aimed at investigating the immediate effects of a semi-occluded vocal tract exercise with a ventilation mask in a group of contemporary commercial singers. A randomized controlled study was carried out. Thirty professional or semi-professional singers with no voice complaints were randomly divided into two groups on recruitment: an experimental group and a control group. The same warm-up exercise was performed by the experimental group with an occluded ventilation mask placed over the nose and the mouth and by the control group without the ventilation mask. Voice was recorded before and after the exercise. Acoustic and self-assessment analysis were accomplished. The acoustic parameters of the voice samples recorded before and after training were compared, as well as the parameters' variations between the experimental and the control group. Self-assessment results of the experimental and the control group were compared too. Significant changes after the warm-up exercise included jitter, shimmer, and singing power ratio (SPR) in the experimental group. No significant changes were recorded in the control group. Significant differences between the experimental and the control group were found for ΔShimmer and ΔSPR. Self-assessment analysis confirmed a significantly higher phonatory comfort and voice quality perception for the experimental group. The results of the present study support the immediate advantageous effects on singing voice of a semi-occluded vocal tract exercise with a ventilation mask in terms of acoustic quality, phonatory comfort, and voice quality perception in contemporary commercial singers. Long-term effects still remain to be studied. Copyright © 2017 The Voice Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Heart rate variability in the standing position reflects training adaptation in professional soccer players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravé, Guillaume; Fortrat, Jacques-Olivier

    2016-08-01

    To show that heart rate variability (HRV) in the standing position better reflects the way in which athletes adapt to training in so-called intermittent sports than the indicator of resting parasympathetic tone usually employed in endurance sports. Twenty professional soccer players (intermittent sport) took part in a 5-week training session divided into three successive periods: "Warm-up", "Intensive training" and "Tapering". At the beginning and end of each of the three periods, a stand test was carried out and the heart rate was recorded, beat by beat (Polar Team 2). We analysed HRV to determine the indicator mostly used to demonstrate training adaptation in endurance sports (lnRMSSD supine, natural logarithm of root mean square of the successive differences) as well as indicators obtained by means of spectral analysis in both supine and standing position. A decrease in heart rate was observed in the supine position at rest during training (-5.2 ± 1.3 bpm) while lnRMSSD and spectral analysis indicators remained unchanged. The "Warm-up" caused an increase in spectral analysis total power in standing position which was further highlighted by "Tapering" (3.39 ± 0.09, 3.61 ± 0.08 and 3.65 ± 0.09 log ms(2), respectively). However, the autonomic changes are probably more complex than a change in autonomic activity or balance since spectral analysis autonomic indicators remained unchanged. HRV in the standing position could monitor training adaptation in intermittent sports contrary to the indicator usually employed in endurance sports. However, the significance of the HRV change in the standing position during training remains unclear.

  12. An examination of the stretching practices of Division I and Division III college football programs in the midwestern United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Judge, Lawrence W; Craig, Bruce; Baudendistal, Steve; Bodey, Kimberly J

    2009-07-01

    Research supports the use of preactivity warm-up and stretching, and the purpose of this study was to determine whether college football programs follow these guidelines. Questionnaires designed to gather demographic, professional, and educational information, as well as specific pre- and postactivity practices, were distributed via e-mail to midwestern collegiate programs from NCAA Division I and III conferences. Twenty-three male coaches (12 from Division IA schools and 11 from Division III schools) participated in the study. Division I schools employed certified strength coaches (CSCS; 100%), whereas Division III schools used mainly strength coordinators (73%), with only 25% CSCS. All programs used preactivity warm-up, with the majority employing 2-5 minutes of sport-specific jogging/running drills. Pre stretching (5-10 minutes) was performed in 19 programs (91%), with 2 (9%) performing no pre stretching. Thirteen respondents used a combination of static/proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation/ballistic and dynamic flexibility, 5 used only dynamic flexibility, and 1 used only static stretching. All 12 Division I coaches used stretching, whereas only 9 of the 11 Division III coaches did (p = 0.22). The results indicate that younger coaches did not use pre stretching (p = 0.30). The majority of the coaches indicated that they did use post stretching, with 11 of the 12 Division I coaches using stretching, whereas only 5 of the 11 Division III coaches used stretching postactivity (p = 0.027). Divisional results show that the majority of Division I coaches use static-style stretching (p = 0.049). The results of this study indicate that divisional status, age, and certification may influence how well research guidelines are followed. Further research is needed to delineate how these factors affect coaching decisions.

  13. Electrostimulation improves muscle perfusion but does not affect either muscle deoxygenation or pulmonary oxygen consumption kinetics during a heavy constant-load exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Layec, Gwenael; Millet, Grégoire P; Jougla, Aurélie; Micallef, Jean-Paul; Bendahan, David

    2008-02-01

    Electromyostimulation (EMS) is commonly used as part of training programs. However, the exact effects at the muscle level are largely unknown and it has been recently hypothesized that the beneficial effect of EMS could be mediated by an improved muscle perfusion. In the present study, we investigated rates of changes in pulmonary oxygen consumption (VO(2p)) and muscle deoxygenation during a standardized exercise performed after an EMS warm-up session. We aimed at determining whether EMS could modify pulmonary O(2) uptake and muscle deoxygenation as a result of improved oxygen delivery. Nine subjects performed a 6-min heavy constant load cycling exercise bout preceded either by an EMS session (EMS) or under control conditions (CONT). VO(2p) and heart rate (HR) were measured while deoxy-(HHb), oxy-(HbO(2)) and total haemoglobin/myoglobin (Hb(tot)) relative contents were measured using near infrared spectroscopy. EMS significantly increased (P < 0.05) the Hb(tot) resting level illustrating a residual hyperaemia. The EMS priming exercise did not affect either the HHb time constant (17.7 +/- 14.2 s vs. 13.1 +/- 2.3 s under control conditions) or the VO(2p) kinetics (time-constant = 18.2 +/- 5.2 s vs. 15.4 +/- 4.6 s under control conditions). Likewise, the other VO(2p) parameters were unchanged. Our results further indicated that EMS warm-up improved muscle perfusion through a residual hyperaemia. However, neither VO(2p) nor [HHb] kinetics were modified accordingly. These results suggest that improved O(2) delivery by residual hyperaemia induced by EMS does not accelerate the rate of aerobic metabolism during heavy exercise at least in trained subjects.

  14. Development and analysis of a variable position thermostat for smart cooling system of a light duty diesel vehicles and engine emissions assessment during NEDC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohamed, Eid S.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • A new concept of the variable position electromagnetic thermostat in MCS is proposed. • A series of experiments were conducted on a light duty diesel vehicle operated over the NEDC test. • A comparative study was done on emission characteristics of the MCS and the conventional cooling system. • Engine cold start and steady-state coolant flow rate and emissions are presented. • The effect of MCS on engine accumulation FC and emissions over NEDC are evaluated. - Graphical Abstract: Display Omitted - Abstract: Smart cooling control systems for IC engines can better regulate the combustion process and heat, a variable position thermostat and electric coolant pumps (EWP) for IC engines are under development by a number of researchers. However, the aim of this study is to assess the performance of a variable position electromagnetic thermostat (VPEMT) to provide more flexible control of the engine temperature and coolant mass flow rate of modification cooling system (MCS). The measurement procedure was applied to two phases under new European drive cycle (NEDC) on a chassis dynamometer, with conventional cooling system (baseline engine) and MCS of a light duty diesel engine. The experimental results revealed that MCS using a VPEMT and EWP contributed to a reduction of engine warm-up period. As a consequence, important reduces in coolant flow rate and most exhaust emission compounds (THC, CO_2, CO and smoke opacity) were obtained. In contrast, NOx emission was observed to increase in these conditions. Comparative results are given for various engine speeds during a cold start and engine fully warm-up tests when the engine was equipped by conventional cooling system and MCS operation under NEDC, revealing the effect of MCS on engine fuel consumption and exhaust emissions.

  15. Organic Species in Infrared Dark Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasyunina, T.; Vasyunin, A. I.; Herbst, Eric; Linz, Hendrik; Voronkov, Maxim; Britton, Tui; Zinchenko, Igor; Schuller, Frederic

    2014-01-01

    It is currently assumed that infrared dark clouds (IRDCs) represent the earliest evolutionary stages of high-mass stars (>8 M ⊙). Submillimeter and millimeter-wave studies performed over the past 15 yr show that IRDCs possess a broad variety of properties, and hence a wide range of problems and questions that can be tackled. In this paper, we report an investigation of the molecular composition and chemical processes in two groups of IRDCs. Using the Mopra, APEX, and IRAM radio telescopes over the last four years, we have collected molecular line data for CO, H2CO, HNCO, CH3CCH, CH3OH, CH3CHO, CH3OCHO, and CH3OCH3. For all of these species we estimated molecular abundances. We then undertook chemical modeling studies, concentrating on the source IRDC028.34+0.06, and compared observed and modeled abundances. This comparison showed that to reproduce observed abundances of complex organic molecules, a zero-dimensional gas-grain model with constant physical conditions is not sufficient. We achieved greater success with the use of a warm-up model, in which warm-up from 10 K to 30 K occurs following a cold phase. Based on observations carried out with the IRAM 30 m Telescope. IRAM is supported by INSU/CNRS (France), MPG (Germany) and IGN (Spain). This publication is based on data acquired with the Atacama Pathfinder Experiment (APEX). APEX is a collaboration between the Max-Planck-Institut für Radioastronomie, the European Southern Observatory, and the Onsala Space Observatory. The 22 m Mopra antenna is part of the Australia Telescope, which is funded by the Commonwealth of Australia for operations as a National Facility managed by CSIRO. The University of New South Wales Digital Filter Bank used for the observations with the Mopra Telescope was provided with support from the Australian Research Council.

  16. Short Durations of Static Stretching when Combined with Dynamic Stretching do not Impair Repeated Sprints and Agility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Del P; Chaouachi, Anis; Lau, Patrick W C; Behm, David G

    2011-01-01

    This study aimed to compare the effect of different static stretching durations followed by dynamic stretching on repeated sprint ability (RSA) and change of direction (COD). Twenty-five participants performed the RSA and COD tests in a randomized order. After a 5 min aerobic warm up, participants performed one of the three static stretching protocols of 30 s, 60 s or 90 s total duration (3 stretches x 10 s, 20 s or 30 s). Three dynamic stretching exercises of 30 s duration were then performed (90 s total). Sit-and-reach flexibility tests were conducted before the aerobic warm up, after the combined static and dynamic stretching, and post- RSA/COD test. The duration of static stretching had a positive effect on flexibility with 36.3% and 85.6% greater sit-and-reach scores with the 60 s and 90 s static stretching conditions respectively than with the 30 s condition (p ≤ 0.001). However there were no significant differences in RSA and COD performance between the 3 stretching conditions. The lack of change in RSA and COD might be attributed to a counterbalancing of static and dynamic stretching effects. Furthermore, the short duration (≤ 90 s) static stretching may not have provided sufficient stimulus to elicit performance impairments. Key pointsThe duration of combined static and dynamic stretching had a positive effect on flexibility with 36.3% and 85.6% greater sit and reach scores with the 60 s and 90 s static stretching conditions respectively than with the 30 s condition (p ≤ 0.001).No significant differences in RSA and COD between the 3 stretching conditions.The lack of change in RSA and COD might be attributed to a counterbalancing of static and dynamic stretching effects.The short duration (≤ 90 s) static stretching may not have provided sufficient stimulus to elicit performance impairments.

  17. A simulation approach to assessing sampling strategies for insect pests: an example with the balsam gall midge.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Drew Carleton

    Full Text Available Estimation of pest density is a basic requirement for integrated pest management in agriculture and forestry, and efficiency in density estimation is a common goal. Sequential sampling techniques promise efficient sampling, but their application can involve cumbersome mathematics and/or intensive warm-up sampling when pests have complex within- or between-site distributions. We provide tools for assessing the efficiency of sequential sampling and of alternative, simpler sampling plans, using computer simulation with "pre-sampling" data. We illustrate our approach using data for balsam gall midge (Paradiplosis tumifex attack in Christmas tree farms. Paradiplosis tumifex proved recalcitrant to sequential sampling techniques. Midge distributions could not be fit by a common negative binomial distribution across sites. Local parameterization, using warm-up samples to estimate the clumping parameter k for each site, performed poorly: k estimates were unreliable even for samples of n ∼ 100 trees. These methods were further confounded by significant within-site spatial autocorrelation. Much simpler sampling schemes, involving random or belt-transect sampling to preset sample sizes, were effective and efficient for P. tumifex. Sampling via belt transects (through the longest dimension of a stand was the most efficient, with sample means converging on true mean density for sample sizes of n ∼ 25-40 trees. Pre-sampling and simulation techniques provide a simple method for assessing sampling strategies for estimating insect infestation. We suspect that many pests will resemble P. tumifex in challenging the assumptions of sequential sampling methods. Our software will allow practitioners to optimize sampling strategies before they are brought to real-world applications, while potentially avoiding the need for the cumbersome calculations required for sequential sampling methods.

  18. Including the Copenhagen Adduction Exercise in the FIFA 11+ Provides Missing Eccentric Hip Adduction Strength Effect in Male Soccer Players: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harøy, Joar; Thorborg, Kristian; Serner, Andreas; Bjørkheim, André; Rolstad, Linn E; Hölmich, Per; Bahr, Roald; Andersen, Thor Einar

    2017-11-01

    The FIFA 11+ was developed as a complete warm-up program to prevent injuries in soccer players. Although reduced hip adduction strength is associated with groin injuries, none of the exercises included in the FIFA 11+ seem to specifically target hip adduction strength. To investigate the effect on eccentric hip adduction strength of the FIFA 11+ warm-up program with or without the Copenhagen adduction exercise. Randomized controlled trial; Level of evidence, 1. We recruited 45 eligible players from 2 U19 elite male soccer teams. Players were randomized into 2 groups; 1 group carried out the standard FIFA 11+ program, while the other carried out the FIFA 11+ but replaced the Nordic hamstring exercise with the Copenhagen adduction exercise. Both groups performed the intervention 3 times weekly for 8 weeks. Players completed eccentric strength and sprint testing before and after the intervention. Per-protocol analyses were performed, and 12 players were excluded due to low compliance (<67% of sessions completed). The main outcome was eccentric hip adduction strength (N·m/kg). Between-group analyses revealed a significantly greater increase in eccentric hip adduction strength of 0.29 Nm/kg (8.9%; P = .01) in favor of the group performing the Copenhagen adduction exercise, whereas no within-group change was noted in the group that used the standard FIFA 11+ program (-0.02 N·m/kg [-0.7%]; P = .69). Including the Copenhagen adduction exercise in the FIFA 11+ program increases eccentric hip adduction strength, while the standard FIFA 11+ program does not. Registration: Registration: ISRCTN13731446 (International Standard Randomised Controlled Trial Number registry).

  19. Operational and troubleshooting experiences in the SST-1 cryogenic system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahesuria, G.; Panchal, P.; Panchal, R.; Patel, R.; Sonara, D.; Gupta, N. C.; Srikanth, G. L. N.; Christian, D.; Garg, A.; Bairagi, N.; Patel, K.; Shah, P.; Nimavat, H.; Sharma, R.; Patel, J. C.; Tank, J.; Tanna, V. L.; Pradhan, S.

    2014-01-01

    Recently, the cooldown and current charging campaign have been carried out towards the demonstration of the first successful plasma discharge in the steady state superconducting Tokomak (SST-1). The SST-1 machine consists of cable-in-conduit wound superconducting toroidal as well as poloidal coils, cooled using 1.3 kW at 4.5 K helium refrigerator -cum- liquefier (HRL) system. The cryo system provides the two-phase helium at 0.13 MPa at 4.5 K as well as forced-flow pressurized helium at 0.4 MPa and in addition to 7 g-s-1 liquefaction capacity required for the current leads and other cold mass at 4.5 K. The entire integrated cold masses having different thermo hydraulic resistances cooled with the SST-1 HRL in optimised process parameters. In order to maintain different levels of temperatures and to facilitate smooth and reliable cooldown, warm-up, normal operations as well as to handle abnormal events such as, quench or utilities failures etc., exergy efficient process are adopted for the helium refrigerator-cum-liquefier (HRL) with an installed equivalent capacity of 1.3 kW at 4.5 K. Using the HRL, the cold mass of about 40 tons is being routinely cooled down from ambient temperature to 4.5 K with an average cooldown rate of 0.75 - 1 K-h-1. Long-term cryogenic stable conditions were obtained within 15 days in the superconducting coils and their connecting feeders. Afterwards, all of the cold mass is warmed-up in a controlled manner to ambient temperature. In this paper, we report the recent operational results of the cryogenic system during the first plasma discharge in SST-1 as well as the troubleshooting experiences of the cryogenic plant related hardware.

  20. Effect of spotters on state anxiety and self-confidence during maximal squatting among male high school athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Drew Rykert

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The ideal performance state is manifested by psychological and physiological efficiency. The psychological effects of anxiety and self-confidence has been shown to alter the efficiency of performance. This study attempted to identify the state anxiety and self-confidence of high school athletes just prior to a one repetition maximum (1-RM back squat and determine if the number of spotters affects an athlete’s level of state anxiety and/or self-confidence. Male high school athletes (10th and 11th grades were randomly separated into two experimental groups who performed the 1-RM back squat (BSQ with either 1 spotter (1SG: n=52 or 3 spotters (3SG: n=54. Following a dynamic warm-up period and several progressive BSQ warm-up sets, and just prior to attempts at a 1-RM BSQ, the participants completed the revised Competitive State Anxiety Inventory-2 (CSAI-2R. The CSAI-2R included the number of spotters (1 or 3 that would be present during the subsequent 1-RM BSQ attempts. The CSAI-2R is a17-question instrument with three subscales (self-confidence, somatic anxiety, and cognitive anxiety. The subscale scores were compared between the 1SG and 3SG with an independent t-test (alpha≤0.05. None of the subscales (self-confidence, somatic anxiety, and cognitive anxiety were significantly different between the 1SG and 3SG experimental groups (p>0.05. Within the parameters of this study, the number of spotters present during the execution of the 1-RM BSQ had no practical or statistical impact on self-confidence, somatic anxiety, and cognitive anxiety. Coaches and athletes could use this information in the training environment in order to make best use of personnel (assigned to spotting tasks, physical resources (ex. squat racks, and time management.