WorldWideScience

Sample records for materials tested include

  1. Results of a Saxitoxin Proficiency Test Including Characterization of Reference Material and Stability Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirsi Harju

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available A saxitoxin (STX proficiency test (PT was organized as part of the Establishment of Quality Assurance for the Detection of Biological Toxins of Potential Bioterrorism Risk (EQuATox project. The aim of this PT was to provide an evaluation of existing methods and the European laboratories’ capabilities for the analysis of STX and some of its analogues in real samples. Homogenized mussel material and algal cell materials containing paralytic shellfish poisoning (PSP toxins were produced as reference sample matrices. The reference material was characterized using various analytical methods. Acidified algal extract samples at two concentration levels were prepared from a bulk culture of PSP toxins producing dinoflagellate Alexandrium ostenfeldii. The homogeneity and stability of the prepared PT samples were studied and found to be fit-for-purpose. Thereafter, eight STX PT samples were sent to ten participating laboratories from eight countries. The PT offered the participating laboratories the possibility to assess their performance regarding the qualitative and quantitative detection of PSP toxins. Various techniques such as official Association of Official Analytical Chemists (AOAC methods, immunoassays, and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry were used for sample analyses.

  2. A review of a radioactive material shipping container including design, testing, upgrading compliance program and shipping logistics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Celovsky, A.; Lesco, R.; Gale, B.; Sypes, J.

    2003-01-01

    Ten years ago Atomic Energy of Canada developed a Type B(U)-85 shipping container for the global transport of highly radioactive materials. This paper reviews the development of the container, including a summary of the design requirements, a review of the selected materials and key design elements, and the results of the major qualification tests (drop testing, fire test, leak tightness testing, and shielding integrity tests). As a result of the testing, improvements to the structural, thermal and containment design were made. Such improvements, and reasons thereof, are noted. Also provided is a summary of the additional analysis work required to upgrade the package from a Type B(U) to a Type B(F), i.e. essentially upgrading the container to include fissile radioisotopes to the authorized radioactive contents list. Having a certified shipping container is only one aspect governing the global shipments of radioactive material. By necessity the shipment of radioactive material is a highly regulated environment. This paper also explores the experiences with other key aspects of radioactive shipments, including the service procedures used to maintain the container certification, the associated compliance program for radioactive material shipments, and the shipping logistics involved in the transport. (author)

  3. Gas storage materials, including hydrogen storage materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohtadi, Rana F; Wicks, George G; Heung, Leung K; Nakamura, Kenji

    2013-02-19

    A material for the storage and release of gases comprises a plurality of hollow elements, each hollow element comprising a porous wall enclosing an interior cavity, the interior cavity including structures of a solid-state storage material. In particular examples, the storage material is a hydrogen storage material such as a solid state hydride. An improved method for forming such materials includes the solution diffusion of a storage material solution through a porous wall of a hollow element into an interior cavity.

  4. Materials and material testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joergens, H.

    1978-01-01

    A review based on 105 literature quotations is given on the latest state of development in the steel sector and in the field of non-ferrous metals and plastics. The works quoted also include, preparation, working, welding including simulation methods, improvement of weldability, material mechanics (explanation of defects mechanisms by means of fracture mechanics), defect causes (corrosion, erosion, hydrogen influence), mechanical-technological and non-destructive material testing. Examples from the field of reactor building are also given within there topics. (IHOE) [de

  5. Experimental test of a hot water storage system including a macro-encapsulated phase change material (PCM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mongibello, L.; Atrigna, M.; Bianco, N.; Di Somma, M.; Graditi, G.; Risi, N.

    2017-01-01

    Thermal energy storage systems (TESs) are of fundamental importance for many energetic systems, essentially because they permit a certain degree of decoupling between the heat or cold production and the use of the heat or cold produced. In the last years, many works have analysed the addition of a PCM inside a hot water storage tank, as it can allow a reduction of the size of the storage tank due to the possibility of storing thermal energy as latent heat, and as a consequence its cost and encumbrance. The present work focuses on experimental tests realized by means of an indoor facility in order to analyse the dynamic behaviour of a hot water storage tank including PCM modules during a charging phase. A commercial bio-based PCM has been used for the purpose, with a melting temperature of 58°C. The experimental results relative to the hot water tank including the PCM modules are presented in terms of temporal evolution of the axial temperature profile, heat transfer and stored energy, and are compared with the ones obtained by using only water as energy storage material. Interesting insights, relative to the estimation of the percentage of melted PCM at the end of the experimental test, are presented and discussed.

  6. Dictionary materials engineering, materials testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    This dictionary contains about 9,500 entries in each part of the following fields: 1) Materials using and selection; 2) Mechanical engineering materials -Metallic materials - Non-metallic inorganic materials - Plastics - Composites -Materials damage and protection; 3) Electrical and electronics materials -Conductor materials - Semiconductors - magnetic materials - Dielectric materials - non-conducting materials; 4) Materials testing - Mechanical methods - Analytical methods - Structure investigation - Complex methods - Measurement of physical properties - Non-destructive testing. (orig.) [de

  7. Nondestructive testing of materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    NUKEM has transferred know-how from reactor technology to materials testing. The high and to a large extent new quality standards in the nuclear industry necessitate reliable measuring and testing equipment of the highest precision. Many of the tasks presented to us could not be solved with the equipment available on the market, for which reason we have developed our own measuring, testing and control systems. We have therefore acquired considerable experience in dealing with specific measuring, testing and control tasks and can handle even out-of-the-way problems that are submitted to us from a wide variety of fields. Our mechanical systems for the checking of close-tolerance gaps, the automatic determination of pellet dimensions and the measurement of absolute lengths and absolute velocities are in use in many different industrial fields. We have succeeded in solving unusual testing and sorting problems with the aid of automated surface testing equipment working on optical principles. Our main activities in the field of non-destructive testing have been concentrated on ultrasonic and eddy current testing and, of late, acoustic emission analysis. NUKEM ultrasonic systems are notable for their high defect detection rate and testing accuracy, combined with high testing speed. The equipment we supply includes ultrasonic rotary systems for the production testing of quality tubes, ultrasonic immersion systems for the final testing of reactor cladding tubes, weld testing equipment, and test equipment for the bonds in multi-layer plates. (orig./RW) [de

  8. Materials testing 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    The following subjects were dealt with at the meeting: Testing with vibration loads; Hardness testing; Calibration of test devices and equipment; Test technique for compound materials; Vibration strength testing and expense of experiments; Solving problems in introducing forces into samples and components and process of ambulant materials testing. There are 17 separate abstracts from among 43 lectures. (orig./PW) [de

  9. Armor systems including coated core materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Henry S [Idaho Falls, ID; Lillo, Thomas M [Idaho Falls, ID; McHugh, Kevin M [Idaho Falls, ID

    2012-07-31

    An armor system and method involves providing a core material and a stream of atomized coating material that comprises a liquid fraction and a solid fraction. An initial layer is deposited on the core material by positioning the core material in the stream of atomized coating material wherein the solid fraction of the stream of atomized coating material is less than the liquid fraction of the stream of atomized coating material on a weight basis. An outer layer is then deposited on the initial layer by positioning the core material in the stream of atomized coating material wherein the solid fraction of the stream of atomized coating material is greater than the liquid fraction of the stream of atomized coating material on a weight basis.

  10. Testing of abrasion materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hummert, G.

    1983-01-01

    A method of abrasion testing according to ASTM C 704-76 a is presented for steel fibre concrete mortar, fusion-cast basalt and a surface coating material and results of practical interest are mentioned. Due to the high technical demands on these materials and their specific fields of application, the very first test already supplied interesting findings. From the user's point of view, the method is an interesting alternative to the common test methods, e.g. according to DIN 52 108 (wheel test according to Boehme). In English-speaking countries, testing according to ASTM is often mandatory in the refractory industry in order to assure constant quality of refractory materials after setting. The method is characterized by good comparability and high accuracy of measurement. Only the test piece is exchanged while the test conditions remain constant, so that accurate information on the material studied is obtained. (orig.) [de

  11. Materials Test Station

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — When completed, the Materials Test Station at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center will meet mission need. MTS will provide the only fast-reactor-like irradiation...

  12. Advances in ultrasonic testing of austenitic stainless steel welds. Towards a 3D description of the material including attenuation and optimisation by inversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moysan, J.; Gueudré, C.; Ploix, M.-A.; Corneloup, G.; Guy, Ph.; Guerjouma, R. El; Chassignole, B.

    In the case of multi-pass welds, the material is very difficult to describe due to its anisotropic and heterogeneous properties. Anisotropy results from the metal solidification and is correlated with the grain orientation. A precise description of the material is one of the key points to obtain reliable results with wave propagation codes. A first advance is the model MINA which predicts the grain orientations in multi-pass 316-L steel welds. For flat position welding, good predictions of the grains orientations were obtained using 2D modelling. In case of welding in position the resulting grain structure may be 3D oriented. We indicate how the MINA model can be improved for 3D description. A second advance is a good quantification of the attenuation. Precise measurements are obtained using plane waves angular spectrum method together with the computation of the transmission coefficients for triclinic material. With these two first advances, the third one is now possible: developing an inverse method to obtain the material description through ultrasonic measurements at different positions.

  13. Dictionary of materials testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goedecke, W.

    1992-01-01

    This trilingual dictionary contains about 12000 terms from the field of non-destructive and destructive materials testing; the English and French terms can be looked up in two separate, alphabetical indexes. The compilation also presents terms from related fields such as quality control, production control, environmental protection and radiological protection, and wherever appropriate in the context from the fields of physics, chemistry, mathematics and electronic data processing. (HP) [de

  14. A hydrodynamic model for granular material flows including segregation effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilberg, Dominik; Klar, Axel; Steiner, Konrad

    2017-06-01

    The simulation of granular flows including segregation effects in large industrial processes using particle methods is accurate, but very time-consuming. To overcome the long computation times a macroscopic model is a natural choice. Therefore, we couple a mixture theory based segregation model to a hydrodynamic model of Navier-Stokes-type, describing the flow behavior of the granular material. The granular flow model is a hybrid model derived from kinetic theory and a soil mechanical approach to cover the regime of fast dilute flow, as well as slow dense flow, where the density of the granular material is close to the maximum packing density. Originally, the segregation model has been formulated by Thornton and Gray for idealized avalanches. It is modified and adapted to be in the preferred form for the coupling. In the final coupled model the segregation process depends on the local state of the granular system. On the other hand, the granular system changes as differently mixed regions of the granular material differ i.e. in the packing density. For the modeling process the focus lies on dry granular material flows of two particle types differing only in size but can be easily extended to arbitrary granular mixtures of different particle size and density. To solve the coupled system a finite volume approach is used. To test the model the rotational mixing of small and large particles in a tumbler is simulated.

  15. Radioactive material package seal tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madsen, M.M.; Humphreys, D.L.; Edwards, K.R.

    1990-01-01

    General design or test performance requirements for radioactive materials (RAM) packages are specified in Title 10 of the US Code of Federal Regulations Part 71 (US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, 1983). The requirements for Type B packages provide a broad range of environments under which the system must contain the RAM without posing a threat to health or property. Seals that provide the containment system interface between the packaging body and the closure must function in both high- and low-temperature environments under dynamic and static conditions. A seal technology program, jointly funded by the US Department of Energy Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM) and the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM), was initiated at Sandia National Laboratories. Experiments were performed in this program to characterize the behavior of several static seal materials at low temperatures. Helium leak tests on face seals were used to compare the materials. Materials tested include butyl, neoprene, ethylene propylene, fluorosilicone, silicone, Eypel, Kalrez, Teflon, fluorocarbon, and Teflon/silicone composites. Because most elastomer O-ring applications are for hydraulic systems, manufacturer low-temperature ratings are based on methods that simulate this use. The seal materials tested in this program with a fixture similar to a RAM cask closure, with the exception of silicone S613-60, are not leak tight (1.0 x 10 -7 std cm 3 /s) at manufacturer low-temperature ratings. 8 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab

  16. Railgun bore material test results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, S.Y.; Burton, R.L.; Witherspoon, F.D.; Bloomberg, H.W.; Goldstein, S.A.; Tidman, D.A.; Winsor, N.K.

    1987-01-01

    GT-Devices, Inc. has constructed a material test facility (MTF) to study the fundamental heat transfer problem of both railgun and electrothermal guns, and to test candidate gun materials under real plasma conditions. The MTF electrothermally produces gigawatt-level plasmas with pulse lengths of 10-30 microseconds. Circular bore and non-circular bore test barrels have been successfully operated under a wide range of simulated heating environments for EM launchers. Diagnostics include piezoelectric MHz pressure probes, time-of-flight probes, and current and voltage probes. Ablation measurements are accomplished by weighing and optical inspection, including borescope, optical microscope, and scanning electron microscope (SEM). From these measurements the ablation threshold for both the rail and insulator materials can be determined as a function of plasma heating. The MTF diagnostics are supported by an unsteady 1-D model of MTF which uses the flux-corrected transport (FCT) algorithm to calculate the fluid equations in conservative form. A major advantage of the FCT algorithm is that it can model gas dynamic shock behaviour without the requirement of numerical diffusion. The principle use of the code is to predict the material surface temperature ΔT/α from the unsteady heat transfer q(t)

  17. Including test errors in evaluating surveillance test intervals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, I.S.; Samanta, P.K.; Martorell, S.; Vesely, W.E.

    1991-01-01

    Technical Specifications require surveillance testing to assure that the standby systems important to safety will start and perform their intended functions in the event of plant abnormality. However, as evidenced by operating experience, the surveillance tests may be adversely impact safety because of their undesirable side effects, such as initiation of plant transients during testing or wearing-out of safety systems due to testing. This paper first defines the concerns, i.e., the potential adverse effects of surveillance testing, from a risk perspective. Then, we present a methodology to evaluate the risk impact of those adverse effects, focusing on two important kinds of adverse impacts of surveillance testing: (1) risk impact of test-caused trips and (2) risk impact of test-caused equipment wear. The quantitative risk methodology is demonstrated with several surveillance tests conducted at boiling water reactors, such as the tests of the main steam isolation valves, the turbine overspeed protection system, and the emergency diesel generators. We present the results of the risk-effectiveness evaluation of surveillance test intervals, which compares the adverse risk impact with the beneficial risk impact of testing from potential failure detection, along with insights from sensitivity studies

  18. Materials and test methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasen, M.B.

    1984-01-01

    The industrial specification for production of the G-10CR grade of cryogenic high-pressure laminate has been revised and accepted by US manufacturers. The objective was to make the specification as generic as possible without adversely affecting performance and to add a material performance criteria to the specification. G-10CR and G-11CR products have been produced by five US industrial laminating forms. No significant differences in cryogenic mechanical properties were found among G-10CR material produced by these manufacturers. This indicates that the specifications are fulfilling their intended purpose. An efficient system for producing research materials for systematic screening of the parameters influencing cryogenic radiation resistance was devised. Laboratories in Japan and England have agreed to actively cooperate with NBS in further development of this system

  19. Materials and test methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kase, M.B.

    1985-01-01

    The objective of this study was to provide, in cooperation with ORNL and LANL, specimens required for studies to develop organic insulators having the cryogenic neutron irradiation resistance required for MFE systems utilizing superconducting magnetic confinement. To develop test methods and analytical procedures for assessing radiation damage. To stimulate and participate in international cooperation directed toward accomplishing these objectives. The system for producing uniaxially reinforced, 3-4 mm (0.125 in) diameter rod specimens has been refined and validated by production of excellent quality specimens using liquid-mix epoxy resin systems. The methodology is undergoing further modification to permit use of hot-melt epoxy and polyimide resin systems as will be required for the experimental program to be conducted in the NLTNIF reactor at ORNL. Preliminary studies indicate that short beam and torsional shear test methods will be useful in evaluating radiation degradation. Development of these and other applicable test methods are continuing. A cooperative program established with laboratories in Japan and in England has resulted in the production and testing of specimens having an identical configuration

  20. Materials Testing - Digital Ecology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seth Wiley

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Access to credible building product performance information throughout the design and construction process is critical to enable project development, vet product selections, ensure as-built quality, and successfully complete construction. This is common knowledge and part of common practice for nearly all parties involved in design and construction. The sources of such information can range from vernacular to formal – from common practice to special reference. The focus of this paper is one of the more formal or specialized information sources, performance testing, as well as how such performance testing information can be better used. This paper’s goals are to familiarize the reader with performance testing and to depict a new kind of valuable informational tool (digital ecology. Reference to pertinent nomenclature, description of a real world example, and detailed description of such an informational tool’s values will be provided.The major content of this paper was developed during project-based work and firm-funded internal research at point b design, ltd. over approximately the previous 4 years. The phrase ‘digital ecology’ as herein used is a new concept proposed by the author. The analysis contained in this paper could be applied to the field of operations and maintenance as it is herein applied to design and construction; however, operations and maintenance is beyond the scope of this paper and may be addressed in future papers. It is my hope that this paper will contribute to tangible and real improvements of the built environment via continued, positive development within academic and professional practice.

  1. Methods of using structures including catalytic materials disposed within porous zeolite materials to synthesize hydrocarbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rollins, Harry W [Idaho Falls, ID; Petkovic, Lucia M [Idaho Falls, ID; Ginosar, Daniel M [Idaho Falls, ID

    2011-02-01

    Catalytic structures include a catalytic material disposed within a zeolite material. The catalytic material may be capable of catalyzing a formation of methanol from carbon monoxide and/or carbon dioxide, and the zeolite material may be capable of catalyzing a formation of hydrocarbon molecules from methanol. The catalytic material may include copper and zinc oxide. The zeolite material may include a first plurality of pores substantially defined by a crystal structure of the zeolite material and a second plurality of pores dispersed throughout the zeolite material. Systems for synthesizing hydrocarbon molecules also include catalytic structures. Methods for synthesizing hydrocarbon molecules include contacting hydrogen and at least one of carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide with such catalytic structures. Catalytic structures are fabricated by forming a zeolite material at least partially around a template structure, removing the template structure, and introducing a catalytic material into the zeolite material.

  2. Testing of Replacement Bag Material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laurinat, J.E.

    1998-01-01

    Recently, the FB-Line bagout material was changed to simplify the processing of sand, slag, and crucible.The results of the strength tests and the outgassing measurements and calculations demonstrate that the proposed replacement nylon bag materials (HRMP and orange anti-static material) are acceptable substitutes for LDPE and the original nylon with respect to mechanical properties

  3. Developing test materials for dyscalculia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindenskov, Lena; Bent, Lindhardt,

    Aims, requirements and context for the development of test materials for dyscalculia are analyzed. The test materials are to be used for Grade 4 pupils in Danish primary schools. Preliminary results are presented from focus group interview with adolescents and adults, who see themselves as being...

  4. Reference materials and representative test materials: the nanotechnology case

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roebben, G.; Rasmussen, K.; Kestens, V.; Linsinger, T. P. J.; Rauscher, H.; Emons, H.; Stamm, H.

    2013-01-01

    An increasing number of chemical, physical and biological tests are performed on manufactured nanomaterials for scientific and regulatory purposes. Existing test guidelines and measurement methods are not always directly applicable to or relevant for nanomaterials. Therefore, it is necessary to verify the use of the existing methods with nanomaterials, thereby identifying where modifications are needed, and where new methods need to be developed and validated. Efforts for verification, development and validation of methods as well as quality assurance of (routine) test results significantly benefit from the availability of suitable test and reference materials. This paper provides an overview of the existing types of reference materials and introduces a new class of test materials for which the term ‘representative test material’ is proposed. The three generic concepts of certified reference material, reference material(non-certified) and representative test material constitute a comprehensive system of benchmarks that can be used by all measurement and testing communities, regardless of their specific discipline. This paper illustrates this system with examples from the field of nanomaterials, including reference materials and representative test materials developed at the European Commission’s Joint Research Centre, in particular at the Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements (IRMM), and at the Institute for Health and Consumer Protection (IHCP).

  5. Composite material including nanocrystals and methods of making

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bawendi, Moungi G.; Sundar, Vikram C.

    2010-04-06

    Temperature-sensing compositions can include an inorganic material, such as a semiconductor nanocrystal. The nanocrystal can be a dependable and accurate indicator of temperature. The intensity of emission of the nanocrystal varies with temperature and can be highly sensitive to surface temperature. The nanocrystals can be processed with a binder to form a matrix, which can be varied by altering the chemical nature of the surface of the nanocrystal. A nanocrystal with a compatibilizing outer layer can be incorporated into a coating formulation and retain its temperature sensitive emissive properties.

  6. Simulator for materials testing reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takemoto, Noriyuki; Sugaya, Naoto; Ohtsuka, Kaoru; Hanakawa, Hiroki; Onuma, Yuichi; Hosokawa, Jinsaku; Hori, Naohiko; Kaminaga, Masanori; Tamura, Kazuo; Hotta, Kohji; Ishitsuka, Tatsuo

    2013-06-01

    A real-time simulator for both reactor and irradiation facilities of a materials testing reactor, “Simulator of Materials Testing Reactors”, was developed for understanding reactor behavior and operational training in order to utilize it for nuclear human resource development and to promote partnership with developing countries which have a plan to introduce nuclear power plant. The simulator is designed based on the JMTR (Japan Materials Testing Reactor), and it simulates operation, irradiation tests and various kinds of anticipated operational transients and accident conditions caused by the reactor and irradiation facilities. The development of the simulator was sponsored by the Japanese government as one of the specialized projects of advanced research infrastructure in order to promote basic as well as applied researches. This report summarizes the simulation components, hardware specification and operation procedure of the simulator. (author)

  7. Radioactive material packaging performance testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romano, T.; Cruse, J.M.

    1991-02-01

    To provide uniform packaging of hazardous materials on an international level, the United Nations has developed packaging recommendations that have been implemented worldwide. The United Nations packaging recommendations are performance oriented, allowing for a wide variety of package materials and systems. As a result of this international standard, efforts in the United States are being directed toward use of performance-oriented packaging and elimination of specification (designed) packaging. This presentation will focus on trends, design evaluation, and performance testing of radioactive material packaging. The impacts of US Department of Transportation Dockets HM-181 and HM-169A on specification and low-specific activity radioactive material packaging requirements are briefly discussed. The US Department of Energy's program for evaluating radioactive material packings per US Department of Transportation Specification 7A Type A requirements, is used as the basis for discussing low-activity packaging performance test requirements. High-activity package testing requirements are presented with examples of testing performed at the Hanford Site that is operated by Westinghouse Hanford Company for the US Department of Energy. 5 refs., 2 tabs

  8. PAVECHECK : training material updated user's manual including GPS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    PAVECHECK is a software package used to integrate nondestructive test data from various testing systems to provide the pavement engineer with a comprehensive evaluation of both surface and subsurface conditions. This User's Manual is intended to demo...

  9. the JHR Material Testing Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roure, C.; Cornu, B.; Berthet, B.; Simon, E.; Estre, N.; Guimbal, P.; Kinnunen, P.; Kotiluoto, P.

    2013-06-01

    The Jules Horowitz Reactor (JHR) is a European experimental reactor under construction in CEA Cadarache. It will be dedicated to material and fuel irradiation tests, and to medical isotopes production. Non-Destructive nuclear Examinations systems (NDE) will be implemented in pools to analyse the irradiated fuel or tested material in their supporting experimental irradiation devices extracted from the core or its immediate periphery. The Nuclear Measurement Laboratory (NML) of CEA Cadarache is working in collaboration with VTT (Technical Research Centre in Finland) in designing and developing NDE systems implementing gamma-ray spectroscopy and high energy X-ray imaging of the sample and irradiation device. CEA is also designing a neutron radiography system for which NML is working on the detection system. Design studies are performed with Monte Carlo transport codes and specific simulation tools developed by the NML for Xray and neutron imaging. (authors)

  10. Research reactors and materials testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vidal, H.

    1986-01-01

    Research reactors can be classified in three main groups according to the moderator which is used. Their technical characteristics are given and the three most recent research and materials testing reactors are described: OSIRIS, ORPHEE and the high-flux reactor of Grenoble. The utilization of research reactors is reviewed in four fields of activity: training, fundamental or applied research and production (eg. radioisotopes) [fr

  11. Radioactive material packaging performance testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romano, T.

    1992-06-01

    In an effort to provide uniform packaging of hazardous material on an international level, recommendations for the transport of dangerous goods have been developed by the United Nations. These recommendations are performance oriented and contrast with a large number of packaging specifications in the US Department of Transportation's hazard materials regulations. This dual system presents problems when international shipments enter the US Department of Transportation's system. Faced with the question of continuing a dual system or aligning with the international system, the Research and Special Programs Administration of the US Department of Transportation responded with Docket HM-181. This began the transition toward the international transportation system. Following close behind is Docket HM-169A, which addressed low specific activity radioactive material packaging. This paper will discuss the differences between performance-oriented and specification packaging, the transition toward performance-oriented packaging by the US Department of Transportation, and performance-oriented testing of radioactive material packaging by Westinghouse Hanford Company. Dockets HM-181 and HM-169A will be discussed along with Type A (low activity) and Type B (high activity) radioactive material packaging evaluations

  12. Constitutive modeling of multiphase materials including phase transformations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Perdahcioglu, Emin Semih; Geijselaers, Hubertus J.M.; Khan, A.S.; Meredith, C; Farrokh, B

    2011-01-01

    A constitutive model is developed for materials involving two or more different phases in their microstructure such as DP (Dual Phase) or TRIP (TRansformation Induced Plasticity) steels. Homogenization of the response of the phases is achieved by the Mean-Field method. One of the phases in TRIP

  13. Thermal and Electrical Properties of Nanocomposites, Including Material Properties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kochetov, R.

    2012-01-01

    The research described in this thesis is part of a state-funded IOP-EMVT project in cooperation with industrial companies, aiming at the design, assessment and implementation of new, environmental friendly (e.g. oil and SF6 - free) solid dielectric materials. A large disadvantage of solid polymer

  14. Fusion Materials Irradiation Test Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kemp, E.L.; Trego, A.L.

    1979-01-01

    A Fusion Materials Irradiation Test Facility is being designed to be constructed at Hanford, Washington, The system is designed to produce about 10 15 n/cm-s in a volume of approx. 10 cc and 10 14 n/cm-s in a volume of 500 cc. The lithium and target systems are being developed and designed by HEDL while the 35-MeV, 100-mA cw accelerator is being designed by LASL. The accelerator components will be fabricated by US industry. The total estimated cost of the FMIT is $105 million. The facility is scheduled to begin operation in September 1984

  15. Repetitively pulsed material testing facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zucker, O.; Bostick, W.; Gullickson, R; Long, J.; Luce, J.; Sahlin, H.

    1975-01-01

    A continuously operated, 1 pps, dense-plasma-focus device capable of delivering a minimum of 10 15 neutrons per pulse for material testing purposes is described. Moderate scaling from existing results is sufficient to provide 2 x 10 13 n/cm 2 .s to a suitable target. The average power consumption, which has become a major issue as a result of the energy crisis, is analyzed with respect to other plasma devices and is shown to be highly favorable. A novel approach to the capacitor bank and switch design allowing repetitive operation is discussed. (U.S.)

  16. Repetitively pulsed material testing facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zucker, O.; Bostick, W.; Gullickson, R.; Long, J.; Luce, J.; Sahlin, H.

    1975-01-01

    A continuously operated, 1 pps, dense-plasma-focus device capable of delivering a minimum of 10 15 neutrons per pulse for material testing purposes is described. Moderate scaling from existing results is sufficient to provide 2 x 10 13 n/cm 2 . s to a suitable target. The average power consumption, which has become a major issue as a result of the energy crisis, is analyzed with respect to other plasma devices and is shown to be highly favorable. A novel approach to the capacitor bank and switch design allowing repetitive operation is discussed

  17. CANMET Gasifier Liner Coupon Material Test Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mark Fitzsimmons; Dave Grimmett; Bryan McEnerney

    2007-01-31

    This report provides detailed test results consisting of test data and post-test inspections from Task 1 ''Cooled Liner Coupon Development and Test'' of the project titled ''Development of Technologies and Capabilities for Coal Energy Resources--Advanced Gasification Systems Development (AGSD)''. The primary objective of this development and test program is to verify that ceramic matrix composite (CMC) liner materials planned for use in an advanced gasifier pilot plant will successfully withstand the environments in a commercial gasifier. Pratt & Whitney Rocketdyne (PWR) designed and fabricated the cooled liner test assembly article that was tested in a slagging gasifier at CANMET Energy Technology Center (CETC-O) in Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. The test program conducted in 2006 met the objective of operating the cooled liner test article at slagging conditions in a small scale coal gasifier at CETC-O for over the planned 100 hours. The test hardware was exposed to at least 30 high temperature excursions (including start-up and shut-down cycles) during the test program. The results of the testing has provided valuable information on gasifier startup and required cooling controls in steady state operation of future advanced gasifiers using similar liners. The test program also provided a significant amount of information in the areas of CMC materials and processing for improved capability in a gasifier environment and insight into CMC liner fabrication that will be essential for near-term advanced gasifier projects.

  18. Fuels and materials testing capabilities in Fast Flux Test Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, R.B.; Chastain, S.A.; Culley, G.E.; Ethridge, J.L.; Lovell, A.J.; Newland, D.J.; Pember, L.A.; Puigh, R.J.; Waltar, A.E.

    1989-01-01

    The Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) reactor, which started operating in 1982, is a 400 MWt sodium-cooled fast neutron reactor located in Hanford, Washington State, and operated by Westinghouse Hanford Co. under contract with U.S. Department of Energy. The reactor has a wide variety of functions for irradiation tests and special tests, and its major purpose is the irradiation of fuel and material for liquid metal reactor, nuclear reactor and space reactor projects. The review first describes major technical specifications and current conditions of the FFTF reactor. Then the plan for irradiation testing is outlined focusing on general features, fuel pin/assembly irradiation tests, and absorber irradiation tests. Assemblies for special tests include the material open test assembly (MOTA), fuel open test assembly (FOTA), closed loop in-reactor assembly (CLIRA), and other special fuel assemblies. An interim examination and maintenance cell (FFTF/IEM cell) and other hot cells are used for nondestructive/destructive tests and physical/mechanical properties test of material after irradiation. (N.K.)

  19. Property transfer assessments should include radon gas testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nardi, M.A.

    1992-01-01

    There are two emerging influences that will require radon gas testing as part of many property transfers and most environmental assessments. These requirements come from lending regulators and state legislatures and affect single family, multifamily, and commercial properties. Fannie Mae and others have developed environmental investigation guidelines for protection from long term legal liabilities in the purchase of environmentally contaminated real estate. These guidelines include radon gas testing for many properties. Several states have enacted laws that require environmental disclosure forms be prepared to ensure that the parties involved in certain real estate transactions are aware of the environmental liabilities that may come with the transfer of property. Indiana has recently enacted legislation that would require the disclosure of the presence of radon gas on many commercial real estate transactions. With more banks and state governments following this trend, radon gas testing should be performed during all property transfers and environmental assessments to protect the parties involved from any long term legal liabilities

  20. Environmental site assessments should include radon gas testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nardi, M.A.

    1991-01-01

    There are two emerging influences that will require radon gas testing as part of many property transfers and most site assessments. These requirements come from lending regulators and state legislatures. Fannie Mae and others have developed environmental investigation guidelines for the purchase of environmentally contaminated real estate. These guidelines include radon gas testing for many properties. Several states have enacted laws that require environmental disclosure forms be prepared to ensure that the parties involved in certain real estate transactions are aware of the environmental liabilities that may come with the transfer of property. Indiana has recently enacted legislation that would require the disclosure of the presence of radon gas on many commercial real estate transactions. With more lenders and state governments likely to follow this trend, radon gas testing should be performed during all property transfers and site assessment to protect the parties involved from any legal liabilities

  1. Accelerators for Fusion Materials Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knaster, Juan; Okumura, Yoshikazu

    Fusion materials research is a worldwide endeavor as old as the parallel one working toward the long term stable confinement of ignited plasma. In a fusion reactor, the preservation of the required minimum thermomechanical properties of the in-vessel components exposed to the severe irradiation and heat flux conditions is an indispensable factor for safe operation; it is also an essential goal for the economic viability of fusion. Energy from fusion power will be extracted from the 14 MeV neutron freed as a product of the deuterium-tritium fusion reactions; thus, this kinetic energy must be absorbed and efficiently evacuated and electricity eventually generated by the conventional methods of a thermal power plant. Worldwide technological efforts to understand the degradation of materials exposed to 14 MeV neutron fluxes >1018 m-2s-1, as expected in future fusion power plants, have been intense over the last four decades. Existing neutron sources can reach suitable dpa (“displacement-per-atom”, the figure of merit to assess materials degradation from being exposed to neutron irradiation), but the differences in the neutron spectrum of fission reactors and spallation sources do not allow one to unravel the physics and to anticipate the degradation of materials exposed to fusion neutrons. Fusion irradiation conditions can be achieved through Li (d, xn) nuclear reactions with suitable deuteron beam current and energy, and an adequate flowing lithium screen. This idea triggered in the late 1970s at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) a campaign working toward the feasibility of continuous wave (CW) high current linacs framed by the Fusion Materials Irradiation Test (FMIT) project. These efforts continued with the Low Energy Demonstrating Accelerator (LEDA) (a validating prototype of the canceled Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT) project), which was proposed in 2002 to the fusion community as a 6.7MeV, 100mA CW beam injector for a Li (d, xn) source to bridge

  2. Test Review: Wilkinson, G. S., & Robertson, G. J. (2006). Wide Range Achievement Test--Fourth Edition. Lutz, FL: Psychological Assessment Resources. WRAT4 Introductory Kit (Includes Manual, 25 Test/Response Forms [Blue and Green], and Accompanying Test Materials): $243.00

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dell, Cindy Ann; Harrold, Barbara; Dell, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    The Wide Range Achievement Test-Fourth Edition (WRAT4) is designed to provide "a quick, simple, psychometrically sound assessment of academic skills". The test was first published in 1946 by Joseph F. Jastak, with the purpose of augmenting the cognitive performance measures of the Wechsler-Bellevue Scales, developed by David Wechsler.…

  3. Automation software for a materials testing laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcgaw, Michael A.; Bonacuse, Peter J.

    1990-01-01

    The software environment in use at the NASA-Lewis Research Center's High Temperature Fatigue and Structures Laboratory is reviewed. This software environment is aimed at supporting the tasks involved in performing materials behavior research. The features and capabilities of the approach to specifying a materials test include static and dynamic control mode switching, enabling multimode test control; dynamic alteration of the control waveform based upon events occurring in the response variables; precise control over the nature of both command waveform generation and data acquisition; and the nesting of waveform/data acquisition strategies so that material history dependencies may be explored. To eliminate repetitive tasks in the coventional research process, a communications network software system is established which provides file interchange and remote console capabilities.

  4. Unmanned Vehicle Material Flammability Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urban, David; Ruff, Gary A.; Fernandez-Pello, A. Carlos; T’ien, James S.; Torero, Jose L.; Cowlard, Adam; Rouvreau, Sebastian; Minster, Olivier; Toth, Balazs; Legros, Guillaume; hide

    2013-01-01

    Microgravity combustion phenomena have been an active area of research for the past 3 decades however, there have been very few experiments directly studying spacecraft fire safety under low-gravity conditions. Furthermore, none of these experiments have studied sample and environment sizes typical of those expected in a spacecraft fire. All previous experiments have been limited to samples of the order of 10 cm in length and width or smaller. Terrestrial fire safety standards for all other habitable volumes on earth, e.g. mines, buildings, airplanes, ships, etc., are based upon testing conducted with full-scale fires. Given the large differences between fire behavior in normal and reduced gravity, this lack of an experimental data base at relevant length scales forces spacecraft designers to base their designs using 1-g understanding. To address this question a large scale spacecraft fire experiment has been proposed by an international team of investigators. This poster presents the objectives, status and concept of this collaborative international project to examine spacecraft material flammability at realistic scales. The concept behind this project is to utilize an unmanned spacecraft such as Orbital Cygnus vehicle after it has completed its delivery of cargo to the ISS and it has begun its return journey to earth. This experiment will consist of a flame spread test involving a meter scale sample ignited in the pressurized volume of the spacecraft and allowed to burn to completion while measurements are made. A computer modeling effort will complement the experimental effort. Although the experiment will need to meet rigorous safety requirements to ensure the carrier vehicle does not sustain damage, the absence of a crew removes the need for strict containment of combustion products. This will facilitate the examination of fire behavior on a scale that is relevant to spacecraft fire safety and will provide unique data for fire model validation. This will be

  5. Testing and assessment strategies, including alternative and new approaches

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meyer, Otto A.

    2003-01-01

    The object of toxicological testing is to predict possible adverse effect in humans when exposed to chemicals whether used as industrial chemicals, pharmaceuticals or pesticides. Animal models are predominantly used in identifying potential hazards of chemicals. The use of laboratory animals raises...... ethical concern. However, irrespective of animal welfare it is an important aspect of the discipline of toxicology that the primary object is human health. The ideal testing and assessment strategy is simple to use all the available test methods and preferably more in laboratory animal species from which...... uses and of the absence of health problems involved with their use. Thus, the regulatory toxicology is a cocktail of science and pragmatism added a crucial concern for animal welfare. Test methods are most often used in a testing sequence as bricks in a testing strategy. The main key driving forces...

  6. Environmental testing techniques for electronics and materials

    CERN Document Server

    Dummer, Geoffrey W A; Fry, D W; Higinbotham, W

    2013-01-01

    Environmental Testing Techniques for Electronics and Materials reviews environmental testing techniques for evaluating the performance of electronic equipment, components, and materials. Environmental test planning, test methods, and instrumentation are described, along with the general environmental conditions under which equipment must operate. This book is comprised of 15 chapters and begins by explaining why environmental testing is necessary and describing the environment in which electronics must operate. The next chapter considers how an environmental test plan is designed; the methods

  7. Thermophysical tests of buffer materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, H. [ITC, Tokyo (Japan); Taniguchi, Wataru

    1999-03-01

    Thermodynamic properties of buffer materials were measured for putting in order thermodynamic constants to be used in the near-field thermal analysis. The thermal diffusivity and thermal conductivity were measured as functions of the water content and temperature to deduce the specific heat. The thermal conductivity and specific heat varied significantly as the water content changed. Obtained values of the specific heat agreed well the expected values calculated based on the constituents of the buffer material. Temperature dependence of the thermodynamic constants was found small below 90degC. From the findings, the thermal conductivity and specific heat of the buffer material were formulated as functions of the water content. Thermodynamic study of powdery bentonite was carried out as well with a purpose of use for filling apertures in the artificial barrier. (H. Baba)

  8. Hydraulic testing of Type Q septifoils including modifications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steimke, J.L.; Fowley, M.D.; Guerrero, H.N.

    1992-09-01

    On May 25, 1992 a leak of moderator was detected as K Reactor was approaching initial criticality. The partial length control rods were being withdrawn when the leak detectors in the Process Room alarmed. The apparent location of the moderator leak was the top of the guide tubes which are positioned over the new Type Q septifoils. The reactor was shut down immediately. In response, a testing program was begun at the Heat Transfer Laboratory (HTL). The goals of the program were to determine the cause of the septifoil leak and to test methods for preventing future leaks. These tests are described in this report

  9. Standard test methods for bend testing of material for ductility

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2009-01-01

    1.1 These test methods cover bend testing for ductility of materials. Included in the procedures are four conditions of constraint on the bent portion of the specimen; a guided-bend test using a mandrel or plunger of defined dimensions to force the mid-length of the specimen between two supports separated by a defined space; a semi-guided bend test in which the specimen is bent, while in contact with a mandrel, through a specified angle or to a specified inside radius (r) of curvature, measured while under the bending force; a free-bend test in which the ends of the specimen are brought toward each other, but in which no transverse force is applied to the bend itself and there is no contact of the concave inside surface of the bend with other material; a bend and flatten test, in which a transverse force is applied to the bend such that the legs make contact with each other over the length of the specimen. 1.2 After bending, the convex surface of the bend is examined for evidence of a crack or surface irregu...

  10. Systems including catalysts in porous zeolite materials within a reactor for use in synthesizing hydrocarbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolllins, Harry W [Idaho Falls, ID; Petkovic, Lucia M [Idaho Falls, ID; Ginosar, Daniel M [Idaho Falls, ID

    2012-07-24

    Catalytic structures include a catalytic material disposed within a zeolite material. The catalytic material may be capable of catalyzing a formation of methanol from carbon monoxide and/or carbon dioxide, and the zeolite material may be capable of catalyzing a formation of hydrocarbon molecules from methanol. The catalytic material may include copper and zinc oxide. The zeolite material may include a first plurality of pores substantially defined by a crystal structure of the zeolite material and a second plurality of pores dispersed throughout the zeolite material. Systems for synthesizing hydrocarbon molecules also include catalytic structures. Methods for synthesizing hydrocarbon molecules include contacting hydrogen and at least one of carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide with such catalytic structures. Catalytic structures are fabricated by forming a zeolite material at least partially around a template structure, removing the template structure, and introducing a catalytic material into the zeolite material.

  11. Coal Ash Corrosion Resistant Materials Testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. K. McDonald; P. L. Daniel; D. J. DeVault

    2007-12-31

    is intended to compare and summarize the results for all three test sections. The analysis of Test Section B followed much the same protocol that was employed in the assessment of the other two test sections. The focus was on determining and documenting the relative corrosion rates of the candidate materials; however, additional investigations were undertaken to better understand the wastage mechanism, and to characterize how selected candidate materials performed either well, or poorly, in the severe coal ash corrosion environment in the convection pass of Niles Unit No.1. The detailed results of the investigation are included in this report as a series of twelve appendices. Each appendix is devoted to the performance of one of the candidate alloys. The table below summarizes metal loss rate for the worst case sample of each of the candidate materials in all three test sections. The body of this report compares these for all of the samples in the test section.

  12. HFR irradiation testing of fusion materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conrad, R.; von der Hardt, P.; Loelgen, R.; Scheurer, H.; Zeisser, P.

    1984-01-01

    The present and future role of the High Flux Reactor Petten for fusion materials testing has been assessed. For practical purposes the Tokamak-based fusion reactor is chosen as a point of departure to identify material problems and materials data needs. The identification is largely based on the INTOR and NET design studies, the reported programme strategies of Japan, the U.S.A. and the European Communities for technical development of thermonuclear fusion reactors and on interviews with several experts. Existing and planned irradiation facilities, their capabilities and limitations concerning materials testing have been surveyed and discussed. It is concluded that fission reactors can supply important contributions for fusion materials testing. From the point of view of future availability of fission testing reactors and their performance it appears that the HFR is a useful tool for materials testing for a large variety of materials. Prospects and recommendations for future developments are given

  13. 46 CFR 154.430 - Material test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Material test. 154.430 Section 154.430 Shipping COAST... § 154.430 Material test. (a) The membrane and the membrane supporting insulation must be made of... test for the membrane and the membrane supporting insulation must be submitted to the Commandant (CG...

  14. Buffer mass test - Buffer materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pusch, R.; Boergesson, L.

    1982-08-01

    Commercial Na bentonite (MX-80) is the clay component of the buffer material in the heater holes as well of the tunnel backfill. Important characteristics are the clay content, liquid limit, X-ray diffraction pattern, water content, and degree of granulation. The ballast material consists of quartz-rich sand and feldspar-rich filler. The preparation of highly compacted bentonite for the near-field isolation of the canister was made by using isostatic compaction technique. The resulting dense bentonite core was cut into regularly shaped blocks which were arranged around each heater and lowered as one unit - heavily instrumented - in the respective deposition holes. For three of the six holes a narrow slot was left open between the bentonite stack and the rock; for the remaining ones a wider slot was chosen with a fill of soft bentonite powder. Both arrangements are expected to yield an ultimate bulk density which is sufficiently high to fulfil the requirement of a negligible permeability and a sufficient swelling pressure as well as heat conductivity, which are the essential parameters. The tunnel backfill, which consists of a mixture of suitably graded ballast material and MX-80 powder, has a considerably lower swelling pressure and heat conductivity, and a higher permeability, all these parameters still within the requirements of the KBS 2 concept. The various zones with different bentonite/sand ratios and the technique to apply them are described in the final part of the report. (Author)

  15. Thermal testing of solid neutron shielding materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boonstra, R.H.

    1990-03-01

    The GA-4 and GA-9 spent fuel shipping casks employ a solid neutron shielding material. During a hypothetical thermal accident, any combustion of the neutron shield must not compromise the ability of the cask to contain the radioactive contents. A two-phase thermal testing program was carried out to assist in selecting satisfactory shielding materials. In the first phase, small-scale screening tests were performed on nine candidate materials using ASTM procedures. From these initial results, three of the nine candidates were chosen for inclusion in the second phase of testing, These materials were Bisco Products NS-4-FR, Reactor Experiments 201-1, and Reactor Experiments 207. In the second phase, each selected material was fabricated into a test article which simulated a full-scale of neutron shield from the cask. The test article was heated in an environmental prescribed by NRC regulations. Results of this second testing phase showed that all three materials are thermally acceptable

  16. Thermal testing of solid neutron shielding materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boonstra, R.N.

    1990-01-01

    The GA-4 and GA-9 spent fuel shipping casks employ a solid neutron shielding material. During a hypothetical thermal accident, any combustion of the neutron shield must not compromise the ability of the cask to contain the radioactive contents. A two-phase thermal testing program was carried out to assist in selecting satisfactory shielding materials. In the first phase, small-scale screening tests were performed on nine candidate materials using ASTM procedures. From these initial results, three of the nine candidates were chosen for inclusion in the second phase of testing. These materials were Bisco Products NS-4-FR, Reactor Experiments 201-1, and Reactor Experiments 207. In the second phase, each selected material was fabricated into a test article which simulated a full-scale section of neutron shield from the cask. The test article was heated in an environment prescribed by NRC regulations. Results of this second testing phase show that all three materials are thermally acceptable

  17. Measurements for testing of fluoroscopic screens, including the photofluorographic units

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balfanz, R.

    1986-01-01

    Image quality control measurements for fluoroscopic screens and photofluorographs have shown that both types of equipment have a long operating life, so that constancy and technical performance tests are absolutely necessary. It is recommended to conclude in-service maintenance contracts with the manufacturers. (DG) [de

  18. FBR metallic materials test manual (English version)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Odaka, Susumu; Kato, Shoichi; Yoshida, Eiichi

    2003-06-01

    For the development of the fast breeder reactor, this manual describes the method of in-air and in-sodium material tests and the method of organization the data. This previous manual has revised in accordance with the revision of Japanese Industrial Standard (JIS) and the conversion to the international unit. The test methods of domestic committees such as the VAMAS (Versailles Project on Advanced Materials and Standards) workshop were also refereed. The material test technologies accumulated in this group until now were also incorporated. This English version was prepared in order to provide more engineers with the FBR metallic materials test manual. (author)

  19. Thermal testing of solid neutron shielding materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boonstra, R.H.

    1993-01-01

    In May-June 1989 the first series of full-scale thermal tests was performed on three shielding materials: Bisco Products NS-4-FR, and Reactor Experiments RX-201 and RX-207. The tests are described in Thermal Testing of Solid Neutron Shielding Materials, GA-A19897, R.H. Boonstra, General Atomics (1990), and demonstrated the acceptability of these materials in a thermal accident. Subsequent design changes to the cask rendered these materials unattractive in terms of weight or adequate service temperature margin. For the second test series a material specification was developed for a polypropylene based neutron shield with a softening point of at least 280degF. Table 1 lists the neutron shield materials tested. The Envirotech and Bisco materials are not polypropylene, but were tested as potential backup materials in the event that a satisfactory polypropylene could not be found. The Bisco modified NS-4 and Reactor Experiments HMPP are both acceptable materials from a thermal accident standpoint for use in the shipping cask. Tests of the Kobe PP-R01 and Envirotech HDPE were stopped for safety reasons, due to inability to deal with the heavy smoke, before completion of the 30-minute heating phase. However these materials may prove satisfactory if they could undergo the complete heating. (J.P.N.)

  20. Nondestructive Testing of Materials and Structures

    CERN Document Server

    Akkaya, Yılmaz

    2013-01-01

    Condition assessment and characterization of materials and structures by means of nondestructive testing (NDT) methods is a priority need around the world to meet the challenges associated with the durability, maintenance, rehabilitation, retrofitting, renewal and health monitoring of new and existing infrastructures including historic monuments. Numerous NDT methods that make use of certain components of the electromagnetic and acoustic spectra are currently in use to this effect with various levels of success and there is an intensive worldwide research effort aimed at improving the existing methods and developing new ones. The knowledge and information compiled in this book captures the current state-of-the-art in NDT methods and their application to civil and other engineering materials and structures. Critical reviews and advanced interdisciplinary discussions by world-renowned researchers point to the capabilities and limitations of the currently used NDT methods and shed light on current and future res...

  1. Radioactive waste material testing capabilities in Romania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vieru, G.

    1999-01-01

    Radioactive material including wastes, generated by Romanian nuclear facilities are packaged in accordance with national and IAEA's Regulation for a safe transport to the disposal center. The evaluation and certification of packages is accomplished by subjecting these packages to normal and simulated test conditions in order to prove the package to technical performances. The standards provide to package designers the possibility to use analysis, testing or a combination of these. The paper describes the experimental and simulating qualification tests for type A packages used for transport and storage of radioactive wastes (low level). Testing are used to substantiate assumptions used in analytical models and to demonstrate package structural response. There are also presented testing capabilities which are used to perform and simulate the required qualification tests. By direct comparison of analysis and experimental results, the degree of reliability of analytical methods and admissibility of assumptions taken in package designing and in demonstrating its safety under conditions of INR - Pitesti, within the contract between the INR - Pitesti and IAEA - Vienna, were determined. (author)

  2. Permeation Tests on Polypropylene Fiber Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-03-16

    Permeation Tests on Polypropylene Fiber Materials Brandy J. White Martin H. Moore Brian J. Melde Laboratory for the Study of Molecular Interfacial...ABSTRACT Permeation Tests on Polypropylene Fiber Materials Brandy J. White, Martin H. Moore, Brian J. Melde Center for Bio/Molecular Science

  3. Impact Testing of Stainless Steel Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    R. K. Blandford; D. K. Morton; T. E. Rahl; S. D. Snow

    2005-01-01

    Stainless steels are used for the construction of numerous spent nuclear fuel or radioactive material containers that may be subjected to high strains and moderate strain rates (10 to 200 per second) during accidental drop events. Mechanical characteristics of these materials under dynamic (impact) loads in the strain rate range of concern are not well documented. The goal of the work presented in this paper was to improve understanding of moderate strain rate phenomena on these materials. Utilizing a drop-weight impact test machine and relatively large test specimens (1/2-inch thick), initial test efforts focused on the tensile behavior of specific stainless steel materials during impact loading. Impact tests of 304L and 316L stainless steel test specimens at two different strain rates, 25 per second (304L and 316L material) and 50 per second (304L material) were performed for comparison to their quasi-static tensile test properties. Elevated strain rate stress-strain curves for the two materials were determined using the impact test machine and a ''total impact energy'' approach. This approach considered the deformation energy required to strain the specimens at a given strain rate. The material data developed was then utilized in analytical simulations to validate the final elevated stress-strain curves. The procedures used during testing and the results obtained are described in this paper

  4. Fusion Materials Irradiation Test Facility: experimental capabilities and test matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Opperman, E.K.

    1982-01-01

    This report describes the experimental capabilities of the Fusion Materials Irradiation Test Facility (FMIT) and reference material specimen test matrices. The description of the experimental capabilities and the test matrices has been updated to match the current single test cell facility ad assessed experimenter needs. Sufficient detail has been provided so that the user can plan irradiation experiments and conceptual hardware. The types of experiments, irradiation environment and support services that will be available in FMIT are discussed

  5. Material testing of reconditioned orthodontic brackets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reimann, S; Rewari, A; Keilig, L; Widu, F; Jäger, A; Bourauel, C

    2012-12-01

    While all manufacturers of orthodontic brackets label these products for single use, there are commercial providers offering bracket reconditioning (or "recycling"). We conducted this study to investigate the effects of different recycling techniques on material-related parameters in orthodontic brackets, aiming to derive indications for clinical use and conclusions about the biocompatibility, longevity, and application of recycled brackets. New metal brackets (equilibrium(®); Dentaurum, Ispringen, Germany) were compared to brackets recycled by different techniques, including direct flaming with a Bunsen burner, chemical reconditioning in an acid bath, a commercial unit (Big Jane; Esmadent, IL, USA), and outsourcing to a company (Ortho Clean, Dellstedt, Germany). Material-related examinations included the following: (1) corrosion behavior by static immersion testing and use of a mass spectrometer to determine nickel-ion concentrations in the corrosive medium, (2) surface features in scanning electron micrographs before and after corrosion testing, (3) Vickers hardness using a hardness testing machine, (4) shear bond strength as defined in DIN 13990-1, (5) dimensional stability of the bracket slots by light microscopy, and (6) frictional loss as assessed by an orthodontic measurement and simulation system (OMSS). Each examination was performed on ten brackets. Student's t-test was used for statistical analysis. Compared to the new brackets, those recycled in an acid bath or by a commercial provider revealed significant dimensional changes (pbrackets varied according to the recycling techniques employed. The group of brackets recycled by one company revealed hardness values that differed from those of all the other groups. No significant differences were observed in nickel-ion release, frictional loss, and shear bond strength. Recycling was found to significantly reduce the corrosion resistance and dimensional stability of orthodontic brackets. As the savings

  6. Thermal testing of solid neutron shielding materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boonstra, R.H.

    1992-09-01

    Two legal-weight truck casks the GA-4 and GA-9, will carry four PWR and nine BWR spent fuel assemblies, respectively. Each cask has a solid neutron shielding material separating the steel body and the outer steel skin. In the thermal accident specified by NRC regulations in 10CFR Part 71, the cask is subjected to an 800 degree C environment for 30 minutes. The neutron shield need not perform any shielding function during or after the thermal accident, but its behavior must not compromise the ability of the cask to contain the radioactive contents. In May-June 1989 the first series of full-scale thermal tests was performed on three shielding materials: Bisco Products NS-4-FR, and Reactor Experiments RX-201 and RX-207. The tests are described in Thermal Testing of Solid Neutron Shielding Materials, GA-AL 9897, R. H. Boonstra, General Atomics (1990), and demonstrated the acceptability of these materials in a thermal accident. Subsequent design changes to the cask rendered these materials unattractive in terms of weight or adequate service temperature margin. For the second test series, a material specification was developed for a polypropylene based neutron shield with a softening point of at least 280 degree F. The neutron shield materials tested were boronated (0.8--4.5%) polymers (polypropylene, HDPE, NS-4). The Envirotech and Bisco materials are not polypropylene, but were tested as potential backup materials in the event that a satisfactory polypropylene could not be found

  7. Test for radioactive material transport package safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Guoqiang; Zhao Bing; Zhang Jiangang; Wang Xuexin; Ma Anping

    2012-01-01

    Regulations on radioactive material transport in China were introduced. Test facilities and data acquiring instruments for radioactive material package in China Institute for Radiation Protection were also introduced in this paper, which were used in drop test and thermal test. Test facilities were constructed according to the requirements of IAEA's 'Regulations for the Safe Transport of Radioactive Material' (TS-R-l) and Chinese 'Regulations for the Safe Transport of Radioactive Material' (GB 11806-2004). Drop test facilities were used in free drop test, penetration test, mechanical test (free drop test Ⅰ, free drop test Ⅱ and free drop test Ⅲ) of type A and type B packages weighing less than thirteen tons. Thermal test of type B packages can be carried out in the thermal test facilities. Certification tests of type FCo70-YQ package, type 30A-HB-01 package, type SY-I package and type XAYT-I package according to regulations were done using these facilities. (authors)

  8. Composite materials and bodies including silicon carbide and titanium diboride and methods of forming same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lillo, Thomas M.; Chu, Henry S.; Harrison, William M.; Bailey, Derek

    2013-01-22

    Methods of forming composite materials include coating particles of titanium dioxide with a substance including boron (e.g., boron carbide) and a substance including carbon, and reacting the titanium dioxide with the substance including boron and the substance including carbon to form titanium diboride. The methods may be used to form ceramic composite bodies and materials, such as, for example, a ceramic composite body or material including silicon carbide and titanium diboride. Such bodies and materials may be used as armor bodies and armor materials. Such methods may include forming a green body and sintering the green body to a desirable final density. Green bodies formed in accordance with such methods may include particles comprising titanium dioxide and a coating at least partially covering exterior surfaces thereof, the coating comprising a substance including boron (e.g., boron carbide) and a substance including carbon.

  9. Systems and strippable coatings for decontaminating structures that include porous material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Robert V [Idaho Falls, ID; Avci, Recep [Bozeman, MT; Groenewold, Gary S [Idaho Falls, ID

    2011-12-06

    Methods of removing contaminant matter from porous materials include applying a polymer material to a contaminated surface, irradiating the contaminated surface to cause redistribution of contaminant matter, and removing at least a portion of the polymer material from the surface. Systems for decontaminating a contaminated structure comprising porous material include a radiation device configured to emit electromagnetic radiation toward a surface of a structure, and at least one spray device configured to apply a capture material onto the surface of the structure. Polymer materials that can be used in such methods and systems include polyphosphazine-based polymer materials having polyphosphazine backbone segments and side chain groups that include selected functional groups. The selected functional groups may include iminos, oximes, carboxylates, sulfonates, .beta.-diketones, phosphine sulfides, phosphates, phosphites, phosphonates, phosphinates, phosphine oxides, monothio phosphinic acids, and dithio phosphinic acids.

  10. Liquid Lead-Bismuth Materials Test Loop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tcharnotskaia, Valentina; Ammerman, Curtt; Darling, Timothy; King, Joe; Li, Ning; Shaw, Don; Snodgrass, Leon; Woloshun, Keith

    2002-01-01

    We designed and built the Liquid Lead-Bismuth Materials Test Loop (MTL) to study the materials behavior in a flow of molten lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE). In this paper we present a description of the loop with main components and their functions. Stress distribution in the piping due to sustained, occasional and expansion loads is shown. The loop is designed so that a difference of 100 deg. C can be attained between the coldest and the hottest parts at a nominal flow rate of 8.84 GPM. Liquid LBE flow can be activated by a mechanical sump pump or by natural convection. In order to maintain a self-healing protective film on the surface of the stainless steel pipe, a certain concentration of oxygen has to be maintained in the liquid metal. We developed oxygen sensors and an oxygen control system to be implemented in the loop. The loop is outfitted with a variety of instruments that are controlled from a computer based data acquisition system. Initial experiments include preconditioning the loop, filling it up with LBE, running at uniform temperature and tuning the oxygen control system. We will present some preliminary results and discuss plans for the future tests. (authors)

  11. Review of neutron activation analysis in the standardization and study of reference materials, including its application to radionuclide reference materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Byrne, A.R.

    1993-01-01

    Neutron activation analysis (NAA) plays a very important role in the certification of reference materials (RMs) and their characterization, including homogeneity testing. The features of the method are briefly reviewed, particularly aspects relating to its completely independent nuclear basis, its virtual freedom from blank problems, and its capacity for self-verification. This last aspect, arising from the essentially isotopic character of NAA, can be exploited by using different nuclear reactions and induced nuclides, and the possibility of employing two modes, one instrumental (nondestructive), the other radiochemical (destructive). This enables the derivation of essentially independent analytical information and the unique capacity of NAA for selfvalidation. The application of NAA to quantify natural or man-made radionuclides such as uranium, thorium, 237 Np, 129 I and 230 Th is discussed, including its advantages over conventional radiometric methods and its usefulness in providing independent data for nuclides where other confirmatory analyses are impossible, or are only recently becoming available through newer 'atom counting' techniques. Certain additional, prospective uses of NAA in the study of RMs and potential RMs are mentioned, including transmutation reactions, creation of endogenously radiolabelled matrices for production and study of RMs (such as dissolution and leaching tests, use as incorporated radiotracers for chemical recovery correction), and the possibility of molecular activation analysis for specification. (orig.)

  12. Thick electrodes including nanoparticles having electroactive materials and methods of making same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Jie; Lu, Dongping; Liu, Jun; Zhang, Jiguang; Graff, Gordon L.

    2017-02-21

    Electrodes having nanostructure and/or utilizing nanoparticles of active materials and having high mass loadings of the active materials can be made to be physically robust and free of cracks and pinholes. The electrodes include nanoparticles having electroactive material, which nanoparticles are aggregated with carbon into larger secondary particles. The secondary particles can be bound with a binder to form the electrode.

  13. Real time simulator for material testing reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takemoto, Noriyuki; Imaizumi, Tomomi; Izumo, Hironobu; Hori, Naohiko; Suzuki, Masahide [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Oarai Research and Development Center, Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan); Ishitsuka, Tatsuo; Tamura, Kazuo [ITOCHU Techno-Solutions Corp., Tokyo (Japan)

    2012-03-15

    Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) is now developing a real time simulator for a material testing reactor based on Japan Materials Testing Reactor (JMTR). The simulator treats reactor core system, primary and secondary cooling system, electricity system and irradiation facility systems. Possible simulations are normal reactor operation, unusual transient operation and accidental operation. The developed simulator also contains tool to revise/add facility in it for the future development. (author)

  14. Real time simulator for material testing reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takemoto, Noriyuki; Imaizumi, Tomomi; Izumo, Hironobu; Hori, Naohiko; Suzuki, Masahide; Ishitsuka, Tatsuo; Tamura, Kazuo

    2012-01-01

    Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) is now developing a real time simulator for a material testing reactor based on Japan Materials Testing Reactor (JMTR). The simulator treats reactor core system, primary and secondary cooling system, electricity system and irradiation facility systems. Possible simulations are normal reactor operation, unusual transient operation and accidental operation. The developed simulator also contains tool to revise/add facility in it for the future development. (author)

  15. Standard Guide for Testing Polymer Matrix Composite Materials

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2011-01-01

    1.1 This guide summarizes the application of ASTM standard test methods (and other supporting standards) to continuous-fiber reinforced polymer matrix composite materials. The most commonly used or most applicable ASTM standards are included, emphasizing use of standards of Committee D30 on Composite Materials. 1.2 This guide does not cover all possible standards that could apply to polymer matrix composites and restricts discussion to the documented scope. Commonly used but non-standard industry extensions of test method scopes, such as application of static test methods to fatigue testing, are not discussed. A more complete summary of general composite testing standards, including non-ASTM test methods, is included in the Composite Materials Handbook (MIL-HDBK-17). Additional specific recommendations for testing textile (fabric, braided) composites are contained in Guide D6856. 1.3 This guide does not specify a system of measurement; the systems specified within each of the referenced standards shall appl...

  16. Materials testing using laser energy deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilcox, W.W.; Calder, C.A.

    1977-01-01

    A convenient method for determining the elastic constants of materials has been devised using the energy from a Q-switched neodymium-glass laser. Stress waves are induced in materials having circular rod or rectangular bar geometries by the absorption of energy from the laser. The wave transit times through the material are recorded with a piezoelectric transducer. Both dilatation and shear wave velocities are determined in a single test using an ultrasonic technique and these velocities are used to calculate the elastic constants of the material. A comparison of the constants determined for ten common engineering materials using this method is made with constants derived using the conventional ultrasonic pulse technique and agreement is shown to be about one percent in most cases. Effects of material geometry are discussed and surface damage to the material caused by laser energy absorption is shown

  17. Shear bond strengths of tooth coating materials including the experimental materials contained various amounts of multi-ion releasing fillers and their effects for preventing dentin demineralization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arita, Shoko; Suzuki, Masaya; Kazama-Koide, Miku; Shinkai, Koichi

    2017-10-01

    We examined shear bond strengths (SBSs) of various tooth-coating-materials including the experimental materials to dentin and demineralization resistance of a fractured adhesive surface after the SBS testing. Three resin-type tooth-coating-materials (BC, PRG Barrier Coat; HC, Hybrid Coat II; and SF, Shield force plus) and two glass-ionomer-type tooth-coating-materials (CV, Clinpro XT Varnish; and FJ, Fuji VII) were selected. The experimental PRG Barrier Coat containing 0, 17, and 33 wt% S-PRG filler (BC0, BC17, and BC33, respectively) were developed. Each tooth-coating-material was applied to flattened dentin surfaces of extracted human teeth for SBS testing. After storing in water for 32 days with 4000 thermal cycling, the specimens were subjected to the SBS test. Specimens after SBS testing were subjected to a pH cycling test, and then, demineralization depths were measured using a polarized-light microscope. ANOVA and Tukey's HSD test were used for statistical analysis. The SBS value of FJ and CV was significantly lower than those of other materials except for BC (p coating-materials demonstrated significantly higher SBS for dentin than the glass-ionomer-type tooth-coating-materials; however, they were inferior to the glass ionomer-type tooth-coating-materials in regards to the acid resistance of the fractured adhesion surface.

  18. Standard leach tests for nuclear waste materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strachan, D.M.; Barnes, B.O.; Turcotte, R.P.

    1980-01-01

    Five leach tests were conducted to study time-dependent leaching of waste forms (glass). The first four tests include temperature as a variable and the use of three standard leachants. Three of the tests are static and two are dynamic (flow). This paper discusses the waste-form leach tests and presents some representative data. 4 figures

  19. Improved cytotoxicity testing of magnesium materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, Janine [Helmholtz-Zentrum Geesthacht, Institute of Materials Research, Department for Structural Research on Macromolecules, Max-Planck Str. 1, D - 21502 Geesthacht (Germany); Proefrock, Daniel [Helmholtz-Zentrum Geesthacht, Institute for Coastal Research, Department for Marine Bioanalytical Chemistry, Max-Planck Str. 1, D - 21502 Geesthacht (Germany); Hort, Norbert [Helmholtz-Zentrum Geesthacht, Institute of Materials Research, Department for Magnesium Processing, Max-Planck Str. 1, D - 21502 Geesthacht (Germany); Willumeit, Regine; Feyerabend, Frank [Helmholtz-Zentrum Geesthacht, Institute of Materials Research, Department for Structural Research on Macromolecules, Max-Planck Str. 1, D - 21502 Geesthacht (Germany)

    2011-06-25

    Metallic magnesium (Mg) and its alloys are highly suitable for medical applications as biocompatible and biodegradable implant materials. Magnesium has mechanical properties similar to bone, stimulates bone regeneration, is an essential non-toxic element for the human body and degrades completely within the body environment. In consequence, magnesium is a promising candidate as implant material for orthopaedic applications. Protocols using the guideline of current ISO standards should be carefully evaluated when applying them for the characterization of the cytotoxic potential of degradable magnesium materials. For as-cast material we recommend using 10 times more extraction medium than recommended by the ISO standards to obtain reasonable results for reliable cytotoxicity rankings of degradable materials in vitro. In addition primary isolated human osteoblasts or mesenchymal stem cells should be used to test magnesium materials.

  20. Improved cytotoxicity testing of magnesium materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, Janine; Proefrock, Daniel; Hort, Norbert; Willumeit, Regine; Feyerabend, Frank

    2011-01-01

    Metallic magnesium (Mg) and its alloys are highly suitable for medical applications as biocompatible and biodegradable implant materials. Magnesium has mechanical properties similar to bone, stimulates bone regeneration, is an essential non-toxic element for the human body and degrades completely within the body environment. In consequence, magnesium is a promising candidate as implant material for orthopaedic applications. Protocols using the guideline of current ISO standards should be carefully evaluated when applying them for the characterization of the cytotoxic potential of degradable magnesium materials. For as-cast material we recommend using 10 times more extraction medium than recommended by the ISO standards to obtain reasonable results for reliable cytotoxicity rankings of degradable materials in vitro. In addition primary isolated human osteoblasts or mesenchymal stem cells should be used to test magnesium materials.

  1. Systems and Methods for Fabricating Structures Including Metallic Glass-Based Materials Using Low Pressure Casting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, Douglas C. (Inventor); Kennett, Andrew (Inventor)

    2018-01-01

    Systems and methods to fabricate objects including metallic glass-based materials using low-pressure casting techniques are described. In one embodiment, a method of fabricating an object that includes a metallic glass-based material includes: introducing molten alloy into a mold cavity defined by a mold using a low enough pressure such that the molten alloy does not conform to features of the mold cavity that are smaller than 100 microns; and cooling the molten alloy such that it solidifies, the solid including a metallic glass-based material.

  2. Erosion testing of hard materials and coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hawk, Jeffrey A.

    2005-04-29

    Erosion is the process by which unconstrained particles, usually hard, impact a surface, creating damage that leads to material removal and component failure. These particles are usually very small and entrained in fluid of some type, typically air. The damage that occurs as a result of erosion depends on the size of the particles, their physical characteristics, the velocity of the particle/fluid stream, and their angle of impact on the surface of interest. This talk will discuss the basics of jet erosion testing of hard materials, composites and coatings. The standard test methods will be discussed as well as alternative approaches to determining the erosion rate of materials. The damage that occurs will be characterized in genera1 terms, and examples will be presented for the erosion behavior of hard materials and coatings (both thick and thin).

  3. Principles for supplying virus-tested material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varveri, Christina; Maliogka, Varvara I; Kapari-Isaia, Theodora

    2015-01-01

    Production of virus-tested material of vegetatively propagated crops through national certification schemes has been implemented in many developed countries for more than 60 years and its importance for being the best virus control means is well acknowledged by growers worldwide. The two most important elements of certification schemes are the use of sensitive, reliable, and rapid detection techniques to check the health status of the material produced and effective and simple sanitation procedures for the elimination of viruses if present in candidate material before it enters the scheme. New technologies such as next-generation sequencing platforms are expected to further enhance the efficiency of certification and production of virus-tested material, through the clarification of the unknown etiology of several graft-transmissible diseases. The successful production of virus-tested material is a demanding procedure relying on the close collaboration of researchers, official services, and the private sector. Moreover, considerable efforts have been made by regional plant protection organizations such as the European and Mediterranean Plant Protection Organization (EPPO), the North American Plant Protection Organization (NAPPO), and the European Union and the USA to harmonize procedures, methodologies, and techniques in order to assure the quality, safety, and movement of the vegetatively propagated material produced around the world. © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Simulation and material testing of jet engines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tariq, M.M.

    2006-01-01

    The NASA software engine simulator version U 1.7a beta has been used for simulation and material testing of jet engines. Specifications of Modem Jet Engines are stated, and then engine simulator is applied on these specifications. This simulator can simulate turbojet, afterburner, turbofan and ram jet. The material of many components of engine may be varied. Conventional and advanced materials for jet engines can be simulated and tested. These materials can be actively cooled to increase the operating temperature limit. As soon as temperature of any engine component exceeds the temperature limit of material, a warning message flashes across screen. Temperature Limits Exceeded. This flashing message remainst here until necessaryc hangesa re carried out in engine operationp rocedure. Selection Criteria of Engines is stated for piston prop, turboprop, turbofan, turbojet, and turbojet with afterburner and Ramjet. Several standard engines are modeled in Engine Simulator. These engines can. be compared by several engineering specifications. The design, modeling, simulation and testing of engines helps to better understand different types of materials used in jet engines. (author)

  5. Plasma-Materials Interactions Test Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uckan, T.

    1986-11-01

    The Plasma-Materials Interactions Test Facility (PMITF), recently designed and constructed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), is an electron cyclotron resonance microwave plasma system with densities around 10 11 cm -3 and electron temperatures of 10-20 eV. The device consists of a mirror cell with high-field-side microwave injection and a heating power of up to 0.8 kW(cw) at 2.45 GHz. The facility will be used for studies of plasma-materials interactions and of particle physics in pump limiters and for development and testing of plasma edge diagnostics

  6. Testing fireproof materials in a combustion chamber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kulhavy Petr

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This article deals with a prototype concept, real experiment and numerical simulation of a combustion chamber, designed for testing fire resistance some new insulating composite materials. This concept of a device used for testing various materials, providing possibility of monitoring temperatures during controlled gas combustion. As a fuel for the combustion process propane butane mixture has been used and also several kinds of burners with various conditions of inlet air (forced, free and fuel flows were tested. The tested samples were layered sandwich materials based on various materials or foams, used as fillers in fire shutters. The temperature distribution was measured by using thermocouples. A simulation of whole concept of experimental chamber has been carried out as the non-premixed combustion process in the commercial final volume sw Pyrosim. The result was to design chamber with a construction suitable, according to the international standards, achieve the required values (temperature in time. Model of the combustion based on a stoichiometric defined mixture of gas and the tested layered samples showed good conformity with experimental results – i.e. thermal distribution inside and heat release rate that has gone through the sample.

  7. Development for advanced materials and testing techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hishinuma, Akimichi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1998-03-01

    Recent studies using a JMTR and research reactors of JRR-2 and JRR-3 are briefly summarized. Small specimen testing techniques (SSTT) required for an effective use of irradiation volume and also irradiated specimens have been developed focussing on tensile test, fatigue test, Charpy test and small punch test. By using the small specimens of 0.1 - several mm in size, similar values of tensile and fatigue properties to those by standard size specimens can be taken, although the ductile-brittle transition temperature (DBTT) depends strongly on Charpy specimen size. As for advanced material development, R and D about low activation ferritic steels have been done to investigate irradiation response. The low activation ferritic steel, so-called F82H jointly-developed by JAERI and NKK for fusion, has been confirmed to have good irradiation resistance within a limited dose and now selected as a standard material in the fusion material community. It is also found that TiAi intermetallic compounds, which never been considered for nuclear application in the past, have an excellent irradiation resistance under an irradiation condition. Such knowledge can bring about a large expectation for developing advanced nuclear materials. (author)

  8. Nuclear Materials Management for the Nevada Test Site (NTS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jesse C. Schreiber

    2007-01-01

    The Nevada Test Site (NTS) has transitioned from its historical role of weapons testing to a broader role that is focused on being a solution to multiple National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) challenges and opportunities with nuclear materials for the nation. NTS is supporting other NNSA sites challenged with safe nuclear materials storage and disposition. NNSA, with site involvement, is currently transforming the nuclear stockpile and supporting infrastructure to meet the 2030 vision. Efforts are under way to make the production complex smaller, more consolidated, and more modern. With respect to the nuclear material stockpile, the NNSA sites are currently reducing the complex nuclear material inventory through dispositioning and consolidating nuclear material. This includes moving material from other sites to NTS. State-of-the-art nuclear material management and control practices at NTS are essential for NTS to ensure that these new activities are accomplished in a safe, secure, efficient, and environmentally responsible manner. NTS is aggressively addressing this challenge

  9. Double Retort System for Materials Compatibility Testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    V. Munne; EV Carelli

    2006-01-01

    With Naval Reactors (NR) approval of the Naval Reactors Prime Contractor Team (NRPCT) recommendation to develop a gas cooled reactor directly coupled to a Brayton power conversion system as the Space Nuclear Power Plant (SNPP) for Project Prometheus (References a and b) there was a need to investigate compatibility between the various materials to be used throughout the SNPP. Of particular interest was the transport of interstitial impurities from the nickel-base superalloys, which were leading candidates for most of the piping and turbine components to the refractory metal alloys planned for use in the reactor core. This kind of contamination has the potential to affect the lifetime of the core materials. This letter provides technical information regarding the assembly and operation of a double retort materials compatibility testing system and initial experimental results. The use of a double retort system to test materials compatibility through the transfer of impurities from a source to a sink material is described here. The system has independent temperature control for both materials and is far less complex than closed loops. The system is described in detail and the results of three experiments are presented

  10. High Flux Materials Testing Reactor (HFR), Petten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-09-01

    After conversion to burnable poison fuel elements, the High Flux Materials Testing Reactor (HFR) Petten (Netherlands), operated through 1974 for 280 days at 45 MW. Equipment for irradiation experiments has been replaced and extended. The average annual occupation by experiments was 55% as compared to 38% in 1973. Work continued on thirty irradiation projects and ten development activities

  11. Tests on irradiated magnet-insulator materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmunk, R.E.; Miller, L.G.; Becker, H.

    1983-01-01

    Fusion-reactor coils, located in areas where they will be only partially shielded, must be fabricated from materials which are as resistant to radiation as possible. They will probably incorporate resistive conductors with either water or cryogenic cooling. Inorganic insulators have been recommended for these situations, but the possibility exists that some organic insulators may be usuable as well. Results were previously reported for irradiation and testing of three glass reinforced epoxies: G-7, G-10, and G-11. Thin disks of these materials, nominally 0.5 mm thick by 11.1 mm diameter, were tested in compressive fatigue, a configuration and loading which represents reasonably well the magnet environment. In that work G-10 was shown to withstand repeated loading to moderately high stress levels without failure, and the material survived better at liquid nitrogen temperature than at room temperature

  12. Standard test method for galling resistance of material couples

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2008-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers a laboratory test that ranks the galling resistance of material couples using a quantitative measure. Bare metals, alloys, nonmetallic materials, coatings, and surface modified materials may be evaluated by this test method. 1.2 This test method is not designed for evaluating the galling resistance of material couples sliding under lubricated conditions, because galling usually will not occur under lubricated sliding conditions using this test method. 1.3 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as standard. No other units of measurement are included in this standard. 1.4 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  13. Recent developments in dynamic testing of materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilat Amos

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available New techniques for dynamic characterization of materials that have been developed in the last three years (since the last DYMAT conference in 2012, and results from recent dynamic testing of Inconel 718 are presented. The first development is a dynamic punch test in which three dimensional Digital Image Correlation (DIC is used to measure the deformation of the rear surface of a specimen as it being penetrated. The second experimental technique that is under development is a dynamic tension experiment in which full-field strain measurement with DIC and full-field temperature measurement are done simultaneously during the test.

  14. Capsule development and utilization for material irradiation tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Young Hwan; Kim, B. G.; Joo, K. N. [and others

    2000-05-01

    The development program of advanced nuclear structural and fuel materials includes the in-pile tests using the instrumented capsule at HANARO. The tests were performed in the in-core test holes of CT, IR 1 and 2 and OR 4 and 5 of HANARO. Extensive efforts have also been made to establish design and manufacturing technology for the instrumented capsule and its related system, which should be compatible with the HANARO's characteristics. Since the first instrumented capsule(97M-01K) had been designed and successfully fabricated, five tests were done to support the users and provided the economic benefits to user by generating the essential in-pile information on the performance and structural integrity of materials. This paper describes the present status and future plans of these R and D activities for the development of the instrumented capsule including in-situ material property measurement capsules and nuclear fuel test capsules.

  15. Capsule development and utilization for material irradiation tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Young Hwan; Kim, B. G.; Joo, K. N.

    2000-05-01

    The development program of advanced nuclear structural and fuel materials includes the in-pile tests using the instrumented capsule at HANARO. The tests were performed in the in-core test holes of CT, IR 1 and 2 and OR 4 and 5 of HANARO. Extensive efforts have also been made to establish design and manufacturing technology for the instrumented capsule and its related system, which should be compatible with the HANARO's characteristics. Since the first instrumented capsule(97M-01K) had been designed and successfully fabricated, five tests were done to support the users and provided the economic benefits to user by generating the essential in-pile information on the performance and structural integrity of materials. This paper describes the present status and future plans of these R and D activities for the development of the instrumented capsule including in-situ material property measurement capsules and nuclear fuel test capsules

  16. Capsule development and utilization for material irradiation tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Young Hwan; Kim, B G; Joo, K N [and others

    2000-05-01

    The development program of advanced nuclear structural and fuel materials includes the in-pile tests using the instrumented capsule at HANARO. The tests were performed in the in-core test holes of CT, IR 1 and 2 and OR 4 and 5 of HANARO. Extensive efforts have also been made to establish design and manufacturing technology for the instrumented capsule and its related system, which should be compatible with the HANARO's characteristics. Since the first instrumented capsule(97M-01K) had been designed and successfully fabricated, five tests were done to support the users and provided the economic benefits to user by generating the essential in-pile information on the performance and structural integrity of materials. This paper describes the present status and future plans of these R and D activities for the development of the instrumented capsule including in-situ material property measurement capsules and nuclear fuel test capsules.

  17. Ablative Material Testing at Lewis Rocket Lab

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    The increasing demand for a low-cost, reliable way to launch commercial payloads to low- Earth orbit has led to the need for inexpensive, expendable propulsion systems for new launch vehicles. This, in turn, has renewed interest in less complex, uncooled rocket engines that have combustion chambers and exhaust nozzles fabricated from ablative materials. A number of aerospace propulsion system manufacturers have utilized NASA Lewis Research Center's test facilities with a high degree of success to evaluate candidate materials for application to new propulsion devices.

  18. FMIT - the fusion materials irradiation test facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liska, D.J.

    1980-01-01

    A joint effort by the Hanford Engineering Development Laboratory (HEDL) and Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL) has produced a preliminary design for a Fusion Materials Irradiation Test Facility (FMIT) that uses a high-power linear accelerator to fire a deuteron beam into a high-speed jet of molten lithium. The result is a continuous energy spectrum of neutrons with a 14-MeV average energy which can irradiate material samples to projected end-of-life levels in about 3 years, with a total accumulated fluence of 10 21 to 10 22 n/cm 2

  19. Physical and chemical test results of electrostatic safe flooring materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gompf, R. H.

    1988-01-01

    This test program was initiated because a need existed at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) to have this information readily available to the engineer who must make the choice of which electrostatic safe floor to use in a specific application. The information, however, should be of value throughout both the government and private industry in the selection of a floor covering material. Included are the test results of 18 floor covering materials which by test evaluation at KSC are considered electrostatically safe. Tests were done and/or the data compiled in the following areas: electrostatics, flammability, hypergolic compatibility, outgassing, floor type, material thickness, and available colors. Each section contains the test method used to gather the data and the test results.

  20. Potential countersample materials for in vitro simulation wear testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shortall, Adrian C; Hu, Xiao Q; Marquis, Peter M

    2002-05-01

    Any laboratory investigation of the wear resistance of dental materials needs to consider oral conditions so that in vitro wear results can be correlated with in vivo findings. The choice of the countersample is a critical factor in establishing the pattern of tribological wear and in achieving an efficient in vitro wear testing system. This research investigated the wear behavior and surface characteristics associated with three candidate countersample materials used for in vitro wear testing in order to identify a possible suitable substitute for human dental enamel. Three candidate materials, stainless steel, steatite and dental porcelain were evaluated and compared to human enamel. A variety of factors including hardness, wear surface evolution and frictional coefficients were considered, relative to the tribology of the in vivo situation. The results suggested that the dental porcelain investigated bore the closest similarity to human enamel of the materials investigated. Assessment of potential countersample materials should be based on the essential tribological simulation supported by investigations of mechanical, chemical and structural properties. The selected dental porcelain had the best simulating ability among the three selected countersample materials and this class of material may be considered as a possible countersample material for in vitro wear test purposes. Further studies are required, employing a wider range of dental ceramics, in order to optimise the choice of countersample material for standardized in vitro wear testing.

  1. Ultrasonic testing of materials at level 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-06-01

    Ultrasonic inspection is a nondestructive method in which high frequency sound waves are introduced into the material being inspected. Ultrasonic testing has a superior penetrating power to radiography and can detect flaws deep in the test specimen (say up to about 6 to 7 meters of steel). It is quite sensitive to small flaws and allows the precise determination of the location and size of the flaws. Basic ultrasonic test methods such as the through transmission method and the resonance method, sensors and testing techniques are described. Pulse echo type flaw detectors and their applications for inspection of welds are surveyed. Ultrasonic standards, calibration of the equipment and evaluation methods are presented. Examples of practical applications in welding, casting and forging processes are given. Figs and tabs

  2. Test System for Thermoelectric Modules and Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hejtmánek, J.; Knížek, K.; Švejda, V.; Horna, P.; Sikora, M.

    2014-10-01

    We present a design for a complex measuring device that enables its user to assess the parameters of power-generating thermoelectric modules (TEMs) (or bulk thermoelectric materials) under a wide range of temperatures ( T cold = 25°C to 90°C, T hot TEM, the actual heat flow through the module, and its mechanical load, which can be varied during the measurement. Key components of our testing setup are (i) a measuring chamber where the TEM/material is compressed between thermally shielded heating blocks equipped with a mechanical loading system and water-cooled copper-based cooler, (ii) an electrical load system, (iii) a type K thermocouple array connected to a data acquisition computer, and (iv) a thermostatic water-based cooling system with electronically controlled flow rate and temperature of cooling water. Our testing setup represents a useful tool able to assess, e.g., the thermoelectric parameters of newly developed TEMs and materials or to evaluate the thermoelectric parameters of commercially available modules and materials for comparison with values declared by the manufacturer.

  3. Apparatus Tests Peeling Of Bonded Rubbery Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crook, Russell A.; Graham, Robert

    1996-01-01

    Instrumented hydraulic constrained blister-peel apparatus obtains data on degree of bonding between specimen of rubbery material and rigid plate. Growth of blister tracked by video camera, digital clock, pressure transducer, and piston-displacement sensor. Cylinder pressure controlled by hydraulic actuator system. Linear variable-differential transformer (LVDT) and float provide second, independent measure of change in blister volume used as more precise volume feedback in low-growth-rate test.

  4. Ultrasonic tests on materials with protective coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whaley, H.L.

    1977-01-01

    Protective coatings are applied to some nuclear components such as reactor vessels to inhibit surface corrosion. Since in-service ultrasonic inspection is required for such components, a study was performed to determine whether the use of protective coatings can affect ultrasonic tests. Two 2 in. thick steel plates were uniformly machined, sandblasted, and used as bases for two types of protective coatings. The type and thickness of the coating and the presence of contamination, such as fingerprints or mild oxidation under the paint, were the independent variables associated with the coating. Tests were run to determine the effects of the protective coatings on ultrasonic tests conducted on the steel plates. Significant variations in ultrasonic test sensitivity occurred as a function of the type and thickness of protective coating, couplant (material that conducts the ultrasound from the transducer into the test part, normally water or some type of oil), transducer wear plate, and ultrasonic test frequency. Ultrasonic tests can be strongly affected by a protective coating on the component to be inspected. As compared to the test sensitivity for an uncoated reference sample, the sensitivity may be dramatically shifted up or down on the coated surface. In certain coating thickness ranges, the sensitivity can fluctuate widely with small changes in coating thickness. If a coating is chosen properly, however, components with protective coatings can be tested ultrasonically with valid results. These results are for the case of ultrasonic input on the coated surface. It is not expected that an ultrasonic test conducted from the front surface would be appreciably affected by a coating on the rear surface

  5. Standard test method for dynamic tear testing of metallic materials

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    1983-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers the dynamic tear (DT) test using specimens that are 3/16 in. to 5/8 in. (5 mm to 16 mm) inclusive in thickness. 1.2 This test method is applicable to materials with a minimum thickness of 3/16 in. (5 mm). 1.3 The pressed-knife procedure described for sharpening the notch tip generally limits this test method to materials with a hardness level less than 36 HRC. Note 1—The designation 36 HRC is a Rockwell hardness number of 36 on Rockwell C scale as defined in Test Methods E 18. 1.4 The values stated in inch-pound units are to be regarded as standard. The values given in parentheses are mathematical conversions to SI units that are provided for information only and are not considered standard. 1.5 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  6. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 168: Areas 25 and 26 Contaminated Materials and Waste Dumps, Nevada Test Site, Nevada (Rev. 0) includes Record of Technical Change No. 1 (dated 8/28/2002), Record of Technical Change No. 2 (dated 9/23/2002), and Record of Technical Change No. 3 (dated 6/2/2004)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada

    2001-11-21

    This Corrective Action Investigation Plan contains the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office's approach to collect data necessary to evaluate corrective action alternatives appropriate for the closure of Corrective Action Unit 168 under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Corrective Action Unit 168 consists of a group of twelve relatively diverse Corrective Action Sites (CASs 25-16-01, Construction Waste Pile; 25-16-03, MX Construction Landfill; 25-19-02, Waste Disposal Site; 25-23-02, Radioactive Storage RR Cars; 25-23-18, Radioactive Material Storage; 25-34-01, NRDS Contaminated Bunker; 25-34-02, NRDS Contaminated Bunker; CAS 25-23-13, ETL - Lab Radioactive Contamination; 25-99-16, USW G3; 26-08-01, Waste Dump/Burn Pit; 26-17-01, Pluto Waste Holding Area; 26-19-02, Contaminated Waste Dump No.2). These CASs vary in terms of the sources and nature of potential contamination. The CASs are located and/or associated wit h the following Nevada Test Site (NTS) facilities within three areas. The first eight CASs were in operation between 1958 to 1984 in Area 25 include the Engine Maintenance, Assembly, and Disassembly Facility; the Missile Experiment Salvage Yard; the Reactor Maintenance, Assembly, and Disassembly Facility; the Radioactive Materials Storage Facility; and the Treatment Test Facility Building at Test Cell A. Secondly, the three CASs located in Area 26 include the Project Pluto testing area that operated from 1961 to 1964. Lastly, the Underground Southern Nevada Well (USW) G3 (CAS 25-99-16), a groundwater monitoring well located west of the NTS on the ridgeline of Yucca Mountain, was in operation during the 1980s. Based on site history and existing characterization data obtained to support the data quality objectives process, contaminants of potential concern (COPCs) for CAU 168 are primarily radionuclide; however, the COPCs for several CASs were not defined. To address COPC

  7. New Nuclear Materials Including Non Metallic Fuel Elements. Vol. I. Proceedings of the Conference on New Nuclear Materials Technology, Including Non Metallic Fuel Elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1963-01-01

    One of the major aims of the International Atomic Energy Agency in furthering the peaceful uses of atomic energy is to encourage the development of economical nuclear power. Certainly, one of the more obvious methods of producing economical nuclear power is the development of economical fuels that can be used at high temperatures for long periods of time, and which have sufficient strength and integrity to operate under these conditions without permitting the release of fission products. In addition it is desirable that after irradiation these new fuels be economically reprocessed to reduce further the cost of the fuel cycle. As nuclear power becomes more and more competitive with conventional power the interest in new and more efficient higher-temperature fuels naturally increases rapidly. For these reasons, the Agency organized a Conference on New Nuclear Materials Technology, Including Non-Metallic Fuel Elements, which was held from 1 to 5 July 1963 at the International Hotel, Prague, with the assistance and co-operation of the Government of the Czechoslovak Socialist Republic. A total of 151 scientists attended, from 23 countries and 4 international organizations. The participants heard and discussed more than 60 scientific papers

  8. A smart predictor for material property testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Wilson; Kanneg, Derek

    2008-01-01

    A reliable predictor is very useful for real-world industrial applications to forecast the future behavior of dynamic systems. A smart predictor, based on a novel recurrent neural fuzzy (RNF) scheme, is developed in this paper for multi-step-ahead prediction of material properties. A systematic investigation based on two benchmark data sets is conducted in terms of performance and efficiency. Analysis results reveal that, of the data-driven forecasting schemes, predictors based on step input patterns outperform those based on sequential input patterns; the RNF predictor outperforms those based on recurrent neural networks and ANFIS schemes in multi-step-ahead prediction of nonlinear time series. An adaptive Levenberg–Marquardt training technique is adopted to improve the robustness and convergence of the RNF predictor. Furthermore, the proposed smart predictor is implemented for material property testing. Investigation results show that the developed RNF predictor is a reliable forecasting tool for material property testing; it can capture and track the system's dynamic characteristics quickly and accurately. It is also a robust predictor to accommodate different system conditions

  9. Material characterization models and test methods for historic building materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Tessa Kvist; Peuhkuri, Ruut Hannele; Møller, Eva B.

    2017-01-01

    Predictions of long term hygrothermal performance can be assessed by dynamic hygrothermal simulations, in which material parameters are crucial input. Material parameters for especially historic materials are often unknown; therefore, there is a need to determine important parameters, and simple...

  10. Experience in nuclear materials accountancy, including the use of computers, in the UKAEA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, A.R.; Adamson, A.S.; Good, P.T.; Terrey, D.R.

    1976-01-01

    The UKAEA have operated systems of nuclear materials accountancy in research and development establishments handling large quantities of material for over 20 years. In the course of that time changing requirements for nuclear materials control and increasing quantities of materials have required that accountancy systems be modified and altered to improve either the fundamental system or manpower utilization. The same accountancy principles are applied throughout the Authority but procedures at the different establishments vary according to the nature of their specific requirements; there is much in the cumulative experience of the UKAEA which could prove of value to other organizations concerned with nuclear materials accountancy or safeguards. This paper reviews the present accountancy system in the UKAEA and summarizes its advantages. Details are given of specific experience and solutions which have been found to overcome difficulties or to strengthen previous weak points. Areas discussed include the use of measurements, the establishment of measurement points (which is relevant to the designation of MBAs), the importance of regular physical stock-taking, and the benefits stemming from the existence of a separate accountancy section independent of operational management at large establishments. Some experience of a dual system of accountancy and criticality control is reported, and the present status of computerization of nuclear material accounts is summarized. Important aspects of the relationship between management systems of accountancy and safeguards' requirements are discussed briefly. (author)

  11. Test plan for buried waste containment system materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weidner, J.; Shaw, P.

    1997-03-01

    The objectives of the FY 1997 barrier material work at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory are to (1) select a waste barrier material and verify that it is compatible with the Buried Waste Containment System Process, and (2) determine if, and how, the Buried Waste Containment System emplacement process affects the material properties and performance (on proof of principle scale). This test plan describes a set of measurements and procedures used to validate a waste barrier material for the Buried Waste Containment System. A latex modified proprietary cement manufactured by CTS Cement Manufacturing Company will be tested. Emplacement properties required for the Buried Waste Containment System process are: slump between 8 and 10 in., set time between 15 and 30 minutes, compressive strength at set of 20 psi minimum, and set temperature less than 100 degrees C. Durability properties include resistance to degradation from carbonate, sulfate, and waste-site soil leachates. A set of baseline barrier material properties will be determined to provide a data base for comparison with the barrier materials when tested in the field. The measurements include permeability, petrographic analysis to determine separation and/or segregation of mix components, and a set of mechanical properties. The measurements will be repeated on specimens from the field test material. The data will be used to determine if the Buried Waste Containment System equipment changes the material. The emplacement properties will be determined using standard laboratory procedures and instruments. Durability of the barrier material will be evaluated by determining the effect of carbonate, sulfate, and waste-site soil leachates on the compressive strength of the barrier material. The baseline properties will be determined using standard ASTM procedures. 9 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs

  12. Investigation of contact allergy to dental materials by patch testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reena Rai

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Dental products are widely used by patients and dental personnel alike and may cause problems for both. Dental materials could cause contact allergy with varying manifestations such as burning, pain, stomatitis, cheilitis, ulcers, lichenoid reactions localized to the oral mucosa in patients, and hand dermatitis in dental personnel. Patch testing with the dental series comprising commonly used materials can be used to detect contact allergies to dental materials. Aim: This study aimed to identify contact allergy among patients who have oral mucosal lesions after dental treatment and among dental personnel who came in contact with these materials. Materials and Methods: Twenty patients who had undergone dental procedures with symptoms of oral lichen planus, oral stomatitis, burning mouth, and recurrent aphthosis, were included in the study. Dental personnel with history of hand dermatitis were also included in the study. Patch testing was performed using Chemotechnique Dental Series and results interpreted as recommended by the International Contact Dermatitis Research Group (ICDRG. Results: Out of 13 patients who had undergone dental treatment/with oral symptoms, six patients with stomatitis, lichenoid lesions, and oral ulcers showed positive patch tests to a variety of dental materials, seven patients with ulcers had negative patch tests, seven dental personnel with hand dermatitis showed multiple allergies to various dental materials, and most had multiple positivities. Conclusion: The patch test is a useful, simple, noninvasive method to detect contact allergies among patients and among dental personnel dealing with these products. Long term studies are necessary to establish the relevance of these positive patch tests by eliminating the allergic substances, identifying clinical improvement, and substituting with nonallergenic materials.

  13. Proceedings of the international symposium on materials testing reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishihara, Masahiro; Kawamura, Hiroshi

    2009-01-01

    This report is the Proceedings of the International Symposium on Materials Testing Reactors hosted by Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA). The symposium was held on July 16 to 17, 2008, at the Oarai Research and Development Center of JAEA. This symposium was also held for the 40th anniversary ceremony of Japan Materials Testing Reactor (JMTR) from achieving its first criticality. The objective of the symposium is to exchange the information on current status, future plan and so on among each testing reactors for the purpose of mutual understanding. There were 138 participants from Argentina, Belgium, France, Indonesia, Kazakhstan, Korea, the Russian Federation, Sweden, the United State, Vietnam and Japan. The symposium was divided into four technical sessions and three topical sessions. Technical sessions addressed the general topics of 'status and future plan of materials testing reactors', 'material development for research and testing reactors', irradiation technology (including PIE technology)' and 'utilization with materials testing reactors', and 21 presentations were made. Also the topical sessions addressed 'establishment of strategic partnership', 'management on re-operation work at reactor trouble' and 'basic technology for neutron irradiation tests in MTRs', and panel discussion was made. The 21 of the presented papers are indexed individually. (J.P.N.)

  14. New Nuclear Materials Including Non Metallic Fuel Elements. Vol. II. Proceedings of the Conference on New Nuclear Materials Technology, Including Non Metallic Fuel Elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1963-01-01

    One of the major aims of the International Atomic Energy Agency in furthering the peaceful uses of atomic energy is to encourage the development of economical nuclear power. Certainly, one of the more obvious methods of producing economical nuclear power is the development of economical fuels that can be used at high temperatures for long periods of time, and which have sufficient strength and integrity to operate under these conditions without permitting the release of fission products. In addition it is desirable that after irradiation these new fuels be economically reprocessed to reduce further the cost of the fuel cycle. As nuclear power becomes more and more competitive with conventional power the interest in new and more efficient higher-temperature fuels naturally increases rapidly. For these reasons, the Agency organized a Conference on New Nuclear Materials Technology, Including Non-Metallic Fuel Elements, which was held from 1 to 5 July 1963 at the International Hotel, Prague, with the assistance and co-operation of the Government of the Czechoslovak Socialist Republic. A total of 151 scientists attended, from 23 countries and 4 international organizations. The participants heard and discussed more than 60 scientific papers. The Agency wishes to thank the scientists who attended this Conference for their papers and for many spirited discussions that truly mark a successful meeting. The Agency wishes also to record its gratitude for the assistance and generous hospitality accorded the Conference, the participants and the Agency's staff by the Government of the Czechoslovak Socialist Republic and by the people of Prague. The scientific information contained in these Proceedings should help to quicken the pace of progress in the fabrication of new and m ore economical fuels, and it is hoped that these proceedings will be found useful to all workers in this and related fields

  15. Electrochemical Corrosion Testing of Neutron Absorber Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tedd Lister; Ron Mizia; Sandra Birk; Brent Matteson; Hongbo Tian

    2006-01-01

    The Yucca Mountain Project (YMP) has been directed by DOE-RW to develop a new repository waste package design based on the transport, aging, and disposal canister (TAD) system concept. A neutron poison material for fabrication of the internal spent nuclear fuel (SNF) baskets for these canisters needs to be identified. A material that has been used for criticality control in wet and dry storage of spent nuclear fuel is borated stainless steel. These stainless products are available as an ingot metallurgy plate product with a molybdenum addition and a powder metallurgy product that meets the requirements of ASTM A887, Grade A. A new Ni-Cr-Mo-Gd alloy has been developed by the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) with its research partners (Sandia National Laboratory and Lehigh University) with DOE-EM funding provided by the National Spent Nuclear Fuel Program (NSNFP). This neutron absorbing alloy will be used to fabricate the SNF baskets in the DOE standardized canister. The INL has designed the DOE Standardized Spent Nuclear Fuel Canister for the handling, interim storage, transportation, and disposal in the national repository of DOE owned spent nuclear fuel (SNF). A corrosion testing program is required to compare these materials in environmental conditions representative of a breached waste canister. This report will summarize the results of crevice corrosion tests for three alloys in solutions representative of ionic compositions inside the waste package should a breech occur. The three alloys in these tests are Neutronit A978 (ingot metallurgy, hot rolled), Neutrosorb 304B4 Grade A (powder metallurgy, hot rolled), and Ni-Cr-Mo-Gd alloy (ingot metallurgy, hot rolled)

  16. Material test of concrete for PCCV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okada, Katsuya; Kamiyama, Yukio; Iwasawa, Jiro.

    1987-01-01

    The concrete used for the prestressed concrete containment vessel (PCCV) for Tsuruga No.2 plant of Japan Atomic Power Co. has the design standard strength as high as 420 kg/cm 2 , but for the purpose of preventing the cracking due to hydration heat at the time of concrete hardening, the medium heat cement mixed with flyash was adopted. The example of using the cement of this kind for high strength concrete has been few, and the data on its various properties have been scarce. First, the various mixing proportion for the high strength concrete using the medium heat cement mixed with flyash was experimented, and the basic mixing proportion for satisfying the design standard strength 420 kg/cm 2 was determined. Next, about this basic mixing proportion, the tests on the crrep characteristics and the thermal characteristics required for the design of PCCVs were carried out. In this report, the results of these tests on the concrete are described. By combining the concrete materials available in Tsuruga district, the test on unsolidified concrete and hardened concrete was carried out. The experimental method and the results are reported. Uniaxial compression creep test was carried out on the concrete having the selected mixing proportion to evaluate the propriety of the design creep factor. In the test of the thermal characteristics, the heat conductivity, heat diffusivity, linear thermal expansion and specific heat were measured. (Kako, I.)

  17. Tests on 'radio-active' material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1982-01-01

    The storage of radio-active waste from nuclear power stations is a well known problem and a subject for extensive investigation. In connection with the use of cement as storage material, tests were carried out on cement-filled 200-litre sheet-steel containers. In order to avoid contamination of the cement core by drilling sludge, any drilling operation must be carried out dry, i.e. without liquid cooling. Air-blast cooling was therefore used for the cooling of a diamond drill and also for the removal of swarf. (H.E.G.)

  18. Standard test methods for rockwell hardness of metallic materials

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2011-01-01

    1.1 These test methods cover the determination of the Rockwell hardness and the Rockwell superficial hardness of metallic materials by the Rockwell indentation hardness principle. This standard provides the requirements for Rockwell hardness machines and the procedures for performing Rockwell hardness tests. 1.2 This standard includes additional requirements in annexes: Verification of Rockwell Hardness Testing Machines Annex A1 Rockwell Hardness Standardizing Machines Annex A2 Standardization of Rockwell Indenters Annex A3 Standardization of Rockwell Hardness Test Blocks Annex A4 Guidelines for Determining the Minimum Thickness of a Test Piece Annex A5 Hardness Value Corrections When Testing on Convex Cylindrical Surfaces Annex A6 1.3 This standard includes nonmandatory information in appendixes which relates to the Rockwell hardness test. List of ASTM Standards Giving Hardness Values Corresponding to Tensile Strength Appendix X1 Examples of Procedures for Determining Rockwell Hardness Uncertainty Appendix X...

  19. Standard test methods for rockwell hardness of metallic materials

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2008-01-01

    1.1 These test methods cover the determination of the Rockwell hardness and the Rockwell superficial hardness of metallic materials by the Rockwell indentation hardness principle. This standard provides the requirements for Rockwell hardness machines and the procedures for performing Rockwell hardness tests. 1.2 This standard includes additional requirements in annexes: Verification of Rockwell Hardness Testing Machines Annex A1 Rockwell Hardness Standardizing Machines Annex A2 Standardization of Rockwell Indenters Annex A3 Standardization of Rockwell Hardness Test Blocks Annex A4 Guidelines for Determining the Minimum Thickness of a Test Piece Annex A5 Hardness Value Corrections When Testing on Convex Cylindrical Surfaces Annex A6 1.3 This standard includes nonmandatory information in appendixes which relates to the Rockwell hardness test. List of ASTM Standards Giving Hardness Values Corresponding to Tensile Strength Appendix X1 Examples of Procedures for Determining Rockwell Hardness Uncertainty Appendix X...

  20. Nuclear waste package materials testing report: basaltic and tuffaceous environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bradley, D.J.; Coles, D.G.; Hodges, F.N.; McVay, G.L.; Westerman, R.E.

    1983-03-01

    The disposal of high-level nuclear wastes in underground repositories in the continental United States requires the development of a waste package that will contain radionuclides for a time period commensurate with performance criteria, which may be up to 1000 years. This report addresses materials testing in support of a waste package for a basalt (Hanford, Washington) or a tuff (Nevada Test Site) repository. The materials investigated in this testing effort were: sodium and calcium bentonites and mixtures with sand or basalt as a backfill; iron and titanium-based alloys as structural barriers; and borosilicate waste glass PNL 76-68 as a waste form. The testing also incorporated site-specific rock media and ground waters: Reference Umtanum Entablature-1 basalt and reference basalt ground water, Bullfrog tuff and NTS J-13 well water. The results of the testing are discussed in four major categories: Backfill Materials: emphasizing water migration, radionuclide migration, physical property and long-term stability studies. Structural Barriers: emphasizing uniform corrosion, irradiation-corrosion, and environmental-mechanical testing. Waste Form Release Characteristics: emphasizing ground water, sample surface area/solution volume ratio, and gamma radiolysis effects. Component Compatibility: emphasizing solution/rock, glass/rock, glass/structural barrier, and glass/backfill interaction tests. This area also includes sensitivity testing to determine primary parameters to be studied, and the results of systems tests where more than two waste package components were combined during a single test

  1. Standard Test Method for Testing Nonmetallic Seal Materials by Immersion in a Simulated Geothermal Test Fluid

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    1985-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers a procedure for a laboratory test for performing an initial evaluation (screening) of nonmetallic seal materials by immersion in a simulated geothermal test fluid. 1.2 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as standard. No other units of measurement are included in this standard. 1.3 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use. For specific precautionary statements, see Section 6 and 11.7.

  2. Present status of Japan materials testing reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hori, Naohiko; Kaminaga, Masanori; Kusunoki, Tsuyoshi; Ishihara, Masahiro; Niimi, Motoji; Komori, Yoshihiro; Suzuki, Masahide; Kawamura, Hiroshi [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Oarai Research and Development Center, Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2012-03-15

    The Japan Materials Testing Reactor (JMTR) in Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) is a light water cooled tank type reactor with first criticality in March 1968. Owing to the connection between the JMTR and hot laboratory by a canal, easy re-irradiation tests can be conducted with safe and quick transportation of irradiated samples. The JMTR has been applied to fuel/material irradiation examinations for LWRs, HTGR, fusion reactor and RI production. However, the JMTR operation was once stopped in August 2006, and check and review on the reoperation had been conducted by internal as well as external committees. As a result of the discussion, the JMTR reoperation was determined, and refurbishment works started from the beginning of JFY 2007. The refurbishment works have finished in March 2011 taking four years from JFY 2007. Unfortunately, at the end of the JFY 2010 on March 11, the Great-Eastern-Japan-Earthquake occurred, and functional tests before the JMTR restart, such as cooling system, reactor control system and so on, were delayed by the earthquake. Moreover, a detail inspection found some damages such as slight deformation of the truss structure at the roof of the JMTR reactor building. Consequently, the restart of the JMTR will be delayed from June to next October, 2012. Now, the safety evaluation after the earthquake disaster is being carried out aiming at the restart of the JMTR. The renewed JMTR will be started from JFY 2012 and operated for a period of about 20 years until around JFY 2030. The usability improvement of the JMTR, e.g. higher reactor availability, shortening turnaround time to get irradiation results, attractive irradiation cost, business confidence, is also discussed with users as the preparations for re-operation. (author)

  3. Present status of Japan materials testing reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hori, Naohiko; Kaminaga, Masanori; Kusunoki, Tsuyoshi; Ishihara, Masahiro; Niimi, Motoji; Komori, Yoshihiro; Suzuki, Masahide; Kawamura, Hiroshi

    2012-01-01

    The Japan Materials Testing Reactor (JMTR) in Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) is a light water cooled tank type reactor with first criticality in March 1968. Owing to the connection between the JMTR and hot laboratory by a canal, easy re-irradiation tests can be conducted with safe and quick transportation of irradiated samples. The JMTR has been applied to fuel/material irradiation examinations for LWRs, HTGR, fusion reactor and RI production. However, the JMTR operation was once stopped in August 2006, and check and review on the reoperation had been conducted by internal as well as external committees. As a result of the discussion, the JMTR reoperation was determined, and refurbishment works started from the beginning of JFY 2007. The refurbishment works have finished in March 2011 taking four years from JFY 2007. Unfortunately, at the end of the JFY 2010 on March 11, the Great-Eastern-Japan-Earthquake occurred, and functional tests before the JMTR restart, such as cooling system, reactor control system and so on, were delayed by the earthquake. Moreover, a detail inspection found some damages such as slight deformation of the truss structure at the roof of the JMTR reactor building. Consequently, the restart of the JMTR will be delayed from June to next October, 2012. Now, the safety evaluation after the earthquake disaster is being carried out aiming at the restart of the JMTR. The renewed JMTR will be started from JFY 2012 and operated for a period of about 20 years until around JFY 2030. The usability improvement of the JMTR, e.g. higher reactor availability, shortening turnaround time to get irradiation results, attractive irradiation cost, business confidence, is also discussed with users as the preparations for re-operation. (author)

  4. New JMTR irradiation test plan on fuels and materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Takehiko; Nishiyama, Yutaka; Chimi, Yasuhiro; Sasajima, Hideo; Ogiyanagi, Jin; Nakamura, Jinichi; Suzuki, Masahide; Kawamura, Hiroshi

    2009-01-01

    In order to maintain and enhance safety of light water reactors (LWRs) in long-term and up-graded operations, proper understanding of irradiation behavior of fuels and materials is essentially important. Japanese government and the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) have decided to refurbish the Japan Materials Testing Reactor (JMTR) and to install new tests rigs, in order to play an active role for solving irradiation related issues on plant aging and high-duty uses of the current LWRs and on development of next-generation reactors. New tests on fuel integrity under simulated abnormal transients and high-duty irradiation conditions are planned in the JMTR. Power ramp tests of newdesign fuel rods will also be performed in the first stage of the program, which is expected to start in year 2011 after refurbishment of the JMTR. Combination of the JMTR tests with simulated reactivity initiated accident tests in the Nuclear Safety Research Reactor (NSRR) and loss of coolant accident tests in hot laboratories would serve as the integrated fuel safety research on the high performance fuels at extended burnups, covering from the normal to the accident conditions, including abnormal transients. For the materials irradiation, fracture toughness of reactor vessel steels and stress corrosion cracking behavior of stainless steels are being studied in addition to basic irradiation behavior of nuclear materials such as hafnium. The irradiation studies would contribute not only to solve the current problems but also to identify possible seeds of troubles and to make proactive responses. (author)

  5. Standard Test Method for Contamination Outgassing Characteristics of Spacecraft Materials

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2009-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers a technique for generating data to characterize the kinetics of the release of outgassing products from materials. This technique will determine both the total mass flux evolved by a material when exposed to a vacuum environment and the deposition of this flux on surfaces held at various specified temperatures. 1.2 This test method describes the test apparatus and related operating procedures for evaluating the total mass flux that is evolved from a material being subjected to temperatures that are between 298 and 398 K. Pressures external to the sample effusion cell are less than 7 × 10−3 Pa (5 × 10−5 torr). Deposition rates are measured during material outgassing tests. A test procedure for collecting data and a test method for processing and presenting the collected data are included. 1.3 This test method can be used to produce the data necessary to support mathematical models used for the prediction of molecular contaminant generation, migration, and deposition. 1.4 Al...

  6. Mechanical experiments on the superplastic material ALNOVI-1, including leak information

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snippe, Q.H.C.; Meinders, T.

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → Mechanical testing of superplastic materials, in particular ALNOVI-1. → Uniaxial tests to show the one-dimensional stress-strain behaviour and the high amount of strain rate sensitivity. → Void volume fractions have been observed. → Free bulge experiments to show the dependence on the backpressure during the forming stage. → Measuring leak tightness of superplastically formed sheets. → Experiments are used in order to develop a constitutive model in a later stage. - Abstract: In subatomic particle physics, unstable particles can be detected with a so-called vertex detector, placed inside a particle accelerator. A detecting unit close to the accelerator bunch of charged particles must be separated from the accelerator vacuum. A thin sheet with a complex 3D shape prevents the detector vacuum from polluting the accelerator vacuum. Therefore, this sheet has to be completely leak tight. However, this can conflict with restrictions concerning maximum sheet thickness of the product. To produce such a complex thin sheet, superplastic forming can be very attractive in cases where a small number of products is needed. In order to predict gas permeability of these formed sheets, many mechanical experiments are necessary, where the gas leak has to be measured. To obtain insight in the mechanical behaviour of the used material, ALNOVI-1, tensile experiments were performed to describe the uniaxial stress-strain behaviour. From these experiments, a high strain rate sensitivity was measured. The flow stress of this material under superplastic conditions was low and the material behaved in an isotropic manner upon large plastic strains. The results of these experiments were used to predict the forming pressure as a function of time in a free bulge experiment, such that a predefined target strain rate will not be exceeded in the material. An extra parameter within these bulging experiments is the application of a hydrostatic pressure during the

  7. Managing nuclear knowledge: IAEA activities and international coordination. Including resource material full text CD-ROM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-06-01

    The present CD-ROM summarizes some activities carried out by the Departments of Nuclear Energy and Nuclear Safety and Security in the area of nuclear knowledge management in the period 2003-2005. It comprises, as open resource, most of the relevant documents in full text, including policy level documents, reports, presentation material by Member States and meeting summaries. The collection starts with a reprint of the report to the IAEA General Conference 2004 on Nuclear Knowledge [GOV/2004/56-GC(48)/12] summarizing the developments in nuclear knowledge management since the 47th session of the General Conference in 2003 and covers Managing Nuclear Knowledge including safety issues and Information and Strengthening Education and Training for Capacity Building. It contains an excerpt on Nuclear Knowledge from the General Conference Resolution [GC(48)/RES/13] on Strengthening the Agency's Activities Related to Nuclear Science, Technology and Applications. On the CD-ROM itself, all documents can easily be accessed by clicking on their titles on the subject pages (also printed at the end of this Working Material). Part 1 of the CD-ROM covers the activities in the period 2003-2005 and part 2 presents a resource material full text CD-ROM on Managing Nuclear Knowledge issued in October 2003

  8. Erosion tests of materials by energetic particle beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schechter, D.E.; Tsai, C.C.; Sluss, F.; Becraft, W.R.; Hoffman, D.J.

    1985-01-01

    The internal components of magnetic fusion devices must withstand erosion from and high heat flux of energetic plasma particles. The selection of materials for the construction of these components is important to minimize contamination of the plasma. In order to study various materials' comparative resistance to erosion by energetic particles and their ability to withstand high heat flux, water-cooled copper swirl tubes coated or armored with various materials were subjected to bombardment by hydrogen and helium particle beams. Materials tested were graphite, titanium carbide (TiC), chromium, nickel, copper, silver, gold, and aluminum. Details of the experimental arrangement and methods of application or attachment of the materials to the copper swirl tubes are presented. Results including survivability and mass losses are discussed.

  9. Developing the MAPLE materials test reactor concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, A.G.; Lidstone, R.F.; Donnelly, J.V.

    1992-05-01

    MAPLE-MTR is a new multipurpose research facility being planned by AECL Research as a possible replacement for the 35-year-old NRU reactor. In developing the MAPLE-MTR concept, AECL is starting from the recent design and licensing experience with the MAPLE-X10 reactor. By starting from technology developed to support the MAPLE-X10 design and adapting it to produce a concept that satisfies the requirements of fuel channel materials testing and fuel irradiation programs, AECL expects to minimize the need for major advances in nuclear technology (e.g., fuel, heat transfer). Formulation of the MAPLE-MTR concept is at an early stage. This report describes the irradiation requirements of the research areas, how these needs are translated into design criteria for the project and elements of the preliminary design concept

  10. Decontamination tests on tritium-contaminated materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boutot, P.; Schipfer, P.

    1967-01-01

    These tests are designed to try out various processes liable to be applied to the decontamination of a material contaminated with tritium. The samples are thin stainless- steel slabs contaminated in the laboratory with elements extracted from industrial installations. The measurement of the initial and residual activities is carried out using an open-window BERTHOLD counter. The best results are obtained by passing a current of pre-heated (300 deg. C) air containing water vapour. This process makes it possible to reach a decontamination factor of 99.5 per cent in 4 hours. In a vacuum, the operation has to be prolonged to 100 hours in order to obtain a decontamination factor of 99.2 per cent. Wet-chemical or electrolytic treatments are efficient but their use is limited by the inherent corrosion risks. A study of the reappearance of the contamination has made it possible to observe that this phenomenon occurs whatever the process used. (authors) [fr

  11. Research reactors for power reactor fuel and materials testing - Studsvik's experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grounes, M.

    1998-01-01

    Presently Studsvik's R2 test reactor is used for BWR and PWR fuel irradiations at constant power and under transient power conditions. Furthermore tests are performed with defective LWR fuel rods. Tests are also performed on different types of LWR cladding materials and structural materials including post-irradiation testing of materials irradiated at different temperatures and, in some cases, in different water chemistries and on fusion reactor materials. In the past, tests have also been performed on HTGR fuel and FBR fuel and materials under appropriate coolant, temperature and pressure conditions. Fuel tests under development include extremely fast power ramps simulating some reactivity initiated accidents and stored energy (enthalpy) measurements. Materials tests under development include different types of in-pile tests including tests in the INCA (In-Core Autoclave) facility .The present and future demands on the test reactor fuel in all these cases are discussed. (author)

  12. Radioactive material package testing capabilities at Sandia National Laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uncapher, W.L.; Hohnstreiter, G.F.

    1995-01-01

    Evaluation and certification of radioactive and hazardous material transport packages can be accomplished by subjecting these packages to normal transport and hypothetical accident test conditions. The regulations allow package designers to certify packages using analysis, testing, or a combination of analysis and testing. Testing can be used to substantiate assumptions used in analytical models and to demonstrate package structural and thermal response. Regulatory test conditions include impact, puncture, crush, penetration, water spray, immersion, and thermal environments. Testing facilities are used to simulate the required test conditions and provide measurement response data. Over the past four decades, comprehensive testing facilities have been developed at Sandia National Laboratories to perform a broad range of verification and certification tests on hazardous and radioactive material packages or component sections. Sandia's facilities provide an experience base that has been established during the development and certification of many package designs. These unique facilities, along with innovative instrumentation data collection capabilities and techniques, simulate a broad range of testing environments. In certain package designs, package testing can be an economical alternative to complex analysis to resolve regulatory questions or concerns

  13. Advanced Gas Cooled Reactor Materials Program. Reducing helium impurity depletion in HTGR materials testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baldwin, D.H.

    1984-08-01

    Moisture depletion in HTGR materials testing rigs has been empirically studied in the GE High Temperature Reactor Materials Testing Laboratory (HTRMTL). Tests have shown that increased helium flow rates and reduction in reactive (oxidizable) surface area are effective means of reducing depletion. Further, a portion of the depletion has been shown to be due to the presence of free C released by the dissociation of CH 4 . This depletion component can be reduced by reducing the helium residence time (increasing the helium flow rate) or by reducing the CH 4 concentration in the test gas. Equipment modifications to reduce depletion have been developed, tested, and in most cases implemented in the HTRMTL to date. These include increasing the Helium Loop No. 1 pumping capacity, conversion of metallic retorts and radiation shields to alumina, isolation of thermocouple probes from the test gas by alumina thermowells, and substitution of non-reactive Mo-TZM for reactive metallic structural components

  14. Test or toy? Materiality and the measurement of infant intelligence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Jacy L

    2015-05-01

    Adopting a material culture perspective, this article interrogates the composition of the copy of the Cattell Infant Intelligence Scale housed at the University of Toronto Scientific Instruments Collection. As a deliberately assembled collection of toys, the Cattell Scale makes clear the indefinite boundary between test and toy in 20th-century American psychology. Consideration of the current condition of some of the material constituents of this particular Cattell Scale provides valuable insight into some of the elusive practices of intelligence testers in situ and highlights the dynamic nature of the testing process. At the same time, attending to the materiality of this intelligence test reveals some of the more general assumptions about the nature of intelligence inherent in tests for young children. The scale and others like it, I argue, exposes psychologists' often-uncritical equation of childhood intelligence with appropriate play undertaken with an appropriate toy, an approach complicit in, and fostered by, midcentury efforts to cultivate particular forms of selfhood. This analysis serves as an example of the kind of work that may be done on the history of intelligence testing when the material objects that were (and are) inherently a part of the testing process are included in historical scholarship. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  15. Materials Compatibility Testing in RSRM ODC: Free Cleaner Selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keen, Jill M.; Sagers, Neil W.; McCool, Alex (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Government regulations have mandated production phase-outs of a number of solvents, including 1,1,1-trichloroethane, an ozone-depleting chemical (ODC). This solvent was used extensively in the production of the Reusable Solid Rocket Motors (RSRMs) for the Space Shuttle. Many tests have been performed to identify replacement cleaners. One major area of concern in the selection of a new cleaner has been compatibility. Some specific areas considered included cleaner compatibility with non-metallic surfaces, painted surfaces, support materials such as gloves and wipers as well as corrosive properties of the cleaners on the alloys used on these motors. The intent of this paper is to summarize the test logic, methodology, and results acquired from testing the many cleaner and material combinations.

  16. Commentary on guidelines for radiation measurement and treatment of substances including naturally occurring radioactive materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakurai, Naoyuki; Ishiguro, Hideharu

    2007-01-01

    Study group on safety regulation on research reactors in Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology (MEXT) reported the guidelines of 'Guidelines on radiation measurement and treatment of naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM)' on 6 February 2006. RANDEC made the website contents 'Study on use and safety of the substances including uranium or thorium', based on the contract with MEXT to make theirs contents. This paper describes the outline of the website in MEXT homepage, background and contents of NORM guidelines in order to understand easily and visually the NORM guidelines, adding in some flowcharts and figures. (author)

  17. Numerical regulation of a test facility of materials for PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zauq, M.H.

    1982-02-01

    The installation aims at testing materials used in nuclear power plants; tests consists in simulations of a design basis accident (failure of a primary circuit of a PWR type reactor) for a qualification of these materials. A description of the test installation, of the thermodynamic control, and of the control system is presented. The organisation of the software is then given: description of the sequence chaining monitor, operation, list and function of the programs. The analog information processing is also presented (data transmission). A real-time microcomputer and clock are used for this work. The microprocessor is the 6800 of MOTOROLA. The microcomputer used has been built around the MC 6800; its structure is described. The data acquisition include an analog data acquisition system and a numerical data acquisition system. Laboratory and on-site tests are finally presented [fr

  18. Challenges for INAA in studies of materials from advanced material research including rare earth concentrates and carbon based ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bode, P.; Van Meerten, Th.G.

    2000-01-01

    Rare-earth elements are increasingly applied in advanced materials to be used, e.g., in electronic industry, automobile catalysts, or lamps and optical devices. Trace element analysis of these materials might be an interesting niche for NAA because of the intrinsic high accuracy of this technique, and the shortage of matrix matching reference materials with other methods for elemental analysis. The carbon composite materials form another category of advanced materials, where sometimes a very high degree of purity is required. Also for these materials, NAA has favorable analytical characteristics. Examples are given of the use of NAA in the analysis of both categories of materials. (author)

  19. Multilayer Pressure Vessel Materials Testing and Analysis. Phase 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardinal, Joseph W.; Popelar, Carl F.; Page, Richard A.

    2014-01-01

    To provide NASA a comprehensive suite of materials strength, fracture toughness and crack growth rate test results for use in remaining life calculations for aging multilayer pressure vessels, Southwest Research Institute (R) (SwRI) was contracted in two phases to obtain relevant material property data from a representative vessel. This report describes Phase 1 of this effort which includes a preliminary material property assessment as well as a fractographic, fracture mechanics and fatigue crack growth analyses of an induced flaw in the outer shell of a representative multilayer vessel that was subjected to cyclic pressure test. SwRI performed this Phase 1 effort under contract to the Digital Wave Corporation in support of their contract to Jacobs ATOM for the NASA Ames Research Center.

  20. Multilayer Pressure Vessel Materials Testing and Analysis Phase 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popelar, Carl F.; Cardinal, Joseph W.

    2014-01-01

    To provide NASA with a suite of materials strength, fracture toughness and crack growth rate test results for use in remaining life calculations for the vessels described above, Southwest Research Institute® (SwRI®) was contracted in two phases to obtain relevant material property data from a representative vessel. An initial characterization of the strength, fracture and fatigue crack growth properties was performed in Phase 1. Based on the results and recommendations of Phase 1, a more extensive material property characterization effort was developed in this Phase 2 effort. This Phase 2 characterization included additional strength, fracture and fatigue crack growth of the multilayer vessel and head materials. In addition, some more limited characterization of the welds and heat affected zones (HAZs) were performed. This report

  1. Phase Change Material Heat Exchanger Life Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lillibridge, Sean; Stephan, Ryan

    2009-01-01

    Low Lunar Orbit (LLO) poses unique thermal challenges for the orbiting space craft, particularly regarding the performance of the radiators. The IR environment of the space craft varies drastically from the light side to the dark side of the moon. The result is a situation where a radiator sized for the maximal heat load in the most adverse situation is subject to freezing on the dark side of the orbit. One solution to this problem is to implement Phase Change Material (PCM) Heat Exchangers. PCM Heat Exchangers act as a "thermal capacitor," storing thermal energy when there is too much being produced by the space craft to reject to space, and then feeding that energy back into the thermal loop when conditions are more favorable. Because they do not use an expendable resource, such as the feed water used by sublimators and evaporators, PCM Heat Exchangers are ideal for long duration LLO missions. In order to validate the performance of PCM Heat Exchangers, a life test is being conducted on four n-Pentadecane, carbon filament heat exchangers. Fluid loop performance, repeatability, and measurement of performance degradation over 2500 melt-freeze cycles will be performed.

  2. Test device for measuring permeability of a barrier material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reese, Matthew; Dameron, Arrelaine; Kempe, Michael

    2014-03-04

    A test device for measuring permeability of a barrier material. An exemplary device comprises a test card having a thin-film conductor-pattern formed thereon and an edge seal which seals the test card to the barrier material. Another exemplary embodiment is an electrical calcium test device comprising: a test card an impermeable spacer, an edge seal which seals the test card to the spacer and an edge seal which seals the spacer to the barrier material.

  3. Autoclave Testing on Zirconium Alloy Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffmann, Petra-Britt; Sell, Hans-Juergen; Garzarolli, Friedrich

    2012-09-01

    The corrosion of Zirconium components like fuel rod claddings and spacer grids is limiting lifetime and duty of these components. In Pressurized and Boiling Water Reactors (PWR and BWR), different corrosion phenomena are of interest. Although in-pile experience is the final proof for a material development, significant experience was gained by autoclave tests, trying to simulate in-pile conditions but reducing time for return of experience by increased temperatures. For PWR application, the uniform corrosion is studied in water at up to 370 deg. C and in high pressure steam at 400 deg. C, and for BWR, the nodular corrosion is studied in high pressure steam at 500-520 deg. C. Particular attention has to be given to the corrosion media, because oxidative traces in the water can significantly affect the corrosion response. An extensive air removal is thus important for all corrosion tests. This links to the different water chemistry conditions that have been investigated as separate effects otherwise difficult to separate under in-pile conditions. Uniform corrosion in 350 deg. C water is usually a cyclic process with repeated rate transitions. In addition, at high exposure times an acceleration of corrosion can occur, e.g. for Zr-Sn alloys with a high Sn content. In 400 deg. C steam, corrosion rate decreases somewhat with increasing time. Uniform corrosion rate of Zr alloys depends on their Sn- and Fe+Cr contents as well as on their annealing parameters with a similar trend as in PWR and on their yield strength, however with an opposite trend compared to BWR conditions. Nodular corrosion of BWR alloys depends on the annealing parameter with a similar trend as in PWR and out-of-reactor also significantly on the Fe+Cr content. The hydrogen pickup fraction (HPUF) depends largely on details of the water chemistry and can particularly depend on autoclave degassing and probably also on autoclave contaminations. Thus any HPUF value from out-of- pile corrosion tests is only

  4. OCV Hysteresis in Li-Ion Batteries including Two-Phase Transition Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael A. Roscher

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The relation between batteries' state of charge (SOC and open-circuit voltage (OCV is a specific feature of electrochemical energy storage devices. Especially NiMH batteries are well known to exhibit OCV hysteresis, and also several kinds of lithium-ion batteries show OCV hysteresis, which can be critical for reliable state estimation issues. Electrode potential hysteresis is known to result from thermodynamical entropic effects, mechanical stress, and microscopic distortions within the active electrode materials which perform a two-phase transition during lithium insertion/extraction. Hence, some Li-ion cells including two-phase transition active materials show pronounced hysteresis referring to their open-circuit voltage. This work points out how macroscopic effects, that is, diffusion limitations, superimpose the latte- mentioned microscopic mechanisms and lead to a shrinkage of OCV hysteresis, if cells are loaded with high current rates. To validate the mentioned interaction, Li-ion cells' state of charge is adjusted to 50% with various current rates, beginning from the fully charged and the discharged state, respectively. As a pronounced difference remains between the OCV after charge and discharge adjustment, obviously the hysteresis vanishes as the target SOC is adjusted with very high current rate.

  5. Engineer Research and Development Center's Materials Testing Center (MTC)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Engineer Research and Development Center's Materials Testing Center (MTC) is committed to quality testing and inspection services that are delivered on time and...

  6. Material testing facilities and programs for plasma-facing component testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linsmeier, Ch.; Unterberg, B.; Coenen, J. W.; Doerner, R. P.; Greuner, H.; Kreter, A.; Linke, J.; Maier, H.

    2017-09-01

    Component development for operation in a large-scale fusion device requires thorough testing and qualification for the intended operational conditions. In particular environments are necessary which are comparable to the real operation conditions, allowing at the same time for in situ/in vacuo diagnostics and flexible operation, even beyond design limits during the testing. Various electron and neutral particle devices provide the capabilities for high heat load tests, suited for material samples and components from lab-scale dimensions up to full-size parts, containing toxic materials like beryllium, and being activated by neutron irradiation. To simulate the conditions specific to a fusion plasma both at the first wall and in the divertor of fusion devices, linear plasma devices allow for a test of erosion and hydrogen isotope recycling behavior under well-defined and controlled conditions. Finally, the complex conditions in a fusion device (including the effects caused by magnetic fields) are exploited for component and material tests by exposing test mock-ups or material samples to a fusion plasma by manipulator systems. They allow for easy exchange of test pieces in a tokamak or stellarator device, without opening the vessel. Such a chain of test devices and qualification procedures is required for the development of plasma-facing components which then can be successfully operated in future fusion power devices. The various available as well as newly planned devices and test stands, together with their specific capabilities, are presented in this manuscript. Results from experimental programs on test facilities illustrate their significance for the qualification of plasma-facing materials and components. An extended set of references provides access to the current status of material and component testing capabilities in the international fusion programs.

  7. Specialists meeting on properties of primary circuit structural materials including environmental effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1977-07-01

    The Specialists Meeting on Properties of Primary Circuit Structural Materials of LMFBRs covered the following topics: overview of materials program in different countries; mechanical properties of materials in air; fracture mechanics studies - component related activities; impact of environmental influences on mechanical properties; relationship of material properties and design methods. The purpose of the meeting was to provide a forum for exchange of information on structural materials behaviour in primary circuit of fast breeder reactors. Special emphasis was placed on environmental effects such as influence of sodium and irradiation on mechanical properties of reactor materials.

  8. Specialists meeting on properties of primary circuit structural materials including environmental effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    The Specialists Meeting on Properties of Primary Circuit Structural Materials of LMFBRs covered the following topics: overview of materials program in different countries; mechanical properties of materials in air; fracture mechanics studies - component related activities; impact of environmental influences on mechanical properties; relationship of material properties and design methods. The purpose of the meeting was to provide a forum for exchange of information on structural materials behaviour in primary circuit of fast breeder reactors. Special emphasis was placed on environmental effects such as influence of sodium and irradiation on mechanical properties of reactor materials

  9. Retrospective search on biomass harvesting techniques including materials handling and storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1985-10-01

    This literature search covers the period 1977 to date. The harvesting, materials handling and storage of the following materials: wood; crops and crop residues; peat; sugar cane; reeds, grasses and fers; algae and jojoba shrubs are covered.

  10. Second-principles method for materials simulations including electron and lattice degrees of freedom

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Fernández, Pablo; Wojdeł, Jacek C.; Íñiguez, Jorge; Junquera, Javier

    2016-05-01

    We present a first-principles-based (second-principles) scheme that permits large-scale materials simulations including both atomic and electronic degrees of freedom on the same footing. The method is based on a predictive quantum-mechanical theory—e.g., density functional theory—and its accuracy can be systematically improved at a very modest computational cost. Our approach is based on dividing the electron density of the system into a reference part—typically corresponding to the system's neutral, geometry-dependent ground state—and a deformation part—defined as the difference between the actual and reference densities. We then take advantage of the fact that the bulk part of the system's energy depends on the reference density alone; this part can be efficiently and accurately described by a force field, thus avoiding explicit consideration of the electrons. Then, the effects associated to the difference density can be treated perturbatively with good precision by working in a suitably chosen Wannier function basis. Further, the electronic model can be restricted to the bands of interest. All these features combined yield a very flexible and computationally very efficient scheme. Here we present the basic formulation of this approach, as well as a practical strategy to compute model parameters for realistic materials. We illustrate the accuracy and scope of the proposed method with two case studies, namely, the relative stability of various spin arrangements in NiO (featuring complex magnetic interactions in a strongly-correlated oxide) and the formation of a two-dimensional electron gas at the interface between band insulators LaAlO3 and SrTiO3 (featuring subtle electron-lattice couplings and screening effects). We conclude by discussing ways to overcome the limitations of the present approach (most notably, the assumption of a fixed bonding topology), as well as its many envisioned possibilities and future extensions.

  11. System Studies for the ADTF: Target and Materials Test Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cappiello, M.; Pitcher, E.; Pasamehmetoglu, K.

    2002-01-01

    To meet the objectives of the Advanced Accelerator Applications (AAA) program, the Accelerator-Driven Test Facility (ADTF) provides a world-class accelerator-driven test facility to: - Provide the capability to assess technology options for the transmutation of spent nuclear fuel and waste through a proof-of-performance. - Provide a user facility that allows testing of advanced nuclear technologies and applications, material science and research, experimental physics, and conventional nuclear engineering science applications. - Provide the capability, through upgrades or additions to the ADTF accelerator, to produce tritium for defense purposes, if required. - Provide the capability, through upgrades or additions, to produce radioisotopes for medical and commercial purposes. These missions are diverse and demand a facility with significant flexibility. In order to meet them, it is envisioned that we construct two target stations: the Target and Materials Test (TMT) station and the Subcritical Multiplier (SCM) test station. The two test stations share common hot-cell facilities for post-irradiation examination. It is expected the TMT will come online first, closely followed by the SCM. The TMT will provide the capability to: - Irradiate small samples of proposed ATW (accelerator-driven transmutation of waste) fuels and materials at prototypic flux, temperature, and coolant conditions (requires intense source of neutrons). - Perform transient testing. - Test liquid (lead-bismuth) and solid spallation targets with water, sodium, or helium coolant. - Test generation-IV fuels for advance nuclear systems (requires high-intensity thermal flux). - Irradiate fission product transmutation targets. - Test advanced fuel and coolant combinations, including helium, water, sodium, and lead-bismuth. - Produce isotopes for commercial and medical applications. - Perform neutron physics experiments. The SCM will provide the capability to: - Irradiate large samples of proposed ATW

  12. Occurance of Staphylococcus nepalensis strains in different sources including human clinical material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nováková, Dana; Pantůcek, Roman; Petrás, Petr; Koukalová, Dagmar; Sedlácek, Ivo

    2006-10-01

    Five isolates of coagulase-negative staphylococci were obtained from human urine, the gastrointestinal tract of squirrel monkeys, pig skin and from the environment. All key biochemical characteristics of the tested strains corresponded with the description of Staphylococcus xylosus species. However, partial 16S rRNA gene sequences obtained from analysed strains corresponded with those of Staphylococcus nepalensis reference strains, except for two strains which differed in one residue. Ribotyping with EcoRI and HindIII restriction enzymes, whole cell protein profile analysis performed by SDS-PAGE and SmaI macrorestriction analysis were used for more precise characterization and identification of the analysed strains. Obtained results showed that EcoRI and HindIII ribotyping and whole cell protein fingerprinting are suitable and reliable methods for the differentiation of S. nepalensis strains from the other novobiocin resistant staphylococci, whereas macrorestriction analysis was found to be a good tool for strain typing. The isolation of S. nepalensis is sporadic, and according to our best knowledge this study is the first report of the occurrence of this species in human clinical material as well as in other sources.

  13. Inpile (in PWR) testing of cladding materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hahn, R.; Jeong, Y. H.; Baek, B. J.; Kim, K. H.; Kim, S. J.; Choi, B. K.; Kim, J. M.

    1999-04-01

    As an introduction, the reasons to perform inpile tests are depicted. An overview over general inpile test procedure is given, and test details which are necessary for the development of new alloys for high burnup claddings, like sample geometries and measuring techniques for inpile corrosion testing, are described in detail. Tests for the creep and length change behavior of cladding tubes are described briefly. Finally, conclusions are drawn and literature citations for further test details are given. (author). 9 refs., 2 tabs., 17 figs

  14. Brittle fracture tests at low temperature for transport cask materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kosaki, Akio; Ito, Chihiro; Arai, Taku; Saegusa, Toshiari

    1993-01-01

    The IAEA Regulations for the Safe Transport of Radioactive Material were revised in 1985, and brittle fracture assessment at low temperature for transport packages are now required. This report discusses the applicability of the actual method for brittle fracture assessment of type-B transport cask materials used in JAPAN. The necessity of brittle fracture assessment at low temperature was estimated for each material of type-B transport casks used in Japan and the applicability was investigated. Dynamic fracture toughness values, K Id (J Id ), and RT NDT values of Low-Mn Carbon Steels, that are SA 350 Gr.LF1 Modify and SA 516 Gr.70 material which used in type-B transport cask body, were also obtained to check whether or not an easier and conventional test method, that prescribed in ASME CODE SECTION III, can be substituted for the dynamic fracture test method. And for bolt materials, which include 1.8Ni-0.8Cr-0.3Mo Carbon Steel and type 630 H Stainless Steel, toughness data were obtained for reference. (J.P.N.)

  15. Design of online testing system of material radiation resistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wan Junsheng; He Shengping; Gao Xinjun

    2014-01-01

    The capability of radiation resistance is important for some material used in some specifically engineering fields. It is the same principal applied in all existing test system that compares the performance parameter after radiation to evaluate material radiation resistance. A kind of new technique on test system of material radiation resistance is put forward in this paper. Experimentation shows that the online test system for material radiation resistance works well and has an extending application outlook. (authors)

  16. Open literature review of threats including sabotage and theft of fissile material transport in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cochran, John Russell; Furaus, James Phillip; Marincel, Michelle K.

    2005-01-01

    This report is a review of open literature concerning threats including sabotage and theft related to fissile material transport in Japan. It is intended to aid Japanese officials in the development of a design basis threat. This threat includes the external threats of the terrorist, criminal, and extremist, and the insider threats of the disgruntled employee, the employee forced into cooperation via coercion, the psychotic employee, and the criminal employee. Examination of the external terrorist threat considers Japanese demographics, known terrorist groups in Japan, and the international relations of Japan. Demographically, Japan has a relatively homogenous population, both ethnically and religiously. Japan is a relatively peaceful nation, but its history illustrates that it is not immune to terrorism. It has a history of domestic terrorism and the open literature points to the Red Army, Aum Shinrikyo, Chukaku-Ha, and Seikijuku. Japan supports the United States in its war on terrorism and in Iraq, which may make Japan a target for both international and domestic terrorists. Crime appears to remain low in Japan; however sources note that the foreign crime rate is increasing as the number of foreign nationals in the country increases. Antinuclear groups' recent foci have been nuclear reprocessing technology, transportation of MOX fuel, and possible related nuclear proliferation issues. The insider threat is first defined by the threat of the disgruntled employee. This threat can be determined by studying the history of Japan's employment system, where Keiretsu have provided company stability and lifetime employment. Recent economic difficulties and an increase of corporate crime, due to sole reliability on the honor code, have begun to erode employee loyalty

  17. Data package for the Turkey Point material interaction test capsules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krogness, J.C.; Davis, R.B.

    1979-01-01

    Objective of the Materials Interaction Test (MIT) is to obtain interaction information on candidate package storage materials and geologies under prototypic temperatures in gamma and low level neutron fields. Compatibility, structural properties, and chemical transformations will be studied. The multiple test samples are contained within test capsules connected end-to-end to form a test train. Only passive instrumentation has been used to monitor temperatures and record neutron fluence. The test train contains seven capsules: three to test compatibility, two for structural tests, and two for chemical transformation studies. The materials tested are potential candidates for the spent fuel package canister and repository geologies

  18. Empirical Validation of a Thermal Model of a Complex Roof Including Phase Change Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stéphane Guichard

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the empirical validation of a building thermal model of a complex roof including a phase change material (PCM. A mathematical model dedicated to PCMs based on the heat apparent capacity method was implemented in a multi-zone building simulation code, the aim being to increase the understanding of the thermal behavior of the whole building with PCM technologies. In order to empirically validate the model, the methodology is based both on numerical and experimental studies. A parametric sensitivity analysis was performed and a set of parameters of the thermal model has been identified for optimization. The use of the generic optimization program called GenOpt® coupled to the building simulation code enabled to determine the set of adequate parameters. We first present the empirical validation methodology and main results of previous work. We then give an overview of GenOpt® and its coupling with the building simulation code. Finally, once the optimization results are obtained, comparisons of the thermal predictions with measurements are found to be acceptable and are presented.

  19. Material control and accounting self-test program design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eggers, R.F.; Wilson, R.L.; Byers, K.R.

    1981-01-01

    This paper describes a controversial but potentially beneficial MCandA strategy that has not been widely attempted in the past, called Self-Test. In this strategy a processor of Strategic Special Nuclear Material (SSNM) devises a program of internally administered tests to determine if the MCandA system performs in a reliable, expedient manner in the face of a simulated loss or compromise. Self-Test procedures would include, for example, the actual removal of SSNM from process equipment in order to determine whether the MCandA system will detect the simulated theft. Self-Test programs have several potential problems. However, an approach with the potential for solving many of these problems has been devised and is discussed

  20. Small Punch Test Techniques for Irradiated Materials in Hot Cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Do Sik; Ahn, S. B.; Oh, W. H.; Yoo, B. O.; Choo, Y. S.

    2006-06-01

    Detailed procedures of the small punch test including the apparatus, the definition of small punch-related parameters, and the interpretation of results were presented. The testing machine should have a capability of the compressive loading and unloading at a given deflection level. The small punch specimen holder consists of an upper and lower die and clamping screws. The clamped specimen is deformed by using ball or spherical head punch. Two type of specimens with a circular and a square shape were used. The irradiated small punch specimen is made from the undamaged portion of the broken CVN bars or prepared by the irradiation of the specimen fabricated from the fresh materials. The heating and cooling devices should have the capability of the temperature control within ±2 .deg. C for the target value during the test. Based on the load-deflection data obtained from the small punch test. the empirical correlation between the small punch related parameters and a tensile properties such as 0.2% yield strength and ultimate tensile strength, fracture toughness, ductile-brittle transition temperature and creep properties determined from the standard test method is established and used to evaluate the mechanical properties of an irradiated materials. In addition, from the quantitative fractographic assessment of small punch test specimens, the relationship between the small punch energy and the quantity of ductile crack growth is obtained. Analytical formulations demonstrated good agreement with experimental load-deflection curves

  1. Glass solidification material confinement test device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Namiki, Shigekazu.

    1997-01-01

    In a device for confining glass solidification materials, a pipeline connecting a detection vessel and a detector is formed to have a double walled structure, and air blowing holes are formed on the wall of the inner pipe, and an air supply mechanism is connected to inner and outer pipes for supplying blowing air thereby preventing deposition on the inner pipe wall. The air blowing holes are formed by constituting the pipe by using a porous sintered material and porous portions thereof are defined as the air blowing holes, or holes are formed on the pipe wall made of a metal by machining. A blowing boundary layer is formed by blowing the supplied air along the pipe wall of the inner pipe, by which deposition of the sucked materials to the inner wall of the inner pipe is prevented, and all of the materials sucked from the detection vessel are collected to the detector. In addition, an air exit pipe is formed into a double walled structure so as to be supplied blowing air from the air supply mechanism thereby enabling to prevent deposition of sucked materials more reliably. (N.H.)

  2. Nuclear Rocket Test Facility Decommissioning Including Controlled Explosive Demolition of a Neutron-Activated Shield Wall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michael Kruzic

    2007-01-01

    Located in Area 25 of the Nevada Test Site, the Test Cell A Facility was used in the 1960s for the testing of nuclear rocket engines, as part of the Nuclear Rocket Development Program. The facility was decontaminated and decommissioned (D and D) in 2005 using the Streamlined Approach For Environmental Restoration (SAFER) process, under the Federal Facilities Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO). Utilities and process piping were verified void of contents, hazardous materials were removed, concrete with removable contamination decontaminated, large sections mechanically demolished, and the remaining five-foot, five-inch thick radiologically-activated reinforced concrete shield wall demolished using open-air controlled explosive demolition (CED). CED of the shield wall was closely monitored and resulted in no radiological exposure or atmospheric release

  3. A constitutive model for the superplastic material ALNOVI-1 including leak risk information

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snippe, Corijn H.C.; Snippe, Q.H.C.; Meinders, Vincent T.; Pietzyk, M.; Kusiak, J.; Majta, J.; Hartley, P.; Lin, J.; Mori, K.

    2008-01-01

    For some applications, it is important that a formed sheet of material is completely gas tight, therefore it is beneficial to be able to predict whether a formed sheet will be leak tight for gases or not. Superplastic materials show the ability to attain very high plastic strains before failure.

  4. Thermoelectric material including a multiple transition metal-doped type I clathrate crystal structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jihui [Lakeshore, CA; Shi, Xun [Troy, MI; Bai, Shengqiang [Shanghai, CN; Zhang, Wenqing [Shanghai, CN; Chen, Lidong [Shanghai, CN; Yang, Jiong [Shanghai, CN

    2012-01-17

    A thermoelectric material includes a multiple transition metal-doped type I clathrate crystal structure having the formula A.sub.8TM.sub.y.sub.1.sup.1TM.sub.y.sub.2.sup.2 . . . TM.sub.y.sub.n.sup.nM.sub.zX.sub.46-y.sub.1.sub.-y.sub.2.sub.- . . . -y.sub.n.sub.-z. In the formula, A is selected from the group consisting of barium, strontium, and europium; X is selected from the group consisting of silicon, germanium, and tin; M is selected from the group consisting of aluminum, gallium, and indium; TM.sup.1, TM.sup.2, and TM.sup.n are independently selected from the group consisting of 3d, 4d, and 5d transition metals; and y.sub.1, y.sub.2, y.sub.n and Z are actual compositions of TM.sup.1, TM.sup.2, TM.sup.n, and M, respectively. The actual compositions are based upon nominal compositions derived from the following equation: z=8q.sub.A-|.DELTA.q.sub.1|y.sub.1-|.DELTA.q.sub.2|y.sub.2- . . . -|.DELTA.q.sub.n|y.sub.n, wherein q.sub.A is a charge state of A, and wherein .DELTA.q.sub.1, .DELTA.q.sub.2, .DELTA.q.sub.n are, respectively, the nominal charge state of the first, second, and n-th TM.

  5. Advanced Mechanical Testing of Sandwich Materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hayman, Brian; Berggreen, Christian; Jenstrup, Claus

    2008-01-01

    An advanced digital optical system has been used to measure surface strains on sandwich face and core specimens tested in a project concerned with improved criteria for designing sandwich X-joints. The face sheet specimens were of glass reinforced polyester and were tested in tension. The core sp...

  6. TESTING ANTIMICROBIAL EFFICACY ON POROUS MATERIALS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The efficacy of antimicrobial treatments to eliminate or control biological growth in the indoor environment can easily be tested on nonporous surfaces. However, the testing of antimicrobial efficacy on porous surfaces, such as those found in the indoor environment [i.e., gypsum ...

  7. Discrete Material and Thickness Optimization of laminated composite structures including failure criteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Erik

    2017-01-01

    This work extends the Discrete Material and Thickness Optimization approach to structural optimization problems where strength considerations in the form of failure criteria are taken into account for laminated composite structures. It takes offset in the density approaches applied for stress...... constrained topology optimization of single-material problems and develops formulations for multi-material topology optimization problems applied for laminated composite structures. The method can be applied for both stress- and strain-based failure criteria. The large number of local constraints is reduced...

  8. Compositions of graphene materials with metal nanostructures and microstructures and methods of making and using including pressure sensors

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Ye

    2017-01-26

    Composition comprising at least one graphene material and at least one metal. The metal can be in the form of nanoparticles as well as microflakes, including single crystal microflakes. The metal can be intercalated in the graphene sheets. The composition has high conductivity and flexibility. The composition can be made by a one-pot synthesis in which a graphene material precursor is converted to the graphene material, and the metal precursor is converted to the metal. A reducing solvent or dispersant such as NMP can be used. Devices made from the composition include a pressure sensor which has high sensitivity. Two two- dimension materials can be combined to form a hybrid material.

  9. Aircraft Carrier Exposure Testing of Aircraft Materials

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lee, Eui

    2004-01-01

    .... Test and control specimens were affixed on exposure racks and installed on aircraft carriers to compare adhesive bonding primers for aluminum and to determine the static property behavior of various...

  10. Cibachrome testing. [photographic processing and printing materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinstein, M. S.

    1974-01-01

    The use of Cibachrome products as a solution to problems encountered when contact printing Kodak film type SO-397 onto Kodak Ektrachrome color reversal paper type 1993 is investigated. A roll of aerial imagery consisting of Kodak film types SO-397 and 2443 was contact printed onto Cibachrome and Kodak materials and compared in terms of color quality, resolution, cost, and compatibility with existing equipment and techniques. Objective measurements are given in terms of resolution and sensitometric response. Comparison prints and transparencies were viewed and ranked according to overall quality and aesthetic appeal. It is recommended that Cibachrome Print material be used in place of Kodak Ektachrome paper because it is more easily processed, the cost is equivalent, and it provides improved resolution, color quality, and image fade resistance.

  11. Material test data of SUS304 welded joints

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asayama, Tai [Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Inst., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Engineering Center; Kawakami, Tomohiro [Nuclear Energy System Incorporation, Tokyo (Japan)

    1999-10-01

    This report summarizes the material test data of SUS304 welded joints. Numbers of the data are as follows: Tensile tests 71 (Post-irradiation: 39, Others: 32), Creep tests 77 (Post-irradiation: 20, Others: 57), Fatigue tests 50 (Post-irradiation: 0), Creep-fatigue tests 14 (Post-irradiation: 0). This report consists of the printouts from 'the structural material data processing system'. (author)

  12. Material testing in a linear theta pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alani, R.; Azodi, H.; Naraghi, M.; Safaii, B.; Torabi-Fard, A.

    1983-01-01

    The interaction of stainless steel 316 and Inconel 625 alloys has been investigated with a thermonuclear-like plasma, n = 10 16 cm -3 and Tsub(i) = 1 keV, generated in the Alvand I linear theta pinch. The average power flux is 10 7 W/cm 2 and the interaction time nearly one μs. A theoretical analysis based on the formation of an observed impurity layer near the material, has been used to determine the properties of the impurity layer and the extent of the damage on the material. Although arcing has been observed, the dominant damage mechanism has been assessed to be due to evaporation. Exposure to single shots has produced very heavily defective areas and even surface cracks on the SS 316 sample, but no cracks were observed on Inconel 625 after exposure to even 18 shots. On the basis of temperature rise and evaporation a comparison is made among materials exposed to plasmas of a theta pinch, shock tube, present generation tokamak and an anticipated tokamak reactor. (orig.)

  13. Test facilities for radioactive materials transport packages (Transportation Technology Center Inc., Pueblo, Colorado, USA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conlon, P.C.L.

    2001-01-01

    Transportation Technology Center, Inc. is capable of conducting tests on rail vehicle systems designed for transporting radioactive materials including low level waste debris, transuranic waste, and spent nuclear fuel and high level waste. Services include rail vehicle dynamics modelling, on-track performance testing, full scale structural fatigue testing, rail vehicle impact tests, engineering design and technology consulting, and emergency response training. (author)

  14. Standard Guide for Testing Materials for Aerospace Plastic Transparent Enclosures

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2008-01-01

    1.1 This guide is intended to summarize the standard test methods available on individual and composite materials utilized in fabrication of aerospace plastic transparent enclosures. As such, it is intended to specifically include transparent thermoplastics, transparent elastomers, and reinforced plastics, whether thermoplastic or thermosetting. 1.2 This guide is intended as an aid in the search for test methods pertinent to Aerospace Plastic Transparent Enclosures. It should be understood that all methods listed may not apply to all enclosures. 1.3 The standards included refer to the properties or aspects listed in Table 1. The properties or aspects are listed in alphabetical order and the descriptions used are intended to facilitate the search. 1.4 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limi...

  15. Honeycomb technology materials, design, manufacturing, applications and testing

    CERN Document Server

    Bitzer, Tom

    1997-01-01

    Honeycomb Technology is a guide to honeycomb cores and honeycomb sandwich panels, from the manufacturing methods by which they are produced, to the different types of design, applications for usage and methods of testing the materials. It explains the different types of honeycomb cores available and provides tabulated data of their properties. The author has been involved in the testing and design of honeycomb cores and sandwich panels for nearly 30 years. Honeycomb Technology reflects this by emphasizing a `hands-on' approach and discusses procedures for designing sandwich panels, explaining the necessary equations. Also included is a section on how to design honeycomb energy absorbers and one full chapter discussing honeycomb core and sandwich panel testing. Honeycomb Technology will be of interest to engineers in the aircraft, aerospace and building industries. It will also be of great use to engineering students interested in basic sandwich panel design.

  16. Wear Test Results of Candidate Materials for the OK-542 Towed Array Handling Machine Level Winder

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-12-29

    10 6. Wear Testing Photograph B ....................................................... .11 7. Clad Inconel 625 ...interfere with this wear test. Other materials that were tested included Inconel 625 , Titanium, 304 Stainless, 316 Stainless, and Ni-Al-Br. All of these...Stainless Steel, Inconel 625 , Nickel-Aluminum-Bronze, and Titanium. The specialty materials: Inconel 625 , Monel, Stainless and Stellite, were clad-welded

  17. Creep property testing of energy power plant component material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nitiswati, Sri; Histori; Triyadi, Ari; Haryanto, Mudi

    1999-01-01

    Creep testing of SA213 T12 boiler piping material from fossil plant, Suralaya has been done. The aim of the testing is to know the creep behaviour of SA213 T12 boiler piping material which has been used more than 10 yeas, what is the material still followed ideal creep curve (there are primary stage, secondary stage, and tertiary stage). This possibility could happened because the material which has been used more than 10 years usually will be through ageing process because corrosion. The testing was conducted in 520 0C, with variety load between 4% until 50% maximum allowable load based on strength of the material in 520 0C

  18. Recent developments in dynamic testing of materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seidt J.D.

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Three new testing configurations that have been developed since the last DYMAT conference in 2009 are presented. The first is high strain rate testing of Kevlar cloth and Kevlar yarn in a tensile Split Hopkinson Bar (SHB apparatus. The Kevlar cloth/yarn is attached to the bars by specially designed adaptors that keep the impedance constant. In addition to determining the specimen’s stress and strain from the recorded waves in the bars the deformations are also measured with Digital Image Correlation (DIC. The second testing configuration is a high strain rate shear test for sheet metal. The experiment is done by using a flat notched specimen in a tensile SHB apparatus. The shear strain is measured using DIC within the notch and on the boundary. The third development is a compression apparatus for testing at intermediate strain rates ranging from 20 s−1 to 200 s−1. The apparatus is a combination of a hydraulic actuator and a compression SHB. The stress in the specimen is determined from the stress wave in a very long transmitter bar and the strain and strain rate is determined by using DIC. The results show clean stress strain curves (no ringing.

  19. Disk-bend ductility tests for irradiated materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klueh, R.L.; Braski, D.N.

    1984-01-01

    We modified the HEDL disk-bend test machine and are using it to qualitatively screen alloys that are susceptible to embrittlement caused by irradiation. Tests designed to understand the disk-bend test in relation to a uniaxial test are discussed. Selected results of tests of neutron-irradiated material are also presented

  20. The design, construction and testing of packaging[Radioactive materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1976-07-01

    Essentially uniform regulations, based on the IAEA Regulations for the Safe Transport of Radioactive Materials, have been adopted on a world-wide basis with the aim of ensuring safety in the transport of radioactive and fissile substances by road, rail, sea and air. The application of these regulations over a period of almost 20 years has resulted in practically complete safety in the sense that there has been no evidence of death or injury that could be attributed to the special properties of the material even when consignments were involved in serious accidents. In the regulations, reliance is placed, to the greatest extent possible, on the packaging to provide adequate shielding and containment of the contents under both normal transport and accident conditions. The Agency organized an international seminar in 1971 to consider the performance tests that have to be applied to packaging to demonstrate compliance with the regulatory requirements. The general conclusion was that the testing programme specified in the regulations was adequate for the near future, but that further consideration should be given to assessing the risks presented by the increasing volume of transport. The second international seminar, which is the subject of this report, dealt with all aspects of the design, construction and testing of packaging for the transport both of relatively small quantities of radioactive substances, which are being used to an ever increasing extent for medical and research purposes, and of the much larger quantities arising in various stages of the nuclear fuel cycle. The programme covered the general requirements for packaging; risk assessment for the transport of various radioactive and fissile substances, including plutonium; specific features of the design and construction of packaging; quality assurance; damage simulation tests, including calculational methods and scale-model testing; tests for the retention of shielding and containment after damage; and the

  1. Electrochemical Corrosion Testing of Neutron Absorber Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tedd Lister; Ron Mizia; Arnold Erickson; Tammy Trowbridge

    2007-01-01

    This report summarizes the results of crevice-corrosion tests for six alloys in solutions representative of ionic compositions inside the Yucca Mountain waste package should a breech occur. The alloys in these tests are Neutronit A978a (ingot metallurgy, hot rolled), Neutrosorb Plus 304B4 Grade Ab (powder metallurgy, hot rolled), Neutrosorb Plus 304B5 Grade Ab (powder metallurgy, hot rolled), Neutrosorb Plus 304B6 Grade Ab (powder metallurgy, hot rolled), Ni-Cr-Mo-Gd alloy2 (ingot metallurgy, hot rolled), and Alloy 22 (ingot metallurgy, hot rolled)

  2. Method of extruding and packaging a thin sample of reactive material including forming the extrusion die

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewandowski, E.F.; Peterson, L.L.

    1985-01-01

    This invention teaches a method of cutting a narrow slot in an extrusion die with an electrical discharge machine by first drilling spaced holes at the ends of where the slot will be, whereby the oil can flow through the holes and slot to flush the material eroded away as the slot is being cut. The invention further teaches a method of extruding a very thin ribbon of solid highly reactive material such as lithium or sodium through the die in an inert atmosphere of nitrogen, argon or the like as in a glovebox. The invention further teaches a method of stamping out sample discs from the ribbon and of packaging each disc by sandwiching it between two aluminum sheets and cold welding the sheets together along an annular seam beyond the outer periphery of the disc. This provides a sample of high purity reactive material that can have a long shelf life

  3. Shield design for the Fusion Materials Irradiation Test facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carter, L.L.; Mann, F.M.; Morford, R.J.; Wilcox, A.D.; Johnson, D.L.; Huang, S.T.

    1983-03-01

    The shield design for the Fusion Materials Irradiation Test facility is based upon one-, two- and three-dimensional transport calculations with experimental measurements utilized to refine the nuclear data including the neutron cross sections from 20 to 50 MeV and the gamma ray and neutron source terms. The high energy neutrons and deuterons produce activation products from the numerous reactions that are kinematically allowed. The analyses for both beam-on and beam-off (from the activation products) conditions have required extensive nuclear data libraries and the utilization of Monte Carlo, discrete ordinates, point kernel and auxiliary computer codes

  4. Test system for thermoelectric modules and materials

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hejtmánek, Jiří; Knížek, Karel; Švejda, V.; Horna, P.; Sikora, M.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 43, č. 10 (2014), s. 3726-3732 ISSN 0361-5235 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-17538S Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : thermoelectric power module * automatic thermoelectric testing setup * heat flow measurement * power generation * heat recovery Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.798, year: 2014

  5. Active Waste Materials Corrosion and Decontamination Tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Danielson, M.J.; Elmore, M.R.; Pitman, S.G.

    2000-01-01

    Stainless steel alloys, 304L and 316L, were corrosion tested in representative radioactive samples of three actual Hanford tank waste solutions (Tanks AW-101, C-104, AN-107). Both the 304L and 316L exhibited good corrosion performance when immersed in boiling waste solutions. The maximum general corrosion rate was 0.015 mm/y (0.60 mils per year). Generally, the 304L had a slightly higher rate than the 316L. No localized attack was observed after 122 days of testing in the liquid phase, liquid/vapor phase, or vapor phase. Radioactive plate-out decontamination tests indicated that a 24-hour exposure to 1 und M HNO 3 could remove about 99% of the radioactive components in the metal film when exposed to the C-104 and AN-107 solutions. The decontamination results are less certain for the AW-101 solution, since the initial contamination readings exceeded the capacity of the meter used for this test

  6. Needs of in-situ materials testing under neutron irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noda, K.; Hishinuma, A.; Kiuchi, K.

    1989-01-01

    Under neutron irradiation, the component atoms of materials are displaced as primary knock-on atoms, and the energy of the primary knock-on atoms is consumed by electron excitation and nuclear collision. Elementary irradiation defects accumulate to form damage structure including voids and bubbles. In situ test under neutron irradiation is necessary for investigating into the effect of irradiation on creep behavior, the electric properties of ceramics, transport phenomena and so on. The in situ test is also important to investigate into the phenomena related to the chemical reaction with environment during irradiation. Accelerator type high energy neutron sources are preferable to fission reactors. In this paper, the needs and the research items of in situ test under neutron irradiation using a D-Li stripping type high energy neutron source on metallic and ceramic materials are described. Creep behavior is one of the most important mechanical properties, and depends strongly on irradiation environment, also it is closely related to microstructure. Irradiation affects the electric conductibity of ceramics and also their creep behavior. In this way, in situ test is necessary. (K.I.)

  7. Observational constraint on the interacting dark energy models including the Sandage-Loeb test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ming-Jian; Liu, Wen-Biao

    2014-05-01

    Two types of interacting dark energy models are investigated using the type Ia supernova (SNIa), observational data (OHD), cosmic microwave background shift parameter, and the secular Sandage-Loeb (SL) test. In the investigation, we have used two sets of parameter priors including WMAP-9 and Planck 2013. They have shown some interesting differences. We find that the inclusion of SL test can obviously provide a more stringent constraint on the parameters in both models. For the constant coupling model, the interaction term has been improved to be only a half of the original scale on corresponding errors. Comparing with only SNIa and OHD, we find that the inclusion of the SL test almost reduces the best-fit interaction to zero, which indicates that the higher-redshift observation including the SL test is necessary to track the evolution of the interaction. For the varying coupling model, data with the inclusion of the SL test show that the parameter at C.L. in Planck priors is , where the constant is characteristic for the severity of the coincidence problem. This indicates that the coincidence problem will be less severe. We then reconstruct the interaction , and we find that the best-fit interaction is also negative, similar to the constant coupling model. However, for a high redshift, the interaction generally vanishes at infinity. We also find that the phantom-like dark energy with is favored over the CDM model.

  8. Computational homogenization of sound propagation in a deformable porous material including microscopic viscous-thermal effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gao, K.; van Dommelen, J. A. W.; Göransson, P.; Geers, M. G. D.

    2016-01-01

    Porous materials like acoustic foams can be used for acoustic shielding, which is important for high-tech systems and human comfort. In this paper, a homogenization model is proposed to investigate the relation between the microstructure and the resulting macroscopic acoustic properties. The

  9. Nondestructive control of materials by ultrasonic tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mercier, Noelle.

    1974-01-01

    A bibliographic study of nondestructive control methods of solids by ultrasonic tests, and of the ultrasonic emission of a transducer of finite dimension, is first presented. The principle of two of these methods is verified experimentally; they should permit the measurement of various physical parameters of solids, and the detection of local inhomogeneities. The first method calls upon the analysis of the ultrasonic signal (amplitude and phase), after it has crossed a constant thickness of a metallic specimen. This analysis reveals variations of attenuation and of ultrasonic propagation velocity within the specimen. A good spatial resolution is obtained by using 1mm-diameter probes. The second method leads, thanks to a test rig equipped with broad frequency band electrostatic transducers, to the knowledge of the attenuation law of the specimens as a function of frequency (present range: 5 to 15MHz); from this a classification of these specimens as regards their granulometry is deduced [fr

  10. New spark test device for material characterization

    CERN Document Server

    Kildemo, Morten

    2004-01-01

    An automated spark test system based on combining field emission and spark measurements, exploiting a discharging capacitor is investigated. In particular, the remaining charge on the capacitor is analytically solved assuming the field emitted current to follow the Fowler Nordheim expression. The latter allows for field emission measurements from pA to A currents, and spark detection by complete discharge of the capacitor. The measurement theory and experiments on Cu and W are discussed.

  11. High temperature tests for graphite materials

    OpenAIRE

    Zhmurikov, Evgenij

    2015-01-01

    This study was performed within the framework of the EURISOL for facilities SPIRAL-II (GANIL, France) and SPES (LNL, Italy), and aims to investigate the anticipated strength properties of fine-grained graphite at elevated temperatures. It appears that the major parameters that affect to the lifetime of a graphite target of this IP are the temperature and heating time. High temperature tests were conducted to simulate the heating under the influence of a beam of heavy particles by passing thro...

  12. Proposal of world network on material testing reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takemoto, Noriyuki; Izumo, Hironobu; Hori, Naohiko; Ishitsuka, Etsuo; Ishihara, Masahiro

    2011-01-01

    Establishment of an international cooperation system of worldwide testing reactor network (world network) is proposed in order to achieve efficient facility utilization and provide high quality irradiation data by role sharing of irradiation tests with materials testing reactors in the world. As for the first step, mutual understanding among materials testing reactors is thought to be necessary. From this point, an international symposium on materials testing reactors (ISMTR) was held to construct the world network from 2008, and a common understanding of world network has begun to be shared. (author)

  13. Small ring testing of a creep resistant material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hyde, C.J.; Hyde, T.H.; Sun, W.; Nardone, S.; De Bruycker, E.

    2013-01-01

    Many components in conventional and nuclear power plant, aero-engines, chemical plant etc., operate at temperatures which are high enough for creep to occur. These include steam pipes, pipe branches, gas and steam turbine blades, etc. The manufacture of such components may also require welds to be part of them. In most cases, only nominal operating conditions (i.e. pressure, temperatures, system load, etc.) are known and hence precise life predictions for these components are not possible. Also, the proportion of life consumed will vary from position to position within a component. Hence, non-destructive techniques are adopted to assist in making decisions on whether to repair, continue operating or replace certain components. One such approach is to test a small sample removed from the component to make small creep test specimens which can be tested to give information on the remaining creep life of the component. When such a small sample cannot be removed from the operating component, e.g. in the case of small components, the component can be taken out of operation in order to make small creep test specimens, the results from which can then be used to assist with making decisions regarding similar or future components. This paper presents a small creep test specimen which can be used for the testing of particularly strong and creep resistant materials, such as nickel-based superalloys

  14. Nuclear fuels for material test reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramanathan, L.V.; Durazzo, M.; Freitas, C.T. de

    1982-01-01

    Experimental results related do the development of nuclear fuels for reactors cooled and moderated by water have been presented cylindrical and plate type fuels have been described in which the core consists of U compouns dispersed in an Al matrix and is clad with aluminium. Fabrication details involving rollmilling, swaging or hot pressing have been described. Corrosion and irradiation test results are also discussed. The performance of the different types of fuels indicates that it is possible to locally fabricate fuel plates with U 3 O 8 +Al cores (20% enriched U) for use in operating Brazilian research reactors. (Author) [pt

  15. Transfer of microorganisms, including Listeria monocytogenes, from various materials to beef.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Midelet, Graziella; Carpentier, Brigitte

    2002-08-01

    The quantity of microorganisms that may be transferred to a food that comes into contact with a contaminated surface depends on the density of microorganisms on the surface and on the attachment strengths of the microorganisms on the materials. We made repeated contacts between pieces of meat and various surfaces (stainless steel and conveyor belt materials [polyvinyl chloride and polyurethane]), which were conditioned with meat exudate and then were contaminated with Listeria monocytogenes, Staphylococcus sciuri, Pseudomonas putida, or Comamonas sp. Attachment strengths were assessed by the slopes of the two-phase curves obtained by plotting the logarithm of the number of microorganisms transferred against the order number of the contact. These curves were also used to estimate the microbial population on the surface by using the equation of A. Veulemans, E. Jacqmain, and D. Jacqmain (Rev. Ferment. Ind. Aliment. 25:58-65, 1970). The biofilms were characterized according to their physicochemical surface properties and structures. Their exopolysaccharide-producing capacities were assessed from biofilms grown on polystyrene. The L. monocytogenes biofilms attached more strongly to polymers than did the other strains, and attachment strength proved to be weaker on stainless steel than on the two polymers. However, in most cases, it was the population of the biofilms that had the strongest influence on the total number of CFU detached. Although attachment strengths were weaker on stainless steel, this material, carrying a smaller population of bacteria, had a weaker contaminating capacity. In most cases the equation of Veulemans et al. revealed more bacteria than did swabbing the biofilms, and it provided a better assessment of the contaminating potential of the polymeric materials studied here.

  16. Materials testing for molten carbonate fuel cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Di Mario, F.; Frangini, S.

    1995-01-01

    Unlike conventional generation systems fuel cells use an electrochemical reaction between a fossil fuel and an oxidant to produce electricity through a flame less combustion process. As a result, fuel cells offer interesting technical and operating advantages in terms of conversion efficiencies and environmental benefits due to very low pollutant emissions. Among the different kinds of fuel cells the molten carbonate fuel cells are currently being developed for building compact power generation plants to serve mainly in congested urban areas in virtue of their higher efficiency capabilities at either partial and full loads, good response to power peak loads, fuel flexibility, modularity and, potentially, cost-effectiveness. Starting from an analysis of the most important degradative aspects of the corrosion of the separator plate, the main purpose of this communication is to present the state of the technology in the field of corrosion control of the separator plate in order to extend the useful lifetime of the construction materials to the project goal of 40,000 hours

  17. State-of-the-art methods for testing materials outdoors

    Science.gov (United States)

    R. Sam Williams

    2004-01-01

    In recent years, computers, sensors, microelectronics, and communication technologies have made it possible to automate the way materials are tested in the field. It is now possible to purchase monitoring equipment to measure weather and materials properties. The measurement of materials response often requires innovative approaches and added expense, but the...

  18. Radiochemical analyses of several spent fuel Approved Testing Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guenther, R.J.; Blahnik, D.E.; Wildung, N.J.

    1994-09-01

    Radiochemical characterization data are described for UO 2 and UO 2 plus 3 wt% Gd 2 O 3 commercial spent nuclear fuel taken from a series of Approved Testing Materials (ATMs). These full-length nuclear fuel rods include MLA091 of ATM-103, MKP070 of ATM-104, NBD095 and NBD131 of ATM-106, and ADN0206 of ATM-108. ATMs 103, 104, and 106 were all irradiated in the Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant (Reactor No.1), a pressurized-water reactor that used fuel fabricated by Combustion Engineering. ATM-108 was part of the same fuel bundle designed as ATM-105 and came from boiling-water reactor fuel fabricated by General Electric and irradiated in the Cooper Nuclear Power Plant. Rod average burnups and expected fission gas releases ranged from 2,400 to 3,700 GJ/kgM. (25 to 40 Mwd/kgM) and from less than 1% to greater than 10%, respectively, depending on the specific ATM. The radiochemical analyses included uranium and plutonium isotopes in the fuel, selected fission products in the fuel, fuel burnup, cesium and iodine on the inner surfaces of the cladding, 14 C in the fuel and cladding, and analyses of the gases released to the rod plenum. Supporting examinations such as fuel rod design and material descriptions, power histories, and gamma scans used for sectioning diagrams are also included. These ATMs were examined as part of the Materials Characterization Center Program conducted at Pacific Northwest Laboratory provide a source of well-characterized spent fuel for testing in support of the US Department of Energy Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program

  19. Flammability tests for regulation of building and construction materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    K. Sumathipala

    2006-01-01

    The regulation of building materials and products for flammability is critical to ensure the safety of occupants in buildings and other structures. The involvement of exposed building materials and products in fires resulting in the loss of human life often spurs an increase in regulation and new test methods to address the problem. Flammability tests range from those...

  20. Nuclear material control and accountancy planning and performance testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mike Enhinger; Dennis Wilkey; Rod Martin; Ken Byers; Brian Smith

    1999-01-01

    An overview of performance testing as used at U.S. Department of Energy facilities is provided. Performance tests are performed on specific aspects of the regulations or site policy. The key issues in establishing a performance testing program are: identifying what needs to be tested; determining how to test; establishing criteria to evaluate test results. The program elements of performance testing program consist of: planning; coordination; conduct; evaluation. A performance test may be conducted of personnel or equipment. The DOE orders for nuclear material control and accountancy are divided into three functional areas: program administration, material accounting, and material control. Examples performance tests may be conducted on program administration, accounting, measurement and measurement control, inventory, and containment [ru

  1. Characterization of spent fuel approved testing material: ATM-106

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guenther, R.J.; Blahnik, D.E.; Campbell, T.K.; Jenquin, U.P.; Mendel, J.E.; Thornhill, C.K.

    1988-10-01

    The characterization data obtained to date are described for Approved Testing Material (ATM)-106 spent fuel from Assembly BT03 of pressurized-water reactor Calvert Cliffs No. 1. This report is one in a series being prepared by the Materials Characterization Center at Pacific Northwest Laboratory on spent fuel ATMs. The ATMs are receiving extensive examinations to provide a source of well- characterized spent fuel for testing in the US Department of Energy Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCWRM) program. ATM-106 consists of 20 full-length irradiated fuel rods with rod-average burnups of about 3700 GJ/kgM (43 MWd/kgM) and expected fission gas release of /approximately/10%. Characterization data include (1) as-fabricated fuel design, irradiation history, and subsequent storage and handling; (2) isotopic gamma scans; (3) fission gas analyses; (4) ceramography of the fuel and metallography of the cladding; (5) calculated nuclide inventories and radioactivities in the fuel and cladding; and (6) radiochemical analyses of the fuel and cladding. Additional analyses of the fuel rod are being conducted and will be included in planned revisions of this report. 12 refs., 110 figs., 81 tabs

  2. Materials development for ITER shielding and test blanket in China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, J.M., E-mail: Chenjm@swip.ac.cn [Southwestern Institute of Physics, P.O. Box 432, Chengdu 610041 (China); Wu, J.H.; Liu, X.; Wang, P.H. [Southwestern Institute of Physics, P.O. Box 432, Chengdu 610041 (China); Wang, Z.H.; Li, Z.N. [Ningxia Orient Non-ferrous Metals Group Co. Ltd., P.O. Box 105, Shizuishan (China); Wang, X.S.; Zhang, P.C. [China Academy of Engineering Physics, P.O. Box 919-71, Mianyang 621900 (China); Zhang, N.M.; Fu, H.Y.; Liu, D.H. [Southwestern Institute of Physics, P.O. Box 432, Chengdu 610041 (China)

    2011-10-01

    China is a member of the ITER program and is developing her own materials for its shielding and test blanket modules. The materials include vacuum-hot-pressing (VHP) Be, CuCrZr alloy, 316L(N) and China low activation ferritic/martensitic (CLF-1) steels. Joining technologies including Be/Cu hot isostatic pressing (HIP) and electron beam (EB) weldability of 316L(N) were investigated. Chinese VHP-Be showed good properties, with BeO content and ductility that satisfy the ITER requirements. Be/Cu mock-ups were fabricated for Be qualification tests at simulated ITER vertical displacement event (VDE) and heat flux cycling conditions. Fine microstructure and good mechanical strength of the CuCrZr alloy were achieved by a pre-forging treatment, while the weldability of 316L(N) by EB was demonstrated for welding depths varying from 5 to 80 mm. Fine microstructure, high strength, and good ductility were achieved in CLF-1 steel by an optimized normalizing, tempering and aging procedure.

  3. Characterization of spent fuel approved testing material---ATM-105

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guenther, R.J.; Blahnik, D.E.; Campbell, T.K.; Jenquin, U.P.; Mendel, J.E.; Thomas, L.E.; Thornhill, C.K.

    1991-12-01

    The characterization data obtained to data are described for Approved Testing Material 105 (ATM-105), which is spent fuel from Bundles CZ346 and CZ348 of the Cooper Nuclear Power Plant, a boiling-water reactor. This report is one in a series being prepared by the Materials Characterization Center at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) on spent fuel ATMs. The ATMs are receiving extensive examinations to provide a source of well-characterized spent fuel for testing in the US Department of Energy Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) Program. ATM-105 consists of 88 full-length irradiated fuel rods with rod-average burnups of about 2400 GJ/kgM (28 MWd/kgM) and expected fission gas release of about 1%. Characterization data include (1) descriptions of as-fabricated fuel design, irradiation history, and subsequent storage and handling; (2) isotopic gamma scans; (3) fission gas analyses; (4) ceramography of the fuel and metallography of the cladding; (5) special fuel studies involving analytical transmission electron microscopy (AEM); (6) calculated nuclide inventories and radioactivities in the fuel and cladding; and (7) radiochemical analyses of the fuel and cladding. Additional analyses of the fuel are being conducted and will be included in planned revisions of this report.

  4. Biostatistics with emphasis on life table survival rate calculations (including Kaplan Meier) and the logrank test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mould, Richard F.

    1995-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: To explain some of the most useful statistical calculation procedures which are relevant to radiation oncologists and to provide insights on what tests and procedures should be used in various situations such as when survival rates and their associated standard errors have to be determined. To describe some of the problems and pitfalls in clinical trial designs which have to be overcome if a trial is to have the possibility of reaching a successful conclusion. To review methods of computing criteria to quantitatively describe criteria of success (eg. quality of life, long-term survival, cure) of radiation oncology and to suggest possible future statistical improvements in this area. Chi-Squared Test: The chi-squared test is probably the most useful of the tests of statistical significance for the radiation oncologist. Applications will be described, including goodness of fit tests and 2x2 contingency tables which are the simplest of the generalized nxm contingency tables. Degrees of Freedom and P<0.05 for Significance Testing: An Introduction will be given to the meaning of P<0.05 in relation to significance testing and the use of tables of critical values of a test statistic (eg. chi-squared) which are given as a function of degrees of freedom and P-values. Survival Rate Calculations for Grouped and Ungrouped Data: The life-table method (sometimes termed the actuarial method) will be explained for both grouped data (eg. survival times grouped in annual intervals for patients who have died and for those who are still alive or lost to follow-up) and for ungrouped data (when individual survival times are used). The method for ungrouped data is variously termed the Kaplan-Meier or Product Limit method. Logrank Test: This is the most useful test for comparison of the survival experience of two groups of patients and its use will be explained. In part the computation is similar to that for the Kaplan-Meier/Product Limit method

  5. Biostatistics with emphasis on life table survival rate calculations (including Kaplan Meier) and the logrank test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mould, Richard F

    1995-07-01

    Purpose/Objective: To explain some of the most useful statistical calculation procedures which are relevant to radiation oncologists and to provide insights on what tests and procedures should be used in various situations such as when survival rates and their associated standard errors have to be determined. To describe some of the problems and pitfalls in clinical trial designs which have to be overcome if a trial is to have the possibility of reaching a successful conclusion. To review methods of computing criteria to quantitatively describe criteria of success (eg. quality of life, long-term survival, cure) of radiation oncology and to suggest possible future statistical improvements in this area. Chi-Squared Test: The chi-squared test is probably the most useful of the tests of statistical significance for the radiation oncologist. Applications will be described, including goodness of fit tests and 2x2 contingency tables which are the simplest of the generalized nxm contingency tables. Degrees of Freedom and P<0.05 for Significance Testing: An Introduction will be given to the meaning of P<0.05 in relation to significance testing and the use of tables of critical values of a test statistic (eg. chi-squared) which are given as a function of degrees of freedom and P-values. Survival Rate Calculations for Grouped and Ungrouped Data: The life-table method (sometimes termed the actuarial method) will be explained for both grouped data (eg. survival times grouped in annual intervals for patients who have died and for those who are still alive or lost to follow-up) and for ungrouped data (when individual survival times are used). The method for ungrouped data is variously termed the Kaplan-Meier or Product Limit method. Logrank Test: This is the most useful test for comparison of the survival experience of two groups of patients and its use will be explained. In part the computation is similar to that for the Kaplan-Meier/Product Limit method.

  6. Development of microwave absorbing materials prepared from a polymer binder including Japanese lacquer and epoxy resin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwamaru, T.; Katsumata, H.; Uekusa, S.; Ooyagi, H.; Ishimura, T.; Miyakoshi, T.

    Microwave absorption composites were synthesized from a poly urushiol epoxy resin (PUE) mixed with one of microwave absorbing materials; Ni-Zn ferrite, Soot, Black lead, and carbon nano tube (CNT) to investigate their microwave absorption properties. PUE binders were specially made from Japanese lacquer and epoxy resin, where Japanese lacquer has been traditionally used for bond and paint because it has excellent beauty. Japanese lacquer solidifies with oxygen contained in air's moisture, which has difficulty in making composite, but we improved Japanese lacquer's solidification properties by use of epoxy resin. We made 10 mm thickness composite samples and cut them into toroidal shape to measure permittivity, permeability, and reflection loss in frequencies ranging from 50 Hz to 20 GHz. Electric magnetic absorber's composites synthesized from a PUE binders mixed either with Soot or CNT showed significantly higher wave absorption over -27 dB than the others at frequencies around 18 GHz, although Japanese lacquer itself doesn't affect absorption. This means Japanese lacquer can be used as binder materials for microwave absorbers.

  7. Material control test and evaluation system at the ICPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, C.E.

    1979-01-01

    The US DOE is evaluating process monitoring as part of a total nuclear material safeguards system. A monitoring system is being installed at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant to test and evaluate material control and surveillance concepts in an operating nuclear fuel reprocessing plant. Process monitoring for nuclear material control complements conventional safeguards accountability and physical protection to assure adherence to approved safeguards procedures and verify containment of nuclear materials within the processing plant

  8. Research process of nondestructive testing pitting corrosion in metal material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo ZHANG

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Pitting corrosion directly affects the usability and service life of metal material, so the effective nondestructive testing and evaluation on pitting corrosion is of great significance for fatigue life prediction because of data supporting. The features of pitting corrosion are elaborated, and the relation between the pitting corrosion parameters and fatigue performance is pointed out. Through introducing the fundamental principles of pitting corrosion including mainly magnetic flux leakage inspection, pulsed eddy current and guided waves, the research status of nondestructive testing technology for pitting corrosion is summarized, and the key steps of nondestructive testing technologies are compared and analyzed from the theoretical model, signal processing to industrial applications. Based on the analysis of the signal processing specificity of different nondestructive testing technologies in detecting pitting corrosion, the visualization combined with image processing and signal analysis are indicated as the critical problems of accurate extraction of pitting defect information and quantitative characterization for pitting corrosion. The study on non-contact nondestructive testing technologies is important for improving the detection precision and its application in industries.

  9. Compositions of graphene materials with metal nanostructures and microstructures and methods of making and using including pressure sensors

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Ye; Khashab, Niveen M.; Tao, Jing

    2017-01-01

    Composition comprising at least one graphene material and at least one metal. The metal can be in the form of nanoparticles as well as microflakes, including single crystal microflakes. The metal can be intercalated in the graphene sheets

  10. Aerogel Hybrid Composite Materials: Designs and Testing for Multifunctional Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Martha K.; Fesmire, James E.

    2016-01-01

    This webinar will introduce the broad spectrum of aerogel composites and their diverse performance properties such as reduced heat transfer to energy storage, and expands specifically on the aerogel/fiber laminate systems and testing methodologies. The multi-functional laminate composite system, AeroFiber, and its construction is designed by varying the type of fiber (e.g. polyester, carbon, Kevlar®, Spectra® or Innegral(TradeMark) and combinations thereof), the aerogel panel type and thickness, and overall layup configuration. The combination and design of materials may be customized and tailored to achieve a range of desired properties in the resulting laminate system. Multi-functional properties include structural strength, impact resistance, reduction in heat transfer, increased fire resistance, mechanical energy absorption, and acoustic energy dampening. Applications include aerospace, aircraft, automotive, boating, building and construction, lightweight portable structures, liquefied natural gas, cryogenics, transportation and energy, sporting equipment, and military protective gear industries.

  11. Wrought stainless steel butt-welding fittings: including reference to other corrosion resistant materials - approved 1971

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1975-01-01

    ANSI B16.9 is the American Standard for steel butt-welding fittings and although not so stated, it is implied that its scope deals primarily with the schedules of wall thicknesses which are common to carbon steel and the grades of alloy steel piping that are selected for pressure and temperature considerations. The purpose of this standard is to provide industry with a set of dimensional standards for butt-welding fittings that can be used with these light wall pipes of corrosion resisting materials. The center-to-end dimensions of all fittings are identical with those in ANSI B16.9 which give to industry the advantage of uniform design room practice and a maximum utilization of existing die equipment. The only departure from this is in the lap-joint stub end where for purposes of economy the face-to-end of the product has been reduced for use with thin wall piping

  12. Test and evaluation of pressure vessel materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Sun Pil; Hong, Jun Hwa; Nho, Kye Hoe; Han, Dae June; Chi, Se Hwan

    1985-01-01

    We have prepared a method for analyzing the Charpy impact test data, which is deduced from ''the standard anelastic solid equation''. The theoretical expression for the absorbed energy is in a form of W=Wsub(U)+(Wsub(R)-Wsub(U))/ [1+(ωtau) 2 ] showing the Debye characteristics and where tau is given by the Arrhenius equation; tau=tau 0 exp(ΔH/ksub(B)T). Four measurable parameters, at the present stage, can characterize the dynamic hehavior of cracking (Charpy impact result). They are the upper shelf energy(Wsub(R), the lower shelf energy (Wsub(U)), the activation energy of crack (ΔH, and wtau(0) where w tau(0) are the resonance frequency of the specimen and the jumping pre-exponential factor of propagating crack respectively. However the states of R (relaxed) and U (un-relaxed) should be defined from reasonable physical conditions in the future and it is possible that Wsub(U) is small enough to be taken as zero. The effects of irradiation, alloying elements, and heat treatment on the impact results should be interpreted as changes in the above characteristic parameters. The present method has been applied for weld metal of SA 508-2 irradiated up to a fluence of 4x10 18 n/cm 2 , E>1.0Mev, resulting in about 29% decrease in Wsub(R), negligible change in Wsub(U), 5.6 times increase in ωtau 0 , and no change in ΔH. This seems to indicate that irradiation degrades an average value of YOUNG's modulus so that cracks propagate more easily and it does not effect on breaking the lattice bond. However much more systematic analyses should be necessary for correct judgment. It is concluded that the present method is quite adequate for analyzing the Charpy impact data even though plastic deformation in the specimen was not considered separately so that the method should be applied for various cases in order to evaluate the proper trend of effects of irradiation, alloying elements, and heat treatment on the Charpy impact results. (Author)

  13. Preparation of working calibration and test materials: uranyl nitrate solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamura, S.S.; Spraktes, F.W.; Baldwin, J.M.; Hand, R.L.; Lash, R.P.

    1977-05-01

    Reliable working calibration and test materials (WCTMs) are essential to a meaningful analytical measurements quality assurance program. This report describes recommended methods for the preparation of uranyl nitrate solution WCTMs for testing analytical methods, for calibrating methods, and for testing personnel. Uranyl nitrate solution WCTMs can be synthesized from characterized starting materials or prepared from typical plant materials by thorough characterization with reference to primary or secondary reference calibration and test materials (PRCTMs or SRCTMs). Recommended starting materials are described along with detailed procedures for (a) preparing several widely-used types of uranyl nitrate solution WCTMs, (b) packaging the WCTMs, (c) analyzing the WCTMs to establish the reference values or to confirm the synthesis, and (d) statistically evaluating the analytical data to assign reference values and to assess the accuracy of the WCTMs

  14. More Than Just Accuracy: A Novel Method to Incorporate Multiple Test Attributes in Evaluating Diagnostic Tests Including Point of Care Tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Matthew; Weigl, Bernhard; Fitzpatrick, Annette; Ide, Nicole

    2016-01-01

    Current frameworks for evaluating diagnostic tests are constrained by a focus on diagnostic accuracy, and assume that all aspects of the testing process and test attributes are discrete and equally important. Determining the balance between the benefits and harms associated with new or existing tests has been overlooked. Yet, this is critically important information for stakeholders involved in developing, testing, and implementing tests. This is particularly important for point of care tests (POCTs) where tradeoffs exist between numerous aspects of the testing process and test attributes. We developed a new model that multiple stakeholders (e.g., clinicians, patients, researchers, test developers, industry, regulators, and health care funders) can use to visualize the multiple attributes of tests, the interactions that occur between these attributes, and their impacts on health outcomes. We use multiple examples to illustrate interactions between test attributes (test availability, test experience, and test results) and outcomes, including several POCTs. The model could be used to prioritize research and development efforts, and inform regulatory submissions for new diagnostics. It could potentially provide a way to incorporate the relative weights that various subgroups or clinical settings might place on different test attributes. Our model provides a novel way that multiple stakeholders can use to visualize test attributes, their interactions, and impacts on individual and population outcomes. We anticipate that this will facilitate more informed decision making around diagnostic tests.

  15. Assessment of the quality of test results from selected civil engineering material testing laboratories in Tanzania

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mbawala, SJ

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Civil and geotechnical engineering material testing laboratories are expected to produce accurate and reliable test results. However, the ability of laboratories to produce accurate and reliable test results depends on many factors, among others...

  16. Test methods for the dynamic mechanical properties of polymeric materials. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, G.K.

    1980-06-01

    Various test geometries and procedures for the dynamic mechanical analysis of polymers employing a mechanical spectrometer have been evaluated. The methods and materials included in this work are forced torsional pendulum testing of Kevlar/epoxy laminates and rigid urethane foams, oscillatory parallel plate testing to determine the kinetics of the cure of VCE with Hylene MP, oscillatory compressive testing of B-3223 cellular silicone, and oscillatory tensile testing of Silastic E and single Kevlar filaments. Fundamental dynamic mechanical properties, including the storage and loss moduli and loss tangent of the materials tested, were determined as a function of temperature and sometimes of frequency.

  17. FY 2016 Status Report: Documentation of All CIRFT Data including Hydride Reorientation Tests (Draft M2)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jy-An John [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Materials Science and Technology Division; Wang, Hong [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Materials Science and Technology Division; Jiang, Hao [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Materials Science and Technology Division; Yan, Yong [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Materials Science and Technology Division; Bevard, Bruce B. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Materials Science and Technology Division; Scaglione, John M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Materials Science and Technology Division

    2016-09-04

    The first portion of this report provides a detailed description of fiscal year (FY) 2015 test result corrections and analysis updates based on FY 2016 updates to the Cyclic Integrated Reversible-Bending Fatigue Tester (CIRFT) program methodology, which is used to evaluate the vibration integrity of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) under normal conditions of transport (NCT). The CIRFT consists of a U-frame test setup and a real-time curvature measurement method. The three-component U-frame setup of the CIRFT has two rigid arms and linkages connecting to a universal testing machine. The curvature SNF rod bending is obtained through a three-point deflection measurement method. Three linear variable differential transformers (LVDTs) are clamped to the side connecting plates of the U-frame and used to capture deformation of the rod. The second portion of this report provides the latest CIRFT data, including data for the hydride reorientation test. The variations in fatigue life are provided in terms of moment, equivalent stress, curvature, and equivalent strain for the tested SNFs. The equivalent stress plot collapsed the data points from all of the SNF samples into a single zone. A detailed examination revealed that, at the same stress level, fatigue lives display a descending order as follows: H. B. Robinson Nuclear Power Station (HBR), LMK, and mixed uranium-plutonium oxide (MOX). Just looking at the strain, LMK fuel has a slightly longer fatigue life than HBR fuel, but the difference is subtle. The third portion of this report provides finite element analysis (FEA) dynamic deformation simulation of SNF assemblies . In a horizontal layout under NCT, the fuel assembly’s skeleton, which is formed by guide tubes and spacer grids, is the primary load bearing apparatus carrying and transferring vibration loads within an SNF assembly. These vibration loads include interaction forces between the SNF assembly and the canister basket walls. Therefore, the integrity of the guide

  18. Differences in Tribological Behaviors upon Switching Fixed and Moving Materials of Tribo-pairs including Metal and Polymer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Aijie; Tian, Pengyi; Wen, Shizhu; Guo, Fei; Hu, Yueqiang; Jia, Wenpeng; Dong, Conglin; Tian, Yu

    2017-10-12

    The coefficient of friction (COF) between two materials is usually believed to be an intrinsic property of the materials themselves. In this study, metals of stainless steel (304) and brass (H62), and polymers of polypropylene (PP) and polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) were tested on a standard ball-on-three-plates test machine. Significantly different tribological behaviors were observed when fixed and moving materials of tribo-pairs (metal/polymer) were switched. As an example, under the same applied load and rotating speed, the COF (0.49) between a rotating PP ball and three fixed H62 plates was approximately 2.3 times higher than that between switched materials of tribo-pairs. Meanwhile, the COF between H62 and PTFE was relatively stable. The unexpected tribological behaviors were ascribed to the thermal and mechanical properties of tribo-pairs. Theoretical analysis revealed that the differences in the maximum local temperature between switching the fixed and moving materials of tribo-pairs were consistent with the differences in the tested COF. This result indicated the precise prediction of the COF of two materials is complexcity, and that thermal and mechanical properties should be properly considered in designing tribo-pairs, because these properties may significantly affect tribological performance.

  19. Modelling of ultrasonic nondestructive testing in anisotropic materials - Rectangular crack

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bostroem, A.

    2001-12-01

    Nondestructive testing with ultrasound is a standard procedure in the nuclear power industry when searching for defects, in particular cracks. To develop and qualify testing procedures extensive experimental work on test blocks is usually required. This can take a lot of time and therefore be quite costly. A good mathematical model of the testing situation is therefore of great value as it can reduce the experimental work to a great extent. A good model can be very useful for parametric studies and as a pedagogical tool. A further use of a model is as a tool in the qualification of personnel. In anisotropic materials, e.g. austenitic welds, the propagation of ultrasound becomes much more complicated as compared to isotropic materials. Therefore, modelling is even more useful for anisotropic materials, and it in particular has a greater pedagogical value. The present project has been concerned with a further development of the anisotropic capabilities of the computer program UTDefect, which has so far only contained a strip-like crack as the single defect type for anisotropic materials. To be more specific, the scattering by a rectangular crack in an anisotropic component has been studied and the result is adapted to include transmitting and receiving ultrasonic probes. The component under study is assumed to be anisotropic with arbitrary anisotropy. On the other hand, it is assumed to be homogeneous, and this in particular excludes most welds, where it is seldom an adequate approximation to assume homogeneity. The anisotropy may be arbitrarily oriented and the same is true of the rectangular crack. The crack may also be located near a backside of the component. To solve the scattering problem for the crack an integral equation method is used. The probe model has been developed in an earlier project and to compute the signal response in the receiving probe an electromechanical reciprocity argument is employed. As a rectangle is a truly 3D scatterer the sizes of the

  20. Historical Evolution of NASA Standard Materials Testing with Hypergolic Propellants and Ammonia (NASA Standard 6001 Test 15)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Benjamin; McClure, Mark B.

    2012-01-01

    The NASA Johnson Space Center White Sands Test Facility (WSTF) has performed testing of hazardous and reactive aerospace fluids, including hypergolic propellants, with materials since the 1960s with the Apollo program. Amongst other test activities, Test 15 is a NASA standard test for evaluating the reactivity of materials with selected aerospace fluids, in particular hydrazine, monomethylhydrazine, uns-dimethylhydrazine, Aerozine 50, dinitrogen tetroxide oxidizers, and ammonia. This manuscript provides an overview of the history of Test 15 over a timeline ranging from prior to its development and first implementation as a NASA standard test in 1974 to its current refinement. Precursor documents to NASA standard tests, as they are currently known, are reviewed. A related supplementary test, international standardization, and enhancements to Test 15 are also discussed. Because WSTF was instrumental in the development and implementation of Test 15, WSTF experience and practices are referred to in this manuscript.

  1. Alternative buffer material. Status of the ongoing laboratory investigation of reference materials and test package 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Svensson, Daniel; Dueck, Ann; Nilsson, Ulf; Olsson, Siv; Sanden, Torbjoern; Lydmark, Sara; Jaegerwall, Sara; Pedersen, Karsten; Hansen, Staffan

    2011-07-01

    Bentonite clay is part of the Swedish KBS-3 design of final repositories for high level radioactive waste. Wyoming bentonite with the commercial name MX-80 (American Colloid Co) has long been the reference for buffer material in the KBS-3 concept. Extending the knowledge base of alternative buffer materials will make it possible to optimize regarding safety, availability and cost. For this reason the field experiment Alternative Buffer Material (ABM) was started at Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory during 2006. The experiment includes three medium-scale test packages, each consisting of a central steel tube with heaters, and a buffer of compacted clay. Eleven different clays were chosen for the buffers to examine effects of smectite content, interlayer cations and overall iron content. Also bentonite pellets with and without additional quartz are being tested. The buffer in package 1 had been subjected to wetting by formation water and heating for more than two years (at 130 deg C for ∼ 1 year) when it was retrieved and analyzed. The main purposes of the project were to characterise the clays with respect to hydro-mechanical properties, mineralogy and chemical composition and to identify any differences in behaviour or long term stability. The diversity of clays and the heater of steel also make the experiment suitable for studies of iron-bentonite interactions. This report concerns the work accomplished up to now and is not to be treated as any final report of the project

  2. Alternative buffer material. Status of the ongoing laboratory investigation of reference materials and test package 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Svensson, Daniel [Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co., Stockholm (Sweden); Dueck, Ann; Nilsson, Ulf; Olsson, Siv; Sanden, Torbjoern [Clay Technology AB, Lund (Sweden); Lydmark, Sara; Jaegerwall, Sara; Pedersen, Karsten [Microbial Analytics Sweden AB, Moelnlycke (Sweden); Hansen, Staffan [LTH Lund Univ., Lund (Sweden)

    2011-07-15

    Bentonite clay is part of the Swedish KBS-3 design of final repositories for high level radioactive waste. Wyoming bentonite with the commercial name MX-80 (American Colloid Co) has long been the reference for buffer material in the KBS-3 concept. Extending the knowledge base of alternative buffer materials will make it possible to optimize regarding safety, availability and cost. For this reason the field experiment Alternative Buffer Material (ABM) was started at Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory during 2006. The experiment includes three medium-scale test packages, each consisting of a central steel tube with heaters, and a buffer of compacted clay. Eleven different clays were chosen for the buffers to examine effects of smectite content, interlayer cations and overall iron content. Also bentonite pellets with and without additional quartz are being tested. The buffer in package 1 had been subjected to wetting by formation water and heating for more than two years (at 130 deg C for {approx} 1 year) when it was retrieved and analyzed. The main purposes of the project were to characterise the clays with respect to hydro-mechanical properties, mineralogy and chemical composition and to identify any differences in behaviour or long term stability. The diversity of clays and the heater of steel also make the experiment suitable for studies of iron-bentonite interactions. This report concerns the work accomplished up to now and is not to be treated as any final report of the project.

  3. Qualification test of packages for transporting radioactive materials and wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira Santos, P. de; Miaw, S.T.W.

    1990-01-01

    Since 1979 the Waste Treatment Division of Nuclear Tecnology Development Center has been developed and tested packagings for transporting radioactive materials and wastes. The Division has designed facilities for testing Type A packages in accordance with the adopted regulations. The Division has tested several packages for universities, research centers, industries, INB, FURNAS, etc. (author) [pt

  4. Test plan for the irradiation of nonmetallic materials.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brush, Laurence H.; Farnum, Cathy Ottinger; Gelbard, Fred; Dahl, M.; Joslyn, C. C.; Venetz, T. J.

    2013-03-01

    A comprehensive test program to evaluate nonmetallic materials use in the Hanford Tank Farms is described in detail. This test program determines the effects of simultaneous multiple stressors at reasonable conditions on in-service configuration components by engineering performance testing.

  5. Test plan for the irradiation of nonmetallic materials.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brush, Laurence H.; Farnum, Cathy Ottinger; Dahl, M.; Joslyn, C. C.; Venetz, T. J.

    2013-05-01

    A comprehensive test program to evaluate nonmetallic materials use in the Hanford tank farms is described in detail. This test program determines the effects of simultaneous multiple stressors at reasonable conditions on in-service configuration components by engineering performance testing.

  6. Approved reference and testing materials for use in Nuclear Waste Management Research and Development Programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mellinger, G.B.; Daniel, J.L.

    1984-12-01

    This document, addressed to members of the waste management research and development community summarizes reference and testing materials available from the Nuclear Waste Materials Characterization Center (MCC). These materials are furnished under the MCC's charter to distribute reference materials essential for quantitative evaluation of nuclear waste package materials under development in the US. Reference materials with known behavior in various standard waste management related tests are needed to ensure that individual testing programs are correctly performing those tests. Approved testing materials are provided to assist the projects in assembling materials data base of defensible accuracy and precision. This is the second issue of this publication. Eight new Approved Testing Materials are listed, and Spent Fuel is included as a separate section of Standard Materials because of its increasing importance as a potential repository storage form. A summary of current characterization information is provided for each material listed. Future issues will provide updates of the characterization status of the materials presented in this issue, and information about new standard materials as they are acquired. 7 references, 1 figure, 19 tables

  7. Nuclear-waste-package materials degradation modes and accelerated testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-09-01

    This report reviews the materials degradation modes that may affect the long-term behavior of waste packages for the containment of nuclear waste. It recommends an approach to accelerated testing that can lead to the qualification of waste package materials in specific repository environments in times that are short relative to the time period over which the waste package is expected to provide containment. This report is not a testing plan but rather discusses the direction for research that might be considered in developing plans for accelerated testing of waste package materials and waste forms

  8. Electrofracturing test system and method of determining material characteristics of electrofractured material samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Stephen J.; Glover, Steven F.; Pfeifle, Tom; Su, Jiann-Cherng; Williamson, Kenneth Martin; Broome, Scott Thomas; Gardner, William Payton

    2017-08-01

    A device for electrofracturing a material sample and analyzing the material sample is disclosed. The device simulates an in situ electrofracturing environment so as to obtain electrofractured material characteristics representative of field applications while allowing permeability testing of the fractured sample under in situ conditions.

  9. Electric fields, weighting fields, signals and charge diffusion in detectors including resistive materials

    CERN Document Server

    Riegler, Werner

    2016-11-07

    In this report we discuss static and time dependent electric fields in detector geometries with an arbitrary number of parallel layers of a given permittivity and weak conductivity. We derive the Green's functions i.e. the field of a point charge, as well as the weighting fields for readout pads and readout strips in these geometries. The effect of 'bulk' resistivity on electric fields and signals is investigated. The spreading of charge on thin resistive layers is also discussed in detail, and the conditions for allowing the effect to be described by the diffusion equation is discussed. We apply the results to derive fields and induced signals in Resistive Plate Chambers, Micromega detectors including resistive layers for charge spreading and discharge protection as well as detectors using resistive charge division readout like the MicroCAT detector. We also discuss in detail how resistive layers affect signal shapes and increase crosstalk between readout electrodes.

  10. Electric fields, weighting fields, signals and charge diffusion in detectors including resistive materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riegler, W.

    2016-01-01

    In this report we discuss static and time dependent electric fields in detector geometries with an arbitrary number of parallel layers of a given permittivity and weak conductivity. We derive the Green's functions i.e. the field of a point charge, as well as the weighting fields for readout pads and readout strips in these geometries. The effect of 'bulk' resistivity on electric fields and signals is investigated. The spreading of charge on thin resistive layers is also discussed in detail, and the conditions for allowing the effect to be described by the diffusion equation is discussed. We apply the results to derive fields and induced signals in Resistive Plate Chambers, MICROMEGAS detectors including resistive layers for charge spreading and discharge protection as well as detectors using resistive charge division readout like the MicroCAT detector. We also discuss in detail how resistive layers affect signal shapes and increase crosstalk between readout electrodes.

  11. Laboratory Testing of Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Surrogate Waste Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broome, S.; Bronowski, D.; Pfeifle, T.; Herrick, C. G.

    2011-12-01

    The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) is a U.S. Department of Energy geological repository for the permanent disposal of defense-related transuranic (TRU) waste. The waste is emplaced in rooms excavated in the bedded Salado salt formation at a depth of 655 m below the ground surface. After emplacement of the waste, the repository will be sealed and decommissioned. WIPP Performance Assessment modeling of the underground material response requires a full and accurate understanding of coupled mechanical, hydrological, and geochemical processes and how they evolve with time. This study was part of a broader test program focused on room closure, specifically the compaction behavior of waste and the constitutive relations to model this behavior. The goal of this study was to develop an improved waste constitutive model. The model parameters are developed based on a well designed set of test data. The constitutive model will then be used to realistically model evolution of the underground and to better understand the impacts on repository performance. The present study results are focused on laboratory testing of surrogate waste materials. The surrogate wastes correspond to a conservative estimate of the degraded containers and TRU waste materials after the 10,000 year regulatory period. Testing consists of hydrostatic, uniaxial, and triaxial tests performed on surrogate waste recipes that were previously developed by Hansen et al. (1997). These recipes can be divided into materials that simulate 50% and 100% degraded waste by weight. The percent degradation indicates the anticipated amount of iron corrosion, as well as the decomposition of cellulosics, plastics, and rubbers. Axial, lateral, and volumetric strain and axial and lateral stress measurements were made. Two unique testing techniques were developed during the course of the experimental program. The first involves the use of dilatometry to measure sample volumetric strain under a hydrostatic condition. Bulk

  12. Method for contamination control and barrier apparatus with filter for containing waste materials that include dangerous particulate matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinson, Paul A.

    1998-01-01

    A container for hazardous waste materials that includes air or other gas carrying dangerous particulate matter has incorporated in barrier material, preferably in the form of a flexible sheet, one or more filters for the dangerous particulate matter sealably attached to such barrier material. The filter is preferably a HEPA type filter and is preferably chemically bonded to the barrier materials. The filter or filters are preferably flexibly bonded to the barrier material marginally and peripherally of the filter or marginally and peripherally of air or other gas outlet openings in the barrier material, which may be a plastic bag. The filter may be provided with a backing panel of barrier material having an opening or openings for the passage of air or other gas into the filter or filters. Such backing panel is bonded marginally and peripherally thereof to the barrier material or to both it and the filter or filters. A coupling or couplings for deflating and inflating the container may be incorporated. Confining a hazardous waste material in such a container, rapidly deflating the container and disposing of the container, constitutes one aspect of the method of the invention. The chemical bonding procedure for producing the container constitutes another aspect of the method of the invention.

  13. Method for contamination control and barrier apparatus with filter for containing waste materials that include dangerous particulate matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinson, P.A.

    1998-01-01

    A container for hazardous waste materials that includes air or other gas carrying dangerous particulate matter has incorporated barrier material, preferably in the form of a flexible sheet, and one or more filters for the dangerous particulate matter sealably attached to such barrier material. The filter is preferably a HEPA type filter and is preferably chemically bonded to the barrier materials. The filter or filters are preferably flexibly bonded to the barrier material marginally and peripherally of the filter or marginally and peripherally of air or other gas outlet openings in the barrier material, which may be a plastic bag. The filter may be provided with a backing panel of barrier material having an opening or openings for the passage of air or other gas into the filter or filters. Such backing panel is bonded marginally and peripherally thereof to the barrier material or to both it and the filter or filters. A coupling or couplings for deflating and inflating the container may be incorporated. Confining a hazardous waste material in such a container, rapidly deflating the container and disposing of the container, constitutes one aspect of the method of the invention. The chemical bonding procedure for producing the container constitutes another aspect of the method of the invention. 3 figs

  14. Round-Robin Test of Paraffin Phase-Change Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidi, S.; Mehling, H.; Hemberger, F.; Haussmann, Th.; Laube, A.

    2015-11-01

    A round-robin test between three institutes was performed on a paraffin phase-change material (PCM) in the context of the German quality association for phase-change materials. The aim of the quality association is to define quality and test specifications for PCMs and to award certificates for successfully tested materials. To ensure the reproducibility and comparability of the measurements performed at different institutes using different measuring methods, a round-robin test was performed. The sample was unknown. The four methods used by the three participating institutes in the round-robin test were differential scanning calorimetry, Calvet calorimetry and three-layer calorimetry. Additionally, T-history measurements were made. The aim of the measurements was the determination of the enthalpy as a function of temperature. The results achieved following defined test specifications are in excellent agreement.

  15. Choose of standard materials in the method of β-testing new materials' mass thickness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Zhong

    2007-01-01

    To make sure of the standard mass thickness in beta radials testing mass thickness, this paper calculate using M. C. method and get the result of the relations between the beta radials' transmission rate of different energies and mass thickness in different materials. This result prove that in method of beta test mass thickness choosing materials whose elements are close as standard materials are viable. (authors)

  16. Special Nuclear Material Portal Monitoring at the Nevada Test Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeAnn Long; Michael Murphy

    2008-01-01

    Prior to April 2007, acceptance and performance testing of the various Special Nuclear Material (SNM) monitoring devices at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) was performed by the Radiological Health Instrumentation department. Calibration and performance testing on the PM-700 personnel portal monitor was performed, but there was no test program for the VM-250 vehicle portal monitor. The handheld SNM monitors, the TSA model 470B, were being calibrated annually, but there was no performance test program. In April of 2007, the Material Control and Accountability Manager volunteered to take over performance testing of all SNM portal monitors at NTS in order to strengthen the program and meet U.S. Department of Energy Order requirements. This paper will discuss the following activities associated with developing a performance testing program: changing the culture, learning the systems, developing and implementing procedures, troubleshooting and repair, validating the process, physical control of equipment, acquisition of new systems, and implementing the performance test program

  17. Data package for the Turkey Point material interaction test capsules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krogness, J.C.; Davis, R.B.

    1980-02-01

    Objective of the test is to obtain interaction information on candidate package storage materials and geologies under prototypic temperatures in gamma and low-level neutron fields. This document provides a fabrication record of the experiment

  18. Nuclear technology in materials testing and radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neider, R.

    1975-01-01

    A report of the 1974 activities of the laboratories for physical and measuring technical fundamentals, radiation effects and radiation protection, application of radionuclides and testing of radioactive materials of the Bundesanstalt fuer Materialpruefung (BAM) is given. (RW/LH) [de

  19. Dredged Material Testing and Evaluation for Ocean Disposal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evaluation and testing of dredged material proposed for ocean dumping is conducted to help protect human health and the marine environment. National guidance is provided by the Green Book. Regional Implementation Manuals are provided.

  20. Progress and Strategies for Testing of Materials for Solar Panels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurtz, Sarah

    2017-04-25

    Accelerated testing is key to confident launch of a new product. However, for new products like solar panels, the best approach is not always clear. The challenge for materials manufacturers is that test times can be long. Also, small-coupon testing may not predict the behavior in the full-size module, but testing of the full-size module is too expensive. As a result, solar panel test standards like IEC 61215 are useful, but are not sufficient. Material manufacturers have needed to define their own test protocols. This presentation will review some historical data (e.g., data show that manufacturers are making great progress toward reducing encapsulant discoloration) and describe advances in material testing (for example, new techniques are being demonstrated on how to more quantitatively assess adhesion, detect tendency for delamination, and understand how encapsulant properties affect other properties like cracking of cells). The International PV Quality Assurance Task Force has been researching climate-specific weathering tests toward the goal of defining international standards that would simplify qualification and quality assurance testing for materials. The status of these tests and the strategies for how to organize these standards to best meet the needs of the industry will be discussed.

  1. Multi trace element analysis of dry biological materials by neutron activation analysis including a chemical group separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weers, C.A.

    1980-07-01

    Multi-element analysis of dry biological material by neutron activation analysis has to include radiochemical separation. The evaporation process is described in terms of the half-volume. The pretreatment of the samples and the development of the destruction-evaporation apparatus are described. The successive adsorption steps with active charcoal, Al 2 O 3 and coprecipitation with Fe(OH) 3 are described. Results obtained for standard reference materials are summarized. (G.T.H.)

  2. Using Virtual Testing for Characterization of Composite Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrington, Joseph

    Composite materials are finally providing uses hitherto reserved for metals in structural systems applications -- airframes and engine containment systems, wraps for repair and rehabilitation, and ballistic/blast mitigation systems. They have high strength-to-weight ratios, are durable and resistant to environmental effects, have high impact strength, and can be manufactured in a variety of shapes. Generalized constitutive models are being developed to accurately model composite systems so they can be used in implicit and explicit finite element analysis. These models require extensive characterization of the composite material as input. The particular constitutive model of interest for this research is a three-dimensional orthotropic elasto-plastic composite material model that requires a total of 12 experimental stress-strain curves, yield stresses, and Young's Modulus and Poisson's ratio in the material directions as input. Sometimes it is not possible to carry out reliable experimental tests needed to characterize the composite material. One solution is using virtual testing to fill the gaps in available experimental data. A Virtual Testing Software System (VTSS) has been developed to address the need for a less restrictive method to characterize a three-dimensional orthotropic composite material. The system takes in the material properties of the constituents and completes all 12 of the necessary characterization tests using finite element (FE) models. Verification and validation test cases demonstrate the capabilities of the VTSS.

  3. FMIT test cell diagnostics: a unique materials challenge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cannon, C.P.; Fuller, J.L.

    1981-08-01

    Basic materials problems are discussed in instrumenting the FMIT test cell, which are applicable to fusion devices in general. Recent data on ceramic-to-metal seals, mineral insulated instrument cables, thermocouples, and optical components are reviewed. The data makes it clear that it would be a mistake to assume that materials and instruments will behave in the FMIT test cell environment as they do in more familiar fission reactors and low power accelerators

  4. Standard test methods for elevated temperature tension tests of metallic materials

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2009-01-01

    1.1 These test methods cover procedure and equipment for the determination of tensile strength, yield strength, elongation, and reduction of area of metallic materials at elevated temperatures. 1.2 Determination of modulus of elasticity and proportional limit are not included. 1.3 Tension tests under conditions of rapid heating or rapid strain rates are not included. 1.4 The values stated in inch-pound units are to be regarded as standard. The values given in parentheses are mathematical conversions to SI units that are provided for information only and are not considered standard. 1.5 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  5. Accelerated irradiation test of gundremmingen reactor vessel trepan material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hawthorne, J.R.

    1992-08-01

    Initial mechanical properties tests of beltline trepanned from the decommissioned KRB-A pressure vessel and archive material irradiated in the UBR test reactor revealed a major anomaly in relative radiation embrittlement sensitivity. Poor correspondence of material behavior in test vs. power reactor environments was observed for the weak test orientation (ASTL C-L) whereas correspondence was good for the strong orientation (ASTM C-L). To resolve the anomaly directly, Charpy-V specimens from a low (essentially-nil) fluence region of the vessel were irradiated together with archive material at 279 degrees C in the UBR test reactor. Properties tests before UBR irradiation revealed a significant difference in 41-J transition temperature and upper shelf energy level between the materials. However, the materials exhibited essentially the same radiation embrittlement sensitivity (both orientations), proving that the anomaly is not due to a basic difference in material irradiation resistances. Possible causes of the original anomaly and the significance to NRC Regulatory Guide 1.99 are discussed

  6. Accelerated irradiation test of Gundremmingen reactor vessel trepan material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hawthorne, J.R. [Materials Engineering Associates, Inc., Lanham, MD (United States)

    1992-08-01

    Initial mechanical properties tests of beltline trepanned from the decommissioned KRB-A pressure vessel and archive material irradiated in the UBR test reactor revealed a major anomaly in relative radiation embrittlement sensitivity. Poor correspondence of material behavior in test vs. power reactor environments was observed for the weak test orientation (ASTL C-L) whereas correspondence was good for the strong orientation (ASTM C-L). To resolve the anomaly directly, Charpy-V specimens from a low (essentially-nil) fluence region of the vessel were irradiated together with archive material at 279{degrees}C in the UBR test reactor. Properties tests before UBR irradiation revealed a significant difference in 41-J transition temperature and upper shelf energy level between the materials. However, the materials exhibited essentially the same radiation embrittlement sensitivity (both orientations), proving that the anomaly is not due to a basic difference in material irradiation resistances. Possible causes of the original anomaly and the significance to NRC Regulatory Guide 1.99 are discussed.

  7. Remote-handling demonstration tests for the Fusion Materials Irradiation Test (FMIT) Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen, E.J.; Hussey, M.W.; Kelly, V.P.; Yount, J.A.

    1982-01-01

    The mission of the Fusion Materials Irradiation Test (FMIT) Facility is to create a fusion-like environment for fusion materials development. Crucial to the success of FMIT is the development and testing of remote handling systems required to handle materials specimens and maintenance of the facility. The use of full scale mock-ups for demonstration tests provides the means for proving these systems

  8. Cost-effectiveness analysis of chemical testing for decision-support: How to include animal welfare?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gabbert, S.G.M.; Ierland, van E.C.

    2010-01-01

    Toxicity testing for regulatory purposes raises the question of test selection for a particular endpoint. Given the public's concern for animal welfare, test selection is a multi-objective decision problem that requires balancing information outcome, animal welfare loss, and monetary testing costs.

  9. Considerations When Including Students with Disabilities in Test Security Policies. NCEO Policy Directions. Number 23

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazarus, Sheryl; Thurlow, Martha

    2015-01-01

    Sound test security policies and procedures are needed to ensure test security and confidentiality, and to help prevent cheating. In this era when cheating on tests draws regular media attention, there is a need for thoughtful consideration of the ways in which possible test security measures may affect accessibility for some students with…

  10. Testing of materials and scale models for impact limiters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maji, A.K.; Satpathi, D.; Schryer, H.L.

    1991-01-01

    Aluminum Honeycomb and Polyurethane foam specimens were tested to obtain experimental data on the material's behavior under different loading conditions. This paper reports the dynamic tests conducted on the materials and on the design and testing of scale models made out of these open-quotes Impact Limiters,close quotes as they are used in the design of transportation casks. Dynamic tests were conducted on a modified Charpy Impact machine with associated instrumentation, and compared with static test results. A scale model testing setup was designed and used for preliminary tests on models being used by current designers of transportation casks. The paper presents preliminary results of the program. Additional information will be available and reported at the time of presentation of the paper

  11. The concept verification testing of materials science payloads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griner, C. S.; Johnston, M. H.; Whitaker, A.

    1976-01-01

    The concept Verification Testing (CVT) project at the Marshall Space Flight Center, Alabama, is a developmental activity that supports Shuttle Payload Projects such as Spacelab. It provides an operational 1-g environment for testing NASA and other agency experiment and support systems concepts that may be used in shuttle. A dedicated Materials Science Payload was tested in the General Purpose Laboratory to assess the requirements of a space processing payload on a Spacelab type facility. Physical and functional integration of the experiments into the facility was studied, and the impact of the experiments on the facility (and vice versa) was evaluated. A follow-up test designated CVT Test IVA was also held. The purpose of this test was to repeat Test IV experiments with a crew composed of selected and trained scientists. These personnel were not required to have prior knowledge of the materials science disciplines, but were required to have a basic knowledge of science and the scientific method.

  12. Laser-accelerated particle beams for stress testing of materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barberio, M; Scisciò, M; Vallières, S; Cardelli, F; Chen, S N; Famulari, G; Gangolf, T; Revet, G; Schiavi, A; Senzacqua, M; Antici, P

    2018-01-25

    Laser-driven particle acceleration, obtained by irradiation of a solid target using an ultra-intense (I > 10 18  W/cm 2 ) short-pulse (duration testing materials and are particularly suited for identifying materials to be used in harsh conditions. We show that these laser-generated protons can produce, in a very short time scale, a strong mechanical and thermal damage, that, given the short irradiation time, does not allow for recovery of the material. We confirm this by analyzing changes in the mechanical, optical, electrical, and morphological properties of five materials of interest to be used in harsh conditions.

  13. End of FY2014 Report - Filter Measurement System for Nuclear Material Storage Canisters (Including Altitude Correction for Filter Pressure Drop)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, Murray E. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Reeves, Kirk Patrick [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-02-24

    Two LANL FTS (Filter Test System ) devices for nuclear material storage canisters are fully operational. One is located in PF-4 ( i.e. the TA-55 FTS) while the other is located at the Radiation Protection Division’s Aerosol Engineering Facility ( i.e. the TA-3 FTS). The systems are functionally equivalent , with the TA-3 FTS being the test-bed for new additions and for resolving any issues found in the TA-55 FTS. There is currently one unresolved issue regarding the TA-55 FTS device. The canister lid clamp does not give a leak tight seal when testing the 1 QT (quart) or 2 QT SAVY lids. An adapter plate is being developed that will ensure a correct test configuration when the 1 or 2 QT SAVY lid s are being tested .

  14. Tests of candidate materials for particle bed reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horn, F.L.; Powell, J.R.; Wales, D.

    1987-01-01

    Rhenium metal hot frits and zirconium carbide-coated fuel particles appear suitable for use in flowing hydrogen to at least 2000 K, based on previous tests. Recent tests on alternate candidate cooled particle and frit materials are described. Silicon carbide-coated particles began to react with rhenium frit material at 1600 K, forming a molten silicide at 2000 K. Silicon carbide was extensively attacked by hydrogen at 2066 K for 30 minutes, losing 3.25% of its weight. Vitrous carbon was also rapidly attacked by hydrogen at 2123 K, losing 10% of its weight in two minutes. Long term material tests on candidate materials for closed cycle helium cooled particle bed fuel elements are also described. Surface imperfections were found on the surface of pyrocarbon-coated fuel particles after ninety days exposure to flowing (∼500 ppM) impure helium at 1143 K. The imperfections were superficial and did not affect particle strength

  15. Quality Assurance Protocol for AFCI Advanced Structural Materials Testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Busby, Jeremy T [ORNL

    2009-05-01

    The objective of this letter is to inform you of recent progress on the development of advanced structural materials in support of advanced fast reactors and AFCI. As you know, the alloy development effort has been initiated in recent months with the procurement of adequate quantities of the NF616 and HT-UPS alloys. As the test alloys become available in the coming days, mechanical testing, evaluation of optimizing treatments, and screening of environmental effects will be possible at a larger scale. It is therefore important to establish proper quality assurance protocols for this testing effort in a timely manner to ensure high technical quality throughout testing. A properly implemented quality assurance effort will also enable preliminary data taken in this effort to be qualified as NQA-1 during any subsequent licensing discussions for an advanced design or actual prototype. The objective of this report is to describe the quality assurance protocols that will be used for this effort. An essential first step in evaluating quality protocols is assessing the end use of the data. Currently, the advanced structural materials effort is part of a long-range, basic research and development effort and not, as yet, involved in licensing discussions for a specific reactor design. After consultation with Mark Vance (an ORNL QA expert) and based on the recently-issued AFCI QA requirements, the application of NQA-1 quality requirements will follow the guidance provided in Part IV, Subpart 4.2 of the NQA-1 standard (Guidance on Graded Application of QA for Nuclear-Related Research and Development). This guidance mandates the application of sound scientific methodology and a robust peer review process in all phases, allowing for the data to be qualified for use even if the programmatic mission changes to include licensing discussions of a specific design or prototype. ORNL has previously implemented a QA program dedicated to GNEP activities and based on an appropriately graded

  16. Quality Assurance Protocol for AFCI Advanced Structural Materials Testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Busby, Jeremy T.

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this letter is to inform you of recent progress on the development of advanced structural materials in support of advanced fast reactors and AFCI. As you know, the alloy development effort has been initiated in recent months with the procurement of adequate quantities of the NF616 and HT-UPS alloys. As the test alloys become available in the coming days, mechanical testing, evaluation of optimizing treatments, and screening of environmental effects will be possible at a larger scale. It is therefore important to establish proper quality assurance protocols for this testing effort in a timely manner to ensure high technical quality throughout testing. A properly implemented quality assurance effort will also enable preliminary data taken in this effort to be qualified as NQA-1 during any subsequent licensing discussions for an advanced design or actual prototype. The objective of this report is to describe the quality assurance protocols that will be used for this effort. An essential first step in evaluating quality protocols is assessing the end use of the data. Currently, the advanced structural materials effort is part of a long-range, basic research and development effort and not, as yet, involved in licensing discussions for a specific reactor design. After consultation with Mark Vance (an ORNL QA expert) and based on the recently-issued AFCI QA requirements, the application of NQA-1 quality requirements will follow the guidance provided in Part IV, Subpart 4.2 of the NQA-1 standard (Guidance on Graded Application of QA for Nuclear-Related Research and Development). This guidance mandates the application of sound scientific methodology and a robust peer review process in all phases, allowing for the data to be qualified for use even if the programmatic mission changes to include licensing discussions of a specific design or prototype. ORNL has previously implemented a QA program dedicated to GNEP activities and based on an appropriately graded

  17. Potential mirror concepts for radiation testing of fusion reactor materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miley, G.H.

    1977-01-01

    Studies under the University of Illinois PROMETHEUS (Plasma Reactor Optimized for Materials Experimentation for Thermonuclear Energy Usage) project are described that started in 1971 with the realization that a practical fusion-plasma neutron source was feasible with a net-power input (rather than production). The basic objectives were similar to those in later FERF (Fusion Engineering Research Facility) studies: namely, to maximize the neutron flux and usable experimental volume; to include the flexibility to handle a variety of both materials and engineering experiments; to minimize capital and operating costs; and to utilize near- term technology. The PROMETHEUS design provides a neutron flux of approximately 5x10 14 n/cm 2 s by injection of approximately 30 MW of neutral-beams into a 20 cm radius mirror-confined plasma. Charge-exchange bombardment of the first wall is viewed as a key problem in the design and is discussed in some detail. To gain yet higher neutron fluxes for accelerated testing, two alternate designs have been studied: a 'Twin-beam' injection device and a field reversed mirror concept. The latter potentially offers fluxes approaching 10 16 n/cm 2 s but involves more speculative technology. (Auth.)

  18. Organic lining materials test in flue gas ducts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raveh, R.; Sfez, D.; Johannsson, L.

    1998-01-01

    Corrosion protection solutions are being widely used in electric power plants equipped with Flue Gas Desulfurization (FGD) systems. Organic lining materials are one of many solutions available on the market for corrosion protection. This market segment is found in a continuous development in order to fulfill the severe demands of these materials. The main goal of this test is to obtain information about the high temperature resistance of the materials as occurs when the FGD system is by-passed. Aster initial investigation of this market segment only a few lining materials were found compatible according to their manufacturer data. Seven of these materials were installed in the outlet flue gas duct of the Israeli power station M.D. B. This power station is not equipped with a FGD system, thus it gives a real simulation of the environmental conditions into which the lining material is subjected when the FGD system is by-passed. The materials installation was observed carefully and performed by representatives from the manufacturers in order to avoid material failure due to a non-adequate application. The power station was shut down and the lining materials were inspected three and a half months after the lining materials were applied. The inspection results were good and besides changes in the lining color, most materials did not show any damages. During that time the flue gas temperature at the duct was 134?C except some temperature fluctuations

  19. An Approach to the Flammability Testing of Aerospace Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirsch, David B.

    2012-01-01

    Presentation reviews: (1) Current approach to evaluation of spacecraft materials flammability (2) The need for and the approach to alternative routes (3) Examples of applications of the approach recommended a) Crew Module splash down b) Crew Module depressurization c) Applicability of NASA's flammability test data to other sample configurations d) Applicability of NASA's ground flammability test data to spacecraft environments

  20. Nondestructive testing technology for measurement coatings thickness on material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Mingtai; Wu Lunqiang; Zhang Lianping

    2008-01-01

    The principle, applicability range, advantage and disadvantage of electromagnetic, eddy current method, β backscatter method and XRF methods for nondestructive testing coating thickness of material have been reviewed. The relevant apparatus and manufacturers have been summarized. And the application and developmental direction of manufacturers for nondestructive testing coatings thickness has been foreshowed. (authors)

  1. Development, simulation and testing of structural materials for DEMO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laesser, R.; Baluc, N.; Boutard, J.-L.; Diegele, E.; Gasparotto, M.; Riccardi, B.; Dudarev, S.; Moeslang, A.; Pippan, R.; Schaaf, B. van der

    2006-01-01

    In DEMO the structural and functional materials of the in-vessel components will be exposed to a very intense flux of fusion neutrons with energies up to 14 MeV creating displacement cascades and gaseous transmutation products. Point defects and transmutations will induce new microstructures leading to changes in mechanical and physical properties such as hardening, swelling, loss of fracture toughness and creep strength. The kinetics of microstructural evolution depends on time, temperature and defect production rates. The structural materials to be used in DEMO should have very special properties: high radiation resistance up to the dose of 100 dpa, low residual activation, high creep strength and good compatibility with the cooling media in as wide a temperature operational window as possible for the achievement of high thermal efficiency. The most promising materials are: Reduced Activation Ferritic Martensitic (RAFM) steels (Eurofer and F82H), Oxide Dispersion Strengthened (ODS) RAFM and RAF steels, SiC fibres reinforced SiC matrix composites (SiCf/SiC), tungsten (W) and W-alloys. Each of these materials has its advantages and drawbacks and will be best used under certain conditions. Presently the best studied group of materials are the RAFM steels. They require the smallest extrapolation for use in DEMO but also offer the lowest upper temperature limit of operation (550 o C) and thus the lowest thermal efficiency. The other materials foreseen for more advanced breeder blanket and divertor concepts require intense fundamental R(and)D and testing before their acceptance, whereas the so-called Test Blanket Modules (TBMs) will be constructed using RAFM steel and tested in ITER. Validation of the DEMO structural materials will be done in IFMIF, the International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility, which will produce neutron damage and transmutation products very similar to those characterising a fusion device and will allow accelerated testing with damage rates

  2. Reprint of: Improved cytotoxicity testing of magnesium materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, Janine; Pröfrock, Daniel; Hort, Norbert; Willumeit, Regine; Feyerabend, Frank

    2011-01-01

    Metallic magnesium (Mg) and its alloys are highly suitable for medical applications as biocompatible and biodegradable implant materials. Magnesium has mechanical properties similar to bone, stimulates bone regeneration, is an essential non-toxic element for the human body and degrades completely within the body environment. In consequence, magnesium is a promising candidate as implant material for orthopaedic applications. Protocols using the guideline of current ISO standards should be carefully evaluated when applying them for the characterization of the cytotoxic potential of degradable magnesium materials. For as-cast material we recommend using 10 times more extraction medium than recommended by the ISO standards to obtain reasonable results for reliable cytotoxicity rankings of degradable materials in vitro. In addition primary isolated human osteoblasts or mesenchymal stem cells should be used to test magnesium materials.

  3. Reprint of: Improved cytotoxicity testing of magnesium materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, Janine [Helmholtz-Zentrum Geesthacht, Institute of Materials Research, Department for Structural Research on Macromolecules, Max-Planck Str. 1, D - 21502 Geesthacht (Germany); Proefrock, Daniel [Helmholtz-Zentrum Geesthacht, Institute for Coastal Research, Department for Marine Bioanalytical Chemistry, Max-Planck Str. 1, D - 21502 Geesthacht (Germany); Hort, Norbert [Helmholtz-Zentrum Geesthacht, Institute of Materials Research, Department for Magnesium Processing, Max-Planck Str. 1, D - 21502 Geesthacht (Germany); Willumeit, Regine; Feyerabend, Frank [Helmholtz-Zentrum Geesthacht, Institute of Materials Research, Department for Structural Research on Macromolecules, Max-Planck Str. 1, D - 21502 Geesthacht (Germany)

    2011-12-15

    Metallic magnesium (Mg) and its alloys are highly suitable for medical applications as biocompatible and biodegradable implant materials. Magnesium has mechanical properties similar to bone, stimulates bone regeneration, is an essential non-toxic element for the human body and degrades completely within the body environment. In consequence, magnesium is a promising candidate as implant material for orthopaedic applications. Protocols using the guideline of current ISO standards should be carefully evaluated when applying them for the characterization of the cytotoxic potential of degradable magnesium materials. For as-cast material we recommend using 10 times more extraction medium than recommended by the ISO standards to obtain reasonable results for reliable cytotoxicity rankings of degradable materials in vitro. In addition primary isolated human osteoblasts or mesenchymal stem cells should be used to test magnesium materials.

  4. Growing and testing mycelium bricks as building insulation materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Yangang; Brewer, Matthew; El-Gharabawy, Hoda; Griffith, Gareth; Jones, Phil

    2018-02-01

    In order to improve energy performance of buildings, insulation materials (such as mineral glass and rock wools, or fossil fuel-based plastic foams) are being used in increasing quantities, which may lead to potential problem with materials depletions and landfill disposal. One sustainable solution suggested is the use of bio-based, biodegradable materials. A number of attempts have been made to develop biomaterials, such as sheep wood, hemcrete or recycled papers. In this paper, a novel type of bio insulation materials - mycelium is examined. The aim is to produce mycelium materials that could be used as insulations. The bio-based material was required to have properties that matched existing alternatives, such as expanded polystyrene, in terms of physical and mechanical characteristics but with an enhanced level of biodegradability. The testing data showed mycelium bricks exhibited good thermal performance. Future work is planned to improve growing process and thermal performance of the mycelium bricks.

  5. Vertical drop test of a transport fuselage center section including the wheel wells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, M. S.; Hayduk, R. J.

    1983-01-01

    A Boeing 707 fuselage section was drop tested to measure structural, seat, and anthropomorphic dummy response to vertical crash loads. The specimen had nominally zero pitch, roll and yaw at impact with a sink speed of 20 ft/sec. Results from this drop test and other drop tests of different transport sections will be used to prepare for a full-scale crash test of a B-720.

  6. Atomistic Simulations of Small-scale Materials Tests of Nuclear Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Chan Sun; Jin, Hyung Ha; Kwon, Jun Hyun

    2012-01-01

    Degradation of materials properties under neutron irradiation is one of the key issues affecting the lifetime of nuclear reactors. Evaluating the property changes of materials due to irradiations and understanding the role of microstructural changes on mechanical properties are required for ensuring reliable and safe operation of a nuclear reactor. However, high dose of neuron irradiation capabilities are rather limited and it is difficult to discriminate various factors affecting the property changes of materials. Ion beam irradiation can be used to investigate radiation damage to materials in a controlled way, but has the main limitation of small penetration depth in the length scale of micro meters. Over the past decade, the interest in the investigations of size-dependent mechanical properties has promoted the development of various small-scale materials tests, e.g. nanoindentation and micro/nano-pillar compression tests. Small-scale materials tests can address the issue of the limitation of small penetration depth of ion irradiation. In this paper, we present small-scale materials tests (experiments and simulation) which are applied to study the size and irradiation effects on mechanical properties. We have performed molecular dynamics simulations of nanoindentation and nanopillar compression tests. These atomistic simulations are expected to significantly contribute to the investigation of the fundamental deformation mechanism of small scale irradiated materials

  7. Strip specimen tests for pipeline materials and girth welds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohr, William C. [Edison Welding Institute (EWI), Columbus, Ohio (United States)

    2009-07-01

    Strip specimen testing of pipeline materials has been widely applied as a method of getting data relevant to the performance of pipelines under axial direction loading. Comparisons of strip specimen against smaller standard tests (round tensile bar, fracture toughness specimens, polished round bars) and against full-scale or large-scale testing will be explored. Data from early-generation pipe welds from the 1920's to the 1940's to the most recent materials for offshore reeled pipe will be used for examples. Strip samples can provide full thickness information to take account of varying material properties or imperfection distribution through the thickness. Strip samples can also accommodate measurement of effects of the original surface finish or weld surface shape. Strip samples have more design flexibility than standard tests, but must be designed to limit stress concentrations and effects of local bending. (author)

  8. Piezoelectric materials involved in road traffic applications test system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vazquez Rodriguez, M.; Jimenez Martinez, F.; Frutos, J. de

    2011-01-01

    The test bench system described in this paper performs experiments on piezoelectric materials used in road traffic applications, covering a range between 14 and 170 km/h, which is considered enough for testing under standard traffic conditions. A software has been developed to control the three phase induction motor driver and to acquire all the measurement data of the piezoelectric materials. The mass over each systems axis can be selected, with a limit of 60 kg over each wheel. The test bench is used to simulate the real behaviour of buried piezoelectric cables in road traffic applications for both light and heavy vehicles. This new test bed system is a powerful research tool and can be applied to determine the optimal installation and configuration of the piezoelectric cable sensors and opens a new field of research: the study of energy harvesting techniques based on piezoelectric materials. (Author) 10 refs.

  9. Elevated Temperature Testing and Modeling of Advanced Toughened Ceramic Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keith, Theo G.

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide a final report for the period of 12/1/03 through 11/30/04 for NASA Cooperative Agreement NCC3-776, entitled "Elevated Temperature Testing and Modeling of Advanced Toughened Ceramic Materials." During this final period, major efforts were focused on both the determination of mechanical properties of advanced ceramic materials and the development of mechanical test methodologies under several different programs of the NASA-Glenn. The important research activities made during this period are: 1. Mechanical properties evaluation of two gas-turbine grade silicon nitrides. 2) Mechanical testing for fuel-cell seal materials. 3) Mechanical properties evaluation of thermal barrier coatings and CFCCs and 4) Foreign object damage (FOD) testing.

  10. Cone calorimeter tests of wood-based decking materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert H. White; Mark A. Dietenberger; Nicole M. Stark

    2007-01-01

    New technologies in building materials have resulted in the use of a wide variety of materials in decks. As part of our effort to address fire concerns in the wildland-urban interface, the Forest Products Laboratory has been examining the fire performance of decking products. In addition to preservative-treated wood, decking products include wood-plastic composites and...

  11. Qualification tests of materials for spallation neutron sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sommer, W.F.; Maloy, S.; Wechsler, M.S.

    1997-01-01

    Several laboratories will take part in an extensive materials qualification program that includes irradiation in the proton beam and neutron field available at the Los Alamos Spallation Radiation Damage Facility (LASREF). A number of candidate materials will be exposed to prototypic spallation producing particle radiation. Studies of corrosion-related phenomena and the mitigation of these effects will also be accomplished

  12. A Cryogenic RF Material Testing Facility at SLAC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Jiquan; Martin, David; Tantawi, Sami; Yoneda, Charles; /SLAC

    2012-06-22

    The authors have developed an X-band SRF testing system using a high-Q copper cavity with an interchangeable flat bottom for the testing of different materials. By measuring the Q of the cavity, the system is capable to characterize the quenching magnetic field of the superconducting samples at different power level and temperature, as well as the surface resistivity. This paper presents the most recent development of the system and testing results.

  13. Thermal testing transport packages for radioactive materials: Reality vs regulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hovingh, J.; Carlson, R.W.

    1994-03-01

    The principle objective of this paper is to provide information that will help describe the physical thermal tests performed to demonstrate compliance with the hypothetical accident conditions specified in 10 CFR 71.73. Physical testing should be applied to packages that cannot be modeled by analysis to adequately predict their response to hypothetical accident conditions. These tests should be used when chemical decomposition or material changes occur during an accident that would be difficult to analytically predict or model

  14. Ultraviolet Testing of Space Suit Materials for Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Kristine; Fries, Marc

    2017-01-01

    Human missions to Mars may require radical changes in the approach to extra-vehicular (EVA) suit design. A major challenge is the balance of building a suit robust enough to complete multiple EVAs under intense ultraviolet (UV) light exposure without losing mechanical strength or compromising the suit's mobility. To study how the materials degrade on Mars in-situ, the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) invited the Advanced Space Suit team at NASA's Johnson Space Center (JSC) to place space suit materials on the Scanning Habitable Environments with Raman & Luminescence for Organics and Chemicals (SHERLOC) instrument's calibration target of the Mars 2020 rover. In order to select materials for the rover and understand the effects from Mars equivalent UV exposure, JSC conducted ground testing on both current and new space suit materials when exposed to 2500 hours of Mars mission equivalent UV. To complete this testing, JSC partnered with NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center to utilize their UV vacuum chambers. Materials tested were Orthofabric, polycarbonate, Teflon, Dacron, Vectran, spectra, bladder, nGimat coated Teflon, and nGimat coated Orthofabric. All samples were measured for mass, tensile strength, and chemical composition before and after radiation. Mass loss was insignificant (less than 0.5%) among the materials. Most materials loss tensile strength after radiation and became more brittle with a loss of elongation. Changes in chemical composition were seen in all radiated materials through Spectral Analysis. Results from this testing helped select the materials that will fly on the Mars 2020 rover. In addition, JSC can use this data to create a correlation to the chemical changes after radiation-which is what the rover will send back while on Mars-to the mechanical changes, such as tensile strength.

  15. Multi trace element analysis of dry biological materials by neutron activation analysis including a chemical group separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weers, C.A.

    1980-01-01

    The principles of activation analysis and the practical aspects of neutron activation analysis are outlined. The limits which are set to accuracy and precision are defined. The description of the evaporation process is summarised in terms of the half-volume. This quantity is then used to define the resolving power. The formulation is checked by radiotracer experiments. Dried animal blood is used as the testing material. The pretreatment of the samples and (the development of) the destruction-evaporation apparatus is described. Four successive devices were built and tested. The development of the successive adsorption steps with active charcoal, Al 2 O 3 and coprecipitation with Fe(OH) 3 is presented. Seven groups of about 25 elements in total can be determined this way. The results obtained for standard reference materials are summarized and compared with literature data. (Auth.)

  16. Harmonization of malaria rapid diagnostic tests: best practices in labelling including instructions for use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Jan; Barbé, Barbara; Gillet, Philippe; Aidoo, Michael; Serra-Casas, Elisa; Van Erps, Jan; Daviaud, Joelle; Incardona, Sandra; Cunningham, Jane; Visser, Theodoor

    2014-12-17

    Rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) largely account for the scale-up of malaria diagnosis in endemic settings. However, diversity in labelling including the instructions for use (IFU) limits their interchangeability and user-friendliness. Uniform, easy to follow and consistent labelling, aligned with international standards and appropriate for the level of the end user's education and training, is crucial but a consolidated resource of information regarding best practices for IFU and labelling of RDT devices, packaging and accessories is not available. The Roll Back Malaria Partnership (RBM) commissioned the compilation of international standards and regulatory documents and published literature containing specifications and/or recommendations for RDT design, packaging and labelling of in vitro diagnostics (IVD) (which includes RDTs), complemented with a questionnaire based survey of RDT manufacturers and implementers. A summary of desirable RDT labelling characteristics was compiled, which was reviewed and discussed during a RBM Stakeholder consultation meeting and subsequently amended and refined by a dedicated task force consisting of country programme implementers, experts in RDT implementation, IVD regulatory experts and manufacturers. This process led to the development of consensus documents with a list of suggested terms and abbreviations as well as specifications for labelling of box, device packaging, cassettes, buffer bottle and accessories (lancets, alcohol swabs, transfer devices, desiccants). Emphasis was placed on durability (permanent printing or water-resistant labels), legibility (font size, letter type), comprehension (use of symbols) and ease of reference (e.g. place of labelling on the box or cassette packaging allowing quick oversight). A generic IFU template was developed, comprising background information, a template for procedure and reading/interpretation, a selection of appropriate references and a symbol key of internationally recognized

  17. Screening for Specific Language Impairment in Preschool Children: Evaluating a Screening Procedure Including the Token Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willinger, Ulrike; Schmoeger, Michaela; Deckert, Matthias; Eisenwort, Brigitte; Loader, Benjamin; Hofmair, Annemarie; Auff, Eduard

    2017-01-01

    Specific language impairment (SLI) comprises impairments in receptive and/or expressive language. Aim of this study was to evaluate a screening for SLI. 61 children with SLI (SLI-children, age-range 4-6 years) and 61 matched typically developing controls were tested for receptive language ability (Token Test-TT) and for intelligence (Wechsler…

  18. Capsule Development and Utilization for Material Irradiation Tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Bong Goo; Kang, Y. H.; Cho, M. S. (and others)

    2007-06-15

    The essential technology for an irradiation test of materials and nuclear fuel has been successively developed and utilized to meet the user's requirements in Phase I(July 21, 1997 to March 31, 2000). It enables irradiation tests to be performed for a non-fissile material under a temperature control(300{+-}10 .deg. C) in a He gas environment, and most of the irradiation tests for the internal and external users are able to be conducted effectively. The basic technology was established to irradiate a nuclear fuel, and a creep capsule was also developed to measure the creep property of a material during an irradiation test in HANARO in Phase II(April 1, 2000 to March 31, 2003). The development of a specific purpose capsule, essential technology for a re-irradiation of a nuclear fuel, advanced technology for an irradiation of materials and a nuclear fuel were performed in Phase III(April 1, 2003 to February 28, 2007). Therefore, the technology for an irradiation test was established to support the irradiation of materials and a nuclear fuel which is required for the National Nuclear R and D Programs. In addition, an improvement of the existing capsule design and fabrication technology, and the development of an instrumented capsule for a nuclear fuel and a specific purpose will be able to satisfy the user's requirements. In order to support the irradiation test of materials and a nuclear fuel for developing the next generation nuclear system, it is also necessary to continuously improve the design and fabrication technology of the existing capsule and the irradiation technology.

  19. Capsule Development and Utilization for Material Irradiation Tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Bong Goo; Kang, Y H; Cho, M S [and others

    2007-06-15

    The essential technology for an irradiation test of materials and nuclear fuel has been successively developed and utilized to meet the user's requirements in Phase I(July 21, 1997 to March 31, 2000). It enables irradiation tests to be performed for a non-fissile material under a temperature control(300{+-}10 .deg. C) in a He gas environment, and most of the irradiation tests for the internal and external users are able to be conducted effectively. The basic technology was established to irradiate a nuclear fuel, and a creep capsule was also developed to measure the creep property of a material during an irradiation test in HANARO in Phase II(April 1, 2000 to March 31, 2003). The development of a specific purpose capsule, essential technology for a re-irradiation of a nuclear fuel, advanced technology for an irradiation of materials and a nuclear fuel were performed in Phase III(April 1, 2003 to February 28, 2007). Therefore, the technology for an irradiation test was established to support the irradiation of materials and a nuclear fuel which is required for the National Nuclear R and D Programs. In addition, an improvement of the existing capsule design and fabrication technology, and the development of an instrumented capsule for a nuclear fuel and a specific purpose will be able to satisfy the user's requirements. In order to support the irradiation test of materials and a nuclear fuel for developing the next generation nuclear system, it is also necessary to continuously improve the design and fabrication technology of the existing capsule and the irradiation technology.

  20. Reference Material Kydex(registered trademark)-100 Test Data Message for Flammability Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engel, Carl D.; Richardson, Erin; Davis, Eddie

    2003-01-01

    The Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Materials and Processes Technical Information System (MAPTIS) database contains, as an engineering resource, a large amount of material test data carefully obtained and recorded over a number of years. Flammability test data obtained using Test 1 of NASA-STD-6001 is a significant component of this database. NASA-STD-6001 recommends that Kydex 100 be used as a reference material for testing certification and for comparison between test facilities in the round-robin certification testing that occurs every 2 years. As a result of these regular activities, a large volume of test data is recorded within the MAPTIS database. The activity described in this technical report was undertaken to mine the database, recover flammability (Test 1) Kydex 100 data, and review the lessons learned from analysis of these data.

  1. Lyral has been included in the patch test standard series in Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geier, Johannes; Brasch, Jochen; Schnuch, Axel; Lessmann, Holger; Pirker, Claudia; Frosch, Peter J

    2002-05-01

    Lyral 5% pet. was tested in 3245 consecutive patch test patients in 20 departments of dermatology in order (i) to check the diagnostic quality of this patch test preparation, (ii) to examine concomitant reactions to Lyral and fragrance mix (FM), and (iii) to assess the frequency of contact allergy to Lyral in an unselected patch test population of German dermatological clinics. 62 patients reacted to Lyral, i.e. 1.9%. One third of the positive reactions were + + and + + +. The reaction index was 0.27. Thus, the test preparation can be regarded a good diagnostic tool. Lyral and fragrance mix (FM) were tested in parallel in 3185 patients. Of these, 300 (9.4%) reacted to FM, and 59 (1.9%) to Lyral. In 40 patients, positive reactions to both occurred, which is 13.3% of those reacting to FM, and 67.8% of those reacting to Lyral. So the concordance of positive test reactions to Lyral and FM was only slight. Based on these results, the German Contact Dermatitis Research Group (DKG) decided to add Lyral 5% pet. to the standard series.

  2. NNWSI Phase II materials interaction test procedure and preliminary results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bates, J.K.; Gerding, T.J.

    1985-01-01

    The Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations (NNWSI) project is investigating the volcanic tuff beds of Yucca Mountain, Nevada, as a potential location for a high-level radioactive waste repository. This report describes a test method (Phase II) that has been developed to measure the release of radionuclides from the waste package under simulated repository conditions, and provides information on materials interactions that may occur in the repository. The results of 13 weeks of testing using the method are presented, and an analog test is described that investigates the relationship between the test method and expected repository conditions. 9 references, 10 figures, 11 tables

  3. Compilation of radiation damage test data cable insulating materials

    CERN Document Server

    Schönbacher, H; CERN. Geneva

    1979-01-01

    This report summarizes radiation damage test data on commercially available organic cable insulation and jacket materials: ethylene- propylene rubber, Hypalon, neoprene rubber, polyethylene, polyurethane, polyvinylchloride, silicone rubber, etc. The materials have been irradiated in a nuclear reactor to integrated absorbed doses from 5*10/sup 5/ to 5*10/sup 6/ Gy. Mechanical properties, e.g. tensile strength, elongation at break, and hardness, have been tested on irradiated and non-irradiated samples. The results are presented in the form of tables and graphs, to show the effect of the absorbed dose on the measured properties. (13 refs).

  4. Testing of SRS and RFETS Nylon Bag Material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laurinat, J.E.

    1998-01-01

    This report compares the effects of radiation and heating on nylon bagout materials used at the Savannah River Site (SRS) and the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS). Recently, to simplify the processing of sand, slag, and crucible (SS and C), FB-Line has replaced the low-density polyethylene (LDPE) and polyvinyl chloride (PVC) bags normally used to package cans of plutonium-bearing material with nylon bags. LDPE and PVC are not soluble in the nitric acid dissolver solution used in F-Canyon, so cans bagged using these materials had to be repackaged before they were added to the dissolver. Because nylon dissolves in nitric acid, cans bagged in nylon can be charged to the F-Canyon dissolvers without repackaging, thereby reducing handling requirements and personnel exposure. As part of a program to process RFETS SS and C at SRS, RFETS has also begun to use a nylon bagout material. The RFETS bag materials is made from a copolymer of nylon 6 and nylon 6.9, while the SRS material is made from a nylon 6 monomer. In addition, the SRS nylon has an anti-static agent added. The RFETS nylon is slightly softer than the SRS nylon, but does not appear to be as resistant to flex cracks initiated by contact with sharp corners of the inner can containing the SS and C.2 FB-Line Operations has asked for measurement of the effects of radiation and heating on these materials. Specifically, they have requested a comparison of the material properties of the plastics before and after irradiation, a measurement of the amount of outgassing when the plastics are heated, and a calculation of the amount of radiolytic gas generation. Testing was performed on samples taken from material that is currently used in FB-Line (color coded orange) and at RFETS. The requested tests are the same tests previously performed on the original and replacement nylon and LDPE bag materials.3,4,5. To evaluate the effect of irradiation on material properties, tensile stresses and elongations to break

  5. Scope and status of the USA Engineering Test Facility including relevant TFTR research and development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becraft, W.R.; Reardon, P.J.

    1980-01-01

    The vehicle by which the fusion program would move into the engineering testing phase of fusion power development is designated the Engineering Test Facility (ETF). The progress toward the design and construction of the ETF will reflect the significant achievements of past, present, and future experimental tokamak devices. Some of the features of this foundation of experimental results and relevant engineering designs and operation will derive from the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) Project, now nearing the completion of its construction phase. The ETF would provide a test-bed for reactor components in the fusion environment. In order to initiate preliminary planning for the ETF decision, the Office of Fusion Energy (OFE) established the ETF Design Center activity to prepare the design of the ETF. This paper describes the design status of the ETF and discusses some highlights of the TFTR R and D work

  6. Scope and status of the USA Engineering Test Facility including relevant TFTR research and development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becraft, W.R.; Reardon, P.J.

    1981-01-01

    The vehicle by which the fusion programme would move into the engineering testing phase of fusion power development is designated the Engineering Test Facility (ETF). The progress toward the design and construction of the ETF will reflect the significant achievements of past, present, and future experimental tokamak devices. Some of the features of this foundation of experimental results and relevant engineering designs and operation will derive from the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) Project, now nearing the completion of its construction phase. The ETF would provide a test-bed for reactor components in the fusion environment. To initiate preliminary planning for the ETF decision, the Office of Fusion Energy (OFE) established the ETF Design Center activity to prepare the design of the ETF. This paper describes the design status of the ETF and discusses some highlights of the TFTR R and D work. (author)

  7. Preliminary hazard analysis for the Brayton Isotope Ground Demonstration System (including vacuum test chamber)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, L.G.

    1975-01-01

    The Preliminary Hazard Analysis (PHA) of the BIPS-GDS is a tabular summary of hazards and undesired events which may lead to system damage or failure and/or hazard to personnel. The PHA reviews the GDS as it is envisioned to operate in the Vacuum Test Chamber (VTC) of the GDS Test Facility. The VTC and other equipment which will comprise the test facility are presently in an early stage of preliminary design and will undoubtedly undergo numerous changes before the design is frozen. The PHA and the FMECA to follow are intended to aid the design effort by identifying areas of concern which are critical to the safety and reliability of the BIPS-GDS and test facility

  8. Test facilities for radioactive material transport packages (AEA Technology plc, Winfrith,UK)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gillard, J.E.

    2001-01-01

    Transport containers for radioactive materials are tested to demonstrate compliance with national and international standards. Transport package design, testing, assessment and approval requires a wide range of skills and facilities. The comprehensive capability of AEA Technology in these areas is described. The facilities described include drop-test cranes and targets (up to 700 tonne); pool fires, furnaces and rigs for thermal tests, including heat dissipation on prototype flasks; shielding facilities; criticality simulations and leak test techniques. These are illustrated with photographs demonstrating the comprehensive nature of package testing services supplied to customers. (author)

  9. Test facilities for radioactive material transport packages (AEA Technology plc, Winfrith,UK)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gillard, J.E

    2001-07-01

    Transport containers for radioactive materials are tested to demonstrate compliance with national and international standards. Transport package design, testing, assessment and approval requires a wide range of skills and facilities. The comprehensive capability of AEA Technology in these areas is described. The facilities described include drop-test cranes and targets (up to 700 tonne); pool fires, furnaces and rigs for thermal tests, including heat dissipation on prototype flasks; shielding facilities; criticality simulations and leak test techniques. These are illustrated with photographs demonstrating the comprehensive nature of package testing services supplied to customers. (author)

  10. Radioactive material package test standards and performance requirements - public perception

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pope, R.B.; Shappert, L.B.; Rawl, R.R.

    1992-01-01

    This paper addresses issues related to the public perception of the regulatory test standards and performance requirements for packaging and transporting radioactive material. Specifically, it addresses the adequacy of the package performance standards and testing for Type B packages, which are those packages designed for transporting the most hazardous quantities and forms of radioactive material. Type B packages are designed to withstand accident conditions in transport. To improve public perception, the public needs to better understand: (a) the regulatory standards and requirements themselves, (b) the extensive history underlying their development, and (c) the soundness of the technical foundation. The public needs to be fully informed on studies, tests, and analyses that have been carried out worldwide and form the basis of the regulatory standards and requirements. This paper provides specific information aimed at improving the public perception of packages test standards

  11. Scoping Future Policy Dynamics in Raw Materials Through Scenarios Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correia, Vitor; Keane, Christopher; Sturm, Flavius; Schimpf, Sven; Bodo, Balazs

    2017-04-01

    The International Raw Materials Observatory (INTRAW) project is working towards a sustainable future for the European Union in access to raw materials, from an availability, economical, and environmental framework. One of the major exercises for the INTRAW project is the evaluation of potential future scenarios for 2050 to frame economic, research, and environmental policy towards a sustainable raw materials supply. The INTRAW consortium developed three possible future scenarios that encompass defined regimes of political, economic, and technological norms. The first scenario, "Unlimited Trade," reflects a world in which free trade continues to dominate the global political and economic environment, with expectations of a growing demand for raw materials from widely distributed global growth. The "National Walls" scenario reflects a world where nationalism and economic protectionism begins to dominate, leading to stagnating economic growth and uneven dynamics in raw materials supply and demand. The final scenario, "Sustainability Alliance," examines the dynamics of a global political and economic climate that is focused on environmental and economic sustainability, leading towards increasingly towards a circular raw materials economy. These scenarios were reviewed, tested, and provided simulations of impacts with members of the Consortium and a panel of global experts on international raw materials issues which led to expected end conditions for 2050. Given the current uncertainty in global politics, these scenarios are informative to identifying likely opportunities and crises. The details of these simulations and expected responses to the research demand, technology investments, and economic components of raw materials system will be discussed.

  12. Guide for Operational Configuration Management Program including the adjunct programs of design reconstitution and material condition and aging management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-11-01

    This standard presents program criteria and implementation guidance for an operational configuration management program for DOE nuclear and non-nuclear facilities in the operational phase. Portions of this standard are also useful for other DOE processes, activities, and programs. This Part 1 contains foreword, glossary, acronyms, bibliography, and Chapter 1 on operational configuration management program principles. Appendices are included on configuration management program interfaces, and background material and concepts for operational configuration management

  13. Material characterization of Inconel 718 from free bulging test at high temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoo, Joon Tae; Yoon, Jong Hoon; Lee, Ho Sung [Korea Aerospace Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Youn, Sung Kie [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-07-15

    Macroscopic superplastic behavior of metallic or non metallic materials is usually represented by the strain rate sensitivity, and it can be determined by tensile tests in uniaxial stress state and bulging tests in multi axial stress state, which is the actual hot forming process. And macroscopic behavior of Non SPF grade materials could be described in a similar way as that of superplastic materials, including strain hardening, cavity and so on. In this study, the material characterization of non SPF grade Inconel 718 has been carried out to determine the material parameters for flow stress throughout free bulging test under constant temperature. The measured height of bulged plate during the test was used for estimation of strain rate sensitivity, strain hardening index and cavity volume fraction with the help of numerical analysis. The bulged height obtained from the simulation showed good agreement with the experimental findings. The effects of strain hardening and cavity volume fraction factor for flow stress were also compared.

  14. Impact Testing of Orbiter Thermal Protection System Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerr, Justin

    2006-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the impact testing of the materials used in designing the shuttle orbiter thermal protection system (TPS). Pursuant to the Columbia Accident Investigation Board recommendations a testing program of the TPS system was instituted. This involved using various types of impactors in different sizes shot from various sizes and strengths guns to impact the TPS tiles and the Leading Edge Structural Subsystem (LESS). The observed damage is shown, and the resultant lessons learned are reviewed.

  15. New facilities in Japan materials testing reactor for irradiation test of fusion reactor components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawamura, H.; Sagawa, H.; Ishitsuka, E.; Sakamoto, N.; Niiho, T.

    1996-01-01

    The testing and evaluation of fusion reactor components, i.e. blanket, plasma facing components (divertor, etc.) and vacuum vessel with neutron irradiation is required for the design of fusion reactor components. Therefore, four new test facilities were developed in the Japan Materials Testing Reactor: an in-pile functional testing facility, a neutron multiplication test facility, an electron beam facility, and a re-weldability facility. The paper describes these facilities

  16. Screening for Specific Language Impairment in Preschool Children: Evaluating a Screening Procedure Including the Token Test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willinger, Ulrike; Schmoeger, Michaela; Deckert, Matthias; Eisenwort, Brigitte; Loader, Benjamin; Hofmair, Annemarie; Auff, Eduard

    2017-10-01

    Specific language impairment (SLI) comprises impairments in receptive and/or expressive language. Aim of this study was to evaluate a screening for SLI. 61 children with SLI (SLI-children, age-range 4-6 years) and 61 matched typically developing controls were tested for receptive language ability (Token Test-TT) and for intelligence (Wechsler Preschool-and-Primary-Scale-of-Intelligence-WPPSI). Group differences were analyzed using t tests, as well as direct and stepwise discriminant analyses. The predictive value of the WPPSI with respect to TT performance was analyzed using regression analyses. SLI-children performed significantly worse on both TT and WPPSI ([Formula: see text]). The TT alone yielded an overall classification rate of 79%, the TT and the WPPSI together yielded an overall classification rate of 80%. TT performance was significantly predicted by verbal intelligence in SLI-children and nonverbal intelligence in controls whilst WPPSI subtest arithmetic was predictive in both groups. Without further research, the Token Test cannot be seen as a valid and sufficient tool for the screening of SLI in preschool children but rather as a tool for the assessment of more general intellectual capacities. SLI-children at this age already show impairments typically associated with SLI which indicates the necessity of early developmental support or training. Token Test performance is possibly an indicator for a more general developmental factor rather than an exclusive indicator for language difficulties.

  17. Capsule Development and Utilization for Material Irradiation Tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Young Hwan; Kim, B. G.; Joo, K. N.

    2003-05-01

    The objective of this project was to establish basic capsule irradiation technology using the multi-purpose research reactor [HANARO] to eventually support national R and D projects of advanced fuel and materials related to domestic nuclear power plants and next generation reactors. There are several national nuclear projects in KAERI, which require several irradiation tests to investigate in-pile behavior of nuclear reactor fuel and materials for the R and D of several types of fuels such as advanced PWR and DUPIC fuels and for the R and D of structural materials such as RPV(reactor pressure vessel) steel, Inconel, zirconium alloy, and stainless steel. At the moment, internal and external researchers in institutes, industries and universities are interested in investigating the irradiation characteristics of materials using the irradiation facilities of HANARO. For these kinds of material irradiation tests, it is important to develop various capsules using our own techniques. The development of capsules requires several leading-edge technologies and our own experiences related to design and fabrication. In the second phase from April 1,2000 to March 31, 2003, the utilization technologies were developed using various sensors for the measurements of temperature, pressure and displacement, and instrumented capsule technologies for the required fuel irradiation tests were developed. In addition, the improvement of the existing capsule technologies and the development of an in-situ measurable creep capsule for specific purposes were done to meet the various requirements of users

  18. Test Methods for Measuring Material Properties of Composite Materials in all Three Material Axes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-24

    eccentricities in the test setup. Therefore, the research team purchased a special test fixture for performing out-of-plane tension testing in which the...coated wheels as shown in Figure 6. The 15.2 cm long by 2.54 cm thick blocks were separated into five pieces, each with a length of 2.67 cm using the...composite plate. Figure 6. Blocks reduced to a thickness of 2.54 cm using surface grinder and custom electro plated diamond coated wheels Figure 7

  19. Comments on Thermal Physical Properties Testing Methods of Phase Change Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingchao Xie

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available There is no standard testing method of the thermal physical properties of phase change materials (PCM. This paper has shown advancements in this field. Developments and achievements in thermal physical properties testing methods of PCM were commented, including differential scanning calorimetry, T-history measurement, the water bath method, and differential thermal analysis. Testing principles, advantages and disadvantages, and important points for attention of each method were discussed. A foundation for standardized testing methods for PCM was made.

  20. Standard Test Methods for Constituent Content of Composite Materials

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2009-01-01

    1.1 These test methods determine the constituent content of composite materials by one of two approaches. Method I physically removes the matrix by digestion or ignition by one of seven procedures, leaving the reinforcement essentially unaffected and thus allowing calculation of reinforcement or matrix content (by weight or volume) as well as percent void volume. Method II, applicable only to laminate materials of known fiber areal weight, calculates reinforcement or matrix content (by weight or volume), and the cured ply thickness, based on the measured thickness of the laminate. Method II is not applicable to the measurement of void volume. 1.1.1 These test methods are primarily intended for two-part composite material systems. However, special provisions can be made to extend these test methods to filled material systems with more than two constituents, though not all test results can be determined in every case. 1.1.2 The procedures contained within have been designed to be particularly effective for ce...

  1. Fusion materials irradiation test facility: description and status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trego, A.L.; Parker, E.F.; Hagan, J.W.

    1982-01-01

    The Fusion Materials Irradiation Test (FMIT) Facility will generate a high-flux, high-energy neutron source that will provide a fusion-like radiation environment for fusion reactor materials development. The neutrons will be produced in a nuclear stripping reaction by impinging a 35 MeV beam of deuterons from an Alvarez-type linear accelerator on a flowing lithium target. The target will be located in a test cell which will provide an irradiation volume of over 750l within which 10 cm 3 will have an average neutron flux of greater than 1.4 x 10 15 n/cm 2 -s and 500 cm 3 an average flux of greater than 2.2 by 10 14 n/cm 2- s with an expected availability factor greater than 65%. The projected fluence within the 10 cm 3 high flux region of FMIT will effect damage upon the materials test specimens to 30 dpa (displacements per atom) for each 90 day irradiation period. This irradiation flux volume will be at least 500 times larger than that of any other facility with comparable neutron energy and will fully meet the fusion materials damage research objective of 100 dpa within three years for the first round of tests

  2. 44 years of testing radioactive materials packages at ORNL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shappert, L.B.; Ludwig, S.B. [Oak Ridge National Lab., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2004-07-01

    This paper briefly reviews the package testing at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) since 1960 and then examines the trends in the testing activities that occurred during the same period. Radioactive material shipments have been made from ORNL since the 1940s. The first fully operating reactor built at the ORNL site was patterned after the graphite pile constructed by Enrico Fermi under Stagg Field in Chicago. After serving as a test bed for future reactors, it became useful as a producer of radioactive isotopes. The Isotopes Division was established at ORNL to furnish radioactive materials used in the medical community. Often these shipments have been transported by aircraft worldwide due to the short half-lives of many of the materials. This paper touches briefly on the lighter and smaller radioisotope packages that were being shipped from ORNL in large numbers and then deals with the testing of packages designed to handle large radioactive sources, such as spent fuel, and other fissile materials.

  3. 44 years of testing radioactive materials packages at ORNL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shappert, L.B.; Ludwig, S.B.

    2004-01-01

    This paper briefly reviews the package testing at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) since 1960 and then examines the trends in the testing activities that occurred during the same period. Radioactive material shipments have been made from ORNL since the 1940s. The first fully operating reactor built at the ORNL site was patterned after the graphite pile constructed by Enrico Fermi under Stagg Field in Chicago. After serving as a test bed for future reactors, it became useful as a producer of radioactive isotopes. The Isotopes Division was established at ORNL to furnish radioactive materials used in the medical community. Often these shipments have been transported by aircraft worldwide due to the short half-lives of many of the materials. This paper touches briefly on the lighter and smaller radioisotope packages that were being shipped from ORNL in large numbers and then deals with the testing of packages designed to handle large radioactive sources, such as spent fuel, and other fissile materials

  4. Introduction to non-destructive testing of materials: part II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, M.; Ahmed, B.

    2001-01-01

    Ultrasonic waves are mechanical vibrations that require a medium, which functions as carrier. Ultrasonics are widely used in non-destructive testing of materials in which high frequency sound waves are introduced into the material being inspected. If the frequency of sound waves in within the range 10 to 20,000 Hz, the sound is audible, i.e. the range of hearing, above 20,000 Hz, the sound waves are referred to as Ultrasound or Ultrasonics. Sound waves do not cause any permanent change in material although its transient presence is very noticeable. An energy transport through a sound wave is possible only when constituent particles are connected to each other by elastic forces. Liquids and Gases are also suitable media for the transmission of sound. In vacuum no matter exists and thus no sound transmission is possible. At the end of this article advantages and limitations of ultrasonic testing are also given. (A.B.)

  5. Evaluation of field test kits including immunoassays for the detection of contaminants in soil and water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waters, L.C.; Smith, R.R.; Counts, R.W.; Stewart, J.H.; Jenkins, R.A.

    1993-01-01

    Effective field test methods are needed for hazardous waste site characterization and remediation. Useful field methods should be rapid, analyte-specific, cost-effective and accurate in the concentration range at which the analyte is regulated. In this study, field test kits for polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), mercury, lead and nitrate were evaluated with reference to these criteria. PCBs and mercury, in soils, were analyzed by immunoassay. Ionic lead and nitrate, in water, were measured chemically using test strips. Except for lead, each analyte was measured in both spiked and actual field samples. Twenty to 40 samples per day can be analyzed with the immunoassays and even more with the strip tests. The sensitivity of the immunoassays is in the 1-3 ppM range. Nitrate was consistently detected at ≥5 ppM; lead ions at ≥20 ppM. Results obtained using these methods compared favorably with those obtained by standard laboratory methods. In addition to being useful field screening methods, these kits can be used in the laboratory to sort out negative samples and/or to define proper dilutions for positive samples requiring further analysis

  6. Build green and conventional materials off-gassing tests: A final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piersol, P.

    1995-12-31

    Build Green is a certification program that will identify and label building products with a known recycled content. The introduction of these recycled materials has raised the concern that they may emit more indoor pollutants than conventional materials. This study addresses that concern by analyzing Build Green and conventional materials to assess their potential for off-gassing. The study involved emission tests of 37 materials including carpets, carpet undercushions, structural lumber, foundation material, insulation, drywall, fiberboard, counter tops, and cabinetry. The results presented in this report include comparisons of Build Green and conventional materials in terms of emissions of volatile organic compounds and formaldehyde, the material loading ratio, and discussion of the specific sources of the emissions.

  7. Development and Execution of a Large-scale DDT Tube Test for IHE Material Qualification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parker, Gary Robert [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Broilo, Robert M. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Lopez-Pulliam, Ian Daniel [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Vaughan, Larry Dean [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-10-24

    Insensitive High Explosive (IHE) Materials are defined in Chapter IX of the DOE Explosive Safety Standard (DOE-STD-1212-2012) as being materials that are massdetonable explosives that are so insensitive that the probability of accidental initiation or transition from burning to detonation is negligible1. There are currently a number of tests included in the standard that are required to qualify a material as IHE, however, none of the tests directly evaluate for the transition from burning to detonation (aka deflagration-to-detonation transition, DDT). Currently, there is a DOE complex-wide effort to revisit the IHE definition in DOE-STD-1212-2012 and change the qualification requirements. The proposal lays out a new approach, requiring fewer, but more appropriate tests, for IHE Material qualification. One of these new tests is the Deflagration-to-Detonation Test. According to the redefinition proposal, the purpose of the new deflagration-todetonation test is “to demonstrate that an IHE material will not undergo deflagration-to-detonation under stockpile relevant conditions of scale, confinement, and material condition. Inherent in this test design is the assumption that ignition does occur, with onset of deflagration. The test design will incorporate large margins and replicates to account for the stochastic nature of DDT events.” In short, the philosophy behind this approach is that if a material fails to undergo DDT in a significant over-test, then it is extremely unlikely to do so in realistic conditions. This effort will be valuable for the B61 LEP to satisfy their need qualify the new production lots of PBX 9502. The work described in this report is intended as a preliminary investigation to support the proposed design of an overly conservative, easily fielded DDT test for updated IHE Material Qualification standard. Specifically, we evaluated the aspects of confinement, geometry, material morphology and temperature. We also developed and tested a

  8. Installation for fatigue testing of materials at cryogenic temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abushenkov, I.D.; Chernetskij, V.K.; Il'ichev, V.Ya.

    1986-01-01

    A new installation for mechanical fatigue tests of structural material samples is described, in which the possibility to conduct tests in the range of lower temperatures (4.2-300 K) is ensured. The installation permits to carry out fatigue tests using the method of axial loading of annular (up to 6 mm in diameter) and plane (up to 12 mm wide) samples during symmetric, asymmetric and pulsing loading cycles. It is shown that the installation suggested has quite extended operation possibilities and, coincidentally, it is characterized by design simplicity, compactness, comparatively low metal consumption and maintenance convenience

  9. Development and characterisation of a novel composite electrode material consisting of poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) including Au nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zanardi, C.; Terzi, F.; Pigani, L.; Heras, A.; Colina, A.; Lopez-Palacios, J.; Seeber, R.

    2008-01-01

    Composite material consisting of poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT), including Au nanoparticles encapsulated by N-dodecyl-N,N-dimethyl-3-ammonium-1-propanesulphonate (SB12) is synthesised by constant-current method on ITO glass, in aqueous medium, leading to an electrode coating. The synthesis process is followed by UV-vis spectroelectrochemistry, both in normal-beam and in parallel-beam configurations. Under the same experimental conditions PEDOT is also synthesised by electropolymerisation only in the presence of LiClO 4 supporting electrolyte, as well in solutions also containing SB12. The data relative to the electrosynthesis of the three materials are compared. The composite material based on the conductive polymer matrix including Au nanoparticles has been characterised by SEM, TEM, ICP, Raman and UV-vis spectroscopies. The behaviour of the three different electrode coatings with respect to p-doping process has been studied by conventional electrochemical techniques and by potentiostatic and potentiodynamic UV-vis spectroelectrochemical methods. Conclusions are drawn out about the effect of the presence of the surfactant and of Au nanoparticles on the electrochemical properties of the electrode system

  10. Two micro fatigue test methods for irradiated materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nunomura, Shigetomo; Noguchi, Shinji; Okamura, Yuichi; Kumai, Shinji

    1993-01-01

    This paper demonstrates two miniature fatigue test methods in response to the requirements of the fusion reactor wall materials development program. It is known that the fatigue strength evaluated by the axial loading test is independent of the specimen size, while that evaluated by the bend test or torsion test is dependent upon the size of specimen. The new type of gripping system for the axial, tension-tension, fatigue testing of TEM disk-size specimens that has been developed is described in this paper. An alignment tool assists in gripping the miniature specimen. The miniature tension-tension fatigue test method seems to provide reliable S-N curves for SUS304 and SUS316L stainless steels. An indentation method has also been developed to determine fatigue properties. A hard steel ball or ceramic ball was used for cyclically loading the specimen, and an S-N curve was subsequently obtained. The merit of this method is primarily simple handling. S-N curves obtained from four materials by this indentation method compared well with those obtained from the rotary bend fatigue test employing a standard-size specimen

  11. Special Nuclear Material Portal Monitoring at the Nevada Test Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mike Murphy

    2008-01-01

    In the past, acceptance and performance testing of the various Special Nuclear Material (SNM) monitoring devices at the Nevada Test Site has been performed by the Radiological Health Instrumentation Department. Calibration and performance tests on the PM-700 personnel portal monitor were performed but there was no test program for the VM-250 vehicle portal monitor because it had never been put into service. The handheld SNM monitors, the TSA model 470B, were being calibrated annually, but there was no program in place to test them quarterly. In April of 2007, the Material Control and Accountability (MC and A) Manager at the time decided that the program needed to be strengthened and MC and A took over performance testing of all SNM portal monitoring equipment. This paper will discuss the following activities associated with creating a performance testing program: changing the culture, learning the systems, writing procedures, troubleshooting/repairing, validating the process, control of equipment, acquisition of new systems, and running the program

  12. Chairside CAD/CAM materials. Part 2: Flexural strength testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendler, Michael; Belli, Renan; Petschelt, Anselm; Mevec, Daniel; Harrer, Walter; Lube, Tanja; Danzer, Robert; Lohbauer, Ulrich

    2017-01-01

    Strength is one of the preferred parameters used in dentistry for determining clinical indication of dental restoratives. However, small dimensions of CAD/CAM blocks limit reliable measurements with standardized uniaxial bending tests. The objective of this study was to introduce the ball-on-three-ball (B3B) biaxial strength test for dental for small CAD/CAM block in the context of the size effect on strength predicted by the Weibull theory. Eight representative chairside CAD/CAM materials ranging from polycrystalline zirconia (e.max ZirCAD, Ivoclar-Vivadent), reinforced glasses (Vitablocs Mark II, VITA; Empress CAD, Ivoclar-Vivadent) and glass-ceramics (e.max CAD, Ivoclar-Vivadent; Suprinity, VITA; Celtra Duo, Dentsply) to hybrid materials (Enamic, VITA; Lava Ultimate, 3M ESPE) have been selected. Specimens were prepared with highly polished surfaces in rectangular plate (12×12×1.2mm 3 ) or round disc (Ø=12mm, thickness=1.2mm) geometries. Specimens were tested using the B3B assembly and the biaxial strength was determined using calculations derived from finite element analyses of the respective stress fields. Size effects on strength were determined based on results from 4-point-bending specimens. A good agreement was found between the biaxial strength results for the different geometries (plates vs. discs) using the B3B test. Strength values ranged from 110.9MPa (Vitablocs Mark II) to 1303.21MPa (e.max ZirCAD). The strength dependency on specimen size was demonstrated through the calculated effective volume/surface. The B3B test has shown to be a reliable and simple method for determining the biaxial strength restorative materials supplied as small CAD/CAM blocks. A flexible solution was made available for the B3B test in the rectangular plate geometry. Copyright © 2016 The Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Solar Energy Education. Home economics: teacher's guide. Field test edition. [Includes glossary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-06-01

    An instructional aid is provided for home economics teachers who wish to integrate the subject of solar energy into their classroom activities. This teacher's guide was produced along with the student activities book for home economics by the US Department of Energy Solar Energy Education. A glossary of solar energy terms is included. (BCS)

  14. Finite Element Verification of Non-Homogeneous Strain and Stress Fields during Composite Material Testing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Lars Pilgaard

    2015-01-01

    Uni-directional glass fiber reinforced polymers play a central role in the task increasing the length of wind turbines blades and thereby lowering the cost of energy from wind turbine installations. During this, optimizing the mechanical performance regarding material stiffness, compression...... strength and fatigue performance is essential. Nevertheless, testing composites includes some challenges regarding stiffness determination using conventional strain gauges and achieving correct material failure unaffected by the gripping region during fatigue testing. Challenges, which in the present study......, has been addressed using the finite element method. During this, a verification of experimental observations, a deeper understanding on the test coupon loading and thereby improved test methods has been achieved....

  15. Mechanical Testing of Carbon Based Woven Thermal Protection Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, John; Agrawal, Parul; Arnold, James O.; Peterson, Keith; Venkatapathy, Ethiraj

    2013-01-01

    Three Dimensional Woven thermal protection system (TPS) materials are one of the enabling technologies for mechanically deployable hypersonic decelerator systems. These materials have been shown capable of serving a dual purpose as TPS and as structural load bearing members during entry and descent operations. In order to ensure successful structural performance, it is important to characterize the mechanical properties of these materials prior to and post exposure to entry-like heating conditions. This research focuses on the changes in load bearing capacity of woven TPS materials after being subjected to arcjet simulations of entry heating. Preliminary testing of arcjet tested materials [1] has shown a mechanical degradation. However, their residual strength is significantly more than the requirements for a mission to Venus [2]. A systematic investigation at the macro and microstructural scales is reported here to explore the potential causes of this degradation. The effects of heating on the sizing (an epoxy resin coating used to reduce friction and wear during fiber handling) are discussed as one of the possible causes for the decrease in mechanical properties. This investigation also provides valuable guidelines for margin policies for future mechanically deployable entry systems.

  16. GPR Laboratory Tests For Railways Materials Dielectric Properties Assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca De Chiara

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In railways Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR studies, the evaluation of materials dielectric properties is critical as they are sensitive to water content, to petrographic type of aggregates and to fouling condition of the ballast. Under the load traffic, maintenance actions and climatic effects, ballast condition change due to aggregate breakdown and to subgrade soils pumping, mainly on existing lines with no sub ballast layer. The main purpose of this study was to validate, under controlled conditions, the dielectric values of materials used in Portuguese railways, in order to improve the GPR interpretation using commercial software and consequently the management maintenance planning. Different materials were tested and a broad range of in situ conditions were simulated in laboratory, in physical models. GPR tests were performed with five antennas with frequencies between 400 and 1800 MHz. The variation of the dielectric properties was measured, and the range of values that can be obtained for different material condition was defined. Additionally, in situ GPR measurements and test pits were performed for validation of the dielectric constant of clean ballast. The results obtained are analyzed and the main conclusions are presented herein.

  17. Design of a high-flux test assembly for the Fusion Materials Irradiation Test Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Opperman, E.K.; Vogel, M.A.

    1982-01-01

    The Fusion Material Test Facility (FMIT) will provide a high flux fusion-like neutron environment in which a variety of structural and non-structural materials irradiations can be conducted. The FMIT experiments, called test assemblies, that are subjected to the highest neutron flux magnitudes and associated heating rates will require forced convection liquid metal cooling systems to remove the neutron deposited power and maintain test specimens at uniform temperatures. A brief description of the FMIT facility and experimental areas is given with emphasis on the design, capabilities and handling of the high flux test assembly

  18. Radiation damage calculations for the APT materials test program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corzine, R.K.; Wechsler, M.S.; Dudziak, D.J.; Ferguson, P.D.; James, M.R.

    1999-01-01

    A materials irradiation was performed at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) in the fall of 1996 and spring of 1997 in support of the Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT) program. Testing of the irradiated materials is underway. In the proposed APT design, materials in the target and blanket are to be exposed to protons and neutrons over a wide range of energies. The irradiation and testing program was undertaken to enlarge the very limited direct knowledge presently available of the effects of medium-energy protons (∼1 GeV) on the properties of engineering materials. APT candidate materials were placed in or near the LANSCE accelerator 800-MeV, 1-mA proton beam and received roughly the same proton current density in the center of the beam as would be the case for the APT facility. As a result, the proton fluences achieved in the irradiation were expected to approach the APT prototypic full-power-year values. To predict accurately the performance of materials in APT, radiation damage parameters for the materials experiment must be determined. By modeling the experiment, calculations for atomic displacement, helium and hydrogen cross sections and for proton and neutron fluences were done for representative samples in the 17A, 18A, and 18C areas. The LAHET code system (LCS) was used to model the irradiation program, LAHET 2.82 within LCS transports protons > 1 MeV, and neutrons >20 MeV. A modified version of MCNP for use in LCS, HMCNP 4A, was employed to tally neutrons of energies <20 MeV

  19. In Situ Estuarine and Marine Toxicity Testing: A Review, Including Recommendations for Future Use in Ecological Risk Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-09-01

    field and microcosms than they do under laboratory test conditions. In the case of tributyltin ( TBT ) exposures in San Diego Bay, he found that...TECHNICAL REPORT 1986 September 2009 In Situ Estuarine and Marine Toxicity Testing A Review, Including Recommendations for Future Use in...Pacific TECHNICAL REPORT 1986 September 2009 In Situ Estuarine and Marine Toxicity Testing A Review, Including Recommendations for Future Use in

  20. L'Uso dei Materiali Video nei Test Linguistici (The Use of Video Materials in Language Tests).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diadori, Pierangela

    1995-01-01

    This article argues that a communicative language course must have communicative exams. It explains how to choose and use material to test students' listening comprehension and socio-cultural knowledge. Transcripts of a commercial, a talk show, a film, a TV news show, and a documentary are included accompanied by exercises. (CFM)

  1. Design of a materials testing experiment for the INTOR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vogel, M.A.; Opperman, E.K.

    1981-01-01

    The United States, Japan, USSR and the European community are jointly participating in the design of an International Tokamak Reactor called INTOR. In support of the US contribution to the INTOR design, the features of an experiment for bulk neutron irradiation damage studies were developed. It is anticipated that materials testing will be an important part of the programmatic mission of INTOR and consequently the requirements for materials testing in INTOR must be identified early in the reactor design to insure compatibility. The design features of the experiment, called a Channel Test, are given in this paper. The major components of the channel test are the water cooled heat sink (channel module) and the specimen capsule. The temperature within each of the 153 specimen capsules is predetermined by engineering the thermal barrier between the specimen capsule and heat sink. Individual capsules can be independently accessed and are designed to operate at a predetermined temperature within the range of 50 to 700 0 C. The total irradiation volume within a single channel test is 45 liters. Features of the channel test that result in experimental versatility and simplified remote access and handling are discussed

  2. TESTING OF GAS REACTOR MATERIALS AND FUEL IN THE ADVANCED TEST REACTOR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grover, S.B.

    2004-01-01

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) has long been involved in testing gas reactor materials, and has developed facilities well suited for providing the right conditions and environment for gas reactor tests. This paper discusses the different types of irradiation hardware that have been utilized in past ATR irradiation tests of gas reactor materials. The new Gas Test Loop facility currently being developed for the ATR is discussed and the different approaches being considered in the design of the facility. The different options for an irradiation experiment such as active versus passive temperature control, neutron spectrum tailoring, and different types of lead experiment sweep gas monitors are also discussed. The paper is then concluded with examples of different past and present gas reactor material and fuel irradiations

  3. Testing of Gas Reactor Materials and Fuel in the Advanced Test Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    S. Blaine Grover

    2004-01-01

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) has long been involved in testing gas reactor materials, and has developed facilities well suited for providing the right conditions and environment for gas reactor tests. This paper discusses the different types of irradiation hardware that have been utilized in past ATR irradiation tests of gas reactor materials. The new Gas Test Loop facility currently being developed for the ATR is discussed and the different approaches being considered in the design of the facility. The different options for an irradiation experiment such as active versus passive temperature control, neutron spectrum tailoring, and different types of lead experiment sweep gas monitors are also discussed. The paper is then concluded with examples of different past and present gas reactor material and fuel irradiations

  4. 40 CFR 1039.505 - How do I test engines using steady-state duty cycles, including ramped-modal testing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...-state duty cycles, including ramped-modal testing? 1039.505 Section 1039.505 Protection of Environment... duty cycles, including ramped-modal testing? This section describes how to test engines under steady-state conditions. In some cases, we allow you to choose the appropriate steady-state duty cycle for an...

  5. Impact analysis and testing of tritiated heavy water transportation packages including hydrodynamic effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sauve, R.G.; Tulk, J.D.; Gavin, M.E.

    1989-01-01

    Ontario Hydro has recently designed a new Type B(M) Tritiated Heavy Water Transportation Package (THWTP) for the road transportation of tritiated heavy water from its operating nuclear stations to the Tritium Removal Facility in Ontario. These packages must demonstrate the ability to withstand severe shock and impact scenarios such as those prescribed by IAEA standards. The package, shown in figure 1, comprises an inner container filled with tritiated heavy water, and a 19 lb/ft 3 polyurethane foam-filled overpack. The overpack is of sandwich construction with 304L stainless steel liners and 10.5 inch thick nominal foam walls. The outer shell is 0.75 inch thick and the inner shell is 0.25 inch thick. The primary containment boundary consists of the overpack inner liner, the containment lid and outer containment seals in the lid region. The total weight of the container including the 12,000 lb. payload is 36,700 lb. The objective of the present study is to evaluate the hydrodynamic effect of the tritiated heavy water payload on the structural integrity of the THWTP during a flat end drop from a height of 9 m. The study consisted of three phases: (i) developing an analytical model to simulate the hydrodynamic effects of the heavy water payload during impact; (ii) performing an impact analysis for a 9 m flat end drop of the THWTP including fluid structure interaction; (iii) verification of the analytical models by experiment

  6. Fusion Materials Irradiation Test Facility: a facility for fusion-materials qualification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trego, A.L.; Hagan, J.W.; Opperman, E.K.; Burke, R.J.

    1983-01-01

    The Fusion Materials Irradiation Test Facility will provide a unique testing environment for irradiation of structural and special purpose materials in support of fusion power systems. The neutron source will be produced by a deuteron-lithium stripping reaction to generate high energy neutrons to ensure damage similar to that of a deuterium-tritium neutron spectrum. The facility design is now ready for the start of construction and much of the supporting lithium system research has been completed. Major testing of key low energy end components of the accelerator is about to commence. The facility, its testing role, and the status and major aspects of its design and supporting system development are described

  7. Performance and Test Results of Harshaw Pelletised LiF:Mg,Ti TLD Material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Velbeck, K.J.; Zhang, L.; Green, R.; Tomlins, P.

    1999-01-01

    BICRON NE has recently introduced a pelletised version of their popular TLD-100, 600 and 700 lithium fluoride based thermoluminescence dosemeters (TLDs). These materials can be used unmounted or in card and ring formats. Applications include whole-body, environmental, medical, and extremity monitoring. The former manufacturing process included purifying, growing doped LiF, grinding, blending, pressing, slicing, and dicing. The new process eliminates the last four steps, replacing them with a pelletising process. This process transforms the material directly from a powder to its final form. This new process provides the benefits of better batch uniformity and excellent dimensional consistency. The testing is described that was performed for the purpose of accepting the pelletised material as a directly interchangeable substitute for the same material produced by the former process. Tests performed include reproducibility, batch homogeneity, linearity, detection threshold, and light sensitivity. (author)

  8. Full scale tests of moisture buffer capacity of wall materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Lone Hedegaard; Rode, Carsten; Peuhkuri, Ruut Hannele

    2005-01-01

    that are harmful such as growth of house dust mites, surface condensation and mould growth. Therefore a series of experiments has been carried out in a full scale test facility to determine the moisture buffer effect of interior walls of cellular concrete and plaster board constructions. For the cellular concrete......Moisture buffer capacity of hygroscopic materials can be used to moderate peaks in the relative humidity (RH) of indoor air as well as moisture content variations in building materials and furnishing. This can help to ensure healthier indoor environments by preventing many processes...... of the changes of moisture content in specimens of the wall composites exposed to the same environment. It was found that the finishes had a big impact on the buffer performance of the underlying materials. Even though the untreated cellular concrete had a very high buffer capacity, the effect was strongly...

  9. Database on gas migration tests through bentonite buffer material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanai, Kenji

    2009-02-01

    Carbon steel is a candidate material for an overpack for geological disposal of high-level radioactive waste in Japan. The corrosion of the carbon steel overpack in aqueous solution under anoxic conditions will cause the generation of hydrogen gas, which may affect hydrological and mechanical properties of the bentonite buffer. To evaluate such an effect of gas generation, it is necessary to develop a model of gas migration through bentonite buffer material taking account of data obtained from experiments. The gas migration experiments under both unsaturated and saturated conditions have been carried out to clarify the fundamental characteristics of bentonite for gas migration. This report compiles the experimental data obtained from gas migration tests for buffer material which has been conducted by JAEA until December, 2007. A CD-ROM is attached as an appendix. (author)

  10. Tests with ceramic waste form materials made by pressureless consolidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, M. A.; Hash, M. C.; Hebden, A. S.; Ebert, W. L.

    2002-01-01

    A multiphase waste form referred to as the ceramic waste form (CWF) will be used to immobilize radioactively contaminated salt wastes recovered after the electrometallurgical treatment of spent sodium-bonded nuclear fuel. The CWF is made by first occluding salt in zeolite and then encapsulating the zeolite in a borosilicate binder glass. A variety of surrogate CWF materials were made using pressureless consolidation (PC) methods for comparison with CWF consolidated using a hot isostatic press (HIP) method and to study the effects of glass/zeolite batching ratio and processing conditions on the physical and chemical properties of the resulting materials. The data summarized in this report will also be used to support qualification of the PC CWF for disposal in the proposed federal high-level radioactive waste repository at Yucca Mountain. The phase composition and microstructure of HIP CWF and PC CWF are essentially identical: both are composed of about 70% sodalite, 25% binder glass, and a 5% total of inclusion phases (halite, nepheline, and various oxides and silicates). The primary difference is that PC CWF materials have higher porosities than HIP CWFs. The product consistency test (PCT) that was initially developed to monitor homogeneous glass waste forms was used to measure the chemical durabilities of the CWF materials. Series of replicate tests with several PC CWF materials indicate that the PCT can be conducted with the same precision with CWF materials as with borosilicate glasses. Short-term (7-day) PCTs were used to evaluate the repeatability of making the PC CWF and the effects of the glass/zeolite mass ratio, process temperature, and processing time on the chemical durability. Long-term (up to 1 year) PCTs were used to compare the durabilities of HIP and PC CWFs and to estimate the apparent solubility limit for the PC CWF that is needed for modeling. The PC and HIP CWF materials had similar disabilities, based on the release of silicon in long

  11. Possible checking of technical parameters in nondestructive materials and products testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kesl, J.

    1987-01-01

    The requirements are summed up for partial technical parameters of instruments and facilities for nondestructive testing by ultrasound, radiography, by magnetic, capillary and electric induction methods. The requirements and procedures for testing instrument performance are presented for the individual methods as listed in domestic and foreign standards, specifications and promotional literature. The parameters to be tested and the methods of testing, including the testing and calibration instruments are shown in tables. The Czechoslovak standards are listed currently valid for nondestructive materials testing. (M.D.)

  12. Material control system design: Test Bed Nitrate Storage Area (TBNSA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, G.A.; Da Roza, R.A.; Dunn, D.R.; Sacks, I.J.; Harrison, W.; Huebel, J.G.; Ross, W.N.; Salisbury, J.D.; Sanborn, R.H.; Weissenberger, S.

    1978-05-01

    This report provides an example of a hypothetical Special Nuclear Material (SNM) Safeguard Material Control and Accounting (MC and A) System which will be used as a subject for the demonstration of the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory MC and A System Evaluation Methodology in January 1978. This methodology is to become a tool in the NRC evaluation of license applicant submittals for Nuclear Fuel Cycle facilities. The starting point for this test bed design was the Allied-General Nuclear Services--Barnwell Nuclear Fuel Plant Reprocessing plant as described in the Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR), of August 1975. The test bed design effort was limited to providing an SNM safeguard system for the plutonium nitrate storage area of this facility

  13. EMERIS: an advanced information system for a materials testing reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adorjan, F.; Buerger, L.; Lux, I.; Mesko, L.; Szabo, K.; Vegh, J.; Ivanov, V.V.; Mozhaev, A.A.; Yakovlev, V.V.

    1990-06-01

    The basic features of the Materials Testing Reactor of IAE, Moscow (MR) Information System (EMERIS) are outlined. The purpose of the system is to support reactor and experimental test loop operators by a flexible, fully computerized and user-friendly tool for the aquisition, analysis, archivation and presentation of data obtained during operation of the experimental facility. High availability of EMERIS services is ensured by redundant hardware and software components, and by automatic configuration procedure. A novel software feature of the system is the automatic Disturbance Analysis package, which is aimed to discover primary causes of irregularities occurred in the technology. (author) 2 refs.; 2 figs

  14. Testing of irradiated and annealed 15H2MFA materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gillemot, F.; Uri, G.

    1994-01-01

    A set of surveillance samples made from 15H2MFA material has been studied in the laboratory of AEKI. Miniature notched tensile specimens were cut from some remnants of irradiated and broke surveillance charpy remnants. The Absorbed Specific Fracture Energy (ASFE) was measured on the specimens. A cutting machine and testing technique were elaborated for the measurements. The second part of the Charpy remnants was annealed at 460 deg. C and 490 deg. C for 6-8 hours. The specimens were tested similarity and the results were compared. (author). 5 refs, 9 figs

  15. Fracture Toughness Round Robin Test International in pressure tube materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villagarcia, M.P.; Liendo, M.F.

    1993-01-01

    Part of the pressure tubes surveillance program of CANDU type reactors is to determine the fracture toughness using a special fracture specimen and test procedure. Atomic Energy of Canada Limited decided to hold a Round Robin Test International and 9 laboratories participated worldwide in which several pressure tube materials were selected: Zircaloy-2, Zr-2.5%Nb cold worked and Zr-2.5%Nb heat treated. The small specimens used held back the thickness and curvature of the tube. J-R curves at room temperature were obtained and the crack extension values were determined by electrical potential drop techniques. These values were compared with results generated from other laboratories and a bid scatter was founded. It could be due to slight variations in the test method or inhomogeneity of the materials and a statistical study must be done to see if there is any pattern. The next step for the Round Robin Test would be to make some modifications in the test method in order to reduce the scatter. (Author)

  16. Radioactive wear tests of four cylinder liner materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sylte, G.

    1976-01-01

    An investigation on the wear properties of various liner materials, financed by a research grant from NTNF (Royal Norwegian Council for Scientific and Industrial Research), is reported. The investigation was carried out by the Division of Internal Combustion Engines, Trondheim, Univ.,Norway, on a two-stroke, turbocharged, medium speed diesel engine (Wichmann 2ACAT, 280 by 420 mm). Thin pearlitic cast iron inserts of various compositions were pressed into the upper part of a specially machined cylinder liner. These inserts were activated in a nuclear reactor, and tracer techniques employed to measure the wear rate. Gas oil was used as a fuel throughout all tests. The insert technique employed, and the handling methods devised, were satisfactory. This part of the project must be characterised as being very successful. Originally, six different liner materials were specified, but due to misunderstandings duplications resulted in only four different materials finally being received at the laboratory. The engine tests disclosed that the wear rates of all four materials were low under laboratory conditions, and therefore difficult to measure accurately. Nevertheless, the wear properties of the inserts clearly fell into two distinct classes, which may be termed good and excellent. The relative values inside each group are, however, more uncertain due to the cumulative effects of errors, instrument drift, measurement statistics, etc. (Auth.)

  17. Experimental Verification of an Instrument to Test Flooring Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philip, Rony; Löfgren, Hans, Dr

    2018-02-01

    The focus of this work is to validate the fluid model with different flooring materials and the measurements of an instrument to test flooring materials and its force attenuating capabilities using mathematical models to describe the signature and coefficients of the floor. The main contribution of the present work focus on the development of a mathematical fluid model for floors. The aim of the thesis was to analyze, compare different floor materials and to study the linear dynamics of falling impacts on floors. The impact of the hammer during a fall is captured by an accelerometer and response is collected using a picoscope. The collected data was analyzed using matlab least square method which is coded as per the fluid model. The finding from this thesis showed that the fluid model works with more elastic model but it doesn’t work for rigid materials like wood. The importance of parameters like velocity, mass, energy loss and other coefficients of floor which influences the model during the impact of falling on floors were identified and a standardized testing method was set.

  18. Impact Testing for Materials Science at NASA - MSFC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikapizye, Mitch

    2010-01-01

    The Impact Testing Facility (ITF) at NASA - Marshall Space Flight Center is host to different types of guns used to study the effects of high velocity impacts. The testing facility has been and continues to be utilized for all NASA missions where impact testing is essential. The Facility has also performed tests for the Department of Defense, other corporations, as well as universities across the nation. Current capabilities provided by Marshall include ballistic guns, light gas guns, exploding wire gun, and the Hydrometeor Impact Gun. A new plasma gun has also been developed which would be able to propel particles at velocities of 20km/s. This report includes some of the guns used for impact testing at NASA Marshall and their capabilities.

  19. Composite Material Testing Data Reduction to Adjust for the Systematic 6-DOF Testing Machine Aberrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Athanasios lliopoulos; John G. Michopoulos; John G. C. Hermanson

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes a data reduction methodology for eliminating the systematic aberrations introduced by the unwanted behavior of a multiaxial testing machine, into the massive amounts of experimental data collected from testing of composite material coupons. The machine in reference is a custom made 6-DoF system called NRL66.3 and developed at the NAval...

  20. Test facilities for radioactive materials transport packages (Chicago Bridge and Iron, USA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gallagher, T.A.

    1991-01-01

    Chicago Bridge and Iron, Research and Development Center located in Plainfield, Illinois offers the total capabilities required to perform design verification testing of hazardous waste shipping containers. The tests, defined in the United States Code of Federal Regulations, Title 10, Part 71 (10CFR71), include vertical drop tests, puncture tests, crush tests, immersion tests, thermal tests, and container leak rate tests. Container structural design analysis, container manufacturing analysis, materials development testing plus dimensional analysis of individual components is also available. The test facilities meet or exceed the requirements given in the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Safety Guide, Safety Series No. 37, 1987. Additional capabilities for the design and fabrication of scale models and components for the test programme are also presented. (author)

  1. Standard Guide for Recording Mechanical Test Data of Fiber-Reinforced Composite Materials in Databases

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2000-01-01

    1.1 This guide provides a common format for mechanical test data for composite materials for two purposes: (1) to establish data reporting requirements for test methods and ( 2) to provide information for the design of material property databases. This guide should be used in combination with Guide E 1309 which provides similar information to identify the composite material tested. 1.2 These guidelines are specific to mechanical tests of high-modulus fiber-reinforced composite materials. Types of tests considered in this guide include tension, compression, shear, flexure, open/filled hole, bearing, fracture toughness, and fatigue. The ASTM standards for which this guide was developed are listed in . The guidelines may also be useful for additional tests or materials. 1.3 This guide is the second part of a modular approach for which the first part is Guide E 1309. Guide E 1309 serves to identify the material, and this guide serves to describe mechanical testing procedures and variables and to record results....

  2. Small punch test evaluation methods for material characterisation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janča, Adam, E-mail: adam.janca@fjfi.cvut.cz; Siegl, Jan, E-mail: jan.siegl@fjfi.cvut.cz; Haušild, Petr, E-mail: petr.hausild@fjfi.cvut.cz

    2016-12-01

    The Small Punch Test (SPT) is one of the most widespread mechanical testing methods using miniaturized specimens. The paper presented deals with the time independent SPT, in which a flat specimen is bent by means of a (hemi)spherical punch moving at a constant velocity. The main goal is to relate the measured data to deformation processes taking place during specimen loading. Understanding of such relations is crucial for characterizing a material using any non-standardized experimental procedure. Using enhanced instrumentation, not only traditional load-displacement or load-deflection curves could be obtained, but also specimen thinning could be continuously measured and evaluated. Five alloys having a broad range of mechanical properties were tested. The results obtained were evaluated using both traditional and newly proposed methods and they were correlated with results of the conventional tensile test. The methods proposed seem to lead to a universal correlation between SPT results and tensile characteristics. - Highlights: • The newly proposed methodology significantly improved results of SPT. • Plastic deformation starts inside the specimen from the very beginning of loading. • Specimen thinning = punch displacement−specimen deflection. • Material response to loading is well illustrated by the novel load-thinning curve.

  3. Testing Systems and Results for Advanced Nuclear Fuel Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rooyen, I.J. van; Griffith, G.W.; Garnier, J.E.

    2012-01-01

    Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program Advanced LWR Nuclear Fuel Development (ALFD) Pathway. Development and testing of high performance fuel cladding identified as high priority to support: enhancement of fuel performance, reliability, and reactor safety. One of the technologies being examined is an advanced fuel cladding made from ceramic matrix composites (CMC) utilizing silicon carbide (SiC) as a structural material supplementing a commercial Zircaloy-4 (Zr-4) tube. A series of out-of-pile tests to fully characterize the SiC CMC hybrid design to produce baseline data. The planned tests are intended to either produce quantitative data or to demonstrate the properties required to achieve two initial performance conditions relative to standard zircaloybased cladding: decreased hydrogen uptake (corrosion) and decreased fretting of the cladding tube under normal operating and postulated accident conditions. These two failure mechanisms account for approximately 70% of all in-pile failures of LWR commercial fuel assemblies

  4. Review of the IAEA nuclear fuel cycle and material section activities connected with nuclear fuel including WWER fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sokolov, F.

    2001-01-01

    Program activities on Nuclear Fuel Cycle and Materials cover the areas of: 1) raw materials (B.1.01); 2) fuel performance and technology (B.1.02); 3) pent fuel (B.1.03); 4) fuel cycle issues and information system (B.1.04); 5) support to technical cooperation activities (B.1.05). The IAEA activities in fuel performance and technology in 2001 include organization of the fuel experts meetings and completion of the Co-ordinate Research Projects (CRP). The special attention is given to the advanced post-irradiation examination techniques for water reactor fuel and fuel behavior under transients and LOCA conditions. An international research program on modeling of activity transfer in primary circuit of NPP is finalized in 2001. A new CRP on fuel modeling at extended burnup (FUMEX II) has planed to be carried out during the period 2002-2006. In the area of spent fuel management the implementation of burnup credit (BUC) in spent fuel management systems has motivated to be used in criticality safety applications, based on economic consideration. An overview of spent fuel storage policy accounting new fuel features as higher enrichment and final burnup, usage of MOX fuel and prolongation of the term of spent fuel storage is also given

  5. A quasi-static algorithm that includes effects of characteristic time scales for simulating failures in brittle materials

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, Jinxing

    2013-04-24

    When the brittle heterogeneous material is simulated via lattice models, the quasi-static failure depends on the relative magnitudes of Telem, the characteristic releasing time of the internal forces of the broken elements and Tlattice, the characteristic relaxation time of the lattice, both of which are infinitesimal compared with Tload, the characteristic loading period. The load-unload (L-U) method is used for one extreme, Telem << Tlattice, whereas the force-release (F-R) method is used for the other, Telem T lattice. For cases between the above two extremes, we develop a new algorithm by combining the L-U and the F-R trial displacement fields to construct the new trial field. As a result, our algorithm includes both L-U and F-R failure characteristics, which allows us to observe the influence of the ratio of Telem to Tlattice by adjusting their contributions in the trial displacement field. Therefore, the material dependence of the snap-back instabilities is implemented by introducing one snap-back parameter γ. Although in principle catastrophic failures can hardly be predicted accurately without knowing all microstructural information, effects of γ can be captured by numerical simulations conducted on samples with exactly the same microstructure but different γs. Such a same-specimen-based study shows how the lattice behaves along with the changing ratio of the L-U and F-R components. © 2013 The Author(s).

  6. Comparison of the release of constituents from granular materials under batch and column testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez Meza, Sarynna; Garrabrants, Andrew C; van der Sloot, Hans; Kosson, David S

    2008-01-01

    Column leaching testing can be considered a better basis for assessing field impact data than any other available batch test method and thus provides a fundamental basis from which to estimate constituent release under a variety of field conditions. However, column testing is time-intensive compared to the more simplified batch testing, and may not always be a viable option when making decisions for material reuse. Batch tests are used most frequently as a simple tool for compliance or quality control reasons. Therefore, it is important to compare the release that occurs under batch and column testing, and establish conservative interpretation protocols for extrapolation from batch data when column data are not available. Five different materials (concrete, construction debris, aluminum recycling residue, coal fly ash and bottom ash) were evaluated via batch and column testing, including different column flow regimes (continuously saturated and intermittent unsaturated flow). Constituent release data from batch and column tests were compared. Results showed no significant difference between the column flow regimes when constituent release data from batch and column tests were compared. In most cases batch and column testing agreed when presented in the form of cumulative release. For arsenic in carbonated materials, however, batch testing underestimates the column constituent release for most LS ratios and also on a cumulative basis. For cases when As is a constituent of concern, column testing may be required.

  7. Critical outlook and trends for environmental reference materials at the Measurements & Testing Generic Activity (European Commission).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quevauviller, P; Bennink, D; Bøwadt, S

    2001-05-01

    It is now well recognised that the quality control (QC) of all types of analyses, including environmental analyses depends on the appropriate use of reference materials. One of the ways to check the accuracy of methods is based on the use of Certified Reference Materials (CRMs), whereas other types of (not certified) Reference Materials (RMs) are used for routine quality control (establishment of control charts) and interlaboratory testing (e.g. proficiency testing). The perception of these materials, in particular with respect to their production and use, differs widely according to various perspectives (e.g. RM producers, routine laboratories, researchers). This review discusses some critical aspects of RM use and production for the QC of environmental analyses and describes the new approach followed by the Measurements & Testing Generic Activity (European Commission) to tackle new research and production needs.

  8. Compendium of information on identification and testing of materials for plastic solar thermal collectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGinniss, V.D.; Sliemers, F.A.; Landstrom, D.K.; Talbert, S.G.

    1980-07-31

    This report is intended to organize and summarize prior and current literature concerning the weathering, aging, durability, degradation, and testing methodologies as applied to materials for plastic solar thermal collectors. Topics covered include (1) rate of aging of polymeric materials; (2) environmental factors affecting performance; (3) evaluation and prediction of service life; (4) measurement of physical and chemical properties; (5) discussion of evaluation techniques and specific instrumentation; (6) degradation reactions and mechanisms; (7) weathering of specific polymeric materials; and (8) exposure testing methodology. Major emphasis has been placed on defining the current state of the art in plastics degradation and on identifying information that can be utilized in applying appropriate and effective aging tests for use in projecting service life of plastic solar thermal collectors. This information will also be of value where polymeric components are utilized in the construction of conventional solar collectors or any application where plastic degradation and weathering are prime factors in material selection.

  9. Mechanical and Vibration Testing of Carbon Fiber Composite Material with Embedded Piezoelectric Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffy, Kirsten P.; Lerch, Bradley A.; Wilmoth, Nathan G.; Kray, Nicholas; Gemeinhardt, Gregory

    2012-01-01

    Piezoelectric materials have been proposed as a means of decreasing turbomachinery blade vibration either through a passive damping scheme, or as part of an active vibration control system. For polymer matrix fiber composite (PMFC) blades, the piezoelectric elements could be embedded within the blade material, protecting the brittle piezoceramic material from the airflow and from debris. Before implementation of a piezoelectric element within a PMFC blade, the effect on PMFC mechanical properties needs to be understood. This study attempts to determine how the inclusion of a packaged piezoelectric patch affects the material properties of the PMFC. Composite specimens with embedded piezoelectric patches were tested in four-point bending, short beam shear, and flatwise tension configurations. Results show that the embedded piezoelectric material does decrease the strength of the composite material, especially in flatwise tension, attributable to failure at the interface or within the piezoelectric element itself. In addition, the sensing properties of the post-cured embedded piezoelectric materials were tested, and performed as expected. The piezoelectric materials include a non-flexible patch incorporating solid piezoceramic material, and two flexible patch types incorporating piezoelectric fibers. The piezoceramic material used in these patches was Navy Type-II PZT.

  10. Experimental patch testing with chromium-coated materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bregnbak, David; Thyssen, Jacob P; Jellesen, Morten Stendahl

    2017-01-01

    Chromium coatings on metal alloys can be decorative, and prevent corrosion and metal ion release. We recently showed that handling of a chromium-containing disc resulted in chromium deposition on the skin. To examine patch test reactivity to chromium-coated discs. We included 15 patients: 10...... chromium-allergic patients, and 5 patients without chromium allergy. All were patch tested with potassium dichromate, cobalt chloride, nickel sulfate, and nine different metallic discs. The chromium-allergic patients were also patch tested with serial dilutions of potassium dichromate. Positive...

  11. Testing of ceramic filter materials at the PCFB test facility; Keraamisten suodinmateriaalien testaus PCFB-koelaitoksessa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuivalainen, R; Eriksson, T; Lehtonen, P; Tiensuu, J [Foster Wheeler Energia Oy, Karhula (Finland)

    1997-10-01

    Pressurized Circulating Fluidized Bed (PCFB) combustion technology has been developed in Karhula, Finland since 1986. In 1989, a 10 MW PCFB test facility was constructed. The test facility has been used for performance testing with different coal types through the years 1990-1994 for obtaining data for design and commercialization of the high-efficiency low-emission PCFB combustion technology. The main objective of the project Y53 was to evaluate advanced candle filter materials for the Hot Gas Clean-up Unit (HGCU) to be used in a commercial PCFB Demonstration Project. To achieve this goal, the selected candle materials were exposed to actual high temperature, high pressure coal combustion flue gases for a period of 1000-1500 h during the PCFB test runs. The test runs were carried out in three test segments in Foster Wheeler`s PCFB test facility at the Karhula R and D Center. An extensive inspection and sampling program was carried out after the second test segment. Selected sample candles were analyzed by the filter supplier and the preliminary results were encouraging. The material strength had decreased only within expected range. Slight elongation of the silicon carbide candles was observed, but at this phase the elongation can not be addressed to creep, unlike in the candles tested in 1993-94. The third and last test segment was completed successfully in October 1996. The filter system was inspected and several sample candles were selected for material characterization. The results will be available in February - March 1997. (orig.)

  12. Irradiation experiments and materials testing capabilities in High Flux Reactor in Petten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luzginova, N.; Blagoeva, D.; Hegeman, H.; Van der Laan, J.

    2011-01-01

    The text of publication follows: The High Flux Reactor (HFR) in Petten is a powerful multi-purpose research and materials testing reactor operating for about 280 Full Power Days per year. In combination with hot cells facilities, HFR provides irradiation and post-irradiation examination services requested by nuclear energy research and development programs, as well as by industry and research organizations. Using a variety of the custom developed irradiation devices and a large experience in executing irradiation experiments, the HFR is suitable for fuel, materials and components testing for different reactor types. Irradiation experiments carried out at the HFR are mainly focused on the understanding of the irradiation effects on materials; and providing databases for irradiation behavior of materials to feed into safety cases. The irradiation experiments and materials testing at the HFR include the following issues. First, materials irradiation to support the nuclear plant life extensions, for instance, characterization of the reactor pressure vessel stainless steel claddings to insure structural integrity of the vessel, as well as irradiation of the weld material coupons to neutron fluence levels that are representative for Light Water Reactors (LWR) internals applications. Secondly, development and qualification of the structural materials for next generation nuclear fission reactors as well as thermo-nuclear fusion machines. The main areas of interest are in both conventional stainless steel and advanced reduced activation steels and special alloys such as Ni-base alloys. For instance safety-relevant aspects of High Temperature Reactors (HTR) such as the integrity of fuel and structural materials with increasing neutron fluence at typical HTR operating conditions has been recently assessed. Thirdly, support of the fuel safety through several fuel irradiation experiments including testing of pre-irradiated LWR fuel rods containing UO 2 or MOX fuel. Fourthly

  13. Test plan for qualification of the S-type fiberglass materials for use as the liquid observation well casing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parra, S.A.

    1995-01-01

    This test plan presents the guidelines and requirements for acceptance of the S-type fiberglass material for use as the liquid observation well casing material. The plan for evaluating the physical properties of the candidate fiberglass materials when subjected to radiation, corrosive chemicals, and high temperatures typically found in the waste tanks are outlined. The tests also include tube connection evaluations. Finally, the test plan identifies the participants, their responsibilities, and the schedule for completion of the work

  14. Efficient Time-Domain Ray-Tracing Technique for the Analysis of Ultra-Wideband Indoor Environments including Lossy Materials and Multiple Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Saez de Adana

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an efficient application of the Time-Domain Uniform Theory of Diffraction (TD-UTD for the analysis of Ultra-Wideband (UWB mobile communications for indoor environments. The classical TD-UTD formulation is modified to include the contribution of lossy materials and multiple-ray interactions with the environment. The electromagnetic analysis is combined with a ray-tracing acceleration technique to treat realistic and complex environments. The validity of this method is tested with measurements performed inside the Polytechnic building of the University of Alcala and shows good performance of the model for the analysis of UWB propagation.

  15. Reliability of wind turbine blades: An overview of materials testing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmes, John W.; Sørensen, Bent F.; Brøndsted, Povl

    2007-01-01

    an understanding of how damage develops in composite structures, composite materials and adhesives. Designing reliable wind turbine blades also requires the further development of laboratory scale and full scale test methods to evaluate the structural response and durability of new materials under various loading......The structural reliability of wind turbine components can have a profound impact on both the profitability and reputation of a wind turbine manufacturer or supplier of wind turbine components. The issue of reliability is of critical concern when large wind farm co-operatives are considered......, and when wind turbines are located in remote regions where the cost of inspections and repairs can be very high. From a structural viewpoint, wind turbine blades are subjected to very complex loading histories with coupled deformation modes. The long-term reliability of wind turbine blades requires...

  16. Digital Radiography of a Drop Tested 9975 Radioactive Materials Packaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blanton, P.S.

    2001-01-01

    This paper discusses the use of radiography as a tool for evaluating damage to radioactive material packaging subjected to regulatory accident conditions. The Code of Federal Regulations, 10 CFR 71, presents the performance based requirements that must be used in the development (design, fabrication and testing) of a radioactive material packaging. The use of various non-destructive examination techniques in the fabrication of packages is common. One such technique is the use of conventional radiography in the examination of welds. Radiography is conventional in the sense that images are caught one at a time on film stock. Most recently, digital radiography has been used to characterize internal damage to a package subjected to the 30-foot hypothetical accident conditions (HAC) drop. Digital radiography allows for real time evaluation of the item being inspected. This paper presents a summary discussion of the digital radiographic technique and an example of radiographic results of a 9975 package following the HAC 30-foot drop

  17. 40 CFR 1048.505 - How do I test engines using steady-state duty cycles, including ramped-modal testing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...-state duty cycles, including ramped-modal testing? 1048.505 Section 1048.505 Protection of Environment... SPARK-IGNITION ENGINES Test Procedures § 1048.505 How do I test engines using steady-state duty cycles... some cases, we allow you to choose the appropriate steady-state duty cycle for an engine. In these...

  18. Hybrid microcircuit technology handbook materials, processes, design, testing and production

    CERN Document Server

    Licari, James J

    1998-01-01

    The Hybrid Microcircuit Technology Handbook integrates the many diverse technologies used in the design, fabrication, assembly, and testing of hybrid segments crucial to the success of producing reliable circuits in high yields. Among these are: resistor trimming, wire bonding, die attachment, cleaning, hermetic sealing, and moisture analysis. In addition to thin films, thick films, and assembly processes, important chapters on substrate selections, handling (including electrostatic discharge), failure analysis, and documentation are included. A comprehensive chapter of design guidelines will

  19. Testing capabilities of Los Alamos National Laboratory for irradiated materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maloy, S.A.; James, M.R.; Sommer, W.F.

    1999-01-01

    Spallation neutron sources expose materials to high energy (>100 MeV) proton and neutron spectra. Although numerous studies have investigated the effects of radiation damage in a lower energy neutron flux from fission or fusion reactors on the mechanical properties of materials, very little work has been performed on the effects that exposure to a spallation neutron spectrum has on the mechanical properties of materials. These effects can be significantly different than those observed in a fission or fusion reactor spectrum because exposure to high energy protons and neutrons produces more He and H along with the atomic displacement damage. Los Alamos National Laboratory has unique facilities to study the effects of spallation radiation damage on the mechanical properties of materials. The Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) has a pulsed linear accelerator which operates at 800 MeV and 1 mA. The Los Alamos Spallation Radiation Effect Facility (LASREF) located at the end of this accelerator is designed to allow the irradiation of components in a proton beam while water cooling these components and measuring their temperature. After irradiation, specimens can be investigated at hot cells located at the Chemical Metallurgy Research Building. Wing 9 of this facility contains 16 hot cells set up in two groups of eight, each having a corridor in the center to allow easy transfer of radioactive shipments into and out of the hot cells. These corridors have been used to prepare specimens for shipment to collaborating laboratories such as PNNL, ORNL, BNL, and the Paul Scherrer Institute to perform specialized testing at their hot cells. The LANL hot cells contain capabilities for opening radioactive components and testing their mechanical properties as well as preparing specimens from irradiated components

  20. IFMIF [International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility], an accelerator-based neutron source for fusion components irradiation testing: Materials testing capabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mann, F.M.

    1988-08-01

    The International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility (IFMIF) is proposed as an advanced accelerator-based neutron source for high-flux irradiation testing of large-sized fusion reactor components. The facility would require only small extensions to existing accelerator and target technology originally developed for the Fusion Materials Irradiation Test (FMIT) facility. At the extended facility, neutrons would be produced by a 0.1-A beam of 35-MeV deuterons incident upon a liquid lithium target. The volume available for high-flux (>10/sup 15/ n/cm/sup 2/-s) testing in IFMITF would be over a liter, a factor of about three larger than in the FMIT facility. This is because the effective beam current of 35-MeV deuterons on target can be increased by a factor of ten to 1A or more. Such an increase can be accomplished by funneling beams of deuterium ions from the radio-frequency quadruple into a linear accelerator and by taking advantage of recent developments in accelerator technology. Multiple beams and large total current allow great variety in available testing. For example, multiple simultaneous experiments, and great flexibility in tailoring spatial distributions of flux and spectra can be achieved. 5 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab

  1. Chalcogenide Glass Radiation Sensor; Materials Development, Design and Device Testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitkova, Maria; Butt, Darryl; Kozicki, Michael; Barnaby, Hugo

    2013-04-30

    studied the effect of x-rays and γ-rays, on thin film chalcogenide glasses and applied them in conjunction with film incorporating a silver source in a new type of radiation sensor for which we have an US patent application [3]. In this report, we give data about our studies regarding our designed radiation sensor along with the testing and performance at various radiation doses. These studies have been preceded by materials characterization research related to the compositional and structural characteristics of the active materials used in the radiation sensor design. During the work on the project, we collected a large volume of material since every experiment was repeated many times to verify the results. We conducted a comprehensive material research, analysis and discussion with the aim to understand the nature of the occurring effects, design different structures to harness these effects, generated models to aid in the understanding the effects, built different device structures and collected data to quantify device performance. These various aspects of our investigation have been detailed in previous quarterly reports. In this report, we present our main results and emphasize on the results pertaining to the core project goals materials development, sensor design and testing and with an emphasis on classifying the appropriate material and design for the optimal application. The report has three main parts: (i) Presentation of the main data; (ii) Bulleted summary of the most important results; (iii) List of the patent, journal publications, conference proceedings and conferences participation, occurring as a result of working on the project.

  2. Lap-joint testing of precoated steel materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chico, B.

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available In industry, particularly in the building construction, lap-joint technology for precoated steel sheet materials has undergone rapid development. However, standars for lap-joint testing are lacking. This work analyses the behaviour of four precoated steel materials commonly used in the building industry: 55 % Al-Zn and hot dip galvanized, painted and unpainted. Two-year atmospheric exposure tests have been carried out in Madrid and Avilés (Spain, complemented by accelerated weathering tests in climatic cabinets. The latter have consisted of two salt fog/humidity/drying cycles: VDA cycle 621-415 and the "CENIM cycle", which has been designed to adequately simulate the behaviour of materials in this type of joints.

    En la industria en general y, particularmente, en la industria de la construcción, las tecnologías sobre uniones solapadas han experimentado un rápido desarrollo. Sin embargo, no son abundantes los ensayos para este tipo de uniones. Este trabajo analiza el comportamiento de cuatro materiales de acero pre-recubierto comúnmente usados en la industria de la construcción: 55 % Al-Zn y galvanizado por inmersión en caliente, con recubrimiento orgánico y sin él. Se han realizado ensayos de exposición natural durante dos años en las atmósferas de Madrid y Avilés (España, complementados con ensayos de envejecimiento acelerado en cámaras climáticas. En estos últimos se han ensayado dos ciclos de proyección niebla salina/humedad/secado: ciclo VDA 621-415 y un ciclo desarrollado en el CENIM diseñado.

  3. Neutron-Irradiated Samples as Test Materials for MPEX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ellis, Ronald James; Rapp, Juergen

    2015-01-01

    Plasma Material Interaction (PMI) is a major concern in fusion reactor design and analysis. The Material-Plasma Exposure eXperiment (MPEX) will explore PMI under fusion reactor plasma conditions. Samples with accumulated displacements per atom (DPA) damage produced by fast neutron irradiations in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) will be studied in the MPEX facility. This paper presents assessments of the calculated induced radioactivity and resulting radiation dose rates of a variety of potential fusion reactor plasma-facing materials (such as tungsten). The scientific code packages MCNP and SCALE were used to simulate irradiation of the samples in HFIR including the generation and depletion of nuclides in the material and the subsequent composition, activity levels, gamma radiation fields, and resultant dose rates as a function of cooling time. A challenge of the MPEX project is to minimize the radioactive inventory in the preparation of the samples and the sample dose rates for inclusion in the MPEX facility

  4. An investigation of high-temperature irradiation test program of new ceramic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishino, Shiori; Terai, Takayuki; Oku, Tatsuo

    1999-08-01

    The Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute entrusted the Atomic Energy Society of Japan with an investigation into the trend of irradiation processing/damage research on new ceramic materials. The present report describes the result of the investigation, which was aimed at effective execution of irradiation programs using the High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR) by examining preferential research subjects and their concrete research methods. Objects of the investigation were currently on-going preliminary tests of functional materials (high-temperature oxide superconductor and high-temperature semiconductor) and structural materials (carbon/carbon and SiC/SiC composite materials), together with newly proposed subjects of, e.g., radiation effects on ceramics-coated materials and super-plastic ceramic materials as well as microscopic computer simulation of deformation and fracture of ceramics. These works have revealed 1) the background of each research subject, 2) its objective and significance from viewpoints of science and engineering, 3) research methodology in stages from preliminary tests to real HTTR irradiation, and 4) concrete HTTR-irradiation methods which include main specifications of test specimens, irradiation facilities and post-irradiation examination facilities and apparatuses. The present efforts have constructed the important fundamentals in the new ceramic materials field for further planning and execution of the innovative basic research on high-temperature engineering. (author)

  5. Production integrated nondestructive testing of composite materials and material compounds - an overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straß, B.; Conrad, C.; Wolter, B.

    2017-03-01

    Composite materials and material compounds are of increasing importance, because of the steadily rising relevance of resource saving lightweight constructions. Quality assurance with appropriate Nondestructive Testing (NDT) methods is a key aspect for reliable and efficient production. Quality changes have to be detected already in the manufacturing flow in order to take adequate corrective actions. For materials and compounds the classical NDT methods for defectoscopy, like X-ray and Ultrasound (US) are still predominant. Nevertheless, meanwhile fast, contactless NDT methods, like air-borne ultrasound, dynamic thermography and special Eddy-Current techniques are available in order to detect cracks, voids, pores and delaminations but also for characterizing fiber content, distribution and alignment. In Metal-Matrix Composites US back-scattering can be used for this purpose. US run-time measurements allow the detection of thermal stresses at the metal-matrix interface. Another important area is the necessity for NDT in joining. To achieve an optimum material utilization and product safety as well as the best possible production efficiency, there is a need for NDT methods for in-line inspection of the joint quality while joining or immediately afterwards. For this purpose EMAT (Electromagnetic Acoustic Transducer) technique or Acoustic Emission testing can be used.

  6. 75 FR 16514 - Bayer Material Science, LLC, Formally Known as Sheffield Plastics, Including On-Site Leased...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Employment and Training Administration [TA-W-71,045] Bayer Material Science... January 8th, 2010, applicable to workers of Bayer Material Science, LLC, formally known as Sheffield... polycarbonate film products. Information shows that Bayer Material Science, LLC was formally known as Sheffield...

  7. Materials Science Research Rack-1 Fire Suppressant Distribution Test Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieland, P. O.

    2002-01-01

    Fire suppressant distribution testing was performed on the Materials Science Research Rack-1 (MSRR-1), a furnace facility payload that will be installed in the U.S. Lab module of the International Space Station. Unlike racks that were tested previously, the MSRR-1 uses the Active Rack Isolation System (ARIS) to reduce vibration on experiments, so the effects of ARIS on fire suppressant distribution were unknown. Two tests were performed to map the distribution of CO2 fire suppressant throughout a mockup of the MSRR-1 designed to have the same component volumes and flowpath restrictions as the flight rack. For the first test, the average maximum CO2 concentration for the rack was 60 percent, achieved within 45 s of discharge initiation, meeting the requirement to reach 50 percent throughout the rack within 1 min. For the second test, one of the experiment mockups was removed to provide a worst-case configuration, and the average maximum CO2 concentration for the rack was 58 percent. Comparing the results of this testing with results from previous testing leads to several general conclusions that can be used to evaluate future racks. The MSRR-1 will meet the requirements for fire suppressant distribution. Primary factors that affect the ability to meet the CO2 distribution requirements are the free air volume in the rack and the total area and distribution of openings in the rack shell. The length of the suppressant flowpath and degree of tortuousness has little correlation with CO2 concentration. The total area of holes in the rack shell could be significantly increased. The free air volume could be significantly increased. To ensure the highest maximum CO2 concentration, the PFE nozzle should be inserted to the stop on the nozzle.

  8. Proposed rf system for the fusion materials irradiation test facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fazio, M.V.; Johnson, H.P.; Hoffert, W.J.; Boyd, T.J.

    1979-01-01

    Preliminary rf system design for the accelerator portion of the Fusion Materials Irradiation Test (FMIT) Facility is in progress. The 35-MeV, 100-mA, cw deuteron beam will require 6.3 MW rf power at 80 MHz. Initial testing indicates the EIMAC 8973 tetrode is the most suitable final amplifier tube for each of a series of 15 amplifier chains operating at 0.5-MW output. To satisfy the beam dynamics requirements for particle acceleration and to minimize beam spill, each amplifier output must be controlled to +-1 0 in phase and the field amplitude in the tanks must be held within a 1% tolerance. These tolerances put stringent demands on the rf phase and amplitude control system

  9. Removal of the Materials Test Reactor overhead working reservoir

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lunis, B.C.

    1975-10-01

    Salient features of the removal of an excessed contaminated facility, the Materials Test Reactor (MTR) overhead working reservoir (OWR) from the Test Reactor Area to the Radioactive Waste Management Complex at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory are described. The 125-ton OWR was an overhead 160,000-gallon-capacity tank approximately 193 feet high which supplied cooling water to the MTR. Radiation at ground level beneath the tank was 5 mR/hr and approximately 600 mR/hr at the exterior surface of the tank. Sources ranging from 3 R/hr to in excess of 500 R/hr exist within the tank. The tank interior is contaminated with uranium, plutonium, and miscellaneous fission products. The OWR was lowered to ground level with the use of explosive cutters. Dismantling, decontamination, and disposal were performed by Aerojet Nuclear Company maintenance forces

  10. Soil washing treatability testing for rad-waste material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leis, K.S.; Lear, P.R.

    1997-01-01

    Soil washing treatability testing was successfully completed on soil contaminated with Ra-226 and Th-232. The objective of the soil washing study was to determine if the radiologically contaminated fraction of the soil could be separated from the bulk of the soil material. The cleanup criteria was 38 microm) fraction was allowed to settle and was washed to separate it from the highly contaminated fine (< 38 microm) fraction. The clean coarse fraction comprised 85.7% of the total solids and had less than 15 pCi/g of Ra-226 and Th-232. This material was to be disposed at a RCRA Subtitle D disposal facility. The suspended fines were flocculated and dewatered to minimize the amount of highly contaminated material produced by the soil washing. The dewatered fines would require disposal at a low-level radiological disposal facility. Mass balance calculations were made to determine production rates and chemical and equipment requirements for the full-scale soil washing treatment

  11. Versatile equipment for mechanical testing of active materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertsch, Johannes; Heimgartner, Peter

    2005-01-01

    At the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI) 3 different project groups presently perform aging research on active materials. The research fields are fusion, high neutron flux targets and LWR relevant components. Up to now mechanical testing has been performed with small, low dose rate samples behind local shielding, not appropriate for highly activated material. To overcome this situation, a cell concept for active mechanical testing was elaborated and has been erected in PSI's Hotlab. It consists of 4 shielded cells. 3 connected cells are versatile and independently operable for highly beta/gamma active samples. One cell is an alpha/beta/gamma-box which will be realized in a second phase. This paper presents the versatility especially of the beta/gamma-cells: The different user groups perform experiments in these cells, whereas different machines can be placed into the cells. As consequence of the need of heavily shielded cell doors, a special strengthening and levelling of the floor has been required. In all cells the relevant media are installed. Besides the performance of the cells, the project progress as the difficulties and their solutions are described. (Author)

  12. Component design and testing for a miniaturised autonomous sensor based on a nanowire materials platform

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rajesh Ramaneti; Francois Krummenacher; Fritz Falk; Naser Khosropour; Björn Eisenhawer; Cees van Rijn; Giorgos Fagas; Ran Yu; Adrian M. Ionescu; Ing. Erik Puik; Montserrat Fernández-Bolaños Badia; Nikolay Petkov; Hien Duy Tong; Rik Lafeber; John C De Mello; Olan Lotty; Adrian M. Nightingale; Yordan M. Georgiev; Elizabeth Buitrago; Frank van der Bent; Michael Nolan; Justin D. Holmes; Annett Gawlik; Maher Kayal; Guobin Jia

    2014-01-01

    From Springer description: "We present the design considerations of an autonomous wireless sensor and discuss the fabrication and testing of the various components including the energy harvester, the active sensing devices and the power management and sensor interface circuits. A common materials

  13. Exposure testing and evaluation of solar utilization materials. Semiannual report, May 1, 1975--October 31, 1975

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilligan, J.E.; Brzuskiewicz, J.

    1975-01-01

    The initial efforts of a program of research and experimental testing is described in which the optical performance of materials for use in solar energy utilization devices will be determined before and after exposure to outdoor weathering tests. Materials which are currently in use and others which are being considered or developed for these applications will be characterized and exposed to natural solar radiation. Outdoor testing will be accomplished in Phoenix (Ariz.), Miami (Fla.), and Chicago (Ill.). The results of these tests, primarily the effects of outdoor exposure on optical and physical properties, will be compiled in a handbook, along with cost, availability and other pertinent information. These data are vital to the intelligent selection of solar utilization materials, since a knowledge of the cost performance and lifetime characteristics of candidate materials will greatly assist the design of efficient and reliable solar energy utilization devices. Primary accomplishments include the definition of sample requirements, specification of test samples and test configurations, formulation of acceptance/rejection criteria and contacts with numerous potential materials suppliers.

  14. The Use of Digital Radiography in the Evaluation of Radioactive Materials. Packaging Performance Testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    May, C; Lawrence Gelder, L; Boyd Howard, B

    2007-01-01

    New designs of radioactive material shipping packages are required to be evaluated in accordance with 10 CFR Part 71, ''Packaging and Transportation of Radioactive Material''. This paper will discuss the use of digital radiography to evaluate the effects of the tests required by 10 CFR 71.71, Normal Conditions of Transport (NCT), and 10 CFR 71.73, Hypothetical Accident Conditions (HAC). One acceptable means of evaluating packaging performance is to subject packagings to the series of NCT and HAC tests. The evaluation includes a determination of the effect on the packaging by the conditions and tests. That determination has required that packagings be cut and sectioned to learn the actual effects on internal components. Digital radiography permits the examination of internal packaging components without sectioning a package. This allows a single package to be subjected to a series of tests. After each test, the package is digitally radiographed and the effects of particular tests evaluated. Radiography reduces the number of packages required for testing and also reduces labor and materials required to section and evaluate numerous packages. This paper will include a description of the digital radiography equipment used in the testing and evaluation of the 9977 and 9978 packages at SRNL. The equipment is capable of making a single radiograph of a full-sized package in one exposure. Radiographs will be compared to sectioned packages that show actual conditions compared to radiographic images

  15. Experimental patch testing with chromium-coated materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bregnbak, David; Thyssen, Jacob P; Jellesen, Morten S; Zachariae, Claus; Johansen, Jeanne D

    2017-06-01

    Chromium coatings on metal alloys can be decorative, and prevent corrosion and metal ion release. We recently showed that handling of a chromium-containing disc resulted in chromium deposition on the skin. To examine patch test reactivity to chromium-coated discs. We included 15 patients: 10 chromium-allergic patients, and 5 patients without chromium allergy. All were patch tested with potassium dichromate, cobalt chloride, nickel sulfate, and nine different metallic discs. The chromium-allergic patients were also patch tested with serial dilutions of potassium dichromate. Positive/weaker reactions were observed to disc B (1 of 10), disc C (1 of 10), and disc D, disc E, and disc I (4 of 10 each). As no controls reacted to any of the discs, the weak reactions indicate allergic reactions. Positive patch test reactions to 1770 ppm chromium(VI) in the serial dilutions of potassium dichromate were observed in 7 of 10 patients. When the case group was narrowed down to include only the patients with a current positive patch test reaction to potassium dichromate, elicitation of dermatitis by both chromium(III) and chromium(VI) discs was observed in 4 of 7 of patients. Many of the patients reacted to both chromium(III) and chromium(VI) surfaces. Our results indicate that both chromium(VI) and chromium(III) pose a risk to chromium-allergic patients. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Damage functions generation for polyatomic materials irradiated in test reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alberman, A.; Lesueur, D.

    1987-06-01

    Neutron exposure parameters in polyatomic materials is of great importance for fusion technology programs. The COMPOSI code computes the number of displaced atoms of sub-lattice ''j'' induced by one atom of sub-lattice ''i'' either by direct collision or through intermediate knocked atom. The code uses Lindhard equations; it is solved by iterative process. The atomic displacements cross-sections, as a function of neutron energy are derived by folding previous results with ''i'' type PKA. Moreover the COMPOSI code may include recoils from charged particles e.g.: Alpha + Triton from Li 6 capture in Li Al 0 2 . These responses in various spectra are discussed [fr

  17. Development of aircraft brake materials. [evaluation of metal and ceramic materials in sliding tests simulation of aircraft braking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, T. L.; Peterson, M. B.

    1974-01-01

    The requirements of brake materials were outlined and a survey made to select materials to meet the needs of high temperature brakes. A number of metals and ceramic materials were selected and evaluated in sliding tests which simulated aircraft braking. Nickel, molybdenum tungsten, Zr02, high temperature cements and carbons were tested. Additives were then incorporated into these materials to optimize their wear or strength behavior with particular emphasis on nickel and molybdenum base materials and a high temperature potassium silicate cement. Optimum materials were developed which improved wear behavior over conventional brake materials in the simulated test. The best materials are a nickel, aluminum oxide, lead tungstate composition containing graphite or molybdenum disulphite; a molybdenum base material containing LPA100 (an intermetallic compound of cobalt, molybdenum, and silicon); and a carbon material (P5).

  18. 1000–ton testing machine for cyclic fatigue tests of materials at liquid nitrogen temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khitruk, A. A.; Klimchenko, Yu. A.; Kovalchuk, O. A.; Marushin, E. L.; Mednikov, A. A.; Nasluzov, S. N.; Privalova, E. K.; Rodin, I. Yu.; Stepanov, D. B.; Sukhanova, M. V. [The D.V. Efremov Scientific Research Institute of Electrophysical Apparatus (NIIEFA), 3 Doroga na Metallostroy, Metallostroy, Saint Petersburg 196641 (Russian Federation)

    2014-01-29

    One of the main tasks of superconductive magnets R and D is to determine the mechanical and fatigue properties of structural materials and the critical design elements in the cryogenic temperature range. This paper describes a new facility built based on the industrial 1000-ton (10 MN) testing machine Schenk PC10.0S. Special equipment was developed to provide the mechanical and cyclic tensile fatigue tests of large-scale samples at the liquid nitrogen temperature and in a given load range. The main feature of the developed testing machine is the cryostat, in which the device converting a standard compression force of the testing machine to the tensile force affected at the test object is placed. The control system provides the remote control of the test and obtaining, processing and presentation of test data. As an example of the testing machine operation the test program and test results of the cyclic tensile fatigue tests of fullscale helium inlet sample of the PF1 coil ITER are presented.

  19. 1000–ton testing machine for cyclic fatigue tests of materials at liquid nitrogen temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khitruk, A. A.; Klimchenko, Yu. A.; Kovalchuk, O. A.; Marushin, E. L.; Mednikov, A. A.; Nasluzov, S. N.; Privalova, E. K.; Rodin, I. Yu.; Stepanov, D. B.; Sukhanova, M. V.

    2014-01-01

    One of the main tasks of superconductive magnets R and D is to determine the mechanical and fatigue properties of structural materials and the critical design elements in the cryogenic temperature range. This paper describes a new facility built based on the industrial 1000-ton (10 MN) testing machine Schenk PC10.0S. Special equipment was developed to provide the mechanical and cyclic tensile fatigue tests of large-scale samples at the liquid nitrogen temperature and in a given load range. The main feature of the developed testing machine is the cryostat, in which the device converting a standard compression force of the testing machine to the tensile force affected at the test object is placed. The control system provides the remote control of the test and obtaining, processing and presentation of test data. As an example of the testing machine operation the test program and test results of the cyclic tensile fatigue tests of fullscale helium inlet sample of the PF1 coil ITER are presented

  20. Apparatus and test method for characterizing the temperature regulating properties of thermal functional porous polymeric materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Bao-Guo; Zhang, Shan; Zhang, De-Pin

    2017-05-01

    In order to evaluate the temperature regulating properties of thermal functional porous polymeric materials such as fabrics treated with phase change material microcapsules, a new apparatus was developed. The apparatus and the test method can measure the heat flux, temperature, and displacement signals during the dynamic contact and then quickly give an evaluation for the temperature regulating properties by simulating the dynamic heat transfer and temperature regulating process when the materials contact the body skin. A series of indices including the psychosensory intensity, regulating capability index, and relative regulating index were defined to characterize the temperature regulating properties. The measurement principle, the evaluation criteria and grading method, the experimental setup and the test results discussion, and the gage capability analysis of the apparatus are presented. The new apparatus provides a method for the objective measurement and evaluation of the temperature regulating properties of thermal functional porous polymeric materials.

  1. Use of Melt Flow Rate Test in Reliability Study of Thermoplastic Encapsulation Materials in Photovoltaic Modules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moseley, J.; Miller, D.; Shah, Q.-U.-A. S. J.; Sakurai, K.; Kempe, M.; Tamizhmani, G.; Kurtz, S.

    2011-10-01

    Use of thermoplastic materials as encapsulants in photovoltaic (PV) modules presents a potential concern in terms of high temperature creep, which should be evaluated before thermoplastics are qualified for use in the field. Historically, the issue of creep has been avoided by using thermosetting polymers as encapsulants, such as crosslinked ethylene-co-vinyl acetate (EVA). Because they lack crosslinked networks, however, thermoplastics may be subject to phase transitions and visco-elastic flow at the temperatures and mechanical stresses encountered by modules in the field, creating the potential for a number of reliability and safety issues. Thermoplastic materials investigated in this study include PV-grade uncured-EVA (without curing agents and therefore not crosslinked); polyvinyl butyral (PVB); thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU); and three polyolefins (PO), which have been proposed for use as PV encapsulation. Two approaches were used to evaluate the performance of these materials as encapsulants: module-level testing and a material-level testing.

  2. Environmental test program for superconducting materials and devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haertling, Gene; Randolph, Henry; Hsi, Chi-Shiung; Verbelyi, Darren

    1991-01-01

    This report is divided into two parts. The first dealing with work involved with Clemson University and the second with the results from Westinghouse/Savannah River. Both areas of work involved low noise, low thermal conductivity superconducting grounding links used in the NASA-sponsored Spectroscopy of the Atmosphere using Far Infrared Emission (SAFIRE) Project. Clemson prepared the links from YBa2Cu3O(7-x) superconductor tape that was mounted on a printed circuit board and encapsulated with epoxy resin. The Clemson program includes temperature vs. resistance, liquid nitrogen immersion, water immersion, thermal cycling, humidity, and radiation testing. The evaluation of the links under a long term environmental test program is described. The Savannah River program includes gamma irradiation, vibration, and long-term evaluation. The progress made in these evaluations is discussed.

  3. Synthesis of functional materials by radiation and qualification testing of organic materials in nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nho, Young Chang; Kim, Ki Yup; Kang, Phil Hyun and others; Jun, Hong Jae; Suh, Dong Hak; Lee, Young Moo; Min, Byung Kak; Bae, You Han

    2003-05-01

    The radiation crosslinking and grafting can be easily adjusted and is easily reproducible by controlling the radiation dose. These studies aim to develop new biomaterials such as covering for burns and wound, and controlled release of drug. A radiation technology was used to develop PTC materials useful in devices that limit electric fault currents. Radiation-curing of fiber-matrix composites is a promising application. There are a number of advantages to radiation curing of composites, compared with conventional thermal processing. Radiation curing at ambient temperature allows tighter control of part dimensions, and elimination of internal stresses which otherwise occur on cooling and which reduce material strength. These studies involved radiation curing of epoxy resins with various fibers and filler for structural application for aerospace and sport goods. The chain scission is the basis of other radiation treatments aimed at enhancing processing characteristics of polymers. These studies aim to make PTFE powder from PTFE scrap using the radiation degradation which allows incorporation of the material into coatings, inks etc. Low density polyethylene, crosslinked polyethylene, ethylene propylene rubber, and acrylonitrile butadiene rubber as cable insulating, seathing and sealing materials were irradiated for the accelerated ageing tests. Degradation was investigated by measuring dielectric analysis, thermogravimetric analysis, and dynamic mechanical analysis. Dielectric tanδ, storage modulus and loss modulus were increased with irradiation doses. However, decomposition temperature decreased with irradiation doses

  4. Test facilities for radioactive material transport packages (AEA Technology, Winfrith, UK)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burgess, M.H.

    1991-01-01

    Transport packages for radioactive materials are tested to demonstrate compliance with national and international regulations. The involvement of AEA Technology is traced from the establishment of the early IAEA Regulations. Transport package design, testing, assessment and approval requires a wide variety of skills and facilities. The comprehensive capability of AEA Technology in these areas is described with references to practical experience in the form of a short bibliography. The facilities described include drop-test cranes and targets (up to 700te); air guns for impacts up to sonic velocities; pool fires, furnaces and rigs for thermal tests including heat dissipation on prototype flasks; shielding facilities and instruments; criticality simulations and leak test instruments. These are illustrated with photographs demonstrating the comprehensive nature of package testing services supplied to customers. (author)

  5. Cascaded image analysis for dynamic crack detection in material testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hampel, U.; Maas, H.-G.

    Concrete probes in civil engineering material testing often show fissures or hairline-cracks. These cracks develop dynamically. Starting at a width of a few microns, they usually cannot be detected visually or in an image of a camera imaging the whole probe. Conventional image analysis techniques will detect fissures only if they show a width in the order of one pixel. To be able to detect and measure fissures with a width of a fraction of a pixel at an early stage of their development, a cascaded image analysis approach has been developed, implemented and tested. The basic idea of the approach is to detect discontinuities in dense surface deformation vector fields. These deformation vector fields between consecutive stereo image pairs, which are generated by cross correlation or least squares matching, show a precision in the order of 1/50 pixel. Hairline-cracks can be detected and measured by applying edge detection techniques such as a Sobel operator to the results of the image matching process. Cracks will show up as linear discontinuities in the deformation vector field and can be vectorized by edge chaining. In practical tests of the method, cracks with a width of 1/20 pixel could be detected, and their width could be determined at a precision of 1/50 pixel.

  6. Teacher-Made Tactile Science Materials with Critical and Creative Thinking Activities for Learners Including Those with Visual Impairments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teske, Jolene K.; Gray, Phyllis; Kuhn, Mason A.; Clausen, Courtney K.; Smith, Latisha L.; Alsubia, Sukainah A.; Ghayoorad, Maryam; Rule, Audrey C.; Schneider, Jean Suchsland

    2014-01-01

    Gifted students with visual impairments are twice exceptional learners and may not evidence their advanced science aptitudes without appropriate accommodations for learning science. However, effective tactile science teaching materials may be easily made. Recent research has shown that when tactile materials are used with "all" students…

  7. Integrated infrastructure initiatives for material testing reactor innovations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dekeyser, Jean; Vermeeren, Ludo; Iracane, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → The EU FP7 MTR+I3 project has initiated a durable cooperation between MTR operators. → Improvements in irradiation test device technology and instrumentation were achieved. → Professional training efforts were streamlined and best practices were exchanged. → A framework has been set up to coordinate and optimize the use of MTRs in the EU. - Abstract: The key goal of the European FP6 project MTR+I3 was to build a durable cooperation between Material Testing Reactor (MTR) operators and relevant laboratories that can maintain European leadership with updated capabilities and competences regarding reactor performances and irradiation technology. The MTR+I3 consortium was composed of 18 partners with a high level of expertise in irradiation-related services for all types of nuclear plants. This project covered activities that foster integration of the MTR community involved in designing, fabricating and operating irradiation devices through information exchange, know-how cross-fertilization, exchanges of interdisciplinary personnel, structuring of key-technology suppliers and professional training. The network produced best practice guidelines for selected irradiation activities. This project allowed to launch or to improve technical studies in various domains dealing with irradiation test device technology, experimental loop designs and instrumentation. Major results are illustrated in this paper. These concern in particular: on-line fuel power determination, neutron screen optimization, simulation of transmutation process, power transient systems, water chemistry and stress corrosion cracking, fission gas measurement, irradiation behaviour of electronic modules, mechanical loading under irradiation, high temperature gas loop technology, heavy liquid metal loop development and safety test instrumentation. One of the major benefits of this project is that, starting from a situation of fragmented resources in a strongly competitive sector, it has

  8. Standard Test Method for Oxyacetylene Ablation Testing of Thermal Insulation Materials

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2008-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers the screening of ablative materials to determine the relative thermal insulation effectiveness when tested as a flat panel in an environment of a steady flow of hot gas provided by an oxyacetylene burner. 1.2 This test method should be used to measure and describe the properties of materials, products, or assemblies in response to heat and flame under controlled laboratory conditions and should not be used to describe or appraise the fire hazard of materials, products, or assemblies under actual fire conditions. However, results of this test method may be used as elements of a fire risk assessment which takes into account all of the factors which are pertinent to an assessment of the fire hazard of a particular end use. 1.3 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limi...

  9. The materials irradiation experiment for testing plasma facing materials at fusion relevant conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garrison, L. M., E-mail: garrisonlm@ornl.gov; Egle, B. J. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, 1 Bethel Valley Road, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Fusion Technology Institute, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1500 Engineering Drive, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Zenobia, S. J.; Kulcinski, G. L.; Santarius, J. F. [Fusion Technology Institute, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1500 Engineering Drive, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States)

    2016-08-15

    The Materials Irradiation Experiment (MITE-E) was constructed at the University of Wisconsin-Madison Inertial Electrostatic Confinement Laboratory to test materials for potential use as plasma-facing materials (PFMs) in fusion reactors. PFMs in fusion reactors will be bombarded with x-rays, neutrons, and ions of hydrogen and helium. More needs to be understood about the interactions between the plasma and the materials to validate their use for fusion reactors. The MITE-E simulates some of the fusion reactor conditions by holding samples at temperatures up to 1000 °C while irradiating them with helium or deuterium ions with energies from 10 to 150 keV. The ion gun can irradiate the samples with ion currents of 20 μA–500 μA; the typical current used is 72 μA, which is an average flux of 9 × 10{sup 14} ions/(cm{sup 2} s). The ion gun uses electrostatic lenses to extract and shape the ion beam. A variable power (1-20 W), steady-state, Nd:YAG laser provides additional heating to maintain a constant sample temperature during irradiations. The ion beam current reaching the sample is directly measured and monitored in real-time during irradiations. The ion beam profile has been investigated using a copper sample sputtering experiment. The MITE-E has successfully been used to irradiate polycrystalline and single crystal tungsten samples with helium ions and will continue to be a source of important data for plasma interactions with materials.

  10. Waste package materials testing for a salt repository: 1983 status summary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moak, D.P.

    1986-09-01

    The United States plans to safely dispose of nuclear waste in deep, stable geologic formations. As part of these plans, the US Department of Energy is sponsoring research on the designing and testing of waste packages and waste package materials. This fiscal year 1983 status report summarizes recent results of waste package materials testing in a salt environment. The results from these tests will be used by waste package designers and performance assessment experts. Release characteristics data are available on two waste forms (spent fuel and waste-containing glass) that were exposed to leaching tests at various radiation levels, temperatures, pH, glass surface area to solution volume ratios, and brine solutions simulating expected salt repository conditions. Candidate materials tested for corrosion resistance and other properties include iron alloys; TI-CODE 12, the most promising titanium alloy for containment; and nickel alloys. In component interaction testing, synergistic effects have not ruled out any candidate material. 21 refs., 37 figs., 15 tabs

  11. Compatibility tests between molten salts and metal materials (2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiina, Yasuaki

    2003-08-01

    Latent heat storage technology using molten salts can reduce temperature fluctuations of heat transfer fluid by latent heat for middle and high temperature regions. This enables us to operate several heat utilization systems in cascade connected to High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactors (HTGRs) from high to low temperature range by setting the latent heat storage system after a heat utilization system to reduce thermal load after the heat utilization systems. This latent heat technology is expected to be used for effective use of heat such as equalization of electric load between night and daytime. In the application of the latent heat technology, compatibility between molten salts and metal materials is very important because molten salts are corrosive, and heat transfer pipes and vessels will contact with the molten salts. It will be necessary to prevail the latent heat storage technique that normal metal materials can be used for the pipes and vessels. However, a few studies have been reported of compatibility between molten salts and metals in middle and high temperature ranges. In this study, four molten salts, range of the melting temperature from 490degC to 800degC, are selected and five metals, high temperature and corrosion resistance steels of Alloy600, HastelloyB2, HastelloyC276, SUS310S and pure Nickel are selected for the test with the consideration of metal composition. Test was performed in an electric furnace by setting the molten salts and the metals in melting pots in an atmosphere of nitrogen. Results revealed excellent corrosion resistance of pure Nickel and comparatively low corrosion resistance of nickel base alloys such as Alloy600 and Hastelloys against Li 2 CO 3 . Corrosion resistance of SUS310S was about same as nickel based alloys. Therefore, if some amount of corrosion is permitted, SUS310S would be one of the candidate alloys for structure materials. These results will be used as reference data to select metals in latent heat technology

  12. A quasi-static algorithm that includes effects of characteristic time scales for simulating failures in brittle materials

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, Jinxing; El Sayed, Tamer S.

    2013-01-01

    When the brittle heterogeneous material is simulated via lattice models, the quasi-static failure depends on the relative magnitudes of Telem, the characteristic releasing time of the internal forces of the broken elements and Tlattice

  13. Nonlinear Thermo-mechanical Finite Element Analysis of Polymer Foam Cored Sandwich Structures including Geometrical and Material Nonlinearity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Palleti, Hara Naga Krishna Teja; Thomsen, Ole Thybo; Taher, Siavash Talebi

    In this paper, polymer foam cored sandwich structures with fibre reinforced composite face sheets subjected to combined mechanical and thermal loads will be analysed using the commercial FE code ABAQUS® incorporating both material and geometrical nonlinearity. Large displacements and rotations...

  14. Instrumentation Technologies for Improving an Irradiation Testing of Nuclear Fuels and Materials at the HANARO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Bong Goo; Park, Sung Jae; Choo, Ki Nam

    2011-01-01

    Over 50 years of nuclear fuels and materials irradiation testing has led to many countries developing significant improvements in instrumentation to monitor physical parameters and to control the test conditions in Materials Test Reactors (MTRs) or research reactors. Recent effort to deploy new fuels and materials in existing and advanced reactors has increased the demand for well-instrumented irradiation tests. Specifically, demand has increased for tests with sensors capable of providing real-time measurement of key parameters, such as temperature, geometry changes, thermal conductivity, fission gas release, cracking, coating buildup, thermal and fast flux, etc. This review paper documents the current state of instrumentation technologies in MTRs in the world and summarizes on-going research efforts to deploy new sensors. There is increased interest to irradiate new materials and reactor fuels for advanced PWRs and the Gen-IV reactor systems, such as SFRs (Sodium-cooled Fast Reactors), VHTRs (Very-High-Temperature Reactors), SCWRs (Supercritical-Water-cooled Reactors) and GFRs (Gas-cooled Fast Reactor). This review documents the current state of instrumentation technologies in MTRs in the world, identifies challenges faced by previous testing methods and how these challenges were overcome. A wide range of sensors are available to measure key parameters of interest during fuels and materials irradiations in MTRs. Such sensors must be reliable, small size, highly accurate, and able to withstand harsh conditions. On-going development efforts are focusing on providing MTR users a wider range of parameter measurements with increased accuracy. In addition, development efforts are focusing on reducing the impact of sensor on measurements by reducing sensor size. This report includes not only status of instrumentation using research reactors in the world to irradiate nuclear fuels and materials but also future directions relating to instrumentation technologies for

  15. The technology development for surveillance test of reactor vessel materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Kee Ok; Kim, Byoung Chul; Lee, Sam Lai; Choi, Sun Phil; Park, Day Young; Choi, Kwen Jai

    1997-12-01

    Benchmark test was performed in accordance with the requirement of US NRC Reg. Guide DG-1053 for Kori unit-1 in order to determine best-estimated fast neutron fluence irradiated into reactor vessel. Since the uncertainty of radiation analysis comes from the calculation error due to neutron cross-section data, reactor core geometrical dimension, core source, mesh density, angular expansion and convergence criteria, evaluation of calculational uncertainty due to analytical method was performed in accordance with the regulatory guide and the proof was performed for entire analysis by comparing the measurement value obtained by neutron dosimetry located in surveillance capsule. Best-estimated neutron fluence in reactor vessel was calculated by bias factor, neutron flux measurement value/calculational value, from reanalysis result from previous 1st through 4th surveillance testing and finally fluence prediction was performed for the end of reactor life and the entire period of plant life extension. Pressurized thermal shock analysis was performed in accordance with 10 CFR 50.61 using the result of neutron fluence analysis in order to predict the life of reactor vessel material and the criteria of safe operation for Kori unit 1 was reestablished. (author). 55 refs., 55 figs.

  16. Project accent: graphite irradiated creep in a materials test reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brooking, M.

    2014-01-01

    Atkins manages a pioneering programme of irradiation experiments for EDF Energy. One of these projects is Project ACCENT, designed to obtain evidence of a beneficial physical property of the graphite, which may extend the life of the Advanced Gas-cooled Reactors (AGRs). The project team combines the in-house experience of EDF Energy with two supplier organisations (providing the material test reactors and testing facilities) and supporting consultancies (Atkins and an independent technical expert). This paper describes: - Brief summary of the Project; - Discussion of the challenges faced by the Project; and - Conclusion elaborating on the aims of the Project. These challenging experiments use bespoke technology and both un-irradiated (virgin) and irradiated AGR graphite. The results will help to better understand graphite irradiation-induced creep (or stress modified dimensional change) properties and therefore more accurately determine lifetime and safe operating envelopes of the AGRs. The first round of irradiation has been completed, with a second round about to commence. This is a key step to realising the full lifetime ambition for AGRs, demonstrating the relaxation of stresses within the graphite bricks. (authors)

  17. Evaluation and Comparison of Multiple Test Methods, Including Real-time PCR, for Legionella Detection in Clinical Specimens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peci, Adriana; Winter, Anne-Luise; Gubbay, Jonathan B.

    2016-01-01

    Legionella is a Gram-negative bacterium that can cause Pontiac fever, a mild upper respiratory infection and Legionnaire’s disease, a more severe illness. We aimed to compare the performance of urine antigen, culture, and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test methods and to determine if sputum is an acceptable alternative to the use of more invasive bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL). Data for this study included specimens tested for Legionella at Public Health Ontario Laboratories from 1st January, 2010 to 30th April, 2014, as part of routine clinical testing. We found sensitivity of urinary antigen test (UAT) compared to culture to be 87%, specificity 94.7%, positive predictive value (PPV) 63.8%, and negative predictive value (NPV) 98.5%. Sensitivity of UAT compared to PCR was 74.7%, specificity 98.3%, PPV 77.7%, and NPV 98.1%. Out of 146 patients who had a Legionella-positive result by PCR, only 66 (45.2%) also had a positive result by culture. Sensitivity for culture was the same using either sputum or BAL (13.6%); sensitivity for PCR was 10.3% for sputum and 12.8% for BAL. Both sputum and BAL yield similar results regardless testing methods (Fisher Exact p-values = 1.0, for each test). In summary, all test methods have inherent weaknesses in identifying Legionella; therefore, more than one testing method should be used. Obtaining a single specimen type from patients with pneumonia limits the ability to diagnose Legionella, particularly when urine is the specimen type submitted. Given ease of collection and similar sensitivity to BAL, clinicians are encouraged to submit sputum in addition to urine when BAL submission is not practical from patients being tested for Legionella. PMID:27630979

  18. Investigation of a precise static leach test for the testing of simulated nuclear waste materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kingston, H.M.; Cronin, D.J.; Epstein, M.S.

    1984-01-01

    The precision of the nuclear waste static leach test was evaluated using controlled experimental conditions and homogeneous glass materials. The majority of the leachate components were subjected to simultaneous multielement DCP analysis. The overall precision of the static leach test is determined by the summation of random effects caused by: variance in the experimental conditions of the leaching procedure; inhomogeneity of the material to be leached; and variance of the analytical techniques used to determine elemental concentrations in the leachate. In this study, strict control of key experimental parameters was employed to reduce the first source of variance. In addition, special attention to the preparation of glass samples to be tested assured a high degree of homogeneity. Described here are the details of the reduction of these two sources of variance to a point where the overall test precision is limited by that of the analysis step. Of the elements determined - B, Ba, Ca, Cs, Mo, Na, Si, Sr, and Zn - only Ca and Zn exhibited replicate imprecision significantly greater than that observed in the analysis of the leachate solutions. The imprecision in the Zn was partially attributed to the non-reproducible adsorption onto the leach vessel walls during the 28 day test period. None of the other elements exhibited this behavior

  19. Biomechanical testing and material characterization for the rat large intestine: regional dependence of material parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokolis, Dimitrios P; Orfanidis, Ioannis K; Peroulis, Michalis

    2011-12-01

    The function of the large bowel is to absorb water from the remaining indigestible food matter and subsequently pass useless waste material from the body, but there has been only a small amount of data in the literature on its biomechanical characteristics that would facilitate our understanding of its transport function. Our study aims to fill this gap by affording comprehensive inflation/extension data of intestinal segments from distinct areas, spanning a physiologically relevant deformation range (100-130% axial stretches and 0-15 mmHg lumen pressures). These data were characterized by the Fung-type exponential model in the thick-walled setting, showing reasonable agreement, i.e. root-mean-square error ~30%. Based on optimized material parameters, i.e. a(1)testing and material characterization results for the large intestine of healthy young animals are expected to aid in comprehending the adaptation/remodeling that occurs with ageing, pathological conditions and surgical procedures, as well as for the development of suitable biomaterials for replacement.

  20. Developing standard performance testing procedures for material control and accounting components at a site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scherer, Carolynn P.; Bushlya, Anatoly V.; Efimenko, Vladimir F.; Ilyanstev, Anatoly; Regoushevsky, Victor I.

    2010-01-01

    The condition of a nuclear material control and accountability system (MC and A) and its individual components, as with any system combining technical elements and documentation, may be characterized through an aggregate of values for the various parameters that determine the system's ability to perform. The MC and A system's status may be functioning effectively, marginally or not functioning based on a summary of the values of the individual parameters. This work included a review of the following subsystems, MC and A and Detecting Material Losses, and their respective elements for the material control and accountability system: (a) Elements of the MC and A Subsystem - Information subsystem (Accountancy/Inventory), Measurement subsystem, Nuclear Material Access subsystem, including tamper-indicating device (TID) program, and Automated Information-gathering subsystem; (b) Elements for Detecting Nuclear Material Loses Subsystem - Inventory Differences, Shipper/receiver Differences, Confirmatory Measurements and differences with accounting data, and TID or Seal Violations. In order to detect the absence or loss of nuclear material there must be appropriate interactions among the elements and their respective subsystems from the list above. Additionally this work includes a review of regulatory requirements for the MC and A system component characteristics and criteria that support the evaluation of the performance of the listed components. The listed components had performance testing algorithms and procedures developed that took into consideration the regulatory criteria. The developed MC and A performance-testing procedures were the basis for a Guide for MC and A Performance Testing at the material balance areas (MBAs) of State Scientific Center of the Russian Federation - Institute for Physics and Power Engineering (SSC RF-IPPE).

  1. Permeation Testing of Materials With Chemical Agents or Simulants (Swatch Testing)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-05

    nerve agents, sarin (GB), soman (GD), and persistent nerve agent (VX). These procedures can also be applied to toxic industrial chemicals (TICs...garment, cap, clothing liner, mask, glove, footwear , etc. The swatch should be selected to be representative of the area of the material to be tested...solvent and the extract analyzed. This reduces the sensitivity but obviates problems arising from one-shot thermal desorption. c. NRT and real

  2. Thermo-hydro-mechanical tests of buffer material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pintado, X.; Hassan, Md. M.; Martikainen, J. [B and Tech Oy, Helsinki (Finland)

    2013-10-15

    MX-80 bentonite is the reference clay material for the buffer component planned to be used in the deep geological repository for the disposal of spent nuclear fuel in Finland. The buffer presents complex thermo-hydro-mechanical behavior which is modeled with different constitutive models for heat flow, water flow and stress-strain evolution in the buffer. Thermo, hydro and mechanical models need parameters to evaluate the THM-behavior. These modeling parameters were determined by performing series of laboratory experiments as follows: Water retention curve tests were performed on compacted bentonite samples, encompassing a range of initial dry density values from 1397 to 1718 kg/m{sup 3} as the initial water content was around of 5-8 %. The water retention curve was determined by imposing different suctions to the samples and the suctions were then checked using capacitive hygrometer and chilled mirror psychrometer. Oedometer tests were performed on compacted bentonite samples, encompassing a range of initial dry density values from 1590 to 1750 kg/m{sup 3} as the initial water content was around of 6 %. Samples were saturated with tap water, 35 or 70 g/L salt solutions. Infiltration tests were performed on compacted unsaturated bentonite samples, encompassing a range of initial dry density values from 1400 to 1720 kg/m{sup 3} as the initial water content was approximately between 4-7 %. Samples were saturated with tap water, 0.87, 35 or 70 g/L salt solutions. Tortuosity tests were performed on bentonite samples, encompassing a range of dry density values from 1460 to 1750 kg/m{sup 3} and the degree of saturation varied between 33-93 %. Thermal conductivity tests were performed on compacted bentonite samples, encompassing a range of dry density values from 1545 to 1715 kg/m{sup 3} and the degree of saturation varied between 31-88 %. The measurement was performed using a thermal needle probe. The general trend of all analyzed parameters was as expected when dry

  3. Thermo-hydro-mechanical tests of buffer material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pintado, X.; Hassan, Md. M.; Martikainen, J.

    2013-10-01

    MX-80 bentonite is the reference clay material for the buffer component planned to be used in the deep geological repository for the disposal of spent nuclear fuel in Finland. The buffer presents complex thermo-hydro-mechanical behavior which is modeled with different constitutive models for heat flow, water flow and stress-strain evolution in the buffer. Thermo, hydro and mechanical models need parameters to evaluate the THM-behavior. These modeling parameters were determined by performing series of laboratory experiments as follows: Water retention curve tests were performed on compacted bentonite samples, encompassing a range of initial dry density values from 1397 to 1718 kg/m 3 as the initial water content was around of 5-8 %. The water retention curve was determined by imposing different suctions to the samples and the suctions were then checked using capacitive hygrometer and chilled mirror psychrometer. Oedometer tests were performed on compacted bentonite samples, encompassing a range of initial dry density values from 1590 to 1750 kg/m 3 as the initial water content was around of 6 %. Samples were saturated with tap water, 35 or 70 g/L salt solutions. Infiltration tests were performed on compacted unsaturated bentonite samples, encompassing a range of initial dry density values from 1400 to 1720 kg/m 3 as the initial water content was approximately between 4-7 %. Samples were saturated with tap water, 0.87, 35 or 70 g/L salt solutions. Tortuosity tests were performed on bentonite samples, encompassing a range of dry density values from 1460 to 1750 kg/m 3 and the degree of saturation varied between 33-93 %. Thermal conductivity tests were performed on compacted bentonite samples, encompassing a range of dry density values from 1545 to 1715 kg/m 3 and the degree of saturation varied between 31-88 %. The measurement was performed using a thermal needle probe. The general trend of all analyzed parameters was as expected when dry density, water content, and

  4. Scoping corrosion tests on candidate waste package basket materials for the Yucca Mountain project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konynenburg, R.A. van; Curtis, P.G.; Summers, T.S.E.

    1998-03-01

    A scoping corrosion test was performed on candidate waste package basket materials. The corrosion medium was a pH-buffered solution of chemical species expected to be produced by radiolysis. The test was conducted at 90 C for 96 hours. Samples included aluminum-, copper-, stainless steel- and zirconium-based metallic materials and several ceramics, incorporating neutron-absorbing elements. Sample weight losses and solution chemical changes were measured. Both corrosion of the host materials and dissolution of the neutron-absorbing elements were studied. The ceramics and the zirconium-based materials underwent only minor corrosion. The stainless steel-based materials performed well except for a welded sample. The aluminum- and copper-based materials exhibited the highest corrosion rates. Boron dissolution depends on its chemical form. Boron oxide and many metal borides dissolve readily in acidic solutions while high-chromium borides and boron carbide, though thermodynamically unstable, exhibit little dissolution in short times. The results of solution chemical analyses were consistent with this. Gadolinium did not dissolve significantly from monazite, and hafnium showed little dissolution from a variety of host materials, in keeping with its low solubility

  5. Evaluation and comparison of multiple test methods, including real-time PCR, for Legionella detection in clinical specimens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Peci

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Legionella is a gram-negative bacterium that can cause Pontiac fever, a mild upper respiratory infection and Legionnaire’s disease, a more severe illness. We aimed to compare the performance of urine antigen, culture and PCR test methods and to determine if sputum is an alternative to the use of more invasive bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL. Data for this study included specimens tested for Legionella at PHOL from January 1, 2010 to April 30, 2014, as part of routine clinical testing. We found sensitivity of UAT compared to culture to be 87%, specificity 94.7%, positive predictive value (PPV 63.8% and negative predictive value (NPV 98.5%. Sensitivity of UAT compared to PCR was 74.7%, specificity 98.3%, PPV 77.7% and NPV 98.1%. Of 146 patients who had a Legionella positive result by PCR, only 66(45.2% also had a positive result by culture. Sensitivity for culture was the same using either sputum or BAL (13.6%; sensitivity for PCR was 10.3% for sputum and 12.8% for BAL. Both sputum and BAL yield similar results despite testing methods (Fisher Exact p-values=1.0, for each test. In summary, all test methods have inherent weaknesses in identifying Legionella; thereforemore than one testing method should be used. Obtaining a single specimen type from patients with pneumonia limits the ability to diagnose Legionella, particularly when urine is the specimen type submitted. Given ease of collection, and similar sensitivity to BAL, clinicians are encouraged to submit sputum in addition to urine when BAL submission is not practical, from patients being tested for Legionella.

  6. Audit of Trichomonas vaginalis test requesting by community referrers after a change from culture to molecular testing, including a cost analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bissessor, Liselle; Wilson, Janet; McAuliffe, Gary; Upton, Arlo

    2017-06-16

    Trichomonas vaginalis (TV) prevalence varies among different communities and peoples. The availability of robust molecular platforms for the detection of TV has advanced diagnosis; however, molecular tests are more costly than phenotypic methodologies, and testing all urogenital samples is costly. We recently replaced culture methods with the Aptima Trichomonas vaginalis nucleic acid amplification test on specific request and as reflex testing by the laboratory, and have audited this change. Data were collected from August 2015 (microbroth culture and microscopy) and August 2016 (Aptima TV assay) including referrer, testing volumes, results and test cost estimates. In August 2015, 10,299 vaginal swabs, and in August 2016, 2,189 specimens (urogenital swabs and urines), were tested. The positivity rate went from 0.9% to 5.3%, and overall more TV infections were detected in 2016. The number needed to test and cost for one positive TV result respectively was 111 and $902.55 in 2015, and 19 and $368.92 in 2016. Request volumes and positivity rates differed among referrers. The methodology change was associated with higher overall detection of TV, and reductions in the numbers needed to test/cost for one TV diagnosis. Our audit suggests that there is room for improvement with TV test requesting in our community.

  7. Extended automated separation techniques in destructive neutron activation analysis; application to various biological materials, including human tissues and blood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tjioe, P.S.; Goeij, J.J.M. de; Houtman, J.P.W.

    1976-09-01

    Neutron activation analysis may be performed as a multi-element and low-level technique for many important trace elements in biological materials, provided that post-irradiation chemical separations are applied. This paper describes a chemical separation consisting of automated procedures for destruction, distillation, and anion-chromatography. The system developed enables the determination of 14 trace elements in biological materials, viz. antimony, arsenic, bromine, cadmium, chromium, cobalt, copper, gold, iron, mercury, molybdenum, nickel, selenium, and zinc. The aspects of sample preparation, neutron irradiation, gamma-spectrum evaluation, and blank-value contribution are also discussed

  8. Recommendation to include fragrance mix 2 and hydroxyisohexyl 3-cyclohexene carboxaldehyde (Lyral) in the European baseline patch test series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruze, Magnus; Andersen, Klaus Ejner; Goossens, An

    2008-03-01

    The currently used fragrance mix in the European baseline patch test series (baseline series) fails to detect a substantial number of clinically relevant fragrance allergies. To investigate whether it is justified to include hydroxyisohexyl 3-cyclohexene carboxaldehyde (Lyral) and fragrance mix 2 containing hydroxyisohexyl 3-cyclohexene carboxaldehyde, citral, farnesol, coumarin, citronellol, and alpha-hexyl cinnamal in the European baseline patch test series. Survey of the literature on reported frequencies of contact allergy and allergic contact dermatitis from fragrance mix 2 and hydroxyisohexyl 3-cyclohexene carboxaldehyde (Lyral) as well as reported results of experimental provocation test. Fragrance mix 2 has been demonstrated to be a useful additional marker of fragrance allergy with contact allergy rates up to 5% when included in various national baseline patch test series. Of the fragrance substances present in fragrance mix 2, hydroxyisohexyl 3-cyclohexene carboxaldehyde is the most common sensitizer. Contact allergy rates between 1.5% and 3% have been reported for hydroxyisohexyl 3-cyclohexene carboxaldehyde in petrolatum (pet.) at 5% from various European centres when tested in consecutive dermatitis patients. From 2008, pet. preparations of fragrance mix 2 at 14% w/w (5.6 mg/cm(2)) and hydroxyisohexyl 3-cyclohexene carboxaldehyde at 5% w/w (2.0 mg/cm(2)) are recommended for inclusion in the baseline series. With the Finn Chamber technique, a dose of 20 mg pet. preparation is recommended. Whenever there is a positive reaction to fragrance mix 2, additional patch testing with the 6 ingredients, 5 if there are simultaneous positive reactions to hydroxyisohexyl 3-cyclohexene carboxaldehyde and fragrance mix 2, is recommended.

  9. Material test reactor fuel research at the BR2 reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dyck, Steven Van; Koonen, Edgar; Berghe, Sven van den [Institute for Nuclear Materials Science, SCK-CEN, Boeretang, Mol (Belgium)

    2012-03-15

    The construction of new, high performance material test reactor or the conversion of such reactors' core from high enriched uranium (HEU) to low enriched uranium (LEU) based fuel requires several fuel qualification steps. For the conversion of high performance reactors, high density dispersion or monolithic fuel types are being developed. The Uranium-Molybdenum fuel system has been selected as reference system for the qualification of LEU fuels. For reactors with lower performance characteristics, or as medium enriched fuel for high performance reactors, uranium silicide dispersion fuel is applied. However, on the longer term, the U-Mo based fuel types may offer a more efficient fuel alternative and-or an easier back-end solution with respect to the silicide based fuels. At the BR2 reactor of the Belgian nuclear research center, SCK-CEN in Mol, several types of fuel testing opportunities are present to contribute to such qualification process. A generic validation test for a selected fuel system is the irradiation of flat plates with representative dimensions for a fuel element. By flexible positioning and core loading, bounding irradiation conditions for fuel elements can be performed in a standard device in the BR2. For fuel element designs with curved plates, the element fabrication method compatibility of the fuel type can be addressed by incorporating a set of prototype fuel plates in a mixed driver fuel element of the BR2 reactor. These generic types of tests are performed directly in the primary coolant flow conditions of the BR2 reactor. The experiment control and interpretation is supported by detailed neutronic and thermal-hydraulic modeling of the experiments. Finally, the BR2 reactor offers the flexibility for irradiation of full size prototype fuel elements, as 200mm diameter irradiation channels are available. These channels allow the accommodation of various types of prototype fuel elements, eventually using a dedicated cooling loop to provide the

  10. Analysis of alternative transportation methods for radioactive materials shipments including the use of special trains for spent fuel and wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, D.R.; Luna, R.E.; Taylor, J.M.

    1978-01-01

    Two studies were completed which evaluate the environmental impact of radioactive material transport. The first was a generic study which evaluated all radioactive materials and all transportation modes; the second addressed spent fuel and fuel-cycle wastes shipped by truck, rail and barge. A portion of each of those studies dealing with the change in impact resulting from alternative shipping methods is presented in this paper. Alternatives evaluated in each study were mode shifts, operational constraints, and, in generic case, changes in material properties and package capabilities. Data for the analyses were obtained from a shipper survey and from projections of shipments that would occur in an equilibrium fuel cycle supporting one hundred 1000-MW(e) reactors. Population exposures were deduced from point source radiation formulae using separation distances derived for scenarios appropriate to each shipping mode and to each exposed population group. Fourteen alternatives were investigated for the generic impact case. All showed relatively minor changes in the overall radiological impact. Since the radioactive material transport is estimated to be fewer than 3 latent cancer fatalities (LCF) for each shipment year (compared to some 300,000 yearly cancer fatalities or 5000 LCF's calculated for background radiation using the same radiological effects model), a 15% decrease caused by shifting from passenger air to cargo air is a relatively small effect. Eleven alternatives were considered for the fuel cycle/special train study, but only one produced a reduction in total special train baseline LCF's (.047) that was larger than 5%

  11. Recent progress and tests of radiation resistant impregnation materials for Nb3Sn coils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bossert, R.; Krave, S.; Ambrosio, G.; Andreev, N.; Chlachidze, G.; Nobrega, A.; Novitski, I.; Yu, M.; Zlobin, A. V.

    2014-01-01

    Fermilab is collaborating with Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) and Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) (US-LARP collaboration) to develop a large-aperture Nb3Sn superconducting quadrupole for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) luminosity upgrade. An important component of this work is the development of materials that are sufficiently radiation resistant for use in critical areas of the upgrade. This paper describes recent progress in characterization of materials, including the baseline CTD101K epoxy, cyanate ester blends, and Matrimid 5292, a bismaleimide-based system. Structural properties of "ten stacks" of cable impregnated with these materials are tested at room and cryogenic temperatures and compared to the baseline CT-101K. Experience with potting 1 and 2 meter long coils with Matrimid 5292 are described. Test results of a single 1-m coil impregnated with Matrimid 5292 are reported and compared to similar coils impregnated with the traditional epoxy.

  12. Recent progress and tests of radiation resistant impregnation materials for Nb3Sn coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bossert, R.; Krave, S.; Ambrosio, G.; Andreev, N.; Chlachidze, G.; Nobrega, A.; Novitski, I.; Yu, M.; Zlobin, A. V.

    2014-01-01

    Fermilab is collaborating with Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) and Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) (US-LARP collaboration) to develop a large-aperture Nb 3 Sn superconducting quadrupole for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) luminosity upgrade. An important component of this work is the development of materials that are sufficiently radiation resistant for use in critical areas of the upgrade. This paper describes recent progress in characterization of materials, including the baseline CTD101K epoxy, cyanate ester blends, and Matrimid 5292, a bismaleimide-based system. Structural properties of “ten stacks” of cable impregnated with these materials are tested at room and cryogenic temperatures and compared to the baseline CT-101K. Experience with potting 1 and 2 meter long coils with Matrimid 5292 are described. Test results of a single 1-m coil impregnated with Matrimid 5292 are reported and compared to similar coils impregnated with the traditional epoxy

  13. Thermophysical and Optical Properties of Materials Considered for Use on the LDSD Test Vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redmond, Matthew; Mastropietro, A.J.

    2015-01-01

    In June 2014, the first of multiple flights in the Low Density Supersonic Decelerator (LDSD) technology development program took place and successfully demonstrated a Supersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerator (SIAD) in Mars-like conditions. Although the primary goal of the technology program was the development of new decelerators for landing heavier payloads on Mars, the low-cost thermal design of the test vehicle was only possible through the innovative use of a combination of both commercial off the shelf (COTS) and aerospace grade materials. As a result, numerous thermophysical and optical property measurements were undertaken to characterize material candidates before the final material selection was made. This paper presents thermophysical and optical property measurements performed over the course of the LDSD test vehicle development, including those not ultimately selected for use on the vehicle. These properties are compared and contrasted with the existing measurements available in previous literature.

  14. The technology development for surveillance test of RPV materials 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Kee Ok; Lee, Sam Lai; Kim, Byoung Chul; Choi, Sun Pil; Choi, Kwen Jai

    1998-12-01

    Irradiation-induced changes in mechanical properties and magnetic parameters were measured and compared to explore possible correlations for Mn-Mo-Ni low alloy steel surveillance specimens which were irradiated to a neutron fluence of 2.4 x 10 1 9n/cm 2 (E≥1.0 MeV) in a typical pressurized water reactor environment at about 288 deg C. For mechanical property parameters, microvickers hardness, tensile and Charpy impact test were performed and Barkhausen Noise(BN) amplitude, coercivity, maximum induction were measured for magnetic parameters, respectively. Results of mechanical property measurements showed an increase in yield and tensil strength, microvickers hardness 41J indexed RT NDT and a decrease in upper shelf energy irrespective of base and weld metals. In the case of magnetic measurements, it is found that magnetic remanence, BN amplitude, BN energy have dropped significantly but coercivity has increased rapidly after irradiation. For isothermally heat treated condition of irradiated specimen, BN energy has increased while Vickers microhardness has decreased. Results of BNE and Vickers microhardness are reversed to the results on irradiated condition. All these consistent changes in magnetic parameter and Vickers microhardness measurement, which are thought to be resulted from the interaction between irradiation-induced defects and dislocation, and magnetic domain, respectively, show a possibility that magnetic measurement may be used to the evaluation of material degradation and recovery due to neutron irradiation and heat treatment, respectively, if a relevant large database is prepared. (author). 49 refs., 7 tabs., 23 figs

  15. Shear test on viscoelastic granular material using Contact Dynamics simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quezada, Juan Carlos; Sagnol, Loba; Chazallon, Cyrille

    2017-06-01

    By means of 3D contact dynamic simulations, the behavior of a viscoelastic granular material under shear loading is investigated. A viscoelastic fluid phase surrounding the solid particles is simulated by a contact model acting between them. This contact law was implemented in the LMGC90 software, based on the Burgers model. This model is able to simulate also the effect of creep relaxation. To validate the proposed contact model, several direct shear tests were performed, experimentally and numerically using the Leutner device. The numerical samples were created using spheres with two particle size distribution, each one identified for two layers from a road structure. Our results show a reasonable agreement between experimental and numerical data regarding the strain-stress evolution curves and the stress levels measured at failure. The proposed model can be used to simulate the mechanical behavior of multi-layer road structure and to study the influence of traffic on road deformation, cracking and particles pull-out induced by traffic loading.

  16. Bleed water testing program for controlled low strength material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langton, C.A.

    1996-01-01

    Bleed water measurements for two Controlled Low Strength Material (CLSM) mixes were conducted to provide engineering data for the Tank 20F closure activities. CLSM Mix 1 contained 150 pounds of cement per cubic yard whereas CLSM Mix 2 contained 50 pounds per cub yard. SRS currently used CLSM Mix 2 for various applications. Bleed water percentages and generation rates were measured along with flow and compressive strength. This information will be used to select a mix design for the Tank 20F closure activities and to establish the engineering requirements, such as, lift height, time required between lifts and quantity of bleed water to be removed from the tank during the placement activities. Mix 1 is recommended for placement within Tank 20F because it has better flow characteristics, less segregation, lower percentage of bleed water and slightly higher strength. Optimization of Mix 1 was beyond the scope of this study. However, further testing of thickening additives, such as clays (bentonite), sodium silicate or fine silicas maybe useful for decreasing or eliminating bleed water

  17. Heat resistance study of basalt fiber material via mechanical tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Y. Q.; Jia, C.; Meng, L.; Li, X. H.

    2017-12-01

    This paper focuses on the study of the relationship between the fracture strength of basalt rovings and temperature. Strong stretching performance of the rovings has been tested after the treatment at fixed temperatures but different heating time and then the fracture strength of the rovings exposed to the heating at different temperatures and cooled in different modes investigated. Finally, the fracture strength of the basalt material after the heat treatment was studied. The results showed that the room-temperature strength tends to decrease with an increase of the heat treatment time at 250 °C, but it has the local maximum after 2h heating. And the basalt rovings strength increased after the heat treatment up to 200 °C. It was 16.7 percent higher than the original strength. The strength depends not only on the temperature and duration of the heating, but also on the cooling mode. The value of the strength measured after cold water cooling was less by 6.3% compared with an ambient air cooling mode. The room-temperature breaking strength of the rovings heated at 200 °C and 100 °C for 2 hours each increased by about 14.6% with respect to unpretreated basalt rovings.

  18. Evaluation of the anti-inflammatory actions of various functional food materials including glucosamine on synovial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamagishi, Yoshie; Someya, Akimasa; Imai, Kensuke; Nagao, Junji; Nagaoka, Isao

    2017-08-01

    The anti-inflammatory actions of glucosamine (GlcN) on arthritic disorders involve the suppression of inflammatory mediator production from synovial cells. GlcN has also been reported to inhibit the activation of the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway. The present study aimed to determine the cooperative and anti‑inflammatory actions of functional food materials and evaluated the production of interleukin (IL)‑8 and phosphorylation of p38 MAPK in IL-1β-activated synovial cells, incubated with the combination of GlcN and various functional food materials containing L‑methionine (Met), undenatured type II collagen (UC‑II), chondroitin sulfate (CS), methylsulfonylmethane (MSM) and agaro-oligosaccharide (AO). The results indicated that Met, UC‑II, CS, MSM and AO slightly or moderately suppressed the IL-1β-stimulated IL‑8 production by human synovial MH7A cells. The same compounds further decreased the IL‑8 level lowered by GlcN. Similarly, they slightly suppressed the phosphorylation level of p38 MAPK and further reduced the phosphorylation level lowered by GlcN. These observations suggest a possibility that these functional food materials exert an anti‑inflammatory action (inhibition of IL‑8 production) in combination with GlcN by cooperatively suppressing the p38 MAPK signaling (phosphorylation).

  19. Toxicity testing of polymer materials for dialysis equipment: reconsidering in vivo testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauer, U G; Liebsch, M; Kolar, R

    2000-01-01

    In fulfilment of the aims of the European Union Biocidal Directive (Directive 98/8/EC), Technical Guidance Documents are currently being compiled. Part I of these Technical Guidance Documents covers data requirements for active substances and biocidal products. The Three Rs principle has been applied in certain parts of the toxicity and ecotoxicity testing scheme for pesticides, such as testing for acute oral toxicity, skin and eye irritation, skin sensitisation, and dermal absorption. Further recommendations on how to proceed with regard to the continuing replacement, reduction and refinement of animal experiments in this field of regulatory testing are included for consideration. In this context, besides stressing the necessity to validate and accept further alternatives, emphasis is placed on providing the possibility of waiving unnecessary tests and on the continuous evaluation of whether certain tests are needed at all. 2000 FRAME.

  20. ESP – Data from Restarted Life Tests of Various Silicon Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, Jim

    2010-10-06

    Current funding has allowed the restart of testing of various silicone materials placed in Life Tests or Aging Studies from past efforts. Some of these materials have been in test since 1982, with no testing for approximately 10 years, until funding allowed the restart in FY97. Charts for the various materials at different thickness, compression, and temperature combinations illustrate trends for the load-bearing properties of the materials.

  1. Materials for the field test - students' attitudes to nuclear power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffmann, L.; Kattmann, U.; Lucht, H.; Spada, H.

    1975-01-01

    This working paper contains all the materials developed for and used in the field test of 'Student Attitudes toward Atomic Power Stations'. This research is a component of a larger project called 'Attitudes and Attitudes Change with Regard to Problems of Energy Supply and their Consequences for our Environment'. A central aim of this project is the development of instrumental strategies enabling the student to build up in this field a critically reflective and active behavior and attitudes based on sound problem consciousness. These instrumental strategies are derived from theories of social, learning and environmental psychology. A concrete result of these efforts are the materials of the field test mentioned above. They include: a) The draft of an instructional unit 'Atomic Power Stations - Prosperity or Disaster' with - a booklet on the subject matter for students and teachers - a paper on the contents of the instructional unit and their sequence - information for the students concerning the aims of the investigation - working materials for the students - reading materials for the teachers informing them about the proposed instructional strategies based on the psychological theories: (1) model-learning and the structuring of knowledge, (2) how to activate and motivate students, (3) the stabilization of attitudes and (4) small group work. b) Instruments for testing and observation. These instruments were used within a criterion-oriented evaluation and for a test of the effects of the different proposed items used in the instruction. (orig./HP) [de

  2. Improving students’ creative thinking skill through local material-based experiment (LMBE) on protein qualitative test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Supriyanti, F. M. T.; Halimatul, H. S.

    2018-05-01

    This study aims to enhance chemistry students’ creative thinking skills using material from local resources on protein qualitative test experiment (LMBE). In this study, a quasi experiment method using one group pretest-postest non-equivalen control group design was carried out on the effectiveness of local material-based experiment approach. The data was collected using the test consists of five assay test and student work sheet (LKM). The effectiveness of the local material-based experiment was tested by means of percentage of normalized gain and score percentage of students’ worksheet. Comparison of creative thinking skills pretest and postest scores showed that the implementation of local material- based experiment (LMBE) enhanced students’s creative thinking skills in experiment class with the value of normalized gain (=0,77) at high category, while in control class reached to =0,44 at medium category. In addition, the LKM shown the enhancements of all aspect of creative thinking skills, including fluency, flexibility, and elaboration skills with the score of in experiment class are 0.79; 0.75; and 0.87 at high category, respectively. In contrast, the only the elaboration skill of control group was improved at high category (=0.76), while fluency and flexibility indicators enhanced at medium category (=0.48 and 0.56, respectively).

  3. Innovative techniques for the production of energetic radicals for lunar materials processing including photogeneration via concentrated solar energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osborn, D. E.; Lynch, D. C.; Fozzolari, R.

    1991-01-01

    A technique for photo generation of radicals is discussed that can be used in the recovery of oxygen and metals from extraterrestrial resources. The concept behind this work was to examine methods whereby radicals can be generated and used in the processing of refractory materials. In that regard, the focus is on the use of sunlight. Sunlight provides useful energy for processing in the forms of both thermal and quantum energy. A number of experiments were conducted in the chlorination of metals with and without the aid of UV and near UV light. The results of some of those experiments are discussed.

  4. Toxicity of Uranium Adsorbent Materials using the Microtox Toxicity Test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jiyeon [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Jeters, Robert T. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Gill, Gary A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Kuo, Li-Jung [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Bonheyo, George T. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-10-01

    The Marine Sciences Laboratory at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory evaluated the toxicity of a diverse range of natural and synthetic materials used to extract uranium from seawater. The uranium adsorbent materials are being developed as part of the U. S. Department of Energy, Office of Nuclear Energy, Fuel Resources Program. The goal of this effort was to identify whether deployment of a farm of these materials into the marine environment would have any toxic effects on marine organisms.

  5. What is materialism? Testing two dominant perspectives on materialism in the marketing literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manchiraju Srikant

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Materialism is defined as the importance an individual attaches to worldly possessions, which has been considered as an important construct in consumer behavior and marketing literature. There are two dominant perspectives on individual materialism in the marketing literature that focus on (1 personality traits or (2 individual personal values. However, several scholars have questioned the aforementioned materialism conceptualizations. Therefore, the present study directly compares the constructs of personality materialism and value materialism. Structural equation modeling was employed to address the following issues: (1 what are the key conceptual dimensions of materialism, (2 how much do they overlap, and (3 what is their discriminant validity in predicting outcomes linked to materialism. We suggest these two dominant perspectives on individual materialism are two distinct constructs, as they shared only 21 percent of common variance. Furthermore, we stress the multi-faceted nature of materialism, with an emphasis on future research directions related to materialism in marketing.

  6. FBR structural material test facility in flowing sodium environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shanmugasundaram, M.; Kumar, Hemant; Ravi, S.

    2016-01-01

    In Fast Breeder Reactor (FBR), components such as Control and Safety Rod Drive Mechanism (CSRDM), Diverse Safety Rod Drive Mechanism (DSRDM), Transfer arm and primary sodium pumps etc., are experiencing friction and wear between the moving parts in contact with liquid sodium at high temperature. Hence, it is essential to evaluate the friction and wear behaviour to validate the design of components. In addition, the above core structural reactor components such as core cover plate, control plugs etc., undergoes thermal striping which is random thermal cycling induced by flow stream resulting from the mixing of non isothermal jets near that component. This leads to development of surface cracks and assist in crack growth which in turn may lead to failure of the structural component. Further, high temperature components are often subjected to low cycle fatigue due to temperature gradient induced cyclic thermal stresses caused by start-ups, shutdowns and transients. Also steady state operation at elevated temperature introduces creep and the combination of creep and fatigue leads to creep-fatigue interactions. Therefore, resistance to low cycle fatigue, creep and creep-fatigue are important considerations in the design of FBR components. Liquid sodium is used as coolant and hence the study of the above properties in dynamic sodium are equally important. In view of the above, facility for materials testing in sodium (INSOT) has been constructed and in operation for conducting the experiments such as tribology, thermal stripping, low cycle fatigue, creep and creep-fatigue interaction etc. The salient features of the operation and maintenance of creep and fatigue loops of INSOT facility are discussed in detail. (author)

  7. NASA GRC's High Pressure Burner Rig Facility and Materials Test Capabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, R. Craig

    1999-01-01

    The High Pressure Burner Rig (HPBR) at NASA Glenn Research Center is a high-velocity. pressurized combustion test rig used for high-temperature environmental durability studies of advanced materials and components. The facility burns jet fuel and air in controlled ratios, simulating combustion gas chemistries and temperatures that are realistic to those in gas turbine engines. In addition, the test section is capable of simulating the pressures and gas velocities representative of today's aircraft. The HPBR provides a relatively inexpensive. yet sophisticated means for researchers to study the high-temperature oxidation of advanced materials. The facility has the unique capability of operating under both fuel-lean and fuel-rich gas mixtures. using a fume incinerator to eliminate any harmful byproduct emissions (CO, H2S) of rich-burn operation. Test samples are easily accessible for ongoing inspection and documentation of weight change, thickness, cracking, and other metrics. Temperature measurement is available in the form of both thermocouples and optical pyrometery. and the facility is equipped with quartz windows for observation and video taping. Operating conditions include: (1) 1.0 kg/sec (2.0 lbm/sec) combustion and secondary cooling airflow capability: (2) Equivalence ratios of 0.5- 1.0 (lean) to 1.5-2.0 (rich), with typically 10% H2O vapor pressure: (3) Gas temperatures ranging 700-1650 C (1300-3000 F): (4) Test pressures ranging 4-12 atmospheres: (5) Gas flow velocities ranging 10-30 m/s (50-100) ft/sec.: and (6) Cyclic and steady-state exposure capabilities. The facility has historically been used to test coupon-size materials. including metals and ceramics. However complex-shaped components have also been tested including cylinders, airfoils, and film-cooled end walls. The facility has also been used to develop thin-film temperature measurement sensors.

  8. Health assessment of gasoline and fuel oxygenate vapors: generation and characterization of test materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henley, Michael; Letinski, Daniel J; Carr, John; Caro, Mario L; Daughtrey, Wayne; White, Russell

    2014-11-01

    In compliance with the Clean Air Act regulations for fuel and fuel additive registration, the petroleum industry, additive manufacturers, and oxygenate manufacturers have conducted comparative toxicology testing on evaporative emissions of gasoline alone and gasoline containing fuel oxygenates. To mimic real world exposures, a generation method was developed that produced test material similar in composition to the re-fueling vapor from an automotive fuel tank at near maximum in-use temperatures. Gasoline vapor was generated by a single-step distillation from a 1000-gallon glass-lined kettle wherein approximately 15-23% of the starting material was slowly vaporized, separated, condensed and recovered as test article. This fraction was termed vapor condensate (VC) and was prepared for each of the seven test materials, namely: baseline gasoline alone (BGVC), or gasoline plus an ether (G/MTBE, G/ETBE, G/TAME, or G/DIPE), or gasoline plus an alcohol (G/EtOH or G/TBA). The VC test articles were used for the inhalation toxicology studies described in the accompanying series of papers in this journal. These studies included evaluations of subchronic toxicity, neurotoxicity, immunotoxicity, genotoxicity, reproductive and developmental toxicity. Results of these studies will be used for comparative risk assessments of gasoline and gasoline/oxygenate blends by the US Environmental Protection Agency. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Engineering Analysis of Intermediate Loop and Process Heat Exchanger Requirements to Include Configuration Analysis and Materials Needs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    T.M. Lillo; R.L. Williamson; T.R. Reed; C.B. Davis; D.M. Ginosar

    2005-09-01

    The need to locate advanced hydrogen production facilities a finite distance away from a nuclear power source necessitates the need for an intermediate heat transport loop (IHTL). This IHTL must not only efficiently transport energy over distances up to 500 meters but must also be capable of operating at high temperatures (>850oC) for many years. High temperature, long term operation raises concerns of material strength, creep resistance and general material stability (corrosion resistance). IHTL design is currently in the initial stages. Many questions remain to be answered before intelligent design can begin. The report begins to look at some of the issues surrounding the main components of an IHTL. Specifically, a stress analysis of a compact heat exchanger design under expected operating conditions is reported. Also the results of a thermal analysis performed on two ITHL pipe configurations for different heat transport fluids are presented. The configurations consist of separate hot supply and cold return legs as well as annular design in which the hot fluid is carried in an inner pipe and the cold return fluids travels in the opposite direction in the annular space around the hot pipe. The effects of insulation configurations on pipe configuration performance are also reported. Finally, a simple analysis of two different process heat exchanger designs, one a tube in shell type and the other a compact or microchannel reactor are evaluated in light of catalyst requirements. Important insights into the critical areas of research and development are gained from these analyses, guiding the direction of future areas of research.

  10. Including osteoprotegerin and collagen IV in a score-based blood test for liver fibrosis increases diagnostic accuracy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosselut, Nelly; Taibi, Ludmia; Guéchot, Jérôme; Zarski, Jean-Pierre; Sturm, Nathalie; Gelineau, Marie-Christine; Poggi, Bernard; Thoret, Sophie; Lasnier, Elisabeth; Baudin, Bruno; Housset, Chantal; Vaubourdolle, Michel

    2013-01-16

    Noninvasive methods for liver fibrosis evaluation in chronic liver diseases have been recently developed, i.e. transient elastography (Fibroscan™) and blood tests (Fibrometer®, Fibrotest®, and Hepascore®). In this study, we aimed to design a new score in chronic hepatitis C (CHC) by selecting blood markers in a large panel and we compared its diagnostic performance with those of other noninvasive methods. Sixteen blood tests were performed in 306 untreated CHC patients included in a multicenter prospective study (ANRS HC EP 23 Fibrostar) using METAVIR histological fibrosis stage as reference. The new score was constructed by non linear regression using the most accurate biomarkers. Five markers (alpha-2-macroglobulin, apolipoprotein-A1, AST, collagen IV and osteoprotegerin) were included in the new function called Coopscore©. Using the Obuchowski Index, Coopscore© shows higher diagnostic performances than for Fibrometer®, Fibrotest®, Hepascore® and Fibroscan™ in CHC. Association between Fibroscan™ and Coopscore© might avoid 68% of liver biopsies for the diagnosis of significant fibrosis. Coopscore© provides higher accuracy than other noninvasive methods for the diagnosis of liver fibrosis in CHC. The association of Coopscore© with Fibroscan™ increases its predictive value. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Thermal imaging during ballistic testing of armour materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carton, E.P.; Roebroeks, G.H.J.J.

    2013-01-01

    During the interaction between a projectile and a target material the kinetic energy of the projectile is transferred into elastic and plastic deformation of both the projectile and target materials. Using a rigid penetrator the loss in kinetic energy is fully converted into energy absorbed by the

  12. Comparison and clinical utility evaluation of four multiple allergen simultaneous tests including two newly introduced fully automated analyzers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Hoon Rim

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: We compared the diagnostic performances of two newly introduced fully automated multiple allergen simultaneous tests (MAST analyzers with two conventional MAST assays. Methods: The serum samples from a total of 53 and 104 patients were tested for food panels and inhalant panels, respectively, in four analyzers including AdvanSure AlloScreen (LG Life Science, Korea, AdvanSure Allostation Smart II (LG Life Science, PROTIA Allergy-Q (ProteomeTech, Korea, and RIDA Allergy Screen (R-Biopharm, Germany. We compared not only the total agreement percentages but also positive propensities among four analyzers. Results: Evaluation of AdvanSure Allostation Smart II as upgraded version of AdvanSure AlloScreen revealed good concordance with total agreement percentages of 93.0% and 92.2% in food and inhalant panel, respectively. Comparisons of AdvanSure Allostation Smart II or PROTIA Allergy-Q with RIDA Allergy Screen also showed good concordance performance with positive propensities of two new analyzers for common allergens (Dermatophagoides farina and Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus. The changes of cut-off level resulted in various total agreement percentage fluctuations among allergens by different analyzers, although current cut-off level of class 2 appeared to be generally suitable. Conclusions: AdvanSure Allostation Smart II and PROTIA Allergy-Q presented favorable agreement performances with RIDA Allergy Screen, although positive propensities were noticed in common allergens. Keywords: Multiple allergen simultaneous test, Automated analyzer

  13. Baseline Assessment of 25-Hydroxyvitamin D Reference Material and Proficiency Testing/External Quality Assurance Material Commutability: A Vitamin D Standardization Program Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phinney, Karen W; Sempos, Christopher T; Tai, Susan S-C; Camara, Johanna E; Wise, Stephen A; Eckfeldt, John H; Hoofnagle, Andrew N; Carter, Graham D; Jones, Julia; Myers, Gary L; Durazo-Arvizu, Ramon; Miller, W Greg; Bachmann, Lorin M; Young, Ian S; Pettit, Juanita; Caldwell, Grahame; Liu, Andrew; Brooks, Stephen P J; Sarafin, Kurtis; Thamm, Michael; Mensink, Gert B M; Busch, Markus; Rabenberg, Martina; Cashman, Kevin D; Kiely, Mairead; Galvin, Karen; Zhang, Joy Y; Kinsella, Michael; Oh, Kyungwon; Lee, Sun-Wha; Jung, Chae L; Cox, Lorna; Goldberg, Gail; Guberg, Kate; Meadows, Sarah; Prentice, Ann; Tian, Lu; Brannon, Patsy M; Lucas, Robyn M; Crump, Peter M; Cavalier, Etienne; Merkel, Joyce; Betz, Joseph M

    2017-09-01

    The Vitamin D Standardization Program (VDSP) coordinated a study in 2012 to assess the commutability of reference materials and proficiency testing/external quality assurance materials for total 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] in human serum, the primary indicator of vitamin D status. A set of 50 single-donor serum samples as well as 17 reference and proficiency testing/external quality assessment materials were analyzed by participating laboratories that used either immunoassay or LC-MS methods for total 25(OH)D. The commutability test materials included National Institute of Standards and Technology Standard Reference Material 972a Vitamin D Metabolites in Human Serum as well as materials from the College of American Pathologists and the Vitamin D External Quality Assessment Scheme. Study protocols and data analysis procedures were in accordance with Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute guidelines. The majority of the test materials were found to be commutable with the methods used in this commutability study. These results provide guidance for laboratories needing to choose appropriate reference materials and select proficiency or external quality assessment programs and will serve as a foundation for additional VDSP studies.

  14. Field tests on migration of TRU-nuclide, (2). Migration test for engineered barrier materials in aerated soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maeda, Toshikatsu; Tanaka, Tadao; Mukai, Masayuki

    2003-01-01

    Field tests on migration of radionuclides for engineered barrier materials such as bentonite and cementitious materials were performed. The tests were run under both wet conditions with artificial rainfall and dry conditions with natural rainfall. Laboratory experiments such as batch adsorption tests were also conducted to analyze the result of field test. The results of field tests agreed with the predicted moisture conditions and the migration behaviors observed at the laboratory experiment that is reported so far. For bentonite material, the movements of the tracer were calculated using known information such as the results of batch sorption tests and migration mechanism. Comparing the result of field test and calculations, it is suggested that tracer migration behavior in bentonite material in field can be evaluated quantitatively by the known migration mechanism and the results of laboratory experiments such as batch sorption test. (author)

  15. In-plant test using process monitoring data for nuclear material accounting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, B.W.; Fager, J.E.

    1982-11-01

    A test of daily material accounting is being conducted for the NRC as part of a continuing program to estimate the effectiveness of using process monitoring data to enhance strategic special nuclear material accounting in fuel facilities. The test is being conducted at a uranium scrap recovery facility. The purpose is to develop and test procedures for resolving anomalies in material loss indicators. This report describes the results of the first test campaign, in which the emphasis was to characterize the daily material accounting system, test generic resolution procedures, and identify specific conditions that result in anomalies in material loss indicators

  16. Defect detection in conducting materials using eddy current testing techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brauer Hartmut

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Lorentz force eddy current testing (LET is a novel nondestructive testing technique which can be applied preferably to the identification of internal defects in nonmagnetic moving conductors. The LET is compared (similar testing conditions with the classical eddy current testing (ECT. Numerical FEM simulations have been performed to analyze the measurements as well as the identification of internal defects in nonmagnetic conductors. The results are compared with measurements to test the feasibility of defect identification. Finally, the use of LET measurements to estimate of the electrical conductors under test are described as well.

  17. Long term test of buffer material at the Aespoe HRL, LOT project. Final report on the A0 test parcel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karnland, Ola; Olsson, Siv; Sanden, Torbjoern; Faelth, Billy; Jansson, Mats; Eriksen, Trygve E.; Svaerdstroem, Kjell; Rosborg, Bo; Muurinen, Arto

    2011-02-01

    In the Swedish repository concept for nuclear waste (KBS-3 concept), the spent nuclear fuel will be stored in copper canisters surrounded by compacted bentonite. The decaying power of the fuel will increase the temperature in the repository which, in combination with the uptake of ground-water, could be expected to produce minor mineralogical changes in the bentonite. The ongoing LOT test series at the Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory are focused on identifying and quantifying any mineralogical alterations in the bentonite exposed to typical repository-like conditions. Further, buffer-related processes concerning copper corrosion, cation transport, and bacterial survival/activity are studied. In total, the LOT project includes seven test parcels, which contain a central Cu-tube surrounded by cylindrical bentonite blocks to a total diameter of 30 cm as well as temperature, total pressure, water pressure and humidity sensors. In each test parcel, an electrical heater placed inside the copper tube is used to simulate the heat generation from the decaying spent fuel. Three test parcels (S1 to S3) have been exposed to standard KBS-3 conditions (maximum temperature below 100 deg C) and three parcels (A1 to A3) to adverse conditions (maximum temperature below ∼140 deg C). Both the standard and the adverse test series include short term tests (1 to 2 years), medium term tests (> 5 years) and long term tests (> 10 years). The present report concerns an additional short term test, thereby the designation A0, which was exposed to adverse conditions for approximately 1.5 years. Cu-coupons, 134 Cs and 57 Co tracers and specific chemical agents were placed in the bentonite at defined positions. After field exposure, the entire test parcel was released from the rock by overlapping percussion drilling and wire sawing. The parcel was lifted and divided at the test site and the bentonite material was sampled for specified analyses. The main aspects of the various tests and analyses may

  18. Long term test of buffer material at the Aespoe HRL, LOT project. Final report on the A0 test parcel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karnland, Ola; Olsson, Siv; Sanden, Torbjoern; Faelth, Billy (Clay Technology AB, Lund (Sweden)); Jansson, Mats; Eriksen, Trygve E.; Svaerdstroem, Kjell (KTH Royal Inst. of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden)); Rosborg, Bo (Studsvik AB, Nykoeping (Sweden); Rosborg Consulting, Nykoeping (Sweden)); Muurinen, Arto (VTT, Espoo (Finland))

    2011-02-15

    In the Swedish repository concept for nuclear waste (KBS-3 concept), the spent nuclear fuel will be stored in copper canisters surrounded by compacted bentonite. The decaying power of the fuel will increase the temperature in the repository which, in combination with the uptake of ground-water, could be expected to produce minor mineralogical changes in the bentonite. The ongoing LOT test series at the Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory are focused on identifying and quantifying any mineralogical alterations in the bentonite exposed to typical repository-like conditions. Further, buffer-related processes concerning copper corrosion, cation transport, and bacterial survival/activity are studied. In total, the LOT project includes seven test parcels, which contain a central Cu-tube surrounded by cylindrical bentonite blocks to a total diameter of 30 cm as well as temperature, total pressure, water pressure and humidity sensors. In each test parcel, an electrical heater placed inside the copper tube is used to simulate the heat generation from the decaying spent fuel. Three test parcels (S1 to S3) have been exposed to standard KBS-3 conditions (maximum temperature below 100 deg C) and three parcels (A1 to A3) to adverse conditions (maximum temperature below approx140 deg C). Both the standard and the adverse test series include short term tests (1 to 2 years), medium term tests (> 5 years) and long term tests (> 10 years). The present report concerns an additional short term test, thereby the designation A0, which was exposed to adverse conditions for approximately 1.5 years. Cu-coupons, 134Cs and 57Co tracers and specific chemical agents were placed in the bentonite at defined positions. After field exposure, the entire test parcel was released from the rock by overlapping percussion drilling and wire sawing. The parcel was lifted and divided at the test site and the bentonite material was sampled for specified analyses. The main aspects of the various tests and analyses

  19. Materials Challenges and Testing for Supply of Energy and Resources

    CERN Document Server

    Bollinghaus, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    One major goal of the World Materials Research Institute Forum - WMRIF is to promote young scientists in the field of materials science and engineering. To enhance the international knowledge exchange between young postdoctoral scientists all over the world, WMRIF meanwhile regularly organizes joint workshops among the member institutes. These workshops also represent an increasingly appreciated platform to get known to each other and to build co-operations. For such workshops, various topics are selected, pointing to future perspectives and challenges in the field of Materials Science and Eng

  20. Thermal Response of UHMWPE Materials in a Flash Flame Test Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-11-13

    protection. The UHMWPE fabric immediately began disintegrating during the flash flame exposure. During the test, one end of the UHMWPE fabric...UHMWPE material after the test. There were places where the fabric material appeared to have melted and re-solidified, creating areas of solid plastic ...and Observations The midscale test results showed that any direct flame on the UHMWPE materials will cause rapid disintegration of the material

  1. Developing Raman spectroscopy for the nondestructive testing of composite materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-08-01

    The proposed research will develop the application of Raman Spectroscopy as a nondestructive evaluation tool for the condition assessment of carbon fiber composites. Composite materials are increasingly being used in engineered structures and compone...

  2. Analysis of the qualification test standards for small radioactive material shipping packages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McClure, J.D.

    1978-01-01

    The study compares the severity of the existing regulatory standards which are used to license radioactive material (RAM) shipping packages with the severity of transportation accidents. The basic findings of the study indicate that the present regulatory standards provide significantly higher levels of protection for surface transportation modes (truck, rail) than for RAM packages shipped by aircraft. It was also determined that crush can occur in all of the transport modes and is not presently included in existing regulations for accident conditions. Test proposals are included for the surface transport mode (truck, rail) and the air transport mode

  3. A materials test system for static compression at elevated temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korellis, J. S.; Steinhaus, C. A.; Totten, J. J.

    1992-06-01

    This report documents modifications to our existing computer-controlled compression testing system to allow elevated temperature testing in an evacuated environment. We have adopted an 'inverse' design configuration where the evacuated test volume is located within the induction heating coil, eliminating the expense and minimizing the evacuation time of a much larger traditional vacuum chamber.

  4. Testing of porous materials using ion beam techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szilagyi, E.; Asrama, M.; Paszti, F.; Battistig, G.; Hajnal, Z.

    1999-01-01

    Porous materials were examined by backscattering spectrometry and oxygen resonance measurements. The material was a porous silicon (PS) sample. The BS data were evaluated by simulation, using the RBX program, and a comparison was made with measured data. The PS sample was also investigated using the 16 O(α,α) 16 O reaction, and the resonance spectra were evaluated. The data yielded useful information on porosity, mean pore diameter, mean pore distance, and structure ordering. (R.P.)

  5. Physical test report to drop test of a 9975 radioactive material shipping packaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blanton, P.S.

    1997-01-01

    This report presents the drop test results for the 9975 radioactive material shipping package being dropped 30 feet onto a unyielding surface followed by a 40-inch puncture pin drop. The purpose of these drops was to show that the package lid would remain attached to the drum. The 30-foot drop was designed to weaken the lid closure lug while still maintaining maximum extension of the lugs from the drum surface. This was accomplished by angling the drum approximately 30 degrees from horizontal in an inverted position. In this position, the drum was rotated slightly so as not to embed the closure lugs into the drum as a result of the 30-foot drop. It was determined that this orientation would maximize deformation to the closure ring around the closure lug while still maintaining the extension of the lugs from the package surface. The second drop was from 40 inches above a 40-inch tall 6-inch diameter puncture pin. The package was angled 10 degrees from vertical and aligned over the puncture pin to solidly hit the drum lug(s) in an attempt to disengage the lid when dropped.Tests were performed in response to DOE EM-76 review Q5 inquires that questioned the capability of the 9975 drum lid to remain in place under this test sequence. Two packages were dropped utilizing this sequence, a 9974 and 9975. Test results for the 9974 package are reported in WSRC-RP-97-00945. A series of 40-inch puncture pin tests were also performed on undamaged 9975 and 9974 packages

  6. Development of a Device for a Material Irradiation Test in the OR Test Hole

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Man Soon; Kang, Y. H.; Kim, B. G.; Choo, K. N.; Sohn, J. M.; Shin, Y. T.; Park, S. J.; Seo, C. K

    2008-05-15

    To develop a technology and a device for the irradiation test for utilization of the OR/IP holes according to the various requirements of users, the properties of the OR/IP holes were investigated and an irradiation device for the OR hole was designed and fabricated. The OR-4, 5 and the IP-9, 10, 11 holes were selected as those suitable to irradiation tests among the test holes located in the out core area. The conceptual design was performed to design a device to irradiate materials using the OR and IP holes. The capsule for the OR holes is fixed by pressing the protection tube using a clamping device, on the other hand the IP capsule is inserted in the hole without a special clamping device. In the basic design of the irradiation device for the OR hole, the capsules having the outside diameter of 50, 52, 54, 56mm were reviewed theoretically to investigate if they meet the hydraulic and vibration conditions required in the HANARO. The results of the pressure drop test showed that the 3 kinds of capsules having diameter of 52, 54, 56mm satisfied the requirement for the pressure difference and flow rate in HANARO. The capsule of {phi}56mm out of the above three satisfied the vibration condition and was finally selected giving consideration of a capacity of specimens. The capsule having a diameter of {phi}56mm was fabricated and the flow rate was measured. Using the velocity data measured at the out-core facility, the heat transfer coefficient, and the temperature on the surface of the capsule was evaluated to confirm it less than the ONB temperature. As a result, the capsule of {phi}56mm was selected for the irradiation test at the OR holes.

  7. [Materiality Analysis of Health Plans Based on Stakeholder Engagement and the Issues Included at ISO 26000:2010].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moyano Santiago, Miguel Angel; Rivera Lirio, Juana María

    2017-01-18

    Health plans of the Spanish autonomous communities can incorporate sustainable development criteria in its development. There have been no analysis or proposals about development and indicators. The goal is to add a contribution to help build better health plans aimed at sustainable development and help to manage economic, social and environmental impacts of health systems criteria. We used a variation of the RAND/UCLA or modified Delphi technique method. The process consisted of a bibliographical and context matters and issues related to health and social responsibility analysis based on ISO 26000: 2010. A survey by deliberately to a selection of 70 expert members of the identified stakeholders was carried out and a discussion group was held to determine the consensus on the issues addressed in the survey sample. The research was conducted in 2015. From the literature review 33 health issues included in ISO 26000:2010 were obtained. 7 survey proved relevant high consensus, 8 relevance and average consensus and 18 with less relevance and high level of dissent. The expert group excluded 4 of the 18 subjects with less consensus. 29 issues included 33 at work, divided into 7 subjects contained in the guide ISO 26000 of social responsibility, were relevant stakeholders regarding possible inclusion in health plans. Considering the direct relationship published by ISO (International Organization for Standardization) among the issues ISO 26000 and the economic, social and environmental indicators in GRI (Global Reporting Initiative) in its G4 version, a panel with monitoring indicators related to relevant issues were elaborated.

  8. Investigation of high flux test module for the international fusion materials irradiation facilities (IFMIF)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyashita, Makoto; Sugimoto, Masayoshi; Yutani, Toshiaki

    2007-03-01

    This report describes investigation on structure of a high neutron flux test module (HFTM) for the International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facilities (IFMIF). The HFTM is aimed for neutron irradiation of a specimen in a high neutron flux domain of the test cell for irradiation ground of IFMIF. We investigated the overall structure of the HFTM that was able to include specimens in a rig and thermocouple arrangement, an interface of control signal and support structure. Moreover, pressure and the amount of the bend in the module vessel (a rectangular section pressure vessel) were calculated. The module vessel did a rectangular section from limitation of a high neutron flux domain. Also, we investigated damage of thermocouples under neutron irradiation, which was a temperature sensor of irradiation materials temperature control demanded high precision. Based on these results, drawings on the HTFM structure. (author)

  9. Development and evaluation of measurement devices used to support testing of radioactive material transportation packages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uncapher, W.L.; Ammerman, D.J.; Stenberg, D.R.; Bronowski, D.R.; Arviso, M.

    1992-01-01

    Radioactive material package designers use structural testing to verify and demonstrate package performance. A major part of evaluating structural response is the collection of instrumentation measurement data. Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) has an ongoing program to develop and evaluate measurement devices to support testing of radioactive material packages. Measurement devices developed in support of this activity include evaluation channels, ruggedly constructed linear variable differential transformers, and piezoresistive accelerometers with enhanced measurement capabilities. In addition to developing measurement devices, a method has been derived to evaluate accelerometers and strain gages for measurement repeatability, ruggedness, and manufacturers' calibration data under both laboratory and field conditions. The developed measurement devices and evaluation technique will be discussed and the results of the evaluation will be presented

  10. Detailed analysis of the supermarket task included on the Japanese version of the Rapid Dementia Screening Test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moriyama, Yasushi; Yoshino, Aihide; Muramatsu, Taro; Mimura, Masaru

    2017-05-01

    The supermarket task, which is included in the Japanese version of the Rapid Dementia Screening Test, requires the quick (1 min) generation of words for things that can be bought in a supermarket. Cluster size and switches are investigated during this task. We investigated how the severity of dementia related to cluster size and switches on the supermarket task in patients with Alzheimer's disease. We administered the Japanese version of the Rapid Dementia Screening Test to 250 patients with very mild to severe Alzheimer's disease and to 49 healthy volunteers. Patients had Mini-Mental State Examination scores from 12 to 26 and Clinical Dementia Rating scale scores from 0.5 to 3. Patients were divided into four groups based on their Clinical Dementia Rating score (0.5, 1, 2, 3). We performed statistical analyses between the four groups and control subjects based on cluster size and switch scores on the supermarket task. The score for cluster size and switches deteriorated according to the severity of dementia. Moreover, for subjects with a Clinical Dementia Rating score of 0.5, cluster size was impaired, but switches were intact. Our findings indicate that the scores for cluster size and switches on the supermarket task may be useful for detecting the severity of symptoms of dementia in patients with Alzheimer's disease. © 2016 The Authors. Psychogeriatrics © 2016 Japanese Psychogeriatric Society.

  11. Scaling of Core Material in Rubble Mound Breakwater Model Tests

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burcharth, H. F.; Liu, Z.; Troch, P.

    1999-01-01

    The permeability of the core material influences armour stability, wave run-up and wave overtopping. The main problem related to the scaling of core materials in models is that the hydraulic gradient and the pore velocity are varying in space and time. This makes it impossible to arrive at a fully...... correct scaling. The paper presents an empirical formula for the estimation of the wave induced pressure gradient in the core, based on measurements in models and a prototype. The formula, together with the Forchheimer equation can be used for the estimation of pore velocities in cores. The paper proposes...... that the diameter of the core material in models is chosen in such a way that the Froude scale law holds for a characteristic pore velocity. The characteristic pore velocity is chosen as the average velocity of a most critical area in the core with respect to porous flow. Finally the method is demonstrated...

  12. LOCA simulation in the NRU reactor: materials test-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russcher, G.E.; Marshall, R.K.; Hesson, G.M.; Wildung, N.J.; Rausch, W.N.

    1981-10-01

    A simulated loss-of-coolant accident was performed with a full-length test bundle of pressurized water reactor fuel rods. This second experiment of the program produced peak fuel cladding temperatures of 1148K (1607 0 F) and resulted in six ruptured fuel rods. Test data and initial results from the experiment are presented here in the form of photographs and graphical summaries. These results are also compared with the preceding prototypic thermal-hydraulic test results and with computer model test predictions

  13. Formulation of a candidate glass for use as an acceptance test standard material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ebert, W.L.; Strachan, D.M.; Wolf, S.F.

    1998-04-01

    In this report, the authors discuss the formulation of a glass that will be used in a laboratory testing program designed to measure the precision of test methods identified in the privatization contracts for the immobilization of Hanford low-activity wastes. Tests will be conducted with that glass to measure the reproducibility of tests and analyses that must be performed by glass producers as a part of the product acceptance procedure. Test results will be used to determine if the contractually required tests and analyses are adequate for evaluating the acceptability of likely immobilized low-activity waste (ILAW) products. They will also be used to evaluate if the glass designed for use in these tests can be used as an analytical standard test material for verifying results reported by vendors for tests withg ILAW products. The results of those tests and analyses will be presented in a separate report. The purpose of this report is to document the strategy used to formulate the glass to be used in the testing program. The low-activity waste reference glass LRM that will be used in the testing program was formulated to be compositionally similar to ILAW products to be made with wastes from Hanford. Since the ILAW product compositions have not been disclosed by the vendors participating in the Hanford privatization project, the composition of LRM was formulated based on simulated Hanford waste stream and amounts of added glass forming chemicals typical for vitrified waste forms. The major components are 54 mass % SiO 2 , 20 mass % Na 2 O, 10 mass % Al 2 O 3 , 8 mass % B 2 O 3 , and 1.5 mass % K 2 O. Small amounts of other chemicals not present in Hanford wastes were also included in the glass, since they may be included as chemical additives in ILAW products. This was done so that the use of LRM as a composition standard could be evaluated. Radionuclides were not included in LRM because a nonradioactive material was desired

  14. Practical Considerations of Design, Fabrication and Tests for Composite Materials,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-09-01

    Harris 2 School of Materials Science University of Bath Claverton Down Bath AB2 7AY UK 1. THE IDEA OF A COMPOSITE The concept is a familiar one even to...A.R. Bunsell " Comportement en torsion des fibres de Kevlar-29 " Colloque nt CNRS No. 319 Comportement plastique des solides anisotropes. 16-19 June...d’hhlicoptares en composites : conception , rdalisation et comportement en operation ". Advances in Composite Materials Vol II Ed. A.R. Bunsell, C. Bathias

  15. Ultrasonic and advanced methods for nondestructive testing and material characterization

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chen, C. H

    2007-01-01

    ... and physics among others. There are at least two dozen NDT methods in use. In fact any sensor that can examine the inside of material nondestructively is useful for NDT. However the ultrasonic methods are still most popular because of its capability, flexibility, and relative cost effectiveness. For this reason this book places a heavy emphasis...

  16. 33 CFR 209.340 - Laboratory investigations and materials testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... hydraulic laboratories, and to the Inter-Agency Sedimentation Project. (c) References. (1) AR 37-20. (2) AR... ordinary business channels. (3) Performance of the work will not interfere with provisions of services... with the same procedures as apply to Division Materials Laboratories. (3) Inter-Agency Sedimentation...

  17. Round robin testing of thermal conductivity reference materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hulstrom, L.C.; Tye, R.P.; Smith, S.E.

    1985-07-01

    The Basalt Waste Isolation Project (BWIP), operated by Rockwell Hanford Operations, has a need to determine the thermal properties of basalt in the region being considered for a nuclear waste repository in basalt. Experimental data on thermal conductivity and its variation with temperature are information required for the characterization of basalt. To establish thermal conductivity values for the reference materials, an interlaboratory measurements program was undertaken. The program was planned to meet the objectives of performing an experimental characterization of the new stock and providing a detailed analysis of the results such that reference values of thermal conductivity could be determined. This program of measurements of the thermal conductivity of Pyrex 7740 and Pyroceram 9606 has produced recommended values that are within +- 1% of those accepted previously. These measurements together with those of density indicate that the present lots of material are similar to those previously available. Pyrex 7740 and Pyroceram 9606 can continue to be used with confidence as thermal conductivity reference materials for studies on rocks and minerals and other materials of similar thermal conductivity. The uncertainty range for Pyrex 7740 and Pyroceram 9606 up to 300 0 C is +- 10.3% and +- 5.6%, respectively. This range is similar to that indicated for the previously recommended values proposed some 18 years ago. It would appear that the overall state of the art in thermal conductivity measurements for materials in this range has changed little in the intervening years. The above uncertainties, which would have been greater had not three data sets been eliminated, are greater than those which are normally claimed for each individual method. Analyses of these differences through refinements in techniques and additional measurements to higher temperatures are required. 13 refs., 7 figs., 4 tabs

  18. Advanced Materials Test Methods for Improved Life Prediction of Turbine Engine Components

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Stubbs, Jack

    2000-01-01

    Phase I final report developed under SBIR contract for Topic # AF00-149, "Durability of Turbine Engine Materials/Advanced Material Test Methods for Improved Use Prediction of Turbine Engine Components...

  19. Material Compressing Test of the High Polymer Part Used in Draft Gear of Heavy Load Locomotive

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Yangang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available According to the actual load cases of heavy load locomotive, the material compressing tests of the high polymer parts used in the locomotive are researched. The relationship between stress and strain during the material compressing are acquired by means of comparing the many results of the material compressing tests under different test condition. The relationship between stress and strain during the material compressing is nonlinear in large range of strain, but the relationship is approximately linear in small range of strain. The material of the high polymer made in China and the material of the high polymer imported are compared through the tests. The results show that the compressing property of the material of the high polymer made in China and the material of the high polymer imported are almost same. The research offers the foundation to study the structure elasticity of the draft gear.

  20. Materials interactions test methods to measure radionuclide release from waste forms under repository-relevant conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strickert, R.G.; Erikson, R.L.; Shade, J.W.

    1984-10-01

    At the request of the Basalt Waste Isolation Project, the Materials Characterization Center has collected and developed a set of procedures into a waste form compliance test method (MCC-14.4). The purpose of the test is to measure the steady-state concentrations of specified radionuclides in solutions contacting a waste form material. The test method uses a crushed waste form and basalt material suspended in a synthetic basalt groundwater and agitated for up to three months at 150 0 C under anoxic conditions. Elemental and radioisotopic analyses are made on filtered and unfiltered aliquots of the solution. Replicate experiments are performed and simultaneous tests are conducted with an approved test material (ATM) to help ensure precise and reliable data for the actual waste form material. Various features of the test method, equipment, and test conditions are reviewed. Experimental testing using actinide-doped borosilicate glasses are also discussed. 9 references, 2 tables

  1. Quantifying and Addressing the DOE Material Reactivity Requirements with Analysis and Testing of Hydrogen Storage Materials & Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khalil, Y. F. [United Technologies Research Center (UTRC), East Hartford, CT (United States)

    2012-04-30

    The objective of this project is to examine safety aspects of candidate hydrogen storage materials and systems being developed in the DOE Hydrogen Program. As a result of this effort, the general DOE safety target will be given useful meaning by establishing a link between the characteristics of new storage materials and the satisfaction of safety criteria. This will be accomplished through the development and application of formal risk analysis methods, standardized materials testing, chemical reactivity characterization, novel risk mitigation approaches and subscale system demonstration. The project also will collaborate with other DOE and international activities in materials based hydrogen storage safety to provide a larger, highly coordinated effort.

  2. 40 CFR 59.208 - Charcoal lighter material testing protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... briquette over 0.9 kilograms (2 pounds), of uniform shape with no broken pieces using an analytical balance... flame. (5) Conduct at least six test runs for both the electric probe ignition and for the lighter...

  3. Development of reference material for proficiency tests: arsenic in fish tissue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santana, Luciana Vieira de; Sarkis, Jorge E.S.; Ulrich, Joao C.; Hortellani, Marcos Antonio

    2013-01-01

    Proficiency tests (PT) are extensively used to evaluate the analytical competence of laboratories, and are also used as a part of accreditation processes. For this reason are important tool for quality control of laboratories including laboratories that act directly with food exporting companies. In Brazil there are no providers of proficiency testing for toxic metals, such as arsenic in fish tissue. This study presents a protocol to produce reference material to be used in proficiency test for arsenic in fish tissue following the recommendations of the ISO Guide 35. The preparation scheme consisted of: selecting of individuals, cleaning of scale and skin, trituration, homogenization, and spiking with arsenic at two levels of concentration. The mixture was then irradiated in a cyclotron Cyclone 30 Applications ion beam with cobalt 60 at 10.00 ± 1.05 KGy, before being packed into sachets. To verify the efficacy of the irradiation procedure, 26 (randomly selected) irradiated sachets and 26 non-irradiated sachets were assessed for homogeneity and stability. The results indicate that irradiation with cobalt 60 is crucial for ensuring the preservation of the integrity of the material, providing stable material at room temperature for 2 months. The samples can therefore be transported at room temperature. (author)

  4. Development of reference material for proficiency tests: arsenic in fish tissue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santana, Luciana Vieira de; Sarkis, Jorge E.S.; Ulrich, Joao C.; Hortellani, Marcos Antonio, E-mail: santana-luciana@ig.com.br, E-mail: jesarkis@ipen.br, E-mail: jculrich@ipen.br, E-mail: mahortel@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    Proficiency tests (PT) are extensively used to evaluate the analytical competence of laboratories, and are also used as a part of accreditation processes. For this reason are important tool for quality control of laboratories including laboratories that act directly with food exporting companies. In Brazil there are no providers of proficiency testing for toxic metals, such as arsenic in fish tissue. This study presents a protocol to produce reference material to be used in proficiency test for arsenic in fish tissue following the recommendations of the ISO Guide 35. The preparation scheme consisted of: selecting of individuals, cleaning of scale and skin, trituration, homogenization, and spiking with arsenic at two levels of concentration. The mixture was then irradiated in a cyclotron Cyclone 30 Applications ion beam with cobalt 60 at 10.00 ± 1.05 KGy, before being packed into sachets. To verify the efficacy of the irradiation procedure, 26 (randomly selected) irradiated sachets and 26 non-irradiated sachets were assessed for homogeneity and stability. The results indicate that irradiation with cobalt 60 is crucial for ensuring the preservation of the integrity of the material, providing stable material at room temperature for 2 months. The samples can therefore be transported at room temperature. (author)

  5. Friction Reduction Tested for a Downsized Diesel Engine with Low-Viscosity Lubricants Including a Novel Polyalkylene Glycol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David E. Sander

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available With the increasing pressure to reduce emissions, friction reduction is always an up-to-date topic in the automotive industry. Among the various possibilities to reduce mechanical friction, the usage of a low-viscosity lubricant in the engine is one of the most effective and most economic options. Therefore, lubricants of continuously lower viscosity are being developed and offered on the market that promise to reduce engine friction while avoiding deleterious mixed lubrication and wear. In this work, a 1.6 L downsized Diesel engine is used on a highly accurate engine friction test-rig to determine the potential for friction reduction using low viscosity lubricants under realistic operating conditions including high engine loads. In particular, two hydrocarbon-based lubricants, 0W30 and 0W20, are investigated as well as a novel experimental lubricant, which is based on a polyalkylene glycol base stock. Total engine friction is measured for all three lubricants, which show a general 5% advantage for the 0W20 in comparison to the 0W30 lubricant. The polyalkylene glycol-based lubricant, however, shows strongly reduced friction losses, which are about 25% smaller than for the 0W20 lubricant. As the 0W20 and the polyalkylene glycol-based lubricant have the same HTHS-viscosity , the findings contradict the common understanding that the HTHS-viscosity is the dominant driver related to the friction losses.

  6. 6. colloquium on quality assurance by materials testing. Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    This conference, now in its tenth year, has become an integral element of nondestructive testing research in Germany. It focuses on the role of nondestructive testing as a tool of in-house quality management and presents practical solutions. In accordance with its long tradition in the motor car industry, this is still a central field of interest. This CD-ROM provides information on shorter development times, diversified type production, modern high-productivity fabrication, and higher quality specifications. (orig.) [de

  7. High temperature outgassing tests on materials used in the DIII-D tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holtrop, K.L.; Hansink, M.J.

    2006-01-01

    This article is a continuation of previous work on determining the outgassing characteristics of materials used in the DIII-D magnetic fusion tokamak [K. L. Holtrop, J. Vac. Sci. Technol. A 17, 2064 (1999)]. Achievement of high performance plasma discharges in the DIII-D tokamak requires careful control of impurity levels. Among the techniques used to control impurities are routine bakes of the vacuum vessel to an average temperature of 350 deg. C. Materials used in DIII-D must release only very small amounts of impurities (below 2x10 -6 mole) at this temperature that could be transferred to the first wall materials and later contaminate plasma discharges. To better study the behavior of materials proposed for use in DIII-D at elevated temperatures, the initial outgassing test chamber was improved to include an independent heating control of the sample and a simple load lock chamber. The goal was to determine not only the total degassing rate of the material during baking, but to also determine the gas species composition and to obtain a quantitative estimate of the degassing rate of each species by the use of a residual gas analyzer. Initial results for aluminum anodized using three different processes, stainless steel plated with black oxide and black chrome, and a commercially available fiber optic feedthrough will be presented

  8. Material characterization and non destructive testing by ultrasounds; modelling, simulation and experimental validation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noroy-Nadal, M.H.

    2002-06-01

    This memory presents the research concerning the characterization of materials and the Non Destructive Testing (N.D.T) by ultrasonics. The different topics include three steps: modeling, computations and experimental validation. The studied materials concern mainly metals. The memory is divided in four parts. The first one concerns the characterization of materials versus temperature. The determination of the shear modulus G(T) is especially studied for a large temperature range, and around the melting point. The second part is devoted to studies by photothermal devices essentially focused on the modeling of the mechanical displacement and the stress field in coated materials. In this particular field of interest, applications concern either the mechanical characterization of the coating, the defect detection in the structure and finally the evaluation of the coating adhesion. The third section is dedicated to microstructural characterization using acoustic microscopy. The evaluation of crystallographic texture is especially approached, for metallic objects obtained by forming. Before concluding and pointing out some perspectives to this work, the last section concerns the introduction of optimization techniques, applied to the material characterization by acoustic microscopy. (author)

  9. Selection Criteria and Methods for Testing Different Surface Materials for Contact Frying Processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ashokkumar, Saranya

    Inner surfaces of industrial process equipment for food are often coated to give the surfaces particular properties with respect to adhesion and cleanability. Existing coating materials (PTFE (Teflon®) or silicone based polymers) suffer from drawbacks when used in contact frying, because these co...... surface materials for contact frying processes. The surfaces selected for this purpose cover a wide spectrum of materials that range from hydrophobic to hydrophilic materials. The different surface materials investigated include stainless steel (reference), aluminium (Al Mg 5754), PTFE......, an experimental rig has been constructed which enabled a controlled fouling of different coatings on steel and aluminium substrates under realistic frying conditions. A subjective rating procedure was employed for screening different surfaces according to their non-stick properties when used for frying of a model...... defects and surface roughness play a significant role. The wear resistance of the coatings was tested by performing abrasive wear experiments. The ceramic coatings: TiAlN and ZrN were found to show the best wear resistance properties. The experiments also revealed the poor wear resistance of stainless...

  10. Basic considerations for the preparation of performance testing materials as related to performance evaluation acceptance criteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCurdy, D.E.; Morton, J.S.

    2001-01-01

    The preparation of performance testing (PT) materials for environmental and radiobioassay applications involves the use of natural matrix materials containing the analyte of interest, the addition (spiking) of the analyte to a desired matrix (followed by blending for certain matrices) or a combination of the two. The distribution of the sample analyte concentration in a batch of PT samples will reflect the degree of heterogeneity of the analyte in the PT material and/or the reproducibility of the sample preparation process. Commercial and government implemented radioanalytical performance evaluation programs have a variety of acceptable performance criteria. The performance criteria should take into consideration many parameters related to the preparation of the PT materials including the within and between sample analyte heterogeneity, the accuracy of the quantification of an analyte in the PT material and to what 'known' value will a laboratory's result be compared. How sample preparation parameters affect the successful participation in performance evaluation (PE) programs having an acceptance criteria established as a percent difference from a 'known' value or in PE programs using other acceptance criteria, such as the guidance provided in ANSI N42.22 and N13.30 is discussed. (author)

  11. Recommendations for Filler Material Composition and Delivery Method for Bench-Scale Testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hardin, Ernest [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Brady, Patrick Vane [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2018-03-01

    This report supplements Joint Workplan on Filler Investigations for DPCs (SNL 2017) providing new and some corrected information for use in planning Phase 1 laboratory testing of slurry cements as possible DPC fillers. The scope description is to "Describe a complete laboratory testing program for filler composition, delivery, emplacement in surrogate canisters, and post-test examination. To the extent possible specify filler material and equipment sources." This report includes results from an independent expert review (Dr. Arun Wagh, retired from Argonne National Laboratory and contracted by Sandia) that helped to narrow the range of cement types for consideration, and to provide further guidance on mix variations to optimize injectability, durability, and other aspects of filler performance.

  12. Technical critique on radiation test facilities for the CTR surface and materials program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Persiani, P.J.

    1975-02-01

    Major radiation test facilities will be necessary in the near-term (5 years) and long-term (greater than 10 years) future for the timely development and understanding of fusion confinement systems and of prototype fusion power reactors. The study includes the technical justifications and requirements for CTR Neutron and Plasma Radiation Test Facilities. The initial technical critique covers the feasibility and design problems: in upgrading the performance of the accelerator-rotating (solid TiT) target systems, and in transforming the accelerator-supersonic jet target concept into a radiation testing facility. A scoping assessment on the potential of a pulsed high-beta plasma device (dense plasma focus) is introduced to explore plasma concepts as near-term neutron and plasma radiation sources for the CTR Surface and Materials Program. (U.S.)

  13. R20 Programme: Field testing of grouting materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ranta-Korpi, R.; Karttunen, P.; Sievaenen, U.

    2008-02-01

    In the year 2004 Finnish nuclear waste management organisation Posiva Oy started to construct an underground rock characterisation facility in Olkiluoto, Eurajoki, Western Finland. The ONKALO was planned to be a final disposal of spent nuclear fuel in Finland. This facility is going to be finished in the end of the year 2010. In ONKALO it is important to grout the water conductive structures to minimize the leakage of the inflowing groundwater in order to keep the geohydrogical environment unchanged and the repository conditions safe. Before the construction began the development of the grouts suitable for this demanding environment was started. Especially pH, the penetration ability and rheology have been the matter of interest. One target for the grout has been that the pH is relatively low. These grouts have different properties than the normal grouts. Several laboratory and field tests have been done for low pH grouts. The suitable recipies are studied in laboratory and the properties are verified in field. This work concerns the field testing of several low pH grout recipies. The different W/DM -ratios and SPL contents were studied. Besides the customary test methods, two new measurement methods were taken into use: the sand column test for measuring the penetration ability and the stick test for determining the plastic viscosity and yield value. The relationships between different properties, the properties as a function of the time and the effect of the (orig.)

  14. Testing of HTR UO{sub 2} TRISO fuels in AVR and in material test reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kania, Michael J., E-mail: MichaelJKania@googlemail.com [Retired from Lockheed Martin Corp, 20 Beach Road, Averill Park, NY 12018 (United States); Nabielek, Heinz, E-mail: heinznabielek@me.com [Retired from Research Center Jülich, Monschauerstrasse 61, 52355 Düren (Germany); Verfondern, Karl [Research Center Juelich,Research Center Jülich, Institute of Energy and Climate Research, 52425 Jülich (Germany); Allelein, Hans-Josef [Research Center Juelich,Research Center Jülich, Institute of Energy and Climate Research, 52425 Jülich (Germany); RWTH Aachen, 52072 Aachen (Germany)

    2013-10-15

    The German High Temperature Reactor Fuel Development Program successfully developed, licensed and manufactured many thousands of spherical fuel elements that were used to power the experimental AVR reactor and the commercial THTR reactor. In the 1970s, this program extended the performance envelope of HTR fuels by developing and qualifying the TRISO-coated particle system. Irradiation testing in real-time AVR tests and accelerated MTR tests demonstrated the superior manufacturing process of this fuel and its irradiation performance. In the 1980s, another program direction change was made to a low enriched UO{sub 2} TRISO-coated particle system coupled with high-quality manufacturing specifications designed to meet new HTR plant design needs. These needs included requirements for inherent safety under normal operation and accident conditions. Again, the German fuel development program met and exceeded these challenges by manufacturing and qualifying the low-enriched UO{sub 2} TRISO-fuel system for HTR systems with steam generation, gas-turbine systems and very high temperature process heat applications. Fuel elements were manufactured in production scale facilities that contained near defect free UO{sub 2} TRISO coated particles, homogeneously distributed within a graphite matrix with very low levels of uranium contamination. Good irradiation performance for these elements was demonstrated under normal operating conditions to 12% FIMA and under accident conditions not exceeding 1600 °C.

  15. Consensus stability testing protocols for organic photovoltaic materials and devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reese, Matthew O.; Gevorgyan, Suren; Jørgensen, Mikkel

    2011-01-01

    Procedures for testing organic solar cell devices and modules with respect to stability and operational lifetime are described. The descriptions represent a consensus of the discussion and conclusions reached during the first 3 years of the international summit on OPV stability (ISOS). The proced......Procedures for testing organic solar cell devices and modules with respect to stability and operational lifetime are described. The descriptions represent a consensus of the discussion and conclusions reached during the first 3 years of the international summit on OPV stability (ISOS...

  16. Impact test on natural fiber reinforced polymer composite materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Chandramohan

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available In this research, natural fibers like Sisal (Agave sisalana, Banana (Musa sepientum & Roselle (Hibiscus sabdariffa , Sisal and banana (hybrid , Roselle and banana (hybrid and Roselle and sisal (hybrid are fabricated with bio epoxy resin using molding method. In this work, impact strength of Sisal and banana (hybrid, Roselle and banana (hybridand Roselle and sisal (hybrid composite at dry and wet conditions were studied. Impact test were conducted izod impact testing machine. In this work micro structure of the specimens are scanned by the Scanning Electron Microscope.

  17. Modeling Spin Testing Using Location Specific Material Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-01

    bulk of a material (for example, ferrite, bainite , martensite phases in steels ) the properties may roughly be derived as a "rule of mixtures" of the...1986): Int. J. of plasticity,p149 α 1σ 2σ loading surface R0σ (HC steel -Wilson & Bate, Acta Metall. 34, pp. 1107-1120,1986) Tension curve ε σ oσ...nucleation potency of primary inclusions in heat treated and shot peened martensitic gear steels ,” International Journal of Fatigue, Vol. 31, No. 7

  18. Assembly and testing of microparticle and microcapsule smart tattoo materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    McShane, Michael J.

    2007-01-01

    Microscale biochemical sensors are attractive for in vitro diagnostics and disease management, as well as medical and biological research applications. Fluorescent sensors, coupling specific glucose-binding proteins with fluorescent readout methods, have been developed for this purpose. Our work has focused on the development of assembly and packaging systems for producing micro- and nanoscale sensing components that can be used as implants, intracellular reporters, or as elements in larger systems. Both hybrid organic/inorganic particles and hollow microshells have been developed to physically couple the sensing materials together in biocompatible, semipermeable packages. Fabrication details and sensor characterization are used to demonstrate the potential of these sensor concepts.

  19. Non Destructive Testing - Identification of Defects in Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tibor Bachorec

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available In electrical impedance tomography (EIT currents are applied through the electrodes attached on the surface of the object, and the resulting voltages are measured using the same or additional electrodes. Internal conductivity distribution is recalculated from the measured voltages and currents. The problem is very ill posed, and therefore, regularization has to be used. The aim is to reconstruct, as accurately as possible, the conductivity distribution s in phantom using finite element method (FEM. In this paper are proposed variations of the regularization term, which are applied to non-destructiveidentification of defects (voids or cracks in conductive material.

  20. Development of a Fissile Materials Irradiation Capability for Advanced Fuel Testing at the MIT Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu Linwen; Bernard, John A.; Hejzlar, Pavel; Kohse, Gordon

    2005-01-01

    A fissile materials irradiation capability has been developed at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Research Reactor (MITR) to support nuclear engineering studies in the area of advanced fuels. The focus of the expected research is to investigate the basic properties of advanced nuclear fuels using small aggregates of fissile material. As such, this program is intended to complement the ongoing fuel evaluation programs at test reactors. Candidates for study at the MITR include vibration-packed annular fuel for light water reactors and microparticle fuels for high-temperature gas reactors. Technical considerations that pertain to the design of the MITR facility are enumerated including those specified by 10 CFR 50 concerning the definition of a research reactor and those contained in a separate license amendment that was issued by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission to MIT for these types of experiments. The former includes limits on the cross-sectional area of the experiment, the physical form of the irradiated material, and the removal of heat. The latter addresses experiment reactivity worth, thermal-hydraulic considerations, avoidance of fission product release, and experiment specific temperature scrams

  1. Thermal-vacuum facility with in-situ mechanical loading. [for testing space construction materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tennyson, R. C.; Hansen, J. S.; Holzer, R. P.; Uffen, B.; Mabson, G.

    1978-01-01

    The paper describes a thermal-vacuum space simulator used to assess property changes of fiber-reinforced polymer composite systems. The facility can achieve a vacuum of approximately .0000001 torr with temperatures ranging from -200 to +300 F. Some preliminary experimental results are presented for materials subjected to thermal loading up to 200 F. The tests conducted include the evaluation of matrix modulus and strength, coefficients of thermal expansion, and fracture toughness. Though the experimental program is at an early stage, the data appear to indicate that these parameters are influenced by hard vacuum.

  2. Statistical approach for collaborative tests, reference material certification procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fangmeyer, H.; Haemers, L.; Larisse, J.

    1977-01-01

    The first part introduces the different aspects in organizing and executing intercomparison tests of chemical or physical quantities. It follows a description of a statistical procedure to handle the data collected in a circular analysis. Finally, an example demonstrates how the tool can be applied and which conclusion can be drawn of the results obtained

  3. Advanced In-pile Instrumentation for Material and Test Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rempe, J.L.; Knudson, D.L.; Daw, J.E.; Unruh, T.C.; Chase, B.M.; Davis, K.L.; Palmer, A.J.; Schley, R.S.

    2013-06-01

    The US Department of Energy sponsors the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) National Scientific User Facility (NSUF) program to promote U.S. research in nuclear science and technology. By attracting new research users - universities, laboratories, and industry - the ATR NSUF facilitates basic and applied nuclear research and development, advancing U.S. energy security needs. A key component of the ATR NSUF effort is to design, develop, and deploy new in-pile instrumentation techniques that are capable of providing real-time measurements of key parameters during irradiation. This paper describes the strategy developed by the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) for identifying instrumentation needed for ATR irradiation tests and the program initiated to obtain these sensors. New sensors developed from this effort are identified; and the progress of other development efforts is summarized. As reported in this paper, INL staff is currently involved in several tasks to deploy real-time length and flux detection sensors, and efforts have been initiated to develop a crack growth test rig. Tasks evaluating 'advanced' technologies, such as fiber-optics based length detection and ultrasonic thermometers are also underway. In addition, specialized sensors for real-time detection of temperature and thermal conductivity are not only being provided to NSUF reactors, but are also being provided to several international test reactors. (authors)

  4. Advanced In-Pile Instrumentation for Materials Testing Reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rempe, J. L.; Knudson, D. L.; Daw, J. E.; Unruh, T. C.; Chase, B. M.; Davis, K. L.; Palmer, A. J.; Schley, R. S.

    2014-08-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy sponsors the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) National Scientific User Facility (NSUF) program to promote U.S. research in nuclear science and technology. By attracting new research users - universities, laboratories, and industry - the ATR NSUF facilitates basic and applied nuclear research and development, advancing U.S. energy security needs. A key component of the ATR NSUF effort is to design, develop, and deploy new in-pile instrumentation techniques that are capable of providing real-time measurements of key parameters during irradiation. This paper describes the strategy developed by the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) for identifying instrumentation needed for ATR irradiation tests and the program initiated to obtain these sensors. New sensors developed from this effort are identified, and the progress of other development efforts is summarized. As reported in this paper, INL researchers are currently involved in several tasks to deploy real-time length and flux detection sensors, and efforts have been initiated to develop a crack growth test rig. Tasks evaluating `advanced' technologies, such as fiber-optics based length detection and ultrasonic thermometers, are also underway. In addition, specialized sensors for real-time detection of temperature and thermal conductivity are not only being provided to NSUF reactors, but are also being provided to several international test reactors.

  5. Application of Denisyuk pulsed holography to material testing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Renesse, R.L. van; Burgmeijer, J.W.

    1983-01-01

    When holography is applied outside the laboratory, some well known problems are experienced: vibrations, rigid body motion, stray daylight. Pulse holography can overcome the difficulties with vibrations, but the other problems are less easily solved. When the object area to be holographically tested

  6. Use of a radionuclid to label material for radioactive tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saklad, E.L.; Layne, W.W.

    1977-01-01

    In order to increase the stability of a test substance labelled with a radiotracer 99 Tcsup(m) the serum albumin portion of human serum albumin, of stannous macroaggregate-forming albumin and of the albumin-bloodpool are defatted. This is achieved by charcoal treatment or the acid precipitation method. (DG) [de

  7. Materials interaction tests to identify base and coating materials for an enhanced in-vessel core catcher design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rempe, J.L.; Knudson, D.L.; Condie, K.G.; Swank, W.D. [Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, Idaho Falls ID (United States); Cheung, F.B. [Pennsylvania State University, Department of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, University Park PA (United States); Suh, K.Y. [Seoul National University, Department of Nuclear Engineering, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, S.B. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Severe Accident Research Project, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-07-01

    An enhanced in-vessel core catcher is being designed and evaluated, it must ensure In-Vessel Retention of core materials that may relocate under severe accident conditions in advanced reactors. To reduce cost and simplify manufacture and installation, this new core catcher design consists of several interlocking sections that are machined to fit together when inserted into the lower head. If needed, the core catcher can be manufactured with holes to accommodate lower head penetrations. Each section of the core catcher consists of two material layers with an option to add a third layer (if deemed necessary): a base material, which has the capability to support and contain the mass of core materials that may relocate during a severe accident; an insulating oxide coating material on top of the base material, which resists interactions with high-temperature core materials; and an optional coating on the bottom side of the base material to prevent any potential oxidation of the base material during the lifetime of the reactor. Initial evaluations suggest that a thermally-sprayed oxide material is the most promising candidate insulator coating for a core catcher. Tests suggest that 2 coatings can provide adequate protection to a stainless steel core catcher: -) a 500 {mu}m thick zirconium dioxide coating over a 100-200 {mu}m Inconel 718 bond coating, and -) a 500 {mu}m thick magnesium zirconate coating.

  8. Hydramite II screening tests of potential bremsstrahlung converter debris shield materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reedy, E.D. Jr.; Hedemann, M.A.; Stark, M.A.

    1986-03-01

    Results of a brief test series aimed at screening a number of potential bremsstrahlung converter debris shield materials are reported. These tests were run on Sandia National Laboratories' Hydramite II accelerator using a diode configuration which produces a pinched electron beam. The materials tested include: (1) laminated Kevlar 49/polyester and E-glass/polyester composites, (2) a low density laminated Kevlar 49 composite, and (3) two types of through-the-thickness reinforced Kevlar 49 composites. As expected, tests using laminated Kevlar 49/polyester shields showed that shield permanent set (i.e., permanent deflection) increased with increasing tantalum conversion foil thickness and decreased with increasing shield thickness. The through-the-thickness reinforced composites developed localized, but severe, back surface damage. The laminated composites displayed little back surface damage, although extensive internal matrix cracking and ply delaminations were generated. Roughly the same degree of permanent set was produced in shields made from the low density Kevlar 49 composite and the Kevlar 49/polyester. The E-glass reinforced shields exhibited relatively low levels of permanent set

  9. A Proposal for a Methodology to Develop a Cyber-Attack Penetration Test Scenario Including NPPs Safety

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, In Hyo [KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Son, Han Seong [Joongbu Univ., Geumsan (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Si Won [Korea Institute of Nuclear Nonproliferation and Control, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Hyun Gook [Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy (United States)

    2016-10-15

    Penetration test is a method to evaluate the cyber security of NPPs; so, this approach was performed in some studies. Because they focused on vulnerability finding or test bed construction, scenario based approach was not performed. However, to test the cyber security of NPPs, a proper test scenario should be needed. Ahn et al. developed cyber-attack scenarios but those scenarios couldn't be applied in penetration test because they developed the scenarios based on past incidents of NPPs induced by cyber-attack. That is, those scenarios only covered scenarios which were happened before; so, they couldn't cover other various scenarios and couldn't reflect them into a penetration test. In this study, a method to develop a cyber-attack penetration test scenario of NPPs especially focused on safety point of view is suggested. To evaluate the cyber security of NPPs, penetration test can be a possible way. In this study, a method to develop a penetration test scenario was explained. Especially, the goal of hacker was focused on nuclear fuel integrity deterioration. So, in the methodology, Level 1 PSA results were utilized to reflect plant safety into the security. From the PSA results, basic event was post processed and possible cyber-attacks were reviewed with vulnerabilities of digital control system.

  10. A Proposal for a Methodology to Develop a Cyber-Attack Penetration Test Scenario Including NPPs Safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, In Hyo; Son, Han Seong; Kim, Si Won; Kang, Hyun Gook

    2016-01-01

    Penetration test is a method to evaluate the cyber security of NPPs; so, this approach was performed in some studies. Because they focused on vulnerability finding or test bed construction, scenario based approach was not performed. However, to test the cyber security of NPPs, a proper test scenario should be needed. Ahn et al. developed cyber-attack scenarios but those scenarios couldn't be applied in penetration test because they developed the scenarios based on past incidents of NPPs induced by cyber-attack. That is, those scenarios only covered scenarios which were happened before; so, they couldn't cover other various scenarios and couldn't reflect them into a penetration test. In this study, a method to develop a cyber-attack penetration test scenario of NPPs especially focused on safety point of view is suggested. To evaluate the cyber security of NPPs, penetration test can be a possible way. In this study, a method to develop a penetration test scenario was explained. Especially, the goal of hacker was focused on nuclear fuel integrity deterioration. So, in the methodology, Level 1 PSA results were utilized to reflect plant safety into the security. From the PSA results, basic event was post processed and possible cyber-attacks were reviewed with vulnerabilities of digital control system

  11. Influence of Specimen Preparation and Test Methods on the Flexural Strength Results of Monolithic Zirconia Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schatz, Christine; Strickstrock, Monika; Roos, Malgorzata; Edelhoff, Daniel; Eichberger, Marlis; Zylla, Isabella-Maria; Stawarczyk, Bogna

    2016-03-09

    The aim of this work was to evaluate the influence of specimen preparation and test method on the flexural strength results of monolithic zirconia. Different monolithic zirconia materials (Ceramill Zolid (Amann Girrbach, Koblach, Austria), Zenostar ZrTranslucent (Wieland Dental, Pforzheim, Germany), and DD Bio zx² (Dental Direkt, Spenge, Germany)) were tested with three different methods: 3-point, 4-point, and biaxial flexural strength. Additionally, different specimen preparation methods were applied: either dry polishing before sintering or wet polishing after sintering. Each subgroup included 40 specimens. The surface roughness was assessed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and a profilometer whereas monoclinic phase transformation was investigated with X-ray diffraction. The data were analyzed using a three-way Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) with respect to the three factors: zirconia, specimen preparation, and test method. One-way ANOVA was conducted for the test method and zirconia factors within the combination of two other factors. A 2-parameter Weibull distribution assumption was applied to analyze the reliability under different testing conditions. In general, values measured using the 4-point test method presented the lowest flexural strength values. The flexural strength findings can be grouped in the following order: 4-point strength values than prepared before sintering. The Weibull moduli ranged from 5.1 to 16.5. Specimens polished before sintering showed higher surface roughness values than specimens polished after sintering. In contrast, no strong impact of the polishing procedures on the monoclinic surface layer was observed. No impact of zirconia material on flexural strength was found. The test method and the preparation method significantly influenced the flexural strength values.

  12. Questions of qualification exam for non-destructive testing and materials science - the first level

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaaban, H.I.; Addarwish, J.M.A.

    2013-01-01

    The book contains seven chapters: Questions of qualification for magnetic particles testing method - Questions of qualification for liquids penetrant testing method - Questions of qualification for the visual inspection testing method - Questions of qualification for the ultrasonic testing method - Questions of qualification for the eddy current testing method - Questions of rehabilitation for industrial radiographic testing method - Qualification questions about materials science and manufacturing defects of castings and welding and comparison between non-destructive testing methods.

  13. Annual meeting 1996 'Nondestructive materials testing'. German, Austrian and Swiss nondestructive materials testing standards as mirrored by international standardization. Vol. 1. Lectures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    The volume contains 45 lectures which were given at the annual meeting of the German Society for Nondestructive Testing on May 13-15, 1996 at Lindau. The main subjects were: Standardization of nondestructive testing, irradiation testing, ultrasonic testing and electromagnetic processes. 13 individual articles were included in the ENERGY database. (MM) [de

  14. Annual meeting 1996 'Nondestructive material testing'. German, Austrian and Swiss nondestructive materials testing standards as mirrored by international standardization. Vol. 2. Posters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    The volume contains 49 poster articles which were presented at the Annual Meeting of the German Society for Nondestructive Testing at Lindau on May 13-15, 1996. The main subjects were: Standardization of nondestructive testing, irradiation testing, ultrasonic testing and electromagnetic processes. 16 individual articles were included in the ENERGY databank. (MM) [de

  15. On the Use of Accelerated Test Methods for Characterization of Advanced Composite Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gates, Thomas S.

    2003-01-01

    A rational approach to the problem of accelerated testing for material characterization of advanced polymer matrix composites is discussed. The experimental and analytical methods provided should be viewed as a set of tools useful in the screening of material systems for long-term engineering properties in aerospace applications. Consideration is given to long-term exposure in extreme environments that include elevated temperature, reduced temperature, moisture, oxygen, and mechanical load. Analytical formulations useful for predictive models that are based on the principles of time-based superposition are presented. The need for reproducible mechanisms, indicator properties, and real-time data are outlined as well as the methodologies for determining specific aging mechanisms.

  16. 3D flow simulation of liquid lead in the erosion test facility for ADS materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muscher, Heinrich; Kieser, Martin; Weisenburger, Alfons; Mueller, Georg

    2009-01-01

    Future nuclear reactor concepts, such as GEN IV or ADS use liquid lead for neutron multiplication and coolant purposes. The design concepts assumes that the structural material is in contact with the liquid metal at temperatures up to 600 C and a flow rate of 20 m/s. Therefore a significant effect of liquid metal corrosion/erosion is expected. The paper describes the fluid dynamical simulation of the ADS erosion test facility. Earlier studies on the laminar flow modeling were completed by introduction of transient behavior and extended to 3D-models. The results for liquid lead should be transferable to LBE (lead bismuth eutectic). Further work has to include a mass transport model for modeling of the global isothermal erosion rate of the structural material dependent on time (for liquid lead and LBE).

  17. System Management on Accreditation Test for Radioactive Material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sohn, S. C.; Kim, Y. B.; Kim, H.W.

    2009-01-01

    The nuclear analytical service was conducted for the determination of nuclear speciation, isotope ratio, elemental analysis, and nuclear analysis in about 184 samples. Their results were recorded as an accreditation report. In this research, the quality control through the verification of uncertainty and confidence was carried out by participation in mutual cross-comparison test administrated by international accreditation organization. The quality control for the analytical counting devices was also conducted using the standard references

  18. Evaluation of candidate magnetohydrodynamic materials for the U-02 Phase III test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marchant, D.D.; Bates, J.L.

    1978-06-01

    As part of a cooperative U.S.--U.S.S.R. program, electrode and insulator materials tested at the Westinghouse Electrode Systems Test Facility in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, were evaluated. From this evaluation materials will be selected for use in the third phase of tests being conducted in the U-02 magnetohydrodynamics test facility in the Soviet Union. Electrode and insulator materials were examined with both an optical microscope and a scanning electron microscope. The cathodes were found to behave differently from the anodes; most notably, the cathodes showed greater potassium interaction. The lanthanum chromite-based electrodes (excluding those fabricated by plasma-spraying) are recommended for testing in the U-02 Phase III test. Hotpressed, fused-grained MgO and sintered MgAl 2 O 4 are recommended as insulator materials. The electrode attachment techniques used in the Westinghouse Tests were inadequate and need to be modified for the U-02 test

  19. Irradiation tests on bitumen and bitumen coated materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tabardel-Brian, R.; Rodier, J.; Lefillatre, G.

    1969-01-01

    The use of bitumen as a material for coating high-activity products calls for prior study of the resistance of bitumen to irradiation. After giving briefly the methods of preparation of bitumen- coated products, this report lists the equipment which has been used for carrying out the β and γ irradiations of these products, and gives the analytical results obtained as a function of the dose rates chosen and of the total integrated dose. Finally, some conclusions have been drawn concerning the best types of bitumen. It should be stressed that some bitumens apparently underwent no degradation whatsoever nor any volume increase, for a total integrated dose of 1.8 x 10 10 rads. (authors) [fr

  20. Improved Nanomechanical Test Techniques for Surface Engineered Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen R. Goodes

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The development and implementation of a wide range of innovative nanomechanical test techniques to solve tribological problems in applications as diverse as biomedical and automotive are described in this review. For improved wear resistance and durability, the importance of understanding the system response rather than the coating-only properties is emphasized. There are many applications involving mechanical contact where the key to understanding the problem is to test at higher load and to combine reliable measurements taken across different length scales using both nano- and micro-indentation and related wear measurement techniques which more closely simulate contact conditions to fully understand the mechanical behaviour and hence deliver improved application performance. Results are presented with the NanoTest platform for applications for biomedical devices and surface engineering of lightweight alloys for the automotive industry. By combining results with different techniques it is possible to postulate predictive design rules – based on the elastic and plastic deformation energies involved in contact - to aid the reliable optimisation of mechanical properties in the various contact situations in the different applications.