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Sample records for marrow donors led

  1. National Marrow Donor Program

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Setterholm, Michelle

    2008-01-01

    ... a nationwide contingency response plan. 2. Rapid Identification of Matched Donors : Increase operational efficiencies that accelerate the search process and increase patient access are key to preparedness in a contingency event. pa 3...

  2. Marrow donor registry and cord blood bank in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Tsung Dao

    2002-08-01

    Unrelated Bone marrow transplant was initiated thirty years ago. Though there are over millions of donors registered with the bone marrow registries worldwide, Asian patients rarely find a match with all these donors. Tzu Chi Marrow Donor Registry was established to meet this need. It has become the largest Asian marrow donor registry in the world. With the introduction of high technology to test the HLA of the donors and recipients, the success rate of bone marrow transplant is greatly improved among Asian countries. 50% of blood disease Asian patients who cannot find a bone marrow matched donor will be complemented by the establishment of cord blood banks in Taiwan.

  3. HLA matching in unrelated donor bone marrow transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charron, D J

    1996-11-01

    The availability of an HLA-matched sibling donor in only 30% to 35% of patients requiring allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (BMT) has led to the proposal of unrelated donors as an alternative source of bone marrow. The greater HLA incompatibility, which, although present, was undetected until recently in many unrelated donor BMT cases, has resulted in a higher rate of posttransplant complications and impaired acturial survival when compared with HLA-matched sibling BMT. Molecular HLA typing enables us to evaluate the impact of incompatibility at each locus in the outcome of unrelated donor BMT. The overall retrospective data would recommend that HLA-A, -B and -C allelic molecular matching should be implemented in addition to HLA-DR allelic matching. Further retrospective analysis is needed in order to assess which incompatibility or combinations are better tolerated than others. Only the definitive knowledge at the sequence level of the donor and the recipient HLA allelic diversity involved in controlling the allogeneic immune response will allow us to understand the precise biologic rationale of the graft-versus-host disease. Knowledge and control of the HLA incompatibilities should allow us to offset the detrimental effects of histoincompatibility while developing strategies to take advantage of the beneficial graft-versus-leukemia effect. Also the role of minor histocompatibility antigens remains largely unknown and will require careful evaluation before minor antigens can be used as a selection criterion in BMT. Carefully designed prospective studies will enable us to test the impact of each HLA locus. HLA typing and BMT represent a successful example of productive cooperation between basic and clinical sciences that should be pursued for the improvement of the clinical outcome of unrelated donor BMT.

  4. Immune transfer studies in canine allogeneic marrow graft donor-recipient pairs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grosse-Wilde, H.; Krumbacher, K.; Schuening, F.D.; Doxiadis, I.; Mahmoud, H.K.; Emde, C.; Schmidt-Weinmar, A.; Schaefer, U.W.

    1986-01-01

    Transfer of immunity occurring with bone marrow grafting was studied using the dog as a preclinical model. Allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (BMT) was performed between DLA-identical beagle litter-mates. The donors were immunized with tetanus toxoid (TT) or sheep red blood cells (SRBC), and their humoral response was monitored by hemagglutination. The recipients of bone marrow from TT-immunized donors showed a marked increase of antibody titer one week posttransplantation, while in the recipients of marrow from SRBC immunized donors the antibody titers were considerably lower. Within the following 60 days the antibody titers in both groups diminished gradually to pregrafting levels. Control experiments in which cell-free plasma from donors immunized with TT and SRBC respectively was transfused indicated that the initial rise of specific antibody titers after marrow grafting is likely to be due to a passive transfer of humoral immunity. A single challenge of these marrow graft recipients with the respective antigen 15-18 weeks posttransplantation led to a secondary type of humoral immune response. It could be demonstrated that transfer of memory against TT or SRBC was independent from the actual antibody titer and the time of vaccination of the donor. One dog was immunized with TT after serving as marrow donor. When the donor had shown an antibody response, a peripheral blood leukocytes (PBL) transfusion was given to his chimera. Subsequent challenge of the latter resulted in a secondary type of specific antibody response. This indicates that specific cellular-bound immunological memory can be transferred after BMT from the donor to his allogeneic bone marrow chimera by transfusion of peripheral blood leukocytes. The data may be of importance in clinical BMT to protect patients during the phase of reduced immune reactivity by transfer of memory cells

  5. Enhancement by dimethyl myleran of donor type chimerism in murine recipients of bone marrow allografts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lapidot, T.; Terenzi, A.; Singer, T.S.; Salomon, O.; Reisner, Y.

    1989-01-01

    A major problem in using murine models for studies of bone marrow allograft rejection in leukemia patients is the narrow margin in which graft rejection can be analyzed. In mice irradiated with greater than 9 Gy total body irradiation (TBI) rejection is minimal, whereas after administration of 8 Gy TBI, which spares a significant number of clonable T cells, a substantial frequency of host stem cells can also be detected. In current murine models, unlike in humans, bone marrow allograft rejection is generally associated with full autologous hematopoietic reconstitution. In the present study, we investigated the effect of the myeloablative drug dimethyl myleran (DMM) on chimerism status following transplantation of T cell-depleted allogenic bone marrow (using C57BL/6 donors and C3H/HeJ recipients, conditioned with 8 Gy TBI). Donor type chimerism 1 to 2 months post-transplant of 1 to 3 x 10(6) bone marrow cells was markedly enhanced by using DMM one day after TBI and prior to transplantation. Conditioning with cyclophosphamide instead of DMM, in combination with 8 Gy TBI, did not enhance engraftment of donor type cells. Artificial reconstitution of T cells, after conditioning with TBI plus DMM, by adding mature thymocytes, or presensitization with irradiated donor type spleen cells 1 week before TBI and DMM, led to strong graft rejection and consequently to severe anemia. The anti-donor responses in these models were proportional to the number of added T cells and to the number of cells used for presensitization, and they could be neutralized by increasing the bone marrow inoculum

  6. UVB pretreatment of rat bone marrow allografts. Prevention of GVHD and induction of allochimerism and donor-specific unresponsiveness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chabot, J.A.; Pepino, P.; Wasfie, T.; Stegall, M.D.; Marboe, C.; Hardy, M.A.

    1990-01-01

    Ultraviolet B irradiation has been used to pretreat blood and islets to prevent subsequent graft rejection. In this study the optimal dose of UVB irradiation of bone marrow was determined in syngeneic recipients and was subsequently applied to in-vitro treatment of bone marrow allografts. UVB pretreatment of donor bone marrow inoculum led to complete prevention of GVHD in allogeneic rat recipients without major marrow or other toxicity. Long-standing recipients of allogeneic UVB-BM became stable adult chimeras. The recipients of allogeneic BM were populated by donor-type peripheral blood lymphocytes and did not reject host or donor-type heart grafts. The BM allograft recipients were immunocompetent as measured by their ability to normally reject third-party cardiac allografts. We suggest that the prevention of GVHD and induction of stable chimerism in adult recipients of allogeneic UVB-BM may be mediated by suppressor mechanisms

  7. UVB pretreatment of rat bone marrow allografts. Prevention of GVHD and induction of allochimerism and donor-specific unresponsiveness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chabot, J.A.; Pepino, P.; Wasfie, T.; Stegall, M.D.; Marboe, C.; Hardy, M.A. (Columbia Univ. College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York, NY (USA))

    1990-05-01

    Ultraviolet B irradiation has been used to pretreat blood and islets to prevent subsequent graft rejection. In this study the optimal dose of UVB irradiation of bone marrow was determined in syngeneic recipients and was subsequently applied to in-vitro treatment of bone marrow allografts. UVB pretreatment of donor bone marrow inoculum led to complete prevention of GVHD in allogeneic rat recipients without major marrow or other toxicity. Long-standing recipients of allogeneic UVB-BM became stable adult chimeras. The recipients of allogeneic BM were populated by donor-type peripheral blood lymphocytes and did not reject host or donor-type heart grafts. The BM allograft recipients were immunocompetent as measured by their ability to normally reject third-party cardiac allografts. We suggest that the prevention of GVHD and induction of stable chimerism in adult recipients of allogeneic UVB-BM may be mediated by suppressor mechanisms.

  8. Protecting the interests of the child bone marrow donor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terry, Louise M; Campbell, Anne

    2004-01-01

    At a time when designer babies have been created to act as cord blood donors to sick siblings, ethical debate has focused predominantly on the extent to which it is acceptable to create one human being to assist another. However, children are frequently used this way, by their families and doctors who extract their bone marrow, to try to save the life of another, usually a sibling. With any life-threatening illness, there is the possibility that the urgency of the sick sibling's need means that the short-term welfare of the donor child receives less attention than it should by parents and doctors. This article suggests ways to protect the interests of such children and empower them within the decision-making process and concludes that the drive to save life must be tempered by recognition of the intrinsic worth of donor children and their rights not to be exploited.

  9. The National Marrow Donor Program and Be The Match Registry | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... outcomes for transplant patients. The National Marrow Donor Program conducts and supports research to help more patients get a transplant and to improve transplant results. Research is also conducted by two affiliate organizations, the Center for International Blood and Marrow ...

  10. Addition of exogenous cytokines in mixed lymphocyte culture for selecting related donors for bone marrow transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeane Eliete Laguila Visentainer

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Mixed lymphocyte culturing has led to conflicting opinions regarding the selection of donors for bone marrow transplantation. The association between a positive mixed lymphocyte culture and the development of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD is unclear. The use of exogenous cytokines in mixed lymphocyte cultures could be an alternative for increasing the sensitivity of culture tests. OBJECTIVE: To increase the sensitivity of mixed lymphocyte cultures between donor and recipient human leukocyte antigen (HLA identical siblings, using exogenous cytokines, in order to predict post-transplantation GVHD and/or rejection. TYPE OF STUDY: Prospective study. SETTING: Bone Marrow Transplantation Unit, Universidade Estadual de Campinas. PARTICIPANTS: Seventeen patients with hematological malignancies and their respective donors selected for bone marrow transplantation procedures. PROCEDURES: Standard and modified mixed lymphocyte culturing by cytokine supplementation was carried out using donor and recipient cells typed for HLA. MAIN MEASUREMENTS: Autologous and allogenic responses in mixed lymphocyte cultures after the addition of IL-4 or IL-2. RESULTS: In comparison with the standard method, average responses in the modified mixed lymphocyte cultures increased by a factor of 2.0 using IL-4 (p < 0.001 and 6.4 using IL-2 (p < 0.001, for autologous donor culture responses. For donor-versus-recipient culture responses, the increase was by a factor of 1.9 using IL-4 (p < 0.001 and 4.1 using IL-2 (p < 0.001. For donor-versus-unrelated culture responses, no significant increase was observed using IL-4, and a mean response inhibition of 20% was observed using IL-2 (p < 0.001. Neither of the cytokines produced a significant difference in the unrelated control versus recipient cell responses. CONCLUSION: IL-4 supplementation was the best for increasing the mixed lymphocyte culture sensitivity. However, IL-4 also increased autologous responses, albeit less

  11. Dominance and persistence of donor marrow in long-lived allogeneic radiation chimeras obtained with unmanipulated bone marrow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pierpaoli, W.; Maestroni, G.J.M.

    1983-01-01

    Allogeneic, H-2-incompatible irradiation chimeras (H-2sup(d) → H-2sup(b)) constructed with normal, unmanipulated bone marrow and with marrow-derived factors live long and do not manifest a GvH disease. Their response to primary immunization is deficient but their alloreactivity is normal. This chimeric allotolerance cannot be passively transferred from chimeric donors to normal irradiated recipients. Passive transfer of both donor- or recipient-type immuno-competent T-cells into the chimeric mice does not lead to syngeneic reconstitution, rejection of the engrafted marrow or GvH disease, and the mice maintain permanently their chimerism. This new model demonstrates that chimerism is not eradicable in long-lived chimeras reconstituted with unmanipulated bone marrow, and that the bone marrow itself plays a dominant role in maintenance of chimerism. (Auth.)

  12. Establishment of donor Chimerism Using Allogeneic Bone Marrow with AMP Cell Co-infusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-15-1-0234 TITLE: Establishment of donor Chimerism Using Allogeneic Bone Marrow with AMP Cell Co-infusion PRINCIPAL...14/2017 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Establishment of donor Chimerism Using Allogeneic Bone Marrow with AMP Cell Co-infusion 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT...tolerance induction of all types of allografts. In this study, we investigate whether co-infusion of amnion- derived multipotent progenitor (AMP) cells

  13. Technical Report of the National Marrow Donor Program

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Setterholm, Michelle

    2008-01-01

    ... a nationwide contingency response plan. Rapid Identification of Matched Donors: Increase operational efficiencies that accelerate the search process and increase patient access are key to preparedness in a contingency event...

  14. Selection of unrelated donors for bone marrow transplantation studied in rhesus monkeys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagemaker, G.; Bekkum, D.W. van

    Graft versus Host disease (GvHD) remains to be a severe limitation to a more general application of bone marrow transplantation. Clinically acceptable results are restricted to those potential recipients for which a major histocompatibility complex (MHC) identical sibling donor is available. At an average family size of 2 to 3 siblings, the frequency of such donors is not more than approximately 30%. This pre-clinical study in rhesus monkeys is directed at the selection of donors for recipients which lack an MHC identical sibling. (Auth.)

  15. Intra-osseous injection of donor mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) into the bone marrow in living donor kidney transplantation; a pilot study

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Hyunah; Park, Jae Berm; Lee, Sanghoon; Baek, Soyoung; Kim, HyunSoo; Kim, Sung Joo

    2013-01-01

    Background Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are multi-potent non-hematopoietic progenitor cells possessing an immune-regulatory function, with suppression of proliferation of activated lymphocytes. In this study, adult living donor kidney transplantation (LDKT) recipients were given MSCs derived from the donor bone marrow to evaluate the safety and the feasibility of immunological changes related to the intra-osseous injection of MSC into the bone marrow. Methods MSCs were derived from negative ...

  16. Subsequent donation requests among 2472 unrelated hematopoietic progenitor cell donors are associated with bone marrow harvest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lown, Robert N.; Tulpule, Sameer; Russell, Nigel H.; Craddock, Charles F.; Roest, Rochelle; Madrigal, J. Alejandro; Shaw, Bronwen E.

    2013-01-01

    Approximately 1 in 20 unrelated donors are asked to make a second donation of hematopoietic progenitor cells, the majority for the same patient. Anthony Nolan undertook a study of subsequent hematopoietic progenitor cell donations made by its donors from 2005 to 2011, with the aims of predicting those donors more likely to be called for a second donation, assessing rates of serious adverse reactions and examining harvest yields. This was not a study of factors predictive of second allografts. During the study period 2591 donations were made, of which 120 (4.6%) were subsequent donations. The median time between donations was 179 days (range, 21–4016). Indications for a second allogeneic transplant included primary graft failure (11.7%), secondary graft failure (53.2%), relapse (30.6%) and others (1.8%). On multivariate analysis, bone marrow harvest at first donation was associated with subsequent donation requests (odds ratio 2.00, P=0.001). The rate of serious adverse reactions in donors making a subsequent donation appeared greater than the rate in those making a first donation (relative risk=3.29, P=0.005). Harvest yields per kilogram recipient body weight were equivalent between donations, although females appeared to have a lower yield at the subsequent donation. Knowledge of these factors will help unrelated donor registries to counsel their donors. PMID:23812935

  17. Frequency analysis of cytotoxic T lymphocyte precursors in search for donors in bone marrow transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cukrova, V.; Dolezalova, L.; Loudova, M.; Matejkova, E.; Korinkova, P.; Lukasova, M.; Stary, J.

    1995-01-01

    The usefulness of cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLp) frequency analysis in the search for donors in bone marrow transplantation was studied. The frequency of anti-recipient CTLp was approached by limiting dilution assay in HLA matched unrelated, HLA partially matched related and HLA genotypically identical donors. The majority of patients examined were affected with different hematological malignancies. Allo-reactive CTLp recognizing non-HLA gene products were not detected in pre-transplant examination of two pairs of HLA identical siblings. However, an increase incidence of allo-specific CTLp was identified in HLA matched mixed lymphocyte culture (MLC) negative unrelated pairs. Thus, CTLp assay allowed to the residual Class I incompatibilities that remained hidden in standard serotyping. In two matched unrelated pairs with high pretranslant CTLp frequency the severe acute graft-versus-host diseases developed after bone marrow transplantation. Examination of other relatives in patients lacking an HLA identical sibling showed the importance of Class I incompatibility for CTLp generation as well. The lack of correlation between CTLp frequency and HLA-D disparity could suggest that Class II antigens do not participate in CTLp induction. With one exception we had good correlation between MLC and DNA analysis of Class II antigens demonstrating that MLC gives interpretable results even in unrelated pairs. Our results demonstrate the significance of CTLp frequency assay in detection of residual Class I incompatibilities in matched unrelated pairs and in assessment of Class I compatibility in related pairs. For that it should be used in the final selection of bone marrow transplantation donors. (author)

  18. The Japan Marrow Donor Program, 25 years of experience in achieving 20,000 bone marrow transplantations: organization structure, activity, and financial basis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Hidehiko; Ito, Masaharu; Kato, Shunichi; Kodera, Yoshihisa; Okamoto, Shinichiro; Taniguchi, Shuichi; Takanashi, Minoko; Kanamori, Heiwa; Masaoka, Toru; Takaku, Fumimaro

    2018-01-24

    The Japan Marrow Donor Program (JMDP), established in 1991, has continued to grow in its capacity to facilitate unrelated bone marrow (BMT) and peripheral blood stem cell transplantation (PBSCT) for the past 25 years in Japan. The current donor pool is 463,465 (as of 31 December 2016) and 20,237 transplants were performed with the help of the Japanese Red Cross, government, and supporters. As JMDP introduced PBSCT in 2010, the vast majority of transplants are BMT. All donors are fully typed for HLA-A, B, C, and DR. The peak age of registered donors is around 40 years. The 8/8 HLA-matched donors are found in our registry for 96% of the patients and 54% of the patients receive a transplant. The median time between the initiation of donor search and the transplantation is approximately 122 days. The median interval between the initiation of donor search and identification of the first potential donor is 40 days. The most common diseases for which unrelated BMT/PBSCT is indicated are acute myelogenous leukemia (AML), acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL), myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), and malignant lymphoma. In recent years we have seen a marked increase in elderly patients who received BMT.

  19. Survival of allografts from bone marrow donors in temporary dog radiation chimeras

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vriesendorp, H.M.

    Complete radiation chimeras accept indefinitely a skin or a kidney graft from the bone marrow (BM) donor. The advantages of this method of inducing graft acceptance are that it does not require the use of toxic post-operative immunosuppressive agents and that the immune reactivity against antigens other than the ones carried by the BM donor remains intact. The disadvantages of this approach are that supralethal total body irradiation (TBI) causes toxicity and that allogeneic BM cells can cause lethal Graft versus Host reactions. Attempts were made to diminish the significance of these disadvantages by using lower dose TBI and giving fewer BM cells. It is shown that, in dogs, 7.5 Gy TBI followed by 4 X 10 8 BM cells.kg -1 body weight of a DLA identical sibling leads to the development of complete radiation chimeras. The exclusive presence of donor type haemopoiesis can be demonstrated by determinations of 'informative' genetic markers, i.e., markers that show different genotypes in donor and recipient. (Auth.)

  20. Recovery of Unrelated Donors of Peripheral Blood Stem Cells versus Recovery of Unrelated Donors of Bone Marrow: A Prespecified Analysis from the Phase III Blood and Marrow Transplant Clinical Trials Network Protocol 0201.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Linda J; Logan, Brent R; Chitphakdithai, Pintip; Miller, John P; Drexler, Rebecca; Spellman, Stephen; Switzer, Galen E; Wingard, John R; Anasetti, Claudio; Confer, Dennis L

    2016-06-01

    We report a comparison of time to recovery, side effects, and change in blood counts from baseline to after donation from unrelated donors who participated in the Blood and Marrow Transplant Clinical Trials Network phase III randomized, multicenter trial (0201) in which donor-recipient pairs were randomized to either peripheral blood stem cell (PBSC) or bone marrow (BM) donation. Of the entire cohort, 262 donated PBSC and 264 donated BM; 372 (71%) donors were from domestic and 154 (29%) were from international centers (145 German and 9 Canadian). PBSC donors recovered in less time, with a median time to recovery of 1 week compared with 2.3 weeks for BM donors. The number of donors reporting full recovery was significantly greater for donors of PBSC than of BM at 1, 2, and 3 weeks and 3 months after donation. Multivariate analysis showed that PBSC donors were more likely to recover at any time after donation compared with BM donors (hazard ratio, 2.08; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.73 to 2.50; P donor and donation in more recent years. Donors of BM were more likely to report grades 2 to 4 skeletal pain, body symptoms, and fatigue at 1 week after donation. In logistic regression analysis of domestic donors only in which toxicities at peri-collection time points (day 5 filgrastim for PBSC donors and day 2 after collection of BM donors) could be analyzed, no variable was significantly associated with grades 2 to 4 skeletal pain, including product donated (BM versus PBSC; odds ratio, 1.13; 95% CI, .74 to 1.74; P = .556). Blood counts were affected by product donated, with greater mean change from baseline to after donation for white blood cells, neutrophils, mononuclear cells, and platelets in PBSC donors whereas BM donors experienced a greater mean change in hemoglobin. This analysis provided an enhanced understanding of donor events as product donated was independent of physician bias or donor preference. Copyright © 2016 The American Society for Blood and

  1. Acute toxicities of unrelated bone marrow versus peripheral blood stem cell donation: results of a prospective trial from the National Marrow Donor Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulsipher, Michael A; Chitphakdithai, Pintip; Logan, Brent R; Shaw, Bronwen E; Wingard, John R; Lazarus, Hillard M; Waller, Edmund K; Seftel, Matthew; Stroncek, David F; Lopez, Angela M; Maharaj, Dipnarine; Hematti, Peiman; O'Donnell, Paul V; Loren, Alison W; Leitman, Susan F; Anderlini, Paolo; Goldstein, Steven C; Levine, John E; Navarro, Willis H; Miller, John P; Confer, Dennis L

    2013-01-03

    Although peripheral blood stem cells (PBSCs) have replaced bone marrow (BM) as the most common unrelated donor progenitor cell product collected, a direct comparison of concurrent PBSC versus BM donation experiences has not been performed. We report a prospective study of 2726 BM and 6768 PBSC donors who underwent collection from 2004 to 2009. Pain and toxicities were assessed at baseline, during G-CSF administration, on the day of collection, within 48 hours of donation, and weekly until full recovery. Peak levels of pain and toxicities did not differ between the 2 donation processes for most donors. Among obese donors, PBSC donors were at increased risk of grade 2 to 4 pain as well as grade 2 to 4 toxicities during the pericollection period. In contrast, BM donors were more likely to experience grade 2 to 4 toxicities at 1 week and pain at 1 week and 1 month after the procedure. BM donors experienced slower recovery, with 3% still not fully recovered at 24 weeks, whereas 100% of PBSC donors had recovered. Other factors associated with toxicity included obesity, increasing age, and female sex. In summary, this study provides extensive detail regarding individualized risk patterns of PBSC versus BM donation toxicity, suggesting donor profiles that can be targeted with interventions to minimize toxicity.

  2. Decisions to register for the National Marrow Donor Program: rational vs emotional appeals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Studts, J L; Ruberg, J L; McGuffin, S A; Roetzer, L M

    2010-03-01

    Little research has examined how the content of health communications regarding the need for BM and stem cell donation affects the intentions and attitudes of potential National Marrow Donor Program (NMDP) donors. This study used an experimental design to test the hypothesis that an emotional appeal (EA) to potential donors would lead to higher rates of NMDP registration than a rational appeal (RA). Participants were randomly assigned to receive either a RA or an EA and then asked if they would (1) register with the NMDP and (2) talk with family members about NMDP registration. A total of 85% of individuals receiving the EA agreed to register for the NMDP, whereas only 49% of the participants receiving the RA agreed to register. The EA (72%) and RA (54%) groups did not differ significantly in their reported willingness to talk with family members about NMDP registration. However, multivariate logistic regression analyses indicated that the EA group endorsed significantly greater willingness to engage in both outcomes. Results suggest that an EA was more effective in motivating participants, but other sociodemographic factors were also associated with decisions about NMDP registration. EA may provide a useful and cost-effective method for increasing NMDP registration.

  3. The immunodeficiency of bone marrow-transplanted patients. II. CD8-related suppression by patient lymphocytes of the response of donor lymphocytes to mitogens, antigens, and allogeneic cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ødum, Niels; Hofmann, B; Jacobsen, N

    1987-01-01

    Lymphocytes from 21 patients sampled 1-6 months after bone marrow transplantation (BMT) were tested for functional suppressor activity against marrow-donor lymphocytes in the lymphocyte transformation test. Suppression of donor responses to allogeneic (i.e. mixed lymphocyte reaction, MLR...

  4. Improved survival and marrow engraftment of mice transplanted with bone marrov of GM-CSF-treated donors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ballin, A.; Sagi, O.; Schiby, G.; Meytes, D.

    1993-01-01

    Recombinant granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) administered to bone marrow (BM) transplant recipients is associated with earlier recovery. We have investigated the possibility of stimulating normal donor mice in vivo with GM-CSF. Donor balb/c mice were injected i.p. with GM-CSF (5000 u) or saline. Seventy-two hours later 5 x 105 BM cells from either GM-CSF-treated or control donors were infused into lethally irradiated (850 R) recipients. In the recipients of BM from GM-CSF-treated donors, significantly higher CFU-S and significantly higher survival rate (57% [n = 65]; vs. 30% [n = 63]; p < 0.05) were noted. Donor mice of the GM-CSF group did not differ in bone-marrow cellularity and composition from their controls. However, recipients of BM from GM-CSF-treated mice had higher blood counts of haemoglobin, Leukocytes and platelets compared to controls. These data demonstrate that pretreatment of BM donors with GM-CSF may be of benefit in improving survival and marrow engraftment in mice. (au) (13 refs.)

  5. The availability of full match sibling donors and feasibility of allogeneic bone marrow transplantation in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eid K.A.B.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The feasibility of allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (alloBMT in a developing country has not yet been demonstrated. Many adverse factors including social and economic limitations may reduce the overall results of this complex and expensive procedure. Our objective was to characterize the most important clinical, social and economic features of candidates for transplantation and their potential donors as well as the influence of these factors on overall survival in a retrospective and exploratory analysis at a university hospital. From July 1993 to July 2001, candidates for BMT were referred to the Bone Marrow Transplantation Unit by Hematology and Oncology Centers from several regions of Brazil. A total of 1138 patients were referred to us as candidates for alloBMT. Median age was 25 years (range: 2 months-60 years, 684 (60.1% were males and 454 (39.9% were females. The clinical indications were severe aplastic anemia and hematological malignancies. From the total of 1138 patients, 923 had HLA-typing; 497/923 (53.8% candidates had full match donors; 352/1138 (30.8% were eligible for alloBMT. Only 235 of 352 (66.7% were transplanted. Schooling was 1st to 8th grade for 123/235 (52.3%; monthly family income ranged from US$60 (7% to more than US$400 (36%. Overall survival for patients with chronic myeloid leukemia, severe aplastic anemia and acute myeloid leukemia was 58, 60 and 30%, respectively. Thus, overall survival rates for the most frequent hematological diseases were similar to those reported in the International Registry, except for acute myeloid leukemia. This descriptive and exploratory analysis suggests the feasibility of alloBMT in a developing country like Brazil.

  6. Exploring the Role of Gender and Risk Perceptions in People's Decisions to Register as a Bone Marrow Donor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mclaren, Patrick J.; Hyde, Melissa K.; White, Katherine M.

    2012-01-01

    Increasing the number of bone marrow (BM) donors is important to ensure sufficient diversity on BM registries to meet the needs of patients. This study used an experimental approach to test the hypothesis that providing information about the risks of BM donation to allay unsubstantiated fears would reduce male and female participants' perceptions…

  7. Intra-osseous injection of donor mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) into the bone marrow in living donor kidney transplantation; a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyunah; Park, Jae Berm; Lee, Sanghoon; Baek, Soyoung; Kim, HyunSoo; Kim, Sung Joo

    2013-04-11

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are multi-potent non-hematopoietic progenitor cells possessing an immune-regulatory function, with suppression of proliferation of activated lymphocytes. In this study, adult living donor kidney transplantation (LDKT) recipients were given MSCs derived from the donor bone marrow to evaluate the safety and the feasibility of immunological changes related to the intra-osseous injection of MSC into the bone marrow. MSCs were derived from negative HLA cross-match donors. Donor bone marrow was harvested 5 weeks prior to KT. At the time of transplantation, 1 x 106 cell/kg of donor MSC was directly injected into the bone marrow of the recipient's right iliac bone. Patients' clinical outcomes, presence of mixed chimerism by short tandem repeat polymerase chain reaction, analysis of plasma FoxP3 mRNA and cytokine level, and mixed lymphocyte reaction (MLR) were performed. Seven patients enrolled in this study and received donor MSC injections simultaneously with LDKT. The median age of recipients was 36 years (32 ~ 48). The number of HLA mismatches was 3 or less in 5 and more than 3 in 2. No local complications or adverse events such as hypersensitivity occurred during or after the injection of donor MSC. There was no graft failure, but the biopsy-proven acute rejections were observed in 3 recipients during the follow-up period controlled well with steroid pulse therapy (SPT). The last serum creatinine was a median of 1.23 mg/dL (0.83 ~ 2.07). Mixed chimerism was not detected in the peripheral blood of the recipients at 1 and 8 week of post-transplantation. Donor-specific lymphocyte or T cell proliferation and Treg priming responses were observed in some patients. Plasma level of IL-10, a known mediator of MSC-induced immune suppression, increased in the patients with Treg induction. Donor MSC injection into the iliac bone at the time of KT was feasible and safe. A possible correlation was observed between the induction of inhibitory

  8. Major Histocompatibility Mismatch and Donor Choice for Second Allogeneic Bone Marrow Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imus, Philip H; Blackford, Amanda L; Bettinotti, Maria; Iglehart, Brian; Dietrich, August; Tucker, Noah; Symons, Heather; Cooke, Kenneth R; Luznik, Leo; Fuchs, Ephraim J; Brodsky, Robert A; Matsui, William H; Huff, Carol Ann; Gladstone, Douglas; Ambinder, Richard F; Borrello, Ivan M; Swinnen, Lode J; Jones, Richard J; Bolaños-Meade, Javier

    2017-11-01

    Large alternative donor pools provide the potential for selecting a different donor for a second allogeneic (allo) bone or marrow transplant (BMT). As HLA disparity may contribute to the graft-versus-tumor effect, utilizing new mismatched haplotype donors may potentially improve the antitumor activity for relapsed hematologic malignancies despite a previous alloBMT. Data from patients who received a second alloBMT for relapsed hematologic malignancies at Johns Hopkins were analyzed. Outcomes were compared between patients who received a second allograft with the same MHC composition and those who received an allograft with a new mismatched haplotype. Loss of heterozygosity analysis was performed for patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) whose first allograft was haploidentical. Between 2005 and 2015, 40 patients received a second BMT for a relapsed hematologic malignancy. The median follow-up is 750 (range, 26 to 2950) days. The median overall survival (OS) in the cohort is 928 days (95% confidence interval [CI], 602 to not reached [NR]); median event-free survival (EFS) for the cohort is 500 days (95% CI, 355 to NR). The 4-year OS is 40% (95% CI, 25% to 64%), and the 4-year EFS is 36% (95% CI, 24% to 55%). The cumulative incidence of nonrelapsed mortality by 2 years was 27% (95% CI, 13% to 42%). The cumulative incidence of grade 3 to 4 acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) at 100 days was 15% (95% CI, 4% to 26%); the cumulative incidence of extensive chronic GVHD at 2 years was 22% (95% CI, 9% to 36%). The median survival was 552 days (95% CI, 376 to 2950+) in the group who underwent transplantation with a second allograft that did not harbor a new mismatched haplotype, while it was not reached in the group whose allograft contained a new mismatched haplotype (hazard ratio [HR], .36; 95% CI, .14 to .9; P = .02). EFS was also longer in the group who received an allograft containing a new mismatched haplotype, (NR versus 401 days; HR, .50; 95% CI, .22 to 1

  9. Development of donor-derived thymic lymphomas after allogeneic bone marrow transplantation in AKR/J mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasumizu, R.; Hiai, H.; Sugiura, K.

    1988-01-01

    The transplantation of bone marrow cells from BALB/c (but not C57BL/6 and C3H/HeN) mice was observed to lead to the development of thymic lymphomas (leukemias) in AKR/J mice. Two leukemic cell lines, CAK1.3 and CAK4.4, were established from the primary culture of two thymic lymphoma, and surface phenotypes of these cell lines found to be H-2d and Thy-1.2+, indicating that these lymphoma cells are derived from BALB/c donor bone marrow cells. Further analyses of surface markers revealed that CAK1.3 is L3T4+ Lyt2+ IL2R-, whereas CAK4.4 is L3T4- Lyt2- IL2R+. Both CAK1.3 and CAK4.4 were transplantable into BALB/c but not AKR/J mice, further indicating that these cells are of BALB/c bone marrow donor origin. The cells were found to produce XC+-ecotropic viruses, but xenotropic and mink cell focus-forming viruses were undetectable. Inasmuch as thymic lymphomas are derived from bone marrow cells of leukemia-resistant BALB/c strain of mice under the allogeneic environment of leukemia-prone AKR/J mice, this animal model may serve as a useful tool not only for the analysis of leukemic relapse after bone marrow transplantation but also for elucidation of the mechanism of leukemogenesis

  10. Motivations, experiences, and perspectives of bone marrow and peripheral blood stem cell donors: thematic synthesis of qualitative studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Maria C; Chapman, Jeremy R; Shaw, Peter J; Gottlieb, David J; Ralph, Angelique; Craig, Jonathan C; Tong, Allison

    2013-07-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) transplantation using bone marrow and peripheral blood stem cells is a lifesaving treatment for patients with leukemia or other blood disorders. However, donors face the risk of physical and psychosocial complications. We aimed to synthesize qualitative studies on the experiences and perspectives of HSC donors. We searched MEDLINE, Embase, PsycINFO, CINAHL, Google Scholar, and reference lists of relevant articles to November 13, 2012. Thematic synthesis was used to analyze the findings. Thirty studies involving 1552 donors were included. The decision to donate included themes of saving life, family loyalty, building a positive identity, religious conviction, fear of invasive procedures, and social pressure and obligation. Five themes about the donation experience were identified: mental preparedness (pervasive pain, intense disappointment over recipient death, exceeding expectations, and valuing positive recipient gains), burden of responsibility (striving to be a quality donor, unresolved guilt, and exacerbated grief), feeling neglected (medical dismissiveness and family inattention), strengthened relationships (stronger family ties, establishing blood bonds), and personal sense of achievement (satisfaction and pride, personal development, hero status, and social recognition). Although HSC donation was appreciated as an opportunity to save life, some donors felt anxious and unduly compelled to donate. HSC donors became emotionally invested and felt responsible for their recipient's outcomes and were profoundly grieved and disappointed if the transplantation was unsuccessful. To maximize donor satisfaction and mitigate the psychosocial risks for HSC donors, strategies to address the emotional challenges of anxiety, sense of coercion, guilt, and grief in donors are warranted. Copyright © 2013 American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Bone marrow cells from allogeneic bone marrow chimeras inhibit the generation of cytotoxic lymphocyte responses against both donor and recipient cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogasawara, M.; Iwabuchi, K.; Good, R.A.; Onoe, K.

    1988-01-01

    When added to a mixed lymphocyte culture, bone marrow cells suppress the generation of CTL activity against H-2 Ag shared by the BM cells and the stimulator cells. These cells have been referred to as veto cells and are thought to play a role in maintaining self-tolerance. We analyzed the H-2 specificity of the suppression expressed by the veto cells from H-2 incompatible bone marrow chimeras, because lymphocytes of such chimeras had been shown to be tolerant to both donor and recipient Ag when tested by CTL responses. We found that the bone marrow cells of such chimeras which were featured by non-T and non-B cell characteristics inhibited the generation of CTL directed against either donor or recipient Ag, but not against third-party Ag. These observations suggest that in allogeneic chimeras the veto or veto-like cells alter the inhibitory specificity exhibited in the recipient microenvironment and indicate that these cells are directly involved in the induction and maintenance of self-tolerance

  12. Molecular profile and cellular characterization of human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells: donor influence on chondrogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cicione, Claudia; Díaz-Prado, Silvia; Muiños-López, Emma; Hermida-Gómez, Tamara; Blanco, Francisco J

    2010-01-01

    The use of autologous or allogenic stem cells has recently been suggested as an alternative therapeutic approach for treatment of cartilage defects. Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs) are well-characterized multipotent cells that can differentiate into different cell types. Understanding the potential of these cells and the molecular mechanisms underlying their differentiation should lead to innovative protocols for clinical applications. The aim of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of surface antigen selection of BM-MSCs and to understand the mechanisms underlying their differentiation. MSCs were isolated from BM stroma and expanded. CD105+ subpopulation was isolated using a magnetic separator. We compared culture-expanded selected cells with non-selected cells. We analyzed the phenotypic profiles, the expression of the stem cell marker genes Nanog, Oct3/4, and Sox2 and the multi-lineage differentiation potential (adipogenic, osteogenic, and chondrogenic). The multi-lineage differentiation was confirmed using histochemistry, immunohistochemistry and/or real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) techniques. The selected and non-selected cells displayed similar phenotypes and multi-lineage differentiation potentials. Analyzing each cell source individually, we could divide the six donors into two groups: one with a high percentage of CD29 (β1-integrin) expression (HL); one with a low percentage of CD29 (LL). These two groups had different chondrogenic capacities and different expression levels of the stem cell marker genes. This study showed that phenotypic profiles of donors were related to the chondrogenic potential of human BM-MSCs. The chondrogenic potential of donors was related to CD29 expression levels. The high expression of CD29 antigen seemed necessary for chondrogenic differentiation. Further investigation into the mechanisms responsible for these differences in BM-MSCs chondrogenesis is therefore warranted. Understanding the mechanisms

  13. Immunohistochemical localization of host and donor-derived cells in the regenerating thymus of radiation bone marrow chimeras

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ceredig, R.; Schreyer, M.

    1984-01-01

    The anatomical distribution of CBA (Thy-1.2) host and AKR (Thy-1.1) donor-derived cells in the regenerating thymus of AKR → CBA radiation bone marrow chimeras was investigated. Cryostat sections of chimeric thymuses were incubated with biotin-conjugated monoclonal anti-Thy-1 antibodies specific for host and donor-derived cells and the distribution of the corresponding Thy-1 antigen revealed by the immunoperoxidase staining technique. The thymus was initially repopulated by Thy-1.2 + host-derived cells, but by 28 days following bone marrow reconstitution the few remaining host cells were found mostly in the thymus medulla. However, occasional Thy-1.2 + cells were still present in extramedullary, primarily cortical, sites. Donor-derived (Thy-1.1 + ) cells were first seen in the 11-day chimeric thymus as single cells frequently closely associated with blood vessels in medullary areas. By 17 days, the cortex contained many Thy-1.1 + cells, although occasional single positive cells were still present in the medulla. Changes in the anatomical distribution of host and donor-derived cells in the regenerating chimeric thymus appeared to correlate with changes in their Thy-1 fluorescence profile as determined by flow microfluorometry. (Auth.)

  14. Determination of Eligibility in Related Pediatric Hematopoietic Cell Donors: Ethical and Clinical Considerations. Recommendations from a Working Group of the Worldwide Network for Blood and Marrow Transplantation Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bitan, Menachem; van Walraven, Suzanna M; Worel, Nina; Ball, Lynne M; Styczynski, Jan; Torrabadella, Marta; Witt, Volker; Shaw, Bronwen E; Seber, Adriana; Yabe, Hiromasa; Greinix, Hildegard T; Peters, Christina; Gluckman, Eliane; Rocha, Vanderson; Halter, Joerg; Pulsipher, Michael A

    2016-01-01

    Related donors for hematopoietic cell (HC) transplantation are a growing population in recent years because of expanding indications for allogeneic transplantation. The safety and welfare of the donor are major concerns for the transplantation community, especially for related sibling donors of young recipients who are children and, thus, not able to fully consent. Because donation of HC does not improve the donor's own physical health and carries a risk of side effects, careful assessment of medical risks specific to the individual donor, as well as consideration of ethical and legal aspects associated with donation from a child, must be considered. In addition, donor centers must balance the needs of both the donor and the recipient, understanding the inherent conflict parents may have as they can be overly focused on the very sick child receiving a transplant, rather than on the relatively less significant health or emotional problems that a sibling donor may have, which could impact risk with donation. Likewise, consideration must be made regarding the nature of the relationship of the sibling donor to the recipient and also aspects of performing research on pediatric HC donors. In this article, as members of the Donor Issues Committee of the Worldwide Network for Blood and Marrow Transplantation, we review key ethical concerns associated with pediatric donation and then give recommendations for screening potential child donors with underlying health conditions. These recommendations are aimed at protecting the physical and emotional well-being of childhood donors and arise out of the Third International Conference on Health and Safety of Donors sponsored by the Worldwide Network for Blood and Marrow Transplantation. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Improved survival after transplantation of more donor plasmacytoid dendritic or naïve T cells from unrelated-donor marrow grafts: results from BMTCTN 0201.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waller, Edmund K; Logan, Brent R; Harris, Wayne A C; Devine, Steven M; Porter, David L; Mineishi, Shin; McCarty, John M; Gonzalez, Corina E; Spitzer, Thomas R; Krijanovski, Oleg I; Linenberger, Michael L; Woolfrey, Ann; Howard, Alan; Wu, Juan; Confer, Dennis L; Anasetti, Claudio

    2014-08-01

    To characterize relationships between specific immune cell subsets in bone marrow (BM) or granulocyte colony-stimulating factor-mobilized peripheral blood (PB) stem cells collected from unrelated donors and clinical outcomes of patients undergoing transplantation in BMTCTN 0201. Fresh aliquots of 161 BM and 147 PB stem-cell allografts from North American donors randomly assigned to donate BM or PB stem cells and numbers of transplanted cells were correlated with overall survival (OS), relapse, and graft-versus-host disease (GvHD). Patients with evaluable grafts were similar to all BMTCTN 0201 patients. The numbers of plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) and naïve T cells (Tns) in BM allografts were independently associated with OS in multivariable analyses including recipient and donor characteristics, such as human leukocyte antigen mismatch, age, and use of antithymocyte globulin. BM recipients of > median number of pDCs, naïve CD8(+) T cells (CD8Tns), or naïve CD4(+) T cells (CD4Tns) had better 3-year OS (pDCs, 56% v 35%; P = .025; CD8Tns, 56% v 37%; P = .012; CD4Tns, 55% v 37%; P = .009). Transplantation of more BM Tns was associated with less grade 3 to 4 acute GvHD but similar rates of relapse. Transplantation of more BM pDCs was associated with fewer deaths resulting from GvHD or from graft rejection. Analysis of PB grafts did not identify a donor cell subset significantly associated with OS, relapse, or GvHD. Donor immune cells in BM but not PB stem-cell grafts were associated with survival after unrelated-donor allogeneic hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation. The biologic activity of donor immune cells in allogeneic transplantation varied between graft sources. Donor grafts with more BM-derived Tns and pDCs favorably regulated post-transplantation immunity in allogeneic hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation. © 2014 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  16. Quality of harvest and role of cell dose in unrelated bone marrow transplantation: an Italian Bone Marrow Donor Registry-Gruppo Italiano Trapianto di Midollo Osseo Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fagioli, Franca; Quarello, Paola; Pollichieni, Simona; Lamparelli, Teresa; Berger, Massimo; Benedetti, Fabio; Barat, Veronica; Marciano, Renato; Rambaldi, Alessandro; Bacigalupo, Andrea; Sacchi, Nicoletta

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the factors affecting cell dose harvest and the role of cell dose on outcome. We analysed data from a cohort of 703 patients who underwent unrelated bone marrow transplantation facilitated by IBMDR in GITMO centers between 2002 and 2008. The median-infused cell doses is 3.7 × 10(8)/kg, the correlation between the nucleated cells requested from transplant centers and those harvested by collection centers was adequate. A harvested/requested cells ratio lower than 0.5 was observed only in 3% of harvests. A volume of harvested marrow higher than the median value of 1270 ml was related to a significant lower infused cell dose (χ(2): 44.4; P < 0.001). No patient- or donor-related variables significantly influenced the cell dose except for the recipient younger age (χ(2): 95.7; P < 0.001) and non-malignant diseases (χ(2): 33.8; P < 0.001). The cell dose resulted an independent predictor factor for a better outcome in patients affected by non-malignant disease (P = 0.05) while early disease malignant patients receiving a lower cell dose showed a higher risk of relapse (P = 0.05).

  17. Neonatal bone marrow transplantation of ADA-deficient SCID mice results in immunologic reconstitution despite low levels of engraftment and an absence of selective donor T lymphoid expansion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbonaro, Denise A; Jin, Xiangyang; Cotoi, Daniel; Mi, Tiejuan; Yu, Xiao-Jin; Skelton, Dianne C; Dorey, Frederick; Kellems, Rodney E; Blackburn, Michael R; Kohn, Donald B

    2008-06-15

    Adenosine deaminase (ADA)-deficient severe combined immune deficiency (SCID) may be treated by allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation without prior cytoreductive conditioning, although the mechanism of immune reconstitution is unclear. We studied this process in a murine gene knockout model of ADA-deficient SCID. Newborn ADA-deficient pups received transplants of intravenous infusion of normal congenic bone marrow, without prior cytoreductive conditioning, which resulted in long-term survival, multisystem correction, and nearly normal lymphocyte numbers and mitogenic proliferative responses. Only 1% to 3% of lymphocytes and myeloid cells were of donor origin without a selective expansion of donor-derived lymphocytes; immune reconstitution was by endogenous, host-derived ADA-deficient lymphocytes. Preconditioning of neonates with 100 to 400 cGy of total body irradiation before normal donor marrow transplant increased the levels of engrafted donor cells in a radiation dose-dependent manner, but the chimerism levels were similar for lymphoid and myeloid cells. The absence of selective reconstitution by donor T lymphocytes in the ADA-deficient mice indicates that restoration of immune function occurred by rescue of endogenous ADA-deficient lymphocytes through cross-correction from the engrafted ADA-replete donor cells. Thus, ADA-deficient SCID is unique in its responses to nonmyeloablative bone marrow transplantation, which has implications for clinical bone marrow transplantation or gene therapy.

  18. Quarterly Performance/Technical Report of the National Marrow Donor Program

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Setterholm, Michelle

    2009-01-01

    ... a nationwide contingency response plan. Rapid Identification of Matched Donors: Increase operational efficiencies that accelerate the search process and increase patient access are key to preparedness in a contingency event...

  19. Quarterly Performance/Technical Report of the National Marrow Donor Program

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Coppo, Patrica A; Davis, Judy W; Spellman, Steve M

    2006-01-01

    ... a nationwide contingency response plan. 2. Rapid Identification of Matched Donors : Increase operational efficiencies that accelerate the search process and increase patient access are key to preparedness in a contingency event...

  20. Quarterly Performance/Technical Report of the National Marrow Donor Program (Trademark)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Setterholm, Michelle

    2008-01-01

    ... a nationwide contingency response plan. 2. Rapid Identification of Matched Donors : Increase operational efficiencies that accelerate the search process and increase patient access are key to preparedness in a contingency event. 3...

  1. The Kinetic Family Drawing with Donor and Nondonor Siblings of Pediatric Bone Marrow Transplant Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Packman, Wendy L.; Crittenden, Mary R.; Fischer, Jodie B. Rieger; Cowan, Morton J.; Long, Janet K.; Gruenert, Carol; Schaeffer, Evonne; Bongar, Bruce

    1998-01-01

    Utilizes the Kinetic Family Drawings-Revised (KFD-R) to measure siblings' (N=44) feelings and attitudes toward bone marrow transplants. Data from drawings and discussions with siblings underscore that not all children are affected by stress in the same way. How a particular child responds depends on factors such as life history, personality,…

  2. The Human Figure Drawing with Donor and Nondonor Siblings of Pediatric Bone Marrow Transplant Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Packman, Wendy L.; Beck, Vanessa L.; VanZutphen, Kelly H.; Long, Janet K.; Spengler, Gisele

    2003-01-01

    There is little research on the psychological impact of bone marrow transplantation (BMT) on family members. This study uses the Human Figure Drawing (HFD) to measure siblings' emotional distress toward BMT. Among the siblings, feelings of isolation, anger, depression, anxiety, and low self-esteem emerged as major themes. Findings indicate the…

  3. Mechanism of donor to host tolerance in rat bone marrow chimeras

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tutschka, P.; Schwerdtfeger, R.; Slavin, R.; Santos, G.

    1977-01-01

    Lewis rats were conditioned with cyclophosphamide and grafted with AgB incompatible bone marrow. They were examined 250 days after transplantation and demonstrated to be healthy complete chimeras. Marrow cells from these chimeras were infused into lethally irradiated ACI, Lewis and BN recipients. Graft-versus-host disease occurred only in the BN rats. Other chimeric rats were given no treatment, busulfan, CY, or total body irradiation prior to the infusion of normal ACI BM. GvHD occurred only in animals given CY or TBI. Normal Lewis rats were conditioned with TBI and given ACI BM. In addition, they received whole blood, irradiated blood, or serum from chimeric rats. GvHD developed in all animals except those given unirradiated chimeric blood. These studies suggest that suppressor cell populations, sensitive to immunosuppression, are likely the fundamental mechanism of recovery from GvHD

  4. Recovery of Unrelated Donors of Peripheral Blood Stem Cells versus Bone Marrow: A Prespecified Analysis from the Phase III BMT CTN Protocol 0201

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Linda J.; Logan, Brent R.; Chitphakdithai, Pintip; Miller, John P.; Drexler, Rebecca; Spellman, Stephen; Switzer, Galen E.; Wingard, John R.; Anasetti, Claudio; Confer, Dennis L.

    2016-01-01

    We report a comparison of time to recovery, side effects, and change in blood counts from baseline to post-donation of unrelated donors who participated in the Blood and Marrow Transplant Clinical Trials Network (BMT CTN) phase III randomized, multicenter trial (0201) in which donor/recipient pairs were randomized to either peripheral blood stem cell (PBSC) or bone marrow (BM) donation. Of the entire cohort, 262 donated PBSC and 264 donated BM; 372 (71%) donors were from domestic and 154 (29%) from international centers (145 German and 9 Canadian). PBSC donors recovered in less time with a median time to recovery of 1 week compared to 2.3 weeks for BM donors. The number of donors reporting full recovery was significantly greater for donors of PBSC than of BM at 1, 2, and 3 weeks and 3 months post-donation. Multivariate analysis showed that PBSC donors were more likely to recover at any time post donation compared to BM donors (HR 2.08 [95% CI 1.73–2.50], pdonor and donation in more recent years. Donors of BM were more likely to report grade 2–4 skeletal pain, body symptoms and fatigue at 1 week post donation. In logistic regression analysis of domestic donors only in which toxicities at peri-collection time points (day 5 filgrastim for PBSC donors and day 2 post-collection of BM donors) could be analyzed, no variable was significantly associated with grade 2–4 skeletal pain, including product donated (BM vs PBSC, OR 1.13 [95% CI 0.74–1.74], p=0.556). Blood counts were impacted by product donated, with mean change from baseline to post-donation being greater for white blood cells, neutrophils, mononuclear cells and platelets in PBSC donors whereas BM donors experienced a greater mean change in hemoglobin. This analysis provided an enhanced understanding of donor events as product donated was independent of physician bias or donor preference. PMID:27013014

  5. The impact of donor characteristics on the immune cell composition of mixture allografts of granulocyte-colony-stimulating factor-mobilized marrow harvests and peripheral blood harvests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yu-Tong; Zhao, Xiang-Yu; Zhao, Xiao-Su; Xu, Lan-Ping; Zhang, Xiao-Hui; Wang, Yu; Liu, Kai-Yan; Chang, Ying-Jun; Huang, Xiao-Jun

    2015-12-01

    The association of donor characteristics with immune cell composition in allografts remains poorly understood. In this retrospective study, the effects of donor characteristics on immune cell composition in allografts were investigated. The correlations of donor characteristics with the immune cell composition in mixture allografts of granulocyte-colony-stimulating factor-mobilized marrow harvests and peripheral blood harvests of 390 healthy donors (male, 240; female, 150; median age, 40 years old) were analyzed. The median doses of CD3+ T cells, CD4+ T cells, CD8+ T cells, CD3+CD4-CD8- T cells, and monocytes in mixture allografts were 160.57 × 10(6), 89.29 × 10(6), 56.16 × 10(6), 10.87 × 10(6), and 137.94 × 10(6)/kg, respectively. Multivariate analysis showed that younger donor age was associated with a higher dose of CD3+ T cells (p = 0.006), CD3+CD8+ T cells (p donor weight with CD3+ T cells (p blood lymphocyte pre-peripheral blood apheresis was correlated with the yield of CD3+ T cells (p blood monocyte count before marrow harvest predicted the monocyte dose (p = 0.002). The results suggested that older and overweight donors should not be chosen. The monocyte and lymphocyte counts before harvest could predict the yield of immune cells in allografts. © 2015 AABB.

  6. Identification of a murine CD45-F4/80lo HSC-derived marrow endosteal cell associated with donor stem cell engraftment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overholt, Kathleen M; Otsuru, Satoru; Olson, Timothy S; Guess, Adam J; Velazquez, Victoria M; Desbourdes, Laura; Dominici, Massimo; Horwitz, Edwin M

    2017-12-26

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) reside in specialized microenvironments within the marrow designated as stem cell niches, which function to support HSCs at homeostasis and promote HSC engraftment after radioablation. We previously identified marrow space remodeling after hematopoietic ablation, including osteoblast thickening, osteoblast proliferation, and megakaryocyte migration to the endosteum, which is critical for effective engraftment of donor HSCs. To further evaluate the impact of hematopoietic cells on marrow remodeling, we used a transgenic mouse model (CD45Cre/iDTR) to selectively deplete hematopoietic cells in situ. Depletion of hematopoietic cells immediately before radioablation and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation abrogated donor HSC engraftment and was associated with strikingly flattened endosteal osteoblasts with preserved osteoblast proliferation and megakaryocyte migration. Depletion of monocytes, macrophages, or megakaryocytes (the predominant hematopoietic cell populations that survive short-term after irradiation) did not lead to an alteration of osteoblast morphology, suggesting that a hematopoietic-derived cell outside these lineages regulates osteoblast morphologic adaptation after irradiation. Using 2 lineage-tracing strategies, we identified a novel CD45 - F4/80 lo HSC-derived cell that resides among osteoblasts along the endosteal marrow surface and, at least transiently, survives radioablation. This newly identified marrow cell may be an important regulator of HSC engraftment, possibly by influencing the shape and function of endosteal osteoblasts.

  7. Data mining of mental health issues of non-bone marrow donor siblings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takita, Morihito; Tanaka, Yuji; Kodama, Yuko; Murashige, Naoko; Hatanaka, Nobuyo; Kishi, Yukiko; Matsumura, Tomoko; Ohsawa, Yukio; Kami, Masahiro

    2011-07-20

    Allogenic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is a curative treatment for patients with advanced hematologic malignancies. However, the long-term mental health issues of siblings who were not selected as donors (non-donor siblings, NDS) in the transplantation have not been well assessed. Data mining is useful in discovering new findings from a large, multidisciplinary data set and the Scenario Map analysis is a novel approach which allows extracting keywords linking different conditions/events from text data of interviews even when the keywords appeared infrequently. The aim of this study is to assess mental health issues on NDSs and to find helpful keywords for the clinical follow-up using a Scenario Map analysis. A 47-year-old woman whose younger sister had undergone allogenic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation 20 years earlier was interviewed as a NDS. The text data from the interview transcriptions was analyzed using Scenario Mapping. Four clusters of words and six keywords were identified. Upon review of the word clusters and keywords, both the subject and researchers noticed that the subject has had mental health issues since the disease onset to date with being a NDS. The issues have been alleviated by her family. This single subject study suggested the advantages of data mining in clinical follow-up for mental health issues of patients and/or their families.

  8. The effect of peripheral lymphoid cells on the incidence of lethal graft versus host disease following allogeneic mouse bone marrow transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almaraz, R.; Ballinger, W.; Sachs, D.H.; Rosenberg, S.A.

    1983-01-01

    Experiments were performed to study the role of circulating lymphoid cells in the incidence of lethal graft versus host disease (GVHD) in radiation-induced fully allogeneic mouse chimeras. The incidence of GVHD was reduced significantly in BALB/c leads to C57BL/6 radiation chimeras if bone marrow donors were exsanguinated immediately prior to marrow harvest. Chimeras resulting from the injection of bone marrow from bled donors exhibited only donor cells in spleen, bone marrow and peripheral blood and normal levels of Thy 1+ and Ia+ cells were found in each of these lymphoid compartments. The addition of as few as 3 X 10(4) peripheral mononuclear cells to the marrow from exsanguinated donors uniformly led to lethal GVHD. 51 Cr-labeled cell traffic studies revealed that prior exsanguination of marrow donors led to about a 70% reduction in the number of circulating mononuclear cells contaminating the bone marrow at the time of marrow harvest. This decrease in contaminating peripheral cells was calculated to be in the appropriate range to account for the decreased GVHD seen when marrow from exsanguinated donors was used. It thus appears that peripheral cells contaminating marrow can be an important factor in causing lethal GVHD in allogeneic radiation chimeras. These results raise the possibility that the fulminant GVHD seen in human marrow transplantation is in part due to the major contamination of bone marrow with peripheral blood that results from the techniques currently used for human bone marrow harvest

  9. Restoration of prostaglandin E2-producing splenic macrophages in 89Sr-treated mice with bone marrow from Corynebacterium parvum primed donors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shibata, Y.

    1989-01-01

    Administration of Corynebacterium parvum (CP), 56 mg/kg ip to CBA/J mice effected the induction of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) producing macrophages (M phi) in the bone marrow and the spleen. Maximal release of PGE2 from M phi cultured in vitro with calcium ionophore A23187 for 2 h was reached by marrow M phi removed on 5 days after CP (450 ng/mg cell protein), and by splenic M phi 9 days after CP (400 ng/mg). Neither M phi population, however, yielded more than 6.0 ng/mg leukotriene C4. To assess ontogenic relationships mice were depleted of bone marrow and blood monocytes by iv injection of the bone-seeking isotope, 89Sr. CP was given at several points before or after bone marrow cell depletion. PGE2 production by splenic M phi harvested on day 9 after CP was profoundly impaired when CP was administered either concurrently with or 3 days after 89Sr. When CP was administered 1, 3, 5, and 7 days before 89Sr, however, the induction of PGE2-producing M phi in the spleen was unaffected. To determine whether bone marrow cells from CP-injected donors can restore PGE2-producing splenic M phi (PGSM) in 89Sr-mice, recipient mice which had and had not received CP 3 days after 89Sr were transfused with 5 x 10(6) syngeneic bone marrow cells from donor mice prepared at varying intervals after CP administration. The results clearly indicate the capacity of bone marrow cells harvested on either day 1 or 2 following CP to restore PGSM in CP-primed, but not unprimed, recipients

  10. Reduced-Intensity Transplantation for Lymphomas Using Haploidentical Related Donors Versus HLA-Matched Sibling Donors: A Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Nilanjan; Karmali, Reem; Rocha, Vanderson; Ahn, Kwang Woo; DiGilio, Alyssa; Hari, Parameswaran N.; Bachanova, Veronika; Bacher, Ulrike; Dahi, Parastoo; de Lima, Marcos; D’Souza, Anita; Fenske, Timothy S.; Ganguly, Siddhartha; Kharfan-Dabaja, Mohamed A.; Prestidge, Tim D.; Savani, Bipin N.; Smith, Sonali M.; Sureda, Anna M.; Waller, Edmund K.; Jaglowski, Samantha; Herrera, Alex F.; Armand, Philippe; Salit, Rachel B.; Wagner-Johnston, Nina D.; Fuchs, Ephraim; Bolaños-Meade, Javier

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Related donor haploidentical hematopoietic cell transplantation (Haplo-HCT) using post-transplantation cyclophosphamide (PT-Cy) is increasingly used in patients lacking HLA-matched sibling donors (MSD). We compared outcomes after Haplo-HCT using PT-Cy with MSD-HCT in patients with lymphoma, using the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research registry. Materials and Methods We evaluated 987 adult patients undergoing either Haplo-HCT (n = 180) or MSD-HCT (n = 807) following reduced-intensity conditioning regimens. The haploidentical group received graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) prophylaxis with PT-Cy with or without a calcineurin inhibitor and mycophenolate. The MSD group received calcineurin inhibitor–based GVHD prophylaxis. Results Median follow-up of survivors was 3 years. The 28-day neutrophil recovery was similar in the two groups (95% v 97%; P = .31). The 28-day platelet recovery was delayed in the haploidentical group compared with the MSD group (63% v 91%; P = .001). Cumulative incidence of grade II to IV acute GVHD at day 100 was similar between the two groups (27% v 25%; P = .84). Cumulative incidence of chronic GVHD at 1 year was significantly lower after Haplo-HCT (12% v 45%; P < .001), and this benefit was confirmed on multivariate analysis (relative risk, 0.21; 95% CI, 0.14 to 0.31; P < .001). For Haplo-HCT v MSD-HCT, 3-year rates of nonrelapse mortality (15% v 13%; P = .41), relapse/progression (37% v 40%; P = .51), progression-free survival (48% v 48%; P = .96), and overall survival (61% v 62%; P = .82) were similar. Multivariate analysis showed no significant difference between Haplo-HCT and MSD-HCT in terms of nonrelapse mortality (P = .06), progression/relapse (P = .10), progression-free survival (P = .83), and overall survival (P = .34). Conclusion Haplo-HCT with PT-Cy provides survival outcomes comparable to MSD-HCT, with a significantly lower risk of chronic GVHD. PMID:27269951

  11. TH1/TH2 cytokines and soluble CD30 levels in kidney allograft patients with donor bone marrow cell infusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solgi, G; Amirzagar, A A; Pourmand, G; Mehrsai, A R; Taherimahmoudi, M; Baradaran, N; Nicknam, M H; Ebrahimi Rad, M R; Saraji, A; Asadpoor, A A; Moheiydin, M; Nikbin, B

    2009-09-01

    We investigated the relevance of donor bone marrow cell infusion (DBMI) and serum levels of interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma), interleukin-10 (IL-10), and soluble CD30 (sCD30) in kidney recipients. We analyzed the allograft outcomes correlated with sCD30, IFN-gamma, and IL-10 levels using pre- and posttransplantation sera from 40 live donor renal transplants (20 patients with DBMI [2.1 x 10(9) +/- 1.3 x 10(9) mononuclear cells/body] and 20 controls). Patients with acute rejection episodes (ARE)-3/20 DBMI and 6/20 controls-showed increased sCD30 and IFN-gamma as well as decreased IL-10 posttransplantation compared with nonrejectors. Significant differences were observed for sCD30 and IFN-gamma levels: 59.54 vs 30.92 ng/mL (P = .02) and 11.91 vs 3.01 pg/mL (P = .01), respectively. Comparison of pre- and posttransplant levels of IFN-gamma, IL-10, and sCD30 in ARE patients showed higher levels in posttransplant sera except for IFN-gamma in controls (6.37 vs 11.93; P = .01). Increased IFN-gamma and IL-10 were correlated with rejection (r = .93; P = .008). sCD30 correlated with serum creatinine among ARE patients in control and DBMI groups (r = .89; P = .019; and r = 1.00; P sCD30, IFN-gamma, and IL-10 posttransplantation in rejecting patients provided evidence for coexistence of cellular and humoral responses in ARE. There appeared to be a down-regulatory effect of infusion on alloresponses.

  12. A quality of life study in 20 adult long-term survivors of unrelated donor bone marrow transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marks, D I; Gale, D J; Vedhara, K; Bird, J M

    1999-07-01

    There are few specific data available concerning quality of life (QOL) of survivors of unrelated donor bone marrow transplantation (UD-BMT). The procedure is expensive, difficult and is being employed increasingly yet we have little information concerning the QOL of survivors to justify this intervention. In this study, 20 long-term (>1 year post-BMT) survivors were studied with four self report questionnaires designed to assess quality of life, satisfaction with life, social support and employment status. Overall, satisfaction with life measures was above average but there was dissatisfaction with physical strength and appearance. The post-transplant employment data indicates that 60% of long-term survivors returned to full-time work and 15% to part-time work. Failure to return to work was not correlated with graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), relapse, age at or time since transplant. In general, there was a good correlation between the clinician's and patient's view of their health but the clinician's assessment of the patients mental health and energy was higher than the patients reported. Further research is required in the area of QOL post-UD-BMT. This will enable transplant physicians to counsel patients better pre-BMT and to evaluate fully the results achieved by different centres performing the procedure.

  13. Effect of selective T cell depletion of host and/or donor bone marrow on lymphopoietic repopulation, tolerance, and graft-vs-host disease in mixed allogeneic chimeras (B10 + B10.D2----B10)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ildstad, S.T.; Wren, S.M.; Bluestone, J.A.; Barbieri, S.A.; Stephany, D.; Sachs, D.H.

    1986-01-01

    Reconstitution of lethally irradiated mice with a mixture of T cell-depleted syngeneic plus T cell-depleted allogeneic bone marrow (B10 + B10.D2----B10) leads to the induction of mixed lymphopoietic chimerism, excellent survivals, specific in vivo transplantation tolerance to subsequent donor strain skin grafts, and specific in vitro unresponsiveness to allogeneic donor lymphoid elements as assessed by mixed lymphocyte reaction (MLR) proliferative and cell-mediated lympholysis (CML) cytotoxicity assays. When B10 recipient mice received mixed marrow inocula in which the syngeneic component had not been T cell depleted, whether or not the allogeneic donor marrow was treated, they repopulated exclusively with host-type cells, promptly rejected donor-type skin allografts, and were reactive in vitro to the allogeneic donor by CML and MLR assays. In contrast, T cell depletion of the syngeneic component of the mixed marrow inocula resulted in specific acceptance of allogeneic donor strain skin grafts. Such animals were specifically unreactive to allogeneic donor lymphoid elements in vitro by CML and MLR, but were reactive to third party. When both the syngeneic and allogeneic marrow were T cell depleted, variable percentages of host- and donor-type lymphoid elements were detected in the mixed reconstituted host. When only the syngeneic bone marrow was T cell depleted, animals repopulated exclusively with donor-type cells. Although these animals had detectable in vitro anti-host (B10) reactivity by CML and MLR and reconstituted as fully allogeneic chimeras, they exhibited excellent survival and had no in vivo evidence for graft-vs-host disease. Experiments in which untreated donor spleen cells were added to the inocula in this last group suggest that the presence of T cell-depleted syngeneic bone marrow cells diminishes graft-vs-host disease and the mortality from it

  14. Kidney Versus Islet Allograft Survival After Induction of Mixed Chimerism With Combined Donor Bone Marrow Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oura, Tetsu; Ko, Dicken S C; Boskovic, Svjetlan; O'Neil, John J; Chipashvili, Vaja; Koulmanda, Maria; Hotta, Kiyohiko; Kawai, Kento; Nadazdin, Ognjenka; Smith, R Neal; Cosimi, A B; Kawai, Tatsuo

    2016-01-01

    We have previously reported successful induction of transient mixed chimerism and long-term acceptance of renal allografts in MHC mismatched nonhuman primates. In this study, we attempted to extend this tolerance induction approach to islet allografts. A total of eight recipients underwent MHC mismatched combined islet and bone marrow (BM) transplantation after induction of diabetes by streptozotocin. Three recipients were treated after a nonmyeloablative conditioning regimen that included low-dose total body and thymic irradiation, horse Atgam (ATG), six doses of anti-CD154 monoclonal antibody (mAb), and a 1-month course of cyclosporine (CyA) (Islet A). In Islet B, anti-CD8 mAb was administered in place of CyA. In Islet C, two recipients were treated with Islet B, but without ATG. The results were compared with previously reported results of eight cynomolgus monkeys that received combined kidney and BM transplantation (Kidney A) following the same conditioning regimen used in Islet A. The majority of kidney/BM recipients achieved long-term renal allograft survival after induction of transient chimerism. However, prolonged islet survival was not achieved in similarly conditioned islet/BM recipients (Islet A), despite induction of comparable levels of chimerism. In order to rule out islet allograft loss due to CyA toxicity, three recipients were treated with anti-CD8 mAb in place of CyA. Although these recipients developed significantly superior mixed chimerism and more prolonged islet allograft survival (61, 103, and 113 days), islet function was lost soon after the disappearance of chimerism. In Islet C recipients, neither prolonged chimerism nor islet survival was observed (30 and 40 days). Significant improvement of mixed chimerism induction and islet allograft survival were achieved with a CyA-free regimen that included anti-CD8 mAb. However, unlike the kidney allograft, islet allograft tolerance was not induced with transient chimerism. Induction of more

  15. First-line treatment for severe aplastic anemia in children: bone marrow transplantation from a matched family donor versus immunosuppressive therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Nao; Kobayashi, Ryoji; Yabe, Hiromasa; Kosaka, Yoshiyuki; Yagasaki, Hiroshi; Watanabe, Ken-Ichiro; Kudo, Kazuko; Morimoto, Akira; Ohga, Shouichi; Muramatsu, Hideki; Takahashi, Yoshiyuki; Kato, Koji; Suzuki, Ritsuro; Ohara, Akira; Kojima, Seiji

    2014-12-01

    The current treatment approach for severe aplastic anemia in children is based on studies performed in the 1980s, and updated evidence is required. We retrospectively compared the outcomes of children with acquired severe aplastic anemia who received immunosuppressive therapy within prospective trials conducted by the Japanese Childhood Aplastic Anemia Study Group or who underwent bone marrow transplantation from an HLA-matched family donor registered in the Japanese Society for Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation Registry. Between 1992 and 2009, 599 children (younger than 17 years) with severe aplastic anemia received a bone marrow transplant from an HLA-matched family donor (n=213) or immunosuppressive therapy (n=386) as first-line treatment. While the overall survival did not differ between patients treated with immunosuppressive therapy or bone marrow transplantation [88% (95% confidence interval: 86-90) versus 92% (90-94)], failure-free survival was significantly inferior in patients receiving immunosuppressive therapy than in those undergoing bone marrow transplantation [56% (54-59) versus 87% (85-90); Paplastic anemia. Copyright© Ferrata Storti Foundation.

  16. Probability of Finding Marrow Unrelated Donor (MUD) for an Indian patient in a Multi-national Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, Aseem K; Bhati-Kushwaha, Himakshi; Kukreja, Pooja; Mishra, Vikash C; Tyagi, Neetu; Sharma, Ashish; Raina, Vimarsh

    2015-06-01

    With an increase in the number of transplants happening globally, hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) transplantation from matched unrelated donor (MUD) has begun. The increasing trend of MUD transplants across countries has been largely facilitated with the conspicuous growth of volunteer HSC donor noted in the last decade i.e. 8 million HSC donors in 2002 to more than 22 million in 2013 registered in 71 member registries of the Bone Marrow Donor Worldwide (BMDW). Some populations of the world are still very poorly represented in these registries. Since, the chances of successful engraftment and disease free survival are directly proportional to the HLA compatibility between the recipient and the prospective donor, the diversity of the HLA system at the antigenic and allelic level and the heterogeneity of HLA data of the registered donors has a bearing on the probability of finding a volunteer unrelated HSC donor for patients from such populations. In the present study 126 patients were identified suffering from hematological diseases requiring MUD transplant. Their HLA typing was performed and search was done using BMDW database. The search results for these Indian patients in the multinational registry as well as in the Indian Registries were analyzed using mean, range, standard deviation and finally evaluated in terms of probability for finding matched donor (MUD). Total Asian population is only 11 % in the BMDW making it difficult to find a MUD for an Asian patient. The current study supports this, experimentally; revealing that the probability of finding an allele match for an Indian patient in the multinational Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) registries is 16 % and a dismal 0.008 % in the Indian registries (donors in Indian registries is just 33,678 as compared to 22.5 million in BMDW). This greatly, emphasizes on enhancing the number of Indian donors in Indian and multi-national registries.

  17. Donor cytomegalovirus status influences the outcome of allogeneic stem cell transplant: a study by the European group for blood and marrow transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ljungman, Per; Brand, Ronald; Hoek, Jennifer; de la Camara, Rafael; Cordonnier, Catherine; Einsele, Hermann; Styczynski, Jan; Ward, Katherine N; Cesaro, Simone

    2014-08-15

    The use of a cytomegalovirus (CMV)-seronegative donor for a CMV-seronegative allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) recipient is generally accepted. However, the importance of donor serostatus in CMV-seropositive patients is controversial. A total of 49 542 HSCT patients, 29 349 seropositive and 20 193 seronegative, were identified from the European Group for Blood and Marrow Transplantation database. Cox multivariate models were fitted to estimate the effect of donor CMV serological status on outcome. Seronegative patients receiving seropositive unrelated-donor grafts had decreased overall survival (hazard ratio [HR], 1.13; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.06-1.21; P donors, whereas no difference was seen in patients receiving HLA-matched sibling grafts. Seropositive patients receiving grafts from seropositive unrelated donors had improved overall survival (HR, 0.92; 95% CI, .86-.98; P donors, if they had received myeloablative conditioning. This effect was absent when they received reduced-intensity conditioning. No effect was seen in patients grafted from HLA-identical sibling donors. The same association was found if the study was limited to patients receiving transplants from the year 2000 onward. We confirm the negative impact on overall survival if a CMV-seropositive unrelated donor is selected for a CMV-seronegative patient. For a CMV-seropositive patient, our data support selecting a CMV-seropositive donor if the patient receives a myeloablative conditioning regimen. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Induction of MHC-mismatched Mouse Lung Allograft Acceptance with Combined Donor Bone Marrow: Lung Transplant using a 12-Hour Nonmyeloablative Conditioning Regimen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vulic, Ante; Panoskaltsis-Mortari, Angela; McDyer, John F.; Luznik, Leo

    2016-01-01

    Background Despite broad and intense conventional immunosuppression, long-term survival after lung transplantation lags behind that for other solid organ transplants, primarily because of allograft rejection. Therefore, new strategies to promote lung allograft acceptance are urgently needed. The purpose of the present study was to induce allograft tolerance with a protocol compatible with deceased donor organ utilization. Methods Using the MHC-mismatched mouse orthotopic lung transplant model, we investigated a conditioning regimen consisting of pretransplant T cell depletion, low dose total body irradiation and posttransplant (donor) bone marrow and splenocyte infusion followed by posttransplantation cyclophosphamide (PTTT-PTB/PTCy). Results Our results show that C57BL/6 recipients of BALB/c lung allografts undergoing this complete short-duration nonmyeloablative conditioning regimen had durable lung allograft acceptance. Mice that lacked 1 or more components of this regimen exhibited significant graft loss. Mechanistically, animals with lung allograft acceptance had established higher levels of donor chimerism, lymphocyte responses which were attenuated to donor antigens but maintained to third-party antigens, and clonal deletion of donor-reactive host Vβ T cells. Frequencies of Foxp3+ T regulatory cells were comparable in both surviving and rejected allografts implying that their perturbation was not a dominant cell-regulatory mechanism. Donor chimerism was indispensable for sustained tolerance, as evidenced by acute rejection of allografts in established chimeric recipients of PTTT-PTB/PTCy following a chimerism-ablating secondary recipient lymphocyte infusion. Conclusion Together, these data provide proof-of-concept for establishing lung allograft tolerance with tandem donor bone marrow transplantation (BMT) using a short-duration nonmyeloablative conditioning regimen and PTCy. PMID:27861294

  19. Phenotypic and functional properties of murine thymocytes. II. Quantitation of host- and donor-derived cytolytic T lymphocyte precursors in regenerating radiation bone marrow chimeras

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ceredig, R.; McDonald, H.R.

    1982-01-01

    Thymocytes from radiation bone marrow chimeras, in which donor bone marrow and irradiated recipient differed at the Thy-1 locus, were stained by indirect immunofluorescence with monoclonal anti-Thy-1 antibodies and analyzed by flow microfluorometry (FMF). Kinetic studies indicated an early appearance of host-derived (CBA, Thy-1.2 + ) thymocytes, which reaches maximum number of 10 to 20 x 10 6 cells at 12 to 16 days after bone marrow reconstitution. Donor-derived (AKR, Thy-1.1 + ) cells were not detectable until 10 to 12 days after reconstitution; subsequently, they increased exponentially in number until 28 days, when they accounted for essentially all cells in the thymus (50 x 10 6 ). Concomitant with the appearance and disappearance of host-derived cells was a change in their Thy-1 surface phenotype. In particular, the proportion of host cells having a ''mature'' phenotype (weakly Thy-1.2 staining) increased progressively with time after irradiation. Functional studies using a sensitive mixed leukocyte microculture system to quantitate cytolytic T lymphocyte precursors (CTL-P) were also carried out in regenerating chimeric thymuses. Initially, the regenerating thymus contained few CTL-P, but by 4 wk after reconstitution, frequencies similar to control adult thymuses were obtained. Analysis of the CTL-P content of host and donor-derived subpopulations, separated either by appropriate anti-Thy-1 antibody plus complement or by direct cell sorting, indicated that both host- and donor-derived cells contained appreciable numbers of CTL-P. Furthermore, increases in CTL-P frequency of both host and donor subpopulations correlated with changes in their surface Thy-1 phenotype

  20. Phenotypic and functional properties of murine thymocytes. II. Quantitation of host- and donor-derived cytolytic T lymphocyte precursors in regenerating radiation bone marrow chimeras

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ceredig, R.; McDonald, H.R.

    1982-02-01

    Thymocytes from radiation bone marrow chimeras, in which donor bone marrow and irradiated recipient differed at the Thy-1 locus, were stained by indirect immunofluorescence with monoclonal anti-Thy-1 antibodies and analyzed by flow microfluorometry (FMF). Kinetic studies indicated an early appearance of host-derived (CBA, Thy-1.2/sup +/) thymocytes, which reaches maximum number of 10 to 20 x 10/sup 6/ cells at 12 to 16 days after bone marrow reconstitution. Donor-derived (AKR, Thy-1.1/sup +/) cells were not detectable until 10 to 12 days after reconstitution; subsequently, they increased exponentially in number until 28 days, when they accounted for essentially all cells in the thymus (50 x 10/sup 6/). Concomitant with the appearance and disappearance of host-derived cells was a change in their Thy-1 surface phenotype. In particular, the proportion of host cells having a ''mature'' phenotype (weakly Thy-1.2 staining) increased progressively with time after irradiation. Functional studies using a sensitive mixed leukocyte microculture system to quantitate cytolytic T lymphocyte precursors (CTL-P) were also carried out in regenerating chimeric thymuses. Initially, the regenerating thymus contained few CTL-P, but by 4 wk after reconstitution, frequencies similar to control adult thymuses were obtained. Analysis of the CTL-P content of host and donor-derived subpopulations, separated either by appropriate anti-Thy-1 antibody plus complement or by direct cell sorting, indicated that both host- and donor-derived cells contained appreciable numbers of CTL-P. Furthermore, increases in CTL-P frequency of both host and donor subpopulations correlated with changes in their surface Thy-1 phenotype.

  1. Blood and Bone Marrow Transplant?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Topics / Blood and Bone Marrow Transplant Blood and Bone Marrow Transplant Also known as Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant , Hematopoietic ... person, called a donor, it is an allogeneic transplant. Blood or bone marrow transplants most commonly are used to treat ...

  2. The devil is in the details: retention of recipient group A type 5 years after a successful allogeneic bone marrow transplant from a group O donor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooling, Laura L W; Herrst, Michelle; Hugan, Sherri L

    2018-01-01

    ABO-incompatible (ABOi) hematopoietic stem cell transplants (HSCTs) can present challenges in the blood bank. During transplantation, patients receive components that are ABO-compatible with both the donor graft and recipient; this practice can strain group O red blood cell (RBC) inventories.1 In addition, there are risks for acute hemolysis at the time of infusion and in the early post-transplant period.1,2 In ABO major-incompatible bone marrow HSCTs, which contain significant quantities of donor RBCs that are ABOi with recipient plasma, it is common to perform a RBC depletion of the bone marrow in an effort to minimize hemolysis at the time of infusion.2 Furthermore, patients with high-titer ABO antibodies may undergo a prophylactic, pre-transplant plasma exchange to further reduce the risk of acute hemolysis, delayed RBC engraftment, and pure RBC aplasia.2-4 ABO minor-incompatible HSCTs, in which donor plasma is ABOi with the recipient, have less risk for hemolysis at the time of infusion but can result in transient hemolysis approximately 10-21 days post-transplant, especially in patients undergoing nonmyeloablative HSCT and/or patients who have not received methotrexate for graft-versus-host-disease (GVHD) prophylaxis.1-4 In these patients, viable donor B-lymphocytes in the graft may expand and produce ABO antibodies capable of hemolyzing patient RBCs.

  3. Effect of peripheral lymphoid cells on the incidence of lethal graft versus host disease following allogeneic mouse bone marrow transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almaraz, R.; Ballinger, W.; Sachs, D.H.; Rosenberg, S.A.

    1983-01-01

    Experiments were performed to study the role of circulating lymphoid cells in the incidence of lethal graft versus host disease (GVHD) in radiation-induced fully allogeneic mouse chimeras. The incidence of GVHD was reduced significantly in BALB/c leads to C57BL/6 radiation chimeras if bone marrow donors were exsanguinated immediately prior to marrow harvest. Chimeras resulting from the injection of bone marrow from bled donors exhibited only donor cells in spleen, bone marrow and peripheral blood and normal levels of Thy 1+ and Ia+ cells were found in each of these lymphoid compartments. The addition of as few as 3 X 10(4) peripheral mononuclear cells to the marrow from exsanguinated donors uniformly led to lethal GVHD. 51 Cr-labeled cell traffic studies revealed that prior exsanguination of marrow donors led to about a 70% reduction in the number of circulating mononuclear cells contaminating the bone marrow at the time of marrow harvest. This decrease in contaminating peripheral cells was calculated to be in the appropriate range to account for the decreased GVHD seen when marrow from exsanguinated donors was used. It thus appears that peripheral cells contaminating marrow can be an important factor in causing lethal GVHD in allogeneic radiation chimeras

  4. Bone marrow transplantation from genetically HLA-nonidentical donors in children with fatal inherited disorders excluding severe combined immunodeficiencies: use of two monoclonal antibodies to prevent graft rejection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabado, N; Le Deist, F; Cant, A; De Graeff-Meeders, E R; Fasth, A; Morgan, G; Vellodi, A; Hale, G; Bujan, W; Thomas, C; Cavazzana-Calvo, M; Wijdenes, J; Fischer, A

    1996-09-01

    For children with life-threatening inborn errors of metabolism without a matched related bone marrow donor, transplantation from an HLA genetically nonidentical donor is the only therapeutic option. To reduce the high risk of graft rejection in this setting without increasing the conditioning regimen, a protocol based on the infusion of an antiadhesion antibody directed against the CD11a (leukocyte function-associated antigen 1 [LFA-1]) molecule was performed by the European Bone Marrow Transplantation-European Society for Immunodeficiency group with promising results. To optimize engraftment, and thereby survival, further, the additional blockade of a second important leukocyte adhesion and signalization pathway mediated by the CD2 and LFA-3 interaction was attempted in a multicenter protocol conducted by the European Bone Marrow Transplantation-European Society for Immunodeficiency group. Results of this study (ie, engraftment and survival) were compared with a historical control group that received the anti-LFA-1 antibody alone. Factors that may have affected engraftment and survival were also considered in this study. Forty-four children with inborn errors, including inherited immunodeficiencies (excluding severe combined immunodeficiencies), Chédiak-Higashi syndrome, familial hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis, and malignant osteopetrosis, received bone marrow from HLA-nonidentical related donors or from HLA-identical unrelated donors at 13 European centers between August 1990 and June 1993. Bone marrow was depleted of T cells by use of either erythrocyte (E) rosetting or monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs) to prevent graft-versus-host disease. The conditioning regimen consisted of busulfan and cyclophosphamide for all patients plus etoposide for patients with osteopetrosis, familial hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis, and Chédiak-Higashi syndrome. Infusions of MoAbs specific for the CD11a and the CD2 molecules were started 4 and 3 days, respectively, before and

  5. Seleção de doador de medula óssea ou sangue periférico Bone marrow or peripheral blood donor selection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noemi F. Pereira

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available A compatibilidade HLA é o fator mais valorizado na escolha do doador de medula óssea voluntário, preconizando-se a realização de HLA de alta resolução nos locos HLA-A,B,C, DRB1 e DQB1. Tem sido dado preferência para o doador com consanguinidade alélica 8x8 (A,B,C, DRB1. Na presença de incompatibilidade na classe-I sugere-se a busca de doador com compatibilidade DQB1 (9x10. Já as incompatibilidades dos locos DPB1 não constituem critério de exclusão de doador, exceto quando existir presença de anticorpo contra o loco HLA-DP do doador.The HLA system is considered the most important factor in choosing a volunteer bone marrow donor with the recommendation of performing high resolution HLA tests for the HLA-A, B, C, DRB1 and DQB1 loci. A preference has been given for donor 8x8 (A, B, C, DRB1 allele matching. In the presence of class-I incompatibility a search for DQB1 (9x10 donor compatibility is suggested. The incompatibility of the DPB1 locus does not constitute exclusion of the donor, except when there is the presence of antibodies against the HLA-DP locus of the donor.

  6. Race, Ethnicity and Ancestry in Unrelated Transplant Matching for the National Marrow Donor Program: A Comparison of Multiple Forms of Self-Identification with Genetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollenbach, Jill A.; Saperstein, Aliya; Albrecht, Mark; Vierra-Green, Cynthia; Parham, Peter; Norman, Paul J.; Maiers, Martin

    2015-01-01

    We conducted a nationwide study comparing self-identification to genetic ancestry classifications in a large cohort (n = 1752) from the National Marrow Donor Program. We sought to determine how various measures of self-identification intersect with genetic ancestry, with the aim of improving matching algorithms for unrelated bone marrow transplant. Multiple dimensions of self-identification, including race/ethnicity and geographic ancestry were compared to classifications based on ancestry informative markers (AIMs), and the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) genes, which are required for transplant matching. Nearly 20% of responses were inconsistent between reporting race/ethnicity versus geographic ancestry. Despite strong concordance between AIMs and HLA, no measure of self-identification shows complete correspondence with genetic ancestry. In certain cases geographic ancestry reporting matches genetic ancestry not reflected in race/ethnicity identification, but in other cases geographic ancestries show little correspondence to genetic measures, with important differences by gender. However, when respondents assign ancestry to grandparents, we observe sub-groups of individuals with well- defined genetic ancestries, including important differences in HLA frequencies, with implications for transplant matching. While we advocate for tailored questioning to improve accuracy of ancestry ascertainment, collection of donor grandparents’ information will improve the chances of finding matches for many patients, particularly for mixed-ancestry individuals. PMID:26287376

  7. Race, Ethnicity and Ancestry in Unrelated Transplant Matching for the National Marrow Donor Program: A Comparison of Multiple Forms of Self-Identification with Genetics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jill A Hollenbach

    Full Text Available We conducted a nationwide study comparing self-identification to genetic ancestry classifications in a large cohort (n = 1752 from the National Marrow Donor Program. We sought to determine how various measures of self-identification intersect with genetic ancestry, with the aim of improving matching algorithms for unrelated bone marrow transplant. Multiple dimensions of self-identification, including race/ethnicity and geographic ancestry were compared to classifications based on ancestry informative markers (AIMs, and the human leukocyte antigen (HLA genes, which are required for transplant matching. Nearly 20% of responses were inconsistent between reporting race/ethnicity versus geographic ancestry. Despite strong concordance between AIMs and HLA, no measure of self-identification shows complete correspondence with genetic ancestry. In certain cases geographic ancestry reporting matches genetic ancestry not reflected in race/ethnicity identification, but in other cases geographic ancestries show little correspondence to genetic measures, with important differences by gender. However, when respondents assign ancestry to grandparents, we observe sub-groups of individuals with well- defined genetic ancestries, including important differences in HLA frequencies, with implications for transplant matching. While we advocate for tailored questioning to improve accuracy of ancestry ascertainment, collection of donor grandparents' information will improve the chances of finding matches for many patients, particularly for mixed-ancestry individuals.

  8. Hepatocyte growth factor is constitutively produced by donor-derived bone marrow cells and promotes regeneration of pancreatic β-cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Izumida, Yoshihiko; Aoki, Takeshi; Yasuda, Daisuke; Koizumi, Tomotake; Suganuma, Chisaki; Saito, Koji; Murai, Noriyuki; Shimizu, Yoshinori; Hayashi, Ken; Odaira, Masanori; Kusano, Tomokazu; Kushima, Miki; Kusano, Mitsuo

    2005-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that the transplantation of bone marrow cells following diabetes induced by streptozotocin can support the recovery of pancreatic β-cell mass and a partial reversal of hyperglycemia. To address this issue, we examined whether the c-Met/hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) signaling pathway was involved in the recovery of β-cell injury after bone marrow transplantation (BMT). In this model, donor-derived bone marrow cells were positive for HGF immunoreactivity in the recipient spleen, liver, lung, and pancreas as well as in the host hepatocytes. Indeed, plasma HGF levels were maintained at a high value. The frequency of c-Met expression and its proliferative activity and differentiative response in the pancreatic ductal cells in the BMT group were greater than those in the PBS-treated group, resulting in an elevated number of endogenous insulin-producing cells. The induction of the c-Met/HGF signaling pathway following BMT promotes pancreatic regeneration in diabetic rats

  9. H-2-incompatible bone marrow chimeras produce donor-H-2-restricted Ly-2 suppressor T-cell factor(s)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noguchi, M.; Onoe, K.; Ogasawara, M.; Iwabuchi, K.; Geng, L.; Ogasawara, K.; Good, R.A.; Morikawa, K.

    1985-01-01

    To study adaptive-differentiation phenomena of T lymphocytes, suppressor T-cell factors (TsF) produced by Ly-2+ splenic T cells from fully allogeneic mouse bone marrow chimeras were analyzed. AKR mice irradiated and reconstituted with B10 marrow cells (B10----AKR chimeras) produced an Ly-2+ TsF after hyperimmunization with sheep erythrocytes. The TsF suppressed primary antibody responses (to sheep erythrocytes) generated with spleen cells of mice of H-2b haplotype but not those of H-2k haplotype. Thus, this suppressor factor was donor-H-2-restricted. The immunoglobulin heavy chain variable region gene (Igh-V)-restricting element was not involved in this form of suppression. Similar results were obtained when TsF from B6----BALB/c and BALB/c----B6 chimeras were analyzed. The TsF from B10----AKR chimeras suppressed responses of B10.A(3R) and B10.A(5R) mice but not those of B10.A(4R). This finding showed that identity between the factor-producing cells and target spleen cells is required on the left-hand side of the E beta locus of the H-2 region and that the putative I-Jb locus is not involved in this form of suppression. The present results support the postulate that post-thymic differentiation in the presence of continued or repeated stimulation with antigen and donor-derived antigen-presenting cells generates donor-H-2-restricted T-cell clones that may predominate within the repertoire of the specific antigen being presented

  10. Resistance to infection with Eimeria vermiformis in mouse radiation chimeras is determined by donor bone-marrow cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joysey, H.S.; Wakelin, D.; Rose, M.E.

    1988-01-01

    The course of infection with Eimeria vermiformis was determined in BALB/b, BALB/c, and C57BL/10ScSn (B10) mice and in radiation chimeras prepared from the H-2-compatible BALB/b and B10 mice. The BALB strains, irrespective of H-2 haplotype, were resistant, the B10 mice were susceptible, and in the chimeras infection was characterized by the genotype of the donated bone-marrow cells and not by the phenotype of the recipient. Thus, the genetic control of relative resistance or susceptibility to infection with this parasite is expressed through bone-marrow-derived cells

  11. [Information and consent forms for hematopoietic stem cell transplantation donors and recipients: Guidelines from the Franchophone society of bone marrow transplantation and cellular therapy (SFGM-TC)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruno, Bénédicte; Thibert, Jean-Baptiste; Bancillon, Nelly; Desbos, Anna; Fawaz, Abir; Fournier, Isabelle; Genty, Carole; Issarni, Dominique; Leveille, Sandrine; Premel, Christelle; Polomeni, Alice; Renault, Myriam; Tarillon, Sylvie; Wallart, Anne; Yakoub-Agha, Ibrahim; Bordessoule, Dominique

    2016-11-01

    Within the context of the SFGM-TC's 6th workshop series on the harmonization of clinical practices, our workshop proposes a standardization of the informed consent process for hematopoietic stem cell donors and recipients leading up to an autologous or allogenic transplantation. All informed consent was for bone marrow or peripheral stem cell donors, and mononuclear/lymphocyte donors according to usual procedures. The informed consent for autologous and allogenic related or unrelated adults and pediatric transplantation patients have been included. A first step has been conducted for collecting in advance the informed consent forms used routinely in all francophone transplantation centers. In a second step, a comprehensive version has been re-written by a multidisciplinary team. For the purposes of understanding the risks and advantages, language has been carefully considered and streamlined. In the third step, texts were sent to stem cell transplantation experts, experts at the French biomedical agency (agence de la biomédecine [ABM]), law specialists, members of the ethical committee of the French society of hematology and several transplant recipients to be edited and proofread. Copyright © 2016 Société Française du Cancer. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. [Information booklet for related hematopoietic stem cell donors: Guidelines from the Francophone Society of Bone Marrow Transplantation and Cellular Therapy (SFGM-TC)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polomeni, Alice; Tardieu, Laure; Ainaoui, Malika; Andrianne, Christelle; Bancillon, Nelly; Chapel, Valerie; Chevallier, Nathalie; Evrard, Solène; Fournier, Isabelle; Gargallo, Guillaume; Godin, Sandrine; Issarni, Dominique; Le Bars, Laetitia; Renaud, Barbara; Yakoub-Agha, Ibrahim; Wallart, Anne; De Bentzmann, Natacha

    2017-12-01

    Providing information to living donors is first and foremost a legal obligation as well as an ethical one, not to mention necessary to health care provision. It's been shown that quality of information concerning the procedure's practical aspects, scheduling of clinical tests and examinations, withdrawing stem cells for the donation, post-donation symptoms, and support provided by healthcare teams, directly impacts the donor's quality of experience. Taking this into consideration our group decided it was essential to create an informational support for donors in the form of a booklet to be provided in different hematopoietic stem cell transplant centers across France. In September 2016 in Lille, France, the Francophone Society of Bone Marrow Transplantation and Cellular Therapy (SFGM-TC) organized the 7th allergenic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation clinical practices harmonization workshops. As part of these workshops, our group worked collectively to develop a basis of indispensable information to be included in the booklet and presented using clear and accessible language. Copyright © 2017 Société Française du Cancer. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. Infusion of Sibling Marrow in a Patient with Purine Nucleoside Phosphorylase Deficiency Leads to Split Mixed Donor Chimerism and Normal Immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Yeates

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Purine nucleoside phosphorylase (PNP deficiency, a rare autosomal recessive metabolic disease causes combined immunodeficiency and developmental delay, hypotonia, and spasticity. Patients present with recurrent infections associated with T-lymphocytopenia, characteristically presenting later than patients with classical severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID. PNP, with adenosine deaminase (ADA, is part of the purine salvage pathway. The only curative therapy is hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Myeloablative conditioning is recommended to prevent rejection caused by residual immune function. However, HLA-identical sibling stem cell infusions in ADA-SCID result in some donor stem cell engraftment and long-term thymopoiesis. We report a patient with PNP deficiency, who received HLA-identical sibling marrow without chemotherapy because of disseminated cytomegalovirus (CMV infection. The patient presented at 14 months of age following recurrent infections, from early infancy, with persistent irritability, developmental delay, and hypotonia. She had neutropenia, pan-lymphocytopenia, and hypogammaglobulinemia with low plasma urate and erythrocyte PNP activity. Diagnosis was confirmed with a homozygous mutation in PNP. The patient was viremic with CMV detected in blood and CSF by PCR. Dual antiviral therapy improved the clinical condition and reduced the viral load. In view of the disseminated CMV infection, the decision was made to infuse stem cells without any pre-conditioning chemotherapy. She received a matched sibling donor unconditioned stem cell infusion at 16 months of age. The post-transplant course was uneventful. Blood PCR became negative for CMV. Global hypotonia persisted, although with significant improvement in irritability. At 4 years of age and 29 months post-transplant, the patient demonstrated normal T-lymphocyte and natural killer cell numbers. Recent thymic emigrants represented 12% of the total T

  14. Marrow transfusions into normal recipients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brecher, G.

    1983-01-01

    During the past several years we have explored the transfusion of bone marrow into normal nonirradiated mice. While transfused marrow proliferates readily in irradiated animals, only minimal proliferation takes place in nonirradiated recipients. It has generally been assumed that this was due to the lack of available proliferative sites in recipients with normal marrow. Last year we were able to report that the transfusion of 200 million bone marrow cells (about 2/3 of the total complement of marrow cells of a normal mouse) resulted in 20% to 25% of the recipient's marrow being replaced by donor marrow. Thus we can now study the behavior of animals that have been transfused (donor) and endogenous (recipient) marrow cells, although none of the tissues of either donor or recipient have been irradiated. With these animals we hope to investigate the nature of the peculiar phenomenon of serial exhaustion of marrow, also referred to as the limited self-replicability of stem cells

  15. Combined cord blood and bone marrow transplantation from the same human leucocyte antigen-identical sibling donor for children with malignant and non-malignant diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucunduva, Luciana; Volt, Fernanda; Cunha, Renato; Locatelli, Franco; Zecca, Marco; Yesilipek, Akif; Caniglia, Maurizio; Güngör, Tayfun; Aksoylar, Serap; Fagioli, Franca; Bertrand, Yves; Addari, Maria Carmen; de la Fuente, Josu; Winiarski, Jacek; Biondi, Andrea; Sengeloev, Henrik; Badell, Isabel; Mellgren, Karin; de Heredia, Cristina Díaz; Sedlacek, Petr; Vora, Ajay; Rocha, Vanderson; Ruggeri, Annalisa; Gluckman, Eliane

    2015-04-01

    Umbilical cord blood (UCB) from an human leucocyte antigen (HLA)-identical sibling can be used for transplantation of patients with malignant and non-malignant diseases. However, the low cellular content of most UCB units represents a limitation to this approach. An option to increase cell dose is to harvest bone marrow (BM) cells from the same donor and infuse them along with the UCB. We studied 156 children who received such a combined graft between 1992 and 2011. Median age was 7 years and 78% of patients (n = 122) were transplanted for non-malignant diseases, mainly haemoglobinopathies. Acute leukaemia (n = 26) was the most frequent malignant diagnosis. Most patients (91%) received myeloablative conditioning. Median donor age was 1·7 years, median infused nucleated cell dose was 24·4 × 10(7) /kg and median follow-up was 41 months. Sixty-days neutrophil recovery occurred in 96% of patients at a median of 17 d. The probabilities of grade-II-IV acute and chronic graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) were 19% and 10%, respectively. Four-year overall survival was 90% (68% malignant; 97% non-malignant diseases) with 3% probability of death. In conclusion, combined UCB and BM transplantation from an HLA-identical sibling donor is an effective treatment for children with malignant and non-malignant disorders with high overall survival and low incidence of GVHD. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Graft versus host disease in a rat small bowel transplant model after T-cell depleted donor specific bone marrow infusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bakonyi Neto Alexandre

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Low cytoreductive regimen of irradiation associated to unmodified bone marrow infusion (UBM does not prevent the occurrence of graft versus host disease (GVHD after transplant. PURPOSE: In this study we evaluated the potential advantages of a long-term immunossupression and T-cell depleted bone marrow infusion (TCDBMI in preventing the occurrence of GVHD after small bowel transplantation (SBTx. METHODS: Heterotopic SBTX was performed with Lewis rats as recipients and DA as donors and distributed into 5 groups according to the irradiation, duration of immunossupression and the use of UBM or TCDBMI: G1 (n=6, without irradiation and G2 (n=9, G3 (n=4, G4 (n=5 and G5 (n=6 was given 250 rd of irradiation. Groups 1,2,4 and G3 and 5 were infused with 100 x 10(6 UBM and TCDBM respectively. Animals in G1, 2, 3 were immunossupressed with 1mg/ FK506/Kg/IM for 5 days and G4 and G5 for 15 days. Anti CD3 monoclonal antibodies and immunomagnetic beads were used for T-cell depletion.Animals were examined for rejection, GVHD, chimerism characterization and ileal and skin biopsies. RESULTS: Minimal to mild rejection was observed in all groups; however, GVHD were present only in irradiated groups. Long-term immunossupression changed the severity of GVHD in G4 and G5. Rejection was the cause of death in G1 while GVHD in G2, 3, 4 and 5, not avoided by the use of TCDBMI. Total chimerism and T-cell chimerism was statistically higher in irradiated groups when compared to G1. CONCLUSION: Extended immunossupression associated to low dose of irradiation decrease the severity of GVHD, not avoided by the use of TCDBMI.

  17. Power laws for heavy-tailed distributions: modeling allele and haplotype diversity for the national marrow donor program.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noa Slater

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Measures of allele and haplotype diversity, which are fundamental properties in population genetics, often follow heavy tailed distributions. These measures are of particular interest in the field of hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT. Donor/Recipient suitability for HSCT is determined by Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA similarity. Match predictions rely upon a precise description of HLA diversity, yet classical estimates are inaccurate given the heavy-tailed nature of the distribution. This directly affects HSCT matching and diversity measures in broader fields such as species richness. We, therefore, have developed a power-law based estimator to measure allele and haplotype diversity that accommodates heavy tails using the concepts of regular variation and occupancy distributions. Application of our estimator to 6.59 million donors in the Be The Match Registry revealed that haplotypes follow a heavy tail distribution across all ethnicities: for example, 44.65% of the European American haplotypes are represented by only 1 individual. Indeed, our discovery rate of all U.S. European American haplotypes is estimated at 23.45% based upon sampling 3.97% of the population, leaving a large number of unobserved haplotypes. Population coverage, however, is much higher at 99.4% given that 90% of European Americans carry one of the 4.5% most frequent haplotypes. Alleles were found to be less diverse suggesting the current registry represents most alleles in the population. Thus, for HSCT registries, haplotype discovery will remain high with continued recruitment to a very deep level of sampling, but population coverage will not. Finally, we compared the convergence of our power-law versus classical diversity estimators such as Capture recapture, Chao, ACE and Jackknife methods. When fit to the haplotype data, our estimator displayed favorable properties in terms of convergence (with respect to sampling depth and accuracy (with respect to diversity

  18. Discovery of the rare HLA-B*39:77 allele in an unrelated Taiwanese bone marrow stem cell donor using the sequence-based typing method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, K L; Lee, S K; Lin, P Y

    2013-08-01

    We detected a rare HLA-B locus allele, B*39:77, in a Taiwanese unrelated marrow stem cell donor in our routine HLA sequence-based typing (SBT) exercise for a possible haematopoietic stem cell donation. In exons 2, 3 and 4, the DNA sequence of B*39:77 is identical to the sequence of B*39:01:01:01 except one nucleotide at nucleotide position 733 (G->A) in exon 4. The nucleotide variation caused one amino acid alteration at residue 221 (Gly->Ser). B*39:77 was probably derived from a nucleotide substitution event involving B*39:01:01:01. The probable HLA-A, -B, -C, -DRB1 and -DQB1 haplotype in association with B*39:77 may be deduced as A*02:01-B*39:77-C*07:02-DRB1*08:03-DQB1*06:01. Our discovery of B*39:77 in Taiwanese adds further polymorphism of B*39 variants in Taiwanese population. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Stem cell collection in unmanipulated HLA-haploidentical/mismatched related transplantation with combined granulocyte-colony stimulating factor-mobilised blood and bone marrow for patients with haematologic malignancies: the impact of donor characteristics and procedural settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, C; Chen, X-H; Zhang, X; Gao, L; Gao, L; Kong, P-Y; Peng, X-G; Sun, A-H; Gong, Y; Zeng, D-F; Wang, Q-Y

    2010-06-01

    Unmanipulated haploidentical/mismatched related transplantation with combined granulocyte-colony stimulating factor-mobilised peripheral blood stem cells (G-PBSCs) and granulocyte-colony stimulating factor-mobilised bone marrow (G-BM) has been developed as an alternative transplantation strategy for patients with haematologic malignancies. However, little information is available about the factors predicting the outcome of peripheral blood stem cell (PBSC) collection and bone marrow (BM) harvest in this transplantation. The effects of donor characteristics and procedure factors on CD34(+) cell yield were investigated. A total of 104 related healthy donors received granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) followed by PBSC collection and BM harvest. Male donors had significantly higher yields compared with female donors. In multiple regression analysis for peripheral blood collection, age and flow rate were negatively correlated with cell yield, whereas body mass index, pre-aphaeresis white blood cell (WBC) and circulating immature cell (CIC) counts were positively correlated with cell yields. For BM harvest, age was negatively correlated with cell yields, whereas pre-BM collection CIC counts were positively correlated with cell yield. All donors achieved the final product of >or=6 x10(6) kg(-1) recipient body weight. This transplantation strategy has been shown to be a feasible approach with acceptable outcomes in stem cell collection for patients who received HLA-haploidentical/mismatched transplantation with combined G-PBSCs and G-BM. In donors with multiple high-risk characteristics for poor aphaeresis CD34(+) cell yield, BM was an alternative source.

  20. Mobilized Peripheral Blood Stem Cells Versus Unstimulated Bone Marrow As a Graft Source for T-Cell-Replete Haploidentical Donor Transplantation Using Post-Transplant Cyclophosphamide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bashey, Asad; Zhang, Mei-Jie; McCurdy, Shannon R; St Martin, Andrew; Argall, Trevor; Anasetti, Claudio; Ciurea, Stefan O; Fasan, Omotayo; Gaballa, Sameh; Hamadani, Mehdi; Munshi, Pashna; Al Malki, Monzr M; Nakamura, Ryotaro; O'Donnell, Paul V; Perales, Miguel-Angel; Raj, Kavita; Romee, Rizwan; Rowley, Scott; Rocha, Vanderson; Salit, Rachel B; Solh, Melhem; Soiffer, Robert J; Fuchs, Ephraim Joseph; Eapen, Mary

    2017-09-10

    Purpose T-cell-replete HLA-haploidentical donor hematopoietic transplantation using post-transplant cyclophosphamide was originally described using bone marrow (BM). With increasing use of mobilized peripheral blood (PB), we compared transplant outcomes after PB and BM transplants. Patients and Methods A total of 681 patients with hematologic malignancy who underwent transplantation in the United States between 2009 and 2014 received BM (n = 481) or PB (n = 190) grafts. Cox regression models were built to examine differences in transplant outcomes by graft type, adjusting for patient, disease, and transplant characteristics. Results Hematopoietic recovery was similar after transplantation of BM and PB (28-day neutrophil recovery, 88% v 93%, P = .07; 100-day platelet recovery, 88% v 85%, P = .33). Risks of grade 2 to 4 acute (hazard ratio [HR], 0.45; P transplantation of BM compared with PB. There were no significant differences in overall survival by graft type (HR, 0.99; P = .98), with rates of 54% and 57% at 2 years after transplantation of BM and PB, respectively. There were no differences in nonrelapse mortality risks (HR, 0.92; P = .74) but relapse risks were higher after transplantation of BM (HR, 1.49; P = .009). Additional exploration confirmed that the higher relapse risks after transplantation of BM were limited to patients with leukemia (HR, 1.73; P = .002) and not lymphoma (HR, 0.87; P = .64). Conclusion PB and BM grafts are suitable for haploidentical transplantation with the post-transplant cyclophosphamide approach but with differing patterns of treatment failure. Although, to our knowledge, this is the most comprehensive comparison, these findings must be validated in a randomized prospective comparison with adequate follow-up.

  1. Human Leukocyte Antigen-A, B, C, DRB1, and DQB1 Allele and Haplotype Frequencies in a Subset of 237 Donors in the South African Bone Marrow Registry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mqondisi Tshabalala

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Human leukocyte antigen- (HLA- A, HLA-B, HLA-C, HLA-DRB1, and HLA-DQB1 allele and haplotype frequencies were studied in a subset of 237 volunteer bone marrow donors registered at the South African Bone Marrow Registry (SABMR. Hapl-o-Mat software was used to compute allele and haplotype frequencies from individuals typed at various resolutions, with some alleles in multiple allele code (MAC format. Four hundred and thirty-eight HLA-A, 235 HLA-B, 234 HLA-DRB1, 41 HLA-DQB1, and 29 HLA-C alleles are reported. The most frequent alleles were A∗02:02g (0.096, B∗07:02g (0.082, C∗07:02g (0.180, DQB1∗06:02 (0.157, and DRB1∗15:01 (0.072. The most common haplotype was A∗03:01g~B∗07:02g~C∗07:02g~DQB1∗06:02~DRB1∗15:01 (0.067, which has also been reported in other populations. Deviations from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium were observed in A, B, and DRB1 loci, with C~DQB1 being the only locus pair in linkage disequilibrium. This study describes allele and haplotype frequencies from a subset of donors registered at SABMR, the only active bone marrow donor registry in Africa. Although the sample size was small, our results form a key resource for future population studies, disease association studies, and donor recruitment strategies.

  2. Effects of T cell depletion in radiation bone marrow chimeras. I. Evidence for a donor cell population which increases allogeneic chimerism but which lacks the potential to produce GVHD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sykes, M.; Sheard, M.; Sachs, D.H.

    1988-01-01

    The opposing problems of graft-vs-host disease (GVHD) and failure of alloengraftment present major obstacles to the application of bone marrow transplantation (BMT) across complete MHC barriers. The addition of syngeneic T-cell-depleted (TCD) bone marrow (BM) to untreated fully allogeneic marrow inocula in lethally irradiated mice has been previously shown to provide protection from GVHD. We have used this model to study the effects of allogeneic T cells on levels of chimerism in recipients of mixed marrow inocula. The results indicate that T cells in allogeneic BM inocula eliminate both coadministered recipient-strain and radioresistant host hematopoietic elements to produce complete allogeneic chimerism without clinical GVHD. To determine the role of GVH reactivity in this phenomenon, we performed similar studies in an F1 into parent combination, in which the genetic potential for GVHD is lacking. The presence of T cells in F1 marrow inocula led to predominant repopulation with F1 lymphocytes in such chimeras, even when coadministered with TCD-recipient-strain BM. These results imply that the ability of allogeneic BM cells removed by T cell depletion to increase levels of allochimerism may be mediated by a population which is distinct from that which produces GVHD. These results may have implications for clinical BM transplantation

  3. Bone marrow transplantation and other treatment after radiation injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balner, H.

    1977-01-01

    This review deals mainly with current concepts about bone marrow transplantation as therapy for serious radiation injury. Such injury can be classified according to the following broadly defined dose ranges: (1) the supralethal range, leading mainly to the cerebral and intestinal syndromes; (2) the potentially lethal or therapeutic range which causes the bone marrow syndrome, and (3) the sublethal range which rarely leads to injury requiring therapy. The bone marrow syndrome of man and animals is discussed in detail. The optimal therapy for this syndrome is bone marrow transplantation in conjunction with conventional supportive treatment. The principal complications of such therapy are Graft versus Host Disease and a slow recovery of the recipient's immune system. Concerted research activities in a number of institutions have led to considerable progress in the field of bone marrow transplantation. Improved donor selection, new techniques for stem-cell separation and preservation, as well as effective barrier-nursing and antibiotic decontamination, have made bone marrow transplantation an accepted therapy for marrow depression, including the aplasia caused by excessive exposure to radiation. The review also contains a number of guidelines for the handling of serious radiation accidents. (Auth.)

  4. LED; Zum Thema LED

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2010-07-01

    This collection of articles on the subject of light emitting diodes (LED) provides technical information on LED technology, examines latest developments and provides examples of LED use in practice. An 'ABC' of LED technology is presented and fifteen common LED mistakes are noted. The chances and risks of LED use are discussed as is the retrofitting of lighting installations with LEDs. The use of LEDs in street lighting is examined. The journal also includes interviews with architects and a lighting designer. Practical examples of the use of LEDs include the refurbished parliamentary library in Berne, their use in the bird sanctuary headquarters in Sempach, Switzerland, as well as LED use in sales outlets. Also, the use of LED lighting in a spa gazebo in Lucerne is examined.

  5. The Human Tissue Act 2004 and the child donor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baston, Jenny

    2009-05-01

    In 2001, the inquiry panel appointed to investigate the removal, retention and disposal of human organs and tissues at the Royal Liverpool Children's Hospital published its report. The panel's recommendations led to a new approach to consent for organ removal and storage under the new Human Tissue Act 2004. For child bone marrow donors, the new consent process requires all donor children or their parent to undergo a separate assessment before the bone marrow donation. They must be assessed by an accredited assessor who will submit a recommendation to the Human Tissue Authority for consideration. The unfortunate circumstances highlighted in the inquiry have led to changes to law, practice and culture that are benefiting other children and families.

  6. Platelet transfusion refractoriness attributable to HLA antibodies produced by donor-derived cells after allogeneic bone marrow transplantation from one HLA-antigen-mismatched mother.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatakeyama, Naoki; Hori, Tsukasa; Yamamoto, Masaki; Inazawa, Natsuko; Iesato, Kotoe; Miyazaki, Toru; Ikeda, Hisami; Tsutsumi, Hiroyuki; Suzuki, Nobuhiro

    2011-12-01

    PTR is a serious problem in patients being treated for hematologic disorders. Two patients with acute leukemia developed PTR after allogeneic BMT from one HLA-antigen-mismatched mother attributable to HLA antibodies, which could not be detected in their serum before BMT. HLA antibodies, whose specificity resembled that of each patient, were detected in each donor's serum. Each donor had probably been immunized during pregnancy by their partner's HLA antigens expressed by the fetus, consequently, transplanted donor-derived cells provoked HLA antibodies in each recipient early after BMT, and those HLA antibodies induced PTR. If the mothers are selected as donors for their children, they should be tested for the presence of HLA antibodies. © 2010 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  7. Unrelated alternative donor transplantation for severe acquired aplastic anemia: a study from the French Society of Bone Marrow Transplantation and Cell Therapies and the EBMT Severe Aplastic Anemia Working Party.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devillier, Raynier; Dalle, Jean-Hugues; Kulasekararaj, Austin; D'aveni, Maud; Clément, Laurence; Chybicka, Alicja; Vigouroux, Stéphane; Chevallier, Patrice; Koh, Mickey; Bertrand, Yves; Michallet, Mauricette; Zecca, Marco; Yakoub-Agha, Ibrahim; Cahn, Jean-Yves; Ljungman, Per; Bernard, Marc; Loiseau, Pascale; Dubois, Valérie; Maury, Sébastien; Socié, Gérard; Dufour, Carlo; Peffault de Latour, Regis

    2016-07-01

    Unrelated allogeneic transplantation for severe aplastic anemia is a treatment option after immunosuppressive treatment failure in the absence of a matched sibling donor. Age, delay between disease diagnosis and transplantation, and HLA matching are the key factors in transplantation decisions, but their combined impact on patient outcomes remains unclear. Using the French Society of Bone Marrow Transplantation and Cell Therapies registry, we analyzed all consecutive patients (n=139) who underwent a first allogeneic transplantation for idiopathic severe aplastic anemia from an unrelated donor between 2000 and 2012. In an adjusted multivariate model, age over 30 years (Hazard Ratio=2.39; P=0.011), time from diagnosis to transplantation over 12 months (Hazard Ratio=2.18; P=0.027) and the use of a 9/10 mismatched unrelated donor (Hazard Ratio=2.14; P=0.036) were independent risk factors that significantly worsened overall survival. Accordingly, we built a predictive score using these three parameters, considering patients at low (zero or one risk factors, n=94) or high (two or three risk factors, n=45) risk. High-risk patients had significantly shorter survival (Hazard Ratio=3.04; Paplastic anemia. Copyright© Ferrata Storti Foundation.

  8. Ex vivo exposure of bone marrow from chronic kidney disease donor rats to pravastatin limits renal damage in recipient rats with chronic kidney disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koppen, A. van; Papazova, D.A.; Oosterhuis, N.R.; Gremmels, H.; Giles, R.H.; Fledderus, J.O.; Joles, J.A.; Verhaar, M.C.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Healthy bone marrow cell (BMC) infusion improves renal function and limits renal injury in a model of chronic kidney disease (CKD) in rats. However, BMCs derived from rats with CKD fail to retain beneficial effects, demonstrating limited therapeutic efficacy. Statins have been reported

  9. Ex vivo exposure of bone marrow from chronic kidney disease donor rats to pravastatin limits renal damage in recipient rats with chronic kidney disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Koppen, Arianne; Papazova, Diana A.; Oosterhuis, Nynke R.; Gremmels, Hendrik; Giles, Rachel H.; Fledderus, Joost O.; Joles, Jaap A.; Verhaar, Marianne C.

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Healthy bone marrow cell (BMC) infusion improves renal function and limits renal injury in a model of chronic kidney disease (CKD) in rats. However, BMCs derived from rats with CKD fail to retain beneficial effects, demonstrating limited therapeutic efficacy. Statins have been reported

  10. The immunodeficiency of bone marrow-transplanted patients. The effect of patient lymphocytes on the response of donor lymphocytes to mitogens and allogeneic cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ødum, Niels; Hofmann, B; Platz, P

    1985-01-01

    Lymphocytes from patients after bone marrow transplantation (BMT) are in most cases predominantly of the Leu-2+ (cytotoxic/suppressor) phenotypes and are almost unresponsive to mitogens. In contrast, normal Leu-3+-depleted, Leu-2+-enriched lymphocyte suspensions retain approximately 50...

  11. Expression of antigens coded in murine leukemia viruses on thymocytes of allogeneic donor origin in AKR mice following syngeneic or allogeneic bone marrow transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wustrow, T.P.; Good, R.A.

    1985-01-01

    Removal of T-lymphocytes from marrow inoculum with monoclonal antibody plus complement permitted establishment of long-lived allogeneic chimeras between C57BL/6 and AKR/J mice. Development of leukemia was prevented for 15 mo. Protection from leukemia occurred with both young (4 wk) and older (4 mo) recipients. AKR mice reconstituted with syngeneic marrow or control AKR mice all developed leukemia-lymphoma before 1 yr of age. During spontaneous lymphomagenesis in AKR mice, amplified expression of gag or env gene-coded virus antigens on the surface of thymocytes preceded leukemia development and evidence for amplification of other virus genes. These changes generally appeared before 6 mo. Similar viral gene expression and viral gene amplification occurred in the thymus and spleen cells of leukemia-resistant chimeric mice. Using monoclonal antibodies to Mr 70,000 glycoprotein epitopes characteristic of ecotropic, xenotropic, or dualtropic viruses, antigens marking each virus form were found on thymocytes of allogeneic 4-wk and 4-mo chimeras as well as on the cells of AKR mice and of AKR mice reconstituted with syngeneic marrow. Flow cytometric analysis showed amplification of the virus genes in mice protected from leukemia-lymphoma by allogeneic bone marrow transplantation from leukemia-resistant mice. Allogeneic chimeras and syngeneically transplanted mice both showed evidence of accelerated viremia and of recombinant virus formation. The findings suggest that an event essential to leukemogenesis which occurs within the AKR lymphoid cells or their environment is lacking in the allogeneic chimeras. The nature of this influence of a resistance gene or genes introduced into AKR mice by allogeneic bone marrow transplantation deserves further study

  12. Molecular Engineering of UV/Vis Light-Emitting Diode (LED)-Sensitive Donor-π-Acceptor-Type Sulfonium Salt Photoacid Generators: Design, Synthesis, and Study of Photochemical and Photophysical Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xingyu; Jin, Ming; Xie, Jianchao; Malval, Jean-Pierre; Wan, Decheng

    2017-11-07

    A series of donor-π-acceptor-type sulfonium salt photoacid generators (PAGs) were designed and synthesized by systematically changing electron-donating groups, π-conjugated systems, electron-withdrawing groups, and the number of branches through molecular engineering. These PAGs can effectively decompose under UV/Vis irradiation from a light-emitting diode (LED) light source because of the matching absorption and emitting spectra of the LEDs. The absorption and acid-generation properties of these sulfonium salts were elucidated by UV/Vis spectroscopy and so forth. Results indicated that the PAG performance benefited from the introduction of strong electron-donating groups, specific π-conjugated structures, certain electron-withdrawing groups, or two-branched structures. Most sulfonium salts showed potential as photoinitiators under irradiation by a wide variety of UV and visible LEDs. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Bone marrow aspiration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iliac crest tap; Sternal tap; Leukemia - bone marrow aspiration; Aplastic anemia - bone marrow aspiration; Myelodysplastic syndrome - bone marrow aspiration; Thrombocytopenia - bone marrow aspiration; Myelofibrosis - bone marrow aspiration

  14. Analysis of Photosystem I Donor and Acceptor Sides with a New Type of Online-Deconvoluting Kinetic LED-Array Spectrophotometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiber, Ulrich; Klughammer, Christof

    2016-07-01

    The newly developed Dual/KLAS-NIR spectrophotometer, technical details of which were reported very recently, is used in measuring redox changes of P700, plastocyanin (PC) and ferredoxin (Fd) in intact leaves of Hedera helix, Taxus baccata and Brassica napus An overview of various light-/dark-induced changes of deconvoluted P700 + , PC + and Fd - signals is presented demonstrating the wealth of novel information and the consistency of the obtained results. Fd - changes are particularly large after dark adaptation. PC oxidation precedes P700 oxidation during dark-light induction and in steady-state light response curves. Fd reoxidation during induction correlates with the secondary decline of simultaneously measured fluorescence yield, both of which are eliminated by removal of O 2 By determination of 100% redox changes, relative contents of PC/P700 and Fd/P700 can be assessed, which show considerable variations between different leaves, with a trend to higher values in sun leaves. Based on deconvoluted P700 + signals, the complementary quantum yields of PSI, Y(I) (photochemical energy use), Y(ND) (non-photochemical loss due to oxidized primary donor) and Y(NA) (non-photochemical loss due to reduced acceptor) are determined as a function of light intensity and compared with the corresponding complementary quantum yields of PSII, Y(II) (photochemical energy use), Y(NPQ) (regulated non-photochemical loss) and Y(NO) (non-regulated non-photochemical loss). The ratio Y(I)/Y(II) increases with increasing intensities. In the low intensity range, a two-step increase of PC + is indicative of heterogeneous PC pools. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Japanese Society of Plant Physiologists. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. What Is a Bone Marrow Transplant?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... however you can Daughter's dying wish became mother's motivation Be The Match Blog Stories Anna, transplant recipient ... Copyright © 1996-2018 National Marrow Donor Program. All Rights Reserved.

  16. [Donor age affects on the «behavior» and the sensibility bone marrow cells in on copper ion of the primary culture].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozhkov, A I; Ohiienko, S L; Kuznetsova, Yu A; Bondar', A Yu; Marchenko, V P; Gumennaya, M S

    2017-01-01

    The changes of bone marrow cells (BMC) number in the primary culture from 0 to 96 hours, the pattern (the distribution of cells) of cells morphotypes and «lifespan» (the time of cell life after isolation) of myelocytes, metamyelocytes, band and segmented neutrophils, isolated of the young (3 months) and old (20months) animals, were investigated. The number of the BMC obtained from intact old animals increased faster in primary culture, than from young animals. The Cu induced fibrosis had different influence on the rate of BMC culture growth of old and young animals. The adding of 4 mM and 8 mM CuSO4x5H2O in the BMC culture of young and old animals resulted in a dose-dependent inhibition of growth rate of young animal cells. If copper ions were added into the culture of BMC of old animals, the decreased of the BMC number was described less than for cells of young animals. The adding of 8 mM CuSO4x5H2O inhibited proliferation less, than the adding of 4 mM CuSO4x5H2O. The Cu-induced liver fibrosis had accelerated the BMC rate death of both old and young animals. However, this effect was more pronounced in young animals. It is suggested, that during the ontogenesis the BMC undergo such epigenetic changes, which change functional properties.

  17. Granulocyte-mobilized bone marrow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arcese, William; De Angelis, Gottardo; Cerretti, Raffaella

    2012-11-01

    In the last few years, mobilized peripheral blood has overcome bone marrow as a graft source, but, despite the evidence of a more rapid engraftment, the incidence of chronic graft-versus-host disease is significantly higher with, consequently, more transplant-related mortality on the long follow-up. Overall, the posttransplant outcome of mobilized peripheral blood recipients is similar to that of patients who are bone marrow grafted. More recently, the use of bone marrow after granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) donor priming has been introduced in the transplant practice. Herein, we review biological acquisitions and clinical results on the use of G-CSF-primed bone marrow as a source of hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) for allogeneic stem cell transplantation. G-CSF the increases the HSC compartment and exerts an intense immunoregulatory effect on marrow T-cells resulting in the shift from Th1 to Th2 phenotype with higher production of anti-inflammatory cytokines. The potential advantages of these biological effects have been translated in the clinical practice by using G-CSF primed unmanipulated bone marrow in the setting of transplant from human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-haploidentical donor with highly encouraging results. For patients lacking an HLA-identical sibling, the transplant of G-CSF primed unmanipulated bone marrow from a haploidentical donor combined with an intense in-vivo immunosuppression is a valid alternative achieving results that are well comparable with those reported for umbilical cord blood, HLA-matched unrelated peripheral blood/bone marrow or T-cell-depleted haploidentical transplant.

  18. Impact of Donor Epstein-Barr Virus Serostatus on the Incidence of Graft-Versus-Host Disease in Patients With Acute Leukemia After Hematopoietic Stem-Cell Transplantation: A Study From the Acute Leukemia and Infectious Diseases Working Parties of the European Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Styczynski, Jan; Tridello, Gloria; Gil, Lidia; Ljungman, Per; Hoek, Jennifer; Iacobelli, Simona; Ward, Katherine N; Cordonnier, Catherine; Einsele, Hermann; Socie, Gerard; Milpied, Noel; Veelken, Hendrik; Chevallier, Patrice; Yakoub-Agha, Ibrahim; Maertens, Johan; Blaise, Didier; Cornelissen, Jan; Michallet, Mauricette; Daguindau, Etienne; Petersen, Eefke; Passweg, Jakob; Greinix, Hildegard; Duarte, Rafael F; Kröger, Nicolaus; Dreger, Peter; Mohty, Mohamad; Nagler, Arnon; Cesaro, Simone

    2016-07-01

    We investigated the effect of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) serostatus on the overall outcome of allogeneic hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation (allo-HSCT). The study included 11,364 patients who underwent allogeneic peripheral-blood or bone marrow transplantation for acute leukemia between 1997 and 2012. We analyzed the impact of donor and recipient EBV serologic status on overall survival, relapse-free survival, relapse incidence, nonrelapse mortality, and incidence of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) after allo-HSCT. Patients receiving grafts from EBV-seropositive donors had the same overall survival as patients who received grafts from EBV-seronegative donors (hazard ratio [HR], 1.05; 95% CI, 0.97 to 1.12; P = .23). Seropositive donors also had no influence on relapse-free survival (HR, 1.04; 95% CI, 0.97 to 1.11; P = 0.31), relapse incidence (HR, 1.03; 95% CI, 0.94 to 1.12; P = .58), and nonrelapse mortality (HR, 1.05; 95% CI, 0.94 to 1.17; P = .37). However, in univariate analysis, recipients receiving grafts from seropositive donors had a higher risk of chronic GVHD than those with seronegative donors (40.8% v 31.0%, respectively; P donors, the HR for chronic GVHD was 1.30 (95% CI, 1.06 to 1.59; P = .039). In seropositive patients with seropositive donors, the HR was 1.24 (95% CI, 1.07 to 1.45; P = .016) for acute GVHD and 1.43 (95% CI, 1.23 to 1.67; P donors did not have an increased risk of GVHD. Our data suggest that donor EBV status significantly influences development of acute and chronic GVHD after allo-HSCT. © 2016 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  19. Donor lymphocyte infusion in bone marrow transplantation therapy Infusão de linfócitos de doador na terapia ao transplante de medula óssea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen Mackinnon

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available The dose escalation of chemo-radiotherapy that is achievable with stem cell transplantation is often insufficient to eradicate malignancy, and an associated immune-mediated graft-versus-malignancy effect may be equally important for many diseases. The most directly compelling evidence for its presence has been provided by the efficacy of donor lymphocyte infusions (DLI in generating anti-tumor responses, particularly for relapsed chronic-phase CML. Response rates and durability appear lower with myeloma and AML/MDS, and minimal with ALL. There is relatively little data on indolent lymphoid malignancies. Issues that remain to be resolved include the precise nature of the effector cells and their target antigens, the best strategies for separating graft-versus-malignancy from graft-versus-host disease (GVHD and their effect on the durability of responses, and the role of adjuvant chemotherapy/cytokines. Similar issues surround routine combination with nonmyeloablative transplantation protocols and preliminary data suggests that GVHD may continue to provide a major obstacle.A quimioterapia seqüencial e transplante de células progenitoras, habitualmente são insuficientes para erradicar a neoplástica e uma associação do efeito enxerto contra o tumor imune mediado pode ser importante para o controle de muitas doenças uma evidencia deste efeito é proporcionado pela eficácia da infusão de lifócitos de doadores com a finalidade de gerar respostas anti-tumoral particularmente na leucemia mielóide crônica. A freqüência de respostas, durabilidade aparentaram ser pequenas no mieloma e na LM1/SMD e mínima na LLA. Existem de dos insuficientes nos linfomas indolentes. Vários aspectos necessitam ser esclarecidos incluindo a natureza presença das células efetoras e os antígenos alvos, e as melhores estratégias para separar o enxerto-versus-tumor da doença enxerto contra o hospedeiro, e o seu efeito na durabilidade das respostas e o seu papel

  20. Overview of marrow transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, E.D.

    1985-01-01

    Bone marrow transplantation is now an accepted form of therapy for many hematologic disorders including aplastic anemia, genetically determined diseases and malignant diseases, particularly leukemia, and for rescue of patients given intensive chemoradiotherapy for malignant disease. The donor may be a healthy identical twin, a family member or even an unrelated person. Selection is made on the basis of human leukocyte antigen tissue typing. Intensive chemoradiotherapy is used to suppress patients' immune systems to facilitate engraftment and destroy diseased marrow. Transfusion of platelets, erythrocytes and granulocytes (or all of these), antibiotic coverage and protection from infection are necessary during the pancytopenic period. Survival rates vary considerably depending on a patient's disease, clinical state and age. Patients with aplastic anemia transplanted early in the course of their disease have a survival rate of approximately 80%. Patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia are usually transplanted in a second or subsequent remission and have a survival rate of 25% to 40%. Patients with acute nonlymphoblastic leukemia in remission have survivals ranging from 45% to 70%. More than 200 patients in the chronic phase of chronic granulocytic leukemia have been transplanted with survival ranging from 50% to 70%. Complications of marrow transplantation include marrow graft rejection, graft-versus-host disease, immunologic insufficiency and the possibility of recurrence of the leukemia. 14 references

  1. Analyzing the cellular contribution of bone marrow to fracture healing using bone marrow transplantation in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colnot, C.; Huang, S.; Helms, J.

    2006-01-01

    The bone marrow is believed to play important roles during fracture healing such as providing progenitor cells for inflammation, matrix remodeling, and cartilage and bone formation. Given the complex nature of bone repair, it remains difficult to distinguish the contributions of various cell types. Here we describe a mouse model based on bone marrow transplantation and genetic labeling to track cells originating from bone marrow during fracture healing. Following lethal irradiation and engraftment of bone marrow expressing the LacZ transgene constitutively, wild type mice underwent tibial fracture. Donor bone marrow-derived cells, which originated from the hematopoietic compartment, did not participate in the chondrogenic and osteogenic lineages during fracture healing. Instead, the donor bone marrow contributed to inflammatory and bone resorbing cells. This model can be exploited in the future to investigate the role of inflammation and matrix remodeling during bone repair, independent from osteogenesis and chondrogenesis

  2. National Marrow Donor Program. HLA Typing for Bone Marrow Transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-11-30

    suggestion that low CFU doses were associated with delayed engraftment by day 28, but the effect disappeared by days 45 and 60 post transplant... chromosome 6, and non-HLA genetic factors may all influence the suitability and success of allogeneic stem cell transplants. The largest body of data...receptors (KIR) that specifically interact with MHC class I molecules. Genes encoding for these Ig-like ligands are found on chromosome 19. The

  3. Homing of bone marrow lymphoid cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Y.; Osmond, D.G.

    1978-01-01

    DNA labeling, bone marrow fractionation, and radioautography were used to follow the fate of transfused, newly formed marrow lymphocytes in irradiated hosts. After infusing donor Hartley guinea pigs with 3 H-thymidine for 3 to 5 days, high concentrations of labeled small lymphocytes and large lymphoid cells were separated from marrow by sedimentation in sucrose-serum gradients and injected into lethally x-irradiated syngeneic recipients. Most labeled small lymphocytes and large lymphoid cells rapidly left the circulation. They appeared to be mainly in the marrow and spleen, increasing in incidence from 1 to 3 days, but declining in mean grain count. Labeled cells were scattered throughout the recipient marrow; in the spleen they localized initially in the red pulp, and subsequently in peripheral areas of white pulp, often in clusters. Labeled small lymphocytes showed a delayed migration into the mesenteric lymph node, mainly in the superficial cortex and medulla; they also appeared in small numbers in Peyer's patches, but rarely in the thymus or thoracic duct lymph. It is concluded that a rapid selective homing of newly formed marrow lymphoid cells occurs in both the marrow and certain areas of the spleen of irradiated hosts, followed by a continuing proliferation of large lymphoid cells and production of small lymphocytes. The results are discussed with respect to the life history of marrow lymphocytes and the use of adoptive immune assays of marrow cells to characterize B lymphocyte maturation

  4. Can bone marrow differentiate into renal cells?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imai, Enyu; Ito, Takahito

    2002-10-01

    A considerable plasticity of adult stem cells has been confirmed in a wide variety of tissues. In particular, the pluripotency of bone marrow-derived stem cells may influence the regeneration of injured tissues and may provide novel avenues in regenerative medicine. Bone marrow contains at least hematopoietic and mesenchymal stem cells, and both can differentiate into a wide range of differentiated cells. Side population (SP) cells, which are originally defined in bone marrow cells by high efflux of DNA-binding dye, seem to be a new class of multipotent stem cells. Irrespective of the approach used to obtain stem cells, the fates of marrow-derived cells following bone marrow transplantation can be traced by labeling donor cells with green fluorescence protein or by identifying donor Y chromosome in female recipients. So far, bone marrow-derived cells have been reported to differentiate into renal cells, including mesangial cells, endothelial cells, podocytes, and tubular cells in the kidney, although controversy exists. Further studies are required to address this issue. Cell therapy will be promising when we learn to control stem cells such as bone marrow-derived stem cells, embryonic stem cells, and resident stem cells in the kidney. Identification of factors that support stem cells or promote their differentiation should provide a relevant step towards cell therapy.

  5. Bone-Marrow Storage and Transplantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costachel, O.; Corneci, I.; Andrian, T.; Kitzulescu, I.; Popescu, N.; Pascu, D.; Buzi, E.; Voiculetz, N. [Oncological Institute, Bucharest (Romania)

    1969-07-15

    The authors present some results from their experiments on bone-marrow storage and transplantation. The main problems with preservation of stored bone marrow are the duration, temperature, adjuvant substances and the significance of viability tests during the conservation processes. The results showed that: Bullet Storage of bone marrow at +4eC produces a progressive decrease in its restoring capacity versus storage time. Bullet While bone marrow stored for 24 h is able to restore 100% of dogs lethally irradiated with 600 rad, after 10 days of storage only 20% of the animals can be restored. Bullet No correlation exists between the actual survival of dogs and that calculated by dye exclusion tests, which indicate a rather high (70%) viability, even after 10 days bone-marrow storage at +4 Degree-Sign C. Bullet DNA degradation (depolymerization) measurements of the bone marrow may be used as a supplementary test for checking the viability or restoration potency of bone-marrow cells after storage. Bullet In the freezing process, the optimum contact time between glycerol and the bone-marrow cells is 15 min. Results of experiments regarding certain bone-marrow transplantation problems showed that: Bullet The best time to administer bone marrow is between 24 and 48 h after irradiation. Bullet No survivors were obtained with dogs lethally irradiated with 600 rad by administering autogenic or allogenic DNA extracted from bone marrow, spleen or liver. Bullet Histocompatibility related to sex may play an important role in the bone-marrow graft. The lowest survival of C57BL mice was obtained when the donors were males and the recipients females. Bullet In radioprotection with foetal haemocytopoietic tissues, the donor's age represents one of the main factors. The best results were obtained in experiments on rats, with 19- to 20-day foetal liver (period of complete and maximum haemocytopoietic activity). The tissues mentioned below may be connected with the appearance of

  6. Bone-Marrow Storage and Transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costăchel, O.; Corneci, I.; Andrian, T.; Kitzulescu, I.; Popescu, N.; Pascu, D.; Buzi, E.; Voiculetz, N.

    1969-01-01

    The authors present some results from their experiments on bone-marrow storage and transplantation. The main problems with preservation of stored bone marrow are the duration, temperature, adjuvant substances and the significance of viability tests during the conservation processes. The results showed that: • Storage of bone marrow at +4eC produces a progressive decrease in its restoring capacity versus storage time. • While bone marrow stored for 24 h is able to restore 100% of dogs lethally irradiated with 600 rad, after 10 days of storage only 20% of the animals can be restored. • No correlation exists between the actual survival of dogs and that calculated by dye exclusion tests, which indicate a rather high (70%) viability, even after 10 days bone-marrow storage at +4°C. • DNA degradation (depolymerization) measurements of the bone marrow may be used as a supplementary test for checking the viability or restoration potency of bone-marrow cells after storage. • In the freezing process, the optimum contact time between glycerol and the bone-marrow cells is 15 min. Results of experiments regarding certain bone-marrow transplantation problems showed that: • The best time to administer bone marrow is between 24 and 48 h after irradiation. • No survivors were obtained with dogs lethally irradiated with 600 rad by administering autogenic or allogenic DNA extracted from bone marrow, spleen or liver. • Histocompatibility related to sex may play an important role in the bone-marrow graft. The lowest survival of C57BL mice was obtained when the donors were males and the recipients females. • In radioprotection with foetal haemocytopoietic tissues, the donor's age represents one of the main factors. The best results were obtained in experiments on rats, with 19- to 20-day foetal liver (period of complete and maximum haemocytopoietic activity). The tissues mentioned below may be connected with the appearance of certain typical signs of secondary syndrome

  7. Worse outcome and more chronic GVHD with peripheral blood progenitor cells than bone marrow in HLA-matched sibling donor transplants for young patients with severe acquired aplastic anemia.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schrezenmeier, H.; Passweg, J.R.; Marsh, J.C.; Bacigalupo, A.; Bredeson, C.N.; Bullorsky, E.; Camitta, B.M.; Champlin, R.E.; Gale, R.P.; Fuhrer, M.; Klein, J.P.; Locasciulli, A.; Oneto, R.; Schattenberg, A.V.M.B.; Socie, G.; Eapen, M.

    2007-01-01

    We analyzed the outcome of 692 patients with severe aplastic anemia (SAA) receiving transplants from HLA-matched siblings. A total of 134 grafts were peripheral blood progenitor cell (PBPC) grafts, and 558 were bone marrow (BM) grafts. Rates of hematopoietic recovery and grades 2 to 4 chronic

  8. Post-irradiation thymocyte regeneration after bone marrow transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boersma, W.; Betel, I.; Daculsi, R.; Westen, G. van der

    1981-01-01

    Growth kinetics of the donor-type thymus cell population after transplantation of bone marrow into irradiated syngeneic recipient mice is biphasic. During the first rapid phase of regeneration, lasting until day 19 after transplantation, the rate of development of the donor cells is independent of the number of bone marrow cells inoculated. The second slow phase is observed only when low numbers of bone marrow cells (2.5 x 10 4 ) are transplanted. The decrease in the rate of development is attributed to an efflux of donor cells from the thymus because, at the same time, the first immunologically competent cells are found in spleen. After bone marrow transplantation the regeneration of thymocyte progenitor cells in the marrow is delayed when compared to regeneration of CFUs. Therefore, regenerating marrow has a greatly reduced capacity to restore the thymus cell population. One week after transplantation of 3 x 10 6 cells, 1% of normal capacity of bone marrow is found. It is concluded that the regenerating thymus cells population after bone marrow transplantation is composed of the direct progeny of precursor cells in the inoculum. (author)

  9. Bone marrow transplantation for an infant with neutrophil dysfunction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camitta, B M; Quesenberry, P J; Parkman, R; Boxer, L A; Stossel, T P; Cassady, J R; Rappeport, J M; Nathan, D G [Harvard Medical School, Boston, Mass. (USA); Tufts Univ., Boston, Mass. (USA). School of Medicine)

    1977-01-01

    A child with severe neutrophil dysfunction and intractable infections received bone marrow transplants from histocompatible siblings. After a first transplant preceded by cyclophosphamide (CY), antithymocyte serum (ATS) and procarbazine (PCB) preconditioning, there was no evidence for engraftment and autologous marrow function rapidly returned. Cell mediated lysis showed no evidence of patient sensitization against the marrow donor suggesting that graft rejection did not cause the transplant failure. A second transplant was performed utilizing another matched sibling donor. Total body irradiation was added to CY, ATS, and PCB for preconditioning after in vitro studies of the colony forming capacity (CFUsub(c)) of the patient's marrow cells showed normal sensitivity to radiation. Full engraftment ensued with correction of granulocyte function abnormalities. The patient eventually died of intractable pulmonary disease. Experience with this child suggests that cyclophosphamide alone may be insufficient preparation for marrow transplantation in some patients with non-neoplastic hematologic disorders. Experimental and clinical data supporting this contention are reviewed.

  10. Bone marrow transplantation - a field in continuous development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pfeffer, P.F.

    1975-01-01

    The symptoms of the radiation syndrome are described briefly and the Vinca accident in 1958 is used as an illustration of the application of bone marrow transplantation as a treatment in radiation accidents. Thereafter the immunological problems arising when a permanent substitution of donor marrow is required are discussed. Greatest experience in bone marrow transplantation has been had in the treatment of aplastic anemia and acute leukemia. In these cases the recipient's bone marrow cells must be killed by whole body irradiation or by cyclophosphamide to preclude graft-host reaction. The removal of marrow from the donor and transplanting in the recipient are described, as is the progress of the patient in a typical case. The graft-host reaction is then discussed, as is the danger of secondary infections. In conclusion the long term results are evaluated and the future developments of the treatment discussed. (JIW)

  11. Gillick, bone marrow and teenagers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherkassky, Lisa

    2015-09-01

    The Human Tissue Authority can authorise a bone marrow harvest on a child of any age if a person with parental responsibility consents to the procedure. Older children have the legal capacity to consent to medical procedures under Gillick, but it is unclear if Gillick can be applied to non-therapeutic medical procedures. The relevant donation guidelines state that the High Court shall be consulted in the event of a disagreement, but what is in the best interests of the teenage donor under s.1 of the Children Act 1989? There are no legal authorities on child bone marrow harvests in the United Kingdom. This article considers the best interests of the older saviour sibling and questions whether, for the purposes of welfare, the speculative benefits could outweigh the physical burdens. © The Author(s) 2015.

  12. Reversal of acute (''malignant'') myelosclerosis by allogeneic bone marrow transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolf, J.L.; Spruce, W.E.; Bearman, R.M.; Forman, S.J.; Scott, E.P.; Fahey, J. L.; Farbstein, M.J.; Rappaport, H.; Blume, K.G.

    1982-01-01

    A 28-yr-old woman with acute malignant myelosclerosis received, as primary treatment, ablative chemotherapy and total body radiation therapy followed by bone marrow transplantation from her histocompatible brother. The patient is now well more than 15 mo after bone marrow transplantation, with normal peripheral blood counts, a normal bone marrow, no evidence of graft-versus-host disease, and is on no therapy. In light of the poor results obtained with conventional chemotherapy in this disease, bone marrow transplantation may represent the treatment of choice for patients who have an appropriate donor

  13. Graft Transit Time Has No Effect on Outcome of Unrelated Donor Hematopoietic Cell Transplants Performed in Australia and New Zealand: A Study from the Australasian Bone Marrow Transplant Recipient Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patton, William Nigel; Nivison-Smith, Ian; Bardy, Peter; Dodds, Anthony; Ma, David; Shaw, Peter John; Kwan, John; Wilcox, Leonie; Butler, Andrew; Carter, John M; Blacklock, Hilary; Szer, Jeffrey

    2017-01-01

    A previous study found that platelet recovery and mortality were worse in recipients of myeloablative bone marrow transplants where graft transit times were longer than 20 hours. This retrospective study of unrelated myeloablative allogeneic transplantation performed within Australia and New Zealand analyzed transplant outcomes according to graft transit times. Of 233 assessable cases, 76 grafts (33%) were sourced from bone marrow (BM) and 157 (67%) from peripheral blood. Grafts sourced from Australia and New Zealand (47% of total) were associated with a median transit time of 6 hours versus 32 hours for overseas sourced grafts (53% of total). Graft transit temperature was refrigerated in 85%, ambient in 6%, and unknown in 9% of cases, respectively. Graft transit times had no significant effect on neutrophil or platelet engraftment, treatment-related mortality, overall survival, and incidence of acute or chronic graft-versus-host disease. Separate analysis of BM grafts, although of reduced power, also showed no significant difference in either neutrophil or platelet engraftment or survival between short and longer transport times. This study gives reassurance that both peripheral blood stem cell and especially BM grafts subjected to long transit times and transported at refrigerated temperatures may not be associated with adverse recipient outcomes. Copyright © 2017 The American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Donor transplant programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abu Bakar Sulaiman

    1999-01-01

    The transplantation of organs and tissues from one human to another human has become an essential and well established form of therapy for many types of organ and tissue failure. In Malaysia, kidney, cornea and bone marrow transplantation are well established. Recently, liver, bone and heart transplanation have been performed. Unfortunately, because of the lack of cadaveric organ donation, only a limited number of solid organ transplantation have been performed. The cadaveric organ donor rate in Malaysia is low at less than one per million population. The first tissue transplanted in Malaysia was the cornea which was performed in the early 1970s. At that time and even now the majority of corneas came from Sri Lanka. The first kidney transplant was performed in 1975 from a live related donor. The majority of the 629 kidney transplants done at Hospital Kuala Lumpur to date have been from live related donors. Only 35 were from cadaver donors. Similarly, the liver transplantation programme which started in 1995 are from live related donors. A more concerted effort has been made recently to increase the awareness of the public and the health professionals on organ and tissue donation. This national effort to promote organ and tissue donation seems to have gathered momentum in 1997 with the first heart transplant successfully performed at the National Heart Institute. The rate of cadaveric donors has also increased from a previous average of I to 2 per year to 6 per year in the last one year. These developments are most encouraging and may signal the coming of age of our transplantati on programme. The Ministry of Health in conjunction with various institutions, organizations and professional groups, have taken a number of proactive measures to facilitate the development of the cadaveric organ donation programme. Efforts to increase public awareness and to overcome the negative cultural attitude towards organ donation have been intensified. Equally important are efforts

  15. Special proliferative sites are not needed for seeding and proliferation of transfused bone marrow cells in normal syngeneic mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brecher, G.; Ansell, J.D.; Micklem, H.S.; Tjio, J.H.; Cronkite, E.P.

    1982-01-01

    The widely held view that transfused bone marrow cells will not proliferate in normal mice, not exposed to irradiation or other forms of bone marrow ablation, was reinvestigated. Forty million bone marrow cells from male donors were given to female recipients on each of 5 consecutive days, 5 to 10 times the number customarily used in the past. When the recipients were examined 2-13 weeks after the last transfusion, donor cells were found to average 16-25% of total marrow cells. Similar percentages of donor cells were found when variants of the enzyme phosphoglycerate kinase determined electrophoretically were used for identification of donor and recipient cells. Evidence is presented that the proportion of donor cells is compatible with a nonlinear dependence on the number of cells transfused over the range tested - i.e., 20-200 million bone marrow cells injected intravenously. Special proliferative sites thus do not appear to be required

  16. Bone Formation by Sheep Stem Cells in an Ectopic Mouse Model: Comparison of Adipose and Bone Marrow Derived Cells and Identification of Donor-Derived Bone by Antibody Staining

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristian Kjærgaard

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Scaffolds for bone tissue engineering (BTE can be loaded with stem and progenitor cells (SPC from different sources to improve osteogenesis. SPC can be found in bone marrow, adipose tissue, and other tissues. Little is known about osteogenic potential of adipose-derived culture expanded, adherent cells (A-CEAC. This study compares in vivo osteogenic capacity between A-CEAC and bone marrow derived culture expanded, adherent cells (BM-CEAC. Method. A-CEAC and BM-CEAC were isolated from five female sheep and seeded on hydroxyapatite granules prior to subcutaneous implantation in immunodeficient mice. The doses of cells in the implants were 0.5 × 106, 1.0 × 106, or 1.5 × 106 A-CEAC and 0.5 × 106 BM-CEAC, respectively. After eight weeks, bone volume versus total tissue volume (BV/TV was quantified using histomorphometry. Origin of new bone was assessed using human vimentin (HVIM antibody staining. Results. BM-CEAC yielded significantly higher BV/TV than any A-CEAC group, and differences between A-CEAC groups were not statistically significant. HVIM antibody stain was successfully used to identify sheep cells in this model. Conclusion. A-CEAC and BM-CEAC were capable of forming bone, and BM-CEAC yielded significantly higher BV/TV than any A-CEAC group. In vitro treatment to enhance osteogenic capacity of A-CEAC is suggested for further research in ovine bone tissue engineering.

  17. Successful bone marrow transplantation in sensitized recipients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levey, R.H.; Parkman, J.; Rappeport, J.; Nathan, D.G.; Rosen, F.

    1979-01-01

    Fourteen patients with aplastic anemia and one with the Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome who were specifically sensitized against their donors were successfully engrafted with bone marrow from those donors. Sensitivity was detected in antibody-independent and antibody-dependent cell-mediated lysis assays. In order to erase this immunity to non-MHR familial transplantation antigens, multiagent immunosuppression with cyclophosphamide, procarbazine, and whole rabbit antithymocyte serum (ATS) was used. The data suggest that ATS was largely responsible for abrogation of this sensitivity and indicate that immunity does not represent a barrier to successful transplantation

  18. Role of T cells in sex differences in syngeneic bone marrow transfers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raveche, E.S.; Santoro, T.; Brecher, G.; Tjio, J.H.

    1985-01-01

    Transferred marrow cells will proliferate in normal mice not exposed to irradiation or any other type of stem cell depletion when five consecutive transfers of 40 million cells are given. Approximately 25% of the mitotic cells are of male donor origin observed cytogenetically in all of the female recipient spleens and marrow analyzed from two weeks to one and one-half years after transfusions. Male donor stem cells are accepted and form a stable component of the self-renewing stem cell pool. In contrast, only 5% female cells are found in male recipients. This sex difference in engraftment is not hormonal since castration of recipients does not alter the percentage of donor cells. Rigorous T depletion of female donor bone marrow, however, increases the percentage of donor engraftment to the level observed when male marrow, either whole or T depleted, is transferred to female recipients. The success of T-depleted female stem cells to seed male recipients is observed in both C57BL/6 and CBA/J. In addition, recipient nude BALB/c males, which lack a thymus, fail to accept whole bone marrow from BALB/c females. However, male bone marrow cells seed BALB/c nude females. These studies demonstrate that the poor engraftment of female cells in transfused male recipients is abrogated by the removal of T cells from the donor female marrow

  19. Bone marrow dosimetry for monoclonal antibody therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bigler, R.E.; Zanzonico, P.B.; Leonard, R.

    1986-01-01

    Immunoglobulins must permeate through the basement membrane of capillaries in order to enter the extracellular space (ECS) of tissue. Since the process is quite slow, the blood plasma activity in various organs contributes considerably to the radiation dose of the dose-limiting tissues. In bone marrow the basement membrane is absent and the blood circulation is functionally open. Therefore, blood plasma and marrow ECS maintain equal concentrations of labeled immunoglobulins. A combination of factors including intravenous administration, slow absorption into most tissues, slow breakdown and elimination of labeled immunoglobulin, and rapid entry into bone marrow ECS as well as known radiosensitivity of marrow led the authors to expect this tissue would prove to be the primary tissue at risk for systemic monoclonal antibody therapy. They have developed and applied in a Phase I clinical study of 131 I labeled CEA antibody a procedure for estimation of radiation dose to red bone marrow. Serieal measurements of blood plasma and total body retention are carried out. Binding of labeled antibody to the cellular components of blood is verified to be very low. They have observed bone marrow depression at doses greater than 400 rad. If no special procedures are used to reconstitute marrow after radiation treatment, this level represents a much greater than generally recognized limitation to radiolabeled monoclonal antibody therapy. 25 references, 4 tables

  20. Computer Algorithms in the Search for Unrelated Stem Cell Donors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Steiner

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT is a medical procedure in the field of hematology and oncology, most often performed for patients with certain cancers of the blood or bone marrow. A lot of patients have no suitable HLA-matched donor within their family, so physicians must activate a “donor search process” by interacting with national and international donor registries who will search their databases for adult unrelated donors or cord blood units (CBU. Information and communication technologies play a key role in the donor search process in donor registries both nationally and internationaly. One of the major challenges for donor registry computer systems is the development of a reliable search algorithm. This work discusses the top-down design of such algorithms and current practice. Based on our experience with systems used by several stem cell donor registries, we highlight typical pitfalls in the implementation of an algorithm and underlying data structure.

  1. Bone marrow-derived T lymphocytes responsible for allograft rejection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Senjanovic, M.; Marusic, M.

    1984-01-01

    Lethally irradiated mice reconstituted with syngeneic bone marrow cells were grafted with allogeneic skin grafts 6-7 weeks after irradiation and reconstitution. Mice with intact thymuses rejected the grafts whereas the mice thymectomized before irradiation and reconstitution did not. Thymectomized irradiated mice (TIR mice) reconstituted with bone marrow cells from donors immune to the allografts rejected the grafts. Bone marrow cells from immunized donors, pretreated with Thy 1.2 antibody and C', did not confer immunity to TIR recipients. To determine the number of T lymphocytes necessary for the transfer of immunity by bone marrow cells from immunized donors, thymectomized irradiated mice were reconstituted with nonimmune bone marrow cells treated with Thy 1.2 antibody and C' and with various numbers of splenic T lymphocytes from nonimmune and immune donors. Allogeneic skin graft rejection was obtained with 10(6) nonimmune or 10(4) immune T cells. The effect of immune T cells was specific: i.e., immune T cells accelerated only rejection of the relevant skin grafts whereas against a third-party skin grafts acted as normal T lymphocytes

  2. Stimulation and inhibition of erythropoiesis in donors and hematopoietic effect in irradiated recipient

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ninkov, V; Piletic, O; Stepanovic, D [Institut za Nuklearne Nauke Boris Kidric, Vinca (Yugoslavia); Belgrade Univ. (Yugoslavia). Inst. of Histology)

    1976-03-01

    Regeneration dynamics in bone marrow and spleen was studied in rats after irradiation of 800 R and transfusion of bone marrow cells from donors treated in different ways. Priority of the microenvironment of the recipient or of the information obtained in cell donors with respect to further hematopoietic cell differentiation was studied in irradiated recipients. Rats irradiated with 800 R were used as recipients in the experiments. The donors of marrow cells were the rats with stimulated or inhibited erythropoiesis. Stimulation of erythropoiesis was induced by bleeding and experimental polycythemia was provoked by packed erythrocytes. According to our results, it can be concluded that the processes of postirradiation hematopoiesis after transplantation of the bone marrow cells depend on the number and proliferative state of both donors and recipient stem cells, and microenvironment, not excluding the information introduced with the donor cell transplant.

  3. Bone Formation by Sheep Stem Cells in an Ectopic Mouse Model: Comparison of Adipose and Bone Marrow Derived Cells and Identification of Donor-Derived Bone by Antibody Staining

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærgaard, Kristian; Dreyer, Chris Halling; Ditzel, Nicholas

    2016-01-01

    expanded, adherent cells (A-CEAC). This study compares in vivo osteogenic capacity between A-CEAC and bone marrow derived culture expanded, adherent cells (BM-CEAC). Method. A-CEAC and BM-CEAC were isolated from five female sheep and seeded on hydroxyapatite granules prior to subcutaneous implantation...... in immunodeficient mice. The doses of cells in the implants were 0.5 × 106, 1.0 × 106, or 1.5 × 106 A-CEAC and 0.5 × 106 BM-CEAC, respectively. After eight weeks, bone volume versus total tissue volume (BV/TV) was quantified using histomorphometry. Origin of new bone was assessed using human vimentin (HVIM) antibody...... staining. Results. BM-CEAC yielded significantly higher BV/TV than any A-CEAC group, and differences between A-CEAC groups were not statistically significant. HVIM antibody stain was successfully used to identify sheep cells in this model. Conclusion. A-CEAC and BM-CEAC were capable of forming bone, and BM...

  4. Total lymphatic irradiation and bone marrow in human heart transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kahn, D.R.; Hong, R.; Greenberg, A.J.; Gilbert, E.F.; Dacumos, G.C.; Dufek, J.H.

    1984-01-01

    Six patients, aged 36 to 59 years, had heart transplants for terminal myocardial disease using total lymphatic irradiation (TLI) and donor bone marrow in addition to conventional therapy. All patients were poor candidates for transplantation because of marked pulmonary hypertension, unacceptable tissue matching, or age. Two patients are living and well more than four years after the transplants. Two patients died of infection at six and seven weeks with normal hearts. One patient, whose preoperative pulmonary hypertension was too great for an orthotopic heart transplant, died at 10 days after such a procedure. The other patient died of chronic rejection seven months postoperatively. Donor-specific tolerance developed in 2 patients. TLI and donor bone marrow can produce specific tolerance to donor antigens and allow easy control of rejection, but infection is still a major problem. We describe a new technique of administering TLI with early reduction of prednisone that may help this problem

  5. FORUM Paediatric living donor liver transplantation

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    879 November 2012, Vol. 102, No. 11 SAMJ. REVIEW. Paediatric living donor liver transplantation ... been excellent after left lateral segmentectomy, with a usually quoted ... has led to the development of new surgical techniques to increase.

  6. Effect of Massive Blood Transfusion on the Therapeutic Efficiency of Homogenic Bone Marrow in Acute Radiation Illness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seraphimov-Dimitrov, V.; Decheva, Z.; Nedyalkova, M. [Institute of Haematology and Blood Transfusion, Sofia (Bulgaria)

    1969-07-15

    Simultaneously with bone-marrow transplantation, the authors replaced the blood of the lethally irradiated recipient animals with blood from the bone-marrow donor. From experiments on dogs and rabbits it became clear that replacing 86% of the recipient's blood with blood from the bone-marrow donor considerably reduces the therapeutic effect of bone-marrow transplantation. The authors consider that the main cause of the animals' early death in experiments combining bone-marrow transplantation and massive donor blood transfusions is a secondary syndrome resulting from the graft-versus-host reaction. This does not exclude the inverse possibility - that the development of a host-versus-graft reaction is due to the presence of a massive number of antigens of the donor blood in the blood of the recipient. (author)

  7. The establishment of a bank of stored clinical bone marrow stromal cell products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabatino Marianna

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs are being used to treat a variety of conditions. For many applications a supply of cryopreserved products that can be used for acute therapy is needed. The establishment of a bank of BMSC products from healthy third party donors is described. Methods The recruitment of healthy subjects willing to donate marrow for BMSC production and the Good Manufacturing Practices (GMP used for assessing potential donors, collecting marrow, culturing BMSCs and BMSC cryopreservation are described. Results Seventeen subjects were enrolled in our marrow collection protocol for BMSC production. Six of the 17 subjects were found to be ineligible during the donor screening process and one became ill and their donation was cancelled. Approximately 12 ml of marrow was aspirated from one posterior iliac crest of 10 donors; one donor donated twice. The BMSCs were initially cultured in T-75 flasks and then expanded for three passages in multilayer cell factories. The final BMSC product was packaged into units of 100 × 106 viable cells, cryopreserved and stored in a vapor phase liquid nitrogen tank under continuous monitoring. BMSC products meeting all lot release criteria were obtained from 8 of the 11 marrow collections. The rate of growth of the primary cultures was similar for all products except those generated from the two oldest donors. One lot did not meet the criteria for final release; its CD34 antigen expression was greater than the cut off set at 5%. The mean number of BMSC units obtained from each donor was 17 and ranged from 3 to 40. Conclusions The production of large numbers of BMSCs from bone marrow aspirates of healthy donors is feasible, but is limited by the high number of donors that did not meet eligibility criteria and products that did not meet lot release criteria.

  8. Graft failure following bone marrow transplantation for severe aplastic anemia risk factors and treatment results

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Champlin, R.E.; Horowitz, M.M.; Bekkum, D.W. van; Camitta, B.M. Elfenbein, G.E.; Gale, R.P.; Gluckman, E.; Good, R.A.; Rimm, A.A. Rozman, C.; Speck, B. Bortin, M.M

    1989-01-01

    Graft failure was analyzed in 625 patients receiving allogeneic bone marrow transplants from HLA-identical sibling donors as treatment for severe aplastic anemia. Sixty-eight (11%) had no or only transient engraftment. Second bone marrow transplants were successful in achieving extended survival in

  9. Lethal graft-versus-host disease: modification with allogeneic cultured donor cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mauch, P.; Lipton, J.M.; Hamilton, B.; Obbagy, J.; Kudisch, M.; Nathan, D.; Hellman, S.

    1984-01-01

    The use of the bone marrow culture technique was studied as a means to prepare donor marrow for bone marrow transplantation to avoid lethal graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). Preliminary experiments demonstrated the rapid loss of theta-positive cells in such cultures, so that theta-positive cells were not detected after 6 days. Initial experiments in C3H/HeJ (H-2k, Hbbd) recipients prepared with 900 rad demonstrated improved survival when 3-day cultured C57BL/6 (H-2b, Hbbs) donor cells were used in place of hind limb marrow for transplantation. However, hemoglobin typing of recipient animals revealed only short-term donor engraftment, with competitive repopulation of recipient marrow occurring. Subsequent experiments were done in 1,200-rad prepared recipients, with long-term donor engraftment demonstrated. The majority of 1,200-rad prepared animals receiving cultured allogeneic cells died of GVHD, but animals receiving 28-day cultured cells had an improved 90-day survival and a delay in GVHD development over animals receiving hind limb marrow or marrow from shorter times in culture. In addition, animals receiving anti-theta-treated, 3-day nonadherent cells had an improved survival (44%) over animals receiving anti-theta-treated hind limb marrow (20%). These experiments demonstrate modest benefit for the use of cultured cells in bone marrow transplantation across major H-2 histocompatibility complex differences

  10. Recruitment of feces donors among blood donors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl Jørgensen, Simon Mark; Erikstrup, Christian; Dinh, Khoa Manh

    2018-01-01

    As the use of fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) has gained momentum, an increasing need for continuous access to healthy feces donors has developed. Blood donors constitute a healthy subset of the general population and may serve as an appropriate group for recruitment. In this study, we...... investigated the suitability of blood donors as feces donors. In a prospective cohort study, we recruited blood donors onsite at a public Danish blood bank. Following their consent, the blood donors underwent a stepwise screening process: First, blood donors completed an electronic pre-screening questionnaire...... to rule out predisposing risk factors. Second, eligible blood donors had blood and fecal samples examined. Of 155 blood donors asked to participate, 137 (88%) completed the electronic pre-screening questionnaire, 16 declined, and 2 were excluded. Of the 137 donors who completed the questionnaire, 79 (58...

  11. Enhanced proliferation of transfused marrow and reversal of normal growth inhibition of female marrow in male hosts 2 months after sublethal irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brecher, G.; Mulcahy, K.; Tjio, J.H.; Raveche, E.

    1985-01-01

    It is well established that 0.5 to 1 million marrow cells suffice to rescue (though not necessarily fully restore) lethally irradiated mice, while even 40 million cells result only in minimal seeding in isogeneic, nonirradiated mice. It was originally suggested that the results imply the existence of special proliferative sites which are filled in the nonirradiated animal, but are emptied by high doses of irradiation. In 1982 the authors demonstrated the feasibility of establishing substantial numbers of donor cells in normal, non-irradiated hosts. After four daily transfusions of 50 million marrow cells, 20-40% of the host's marrow consisted of cells of donor origin. The present paper reports the marked enhancement of the proliferation of transfused marrow cells in mice exposed to sublethal doses of irradiation of 300-900 R. Two months later, when the peripheral blood counts of the irradiated animals had returned to normal, transfusion of 100 million cells resulted in donor cell percentages of 55-100% in the peripheral blood and marrow. The authors previously found that male donor cells proliferated as readily in female as in male hosts, while female donor cells proliferated to a comparable degree only in female hosts. In the present study, male animals that had been exposed to 600-900 R 2 months earlier sustained proliferation of male and female donor cells equally well

  12. A perspective on the selection of unrelated donors and cord blood units for transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spellman, Stephen R.; Eapen, Mary; Logan, Brent R.; Mueller, Carlheinz; Rubinstein, Pablo; Setterholm, Michelle I.; Woolfrey, Ann E.; Confer, Dennis L.; Hurley, Carolyn K.

    2012-01-01

    Selection of a suitable graft for allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation involves consideration of both donor and recipient characteristics. Of primary importance is sufficient donor-recipient HLA matching to ensure engraftment and acceptable rates of GVHD. In this Perspective, the National Marrow Donor Program and the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research provide guidelines, based on large studies correlating graft characteristics with clinical transplantation outcomes, on appropriate typing strategies and matching criteria for unrelated adult donor and cord blood graft selection. PMID:22596257

  13. Human decellularized bone scaffolds from aged donors show improved osteoinductive capacity compared to young donor bone.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher A Smith

    Full Text Available To improve the safe use of allograft bone, decellularization techniques may be utilized to produce acellular scaffolds. Such scaffolds should retain their innate biological and biomechanical capacity and support mesenchymal stem cell (MSC osteogenic differentiation. However, as allograft bone is derived from a wide age-range, this study aimed to determine whether donor age impacts on the ability an osteoinductive, acellular scaffold produced from human bone to promote the osteogenic differentiation of bone marrow MSCs (BM-MSC. BM-MSCs from young and old donors were seeded on acellular bone cubes from young and old donors undergoing osteoarthritis related hip surgery. All combinations resulted in increased osteogenic gene expression, and alkaline phosphatase (ALP enzyme activity, however BM-MSCs cultured on old donor bone displayed the largest increases. BM-MSCs cultured in old donor bone conditioned media also displayed higher osteogenic gene expression and ALP activity than those exposed to young donor bone conditioned media. ELISA and Luminex analysis of conditioned media demonstrated similar levels of bioactive factors between age groups; however, IGF binding protein 1 (IGFBP1 concentration was significantly higher in young donor samples. Additionally, structural analysis of old donor bone indicated an increased porosity compared to young donor bone. These results demonstrate the ability of a decellularized scaffold produced from young and old donors to support osteogenic differentiation of cells from young and old donors. Significantly, the older donor bone produced greater osteogenic differentiation which may be related to reduced IGFBP1 bioavailability and increased porosity, potentially explaining the excellent clinical results seen with the use of allograft from aged donors.

  14. Bone marrow transplantation for treatment of radiation disease. Problems involved

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fliedner, T.M.

    1992-01-01

    Transplantation of bone marrow cells still is one of the major means available for treatment of radiation injuries. The decisive indication is the diagnostic of irreversible damage to the hemopoietic stem cells, which becomes manifest about 5 or 6 days after exposure, by severe granulocytopenia and simultaneous, progressive thrombopenia. The radiation dose provoking such severe injury is estimated to be at least 9-10 Gy of homogeneous whole-body irradiation. Preparatory measures for transplantation include proof of tissue compatibility of donor and patient, sufficient immunosuppression prior to and/or after irradiation and bone marrow transplantation. The donor's marrow should be free of T-cells. In spite of preparatory treatment, complications such as immunological reactions or disturbance of organ functions are to be very probable. These are treated according to therapy protocols. (orig./MG) [de

  15. Bone Marrow Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bone marrow is the spongy tissue inside some of your bones, such as your hip and thigh bones. It contains stem cells. The stem cells can ... the platelets that help with blood clotting. With bone marrow disease, there are problems with the stem ...

  16. Mixed allogeneic reconstitution (A+B----A) to induce donor-specific transplantation tolerance. Permanent acceptance of a simultaneous donor skin graft

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ildstad, S.T.; Wren, S.M.; Oh, E.; Hronakes, M.L.

    1991-01-01

    Mixed allogeneic reconstitution, in which a mixture of T-cell-depleted bone marrow of syngeneic host and allogeneic donor type is transplanted into a lethally irradiated recipient (A+B----A), results in mixed lymphopoietic chimerism with engraftment of a mixture of both host and donor bone marrow elements. Recipients are specifically tolerant to donor both in vitro and in vivo. Donor-specific skin grafts survive indefinitely when they are placed after full bone marrow repopulation at 28 days, while third-party grafts are rapidly rejected. To determine whether a delay of a month or more for full bone marrow repopulation is required before a donor-specific graft can be placed, we have now examined whether tolerance induction can be achieved if a graft is placed at the time of bone marrow transplantation. Permanent acceptance of donor-specific B10.BR skin grafts occurred when mixed allogeneic chimerism (B10+B10.BR----B10) was induced and a simultaneous allogeneic donor graft placed. In vitro, mixed reconstituted recipients were specifically tolerant to the B10.BR donor lymphoid cells but fully reactive to MHC-disparate third-party (BALB/c; H-2dd) when assessed by mixed lymphocyte reaction (MLR) and cell-mediated lympholysis (CML) assays. These data therefore indicate that a donor-specific graft placed at the time of mixed allogeneic reconstitution is permanently accepted without rejection. To determine whether an allogeneic skin graft alone without allogeneic bone marrow would be sufficient to induce tolerance, syngeneic reconstitution (B10----B10) was carried out, and a simultaneous B10.BR allogeneic skin graft placed. Although skin grafts were prolonged in all recipients, all grafts rejected when full lymphopoietic repopulation occurred at 28 days

  17. Engraftment Efficiency after Intra-Bone Marrow versus Intravenous Transplantation of Bone Marrow Cells in a Canine Nonmyeloablative Dog Leukocyte Antigen-Identical Transplantation Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, Sandra; Steder, Anne; Killian, Doreen; Knuebel, Gudrun; Sekora, Anett; Vogel, Heike; Lindner, Iris; Dunkelmann, Simone; Prall, Friedrich; Murua Escobar, Hugo; Freund, Mathias; Junghanss, Christian

    2017-02-01

    An intra-bone marrow (IBM) hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is assumed to optimize the homing process and therefore to improve engraftment as well as hematopoietic recovery compared with conventional i.v. HSCT. This study investigated the feasibility and efficacy of IBM HSCT after nonmyeloablative conditioning in an allogeneic canine HSCT model. Two study cohorts received IBM HSCT of either density gradient (IBM-I, n = 7) or buffy coat (IBM-II, n = 6) enriched bone marrow cells. An historical i.v. HSCT cohort served as control. Before allogeneic HSCT experiments were performed, we investigated the feasibility of IBM HSCT by using technetium-99m marked autologous grafts. Scintigraphic analyses confirmed that most IBM-injected autologous cells remained at the injection sites, independent of the applied volume. In addition, cell migration to other bones occurred. The enrichment process led to different allogeneic graft volumes (IBM-I, 2 × 5 mL; IBM-II, 2 × 25 mL) and significantly lower counts of total nucleated cells in IBM-I grafts compared with IBM-II grafts (1.6 × 10 8 /kg versus 3.8 × 10 8 /kg). After allogeneic HSCT, dogs of the IBM-I group showed a delayed engraftment with lower levels of donor chimerism when compared with IBM-II or to i.v. HSCT. Dogs of the IBM-II group tended to reveal slightly faster early leukocyte engraftment kinetics than intravenously transplanted animals. However, thrombocytopenia was significantly prolonged in both IBM groups when compared with i.v. HSCT. In conclusion, IBM HSCT is feasible in a nonmyeloablative HSCT setting but failed to significantly improve engraftment kinetics and hematopoietic recovery in comparison with conventional i.v. HSCT. Copyright © 2017 The American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Abscopal suppression of bone marrow erythropoiesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Werts, E.D.; Johnson, M.J.; DeGowin, R.L.

    1978-01-01

    Abscopal responses of hemopoietic tissue, which we noted in preliminary studies of mice receiving partial-body irradiation, led us to clarify these effects. In studies reported here, one hind leg of CF-1 female mice received 1000, 5000, or 10,000 rad of x radiation. We found a persistent shift from medullary to splenic erythropoiesis preventing anemia in mice receiving 5000 or 10,000 rad. Splenectomy prior to 5000-rad irradiation resulted in anemia, which was not ameliorated by exposure to intermittent hypoxia. Despite evidence for increased levels of erythropoietin in the animals, namely, a reticulocytosis and increased erythrocyte radioiron incorporation, both 59 Fe uptake and erythroblast counts in shielded marrow remained below normal. We found 50 to 90% suppression of the growth of marrow stromal colonies (MSC) from bone marrow aspirates of the shielded and irradiated femoral marrow at 1 month and at least 20% depression of MSC at 1 year, with each dose. We conclude that: (i) high doses of x radiation to one leg of mice caused prolonged suppression of medullary erythropoiesis with splenic compensation to prevent anemia; (ii) splenectomy, anemia, and hypoxia prevented the severe abscopal depression of medullary erythropoiesis; and (iii) suppressed medullary erythropoiesis with decreased growth of MSC suggested a change in the hemopoietic microenvironment of the bone marrow

  19. Bone - marrow postirradiation syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sesztakova, E.; Bilek, J.; Benova, K.; Novakova, J.; Culenova, K.

    2006-01-01

    Quantitative and qualitative changes in haemopoietic cells in chicken bone Marrow were investigated after acute single irradiation with doses 4.5 Gy and 5 Gy. Samples of bone marrow were obtained from proximal femoral epiphysis of decapitated chickens. Marrow smears were prepared and stained according to Pappenheim. Qualitative examination of myelogram showed proliferation of adipose tissue, hypocellularity, caryolyosis, caryorexis, disintegration of cells and proliferation of cells which could not be differentiated. Quantitative examination revealed high radiosensitivity of blast cells and lymphocytes shortly after irradiation. (authors)

  20. Bone marrow transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Storb, R.; Santos, G.W.

    1979-01-01

    Bone marrow transplantation has been increasingly used to treat patients with severe combined immunodeficiency diseases, severe aplastic anemia, and malignant hematologic diseases, especially leukemia. At the Workshop a number of problems were discussed, e.g., conditioning regimens aimed at overcoming the problem of marrow graft rejection and reducing the incidence of recurrent leukemia, prevention of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), possible mechanisms involved in stable graft-host tolerance, graft-versus-leukemia effect in mice, and finally, the possible use of autologous marrow transplantation

  1. Nuclear accidents and bone marrow graft

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernard, J.

    1988-01-01

    In case of serious contamination, the only efficacious treatment is the bone marrow grafts. The graft types and conditions have been explained. To restrict the nuclear accidents consequences, it is recommended to: - take osseous medulla of the personnel exposed to radiations and preserve it , that permits to carry out rapidly the auto-graft in case of accidents; - determine, beforehand, the HLA group of the personnel; - to register the voluntary donors names and addresses, and their HLA group, that permits to find easily a compatible donar in case of allo-graft. (author)

  2. Bone marrow transplant

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Arrange medical leave from work Take care of bank or financial statements Arrange care of pets Arrange ... Bleeding during cancer treatment Bone marrow transplant - discharge Central venous catheter - dressing change Central venous catheter - flushing ...

  3. Bone marrow transplant - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... HE. Overview and choice of donor of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. In: Hoffman R, Benz EJ, Silberstein ... lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) Chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) Graft-versus-host ...

  4. Karyotype of cryopreserved bone marrow cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.L.L.F. Chauffaille

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available The analysis of chromosomal abnormalities is important for the study of hematological neoplastic disorders since it facilitates classification of the disease. The ability to perform chromosome analysis of cryopreserved malignant marrow or peripheral blast cells is important for retrospective studies. In the present study, we compared the karyotype of fresh bone marrow cells (20 metaphases to that of cells stored with a simplified cryopreservation method, evaluated the effect of the use of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF as an in vitro mitotic index stimulator, and compared the cell viability and chromosome morphology of fresh and cryopreserved cells whenever possible (sufficient metaphases for analysis. Twenty-five bone marrow samples from 24 patients with hematological disorders such as acute myeloid leukemia, acute lymphoblastic leukemia, myelodysplastic syndrome, chronic myeloid leukemia, megaloblastic anemia and lymphoma (8, 3, 3, 8, 1, and 1 patients, respectively were selected at diagnosis, at relapse or during routine follow-up and one sample was obtained from a bone marrow donor after informed consent. Average cell viability before and after freezing was 98.8 and 78.5%, respectively (P < 0.05. Cytogenetic analysis was successful in 76% of fresh cell cultures, as opposed to 52% of cryopreserved samples (P < 0.05. GM-CSF had no proliferative effect before or after freezing. The morphological aspects of the chromosomes in fresh and cryopreserved cells were subjectively the same. The present study shows that cytogenetic analysis of cryopreserved bone marrow cells can be a reliable alternative when fresh cell analysis cannot be done, notwithstanding the reduced viability and lower percent of successful analysis that are associated with freezing.

  5. Karyotype of cryopreserved bone marrow cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauffaille, M L L F; Pinheiro, R F; Stefano, J T; Kerbauy, J

    2003-07-01

    The analysis of chromosomal abnormalities is important for the study of hematological neoplastic disorders since it facilitates classification of the disease. The ability to perform chromosome analysis of cryopreserved malignant marrow or peripheral blast cells is important for retrospective studies. In the present study, we compared the karyotype of fresh bone marrow cells (20 metaphases) to that of cells stored with a simplified cryopreservation method, evaluated the effect of the use of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) as an in vitro mitotic index stimulator, and compared the cell viability and chromosome morphology of fresh and cryopreserved cells whenever possible (sufficient metaphases for analysis). Twenty-five bone marrow samples from 24 patients with hematological disorders such as acute myeloid leukemia, acute lymphoblastic leukemia, myelodysplastic syndrome, chronic myeloid leukemia, megaloblastic anemia and lymphoma (8, 3, 3, 8, 1, and 1 patients, respectively) were selected at diagnosis, at relapse or during routine follow-up and one sample was obtained from a bone marrow donor after informed consent. Average cell viability before and after freezing was 98.8 and 78.5%, respectively (P < 0.05). Cytogenetic analysis was successful in 76% of fresh cell cultures, as opposed to 52% of cryopreserved samples (P < 0.05). GM-CSF had no proliferative effect before or after freezing. The morphological aspects of the chromosomes in fresh and cryopreserved cells were subjectively the same. The present study shows that cytogenetic analysis of cryopreserved bone marrow cells can be a reliable alternative when fresh cell analysis cannot be done, notwithstanding the reduced viability and lower percent of successful analysis that are associated with freezing.

  6. Lasting engraftment of histoincompatible bone marrow cells in dogs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vriesendorp, H.M.; Klapwijk, W.M.; van Kessel, A.M.C.; Zurcher, C.; van Bekkum, D.W.

    1981-05-01

    Conditioning protocols were tested for their efficacy in increasng the incidence of engraftment of histoincompatible dog bone marrow cells. Cyclophosphamide and total body irradiation (TBI), Corynebacterium parvum and TBI, a 3- or 5-day delayed transfusion of bone marrow cells after TBI, or an increase in the number of donor bone marrow cells or lymphocytes appeared to be ineffective. These protocols were previously reported to promote recovery of splenic hemopoiesis in mice in short-term assays. The noted discrepancy between studies with mice and dogs invalidated allogeneic resistance as measured in the mouse spleen assay as a model for bone marrow allograft rejection. Intravenous treatment with silica particles or L-asparaginase did improve the engraftment rate after 7.5 Gy TBI. Low efficiency and significant extra toxicity restrict the applicability of these procedures. The most promising conditioning schedule found appeared to be two fractions of 6.0 Gy TBI separated by a 72-h interval. Prolonged survival was noted after transplantation of bone marrow cells from a one-DLA haplotype-mismatched donor. Possibilities for further improvement of this protocol are discussed.

  7. Lasting engraftment of histoincompatible bone marrow cells in dogs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vriesendorp, H.M.; Klapwijk, W.M.; van Kessel, A.M.; Zurcher, C.; van Bekkum, D.W.

    1981-05-01

    Conditioning protocols were tested for their efficacy in increasing the incidence of engraftment of histoincompatible dog bone marrow cells. Cyclophosphamide and total body irradation (TBI), Corynebacterium parvum and TBI, a 3- or 5-day delayed transfusion of bone marrow cells after TBI, or an increase in the number of donor bone marrow cells or lymphocytes appeared to be ineffective. These protocols were previously reported to promote recovery of splenic hemopoiesis in mice in short-term assays. The noted discrepancy between studies with mice and dogs invalidated allogeneic resistance as measured in the mouse spleen assay as a model for bone marrow allograft rejection. Intravenous treatment with silica particles or L-asparaginase did improve the engraftment rate after 7.5 Gy TBI. Low efficiency and significant extra toxicity restrict the applicability of these procedures. The most promising conditioning schedule found appeared to be two fractions of 6.0 Gy TBI separated by a 72-hr interval. Prolonged survival was noted after transplantation of bone marrow cells from a one-DLA haplo-type-mismatched donor. Possibilities for further improvement of this protocol are discussed.

  8. Lasting engraftment of histoincompatible bone marrow cells in dogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vriesendorp, H.M.; Klapwijk, W.M.; van Kessel, A.M.C.; Zurcher, C.; van Bekkum, D.W.

    1981-01-01

    Conditioning protocols were tested for their efficacy in increasng the incidence of engraftment of histoincompatible dog bone marrow cells. Cyclophosphamide and total body irradiation (TBI), Corynebacterium parvum and TBI, a 3- or 5-day delayed transfusion of bone marrow cells after TBI, or an increase in the number of donor bone marrow cells or lymphocytes appeared to be ineffective. These protocols were previously reported to promote recovery of splenic hemopoiesis in mice in short-term assays. The noted discrepancy between studies with mice and dogs invalidated allogeneic resistance as measured in the mouse spleen assay as a model for bone marrow allograft rejection. Intravenous treatment with silica particles or L-asparaginase did improve the engraftment rate after 7.5 Gy TBI. Low efficiency and significant extra toxicity restrict the applicability of these procedures. The most promising conditioning schedule found appeared to be two fractions of 6.0 Gy TBI separated by a 72-h interval. Prolonged survival was noted after transplantation of bone marrow cells from a one-DLA haplotype-mismatched donor. Possibilities for further improvement of this protocol are discussed

  9. Bone marrow transplantation immunology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trentin, J.J.; Kiessling, R.; Wigzell, H.; Gallagher, M.T.; Datta, S.K.; Kulkarni, S.S.

    1977-01-01

    Tests were made to determine whether genetic resistance (GR) to bone marrow transplantation represents a natural lymphoma-leukemia defense mechanism, as follows: (C57 x AKR) F 1 hybrid mice show GR to C57 parental bone marrow cells, but not to AKR parental bone marrow cells (C3H x AKR) F 1 hybrids show no GR to bone marrow transplantation from either parental strain. However, transplantation of AKR lymphoma cells into lethally irradiated ''resistant'' (C57 x AKR) F 1 and ''nonresistant'' (C3H x AKR) F 1 hybrids produced lymphomatous spleen colonies in ''nonresistant'' hybrids but not in ''resistant'' hybrids. Thus ''resistant'' (C57 x AKR) F 1 hybrids can recognize and reject AKR lymphoma cells, but not normal AKR bone marrow cells. A normal biologic role of leukemia-lymphoma surveillance was postulated for genetic resistance to marrow transplantation, directed at antigens which, like TL, are expressed on normal hemopoietic cells of some strains, but only on leukemic cells of other strains

  10. Factors controlling the engraftment of transplanted dog bone marrow cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vriesendorp, H.M.; Klapwyk, W.M.; Heidt, P.J.; Hogeweg, B.; Zurcher, C.; Bekkum, D.W. van

    1982-01-01

    The LD50 of total body irradiation (TBI) for the bone marrow (BM) syndrome and the gastrointestinal (GI) syndrme was determined in dogs as 3.7 Gy, and 8.5 Gy respectively. Five Gy TBI was adequate conditioning for BM cells of littermate donors identical for the major histocompatibility comples (MHC). The maximum tolerated TBI (about 7.5 Gy) caused more side effects than 5.0 Gy TBI and was insufficient for engraftment of realistic numbers of BM cells of MHC mismatched donors. In autologous and MHC matched transplants, the rateof hemopoietic recovery correlated with the number of BM cells given. Approximtely 2 x 10 7 autologous and 1 x 10 8 MHC identical BM cells.kg -1 were needed for radiation protection. Platelet recovery was significantly more rapid in allogeneic combinations in comparison to autologous transplants. Low numbers of autologous cryopreserved bone marrow cells were as effective as fresh bone marrow cells in rescuing animals after lethal TBI. Other factors that influence BM cell engraftment were confirmed (prior sensitization of the recipient, donor selection) or identified (purification of BM cells on density gradient and selective gastrointestinal decontamination of the recipient). Consistent engraftment of gradient separated, MHC identical, BM cells was found after conditioning with two fractions of 6.0 Gy TBI, separated by 72 h. One MHC haplotype mismatched marrow did engraft after two TBI fractions of 6.0 Gy. Engraftment no longer occurred with gradient purified bone marrow cells from this type of donor. Late effects of TBI were early greying in all animals, and secondary uterine inertia in female dogs after 7.5 GY TBI. Fertility in males or females was not changed by radiation. An increase of pancreas fibrosis was noted in dogs receiving fractions of 6.0 Gy TBI. (author)

  11. Bone Marrow Donation from the Perspective of Sibling Donors Donación de médula ósea en la perspectiva de hermanos donadores Doação de medula óssea na perspectiva de irmãos doadores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Érika Arantes de Oliveira-Cardoso

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to characterize the sociodemographic profile of sibling bone marrow donors and to describe how they perceive the donation. This was a descriptive, exploratory and longitudinal study. Participants were 20 related bone marrow donors, between 18 and 42 years of age (mean=30.5 years, sd=7.47. Interviews were held before and immediately after the donation. Sociodemographic data were subject to descriptive statistical analysis and qualitative data to categorical content analysis. In the interviews held before the donation, stressor events were the sibling’s disease and treatment and the responsibility of being the donors. During the interviews after the donation, the following were mentioned: anxiety on the day before and on the day of the donation, pain the following day, and acknowledgement of the health team’s support as a facilitator of the donation process. In view of the findings, it is important for the team to outline intervention strategies to meet to the donors’ specific needs.Este estudio objetivó caracterizar el perfil socio demográfico y describir la percepción, de hermanos donadores de médula ósea, acerca de la donación. Se trata de estudio descriptivo, exploratorio y con recorte longitudinal. Participaron 20 donadores-relacionados de médula ósea, con edades entre 18 y 42 años (promedio=30,5 años, de=7,47. Fueron utilizadas entrevistas, aplicadas antes e inmediatamente después de la donación. Fue realizado un análisis estadístico descriptivo de los datos socio demográficos y análisis de contenido categorial de los datos cualitativos. En las entrevistas antes de la donación aparecieron como eventos causantes de estrés: el enfermarse, el tratamiento del hermano y la responsabilidad de ser los donadores. En el período posterior a la donación fue relatada ansiedad (en la víspera y en el día de la donación, dolor en el día siguiente, y reconocimiento del apoyo del equipo como elemento facilitador

  12. Nyretransplantation med levende donor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kamper, A L; Løkkegaard, H; Rasmussen, F

    2000-01-01

    In recent years transplantation from living donors has accounted for 25-30% of all kidney transplants in Denmark corresponding to 40-45 per year. Most of these living donors are parents or siblings, although internationally an increasing number are unrelated donors. Donor nephrectomy is associate...... in cadaver transplantation. The ethical and psychological aspects related to transplantation from a living donor are complex and need to be carefully evaluated when this treatment is offered to the patients....

  13. LED-roulette : LED's vervangen balletje

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goossens, P.

    2007-01-01

    Iedereen waagt wel eens een gokje, in een loterij of misschien ook in een casino. Wie droomt er immers niet van om op een gemakkelijke manier rijk te worden? Met de hier beschreven LED-roulette valt weliswaar weinig te winnen, maar het is wel een uitstekende manier om het roulettespel thuis te

  14. Primary tumor cells of myeloma patients induce interleukin-6 secretion in long-term bone marrow cultures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lokhorst, H. M.; Lamme, T.; de Smet, M.; Klein, S.; de Weger, R. A.; van Oers, R.; Bloem, A. C.

    1994-01-01

    Long-term bone marrow cultures (LTBMC) from patients with multiple myeloma (MM) and normal donors were analyzed for immunophenotype and cytokine production. Both LTBMC adherent cells from myeloma and normal donor origin expressed CD10, CD13, the adhesion molecules CD44, CD54, vascular cell adhesion

  15. Specific allogeneic unresponsiveness in irradiated dogs reconstituted with autologous bone marrow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rapaport, F.T.; Bachvaroff, R.J.; Akiyama, N.; Sato, T.; Ferrebee, J.W.

    1980-01-01

    Hemopoietic reconstitution of supralethally irradiated adult dogs of the Cooperstown colony with their own stored bone marrow can produce long-term unresponsiveness to DLA-identical kidney allografts with no need for any additional immunosuppression. Eleven of 18 kidneys transplanted 12 h after replacement of autologous marrow into irradiated recipients currently survive with normal function for as long as 1417 d; 8 of 13 organs transplanted 28 h after marrow replacement, and 8 of 13 organs transplanted 36 h after marrow injection, currently survive up to 502 d, with no further treatment. Alterations in the timing and sequence of each procedure decrease the incidence of unresponsiveness. Survival and function of the kidney allografts were not affected by the rejection of successive skin grafts from the kidney donor. Skin grafts from other DLA-identical donors and DLA-incompatible skin grafts were rejected by the same recipients in uniform fashion

  16. Broadband Radiometric LED Measurements

    OpenAIRE

    Eppeldauer, G. P.; Cooksey, C. C.; Yoon, H. W.; Hanssen, L. M.; Podobedov, V. B.; Vest, R. E.; Arp, U.; Miller, C. C.

    2016-01-01

    At present, broadband radiometric measurements of LEDs with uniform and low-uncertainty results are not available. Currently, either complicated and expensive spectral radiometric measurements or broadband photometric LED measurements are used. The broadband photometric measurements are based on the CIE standardized V(��) function, which cannot be used in the UV range and leads to large errors when blue or red LEDs are measured in its wings, where the realization is always poor. Reference irr...

  17. Development of Medical Technology for Contingency Response to Marrow Toxic Agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-02-28

    Program HHQ Health History Questionnaire National Marrow Donor Program® N00014-16-1-2020 Development of Medical Technology for Contingency Response to...Report 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) DEC 2015 -November 2017 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Development of Medical Technology for Contingency Response to Marrow...immunobiologic and clinical research activities promote studies to advance the science and technology of HCT to improve outcomes and quality of life for

  18. Broadband radiometric LED measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eppeldauer, G. P.; Cooksey, C. C.; Yoon, H. W.; Hanssen, L. M.; Podobedov, V. B.; Vest, R. E.; Arp, U.; Miller, C. C.

    2016-09-01

    At present, broadband radiometric LED measurements with uniform and low-uncertainty results are not available. Currently, either complicated and expensive spectral radiometric measurements or broadband photometric LED measurements are used. The broadband photometric measurements are based on the CIE standardized V(λ) function, which cannot be used in the UV range and leads to large errors when blue or red LEDs are measured in its wings, where the realization is always poor. Reference irradiance meters with spectrally constant response and high-intensity LED irradiance sources were developed here to implement the previously suggested broadband radiometric LED measurement procedure [1, 2]. Using a detector with spectrally constant response, the broadband radiometric quantities of any LEDs or LED groups can be simply measured with low uncertainty without using any source standard. The spectral flatness of filtered-Si detectors and low-noise pyroelectric radiometers are compared. Examples are given for integrated irradiance measurement of UV and blue LED sources using the here introduced reference (standard) pyroelectric irradiance meters. For validation, the broadband measured integrated irradiance of several LED-365 sources were compared with the spectrally determined integrated irradiance derived from an FEL spectral irradiance lamp-standard. Integrated responsivity transfer from the reference irradiance meter to transfer standard and field UV irradiance meters is discussed.

  19. Polyclonal Recipient nTregs Are Superior to Donor or Third-Party Tregs in the Induction of Transplantation Tolerance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina Pilat

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Induction of donor-specific tolerance is still considered as the “Holy Grail” in transplantation medicine. The mixed chimerism approach is virtually the only tolerance approach that was successfully translated into the clinical setting. We have previously reported successful induction of chimerism and tolerance using cell therapy with recipient T regulatory cells (Tregs to avoid cytotoxic recipient treatment. Treg therapy is limited by the availability of cells as large-scale expansion is time-consuming and associated with the risk of contamination with effector cells. Using a costimulation-blockade based bone marrow (BM transplantation (BMT model with Treg therapy instead of cytoreductive recipient treatment we aimed to determine the most potent Treg population for clinical translation. Here we show that CD4+CD25+ in vitro activated nTregs are superior to TGFβ induced iTregs in promoting the induction of chimerism and tolerance. Therapy with nTregs (but not iTregs led to multilineage chimerism and donor-specific tolerance in mice receiving as few as 0.5 × 106 cells. Moreover, we show that only recipient Tregs, but not donor or third-party Tregs, had a beneficial effect on BM engraftment at the tested doses. Thus, recipient-type nTregs significantly improve chimerism and tolerance and might be the most potent Treg population for translation into the clinical setting.

  20. Donor-derived, tolerogenic dendritic cells suppress immune rejection in the indirect allosensitization-dominant setting of corneal transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hattori, Takaaki; Saban, Daniel R; Emami-Naeini, Parisa; Chauhan, Sunil K; Funaki, Toshinari; Ueno, Hiroki; Dana, Reza

    2012-04-01

    Significant interest has been focused on the use of ex vivo-manipulated DCs to optimally induce transplant tolerance and promote allograft survival. Although it is understood that donor-derived, tolerogenic DCs suppress the direct pathway of allosensitization, whether such DCs can similarly suppress the indirect pathway remains unclear. We therefore used the murine model of corneal transplantation to address this, as these allografts are rejected in an indirect pathway-dominant manner. Interestingly, recipients administered with donor bone marrow-derived DCregs, generated via culturing with GM-CSF, IL-10, and TGF-β1, significantly prolonged survival of corneal allografts. Correspondingly, these recipients demonstrated a potent reduction in the frequency of indirectly allosensitized T cells, as determined by ELISPOT. Examination of DCregs relative to mDCs or iDCs showed a resistance to up-regulation of MHC-II and costimulatory molecules, as well as an impaired capacity to stimulate MLRs. In vivo, DCreg administration in corneal-allografted recipients led to inhibition of CD4(+)IFN-γ(+) T cell frequencies and an associated increase in Foxp3 expression in the Treg compartment. We conclude that donor-derived, tolerogenic DCs significantly suppress the indirect pathway, thereby identifying a novel regulatory mechanism for these cells in transplantation.

  1. Transfer of immunity by transfer of bone marrow cells: T-cell dependency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marusic, M.

    1978-01-01

    Thymectomized, lethally irradiated mice reconstituted with normal bone marrow cells succumbed when challenged ip with rat Yoshida ascites sarcoma (YAS) cells 40 days after irradiation and reconstitution. In contrast, thymectomized irradiated mice reconstituted with bone marrow cells from YAS-immune donors rejected the subsequent tumor challenge. Pretreatment of the bone marrow cells from immune donors with anti-Thy 1.2 antiserum and complement completely abolished the transfer of anti-YAS resistance. Bone marrow cells from donors thymectomized 2 months before immunization enabled almost all recipients to reject YAS, but bone marrow cells from donors thymectomized 8 months before immunization protected only 50 percent of the recipients. Further analysis showed that mice thymectomized 8 months before immunization failed to generate anti-YAS antibody response, whereas the antibody response of mice thymectomized 2 months before immunization did not differ from that of non-thymectomized age-matched control mice. The data suggest that the immune reaction of mice against xenogeneic YAS requires long-lived T 2 lymphocytes

  2. Dansk LED - Museumsbelysning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Peter Behrensdorff; Dam-Hansen, Carsten; Thorseth, Anders

    Projektet har til formål at anvende dansk forskning inden for optik og lys til at realisere innovative energieffektive LED lyssystemer til museumsbranchen.......Projektet har til formål at anvende dansk forskning inden for optik og lys til at realisere innovative energieffektive LED lyssystemer til museumsbranchen....

  3. Effects and Complications of Bone-Marrow Transplantation in Man

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mathe, G.; Schwarzenberg, L.; Miel, J.L. A; Schneider, M.; Cattan, A.; Schlumberger, J. R. [Institut de cancerologie et immunogenetique, Hopital Paul Brousse, Villejuif (France)

    1969-07-15

    Full text: Allogenic bone-marrow grafting in 24 human leukaemic subjects is described. The graft failed in 7 cases and took in 17 cases. In the latter group, all 17 cases were complicated by the secondary syndrome which was-fatal in 13 cases and controlled in 4 cases. The immunogenetic and immunological factors determining the establishment and evolution of haematological radiochimeras in man are discussed. The choice of donor is fundamental. Three tests are effective in donor selection, the indirect histocompatibility test, the leucocyte antigen test and the reaction of donor and recipient leucocytes in the dermis of an irradiated hamster. When marrow from several donors is transfused, the recipient spontaneously selects the genetically nearest. It seems likely there is more chance of finding a suitable donor among genetically related subjects than among those who are unrelated. The frequency of graft take seems slightly lower in recipients who have previously received blood transfusions. Total bone-marrow graft is associated with specific tolerance towards donor tissues. This is paralleled by the production in the chimera of immunoglobulins produced by the graft. The secondary syndrome seems, as in animals, to be related essentially to the graft-versus-host reaction. It is convenient to distinguish among its various manifestations, on the one hand, those lesions which are readily controlled such as hepatitis or erythrodermia associated with infiltration and proliferation of immunologically competent cells from the graft and, on the other hand, immune insufficiency with regard to micro-organisms, especially viruses and Candida albicans. This latter group, the mechanism of which is complex, still eludes attempts at preventive and curative control. The use of multiple donors and the administration of cortisone during marrow transfusion and A-methopterin and/or cyclophosphamide in the days following transfusions; seem to have reduced the severity of the secondary

  4. Transplantation of cryopreserved allogeneic bone marrow after its long-term storage to lethally irradiated dogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novikova, N.N.; Fedotenkov, A.G.; Sukyasyan, G.V.; Timakova, L.A.

    1982-01-01

    The study of the dog bone marrow preserved at -196 deg C during 6-12 years has shown that in the body of lethally irradiated animals (8Gy), due to the antigenic difference in the tissues of the donor and the irradiated recipients, the cells of cryopreserved allogeneic bone marrow were differentiated by the lymphoid type similar to that observed in transplantation of freshly prepared myelocaryocytes. However, their proliferative activity in the period of active lymphocyte transformation was quantitatively less manifest than in freshly transplanted cells. The results of the study evidence that the bone marrow cells cryopreserved during 6-12 years retain their functional activity

  5. Bone marrow transplantation in miniature swine: I. Autologous and SLA matched allografts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pennington, L.R.; Pescovitz, M.D.; Popitz, F.; Sachs, D.H.; Sakamoto, K.

    1986-01-01

    We developed a successful bone marrow transplant protocol in MHC-inbred miniature swine (MS). Three groups of MS were studied: irradiation controls, autologous bone marrow transplants and SLA matched bone marrow allografts. One day prior to irradiation, all animals underwent Hickman catheter placement via the external jugular vein. Bone marrow was harvested by direct mechanical removal of marrow from four long bones in Groups 2 and 3 one day prior to irradiation. All animals received 900 rads of midline body radiation from a Cobalt-60 source, were treated 1 g of cephalothin IV bid from day 1 to 14, 20 mg of genetamicin IV bid, from day 4 through 14 and 250 to 350 ml of fresh, irradiated whole blood from blood group identical donors on days 7, 11 and 14. Bone marrow was filtered, washed, stored overnight at 4 C and reinfused one to six hr after irradiation. Engraftment was defined by return of the peripheral WBC to 1000/mm 3 . All six animals in Group 1 died of aplasia between days 7 and 12. Marrow engrafted in eight of 12 animals in Group 2 and 7 of 10 animals in Group 3. This model provides a means to study the biological characteristics of bone marrow transplantation in immunologically well characterized large animals and should prove useful as a model for bone marrow transplants in man

  6. Marrow heterotopia in thalassemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Papavasiliou, C.; Gouliamos, A.; Andreou, J.

    1986-05-01

    The subject of marrow heterotopia has been reviewed on the basis of 15 cases suffering from thalassemia. Other cases reported in the literature were also reviewed. Using conventional radiography, scintigraphy, computerized tomography and myelography, 17% of the cases admitted into the hospital with the diagnosis of Thalassemia, were found to have macroscopic masses of marrow heterotopia. The most common site of development of these masses was the costovertebral gutter, followed by the anterior end of the ribs and the extradural space of the spinal canal. In one case, masses were located in the maxillary antra. The clinical implications, the pathogenesis of the masses and the differential diagnosis from other tumour-like entities are discussed. Three patients presented with symptoms and signs of spinal cord compression. All three patients were treated satisfactorily with small doses of radiotherapy.

  7. Role of Alternative Donor Allogeneic Transplants in the Therapy of Acute Myeloid Leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elmariah, Hany; Pratz, Keith W

    2017-07-01

    Adult acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is often associated with a poor prognosis, with allogeneic transplantation representing the greatest chance of cure for eligible patients. Historically, the preferred donor source is a human leukocyte antigen-matched blood relative, although only approximately 30% of patients have access to such a donor. Alternative donor sources, including matched unrelated donors, umbilical cord blood, and haploidentical related donors, are available for almost every patient and are increasingly being used for patients without a matched related donor. Survival outcomes with these alternative donor sources now approximate those of matched related donor transplants. Given the safety and success of alternative donor transplants, comparative trials are needed to reassess the optimal donor source for patients with AML. This review summarizes the available data on these alternative donor transplants. Further investigation is needed to contemporize donor selection algorithms, but, in the current era, donor availability should no longer preclude a patient's eligibility for an allogeneic blood or marrow transplant. Copyright © 2017 by the National Comprehensive Cancer Network.

  8. Investigating the Abscopal Effects of Radioablation on Shielded Bone Marrow in Rodent Models Using Multimodality Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afshar, Solmaz F; Zawaski, Janice A; Inoue, Taeko; Rendon, David A; Zieske, Arthur W; Punia, Jyotinder N; Sabek, Omaima M; Gaber, M Waleed

    2017-07-01

    The abscopal effect is the response to radiation at sites that are distant from the irradiated site of an organism, and it is thought to play a role in bone marrow (BM) recovery by initiating responses in the unirradiated bone marrow. Understanding the mechanism of this effect has applications in treating BM failure (BMF) and BM transplantation (BMT), and improving survival of nuclear disaster victims. Here, we investigated the use of multimodality imaging as a translational tool to longitudinally assess bone marrow recovery. We used positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and optical imaging to quantify bone marrow activity, vascular response and marrow repopulation in fully and partially irradiated rodent models. We further measured the effects of radiation on serum cytokine levels, hematopoietic cell counts and histology. PET/CT imaging revealed a radiation-induced increase in proliferation in the shielded bone marrow (SBM) compared to exposed bone marrow (EBM) and sham controls. T 2 -weighted MRI showed radiation-induced hemorrhaging in the EBM and unirradiated SBM. In the EBM and SBM groups, we found alterations in serum cytokine and hormone levels and in hematopoietic cell population proportions, and histological evidence of osteoblast activation at the bone marrow interface. Importantly, we generated a BMT mouse model using fluorescent-labeled bone marrow donor cells and performed fluorescent imaging to reveal the migration of bone marrow cells from shielded to radioablated sites. Our study validates the use of multimodality imaging to monitor bone marrow recovery and provides evidence for the abscopal response in promoting bone marrow recovery after irradiation.

  9. Laparoscopic donor nephrectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gupta Nitin

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Of the various options for patients with end stage renal disease, kidney transplantation is the treatment of choice for a suitable patient. The kidney for transplantation is retrieved from either a cadaver or a live donor. Living donor nephrectomy has been developed as a method to address the shortfall in cadaveric kidneys available for transplantation. Laparoscopic living donor nephrectomy (LLDN, by reducing postoperative pain, shortening convalescence, and improving the cosmetic outcome of the donor nephrectomy, has shown the potential to increase the number of living kidney donations further by removing some of the disincentives inherent to donation itself. The technique of LLDN has undergone evolution at different transplant centers and many modifications have been done to improve donor safety and recipient outcome. Virtually all donors eligible for an open surgical procedure may also undergo the laparoscopic operation. Various earlier contraindications to LDN, such as right donor kidney, multiple vessels, anomalous vasculature and obesity have been overcome with increasing experience. Laparoscopic live donor nephrectomy can be done transperitoneally or retroperitoneally on either side. The approach is most commonly transperitoneal, which allows adequate working space and easy dissection. A review of literature and our experience with regards to standard approach and the modifications is presented including a cost saving model for the developing countries. An assessment has been made, of the impact of LDN on the outcome of donor and the recipient.

  10. [LED lights in dermatology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noé, C; Pelletier-Aouizerate, M; Cartier, H

    2017-04-01

    The use in dermatology of light-emitting diodes (LEDs) continues to be surrounded by controversy. This is due mainly to poor knowledge of the physicochemical phases of a wide range of devices that are difficult to compare to one another, and also to divergences between irrefutable published evidence either at the level of in vitro studies or at the cellular level, and discordant clinical results in a variety of different indications: rejuvenation, acne, wound healing, leg ulcers, and cutaneous inflammatory or autoimmune processes. Therapeutic LEDs can emit wavelengths ranging from the ultraviolet, through visible light, to the near infrared (247-1300 nm), but only certain bands have so far demonstrated any real value. We feel certain that if this article remains factual, then readers will have a different, or at least more nuanced, opinion concerning the use of such LED devices in dermatology. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. LED system reliability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Driel, W.D. van; Yuan, C.A.; Koh, S.; Zhang, G.Q.

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents our effort to predict the system reliability of Solid State Lighting (SSL) applications. A SSL system is composed of a LED engine with micro-electronic driver(s) that supplies power to the optic design. Knowledge of system level reliability is not only a challenging scientific

  12. Subtotal body irradiation with linear accelerator as preparation for marrow engraftment in aplastic anemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walbom-Joergensen, S.; Ernst, P.

    1979-01-01

    Two cases of multitransfused severe aplastic anemia were retransplanted with bone marrow from the same HLA compatible sibling donors after subtotal body irradiation (800 r). Only minor non hematologic toxicity was observed. No permanent take was seen in relation to this procedure. During the survival time of the patients (78-120 days) no signs of interstitial pneumonia were observed

  13. Aging is associated with decreased maximal life span and accelerated senescence of bone marrow stromal cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dokkedahl, Karin Stenderup; Justesen, Jeannette; Clausen, Christian

    2003-01-01

    Age-related decrease in bone formation is well described. However, the cellular causes are not known. Thus, we have established cultures of bone marrow stromal cells (MSC) from young (aged 18-29 years, n = 6) and old (aged 68-81 years, n = 5) donors. MSC were serially passaged until reaching maxi...

  14. Ceramic hydroxyapatite coating on titanium implants drives selective bone marrow stromal cell adhesion.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Torensma, R.; Brugge, P.J. ter; Jansen, J.A.; Figdor, C.G.

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the cell characteristics that regulate implant osseointegration. The heterogeneity of bone marrow stromal cells obtained from 11 donors was assessed by measuring the expression of a large panel of adhesion molecules. Large differences in expression of adhesion

  15. The role of bone marrow-derived cells during the bone healing process in the GFP mouse bone marrow transplantation model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsujigiwa, Hidetsugu; Hirata, Yasuhisa; Katase, Naoki; Buery, Rosario Rivera; Tamamura, Ryo; Ito, Satoshi; Takagi, Shin; Iida, Seiji; Nagatsuka, Hitoshi

    2013-03-01

    Bone healing is a complex and multistep process in which the origin of the cells participating in bone repair is still unknown. The involvement of bone marrow-derived cells in tissue repair has been the subject of recent studies. In the present study, bone marrow-derived cells in bone healing were traced using the GFP bone marrow transplantation model. Bone marrow cells from C57BL/6-Tg (CAG-EGFP) were transplanted into C57BL/6 J wild mice. After transplantation, bone injury was created using a 1.0-mm drill. Bone healing was histologically assessed at 3, 7, 14, and 28 postoperative days. Immunohistochemistry for GFP; double-fluorescent immunohistochemistry for GFP-F4/80, GFP-CD34, and GFP-osteocalcin; and double-staining for GFP and tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase were performed. Bone marrow transplantation successfully replaced the hematopoietic cells into GFP-positive donor cells. Immunohistochemical analyses revealed that osteoblasts or osteocytes in the repair stage were GFP-negative, whereas osteoclasts in the repair and remodeling stages and hematopoietic cells were GFP-positive. The results indicated that bone marrow-derived cells might not differentiate into osteoblasts. The role of bone marrow-derived cells might be limited to adjustment of the microenvironment by differentiating into inflammatory cells, osteoclasts, or endothelial cells in immature blood vessels.

  16. Donor Telomere Length SAA

    Science.gov (United States)

    A new NCI study has found that, among patients with severe aplastic anemia who received a hematopoietic cell transplant from an unrelated donor, those whose donor white blood cells had longer telomeres had higher survival rates five-years after transplant

  17. Systems of donor transfer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F.T. de Charro (Frank); J.E.M. Akveld (Hans); E. Hessing (Ellen)

    1993-01-01

    textabstractThe development of medical knowledge has resulted in a demand in society for donor organs, but the recruitment of donor organs for transplantation is difficult. This paper aims to provide some general insights into the complex interaction processes involved. A laissez-faire policy, in

  18. Graft rejection by cytolytic T cells. Specificity of the effector mechanism in the rejection of allogeneic marrow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, H.; Gress, R.E.

    1990-01-01

    Cellular effector mechanisms of allograft rejection remain incompletely described. Characterizing the rejection of foreign-marrow allografts rather than solid-organ grafts has the advantage that the cellular composition of the marrow graft, as a single cell suspension, can be altered to include cellular components with differing antigen expression. Rejection of marrow grafts is sensitive to lethal doses of radiation in the mouse but resistant to sublethal levels of radiation. In an effort to identify cells mediating host resistance, lymphocytes were isolated and cloned from spleens of mice 7 days after sublethal TBI (650 cGy) and inoculation with allogeneic marrow. All clones isolated were cytolytic with specificity for MHC encoded gene products of the allogeneic marrow donor. When cloned cells were transferred in vivo into lethally irradiated (1025 cGy) recipients unable to reject allogeneic marrow, results utilizing splenic 125IUdR uptake indicated that these MHC-specific cytotoxic clones could suppress marrow proliferation. In order to characterize the effector mechanism and the ability of the clones to affect final engraftment, double donor chimeras were constructed so that 2 target cell populations differing at the MHC from each other and from the host were present in the same marrow allograft. Results directly demonstrated an ability of CTL of host MHC type to mediate graft rejection and characterized the effector mechanism as one with specificity for MHC gene products

  19. Starvation marrow – gelatinous transformation of bone marrow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Osgood

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Gelatinous bone marrow transformation (GMT, also known as starvation marrow, represents a rare pathological entity of unclear etiology, in which bone marrow histopathology demonstrates hypoplasia, fat atrophy, and gelatinous infiltration. The finding of gelatinous marrow transformation lacks disease specificity; rather, it is an indicator of severe illness and a marker of poor nutritional status, found in patients with eating disorders, acute febrile illnesses, acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, alcoholism, malignancies, and congestive heart failure. We present a middle-aged woman with a history of alcoholism, depression, and anorexia nervosa who presented with failure to thrive and macrocytic anemia, with bone marrow examination demonstrative of gelatinous transformation, all of which resolved with appropriate treatment. To our knowledge, there are very few cases of GMT which have been successfully treated; thus, our case highlights the importance of proper supportive management.

  20. [Study of migration and distribution of bone marrow cells transplanted animals with B16 melanoma ].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poveshchenko, A F; Solovieva, A O; Zubareva, K E; Strunkin, D N; Gricyk, O B; Poveshchenko, O V; Shurlygina, A V; Konenkov, V I

    2017-01-01

    Purpose. Reveal features migration and distribution of syngeneic bone marrow cells (BMC) and subpopulations (MSC) after transplantation into the recipient carrier B16 melanoma bodies. Methods. We used mouse male and female C57BL/6 mice. Induction of Tumor Growth: B16 melanoma cells implanted subcutaneously into right hind paw of female C57BL/6 mice at a dose of 2.5 x 105 cells / mouse. migration study in vivo distribution and BMC and MSC was performed using genetic markers - Y-chromosome specific sequence line male C57Bl/6 syngeneic intravenous transplantation in females using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in real time on Authorized Termal Cycler - Light Cycler 480 II / 96 (Roche). Introduction suspension of unseparated bone marrow cells, mesenchymal stem cells from donor to recipient male mice (syngeneic recipient female C57BL/6), followed by isolation of recipients of organs was performed at regular intervals, then of organ recipients isolated DNA. Results. It was shown that bone marrow cells positive for Y-chromosome in migrate lymphoid (lymph nodes, spleen, bone marrow) or in non-lymphoid organs (liver, heart, brain, skin) syngeneic recipients. In addition to the migration of cells from the bone marrow to other organs, there is a way back migration of cells from the circulation to the bone marrow. B16 melanoma stimulates the migration of transplanted MSCs and BMC in bone marrow. It is found that tumor growth enhanced migration of transplanted bone marrow cells, including populations of MSCs in the bone marrow. In the early stages of tumor formation MSC migration activity higher than the BMC. In the later stages of tumor formation undivided population of bone marrow cells migrate to the intense swelling compared with a population of MSCs. Conclusion. The possibility of using bone marrow MSCs for targeted therapy of tumor diseases, because migration of MSCs in tumor tissue can be used to effectively deliver anticancer drugs.

  1. Bone marrow transplantation for patients with chronic myeloid leukemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldman, J.M.; Apperley, J.F.; Jones, L.

    1986-01-01

    Between February 1981 and December 1984 we treated 52 patients with chronic myeloid leukemia in the chronic phase and 18 patients with more advanced disease by high-dose chemoradiotherapy followed by allogeneic bone marrow transplantation using marrow cells from HLA-identical sibling donors. In addition, the 40 patients who had not previously undergone splenectomy received radiotherapy to the spleen. To prevent graft versus host disease, cyclosporine was given either alone or in conjunction with donor marrow depleted of T cells. Of the 52 patients treated in the chronic phase, 38 are alive after a median follow-up of 25 months (range, 7 to 50); the actuarial survival at two years was 72%, and the actuarial risk of relapse was 7%. Of the 18 patients with more advanced disease, 4 have survived; the actuarial two-year survival was 18%, and the actuarial risk of relapse was 42%. We conclude that the probability of cure is highest if transplantation is performed while the patient remains in the chronic phase of chronic myeloid leukemia. T-cell depletion may have reduced the incidence and severity of graft versus host disease. The value of irradiation to the spleen before transplantation has not been established

  2. Bone marrow edema syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korompilias, Anastasios V.; Lykissas, Marios G.; Beris, Alexandros E.; Karantanas, Apostolos H.

    2009-01-01

    Bone marrow edema syndrome (BMES) refers to transient clinical conditions with unknown pathogenic mechanism, such as transient osteoporosis of the hip (TOH), regional migratory osteoporosis (RMO), and reflex sympathetic dystrophy (RSD). BMES is primarily characterized by bone marrow edema (BME) pattern. The disease mainly affects the hip, the knee, and the ankle of middle-aged males. Many hypotheses have been proposed to explain the pathogenesis of the disease. Unfortunately, the etiology of BMES remains obscure. The hallmark that separates BMES from other conditions presented with BME pattern is its self-limited nature. Laboratory tests usually do not contribute to the diagnosis. Histological examination of the lesion is unnecessary. Plain radiographs may reveal regional osseous demineralization. Magnetic resonance imaging is mainly used for the early diagnosis and monitoring the progression of the disease. Early differentiation from other aggressive conditions with long-term sequelae is essential in order to avoid unnecessary treatment. Clinical entities, such as TOH, RMO, and RSD are spontaneously resolving, and surgical treatment is not needed. On the other hand, early differential diagnosis and surgical treatment in case of osteonecrosis is of crucial importance. (orig.)

  3. Thymic repopulation following intrathymic injection of mouse bone marrow cells in MHC matched and mismatched recipients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chervenak, R.

    1986-01-01

    T cell precursors (pre-T cells) have traditionally been detected by their ability to repopulate the thymus of heavily irradiated mice following intravenous injection. Recently, Goldschneider et. al. developed an assay system which involves the direct injection of pre-T cells into the thymus. The authors used this technique to evaluate the ability of bone marrow cells to repopulate thymuses in various donor-host strain combinations. Sub-lethally irradiated (600R) mice were injected intrathymically with 2 x 10 6 bone marrow cells which differed from the recipient with respect to their Thy 1 allotype. The percentage of thymus cells expressing either the donor or recipient type Thy 1 marker was determined 14 to 21 days after injection. These experiments showed that in MHC matched donor-host combinations (AKR/cum → AKR/J and CBA/J → AKR/J), cells derived from the donor inoculum accounted for 40% to 75% of the total thymus population. MHC mismatched donor-host combinations (C57BL/6J → AKR/J and Balb/c → AKR/J) resulted in significantly less donor-type repopulation of the thymus. In these cases, donor repopulation typically ranged from 0% to 4%. The ability of the pre-T cells detected by intrathymic injection to proliferate in the thymic environment, therefore, appears to be influenced by the MHC. This may reflect commitment of pre-T cells to MHC haplotype recognition prior to their migration to the thymus

  4. Advances in Bone Marrow Stem Cell Therapy for Retinal Dysfunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Susanna S.; Moisseiev, Elad; Bauer, Gerhard; Anderson, Johnathon D.; Grant, Maria B.; Zam, Azhar; Zawadzki, Robert J.; Werner, John S.; Nolta, Jan A.

    2016-01-01

    The most common cause of untreatable vision loss is dysfunction of the retina. Conditions, such as age-related macular degeneration, diabetic retinopathy and glaucoma remain leading causes of untreatable blindness worldwide. Various stem cell approaches are being explored for treatment of retinal regeneration. The rationale for using bone marrow stem cells to treat retinal dysfunction is based on preclinical evidence showing that bone marrow stem cells can rescue degenerating and ischemic retina. These stem cells have primarily paracrine trophic effects although some cells can directly incorporate into damaged tissue. Since the paracrine trophic effects can have regenerative effects on multiple cells in the retina, the use of this cell therapy is not limited to a particular retinal condition. Autologous bone marrow-derived stem cells are being explored in early clinical trials as therapy for various retinal conditions. These bone marrow stem cells include mesenchymal stem cells, mononuclear cells and CD34+ cells. Autologous therapy requires no systemic immunosuppression or donor matching. Intravitreal delivery of CD34+ cells and mononuclear cells appears to be tolerated and is being explored since some of these cells can home into the damaged retina after intravitreal administration. The safety of intravitreal delivery of mesenchymal stem cells has not been well established. This review provides an update of the current evidence in support of the use of bone marrow stem cells as treatment for retinal dysfunction. The potential limitations and complications of using certain forms of bone marrow stem cells as therapy are discussed. Future directions of research include methods to optimize the therapeutic potential of these stem cells, non-cellular alternatives using extracellular vesicles, and in vivo high-resolution retinal imaging to detect cellular changes in the retina following cell therapy. PMID:27784628

  5. Phenotypic characterization of early events of thymus repopulation in radiation bone marrow chimeras

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharrow, S.O.; Singer, A.; Hammerling, U.; Mathieson, B.J.

    1983-01-01

    The phenotype of murine thymocytes repopulating the thymus of radiation bone marrow chimeras shortly after irradiation and bone marrow reconstitution was analyzed by immunofluorescence and flow microfluorometry. Thymuses in these chimeras, while essentially devoid of lymphoid cells at day 7, were repopulated by days 10 to 12 after irradiation. It was found that this initial repopulation arose from a radioresistant intrathymic precursor that expanded to an almost complete complement of host-type thymocytes. However, these host-derived thymocytes were unusual in that they were relatively deficient in Lyt 1+2- and peanut agglutinin ''dull'' cells as compared with normal thymocytes. Donor bone-marrow-derived cells first appeared in the irradiated chimeric thymuses between days 12 and 15 after irradiation and bone marrow transfer. By day 19, chimeric thymuses contained more than 98% donor cells. This course was identical for three chimeric combinations, each made across different genetic barriers. In contrast to the cells that populate the fetal thymus during normal ontogeny, the first donor bone-marrow-derived cells that can be detected within the irradiated chimeric thymuses already expressed phenotypically normal adult T cell subpopulations in that they contained significant numbers both of Lyt 1+2- and of Lyt 1+2+ thymocytes. Thus, the Lyt phenotype of donor cells that initially repopulate an adult thymus after irradiation is markedly different from the Lyt phenotype of cells that initially populate the fetal thymus. The differences between adult and fetal thymic development that are observed in radiation bone marrow chimeras may be important in our understanding of T cell differentiation in these animals

  6. Marginal kidney donor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ganesh Gopalakrishnan

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Renal transplantation is the treatment of choice for a medically eligible patient with end stage renal disease. The number of renal transplants has increased rapidly over the last two decades. However, the demand for organs has increased even more. This disparity between the availability of organs and waitlisted patients for transplants has forced many transplant centers across the world to use marginal kidneys and donors. We performed a Medline search to establish the current status of marginal kidney donors in the world. Transplant programs using marginal deceased renal grafts is well established. The focus is now on efforts to improve their results. Utilization of non-heart-beating donors is still in a plateau phase and comprises a minor percentage of deceased donations. The main concern is primary non-function of the renal graft apart from legal and ethical issues. Transplants with living donors outnumbered cadaveric transplants at many centers in the last decade. There has been an increased use of marginal living kidney donors with some acceptable medical risks. Our primary concern is the safety of the living donor. There is not enough scientific data available to quantify the risks involved for such donation. The definition of marginal living donor is still not clear and there are no uniform recommendations. The decision must be tailored to each donor who in turn should be actively involved at all levels of the decision-making process. In the current circumstances, our responsibility is very crucial in making decisions for either accepting or rejecting a marginal living donor.

  7. Thermal management for LED applications

    CERN Document Server

    Poppe, András

    2014-01-01

    Thermal Management for LED Applications provides state-of-the-art information on recent developments in thermal management as it relates to LEDs and LED-based systems and their applications. Coverage begins with an overview of the basics of thermal management including thermal design for LEDs, thermal characterization and testing of LEDs, and issues related to failure mechanisms and reliability and performance in harsh environments. Advances and recent developments in thermal management round out the book with discussions on advances in TIMs (thermal interface materials) for LED applications, advances in forced convection cooling of LEDs, and advances in heat sinks for LED assemblies. This book also: Presents a comprehensive overview of the basics of thermal management as it relates to LEDs and LED-based systems Discusses both design and thermal management considerations when manufacturing LEDs and LED-based systems Covers reliability and performance of LEDs in harsh environments Has a hands-on applications a...

  8. Transient engraftment of syngeneic bone marrow after conditioning with high-dose cyclophosphamide and thoracoabdominal irradiation in a patient with aplastic anemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsue, K.; Niki, T.; Shiobara, S.; Ueda, M.; Ohtake, S.; Mori, T.; Matsuda, T.; Harada, M.

    1990-01-01

    We describe the clinical course of a 16 year old girl with aplastic anemia who was treated by syngeneic bone marrow transplantation. Engraftment was not obtained by simple infusion of bone marrow without immunosuppression. The patient received a high-dose cyclophosphamide and thoracoabdominal irradiation, followed by second marrow transplantation from the same donor. Incomplete but significant hematologic recovery was observed; however, marrow failure recurred 5 months after transplantation. Since donor and recipient pairs were genotypically identical, graft failure could not be attributed to immunological reactivity of recipient cells to donor non-HLA antigens. This case report implies that graft failure in some cases of aplastic anemia might be mediated by inhibitory cells resistant to cyclophosphamide and irradiation

  9. Quantification of transplant-derived circulating cell-free DNA in absence of a donor genotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharon, Eilon; Shi, Hao; Kharbanda, Sandhya; Koh, Winston; Martin, Lance R; Khush, Kiran K; Valantine, Hannah; Pritchard, Jonathan K; De Vlaminck, Iwijn

    2017-08-01

    Quantification of cell-free DNA (cfDNA) in circulating blood derived from a transplanted organ is a powerful approach to monitoring post-transplant injury. Genome transplant dynamics (GTD) quantifies donor-derived cfDNA (dd-cfDNA) by taking advantage of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) distributed across the genome to discriminate donor and recipient DNA molecules. In its current implementation, GTD requires genotyping of both the transplant recipient and donor. However, in practice, donor genotype information is often unavailable. Here, we address this issue by developing an algorithm that estimates dd-cfDNA levels in the absence of a donor genotype. Our algorithm predicts heart and lung allograft rejection with an accuracy that is similar to conventional GTD. We furthermore refined the algorithm to handle closely related recipients and donors, a scenario that is common in bone marrow and kidney transplantation. We show that it is possible to estimate dd-cfDNA in bone marrow transplant patients that are unrelated or that are siblings of the donors, using a hidden Markov model (HMM) of identity-by-descent (IBD) states along the genome. Last, we demonstrate that comparing dd-cfDNA to the proportion of donor DNA in white blood cells can differentiate between relapse and the onset of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). These methods alleviate some of the barriers to the implementation of GTD, which will further widen its clinical application.

  10. Quantification of transplant-derived circulating cell-free DNA in absence of a donor genotype.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eilon Sharon

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Quantification of cell-free DNA (cfDNA in circulating blood derived from a transplanted organ is a powerful approach to monitoring post-transplant injury. Genome transplant dynamics (GTD quantifies donor-derived cfDNA (dd-cfDNA by taking advantage of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs distributed across the genome to discriminate donor and recipient DNA molecules. In its current implementation, GTD requires genotyping of both the transplant recipient and donor. However, in practice, donor genotype information is often unavailable. Here, we address this issue by developing an algorithm that estimates dd-cfDNA levels in the absence of a donor genotype. Our algorithm predicts heart and lung allograft rejection with an accuracy that is similar to conventional GTD. We furthermore refined the algorithm to handle closely related recipients and donors, a scenario that is common in bone marrow and kidney transplantation. We show that it is possible to estimate dd-cfDNA in bone marrow transplant patients that are unrelated or that are siblings of the donors, using a hidden Markov model (HMM of identity-by-descent (IBD states along the genome. Last, we demonstrate that comparing dd-cfDNA to the proportion of donor DNA in white blood cells can differentiate between relapse and the onset of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD. These methods alleviate some of the barriers to the implementation of GTD, which will further widen its clinical application.

  11. Treatment of chronic granulocytic leukemia by chemotherapy, total body irradiation and allogeneic bone marrow transplantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doney, K; Buckner, C D; Sale, G E; Ramberg, R; Boyd, C; Thomas, E D [Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Institute; Washington Univ., Seattle (USA). School of Medicine)

    1978-01-01

    Fourteen patients with chronic granulocytic leukemia received bone marrow grafts from HLA identical siblings. Ten patients were in blast crisis prior to grafting, three were in an accelerated phase of their disease, and one was aplastic secondary to chemotherapy. Prior to transplant all patients were conditioned with chemotherapy including cyclophosphamide plus 1,000 rad of total body irradiation. Ten patients achieved engraftment while four died 1 to 26 days after marrow infusion without functioning grafts. Two patients reveived a second infusion of donor marrow because of delayed engraftment. Neither marrow cell dose nor presence of myelofibrosis correlated with succesful engraftment. Three out of ten engrafted patients developed graft-versus-host disease. Interstitial pneumonia occurred in seven patients. The immediate cause of death was bacterial septicemia in six patients. All evidence of leukemia disappeared in nine out of ten evaluable patients. The median survival was 43 days. One patient had a complete remission of 16 months duration.

  12. Treatment of chronic granulocytic leukemia by chemotherapy, total body irradiation and allogeneic bone marrow transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doney, K.; Buckner, C.D.; Sale, G.E.; Ramberg, R.; Boyd, C.; Thomas, E.D.; Washington Univ., Seattle

    1978-01-01

    Fourteen patients with chronic granulocytic leukemia received bone marrow grafts from HLA identical siblings. Ten patients were in blast crisis prior to grafting, three were in an accelerated phase of their disease, and one was aplastic secondary to chemotherapy. Prior to transplant all patients were conditioned with chemotherapy including cyclophosphamide plus 1,000 rad of total body irradiation. Ten patients achieved engraftment while four died 1 to 26 days after marrow infusion without functioning grafts. Two patients reveived a second infusion of donor marrow because of delayed engraftment. Neither marrow cell dose nor presence of myelofibrosis correlated with succesful engraftment. Three out of ten engrafted patients developed graft-versus-host disease. Interstitial pneumonia occurred in seven patients. The immediate cause of death was bacterial septicemia in six patients. All evidence of leukemia disappeared in nine out of ten evaluable patients. The median survival was 43 days. One patient had a complete remission of 16 months duration. (Author)

  13. Influence of intensity of bone marrow erythropoietic activity on radiosensitivity of mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwiek, S. Jr.

    1985-01-01

    Hypererythropoiesis was induced in mice by exposure to carbon monoxide. They became polycythemic after transfer to normal air. Mice irradiated with 550-650 R of X-rays in the state of polycythemia had higher 30-day survival than controls. Bone marrow levels of multipotential haemopoietic stem cells (CFU-S) were found to be elevated by 50% in polycythemic mice and after whole body sublethal irradiation (200 R) substantially faster regeneration of bone marrow was noted in them. It was estimated by renewal of bone marrow cellularity, content of CFU-S and ability to growth in diffusion chambers. Bone marrow from polycythemic mice was found to yield considerably less macrophages than the ones from hypererythropoietic and normal donors. 27 refs., 5 tabs. (author)

  14. Impact of starting material (fresh versus cryopreserved marrow) on mesenchymal stem cell culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Alesia; Sackett, Katie; Sumstad, Darin; Kadidlo, Dianne; McKenna, David H

    2017-09-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) continue to be investigated in multiple clinical trials as potential therapy for different disorders. There is ongoing controversy surrounding the clinical use of cryopreserved versus fresh MSCs. However, little is known about how cryopreservation affects marrow as starting material. The growth kinetics of MSC cultures derived from fresh versus cryopreserved marrow were compared. Data were reviewed on the growth kinetics of MSCs derived from fresh versus cryopreserved marrow of nine donors. Marrow harvested from each donor was separated into four aliquots (one fresh and three cryopreserved for culture). Data on the date of mononuclear cell cryopreservation/thaw, MSC counts at Passages 1 and 2, MSC doubling, MSC fold expansion, viability (of mononuclear cells and final MSCs), and on flow cytometry markers of mononuclear cells and final MSCs were analyzed for the fresh and cryopreserved marrow groups. In total, 21 MSC lots (seven fresh and 14 cryopreserved) were obtained. The average age of cryopreserved mononuclear cell product was 295 days (range, 18-1241 days). There were no significant differences between MSC numbers at Passage 1 (p = 0.1), final MSC numbers (p = 0.5), MSC doubling (p = 0.7), or MSC fold expansion (p = 0.7). A significant difference was observed in viability by flow cytometry for both mononuclear cells (p = 0.002) and final MSCs (p = 0.009), with higher viability in the fresh marrow group. This study demonstrates that MSCs derived from cryopreserved marrow have the same growth characteristics as fresh marrow-derived MSCs. Further studies are needed to explore potential differences in clinical efficacy. © 2017 AABB.

  15. Reduced immune responses in chimeric mice engrafted with bone marrow cells from mice with airways inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Naomi M; Ng, Royce L X; McGonigle, Terence A; Gorman, Shelley; Hart, Prue H

    2015-11-01

    During respiratory inflammation, it is generally assumed that dendritic cells differentiating from the bone marrow are immunogenic rather than immunoregulatory. Using chimeric mice, the outcomes of airways inflammation on bone marrow progenitor cells were studied. Immune responses were analyzed in chimeric mice engrafted for >16 weeks with bone marrow cells from mice with experimental allergic airways disease (EAAD). Responses to sensitization and challenge with the allergen causing inflammation in the bone marrow-donor mice were significantly reduced in the chimeric mice engrafted with bone marrow cells from mice with EAAD (EAAD-chimeric). Responses to intranasal LPS and topical fluorescein isothiocyanate (non-specific challenges) were significantly attenuated. Fewer activated dendritic cells from the airways and skin of the EAAD-chimeric mice could be tracked to the draining lymph nodes, and may contribute to the significantly reduced antigen/chemical-induced hypertrophy in the draining nodes, and the reduced immune responses to sensitizing allergens. Dendritic cells differentiating in vitro from the bone marrow of >16 weeks reconstituted EAAD-chimeric mice retained an ability to poorly prime immune responses when transferred into naïve mice. Dendritic cells developing from bone marrow progenitors during airways inflammation are altered such that daughter cells have reduced antigen priming capabilities.

  16. CMV infection after transplant from cord blood compared to other alternative donors: the importance of donor-negative CMV serostatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikulska, Małgorzata; Raiola, Anna Maria; Bruzzi, Paolo; Varaldo, Riccardo; Annunziata, Silvana; Lamparelli, Teresa; Frassoni, Francesco; Tedone, Elisabetta; Galano, Barbara; Bacigalupo, Andrea; Viscoli, Claudio

    2012-01-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection and disease are important complications after hematopoietic stem cell transplant, particularly after transplant from alternative donors. Allogeneic cord blood transplantation (CBT) is being increasingly used, but immune recovery may be delayed. The aim of this study was to compare CMV infection in CBT with transplants from unrelated or mismatched related donors, from now on defined as alternative donors. A total of 165 consecutive transplants were divided in 2 groups: (1) alternative donors transplants (n = 85) and (2) CBT recipients (n = 80). Donor and recipient (D/R) CMV serostatus were recorded. The incidence of CMV infection, its severity, timing, and outcome were compared. Median follow-up was 257 days (1-1328). CMV infection was monitored by CMV antigenemia and expressed as CMV Ag positive cell/2 × 10(5) polymorphonuclear blood cells. There was a trend toward a higher cumulative incidence of CMV infection among CBT than alternative donor transplant recipients (64% vs 51%, P = .12). The median time to CMV reactivation was 35 days, and was comparable in the 2 groups (P = .8). The maximum number of CMV-positive cells was similar in the 2 groups (11 versus 16, P = .2). The time interval between the first and the last positive CMV antigenemia was almost 4 times longer in CBT compared with alternative donor transplants (109 vs 29 days, respectively, P = .008). The incidence of late CMV infection was also higher in CBT (62% vs 24%, P donor transplants, whereas no difference in mortality was observed. The duration and incidence of late CMV infection were similar when D-/R+ CBT were compared with D-/R+ alternative donor transplants. Copyright © 2012 American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Mechanism of stimulation of antibody-forming ability of bone marrow cells of mice immunized with staphylococci

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyashchenko, K.P.; Golovanova, T.A.; Bobrovnik, S.A.

    1987-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to study the formation of the ability of the bone marrow cells of mice immunized with staphylococci to create antibodies to this antigen. The research includes a study of the effect of the irradiation in vitro of the bone marrow cells on their stimulating activity and the role played by the thymus and spleen in the formation of this activity. Experiments were carried out on CBA and BALB/c mice as well as on mice with congenital absence of the thymus. The bone marrow cell donors were immunized intravenously with staphylococcal corpuscular antigen. Receptor mice were irradiated with cobalt 60 gamma radiation and injected intravenously with bone marrow cell extract from the immunized donors and were immunized with the antigen. Spleen cells were labelled with chromium 51 and injected intravenously into intact syngeneic recipients together with as well as without the antigen. Three days later the level of radioactivity in the spleen and femora of the animals was determined by scintillation counting. Total radioactivity of the bone marrow was calculated. Irradiation of the bone marrow cells of immunized animals was shown to abolish their stimulating effect on the humoral immune response of intact syngeneic recipients to the staphylococcal corpuscular antigen. Consequently, the immunostimulating effect of bone marrow cells is realized through the proliferating and radiosensitive lymphoid cells rather than through the macrophages

  18. Association of murine lupus and thymic full-length endogenous retroviral expression maps to a bone marrow stem cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krieg, A.M.; Gourley, M.F.; Steinberg, A.D.

    1991-01-01

    Recent studies of thymic gene expression in murine lupus have demonstrated 8.4-kb (full-length size) modified polytropic (Mpmv) endogenous retroviral RNA. In contrast, normal control mouse strains do not produce detectable amounts of such RNA in their thymuses. Prior studies have attributed a defect in experimental tolerance in murine lupus to a bone marrow stem cell rather than to the thymic epithelium; in contrast, infectious retroviral expression has been associated with the thymic epithelium, rather than with the bone marrow stem cell. The present study was designed to determine whether the abnormal Mpmv expression associated with murine lupus mapped to thymic epithelium or to a marrow precursor. Lethally irradiated control and lupus-prone mice were reconstituted with T cell depleted bone marrow; one month later their thymuses were studied for endogenous retroviral RNA and protein expression. Recipients of bone marrow from nonautoimmune donors expressed neither 8.4-kb Mpmv RNA nor surface MCF gp70 in their thymuses. In contrast, recipients of bone marrow from autoimmune NZB or BXSB donors expressed thymic 8.4-kb Mpmv RNA and mink cell focus-forming gp70. These studies demonstrate that lupus-associated 8.4-kb Mpmv endogenous retroviral expression is determined by bone marrow stem cells

  19. Color homogeneity in LED spotlights

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prins, C.R.

    2013-01-01

    Color variation in the light output of white LEDs is a common problem in LED lighting. We aim to design LED spotlights with a uniform color output while keeping the cost of the system low and the energy efficiency high. Therefore we design a special optic to eliminate the color variation of the LED.

  20. Succesful therapy of viral leukemia by transplantation of histocompatibly unmatched marrow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meredith, R.F.; OKunewick, J.P.; Kuhnert, P.M.; Brozovich, B.J.; Weaver, E.V.

    1978-01-01

    The therapeutic effectiveness on murine viral-leukemia of allogeneic or hybrid hematopoietic cells transplanted from leukemia-virus resistant donors was evaluated and compared with that of syngeneic cells. Transplantation of syngeneic cells gave no protection to the viral-leukemic mice. Transplantation of spleen cells from allogeneic donors resulted in early deaths of both leukemic and non-leukemic recipients. Transplantation of hybrid spleen cells resulted in no long-term survival of the leukemic mice. However, there were a number of long-term survivors among the leukemic recipients of allogeneic or hybrid marrow cells. Engraftment of allogeneic marrow resulted in a large number of survivors. Hybrid marrow recipients showed an even better survival, but some leukemia relapses. Tests of the longterm survivors revealed that even though they gave no evidence of leukemia they still harbored the active virus. This suggests that the mechanism of protection may be related to some inherent characteristic of the donor cells rendering them refractory to viral transformation. A difference in graft-versus-host (GvH) response between the leukemic and control mice was also found after transplantation of allogeneic cells. While all of the controls died of GvH reaction, none of the leukemic recipients showed severe GvH response, suggesting a possible effect of the leukemia on histocompatibility. No GvH reaction was found with hybrid marrow engraftment, although some of the leukemic recipients reconstituted with F 1 cells did die of leukemic relapse. (author)

  1. Characteristics of macrophages in irradiation chimeras in mice reconstituted with allogeneic bone marrow cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasumizu, R.; Onoe, K.; Iwabuchi, K.; Ogasawara, M.; Fujita, M.; Okuyama, H.; Good, R.A.; Morikawa, K.

    1985-01-01

    Biological and immunological characteristics of the reticuloendothelial system of irradiation bone marrow chimeric mice and macrophages collected from various tissue sources of the mice were studied. The chimeras showed comparable activities in carbon clearance to those of normal donor or recipient mice. The macrophages from spleen, lymph node, bone marrow, peripheral blood, liver, peritoneal cavity, and lung were demonstrated to be of donor marrow origin. They showed almost the same enzyme activities and phagocytic capability of sheep erythrocytes (SRBC, E), SRBC sensitized with anti-SRBC IgG (EA), and SRBC sensitized with anti-SRBC IgM and coated with complement (EAC) as those of normal mice. Proportions of Fc receptor and complement receptor-positive cells are also in normal range. In addition, the antigen-presenting capability of the chimeric macrophages for in vitro primary antibody response to SRBC was intact. These observations suggest that the reticuloendothelial system and macrophages of allogeneic bone marrow chimeras where donor and recipient differ at the major histocompatibility complex have no defect so far as could be ascertained by the present study

  2. Blood and Bone Marrow Donation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for a stem cell transplant. Risks Bone marrow donation The most serious risk associated with donating bone ... you feel fully recovered. Peripheral blood stem cell donation The risks of this type of stem cell ...

  3. MRI in bone marrow lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linden, A.; Theissen, P.; Schauerte, G.; Schicha, H.; Diehl, V.

    1989-01-01

    MRI has the potential to demonstrate bone marrow pathology due to its good soft tissue contrast. Inflammation and necrosis can be detected very early before there is evidence of radiological changes. In bone tumors intramedullary infiltration can be visualized in addition to soft tissue changes. Metastases of bone and bone marrow, especially in spinal and pelvic regions, are well depicted, often before bone scintigraphy yields pathological findings. In haematological disorders MRI permits follow-up studies due to its good reproducibility. Infiltration by malignant lymphoma and multiple myeloma and its extension in bone marrow can be visualized by MRI, too. However, the most common pathological MRI findings in bone marrow are not very specific, and final diagnosis requires further clinical or histological information. (orig.) [de

  4. HLA in bone marrow transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuji, Kimiyoshi

    1989-01-01

    It has been well understood that human major histocompatibility antigen system, HLA is the most important role in the allo transplantation. Therefore, the structure of HLA genes was presented by the recent information (1987). Moreover, their functions in vitro and in vivo also were described. Finally, bone marrow transplantation and HLA network system in Japan against HLA mismatched case was proposed. It is eagerly expected that functional and clinical bone marrow transplantation in Japan could be succeeded. (author)

  5. Reduced-intensity conditioning for alternative donor hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in patients with dyskeratosis congenita.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishio, Nobuhiro; Takahashi, Yoshiyuki; Ohashi, Haruhiko; Doisaki, Sayoko; Muramatsu, Hideki; Hama, Asahito; Shimada, Akira; Yagasaki, Hiroshi; Kojima, Seiji

    2011-03-01

    DC is an inherited bone marrow failure syndrome mainly characterized by nail dystrophy, abnormal skin pigmentation, and oral leukoplakia. Bone marrow failure is the most common cause of death in patients with DC. Because previous results of HSCT with a myeloablative regimen were disappointing, we used a reduced-intensity conditioning regimen for two patients with classic DC, and one patient with cryptic DC who harbored the TERT mutation. Graft sources included two mismatched-related bone marrow (BM) donors and one unrelated BM donor. Successful engraftment was achieved with few regimen-related toxicities in all patients. They were alive 10, 66, and 72 months after transplantation, respectively. Long-term follow-up is crucial to determine the late effects of our conditioning regimen. © 2010 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  6. THE PATHOLOGY OF BONE MARROW FAILURE

    OpenAIRE

    Leguit , Roos; Van Den Tweel , Jan G

    2010-01-01

    Abstract An important indication for bone marrow investigation is the presence of bone marrow failure, which manifests itself as (pan)cytopenia. The causes of cytopenia are varied and differ considerable between childhood and adulthood. In the paediatric age group, inherited bone marrow failure syndromes are important causes of bone marrow failure but they play only a minor role in later life. This review gives a comprehensive overview of bone marrow failure disorders in children a...

  7. Autologous bone marrow purging with LAK cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giuliodori, L; Moretti, L; Stramigioli, S; Luchetti, F; Annibali, G M; Baldi, A

    1993-12-01

    In this study we will demonstrate that LAK cells, in vitro, can lyse hematologic neoplastic cells with a minor toxicity of the staminal autologous marrow cells. In fact, after bone marrow and LAK co-culture at a ratio of 1/1 for 8 hours, the inhibition on the GEMM colonies resulted to be 20% less compared to the untreated marrow. These data made LAK an inviting agent for marrow purging in autologous bone marrow transplantation.

  8. Bone marrow-derived thymic antigen-presenting cells determine self-recognition of Ia-restricted T lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Longo, D.L.; Kruisbeek, A.M.; Davis, M.L.; Matis, L.A.

    1985-01-01

    The authors previously have demonstrated that in radiation-induced bone marrow chimeras, T-cell self-Ia restriction specificity appeared to correlate with the phenotype of the bone marrow-derived antigen-presenting (or dendritic) cell in the thymus during T-cell development. However, these correlations were necessarily indirect because of the difficulty in assaying thymic function directly by adult thymus transplant, which has in the past been uniformly unsuccessful. They now report success in obtaining functional T cells from nude mice grafted with adult thymuses reduced in size by treatment of the thymus donor with anti-thymocyte globulin and cortisone. When (B10 Scn X B10.D2)F1 nude mice (I-Ab,d) are given parental B10.D2 (I-Ad) thymus grafts subcutaneously, their T cells are restricted to antigen recognition in association with I-Ad gene products but not I-Ab gene products. Furthermore, thymuses from (B10 X B10.D2)F1 (I-Ab,d)----B10 (I-Ab) chimeras transplanted 6 months or longer after radiation (a time at which antigen-presenting cell function is of donor bone marrow phenotype) into (B10 X B10.D2)F1 nude mice generate T cells restricted to antigen recognition in association with both I-Ad and I-Ab gene products. Thymuses from totally allogeneic bone marrow chimeras appear to generate T cells of bone marrow donor and thymic host restriction specificity. Thus, when thymus donors are radiation-induced bone marrow chimeras, the T-cell I-region restriction of the nude mice recipients is determined at least in part by the phenotype of the bone marrow-derived thymic antigen presenting cells or dendritic cells in the chimeric thymus

  9. Anti-bacterial immunity to Listeria monocytogenes in allogeneic bone marrow chimera in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onoe, K.; Good, R.A.; Yamamoto, K.

    1986-01-01

    Protection and delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) to the facultative intracellular bacterium Listeria monocytogenes (L.m.) were studied in allogeneic and syngeneic bone marrow chimeras. Lethally irradiated AKR (H-2k) mice were successfully reconstituted with marrow cells from C57BL/10 (B10) (H-2b), B10 H-2-recombinant strains or syngeneic mice. Irradiated AKR mice reconstituted with marrow cells from H-2-compatible B10.BR mice, [BR----AKR], as well as syngeneic marrow cells, [AKR----AKR], showed a normal level of responsiveness to the challenge stimulation with the listeria antigens when DTH was evaluated by footpad reactions. These mice also showed vigorous activities in acquired resistance to the L.m. By contrast, chimeric mice that had total or partial histoincompatibility at the H-2 determinants between donor and recipient, [B10----AKR], [B10.AQR----AKR], [B10.A(4R)----AKR], or [B10.A(5R)----AKR], were almost completely unresponsive in DTH and antibacterial immunity. However, when [B10----AKR] H-2-incompatible chimeras had been immunized with killed L.m. before challenge with live L.m., these mice manifested considerable DTH and resistance to L.m. These observations suggest that compatibility at the entire MHC between donor and recipient is required for bone marrow chimeras to be able to manifest DTH and protection against L.m. after a short-term immunization schedule. However, this requirement is overcome by a preceding or more prolonged period of immunization with L.m. antigens. These antigens, together with marrow-derived antigen-presenting cells, can then stimulate and expand cell populations that are restricted to the MHC (H-2) products of the donor type

  10. A Comparative Reference Study for the Validation of HLA-Matching Algorithms in the Search for Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Donors and Cord Blood Units

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-15

    donors and cord blood units W. Bochtler1, L. Gragert2, Z. I. Patel3, J. Robinson3,4, D. Steiner5, J. A. Hofmann6, J. Pingel6, A. Baouz7, A. Melis8, J...cord blood units for individual patients is of primary importance. This challenging search process is routinely performed in a donor registry or cord...term ‘ donor ’ to refer to donors of HSCs from bone marrow or peripheral blood and cord blood units and the term ‘ donor registry’ shall include cord blood

  11. Long-term high-level expression of human beta-globin occurs following transplantation of transgenic marrow into irradiated mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Himelstein, A; Ward, M; Podda, S; de la Flor Weiss, E; Costantini, F; Bank, A

    1993-03-01

    When the human beta-globin gene is transferred into the bone marrow cells of live mice, its expression is very low. To investigate the reason for this, we transferred the bone marrow of transgenic mice containing and expressing the human beta-globin into irradiated recipients. We demonstrate that long-term high level expression of the human beta-globin gene can be maintained in the marrow and blood of irradiated recipients following transplantation. Although expression decreased over time in most animals because of host marrow reconstitution, the ratio of human beta-globin transgene expression to endogenous mouse beta-globin gene expression in donor-derived erythroid cells remained constant over time. We conclude that there is no inherent limitation to efficient expression of an exogenous human beta-globin gene in mouse bone marrow cells following marrow transplantation.

  12. Maintenance of host leukocytes in peripheral immune compartments following lethal irradiation and bone marrow reconstitution: implications for graft versus host disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staley, Elizabeth M; Tanner, Scott M; Daft, Joseph G; Stanus, Andrea L; Martin, Steven M; Lorenz, Robin G

    2013-03-01

    Bone marrow reconstitution is utilized as a tool for disease treatment and as a research technique to elucidate the function of bone marrow derived cells. Clinically successful engraftment is indicated by the development of a functioning immune repertoire. In research, reconstitution is considered successful if >85% of splenic leukocytes are of donor origins. Previous work suggests that splenic reconstitution may not be indicative of reconstitution in the mucosa. We sought to evaluate mucosal reconstitution in animals following a standard bone marrow eradication and reconstitution technique. Bone marrow was harvested from adult B6.SJL donor mice (CD45.1) and injected via either the retro-orbital or intraperitoneal route into lethally irradiated B6 (CD45.2) adult or neonatal recipients respectively. The expression of CD45 by flow cytometry was used to calculate reconstitution with respect to immune compartment and cell type. In reconstituted adult animals 93.2±1.5% of splenic leukocytes expressed the donor CD45.1 antigen thus meeting the standard definition of reconstitution, however only 58.6±13.6% of intestinal lamina propria lymphocytes and 52.4±16.0% of intestinal intraepithelial lymphocytes were of donor origin, confirming splenic reconstitution fails to represent peripheral immune reconstitution. T-cells in the gastrointestinal tract are the most poorly reconstituted, while B-cells appear to be almost universally replaced by donor cells. The inadequate mucosal reconstitution was not corrected by evaluating later time points or by performing the bone marrow transfer during the neonatal period. This demonstration that substantial host T-cells remain in the intestinal mucosa after a "successful" bone marrow transplantation should cause a re-evaluation of data from research bone marrow chimera experiments, as well as the mechanisms for complications after clinical bone marrow transplantation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Increased levels of anti-non-Gal IgG following pig-to-baboon bone marrow transplantation correlate with failure of engraftment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Fan; Wamala, Isaac; Scalea, Joseph; Tena, Aseda; Cormack, Taylor; Pratts, Shannon; Struuck, Raimon Duran; Elias, Nahel; Hertl, Martin; Huang, Christene A.; Sachs, David H.

    2013-01-01

    Background The development of genetically modified pigs which lack the expression of alpha 1–3 galactosyl transferase, (GalT-KO pigs) has facilitated the xenogeneic transplantation of porcine organs and tissues into primates by avoiding hyperacute rejection due to pre-existing antibodies against the Gal epitope. However, antibodies against other antigens (anti-non-Gal antibodies), are found at varying levels in the pre-transplant sera of most primates. We have previously found that baboons with high levels of pre-transplant anti-non-Gal IgG, conditioned with a non-myeloablative conditioning regimen, failed to engraft following pig-to-baboon bone marrow transplantation [8]. Two baboons with low levels of pre-transplant anti-non-Gal IgG, conditioned with the same regimen, showed porcine bone marrow progenitors at 28 days following transplantation, suggesting engraftment. These baboons also showed evidence of donor-specific hypo-responsiveness. This observation led us to investigate the hypothesis that selecting for baboon recipients with low pre-transplant anti-non-Gal IgG levels might improve engraftment levels following GalT-KO pig-to-baboon bone marrow transplantation. Methods Five baboons, with low pre-transplant anti-non-Gal IgG levels, received transplantation of bone marrow cells (1–5 × 10^9/kg of recipient weight) from GalT-KO pigs. They received a non-myeloablative conditioning regimen consisting of low-dose total body irradiation (150cGy), thymic irradiation (700cGy), anti-thymocyte globulin (ATG) and tacrolimus. In addition, two baboons received Rituximab and Bortezomib (Velcade) treatment as well as extra-corporeal immunoadsorption using GalT-KO pig livers. Bone marrow engraftment was assessed by porcine-specific PCR on colony forming units (CFU) of day 28 bone marrow aspirates. Anti-non-Gal antibody levels were assessed by serum binding towards GalT-KO PBMC using flow cytometry (FACS). Peripheral macro-chimerism was measured by FACS using pig and

  14. Transfer of experimental allergic encephalomyelitis to bone marrow chimeras. Endothelial cells are not a restricting element

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hinrichs, D.J.; Wegmann, K.W.; Dietsch, G.N.

    1987-01-01

    The adoptive transfer of clinical and histopathologic signs of experimental allergic encephalomyelitis (EAE) requires MHC compatibility between cell donor and cell recipient. The results of adoptive transfer studies using F1 to parent bone marrow chimeras as recipients of parental-derived BP-sensitive spleen cells indicate that this restriction is not expressed at the level of the endothelial cell but is confined to the cells of bone marrow derivation. Furthermore, these results indicate that the development of EAE is not dependent on the activity of MHC-restricted cytotoxic cells

  15. Transplantation tolerance in primates following total lymphoid irradiation and allogeneic bone marrow injection. II. Renal allographs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myburgh, J.A.; Smit, J.A.; Hill, R.R.H.; Browde, S.

    1980-01-01

    A modified regimen of fractionated total lymphoid irradiation and allogeneic bone marrow (BM) injection in chacma baboons produced transplantation tolerance for allografted kidneys from the BM donors, and substantial chimerism without evidence of graft-versus-host disease. Increasing the dose of nucleated BM cells injected 4-fold over that used in liver transplantation resulted consistently in normal graft function in the early weeks after transplantation. Bone marrow injection and challenge with renal allografts could be delayed for at least 3 weeks after completion of irradiation. If it can be shown that this period can be extended even further, the protocols will be relevant to the circumstances of clinical cadaveric renal transplantation

  16. Autologous Bone Marrow Stem Cell Infusion (AMBI therapy for Chronic Liver Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajkumar JS

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Liver Cirrhosis is the end stage of chronic liver disease which may happen due to alcoholism, viral infections due to Hepatitis B, Hepatitis C viruses and is difficult to treat. Liver transplantation is the only available definitive treatment which is marred by lack of donors, post operative complications such as rejection and high cost. Autologous bone marrow stem cells have shown a lot of promise in earlier reported animal studies and clinical trials. We have in this study administered in 22 patients with chronic liver disease, autologous bone marrow stem cell whose results are presented herewith.

  17. [Favorable current prognosis after HLA-identical bone marrow transplantation for children with required severe aplastic anemia; evaluation of 30 years of bone marrow transplantation at the Leiden University Medical Center

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steekelenburg, M. van; Weel-Sipman, M.H. van; Zwinderman, A.H.; Hoogerbrugge, P.M.; Vossen, J.M.J.J.; Egeler, R.M.

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the results of 30 years of allogeneic HLA-identical bone marrow transplantation (BMT) as the treatment for children with acquired severe aplastic anaemia. DESIGN: Retrospective, descriptive. METHOD: Of all patients who underwent an HLA-identical sibling-donor BMT for severe

  18. BLOOD DONORS CAMPAIGN

    CERN Document Server

    Medical Service

    2002-01-01

    Tuesday 19 March 2002 in restaurant nr 2, from 9.00 to 16.30 hrs A blood donors campaign, organized by the Centre de Transfusion sanguine of Geneva If you already have a card giving your blood group, please bring this with you.

  19. BLOOD DONORS CAMPAIGN

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    A blood donors campaign, organized by the Centre de Transfusion Sanguine of Geneva will be held at CERN on Tuesday 13 March 2001 in restaurant nr 2, from 9.00 to 16.30 hrs If you already have a card giving your blood group, please bring this with you.

  20. BLOOD DONORS CAMPAIGN

    CERN Document Server

    2002-01-01

    Wednesday 13 November 2002 in restaurant nr 2, from 8.30 to 16.30 hrs will be held a blood donors campaign, organized by the Etablissement de Transfusion de Haute-Savoie If you already have a card giving your blood group, please bring this with you.

  1. BLOOD DONORS CAMPAIGN

    CERN Document Server

    2000-01-01

    A blood donors campaign, organized by the Établissement de Transfusion de Rhône-Alpes will be held at CERN on Tuesday 14 November 2000 in restaurant nr 2, from 8.30 to 16.30 hrs If you already have a card giving your blood group, please bring this with you.

  2. BLOOD DONORS CAMPAIGN

    CERN Document Server

    2001-01-01

    A blood donors campaign, organized by the Centre de Transfusion d'Annemasse will be held at CERN on Tuesday 14 November 2001 in restaurant nr 2, from 9.00 to 16.30 hrs If you already have a card giving your blood group, please bring this with you.

  3. LED Technology for Dental Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Argyraki, Aikaterini; Ou, Yiyu; Soerensen, L. H.

    LEDs have a large potential in many dental and oral applications. Areas such as photo polymerization, fluorescence imaging, photodynamic therapy, and photoactivated disinfection are important future candidates for LED based diagnostics and treatment in dentistry.......LEDs have a large potential in many dental and oral applications. Areas such as photo polymerization, fluorescence imaging, photodynamic therapy, and photoactivated disinfection are important future candidates for LED based diagnostics and treatment in dentistry....

  4. Proteinase activated receptor 1 mediated fibrosis in a mouse model of liver injury: a role for bone marrow derived macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yiannis N Kallis

    Full Text Available Liver fibrosis results from the co-ordinated actions of myofibroblasts and macrophages, a proportion of which are of bone marrow origin. The functional effect of such bone marrow-derived cells on liver fibrosis is unclear. We examine whether changing bone marrow genotype can down-regulate the liver's fibrotic response to injury and investigate mechanisms involved. Proteinase activated receptor 1 (PAR1 is up-regulated in fibrotic liver disease in humans, and deficiency of PAR1 is associated with reduced liver fibrosis in rodent models. In this study, recipient mice received bone marrow transplantation from PAR1-deficient or wild-type donors prior to carbon tetrachloride-induced liver fibrosis. Bone marrow transplantation alone from PAR1-deficient mice was able to confer significant reductions in hepatic collagen content and activated myofibroblast expansion on wild-type recipients. This effect was associated with a decrease in hepatic scar-associated macrophages and a reduction in macrophage recruitment from the bone marrow. In vitro, PAR1 signalling on bone marrow-derived macrophages directly induced their chemotaxis but did not stimulate proliferation. These data suggest that the bone marrow can modulate the fibrotic response of the liver to recurrent injury. PAR1 signalling can contribute to this response by mechanisms that include the regulation of macrophage recruitment.

  5. Color homogeneity in LED spotlights

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prins, C.R.; Tukker, T.W.; IJzerman, W.L.; Thije Boonkkamp, ten J.H.M.

    2014-01-01

    LED is a rising technology in the field of lighting. Halogen spotlights are nowadays replaced by LED spotlights because of their energy efficiency and long lifetime. However, color variation in the light output is a common problem. Poorly designed LED spotlights tend to have yellowish or bluish

  6. Correction of lysosomal enzyme deficiency in various organs of beta-glucuronidase-deficient mice by allogeneic bone marrow transplantation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogerbrugge, P. M.; Poorthuis, B. J.; Mulder, A. H.; Wagemaker, G.; Dooren, L. J.; Vossen, J. M.; van Bekkum, D. W.

    1987-01-01

    The correction of lysosomal enzyme deficiency was investigated for various organs of beta-glucuronidase-deficient C3H/Rij mice after allogeneic bone marrow transplantation from an enzymatically normal donor strain (C57BL/Rij). In the hemopoietic organs, the enzyme level increased to levels found in

  7. HLA-DP and bone marrow transplantation: DP-incompatibility and severe acute graft versus host disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ødum, Niels; Platz, P; Jakobsen, B K

    1987-01-01

    Thirteen recipients of HLA-haploidentical, DR compatible bone marrow (BM) and the corresponding BM donors were HLA-DP typed using primed lymphocyte typing (PLT). Severe acute GVHD (greater than or equal to grade 2) developed within 3 months after BM-transplantation in all of eight recipients of DP...... a role as transplantation antigens....

  8. Deep UV LEDs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jung; Amano, Hiroshi; Schowalter, Leo

    2014-06-01

    Deep ultraviolet (DUV) photons interact strongly with a broad range of chemical and biological molecules; compact DUV light sources could enable a wide range of applications in chemi/bio-sensing, sterilization, agriculture, and industrial curing. The much shorter wavelength also results in useful characteristics related to optical diffraction (for lithography) and scattering (non-line-of-sight communication). The family of III-N (AlGaInN) compound semiconductors offers a tunable energy gap from infrared to DUV. While InGaN-based blue light emitters have been the primary focus for the obvious application of solid state lighting, there is a growing interest in the development of efficient UV and DUV light-emitting devices. In the past few years we have witnessed an increasing investment from both government and industry sectors to further the state of DUV light-emitting devices. The contributions in Semiconductor Science and Technology 's special issue on DUV devices provide an up-to-date snapshot covering many relevant topics in this field. Given the expected importance of bulk AlN substrate in DUV technology, we are pleased to include a review article by Hartmann et al on the growth of AlN bulk crystal by physical vapour transport. The issue of polarization field within the deep ultraviolet LEDs is examined in the article by Braut et al. Several commercial companies provide useful updates in their development of DUV emitters, including Nichia (Fujioka et al ), Nitride Semiconductors (Muramoto et al ) and Sensor Electronic Technology (Shatalov et al ). We believe these articles will provide an excellent overview of the state of technology. The growth of AlGaN heterostructures by molecular beam epitaxy, in contrast to the common organo-metallic vapour phase epitaxy, is discussed by Ivanov et al. Since hexagonal boron nitride (BN) has received much attention as both a UV and a two-dimensional electronic material, we believe it serves readers well to include the

  9. Transplantation? Peripheral Stem Cell/Bone Marrow/Cord Blood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Itır Sirinoglu Demiriz

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The introduction of peripheral stem cell (PSC and cord blood (CB as an alternative to bone marrow (BM recently has caused important changes on hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT practice. According to the CIBMTR data, there has been a significant decrease in the use of bone marrow and increase in the use of PSC and CB as the stem cell source for HSCT performed during 1997–2006 period for patients under the age of 20. On the other hand, the stem cell source in 70% of the HSCT procedures performed for patients over the age of 20 was PSC and the second most preferred stem cell source was bone marrow. CB usage is very limited for the adult population. Primary disease, stage, age, time and urgency of transplantation, HLA match between the patient and the donor, stem cell quantity, and the experience of the transplantation center are some of the associated factors for the selection of the appropriate stem cell source. Unfortunately, there is no prospective randomized study aimed to facilitate the selection of the correct source between CB, PSC, and BM. In this paper, we would like to emphasize the data on stem cell selection in light of the current knowledge for patient populations according to their age and primary disease.

  10. Survival of Free and Encapsulated Human and Rat Islet Xenografts Transplanted into the Mouse Bone Marrow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, Raphael P. H.; Seebach, Jörg D.; Morel, Philippe; Mahou, Redouan; Borot, Sophie; Giovannoni, Laurianne; Parnaud, Geraldine; Montanari, Elisa; Bosco, Domenico; Wandrey, Christine; Berney, Thierry; Bühler, Leo H.; Muller, Yannick D.

    2014-01-01

    Bone marrow was recently proposed as an alternative and potentially immune-privileged site for pancreatic islet transplantation. The aim of the present study was to assess the survival and rejection mechanisms of free and encapsulated xenogeneic islets transplanted into the medullary cavity of the femur, or under the kidney capsule of streptozotocin-induced diabetic C57BL/6 mice. The median survival of free rat islets transplanted into the bone marrow or under the kidney capsule was 9 and 14 days, respectively, whereas that of free human islets was shorter, 7 days (bone marrow) and 10 days (kidney capsule). Infiltrating CD8+ T cells and redistributed CD4+ T cells, and macrophages were detected around the transplanted islets in bone sections. Recipient mouse splenocytes proliferated in response to donor rat stimulator cells. One month after transplantation under both kidney capsule or into bone marrow, encapsulated rat islets had induced a similar degree of fibrotic reaction and still contained insulin positive cells. In conclusion, we successfully established a small animal model for xenogeneic islet transplantation into the bone marrow. The rejection of xenogeneic islets was associated with local and systemic T cell responses and macrophage recruitment. Although there was no evidence for immune-privilege, the bone marrow may represent a feasible site for encapsulated xenogeneic islet transplantation. PMID:24625569

  11. Regulation of heme metabolism in normal and sideroblastic bone marrow cells in culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ibraham, N.G.; Lutton, J.D.; Hoffman, R.; Levere, R.D.

    1985-01-01

    Heme metabolism was examined in developing in vitro erythroid colonies (CFUE) and in bone marrow samples taken directly from four normal donors and four patients with sideroblastic anemia. Maximum activities of delta-aminolevulinic acid synthase (ALAS), ALA dehydratase (ALAD), and 14 C-ALA incorporation into heme were achieved in normal marrow CFUE after 8 days of culture, whereas heme oxygenase progressively decreased to low levels of activity during the same period. Assays on nucleated bone marrow cells taken directly from patients revealed that ALAS activity was considerably reduced in idiopathic sideroblastic anemia (IASA) and X-linked sideroblastic anemia (X-SA) bone marrow specimens, whereas the activity increased more than twofold (normal levels) when cells were assayed from 8-day CFUE. In all cases, ALAD activity appeared to be within normal levels. Measurement of heme synthesis revealed that normal levels of 14 C-ALA incorporation into heme were achieved in IASA cells but were reduced in X-SA cells. In marked contrast to levels in normal cells, heme oxygenase was found to be significantly elevated (two- to fourfold) in bone marrow cells taken directly from patients with IASA and X-SA. Results from this study demonstrate that IASA and X-SA bone marrow cells have disturbances in ALAS and heme metabolism, and that erythropoiesis (CFUE) can be restored to normal levels when cells are cultured in methylcellulose

  12. Survival of free and encapsulated human and rat islet xenografts transplanted into the mouse bone marrow.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raphael P H Meier

    Full Text Available Bone marrow was recently proposed as an alternative and potentially immune-privileged site for pancreatic islet transplantation. The aim of the present study was to assess the survival and rejection mechanisms of free and encapsulated xenogeneic islets transplanted into the medullary cavity of the femur, or under the kidney capsule of streptozotocin-induced diabetic C57BL/6 mice. The median survival of free rat islets transplanted into the bone marrow or under the kidney capsule was 9 and 14 days, respectively, whereas that of free human islets was shorter, 7 days (bone marrow and 10 days (kidney capsule. Infiltrating CD8+ T cells and redistributed CD4+ T cells, and macrophages were detected around the transplanted islets in bone sections. Recipient mouse splenocytes proliferated in response to donor rat stimulator cells. One month after transplantation under both kidney capsule or into bone marrow, encapsulated rat islets had induced a similar degree of fibrotic reaction and still contained insulin positive cells. In conclusion, we successfully established a small animal model for xenogeneic islet transplantation into the bone marrow. The rejection of xenogeneic islets was associated with local and systemic T cell responses and macrophage recruitment. Although there was no evidence for immune-privilege, the bone marrow may represent a feasible site for encapsulated xenogeneic islet transplantation.

  13. HEMATOPOIETIC PROGENITOR CELL CONTENT OF VERTEBRAL BODY MARROW USED FOR COMBINED SOLID ORGAN AND BONE MARROW TRANSPLANTATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rybka, Witold B.; Fontes, Paulo A.; Rao, Abdul S.; Winkelstein, Alan; Ricordi, Camillo; Ball, Edward D.; Starzl, Thomas E.

    2010-01-01

    While cadaveric vertebral bodies (VB) have long been proposed as a suitable source of bone marrow (BM) for transplantation (BMT), they have rarely been used for this purpose. We have infused VB BM immediately following whole organ (WO) transplantation to augment donor cell chimerism. We quantified the hematopoietic progenitor cell (HPC) content of VB BM as well as BM obtained from the iliac crests (IC) of normal allogeneic donors (ALLO) and from patients with malignancy undergoing autologous marrow harvest (AUTO). Patients undergoing WOIBM transplantation also had AUTO BM harvested in the event that subsequent lymphohematopoietic reconstitution was required. Twenty-four VB BM, 24 IC BM-ALLO, 31 IC AUTO, and 24 IC WO-AUTO were harvested. VB BM was tested 12 to 72 hr after procurement and infused after completion ofWO grafting. IC BM was tested and then used or cryopreserved immediately. HPC were quantified by clonal assay measuring CFU-GM, BFU-E, and CFU-GEMM, and by flow cytometry for CD34+ progenitor cells. On an average, 9 VB were processed during each harvest, and despite an extended processing time the number of viable nucleated cells obtained was significantly higher than that from IC. Furthermore, by HPC content, VB BM was equivalent to IC BM, which is routinely used for BMT. We conclude that VB BM is a clinically valuable source of BM for allogeneic transplantation. PMID:7701582

  14. Role of donor lymphoid cells in the transfer of allograft tolerance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pierce, G.E.; Watts, L.M.

    1985-01-01

    Tolerance to murine skin allografts across a MHC disparity was induced by conditioning primary hosts with sublethal fractionated total-body irradiation (FTBI) and transfusion of allogeneic bone marrow (BM). Tolerance could be adoptively transferred to secondary hosts conditioned by FTBI with infusion of spleen cells from hosts bearing intact skin allografts greater than 60 days. Tolerance could not be transferred by tolerant host spleen (THS) preparations from which cells of the donor genotype had been deleted by cytotoxic alloantisera. Deletion of host genotype cells, however, did not diminish the capability of THS to transfer tolerance. All of the tolerizing activity of THS appeared to reside within cells of the donor genotype. Small numbers of normal donor spleen cells could induce tolerance in FTBI hosts but only at the expense of very high mortality, in contrast to the low mortality observed with tolerizing injections of allogeneic donor cells from THS or injections of normal semiallogeneic F1 hybrid spleen cells. If an active immune response is responsible for tolerance induction/transfer in this model, allogeneic donor lymphoid cells derived from BM, in contrast to donor spleen cells, must be capable of mounting this response without concomitant severe GVHD. In future experiments, cells of donor genotype can be isolated from THS and purified in sufficient numbers to compare their tolerizing efficiency vs. that of normal donor cells, detect possible suppression of normal host cell alloreactivity in vitro and identify the donor cell phenotypes involved

  15. Donor Selection for Allogenic Hemopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation: Clinical and Ethical Considerations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene Riezzo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Allogenic hematopoietic progenitor cell transplantation (allo-HSCT is an established treatment for many diseases. Stem cells may be obtained from different sources: mobilized peripheral blood stem cells, bone marrow, and umbilical cord blood. The progress in transplantation procedures, the establishment of experienced transplant centres, and the creation of unrelated adult donor registries and cord blood banks gave those without an human leucocyte antigen- (HLA- identical sibling donor the opportunity to find a donor and cord blood units worldwide. HSCT imposes operative cautions so that the entire donation/transplantation procedure is safe for both donors and recipients; it carries with it significant clinical, moral, and ethical concerns, mostly when donors are minors. The following points have been stressed: the donation should be excluded when excessive risks for the donor are reasonable, donors must receive an accurate information regarding eventual adverse events and health burden for the donors themselves, a valid consent is required, and the recipient’s risks must be outweighed by the expected benefits. The issue of conflict of interest, when the same physician has the responsibility for both donor selection and recipient care, is highlighted as well as the need of an adequate insurance protection for all the parties involved.

  16. Bone and marrow dose modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stabin, Michael G.

    2004-01-01

    Nuclear medicine therapy is being used increasingly in the treatment of cancer (thyroid, leukemia/lymphoma with RIT, primary and secondary bone malignancies, and neuroblastomas). In all cases it is marrow toxicity that limits the amount of treatment that can be administered safely. Marrow dose calculations are more difficult than for many major organs because of the intricate association of bone and soft tissue elements. In RIT, there appears to be no consensus on how to calculate that dose accurately, or of individual patients ability to tolerate planned therapy. Available dose models are designed after an idealized average, healthy individual. Patient-specific methods are applied in evaluation of biokinetic data, and need to be developed for treatment of the physical data (dose conversion factors) as well: age, prior patient therapy, disease status. Contributors to marrow dose: electrons and photons

  17. Soluble factor(s) from bone marrow cells can rescue lethally irradiated mice by protecting endogenous hematopoietic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yi; Zhan, Yuxia; Burke, Kathleen A; Anderson, W French

    2005-04-01

    Ionizing radiation-induced myeloablation can be rescued via bone marrow transplantation (BMT) or administration of cytokines if given within 2 hours after radiation exposure. There is no evidence for the existence of soluble factors that can rescue an animal after a lethal dose of radiation when administered several hours postradiation. We established a system that could test the possibility for the existence of soluble factors that could be used more than 2 hours postirradiation to rescue animals. Animals with an implanted TheraCyte immunoisolation device (TID) received lethal-dose radiation and then normal bone marrow Lin- cells were loaded into the device (thereby preventing direct interaction between donor and recipient cells). Animal survival was evaluated and stem cell activity was tested with secondary bone marrow transplantation and flow cytometry analysis. Donor cell gene expression of five antiapoptotic cytokines was examined. Bone marrow Lin- cells rescued lethally irradiated animals via soluble factor(s). Bone marrow cells from the rescued animals can rescue and repopulate secondary lethally irradiated animals. Within the first 6 hours post-lethal-dose radiation, there is no significant change of gene expression of the known radioprotective factors TPO, SCF, IL-3, Flt-3 ligand, and SDF-1. Hematopoietic stem cells can be protected in lethally irradiated animals by soluble factors produced by bone marrow Lin- cells.

  18. Widespread marrow necrosis during pregnancy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knickerbocker, W.J.; Quenville, N.F.

    1982-01-01

    Recently, a 22-year-old Caucasian female was referred to our Hospital two days post-partum. She had been feeling unwell during the last few days of her pregnancy and complained of multiple aches and pains, worst in the abdomen and lower back. Her admission platelet count was severely depressed and a bone biopsy showed extensive marrow necrosis with viable bony trabeculae. There was no evidence of vasculitis, vascular thrombosis, or malignancy. Widespread marrow necrosis in pregnancy followed by recovery, to our knowledge, has not been previously reported. (orig.)

  19. A murine model of graft-versus-host disease induced by allogeneic bone marrow transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu Jiangwei; Jin Jiangang; Ning Hongmei; Yu Liquan; Feng Kai; Chen Hu; Wang Lisha

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To establish the model of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) in mice with allogeneic bone marrow transplantation. Methods: Bone marrow cells were combined with spleen cells of male donor C57BL/6 mice according to different proportions, then were transfused into female postradiation recipient BALB/c mice. General state, life span and histopathology of the recipient mice and detected chimera were observed. Results and Conclusion:The recipient mice groups which accepted above 5 x 10 6 donor spleen cells developed acute GVHD after different peroids of time. The GVHD model in mice after allo-BMT was successfully established. The transfusion of 5 x 10 6 -5 x 10 7 spleen cells may be adequate to establish the murine model of GVHD for the prevention and treatment of GVHD. The number of murine spleen cells can be chosen according to the experimental requirement. (authors)

  20. Characterization of host lymphoid cells in antibody-facilitated bone marrow chimeras

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCarthy, S.A.; Griffith, I.J.; Gambel, P.; Francescutti, L.H.; Wegmann, T.G.

    1985-01-01

    The authors have produced stable murine antibody-facilitated (AF) chimeras by the simultaneous injection of P1 bone marrow cells and anti-P2 monoclonal antibody into normal (unirradiated) adult (P1 X P2)F1 recipients. These AF chimeras are healthy, long-lived, and exhibit no overt signs of graft-versus-host disease. They are immunocompetent and tolerant of host, P2-encoded alloantigens. Donor cell engraftment and takeover, monitored by glucosephosphate isomerase isozyme patterns, is usually complete (greater than 95%) in the peripheral blood, bone marrow, and hemopoietic stem cell compartments of long-term (greater than 3 months posttransplantation) AF chimeras. The authors report here, however, that splenic, lymph node, and thymic leukocytes of AF chimeras represent donor/host chimeric populations. Spleen cell populations of AF chimeras exhibit substantial chimera-to-chimera variation in the preponderant residual host cell type(s) present. Interpretations of the implications of these findings are discussed

  1. The long and the short of telomeres in bone marrow recipient SCID patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarzotti-Kelsoe, Marcella; Daniell, Xiaoju G; Whitesides, John F; Buckley, Rebecca H

    2011-04-01

    Telomeres are noncoding DNA regions at the end of the chromosomes that are crucial for genome stability. Since telomere length decreases with cell division, they can be used as a signature of cell proliferation history. T-cell reconstitution in severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) subjects, recipients of T-cell-depleted, allogeneic-related bone marrow cells, is due to the development and maturation of donor T-cell precursors in the infant's vestigial thymus and to homeostatic proliferation of mature T cells in the peripheral organs. Since T-cell function, thymic output, and T-cell clonal diversity are maintained long term in these patients, we investigated whether donor T-cell engraftment resulted in increased telomere shortening. Our study of seven SCID patients, following successful bone marrow transplantation, demonstrates that the patients' peripheral T cells did not exhibit greater than normal telomere shortening.

  2. Bone marrow edema of the knee joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breitenseher, M.J.; Mayerhoefer, M.E.; Hofmann, S.

    2006-01-01

    Bone marrow edema of the knee joint is a frequent clinical picture in MR diagnostics. It can be accompanied by symptoms and pain in the joint. Diseases that are associated with bone marrow edema can be classified into different groups. Group 1 includes vascular ischemic bone marrow edema with osteonecrosis (synonyms: SONK or Ahlbaeck's disease), osteochondrosis dissecans, and bone marrow edema syndrome. Group 2 comprises traumatic or mechanical bone marrow edema. Group 3 encompasses reactive bone marrow edemas such as those occurring in gonarthrosis, postoperative bone marrow edemas, and reactive edemas in tumors or tumorlike diseases. Evidence for bone marrow edema is effectively provided by MRI, but purely morphological MR information is often unspecific so that anamnestic and clinical details are necessary in most cases for definitive disease classification. (orig.) [de

  3. Bone-marrow transplant - series (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bone-marrow transplants are performed for: deficiencies in red blood cells (aplastic anemia) and white blood cells (leukemia or ... Bone-marrow transplants prolong the life of patients who might otherwise die. As with all major organ transplants, however, ...

  4. Skin Recurrence of Transformed Mycosis Fungoides Postumbilical Cord Blood Transplant despite Complete Donor Chimerism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahul Pawar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Allogeneic stem cell transplant is the treatment of choice for systemic cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL which provides graft-versus-lymphoma effect. Herein we discuss a case of recurrence of CTCL skin lesions after cord blood transplant in a patient who continued to have 100% donor chimerism in bone marrow. Case Presentation. A 48-year-old female with history of mycosis fungoides (MF presented with biopsy proven large cell transformation of MF. PET scan revealed multiple adenopathy in abdomen and chest suspicious for lymphoma and skin biopsy showed large cell transformation. She was treated with multiple cycles of chemotherapy. Posttherapy PET scan showed resolution of lymphadenopathy. Later she underwent ablative preparative regimen followed by single cord blood transplant. Bone marrow chimerism studies at day +60 after transplant showed 100% donor cells without presence of lymphoma. However 5 months after transplant she had recurrence of MF with the same genotype as prior skin lesion. Bone marrow chimerism study continued to show 100% donor cells. Conclusion. A differential graft-versus-lymphoma effect in our case prevented lymphoma recurrence systemically but failed to do so in skin. We hypothesize that this response may be due to presence of other factors in the bone marrow and lymph node microenvironments preventing recurrence in these sites.

  5. Engraftment of allogeneic bone marrow without graft-versus-host disease in mongrel dogs using total lymphoid irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gottlieb, M.; Strober, S.; Hoppe, R.T.; Grumet, F.C.; Kaplan, H.S.

    1980-01-01

    We achieved long-term engraftment of unmatched bone marrow (BM) in dogs without graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) using a regimen of total lymphoid irradiation (TLI) which could be applied clinically. Twelve normal adult mongrel dogs were given TLI in 18 fractions of 100 rad each (total dose, 1800 rad) over 4 weeks to mantle and abdominal fields in continuity. Nine of the 12 were transfused with one or two random donor whole blood transfusions during the irradiation regimen to determine the risk of sensitization after the onset of immunosuppression. A mean (+- SD) of 0.71 +- 0.54 x 10 9 BM cells/kg of recipient body weight from unrelated sex-mismatched donors was infused within 24 h of the 18th irradiation fraction. Engraftment was assessed by demonstration of donor-type sex chromosomes in spontaneous metaphase spreads of recipient marrow aspirates, and by the appearance of donor-type red blood cells antigens (DEA) in the recipients' blood. Three untransfused and nine transfused recipients were shown to be stable mixed BM chimeras during a followup period of 2 to 11 months after transplantation. Blood transfusion during TLI did not result in graft rejection. We observed no clinical signs of acute or chronic GVHD. TLI has minimal toxicity when compared with conditioning regimens currently used in BM transplantation for aplastic anemia. Potential advantages of the TLI regimen include the opportunity to use unmatched marrow donors and protection from GVHD

  6. The long and the short of telomeres in bone marrow recipient SCID patients

    OpenAIRE

    Sarzotti-Kelsoe, Marcella; Daniell, Xiaoju G.; Whitesides, John F.; Buckley, Rebecca H.

    2011-01-01

    Telomeres are noncoding DNA regions at the end of the chromosomes that are crucial for genome stability. Since telomere length decreases with cell division, they can be used as a signature of cell proliferation history. T-cell reconstitution in severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) subjects, recipients of T-cell-depleted, allogeneic-related bone marrow cells, is due to the development and maturation of donor T-cell precursors in the infant’s vestigial thymus and to homeostatic proliferation...

  7. Diversity and origin of hepatitis B virus in Dutch blood donors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koppelman, M. H. G. M.; Zaaijer, H. L.

    2004-01-01

    Two considerations led us to study the genetic diversity and origin of hepatitis B virus (HBV) in Dutch blood donors. Firstly, an HBV-infected Dutch blood donor was found negative by four assays used commonly for detection of HBV surface antigen (HBsAg). How variable is HBsAg among HBV infected

  8. Use of G-CSF-stimulated marrow in allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation settings: a comprehensive review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Ying-Jun; Huang, Xiao-Jun

    2011-01-01

    In recent years, several researchers have unraveled the previously unrecognized effects of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) on hematopoiesis and the immune cell functions of bone marrow in healthy donors. In human leukocyte antigen-matched or haploidentical transplant settings, available data have established the safety of using G-CSF-stimulated bone marrow grafts, as well as the ability of this source to produce rapid and sustained engraftment. Interestingly, G-CSF-primed bone marrow transplants could capture the advantages of blood stem cell transplants, without the increased risk of chronic graft-versus-host disease that is associated with blood stem cell transplants. This review summarizes the growing body of evidence that supports the use of G-CSF-stimulated bone marrow grafts as an alternative stem cell source in allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. © 2010 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  9. Comparison of human adipose-derived stem cells and bone marrow-derived stem cells in a myocardial infarction model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Jeppe; Frøbert, Ole; Holst-Hansen, Claus

    2014-01-01

    Background: Treatment of myocardial infarction with bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells and recently also adipose-derived stem cells has shown promising results. In contrast to clinical trials and their use of autologous bone marrow-derived cells from the ischemic patient, the animal...... myocardial infarction models are often using young donors and young, often immune-compromised, recipient animals. Our objective was to compare bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells with adipose-derived stem cells from an elderly ischemic patient in the treatment of myocardial infarction, using a fully...... grown non-immunecompromised rat model. Methods: Mesenchymal stem cells were isolated from adipose tissue and bone marrow and compared with respect to surface markers and proliferative capability. To compare the regenerative potential of the two stem cell populations, male Sprague-Dawley rats were...

  10. Total lymphoid irradiation preceding bone marrow transplantation for chronic myeloid leukaemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James, N D; Apperley, J F; Kam, K C; Mackinnon, S; Goldman, J M; Goolden, A W.G.; Sikora, K [Royal Postgraduate Medical School, London (UK)

    1989-03-01

    Between August 1985 and October 1987 35 patients with chronic myeloid leukaemia (CML) were treated by high dose chemotherapy, total body irradiation (TBI) (1000 or 1200 cGy, n=31) and total lymphoid irradiation (TLI) (800 or 600 cGy, n=35) preceding allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (BMT). Both TBI and TLI were given at 200 cGy/fraction. Twenty-three patients had HLA-identical sibling donors, nine patients had HLA-matched but unrelated donors, and three partially HLA-mismatched donors. Twenty-two patients received T-cell depleted marrow. TLI did not add greatly to the toxicity. Four patients had recurrent leukaemia before engraftment was evaluable. The other 31 patients engrafted and no graft failed. Twenty-two patients survive at a median time from transplant of 305 days (range 81-586 days). Fourteen have no evidence of disease; eight have or had only cytogenetic evidence of leukaemia. It is concluded that addition of TLI to pretransplant immunosuppression increases the probability of reliable engraftment in patients receiving T-cell depleted marrow. This is not associated with significantly increased toxicity. (author).

  11. Total lymphoid irradiation preceding bone marrow transplantation for chronic myeloid leukaemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    James, N.D.; Apperley, J.F.; Kam, K.C.; Mackinnon, S.; Goldman, J.M.; Goolden, A.W.G.; Sikora, K.

    1989-01-01

    Between August 1985 and October 1987 35 patients with chronic myeloid leukaemia (CML) were treated by high dose chemotherapy, total body irradiation (TBI) (1000 or 1200 cGy, n=31) and total lymphoid irradiation (TLI) (800 or 600 cGy, n=35) preceding allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (BMT). Both TBI and TLI were given at 200 cGy/fraction. Twenty-three patients had HLA-identical sibling donors, nine patients had HLA-matched but unrelated donors, and three partially HLA-mismatched donors. Twenty-two patients received T-cell depleted marrow. TLI did not add greatly to the toxicity. Four patients had recurrent leukaemia before engraftment was evaluable. The other 31 patients engrafted and no graft failed. Twenty-two patients survive at a median time from transplant of 305 days (range 81-586 days). Fourteen have no evidence of disease; eight have or had only cytogenetic evidence of leukaemia. It is concluded that addition of TLI to pretransplant immunosuppression increases the probability of reliable engraftment in patients receiving T-cell depleted marrow. This is not associated with significantly increased toxicity. (author)

  12. Are drowned donors marginal donors? A single pediatric center experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumm, Kayla R; Galván, N Thao N; Koohmaraie, Sarah; Rana, Abbas; Kueht, Michael; Baugh, Katherine; Hao, Liu; Yoeli, Dor; Cotton, Ronald; O'Mahony, Christine A; Goss, John A

    2017-09-01

    Drowning, a common cause of death in the pediatric population, is a potentially large donor pool for OLT. Anecdotally, transplant centers have deemed these organs high risk over concerns for infection and graft dysfunction. We theorized drowned donor liver allografts do not portend worse outcomes and therefore should not be excluded from the donation pool. We reviewed our single-center experience of pediatric OLTs between 1988 and 2015 and identified 33 drowned donor recipients. These OLTs were matched 1:2 to head trauma donor OLTs from our center. A chart review assessed postoperative peak AST and ALT, incidence of HAT, graft and recipient survival. Recipient survival at one year between patients with drowned donor vs head trauma donor allografts was not statistically significant (94% vs 97%, P=.63). HAT incidence was 6.1% in the drowned donor group vs 7.6% in the control group (P=.78). Mean postoperative peak AST and ALT was 683 U/L and 450 U/L for drowned donors vs 1119 U/L and 828 U/L in the matched cohort. These results suggest drowned donor liver allografts do not portend worse outcomes in comparison with those procured from head trauma donors. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Bone marrow hypoplasia associated with fenbendazole administration in a dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gary, Anthony T; Kerl, Marie E; Wiedmeyer, Charles E; Turnquist, Susan E; Cohn, Leah A

    2004-01-01

    A 1.5-year-old Doberman pinscher was presented with sudden-onset of fever and malaise. Twelve days prior to presentation, fenbendazole therapy was initiated for a suspected lungworm infection. Results of a complete blood count on presentation showed pancytopenia, while histopathological evaluation of a bone marrow core sample revealed bone marrow hypoplasia of undetermined etiology. Bactericidal antibiotics and fluid therapy, as well as discontinuation of fenbendazole administration, led to a complete resolution of clinical and hematological abnormalities within 15 days. An idiosyncratic reaction to fenbendazole was suspected based on the absence of infectious, neoplastic, autoimmune, and toxic etiologies, as well as resolution of clinical signs and pancytopenia upon drug withdrawal.

  14. Acquisition of vernal and atopic keratoconjunctivitis after bone marrow transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabbara, Khalid F; Nassar, Amr; Ahmed, Syed Osman; Al Mohareb, Fahad; Aljurf, Mahmoud

    2008-09-01

    Vernal keratoconjunctivitis (VKC) and atopic keratoconjunctivitis (AKC) result from genetic and environmental factors. We present patients who had no history of atopic disorders before bone marrow transplantation (BMT) and who seem to have acquired VKC or AKC from their donors, who had atopic disorders. Observational case series. The patients in this study were part of a cohort of patients who had undergone allogeneic hemapoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) from January 1997 through December 2007. Of 621 HSCT recipients, four recipients who were free of allergic disorders acquired VKC or AKC from their afflicted donors after HSCT. Each patient underwent complete ophthalmologic examination, determination of the total serum immunoglobulin (Ig) E, and conjunctival scrapings. Four (0.64%) of 621 patients who had undergone HSCT acquired VKC or AKC after BMT. The donors had VKC or atopic dermatitis. In addition, in two of these four patients, asthma developed. One patient had elevated total serum IgE. Conjunctival scrapings of all four patients revealed the presence of eosinophils. One patient had concurrent graft-versus-host disease. VKC and AKC are systemic allergic disorders characterized by local ocular manifestations. This report suggests the possibility of the acquisition of VKC or AKC after BMT by adoptive transfer.

  15. Iron deficiency in blood donors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodolfo Delfini Cançado

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Blood donation results in a substantial loss of iron (200 to 250 mg at each bleeding procedure (425 to 475 ml and subsequent mobilization of iron from body stores. Recent reports have shown that body iron reserves generally are small and iron depletion is more frequent in blood donors than in non-donors. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to evaluate the frequency of iron deficiency in blood donors and to establish the frequency of iron deficiency in blood donors according to sex, whether they were first-time or multi-time donors, and the frequency of donations per year. DESIGN: From September 20 to October 5, 1999, three hundred blood donors from Santa Casa Hemocenter of São Paulo were studied. DIAGNOSTIC TESTS: Using a combination of biochemical measurements of iron status: serum iron, total iron-binding capacity, transferrin saturation index, serum ferritin and the erythrocyte indices. RESULTS: The frequency of iron deficiency in blood donors was 11.0%, of whom 5.5% (13/237 were male and 31.7% (20/63 female donors. The frequency of iron deficiency was higher in multi-time blood donors than in first-time blood donors, for male blood donors (7.6% versus 0.0%, P < 0.05 and female ones (41.5% versus 18.5%, P < 0.05. The frequency of iron deficiency found was higher among the male blood donors with three or more donations per year (P < 0.05 and among the female blood donors with two or more donations per year (P < 0.05. CONCLUSIONS: We conclude that blood donation is a very important factor for iron deficiency in blood donors, particularly in multi-time donors and especially in female donors. The high frequency of blood donors with iron deficiency found in this study suggests a need for a more accurate laboratory trial, as hemoglobin or hematocrit measurement alone is not sufficient for detecting and excluding blood donors with iron deficiency without anemia.

  16. New dental applications with LEDs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Argyraki, A.; Ou, Yiyu; Petersen, Paul Michael

    Visible and ultraviolet LEDs will in the future give rise to new dental applications. Fluorescence imaging, photodynamic therapy and photoactivated disinfection are important future candidates for diagnostics and treatment in dentistry.......Visible and ultraviolet LEDs will in the future give rise to new dental applications. Fluorescence imaging, photodynamic therapy and photoactivated disinfection are important future candidates for diagnostics and treatment in dentistry....

  17. Mobilized peripheral blood stem cells compared with bone marrow from HLA-identical siblings for reduced-intensity conditioning transplantation in acute myeloid leukemia in complete remission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nagler, Arnon; Labopin, Myriam; Shimoni, Avichai

    2012-01-01

    Reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC)-alloSCT is increasingly used for acute myelogenous leukemia. Limited data are available for the comparison of peripheral blood stem cells with bone marrow for RIC-alloSCT. We used the European Group for Blood and Marrow Transplantation (EBMT) ALWP data...... to compare the outcome of mobilized peripheral blood stem cells (PBSC) (n = 1430) vs. bone marrow (BM) (n = 107) for acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) patients with complete remission that underwent RIC-alloSCT from compatible sibling donors. The leukemia features, the disease status, and the time from...

  18. Donor body mass index is an important factor that affects peripheral blood progenitor cell yield in healthy donors after mobilization with granulocyte-colony-stimulating factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jian; Burns, Kevin M; Babic, Aleksandar; Carrum, George; Kennedy, Martha; Segura, Francisco J; Garcia, Salvador; Potts, Sandra; Leveque, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    The use of hematopoietic progenitor cell (HPC) transplantation has rapidly expanded in recent years. Currently, several sources of HPCs are available for transplantation including peripheral blood HPCs (PBPCs), cord blood cells, and marrow cells. Of these, PBPC collection has become the major source of HPCs. An important variable in PBPC collection is the response to PBPC mobilization, which varies significantly and sometime causes mobilization failure. A retrospective study of 69 healthy donors who underwent PBPC donation by leukapheresis was performed. All of these donors received 10 μg/kg/day or more granulocyte-colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) for 5 days before PBPC harvest. Donor factors were evaluated and correlated with mobilization responses, as indicated by the precollection CD34 count (pre-CD34). Donors with a pre-CD34 of more than 100 × 10(6) /L had higher body mass index (BMI) compared with donors whose pre-CD34 was 38 × 10(6) to 99 × 10(6) /L or less than 38 × 10(6) /L (32.0 ± 1.04 kg/m(2) vs. 28.7 ± 0.93 kg/m(2) vs. 25.9 ± 1.27 kg/m(2) , respectively; p donors with high BMIs had higher pre-CD34 on a per-kilogram-of-body-weight basis compared with donors with low BMIs. BMI is an important factor that affects donor's response to mobilization and consequently the HPC yield. This effect may be due to a relatively high dose of G-CSF administered to donors with higher BMI or due to the presence of unknown intrinsic factors affecting mobilization that correlate with the amount of adipose tissue in each donor. © 2013 American Association of Blood Banks.

  19. Donor hematopoiesis in mice following total lymphoid irradiation requires host T-regulatory cells for durable engraftment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Antonia M. S.; Poyser, Jessica; Küpper, Natascha J.; Burnett, Cassandra; Ko, Rose M.; Kohrt, Holbrook E.K.; Florek, Mareike; Zhang, Pei; Negrin, Robert S.

    2014-01-01

    Total lymphoid irradiation (TLI) with antithymocyte globulin (ATG) is a unique regimen that prepares recipients for allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation by targeting lymph nodes, while sparing large areas of the bone marrow. TLI is reported to increase the frequency of CD4+CD25+FoxP3+ T-regulatory cells (Treg) relative to conventional T cells. In this study, barriers to hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) engraftment following this nonmyeloablative conditioning were evaluated. TLI/ATG resulted in profound lymphoablation but endogenous host HSC remained. Initial donor HSC engraftment occurred only in radiation exposed marrow sites, but gradually distributed to bone marrow outside the radiation field. Sustained donor engraftment required host lymphoid cells insofar as lymphocyte deficient Rag2γc−/− recipients had unstable engraftment compared with wild-type. TLI/ATG treated wild-type recipients had increased proportions of Treg that were associated with increased HSC frequency and proliferation. In contrast, Rag2γc−/− recipients who lacked Treg did not. Adoptive transfer of Treg into Rag2γc−/− recipients resulted in increased cell cycling of endogenous HSC. Thus, we hypothesize that Treg influence donor engraftment post-TLI/ATG by increasing HSC cell cycling, thereby promoting the exit of host HSC from the marrow niche. Our study highlights the unique dynamics of donor hematopoiesis following TLI/ATG, and the effect of Treg on HSC activity. PMID:24591203

  20. Meet the donors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olejaz, Maria; Hoeyer, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    motivations, but rather as something made meaningful in the light of how donors understand their bodies; their social relations; and their societal position and experiences as patients in the healthcare system. The article thus contributes to the field by investigating the nature of the relationship between......For centuries, gross anatomy teaching and anatomical dissection have been fundamental elements in the training of medical doctors and surgeons across the world. Anatomy education and research rely on a stable and reliable supply of bodies in order to take place. Based on qualitative in...

  1. Iron deficiency among blood donors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rigas, A S; Pedersen, O B; Magnussen, K

    2017-01-01

    Blood components collected from blood donors are an invaluable part of modern-day medicine. A healthy blood donor population is therefore of paramount importance. The results from the Danish Blood Donor Study (DBDS) indicate that gender, number of previous donations, time since last donation...... and menopausal status are the strongest predictors of iron deficiency. Only little information on the health effects of iron deficiency in blood donors exits. Possibly, after a standard full blood donation, a temporarily reduced physical performance for women is observed. However, iron deficiency among blood...... donors is not reflected in a reduced self-perceived mental and physical health. In general, the high proportion of iron-deficient donors can be alleviated either by extending the inter-donation intervals or by guided iron supplementation. The experience from Copenhagen, the Capital Region of Denmark...

  2. The entry of the prothymocyte into the thymus after lethal irradiation and bone marrow transplantation. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mulder, A.H.; Visser, J.W.M.; Zoetelief, J.; Bekkum, D.W. van

    1988-01-01

    The time of entry of prothymocytes into the thymus after lethal irradiation and bone marrow transplantation (BMT) was determined by exposing the thymus only or the whole body with the thymus shielded to a second irradiation after different intervals. The repopulation of the thymus by donor type cells was determined by a thymus repopulation assay using donor specific markers. Reirradiation of the thymus kills the prothymocytes that have entered the thymus during the interval. It was found that reirradiation of the thymus from 48 hours after BMT onwards increasingly delayed thymus regeneration. This shows that donor prothymocytes do not enter the thymus until about 2 days after BMT and that they continue to do so during at least 3 subsequent days. In the second reirradiation protocol thymus regeneration occurred earlier in the shielded thymus than in thymuses of whole body irradiated mice. Earlier thymus regeneration was not seen in mice that were reirradiated at 24 hours after BMT, but occurred only when irradiation took place at 48 hours and later. These data are consistent with those obtained in the first protocol. The results are in contradiction with results of direct homing experiments, which showed entrance of donor cells within 3 hours after BMT. A functional assay demonstrated that the early appearing cells cannot be prothymocytes. In retransplantation experiments it was shown that the bone marrow may indeed be the initial homing site of prothymocytes. 14 refs.; 5 figs.; 1 table

  3. Clinical studies on bone marrow transplantation of acute leukemia and aplastic anemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morishima, Yasuo

    1979-01-01

    Since 1974, we have done bone marrow transplantation (BMT) in six patients of acute leukemia and two of aplastic anemia. Leukemia patients were premedicated by CY+TBI method; cyclophosphamide (CY) 60 mg/kg/day was administered for two successive days and two days later, total body irradiation (TBI) was done in a dose of 800 - 1000 rad at a rate of 20-28 rad/min by linear accerelator. Patients with aplastic anemia were premedicated by CY method; CY 50 mg/kg/day for four successive days. Bone marrow graft was obtained from donor under general anesthesia. The nucleated bone marrow cells, ranged from 0.7 x 10 10 to 1.4 x 10 10 were transfused into the patient intravenously. Any lethal side effects did not develop in all patient during these procedures. Two died on day 10 and 12 with septicemia. The other 6 patients showed engraftment of bone marrow indicated by rising blood counts, return of marrow cellularity and in one case by blood cytogenetic markers. Relapse of leukemia did not occur in five patients treated with CY + TBI method. Three patients with allogeneic BMT developed moderately severe to severe Graft versus Host Disease. Survival time after BMT were 12, 35, 63, 68, 98, 125 days. 15 months in leukemia, and 10 days, 12 + months in aplastic anemia. (author)

  4. The marrow heterotopia in thalassemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papavasiliou, C.; Gouliamos, A.; Andreou, J.

    1986-01-01

    The subject of marrow heterotopia has been reviewed on the basis of 15 cases suffering from thalassemia. Other cases reported in the literature were also reviewed. Using conventional radiography, scintigraphy, computerized tomography and myelography, 17% of the cases admitted into the hospital with the diagnosis of Thalassemia, were found to have macroscopic masses of marrow heterotopia. The most common site of development of these masses was the costovertebral gutter, followed by the anterior end of the ribs and the extradural space of the spinal canal. In one case, masses were located in the maxillary antra. The clinical implications, the pathogenesis of the masses and the differential diagnosis from other tumour-like entities are discussed. Three patients presented with symptoms and signs of spinal cord compression. All three patients were treated satisfactorily with small doses of radiotherapy. (orig.)

  5. Bone--bone marrow interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patt, H.M.

    1976-01-01

    Within medullary cavities, blood formation tends to be concentrated near bone surfaces and this raises interesting questions about hematopoietic consequences of radionuclide fixation in osseous tissue. Thus, it may be important, on the one hand, to consider the medullary radiation dose distribution as well as total marrow dose from bone-bound radioelements and, on the other, to inquire about possible hematopoietic implications of radiation damage to endosteal surfaces per se. The reasons for this are discussed

  6. Expression of T cell antigen receptor genes in the thymus of irradiated mice after bone marrow transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuzaki, G.; Yoshikai, Y.; Kishihara, K.; Nomoto, K.

    1988-01-01

    Sequential appearance of the expression of T cell antigen receptor genes was investigated in the thymus of irradiated mice at the early stage after transplantation of Thy-1 congeneic H-2 compatible allogeneic bone marrow cells. The first cells to repopulate the thymus on day 7 after bone marrow transplantation were intrathymic radioresistant T cell precursors, which expanded mainly to CD4+CD8+ host-type thymocytes by day 14. A high level of gamma gene expression but a much reduced level of alpha and beta gene expression were detected in the host-type thymocytes on day 7. During regeneration of these cells, gamma-chain messages fell to low level and alpha and beta mRNA levels increased. The thymus of the recipients began to be repopulated by donor-derived T cells about 2 wk after bone marrow transplantation and was almost completely replaced by the third week. An ordered expression of gamma then beta and alpha-chain gene transcript was also observed in the donor-type thymocytes at the early stage after bone marrow transplantation. The use of thymocytes at early stage in whole-body irradiated bone marrow chimera provides a pertinent source for investigating the molecular mechanism of T cell differentiation in adult thymus

  7. Bone marrow edema in sports: General concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vanhoenacker, F.M.; Snoeckx, A.

    2007-01-01

    This paper will discuss the value of medical imaging in the detection and follow-up of bone marrow edema (BME), resulting from acute and chronic trauma in sports. MR imaging is the only imaging technique that allows direct evaluation of bone marrow edema in sports medicine. The use of fat suppressed T2-weighted or STIR images is particularly appropriate to detect bone marrow edema. The extent of bone marrow edema reflects the biomechanics of trauma. Compressive forces between two bony structures will result in extensive areas of bone marrow edema, whereas distraction forces provoke more subtle areas of bone marrow edema at the insertion of supporting structures of joints. In most clinical situations, a combination of compression and distraction forces is present, causing a complex pattern of bone marrow edema. A meticulous pattern approach of the distribution of these bone marrow changes around a joint can reveal in most instances the underlying mechanism of trauma. This may be helpful to analyze which joint supporting structures may be at risk. In the acute setting, plain radiography and CT scan may have an additional role in the detection of small avulsion fractures occurring at the site of minor areas of bone marrow edema. The clinical significance and natural history of bone marrow edema is still a matter of debate

  8. LEDS Global Partnership in Action: Advancing Climate-Resilient Low Emission Development Around the World (Fact Sheet)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2013-11-01

    Many countries around the globe are designing and implementing low emission development strategies (LEDS). These LEDS seek to achieve social, economic, and environmental development goals while reducing long-term greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and increasing resiliency to climate change impacts. The LEDS Global Partnership (LEDS GP) harnesses the collective knowledge and resources of more than 120 countries and international donor and technical organizations to strengthen climate-resilient low emission development efforts around the world.

  9. Practical lighting design with LEDs

    CERN Document Server

    Lenk, Ron

    2016-01-01

    The second edition of Practical Lighting Design with LEDs has been revised and updated to provide the most current information for developing light-emitting diodes products. The authors, noted authorities in the field, offer a review of the most relevant topics including optical performance, materials, thermal design, and modeling and measurement. Comprehensive in scope, the text covers all the information needed to design LEDs into end products.

  10. Standardization of UV LED measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eppeldauer, G. P.; Larason, T. C.; Yoon, H. W.

    2015-09-01

    Traditionally used source spectral-distribution or detector spectral-response based standards cannot be applied for accurate UV LED measurements. Since the CIE standardized rectangular-shape spectral response function for UV measurements cannot be realized with small spectral mismatch when using filtered detectors, the UV measurement errors can be several times ten percent or larger. The UV LEDs produce broadband radiation and both their peaks or spectral bandwidths can change significantly. The detectors used for the measurement of these LEDs also have different spectral bandwidths. In the discussed example, where LEDs with 365 nm peak are applied for fluorescent crack-recognition using liquid penetrant (non-destructive) inspection, the broadband radiometric LED (signal) measurement procedure is standardized. A UV LED irradiance-source was calibrated against an FEL lamp standard to determine its spectral irradiance. The spectral irradiance responsivity of a reference UV meter was also calibrated. The output signal of the reference UV meter was calculated from the spectral irradiance of the UV source and the spectral irradiance responsivity of the reference UV meter. From the output signal, both the integrated irradiance (in the reference plane of the reference meter) and the integrated responsivity of the reference meter were determined. Test UV meters calibrated for integrated responsivity against the reference UV meter, can be used to determine the integrated irradiance from a field UV source. The obtained 5 % (k=2) measurement uncertainty can be decreased when meters with spectral response close to a constant value are selected.

  11. Bone marrow ablation with Ho-166 pharmaceuticals as preparation for bone marrow transplants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parks, N.J.; Kawakami, T.; Avila, M.; White, R.; Cain, G.; Moore, P.F.

    1991-01-01

    Bone marrow ablation is required preparation for leukemia patients where bone marrow transplantation is to be the therapeutic modality. Presently, the total body irradiation that is used produces appreciable morbidity in terms of radiation sickness, but an evenly distributed dose to marrow. The authors have shown in Beagles that bone-seeking radiolanthanide (Ho-166, t 1/2 = 25 h, 1.8 MeB beta, carrier added) phosphonic acid chelates can be used to completely ablate bone marrow with little morbidity. The research plan, incorporating bone marrow ablation with bone-seeking radionuclides and in vitro purging of aspirated leukemic marrow for use in autologous marrow transplants, is presented. Phosphonic acid complexes of Sm-153 also localize in the skeleton and have found use in the palliation of bone pain. However, the dose distribution is uneven because these radiopharmaceuticals distribute according to available surface; 2-4 times the skeletal average in trabecular vs cortical bone. Thus, the marrow dose can vary. The authors' research group and the Radiation Interactions Division of NIST have announced the discovery that beta radiation-induced excited electrons are trapped in the hydroxyapatite mineral of bone and provide a potential direct dosimetric method for marrow dose when combined with routine bone marrow (and included bone) biopsies. The overall research plan sets the hypothesis that reduced morbidity marrow ablation can be successfully followed by bone marrow transplantation (BMT) with autologous marrow purged in vitro by antibody-targeted alpha emitters

  12. Immunosuppression prior to marrow transplantation for sensitized aplastic anemia patients: comparison of TLI with TBI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shank, B.; Brochstein, J.A.; Castro-Malaspina, H.; Yahalom, J.; Bonfiglio, P.; O'Reilly, R.J.

    1988-01-01

    From May 1980 through July 1986, 26 patients with severe aplastic anemia, sensitized with multiple transfusions of blood products, were treated on either of two immunosuppressive regimens in preparation for bone marrow transplantation from a matched donor. There were 10 patients treated with total body irradiation (TBI), 200 cGy/fraction X 4 daily fractions (800 cGy total dose), followed by cyclophosphamide, 60 mg/kg/d X 2 d. An additional 16 patients were treated with total lymphoid irradiation (TLI) [or, if they were infants, a modified TLI or thoracoabdominal irradiation (TAI)], 100 cGy/fraction, 3 fractions/d X 2 d (600 cGy total dose), followed by cyclophosphamide, 40 mg/kg/d X 4 d. The extent of immunosuppression was similar in both groups as measured by peripheral blood lymphocyte depression at the completion of the course of irradiation (5% of initial concentration for TBI and 24% for TLI), neutrophil engraftment (10/10 for TBI and 15/16 for TLI), and time to neutrophil engraftment (median of 22 d for TBI and 17 d for TLI). Marrow and peripheral blood cytogenetic analysis for assessment of percent donor cells was also compared in those patients in whom it was available. 2/2 patients studied with TBI had 100% donor cells, whereas 6/11 with TLI had 100% donor cells. Of the five who did not, three were stable mixed chimeras with greater than or equal to 70% donor cells, one became a mixed chimera with about 50% donor cells, but became aplastic again after Cyclosporine A cessation 5 mo post-transplant, and the fifth reverted to all host cells by d. 18 post-transplant. Overall actuarial survival at 2 years was 56% in the TLI group compared with 30% in the TBI group although this was not statistically significant. No survival decrement has been seen after 2 years in either group

  13. Successful haploidentical donor hematopoietic stem cell transplant and restoration of STAT3 function in an adolescent with autosomal dominant hyper-IgE syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, N C; Gallagher, J L; Torgerson, T R; Gilman, A L

    2015-07-01

    Autosomal dominant hyper-IgE syndrome (AD-HIES), caused by mutations in Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription 3 (STAT3) is associated with defective STAT3 signaling and Th17 differentiation and recurrent bacterial and fungal infections. Most patients suffer significant morbidity and premature mortality. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) has been reported in a small number of cases, with mixed outcomes. We report successful haploidentical donor HSCT in a patient with AD-HIES. Evaluation of lymphocyte subsets, STAT3 signaling, and Th17 cells was performed pre- and post-HSCT. A 14-year old female with AD-HIES developed recurrent methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) abscesses. Immunologic analysis showed elevated IgE (4331 kU/L), absent Th17 cells, and markedly decreased STAT3 phosphorylation in cytokine stimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cells. She had breakthrough abscesses despite clindamycin and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole prophylaxis, and developed steroid refractory autoimmune hemolytic anemia. She underwent T-cell depleted haploidentical HSCT from her father following reduced intensity conditioning. She developed one MRSA hand abscess after transplant. Twenty-four months post transplant, she had complete donor chimerism (>95 % donor), normal absolute T cell numbers, and a normal percentage of Th17 cells. IgE was normal at 25 kU/L. She remains well 42 months after transplantation off all antibacterial prophylaxis. Haploidentical HSCT led to successful bone marrow engraftment, normalization of STAT3 signaling in hematopoietic cells, normalization of IgE, and restoration of immune function in this patient with AD-HIES.

  14. Quantitation of specific myeloid cells in rat bone marrow measured by in vitro /sup 35/S-sulphate incorporation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, A F; Rose, M S

    1984-08-01

    A biochemical measurement which can be used for quantitation of specific early myeloid cells in rat bone marrow has been developed. This measurement consists of a rapid, simple assay for the in vitro quantitation of /sup 35/S-sulfate incorporation into rat bone marrow cells. Incubation of bone marrow cells with /sup 35/S-sulfate led to a time-dependent increase in radioactivity obtained in perchloric acid insoluble fractions of bone marrow cell suspensions. This incorporation was inhibited by cyanide and puromycin. Autoradiography has demonstrated the radiolabel to be specifically associated with immature cells of the myeloid series. The cells most active in this respect were eosinophils. When rats were treated with endotoxin, the rate of /sup 35/S-sulfate incorporation was increased. Cell number measurements, using conventional histopathology and a Coulter Counter, demonstrated that endotoxin caused an initial release of mature granulocytes from the bone marrow. The regeneration of this mature population in the marrow was rapid, and was characterized by an increase in the number of immature cells and a concomitant increase in the rate of /sup 35/S-sulfate incorporation measured in preparations of bone marrow cells in vitro. Furthermore, this response to endotoxin has demonstrated that Coulter Counting techniques can be used to distinguish specific populations of cells (e.g. mature granulocytes) within the bone marrow.

  15. Prostacyclin Suppresses Twist Expression in the Presence of Indomethacin in Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stromal Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Kemper, Oliver; Herten, Monika; Fischer, Johannes; Haversath, Marcel; Beck, Sascha; Classen, Tim; Warwas, Sebastian; Tassemeier, Tjark; Landgraeber, Stefan; Lensing-Höhn, Sabine; Krauspe, Rüdiger; Jäger, Marcus

    2014-01-01

    Background Iloprost, a stable prostacyclin I2 analogue, seems to have an osteoblast-protective potential, whereas indomethacin suppresses new bone formation. The aim of this study was to investigate human bone marrow stromal cell (BMSC) proliferation and differentiation towards the osteoblastic lineage by administration of indomethacin and/or iloprost. Material/Methods Human bone marrow cells were obtained from 3 different donors (A=26 yrs/m; B=25 yrs/f, C=35 yrs/m) via vacuum aspiration of t...

  16. Natural killer function following allogeneic bone marrow transplantation. Very early reemergence but strong dependence of cytomegalovirus infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hokland, M; Jacobsen, N; Ellegaard, J

    1988-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cell function was followed sequentially after allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (BMT) using three approaches: (1) chromium-release assay with purified mononuclear effector cells, (2) chromium-release assay with whole blood effectors, and 3) enumeration of lymphocytes......) infections (primary or reactivated). In contrast, the presence of graft-versus-host (GVH) disease did not associate with consistent changes in the NK parameters measured here. After the first month of increase, NK declined reaching levels near those observed in their respective bone marrow donors at day 90...

  17. MR imaging of normal bone marrow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stajgis, M.; Paprzycki, W.

    1994-01-01

    Principles of MR bone marrow imaging on the basis of retrospective analysis of MR examinations of bone marrow in different anatomic sites in 200 patients have been discussed. Significance of different physiologic factors and processes such as age, steatosis, osteoporosis, conversion and reconversion, which influence on MR bone marrow images, have been emphasized. T1-weighted images obtained with spin-echo sequences give the most of information about bone marrow structure in MR. Thorough knowledge of bone marrow physiology and clinical status of the patient is indispensable in correct interpretation of hypointensive lesions on T1-weighted images. When presence of disseminated bone marrow disease is suspected, authors propose routine imaging of lumbar vertebral column, pelvis and proximal parts of femoral bones. (author)

  18. Global transcriptome analysis of T-competent progenitors in the bone marrow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vionnie W.C. Yu

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available T cells are known to develop in the thymus. However, molecular events that control the transition from hematopoietic progenitor cells in the bone marrow to T precursor cells seeded in the thymus remained poorly defined. Our recent report showed that osteocalcin (Ocn-expressing bone cells in the bone marrow have major impact on T cell immunity by regulating T progenitor development in the bone marrow (Yu et al., 2015 [1]. Selective endogenous depletion of Ocn+ cells by inducible diphtheria toxin receptor expression (OcnCre;iDTR led to reduction of T-competent common lymphoid progenitors (Ly6D− CLPs in the bone marrow and loss of T cells in the thymus. Expression of the Notch ligand DLL4 by Ocn+ cells in the bone marrow ensures the production of Ly6D− CLPs, and expression of chemotactic molecules CCR7 and PSGL1 to enable subsequent thymic seeding. These data indicate that specific mesenchymal cells in bone marrow provide key molecular drivers enforcing thymus-seeding progenitor generation and thereby directly link skeletal biology to the production of T cell based adaptive immunity. Here we present the transcriptome profiles of Ly6D− CLPs derived from Ocn+ cells deleted mice (OcnCre+;iDTR compared to those derived from control littermates (OcnCre−;iDTR. These data are publically available from NCBI Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO with the accession number GSE66102.

  19. Donor selection criteria and procurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agcaoili, N.R.

    1999-01-01

    Donor selection is one of the most important aspects of tissue banking practice. Without a good donor selection criteria, the results of any effort of trying to preserve tissues will have disastrous outcome for the recipient of these tissues. While with a very good and strict donor selection the Tissue Bank can guarantee safe and effective tissue allografts. There are significant aspects in the history and physical examination of the donor that must be emphasized. A donor exclusion criteria has also been formulated together with a list of all the needed laboratory examinations to eliminate possible diseases that may be transferred from the donor. The methods of procurement of tissue allografts from living and cadaver donors will be described. The limitations and advantages of each will be taken.There are also special restrictions that are important in the practice of removing the tissues from the donors. All the necessary equipment should be ready and the potential risk on the personnel should be known to all doing Tissue Banking

  20. The Dirt on the Donors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Mary Margaret

    1996-01-01

    A discussion of donor records in college and university fund-raising programs looks at a variety of issues, including who sees them (administrators, donors, volunteers, and members of the legal profession), how access to them is controlled, and what is kept in them. Suggestions are offered for managing such records, and the experiences of a number…

  1. MR appearances of bone marrow in children following bone marrow transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boothroyd, A.E.; Sebag, G.; Brunelle, F.

    1991-01-01

    Two cases are presented of children who demonstrated complete absence of bone marrow signal on MR imaging of the spine following bone marrow transplantation. The possible causes for these appearances are discussed. (orig.)

  2. Eosinophilic spleen colonies are produced in rat-marrow-transplanted but not in murine-marrow-transplanted mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szabo, L.G.; Kelemen, E.

    1988-01-01

    Differential counts of about 5000 splenic clusters and colonies developing in whole-body-irradiated mice and rats were made, using semi-serial histological sections prepared 9 to 12 d after transplantation with bone marrow haemopoietic cells. The investigated mouse and rat spleens were from syngeneically, allogeneically, or xenogeneically transplanted recipients. Splenic eosinophil clusters were always found when rat eosinophil-producing progenitors were present in the inoculum, whereas murine inocula failed to produce splenic eosinophilic clusters even in the syngeneic mouse. The limiting factor in the production pf splenic eosinophilic clusters was the appropriate donor progenitor/committed stem cell itself. Changes in the percentages of eosinophil clusters with the number of injected cells and with increased doses of irradiation, as well as formation of rat eosinophil colonies in mice, as against mainly clusters in rats, themselves show that regulatory mechanisms of the recipients also play a role. These regulatory mechanisms cannot be attributed to the splenic microenvironment. (author)

  3. Heart transplantation from older donors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. N. Poptsov

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In the current situation of the shortage of suitable donor organs, heart transplantation from older donors is one of the ways to increase the performance of more heart transplants, particularly, in patients with urgent need of transplantation. While planning a heart transplantation from older donor one should consider increased risk of early cardiac allograft dysfunction, preexisting coronary artery disease, accelerated transplant vasculopathy which may adversely affect early and long-term survival of recipients. Subject to careful selection of donor–recipient pairs, effective prevention and treatment of early cardiac allograft dysfunction, pre-existing atherosclerosis and transplant vasculopathy the early and long-term survival of heart transplant recipients from older donors is comparable to heart transplantation from young donors.

  4. Patterns of bone-marrow scintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Touya, J.J.; Lee, G.S.; Narvaez, M.; Marciano, D.

    1977-01-01

    111 In-transferrin, radiocolloid and bone scans were performed within one week on 105 from more than 250 scanned patients with different haematological disorders. All patients had complete haematological workups and confirmed final diagnoses. From the comparison of the 111 In-transferrin marrow scan with the radiocolloid marrow scan and bone scan, eight basic patterns of localized or generalized disorders in the bone marrow cell production were delineated. The first pattern was called a cold area and two sub-patterns were distinguished in it. A cold area in the erythropoietic and reticuloendothelial scans associated with cold or normal areas in the bone scan corresponded to radiation damage of the marrow or multiple myeloma; a cold area in both marrow scans with a hot area in the bone scan to tumour, infarct and bone trauma. The second pattern was called a hot area. A hot area in the two marrow scans with a normal bone scan was observed in islands of active bone-marrow. Hot areas in both 111 In-transferrin and bone scan associated with a cold area in the radiocolloid scan were observed in tumours growing in bones with or without little active bone marrow. Hot areas on the three scans were observed in osteomyelitis of bones of the extremities. The third pattern was bone-marrow expansion, which was observed in hereditary haemolytic anaemias, in myeloproliferative disorders and in patients with bone-marrow damage following irradiation. The fourth pattern was saturation of the serum iron-binding capacity and it was manifested by increased activity in the kidneys in the 111 In-transferrin scan. The fifth pattern was bone-marrow failure which consists of decreased accumulation in the marrow and increased accumulation in the liver of marrow-seeking agents associated with normal bone scan. The sixth pattern, pure red cell aplasia, was characterized by less accumulation of 111 In-transferrin than radiocolloid in the bone marrow. The seventh pattern, bone-marrow siderosis

  5. [Acute unclassified leukemia with bone marrow necrosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uoshima, N; Yamazaki, N; Iinuma, S; Kimura, S; Wada, K; Kobayashi, Y; Ozawa, M; Horiuchi, H; Maruo, N; Kondo, M

    1991-01-01

    Massive bone marrow necrosis was seen in a 42-year-old male with acute leukemia. In December, 1988, on admission, laboratory data revealed pancytopenia and a high level of serum LDH and ALKP. Bone marrow aspiration resulted in dry-tap and showed bone marrow necrosis in the bone marrow biopsy specimen. A bone marrow scintigraphy with 111In faintly visualized the bone marrow but visualized area was expanded in the extremities compared with normal subjects. The second bone marrow biopsy showed proliferation of blasts. In the middle of March, blasts began to appear in peripheral blood. The blasts were cytochemically negative for POX, Es, PAS, AcP, TdT and had surface markers CD3-, CD19-, CD33-, CD13-, LCA-, HLA-DR-. Even by investigation on rearrangement of the immunoglobulin heavy chain region, an origin of the blasts could not be determined. In April, the number of blasts in peripheral blood increased and hepatosplenomegaly developed rapidly. Therefore, he was put on the chemotherapy with vincristine and prednisolone, but he died of cerebral hemorrhage. The autopsy revealed widespread bone marrow necrosis. It has rarely been reported that massive bone marrow necrosis is found prior to the occurrence of acute unclassified leukemia.

  6. Optical characterization of ultrabright LEDs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benavides, Juan Manuel; Webb, Robert H.

    2005-01-01

    Ultrabright light emitting diodes (LEDs) are a new light source for visual psychophysics and microscopy. The new LEDs are intended primarily for room and exterior illumination, and the manufacturers' specifications are adequate for that. However, we use them as light sources in situations where a more complete characterization may be useful. For one set of LEDs we have measured the radiometric intensity and its distribution in space and wavelength, and we have tested for interactions of these variables and their dependence on driver configuration. We describe techniques for making these measurements and give a link to a simple calculator for converting among radiometric and photometric measures, as well as an evaluation of the safety considerations these very bright sources demand

  7. Semiconductor lasers and herterojunction leds

    CERN Document Server

    Kressel, Henry

    2012-01-01

    Semiconductor Lasers and Heterojunction LEDs presents an introduction to the subject of semiconductor lasers and heterojunction LEDs. The book reviews relevant basic solid-state and electromagnetic principles; the relevant concepts in solid state physics; and the p-n junctions and heterojunctions. The text also describes stimulated emission and gain; the relevant concepts in electromagnetic field theory; and the modes in laser structures. The relation between electrical and optical properties of laser diodes; epitaxial technology; binary III-V compounds; and diode fabrication are also consider

  8. Automated processing of human bone marrow can result in a population of mononuclear cells capable of achieving engraftment following transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Areman, E M; Cullis, H; Spitzer, T; Sacher, R A

    1991-10-01

    A concentrate of mononuclear bone marrow cells is often desired for ex vivo treatment with pharmacologic agents, monoclonal antibodies, cytokines, and other agents prior to transplantation. A method has been developed for automated separation of mononuclear cells from large volumes of harvested bone marrow. A programmable instrument originally designed for clinical ex vivo cell separation and the plasma-pheresis of patients and blood donors was adapted to permit rapid preparation, in a closed sterile system, of a bone marrow product enriched with mononuclear cells. A mean (+/- SEM) of 53 +/- 30 percent of the original mononuclear cells was recovered in a volume of 125 +/- 42 mL containing 82 +/- 12 percent mononuclear cells. This technique removed 95 +/- 9 percent of the red cells in the original marrow. No density gradient materials or sedimenting agents were employed in this process. Of 36 marrows processed by this technique, 19 autologous (6 of which were purged with 4-hydroperoxycyclophosphamide) and 7 allogeneic marrows have been transplanted, with all evaluable patients achieving a neutrophil count of 0.5 x 10(9) per L in a mean (+/- SEM) of 21 +/- 6 days.

  9. CHAPTER 3. High-performance Organic Photovoltaic Donor Polymers

    KAUST Repository

    Wadsworth, Andrew

    2017-11-08

    The field of organic photovoltaics has advanced a great deal over the last decade, with device efficiencies now exceeding 11%. A large part of this success can be attributed to the development of donor polymer materials, from their humble beginnings as homopolymers to the highly tuned push-pull copolymer and terpolymer materials that are now being reported on a regular basis. Through the careful use of chemical modification, it has been possible to design and synthesize a wide variety of donor polymers, allowing optimization of both the optoelectronic and structural properties of the materials. In doing so, more favourable active layer blends have been achieved and therefore significant improvements in device performance have been observed. Herein we discuss how the chemical design of donor polymers for organic photovoltaics has led to the emergence of high-performance materials.

  10. CHAPTER 3. High-performance Organic Photovoltaic Donor Polymers

    KAUST Repository

    Wadsworth, Andrew; Baran, Derya; Gorman, Jeffrey; McCulloch, Iain

    2017-01-01

    The field of organic photovoltaics has advanced a great deal over the last decade, with device efficiencies now exceeding 11%. A large part of this success can be attributed to the development of donor polymer materials, from their humble beginnings as homopolymers to the highly tuned push-pull copolymer and terpolymer materials that are now being reported on a regular basis. Through the careful use of chemical modification, it has been possible to design and synthesize a wide variety of donor polymers, allowing optimization of both the optoelectronic and structural properties of the materials. In doing so, more favourable active layer blends have been achieved and therefore significant improvements in device performance have been observed. Herein we discuss how the chemical design of donor polymers for organic photovoltaics has led to the emergence of high-performance materials.

  11. White LED motorcycle headlamp design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Wen-Shing

    2015-09-01

    The motorcycle headlamp is composed of a white LED module, an elliptical reflector, a parabolic reflector and a toric lens. We use non-sequential ray to improve the optical efficiency of the compound reflectors. Using the toric lens can meet ECE_113 regulation and obtain a good uniformity.

  12. Architecture-Led Safety Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-01

    Contents Acknowledgments iv Abstract v 1 Introduction 1 2 Architecture -Led Processes and ALSA 2 3 ALSA Practices 5 3.1 Example System 8 4 Identify... Architecture Models 13 5 Identify Operational Hazards and Hazard Contributors 15 5.1 System Partitioning 15 5.2 Operational Context as a Control

  13. LED licht van de toekomst

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zeiler, W.

    2009-01-01

    De gloeilamp is verleden tijd, na ongeveer 125 jaar na de ontdekking door Thomas Edison valt langzaam maar zeker binnen een decennium het doek. Australië heeft de klassieke gloeilamp al in de ban gedaan en vele landen volgen deze trend. De rol van de klassieke gloeilamp wordt overgenomen door LED.

  14. Bone Marrow Transplantation: MedlinePlus Health Topic

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... marrow transplant - discharge (Medical Encyclopedia) Also in Spanish Topic Image MedlinePlus Email Updates Get Bone Marrow Transplantation ... transplant - slideshow Graft-versus-host disease Related Health Topics Bone Marrow Diseases Stem Cells National Institutes of ...

  15. Genetics Home Reference: Pearson marrow-pancreas syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Health Conditions Pearson marrow-pancreas syndrome Pearson marrow-pancreas syndrome Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable ... view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Pearson marrow-pancreas syndrome is a severe disorder that usually begins ...

  16. Studies on the distribution of hematopoietic bone marrow by bone marrow scintigraphy, 2. The bone marrow distribution in leukemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujimori, K [Kyoto Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine

    1976-04-01

    Distribution of the leukemic marrow was investigated in 42 cases by bone marrow scintigraphy using sup(99m)Tc sulfur colloid in association with clinical findings and ferrokinetics studies in order to clarify hematopoietic function in leukemia. 17 of chronic myelogenous leukemia, 3 of lymphatic leukemia, 2 of monocytic leukemia, 7 of atypical leukemia and one of erythroleukemia. 12 acute myelogenous leukemia were classified into 3 types A, B and C. Type A showed the distribution similar to those obtained with normal controls. Ferrokinetics studies, however, indicated complete absence of erythropoiesis. Type B showed complete lack of sup(99m)Tc activity in usual marrow sites, although ferrokinetics data showed normal erythropoeitic function. Type C showed abnormal concentration of sup(99m)Tc sulfur colloid in the tibiae. 17 chronic myelogenous leukemia showed reduced sup(99m)Tc activity in usual marrow sites and remarkable expanded marrow extending into distal femurs, proximal and distal tibiae and bones of feet. 2 acute lymphotic leukemia patients showed complete absence of sup(99m)Tc activity. The one chronic type showed almost normal distribution. Monocytic leukemia showed decreased marrow distribution in the sternum and vertebrae. Of 6 atypical leukemias one showed almost normal distribution. The others, including a case with hypoplastic luekemia, demonstrated marrow extension similar to that observed in chronic myelogenous leukemia or monocytic leukemia. Erythroleukemia showed increased concentrations of sup(99m)Tc activity in the usual marrow sites and marked marrow expansion throughout all long bones. These results suggest that there is a discrepancy between bone marrow distribution and hematopoietic function in the cases of acute myelogenous leukemia.

  17. Anesthesia Management of Organ Donors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Victor W; Braunfeld, Michelle

    2017-09-01

    The shortage of suitable organs is the biggest obstacle for transplants. At present, most organs for transplant in the United States are from donation after neurologic determination of death (brain death). Potential organs for transplant need to maintain their viability during a series of insults, including the original disease, physiologic derangements during the dying process, ischemia, and reperfusion. Proper donor management before, during, and after procurement has potential to increase the number and quality of organs from donors. Anesthesiologists need to understand the physiologic derangements associated with brain death and the updated donor management during the periprocurement period. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. New hydrogen donors in germanium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pokotilo, Yu.M.; Petukh, A.N.; Litvinov, V.V.

    2003-01-01

    The electrophysical properties of the n-type conductivity germanium, irradiated through protons, is studied by the volt-farad method. It is shown that the heat treatment of the implanted germanium at the temperature of 200-300 deg C leads to formation of the fast-diffusing second-rate donors. It is established that the diffusion coefficient of the identified donors coincides with the diffusion coefficient of the atomic hydrogen with an account of the capture on the traps. The conclusion is made, that the atomic hydrogen is the second-rate donor center in germanium [ru

  19. Magnetic resonance imaging of the bone marrow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baur-Melnyk, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    The first book devoted to MRI of the bone marrow. Describes the MRI appearances of normal bone marrows and the full range of bone marrow disorders. Discusses the role of advanced MRI techniques and contrast enhancement. On account of its unrivalled imaging capabilities and sensitivity, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is considered the modality of choice for the investigation of physiologic and pathologic processes affecting the bone marrow. This book describes the MRI appearances of both the normal bone marrow, including variants, and the full range of bone marrow disorders. Detailed discussion is devoted to malignancies, including multiple myeloma, lymphoma, chronic myeloproliferative disorders, leukemia, and bone metastases. Among the other conditions covered are benign and malignant compression fractures, osteonecrosis, hemolytic anemia, Gaucher's disease, bone marrow edema syndrome, trauma, and infective and non-infective inflammatory disease. Further chapters address the role of MRI in assessing treatment response, the use of contrast media, and advanced MRI techniques. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Bone Marrow represents an ideal reference for both novice and experienced practitioners.

  20. Inherited Bone Marrow Failure Syndromes (IBMFS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The NCI IBMFS Cohort Study consists of affected individuals and their immediate families in North America who have an inherited bone marrow failure syndrome (IBMFS)-either one that has been specifically identified and defined, or bone marrow failure that appears to be inherited but has not yet been clearly identified as having a genetic basis.

  1. How to exhaust your bone marrow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salomo, Louise; Salomo, Morten; Andersen, Steven A W

    2013-01-01

    at work and in his spare time, and kept a very thorough training and weight diary. Owing to a high intake of energy and protein drinks he tried to optimise his physical performance and kept a normal body mass index  at 23.7. A bone marrow biopsy showed gelatinous bone marrow transformation, normally seen...

  2. Functional bone marrow scintigraphy in psoriatics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munz, D.; Altmeyer, P.; Chilf, G.; Schlesinger, G.; Holzmann, H.; Hoer, G.

    1982-01-01

    24 psoriatics as well as 24 normal healthy adults were studied by functional bone marrow scintigraphy using Tc-99m-labeled human serum albumin millimicrospheres (Tc-99m-HSA-MM). Functional bone marrow scintigraphy is an in vivo test system for the assessment of various functional properties of fixed macrophages. 58% of psoriatics who had no systemic drug treatment demonstrated peripheral extension of the bone marrow space indicating hyperplasia of bone marrow macrophages. This phenomenon could be observed only in one normal subject who was a high-performance sportsman. 83% (n=6) of psoriatics with cirrhosis of liver demonstrated bone marrow extension. The 'capacity' of bone marrow macrophages to engulf Tc-99m-HSA-MM ('uptake ratio') was diminished in 42% of non-treated as well as 66% of psoriatics treated with aromatic retinoid. The phagocytic and proteolytic turnover of Tc-99m-HSA-MM in bone marrow, spleen, and liver was found to be accelerated in 66% of non-treated psoriatics, normal, accelerated or delayed in psoriatics treated with aromatic retinoid as well as considerably delayed in all of the psoriatics with cirrhosis of liver. Functional bone marrow scintigraphy proved to be an appropriate in vivo test system to reveal abnormalities of fixed macrophages in psoriatics. Furthermore, theratpeutic effects as well as influences of pre-existing disorders on different macrophage populations can be assessed. (Author)

  3. Magnetic resonance imaging of the bone marrow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baur-Melnyk, Andrea (ed.) [Klinikum der Univ. Muenchen (Germany). Inst. fuer Klinische Radiologie

    2013-08-01

    The first book devoted to MRI of the bone marrow. Describes the MRI appearances of normal bone marrows and the full range of bone marrow disorders. Discusses the role of advanced MRI techniques and contrast enhancement. On account of its unrivalled imaging capabilities and sensitivity, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is considered the modality of choice for the investigation of physiologic and pathologic processes affecting the bone marrow. This book describes the MRI appearances of both the normal bone marrow, including variants, and the full range of bone marrow disorders. Detailed discussion is devoted to malignancies, including multiple myeloma, lymphoma, chronic myeloproliferative disorders, leukemia, and bone metastases. Among the other conditions covered are benign and malignant compression fractures, osteonecrosis, hemolytic anemia, Gaucher's disease, bone marrow edema syndrome, trauma, and infective and non-infective inflammatory disease. Further chapters address the role of MRI in assessing treatment response, the use of contrast media, and advanced MRI techniques. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Bone Marrow represents an ideal reference for both novice and experienced practitioners.

  4. Clinical aspects of bone marrow transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shmitts, N.; Gassmann, V.; Leffler, G.

    1986-01-01

    Experience of bone marrow transplantation into patients with myeloproliferative syndromes, myelodysplasias and highly malignant lymphomas is presented. Side early and late effects of transplantation are described. The frequency and severity of complications of bone marrow transplantation depend sufficiently on the disease as well as on patient's age and general condition

  5. [Endogenous pyrogen formation by bone marrow cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efremov, O M; Sorokin, A V; El'kina, O A

    1978-01-01

    The cells of the rabbit bone marrow produced endogenous pyrogen in response to stimulation with bacterial lipopolysaccharide. Incubation of the cells in medium No 199 containing a 15% homologous serum is optimal for the release of pyrogen. It is supposed that the cells of the bone marrow take part in the formation of endgenous pyrogen and in the mechanism of pyrexia in the organism.

  6. One hundred patients with acute leukemia treated by chemotherapy, total body irradiation, and allogeneic marrow transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, E.D.; Buckner, C.D.; Banaji, M.

    1977-01-01

    One hundred patients, 54 with acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) and 46 with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), considered to be in the end stages of their disease, after combination chemotherapy were treated by marrow transplantation. All patients were given a marrow graft from an HLA-identical sibling after receiving 1000-rad total body irradiation (TBI). One group of 43 patients was given cyclophosphamide (CY), 60 mg/kg on each of 2 days, 5 and 4 days before TBI. In a second group of 31 patients, additional chemotherapy was given before CY and TBI. In a third group of 19 patients, BCNU was given before CY and TBI. A fourth group of 7 patients received other chemotherapy regimens before TBI. Six patients died 3 to 17 days after marrow infusion without evidence of engraftment. Ninety-four patients were engrafted rejected and only one patient rejected the graft. Thirteen patients are alive with a marrow graft, on no maintenance antileukemic therapy, and without recurrent leukemia 1--4 1 / 2 yr after transplantation. Three have chronic graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). The relapse rate appeared to be relatively constant over the first 2 yr and was extremely low after that time. Neither survival nor leukemic relapse appeared to be influenced by the type of leukemia nor by the preparative chemotherapy regimen given before TBI. Patients in fair clinical condition at the time of transplantation showed significantly longer survival times than patients in poor condition (p = 0.001). This observation, coupled with the observation that some patients may be cured of their disease, indicates that marrow transplantation should now be undertaken earlier in the management of patients with acute leukemia who have an HLA-matched sibling marrow donor

  7. Bone marrow uptake of 99mTc-MIBI in patients with multiple myeloma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fonti, R.; Del Vecchio, S.; Zannetti, A.; Di Gennaro, F.; Pace, L.; Salvatore, M.; De Renzo, A.; Catalano, L.; Califano, C.; Rotoli, B.

    2001-01-01

    In a previous study, we showed the ability of technetium-99m methoxyisobutylisonitrile ( 99m Tc-MIBI) scan to identify active disease in patients with multiple myeloma (Eur J Nucl Med 1998; 25: 714-720). In particular, a semiquantitative score of the extension and intensity of bone marrow uptake was derived and correlated with both the clinical status of the disease and plasma cell bone marrow infiltration. In order to estimate quantitatively 99m Tc-MIBI bone marrow uptake and to verify the intracellular localization of the tracer, bone marrow samples obtained from 24 multiple myeloma patients, three patients with monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) and two healthy donors were studied for in vitro uptake. After centrifugation over Ficoll-Hypaque gradient, cell suspensions were incubated with 99m Tc-MIBI and the uptake was expressed as the percentage of radioactivity specifically retained within the cells. The cellular localization of the tracer was assessed by micro-autoradiography. Twenty-two out of 27 patients underwent 99m Tc-MIBI scan within a week of bone marrow sampling. Whole-body images were obtained 10 min after intravenous injection of 555 MBq of the tracer; the extension and intensity of 99m Tc-MIBI uptake were graded using the semiquantitative score. A statistically significant correlation was found between in vitro uptake of 99m Tc-MIBI and both plasma cell infiltration (Pearson's coefficient of correlation r=0.69, P 99m Tc-MIBI inside the plasma cells infiltrating the bone marrow. Therefore, our findings show that the degree of tracer uptake both in vitro and in vivo is related to the percentage of infiltrating plasma cells which accumulate the tracer in their inner compartments. (orig.)

  8. Characterization of Fatty Acid Composition in Bone Marrow Fluid From Postmenopausal Women: Modification After Hip Fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, Melissa; Pino, Ana María; Fuenzalida, Karen; Rosen, Clifford J; Seitz, Germán; Rodríguez, J Pablo

    2016-10-01

    Bone marrow adipose tissue (BMAT) is associated with low bone mass, although the functional consequences for skeletal maintenance of increased BMAT are currently unclear. BMAT might have a role in systemic energy metabolism, and could be an energy source as well as an endocrine organ for neighboring bone cells, releasing cytokines, adipokines and free fatty acids into the bone marrow microenvironment. The aim of the present report was to compare the fatty acid composition in the bone marrow supernatant fluid (BMSF) and blood plasma of postmenopausal women women (65-80 years old). BMSF was obtained after spinning the aspirated bone marrow samples; donors were classified as control, osteopenic or osteoporotic after dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Total lipids from human bone marrow fluid and plasma were extracted, converted to the corresponding methyl esters, and finally analyzed by a gas chromatographer coupled with a mass spectrometer. Results showed that fatty acid composition in BMSF was dynamic and distinct from blood plasma, implying significance in the locally produced lipids. The fatty acid composition in the BMSF was enriched in saturated fatty acid and decreased in unsaturated fatty acids as compared to blood plasma, but this relationship switched in women who suffered a hip fracture. On the other hand, there was no relationship between BMSF and bone mineral density. In conclusion, lipid composition of BMSF is distinct from the circulatory compartment, most likely reflecting the energy needs of the marrow compartment. J. Cell. Biochem. 117: 2370-2376, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Bone marrow transplantation (1958-1978): conditioning and graft-versus-host disease, indications in aplasias and leukemias

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mathe, G; Schwarzenberg, L [Hopital Paul Brousse, 94 - Villejuif (France)

    1979-06-01

    Bone marrow transplantation (BMT), which stimulated great hope for treatment of aplasias and leukemias in 1958 following our first success in grafting this tissue, is, after a long period of study and development, experiencing renewed interest since it is now possible to obtain, in case of transplantation with genotypically matched sibling donors, 70% long survival (cures) in aplasia (under the condition that the recipient is not sensitized by previous transfusions) and in leukemia (under the condition that the recipient is transplanted in a period of remission and is not sensitized by transfusions). When the patient does not possess any genotypically matched donor, a trial of incompatible bone marrow transplantation after conditioning with antilymphocyte serum is reasonable, since we have obtained good, although unexplained, results with this method, which should be pursued. In any case, these transplants must be done in intensive care units in hemato-oncology departments.

  10. Bone marrow transplantation (1958-1978): conditioning and graft-versus-host disease, indications in aplasias and leukemias

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mathe, G.; Schwarzenberg, L.

    1979-01-01

    Bone marrow transplantation (BMT), which stimulated great hope for treatment of aplasias and leukemias in 1958 following our first success in grafting this tissue, is, after a long period of study and development, experiencing renewed interest since it is now possible to obtain, in case of transplantation with genotypically matched sibling donors, 70% long survival (cures) in aplasia (under the condition that the recipient is not sensitized by previous transfusions) and in leukemia (under the condition that the recipient is transplanted in a period of remission and is not sensitized by transfusions). When the patient does not possess any genotypically matched donor, a trial of incompatible bone marrow transplantation after conditioning with antilymphocyte serum is reasonable, since we have obtained good, although unexplained, results with this method, which should be pursued. In any case, these transplants must be done in intensive care units in hemato-oncology departments

  11. Marrow uptake index (MUI): A quantitative scintigraphic study of bone marrow in aplastic anaemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Padhy, A.K.; Garg, A.; Kochupillai, V.; Gopinath, P.G.; Basu, A.K.

    1987-01-01

    Aplastic anaemia affects the entire bone marrow. This prospective study was undertaken to develop and standardise a new nuclear medicine technique called 'dynamic bone marrow imaging'. Eleven patients and ten controls were studied. Serial images of the pelvis were obtained in frame mode following intravenous injection of 185-370 mBq of 99m Tc S. Colloid, and an index, called the bone marrow uptake index was calculated by taking into consideration the time activity curve obtained over the iliac crest. This was followed by static imaging of the entire bone marrow in all cases. It was possible to obtain excellent information regarding topographic distribution of bone marrow as well as detect early changes in bone marrow function following treatment. An attempt was also made to correlate bone marrow cellularity as obtained by bone marrow biopsy with results of dynamic bone marrow scintigraphy. On the basis of the encouraging results obtained in the present study, the authors feel that dynamic bone marrow imaging is an excellent technique for the objective evaluation of bone marrow in aplastic anaemia. 20 refs.; 4 figs.; 5 tabs

  12. Epithelial architectural destruction is necessary for bone marrow derived cell contribution to regenerating prostate epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palapattu, Ganesh S; Meeker, Alan; Harris, Timothy; Collector, Michael I; Sharkis, Saul J; DeMarzo, Angelo M; Warlick, Christopher; Drake, Charles G; Nelson, William G

    2006-08-01

    Using various nonphysiological tissue injury/repair models numerous studies have demonstrated the capacity of bone marrow derived cells to contribute to the repopulation of epithelial tissues following damage. To investigate whether this phenomenon might also occur during periods of physiological tissue degeneration/regeneration we compared the ability of bone marrow derived cells to rejuvenate the prostate gland in mice that were castrated and then later treated with dihydrotestosterone vs mice with prostate epithelium that had been damaged by lytic virus infection. Using allogenic bone marrow grafts from female donor transgenic mice expressing green fluorescent protein transplanted into lethally irradiated males we were able to assess the contributions of bone marrow derived cells to recovery of the prostatic epithelium in 2 distinct systems, including 1) surgical castration followed 1 week later by dihydrotestosterone replacement and 2) intraprostatic viral injection. Eight to 10-week-old male C57/Bl6 mice were distributed among bone marrow donor-->recipient/prostate injury groups, including 5 with C57/Bl6-->C57/Bl6/no injury, 3 with green fluorescent protein-->C57/Bl6/no injury, 3 with green fluorescent protein-->C57/Bl6/vehicle injection, 4 with green fluorescent protein-->C57/Bl6/virus injection and 3 each with green fluorescent protein-->C57/Bl6/castration without and with dihydrotestosterone, respectively. Prostate tissues were harvested 3 weeks after dihydrotestosterone replacement or 14 days following intraprostatic viral injection. Prostate tissue immunofluorescence was performed with antibodies against the epithelial marker cytokeratin 5/8, the hematopoietic marker CD45 and green fluorescent protein. Mice that sustained prostate injury from vaccinia virus infection with concomitant severe inflammation and glandular disruption showed evidence of bone marrow derived cell reconstitution of prostate epithelium, that is approximately 4% of all green

  13. LED lamp color control system and method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaines, James; Clauberg, Bernd; Van Erp, Josephus A.M.

    2013-02-05

    An LED lamp color control system and method including an LED lamp having an LED controller 58; and a plurality of LED channels 60 operably connected to the LED controller 58, each of the plurality of LED channels 60 having a channel switch 62 in series with at least one shunted LED circuit 83, the shunted LED circuit 83 having a shunt switch 68 in parallel with an LED source 80. The LED controller 58 determines whether the LED source 80 is in a feedback controllable range, stores measured optical flux for the LED source 80 when the LED source 80 is in the feedback controllable range, and bypasses storing the measured optical flux when the LED source 80 is not in the feedback controllable range.

  14. LED lamp power management system and method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaines, James; Clauberg, Bernd; Van Erp, Josephus A. M.

    2013-03-19

    An LED lamp power management system and method including an LED lamp having an LED controller 58; a plurality of LED channels 60 operably connected to the LED controller 58, each of the plurality of LED channels 60 having a channel switch 62 in series with at least one shunted LED circuit 83, the shunted LED circuit 83 having a shunt switch 68 in parallel with an LED source 80. The LED controller 58 reduces power loss in one of the channel switch 62 and the shunt switch 68 when LED lamp electronics power loss (P.sub.loss) exceeds an LED lamp electronics power loss limit (P.sub.lim); and each of the channel switches 62 receives a channel switch control signal 63 from the LED controller 58 and each of the shunt switches 68 receives a shunt switch control signal 69 from the LED controller 58.

  15. Increased incidence of murine graft-versus-host disease after allogeneic bone marrow transplantation by previous infusion of syngeneic bone marrow cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waer, M.; Ang, K.K.; van der Schueren, E.; Vandeputte, M.

    1984-01-01

    Different groups of BALB/c mice received supralethal total-body irradiation (TBI; 8.5 Gy, day 0). When 30 x 10(6) allogeneic (C57B1) bone marrow (BM) cells were infused with or without 10 x 10(6) syngeneic (BALB/c) bM cells on day 1, many animals (60%) died from graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). Typing of peripheral blood leukocytes for donor antigens showed that, respectively, 22/22 and 17/21 of the mice in both groups became chimeric. When syngeneic bone marrow was given on day 1 and allogeneic bone marrow on day 2 after TBI, a similar number of animals (21/23) became chimeric, but GVHD occurred more frequently in this group (25/26 mice, P less than 0.01). When the syngeneic bone marrow cells were replaced by spleen cells, or when the transplantation of allogeneic bone marrow was delayed till days 3 or 6 after TBI, almost all mice rejected the allogeneic BM graft and became long-term survivors. BALB/c mice receiving 30 x 10(6) C57B1 BM cells after 17 daily fractions of 0.2 Gy of total lymphoid irradiation (TLI), showed a high incidence of chimerism (15/17) and in none of the latter animals was GVHD observed. Despite the high incidence of GVHD in the mice receiving allogeneic BM after TBI and syngeneic BM transplantation, as compared with mice prepared with TLI which do not develop GVHD, suppressor cells were as easily induced after TBI and syngeneic BM transplantation as after TLI

  16. MR imaging of bone marrow disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, H.; Mano, I.; Yashiro, N.; Asai, S.; Lio, M.

    1986-01-01

    The author performed MR imaging in 89 patients with bone marrow disorders (29 with aplastic anemia, 20 with leukemia, 9 with postirradiation changes, 8 with hemosiderosis, 6 with primary bone tumors and metastases, and 17 with bone marrow disorders of other etiologies). They selected the thoracic and lumbar vertebral marrow as a target and used both T1-weighted spin-echo images and calculated T1 images. T1 was prolonged in bone marrow hyperplasia but shortened in hypoplasia. Bone marrow T1 values proved to depend on the number of fat cells (pathologic correlation). In aplastic anemia scattered islands of low signal intensity were seen within a background of high signal intensity in some typical cases. MR imaging patterns were used for staging aplastic anemia. T1 was prolonged in leukemia cells

  17. Donor milk: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuliani F

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Francesca Giuliani,1 Ilaria Rovelli,1 Chiara Peila,1 Stefania Alfonsina Liguori,2 Enrico Bertino,1 Alessandra Coscia1 1SCDU Neonatologia, Dipartimento di Scienze Pediatriche e dell'Adolescenza, Università degli Studi di Torino, Torino, Italy; 2SC Neonatologia, Ospedale Maria Vittoria, Torino, Italy Abstract: Mother's own milk is widely recognized as the optimal feeding for term infants, but increasing evidence exists of its benefits also for sick and preterm infants in neonatal intensive care units. However, the nutritional needs for appropriate growth and neurodevelopmental outcomes of such a particular population of infants should be attentively evaluated, considering also the indication to an appropriate fortification of human milk. The target is to achieve growth potential for preterm newborns while ensuring good metabolic outcomes and normal neurological development. When mother's milk is unavailable or in short supply, donor human milk (DHM represents the second best choice and, although somewhat modified by the Holder pasteurization process, it preserves many benefits when compared to formula, as documented by more and more reports, randomized controlled trials, and meta-analyses published in the past few years. Evidence exists of the protection exerted by DHM from necrotizing enterocolitis, while further studies are required to look at possible beneficial effects regarding infections, bronchopulmonary dysplasia, long-term cardiovascular risk factors, feeding tolerance, neurological outcome, and allergy. Finally, the concern that the use of DHM might decrease preterm infant breastfeeding is being raised. Conversely, publications exist showing that the use of DHM in the neonatal unit increases breastfeeding rates at discharge for infants of very low birth weight. Keywords: human milk, preterm infant feeding, milk bank, breast milk, mother's own milk, pasteurized human milk, fortification

  18. EFFECT ON LIFESPAN OF HIGH YIELD NONMYELOABLATING TRANSPLANTATION OF BONE MARROW FROM YOUNG TO OLD MICE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina eKovina

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Tissue renewal is a well-known phenomenon by which old and dying-off cells of various tissues of the body are replaced by progeny of local or circulating stem cells (SC. An interesting question is whether donor stem cells are capable to prolong the lifespan of an ageing organism by tissue renewal.. In this work we investigated the possible use of bone marrow SC for lifespan extension. To this purpose, chimeric C57BL/6 mice were created by transplanting bone marrow from young 1.5-month donors to 21.5-month-old recipients. Transplantation was carried out by means of a recently developed method which allowed to transplant without myeloablation up to 1.5×108 cells, that is, about 25 % of the total BM cells of the mouse. As a result, the mean survival time, counting from the age of 21.5 months, the start of the experiment, was +3.6 and +5.0 (± 0.1 months for the control and experimental groups, respectively, corresponding to a 39% ± 4% increase in the experimental group over the control. In earlier studies on BM transplantation a considerably smaller quantity of donor cells (5×106 was used, about 1 % of the total own BM cells. The recipients before transplantation were exposed to a lethal (for control animals X-ray dose which eliminated the possibility of studying the lifespan extension by this method.

  19. Bone Marrow Derivation of Interstitial Cells of Cajal in Small Intestine Following Intestinal Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dengqun Liu

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Interstitial cells of Cajal (ICCs in gastrointestinal tract are specialized cells serving as pacemaker cells. The origin of ICCs is currently not fully characterized. In this work, we aimed to study whether bone marrow-derived cells (BMDCs could contribute to the origin of ICCs in the muscular plexus of small intestine using GFP-C57BL/6 chimeric mice.Engraftment of BMDCs in the intestine was investigated for GFP expression. GFP positive bone marrow mononuclear cells reached a proportion of 95.65%±3.72% at different times in chimerism. Donor-derived cells distributed widely in all the layers of the gastrointestinal tract. There were GFP positive BMDCs in the myenteric plexus, which resembled characteristics of ICCs, including myenteric location, c-Kit positive staining, and ramified morphology. Donor-derived ICCs in the myenteric plexus contributed to a percentage ranging 9.25%±4.9% of all the ICCs in the myenteric plexus. In conclusion, here we described that donor-derived BMDCs might differentiate into gastrointestinal ICCs after radiation injury, which provided an alternative source for the origin of the ICCs in the muscular plexus of adult intestine. These results further identified the plasticity of BMDCs and indicated therapeutic implications of BMDCs for the gastrointestinal dysmotility caused by ICCs disorders.

  20. Use of lymphokine-activated killer cells to prevent bone marrow graft rejection and lethal graft-vs-host disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azuma, E.; Yamamoto, H.; Kaplan, J.

    1989-01-01

    Prompted by our recent finding that lymphokine-activated killer (LAK) cells mediate both veto and natural suppression, we tested the ability of adoptively transferred LAK cells to block two in vivo alloreactions which complicate bone marrow transplantation: resistance to transplanted allogeneic bone marrow cells, and lethal graft-vs-host disease. Adoptive transfer of either donor type B6D2 or recipient-type B6 lymphokine-activated bone marrow cells, cells found to have strong LAK activity, abrogated or inhibited the resistance of irradiated B6 mice to both B6D2 marrow and third party-unrelated C3H marrow as measured by CFU in spleen on day 7. The ability of lymphokine-activated bone marrow cells to abrogate allogeneic resistance was eliminated by C lysis depletion of cells expressing asialo-GM1, NK1.1, and, to a variable degree, Thy-1, but not by depletion of cells expressing Lyt-2, indicating that the responsible cells had a LAK cell phenotype. Similar findings were obtained by using splenic LAK cells generated by 3 to 7 days of culture with rIL-2. Demonstration that allogeneic resistance could be blocked by a cloned LAK cell line provided direct evidence that LAK cells inhibit allogeneic resistance. In addition to inhibiting allogeneic resistance, adoptively transferred recipient-type LAK cells prevented lethal graft-vs-host disease, and permitted long term engraftment of allogeneic marrow. Irradiation prevented LAK cell inhibition of both allogeneic resistance and lethal graft-vs-host disease. These findings suggest that adoptive immunotherapy with LAK cells may prove useful in preventing graft rejection and graft-versus-host disease in human bone marrow transplant recipients

  1. Colorimetric characterization of LED luminaires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa, C L M; Vieira, R R; Pereira, R C; Silva, P V M; Oliveira, I A A; Sardinha, A S; Viana, D D; Barbosa, A H; Souza, L P; Alvarenga, A D

    2015-01-01

    The Optical Metrology Division of Inmetro – National Institute of Metrology, Quality and Technology has recently started the colorimetric characterization of lamps by implementing Correlated Color Temperature (CCT) and Color Rendering Index (CRI) measurements of incandescent lamps, followed by the CFL, and LED lamps and luminaires. Here we present the results for the verification of the color characterization of samples of SSL luminaires for public as well as indoor illumination that are sold in Brazil

  2. Red-yellow marrow conversion: Its effect on the location of some solitary bone lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kricun, M.E.

    1985-01-01

    The location of red marrow related bone lesions is dependent upon the distribution of red marrow. It is altered by the normal conversion of red marrow to yellow (fat) marrow and by the reconversion of yellow marrow to red marrow caused by marrow infiltrating disorders or marrow stress disorders. (orig.)

  3. On kinetic study of blood cells and bone marrow under fractionated irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teterina, V.I.

    1977-01-01

    To study the changes in the cellular composition of bone marrow during irradiation experiments on the guinea pigs have been carried out. Animals were subjected to fractionated irradiation; daily dose of 12 rad, total doses of 250, 500, 750, 1000 and 1500 rad, total duration of radiation of 1,2,3,4 and 6 monts. Experiments have shown that with small levels of total doses of the ionizing radiation haemopoiesis in the bone marrow reached its maximum. This led to suppression of anaemia and profound leukaemia in the peripheral blood. With the increase of total doses phase of insufficient compensation of harmful effects of radiation has been reached, which with continuing radiation may lead to the exhaustion of reserve possibilities of bone marrow and to the development of pancytopenia

  4. Governance, resource curse and donor

    OpenAIRE

    Wiig, Arne

    2008-01-01

    Plan Part 1. Governance What is good governance? Why is it important? How can we measure good governance? Part 2. The resource curse and the importance of governance in resource rich countries Focus on political economy (PE) models of the resource curse Policy implications Some donor initiatives Transparency and the EITI Petroleum related aid - Window dressing initiatives or research based? Conclusion Governance, resource curse and donor

  5. The effect of variation in donor platelet function on transfusion outcome: a semirandomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Anne M; Garner, Stephen F; Foukaneli, Theodora; Godec, Thomas R; Herbert, Nina; Kahan, Brennan C; Deary, Alison; Bakrania, Lekha; Llewelyn, Charlotte; Ouwehand, Willem H; Williamson, Lorna M; Cardigan, Rebecca A

    2017-07-13

    The effect of variation in platelet function in platelet donors on patient outcome following platelet transfusion is unknown. This trial assessed the hypothesis that platelets collected from donors with highly responsive platelets to agonists in vitro assessed by flow cytometry (high-responder donors) are cleared more quickly from the circulation than those from low-responder donors, resulting in lower platelet count increments following transfusion. This parallel group, semirandomized double-blinded trial was conducted in a single center in the United Kingdom. Eligible patients were those 16 or older with thrombocytopenia secondary to bone marrow failure, requiring prophylactic platelet transfusion. Patients were randomly assigned to receive a platelet donation from a high- or low-responder donor when both were available, or when only 1 type of platelet was available, patients received that. Participants, investigators, and those assessing outcomes were masked to group assignment. The primary end point was the platelet count increment 10 to 90 minutes following transfusion. Analysis was by intention to treat. Fifty-one patients were assigned to receive platelets from low-responder donors, and 49 from high-responder donors (47 of which were randomized and 53 nonrandomized). There was no significant difference in platelet count increment 10 to 90 minutes following transfusion in patients receiving platelets from high-responder (mean, 21.0 × 10 9 /L; 95% confidence interval [CI], 4.9-37.2) or low-responder (mean, 23.3 × 10 9 /L; 95% CI, 7.8-38.9) donors (mean difference, 2.3; 95% CI, -1.1 to 5.7; P = .18). These results support the current policy of not selecting platelet donors on the basis of platelet function for prophylactic platelet transfusion. © 2017 by The American Society of Hematology.

  6. Graft-versus-leukemia, donor selection for adoptive immunotherapy in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LeFeber, W.P.; Truitt, R.L.; Rose, W.C.; Bortin, M.M.

    1977-01-01

    The optimal donor for adoptive immunotherapy would exhibit great antitumor reactivity and no antihost reactivity. Immunocompetent cells from 11 strains of mice were tested in vivo for their reactivity against a long-passage AKR acute lymphoblastic leukemia and against immunosuppressed nonleukemic AKR mice. Donor mice were syngeneic, unprimed H-2 compatible, primed H-2 compatible, congenic, or H-2 incompatible with AKR. Bioassays were used to evaluate the relative graft-vs.-leukemia (GvL) reactivity and the relative graft-vs.-host (GvH) reactivity of transplanted bone marrow and lymph-node cells from the panel of donors. No significant GvL reactivity was found when cells from syngeneic, unprimed H-2 compatible, or congenic donors were tested. H-2 compatible donors that were immunized with γ-irradiated AKR leukemic spleen cells showed modest GvL reactivity, but associated with the immunization was a disproportionate increase in acute and delayed GvH mortality. Among the H-2 mismatched donors, mice of the SJL strain appeared to most closely approach the ideal because of least intense GvH reactivity and maximal GvL reactivity. As measured in these experiments there was no correlation between the severity of GvH disease and the efficacy of the GvL reaction; GvL reactivity in unprimed donors was always associated with H-2 incompatibility; disparity between donor and recipient at H-2 did not guarantee an effective GvL reaction; and the increase in GvL reactivity obtained by immunizing H-2 compatible donors was overshadowed by the increase in GvH disease

  7. Hemopoietic regeneration in murine spleen following transfusion of normal and irradiated marrow: different response of granulocyte/macrophage and erythroid precursors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wangenheim, K.-H. von; Peterson, H.-P.; Huebner, G.E.; Feinendegen, L.E.

    1987-01-01

    To investigate cell proliferation in regenerating spleen, bone marrow of normal and gamma-irradiated donor mice (3 weeks after 5 Gy) was transfused into lethally irradiated recipients. In the donors and in the recipient spleens numbers of CFU-S and progenitor cells were determined. In the irradiated donors the progenitors were at control level after 3 weeks of recovery although CFU-S were still at 50% of control. Recipients of the irradiated marrow received therefore an increased proportion of progenitors. CFU-C appeared to be self-renewing and/or increased in number due to enhanced CFU-S differentiation, but not the erythroid progenitors. CFU-S self-renewal was reduced after 5 Gy. The data suggest that cell differentiation and maturation proceed during early splenic regeneration. The quantity of CFU-C does not necessarily mirror the situation in the stem cell compartment. (author)

  8. Celebrity-led development organisations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Budabin, Alexandra Cosima; Rasmussen, Louise Mubanda; Richey, Lisa Ann

    2017-01-01

    The past decade has seen a frontier open up in international development engagement with the entrance of new actors such as celebrity-led organisations. We explore how such organisations earn legitimacy with a focus on Madonna’s Raising Malawi and Ben Affleck’s Eastern Congo Initiative. The study...... for funding, endorsements, and expertise. We argue that the ways in which celebrity-led organisations establish themselves as legitimate development actors illustrate broader dynamics of the machinery of development.......The past decade has seen a frontier open up in international development engagement with the entrance of new actors such as celebrity-led organisations. We explore how such organisations earn legitimacy with a focus on Madonna’s Raising Malawi and Ben Affleck’s Eastern Congo Initiative. The study...... draws from organisational materials, interviews, mainstream news coverage, and the texts of the celebrities themselves to investigate the construction of authenticity, credibility, and accountability. We find these organisations earn legitimacy and flourish rapidly amid supportive elite networks...

  9. Visceral Leishmaniasis: A Differential Diagnosis to Remember after Bone Marrow Transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margarida Dantas Brito

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Leishmania infection in immunocompromised hosts is reported in the literature, mostly concerning human immunodeficiency virus infected patients. It is not well characterized in the context of stem cell transplantation. We report a rare case clinical case of visceral leishmaniasis after allogeneic bone marrow transplantation. A 50-year-old Caucasian male was referred to allogeneic bone marrow transplantation with a high-risk acute lymphoblastic B leukemia in first complete remission. Allogeneic SCT was performed with peripheral blood stem cells from an unrelated Portuguese matched donor. In the following months, patient developed mild fluctuating cytopenias, mostly thrombocytopenia (between 60 and 80∗109/L. The only significant complaint was intermittent tiredness. The common causes for thrombocytopenia in this setting were excluded—no evidence of graft versus host disease, no signs of viral or bacterial infection, and no signs of relapsed disease/dysplastic changes. The bone marrow smear performed 12 months after transplantation revealed an unsuspected diagnosis: a massive bone marrow infiltration with amastigotes.

  10. Prolonged Survival of Subcutaneous Allogeneic Islet Graft by Donor Chimerism without Immunosuppressive Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brend Ray-Sea Hsu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate whether tolerance-induced protection of islets in the renal subcapsular space can also prevent subcutaneous allogeneic islets from being rejected. We used bone marrow stem cells from C57BL/6 (H2b mice to construct donor chimerism in conditioned diabetic BALB/c (H2d mice and investigated the effect of donor chimerism on engraftment and survival of subcutaneously transplanted allogeneic islets in streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice. We also studied the anti-inflammatory effect of mesenchymal stem cell on islet engraftment. Full but not low-grade or no donor chimerism was associated with successful engraftment of allogeneic islets and restoration of normoglycemia in the treated diabetic mice. The temporary hyperglycemia was 11 ± 1 versus 19 ± 5 days (p<0.05 for the mice with full donor chimerism with transplanted islets in the renal subcapsular space versus the subcutaneous space, respectively. Cotransplantation of mesenchymal stem cell did not enhance alloislet engraftment. Full multilineage donor chimerism was associated with a higher transient expansion of CD11b+ and Gr-1+ myeloid progenitor cells and effector memory CD4 and CD8 T cells. In conclusion, full donor chimerism protected both renal subcapsular and subcutaneous allogeneic islets in this rodent transplantation model.

  11. Transplantation of islet cells across major histocompatibility barriers after total lymphoid irradiation and infusion of allogeneic bone marrow cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Britt, L.D.; Scharp, D.W.; Lacy, P.E.; Slavin, S.

    1982-01-01

    Diabetic Lewis rats (AgB1/L) were evaluated as recipients of allogeneic Wistar-Furth (AgB2/2) isolated adult islets without the use of standard recipient immunosuppression. One group was treated with fractionated total lymphoid irradiation (TLI) and Wistar-Furth bone marrow cell reconstitution to proven chimerism prior to islet transplantation. This group returned to a prediabetic state following Wistar-Furth islet transplantation without any evidence of rejection for 100 days posttransplant. A second group of Lewis rats received only TLI without bone marrow treatment. They gave a varying result following islet transplantation with one recipient showing evidence of prolonged islet survival. A third chimeric control group did not receive isolated islets and did not alter their diabetic state. A fourth group was not given TLI nor donor bone marrow cells and uniformly rejected their allogeneic islets by 7 days. Thus, allogeneic adult islets will survive across major rat histocompatibility barriers using TLI and donor bone marrow chimerism as the only form of immunosuppression

  12. Bone marrow transplantation after irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koch, M.; Blaha, M.; Merka, V.

    1990-01-01

    Bone marrow transplantation after irradiation is successful in only a part of the affected patients. The Chernobyl accident added to our knowledge: BMT can save life after whole-body irradiation with a dose exceeding 7-8 Gy. A timely decision on transplantation after a nuclear accident is difficult to make (rapid determination of homogeneity and type of radiation and the total dose. HL-A typing in lymphopenia, precise identification of radiation damage to other target organs, etc.). Further attention is to be paid to the treatment. Transplantations in case of malignities (especially hematologic ones) and other diseases will add to our knowledge and will lead to more simple procedures. (author). 3 figs., 1 tab., 12 refs

  13. The determination of lymphoid cell chimerism using peripheral blood lymphocytes from murine bone marrow chimeras

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skidmore, B.J.; Miller, L.S.

    1978-01-01

    A simple, rapid and accurate method was devised for determining lymphoid cell chimerism in bone marrow-reconstituted mice. Chimeras were produced by reconstituting lethally irradiated mice with semi-allogeneic bone marrow cells. Lymphocytes from the peripheral blood of individual chimeric mice were purified by sedimentation in dextran solution and differential flotation in Ficoll-Hypaque gradients. From 250-500 μl of blood, 1-7 x 10 5 cells were routinely obtained. The extent of chimerism was determined serologically by using peripheral blood lymphocytes as target cells in a dye exclusion microcytotoxicity assay. Using this new technique, approximately 80% of the reconstituted mice were found to be repopulated with lymphocytes of the donor type. (Auth.)

  14. Proliferation differentiation and therapeutic effect of short-term cultured murine bone marrow cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Zekun; Cong Jianbo

    1986-01-01

    Murine bone marrow cells were cultured in conditioned medium of muscle. After 24 hours of culture, both adherent and suspended cells appeared in the culture. The adherent cells mainly consisted of macrophages and the suspended cells were predominantly granulocytes. After 6 days, the total number of nucleated cells and CFU-C in the culture increased about 400% and 600% respectively, but CFU-S reduced to 21% approximately. Lymphocytes persisted only for 4 days. The stem cells (CFU-S) from 6-day culture were injected into the lethally irradiated syngenic mice. The 30 day survival rate of the treated mice was 89% whereas that of the controls was only 7%. The bone marrow cells in 2/8 of recipients sacrificed at 30 or 60 days were of donor type and 6/8 of the recipients were chimeras

  15. G-CSF-primed autologous and allogeneic bone marrow for transplantation in clinical oncology. Cell content and immunological characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grivtsova, L. Yu; Melkova, K. N.; Kupryshkina, N. A.; Vorotnikov, I. K.; Grigoryeva, T. A.; Selchuk, V. Yu; Grebennikova, O. P.; Titova, G. V.; Tupitsyn, N. N.

    2018-01-01

    60 samples of G-CSF-primed bone marrow (39 cancer patients and 21 healthy donors) to be used for transplantation to cancer patients were analyzed and compared by main characteristics with historical control and 13 bone marrow samples from control patient with mastopathy. Basing on morphological and multicolor flow cytometry findings certain characteristics of G-CSF-primed bone marrow were discovered, such as a significant increase in blast count in cancer patients as compared to donors and control patients (p<0.037), a higher neutrophil maturation index (p<0.001) and a lower percentage of mature lymphocytes (p<0.008) as compared to the control group. Among lymphocyte populations G-CSF-priming was associated with a significant increase in the total of mature CD3+ T-cells and CD8+ T-killers (p<0.0001) and a decrease in CD56+CD3- and/or CD16+CD3- NK-cells (p<0.006) both in cancer patients and healthy donors in comparison with the controls.

  16. Philanthropic Motivations of Community College Donors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Linnie S.; Duggan, Molly H.

    2011-01-01

    This descriptive study surveyed current, lapsed, and major gift donors to explore the impact of college communications on donors' decisions to contribute to the college, the likelihood of donor financial support for various college projects, and the philanthropic motivation profiles of the donors of a midsized, multicampus community college in…

  17. Kidney transplant outcomes from older deceased donors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pippias, Maria; Jager, Kitty J; Caskey, Fergus

    2018-01-01

    As the median age of deceased kidney donors rises, updated knowledge of transplant outcomes from older deceased donors in differing donor-recipient age groups is required. Using ERA-EDTA Registry data we determined survival outcomes of kidney allografts donated from the same older deceased donor...

  18. Bone marrow origin of decidual cell precursors in the pseudopregnant mouse uterus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kearns, M.; Lala, P.K.

    1982-01-01

    Decidual cells are considered to be the endproduct of a hormonally induced transformation of endometrial stromal cells of the uterus. However, the source of these precursors remains unknown. This study of evaluated the possibility of their bone marrow origin by an examination of the H-2 phenotype of decidual cells in pseudopregnant bone marrow chimeras. These chimeras were produced by repopulating lethally irradiated CBA/J female (H-2k) mice with bone marrow from (CBA/J x C57BL/6J) F1 female (H-2kb) mice. Pseudopregnancy was produced with a hormonal regimen followed by an oil-induced decidual stimulus. Chimerism was evaluated radioautographically by an identification of the donor-specific Kb phenotype on cells with an immunolabeling technique with monospecific anti-H-2 serum followed by radioiodinated protein A. The extent of chimerism as indicated by the degree of Kb labeling on decidual cells as well as macrophages contained within the decidual nodules was quantitatively compared with that seen on splenic lymphocytes. Fair to good chimerism, as reflected by labeling for the donor-specific marker (Kb), was seen on splenic lymphocytes and macrophages within the decidual nodules in 6 out of 11 animals. A similar level of chimerism was detected on decidual cells in all but one of these six, in which case this was low. One animal showed low chimerism in the spleen but good chimerism on the decidual cells. The remaining four mice were nonchimeric for all three cell types. These results indicate that decidual cells and macrophages appearing within the decidual nodules of pseudopregnant mice are ultimate descendants of bone marrow cells

  19. Hypoxia-Activated Prodrug TH-302 Targets Hypoxic Bone Marrow Niches in Preclinical Leukemia Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benito, Juliana; Ramirez, Marc S; Millward, Niki Zacharias; Velez, Juliana; Harutyunyan, Karine G; Lu, Hongbo; Shi, Yue-Xi; Matre, Polina; Jacamo, Rodrigo; Ma, Helen; Konoplev, Sergej; McQueen, Teresa; Volgin, Andrei; Protopopova, Marina; Mu, Hong; Lee, Jaehyuk; Bhattacharya, Pratip K; Marszalek, Joseph R; Davis, R Eric; Bankson, James A; Cortes, Jorge E; Hart, Charles P; Andreeff, Michael; Konopleva, Marina

    2016-04-01

    To characterize the prevalence of hypoxia in the leukemic bone marrow, its association with metabolic and transcriptional changes in the leukemic blasts and the utility of hypoxia-activated prodrug TH-302 in leukemia models. Hyperpolarized magnetic resonance spectroscopy was utilized to interrogate the pyruvate metabolism of the bone marrow in the murine acute myeloid leukemia (AML) model. Nanostring technology was used to evaluate a gene set defining a hypoxia signature in leukemic blasts and normal donors. The efficacy of the hypoxia-activated prodrug TH-302 was examined in the in vitro and in vivo leukemia models. Metabolic imaging has demonstrated increased glycolysis in the femur of leukemic mice compared with healthy control mice, suggesting metabolic reprogramming of hypoxic bone marrow niches. Primary leukemic blasts in samples from AML patients overexpressed genes defining a "hypoxia index" compared with samples from normal donors. TH-302 depleted hypoxic cells, prolonged survival of xenograft leukemia models, and reduced the leukemia stem cell pool in vivo In the aggressive FLT3/ITD MOLM-13 model, combination of TH-302 with tyrosine kinase inhibitor sorafenib had greater antileukemia effects than either drug alone. Importantly, residual leukemic bone marrow cells in a syngeneic AML model remain hypoxic after chemotherapy. In turn, administration of TH-302 following chemotherapy treatment to mice with residual disease prolonged survival, suggesting that this approach may be suitable for eliminating chemotherapy-resistant leukemia cells. These findings implicate a pathogenic role of hypoxia in leukemia maintenance and chemoresistance and demonstrate the feasibility of targeting hypoxic cells by hypoxia cytotoxins. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  20. Living related donor liver transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, C L; Chen, Y S; Liu, P P; Chiang, Y C; Cheng, Y F; Huang, T L; Eng, H L

    1997-10-01

    Living related liver transplantation (LRLT) has been developed in response to the paediatric organ donor shortage. According to the International Living Donor Registry, 521 transplants had been performed in 515 patients between December 8 1988 and January 19 1996 in 30 centres worldwide. The overall actuarial patient and graft survival rates were 82.7 and 80%, respectively. Between June 17 1994 and November 30 1996, the authors performed 11 LRLT at the Chung Gung Memorial Hospital. The living donors consisted of 10 mothers and one father. The mean graft weight was 303 g and the mean graft recipient weight ratio was 2.2%. Donor hepatectomy was performed without vascular inflow occlusion. The intra-operative blood loss ranged from 30 mL to 120 mL with an average of 61 mL, and blood transfusion was not required in all donors both intra-operatively and during the postoperative period. Underlying diseases of the recipients were biliary atresia (n = 10) and glycogen storage disease (n = 1). The mean graft cold ischaemia time was 106 min, the mean second warm ischaemia time was 51 min and the mean interval between portal and arterial reperfusion was 81 min. The initial LRLT results were promising with all donors having been discharged without complication. The recipients experienced a few complications, all of which were manageable with early intervention. All 11 recipients are alive and well. These are encouraging results and the authors hope to expand the use of live donors for liver transplantation to cope with demand.

  1. Living Donor Liver Transplant is not a Transparent Activity in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naidu, Sudeep

    2013-03-01

    Living donor liver transplant has gained rapid popularity in India as a life saving procedure for end stage liver disease. The undoubted benefit for the recipient is clouded by a few unfavorable outcomes in donors which have led to allegations of lack of transparency. These factors are easily remediable with an attitude of self audit and self disclosure by transplant centers, enabling a truly informed consenting procedure.

  2. [Lack of donor organs as an argument for living donors?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirste, G

    2010-09-01

    In Germany more than 12,000 patients are presently waiting for an organ donation. Living donation makes sense for the long waiting time for a kidney, but it is not a permanent solution for the lack of organ donations. In the future topics which should be discussed are intensified public relations, a better family care and the allocation of rights and duties at the German coordinating agency. For all the prospects of success after a living donation the high standards of quality and security, which are targeted by the German donor organization in recipient protection, responsible evaluation of the expanded donor criteria and immunosuppressive therapy are all in favor of post-mortem organ donation. For all the phenomenal chance of success the priority of the post-mortem organ donation is regulated by law. The living donation remains an individual decision of the donor and the personal situation of life.

  3. Why Should Donors Care about Corruption?

    OpenAIRE

    Kolstad, Ivar

    2008-01-01

    Corruption is bad for donor business. Corruption reduces popular support for aid in donor countries. However, aid agencies should pay attention to corruption because it is the right thing to do, rather than just the smart thing to do. Donor anti-corruption policies require a strong grounding in ethics. Corruption produces bad development outcomes. This is the reasoning largely underlying donor anti-corruption efforts. The focus on consequences of corruption makes donor anticorruptioneffo...

  4. The proteomic dataset for bone marrow derived human mesenchymal stromal cells: Effect of in vitro passaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel T. Mindaye

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Bone-marrow derived mesenchymal stromal cells (BMSCs have been in clinical trials for therapy. One major bottleneck in the advancement of BMSC-based products is the challenge associated with cell isolation, characterization, and ensuring cell fitness over the course of in vitro cell propagation steps. The data in this report is part of publications that explored the proteomic changes following in vitro passaging of BMSCs [4] and the molecular heterogeneity in cultures obtained from different human donors [5,6].The methodological details involving cell manufacturing, proteome harvesting, protein identification and quantification as well as the bioinformatic analyses were described to ensure reproducibility of the results.

  5. Rapid and automated processing of bone marrow grafts without Ficoll density gradient for transplantation of cryopreserved autologous or ABO-incompatible allogeneic bone marrow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schanz, U; Gmür, J

    1992-12-01

    The growing number of BMTs has increased interest in safe and standardized in vitro bone marrow processing techniques. We describe our experience with a rapid automated method for the isolation of mononuclear cells (MNC) from large volumes of bone marrow using a Fenwal CS-3000 cell separator without employing density gradient materials. Forty bone marrow harvests with a mean volume of 1650 +/- 307 ml were processed. A mean of 75 +/- 34% (50 percentile range 54-94%) of the original MNCs were recovered in a volume of 200 ml with only 4 +/- 2% of the starting red blood cells (RBC). Removal of granulocytes, immature myeloid precursors and platelets proved to be sufficient to permit safe cryopreservation and successful autologous BMT (n = 25). Allogeneic BMT (n = 14, including three major ABO-incompatible) could be performed without additional manipulation. In both groups of patients timely and stable engraftment comparable to historical controls receiving Ficoll gradient processed autologous (n = 17) or unprocessed allogeneic BMT (n = 54) was observed. Moreover, 70 +/- 14% of the RBC could be recovered from the grafts. They were used for autologous RBC support of donors, rendering unnecessary autologous blood pre-donations.

  6. Function following Living Donor Nephrectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan Heldt

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. While tobacco use by a renal transplant recipient has been shown to negatively affect graft and patient survival, the effect of smoking on the part of the kidney donor remains unknown. Methods. 29 smoking donors (SD and their recipients (SD-R as well as 71 non-smoking donors (ND and their recipients (ND-R were retrospectively reviewed. Preoperative demographics and perioperative variables including serum creatinine (Cr and glomerular filtration rate (GFR were calculated and stratified by amount of tobacco exposure in pack-years. Clinical outcomes were analyzed with a Student's t-test, chi-square, and multiple linear regression analysis (=0.05. Results. At most recent followup, SD-R's had a significantly smaller percent decrease in postoperative Cr than ND-R's (−57% versus −81%; =0.015 and lower calculated GFR's (37.0 versus 53.0 mL/min per 1.73 m2; <0.001. SD's had a larger percent increase in Cr than ND's at most recent followup (57% versus 40%; <0.001, with active smokers having a larger increase than those who quit, although this difference was not statistically significant (68% versus 52%; =0.055. Conclusions. Use of tobacco by kidney donors is associated with decreased posttransplant renal function, although smoking cessation can improve outcomes. Kidneys from donors who smoke should be used with caution.

  7. Dengue antibodies in blood donors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribas-Silva, Rejane Cristina; Eid, Andressa Ahmad

    2012-01-01

    Dengue is an urban arbovirus whose etiologic agent is a virus of the genus Flavorius with four distinct antigen serotypes (DENV-1, DENV-2, DENV-3 and DENV-4) that is transmitted to humans through the bite of the mosquito Aedes aegypti. The Campo Mourão region in Brazil is endemic for dengue fever. OBTECTIVE: The aim of this study was to evaluate the presence of IgG and IgM antibodies specific to the four serotypes of dengue in donors of the blood donor service in the city of Campo Mourão. Epidemiological records were evaluated and 4 mL of peripheral blood from 213 blood donors were collected in tubes without anticoagulant. Serum was then obtained and immunochromatographic tests were undertaken (Imuno-Rápido Dengue IgM/IgG(TM)). Individuals involved in the study answered a social and epidemiological questionnaire on data which included age, gender and diagnosis of dengue. Only three (1.4%) of the 213 blood tests were positive for IgG anti-dengue antibodies. No donors with IgM antibody, which identifies acute infection, were identified. The results of the current analysis show that the introduction of quantitative or molecular serological methods to determine the presence of anti-dengue antibodies or the detection of the dengue virus in blood donors in endemic regions should be established so that the quality of blood transfusions is guaranteed.

  8. Irradiation of the red bone marrow and the health implications ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The physiology and function of the bone is looked at as to the role in housing bone marrow. The bone marrow and particularly the red bone marrow is discussed. Sources of radiation are discussed and the health implications highlighted for caution and for study or evaluation. Key Words: Bone marrow, Irradiation, Radiation, ...

  9. Donor Outcomes in Living Donor Liver Transplantation-Analysis of 275 Donors From a Single Centre in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narasimhan, Gomathy; Safwan, Mohamed; Kota, Venugopal; Reddy, Mettu S; Bharathan, Anand; Dabora, Abderrhaim; Kaliamoorthy, Ilankumaran; Kanagavelu, Rathnavel G; Srinivasan, Vijaya; Rela, Mohamed

    2016-06-01

    Live donor liver transplantation is the predominant form of liver transplantation in India and in most Asian countries. Donor outcome reports are an important source of information to be shared with prospective donors at the time of informed consent. This is the first donor outcome series from India. Analysis of donor characteristics and morbidity of 275 live donors from a single large volume center is documented. Two hundred seventy-five patients donated from November 2009 to October 2014, 144 were women and 131 were men, 180 donated to adults and 95 donated to children. Right lobe donors were majority at 62.2% followed by left lateral segment 28%. Two thirds of the live donors did not have any morbidity; 114 complications were encountered in 85 patients. The complications were graded as per Clavien 5 tier grading and major morbidity (grade III b, grade IV grade V) was 4.36%. Postoperative biliary complication was seen in 3 donors. This large single-center study is the first donor outcome report from India, and the results are comparable to other published donor series. Documentation and regular audit of donor outcomes is important to help improve the safety of donor hepatectomy and to provide a database for informed consent of prospective donors.

  10. Circulating endothelial progenitor cell numbers are not associated with donor organ age or allograft vasculopathy in cardiac transplant recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, H E; Parry, G; Dark, J H; Arthur, H M; Keavney, B D

    2009-02-01

    Increasing age is associated with reduced numbers of circulating endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs). It is unclear whether this relates to depletion or impairment of bone marrow progenitors, or to deficient mobilization signals from aging tissues. In cardiac transplant patients, one previous study has reported an association between circulating EPCs and the risk of cardiac allograft vasculopathy (CAV). We investigated whether increased donor heart age, a strong risk factor for CAV, was associated with reduced circulating EPC numbers in a group of cardiac transplant recipients matched for factors which influence EPC numbers, but with maximally discordant donor heart ages. We identified 32 patient pairs, matched for factors known to influence EPC numbers, but who had discordant donor heart ages by at least 20 years. EPCs were quantified using flow cytometry for absolute counts of cells expressing all the combinations of CD45, CD34, CD133 and the kinase domain receptor (KDR). There were no significant differences in the numbers of circulating EPCs between patients with old or young donor heart age. There was no association between the presence of CAV and circulating EPC numbers. We suggest that the increased susceptibility to CAV of older donor hearts is not mediated via circulating EPCs. Our results are consistent with the theory that the normal age-related decline in EPC numbers relates to bone marrow aging rather than failure of target tissues to induce EPC mobilization.

  11. Aging of bone marrow mesenchymal stromal/stem cells: Implications on autologous regenerative medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charif, N; Li, Y Y; Targa, L; Zhang, L; Ye, J S; Li, Y P; Stoltz, J F; Han, H Z; de Isla, N

    2017-01-01

    With their proliferation, differentiation into specific cell types, and secretion properties, mesenchymal stromal/stem cells (MSC) are very interesting tools to be used in regenerative medicine. Bone marrow (BM) was the first MSC source characterized. In the frame of autologous MSC therapy, it is important to detect donor's parameters affecting MSC potency. Age of the donors appears as one parameter that could greatly affect MSC properties. Moreover, in vitro cell expansion is needed to obtain the number of cells necessary for clinical developments. It will lead to in vitro cell aging that could modify cell properties. This review recapitulates several studies evaluating the effect of in vitro and in vivo MSC aging on cell properties.

  12. Determination of an unrelated donor pool size for human leukocyte antigen-matched platelets in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Bonet Bub

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Background: Successful transfusion of platelet refractory patients is a challenge. Many potential donors are needed to sustain human leukocyte antigen matched-platelet transfusion programs because of the different types of antigens and the constant needs of these patients. For a highly mixed population such as the Brazilian population, the pool size required to provide adequate platelet support is unknown. Methods: A mathematical model was created to estimate the appropriate size of an unrelated donor pool to provide human leukocyte antigen-compatible platelet support for a Brazilian population. A group of 154 hematologic human leukocyte antigen-typed patients was used as the potential patient population and a database of 65,500 human leukocyte antigen-typed bone marrow registered donors was used as the donor population. Platelet compatibility was based on the grading system of Duquesnoy. Results: Using the mathematical model, a pool containing 31,940, 1710 and 321 donors would be necessary to match more than 80% of the patients with at least five completely compatible (no cross-reactive group, partial compatible (one cross-reactive group or less compatible (two cross-reactive group donors, respectively. Conclusion: The phenotypic diversity of the Brazilian population has probably made it more difficulty to find completely compatible donors. However, this heterogeneity seems to have facilitated finding donors when cross-reactive groups are accepted as proposed by the grading system of Duquesnoy. The results of this study may help to establish unrelated human leukocyte antigen-compatible platelet transfusions, a procedure not routinely performed in most Brazilian transfusion services.

  13. Gamete donation: parents' experiences of searching for their child's donor siblings and donor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, T; Jadva, V; Kramer, W; Golombok, S

    2009-03-01

    This study investigates the new phenomenon of parents of donor offspring searching for and contacting their child's 'donor siblings' (i.e. donor offspring conceived by the same donor) and donor. Online questionnaires were completed by 791 parents (39% lone-mother, 35% lesbian-couple, 21% heterosexual-couple, 5% non-specified) recruited via the Donor Sibling Registry; a US-based international registry that facilitates contact between donor conception families who share the same donor. Data were collected on parents' reasons for searching for their child's donor siblings and/or donor, the outcome of these searches and parents' and their child's experiences of any resulting contact. Parents' principal motivation for searching for their child's donor siblings was curiosity and for their donor, enhancing their child's sense of identity. Some parents had discovered large numbers of donor siblings (maximum = 55). Most parents reported positive experiences of contacting and meeting their child's donor siblings and donor. This study highlights that having access to information about a child's donor origins is important for some parents and has potentially positive consequences. These findings have wider implications because the removal of donor anonymity in the UK and elsewhere means that increasing numbers of donor offspring are likely to seek contact with their donor relations in the future.

  14. Reduction and repopulation of recipient T4+ and T8+ T-lymphocytes in allogeneic bone marrow transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gratama, J.W.; van den Bergh, R.L.; Naipal, A.; D'Amaro, J.; Zwaan, F.E.; Jansen, J.; de Gast, G.C.

    1986-01-01

    In eight recipients of allogeneic bone marrow grafts who had sex-mismatched donors, the reduction and subsequent repopulation of T4+ and T8+ T-lymphocytes of recipient origin were studied. The origin of the donor-recipient T4+ and T8+ T cells was studied using quinacrine staining of Y chromatin combined with T-cell typing for T4 and T8. Following chemoradiotherapy and bone marrow transplantation (BMT), T cells reached their nadir at a median of five (range 1-8) days after BMT. T8+ T cells decreased at a faster rate from the peripheral blood than T4+ T cells. The first T cells that appeared in the circulation at day 12 were predominantly T4+, and a large number of them were of recipient origin. Thereafter, they gradually decreased, and the numbers of T cells of donor origin increased. In the patients who had no or only minor complications, T4+ and T8+ T cells of donor origin repopulated the blood at similar rates. This pattern, however, was modified by severe graft-versus-host disease or by cytomegalovirus infection

  15. Pathological changes after bone marrow and skin allograft transplantation in rats inflicted with severe combined radiation-burn injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng Huaien; Cheng Tianmin; Yan Yongtang

    1994-01-01

    Bone marrow and skin allografts from the same donor were transplanted to rats inflicted with 8 Gy γ-radiation combined with third degree burns of 15% body surface area within 6 hr post injury. Pathological changes of hematopoietic tissues and skin allografts were studied. All injured controls died within 7 days post injury without bone marrow regeneration; 50% of treated rats survived with living skin allografts on 50th day post injury. On days 100 and 480 post operation, grafted skin still survived well on recipients with normal ultrastructure. Epidermic cells of skin allografts proliferated on day 5, developed and repaired on day 10. Histological structure of the skin returned to normal on day 30 post operation. The regeneration of bone marrow appeared on 5th day, increased markedly on day 10, and almost completed on day 15 after bone marrow transplantation. However, the regeneration of lymphocytes in cortex of spleen and lymph nodes did not appear until day 15 of BMT. The results show that bone marrow and skin allograft transplantation at early time post injury in most severe combined radiation-burn injury have tremendous beneficial effects, and the skin allograft can survive for a long time

  16. Prevention of lethal murine graft versus host disease by treatment of donor cells with L-leucyl-L-leucine methyl ester

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charley, M.; Thiele, D.L.; Bennett, M.; Lipsky, P.E.

    1986-01-01

    Graft vs. host disease (GVHD) remains one of the main problems associated with bone marrow transplantation. The current studies were undertaken to determine whether treatment of the donor inoculum with the anticytotoxic cell compound L-leucyl-L-leucine methyl ester (Leu-Leu-OMe) would alter the development of GVHD in a murine model. Irradiated recipient mice transplanted with a mixture of control bone marrow and spleen cells from naive semiallogeneic donors died rapidly from GVHD, whereas the recipients of cells incubated with 250 microM Leu-Leu-OMe all survived. In addition, Leu-Leu-OMe treatment of cells obtained from donors immunized against host alloantigens resulted in significantly prolonged survival. Phenotypic characterization of spleen cells from the various groups of mice that had received Leu-Leu-OMe-treated cells and survived consistently revealed the donor phenotype. Treatment of marrow cells with 250 microM Leu-Leu-OMe appeared to have no adverse effects on stem cell function. Erythropoiesis was undiminished, as assayed by splenic 5-iodo-2'-deoxyuridine- 125 I uptake. Moreover, granulocytic and megakaryocytic regeneration were histologically equivalent in the spleens of recipients of control or Leu-Leu-OMe-treated cells. Treatment of the donor inoculum with Leu-Leu-OMe thus prevents GVHD in this murine strain combination with no apparent stem cell toxicity

  17. Establishment of Donor Chimerism Using Allogeneic Bone Marrow with AMP Cell Co-infusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-01

    and/or select agents We have modified the protocol to allow for intraosseous injection of AMP cells and stem cells. We obtained approval from...into the tibial tuberosity using a 16-guage needle after inducing general anesthesia and sterile preparation of the site. A pressure bandage is

  18. Effect of total lymphoid irradiation (TLI) and donor bone marrow (BM) on islet transplantation in baboons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nash, J.R.; Smit, J.A.; Myburgh, M.A.; Bell, P.R.F.

    1981-01-01

    The susceptibility of isolated islet allografts to rejection and the limited success of established immunosuppressive technique in influencing it is well known. However, the recent demonstration of the efficacy of TLI and BM in the induction of transplantation tolerance has been a major advance. In this study, we investigated the efficacy of similar irradiation schedules on the prolongation of islet allograft survival in the same animal model

  19. Quarterly Performance/Technical Report of the National Marrow Donor Program

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Setterholm, Michelle

    2009-01-01

    .... Contingency Preparedness: Collect information from transplant centers, build awareness of the Transplant Center Contingency Planning Committee and educate the transplant community about the critical importance of establishing...

  20. In vitro characterization of bone marrow stromal cells from osteoarthritic donors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maik Stiehler

    2016-05-01

    Overall, the in vitro characteristics of BMSCs are not markedly influenced by OA. However, increased SOX9 and CD90 as well as reduced CD166 expression levels in OA-BMSCs warrant further investigation. These data will help to further understand the role of BMSC in OA and facilitate the application of autologous cell-based strategies for musculoskeletal tissue regeneration in OA patients.

  1. Bone marrow lesions: A systematic diagnostic approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grande, Filippo Del; Farahani, Sahar J; Carrino, John A; Chhabra, Avneesh

    2014-01-01

    Bone marrow lesions on magnetic resonance (MR) imaging are common and may be seen with various pathologies. The authors outline a systematic diagnostic approach with proposed categorization of various etiologies of bone marrow lesions. Utilization of typical imaging features on conventional MR imaging techniques and other problem-solving techniques, such as chemical shift imaging and diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), to achieve accurate final diagnosis has been highlighted

  2. Thalassemia paravertebral tumors and bone marrow scan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huglo, D.; Rose, C.; Deveaux, M.; Bauters, F.; Marchandise, X.

    1995-01-01

    Two first cousins with thalassemia and with a paravertebral mass had had an indium 111 chloride bone marrow scan. Result of scan influenced therapy: medical treatment in one case where an extramedullary erythropoiesis was confirmed, surgical treatment in the other case. The use of dual-isotope SPECT (indium 111 chloride, HDP -99 Tc) constitutes a contribution to the establishment of diagnosis of extramedullary erythropoiesis, giving to bone marrow scintigraphy a merited importance, avoiding the biopsy. (authors). 15 refs., 5 figs

  3. Bone marrow lesions: A systematic diagnostic approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filippo Del Grande

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Bone marrow lesions on magnetic resonance (MR imaging are common and may be seen with various pathologies. The authors outline a systematic diagnostic approach with proposed categorization of various etiologies of bone marrow lesions. Utilization of typical imaging features on conventional MR imaging techniques and other problem-solving techniques, such as chemical shift imaging and diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI, to achieve accurate final diagnosis has been highlighted.

  4. BONE MARROW ABONRMALITIES IN HIV INFECTION

    OpenAIRE

    Sharad Antiram Dhurve

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Hematological abnormalities are a common complication of HIV infection. Bone marrow abnormalities occur in all stages of HIV infection. Present work was carried out to study the bone marrow abnormalities in patients with HIV/AIDS. Methods 160 patients of HIV +ve were included in the study. A complete blood count, relevant biochemical investigations, CD4 counts were done, besides a thorough history and clinical examination. HIV positive patients were classified as those having AID...

  5. Splenic irradiation before bone marrow transplantation for chronic myeloid leukaemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gratwohl, A.; Hermans, J.; Biezen, A.V.

    1996-01-01

    A total of 229 patients with chronic myeloid leukaemia (CML) in chronic phase were randomized between 1986 and 1990 to receive or not receive additional splenic irradiation as part of their conditioning prior to bone marrow transplantation (BMT). Both groups, 115 patients with and 114 patients without splenic irradiation, were very similar regarding distribution of age, sex, donor/recipient sex combination, conditioning, graft-versus-host disease (GvHD) prevention method and blood counts at diagnosis or prior to transplant. 135 patients (59%) are alive as of October 1995 with a minimum follow-up of 5 years. 52 patients have relapsed (23%), 26 patients in the irradiated, 26 patients in the non-irradiated group (n.s.) with a relapse incident at 6 years of 28%. The main risk factor for relapse was T-cell depletion as the method for GvHD prevention, and an elevated basophil count in the peripheral blood prior to transplant. Relapse incidence between patients with or without splenic irradiation was no different in patients at high risk for relapse, e.g. patients transplanted with T-cell-depleted marrows (P = n.s.) and in patients with low risk for relapse, e.g. patients transplanted with non-T-cell-depleted transplants and basophil counts 3% basophils in peripheral blood). In this patient group, relapse incidence was 11% at 6 years with splenic irradiation but 32% in the non-irradiated group (P = 0.05). Transplant-related mortality was similar whether patients received splenic irradiation or not. This study suggests an advantage in splenic irradiation prior to transplantation for CML in this subgroup of patients and illustrates the need for tailored therapy. (Author)

  6. Achieving donor management goals before deceased donor procurement is associated with more organs transplanted per donor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malinoski, Darren J; Daly, Michael C; Patel, Madhukar S; Oley-Graybill, Chrystal; Foster, Clarence E; Salim, Ali

    2011-10-01

    There is a national shortage of organs available for transplantation. Implementation of preset donor management goals (DMGs) to improve outcomes is recommended, but uniform practices and data are lacking. We hypothesized that meeting DMGs before organ procurement would result in more organs transplanted per donor (OTPD). The eight organ procurement organization in United Network for Organ Sharing Region 5 selected 10 critical care end points as DMGs. Each organ procurement organization submitted retrospective data from 40 standard criteria donors. "DMGs met" was defined as achieving any eight DMGs before procurement. The primary outcome was ≥4 OTPD. Binary logistic regression was used to determine independent predictors of ≥4 OTPD with a pdonors had 3.6±1.6 OTPD. Donors with DMGs met had more OTPD (4.4 vs. 3.3, p50% (OR=4.0), Pao2:FIO2>300 (OR=4.6), and serum sodium 135 to 160 mEq/L (OR=3.4). Meeting DMGs before procurement resulted in more OTPD. Donor factors and critical care end points are independent predictors of organ yield. Prospective studies are needed to determine the true impact of each DMG on the number and function of transplanted organs.

  7. Bone density in apheresis donors and whole blood donors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boot, C.L.; Luken, J.S.; van den Burg, P.J.M.; de Kort, W.L.A.M.; Koopman, M.M.W.; Vrielink, H.; van Schoor, N.M.; den Heijer, M.; Lips, P.

    2015-01-01

    Apheresis donation using citrate causes acute decrease in serum calcium and increase in serum parathyroid hormone. Long-term consequences, such as decrease in bone mineral density (BMD), are not known. In this study, we compared the BMD of 20 postmenopausal apheresis donors (mean donation number 115

  8. Suicidal hanging donors for lung transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ananiadou, Olga; Schmack, Bastian; Zych, Bartlomiej; Sabashnikov, Anton; Garcia-Saez, Diana; Mohite, Prashant; Weymann, Alexander; Mansur, Ashham; Zeriouh, Mohamed; Marczin, Nandor; De Robertis, Fabio; Simon, Andre Rüdiger; Popov, Aron-Frederik

    2018-01-01

    Abstract In the context of limited donor pool in cardiothoracic transplantation, utilization of organs from high risk donors, such as suicidal hanging donors, while ensuring safety, is under consideration. We sought to evaluate the outcomes of lung transplantations (LTx) that use organs from this group. Between January 2011 and December 2015, 265 LTx were performed at our center. Twenty-two recipients received lungs from donors after suicidal hanging (group 1). The remaining 243 transplantations were used as a control (group 2). Analysis of recipient and donor characteristics as well as outcomes was performed. No statistically significant difference was found in the donor characteristics between analyzed groups, except for higher incidence of cardiac arrest, younger age and smoking history of hanging donors (P donor cause of death is not associated with poor mid-term survival or chronic lung allograft dysfunction following transplantation. These results encourage assessment of lungs from hanging donors, and their consideration for transplantation. PMID:29620623

  9. Simultaneous development of antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) and natural killer (NK) activity in irradiated mice reconstituted with bone marrow cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sihvola, M.; Hurme, M.

    1987-01-01

    Spleen cells from irradiated, bone marrow-reconstituted mice were tested for their ability to mediate antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity against P815 target (ADCC-P815), ADCC against sheep red blood cells (ADCC-SRBC), and natural killer (NK) activity judged as YAC-1 lysis at different times after bone marrow reconstitution. Donor-derived ADCC-P815 effectors were found to appear in the spleens 10-12 days after bone marrow reconstitution simultaneously with the appearance of donor-derived NK cells. NK cells recently derived from bone marrow are known to express the Thy-1 antigen; the phenotype of the ''early'' ADCC-P815 effectors was found to be the same as that of NK cells, i.e., Thy-1+, asialo-GM1+. These data suggest that ADCC-P815 effector cells belong to the NK cell population. ADCC-SRBC, in contrast to ADCC-P815 and NK activity, was already high on Day 7 after bone marrow reconstitution. However, it was mediated partly by recipient-derived effectors. ADCC-SRBC effectors were characterized to be different from ADCC-P815 effectors

  10. Bioactive lipid coating of bone allografts directs engraftment and fate determination of bone marrow-derived cells in rat GFP chimeras.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Anusuya; Segar, Claire E; Chu, Yihsuan; Wang, Tiffany W; Lin, Yong; Yang, Chunxi; Du, Xeujun; Ogle, Roy C; Cui, Quanjun; Botchwey, Edward A

    2015-09-01

    Bone grafting procedures are performed to treat wounds incurred during wartime trauma, accidents, and tumor resections. Endogenous mechanisms of repair are often insufficient to ensure integration between host and donor bone and subsequent restoration of function. We investigated the role that bone marrow-derived cells play in bone regeneration and sought to increase their contributions by functionalizing bone allografts with bioactive lipid coatings. Polymer-coated allografts were used to locally deliver the immunomodulatory small molecule FTY720 in tibial defects created in rat bone marrow chimeras containing genetically-labeled bone marrow for monitoring cell origin and fate. Donor bone marrow contributed significantly to both myeloid and osteogenic cells in remodeling tissue surrounding allografts. FTY720 coatings altered the phenotype of immune cells two weeks post-injury, which was associated with increased vascularization and bone formation surrounding allografts. Consequently, degradable polymer coating strategies that deliver small molecule growth factors such as FTY720 represent a novel therapeutic strategy for harnessing endogenous bone marrow-derived progenitors and enhancing healing in load-bearing bone defects. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Reintegration after bone marrow transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, F; Zabora, J; Polland, A; Wingard, J

    1999-01-01

    This study examines the problems of bone marrow transplantation (BMT) survivors in returning to "normal" life in the community after BMT. Before being released from The Johns Hopkins Oncology Center, 84 recipients of BMT were interviewed regarding their quality of life and psychosocial adaptation. Survivors were reinterviewed at 6 months, and at 1 year post-BMT, producing considerable qualitative data regarding their problems in living. Eighty-four patients who had received BMT completed qualitative interviews and standardized measures before treatment, before the return home, and at 6 and 12 months post-BMT. The interviews were subjected to a content analysis methodology to establish units and categories to examine the body of material. Content analysis of these interviews from the first year after BMT identified three areas of psychosocial morbidity; 1) physical problems, which included fatigue, appearance, troubles in eating, and physical restrictions; 2) psychological problems, which included fears about the future, sense of loss of control, anxiety, and depression; and 3) community reintegration problems, which included difficulty in returning to former social roles, separation from home, family, and friends, difficulty in resuming social relations, dealing with stigmatization, problems with family and children, and financial and employment difficulties. Identification of these problems for BMT survivors can be used to guide the development of specific materials and services to prepare recipients of BMTs and their families for life after the transplant. These qualitative results can also be used to direct the development of assessment tools to identify potential patient and family problems.

  12. Comparison of fracture site callus with iliac crest bone marrow as the source of plastic-adherent cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Achmad Zaki

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Red marrow has been described as the main source of mesenchymal stem cells although its aspiration and isolation from bone marrow was reported to have significant donor site morbidity. Since secondary bone healing occurs through formation of callus as the result of proliferation and differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells, callus may become alternative source for mesenchymal stem cells. In this study, we compared the number of plastic-adherent cells from fracture site callus and bone marrow of iliac crest after two and four weeks of culture.Methods: Sixteen New Zealand rabbits were fracturized at the femoral shaft. Then, these rabbits were taken care. After two weeks of fracturization, 3 mL iliac crest bone marrow aspiration and callus extraction of eight rabbits were cultured (group I. The other eight rabbits were treated equally after four weeks of fracturization (group II. Simultaneously, the cultures were observed after one and two weeks. Four weeks later, they were harvested. Cells were counted using Neubauer hemocytometer. The average number of cells between the sources and groups were statistically analyzed using the unpaired t-test. Results: In group I, there were 2.6 ± 0.1 x 104 cells in the culture of iliac crest bone marrow aspirate and 2.5 ± 0.1 x 104 cells in culture of callus extract from fracture site (p = 0.34. In group II, there were 2.7 ± 0.1 x 104 cells and 2.1 ± 0.1 x 104 cells, respectively (p < 0.001.Conclusion: Fracture site callus at the second week post-fracturization may be potential as source of plastic-adherent cells compared with iliac crest bone marrow. (Med J Indones. 2013;22:70-5Keywords: Bone marrow, fracture site callus, iliac crest, long bone, mesenchymal stem cell, plastic-adherent cells

  13. Effects Of Hypoxia in Long-Term In Vitro Expansion of Human Bone Marrow Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pezzi, Annelise; Amorin, Bruna; Laureano, Álvaro; Valim, Vanessa; Dahmer, Alice; Zambonato, Bruna; Sehn, Filipe; Wilke, Ianaê; Bruschi, Lia; Silva, Maria Aparecida Lima da; Filippi-Chiela, Eduardo; Silla, Lucia

    2017-10-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) are considered multipotent stromal, non-hematopoietic cells with properties of self-renovation and differentiation. Optimal conditions for culture of MSC have been under investigation. The oxygen tension used for cultivation has been studied and appears to play an important role in biological behavior of mesenchymal cells. The aim is characterize MSC in hypoxia and normoxia conditions comparing their morphological and functional characteristics. Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells obtained from 15 healthy donors and cultured. MSC obtained from each donor were separated into two cultivation conditions normoxia (21% O 2 ) and hypoxia (three donors at 1%, three donors at 2%, five donors at 3%, and four donors at 4% O 2 ) up to second passage. MSC were evaluated for proliferation, differentiation, immunophenotyping, size and cell complexity, oxidative stress, mitochondrial activity, and autophagy. Culture conditions applied did not seem to affect immunophenotypic features and cellular plasticity. However, cells subjected to hypoxia showed smaller size and greater cellular complexity, besides lower proliferation (P cells cultured in low O 2 tension had lower mitochondrial activity (P Cell. Biochem. 118: 3072-3079, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Role of bone marrow transplantation for correcting hemophilia A in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Follenzi, Antonia; Raut, Sanj; Merlin, Simone; Sarkar, Rita

    2012-01-01

    To better understand cellular basis of hemophilia, cell types capable of producing FVIII need to be identified. We determined whether bone marrow (BM)–derived cells would produce cells capable of synthesizing and releasing FVIII by transplanting healthy mouse BM into hemophilia A mice. To track donor-derived cells, we used genetic reporters. Use of multiple coagulation assays demonstrated whether FVIII produced by discrete cell populations would correct hemophilia A. We found that animals receiving healthy BM cells survived bleeding challenge with correction of hemophilia, although donor BM-derived hepatocytes or endothelial cells were extremely rare, and these cells did not account for therapeutic benefits. By contrast, donor BM-derived mononuclear and mesenchymal stromal cells were more abundant and expressed FVIII mRNA as well as FVIII protein. Moreover, injection of healthy mouse Kupffer cells (liver macrophage/mononuclear cells), which predominantly originate from BM, or of healthy BM-derived mesenchymal stromal cells, protected hemophilia A mice from bleeding challenge with appearance of FVIII in blood. Therefore, BM transplantation corrected hemophilia A through donor-derived mononuclear cells and mesenchymal stromal cells. These insights into FVIII synthesis and production in alternative cell types will advance studies of pathophysiological mechanisms and therapeutic development in hemophilia A. PMID:22368271

  15. Global trends and challenges in deceased donor kidney allocation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Diana A; Watson, Christopher J; Bradley, J Andrew; Johnson, Rachel J; Forsythe, John L; Oniscu, Gabriel C

    2017-06-01

    Worldwide, the number of patients able to benefit from kidney transplantation is greatly restricted by the severe shortage of deceased donor organs. Allocation of this scarce resource is increasingly challenging and complex. Striking an acceptable balance between efficient use of (utility) and fair access to (equity) the limited supply of donated kidneys raises controversial but important debates at ethical, medical, and social levels. There is no international consensus on the recipient and donor factors that should be considered in the kidney allocation process. There is a general trend toward a reduction in the influence of human leukocyte antigen mismatch and an increase in the importance of other factors shown to affect posttransplant outcomes, such as cold ischemia, duration of dialysis, donor and recipient age, and comorbidity. Increased consideration of equity has led to improved access to transplantation for disadvantaged patient groups. There has been an overall improvement in the transparency and accountability of allocation policies. Novel and contentious approaches in kidney allocation include the use of survival prediction scores as a criterion for accessing the waiting list and at the point of organ offering with matching of predicted graft and recipient survival. This review compares the diverse international approaches to deceased donor kidney allocation and their evolution over the last decade. Copyright © 2017 International Society of Nephrology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Simultaneous bone marrow and composite tissue transplantation in rats treated with nonmyeloablative conditioning promotes tolerance1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Hong; Ramsey, Deborah M.; Wu, Shengli; Bozulic, Larry D.; Ildstad, Suzanne T.

    2012-01-01

    Background Approaches to safely induce tolerance in vascularized composite allotransplantation (VCA) with chimerism through bone marrow transplantation (BMT) are currently being pursued. However, the VCA were historically performed sequentially after donor chimerism was established. Delayed VCA is not clinically applicable due to the time constraints associated with procurement from deceased donors. A more clinically relevant approach to perform both the BMT and VCA simultaneously was evaluated. Methods WF (RT1Au) rats were treated with a short course of immunosuppressive therapy (anti-αβ-TCR mAb, FK-506, and anti-lymphocyte serum). One day prior to BMT, rats were treated with varying doses of total body irradiation (TBI) followed by transplantation of heterotopic osteomyocutaneous flaps from hind limbs of ACI (RT1Aabl) rats. Results 80% of rats conditioned with 300 cGy TBI and 40% of rats receiving 400 cGy TBI accepted the VCA. Mixed chimerism was detected in peripheral blood at one month post-VCA, but chimerism was lost in all transplant recipients by 4 months. The majority of peripheral donor cells originated from the BMT and not the VCA. Acceptors of VCA were tolerant of a donor skin graft challenge and no anti-donor antibodies were detectable, suggesting a central deletional mechanism for tolerance. Regulatory T cells (Treg) from spleens of acceptors more potently suppressed lymphocyte proliferation than Treg from rejectors in the presence of donor stimulator cells. Conclusions These studies suggest that simultaneous BMT and VCA may establish indefinite allograft survival in rats through Treg-mediated suppression and thymic deletion of alloreactive T cells. PMID:23250336

  17. For Donors Who Have Everything.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shubeck, Theresa

    1990-01-01

    Most major donors don't need another plaque or formal dinner. Development officers need to be more imaginative and less materialistic in expressing their institution's thanks, personalizing them by tying the gesture in with something distinctive about the institution or the gift. Development office teamwork and care help promote donor…

  18. Being a Living Donor: Risks

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to know FAQ Living donation What is living donation? Organs Types Being a living donor First steps Being ... are considering one of these types of living donation, please talk to your transplant center about the organ-specific risks. Psychological concerns You may also have ...

  19. LEDs light up the world

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mather, N.

    2004-06-30

    A lighting system using light-emitting diodes, and privately financed by a Canadian engineering professor at the University of Calgary, has been set up in a village in Nepal in 2000. Since then, through the efforts of the 'Light Up The World' Foundation, established by Dr. Irvine-Halliday, projects have lit up thousands of homes in the Philippines, India, Afghanistan, the Galapagos Islands, Mexico, Sri Lanka, and Angola. Although the goal of the project is primarily to provide lighting for reading and writing for school-children, the project has been the source of many other advantages; creation of enterprise, increased employment, enhanced income, gender equality, and improvements in health and safety among them. Since LED lamps in most cases replace kerosene lamps, the system also has significant environmental benefits. The system as originally envisioned creates electricity by pedal-powered generator, or by solar panels connected to a battery, depending on what is available at each home. Each home is connected to the power supply and supplied with low-energy diode lamps. The lights are extremely efficient and many homes can be equipped with them using less energy than it takes to power a single 100-watt light bulb. 5 photos.

  20. Associations of health status with subsequent blood donor behavior-An alternative perspective on the Healthy Donor Effect from Donor InSight

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Hurk, Katja; Zalpuri, Saurabh; Prinsze, Femmeke J.; Merz, Eva-Maria; de Kort, Wim L. A. M.

    2017-01-01

    In donor health research, the 'Healthy Donor Effect' (HDE) often biases study results and hampers their interpretation. This refers to the fact that donors are a selected 'healthier' subset of a population due to both donor selection procedures and self-selection. Donors with long versus short donor

  1. Aggregation-Induced Emission Enhancement from Disilane-Bridged Donor-Acceptor-Donor Luminogens Based on the Triarylamine Functionality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usuki, Tsukasa; Shimada, Masaki; Yamanoi, Yoshinori; Ohto, Tatsuhiko; Tada, Hirokazu; Kasai, Hidetaka; Nishibori, Eiji; Nishihara, Hiroshi

    2018-04-18

    Six novel donor-acceptor-donor organic dyes containing a Si-Si moiety based on triarylamine functionalities as donor units were prepared by Pd-catalyzed arylation of hydrosilanes. Their photophysical, electrochemical, and structural properties were studied in detail. Most of the compounds showed attractive photoluminescence (PL) and electrochemical properties both in solution and in the solid state because of intramolecular charge transfer (ICT), suggesting these compounds could be useful for electroluminescence (EL) applications. The aggregation-induced emission enhancement (AIEE) characteristics of 1 and 3 were examined in mixed water/THF solutions. The fluorescence intensity in THF/water was stronger in the solution with the highest ratio of water because of the suppression of molecular vibration and rotation in the aggregated state. Single-crystal X-ray diffraction of 4 showed that the reduction of intermolecular π-π interaction led to intense emission in the solid state and restricted intramolecular rotation of the donor and acceptor moieties, thereby indicating that the intense emission in the solid state is due to AIEE. An electroluminescence device employing 1 as an emitter exhibited an external quantum efficiency of up to 0.65% with green light emission. The emission comes solely from 1 because the EL spectrum is identical to that of the PL of 1. The observed luminescence was sufficiently bright for application in practical devices. Theoretical calculations and electrochemical measurements were carried out to aid in understanding the optical and electrochemical properties of these molecules.

  2. Neural differentiation potential of human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells: misleading marker gene expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Montzka Katrin

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In contrast to pluripotent embryonic stem cells, adult stem cells have been considered to be multipotent, being somewhat more restricted in their differentiation capacity and only giving rise to cell types related to their tissue of origin. Several studies, however, have reported that bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs are capable of transdifferentiating to neural cell types, effectively crossing normal lineage restriction boundaries. Such reports have been based on the detection of neural-related proteins by the differentiated MSCs. In order to assess the potential of human adult MSCs to undergo true differentiation to a neural lineage and to determine the degree of homogeneity between donor samples, we have used RT-PCR and immunocytochemistry to investigate the basal expression of a range of neural related mRNAs and proteins in populations of non-differentiated MSCs obtained from 4 donors. Results The expression analysis revealed that several of the commonly used marker genes from other studies like nestin, Enolase2 and microtubule associated protein 1b (MAP1b are already expressed by undifferentiated human MSCs. Furthermore, mRNA for some of the neural-related transcription factors, e.g. Engrailed-1 and Nurr1 were also strongly expressed. However, several other neural-related mRNAs (e.g. DRD2, enolase2, NFL and MBP could be identified, but not in all donor samples. Similarly, synaptic vesicle-related mRNA, STX1A could only be detected in 2 of the 4 undifferentiated donor hMSC samples. More significantly, each donor sample revealed a unique expression pattern, demonstrating a significant variation of marker expression. Conclusion The present study highlights the existence of an inter-donor variability of expression of neural-related markers in human MSC samples that has not previously been described. This donor-related heterogeneity might influence the reproducibility of transdifferentiation protocols as

  3. Magnetic resonance imaging of bone marrow disease in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, M.D.; Klatte, E.C.; Baehner, R.

    1984-01-01

    Seven children underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the bone marrow: results showed that it is technically feasible to obtain good MR images of marrow in children. MR has detected abnormality in the bone marrow of a child who had metastatic neuroblastoma. The extent of abnormality in the femur correlated well with findings of a bone marrow isotope scan. In one child who had idiopathic aplastic anemia, diseased marrow could not be distinguished from normal marrow on MR images. MRI identified abnormality of the marrow in osteogenic sarcoma, and demonstrated change in response to chemotherapy. It displayed marrow spread of tumors as well as CT. MRI showed marrow abnormality in four children who had leukemia

  4. Dissociation between peripheral blood chimerism and tolerance to hindlimb composite tissue transplants: preferential localization of chimerism in donor bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahhal, Dina N; Xu, Hong; Huang, Wei-Chao; Wu, Shengli; Wen, Yujie; Huang, Yiming; Ildstad, Suzanne T

    2009-09-27

    Mixed chimerism induces donor-specific tolerance to composite tissue allotransplants (CTAs). In the present studies, we used a nonmyeloablative conditioning approach to establish chimerism and promote CTA acceptance. Wistar Furth (RT1A(u)) rats were conditioned with 600 to 300 cGy total body irradiation (TBI, day-1), and 100 x 10(6) T-cell-depleted ACI (RT1A(abl)) bone marrow cells were transplanted on day 0, followed by a 11-day course of tacrolimus and one dose of antilymphocyte serum (day 10). Heterotopic osteomyocutaneous flap transplantation was performed 4 to 6 weeks after bone marrow transplantation. Mixed chimerism was initially achieved in almost all recipients, but long-term acceptance of CTA was only achieved in rats treated with 600 cGy TBI. When anti-alphabeta-T-cell receptor (TCR) monoclonal antibody (mAb) (day-3) was added into the regimens, donor chimerism was similar to recipients preconditioned without anti-alphabeta-TCR mAb. However, the long-term CTA survival was significantly improved in chimeras receiving more than or equal to 300 cGy TBI plus anti-alphabeta-TCR mAb. Higher levels of donor chimerism were associated with CTA acceptance. The majority of flap acceptors lost peripheral blood chimerism within 6 months. However, donor chimerism persisted in the transplanted bone at significantly higher levels compared with other hematopoietic compartments. The compartment donor chimerism may be responsible for the maintenance of tolerance to CTA. Long-term acceptors were tolerant to a donor skin graft challenge even in the absence of peripheral blood chimerism. Mixed chimerism established by nonmyeloablative conditioning induces long-term acceptance of CTA, which is associated with persistent chimerism preferentially in the transplanted donor bone.

  5. Biosimilar G-CSF versus filgrastim and lenograstim in healthy unrelated volunteer hematopoietic stem cell donors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farhan, Roiya; Urbanowska, Elżbieta; Zborowska, Hanna; Król, Małgorzata; Król, Maria; Torosian, Tigran; Piotrowska, Iwona; Bogusz, Krzysztof; Skwierawska, Kamila; Wiktor-Jędrzejczak, Wiesław; Snarski, Emilian

    2017-10-01

    The World Marrow Donor Organization recommends original granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) for the mobilization of stem cells in healthy unrelated hematopoietic stem cell donors. We report the comparison of a biosimilar G-CSF (Zarzio) with two original G-CSFs (filgrastim and lenograstim) in mobilization in unrelated donors. We included data of 313 consecutive donors who were mobilized during the period from October 2014 to March 2016 at the Medical University of Warsaw. The primary endpoints of this study were the efficiency of CD34+ cell mobilization to the circulation and results of the first apheresis. The mean daily dose of G-CSF was 9.1 μg/kg for lenograstim, 9.8 μg/kg for biosimilar filgrastim, and 9.3 μg/kg for filgrastim (p blood before the first apheresis was 111 for lenograstim, 119 for biosimilar filgrastim, and 124 for filgrastim (p = 0.354); the mean difference was even less significant when comparing CD34+ number per dose of G-CSF per kilogram (p = 0.787). Target doses of CD34+ cells were reached with one apheresis in 87% donors mobilized with lenograstim and in 93% donors mobilized with original and biosimilar filgrastim (p = 0.005). The mobilized apheresis outcomes (mean number of CD34+ cells/kg of donor collected during the first apheresis) was similar with lenograstim, biosimilar filgrastim, and filgrastim: 6.2 × 10 6 , 7.6 × 10 6 , and 7.3 × 10 6 , respectively, p = 0.06. There was no mobilization failure in any of the donors. Biosimilar G-CSF is as effective in the mobilization of hematopoietic stem cells in unrelated donors as original G-CSFs. Small and clinically irrelevant differences seen in the study can be attributed to differences in G-CSF dose and collection-related factors. Active safety surveillance concurrent to clinical use and reporting to donor outcome registry (e.g., EBMT donor outcome registry or WMDA SEAR/SPEAR) might help to evaluate the possible short- and long-term complications of

  6. Studies on the distribution of hematopoietic bone marrow by bone marrow scintigraphy, 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujimori, Katsuhiko

    1976-01-01

    Distribution of the leukemic marrow was investigated in 42 cases by bone marrow scintigraphy using sup(99m)Tc sulfur colloid in association with clinical findings and ferrokinetics studies in order to clarify hematopoietic function in leukemia. 17 of chronic myelogenous leukemia, 3 of lymphatic leukemia, 2 of monocytic leukemia, 7 of atypical leukemia and one of erythroleukemia. 12 acute myelogenous leukemia were classified into 3 types A, B and C. Type A showed the distribution similar to those obtained with normal controls. Ferrokinetics studies, however, indicated complete absence of erythropoiesis. Type B showed complete lack of sup(99m)Tc activity in usual marrow sites, although ferrokinetics data showed normal erythropoeitic function. Type C showed abnormal concentration of sup(99m)Tc sulfur colloid in the tibiae. 17 chronic myelogenous leukemia showed reduced sup(99m)Tc activity in usual marrow sites and remarkable expanded marrow extending into distal femurs, proximal and distal tibiae and bones of feet. 2 acute lymphotic leukemia patients showed complete absence of sup(99m)Tc activity. The one chronic type showed almost normal distribution. Monocytic leukemia showed decreased marrow distribution in the sternum and vertebrae. Of 6 atypical leukemias one showed almost normal distribution. The others, including a case with hypoplastic luekemia, demonstrated marrow extension similar to that observed in chronic myelogenous leukemia or monocytic leukemia. Erythroleukemia showed increased concentrations of sup(99m)Tc activity in the usual marrow sites and marked marrow expansion throughout all long bones. These results suggest that there is a discrepancy between bone marrow distribution and hematopoietic function in the cases of acute myelogenous leukemia. (J.P.N.)

  7. In utero transplantation of human bone marrow-derived multipotent mesenchymal stem cells in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Shiu-Huey; Kuo, Tom K; Liu, Ming; Lee, Oscar K

    2006-03-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are multipotent cells that can be isolated from human bone marrow and possess the potential to differentiate into progenies of embryonic mesoderm. However, current evidence is based predominantly on in vitro experiments. We used a murine model of in utero transplantation (IUT) to study the engraftment capabilities of human MSCs. MSCs were obtained from bone marrow by negative immunoselection and limiting dilution, and were characterized by flow cytometry and by in vitro differentiation into osteoblasts, chondrocytes, and adipocytes. MSCs were transplanted into fetal mice at a gestational age of 14 days. Engraftment of human MSCs was determined by flow cytometry, polymerase chain reaction, and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). MSCs engrafted into tissues originating from all three germ layers and persisted for up to 4 months or more after delivery, as evidenced by the expression of the human-specific beta-2 microglobulin gene and by FISH for donor-derived cells. Donor-derived CD45+ cells were detectable in the peripheral blood of recipients, suggesting the participation of MSCs in hematopoiesis at the fetal stage. This model can further serve to evaluate possible applications of MSCs. Copyright 2006 Orthopaedic Research Society.

  8. Reactivation of Immunological Response in Lethally X-Irradiated Mice Treated with Isogeneic Bone Marrow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stankovic, V.; Slijepcevic, M.; Hrsak, I. [Institute Ruder Boskovic, Zagreb, Yugoslavia (Croatia)

    1968-08-15

    Male and female C57BL/H and CBA/H mice aged 10-12 weeks were used as recipients and donors, respectively. All recipient mice were given a lethal whole-body X-irradiation dose (850 R for C57BL and 950 R for CBA mice) followed by iv injection of 10 x 106 isogeneic eosin-negative bone-marrow cells suspended in 0.5 ml of Hank's solution. The number of eosin-positive cells was less than 10%. The state of immunological responsiveness of irradiated recipients was measured at different time intervals up to 86 days after irradiation. The immune response to bacterial antigen was measured with the titre of agglutinating antibodies in serum six days after iv antigenic stimulation with a suspension of 2 x 10{sup 7} killed Salmonella typhimurium cells. The immune response to tissue antigens was evaluated by: (a) the effectiveness of the spleen cells from isologous radiation chimeric parental mice in preventing bone marrow from F{sub 1} (C57BL x CBA) hybrid donor from therapeutically affecting lethally irradiated F j recipient mice; (b) the effectiveness of the spleen cells in inducing splenom egaly in recipient F{sub 1} hybrid mice (Simonsen test). It was found that the responsiveness to bacterial antigens reappears much earlier and increases much faster than the immunological responsiveness to tissue antigens. (author)

  9. Influence of donor-donor transport on excitation energy transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pandey, K K; Joshi, H C; Pant, T C [Kumaun University, Nainital (India). Department of Physics

    1989-01-01

    Energy migration and transfer from acriflavine to rhodamine B and malachite green in poly (methylmethacrylate) have been investigated using the decay function analysis. It is found that the influence of energy migration in energy transfer can be described quite convincingly by making use of the theories of Loring, Andersen and Fayer (LAF) and Huber. At high acceptor concentration direct donor-acceptor transfer occurs through Forster mechanism. (author). 17 refs., 5 figs.

  10. Establishment of an oocyte donor program. Donor screening and selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quigley, M M; Collins, R L; Schover, L R

    1991-01-01

    IVF with donated oocytes, followed by embryo placement in the uterus of a recipient who has been primed with exogenous steroids, is a successful treatment for special cases of infertility. Preliminary results indicate that the success rate in this situation is even greater than that usually seen with normal IVF (with placement of the embryos back into the uteri of the women from whom the oocytes were recovered). Although different sources for donated oocytes have been identified, the use of "excess" oocytes from IVF cycles and the attempted collection of oocytes at the time of otherwise indicated pelvic surgery have ethical and practical problems associated with their use. We have herein described the establishment of a successful program relying on anonymous volunteers who go through ovarian stimulation, monitoring, and oocyte recovery procedures solely to donate oocytes. The potential donors go through an exhaustive screening and education process before they are accepted in the program. Psychological evaluation of our potential donors indicated a great degree of turmoil in their backgrounds and a wide variety of motivations for actually participating. Despite the extensive educational and screening process, a substantial percentage of the donors did not complete a donation cycle, having either voluntarily withdrawn or been dropped because of lack of compliance. Further investigation of the psychological aspects of participating in such a program is certainly warranted. The use of donated oocytes to alleviate specific types of infertility is quite successful, but the application of this treatment is likely to be limited by the relative unavailability of suitable oocyte donors.

  11. Live donor transplantation--the incompetent donor: comparative law.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfman, Samuel; Shaked, Tali

    2008-12-01

    Informed consent of the patient to medical treatment is an essential prerequisite for any invasive medical procedure. However in emergency cases, when the patient is unable to sign a consent form due to unconsciousness or to psychotic state, than the primary medical consideration shall take place. In such a case, in order to save life or even prevent a major medical hazard to the patient, doctors are allowed, in certain cases and in accordance with well accepted medical practice, to perform invasive procedures, major surgery or risky pharmacological treatment, without the explicit consent of the patient. All the above refers to the cases when avoidance of such non-consented treatment may harm severely the health and wellbeing of the patient and there is no doubt that such treatment is for the ultimate benefit of the patient. The question, however, shall arise when such a medical procedure is not necessarily for the benefit of the patient, but rather for the benefit of somebody else. Such is the case in the transplantation area and the question of living donor-donee relationship. This paper shall analyze the legal situation in cases of non competent donors whose consent cannot be considered legal consent given in full understanding and out of free will. It will also compare three legal systems, the Israeli, the American and the traditional Jewish law, with regard to the different approaches to this human problem, where the autonomy of the donor may be sacrificed for the purpose of saving life of another person.

  12. Bone marrow scintigraphy in hemopoietic depletion states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fortynova, J.; Bakos, K.; Pradacova, J.

    1981-01-01

    Bone marrow scintigraphy was performed in 29 patients with hemopoietic depletion states of various etiology. Two tracers were used for visualization, viz., sup(99m)Tc-sulfur-colloid and 111 InCl 3 ;some patients were examined using both indicators. 111 InCl 3 is bound to transferrin and is adsorbed on the surface of reticulocytes and erythroblasts. A scintillation camera PHO GAMMA SEARLE IV fitted with a moving table and computer CLINCOM were used to obtain whole-body images. The comparison of all scans and marrow puncture smears was done. In patients with aplastic anemia with both hyperplastic or hypoplastic marrow good correlation of bone marrow scans and sternal puncture smears was found. In several cases the scintigraphic examination helped to establish the diagnosis of marrow depletion. A peculiar disadvantage of the imaging method with either sup(99m)Tc-sulfur-colloid or 111 InCl 3 is that it shows the disorders in erythropoietic and reticuloendothelial cells whereas the defects in myelopoietic cell series and platelet precursors are not provable. According to literature data, great attention is paid to the prognostic value of scintigraphic examination in aplastic anemia. (author)

  13. Bone marrow scintigraphy in hemopoietic depletion states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fortynova, J. (Ustav Hematologie a Krevni Transfuze, Prague (Czechoslovakia)); Bakos, K.; Pradacova, J. (Karlova Univ., Prague (Czechoslovakia). Biofyzikalni Ustav)

    1981-01-01

    Bone marrow scintigraphy was performed in 29 patients with hemopoietic depletion states of various etiology. Two tracers were used for visualization, viz., sup(99m)Tc-sulfur-colloid and /sup 111/InCl/sub 3/; some patients were examined using both indicators. /sup 111/InCl/sub 3/ is bound to transferrin and is adsorbed on the surface of reticulocytes and erythroblasts. A scintillation camera PHO GAMMA SEARLE IV fitted with a moving table and computer CLINCOM were used to obtain whole-body images. The comparison of all scans and marrow puncture smears was done. In patients with aplastic anemia with both hyperplastic or hypoplastic marrow good correlation of bone marrow scans and sternal puncture smears was found. In several cases the scintigraphic examination helped to establish the diagnosis of marrow depletion. A peculiar disadvantage of the imaging method with either sup(99m)Tc-sulfur-colloid or /sup 111/InCl/sub 3/ is that it shows the disorders in erythropoietic and reticuloendothelial cells whereas the defects in myelopoietic cell series and platelet precursors are not provable. According to literature data, great attention is paid to the prognostic value of scintigraphic examination in aplastic anemia.

  14. Shifting bone marrow edema of the knee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moosikasuwan, Josh B.; Schultz, Elizabeth; Miller, Theodore T.; Math, Kevin

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of our study is to describe shifting bone marrow edema in the knee as the MR imaging feature of intra-articular regional migratory osteoporosis of the knee. Five men, aged 45-73 years, were referred by orthopedic surgeons for MR imaging evaluation of knee pain, which had been present for 2 weeks to 6 months. One patient had a prior history of blunt trauma. None had risk factors for osteonecrosis. Four patients had two MR examinations and the patient with prior blunt trauma had four. Plain radiographs were obtained in all patients. In all cases, a large area of marrow edema initially involved a femoral condyle, with migration of the bone marrow edema to the other femoral condyle, tibia, and/or patella occurring over a 2- to 4-month period. Adjacent soft tissue edema was present in all five patients, while none had a joint effusion. Radiographs of two patients showed generalized osteopenia. In the absence of acute trauma or clinical suspicion of infection, a large area of bone marrow edema without a zone of demarcation may represent intra-articular regional migratory osteoporosis. Demonstration of shifting bone marrow edema on follow-up examinations suggests this diagnosis. (orig.)

  15. Effects of radiations on bone marrow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tubiana, M.; Frindel, E.; Croizat, H.; Parmentier, C.

    1979-01-01

    After total body irradiation for kidney transplant, the initial decrease of circulating blood cells is more rapid, the nadir is reached sooner and the regeneration occurs earlier when the doses are higher than a few hundred rads. The LD 50 in man seems to be higher than 450 rads. The in vivo and in vitro assays of hemopoietic stem cells have greatly increasedd the understanding of acute and late effects. Multipotential stem cells are very radiosensitive, furthermore the differentiation of the surviving stem cells is accelerated after irradiation. This results in a severe depletion of the stem cell compartment. When this stem cell number falls below a critical value, the stem cell no longer differentiates till the completion of the regeneration of the stem cell compartment. Stem cell proliferation is regulated by inhibitors and stimulators. Release of stimulators by irradiated bone marrow has been demonstrated. Severe sequellae are observed after irradiation of animal and human bone marrow. They seem to be due either to the damage of the stromal cell or to the stem cell population. In patients, four compensating mechanisms are observed after a regional bone marrow irradiation: stimulation of non irradiated bone marrow, extension of hemopoietic areas, regeneration of irradiated bone marrow when the irradiated volume is large and increase in the amplification factor resulting in an increase in the output of mature cells for one stem cell input. Assay of progenitor cells provides useful information and a reduction in their number is still observed many years after a large regional irradiation

  16. Transfer of innate resistance and susceptibility to Leishmania donovani infection in mouse radiation bone marrow chimaeras

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crocker, P.R.; Blackwell, J.M.; Bradley, D.J. (London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine (UK))

    1984-07-01

    Reciprocal radiation bone marrow chimaeras were made between H-2-compatible strains of mice innately resistant or susceptible to visceral leishmaniasis. In initial experiments, susceptibility but not resistance to Leishmania donovani could be transferred with donor bone marrow into irradiated recipients. In subsequent experiments it was possible to transfer both resistance and susceptibility. This was achieved either by selecting more radiosensitive mouse strains as susceptible recipients, or alternatively by increasing the irradiation dose for the susceptible recipients used in the initial experiments. Using the higher irradiation dose, successful transfer of resistance and susceptibility between congenic mice carrying the Lshsup(r) and Lshsup(s) alleles on the more radioresistant B10 genetic background provided firm evidence that the results obtained in this study were specifically related to expression of the Lsh gene. It is concluded that Lsh gene-controlled resistance and susceptibility to L. donovani is determined by bone marrow-derived cells. The cell type(s) involved is likely to be of the macrophage lineage.

  17. Characterization of hemopoietic stem cell chimerism in antibody-facilitated bone marrow chimeras

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Francescutti, L.H.; Gambel, P.; Wegmann, T.G.

    1985-01-01

    The authors have previously described a model for bone marrow transplantation that involves preparation of the host with monoclonal antibody against class I or class II antigens instead of irradiation or cytotoxic drugs. This allows engraftment and subsequent repopulation of the host by donor tissue. They have previously reported on chimerism in the peripheral blood of P1----(P1 X P2)F1 animals. In this report, the authors describe the examination of the bone marrow and spleen stem cell chimerism of these antibody-facilitated (AF) chimeras, by determining, with an isozyme assay, the phenotype of methylcellulose colonies grown from stem cells. They have found a correlation between peripheral blood chimerism and the stem cell constitution of both spleen and bone marrow. The peripheral blood chimerism also correlates with the level of chimerism in macrophages derived from peritoneal exudate cells. These findings indicate that assaying the peripheral blood of such chimeras provides an excellent indication of the degree of chimerism at the stem cell level and stands in sharp contrast to the level of chimerism in certain lymphoid compartments

  18. Safety assessment of bone marrow derived MSC grown in platelet-rich plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shoji Fukuda

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The injection of endothelial progenitor cells and mononuclear cells derived from bone marrow at the ischemic region of peripheral artery disease patients is reported to be effective for therapeutic angiogenesis; however, these cell therapies require large amounts of bone marrow to obtain sufficient numbers of cells. To solve this problem, we attempted to culture bone-marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSC, which are supposed to secrete several cytokines that promote angiogenesis. We also focused on using platelet-rich plasma (PRP as a supplement for cell culture instead of fetal bovine serum. Human BM-MSC obtained from healthy volunteers expanded rapidly when cultured with 10% PRP prepared from their own blood. FACS analysis revealed that these cultured human MSC were homogeneous populations, and chromosomal analysis showed a normal karyotype. Moreover, the angiogenetic effect was apparent two weeks after human BM-MSC were injected into the ischemic muscle in SCID mice. Tumor formation was not detected three months after injection into SCID mice either subcutaneously or intramuscularly. To simulate clinical settings, canine BM-MSC were grown with canine PRP and injected into their ischemic muscles. We confirmed that donor cells existed in situ two and six weeks after operation without any side effects. These results suggest that cultured human BM-MSC can be a promising cell source for therapeutic angiogenesis.

  19. Transfer of innate resistance and susceptibility to Leishmania donovani infection in mouse radiation bone marrow chimaeras

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crocker, P.R.; Blackwell, J.M.; Bradley, D.J.

    1984-01-01

    Reciprocal radiation bone marrow chimaeras mere made between H-2-compatible strains of mice innately resistant or susceptible to visceral leishmaniasis. In initial experiments, susceptibility but not resistance to Leishmania donovani could be transferred with donor bone marrow into irradiated recipients. In subsequent experiments it was possible to transfer both resistance and susceptibility. This was achieved either by selecting more radiosensitive mouse strains as susceptible recipients, or alternatively by increasing the irradiation dose for the susceptible recipients used in the initial experiments. Using the higher irradiation dose, successful transfer of resistance and susceptibility between congenic mice carrying the Lshsup(r) and Lshsup(s) alleles on the more radioresistant B10 genetic background provided firm evidence that the results obtained in this study were specifically related to expression of the Lsh gene. It is concluded that Lsh gene-controlled resistance and susceptibility to L. donovani is determined by bone marrow-derived cells. The cell type(s) involved is likely to be of the macrophage lineage. (author)

  20. Fokusgruppeinterview som led i en evalueringsproces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen-Mølgaard, Hanna; Harrit, Ole

    2006-01-01

    Teoretiske begrundelser og perspektiver, responsiv-konstruktivistisk evaluering, fokusgruppeinterview som led i BIKVAmodellen, eksempler, vurdering og perspektivering......Teoretiske begrundelser og perspektiver, responsiv-konstruktivistisk evaluering, fokusgruppeinterview som led i BIKVAmodellen, eksempler, vurdering og perspektivering...

  1. Goniometric characterization of LED based greenhouse lighting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorseth, Anders; Lindén, Johannes; Corell, Dennis Dan

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes a demonstration of goniospectroradiometry for characterizations of new light emitting diode (LED) based luminaries for enhanced photosynthesis in greenhouses. It highlights the differences between measurement of the traditional high pressure sodium (HPS) luminaries and the LED...

  2. The impact of meeting donor management goals on the number of organs transplanted per expanded criteria donor: a prospective study from the UNOS Region 5 Donor Management Goals Workgroup.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Madhukar S; Zatarain, John; De La Cruz, Salvador; Sally, Mitchell B; Ewing, Tyler; Crutchfield, Megan; Enestvedt, C Kristian; Malinoski, Darren J

    2014-09-01

    The shortage of organs available for transplant has led to the use of expanded criteria donors (ECDs) to extend the donor pool. These donors are older and have more comorbidities and efforts to optimize the quality of their organs are needed. To determine the impact of meeting a standardized set of critical care end points, or donor management goals (DMGs), on the number of organs transplanted per donor in ECDs. Prospective interventional study from February 2010 to July 2013 of all ECDs managed by the 8 organ procurement organizations in the southwestern United States (United Network for Organ Sharing Region 5). Implementation of 9 DMGs as a checklist to guide the management of every ECD. The DMGs represented normal cardiovascular, pulmonary, renal, and endocrine end points. Meeting the DMG bundle was defined a priori as achieving any 7 of the 9 end points and was recorded at the time of referral to the organ procurement organization, at the time of authorization for donation, 12 to 18 hours later, and prior to organ recovery. The primary outcome measure was 3 or more organs transplanted per donor and binary logistic regression was used to identify independent predictors with P organs transplanted per donor. Ten percent of the ECDs had met the DMG bundle at referral, 15% at the time of authorization, 33% at 12 to 18 hours, and 45% prior to recovery. Forty-three percent had 3 or more organs transplanted per donor. Independent predictors of 3 or more organs transplanted per donor were older age (odds ratio [OR] = 0.95 per year [95% CI, 0.93-0.97]), increased creatinine level (OR = 0.73 per mg/dL [95% CI, 0.63-0.85]), DMGs met prior to organ recovery (OR = 1.90 [95% CI, 1.35-2.68]), and a change in the number of DMGs achieved from referral to organ recovery (OR = 1.11 per additional DMG [95% CI, 1.00-1.23]). Meeting DMGs prior to organ recovery with ECDs is associated with achieving 3 or more organs transplanted per donor. An increase in the number

  3. Cytomegalovirus infection in the bone marrow transplant patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhat, Vivek; Joshi, Amit; Sarode, Rahul; Chavan, Preeti

    2015-12-24

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection is an important contributor to the morbidity and mortality associated with bone marrow transplantation (BMT). Infection may lead to CMV disease involving multiple organs such as pneumonia, gastroenteritis, retinitis, central nervus system involvement and others. CMV seropositivity is an important risk factor and approximately half of BMT recipients will develop clinically significant infection most commonly in the first 100 d post-transplant. The commonly used tests to diagnose CMV infection in these patients include the pp65 antigenemia test and the CMV DNA polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay. Because of its greater sensitivity and lesser turnaround time, the CMV PCR is nowadays the preferred test and serves as a main guide for pre-emptive therapy. Methods of CMV prevention include use of blood products from seronegative donors or leukodepleted products. Prophylaxis or pre-emptive therapy strategies for CMV prevention may be used post-transplant with the latter becoming more common. The commonly used antivirals for pre-emptive therapy and CMV disease management include intravenous gancyclovir and foscarnet. The role of intravenous immunoglobulin, although used commonly in CMV pneumonia is not clear.

  4. Measurement of the photometric characteristics of LEDs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nazarenko, L.A.; Zubkov, D.P.

    2015-01-01

    Proposed and implemented a method for measuring LEDs, which is based on self-calibration of the LED goniophotometer facility by using a trap-detector. Designed and manufactured automated goniophotometer, which provides a measurement of high power LEDs at a specified junction temperature. Designed and experimentally researched the photometer with a photometric sphere based diffuser, which meets all requirements of CIE for photometric measurements of LEDs

  5. Mechanical Loading Attenuates Radiation-Induced Bone Loss in Bone Marrow Transplanted Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govey, Peter M.; Zhang, Yue; Donahue, Henry J.

    2016-01-01

    Exposure of bone to ionizing radiation, as occurs during radiotherapy for some localized malignancies and blood or bone marrow cancers, as well as during space travel, incites dose-dependent bone morbidity and increased fracture risk. Rapid trabecular and endosteal bone loss reflects acutely increased osteoclastic resorption as well as decreased bone formation due to depletion of osteoprogenitors. Because of this dysregulation of bone turnover, bone’s capacity to respond to a mechanical loading stimulus in the aftermath of irradiation is unknown. We employed a mouse model of total body irradiation and bone marrow transplantation simulating treatment of hematologic cancers, hypothesizing that compression loading would attenuate bone loss. Furthermore, we hypothesized that loading would upregulate donor cell presence in loaded tibias due to increased engraftment and proliferation. We lethally irradiated 16 female C57Bl/6J mice at age 16 wks with 10.75 Gy, then IV-injected 20 million GFP(+) total bone marrow cells. That same day, we initiated 3 wks compression loading (1200 cycles 5x/wk, 10 N) in the right tibia of 10 of these mice while 6 mice were irradiated, non-mechanically-loaded controls. As anticipated, before-and-after microCT scans demonstrated loss of trabecular bone (-48.2% Tb.BV/TV) and cortical thickness (-8.3%) at 3 wks following irradiation. However, loaded bones lost 31% less Tb.BV/TV and 8% less cortical thickness (both pbones also had significant increases in trabecular thickness and tissue mineral densities from baseline. Mechanical loading did not affect donor cell engraftment. Importantly, these results demonstrate that both cortical and trabecular bone exposed to high-dose therapeutic radiation remain capable of an anabolic response to mechanical loading. These findings inform our management of bone health in cases of radiation exposure. PMID:27936104

  6. Hematopoietic microenvironment. Origin, lineage, and transplantability of the stromal cells in long-term bone marrow cultures from chimeric mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perkins, S.; Fleischman, R.A.

    1988-01-01

    Studies of bone marrow transplant patients have suggested that the stromal cells of the in vitro hematopoietic microenvironment are transplantable into conditioned recipients. Moreover, in patients with myeloproliferative disorders, all of the stromal cells, which include presumptive endothelial cells, appear to be derived from hematopoietic precursors. To confirm these findings, we have constructed two chimeric mouse models: (a) traditional radiation chimeras, and (b) fetal chimeras, produced by placental injection of bone marrow into genetically anemic Wx/Wv fetuses, a technique that essentially precludes engraftment of nonhematopoietic cells. Using two-color indirect immunofluorescence, the stromal cells in long-term bone marrow culture derived from these chimeras were analyzed for donor or host origin by strain-specific H-2 antigens, and for cell lineage by a variety of other specific markers. 75-95% of the stromal cells were shown to be hematopoietic cells of the monocyte-macrophage lineage, based upon donor origin, phagocytosis, and expression of specific hematopoietic surface antigens. The remaining 5-25% of the stromal cells were exclusively host in origin. Apart from occasional fat cells, these cells uniformly expressed collagen type IV, laminin, and a surface antigen associated with endothelial cells. Since these endothelial-like cells are not transplantable into radiation or fetal chimeras, they are not derived from hematopoietic stem cells. The contrast between our findings and human studies suggests either unexpected species differences in the origin of stromal lineages or limitations in the previous methodology used to detect nonhematopoietic stromal cells

  7. Provocation of skin graft rejection across murine class II differences by non--bone-marrow-derived cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stuart, P.M.; Beck-Maier, B.; Melvold, R.W.

    1984-01-01

    We have evaluated the relative contribution of bone-marrow-derived cells to skin allograft immunogenicity in mice differing only at class II major histocompatibility genes by using bone marrow radiation chimeras as donors. The mouse strains used were C57BL/6Kh (B6) and B6.C-H-2bm12 (bm12), which differ only at at A beta gene of the I region of the mouse H-2 complex. Our results demonstrated that skin from (B6----bm12) chimeras was accepted by bm12 recipients and rejected by B6 mice in a manner indistinguishable from that of normal bm12 skin. Likewise, naive bm12 mice rejected (bm12----B6) chimeric skin and normal B6 skin equally well, and B6 animals accepted both types of skin grafts. Our data argues that the donor cell-type leading to graft rejection across limited I region differences is not of bone marrow origin, and that these cells must--at least under certain circumstances--express class II antigens

  8. Alternative allogeneic donor sources for transplantation for childhood diseases: unrelated cord blood and haploidentical family donors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cairo, Mitchell S; Rocha, Vanderson; Gluckman, Eliane; Hale, Gregory; Wagner, John

    2008-01-01

    Allogeneic stem cell transplantation has been demonstrated to be curative in a wide variety of pediatric malignant and nonmalignant diseases, and can be traced back over 50 years ago to the original report of Thomas et al. HLA matched sibling donors have been the gold standard for pediatric recipients requiring allogeneic donors for both nonmalignant and malignant conditions. However, only 25% of potential pediatric recipients possesses an HLA-matched sibling donor, and the frequency is even less in those with genetic nonmalignant conditions because of genetically affected other siblings within the family. Therefore, 75% to 90% of potential pediatric recipients require alternative allogeneic donor cells for treatment of their underlying conditions. Potential alternative allogeneic donor sources include unrelated cord blood donors, unrelated adult donors, and haploidentical family donors. In this article we review the experience of both unrelated cord blood donor and haploidentical family donor transplants in selected pediatric malignant and nonmalignant conditions.

  9. Spontaneous hematologic recovery from bone marrow aplasia after accidental tenfold overdosage with radiophosphorus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gmuer, J.; Bischof, B.; Coninx, S.

    1983-01-01

    Two patients with polycythemia vera received intravenously an accidental tenfold overdosage of radiophosphorus therapy (60 and 50 mCi 32P, respectively). In both patients, the occurrence of hemorrhagic complications 3 wk after the 32P medication led to detection of the error and referral to our hospital. Upon admission they showed an agranulocytosis, severe thrombocytopenia, and bone marrow aplasia. In both cases, spontaneous recovery of the hematopoiesis was observed from day 40 posttreatment onward. In one patient, a slow but ultimately complete normalization of blood counts and marrow morphology took place, whereas in the other, a mild thrombocytopenia persists. Nearly 5 yr after the accidental overdosage, both patients are clinically well. Symptoms of polycythemia vera have not reappeared up to now. Attempts were made to evaluate the radiation dose absorbed by the bone marrow. In the first patient, the daily 32P excretion was determined from day 22 to day 60, whereas in the other patient a whole body count was performed on day 78 after administration. From these results, an approximate cumulative bone marrow dose of 10 Sv (1000 rem) could be calculated

  10. Blood donor: nursing care plan

    OpenAIRE

    Marco Antonio Zapata Sampedro; Laura Castro Varela

    2008-01-01

    The standardized nursing care plan can be used as a means through which the nurse will assess and identify the particular needs of the blood donor.To draw up the care plan, we have conducted the evaluation on the basis of the Marjory Gordon’s functional health patterns.The more prevailing diagnosis according to the NANDA taxonomy have been identified, results have been established according to the NOC (Nursing Outcomes Classification) taxonomy, and nursing interventions have been suggested ac...

  11. Bone Marrow Aspirate Concentrate-Enhanced Marrow Stimulation of Chondral Defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichler, Hermann; Orth, Patrick

    2017-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) from bone marrow play a critical role in osteochondral repair. A bone marrow clot forms within the cartilage defect either as a result of marrow stimulation or during the course of the spontaneous repair of osteochondral defects. Mobilized pluripotent MSCs from the subchondral bone migrate into the defect filled with the clot, differentiate into chondrocytes and osteoblasts, and form a repair tissue over time. The additional application of a bone marrow aspirate (BMA) to the procedure of marrow stimulation is thought to enhance cartilage repair as it may provide both an additional cell population capable of chondrogenesis and a source of growth factors stimulating cartilage repair. Moreover, the BMA clot provides a three-dimensional environment, possibly further supporting chondrogenesis and protecting the subchondral bone from structural alterations. The purpose of this review is to bridge the gap in our understanding between the basic science knowledge on MSCs and BMA and the clinical and technical aspects of marrow stimulation-based cartilage repair by examining available data on the role and mechanisms of MSCs and BMA in osteochondral repair. Implications of findings from both translational and clinical studies using BMA concentrate-enhanced marrow stimulation are discussed. PMID:28607559

  12. Effects of smoke and tea on radiation-induced bone marrow cell mutation and marrow inhibition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Yong; Zhang Weiguang

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To provide scientific information for the prevention and treatment of the radiation damage by analyzing the effects of smoke and tea on radiation-induced bone marrow cell mutation and marrow inhibition. Methods: 7 group mice were exposed to smoke and/or tea and/or radiation respectively. There were also b blank control group and a cyclophosphamide positive control group. The frequencies of micronucleated polychromatic erythrocytes (MPCE), the ratio of polychromatic erythrocytes (PCE) to mature erythrocytes (RBC) in marrow, and the count of peripheral blood hemoleukocyte were observed. Results: The frequencies of MPCE in the groups irradiated with γ-rays were significantly higher than that in the blank control group (P<0.05 or 0.01). The smoke + radiation group's frequency was significantly higher than single radiation group (P<0.05). The ratios of PCE to RBC in the groups irradiated were significantly lower than that in the blank control group (P<0.01). The counts of peripheral blood hemoleukocyte in the groups irradiated were significantly lower than the blank control group (P<0.01). Conclusion: Radiation were able to cause marrow cell mutation and induce marrow inhibition. Smoke increases the effect of radiation-induced marrow cell mutation. Tea and smoke could not affect radiation-induced bone marrow inhibition

  13. BONE MARROW ABONRMALITIES IN HIV INFECTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharad Antiram Dhurve

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Introduction; Hematological abnormalities are a common complication of HIV infection.  Bone marrow abnormalities occur in all stages of HIV infection.  Present work was carried out to study the bone marrow abnormalities in patients with HIV/AIDS.  Methods: 160 patients of HIV +ve were included in the study. A complete blood count, relevant biochemical investigations, CD4   counts were done, besides a thorough history and clinical examination. HIV positive patients were classified as those having AIDS and those without AIDS according to NACO criteria.   Bone marrow examination was performed for indication of anemia, leucopenia, pancytopenia and thrombocytopenia. Results: As per CDC criteria 59.81% patients had AIDS in 107 patients. The most common hematological abnormality was anemia, seen in 93.12% patients.  Bone marrow was normocellular in 79.06% of non-AIDS and 79.68% of AIDS, hypocellular in 13.95%.Thrombocytopenia was seen in 4 cases of ART (4.93% and 3 cases (4.68% of AIDS group. Abnormal cells like plasma cell, histocyte and toxic granule found in bone marrow. Conclusions: Myelodysplasia was more common in AIDS than in non AIDS patients. Granulocytic series is most commonly associated with evidence of dysplasia. Anemia in HIV patients can be a good clinical indicator to predict and access the underlying immune status. Thus bone marrow study is imperative to methodically observe and follow clinical and laboratory aberration in such patients in order to improve our diagnostic and therapeutic skills pertinent to HIV/AIDS.

  14. Risk of Exposure to Zika Virus and Impact on Cord Blood Banking and Adult Unrelated Donors in Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation: The Canadian Blood Services Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Zachary; Morris, Gail; Campbell, Todd; Mostert, Karen; Dibdin, Nicholas; Fearon, Margaret; Elmoazzen, Heidi; Mercer, Dena; Young, Kimberly; Allan, David

    2018-04-01

    Zika virus has emerged as a potential threat to the Canadian blood supply system. Stem cell donors within Canadian Blood Services' Cord Blood Bank (CBB) and OneMatch Stem Cell and Marrow Network (OM) now undergo screening measures designed to reduce the risk of Zika virus transmission. The impact these screening measures have on cord blood and unrelated adult stem cell donations is currently unknown. Among 146 donor workups initiated by OM between July 2016 and May 2017, 102 were completed and 44 workups were canceled. There were 17 potential donors (11.6%) with a risk of Zika virus exposure identified by the donor questionnaire (13 completed, 4 canceled workups). None of the workups involved a donor diagnosed with confirmed Zika virus within the past 6 months. Only 1 of the 44 canceled workups (and only 1 of 4 cases with a risk of Zika transmission) was canceled because of the risk of Zika transmission, and a backup donor was selected. Canadian Blood Services' CBB identified 25 of 875 cord blood units (2.9%) from women who donated their infants' cord blood and underwent screening that otherwise met the initial cell number thresholds for banking and had at least 1 risk factor for exposure to Zika virus. No women were diagnosed with Zika virus at any point of their pregnancy. All 25 units were discarded. Unrelated donors at OM have a higher incidence of a risk of exposure to Zika virus compared with cord blood donors. Only rarely did transplant centers cancel donor workups due to potential Zika virus exposure. The impact of screening for Zika virus exposure risk on cord blood banking was minor. Continued vigilance and surveillance is recommended. Copyright © 2017 The American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. The Bone Marrow-Derived Stromal Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tencerova, Michaela; Kassem, Moustapha

    2016-01-01

    Bone marrow (BM) microenvironment represents an important compartment of bone that regulates bone homeostasis and the balance between bone formation and bone resorption depending on the physiological needs of the organism. Abnormalities of BM microenvironmental dynamics can lead to metabolic bone...... diseases. BM stromal cells (also known as skeletal or mesenchymal stem cells) [bone marrow stromal stem cell (BMSC)] are multipotent stem cells located within BM stroma and give rise to osteoblasts and adipocytes. However, cellular and molecular mechanisms of BMSC lineage commitment to adipocytic lineage...

  16. Renal Transplantation from Elderly Living Donors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacob A. Akoh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Acceptance of elderly living kidney donors remains controversial due to the higher incidence of comorbidity and greater risk of postoperative complications. This is a review of publications in the English language between 2000 and 2013 about renal transplantation from elderly living donors to determine trends and effects of donation, and the outcomes of such transplantation. The last decade witnessed a 50% increase in living kidney donor transplants, with a disproportionate increase in donors >60 years. There is no accelerated loss of kidney function following donation, and the incidence of established renal failure (ERF and hypertension among donors is similar to that of the general population. The overall incidence of ERF in living donors is about 0.134 per 1000 years. Elderly donors require rigorous assessment and should have a predicted glomerular filtration rate of at least 37.5 mL/min/1.73 m2 at the age of 80. Though elderly donors had lower glomerular filtration rate before donation, proportionate decline after donation was similar in both young and elderly groups. The risks of delayed graft function, acute rejection, and graft failure in transplants from living donors >65 years are significantly higher than transplants from younger donors. A multicentred, long-term, and prospective database addressing the outcomes of kidneys from elderly living donors is recommended.

  17. Development of Organ-Specific Donor Risk Indices

    OpenAIRE

    Akkina, Sanjeev K.; Asrani, Sumeet K.; Peng, Yi; Stock, Peter; Kim, Ray; Israni, Ajay K.

    2012-01-01

    Due to the shortage of deceased donor organs, transplant centers accept organs from marginal deceased donors, including older donors. Organ-specific donor risk indices have been developed to predict graft survival using various combinations of donor and recipient characteristics. We will review the kidney donor risk index (KDRI) and liver donor risk index (LDRI) and compare and contrast their strengths, limitations, and potential uses. The Kidney Donor Risk Index has a potential role in devel...

  18. Transplantation of Kidneys From Donors With Acute Kidney Injury: Friend or Foe?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boffa, C.; van de Leemkolk, F.; Curnow, E.; Homan van der Heide, J.; Gilbert, J.; Sharples, E.; Ploeg, R. J.

    2017-01-01

    The gap between supply and demand in kidney transplantation has led to increased use of marginal kidneys; however, kidneys with acute kidney injury are often declined/discarded. To determine whether this policy is justified, we analyzed outcomes of donor kidneys with acute kidney injury (AKI) in a

  19. Bone-marrow MR imaging before and after autologous marrow transplantation in lymphoma patients without known bone-marrow involvement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lien, H.H.; Blomlie, V.; Blystad, A.K.; Holte, H.; Kvaloey, S.; Langholm, R.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: To study lumbar bone marrow by means of MR imaging before and after bone-marrow transplantation in lymphoma patients. Particular emphasis was paid to heterogeneity and to focal manifestations, i.e. appearances that could simulate tumor. Material and Methods: Twenty-two patients who were disease-free for a minimum of 30 months after transplantation were studied in 107 MR examinations. Two radiologists visually evaluated coronal T1-weighted and short inversion time inversion-recovery (STIR) images. Results: T1-weighted images demonstrated a more heterogeneous marrow after transplantation than before it. Sharply defined focal low signal intensity areas appeared on this sequence in 5 (23%) of the 22 patients at between 21 and 60 weeks after transplantation. The mean age of these 5 patients was 48.4 years (range 42-54 years). The difference in age between these 5 patients and the remaining 17 patients, who had a mean age of 33.4 years (range 14-51 years), was statistically significant (p<0.01, Student's t-test, 2-sided test). Conclusion: Sharply defined focal low signal intensity areas may be seen on T1-weighted images of bone marrow in patients who are in complete remission after transplantation, particularly in those aged over 40-45 years. (orig.)

  20. Proton MR spectroscopy of hyperplastic hematopoietic marrow in aplastic anemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amano, Yasuo; Kumazaki, Tatsuo [Nippon Medical School, Tokyo (Japan); Arai, Nobuyuki

    1997-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the findings of magnetic resonance (MR) spectroscopy of hyperplastic hematopoietic marrow with those of normal bone marrow. Twenty-four samples of normal marrow from eight control subjects and 19 samples of hyperplastic marrow in aplastic anemia were examined with a 1.5 T MR unit. The former showed low intensity on opposed-phase T1-weighted images, while the latter showed high intensity on both fast STIR and opposed-phase T1-weighted images. MR spectroscopy quantitatively confirmed that the water; fat ratio was increased and the transverse relaxation time of water was changed in hyperplastic bone marrow, compared with normal bone marrow. In summary, MR imaging is able to detect hematopoietic regions among a wide range of bone marrow of aplastic anemia, while MR spectroscopy allowed us to quantitatively analyze the cell population of hyperplastic hematopoietic marrow in aplastic anemia. (author)

  1. Normal human bone marrow and its variations in MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vahlensieck, M.; Schmidt, H.M.

    2000-01-01

    Physiology and age dependant changes of human bone marrow are described. The resulting normal distribution patterns of active and inactive bone marrow including the various contrasts on different MR-sequences are discussed. (orig.) [de

  2. Pericyte coverage of abnormal blood vessels in myelofibrotic bone marrows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zetterberg, Eva; Vannucchi, Alessandro M; Migliaccio, Anna Rita

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Myelofibrotic bone marrow displays abnormal angiogenesis but the pathogenic mechanisms of this are poorly understood. Since pericyte abnormalities are described on solid tumor vessels we studied whether vessel morphology and pericyte coverage in bone marrow samples from...

  3. Proton MR spectroscopy of hyperplastic hematopoietic marrow in aplastic anemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amano, Yasuo; Kumazaki, Tatsuo; Arai, Nobuyuki.

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the findings of magnetic resonance (MR) spectroscopy of hyperplastic hematopoietic marrow with those of normal bone marrow. Twenty-four samples of normal marrow from eight control subjects and 19 samples of hyperplastic marrow in aplastic anemia were examined with a 1.5 T MR unit. The former showed low intensity on opposed-phase T1-weighted images, while the latter showed high intensity on both fast STIR and opposed-phase T1-weighted images. MR spectroscopy quantitatively confirmed that the water; fat ratio was increased and the transverse relaxation time of water was changed in hyperplastic bone marrow, compared with normal bone marrow. In summary, MR imaging is able to detect hematopoietic regions among a wide range of bone marrow of aplastic anemia, while MR spectroscopy allowed us to quantitatively analyze the cell population of hyperplastic hematopoietic marrow in aplastic anemia. (author)

  4. Plant growth with Led lighting systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campiotti, C.A.; Bernardini, A.; Di Carlo, F.; Scoccianti, M.; Alonzo, G.; Carlino, M.; Dondi, F.; Bibbiani, C.

    2009-01-01

    Leds lighting is highly relevant for the horticultural industry. Compared to other light sources used for plant production, leds have several properties which are potentially useful in relation to horticulture. However, although LEDs technology has raised strong interest in research for extraterrestrial agriculture, current LEDs panel costs are still too high for commercial adoption in greenhouse sector, and their electrical efficacies do not compete with those of high-pressure sodium lamps, but several manufactures are working to address these issues. When LEDs become practical, their ability to based light sources specifically suitable for photosynthesis and other horticulturally relevant plant properties (i.e. low radiated heat; lighting from within the canopy) will render the narrow band spectrum of LEDs of particular interest for providing light to greenhouse horticulture. A general description of LEDs application and their technical characteristics is briefly reported. [it

  5. Immune reconstitution in patients with Fanconi anemia after allogeneic bone marrow transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perlingeiro Beltrame, Miriam; Malvezzi, Mariester; Bonfim, Carmem; Covas, Dimas Tadeu; Orfao, Alberto; Pasquini, Ricardo

    2014-07-01

    Fanconi anemia is an autosomal recessive or X-linked genetic disorder characterized by bone marrow (BM) failure/aplasia. Failure of hematopoiesis results in depletion of the BM stem cell reservoir, which leads to severe anemia, neutropenia and thrombocytopenia, frequently requiring therapeutic interventions, including hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Successful BM transplantation (BMT) requires reconstitution of normal immunity. In the present study, we performed a detailed analysis of the distribution of peripheral blood subsets of T, B and natural killer (NK) lymphocytes in 23 patients with Fanconi anemia before and after BMT on days +30, +60, +100, +180, +270 and +360. In parallel, we evaluated the effect of related versus unrelated donor marrow as well as the presence of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). After transplantation, we found different kinetics of recovery for the distinct major subsets of lymphocytes. NK cells were the first to recover, followed by cytotoxic CD8(+) T cells and B cells, and finally CD4(+) helper T cells. Early lymphocyte recovery was at the expense of memory cells, potentially derived from the graft, whereas recent thymic emigrant (CD31(+) CD45RA(+)) and naive CD4(+) or CD8(+) T cells rose only at 6 months after HSCT, in the presence of immunosuppressive GVHD prophylactic agents. Only slight differences were observed in the early recovery of cytotoxic CD8(+) T cells among those cases receiving a graft from a related donor versus an unrelated donor. Patients with GVHD displayed a markedly delayed recovery of NK cells and B cells as well as of regulatory T cells and both early thymic emigrant and total CD4(+) T cells. Our results support the utility of post-transplant monitoring of a peripheral blood lymphocyte subset for improved follow-up of patients with Fanconi anemia undergoing BMT. Copyright © 2014 International Society for Cellular Therapy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Generation of solar spectrum by using LEDs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Pengzhi; Yang, Hua; Pei, Yanrong; Li, Jing; Xue, Bin; Wang, Junxi; Li, Jinmin

    2016-09-01

    Light emitting diode (LED) has been recognized as an applicable light source for indoor and outdoor lighting, city beautifying, landscape facilities, and municipal engineering etc. Conventional LED has superior characteristics such as long life time, low power consumption, high contrast, and wide viewing angle. Recently, LED with high color-rendering index and special spectral characteristics has received more and more attention. This paper is intended to report a solar spectrum simulated by multichip LED light source. The typical solar spectrum of 5500k released by CIE was simulated as a reference. Four types of LEDs with different spectral power distributions would be used in the LED light source, which included a 430nm LED, a 480nm LED, a 500nm LED and a white LED. In order to obtain better simulation results, the white LED was achieved by a 450nm LED chip with the mixture of phosphor. The phosphor combination was prepared by mixing green phosphor, yellow phosphor and red phosphor in a certain proportion. The multichip LED light source could provide a high fidelity spectral match with the typical solar spectrum of 5500k by adjusting injection current to each device. The luminous flux, CIE chromaticity coordinate x, y, CCT, and Ra were 104.7 lm, 0.3337, 0.3681, 5460K, and 88.6, respectively. Because of high color-rendering index and highly match to the solar spectrum, the multichip LED light source is a competitive candidate for applications where special spectral is required, such as colorimetric measurements, visual inspection, gemstone identification and agriculture.

  7. Thy-1+ dendritic cells in murine epidermis are bone marrow-derived

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breathnach, S.M.; Katz, S.I.

    1984-01-01

    Thy-1+, Ly-5+ dendritic cells have recently been described as a resident cell population in murine epidermis, but their ontogeny and function are unknown. The origin and turnover of epidermal Thy-1+ cells utilizing chimeric mice were investigated. Lethally x-irradiated AKR/J (Thy-1.1+) and AKR/Cum (Thy-1.2+) mice were reconstituted with allogeneic bone marrow cells with or without thymocytes from congenic AKR/Cum or AKR/J mice, respectively. The density of residual indigenous Thy-1.1+ cells in AKR/J chimeras and Thy-1.2+ cells in AKR/Cum chimeras was substantially reduced following x-irradiation, as determined by immunofluorescence staining of epidermal sheets. Epidermal repopulation by allogeneic Thy-1+ dendritic epidermal cells was first observed at 5 weeks in AKR/J chimeras and at 7 weeks in AKR/Cum chimeras and progressed slowly. Repopulation was not enhanced by increasing the number of allogeneic bone marrow cells injected from 2 X 10(7) to 10(8) cells or by the addition of 8 X 10(7) allogeneic thymocytes to the donor inoculate. Epidermal repopulation by allogeneic Thy-1.2+ cells was not seen in AKR/J mice reconstituted with syngeneic bone marrow cells and allogeneic Thy-1.2+ AKR/Cum thymocytes. Taken together, these results indicate that Thy-1+ dendritic epidermal cells are derived from the bone marrow and suggest that they are not related to conventional peripheral T-lymphocytes

  8. Allograft tolerance in pigs after fractionated lymphoid irradiation. II. Kidney graft after conventional total lymphoid irradiation and bone marrow cell grafting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fradelizi, D.; Mahouy, G.; de Riberolles, C.; Lecompte, Y.; Alhomme, P.; Douard, M.C.; Chotin, G.; Martelli, H.; Daburon, F.; Vaiman, M.

    1981-01-01

    Experiments with pigs have been performed in order to establish bone marrow chimerism and kidney graft tolerance between SLA genotyped semi-incompatible animals. Recipients were conditioned by means of conventional fractionated total lymphoid irradiation (TLI) delivered by a vertical cobalt source. The principal lymphoid regions of the pig, including thymus and spleen, were submitted to irradiation. Two protocols were tested: A = 250 cGy four times a week x 13 times (TLI) (two animals) and B = 350 cGy three times a week x 8 times (TLI) (four animals). Bone marrow cells were injected 24 h after the last irradiation. One day later, bilateral nephrectomy and the graft of one kidney from the bone marrow cell donor were performed simultaneously. Results convinced us that application of the TLI protocol to humans is not yet practicable and that further experimental work is needed

  9. Bioactive lipid coating of bone allografts directs engraftment and fate determination of bone marrow-derived cells in rat GFP chimeras

    OpenAIRE

    Das, Anusuya; Segar, Claire E.; Chu, Yihsuan; Wang, Tiffany W.; Lin, Yong; Yang, Chunxi; Du, Xeujun; Ogle, Roy C.; Cui, Quanjun; Botchwey, Edward A.

    2015-01-01

    Bone grafting procedures are performed to treat wounds incurred during wartime trauma, accidents, and tumor resections. Endogenous mechanisms of repair are often insufficient to ensure integration between host and donor bone and subsequent restoration of function. We investigated the role that bone marrow-derived cells play in bone regeneration and sought to increase their contributions by functionalizing bone allografts with bioactive lipid coatings. Polymer-coated allografts were used to lo...

  10. Experience with LEDS and NAMA Low Carbon Strategies: The Case of Georgia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kakhaberi Mdivani

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Low Emission Development Strategies (LEDS and National Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs have the potential to support developing countries in attaining low carbon goals. In spite of the evident potential, there is a need to learn from practice. This paper explores the case of Georgia. The main research question discussed is: What experience has been gained with the development of LEDS and NAMAs in Georgia? The study reveals that both LEDS and NAMAs are subject to barriers that considerably slow development processes: there is a lack of institutional capacity, little inter-governmental goal alignment and poor coordination of actions, a lack of experienced staff and insufficient, substantial, earmarked funding. Capacity building depends on support from organizations in donor countries. This paper contributes to a growing body of knowledge of the implementation of LEDS and NAMA.

  11. Telomerase deficiency in bone marrow-derived cells attenuates angiotensin II-induced abdominal aortic aneurysm formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Findeisen, Hannes M; Gizard, Florence; Zhao, Yue; Cohn, Dianne; Heywood, Elizabeth B; Jones, Karrie L; Lovett, David H; Howatt, Deborah A; Daugherty, Alan; Bruemmer, Dennis

    2011-02-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) are an age-related vascular disease and an important cause of morbidity and mortality. In this study, we sought to determine whether the catalytic component of telomerase, telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT), modulates angiotensin (Ang) II-induced AAA formation. Low-density lipoprotein receptor-deficient (LDLr-/-) mice were lethally irradiated and reconstituted with bone marrow-derived cells from TERT-deficient (TERT-/-) mice or littermate wild-type mice. Mice were placed on a diet enriched in cholesterol, and AAA formation was quantified after 4 weeks of Ang II infusion. Repopulation of LDLr-/- mice with TERT-/- bone marrow-derived cells attenuated Ang II-induced AAA formation. TERT-deficient recipient mice revealed modest telomere attrition in circulating leukocytes at the study end point without any overt effect of the donor genotype on white blood cell counts. In mice repopulated with TERT-/- bone marrow, aortic matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) activity was reduced, and TERT-/- macrophages exhibited decreased expression and activity of MMP-2 in response to stimulation with Ang II. Finally, we demonstrated in transient transfection studies that TERT overexpression activates the MMP-2 promoter in macrophages. TERT deficiency in bone marrow-derived macrophages attenuates Ang II-induced AAA formation in LDLr-/- mice and decreases MMP-2 expression. These results point to a previously unrecognized role of TERT in the pathogenesis of AAA.

  12. Biochemical markers predictive for bone marrow involvement in systemic mastocytosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Donker, Marjolein L.; van Doormaal, Jasper J.; van Doormaal, Frederiek F.; Kluin, Philip M.; van der Veer, Eveline; de Monchy, Jan G. R.; Kema, Ido P.; Kluin-Nelemans, Hanneke C.

    Systemic mastocytosis is characterized by bone marrow involvement, which requires a bone marrow biopsy for diagnostic work-up. We questioned whether bone marrow involvement could be predicted using biochemical markers. We selected patients with various symptoms suggestive of indolent systemic

  13. The Role od Bone Marrow Aspirate and Trephine Samples in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Other disorders diagnosed after bone marrow examination include myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), aplastic anaemia, megaloblastic anaemia and myelofibrosis. Only 8.75% of these patients had a normal bone marrow. Conclusions: This study has demonstrated the complexity of using bone marrow examination in ...

  14. Cytogenetic and morphological assessment of bone marrow in therapeutic irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, U.; Das, B.P.; Singhal, R.M.; Radhakrishnaiah, Y.; Rath, G.K.; Padmaraju, I.; Bhargava, V.L.

    1978-01-01

    Morphological and cytogenetic study from the irradiated bone marrow, in 59 cases of radically irradiated carcinoma cervix was done. Regeneration of a marrow adjudged on cellular morphology was after 12 months whereas cytogenetic studies revealed it at the end of three months. It is concluded that cytogenetic study is a more sensitive parameter in assessing the recovery of bone marrow. (author)

  15. Cryogenic characterization of LEDs for space application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carron, Jérôme; Philippon, Anne; How, Lip Sun; Delbergue, Audrey; Hassanzadeh, Sahar; Cillierre, David; Danto, Pascale; Boutillier, Mathieu

    2017-09-01

    In the frame of EUCLID project, the Calibration Unit of the VIS (VISible Imager) instrument must provide an accurate and well characterized light source for in-flight instrument calibration without noise when it is switched off. The Calibration Unit consists of a set of LEDs emitting at various wavelengths in the visible towards an integrating sphere. The sphere's output provides a uniform illumination over the entire focal plane. Nine references of LEDs from different manufacturers were selected, screened and qualified under cryogenic conditions. Testing this large quantity of samples led to the implementation of automated testing equipment with complete in-situ monitoring of optoelectronic parameters as well as temperature and vacuum values. All the electrical and optical parameters of the LED have been monitored and recorded at ambient and cryogenic temperatures. These results have been compiled in order to show the total deviation of the LED electrical and electro-optical properties in the whole mission and to select the best suitable LED references for the mission. This qualification has demonstrated the robustness of COTS LEDs to operate at low cryogenic temperatures and in the space environment. Then 6 wavelengths were selected and submitted to an EMC sensitivity test at room and cold temperature by counting the number of photons when LEDs drivers are OFF. Characterizations were conducted in the full frequency spectrum in order to implement solutions at system level to suppress the emission of photons when the LED drivers are OFF. LEDs impedance was also characterized at room temperature and cold temperature.

  16. Intractable Diseases Treated with Intra-Bone Marrow-Bone Marrow Transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming eLi

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Bone marrow transplantation (BMT is used to treat hematological disorders, autoimmune diseases and lymphoid cancers. Intra bone marrow-BMT (IBM-BMT has been proven to be a powerful strategy for allogeneic BMT due to the rapid hematopoietic recovery and the complete restoration of T cell functions. IBM-BMT not only replaces hematopoietic stem cells but also mesenchymal stem cells (MSMCs. MSMCs are multi-potent stem cells that can be isolated from bone marrow, umbilical cord blood, and adipose tissue. MSMCs play an important role in the support of hematopoiesis, and modify and influence the innate and adaptive immune systems. MSMCs also differentiate into mesodermal, endodermal and ectodermal lineage cells to repair tissues. This review aims to summarize the functions of bone marrow-derived- MSMCs, and the treatment of intractable diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis and malignant tumors with IBM-BMT.

  17. PET in Benign Bone Marrow Disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Bruggen, Wouter; Glaudemans, Andor W. J. M.; Vellenga, Edo; Slart, Riemer H. J. A.

    This review aims to describe the current status of benign bone marrow (BM) imaging using PET. BM imaging is important as the BM is not only involved in poiesis of different vital cell lines and. can be affected by primary BM disorders, but it is also frequently affected by several extramedullary

  18. Diffusion and perfusion imaging of bone marrow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biffar, Andreas; Dietrich, Olaf; Sourbron, Steven; Duerr, Hans-Roland; Reiser, Maximilian F.; Baur-Melnyk, Andrea

    2010-01-01

    In diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DWI), the observed MRI signal intensity is attenuated by the self-diffusion of water molecules. DWI provides information about the microscopic structure and organization of a biological tissue, since the extent and orientation of molecular motion is influenced by these tissue properties. The most common method to measure perfusion in the body using MRI is T1-weighted dynamic contrast enhancement (DCE-MRI). The analysis of DCE-MRI data allows determining the perfusion and permeability of a biological tissue. DWI as well as DCE-MRI are established techniques in MRI of the brain, while significantly fewer studies have been published in body imaging. In recent years, both techniques have been applied successfully in healthy bone marrow as well as for the characterization of bone marrow alterations or lesions; e.g., DWI has been used in particular for the differentiation of benign and malignant vertebral compression fractures. In this review article, firstly a short introduction to diffusion-weighted and dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI is given. Non-quantitative and quantitative approaches for the analysis of DWI and semiquantitative and quantitative approaches for the analysis of DCE-MRI are introduced. Afterwards a detailed overview of the results of both techniques in healthy bone marrow and their applications for the diagnosis of various bone-marrow pathologies, like osteoporosis, bone tumors, and vertebral compression fractures are described.

  19. Diabetes Mellitus Induces Bone Marrow Microangiopathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oikawa, Atsuhiko; Siragusa, Mauro; Quaini, Federico; Mangialardi, Giuseppe; Katare, Rajesh G.; Caporali, Andrea; van Buul, Jaap D.; van Alphen, Floris P. J.; Graiani, Gallia; Spinetti, Gaia; Kraenkel, Nicolle; Prezioso, Lucia; Emanueli, Costanza; Madeddu, Paolo

    2010-01-01

    Objective-The impact of diabetes on the bone marrow (BM) microenvironment was not adequately explored. We investigated whether diabetes induces microvascular remodeling with negative consequence for BM homeostasis. Methods and Results-We found profound structural alterations in BM from mice with

  20. Allogeneic and Autologous Bone-Marrow Transplantation

    OpenAIRE

    Deeg, H. Joachim

    1988-01-01

    The author of this paper presents an overview of the current status of bone marrow transplantation, including indications, pre-transplant considerations, the transplant procedure, acute and delayed transplant-related problems, results currently attainable, and a short discussion of possible future developments.

  1. Periapical multilocular osteoporotic bone marrow defect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Yun Hoa; Cho, Bong Hae; Nah, Kyung Soo

    2005-01-01

    A case of osteoporotic bone marrow defect, which appeared as a well-defined multilocular radiolucency overlapping the roots of mandibular right second molar, was reported. On periapical radiograph, a daughter cyst-like radiolucency was seen at the anterior margin of the lesion making it difficult to rule out odontogenic keratocyst.

  2. Periapical multilocular osteoporotic bone marrow defect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Yun Hoa; Cho, Bong Hae; Nah, Kyung Soo [Pusan National University College of Medicine, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-12-15

    A case of osteoporotic bone marrow defect, which appeared as a well-defined multilocular radiolucency overlapping the roots of mandibular right second molar, was reported. On periapical radiograph, a daughter cyst-like radiolucency was seen at the anterior margin of the lesion making it difficult to rule out odontogenic keratocyst.

  3. Bone marrow examination: Indications and diagnostic value

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bashawri, Layla A.

    2002-01-01

    Objective was to identify the main indications for bone marrow examination in a University hospital setup and the most common diagnoses encountered. To also identify the extent of correlation, if any, between the preliminary diagnosis and the result of the final bone marrow diagnosis. The requests and reports of all bone marrow biopsies and aspirations carried out during a 12-year period from January 1988 through to December 1999, in King Fahd Hospital of the University, Al Khobar, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia were retrospectively reviewed. The information extracted included the main indications for performing this procedure, age groups involved, and the most common diagnoses encountered. A specially designed form was used for this purpose and the data was analyzed using the statistical package for social sciences. Randomly selected slides of the most common diagnoses were reviewed to concur with the diagnosis. There was a total of 1813 bone marrow biopsies or aspirations, or both, performed. The main indications for bone marrow examination in a descending order of frequency were the following: The diagnosis and management of acute leukemia 403 (22.2%), staging for lymphoma 276 (15.2%), evaluation of pancytopenia 215 (11.9%), thrombocytopenia 173 (9.5%), investigation of anemia 151 (8.3%), fever (pyrexia of unknown origin) 130 (7.2%), lymphadenopathy 120 (6.6%), and hepatosplenomegaly 80 (4.4%). The most common diagnoses encountered were: acute lymphoblastic leukemia 242 (13.3%), immune thrombocytopenia 123 (6.8%), acute myeloblastic leukemia 80 (4.4%), hypersplenism 79 (4.4%), chronic granulocytic leukemia 73 (4.0%), megaloblastic anemia 66 (3.6%), bone marrow positive for lymphomatous infiltration 63 (3.5%), chronic lymphocytic leukemia 40 (2.2%), and multiple myeloma 32 (1.8%). This study confirms that bone marrow examination is a very important investigation for establishing the diagnosis in many conditions, especially hematological neoplasms. The most common

  4. A novel immunohistochemical sequential multi-labelling and erasing technique enables epitope characterization of bone marrow pericytes in primary myelofibrosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madelung, Ann; Bzorek, Michael; Bondo, Henrik

    2012-01-01

    : In Philadelphia (Ph)-negative chronic myeloproliferative neoplasms, increased microvascular density, bizarre vessel architecture and increased number of pericytes are among the distinct histopathological features. The aim of this study was to characterize bone marrow pericytes in primary myelofibrosis (PMF) using...... a novel multi-labelling immunohistochemical technique. Methods and results: Bone marrow biopsies from a normal donor (n = 1) and patients with PMF (n = 3) were subjected to an immunohistochemical sequential multi-labelling and erasing technique (SE-technique). Antigens of interest in the first and....../or second layer were detected with an immunoperoxidase system and visualized with aminoethylcarbazole. After imaging, erasing and blocking of immunoreagents, the slides were stained with a traditional double immunolabelling procedure. In addition, we applied a Photoshop(®) colour palette, creating a single...

  5. Restricted antibody formation to sheep erythrocytes of allogeneic bone marrow chimeras histoincompatible at the K end of the H-2 complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onoe, K.; Yasumizu, R.; Oh-Ishi, T.; Kakinuma, M.; Good, R.A.; Morikawa, K.

    1981-01-01

    Employing a new method for allogeneic bone marrow transplantation, irradiation chimeras constructed from various combinations of marrow cells from B10 H-2 recombinant mice and AKR recipients were prepared. Though these chimeras had well-developed populations of T and B cells, they showed strikingly different patterns of responses in the primary antibody formation to sheep erythrocytes (SRBC), a T dependent antigen. These are (a) AKR mice treated with C57BL/10 cells, [B10 leads to AKR] fully H-2 incompatible, and AKR mice treated with B10.A (5R) cells, [5R leads to AKR] I-J,E compatible chimeras that were almost completely unresponsive to SRBC; (b) AKR mice treated with B10.BR cells [BR leads to AKR] fully H-2 compatible, and AKR mice treated with B10 AKM cells, [AKM leads to AKR] chimeras where donor and recipient differed only at H-2D, showed the same number of plaque-forming cells (PFC) as B10 control mice; (c) AKR mice treated with B10.A cells, [B10 leads to AKR] chimeras, where donor and recipient were matched at H-2K-I-E region, showed about one-half the number of PFC as the control mice. From these results we conclude that in allogeneic bone marrow chimeras primary antibody response to T-dependent antigen, such as SRBC, is generated when at least the K end of the H-2 complex is compatible between donor and recipient

  6. Second allogeneic stem cell transplant for aplastic anaemia: a retrospective study by the Severe Aplastic Anaemia Working Party of the European Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cesaro, Simone; Peffault de Latour, Regis; Tridello, Gloria; Pillon, Marta; Carlson, Kristina; Fagioli, Franca; Jouet, Jean-Pierre; Koh, Mickey B C; Panizzolo, Irene Sara; Kyrcz-Krzemien, Slawomira; Maertens, Johan; Rambaldi, Alessandro; Strahm, Brigitte; Blaise, Didier; Maschan, Alexei; Marsh, Judith; Dufour, Carlo

    2015-11-01

    We analysed the outcome of a second allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplant (alloHSCT) in 162 patients reported to the European Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation between 1998 and 2009. Donor origin was a sibling in 110 and an unrelated donor in 52 transplants, respectively. The stem cell source was bone marrow in 31% and peripheral blood in 69% of transplants. The same donor as for the first alloHSCT was used in 81% of transplants whereas a change in the choice of stem cell source was reported in 56% of patients, mainly from bone marrow to peripheral blood. Neutrophil and platelet engraftment occurred in 85% and 72% of patients, after a median time of 15 and 17 days, respectively. Grade II-IV acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) and chronic GVHD occurred in 21% and 37% of patients, respectively. Graft failure (GF) occurred in 42 patients (26%). After a median follow-up of 3·5 years, the 5-year overall survival (OS) was 60·7%. In multivariate analysis, the only factor significantly associated with a better outcome was a Karnofsky/Lansky score ≥80 (higher OS). We conclude that a second alloHSCT is feasible rescue option for GF in SAA, with a successful outcome in 60% of cases. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Laparoscopic nephrectomy in live donor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitre Anuar I.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To present the initial experience of videolaparoscopic nephrectomy in live renal donor. MATERIALS AND METHODS: In the period from April 2000 to August 2003, 50 left nephrectomies in live donor were performed by videolaparoscopy for transplantation. Twenty-eight patients were male (56% and 22 female (44%. Mean age was 37.2 years, and the mean body mass index (BMI was 27.1 kg/m². RESULTS: Mean surgical time was 179.5 minutes, and warm ischemia time of the graft was 3.79 minutes. The mean estimated bleeding was 141 mL. There was no need of blood transfusion or conversion to open surgery. In 42 cases (84%, the vascular portion of the graft was considered good by the recipient's surgical team and in all cases, the ureter was considered of proper size, though in one of them (2% its vascularization was considered improper. The transplanted kidneys produced urine still in the surgical room in 46 of the 50 transplantations considered. In only 2 cases opioid was required for analgesia. In average, 3.1 doses of dipyrone were used for each patient during hospital stay, and hospital discharge occurred, in average, after 3.2 days post-operatively. Two patients required re-operations and one of them evolved to death. CONCLUSIONS: The laparoscopic nephrectomy in live donor for renal transplantation is an alternative to conventional open surgery. In relation to the graft, no alteration, either anatomic or functional, was detected. Though there is already a large documentation in the international literature regarding this procedure, in our setting a prospective randomized study with the usual surgical study is still necessary in order to prove the advantages and disadvantages of the method.

  8. Laparoscopic nephrectomy in live donor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anuar I. Mitre

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To present the initial experience of videolaparoscopic nephrectomy in live renal donor. MATERIALS AND METHODS: In the period from April 2000 to August 2003, 50 left nephrectomies in live donor were performed by videolaparoscopy for transplantation. Twenty-eight patients were male (56% and 22 female (44%. Mean age was 37.2 years, and the mean body mass index (BMI was 27.1 kg/m². RESULTS: Mean surgical time was 179.5 minutes, and warm ischemia time of the graft was 3.79 minutes. The mean estimated bleeding was 141 mL. There was no need of blood transfusion or conversion to open surgery. In 42 cases (84%, the vascular portion of the graft was considered good by the recipient's surgical team and in all cases, the ureter was considered of proper size, though in one of them (2% its vascularization was considered improper. The transplanted kidneys produced urine still in the surgical room in 46 of the 50 transplantations considered. In only 2 cases opioid was required for analgesia. In average, 3.1 doses of dipyrone were used for each patient during hospital stay, and hospital discharge occurred, in average, after 3.2 days post-operatively. Two patients required re-operations and one of them evolved to death. CONCLUSIONS: The laparoscopic nephrectomy in live donor for renal transplantation is an alternative to conventional open surgery. In relation to the graft, no alteration, either anatomic or functional, was detected. Though there is already a large documentation in the international literature regarding this procedure, in our setting a prospective randomized study with the usual surgical study is still necessary in order to prove the advantages and disadvantages of the method.

  9. Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells for improving hematopoietic function: an in vitro and in vivo model. Part 2: Effect on bone marrow microenvironment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soraya Carrancio

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to determine how mesenchymal stem cells (MSC could improve bone marrow (BM stroma function after damage, both in vitro and in vivo. Human MSC from 20 healthy donors were isolated and expanded. Mobilized selected CD34(+ progenitor cells were obtained from 20 HSCT donors. For in vitro study, long-term bone marrow cultures (LTBMC were performed using a etoposide damaged stromal model to test MSC effect in stromal confluence, capability of MSC to lodge in stromal layer as well as some molecules (SDF1, osteopontin, involved in hematopoietic niche maintenance were analyzed. For the in vivo model, 64 NOD/SCID recipients were transplanted with CD34+ cells administered either by intravenous (i.v. or intrabone (i.b. route, with or without BM derived MSC. MSC lodgement within the BM niche was assessed by FISH analysis and the expression of SDF1 and osteopontin by immunohistochemistry. In vivo study showed that when the stromal damage was severe, TP-MSC could lodge in the etoposide-treated BM stroma, as shown by FISH analysis. Osteopontin and SDF1 were differently expressed in damaged stroma and their expression restored after TP-MSC addition. Human in vivo MSC lodgement was observed within BM niche by FISH, but MSC only were detected and not in the contralateral femurs. Human MSC were located around blood vessels in the subendoestal region of femurs and expressed SDF1 and osteopontin. In summary, our data show that MSC can restore BM stromal function and also engraft when a higher stromal damage was done. Interestingly, MSC were detected locally where they were administered but not in the contralateral femur.

  10. Legumain Regulates Differentiation Fate of Human Bone Marrow Stromal Cells and Is Altered in Postmenopausal Osteoporosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbas Jafari

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Secreted factors are a key component of stem cell niche and their dysregulation compromises stem cell function. Legumain is a secreted cysteine protease involved in diverse biological processes. Here, we demonstrate that legumain regulates lineage commitment of human bone marrow stromal cells and that its expression level and cellular localization are altered in postmenopausal osteoporotic patients. As shown by genetic and pharmacological manipulation, legumain inhibited osteoblast (OB differentiation and in vivo bone formation through degradation of the bone matrix protein fibronectin. In addition, genetic ablation or pharmacological inhibition of legumain activity led to precocious OB differentiation and increased vertebral mineralization in zebrafish. Finally, we show that localized increased expression of legumain in bone marrow adipocytes was inversely correlated with adjacent trabecular bone mass in a cohort of patients with postmenopausal osteoporosis. Our data suggest that altered proteolytic activity of legumain in the bone microenvironment contributes to decreased bone mass in postmenopausal osteoporosis.

  11. Molecular blood grouping of donors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    St-Louis, Maryse

    2014-04-01

    For many decades, hemagglutination has been the sole means to type blood donors. Since the first blood group gene cloning in the early 1990s, knowledge on the molecular basis of most red blood cell, platelet and neutrophil antigens brought the possibility of using nucleotide-based techniques to predict phenotype. This review will summarized methodologies available to genotype blood groups from laboratory developed assays to commercially available platforms, and how proficiency assays become more present. The author will also share her vision of the transfusion medicine future. The field is presently at the crossroads, bringing new perspectives to a century old practice. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Donor free radical explosive composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Franklin E. [15 Way Points Rd., Danville, CA 94526; Wasley, Richard J. [4290 Colgate Way, Livermore, CA 94550

    1980-04-01

    An improved explosive composition is disclosed and comprises a major portion of an explosive having a detonation velocity between about 1500 and 10,000 meters per second and a minor amount of a donor additive comprising an organic compound or mixture of organic compounds capable of releasing low molecular weight free radicals or ions under mechanical or electrical shock conditions and which is not an explosive, or an inorganic compound or mixture of inorganic compounds capable of releasing low molecular weight free radicals or ions under mechanical or electrical shock conditions and selected from ammonium or alkali metal persulfates.

  13. Cell surface appearance of unexpected host MHC determinants on thymocytes from radiation bone marrow chimeras

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharrow, S.O.; Mathieson, B.J.; Singer, A.

    1981-01-01

    The phenotypic appearance of cell surface antigens on murine thymocytes from long-term radiation bone marrow chimeras was analyzed using indirect immunofluorescence and flow microfluorometry. Cells maturing in the thymi of these mice were typed for MHC (Kk, I-Ak, H-2b, Kb, and Ib) and non-MHC (Lty 1, Ly 9, and TL) determinants. All cells were of donor origin as determined by non-MHC (Ly) phenotype in P1 leads to P2, P1 x P2 leads to P1, and P1 leads to P2 radiation chimeras. In contrast, the MHC phenotypes of these thymocytes were markedly affected by the host environment. Specifically, H-2 and I-A determinants of both parental phenotypes were detected on thymocytes from P1 leads to P1 x P2 chimeras; I-A determinants of host phenotype were present, whereas I-A determinants of donor phenotype were reduced on thymocytes from P1 x P2 leads to P1 chimeras; and thymocytes from P1 leads to P2 chimeras possessed H-2 and I-A determinants of host phenotype but showed reduction of donor I-A phenotype determinants. The appearance of host cell surface H-2 and I-A determinants on thymocytes from chimeras closely parallels the functional recognition of MHC determinants by T cells from chimeric mice and thus may be significantly related to the development of the self-recognition repertoire by maturing T cells

  14. Autoserum: An Optimal Supplement for Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells of Liver-Injured Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qinglin Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs are an attractive source for the clinical cell therapy of liver injury. Although the use of adult serum, platelet lysate, or cord blood serum solves some of the problems caused by fetal bovine serum (FBS, the allogeneic immune response, contamination, and donor-to-donor and donor-to-receptor differences still obstruct the application of MSCs. In this study, the influences of autoserum from liver-injured rats (LIRs and allogeneic serum from healthy rats on the isolation and culture of bone marrow MSCs (BMSCs were examined and compared to FBS. The results showed that BMSCs cultured with autoserum or allogeneic serum exhibited better MSC-specific morphology, lower rate of cell senescent, and higher proliferation kinetics than those with FBS. In addition, autoserum promoted the osteogenic differentiation potential of BMSCs as allogeneic serum did. Although there were no significant differences in proliferation activity, immunophenotypic characterization, and differentiation potential between BMSCs cultured with autoserum and those with allogeneic serum, the potential adverse immunological reactions in patients with allogeneic material transplantation must be considered. We therefore believe that the autoserum from liver-injured patients may be a better choice for MSC expansion to meet the needs of liver injury therapy.

  15. White LED visible light communication technology research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chao

    2017-03-01

    Visible light communication is a new type of wireless optical communication technology. White LED to the success of development, the LED lighting technology is facing a new revolution. Because the LED has high sensitivity, modulation, the advantages of good performance, large transmission power, can make it in light transmission light signal at the same time. Use white LED light-emitting characteristics, on the modulation signals to the visible light transmission, can constitute a LED visible light communication system. We built a small visible optical communication system. The system composition and structure has certain value in the field of practical application, and we also research the key technology of transmitters and receivers, the key problem has been resolved. By studying on the optical and LED the characteristics of a high speed modulation driving circuit and a high sensitive receiving circuit was designed. And information transmission through the single chip microcomputer test, a preliminary verification has realized the data transmission function.

  16. CXCR7 maintains osteosarcoma invasion after CXCR4 suppression in bone marrow microenvironment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Yan; Wu, Chunlei; Wang, Jing; Liu, Na

    2017-05-01

    The major cause of death in osteosarcoma is the invasion and metastasis. Better understanding of the molecular mechanism of osteosarcoma invasion is essential in developing effective tumor-suppressive therapies. Interaction between chemokine receptors plays a crucial role in regulating osteosarcoma invasion. Here, we investigated the relationship between CXCR7 and CXCR4 in osteosarcoma invasion induced by bone marrow microenvironment. Human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells were co-cultured with osteosarcoma cells to mimic actual bone marrow microenvironment. Osteosarcoma cell invasion and CXCL12/CXCR4 activation were observed within this co-culture model. Interestingly, in this co-culture model, osteosarcoma cell invasion was not inhibited by suppressing CXCR4 expression with neutralizing antibody or specific inhibitor AMD3100. Downstream signaling extracellular signal-regulated kinase and signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 were not significantly affected by CXCR4 inhibition. However, suppressing CXCR4 led to CXCR7 upregulation. Constitutive expression of CXCR7 could maintain osteosarcoma cell invasion when CXCR4 was suppressed. Simultaneously, inhibiting CXCR4 and CXCR7 compromised osteosarcoma invasion in co-culture system and suppressed extracellular signal-regulated kinase and signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 signals. Moreover, bone marrow microenvironment, not CXCL12 alone, is required for CXCR7 activation after CXCR4 suppression. Taken together, suppressing CXCR4 is not enough to impede osteosarcoma invasion in bone marrow microenvironment since CXCR7 is activated to sustain invasion. Therefore, inhibiting both CXCR4 and CXCR7 could be a promising strategy in controlling osteosarcoma invasion.

  17. Blood donor incentives: A step forward or backward

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abolghasemi Hassan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Dramatic increase in blood usage and critical seasonal blood shortages are faced by various countries. Countries which previously reached 100% voluntary nonremunerated donation have been led to offer different kinds of incentives to recruit blood donors and meet their blood demands. In some cases, these incentives are considered monetary and are in complete contrast with International standards like World Health Organization (WHO. It seems that attitudes toward sole dependency on nonremunerated voluntary blood donation have been changed in recent years and experts in some developed countries are reevaluating partial reliance on paid donation. On the other hand, besides the effects of such incentives on blood safety, several economic and psychological studies have shown that incentives have discouraging effects on pro-social behaviors like blood donation and will reduce the number of blood donors in long term. With regard to the results of such studies, it seems that implementing incentive-based blood donor recruitment programs to meet blood requirements by some countries is becoming a challenge for blood banks.

  18. System Reliability for LED-Based Products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, J Lynn; Mills, Karmann; Lamvik, Michael; Yaga, Robert; Shepherd, Sarah D; Bittle, James; Baldasaro, Nick; Solano, Eric; Bobashev, Georgiy; Johnson, Cortina; Evans, Amy

    2014-04-07

    Results from accelerated life tests (ALT) on mass-produced commercially available 6” downlights are reported along with results from commercial LEDs. The luminaires capture many of the design features found in modern luminaires. In general, a systems perspective is required to understand the reliability of these devices since LED failure is rare. In contrast, components such as drivers, lenses, and reflector are more likely to impact luminaire reliability than LEDs.

  19. The deceased organ donor with an "open abdomen": proceed with caution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkins, A C; Vedula, G V; Horan, J; Dellicarpini, K; Pak, S-W; Daly, T; Samstein, B; Kato, T; Emond, J C; Guarrera, J V

    2012-06-01

    In solid organ transplantation, the disparity between donor supply and patients awaiting transplant continues to increase. The organ shortage has led to relaxation of historic contraindications to organ donation. A large percentage of deceased organ donors have been subjected to traumatic injuries, which can often result in intervention that leads to abdominal packing and intensive care unit resuscitation. The donor with this "open abdomen" (OA) presents a situation in which the risk of organ utilization is difficult to quantify. There exists a concern for the potential of a higher risk for both bacterial and fungal infections, including multidrug-resistant (MDR) pathogens because of the prevalence of antibiotic use and critical illness in this population. No recommendations have been established for utilization of organs from these OA donors, because data are limited. Herein, we report a case of a 21-year-old donor who had sustained a gunshot wound to his abdomen, resulting in a damage-control laparotomy and abdominal packing. The donor subsequently suffered brain death, and the family consented to organ donation. A multiorgan procurement was performed with respective transplantation of the procured organs (heart, liver, and both kidneys) into 4 separate recipients. Peritoneal swab cultures performed at the time of organ recovery grew out MDR Pseudomonas aeruginosa on the day after procurement, subsequently followed by positive blood and sputum cultures as well. All 4 transplant recipients subsequently developed infections with MDR P. aeruginosa, which appeared to be donor-derived with similar resistance patterns. Appropriate antibiotic coverage was initiated in all of the patients. Although 2 of the recipients died, mortality did not appear to be clearly associated with the donor-derived infections. This case illustrates the potential infectious risk associated with organs from donors with an OA, and suggests that aggressive surveillance for occult infections

  20. [Demography and donation frequencies of blood and plasma donor populations in Germany. Update 2010 and 5-year comparison].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritter, S; Hamouda, O; Offergeld, R

    2012-08-01

    The Robert Koch Institute collects and evaluates nationwide data on the incidence and prevalence of transfusion-relevant infections among blood and plasma donors in Germany. Since 2006 data not only on the number of donations tested but also on the number of the respective donors have become available. The demographic profile and donation frequencies of German whole blood, plasma and platelet donors in 2010 and the percentages among the general population are described and compared to data from 2006. Although the general population eligible to donate blood is on the decline since 2003, with a loss of 2% between 2006 and 2010, this has not led to a decrease in the number of blood donors and donations. Instead, the number of new and repeat whole blood donors increased by 8% and 7%, respectively. At the same time, the number of new plasma donors grew by 23%, that of repeat plasma donors by 41%. In 2010 more than 4.3% of the population aged 18-68 years was active as repeat whole blood donors; 0.4% repeatedly donated plasma or platelets. Since 2006 the percentage of donors among the general population increased significantly, especially among the youngest age group (18-24 years). Donation frequency varied depending on donor age and sex, with an average of 1.9 per year for whole blood donations, 12.5 for plasmapheresis and 5.0 for plateletpheresis. While the donation frequency for whole blood remained unchanged since 2006, the frequency of apheresis donations increased, especially among older donors. By recruiting more new donors and retaining and reactivating existing ones more effectively, the number of whole blood and apheresis donations was augmented.

  1. Control of charge transfer by conformational and electronic effects: Donor-donor and donor-acceptor phenyl pyrroles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neubauer, Antje; Bendig, Juergen; Rettig, Wolfgang

    2009-01-01

    Derivatives of N-pyrrolobenzene with a para-donor and a para-acceptor substituent on the benzene ring are compared. It is shown that by a suitable increase of the donor strength of the pyrrolo group, CT fluorescence can be achieved even for donor-donor-substituted benzenes. The ICT emission for sterically hindered compounds is more forbidden than that of unhindered phenyl pyrroles. This suggests conformational effects which induce a narrower twist angle distribution around a perpendicular minimum in the excited state.

  2. Projecting LED product life based on application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narendran, Nadarajah; Liu, Yi-wei; Mou, Xi; Thotagamuwa, Dinusha R.; Eshwarage, Oshadhi V. Madihe

    2016-09-01

    LED products have started to displace traditional light sources in many lighting applications. One of the commonly claimed benefits for LED lighting products is their long useful lifetime in applications. Today there are many replacement lamp products using LEDs in the marketplace. Typically, lifetime claims of these replacement lamps are in the 25,000-hour range. According to current industry practice, the time for the LED light output to reach the 70% value is estimated according to IESNA LM-80 and TM-21 procedures and the resulting value is reported as the whole system life. LED products generally experience different thermal environments and switching (on-off cycling) patterns when used in applications. Current industry test methods often do not produce accurate lifetime estimates for LED systems because only one component of the system, namely the LED, is tested under a continuous-on burning condition without switching on and off, and because they estimate for only one failure type, lumen depreciation. The objective of the study presented in this manuscript was to develop a test method that could help predict LED system life in any application by testing the whole LED system, including on-off power cycling with sufficient dwell time, and considering both failure types, catastrophic and parametric. The study results showed for the LED A-lamps tested in this study, both failure types, catastrophic and parametric, exist. The on-off cycling encourages catastrophic failure, and maximum operating temperature influences the lumen depreciation rate and parametric failure time. It was also clear that LED system life is negatively affected by on-off switching, contrary to commonly held belief. In addition, the study results showed that most of the LED systems failed catastrophically much ahead of the LED light output reaching the 70% value. This emphasizes the fact that life testing of LED systems must consider catastrophic failure in addition to lumen depreciation, and

  3. Live Donor Liver Transplantation Without Blood Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabbour, Nicolas; Gagandeep, Singh; Mateo, Rodrigo; Sher, Linda; Strum, Earl; Donovan, John; Kahn, Jeffrey; Peyre, Christian G.; Henderson, Randy; Fong, Tse-Ling; Selby, Rick; Genyk, Yuri

    2004-01-01

    Objective: Developing strategies for transfusion-free live donor liver transplantation in Jehovah's Witness patients. Summary Background Data: Liver transplantation is the standard of care for patients with end-stage liver disease. A disproportionate increase in transplant candidates and an allocation policy restructuring, favoring patients with advanced disease, have led to longer waiting time and increased medical acuity for transplant recipients. Consequently, Jehovah's Witness patients, who refuse blood product transfusion, are usually excluded from liver transplantation. We combined blood augmentation and conservation practices with live donor liver transplantation (LDLT) to accomplish successful LDLT in Jehovah's Witness patients without blood products. Our algorithm provides broad possibilities for blood conservation for all surgical patients. Methods: From September 1998 until June 2001, 38 LDLTs were performed at Keck USC School of Medicine: 8 in Jehovah's Witness patients (transfusion-free group) and 30 in non-Jehovah's Witness patients (transfusion-eligible group). All transfusion-free patients underwent preoperative blood augmentation with erythropoietin, intraoperative cell salvage, and acute normovolemic hemodilution. These techniques were used in only 7%, 80%, and 10%, respectively, in transfusion-eligible patients. Perioperative clinical data and outcomes were retrospectively reviewed. Data from both groups were statistically analyzed. Results: Preoperative liver disease severity was similar in both groups; however, transfusion-free patients had significantly higher hematocrit levels following erythropoietin augmentation. Operative time, blood loss, and postoperative hematocrits were similar in both groups. No blood products were used in transfusion-free patients while 80% of transfusion-eligible patients received a median of 4.5+/− 3.5 units of packed red cell. ICU and total hospital stay were similar in both groups. The survival rate was 100% in

  4. Magnetic resonance imaging of the bone marrow in hematological malignancies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berg, B.C. vande; Lecouvet, F.E.; Maldague, B.; Malghem, J.; Michaux, L.; Ferrant, A.

    1998-01-01

    Despite its lack of specificity, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the bone marrow has the potential to play a role in the management of patients with primary neoplastic disorders of the hematopoietic system, including lymphomas, leukemias and multiple myeloma. In addition to its use in the assessment of suspected spinal cord compression, bone marrow MRI could be used as a prognostic method or as a technique to assess the response to treatment. The current review addresses the common patterns of bone marrow involvement observed in primary neoplasms of the bone marrow, basic technical principles of bone marrow MRI, and several applications of MRI in selected clinical situations. (orig.) (orig.)

  5. Bone marrow transplantation across major histocompatibility barriers in mice. II. T cell requirement for engraftment in total lymphoid irradiation-conditioned recipients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vallera, D.A.; Soderling, C.C.; Carlson, G.J.; Kersey, J.H.

    1982-01-01

    Studies were undertaken to examine the role of T lymphocytes in engraftment of bone marrow (BM) in animals conditioned with total lymphoid irradiation (TLI) prior to transplantation across major histocompatibility barriers. Donor BM (added as a source of lymphohematopoietic stem cells) and spleen cells (added as a source of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD)-causing cells) were pretreated in vitro with monoclonal anti-Thy-1.2 plus complement (C). T cell-depleted grafts were then give to allogeneic mice conditioned with 900 rad of single dose TLI plus cyclophosphamide (CY). These mice did not engraft. Even in the absence of added spleen cells, elimination of the small T cell population from donor BM grafts prevented engraftment compared with animals that received the same conditioning regimen and untreated donor cells. These control animals demonstrated uniform evidence of engraftment about 1 month after transplantation. Similar findings were reported when recipients were conditioned with fractionated 17 x 200-rad TLI. In TLI plus CY-conditional recipients, we have also observed that increasing the donation of treated bone marrow cells still did not result in significant engraftment. Furthermore, graft failure in mice receiving normal dosages of anti-Thy-1.2 plus C-treated donor cells was not a strain-restricted phenomenon. Moreover, removal of bone marrow T cells with monoclonal anti-Lyt-1 plus complement also resulted in graft failure in TLI-conditioned recipients. In contrast to TLI conditioning, when Thy-1.2 plus C-treated donor cells were given to recipients conditioned with total body irradiation (TBI), a high percentage of engraftment was demonstrated by an H-2 microcytotoxicity assay. Plausible mechanisms for there findings are discussed

  6. Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation Using Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis and Human Leukocyte Antigen Typing for Human Leukocyte Antigen-Matched Sibling Donor: A Turkish Multicenter Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurekci, Emin; Küpesiz, Alphan; Anak, Sema; Öztürk, Gülyüz; Gürsel, Orhan; Aksoylar, Serap; Ileri, Talia; Kuşkonmaz, Barış; Eker, İbrahim; Cetin, Mualla; Tezcan Karasu, Gülsün; Kaya, Zühre; Fışgın, Tunç; Ertem, Mehmet; Kansoy, Savaş; Yeşilipek, Mehmet Akif

    2017-05-01

    Preimplantation genetic diagnosis involves the diagnosis of a genetic disorder in embryos obtained through in vitro fertilization, selection of healthy embryos, and transfer of the embryos to the mother's uterus. Preimplantation genetic diagnosis has been used not only to avoid the risk of having an affected child, but it also offers, using HLA matching, preselection of potential HLA-genoidentical healthy donor progeny for an affected sibling who requires bone marrow transplantation. Here, we share the hematopoietic stem cell transplantation results of 52 patients with different benign and malign hematological or metabolic diseases or immunodeficiencies whose donors were siblings born with this technique in Turkey since 2008. The median age of the patients' at the time of the transplantation was 8 years (range, 3 to 16 years) and the median age of the donors was 2 years (range, .5 to 6 years). The most common indication for HSCT was thalassemia major (42 of all patients, 80%). The stem cell source in all of the transplantations was bone marrow. In 37 of the transplantations, umbilical cord blood of the same donor was also used. In 50 of the 52 patients, full engraftment was achieved with a mean of 4.6 × 10 6 CD 34 + cells per kg of recipient weight. Ninety-six percent of the patients have been cured through hematopoietic stem cell transplantation without any complication. Primary engraftment failure was seen in only 2 patients with thalassemia major. All of the donors and the patients are alive with good health status. Preimplantation genetic diagnosis with HLA matching offers a life-saving chance for patients who need transplantation but lack an HLA genoidentical donor. Copyright © 2017 The American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Alternative Donor Graft Sources for Adults with Hematologic Malignancies: A Donor for All Patients in 2017!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kindwall-Keller, Tamila L; Ballen, Karen K

    2017-09-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) is potentially curative for a wide variety of malignant diseases, including acute and leukemias, lymphoma, and myelodysplasia. Choice of a stem cell donor is dependent on donor availability, donor compatibility and health, recipient disease type, and recipient condition. Current sources of stem cell donation for HSCT are matched sibling donors (MSDs), matched unrelated donors (MUDs), 1-antigen mismatched unrelated donors (MMUDs), haploidentical donors (haplo), and umbilical cord blood (UCB) units. Historically, preferred donors for HSCT have been human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-matched sibling donors; however, only about 30% of U.S. patients will have a MSD available. The majority of patients referred for HSCT will require an alternative donor graft: MUD, MMUD, UCB, or haplo. The likelihood of finding a MUD varies depending on the ethnicity of the recipient. White Caucasians of European descent have the greatest chance of finding a MUD. Chances of finding a MUD are significantly less for African-American or Hispanic recipients due to HLA polymorphisms. Therefore, MMUD, UCB, and haplo donor graft sources expand the donor pool for recipients who do not have a MSD or MUD available. Given the variety of different donor stem cell sources available today, nearly every patient who needs an allogeneic HSCT has a potential donor in 2017. All transplant-eligible patients with hematologic malignancies should be evaluated by a transplant center to determine if HSCT is a viable treatment option for their underlying disease process. The goal of this review is to increase the awareness of oncology practitioners to the availability of alternative donor stem cell transplants for patients with hematologic malignancies. Despite new agents, stem cell transplant remains the only curative therapy for many patients with acute and chronic leukemia, myelodysplasia, and lymphoma. Given the variety of different donor stem cell sources available today

  8. Changes in compartments of hemospoietic and stromal marrow progenitor cells after continuous low dose gamma-irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domaratskaya, E.; Starostin, V.

    The low dose continuous gamma-irradiation chosen corresponded with that affected the organisms onboard a spacecraft (Mitrikas, Tsetlin, 2000). F1 (CBAxC57Bl/6) male and female mice were used at 3 4 months of age. Experimental mice were- irradiated during 10 days to a total dose of 15 mGy (Co60 gamma-sources, mean dose rate of 1.5-2.0 mGy/day). Another group of intact mice served as control. Younger and advanced hemopoietic progenitors measured at day 11 (i.e. CFU -S-11) and day 7 (i.e. CFU-S-7), respectively, after transplantation of test donor cells were assayed by the method of Till and McCulloch (1961). Stromal changes were evaluated by estimation of in vitro fibroblastic colony-forming units (CFU -F ) content and by the ability of ectopically grafted (under renal capsule) stroma to regenerate the new bone marrow organ. CFU-S-11 number increased of 40% as compared with control and almost 2-fold higher than that of CFU-S-7. The CFU-F content increased almost of 3-fold. Size of ectopic marrow transplants was estimated at day 70 following grafting by counting myelokariocyte and CFU -S number that repopulated the newly formed bone marrow organ. It was found more than 2-fold increase of myelokariocytes in transplants produced by marrow stroma of irradiated donors. CFU -S contents in transplants increased strikingly in comparison to control level. CFU-S-7 and CFU-S-11 increased of 7.5- and of 3.7-fold, respectively, i.e. the rate of advanced CFU - S predominated. It should be noted a good correlation between number of stromal progenitor cells (CFU-F) and ectopic transplant sizes evaluated as myelokaryocyte counts when irradiated donors used. In the same time, if sizes of transplants was measured as CFU-S-7 and CFU - S-11 numbers, their increases were more pronounced. Therefore, continuous low dose gamma- irradiation augments significantly both hemopoietic and stromal progenitor cell number in bone marrow. Additionally, the ratio of distinct CFU -S subpopulations

  9. Ionizing Radiation Stimulates Expression of Pro-Osteoclastogenic Genes in Marrow and Skeletal Tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alwood, J. S.; Shahnazari, M.; Chicana, B.; Schreurs, A. S.; Kumar, A.; Bartolini, A.; Shirazi-Fard, Y.; Globus, R. K.

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to ionizing radiation can cause rapid mineral loss and increase bone-resorbing osteoclasts within metabolically-active, cancellous-bone tissue leading to structural deficits. To better understand mechanisms involved in rapid, radiation-induced bone loss, we determined the influence of total-body irradiation on expression of select cytokines known both to stimulate osteoclastogenesis and contribute to inflammatory bone disease. Adult (16wk), male C57BL/6J mice were exposed to either 2Gy gamma rays (137Cs, 0.8Gy/min) or heavy ions (56Fe, 600MeV, 0.50-1.1Gy/min); this dose corresponds to either a single fraction of radiotherapy (typical total dose is =10Gy) or accumulates over long-duration, interplanetary missions. Serum, marrow, and mineralized tissue were harvested 4hrs-7d later. Gamma irradiation caused a prompt (2.6-fold within 4hrs) and persistent (peaking at 4.1-fold within 1d) rise in the expression of the obligate osteoclastogenic cytokine, receptor activator of nuclear factor kappaB-ligand (Rankl) within marrow cells over controls. Similarly, Rankl expression peaked in marrow cells within 3d of iron exposure (9.2-fold). Changes in Rankl expression induced by gamma irradiation preceded and overlapped with a rise in expression of other pro-osteoclastic cytokines in marrow (e.g., monocyte chemotactic protein-1 increased 11.9-fold, tumor necrosis factor-alpha increased 1.7- fold over controls). Marrow expression of the RANKL decoy receptor, osteoprotegerin (Opg), also rose after irradiation (11.3-fold). The ratio Rankl/Opg in marrow was increased 1.8-fold, a net pro-resorption balance. As expected, radiation increased a serum marker of resorption (tartrate resistant acid phosphatase) and led to cancellous bone loss (16% decrease in bone volume/total volume) through reduced trabecular struts. We conclude that total-body irradiation (gamma or heavy-ion) caused temporal, concerted regulation of gene expression within marrow and mineralized tissue for

  10. Graft rejection as a Th1-type process amenable to regulation by donor Th2-type cells through an interleukin-4/STAT6 pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariotti, Jacopo; Foley, Jason; Ryan, Kaitlyn; Buxhoeveden, Nicole; Kapoor, Veena; Amarnath, Shoba; Fowler, Daniel H

    2008-12-01

    Graft rejection has been defined as the mirror image of graft-versus-host disease, which is biologically characterized primarily as a Th1-type process. As such, we reasoned that graft rejection would represent a Th1 response amenable to Th2 modulation. Indeed, adoptive transfer of host Th1-type cells mediated rejection of fully MHC-disparate murine bone marrow allografts more effectively than host Th2-type cells. Furthermore, STAT1-deficient host T cells did not differentiate into Th1-type cells in vivo and failed to mediate rejection. We next hypothesized that donor Th2 cell allograft augmentation would prevent rejection by modulation of the host Th1/Th2 balance. In the setting of donor Th2 cell therapy, host-anti-donor allospecific T cells acquired Th2 polarity, persisted posttransplantation, and did not mediate rejection. Abrogation of rejection required donor Th2 cell IL-4 secretion and host T-cell STAT6 signaling. In conclusion, T cell-mediated marrow graft rejection primarily resembles a Th1-type process that can be abrogated by donor Th2 cell therapy that promotes engraftment through a novel mechanism whereby cytokine polarization is transferred to host T cells.

  11. Comparison of clinical grade human platelet lysates for cultivation of mesenchymal stromal cells from bone marrow and adipose tissue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juhl, Morten; Tratwal, Josefine; Follin, Bjarke

    2016-01-01

    be devoid of any animal derived components. We have evaluated whether human Platelet Lysate (hPL) could be an attractive alternative to animal supplements. METHODS: MSCs from bone marrow (BMSCs) and adipose tissue-derived stromal cells (ASCs) obtained from three donors were culture expanded in three...... culture conditions with 10% fetal bovine serum (FBS). Cell morphology, proliferation, phenotype, genomic stability, and differentiation potential were analyzed. RESULTS: Regardless of manufacturer, BMSCs and ASCs cultured in hPL media showed a significant increase in proliferation capacity compared to FBS...

  12. Mechanisms of tolerance in murine radiation bone marrow chimeras. II. Absence of nonspecific suppression in mature chimeras

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auchincloss, H. Jr.; Sachs, D.H.

    1983-01-01

    Spleen cells from a series of allogeneic bone marrow chimeras were sensitized in vitro with stimulator cells from major histocompatibility complex recombinant strains of mice. The combinations were chosen such that both tolerated (host or donor) and nontolerated (third-party) antigens were present on the same stimulator cells in order to determine whether the tolerated host antigens might elicit nonspecific suppressor mechanisms affecting the cell-mediated lympholysis (CML) response to the nontolerated antigens. No evidence for such nonspecific suppression was obtained in several types of assays. Therefore, if suppressor mechanisms exist that mediate such tolerance in mature allogeneic chimeras then these mechanisms must be highly antigen-specific

  13. Prisoners as Living Donors: A Vulnerabilities Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Lainie Friedman; Thistlethwaite, J Richard

    2018-01-01

    Although national guidelines exist for evaluating the eligibility of potential living donors and for procuring their informed consent, no special protections or considerations exist for potential living donors who are incarcerated. Human research subject protections in the United States are codified in the Federal Regulations, 45 CFR 46, and special protections are given to prisoners. Living donor transplantation has parallels with human subject research in that both activities are performed with the primary goal of benefiting third parties. In this article, we describe what special considerations should be provided to prisoners as potential living donors using a vulnerabilities approach adapted from the human research subject protection literature.

  14. Allogeneic radiation chimeras respond to TNP-modified donor and host targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lattime, E.C.; Gershon, H.E.; Stutman, O.

    1980-01-01

    Tolerance to major histocompatibility antigens as well as the ability to mount a cytotoxic response to hapten-modified cells of bone marrow donor and host origin was studied in allogeneic radiation chimeras. Lethally irradiated (C57BL/6 x DBA/2)F1 hosts reconstituted with anti-Thy 1.2 + C-treated bone marrow from (C57BL/6 x CBA)F1 mice showed tolerance to the MHC antigens of the three parental strains as measured by MLC and CML assay. The chimeras responded normally to unrelated allogeneic cells. Chimeric animals generated a cytotoxic response to hapten-modified cells of both donor (CBA) and host (DBA/2) haplotypes, as well as to C57BL/6, demonstrating that tolerance to the hapten-presenting host haplotype is sufficient to allow a cytotoxic antihapten response, and that processing through a semiallogeneic host environment does not affect the ability to generate a response to hapten in conjunction with self-determinants. Chimeras failed to mount a cytotoxic response to hapten presented on nontolerated allogeneic spleen cells

  15. The implication of follicular lymphoma patients receiving allogeneic stem cell transplantation from donors carrying t(14;18)-positive cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGregor, D K; Keever-Taylor, C A; Bredeson, C; Schur, B; Vesole, D H; Logan, B; Chang, C-C

    2005-06-01

    We performed real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RQ-PCR) in peripheral blood (PB) and/or bone marrow (BM) samples collected pre- and post transplant from 23 recipient-donor pairs receiving allogeneic stem cell transplantation (allo-SCT) for follicular lymphoma (FL). Of 23 donors, 11 had a PB and/or BM sample positive for t(14;18) (BCL2/IGH fusion) at low levels (donors with (n=11) and those without (n=12) detectable t(14:18) cells were similar in age, sex, and disease status pretransplant. No differences in the incidence of graft-versus-host-disease (GVHD), delayed engraftment, relapse rate, disease-free survival and overall survival were identified between the groups. Two recipients without detectable t(14;18) cells pre-transplant showed detectable t(14;18) cells at 2 and 11 years after receiving grafts from donors with t(14:18) cells. Neither patient developed FL 1.5 and 2 years after the emergence of t(14;18) cells. Although the sample size is relatively small, our findings suggest that individuals carrying t(14;18) cells may not be excluded as donors given the lack of an association of t(14;18) detected in donors with adverse clinical outcome. It may be necessary to screen for the donor's t(14;18) status before using t(14;18) for monitoring minimal residual disease by RQ-PCR to exclude the possibility of confounding donor's t(14;18) clone.

  16. Led Zeppelin reklaamib Narvat / Anti Ronk

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Ronk, Anti

    2007-01-01

    Ilmus Narva-teemaline kahest CD-st koosnev album, kus ühel plaadil on 60 minutit videot linna vaatamisväärsuste ja informatsiooniga, teisel - briti rockansambli Led Zeppelini teosed Narva sümfooniaorkestri ja rockansambli Led R esituses

  17. Imaging evaluation of potential donors in living-donor liver transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Low, G.; Wiebe, E.; Walji, A.H.; Bigam, D.L.

    2008-01-01

    Liver transplants, originally obtained from deceased donors, can now be harvested from living donors as well. This technique, called living-donor liver transplantation (LDLT), provides an effective alternative means of liver transplantation and is a method of expanding the donor pool in light of the demand and supply imbalance for organ transplants. Imaging plays an important role in LDLT programmes by providing robust evaluation of potential donors to ensure that only anatomically suitable donors with no significant co-existing pathology are selected and that crucial information that allows detailed preoperative planning is available. Imaging evaluation helps to improve the outcome of LDLT for both donors and recipients, by improving the chances of graft survival and reducing the postoperative complication rate. In this review, we describe the history of LDLT and discuss in detail the application of imaging in donor assessment with emphasis on use of modern computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques

  18. Advances in LEDs for automotive applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhardwaj, Jy; Peddada, Rao; Spinger, Benno

    2016-03-01

    High power LEDs were introduced in automotive headlights in 2006-2007, for example as full LED headlights in the Audi R8 or low beam in Lexus. Since then, LED headlighting has become established in premium and volume automotive segments and beginning to enable new compact form factors such as distributed low beam and new functions such as adaptive driving beam. New generations of highly versatile high power LEDs are emerging to meet these application needs. In this paper, we will detail ongoing advances in LED technology that enable revolutionary styling, performance and adaptive control in automotive headlights. As the standards which govern the necessary lumens on the road are well established, increasing luminance enables not only more design freedom but also headlight cost reduction with space and weight saving through more compact optics. Adaptive headlighting is based on LED pixelation and requires high contrast, high luminance, smaller LEDs with high-packing density for pixelated Matrix Lighting sources. Matrix applications require an extremely tight tolerance on not only the X, Y placement accuracy, but also on the Z height of the LEDs given the precision optics used to image the LEDs onto the road. A new generation of chip scale packaged (CSP) LEDs based on Wafer Level Packaging (WLP) have been developed to meet these needs, offering a form factor less than 20% increase over the LED emitter surface footprint. These miniature LEDs are surface mount devices compatible with automated tools for L2 board direct attach (without the need for an interposer or L1 substrate), meeting the high position accuracy as well as the optical and thermal performance. To illustrate the versatility of the CSP LEDs, we will show the results of, firstly, a reflector-based distributed low beam using multiple individual cavities each with only 20mm height and secondly 3x4 to 3x28 Matrix arrays for adaptive full beam. Also a few key trends in rear lighting and impact on LED light

  19. Harmonics Monitoring Survey on LED Lamps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdelrahman Ahmed Akila

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Light Emitting Diode (LED lamps are being increasingly used in many applications. These LED lamps operate using a driver, which is a switching device. Hence, LED lamps will be a source of harmonics in the power system. These harmonics if not well treated, may cause severe performance and operational problems. In this paper, harmonics (amplitude and phase angles generated by both LED lamps and conventional fluorescent lamps will be studied practically. Then they will be analyzed and evaluated. Compared to each other harmonics generated by both LED and conventional florescent lamps, self mitigation may occur based on the phase angle of these harmonics. All data will be measured using power analyzer and will be done on a sample of actual lamps.

  20. White LEDs with limit luminous efficacy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lisitsyn, V. M.; Stepanov, S. A., E-mail: stepanovsa@tpu.ru; Yangyang, Ju [National Research Tomsk Polytechnic University, 30 Lenin Av., Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation); Lukash, V. S. [JSC Research Institute of Semiconductor Devices, 99a Krasnoarmeyskaja St., Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation)

    2016-01-15

    In most promising widespread gallium nitride based LEDs emission is generated in the blue spectral region with a maximum at about 450 nm which is converted to visible light with the desired spectrum by means of phosphor. The thermal energy in the conversion is determined by the difference in the energies of excitation and emission quanta and the phosphor quantum yield. Heat losses manifest themselves as decrease in the luminous efficacy. LED heating significantly reduces its efficiency and life. In addition, while heating, the emission generation output and the efficiency of the emission conversion decrease. Therefore, the reduction of the energy losses caused by heating is crucial for LED development. In this paper, heat losses in phosphor-converted LEDs (hereinafter chips) during spectrum conversion are estimated. The limit values of the luminous efficacy for white LEDs are evaluated.

  1. ‘No Blue’ White LED

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ou, Haiyan; Corell, Dennis Dan; Dam-Hansen, Carsten

    2010-01-01

    This paper explored the feasibility of making a white LED light source by color mixing method without using the blue color. This ‘no blue’ white LED has potential applications in photolithography room illumination, medical treatment and biophotonics research. A no-blue LED was designed......-2005. Even after 15 days of illumination, no effect was observed. So this LED-based solution was demonstrated to be a very promising light source for photolithography room illumination due to its better color rendering in addition to energy efficiency, long life time and design flexibility. Additionally......, and the prototype was fabricated. The spectral power distribution of both the LED bulb and the yellow fluorescent tube was measured. Based on that, colorimetric values were calculated and compared on terms of chromatic coordinates, correlated color temperature, color rendering index, and chromatic deviation...

  2. Magnetic resonance imaging of the spinal marrow: Basic understanding of the normal marrow pattern and its variant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nouh, Mohamed Ragab; Eid, Ahmed Fathi

    2015-01-01

    For now, magnetic resonance (MR) is the best noninvasive imaging modality to evaluate vertebral bone marrow thanks to its inherent soft-tissue contrast and non-ionizing nature. A daily challenging scenario for every radiologist interpreting MR of the vertebral column is discerning the diseased from normal marrow. This requires the radiologist to be acquainted with the used MR techniques to judge the spinal marrow as well as its normal MR variants. Conventional sequences used basically to image marrow include T1W, fat-suppressed T2W and short tau inversion recovery (STIR) imaging provides gross morphological data. Interestingly, using non-routine MR sequences; such as opposed phase, diffusion weighted, MR spectroscopy and contrasted-enhanced imaging; may elucidate the nature of bone marrow heterogeneities; by inferring cellular and chemical composition; and adding new functional prospects. Recalling the normal composition of bone marrow elements and the physiologic processes of spinal marrow conversion and reconversion eases basic understanding of spinal marrow imaging. Additionally, orientation with some common variants seen during spinal marrow MR imaging as hemangiomas and bone islands is a must. Moreover, awareness of the age-associated bone marrow changes as well as changes accompanying different variations of the subject’s health state is essential for radiologists to avoid overrating normal MR marrow patterns as pathologic states and metigate unnecessary further work-up. PMID:26753060

  3. Differences in social representation of blood donation between donors and non-donors: an empirical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guarnaccia, Cinzia; Giannone, Francesca; Falgares, Giorgio; Caligaris, Aldo Ozino; Sales-Wuillemin, Edith

    2015-11-04

    Both donors and non-donors have a positive image of blood donation, so donors and non-donors do not differ regarding their views on donation but do differ in converting their opinion into an active deed of donation. Several studies have identified altruism and empathy as the main factors underlying blood donation. However, a mixture of various motivational factors mould the complex behaviour of donation. This paper presents an exploratory study on differences of social representations of blood donation between blood donors and non-donors, in order to understand the reasons that bring someone to take the decision to become a blood donor. Participants filled in the Adapted Self-Report Altruism Scale, Toronto Empathy Questionnaire and answered a test of verbal association. Descriptive and correlation analyses were carried out on quantitative data, while a prototypic analysis was used for qualitative data. The study was carried out on a convenience sample of 786 individuals, 583 donors (mean age: 35.40 years, SD: 13.01 years; 39.3% female) and 203 non-donors (mean age: 35.10 years, SD: 13.30 years; 67.5% female). Social representations of donors seem to be more complex and articulated than those of non-donors. The terms that appear to be central were more specific in donors (life, needle, blood, help, altruism were the words most associated by non-donors; life, aid, altruism, solidarity, health, love, gift, generosity, voluntary, control, needed, useful, needle were the words most associated by donors). Furthermore, non-donors associated a larger number of terms referring to negative aspects of blood donation. Aspects related to training and the accuracy of any information on blood donation seem to be important in the decision to become a donor and stabilise the behaviour of donation over time, thus ensuring the highest levels of quality and safety in blood establishments.

  4. In vitro regulation of immunoglobulin synthesis after marrow transplantation. I. T-cell and B-cell deficiencies in patients with and without chronic graft-versus-host disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lum, L.G.; Seigneuret, M.C.; Storb, R.F.; Witherspoon, R.P.; Thomas, E.D.

    1981-01-01

    Twenty-four patients with aplastic anemia or acute leukemia were treated by marrow grafts from HLA-identical donors after conditioning with high doses of cyclophosphamide and/or today body irradiation. They were studied between 4 and 63 mo (median 14.2) after transplantation. Seventeen patients had chronic graft-versus-host disease (C-GVHD) and 7 were healthy. They were studied for defects in their T- and B-cell function using and indirect hemolytic plaque assay for Ig production after 6 days of culture in the presence of pokeweek mitogen. T or B cells from the patients with or without C-GVHD were cocultured with T or B cells from their HLA-identical marrow donors or unrelated normal controls. Intrinsic B-cell defects, lack of helper T-cell activity, and suppressor T-cell activity were more frequently found in patients with C-GVHD than in healthy patients. Fifteen of the 17 patients with C-GVHD showed on or more defects in their T-and B-cell function compared to only 3 of the 7 patients without C-GVHD. None of the healthy controls, including the marrow donors, showed defects in their T- and B-cell functions. These in vitro findings may be helpful in assessing the process of immune reconstitution and the immunologic aberration found after human marrow transplantation

  5. The "ick" factor, anticipated regret, and willingness to become an organ donor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Carroll, Ronan E; Foster, Catherine; McGeechan, Grant; Sandford, Kayleigh; Ferguson, Eamonn

    2011-03-01

    This research tested the role of traditional rational-cognitive factors and emotional barriers to posthumous organ donation. An example of an emotional barrier is the "ick" factor, a basic disgust reaction to the idea of organ donation. We also tested the potential role of manipulating anticipated regret to increase intention to donate in people who are not yet registered organ donors. In three experiments involving 621 members of the United Kingdom general public, participants were invited to complete questionnaire measures tapping potential emotional affective attitude barriers such as the "ick" factor, the desire to retain bodily integrity after death, and medical mistrust. Registered posthumous organ donors were compared with nondonors. In Experiments 2 and 3, nondonors were then allocated to a simple anticipated regret manipulation versus a control condition, and the impact on intention to donate was tested. Self-reported emotional barriers and intention to donate in the future. Traditional rational-cognitive factors such as knowledge, attitude, and subjective norm failed to distinguish donors from nondonors. However, in all three experiments, nondonors scored significantly higher than donors on the emotional "ick" factor and bodily integrity scales. A simple anticipated regret manipulation led to a significant increase in intention to register as an organ donor in future. Negative affective attitudes are thus crucial barriers to people registering as organ donors. A simple anticipated regret manipulation has the potential to significantly increase organ donation rates. (c) 2011 APA, all rights reserved

  6. Pathophysiology and management of thrombocytopenia in bone marrow failure: possible clinical applications of TPO receptor agonists in aplastic anemia and myelodysplastic syndromes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desmond, Ronan; Dunbar, Cynthia E.; Young, Neal S.

    2014-01-01

    Aplastic anemia is a bone marrow failure syndrome that causes pancytopenia and can lead to life-threatening complications. Bone marrow transplantation remains the standard of care for younger patients and those with a good performance status but many patients may not have a suitable donor. Immunosuppressive therapy is able to resolve cytopenias in a majority of patients with aplastic anemia but relapses are not uncommon and some patients remain refractory to this approach. Patients may require frequent blood and platelet transfusion support which is expensive and inconvenient. Life-threatening bleeding complications still occur despite prophylactic platelet transfusion. Thrombopoietin (TPO) mimetics, such as romiplostim and eltrombopag, were developed to treat patients with refractory immune thrombocytopenia but are now being investigated for the treatment of bone marrow failure syndromes. TPO is the main regulator for platelet production and its receptor (c-Mpl) is present on megakaryocytes and hematopoietic stem cells. Trilineage hematopoietic responses were observed in a recent clinical trial using eltrombopag in patients with severe aplastic anemia refractory to immunosuppression suggesting that these agents can provide a new therapeutic option for enhancing blood production. In this review, we discuss these recent results and ongoing investigation of TPO mimetics for aplastic anemia and other bone marrow failure states like myelodysplastic syndromes. Clonal evolution or progression to acute myeloid leukemia remains a concern when using these drugs in bone marrow failure and patients should only be treated in the setting of a clinical trial. PMID:23690288

  7. Animal experimental model of a graft-versus-host (GVH) reaction after allogenic transplantation of bone marrow in lethally irradiated mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwenke, H.; Muench, S.; Haubold, S.; Weber, B.

    1977-01-01

    The graft-versus-host (GVH) disease represents a serious still unsolved problem in the human allogenic transplantation of bone marrow. An experimental model of GVH reaction after an allogenic transplantation of bone marrow in the adult mouse has been worked out as a prerequisite for further studies on the therapeutic influence of this syndrome. 3 groups have been formed out of 82 lethally X-irradiated C57 Bl mice. The non-transplanted control group died to a hundred per cent within 12 days. While out of the 2nd group treated with syngenic bone marrow 55 per cent survived from the 22nd day, 30 per cent of the third animal group, allogenicly transplanted with histoincompatible AKR donor marrow developed a chronic GVH syndrome. The following symptoms were observed: retardation, alterations of the skin, diarrhea, edemas of the legs, failing increase of leukocytes in blood and proliferation of lymphocytes in bone marrow of about 60 per cent (18 per cent in syngenically transplanted animals), in lacking proliferation of hematopoiesis. The increase of liver and especially spleen index is not characteristic in comparison with the syngenically transplanted group, since in the latter there is also an increase of the values on account of a strong hematopoetic proliferation. The model is suitable and sufficiently well characterized for the performance of further experimental studies. (author)

  8. Postirradiation bone marrow damage in chickens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skardova, I.; Ojeda, F.

    1994-01-01

    The frequency of bone marrow damage induced by the continuous gamma irradiation was studied. Effect of dose rate and level of cumulated doses of radiation was evaluated in clinical and hematological examinations and bone marrow damage was determined by chromosome aberrations in anaphase. The regulative ability of hematopoiesis of many cytokines are discussed. Positive regulators are inducers of cell proliferation, and negative regulators are inducers of apoptosis /programmed cell death/. Birds corresponding with similarities in thymus-T and bursal-B cells appear to be an interesting model for studying the possible participation of apoptosis in radiation disease. Our recent experimental studies continue to progress in this direction. (author) 17 refs.; 3 figs.; 2 tabs

  9. Bone marrow transplantation for childhood malignancies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toyoda, Yasunori

    1992-01-01

    As of June 30, 1991, 1013 pediatric patients had registrated to The Bone Marrow Transplantation Committee of the Japanese Society of Pediatric Hematology. Bone marrow transplantation (BMT) from HLA-matched siblings is now reasonably safe and an established method of treatment in acute leukemia. Total body irradiation, which is major part of preparative regimen for BMT, affect endocrine function, subsequent growth, gonadal function, development of secondary malignancies. We propose the indication of TBI for children and young adults as follows; those who are at high risk for leukemic relapse after BMT such as Phl-positive-All, leukemia-lymphoma syndrome, AML with monocytic component, BMT in elapse, BMT from other than HLA-matched siblings. (author)

  10. Experiences of offspring searching for and contacting their donor siblings and donor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jadva, Vasanti; Freeman, Tabitha; Kramer, Wendy; Golombok, Susan

    2010-04-01

    This study investigates a new phenomenon whereby individuals conceived by donor insemination are searching for and contacting their donor and/or 'donor siblings' (i.e. donor offspring conceived by the same donor who are their genetic half siblings). On-line questionnaires were completed by members of the Donor Sibling Registry (DSR), a US-based registry that facilitates contact between donor conception families who share the same donor. Of the 165 donor offspring who completed the survey, 15% were searching for their donor siblings, 13% were searching for their donor, and 64% were searching for both. Differences were found according to family type and age of disclosure. Fewer offspring from heterosexual couple families had told their father about their search when compared with offspring from lesbian couple families who had told their co-parent. Offspring who had found out about their conception after age 18 were more likely to be searching for medical reasons, whereas those who had found out before age 18 tended to be searching out of curiosity. Some offspring had discovered large numbers of half siblings (maximum=13). The majority of offspring who had found their donor relations reported positive experiences and remained in regular contact with them. Copyright (c) 2010 Reproductive Healthcare Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. BLOODR: blood donor and requester mobile application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatikonda, Vamsi Krishna; El-Ocla, Hosam

    2017-01-01

    With rapid increase in the usage of social networks sites across the world, there is also a steady increase in blood donation requests as being noticed in the number of posts on these sites such as Facebook and twitter seeking blood donors. Finding blood donor is a challenging issue in almost every country. There are some blood donor finder applications in the market such as Blood app by Red Cross and Blood Donor Finder application by Neologix. However, more reliable applications that meet the needs of users are prompted. Several software technologies including languages and framework are used to develop our blood-donor web application known as BLOODR application. These technologies comprise Ruby programming language (simply known as Ruby) along with JavaScript and PostgreSQL for database are used. Ruby on Rails (simply known as Rails) is an open source Web framework that makes it possible to quickly and easily create data-based web applications. We show screenshots for the BLOODR application for different types of users including requester, donor, and administrator. Various features of the application are described and their needs of use are analyzed. If a patient needs a blood at a clinic, blood donors in vicinity can be contacted through using a clinic management service provided in this application. Registered donors will get notification for the blood requests only if their blood group is compatible with the requested blood type and in the same city/region. Then matching blood donors can go to the requesting clinic and donate. BLOODR application provides a reliable platform to connect local blood donors with patients. BLOODR creates a communication channel through authenticated clinics whenever a patient needs blood donation. It is a useful tool to find compatible blood donors who can receive blood request posts in their local area. Clinics can use this web application to maintain the blood donation activity. Future improvement of the BLOODR is explained.

  12. Design of an Oximeter Based on LED-LED Configuration and FPGA Technology

    OpenAIRE

    Stojanovic, Radovan; Karadaglic, Dejan

    2013-01-01

    A fully digital photoplethysmographic (PPG) sensor and actuator has been developed. The sensing circuit uses one Light Emitting Diode (LED) for emitting light into human tissue and one LED for detecting the reflectance light from human tissue. A Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) is used to control the LEDs and determine the PPG and Blood Oxygen Saturation (SpO2). The configurations with two LEDs and four LEDs are developed for measuring PPG signal and Blood Oxygen Saturation (SpO2). N-LEDs...

  13. Central and peripheral distribution of bone marrow on bone marrow scintigraphy with antigranulocytic antibody in hematologic malignancy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Do Young [Dong-A University College of Medicne, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jae Tae; Sohn, Sang Kyun; Lee, Kyu Bo [Kyungpook National University School of Medicine, Taegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-10-01

    Bone marrow scintigraphy has been used to evaluate the status of bone marrow in various hematologic disorders. We have analyzed the peripheral distribution pattern and central uptake ratio of bone marrow using anti-NCA-95 monoclonal antibody and the their correlation in patients with various hematologic malignancy. Bone marrow immunoscintigraphy was performed using Tc-99m anti-granulocyte monoclonal mouse antibody BW 250/183. Fifty patients were classified into four groups; 11 with acute myelogenous leukemia, 12 with acute lymphocytic leukemia, 15 with lymphoma and 12 with myelodysplastic syndrome. Th extension of peripheral bone marrow was categorized into four grades: I, II, III and IV. The activity of central bone marrow was expressed as sacroiliac uptake ratio. The patient's number was 4 in grade I, 27 in grade II, 15 in grade III and 4 in grade IV according to extension of peripheral bone marrow. The extension of peripheral bone marrow was marked (58% in grade III and IV) in myelodysplastic syndrome and acute lymphocytic leukemia and mild (93% in grade I and II) in lymphoma. Sacroiliac uptake ratio was highest (8.5{+-}4.0) in myelodysplastic syndrome and lowest (5.9{+-}3.6) in acute myelogenous leukemia, but not significantly different among four grades (p=0.003), but there was not correlated between grade of peripheral bone marrow and sacroiliac uptake ratio (r=0.05). Sacroiliac uptake ratio of whole patients was significantly different among four grades (p=0.003), but there was not correlated between grade of peripheral bone marrow and sacroiliac uptake ratio (r=0.05). The pattern of peripheral bone marrow extension and activity of central hemopoietic marrow were not specific to the disease entities. Response of hemopoietic bone marrow may be evaluated on both peripheral and central bone marrow in patients with hematologic malignancy.

  14. Central and peripheral distribution of bone marrow on bone marrow scintigraphy with antigranulocytic antibody in hematologic malignancy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Do Young; Lee, Jae Tae; Sohn, Sang Kyun; Lee, Kyu Bo

    2002-01-01

    Bone marrow scintigraphy has been used to evaluate the status of bone marrow in various hematologic disorders. We have analyzed the peripheral distribution pattern and central uptake ratio of bone marrow using anti-NCA-95 monoclonal antibody and the their correlation in patients with various hematologic malignancy. Bone marrow immunoscintigraphy was performed using Tc-99m anti-granulocyte monoclonal mouse antibody BW 250/183. Fifty patients were classified into four groups; 11 with acute myelogenous leukemia, 12 with acute lymphocytic leukemia, 15 with lymphoma and 12 with myelodysplastic syndrome. Th extension of peripheral bone marrow was categorized into four grades: I, II, III and IV. The activity of central bone marrow was expressed as sacroiliac uptake ratio. The patient's number was 4 in grade I, 27 in grade II, 15 in grade III and 4 in grade IV according to extension of peripheral bone marrow. The extension of peripheral bone marrow was marked (58% in grade III and IV) in myelodysplastic syndrome and acute lymphocytic leukemia and mild (93% in grade I and II) in lymphoma. Sacroiliac uptake ratio was highest (8.5±4.0) in myelodysplastic syndrome and lowest (5.9±3.6) in acute myelogenous leukemia, but not significantly different among four grades (p=0.003), but there was not correlated between grade of peripheral bone marrow and sacroiliac uptake ratio (r=0.05). Sacroiliac uptake ratio of whole patients was significantly different among four grades (p=0.003), but there was not correlated between grade of peripheral bone marrow and sacroiliac uptake ratio (r=0.05). The pattern of peripheral bone marrow extension and activity of central hemopoietic marrow were not specific to the disease entities. Response of hemopoietic bone marrow may be evaluated on both peripheral and central bone marrow in patients with hematologic malignancy

  15. HLA Typing for Bone Marrow Transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-21

    ASBMT American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation ASEATTA Australasian and South East Asian Tissue Typing Association ASH American...for investigators to obtain statistical and data management support for prospective trials focusing on addressing various transplant issues. These...these relationships so that when an event occurs no one will need to exchange business cards, but rather will already know who to call. Two levels

  16. Regulatory Immunotherapy in Bone Marrow Transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa Morales-Tirado

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Every year individuals receive hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT to eradicate malignant and nonmalignant disease. The immunobiology of allotransplantation is an area of ongoing discovery, from the recipient's conditioning treatment prior to the transplant to the donor cell populations responsible for engraftment, graft-versus-host disease, and graft-versus-tumor effect. In this review, we focus on donor-type immunoregulatory T cells, namely, natural killer T cells (NKT and regulatory T cells (Treg, and their current and potential roles in tolerance induction after allogeneic HSCT.

  17. 'Mini' total body irradiation and allogeneic bone marrow transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gocheva, L.; Sergieva, K.; Koleva, I.; Avramova, V.; Vassileva, V.; Georgieva, S.; Sultanov, B.

    2006-01-01

    Full text: The total body irradiation (TBI) combined with intensive chemotherapy plays an important role in the preparation of patients for bone marrow transplantation (BMT). The first autologous BMT in Bulgaria was performed in 1997 in the Specialized Pediatric Hospital for Active Treatment (SPHAT) of oncohematological diseases. The first TBI, followed by allogeneic BMT, was carried out in 2002 in the 'Queen Giovanna' University Hospital, after which its routine application as a basic form of large field radiotherapy and a main stage of the conditioning regimen for BMT was started. Fourteen allogeneic BMTs including TBI as a basic conditioning regimen have been performed till May 2006. The objective of the present report is to present the first clinical observations in the Bulgarian oncological practice on 'mini' TBI followed by allogeneic blood stem cell transplantation. During the period October 2005 - May 2006, 'mini' TBI followed by allogeneic BMT was carried out for two patients of the age 43 and 50 years. The diagnosis of both patients was acute non-lymphoblastic leukemia, in the remission stage, after one relapse, respectively. Intensive preceding chemotherapy was applied for both patients. A conditioning regimen was applied including the fludarabine purine analogue (3 x 30 mg/m 2 ) and 200 cGy TBI. It was followed by transplantation of allogeneic cell concentrate containing 2.5 x10 6 /kg CD34+ and 4.0 x10 6 /kg CD34+ blood stem cells of partially compatible family donors (a sister and a son), which were tolerable for the patients without complications. Cyclosporine and mycophelonate mofetile were applied as post-transplantation treatment. Active antibiotic, antiviral, symptomatic and substituting therapy, as well as GvHD prophylaxis was applied for both patients. Good clinical tolerance was recorded for the applied low dose conditioning regimen. The patients were discharged within 30 days in good general condition and stable draft action, with

  18. Total body irradiation in bone marrow transplantation: the influence of fractionation and delay of marrow infusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lichter, A.S.; Tracy, D.; Lam, W.C.; Order, S.E.

    1980-01-01

    Bone marrow transplantation (BMT) after total body irradiation (TBI) and cyclophosphamide is being employed increasingly in the therapy of end stage leukemia. Interstitial pneumonitis (IP) represents a major acute toxicity after allogeneic transplantation. A more rapid reconstitution of lymphoid organs and bone marrow post transplant may result in increased immune competence and hence fewer opportunistic pulmonary infections and IP. By delaying the infusion of marrow to 72 hr after TBI (1250 rad at 7.5 rad/min) instead of the customary 24 hr, we can demonstrate an increase in initial repopulation of thymus, spleen and bone marrow, with syngeneic transplants in Lewis rats. Interstitial pneumonitis may also be caused, in part, by the pulmonary toxicity of large single exposures of TBI. Clinical and laboratory data suggest that fractionated TBI may be less toxic to the lung. When fractionated TBI (625 rad x 2, 7.5 rad/min) is compared to single dose TBI (1250 rad, 7.5 rad/min), and increased initial repopulation of lymphoid organs is observed when fractionated therapy is employed. Delay in marrow infusion and fractionation of TBI exposure may have clinical advantages in patients who receive BMT

  19. White LED with High Package Extraction Efficiency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yi Zheng; Stough, Matthew

    2008-01-01

    The goal of this project is to develop a high efficiency phosphor converting (white) Light Emitting Diode (pcLED) 1-Watt package through an increase in package extraction efficiency. A transparent/translucent monolithic phosphor is proposed to replace the powdered phosphor to reduce the scattering caused by phosphor particles. Additionally, a multi-layer thin film selectively reflecting filter is proposed between blue LED die and phosphor layer to recover inward yellow emission. At the end of the project we expect to recycle approximately 50% of the unrecovered backward light in current package construction, and develop a pcLED device with 80 lm/W e using our technology improvements and commercially available chip/package source. The success of the project will benefit luminous efficacy of white LEDs by increasing package extraction efficiency. In most phosphor-converting white LEDs, the white color is obtained by combining a blue LED die (or chip) with a powdered phosphor layer. The phosphor partially absorbs the blue light from the LED die and converts it into a broad green-yellow emission. The mixture of the transmitted blue light and green-yellow light emerging gives white light. There are two major drawbacks for current pcLEDs in terms of package extraction efficiency. The first is light scattering caused by phosphor particles. When the blue photons from the chip strike the phosphor particles, some blue light will be scattered by phosphor particles. Converted yellow emission photons are also scattered. A portion of scattered light is in the backward direction toward the die. The amount of this backward light varies and depends in part on the particle size of phosphors. The other drawback is that yellow emission from phosphor powders is isotropic. Although some backward light can be recovered by the reflector in current LED packages, there is still a portion of backward light that will be absorbed inside the package and further converted to heat. Heat generated

  20. Allogeneic bone marrow grafts in genotyped swine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaiman, M.

    1974-01-01

    The proof of a major histocompatibility complex (MHC) called SL-A enabled to promote bone marrow allografts. A study of the response to that kind of graft in irradiated pig states a number of interesting points. Bone marrow allografting complies with the rule of tissular compatibility with the major histocompatibility complex. The taking of SL-A incompatible bone marrow allografts could not be achieved under the experimental conditions. In spite of the high doses of radiation, 950 to 1050 rads, higher than 1.5 LD 100%, recipients were capable of rejecting their grafts, regularly. SL-A identify ensured 100%, initial achievement. However, animals developed regular fatal disease within a fairly short time. This development could by no means, be ascribed to the sole sequealae of radiation sickness since autografted animals at equal or even higher doses, showed none of the symptome. Assumption of a chronic graft-vs-host reactions, induced by the minor histocompatible systems, was put foreward, but should be confirmed histopathologically [fr