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Sample records for massive pleural effusion

  1. MASSIVE PLEURAL EFFUSION: A CASE REPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Putu Bayu Dian Tresna Dewi

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Pleural effusion is abnormal fluid accumulation within pleural cavity between the parietal pleura and visceralis pleura, either transudation or exudates. A 47 year-old female presented with dyspneu, cough, and decreased of appetite. She had history of right lung tumor. Physical examination revealed asymmetric chest movement where right part of lung was lagged during breathing, vocal fremitus on the right chest was decreased, dullness at the right chest, decreased vesicular sound in the right chest, enlargement of supraclavicular and colli dextra lymph nodes, and hepatomegali. Complete blood count showed leukocytosis. Clinical chemistry analysis showed hipoalbumin and decreased liver function. Blood gas analysis showed hypoxemia. Pleural fluid analysis showed an exudates, murky red liquid color filled with erythrocytes, number of cells. Cytological examination showed existence of a non-small cell carcinoma tends adeno type. From chest X-ray showed massive right pleural effusion. Based on history, physical examination and investigations, she was diagnosed with massive pleural effusion et causa suspected malignancy. She had underwent pleural fluid evacuation and treated with analgesics and antibiotics.

  2. Massive pleural effusion in a young woman

    OpenAIRE

    Ghiringhelli, Paolo; Cattaneo, Roberto; Tiso, Angelo; Cesaro, Claudia

    2012-01-01

    Pleural effusion is a clinical manifestation shared by several underlying pathologies. The differential diagnosis is based on the clinical history, the physical examination, the analysis of the pleural fluid, and the laboratory data (mainly blood tests). There are cases, such as the patient described, where TC is not enough, and unusual imaging techniques are required for the study of pleural effusion, i.e. magnetic resonance cholangiography, cholangiopancreatography (MRCP) and endoscopic ret...

  3. Massive pleural effusion in a young woman

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    Paolo Ghiringhelli

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Pleural effusion is a clinical manifestation shared by several underlying pathologies. The differential diagnosis is based on the clinical history, the physical examination, the analysis of the pleural fluid, and the laboratory data (mainly blood tests. There are cases, such as the patient described, where TC is not enough, and unusual imaging techniques are required for the study of pleural effusion, i.e. magnetic resonance cholangiography, cholangiopancreatography (MRCP and endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP.This case analyses a 42-year-old female patient who arrived with progressive dyspnoea, chest pain, cough, a history of alcohol abuse, and a recent episode of acute pancreatitis. The physical examination revealed signs of right-sided pleural effusion. These features, together with laboratory data, made it possible to pose the diagnosis of pancreaticopleural fistula, to treat it, and to obtain a complete healing in a two-month period.

  4. A Case of Massive Pleural Effusion: Pleurodesis by Bleomycin.

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    Hasan, R; Khan, O S; Aftabuddin, M; Razzaque, A M; Chowdhury, G A

    2016-04-01

    Malignant pleural effusion is a common complication of primary and metastatic pleural malignancies. Pleurodesis for the management of malignant pleural effusion is intended to achieve symphysis between parietal and visceral pleura, and to prevent relapse of pleural effusion. Many chemical agents are tried to induce inflammation and damage of the pleural mesothelial layer to achieve this symphysis. Hemorrhagic pleural effusion, especially in the right hemithorax commonly occurs as presentation of primary and metastatic pleural malignancies. This case reports massive right-sided hemorrhagic pleural effusion as the sole manifestation of primary lung cancer in a 45 year old man. Patient attended our department of thoracic surgery complaining of cough, shortness of breath and right sided chest pain. A chest X-ray and chest computer tomography (CT) radiograph shows right sided massive pleural effusion. Right sided tube thoracotomy done. Pleural fluid study was done. Fluid for cytopathology was positive for malignant cell. Computed tomography guided fine needle aspiration cytology from right lung lesion was also done. Diagnosis was as small cell carcinoma. Pleural effusion resolved after 9(th) post operative day of chest tube insertion. Bleomycin pleurodesis was done. Day after pleurodesis intra thoracic tube was removed and patient was discharged from hospital on 10(th) Post operative day with an advice to attend the oncology department for further treatment. The protocol of tube thoracostomy and chemical pleurodesis was almost always successful in giving symptomatic relief of respiratory distress for a considerable period of time. However, chemical pleurodesis is not possible in all cases of malignant pleural effusion because it has got potential complication including death.

  5. Pleural effusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Complications of pleural effusion may include: Lung damage Infection that turns into an abscess, called an empyema Air in the chest cavity ( pneumothorax ) after drainage of the effusion Pleural thickening (scarring of the lining of the ...

  6. Pleural effusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jimenez Q, Andres; Camacho D, Fidel

    2009-01-01

    The pleural effusion is defined as the abnormal accumulation of liquid in the pleural space that produces to itself for increase in the production or decrease of the drainage, common reasons in clinics disorders. Inside the reasons of the increase of the production we can enunciate an increase of the capillary pleural permeability, decrease of the oncotic pressure capillary and increase of the hydrostatic capillary pressure, there are less clear the reasons of the decrease of the drainage but are outlined the alteration of the lymphatic pleural contractibility , infiltration of vessels and lymphatic nodules for neoplasia diseases and alterations to pleural level that they should prevent that the this liquid touch the lymphatic pores. The objective of this review is the analysis of the physiological bases of the pleura and the production of the pleural liquid, the physiological aspects of the pleural effusion, the approach of the diagnose and the medical and surgical managing of the same one for the different reasons that produce it.

  7. Parapneumonic pleural effusion

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    Pleural effusion - pneumonia ... Pneumonia, most commonly from bacteria, causes parapneumonic pleural effusion. ... Call your provider if you have symptoms of pleural effusion. Call your provider or go to the emergency ...

  8. IgG4-related pleural disease presenting as a massive bilateral effusion.

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    Ishida, Atsuko; Furuya, Naoki; Nishisaka, Takashi; Mineshita, Masamichi; Miyazawa, Teruomi

    2014-07-01

    A 74-year-old woman with massive bilateral pleural effusion, which was exudative in nature, and with mononuclear cell predominance underwent a pleuroscopy. Parietal pleura were thickened and partly reddish in color. Biopsy specimens taken from the parietal pleura revealed lymphoplasmacytic inflammation with fibrosis. As her performance status rapidly worsened with thoracentesis, we performed bilateral pleurodesis using talc. Pathologic evaluation of the pleural biopsy specimen with immunohistochemical staining revealed 91 IgG4-positive plasma cells per high-power field and an IgG4/IgG ratio of 91%. Thus, the diagnosis of pleuritis from IgG4-related disease was established. Our case suggests that IgG4-related disease is one of the causes of pleural effusion, and it should be included in the differential diagnosis of unexplained pleuritis.

  9. Diagnostic Tools of Pleural Effusion

    OpenAIRE

    Na, Moon Jun

    2014-01-01

    Pleural effusion is not a rare disease in Korea. The diagnosis of pleural effusion is very difficult, even though the patients often complain of typical symptoms indicating of pleural diseases. Pleural effusion is characterized by the pleural cavity filled with transudative or exudative pleural fluids, and it is developed by various etiologies. The presence of pleural effusion can be confirmed by radiological studies including simple chest radiography, ultrasonography, or computed tomography....

  10. Pleural effusion in the dog and cat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forrester, S.D.

    1990-01-01

    The most common causes of pleural effusion and their management are discussed under the headings: pleural anatomy; pleural fluid movement; mechanisms of pleural effusion; diagnosis; patterns of pleural effusion

  11. Diagnostic Tools of Pleural Effusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Pleural effusion is not a rare disease in Korea. The diagnosis of pleural effusion is very difficult, even though the patients often complain of typical symptoms indicating of pleural diseases. Pleural effusion is characterized by the pleural cavity filled with transudative or exudative pleural fluids, and it is developed by various etiologies. The presence of pleural effusion can be confirmed by radiological studies including simple chest radiography, ultrasonography, or computed tomography. Identifying the causes of pleural effusions by pleural fluid analysis is essential for proper treatments. This review article provides information on the diagnostic approaches of pleural effusions and further suggested ways to confirm their various etiologies, by using the most recent journals for references. PMID:24920946

  12. Tuberculous Pleural Effusion

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    Cohen, Leah A.; Light, Richard W.

    2015-01-01

    When a patient presents with new pleural effusion, the diagnosis of tuberculous (TB) pleuritis should be considered. The patient is at risk for developing pulmonary or extrapulmonary TB if the diagnosis is not made. Between 3% and 25% of patients with TB will have TB pleuritis. The incidence of TB pleuritis is higher in patients who are human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive. Pleural fluid is an exudate that usually has a predominance of lymphocytes. The easiest way to diagnose TB pleuritis in a patient with lymphocytic pleural effusion is to demonstrate a pleural fluid adenosine deaminase level above 40 IU/L. The treatment for TB pleuritis is the same as that for pulmonary TB. Tuberculous empyema is a rare occurrence, and the treatment is difficult. PMID:29404070

  13. Large Right Pleural Effusion

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    Robert Rowe

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available History of present illness: An 83-year-old male with a distant history of tuberculosis status post treatment and resection approximately fifty years prior presented with two days of worsening shortness of breath. He denied any chest pain, and reported his shortness of breath was worse with exertion and lying flat. Significant findings: Chest x-ray and bedside ultrasound revealed a large right pleural effusion, estimated to be greater than two and a half liters in size. Discussion: The incidence of pleural effusion is estimated to be at least 1.5 million cases annually in the United States.1 Erect posteroanterior and lateral chest radiography remains the mainstay for diagnosis of a pleural effusion; on upright chest radiography small effusions (>400cc will blunt the costophrenic angles, and as the size of an effusion grows it will begin to obscure the hemidiphragm.1 Large effusions will cause mediastinal shift away from the affected side (seen in effusions >1000cc.1 Lateral decubitus chest radiography can detect effusions greater than 50cc.1 Ultrasonography can help differentiate large pulmonary masses from effusions and can be instrumental in guiding thoracentesis.1 The patient above was comfortable at rest and was admitted for a non-emergent thoracentesis. The pulmonology team removed 2500cc of fluid, and unfortunately the patient subsequently developed re-expansion pulmonary edema and pneumothorax ex-vacuo. It is generally recommended that no more than 1500cc be removed to minimize the risk of re-expansion pulmonary edema.2

  14. [Sarcoid pleural effusion].

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    Rodríguez-Núñez, Nuria; Rábade, Carlos; Valdés, Luis

    2014-12-09

    Pleural effusion (PE) is a very uncommon manifestation of sarcoidosis. It is equally observed in men and women, can appear at any age and in all radiologic stages, though it is more common in stages i and ii. Effusions have usually a mild or medium size and mainly involve the right side. Various mechanisms can be implicated. PE will be a serous exudate if there is an increase in the capillary permeability due to direct involvement of the pleural membrane, a chylothorax if mediastinum lymph nodes compress the thoracic duct and/or the lymphatic drainage from the pleural cavity, an hemothorax if granuloma compress or invade pleural small vessels or capillaries, and even a transudate if there is compression of the inferior vena cava, atelectasis due to complete bronchial obstruction or when the resolution of the PE is incomplete with chronic thickening of visceral pleura (trapped lung). It manifests biochemically as a pauci-cellular exudate with a predominance of lymphocytes, though there can be a preponderance of eosinophils or neutrophils. Protein concentrations are usually proportionately higher than lactate dehidrogenase, adenosine deaminase is normally low and it is possible to find increased levels of CA-125 in women. The tuberculin test is negative and pleural or lung biopsies yield the diagnosis by confirming the presence of non-caseating granulomata. These PE can have a favorable self-limited outcome, even though in most cases treatment with corticosteroids is needed, while surgery is required in a few cases. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  15. [Pleural effusion: diagnosis and management].

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    Pastré, J; Roussel, S; Israël Biet, D; Sanchez, O

    2015-04-01

    Pleural effusion management is a common clinical situation associated with numerous pulmonary, pleural or extra-pulmonary diseases. A systematic approach is needed to enable a rapid diagnosis and an appropriate treatment. Pleural fluid analysis is the first step to perform which allows a presumptive diagnosis in most cases. Otherwise, further analysis of the pleural fluid or thoracic imaging or pleural biopsy may be necessary. This review aims at highlighting the important elements of the work-up required by a pleural effusion. Copyright © 2014 Société nationale française de médecine interne (SNFMI). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. A case of young woman with recurrent right pleural effusion

    OpenAIRE

    Mehta, Asmita A; Gupta, Amit; Venkitakrishnan, Rajesh

    2015-01-01

    Endomterisois is usually found in women of child-bearing age. A case is presented of massive right-sided pleural effusion caused by endometriosis. The final diagnosis was made by thoracoscopic pleural biopsy. Physicians should be aware of this potentially treatable cause of pleural effusion having excluded other possibilities such as malignancy and tuberculosis.

  17. A case of young woman with recurrent right pleural effusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asmita A Mehta

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Endomterisois is usually found in women of child-bearing age. A case is presented of massive right-sided pleural effusion caused by endometriosis. The final diagnosis was made by thoracoscopic pleural biopsy. Physicians should be aware of this potentially treatable cause of pleural effusion having excluded other possibilities such as malignancy and tuberculosis.

  18. A case of young woman with recurrent right pleural effusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Asmita A; Gupta, Amit; Venkitakrishnan, Rajesh

    2015-01-01

    Endomterisois is usually found in women of child-bearing age. A case is presented of massive right-sided pleural effusion caused by endometriosis. The final diagnosis was made by thoracoscopic pleural biopsy. Physicians should be aware of this potentially treatable cause of pleural effusion having excluded other possibilities such as malignancy and tuberculosis.

  19. Management of malignant pleural effusions.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Uzbeck, Mateen H

    2010-06-01

    Malignant pleural effusions are a common clinical problem in patients with primary thoracic malignancy and metastatic malignancy to the thorax. Symptoms can be debilitating and can impair tolerance of anticancer therapy. This article presents a comprehensive review of pharmaceutical and nonpharmaceutical approaches to the management of malignant pleural effusion, and a novel algorithm for management based on patients\\' performance status.

  20. Pleural Effusion in Multiple Myeloma.

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    Wang, Zhuo; Xia, Guoguang; Lan, Ling; Liu, Fayong; Wang, Yanxun; Liu, Baoyue; Ding, Yi; Dai, Li; Zhang, Yunjian

    2016-01-01

    Pleural effusion is rarely observed in patients with multiple myeloma (MM). Myeloma cell infiltration or invasion to the pleura is very rare. This study aimed to investigate the clinical characteristics of pleural effusion in patients with MM. We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of patients diagnosed with pleural effusion, MM, and pleural effusion with MM between 2004 and 2014 at Beijing Jishuitan Hospital. The present study included patients with pleural effusion who underwent cytological, bacteriological, biochemical and other testing. The cytopathology of abnormal pleural effusion cells was not diagnostic, thus flow cytometry was performed. MM was defined using the diagnosis standard of NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology (NCCN Guidelines) 2014 for MM. This study included 3,480 pleural effusion patients and 319 MM patients. There were 34 patients with both MM and pleural effusion (17 men and 17 women). The average age was 63 years (range, 48-84 years). Pleural effusion with MM was caused by congestive heart disease, chronic renal failure, hypoalbuminemia, pulmonary infarctions, cirrhosis, pulmonary arterial hypertension, parapneumonic effusion, tuberculous pleural effusion, and myelomatous pleural effusion (MPE). The diagnosis of MPE was confirmed by the detection of myeloma cells in the pleural fluid using flow cytometric analyses. There were only 2 MPE cases in our study. The first MPE case was a woman. The first clinical manifestation was pleural effusion, and the diagnosis was non-secretory MM, DSS stage IIIA (Durie-Salmon staging system); ISS stage I (the International Staging System). The second MPE case was a man who was diagnosed with MM IgA-κ, DSS stage IIIA; ISS stage II. The detection rate of MPE was very low. MPE tended to present with yellow exudates and the lack of physical and chemical characteristics. Furthermore, patients with MPE exhibited many yellow nodules on the pleura. These nodules were lobulated and had abundant

  1. Management of malignant pleural effusion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boshuizen, R.C.

    2017-01-01

    The first part of this thesis focuses on IPCs (indwelling pleural catheters) in malignant pleural effusion (MPE) management. In an invited review, the (dis)advantages and prejudices of IPCs are described (Chapter1.1). Since costs and reimbursement issues are the main reasons in the Netherlands to

  2. A very complicated pleural effusion

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    J.P. Gilbert*

    2013-12-01

    Discussion: Re-expansion pulmonary oedema is a recognised complication of large pleural effusion drainage. The mechanism remains unclear, although reduced left ventricular function, in this case from a possible pericardial effusion, may be a precipitant. To prevent this phenomenon the British Thoracic Society recommends draining a maximum of 1.5 litres of fluid. This case was further complicated by a pneumothorax; again a recognised complication, especially if there is underlying poor compliance of the lung parenchyma. Re-expansion pulmonary oedema has an incidence of <1% and pneumothorax <5%. Their occurrence has not previously been reported simultaneously. Large pleural effusions are commonly encountered in clinical practice in South Africa. The existence of multiple co-morbidities including tuberculosis, HIV and impaired cardiac function may complicate their management. This case highlights the need for close monitoring and controlled drainage of pleural effusions in emergency practice.

  3. Postoperative pleural effusion following upper abdominal surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, P H; Jepsen, S B; Olsen, A D

    1989-01-01

    amylases, sex, smoking habits, or weight. There was no correlation between the localization of the pleural effusions and that of the abdominal incisions. There was a positive correlation between atelectasis and pleural effusion, but no evidence of a causal relationship. Pleural effusions might be related...

  4. [Pleural lymphatics and effusions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mordant, P; Arame, A; Legras, A; Le Pimpec Barthes, F; Riquet, M

    2013-06-01

    The pleural lymphatic system has a great absorption capacity. Its most known function is fluid resorption. The pleura which cover the lungs (visceral pleura), the mediastinum, diaphragm and thoracic wall (parietal pleura) are formed by a mesothelial cell layer (mesothelium). This permeable layer is in direct contact with the vascular endothelium. The mesothelium is based over a connective tissue (interstitium) containing the blood and lymphatic vessels. The primary lymphatic vessels drain interstitium but are also in direct contact with pleural space by the stoma or openings, situated in the lower parts of parietal pleura, i.e: diaphragm, over lower ribs and mediastinum but not existing in the adjacent visceral pleura. In addition, a part of interstitial pulmonary fluid entered in the pleural cavity by passing the visceral pleura would be absorbed by these openings. The resorption process is active and directly related to the function of smooth muscles of lymphatic vessels. Besides resorption, we must emphasize that this "pumping" activity is permanent and the origin of negative pressure (the pleural void) in pleural cavity, a unique property. The other resorbed elements are molecules, bacterial and cellular debris, cells, red blood and cancer cells. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  5. Ultrasonographic Observations of the Pleural Effusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Dong Hoo; Park, Sung Soo; Lee, Chung Hee

    1982-01-01

    Five cases of patients with pleural effusion were evaluated by the grey-scale ultrasonography. Ultrasonography of pleural effusion in each case was represented as fluid accumulation within the pleural cavity with anechoic crescent moon shape or saddle appearance marginated by diaphragm. Ptosis of the liver with demonstrable right diaphragm was assessment in the severe right pleural effusion. it is emphasized that the practical advantages of the ultrasonographic approach were notable both in establishing diagnosis and in treatment of pleural effusion,with special regarding of noninvasiveness particularly in the women of pregnancy, of staging in the patient with malignant lymphoma, and of safety in a subsequent thoracentesis under the ultrasonographic guidance

  6. Ultrasonographic Observations of the Pleural Effusion

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    Lee, Dong Hoo; Park, Sung Soo; Lee, Chung Hee [Hanyang University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1982-12-15

    Five cases of patients with pleural effusion were evaluated by the grey-scale ultrasonography. Ultrasonography of pleural effusion in each case was represented as fluid accumulation within the pleural cavity with anechoic crescent moon shape or saddle appearance marginated by diaphragm. Ptosis of the liver with demonstrable right diaphragm was assessment in the severe right pleural effusion. it is emphasized that the practical advantages of the ultrasonographic approach were notable both in establishing diagnosis and in treatment of pleural effusion,with special regarding of noninvasiveness particularly in the women of pregnancy, of staging in the patient with malignant lymphoma, and of safety in a subsequent thoracentesis under the ultrasonographic guidance

  7. Physiology of breathlessness associated with pleural effusions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Rajesh; Jenkins, Susan; Eastwood, Peter R.; Lee, Y.C. Gary; Singh, Bhajan

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of review Pleural effusions have a major impact on the cardiorespiratory system. This article reviews the pathophysiological effects of pleural effusions and pleural drainage, their relationship with breathlessness, and highlights key knowledge gaps. Recent findings The basis for breathlessness in pleural effusions and relief following thoracentesis is not well understood. Many existing studies on the pathophysiology of breathlessness in pleural effusions are limited by small sample sizes, heterogeneous design and a lack of direct measurements of respiratory muscle function. Gas exchange worsens with pleural effusions and improves after thoracentesis. Improvements in ventilatory capacity and lung volumes following pleural drainage are small, and correlate poorly with the volume of fluid drained and the severity of breathlessness. Rather than lung compression, expansion of the chest wall, including displacement of the diaphragm, appears to be the principle mechanism by which the effusion is accommodated. Deflation of the thoracic cage and restoration of diaphragmatic function after thoracentesis may improve diaphragm effectiveness and efficiency, and this may be an important mechanism by which breathlessness improves. Effusions do not usually lead to major hemodynamic changes, but large effusions may cause cardiac tamponade and ventricular diastolic collapse. Patients with effusions can have impaired exercise capacity and poor sleep quality and efficiency. Summary Pleural effusions are associated with abnormalities in gas exchange, respiratory mechanics, respiratory muscle function and hemodynamics, but the association between these abnormalities and breathlessness remains unclear. Prospective studies should aim to identify the key mechanisms of effusion-related breathlessness and predictors of improvement following pleural drainage. PMID:25978627

  8. Ultrasound guided pleural biopsy in undiagnosed exudative pleural effusion patients

    OpenAIRE

    Adel S. Ahmed; Mostafa I. Ragab; Alaa eldin M. Elgazaar; Nagwan A. Ismail

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Pleural biopsy for pathological confirmation is the standard diagnostic procedure for pleural diseases, transthoracic ultrasonography (TUS) has evolved as an important imaging tool for diagnosing pleural and pulmonary conditions. Aim of the study: To assess the diagnostic yield of TUS guided pleural biopsy versus both CT guided and thoracoscopic pleural biopsy in the diagnosis of undiagnosed exudative pleural effusion. Patients and methods: The study was conducted at chest...

  9. Pleural biopsy for indeterminate cases of pleural effusion | Ukadike ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Materials and Methods: This is a retrospective study of all consecutive cases of pleural biopsies done for indeterminate cause of pleural effusion in the University of Benin Teaching Hospital from December 2008 to May 2010, a total of 18months. Blind pleural biopsy was carried out using the Abram's Pleural Biopsy Needle.

  10. Lymphocytic Pleural Effusion in Acute Melioidosis

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    Kuo-Mou Chung

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available An endemic outbreak of melioidosis developed in southern Taiwan following a flood caused by a typhoon in July 2005. A total of 27 patients were diagnosed with the acute and indigenous form of pulmonary melioidosis. Parapneumonic pleural effusions were noted on chest X-rays in six patients. Thoracentesis was done in three patients and all revealed lymphocyte predominance in differential cell count. Burkholderia pseudomallei was isolated in the pleural effusion in one of them. All three patients survived after antibiotic treatment. Lymphocytic pleural effusion is generally seen in tuberculosis or malignancy. However, our findings suggest that melioidosis should be considered in the differential diagnosis of lymphocytic pleural effusion.

  11. Microfilaria in pleural effusion: An unusual association

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    Rehena Sarkar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Lymphatic filariasis is a major public health problem in tropical countries and India is endemic for it. However, lymphatic filariasis presenting as pleural effusion is an unusual manifestation and finding microfilaria in pleural effusion without any lung pathology is rare. We report a case of pleural effusion without any underlying lung pathology and normal blood picture. Clinical cure occurred after treatment with diethyl-carbamazepine. Filariasis should be kept in view while considering the differential diagnosis of idiopathic pleural effusion, especially in endemic countries.

  12. Management of Septated Malignant Pleural Effusions

    OpenAIRE

    Banka, Radhika; Terrington, Dayle; Mishra, Eleanor K.

    2018-01-01

    Purpose of Review: We review recent studies of patients with septated malignant pleural effusions, to understand what the clinical implications for patients are and what evidence-based methods should be used to manage these effusions. Recent Findings: Fibrinolytics improve effusion size assessed radiologically in patients with a chest drain inserted for septated malignant pleural effusions but this does not translate into an improvement in breathlessness relief or pleurodesis success. Fibrino...

  13. Pleural effusion: diagnosis, treatment, and management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karkhanis, Vinaya S; Joshi, Jyotsna M

    2012-01-01

    A pleural effusion is an excessive accumulation of fluid in the pleural space. It can pose a diagnostic dilemma to the treating physician because it may be related to disorders of the lung or pleura, or to a systemic disorder. Patients most commonly present with dyspnea, initially on exertion, predominantly dry cough, and pleuritic chest pain. To treat pleural effusion appropriately, it is important to determine its etiology. However, the etiology of pleural effusion remains unclear in nearly 20% of cases. Thoracocentesis should be performed for new and unexplained pleural effusions. Laboratory testing helps to distinguish pleural fluid transudate from an exudate. The diagnostic evaluation of pleural effusion includes chemical and microbiological studies, as well as cytological analysis, which can provide further information about the etiology of the disease process. Immunohistochemistry provides increased diagnostic accuracy. Transudative effusions are usually managed by treating the underlying medical disorder. However, a large, refractory pleural effusion, whether a transudate or exudate, must be drained to provide symptomatic relief. Management of exudative effusion depends on the underlying etiology of the effusion. Malignant effusions are usually drained to palliate symptoms and may require pleurodesis to prevent recurrence. Pleural biopsy is recommended for evaluation and exclusion of various etiologies, such as tuberculosis or malignant disease. Percutaneous closed pleural biopsy is easiest to perform, the least expensive, with minimal complications, and should be used routinely. Empyemas need to be treated with appropriate antibiotics and intercostal drainage. Surgery may be needed in selected cases where drainage procedure fails to produce improvement or to restore lung function and for closure of bronchopleural fistula. PMID:27147861

  14. Pleural effusions in the postpartum period

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stark, P.; Pollack, M.S.

    1986-01-01

    We report on the high frequency of pleural effusions in the immediate postpartum period. Forty-four out of 45 women who examined within 24-48 h after delivery showed evidence of pleural fluid. Under these circumstances, this pleural abnormality should not be considered an indicator of serious cardiopulmonary disease. (orig.) [de

  15. Mast cells mediate malignant pleural effusion formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannou, Anastasios D; Marazioti, Antonia; Spella, Magda; Kanellakis, Nikolaos I; Apostolopoulou, Hara; Psallidas, Ioannis; Prijovich, Zeljko M; Vreka, Malamati; Zazara, Dimitra E; Lilis, Ioannis; Papaleonidopoulos, Vassilios; Kairi, Chrysoula A; Patmanidi, Alexandra L; Giopanou, Ioanna; Spiropoulou, Nikolitsa; Harokopos, Vaggelis; Aidinis, Vassilis; Spyratos, Dionisios; Teliousi, Stamatia; Papadaki, Helen; Taraviras, Stavros; Snyder, Linda A; Eickelberg, Oliver; Kardamakis, Dimitrios; Iwakura, Yoichiro; Feyerabend, Thorsten B; Rodewald, Hans-Reimer; Kalomenidis, Ioannis; Blackwell, Timothy S; Agalioti, Theodora; Stathopoulos, Georgios T

    2015-06-01

    Mast cells (MCs) have been identified in various tumors; however, the role of these cells in tumorigenesis remains controversial. Here, we quantified MCs in human and murine malignant pleural effusions (MPEs) and evaluated the fate and function of these cells in MPE development. Evaluation of murine MPE-competent lung and colon adenocarcinomas revealed that these tumors actively attract and subsequently degranulate MCs in the pleural space by elaborating CCL2 and osteopontin. MCs were required for effusion development, as MPEs did not form in mice lacking MCs, and pleural infusion of MCs with MPE-incompetent cells promoted MPE formation. Once homed to the pleural space, MCs released tryptase AB1 and IL-1β, which in turn induced pleural vasculature leakiness and triggered NF-κB activation in pleural tumor cells, thereby fostering pleural fluid accumulation and tumor growth. Evaluation of human effusions revealed that MCs are elevated in MPEs compared with benign effusions. Moreover, MC abundance correlated with MPE formation in a human cancer cell-induced effusion model. Treatment of mice with the c-KIT inhibitor imatinib mesylate limited effusion precipitation by mouse and human adenocarcinoma cells. Together, the results of this study indicate that MCs are required for MPE formation and suggest that MC-dependent effusion formation is therapeutically addressable.

  16. Role of Bronchoscopy in Malignant Pleural effusion

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    Gomathi. R. G.

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to assess the role of Bronchoscopy in plural effusion in cancer condition. Pleural effusion is one of the commonest problems with which patients present to the hospital. Around a million patients worldwide develop pleural effusion each year. This is a Prospective and Observational Study. All patients diagnosed to have pleural effusion by xray, clinical examination and ultrasound examination of pleura if needed will undergo informed. All 32 patients underwent bronchoscopy procedure, 30 patients had endobronchial mass and biopsy was done which was positive for malignancy and 2 patients had bronchial wash cytology positive for malignancy We conclude that bronchoscopy has a definite role in the etiological diagnosis of pleural effusion.

  17. Evaluation of lymphocytic exudative pleural effusion with pleural biopsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khurram, M.; Jaffery, A.H.; Khar, Hamama-tul-Bushra; Malik, M.F.; Javed, S.; Burki, U.F.; Khan, B.A.; Ali, A.

    2002-01-01

    Objective: Evaluation of lymphocytic exudative pleural effusion by histopathological examination of pleural biopsy in patients with suspected tuberculous or malignant pleural effusion. Place and Duration of Study: The study was conducted at Pulmonology Department, Pakistan Institute of Medical Sciences, Islamabad and DHQ Teaching Hospital, Rawalpindi for two years 1999-2000. Subjects and Methods: A total of 120 patients with exudative pleural effusion underwent closed pleural biopsy with Abram's needle in standard way. Average 4 biopsy specimens were obtained in each patient which were examined histopathologically. Patients in whom a definite diagnosis was not possible were further investigated with repeat pleural biopsy, sputum examinations, bronchoscopy etc. Results definite histopathological diagnosis with pleural biopsy was possible in 59 (49.16% patients, including 13 diagnosed on repeat pleural biopsy. Two commonest diagnoses made were tuberculosis and adenocarcinoma, 64.40% and 13.55% respectively. Conclusion: Histopathological evaluation of pleural biopsy specimens can lead to diagnosis in 49.16% patients with exudative lymphocytic pleural effusion. (author)

  18. Dissecting aneurysm of arch and descending thoracic aorta presenting as a left sided hemorrhagic pleural effusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shamim Shelley

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The most common cause of massive hemorrhagic effusion is malignancy. Herein we present a case of dissecting aneurysm of descending thoracic aorta presenting initially with shortness of breath due to left sided massive pleural effusion. Effusion was hemorrhagic in nature with high hematocrit value. CT scan of thorax with CT angiogram was done and that revealed the diagnosis.

  19. Computed tomography (CT) findings of the pleural metastasis effusion: the examination of 100 patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arenas, J. J.; Alonso, S.; Gil, S.; Fernandez, F.; Lloret, M.

    1999-01-01

    To evaluate the computed tomography (CT) findings in a series of 100 pleural metastasis effusions. A retrospective study was carried out that consisted of assessing the CT images of 100 malignant pleural metastasis effusions, evaluating the amount of the effusion, its distribution, the presence of swelling or nodules in the different pleural surfaces, the existence and the characteristics of the extrapleural fat and the changes in other locations different to the pleural cavity, mainly the mediastinum and the pulmonary parenchyma. The effusion was located in 12 patients. The amount of the effusion was slight in 14% and massive in 10% of the sick patients. Pleural nodules were detected in 19% of the studies, in all those that affected the costal parental pleura, being less frequent in the other pleural surfaces. The costal parental pleura was swollen in 43% of the sick patients. 52 sick patients did not have any swelling nor pleural nodules, with the pleural effusion being the only sign of pleural metastasis. Changes in the rest of the thorax were frequent in relation to the malignant illness that causes the effusion and appeared in 67% of the sick patients. The patients with pleural effusions of malignant etiology showed variable CT findings, that in general were non-specific, and in almost half the cases no pleural changes can be seen apart from the effusion. (Author) 13 refs

  20. An undiagnosed pleural effusion with surprising consequences

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    A.G. Casalini

    2017-01-01

    With this case report, we would like to underline the importance of making a correct diagnosis of any pleural effusion as soon as possible by at least a thoracocentesis. If untreated, tuberculosis may easily disseminate to other organs. Some considerations and suggestions for antibiotic treatment of pleural effusion will also be given, since many antibiotics have some anti-tuberculosis effect and may delay the diagnosis of this infectious disease.

  1. MR imaging of pleural and peritoneal effusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiono, Takahiro; Yoshikawa, Kohki; Takenaka, Eiichi; Hisamatsu, Katsuji

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the efficacy of MR imaging in predicting the quality of ascites and pleural effusion. MR examinations of 20 patients with different benign or malignant diseases accompanied with ascites or pleural effusion were retrospectively studied. Results were compared with histopathological findings. On T 1 - and T 2 -weighted images, the MR intensity of the effusion depended mainly on the concentration of protein, whereas on gradient echo images, it depended mainly on the concentration of blood. MR examination was useful in non-invasively differentiating exudative or hemorrhagic effusion from serous effusion. Knowledge or inference of the quality of effusion can direct MR interpretation and may improve diagnostic accuracy. (author)

  2. Yield of abrams needle pleural biopsy in exudative pleural effusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, I.N.; Zaman, M.; Khan, N.; Jadoon, H.; Ahmed, A.

    2009-01-01

    Pleural effusion is the abnormal collection of fluid in the pleural space resulting from excessive fluid production or decreased absorption and it is one of the most common clinical conditions that we come across in pulmonology clinics and in hospitals. The objective of prospective study was to evaluate the diagnostic role of Abrams Needle Biopsy in Exudative Pleural Effusion The study was performed at the Department of Pulmonology, Ayub Teaching Hospital, Abbottabad over a period of 1 year, i.e., January 2008 to December 2008. Sixty-three patients of either sex and all ages with exudative pleural effusion, on whom Abrams Needle Biopsy was performed were included in the study. Minimum of four specimens from each patient were taken and histopathology done. Out of 63 patients, histopathology revealed the cause in 60 (95%) cases. Tuberculosis, malignancy and rheumatoid pleurisy were confirmed in 34, 24, and 2 cases respectively. Specimens of 3 patients did not reveal any result and showed non-specific inflammation and were further investigated accordingly. The diagnostic yield of Biopsy was 95%. Pleural biopsy is still a reliable and valuable investigation in diagnosing pleural effusion, provided that adequate pleural specimen is taken. (author)

  3. Investigating a Case of Recurrent Pleural Effusion

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    Patrícia Rodrigues

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe the case of a patient with long-standing Parkinson's disease and recurrent bilateral pleural effusions. The pleural fluid was an exudate, rich in normal lymphocytes, and the echocardiogram, chest computerized axial tomography, and immunological, microbiological and cytological studies were negative. The patient had been taking bromocriptine, which can be related to chronic pleural effusions. Using Pubmed, we found about 40 cases of pleuropulmonary changes or constrictive pericarditis that were related to bromocriptine. We decided to suspend this drug, with resolution of the pleural effusion and respiratory complaints for more than a year now. We discuss possible underlining mechanisms for this and emphasize the importance of collecting the past medical history and medication and of considering possible iatrogenic effects.

  4. Vascular endothelial growth factor in diagnosis of pleural effusion

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    Nasr H. Khalil

    2017-01-01

    Conclusion: VEGF pleural fluid level could differentiate between malignant and non malignant effusion, while could not differentiate between tuberculous and nontuberculous, or between parapneumonic and nonparapneumonic exudative effusions.

  5. Diagnostic yield of pleural biopsy in exudative pleural effusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devkota, K C; Chokhani, R; Gautam, S

    2014-09-01

    To know the diagnostic role of pleural biopsy in determining underlying etiological causes of exudative pleural effusion. A total of 47 patients, aged 16-104 years with mean age of 47.36 years, of either sex, with exudative pleural effusion underwent closed pleural biopsy with Abram's needle in standard way. Average 4-6 biopsy specimens were obtained from each patient, which were sent for histopathological examination. In this study, 47 cases of exudative pleural effusion were included, among them 26 (55.31%) cases were male and 21 (44.69%) were female with mean age 47.36 years. Cough was reported by 42 (89.36%) cases, expectoration 28 (59.57%), hemoptysis 3 (6.38%), breathlessness 27 (57.44%), wheezing 3 (6.38%), chest pain 38 (80.85%) and fever by 30 (63.82%) cases. Out of 47 cases, 28 (59.57%) cases had a positive yield, whereas in 19 (40.43%) cases the result was nonspecific inflammation. Out of 28 (59.57%) cases with positive yield 21 (44.68%) were found to have granulomatous inflammation and 10 (21.28%) cases were malignant. Among malignant pleural effusion, 4 cases were squamous cell carcinoma; 3 small cell carcinoma; 1 case adenocarcinoma and 1 case found to have mesothelioma. Tuberculosis and malignancy are the two most common causes of exudative pleural effusion in our set up. Pleural biopsy is a safe, simple and well validated diagnostic tool that helps us to differentiate between malignancy and tuberculosis.

  6. Evaluation of CT findings for diagnosis of pleural effusions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arenas-Jimenez, J.; Alonso-Charterina, S.; Fernandez-Latorre, F.; Gil-Sanchez, S.; Sanchez-Paya, J.; Lloret-Llorens, M.

    2000-01-01

    Computed tomography studies are usually used to assess patients with pleural effusions, and radiologists should be aware of the significance of different CT findings for the diagnosis of the effusion. The purpose of this study was to evaluate CT findings for etiological diagnosis of pleural effusions. Contrast-enhanced CT of the chest of 211 patients with pleural effusion of definite diagnosis were evaluated. The CT images were evaluated for the presence and extent of pleural effusion, thickening or nodules, extrapleural fat and other changes in the mediastinum or lung. The CT scans were read by two independent observers and correlation between them was evaluated. Comparison of CT findings between benign and malignant effusions, between exudates and transudates, and between empyemas and the other parapneumonic effusions were carried out. Kappa values for most CT findings were >0.85. Loculation, pleural thickening, pleural nodules, and extrapleural fat of increased density were only present in exudative effusions. Multiple pleural nodules and nodular pleural thickening were the only pleural findings limited to malignant pleural effusions. The signs were also more frequently seen in empyemas than in other parapneumonic effusions. Computed tomography findings can help to distinguish between transudates and exudates. Although there is some overlap between benign and malignant pleural effusions, pleural nodules and nodular pleural thickening were present almost exclusively in the latter. Although differences between CT findings of empyemas and the other parapneumonic effusions exist, there is no finding which can definitely differentiate between them. (orig.)

  7. [Sarcoidosis related pleural effusion: 6 case reports and literatures review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Feng; Tong, Zhaohui; Wang, Zhen; Wang, Xiaojuan; Xu, Lili

    2015-02-01

    To summarize the clinical features and the diagnosis-treatment points of sarcoidosis related pleural effusion. Six typical sarcoidosis related pleural effusion cases with pathological evidence were reviewed, and the clinical data of these cases were retrospectively analyzed and the related literatures were reviewed. The literature review was carried out respectively with "sarcoidosis", "pleural disease" and "pleural effusion" as the keywords in CNKI and PubMed database by January 2014. Six cases, including 1 male and 5 females, with sarcoidosis related pleural effusions were reported. 3 cases had bilateral effusions, 2 cases had left effusion and 1 case had right effusion. The pleural effusion routine test had a low specificity, which demonstrated that the fluid was exudate and consisted with large number of lymphocytes. 3 of these cases were diagnosed by medical thoracoscopy. Medical thoracoscopy revealed that pleural involvement was variable with multiple nodulespresent in some cases and subtle change in others. A total of 28 literatures and 92 cases with pleural involvement in sarcoidosis were retrieved from CNKI and PubMed database (time range: 2004.1-2014.1), including 59 cases of pleural effusion, 29 cases of pleural thickening, 3 cases of pneumothorax and 1 case of nodules in pleura. Pleural involvement in sarcoidosis was often misdiagnosed or mistreated as tuberculous pleurisy because the routine tests regarding pleural effusion usually had a low specificity. Medical thoracoscopy could provide clinicians with important clues to assist differentiation of the cause for non-conclusive pleural effusion in this situation.

  8. Clinical Investigation of Benign Asbestos Pleural Effusion

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    Nobukazu Fujimoto

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available There is no detailed information about benign asbestos pleural effusion (BAPE. The aim of the study was to clarify the clinical features of BAPE. The criteria of enrolled patients were as follows: (1 history of asbestos exposure; (2 presence of pleural effusion determined by chest X-ray, CT, and thoracentesis; and (3 the absence of other causes of effusion. Clinical information was retrospectively analysed and the radiological images were reviewed. There were 110 BAPE patients between 1991 and 2012. All were males and the median age at diagnosis was 74 years. The median duration of asbestos exposure and period of latency for disease onset of BAPE were 31 and 48 years, respectively. Mean values of hyaluronic acid, adenosine deaminase, and carcinoembryonic antigen in the pleural fluid were 39,840 ng/mL, 23.9 IU/L, and 1.8 ng/mL, respectively. Pleural plaques were detected in 98 cases (89.1%. Asbestosis was present in 6 (5.5% cases, rounded atelectasis was detected in 41 (37.3% cases, and diffuse pleural thickening (DPT was detected in 30 (27.3% cases. One case developed lung cancer (LC before and after BAPE. None of the cases developed malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM during the follow-up.

  9. Diagnostic imaging of small amounts of pleural fluid: pleural effusion vs. physiologic pleural fluid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocijancic, Igor

    2007-12-01

    The aim of this article is to present an overview of our 10 years clinical research work and early clinical experience with small pleural effusions. Small amounts of pleural fluid are severely difficult to identify with imaging methods (chest x-rays and ultrasound). Nevertheless, it may be an important finding, sometimes leading to a definitive diagnosis of pleural carcinomatosis, infection or other pathologic condition. Chest x-rays were used for many years for the diagnosis of small pleural effusions. Lateral decubitus chest radiographs represented a gold standard for imaging of small amounts of plural fluid for more than 80 years. In the last two decades, ultrasonography of pleural space became a leading real-time method for demonstrating small pleural effusions. Furthermore, the advent of sonographic technology actually enables detection of physiologic pleural fluid in some otherwise healthy individuals. In conclusion, new definitions of the key terms in the field of diagnostic imaging of small amounts of pleural fluid seem to be justified. We suggest that the term pleural fluid should determine physiologic pleural space condition while the term pleural effusion should only be used in the cases of pleural involvement or pleural illness.

  10. Ewing’s Sarcoma Presenting as Pleural Effusion

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    Nuzhat Husain

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available  A 20-year-old female presented to the Pulmonary Medicine Department with complaints of fever, left sided chest pain and progressive dyspnoea of four months duration. Radiological examination revealed a mass lesion with massive pleural effusion and rib erosion. Histopathology showed neoplastic cells with scanty cytoplasm, hyperchromatic nuclei and rosette formation suggestive of Ewing sarcoma. The rarity of this tumor and its unusual presentation prompted this report.

  11. Evaluation of pleural and pericardial effusions by magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tscholakoff, D.; Sechtem, U.; De Geer, G.; Schmidt, H.; Higgins, C.B.

    1987-08-01

    MR examinations of 36 patients with pleural and/or pericardial effusions were retrospectively evaluated. The purpose of this study was to determine of MR imaging is capable of differentiating between pleural and pericardial effusions of different compositions using standard electrocardiogram (ECG)-gated and nongated spin echo pulse sequences. Additional data was obtained from experimental pleural effusions in 10 dogs. The results of this study indicate that old haemorhages into the pleural or pericardial space can be differentiated from other pleural or pericardial effusions. However, further differentiation between transudates, exudates and sanguinous effusions is not possible on MR images acquired with standard spin echo pulse sequences. (orig./MG)

  12. Palliative Treatment of Malignant Pleural Effusion

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    Chenyang Liu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Malignant pleural effusion (MPE is a common clinical problem caused by cancers. Pleural effusion can be the first sign of cancer in more than 25% of patients. Lung cancer and breast cancer are the most common cancers that metastasize to the pleura in men and women, respectively. Other cancers, including, but not limited to, lymphomas, ovarian cancer, stomach cancer, and several unknown primary cancers can also lead to MPE. Dyspnea and chest pain are the most common symptoms of MPE along with other symptoms such as a cough, weight loss, anorexia, fatigue, and weakness. Aggravation of these symptoms is closely related to the rate of accumulation of pleural effusion. Treatment options to MPE are determined by the type and extent of the underlying malignancy. The major goals of the treatment are to relieve symptoms, restore functions, improve the quality of life, and minimize the duration of hospital stay and costs. Although some patients can be treated with systemic therapies, most of these treatments are temporary, and MPE would recur soon. Hence, further palliative treatments to effectively control pleural effusions and relieve symptoms are necessary. This review addresses the pathophysiology of MPE and the treatment options for patients with MPE.

  13. Diaphragmatic Hernia Masquerading as Pleural Effusion | Nalladaru ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Rupture of the diaphragm is almost always due to major trauma. We present here an unusual and rare case of late presentation of diaphragmatic hernia after an innocuous injury. The patient was initially misdiagnosed as a left pleural effusion on the basis of chest X.ray and ultrasound findings. Finally, the diagnosis was ...

  14. Diaphragmatic Hernia Masquerading as Pleural Effusion

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    As many as 30% of diaphragmatic hernias present late.[1] We present an unusual case report of a late presentation of isolated diaphragmatic injury, after apparently minor blunt trauma, which was initially misdiagnosed as pleural effusion. CASE REPORT. A 40-year-old man slipped and fell against the edge of his bath tub.

  15. Polycystic liver disease with right pleural effusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anggreini, A. Y.; Dairi, L. B.

    2018-03-01

    Polycystic liver disease (PCLD) is a condition in which multiple cysts form in the hepatic parenchyma. The polycystic liver disease is also an autosomal dominant disorder (ADPLD) caused by a mutation in a gene that encodes a protein hepatocystin. PCLD has a prevalence count of 1:200,000 people in the people of America. PCLD occurs ± 24% of patients in the third decade of age to 80% by the sixth decade. Women tend to get larger cysts and more and correlated with the number of pregnancies. The following case report of a woman, 51-years-old who was treated at Haji Adam Malik hospital Medan with a diagnosis of polycystic liver disease with right pleural effusion. Some literature has reported complications of the polycystic liver disease but rarely reported with pleural effusion presentation. The patient had already undergone a puncture of pleural fluid and after three weeks of treatment condition of the patient improved and permitted to be outgoing patient.

  16. Distribution of pleural effusion associated with ascites on abdominal CT

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    Bae, In Young; Park, Chan Sup; Yeon, Jae Woo; Jeon, Yong Sun; Choi, Sung Kyu; Chung, Won Kyun [Inha Univ. Hospital, Songnam (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-04-01

    To determine through an analysis of the location of pleural effusion associated with ascites, as seen on abdominal CT scan, differences in the distribution of pleural effusion according to the etiology and distribution of ascites. We retrospectively evaluated 77 consecutive patients in whom abdominal CT scan revealed pleural effusion associated with ascites. Patients with history of surgery or trauma and those with clinically and radiologically diagnosed lung or pleural diseases were excluded. We compared the location of pleural effusion with the etiology and distribution of ascites. Forty-two patients were suffering from hepatobiliary diseases, mainly right dominant pleural effusion (26/42, 62%). Fourteen had intraperitoneal carcinomatosis with no significant difference between the frequency of right dominant (5/14, 36%) and of left dominant (6/14, 43%) pleural effusion. Eleven patients had pancreatic diseases, with mainly left dominant pleural effusion (6/11, 55%). Patients with right dominant ascites usually had right dominant pleural effusion (22/24, 92%) and those with left dominant ascites had left dominant pleural effusion (9/10, 90%). Ascites-associated pleural effusion correlated with the anatomical location of the etiology of ascites; its laterality was, in addition, usually the same as that of ascites.

  17. Distribution of pleural effusion associated with ascites on abdominal CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bae, In Young; Park, Chan Sup; Yeon, Jae Woo; Jeon, Yong Sun; Choi, Sung Kyu; Chung, Won Kyun

    1997-01-01

    To determine through an analysis of the location of pleural effusion associated with ascites, as seen on abdominal CT scan, differences in the distribution of pleural effusion according to the etiology and distribution of ascites. We retrospectively evaluated 77 consecutive patients in whom abdominal CT scan revealed pleural effusion associated with ascites. Patients with history of surgery or trauma and those with clinically and radiologically diagnosed lung or pleural diseases were excluded. We compared the location of pleural effusion with the etiology and distribution of ascites. Forty-two patients were suffering from hepatobiliary diseases, mainly right dominant pleural effusion (26/42, 62%). Fourteen had intraperitoneal carcinomatosis with no significant difference between the frequency of right dominant (5/14, 36%) and of left dominant (6/14, 43%) pleural effusion. Eleven patients had pancreatic diseases, with mainly left dominant pleural effusion (6/11, 55%). Patients with right dominant ascites usually had right dominant pleural effusion (22/24, 92%) and those with left dominant ascites had left dominant pleural effusion (9/10, 90%). Ascites-associated pleural effusion correlated with the anatomical location of the etiology of ascites; its laterality was, in addition, usually the same as that of ascites

  18. Radionuclide Peritoneal Scintigraphy in Patients with Ascites and Pleural Effusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jae Tae; Lee, Kyu Bo; Whang, Kee Suk; Kim, Gwang Won; Chung, Byung Chun; Cho, Dong Kyu; Chung, Joon Mo

    1990-01-01

    Simultaneous presence of ascites and pleural effusion has been documented in patients with cirrhosis of the liver, renal disease, Meigs' syndrome and in patients undergoing peritoneal dialysis. Mechanisms proposed in the formation of pleural effusion in most of the above diseases are lymphatic drainage and diaphragmatic defect. But sometimes, hepatic hydrothoraxes in the absence of clinical ascites and pleural effusion secondary to pulmonary or cardiac disease are noted. It is not always possible to differentiate between pleural effusion caused by transdiaphragmatic migration of ascites and by other causes based solely on biochemical analysis. Authors performed radionuclide scintigraphy after intraperitoneal administration of 99m Tc-labeled colloid in 23 patients with both ascites and pleural effusion in order to discriminate causative mechanisms responsible for pleural effusion. Scintigraphy demonstrated the transdiaphtagmatic flow of fluid from the peritoneum to pleural cavities in 13 patients correctly. In contrast, in 5 patients with pleural effusion secondary to pulmonary, pleural and cardiac diseases, radiotracers fail to traverse the diaphragm and localize in the pleural space. Ascites draining to mediastinal lymph nodes and blocked passage of lymphatic drainage were also clarified, additionally. Conclusively, radionuclide peritoneal scintigraphy is an accurate, rapid and easy diagnostic tool in patients with both ascites and pleural effusion. It enables the causes of pleural effusion to be elucidated, as well as providing valuable information required when determining the appropriate therapy.

  19. Predictive Factors and Treatment Outcomes of Tuberculous Pleural Effusion in Patients With Cancer and Pleural Effusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jaehee; Lee, Yong Dae; Lim, Jae Kwang; Lee, Deok Heon; Yoo, Seung Soo; Lee, Shin Yup; Cha, Seung Ick; Park, Jae Yong; Kim, Chang Ho

    2017-08-01

    Patients with cancer are at an increased risk of tuberculosis. As pleural effusion has great clinical significance in patients with cancer, the differential diagnosis between tuberculous pleural effusion (TPE) and malignant pleural effusion (MPE) is important. However, the predictive factors and treatment outcomes of TPE in patients with cancer have rarely been studied. Confirmed TPE cases identified at cancer diagnosis and during anticancer management from 2008-2015 were retrospectively investigated. Patients in the study included coexisting TPE and cancer (n = 20), MPE (n = 40) and TPE without cancer (n = 40). Control groups were patients with MPE, and patients with TPE without cancer. Clinical, laboratory and pleural fluid characteristics were compared among groups. Treatment outcomes were compared between patients with TPE with and without cancer. In the final analysis, serum C-reactive protein (S-CRP) ≥3.0mg/dL and pleural fluid adenosine deaminase (ADA) ≥40U/L were independent predictors for identifying TPE in patients with cancer having pleural effusion. The combination of S-CRP with pleural fluid ADA using an "or" rule achieved a sensitivity of 100%, whereas both parameters combined in an "and" rule had a specificity of 98%. Treatment outcomes were not different between the TPE groups with and without cancer. S-CRP and pleural fluid ADA levels may be helpful for predicting TPE in patients with cancer with pleural effusion. The combination of these biomarkers provides better information for distinguishing between TPE and MPE in these patients. Treatment outcomes of TPE in patients with cancer are comparable to those in patients without cancer. Copyright © 2017 Southern Society for Clinical Investigation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Infectious pleural effusion status and treatment progress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wei; Zhang, Ze-Ming

    2017-01-01

    Pleural cavity infection continuously seriously threatens human health with continuous medical progress. From the perspective of pathophysiology, it can be divided into three stages: exudative stage, fibrin exudation and pus formation stage, and organization stage. Due to the pathogenic bacteria difference of pleural cavity infection and pulmonary infection, it is very important for disease treatment to analyze the bacteria and biochemical characteristics of the infectious pleural effusion. Most prognoses of patients have been relatively good, while for some patients, the complicated parapneumonic effusion or empyema could be evolved. Antibiotic treatment and sufficient drainage are the foundation for this treatment. No evidence can support the routine use of a fibrin agent. However, it has been reported that the plasminogen activator and deoxyribonuclease can be recommended to be applied in the pleural cavity. In case of failure on conservative medical treatment, operative treatment can be applied such as thoracoscopy and pleural decortication. According to the clinical characteristics of these patients, it is a key to research prognosis, as well as early evaluation and stratification, in the future. PMID:29268539

  1. A PRACTICAL METHOD FOR QUANTIFICATION OF PLEURAL EFFUSION BY USG

    OpenAIRE

    Swish Kumar; Dinesh Kumar; Suganita; Singh; Vijay Shankar; Rajeev; Ajay; Anjali

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The aim of this study is to find a correlation between pleural separation and amount of aspirated effusion. METHODS Total 20 adult patients with 25 effusions were taken into the study with chest x-ray showing homogeneous opacity in either one or both of the lung field, which was confirmed on USG. Only uncomplicated pleural effusion were taken into study. Effusion with septations or encysted effusion or pyothorax were excluded from the study. RESULTS...

  2. Incidence and significance of pleural effusion after hepatoma surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Jae Uoo; Im, Jung Gi; Ahn, Joong Mo; Kim, Seung Cheol; Kim, Sam Soo; Kim, Seung Hoon; Yeon, Kyung Mo

    1994-01-01

    We performed this study to evaluate the clinical significance and temporal changes of pleural effusion developed after the resection of hepatoma. We reviewed retrospectively follow-up chest radiographs of 97 patients who had undergone operation for hepatoma and had no radiologically demonstrable postoperative complications. The duration of pleural effusion was classified into five groups and the amount of pleural effusion at one week after operation was graded into four groups. Statistical significance of the relationship between the duration, amount of pleural effusion and five factors, which are location and size of tumor, age of the patients, methods of operation, and preoperative liver function, was studied respectively. Pleural effusion was developed in 63.9% (62/97) and the mean duration was 2.5 weeks. In 92% (52/56), pleural effusion disappeared spontaneously within four weeks. Patients who had hepatoma in upper portion of the right lobe developed more frequent pleural effusion which persisted longer, and was larger in amount at one week after operation(p<0.05). There were no statistically significant differences between pleural effusion and the other four factors. Pleural effusion following hepatoma surgery should not be regarded as a sign of post-operative complication, as it invariably disappears spontaneously within four weeks. Development of pleural effusion is considered to be caused by local irritation and disturbance of lymphatic flow at the diaphragm

  3. Usefulness of a pleuroperitoneal shunt for treatment of refractory pleural effusion in a patient receiving maintenance hemodialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habuka, Masato; Ito, Toru; Yoshizawa, Yuta; Matsuo, Koji; Murakami, Shuichi; Kondo, Daisuke; Kanazawa, Hiroshi; Narita, Ichiei

    2018-03-23

    Refractory pleural effusion can be a life-threatening complication in patients receiving maintenance hemodialysis. We report successful treatment of refractory pleural effusion using a Denver® pleuroperitoneal shunt in one such patient. A 54-year-old Japanese man, who had previously undergone left nephrectomy, was admitted urgently to our department because of a high C-reactive protein (CRP) level, right pleural effusion, and right renal abscess. Because antibiotics proved ineffective and his general state was deteriorating, he underwent emergency insertion of a thoracic drainage tube and nephrectomy, and hemodialysis was started. Although his general state improved slowly thereafter, the pleural effusion, which was unilateral and transudative, remained refractory and therefore he needed to be on oxygenation. To control the massive pleural effusion, a pleuroperitoneal shunt was inserted. Thereafter, his respiratory condition became stable without oxygenation and he was discharged. His general condition has since been well. Although pleural effusion is a common complication of maintenance hemodialysis, few reports have documented the use of pleuroperitoneal shunt to control refractory pleural effusion. Pleuroperitoneal shunt has been advocated as an effective and low-morbidity treatment for refractory pleural effusion, and its use for some patients with recurrent pleural effusion has also been reported, without any severe complications. In the present case, pleuroperitoneal shunt improved the patient's quality of life sufficiently to allow him to be discharged home without oxygenation. Pleuroperitoneal shunt should be considered a useful treatment option for hemodialysis patients with refractory pleural effusion.

  4. Evaluation of usefulness of pleural fluid adenosine deaminase in diagnosing tuberculous pleural effusion from empyema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijetha Shenoy

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the utility of adenosine deaminase activity in the pleural fluid for the diagnosis of tuberculous pleural effusion from empyema of non-tubercular origin. Method: A retrospective analysis of data was performed on patients who were diagnosed to have tuberculous pleural effusion and empyema of non tubercular origin. Among 46 patients at Kasturba Hospital, Manipal University, Manipal, Karnataka, India, from November 201 2 to February 2013 who underwent pleural fluid adenosine deaminase estimation, 25 patients with tuberculous pleural effusion and 21 patients with empyema were diagnosed respectively. Adenosine deaminase in pleural fluid is estimated using colorimetric, Galanti and Guisti method. Results: Pleural fluid Adenosine Deaminase levels among tuberculous pleural effusion(109.38依 53.83 , empyema (141.20依71.69 with P=0.27. Conclusion: Pleural fluid adenosine deaminase alone cannot be used as a marker for the diagnosis of tuberculous pleural effusion.

  5. Tuberculous pleural effusions: advances and controversies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allwood, Brian W.; Diacon, Andreas H.; Koegelenberg, Coenraad F. N.

    2015-01-01

    On a global scale, tuberculosis (TB) remains one of the most frequent causes of pleural effusions. Our understanding of the pathogenesis of the disease has evolved and what was once thought to be an effusion as a result of a pure delayed hypersensitivity reaction is now believed to be the consequence of direct infection of the pleural space with a cascade of events including an immunological response. Pulmonary involvement is more common than previously believed and induced sputum, which is grossly underutilised, can be diagnostic in approximately 50%. The gold standard for the diagnosis of tuberculous pleuritis remains the detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in pleural fluid, or pleural biopsy specimens, either by microscopy and/or culture, or the histological demonstration of caseating granulomas in the pleura along with acid fast bacilli (AFB). In high burden settings, however, the diagnosis is frequently inferred in patients who present with a lymphocytic predominant exudate and a high adenosine deaminase (ADA) level, which is a valuable adjunct in the diagnostic evaluation. ADA is generally readily accessible, and together with lymphocyte predominance justifies treatment initiation in patients with a high pre-test probability. Still, false-negative and false-positive results remain an issue. When adding closed pleural biopsy to ADA and lymphocyte count, diagnostic accuracy approaches that of thoracoscopy. The role of other biomarkers is less well described. Early pleural drainage may have a role in selected cases, but more research is required to validate its use and to define the subpopulation that may benefit from such interventions. PMID:26150911

  6. Proteomic study of benign and malignant pleural effusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hongqing; Tang, Zhonghao; Zhu, Huili; Ge, Haiyan; Cui, Shilei; Jiang, Weiping

    2016-06-01

    Lung adenocarcinoma can easily cause malignant pleural effusion which was difficult to discriminate from benign pleural effusion. Now there was no biomarker with high sensitivity and specificity for the malignant pleural effusion. This study used proteomics technology to acquire and analyze the protein profiles of the benign and malignant pleural effusion, to seek useful protein biomarkers with diagnostic value and to establish the diagnostic model. We chose the weak cationic-exchanger magnetic bead (WCX-MB) to purify peptides in the pleural effusion, used matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS) to obtain peptide expression profiles from the benign and malignant pleural effusion samples, established and validated the diagnostic model through a genetic algorithm (GA) and finally identified the most promising protein biomarker. A GA diagnostic model was established with spectra of 3930.9 and 2942.8 m/z in the training set including 25 malignant pleural effusion and 26 benign pleural effusion samples, yielding both 100 % sensitivity and 100 % specificity. The accuracy of diagnostic prediction was validated in the independent testing set with 58 malignant pleural effusion and 34 benign pleural effusion samples. Blind evaluation was as follows: the sensitivity was 89.6 %, specificity 88.2 %, PPV 92.8 %, NPV 83.3 % and accuracy 89.1 % in the independent testing set. The most promising peptide biomarker was identified successfully: Isoform 1 of caspase recruitment domain-containing protein 9 (CARD9), with 3930.9 m/z, was decreased in the malignant pleural effusion. This model is suitable to discriminate benign and malignant pleural effusion and CARD9 can be used as a new peptide biomarker.

  7. Characteristics of Patients with Tuberculous Pleural Effusion in Rural Nepal

    OpenAIRE

    M S Paudel; Anjana Kafle; Bishal Khatri Chhetri; Sahadev Prasad Dhungana; Anuj Poudel; Shamsuddhin .

    2013-01-01

      Introduction: Tuberculosis (TB) is a major cause of mortality and morbidity in developing countries. Tubercular Pleural effusion is the second most common form of extra pulmonary tuberculosis (EPTB), superseded in Prevalence only by lymph node tuberculosis. Pleural effusion occurs in approximately 5% of patients with TB. The purpose of this study was to assess the demographic characteristics of patients presenting with pleural effusion in rural Nepal.   Methods: A retrospe...

  8. Thoracic computed tomography in patients with suspected malignant pleural effusions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Traill, Zoee C.; Davies, Robert J.O.; Gleeson, Fergus V.

    2001-01-01

    AIM: To assess the role of contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) prospectively in patients with suspected malignant pleural effusions. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Forty consecutive patients referred for the investigation of a suspected malignant pleural effusion had contrast-enhanced thoracic CT, thoracoscopy, thoraco-centesis and pleural biopsy, either percutaneously or at thoracoscopy. Final diagnoses were based on histopathological or cytological analysis (n = 30), autopsy findings (n = 3) or clinical follow-up (n = 7). The pleural surfaces were classified at contrast-enhanced CT as normal or abnormal and, if abnormal, as benign or malignant in appearance using previously established CT criteria for malignant pleural thickening by two observers unaware of the pathological diagnosis. RESULTS: Pleural effusions were malignant in 32 patients and benign in eight patients. Pleural surfaces assessed at CT showed features of malignancy in 27 out of 32 patients with a malignant effusion (sensitivity 84%, specificity 100%). Overall, CT appearances indicated the presence of malignancy in 28 of 32 (87%) patients. All eight patients with benign pleural disease were correctly diagnosed by CT. CONCLUSION: Contrast-enhanced CT is of value in patients with suspected malignant pleural effusions. The previously established criteria for malignant pleural thickening of nodularity, irregularity and pleural thickness >1 cm are reliable in the presence of a pleural effusion. Traill, Z.C. et al. (2001)

  9. Pathogenesis of pleural effusion in carcinoma of the breast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weichselbaum, R.; Marck, A.; Hellman, S.

    1977-01-01

    Three hundred and fifty-two patients with carcinoma of the breast treated postoperatively with radiotherapy were analyzed for laterality and incidence of pleural effusion. A statistically significant increase in ipsilateral pleural effusions was noted in the entire group (p less than 0.0001). Thirty-three percent of the patients with chest wall recurrences developed ipsilateral effusions while only 4.5 percent of those who did not develop chest wall recurrences suffered ipsilateral effusions (p less than 0.001). The role of the chest wall lymphatics in the development of malignant pleural effusions is discussed

  10. Discrimination between pleural thickening and minimal pleural effusion using color Doppler chest ultrasonography

    OpenAIRE

    Hasan, Ali A.; Makhlouf, Hoda A.; Mohamed, Alaa R.M.

    2013-01-01

    Background: The discrimination of pleural thickening from minimal pleural effusion may be difficult as both lesions appear as anechoic on grayscale ultrasound, hence, free of “echoes” does not confirm the presence of pleural fluid. Aim of this study: To evaluate the value of color Doppler ultrasound in differentiating minimal pleural effusion that could be aspirated from pleural thickening and to compare it with grayscale ultrasound. Patients and methods: This analytic cross-sectional s...

  11. Diagnostic yield and safety of closed needle pleural biopsy in exudative pleural effusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajawat, Govind Singh; Batra, Supreet; Takhar, Rajendra Prasad; Rathi, Lalit; Bhandari, Chand; Gupta, Manohar Lal

    2017-01-01

    Closed pleural biopsy was previously considered a procedure of choice in cases of undiagnosed pleural effusion with good efficacy. Currently, the closed pleural biopsy has been replaced by thoracoscopic biopsy but not easily available in resource-limited setups. The objective of this study was to analyze the diagnostic yield and safety of closed needle pleural biopsy in exudative pleural effusion and assessment of patients' characteristics with the yield of pleural biopsy. This was a cross-sectional study. This study was conducted at Institute of Respiratory Diseases, SMS Medical College, Jaipur, a tertiary care center of West India. A total of 250 cases of pleural effusion were evaluated with complete pleural fluid biochemical, microbiological, and cytological examination. Out of these 250 patients, 59 were excluded from the study as the diagnosis could be established on initial pleural fluid examination. The remaining (191) patients were considered for closed pleural biopsy with Abrams pleural biopsy needle. The main outcome measure was diagnostic yield in the form of confirming diagnosis. Out of the 191 patients with exudative lymphocytic pleural effusion, 123 (64.40%) were diagnosed on the first pleural biopsy. Among the remaining 68 patients, 22 patients had repeat pleural biopsy with a diagnostic yield of 59.9%. The overall pleural biopsy could establish the diagnosis in 136 (71.20%) patients with pleural effusion. The most common diagnosis on pleural biopsy was malignancy followed by tuberculosis. Closed pleural biopsy provides diagnostic yield nearly comparative to thoracoscopy in properly selected patients of pleural effusions. In view of good yield, low cost, easy availability, and very low complication rate, it should be used routinely in all cases of undiagnosed exudative lymphocytic pleural effusion. There was no comparison with a similar group undergoing thoracoscopic pleural biopsy.

  12. Pregnancy with bilateral tubercular pleural effusion: challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahuja, Vanita; Gombar, Satinder; Kumar, Navneet; Goyal, Nitika; Gupta, Kanika

    2014-04-01

    Pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) during pregnancy mimics some of the physiological changes that occur during pregnancy. Diagnosis is challenging, especially when the patient presents with acute respiratory distress. The incidence of pleural effusion in TB is 3-25% and in the majority of patients, is unilateral. We describe the intensive care management of a 27-year-old pregnant woman admitted to our hospital with life threatening respiratory distress and circulatory shock. She continued to have severe metabolic and respiratory acidosis with shock in spite of the resuscitative measures undertaken. At that point, a bedside lung ultrasonography showed bilateral pleural effusion which was followed with therapeutic thoracocentesis of the right side. This resulted in the stabilization of the respiratory mechanics and haemodynamics of the patient. The pleural fluid culture tested positive for acid fast bacilli after 4 weeks in the intensive care unit. Anti-TB therapy was started and she made a rapid recovery with liberation from mechanical ventilation. The early use of bedside lung ultrasonography was instrumental in the successful management of this patient.

  13. Diagnosis of malignant pleural effusion and lung cancer with CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jakimovska, S.; Jakimovska, M.; Jovanovska, S.; Ilieva, S.

    2012-01-01

    Full text: Introduction: A pleural effusion is defined as an abnormal amount of fluid in the space between the layers of tissue (the pleura) that line the lungs. If cancer cells are present in this fluid (pleural cavity) it is called a malignant cancerous pleural effusion. Many benign and malignant disease can cause pleural effusion.The new onset of pleural effusion may herald the presence of a previously undiagnosed malignancy, or more typically, complicate the course of a known lung tumor. Malignant pleural effusions can lead lead to an initial diagnosis of lung cancer in patients.and it was the first symptom of lung cancer. Pleural deposits of tumor cause pleuritic pain. Purpose of this presentation is to show the role of CT in diagnosis of malignant pleural effusion and lung cancer. Material and methods: CT examinations of chest were made to 138 patients for 1 year (1/6/2011- 1/6/2012) with Siemens Somatom Emotion 16 CT Scanner. Patients were at age of 30 -81 years, 93 of them are male and 45 are female. Results: 56 (40.5%) of the patients had pleural effusion. From this group 21 37.5% had malignant pleural effusion and lung cancer. 17 (81%) of them are male, and 4 (19%) are female. 9 (43%) diagnosed lung cancer for first time. Conclusion: Pleural effusion more commonly occur in patient with advanced-stage tumor who frequently have metastases to other organs and long-term survival is uncommon in this group. CT diagnosed malignant pleural effusion and lung cancer and help to choice treatment for these patients

  14. Discrimination between pleural thickening and minimal pleural effusion using color Doppler chest ultrasonography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali A. Hasan

    2013-07-01

    Conclusions: Application of color Doppler examination increases the accuracy of real time chest ultrasound to discriminate pleural thickening from minimal pleural effusion and hence color Doppler examination proved to be a useful diagnostic tool to real-time gray-scale ultrasound for diagnosis of minimal pleural effusion.

  15. [The diagnostic value of medical thoracoscopy for unexplained pleural effusion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Shu-juan; Mu, Xiao-yan; Zhang, Song; Su, Li-li; Ma, Wei-xia

    2013-05-01

    To explore the endoscopic features of patients with unexplained pleural effusion, and to evaluate the diagnostic value of medical thoracoscopy. A retrospective analysis of 2380 patients with unexplained pleural effusion (1320 males and 1060 females; age 15-94 years) in Shandong Provincial Hospital from 1992 to 2011 were performed .The diagnosis was confirmed by medical thoracoscopy. The endoscopic findings of malignant pleural effusion mostly showed nodules of varying sizes. The nodules could be grape-like, cauliflower-like, fused into masses, or diffused small nodules . The appearance of cancerous nodules was more diversified compared to tuberculous nodules. Tuberculous pleurisy was manifested as diffuse pleural congestion and miliary changes, multiple small gray-white nodules, fibrin deposition and adhesion in the pleural cavity, pleural thickening and loculation . The pathological diagnosis was as follows: pleural metastases in 899 (37.8%), primary pleural mesothelioma in 439 (18.4%), tuberculous pleurisy in 514 (21.6%), non-specific inflammation in 226 (9.5%), empyema in 190 (8.0%), hepatic pleural effusion in 36 (1.5%) and pleural effusion of unknown causes in 76 (3.2%) cases. The diagnostic positive rate of medical thoracoscopy was 96.8%. No serious complications were observed. Medical thoracoscopy is a relatively safe procedure and has an important application value in the diagnosis of unexplained pleural effusion.

  16. The use of Jackson-Pratt silicone flat drains as prolonged pleural catheters for the management of pleural effusions

    OpenAIRE

    Demirhan, Ozkan; Kasapoglu, Tugce; Ece, Ferah; Toker, Alper

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Imbalance between secretion and absorbtion of pleural fluid results in pleural effusion. Emergence of pleural effusion ipsilateral or contralateral to the side drained previously is named recurrent effusion. There is currently no standart approach for the management of recurrent pleural effusions. Materials and methods: Eighteen patients, treated between 2011 and 2012 for recurrent pleural effusions due to various etiologies, not considered for surgical or other treatments, ...

  17. Prognostic impact of pleural effusion in acute pulmonary embolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiris, Tuncay; Yazıcı, Selçuk; Koc, Ali; Köprülü, Cinar; Ilke Akyildiz, Zehra; Karaca, Mustafa; Nazli, Cem; Dogan, Abdullah

    2017-07-01

    Background Pulmonary embolism (PE) is a common and life-threatening condition associated with considerable morbidity and mortality. Pleural effusion occurs in about one in three cases; however, data on its prognostic value are scarce. Purpose To investigate the association between pleural effusion and both 30-day and long-term mortality in patients with acute PE. Material and Methods We retrospectively evaluated 463 patients diagnosed with acute PE using computed tomography pulmonary angiography (CTPA). Echocardiographic, demographic, and laboratory data were collected. The study population was divided into two groups: patients with and without pleural effusions. Pleural effusion detected on CT was graded as small, moderate, and large according to the amount of effusion. The predictors of 30-day and long-term total mortality were analyzed. Results Pleural effusions were found in 120 patients (25.9%). After the 30-day follow-up, all-cause mortality was higher in acute PE patients with pleural effusions than in those without (23% versus 9%, P pleural effusions had significantly higher incidence of long-term total mortality than those without pleural effusions (55% versus 23%, P pleural effusion was an independent predictor of 30-day and long-term mortality (odds ratio [OR], 2.154; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.186-3.913; P = 0.012 and OR, 1.591; 95% CI, 1.129-2.243; P = 0.008, respectively). Conclusion Pleural effusion can be independently associated with both 30-day and long-term mortality in patients with acute PE.

  18. Managing malignant pleural effusion with an indwelling pleural catheter: factors associated with spontaneous pleurodesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, W M; Tam, T Cc; Wong, M Ky; Lui, M Ms; Ip, M Sm; Lam, D Cl

    2016-08-01

    Malignant pleural effusion can be recurrent despite active anti-cancer treatment. Significant malignant pleural effusion leads to debilitating dyspnoea and worsening quality of life in patients with advanced cancer. An indwelling pleural catheter offers a novel means to manage recurrent malignant pleural effusion and may remove the need for repeated thoracocentesis. Spontaneous pleurodesis is another unique advantage of indwelling pleural catheter placement but the factors associated with its occurrence are not clearly established. The aims of this study were to explore the safety of an indwelling pleural catheter in the management of symptomatic recurrent malignant pleural effusion, and to identify the factors associated with spontaneous pleurodesis. This case series with internal comparisons was conducted in the Division of Respiratory Medicine, Department of Medicine, Queen Mary Hospital, Hong Kong. All patients who underwent insertion of an indwelling pleural catheter from the initiation of such service from January 2010 to December 2014 were included for data analysis. Patients were monitored until December 2014, with the last catheter inserted in July 2014. Between 2010 and 2014, a total of 23 indwelling pleural catheters were inserted in 22 consecutive patients with malignant pleural effusion, including 15 (65.2%) cases with malignant pleural effusion as a result of metastatic lung cancer. Ten (43.5%) cases achieved minimal output according to defined criteria, in five of whom the pleural catheter was removed without subsequent re-accumulation of effusion (ie spontaneous pleurodesis). Factors associated with minimal output were the absence of trapped lung (P=0.036), shorter time from first appearance of malignant pleural effusion to catheter insertion (P=0.017), and longer time from catheter insertion till patient's death or end of study (P=0.007). An indwelling pleural catheter provides a safe means to manage symptomatic malignant pleural effusion

  19. Identifying Malignant Pleural Effusion by A Cancer Ratio (Serum LDH: Pleural Fluid ADA Ratio).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Akash; Abisheganaden, John; Light, R W

    2016-02-01

    We studied the diagnostic potential of serum lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) in malignant pleural effusion. Retrospective analysis of patients hospitalized with exudative pleural effusion in 2013. Serum LDH and serum LDH: pleural fluid ADA ratio was significantly higher in cancer patients presenting with exudative pleural effusion. In multivariate logistic regression analysis, pleural fluid ADA was negatively correlated 0.62 (0.45-0.85, p = 0.003) with malignancy, whereas serum LDH 1.02 (1.0-1.03, p = 0.004) and serum LDH: pleural fluid ADA ratio 0.94 (0.99-1.0, p = 0.04) was correlated positively with malignant pleural effusion. For serum LDH: pleural fluid ADA ratio, a cut-off level of >20 showed sensitivity, specificity of 0.98 (95 % CI 0.92-0.99) and 0.94 (95 % CI 0.83-0.98), respectively. The positive likelihood ratio was 32.6 (95 % CI 10.7-99.6), while the negative likelihood ratio at this cut-off was 0.03 (95 % CI 0.01-0.15). Higher serum LDH and serum LDH: pleural fluid ADA ratio in patients presenting with exudative pleural effusion can distinguish between malignant and non-malignant effusion on the first day of hospitalization. The cut-off level for serum LDH: pleural fluid ADA ratio of >20 is highly predictive of malignancy in patients with exudative pleural effusion (whether lymphocytic or neutrophilic) with high sensitivity and specificity.

  20. [Parapneumonic pleural effusion: difficulties in making therapeutic decisions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chudzicka, Aleksandra; Chciałowski, Andrzej

    2007-01-01

    Pneumonia is the second most common cause of pleural effusion. The presence of pleural fluid makes the prognosis in patients with pneumonia worse and causes a higher mortality rate. This is why it is very important to undertake suitable treatment as soon as possible. Most parapneumonic pleural effusions resolve with antibiotic alone, but sometimes more invasive treatment is necessary. Therapeutic decisions are based on different criteria. For many years determining biochemical fluid characteristics has been used for this purpose. Presentlythe usefullness of new parameters is being evaluated. Their application in diagnostics was possible thanks to better knowledge of mechanisms that participate in the development of parapneumonic pleural effusion.

  1. [Eosinophilic pleural effusion possibly induced by fibrin sealant].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kambayashi, Takatoyo; Suzuki, Takashi

    2012-02-01

    A 74-year-old man underwent right upper lobectomy for the lung cancer and bullectomy of right lower lobe. Fibrin sealant was used for sealing the excision line. The increase of the pleural effusion with increasing C-reactive protein( CRP) and eosinophilia was noted at the 17th day after the operation. The pleural effusion was transparent and yellowish colored suggesting transudatory liquid. The eosinophil in the pleural effusion was as high as 14%. The drainage of the pleural effusion was performed for 2 days resulting in disappearing the abnormal accumulation without any additional treatment. The cause of pleural effusion was supposed to be fibrin sealant by a positive result of the drug lymphocyte stimulation test.

  2. Pleural effusion segmentation in thin-slice CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donohue, Rory; Shearer, Andrew; Bruzzi, John; Khosa, Huma

    2009-02-01

    A pleural effusion is excess fluid that collects in the pleural cavity, the fluid-filled space that surrounds the lungs. Surplus amounts of such fluid can impair breathing by limiting the expansion of the lungs during inhalation. Measuring the fluid volume is indicative of the effectiveness of any treatment but, due to the similarity to surround regions, fragments of collapsed lung present and topological changes; accurate quantification of the effusion volume is a difficult imaging problem. A novel code is presented which performs conditional region growth to accurately segment the effusion shape across a dataset. We demonstrate the applicability of our technique in the segmentation of pleural effusion and pulmonary masses.

  3. Eosinophilic Pleural Effusion: A Rare Manifestation of Hypereosinophilic Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ndubuisi C. Okafor

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Several causes of eosinophilic pleural effusions have been described with malignancy being the commonest cause. Hypereosinophilic syndrome (HES is a rare disease and very few cases have been reported of HES presenting as eosinophilic pleural effusion (EPE. We report a case of a 26-year-old male who presented with shortness of breath. He had bilateral pleural effusions, generalized lymphadenopathy, splenomegaly, and leukocytosis with marked peripheral blood eosinophilia. The pleural fluid was exudative, with 25%–30% eosinophilis, and absence of neoplastic cells. Hypereosinophilic syndrome was diagnosed after other causes of eosinophilia were excluded. He continued to be dyspneic with persistent accumulation of eosinophilic pleural fluid, even after his peripheral eosinophil count had normalized in response to treatment. This patient represents a very unusual presentation of HES with dyspnea and pleural effusions and demonstrates that treatment based on response of peripheral eosinophil counts, as is currently recommended, may not always be clinically adequate.

  4. Micro-pleural Metastasis Without Effusion: CT and US Findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Na, Hyoung Il; Yoo, Seung Min; Kim, Yang Soo; Lee, Hwa Yeon; Song, In Sup; Shim, Hyung Jin; Kwak, Byung Kook; Shin, Jong Wook

    2004-01-01

    Pleural metastasis from malignancy is commonly combined with effusion. We report the ultrasonographic and CT findings in a rare case of micro-pleural metastasis without effusion. A 34-year-old male patient with lung cancer underwent video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS), prior to open thoracotomy. VATS revealed multiple metastatic micronodules on the pleura, which were overlooked on the preoperative CT scan. The HRCT images and chest ultrasonograms showed clear evidence of pleural micro-nodules

  5. Micro-pleural Metastasis Without Effusion: CT and US Findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Na, Hyoung Il; Yoo, Seung Min; Kim, Yang Soo; Lee, Hwa Yeon; Song, In Sup; Shim, Hyung Jin; Kwak, Byung Kook; Shin, Jong Wook [Chung-Ang University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-09-15

    Pleural metastasis from malignancy is commonly combined with effusion. We report the ultrasonographic and CT findings in a rare case of micro-pleural metastasis without effusion. A 34-year-old male patient with lung cancer underwent video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS), prior to open thoracotomy. VATS revealed multiple metastatic micronodules on the pleura, which were overlooked on the preoperative CT scan. The HRCT images and chest ultrasonograms showed clear evidence of pleural micro-nodules

  6. [Determination of isoniazide concentration in pleural effusion and its pleural permeability in patients with tuberculous pleurisy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yuan; Zhang, Qing; Zhang, Junfeng; Huang, Guohua; Zhu, Shunfang; Liu, Sijia; Li, Guofeng

    2012-05-01

    To establish a high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC)-based method for determining isoniazide concentration in pleural effusion and plasma of patients with tuberculous pleurisy, and evaluate the permeability of isoniazide from blood into pleural effusion. We collected pleural effusion from 15 patients with tuberculous pleurisy 2 h after administration 300 mg isoniazide in the morning of day 1. Pleural effusion and plasma were obtained 2 h after isoniazide administration on day 3. Isoniazide concentration was measured using HPLC, and the penetration rate of isoniazide in pleural effusion was calculated. Isoniazide concentration in the pleural effusion averaged 1.156∓1.190 µg/ml in the 15 patients at 2 h after isoniazide administration on day 1. On day 3, isoniazide concentration was 1.920∓1.294 µg/ml in the pleural effusion and 2.445∓1.463 µg/ml in the plasma, and the mean penetration rate of isoniazide from blood into the pleural effusion was 86.0%. As isoniazide has a high penetration rate into the pleural effusion in most patients, continuous oral administration of isoniazid has been sufficient to achieve an effective treatment concentration, and intrapleural injection of isoniazide may seem unnecessary for non-drug-resistant tuberculosis pleurisy.

  7. Treatment of complicated parapneumonic pleural effusion and pleural parapneumonic empyema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez Suárez, Pedro; Freixinet Gilart, Jorge; Hernández Pérez, José María; Hussein Serhal, Mohamed; López Artalejo, Antonio

    2012-07-01

    We performed this observational prospective study to evaluate the results of the application of a diagnostic and therapeutic algorithm for complicated parapneumonic pleural effusion (CPPE) and pleural parapneumonic empyema (PPE). From 2001 to 2007, 210 patients with CPPE and PPE were confirmed through thoracocentesis and treated with pleural drainage tubes (PD), fibrinolytic treatment or surgical intervention (videothoracoscopy and posterolateral thoracotomy). Patients were divided into 3 groups: I (PD); II (PD and fibrinolytic treatment); IIIa (surgery after PD and fibrinolysis), and IIIb (direct surgery). The statistical study was done by variance analysis (ANOVA), χ2 and Fisher exact test. The presence of alcohol or drug consumption, smoking and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) were strongly associated with a great necessity for surgical treatment. The IIIa group was associated with increased drainage time, length of stay and complications. No mortality was observed. The selective use of PD and intrapleural fibrinolysis makes surgery unnecessary in more than 75% of cases. The selective use of PD and fibrinolysis avoids surgery in more than 75% of cases. However, patients who require surgery have more complications, longer hospital stay, and more days on PD and they are more likely to require admittance to the Intensive Care Unit.

  8. Mortality Among Patients with Pleural Effusion Undergoing Thoracentesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeBiasi, Erin M.; Pisani, Margaret A.; Murphy, Terrence E.; Araujo, Katy; Kookoolis, Anna; Argento, A Christine; Puchalski, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    Background Of the 1.5 million people diagnosed with pleural effusion annually in the U.S., approximately 178,000 undergo thoracentesis. While it is known that malignant pleural effusion portends a poor prognosis, mortality of patients with nonmalignant effusions has not been well studied. Methods This prospective cohort study evaluated 308 patients undergoing thoracentesis. Chart review was performed to obtain baseline characteristics. The etiology of the effusions was determined using standardized criteria. Mortality was determined at 30-days and 1-year. Results 247 unilateral and 61 bilateral thoracenteses were performed. Malignant effusion had the highest 30-day (37%) and 1 year (77%) mortality. There was substantial patient 30-day and 1-year mortality with effusions due to multiple benign etiologies (29% and 55%), CHF (22% and 53%), and renal failure (14% and 57%). Patients with bilateral pleural effusion, relative to unilateral, were associated with higher risk of death at 30 days and 1 year (17% versus 47%; HR 2.58 CI [1.44–4.63] and 36% versus 69%; HR 2.32 CI [1.55–3.48]). Conclusions Patients undergoing thoracentesis for pleural effusion have high short and long-term mortality. Patients with malignant effusion had the highest mortality followed by multiple benign etiologies, CHF and renal failure. Bilateral pleural effusion is distinctly associated with high mortality. PMID:25837039

  9. Allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis: a rare cause of pleural effusion.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Connor, T M

    2012-02-03

    Aspergillus fumigatus is one of the most ubiquitous of the airborne saprophytic fungi. Allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis (ABPA) is a syndrome seen in patients with asthma and cystic fibrosis, and is characterized by hypersensitivity to chronic colonization of the airways with A. fumigatus. We report the case of a patient with ABPA presenting with pleural effusion. A 27-year-old male was referred with recurrent right pleural effusion. Past medical history was remarkable for asthma, allergic sinusitis, and recurrent pleurisy. Investigations revealed peripheral eosinophilia with elevated serum immunoglobulin E and bilateral pleural effusions with bilateral upper lobe proximal bronchiectasis. Precipitating serum antibodies to A. fumigatus were positive and the A. fumigatus immediate skin test yielded a positive reaction. A diagnosis of ABPA associated with bilateral pleural effusions was made and the patient was commenced on prednisolone. At review, the patient\\'s symptoms had considerably improved and his pleural effusions had resolved. ABPA may present with diverse atypical syndromes, including paratracheal and hilar adenopathy, obstructive lung collapse, pneumothorax and bronchopleural fistula, and allergic sinusitis. Allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis is a rare cause of pleural effusion and must be considered in the differential diagnosis of patients presenting with a pleural effusion, in particular those with a history of asthma.

  10. Closed pleural biopsy is still useful in the evaluation of malignant pleural effusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Somnath Bhattacharya

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Pleural fluid cytology for malignant cells is the easiest way to diagnose malignant pleural effusion with good sensitivity and specificity. With the introduction of medical thoracoscopy, the use of closed pleural biopsy for the diagnosis of cytology negative malignant pleural effusion is gradually decreasing. However use of thoracoscopy is limited due to its high cost and procedure related complications. Aims: The aim was to assess the usefulness of closed pleural biopsy in the diagnosis of malignant pleural effusion. Materials and Methods: Sixty-six patients of pleural effusion associated with malignancy were selected from the patients admitted in the chest ward of a tertiary care hospital over a period of 1 year. Pleural fluid aspiration for cytology and closed pleural biopsy were done in all the patients. Results: Out of 66 patients, 46 (69% patients showed malignant cells in pleural fluid cytology examination. Cytology was positive in 35 (52%, 10 (15%, and 1 (1.5% patients in the first, second, and third samples respectively. Closed pleural biopsy was positive in 32 (48% patients. Among them, 22 also had positive cytology. Additional 10 cytology negative patients were diagnosed by pleural biopsy. Cytology-histology concordance was seen in 12 patients. Definite histological diagnosis could be achieved in five patients with indeterminate cytology. Pleural biopsy was not associated with any major postoperative complication. Conclusion: Closed pleural biopsy can improve the diagnostic ability in cytology negative malignant pleural effusion. Closed pleural biopsy has still a place in evaluation of malignant pleural effusion especially in a resource-limited country like India.

  11. Radiographic features of pleural effusions in pulmonary embolism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bynum, L.J.; Wilson, J.E.

    1978-01-01

    A prospective analysis of 155 patients with pulmonary embolism was undertaken to describe the radiographic characteristics of associated pleural effusions and related abnormalities. Approximately one half of these patients had pleural effusions. Patients with other potential causes of effusion, such as heart failure, pneumonia, or cancer, were eliminated from further analysis. In the remaining 62 patients, radiographic evidence of pulmonary infarction accompanied pleural effusions in one half of the cases. One third of patients with parenchymal consolidation had no evidence of effusion. Atelectasis and other nonspecific radiographic abnormalities occurred in less than one fifth of the cases. Typically, pleural effusions were small and unilateral, appeared soon after symptoms of thromboembolism began, and tended to reach their maximal size very early in the course of the disorder. Pulmonary infarction was associated with larger effusions that cleared more slowly and were more often bloody in appearance on thoracentesis. Chest pain occurred in all but one patient and was a valuable diagnostic clue. Pain and pleural effusions were always ipsilateral and almost always unilateral, but neither correlated well with the presence or time course of infarction. Effusions that were delayed in onset or that enlarged late in the course were associated with recurrent pulmonary embolism or superinfection. These radiographic features may be helpful in the diagnosis and management of pulmonary embolism

  12. Malignant pleural effusion from papillary thyroid carcinoma diagnosed by pleural effusion cytology: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosmas, Konstantinos; Tsonou, Anna; Mitropoulou, Georgia; Salemi, Eufrosyni; Kazi, Danai; Theofanopoulou, Ageliki

    2018-02-01

    Papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) is by far the most common thyroid malignancy (over 85%) of all the thyroid cancers. It has excellent prognosis and 10-year survival rate in most of the cases (95%). Most of the tumors are indolent and do not recur or metastasize after removal. However, widespread metastases to lung, skeleton, central nervous system and, occasionally, other organs may be observed. In rare instances, this disease may metastasize to the pleura and manifest as a malignant pleural effusion (MPE) and portend poor prognosis. This article reports the cytomorphologic and immunocytochemical findings of a female patient with a symptomatic pleural effusion resulting from PTC metastatic to the pleura. Pleural fluid cytology revealed abundant papillary clusters with relatively nuclear pleomorphism, intranuclear cytoplasmic inclusions and nuclear grooves, small and distinct nucleoli as well as small discrete vacuoles. Psammoma bodies were not seen. Immunocytochemical staining was positive for TGB, EMA, Ber-EP4, CK19, and negative for TTF-1. Metastasis of PTC to pleural fluid is extremely rare and diagnosing the disease by cytology is challenging and requires medical expertise as well as knowledge of clinical context and immunocytochemical staining. Additionally, a cytologic diagnosis of MPE due to PTC provides important treatment information and plays an important role in prognosis. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Parapneumonic pleural effusion: early versus late thoracoscopy

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    Rodrigo Romualdo Pereira

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: To evaluate the best time to perform thoracoscopy for the treatment of complicated parapneumonic pleural effusion in the fibrinopurulent phase in patients ≤ 14 years of age, regarding the postoperative evolution and occurrence of complications. Methods: This was a retrospective comparative study involving patients with parapneumonic pleural effusion presenting with septations or loculations on chest ultrasound who underwent thoracoscopy between January of 2000 and January of 2013. The patients were divided into two groups: early thoracoscopy (ET, performed by day 5 of hospitalization; and late thoracoscopy (LT, performed after day 5 of hospitalization. Results: We included 60 patients, 30 in each group. The mean age was 3.4 years; 28 patients (46.7% were male; and 47 (78.3% underwent primary thoracoscopy (no previous simple drainage. The two groups were similar regarding gender, age, weight, and type of thoracoscopy (p > 0.05 for all. There was a significant difference between the ET and the LT groups regarding the length of the hospital stay (14.5 days vs. 21.7 days; p < 0.001. There were also significant differences between the groups regarding the duration of fever in days; the total number of days from admission to the initiation of drainage; and the total number of days with the drain in place. Eight patients (13.6% had at least one post-thoracoscopy complication, there being no difference between the groups. There were no deaths. Conclusions: Performing ET by day 5 of hospitalization was associated with shorter hospital stays, shorter duration of drainage, and shorter duration of fever, although not with a higher frequency of complications, requiring ICU admission, or requiring blood transfusion.

  14. Distribution side of pleural effusion in heart failure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Cheol Kyu; Park, Young Ha; Jung, Se Young; Park, Seog Hee; Bahk, Yong Whee

    1988-01-01

    The interrelationship between the etiology of pleural effusion and the side of its occurrence has been a subject of clinical interest for many years. It has often been stated that pleural effusion caused by congestive heart failure tends to occur on the right side. However, some authors contended that such a side proclivity is not reliable. In the present study, the authors investigated the laterally of effusion caused by various cardiovascular diseases complicated by heart failure. We reviewed the chest X-ray films and clinical records of 68 patients with proven pleural effusion resulted from heart failure. 1. There were 34 men and 34 women with the age ranging from 10 to 84 years with the mean of 59. 2. The diagnoses were rheumatic heart disease (2 patients), coronary heart disease (10 patients), hypertensive heart disease (8 patients), mitral valvular disease (18 patients), aortic valvular disease (3 patients), and miscellaneous (27 patients). 3. 34 patients had unilateral pleural effusion, 25 and 9, right and left, respectively. Of the 34 patients with bilateral effusion, 13 patients had predominantly right-sided effusion, 5 patients had predominantly left-sided effusion and 16 patients had evenly distributed bilateral effusion. Thus, 55.8% of effusion was right-sided

  15. Differential diagnosis of tuberculous pleural effusion and malignant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Na, Eui Sung; Kim, Young Nam; Lee, Mee Ran; Oh, Yu Whan; Kang, Eun Young

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of CT in the differential diagnosis of tuberculous and malignant pleural effusion whether or not lung lesions are present, and to investigate the CT findings used for this differential diagnosis. This study involved 30 patients with tuberculous pleural effusion (mean age, 44.6 years; M : F = 19:11) and 20 with malignant pleural effusion (mean age, 57.2 years; M: F=10:10). All 50 patients underwent enhanced CT chest scans, and the respective conditions were pathologically confirmed. Two radiologists unaware of the pathologic results and distributions of patients reviewed these scans, CT findings of pleural effusions, their diagnoses, and the degree of confidence of their diagnoses. In most cases, CT provided correct differential diagnosis between tuberculous and malignant pleural effusion. It can help determine the nature of associated lung and pleural lesions, and specific findings of the latter, and can accurately differentiate tuberculous and malignant pleural effusion. (author). 20 refs., 3 tabs., 5 figs

  16. Long-term Outcome of Patients With Undiagnosed Pleural Effusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunluoglu, Gulsah; Olcmen, Aysun; Gunluoglu, Mehmet Zeki; Dincer, Ibrahim; Sayar, Adnan; Camsari, Gungor; Yilmaz, Veysel; Altin, Sedat

    2015-12-01

    The cause of exudative pleural effusion cannot be determined in some patients. The longterm outcomes of patients with undiagnosed pleural effusion were analyzed. Patients with exudative pleural effusion whose diagnostic procedures included pleural biopsy using video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery carried out between 2008 and 2012 were evaluated retrospectively. Patients diagnosed with non-specific pleuritis were included. Fifty-three patients with available follow-up data were included in the study. Forty men and 13 women (mean age 53.9±13.9 years) were included. Median follow-up time was 24 months. No diagnosis was given in 27 patients (51%), and a clinical diagnosis was given in 26 patients (49%) during the follow-up period. Malignant disease (malignant mesothelioma) was diagnosed in 2 (3.7%) patients. Other diseases were parapneumonic effusion in 12, congestive heart failure in 8, and miscellaneous in 4 patients. Volume of effusion at the time of initial examination and re-accumulation of fluid after video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery were associated with malignant disease (P=.004 and .0001, respectively). Although the probability is low, some patients with exudative pleural effusion undiagnosed after pleural biopsy via video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery may have malignant disease. Patients with an initially large volume of effusion that re-accumulates after examination should be closely monitored. Copyright © 2014 SEPAR. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  17. Methimazole associated eosinophilic pleural effusion: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaspar-da-Costa, Pedro; Duarte Silva, Filipa; Henriques, Júlia; do Vale, Sónia; Braz, Sandra; Meneses Santos, João; M M Victorino, Rui

    2017-03-21

    Adverse reactions associated to anti-thyroid drugs include fever, rash, arthralgia, agranulocytosis and hepatitis that are thought to be hypersensitivity reactions. Five cases of pleural effusion associated to thionamides have also been reported, two with propylthiouracil and three with carbimazole. We report here a case of a 75-year-old man admitted because of unilateral pleural effusion. The patient had a recent diagnosis of hyperthyroidism and 6 days after starting methimazole complained of pleuritic chest pain. He had elevated C-reactive protein and erythrocyte sedimentation rate and normal white blood cell count and liver enzymes. Chest radiography showed a moderate right pleural effusion and the ultrasound revealed a loculated effusion that was shown to be an eosinophilic exudate. The temporal relationship between methimazole intake and the development of pleural effusion combined with the extensive exclusion of alternative causes, namely infectious, neoplastic and primary auto-immune diseases, led to the diagnosis of hypersensitivity reaction to methimazole. The thionamide was stopped and corticosteroid was started with complete resolution of the pleural effusion in 3 months. Awareness of this rare adverse reaction of anti-thyroid drugs is important and methimazole can be added to the list of possible etiologies of drug-induced eosinophilic pleural effusion.

  18. Medical thoracoscopy: a useful diagnostic tool for undiagnosed pleural effusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Abhishek; Prasad, Rajendra; Garg, Rajiv; Verma, S K; Singh, Abhijeet; Husain, N

    2014-01-01

    We aimed to assess the role of medical thoracoscopy in patients with undiagnosed pleural effusion. Patiens presenting with pleural effusion underwent three pleural aspirations. Patients in whom pleural fluid analysis was inconclusive underwent closed pleural biopsy for diagnostic confirmation. Patients in whom closed pleural biopsy was incolcusive underwent medical thoracoscopy using a rigid thoracoscope with a viewing angle of zero degrees was done under local anaesthesia and sedation with the patient lying in lateral decubitus position with the affected side up. Biopsy specimens from parietal pleura were obtained under direct vision and were sent for histopathological examination. Of the 128 patients with pleural effusion who were studied, pleural fluid examination established the diagnosis in 81 (malignancy 33, tuberculosis 33, pyogenic 14 and fungal 1); 47 patients underwent closed pleural biopsy and a diagnosis was made in 28 patients (malignancy 24, tuberculosis 4). The remaining 19 patients underwent medical thoracoscopy and pleural biopsy and the aetiological diagnosis could be confirmed in 13 of the 19 patients (69%) (adenocarcinoma 10, poorly differentiated carcinoma 2 and mesothelioma 1). Medical thoracoscopy is a useful tool for the diagnosis of pleural diseases. The procedure is safe with minimal complications.

  19. Imaging of small amounts of pleural fluid. Part one - small pleural effusions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kocijancic, I.

    2005-01-01

    Background. Small pleural effusions are not readily identified on conventional radiographic views of the chest, but may be an important finding, sometimes leading, via thoracocentesis, to a definitive diagnosis of pleural carcinomatosis, infection or transudate. A small meniscus sign and a medial displacement of the costophrenic angle are the only subtle signs of small accumulations of fluid on posteroanterior chest X-rays. On lateral views the finding of a small meniscus sign in the posterior costophrenic angle is the sign of small pleural effusion. Conclusions. Lateral decubitus chest radiographs were used for many years for the diagnosis of small pleural effusions. In last decades ultrasonography of pleural space becomes a leading real-time method for demonstrating small pleural effusions. (author)

  20. A new diagnostic approach for bilious pleural effusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saraya, Takeshi; Light, Richard W; Sakuma, Sho; Nakamoto, Yasuo; Wada, Shoko; Ishida, Manabu; Inui, Toshiya; Koide, Takashi; Ishii, Haruyuki; Takizawa, Hajime

    2016-09-01

    Bilious pleural effusion is an extremely rare condition associated with liver diseases, subphrenic or subhepatic abscess formation, biliary peritonitis, and invasive procedures (i.e., percutaneous biliary drainage or liver biopsy). The current diagnostic test is based on the measurement of the ratio of pleural total bilirubin to serum total bilirubin, which is greater than 1 in patients with bilious pleural effusion. Given the low incidence of bilious pleural effusion, the precise diagnostic yield of this ratio based test has not been evaluated. We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of our institution and searched the PubMed database for reports of bilious pleural effusion. We identified a total of 12 cases of bilious pleural effusion (9 from 8 Pubmed reports and 3 from our institutional records). The factors causing this condition were broadly classified into three categories based on the pathophysiology: 1) liver diseases (echinococcosis, tuberculosis and amebiasis); 2) subhepatic/subphrenic abscess or biliary peritonitis, with or without biliary tract obstruction; and 3) iatrogenic disease after percutaneous biliary drainage and/or liver biopsy. The sensitivity of detection was 76.9% when the ratio of pleural total bilirubin to serum total bilirubin was greater than 1. The sensitivity increased to 100% when a combination test including pleural glycoholic acid was adopted. This study demonstrates the high diagnostic yield for bilious pleural effusion using a combination of two test criteria; a ratio of pleural total bilirubin to serum total bilirubin greater than 1 and the presence of pleural glycoholic acid. Copyright © 2016 The Japanese Respiratory Society. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Cell origins and diagnostic accuracy of interleukin 27 in pleural effusions.

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    Wei-Bing Yang

    Full Text Available The objective of the present study was to investigate the presence of interleukin (IL-27 in pleural effusions and to evaluate the diagnostic significance of pleural IL-27. The concentrations of IL-27 were determined in pleural fluids and sera from 68 patients with tuberculous pleural effusion, 63 malignant pleural effusion, 22 infectious pleural effusion, and 21 transudative pleural effusion. Flow cytometry was used to identify which pleural cell types expressed IL-27. It was found that the concentrations of pleural IL-27 in tuberculous group were significantly higher than those in malignant, infectious, and transudative groups, respectively. Pleural CD4(+ T cells, CD8(+ T cells, NK cells, NKT cells, B cells, monocytes, macrophages, and mesothelial cells might be the cell sources for IL-27. IL-27 levels could be used for diagnostic purpose for tuberculous pleural effusion, with the cut off value of 1,007 ng/L, IL-27 had a sensitivity of 92.7% and specificity of 99.1% for differential diagnosing tuberculous pleural effusion from non-tuberculous pleural effusions. Therefore, compared to non-tuberculous pleural effusions, IL-27 appeared to be increased in tuberculous pleural effusion. IL-27 in pleural fluid is a sensitive and specific biomarker for the differential diagnosing tuberculous pleural effusion from pleural effusions with the other causes.

  2. VEGF Correlates with Inflammation and Fibrosis in Tuberculous Pleural Effusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bien, Mauo-Ying; Wu, Ming-Ping; Chen, Wei-Lin; Chung, Chi-Li

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To investigate the relationship among angiogenic cytokines, inflammatory markers, and fibrinolytic activity in tuberculous pleural effusion (TBPE) and their clinical importance. Methods. Forty-two patients diagnosed with TBPE were studied. Based on chest ultrasonography, there were 26 loculated and 16 nonloculated TBPE patients. The effusion size radiological scores and effusion vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), interleukin- (IL-) 8, plasminogen activator inhibitor type-1 (PAI-1), and tissue type plasminogen activator (tPA) were measured. Treatment outcome and pleural fibrosis, defined as radiological residual pleural thickening (RPT), were assessed at 6-month follow-up. Results. The effusion size and effusion lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), VEGF, IL-8, PAI-1, and PAI-1/tPA ratio were significantly higher, while effusion glucose, pH value, and tPA were significantly lower, in loculated than in nonloculated TBPE. VEGF and IL-8 correlated positively with LDH and PAI-1/tPA ratio and negatively with tPA in both loculated and nonloculated TBPE. Patients with higher VEGF or greater effusion size were prone to develop RPT (n = 14; VEGF, odds ratio 1.28, P = 0.01; effusion size, odds ratio 1.01, P = 0.02), and VEGF was an independent predictor of RPT in TBPE (receiver operating characteristic curve AUC = 0.985, P Effusion VEGF correlates with pleural inflammation and fibrosis and may be targeted for adjunct therapy for TBPE. PMID:25884029

  3. VEGF Correlates with Inflammation and Fibrosis in Tuberculous Pleural Effusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauo-Ying Bien

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To investigate the relationship among angiogenic cytokines, inflammatory markers, and fibrinolytic activity in tuberculous pleural effusion (TBPE and their clinical importance. Methods. Forty-two patients diagnosed with TBPE were studied. Based on chest ultrasonography, there were 26 loculated and 16 nonloculated TBPE patients. The effusion size radiological scores and effusion vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF, interleukin- (IL- 8, plasminogen activator inhibitor type-1 (PAI-1, and tissue type plasminogen activator (tPA were measured. Treatment outcome and pleural fibrosis, defined as radiological residual pleural thickening (RPT, were assessed at 6-month follow-up. Results. The effusion size and effusion lactate dehydrogenase (LDH, VEGF, IL-8, PAI-1, and PAI-1/tPA ratio were significantly higher, while effusion glucose, pH value, and tPA were significantly lower, in loculated than in nonloculated TBPE. VEGF and IL-8 correlated positively with LDH and PAI-1/tPA ratio and negatively with tPA in both loculated and nonloculated TBPE. Patients with higher VEGF or greater effusion size were prone to develop RPT (n=14; VEGF, odds ratio 1.28, P=0.01; effusion size, odds ratio 1.01, P=0.02, and VEGF was an independent predictor of RPT in TBPE (receiver operating characteristic curve AUC=0.985, P<0.001. Conclusions. Effusion VEGF correlates with pleural inflammation and fibrosis and may be targeted for adjunct therapy for TBPE.

  4. A case of Meigs' syndrome with preceding pericardial effusion in advance of pleural effusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okuda, Kenichi; Noguchi, Satoshi; Narumoto, Osamu; Ikemura, Masako; Yamauchi, Yasuhiro; Tanaka, Goh; Takai, Daiya; Fukayama, Masashi; Nagase, Takahide

    2016-05-10

    Meigs' syndrome is defined as the presence of a benign ovarian tumor with pleural effusion and ascites that resolve after removal of the tumor. The pathogenesis of the production of ascites and pleural effusion in this syndrome remains unknown. Aside from pleural effusion and ascites, pericardial effusion is rarely observed in Meigs' syndrome. Here, we report the first case of Meigs' syndrome with preceding pericardial effusion in advance of pleural effusion. An 84-year-old Japanese non-smoking woman with a history of lung cancer, treated by surgery, was admitted due to gradual worsening of dyspnea that had occurred over the previous month. She had asymptomatic and unchanging pericardial effusion and a pelvic mass, which had been detected 3 and 11 years previously, respectively. The patient was radiologically followed-up without the need for treatment. Two months before admission, the patient underwent a right upper lobectomy for localized lung adenocarcinoma and intraoperative pericardial fenestration confirmed that the pericardial effusion was not malignant. However, she began to experience dyspnea on exertion leading to admission. A chest, abdomen, and pelvis computed tomography scan confirmed the presence of right-sided pleural and pericardial effusion and ascites with a left ovarian mass. Repeated thoracentesis produced cultures that were negative for any microorganism and no malignant cells were detected in the pleural effusions. Pleural fluid accumulation persisted despite a tube thoracostomy for pleural effusion drainage. With a suspicion of Meigs' syndrome, the patient underwent surgical resection of the ovarian mass and histopathological examination of the resected mass showed ovarian fibroma. Pleural and pericardial effusion as well as ascites resolved after tumor resection, confirming a diagnosis of Meigs' syndrome. This clinical course suggests a strong association between pericardial effusion and ovarian fibroma, as well as pleural and peritoneal

  5. Ultrasound guided pleural biopsy in undiagnosed exudative pleural effusion patients

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    Adel S. Ahmed

    2016-04-01

    In conclusion: Thoracic ultrasound (TUS guided pleural biopsy had a diagnostic yield which was slightly lower but comparable to both CT guided pleural biopsy and medical thoracoscopic pleural biopsy (MT.

  6. Successful pleurodesis with OK-432 (picibanil in preterm infants with persistent pleural effusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeong Eun Kim

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available OK-432 (picibanil is an inactivated preparation of &lt;em&gt;Streptococcus pyogenes&lt;/em&gt; that causes pleurodesis by inducing a strong inflammatory response. Intrapleural instillation of OK-432 has recently been used to successfully treat neonatal and fetal chylothorax. Here we report a trial of intrapleural instillation of OK-432 in two preterm infants who were born with hydrops fetalis and massive bilateral pleural effusion. Both cases showed persistent pleural effusion, refractory to conservative treatment, up to postnatal days 26 and 46, respectively. An average of 80 to 140 mL of pleural fluid was drained daily. In case 1, the infant was treated with OK-432 during the fetal period at gestation 28 weeks and 4 days of gestation, but showed recurrence of pleural effusion and progressed into hydrops. Within two to three days after OK-432 injection, the amount of pleural fluid drainage was dramatically decreased and there was no reaccumulation. We did not observe any side effects related to OK-432 injection. We suggest that OK-432 should be considered as a therapeutic option in infants who have persistent pleural effusion for more than four weeks, with the expectation of the early removal of the chest tube and a good outcome.

  7. Recurrent Exudative Pleural Effusion with Flare up of Chronic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We describe herein a young male patient who presented with exudative pleural effusion that appeared with flare up of chronic HBV infection and spontaneously recovered with the clinical and biochemical improvement of the hepatitis on two occasions five months apart. Other causes of hepatitis and exudative pleural ...

  8. VEGF correlates with inflammation and fibrosis in tuberculous pleural effusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bien, Mauo-Ying; Wu, Ming-Ping; Chen, Wei-Lin; Chung, Chi-Li

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the relationship among angiogenic cytokines, inflammatory markers, and fibrinolytic activity in tuberculous pleural effusion (TBPE) and their clinical importance. Forty-two patients diagnosed with TBPE were studied. Based on chest ultrasonography, there were 26 loculated and 16 nonloculated TBPE patients. The effusion size radiological scores and effusion vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), interleukin- (IL-) 8, plasminogen activator inhibitor type-1 (PAI-1), and tissue type plasminogen activator (tPA) were measured. Treatment outcome and pleural fibrosis, defined as radiological residual pleural thickening (RPT), were assessed at 6-month follow-up. The effusion size and effusion lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), VEGF, IL-8, PAI-1, and PAI-1/tPA ratio were significantly higher, while effusion glucose, pH value, and tPA were significantly lower, in loculated than in nonloculated TBPE. VEGF and IL-8 correlated positively with LDH and PAI-1/tPA ratio and negatively with tPA in both loculated and nonloculated TBPE. Patients with higher VEGF or greater effusion size were prone to develop RPT (n=14; VEGF, odds ratio 1.28, P=0.01; effusion size, odds ratio 1.01, P=0.02), and VEGF was an independent predictor of RPT in TBPE (receiver operating characteristic curve AUC=0.985, PEffusion VEGF correlates with pleural inflammation and fibrosis and may be targeted for adjunct therapy for TBPE.

  9. Combined detection of AM, CYFRA21-1, NSE and CEA levels in pleural effusion for differentiation of malignant from tuberculous pleural effusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Hua; Zhu Wenru; Sun Shuhong; Xu Shuhua; Yu Hui

    2005-01-01

    The level s of four tumor markers (AM, CYFRA21-1, NSE and CEA) pleural effusion in plearal effusion were determined by RIA in 52 patients with tuberculous pleural effusion and 74 patients with malignant pleural effusion. The results showed that the levels of the four tumor markers in malignant pleural effusion were significantly higher than those in tuberculous pleural effusion. Combined detection of the four tumor markers could improve the diagnostic sensitivity and the accuracy to 90.5% and 92.9%, respectively (P<0.01). Detection of AM, CYFRA21-1, NSE and CEA levels in pleural effusion is very useful for the differentiation of malignant from tuberculous pleural effusion. Combined detection of the four markers may greatly improve the diagnostic accuracy. (authors)

  10. The clinical characteristics of pleural effusion in scrub typhus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyung Ho; Chung, Jong-Hoon; Kim, Dong-Min; Yun, Na Ra; Lee, Jun; Kwon, Yong Eun; Yoon, Sung Ho; Lee, Seung Il; Han, Mi Ah

    2016-06-11

    The aim of this study is to identify the factors associated with the occurrence of pleural effusion and to investigate the characteristics of pleural effusion in scrub typhus. We conducted a retrospective analysis of the medical records of scrub typhus patients between January 2004 and December 2011 at Chosun University Hospital in South Korea. A total of 445 scrub typhus patients were divided into the following two groups: without (n = 352) or with pleural effusion (n = 93). The data of 18 scrub typhus patients who underwent thoracentesis were summarized. Multivariate analysis demonstrated that the following factors were associated with the occurrence of pleural effusion in scrub typhus: older age (odds ratio [OR] = 1.029, P = 0.037, confidence interval [CI] = 1.002-1.056); male gender (OR = 1.924, P = 0.020, CI = 1.109-3.340); presence of heart failure (OR = 2.628, P = 0.039, CI = 1.052-6.565); and lower albumin (OR = 0.107, P ≤ 0.001, CI = 0.058-0.196). Most pleural effusion presentations were bilateral (88 %) and small (91 %). The effusion had transudate characteristics in 7 patients and exudate characteristics in 11 patients based on Light's criteria. This study provided the first data regarding the following four independent risk factors associated with the occurrence of pleural effusion: older age; male gender; the presence of heart failure; and lower albumin. The pleural effusion presentations in scrub typhus patients were bilateral and small in most cases, with transudate and/or exudate characteristics.

  11. Vascular endothelial growth factor and protein level in pleural effusion for differentiating malignant from benign pleural effusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Da-Wei; Chang, Wei-An; Liu, Kuan-Ting; Yen, Meng-Chi; Kuo, Po-Lin

    2017-09-01

    Pleural effusion is associated with multiple benign and malignant conditions. Currently no biomarkers differentiate malignant pleural effusion (MPE) and benign pleural effusion (BPE) sensitively and specifically. The present study identified a novel combination of biomarkers in pleural effusion for differentiating MPE from BPE by enrolling 75 patients, 34 with BPE and 41 with MPE. The levels of lactate dehydrogenase, glucose, protein, and total cell, neutrophil, monocyte and lymphocyte counts in the pleural effusion were measured. The concentrations of interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-4, IL-5, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, IL-12, tumor necrosis factor-α, interferon γ, transforming growth factor-β1, colony stimulating factor 2, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) were detected using cytometric bead arrays. Protein and VEGF levels differed significantly between patients with BPE and those with MPE. The optimal cutoff value of VEGF and protein was 214 pg/ml and 3.35 g/dl respectively, according to the receiver operating characteristic curve. A combination of VEGF >214 pg/ml and protein >3.35 g/dl in pleural effusion presented a sensitivity of 92.6% and an accuracy of 78.6% for MPE, but was not associated with a decreased survival rate. These results suggested that this novel combination strategy may provide useful biomarkers for predicting MPE and facilitating early diagnosis.

  12. VEGF Correlates with Inflammation and Fibrosis in Tuberculous Pleural Effusion

    OpenAIRE

    Bien, Mauo-Ying; Wu, Ming-Ping; Chen, Wei-Lin; Chung, Chi-Li

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To investigate the relationship among angiogenic cytokines, inflammatory markers, and fibrinolytic activity in tuberculous pleural effusion (TBPE) and their clinical importance. Methods. Forty-two patients diagnosed with TBPE were studied. Based on chest ultrasonography, there were 26 loculated and 16 nonloculated TBPE patients. The effusion size radiological scores and effusion vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), interleukin- (IL-) 8, plasminogen activator inhibitor type-1 ...

  13. The effectiveness of single port thoracoscopic approach in pleural effusions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasemin Bilgin Büyükkarabacak

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Currently, thoracoscopic procedures have been used frequently in diagnosis and treatment of pleural effusions. It was reported, high diagnosis and treatment success with thoracoscopy in pleural effusion, which was not, diagnosed using cytology and blinding pleural biopsy procedures. In this study, it was aimed to evaluate of the patient was performed video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS due to pleural effusion. Methods: Between 2011 and 2014 years, it was evaluated 52 patients was performed VATS because of pleural effusion. The procedure was performed under general anesthesia and single lung ventilation in 50 patients, and local anesthesia in 2 patients. Results: Histopathological results were reported as carcinoma infiltration in 29 patients, benign disease in 23 patients. Cytological examination of liquid was executed before thoracoscopy in all of the patients with malignity positive. In addition, in eight patients pleura biopsy, on which blinding was executed, evaluated as malignity negative. The diagnostic value of our procedure has 100% in malign group and 98% in benign group. In patients with malignant disease, pleurodesis was performed peroperatively. Mean hospital stay was 5 days (3-15. Mean duration of terminating chest tube was 3 days (3-15. There were no morbidity and mortality due to procedure. Conclusion: Single port VATS is an effective and safe procedure in diagnosis and palliative treatment of patient with pleural effusion, and it has high success rate and reduces hospital stay.

  14. Pleural Fluid Adenosine Deaminase (ADA) Predicts Survival in Patients with Malignant Pleural Effusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terra, Ricardo Mingarini; Antonangelo, Leila; Mariani, Alessandro Wasum; de Oliveira, Ricardo Lopes Moraes; Teixeira, Lisete Ribeiro; Pego-Fernandes, Paulo Manuel

    2016-08-01

    Systemic and local inflammations have been described as relevant prognostic factors in patients with cancer. However, parameters that stand for immune activity in the pleural space have not been tested as predictors of survival in patients with malignant pleural effusion. The objective of this study was to evaluate pleural lymphocytes and Adenosine Deaminase (ADA) as predictors of survival in patients with recurrent malignant pleural effusion. Retrospective cohort study includes patients who underwent pleurodesis for malignant pleural effusion in a tertiary center. Pleural fluid protein concentration, lactate dehydrogenase, glucose, oncotic cytology, cell count, and ADA were collected before pleurodesis and analyzed. Survival analysis was performed considering pleurodesis as time origin, and death as the event. Backwards stepwise Cox regression was used to find predictors of survival. 156 patients (out of 196 potentially eligible) were included in this study. Most were female (72 %) and breast cancer was the most common underlying malignancy (53 %). Pleural fluid ADA level was stratified as low (Pleural fluid cell count and lymphocytes number and percentage did not correlate with survival. Pleural fluid Adenosine Deaminase levels (pleural effusion who undergo pleurodesis.

  15. Pleural irregularities and mediastinal pleural involvement in early stages of malignant pleural mesothelioma and benign asbestos pleural effusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Katsuya; Gemba, Kenichi; Fujimoto, Nobukazu; Aoe, Keisuke; Takeshima, Yukio; Inai, Kouki; Kishimoto, Takumi

    2016-09-01

    To elucidate differences in the level and localization of pleural irregularities in early malignant pleural mesothelioma (eMPM) and benign asbestos pleural effusion (BAPE) using CT. Retrospective assessment of CT findings of consecutive patients with BAPE at a single centre and patients with eMPM reported in Japanese vital statistics. Thirty-six patients with confirmed diagnoses of BAPE and sixty-six patients with confirmed diagnoses of eMPM (mesothelioma stages T1 or T2) were included. Informed consent, CT scans, and clinical and pathologic details were obtained for all patients and were reviewed by one radiologist, two pathologists, and two pulmonologists. Asbestosis, pleural plaque, rounded atelectasis, and diffuse pleural thickening were assessed in all patients. Prevalence of asbestosis, pleural plaque, rounded atelectasis, and diffuse pleural thickening was significantly higher in the BAPE group. Low-level irregularity was more common in the BAPE group (ppleural irregularity was not observed in any patients in the BAPE group, although 55% of patients in the eMPM group showed interlobar pleural irregularity. Mediastinal pleural involvement was observed in 74% of patients in the eMPM group and had a positive predictive value of 89%. This study demonstrates that the level and localization of plural irregularities significantly differed between patients with BAPE and eMPM. Large-scale prospective studies are needed to fully establish the diagnostic utility of such differences. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Differentiation of exudative and transudative pleural effusion : MR appearances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Tae Hoon; Lee, Sang Yoon; Kang, Ho Yeong; Kim, Soo Rhan; Yang, Sang Kyu; Shin, So Young; Lee, Shin Hyung; Lee, Chang Joon

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine whether MR images after intravenous administration of Gd-DTPA can differentiate exudative and transudative pleural effusion. We studied 18 patients with ten exudative and eight transudative pleural effusions diagnosed clinically and by thoracentesis. We analysed the relationship between T1 value(normalized to fat) and the ratio of effusion/serum protein of pleural effusion. We also assessed the contrast enhancement of exudative and transudative pleural effusion on T1 weighted SE images taken at 15 and 30minutes after administration of Gd-DTPA. The relationship between the effusion/serum protein ratio and T1 value(normalized to fat) was statistically not significant(r=0.27, P=0.381). On precontrast spin-echo T1WI, mean signal intensity of the transudate was 0.18(±0.04) and that of the exudate was 0.24(±0.07), values which were not significant differences(P>0.05). Postcontrast mean signal intensities of transudates at 15 and 30 were 0.20±0.06 and 0.26±0.08, respectively, values which were not significantly higher than that of precontrast mean signal intensity(P<0.05). Postcontrast mean signal intensity values of exudative pleural effusions at 15 and 30 minutes(0.32±0.06 and 0.39±0.06, respectively) were, on the other hand, significantly higher than that of precontrast mean signal intensity(P<0.05). Postcontrast T1-weighted SE images at 15 and 30 minutes can be helpful in the differentiation of transudative and exudative pleural effusion

  17. Management of Pleural Effusion, Empyema, and Lung Abscess

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Hyeon

    2011-01-01

    Pleural effusion is an accumulation of fluid in the pleural space that is classified as transudate or exudate according to its composition and underlying pathophysiology. Empyema is defined by purulent fluid collection in the pleural space, which is most commonly caused by pneumonia. A lung abscess, on the other hand, is a parenchymal necrosis with confined cavitation that results from a pulmonary infection. Pleural effusion, empyema, and lung abscess are commonly encountered clinical problems that increase mortality. These conditions have traditionally been managed by antibiotics or surgical placement of a large drainage tube. However, as the efficacy of minimally invasive interventional procedures has been well established, image-guided small percutaneous drainage tubes have been considered as the mainstay of treatment for patients with pleural fluid collections or a lung abscess. In this article, the technical aspects of image-guided interventions, indications, expected benefits, and complications are discussed and the published literature is reviewed. PMID:22379278

  18. Recommendations of diagnosis and treatment of pleural effusion. Update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villena Garrido, Victoria; Cases Viedma, Enrique; Fernández Villar, Alberto; de Pablo Gafas, Alicia; Pérez Rodríguez, Esteban; Porcel Pérez, José Manuel; Rodríguez Panadero, Francisco; Ruiz Martínez, Carlos; Salvatierra Velázquez, Angel; Valdés Cuadrado, Luis

    2014-06-01

    Although during the last few years there have been several important changes in the diagnostic or therapeutic methods, pleural effusion is still one of the diseases that the respiratory specialist have to evaluate frequently. The aim of this paper is to update the knowledge about pleural effusions, rather than to review the causes of pleural diseases exhaustively. These recommendations have a longer extension for the subjects with a direct clinical usefulness, but a slight update of other pleural diseases has been also included. Among the main scientific advantages are included the thoracic ultrasonography, the intrapleural fibrinolytics, the pleurodesis agents, or the new pleural drainages techniques. Copyright © 2013 SEPAR. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  19. Profiling pleural effusion cells by a diffraction imaging method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Qaysi, Safaa; Hong, Heng; Wen, Yuhua; Lu, Jun Q.; Feng, Yuanming; Hu, Xin-Hua

    2018-02-01

    Assay of cells in pleural effusion (PE) is an important means of disease diagnosis. Conventional cytology of effusion samples, however, has low sensitivity and depends heavily on the expertise of cytopathologists. We applied a polarization diffraction imaging flow cytometry method on effusion cells to investigate their features. Diffraction imaging of the PE cell samples has been performed on 6000 to 12000 cells for each effusion cell sample of three patients. After prescreening to remove images by cellular debris and aggregated non-cellular particles, the image textures were extracted with a gray level co-occurrence matrix (GLCM) algorithm. The distribution of the imaged cells in the GLCM parameters space was analyzed by a Gaussian Mixture Model (GMM) to determine the number of clusters among the effusion cells. These results yield insight on textural features of diffraction images and related cellular morphology in effusion samples and can be used toward the development of a label-free method for effusion cells assay.

  20. Mechanics of the canine diaphragm in pleural effusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Troyer, André; Leduc, Dimitri; Cappello, Matteo; Gevenois, Pierre Alain

    2012-09-01

    Pleural effusion is a complicating feature of many diseases of the lung and pleura, but its effects on the mechanics of the diaphragm have not been assessed. In the present study, radiopaque markers were attached along muscle bundles in the midcostal region of the diaphragm in anesthetized dogs, and the three-dimensional location of the markers during relaxation before and after the stepwise introduction of liquid into the left or right pleural space and during phrenic nerve stimulation in the same conditions was determined using computed tomography. From these data, accurate measurements of diaphragm muscle length and displacement were obtained, and the changes in pleural and abdominal pressure were analyzed as functions of these parameters. The effect of liquid instillation on the axial position of rib 5 was also measured. The data showed that 1) liquid leaked through the dorsal mediastinal sheet behind the pericardium so that effusion was bilateral; 2) effusion caused a caudal displacement of the relaxed diaphragm; 3) this displacement was, compared with passive lung inflation, much larger than the cranial displacement of the ribs; and 4) the capacity of the diaphragm to generate pressure, in particular pleural pressure, decreased markedly as effusion increased, and this decrease was well explained by the decrease in active muscle length. It is concluded that pleural effusion has a major adverse effect on the pressure-generating capacity of the diaphragm and that this is the result of the action of hydrostatic forces on the muscle.

  1. Idiopathic pleural panniculitis with recurrent pleural effusion not associated with Weber-Christian disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laperuta Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A 82-year-old patient with dyspnea and a recurrent history of pleural effusion was admitted into our unit. He performed a Chest computed tomography showing right pleural effusion. Video-assisted thoracoscopy (VATS exploratory showed parietal pleural thickening of adipose tissue. The surgical procedure consisted, therefore, in the execution of multiple biopsies of the parietal pleura which appeared covered, on the whole surface, by islands of adipose tissue, without macroscopic pathological aspects. After the procedure was performed pleurodesis with talc. The definitive histological examination consisted of normal mesothelial cells surrounded by fatty tissue infiltrated by small lymphocytes in a patient without skin lesions or visceral or systemic signs of inflammatory involvement of the adipose tissue. We reported a rare case of idiopathic pleural panniculitis with recurrent pleural effusion not associated with Weber-Christian disease.

  2. Diagnostic Utility of Pleural Fluid Adenosine Deaminase Level in Tuberculousis Pleural Effusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suleman, A.; Abbasi, M. A.; Anwar, S. A.; Kamal, M.; Khan, H.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Early diagnosis and management of tuberculosis is essential for decreasing the disease burden. Pakistan is one of the few countries of world with a very high burden of tuberculosis. Many diagnostic tests are available for detection of tuberculosis but each is fraught with certain limitations of its own. Methods: This study was a cross sectional validation study that sought to determine the validity of pleural fluid adenosine deaminase levels for diagnosis of tuberculous pleural effusion. Results: A total of 160 patients with exudative lymphocytic pleural effusions were enrolled in this study. The mean pleural fluid ADA level was 52.18±1.98 U/L. The mean pleural fluid ADA level in patients diagnosed to have tuberculosis on pleural biopsy/histopathology was higher as compared to patients who did not have tuberculous pleural effusion 52.16±2.4 U/L vs 38.6±3.14 U/L. The difference was found to be statistically significant between the two groups (p<0.05). The sensitivity, specificity, ppv and npv of pleural fluid ADA level were 88.88 percent, 77.04 percent, 86.28 percent and 81.04 percent respectively. Conclusion: Despite wide variations in the reported sensitivity and specificity of pleural fluid ADA level, it can be used as a surrogate for pleural biopsy when the latter is not feasible. (author)

  3. Secretion of intelectin-1 from malignant pleural mesothelioma into pleural effusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuji, S; Tsuura, Y; Morohoshi, T; Shinohara, T; Oshita, F; Yamada, K; Kameda, Y; Ohtsu, T; Nakamura, Y; Miyagi, Y

    2010-08-10

    Malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) is a rare but fatal tumour. Although most MPM patients show pleural effusion at even the early stage, it is hard to diagnose as MPM at the early stage because a sensitive and reliable diagnostic marker for MPM has not been found in plasma or pleural effusion. In this study, we investigated whether intelectin-1 was specifically contained in MPM cells and the pleural effusion of MPM patient by immunohistochemistry, western blotting, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Malignant pleural mesothelioma cell lines, but not lung adenocarcinoma cell lines, secreted intelectin-1. In immunohistochemistry, epithelioid-type MPMs, but neither pleura-invading lung adenocarcinomas nor reactive mesothelial cells near the lung adenocarcinomas, were stained with anti-intelectin antibodies. Pleural effusion of MPM patients contained a higher concentration of intelectin-1 than that of lung cancer patients. These results suggest that detection of intelectin-1 may be useful for a differential diagnosis of epithelioid-type MPM in immunohistochemistry and that a high concentration of intelectin-1 in pleural effusion can be used as a new marker for clinical diagnosis of MPM.

  4. Validation of equations for pleural effusion volume estimation by ultrasonography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Maged; Rizk, Rana; Essam, Hatem; Abouelnour, Ahmed

    2017-12-01

    To validate the accuracy of previously published equations that estimate pleural effusion volume using ultrasonography. Only equations using simple measurements were tested. Three measurements were taken at the posterior axillary line for each case with effusion: lateral height of effusion ( H ), distance between collapsed lung and chest wall ( C ) and distance between lung and diaphragm ( D ). Cases whose effusion was aspirated to dryness were included and drained volume was recorded. Intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC) was used to determine the predictive accuracy of five equations against the actual volume of aspirated effusion. 46 cases with effusion were included. The most accurate equation in predicting effusion volume was ( H  +  D ) × 70 (ICC 0.83). The simplest and yet accurate equation was H  × 100 (ICC 0.79). Pleural effusion height measured by ultrasonography gives a reasonable estimate of effusion volume. Incorporating distance between lung base and diaphragm into estimation improves accuracy from 79% with the first method to 83% with the latter.

  5. CT differentiation of subphrenic abscess and pleural effusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexander, E.S.; Proto, A.V.; Clark, R.A.

    1983-01-01

    The computed tomographic scans of 38 patients with proven subphrenic abscesses and 28 patients with proven pleural effusions were reviewed without knowledge of the final diagnosis. In 26% of cases the hemidiaphragm could be identified directly as a stripe, while in 71% of cases only the hemidiaphragmatic contour could be seen. In 3% of cases the hemidiaphragm position was indeterminate because insufficient scans of the chest or abdomen were obtained. In the cases where the hemidiaphragm position could be established, the computed tomographic diagnosis was correct in 100% of subphrenic abscesses and in 96% of pleural effusions. Methods of identifying the hemidiaphragm on computed tomography and the possible pitfalls are discussed

  6. Imatinib-induced pleural effusion: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Banka

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Imatinib is a tyrosine kinase inhibitor and has rarely been reported to cause pleural effusion. We report the case of an 88-year-old male, known case of gastrointestinal stromal tumor on treatment with imatinib, who presented with a 2-week history of cough and dyspnea. He was diagnosed to have a right-sided pleural effusion and thoracentesis of the fluid revealed an exudate with low adenosine deaminase and negative cytology. Withdrawal of the drug lead to resolution of symptoms. We report this case to highlight the side effect profile of imatinib and warn physicians regarding this potential adverse effect which may be mistaken for metastasis or infection.

  7. Randomized Trial of Pleural Fluid Drainage Frequency in Patients with Malignant Pleural Effusions. The ASAP Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahidi, Momen M; Reddy, Chakravarthy; Yarmus, Lonny; Feller-Kopman, David; Musani, Ali; Shepherd, R Wesley; Lee, Hans; Bechara, Rabih; Lamb, Carla; Shofer, Scott; Mahmood, Kamran; Michaud, Gaetane; Puchalski, Jonathan; Rafeq, Samaan; Cattaneo, Stephen M; Mullon, John; Leh, Steven; Mayse, Martin; Thomas, Samantha M; Peterson, Bercedis; Light, Richard W

    2017-04-15

    Patients with malignant pleural effusions have significant dyspnea and shortened life expectancy. Indwelling pleural catheters allow patients to drain pleural fluid at home and can lead to autopleurodesis. The optimal drainage frequency to achieve autopleurodesis and freedom from catheter has not been determined. To determine whether an aggressive daily drainage strategy is superior to the current standard every other day drainage of pleural fluid in achieving autopleurodesis. Patients were randomized to either an aggressive drainage (daily drainage; n = 73) or standard drainage (every other day drainage; n = 76) of pleural fluid via a tunneled pleural catheter. The primary outcome was the incidence of autopleurodesis following the placement of the indwelling pleural catheters. The rate of autopleurodesis, defined as complete or partial response based on symptomatic and radiographic changes, was greater in the aggressive drainage arm than the standard drainage arm (47% vs. 24%, respectively; P = 0.003). Median time to autopleurodesis was shorter in the aggressive arm (54 d; 95% confidence interval, 34-83) as compared with the standard arm (90 d; 95% confidence interval, 70 to nonestimable). Rate of adverse events, quality of life, and patient satisfaction were not significantly different between the two arms. Among patients with malignant pleural effusion, daily drainage of pleural fluid via an indwelling pleural catheter led to a higher rate of autopleurodesis and faster time to liberty from catheter. Clinical trial registered with www.clinicaltrials.gov (NCT 00978939).

  8. Recurrence of Malignant Pleural Effusion Following Pleurodesis: Is ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    diluted with 60mls of isotonic saline after which the chest tube was clamped for 4 hours. The thoracostomy tube was removed as soon as the drainage decreased to less than 100ml/day and the chest xray confirmed lung re-expansion and no residual pleural effusion. Pleurodesis was repeated after 7 days if the drainage.

  9. The mysterious pleural effusion | Simao | Annals of Pediatric Surgery

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We report the case of a 6-month-old infant on total parenteral nutrition since neonatal period, as a consequence of severe intestinal insufficiency secondary to extensive intestinal resection for necrotizing enterocolitis. The child was admitted to the ICU with respiratory failure due to bilateral milky pleural effusion 17 days after ...

  10. Thoracoscopy in undiagnosed pleural effusions | de Groot | South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective. To review the indications and accuracy of diagnostic thoracoscopy for pleural effusions of unknown origin. Design. Retrospective review of consecutive patients referred for diagnostic thoracoscopy over a 5-year period from 1 January 1989 to 31 December 1993. Setting. Tertiary referral cardiothoracic unit.

  11. Multiple skeletal lesions and pleural effusion owing to Histoplasma ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We describe a rare case of multiple skeletal lesions and a pleural effusion owing to Histoplasma capsulatum infection in a 16-year-old immunocompetent girl residing in a non-endemic region. Of note is that she had a lesion within a thoracic vertebra. Following an extensive literature search, we found that vertebral ...

  12. Prognostic factors of hydrops fetalis with pleural effusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakayama, Atsushi; Oshiro, Makoto; Yamada, Yasumasa; Hattori, Tetsuo; Wakano, Yasuhiro; Hayashi, Seiji; Kokubo, Minoru; Takemoto, Koji; Honda, Shigeru; Ieda, Kuniko; Yamamoto, Hikaru; Kouwaki, Masanori; Yokoi, Kyoko; Shinohara, Osamu; Kato, Takenori; Miyata, Masafumi; Tanaka, Taihei; Hayakawa, Masahiro

    2017-10-01

    Hydrops fetalis (HF) has a low survival rate, particularly in the case of preterm birth. In addition, the severity index of HF has not been fully investigated yet. The aim of this study was to clarify the prognostic factors of HF with pleural effusion. All live-born HF patients with pleural effusion, except for chromosomal abnormality or complex congenital heart disease, born from 2009 to 2013 in Aichi Prefecture in Japan were included. Prenatal, perinatal, and postnatal information was obtained from the medical records and was retrospectively analyzed. Forty-one HF patients with pleural effusion were included, and 28 patients (68%) survived. On multivariate logistic stepwise analysis, gestational birth week (OR, 0.71; 95% CI: 0.52-0.96, P = 0.027) and standard deviation (SD) score of the birthweight (OR, 1.74; 95% CI: 1.01-2.99, P = 0.045) were significant factors for postnatal death. All patients with both ≥32 gestational weeks and pleural effusion. © 2017 Japan Pediatric Society.

  13. Intervention for pleural effusions and ascites following liver transplantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adetiloye, V.A. [Radiology Department, Birmingham Children`s Hospital NHS Trust, Ladywood Middleway, Birmingham B16 8ET (United Kingdom)]|[Radiology Department, College of Health Sciences, Obafemi Awolowo University, Ile-Ife (Nigeria); John, P.R. [Radiology Department, Birmingham Children`s Hospital NHS Trust, Ladywood Middleway, Birmingham B16 8ET (United Kingdom)

    1998-07-01

    Background. Small volumes of fluid in the pleural and peritoneal cavities are common after paediatric liver transplantation. Occasionally, larger fluid collections develop and need intervention by aspiration or insertion of a drain. Objective. To assess the incidence of moderate and large pleural and peritoneal fluid collections following paediatric liver transplantation, the need for intervention and the outcome following radiological and non-radiological treatment, with the ultimate objective of recommending a treatment protocol for such post-operative fluid collections. Materials and methods. A total of 184 consecutive liver grafts in 164 children were reviewed. Results. Of 184 grafts, 31 (16.8 %) developed excessive fluid collections requiring intervention (19 pleural effusions, 8 ascites and 4 effusions and ascites). The effusions were first diagnosed between days 1 and 44 after transplant and the ascites between days 1 and 14. The initial diagnosis was made radiologically in 21 (91 %) of 23 pleural effusions and in 10 (83 %) of 12 ascites. No identifiable cause or association was seen in 18 (58 %) of 31 cases. The mean duration of the pleural effusions and ascites, from onset of treatment to resolution, ranged from 33 {+-} 42 days (SD) to 35 {+-} 48 days and from 36 {+-} 47 days to 39 {+-} 46 days respectively. Comparison of the modes of interventional treatment (i. e. unguided, radiological and surgical) showed no statistically significant difference in the outcome of the management. Conclusions. Post-transplantation pleural effusions and ascites requiring intervention are often without definite cause. They are more common with reduced grafts, but this cannot completely explain the occurrence or the protracted duration of accumulation in spite of combined interventional management. The outcome of treatment is not significantly influenced by the mode of intervention except in cases where surgical intervention is indicated. Patients could be managed

  14. Intervention for pleural effusions and ascites following liver transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adetiloye, V.A.; John, P.R.

    1998-01-01

    Background. Small volumes of fluid in the pleural and peritoneal cavities are common after paediatric liver transplantation. Occasionally, larger fluid collections develop and need intervention by aspiration or insertion of a drain. Objective. To assess the incidence of moderate and large pleural and peritoneal fluid collections following paediatric liver transplantation, the need for intervention and the outcome following radiological and non-radiological treatment, with the ultimate objective of recommending a treatment protocol for such post-operative fluid collections. Materials and methods. A total of 184 consecutive liver grafts in 164 children were reviewed. Results. Of 184 grafts, 31 (16.8 %) developed excessive fluid collections requiring intervention (19 pleural effusions, 8 ascites and 4 effusions and ascites). The effusions were first diagnosed between days 1 and 44 after transplant and the ascites between days 1 and 14. The initial diagnosis was made radiologically in 21 (91 %) of 23 pleural effusions and in 10 (83 %) of 12 ascites. No identifiable cause or association was seen in 18 (58 %) of 31 cases. The mean duration of the pleural effusions and ascites, from onset of treatment to resolution, ranged from 33 ± 42 days (SD) to 35 ± 48 days and from 36 ± 47 days to 39 ± 46 days respectively. Comparison of the modes of interventional treatment (i. e. unguided, radiological and surgical) showed no statistically significant difference in the outcome of the management. Conclusions. Post-transplantation pleural effusions and ascites requiring intervention are often without definite cause. They are more common with reduced grafts, but this cannot completely explain the occurrence or the protracted duration of accumulation in spite of combined interventional management. The outcome of treatment is not significantly influenced by the mode of intervention except in cases where surgical intervention is indicated. Patients could be managed effectively

  15. Untargeted mass spectrometry-based metabolomic profiling of pleural effusions: fatty acids as novel cancer biomarkers for malignant pleural effusions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Ching-Wan; Law, Chun-Yiu

    2014-09-05

    Untargeted mass spectrometry-based metabolomic profiling is a powerful analytical method used for broad-spectrum identification and quantification of metabolites in biofluids in human health and disease states. In this study, we exploit metabolomic profiling for cancer biomarker discovery for diagnosis of malignant pleural effusions. We envisage the result will be clinically useful since currently there are no cancer biomarkers that are accurate enough for the diagnosis of malignant pleural effusions. Metabolomes of 32 malignant pleural effusions from lung cancer patients and 18 benign effusions from patients with pulmonary tuberculosis were analyzed using reversed-phase liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) using AB SCIEX TripleTOF 5600. MS spectra were analyzed using XCMS, PeakView, and LipidView. Metabolome-Wide Association Study (MWAS) was performed by Receiver Operating Characteristic Curve Explorer and Tester (ROCCET). Insignificant markers were filtered out using a metabolome-wide significance level (MWSL) with p-value pleural effusions. Using a ratio of FFA 18:1-to-ceramide (d18:1/16:0), the area-under-ROC was further increased to 0.99 (95% CI = 0.91-1.00) with sensitivity 93.8% and specificity 100.0%. Using untargeted metabolomic profiling, the diagnostic cancer biomarker with the largest area-under-ROC can be determined objectively. This lipogenic phenotype could be explained by overexpression of fatty acid synthase (FASN) in cancer cells. The diagnostic performance of FFA 18:1-to-ceramide (d18:1/16:0) ratio supports its use for diagnosis of malignant pleural effusions.

  16. Radiologically guided percutaneous pleurodesis of malignant pleural effusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morrison, M.C.; Mueller, P.R.; Saini, S.; Hahn, P.F.; Lee, M.J.; Cortell, E.; Girard, M.; Goldberg, M.; Simeone, J.F.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports that in patients with symptomatic malignant pleural effusion. US-guided placement of small-bore catheters for pleurodesis presents an alternative to traditional surgical management. Catheters ranging in size from 7-F to 16-F (n = 17), or greater than 16-F (n = 5), were placed intrapleurally under US guidance in 22 patients with symptomatic malignant pleural effusion. Pleur-E-Vac suction was applied until tube drainage was less than 100 mL/d. Tetracycline (1--2 g/100 mL of normal saline solution) or bleomycin (45--100 U/50 mL of 5% dextrose) was then instilled and left in the pleural space for 1--3 hours. The chest tube was removed when output was less than 20 mL/d

  17. Minimally invasive surgical treatment of malignant pleural effusions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciuche, Adrian; Nistor, Claudiu; Pantile, Daniel; Prof Horvat, Teodor

    2011-10-01

    Usually the pleural cavity contains a small amount of liquid (approximately 10 ml). Pleural effusions appear when the liquid production rate overpasses the absorption rate with a greater amount of liquid inside the pleural cavity. Between January 1998 to December 2008 we conducted a study in order to establish the adequate surgical treatment for MPEs. Effective control of a recurrent malignant pleural effusion can greatly improve the quality of life of the cancer patient. The present review collects and examines the clinical results of minimally invasive techniques designed to treat this problem. Patients with MPEs were studied according to several criteria. In our study we observed the superiority of intraoperative talc poudrage, probably due to a more uniform distribution of talc particles over the pleural surface. Minimal pleurotomy with thoracic drainage and instillation of a talc suspension is also a safe and effective technique and should be employed when there are contraindications for the thoracoscopic minimally invasive procedure. On the basis of comparisons involving effectiveness, morbidity, and convenience, we recommend the thoracoscopic insufflations of talc as a fine powder with pleural drainage as the procedure of choice.

  18. Accumulation of sup(99m)Tc-MDP in pleural effusions and ascites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yokomizo, Yu; Ichiya, Yuichi; Kuwabara, Yasuo; Wada, Makoto; Shiozaki, Hiroshi

    1983-01-01

    In 1500 cases bone scintigraphy was performed. sup(99m)Tc-MDP accumulation were revealed on bone scintigraphy in pleural effusion in 5 cases and that in ascitic effusion in 2 cases. The sensitivity of sup(99m)Tc-MDP accumulation was 5.5% for pleural effusion and 10.0% for ascites. It was noticed that the sup(99m)Tc-MDP accumulation was often associated with retention of a large amount of pleural effusion. (Ueda, J.)

  19. The Prevalence of Pleural Effusion in Pregnant Women: A Pilot Study

    OpenAIRE

    DİKENSOY, Ebru

    2014-01-01

    Pleural effusions are very common in general population. There are more than 50 reasons for the etiology. There is limited data on the prevalence of pleural effusions in a population of pregnant women. We prospectively screened 45 pregnant women between May and October 2006. All the pregnant women underwent thoracic ultrasonography during their routine check. Five out of 45 subjects (11%) had minimal and bilateral pleural effusion. None of the subjects was symptomatic. All of the effusions re...

  20. A large pericardial effusion and bilateral pleural effusions as the initial manifestations of Familial Mediterranean Fever

    OpenAIRE

    Schembri, Emma Louise; Mifsud, Simon; Cassar Demarco, Daniela; Coleiro, Bernard; Mallia, Carmel

    2015-01-01

    Familial Mediterranean Fever (FMF) is a condition characterized by recurrent febrile poly-serositis. Typical presentations of the disease include episodes of fever, abdominal pain and joint pains. Chest pain is a less common presentation. We report a case of FMF which presented with a large pericardial effusion and bilateral pleural effusions in a lady who had no positive family history and negative genetic testing.

  1. CT diagnosis of pleural dissemination without pleural effusion in primary lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murayama, Sadayuki; Murakami, Junji; Yoshimitsu, Kengo; Torii, Yoshikuni; Masuda, Kouji; Ishida, Teruyoshi.

    1996-01-01

    We retrospectively reviewed the CT scans of 25 primary lung cancers with disseminated pleural nodules or minimal malignant pleural effusion that were not recognized preparatively. Special attention was devoted to abutting interlobar fissures, thick major fissures, and disseminated nodules on the chest wall, the diaphragm, and in the interlobar fissures. Among 10 primary tumors abutting interlobar fissures, nine (90%) had at least one of these findings. Among 15 primary lung tumors which did not abut interlobar fissures, four (27%) had at least one of these findings. We conclude that CT is a useful modality for detecting the pleural dissemination of primary lung cancers when primary lung cancers abut interlobar fissures even if no pleural effusion is detectable on CT. (author)

  2. Management of malignant pleural effusion: challenges and solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penz, Erika; Watt, Kristina N; Hergott, Christopher A; Rahman, Najib M; Psallidas, Ioannis

    2017-01-01

    Malignant pleural effusion (MPE) is a sign of advanced cancer and is associated with significant symptom burden and mortality. To date, management has been palliative in nature with a focus on draining the pleural space, with therapies aimed at preventing recurrence or providing intermittent drainage through indwelling catheters. Given that patients with MPEs are heterogeneous with respect to their cancer type and response to systemic therapy, functional status, and pleural milieu, response to MPE therapy is also heterogeneous and difficult to predict. Furthermore, the impact of therapies on important patient outcomes has only recently been evaluated consistently in clinical trials and cohort studies. In this review, we examine patient outcomes that have been studied to date, address the question of which are most important for managing patients, and review the literature related to the expected value for money (cost-effectiveness) of indwelling pleural catheters relative to traditionally recommended approaches. PMID:28694705

  3. Indwelling pleural drain for mobile management of malignant pleural effusion-combining benefits of both methods

    OpenAIRE

    Dinesh Mehta; Anshu Gupta; Sameer Singhal; Sachin Bansal

    2015-01-01

    Malignant pleural effusion is a leading cause of morbidity in lung cancer patients requiring repeated pleural aspirations or persistent intercostal drainage tube. Using an indigenous method of putting icd tube of smaller size with subcutaneous tunneling would allow draining fluid from lungs easily and painlessly when needed and avoid the need for repeated injections and chest tube insertion every time the fluid is to be drained.

  4. Indwelling pleural drain for mobile management of malignant pleural effusion-combining benefits of both methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dinesh Mehta

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Malignant pleural effusion is a leading cause of morbidity in lung cancer patients requiring repeated pleural aspirations or persistent intercostal drainage tube. Using an indigenous method of putting icd tube of smaller size with subcutaneous tunneling would allow draining fluid from lungs easily and painlessly when needed and avoid the need for repeated injections and chest tube insertion every time the fluid is to be drained.

  5. Diagnostic accuracy of sonography for pleural effusion: systematic review

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    Alexandre Grimberg

    Full Text Available CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE: The initial method for evaluating the presence of pleural effusion was chest radiography. Isolated studies have shown that sonography has greater accuracy than radiography for this diagnosis; however, no systematic reviews on this matter are available in the literature. Thus, the aim of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of sonography in detecting pleural effusion, by means of a systematic review of the literature. DESIGN AND SETTING: This was a systematic review with meta-analysis on accuracy studies. This study was conducted in the Department of Diagnostic Imaging and in the Brazilian Cochrane Center, Discipline of Emergency Medicine and Evidence-Based Medicine, Department of Medicine, Universidade Federal de São Paulo (Unifesp, São Paulo, Brazil. METHOD: The following databases were searched: Cochrane Library, Medline, Web of Science, Embase and Literatura Latino-Americana e do Caribe em Ciências da Saúde (Lilacs. The references of relevant studies were also screened for additional citations of interest. Studies in which the accuracy of sonography for detecting pleural effusion was tested, with an acceptable reference standard (computed tomography or thoracic drainage, were included. RESULTS: Four studies were included. All of them showed that sonography had high sensitivity, specificity and accuracy for detecting pleural effusions. The mean sensitivity was 93% (95% confidence interval, CI: 89% to 96%, and specificity was 96% (95% CI: 95% to 98%. CONCLUSIONS: In different populations and clinical settings, sonography showed consistently high sensitivity, specificity and accuracy for detecting fluid in the pleural space.

  6. A rare pleural effusion in a young male

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shabana Begum

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A 28-year-old male presented with fever with right-sided chest pain for 2 weeks. Clinicoradiological picture was suggestive of right-sided pleural effusion. He had history of polytrauma following a road traffic accident and had to undergo emergency laparotomy a month ago. Microscopic and culture examination of the pleural fluid showed neutrophilia, high bilirubin content and presence of gram-negative bacilli. Ultrasound of the abdomen showed the presence of biloma in the liver and right subdiaphragmatic space with fistulous communication into the right thoracic cavity. The patient was managed successfully with complete recovery.

  7. An Unusual Case of Recurrent Pleural Effusion in a Child | Harjai ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Traumatic pancreatitis in children rarely results in the development of a recalcitrant pleural effusion, secondary to a connection between the pleural cavity and the pancreas. This child presented with predominantly respiratory symptoms of an underlying abdominal condition. Patients with large, recurring pleural effusions ...

  8. Derrame pleural secundário à hiperestimulação ovariana Pleural effusion following ovarian hyperstimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jader Joel Machado Junqueira

    2012-06-01

    the present study was to describe the clinical presentation, treatment, and outcome of pleural effusion associated with OHSS in three patients undergoing in vitro fertilization. The patients ranged in age from 27 to 33 years. The onset of symptomatic pleural effusion (bilateral in all cases occurred, on average, 43 days (range, 27-60 days after initiation of hormone therapy for ovulation induction. All three patients required hospitalization for massive fluid resuscitation, and two required noninvasive mechanical ventilation. Although all three patients initially underwent thoracentesis, early recurrence of symptoms and pleural effusion prompted the use of drainage with a pigtail catheter. Despite the high output from the pleural drain (mean, 1,000 mL/day in the first week and prolonged drainage (for 9-22 days, the outcomes were excellent: all three patients were discharged from hospital. Although pleural effusion secondary to OHSS is probably underdiagnosed, the associated morbidity should not be underestimated, especially because it affects potentially pregnant patients. In this study, early diagnosis and appropriate supportive measures yielded favorable results, limiting the surgical approach to adequate pleural drainage.

  9. Pleural pressure swing and lung expansion after malignant pleural effusion drainage: the benefits of high-temporal resolution pleural manometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boshuizen, Rogier C; Sinaasappel, Michiel; Vincent, Andrew D; Goldfinger, Vicky; Farag, Sheima; van den Heuvel, Michel M

    2013-07-01

    Malignant pleural effusion is a common complication in end-stage cancer patients and can cause severe dyspnea. Therapeutic thoracentesis is often limited to 1 to 1.5 L. Pleural manometry can be used to recognize a not-expanded lung. Interval pleural pressure measurements with a high temporal resolution were performed after each removal of 200 mL of fluid to observe pleural pressure swings. Pleural elastance was defined as the difference in pleural pressure divided by the change in volume. Chest x-rays were performed to evaluate lung expansion, reexpansion pulmonary edema, and fluid residue. Thirty-four procedures in 30 patients were eligible for analysis. Four patients had incomplete lung expansion after drainage. No reexpansion pulmonary edema was observed. Pleural pressure swing after 200 mL drainage was higher when the lung did not expand. Pleural elastance after removal of 500 mL was higher in the not-expanded subgroup. We demonstrated that a high pleural pressure swing after removal of only 200 mL was related to incomplete lung expansion. We confirmed the association between pleural elastance and lung expansion.

  10. Pleuropulmonary blastoma presenting as a complicated pleural effusion.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Brien, J

    2012-02-01

    Pleuropulmonary blastoma (PPB) is a rare tumour of mesenchymal cells. We present a case of PPB in a child, which presented to the emergency department with an extensive pleural effusion. We discuss the radiological features, pathology, classification and treatment of this condition. This case reiterates the importance of considering this diagnosis prior to surgical intervention, to improve the long term prognosis of this aggressive disease.

  11. Minocycline induced lupus with yellow colored chylous exudative pleural effusion

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    Daniel Starobin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Ninety years old male was admitted to hospital due to breathlessness. The prominent findings were extensive blue-grey skin pigmentation and large left chylothorax. Drug induced lupus was diagnosed due to either minocycline chronic treatment or no alternative illness to explain his sub-acute disease. Minocycline therapy was stopped with gradual improvement of pleural effusion and skin discoloration. This case is the first presentation of minocycline induced lupus with chylothorax.

  12. High IL-35 pleural expression in patients with tuberculous pleural effusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Xuan; Yang, Jiong

    2015-05-03

    IL-35 is a novel anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive cytokine primarily produced by Treg cells, and is involved in inflammatory diseases and autoimmune diseases. However, its roles in tuberculous pleural effusion (TPE) remain unknown. We aimed to investigate the potential involvement of IL-35 in TPE. Thirty TPE patients and 20 lung cancer patients with malignant pleural effusion (MPE) were recruited. Samples of pleural effusion (100 mL) were collected after traditional pleurocentesis. Blood was sampled from TPE patients. Mononuclear cells were isolated by Ficoll-Hypaque gradient. Proportions of Th1, Th17, and IL-35-producing cells were analyzed by flow cytometry. IL-35 was assessed by real-time RT-PCR, ELISA, and immunofluorescence. An ELISPOT assay was used to assess the effect of IL-35 on pleural effusion mononuclear cells (PEMCs). Proportions of IL-35-producing cells were higher in TPE compared with MPE (49.4±6.0 vs. 15.8±5.4%, Ppleural tissues from TPE patients. Results suggest that there is an imbalance in IL-35 metabolism in TPE. However, further studies are required to assess the exact relationship with the immune system response to tuberculosis. IL-35 might play a role in TPE and might be targeted as a treatment for TPE.

  13. Switching off malignant pleural effusion formation—fantasy or future?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannou, Anastasios D.; Stathopoulos, Georgios T.

    2015-01-01

    Malignant pleural effusion (MPE) is common and difficult to treat. In the vast majority of patients the presence of MPE heralds incurable disease, associated with poor quality of life, morbidity and mortality. Current therapeutic approaches are inefficient and merely offer palliation of associated symptoms. Recent scientific progress has shed light in the biologic processes governing the mechanisms behind the pathobiology of MPE. Pleural based tumors interfere with pleural fluid drainage, as well as the host vasculature and immune system, resulting in decreased fluid absorption and increased pleural fluid production via enhanced plasma extravasation into the pleural space. In order to achieve this feat, pleural based tumors must elicit critical vasoactive events in the pleura, thus forming a favorable microenvironment for tumor dissemination and MPE development. Such properties involve specific transcriptional signaling cascades in addition to secretion of important mediators which attract and activate host cell populations which, in turn, impact tumor cell functions. The dissection of the biologic steps leading to MPE formation provides novel therapeutic targets and recent research findings provide encouraging results towards future therapeutic innovations in MPE management. PMID:26150914

  14. Eosinophilic pleural effusion: incidence, etiology and prognostic significance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreiro, Lucía; San José, Esther; González-Barcala, Francisco Javier; Alvarez-Dobaño, José Manuel; Golpe, Antonio; Gude, Francisco; Anchorena, Christian; Pereyra, Marco F; Zamarrón, Carlos; Valdés, Luis

    2011-10-01

    Eosinophilic pleural effusion (EPE) has been associated with less risk for malignancy with a potential causal relationship with the presence of air and/or blood in the pleural space. However, these theories have fallen by the wayside in the light of recent publications. To determine the incidence and etiology of EPE and to observe whether the eosinophils in the pleural liquid (PL) increase in successive thoracocenteses. We analyzed 730 PL samples from 605 patients hospitalized between January 2004 and December 2010. We identified 55 samples with EPE from 50 patients (8.3%). The most frequent etiologies of EPE were: unknown (36%) and neoplasm (30%). There were no significant differences in the incidence of neoplasms between the non-eosinophilic pleural effusions (non-EPE) (25.9%) and the EPE (30%) (p=0.533). One hundred patients (16.5%) underwent a second thoracocentesis. Out of the 9 who had EPE in the first, 6 maintained EPE in the second. Out of the 91 with non-EPE in the first thoracocentesis, 8 (8.8%) had EPE in the repeat thoracocentesis. The percentage of eosinophils did not increase in the successive thoracocenteses (p=0.427). In the EPE, a significant correlation was found between the number of hematites and eosinophils in the PL (r=0.563; p=0.000). An EPE cannot be considered an indicator of benignancy, therefore it should be studied as any other pleural effusion. The number of eosinophils does not seem to increase with the of repetition of thoracocentesis and, lastly, the presence of blood in the PL could explain the existence of EPE. Copyright © 2011 SEPAR. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  15. Moxifloxacin pharmacokinetics and pleural fluid penetration in patients with pleural effusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatzika, Kalliopi; Manika, Katerina; Kontou, Paschalina; Pitsiou, Georgia; Papakosta, Despina; Zarogoulidis, Konstantinos; Kioumis, Ioannis

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the pharmacokinetics and penetration of moxifloxacin (MXF) in patients with various types of pleural effusion. Twelve patients with empyema/parapneumonic effusion (PPE) and 12 patients with malignant pleural effusion were enrolled in the study. A single-dose pharmacokinetic study was performed after intravenous administration of 400 mg MXF. Serial plasma (PL) and pleural fluid (PF) samples were collected during a 24-h time interval after drug administration. The MXF concentration in PL and PF was determined by high-performance liquid chromatography, and main pharmacokinetic parameters were estimated. Penetration of MXF in PF was determined by the ratio of the area under the concentration-time curve from time zero to 24 h (AUC24) in PF (AUC24PF) to the AUC24 in PL. No statistically significant differences in the pharmacokinetics in PL were observed between the two groups, despite the large interindividual variability in the volume of distribution, clearance, and elimination half-life. The maximum concentration in PF (CmaxPF) in patients with empyema/PPE was 2.23±1.31 mg/liter, and it was detected 7.50±2.39 h after the initiation of the infusion. In patients with malignant effusion, CmaxPF was 2.96±1.45 mg/liter, but it was observed significantly earlier, at 3.58±1.38 h (Ppleural effusion.

  16. Value of ultrasound in the determination of drainage methods in patients with tuberculous pleural effusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Eun Young; Suh, Bo Kyoung; Shim, Jae Jeong

    1997-01-01

    To evaluate the utility of ultrasonography (US) as a guide in deciding drainage methods and as a prognostic factor in the prediction of pleural fibrosis, and to compare the effects of drainage methods in patients with tuberculous pleural effusions. In 51 patients with tuberculous pleural effusion, US patterns of pleural effusion were classified according to degree of septa into three groups, as follows : anechoic (n=5), linear septa (n=15), and honeycomb septa (n=31). US-guided drainage methods, including thoracentesis (n=17), percutaneous catheter insertion (n=12), catheter insertion with urokinase instillation (n=22) were employed. Therapeutic effects were evaluated with follow-up chest radiographs after 3 and 6 months. Three months after the procedure, 43 of 51 effusions had drained effectively. US guided drainage failed in eight patients including two of six with linear septated effusion treated with thoracentesis, four of seven with honeycomb septated effusion treated with thoracentesis, and two of six with honeycomb septated effusion treated with catheter drainage. There was no drainage failure in patients with anechoic effusions and in patients with urokinase instillation. Late effects were assessed in 39 patients after 6 months. Follow-up radiographs available in 39 patients demonstrated pleural fibrosis with intercostal space narrowing in 7 patients with honeycomb septated effusion, 3 patients with linear septated effusion, and none of the patients with anechoic effusions. The pattern of septa seen on US could be a useful factor for determining drainage methods and predicting late results in tuberculous pleural effusion. Percutaneous catheter drainage with urokinase instillation was a good drainage modality for patients with septated pleural effusions. Pleural fibrosis is more frequently induced by septated pleural effusion than by anechoic pleural effusion

  17. Value of ultrasound in the determination of drainage methods in patients with tuberculous pleural effusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Eun Young; Suh, Bo Kyoung; Shim, Jae Jeong [Korea Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-01-01

    To evaluate the utility of ultrasonography (US) as a guide in deciding drainage methods and as a prognostic factor in the prediction of pleural fibrosis, and to compare the effects of drainage methods in patients with tuberculous pleural effusions. In 51 patients with tuberculous pleural effusion, US patterns of pleural effusion were classified according to degree of septa into three groups, as follows : anechoic (n=5), linear septa (n=15), and honeycomb septa (n=31). US-guided drainage methods, including thoracentesis (n=17), percutaneous catheter insertion (n=12), catheter insertion with urokinase instillation (n=22) were employed. Therapeutic effects were evaluated with follow-up chest radiographs after 3 and 6 months. Three months after the procedure, 43 of 51 effusions had drained effectively. US guided drainage failed in eight patients including two of six with linear septated effusion treated with thoracentesis, four of seven with honeycomb septated effusion treated with thoracentesis, and two of six with honeycomb septated effusion treated with catheter drainage. There was no drainage failure in patients with anechoic effusions and in patients with urokinase instillation. Late effects were assessed in 39 patients after 6 months. Follow-up radiographs available in 39 patients demonstrated pleural fibrosis with intercostal space narrowing in 7 patients with honeycomb septated effusion, 3 patients with linear septated effusion, and none of the patients with anechoic effusions. The pattern of septa seen on US could be a useful factor for determining drainage methods and predicting late results in tuberculous pleural effusion. Percutaneous catheter drainage with urokinase instillation was a good drainage modality for patients with septated pleural effusions. Pleural fibrosis is more frequently induced by septated pleural effusion than by anechoic pleural effusion.

  18. A case of recurrent pleural effusion: Can we think beyond tuberculosis and malignancy?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhumika Vaishnav

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Pleural effusion can occur due to a variety of causes such as infectious, neoplastic, inflammatory, autoimmune, traumatic, etc. Recurrent pleural effusions have always been a diagnostic challenge. Here, we present a case of recurrent exudative pleural effusion in a male patient, which was the first clinical manifestation of rheumatoid arthritis. Of note was the absence of articular involvement at the onset of the disease. The low glucose concentration, low pH and low C4 level in the pleural fluid were the most valuable findings to distinguish it from tuberculous and malignant pleural effusions. Pleural biopsy also helped in making such a distinction. Thus, in a patient with recurrent pleural effusion, rheumatoid etiology should also be kept in mind as a differential diagnosis.

  19. Diffusion-weighted MR imaging of pleural fluid: differentiation of transudative vs exudative pleural effusions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baysal, T.; Bulut, T.; Dusak, A.; Dogan, M.; Goekirmak, M.; Kalkan, S.

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the ability of diffusion-weighted MRI in differentiating transudative from exudative pleural effusions. Fifty-seven patients with pleural effusion were studied. Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) was performed with an echo-planar imaging (EPI) sequence (b values 0, 1000 s/mm 2 ) in 52 patients. The apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values were reconstructed from three different regions. Subsequently, thoracentesis was performed and the pleural fluid was analyzed. Laboratory results revealed 20 transudative and 32 exudative effusions. Transudates had a mean ADC value of 3.42±0.76 x 10 -3 mm 2 /s. Exudates had a mean ADC value of 3.18±1.82 x 10 -3 mm 2 /s. The optimum cutoff point for ADC values was 3.38 x 10 -3 mm 2 /s with a sensitivity of 90.6% and specificity of 85%. A significant negative correlation was seen between ADC values and pleural fluid protein, albumin concentrations and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) measurements (r=-0.69, -0.66, and -0.46, respectively; p<0.01). The positive predictive value, negative predictive value, and diagnostic accuracy of ADC values were determined to be 90.6, 85, and 88.5%, respectively. The application of diffusion gradients to analyze pleural fluid may be an alternative to the thoracentesis. Non-invasive characterization of a pleural effusion by means of DWI with single-shot EPI technique may obviate the need for thoracentesis with its associated patient morbidity. (orig.)

  20. Role of medical thoracoscopy in the treatment of tuberculous pleural effusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xusheng; Zhu, Huaiyang; Ding, Caihong

    2016-01-01

    Background Fibrous tuberculous pleural effusion (TPE) represents common disease in tuberculous clinic. Medical thoracoscopy has been used to treat pleural empyema and shown promising outcomes, but data of its use in multiloculated and organized TPE remains limited to know. Methods The study was performed on 430 cases with TPE. The cases were divided into free-flowing, multiloculated effusion and organized effusion group. Each group was subdivided into two or three types of therapeutic approaches: ultrasound guided pigtail catheter, large-bore tube chest drainage and medical thoracoscopy. Patients with multiloculated or organized effusions received streptokinase, introduced into the pleural cavity via chest tubes. The successful effectiveness of the study was defined as duration of chest drainage, time from treatment to discharge days and no further managements. Results Patients with organized effusion were older than those with free-flowing effusion and incidence of organized effusion combined with pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) was higher than those of multiloculated effusion and free-flowing effusion respectively. Positive tuberculosis of pleural fluid culture was higher in organized effusion than that in free-flowing effusion. Sputum positive for acid-fast bacillus (AFB) in organized effusion was higher than that in multiloculated effusion and free-flowing effusion. Medical thoracoscopy showed significant efficacy in the group of multiloculated effusion and organized effusion but free-flowing effusion. No chronic morbidity and mortality related to complications was observed. Conclusions Medical thoracoscopy was a safe and successful method in treating multiloculated and organized TPE. PMID:26904212

  1. In need of a patch UP: Recurrent congenital diaphragmatic hernia presenting with a large pleural effusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farhana Shariff

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of recurrent congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH presenting with a large unilateral pleural effusion. A 12-year old boy who had a left sided CDH repaired in the neonatal period, presented with fever, lethargy, and non-productive cough. Chest radiograph demonstrated a loculated pleural effusion. Computed tomography scan revealed recurrent herniation of abdominal contents. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of a recurrent congenital diaphragmatic hernia presenting with large pleural effusion.

  2. Different expression of FoxM1 in human benign and malignant pleural effusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Zhonghao; Li, Hongqing; Zhu, Huili; Bai, Chunxue

    2015-01-01

    The aims of this study were as follows: to analyze the forkhead box M1 (FoxM1) expression in benign and malignant pleural effusion by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction assay (RT-PCR); to explore the role of FoxM1 in formation and progress in malignant pleural effusion, and whether there is significant difference in expression level of FoxM1 between benign and malignant pleural effusion; to seek a gene marker diagnostically useful to identify benign and malignant pleural effusion in diagnosis and treatment of pleural effusion; and to collect expression level data of FoxM1 in 23 malignant pleural effusion samples (17 adenocarcinoma samples, four squamous carcinoma samples and two small cell lung carcinoma samples) and 15 benign pleural effusion samples (11 inflammatory pleural effusions, two transudates, two tuberculous pleural effusions) by RT-PCR. Among all 38 samples, average FoxM1 expression level of benign pleural effusions is (235.09 ± 59.99), while malignant pleural effusions (828.77 ± 109.76). Among 23 malignant samples, average FoxM1 expression level is (529.27 ± 75.85) in samples without cytological diagnostic evidence, while (1,218.12 ± 167.21) in samples with cytological diagnostic evidence. Differences of FoxM1 expression level between benign pleural effusions and malignant ones have statistical significance. There is an area of 0.881 under the receiver-operating characteristic curve, which verifies the accuracy of using FoxM1 expression level as diagnostic index to identify benign and malignant pleural effusions. According to our study, diagnostic sensitivity and specificity for FoxM1 expression level at 418.1 were 82.6 and 86.7 %, respectively, while 47.8 and 100 %, respectively, at 768.7. FoxM1 expression level in malignant pleural effusions is significantly higher than in benign ones. This study provides a new approach in clinical diagnosis, with FoxM1 as a specific molecule marker to identify benign and malignant pleural

  3. Identification of pleural effusion with low levels of adenosine deaminase but without signs of acute inflammation or pleural thickening to diagnose early malignant pleural mesothelioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moriyama, Satoru; Tanahashi, Masayuki; Suzuki, Eriko

    2012-01-01

    We reviewed the clinical findings and diagnostic methods used in the diagnosis of malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) in patients with pleural effusion with low levels of adenosine deaminase (ADA), but without signs of acute inflammation or pleural thickening. The hospital records of 40 patients with pleural effusion of unknown origin or pleural thickening were retrospectively investigated. In all of those studies, pleural effusion was exudative, lymphocyte-dominant, no mycobacteria or other bacteria, and low levels of ADA. There were 30 men and 10 women with an average age of 62.8 years old. The diagnosis of MPM was obtained by cytology of the pleural effusion in 3 patients and by core-needle biopsy of the thickened pleura in 3. Thoracoscopic pleural biopsy under general anesthesia was performed for the other 34 patients. The pathologic diagnosis of pleural biopsy was MPM in 20 patients, inflammatory change in 12, and pleural dissemination of cancer in 2. All of the 7 patients with more than 100 μg/ml of hyaluronic acid in their pleural effusion received a diagnosis of MPM. A total of 20 of 23 patients with irregular or nodular pleural thickening on computed tomography findings were confirmed to have MPM. Moreover, 6 of 17 patients with smooth pleural thickening were confirmed to have MPM. In patients with nodular pleural thickening it was easy to make the diagnosis. However, in those with smooth thickening, careful observation was required to select the appropriate biopsy site and resection margins of full-thickness pleura. As the rate of MPM in the patients with pleural effusion with low levels of ADA, but without signs of acute inflammation or pleural thickening is high (65%), an early thoracoscopic pleural biopsy is strongly recommended. (author)

  4. The diagnostic value of procalcitonin, adenosine deaminase for tuberculous pleural effusions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Jia; Jing Xiufeng; Hui Fuxin

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To explore differential diagnostic value of procalcitonin (PCT), adenosine deaminase (ADA) in pleural fluid and serum for tuberculous pleural effusions. Methods: The concentrations of PCT and ADA both in serum and pleural fluid in one hundred and twenty-eight patients with pleural effusion were detected. These patients were divided into three groups. Fifty-two patients with tuberculous plueral effusion were composed of the tuberculous group. Twenty-two patients with parapneumonic effusion composed the pneumonic group and forty patients with malignant pleural effusion and fourteen patients with heart faliure composed of the control group. Results: There were no statistically significant differences in serum PCT among the three groups (P > 0.05). PCT of pleural fluid was significantly increased in tuberculous and parapneumonic groups compared to the control group (P < 0.05). ADA activities in tuberculous serum and pleural fluid were both higher than those in the parapneumonic and the control groups (P < 0.01). The ratio of ADA in pleural fluid and serum (P /S) was calculated. The diagnostic sensitivity and specificity of P /S (cut-off value 1.27) were 92.3% and 100% respectively for tuberculous pleural effusions calcuted by receiver operating curve. Conclusion: Combined measurements of PCT and ADA in pleural fluid are useful in diagnosing tuberculous pleural effusions. (authors)

  5. Diagnostic value and safety of medical thoracoscopy in tuberculous pleural effusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhen; Xu, Li-Li; Wu, Yan-Bing; Wang, Xiao-Juan; Yang, Yuan; Zhang, Jun; Tong, Zhao-Hui; Shi, Huan-Zhong

    2015-09-01

    Differentiating tuberculous pleural effusion from other lymphocytic pleural effusions is often challenging. This retrospective study aimed to assess the efficacy and safety of medical thoracoscopy in patients with suspected tuberculous pleural effusion. Between July 2005 and June 2014, patients with pleural effusions of unknown etiologies underwent medical thoracoscopy in our institute after less invasive means of diagnosis had failed. Demographic, radiographic, procedural, and histological data of patients with tuberculous pleural effusion were analyzed. During this 9-year study, 333 of 833 patients with pleural effusion were confirmed to have tuberculous pleurisy. Under thoracoscopy, we observed pleural nodules in 69.4%, pleural adhesion in 66.7%, hyperemia in 60.7%, plaque-like lesions in 6.0%, ulceration in 1.5% of patients with tuberculous pleurisy. Pleural biopsy revealed the presence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in the pleural tissue or/and demonstration of caseating granulomas in 330 (99.1%) patients. No serious adverse events were recorded, and the most common minor complication was transient chest pain (43.2%) from the indwelling chest tube. Our data showed that medical thoracoscopy is a simple procedure with high diagnostic yield and excellent safety for the diagnosis of tuberculous pleural effusion. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Role of therapeutic thoracentesis in tuberculous pleural effusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sourin Bhuniya

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Prevalence of tuberculous pleural effusion is very high in the Asian subcontinent but very few studies have come up from this part of the world about the course of recovery of pulmonary functions after institution of anti-tubercular therapy (ATT and thoracentesis. Aims: To study initial lung function impairment, changes over time after institution of ATT and thoracentesis and residual abnormalities left at the end of six months of treatment. Settings and Design: Randomized open level interventional study over two years in 52 patients at a tertiary level teaching hospital. Methods: The study population was divided into two equal groups, A (therapeutic thoracentesis and B (diagnostic thoracentesis. Spirometry, chest radiograph and ultrasonography of thorax were done initially and at each follow-up visit up to six months. Statistical analysis was done (P value < 0.05 considered significant. Results: Both groups were comparable initially. After six months none in group A and five patients in group B had minimal pleural effusion. During follow up, mean percentage predicted of FEV1 and FVC increased more in A than in B and the differences were statistically significant (P < 0.05. Pleural thickening, initially absent in both groups, was found to be more in B as compared to A at subsequent follow-up visits and this was statistically significant (P < 0.05. Conclusions: Thoracentesis should be considered in addition to anti-TB treatment, especially in large effusions, in order to relieve dyspnea, avoid possibility of residual pleural thickening and risk of developing restrictive functional impairment.

  7. Optimising the utility of pleural fluid adenosine deaminase for the diagnosis of adult tuberculous pleural effusion in Hong Kong.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, K C; Chan, M C; Leung, W M; Kong, F Y; Mak, C M; Chen, S Pl; Yu, W C

    2018-02-01

    Pleural fluid adenosine deaminase level can be applied to rapidly detect tuberculous pleural effusion. We aimed to establish a local diagnostic cut-off value for pleural fluid adenosine deaminase to identify patients with tuberculous pleural effusion, and optimise its utility. We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of consecutive adults with pleural fluid adenosine deaminase level measured by the Diazyme commercial kit (Diazyme Laboratories, San Diego [CA], United States) during 1 January to 31 December 2011 in a cluster of public hospitals in Hong Kong. We considered its level alongside early (within 2 weeks) findings in pleural fluid and pleural biopsy, with and without applying Light's criteria in multiple scenarios. For each scenario, we used the receiver operating characteristic curve to identify a diagnostic cut-off value for pleural fluid adenosine deaminase, and estimated its positive and negative predictive values. A total of 860 medical records were reviewed. Pleural effusion was caused by congestive heart failure, chronic renal failure, or hypoalbuminaemia caused by liver or kidney diseases in 246 (28.6%) patients, malignancy in 198 (23.0%), non-tuberculous infection in 168 (19.5%), tuberculous pleural effusion in 157 (18.3%), and miscellaneous causes in 91 (10.6%). All those with tuberculous pleural effusion had a pleural fluid adenosine deaminase level of ≤100 U/L. When analysis was restricted to 689 patients with pleural fluid adenosine deaminase level of ≤100 U/L and early negative findings for malignancy and non-tuberculous infection in pleural fluid, the positive predictive value was significantly increased and the negative predictive value non-significantly reduced. Using this approach, neither additionally restricting analysis to exudates by Light's criteria nor adding closed pleural biopsy would further enhance predictive values. As such, the diagnostic cut-off value for pleural fluid adenosine deaminase is 26.5 U/L, with a

  8. Pleural fluid cell-free DNA integrity index to identify cytologically negative malignant pleural effusions including mesotheliomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sriram, Krishna B; Courtney, Deborah; Yang, Ian A; Bowman, Rayleen V; Fong, Kwun M; Relan, Vandana; Clarke, Belinda E; Duhig, Edwina E; Windsor, Morgan N; Matar, Kevin S; Naidoo, Rishendran; Passmore, Linda; McCaul, Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    The diagnosis of malignant pleural effusions (MPE) is often clinically challenging, especially if the cytology is negative for malignancy. DNA integrity index has been reported to be a marker of malignancy. The aim of this study was to evaluate the utility of pleural fluid DNA integrity index in the diagnosis of MPE. We studied 75 pleural fluid and matched serum samples from consecutive subjects. Pleural fluid and serum ALU DNA repeats [115bp, 247bp and 247bp/115bp ratio (DNA integrity index)] were assessed by real-time quantitative PCR. Pleural fluid and serum mesothelin levels were quantified using ELISA. Based on clinico-pathological evaluation, 52 subjects had MPE (including 16 mesotheliomas) and 23 had benign effusions. Pleural fluid DNA integrity index was higher in MPE compared with benign effusions (1.2 vs. 0.8; p<0.001). Cytology had a sensitivity of 55% in diagnosing MPE. If cytology and pleural fluid DNA integrity index were considered together, they exhibited 81% sensitivity and 87% specificity in distinguishing benign and malignant effusions. In cytology-negative pleural effusions (35 MPE and 28 benign effusions), elevated pleural fluid DNA integrity index had an 81% positive predictive value in detecting MPEs. In the detection of mesothelioma, at a specificity of 90%, pleural fluid DNA integrity index had similar sensitivity to pleural fluid and serum mesothelin (75% each respectively). Pleural fluid DNA integrity index is a promising diagnostic biomarker for identification of MPEs, including mesothelioma. This biomarker may be particularly useful in cases of MPE where pleural aspirate cytology is negative, and could guide the decision to undertake more invasive definitive testing. A prospective validation study is being undertaken to validate our findings and test the clinical utility of this biomarker for altering clinical practice

  9. Protocol of the PLeural Effusion And Symptom Evaluation (PLEASE) study on the pathophysiology of breathlessness in patients with symptomatic pleural effusions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Rajesh; Azzopardi, Maree; Muruganandan, Sanjeevan; Read, Catherine; Murray, Kevin; Eastwood, Peter; Jenkins, Sue; Singh, Bhajan; Lee, Y C Gary

    2016-08-03

    Pleural effusion is a common clinical problem that can complicate many medical conditions. Breathlessness is the most common symptom of pleural effusion of any cause and the most common reason for pleural drainage. However, improvement in breathlessness following drainage of an effusion is variable; some patients experience either no benefit or a worsening of their breathlessness. The physiological mechanisms underlying breathlessness in patients with a pleural effusion are unclear and likely to be multifactorial with patient-related and effusion-related factors contributing. A comprehensive study of the physiological and symptom responses to drainage of pleural effusions may provide a clearer understanding of these mechanisms, and may identify predictors of benefit from drainage. The ability to identify those patients whose breathlessness will (or will not) improve after pleural fluid drainage can help avoid unnecessary pleural drainage procedures, their associated morbidities and costs. The PLeural Effusion And Symptom Evaluation (PLEASE) study is a prospective study to comprehensively evaluate factors contributing to pleural effusion-related breathlessness. The PLEASE study is a single-centre prospective study of 150 patients with symptomatic pleural effusions that require therapeutic drainage. The study aims to identify key factors that underlie breathlessness in patients with pleural effusions and develop predictors of improvement in breathlessness following effusion drainage. Participants will undergo evaluation pre-effusion and post-effusion drainage to assess their level of breathlessness at rest and during exercise, respiratory and other physiological responses as well as respiratory muscle mechanics. Pre-drainage and post-drainage parameters will be collected and compared to identify the key factors and mechanisms that correlate with improvement in breathlessness. Approved by the Sir Charles Gairdner Group Human Research Ethics Committee (HREC number 2014

  10. Lung cancer, pulmonary emphysema and pleural effusion: An autopsy study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marel, Miloslav; Koubkova, Leona; Kovarikova, Zuzana; Grandcourtova, Alzbeta; Petrik, Frantisek; Hroudova, Hana; Capkova, Linda; Kodet, Roman; Fila, Libor

    2015-12-01

    To determine the exact incidence of lung cancer, pulmonary emphysema and pleural effusion we decided to carry out an autopsy study. In this autopsy study carried out over two years, we compared the results of autopsy findings with the clinical data in accompanying records of the deceased. Among the 708 deceased subjects, there were 398 males and 310 females with a median age of 71 years. At autopsy, 55 cases of lung carcinoma (BCA) were found, of which 24 have not been identified during life (44%). Among the deceased with BCA, emphysema was also observed at autopsy in 40% of the cases. Pulmonary emphysema was described macroscopically in 28% of the full set of 708 deceased, whereas the accompanying records of the deceased described this condition in only 12% of the cases. Microscopic changes compatible with emphysema were identified in 54% of the examined lungs. Pleural effusions were described in the accompanying records of 13% of the deceased, while the autopsies showed this condition in 33% of the deceased. BCA was accompanied by effusion in 25% of the cases. The obtained results show that the studied conditions are present in more cases than are reported by clinicians. The study confirms the commonly accepted association between lung cancer and emphysema.

  11. Flow Cytometry in Diagnosis of Myelomatous Pleural Effusion: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, Parul; Gupta, Sanjeev Kumar; Mallik, Nabhajit; Mittal, Reena; Sharma, Om Dutt; Kumar, Lalit

    2016-06-01

    Plasma cell myeloma is a multifocal plasma cell neoplasm associated with increased monoclonal protein in serum and/or urine. Pleural effusions in patients with myeloma are uncommon (6 %). However, effusions due to direct infiltration of the pleura by plasma cells (myelomatous pleural effusion) are extremely rare (pleural fluid cytology, electrophoresis or pleural biopsy. We present a case of myelomatous pleural effusion diagnosed using flow cytometry immunophenotyping in addition to the pleural fluid cytology. A 45 year old female was diagnosed as plasma cell myeloma (IgG kappa) in 2007. She received multiple lines of therapy during the course of her treatment including thalidomide, dexamethasone, lenalidomide, bortezomib, and doxorubicin based regimens. However, the patient had progressive extramedullary disease and developed pleural effusion in 2014. Cytological examination of the pleural fluid showed degenerative changes. Few preserved areas showed mononuclear cells including morphologically abnormal plasma cells. Immunophenotyping of these cells by flow cytometry revealed a pattern indicating neoplastic plasma cells. There was expression of CD38, CD138, and CD56, with absence of CD19, CD10 and CD45. This confirmed the diagnosis of myelomatous pleural effusion. Subsequently, the patient was offered a dexamethasone, cyclophosphamide, etoposide and cisplatin based regimen but, she declined further treatment and succumbed to her disease 3 months later. Myelomatous pleural effusion is a rare complication of plasma cell myeloma. Flow cytometry can be used as an adjunctive technique in its diagnosis particularly in cases with equivocal cytology and electrophoresis findings.

  12. Massive pericardial effusion associated with hypothyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ionescu, Simona Daniela; Tănase, Daniela Maria; Ouatu, Anca; Ambăruş, V; Dosa, Anca; Arsenescu-Georgescu, Cătălina

    2014-01-01

    The diagnosis of hypothyroidism is difficult because hypothyroidism in adults and especially the elderly, classic, has an insidious onset with a range of nonspecific symptoms which may delay diagnosis for months or even years. Old age seems to represent trigger factor for autoimmune diseases, including hypothyroidism. Clinical features in hypothyroidism, such as weight gain, fatigue, cold intolerance, constipation, dry skin, edema and muscle weakness, and decreased osteo-tendinous reflexes are usually subtle and can be overlooked. Thyroid dysfunction may be associated with a negative impact on the cardiovascular system. Pericardial, pleural and peritoneal effusions are common findings in hypothyroidism. This case report represents a typical primary hypothyroidism (autoimmune) and shows the clinical features of this disease. Basically we talked about a severe myxedema with the involvement of internal organs in an elderly woman and the euthyroidism restoration, under thyroid replacement therapy, was correlated with the clinical improvement and cardiovascular and neurological status, with radiographic remission and regression to extinction of pericardial effusion at repeated echocardiographic evaluations.

  13. Diagnosis and management options in malignant pleural effusions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixit, Ramakant; Agarwal, KC; Gokhroo, Archana; Patil, Chetan B; Meena, Manoj; Shah, Narender S; Arora, Piyush

    2017-01-01

    Malignant pleural effusion (MPE) denotes an advanced malignant disease process. Most of the MPE are metastatic involvement of the pleura from primary malignancy at lung, breast, and other body sites apart from lymphomas. The diagnosis of MPE has been traditionally made on cytological examination of pleural fluid and/or histological examination of pleural biopsy tissue that still remains the initial approach in these cases. There has been tremendous advancement in the diagnosis of MPE now a day with techniques i.e. characteristic Ultrasound and computed tomography features, image guided biopsies, fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography imaging, thoracoscopy with direct biopsy under vision, tumor marker studies and immunocytochemical analysis etc., that have made possible an early diagnosis of MPE. The management of MPE still remains a challenge to pulmonologist and oncologist. Despite having various modalities with better tolerance such as pleurodesis and indwelling pleural catheters etc., for long-term control, all the management approaches remain palliative to improve the quality of life and reduce symptoms. While choosing an appropriate management intervention, one should consider the clinical status of the patient, life expectancy, overall cost, availability and comparative institutional outcomes, etc. PMID:28360465

  14. Diagnosis and management options in malignant pleural effusions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramakant Dixit

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Malignant pleural effusion (MPE denotes an advanced malignant disease process. Most of the MPE are metastatic involvement of the pleura from primary malignancy at lung, breast, and other body sites apart from lymphomas. The diagnosis of MPE has been traditionally made on cytological examination of pleural fluid and/or histological examination of pleural biopsy tissue that still remains the initial approach in these cases. There has been tremendous advancement in the diagnosis of MPE now a day with techniques i.e. characteristic Ultrasound and computed tomography features, image guided biopsies, fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography imaging, thoracoscopy with direct biopsy under vision, tumor marker studies and immunocytochemical analysis etc., that have made possible an early diagnosis of MPE. The management of MPE still remains a challenge to pulmonologist and oncologist. Despite having various modalities with better tolerance such as pleurodesis and indwelling pleural catheters etc., for long-term control, all the management approaches remain palliative to improve the quality of life and reduce symptoms. While choosing an appropriate management intervention, one should consider the clinical status of the patient, life expectancy, overall cost, availability and comparative institutional outcomes, etc.

  15. Churg-Strauss syndrome: A rare cause of pleural effusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Govind Singh Rajawat

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Churg-Strauss syndrome (CSS is a rare, small-vessel vasculitis associated with a prominent allergic component, asthma, and blood or tissue eosinophilia. Granulomas, eosinophils, and palisading histiocytes in extravascular tissues are hallmarks of this disorder. The presence of asthma or allergy as well as more than 10% of eosinophils in blood is 95% sensitive and 99% specific, respectively, in distinguishing CSS among a subgroup of patients with well-documented systemic vasculitis. We present a case of pleural effusion which was finally diagnosed as CSS. Considering its rarity, this case is reported.

  16. Automated extraction of pleural effusion in three-dimensional thoracic CT images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kido, Shoji; Tsunomori, Akinori

    2009-02-01

    It is important for diagnosis of pulmonary diseases to measure volume of accumulating pleural effusion in threedimensional thoracic CT images quantitatively. However, automated extraction of pulmonary effusion correctly is difficult. Conventional extraction algorithm using a gray-level based threshold can not extract pleural effusion from thoracic wall or mediastinum correctly, because density of pleural effusion in CT images is similar to those of thoracic wall or mediastinum. So, we have developed an automated extraction method of pulmonary effusion by use of extracting lung area with pleural effusion. Our method used a template of lung obtained from a normal lung for segmentation of lungs with pleural effusions. Registration process consisted of two steps. First step was a global matching processing between normal and abnormal lungs of organs such as bronchi, bones (ribs, sternum and vertebrae) and upper surfaces of livers which were extracted using a region-growing algorithm. Second step was a local matching processing between normal and abnormal lungs which were deformed by the parameter obtained from the global matching processing. Finally, we segmented a lung with pleural effusion by use of the template which was deformed by two parameters obtained from the global matching processing and the local matching processing. We compared our method with a conventional extraction method using a gray-level based threshold and two published methods. The extraction rates of pleural effusions obtained from our method were much higher than those obtained from other methods. Automated extraction method of pulmonary effusion by use of extracting lung area with pleural effusion is promising for diagnosis of pulmonary diseases by providing quantitative volume of accumulating pleural effusion.

  17. Doença de Castleman associada a derrame pleural Castleman's disease accompanied by pleural effusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valéria Góes Ferreira Pinheiro

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available A doença de Castleman é uma rara afecção do tecido linfóide. Relatamos o caso de uma paciente do sexo feminino com otosclerose bilateral, sem sintomas respiratórios e com achado incidental de derrame pleural esquerdo em uma radiografia de tórax. A tomografia computadorizada de tórax revelou uma massa mediastinal. A biópsia demonstrou tratar-se de variante plasmocitária da doença de Castleman. A paciente foi submetida à ressecção da massa mediastinal. Houve regressão do derrame, o qual persistiu como pequena loculação no espaço pleural esquerdo.Castleman's disease is a rare disorder of the lymphoid tissue. We report the case of a female patient with bilateral otosclerosis, no respiratory symptoms, and pleural effusion discovered as an incidental finding on a chest X-ray. Computed tomography of the chest revealed a mediastinal mass. The biopsy findings demonstrated that it was a plasmacytic variant of Castleman's disease. The patient underwent mediastinal mass resection. This resulted in near-total resolution of the effusion, which remained as a small loculation within the left pleural space.

  18. The accuracy of pleural ultrasonography in diagnosing complicated parapneumonic pleural effusions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svigals, Philip Z; Chopra, Amit; Ravenel, James G; Nietert, Paul J; Huggins, John T

    2017-01-01

    We compared the accuracy of pleural ultrasound versus chest CT versus chest radiograph (CXR) to determine radiographic complexity in predicting a complicated parapneumonic effusion (CPPE) defined by pleural fluid analysis. 66 patients with parapneumonic effusions were identified with complete data. Pleural ultrasound had a sensitivity of 69.2% (95% CI 48.2% to 85.7%) and specificity of 90.0% (95% CI 76.3% to 97.2%). Chest CT had a sensitivity of 76.9% (95% CI 56.3% to 91.0%) and specificity of 65.0% (95% CI 48.3% to 79.4%). CXR had a sensitivity of 61.5% (95% CI 40.6% to 79.8%) and specificity of 60.0% (95% CI 43.3% to 75.1%). Pleural ultrasound appears to be a superior modality to rule in a CPPE when compared with chest CT and CXR. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  19. Relationship of pleural effusions to increased permeability pulmonary edema in anesthetized sheep.

    OpenAIRE

    Wiener-Kronish, J P; Broaddus, V C; Albertine, K H; Gropper, M A; Matthay, M A; Staub, N C

    1988-01-01

    We studied anesthetized sheep to determine the relationship between increased permeability pulmonary edema and the development and mechanism of pleural effusion formation. In 12 sheep with intact, closed thoraces, we studied the time course of pleural liquid formation after 0.12 ml/kg i.v. oleic acid. After 1 h, there were no pleural effusions, even though extravascular lung water increased 50% to 6.0 +/- 0.7 g/g dry lung. By 3 h pleural effusions had formed, they reached a maximum at 5 h (48...

  20. Spatial context learning approach to automatic segmentation of pleural effusion in chest computed tomography images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansoor, Awais; Casas, Rafael; Linguraru, Marius G.

    2016-03-01

    Pleural effusion is an abnormal collection of fluid within the pleural cavity. Excessive accumulation of pleural fluid is an important bio-marker for various illnesses, including congestive heart failure, pneumonia, metastatic cancer, and pulmonary embolism. Quantification of pleural effusion can be indicative of the progression of disease as well as the effectiveness of any treatment being administered. Quantification, however, is challenging due to unpredictable amounts and density of fluid, complex topology of the pleural cavity, and the similarity in texture and intensity of pleural fluid to the surrounding tissues in computed tomography (CT) scans. Herein, we present an automated method for the segmentation of pleural effusion in CT scans based on spatial context information. The method consists of two stages: first, a probabilistic pleural effusion map is created using multi-atlas segmentation. The probabilistic map assigns a priori probabilities to the presence of pleural uid at every location in the CT scan. Second, a statistical pattern classification approach is designed to annotate pleural regions using local descriptors based on a priori probabilities, geometrical, and spatial features. Thirty seven CT scans from a diverse patient population containing confirmed cases of minimal to severe amounts of pleural effusion were used to validate the proposed segmentation method. An average Dice coefficient of 0.82685 and Hausdorff distance of 16.2155 mm was obtained.

  1. Evaluation of serum and pleural levels of endostatin and vascular epithelial growth factor in lung cancer patients with pleural effusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu; Yu, Li-Ke; Xia, Ning

    2012-03-01

    To evaluate the diagnostic value of endostatin (ES), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) in both serum and pleural effusion of lung cancer patients. Levels of ES, VEGF and CEA in 52 malignant pleural effusion due to lung cancer and 50 patients with non-malignant disease were measured by using sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and microparticle enzyme immunoassay. The ES, VEGF and CEA levels in pleural effusion and serum, and their ratio (F/S) were higher in lung cancer group than that in benign group, and the differences were statistically significant (Ppleural effusion due to lung cancer. In comparison with either single determination of concentration in serum or pleural fluid, the combined detection of two or three markers is of important clinical significance in the diagnosis of lung cancer. Copyright © 2012 Hainan Medical College. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. C-reactive protein and serum amyloid A levels in discriminating malignant from non-malignant pleural effusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hala Mohamed Shalaby Samaha

    2015-10-01

    Conclusion: Measurement of SAA and CRP levels in pleural fluid has good diagnostic utility in differentiation between malignant and non-malignant pleural effusion and pleural SAA has a better diagnostic performance than CRP.

  3. Percutaneous catheter drainage of empyema and loculated pleural effusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Im, Jung Gi; Park, Kyung Joo; Park, Jae Hyung [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1988-08-15

    Closed thoracotomy by using a chest tube in cases of thoracic empyema is known to be an effective and popular way of treatment. However, it happens commonly that chest tube drainage is not appropriate because of either malpositioning of the tube or undesirable patient's general condition such as bleeding tendency or debilitation. We performed fluoroscopy-guided percutaneous catheter drainage (PCD) in 14 cases of empyema and loculated pleural effusion and in 2 cases of lung abscess. In most of the patients, PCDs were performed because chest tube drainage was considered to be inappropriate or after failed chest tube drainage. In all patients, catheters were successfully placed into the fluid collections, which were drained effectively. Ten of the 11 febrile patient showed improvement of feverishness within 24 hours after PCD. 10 patients were cured without further treatment. Complications were few and minimal. We believe that the safety, effectiveness and good patients tolerance of PCD makes it an excellent alternative method of treatment in cases of empyema and loculated pleural effusion.

  4. The preliminary exploration of 64-slice volume computed tomography in the accurate measurement of pleural effusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Zhi-Jun; Lin, Qiang; Liu, Hai-Tao; Lu, Jun-Ying; Zeng, Yan-Hong; Meng, Fan-Jie; Cao, Bin; Zi, Xue-Rong; Han, Shu-Ming; Zhang, Yu-Huan

    2013-09-01

    Using computed tomography (CT) to rapidly and accurately quantify pleural effusion volume benefits medical and scientific research. However, the precise volume of pleural effusions still involves many challenges and currently does not have a recognized accurate measuring. To explore the feasibility of using 64-slice CT volume-rendering technology to accurately measure pleural fluid volume and to then analyze the correlation between the volume of the free pleural effusion and the different diameters of the pleural effusion. The 64-slice CT volume-rendering technique was used to measure and analyze three parts. First, the fluid volume of a self-made thoracic model was measured and compared with the actual injected volume. Second, the pleural effusion volume was measured before and after pleural fluid drainage in 25 patients, and the volume reduction was compared with the actual volume of the liquid extract. Finally, the free pleural effusion volume was measured in 26 patients to analyze the correlation between it and the diameter of the effusion, which was then used to calculate the regression equation. After using the 64-slice CT volume-rendering technique to measure the fluid volume of the self-made thoracic model, the results were compared with the actual injection volume. No significant differences were found, P = 0.836. For the 25 patients with drained pleural effusions, the comparison of the reduction volume with the actual volume of the liquid extract revealed no significant differences, P = 0.989. The following linear regression equation was used to compare the pleural effusion volume (V) (measured by the CT volume-rendering technique) with the pleural effusion greatest depth (d): V = 158.16 × d - 116.01 (r = 0.91, P = 0.000). The following linear regression was used to compare the volume with the product of the pleural effusion diameters (l × h × d): V = 0.56 × (l × h × d) + 39.44 (r = 0.92, P = 0.000). The 64-slice CT volume-rendering technique can

  5. The preliminary exploration of 64-slice volume computed tomography in the accurate measurement of pleural effusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo, Zhi-Jun; Lin, Qiang; Liu, Hai-Tao

    2013-01-01

    Background: Using computed tomography (CT) to rapidly and accurately quantify pleural effusion volume benefits medical and scientific research. However, the precise volume of pleural effusions still involves many challenges and currently does not have a recognized accurate measuring. Purpose: To explore the feasibility of using 64-slice CT volume-rendering technology to accurately measure pleural fluid volume and to then analyze the correlation between the volume of the free pleural effusion and the different diameters of the pleural effusion. Material and Methods: The 64-slice CT volume-rendering technique was used to measure and analyze three parts. First, the fluid volume of a self-made thoracic model was measured and compared with the actual injected volume. Second, the pleural effusion volume was measured before and after pleural fluid drainage in 25 patients, and the volume reduction was compared with the actual volume of the liquid extract. Finally, the free pleural effusion volume was measured in 26 patients to analyze the correlation between it and the diameter of the effusion, which was then used to calculate the regression equation. Results: After using the 64-slice CT volume-rendering technique to measure the fluid volume of the self-made thoracic model, the results were compared with the actual injection volume. No significant differences were found, P = 0.836. For the 25 patients with drained pleural effusions, the comparison of the reduction volume with the actual volume of the liquid extract revealed no significant differences, P = 0.989. The following linear regression equation was used to compare the pleural effusion volume (V) (measured by the CT volume-rendering technique) with the pleural effusion greatest depth (d): V = 158.16 X d - 116.01 (r = 0.91, P = 0.000). The following linear regression was used to compare the volume with the product of the pleural effusion diameters (l X h X d): V = 0.56 X (l X h X d) + 39.44 (r = 0.92, P = 0

  6. The preliminary exploration of 64-slice volume computed tomography in the accurate measurement of pleural effusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Zhi-Jun [Dept. of Radiology, North China Petroleum Bureau General Hospital, Renqiu, Hebei (China)], e-mail: Gzj3@163.com; Lin, Qiang [Dept. of Oncology, North China Petroleum Bureau General Hospital, Renqiu, Hebei (China); Liu, Hai-Tao [Dept. of General Surgery, North China Petroleum Bureau General Hospital, Renqiu, Hebei (China)] [and others])

    2013-09-15

    Background: Using computed tomography (CT) to rapidly and accurately quantify pleural effusion volume benefits medical and scientific research. However, the precise volume of pleural effusions still involves many challenges and currently does not have a recognized accurate measuring. Purpose: To explore the feasibility of using 64-slice CT volume-rendering technology to accurately measure pleural fluid volume and to then analyze the correlation between the volume of the free pleural effusion and the different diameters of the pleural effusion. Material and Methods: The 64-slice CT volume-rendering technique was used to measure and analyze three parts. First, the fluid volume of a self-made thoracic model was measured and compared with the actual injected volume. Second, the pleural effusion volume was measured before and after pleural fluid drainage in 25 patients, and the volume reduction was compared with the actual volume of the liquid extract. Finally, the free pleural effusion volume was measured in 26 patients to analyze the correlation between it and the diameter of the effusion, which was then used to calculate the regression equation. Results: After using the 64-slice CT volume-rendering technique to measure the fluid volume of the self-made thoracic model, the results were compared with the actual injection volume. No significant differences were found, P = 0.836. For the 25 patients with drained pleural effusions, the comparison of the reduction volume with the actual volume of the liquid extract revealed no significant differences, P = 0.989. The following linear regression equation was used to compare the pleural effusion volume (V) (measured by the CT volume-rendering technique) with the pleural effusion greatest depth (d): V = 158.16 X d - 116.01 (r = 0.91, P = 0.000). The following linear regression was used to compare the volume with the product of the pleural effusion diameters (l X h X d): V = 0.56 X (l X h X d) + 39.44 (r = 0.92, P = 0

  7. Protocol of the Australasian Malignant Pleural Effusion (AMPLE) trial: a multicentre randomised study comparing indwelling pleural catheter versus talc pleurodesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fysh, Edward T H; Thomas, Rajesh; Read, Catherine A; Lam, Ben C H; Yap, Elaine; Horwood, Fiona C; Lee, Pyng; Piccolo, Francesco; Shrestha, Ranjan; Garske, Luke A; Lam, David C L; Rosenstengel, Andrew; Bint, Michael; Murray, Kevin; Smith, Nicola A; Lee, Y C Gary

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Malignant pleural effusion can complicate most cancers. It causes breathlessness and requires hospitalisation for invasive pleural drainages. Malignant effusions often herald advanced cancers and limited prognosis. Minimising time spent in hospital is of high priority to patients and their families. Various treatment strategies exist for the management of malignant effusions, though there is no consensus governing the best choice. Talc pleurodesis is the conventional management but requires hospitalisation (and substantial healthcare resources), can cause significant side effects, and has a suboptimal success rate. Indwelling pleural catheters (IPCs) allow ambulatory fluid drainage without hospitalisation, and are increasingly employed for management of malignant effusions. Previous studies have only investigated the length of hospital care immediately related to IPC insertion. Whether IPC management reduces time spent in hospital in the patients’ remaining lifespan is unknown. A strategy of malignant effusion management that reduces hospital admission days will allow patients to spend more time outside hospital, reduce costs and save healthcare resources. Methods and analysis The Australasian Malignant Pleural Effusion (AMPLE) trial is a multicentred, randomised trial designed to compare IPC with talc pleurodesis for the management of malignant pleural effusion. This study will randomise 146 adults with malignant pleural effusions (1:1) to IPC management or talc slurry pleurodesis. The primary end point is the total number of days spent in hospital (for any admissions) from treatment procedure to death or end of study follow-up. Secondary end points include hospital days specific to pleural effusion management, adverse events, self-reported symptom and quality-of-life scores. Ethics and dissemination The Sir Charles Gairdner Group Human Research Ethics Committee has approved the study as have the ethics boards of all the participating hospitals. The

  8. Association of immunoglobulin G4 and free light chain with idiopathic pleural effusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murata, Y; Aoe, K; Mimura-Kimura, Y; Murakami, T; Oishi, K; Matsumoto, T; Ueoka, H; Matsunaga, K; Yano, M; Mimura, Y

    2017-10-01

    The cause of pleural effusion remains uncertain in approximately 15% of patients despite exhaustive evaluation. As recently described immunoglobulin (Ig)G4-related disease is a fibroinflammatory disorder that can affect various organs, including the lungs, we investigate whether idiopathic pleural effusion includes IgG4-associated etiology. Between 2000 and 2012, we collected 830 pleural fluid samples and reviewed 35 patients with pleural effusions undiagnosed after pleural biopsy at Yamaguchi-Ube Medical Center. Importantly, IgG4 immunostaining revealed infiltration of IgG4-positive plasma cells in the pleura of 12 patients (34%, IgG4 + group). The median effusion IgG4 level was 41 mg/dl in the IgG4 + group and 27 mg/dl in the IgG4 - group (P effusion IgG4 antibodies of patients in the IgG4 + group were heterogeneous by two-dimensional electrophoresis, indicating the absence of clonality of the IgG4 antibodies. Interestingly, the κ light chains were more heterogeneous than the λ light chains. The measurement of the κ and λ free light chain (FLC) levels in the pleural fluids showed significantly different κ FLC levels (median: 28·0 versus 9·1 mg/dl, P pleural effusions and provide insights into the diagnosis, pathogenesis and therapeutic opportunities of IgG4-associated pleural effusion. © 2017 British Society for Immunology.

  9. Status of Exudative Pleural Effusion in Adults of South Khorasan Province, Northeast Iran: Pleural Tuberculosis Tending toward Elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sayyed Gholam Reza Mortazavi-Moghaddam

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The causes and situation of exudative pleural effusion vary from one area to another. A cross-sectional study was conducted on 327 patients with exudative pleural effusion in South Khorasan province (Iran. The patients were older than 12 years and comprised 172 (52.6% males and 155 (47.4% females. The study commenced in 2007 with seven years duration. The Light’s criteria were used to define exudative effusion. Procedures including pleural fluid analysis, microbiological study, pleural biopsy, and systemic investigations were conducted to determine the special cause of pleural effusion. The mean age of the patients was 63.4±18.4 years. Malignancies, tuberculosis, and parapneumonia pleural exudation were diagnosed in 125 (38.2%, 48 (14.7%, and 45 (13.8% cases, respectively. Among malignant effusions, metastasis from lung cancer made 48 (38.4% of the cases. The origin of metastasis was not determined in 44 (35.2% patients. The mean age of patients was not significantly different between malignant (66.9±14.3 years and tuberculosis (63.9±19.7 years cases (P=0.16. The older age of tuberculosis patients could be a new discussion point on the overall impression created on the subject of tuberculosis pleural exudation (TB-PLE occurring in young people.

  10. Pleural space elastance and changes in oxygenation after therapeutic thoracentesis in ventilated patients with heart failure and transudative pleural effusions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei-Lin; Chung, Chi-Li; Hsiao, Shih-Hsin; Chang, Shi-Chuan

    2010-08-01

    Therapeutic thoracentesis (TT) is required in patients with refractory pleural effusions and impaired oxygenation. In this study, the relationship between pleural space elastance (PE) and changes in oxygenation after TT was investigated in ventilated patients with heart failure and transudative pleural effusions. Twenty-six mechanically ventilated patients with heart failure and significant transudative effusions, who were undergoing TT, were studied. The effusion was drained as completely as possible, with monitoring of pleural liquid pressure (Pliq) and chest symptoms. The volume of effusion removed, the changes in Pliq during TT, PE and arterial blood gases before and after TT were recorded. The mean volume of effusion removed was 1011.9 +/- 58.2 mL. The mean Pliq decreased from 14.5 +/- 1.0 to 0.1 +/- 1.5 cm H(2)O after TT, and the mean PE was 15.3 +/- 1.8 cm H(2)O/L. TT significantly increased the mean ratio of PaO(2)/fraction of inspired oxygen (FiO(2)) from 243.2 +/- 19.9 to 336.0 +/- 17.8 mm Hg (P 14.5 cm H(2)O/L). Measurement of PE during TT may be valuable for predicting improvement in oxygenation in ventilated patients with heart failure and pleural effusions. Patients with lower PE showed greater improvement in oxygenation after TT.

  11. Transudative vs exudative pleural effusions: differentiation using Gd-DTPA-enhanced MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frola, C.; Cantoni, S.; Turtulici, I.; Leoni, C.; Loria, F.; Gaeta, M.; Derchi, L.E.

    1997-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the capability of Gd-DTPA-enhanced MRI to differentiate between exudative and transudative pleural effusions. An MRI examination was performed on 22 patients with different types of pleural effusion (10 transudative and 12 exudative effusions). T1-weighted SE images were obtained before and 20 min after administration of Gd-DTPA (0.1 mmol/kg). The degree of enhancement of pleural effusions was evaluated both by visual assessement and by quantitative analysis of images. None of 10 transudative effusions showed significative enhancement, whereas 10 of 12 exudative effusions showed enhancement (sensitivity 83 %, specificity 100 %, positive predictive value 100 %). The postcontrast signal intensity ratios (SIRs) of exudates were significantly higher than corresponding precontrast ratios (P = 0.0109) and the postcontrast SIRs of exudates were significantly higher than those of transudates (P = 0.0300). Exudative pleural effusions show a significant enhancement following administration of Gd-DTPA. We presume that this may be caused by increased pleural permeability and more rapid passage of a large amount of Gd-DTPA from the blood into the pleural fluid in case of exudative effusions. In our limited group of patients, signal enhancement proved the presence of an exudative effusion. Absence of signal enhancement suggests a transudate, but does not exclude an exudate. (orig.). With 5 figs., 2 tabs

  12. Cytologic diagnosis of rhabdomyosarcoma in a child with a pleural effusion. A case report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Theunissen, Paul; Cremers, Martin; van der Meer, Syb; Bot, Freek; Bras, Johannes

    2004-01-01

    A pleural effusion in children is usually caused by infectious diseases; malignant effusion is very uncommon. In a case of a malignant effusion in a child, a pleura-based metastasis of a neoplasm with a typically high prevalence in childhood has to be considered. Examples are neuroblastoma,

  13. Clinical implications of pleural effusion in patients with acute type B aortic dissection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Yoshihiro; Tanno, Jun; Nakano, Shintaro; Kasai, Takatoshi; Senbonmatsu, Takaaki; Nishimura, Shigeyuki

    2016-11-01

    Pleural effusion may complicate acute Stanford type B aortic dissection (ABAD). To identify the relationships between the quantity and side of the pleural effusion, biomarkers and outcomes in patients with ABAD. We undertook a retrospective review of 105 patients with ABAD. Their demographics, the data on admission and during hospital stay, the volume of pleural effusion calculated from the area on computed tomography images and clinical outcomes were analysed. The median estimated peak volume (median 6.7 days after onset) was 129 ml (63-192, range 26-514 ml) on the left and 11 ml (6-43, range 2-300 ml) on the right. On univariate analysis, the volume of bilateral effusions was associated with anaemia, hypoalbuminaemia and inflammatory markers, whereas the volume of left-sided effusions was associated with older age, low diastolic blood pressure and maximum aortic diameter. Multivariate analysis revealed that hypoalbuminaemia was independently associated with bilateral effusion volume ( Peffusion volume ( P=0.019). A greater volume of bilateral plural effusion was associated with longer intensive care unit stay. Larger bilateral pleural effusions in patients with ABAD were associated with hypoalbuminaemia and potentially with anaemia and inflammation, and may increase the length of intensive care unit stay. Left-sided effusion volume appears to be influenced by the nature of the aortic dilatation. Multiple mechanisms may underpin the development of pleural effusion in ABAD, and are likely to influence clinical outcomes.

  14. Cost-effectiveness of indwelling pleural catheter compared with talc in malignant pleural effusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olfert, Jordan A P; Penz, Erika D; Manns, Braden J; Mishra, Eleanor K; Davies, Helen E; Miller, Robert F; Luengo-Fernandez, Ramon; Gao, Song; Rahman, Najib M

    2017-05-01

    Malignant pleural effusion is associated with morbidity and mortality. A randomized controlled trial previously compared clinical outcomes and resource use with indwelling pleural catheter (IPC) and talc pleurodesis in this population. Using unpublished quality of life data, we estimate the cost-effectiveness of IPC compared with talc pleurodesis. Healthcare utilization and costs were captured during the trial. Utility weights produced by the EuroQol Group five-dimensional three-level questionnaire and survival were used to determine quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) gained. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) was calculated over the 1-year trial period. Sensitivity analysis used patient survival data and modelled additional nursing time required per week for catheter drainage. Utility scores, cost and QALYs gained did not differ significantly between groups. The ICER for IPC compared with talc was favorable at $US10 870 per QALY gained. IPC was less costly with a probability exceeding 95% of being cost-effective when survival was pleural effusion in patients without history of prior pleurodesis, with consideration for patient survival, support and preferences. © 2016 The Authors. Respirology published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Asian Pacific Society of Respirology.

  15. Radiographic evidence of small amounts of pleural effusion in infant stage individuals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Troeger, J.; Kuntz, M.; Otte, J.; Fuchs, M.

    1980-01-01

    The pleural cavity of ten young pigs was punctured and filled with specific amounts of fluid. Subsequently chest films were obtained in ap and lateral erect and in cross-table lateral decubitus position. Only 2 cases of these pigs radiographed in the erect position (after injection of 80 and even 100 ml of fluid) gave clear evidence of pleural effusion. Indirect signs of pleural effusion (such as blunting of the costophrenic angles; unsharpness, flatting or elevation of the diaphragm as a sign subpulmonic effusion), however, were already noted with only 20 ml of pleural fluid. In contrast to these exams done in the erect position, the radiographs obtained in cross table lateral decubitus position showed as little as 5 ml of fluid. Therefore, the cross table lateral decubitus position is ideal for the work up of suspected pleural effusion. (orig.) [de

  16. IgG4-related Pleuritis with Elevated Adenosine Deaminase in Pleural Effusion: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagayasu, Atsushi; Kubo, Satoshi; Nakano, Kazuhisa; Nakayamada, Shingo; Iwata, Shigeru; Miyagawa, Ippei; Fukuyo, Shunsuke; Saito, Kazuyoshi; Tanaka, Yoshiya

    2018-03-09

    An 81-year-old man was admitted with bilateral pleural effusion. A clinical examination showed lymphocytic pleura effusion and elevated serum IgG4 levels, so that IgG4-related disease was suggested, whereas tuberculous pleurisy was suspected because of high adenosine deaminase (ADA) levels in the pleural effusion. A surgical pleural biopsy revealed that there were large numbers of IgG4-positive cells and IgG4/IgG positive cell ratio exceeded 40% in several sites. Accordingly, we diagnosed IgG4-related pleuritis and treated with the patient with glucocorticoid therapy. The ADA levels in pleural effusion can increase in IgG4-related pleuritis, and it is therefore important to perform a pleural biopsy.

  17. Pleural effusion following blunt splenic injury in the pediatric trauma population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulaylat, Afif N; Engbrecht, Brett W; Pinzon-Guzman, Carolina; Albaugh, Vance L; Rzucidlo, Susan E; Schubart, Jane R; Cilley, Robert E

    2014-09-01

    Pleural effusion is a potential complication following blunt splenic injury. The incidence, risk factors, and clinical management are not well described in children. Ten-year retrospective review (January 2000-December 2010) of an institutional pediatric trauma registry identified 318 children with blunt splenic injury. Of 274 evaluable nonoperatively managed pediatric blunt splenic injures, 12 patients (4.4%) developed left-sided pleural effusions. Seven (58%) of 12 patients required left-sided tube thoracostomy for worsening pleural effusion and respiratory insufficiency. Median time from injury to diagnosis of pleural effusion was 1.5days. Median time from diagnosis to tube thoracostomy was 2days. Median length of stay was 4days for those without and 7.5days for those with pleural effusions (psplenic injury (IV-V) (OR 16.5, p=0.001) was associated with higher odds of developing a pleural effusion compared to low-grade splenic injury (I-III). Pleural effusion following pediatric blunt splenic injury has an incidence of 4.4% and is associated with high-grade splenic injuries and longer lengths of stay. While some symptomatic patients may be successfully managed medically, many require tube thoracostomy for progressive respiratory symptoms. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. [A case having chyliform pleural effusion caused by former tuberculous pleurisy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishio, Kazumi; Harada, Kana; Nakano, Yasushi; Aida, Shinji; Okabayashi, Ken

    2011-02-01

    A 49-year-old male who had been treated for pulmonary tuberculosis and tuberculous pleurisy in 2007 was referred to our hospital with the complaint of dyspnea on exertion in Nov. 2009. Chest X-ray showed increased pleural effusion compared with that remaining after the previous treatment of pleurisy in 2008. A chest CT revealed that fluid collection was surrounded by thickened pleura. Thoracocentesis was performed, and yellow milky liquid was obtained. The pleural effusion contained few cells. The triglyceride concentration was 83 mg/dl, and the cholesterol level was very high at 628 mg/dl. Based on these findings we diagnosed this case as chyliform pleural effusion. Both smear of acid-fast bacilli and PCR-TB test of the pleural effusion were positive, but culture was negative for mycobacterium, suggesting that this chyliform pleural effusion was produced by the former episode of tuberculous pleurisy, not by the recent reactivation of tuberculous pleurisy. The ADA concentration in the pleural effusion was high at 91.7 IU/l. No increase in the amount of pleural effusion was observed after thoracocentesis without any anti-tuberculosis therapy.

  19. The long-term outcomes of cirrhotic patients with pleural effusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Tsung-Hsing; Tseng, Chih-Wei; Tsai, Chih-Chun; Tsai, Chen-Chi; Tseng, Kuo-Chih; Hsieh, Yu-Hsi

    2018-01-01

    A pleural effusion is an abnormal collection of fluid in the pleural space and may cause related morbidity or mortality in cirrhotic patients. Currently, there are insufficient data to support the long-term prognosis for cirrhotic patients with pleural effusion. In this study, we investigated the short- and long-term effects of pleural effusion on mortality in cirrhotic patients and evaluated the benefit of liver transplantation in these patients. The National Health Insurance Database, derived from the Taiwan National Health Insurance Program, was used to identify 3,487 cirrhotic patients with pleural effusion requiring drainage between January 1, 2007 and December 31, 2010. The proportional hazards Cox regression model was used to control for possible confounding factors. The 30-day, 90-day, 1-year, and 3-year mortalities were 20.1%, 40.2%, 59.1%, and 75.9%, respectively, in the cirrhotic patients with pleural effusion. After Cox proportional hazard regression analysis adjusted by patient gender, age, complications of cirrhosis and comorbid disorders, old age, esophageal variceal bleeding, hepatocellular carcinoma, hepatic encephalopathy, pneumonia, renal function impairment, and without liver transplantation conferred higher risks for 3-year mortality in the cirrhotic patients with pleura effusion. Liver transplantation is the most important factor to determine the 3-year mortalities (HR: 0.17, 95% CI 0.11- 0.26, P pleural effusion predicts poor long-term outcomes. Liver transplantation could dramatically improve the survival and should be suggested as soon as possible.

  20. Chronic eosinophilic pneumonia presenting with ipsilateral pleural effusion: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sriratanaviriyakul, Narin; La, Hanh H; Albertson, Timothy E

    2016-08-12

    Chronic eosinophilic pneumonia is a rare idiopathic interstitial lung disease. The nearly pathognomonic radiographic finding is the peripheral distribution of alveolar opacities. Pleural effusions are rarely seen. We report a case of chronic eosinophilic pneumonia with transudative eosinophilic pleural effusion. A 57-year-old Hispanic woman, a nonsmoker with a history of controlled asthma, presented to the hospital with unresolving pneumonia despite three rounds of antibiotics over a 2-month period. She was later diagnosed with chronic eosinophilic pneumonia based on the presence of peripheral blood eosinophilia, the peripheral distribution of alveolar infiltrates on chest radiograph, and a lung parenchymal biopsy with infiltrates of eosinophils. Upon presentation, our patient had a right-sided moderate-sized pleural effusion. The pleural fluid profile was consistent with a transudative effusion with eosinophil predominance. Our patient responded promptly to oral corticosteroid treatment in a few days. The pulmonary infiltrates and pleural effusion subsided on a 1-month follow-up chest radiograph after starting corticosteroid treatment. We report the first case of chronic eosinophilic pneumonia presenting with pneumonia with ipsilateral transudative eosinophilic pleural effusion. Like other cases of chronic eosinophilic pneumonia, early recognition and diagnosis is essential and prompt treatment with corticosteroids is the mainstay of therapy. Pleural effusion resolved without the further need for therapeutic thoracentesis.

  1. [Clinical analysis of thoracoscopy of 30 coalworker's pneumoconiosiswith pleural effusion cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Yandong; Jiang, Ruiling; Yu, Chunxiao; Huang, Cheng

    2015-07-01

    To investigate the diagnostic value of thoracoscopy on idiopathic coalworker's pneumoconiosis with pleural effusion in general medicine. Routine (general medicine) thoracoscopyof patients suffering from iIdiopathiccoalworker's pneumoconiosis with pleural effusion, pathological examination of lesions obtained (direct vision). Pathological examination revealed grayish-white miliary nodules with multiple protruding nodules, irregular focal pleura thickening, pulmonary congestion, edema, fibrous adhesion. Thorascopy produced a diagnostic rate of 93.3%. Confirmed cases includes 13 cases of tuberculous pleurisy, 11 cases of malignant pleural effusion, 4 cases of cardiac insufficiency with pleural effusion and 2 cases of idiopathic pleural effusion, with no serious complications. Thoracoscopy of idiopathic coalworker's pneumoconiosis with pleural effusion is a safe, accurate diagnostic methodin general medicine, and could benefit the establishment of a treatment method quickly, visual observation of the lesions of patients suffering from coalworker's pneumoconiosis with pleural effusion using thoracoscopy, and at the same time offer preliminary investigationof the correlation between the intensity and compactibilityof coal macule distribution and clinical stages of coalworker's Pneumoconiosis.

  2. Initial 12-h operative fluid volume is an independent risk factor for pleural effusion after hepatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Xiang; Wu, Jia-Wei; Sun, Ping; Song, Zi-Fang; Zheng, Qi-Chang

    2016-12-01

    Pleural effusion after hepatectomy is associated with significant morbidity and prolonged hospital stays. Several studies have addressed the risk factors for postoperative pleural effusion. However, there are no researches concerning the role of the initial 12-h operative fluid volume. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether the initial 12-h operative fluid volume during liver resection is an independent risk factor for pleural effusion after hepatectomy. In this study, we retrospectively analyzed clinical data of 470 patients consecutively undergoing elective hepatectomy between January 2011 and December 2012. We prospectively collected and retrospectively analyzed baseline and clinical data, including preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative variables. Univariate and multivariate analyses were carried out to identify whether the initial 12-h operative fluid volume was an independent risk factor for pleural effusion after hepatectomy. The multivariate analysis identified 2 independent risk factors for pleural effusion: operative time [odds ratio (OR)=10.2] and initial 12-h operative fluid volume (OR=1.0003). Threshold effect analyses revealed that the initial 12 h operative fluid volume was positively correlated with the incidence of pleural effusion when the initial 12-h operative fluid volume exceeded 4636 mL. We conclude that the initial 12-h operative fluid volume during liver resection and operative time are independent risk factors for pleural effusion after hepatectomy. Perioperative intravenous fluids should be restricted properly.

  3. Markers to differentiate between Kaposi's sarcoma and tuberculous pleural effusions in HIV-positive patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, M; Finney, L J; Komrower, D; Chitani, A; Bates, J; Chipungu, G A; Corbett, E; Allain, T J

    2015-02-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) and tuberculosis (TB) commonly cause pleural effusions in high human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) burden resource-limited countries. Differentiating between them is challenging, as pleural biopsy and TB culture are rarely available. To identify markers to differentiate between TB effusions and KS effusions in HIV-positive patients, and to compare liquid culture and Xpert MTB/RIF in pleural fluid. Fifty HIV-positive patients with pleural effusions recruited in Malawi underwent pleural ultrasound and aspiration. Fluid visual inspection, cell count, bacterial culture, glucose/protein, solid and liquid TB culture and Xpert were performed. The mean age of the patients was 32 years; 30/50 (60%) were male and 29 (58%) had cutaneous/oral KS. Thirteen (26%) pleural fluid samples were liquid culture-positive for TB, while 9/13 (69%) were Xpert-positive. Three (10.3%) KS patients had culture-positive TB effusions; 17 (58.6%) had KS effusions. The relative risk of TB in KS patients increased with limited KS, loculated fluid and low glucose. Eleven (52.3%) non-KS patients had culture-positive TB effusions associated with male sex, straw-coloured fluid and fibrin stranding on ultrasound. KS patients were most likely to have KS effusion, but TB should be considered. Most non-KS patients had TB, supporting the use of World Health Organization guidelines. Xpert identified two thirds of liquid culture-positive results.

  4. Pleural effusion: Role of pleural fluid cytology, adenosine deaminase level, and pleural biopsy in diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biswajit Biswas

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The present study is designed to evaluate the role of pleural fluid analysis in diagnosing pleural diseases and to study the advantages and disadvantages of thoracocentasis and pleural biopsy. Materials and Methods: We prospectively included 66 consecutive indoor patients over a duration of 1 year. Pleural fluid was collected and cytological smears were made from the fluid. Plural biopsy was done in the same patient by Cope needle. Adequate pleural biopsy tissue yielding specific diagnosis was obtained in 47 (71.2% cases. Results: Tuberculosis was the commonest nonneoplastic lesion followed by chronic nonspecific pleuritis comprising 60% and 33.3% of the nonneoplastic cases respectively and tuberculosis was predominantly diagnosed in the younger age group. Majority (70.8% of malignancy cases were in the age group of >50-70. Adenocarcinoma was found to be the commonest (66.7% malignant neoplasm in the pleurae followed by small-cell carcinoma (20.8%. Conclusion: Pleural biopsy is a useful and minimally invasive procedure. It is more sensitive and specific than pleural fluid smears.

  5. Outcome of ultrasound-guided small-bore catheter drainage in exudative pleural effusions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiranantawat, Nantaka; Sungsiri, Jitpreedee; Geater, Sarayut L

    2014-05-01

    To evaluate the outcome and safety of ultrasound-guided percutaneous catheter drainage of exudative pleural effusion. The present study was a retrospective analysis of 412 pleural effusions from 373 patients that underwent ultrasound-guided small-bore catheter drainage in exudative pleural effusions between 2004 and 2009. The two most common causes for drainage were parapneumonic effusion or empyema (52.2%) and malignant effusion (30.3%), while the remains were trauma, iatrogenic, and others. Overall clinical success rate was 76.5%. The success rate was lower among malignant pleural effusion (p = 0.003). Causes of effusion were the only independent predictors related to success. Only five (1.2%) patients developed complication during the procedure. Seventy-five of 412 effusions (15.8%) developed complication during the period of drainage; the majority were drain blockage (9%) and accidental dislodgment (4.1%). Ultrasound-guided small-bore catheter drainage was a safe and efficient procedure for exudative pleural effusions.

  6. The role of pleural fluid MAGE RT-nested PCR in the diagnosis of malignant pleural effusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Eun Ju; Park, Hye Kyeong; Jeon, Kyeongman; Koh, Won-Jung; Suh, Gee Young; Chung, Man Pyo; Kim, Hojoong; Kwon, O Jung; Ki, Chang-Seok; Kim, Jong-Won; Shim, Young Mog; Um, Sang-Won

    2012-11-01

      Melanoma antigen (MAGE) genes are expressed in tumor cells, the testis and the placenta. The purpose of this prospective study was to investigate the sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of the carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), MAGE reverse transcriptase-nested polymerase chain reaction (RT-nested PCR), and cytology of pleural fluid in the diagnosis of malignant pleural effusion.   Patients in whom unilateral pleural effusion was identified on chest radiography from January to December 2009 were included in the study. MAGE genes were analyzed by RT-nested PCR using MAGE A1-6 common primers.   Of 81 enrolled patients, 46 were diagnosed as malignant pleural effusion, and 24 were diagnosed as benign pleural effusion. The diagnoses of 11 patients were not confirmed in this study. The diagnostic sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of MAGE RT-nested PCR were 61.4%, 95.7%, and 73.1%, respectively. The diagnostic sensitivities of cytology and CEA (>5 ng/mL) were 61.4% and 75.0%, respectively. Among 17 patients with negative cytology who had malignant pleural effusion, 12 and 10 patients were positive for CEA (>5.0 ng/mL) and MAGE RT-nested PCR, respectively. However, of five patients with malignant pleural effusion that was not recognized by cytology and CEA, MAGE RT-nested PCR correctly predicted a malignant etiology in only one additional patient (20%).   MAGE RT-nested PCR seems to add little on the combination of conventional methods in the diagnosis of malignant effusion. © 2012 Tianjin Lung Cancer Institute and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty. Ltd.

  7. Diagnostics of pleural effusions and atelectases: A comparison of sonography and radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelbel, C.; Boerner, N.; Weilemann, L.S.; Meyer, J.; Schadmand, S.; Klose, K.J.; Thelen, M.

    1991-01-01

    In a prospective study it was shown that chest ultrasonography is superior to conventional X-ray diagnosis of recumbent patients in diagnosing pleural effusion and lung atelectasis. In 110 supine radiographs we found a sensitivity of 47% and a specificity of 71% for right pleural effusions and a sensitivity of 55% and a specificity of 93% for left pleural effusions in comparison to 110 sonographic examinations. The results of supine radiographs in detection of atelectasis were less efficient: sensitivity for the right side: 7%; sensitivity for the left side: 13,5%. Hence, the knowledge of chest ultrasonographic diagnosis can improve the interpretation of supine radiographs. (orig.) [de

  8. Thoracentesis-reverting cardiac tamponade physiology in a patient with myxedema coma and large pleural effusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werlang, Monia E; Pimentel, Mario R; Diaz-Gomez, Jose L

    2017-07-01

    A large pleural effusion causing cardiac tamponade physiology and severe hemodynamic compromise is an uncommon event. We report a case of a 53-year-old woman with severe hypothyroidism presenting with myxedema coma and refractory shock. Her hemodynamic status failed to respond to fluid resuscitation and vasopressors. A transthoracic echocardiogram and chest radiograph demonstrated a pericardial fluid accumulation associated with a large left-sided pleural effusion. Thoracostomy tube insertion resulted in prompt improvement of the patient's hemodynamic status. Our finding demonstrates that a large pleural effusion may play an important role in cardiac tamponade physiology.

  9. Pleural effusion as the initial manifestation of chronic myeloid leukemia: Report of a case with clinical and cytologic correlation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paras Nuwal

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Pleural effusion in patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML is very rare and poorly understood. We report here a 26-year-old male patient having CML and presenting with pleural effusion as the first clinical sign. The possible mechanism of pleural effusion in CML, the cytological interpretive problem and the clinical significance of finding immature leucocytes in pleural fluid are also briefly discussed.

  10. Utility of semi-rigid thoracoscopy in undiagnosed exudative pleural effusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nattusamy, Loganathan; Madan, Karan; Mohan, Anant; Hadda, Vijay; Jain, Deepali; Madan, Neha Kawatra; Arava, Sudheer; Khilnani, Gopi C; Guleria, Randeep

    2015-01-01

    Semi-rigid thoracoscopy is a safe and efficacious procedure in patients with undiagnosed pleural effusion. Literature on its utility from developing countries is limited. We herein describe our initial experience on the utility of semi-rigid thoracoscopy from a tertiary care teaching and referral center in north India. We also perform a systematic review of studies reporting the utility of semi-rigid thoracoscopy from India. The primary objective was to evaluate the diagnostic utility of semi-rigid thoracoscopy in patients with undiagnosed exudative pleural effusion. Semi-rigid thoracoscopy was performed under local anesthesia and conscious sedation in the bronchoscopy suite. A total of 48 patients underwent semi-rigid thoracoscopy between August 2012 and December 2013 for undiagnosed pleural effusion. Mean age was 50.9 ± 14.1 years (range: 17-78 years). Pre-procedure clinico-radiological diagnoses were malignant pleural effusion [36 patients (75%)], tuberculosis (TB) [10 (20.83%) patients], and empyema [2 patients (4.17%)]. Patients with empyema underwent the procedure for pleural biopsy, optimal placement of intercostal tube and adhesiolysis. Thoracoscopic pleural biopsy diagnosed pleural malignancy in 30 (62.5%) patients and TB in 2 (4.17%) patients. Fourteen (29.17%) patients were diagnosed with non-specific pleuritis and normal pleura was diagnosed on a pleural biopsy in 2 (4.17%) patients. Overall, a definitive diagnosis of either pleural malignancy or TB was obtained in 32 (66.7%) patients. Combined overall sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value of thoracoscopic pleural biopsy for malignant pleural effusion were 96.77%, 100%, 100% and 66.67%, respectively. There was no procedure-related mortality. On performing a systematic review of literature, four studies on semi-rigid thoracoscopy from India were identified. Semi-rigid thoracoscopy is a safe and efficacious procedure in patients with undiagnosed exudative

  11. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided evaluation of the pleura and cases of pleural effusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Malay; Rameshbabu, Chittapuram Srinivasan

    2017-01-01

    The most efficient and cost-effective approach for the diagnosis of pleural exudates remains uncertain and is a subject of controversy. Essential factors to be considered include the respective diagnostic yields of thoracocentesis, closed pleural biopsy, and thoracoscopy. The role of endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) of the esophagus as a modality for the evaluation of pleural exudates has not yet been evaluated. The applied anatomy of the pleura has been discussed. The techniques involved in the EUS imaging of different aspects of the pleura in normal cases and in cases with pleural effusion are elaborated. The practical application of this knowledge can be useful in EUS-guided sampling of the pleural wall, pleural nodules, and in cases of pleural effusion.

  12. The Significance of Caspase-Cleaved Cytokeratin 18 in Pleural Effusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Keu Sung; Chung, Joo Yang; Jung, Yun Jung; Chung, Wou Young; Park, Joo Hun; Sheen, Seung Soo; Lee, Kyi Beom

    2014-01-01

    Background Apoptosis plays a role in the development of pleural effusion. Caspase-cleaved cytokeratin 18, a marker for epithelial cell apoptosis, was evaluated in pleural effusion. Methods A total of 79 patients with pleural effusion were enrolled. The underlying causes were lung cancer (n=24), parapneumonic effusion (n=15), tuberculous effusion (n=28), and transudates (n=12). The levels of M30, an epitope of caspase-cleaved cytokeratin 18, were measured in blood and pleural fluids using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay along with routine cellular and biochemical parameters. The expression of M30 was evaluated in the pleural tissues using immunohistochemistry for M30. Results The M30 levels in pleural fluid were significantly higher in patients with tuberculosis (2,632.1±1,467.3 U/mL) than in patients with lung cancer (956.5±618.5 U/mL), parapneumonic effusion (689.9±413.6 U/mL), and transudates (273.6±144.5 U/mL; all peffusion from all other effusions was 0.93. In the immunohistochemical analysis of M30, all pathologic types of cancer cells showed moderate to high expression, and the epithelioid cells in granulomas showed high expression in tuberculous pleural tissues. Conclusion Caspase-cleaved cytokeratin 18 was most prominently observed in tuberculous pleural effusion and showed utility as a clinical marker. The main source of M30 was found to be the epithelioid cells of granulomas in tuberculous pleural tissues. PMID:24523813

  13. Elevated pleural effusion IL-17 is a diagnostic marker and outcome predictor in lung cancer patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Interleukin 17 (IL-17) is a proinflammatory cytokine produced mainly by CD4+ T-lymphocytes and may be important in tumor cell growth and progression. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the diagnostic and prognostic value of pleural effusion levels of IL-17 in lung cancer patients with malignant pleural effusion (MPE). Methods Pleural effusion samples were collected from 78 lung cancer patients with MPE and from 45 patients with nonmalignant pleural effusion. Pleural fluid concentrations of IL-17 were measured by using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. Results Malignant effusion exhibited higher IL-17 levels than nonmalignant effusion (20.49 ± 5.27 pg/ml vs. 13.16 ± 2.25 pg/ml; P < 0.01). Lung cancer patients with pleural fluid IL-17 levels below 15 pg/ml had longer overall survival than those patients with higher levels (10.8 months vs. 4.7 months; P < 0.05). On the basis of multivariate analysis, we found that pleural fluid IL-17 level was an independent prognostic factor in lung cancer patients with MPE. Conclusions Measurement of IL-17 levels might be a useful diagnostic and prognostic test for lung cancer patients with MPE. PMID:24887477

  14. Tuberculous Pleural Effusion: Clinical Characteristics of 320 Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bielsa, Silvia; Acosta, Cristina; Pardina, Marina; Civit, Carmen; Porcel, José M

    2018-05-22

    To analyze the clinical and radiological characteristics and features of pleural fluid (PF) in patients with tuberculous pleural effusion (TPE). Retrospective analysis of TPEs treated in our clinic over the last 23years. We included 320 patients with TPE (70% men; median age 33years). Mycobacterium tuberculosis was identified in the sputum or PF of 36% of the patients by microscopic examination, solid and liquid media cultures, or nucleic acid amplification tests. The greatest percentage of positive microbiological findings were associated with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) co-infection (OR: 3.27), and with the presence in PF of proteins 60% (OR: 3.23), and glucose Pleural adenosine deaminase <35U/L was associated with TPEs that occupied less than half of the hemithorax (OR: 6.36) and with PF lactate dehydrogenase levels <500U/L (OR: 8.09). Radiological pulmonary opacities (30%) were more common in TPE occupying less than half of the hemithorax (OR: 2.73), in bilateral TPE (OR: 4.48), and in older patients (OR: 1.02). Factors predicting mortality were: HIV co-infection (OR: 24), proteins in PF <5g/dL (OR: 10), and greater age (OR: 1.05). Patients with TPE and HIV co-infection and those with lower concentrations of proteins in PF had higher rates of positive microbiological results and death. Moreover, older patients had more pulmonary opacities and a higher incidence of death. Copyright © 2018 SEPAR. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  15. An unusual association of pleural effusion with acute viral hepatitis A infection

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    Dhakal AK

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Ajaya Kumar Dhakal, Arati Shakya, Devendra Shrestha, Subhash Chandra Shah, Henish Shakya Department of Pediatrics, KIST Medical College Teaching Hospital, Imadol, Lalitpur, Nepal Abstract: Hepatitis A virus infection is a common public health problem in developing countries primarily due to poor hygiene and sanitation. The clinical features of hepatitis A virus are mostly related to the derangement of liver function with occasional extrahepatic complications. Herein, a 2.5-year-old girl presented with abdominal pain and decreased appetite for 4 days, high-colored urine for 3 days, and yellowish discoloration of the eyes for 2 days. On presentation, there was icterus along with hepatomegaly and diminished breath sounds on the right side were noted 1 day after admission. Chest X-ray revealed right sided pleural effusion; however, ultrasonography of chest and abdomen displayed bilateral pleural effusion (right more than left and minimal ascites with thickened gall bladder wall. Immunoglobulin M anti-hepatitis-A virus serology was positive. The pleural effusion in this child resolved spontaneously in 10 days. We report this case to highlight that hepatitis A infection should be considered in the differential diagnosis of pleural effusion in a patient with features of acute hepatitis. However, other common causes of pleural effusion such as tuberculosis and parapneumonic effusions that may coexist with hepatitis, especially in developing world, need to be excluded. Keywords: hepatitis A, pleural effusion, viral hepatitis

  16. Penetration of isoniazid, rifampicin and pyrazinamide in tuberculous pleural effusion and psoas abscess

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jutte, P.C.; Rutgers, S.R.; Van Altena, R.; Uges, D.R.; van Horn, J.R.

    2004-01-01

    SETTING: Tuberculosis Centre, University Medical Centre, Groningen, The Netherlands. OBJECTIVES: To study intralesional concentrations of isoniazid (INH), rifampicin (RMP) and pyrazinamide (PZA) in tuberculous pleural effusions and psoas abscesses, and to compare these to reference serum values and

  17. Penetration of isoniazid, refampicin and pyrazinamide in tuberculous pleural effusion and psoas abscess

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jutte, PC; Rutgers, [No Value; Van Altena, R; Uges, DR; Van Horn, [No Value

    SETTING: Tuberculosis Centre, University Medical Centre, Groningen, The Netherlands. OBJECTIVES: To study intralesional concentrations of isoniazid (INH), rifampicin (RMP) and pyrazinamide (PZA) in tuberculous pleural effusions and psoas abscesses, and to compare these to reference serum values and

  18. Non-resolving pleural effusion in a patient with HIV infection

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    night sweats, cough and shortness of breath. The results of ... treatment,but he then developed a pleural effusion that ... lymphoma, mesothelioma and lung cancer seemed unlikely ... that two active antibiotics are used, which should have good.

  19. Unsuspected multiples myeloma presenting as bilateral pleural effusion – a cytological diagnosis

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    Dhingra Kajal

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Multiple Myeloma presenting as a pleural effusion is extremely rare. It is usually a late complication and is associated with a poor prognosis. Case Presentation A 40-year-old male presented with dyspnea and fever of six months duration. Clinical diagnosis of pulmonary tuberculosis was considered. X-ray chest showed bilateral pleural effusion. Pleural cytology revealed numerous plasma cells, some of which were binucleated and atypical. Cytological differential diagnosis included: Myelomatous effusion and Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma deposit (Immunoblastic type. Bone marrow biopsy, serum protein electrophoresis and bone scan confirmed the diagnosis of multiple myeloma (Plasmablastic type. Conclusion Myelomatous pleural effusion as an initial presentation although extremely rare, should always be considered in presence of atypical plasma cells irrespective of age.

  20. Efficacy of ultrasound-guided thoracentesis catheter drainage for pleural effusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Weitian; Wang, Yi; Zhou, Ningming; Xu, Bing

    2016-01-01

    The factors influencing the efficacy of ultrasound-guided thoracentesis catheter drainage were investigated in the present study. A retrospective analysis of clinical data from 435 patients who presented with a pleural effusion was performed. Patients were divided into a control group and an intervention group. Thirty-seven patients in the control group were given standard care using pleural puncture to draw the excess fluid. The 398 patients in the intervention group were treated using ultrasound-guided thoracentesis catheter drainage. The rate of successful drainage of a pleural effusion was significantly higher (Ppleural effusion. The efficacy of the procedure is related to the separation of pleural effusion, drainage tube type and tube diameter. PMID:28105155

  1. Diagnosis and treatment of malignant pleural effusion: a systematic literature review and new approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombardi, Giuseppe; Zustovich, Fable; Nicoletto, Maria Ornella; Donach, Martin; Artioli, Grazia; Pastorelli, Davide

    2010-08-01

    Malignant pleural effusion is a frequent complication in many types of tumors, and its presence indicates short expected survival. This review updates the current knowledge about diagnosis and management of malignant pleural effusion. In recent years, progress has been made in diagnosis through the use of new pathologic and radiologic approaches, such as the introduction of positron emission tomography-computed tomography, immunohistochemical marker combinations, and genetic studies to identify malignant cells. Treatment is always palliative. New promising drugs have been tested, but, awaiting randomized studies, talc pleurodesis is still the treatment of choice, although doubts remain about its safety. A long-term indwelling pleural catheter could be a valid alternative to talc pleurodesis in selected patients with trapped lung syndrome (a lung that fails to reexpand after drainage of pleural effusion) and short life expectancy. However, the correct treatment depends on several factors such as performance status, expected survival, presence of lung reexpansion following pleural drainage and comorbidities.

  2. Value of Detection of CAIX in the Pleural Effusion and Its Sediment in the Diagnosis of Lung Cancer

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    Lina PENG

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective Carbonic anhydrase IX (CAIX is widely expressed in a variety of malignant tumors, including-lung cancer. Our previous study has shown that the serum level of soluble form of carbonic anhydrase IX (s-CAIX was significantly higher in patients with lung cancer than that in the healthy group. The aim of this study is to detect the s-CAIX level in the pleural effusion and its sediment, and to evaluate the significance of CAIX detection in the diagnosis of lung cancer. Methods The s-CAIX level in pleural effusion of 29 lung cancer patients and 27 patients with tuberculosis was detected by ELISA. The expression of CAIX in the pleural effusion sediment of 21 lung cancer patients with malignant pleural effusion and 6 patients with benign pleural effusion was examined by immunohistochemistry. With pathological diagnosis as the gold standard, receiver operating characteristic (ROC curve of pleural effusion s-CAIX was established for the diagnosis of lung cancer with malignant pleural effusion. Results The s-CAIX level in the malignant pleural effusion was significantly higher than that in the tuberculosis group (P<0.05. The AUC of pleural effusion s-CAIX level was 0.761. At a threshold level of 109.135 pg/mL, sensitivity and specificity were 92.3% and 58.3%, respectively. The CAIX expression in all samples of the benign pleural effusion sediment was negative. The positive rate of CAIX expression in malignant pleural effusion sediment was 66.67%. Conclusion Detection of CAIX in the pleural effusion and its sediment exhibits high sensitivity and specificity, and is helpful in diagnosis of lung cancer with malignant pleural effusion.

  3. Detection of EpCAM-positive microparticles in pleural fluid: A new approach to mini-invasively identify patients with malignant pleural effusions

    OpenAIRE

    Roca, Elisa; Lacroix, Romaric; Judicone, Coralie; Laroumagne, Sophie; Robert, St?phane; Cointe, Sylvie; Muller, Alexandre; Kaspi, Elise; Roll, Patrice; Brisson, Alain R.; Tantucci, Claudio; Astoul, Philippe; Dignat-George, Fran?oise

    2015-01-01

    Pleural biomarkers allowing to mini-invasively discriminate benign from malignant pleural effusions are needed. Among potential candidates, microparticles (MPs) are extracellular vesicles that vectorize antigen derived from the parent cell. We hypothesized that tumor-derived MPs could be present in the pleural liquid and help to identify patients with malignant pleural effusions. Using highly sensitive flow cytometry and cryo-electron microscopy, we showed that large amounts of MPs from hemat...

  4. Lymphoproliferative disorder in pleural effusion in a subject with past asbestos exposure

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    Naofumi Hara

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Primary effusion lymphoma (PEL is a subtype of non-Hodgkin lymphoma that presents as serous effusions without detectable masses or organomegaly. Here we report a case of PEL-like lymphoma in a patient with past asbestos exposure. A 65-year-old man was referred to our hospital due to dyspnea upon exertion. He had been exposed to asbestos for three years in the construction industry. Chest X-ray and CT images demonstrated left pleural effusion. Cytological analysis of the pleural effusion revealed large atypical lymphocytes with distinct nuclear bodies and high nucleus-to-cytoplasm ratio. Immunohistochemical analyses showed that the cells were CD20+, CD3−, CD5−, and CD10−. These findings led to a diagnosis of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. PEL or PEL-like lymphoma should be considered a potential cause of pleural effusion in subjects with past asbestos exposure.

  5. CT Scan-Guided Abrams' Needle Pleural Biopsy versus Ultrasound-Assisted Cutting Needle Pleural Biopsy for Diagnosis in Patients with Pleural Effusion: A Randomized, Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metintas, Muzaffer; Yildirim, Huseyin; Kaya, Tamer; Ak, Guntulu; Dundar, Emine; Ozkan, Ragip; Metintas, Selma

    2016-01-01

    Image-guided pleural biopsies, both using ultrasound (US) or computed tomography (CT), are important in the diagnosis of pleural disease. However, no consensus exists regarding which biopsy needles are appropriate for specific procedures. In this randomized, prospective study, we aimed to compare CT scan-guided pleural biopsy using an Abrams' needle (CT-ANPB) with US-assisted pleural biopsy using a cutting needle (US-CNPB) with respect to both diagnostic yield and safety. Between February 2009 and April 2013, 150 patients with exudative pleural effusion who could not be diagnosed by cytological analysis were included in the study. The patients were randomized into either the US-CNPB group or the CT-ANPB group. The two groups were compared in terms of diagnostic sensitivity and complications. Of the 150 patients enrolled in this study, 45 were diagnosed with malignant mesothelioma, 46 were diagnosed with metastatic pleural disease, 18 were diagnosed with pleural tuberculosis, 34 were diagnosed with benign pleural disease, and 7 were lost to follow-up. In the US-CNPB group, the diagnostic sensitivity was 66.7%, compared with 82.4% in the CT-ANPB group; the difference between the two groups was statistically significant (p = 0.029). The sensitivity of CT-ANPB increased to 93.7% for patients with a pleural thickness ≥1 cm. The complication rates were low and acceptable. The first diagnostic intervention that should be preferred in patients with pleural effusion and associated pleural thickening on a CT scan is CT-ANPB. US-CNPB should be used primarily in cases for which only pleural thickening but no pleural effusion is noted. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  6. Frequency of pleural effusion in acute bronchiolitis and its effect on prognosis

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    Yilmaz Ayse E

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Aim To analyze the frequency of pleural effusion and the effect on prognosis in children with acute bronchiolitis. Methods A total of 69 infants aged 1-24 months with acute bronchiolitis were studied between September 2009 and December 2010. All patients'age, sex, breastfeeding duration, exposure to smoking, history of using vitamin D, symptoms duration, physical examination and laboratory findings were recorded. Bronchiolitis score and predisposing factors that influence the disease process were determined. Thorax ultrasonography was carried out in all patients, who were evaluated on the 3rd and 7th day of the treatment. Results Mean age of patients (43 boys, 26 girls was 11.97 ± 0.69 months (median 11 months. Breastfeeding duration was 8.26 ± 0.56 months (median 8 months. According to bronchiolitis score, 52 patients (75.4% had mild and moderate bronchiolitis and 17 (24.6% had severe bronchiolitis; 34 patients (49.2% had pleural effusion. There was no relation between pleural effusion and symptoms. Frequency of pleural effusion was significantly higher in patients with risk factors. Conclusions This study demonstrated that most of the acute bronchiolitis cases in the infants studied were accompanied by pleural effusion. Pleural effusion in acute bronchiolitis had no effects on prognosis.

  7. Ultrasound estimation of volume of postoperative pleural effusion in cardiac surgery patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usta, Engin; Mustafi, Migdat; Ziemer, Gerhard

    2010-02-01

    The aim of this study was to establish a practical simplified formula to facilitate the management of a frequently occurring postoperative complication, pleural effusion. Chest ultrasonography with better sensitivity and reliability in the diagnosis of pleural effusions than chest X-ray can be repeated serially at the bedside without any radiation risk. One hundred and fifty patients after cardiac surgery with basal pleural opacity on chest X-ray have been included in our prospective observational study during a two-year period. Effusion was confirmed on postoperative day (POD) 5.9+/-3.2 per chest ultrasound sonography. Inclusion criteria for subsequent thoracentesis based on clinical grounds alone and were not protocol-driven. Major inclusion criteria were: dyspnea and peripheral oxygen saturation (SpO(2)) levels or = 30 mm). One hundred and thirty-five patients (90%) were drained with a 14-G needle if according to the simplified formula: V (ml)=[16 x D (mm)] the volume of the pleural effusion was around 500 ml. The success rate of obtaining fluid was 100% without any complications. There is a high accuracy between the estimated and drained pleural effusion. Simple quantification of pleural effusion enables time and cost-effective decision-making for thoracentesis in postoperative patients.

  8. Neonatal pleural effusions in a Level III Neonatal Intensive Care Unit

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    Mariana Barbosa

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Pleural effusions are rare in the newborn. Still, being familiar with this condition is relevant given its association with a wide range of disorders. Only two large series of cases on this matter have been published, with no solid conclusions established. The aim of this study is to determine the etiology, management and prognosis of pleural effusions in a population of high-risk neonates.The authors performed a retrospective study in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit of "Hospital de São João", Porto (Portugal, between 1997 and 2014, of all newborns with the diagnosis of pleural effusion, chylothorax, hemothorax, empyema, fetal hydrops or leakage of total parenteral nutrition (TPN.Eighty-two newborns were included, 48 males and 34 females. Pleural effusions were congenital in 19 (23.2% newborns and acquired in 63 (76.8%. Fetal hydrops was the most frequent cause (15 cases, 78.9% of congenital effusions while postoperative after intrathoracic surgery was the most common cause (39 cases, 61.9% of acquired effusions, followed by leakage of TPN (13 cases, 20.6%. Chylothorax was the most common type of effusion (41.5% of cases. Pleural effusions after intrathoracic surgery were mainly (64.1% chylothoraces. Regarding use of octreotide for treatment of acquired chylous effusions, the comparative analysis showed no statistical differences between the group of alive newborns who received octreotide and the group who did not. Twenty-seven (32.9% newborns died; the causes of death were related to underlying diseases and not to the pleural effusion. Clinical outcome is generally good, except in hydropic neonates. Blood albumin level appears to be predictive of prognosis and further investigation on its clinical significance should be encouraged.

  9. Frequency of causative factors for pleural effusions: a hospital based study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ibrahim, M.T.; Saeed, M.K.; Umar, M.

    2010-01-01

    To determine the frequency of various causative factors of pleural effusion in adults. Combined Military Hospital, Attock and PAF hospital Faisal Karachi. One hundred and fifty patients of clinical signs of pleural effusion, were selected and then, further classified in to transudative and exudative variety by carrying out pleural fluid routine testing and using Light's criteria . Later the final etiological diagnosis was made with the help of appropriate laboratory tests. Out of total 150 patients who were studied, 123 patients were found to have exudative effusions whereas 27 cases had transudative effusion. A total of five 5 patients (3.33%) were lost to follow up. Three patients were out of exudative variety and 02 were from transudative variety. Out of 120 patient of exudative pleural effusion, 70(58.2%) had tuberculosis, 28(23.2%) had malignancy, 12(10%) had pneumonia, 5(6%) were uraemic, 2(1.6%) had pulmonary embolism, and rheumatoid arthritis, Systemic lupus erythematosis and liver abscess were causative factors in 1(0.8%) each patient. Out of transudative effusions, 14(56%) had congestive cardiac failure, 5(20%) had cirrhosis liver, 4(16%) had nephrotic syndrome and 1(4%) each had cardiac tamponade and myxoedema. The most common cause of pleural effusion remains tuberculosis. (author)

  10. A simple method of using a Foley catheter to drain pleural effusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Nun, Alon; Best, Lael Anson

    2008-01-01

    Pleural effusion is a common problem, and various techniques of pleural fluid drainage have been described. We report our experience of using a Foley-type catheter to drain pleural effusion. After the injection of local anesthesia, the catheter is inserted, usually through the 7th intercostal space, with the patient sitting upright. The size of the catheter is selected according to the predicted fluid characteristics, and ranges from 18 to 24 F. Once the catheter is positioned in the pleural space, the balloon is inflated with diluted soluble contrast material and connected to a urine collection bag. During the last 10 years, we have used 3500 catheters for this purpose. The catheter site can be used as a port for various procedures, including needle biopsy of the parietal pleura, talc-slurry pleurodesis, and intra-pleural fibrinolysis. This method of pleural drainage is simple, reliable, and inexpensive.

  11. The role of tumor necrosis factor alpha in differentiation between malignant and non malignant pleural effusion

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    Heba M. Atef

    2016-07-01

    Conclusion: Pleural fluid level of TNF-α can be used in differentiating malignant from non malignant effusion. Also levels of TNF-α in the serum and pleural fluid could be useful as a complementary marker in the differential diagnosis of two most common types of exudates (tuberculous and malignant.

  12. Bosutinib induced pleural effusions: Case report and review of tyrosine kinase inhibitors induced pulmonary toxicity

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    Natalia I. Moguillansky, MD

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Tyrosine kinase inhibitors are known to cause pulmonary complications. We report a case of bosutinib related bilateral pleural effusions in a patient with chronic myeloid leukemia. Characteristics of the pleural fluid are presented. We also discuss other tyrosine kinase inhibitors induced pulmonary toxicities, including pulmonary hypertension and interstitial lung disease.

  13. Reactive oxygen species modulator 1, a novel protein, combined with carcinoembryonic antigen in differentiating malignant from benign pleural effusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xianmeng; Zhang, Na; Dong, Jiahui; Sun, Gengyun

    2017-05-01

    The differential diagnosis of malignant pleural effusion and benign pleural effusion remains a clinical problem. Reactive oxygen species modulator 1 is a novel protein overexpressed in various human tumors. The objective of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic value of joint detection of reactive oxygen species modulator 1 and carcinoembryonic antigen in the differential diagnosis of malignant pleural effusion and benign pleural effusion. One hundred two consecutive patients with pleural effusion (including 52 malignant pleural effusion and 50 benign pleural effusion) were registered in this study. Levels of reactive oxygen species modulator 1 and carcinoembryonic antigen were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and radioimmunoassay, respectively. Results showed that the concentrations of reactive oxygen species modulator 1 both in pleural fluid and serum of patients with malignant pleural effusion were significantly higher than those of benign pleural effusion (both p pleural fluid reactive oxygen species modulator 1 were 61.54% and 82.00%, respectively, with the optimized cutoff value of 589.70 pg/mL. However, the diagnostic sensitivity and specificity of serum reactive oxygen species modulator 1 were only 41.38% and 86.21%, respectively, with the cutoff value of 27.22 ng/mL, indicating that serum reactive oxygen species modulator 1 may not be a good option in the differential diagnosis of malignant pleural effusion and benign pleural effusion. The sensitivity and specificity of pleural fluid carcinoembryonic antigen were 69.23% and 88.00%, respectively, at the cutoff value of 3.05 ng/mL, while serum carcinoembryonic antigen were 80.77% and 72.00% at the cutoff value of 2.60 ng/mL. The sensitivity could be raised to 88.17% in parallel detection of plural fluid reactive oxygen species modulator 1 and carcinoembryonic antigen concentration, and the specificity could be improved to 97.84% in serial detection.

  14. Pleural Effusion Resultant after Upper Abdominal Surgery: Analysis of 47 Cases

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    Ufuk Cobanoglu

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Postoperative pulmonary complications, following upper abdominal surgery, occur at a rate which is higher, than lower abdominal surgery. One of these complications is pleural effusion. In this study, the frequency and causes of pleural effusions and the changes of the blood gas values and pulmonary functions of the patients with pleural effusions, occured after upper abdominal surgery are discussed in the accompaniment of the literature. Material and Methods:148 patients to whom upper adominal surgery is performed and in 47 of these patients pleural effusion is developed (31.75% , were examined restrospectivitely. Preoperative and postoperative pulmonary function tests (PFT and arterial blood gas (ABG results and the blood proteins, albumin values were recorded. The anesthesia type, the surgery properties, involving type of surgery and the surgical incision were determined. Results:Pleural effusion is detected bilaterally in 8 patients (17:02, at the rightside in 21 patients (44.69% ,and at the left side in 18 patients (38.29%.The 40.42% (19 cases of the patients who has pleural effusion in the postoperative period, had liver and gallbladder surgery, the %23.41 (11 Cases had spleen and pancreas surgery and the %36.17 (17 cases had the  other surgical procedures.Conclusions: While the upper abdominal surgery, impairment of the integrity of the diaphragm‘s peritoneum that covers the abdominal cavity where there is a highliquid pressure, may cause the liquid transition to the pleural space that has a negative pressure. Hypoalbuminemia and hipoproteinemia, that will occur due to the changes of oral intake and diet regulation in the postoperative period, may cause a reason for the pleural effusion. For this reason, doctors who performed these surgery procedures, should not ignore this complication, in the period of postoperative follow-ups of the patients.

  15. Pleural Effusion in Spinal Deformity Correction Surgery- A Report of 28 Cases in a Single Center.

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    Weiqiang Liang

    Full Text Available To analyze the occurrence, risk factors, treatment and prognosis of postoperative pleural effusion after spinal deformity correction surgery.The clinical and imaging data of 3325 patients undergoing spinal deformity correction were collected from the database of our hospital. We analyzed the therapeutic process of the 28 patients who had postoperative pleural effusion, and we identified the potential risk factors using logistic regression.Among the 28 patients with postoperative pleural effusion, 24 (85.7% suffered from hemothorax, 2 (7.1% from chylothorax, and 2 (7.1% from subarachnoid-pleural fistula. The pleural effusion occurred on the convex side in 19 patients (67.9%, on the concave side in 4 patients (14.3%, and on both sides in 4 patients (14.3%. One patient with left hemothorax was diagnosed with kyphosis. The treatment included conservative clinical observation for 5 patients and chest tube drainage for 23 patients. One patient also underwent thoracic duct ligation and pleurodesis. All of these treatments were successful. Logistic regression analysis showed that adult patients(≥18 years old, congenital scoliosis, osteotomy and thoracoplasty were risk factors for postoperative pleural effusion in spinal deformity correction surgery.The incidence of postoperative pleural effusion in spinal deformity correction surgery was approximately 0.84% (28/3325, and hemothorax was the most common type. Chest tube drainage treatment was usually successful, and the prognosis was good. Adult patients(≥18 years old, congenital scoliosis, and had undergone osteotomy or surgery with thoracoplasty were more likely to suffer from postoperative pleural effusion.

  16. STUDY OF THE CAUSES AND DIAGNOSTIC MODALITIES OF MALIGNANT PLEURAL EFFUSIONS IN THE PRE-THORACOSCOPY ERA IN A TERTIARY CARE CENTRE

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    Vinod Kumar Viswanathan

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Malignant pleural effusions are a common cause of morbidity in patients with advanced cancers. Common malignancies associated with malignant pleural effusion include lung, breast and lymphomas. Diagnostic methods include cytological analysis and pleural biopsy either closed or thoracoscopic guided. This study was taken up to analyse the cancers associated with malignant pleural effusions and the diagnostic modalities employed towards the diagnosis of malignant pleural effusion. MATERIALS AND METHODS Retrospective analysis of case records of patients diagnosed as malignant pleural effusion prior to the use of thoracoscopicguided pleural biopsy during a two year period was done and the results were analysed to assess the causes of malignant pleural effusion and the diagnostic methods employed to confirm the diagnosis of malignant pleural effusion. RESULTS 48 cases of malignant pleural effusion were identified during the study period. The commonest malignancies associated with malignant pleural effusion were lung and breast cancer. Most of the patients were elderly, but some of the cases were identified in younger age groups especially in breast cancer. Cytological analysis and closed pleural biopsies were the diagnostic methods employed for diagnosing malignant pleural effusion. CONCLUSION The study results were consistent with published data that malignant pleural effusions were commonly associated with lung and breast malignancies. Most of the malignancies were in patients aged more than 50 years, but some cases in younger age group especially associated with breast malignancy were noted. Cytology and closed pleural biopsy are adequate to diagnose malignant pleural effusion even in absence of thoracoscopy.

  17. Hemostatic findings of pleural fluid in dogs and the association between pleural effusions and primary hyperfibrino(geno)lysis: A cohort study of 99 dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoia, Andrea; Drigo, Michele; Piek, Christine J; Simioni, Paolo; Caldin, Marco

    2018-01-01

    The primary objective of this study was to determine if activation of coagulation and fibrinolysis occurs in canine pleural effusions. Thirty-three dogs with pleural effusions of different origin were studied. Pleural effusion fibrinogen concentrations were significantly lower, while pleural fibrin-fibrinogen degradation products (FDPs) and D-dimer concentrations were significantly higher than those in plasma (P dogs with pleural effusion, and whether the presence of a concurrent inflammatory process may have activated the hemostatic cascade, with its intrinsically linked secondary hyperfibrinolysis, masking the concurrent PHF. The previously 33 selected dogs with pleural effusion (group 1) were compared to two control groups of 33 healthy (group 2) and 33 sick dogs without pleural effusion (group 3). Serum fibrinogen, FDPs, D-dimer, C-reactive protein (CRP), fibrinogen/CRP ratio, and frequency of PHF were determined. Fibrinogen, FDPs, D-dimer and CRP concentrations in group 1 were significantly increased compared to group 2 (P dogs with pleural effusion compared to healthy dogs. Nevertheless, the decrease in the fibrinogen/CRP ratio in group 1 compared to group 3, considering the higher FDPs and similar D-dimer concentrations, would suggest that PHF is also more frequent in dogs with pleural effusion compared to sick control dogs, and that this phenomenon is hidden due to concurrent secondary hyperfibrinolysis.

  18. Goose-skin Pleura: A Thoracoscopic Finding in a Case of Recurrent Undiagnosed Pleural Effusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Halfawy, Ahmed; Light, Richard W

    2010-10-01

    We present the case of a female patient who presented with undiagnosed pleural effusion. Thoracoscopy was performed and at the beginning of the procedure, the parietal pleura was rather uniformly congested but with a smooth surface. As time passed, the parietal pleura became roughened by bumpy areas of mucosal elevations, which looked soft and watery. This became evident during the biopsy procedure, as the pleura was markedly edematous. The biopsy specimens were nonspecific and the cause of the effusion remained unclear. This phenomenon, which we termed "goose-skin" pleura, showed that the origin of the pleural effusion formed was the parietal pleura, for unknown causes.

  19. Moderate acute pancreatitis with pleural effusion and impaired kidney functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lumbantoruan, O. H.; Dairi, L. B.

    2018-03-01

    Acute pancreatitis is a pancreatic inflammatory reaction that is clinically characterized by acute abdominal pain accompanied by elevated amylase and lipase enzymes. A 57-year-old female patient came to the emergency department with the main complaint of localized pain in the epigastric region within the last three days. Blood pressure 130/90mmHg, pulse 90x/i, RR 20x/i, temperature 37°C, sub-icteric on the eyes and tenderness in the epigastric region. Laboratory findings were leukocytosis, increased amylase, and lipase, elevated liver enzymes, hypoalbuminemia, elevated Kidney Functions, acidosis, and hypoglycemia. Abdominal CT-Scan revealed a partially lobulated edge with solid and necrotic components of the caput pancreas and widespread suspicion to the pancreatic corpus. The mass appeared to cause widening of the biliary and intrahepatic systems with minimal right pleural effusion. The liverwas slightly enlarged. The patient was with acute pancreatitis and treated with the installation of an open nasogastric tube, and resuscitated with ringer lactate fluid followed by IVFD D5%. Patients fasted for three days before giving a low fat, protein diet, antibiotic and proton pump inhibitors for seven days. After nine days, amylase and lipase levels decreased with significant clinical improvement. The next three days, the patient was discharged.

  20. Dasatinib-induced pleural effusion: Chylothorax, an option to consider

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    Lucia Ferreiro

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Dasatinib is a drug for treatment of oncogene fusion protein BCR-ABL-positive chronic myeloid leukemia and Philadelphia chromosome-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia resistant/intolerant to imatinib. Pleural effusion (PE is a common adverse effect, and in this context, we present four cases seen due to this cause. One of them is a chylothorax. The PE grade is variable, and the physiopathology is not well established, although a block in T-lymphocyte function or inhibition of platelet-derived growth factor receptor-β is suggested being involved. The PE is generally a lymphocyte-predominant exudate, but can also present as chylothorax. Several factors have been associated with its appearance, particularly the administration in two daily doses. Low grade (1–2 PEs usually respond well to interrupt the treatment while those of higher grade may also require therapeutic thoracentesis and corticosteroids. There are currently no firm guidelines that establish when to resort to one form of treatment or another.

  1. MEDIASTINAL SHIFT: A SIGN OF SIGNIFICANT CLINICAL AND RADIOLOGICAL IMPORTANCE IN DIAGNOSIS OF MALIGNANT PLEURAL EFFUSION

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    R Khajotia

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Mediastinal shift (upper and lower is a clinical and radiologicalmarker of significant importance, which at times helps todetermine the aetiological cause of the underlying pathology.Tracheal shift is an indicator of upper mediastinal shift, whilea shift in the position of the heart indicates a lower mediastinalshift. Since the pleural cavity is confined by the rib cage, incase of a moderately large pleural effusion, the structures inthe thoracic cavity normally get ‘pushed’ to the opposite sideresulting in a shift of the upper and lower mediastinum. Thisis clinically and radiologically detected by a shift in the tracheaand heart to the side opposite to the pleural effusion. This iscommonly seen in pleural effusions resulting from tuberculosisor other infections. However, in some cases even a largepleural effusion fails to shift the mediastinum to the oppositeside. In fact, in some cases, the trachea and heart areobserved to be central or even shifted to the same side asthe effusion. This finding is of immense importance as it is aclinical indicator of a more serious condition which needsprompt diagnosis and urgent management. We report here,one such case of a middle-aged man who presented to theemergency department with complaints of increasingbreathlessness and whose clinical and radiological examinationrevealed a moderately large right-sided pleural effusion withthe trachea and heart also shifted to the right side.

  2. [Potential role of cholesterol in distinguishing malignant from benign pleural effusion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plavec, Goran; Tomić, Ilija; Nidzović, Natasa; Radojcić, Branko; Aćimović, Slobodan; Bokun, Radojka

    2004-01-01

    Cholesterol and carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) levels in pleural effusion and sera, were measured in 199 patients with pleural effusions of various origins. Malignant cause was found in 93, and nonmalignant in 106 patients. Mean cholesterol level in sera of patient with malignant disease was 5.0 +/- 0.93 mmol/L, and in nonmalignant group 4.34 +/- 1.32 mmol/L. The difference was not statistically significant. Mean cholesterol level in nonmalignant pleural effusions was higher thAn those in malignant (2.51 +/- 1.23 mmol/L; and 2.28 +/- 1.06 mmol/L), but the difference was also not significant. Average pleural fluid/serum cholesterol ratio (Holl/S) in nonmalignant group was 0.61 +/- 0.32 and in malignant group 0.46 +/- 0.22. The difference between those mean values was significant. Higher ratio, at the cut off value of 0.5 was found in 79/106 and in 25/93 malignant patients. Calculated sensitivity was 75%, specificity 73%, positive predictive value 76%, negative predictive value 65% and accuracy 69%. Significant negative correlation between Holi/S and pleural fluid CEA was found (p < 0.05). It was assumed that pleural fluid/serum cholesterol ratio lower than 0.5 could be of great benefit, as an additional test in the differentiation of malignant from benign pleural effusion.

  3. Potential role of cholesterol in distinguishing malignant from benign pleural effusion

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    Plavec Goran

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Cholesterol and carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA levels in pleural effusion and sera, were measured in 199 patients with pleural effusions of various origins. Malignant cause was found in 93, and nonmalignant in 106 patients. Mean cholesterol level in sera of patient with malignant disease was 5.0 ± 0.93mmol/L, and in nonmalignant group 4.34 ± 1.32 mmol/L. The difference was not statistically significant. Mean cholesterol level in nonmalignant pleural effusions was higher thAn those in malignant (2.51 ± 1.23 mmol/L; and 2.28 ± 1.06 mmol/L, but the difference was also not significant. Average pleural fluid/serum cholesterol ratio (HolI/S in nonmalignant group was 0.61 ± 0.32 and in malignant group 0.46 ± 0.22. The difference between those mean values was significant. Higher ratio, at the cut off value of 0.5 was found in 79/106 and in 25/93 malignant patients. Calculated sensitivity was 75%, specificity 73%, positive predictive value 76%, negative predictive value 65% and accuracy 69%. Significant negative correlation between Holi/S and pleural fluid CEA was found (p<0.05. It was assumed that pleural fluid/serum cholesterol ratio lower than 0,5 could be of great benefit, as an additional test in the differentiation of malignant from benign pleural effusion.

  4. Effect of using pump on postoperative pleural effusion in the patients that underwent CABG

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    Mehmet Özülkü

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective: The present study investigated effect of using pump on postoperative pleural effusion in patients who underwent coronary artery bypass grafting. Methods: A total of 256 patients who underwent isolated coronary artery bypass grafting surgery in the Cardiovascular Surgery clinic were enrolled in the study. Jostra-Cobe (Model 043213 105, VLC 865, Sweden heart-lung machine was used in on-pump coronary artery bypass grafting. Off-pump coronary artery bypass grafting was performed using Octopus and Starfish. Proximal anastomoses to the aorta in both on-pump and off-pump techniques were performed by side clamps. The patients were discharged from the hospital between postoperative day 6 and day 11. Results: The incidence of postoperative right pleural effusion and bilateral pleural effusion was found to be higher as a count in Group 1 (on-pump as compared to Group 2 (off-pump. But the difference was not statistically significant [P>0.05 for right pleural effusion (P=0.893, P>0.05 for bilateral pleural effusion (P=0.780]. Left pleural effusion was encountered to be lower in Group 2 (off-pump. The difference was found to be statistically significant (P<0.05, P=0.006. Conclusion: Under the light of these results, it can be said that left pleural effusion is less prevalent in the patients that underwent off-pump coronary artery bypass grafting when compared to the patients that underwent on-pump coronary artery bypass grafting.

  5. [Matrix metalloproteinases and their inhibitors in lung cancer with malignant pleural effusion].

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    Moche, M; Hui, D S C; Huse, K; Chan, K S; Choy, D K L; Scholz, G H; Gosse, H; Winkler, J; Schauer, J; Sack, U; Hoheisel, G

    2005-08-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMP) and tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMP) play a crucial role in physiological and pathological matrix turnover. This study aimed to determine the occurrence of MMP and TIMP in lung cancer patients with malignant pleural effusions (CA). MMP-1, MMP-2, MMP-3, MMP-8, MMP-9, TIMP-1, and IMP-2 oncentrations were determined by ELISA and zymography in pleural effusions and plasma of 31 CA and 14 congestive heart failure (CHF) patients and in plasma of 18 healthy controls (CON). MMP-2, TIMP-1, and TIMP-2 ELISA-concentrations were increased in CA pleural fluid vs. CA plasma (p < 0.005, p < 0.005, p < 0.05), in contrast to MMP-9 being higher in plasma (p < 0.005). Pleural fluid MMP-1 and MMP-8 were increased in CA vs. CHF (p < 0.05, p < 0.005). MMP and TIMP plasma concentrations were not different in CA vs. CHF, but MMP-9, TIMP-1, and TIMP-2 were increased vs. CON (p < 0.005, each). Gelatine zymography MMP-9/MMP-2 ratios were increased in CA plasma vs. effusion fluid (p < 0.005), in CA vs. CHF plasma, CA vs. CHF effusions (p < 0.005 each), and in CA vs. CON plasma (p < 0.05). MMP-2, TIMP-1, and TIMP-2 accumulate in the pleural compartment in CA and CHF, probably reflecting an unspecific pleural reaction. MMP-1 and MMP-8 are increased in cellular rich CA pleural effusions only. The determination of MMP-9/MMP-2 ratios in pleural fluid may contribute to differentiate CHF from CA effusions.

  6. Utility of adenosine deaminase (ADA), PCR & thoracoscopy in differentiating tuberculous & non-tuberculous pleural effusion complicating chronic kidney disease.

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    Kumar, Sravan; Agarwal, Ritesh; Bal, Amanjit; Sharma, Kusum; Singh, Navneet; Aggarwal, Ashutosh N; Verma, Indu; Rana, Satyawati V; Jha, Vivekanand

    2015-03-01

    Pleural effusion is a common occurrence in patients with late-stage chronic kidney disease (CKD). In developing countries, many effusions remain undiagnosed after pleural fluid analysis (PFA) and patients are empirically treated with antitubercular therapy. The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of adenosine deaminase (ADA), nucleic acid amplification tests (NAAT) and medical thoracoscopy in distinguishing tubercular and non-tubercular aetiologies in exudative pleural effusions complicating CKD. Consecutive stage 4 and 5 CKD patients with pleural effusions underwent PFA including ADA and PCR [65 kDa gene; multiplex (IS6110, protein antigen b, MPB64)]. Patients with exudative pleural effusion undiagnosed after PFA underwent medical thoracoscopy. All 107 patients underwent thoracocentesis with 45 and 62 patients diagnosed as transudative and exudative pleural effusions, respectively. Twenty six of the 62 patients underwent medical thoracoscopy. Tuberculous pleurisy was diagnosed in six while uraemic pleuritis was diagnosed in 20 subjects. The sensitivity and specificity of pleural fluid ADA, 65 kDa gene PCR, and multiplex PCR were 66.7 and 90 per cent, 100 and 50 per cent, and 100 and 100 per cent, respectively. Thoracoscopy was associated with five complications in three patients. Uraemia remains the most common cause of pleural effusion in CKD even in high TB prevalence country. Multiplex PCR and thoracoscopy are useful investigations in the diagnostic work-up of pleural effusions complicating CKD while the sensitivity and/or specificity of ADA and 65 kDa gene PCR is poor.

  7. A patient on RIPE therapy presenting with recurrent isoniazid-associated pleural effusions: a case report

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    Varenika Vanja

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction The clinical scenario of a new or worsening pleural effusion following the initiation of antituberculous therapy has been classically referred to as a 'paradoxical' pleural response, presumably explained by an immunological rebound phenomenon. Emerging evidence suggests that there also may be a role for a lupus-related reaction in the pathophysiology of this disorder. Case presentation An 84-year-old Asian man treated with isoniazid, along with rifampin, pyrazinamide and ethambutol for suspected extrapulmonary tuberculosis, presented with a recurrent pleural effusion, his third episode since the initiation of this therapy. The first effusion occurred one month after the start of treatment, without any prior evidence of pulmonary tuberculosis involvement. Follow-up testing, including thoracoscopic pleural biopsies, never confirmed tuberculosis infection. Further evaluation yielded serological evidence suggesting drug-induced lupus. No effusions recurred following the discontinuation of isoniazid, although other antituberculosis medications were continued. Conclusion The immunological rebound construct is inconsistent with the evolution of this case, which indicates rather that drug-induced lupus may explain at least some cases of new pleural effusions following the initiation of isoniazid.

  8. BMVC test, an improved fluorescence assay for detection of malignant pleural effusions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, I-Ting; Tsai, Yu-Lin; Kang, Chi-Chih; Huang, Wei-Chun; Wang, Chiung-Lin; Lin, Mei-Ying; Lou, Pei-Jen; Shih, Jin-Yuan; Wang, Hao-Chien; Wu, Huey-Dong; Tsai, Tzu-Hsiu; Jan, I-Shiow; Chang, Ta-Chau

    2014-01-01

    The diagnosis of malignant pleural effusions is an important issue in the management of malignancy patients. Generally, cytologic examination is a routine diagnostic technique. However, morphological interpretation of cytology is sometimes inconclusive. Here an ancillary method named BMVC test is developed for rapid detection of malignant pleural effusion to improve the diagnostic accuracy at low cost. A simple assay kit is designed to collect living cells from clinical pleural effusion and a fluorescence probe, 3,6-Bis(1-methyl-4-vinylpyridinium) carbazole diiodide (BMVC), is used to illuminate malignant cells. The fluorescence intensity is quantitatively analyzed by ImageJ program. This method yields digital numbers for the test results without any grey zone or ambiguities in the current cytology tests due to intra-observer and inter-observer variability. Comparing with results from double-blind cytologic examination, this simple test gives a good discrimination between malignant and benign specimens with sensitivity of 89.4% (42/47) and specificity of 93.3% (56/60) for diagnosis of malignant pleural effusion. BMVC test provides accurate results in a short time period, and the digital output could assist cytologic examination to become more objective and clear-cut. This is a convenient ancillary tool for detection of malignant pleural effusions

  9. Primary Sjögren's syndrome accompanied by pleural effusion: a case report and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Dedong; Lu, Hongxiu; Qu, Yiqing; Wang, Shanshan; Ying, Yangyang; Xiao, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Sjögren's syndrome (SS) is a systemic autoimmune disease characterized by the infiltration of lymphocytes in exocrine glands, specifically the salivary and lacrimal glands, resulting in the typical symptoms of xerophthalmia and xerostomia. SS may be accompanied by pleural effusion when the lung is involved, but this occurrence has been reported in only 10 cases in the literature. We report the case of a 42 year-old woman with severe bilateral pleural effusion for eight years. Primary Sjögren's Syndrome was finally diagnosed based on the presence of xerophthalmia and xerostomia, biopsy of the minor salivary glands, and positive anti-SS-A antibody in the serum and pleural effusion. Biopsy of the parietal pleura through video-assisted thoracoscopy revealed infiltration of lymphocytes. The patient had a long history of pleural effusion without clear etiology. Malignant disease was first suspected because of abnormal density lesion on the left lung and malignant cells found on cytology, but PET-CT revealed no malignant lesion. Examinations did not support infection, malignant tumor, pulmonary sarcoidosis, or other connective tissue diseases. This data could be useful for the future study of pleural effusion in SS.

  10. Mortality Following Catheter Drainage Versus Thoracentesis in Cirrhotic Patients with Pleural Effusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Tsung-Hsing; Tseng, Chih-Wei; Tsai, Chen-Chi; Hsieh, Yu-Hsi; Tseng, Kuo-Chih; Tsai, Chih-Chun

    2017-04-01

    Pleural effusion is an abnormal collection of body fluids that may cause related morbidity or mortality in cirrhotic patients. There are insufficient data to determine the optimal method of drainage, for symptomatic relief in cirrhotic patients with pleural effusion. In this study, we compare the mortality outcomes of catheter drainage versus thoracentesis in cirrhotic patients. The National Health Insurance Database, derived from the Taiwan National Health Insurance Program, was used to identify cirrhotic patients with pleural effusion requiring drainage between January 1, 2007, and December 31, 2010. In all, 2556 cirrhotic patients with pleural effusion were selected for the study and divided into the two groups (n = 1278/group) after propensity score matching. The mean age was 61.0 ± 14.3 years, and 68.9% (1761/2556) were men. The overall 30-day mortality was 21.0% (538/2556) and was higher in patients treated with catheter drainage than those treated with thoracentesis (23.5 vs. 18.6%, respectively, P pleural effusion requiring drainage, catheter drainage is associated with higher mortality compared to thoracentesis.

  11. The accuracy of chest sonography in the diagnosis of small pleural effusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kocijancic, I.

    2003-01-01

    Background. The aim of the study was to evaluate the accuracy of chest sonography in the radiological diagnosis of small pleural effusions. Patients and methods. Patients referred for abdominal and/or chest sonographies for various reasons were examined for sonographic features of pleural effusion. From January 1997 till January 2000, 69 patients were included into the study. Fifty-two patients were found to have pleural effusion not exceeding 15 mm in depth, the rest of them served as controls. Subsequently erect posteroanterior and expiratory lateral decubitus projections were done in all patients. Results. Compared to radiological examination chest sonography had a positive predictive value of 92% in the diagnosis of small pleural effusions in our study population. The mean thickness of fluid was 9.2 mm on ultrasonography and 7.6 mm on expiratory lateral decubitus views (P<0.01). Conclusions. Chest sonography showed a high degree of accuracy for demonstrating small pleural effusions and could replace lateral decubitus chest radiographs adequately. (author)

  12. Multivariate modelling with 1H NMR of pleural effusion in murine cerebral malaria

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    Ghosh Soumita

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cerebral malaria is a clinical manifestation of Plasmodium falciparum infection. Although brain damage is the predominant pathophysiological complication of cerebral malaria (CM, respiratory distress, acute lung injury, hydrothorax/pleural effusion are also observed in several cases. Immunological parameters have been assessed in pleural fluid in murine models; however there are no reports of characterization of metabolites present in pleural effusion. Methods 1H NMR of the sera and the pleural effusion of cerebral malaria infected mice were analyzed using principal component analysis, orthogonal partial least square analysis, multiway principal component analysis, and multivariate curve resolution. Results It has been observed that there was 100% occurrence of pleural effusion (PE in the mice affected with CM, as opposed to those are non-cerebral and succumbing to hyperparasitaemia (NCM/HP. An analysis of 1H NMR and SDS-PAGE profile of PE and serum samples of each of the CM mice exhibited a similar profile in terms of constituents. Multivariate analysis on these two classes of biofluids was performed and significant differences were detected in concentrations of metabolites. Glucose, creatine and glutamine contents were high in the PE and lipids being high in the sera. Multivariate curve resolution between sera and pleural effusion showed that changes in PE co-varied with that of serum in CM mice. The increase of glucose in PE is negatively correlated to the glucose in serum in CM as obtained from the result of multiway principal component analysis. Conclusions This study reports for the first time, the characterization of metabolites in pleural effusion formed during murine cerebral malaria. The study indicates that the origin of PE metabolites in murine CM may be the serum. The loss of the components like glucose, glutamine and creatine into the PE may worsen the situation of patients, in conjunction with the enhanced

  13. Proteomic profiling of human pleural effusion using two-dimensional nano liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyan, Yu-Chang; Wu, Hsin-Yi; Lai, Wu-Wei; Su, Wu-Chou; Liao, Pao-Chi

    2005-01-01

    Pleural effusion, an accumulation of pleural fluid, contains proteins originated from plasma filtrate and, especially when tissues are damaged, parenchyma interstitial spaces of lungs and/or other organs. This study details protein profiles in human pleural effusion from 43 lung adenocarcinoma patients by a two-dimensional nano-high performance liquid chromatography electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (2D nano-HPLC-ESI-MS/MS) system. The experimental results revealed the identification of 1415 unique proteins from human pleural effusion. Among these 124 proteins identified with higher confidence levels, some proteins have not been reported in plasma and may represent proteins specifically present in pleural effusion. These proteins are valuable for mass identification of differentially expressed proteins involved in proteomics database and screening biomarker to further study in human lung adenocarcinoma. The significance of the use of proteomics analysis of human pleural fluid for the search of new lung cancer marker proteins, and for their simultaneous display and analysis in patients suffering from lung disorders has been examined.

  14. Diagnostic Significance of Measuring Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor for the Differentiation between Malignant and Tuberculous Pleural Effusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hak-Ryul; Kim, Byoung-Ryun; Park, Rae-Kil; Yoon, Kwon-Ha; Jeong, Eun-Taik; Hwang, Ki-Eun

    2017-06-01

    Malignancy and tuberculosis are common causes of lymphocytic exudative pleural effusion. However, it is occasionally difficult to differentiate malignant pleural effusion from tuberculous pleural effusion. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is a critical cytokine in the pathogenesis of malignant pleural effusion. Endocan is a dermatan sulfate proteoglycan that is secreted by endothelial cells. Importantly, endocan mediates the vascular growth-promoting action of VEGF. The aim of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic significance of VEGF and endocan in pleural effusion. We thus measured the levels of VEGF and endocan in the pleural effusion and serum samples of patients with lung cancer (n = 59) and those with tuberculosis (n = 32) by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Lung cancer included 40 cases of adenocarcinoma, 13 of squamous cell carcinoma, and 6 of small cell carcinoma. Pleural effusion VEGF levels were significantly higher in the malignant group than in the tuberculosis group (2,091.47 ± 1,624.80 pg/mL vs. 1,291.05 ± 1,100.53 pg/mL, P pleural effusion endocan levels were similar between the two groups (1.22 ± 0.74 ng/mL vs. 0.87 ± 0.53 ng/mL). The areas under the curve of VEGF and endocan were 0.73 and 0.52, respectively. Notably, the VEGF levels were similar in malignant pleural effusion, irrespective of the histological type of lung cancer. Moreover, no significant difference was found in the serum VEGF and endocan levels between patients with lung cancer and those with tuberculosis. In conclusion, high VEGF levels in pleural effusion are suggestive of malignant pleural effusion.

  15. The result analysis of 18F-FDG imaging in suspected malignant pleural effusion or atelectasis on CT scanning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Huoqiang; Wu Jiyong; Pan Huizhong; Liu Jinjun; Zhao Xianguo

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To determine the ability of 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) dual-head tomography with coincidence (DHTC) imaging in detecting lung cancer in patients with suspected malignant pleural effusion or malignant atelectasis on CT scanning and to differentiate benign and malignant pleural effusions in patients with lung cancer. Methods: One hundred and ten patients with suspected malignant pleural effusion (n=84) or atelectasis (n=26) but without primary lesions in the lungs on CT scanning underwent 18 F-FDG DHTC. Results: Thirty-eight of 110 patients were proven with lung cancer. Among the 38 lung cancer patients, 30 of them had pleural effusion and 8 of them had atelectasis. Seventy-two of 110 patients were proven with benign lung diseases. The sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of 18 F-FDG DHTC for detecting lung cancer in patients with suspected malignant pleural effusion or atelectasis were 97%, 78% and 85%, respectively. In 30 patients with lung cancer plus pleural effusion, 18 F-FDG DHTC correctly detected the presence of malignant pleural effusion and malignant pleural metastatic involvement in 18 of 21 patients and excluded malignant pleural effusion or pleural metastatic involvement in 8 of 9 patients (sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of 86%, 8/9 and 87%, respectively). Conclusion: 18 F-FDG DHTC imaging is a highly accurate and reliable noninvasive test for detecting primary malignant lesions in lung in patients with pleural effusion or atelectasis findings on CT scanning and is useful to differentiate malignant from benign pleural effusion in patients with lung cancer. (authors)

  16. The long-term outcomes of cirrhotic patients with pleural effusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Tsung-Hsing; Tseng, Chih-Wei; Tsai, Chih-Chun; Tsai, Chen-Chi; Tseng, Kuo-Chih; Hsieh, Yu-Hsi

    2018-01-01

    Background/Aim: A pleural effusion is an abnormal collection of fluid in the pleural space and may cause related morbidity or mortality in cirrhotic patients. Currently, there are insufficient data to support the long-term prognosis for cirrhotic patients with pleural effusion. In this study, we investigated the short- and long-term effects of pleural effusion on mortality in cirrhotic patients and evaluated the benefit of liver transplantation in these patients. Patients and Methods: The National Health Insurance Database, derived from the Taiwan National Health Insurance Program, was used to identify 3,487 cirrhotic patients with pleural effusion requiring drainage between January 1, 2007 and December 31, 2010. The proportional hazards Cox regression model was used to control for possible confounding factors. Results: The 30-day, 90-day, 1-year, and 3-year mortalities were 20.1%, 40.2%, 59.1%, and 75.9%, respectively, in the cirrhotic patients with pleural effusion. After Cox proportional hazard regression analysis adjusted by patient gender, age, complications of cirrhosis and comorbid disorders, old age, esophageal variceal bleeding, hepatocellular carcinoma, hepatic encephalopathy, pneumonia, renal function impairment, and without liver transplantation conferred higher risks for 3-year mortality in the cirrhotic patients with pleura effusion. Liver transplantation is the most important factor to determine the 3-year mortalities (HR: 0.17, 95% CI 0.11- 0.26, P effusion predicts poor long-term outcomes. Liver transplantation could dramatically improve the survival and should be suggested as soon as possible. PMID:29451184

  17. Diagnostic value of eosinophils in pleural effusion: a prospective study of 26 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthai, Smita Mary; Kini, Usha

    2003-02-01

    Eosinophilic pleural effusions (EPFs), defined as the presence of 10% or more eosinophils in the pleural fluid, are relatively rare. Their diagnostic and prognostic significance, however, remains controversial, as most of the studies are based almost entirely on retrospective case studies. This prospective study examines 26 eosinophilic pleural effusions from among 444 consecutive pleural effusions investigated at this tertiary health care center from October 1999 to April 2002. This study was attempted to unravel the diagnostic and prognostic significance of these eosinophilic effusions and assess their clinical implications, if any. Koss and Light's criteria were applied in the analysis, which comprised macroscopic, biochemical, cytological, and microbiological examinations. Of the 26 EPFs studied, five were associated with tuberculosis and three with metastatic disease. Nineteen patients had significant associated lymphocytosis. Twenty-four patients have been followed up and are in good health to date and have had no recurrence of effusion. Thus, EPF could be associated with inflammatory, benign, and malignant conditions. Hence, a closer search for a definite etiological agent is warranted in the setting of such an effusion, especially in populations endemic for tuberculosis, as in a developing country like India and in populations with a high prevalence of malignancy. Copyright 2003 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  18. EGFR mutations predict a favorable outcome for malignant pleural effusion of lung adenocarcinoma with Tarceva therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Haisheng; Wan, Yunyan; Tian, Guangyan; Liu, Qinghua; Kang, Yanmeng; Li, Yuye; Yao, Zhouhong; Lin, Dianjie

    2012-03-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the therapeutic effects and adverse reactions of Tarceva treatment for malignant pleural effusion (MPE) caused by metastatic lung adenocarcinomas. One hundred and twenty-eight patients who failed first-line chemotherapy drug treatment were divided into a mutation and a non-mutation group according to the presence or absence of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations. Each patient received closed drainage combined with simple negative pressure suction after thoracoscopic talc poudrage pleurodesis and oral Tarceva treatment. Short-term and long-term clinical therapeutic effects of Tarceva were evaluated. The EGFR mutation rate in pleural metastatic tissues of lung adenocarcinoma acquired through video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery was higher compared to that in surgical resection specimens, plasma specimens and pleural effusion specimens compared to previously reported results. There were significant statistical differences in the average extubation time (ppleural effusion (ppleural effusion 4 weeks after surgery (ppleural hypertrophy in the mutation group was significantly higher compared to the non-mutation group (ppleural hypertrophy was significantly reduced (ppleural effusion of lung adenocarcinoma with Tarceva therapy. Detection of EGFR mutations may determine the responsiveness of malignant pleural effusion to Tarceva treatment.

  19. Pleural sarcoidosis diagnosed on the basis of an increased CD4/CD8 lymphocyte ratio in pleural effusion fluid: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumagai, Toru; Tomita, Yasuhiko; Inoue, Takako; Uchida, Junji; Nishino, Kazumi; Imamura, Fumio

    2015-08-14

    Pleural effusion induced by sarcoidosis is rare, and pleural sarcoidosis is often diagnosed by thoracoscopic surgery. The diagnosis of pleural sarcoidosis using thoracentesis may be less invasive when sarcoidosis is already diagnosed histologically in more than one organ specimen. Here we report the case of a 64-year-old woman with pleural sarcoidosis diagnosed on the basis of an increased CD4/CD8 lymphocyte ratio in pleural effusion fluid obtained by thoracentesis. This case report is important because it highlights the usefulness of the CD4/CD8 lymphocyte ratio in pleural effusion as an indicator of pleural involvement of sarcoidosis. A 64-year-old Japanese woman visited our hospital with an initial symptom of dyspnea on exertion for a period of 4 months. Chest computed tomography showed bilateral hilar and multiple mediastinal lymphadenopathy, multiple small nodular shadows in her bilateral lungs, small nodular shadows along the interlobar pleura, and bilateral pleural effusion. Her serum angiotensin-converting enzyme and soluble interleukin-2 receptor levels were elevated. Histological analysis of a resected subcutaneous nodule, and biopsy specimens from a right mediastinal lymph node and from her right lung revealed non-caseous epithelioid granulomas. Her bronchoalveolar lavage fluid exhibited a predominance of lymphocytes together with an increase in the CD4/CD8 lymphocyte ratio. The lymphocytic predominance and the increased CD4/CD8 lymphocyte ratio were also detected in the right-sided pleural effusion fluid obtained by thoracentesis. We diagnosed sarcoidosis with pleural involvement. Because pleural effusion did not resolve spontaneously and her symptom of dyspnea on exertion worsened, corticosteroid therapy was initiated, which ameliorated the sarcoidosis and the pleuritis. Analysis of the CD4/CD8 lymphocyte ratio in pleural effusion fluid obtained by thoracentesis may be helpful for the diagnosis of pleural sarcoidosis when the diagnosis is already made

  20. Clinical value of jointly detection serum lactate dehydrogenase/pleural fluid adenosine deaminase and pleural fluid carcinoembryonic antigen in the identification of malignant pleural effusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Fan; Hu, Lijuan; Wang, Junjun; Chen, Jian; Chen, Jie; Wang, Yumin

    2017-09-01

    Limited data are available for the diagnostic value, and for the diagnostic sensitivity and specificity of joint detection of serum lactate dehydrogenase (sLDH)/pleural fluid adenosine deaminase (pADA) and pleural fluid carcinoembryonic antigen (pCEA) in malignant pleural effusion (MPE). We collected 987 pleural effusion specimens (of which 318 were malignant pleural effusion, 374 were tubercular pleural effusion, and 295 were parapneumonic effusion specimens) from the First Affiliated Hospital of Wenzhou Medical University from July 2012 to March 2016. The pADA, sLDH, pleural fluid LDH (pLDH), serum C-reactive protein (sCRP), pleural fluid protein, pCEA, white blood cell (WBC), and red blood cell (RBC) were analyzed, and the clinical data of each group were collected for statistical analysis. The level of sLDH/pADA, pCEA, and RBC from the MPE group was markedly higher than the tuberculosis pleural effusion (TB) group (Mann-Whitney U=28422.000, 9278.000, 30518, P=.000, .000, .000) and the parapneumonic pleural fluid group (Mann-Whitney U=5972.500, 7113.000, 36750.500, P=.000, .000, .000). The receiver operating characteristic curve ROC showed that the area under the ROC curve (AUC) (=0.924, 0.841) of pCEA and sLDH/pADA (cutoff=4.9, 10.6) were significantly higher than other markers for the diagnosis of MPE. Thus, joint detection of pCEA and sLDH/pADA suggested that the sensitivity, specificity, and AUC was 0.94, 81.70, and 94.32 at the cutoff 0.16 and diagnostic performance was higher than pCEA or sLDH/pADA. Joint detection of sLDH/pADA and pCEA can be used as a good indicator for the identification of benign and MPE with higher sensitivity and specificity than pCEA or sLDH/pADA. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Differential diagnosis between benign and malignant pleural effusion with dual-energy spectral CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xirong; Duan, Haifeng; Yu, Yong; Ma, Chunling; Ren, Zhanli; Lei, Yuxin; He, Taiping; Zhang, Ming

    2018-01-01

    To investigate the value of spectral CT in the differential diagnosis of benign from malignant pleural effusion. 14 patients with benign pleural effusion and 15 patients with malignant pleural effusion underwent non-contrast spectral CT imaging. These patients were later verified by the combination of disease history, clinical signs and other information with the consensus of surgeons and radiologists. Various Spectral CT image parameters measured for the effusion were as follows: CT numbers of the polychromatic 140kVp images, monochromatic images at 40keV and 100keV, the material density contents from the water, fat and blood-based material decomposition images, the effective atomic number and the spectral curve slope. These values were statistically compared with t test and logistic regression analysis between benign and malignant pleural effusion. The CT value of benign and malignant pleural effusion in the polychromatic 140kVp images showed no differences (12.61±3.39HU vs. 14.71±5.03HU) (P>0.05), however, they were statistically different on the monochromatic images at 40keV (43.15±3.79 vs. 39.42±2.60, p = 0.005) and 100keV (9.11±1.38 vs. 6.52±2.04, p<0.001). There was difference in the effective atomic number value between the benign (7.87±0.08) and malignant pleural effusion (7.90±0.02) (P = 0.02). Using 6.32HU as the threshold for CT value measurement at 100keV, one could obtain sensitivity of 100% and specificity of 66.7% with area-under-curve of 0.843 for differentiating benign from malignant effusion. In addition, age and disease history were potential confounding factors for differentiating malignant pleural effusion from benign, since the older age (61.13±12.51 year-old vs48.57±12.33 year-old) as well as longer disease history (70.00±49.28 day vs.28.36±21.64 day) were more easily to be found in the malignant pleural effusion group than those in the benign pleural effusion group. By combining above five factors, one could obtain sensitivity

  2. Detection of EpCAM-positive microparticles in pleural fluid: A new approach to mini-invasively identify patients with malignant pleural effusions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roca, Elisa; Lacroix, Romaric; Judicone, Coralie; Laroumagne, Sophie; Robert, Stéphane; Cointe, Sylvie; Muller, Alexandre; Kaspi, Elise; Roll, Patrice; Brisson, Alain R; Tantucci, Claudio; Astoul, Philippe; Dignat-George, Françoise

    2016-01-19

    Pleural biomarkers allowing to mini-invasively discriminate benign from malignant pleural effusions are needed. Among potential candidates, microparticles (MPs) are extracellular vesicles that vectorize antigen derived from the parent cell. We hypothesized that tumor-derived MPs could be present in the pleural liquid and help to identify patients with malignant pleural effusions. Using highly sensitive flow cytometry and cryo-electron microscopy, we showed that large amounts of MPs from hematopoïetic and vascular origin could be detectable in pleural fluids. Their level did not differ between benign (n = 14) and malignant (n = 71) pleural effusions. Analysis of selected tumoral associated antigens (podoplanin, mucin 1 and EpCAM, epithelial-cell-adhesion-molecule) evidenced for the first time the presence of tumor-derived MPs expressing EpCAM in malignant pleural fluids only (Specificity = 93%, Sensitivity = 49% and 45% for flow cytometry and ELISA, respectively). The detection of EpCAM-positive-MPs (EpCAM + MPs) by flow cytometry showed a better specificity and sensitivity than ELISA to distinguish between pleural carcinoma and the others malignant pleural effusions (MPE; Sp: 96% vs 89%; Se: 79% vs 66%). Combining EpCAM+ MPs and cytology improved the diagnosis of MPE compared to cytology alone. This study establishes the basis for using EpCAM+ MPs as a promising new biomarker that could be added to the armamentarium to mini-invasively identify patients with malignant pleural effusions.

  3. Drainage of pleural effusion improves diaphragmatic function in mechanically ventilated patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umbrello, Michele; Mistraletti, Giovanni; Galimberti, Andrea; Piva, Ilaria R; Cozzi, Ottavia; Formenti, Paolo

    2017-03-01

    Pleural effusion adversely affects the pressuregenerating capacity of the diaphragm. It uncouples the lung and chest wall, which may result in diaphragmatic dysfunction. Information on the effects of effusion drainage on diaphragmatic function is limited, but several studies report relief of dyspnoea after drainage, which was attributed to improved diaphragmatic mechanics, even if this issue was never formally addressed. To investigate the effect of drainage of unilateral pleural effusion on diaphragmatic function. In a prospective twostep protocol (at baseline and after drainage of effusion), we conducted a spontaneous breathing trial in fourteen critically ill, mechanically ventilated patients undergoing pressure support ventilation. We used ultrasonography of the ipsilateral hemidiaphragm to evaluate and record respiratory displacement and thickening during tidal and maximal breathing efforts. We recorded and analysed airway pressures, respiratory system compliance, vital capacity, indices of respiratory effort and arterial blood gases. After drainage of the effusion, the respiratory rate decreased and tidal volume increased, but haemodynamic parameters were unaffected and oxygenation levels showed a non-significant increase. Drainage was associated with significant decreases in indices of respiratory drive and the maximal pressure generated by the respiratory muscles, as well as an increased compliance of the respiratory system. Diaphragmatic displacement and thickening significantly increased after drainage. We found there was a significant correlation between the volume of the effusion drained and the increase in tidal diaphragmatic thickening. Drainage of a unilateral pleural effusion during weaning from mechanical ventilation improves diaphragmatic contractile activity and respiratory system performance.

  4. Thoraco-amniotic shunting for fetal pleural effusion--a case series.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Walsh, J

    2011-11-15

    Fetal pleural effusion is a rare occurrence, with an incidence of 1 per 10-15,000 pregnancies. The prognosis is related to the underlying cause and is often poor. There is increasing evidence that in utero therapy with thoraco-amniotic shunting improves prognosis by allowing lung expansion thereby preventing hydrops and pulmonary hypoplasia. This is a review of all cases of fetal pleural effusion managed over an eight year period the National Maternity Hospital Dublin. Over the nine year period there were 21 cases of fetal pleural effusion giving an overall incidence of 1 per 9281 deliveries. Of these, 15 underwent thoraco-amniotic shunting. There were associated anomalies diagnosed in 5 (33%) of cases. The overall survival in our cohort was 53%. The presence of hydrops was a poor prognostic factor, with survival in cases with hydrops of 33% (3\\/9) compared to 83% (5\\/6) in those cases without associated hydrops.

  5. Empyema Necessitans Complicating Pleural Effusion Associated with Proteus Species Infection: A Diagnostic Dilemma

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    M. S. Yauba

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Empyema necessitans, a rare complication of pleural effusion, could result in significant morbidity and mortality in children. It is characterized by the dissection of pus through the soft tissues and the skin of the chest wall. Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Actinomyces israelii are common causes but Gram negative bacilli could be a rare cause. However, there were challenges in differentiating between Mycobacterium tuberculosis and nontuberculous empyema in a resource poor setting like ours. We report a child with pleural effusion and empyema necessitans secondary to Proteus spp. infection. Methods. We describe a 12-year-old child with empyema necessitans complicating pleural effusion and highlight management challenges. Results. This case was treated with quinolones, antituberculous drugs, chest tube drainage, and nutritional rehabilitation. Conclusion. Empyema necessitatis is a rare condition that can be caused by Gram negative bacterial pathogens like Proteus species.

  6. [Pleuro-peritoneal shunt in a patient with intractable pleural effusion after cardiac surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuji, Maiko; Yamazaki, Takenori

    2014-10-01

    A 45-year-old man experienced dyspnea on effort and was hospitalized due to severe mitral valve regurgitation and atrial fibrillation. He also had alcoholic cirrhosis. After he was stabilized, mitral valve plasty and Maze procedure were performed. The postoperative clinical course was satisfactory. During the follow-up period, he began to suffer from persistent left pleural effusion, which amounted to about 2,500 to 3,000 ml, and required intercostal tube drainage weekly. Therefore a pleuro-peritoneal shunt was implanted. The pleural effusion decreased, and he obtained significant relief from dyspnea. After one year, we confirmed that pleural effusion had not reoccurred, and removed the pleuro-peritoneal shunt.

  7. Matrix metalloproteinase-9 and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 in diagnosis of pleural effusion of malignant origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorelli, Alfonso; Ricci, Serena; Feola, Antonia; Mazzella, Antonio; D'Angelo, Luigi; Santini, Mario; Di Domenico, Marina; Di Carlo, Angelina

    2016-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of matrix metalloproteinase-9 and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 in differentiating benign from malignant exudative pleural effusions. This is a unicentre observational study including 97 consecutive patients with exudative pleural effusions. Metalloproteinase-9, tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1, lactate dehydrogenase, ferritin, carcinoembryonic antigen and carbohydrate antigen 15-3 were measured in pleural effusion and serum by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The activity of metalloproteinase-9 was also evaluated by substrate zymography. The data were correlated with final diagnosis of pleural effusions to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy. Of the 97 eligible patients, 6 were excluded. Of the 91 patients included in the study, 70 had malignant pleural effusions and 21 had benign pleural effusions. Both in sera and pleural effusions, matrix metalloproteinase-9 (P effusion (P effusion metalloproteinase-9 and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 levels showed higher value of sensitivity (97 and 91%, respectively) and specificity (90 and 95%, respectively) compared with other standard markers. Serum metalloproteinase-9 and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 levels showed similar results. Among 70 neoplastic patients, 29 had negative pleural cytology. Of these, 25 presented elevated levels of metalloproteinase-9 and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1, whereas 4 patients had elevated levels of one of the two markers. Our results showed that metalloproteinase-9 and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 might be valuable markers in differentiating benign from malignant pleural effusions. Their levels are neither influenced by the histology and tumour origin nor by the presence of tumour cells in pleural effusions. Thus, their use in clinical practice could help in the selection of patients needing more invasive procedures, such as thoracoscopic biopsy. © The Author 2016

  8. Drainage of pleural effusion in mechanically ventilated patients: time to measure chest wall compliance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Formenti, Paolo; Umbrello, Michele; Piva, Ilaria R; Mistraletti, Giovanni; Zaniboni, Matteo; Spanu, Paolo; Noto, Andrea; Marini, John J; Iapichino, Gaetano

    2014-10-01

    Pleural effusion (PE) is commonly encountered in mechanically ventilated, critically ill patients and is generally addressed with evacuation or by fluid displacement using increased airway pressure (P(AW)). However, except when massive or infected, clear evidence is lacking to guide its management. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of recruitment maneuvers and drainage of unilateral PE on respiratory mechanics, gas exchange, and lung volume. Fifteen critically ill and mechanically ventilated patients with unilateral PE were enrolled. A 3-step protocol (baseline, recruitment, and effusion drainage) was applied to patients with more than 400 mL of PE, as estimated by chest ultrasound. Predefined subgroup analysis compared patients with normal vs reduced chest wall compliance (C(CW)). Esophageal and P(AW)s, respiratory system, lung and C(CW)s, arterial blood gases, and end-expiratory lung volumes were recorded. In the whole case mix, neither recruitment nor drainage improved gas exchange, lung volume, or tidal mechanics. When C(CW) was normal, recruitment improved lung compliance (81.9 [64.8-104.1] vs 103.7 [91.5-111.7] mL/cm H2O, P drainage had no significant effect on total respiratory system mechanics or gas exchange, although it measurably increased lung volume (1717 vs 2150 mL, P drainage improved respiratory system and C(CW)s as well as lung volume (42.7 [38.9-50.0] vs 47.0 [43.8-63.3], P Drainage of a moderate-sized effusion should not be routinely performed in unselected population of critically ill patients. We suggest that measurement of C(CW) may help in the decision-making process. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Tuberculous pleural effusion – relapse or re-infection? Follow up of a case report and review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tahziba Hussain

    2016-10-01

    This condition carries good prognosis, if promptly diagnosed and treated. A reasonable management strategy for pleural TB would be to initiate a four-drug regimen and perform a therapeutic thoracocentesis in patients with large, symptomatic effusions. Prolonged follow-up is essential in cases of pleural effusion, as in the presented case.

  10. Beta-trace protein in ascites and pleural effusions: limits of CSF leakage detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietzel, Joanna; Krebs, Alexander; Böttcher, Dominique; Sieb, Manuela; Glocker, Michael O; Lüdemann, Jan; Roser, Markus; Dressel, Alexander

    2012-06-10

    Rhino- and/or otoliquorrhea can be diagnosed by detecting beta-trace protein (β-TP) in nasal or ear secretions, as β-TP is found in high concentrations in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) but not in serum. CSF fistulae following trauma or surgery can also occur at other anatomical sites, resulting in CSF leakage into the thoracic and abdominal cavities. By analogy, determination of ß-TP has also been used to diagnose CSF admixture in pleural effusions and ascites. However, no systematic study has yet evaluated the concentrations of β-TP in such fluids in the absence of CSF. To determine the validity of β-TP determination as a marker for the presence of CSF, we investigated β-TP concentrations in pleural effusions and ascites without CSF admixture. Patients from whom samples of ascites or pleural effusion and a paired plasma sample were available were investigated. One hundred sixty-four patients were prospectively recruited. ß-TP concentrations were determined by nephelometry. Mass spectrometric proteome analysis confirmed the presence of ß-TP in the samples. Median β-TP concentrations detected in ascites and pleural effusions (range, 0.014-26.5 mg/L, median 2.29 mg/L) exceeded the corresponding plasma concentrations 2.6-fold. According to cutoffs published to diagnose rhino- and otoliquorrhea, between 6.1% and 95.7% of the specimens would have been erroneously rated CSF-positive. Protein analysis confirmed the presence of β-TP in pleural effusion and ascites. Ascites and pleural effusion contain high concentrations of β-TP that exceed the levels in corresponding plasma. Therefore, β-TP is not a specific marker for the presence of CSF in these fluids.

  11. Chemical pleurodesis using mistletoe extracts via spray catheter during medical thoracoscopy for management of malignant pleural effusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eom, Jung Seop; Kim, Tae Hwa; Lee, Geewon; Ahn, Hyo Yeong; Mok, Jeong Ha; Lee, Min Ki

    2017-05-01

    We present three cases of successful chemical pleurodesis with a liquid solution of mistletoe extract using a spray catheter during medical thoracoscopy. The medical thoracoscopy was performed in all presented cases to remove pleural effusion and conduct chemical pleurodesis to manage symptomatic malignant pleural effusion. A spray catheter was used to instil the mistletoe extract evenly into the pleural cavity, and there were no pleurodesis-related complications. Respiratory symptoms caused by pleural effusion improved after pleurodesis, and successful pleurodesis was maintained for more than 3 months after medical thoracoscopy in all three patients.

  12. Bilateral Pleural Effusion in a Patient with an Extensive Extramedullary Hematopoietic Mass

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    Yun Luo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a 56-year-old woman with bilateral pleural effusions, widespread enlarged lymph nodes, and soft tissue masses located within the renal pelvis. The initially working diagnosis was tuberculosis and lymphoma. Further pathological examination of the lymph node biopsy confirmed a diagnosis of extramedullary hematopoiesis, and a bone marrow biopsy revealed myelofibrosis. Unlike common treatment options such as radiotherapy and/or surgery, intrathoracic cisplatin and dexamethasone for the treatment of pleural effusions secondary to extramedullary hematopoiesis demonstrated an improvement in feasibility and efficacy in the present case.

  13. A Case of Hemophilia A Associated with Spontaneous Hemorrhagic Pleural Effusion and Intracranial Hem

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    Nuri Tutar

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Hemophilia A is a sex-linked recessive coagulation disorder almost exclusively occurring in male subjects and caused by a deficiency of factor VIII. It  is a rare disorder characterized by spontaneous hemorrhages. Spontaneous bleeding in the pleural space is very rare in hemophilia both in children and adults. Here in, we present the case of a 56-year-old hemophilia A patient with hemorrhagic pleural effusion and intracranial hematoma.

  14. Hemostatic findings of pleural fluid in dogs and the association between pleural effusions and primary hyperfibrino(geno)lysis: A cohort study of 99 dogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drigo, Michele; Piek, Christine J.; Simioni, Paolo; Caldin, Marco

    2018-01-01

    The primary objective of this study was to determine if activation of coagulation and fibrinolysis occurs in canine pleural effusions. Thirty-three dogs with pleural effusions of different origin were studied. Pleural effusion fibrinogen concentrations were significantly lower, while pleural fibrin-fibrinogen degradation products (FDPs) and D-dimer concentrations were significantly higher than those in plasma (P pleural fluids, there is evidence of coagulation activation and fibrinolysis. The secondary aims of the current study were to determine if primary hyperfibrinolysis ([PHF] i.e., elevated plasma FDPs with a normal D-dimer concentrations), occurs in dogs with pleural effusion, and whether the presence of a concurrent inflammatory process may have activated the hemostatic cascade, with its intrinsically linked secondary hyperfibrinolysis, masking the concurrent PHF. The previously 33 selected dogs with pleural effusion (group 1) were compared to two control groups of 33 healthy (group 2) and 33 sick dogs without pleural effusion (group 3). Serum fibrinogen, FDPs, D-dimer, C-reactive protein (CRP), fibrinogen/CRP ratio, and frequency of PHF were determined. Fibrinogen, FDPs, D-dimer and CRP concentrations in group 1 were significantly increased compared to group 2 (P pleural effusion compared to healthy dogs. Nevertheless, the decrease in the fibrinogen/CRP ratio in group 1 compared to group 3, considering the higher FDPs and similar D-dimer concentrations, would suggest that PHF is also more frequent in dogs with pleural effusion compared to sick control dogs, and that this phenomenon is hidden due to concurrent secondary hyperfibrinolysis. PMID:29462172

  15. Dose-Volume Histogram Parameters and Clinical Factors Associated With Pleural Effusion After Chemoradiotherapy in Esophageal Cancer Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shirai, Katsuyuki; Tamaki, Yoshio; Kitamoto, Yoshizumi; Murata, Kazutoshi; Satoh, Yumi; Higuchi, Keiko; Nonaka, Tetsuo; Ishikawa, Hitoshi; Katoh, Hiroyuki; Takahashi, Takeo; Nakano, Takashi

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the dose-volume histogram parameters and clinical factors as predictors of pleural effusion in esophageal cancer patients treated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CRT). Methods and Materials: Forty-three esophageal cancer patients treated with definitive CRT from January 2001 to March 2007 were reviewed retrospectively on the basis of the following criteria: pathologically confirmed esophageal cancer, available computed tomography scan for treatment planning, 6-month follow-up after CRT, and radiation dose ≥50 Gy. Exclusion criteria were lung metastasis, malignant pleural effusion, and surgery. Mean heart dose, mean total lung dose, and percentages of heart or total lung volume receiving ≥10-60 Gy (Heart-V 10 to V 60 and Lung-V 10 to V 60 , respectively) were analyzed in relation to pleural effusion. Results: The median follow-up time was 26.9 months (range, 6.7-70.2) after CRT. Of the 43 patients, 15 (35%) developed pleural effusion. By univariate analysis, mean heart dose, Heart-V 10 to V 60 , and Lung-V 50 to V 60 were significantly associated with pleural effusion. Poor performance status, primary tumor of the distal esophagus, and age ≥65 years were significantly related with pleural effusion. Multivariate analysis identified Heart-V 50 as the strongest predictive factor for pleural effusion (p = 0.01). Patients with Heart-V 50 50 50 ≥40% had 6%, 44%, and 64% of pleural effusion, respectively (p 50 is a useful parameter for assessing the risk of pleural effusion and should be reduced to avoid pleural effusion.

  16. Metabolomic analysis based on 1H-nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy metabolic profiles in tuberculous, malignant and transudative pleural effusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Cheng; Peng, Jingjin; Kuang, Yanling; Zhang, Jiaqiang; Dai, Luming

    2017-01-01

    Pleural effusion is a common clinical manifestation with various causes. Current diagnostic and therapeutic methods have exhibited numerous limitations. By involving the analysis of dynamic changes in low molecular weight catabolites, metabolomics has been widely applied in various types of disease and have provided platforms to distinguish many novel biomarkers. However, to the best of our knowledge, there are few studies regarding the metabolic profiling for pleural effusion. In the current study, 58 pleural effusion samples were collected, among which 20 were malignant pleural effusions, 20 were tuberculous pleural effusions and 18 were transudative pleural effusions. The small molecule metabolite spectrums were obtained by adopting 1H nuclear magnetic resonance technology, and pattern-recognition multi-variable statistical analysis was used to screen out different metabolites. One-way analysis of variance, and Student-Newman-Keuls and the Kruskal-Wallis test were adopted for statistical analysis. Over 400 metabolites were identified in the untargeted metabolomic analysis and 26 metabolites were identified as significantly different among tuberculous, malignant and transudative pleural effusions. These metabolites were predominantly involved in the metabolic pathways of amino acids metabolism, glycometabolism and lipid metabolism. Statistical analysis revealed that eight metabolites contributed to the distinction between the three groups: Tuberculous, malignant and transudative pleural effusion. In the current study, the feasibility of identifying small molecule biochemical profiles in different types of pleural effusion were investigated reveal novel biological insights into the underlying mechanisms. The results provide specific insights into the biology of tubercular, malignant and transudative pleural effusion and may offer novel strategies for the diagnosis and therapy of associated diseases, including tuberculosis, advanced lung cancer and congestive heart

  17. Chemical pleurodesis using mistletoe extracts via spray catheter during medical thoracoscopy for management of malignant pleural effusion

    OpenAIRE

    Eom, Jung Seop; Kim, Tae Hwa; Lee, Geewon; Ahn, Hyo Yeong; Mok, Jeong Ha; Lee, Min Ki

    2017-01-01

    We present three cases of successful chemical pleurodesis with a liquid solution of mistletoe extract using a spray catheter during medical thoracoscopy. The medical thoracoscopy was performed in all presented cases to remove pleural effusion and conduct chemical pleurodesis to manage symptomatic malignant pleural effusion. A spray catheter was used to instil the mistletoe extract evenly into the pleural cavity, and there were no pleurodesis?related complications. Respiratory symptoms caused ...

  18. [Evaluation of the diagnosis value of carcinoembryonic antigen in malignant pleural effusion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Y X; Tong, Z H; Zhou, X X; Liang, L R; Wang, Z; Xu, L L; Wang, X J; Wu, Y B; Li, H J; Lu, Z

    2018-02-06

    Objective: To investigate the diagnostic value of serum and pleural fluid carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) for malignant pleural effusion (MPE). Methods: The concentration of CEA in serum and pleural fluid of 286 patients with the diagnosis confirmed by pleural biopsy through medical thoracoscopy were retrospectively analyzed. MPE was confirmed in 171 cases which were divided into two groups (adenocarcinoma group with 121cases and non-adenocarcinoma group with 50 cases) and benign pleural effusion in 115 cases. The optimal cutoff for MPE and MPE caused by adenocarcinoma were determined by using the ROC curve. Results: The concentration of serum CEA 12.27(3.80, 58.45) μg/L was significantly higher in MPE caused by adenocarcinoma than that of non-adenocarcinoma 1.91(1.08, 4.55) μg/L and benign effusion 1.32(0.86, 2.27) μg/L (both P value of serum and pleural fluid CEA for MPE was 3.10 and 5.83 μg/L, the sensitivity respectively was 67.3% and 74.3%, the specificity respectively was 87.8% and 98.3%, positive predictive value respectively was 89.2% and 98.5%, negative predictive value respectively was 64.3% and 72.0%. The cutoff value of serum and pleural fluid CEA for MPE caused by adenocarcinoma was 3.54 and 7.30 μg/L, the sensitivity respectively was 76.0% and 91.7%, the specificity respectively was 74.0% and 72.0%, positive predictive value respectively was 87.6% and 88.8%, negative predictive value respectively was 56.1% and 78.3%. Conclusions: The concentration of serum and pleural fluid CEA have diagnostic significance to MPE, especially MPE caused by adenocarcinoma. The diagnostic value of pleural fluid CEA is superior to serum CEA.

  19. Clinical value of FDG dual-head tomography with coincidence imaging in suspected malignant pleural effusion or atelectasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Huoqiang; Wu Jiyang; Pan Huizhong; Liu Jinjun; Shen Yi; Zhao Xianguo

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To determine the ability of 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) dual-head tomography with coincidence (DHTC) imaging in detecting lung cancer in patients with suspected malignant pleural effusion or malignant atelectasis on CT scanning. On the other hand, used FDG DHTC to differentiate benign and malignant pleural effusions in patients with lung cancer. Methods: Over a 4-year period, 110 patients with abnormal findings on CT scanning for presence of pleural effusion (n=84) and/or pleural thickening or mediastinal lymph nodes enlargement, or presence of atelectasis (n-26). All patients were suspected malignant pleural effusion or atelectasis caused by lung cancer. But all of them could not found primary lesions in the lungs on CT scanning. FDG DHTC was underwent for all the patients. Imagings were visually analyzed by two experienced observers. They were considered positive if the FDG uptake was increased relative to that in the adjacent lung tissue, and the uptake appeared localized pattern. They were considered negative if the uptake was the same as or less than the adjacent lung tissue, and/or the uptake appeared diffused pattern. Results of FDG DHTC were correlated with pathologic diagnosis for lung cancer. In these patients with proven lung cancer and a suspected malignant pleural effusion, FDG DHTC revealed positive findings (malignant pleural effusion) if pleural activity was greater than background mediastinal activity; or FDG DHTC revealed negative findings (benign pleural effusion) if pleural activity was the same or less than background mediastinal activity. Results of FDG DHTC were compared to pleural cytology, histologic findings of pleural biopsy, or clinical follow-up for presence or absence of malignant pleural effusion. Results: 38 of 110 patients were proven with lung cancer. Among the 38 lung cancer patients, 30 of them had a pleural effusion and 8 of them had a atelectasis. 72 of 110 patients were proven with lung benign diseases (50 with

  20. A New, Simple Method for Estimating Pleural Effusion Size on CT Scans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moy, Matthew P.; Berko, Netanel S.; Godelman, Alla; Jain, Vineet R.; Haramati, Linda B.

    2013-01-01

    Background: There is no standardized system to grade pleural effusion size on CT scans. A validated, systematic grading system would improve communication of findings and may help determine the need for imaging guidance for thoracentesis. Methods: CT scans of 34 patients demonstrating a wide range of pleural effusion sizes were measured with a volume segmentation tool and reviewed for qualitative and simple quantitative features related to size. A classification rule was developed using the features that best predicted size and distinguished among small, moderate, and large effusions. Inter-reader agreement for effusion size was assessed on the CT scans for three groups of physicians (radiology residents, pulmonologists, and cardiothoracic radiologists) before and after implementation of the classification rule. Results: The CT imaging features found to best classify effusions as small, moderate, or large were anteroposterior (AP) quartile and maximum AP depth measured at the midclavicular line. According to the decision rule, first AP-quartile effusions are small, second AP-quartile effusions are moderate, and third or fourth AP-quartile effusions are large. In borderline cases, AP depth is measured with 3-cm and 10-cm thresholds for the upper limit of small and moderate, respectively. Use of the rule improved interobserver agreement from κ = 0.56 to 0.79 for all physicians, 0.59 to 0.73 for radiology residents, 0.54 to 0.76 for pulmonologists, and 0.74 to 0.85 for cardiothoracic radiologists. Conclusions: A simple, two-step decision rule for sizing pleural effusions on CT scans improves interobserver agreement from moderate to substantial levels. PMID:23632863

  1. Quantitative evaluation of changes in pleural effusion using digital images of the chest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishiike, Shigeaki; Fujimura, Ichiro; Sagara, Kenji; Sakashita, Keiji

    2000-01-01

    Exposure data recognition (EDR) is a function of FCR that automatically determines the optimal density of images. This function makes it difficult to evaluate changes in pleural effusion on sequential chest CR. We developed a method to quantify the amount of pleural effusion using the digital value and S value of chest CR. We evaluated the efficacy of the method to quantify the amount of pleural effusion using these values of chest CR in clinical settings. The study period was from December 1996 to January 1999. Study 1: Chest CR was carried out before and after pleural cavity drainage in 70 cases. The volume calculated with the method using the digital value and S value of CR [x(ml)] was compared with the drained volume [y1] on both sides. Study 2: Change in pleural effusion was estimated with a method using CT (y2) and with the method using the digital value and S value of CR (x). The relationship of these two data was investigated. Study 1: The regression equations between x and y1 were y1=1.05x+21.1 (r 2 =0.89) on the right side and y1=0.95x+69.7 (r 2 =0.68) on the left side. Study 2: The regression equations between x and y2 were y2=0.75x-1.88 (r 2 =0.70) on the right side and y2=0.87x-1.27 (r 2 =0.65) on the left side. The method using the digital value and S value of CR was effective for quantifying changes in pleural effusion. (author)

  2. Effects of pleural effusion drainage on oxygenation, respiratory mechanics, and hemodynamics in mechanically ventilated patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razazi, Keyvan; Thille, Arnaud W; Carteaux, Guillaume; Beji, Olfa; Brun-Buisson, Christian; Brochard, Laurent; Mekontso Dessap, Armand

    2014-09-01

    In mechanically ventilated patients, the effect of draining pleural effusion on oxygenation is controversial. We investigated the effect of large pleural effusion drainage on oxygenation, respiratory function (including lung volumes), and hemodynamics in mechanically ventilated patients after ultrasound-guided drainage. Arterial blood gases, respiratory mechanics (airway, pleural and transpulmonary pressures, end-expiratory lung volume, respiratory system compliance and resistance), and hemodynamics (blood pressure, heart rate, and cardiac output) were recorded before and at 3 and 24 hours (H24) after pleural drainage. The respiratory settings were kept identical during the study period. The mean volume of effusion drained was 1,579 ± 684 ml at H24. Uncomplicated pneumothorax occurred in two patients. Respiratory mechanics significantly improved after drainage, with a decrease in plateau pressure and a large increase in end-expiratory transpulmonary pressure. Respiratory system compliance, end-expiratory lung volume, and PaO2/FiO2 ratio all improved. Hemodynamics were not influenced by drainage. Improvement in the PaO2/FiO2 ratio from baseline to H24 was positively correlated with the increase in end-expiratory lung volume during the same time frame (r = 0.52, P = 0.033), but not with drained volume. A high value of pleural pressure or a highly negative transpulmonary pressure at baseline predicted limited lung expansion following effusion drainage. A lesser improvement in oxygenation occurred in patients with ARDS. Drainage of large (≥500 ml) pleural effusion in mechanically ventilated patients improves oxygenation and end-expiratory lung volume. Oxygenation improvement correlated with an increase in lung volume and a decrease in transpulmonary pressure, but was less so in patients with ARDS.

  3. Novel use of pleural ultrasound can identify malignant entrapped lung prior to effusion drainage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salamonsen, Matthew R; Lo, Ada K C; Ng, Arnold C T; Bashirzadeh, Farzad; Wang, William Y S; Fielding, David I K

    2014-11-01

    The presence of entrapped lung changes the appropriate management of malignant pleural effusion from pleurodesis to insertion of an indwelling pleural catheter. No methods currently exist to identify entrapped lung prior to effusion drainage. Our objectives were to develop a method to identify entrapped lung using tissue movement and deformation (strain) analysis with ultrasonography and compare it to the existing technique of pleural elastance (PEL). Prior to drainage, 81 patients with suspected malignant pleural effusion underwent thoracic ultrasound using an echocardiogram machine. Images of the atelectatic lower lobe were acquired during breath hold, allowing motion and strain related to the cardiac impulse to be analyzed using motion mode (M mode) and speckle-tracking imaging, respectively. PEL was measured during effusion drainage. The gold-standard diagnosis of entrapped lung was the consensus opinion of two interventional pulmonologists according to postdrainage imaging. Participants were randomly divided into development and validation sets. Both total movement and strain were significantly reduced in entrapped lung. Using data from the development set, the area under the receiver-operating curves for the diagnosis of entrapped lung was 0.86 (speckle tracking), 0.79 (M mode), and 0.69 (PEL). Using respective cutoffs of 6%, 1 mm, and 19 cm H2O on the validation set, the sensitivity/specificity was 71%/85% (speckle tracking), 50%/85% (M mode), and 40%/100% (PEL). This novel ultrasound technique can identify entrapped lung prior to effusion drainage, which could allow appropriate choice of definitive management (pleurodesis vs indwelling catheter), reducing the number of interventions required to treat malignant pleural effusion.

  4. Diagnostic value of medical thoracoscopy in malignant pleural effusion induced by non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhen; Wu, Yan-Bing; Xu, Li-Li; Jin, Mu-Lan; Diao, Xiao-Li; Wang, Xiao-Juan; Tong, Zhao-Hui; Shi, Huan-Zhong

    2017-12-01

    Malignant pleural effusion (MPE) appears in up to 20% of patients with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL). The present study aimed to assess the efficacy of medical thoracoscopy (MT) in the diagnosis of patients with MPE induced by NHL. Between July 2005 and June 2014, 833 patients with pleural effusions of unknown etiology underwent MT in Beijing Chaoyang Hospital (Beijing, China), where diagnostic thoracocentesis or/and blind pleural biopsy had failed to yield an answer. Demographic, radiographic, thoracoscopic, histological and immunophenotyping data of 10 NHL patients with MPE were then retrospectively analyzed. Under medical thoracoscopy, pleural nodules (in n=6 patients), hyperemia (n=5), plaque-like lesions (n=4), pleural thickening (n=3), cellulose (n=3), ulcer (n=2), adhesion (n=2), and scattered hemorrhagic spots (n=1) were observed on the surface of parietal pleura. Histopathological and immunohistochemical analysis of pleural biopsy samples led to a correct diagnosis of B-cell NHL in 7 patients and T-lymphoblastic NHL in 2 patients. Data from the present study demonstrated that pleural biopsy through MT achieved a definite diagnosis of NHL in 9 out of 10 (90%) patients with MPE induced by NHL. Therefore, MT is a useful method for diagnosing MPE induced by NHL.

  5. The utility of multi-detector computed tomography in the diagnosis of malignant pleural effusion in the patients with ovarian cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Kyung Won; Choi, Hyuck Jae; Kang, Sokbom; Park, Sang-Yoon; Jung, Dae Chul; Cho, Jeong Yeon; Cho, Kyung-Sik; Kim, Seung Hyup

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to retrospectively assess possible clinical predictors of malignant pleural effusion in patients with ovarian cancer. Materials and methods: This review was performed on 38 ovarian cancer patients that showed pleural effusion in a CT scan and who underwent thoracocentesis before treatment. CT scans were obtained using a 4-channel multi-detector CT scanner. Fisher's exact test was used to determine the probability of malignant pleural effusion as a function of; amount of ascites, lymph node enlargement, amount of pleural effusion, pleural nodules, and pleural thickening. Results: Sixteen (42.1%) of the 38 patients had malignant pleural effusion and malignant pleural effusion amounts were greater than those with nonmalignant effusion. Pleural nodules were more frequently found in the malignant pleural effusion group (eight [50%] patients) than in the nonmalignant group (zero [0%] patient) (p < 0.001). Supradiaphragmatic lymph node enlargement (with short axis diameter 1 cm or more) was more frequent in malignant group (12 [75%] patients) than in the nonmalignant group (two [9.1%] patients) (p < 0.001). Conclusion: The probability of malignant pleural effusion in patients with ovarian cancer was found to be correlated with the amount of pleural effusion, the presence of pleural nodules, and supradiaphragmatic lymph node enlargement.

  6. Diagnostic value of radiological imaging pre- and post-drainage of pleural effusions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corcoran, John P; Acton, Louise; Ahmed, Asia; Hallifax, Robert J; Psallidas, Ioannis; Wrightson, John M; Rahman, Najib M; Gleeson, Fergus V

    2016-02-01

    Patients with an unexplained pleural effusion often require urgent investigation. Clinical practice varies due to uncertainty as to whether an effusion should be drained completely before diagnostic imaging. We performed a retrospective study of patients undergoing medical thoracoscopy for an unexplained effusion. In 110 patients with paired (pre- and post-drainage) chest X-rays and 32 patients with paired computed tomography scans, post-drainage imaging did not provide additional information that would have influenced the clinical decision-making process. © 2015 Asian Pacific Society of Respirology.

  7. Transcatheter instillation of urokinase into loculated pleural effusion: analysis of treatment effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Won Mo; Park, Chan Sup; Cho, Chul Ho; Suh, Chang Hae; Chung, Won Kyun

    1995-01-01

    To evaluate the indication for intracavitary Urokinase(UK) in the treatment of loculated pleural effusion. We analyzed CT and US in 31 patients who were treated with intracavitary UK in loculated pleural effusion. In each patient, a single chest catheter (10-12F) was insected under imaging guidance. When the amount of drainage was less than 100 ml/day, UK was instilled through the catheter until less than 50 ml/day was drained. On follow-up chest radiographs of more than 1 month, we classified the results of treatment into 3 groups: (1) completely effective (lung expansion, over 80%); (2) partially effective (20-80%); (3) ineffective (below 20%) group. Sonographic pattern of pleural fluid was classified into anechoic, linear septated, and honeycomb appearances and the thickness of parietal pleura was measured on CT. Sixteen patients were completely effective, nine were partially effective, and six were ineffective. All patients with completely or partially effective outcome had anechoic and linear septated appearance on US and had less than 4 mm of parietal pleural thickness on CT. Of six ineffective patients, US showed linear septated in one patient and honeycomb appearance in five patients and the thickness of parietal pleura on CT was 3 mm in one patient, 4 mm in two patients, 5 mm in one patient, and 6 mm in two patients. UK instillation through percutaneous catheter was an effective method in the treatment of loculated pleural effusion. However, we found near complete reaccumulation of pleural fluid when honeycomb appearance of pleural fluid on US or more than 5 mm parietal pleural thickness on CT was observed, which might suggest that we should consider the other kinds of treatment method in those patients

  8. Comparing cost of indwelling pleural catheter vs talc pleurodesis for malignant pleural effusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penz, Erika D; Mishra, Eleanor K; Davies, Helen E; Manns, Braden J; Miller, Robert F; Rahman, Najib M

    2014-10-01

    Malignant pleural effusion is associated with short life expectancy and significant morbidity. A randomized controlled trial comparing indwelling pleural catheters (IPCs) with talc pleurodesis found that IPCs reduced in-hospital time and the need for additional procedures but were associated with excess adverse events. Using data from the clinical trial, we compared costs associated with use of IPCs and with talc pleurodesis. Resource use and adverse events were captured through case report forms over the 1-year trial follow-up. Costs for outpatient and inpatient visits, diagnostic imaging, nursing, and doctor time were obtained from the UK National Health Service reference costs and University of Kent's Unit Costs of Health and Social Care 2011 and inflated to 2013 using the UK Consumer Price Index. Procedure supply costs were obtained from the manufacturer. Difference in mean costs was compared using nonparametric bootstrapping. All costs were converted to US dollars using the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development Purchasing Power Parity Index. Overall mean cost (SD) for managing patients with IPCs and talc pleurodesis was $4,993 ($5,529) and $4,581 ($4,359), respectively. The incremental mean cost difference was $401, with 95% CI of -$1,387 to $2,261. The mean cost related to ongoing drainage in the IPC group was $1,011 ($732) vs $57 ($213) in the talc pleurodesis group (P = .001). This included the cost of drainage bottles, dressing changes in the first month, and catheter removal. There was no significant difference in cost of the initial intervention or adverse events between the groups. For patients with survival < 14 weeks, IPC is significantly less costly than talc pleurodesis, with mean cost difference of -$1,719 (95% CI, -$3,376 to -$85). There is no significant difference in the mean cost of managing patients with IPCs compared with talc pleurodesis. For patients with limited survival, IPC appears less costly. isrctn.org; No.: ISRCTN

  9. A Case with Severe Endometriosis, Ovarian Hyperstimulation Syndrome, and Isolated Unilateral Pleural Effusion after IVF

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sopa, Negjyp; Larsen, Elisabeth Clare; Andersen, Anders Nyboe

    2017-01-01

    We present a very rare case of right-sided isolated pleural effusion in a patient with severe endometriosis who, in relation to in vitro fertilization (IVF), developed ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome (OHSS). Earlier laparotomy showed grade IV endometriosis including endometriotic implants...

  10. The negative enrichment by immunomagnetic beads for tumor cells from malignant pleural effusions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨俊俊

    2012-01-01

    Objective To establish a method (negative enrichment by immunomagnetic beads) for detection of tumor cells in pleural effusions and to evaluate the sensitivity and specificity of the method for clinical application. Methods Five,10,20,50 and 100 A549(lung adenocarcinoma) cells were labeled with

  11. Diagnostic accuracy and safety of semirigid thoracoscopy in exudative pleural effusions in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willendrup, Fatin; Bødtger, Uffe; Colella, Sara

    2014-01-01

    March 1, 2009 to September 1, 2013 in Denmark. RESULTS: Sixty-nine patients were retrospectively studied. In 13 patients it was not possible to perform the scheduled MT, in 9 cases due to an insufficient pneumothorax, in 3 due to an insufficient pleural effusion, and in 1 due to a purulent pleuritis...

  12. Atypical presentation of multicentric Castleman disease in a pediatric patient: pleural and pericardial effusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akman, Alkim Oden; Basaran, Ozge; Ozyoruk, Derya; Han, Unsal; Sayli, Tulin; Cakar, Nilgun

    2016-06-01

    Castleman disease (CD) is a rare poorly understood lymphoproliferative disorder. Pediatric onset CD has been reported before. However, most of them have benign unicentric pattern. Multicentric CD (MCD) is quite rare in children. Herein, we report a 13-year-old adolescent boy with MCD of the hyaline vascular variant presenting with pleural and pericardial effusion, which is an uncommon presentation. MCD should be considered in the differential diagnosis of pleural and/or pericardial effusion with unexplained lymph nodes in children. What is Known •Pediatric Castleman disease (CD) most commonly occurs in the unicentric form, which typically is asymptomatic and cured by lymph node excision. •The diagnosis of MCD can be difficult owing to the heterogeneity of presentation and potential for nonspecific multisystem involvement. What is New •A 13-year-old adolescent boy was diagnosed with MCD of the hyaline vascular variant presenting with pleural and pericardial effusion, which is an uncommon presentation. •In a pediatric patient with fever, pleural-pericardial effusion and multiple lymph nodes, MCD should be considered in differantial diagnosis.

  13. Incidence of malignancy in patients with pleural effusion referred for workup by pulmonologists

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindegaard, Dennis V.; Reuter, Simon; Laursen, Christian B.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Pleural effusion (PE) is a common condition. Malignancy accounts for lt;25% in general populations. The proportion is unknown in patients referred to pulmonologists for workup.Finding malignant cells in PE by thoracentesis suggests metastatic and incurable disease making further tests...

  14. LOW-DOSE BROMOCRIPTINE-INDUCED PLEURAL EFFUSION AND PLEUROPULMONARY FIBROSIS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    BRUNT, ERP; BOEREE, MJ

    We describe a parkinsonian patient who developed a slight asymptomatic pleural effusion during prolonged therapy with low dose bromocriptine (BCR) in addition to levodopa, following prior treatment with CQA 206-291. A moderate increase of BCR dosage prompted a severe pleuropulmonary inflammatory

  15. Chylous pleural effusion associated with primary lymphedema and lymphangioma-like malformations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bresser, P.; Kromhout, J. G.; Reekers, J. A.; Verhage, T. L.

    1993-01-01

    We describe a patient with a chylous pleural effusion associated with primary lymphedema of his right leg and abdominal wall. On evaluation a generalized, severe hypoplasia of the lymphatic system turned out to be associated with hyperplastic, lymphangioma-like malformations

  16. Lambda light chain disease associated with myelomatous pericardial and pleural effusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helbig, G.; Wieczorkiewicz, A.; Dziaczkowska-Suszek, J.; Krzemien, S.

    2009-01-01

    The paper presents the case of a 53-year patient with lambda light chain disease and concomitant myelomatous pleural and pericardial effusions. The symptoms of cardiac failure dominated the clinical manifestation. Only moderate plasma cell infiltration in bone marrow was present, whereas 100% of these cells infiltrated the pleura. Chemotherapy appeared to be ineffective and patient died from cardiac failure. (authors)

  17. Ambulatory intercostal drainage for the management of malignant pleural effusion: a single center experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazerbashi, Samer; Villaquiran, Jaime; Awan, Mohammad Yousaf; Unsworth-White, Michael Jonathan; Rahamim, Joe; Marchbank, Adrian

    2009-12-01

    Malignant pleural effusions are common and can be difficult to manage. We have reviewed our use of ambulatory drains (Pleurex drains) in this regard with particular reference to hospital stay, duration of drainage, and incidence of complications. Of 125 patients with malignant pleural effusion with trapped lung or failed previous pleurodesis who underwent insertion of ambulatory pleural drain, 41 patients were under local anesthesia and 84 patients were under general anesthesia. Mean age was 66.5 years with male:female = 80:45. Data were collected retrospectively from the clinical notes, and the family doctors' clinics were contacted to enquire about the patients' survival. When data collection concluded, 48 patients (38.4%) had died, giving mean survival following drain insertion of 84.1 days. There were no in-hospital deaths related to the procedure. One procedure was converted to a mini-thoracotomy to control bleeding from a lung tear. Mean duration of catheter placement was 87.01 days (5-434). Video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery was used in 77 patients (61.6%), and Seldinger's technique was used in 48 patients (38.4%). Mesothelioma was the most common malignant cause. Minor complications were encountered in 15 patients (12%), and they were managed as outpatients. The use of ambulatory pleural catheters for managing malignant pleural effusion is a safe and effective strategy. It has only minor complications that are related to prolonged drainage. We feel that this strategy should be considered the first choice option for these patients.

  18. A practical approach to diagnosing pleural effusion in southern Africa

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    pleural space is a common medical a iction and invariably ... rheumatic arthritis or pulmonary embolisms. Differentiating the ... Patients often present with a cough, dyspnoea ... Peritoneal dialysis .... infection can guide antibiotic choice.[1] e.

  19. Measurement of Pleural Temperature During Radiofrequency Ablation of Lung Tumors to Investigate Its Relationship to Occurrence of Pneumothorax or Pleural Effusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tajiri, Nobuhisa; Hiraki, Takao; Mimura, Hidefumi; Gobara, Hideo; Mukai, Takashi; Hase, Soichiro; Fujiwara, Hiroyasu; Iguchi, Toshihiro; Sakurai, Jun; Aoe, Motoi; Sano, Yoshifumi; Date, Hiroshi; Kanazawa, Susumu

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between pleural temperature and pneumothorax or pleural effusion after radiofrequency (RF) ablation of lung tumors. The pleural temperature was measured immediately outside the lung surface nearest to the tumor with a fiber-type thermocouple during 25 ablation procedures for 34 tumors in 22 patients. The procedures were divided into two groups depending on the highest pleural temperature: P-group I and P-group II, with highest pleural temperatures of <40 deg. C and ≥40 deg. C, respectively. The incidence of pneumothorax or pleural effusion was compared between the groups. Multiple variables were compared between the groups to determine the factors that affect the pleural temperature. The overall incidence of pneumothorax and pleural effusion was 56% (14/25) and 20% (5/25), respectively. Temperature data in five ablation procedures were excluded from the analyses because these were affected by the pneumothorax. P-group I and P-group II comprised 10 procedures and 10 procedures, respectively. The incidence of pleural effusion was significantly higher in P-group II (4/10) than in P-group I (0/10) (p = 0.043). However, the incidence of pneumothorax did not differ significantly (p = 0.50) between P-group I (4/10) and P-group II (5/10). Factors significantly affecting the pleural temperature were distance between the electrode and the pleura (p < 0.001) and length of the lung parenchyma between the electrode and the pleura (p < 0.001). We conclude that higher pleural temperature appeared to be associated with the occurrence of pleural effusion and not with that of pneumothorax

  20. Clinical diagnostic of pleural effusions using a high-speed viscosity measurement method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurth, Cedric; Klein, Katherine; van Nimwegen, Lena; Korn, Ronald; Vijayaraghavan, Krishnaswami; Zenhausern, Frederic

    2011-08-01

    We present a novel bio-analytical method to discriminate between transudative and exudative pleural effusions based on a high-speed video analysis of a solid glass sphere impacting a liquid. Since the result depends on the solution viscosity, it can ultimately replace the battery of biochemical assays currently used. We present results obtained on a series of 7 pleural effusions obtained from consenting patients by analyzing both the splash observed after the glass impactor hits the liquid surface, and in a configuration reminiscent of the drop ball viscometer with added sensitivity and throughput provided by the high-speed camera. The results demonstrate distinction between the pleural effusions and good correlation with the fluid chemistry analysis to accurately differentiate exudates and transudates for clinical purpose. The exudative effusions display a viscosity around 1.39 ± 0.08 cP whereas the transudative effusion was measured at 0.89 ± 0.09 cP, in good agreement with previous reports.

  1. [Analysis of Prognostic Factors and Clinical Characteristics for Patients with Limited Stage Small Cell Lung Cancer with Pleural Effusion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Kunpeng; Wang, Youyou; Qi, Jing; Zhao, Lujun; Wang, Ping

    2018-01-20

    Malignant pleural effusion (PE) was generally defined as pleural effusion containing tumors with poor prognosis. Some kinds of undefined pleural effusions due to too small amount of effusion had poor prognosis too. This study aimed to analyze the clinical characteristics and prognostic factors of patients who suffered from limited-stage small cell lung cancer (LS-SCLC) complicated with pleural effusion. A retrospective analysis included 542 patients who were diagnosed with LS-SCLC and had treatment in our hospital from October 2007 to January 2016. We had observed 109 patients who were diagnosed with pleural effusion at their first visit to the doctor. We analyzed the clinical characters, survival time and the prognostic factors of the 109 patients. Our main observation targets were overall survival (OS) and progression free survival (PFS). The median OS and PFS of whole group were 29.4 and 18.2 months. Before treatment, survival time of patients with PE were significantly shorter than patients without PE (median OS: 21.0 vs 31.7 months; median PFS: 14.1 vs 9.1 months; Log-rank, P=0.001, P=0.014). Multi-factor analysis of multivariate Cox shows PE was the independent prognostic factor of LS-SCLC (P=0.04). Single factor analysis showed factors affecting PE patient's survival time included clinical stages, lymph node (LN) stages, KPS scores, pulmonary atelectasis and the state of pleural after treatment. Cox multi-factor analysis reminded that the state of pleural effusion after treatment was the independent prognostic factor of LS-SCLC complicated with pleural effusion (P=0.016). There were three groups was apportioned patients without pleural effusion before treatment (group 1; n=433), patients whose pleural effusion disappeared after treatment (group 2; n=67) and patients whose pleural effusion didn't disappear after treatment (group 3; n=32).The median OS were 31.7, 23.2, 16.8 months in the group 1, 2, 3 and the median PFS were 19.1, 17.9, 11.4 months. Obvious

  2. The value of the assessment of serum and pleural Dikkopf-1 concentrations in the differentiation between malignant and non-malignant pleural effusions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nourane Y. Azab

    2016-01-01

    Conclusions: Malignant effusions are associated with elevated serum and pleural DKK-1 level but it cannot be used as sure marker for the diagnosis of malignancy since it rises in many other conditions.

  3. Proteome screening of pleural effusions identifies IL1A as a diagnostic biomarker for non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuanyuan; Lian, Hengning; Jia, Qingzhu; Wan, Ying

    2015-02-06

    Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is a common malignant disease, and in ~10-20% of patients, pleural effusion is the first symptom. The pleural effusion proteome contains information on pulmonary disease that directly or indirectly reflects pathophysiological status. However, the proteome of pleural effusion in NSCLC patients is not well understood, nor is the variability in protein composition between malignant and benign pleural effusions. Here, we investigated the different proteins in pleural effusions from NSCLC and tuberculosis (TB) patients by using nano-scale liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (nLC-MS/MS) analysis. In total, 363 proteins were identified in the NSCLC pleural effusion proteome with a low false discovery rate (pleural effusion were involved in cell adhesion, proteolysis, and cell migration. Furthermore, interleukin 1 alpha (IL1A), a protein that regulates tumor growth, angiogenesis, and metastasis, was significantly more abundant in the NSCLC group compared to the TB group, a finding that was validated with an ELISA assay. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Anidulafungin Pharmacokinetics in Ascites Fluid and Pleural Effusion of Critically Ill Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welte, R; Eller, P; Lorenz, I; Joannidis, M; Bellmann, R

    2018-04-01

    Anidulafungin concentrations were quantified with high-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) and UV detection of the ascites fluid and pleural effusion of 10 adult critically ill patients. Samples were collected from ascites fluid and from pleural drains or during paracentesis and thoracentesis, respectively. Anidulafungin levels in ascites fluid (0.12 to 0.99 μg/ml) and in pleural effusion (0.32 to 2.02 μg/ml) were below the simultaneous levels in plasma (1.04 to 7.70 and 2.48 to 13.36 μg/ml, respectively) and below the MIC values for several pathogenic Candida strains. Copyright © 2018 American Society for Microbiology.

  5. Chest tube drainage of transudative pleural effusions hastens liberation from mechanical ventilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kupfer, Yizhak; Seneviratne, Chanaka; Chawla, Kabu; Ramachandran, Kavan; Tessler, Sidney

    2011-03-01

    Pleural effusions occur frequently in patients requiring mechanical ventilatory support. Treatment of the precipitating cause and resolution of the pleural effusion may take considerable time. We retrospectively studied the effect of chest tube drainage of transudative pleural effusions on the liberation of patients from mechanical ventilatory support. Patients in the medical ICU (MICU) at Maimonides Medical Center between January 1, 2009, and October 31, 2009, requiring mechanical ventilatory support with a transudative pleural effusion, were studied retrospectively. They were divided into two groups: standard care and standard care plus chest tube drainage. Chest tubes were placed under ultrasound guidance by trained intensivists. Duration of mechanical ventilatory support was the primary end point. Secondary end points included measures of oxygenation, amount of fluid drained, and complications associated with the chest tube. A total of 168 patients were studied; 88 were treated with standard care and 80 underwent chest tube drainage. Total duration of mechanical ventilatory support was significantly shorter for patients who had chest tube drainage: 3.8±0.5 days vs 6.5±1.1 days for the standard group (P=.03). No differences in oxygenation were noted between the two groups. The average amount of fluid drained was 1,220 mL. No significant complications were caused by chest tube drainage. Chest tube drainage of transudative pleural effusions resulted in more rapid liberation from mechanical ventilatory support. It is a very safe procedure when performed under ultrasound guidance by experienced personnel. ClinicalTrials.gov; Identifier: NCT0114285; URL: www.clinicaltrials.gov.

  6. Rapid Detection of Cell-Free Mycobacterium tuberculosis DNA in Tuberculous Pleural Effusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Che, Nanying; Yang, Xinting; Liu, Zichen; Li, Kun; Chen, Xiaoyou

    2017-05-01

    Tuberculous pleurisy is one of the most common types of extrapulmonary tuberculosis, but its diagnosis remains difficult. In this study, we report for the first time on the detection of cell-free Mycobacterium tuberculosis DNA in pleural effusion and an evaluation of a newly developed molecular assay for the detection of cell-free Mycobacterium tuberculosis DNA. A total of 78 patients with pleural effusion, 60 patients with tuberculous pleurisy, and 18 patients with alternative diseases were included in this study. Mycobacterial culture, the Xpert MTB/RIF assay, the adenosine deaminase assay, the T-SPOT.TB assay, and the cell-free Mycobacterium tuberculosis DNA assay were performed on all the pleural effusion samples. The cell-free Mycobacterium tuberculosis DNA assay and adenosine deaminase assay showed significantly higher sensitivities of 75.0% and 68.3%, respectively, than mycobacterial culture and the Xpert MTB/RIF assay, which had sensitivities of 26.7% and 20.0%, respectively ( P pleural effusion showed the highest sensitivity of 95.0% but the lowest specificity of 38.9%. The cell-free Mycobacterium tuberculosis DNA assay detected as few as 1.25 copies of IS 6110 per ml of pleural effusion and showed good accordance of the results between repeated tests ( r = 0.978, P = 2.84 × 10 -10 ). These data suggest that the cell-free Mycobacterium tuberculosis DNA assay is a rapid and accurate molecular test which provides direct evidence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis etiology. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  7. Urinothorax as an unusual type of pleural effusion – Case report and review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.G. Ferreira

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Despite the fact that there are a great number of established etiologies for pleural effusion, there are grounds for believing that there are also causes from unusual pathophysiological mechanisms, seen in certain clinical contexts and from potential iatrogenic interventions. Urinothorax is such a rare type of pleural effusion as there are fewer than 70 cases reported worldwide. Clinical case: A patient with a persistent left pleural effusion was admitted to the Urology ward for a lithiasic obstructive uropathy with hydronephrosis. A left percutaneous nephrostomy was performed. The effusion was unclassified at the initial workup and recurred after first drainage. A second approach confirmed a citrine fluid with borderline criteria for exudate, ammoniacal odor and an elusive pleural fluid-to-serum creatinine ratio. A retroperitoneal urinoma was recognized on CT, and the patient underwent a left nephrectomy with resolution of the pleural effusion. Conclusions: Urinothorax most frequently develops in patients with excretory uropathy or blunt abdominal trauma, although other mechanisms have been reported. Traditionally, a pleural fluid to serum creatinine ratio higher than one is a hallmark of this condition. In certain settings, taking this diagnosis into account at an early stage might be crucial for a good outcome. Resumo: Contexto: Apesar da multitude de etiologias de derrame pleural, algumas causas decorrentes de mecanismos patofisiológicos incomuns podem ser suspeitadas com base em determinados contextos clínicos sugestivos ou intervenções com potencial iatrogénico. O urinotórax é um tipo raro de derrame pleural com menos de 70 casos mundialmente reportados. Caso clínico: Um doente que fora internado na Urologia por uropatia obstrutiva litiásica com hidronefrose, é diagnosticado com derrame pleural esquerdo persistente. Havia sido sujeito à colocação ipsilateral de nefrostomia percut

  8. The role of liquid-based cytology and ancillary techniques in pleural and pericardic effusions: an institutional experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Esther Diana; Bizzarro, Tommaso; Schmitt, Fernando; Longatto-Filho, Adhemar

    2015-04-01

    Fine-needle aspiration cytology (FNAC) of serous membrane effusions may fulfil a challenging role in the diagnostic analysis of both primary and metastatic disease. From this perspective, liquid-based cytology (LBC) represents a feasible and reliable method for empowering the performance of ancillary techniques (ie, immunocytochemistry and molecular testing) with high diagnostic accuracy. In total, 3171 LBC pleural and pericardic effusions were appraised between January 2000 and December 2013. They were classified as negative for malignancy (NM), suspicious for malignancy (SM), or positive for malignancy (PM). The cytologic diagnoses included 2721 NM effusions (2505 pleural and 216 pericardic), 104 SM effusions (93 pleural and 11 pericardic), and 346 PM effusions (321 pleural and 25 pericardic). The malignant pleural series included 76 unknown malignancies (36 SM and 40 PM effusions), 174 metastatic lesions (85 SM and 89 PM effusions), 14 lymphomas (3 SM and 11 PM effusions), 16 mesotheliomas (5 SM and 11 SM effusions), and 3 myelomas (all SM effusions). The malignant pericardic category included 20 unknown malignancies (5 SM and 15 PM effusions), 15 metastatic lesions (1 SM and 14 PM effusions), and 1 lymphoma (1 PM effusion). There were 411 conclusive immunocytochemical analyses and 47 molecular analyses, and the authors documented 88% sensitivity, 100% specificity, 98% diagnostic accuracy, 98% negative predictive value, and 100% positive predictive value for FNAC. FNAC represents a primary diagnostic tool for effusions and a reliable approach with which to determine the correct follow-up. Furthermore, LBC is useful for ancillary techniques, such as immunocytochemistry and molecular analysis, with feasible diagnostic and predictive utility. © 2015 American Cancer Society.

  9. Clinical value of combined detection of tumor markers in effusion fluid for diagnosis of malignant pleural effusion and ascites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Jiangang; Ji Zhigu; Cui Xuejun; Zhu Zili

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To study the clinical usefulness of combined detection of tumor markers in effusion fluid in patients with malignant pleural effusion or ascites. Methods: Combined detection of six tumor markers (CA125, CA50, CA15-3, CYFRA21-1, βHCG, HCG) in effusion fluid was performed in 92 patients with malignant pleural effusion and 78 patients with malignant ascites as well as 100 control benign specimens. These tumor markers were examined with CLIA, except CA50, which was examined with RIA. Exfoliative cytology was also examined in the malignant specimens. Results: The positive rate of these markers was highest with CA125, followed by CA50, CA15-3, CYFRA21-1, βHCG and HCG in order. βHCG and HCG, though with quite low positive rate, were still useful markers due to the almost zero false-positive rate, i.e. very high specificity. For combined determination of two markers, CA15 + CYFRA21-1 or CA125 + CA50 would result in the highest positive rate. For highly suspected but undetermined cases, the following criteria for malignancy would be helpful: (1) two or more positive among CA125, CA50, CA15-3, CYFRA21-1 (2) One of the four CAs positive + either βHCG or HCG (3) Both βHCG and HCG positive. Tumor markers positiveness would be supplementary to doubtful cytological studies. Conclusion: Combined detection of tumor markers in effusion fluid would be very helpful for diagnosis of malignancy. (authors)

  10. Newly diagnosed primary hypothyroidism applicant with massive pericardial effusion and acute renal failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ates I

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. While non-symptomatic pericardial effusion is seen in primary hypothyroidism, massive pericardial effusion is a very rare finding. In the literature, newly diagnosed primary hypothyroidism cases presenting with massive pericardial effusion or acute renal failure are present, but we did not encounter any case first presenting with combination of two signs. In this case report, primary hypothyroidism case that presenting with massive pericardial effusion and acute renal failure will be discussed.

  11. Dexamethasone for Parapneumonic Pleural Effusion: A Randomized, Double-Blind, Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tagarro, Alfredo; Otheo, Enrique; Baquero-Artigao, Fernando; Navarro, María-Luisa; Velasco, Rosa; Ruiz, Marta; Penín, María; Moreno, David; Rojo, Pablo; Madero, Rosario

    2017-06-01

    To assess whether dexamethasone (DXM) decreases the time to recovery in patients with parapneumonic pleural effusion. This was a multicenter, randomized, double blind, parallel-group, placebo-controlled clinical trial of 60 children, ranging in age from 1 month to 14 years, with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) and pleural effusion. Patients received either intravenous DXM (0.25?mg/kg/dose) or placebo every 6 hours over a period of 48 hours, along with antibiotics. The primary endpoint was the time to recovery in hours, defined objectively. We also evaluated complications and adverse events. Among the 60 randomized patients (mean age, 4.7 years; 58% female), 57 (95%) completed the study. Compared with placebo recipients, the patients receiving DXM had a shorter time to recovery, after adjustment by severity group and stratification by center (hazard ratio, 1.95; 95% CI, 1.10-3.45; P?=?.021). The median time to recovery for patients receiving DXM was 68 hours (2.8 days) shorter than patients receiving placebo (109 hours vs 177 hours; P?=?.037). In exploratory subgroup analysis, the median time to recovery for patients with simple effusion receiving DXM was 76 hours (3.1 days) shorter than for patients with simple effusion receiving placebo (P?=?.017). The median time to recovery for patients with complicated effusion receiving DXM was 14 hours (0.5 days) shorter than for patients with complicated effusion receiving placebo (P?=?.66). The difference in the effect of DXM in the 2 severity groups was not statistically significant (P?=?.138 for interaction). There were no significant differences in complications or adverse events attributable to the study drugs, except for hyperglycemia. In this trial, DXM seemed to be a safe and effective adjunctive therapy for parapneumonic pleural effusion. ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01261546. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Pleural mesothelial cells promote expansion of IL-17-producing CD8+ T cells in tuberculous pleural effusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, X; Zhou, Q; Yang, W B; Xiong, X Z; Du, R H; Zhang, J C

    2013-05-01

    IL-17-producing CD8(+) T lymphocytes (Tc17 cells) have recently been detected in many cancers and autoimmune diseases. However, the possible implication of Tc17 cells in tuberculous pleural effusion remains unclarified. In this study, distribution and phenotypic features of Tc17 cells in both tuberculous pleural effusion (TPE) and peripheral blood from patients with tuberculosis were determined. The effects of proinflammatory cytokines and local accessory cells (pleural mesothelial cells) on Tc17 cell expansion were also explored. We found that TPE contained more Tc17 cells than the blood. Compared with IFN-γ-producing CD8(+) T cells, Tc17 cells displayed higher expression of chemokine receptors (CCRs) and lower expression of cytotoxic molecules. In particularly, Tc17 cells in TPE exhibited high expression levels of CCR6, which could migrate in response to CCL20. Furthermore, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-23, or their various combinations could promote Tc17 cell expansion from CD8(+) T cells, whereas the proliferative response of Tc17 cells to above cytokines was lower than that of Th17 cells. Pleural mesothelial cells (PMCs) were able to stimulate Tc17 cell expansion via cell contact in an IL-1β/IL-6/IL-23 independent fashion. Thus this study demonstrates that Tc17 cells marks a subset of non-cytotoxic, CCR6(+) CD8(+) T lymphocytes with low proliferative capacity. The overrepresentation of Tc17 cells in TPE may be due to Tc17 cell expansion stimulated by pleural proinflammatory cytokines and to recruitment of Tc17 cells from peripheral blood. Additionally, PMCs may promote the production of IL-17 by CD8(+) T cells at sites of TPE via cell-cell interactions.

  13. A quantitative evaluation of pleural effusion on computed tomography scans using B-spline and local clustering level set.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Lei; Gao, Jungang; Wang, Sheng; Hu, Huasi; Guo, Youmin

    2017-01-01

    Estimation of the pleural effusion's volume is an important clinical issue. The existing methods cannot assess it accurately when there is large volume of liquid in the pleural cavity and/or the patient has some other disease (e.g. pneumonia). In order to help solve this issue, the objective of this study is to develop and test a novel algorithm using B-spline and local clustering level set method jointly, namely BLL. The BLL algorithm was applied to a dataset involving 27 pleural effusions detected on chest CT examination of 18 adult patients with the presence of free pleural effusion. Study results showed that average volumes of pleural effusion computed using the BLL algorithm and assessed manually by the physicians were 586 ml±339 ml and 604±352 ml, respectively. For the same patient, the volume of the pleural effusion, segmented semi-automatically, was 101.8% ±4.6% of that was segmented manually. Dice similarity was found to be 0.917±0.031. The study demonstrated feasibility of applying the new BLL algorithm to accurately measure the volume of pleural effusion.

  14. Three-dimensional automatic computer-aided evaluation of pleural effusions on chest CT images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Mark; Summers, Ronald M.; Yao, Jianhua

    2011-03-01

    The ability to estimate the volume of pleural effusions is desirable as it can provide information about the severity of the condition and the need for thoracentesis. We present here an improved version of an automated program to measure the volume of pleural effusions using regular chest CT images. First, the lungs are segmented using region growing, mathematical morphology, and anatomical knowledge. The visceral and parietal layers of the pleura are then extracted based on anatomical landmarks, curve fitting and active contour models. The liver and compressed tissues are segmented out using thresholding. The pleural space is then fitted to a Bezier surface which is subsequently projected onto the individual two-dimensional slices. Finally, the volume of the pleural effusion is quantified. Our method was tested on 15 chest CT studies and validated against three separate manual tracings. The Dice coefficients were 0.74+/-0.07, 0.74+/-0.08, and 0.75+/-0.07 respectively, comparable to the variation between two different manual tracings.

  15. Screening Performance Characteristic of Ultrasonography and Radiography in Detection of Pleural Effusion; a Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousefifard, Mahmoud; Baikpour, Masoud; Ghelichkhani, Parisa; Asady, Hadi; Shahsavari Nia, Kavous; Moghadas Jafari, Ali; Hosseini, Mostafa; Safari, Saeed

    2016-01-01

    The role of ultrasonography in detection of pleural effusion has long been a subject of interest but controversial results have been reported. Accordingly, this study aims to conduct a systematic review of the available literature on diagnostic value of ultrasonography and radiography in detection of pleural effusion through a meta-analytic approach. An extended search was done in databases of Medline, EMBASE, ISI Web of Knowledge, Scopus, Cochrane Library, and ProQuest. Two reviewers independently extracted the data and assessed the quality of the articles. Meta-analysis was performed using a mixed-effects binary regression model. Finally, subgroup analysis was carried out in order to find the sources of heterogeneity between the included studies. 12 studies were included in this meta-analysis (1554 subjects, 58.6% male). Pooled sensitivity of ultrasonography in detection of pleural effusion was 0.94 (95% CI: 0.88-0.97; I2= 84.23, pultrasonography was found to be higher when the procedure was carried out by an intensivist or a radiologist using 5-10 MHz transducers. Chest ultrasonography, as a screening tool, has a higher diagnostic accuracy in identification of plural effusion compared to radiography. The sensitivity of this imaging modality was found to be higher when performed by a radiologist or an intensivist and using 5-10MHz probes.

  16. Pyogenic liver abscess mimicking pleural effusion | Abiodun | South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hence, in this unusual setting, pyogenic liver abscess was not considered at the initial assessment, until closer evaluation and futile efforts to drain a seemingly large “pleural effusion” eventually revealed the diagnosis, which was confirmed by imaging. She underwent ultrasound-guided percutaneous drainage of the ...

  17. Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor in Pleural Effusions and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2018-02-07

    Feb 7, 2018 ... was inversely correlated with pleural fluid glucose and pH levels and had positive correlation with ... Correlation with Radiologic and Biochemical Parameters. N Bayram, Y Karakan, ..... [11,21] Anti-VEGF antibodies have been ...

  18. Lung scans with significant perfusion defects limited to matching pleural effusions have a low probability of pulmonary embolism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Datz, F.L.; Bedont, R.A.; Taylor, A.

    1985-01-01

    Patients with a pleural effusion on chest x-ray often undergo a lung scan to exclude pulmonary embolism (PE). According to other studies, when the scan shows a perfusion defect equal in size to a radiographic abnormality on chest x-ray, the scan should be classified as indeterminate or intermediate probability for PE. However, since those studies dealt primarily with alveolar infiltrates rather than pleural effusions, the authors undertook a retrospective study to determine the probability of PE in patients with pleural effusion and a matching perfusion defect. The authors reviewed 451 scans and x-rays of patients studied for suspected PE. Of those, 53 had moderate or large perfusion defects secondary to pleural effusion without other significant (>25% of a segment) effusion without other significant (>25% of a segment) defects on the scan. Final diagnosis was confirmed by pulmonary angiography (16), thoracentesis (40), venography (11), other radiographic and laboratory studies, and clinical course. Of the 53 patients, only 2 patients had venous thrombotic disease. One patient had PE on pulmonary angiography, the other patient had thrombophlebitis on venography. The remainder of the patients had effusions due to congestive heart failure (12), malignancy (12), infection (7), trauma (7), collegen vascular disease (7), sympathetic effusion (3) and unknown etiology (3). The authors conclude that lung scans with significant perfusion defects limited to matching pleural effusions on chest x-ray have a low probability for PE

  19. What happens to the pleural space affected by malignant effusion after bedside pleurodesis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Araujo, Pedro H X N; Terra, Ricardo M; da Silva Santos, Thiago; Chate, Rodrigo C; de Paiva, Antonio F L; Pêgo-Fernandes, Paulo M

    2018-03-24

    Evaluate radiological characteristics of postpleurodesis pleural space of patients with recurrent malignant pleural effusion(RMPE). Prospective cohort study including patients with RPME treated with bedside pleurodesis. We used CT scans to calculate pleural cavity volume immediately before pleurodesis(iCT) and 30 days after(CT30). Radiological evolution was calculated by the difference between pleural volumes on CT30 and iCT(Δvolume). We categorized initial pleural volume as small(space(≥500 mL) and Δvolume as positive(>254.49 mL), unchanged(≥-268.77-≤ 254.49 mL), or negative(space(62.06%) and 33 large(37.93%). Clinical failure occurred in 7.4% of small space group and in 24.6% of large(P = 0.051, OR4.0(CI:1.098-14.570)). In small space group, 27.77% evolved with positive, 66.66% with unchanged and 5.55% with negative Δvolume. In the large space group these numbers were respectively 21.21%, 27.27%, and 51.51%. There is significant variability on pleural space volume. However, pleural volume remains unchanged in many cases. Besides that, more than half patients with initial large space coursed with relevant reduction. Finally, patients with initial small space presented a greater chance of clinical success. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Amyloidosis diagnosed in cytology specimen of pleural effusion: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manur, Rashmi; Lamzabi, Ihab

    2018-06-01

    Amyloidosis is a rare condition resulting from extracellular deposition of amyloid, a fibrillary material derived from various precursor proteins. Involvement of the pleura by amyloidosis is a rare but serious complication. Pleural amyloidosis is primarily diagnosed by identifying amyloid deposition by histology on pleural biopsy specimens. Hereby, we report a case of systemic amyloidosis where we were able to identify amyloid in a pleural effusion specimen sent for cytopathology evaluation. A 59-year-old male with newly diagnosed multiple myeloma and systemic amyloidosis underwent therapeutic thoracentesis. The H&E stained cell block sections revealed a single, less than one millimeter focus of waxy material surrounded by a rim of reactive mesothelial cells suspicious for amyloid deposit in a background of fibrin, lymphocytes, and reactive mesothelial cells. The focus stained salmon pink with Congo-red special stain and showed apple-green birefringence under polarized light. Our finding suggests that pleural involvement in patients with systemic amyloidosis can be identified on effusion specimens and avert the need for more invasive procedures like pleural or pulmonary parenchymal biopsies. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Clinical utility of a combination of tumour markers in the diagnosis of malignant pleural effusions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaspar, M J; De Miguel, J; García Díaz, J D; Díez, M

    2008-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the diagnostic value of the tumour markers carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), carbohydrate antigens CA 125, CA 15.3, CA 19.9 and tumor-associated glycoprotein 72 (TAG 72) in the pleural fluid (PF) of patients with pleural effusions of different etiologies. One hundred and fifty-five patients with pleural effusions (40 malignant, 84 benign and 31 paraneoplastic) were studied prospectively. The concentration of the tumour markers in serum and PF were measured by magnetic particle enzyme immunoassay. The PF to serum (PF/S) concentration ratios were calculated. The concentrations of CEA, CA 15.3, CA 19.9 and TAG 72 in PF and the PF/serum ratios were significantly higher in effusions of malignant and paraneoplastic origin than in those of benign origin. The receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were calculated for each marker and the diagnostic cut-off point was selected as the value that offered a specificity of 100% (CEA: 6.5 ng/ml; CA 15.3:62.4 IU/l; TAG 72:10.9 IU/l). CEA presented the greatest sensitivity [45% in the malignant group, 38.7% in the paraneoplastic group, and 41.4% in the pooled group (combined malignant and paraneoplastic)]. TAG 72 presented the largest area under the curve (0.89 in the malignant group and 0.80 in the pooled group). The diagnostic efficacy of the PF/S ratios was not better than measurement of the tumour markers in pleural fluid. The highest diagnostic accuracy for the diagnosis of malignant pleural effusions was achieved by grouping the markers in a panel comprising CEA, CA 15.3 and TAG 72; this showed a sensitivity of 75% and a negative predictive value of 79.1% . In the subgroup of patients with negative cytology, the sensitivity was 41.2% for CEA, 35.5% for CA 15.3 and 33.3% for TAG 72. The combination of these three markers achieved a sensitivity of 84.6%. The combined measurement of CEA, CA 15.3 and TAG 72 in pleural fluid is a useful complementary test in the differential

  2. The Usefulness of Intensivist-Performed Bedside Drainage of Pleural Effusion via Ultrasound-Guided Pigtail Catheter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joo Won Min

    2014-08-01

    CONCLUSIONS: Intensivist-performed bedside drainage of pleural effusion via ultrasound (US-guided pigtail catheter is useful and safe and may be recommended in some patients in an intensive care unit.

  3. Right-Sided Pleural Effusion in a Critically Ill Stroke Patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Bautista MD

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Pleural fluid collections are common in those critically ill. We report the case of a left middle cerebral artery stroke patient who developed respiratory distress and required intubation and mechanical ventilation. Although the patient’s clinical status and oxygenation improved, there was persistence of right-sided opacity in the chest radiograph. Further workup proved a right-sided pleural effusion, which was drained and managed. Following extubation, a swallow study was ordered, which led to a fluoroscopic examination that demonstrated esophageal perforation. Thoracic surgery was consulted and did a primary repair of perforation and noted non–small cell carcinoma on the perforated site.

  4. Intrapleural cisplatin for management of malignant pleural effusion in a patient with plasma cell leucaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Abhishek; Klair, Jagpal; Patolia, Setu; Meena, Nikhil K

    2015-06-29

    Plasma cell leucaemia (PCL) is a rare aggressive form of multiple myeloma. It occasionally involves the pleura, causing malignant pleural effusion (MPE). MPE presents a management dilemma for physicians, given the different treatment options available with varying efficacy and side effects. We report a case of a 64-year-old man with MPE due to PCL, successfully managed with intrapleural cisplatin and a tunnelled pleural catheter. We believe this to be the first report of management of PCL-associated MPE with intrapleural cisplatin. 2015 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  5. Pleural effusion in 11:14 translocation q1 multiple myeloma in the setting of proteasome inhibitor presents therapeutic complexity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghannam, Malik; Bryan, Maria; Kuross, Erik; Berry, Brent

    2018-01-01

    Primary malignant pleural effusion has been reported in about 134 cases of multiple myeloma (MM). Associated pleural effusions in cases of MM portend a poor prognosis and identifying them is highly relevant. Reported is the case of a man diagnosed with MM who developed primary myelomatous pleural effusion in the setting of multiple relapses and subsequent mortality within 2 months of the pleural effusion diagnosis. A 61-year-old African American man was diagnosed with MM in 2011. He received induction therapy of lenalidomide and dexamethasone and an autologous stem cell transplant in 2012. Over the next 5 years, the patient went through alternating periods of remission and relapse that were treated with two rounds of thoracic spine radiation therapy and chemotherapeutic agents. In September 2017, the patient presented with worsening dyspnea and was found to have pleural effusion. Fluid analysis showed plasma cell dyscrasia. Fluid drainage was performed, then the patient was discharged after 1 week which was followed by rapid re-accumulation of fluid and rehospitalization about 10 days after discharge. The patient passed away a few weeks after the second admission. Pleural effusion carries a differential diagnosis which may include malignancy but is commonly thought to be less specific to multiple myeloma but should still remain in the differential diagnosis. To our knowledge, this is the first case of myelomatous pleural effusion (MPE) that was reported after multiple relapses of MM. MPE is a very rare complication of MM, and its presence is a strong indicator of imminent mortality and need for comfort care in case of multiple relapses. End-stage pleural effusion in MM in the setting of proteasome inhibitor adds more therapeutic and diagnostic challenges.

  6. Ultrasonography of pleural effusion. The quantification of minimal detectable volume

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sustic, A.; Medved, I.; Ekl, D.; Simic, O.; Kovac, D.; Ivanis, N.

    2001-01-01

    Background. The aim of this study was to establish a minimal volume of free thoracic fluid in the pleural space of the supine cadaver detectable by ultrasonography. Material and methods. A prospective study with an experimental model on 20 cadavers (10 male, 10 female; age 66 ±11 yr.; height 172 ±9 cm; weight 75 ±12.6 kg; body surface area (BSA) 1.87 ±0.2 m 2 ) was used. Each cadaver was punctured bilaterally in 5 th or 6 th intercostal space at the medioclavicular line with venous cannula infusing in NaCl 0,9% solution at randomised speed in the chest. During the procedure the laterodorsal part of the thoracic wall next to the pulmonal base and phrenicocostal sinus was ultrasonographically scanned. At the moment of the visualisation of anechogenic line pertaining to the free fluid between dorsal thoracic wall and lungs, the installation was stopped and the amount of injected fluid verified. Results. Minimal, by ultrasonography detectable amount of free fluid in the right pleural space was 223±52 ml with the significant positive correlation to height (r = 0.69; p < 0.001), weight (r 0.68; p < 0.01) and the BSA (r = 0.71; p < 0.001) of cadaver. Detectable volume in the left pleural space was notably smaller than contra lateral, namely 172±53 ml also with a significant correlation to the cadaver's height (r = 0.55; p < 0.05), weight (r = 0.59; p < 0.01) and BSA (r = 0.60; p < 0.01). Conclusions. The authors affirm that ultrasonographically detectable quantity of free fluid in the chest positively correlates with height, weight and BSA of cadavers, and that the measured amount in the supine position is approximately 223 ml for the right space versus 172 ml for the left pleural space. (author)

  7. Pleural effusion biomarkers and computed tomography findings in diagnosing malignant pleural mesothelioma: A retrospective study in a single center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kataoka, Yuki; Ikegaki, Shunkichi; Saito, Emiko; Matsumoto, Hirotaka; Kaku, Sawako; Shimada, Masatoshi; Hirabayashi, Masataka

    2017-01-01

    In this study, we aimed to examine the clinical value of the pleural effusion (PE) biomarkers, soluble mesothelin-related peptide (SMRP), cytokeratin 19 fragment (CYFRA 21–1) and carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), and the utility of combining chest computed tomography (CT) findings with these biomarkers, in diagnosing malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM). We conducted a retrospective cohort study in a single center. Consecutive patients with undiagnosed pleural effusions who underwent PE analysis between September 2014 and August 2016 were reviewed. This study included 240 patients (32 with MPM and 208 non-MPM). SMRP and the CYFRA 21-1/CEA ratio had a sensitivity and specificity for diagnosing MPM of 56.3% and 86.5%, and 87.5% and 74.0%, respectively. Using receiver operating characteristics (ROC) curve analysis of the ability of these markers to distinguish MPM from all other PE causes, the area under the ROC curve (AUC) for SMRP and the CYFRA 21-1/CEA ratio was 0.804 and 0.874, respectively. The sensitivity and specificity of SMRP combined with the CYFRA 21-1/CEA ratio were 93.8% and 64.9%, respectively. The sensitivity of the combination of SMRP, the CYFRA 21-1/CEA ratio, and the presence of Leung’s criteria (a chest CT finding that is suggestive of malignant pleural disease) was 93.8%. In conclusion, the combined PE biomarkers had a high sensitivity for diagnosing MPM, although the addition of chest CT findings did not improve the sensitivity of SMRP combined with the CYFRA 21-1/CEA ratio. Combination of these biomarkers helped to rule out MPM effectively among patients at high risk of suffering MPM and would be valuable especially for old frail patients who have difficulty in undergoing invasive procedures such as thoracoscopy. PMID:28968445

  8. Detection of EML4-ALK in lung adenocarcinoma using pleural effusion with FISH, IHC, and RT-PCR methods.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leilei Liu

    Full Text Available Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK and echinoderm microtubule-associated protein-like 4 (EML4 gene rearrangements occur in approximately 5% of non-small-cell lung cancers (NSCLC, leading to the overexpression of anaplastic lymphoma kinase and predicting a response to the targeted inhibitor, crizotinib. Malignant pleural effusion occurs in most patients with advanced lung cancer, especially adenocarcinoma, and tissue samples are not always available from these patients. We attempted to clarify the feasibility of detecting the EML4-ALK fusion gene in pleural effusion cells using different methods. We obtained 66 samples of pleural effusion from NSCLC patients. The pleural effusion fluid was centrifuged, and the cellular components obtained were formalin fixed and paraffin embedded. The EML4-ALK fusion gene status was determined with fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH, reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR, and immunohistochemistry (IHC. EML4-ALK was detected in three of 66 patient samples (4.5% with RT-PCR. When the RT-PCR data were used as the standard, one false positive and one false negative samples were identified with IHC; and one false negative sample was identified with FISH. These results suggest that a block of pleural effusion cells can be used to detect the EML4-ALK fusion gene. IHC had good sensitivity, but low specificity. FISH had low sensitivity, but high specificity. RT-PCR is a good candidate method for detecting EML4-ALK in blocks of pleural effusion cells from lung cancer patients.

  9. Chryseobacterium meningosepticum Sepsis Complicated with Retroperitoneal Hematoma and Pleural Effusion in a Diabetic Patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shou-Wu Lee

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Intra-abdominal infection due to Chryseobacterium meningosepticum is rare, and bacteremia complicated with pleural effusion and retroperitoneal hematoma caused by C. meningosepticum has not been reported previously. A 57-year-old diabetic man presented with bacteremia with retroperitoneal abscess and pleural effusion caused by C. meningosepticum on the 12th day of hospitalization. His clinical condition improved after antimicrobial therapy with levofloxacin and rifampin, debridement of the retroperitoneal hematoma and left-side chest tube insertion. Antibiotics were administered for 1 month, and he was later transferred to a local respiratory care ward under afebrile condition. C. meningosepticum should be included in the list of suspected nosocomial infections, especially in patients with immunocompromised status. Administration of appropriate antibiotics, such as quinolone, minocycline, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole or rifampin, and treatment of local infection improve the clinical outcome of patients with C. meningosepticum infection.

  10. Pericardiocentesis in massive pericardial effusions due to hypothyroidism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nainggolan, F. H.; Dalimunthe, N. N.; Harahap, S.; Isnanta, R.; Realsyah, T.; Safri, Z.; Hasan, R.

    2018-03-01

    Pericardial effusion is the accumulation of abnormal fluid in the pericardial cavity. The symptoms are not specific and associated with the underlying disease. It was reported that a 53-year-old male patient entered the Emergency Room with a shortness of breath, and getting worse during activity and position. There was weight loss and smoking history. The history of diabetic, hypertension and malignancy were denied. On physical examination showed the enlarged right and left heart border and weakened heartbeat sheer off is found and edema pretibial and normal the other. The laboratory results;blood routine, renal and liver function within normal; lipid profile: hypercholesterolemia; viral marker is non-reactive.Rontgen thorax suggests cardiomegaly, but there was no infiltrate or nodules. Electrocardiogram (ECG) showed a low voltage. Echocardiography examination showed massive pericardial effusion. Pericardiosynthetis performed produces 750 cc of clear yellow liquid and showed transudate. Other laboratory tests such as ANA test, anti ds-DNA, cyfra were a normal impression. Thyroid function: hypothyroid, Mantoux test is negative. Finally, the patient is a massive pericardial effusion caused by hypothyroidism. The pericardiocentesis took, and the hypothyroid drug of euthirax is administered. The patient was well done and continued for recontrol.

  11. A rare cause of pleural effusion: ruptured primary pleural hydatid cyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erkoç, Mustafa Fatih; Öztoprak, Bilge; Alkan, Sevil; Okur, Aylin

    2014-03-06

    Hydatidosis is an endemic parasitic disease in Mediterranean countries, often caused by the dog tapeworm Echinococcus granulosus. The disease predominantly affects the liver (60-70%) and lungs (30%), and the surgical management is considered as the gold standard for treatment. Besides anaphylactic reactions, the most frequent complication of the hydatid disease is rupture into neighbouring structures, often affecting the bronchi, gastrointestinal tract and peritoneal/pleural cavities, according to its location. Primary pleural hydatidosis is an extremely rare entity and we present a ruptured pleural hydatid cyst with unusual location.

  12. Neoplastic pleural effusion and intrathoracic metastasis of a scapular osteosarcoma in a dog: a multidisciplinary integrated diagnostic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesquita, Luis; Mortier, Jeremy; Ressel, Lorenzo; Finotello, Riccardo; Silvestrini, Paolo; Piviani, Martina

    2017-06-01

    A 10-year-old, female spayed mixed-breed or cross-bred dog was referred to the Small Animal Teaching Hospital of the University of Liverpool due to tachypnea, dyspnea, and pleural effusion not responding to diuretics and antibiotics. The chest was drained and cytology of the pleural fluid was consistent with a modified transudate with presence of atypical cells initially attributed to mesothelial hyperplasia and dysplasia. Computed tomography detected, in addition to the bilateral pleural effusion, diffuse pleural thickening, multiple pleural and pulmonary nodules, and a mineralized and lytic mass in the left scapula. Imaging findings were suggestive of a primary bone tumor with intrathoracic metastasis. Cytology of the left scapular and pleural masses revealed a malignant neoplasm highly suggestive of osteosarcoma. The diagnosis was confirmed by demonstration of a positive cytochemical reaction for alkaline phosphatase on prestained cytology slides. This finding prompted review of the initial interpretation of the pleural effusion cytology. The presence of neoplastic osteoblasts in the thoracic fluid was identified by a combination of cytochemistry, cell pellet immunohistochemistry, and transmission electron microscopy findings. In this report, a multidisciplinary integrated diagnostic approach was used to diagnose and confirm a neoplastic pleural effusion due to osteosarcoma metastasis in a dog. © 2017 American Society for Veterinary Clinical Pathology.

  13. Bilateral Pleural Effusion in a Patient with an Extensive Extramedullary Hematopoietic Mass

    OpenAIRE

    Yun Luo; Ying Zhang; Shi-feng Lou

    2013-01-01

    We present a 56-year-old woman with bilateral pleural effusions, widespread enlarged lymph nodes, and soft tissue masses located within the renal pelvis. The initially working diagnosis was tuberculosis and lymphoma. Further pathological examination of the lymph node biopsy confirmed a diagnosis of extramedullary hematopoiesis, and a bone marrow biopsy revealed myelofibrosis. Unlike common treatment options such as radiotherapy and/or surgery, intrathoracic cisplatin and dexamethasone for the...

  14. Fluid loading and norepinephrine infusion mask the left ventricular preload decrease induced by pleural effusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wemmelund, Kristian Borup; Ringgård, Viktor Kromann; Vistisen, Simon Tilma

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Pleural effusion (PLE) may lead to low blood pressure and reduced cardiac output. Low blood pressure and reduced cardiac output are often treated with fluid loading and vasopressors. This study aimed to determine the impact of fluid loading and norepinephrine infusion on physiologic d...... global haemodynamic parameters. Inferior vena cava distensibility remained unchanged. The haemodynamic significance of PLE may be underestimated during fluid or norepinephrine administration, potentially masking the presence of PLE....

  15. A Simple Method for Differentiating Complicated Parapneumonic Effusion/Empyema from Parapneumonic Effusion Using the Split Pleura Sign and the Amount of Pleural Effusion on Thoracic CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsujimoto, Naoki; Saraya, Takeshi; Light, Richard W; Tsukahara, Yayoi; Koide, Takashi; Kurai, Daisuke; Ishii, Haruyuki; Kimura, Hirokazu; Goto, Hajime; Takizawa, Hajime

    2015-01-01

    Pleural separation, the "split pleura" sign, has been reported in patients with empyema. However, the diagnostic yield of the split pleura sign for complicated parapneumonic effusion (CPPE)/empyema and its utility for differentiating CPPE/empyema from parapneumonic effusion (PPE) remains unclear. This differentiation is important because CPPE/empyema patients need thoracic drainage. In this regard, the aim of this study was to develop a simple method to distinguish CPPE/empyema from PPE using computed tomography (CT) focusing on the split pleura sign, fluid attenuation values (HU: Hounsfield units), and amount of fluid collection measured on thoracic CT prior to diagnostic thoracentesis. A total of 83 consecutive patients who underwent chest CT and were diagnosed with CPPE (n=18)/empyema (n=18) or PPE (n=47) based on the diagnostic thoracentesis were retrospectively analyzed. On univariate analysis, the split pleura sign (odds ratio (OR), 12.1; ppleural effusion (≥30 mm) (OR, 6.13; ppleural fluid were significantly higher in the CPPE/empyema group than in the PPE group. On multivariate analysis, only the split pleura sign (hazard ratio (HR), 6.70; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.91-23.5; p=0.003) and total amount of pleural effusion (≥30 mm) on thoracic CT (HR, 7.48; 95%CI, 1.76-31.8; p=0.006) were risk factors for empyema. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of the presence of both split pleura sign and total amount of pleural effusion (≥30 mm) on thoracic CT for CPPE/empyema were 79.4%, 80.9%, 75%, and 84.4%, respectively, with an area under the curve of 0.801 on receiver operating characteristic curve analysis. This study showed a high diagnostic yield of the split pleura sign and total amount of pleural fluid (≥30 mm) on thoracic CT that is useful and simple for discriminating between CPPE/empyema and PPE prior to diagnostic thoracentesis.

  16. A case of pleural effusion during continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis diagnosed by peritoneopleural scintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hubalewska-Hola, A.; Szybinski, Z.; Szumilak, D.; Kopec, J.; Sulowicz, W.

    1998-01-01

    The occurrence of pleural effusion in patients with end stage renal failure treated with continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD) is a well known although quite rare complication. Intraperitoneal installation of dialysate increases intra-abdominal pressure and predisposes to pleural leak (usually right-sided) through the congenital, anatomic defects of the diaphragm. The presence of a small amount of pleural fluid may be difficult to diagnose (pleural aspiration and measure of the fluid glucose level is technically impossible). We present a case that was investigated by peritoneopleural scintigraphy to identify the leak of dialysate into the thoracic cavity. The serial dynamic images were done after the injection of Tc99m/Sn/Colloid (185 MBq) by a Tenckhoff catheter. The study demonstrated migration of the radioisotope to the right pleural space. The activity further increased with time demonstrating a transdiaphragmatic leakage. Nuclear imaging is a useful, simple, noninvasive method in detecting the transit of peritoneal fluid from the abdomen to the pleural space and it should be used more often as a diagnostic procedure. (author)

  17. Pentoxifylline inhibits the fibrogenic activity of pleural effusions and transforming growth factor-β

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    P. Entzian

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Physiopathology of organ fibrosis is far from being completely understood, and the efficacy of the available therapeutic strategies is disappointing. We chose pleural disease for further studies and addressed the questions of which cytokines are relevant in pleural fibrosis and which drugs might interrupt its development. We screened pleural effusions for mediators thought to interfere with fibrogenesis (transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β, tumour necrosis factor α (TNFα, soluble TNF-receptor p55 (sTNF-R and correlated the results with patient clinical outcome in terms of extent of pleural thickenings. We found pleural thickenings correlated with TGF-β (p<0.005 whereas no correlations could be observed with TNFα and sTNF-R. Further, we were interested in finding out how TGF-β effects on fibroblast growth could be modulated. We found that pentoxifylline is able to inhibit both fibroblast proliferation and collagen synthesis independently of the stimulus. We conclude that, judging from in vitro studies, pentoxifylline might offer a new approach in the therapy of pleural as well as pulmonary fibrosis.

  18. Chronic necrotizing pulmonary aspergillosis presenting as bilateral pleural effusion: a case report

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    Rajalingham Sakthiswary

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Chronic necrotizing pulmonary aspergillosis is an uncommon subacute form of Aspergillus infection. It typically occurs in immunocompromised individuals and in those with underlying lung disease. This interesting case highlights the occurrence of this entity of aspergillosis in an immunocompetent middle-aged woman with atypical radiological findings. To the best of our knowledge this is the first case report of chronic necrotizing pulmonary aspergillosis presenting with pleural effusion. Case presentation Our patient was a 64-year-old Malay woman with a background history of epilepsy but no other comorbidities. She was a lifelong non-smoker. She presented to our facility with a six-month history of productive cough and three episodes of hemoptysis. An initial chest radiograph showed bilateral pleural effusion with bibasal consolidation. Bronchoscopy revealed a white-coated endobronchial tree and bronchoalveolar lavage culture grew Aspergillus niger. A diagnosis of chronic necrotizing pulmonary aspergillosis was made based on the clinical presentation and microbiological results. She responded well to treatment with oral itraconazole. Conclusions The radiological findings in chronic necrotizing pulmonary aspergillosis can be very diverse. This case illustrates that this condition can be a rare cause of bilateral pleural effusion.

  19. Adaptive radiotherapy of lung cancer patients with pleural effusion or atelectasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Møller, Ditte Sloth; Khalil, Azza Ahmed; Knap, Marianne Marquard; Hoffmann, Lone

    2014-01-01

    Background and purpose: Changes in lung density due to atelectasis, pleural effusion and pneumonia/pneumonitis are observed in lung cancer patients. These changes may be an indication for adaptive radiotherapy in order to maintain target coverage and avoid increased risk of normal tissue complications. Material and methods: CBCT scans of 163 patients were reviewed to score lung changes and find the incidence, the impact of geometric and dosimetric changes and the timing of appearance and disappearance of changes. Results: 23% of the patients had changes in the lung related to pleural effusion, atelectasis or pneumonia/pneumonitis. In 9% of all patients, the appearance or disappearance of a change introduced a shift of the tumor or lymph nodes relative to the spine >5 mm. Only major density changes affected the dose distribution, and 9% of all patients needed adaptive treatment planning due to density changes. In total, 12% of all patients did benefit from an adaptive treatment plan and in 85% of these patients, an atelectasis did change. Conclusions: An adaptive strategy was indicated for 12% of the patients due to atelectasis, pleural effusion or pneumonia/pneumonitis. The predominant cause for adaptation was atelectasis. No systematic pattern in the appearance and disappearance of the changes were observed and hence weekly evaluation is preferable

  20. Hemostatic findings of pleural fluid in dogs and the association between pleural effusions and primary hyperfibrino(genolysis: A cohort study of 99 dogs.

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    Andrea Zoia

    Full Text Available The primary objective of this study was to determine if activation of coagulation and fibrinolysis occurs in canine pleural effusions. Thirty-three dogs with pleural effusions of different origin were studied. Pleural effusion fibrinogen concentrations were significantly lower, while pleural fibrin-fibrinogen degradation products (FDPs and D-dimer concentrations were significantly higher than those in plasma (P < 0.001 for all comparisons. These results show that, in canine pleural fluids, there is evidence of coagulation activation and fibrinolysis. The secondary aims of the current study were to determine if primary hyperfibrinolysis ([PHF] i.e., elevated plasma FDPs with a normal D-dimer concentrations, occurs in dogs with pleural effusion, and whether the presence of a concurrent inflammatory process may have activated the hemostatic cascade, with its intrinsically linked secondary hyperfibrinolysis, masking the concurrent PHF. The previously 33 selected dogs with pleural effusion (group 1 were compared to two control groups of 33 healthy (group 2 and 33 sick dogs without pleural effusion (group 3. Serum fibrinogen, FDPs, D-dimer, C-reactive protein (CRP, fibrinogen/CRP ratio, and frequency of PHF were determined. Fibrinogen, FDPs, D-dimer and CRP concentrations in group 1 were significantly increased compared to group 2 (P < 0.001 for all comparisons. FDPs and CRP concentrations in group 1 were also significantly increased compared to group 3 (P = 0.001 and P < 0.001, respectively. The fibrinogen/CRP ratio was significantly decreased in group 1 compared to groups 2 and 3 (P < 0.001 for both comparison. The frequency of PHF was significantly higher in group 1 compared to groups 2 (P = 0.004, but not compared to group 3. These results support the hypothesis that PHF occurs significantly more often in dogs with pleural effusion compared to healthy dogs. Nevertheless, the decrease in the fibrinogen/CRP ratio in group 1 compared to group 3

  1. [The assessment of surgical treatment of patients with malignant pleural effusion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazarev, S M; Reshetov, A V; Kakysheva, O E; Nikolaev, G V; Kirillov, Iu V; Volgin, G N

    2013-01-01

    An analysis of results of 498 patients with malignant pleural effusion was made. All patients were divided into three groups depending on methods of treatment: in the first group of patients the puncture of pleural cavity and the evacuation of liquid were made against the background of complex treatment; in the second group of patients the thoracocentesis and suspension induction were performed; in the third group the video thoracoscopy was carried out. In an assessment of each method of treatment, the researchers came to the conclusion that in case when the patient had the sufficient functional capabilities, the doctors should give preference to the thoracoscopy operations and in case of severe somatic status the doctors should give preference to the drainage of pleural cavity with release from exudates and with subsequent introduction of talc as the most effective sclerosing agent.

  2. Fluorescence in situ hybridization as adjunct to cytology improves the diagnosis and directs estimation of prognosis of malignant pleural effusions

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    Han Jingquan

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The identification of malignant cells in effusions by conventional cytology is hampered by its limited sensitivity and specificity. The aim of this study was to investigate the value of fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH as adjuncts to conventional cytologic examination in patients with malignant pleural effusions. Methods We conducted a retrospective cohort study of 93 inpatients with pleural effusions (72 malignant pleural effusions metastatic from 11 different organs and 21 benign over 23 months. All the patients came from Chinese northeast areas. Aspirated pleural fluid underwent cytologic examination and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH for aneuploidy. We used FISH in single-colour or if appropriate in dual-colour evaluation to detect chromosomal aberrations (chromosomes 7, 11, and 17 in effusion cells as markers of malignancy, to raise the diagnostic yield and identified the efficiency by diagnostic biopsy. Predominant cytogenetic anomalies and patterns of intratumor cytogenetic heterogeneity were brought in relation to overall survival rate. Results Cytology alone confirmed malignant pleural effusions in 45 of 72 patients (sensitivity 63%, whereas FISH alone positively identified 48 of 72 patients (sensitivity 67%. Both tests had high specificity in predicting benign effusions. If cytology and FISH were considered together, they exhibited 88% sensitivity and 94.5% specificity in discriminating benign and malignant effusions. Combined, the two assays were more sensitive than either test alone. Although the positive predictive value of each test was 94.5%, the negative predictive value of cytology and FISH combined was 78%, better than 47% and 44% for FISH and cytology alone, respectively. There was a significantly prolonged survival rate for patients with aneuploidy for chromosome 17. Conclusions FISH in combination with conventional cytology is a highly sensitive and specific diagnostic tool for detecting

  3. [Clinical analysis of prenatal diagnosis and intervention for primary pleural effusion of 13 cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, X Q; Li, W J; Yan, R L; Xiang, J W; Liu, M Y

    2018-02-25

    Objective: To optimize the clinical managements of primary fetal hydrothorax (PFHT) fetus by comparing the perinatal survival rate of different prenatal treatments. Methods: Totally 13 fetuses diagnosed with PFHT from July 2009 to December 2015 in the First Affiliated Hospital of Jinan University were collected and received prenatal expectant treatment, thoracocentesis (TC), and thoraco-amniotic shunting (TAS), respectively. The perinatal survival rate was compared among the three treatments. Results: Among 13 fetuses of PFHT, pleural effusion was absorbed or remained stable in 2(2/13) cases, and progressed in 11(11/13) cases. Six cases received expectant treatment (2 cases had termination of pregnancy due to progressing effusion, 2 cases had term delivery, and 2 cases had intrauterine death); the perinatal survival rate was 2/6. Six cases received TC (2 cases had term delivery, 2 cases had preterm delivery, and 2 cases had termination of pregnancy due to progressing effusion), the perinatal survival rate was 4/6. One case received TC+TAS (term delivery), the perinatal survival rate was 1/1. The overall perinatal survival rate of prenatal intrauterine intervention was 5/7. Conclusions: The clinical process of PFHT is changeable, and the pleural effusion will progress with gestational age. Intrauterine interventions could improve the perinatal survival rate.

  4. Transcatheter intracavitary fibrinolysis of loculated pleural effusions: Experience in 102 patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Gregorio, Miguel A.; Ruiz, Carlos; Alfonso, Eduardo R.; Fernandez, Jose A.; Medrano, Joaquin; Arino, Ignacio

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the efficacy of intrapleural urokinase instillation through smll-caliber catheters for the treatment of loculate and/or septate effusions.Methods: We inserted small-caliber catheters (8.2 Fr) in 102 patients with septate and/or loculate pleural effusions using ultrasonographic guidance. Urokinase (100,000 IU/2 hr, 3 times a day) was instilled through the catheter until the effusion resolved and D-dimer levels were 2 mm). Two patients died from unrelated causes within 30 days after catheter placement. Complications were seen in 13 patients (12.74%): hydropneumothorax, nine cases (8.82%); infection of the puncture point, three cases (2.94%); and adverse reaction, one case (0.98%). No further treatment was required.Conclusions: The use of intrapleural fibrinolytic agents delivered through small-caliber catheters for the treatment of loculate and/or septate pleural effusion is a simple, effective, minimally invasive and inexpensive procedure that can prevent sequelae and shorten drainage time.

  5. [The value of B7-H4 and carcinoembryonic antigen in diagnosing the benign and malignant pleural effusion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, F; Wei, Y; Li, L F; Li, G L; Wang, G J

    2017-07-23

    Objective: To evaluate the value of combined detection of negative costimulatory molecule B7-H4 and carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) in diagnosing malignant and benign pleural effusion. Methods: Ninety-seven pleural effusion specimen were collected, 55 of which were diagnosed as malignant pleural effusion and 42 were benign pleural effusion. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay(ELISA) was used to examine the concentration of B7-H4 and CEA in pleural effusion. Electro-chemiluminescence immunoassay was used to detect the CEA level in pleural effusion. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve was established to analyze and evaluate the single or combined detection of B7-H4 and CEA in diagnosing malignant and benign pleural effusion. Results: The concentrations of B7-H4 and CEA in malignant pleural effusion (MPE) group were (60.08±35.04) ng/ml and (41.49±37.16) ng/ml, respectively, obviously higher than (27.26±9.55) ng/ml and (2.41±0.94) ng/ml of benign pleural effusion (BPE) group (both P 37.25 ng/ml or CEA>4.18 ng/ml, the sensitivity of diagnosis as MPE was down-regulated to 90.9% and the specificity was elevated to 88.1%. When B7-H4 >37.25 ng/ml and CEA>4.18 ng/ml, the sensitivity of diagnosis as MPE was down-regulated to 78.2% and the specificity was elevated to 97.6%. The sensitivity and specificity of combined detection of B7-H4 and CEA to diagnose MPE were elevated to 90.9% and 97.6%, respectively. The level of B7-H4 in MPE and BPE were both positively correlated with CEA ( r =0.670, P =0.001 in MPE and r =0.002, P =0.001 in BEP). Conclusions: B7-H4 is a potential tumor marker in diagnosing the benign and malignant pleural effusion. Although the diagnostic value of B7-H4 may not precede to CEA, the combined detection of B7-H4 and CEA can improve the diagnostic sensitivity and specificity of MPE.

  6. Role of MCP-1 in pleural effusion development in a carrageenan-induced murine model of pleurisy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lansley, Sally M; Cheah, Hui Min; Lee, Y C Gary

    2017-05-01

    Exudative pleural effusions affect over 1500 patients per million population each year. The pathobiology of pleural exudate formation remains unclear. Our recent study revealed monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1) as a key driver of fibrinolytic-induced exudate effusion while another study found a role for MCP-1 in malignant effusion formation. In the present study, we further evaluated the role of MCP-1 in the development of pleural effusion in a mouse model of acute pleural inflammation. λ-Carrageenan (CAR) was injected into the pleural cavity of CD1 mice and pleural effusion volume measured up to 16 h post-injection. Pleural effusion and serum protein and MCP-1 concentrations were measured and differential cell counts performed in fluids. Mice were also treated with either intraperitoneal (i) anti-MCP-1 antibody or isotype control or (ii) an MCP-1 receptor (CCR2) antagonist or vehicle control 12 h prior to and at the time of CAR injection. Intrapleural CAR induced significant pleural fluid accumulation (300.0 ± 49.9 μL) in mice after 4 h. Pleural fluid MCP-1 concentrations were significantly higher than corresponding serum MCP-1 (144 603 ± 23 204 pg/mL vs 3703 ± 801 pg/mL, P pleural fluid formation was seen both with anti-MCP-1 antibody (median (interquartile range, IQR): 36 (0-168) μL vs controls 290 (70-436) μL; P = 0.02) or CCR2 antagonist (153 (30-222) μL vs controls 240 (151-331) μL, P = 0.0049). Blockade of MCP-1 activity significantly reduced inflammatory pleural effusion formation in a CAR model. Together with recent successes in MCP-1 blockade in other effusion formation models, our data strongly support clinical evaluation of MCP-1 antagonists as a novel approach to pleural fluid management. © 2016 Asian Pacific Society of Respirology.

  7. Tru-cut needle pleural biopsy and cytology as the initial procedure in the evaluation of pleural effusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botana Rial, Maribel; Briones Gómez, Andrés; Ferrando Gabarda, José Ramón; Cifuentes Ruiz, José Fernando; Guarín Corredor, María Juliana; Manchego Frach, Nuria; Cases Viedma, Enrique

    2014-08-01

    The evaluation of pleural effusion (PE) includes various techniques, including pleural biopsy (PB). Our aim was to study the diagnostic yield of Tru-Cut needle PB (TCPB) and to define clinical/radiological situations in which TCPB might be indicated as an initial procedure. Retrospective study of TCPB in a hospital centre (2010-2012). Cases of pleural lesions without effusion were excluded. Clinical and radiological variables, diagnostic yield, TCPB complications and factors associated with the diagnostic yield of the combination of TCPB and thoracocentesis as initial procedure were analysed. One hundred and twenty-seven (127) TCPB were reviewed: 29.1% were cases of malignant PE and in 18.9% the cause of the PE could not be determined. The diagnostic yield of TCPB for tuberculosis was 76.5% (13/17) and 54% (20/37) for malignant PE. Complications occurred in 4.7% of the cases. In 72 patients with a final definitive diagnosis, TCPB was performed at the same time as the initial thoracocentesis. Diagnostic yield for the combination of TCPB/cytology as an initial technique was 43% (31/72) compared to 12.5% (9/72) for cytology only (p=0.01). The only predictive variable for the indication of TCBP as an initial technique was a PE volume>2/3 (P=.04). TCPB is safe and provides an acceptable diagnostic yield, particularly when combined with simultaneous cytology in the evaluation of PE of various aetiologies. Radiological criteria may help guide the selection of patients who could benefit from this technique as an initial procedure combined with thoracocentesis. Copyright © 2013 SEPAR. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  8. Radioimmunological detection of the tumor marker CA 12-5 in the serum of patients with benign and malignant pleural effusions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scherer, J.H.; Krause, F.J.; Geier, G.

    1988-01-01

    In 44 patients with benign diseases and 16 patients with malignant diseases the tumour associated antigen CA 12-5 was determined in sera and pleural effusions. In 97% of the investigated pleural effusions and in 89% of the investigated sera we found pathologically elevated CA 12-5-concentrations. It could be shown, that the determination of CA 12-5 in sera of patients with pleural effusions does not permit to discriminate between benign and malignant origin, because there is no significant difference of the CA 12-5-concentrations between patient sera with benign diseases and patient sera with malignant diseases, when they have pleural effusions. (orig.) [de

  9. Classificação ultra-sonográfica do derrame pleural e do empiema parapneumônico Ultrasound classification of pleural effusion and parapneumonic empyema

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    Luís Marcelo Inaco Cirino

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available Os autores correlacionam as alterações anatomopatológicas da cavidade pleural com os achados ultra-sonográficos no derrame pleural e no empiema parapneumônico e apresentam uma classificação baseada nestes dados. Concluem que a ultra-sonografia é método diagnóstico fidedigno para inferir a fase anatomopatológica da doença pleural, bem como auxiliar na escolha da alternativa de tratamento.We correlated the anatomopathological abnormalities of the pleural space with the ultrasound findings in patients with pleural effusion and/or parapneumonic empyema and proposed a classification based on these results. Ultrasonography is a reliable method to infer the anatomopathological phase of pleural disease and consequently may be of help in the choice of the most suitable treatment.

  10. Screening Performance Characteristic of Ultrasonography and Radiography in Detection of Pleural Effusion; a Meta-Analysis

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    Mahmoud Yousefifard

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The role of ultrasonography in detection of pleural effusion has long been a subject of interest but controversial results have been reported. Accordingly, this study aims to conduct a systematic review of the available literature on diagnostic value of ultrasonography and radiography in detection of pleural effusion through a meta-analytic approach. Methods: An extended search was done in databases of Medline, EMBASE, ISI Web of Knowledge, Scopus, Cochrane Library, and ProQuest. Two reviewers independently extracted the data and assessed the quality of the articles. Meta-analysis was performed using a mixed-effects binary regression model. Finally, subgroup analysis was carried out in order to find the sources of heterogeneity between the included studies. Results: 12 studies were included in this meta-analysis (1554 subjects, 58.6% male. Pooled sensitivity of ultrasonography in detection of pleural effusion was 0.94 (95% CI: 0.88-0.97; I2= 84.23, p<0.001 and its pooled specificity was calculated to be 0.98 (95% CI: 0.92-1.0; I2= 88.65, p<0.001, while sensitivity and specificity of chest radiography were 0.51 (95% CI: 0.33-0.68; I2= 91.76, p<0.001 and 0.91 (95% CI: 0.68-0.98; I2= 92.86, p<0.001, respectively. Sensitivity of ultrasonography was found to be higher when the procedure was carried out by an intensivist or a radiologist using 5-10 MHz transducers. Conclusion: Chest ultrasonography, as a screening tool, has a higher diagnostic accuracy in identification of plural effusion compared to radiography. The sensitivity of this imaging modality was found to be higher when performed by a radiologist or an intensivist and using 5-10MHz probes.

  11. Dynamics of pleural fluid effusion and chylothorax in the fetus and newborn: role of the lymphatic system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellini, C; Ergaz, Z; Boccardo, F; Bellini, T; Campisi, C C; Bonioli, E; Ramenghi, L A

    2013-06-01

    Pleural fluid effusion particularly chylothorax is a relatively rare occurrence in the newborn, but when it occurs it is often life-threatening. In this article, we describe and illustrate the morphologic features of the visceral and parietal pleura including pleural lymphatics and the physiology and pathophysiology of pleural fluid balance. The role and function of the lymphatic system in controlling the volume and composition of pleural liquid are detailed and a conceptual scheme presented. Finally, the crucial role of inadequate lymphatic drainage (either functional overload from an imbalance in Starling forces or mechanical insufficiency from lymphatic dysplasia) is emphasized.

  12. Conservative use of chest-tube insertion in children with pleural effusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epaud, R; Aubertin, G; Larroquet, M; Pointe, H Ducou-le; Helardot, P; Clement, A; Fauroux, B

    2006-04-01

    The aim of this work was to evaluate the effect of a more conservative use of chest-tube insertion on the short-term and long-term outcome of pleural infection. Sixty-five patients with pleural infection, aged 1 month to 16 years were each treated according to one of the two protocols: classical management with chest-tube insertion (classical group, n = 33), or conservative use of chest-tube insertion (conservative group, n = 32), with drainage indicated only in the case of voluminous pleural effusion defined by a mediastinal shift and respiratory distress and/or an uncontrolled septic situation. The two groups were comparable with regard to age, baseline C-reactive protein (CRP) value and white blood cell counts, pleural thickness, identified bacteria, and antibiotic treatment. Chest-tube insertion was performed in 17 patients (52%) of the classical group compared to eight patients (25%) of the conservative group (P = 0.03). Duration of temperature above 39 degrees C was shorter in the conservative group (10 +/- 1 vs. 14 +/- 1 days, P = 0.01), as was the normalization of CRP (13 +/- 1 vs. 17 +/- 1 days, P = 0.03). Duration of hospitalization and intravenous (IV) antibiotherapy as well as the delay of chest-radiograph normalization was not significantly different between the two groups. A more conservative use of chest-tube insertion did not change short- and long-term outcome of the pleural infection in children. Drainage could be restricted to the most severely affected patients with pleural empyema causing a mediastinal shift and respiratory distress and/or presenting with an uncontrolled septic situation.

  13. Massive Haemorrhagic Ascites and Pleural effusion: An Unusual ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A histological diagnosis of peritoneal endometriosis was made by tissue obtained at percutaneous peritoneal biopsy.Conservative hormonal treatment using Danazole therapy led to a remission of disease activity. This case illustrates the uncommon presentation of a relatively common disorder,and represents one of the ...

  14. The Comparative Analysis of Biochemical Parameters in Patients with Pleural Effusions: A Prospective Study

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    Ali Kutluk

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The differentiation of exudative from transudative effusion is important to lead the clinician in making further biochemical analysis for possible etiology and in choosing the appropriate treatment strategy. The aim of the study is to evaluate the diagnostic value of biochemical parameters together with Light%u2019s criteria to differentiate exudative from transudative effusions. Material and Method: The LDH, total protein, albumin, adenosine deaminase (ADA, apolipoprotein A1, apolipoprotein B, Lipoprotein-A, total cholesterol, HDL-cholesterol, VLDL-cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol, and triglyceride levels of patients with unknown etiology were measured both in plasma and pleural fluid. Mann-Whitney U was used to compare the groups and p < 0.05 was accepted as statistical significance. Sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy were calculated for each biochemical parameter. The ROC analysis was used to estimate the optimum cut-off value for the highest sensitivity and specificity.Results: Pleural LDH (p=0.001, total protein (p=0.001, albumin (p=0.001, triglyceride (p=0.001, total cholesterol (p=0.001, HDL-cholesterol (p=0.042, VLDL-cholesterol (p=0.001, LDL-cholesterol (p=0.001, apolipoprotein A1 (p=0.021, and HDL-cholesterol/LDL-cholesterol ratio (p=0.048 were found significant in differentiating exudative from transudative effusions. Discussion: The study showed that the use of pleural LDH, total cholesterol, and HDL-cholesterol levels together is more significant than Light%u2019s criteria. The sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of this test were 99%, 94.1%, and 96.2% respectively.

  15. Pulmonary melioidosis presenting with pleural effusion: A case report and review of literature

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    Chun Ian Soo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Melioidosis is a serious infection, which can involve multiple systems. We report a case of pulmonary melioidosis with the initial presentation mimicking a partially treated pneumonia complicated by right-sided pleural effusion. The patient is a 49-year old man who did not respond to parenteral ceftriaxone and tazobactam/piperacillin therapy. However, upon culture and sensitivity results from blood and pleural samples isolated Burkholderia pseudomallei; antimicrobial therapy was de-escalated to parenteral ceftazidime. Within 72 h duration, his fever subsided and other respiratory symptoms improved tremendously. This case highlights the importance of early recognition of B. pseudomallei in pulmonary infection in order for prompt institution of appropriate antibiotics treatment; thus reducing morbidity and mortality.

  16. Report of a rare case of histiocytic necrotizing lymphadenitis with bilateral pleural effusion diagnosed via cervical lymph node biopsy

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    Xuchun Liu

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT CONTEXT: Histiocytic necrotizing lymphadenitis (HNL is a rare disorder that is often benign and self-limiting. There have been reports of co-occurrence of HNL with other diseases, including systemic lupus erythematosus, hemophagocytic syndrome and antiphospholipid syndrome. CASE REPORT: Here, we report a case in which a patient experienced unexplained fever, swelling of the cervical lymph node and bilateral pleural effusion and was ultimately diagnosed with HNL based on results from a lymph node biopsy. After treatment with glucocorticoid, the patient regained normal body temperature, the swelling of the lymph nodes disappeared and the pleural effusion was reabsorbed. CONCLUSIONS: The pathogenesis of HNL remains unclear, and pleural effusion is rarely reported in HNL patients. We presented this case to improve diagnostic awareness of this condition among clinicians and help reduce the likelihood of misdiagnosis.

  17. Prevalence and Impact on Weaning of Pleural Effusion at the Time of Liberation from Mechanical Ventilation: A Multicenter Prospective Observational Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dres, Martin; Roux, Damien; Pham, Tài; Beurton, Alexandra; Ricard, Jean-Damien; Fartoukh, Muriel; Demoule, Alexandre

    2017-06-01

    Pleural effusion is frequent in intensive care unit patients, but its impact on the outcome of weaning remains unknown. In a prospective study performed in three intensive care units, pleural ultrasound was performed at the first spontaneous breathing trial to detect and quantify pleural effusion (small, moderate, and large). Weaning failure was defined by a failed spontaneous breathing trial and/or extubation requiring any form of ventilatory support within 48 h. The primary endpoint was the prevalence of pleural effusion according to weaning outcome. Pleural effusion was detected in 51 of 136 (37%) patients and was quantified as moderate to large in 18 (13%) patients. As compared to patients with no or small pleural effusion, their counterparts were more likely to have chronic renal failure (39 vs. 7%; P = 0.01), shock as the primary reason for admission (44 vs. 19%; P = 0.02), and a greater weight gain (+4 [0 to 7] kg vs. 0 [-1 to 5] kg; P = 0.02). The prevalence of pleural effusion was similar in weaning success and weaning failure patients (odds ratio, 1.23; 95% CI, 0.61 to 2.49; P = 0.56), as was the prevalence of moderate to large pleural effusion (odds ratio, 0.89; 95% CI, 0.33 to 2.41; P = 1.00). Duration of mechanical ventilation and intensive care unit length of stay were similar between patients with no or small pleural effusion and those with moderate to large pleural effusion. Significant pleural effusion was observed in 13% of patients at the time of liberation from mechanical ventilation and was not associated with an alteration of weaning outcome. (ANESTHESIOLOGY 2017; 126:1107-15).

  18. Diagnostic value of combined determination of serum and pleural effusion CEA, CYFRA21-1 and NSE levels in patients with malignancy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Xiaoxiao

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To study the clinical value of combined determination of serum and pleural effusion levels of CEA, CYFRA21-1 and NSE in patients with malignancy. Methods: Serum and pleural effusion CEA, CYFRA21-1 and NSE levels were measured with RIA in 40 patients with malignant and 32 patients with tuberculous pleural effusions. Results: The pleural effusion CEA, CYFRA21-1, NSE levels and pleural effusion serum levels ratio in malignant group were significantly higher than those in tuberculous group (P<0.01). The specificity of CEA (90%) was higher than those in that of CYFRA21-1 and NSE, and the sensitivity of CYFRA21-1 (83%) was higher than that of CEA and NSE. With combined detection of CEA, CYFRA21-1 and NSE, the sensitivity was 90% and the specificity was 89% for diagnosis of malignant pleural effusion. Conclusion: Combined determination of serum and pleural effusion CEA, CYFRA21-1 and NSE levels would be more sensitive for diagnosis of malignant pleural effusion. (authors)

  19. In lung cancer patients where a malignant pleural effusion is found at operation could resection ever still be justified?

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    Fiorelli, Alfonso; Santini, Mario

    2013-08-01

    A best evidence topic in thoracic surgery was written according to a structured protocol. The question addressed was whether surgery could ever be justified in non-small cell lung cancer patients with an unexpected malignant pleural effusion at surgery. Eight papers were chosen to answer the question. The authors, journal, date and country of publication, patient group studied, study type, relevant outcomes and results of these papers were tabulated. Study limitations included a lack of retrospective studies, the heterogeneous patient population and various treatments applied. Three papers found that surgery--compared to exploratory thoracotomy--was associated with a survival advantage in cases of minimal pleural disease. One paper showed that the median survival time of 58.8 months in patients with pleural effusion was better than that of patients with more extensive pleural dissemination as pleural nodule (10 months; P=0.0001) or pleural nodule with effusion (19.3 months; P=0.019). Another study showed that pleural effusion patients with N0-1 status had a median survival time more than 5 years longer than patients with similar or more extensive pleural dissemination but with N2-N3 status. A further study showed a better 5-year survival time in patients with pleural effusion, than in patients with pleural nodule (22.9% vs 8.9%, respectively; P=0.45). In two papers, surgery vs exploratory thoracotomy had better survival in cases of N0 status and of complete tumour resection independently of pleural dissemination. Different strategies were employed to obtain freedom from macroscopic residual tumour, including pneumonectomy, lobar resection or, to a lesser extent, pleurectomy in patients having pleural dissemination. Only one paper reported a worse median survival time after pneumonectomy than for more limited resections (12.8 vs 24.1 months, respectively; P=0.0018). In the remaining papers, no comparison between the different resections was made. In all studies

  20. Accuracy of Medical Students in Detecting Pleural Effusion Using Lung Ultrasound as an Adjunct to the Physical Examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinmetz, Peter; Oleskevich, Sharon; Dyachenko, Alina; McCusker, Jane; Lewis, John

    2018-03-25

    This study compared the accuracy of medical students in identifying pleural effusion in hospitalized patients using the physical examination versus lung ultrasound (US). Fourth-year medical students (n = 14) received 20 hours of general practical US training (including 2 hours of specialized lung US training) plus theoretical and video documentation. The students used the physical examination alone versus the physical examination plus lung US to document the presence or absence of pleural effusion in the right and left hemithoraces of hospitalized patients (n = 11 patients; 22 hemithoraces examined 544 times in total). The reference standard for identification of pleural effusion was a lung US examination by 2 expert point-of-care sonographers. The odds of correctly identifying the presence versus absence of pleural effusion was 5 times greater with lung US as an adjunct to the physical examination compared to the physical examination alone (odds ratio [OR], 5.1 from multivariate logistic regression; 95% confidence interval, 3.3-8.0). The addition of lung US to the physical examination resulted in an increase in sensitivity from 48% to 90%, in specificity from 73% to 86%, and in accuracy from 60% to 88%. The benefits of using US were greater when pleural effusion was present versus absent (OR, 10.8 versus 2.4) and when examining older versus younger patients (OR, 10.2 versus 2.8). These results demonstrate that medical students' ability to detect the presence or absence of pleural effusion is superior when using lung US as an adjunct to the physical examination than when using the physical examination alone. © 2018 by the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine.

  1. Clinical study on bevacizumab combined with carboplatin therapy for malignant pleural effusion of non-small cell lung cancer

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    Li-Ping Yang1

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate the effect of bevacizumab combined with carboplatin therapy for malignant pleural effusion of non-small cell lung cancer on tumor markers, angiogenesis molecules and invasive growth molecules. Methods: A total of 68 patients who were diagnosed with non-small cell lung cancer complicated by pleural effusion in the Affiliated T.C.M Hospital of Southwest Medical University between June 2013 and August 2016 were selected and randomly divided into two groups, the combined group received bevacizumab combined with carboplatin chemotherapy, and the carboplatin group received carboplatin chemotherapy. Before treatment as well as 3 cycles and 6 cycles after treatment, the contents of tumor markers, angiogenesis molecules and invasive growth molecules in pleural effusion were examined. Results: 3 cycles and 6 cycles after treatment, CEA, SCCAg, CYFRA21-1, sHLA-G, VEGF, VEGFR, PTN, MMP7 and MMP10 contents in pleural effusion of both groups of patients were significantly lower than those before treatment while TIMP1 and TIMP2 contents were significantly higher than those before treatment, and CEA, SCCAg, CYFRA21-1, sHLA-G, VEGF, VEGFR, PTN, MMP7 and MMP10 contents in pleural effusion of combined group were significantly lower than those of carboplatin group while TIMP1 and TIMP2 contents were significantly higher than those of carboplatin group. Conclusion: Bevacizumab combined with carboplatin therapy for malignant pleural effusion of non-small cell lung cancer can effectively kill cancer cells, and inhibit angiogenesis and cell invasion.

  2. Value of combined detection of interferon-γ, vascular endothelial growth factor, C-reactive protein and adenosine deaminase in differential diagnosis of tuberculous and malignant pleural effusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Guo'an; Han Sugui; Zhou Xiuyan; He Weishe; Sun Fangchu

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To explore the value of interferon II, vascular endothelial growth factor, C-reactive protein and adenosine deaminase in differential diagnosis of tuberculous and malignant pleural effusion. Methods: 122 cases with tuberculous pleurisy, 56 cases of malignant pleural effusion, 48 cases of tuberculous pleural effusion, 18 cases of inflammatory and other pleural fluid were studied. The serum and pleural fluid levels of IFN-γ, VEGF-C, CRP and ADA serum in those patients were detected. Results: The IFN-γ, CRP and ADA levels in tuberculous pleural effusion were higher than in malignant pleural effusion(P<0.01). According to the receiver operator characteristic (ROC) curve, when 100 ng/L was regarded as critical value of IFN-γ, the sensitivity and specificity of IFN-γ in diagnosing tuberculous pleural effusion were 83.1% and 92.3% respectively. When 45 U/L ADA was regarded as critical value of ADA, the sensitivity and specificity of ADA in diagnosing tuberculous pleural effusion were 85.6% and 96.3% respectively. When 110 mg/L was regarded as critical value of CRP, the sensitivity and specificity of CRP were 79.1% and 84.2% respectively. When combine detection of three markers, the diagnosis sensitivity and specificity were 87.8% and 86.0% respectively. The VEGF-C concentration in malignant pleural effusion was higher than that in tuberculous pleural effusion and inflammatory and other pleural effusion (P<0.01). When the ratio of VEGF-C to ADA≥8, the sensitivity and specificity in diagnosis of malignant pleural effusion were 86.3% and 82.6% respectively, and the ration VEGF-C to ADA≤3, the sensitivity and specificity in diagnosis of tuberculous pleural effusion were 85.1% and 87.1% respectively. Conclusion: The combined detection of IFN-γ, CRP and ADA could improve sensitivity and specificity in diagnosing tuberculous pleurisy. The concentration ratios of VEGF-C to ADA have clinical value in differential diagnosis of pleural effusions. (authors)

  3. To choose the cut-off point of ferritin for differentiation between benign from malignant pleural-peritoneal effusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Liu; Yang Wenjing; Liu Junfeng; Yu Jiuru

    2005-01-01

    To explore the level of ferritin for differentiating the benign from malignant pleural and peritoneal effusion, 218 pleural-peritoneal effusion samples from patients with different kinds of diseases were determined for ferritin (P Ft ) by RIA, in the meanwhile serum ferritin (S Ft ) was also determined. According to clinical diagnosis, these samples were divided into two groups: benign and malignant. P Ft and S Ft were compared between these two groups, and the ratio of P Ft to S Ft was counted. The ROC curve was used to choose the best cut-off point P Ft for differentiating benign from malignant pleural and peritoneal effusion. The results showed that in the benign effusion group the P Ft was 142.4±38.6 μg/L, S Ft was 89.7±43.5 μg/L, and P Ft / S Ft was 1.46±0.55, whereas in the group of malignant effusion the corresponding figures were 576.5±239.l μg/L, 189.±81.7 μg/L, and 3.67±1.48, respectively. The cut-off point for differentiating benign from malignant pleural and peritoneal effusion was 400 μg/L. Our differentiation standards are: P Ft ≥400 μg/L,P Ft /S Ft ≥3 for the malignant pleural and peritoneal ef- fusion, and P Ft Ft /S Ft <3 for the benign effusion. The sensitivity is 84.5%, the specificity is 87.5%, and the accuracy is 92.8%. (authors)

  4. Evaluation of the renal resistive index and pulsatility index in patients with pleural effusion by duplex Doppler ultrasonography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Değirmenci, Nevbahar Akcar; Metintaş, Muzaffer; Atlanoglu, Sahinde; Yıldırım, Huseyin

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the renal resistive index (RI) and pulsatility index (PI) in patients with pleural effusion (PE). We studied the mean renal RI and PI in 50 patients with PE and 30 healthy volunteers by Doppler sonography. We grouped effusion as unilateral and bilateral. Statistical analysis was done by independent t test and correlation coefficient analysis. The mean RI/PI in healthy volunteers and in PE patients was 0.58/0.93 and 0.72/1.35, respectively. We observed a significantly higher RI and PI in patients when compared with healthy volunteers (all p effusion (0.74 or 1.55, respectively) (p > 0.05). Pleural effusion might result in increased renal impedance as seen in cirrhosis, which is a rather complicated pathophysiological process, without causing any morphological changes in kidneys.

  5. In diagnosis of pleural effusion and pneumothorax in the intensive care unit patients: Can chest us replace bedside plain radiography?

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    ElShaimaa Mohamed Mohamed

    2018-06-01

    Conclusions: In evaluation of ICU patients with pleural effusion and pneumothorax, chest US is the first bedside tool with high diagnostic performance. These chest conditions are urgent especially in seriously ill patients, as both need US guided drainage. Chest US has many advantages, including non invasive examination in multiple planes, free of radiation hazard, less expensive, real-time, high sensitivity and diagnostic accuracy in chest lesions detection. Lung ultrasound is being exclusive than bedside chest X-ray and equal to chest CT in diagnosing pleural effusion and pneumothorax.

  6. Sinus cut-off sign: A helpful sign in the CT diagnosis of diaphragmatic rupture associated with pleural effusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaya, Seyda Ors; Karabulut, Nevzat; Yuncu, Gokhan; Sevinc, Serpil; Kiroglu, Yilmaz

    2006-01-01

    The objective of our study was to describe the 'sinus cut-off' sign at CT in the diagnosis of diaphragmatic rupture in patients with blunt abdominal trauma complicated with pleural effusion, and evaluate its utility in an experimental model. Between January 2004 and March 2005, we observed an unusual interruption of costophrenic sinus at CT in three patients with blunt abdominal trauma accompanied with pleural effusion. This observation prompted us to evaluate the utility of this sign in an experimental model. Laparotomically, we created 2 cm diapragmatic lacerations at each hemidiaphragm in two rabbits and pushed up the abdominal viscera with omentum through the defect. To simulate hemothorax, we also injected 5-10 mL of diluted contrast material into the pleural space. Using a dual-slice helical CT scanner, limited thoracoabdominal CT examination was performed before and after injection of intrapleural contrast material. The images were analyzed for the presence of CT signs for diaphragmatic injury. The left posterior costophrenic sulcus was interrupted in all of the three patients with left pleural effusion. While it was associated with other findings of diaphragmatic injury, the 'sinus cut-off sign' was the sole finding in one patient. The sinus cut-off sign was observed on the CT scans of 100% of the rabbits with a left and right sided diaphragmatic rupture. The 'sinus cut-off sign' is useful and can increase the CT detection of acute diaphragmatic injury associated with pleural effusion

  7. Safety and Efficacy of Tissue Plasminogen Activator and DNase for Complicated Pleural Effusions Secondary to Abdominal Pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majid, Adnan; Ochoa, Sebastian; Chatterji, Sumit; Fernandez-Bussy, Sebastian; Kheir, Fayez; Rivera, Estefania; Cheng, George; Folch, Erik

    2017-03-01

    Exudative pleural effusions may arise secondary to inflammation of intra-abdominal structures. Pleural space loculations can complicate these effusions, preventing adequate chest tube drainage and leading to consideration of surgical intervention. Previous studies have demonstrated that intrapleural administration of tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) combined with human recombinant DNase can improve fluid drainage and reduce surgery for patients with loculated parapneumonic effusions; however, the efficacy of this treatment has not been evaluated for complicated pleural effusions attributed to intra-abdominal inflammation. We assessed the safety and efficacy of tPA/DNase for 17 pleural effusions associated with nonmalignant intra-abdominal pathology that did not drain adequately after placement of one or more chest tubes. Efficacy was measured by comparing post- to pretreatment fluid drainage rates, volumetric assessment of pleural fluid on radiographic images before and after treatment, and clinical improvement, including the need for surgical intervention. Symptomatic relief was assessed using the Borg scale for breathlessness. After a median of two doses of tPA/DNase, 23.5% of patients had chest pain and none had pleural bleeding. The volume of pleural fluid drained increased from a median of 325 ml to 890 ml per 24 hours after therapy (P = 0.018). The area of pleural space opacity on chest radiographs decreased from a median of 42.8-17.8% of the hemithorax (P = 0.001). tPA/DNase reduced the pleural fluid volume on chest computed tomographic imaging from a median of 294.4 ml to 116.1 ml. Borg scores improved from a median of 3 (interquartile range = 1-6) to 0 (interquartile range = 0-2) after therapy (P = 0.001). The median duration of chest tube placement and hospital stay were 4 and 11 days, respectively. Two patients required surgical intervention for lung entrapment. Overall, treatment was considered successful for 88.2% of patients

  8. Plasma and pleural fluid pharmacokinetics of erlotinib and its active metabolite OSI-420 in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer with pleural effusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masago, Katsuhiro; Togashi, Yosuke; Fukudo, Masahide; Terada, Tomohiro; Irisa, Kaoru; Sakamori, Yuichi; Kim, Young Hak; Mio, Tadashi; Inui, Ken-Ichi; Mishima, Michiaki

    2011-09-01

    Erlotinib is orally active and selectively inhibits the tyrosine kinase activity of the epidermal growth factor receptor. The pleural space penetration and exposure of erlotinib is poorly understood. Thus, we investigated the pharmacokinetics (PK) of erlotinib and its active metabolite OSI-420 in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) of malignant pleural effusion (MPE). We analyzed the PK of erlotinib and OSI-420 on days 1 and 8 after beginning erlotinib therapy in 9 patients with MPE. Their concentrations were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography with ultraviolet detection. Blood samples were obtained five times per day: before administration, and 2, 4, 8, and 24 hours after administration. Pleural effusions were obtained once per day, 2 hours after administration on day 1, and before administration on day 8. The exceptions were cases 2 and 4, which had pleural effusions obtained just before drug administration, and 2, 4, 8, and 24 hours after administration. The mean percentage of penetration from plasma to pleural effusion for erlotinib was 18% on day 1 and 112% on day 8, while these values for OSI-420 were 9.5% on day 1 and 131% on day 8. The area under the drug concentration-time curve of pleural fluid for erlotinib was 28,406 ng-hr/mL for case 2 and 45,906 ng-hr/mL for case 4. There seems to be a significant accumulation of both erlotinib and OSI-420 in MPE with repeated dosing. Although larger studies will be necessary to determine the true impact of erlotinib MPE accumulation on plasma PK and safety, erlotinib can be administered safely to patients with MPE with respect to efficacy and side effects. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  9. [Clinical Value of Cell Block in the Diagnosis of Malignant Pleural Effusion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xintong; Cheng, Fangyuan; Zhong, Diansheng; Zhang, Lisha; Meng, Fanlu; Shao, Yi; Yu, Tao

    2017-06-20

    Malignant pleural effusion (MPE) is due tumor which arises from the mesothelium or metastases from tumor origniating other sites. Generally, the prognosis of MPE is poor, in the premise of reducing the pain of patients, as soon as possible make clear the property of pleural effusion and cause of the disesease, rightly and quickly, providing effective information for subsequent treatment. The cell block of 103 patients by using natural sedimentation or plasma coagulation method combined with HE staining and immunohistochemical staining method maked clear diagnosis and compared with other methods. 90 patients were diagnosed by cell block section from 103 patients who had MPE (diagnostic rate 87.4%); 32 cases were diagnosed by cell block section only, 74 cases pointed out that the pathological type , 23 cases even pointed out the primary lesions; 71 cases examined other invasive methods at the same time, the diagnostic rate was 87.3% and 81.7%; the detection rate of cell block section and cytological smear in detecting malignant tumor cells was 86.7%and 44.0% respectively. Cell block can not only increase the diagnosis, in contrast to cytological smear, and own the same diagnostic rate compared with other invasive methods, but also can confirm pathological type and primary lesion; especially, for other invasive methods, cell block method is a preferable complementary method, and that cell block method maybe the only way for some patients.

  10. A Case of Brucellosis Presenting with Multiple Hypodense Splenic Lesions and Bilateral Pleural Effusions

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    Emine Dilek Eruz

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Brucellosis is a zoonotic infectious disease, which mainly present with lymphoreticular system invovement. However any organ system can be attacked by the microorganism. In this paper we present a 52-year-old female patient who was admitted to the Infectious Diseases Department with complaints of fatigue, arthralgias, fever, and weight loss. In the medical examination and radiological analysis bilateral pleural effusions and hepatosplenomegaly were detected. Serum transaminase levels were two times higher than the upper limits of normal. Abdominal ultrasound revealed sludge in the gallbladder and multiple hypodense splenic lesions (the largest was 1 cm in diameter. Brucella melitensis was isolated from the blood culture of the patient. Rifampicin (600 mg/day and doxycycline (200 mg/day therapy was started. Follow-up chest radiography and ultrasonography revealed the absence of pleural effusion. Splenic lesions and hepatosplenomegaly were totally regressed. The patient has been followed for 3 months after 6 week antibiotic regimen without recurrence. Brucellosis was expected to be the cause of all pathological signs.

  11. The value of use of amino-terminal brain naturitic peptide as marker in cases of pleural effusion of different etiologies

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    Laila A. Banawan

    2013-10-01

    Conclusion: The results support the feasibility of using the pleural fluid amino terminal proBNP measurement in thoracentesis that would enhance discrimination among the different causes of pleural effusion especially for heart failure patients. Serum and pleural fluid levels of NT-pro BNP were closely correlated and measurement of NT-pro BNP in serum showed equally good diagnostic properties.

  12. Spectrum of pleural effusion etiology revisited in 18–70 years of age group: A tertiary care center-based study of 1000 patients

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    Rahul Gupta

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The main objective study was to evaluate the new-onset cases of pleural effusion with respect to etiology/causation. Materials and Methods: A total of 1000 patients were included in the study aged between 18 and 70 years. The patients with earlier diagnosis of pleural effusion or those who had undergone thoracocentesis were excluded from the study. All the patients were subjected to thorough clinical examination, chest radiography, chest and abdominal sonography, pleural fluid analysis, and pleural fluid cytology, and in select cases, pleural biopsy was done. The results were assimilated and tabulated, observations thereby drawn by. Results and Observations: Out of total 1000 patients, 69.5% had tuberculosis followed by malignancy (16% with the systemic causes forming about 15% bulk of the patients with pleural effusion. It was found more in males, associated with smoking, and majority of patients had unilateral effusion. Eighty-nine percent of patients had exudative effusion. Conclusion: The results of the study revealed that tuberculosis is still the most common cause of pleural effusion and efforts need to be stepped up to control tuberculosis. The national programs for control of tuberculosis need to be revisited to assess the magnitude of the problem, and the patients need to be counseled for the compliance of the therapy. Furthermore, malignancy is trending upward in the etiology of pleural effusion.

  13. Pleural effusion as the initial clinical presentation in disseminated cryptococcosis and fungaemia: an unusual manifestation and a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Mayun; Wang, Xiaomi; Yu, Xianjuan; Dai, Caijun; Chen, Dunshun; Yu, Chang; Xu, Xiaomei; Yao, Dan; Yang, Li; Li, Yuping; Wang, Liangxing; Huang, Xiaoying

    2015-09-22

    Cryptococcus neoformans infection usually presents as chronic meningitis and is increasingly being recognized in immunocompromised patients. Presentation with pleural effusion is rare in cryptococcal disease; in fact, only 4 cases of pleural effusion as the initial clinical presentation in cryptococcosis have been reported in English-language literature to date. We report the first case of pleural effusion as the initial clinical presentation in a renal transplant recipient who was initially misdiagnosed with tuberculous pleuritis but who then developed fungaemia and disseminated cryptococcosis. The examination of this rare manifestation and the accompanying literature review will contribute to increased recognition of the disease and a reduction in misdiagnoses. We describe a 63-year-old male renal transplant recipient on an immunosuppressive regimen who was admitted for left pleural effusion and fever. Cytological examinations and pleural fluid culture were nonspecific and negative. Thoracoscopy only found chronic, nonspecific inflammation with fibrosis in the pleura. After empirical anti-tuberculous therapy, the patient developed an elevated temperature, a severe headache and vomiting and fainted in the ward. Cryptococci were specifically found in the cerebrospinal fluid following lumbar puncture. Blood cultures were twice positive for C. neoformans one week later. He was transferred to the respiratory intensive care unit (RICU) immediately and was placed on non-invasive ventilation for respiratory failure for 2 days. He developed meningoencephalitis and fungaemia with C. neoformans during hospitalization. He was given amphotericin B liposome combined with 5-flucytosine and voriconazole for first 11 days, then amphotericin B liposome combined with 5-flucytosine sustained to 8 weeks, after that changed to fluconazole for maintenance. His condition improved after antifungal treatment, non-invasive ventilation and other support. Further pathological consultation

  14. Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor in Plasma and Pleural Effusion Is a Biomarker for Outcome After Bevacizumab plus Carboplatin-Paclitaxel Treatment for Non-small Cell Lung Cancer with Malignant Pleural Effusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamiya, Motohiro; Tamiya, Akihiro; Yasue, Tomomi; Nakao, Keiko; Omachi, Naoki; Shiroyama, Takayuki; Tani, Eriko; Hamaguchi, Masanari; Morishita, Naoko; Suzuki, Hidekazu; Okamoto, Norio; Okishio, Kyoichi; Kawaguchi, Tomoya; Atagi, Shinji; Hirashima, Tomonori

    2016-06-01

    Malignant effusion is associated with high serum and plasma levels of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). There are no biomarkers of outcome for bevacizumab treatment in patients with malignant pleural effusion (MPE). We previously reported that carboplatin-paclitaxel plus bevacizumab was effective for patients with advanced non-squamous non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and MPE, although we did not evaluate the relationship between treatment outcomes and plasma or pleural effusion levels of VEGF. Therefore, this study evaluated whether plasma or pleural effusion VEGF might predict bevacizumab treatment outcome. We enrolled 23 patients with NSCLC and MPE between September 2010 and June 2012. Plasma VEGF levels were measured in 19 patients and pleural VEGF levels were measured in 22 patients. Compared to patients with a low plasma VEGF level, patients with a high level exhibited significantly shorter overall survival (OS: 13.8 vs. 6.5 months, p=0.04), progression-free survival (PFS: 8.7 vs. 4.8 months, peffusion, patients with a high VEGF level exhibited significantly shorter OS (19.6 vs. 6.9 months, peffusion may predict the outcome of bevacizumab treatment in patients with NSCLC and MPE. Copyright© 2016 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  15. The Role of 18F-FDG PET/CT Integrated Imaging in Distinguishing Malignant from Benign Pleural Effusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yajuan; Yu, Hongjuan; Ma, Jingquan

    2016-01-01

    Objective The aim of our study was to evaluate the role of 18F-FDG PET/CT integrated imaging in differentiating malignant from benign pleural effusion. Methods A total of 176 patients with pleural effusion who underwent 18F-FDG PET/CT examination to differentiate malignancy from benignancy were retrospectively researched. The images of CT imaging, 18F-FDG PET imaging and 18F-FDG PET/CT integrated imaging were visually analyzed. The suspected malignant effusion was characterized by the presence of nodular or irregular pleural thickening on CT imaging. Whereas on PET imaging, pleural 18F-FDG uptake higher than mediastinal activity was interpreted as malignant effusion. Images of 18F-FDG PET/CT integrated imaging were interpreted by combining the morphologic feature of pleura on CT imaging with the degree and form of pleural 18F-FDG uptake on PET imaging. Results One hundred and eight patients had malignant effusion, including 86 with pleural metastasis and 22 with pleural mesothelioma, whereas 68 patients had benign effusion. The sensitivities of CT imaging, 18F-FDG PET imaging and 18F-FDG PET/CT integrated imaging in detecting malignant effusion were 75.0%, 91.7% and 93.5%, respectively, which were 69.8%, 91.9% and 93.0% in distinguishing metastatic effusion. The sensitivity of 18F-FDG PET/CT integrated imaging in detecting malignant effusion was higher than that of CT imaging (p = 0.000). For metastatic effusion, 18F-FDG PET imaging had higher sensitivity (p = 0.000) and better diagnostic consistency with 18F-FDG PET/CT integrated imaging compared with CT imaging (Kappa = 0.917 and Kappa = 0.295, respectively). The specificities of CT imaging, 18F-FDG PET imaging and 18F-FDG PET/CT integrated imaging were 94.1%, 63.2% and 92.6% in detecting benign effusion. The specificities of CT imaging and 18F-FDG PET/CT integrated imaging were higher than that of 18F-FDG PET imaging (p = 0.000 and p = 0.000, respectively), and CT imaging had better diagnostic consistency with

  16. The Role of 18F-FDG PET/CT Integrated Imaging in Distinguishing Malignant from Benign Pleural Effusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yajuan; Yu, Hongjuan; Ma, Jingquan; Lu, Peiou

    2016-01-01

    The aim of our study was to evaluate the role of 18F-FDG PET/CT integrated imaging in differentiating malignant from benign pleural effusion. A total of 176 patients with pleural effusion who underwent 18F-FDG PET/CT examination to differentiate malignancy from benignancy were retrospectively researched. The images of CT imaging, 18F-FDG PET imaging and 18F-FDG PET/CT integrated imaging were visually analyzed. The suspected malignant effusion was characterized by the presence of nodular or irregular pleural thickening on CT imaging. Whereas on PET imaging, pleural 18F-FDG uptake higher than mediastinal activity was interpreted as malignant effusion. Images of 18F-FDG PET/CT integrated imaging were interpreted by combining the morphologic feature of pleura on CT imaging with the degree and form of pleural 18F-FDG uptake on PET imaging. One hundred and eight patients had malignant effusion, including 86 with pleural metastasis and 22 with pleural mesothelioma, whereas 68 patients had benign effusion. The sensitivities of CT imaging, 18F-FDG PET imaging and 18F-FDG PET/CT integrated imaging in detecting malignant effusion were 75.0%, 91.7% and 93.5%, respectively, which were 69.8%, 91.9% and 93.0% in distinguishing metastatic effusion. The sensitivity of 18F-FDG PET/CT integrated imaging in detecting malignant effusion was higher than that of CT imaging (p = 0.000). For metastatic effusion, 18F-FDG PET imaging had higher sensitivity (p = 0.000) and better diagnostic consistency with 18F-FDG PET/CT integrated imaging compared with CT imaging (Kappa = 0.917 and Kappa = 0.295, respectively). The specificities of CT imaging, 18F-FDG PET imaging and 18F-FDG PET/CT integrated imaging were 94.1%, 63.2% and 92.6% in detecting benign effusion. The specificities of CT imaging and 18F-FDG PET/CT integrated imaging were higher than that of 18F-FDG PET imaging (p = 0.000 and p = 0.000, respectively), and CT imaging had better diagnostic consistency with 18F-FDG PET/CT integrated

  17. Derrame pleural: uma complicação extra-intestinal da doença de Crohn Pleural effusion: an extraintestinal complication of Crohn's disease

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    ELIE FISS

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available Paciente de 34 anos, portadora de doença de Crohn (DC havia oito anos, foi atendida queixando-se de dor torácica e febre, sem manifestações gastrointestinais. Testes laboratoriais mostraram atividade inflamatória (VHS = 45mm, PCR positivo. O exame físico revelou derrame pleural na base do hemitórax esquerdo, confirmado pela radiografia de tórax. A análise do líquido pleural mostrou 100% de linfócitos, com BAAR negativo. A biópsia pleural evidenciou granuloma não caseoso. Foi instituída terapia para tuberculose, sem sucesso, com regressão dos sintomas apenas após reintrodução de altas doses de corticosteróide, sugerindo atividade da DC como causa do derrame pleural.A 34-year-old patient had had Crohn's disease (CD for eight years; she was seen for complaints of thoracic pain and fever, without gastrointestinal manifestations. Initial laboratory exams were compatible with the presence of inflammatory activity (VHS = 45 mm for normal value of 20 mm and PCR+. The physical exam revealed signs of pleural effusion in the left hemithorax base, which was confirmed by thoracic RX. The pleural liquid analysis showed that the cells were 100% of lymphocytes, with negative BAAR research. The pleural biopsy evidenced non caseous granuloma. Despite the tuberculosis treatment, the patient only got better when corticotherapy was introduced in high doses, suggesting the activity of CD as the cause of the pleural effusion. This case establishes a connection between activity of CD and manifestations of lung disease.

  18. Massive pericardial effusion and rhabdomyolysis secondary to untreated severe hypothyroidism: the first report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zare-Khormizi, M R; Rahmanian, M; Pourrajab, F; Akbarnia, S

    2014-10-01

    Hypothyroidism is an endocrine disease with various clinical manifestations. It is a rare cause for rhabdomyolysis and massive pericardial effusion. We describe a case of severe hypothyroidism secondary to autoimmune hashimoto thyroiditis with massive pericardial effusion and rhabdomyolysis. Improvement of mentioned complications after hypothyroidism treatment and rule out of other possible causes are supportive clues that hypothyroidism is the main cause of patient's rare presentation. With the best of our knowledge, it is the first report of rhabdomyolysis and massive pericardial effusion coincidence in a patient of adult population with primary uncontrolled hypothyroidism for years.

  19. Pleural effusion adenosine deaminase: a candidate biomarker to discriminate between Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacterial infections of the pleural space

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruolin Li

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Delay in the treatment of pleural infection may contribute to its high mortality. In this retrospective study, we aimed to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of pleural adenosine deaminase in discrimination between Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacterial infections of the pleural space prior to selecting antibiotics. METHODS: A total of 76 patients were enrolled and grouped into subgroups according to Gram staining: 1 patients with Gram-negative bacterial infections, aged 53.2±18.6 years old, of whom 44.7% had empyemas and 2 patients with Gram-positive bacterial infections, aged 53.5±21.5 years old, of whom 63.1% had empyemas. The pleural effusion was sampled by thoracocentesis and then sent for adenosine deaminase testing, biochemical testing and microbiological culture. The Mann-Whitney U test was used to examine the differences in adenosine deaminase levels between the groups. Correlations between adenosine deaminase and specified variables were also quantified using Spearman’s correlation coefficient. Moreover, receiver operator characteristic analysis was performed to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of pleural effusion adenosine deaminase. RESULTS: Mean pleural adenosine deaminase levels differed significantly between Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacterial infections of the pleural space (191.8±32.1 U/L vs 81.0±16.9 U/L, p<0.01. The area under the receiver operator characteristic curve was 0.689 (95% confidence interval: 0.570, 0.792, p<0.01 at the cutoff value of 86 U/L. Additionally, pleural adenosine deaminase had a sensitivity of 63.2% (46.0-78.2%; a specificity of 73.7% (56.9-86.6%; positive and negative likelihood ratios of 2.18 and 0.50, respectively; and positive and negative predictive values of 70.6% and 66.7%, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Pleural effusion adenosine deaminase is a helpful alternative biomarker for early and quick discrimination of Gram-negative from Gram-positive bacterial infections of the

  20. Enhanced Suppressive Activity of Regulatory T Cells in the Microenvironment of Malignant Pleural Effusions

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    Joanna Budna

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Cancer metastatic spread to serous cavity causes malignant pleural effusions (MPEs, indicating dismal prognosis. Tumor microenvironment can implement suppressive activity on host immune responses. Thus, we investigated the prevalence of Tregs and the relationship between them and TGF-β and IL-10 concentrations and measured expression of FOXP3, CTLA-4, CD28, and GITR genes, as well as protein expression of selected genes in benign effusions and MPEs. The percentage of Tregs was determined by means of multicolor flow cytometry system. TGF-β and IL-10 concentrations were measured using human TGF-β1 and IL-10 ELISA kit. Relative mRNA expression of studied genes was analyzed by real-time PCR. The frequency of Tregs was significantly higher in MPEs compared to benign effusions; however, the level of TGF-β and IL-10 in analyzed groups was comparable, and no correlation between concentrations of TGF-β and IL-10 and percentage of Tregs was observed. Relative mRNA expression of all the genes was higher in CD4+CD25+ compared to CD4+CD25− cells. In CD4+CD25+ cells from MPEs, relative mRNA expression of FOXP3, CTLA-4, and CD28 genes was significantly higher than in benign effusions; however, the level of CD4+CD25+CTLA-4+ cells in analyzed groups showed no significant differences. We found numerous genes correlations in an entire CD4+CD25+ cell subset and CD4+CD25+ cells from MPEs. Enhanced suppressive activity of Tregs is observed in the microenvironment of MPEs. Understanding of relations between cellular and cytokine immunosuppressive factors in tumor microenvironment may determine success of anticancer response.

  1. Diagnostic value of N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide for pleural effusion due to heart failure: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Q; Ye, Z J; Su, Y; Zhang, J C; Shi, H Z

    2010-08-01

    N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) is a biomarker useful in diagnosis of pleural effusion due to heart failure. Thus far, its overall diagnostic accuracy has not been systematically reviewed. The aim of the present meta-analysis was to establish the overall diagnostic accuracy of the measurement of pleural NT-proBNP for identifying pleural effusion due to heart failure. After a systematic review of English-language studies, sensitivity, specificity, and other measures of accuracy of NT-proBNP concentrations in pleural fluid in the diagnosis of pleural effusion resulting from heart failure were pooled using fixed-effects models. Summary receiver operating characteristic curves were used to summarise overall test performance. Eight publications met the inclusion criteria. The summary estimates for pleural NT-proBNP in the diagnosis of pleural effusion attributable to heart failure were: sensitivity 0.95 (95% CI 0.92 to 0.97), specificity 0.94 (0.92 to 0.96), positive likelihood ratio 14.12 (10.23 to 19.51), negative likelihood ratio 0.06 (0.04 to 0.09) and diagnostic OR 213.87 (122.50 to 373.40). NT-proBNP levels in pleural fluid showed a high diagnostic accuracy and may help accurately differentiate cardiac from non-cardiac conditions in patients presenting with pleural effusion.

  2. Diagnostics of pleural effusions and atelectases: A comparison of sonography and radiology. Diagnostik von Pleuraerguessen und Atelektasen: Sonographie und Radiologie im Vergleich

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    Kelbel, C.; Boerner, N.; Weilemann, L.S.; Meyer, J. (Mainz Univ. (Germany, F.R.). 2. Medizinische Klinik und Poliklinik); Schadmand, S.; Klose, K.J.; Thelen, M. (Mainz Univ. (Germany, F.R.). Radiologische Klinik)

    1991-02-01

    In a prospective study it was shown that chest ultrasonography is superior to conventional X-ray diagnosis of recumbent patients in diagnosing pleural effusion and lung atelectasis. In 110 supine radiographs we found a sensitivity of 47% and a specificity of 71% for right pleural effusions and a sensitivity of 55% and a specificity of 93% for left pleural effusions in comparison to 110 sonographic examinations. The results of supine radiographs in detection of atelectasis were less efficient: sensitivity for the right side: 7%; sensitivity for the left side: 13,5%. Hence, the knowledge of chest ultrasonographic diagnosis can improve the interpretation of supine radiographs. (orig.).

  3. Accuracy of the diagnosis of pleural effusion on supine chest X-ray

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emamian, S.A.; Kaasboel, M.A.; Olsen, J.F.; Pedersen, J.F.

    1997-01-01

    Diagnosis of pleural effusion (PE) on supine chest X-ray (SCXR) is considered difficult. This study aimed at evaluating the accuracy of the diagnosis of PE on SCXR and was performed in two phases. At phase 1, a formula for the sonographic estimation of the volume of PE was established by correlating 24 measurements (in 7 patients in whom complete drainage was achieved) with the drained volumes. At phase two, 112 consecutive SCXRs were supplemented by sonography of the chest. The films were evaluated for the presence of PE and for the presence of different radiologic signs of PE. Sonography showed PE in 41 right and 30 left hemithoraces. The overall accuracy of the diagnosis of PE on SCXR was 82 %. Only one of the undiagnosed PEs had a volume of > 300 ml. The most accurate signs were increased density of the hemithorax, blunted costophrenic angle, and loss of the hemidiaphragm silhouette. (orig.). With 2 figs., 3 tabs

  4. IL-6 anti-inflammatory activity in pleural effusion post-coronary artery bypass graft surgery

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    António M S Chibante

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The local inflammatory reaction aspects of pleural behaviour post-coronary artery bypass graft surgery (PCABG are not completely evident, demanding further study and observation. Aim: To evaluate the behaviour of some cytokines and the possible anti-inflammatory activity of IL-6 (a protein involved in cortisone synthesis on acute PCABG pleural fluid, since this cytokine is usually considered as an acute phase reaction protein associated to high concentrations of TNF-alpha and IL-1beta in immediate inflammatory reactions. Material and methods: The concentrations of the TNFalpha, IL-1beta, IL-2, IL-6, IL-8, VEGF and TGF-beta cytokines in 16 transudates and 43 exudates in acute PCABS pleural fluid of patients were analysed by the ELISA method 2, 24 and 48 hours after surgery at the Instituto do Coração and Serviço de Pneumologia da USP, Brazil. Results: While no increase was seen in either TNF-alpha or IL-2 in any of the three tests, IL-1beta increased after 24 until 48 hours, coinciding with the TGF-beta curve decline which fell from the beginning to reach the transudates levels. IL-8 reminded higher from the beginning and through the two subsequent tests while VEGF levels were elevated from the first test and continued high for the following 24 and 48 hours. IL-6 had high concentrations from the beginning, suggesting an anti-inflammatory activity at the three times of testing. Conclusions: We conclude that IL-6 seems to play an important anti-inflammatory part which is superior to the anti-inflammatory activity of TGF-beta in PCABG pleural effusions. This performance of IL-6 breaks with the traditional idea of it being a pro-inflammatory acute phase reaction cytokine, at least in this type of pleural effusion. This seems to be the first study involving the favourable behaviour of IL-6 in the inflammatory reaction of pleura in the acute phase of PCABG surgery. Resumo: Introdução: O comportamento pleural p

  5. Papel da ultra-sonografia na avaliação da efusão pleural The role of ultrasound in the assessment of pleural effusion

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    Adilson Cunha Ferreira

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available A efusão pleural, antigamente denominada derrame pleural, é caracterizada pelo acúmulo de líquido no espaço pleural, em decorrência do desequilíbrio entre formação e reabsorção de fluido ou por alteração na drenagem linfática. O propósito desta revisão foi estabelecer a importância da aplicação da ultra-sonografia no diagnóstico de efusão pleural. Os autores discutem a aplicação da ultra-sonografia no diagnóstico e abordagem terapêutica dessa entidade, e ressaltam sua importância nas doenças do tórax, vantagens, limitações e desvantagens em relação a radiografia simples, tomografia computadorizada e exame físico. Discutem, ainda, o conceito de efusão pleural, sua fisiopatologia, morbidade, mortalidade, principais causas e apresentação clínica. A técnica de realização do exame é sistematicamente abordada, tanto pela via torácica quanto abdominal.The pleural effusion, formerly called pleural spill, is an accumulation of fluid in the pleural space, as a consequence of an imbalance between the formation and reabsorption of such fluid, or due to an alteration in the drainage to lymph nodes. The purpose of this bibliographic review is to establish the importance of the use of ultrasound in pleural diffusion diagnosis. The authors discuss the use of ultrasonography in the diagnosis and therapeutic approach of this disease, and stress the importance of ultrasonography in chest diseases diagnosis, its advantages, limitations and disadvantages when compared to the common x-ray, computed tomography and physical examination. The authors also discuss the definition of pleural effusion, its physiopathology, morbidity, mortality, main causes and clinical presentation. The examination technique is systematically approached both by thoracic and abdominal pathways.

  6. A new instrument to assess physician skill at thoracic ultrasound, including pleural effusion markup.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salamonsen, Matthew; McGrath, David; Steiler, Geoff; Ware, Robert; Colt, Henri; Fielding, David

    2013-09-01

    To reduce complications and increase success, thoracic ultrasound is recommended to guide all chest drainage procedures. Despite this, no tools currently exist to assess proceduralist training or competence. This study aims to validate an instrument to assess physician skill at performing thoracic ultrasound, including effusion markup, and examine its validity. We developed an 11-domain, 100-point assessment sheet in line with British Thoracic Society guidelines: the Ultrasound-Guided Thoracentesis Skills and Tasks Assessment Test (UGSTAT). The test was used to assess 22 participants (eight novices, seven intermediates, seven advanced) on two occasions while performing thoracic ultrasound on a pleural effusion phantom. Each test was scored by two blinded expert examiners. Validity was examined by assessing the ability of the test to stratify participants according to expected skill level (analysis of variance) and demonstrating test-retest and intertester reproducibility by comparison of repeated scores (mean difference [95% CI] and paired t test) and the intraclass correlation coefficient. Mean scores for the novice, intermediate, and advanced groups were 49.3, 73.0, and 91.5 respectively, which were all significantly different (P < .0001). There were no significant differences between repeated scores. Procedural training on mannequins prior to unsupervised performance on patients is rapidly becoming the standard in medical education. This study has validated the UGSTAT, which can now be used to determine the adequacy of thoracic ultrasound training prior to clinical practice. It is likely that its role could be extended to live patients, providing a way to document ongoing procedural competence.

  7. Better Clinical Efficiency of TILs for Malignant Pleural Effusion and Ascites than Cisplatin Through Intrapleural and Intraperitoneal Infusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Hongjin; Du, Fengcai; Gong, Zhaohua; Lian, Peiwen; Wang, Zhixin; Li, Peng; Hu, Baohong; Chi, Cheng; Chen, Jian

    2017-08-01

    To evaluate the clinical efficiency of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) compared to cisplatin for malignant pleural effusion and ascites through intrapleural and intraperitoneal infusion. Thirteen patients with malignant pleural effusion and ascites were divided into a TIL-treated group and a cisplatin-treated group. Patients were given TILs or cisplatin, through intrapleural and intraperitoneal infusion respectively, after drainage of the malignant serous effusion by thoracentesis or abdominocentesis. The overall response rate and disease control rate of the TIL-treated group (33.33% and 83.33%) were higher than that of the cisplatin-treated group (28.57% and 71.43%). The progression-free survival for the TIL-treated group was significantly longer (p=0.002) and better than that of the cisplatin-treated group (66.67% vs. 28.57%). Quality of life apparently improved in the TIL-treated group and was clearly higher than that in the cisplatin-treated group. The use of TILs has a better clinical efficiency for malignant pleural effusion and ascites than cisplatin through intrapleural and intraperitoneal infusion without severe adverse effects. Copyright© 2017, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  8. Culture and Drug Profiling of Patient Derived Malignant Pleural Effusions for Personalized Cancer Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, Christian; Kustermann, Stefan; Pietilae, Elina; Vlajnic, Tatjana; Baschiera, Betty; Arabi, Leila; Lorber, Thomas; Oeggerli, Martin; Savic, Spasenija; Obermann, Ellen; Singer, Thomas; Rothschild, Sacha I; Zippelius, Alfred; Roth, Adrian B; Bubendorf, Lukas

    2016-01-01

    The use of patients' own cancer cells for in vitro selection of the most promising treatment is an attractive concept in personalized medicine. Human carcinoma cells from malignant pleural effusions (MPEs) are suited for this purpose since they have already adapted to the liquid environment in the patient and do not depend on a stromal cell compartment. Aim of this study was to develop a systematic approach for the in-vitro culture of MPEs to analyze the effect of chemotherapeutic as well as targeted drugs. MPEs from patients with solid tumors were selected for this study. After morphological and molecular characterization, they were cultured in medium supplemented with patient-derived sterile-filtered effusion supernatant. Growth characteristics were monitored in real-time using the xCELLigence system. MPEs were treated with a targeted therapeutic (erlotinib) according to the mutational status or chemotherapeutics based on the recommendation of the oncologists. We have established a robust system for the ex-vivo culture of MPEs and the application of drug tests in-vitro. The use of an antibody based magnetic cell separation system for epithelial cells before culture allowed treatment of effusions with only moderate tumor cell proportion. Experiments using drugs and drug-combinations revealed dose-dependent and specific growth inhibitory effects of targeted drugs. We developed a new approach for the ex-vivo culture of MPEs and the application of drug tests in-vitro using real-time measuring of cell growth, which precisely reproduced the effect of clinically established treatments by standard chemotherapy and targeted drugs. This sets the stage for future studies testing agents against specific targets from genomic profiling of metastatic tumor cells and multiple drug-combinations in a personalized manner.

  9. Culture and Drug Profiling of Patient Derived Malignant Pleural Effusions for Personalized Cancer Medicine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Ruiz

    Full Text Available The use of patients' own cancer cells for in vitro selection of the most promising treatment is an attractive concept in personalized medicine. Human carcinoma cells from malignant pleural effusions (MPEs are suited for this purpose since they have already adapted to the liquid environment in the patient and do not depend on a stromal cell compartment. Aim of this study was to develop a systematic approach for the in-vitro culture of MPEs to analyze the effect of chemotherapeutic as well as targeted drugs.MPEs from patients with solid tumors were selected for this study. After morphological and molecular characterization, they were cultured in medium supplemented with patient-derived sterile-filtered effusion supernatant. Growth characteristics were monitored in real-time using the xCELLigence system. MPEs were treated with a targeted therapeutic (erlotinib according to the mutational status or chemotherapeutics based on the recommendation of the oncologists.We have established a robust system for the ex-vivo culture of MPEs and the application of drug tests in-vitro. The use of an antibody based magnetic cell separation system for epithelial cells before culture allowed treatment of effusions with only moderate tumor cell proportion. Experiments using drugs and drug-combinations revealed dose-dependent and specific growth inhibitory effects of targeted drugs.We developed a new approach for the ex-vivo culture of MPEs and the application of drug tests in-vitro using real-time measuring of cell growth, which precisely reproduced the effect of clinically established treatments by standard chemotherapy and targeted drugs. This sets the stage for future studies testing agents against specific targets from genomic profiling of metastatic tumor cells and multiple drug-combinations in a personalized manner.

  10. Hepatic hydro thorax: patient with pleural effusion to the right presenting tracer migration to the contralateral thorax projection on early scintigraphic images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ichiki, W.A.; Ribeiro, V.P.B.; Gusman, L.; Coura Filho, G.B.; Sapienza, M.T.; Ono, C.R; Watanabe, T.; Costa, P.L.A.; Hironaka, F.; Cerri, G.G.; Buchpiguel, C.A.

    2008-01-01

    Full text: Introduction: Hepatic hydrothorax is a significant pleural effusion, greater than 500 mL, that appears as a clinical manifestation of portal hypertension in patients with advanced cirrhosis, in the absence of cardiopulmonary disease. Its mechanisms may be explained by migration of ascitic fluid through diaphragm defects. Radioisotope scintigraphy may contribute for the diagnostic of hepatic hydrothorax. Case report: Female, 79 years old, with a history of hepatic cirrhosis due to hepatitis B virus, without primary pulmonary or heart disease. She presented worsening of clinical ascites and dyspnoea, and it was diagnosed an extensive right pleural effusion. She underwent a thoracocentesis with a drainage of 2000 mL of light yellow-citrine fluid with transudate features. The pleural effusion quickly relapsed, leading the hypothesis of a hepatic hydrothorax. A scintigraphy was requested to assess peritoneo-pleural shunt. A dose of 370 MBq (10 mCi) of 99m Tc sulfur colloid was instilled intraperitoneally. Static images involving the thorax and upper abdomen were acquired at 10, 20, 30 and 40 minutes and 4 hours after injection. At 10 minutes the radiotracer was seen on the left side of the thoracic region. The scintigraphy was repeated three days later, just after new thoracocentesis, due to the tracer progression to the left side of the thorax differed to the location of pleural effusion. Likewise, until 4 hours of the second study, the radiotracer was seen again on the left side of the thorax. However, a delayed image of 24 showed accumulation of the radiotracer in the right pleural cavity, confirming peritoneo-pleural shunt as cause of pleural effusion in this patient. Discussion: Hydrothorax is an uncommon complication in patients with decompensated hepatic cirrhosis. Its mechanisms are still not well elucidated, however, it is known that presence of defects in the diaphragm associated with the imbalance of ascitic fluid volume and the pleural absorptive

  11. Hepatic hydro thorax: patient with pleural effusion to the right presenting tracer migration to the contralateral thorax projection on early scintigraphic images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ichiki, W.A.; Ribeiro, V.P.B.; Gusman, L.; Coura Filho, G.B.; Sapienza, M.T.; Ono, C.R; Watanabe, T.; Costa, P.L.A.; Hironaka, F.; Cerri, G.G.; Buchpiguel, C.A. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (FMUSP), SP (Brazil). Fac. de Medicina. Hospital das Clinicas

    2008-07-01

    Full text: Introduction: Hepatic hydrothorax is a significant pleural effusion, greater than 500 mL, that appears as a clinical manifestation of portal hypertension in patients with advanced cirrhosis, in the absence of cardiopulmonary disease. Its mechanisms may be explained by migration of ascitic fluid through diaphragm defects. Radioisotope scintigraphy may contribute for the diagnostic of hepatic hydrothorax. Case report: Female, 79 years old, with a history of hepatic cirrhosis due to hepatitis B virus, without primary pulmonary or heart disease. She presented worsening of clinical ascites and dyspnoea, and it was diagnosed an extensive right pleural effusion. She underwent a thoracocentesis with a drainage of 2000 mL of light yellow-citrine fluid with transudate features. The pleural effusion quickly relapsed, leading the hypothesis of a hepatic hydrothorax. A scintigraphy was requested to assess peritoneo-pleural shunt. A dose of 370 MBq (10 mCi) of {sup 99m}Tc sulfur colloid was instilled intraperitoneally. Static images involving the thorax and upper abdomen were acquired at 10, 20, 30 and 40 minutes and 4 hours after injection. At 10 minutes the radiotracer was seen on the left side of the thoracic region. The scintigraphy was repeated three days later, just after new thoracocentesis, due to the tracer progression to the left side of the thorax differed to the location of pleural effusion. Likewise, until 4 hours of the second study, the radiotracer was seen again on the left side of the thorax. However, a delayed image of 24 showed accumulation of the radiotracer in the right pleural cavity, confirming peritoneo-pleural shunt as cause of pleural effusion in this patient. Discussion: Hydrothorax is an uncommon complication in patients with decompensated hepatic cirrhosis. Its mechanisms are still not well elucidated, however, it is known that presence of defects in the diaphragm associated with the imbalance of ascitic fluid volume and the pleural

  12. Hounsfield units are a useful predictor of pleural effusion cytological type in dogs but not in cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, Sarah J; Spriet, Mathieu; Safra, Noa; Cissell, Derek D; Borjesson, Dori L

    2018-04-23

    All categories of pleural effusion subjectively display as soft tissue opacity on computed tomography (CT). Quantitative measurement using Hounsfield units (HU) has the potential to bring additional information regarding the nature of the fluid in a noninvasive way. The purposes of this retrospective cross-sectional analytical study were to compare Hounsfield units of different pleural effusion categories in dogs and cats, assess association between specific cytologic parameters and Hounsfield units, and evaluate the effect of dependent vs. nondependent aspect of the effusion pool on Hounsfield unit. A total of 111 patients (74 dogs and 37 cats) with pleural effusion, that underwent thoracic CT and diagnostic thoracocentesis, were included in the study. Effusions were cytologically categorized as exudate, transudate, modified transudate, hemorrhage, or chyle. Significant differences existed in Hounsfield units between categories in dogs (P effusion (6.1 ± 4.7 HU (mean ± standard deviation)) and transudate (5.6 ± 2.0) were significantly lower than exudate (20.3 ± 9.5) and hemorrhage (21.4 ± 9.2). No significant differences were found between modified transudate (13.6 ± 10.3) and other categories. Significant, weak linear correlation was identified in dogs between Hounsfield units and total protein (P = 0.018, R   = 0.089), red blood cells (P = 0.021, R   = 0.077), and total nucleated cells (P = 0.013, R   = 0.089). The Hounsfield units of dependent effusion was not significantly higher than the nondependent effusion, except for canine chylous effusion (P = 0.008). Fourteen Hounsfield units was identified as the most clinically useful threshold: effusion with a sensitivity of 100% and a specificity of 69%. A threshold >14 HU had a specificity of 100% and a sensitivity of 69% for identifying exudate, modified transudate, or hemorrhage. © 2018 American College of Veterinary Radiology.

  13. Does the usage of digital chest drainage systems reduce pleural inflammation and volume of pleural effusion following oncologic pulmonary resection?-A prospective randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Waele, Michèle; Agzarian, John; Hanna, Waël C; Schieman, Colin; Finley, Christian J; Macri, Joseph; Schneider, Laura; Schnurr, Terri; Farrokhyar, Forough; Radford, Katherine; Nair, Parameswaran; Shargall, Yaron

    2017-06-01

    Prolonged air leak and high-volume pleural drainage are the most common causes for delays in chest tube removal following lung resection. While digital pleural drainage systems have been successfully used in the management of post-operative air leak, their effect on pleural drainage and inflammation has not been studied before. We hypothesized that digital drainage systems (as compared to traditional analog continuous suction), using intermittent balanced suction, are associated with decreased pleural inflammation and postoperative drainage volumes, thus leading to earlier chest tube removal. One hundred and three [103] patients were enrolled and randomized to either analog (n=50) or digital (n=53) drainage systems following oncologic lung resection. Chest tubes were removed according to standardized, pre-defined protocol. Inflammatory mediators [interleukin-1B (IL-1B), 6, 8, tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α)] in pleural fluid and serum were measured and analysed. The primary outcome of interest was the difference in total volume of postoperative fluid drainage. Secondary outcome measures included duration of chest tube in-situ, prolonged air-leak incidence, length of hospital stay and the correlation between pleural effusion formation, degree of inflammation and type of drainage system used. There was no significant difference in total amount of fluid drained or length of hospital stay between the two groups. A trend for shorter chest tube duration was found with the digital system when compared to the analog (P=0.055). Comparison of inflammatory mediator levels revealed no significant differences between digital and analog drainage systems. The incidence of prolonged post-operative air leak was significantly higher when using the analog system (9 versus 2 patients; P=0.025). Lobectomy was associated with longer chest tube duration (P=0.001) and increased fluid drainage when compared to sub-lobar resection (Pdigital drainage does not appear to decrease pleural

  14. Efficacy of the addition of positive airway pressure to conventional chest physiotherapy in resolution of pleural effusion after drainage: protocol for a randomised controlled trial

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    Elinaldo da Conceição dos Santos

    2015-04-01

    Discussion: Conventional chest physiotherapy and intermittent positive airway pressure breathing are widely indicated for people with pleural effusion and chest drains; however, no studies have evaluated the real benefit of this type of treatment. Our hypothesis is that optimised lung expansion achieved through the application of intermittent positive airway pressure will accelerate the reabsorption of pleural effusion, decrease the duration of chest drainage and respiratory system impairment, reduce the length of hospital stay, and reduce the incidence of pulmonary complications.

  15. Metabonomics by proton nuclear magnetic resonance in human pleural effusions: A route to discriminate between benign and malignant pleural effusions and to target small molecules as potential cancer biomarkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zennaro, Lucio; Vanzani, Paola; Nicolè, Lorenzo; Cappellesso, Rocco; Fassina, Ambrogio

    2017-05-01

    Cytopathology is a noninvasive and cost-effective method for detecting cancer cells in pleural effusions (PEs), although in many cases, the diagnostic performance is hindered by the paucity of significant cells or the lack of clear morphological criteria. This study presents the results of an omics approach to improving the diagnostic performance of PE cytology. Metabolic profiling with proton nuclear magnetic resonance ( 1 H-NMR) was performed for 92 PEs (44 malignant cases of 8 different cancers and 48 benign cases of 7 nonneoplastic conditions). Light's criteria were used to further classify PEs as transudates or exudates, and 1 H-NMR spectroscopy was used to differentiate malignant pleural effusions (mPEs) from benign pleural effusions (bPEs). 1 H-NMR metabolic analysis showed clearly different spectra for mPEs and bPEs in the regions of the signals due to lipids, branched amino acids, and lactate, which were increased in mPEs. Transudates and exudates in bPEs were differentiated as well on the basis of the 1 H-NMR signals from lipids and lipoproteins, which were increased in exudates. Subject to validation in further larger studies, 1 H-NMR metabonomics could be an effective and reliable ancillary tool for PE investigations and diagnoses. Cancer Cytopathol 2017;125:341-348. © 2017 American Cancer Society. © 2017 American Cancer Society.

  16. Bilateral pleural effusion and interstitial lung disease as unusual manifestations of kikuchi-fujimoto disease: case report and literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena Fernandez-Martinez

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Kikuchi-Fujimoto's disease (KFD, also called histiocytic necrotizing lymphadenitis, is a rare, idiopathic and self-limited condition usually characterized by cervical lymphadenopathy and fever, most often affecting young patients. Aetiology is unknown. Differential diagnosis includes mainly malignant lymphoma, tuberculous lymphadenitis and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE, so early diagnosis is crucial. Pleuropulmonary involvement due to isolated KFD has been seldom reported. Case Presentation a 32-year-old man, on treatment for iatrogenic hypothyroidism, was admitted due to high grade fever and painful cervical lymphadenopathies. KFD was diagnosed by lymph node biopsy. Some days after admission the patient got worse, he developed generalized lymphadenopathy, bilateral pleural effusion and interstitial lung disease. All of them resolved with prednisone and after two years of following up he remains asymptomatic and without evidence of any other associated disease. Conclusion Pleural effusion and interstitial lung disease are very uncommon manifestations of KFD. In our experience, treatment with oral prednisone was effective.

  17. Hemorrhagic pleural effusion secondary to an unusual type III hiatal hernia in a 4-year-old great dane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Lena C; Friend, Edward J; Hamilton, Michael H

    2010-01-01

    An unusual case of combined axial and paraesophageal (type III) hiatal hernia (HH) in a 4-year-old Great Dane is reported. The main presenting complaint was dyspnea, and no history of trauma was present. A tentative diagnosis of HH with secondary pleural effusion was made based on clinical signs and radiographic findings. Exploratory celiotomy revealed herniation of the gastric cardia, fundus, and body through the esophageal hiatus and an adjacent, distinct defect in the diaphragm. Rupture of the short gastric vessels lead to the formation of a hemorrhagic pleural effusion that impaired ventilation. The esophageal hiatus was surgically reduced in size, and the second defect was closed with nonabsorbable sutures. Esophagopexy and tube gastropexy procedures were also performed. The dog was clinically normal 9 months postoperatively. This type of HH is not currently defined within the traditional classification system and to the authors' knowledge has not been previously reported.

  18. Diagnostic value of soluble B7-H4 and carcinoembryonic antigen in distinguishing malignant from benign pleural effusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, Xiaogang; Wei, Fei; Li, Jing; Dai, Lingling; Wang, Xi; Jia, Liuqun; Wang, Huan; An, Lin; Yang, Yuanjian; Zhang, Guojun; Cheng, Zhe

    2018-03-01

    To explore the diagnostic value of joint detection of soluble B7-H4 (sB7-H4) and carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) in identifying malignant pleural effusion (MPE) from benign pleural effusion (BPE). A total of 97 patients with pleural effusion specimens were enrolled from The First Affiliated Hospital of Zhengzhou University between June 2014 and December 2015. All cases were categorized into malignant pleural effusion group (n = 55) and benign pleural effusion group (n = 42) according to etiologies. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was applied to examine the levels of sB7-H4 in pleural effusion and meanwhile CEA concentrations were detected by electro-chemiluminescence immunoassays. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve was established to assess the diagnostic value of sB7-H4 and CEA in pleural effusion. The correlation between sB7-H4 and CEA levels was analyzed by Pearson's product-moment. The concentrations of sB7-H4 and CEA in MPE exhibited obviously higher than those of BPE ([60.08 ± 35.04] vs. [27.26 ± 9.55] ng/ml, P = .000; [41.49 ± 37.16] vs. [2.41 ± 0.94] ng/ml, P = .000). The AUC area under ROC curve of sB7-H4 and CEA was 0.884 and 0.954, respectively. Two cutoff values by ROC curve analysis of sB7-H4 36.5 ng/ml and CEA 4.18 ng/ml were obtained, with a corresponding sensitivity (81.82%, 87.28%), specificity (90.48%, 95.24%), accuracy (85.57%, 90.72%), positive predictive value (PPV) (91.84%, 96.0%), negative predictive value (NPV) (79.17%, 85.11%), positive likelihood ratio (PLR) (8.614, 18.327), and negative likelihood ratio (NLR) (0.201, 0.134). When sB7-H4 and CEA were combined to detect pleural effusion, it obtained a higher sensitivity 90.91% and specificity 97.62%. Furthermore, correlation analysis result showed that the level of sB7-H4 was correlated with CEA level (r = .770, P = .000). sB7-H4 was a potentially valuable tumor marker in the differentiation between BPE and MPE. The combined detection of sB7-H4 and

  19. Diagnostic value of tumor markers for lung adenocarcinoma-associated malignant pleural effusion: a validation study and meta-analysis.

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    Feng, Mei; Zhu, Jing; Liang, Liqun; Zeng, Ni; Wu, Yanqiu; Wan, Chun; Shen, Yongchun; Wen, Fuqiang

    2017-04-01

    Pleural effusion is one of the most common complications of lung adenocarcinoma and is diagnostically challenging. This study aimed to investigate the diagnostic performance of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), cytokeratin fragment (CYFRA) 21-1, and cancer antigen (CA) 19-9 for lung adenocarcinoma-associated malignant pleural effusion (MPE) through a validation study and meta-analysis. Pleural effusion samples were collected from 81 lung adenocarcinoma-associated MPEs and 96 benign pleural effusions. CEA, CYFRA 21-1, and CA19-9 were measured by electrochemiluminescence immunoassay. The capacity of tumor markers was assessed with receiver operating characteristic curve analyses and the area under the curve (AUC) was calculated. Standard methods for meta-analysis of diagnostic studies were used to summarize the diagnostic performance of CEA, CYFRA 21-1, and CA19-9 for lung adenocarcinoma-associated MPE. The pleural levels of CEA, CYFRA 21-1, and CA19-9 were significantly increased in lung adenocarcinoma-associated MPE compared to benign pleural effusion. The cut-off points for CEA, CYFRA 21-1, and CA19-9 were optimally set at 4.55 ng/ml, 43.10 μg/ml, and 12.89 U/ml, and corresponding AUCs were 0.93, 0.85, and 0.81, respectively. The combination of CEA, CYFRA 21-1, and CA19-9 increased the sensitivity to 95.06%, with an AUC of 0.95. Eight studies were included in this meta-analysis. CEA showed the best diagnostic performance with pooled sensitivity, specificity, positive/negative likelihood ratio, and diagnostic odds ratio of 0.75, 0.96, 16.01, 0.23, and 81.49, respectively. The AUC was 0.93. CEA, CYFRA 21-1, and CA19-9 play a role in the diagnosis of lung adenocarcinoma-associated MPE. The combination of these tumor markers increases the diagnostic accuracy.

  20. Lipidomic Profiling of Lung Pleural Effusion Identifies Unique Metabotype for EGFR Mutants in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Ying Swan Ho; Lian Yee Yip; Nurhidayah Basri; Vivian Su Hui Chong; Chin Chye Teo; Eddy Tan; Kah Ling Lim; Gek San Tan; Xulei Yang; Si Yong Yeo; Mariko Si Yue Koh; Anantham Devanand; Angela Takano; Eng Huat Tan; Daniel Shao Weng Tan

    2016-01-01

    Cytology and histology forms the cornerstone for the diagnosis of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) but obtaining sufficient tumour cells or tissue biopsies for these tests remains a challenge. We investigate the lipidome of lung pleural effusion (PE) for unique metabolic signatures to discriminate benign versus malignant PE and EGFR versus non-EGFR malignant subgroups to identify novel diagnostic markers that is independent of tumour cell availability. Using liquid chromatography mass spect...

  1. Pelvic actinomycosis with abundant ascites, pleural effusion, and lymphadenopathy diagnosed with endometrial biopsy and treated with medication only

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    Myounghwan Kim

    2014-12-01

    Conclusion: Pelvic actinomycosis should always be considered in patients with a pelvic mass and peritoneal infiltration, especially in the presence of intrauterine device use, despite the fact that abundant ascites, pleural effusion, and lymphadenopathy almost never accompany pelvic actinomycosis. Endometrial/endocervical biopsy may yield a diagnosis without an invasive procedure and should be performed. Because of the excellent response to penicillin, medical treatment alone is an effective method to eradicate pelvic actinomycosis without the need for surgical intervention.

  2. Establishment of A Malignant Pleural Effusion Mouse Model with Lewis Lung 
Carcinoma Cell Lines Expressing Enhanced Green Fluorescent Protein

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    Xingqun MA

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective Malignant pleural effusion (MPE is a poor prognosis factor in patients with advanced lung cancer. The aim of this study is to establish a mouse model of MPE using Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC cell lines expressing enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP. Methods The mouse model was created by injecting LLC-EGFP cells directly into the pleural cavity of mice that were sacrificed periodically. The dynamic growth and metastasis of tumor cells were screened using in vivo fluorescence imaging. The remaining mice were subjected to transverse computed tomography (CT imaging periodically to analyze the formation rate of pleural effusion. The survival rate and tumor metastasis were also observed. Pleural fluid was gently aspirated using a 1 mL syringe and its volume was measured. When two or more mice bore pleural effusion at the same time, we calculated the average volume. The correlation of pleural effusion with the integrated optical density (IOD were analyzed. Results Four days after the inoculation of LLC-EGFP cells, green fluorescence was observed by opening the chest wall. The tumor formation rate was 100%, and the IOD gradually increased after inoculation. The metastasis sites were mediastinal, and the hilar lymph nodes were contralateral pleural as well as pericardial. The metastasis rates were 87%, 73% and 20%, respectively. The CT scan revealed that the formation rates of pleural effusion on days 7, 14 and 21 were 13%, 46% and 53%, respectively. The average volume of pleural effusion increased obviously on day 10 and peaked on day 16 with a value of 0.5 mL. The mean survival time of nude mice was 28.8 days. The volume of pleural effusion and IOD were significantly correlated (r=0.91, P<0.000,1. Conclusion A mouse model of lung cancer malignant pleural effusion was successfully established by injecting LLC lines expressing EGFP into the pleural cavity under a microscope. The model can enable dynamic observations of the

  3. Prognostic factors in patients with malignant pleural effusion: Is it possible to predict mortality in patients with good performance status?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrao, Fernando Conrado; Peixoto, Renata D'Alpino; de Abreu, Igor Renato Louro Bruno; Janini, Maria Cláudia; Viana, Geisa Garcia; de Oliveira, Mariana Campello; Younes, Riad Naim

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study was to identify predictors of mortality only in patients with malignant pleural effusion (MPE) showing good performance status which required pleural palliative procedures. All patients with MPE submitted to pleural palliative procedure were enrolled in a prospective study between 2013 and 2014. Patients with Eastern cooperative oncology group (ECOG) score zero, one, and two were considered with good performance status. The possible prognostic factors were tested for significance using the log-rank test (Kaplan-Meier method) and those with significance on univariate analysis were entered into a multivariable Cox model. A total of 64 patients were included in the analysis. Median follow-up time for surviving patients was 263 days. Median survival for the entire cohort was not reached yet. In the multivariate analysis, gastrointestinal primary site (P = 0.006), low albumin concentration in the pleural fluid (P = 0.017), and high serum NLR (P = 0.007) were associated with mortality. In our cohort of ECOG 0-2 patients with MPE submitted to pleural palliative procedures, gastrointestinal malignancy compared to other sites, low pleural fluid albumin and high NLR were significantly associated with mortality. The identification of these prognostic factors may assist the choice of the optimal palliative technique. J. Surg. Oncol. 2016;113:570-574. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Beneficial impact of CCL2 and CCL12 neutralization on experimental malignant pleural effusion.

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    Antonia Marazioti

    Full Text Available Using genetic interventions, we previously determined that C-C motif chemokine ligand 2 (CCL2 promotes malignant pleural effusion (MPE formation in mice. Here we conducted preclinical studies aimed at assessing the specific therapeutic potential of antibody-mediated CCL2 blockade against MPE. For this, murine MPEs or skin tumors were generated in C57BL/6 mice by intrapleural or subcutaneous delivery of lung (LLC or colon (MC38 adenocarcinoma cells. Human lung adenocarcinoma cells (A549 were used to induce MPEs in severe combined immunodeficient mice. Intraperitoneal antibodies neutralizing mouse CCL2 and/or CCL12, a murine CCL2 ortholog, were administered at 10 or 50 mg/kg every three days. We found that high doses of CCL2/12 neutralizing antibody treatment (50 mg/kg were required to limit MPE formation by LLC cells. CCL2 and CCL12 blockade were equally potent inhibitors of MPE development by LLC cells. Combined CCL2 and CCL12 neutralization was also effective against MC38-induced MPE and prolonged the survival of mice in both syngeneic models. Mouse-specific CCL2-blockade limited A549-caused xenogeneic MPE, indicating that host-derived CCL2 also contributes to MPE precipitation in mice. The impact of CCL2/12 antagonism was associated with inhibition of immune and vascular MPE-related phenomena, such as inflammation, new blood vessel assembly and plasma extravasation into the pleural space. We conclude that CCL2 and CCL12 blockade are effective against experimental MPE induced by murine and human adenocarcinoma in mice. These results suggest that CCL2-targeted therapies may hold promise for future use against human MPE.

  5. A difficult case of esophageal and gastric double cancer with pleural and pericardial effusion following chemo-radiotherapy (CRT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aoki, Taro; Kobayashi, Kenji; Tanida, Tsukasa; Hatano, Hisanori; Komori, Takamichi; Matsumoto, Takashi; Nishioka, Kiyonori; Uemura, Yoshio

    2007-01-01

    A 70-year-old man was presented with esophageal and gastric cancer pointed by his personal doctor in November 2002. Both of the esophageal and gastric cancer were diagnosed as multiples with cStage II and cStage IA, respectively. In consideration of the patient's quality of life (QOL), chemo-radiotherapy (CRT) for esophageal cancer was preceded, and then total gastrectomy was done. Although esophageal cancer was responded as being complete response (CR), 14 courses of FP therapy were added as supportive chemotherapy. Ten months following CRT, pericardial effusion was noticed, so that pericardiocentesis was performed. Also diuretic has been administered up to the present. Nineteen months following CRT, pleural effusion was noticed and thoracentesis was performed several times into both of the pleural cavities, and that was depending on the degree with OK-432 infusion. Consequently, the patient has been controlled well. As a treatment for esophageal and gastric double cancer, we chose CRT rather than esophagectomy because of the excessive invasiveness. Despite of CR, we have had a difficulty with pleural and pericardial effusions due to the late toxicity of radiotherapy. We need to pay attention to the late toxicity in the case of long-term survival following CRT. (author)

  6. Visualization of the inferoposterior thoracic wall (VIP) and boomerang signs-novel sonographic signs of right pleural effusion.

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    Lau, James Siu Ki; Yuen, Chi Kit; Mok, Ka Leung; Yan, Wing Wa; Kan, Pui Gay

    2017-11-15

    This study is to present the diagnostic values of the novel sonographic visualization of the inferoposterior thoracic wall (VIP) and boomerang signs in detecting right pleural effusion by sonologists with little to no experience in ultrasound. A prospective analysis of a convenience sample of patients who were assessed by junior intensive care physicians was performed. The patients all underwent computed tomography (CT) of the chest or abdomen with lung bases as part of their care regardless of indication; the results were interpreted by radiologists and were considered the gold standard. Sonography was performed to assess for the presence of the VIP and boomerang signs. Sonographic and chest radiographic findings were compared against CT results. 73 patients were enrolled. The sensitivity and specificity for the VIP sign were 0.85 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.67-0.94) and 0.86 (95% CI, 0.70-0.95). The sensitivity and specificity for the boomerang sign were 0.78 (95% CI, 0.60-0.90) and 0.87 (95% CI, 0.71-0.95). However, the sensitivity and specificity for the traditional approach of detecting an anechoic collection above the diaphragm to indicate pleural effusion were only 0.54 (95% CI, 0.37-0.71) and 0.86 (95% CI, 0.80-0.99). Despite inexperience in sonography, the novel VIP and boomerang signs show high diagnostic values in detecting right pleural effusion compared to the traditional methods. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. The proliferative cytokines TGF-β and VEGF in pleural effusions post-coronary artery bypass graft

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    António MS Chibante

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Coronary artery bypass graft (CABG surgeries can impact on the pericardium and pleural space, leading to inflammation which can cause effusion. Aim: To study the role of the proliferative cytokines TGF-β and VEGF in the fluids of 16 transudates and 43 pleural effusions of patients who underwent CABG at the Heart Unit and Pulmonology Unit of the University Hospital of São Paulo. Levels of cytokines were assessed 2, 24 and 48 hours post-surgery. Results: The pleural effusion after CABG is an exsudative mobilizer of TGF-β and VEGF cytokines immediately after surgery. The TGF-β concentrations were elevated 2 hours after surgery but started to fall soon after, reaching transudate levels after 48 hours. VEGF levels were high in the first 2 hours post surgery and tended to maintain the same concentrations for at least 48 hours after surgery. Conclusions: Based on the results obtained, TGF-β is a cytokine that seems to work as a trigger, leading the pleural mesothelial cell to express VEGF a cause of pleural effusion in CABG surgeries. Resumo: A cirurgia de revascularização do miocárdio envolve o acometimento, tanto do pericárdio como da pleura, conduzindo ao favorecimento de processos inflamatórios responsáveis pelo desenvolvimento de derrames nestes compartimentos. Objectivo: Estudar o comportamento das citocinas proliferativas TGF-β (factor beta de transformação do crescimento e VEGF (factor de crescimento do endotélio vascular nos líquidos de 16 transudatos e de 43 derrames pleurais de doentes submetidos a cirurgias de revascularização do miocárdio provenientes do Instituto de Coração e do Serviço de Pneumologia da Universidade do São Paulo nos intervalos de 2, 24 e 48 horas de pós-operatório. Resultados: O derrame pleural pós-revascularização do miocárdio é um exsudato mobilizador de TGF-β e VEGF no pós-operatório imediato. Os níveis de TGF

  8. Fatores preditivos para drenagem de derrames pleurais parapneumônicos em crianças Predictive factors for pleural drainage in children with parapneumonic pleural effusion

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    HELENA TERESINHA MOCELIN

    2001-07-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: Avaliar os critérios de Light et al. para drenagem em derrames pleurais parapneumônicos (DPP em crianças. Métodos: Estudo transversal prospectivo realizado com 85 crianças admitidas no Hospital da Criança Santo Antônio, Porto Alegre, no Estado do Rio Grande do Sul, região Sul do Brasil, que apresentaram pneumonia e derrame pleural confirmado por radiografia de tórax e/ou ultra-sonografia. Os critérios de exclusão foram: drenagem prévia, derrame associado com outras doenças. A análise do pH foi em aparelho de gasometria. Glicose e desidrogenase láctica foram analisadas por espectrofotometria. A indicação de drenagem foi feita pelo médico assistente sem participação dos pesquisadores. Resultados: Neste estudo, os DPP com pH menor que 7,2 e glicose igual ou inferior a 40mg/dl apresentaram índices de drenagem superiores aos da DHL > 1.000UI/l. O pH e a glicose apresentaram especificidades elevadas na predição de drenagem (89% e 88% e superiores às da DHL (65%. Os mesmos resultados foram observados quando líquidos não purulentos foram analisados (pH 1.000 -- 68%. Em pacientes com pH 1.000UI/l e glicose Objective: To evaluate Light's criteria for drainage in children with parapneumonic pleural effusion. Methods: Prospective cross-sectional study on 85 children who were admitted to Hospital da Criança Santo Antônio, State of Rio Grande do Sul, Southern Brazil, presenting pneumonia with pleural effusion confirmed by chest X-ray and/or chest ultrasonography. The exclusion criteria were: previous drainage, pleural effusions associated with other disorders. The pH analysis was performed with a blood gas analyzer. Glucose and LDH were analyzed by spectrophotometry. The decision to perform pleural drainage was made by the attending physician without the participation of the researchers. Results: Pleural fluid in parapneumonic effusion with pH 1,000 UI/l. The pH and glucose had high specificity (89% and 88% and above the

  9. Parapneumonic pleural effusion: reality and strategies in an Amazon university hospital

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    CLAUDIA GISELLE SANTOS ARÊAS

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: to define the profile and analyze the postoperative evolution of children with parapneumonic pleural effusion (PPE, and to evaluate strategies used in the presence of diagnostic and therapeutic limitations, emphasizing the open thoracic drainage (OTD . Methods: we conducted a cross-sectional, prospective, analytical study in which we followed children admitted in an Amazon university hospital with surgically addressed PPE, from October 2010 to October 2011. Results: we studied 46 patients, most children under three years of age (74%, with no gender predominance. A significant portion of the sample (28% had inappropriate body mass index. We found short stature in five patients (11%, which tended, in general, to a worst postoperative outcome when compared with children of normal height (p=0.039. The average duration of symptoms till admission was 16.9 days. Empyema was a common diagnosis in the first surgery (47.8%, and its bearers had longer duration of chest tube drainage (p=0.015. Most children (80.4% were operated only once. The mean length of hospital stay was 25.9 days. Thoracic drainage (water-sealed was the most common procedure (85%, with conversion to OTD in 24% of the sample, thoracotomy being rare (4%. There were no deaths. Conclusion: the studied individuals often had advanced disease and nutritional disorders, affecting outcome. OTD remains a valid option for specific situations, and further studies are needed for confirmation.

  10. Intrapleural chemo- and hyperthermotherapies for malignant pleural effusion: a randomized prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wen-Jun; Yuan, Shao-Fei; Yan, Qing-Yuan; Xiong, Jian-Ping; Wang, Sen-Ming; Zheng, Wei-E; Zhang, Wu; Sun, Hong-Yu; Chen, Hua; Wu, Li-Li

    2012-02-01

    The current prospective randomized study was designed to evaluate the safety and efficacy of combined intrapleural cisplatin and OK-432 (picibanil) plus hyperthermotherapy in patients with malignant pleural effusion (MPE). A total of 358 patients with MPE due to end-stage malignancies were enrolled and randomly divided into two groups, A and B: the intrapleural combination of cisplatin and OK-432 with hyperthermotherapy (n = 179) or without hyperthermotherapy (n = 179), respectively. Mild toxicities such as nausea, vomiting or anorexia, bone marrow depression, and pyrexia were similar in both groups. Patients in Group A (with hyperthermotherapy) showed a significantly higher overall response (93.4%) compared to those in Group B (79.8%, χ(2) = 43.11, p .05). After treatment, the quality of life scores were significantly increased in both groups as compared to prior treatment (p < .05). In conclusion, our study suggests that combined intrapleural cisplatin and OK-432 followed by hyperthermotherapy are more effective in the control of MPE and improve patients' quality of life.

  11. Bilateral Ovarian Fibrothecoma Associated with Ascites, Bilateral Pleural Effusion, and Marked Elevated Serum CA-125

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    Védi André Serges Loué

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The risk of ovarian cancer is increased in the association of ovarian tumor, ascites, and hydrothorax with the significant elevated tumor marker CA-125. However, this association can be observed in a rare clinical and benign pathological entity, that is Demons-Meigs’ syndrome. Objective. To describe a rare case of Demons-Meigs' syndrome observed in our department. Methods. A black African woman of 35 years old, seventh gravida and fourth parous, underwent a total abdominal hysterectomy with bilateral salpingoophorectomy for large bilateral ovarian masses associated with significant ascites, bilateral pleural effusion, and particular highly elevated tumor marker CA-125 (1835 UI/mL in a pronounced general alteration condition. Results. The postoperative course was uneventful characterized by a complete remission of hydrothorax and ascites with normal level of CA-125 three months after tumor excision. Histology of both masses revealed a bilateral ovarian fibrothecoma, a benign tumor of the ovary, thus confirming the diagnosis of Demons-Meigs’ syndrome. Conclusion. The Demons-Meigs syndrome, although it strongly mimics the clinical picture of malignant metastatic ovarian cancer, remains a disease with benign prognosis after surgical tumor resection. This is a rare condition that must be known and recognized by practitioners to avoid unnecessary practices.

  12. PD-L1 Expression of Tumor Cells, Macrophages, and Immune Cells in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Patients with Malignant Pleural Effusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Yen-Han; Ho, Hsiang-Ling; Lai, Chiung-Ru; Luo, Yung-Hung; Tseng, Yen-Chiang; Whang-Peng, Jacqueline; Lin, Yi-Hsuan; Chou, Teh-Ying; Chen, Yuh-Min

    2018-03-01

    Whether immunohistochemical staining of programmed death ligand 1 (PD-L1) on cells of pleural effusion could be used to predict response to immunotherapy treatment has not been reported. We retrospectively enrolled patients who had undergone malignant pleural effusion drainage and had effusion cell block specimens from 2014 to 2016. Immunohistochemical staining for PD-L1 was performed with tumor cells, immune cells, and macrophages of all cell block specimens. Immunoactivity was scored as 0 for absence of staining and 1+ for faint, 2+ for moderate, and 3+ for intense membranous staining. Patients' clinicopathological characteristics were also collected. PD-L1 expression of pleural effusion tumor cells was associated with the PD-L1 expression of macrophages (p = 0.003) and immune cells (p pleural effusion tumor cells and macrophages. The low intensity of PD-L1 expression in immune cells is associated with the poor survival of patients with lung cancer with malignant pleural effusion. Copyright © 2017 International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. An Unusual Transudative Pleural Effusion Succeeded by Pulmonary and Brain Edema and Death

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    Sayyed Gholam Reza Mortazavimoghaddam

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Here we report a 22-year old woman with massive and bilateral transudative effusion succeeded by pulmonary edema and brain edema and death. Investigations for systemic disorders were negative. Exacerbation of dyspnea after intravenous fluid infusion was a main problem. As effusion was refractory to medical treatment, the patient was referred for surgical pleurodesis and bilateral surgical pleurodesis were done separately. Postsurgically, dyspnea exacerbation occurred after each common cold infection. Vertigo and high intracranial pressure were also a problem postsurgically. CSF pressure was 225 mm/H2O. Therapeutic lumbar puncture was done in two sequential weeks, and the patient was on acetazolamide 250 mg/trivise a day. Despite the medical treatment, progressive dyspnea, headache, and high intracranial pressure followed by death nine months after pleurodesis. As there is a gradient of pressure between pleura and CSF, after pleurodesis brain edema must be a consequence of inversing this gradient. In conclusion, when there are any abnormalities about fluid volume or pressure in any of these cavities, we have to study other cavities.

  14. Analysis of volatile organic compounds in pleural effusions by headspace solid-phase microextraction coupled with cryotrap gas chromatography and mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Zhongping; Zhang, Jie; Zhang, Peipei; Wang, Hong; Pan, Zaifa; Wang, Lili

    2016-07-01

    Headspace solid-phase microextraction coupled with cryotrap gas chromatography and mass spectrometry was applied to the analysis of volatile organic compounds in pleural effusions. The highly volatile organic compounds were separated successfully with high sensitivity by the employment of a cryotrap device, with the construction of a cold column head by freezing a segment of metal capillary with liquid nitrogen. A total of 76 volatile organic compounds were identified in 50 pleural effusion samples (20 malignant effusions and 30 benign effusions). Among them, 34 more volatile organic compounds were detected with the retention time less than 8 min, by comparing with the normal headspace solid-phase microextraction coupled with gas chromatography and mass spectrometry method. Furthermore, 24 volatile organic compounds with high occurrence frequency in pleural effusion samples, 18 of which with the retention time less than 8 min, were selected for the comparative analysis. The results of average peak area comparison and box-plot analysis showed that except for cyclohexanone, 2-ethyl-1-hexanol, and tetramethylbenzene, which have been reported as potential cancer biomarkers, cyclohexanol, dichloromethane, ethyl acetate, n-heptane, ethylbenzene, and xylene also had differential expression between malignant and benign effusions. Therefore, the proposed approach was valuable for the comprehensive characterization of volatile organic compounds in pleural effusions. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. A combination of MTAP and BAP1 immunohistochemistry in pleural effusion cytology for the diagnosis of mesothelioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinoshita, Yoshiaki; Hida, Tomoyuki; Hamasaki, Makoto; Matsumoto, Shinji; Sato, Ayuko; Tsujimura, Tohru; Kawahara, Kunimitsu; Hiroshima, Kenzo; Oda, Yoshinao; Nabeshima, Kazuki

    2018-01-01

    Homozygous deletion of 9p21 detected by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and loss of BRCA1-associated protein 1 (BAP1) expression detected by immunohistochemistry (IHC) are useful for the differentiation between malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) and reactive mesothelial hyperplasia. The authors previously described that IHC expression of the protein product of the methylthioadenosine phosphorylase (MTAP) gene, which is localized in the 9p21 chromosomal region, was correlated with the deletion status of 9p21 FISH in MPM tissues. In the current study, the authors investigated whether a combination of MTAP and BAP1 IHC could distinguish MPM from reactive mesothelial cells (RMC) in cell blocks obtained from pleural effusions. The authors examined IHC expression of MTAP and BAP1 in cell blocks obtained from pleural effusions of 45 cases of MPM and 21 cases of reactive mesothelial hyperplasia. Furthermore, IHC expression of MTAP was compared with the deletion status of 9p21 FISH. MTAP and BAP1 IHC differentiated MPM from RMC with 100% specificity for both and sensitivities of 42.2% and 60.0%, respectively. The combination of MTAP and BAP1 IHC yielded a sensitivity of 77.8%, which was higher than that of BAP1 IHC alone or 9p21 FISH alone (62.2%). Moreover, a high degree of concordance was observed between the results of MTAP IHC and 9p21 FISH in cell blocks. A combination of MTAP and BAP1 IHC in cell blocks from pleural effusions appears to be a reliable and useful method for differentiating MPM cells from RMC and can be used in the routine diagnosis of MPM. Cancer Cytopathol 2018;126:54-63. © 2017 American Cancer Society. © 2017 American Cancer Society.

  16. Primary Effusion Lymphoma Involving both Pleural and Abdominal Cavities in a Patient with Hepatitis B Virus-related Liver Cirrhosis

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    Pei-Ying Hsieh

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Primary effusion lymphoma (PEL is an unusual form of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, which is characterized by lymphomatous effusion in body cavities, but no associated mass lesions. It is usually associated with an immunodeficient state most often with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV. We describe a 54-year-old man with HIV-negative PEL, with a history of hepatitis B virus-related liver cirrhosis. Both abdominal and pleural cavities were involved; no solid tumor masses were found and bone marrow investigations were normal. The ascites and pleural effusion contained numerous pleomorphic lymphoid cells. Immunophenotyping was positive for CD138. Chromosome study showed complex cytogenetics. The genomic human herpesvirus-8 was detected in the lymphoma cells. It is postulated that the immuno-suppressed state in this patient may have been caused by cirrhosis. The patient received four cycles of chemotherapy of CHOP and Picibanil (OK-432 intraperitoneal administration. However, no durable remission was achieved. Adefovir failed to halt the progressive liver failure after the development of YMDD mutant related to lamivudine. He died of sepsis and hepatic failure.

  17. Clinical diagnostic significance of combined detection of serum and pleural effusion levels of CEA, NSE, CYFRA21-1, SCC-Ag in patients with lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bian Baoxiang; Hu Nan; Wu Fenglei; Yang Chengxi

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To appraise the clinical diagnostic significance of combined detection of serum and chest fluid levels of CEA, NSE, CYFRA21-1 and SCC-Ag in patients with lung cancer. Methods: Serum and pleural effusion contents of CEA, NSE, CYFRA21-1 and SCC-Ag were determined with RIA in 54 patients with lung cancer and 35 patients with benign lung disorders. Results: The serum and pleural effusion contents of CEA, NSE, CYFRA21-1 and SCC-Ag in patients with lung cancer were significantly higher than those in patients with benign lung disorders (P<0.01). The contents of CEA, NSE, CYFRA21-1 and SCC-Ag in patients pleural effusion were significantly higher than those in patients serum (P<0.01). For combined detection of CEA, NSE, CYFRA21-1 and SCC-Ag in serum and pleural effusion, the positive rate was 83.33% and 92.59% respectively. Conclusion: Combined detection of CEA, NSE, CYFRA21-1 and SCC-Ag contents in serum and pleural effusion can increase the positive rate of lung cancer diagnosis. (authors)

  18. Combination of long noncoding RNA MALAT1 and carcinoembryonic antigen for the diagnosis of malignant pleural effusion caused by lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wan-Wei; Zhou, Xi-Lei; Song, Ying-Jian; Yu, Chang-Hua; Zhu, Wei-Guo; Tong, Yu-Suo

    2018-01-01

    Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) are present in body fluids, but their potential as tumor biomarkers has never been investigated in malignant pleural effusion (MPE) caused by lung cancer. The aim of this study was to assess the clinical significance of lncRNAs in pleural effusion, which could potentially serve as diagnostic and predictive markers for lung cancer-associated MPE (LC-MPE). RNAs from pleural effusion were extracted in 217 cases of LC-MPE and 132 cases of benign pleural effusion (BPE). Thirty-one lung cancer-associated lncRNAs were measured using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). The level of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) was also determined. The receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves and the area under the ROC curve (AUC) were established to evaluate the sensitivity and specificity of the identified lncRNAs and other biomarkers. The correlations between baseline pleural effusion lncRNAs expression and response to chemotherapy were also analyzed. Three lncRNAs ( MALAT1 , H19 , and CUDR ) were found to have potential as diagnostic markers in LC-MPE. The AUCs for MALAT1 , H19 , CUDR , and CEA were 0.891, 0.783, 0.824, and 0.826, respectively. Using a logistic model, the combination of MALAT1 and CEA (AUC, 0.924) provided higher sensitivity and accuracy in predicting LC-MPE than CEA (AUC, 0.826) alone. Moreover, baseline MALAT1 expression in pleural fluid was inversely correlated with chemotherapy response in patients with LC-MPE. Pleural effusion lncRNAs were effective in differentiating LC-MPE from BPE. The combination of MALAT1 and CEA was more effective for LC-MPE diagnosis.

  19. A stepwise approach to the etiologic diagnosis of pleural effusion in respiratory intensive care unit and short-term evaluation of treatment

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    Nilesh J Chinchkar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Pleural effusions in respiratory intensive care unit (RICU are associated with diseases of varied etiologies and often carry a grave prognosis. This prospective study was conducted to establish an etiologic diagnosis in a series of such patients before starting treatment. Materials and Methods: Fifty consecutive patients, diagnosed with pleural effusion on admission or during their stay in RICU, were further investigated by a two-step approach. (1 Etiologic diagnosis was established by sequential clinical history and findings on physical examination, laboratory tests, chest radiograph, CECT/HRCT/PET-CT and pleural fluid analysis. (2 Patients who remained undiagnosed were subjected to fiber-optic bronchoscopy, video-assisted thoracoscopic pleural biopsy, and histopathology. Results: Etiologic diagnosis of pleural effusion was established in 44 (88% Metastases (24%; para-pneumonia (22%; congestive cardiac failure (18%; tuberculosis (14%; hemothorax (4%; trapped lung, renal failure, and liver cirrhosis (2% each. Six patients (12% remained undiagnosed, as the final diagnostic thoracoscopic biopsy could not be performed in five and tissue histopathology findings were inconclusive in one. Out of the 50 patients, 10 died in the hospital; 2 left against medical advice; and 2 were referred to oncology center for further treatment. The remaining 36 patients were clinically stabilized and discharged. During a 3-month follow-up, eight of them were re-hospitalized, of which four died. Conclusions: Pleural effusion in RICU carries a high risk of mortality. Etiologic diagnosis can be established in most cases.

  20. A stepwise approach to the etiologic diagnosis of pleural effusion in respiratory intensive care unit and short-term evaluation of treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinchkar, Nilesh J; Talwar, Deepak; Jain, Sushil K

    2015-01-01

    Background: Pleural effusions in respiratory intensive care unit (RICU) are associated with diseases of varied etiologies and often carry a grave prognosis. This prospective study was conducted to establish an etiologic diagnosis in a series of such patients before starting treatment. Materials and Methods: Fifty consecutive patients, diagnosed with pleural effusion on admission or during their stay in RICU, were further investigated by a two-step approach. (1) Etiologic diagnosis was established by sequential clinical history and findings on physical examination, laboratory tests, chest radiograph, CECT/HRCT/PET-CT and pleural fluid analysis. (2) Patients who remained undiagnosed were subjected to fiber-optic bronchoscopy, video-assisted thoracoscopic pleural biopsy, and histopathology. Results: Etiologic diagnosis of pleural effusion was established in 44 (88%) Metastases (24%); para-pneumonia (22%); congestive cardiac failure (18%); tuberculosis (14%); hemothorax (4%); trapped lung, renal failure, and liver cirrhosis (2% each). Six patients (12%) remained undiagnosed, as the final diagnostic thoracoscopic biopsy could not be performed in five and tissue histopathology findings were inconclusive in one. Out of the 50 patients, 10 died in the hospital; 2 left against medical advice; and 2 were referred to oncology center for further treatment. The remaining 36 patients were clinically stabilized and discharged. During a 3-month follow-up, eight of them were re-hospitalized, of which four died. Conclusions: Pleural effusion in RICU carries a high risk of mortality. Etiologic diagnosis can be established in most cases. PMID:25814793

  1. The malignant pleural effusion as a model to investigate intratumoral heterogeneity in lung cancer.

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    Saroj K Basak

    Full Text Available Malignant Pleural Effusions (MPE may be useful as a model to study hierarchical progression of cancer and/or intratumoral heterogeneity. To strengthen the rationale for developing the MPE-model for these purposes, we set out to find evidence for the presence of cancer stem cells (CSC in MPE and demonstrate an ability to sustain intratumoral heterogeneity in MPE-primary cultures. Our studies show that candidate lung CSC-expression signatures (PTEN, OCT4, hTERT, Bmi1, EZH2 and SUZ12 are evident in cell pellets isolated from MPE, and MPE-cytopathology also labels candidate-CSC (CD44, cMET, MDR-1, ALDH subpopulations. Moreover, in primary cultures that use MPE as the source of both tumor cells and the tumor microenvironment (TME, candidate CSC are maintained over time. This allows us to live-sort candidate CSC-fractions from the MPE-tumor mix on the basis of surface markers (CD44, c-MET, uPAR, MDR-1 or differences in xenobiotic metabolism (ALDH. Thus, MPE-primary cultures provide an avenue to extract candidate CSC populations from individual (isogenic MPE-tumors. This will allow us to test whether these cells can be discriminated in functional bioassays. Tumor heterogeneity in MPE-primary cultures is evidenced by variable immunolabeling, differences in colony-morphology, and differences in proliferation rates of cell subpopulations. Collectively, these data justify the ongoing development of the MPE-model for the investigation of intratumoral heterogeneity, tumor-TME interactions, and phenotypic validation of candidate lung CSC, in addition to providing direction for the pre-clinical development of rational therapeutics.

  2. A simple weighted scoring system to guide surgical decision-making in patients with parapneumonic pleural effusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Che-Chia; Chen, Tzu-Ping; Yeh, Chi-Hsiao; Huang, Pin-Fu; Wang, Yao-Chang; Yin, Shun-Ying

    2016-11-01

    The selection of ideal candidates for surgical intervention among patients with parapneumonic pleural effusion remains challenging. In this retrospective study, we sought to identify the main predictors of surgical treatment and devise a simple scoring system to guide surgical decision-making. Between 2005 and 2014, we identified 276 patients with parapneumonic pleural effusion. Patients in the training set (n=201) were divided into two groups according to their treatment modality (non-surgery vs. surgery). Using multivariable logistic regression analysis, we devised a scoring system to guide surgical decision-making. The score was subsequently validated in an independent set of 75 patients. A white blood cell count >13,500/µL, pleuritic pain, loculations, and split pleura sign were identified as independent predictors of surgical treatment. A weighted score based on these factors was devised, as follows: white blood cell count >13,500/µL (one point), pleuritic pain (one point), loculations (two points), and split pleura sign (three points). A score >4 was associated with a surgical approach with a sensitivity of 93.4%, a specificity of 82.4%, and an area under curve (AUC) of 0.879 (95% confidence interval: 0.828-0.930). In the validation set, a sensitivity of 94.3% and a specificity of 79.6% were found (AUC=0.869). The proposed scoring system reliably identifies patients with parapneumonic pleural effusion who are candidates for surgery. Pending independent external validation, our score may inform the appropriate use of surgical interventions in this clinical setting.

  3. Comparison study among conventional, tissue harmonic and pulse inversion harmonic images to evaluate pleural effusion and ascites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Hwan Hoon; Kim, Yun Hwan; Kang, Chang Ho; Park, Bum Jin; Chung, Kyoo Byung; Suh, Won Hyuck

    2000-01-01

    To determine the most useful sonographic technique to evaluate pleural effusion and ascites by comparing conventional, tissue harmonic and pulse inversion harmonic images. 12 patients having pleural effusion and 14 patients having ascites were included in this study. 18 patients were male and 8 patients were female. Average age was 54.8 yrs (25-77). We compared images which had been taken at the same section with 3 above mentioned sonographic techniques. Evaluation was done by 3 radiologists in consensus and grades were given to 3 techniques from 1 to 3. Evaluating points were 1) normal structures that border the fluid such as liver, peritoneal lining, pleura, 2) septation in fluid, 3) debris floating in fluid, and 4) artifacts. Pulse inversion harmonic image was the best in image quality for normal structures, followed by tissue harmonic and conventional image (p<0.05). Pulse inversion harmonic image was better than conventional image to evaluate septation in fluid (p<0.05), but there were no statistically significant difference between pulse inversion and tissue harmonic images, and tissue harmonic and conventional images. Tissue harmonic image was better than pulse inversion harmonic and conventional images to evaluate debris floating in fluid (p<0.05) but there was no statistically significant difference between these two latter techniques. Artifacts were most prominent on conventional image followed by tissue harmonic and pulse inversion harmonic image (p<0.05). Pulse inversion harmonic image was the best sonographic technique to evaluate pleural effusion or ascites, However, Tissue harmonic image was the best for evaluation of debris.

  4. Comparison study among conventional, tissue harmonic and pulse inversion harmonic images to evaluate pleural effusion and ascites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Hwan Hoon; Kim, Yun Hwan; Kang, Chang Ho; Park, Bum Jin; Chung, Kyoo Byung; Suh, Won Hyuck [Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2000-12-15

    To determine the most useful sonographic technique to evaluate pleural effusion and ascites by comparing conventional, tissue harmonic and pulse inversion harmonic images. 12 patients having pleural effusion and 14 patients having ascites were included in this study. 18 patients were male and 8 patients were female. Average age was 54.8 yrs (25-77). We compared images which had been taken at the same section with 3 above mentioned sonographic techniques. Evaluation was done by 3 radiologists in consensus and grades were given to 3 techniques from 1 to 3. Evaluating points were 1) normal structures that border the fluid such as liver, peritoneal lining, pleura, 2) septation in fluid, 3) debris floating in fluid, and 4) artifacts. Pulse inversion harmonic image was the best in image quality for normal structures, followed by tissue harmonic and conventional image (p<0.05). Pulse inversion harmonic image was better than conventional image to evaluate septation in fluid (p<0.05), but there were no statistically significant difference between pulse inversion and tissue harmonic images, and tissue harmonic and conventional images. Tissue harmonic image was better than pulse inversion harmonic and conventional images to evaluate debris floating in fluid (p<0.05) but there was no statistically significant difference between these two latter techniques. Artifacts were most prominent on conventional image followed by tissue harmonic and pulse inversion harmonic image (p<0.05). Pulse inversion harmonic image was the best sonographic technique to evaluate pleural effusion or ascites, However, Tissue harmonic image was the best for evaluation of debris.

  5. Defining the minimal important difference for the visual analogue scale assessing dyspnea in patients with malignant pleural effusions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eleanor K Mishra

    Full Text Available The minimal important difference (MID is essential for interpreting the results of randomised controlled trials (RCTs. Despite a number of RCTs in patients with malignant pleural effusions (MPEs which use the visual analogue scale for dyspnea (VASD as an outcome measure, the MID has not been established.Patients with suspected MPE undergoing a pleural procedure recorded their baseline VASD and their post-procedure VASD (24 hours after the pleural drainage, and in parallel assessed their breathlessness on a 7 point Likert scale.The mean decrease in VASD in patients with a MPE reporting a 'small but just worthwhile decrease' in their dyspnea (i.e. equivalent to the MID was 19mm (95% CI 14-24mm. The mean drainage volume required to produce a change in VASD of 19mm was 760ml.The mean MID for the VASD in patients with a MPE undergoing a pleural procedure is 19mm (95% CI 14-24mm. Thus choosing an improvement of 19mm in the VASD would be justifiable in the design and analysis of future MPE studies.

  6. The diagnostic value of pleural effusion ferritin and the ratio of it to serum ferritin in differentiating exudates from transudates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Liu; Liu Junfeng; Yu Jiuru; Ju Ping; Ke Caiming

    2003-01-01

    To explore the diagnostic value of measuring the level of ferritin in pleural and peritoneal effusion for differentiating exudates from transudates, 128 effusion samples were initially detected for differentiating exudates from transudates by traditional method and Light's criteria. Ferritin in the effusions and serum ferritin were detected simultaneously, and the ratio of effusion ferritin (P Ft ) to serum ferritin (S Ft ) was counted. Based on the clinical data, the samples were divided into four groups and P Ft and P Ft /S Ft were compared. At the same time, the sensitivity and specificity of P Ft and P Ft /S Ft in differentiating exudates from transudates were compared with traditional method and Light's criteria. The results showed that in the groups of tuberculous pleurisy, non-tuberculous, benign pleurisy, and malignant tumor, the concentration of Ft in the effusions was significantly higher than that in the group of congestive heart failure and cirrhosis; and the Ft in exudates was significantly higher than that in transudates (P 0.05). If the cut-off value was set up for Ft in the effusion as 100 μg/L and P Ft /S Ft ratio as 0.5, respectively, the differentiating sensitivity and specificity were 94.2% and 87.0%, respectively. Conclusion was that the concentration of P Ft and P Ft /S Ft in exudates are higher than 100 μg/L and 0.5, respectively. On the contrary, they are lower than the cut-off level in transudates. P Ft and P Ft /S Ft have high sensitivity and high specificity in differentiating exudates from transudates, and have great diagnostic value

  7. Reliability of transpulmonary pressure-time curve profile to identify tidal recruitment/hyperinflation in experimental unilateral pleural effusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Formenti, P; Umbrello, M; Graf, J; Adams, A B; Dries, D J; Marini, J J

    2017-08-01

    The stress index (SI) is a parameter that characterizes the shape of the airway pressure-time profile (P/t). It indicates the slope progression of the curve, reflecting both lung and chest wall properties. The presence of pleural effusion alters the mechanical properties of the respiratory system decreasing transpulmonary pressure (Ptp). We investigated whether the SI computed using Ptp tracing would provide reliable insight into tidal recruitment/overdistention during the tidal cycle in the presence of unilateral effusion. Unilateral pleural effusion was simulated in anesthetized, mechanically ventilated pigs. Respiratory system mechanics and thoracic computed tomography (CT) were studied to assess P/t curve shape and changes in global lung aeration. SI derived from airway pressure (Paw) was compared with that calculated by Ptp under the same conditions. These results were themselves compared with quantitative CT analysis as a gold standard for tidal recruitment/hyperinflation. Despite marked changes in tidal recruitment, mean values of SI computed either from Paw or Ptp were remarkably insensitive to variations of PEEP or condition. After the instillation of effusion, SI indicates a preponderant over-distension effect, not detected by CT. After the increment in PEEP level, the extent of CT-determined tidal recruitment suggest a huge recruitment effect of PEEP as reflected by lung compliance. Both SI in this case were unaffected. We showed that the ability of SI to predict tidal recruitment and overdistension was significantly reduced in a model of altered chest wall-lung relationship, even if the parameter was computed from the Ptp curve profile.

  8. Thoracoamniotic shunting for fetal pleural effusion with hydropic change using a double-basket catheter: An insight into the preoperative determinants of shunting efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidaka, Nobuhiro; Kido, Saki; Sato, Yuka; Murata, Masaharu; Fujita, Yasuyuki; Kato, Kiyoko

    2018-02-01

    Although the efficacy of thoracoamniotic shunting (TAS) for fetal hydrothorax is well-recognized, the coexistence of hydrops fetalis is still a clinical challenge. The preoperative determinants of shunting efficacy are not fully understood. In this study, we aimed to investigate the perinatal and postnatal outcomes of hydrops fetalis with pleural effusion treated by TAS using a double-basket catheter, and to discuss the preoperative factors predictive of patients who will benefit from TAS. We conducted a retrospective study in hydropic fetuses with pleural effusion treated by TAS between 2007 and 2015. We extracted information regarding postnatal survival and pretherapeutic sonographic findings, including skin-edema thickness, pleural-effusion pocket size, and Doppler readings. Twelve subjects underwent TAS at a median gestational age of 29 +5 weeks (range, 25 +5 -33 +2 weeks). Skin edema disappeared or regressed in 7. Three experienced early neonatal death and the other 9 ultimately survived after a live birth at a median gestational age of 33 +4 weeks (range, 29 +1 -38 +2 weeks). All surviving children, except for 1, had a pretherapeutic pleural-effusion pocket greater than the precordial-edema thickness. All 3 children that died had precordial-edema thickness equal to or greater than the size of the pleural-effusion pocket. We achieved a high survival rate (75%) using the double-basket technique. A greater pretherapeutic width of skin edema compared with the pleural-effusion pocket is possibly suggestive of a treatment-resistant condition and subsequent poor postnatal outcome. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Hydrothorax, hydromediastinum and pericardial effusion: a complication of intravenous alimentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damtew, B; Lewandowski, B

    1984-01-01

    Complications secondary to intravenous alimentation are rare but potentially lethal. Massive bilateral pleural effusions and a pericardial effusion developed in a patient receiving prolonged intravenous alimentation. Severe respiratory distress and renal failure ensued. He recovered with appropriate treatment. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:6428731

  10. Pancreatico-pleural Fistula: Case Series

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    Manoj Munirathinam

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatico-pleural fistula is a rare but serious complication of acute and chronic pancreatitis. The pleural effusion caused by pancreatico-pleural fistula is usually massive and recurrent. It is predominately left-sided but right-sided and bilateral effusion does occur. We report four cases of pancreatico-pleural fistula admitted to our hospital. Their clinical presentation and management aspects are discussed. Two patients were managed by pancreatic endotherapy and two patients were managed conservatively. All four patients improved symptomatically and were discharged and are on regular follow-up. Most of these patients would be evaluated for their breathlessness and pleural effusion delaying the diagnosis of pancreatic pathology and management. Hence, earlier recognition and prompt treatment would help the patients to recover from their illnesses. Pancreatic pleural fistula diagnosis requires a high index of suspicion in patients presenting with chest symptoms or pleural effusion. Extremely high pleural fluid amylase levels are usual but not universally present. A chest X-ray, pleural fluid analysis, and abdominal imaging (magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography/magnetic resonance imaging abdomen more useful than contrast-enhanced computed tomography abdomen would clinch the diagnosis. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography with stent or sphincterotomy should be considered when pancreatic duct (PD reveals a stricture or when medical management fails in patients with dilated or irregular PD. Surgical intervention may be indicated in patients with complete disruption of PD or multiple strictures.

  11. Polyacrylate/nanosilica causes pleural and pericardial effusion, and pulmonary fibrosis and granuloma in rats similar to those observed in exposed workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xiaoli; Cao, Wen; Chang, Bing; Zhang, Linyuan; Qiao, Peihuan; Li, Xue; Si, Lifang; Niu, Yingmei; Song, Yuguo

    2016-01-01

    Nanomaterials offer great benefit as well as potential damage to humans. Workers exposed to polyacrylate coatings have pleural effusion, pericardial effusion, and pulmonary fibrosis and granuloma, which are thought to be related to the high exposure to nanomaterials in the coatings. The study aimed to determine whether polyacrylate/silica nanoparticles cause similar toxicity in rats, as observed in exposed workers. Ninety male Wistar rats were randomly divided into five groups with 18 rats in each group. The groups included the saline control group, another control group of polyacrylate only, and low-, intermediate-, and high-dose groups of polyacrylate/nanosilica with concentrations of 3.125, 6.25, and 12.5 mg/kg. Seventy-five rats for the 1-week study were terminated for scheduled necropsy at 24 hours, 3 days, and 7 days postintratracheal instillation. The remaining 15 rats (three males/group) had repeated ultrasound and chest computed tomography examinations in a 2-week study to observe the pleural and pericardial effusion and pulmonary toxicity. We found that polyacrylate/nanosilica resulted in pleural and pericardial effusions, where nanosilica was isolated and detected. Effusion occurred on day 3 and day 5 post-administration of nanocomposites in the 6.25 and 12.5 mg/kg groups, it gradually rose to a maximum on days 7-10 and then slowly decreased and disappeared on day 14. With an increase in polyacrylate/nanosilica concentrations, pleural effusion increased, as shown by ultrasonographic qualitative observations. Pulmonary fibrosis and granuloma were also observed in the high-dose polyacrylate/nanosilica group. Our study shows that polyacrylate/nanosilica results in specific toxicity presenting as pleural and pericardial effusion, as well as pulmonary fibrosis and granuloma, which are almost identical to results in reported patients. These results indicate the urgent need and importance of nanosafety and awareness of toxicity of polyacrylate/nanosilica.

  12. Polyacrylate/nanosilica causes pleural and pericardial effusion, and pulmonary fibrosis and granuloma in rats similar to those observed in exposed workers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xiaoli; Cao, Wen; Chang, Bing; Zhang, Linyuan; Qiao, Peihuan; Li, Xue; Si, Lifang; Niu, Yingmei; Song, Yuguo

    2016-01-01

    Nanomaterials offer great benefit as well as potential damage to humans. Workers exposed to polyacrylate coatings have pleural effusion, pericardial effusion, and pulmonary fibrosis and granuloma, which are thought to be related to the high exposure to nanomaterials in the coatings. The study aimed to determine whether polyacrylate/silica nanoparticles cause similar toxicity in rats, as observed in exposed workers. Ninety male Wistar rats were randomly divided into five groups with 18 rats in each group. The groups included the saline control group, another control group of polyacrylate only, and low-, intermediate-, and high-dose groups of polyacrylate/nanosilica with concentrations of 3.125, 6.25, and 12.5 mg/kg. Seventy-five rats for the 1-week study were terminated for scheduled necropsy at 24 hours, 3 days, and 7 days postintratracheal instillation. The remaining 15 rats (three males/group) had repeated ultrasound and chest computed tomography examinations in a 2-week study to observe the pleural and pericardial effusion and pulmonary toxicity. We found that polyacrylate/nanosilica resulted in pleural and pericardial effusions, where nanosilica was isolated and detected. Effusion occurred on day 3 and day 5 post-administration of nanocomposites in the 6.25 and 12.5 mg/kg groups, it gradually rose to a maximum on days 7–10 and then slowly decreased and disappeared on day 14. With an increase in polyacrylate/nanosilica concentrations, pleural effusion increased, as shown by ultrasonographic qualitative observations. Pulmonary fibrosis and granuloma were also observed in the high-dose polyacrylate/nanosilica group. Our study shows that polyacrylate/nanosilica results in specific toxicity presenting as pleural and pericardial effusion, as well as pulmonary fibrosis and granuloma, which are almost identical to results in reported patients. These results indicate the urgent need and importance of nanosafety and awareness of toxicity of polyacrylate

  13. Subarachnoidal-pleural fistula (SAPF) as an unusual cause of persistent pleural effusion. Beta-trace protein as a marker for SAPF. Case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deseyne, S; Vanhouteghem, K; Hallaert, G; Delanghe, J; Malfait, T

    2015-02-01

    We describe a case of a 56-year-old woman who developed a recurrent pleural effusion after a thoracoscopic resection of an anterior bulging thoracic disc hernia (level D9-D10). Despite several evacuating pleural punctions, dyspnea reoccurred due to recurrent pleural effusion, the same side as the disc resection. Because of increasing headache after each punction, a subarachnoidal pleural fistula (SAPF) was suspected. Although magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed features suggestive of SAPF, there was not enough evidence to justify a new thorascopy. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leakage into the thoracic and abdominal cavity has been described as a result of trauma or surgery. Detection of beta-trace protein (BTP, a brain-specific protein) has been described to detect CSF fistulae causing rhino- and otoliquorrhea. Similarly, BTP determination could be used to identify the presence of CSF at other anatomical sites such as the thoracic cavity. Therefore, we decided to determine the concentration of BTP in the pleural effusion of this patient. BTP was assayed using immunonephelometry. The patient's BTP pleural fluid concentration was 14·0 mg/l, which was a 25-fold increase compared with the BTP serum concentration. After insertion of a subarachnoidal lumbal catheter, a video-assisted thorascopy was performed. Leakage of liquor through the parietal pleura into the thoracic cavity was observed. The SAPF was closed using a durasis patch and DuraSeal®. Postoperatively, there was no reoccurrence of pleural fluid. SAPF has to be included to the differential diagnosis of patients with persistent pleural effusion after spinal surgery. This case illustrates the importance of BTP in diagnosing SAPF, especially in cases where major therapeutic consequences may need to be drawn.

  14. The clinical diagnostic value of determination of contents of HCG and β-HCG in ascitic and pleural effusion fluid for differentiating malignant from benign diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Jiangang; Ji Zhigu; Zhu Zili; Xu Ping; Liu Yun; Lu Xiaopeng; Zhang Fuming

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the chinical value of effusion fluid HCG and β-HCG content determination in the differentiation of malignant from benign disorders. Methods: Fluid contents of HCG and β-HCG were determined with RIA in (1) 50 cases with benign pleural effusion. (2) 50 eases with benign ascites. (3) 79 cases with malignant pleural effusion. (4) 78 eases with malignant ascites and (5) 13 cases with malignant pericardial effusion. Results: (1) No false positive cases were present among the 100 benign eases, suggesting a high specificity with HCG and β-HCG determination. (2) Positive rate of HCG in malignancy: malignant pleural effusion, 55.64% (44/79), malignant ascites, 43.58% (34/76), malignant pericardial effusion 92.30% (12/13). (3) Positive rate of β-HCG in malignancy: malignant pleura[ effusion, 62.02% (49/79), malignant ascites, 66.66% (52/78), malignant pericardial effusion, 92.30% (12/13). (4) Coincidence of 91 eases of positive exfoliative cytology and tumor markers: HCG, 65.93% (60/91), β-HCG 73.62% (67/91), combined HCG and β-HCG, 47.25% (43/91). (5) In 79 eases with negative cytology, HCG was positive in 50 eases (63.29%) and β-HCG was positive in 60 cases (75.94%). A remarkable event was: both HCG and β-HCG were positive in 6 cases of malignant pericardial effusion with negative cytology. (6) In malignant pleural effusions, positive rate of HCG was much higher in the 14 eases with squamous cell carcinoma (78.57%, 11/14) than that in the 33 eases with adenocarcinoma (48.48%), 16/33) (P <0.05), therefore, HCG was the marker of choice in eases with effusion from squamous cell carcinoma. Conclusion: In the abscence of pregnancy, malignancy is highly probable with positive HCG or β-HCG in ascitic or pleural effusion fluid and the diagnosis is almost certain with combined positiveness. (authors)

  15. Ultrasound assessment of lung consolidation and reaeration after pleural effusion drainage in patients with Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinardet, B; Brisson, H; Arbelot, C; Langeron, O; Rouby, J J; Lu, Q

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the pilot study was to assess by ultrasound changes in dimensions of lung consolidation and reaeration after drainage of large pleural effusion in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Lung ultrasound and blood gas were performed before, 2 hours (H2) and 24 hours (H24) after drainage of pleural effusion. Lung ultrasound aeration score was calculated. Cephalocaudal dimension and diaphragmatic transversal area of lung consolidation were measured. Ten patients were studied. Median volume of drained effusion was 675 ml at H2 and 895 at H24. Two hours after drainage, dimension of cephalocaudal consolidation and diaphragmatic transversal area decreased significantly. Lung reaeration after drainage occurred mainly in latero-inferior and postero-superior regions. PaO2/FiO2 increased significantly at H24. Ultrasound is a useful method to assess lung consolidation after pleural effusion drainage. Drainage of pleural effusion may lead to a decrease of lung consolidation and improvement of lung reaeration.

  16. Fluid loading and norepinephrine infusion mask the left ventricular preload decrease induced by pleural effusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wemmelund, Kristian Borup; Ringgård, Viktor Kromann; Vistisen, Simon Tilma; Hyldebrandt, Janus Adler; Sloth, Erik; Juhl-Olsen, Peter

    2017-09-11

    Pleural effusion (PLE) may lead to low blood pressure and reduced cardiac output. Low blood pressure and reduced cardiac output are often treated with fluid loading and vasopressors. This study aimed to determine the impact of fluid loading and norepinephrine infusion on physiologic determinants of cardiac function obtained by ultrasonography during PLE. In this randomised, blinded, controlled laboratory study, 30 piglets (21.9 ± 1.3 kg) had bilateral PLE (75 mL/kg) induced. Subsequently, the piglets were randomised to intervention as follows: fluid loading (80 mL/kg/h for 1.5 h, n = 12), norepinephrine infusion (0.01, 0.03, 0.05, 0.1, 0.2 and 0.3 μg/kg/min (15 min each, n = 12)) or control (n = 6). Main outcome was left ventricular preload measured as left ventricular end-diastolic area. Secondary endpoints included contractility and afterload as well as global measures of circulation. All endpoints were assessed with echocardiography and invasive pressure-flow measurements. PLE decreased left ventricular end-diastolic area, mean arterial pressure and cardiac output (p values  0.05) to baseline. Left ventricular contractility increased with norepinephrine infusion (p = 0.002), but was not affected by fluid loading (p = 0.903). Afterload increased in both active groups (p values > 0.001). Overall, inferior vena cava distensibility remained unchanged during intervention (p values ≥ 0.085). Evacuation of PLE caused numerical increases in left ventricular end-diastolic area, but only significantly so in controls (p = 0.006). PLE significantly reduced left ventricular preload. Both fluid and norepinephrine treatment reverted this effect and normalised global haemodynamic parameters. Inferior vena cava distensibility remained unchanged. The haemodynamic significance of PLE may be underestimated during fluid or norepinephrine administration, potentially masking the presence of PLE.

  17. Diagnostic spectroscopic and computer-aided evaluation of malignancy from UV/VIS spectra of clear pleural effusions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jevtić, Dubravka R.; Avramov Ivić, Milka L.; Reljin, Irini S.; Reljin, Branimir D.; Plavec, Goran I.; Petrović, Slobodan D.; Mijin, Dušan Ž.

    2014-06-01

    The automated, computer-aided method for differentiation and classification of malignant (M) from benign (B) cases, by analyzing the UV/VIS spectra of pleural effusions is described. It was shown that by two independent objective features, the maximum of Katz fractal dimension (KFDmax) and the area under normalized UV/VIS absorbance curve (Area), highly reliable M-B classification is possible. In the Area-KFDmax space M and B samples are linearly separable permitting thus the use of linear support vector machine as a classification tool. By analyzing 104 samples of UV/VIS spectra of pleural effusions (88 M and 16 B) collected from patients at the Clinic for Lung Diseases and Tuberculosis, Military Medical Academy in Belgrade, the accuracy of 95.45% for M cases and 100% for B cases are obtained by using the proposed method. It was shown that by applying some modifications, which are suggested in the paper, the accuracy of 100% for M cases can be reached.

  18. Massive pericardial effusion without cardiac tamponade due to subclinical hypothyroidism (Hashimoto's disease).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papakonstantinou, Panteleimon E; Gourniezakis, Nikolaos; Skiadas, Christos; Patrianakos, Alexandros; Gikas, Achilleas

    2018-05-01

    Hypothyroidism is a significant cause of pericardial effusion. However, large pericardial effusions due to hypothyroidism are extremely rare. Hormone replacement therapy is the cornerstone of treatment for hypothyroidism and regular follow-up of patients after initiation of the therapy is indicated. Herein, the case of a 70-year-old woman with a massive pericardial effusion due to Hashimoto's disease is presented. A 70-year-old female from a rural village on the island of Crete, Greece, was admitted to our hospital due to a urinary tract infection. She was under hormone replacement therapy with levothyroxine 100 µg once a day for Hashimoto's disease. Two years previously, the patient had had an episode of pericarditis due to hypothyroidism and had undergone a computed tomography-guided pericardiocentesis. The patient did not have regular follow-up and did not take the hormone replacement therapy properly. On admission, the patient's chest X-ray incidentally showed a possible pericardial effusion. The patient was referred for echocardiography, which revealed a massive pericardial effusion. Beck's triad was absent. Thyroid hormones were consistent with subclinical hypothyroidism: thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) 30.25 mIU/mL (normal limits: 0.25-3.43); free thyroxin 4 0.81 ng/dL (normal limits: 0.7-1.94). The patient had a score of 5 on the scale outlined by the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) position statement on triage strategy for cardiac tamponade and, despite the absence of cardiac tamponade, a pericardiocentesis was performed after 48 hours. The patient was treated with 125 µg levothyroxine orally once daily. This was a rare case of an elderly female patient from a rural village with chronic massive pericardial effusion due to subclinical hypothyroidism without cardiac tamponade. Hypothyroidism should be included in the differential diagnosis of pericardial effusion, especially in a case of unexplained pericardial fluid. Initiation of hormone

  19. Proteome screening of pleural effusions identifies galectin 1 as a diagnostic biomarker and highlights several prognostic biomarkers for malignant mesothelioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mundt, Filip; Johansson, Henrik J; Forshed, Jenny; Arslan, Sertaç; Metintas, Muzaffer; Dobra, Katalin; Lehtiö, Janne; Hjerpe, Anders

    2014-03-01

    Malignant mesothelioma is an aggressive asbestos-induced cancer, and affected patients have a median survival of approximately one year after diagnosis. It is often difficult to reach a conclusive diagnosis, and ancillary measurements of soluble biomarkers could increase diagnostic accuracy. Unfortunately, few soluble mesothelioma biomarkers are suitable for clinical application. Here we screened the effusion proteomes of mesothelioma and lung adenocarcinoma patients to identify novel soluble mesothelioma biomarkers. We performed quantitative mass-spectrometry-based proteomics using isobaric tags for quantification and used narrow-range immobilized pH gradient/high-resolution isoelectric focusing (pH 4-4.25) prior to analysis by means of nano liquid chromatography coupled to MS/MS. More than 1,300 proteins were identified in pleural effusions from patients with malignant mesothelioma (n = 6), lung adenocarcinoma (n = 6), or benign mesotheliosis (n = 7). Data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD000531. The identified proteins included a set of known mesothelioma markers and proteins that regulate hallmarks of cancer such as invasion, angiogenesis, and immune evasion, plus several new candidate proteins. Seven candidates (aldo-keto reductase 1B10, apolipoprotein C-I, galectin 1, myosin-VIIb, superoxide dismutase 2, tenascin C, and thrombospondin 1) were validated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays in a larger group of patients with mesothelioma (n = 37) or metastatic carcinomas (n = 25) and in effusions from patients with benign, reactive conditions (n = 16). Galectin 1 was identified as overexpressed in effusions from lung adenocarcinoma relative to mesothelioma and was validated as an excellent predictor for metastatic carcinomas against malignant mesothelioma. Galectin 1, aldo-keto reductase 1B10, and apolipoprotein C-I were all identified as potential prognostic biomarkers for malignant mesothelioma. This analysis of the effusion proteome

  20. Bilateral pleural effusion in a HIV negative patient - TB or not TB?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huson, Michaëla A. M.; Hermanides, Hillegonda S.; Grobusch, Martin P.; Kross, Martijn

    2016-01-01

    Pleural tuberculosis is an infrequent cause of respiratory illness in Europe and usually presents unilaterally. We present the case of a young, immunocompetent sailor from the Phillippines, who presented with bilateral pleural fluid caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in the Netherlands.

  1. Effusion under the microscope.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Chong, S G

    2012-03-01

    Pseudochylothorax is a very rare form of pleural effusion. It is also called chyliform or cholesterol pleural effusion. It is usually a unilateral process and approximately one-third of patients are asymptomatic at presentation. We report a case of a 60 year old man with a background of rheumatoid arthritis who presented with progressive dyspnea. Chest X-ray revealed a new left pleural effusion and a small persistent right pleural effusion. He presented 5 years prior due to recurrent pleural effusion and no diagnosis was made. Repeat thoracentesis yielded 350 milliliters of thick, milky, tan-colored fluid.

  2. Ultrasound-guided intrapleural positioning of pleural catheters: influence on immediate lung expansion and pleurodesis in patients with recurrent malignant pleural effusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araujo, Pedro Henrique Xavier Nabuco de; Terra, Ricardo Mingarini; Santos, Thiago da Silva; Chate, Rodrigo Caruso; Paiva, Antonio Fernando Lins de; Pêgo-Fernandes, Paulo Manuel

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the role of intrapleural positioning of a pleural catheter in early lung expansion and pleurodesis success in patients with recurrent malignant pleural effusion (RMPE). This was a retrospective study nested into a larger prospective cohort study including patients with RMPE recruited from a tertiary university teaching hospital between June of 2009 and September of 2014. The patients underwent pleural catheter insertion followed by bedside pleurodesis. Chest CT scans were performed twice: immediately before pleurodesis (iCT) and 30 days after pleurodesis (CT30). Catheter positioning was categorized based on iCT scans as posterolateral, anterior, fissural, and subpulmonary. We used the pleural volume on iCT scans to estimate early lung expansion and the difference between the pleural volumes on CT30 and iCT scans to evaluate radiological success of pleurodesis. Clinical pleurodesis success was defined as no need for any other pleural procedure. Of the 131 eligible patients from the original study, 85 were included in this nested study (64 women; mean age: 60.74 years). Catheter tip positioning was subpulmonary in 35 patients (41%), anterior in 23 (27%), posterolateral in 17 (20%), and fissural in 10 (12%). No significant differences were found among the groups regarding early lung expansion (median residual pleural cavity = 377 mL; interquartile range: 171-722 mL; p = 0.645), radiological success of pleurodesis (median volume = 33 mL; interquartile range: -225 to 257 mL; p = 0.923), and clinical success of pleurodesis (85.8%; p = 0.676). Our results suggest that the position of the tip of the pleural catheter influences neither early lung expansion nor bedside pleurodesis success in patients with RMPE. Avaliar o papel do posicionamento intrapleural do cateter pleural na expansão pulmonar precoce e no sucesso da pleurodese em pacientes com derrame pleural maligno recorrente (DPMR). Trata-se de um estudo retrospectivo aninhado em um estudo prospectivo de

  3. Impact of dual-time-point F-18 FDG PET/CT in the assessment of pleural effusion in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkhawaldeh, Khaled; Biersack, Hans-J; Henke, Anna; Ezziddin, Samer

    2011-06-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the utility of dual-time-point F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (F-18 FDG PET) in differentiating benign from malignant pleural disease, in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer. A total of 61 patients with non-small-cell lung cancer and pleural effusion were included in this retrospective study. All patients had whole-body FDG PET/CT imaging at 60 ± 10 minutes post-FDG injection, whereas 31 patients had second-time delayed imaging repeated at 90 ± 10 minutes for the chest. Maximum standardized uptake values (SUV(max)) and the average percent change in SUV(max) (%SUV) between time point 1 and time point 2 were calculated. Malignancy was defined using the following criteria: (1) visual assessment using 3-points grading scale; (2) SUV(max) ≥2.4; (3) %SUV ≥ +9; and (4) SUV(max) ≥2.4 and/or %SUV ≥ +9. Analysis of variance test and receiver operating characteristic analysis were used in statistical analysis. P < 0.05 was considered significant. Follow-up revealed 29 patient with malignant pleural disease and 31 patients with benign pleural effusion. The average SUV(max) in malignant effusions was 6.5 ± 4 versus 2.2 ± 0.9 in benign effusions (P < 0.0001). The average %SUV in malignant effusions was +13 ± 10 versus -8 ± 11 in benign effusions (P < 0.0004). Sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy for the 5 criteria were as follows: (1) 86%, 72%, and 79%; (2) 93%, 72%, and 82%; (3) 67%, 94%, and 81%; (4) 100%, 94%, and 97%. Dual-time-point F-18 FDG PET can improve the diagnostic accuracy in differentiating benign from malignant pleural disease, with high sensitivity and good specificity.

  4. Ultrasound and supine chest radiograph in road traffic accident patients: a reliable and convenient way to diagnose pleural effusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mumtaz, U.; Zahur, Z.; Raza, M.A.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Portable bed side ultrasound and supine chest radiograph of 80 traumatic patients excluding very clinically unstable patients who subsequently underwent CT scan chest was done for traumatic effusion showing that ultrasound had a higher sensitivity than CXR, 88.23% and 77.94%, respectively, and a similar specificity of 100% and 100%, respectively. Objective of the study is to compare the diagnostic accuracy of high resolution ultrasound and supine chest x-ray in detection of pleural effusion in road traffic accident patients keeping plain CT chest as gold standard. Methods: This study was conducted in PIMS and PAEC General Hospital, Islamabad from 1st January to 15th December 2015. The current study examined total of 80 trauma (blunt and penetrating) patients coming to emergency departments of both hospitals specifically those who had road traffic accident history. Their portable bed side ultrasound and supine chest radiograph were performed for assessing pleural effusion and subsequently CT scan chest was done for confirmation as it's a gold standard. Results: Using CT findings as gold standard the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value was assessed for both ultrasonography and chest radiography and found to be 88.23%,100%, 100%, 40% and 77.94%, 100%, 100%, 55.55% respectively with diagnostic accuracy of ultrasound 90% as compared to 81.25% for supine chest x-rays when compared with gold standard. Conclusion: Ultrasound and chest x-ray can be used as a useful and suitable adjunct to CT in road traffic accident patients as these are easily available, non-invasive, no contrast required, can be performed on bed side and carries no or little radiation risk. (author)

  5. The efficacy of Jackson drain in the application to be a tunnel pleural catheter (TPC) in the management of malignant pleural effusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tscheikuna, Jamsak; Thomrongpairoj, Preecha; Disayabutr, Suppareurg

    2011-06-01

    Malignant pleural effusion (MPE) is a common clinical problem in patients with advanced cancer and portends a poor prognosis, which means survival of less than six months. In June 1997, the US-FDA approved an indwelling TPC with a one-way drainage valve to be used in the management of MPE. Although popularity of this TPC has increased over the past few years, the experience with this device remains limited in Thai patients. One of the reasons is its high cost. Assess the efficacy and the safety of customary indwelling TPC by using Jackson drain in the management of patients with symptomatic MPE. Ten patients with symptomatic MPE were receiving these catheters (18 Fr Silicone catheters with 25 cm fenestrated length) to drain effusion via plastic vacuum bottles (250 ml) every other day or as needed to relieve dyspnea. The patient's dyspnic respiration, quality of life, and comfort during the catheter's application were quantified with a Borg score, the St. George Respiratory Disease Questionnaire (SGRQ), and the comfort's score, respectively. These parameters were recorded at initial (before insertion) and 2-week follow-up visit. Pain after 24 hours of each insertion was quantified by visual pain analogue scale (VPAS). Patients were followed until either death or catheter removal. The Borg score, SGRQ, and comfort's score showed significant improvement at 2-week visit (p drain was effective in the treatment of MPE as a TPC without early complications.

  6. Assessment of a bedside test for N-terminal pro B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) to differentiate cardiac from non-cardiac causes of pleural effusion in cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wurtinger, Gabriel; Henrich, Estelle; Hildebrandt, Nicolai; Wiedemann, Nicola; Schneider, Matthias; Hassdenteufel, Esther

    2017-12-20

    Cats with pleural effusion represent common emergencies in small animal practice. The aim of this prospective study was to investigate the diagnostic ability of a point-of-care ELISA (POC-ELISA) for the measurement of N-terminal pro B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) to differentiate cardiac from non-cardiac disease in cats with pleural effusion. The sample material for use of this rapid test was either plasma or diluted pleural effusion. Twenty cats with moderate to severe pleural effusion were prospectively recruited. The cats were grouped into two groups, with or without congestive heart failure (CHF; N-CHF), after complete work-up. Blood and effusion were collected in EDTA tubes. Plasma and pleural effusion supernatants were transferred into stabilizer tubes and frozen. POC-ELISA for NT-proBNP was performed with plasma and diluted effusion (1:1). Quantitative NT-proBNP measurement was performed in plasma and diluted and undiluted effusions. Six cats were assigned to the CHF group. Of the 14 cats in the N-CHF group, 6 had concurrent cardiac abnormalities that were not responsible for the effusion. For the detection of CHF, the test displayed respective sensitivities and specificities of 100% and 79% in plasma and 100% and 86% in diluted pleural fluid. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis for quantitative NT-proBNP measurement of plasma and diluted and undiluted pleural effusions displayed areas under the curve of 0.98, sensitivities of 100% and specificities of 86%. The optimum cut-off was calculated at 399 pmol/l in plasma and 229 pmol/l in the diluted effusion and 467 pmol/l in the undiluted effusion. POC-ELISA for NT-proBNP in both plasma and diluted pleural effusion was suitable to differentiate cardiac from non-cardiac causes of feline pleural effusion. According to our results, use of pleural effusion is feasible, but dilution of the effusion before measurement seems to improve specificity.

  7. Comparison of the Diagnostic Accuracy of the MSLN Gene Products, Mesothelin and Megakaryocyte Potentiating Factor, as Biomarkers for Mesothelioma in Pleural Effusions and Serum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenette Creaney

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The MSLN gene products, soluble mesothelin and megakaryocyte potentiating factor (MPF, are being investigated as biomarkers for the asbestos-related cancer malignant mesothelioma (MM. Pleural fluid biomarkers of MM can be elevated when serum levels remain normal. The aim of this study was to determine if this was true for MPF and to compare levels of mesothelin. Biomarker concentrations were compared in 66 MM patients, 39 patients with other malignancies, 37 with benign disease, 18 asbestos-exposed healthy individuals, and 53 patients with chronic kidney disease. In pleural effusions, MPF and soluble mesothelin concentrations were both significantly elevated in MM patients relative to controls. No significant difference between the area under the receiver operator curve (AUC for MPF (0.945±0.02 and mesothelin (0.928±0.03 when distinguishing MM from all other causes of effusion was observed. MPF and mesothelin serum concentrations were highly correlated and of equivalent diagnostic accuracy with AUCs of 0.813±0.04 and 0.829±0.03, respectively. Serum levels of both markers increased with decreasing kidney function. In conclusion, MPF is elevated in the pleural effusions of MM patients similar to that of mesothelin. Mesothelin and MPF convey equivalent diagnostic information for distinguishing MM from other diseases in pleural effusions as well as serum.

  8. Diagnostic value of combined determination of serum and chest fluid adenosine deaminase (ADA), IL-2, IL-6, IL-10 contents for differentiation of tuberculous from malignant pleural effusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Jiaming; Wang Limin

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the possible diagnostic value of combined determination of serum and chest fluid contents of ADA, IL-2, IL-6, IL-10 in patients with tuberculous and malignant pleural effusion. Methods: Serum and chest fluid ADA (with biochemical method), IL-2, IL-6, IL-10 (with ELISA) contents were measured in 56 patients with tuberculosis pleural effusion, 53 patients with malignant effusion and 30 controls (in serum only). The receiving operative characteristic (ROC) curve for each parameter was analyzed for study of respective area under curse (Auc). Results: The serum IL-6 levels in both groups of patients were significantly higher than those in the controls (P<0.05). The chest fluid contents of ADA, IL-2, IL-6 and IL-10 in patients with tuberculous effusion were all significantly higher than those in patients with malignancies (P<0.05). The Auc in the ROC was largest in the case of ADA, followed by IL-10, IL-6 with IL-2 the least. Conclusion: Determination of chest fluid ADA, IL-2, IL-6, IL-10 contents was helpful in the differentiation of tuberculous from malignant pleural effusion. Combined determination of chest fluid ADA and IL-10 provided the highest accuracy rate for differentional diagnosis. (authors)

  9. Diagnostic utility of serum and pleural fluid carcinoembryonic antigen, and cytokeratin 19 fragments in patients with effusion from nonsmall cell lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sushil Kumar Sharma

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: To assess the diagnostic value of CEA and CYFRA 21-1 (cytokeratin 19 fragments in serum and pleural fluid in non small cell lung cancer with malignant pleural effusion (MPE. Settings and Design: Two subsets of patients were recruited with lymphocytic exudative effusion, one subset constituted diagnosed patients of NSCLC with malignant pleural effusion and the other subset of constituted with Tubercular pleural effusion. Methods and Material : CYFRA 21-1 and CEA levels were measured using Electrochemilumiscence Immunoassay (ECLIA. The test principle used the Sandwich method. For both the tests, results are determined via a calibration curve which is instrument specifically generated by 2 - point calibration and a master curve provided via reagent barcode. Statistical Analysis Used: All data are expressed as means ± SD and percentage. All the parametric variables were analysed by student-t test where as non parametric variables were compared by Mann-Whitney U-test Statistical significance was accepted for P values < 0.05. Software used were SPSS 11.5, and MS excel 2007. In order to compare the performance of the tumor markers, receiver operating characteristic (ROC curves were constructed and compared with area under the curve (AUC. The threshold for each marker was selected based on the best diagnostic efficacy having achieved equilibrium between sensitivity and specificity. Results: In cases serum CYFRA21-1 levels had mean value of 34.1 ± 29.9 with a range of 1.6-128.3 where as in controls serum CYFRA21-1 levels had mean value of 1.9 ± 1.0 with a range of 0.5-4.7. In cases serum CEA levels had mean value of 24.9 ± 47.3 with a range of 1.0, 267.9 where as in controls serum CEA levels had mean value of 1.9 ± 1.4 with a range of 0.2-6.8. The difference in the means of serum CYFRA 21-l (P = 0.000 and CEA (P = 0.046 were statistically significant. In cases pleural fluid CYFRA21-1 levels had mean value of 160.1 ± 177.1 with a range of 5

  10. Pleurodesis Using Mistletoe Extract Delivered via a Spray Catheter during Semirigid Pleuroscopy for Managing Symptomatic Malignant Pleural Effusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eom, Jung Seop; Ahn, Hyo Yeong; Mok, Jeong Ha; Lee, Geewon; Jo, Eun-Jung; Kim, Mi-Hyun; Lee, Kwangha; Kim, Ki Uk; Park, Hye-Kyung; Lee, Min Ki

    Talc poudrage during thoracoscopy is considered the standard procedure for patients with symptomatic malignant pleural effusion (MPE). Until now, no alternative technique other than talc poudrage for pleurodesis during medical thoracoscopy has been proposed. Liquid sclerosants, such as mistletoe extract, have been sprayed evenly into the pleural cavity during semirigid pleuroscopy for chemical pleurodesis. We conducted a retrospective study using the database of semirigid pleuroscopy to identify the usefulness of pleurodesis using a mistletoe extract delivered via a spray catheter during semirigid pleuroscopy for symptomatic MPE. All consecutive patients with symptomatic MPE who underwent semirigid pleuroscopy from October 2015 to September 2016 were registered. The responses were evaluated using chest X- ray or computed tomography 4 weeks after pleurodesis. The study included 43 patients who underwent pleurodesis with mistletoe extract via a spray catheter during semirigid pleuroscopy. Complete and partial responses were seen in 21 (49%) and 19 (44%) patients, respectively. The median duration of chest tube placement after pleurod-esis was 7 days (range 6-8 days) in the 40 patients with complete or partial responses. No cases of severe hemorrhage, empyema formation, respiratory failure, or procedure-related mortality were observed in the subjects at 4 weeks after semirigid pleuroscopy. Pleurodesis with mistletoe extract delivered via a spray catheter during semirigid pleuroscopy is a safe and effective procedure for managing symptomatic MPE. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  11. OPTIMUM: a protocol for a multicentre randomised controlled trial comparing Out Patient Talc slurry via Indwelling pleural catheter for Malignant pleural effusion vs Usual inpatient Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivakumar, P; Douiri, A; West, A; Rao, D; Warwick, G; Chen, T; Ahmed, L

    2016-10-18

    The development of malignant pleural effusion (MPE) results in disabling breathlessness, pain and reduced physical capability with treatment a palliative strategy. Ambulatory management of MPE has the potential to improve quality of life (QoL). The OPTIMUM trial is designed to determine whether full outpatient management of MPE with an indwelling pleural catheter (IPC) and pleurodesis improves QoL compared with traditional inpatient care with a chest drain and talc pleurodesis. OPTIMUM is currently open for any centres interested in collaborating in this study. OPTIMUM is a multicentre non-blinded randomised controlled trial. Patient