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Sample records for mark-release-recapture experiments electronic

  1. Use of rhodamine B to mark the body and seminal fluid of male Aedes aegypti for mark-release-recapture experiments and estimating efficacy of sterile male releases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Brian J; Mitchell, Sara N; Paton, Christopher J; Stevenson, Jessica; Staunton, Kyran M; Snoad, Nigel; Beebe, Nigel; White, Bradley J; Ritchie, Scott A

    2017-09-01

    Recent interest in male-based sterile insect technique (SIT) and incompatible insect technique (IIT) to control Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus populations has revealed the need for an economical, rapid diagnostic tool for determining dispersion and mating success of sterilized males in the wild. Previous reports from other insects indicated rhodamine B, a thiol-reactive fluorescent dye, administered via sugar-feeding can be used to stain the body tissue and seminal fluid of insects. Here, we report on the adaptation of this technique for male Ae. aegypti to allow for rapid assessment of competitiveness (mating success) during field releases. Marking was achieved by feeding males on 0.1, 0.2, 0.4 or 0.8% rhodamine B (w/v) in 50% honey solutions during free flight. All concentrations produced >95% transfer to females and successful body marking after 4 days of feeding, with 0.4 and 0.8% solutions producing the longest-lasting body marking. Importantly, rhodamine B marking had no effect on male mating competitiveness and proof-of-principle field releases demonstrated successful transfer of marked seminal fluid to females under field conditions and recapture of marked males. These results reveal rhodamine B to be a potentially useful evaluation method for male-based SIT/IIT control strategies as well as a viable body marking technique for male-based mark-release-recapture experiments without the negative side-effects of traditional marking methods. As a standalone method for use in mating competitiveness assays, rhodamine B marking is less expensive than PCR (e.g. paternity analysis) and stable isotope semen labelling methods and less time-consuming than female fertility assays used to assess competitiveness of sterilised males.

  2. Use of rhodamine B to mark the body and seminal fluid of male Aedes aegypti for mark-release-recapture experiments and estimating efficacy of sterile male releases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian J Johnson

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Recent interest in male-based sterile insect technique (SIT and incompatible insect technique (IIT to control Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus populations has revealed the need for an economical, rapid diagnostic tool for determining dispersion and mating success of sterilized males in the wild. Previous reports from other insects indicated rhodamine B, a thiol-reactive fluorescent dye, administered via sugar-feeding can be used to stain the body tissue and seminal fluid of insects. Here, we report on the adaptation of this technique for male Ae. aegypti to allow for rapid assessment of competitiveness (mating success during field releases.Marking was achieved by feeding males on 0.1, 0.2, 0.4 or 0.8% rhodamine B (w/v in 50% honey solutions during free flight. All concentrations produced >95% transfer to females and successful body marking after 4 days of feeding, with 0.4 and 0.8% solutions producing the longest-lasting body marking. Importantly, rhodamine B marking had no effect on male mating competitiveness and proof-of-principle field releases demonstrated successful transfer of marked seminal fluid to females under field conditions and recapture of marked males.These results reveal rhodamine B to be a potentially useful evaluation method for male-based SIT/IIT control strategies as well as a viable body marking technique for male-based mark-release-recapture experiments without the negative side-effects of traditional marking methods. As a standalone method for use in mating competitiveness assays, rhodamine B marking is less expensive than PCR (e.g. paternity analysis and stable isotope semen labelling methods and less time-consuming than female fertility assays used to assess competitiveness of sterilised males.

  3. A global assembly of adult female mosquito mark-release-recapture data to inform the control of mosquito-borne pathogens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guerra, C.A.; Reiner Jr, R.C.; Perkins, T.A.; Lindsay, S.W.; Midega, J.T.; Brady, O.J.; Barker, C.M.; Reisen, W.K.; Harrington, L.C.; Takken, W.; Kitron, U.; Lloyd, A.L.; Hay, S.I.; Scott, T.W.; Smith, D.L.

    2014-01-01

    Background Pathogen transmission by mosquitos is known to be highly sensitive to mosquito bionomic parameters. Mosquito mark-release-recapture (MMRR) experiments are a standard method for estimating such parameters including dispersal, population size and density, survival, blood feeding frequency

  4. Dispersal Range of Anopheles sinensis in Yongcheng City, China by Mark-Release-Recapture Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yuhong; Ren, Dongsheng; Zheng, Canjun; Wu, Haixia; Yang, Shuran; Liu, Jingli; Li, Hongsheng; Li, Huazhong; Li, Qun; Yang, Weizhong; Chu, Cordia

    2012-01-01

    Background Studying the dispersal range of Anopheles sinensis is of major importance for understanding the transition from malaria control to elimination. However, no data are available regarding the dispersal range of An. sinensis in China. The aim of the present study was to study the dispersal range of An. sinensis and provide the scientific basis for the development of effective control measures for malaria elimination in China. Methodology/Principal Findings Mark-Release-Recapture (MRR) experiments were conducted with 3000 adult wild An. sinensis in 2010 and 3000 newly emerged wild An. sinensis in 2011 in two villages of Yongcheng City in Henan Province. Marked An. sinensis were recaptured daily for ten successive days using light traps. The overall recapture rates were 0.83% (95% CI, 0.50%∼1.16%) in 2010 and 1.33% (95% CI, 0.92%∼1.74%) in 2011. There was no significant difference in the recapture rates of wild An. sinensis and newly emerged An. sinensis. The majority of An. sinensis were captured due east at study site I compared with most in the west at study site II. Eighty percent and 90% of the marked An. sinensis were recaptured within a radius of 100 m from the release point in study site I and II, respectively, with a maximum dispersal range of 400 m within the period of this study. Conclusions/Significance Our results indicate that local An. sinensis may have limited dispersal ranges. Therefore, control efforts should target breeding and resting sites in proximity of the villages. PMID:23226489

  5. Quantifying Dispersal of European Culicoides (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) Vectors between Farms Using a Novel Mark-Release-Recapture Technique

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkeby, Carsten; Bødker, Rene; Stockmarr, Anders

    2013-01-01

    Studying the dispersal of small flying insects such as Culicoides constitutes a great challenge due to huge population sizes and lack of a method to efficiently mark and objectively detect many specimens at a time. We here describe a novel mark-release-recapture method for Culicoides in the field...

  6. Mark-release-recapture studies with Aedes dorsalis (Diptera: Culicidae) in coastal northern California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, V L; Carper, E R; Beesley, C; Reisen, W K

    1995-05-01

    Two mark-release-recapture studies were conducted along the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta in northern California to describe the population ecology and dispersal pattern of Aedes dorsalis (Meigen). Immature Ae. dorsalis were collected from saline tidal marshes, reared to adults, marked, and released. Recapture grids during the July and September studies were within 8.0 and 2.4 km of the release sites, and recapture rates were 0.1 and 1.2%, respectively. The longest recorded flight was 5.8 km, and mosquitoes were recaptured up to 15 d after release. In September, 84% of the marked mosquitoes were recaptured within 2.0 km of the release site, and the mean dispersal distance was 1.9 km. Marked mosquitoes flew predominantly downwind to the east. There was no evidence that Ae. dorsalis traversed the 1.6-km-wide river from Contra Costa to Solano County. Temporal and spatial recapture patterns indicated a possible short-range migration pattern from oviposition sites to upland host-seeking areas. Changes in the recapture rate with cohort age delineated a 7-d gonotrophic cycle during September.

  7. Guidance for Evaluating the Safety of Experimental Releases of Mosquitoes, Emphasizing Mark-Release-Recapture Techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedict, Mark Q; Charlwood, J Derek; Harrington, Laura C; Lounibos, L Philip; Reisen, William K; Tabachnick, Walter J

    2018-01-01

    Experimental releases of mosquitoes are performed to understand characteristics of populations related to the biology, ability to transmit pathogens, and ultimately their control. In this article, we discuss considerations related to the safety of experimental releases of living mosquitoes, applying principles of good practice in vector biology that protect human health and comfort. We describe specific factors of experimental releases of mosquitoes that we believe are critical to inform institutional biosafety committees and similar review boards to which proposals to conduct mosquito release experiments have been submitted. In this study, "experimental releases" means those that do not significantly increase vector capacity or nuisance biting relative to the unperturbed natural baseline. This document specifically does not address releases of mosquitoes for ongoing control programs or trials of new control methods for which broader assessments of risk are required. It also does not address releases of transgenic or exotic (non-native) mosquito species, both of which require particular regulatory approval. Experimental releases may include females and males and evaluation must consider their effects based on the number released, their genotype and phenotype, the environment into which they are released, and postrelease collection activities. We consider whether increases of disease transmission and nuisance biting might result from proposed experimental releases against the backdrop of natural population size variation. We recommend that experimental releases be conducted in a manner that can be reasonably argued to have insignificant negative effects. Reviewers of proposals for experimental releases should expect applicants to provide such an argument based on evidence from similar studies and their planned activities. This document provides guidance for creating and evaluating such proposals.

  8. Electronics for LHC Experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2004-07-01

    This document gathers the abstracts of most presentations made at this workshop on electronics for the large hadron collider (LHC) experiments. The presentations were arranged into 6 sessions: 1) electronics for tracker, 2) trigger electronics, 3) detector control systems, 4) data acquisition, 5) electronics for calorimeters and electronics for muons, and 6) links, power systems, grounding and shielding, testing and quality assurance.

  9. Electronics for LHC Experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    This document gathers the abstracts of most presentations made at this workshop on electronics for the large hadron collider (LHC) experiments. The presentations were arranged into 6 sessions: 1) electronics for tracker, 2) trigger electronics, 3) detector control systems, 4) data acquisition, 5) electronics for calorimeters and electronics for muons, and 6) links, power systems, grounding and shielding, testing and quality assurance

  10. Electronics for LHC experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bourgeois, Francois

    1995-01-01

    Full text: A major effort is being mounted to prepare the way handling the high interaction rates expected from CERN's new LHC proton-proton collider (see, for example, November, page 6). September saw the First Workshop on Electronics for LHC Experiments, organized by Lisbon's Particle Physics Instrumentation Laboratory (LIP) on behalf of CERN's LHC Electronics Review Board (LERB - March, page 2). Its purpose was not only for the LERB to have a thorough review of ongoing activities, but also to promote cross fertilization in the engineering community involved in electronics design for LHC experiments. The Workshop gathered 187 physicists and engineers from 20 countries including USA and Japan. The meeting comprised six sessions and 82 talks, with special focus on radiation-hard microelectronic processes, electronics for tracking, calorimetry and muon detectors, optoelectronics, trigger and data acquisition systems. Each topic was introduced by an invited speaker who reviewed the requirements set by the particular detector technology at LHC. At the end of each session, panel discussions were chaired by each invited speaker. Representatives from four major integrated circuit manufacturers covered advanced radiation hard processes. Two talks highlighted the importance of obsolescence and quality systems in the long-lived and demanding environment of LHC. The Workshop identified areas and encouraged efforts for rationalization and common developments within and between the different detector groups. As a result, it will also help ensure the reliability and the long term maintainability of installed equipment. The proceedings of the Workshop are available from LIP Lisbon*. The LERB Workshop on Electronics for LHC Experiments will become a regular event, with the second taking place in Hungary, by Lake Balaton, from 23-27 September 1996. The Hungarian institutes KFKIRMKI have taken up the challenge of being as successful as LIP Lisbon in the organization

  11. Data analysis for electronic experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grote, H.

    1981-01-01

    In this lecture I schell attempt to cover the principal off-line software aspects in electronic experiments. Of course, this is too ambitious an undertaking for two reasons: Firstly the field is vast, and some important aspect will certainly have escaped my attention. Secondly, the choice of methods, features, algorithms, and packages presented will be biased through my personal opinion and experience, although to some extent it is influenced as well by the opinion and experience of my colleagues, who, like myself, are working in this field at CERN. Therefore, beware. Whenever I shall claim something to be evident, a matter of experience -- a fact --it ain't necessarily so. On the other hand, it will not be entirely wrong, since our experience is based on something like 30 experiments in high-energy physics using electronic for other people, and although these people are of course misled, one has to admit their existence. (orig.)

  12. Preliminary experiments of electronic duplication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fay, Bernard

    1974-01-01

    Systems of electron sputtering (at the unit scale) use as master mask a photocathode with localized emitting zones. Emitted electrons are accelerated and focussed on a silicon substrate covered with an electrosensitive resin. The very high definition associated with electron masking is obtained whatever the complexity of the master mask is, for a printing duration of the order of the minute. This is a duplication method without any contact that prevents the master mask from any mechanical erosion. Alignment of the successive masks is obtained from an electric signal directly usable through an automatic alignment system. Experiments using the apparatus for reproducing masks through an electronic image or ''electronic duplicator'' developed in Thomson-CSF Laboratory at Corbeville, are presented [fr

  13. Facility for electron cooling experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Budker, G.I.; Dikanskij, N.S.; Kudelajnen, V.I.

    1982-01-01

    The NAP-M proton storage ring intended for electron cooling experiments is described. The NAP-M magnetic system comprises four bending magnets and eight correction elements. located at the ends of rectilinear gaps. An electron beam facility is located in one of the rectilinear gaps. An 1.5 MeV electrostatic accelerator is used as a proton injector. The NAP-M accelerating system includes a driving generator, a power amplifier and a resonator. The proton beam lifetime (at the RF-system switched-off) up to 7 s has been obtained at the NAP-N at the injection energy, and up to 600 s at 65 MeV and the proton current of 120 μA

  14. Experiences with remote electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Keefe, Michael A.; Parvin, Bahram

    2002-02-22

    With the advent of a rapidly proliferating international computer network, it became feasible to consider remote operation of instrumentation normally operated locally. For modern electron microscopes, the growing automation and computer control of many instrumental operations facilitated the task of providing remote operation. In order to provide use of NCEM TEMs by distant users, a project was instituted in 1995 to place a unique instrument, a Kratos EM-1500 operating at 1.5MeV, on-line for remote use. In 1996, the Materials Microcharacterization Collaboratory (MMC) was created as a pilot project within the US Department of Energy's DOE2000 program to establish national collaboratories to provide access via the Internet to unique or expensive DOE research facilities as well as to expertise for remote collaboration, experimentation, production, software development, modeling, and measurement. A major LBNL contribution to the MMC was construction of DeepView, a microscope-independent computer-control system that could be ported to other MMC members to provide a common graphical user-interface (GUI) for control of any MMC instrument over the wide area network.

  15. Optimising electron microscopy experiment through electron optics simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kubo, Y. [CEMES-CNRS, 29 Rue Jeanne Marvig, 31055 Toulouse France (France); Hitachi High-Technologies Corporation, 882, Ichige, Hitachinaka, Ibaraki 312-8504 (Japan); Gatel, C.; Snoeck, E. [CEMES-CNRS, 29 Rue Jeanne Marvig, 31055 Toulouse France (France); Houdellier, F., E-mail: florent.houdellier@cemes.fr [CEMES-CNRS, 29 Rue Jeanne Marvig, 31055 Toulouse France (France)

    2017-04-15

    We developed a new type of electron trajectories simulation inside a complete model of a modern transmission electron microscope (TEM). Our model incorporates the precise and real design of each element constituting a TEM, i.e. the field emission (FE) cathode, the extraction optic and acceleration stages of a 300 kV cold field emission gun, the illumination lenses, the objective lens, the intermediate and projection lenses. Full trajectories can be computed using magnetically saturated or non-saturated round lenses, magnetic deflectors and even non-cylindrical symmetry elements like electrostatic biprism. This multi-scale model gathers nanometer size components (FE tip) with parts of meter length (illumination and projection systems). We demonstrate that non-trivial TEM experiments requiring specific and complex optical configurations can be simulated and optimized prior to any experiment using such model. We show that all the currents set in all optical elements of the simulated column can be implemented in the real column (I2TEM in CEMES) and used as starting alignment for the requested experiment. We argue that the combination of such complete electron trajectory simulations in the whole TEM column with automatic optimization of the microscope parameters for optimal experimental data (images, diffraction, spectra) allows drastically simplifying the implementation of complex experiments in TEM and will facilitate the development of advanced use of the electron microscope in the near future. - Highlights: • Using dedicated electron optics software, we calculate full electrons trajectories inside a modern transmission electron microscope. • We have determined how to deal with multi-scale electron optics elements like high voltage cold field emission source. • W • e have succeed to model both weak and strong magnetic lenses whether in saturated or unsaturated conditions as well as electrostatic biprism and magnetic deflectors. • We have applied this model

  16. Optimising electron microscopy experiment through electron optics simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubo, Y.; Gatel, C.; Snoeck, E.; Houdellier, F.

    2017-01-01

    We developed a new type of electron trajectories simulation inside a complete model of a modern transmission electron microscope (TEM). Our model incorporates the precise and real design of each element constituting a TEM, i.e. the field emission (FE) cathode, the extraction optic and acceleration stages of a 300 kV cold field emission gun, the illumination lenses, the objective lens, the intermediate and projection lenses. Full trajectories can be computed using magnetically saturated or non-saturated round lenses, magnetic deflectors and even non-cylindrical symmetry elements like electrostatic biprism. This multi-scale model gathers nanometer size components (FE tip) with parts of meter length (illumination and projection systems). We demonstrate that non-trivial TEM experiments requiring specific and complex optical configurations can be simulated and optimized prior to any experiment using such model. We show that all the currents set in all optical elements of the simulated column can be implemented in the real column (I2TEM in CEMES) and used as starting alignment for the requested experiment. We argue that the combination of such complete electron trajectory simulations in the whole TEM column with automatic optimization of the microscope parameters for optimal experimental data (images, diffraction, spectra) allows drastically simplifying the implementation of complex experiments in TEM and will facilitate the development of advanced use of the electron microscope in the near future. - Highlights: • Using dedicated electron optics software, we calculate full electrons trajectories inside a modern transmission electron microscope. • We have determined how to deal with multi-scale electron optics elements like high voltage cold field emission source. • W • e have succeed to model both weak and strong magnetic lenses whether in saturated or unsaturated conditions as well as electrostatic biprism and magnetic deflectors. • We have applied this model

  17. Operational experience with SLAC's beam containment electronics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Constant, T.N.; Crook, K.; Heggie, D.

    1977-03-01

    Considerable operating experience was accumulated at SLAC with an extensive electronic system for the containment of high power accelerated beams. Average beam power at SLAC can approach 900 kilowatts with the potential for burning through beam stoppers, protection collimators, and other power absorbers within a few seconds. Fast, reliable, and redundant electronic monitoring circuits have been employed to provide some of the safeguards necessary for minimizing the risk to personnel. The electronic systems are described, and the design philosophy and operating experience are discussed

  18. Electron beam optics for the FEL experiment and IFEL experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    van Steenbergen, A.

    1990-01-01

    Electron beam transport system parameters for the FEL experiment and for the FEL experiment are given. The perturbation of the ''interaction region'' optics due to wiggler focussing is taken into account and a range of solutions are provided for relevant Twiss parameters in the FEL or IFEL region. Modifications of the transport optics in specific sections of the overall beam transport lines, for reasons of enhanced diagnostic capability or enhanced beam momentum analysis resolution, is also presented

  19. Modeling the Nab Experiment Electronics in SPICE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blose, Alexander; Crawford, Christopher; Sprow, Aaron; Nab Collaboration

    2017-09-01

    The goal of the Nab experiment is to measure the neutron decay coefficients a, the electron-neutrino correlation, as well as b, the Fierz interference term to precisely test the Standard Model, as well as probe for Beyond the Standard Model physics. In this experiment, protons from the beta decay of the neutron are guided through a magnetic field into a Silicon detector. Event reconstruction will be achieved via time-of-flight measurement for the proton and direct measurement of the coincident electron energy in highly segmented silicon detectors, so the amplification circuitry needs to preserve fast timing, provide good amplitude resolution, and be packaged in a high-density format. We have designed a SPICE simulation to model the full electronics chain for the Nab experiment in order to understand the contributions of each stage and optimize them for performance. Additionally, analytic solutions to each of the components have been determined where available. We will present a comparison of the output from the SPICE model, analytic solution, and empirically determined data.

  20. Free-electron laser experiments in the microwave tokamak experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, S.L.; Brown, M.D.; Byers, J.A.; Casper, T.A.; Cohen, B.I.; Cohen, R.H.; Cummings, J.C.; Fenstermacher, M.E.; Foote, J.H.; Hooper, E.B.; Jong, R.A.; Langdon, A.B.; Lasinski, B.F.; Lasnier, C.J.; Matsuda, Y.; Meyer, W.H.; Moller, J.M.; Nexsen, W.E.; Rice, B.W.; Rognlien, T.D.; Smith, G.R.; Stallard, B.W.; Thomassen, K.I.; Throop, A.L.; Turner, W.C.; Wood, R.D.; Cook, D.R.; Makowski, M.A.; Oasa, K.; Ogawa, T.

    1990-08-01

    Microwave pulses have been injected from a free electron-laser (FEL) into the Microwave Tokamak Experiment (MTX) at up to 0.2 GW at 140 GHz in short pulses (10-ns duration) with O-mode polarization. The power transmitted through the plasma was measured in a first experimental study of high power pulse propagation in the plasma; no nonlinear effects were found at this power level. Calculations indicate that nonlinear effects may be found at the higher power densities expected in future experiments. 9 refs., 2 figs

  1. Electronic trigger for the ASP experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, R.J.

    1985-11-01

    The Anomalous Single Photon (ASP) electronic trigger is described. The experiments is based on an electromagnetic calorimeter composed of arrays of lead glass blocks, read out with photo-multiplier tubes, surrounding the interaction point at the PEP storage ring. The primary requirement of the trigger system is to be sensitive to low energy (approx. =0.5 GeV and above) photons whilst discriminating against high backgrounds at PEP. Analogue summing of the PMT signals and a sequence of programmable digital look-up tables produces a ''dead-timeless'' trigger for the beam collision rate of 408 kHz. 6 refs., 6 figs

  2. Electron cooling experiments at the ESR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steck, M.; Beller, P.; Beckert, K.; Franzke, B.; Nolden, F.

    2004-01-01

    The properties of electron cooled beams of highly charged ions have been studied at the ESR. New experiments using a beam scraper to determine the transverse beam size provide the beam parameters in the intrabeam scattering dominated intensity regime, but also at very low intensity when the ion beam enters into an ultra-cold state. Extremely low values of longitudinal and transverse beam temperature on the order of meV were achieved for less than 1000 stored ions. An experiment with bunched ultra-cold beam showed a limit of the line density which agrees with the one observed for coasting beams. Cooling of decelerated ions at a minimum energy of 3 MeV/u has been demonstrated recently

  3. Electron collisions—experiment, theory, and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartschat, Klaus

    2018-07-01

    Electron collisions with atoms, ions, and molecules have represented an important area of ‘applied quantum mechanics’ for more than a century. This Topical Review is the write-up of the Allis Prize Lecture given by the author at the 2016 meeting of the Division of Atomic, Molecular, and Optical Physics of the American Physical Society and the 2017 Gaseous Electronics Conference. In light of the enormous size of the field, the examples presented were selected in order to tell the story of how experimental and theoretical/numerical methods have developed over time, how fruitful collaborations between data producers (experimentalists and theorists) and data users have led to significant progress, and how the results of these studies, which were often designed for fundamental research in order to push both experiment and theory to new frontiers, continue to be highly sought after for modeling applications in a variety of fields. The impact of electron collision studies on other fields, such as photoinduced processes and quantum information, is also discussed.

  4. Complete experiments in electron-atom collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, N.; Bartschat, K.

    1996-01-01

    This paper addresses the advances up to the present in complete electron-atom collision experiments. The aim is to present a series of key examples for fundamental scattering processes, together with the experimental techniques that have been used. The purpose is not a full presentation of all processes studied, nor of all data that have been accumulated; rather, it is to select examples of the most recent theoretical and experimental results that will enable the reader to assess the present level of achievement. We hope that the power of this approach will become evident along the way, in the sense that it provides an efficient framework for a systematic, and complete test of the current theoretical understanding. In addition, it may produce specific recipes for ways to select experimental geometries that most efficiently test theoretical predictions, and it may reveal connections between apparently unrelated observables from often very different and highly sophisticated experiments, thus providing valuable consistency checks. The presentation is structured in the following way. To begin with, a general analysis of scattering amplitude properties concludes in a recipe for determination of the number of independent parameters necessary to define a complete experiment for a given process. We then proceed to analyze in a systematic way a string of specific cases of elastic and inelastic collisions, with gradually increasing levels of sophistication. Finally, we comment on directions in which future studies could fruitfully be pursued. 77 refs., 53 figs

  5. The ALTA cosmic ray experiment electronics system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brouwer, W.; Burris, W.J.; Caron, B.; Hewlett, J.; Holm, L.; Hamilton, A.; McDonald, W.J.; Pinfold, J.L.; Price, P.; Schaapman, J.R.; Sibley, L.; Soluk, R.A.; Wampler, L.J.

    2005-01-01

    Understanding the origin and propagation of high-energy cosmic rays is a fundamental area of astroparticle physics with major unanswered questions. The study of cosmic rays with energy more than 10 14 eV, probed only by ground-based experiments, has been restricted by the low particle flux. The Alberta Large-area Time-coincidence Array (ALTA) uses a sparse array of cosmic ray detection stations located in high schools across a large geographical area to search for non-random high-energy cosmic ray phenomena. Custom-built ALTA electronics is based on a modular board design. Its function is to control the detectors at each ALTA site allowing precise measurements of event timing and energy in the local detectors as well as time synchronization of all of the sites in the array using the global positioning system

  6. Microstrip resonators for electron paramagnetic resonance experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrezan, A. C.; Mayer Alegre, T. P.; Medeiros-Ribeiro, G.

    2009-07-01

    In this article we evaluate the performance of an electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) setup using a microstrip resonator (MR). The design and characterization of the resonator are described and parameters of importance to EPR and spin manipulation are examined, including cavity quality factor, filling factor, and microwave magnetic field in the sample region. Simulated microwave electric and magnetic field distributions in the resonator are also presented and compared with qualitative measurements of the field distribution obtained by a perturbation technique. Based on EPR experiments carried out with a standard marker at room temperature and a MR resonating at 8.17 GHz, the minimum detectable number of spins was found to be 5×1010 spins/GHz1/2 despite the low MR unloaded quality factor Q0=60. The functionality of the EPR setup was further evaluated at low temperature, where the spin resonance of Cr dopants present in a GaAs wafer was detected at 2.3 K. The design and characterization of a more versatile MR targeting an improved EPR sensitivity and featuring an integrated biasing circuit for the study of samples that require an electrical contact are also discussed.

  7. Microstrip resonators for electron paramagnetic resonance experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrezan, A C; Mayer Alegre, T P; Medeiros-Ribeiro, G

    2009-07-01

    In this article we evaluate the performance of an electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) setup using a microstrip resonator (MR). The design and characterization of the resonator are described and parameters of importance to EPR and spin manipulation are examined, including cavity quality factor, filling factor, and microwave magnetic field in the sample region. Simulated microwave electric and magnetic field distributions in the resonator are also presented and compared with qualitative measurements of the field distribution obtained by a perturbation technique. Based on EPR experiments carried out with a standard marker at room temperature and a MR resonating at 8.17 GHz, the minimum detectable number of spins was found to be 5 x 10(10) spins/GHz(1/2) despite the low MR unloaded quality factor Q0=60. The functionality of the EPR setup was further evaluated at low temperature, where the spin resonance of Cr dopants present in a GaAs wafer was detected at 2.3 K. The design and characterization of a more versatile MR targeting an improved EPR sensitivity and featuring an integrated biasing circuit for the study of samples that require an electrical contact are also discussed.

  8. An inverse free electron laser accelerator experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wernick, I.; Marshall, T.C.

    1992-01-01

    A free electron laser was configured as an autoaccelerator to test the principle of accelerating electrons by stimulated absorption of radiation (λ = 1.65mm) by an electron beam (750kV) traversing an undulator. Radiation is produced in the first section of a constant period undulator (1 w1 = 1.43cm) and then absorbed (∼ 40%) in a second undulator, having a tapered period (1 w2 = 1.8 - 2.25cm), which results in the acceleration of a subgroup (∼ 9%) of electrons to ∼ 1MeV

  9. Experience with spice teaching power electronics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munk-Nielsen, Stig

    2009-01-01

    A free Spice version allowing general circuit simulation is used teaching power electronics. There is no lock on the circuit size, stabile and user friendly operation is experienced. A collection of transformer, converter and drive system models are implemented to investigate the usability...... of the programme in high power electronics....

  10. Experiments with polarized electron beams at SLAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooper, P.

    1977-01-01

    Elastic and deep inelastic scattering of electrons on protons are studied. Cross sections for elastic scattering are plotted, and the parity nonconservation and neutral currents are diagramed for the deep inelastic scattering

  11. 6. workshop on electronics for LHC experiments. Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of the workshop was to review the electronics for LHC experiments and to identify areas and encourage common efforts for the development of electronics within and between the different LHC experiments and to promote collaboration in the engineering and physics communities involved in the LHC activities. (orig.)

  12. 6. workshop on electronics for LHC experiments. Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-10-25

    The purpose of the workshop was to review the electronics for LHC experiments and to identify areas and encourage common efforts for the development of electronics within and between the different LHC experiments and to promote collaboration in the engineering and physics communities involved in the LHC activities. (orig.)

  13. Electron characterization in OPERA Experiment; Caracterisation des electrons dans l'experience OPERA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caffari, Yvan [Institut de Physique Nucleaire de Lyon, 4, Rue Enrico Fermi, 69622 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Universite Claude Bernard Lyon-I, 43 boulevard du 11 Novembre 1918, 69622 Villeurbanne cedex (France)

    2006-09-15

    In 1998 by making use of a water Cherenkov detector the Super-Kamiokande Experiment in Japan has measured a deficit of {nu}{sub {tau}} atmospheric neutrinos without observing a corresponding rise in the {nu}{sub e} flux. This phenomenon is understood as neutrino oscillations, a mechanism implying a non vanishing neutrino mass. In 1999 the CHOOZ Experiment has definitely excluded the oscillations {nu}{sub {mu}} {yields} {nu}{sub e} within atmosphere. The OPERA Experiment aims at evidencing the {nu}{sub {mu}} {yields} {nu}{sub {tau}}oscillations through occurrence of {nu}{sub {tau}} and of {nu}{sub {mu}} {yields} {nu}{sub e} oscillations by occurrence of {nu}{sub e} starting from a muon neutrino beam almost totally clean. Such a beam is actually produced at CERN (CNGS beam) in Switzerland and then directed upon the OPERA detector located 732 km southward under Gran Sasso mountains in Italy. The detector consists of more than 200,000 bricks (what amounts to a total mass of 1,800 tons made up of a nuclear emulsion foils / lead foils sandwich. This module structure allows reconstructing with a high spatial resolution ({delta}{sub {theta}} {approx_equal} 1 mrad and {delta}{sub r} {approx_equal} 1 {mu}m) the kink topology created by the {tau} lepton (issued from charged current interaction of a {nu}{sub {tau}} lepton with a lead nucleus) and its decay products. The work reported in this thesis consists in characterization of the electrons needed in the study of {nu}{sub {mu}} {yields} {nu}{sub {tau}}oscillations, with {tau} {yields} e, and the {nu}{sub {mu}} {yields} {nu}{sub e} oscillations, the {nu}{sub e} interacting through charged currents with a lead nucleus and producing an electron. A reconstruction algorithm of the electromagnetic cascades in nuclear emulsion was developed. This algorithm allows reproducing the longitudinal and transverse profiles used in evaluating the electron energies and their identification as well ({pi}/e separation by mean of a neuron

  14. Electron beam facility for divertor target experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anisimov, A.; Gagen-Torn, V.; Giniyatulin, R.N.

    1994-01-01

    To test different concepts of divertor targets and bumpers an electron beam facility was assembled in Efremov Institute. It consists of a vacuum chamber (3m 3 ), vacuum pump, electron beam gun, manipulator to place and remove the samples, water loop and liquid metal loop. The following diagnostics of mock-ups is stipulated: (1) temperature distribution on the mock-up working surface (scanning pyrometer and infra-red imager); (2) temperature distribution over mocked-up thickness in 3 typical cross-sections (thermo-couples); (3) cracking dynamics during thermal cycling (acoustic-emission method), (4) defects in the mock-up before and after tests (ultra-sonic diagnostics, electron and optical microscopes). Carbon-based and beryllium mock-ups are made for experimental feasibility study of water and liquid-metal-cooled divertor/bumper concepts

  15. Low noise electronics for experiments at LHC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manfredi, P.F.

    1984-01-01

    The need of reducing the collection times of solid state detectors will lead to thin layers, 150 to 200 μm thickness. Consequently, the charge made available by minimum ionizing particles will be rather small, between 1.2 x 10 4 and 1.6 x 10 4 electrons for unity muliplicity. Front-end electronics with adequately low noise must be designed to detect such small amounts of charge and the problem looks to be harder if the short times available to process the signals are accounted for. (orig.)

  16. The learning experience with electronic museum guides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bartneck, C.; Masuoka, A.; Takahashi, T.; Fukaya, T.

    2006-01-01

    Within the contextual model of learning framework, the authors conducted a study with electronic handheld guides at the Van Abbemuseum (Eindhoven, the Netherlands). This study investigated the influence that limiting users' freedom of choice and control by facilitated mediation of others has on

  17. Plasma wave observations during electron and ion gun experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olsen, R.C.; Lowery, D.R.; Weddle, L.E.

    1988-01-01

    Plasma wave instruments with high temporal and frequency resolution in the 0-6 kHz frequency range have been used to monitor electron gun-employing charge control experiments with the USAF/NASA p78-2 satellite, in order to determine whether plasma wave signatures consistent with the previous inference of electron heating were present. Strong plasma waves were noted near the electron gyrofrequency; these waves can heat ambient low energy electrons, as previously inferred. Attention is given to the two distinct classes of behavior revealed by the ion gun experiments. 16 references

  18. Coulomb Interactions in Hanbury Brown-Twiss Experiments with Electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Kan

    2009-01-01

    This dissertation examines the effect of Coulomb interactions in Hanbury Brown-Twiss (HBT) type experiments with electrons. HBT experiments deal with intensity interference, which is related to the second-order correlation function of the particle field. This is an extension of the usual amplitude interference experiment, such as Young's…

  19. The electron accelerator for the AWAKE experiment at CERN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pepitone, K., E-mail: kevin.pepitone@cern.ch [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Doebert, S., E-mail: steffen.doebert@cern.ch [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Burt, G. [The University of Lancaster, Lancaster (United Kingdom); Chevallay, E.; Chritin, N.; Delory, C.; Fedosseev, V.; Hessler, Ch.; McMonagle, G. [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Mete, O. [The University of Manchester, Manchester (United Kingdom); Verzilov, V. [Triumf, Vancouver (Canada); Apsimon, R. [The University of Lancaster, Lancaster (United Kingdom)

    2016-09-01

    The AWAKE collaboration prepares a proton driven plasma wakefield acceleration experiment using the SPS beam at CERN. A long proton bunch extracted from the SPS interacts with a high power laser and a 10 m long rubidium vapour plasma cell to create strong wakefields allowing sustained electron acceleration. The electron bunch to probe these wakefields is supplied by a 20 MeV electron accelerator. The electron accelerator consists of an RF-gun and a short booster structure. This electron source should provide beams with intensities between 0.1 and 1 nC, bunch lengths between 0.3 and 3 ps and an emittance of the order of 2 mm mrad. The wide range of parameters should cope with the uncertainties and future prospects of the planned experiments. The layout of the electron accelerator, its instrumentation and beam dynamics simulations are presented.

  20. A control system for a free electron laser experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giove, D.

    1992-01-01

    The general layout of a control and data acquisition system for a Free Electron Laser experiment will be discussed. Some general considerations about the requirements and the architecture of the whole system will be developed. (author)

  1. Strategy for the procurement of electronics for the LHC experiments

    CERN Document Server

    2002-01-01

    At its meeting on 14 March 2001 the Finance Committee requested the preparation of a document outlining the strategy for future procurement of electronics for the LHC experiments. The bulk of the electronics for the LHC experiments is based on custom-developed designs, the manufacturing of which will be contracted out to industry using the CERN purchasing procedures to ensure competitive prices. Analysis of on-going procurement activities for the electronics for the LHC experiments shows that in almost all cases the application of the CERN purchasing procedures has resulted in bids from a sufficient number of qualified companies to ensure competitive prices and a reasonable distribution of returns between CERN Member States. There is no reason to expect that this pattern will change significantly for the electronics that still remains to be purchased to complete the construction of the LHC experiments.

  2. High-efficiency free-electron-laser experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyer, K.; Brau, C.A.; Goldstein, J.C.; Hohla, K.L.; Newnam, B.E.; Stein, W.E.; Warren, R.W.; Winston, J.G.

    1983-01-01

    Experiments with a tapered-wiggler free-electron laser have demonstrated extraction of about 3% of the energy from the electron beam and measured the corresponding optical emission. These results are in excellent agreement with theory and represent an order-of-magnitude improvement over all previous results

  3. The Heisenberg Uncertainty Principle Demonstrated with An Electron Diffraction Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matteucci, Giorgio; Ferrari, Loris; Migliori, Andrea

    2010-01-01

    An experiment analogous to the classical diffraction of light from a circular aperture has been realized with electrons. The results are used to introduce undergraduate students to the wave behaviour of electrons. The diffraction fringes produced by the circular aperture are compared to those predicted by quantum mechanics and are exploited to…

  4. Quantum Hall Effect: proposed multi-electron tunneling experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kostadinov, I.Z.

    1985-11-01

    Here we propose a tunneling experiment for the fractional and Integral Quantum Hall Effect. It may demonstrate multi-electron tunneling and may provide information about the nature of the macroscopic quantum states of 2D electronic liquid or solid. (author)

  5. Electron identification capabilities of the CBM experiment at FAIR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoehne, Claudia; Kisel, Ivan [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Darmstadt (Germany); Lebedev, Semen [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Darmstadt (Germany); Laboratory of Information Technologies, Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation); Ososkov, Gennady [Laboratory of Information Technologies, Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation)

    2010-07-01

    The Compressed Baryonic Matter (CBM) experiment at the future FAIR facility at Darmstadt will measure dileptons emitted from the hot and dense phase in heavy-ion collisions. In case of an electron measurement, a high purity of identified electrons is required in order to suppress the background. Electron identification in CBM will be performed by a RICH and TRD detectors. In this contribution, methods which have been developed for the electron identification in CBM are presented. A fast and efficient RICH ring recognition algorithm based on the Hough Transform has been implemented. An ellipse fitting algorithm has been elaborated because most of the CBM RICH rings have elliptic shapes. An Artificial Neural Network can be used in order to suppress fake rings. The electron identification in RICH is substantially improved by the use of TRD detectors for which several different algorithms for electron identification are implemented. Results of electron identification and pion suppression are presented.

  6. Electron Neutrino Appearance in the MINOS Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holin, Anna Maria [Univ. College London, Bloomsbury (United Kingdom)

    2010-02-01

    The MINOS experiment is a long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiment which sends a high intensity muon neutrino beam through two functionally identical detectors, a Near detector at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory in Illinois, 1km from the beam source, and a Far detector, 734km away, in the Soudan Mine in Minnesota. MINOS may be able to measure the neutrino mixing angle parameter sin213 for the rst time. Detector granularity, however, makes it very hard to distinguish any e appearance signal events characteristic of a non-zero value of θ 13 from background neutral current (NC) and short-track vμ charged current (CC) events. Also, uncertainties in the hadronic shower modeling in the kinematic region characteristic of this analysis are relatively large. A new data-driven background decomposition method designed to address those issues is developed and its results presented. By removing the long muon tracks from vμ-CC events, the Muon Removed Charge Current (MRCC) method creates independent pseudo-NC samples that can be used to correct the MINOS Monte Carlo to agree with the high-statistics Near detector data and to decompose the latter into components so as to predict the expected Far detector background. The MRCC method also provides an important cross-check in the Far detector to test the background in the signal selected region. MINOS finds a 1.0-1.5 σ ve-CC excess above background in the Far detector data, depending on method used, for a total exposure of 3.14 x 1020 protons-on-target. Interpreting this excess as signal, MINOS can set limits on sin213. Using the MRCC method, MINOS sets a limit of sin2 2 θ 13 < 0.265 at the 90% confidence limit for a CP-violating phase δ = 0.

  7. Electron Neutrino Appearance in the MINOS Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orchanian, Mhair-armen Hagop [California Inst. of Technology (CalTech), Pasadena, CA (United States)

    2012-01-01

    This thesis describes a search for ve appearance in the two-detector long-baseline MINOS neutrino experiment at Fermilab, based on a data set representing an exposure of 8.2×1020 protons on the NuMI target. The analysis detailed herein represents an increase in sensitivity to the θ13 mixing angle of approximately 25% over previous analyses, due to improvements in the event discriminant and fitting technique. Based on our observation, we constrain the value of θ13 further, finding 2 sin2θ 23 sin2θ 13< 0.12(0.20) at the 90% confidence level for δCP = 0 and the normal (inverted) neutrino mass hierarchy. The best-fit value is 2 sin2θ 23 sin2θ 13 = 0.041+0.047 -0.031(0.079+0.071 -0.053) under the same assumptions. We exclude the θ 13 = 0 hypothesis at the 89% confidence level.

  8. Pixel electronics for the ATLAS experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, P.

    2001-01-01

    The ATLAS experiment at LHC will use 3 barrel layers and 2x5 disks of silicon pixel detectors as the innermost elements of the semiconductor tracker. The basic building blocks are pixel modules with an active area of 16.4 mmx60.8 mm which include an n + on n-type silicon sensor and 16 VLSI front-end (FE) chips. Every FE chip contains a low power, high speed charge sensitive preamplifier, a fast discriminator, and a readout system which operates at the 40 MHz rate of LHC. The addresses of hit pixels (as well as a low resolution pulse height information) are stored on the FE chips until arrival of a level 1 trigger signal. Hits are then transferred to a module controller chip (MCC) which collects the data of all 16 FE chips, builds complete events and sends the data through two optical links to the data acquisition system. The MCC receives clock and data through an additional optical link and provides timing and configuration information for the FE chips. Two additional chips are used to amplify and decode the pin diode signal and to drive the VCSEL laser diodes of the optical links

  9. Stern-Gerlach experiment, electron spin and intermediate quantum mechanics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mackintosh, A.R. (Copenhagen Univ. (Denmark). H.C. Oersted Inst.)

    1983-01-01

    The paper deals with the theory of electron spin. The Stern-Gerlach experiment, the anticommutation relations and the properties of spin operators are discussed. The Pauli theory, Dirac transformation theory, the double Stern-Gerlach experiment, the EPR paradox and Bell's inequality are also covered.

  10. RADLAC II high current electron beam propagation experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frost, C.A.; Shope, S.L.; Mazarakis, M.G.; Poukey, J.W.; Wagner, J.S.; Turman, B.N.; Crist, C.E.; Welch, D.R.; Struve, K.W.

    1993-01-01

    The resistive hose instability of an electron beam was observed to be convective in recent RADLAC II experiments for higher current shots. The effects of air scattering for these shots were minimal. These experiments and theory suggest low-frequency hose motion which does not appear convective may be due to rapid expansion and subsequent drifting of the beam nose

  11. Staged electron laser accelerator (STELLA) experiment at brookhaven ATF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pogorelsky, I V; Steenbergen, A van; Gallardo, J C [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); and others

    1998-03-01

    The STELLA experiment is being prepared at the BNL Accelerator Test Facility (STF). The goal of the experiment is to demonstrate quasi-monochromatic inverse Cherenkov acceleration (ICA) of electrons bunched to the laser wavelength period. Microbunches on the order of 2 {mu}m in length separated by 10.6 {mu}m will be produced using an inverse free electron laser (IFEL) accelerator driven by a CO{sub 2} laser. The design and simulations for two phases of this experiment including demonstration of 10 MeV and 100 MeV acceleration are presented. (author)

  12. Field estimates of attraction of Ceratitis capitata to Trimedlure and Bactrocera dorsalis (Diptera: Tephritidae) to methyl eugenol in varying environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Measuring and modeling the attractiveness of semiochemical-baited traps is of significant importance to detection, delimitation and control of invasive pests. Here we describe the results of field mark-release-recapture experiments with Ceratitis capitata (Wiedemann) and Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel)...

  13. On the scalar electron mass limit from single photon experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grivaz, J.F.

    1987-03-01

    We discuss how the 90% C.L. lower limit on the mass of the scalar electron, as extracted from the single photon experiments, is affected by the way the background from radiative neutrino pair production is handled. We argue that some of the results presented at the Berkeley conference are overoptimistic, and that the mass lower limit is 65 GeV rather than the advertized value of 84 GeV, for the case of degenerate scalar electrons with massless photinos

  14. Electron beam injection during active experiments. I - Electromagnetic wave emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winglee, R. M.; Kellogg, P. J.

    1990-01-01

    The wave emissions produced in Echo 7 experiment by active injections of electron beams were investigated to determine the properties of the electromagnetic and electrostatic fields for both the field-aligned and cross-field injection in such experiments and to evaluate the sources of free energy and relative efficiencies for the generation of the VLF and HF emissions. It is shown that, for typical beam energies in active experiments, electromagnetic effects do not substantially change the bulk properties of the beam, spacecraft charging, and plasma particle acceleration. Through simulations, beam-generated whistlers; fundamental z-mode and harmonic x-mode radiation; and electrostatic electron-cyclotron, upper-hybrid, Langmuir, and lower-hybrid waves were identified. The characteristics of the observed wave spectra were found to be sensitive to both the ratio of the electron plasma frequency to the cyclotron frequency and the angle of injection relative to the magnetic field.

  15. Electron-ion recombination rates for merged-beams experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pajek, M.

    1994-01-01

    Energy dependence of the electron-ion recombination rates are studied for different recombination processes (radiative recombination, three-body recombination, dissociative recombination) for Maxwellian relative velocity distribution of arbitrary asymmetry. The results are discussed in context of the electron-ion merged beams experiments in cooling ion storage rings. The question of indication of a possible contribution of the three-body recombination to the measured recombination rates versus relative energy is particularly addressed. Its influence on the electron beam temperature derived from the energy dependence of recombination rate is discussed

  16. Analytic model of electron pulse propagation in ultrafast electron diffraction experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michalik, A.M.; Sipe, J.E.

    2006-01-01

    We present a mean-field analytic model to study the propagation of electron pulses used in ultrafast electron diffraction experiments (UED). We assume a Gaussian form to characterize the electron pulse, and derive a system of ordinary differential equations that are solved quickly and easily to give the pulse dynamics. We compare our model to an N-body numerical simulation and are able to show excellent agreement between the two result sets. This model is a convenient alternative to time consuming and computationally intense N-body simulations in exploring the dynamics of UED electron pulses, and as a tool for refining UED experimental designs

  17. Longitudinal electron cooling experiments at HIRFL-CSRe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mao, L.J.; Zhao, H.; Yang, X.D.; Li, J.; Yang, J.C.; Yuan, Y.J.; Parkhomchuk, V.V.; Reva, V.B.; Ma, X.M.; Yan, T.L.; Tang, M.T.; Xia, J.W.

    2016-01-01

    At the heavy ion storage ring HIRFL-CSRe an electron cooler is operated to improve the beam conditions for experiments. The properties of cooled beams have been studied. The longitudinal beam dynamics during the cooling process was measured by a resonant Schottky detector. The dependencies of the parameters electron beam density and profile on cooling times were investigated. The friction force was measured directly with the aid of the high voltage system of the cooler and with the application of the beam bunching system as well. An experiment with bunched cold beam showed a dependence of the bunch length on the beam density.

  18. Longitudinal electron cooling experiments at HIRFL-CSRe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mao, L.J., E-mail: maolijun@impcas.ac.cn [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Zhao, H. [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Yang, X.D.; Li, J.; Yang, J.C.; Yuan, Y.J. [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Parkhomchuk, V.V.; Reva, V.B. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Ma, X.M.; Yan, T.L. [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Tang, M.T. [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Xia, J.W. [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China)

    2016-02-01

    At the heavy ion storage ring HIRFL-CSRe an electron cooler is operated to improve the beam conditions for experiments. The properties of cooled beams have been studied. The longitudinal beam dynamics during the cooling process was measured by a resonant Schottky detector. The dependencies of the parameters electron beam density and profile on cooling times were investigated. The friction force was measured directly with the aid of the high voltage system of the cooler and with the application of the beam bunching system as well. An experiment with bunched cold beam showed a dependence of the bunch length on the beam density.

  19. A ferroelectric electron gun in a free-electron maser experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Einat, M; Rosenman, G

    2002-01-01

    An electron-gun based on a ferroelectric cathode is studied in a free-electron maser (FEM) experiment. In this gun, the electrons are separated from the cathode surface plasma, and are accelerated in two stages. The electron energy-spread is reduced sufficiently for an FEM operation in the microwave regime. A 14 keV, 1-2 A e-beam is obtained in a 0.1-2.1 mu s pulse width. The pulse repetition frequency attains 3.1 MHz in approx 50% duty-cycle. This gun is implemented in an FEM oscillator experiment operating around 3 GHz. The paper presents experimental results and discusses the applicability of ferroelectric guns in free-electron laser devices.

  20. A ferroelectric electron gun in a free-electron maser experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Einat, M.; Jerby, E.; Rosenman, G.

    2002-01-01

    An electron-gun based on a ferroelectric cathode is studied in a free-electron maser (FEM) experiment. In this gun, the electrons are separated from the cathode surface plasma, and are accelerated in two stages. The electron energy-spread is reduced sufficiently for an FEM operation in the microwave regime. A 14 keV, 1-2 A e-beam is obtained in a 0.1-2.1 μs pulse width. The pulse repetition frequency attains 3.1 MHz in ∼50% duty-cycle. This gun is implemented in an FEM oscillator experiment operating around 3 GHz. The paper presents experimental results and discusses the applicability of ferroelectric guns in free-electron laser devices

  1. Ion-electron recombination in merged-beams experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, H.T.

    1994-01-01

    In the present thesis, studies of recombination processes applying the technique of merged beams of fast ions and electrons are described. The main advantage of this technique is that the low relative velocity of ions and electrons necessary for these investigations can be achieved, at the same time as the velocity of the ions relative to the molecules of the residual gas is high. The high ion velocity leads to a very low reaction cross section for the leading contribution to the background signal, the capture of electrons in collisions with residual gas molecules. The experimental technique is described, emphasizing the electron beam velocity distribution and its relation to the energy resolution of the experiments. The presentation of the process of electron cooling is aimed at introducing this process as a tool for merged-beams experiments in storage rings rather than investigating the process itself. The non-resonant process of radiative recombination for non-fully stripped ions, showing evidence of incomplete screening is presented. Experimental investigation of dielectronic recombination is presented. Results of measurements of this process for He-like ions form the Aarhus single-pass experiment and the Heidelberg storage ring experiment are compared. Recombination is reduced from being the aim of the investigation to being a tool for high-precision measurements of the lifetimes of the 1s2s 3 S metastable states of HE-like ions of boron, carbon, and nitrogen, performed at the Heidelberg storage ring. The experiment is concerned with the process of dissociative recombination of molecular hydrogen ions. The discussion of this experiment emphasizes the distribution of population on the different vibrational levels of the ions in the initial state. In particular, a laser photo-dissociation technique was introduced to reduce the number of initial levels in the experiment. (EG) 24 refs

  2. A 20 keV electron gun system for the electron irradiation experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahapatra, S.K.; Dhole, S.D.; Bhoraskar, V.N.

    2005-01-01

    An electron gun consisting of cathode, focusing electrode, control electrode and anode has been designed and fabricated for the electron irradiation experiments. This electron gun can provide electrons of any energy over the range 1-20 keV, with current upto 50 μA. This electron gun and a Faraday cup are mounted in the cylindrical chamber. The samples are fixed on the Faraday cup and irradiated with electrons at a pressure ∼10 -7 mbar. The special features of this electron gun system are that, at any electron energy above 1 keV, the electron beam diameter can be varied from 5 to 120 mm on the Faraday cup mounted at a distance of 200 mm from the anode in the chamber. The variation in the electron current over the beam spot of 120 mm diameter is less than 15% and the beam current stability is better than 5%. This system is being used for studying the irradiation effects of 1-20 keV energy electrons on the space quality materials in which the irradiation time may vary from a few tens of seconds to hours

  3. A 20 keV electron gun system for the electron irradiation experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahapatra, S.K. [Department of Physics, University of Pune, Pune 411007 (India); Dhole, S.D. [Department of Physics, University of Pune, Pune 411007 (India); Bhoraskar, V.N. [Department of Physics, University of Pune, Pune 411007 (India)]. E-mail: vnb@physics.unipune.ernet.in

    2005-01-01

    An electron gun consisting of cathode, focusing electrode, control electrode and anode has been designed and fabricated for the electron irradiation experiments. This electron gun can provide electrons of any energy over the range 1-20 keV, with current upto 50 {mu}A. This electron gun and a Faraday cup are mounted in the cylindrical chamber. The samples are fixed on the Faraday cup and irradiated with electrons at a pressure {approx}10{sup -7} mbar. The special features of this electron gun system are that, at any electron energy above 1 keV, the electron beam diameter can be varied from 5 to 120 mm on the Faraday cup mounted at a distance of 200 mm from the anode in the chamber. The variation in the electron current over the beam spot of 120 mm diameter is less than 15% and the beam current stability is better than 5%. This system is being used for studying the irradiation effects of 1-20 keV energy electrons on the space quality materials in which the irradiation time may vary from a few tens of seconds to hours.

  4. Advancing Small Satellite Electronics Heritage for Microfluidic Biological Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Bruce; Mazmanian, Edward; Tapio, Eric

    2016-01-01

    DLR's Eu:CROPIS (Euglena and Combined Regenerative Organic-Food Production in Space) mission, launching in 2017, will carry multiple biological payloads into a sun-synchronous orbit, including NASA Ames' PowerCell experiment. PowerCell will attempt to characterize the viability of synthetic biology at micro-g, Lunar, and Martian gravity levels. PowerCell experiment requirements demand an electronic system similar to previous microfluidic biology payloads, but with an expanded feature set. As such, the system was based on PharmaSat (Diaz-Aguado et al. 2009), a previous successful biology payload from NASA Ames, and improved upon. Newer, more miniaturized electronics allow for greater capability with a lower part count and smaller size. Two identical PowerCell enclosures will fly. Each enclosure contains two separate and identical experiments with a 48-segment optical density measurement system, grow light system, microfluidic system for nutrient delivery and waste flushing, plus thermal control and environmental sensing/housekeeping including temperature, pressure, humidity, and acceleration. Electronics consist of a single Master PCB that interfaces to the spacecraft bus and regulates power and communication, plus LED, Detector, and Valve Manifold PCBs for each experiment. To facilitate ease of reuse on future missions, experiment electronics were designed to be compatible with a standard 3U small sat form factor and power bus, or to interface with a Master power/comm PCB for use in a larger satellite as in the case of PowerCell's flight on Eu:CROPIS.

  5. Electron microbeam specifications for use in cell irradiation experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, E.-H.; Choi, M.-C.; Lee, D.-H.; Chang, M.; Kang, C.-S.

    2003-01-01

    The microbeam irradiation system was devised originally to identify the hit and unhit cells by confining the beam within the target cell. The major achievement through the microbeam experiment studies has turned out to be the discovery of the 'bystander effect'. Microbeam experiments have been performed with alpha and proton beams in major and with soft x-rays in minor. The study with electron microbeam has been deferred mainly due to the difficulty in confining the electron tracks within a single target cell. In this paper, the electron microbeam irradiation system under development in Korea is introduced in terms of the beam specifications. The KIRAMS electron microbeam irradiation system consists of an electron gun, a vacuum chamber for beam collimation into 5 μm in diameter and a biology stage. The beam characteristics in terms of current and energy spectrum of the electrons entering a target cell and its neighbor cells were investigated by Monte Carlo simulation for the electron source energies of 25, 50, 75 and 100 keV. Energy depositions in the target cell and the neighbor cells were also calculated. The beam attenuation in current and energy occurs while electrons pass through the 2 μm-thick Mylar vacuum window, 100 μm-thick air gap and the 2 μm-thick Mylar bottom of cell dish. With 25 keV electron source, 80 % of decrease in current and 30 % of decrease in average energy were estimated before entering the target cell. With 75 keV electron source, on the other hand, 55 % of decrease in current and less than 1 % of decrease in average energy were estimated. Average dose per single collimated electron emission was 0.067 cGy to the target cell nucleus of 5 μm in diameter and 0.030 cGy to the cytoplasm of 2.5 μm in thickness with 25 keV electron source while they were 0.15 cGy and 0.019 cGy, respectively, with 75 keV electron source. The multiple scattering of electrons resulted in energy deposition in the neighbor cells as well. Dose to the first

  6. The industrial policy experience of the electronics industry in Malaysia

    OpenAIRE

    Rasiah, Rajah

    2015-01-01

    Despite the use of industrial policies to stimulate economic growth by several successful developers, latecomers have faced mixed experiences. Hence, this paper analyses the industrial policy experience of the electronics industry in Malaysia. A blend of institutions have guided technological upgrading in the industry, especially in the state of Penang. Smooth co-ordination between the state government, multinational corporations, national firms, and the federal government helped stimulate te...

  7. Electron-cyclotron heating in the Constance 2 mirror experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mauel, Michael E.

    1982-09-01

    Electron cyclotron heating of a highly-ionized plasma in mirror geometry is investigated. The experimental diagnosis of the electron energy distribution and the comparison of the results of this diagnosis with a two dimensional, time-dependent Fokker-Planck simulation are accomplished in four steps. (1) First, the power balance of the heated and unheated Constance 2 plasma is analyzed experimentally. It is concluded that the heated electrons escape the mirror at a rate dominated by a combination of the influx of cool electrons from outside the mirror and the increased loss rate of the ions. (2) The microwave parameters at the resonance zones are then calculated by cold-plasma ray tracing. High N/sub parallel/ waves are launched and for these waves, strong first-pass absorption is predicted. The absorption strength is qualitatively checked in the experiment by surrounding the plasma with non-reflecting liners. (3) A simplified quasilinear theory including the effect of N/sub parallel/ is developed to model the electrons. An analytic expression is derived for the RF-induced pump-out of the magnetically-confined warm electrons. Results of the Fokker-Planck simulations show the development of the electron energy distribution for several plasma conditions and verify the scaling of the analytic expression for RF-induced diffusion into the loss cone. (4) Sample x-ray and endloss data are presented, and the overall comparison between the simulation and experiment is discussed. The x-ray signals indicate that, for greater RF power, the hot electrondensity increases more rapidly than its temperature. The time history of the endloss data, illustrating RF-enhancement, suggests the predicted scaling for warm-electron pump-out. Finally, a comparison between the measured and predicted energy distribution shows that the bulk, warm and hot components of the heated Constance 2 electrons are indeed reproduced by the simulation.

  8. Electron-cyclotron heating in the Constance 2 mirror experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mauel, M.E.

    1982-09-01

    Electron cyclotron heating of a highly-ionized plasma in mirror geometry is investigated. The experimental diagnosis of the electron energy distribution and the comparison of the results of this diagnosis with a two dimensional, time-dependent Fokker-Planck simulation are accomplished in four steps. (1) First, the power balance of the heated and unheated Constance 2 plasma is analyzed experimentally. It is concluded that the heated electrons escape the mirror at a rate dominated by a combination of the influx of cool electrons from outside the mirror and the increased loss rate of the ions. (2) The microwave parameters at the resonance zones are then calculated by cold-plasma ray tracing. High N/sub parallel/ waves are launched and for these waves, strong first-pass absorption is predicted. The absorption strength is qualitatively checked in the experiment by surrounding the plasma with non-reflecting liners. (3) A simplified quasilinear theory including the effect of N/sub parallel/ is developed to model the electrons. An analytic expression is derived for the RF-induced pump-out of the magnetically-confined warm electrons. Results of the Fokker-Planck simulations show the development of the electron energy distribution for several plasma conditions and verify the scaling of the analytic expression for RF-induced diffusion into the loss cone. (4) Sample x-ray and endloss data are presented, and the overall comparison between the simulation and experiment is discussed. The x-ray signals indicate that, for greater RF power, the hot electrondensity increases more rapidly than its temperature. The time history of the endloss data, illustrating RF-enhancement, suggests the predicted scaling for warm-electron pump-out. Finally, a comparison between the measured and predicted energy distribution shows that the bulk, warm and hot components of the heated Constance 2 electrons are indeed reproduced by the simulation

  9. Experiments on hot-electron ECRH in the Tandem Mirror Experiment-Upgrade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stallard, B.W.

    1983-01-01

    Experiments have begun on the Tandem Mirror Experiment Upgrade (TMX-U) using electron-cyclotron resonant heating (ECRH) to generate the hot electron populations required for thermal barrier operation (Energy E/sub eh/ approx. 50 keV, density n/sub eh/ 12 , and hot-to-cold fraction n/sub eh/n approx. 0.9). For this operation, rf power produced by 28-GHz gyrotrons is injected with extraordinary mode polarization at both fundamental and second harmonic locations. Our initial experiments, which concentrated on startup of the hot electrons, were carried out at low density ( 12 cm - 3 ) where Fokker-Planck calculations predict high heating efficiency when the electron temperature (T/sub e/) is low. Under these conditions, we produced substantial hot electron populations (diamagnetic energy > 400 J, E/sub eh/ in the range of 15 to 50 keV, and n/sub eh//n > 0.5)

  10. Electron cooling and recombination experiments with an adiabatically expanded electron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pastuszka, S.; Heidelberg Univ.; Schramm, U.; Heidelberg Univ.; Grieser, M.; Heidelberg Univ.; Broude, C.; Heidelberg Univ.; Grimm, R.; Heidelberg Univ.; Habs, D.; Heidelberg Univ.; Kenntner, J.; Heidelberg Univ.; Miesner, H.J.; Heidelberg Univ.; Schuessler, T.; Heidelberg Univ.; Schwalm, D.; Heidelberg Univ.; Wolf, A.; Heidelberg Univ.

    1996-01-01

    Magnetically guided electron beams with transverse temperatures reduced with respect to the cathode temperature by a factor of more than 7 were realized in the electron cooling device of the heavy-ion storage ring TSR and the effect of the reduced transverse temperature in recombination and electron cooling experiments was studied. Measured dielectronic recombination resonances at low relative energy and spectra of laser-stimulated recombination indicate that transverse electron temperatures of about 17 meV have been obtained at cathode temperatures of about 110 meV. The temperature dependence of the spontaneous electron-ion recombination rate during electron cooling was investigated and found to follow the inverse square-root law expected from the theory of radiative recombination, although the measured absolute rates are higher than predicted. A new method based on analyzing the intensity of the fluorescence light emitted during simultaneous laser and electron cooling is used to measure the longitudinal electron cooling force in a range of relative velocities extending over two orders of magnitude (10 5 -10 7 cm/s). The results confirm the occurrence of 'magnetized electron cooling' also at the reduced transverse temperature and show that, compared to earlier measurements at the high transverse temperature, the cooling force increases by about a factor of 2; a considerably larger increase by a factor of ∼5 would be expected if 'magnetized electron cooling' would not exist. (orig.)

  11. Source theory analysis of electron--positron annihilation experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwinger, J.

    1975-01-01

    The phenomenological viewpoint already applied to deep inelastic scattering is extended to the discussion of electron-positron annihilation experiments. Some heuristic arguments lead to simple forms for the pion differential cross section that are in reasonable accord with the published experimental data in the energy interval 3 to 4.8 GeV

  12. Experiments on neutron-proton and neutron-electron interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koester, L.

    1975-01-01

    The paper reports on zero-energy experiments with neutrons, protons and electrons with a wavelength that is considerably longer than the particle expansion. Scattering amplitudes are measured for the reactions n + p and n + e. A neutron gravity refractometer is used. (WL/AK) [de

  13. TeV electron measurement with CREST experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Nahee; Anderson, T.; Bower, C.; Coutu, S.; Gennaro, J.; Geske, M.; Muller, D.; Musser, J.; Nutter, S.

    CREST, the Cosmic Ray Electron Synchrotron Telescope is a balloon-borne experiment de-signed to measure the spectrum of multi-TeV electrons by the detection of the x-ray synchrotron photons generated in the magnetic field of the Earth. Electrons in the TeV range are expected to reflect the properties of local sources because fluxes from remote locations are suppressed by radiative losses during propagation. Since CREST needs to intersect only a portion of the kilometers-long trail of photons generated by the high-energy electron, the method yields a larger effective area than the physical size of the detector, boosting detection areas. The in-strument is composed of an array of 1024 BaF2 crystals and a set of scintillating veto counters. A long duration balloon flight in Antarctica is currently planned for the 2010-11 season.

  14. Modelling hot electron generation in short pulse target heating experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sircombe N.J.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Target heating experiments planned for the Orion laser facility, and electron beam driven fast ignition schemes, rely on the interaction of a short pulse high intensity laser with dense material to generate a flux of energetic electrons. It is essential that the characteristics of this electron source are well known in order to inform transport models in radiation hydrodynamics codes and allow effective evaluation of experimental results and forward modelling of future campaigns. We present results obtained with the particle in cell (PIC code EPOCH for realistic target and laser parameters, including first and second harmonic light. The hot electron distributions are characterised and their implications for onward transport and target heating are considered with the aid of the Monte-Carlo transport code THOR.

  15. Neutrino Signals in Electron-Capture Storage-Ring Experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avraham Gal

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Neutrino signals in electron-capture decays of hydrogen-like parent ions P in storage-ring experiments at GSI are reconsidered, with special emphasis placed on the storage-ring quasi-circular motion of the daughter ions D in two-body decays P → D + ν e . It is argued that, to the extent that daughter ions are detected, these detection rates might exhibit modulations with periods of order seconds, similar to those reported in the GSI storage-ring experiments for two-body decay rates. New dedicated experiments in storage rings, or using traps, could explore these modulations.

  16. An angular selective electron gun for the KATRIN experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zacher, Michael; Ortjohann, Hans-Werner; Steinbrink, Nicholas; Josten, Lorenz; Hannen, Volker; Weinheimer, Christian; Winzen, Daniel [Westfaelische Wilhelms-Universitaet, Muenster (Germany); Collaboration: KATRIN-Collaboration

    2013-07-01

    The KArlsruhe TRItium Neutrino experiment aims for a measurement of the electron anti-neutrino mass with a sensitivity of 200 meV/c{sup 2} (95% C.L.) by analysing the endpoint region of the tritium β-decay. The main spectrometer (MAC-E filter type, 23m length) is one of the central parts of the experiment, featuring an energy resolution of Δ E<1 eV. For commissioning of the spectrometer a well defined electron source is needed that allows to determine the transmission characteristics and compare the electromagnetic properties to simulations. For this purpose an angular selective electron gun was developed. A pulsed UV-Laser produces electrons via the photo-electric effect, which are then accelerated electrostatically in a magnetic field. It features a small energy spread, a sharp selectable emission angle and covers the whole magnetic flux tube of KATRIN. By that, the characteristics of the spectrometer can be investigated with high precision. The time structure of the electron pulses allows time of flight measurements, offering enhanced sensitivity. The talk gives an overview about the e-gun design and its properties.

  17. Theory and Simulation of an Inverse Free Electron Laser Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, S. K.; Bhattacharjee, A.; Fang, J. M.; Marshall, T. C.

    1996-11-01

    An experimental demonstration of the acceleration of electrons using a high power CO2 laser in an inverse free electron laser (IFEL) is underway at the Brookhaven National Laboratory. This experiment has generated data, which we are attempting to simulate. Included in our studies are such effects as: a low-loss metallic waveguide with a dielectric coating on the walls; multi-mode coupling due to self-consistent interaction between the electrons and the optical wave; space charge (which is significant at lower laser power); energy-spread of the electrons; arbitrary wiggler field profile; and slippage. Two types of wiggler profile have been considered: a linear taper of the period, and a step-taper of the period (the period is ~ 3cm, the field is ~ 1T, and the wiggler length is 47cm). The energy increment of the electrons ( ~ 1-2%) is analyzed in detail as a function of laser power, wiggler parameters, and the initial beam energy (40MeV). For laser power ~ 0.5GW, the predictions of the simulations are in good accord with experimental results. A matter currently under study is the discrepancy between theory and observations for the electron energy distribution observed at the end of the IFEL. This work is supported by the Department of Energy.

  18. An inverse free electron laser accelerator: Experiment and theoretical interpretation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fang, Jyan-Min.

    1997-01-01

    Experimental and numerical studies of the Inverse Free Electron Laser using a GW-level 10.6 μm CO 2 laser have been carried out at Brookhaven's Accelerator Test Facility. An energy gain of 2.5 % (ΔE/E) on a 40 MeV electron beam has been observed E which compares well with theory. The effects on IFEL acceleration with respect to the variation of the laser electric field, the input electron beam energy, and the wiggler magnetic field strength were studied, and show the importance of matching the resonance condition in the IFEL. The numerical simulations were performed under various conditions and the importance of the electron bunching in the IFEL is shown. The numerical interpretation of our IFEL experimental results was examined. Although good numerical agreement with the experimental results was obtained, there is a discrepancy between the level of the laser power measured in the experiment and used in the simulation, possibly due to the non-Gaussian profile of the input high power laser beam. The electron energy distribution was studied numerically and a smoothing of the energy spectrum by the space charge effect at the location of the spectrometer was found, compared with the spectrum at the exit of the wiggler. The electron bunching by the IFEL and the possibility of using the IFEL as an electron prebuncher for another laser-driven accelerator were studied numerically. We found that bunching of the electrons at 1 meter downstream from the wiggler can be achieved using the existing facility. The simulation shows that there is a fundamental difference between the operating conditions for using the IFEL as a high gradient accelerator, and as a prebuncher for another accelerator

  19. Stabilization of electron-scale turbulence by electron density gradient in national spherical torus experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruiz Ruiz, J.; White, A. E. [MIT-Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Ren, Y.; Guttenfelder, W.; Kaye, S. M.; Leblanc, B. P.; Mazzucato, E. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States); Lee, K. C. [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Domier, C. W. [University of California at Davis, Davis, California 95616 (United States); Smith, D. R. [University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Yuh, H. [Nova Photonics, Inc., Princeton, New Jersey 08540 (United States)

    2015-12-15

    Theory and experiments have shown that electron temperature gradient (ETG) turbulence on the electron gyro-scale, k{sub ⊥}ρ{sub e} ≲ 1, can be responsible for anomalous electron thermal transport in NSTX. Electron scale (high-k) turbulence is diagnosed in NSTX with a high-k microwave scattering system [D. R. Smith et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 79, 123501 (2008)]. Here we report on stabilization effects of the electron density gradient on electron-scale density fluctuations in a set of neutral beam injection heated H-mode plasmas. We found that the absence of high-k density fluctuations from measurements is correlated with large equilibrium density gradient, which is shown to be consistent with linear stabilization of ETG modes due to the density gradient using the analytical ETG linear threshold in F. Jenko et al. [Phys. Plasmas 8, 4096 (2001)] and linear gyrokinetic simulations with GS2 [M. Kotschenreuther et al., Comput. Phys. Commun. 88, 128 (1995)]. We also found that the observed power of electron-scale turbulence (when it exists) is anti-correlated with the equilibrium density gradient, suggesting density gradient as a nonlinear stabilizing mechanism. Higher density gradients give rise to lower values of the plasma frame frequency, calculated based on the Doppler shift of the measured density fluctuations. Linear gyrokinetic simulations show that higher values of the electron density gradient reduce the value of the real frequency, in agreement with experimental observation. Nonlinear electron-scale gyrokinetic simulations show that high electron density gradient reduces electron heat flux and stiffness, and increases the ETG nonlinear threshold, consistent with experimental observations.

  20. The electron capture in 163Ho experiment - ECHo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gastaldo, L.; Blaum, K.; Chrysalidis, K.; Day Goodacre, T.; Domula, A.; Door, M.; Dorrer, H.; Düllmann, Ch. E.; Eberhardt, K.; Eliseev, S.; Enss, C.; Faessler, A.; Filianin, P.; Fleischmann, A.; Fonnesu, D.; Gamer, L.; Haas, R.; Hassel, C.; Hengstler, D.; Jochum, J.; Johnston, K.; Kebschull, U.; Kempf, S.; Kieck, T.; Köster, U.; Lahiri, S.; Maiti, M.; Mantegazzini, F.; Marsh, B.; Neroutsos, P.; Novikov, Yu. N.; Ranitzsch, P. C. O.; Rothe, S.; Rischka, A.; Saenz, A.; Sander, O.; Schneider, F.; Scholl, S.; Schüssler, R. X.; Schweiger, Ch.; Simkovic, F.; Stora, T.; Szücs, Z.; Türler, A.; Veinhard, M.; Weber, M.; Wegner, M.; Wendt, K.; Zuber, K.

    2017-06-01

    Neutrinos, and in particular their tiny but non-vanishing masses, can be considered one of the doors towards physics beyond the Standard Model. Precision measurements of the kinematics of weak interactions, in particular of the 3H β-decay and the 163Ho electron capture (EC), represent the only model independent approach to determine the absolute scale of neutrino masses. The electron capture in 163Ho experiment, ECHo, is designed to reach sub-eV sensitivity on the electron neutrino mass by means of the analysis of the calorimetrically measured electron capture spectrum of the nuclide 163Ho. The maximum energy available for this decay, about 2.8 keV, constrains the type of detectors that can be used. Arrays of low temperature metallic magnetic calorimeters (MMCs) are being developed to measure the 163Ho EC spectrum with energy resolution below 3 eV FWHM and with a time resolution below 1 μs. To achieve the sub-eV sensitivity on the electron neutrino mass, together with the detector optimization, the availability of large ultra-pure 163Ho samples, the identification and suppression of background sources as well as the precise parametrization of the 163Ho EC spectrum are of utmost importance. The high-energy resolution 163Ho spectra measured with the first MMC prototypes with ion-implanted 163Ho set the basis for the ECHo experiment. We describe the conceptual design of ECHo and motivate the strategies we have adopted to carry on the present medium scale experiment, ECHo-1K. In this experiment, the use of 1 kBq 163Ho will allow to reach a neutrino mass sensitivity below 10 eV/ c 2. We then discuss how the results being achieved in ECHo-1k will guide the design of the next stage of the ECHo experiment, ECHo-1M, where a source of the order of 1 MBq 163Ho embedded in large MMCs arrays will allow to reach sub-eV sensitivity on the electron neutrino mass.

  1. Recent single ARM electron scattering experiments at Saclay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frois, B.

    1981-07-01

    Some recent electron scattering experiments at intermediate energies performed at the Saclay linear accelerator (ALS) are presented. First the definitive results of the measurements of the size of valence orbits by magnetic elastic electron scattering are discussed and followed by an overview of the study of charge distributions in closed shell nuclei. These results are among the most stringent experimental tests of nuclear theory because they probe without ambiguity the shape of nuclei. Then, it is shown how the details of the transition densities of the first excited states of 152 Sm have been brought out by very high momentum transfer experiments. Finally, the results of the investigation of mesonic degrees of freedom in deuterium and helium-3 are presented

  2. Hot-electron-plasma accumulation in the CIRCE mirror experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bardet, R.; Briand, P.; Dupas, L.; Gormezano, C.; Melin, G.

    1975-01-01

    In the CIRCE experiment, the plasma is obtained by the trapping of a plasma injected into a magnetic bottle by electron heating at cyclotron resonance. The plasma density lies between 5x10 11 cm -3 and 10 12 cm -3 , the electron temperature is about 100 keV and the ion temperature is in the range of few hundred electronvolts. Gross instabilities are not observed. The ratio of the plasma density to the neutral-gas density inside the plasma is higher than 100. A few kilowatts of r.f. power at 8 GHz are sufficient to obtain these results, a fact which looks encouraging as far as the creation of a more effective fast-neutral-target plasma using the CIRCE-experiment concept is concerned. (author)

  3. Electron effects in the Neutralized Transport Experiment (NTX)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eylon, S. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), MS47R 0112, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States) and Heavy Ion Fusion Virtual National Laboratory, Cyclotron Road, CA 94720 (United States)]. E-mail: S_Eylon@lbl.gov; Henestroza, E. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), MS47R 0112, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Heavy Ion Fusion Virtual National Laboratory, Cyclotron Road, CA 94720 (United States); Roy, P.K. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), MS47R 0112, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Heavy Ion Fusion Virtual National Laboratory, Cyclotron Road, CA 94720 (United States); Yu, S.S. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), MS47R 0112, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Heavy Ion Fusion Virtual National Laboratory, Cyclotron Road, CA 94720 (United States)

    2005-05-21

    The Neutralized Transport Experiment (NTX) at the Heavy Ion Fusion Virtual National Laboratory is exploring the performance of neutralized final focus systems for high-perveance heavy ion beams. To focus a high-intensity beam to a small spot requires a high-brightness beam. In the NTX experiment, a potassium ion beam of up to 400 keV and 80 mA is generated in a Pierce-type diode. At the diode exit, an aperture with variable opening provides the capability to vary the beam perveance. The beam is transported through four quadrupole magnets to a distance of 2.5 m. The beam can be neutralized and focused using a MEVVA plasma plug and a RF plasma source. We shall report on the measurement of the electron effects and the ways to mitigate the effects. Furthermore, we shall present the results of EGUN calculations consistent with the measurements effects of the electrons.

  4. Electron effects in the Neutralized Transport Experiment (NTX)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eylon, S.; Henestroza, E.; Roy, P.K.; Yu, S.S.

    2005-01-01

    The Neutralized Transport Experiment (NTX) at the Heavy Ion Fusion Virtual National Laboratory is exploring the performance of neutralized final focus systems for high-perveance heavy ion beams. To focus a high-intensity beam to a small spot requires a high-brightness beam. In the NTX experiment, a potassium ion beam of up to 400 keV and 80 mA is generated in a Pierce-type diode. At the diode exit, an aperture with variable opening provides the capability to vary the beam perveance. The beam is transported through four quadrupole magnets to a distance of 2.5 m. The beam can be neutralized and focused using a MEVVA plasma plug and a RF plasma source. We shall report on the measurement of the electron effects and the ways to mitigate the effects. Furthermore, we shall present the results of EGUN calculations consistent with the measurements effects of the electrons

  5. Electron effects in the Neutralized Transport Experiment (NTX)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eylon, S.; Henestroza, E.; Roy, P. K.; Yu, S. S.

    2005-05-01

    The Neutralized Transport Experiment (NTX) at the Heavy Ion Fusion Virtual National Laboratory is exploring the performance of neutralized final focus systems for high-perveance heavy ion beams. To focus a high-intensity beam to a small spot requires a high-brightness beam. In the NTX experiment, a potassium ion beam of up to 400 keV and 80 mA is generated in a Pierce-type diode. At the diode exit, an aperture with variable opening provides the capability to vary the beam perveance. The beam is transported through four quadrupole magnets to a distance of 2.5 m. The beam can be neutralized and focused using a MEVVA plasma plug and a RF plasma source. We shall report on the measurement of the electron effects and the ways to mitigate the effects. Furthermore, we shall present the results of EGUN calculations consistent with the measurements effects of the electrons.

  6. Comparison of electron cloud simulation and experiments in the high-current experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, R.H.; Friedman, A.; Covo, M. Kireeff; Lund, S.M.; Molvik, A.W.; Bieniosek, F.M.; Seidl, P.A.; Vay, J.-L.; Verboncoeur, J.; Stoltz, P.; Veitzer, S.

    2004-01-01

    A set of experiments has been performed on the High-Current Experiment (HCX) facility at LBNL, in which the ion beam is allowed to collide with an end plate and thereby induce a copious supply of desorbed electrons. Through the use of combinations of biased and grounded electrodes positioned in between and downstream of the quadrupole magnets, the flow of electrons upstream into the magnets can be turned on or off. Properties of the resultant ion beam are measured under each condition. The experiment is modeled via a full three-dimensional, two species (electron and ion) particle simulation, as well as via reduced simulations (ions with appropriately chosen model electron cloud distributions, and a high-resolution simulation of the region adjacent to the end plate). The three-dimensional simulations are the first of their kind and the first to make use of a timestep-acceleration scheme that allows the electrons to be advanced with a timestep that is not small compared to the highest electron cyclotron period. The simulations reproduce qualitative aspects of the experiments, illustrate some unanticipated physical effects, and serve as an important demonstration of a developing simulation capability

  7. The {nu}MSM and muon to electron conversion experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Canetti, Laurent, E-mail: laurent.canetti@epfl.ch; Shaposhnikov, Mikhail, E-mail: mikhail.shaposhnikov@epfl.ch [EPFL, ITP (Switzerland)

    2013-03-15

    We review briefly the different constraints on the three right-handed neutrinos of the {nu}MSM, an extension of the Standard Model that can explain baryon asymmetry, dark matter and neutrino masses. We include in the discussion the proposed experiments on muon to electron conversion Mu2e (Carey et al., Mu2e Collaboration, 2012), COMET and PRISM (Hungerford, COMET Collaboration, AIP Conf Proc 1182:694, 2009; Cui et al., COMET Collaboration, 2012). We find that the expected sensitivity of these experiments is weaker by about two orders of magnitude than the constraints coming from successful baryogenesis.

  8. Experiments on the Nuclear Interactions of Pions and Electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ralph C. Minehart

    2005-01-01

    This is the final technical report. Yearly Progress Reports were submitted throughout the duration of the project. Along with our publications, these reports provide a detailed record of our accomplishments. This report largely consists of a summary of the technical activities carried out during last 2-1/2 years of the project, along with a list of papers published in the period from 2002-2005. Our work during this period involved the following: 1. Electro-production of excited states of the nucleon through the analysis of exclusive single pion production reactions induced by polarized electrons incident on both polarized and unpolarized nucleon targets. (JLab) 2. Measurement of proton and deuteron spin structure functions in and above the nucleon resonance region at low and moderate Q 2 , using inclusive electron-proton and electron deuteron scattering (JLAB). 3. Contributions to the PRIMEX experiment (JLab). 4. A precise measurement of the branching ratio for pion beta decay was carried out along with other members of the PIBETA collaboration (PSI). The first three, labeled JLab, were experiments made with the CLAS detector at the Thomas Jefferson Laboratory in Newport News, VA. The PIBETA experiment was carried out using a low energy pion beam at the Paul Scherrer Institute in Villigen, Switzerland

  9. Preliminary experiments on a planar electron beam for an intense free electron maser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Katsumasa; Iwata, Kazuma; Kitamura, Taro; Yamada, Naohisa; Soga, Yukihiro; Kamada, Keiichi; Yoshida, Mitsuhiro; Ginzburg, Naum S.

    2013-01-01

    A planar wiggler magnetic field was used to increase the output power of an intense free electron maser. As a preliminary experiment, a cylindrical electron beam was injected into a planar wiggler field with an axial magnetic field. Without the axial magnetic field, the cylindrical beam could not propagate through the wiggler field with length of 1 m. The microwave with frequency of 40 GHz was observed only when the beam propagates through the wiggler field. The frequency was nearly equal to the expected frequency of the free electron maser interaction. Though a sheet electron beam with nearly the same energy propagated through the planar wiggler field with deformation of its cross section, the microwave with frequency of 40 GHz was not observed. (author)

  10. Development of an electron gun for high power CW electron linac (1). Beam experiment for basic performance of electron gun

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamazaki, Yoshio; Nomura, Masahiro; Komata, Tomoki

    1999-05-01

    Presently, the Beam Group of Oarai Engineering Center in Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute (JNC) completed the high power CW electron linac. Then we started full-scale beam experiments after the government permission for a radiation equipment had given last January. Measurements of basic performance for the mesh-grid type electron gun have been done to launch stable beam at 300 mA peak current downstream of the accelerator. These experiments disclosed to increase beam loss in the electron gun in some cases of voltage supplied the mesh-grid in spite of same beam current from gun. Consequently, we could find the best condition for mesh-grid voltage and heater current to supply stable beam at 300 mA peak current for accelerator study. (author)

  11. Ion and electron heating in ICRF heating experiments on LHD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saito, K. [Nagoya Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Engineering; Kumazawa, R.; Mutoh, T. [National Inst. for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu (Japan)] [and others

    2001-02-01

    This paper reports on the Ion Cyclotron Range of Frequency (ICRF) heating conducted in 1999 in the 3rd experimental campaign on the Large Helical Device (LHD) with an emphasis on the optimization of the heating regime. Specifically, an exhaustive study of seven different heating regimes was carried out by changing the RF frequency relative to the magnetic field intensity, and the dependence of the heating efficiency on H-minority concentration was investigated. It was found in the experiment that both ion and electron heating are attainable with the same experimental setup by properly choosing the frequency relative to the magnetic field intensity. In the cases of both electron heating and ion heating, the power absorption efficiency depends on the minority ion concentration. An optimum minority concentration exists in the ion heating case while, in the electron heating case, the efficiency increases with concentration monotonically. A simple model calculation is introduced to provide a heuristic understanding of these experimental results. Among the heating regimes examined in this experiment, one of the ion heating regimes was finally chosen as the optimized heating regime and various high performance discharges were realized with it. (author)

  12. Experiments on the nuclear interactions of pions and electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minehart, R.C.; Ziock, K.O.H.

    1989-07-01

    We have completed the analysis of the 3 He(π + ,pp)n reaction, and are working on the analysis of data for the 3 He(π - ,pn)p reaction. An experiment to study the π + d → 2p reaction at LAMPF was successful in studying incident pion energies as low as 6 MeV. Preliminary results have been reported, and work is continuing to improve the accuracy in the calculation of the fraction of pions in the incident beam. A proposal has been accepted by LAMPF for a new experiment, scheduled to run in the summer of 1990, to study pion absorption in 3 He and 4 He using an extensive scintillator time-of-flight system capable of detecting neutrons as well as charged particles. We are continuing to analyze data obtained in PSI in the search for the admixture of massive neutrinos in pion decay and have continued the search for fractionally charged particles. We are also fully involved in some major collaborations: the search for the decay μ + → e + + γ, and the study of anti-proton absorption in heavy nuclei. We are taking part in a U.Va.-PSI collaboration to measure pion beta decay to an accuracy of about 1%, using a large acceptance CsI detector to measure the π 0 following decay of stopped π + mesons. We have also been working on experiments to study electron scattering, using the SLAC-NPAS facility for nuclear physics and the electron accelerator at SACLAY in France. Data from experiment NE-9 at SLAC are being analyzed. This experiment, which was run near the end of 1987, is intended to separate the transverse and longitudinal cross sections for inclusive electron scattering in the QFS region. Experiment NE-8 measured the cross section for photo-disintegration of the deuteron in the GeV range. Some design work was carried out this year on Experiment NE-16 at SLAC, a study of the (e,e'p) reaction in 4 He, expected to run late in 1990

  13. Electron-cyclotron current drive in the tokamak physics experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, G.R.; Kritz, A.H.; Radin, S.H.

    1992-01-01

    Ray-tracking calculations provide estimates of the electron-cyclotron heating (ECH) power required to suppress tearing modes near the q=2 surface in the Tokamak Physics Experiment. Effects of finite beam width and divergence are included, as are the effects of scattering of the ECH power by drift-wave turbulence. A frequency of about 120 GHz allows current drive on the small-R (high-B) portion of q=2, while 80 GHz drives current on the large-R (low-B) portion. The higher frequency has the advantages of less sensitivity to wave and plasma parameters and of no trapped-electron degradation of current-drive efficiency. Less than 1 MW suffices to suppress tearing modes even with high turbulence levels

  14. Radiation load experiments with electronic components of the SYMPHONIE satellite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spencker, A.; Wagemann, H.G.; Braeunig, D.

    1975-09-01

    This report surveys fundamentals, realization and results of irradiation experiments which applied to 36 different electronic components of the Symphonie satellite and which were completed at the HMI Berlin and the C.N.E.T. Lannion in the years 1972/73. In a general section the evaluation of equivalent fluencies concerning 1 MeV electrons as radiation simulating the extraterrestric particle spectra with regard to the well-known semiconductor damage mechanisms is discussed. Then the realization of irradiation testing for the Symphonie satellite is described. Three selected examples demonstrate typical failure modes of semiconductor devices under radiation stress: Finally the main experimental results are shown in a standardized manner; a survey in English is given on p. 44. (orig.) [de

  15. New experiments on few-electron very heavy atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gould, H.

    1985-07-01

    New experiments, to test quantum electrodynamics (QED) in strong Coulomb fields and to study atomic collisions at ultrarelativistic energies, are proposed. A 0.1% measurement of the 2 2 P/sub 1/2/-2 2 S/sub 1/2/ splitting in lithium like uranium (Z=92) and the 2 3 P 0 - 2 3 S 1 splitting in heliumlike uranium is proposed as a sub 1% test of the Lamb shift in a strong Coulomb field. Measurements of the hyperfine splitting of hydrogenlike thallium (Z=81) and the g/sub j/ factor of the ground state of hydrogenlike uranium are propsed as a test of the QED contribution to the magnetic moment of an electron bound in a strong Coulomb field. Measurements of capture cross sections for ultra relativistic very heavy nuclei are proposed to look for the capture of electrons from pair production. 40 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs

  16. Electron cyclotron current drive experiments on DIII-D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    James, R.A.; Giruzzi, G.; Gentile, B. de; Rodriguez, L.; Fyaretdinov, A.; Gorelov, Yu.; Trukhin, V.; Harvey, R.; Lohr, J.; Luce, T.C.; Matsuda, K.; Politzer, P.; Prater, R.; Snider, R.; Janz, S.

    1990-05-01

    Electron Cyclotron Current Drive (ECCD) experiments on the DIII-D tokamak have been performed using 60 GHz waves launched from the high field side of the torus. Preliminary analysis indicates rf driven currents between 50 and 100 kA in discharges with total plasma currents between 200 and 500 kA. These are the first ECCD experiments with strong first pass absorption, localized deposition of the rf power, and τ E much longer than the slowing-down time of the rf generated current carriers. The experimentally measured profiles for T e , η e and Z eff are used as input for a 1D transport code and a multiply-ray, 3D ray tracing code. Comparisons with theory and assessment of the influence of the residual electric field, using a Fokker-Planck code, are in progress. The ECH power levels were between 1 and 1.5 MW with pulse lengths of about 500 msec. ECCD experiments worldwide are motivated by issues relating to the physics and technical advantages of the use of high frequency rf waves to drive localized currents. ECCD is accomplished by preferentially heating electrons moving in one toroidal direction, reducing their collisionality and thereby producing a non-inductively driven toroidal current. 6 refs., 4 figs

  17. Electron cyclotron current drive experiments on DIII-D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James, R.A. (Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (USA)); Giruzzi, G.; Gentile, B. de; Rodriguez, L. (Association Euratom-CEA, Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires de Cadarache, 13 - Saint-Paul-les-Durance (France)); Fyaretdinov, A.; Gorelov, Yu.; Trukhin, V. (Kurchatov Inst. of Atomic Energy, Moscow (USSR)); Harvey, R.; Lohr, J.; Luce, T.C.; Matsuda, K.; Politzer, P.; Prater, R.; Snider, R. (General Atomics, San Di

    1990-05-01

    Electron Cyclotron Current Drive (ECCD) experiments on the DIII-D tokamak have been performed using 60 GHz waves launched from the high field side of the torus. Preliminary analysis indicates rf driven currents between 50 and 100 kA in discharges with total plasma currents between 200 and 500 kA. These are the first ECCD experiments with strong first pass absorption, localized deposition of the rf power, and {tau}{sub E} much longer than the slowing-down time of the rf generated current carriers. The experimentally measured profiles for T{sub e}, {eta}{sub e} and Z{sub eff} are used as input for a 1D transport code and a multiply-ray, 3D ray tracing code. Comparisons with theory and assessment of the influence of the residual electric field, using a Fokker-Planck code, are in progress. The ECH power levels were between 1 and 1.5 MW with pulse lengths of about 500 msec. ECCD experiments worldwide are motivated by issues relating to the physics and technical advantages of the use of high frequency rf waves to drive localized currents. ECCD is accomplished by preferentially heating electrons moving in one toroidal direction, reducing their collisionality and thereby producing a non-inductively driven toroidal current. 6 refs., 4 figs.

  18. Free electron laser experiments using a long pulse induction linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pasour, J.A.; Lucey, R.

    1983-01-01

    The NRL Long Pulse Induction Linac is being employed in a Free Electron Laser (FEL) experiment. The authors present results of beam transport and focusing experiments as well as measurements of the output radiation generated by various magnetic wigglers. The electron gun of the accelerator presently has a 17-cmdiam. cold cathode which is located in a nearly zero magnetic field (B /SUB z/ less than or equal to 5 G). The gun voltage is flat to within approx. = + or - 5% for 1.5 μsec with this graphite brush cathode. The beam is focused by a series of solenoidal coils as it propagates through the 4-m-long accelerator. 2 A solenoidal field which can be varied from 1-10 kG confines the beam in the FEL interaction region. Previous experiments were limited by poor beam transport, focusing, and matching into the relatively large solenoidal field in the FEL region. By smoothing the axial magnetic field profile in the accelerator and making a more adiabatic transition from the low field in the accelerator to the high field in the FEL, beam transport into the wiggler has been substantially improved. Currently, a 700 kV beam with I > 500 A and r /SUB b/ < 0.75 cm is transported through the FEL region. Beam transport is in qualitative agreement with envelope code calculations

  19. Scaled electron experiments at the University of Maryland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haber, I.; Bai, G.; Bernal, S.; Beaudoin, B.; Feldman, D.; Fiorito, R.B.; Godlove, T.F.; Kishek, R.A.; O'Shea, P.G.; Quinn, B.; Papadopoulos, C.; Reiser, M.; Rodgers, J.; Stratakis, D.; Sutter, D.; Thangaraj, J.C.T.; Tian, K.; Walter, M.; Wu, C.

    2007-01-01

    The University of Maryland Electron Ring (UMER) and the Long Solenoid Experiment (LSE) are two electron machines that were designed explicitly to study the physics of space-charge-dominated beams. The operating parameters of these machines can be varied by choice of apertures and gun operating conditions to access a wide range of parameters that reproduce, on a scaled basis, the full nonlinear time-dependent physics that is expected in much costlier ion systems. Early operation of these machines has demonstrated the importance of the details of beam initial conditions in determining the downstream evolution. These machines have also been a convenient tested for benchmarking simulation codes such as WARP, and for development of several novel diagnostic techniques. We present our recent experience with multi-turn operation as well as recent longitudinal and transverse physics experiments and comparisons to simulation results. Development of novel diagnostic techniques such as time-dependent imaging using optical transition radiation and tomographic beam reconstruction are also described

  20. The electron accelerator for FELIX [Free Electron Laser for Infrared eXperiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amersfoort, P.W. van; Geer, C.A.J. van der; Meer, A.F.G. van der; Bruinsma, P.J.T.; Hoekstra, R.; Kroes, F.B.; Luyckx, G.; Noomen, J.G.; Poole, M.W.; Saxon, G.

    1989-01-01

    The authors discuss the design of the electron accelerator for the Free Electron Laser for Infrared eXperiments (FELIX), which is meant to provide the Dutch science community with a rapidly tunable source of infrared radiation. The first stage of the project will (at least) cover the wavelength range between 8 and 80 μm. The accelerator consists of a triode with a grid modulated at 1 GHz, a 3.8-MeV buncher, and two travelling-wave S-band linac structures, with which 70-A, 3-ps bunches are accelerated to an energy between 15 and 4-5 MeV. The system has been designed to minimize the energy spread in the electron beam. 8 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab

  1. 'TRISTAN'; a database for electron colliding beam experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimizu, Y.; Igarashi, M.; Nakazawa, N.; Oyanagi, Y.

    1982-01-01

    In this data base, the reference papers on the experiments of positron-electron colliding beam were collected for the purpose to utilize them for the TRISTAN project. The on-line retrieval of the references is possible. The number of the references is 289 during the period from January, 1974, to September, 1981. The collection of data will be continued hereafter. The terms retrievable are accelerator, incident beam, code, and radiation correction formula. The SC (name of the first author, year), incident energy, detector, luminocity, integrated luminosity, reaction, purpose and comments are also included as the data. The system is written in FORTRAN 77, and is portable. (Kato, T.)

  2. Future photomultiplier assemblies and associated electrons in large experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duteil, P.; Hammarstroem, R.; Innocenti, P.G.; Michelini, A.; Smith, B.; Soso, F.

    1977-01-01

    The results are presented of a working group study on reducing costs of proposed counter experiments in high-energy physics where several thousand photomultipliers are involved. Photomultiplier design is briefly discussed and new designs are presented for tube housings and high-voltage supplies. An outline presentation is given of a simplified electronics system, based on the Eurocard, for fast logic, data handling, and associated power supplies, suitable for photomultipliers or wire counters. Substantial savings in cost are shown to be possible without affecting performance but with some loss in convenience. (Auth.)

  3. Modification Of The Electron Energy Distribution Function During Lithium Experiments On The National Spherical Torus Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaworski, M A; Gray, T K; Kaita, R; Kallman, J; Kugel, H; LeBlanc, B; McLean, A; Sabbagh, S A; Soukanovskii, V; Stotler, D P

    2011-06-03

    The National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) has recently studied the use of a liquid lithium divertor (LLD). Divertor Langmuir probes have also been installed for making measurements of the local plasma conditions. A non-local probe interpretation method is used to supplement the classical probe interpretation and obtain measurements of the electron energy distribution function (EEDF) which show the occurrence of a hot-electron component. Analysis is made of two discharges within a sequence that exhibited changes in plasma fueling efficiency. It is found that the local electron temperature increases and that this increase is most strongly correlated with the energy contained within the hot-electron population. Preliminary interpretative modeling indicates that kinetic effects are likely in the NSTX.

  4. Determination of the Electron Neutrino Mass from Experiments on Electron-Capture Beta-Decay (EC)

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    The aim of the programme is to measure the electron-neutrino mass, for which at present an upper limit of 500~eV is known. \\\\ \\\\ The experiment studies the shape of the internal bremsstrahlung spectrum in electron-capture near its upper end-point and deduces a mass from small shape changes completely analogous to those in the well-known determination of the electron antineutrino mass in the tritium beta-minus decay. \\\\ \\\\ In a low-energy bremsstrahlung process, the capture takes place from a virtual S state associated with a radiative P~@A~S electromagnetic transition, and the resonant nature of the process leads to important enhancements of the photon intensities at low energy, in particular near the resonance energies co (X-rays). This effect gives this type of experiment a chance to compete with experiments on continuous beta spectra. \\\\ \\\\ The programme concentrates on two long-lived isotopes: \\\\ \\\\ 1)~~|1|6|3Ho. The Q value for this isotope has been found to be 2.6-2.7 keV. A detector specially construct...

  5. Development of an electron momentum spectrometer for time-resolved experiments employing nanosecond pulsed electron beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yaguo; Shan, Xu; Liu, Zhaohui; Niu, Shanshan; Wang, Enliang; Chen, Xiangjun

    2018-03-01

    The low count rate of (e, 2e) electron momentum spectroscopy (EMS) has long been a major limitation of its application to the investigation of molecular dynamics. Here we report a new EMS apparatus developed for time-resolved experiments in the nanosecond time scale, in which a double toroidal energy analyzer is utilized to improve the sensitivity of the spectrometer and a nanosecond pulsed electron gun with a repetition rate of 10 kHz is used to obtain an average beam current up to nA. Meanwhile, a picosecond ultraviolet laser with a repetition rate of 5 kHz is introduced to pump the sample target. The time zero is determined by photoionizing the target using a pump laser and monitoring the change of the electron beam current with time delay between the laser pulse and electron pulse, which is influenced by the plasma induced by the photoionization. The performance of the spectrometer is demonstrated by the EMS measurement on argon using a pulsed electron beam, illustrating the potential abilities of the apparatus for investigating the molecular dynamics in excited states when employing the pump-probe scheme.

  6. Experiments in electron microscopy: from metals to nerves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Unwin, Nigel

    2015-01-01

    Electron microscopy has advanced remarkably as a tool for biological structure research since the development of methods to examine radiation-sensitive unstained specimens and the introduction of cryo-techniques. Structures of biological molecules at near-atomic resolution can now be obtained from images of single particles as well as crystalline arrays. It has also become possible to analyze structures of molecules in their functional context, i.e. in their natural membrane or cellular setting, and in an ionic environment like that in living tissue. Electron microscopy is thus opening ways to answer definitively questions about physiological mechanisms. Here I recall a number of experiments contributing to, and benefiting from the technical advances that have taken place. I begin—in the spirit of this crystallography series—with some biographical background, and then sketch the path to an analysis by time-resolved microscopy of the opening mechanism of an ion channel (nicotinic acetylcholine receptor). This analysis illustrates how electron imaging can be combined with freeze-trapping to illuminate a transient biological event: in our case, chemical-to-electrical transduction at the nerve-muscle synapse. (invited comment)

  7. Millimeter wave free electron laser amplifiers: Experiments and designs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bidwell, S.W.; Zhang, Z.X.; Antonsen, T.M. Jr.; Bensen, D.M.; Destler, W.W.; Granatstein, V.L.; Lantham, P.E.; Levush, B.; Rodgers, J.

    1991-01-01

    Free electron laser amplifies are investigated as sources of high- average-power (1 MW) millimeter to submillimeter wave radiation (200 GHz - 600 GHz) for application to electron cyclotron resonance heating of magnetically confined fusion plasmas. As a stepping-stone to higher frequencies and cw operation a pulsed amplifier (τ pulse ≅ 80 ns) at 98 GHz is being developed. Status is reported on this experiment which investigates linear gain amplification with use of sheet electron beam (transverse cross section = 0.1 cm x 2.0 cm, V beam = 440 keV, I beam ≅ 10 A) and short-period wiggler (ell w = 0.96 cm) and with expected output of 140 W. Predictions of gain and efficiency from a 1-D universal formulation are presented. Beam propagation results, with wiggler focusing as a means of sheet beam confinement in both transverse dimensions, through the 54 cm (56 period) pulsed electromagnet wiggler are discussed. Peak wiggler fields of 5.1 kG on-axis have been achieved

  8. Monte Carlo simulation of Tabata's electron backscattering experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirihara, Y.; Namito, Y.; Iwase, H.; Hirayama, H.

    2010-01-01

    Electron backscattering coefficients, η, obtained from several targets in the MeV range were calculated by using electron-photon Monte Carlo transport calculation codes, i.e., EGS5 and ITS 3.0. These calculated values were compared with those obtained from the electron backscattering experiment performed by Tabata using an ionization chamber . We found that Tabata's estimation of the multiplication factor of the ionization chamber, f, had a non-negligible error. Then, we calculated the ionization chamber output, I, which is a product of η and f. The ratios of I between the experimental and the calculated values were within 1.5 and 1.3 for the EGS5 code and the ITS 3.0 code, respectively. The ratios of η between the experimental and the calculated values were within 2.4 and 1.5 for the EGS5 code and the ITS 3.0 code, respectively. The differences between the experimental and the calculated values of I and η are large for low-Z targets (Be and C). Here, the ratios obtained by using the ITS 3.0 code are closer to unity than those obtained by using the EGS5 code. The reason of this is the fact that the calculated value obtained by using the ITS 3.0 code is underestimated for low-Z targets; this underestimation can, in turn, be attributed to the use of the default value of the number of steps in the electron transport algorithm in the ITS 3.0 code.

  9. Progress on Electron Cyclotron Heating Experiments in LHD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimozuma, T.; Kubo, S.; Yoshimura, Y.; Igami, H.; Nagasaki, K.; Notake, T.; Inagaki, S.; Ito, S.; Kobayashi, S.; Mizuno, Y.; Takita, Y.; Ohkubo, K.; Saito, K.; Seki, T.; Kumazawa, R.; Watari, T.; Mutoh, T.

    2005-01-01

    Electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECH) is a powerful heating method because of its well-controlled local heating and high deposition power density. Together with the development of high power long pulse gyrotrons, ECH becomes one of the major heating scenarios to control electron temperature and current profiles for the improved plasma confinement and suppression of some magneto-hydro-dainamic (MHD) instabilities in both tokamaks and stellarators [1]. In the Large Helical Device (LHD), ECH has been worked as a method of plasma initiation and electron heating. The ECH system has been improved with respect to each experimental campaign. In the recent campaign, nine gyrotrons were operated reliably and steadily. As a diagnostic objective, a modulated ECH (MECH) was injected together with main ECH power. A Fourier analysis of the induced heat wave gave useful information of not only the heat transport in the plasmas but also precise power deposition layer [2]. Several kinds of ECH experiment were performed by using this flexible ECH system. In LHD, electron ITB formation have been observed by using strongly focused ECH in the plasma core [3].Two different kinds of improved confinement were realized depending on the direction of tangentially injected NBI. NBI beam driven currents modify the profiles of the rotational transform 2 ro and the existence low order rational surfaces, 2 = 0.5 in special, affects the difference of appearance of the improved confinement states. The MECH method was used to investigate the internal structure of the thermal diffusion in such plasmas [4]. Another important role of the MECH is the precise determination of the ECH power deposition. Shift of the deposition location by changing an injection polarization in the electron Bernstein wave (EBW) heating was clearly demonstrated by the MECH method. Electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD) experiments were proceeded by using a flexible antenna system, which had wide scanning range in both

  10. Electron Spin Resonance Experiments on a Single Electron in Silicon Implanted with Phosphorous

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luhman, Dwight R.; Nguyen, K.; Tracy, L. A.; Carr, S.; Borchardt, J.; Bishop, N.; Ten Eyck, G.; Pluym, T.; Wendt, J.; Lilly, M. P.; Carroll, M. S.

    2015-03-01

    In this talk we will discuss the results of our ongoing experiments involving electron spin resonance (ESR) on a single electron in a natural silicon sample. The sample consists of an SET, defined by lithographic polysilicon gates, coupled to nearby phosphorous donors. The SET is used to detect charge transitions and readout the spin of the electron being investigated with ESR. The measurements were done with the sample at dilution refrigerator temperatures in the presence of a 1.3 T magnetic field. We will present data demonstrating Rabi oscillations of a single electron in this system as well as measurements of the coherence time, T2. We will also discuss our results using these and various other pulsing schemes in the context of a donor-SET system. This work was performed, in part, at the Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies, a U.S. DOE Office of Basic Energy Sciences user facility. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed-Martin Company, for the U. S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  11. Free electron laser amplifier experiments on SG-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hui Zhongxi; Zhou Chuanming; Wu Ruian

    1994-01-01

    The SG-1 FEL facility is composed of a linear induction accelerator (LIA), an electron beam transport system, a wiggler, a microwave source and a diagnostic system. SG-1 LIA provides a 2 kA, 3.0 MeV beam with a normalized emittance of 0.4∼0.6 (π rad·cm), an energy spread (FWHM) of 4%, resulting in a beam brightness of nearly 10 8 A/πm·rad) 2[1] . The beam current through the wiggler is about 600 A. The first ASE experiments began in September 1991. A 2.6-m long wiggler with a peak magnetic field of 0.3 T was used. At 35.8∼36.5 GHz an ASE output of 0.5 W was obtained for a beam current of nearly 50 A. After a shutdown of about 8 months, the second series of ASE experiments began in October 1992. The second series of ASE experiments were performed with a wiggler magnetic field between 0.25∼0.27 T. The maximum output power is about 100 kw for B w = 0.24 T, I = 600 A, At ν = 35.2 GHz. Based on the ASE experiments the amplifier experiments was carried out on SG-1. Using an 300 W input signal (TE 01 ), a beam current of about 600 A and wiggler magnetic fields of 0.24∼0.28 T, the authors measured the FEL output power as a function of the wiggler magnetic field. The resonant magnetic field was about 0.25 T. Meanwhile, in order to study the amplifier gain, the authors measured the FEL output power as a function of the wiggler length at a peak wiggler magnetic field of 0.26 T. The exponential gain is approximately 19 dB/m and the maximum output power is about 10 MW

  12. Pleasurable and Intersubjectively Embodied Experiences of Electronic Dance Music

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ragnhild Torvanger Solberg

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available How do dancers engage with electronic dance music (EDM when dancing? This paper reports on an empirical study of dancers' pleasurable engagement with three structural properties of EDM: (1 breakdown, (2 build-up, and (3 drop. Sixteen participants danced to a DJ mix in a club-like environment, and the group’s bodily activity was recorded with an infrared, marker-based motion capture system. After they danced, the subjects filled out questionnaires about the pleasure they experienced and their relative desire to move while dancing. Subsequent analyses revealed associations between the group’s quantity of motion and self-reported experiences of pleasure. Associations were also found between certain sonic features and dynamic changes in the dancers' movements. Pronounced changes occurred in the group's quantity of motion during the breakdown, build-up, and drop sections, suggesting a high level of synchronization between the group and the structural properties of the music. The questionnaire confirmed this intersubjective agreement: participants perceived the musical passages consistently and marked the build-up and drop as particularly pleasurable and motivational in terms of dancing. Self-reports demonstrated that the presence and activity of other participants were also important in the shaping of one's own experience, thus supporting the idea of clubbing as an intersubjectively embodied experience.

  13. Clinical experience with routine diode dosimetry for electron beam radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yaparpalvi, Ravindra; Fontenla, Doracy P.; Vikram, Bhadrasain

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: Electron beam radiotherapy is frequently administered based on clinical setups without formal treatment planning. We felt, therefore, that it was important to monitor electron beam treatments by in vivo dosimetry to prevent errors in treatment delivery. In this study, we present our clinical experience with patient dose verification using electron diodes and quantitatively assess the dose perturbations caused by the diodes during electron beam radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: A commercial diode dosimeter was used for the in vivo dose measurements. During patient dosimetry, the patients were set up as usual by the therapists. Before treatment, a diode was placed on the patient's skin surface and secured with hypoallergenic tape. The patient was then treated and the diode response registered and stored in the patient radiotherapy system database via our in-house software. A customized patient in vivo dosimetry report showing patient details, expected and measured dose, and percent difference was then generated and printed for analysis and record keeping. We studied the perturbation of electron beams by diodes using film dosimetry. Beam profiles at the 90% prescription isodose depths were obtained with and without the diode on the beam central axis, for 6-20 MeV electron beams and applicator/insert sizes ranging from a 3-cm diameter circular field to a 25 x 25 cm open field. Results: In vivo dose measurements on 360 patients resulted in the following ranges of deviations from the expected dose at the various anatomic sites: Breast (222 patients) -20.3 to +23.5% (median deviation 0%); Head and Neck (63 patients) -21.5 to +14.8% (median -0.7%); Other sites (75 patients) -17.6 to +18.8% (median +0.5%). Routine diode dosimetry during the first treatment on 360 patients (460 treatment sites) resulted in 11.5% of the measurements outside our acceptable ±6% dose deviation window. Only 3.7% of the total measurements were outside ±10% dose deviation. Detailed

  14. Structure and Electronic Properties of Cerium Orthophosphate: Theory and Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adelstein, Nicole; Mun, B. Simon; Ray, Hannah; Ross Jr, Phillip; Neaton, Jeffrey; De Jonghe, Lutgard

    2010-07-27

    Structural and electronic properties of cerium orthophosphate (CePO{sub 4}) are calculated using density functional theory (DFT) with the local spin-density approximation (LSDA+U), with and without gradient corrections (GGA-(PBE)+U), and compared to X-ray diffraction and photoemission spectroscopy measurements. The density of states is found to change significantly as the Hubbard parameter U, which is applied to the Ce 4f states, is varied from 0 to 5 eV. The calculated structural properties are in good agreement with experiment and do not change significantly with U. Choosing U = 3 eV for LDSA provides the best agreement between the calculated density of states and the experimental photoemission spectra.

  15. Terrestrial effects on dark matter-electron scattering experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Emken, Timon; Kouvaris, Chris; Shoemaker, Ian M.

    2017-01-01

    A well-studied possibility is that dark matter may reside in a sector secluded from the Standard Model, except for the so-called photon portal: kinetic mixing between the ordinary and dark photons. Such interactions can be probed in dark matter direct detection experiments, and new experimental...... techniques involving detection of dark matter-electron scattering offer new sensitivity to sub-GeV dark matter. Typically however it is implicitly assumed that the dark matter is not altered as it traverses the Earth to arrive at the detector. In this paper we study in detail the effects of terrestrial...... stopping on dark photon models of dark matter, and find that they significantly reduce the sensitivity of XENON10 and DAMIC. In particular we find that XENON10 only excludes masses in the range (5-3000) MeV while DAMIC only probes (20-50) MeV. Their corresponding cross section sensitivity is reduced...

  16. Broadband electron spin resonance experiments using superconducting coplanar waveguides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clauss, Conrad; Bogani, Lapo; Scheffler, Marc; Dressel, Martin [1. Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet Stuttgart (Germany); Bothner, Daniel; Koelle, Dieter; Kleiner, Reinhold [Physikalisches Institut - Experimentalphysik II and Center for Collective Quantum Phenomena in LISA+, Universitaet Tuebingen (Germany)

    2012-07-01

    In recent years superconducting coplanar devices operating at microwave/GHz frequencies are employed in more and more experimental studies. Here, we present electron spin resonance (ESR) experiments using a superconducting coplanar waveguide to provide the RF field to drive the spin flips. In contrast to conventional ESR studies this allows broadband frequency as well as magnetic field swept observation of the spin resonance. We show experimental data of the spin resonance of the organic radical NitPhoMe (2-(4'-methoxyphenyl)-4,4,5,5-tetra-methylimidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide) for frequencies in the range of 1 GHz to 40 GHz and corresponding magnetic fields up to 1.4 T (for g=2). In addition we show the temperature dependence of the ESR signals for temperatures up to 30 K, which is well above the critical temperature of the niobium superconductor.

  17. Electronic medical record in cardiology: a 10-year Italian experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpeggiani, Clara; Macerata, Alberto; Morales, Maria Aurora

    2015-08-01

    the aim of this study was to report a ten years experience in the electronic medical record (EMR) use. An estimated 80% of healthcare transactions are still paper-based. an EMR system was built at the end of 1998 in an Italian tertiary care center to achieve total integration among different human and instrumental sources, eliminating paper-based medical records. Physicians and nurses who used EMR system reported their opinions. In particular the hospital activity supported electronically, regarding 4,911 adult patients hospitalized in the 2004- 2008 period, was examined. the final EMR product integrated multimedia document (text, images, signals). EMR presented for the most part advantages and was well adopted by the personnel. Appropriateness evaluation was also possible for some procedures. Some disadvantages were encountered, such as start-up costs, long time required to learn how to use the tool, little to no standardization between systems and the EMR technology. the EMR is a strategic goal for clinical system integration to allow a better health care quality. The advantages of the EMR overcome the disadvantages, yielding a positive return on investment to health care organization.

  18. Electronic medical record in cardiology: a 10-year Italian experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clara Carpeggiani

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available SummaryObjectives:the aim of this study was to report a ten years experience in the electronic medical record (EMR use. An estimated 80% of healthcare transactions are still paper-based.Methods:an EMR system was built at the end of 1998 in an Italian tertiary care center to achieve total integration among different human and instrumental sources, eliminating paper-based medical records. Physicians and nurses who used EMR system reported their opinions. In particular the hospital activity supported electronically, regarding 4,911 adult patients hospitalized in the 2004- 2008 period, was examined.Results:the final EMR product integrated multimedia document (text, images, signals. EMR presented for the most part advantages and was well adopted by the personnel. Appropriateness evaluation was also possible for some procedures. Some disadvantages were encountered, such as start-up costs, long time required to learn how to use the tool, little to no standardization between systems and the EMR technology.Conclusion:the EMR is a strategic goal for clinical system integration to allow a better health care quality. The advantages of the EMR overcome the disadvantages, yielding a positive return on investment to health care organization.

  19. How people with cognitive disabilities experience electronic planning devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adolfsson, Päivi; Lindstedt, Helena; Janeslätt, Gunnel

    2015-01-01

    People with cognitive disabilities have difficulties in accomplishing everyday tasks. Electronic planning devices (EPDs) may compensate for the gap between a person's capacity and everyday challenges. However, the devices are not always used as intended. Despite that, cognitive assistive technology has been investigated in several studies, knowledge regarding when and what makes adults decide to use EPDs is incomplete. The aim was to explore the subjective experiences of people with cognitive disabilities in relation to the use of EPDs. A qualitative approach was applied with a qualitative content analysis. Twelve respondents were interviewed with support from a study specific guide. A model representing the respondents' experiences in the use of EPDs, comprising one theme, Possibility to master my daily life, four categories, Degree of fit to my needs, I am aware of my cognitive disability, I get help to structure my everyday life and The EPD improves my volition and ten subcategories, was developed. EPDs allow people with cognitive disabilities the possibility to deal with daily challenges; those who find EPDs beneficial tend to use them. EPDs can help people with cognitive disabilities in organisation, managing time and improve volition.

  20. Electron beam injection during active experiments. 1. Electromagnetic wave emissions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winglee, R.M.; Kellogg, P.J.

    1990-01-01

    During the active injection of an electron beam, a broad spectrum of waves is generated. In this paper examples of spectra from the recent Echo 7 experiment are presented. These results show that the characteristics of the emissions can change substantially with altitude. Two-dimensional (three velocity) relativistic electromagnetic particle simulations are used to investigate the changes in the plasma conditions required to account for the observed spectral variations. It is shown that many of these variations can be accounted for by assuming that the ratio of the electron plasma frequency ω pe to cyclotron frequency Ω e is less than unity at the lower altitudes of about 200 km and near or above unity at apogee of about 300 km. In the former case, whistlers with a cutoff at ω pe , lower hybrid and plasma waves are driven by the parallel beam energy while electromagnetic fundamental z mode and second harmonic x mode and electrostatic upper hybrid waves are driven by the perpendicular beam energy through the master instability. E x B drifts driven by perpendicular electric fields associated with the beam-plasma interaction can also be important in generating maser emission, particularly for field-aligned injection where there is no intrinsic perpendicular beam energy. The power in the electrostatic waves is a few percent of the beam energy and that in the electromagnetic waves a few tenths of a percent. In the latter case, where ω pe /Ω e increases above unity, emission in the fundamental z mode and second harmonic x mode become suppressed

  1. Laboratory Experiments Enabling Electron Beam use in Tenuous Space Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miars, G.; Leon, O.; Gilchrist, B. E.; Delzanno, G. L.; Castello, F. L.; Borovsky, J.

    2017-12-01

    A mission concept is under development which involves firing a spacecraft-mounted electron beam from Earth's magnetosphere to connect distant magnetic field lines in real time. To prevent excessive spacecraft charging and consequent beam return, the spacecraft must be neutralized in the tenuous plasma environment of the magnetosphere. Particle-In-Cell (PIC) simulations suggest neutralization can be accomplished by emitting a neutral plasma with the electron beam. Interpretation of these simulations also led to an ion emission model in which ion current is emitted from a quasi-neutral plasma as defined by the space charge limit [1,2]. Experiments were performed at the University of Michigan's Plasmadynamics and Electric Propulsion Laboratory (PEPL) to help validate the ion emission model. A hollow cathode plasma contactor was used as a representative spacecraft and charged with respect to the chamber walls to examine the effect of spacecraft charging on ion emission. Retarding Potential Analyzer (RPA) measurements were performed to understand ion flow velocity as this parameter relates directly to the expected space charge limit. Planar probe measurements were also made to identify where ion emission primarily occurred and to determine emission current density levels. Evidence of collisions within the plasma (particularly charge exchange collisions) and a simple model predicting emitted ion velocities are presented. While a detailed validation of the ion emission model and of the simulation tools used in [1,2] is ongoing, these measurements add to the physical understanding of ion emission as it may occur in the magnetosphere. 1. G.L. Delzanno, J.E. Borovsky, M.F. Thomsen, J.D. Moulton, and E.A. MacDonald, J. Geophys. Res. Space Physics 120, 3647, 2015. 2. G.L. Delzanno, J.E. Borovsky, M.F. Thomsen, and J.D. Moulton, J. Geophys. Res. Space Physics 120, 3588, 2015. ________________________________ * This work is supported by Los Alamos National Laboratory.

  2. Experiments on the nuclear interactions of pions and electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minehart, R.C.; Ziock, K.O.H.

    1992-08-01

    The analysis of the deuterium content in the CD target used in an experiment to study the π + d → 2p reaction at incident pion energies from 4 to 20 MeV was completed. The final paper describing this experiment will be submitted for publication this summer. Analysis of LAMPF Exp. on pion absorption in 4 He is continuing. In 1991, we collaborated with D. Pocanic from the Univ. of Virginia on a measurement at LAMPF of the π 0 production in π + p interactions. This run proved the validity of the method and additional data were obtained in a second run during the summer of 1992, using a new target. Current collaborations at LAMPF include the search for the decay μ + → e + + γ(MEGA) and a measurement of the Michel ρ parameter in the decay μ → e + v + v. A U.Va.--PSI collaboration is measuring pion beta decay to an accuracy of less than 1%, using a large acceptance CsI detector to measure the π 0 following decay of stopped π + mesons. Most of the U.Va. effort is devoted to the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS) program to the construction of the CLAS forward calorimeter. An apparatus to measure the properties of the scintillators with light from a N 2 laser was built in the spring of 1992. The electronic circuitry for the energy signal from the EGN detector and the circuitry needed to route the signals from the all the photomultipliers to the TDC and ADC circuits are being developed. Experimental proposals for the study of electroproduction of nucleon resonances at CEBAF, including measurements with polarized beam and targets, are being developed

  3. Electron and photon identification in the D0 experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Agnew, J. P.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Askew, A.; Atkins, S.; Augsten, K.; Avila, C.; Badaud, F.; Bagby, L.; Baldin, B.; Bandurin, D. V.; Banerjee, S.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, P.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bassler, U.; Bazterra, V.; Bean, A.; Begalli, M.; Bellantoni, L.; Beri, S. B.; Bernardi, G.; Bernhard, R.; Bertram, I.; Besançon, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatia, S.; Bhatnagar, V.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, K.; Boehnlein, A.; Boline, D.; Boos, E. E.; Borissov, G.; Borysova, M.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, O.; Brock, R.; Bross, A.; Brown, D.; Bu, X. B.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Bunichev, V.; Burdin, S.; Buszello, C. P.; Camacho-Pérez, E.; Casey, B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Caughron, S.; Chakrabarti, S.; Chan, K. M.; Chandra, A.; Chapon, E.; Chen, G.; Cho, S. W.; Choi, S.; Choudhary, B.; Cihangir, S.; Claes, D.; Clutter, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, W. E.; Corcoran, M.; Couderc, F.; Cousinou, M. -C.; Cutts, D.; Das, A.; Davies, G.; de Jong, S. J.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Déliot, F.; Demina, R.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Desai, S.; Deterre, C.; DeVaughan, K.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; Ding, P. F.; Dominguez, A.; Dubey, A.; Dudko, L. V.; Duperrina, A.; Dutt, S.; Eads, M.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Enari, Y.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Feng, L.; Ferbel, T.; Fiedler, F.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, H. E.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Fuess, S.; Garbincius, P. H.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; García-González, J. A.; Gavrilov, V.; Geng, W.; Gerber, C. E.; Gershtein, Y.; Ginther, G.; Golovanov, G.; Grannis, P. D.; Greder, S.; Greenlee, H.; Grenier, G.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J. -F.; Grohsjean, A.; Grünendahl, S.; Grünewald, M. W.; Guillemin, T.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Haley, J.; Han, L.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hays, J.; Head, T.; Hebbeker, T.; Hedin, D.; Hegab, H.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hensel, C.; Heredia-De La Cruz, I.; Herner, K.; Hesketh, G.; Hildreth, M. D.; Hirosky, R.; Hoang, T.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hogan, J.; Hohlfeld, M.; Holzbauer, J. L.; Howley, I.; Hubacek, Z.; Hynek, V.; Iashvili, I.; Ilchenko, Y.; Illingworth, R.; Ito, A. S.; Jabeen, S.; Jaffré, M.; Jayasinghe, A.; Jeong, M. S.; Jesik, R.; Jiang, P.; Johns, K.; Johnson, E.; Johnson, M.; Jonckheere, A.; Jonsson, P.; Joshi, J.; Jung, A. W.; Juste, A.; Kajfasz, E.; Karmanov, D.; Katsanos, I.; Kehoe, R.; Kermiche, S.; Khalatyan, N.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Kharzheev, Y. N.; Kiselevich, I.; Kohli, J. M.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kraus, J.; Kumar, A.; Kupco, A.; Kurča, T.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Lammers, S.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, S. W.; Lee, W. M.; Lei, X.; Lellouch, J.; Li, D.; Li, H.; Li, L.; Li, Q. Z.; Lim, J. K.; Lincoln, D.; Linnemann, J.; Lipaev, V. V.; Lipton, R.; Liu, H.; Liu, Y.; Lobodenko, A.; Lokajicek, M.; Lopes de Sa, R.; Luna-Garcia, R.; Lyon, A. L.; Maciel, A. K. A.; Madar, R.; Magaña-Villalba, R.; Malik, S.; Malyshev, V. L.; Mansour, J.; Martínez-Ortega, J.; McCarthy, R.; McGivern, C. L.; Meijer, M. M.; Melnitchouk, A.; Menezes, D.; Mercadante, P. G.; Merkin, M.; Meyer, A.; Meyer, J.; Miconi, F.; Mondal, N. K.; Mulhearn, M.; Nagy, E.; Narain, M.; Nayyar, R.; Neal, H. A.; Negret, J. P.; Neustroev, P.; Nguyen, H. T.; Nunnemann, T.; Orduna, J.; Osman, N.; Osta, J.; Pal, A.; Parashar, N.; Parihar, V.; Park, S. K.; Partridge, R.; Parua, N.; Patwa, A.; Penning, B.; Perfilov, M.; Peters, Y.; Petridis, K.; Petrillo, G.; Pétroff, P.; Pleier, M. -A.; Podstavkov, V. M.; Popov, A. V.; Prewitt, M.; Price, D.; Prokopenko, N.; Qian, J.; Quadt, A.; Quinn, B.; Raja, R.; Ratoff, P. N.; Razumov, I.; Ripp-Baudot, I.; Rizatdinova, F.; Rominsky, M.; Ross, A.; Royon, C.; Rubinov, P.; Ruchti, R.; Sajot, G.; Sánchez-Hernández, A.; Sanders, M. P.; Santos, A. S.; Savage, G.; Sawyer, L.; Scanlon, T.; Schamberger, R. D.; Scheglov, Y.; Schellman, H.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwienhorst, R.; Sekaric, J.; Severini, H.; Shabalina, E.; Shary, V.; Shaw, S.; Shchukin, A. A.; Simak, V.; Skubic, P.; Slattery, P.; Smirnov, D.; Snow, G. R.; Snow, J.; Snyder, S.; Söldner-Rembold, S.; Sonnenschein, L.; Soustruznik, K.; Stark, J.; Stoyanova, D. A.; Strauss, M.; Suter, L.; Svoisky, P.; Titov, M.; Tokmenin, V. V.; Tsai, Y. -T.; Tsybychev, D.; Tuchming, B.; Tully, C.; Uvarov, L.; Uvarov, S.; Uzunyan, S.; Van Kooten, R.; van Leeuwen, W. M.; Varelas, N.; Varnes, E. W.; Vasilyev, I. A.; Verkheev, A. Y.; Vertogradov, L. S.; Verzocchi, M.; Vesterinen, M.; Vilanova, D.; Vokac, P.; Wahl, H. D.; Wang, M. H. L. S.; Warchol, J.; Watts, G.; Wayne, M.; Weichert, J.; Welty-Rieger, L.; Williams, M. R. J.; Wilson, G. W.; Wobisch, M.; Wood, D. R.; Wyatt, T. R.; Xie, Y.; Yamada, R.; Yang, S.; Yasuda, T.; Yatsunenko, Y. A.; Ye, W.; Ye, Z.; Yin, H.; Yip, K.; Youn, S. W.; Yu, J. M.; Zennamo, J.; Zhao, T. G.; Zhou, B.; Zhu, J.; Zielinski, M.; Zieminska, D.; Zivkovic, L.

    2014-06-01

    The electron and photon reconstruction and identification algorithms used by the D0 Collaboration at the Fermilab Tevatron collider are described. The determination of the electron energy scale and resolution is presented. Studies of the performance of the electron and photon reconstruction and identification are summarized.

  4. Electron Bernstein Wave Research on the National Spherical Torus Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, G.; Bers, A.; Bigelow, T.S.; Carter, M.D.; Caughman, J.B.; Decker, J.; Diem, S.; Efthimion, P.C.; Ershov, N.M.; Fredd, E.; Harvey, R.W.; Hosea, J.; Jaeger, F.; Preinhaelter, J.; Ram, A.K.; Rasmussen, D.A.; Smirnov, A.P.; Wilgen, J.B.; Wilson, J.R.

    2005-01-01

    Off-axis electron Bernstein wave current drive (EBWCD) may be critical for sustaining noninductive high-beta National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) plasmas. Numerical modeling results predict that the ∼100 kA of off-axis current needed to stabilize a solenoid-free high-beta NSTX plasma could be generated via Ohkawa current drive with 3 MW of 28 GHz EBW power. In addition, synergy between EBWCD and bootstrap current may result in a 10% enhancement in current-drive efficiency with 4 MW of EBW power. Recent dual-polarization EBW radiometry measurements on NSTX confirm that efficient coupling to EBWs can be readily accomplished by launching elliptically polarized electromagnetic waves oblique to the confining magnetic field, in agreement with numerical modeling. Plans are being developed for implementing a 1 MW, 28 GHz proof-of-principle EBWCD system on NSTX to test the EBW coupling, heating and current-drive physics at high radio-frequency power densities

  5. From hadronic parity violation to electron parity-violating experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oers, Willem T.H. van

    2010-01-01

    The weak interaction is manifested in parity-violating observables. With the weak interaction extremely well known parity-violating measurements in hadronic systems can be used to deduce strong interaction effects in those systems. Parity-violating analyzing powers in electron-proton scattering have led to determining the strange quark contributions to the charge and magnetization distributions of the nucleon. Parity-violating electron-proton and electron-electron scattering can also be performed to test the predictions of the Standard Model in the 'running' of the electroweak mixing angle or sin 2 θ W .

  6. Solid electron sources for the energy scale monitoring in the KATRIN experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Zbořil, Miroslav; Vénos, D

    The KArlsruhe TRItium Neutrino (KATRIN) experiment represents a next-generation tritium $\\beta$-decay experiment designed to perform a high precision direct measurement of the electron anti-neutrino mass m($\

  7. Monitoring electronics during the experiments with the OSIRIS (HMI Berlin)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grebosz, J.

    1992-01-01

    This report presents the software to perform the constant monitoring of the electronics dedicated to control the multidetector system. It supervises the correct status of the gamma spectroscopy measurements. (author). 3 figs

  8. Electronics for the LAMPF neutrino experiment's veto counter system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dalton, C.

    1981-09-01

    A cosmic-ray veto detector has been constructed in the neutrino cave at Los Alamos National Laboratory. This report describes the electronic readout system designed to buffer and compact the data from the detector

  9. Operating experience with the polarized electron gun at SLAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alguard, M.J.; Baum, G.; Clendenin, J.E.; Hughes, V.W.; Lubell, M.S.; Miller, R.H.; Raith, W.; Schuler, K.P.; Sodja, J.

    1977-03-01

    During the two years of operation of the SLAC Polarized Electron Gun (PEGGY), the electron intensity delivered to the target has increased from 7 x 10 7 e - /pulse to 1 x 10 9 e - /pulse. The polarization is 0.85 with no measurable degradation caused by acceleration through the linear accelerator. The predominant cause of downtime is replenishment of lithium, which now averages 43 hours. The lifetime of a lithium load is about 175 hours

  10. Auger electron emitters: Insights gained from in vitro experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makrigiorgos, G.; Adelstein, S.J.; Kassis, A.I.

    1990-01-01

    This paper outlines the evolution of the current rationale for research into the biological effects of tissue-incorporated Auger electron emitters. The first section is a brief review of the research conducted by several groups in the last fifteen years. The second section describes the in vitro model used in our studies, dosimetric calculations, experimental techniques and recent findings. The third section focuses on the use of Auger electron emitters as in vitro microprobes for the investigation of the radiosensitivity of distinct subcellular components. Examination of the biological effects of the Auger electron emitter 125 I located in different cellular compartments of a single cell line (V 79 hamster lung fibroblast) verifies that DNA is the critical cell structure for radiation damage and that the sensitive sites are of nanometer dimensions. The data from incorporation of several Auger electron emitters at the same location within DNA suggest that there are no saturation effects from the decay of these isotopes (i.e. all the emitted energy is biologically effective) and provide some insight into which of the numerous physical mechanisms accompanying the Auger decay are most important in causing cell damage. Finally the implications of Auger electron emission for radiotherapy and radiation protection in diagnostic nuclear medicine are detailed and further research possibilities are suggested. (orig.)

  11. Time resolved electron microscopy for in situ experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campbell, Geoffrey H.; McKeown, Joseph T.; Santala, Melissa K.

    2014-01-01

    Transmission electron microscopy has functioned for decades as a platform for in situ observation of materials and processes with high spatial resolution. Yet, the dynamics often remain elusive, as they unfold too fast to discern at these small spatial scales under traditional imaging conditions. Simply shortening the exposure time in hopes of capturing the action has limitations, as the number of electrons will eventually be reduced to the point where noise overtakes the signal in the image. Pulsed electron sources with high instantaneous current have successfully shortened exposure times (thus increasing the temporal resolution) by about six orders of magnitude over conventional sources while providing the necessary signal-to-noise ratio for dynamic imaging. We describe here the development of this new class of microscope and the principles of its operation, with examples of its application to problems in materials science

  12. Time resolved electron microscopy for in situ experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campbell, Geoffrey H., E-mail: ghcampbell@llnl.gov; McKeown, Joseph T.; Santala, Melissa K. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)

    2014-12-15

    Transmission electron microscopy has functioned for decades as a platform for in situ observation of materials and processes with high spatial resolution. Yet, the dynamics often remain elusive, as they unfold too fast to discern at these small spatial scales under traditional imaging conditions. Simply shortening the exposure time in hopes of capturing the action has limitations, as the number of electrons will eventually be reduced to the point where noise overtakes the signal in the image. Pulsed electron sources with high instantaneous current have successfully shortened exposure times (thus increasing the temporal resolution) by about six orders of magnitude over conventional sources while providing the necessary signal-to-noise ratio for dynamic imaging. We describe here the development of this new class of microscope and the principles of its operation, with examples of its application to problems in materials science.

  13. Data acquisition electronics for NESTOR experiment: project and tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ameli, Fabrizio; Bonori, Maurizio; Bottai, Sergio; Capone, Antonio; Curti, Franco; Desiati, Paolo; De Marchis, Giancarlo; Massa, Fabrizio; Masullo, Rocco; Piccari, Luigi; Vannucci, Italo

    1999-01-01

    The NESTOR detector, at present under construction, is a telescope for high-energy neutrino astronomy. The apparatus, based on Cherenkov light detection, will be deployed in deep sea (about 4000 m) near the S.W. Greek coast. We briefly describe the NESTOR detector, then we describe with more details the electronics for NESTOR data acquisition and transmission. The detector signals are sampled at 200 MHz and all the resulting information are transmitted to the laboratory on 30 km long electro-optical cable. The estimated Mean Time Between Failure of the full electronics system is greater than 20 years. Tests performed on the first prototypes confirm the main characteristics of these electronics: the dynamic range allowed for the signals is bigger than 1000, the pulse shape is reconstructed with an 8 bit ADC accuracy and the resolution in the measurement of the signal 'threshold crossing time' is better than 200 ps

  14. Electron temperature diagnostics in the RFX reversed field pinch experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartiromo, R.; Carraro, L.; Marrelli, L.; Murari, A.; Pasqualotto, R.; Puiatti, M.E.; Scarin, P.; Valisa, M.; Franz, P.; Martin, P.; Zabeo, L.

    2000-01-01

    The paper presents an integrated approach to the problem of electron temperature diagnostics of the plasma in a reversed field pinch. Three different methods, sampling different portions of the electron distribution function, are adopted, namely Thomson scattering, soft X-ray spectroscopy by pulse-height analysis and filtered soft X-ray intensity ratio. A careful analysis of the different sources of systematic errors is performed and a novel statistical approach is adopted to mutually validate the three independent measurements. A satisfactory agreement is obtained over a large range of experimental conditions, indicating that in the plasma core the energy distribution function is well represented by a maxwellian. (author)

  15. The GaAs electron source: simulations and experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aleksandrov, A.V.; Ciullo, G.; Guidi, V.; Kudelainen, V.I.; Lamanna, G.; Lenisa, P.; Logachov, P.V.; Maciga, B.; Novokhatsky, A.; Tecchio, L.; Yang, B.

    1994-01-01

    In this paper we calculate electron emission from GaAs photocathodes using the Monte Carlo technique. Typical data of energy spread of the electron beam are presented. For photoenergy ranging from 1.6 to 2.1 eV, the calculated longitudinal and transverse energy spreads are 14.4-78 and 4-14.7 meV respectively. Temporal measurement of GaAs photocathodes has been performed. The preliminary results show that the temporal response is faster than 200 ps. (orig.)

  16. Direct measurement of macroscopic electric fields produced by collective effects in electron-impact experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Velotta, R.; Avaldi, L.; Camilloni, R.; Giammanco, F.; Spinelli, N.; Stefani, G.

    1996-01-01

    The macroscopic electric field resulting from the space charge produced in electron-impact experiments has been characterized by using secondary electrons of well-defined energy (e.g., Auger or autoionizing electrons) as a probe. It is shown that the measurement of the kinetic-energy shifts suffered by secondary electrons is a suitable tool for the analysis of the self-generated electric field in a low-density plasma. copyright 1996 The American Physical Society

  17. Electron density and plasma dynamics of a colliding plasma experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiechula, J., E-mail: wiechula@physik.uni-frankfurt.de; Schönlein, A.; Iberler, M.; Hock, C.; Manegold, T.; Bohlender, B.; Jacoby, J. [Plasma Physics Group, Institute of Applied Physics, Goethe University, 60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany)

    2016-07-15

    We present experimental results of two head-on colliding plasma sheaths accelerated by pulsed-power-driven coaxial plasma accelerators. The measurements have been performed in a small vacuum chamber with a neutral-gas prefill of ArH{sub 2} at gas pressures between 17 Pa and 400 Pa and load voltages between 4 kV and 9 kV. As the plasma sheaths collide, the electron density is significantly increased. The electron density reaches maximum values of ≈8 ⋅ 10{sup 15} cm{sup −3} for a single accelerated plasma and a maximum value of ≈2.6 ⋅ 10{sup 16} cm{sup −3} for the plasma collision. Overall a raise of the plasma density by a factor of 1.3 to 3.8 has been achieved. A scaling behavior has been derived from the values of the electron density which shows a disproportionately high increase of the electron density of the collisional case for higher applied voltages in comparison to a single accelerated plasma. Sequences of the plasma collision have been taken, using a fast framing camera to study the plasma dynamics. These sequences indicate a maximum collision velocity of 34 km/s.

  18. Issues and Experiments in Electronic Publishing and Dissemination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Karen

    1994-01-01

    Examines three topics related to electronic publishing and distribution: the national context, including NREN (National Education and Research Network); issues of market readiness, funding, delivery standards, access software, intellectual property concerns, and pricing and licensing models that must be resolved; and descriptions of seven services…

  19. Electronic licensing filing system development and implementation experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walderhaug, J.

    1993-01-01

    The Electronic Licensing Filing System (ELFS) is a microcomputer-based integrated document search and retrieval system for the Nuclear Regulatory Affairs Division of Southern California Edison (SCE). ELFS allows the user access to the current licensing basis of a subject by providing an easily searchable electronic information data base consisting of regulatory correspondence, design-bases documentation, licensing documents [updated final safety and analysis report (UFSAR) and technical specifications], and regulatory guidance or directives [10CFR, generic letters, bulletins, notices, circulars, regulatory guides, policy statements, and selected US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) regulations]. It is used in the preparation of correspondence and submittals to the NRC, 50.59 safety evaluations, design-bases reconstitution, and commitment tracking and management

  20. ELECTRON SCATTERING EXPERIMENTS ON THE NEUTRON AND PROTON

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berkelman, Karl

    1963-06-15

    The electric and magnetic helicity form factors of the proton are measured at 4-momentum transfers (squared) of 25 to 45 f/sup -2/, by means of electron scattering by protons at high energies. The results are combined with other e/sup -/--p and e/sup -/--d experimental findings in order to show the proton form fuctors from 0 to 45 f/sup -2/ and the neutron form factors from 0 to 25 f/sup -2/. (T.F.H.)

  1. First experiments with the Greifswald electron-beam ion trap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schabinger, B.; Biedermann, C.; Gierke, S.; Marx, G.; Radtke, R.; Schweikhard, L.

    2013-09-01

    The former Berlin electron-beam ion trap (EBIT) was moved to Greifswald. In addition to x-ray studies the setup will be used for the investigation of interaction processes between highly charged ions and atomic clusters such as charge exchange and fragmentation. The EBIT setup has now been reassembled and highly charged ions have been produced from Xe-Ar gas mixtures to study the ‘sawtooth effect’. In addition, the layout of the extraction beamline, the interaction region and product analysis for interaction studies with highly charged ions are presented.

  2. Low-energy electron transmission and secondary-electron emission experiments on crystalline and molten long-chain alkanes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ueno, N.; Sugita, K.; Seki, K.; Inokuchi, H.

    1986-01-01

    This paper describes the results of low-energy electron transmission and secondary-electron emission experiments on thin films of long-chain alkanes deposited on metal substrates. The spectral changes due to crystal-melt phase transition were measured in situ in both experiments. The ground-state energy V 0 of the quasifree electron in crystalline state was determined to be 0.5 +- 0.1 eV. The value of V 0 for the molten state was found to be negative. Further, in the crystalline state evidence is found for a direct correspondence between the transmission maxima and the high value of the density of states in the conduction bands

  3. High Average Power UV Free Electron Laser Experiments At JLAB

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Douglas, David; Benson, Stephen; Evtushenko, Pavel; Gubeli, Joseph; Hernandez-Garcia, Carlos; Legg, Robert; Neil, George; Powers, Thomas; Shinn, Michelle; Tennant, Christopher; Williams, Gwyn

    2012-01-01

    Having produced 14 kW of average power at ∼2 microns, JLAB has shifted its focus to the ultraviolet portion of the spectrum. This presentation will describe the JLab UV Demo FEL, present specifics of its driver ERL, and discuss the latest experimental results from FEL experiments and machine operations.

  4. NIKEL-AMC: readout electronics for the NIKA2 experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bourrion, O.; Bouly, J.L.; Bouvier, J.; Bosson, G.; Catalano, A.; Li, C.; Macías-Pérez, J.F.; Tourres, D.; Ponchant, N.; Vescovi, C.; Benoit, A.; Calvo, M.; Goupy, J.; Monfardini, A.

    2016-01-01

    The New Iram Kid Arrays-2 (NIKA2) instrument has recently been installed at the IRAM 30 m telescope. NIKA2 is a state-of-art instrument dedicated to mm-wave astronomy using microwave kinetic inductance detectors (KID) as sensors. The three arrays installed in the camera, two at 1.25 mm and one at 2.05 mm, feature a total of 3300 KIDs. To instrument these large array of detectors, a specifically designed electronics, composed of 20 readout boards and hosted in three microTCA crates, has been developed. The implemented solution and the achieved performances are presented in this paper. We find that multiplexing factors of up to 400 detectors per board can be achieved with homogeneous performance across boards in real observing conditions, and a factor of more than 3 decrease in volume with respect to previous generations.

  5. The G3 Experience with Electronic Publishing: An Editor's Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, W. M.

    2003-12-01

    G3 (Geochemistry, Geophysics, Geosystems) is an all-electronic journal published jointly by the AGU, the Geochemical Society, and the European Association of Geochemistry. G3 publishes original scientific contributions pertaining to understanding the Earth as a system, including relevant observational, experimental, and theoretical investigations of the solid Earth, hydrosphere, atmosphere, and biosphere. The journal was initiated as a result of a grass roots effort with the following goals in mind: a copyright policy designed to enhance, rather than inhibit, the dissemination of scientific information (for example, allowing authors to post electronic reprints on their web sites), provide a means of publishing, in immediately useable formats, large data sets, provide a means for ready dissemination of computer modeling and analysis tools, and provide a forum where authors could use novel ways of illustrating both data and models (e.g., formats such as movies, virtual reality images, sound, mathematical models, etc.), and finally to reduce costs and speed publication. In most respects, G3 has been enormously successful and has met most of its goals. G3 began publishing in December of 1999; in the subsequent 3 1/2 years 625 papers have been submitted to it and 325 have been published. It currently has over 600 institutional and personal subscribers. Papers are submitted through the web (a variety of formats are accepted, however, Microsoft Word is most common) and are converted to Adobe pdf format for peer review. Except that it is fully electronic using the web and e-mail, the peer review process is traditional, which insures the quality of the papers published. Accepted papers are copyedited and converted to SGML for archival purposes. HTML and Acrobat pdf versions are then generated from the SGML and published as they are ready on the G3 web site (www.g-cubed.org). Large data sets are routinely published in digital formats that can be readily downloaded by readers

  6. Electron beam irradiation experiments of monoblock divertor mock-up

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Satoh, Kazuyoshi; Akiba, Masato; Araki, Masanori; Suzuki, Satoshi; Yokoyama, Kenji; Smid, I.; Cardella, A.; Duwe, R.; Di Pietro, E.

    1993-03-01

    It is one of the key issues for ITER to develop the divertor plate. Electron beam irradiation tests were carried out on a NET divertor mock-up using JEBIS at JAERI under a collaboration between The NET team, JAERI and KFA Juelich. Screening tests (maximum heat flux of 23 MW/m 2 ) and thermal cycling tests (18 MW/m 2 , 30s, 1000cycle) were carried out. As a result of the screening tests, the erosion caused by sublimation of C/C was observed on the surface of armor tile. No serious damage such as cracks or detachments, however, were found. As a result of the thermal cycling tests, no major damage was detected on the C/C surface. However cooling time constant of the divertor mock-up increased over 600cycle. Therefore it implies that some defects would occur at the brazing interface of the divertor mock-up. (author)

  7. NINO ASIC electronics used in MRPC/TOF experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Yongjie; Li Cheng

    2008-01-01

    In order to meet the excellent properties of MRPC, an front-end amplifier/discriminator chip-NINO ASIC, was developed in ALICE TOF group at CERN. This ASIC was fabricated with the 0.25 μm CMOS technology. It is highly integrated and can deal with 8 channels per chip. It has differential input and is differential signal shaping and throughout transition. The peaking time of the amplifier is less than 1 ns. It has LVDS outputs and the width of the output signal depended on the charge of input. This allows the TOT measurement of HPTDC system. A position sensitive MRPC was tested with beam facility using the front-end electronics based on NINO and good results were obtained. (authors)

  8. Electronic laboratory books in fusion experiments and engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Landgraf, B., E-mail: b.landgraf@fz-juelich.d [Institut fuer Energieforschung - Plasmaphysik, Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, EURATOM Association, D-52425 Juelich (Germany); Kraemer-Flecken, A. [Institut fuer Energieforschung - Plasmaphysik, Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, EURATOM Association, D-52425 Juelich (Germany)

    2010-07-15

    In this work we introduce eLaBo-an electronic laboratory book system. ELaBo is a tool that enables collaboration of distributed teams by using standard internet browsers. It provides several functions: Users can create books for specific purposes, e.g. an experimental session or for recording on diagnostics. A book contains pages and resources (e.g. binary files), which are created and manipulated by users of the book. A simple WIKI syntax is used to edit the contents of pages including formatted text, images, and LaTeX for expressing mathematical equations. ELaBo provides for different types of links, a full-text search for the WIKI pages and a version history. Access control is implemented using a key methaphor. Recently (since the last login) modified or created pages or books can be displayed on demand.

  9. Electronic laboratory books in fusion experiments and engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Landgraf, B.; Kraemer-Flecken, A.

    2010-01-01

    In this work we introduce eLaBo-an electronic laboratory book system. ELaBo is a tool that enables collaboration of distributed teams by using standard internet browsers. It provides several functions: Users can create books for specific purposes, e.g. an experimental session or for recording on diagnostics. A book contains pages and resources (e.g. binary files), which are created and manipulated by users of the book. A simple WIKI syntax is used to edit the contents of pages including formatted text, images, and LaTeX for expressing mathematical equations. ELaBo provides for different types of links, a full-text search for the WIKI pages and a version history. Access control is implemented using a key methaphor. Recently (since the last login) modified or created pages or books can be displayed on demand.

  10. Observation of fluxes of electrons scattered by the atmosphere in the second Araks experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyachov, S.B.; Managadze, G.G.

    1980-01-01

    This paper describes the results of the USHBA spectrometer measurements of the fluxes of atmospheric scattered electrons in the second Araks experiment. The experimental data are presented for heights from 100 to 140 km. The spectral distributions of the scattered electron fluxes are given and the altitude variation of their intensity is compared with the atmosphere models. The conclusion is made about the possible effect of rocket gassing on the electron scattering processes for definite angles of injection

  11. Design and performance of TPC readout electronics for the NA49 experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bieser, F. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Cooper, G. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Cwienk, W. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik, Muenchen (Germany); Eckardt, V. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik, Muenchen (Germany); Fessler, H. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik, Muenchen (Germany); Fischer, H.G. [European Lab. for Particle Physics (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Gabler, F. [Frankfurt Univ. (Germany). Fachbereich 13 - Physik; Gornicki, E. [Institute of Nuclear Physics, Cracow (Poland); Hearn, W.E. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Heupke, W. [Frankfurt Univ. (Germany). Fachbereich 13 - Physik; Irmscher, D. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Jacobs, P. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Kleinfelder, S. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Lindenstruth, V. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Machowski, B. [Institute of Nuclear Physics, Cracow (Poland); Marks, K. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Milgrome, O. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Mock, A. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik, Muenchen (Germany); Noggle, T. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Pimpl, W. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik, Muenchen (Germany); Poskanzer, A.M. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Rauch, W. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik, Muenchen (Germany); Renfordt, R. [European Lab. for Particle Physics (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland)]|[Frankfurt Univ. (Germany). Fachbereich 13 -Physik; Ritter, H.G. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)]|[European Lab. for Particle Physics (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Roehrich, D. [Frankfurt Univ. (Germany). Fachbereich 13 - Physik; Rudolph, H. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Rueschmann, G.W. [Frankfurt Univ. (Germany). Fachbereich 13 - Physik; Schaefer, E. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik, Muenchen (Germany); Seyboth, P. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik, Muenchen (Germany); Seyerlein, J.

    1997-02-01

    Highly integrated readout electronics were developed and produced for the 182000 channels of the four TPCs of the NA49 heavy-ion fixed target experiment at the CERN SPS. The large number of channels, the high packing density and required cost minimization led to the choice of a custom electronics system. The requirements, the design and the performance of the electronics components are described. (orig.).

  12. Theory of electron cyclotron heating in the Constance II experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mauel, M.E.

    1981-03-01

    The bounce-averaged quasi-linear equation for a non-relativistic mirror-confined plasma interacting with electromagnetic waves is derived for use in the study of ECRH of the Constance II mirror experiment. The derivations follows the more formal examples given by Berk for electrostatic waves and Bernstein and Baxter for relativistic plasmas. The validity of the theory is discussed by examining individual particle orbits in an EM field. The local dispersion relation is found while deriving a self-consistent WKB theory which can be used to estimate the power transferred from the launching horn to the plasma

  13. Internal interface for RFC muon trigger electronics at CMS experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Pozniak, Krzysztof T; Pietrusinski, Michall

    2004-01-01

    The paper describes design and practical realization of an internal communication layer referred to as the Internal Interface (II). The system was realized for the RFC Muon Trigger of the CMS experiment. Fully automatic implementation of the communication layer is realized in the FPGA chips and in the control software. The methodology of implementation was presented in the description form of the interface structure from the sides of hardware and software. The examples of the communication layer realizations were given for the RFC Muon Trigger.

  14. Ultrafast electron field emission from gold resonant antennas studied by two terahertz pulse experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iwaszczuk, Krzysztof; Zalkovskij, Maksim; Strikwerda, Andrew C.

    2015-01-01

    Summary form only given. Ultrafast electron field emission from gold resonant antennas induced by strong terahertz (THz) transient is investigated using two THz pulse experiments. It is shown that UV emission from nitrogen plasma generated by liberated electrons is a good indication of the local...

  15. Electron distributions in the plasmas of the earth's magnetosphere - an experiment for AMPTE-UKS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hall, D.S.; Chaloner, C.P.; Shah, H.

    1982-06-01

    The objectives, measurement techniques and technical requirements of the electron experiment to be included in the UK-Satellite of the Active Magnetospheric Particle Explorer (AMPTE) mission are described under sections entitled; experiment objectives, experiment technique, mechanical, electrical, command and data handling requirements, ground support equipment interfaces, test procedures, and special requirements. In appendices the experiment controller and the measurement sequence are shown. (U.K.)

  16. Electron irradiation experiments in support of fusion materials development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gelles, D.S.; Ohnuki, S.; Takahashi, H.; Matsui, H.; Kohno, Y.

    1991-11-01

    Microstructural evolution in response to 1 MeV irradiation has been investigated for three simple ferritic alloys, pure beryllium, pure vanadium, and two simple vanadium alloys over a range of temperatures and doses. Microstructural evolution in Fe-3, -9, and -18Cr ferritic alloys is found to consist of crenulated, faulted a loops and circular, unfaulted a/2 loops at low temperatures, but with only unfaulted loops at high temperatures. The complex dislocation evolution is attributed to sigma phase precipifaults arising from chromium segregation to point defect sinks. Beryllium is found to be resistant to electron damage; the only effect observed was enhanced dislocation mobility. Pure vanadium, V-5Fe, and V-1Ni microstructural response was complicated by precipitation on heating to 400 degrees C and above, but dislocation evolution was investigated in the range of room temperature to 300 degrees C and at 600 degrees C. The three materials behaved similarly, except that pure vanadium showed more rapid dislocation evolution. This difference does not explain the enhanced swelling observed in vanadium alloys

  17. Precise measurement in elastic electron scattering: HAPPEX and E-158 experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vacheret, A.

    2004-12-01

    Parity Violation asymmetry measurements in elastic electron scattering are in one hand an interesting way of retrieving new informations about the sea quarks of the nucleon and in the other hand a powerful test of the Standard Model electroweak sector at low energy. This thesis describes the HAPPEX experiment at JLab and the E-158 experiment at SLAC (USA) which measure de parity violation asymmetries in elastic scattering of polarized electron on nuclei like Hydrogen or Helium and on atomic electrons. With the measurements on hadronic targets one can extract the strange quarks contribution to the charge and current density of the nucleon. With the electron-electron scattering one can test the standard model at the loop level and far from the Z pole by extracting sin 2 θ W . In this thesis we describe the formalism associated with the electroweak probe. We present in detail the experimental methods used to make such precise measurements of parity violation asymmetry. Then, we describe the experimental set-up of each experiment and in particular the electron detector and the feedback loop on the beam current for the HAPPEX experiment and the analysis of E-158 run III with a dedicated systematic study on the beam sub-pulse fluctuations. We present the preliminary results for each experiment with a comparison with the other existing results and the future experiments. (author)

  18. Discovering the puzzling behaviour of electrons with the Grimaldi-Young experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matteucci, Giorgio; Castaneda, Roman; Serna, Samuel; Garcia-Sucerquia, Jorge; Medina, Francisco

    2010-01-01

    An experiment analogous to that devised by Grimaldi and subsequently repeated by Young to study the nature of light has been realized with electrons. Following the Grimaldi and Young line of thought, an original approach is presented to introduce undergraduate physics students to the wave behaviour of electrons. An electron microscope equipped with a low coherent source of electrons and a thin platinum wire, acting as an opaque obstacle, is used to reproduce the experimental conditions adopted by Grimaldi and Young with light. Electron interference fringes produced in the geometrical shadow of the obstacle are interpreted by assuming that electrons behave like a sound or a light wave. This hypothesis is confirmed by the modelling of the experimental electron interference patterns.

  19. Optically isolated electronic trigger system for experiments on a subnanosecond time scale with a pulsed Van de Graaff electron accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luthjens, L.H.; Vermeulen, M.J.W.; Hom, M.L.

    1980-01-01

    An optically isolated electronic trigger system for a pulsed Van de Graaff electron accelerator, producing an external pretrigger pulse 75 ns before arrival of the electron pulse at the target, is described. The total time jitter between trigger signal and electron pulse is 50 ps. The measurement of optical and electrical transients on a subnanosecond time scale with a sequential sampling oscilloscope is demonstrated. The contribution of various parts of the equipment to the total jitter is discussed. Those contributions to the jitter due to the electron transit time fluctuations in the accelerator assuming a constant acceleration voltage gradient and to the shot noise in the photomultiplier detector of the trigger system are calculated to be 5 ps and 12 to 21 ps respectively. Comparison with the experimental results leads to the conclusion that a considerable part of the total jitter may be attributed to acceleration voltage gradient fluctuations, to accelerator vibrations and possibly to density fluctuations in the insulation gas. Possible improvements of the trigger system are discussed. The apparatus is used for pulse radiolysis experiments with subnanosecond time resolution down to 100 ps in combination with subnanosecond time duration electron pulses

  20. Measurement of electron neutrino appearance with the MINOS experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boehm, Joshua Adam Alpern

    2009-01-01

    MINOS is a long-baseline two-detector neutrino oscillation experiment that uses a high intensity muon neutrino beam to investigate the phenomena of neutrino oscillations. By measuring the neutrino interactions in a detector near the neutrino source and again 735 km away from the production site, it is possible to probe the parameters governing neutrino oscillation. The majority of the ν μ oscillate to ν τ but a small fraction may oscillate instead to ν e . This thesis presents a measurement of the ν e appearance rate in the MINOS far detector using the first two years of exposure. Methods for constraining the far detector backgrounds using the near detector measurements is discussed and a technique for estimating the uncertainty on the background and signal selection are developed. A 1.6σ excess over the expected background rate is found providing a hint of ν e appearance.

  1. On the presentation of wave phenomena of electrons with the Young-Feynman experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matteucci, Giorgio

    2011-01-01

    The Young-Feynman two-hole interferometer is widely used to present electron wave-particle duality and, in particular, the buildup of interference fringes with single electrons. The teaching approach consists of two steps: (i) electrons come through only one hole but diffraction effects are disregarded and (ii) electrons come through both holes and interference fringes are described. Therefore, a student might believe that wave phenomena are not revealed in case (i), but they arise only by the combined effect of electrons from the two holes. To avoid misunderstanding regarding the distribution of electrons passing through one hole, Fresnel and Fraunhofer diffraction patterns are discussed. In particular, an original experiment, realized with a standard electron microscope and a sample with round holes, is presented to introduce the wave nature of electrons. The experimental results clearly show that a careful discussion of electron diffraction phenomena from one hole provides students with the evidence that the interference experiment from both holes is not strictly required to show the superposition of electron waves.

  2. Observation of suprathermal electron fluxes during ionospheric modification experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fejer, J.A.; Sulzer, M.P.

    1987-01-01

    The temporal behavior of backscatter by ionospheric Langmuir waves was observed with the 430-MHz radar at Arecibo while a powerful HF wave was cycled 2 s on, 3 s off. The time resolution was 0.1 s. Late at night, in the absence of photoelectrons, using an HF equivalent radiated power of 80 MW at 3.175 MHz, the initial enhancement of about 6% above system noise of the backscattered power with Doppler shifts between -3.75 and -3.85 MHz was reached about 0.25 s after switching on the HF transmitter. In the following second the enhancement gradually decreased to about 3% and remained there until switching off. During the late afternoon, in the presence of photoelectrons, using the same HF power at 5.1 MHz, an initial enhancement by 25% of the backscattered power with Doppler shifts between -5.25 and -5.35 MHz appeared within less than 0.1 s after switching on the HF transmitter. The incoherent backscatter by Langmuir waves enhanced by photoelectrons was already above system noise by a factor greatly in excess of 10 before switching on the HF transmitter; the 25% enhancement thus corresponds to an enhancement greatly in excess of 250% above system noise. The enhancement drops to less than one tenth of its original value in less than a second. The nighttime effect is attributed to multiple acceleration of electrons from the high-energy tail of the Maxwellian distribution. The daytime effect is believed to be due to a modification in the distribution function of photoelectrons

  3. Electron beam injection during active experiments. 2. Collisional effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winglee, R.M.

    1990-01-01

    During active beam experiments the presence of high neutral densities at low altitudes and/or during thruster firings has been observed to modify the spacecraft charging and the properties of the beam. Two-dimensional (three velocity) electromagnetic particle simulations with ionizing collisions incorporated are used to investigate the modification of the beam-plasma interaction as the neutral density is increased. It is shown that when the spacecraft is uniformly immersed in a neutral cloud, most of the ionization is produced by direct ionization by the beam and its secondaries, rather than via vehicle-induced or wave-ineuced ionization for the neutral densities considered. This ionization enhances the return current into the spacecraft with the spacecraft potential being reduced well below the beam energy whent he collison period is shorter than the spacecraft charging time. Neutral densities of about 10 11 -10 12 cm -3 are required to produce this reduction in the spacecraft potential for typical ionospheric and beam parameters. At these densities, the beam is able to propagate away from the spacecraft with little distortion except in the case of thruster firings where the beam can be subject to large space-charge oscillations near the boundaries of the neutral cloud. The ionization of neutrals in the beam region also modifies the wave emissions and spatial profile of return currents into the spacecraft, both of which tend to become localized to the beam region in high neutral densities

  4. Measurement of electron neutrino appearance with the MINOS experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boehm, Joshua Adam Alpern [Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (United States)

    2009-05-01

    MINOS is a long-baseline two-detector neutrino oscillation experiment that uses a high intensity muon neutrino beam to investigate the phenomena of neutrino oscillations. By measuring the neutrino interactions in a detector near the neutrino source and again 735 km away from the production site, it is possible to probe the parameters governing neutrino oscillation. The majority of the vμ oscillate to vτ but a small fraction may oscillate instead to ve. This thesis presents a measurement of the ve appearance rate in the MINOS far detector using the first two years of exposure. Methods for constraining the far detector backgrounds using the near detector measurements is discussed and a technique for estimating the uncertainty on the background and signal selection are developed. A 1.6σ excess over the expected background rate is found providing a hint of ve appearance.

  5. Design and Development of a CPCI-Based Electronics Package for Space Station Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolacz, John S.; Clapper, Randy S.; Wade, Raymond P.

    2006-01-01

    The NASA John H. Glenn Research Center is developing a Compact-PCI (CPCI) based electronics package for controlling space experiment hardware on the International Space Station. Goals of this effort include an easily modified, modular design that allows for changes in experiment requirements. Unique aspects of the experiment package include a flexible circuit used for internal interconnections and a separate enclosure (box in a box) for controlling 1 kW of power for experiment fuel heating requirements. This electronics package was developed as part of the FEANICS (Flow Enclosure Accommodating Novel Investigations in Combustion of Solids) mini-facility which is part of the Fluids and Combustion Facility s Combustion Integrated Rack (CIR). The CIR will be the platform for future microgravity combustion experiments and will reside on the Destiny Module of the International Space Station (ISS). The FEANICS mini-facility will be the primary means for conducting solid fuel combustion experiments in the CIR on ISS. The main focus of many of these solid combustion experiments will be to conduct applied scientific investigations in fire-safety to support NASA s future space missions. A description of the electronics package and the results of functional testing are the subjects of this report. The report concludes that the use of innovative packaging methods combined with readily available COTS hardware can provide a modular electronics package which is easily modified for changing experiment requirements.

  6. The Stern-Gerlach experiment, electron spin and intermediate quantum mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mackintosh, A.R.

    1983-01-01

    The paper deals with the theory of electron spin. The Stern-Gerlach experiment, the anticommutation relations and the properties of spin operators are discussed. The Pauli theory, Dirac transformation theory, the double Stern-Gerlach experiment, the EPR paradox and Bell's inequality are also covered. (U.K.)

  7. Design of a Flexible Hardware Interface for Multiple Remote Electronic practical Experiments of Virtual Laboratory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farah Said

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work is to present a new design of a Flexible Hardware Interface (FHI based on PID control techniques to use in a virtual laboratory. This flexible hardware interface allows the easy implementation of different and multiple remote electronic practical experiments for undergraduate engineering classes. This interface can be viewed as opened hardware architecture to easily develop simple or complex remote experiments in the electronic domain. The philosophy of the use of this interface can also be expanded to many other domains as optic experiments for instance. It is also demonstrated that software can be developed to enable remote measurements of electronic circuits or systems using only Web site Interface. Using standard browsers (such as Internet explorer, Firefox, Chrome or Safari, different students can have a remote access to different practical experiments at a time.

  8. Triggering, front-end electronics, and data acquisition for high-rate beauty experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, M.; Lankford, A.J.

    1988-04-01

    The working group explored the feasibility of building a trigger and an electronics data acquisition system for both collider and fixed target experiments. There appears to be no fundamental technical limitation arising from either the rate or the amount of data for a collider experiment. The fixed target experiments will likely require a much higher rate because of the smaller cross section. Rates up to one event per RF bucket (50 MHz) appear to be feasible. Higher rates depend on the details of the particular experiment and trigger. Several ideas were presented on multiplicity jump and impact parameter triggers for fixed target experiments. 14 refs., 3 figs

  9. Coherent operation of detector systems and their readout electronics in a complex experiment control environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koestner, Stefan [CERN (Switzerland)], E-mail: koestner@mpi-halle.mpg.de

    2009-09-11

    With the increasing size and degree of complexity of today's experiments in high energy physics the required amount of work and complexity to integrate a complete subdetector into an experiment control system is often underestimated. We report here on the layered software structure and protocols used by the LHCb experiment to control its detectors and readout boards. The experiment control system of LHCb is based on the commercial SCADA system PVSS II. Readout boards which are outside the radiation area are accessed via embedded credit card sized PCs which are connected to a large local area network. The SPECS protocol is used for control of the front end electronics. Finite state machines are introduced to facilitate the control of a large number of electronic devices and to model the whole experiment at the level of an expert system.

  10. Retrocausation acting in the single-electron double-slit interference experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hokkyo, Noboru

    The single electron double-slit interference experiment is given a time-symmetric interpretation and visualization in terms of the intermediate amplitude of transition between the particle source and the detection point. It is seen that the retarded (causal) amplitude of the electron wave expanding from the source shows an advanced (retrocausal) bifurcation and merging in passing through the double-slit and converges towards the detection point as if guided by the advanced (retrocausal) wave from the detected electron. An experiment is proposed to confirm the causation-retrocausation symmetry of the electron behavior by observing the insensitivity of the interference pattern to non-magnetic obstacles placed in the shadows of the retarded and advanced waves appearing on the rear and front sides of the double-slit.

  11. Measurements of Plasma Expansion due to Background Gas in the Electron Diffusion Gauge Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morrison, Kyle A.; Paul, Stephen F.; Davidson, Ronald C.

    2003-01-01

    The expansion of pure electron plasmas due to collisions with background neutral gas atoms in the Electron Diffusion Gauge (EDG) experiment device is observed. Measurements of plasma expansion with the new, phosphor-screen density diagnostic suggest that the expansion rates measured previously were observed during the plasma's relaxation to quasi-thermal-equilibrium, making it even more remarkable that they scale classically with pressure. Measurements of the on-axis, parallel plasma temperature evolution support the conclusion

  12. Hot-electron plasma formation and confinement in the Tandem Mirror Experiment-Upgrade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ress, D.B.

    1988-01-01

    Electron-cyclotron range-of-frequency heating (ECRH) at 28 GHz is used to create a population of mirror-confined hot electrons in the Tandem Mirror Experiment-Upgrade (TMX-U). Generation of a large fraction of such electrons within each end-cell of TMX-U is essential to the formation of the desired electrostatic potential profile of the thermal-barrier tandem mirror. The formation and confinement of the ECRH-generated hot-electron plasma was investigated with a variety of diagnostic instruments, including a novel instrumented limiter probe. The author characterized the spatial structure of the hot-electron plasma. Details of the heating process cause the plasma to separate into two regions: a halo, consisting entirely of energetic electrons, and a core, which is dominated by cooler electrons. The plasma structure forms rapidly under the action of second-harmonic ECRH. Fundamental ECRH, which is typically applied simultaneously, is only weakly absorbed and generally does not create energetic electrons. The ECRH-generated plasma displays several loss mechanisms. Hot electrons in the halo region, with T e ∼ 30 keV, are formed by localized ECRH near the plasma boundary, and are lost through a radial process involving open magnetic-curvature-drift surfaces

  13. Searching for TeV cosmic electrons with the CREST experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coutu, S.; Anderson, T.; Bower, C.; Gennaro, J.; Geske, M.; Mueller, D.; Musser, J.; Nutter, S.; Park, N.H.; Schubnell, M.; Tarle, G.; Wakely, S.; Yagi, A.

    2011-01-01

    The Cosmic Ray Electron Synchrotron Telescope (CREST) high-altitude balloon experiment is a pathfinding effort to detect for the first time multi-TeV cosmic-ray electrons. Such would be the markers of nearby cosmic accelerators, as energetic electrons from distant Galactic sources are expected to be depleted by radiative losses during interstellar transport. Electrons will be detected indirectly by the characteristic signature of their geomagnetic synchrotron losses, in the form of a burst of coaligned x-ray photons intersecting the plane of the instrument. Since the primary electron itself need not traverse the payload, an effective detection area is achieved that is several times the nominal 6.4 m 2 instrument. The payload is composed of an array of 1024 BaF2 crystals surrounded by a set of veto scintillator detectors. A long-duration balloon flight in Antarctica is planned for the 2011-12 season.

  14. Searching for TeV cosmic electrons with the CREST experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coutu, S., E-mail: coutu@phys.psu.edu [Department of Physics, Pennsylvania State University, 104 Davey Laboratory, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Anderson, T. [Department of Physics, Pennsylvania State University, 104 Davey Laboratory, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Bower, C. [Physics Department, Indiana University, 117 Swain Hall West, Bloomington, IN 47405 (United States); Gennaro, J. [Department of Physics, University of Michigan, Randall Physics Laboratory, 500 E. University Ave, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Geske, M. [Department of Physics, Pennsylvania State University, 104 Davey Laboratory, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Mueller, D. [Enrico Fermi Institute and Department of Physics, University of Chicago, 933 E. 56th St., Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Musser, J. [Physics Department, Indiana University, 117 Swain Hall West, Bloomington, IN 47405 (United States); Nutter, S. [Department of Physics and Geology, Northern Kentucky University, Highland Heights, KY 41099 (United States); Park, N.H. [Enrico Fermi Institute and Department of Physics, University of Chicago, 933 E. 56th St., Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Schubnell, M.; Tarle, G. [Department of Physics, University of Michigan, Randall Physics Laboratory, 500 E. University Ave, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Wakely, S. [Enrico Fermi Institute and Department of Physics, University of Chicago, 933 E. 56th St., Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Yagi, A. [Department of Physics, University of Michigan, Randall Physics Laboratory, 500 E. University Ave, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States)

    2011-06-15

    The Cosmic Ray Electron Synchrotron Telescope (CREST) high-altitude balloon experiment is a pathfinding effort to detect for the first time multi-TeV cosmic-ray electrons. Such would be the markers of nearby cosmic accelerators, as energetic electrons from distant Galactic sources are expected to be depleted by radiative losses during interstellar transport. Electrons will be detected indirectly by the characteristic signature of their geomagnetic synchrotron losses, in the form of a burst of coaligned x-ray photons intersecting the plane of the instrument. Since the primary electron itself need not traverse the payload, an effective detection area is achieved that is several times the nominal 6.4 m{sup 2} instrument. The payload is composed of an array of 1024 BaF2 crystals surrounded by a set of veto scintillator detectors. A long-duration balloon flight in Antarctica is planned for the 2011-12 season.

  15. Electron beam effects on the spectroscopy of multiply charged ions in plasma focus experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdallah, J.; Clark, R.E.H.; Faenov, A.Y.; Karpinski, L.; Pikuz, S.A.; Romanova, V.M.; Sadowski, M.; Scholz, M.; Szydlowski, A.

    1999-01-01

    Argon-hydrogen mixture plasma focus experiments performed at the Warsaw Institute of Plasma Physics and Laser Microfusion show detailed space resolved spectra for Ar K-shell satellite lines up to F-like Ar and K-alpha of Ar. These transitions originating from autoionizing levels are caused by collisions of ions with the energetic electron beams which are created by the constrictions of the plasma column due to the development of magnetohydrodynamic instabilities. A collisional-radiative model was constructed using a non-Maxwellian electron energy distribution consisting of a thermal Maxwellian part plus a Gaussian part to represent the high-energy electron beam. The shapes of the observed satellite structures are consistent with the calculated spectrum for electron temperatures between 20 and 230 eV, and beam densities of about 10 -3 times the plasma electron density. (Copyright (c) 1999 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  16. Electron beam effects on the spectroscopy of multiply charged ions in plasma focus experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdallah, J. [UCLA Plasma Physics Laboratory, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Clark, R.E.H. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM (United States); Faenov, A.Y. [MISDC, NPO ' VNIIFTRI' , Mendeleevo, Moscow region, 141570 (Russian Federation); Karpinski, L. [Institute of Plasma Physics and Laser Microfusion, Warsaw (Poland); Pikuz, S.A.; Romanova, V.M. [P. N. Lebedev Physical Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation); Sadowski, M. [Soltan Institute for Nuclear Studies, Swierk (Poland); Scholz, M.; Szydlowski, A. [Institute of Plasma Physics and Laser Microfusion, Warsaw (Poland)

    1999-05-01

    Argon-hydrogen mixture plasma focus experiments performed at the Warsaw Institute of Plasma Physics and Laser Microfusion show detailed space resolved spectra for Ar K-shell satellite lines up to F-like Ar and K-alpha of Ar. These transitions originating from autoionizing levels are caused by collisions of ions with the energetic electron beams which are created by the constrictions of the plasma column due to the development of magnetohydrodynamic instabilities. A collisional-radiative model wasconstructed using a non-Maxwellian electron energy distribution consisting of a thermal Maxwellian part plus a Gaussian part to represent the high-energy electron beam. The shapes of the observed satellite structures are consistent with the calculated spectrum for electron temperatures between 20 and 230 eV, and beam densities of about 10{sup -3} times the plasma electron density. (Copyright (c) 1999 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  17. Preparation for electron ring - plasma ring merging experiments in RECE-MERGE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taggart, D.; Sekiguchi, A.; Fleischmann, H.H.

    1986-01-01

    The formation of a mixed-CT using relativistic electron rings and gun-produced plasma rings by MERGE-ing them axially is simulated. This process is similar to the axial stacking of relativistic electron rings in RECE-Christa. The results of their first plasm production experiment are reported here. After study of the gun-produced plasma's properties is completed, the gun will be mounted at the downstream end of the vacuum tank and the source of relativistic electron rings will be at the upstream end. The two rings, formed at opposite ends of the tank, will be translated axially and merged

  18. Test of New Readout Electronics for the BONuS12 Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ehrhart, Mathieu [Inst. de Physique Nucleaire (IPN), Orsay (France)

    2017-07-01

    For decades, electron-proton scattering experiments have been providing a large amount of data on the proton structure function. However, because of the instability of free neutrons, fewer experiments have been able to study the neutron structure function. The BONuS collaboration at Jefferson Laboratory addresses this challenge by scattering electrons off a deuterium target, using a RTPC capable of detecting the low-momentum spectator protons near the target. Events of electrons scattering on almost free neutrons are selected by constraining the spectator protons to very low momenta and very backward scattering angles. In 2005, BONuS successfully measured the neutron structure with scattering electrons of up to 5.3 GeV energy. An extension of this measurement has been approved using the newly upgraded 12 GeV electron beam and CLAS12 (CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer). For this new set of measurements, a new RTPC detector using GEM trackers is being developed to allow measurements of spectator protons with momenta as low as 70 MeV/c. The new RTPC will use a new readout electronic system, which is also used by other trackers in CLAS12. This thesis will present the first tests of this electronics using a previously built RTPC of similar design.

  19. ELECTRON CYCLOTRON CURRENT DRIVE IN DIII-D: EXPERIMENT AND THEORY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PRATER, R; PETTY, CC; LUCE, TC; HARVEY, RW; CHOI, M; LAHAYE, RJ; LIN-LIU, Y-R; LOHR, J; MURAKAMI, M; WADE, MR; WONG, K-L

    2003-01-01

    A271 ELECTRON CYCLOTRON CURRENT DRIVE IN DIII-D: EXPERIMENT AND THEORY. Experiments on the DIII-D tokamak in which the measured off-axis electron cyclotron current drive has been compared systematically to theory over a broad range of parameters have shown that the Fokker-Planck code CQL3D provides an excellent model of the relevant current drive physics. This physics understanding has been critical in optimizing the application of ECCD to high performance discharges, supporting such applications as suppression of neoclassical tearing modes and control and sustainment of the current profile

  20. Mikheyev-Smirnov-Wolfenstein effect in electron-neutrino scattering experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bahcall, J.N.; Gelb, J.M.; Rosen, S.P.

    1987-01-01

    We calculate the influence of resonant neutrino scattering [the Mikheyev-Smirnov-Wolfenstein (MSW) effect] in the Sun and in the Earth on measurable quantities in solar-neutrino--electron scattering experiments. The MSW effect reduces the expected rate for 8 B-neutrino--electron scattering by a factor that ranges from --0.8 to --0.2 if resonant scattering is the correct explanation for the discrepancy between observation and calculation in the /sup 37/Cl experiment. The Earth can produce a significant diurnal effect for certain values of the neutrino mixing angle and mass difference

  1. An analysis of the SCEX 3 ionospheric electron beam injection experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goerke, R.T.

    1992-01-01

    The SCEX 3 experiment (Several Compatible EXperiments using a rocket-borne accelerator) was carried to ionospheric altitudes (375 km) by a Black Brant 11 rocket on February 1, 1990. The experiment was launched from Poker Flat Research Range (65.1 degree N, 147.5 degree W) at 1207 UT. The payload split into two parts (hereafter forward and aft payloads) 116 seconds after launch. The aft payload carried two electron accelerators as well as several diagnostic instruments. The forward payload was ejected at an angle of 6 degree with the magnetic field in a northwesterly direction. This payload carried a multiband plasma wave receiver and various particle detectors to make in situ measurements of the Beam Plasma Interaction (BPI) region. Two Throw Away Detectors (TAD's 1 and 2) were also ejected from the aft payload in the east and west directions respectively. TAD 1 also carried a multiband plasma wave receiver. Preceding the launch an auroral arch along the southern boundary of a diffuse auroral patch suddenly brightened, split into two separate arcs and moved to a position north of the rocket's trajectory. SCEX 3 was launched into an active breakup aurora consisting of tall rays and diffuse patches. The purpose of this experiment were (1) to observe injected electrons reflected from the naturally occurring parallel electric field structures which are thought to accelerate the auroral electron, (2) to observe a variety of plasma effects caused by the artificial electron beam and the associated spacecraft charging, and (3) study the natural phenomena associated with auroral activity. This work is a summary of the interesting observations made by the SCEX 3 experiment. These observations include VHF emissions produced by the electron beam via the Beam Plasma Discharge (BPD), Diffuse resonance emissions by the hot plasma region surrounding the electron beam and auroral Z-mode emissions

  2. Electron Neutrino Charged-Current Quasielastic Scattering in the MINERvA Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolcott, Jeremy [Rochester U.

    2015-10-28

    The electron-neutrino charged-current quasielastic (CCQE) cross section on nuclei is an important input parameter to appearance-type neutrino oscillation experiments. Current experiments typically work from the muon neutrino cross section and apply corrections from theoretical arguments to obtain a prediction for the electron neutrino cross section, but to date there has been no experimental verification of the estimates for this channel at an energy scale appropriate to such experiments. We present the first measurement of an exclusive reaction in few-GeV electron neutrino interactions, namely, the cross section for a CCQE-like process, made using the MINERvA detector. The result is given as differential cross-sections vs. the electron energy, electron angle, and square of the four-momentum transferred to the nucleus, $Q^2$. We also compute the ratio to a muon neutrino cross-section in $Q^2$ from MINERvA. We find satisfactory agreement between this measurement and the predictions of the GENIE generator.

  3. Electron collector and ion species experiments on the LION extractor ion diode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rondeau, G.; Greenly, J.B.; Hammer, D.A.; Horioka, K.; Meyerhofer, D.D.

    1987-01-01

    Studies of the effects of an electron collector on the electron flow in an ion diode and on diode impedance history are being done with an extractor geometry ion diode (B/sub r/ magnetic insulation field) on the LION accelerator (1.5 MV, 4Ω, 40 ns). The collector is a flux-penetrable metal protrusion on the inner radius of the anode that collects electrons. This device increases the diode operating impedance particularly during the later part of the pulse when the diode impedance collapses without the collector. In the present set of experiments, several thin wires are inserted into the anode and allowed to protrude a few millimeters into the A-K gap. These wires are damaged by the electron flow during the pulse and by measuring the length of the remaining wire, the distance of the electron layer from the anode can be inferred. The ion current density is also measured in three radial locations across the diode, giving a measure, through the Child-Langmuir law, of the effective gap spacing between the anode and the electron sheath. A simple model is proposed to account for the scaling of ion current density with the diode voltage observed in the experiment

  4. Opportunities for parity violating electron scattering experiments at the planned MESA facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aulenbacher, Kurt

    2011-11-01

    We suggest to start an accelerator physics project called the Mainz Energy recovering Superconducting Accelerator (MESA) as an extension to our experimental facilities. MESA may allow to introduce an innovative internal target regime based on the ERL principle. A second mode of operation will be to use an external polarized electron beam for parity violating experiments.

  5. Stakeout electronic total station construction layout boring of the experience and precision

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Zhiqiang

    2012-01-01

    Electronic total station can simultaneously measure angle and distance, together with the appropriate calculation methods and operating skills, able to efficiently complete the survey work, this paper based on practical experience, theoretical analysis, based on total station introduced in setting out a few boring in the skills and the measurement of total station in the construction layout for accuracy. (authors)

  6. Development of Ultra Low-Temperature Electronics for the AEgIS Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Kaltenbacher, Thomas; Kellerbauer, Alban; Doser, Michael; Caspers, Friedhelm

    This thesis presents the development of electronics for operation at cryogenic temperatures, with particular emphasis on the cryogenic electronics required for the Antimatter Experiment: Gravity, Interferometry, Spectroscopy (AEgIS) experiment at the European Organisation for Nuclear Research (CERN). The research is focused on a highly sensitive charged particle detection system for a Penning trap, on cryogenic low-pass filters and on a low-loss DC-contact RF switch. The detection system consists of a high quality factor tuned circuit including a superconducting coil, and a low-noise amplifier. Since the experimental setup of the AEgIS experiment requires it, the developed electronics must reliably operate at 4.2 K (~269C) and in high constant magnetic field of more than 1 Tesla. Therefore, the performance of the cryogenic electronic designs were carefully evaluated at low-temperature/high magnetic field, the result of which have important implications for the AEgIS experiment. Moreover, a new possibility of ...

  7. Users' Personal Conceptions of Usability and User Experience of Electronic and Software Products

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haaksma, Tim R.; de Jong, Menno D.T.; Karreman, Joyce

    2018-01-01

    Research problem: Despite the abundance of research into usability and user experience (UX), there is still debate about the relationship between both concepts. The user perspective is underrepresented in all discussions. This study examines the personal conceptions that users of electronic and

  8. Fireworks in noble gas clusters a first experiment with the new "free-electron laser"

    CERN Document Server

    2002-01-01

    An international group of scientists has published first experiments carried out using the new soft X-ray free-electron laser (FEL) at the research center DESY in Hamburg, Germany. Using small clusters of noble gas atoms, for the first time, researchers studied the interaction of matter with intense X-ray radiation from an FEL on extremely short time scales (1 page).

  9. Observation and applications of single-electron charge signals in the XENON100 experiment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aprile, E.; et al., [Unknown; Alfonsi, M.; Colijn, A.P.; Decowski, M.P.

    2014-01-01

    The XENON100 dark matter experiment uses liquid xenon in a time projection chamber (TPC) to measure xenon nuclear recoils resulting from the scattering of dark matter weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs). In this paper, we report the observation of single-electron charge signals which are

  10. Search of prompt electrons in the NA14 photoproduction experiment at the CERN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    de Bouard, G.

    1985-03-01

    The purpose of this thesis is to isolate a prompt electron signal from the data of the NA14 photoproduction experiment at CERN. For that aim, a fast data filtering program has been developed. In order to have a good understanding of the electrons behaviour in the electromagnetic calorimeter, electrons from photon conversion were selected. The observation of events with a reconstructed psi and the sharing between the different psi production mechanism leads to a clear excess of the inelastic process relative to a QCD theoretical expectation. The prompt electrons measurement method, when applied to events obtained from a π - beam, does not give any evidence for a signal. With incident photons, a strong signal is seen which cannot been explained by the Bethe Heitler mechanism and psi production alone. This signal is stronger than the photon-gluon fusion model prediction [fr

  11. Very low frequency valuation of a modulated beam of electrons: an application to the ARAKS experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmadi, L.

    1982-12-01

    The purpose of the ARAKS experiments was to study the effects due to the injection of energy electrons into the aurora zone. Here we analyse the TBF (2, 4 and 6 kHz) signals observed on the basis of interpretations in a closed or radiated field. We show that these signals are of an electromagnetic nature below fsub(HB) = 5 kHz and electrostatic above that figure, that they are correlated with the functioning of the electron cannon and independent of the electrons' angle of attack. They propagate in the electronic hissing mode. At frequencies below fsub(HB), the main contribution comes from the close field, whereas it comes from the radiated field for f greater than fsub(HB) [fr

  12. Neonatal Nurses Experience Unintended Consequences and Risks to Patient Safety With Electronic Health Records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudding, Katherine M; Gephart, Sheila M; Carrington, Jane M

    2018-04-01

    In this article, we examine the unintended consequences of nurses' use of electronic health records. We define these as unforeseen events, change in workflow, or an unanticipated result of implementation and use of electronic health records. Unintended consequences experienced by nurses while using electronic health records have been well researched. However, few studies have focused on neonatal nurses, and it is unclear to what extent unintended consequences threaten patient safety. A new instrument called the Carrington-Gephart Unintended Consequences of Electronic Health Record Questionnaire has been validated, and secondary analysis using the tool explored the phenomena among neonatal nurses (N = 40). The purposes of this study were to describe unintended consequences of use of electronic health records for neonatal nurses and to explore relationships between the phenomena and characteristics of the nurse and the electronic health record. The most frequent unintended consequences of electronic health record use were due to interruptions, followed by a heavier workload due to the electronic health record, changes to the workflow, and altered communication patterns. Neonatal nurses used workarounds most often with motivation to better assist patients. Teamwork was moderately related to higher unintended consequences including patient safety risks (r = 0.427, P = .007), system design (r = 0.419, P = .009), and technology barriers (r = 0.431, P = .007). Communication about patients was reduced when patient safety risks were high (r = -0.437, P = .003). By determining the frequency with which neonatal nurses experience unintended consequences of electronic health record use, future research can be targeted to improve electronic health record design through customization, integration, and refinement to support patient safety and better outcomes.

  13. Low-cost workbench client / server cores for remote experiments in electronics

    OpenAIRE

    José M. M. Ferreira; Americo Dias; Paulo Sousa; Zorica Nedic; Jan Machotka; Ozdemir Gol; Andrew Nafalski

    2010-01-01

    This paper offers an open-source solution to implement low-cost workbenches serving a wide range of remote experiments in electronics. The proposed solution comprises 1) a small (9,65 x 6,1 cm) Linux server board; 2) a server core supporting two TCP/IP communication channels, and general purpose I/O pin drivers to interface the remote experiment hardware; and 3) a client core based on a multi-tab user interface supporting text file management to exchange experiment scripts / status informatio...

  14. Initial experiment of focusing wiggler of MM wave Free Electron Laser on LAX-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakamoto, Keishi; Maebara, Sunao; Watanabe, Akihiko; Kishimoto, Yasuaki; Nagashima, Takashi; Maeda, Hikosuke; Shiho, Makoto; Oda, Hisako; Kawasaki, Sunao.

    1991-03-01

    Initial results of Free Electron laser (FEL) Experiment in the mm wave region are presented. The experiment is carried out using a induction linac system (LAX-1: Large current Accelerator Experiment) of E b = 1 MeV, Ib = 1 ∼ 3 kA. The wiggler of FEL is composed of the curved surface magnets arrays (focusing wiggler), which is found to be effective for a transport of low energy and high current beam through the wiggler. The superradiance of the mm wave region (30 GHz ∼ 40 GHz) is observed. The growth rate of this radiation is 0.42 dB/cm. (author)

  15. Total cross section of furfural by electron impact: Experiment and theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traoré Dubuis, A; Verkhovtsev, A; Ellis-Gibbings, L; Krupa, K; Blanco, F; Jones, D B; Brunger, M J; García, G

    2017-08-07

    We present experimental total cross sections for electron scattering from furfural in the energy range from 10 to 1000 eV, as measured using a double electrostatic analyzer gas cell electron transmission experiment. These results are compared to theoretical data for furfural, as well as to experimental and theoretical values for the structurally similar molecules furan and tetrahydrofuran. The measured total cross section is in agreement with the theoretical results obtained by means of the independent-atom model with screening corrected additivity rule including interference method. In the region of higher electron energies, from 500 eV to 10 keV, the total electron scattering cross section is also estimated using a semi-empirical model based on the number of electrons and dipole polarizabilities of the molecular targets. Together with the recently measured differential and integral cross sections, and the furfural energy-loss spectra, the present total cross section data nearly complete the data set that is required for numerical simulation of low-energy electron processes in furfural, covering the range of projectile energies from a few electron volts up to 10 keV.

  16. Total cross section of furfural by electron impact: Experiment and theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traoré Dubuis, A.; Verkhovtsev, A.; Ellis-Gibbings, L.; Krupa, K.; Blanco, F.; Jones, D. B.; Brunger, M. J.; García, G.

    2017-08-01

    We present experimental total cross sections for electron scattering from furfural in the energy range from 10 to 1000 eV, as measured using a double electrostatic analyzer gas cell electron transmission experiment. These results are compared to theoretical data for furfural, as well as to experimental and theoretical values for the structurally similar molecules furan and tetrahydrofuran. The measured total cross section is in agreement with the theoretical results obtained by means of the independent-atom model with screening corrected additivity rule including interference method. In the region of higher electron energies, from 500 eV to 10 keV, the total electron scattering cross section is also estimated using a semi-empirical model based on the number of electrons and dipole polarizabilities of the molecular targets. Together with the recently measured differential and integral cross sections, and the furfural energy-loss spectra, the present total cross section data nearly complete the data set that is required for numerical simulation of low-energy electron processes in furfural, covering the range of projectile energies from a few electron volts up to 10 keV.

  17. Low-energy particle experiments-electron analyzer (LEPe) onboard the Arase spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazama, Yoichi; Wang, Bo-Jhou; Wang, Shiang-Yu; Ho, Paul T. P.; Tam, Sunny W. Y.; Chang, Tzu-Fang; Chiang, Chih-Yu; Asamura, Kazushi

    2017-12-01

    In this report, we describe the low-energy electron instrument LEPe (low-energy particle experiments-electron analyzer) onboard the Arase (ERG) spacecraft. The instrument measures a three-dimensional distribution function of electrons with energies of ˜ 19 eV-19 keV. Electrons in this energy range dominate in the inner magnetosphere, and measurement of such electrons is important in terms of understanding the magnetospheric dynamics and wave-particle interaction. The instrument employs a toroidal tophat electrostatic energy analyzer with a passive 6-mm aluminum shield. To minimize background radiation effects, the analyzer has a background channel, which monitors counts produced by background radiation. Background counts are then subtracted from measured counts. Electronic components are radiation tolerant, and 5-mm-thick shielding of the electronics housing ensures that the total dose is less than 100 kRad for the one-year nominal mission lifetime. The first in-space measurement test was done on February 12, 2017, showing that the instrument functions well. On February 27, the first all-instrument run test was done, and the LEPe instrument measured an energy dispersion event probably related to a substorm injection occurring immediately before the instrument turn-on. These initial results indicate that the instrument works fine in space, and the measurement performance is good for science purposes.[Figure not available: see fulltext.

  18. Hot electron plasma equilibrium and stability in the Constance B mirror experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Xing.

    1988-04-01

    An experimental study of the equilibrium and macroscopic stability property of an electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH) generated plasma in a minimum-B mirror is presented. The Constance B mirror is a single cell quadrupole magnetic mirror in which high beta (β ≤ 0.3) hot electron plasmas (T/sub e/≅400 keV) are created with up to 4 kW of ECRH power. The plasma equilibrium profile is hollow and resembles the baseball seam geometry of the magnet which provides the confining magnetic field. This configuration coincides with the drift orbit of deeply trapped particles. The on-axis hollowness of the hot electron density profile is 50 /+-/ 10%, and the pressure profile is at least as hollow as, if not more than, the hot electron density profile. The hollow plasma equilibrium is macroscopically stable and generated in all the experimental conditions in which the machine has been operated. Small macroscopic plasma fluctuations in the range of the hot electron curvature drift frequency sometimes occur but their growth rate is small (ω/sub i//ω/sub r/ ≤ 10 -2 ) and saturate at very low level (δB//bar B/ ≤ 10 -3 ). Particle drift reversal is predicted to occur for the model pressure profile which best fits the experimental data under the typical operating conditions. No strong instability is observed when the plasma is near the drift reversal parameter regime, despite a theoretical prediction of instability under such conditions. The experiment shows that the cold electron population has no stabilizing effect to the hot electrons, which disagrees with current hot electron stability theories and results of previous maximum-B experiments. A theoretical analysis using MHD theory shows that the compressibility can stabilize a plasma with a hollowness of 20--30% in the Constance B mirror well. 57 refs

  19. Theory and simulation of an inverse free-electron laser experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gou, S. K.; Bhattacharjee, A.; Fang, J.-M.; Marshall, T. C.

    1997-03-01

    An experimental demonstration of the acceleration of electrons using a high-power CO2 laser interacting with a relativistic electron beam moving along a wiggler has been carried out at the Accelerator Test Facility of the Brookhaven National Laboratory [Phys. Rev. Lett. 77, 2690 (1996)]. The data generated by this inverse free-electron-laser (IFEL) experiment are studied by means of theory and simulation. Included in the simulations are such effects as: a low-loss metallic waveguide with a dielectric coating on the walls; multi-mode coupling due to self-consistent interaction between the electrons and the optical wave; space charge; energy spread of the electrons; and arbitrary wiggler-field profile. Two types of wiggler profile are considered: a linear taper of the period, and a step-taper of the period. (The period of the wiggler is ˜3 cm, its magnetic field is ˜1 T, and the wiggler length is 0.47 m.) The energy increment of the electrons (˜1-2%) is analyzed in detail as a function of laser power, wiggler parameters, and the initial beam energy (˜40 MeV). At a laser power level ˜0.5 Gw, the simulation results on energy gain are in reasonable agreement with the experimental results. Preliminary results on the electron energy distribution at the end of the IFEL are presented. Whereas the experiment produces a near-monotone distribution of electron energies with the peak shifted to higher energy, the simulation shows a more structured and non-monotonic distribution at the end of the wiggler. Effects that may help reconcile these differences are considered.

  20. The determination of electron momentum densities by inelastic scattering gamma-ray-electron coincidence measurements: The (γ,eγ)-experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rollason, A.J.; Bell, F.; Schneider, J.R.

    1989-09-01

    Measurements have been made of the recoiling electron in 320 keV gamma ray inelastic scattering collisions in thin aluminium targets. The angular correlation of these electrons detected in coincidence with the scattered photon is in agreement with the kinematic requirements of the Compton effect and is correctly predicted by Monte Carlo simulations based on the impulse approximation. Further simulations of ideal-geometry experiments indicate that information about the initial electron momenta is available from an examination of those electron-photon events originating in a surface layer of one electronic mean free path depth and that elastic scattering of the recoil electrons from greater depths produces a nearly flat background to this signal. The results clearly demonstrate the feasibility of the (γ,eγ) experiment for studying electron momentum densities with synchrotron radiation. (orig.) With 23 refs., 17 figs

  1. ESR Experiments on a Single Donor Electron in Isotopically Enriched Silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tracy, Lisa; Luhman, Dwight; Carr, Stephen; Borchardt, John; Bishop, Nathaniel; Ten Eyck, Gregory; Pluym, Tammy; Wendt, Joel; Witzel, Wayne; Blume-Kohout, Robin; Nielsen, Erik; Lilly, Michael; Carroll, Malcolm

    In this talk we will discuss electron spin resonance experiments in single donor silicon qubit devices fabricated at Sandia National Labs. A self-aligned device structure consisting of a polysilicon gate SET located adjacent to the donor is used for donor electron spin readout. Using a cryogenic HEMT amplifier next to the silicon device, we demonstrate spin readout at 100 kHz bandwidth and Rabi oscillations with 0.96 visibility. Electron spin resonance measurements on these devices show a linewidth of 30 kHz and coherence times T2* = 10 us and T2 = 0.3 ms. We also discuss estimates of the fidelity of our donor electron spin qubit measurements using gate set tomography. This work was performed, in part, at the Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies, a U.S. DOE Office of Basic Energy Sciences user facility. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed-Martin Company, for the U. S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC04-94AL85000. ESR Experiments on a Single Donor Electron in Isotopically Enriched Silicon.

  2. Dosimetry of laser-accelerated electron beams used for in vitro cell irradiation experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richter, C.; Kaluza, M.; Karsch, L.; Schlenvoigt, H.-P.; Schürer, M.; Sobiella, M.; Woithe, J.; Pawelke, J.

    2011-01-01

    The dosimetric characterization of laser-accelerated electrons applied for the worldwide first systematic radiobiological in vitro cell irradiation will be presented. The laser-accelerated electron beam at the JeTi laser system has been optimized, monitored and controlled in terms of dose homogeneity, stability and absolute dose delivery. A combination of different dosimetric components were used to provide both an online beam as well as dose monitoring and a precise absolute dosimetry. In detail, the electron beam was controlled and monitored by means of an ionization chamber and an in-house produced Faraday cup for a defined delivery of the prescribed dose. Moreover, the precise absolute dose delivered to each cell sample was determined by an radiochromic EBT film positioned in front of the cell sample. Furthermore, the energy spectrum of the laser-accelerated electron beam was determined. As presented in a previous work of the authors, also for laser-accelerated protons a precise dosimetric characterization was performed that enabled initial radiobiological cell irradiation experiments with laser-accelerated protons. Therefore, a precise dosimetric characterization, optimization and control of laser-accelerated and therefore ultra-short pulsed, intense particle beams for both electrons and protons is possible, allowing radiobiological experiments and meeting all necessary requirements like homogeneity, stability and precise dose delivery. In order to fulfill the much higher dosimetric requirements for clinical application, several improvements concerning, i.e., particle energy and spectral shaping as well as patient safety are necessary.

  3. Studies of improved electron confinement in low density L-mode National Spherical Torus Experiment discharges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stutman, D.; Finkenthal, M.; Tritz, K.; Redi, M. H.; Kaye, S. M.; Bell, M. G.; Bell, R. E.; LeBlanc, B. P.; Hill, K. W.; Medley, S. S.; Menard, J. E.; Rewoldt, G.; Wang, W. X.; Synakowski, E. J.; Levinton, F.; Kubota, S.; Bourdelle, C.; Dorland, W.; The NSTX Team

    2006-01-01

    Electron transport is rapid in most National Spherical Torus Experiment, M. Ono et al., Nucl. Fusion 40, 557 (2000) beam heated plasmas. A regime of improved electron confinement is nevertheless observed in low density L-mode (''low-confinement'') discharges heated by early beam injection. Experiments were performed in this regime to study the role of the current profile on thermal transport. Variations in the magnetic shear profile were produced by changing the current ramp rate and onset of neutral beam heating. An increased electron temperature gradient and local minimum in the electron thermal diffusivity were observed at early times in plasmas with the fastest current ramp and earliest beam injection. In addition, an increased ion temperature gradient associated with a region of reduced ion transport is observed at slightly larger radii. Ultrasoft x-ray measurements of double-tearing magnetohydrodynamic activity, together with current diffusion calculations, point to the existence of negative magnetic shear in the core of these plasmas. Discharges with slower current ramp and delayed beam onset, which are estimated to have more monotonic q-profiles, do not exhibit regions of reduced transport. The results are discussed in the light of the initial linear microstability assessment of these plasmas, which suggests that the growth rate of all instabilities, including microtearing modes, can be reduced by negative or low magnetic shear in the temperature gradient region. Several puzzles arising from the present experiments are also highlighted

  4. Electron cooling application for luminosity preservation in an experiment with internal targets at COSY

    CERN Document Server

    Meshkov, I N; Maier, R; Prasuhn, D; Sidorin, A O; Smirnov, A V; Stein, H J; Stockhorst, H; Trubnikov, G V

    2003-01-01

    This report is an investigation of the beam parameter evolution in the experiments with internal target. In calculations of the proton and deuteron beams we concentrated on cluster, atomic beam, storage cell and pellet targets at ANKE experiment mainly. In these calculations electron and stochastic cooling, intrabeam scattering, scattering on the target and residual gas atoms are taken into account. Beam parameter evolution is investigated in the long-term time scale, up to one hour, at different beam energies in the range from 1.0 to 2.7 GeV for proton beam and from 1 to 2.11 GeV for deuteron beam. The results of numerical simulations of the proton and deuteron beam parameters at different energies obtained using new version of BETACOOL program (elaborated at the first stage of this work [1]) are presented. Optimum parameters of the electron cooling system are estimated. The COSY experiment requirements can be satisfied even when electron cooling time is rather long. That allows to apply an electron cooling ...

  5. Design of simulated nuclear electronics laboratory experiments based on IAEA-TECDOC-530 on pcs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghousia, S.F.; Nadeem, M.; Khaleeq, M.T.

    2002-05-01

    In this IAEA project, PK-11089 (Design of Simulated Nuclear Electronics Laboratory Experiments based on IAEA-TECDOC-530 on PCs), a software package consisting of Computer-Simulated Laboratory Experiments on Nuclear Electronics compatible with the IAEA-TECDOC-530 (Nuclear Electronics Laboratory Manual) has been developed in OrCAD 9.0 (an electronic circuit simulation software environment) as a self-training aid. The software process model employed in this project is the Feedback Waterfall model with some Rapid Application Model. The project work is completed in the five phases of the SDLC, (all of them have been fully completed) which includes the Requirement Definition, Phase, System and Software Design, Implementation and Unit testing, Integration and System-testing phase and the Operation and Maintenance phase. A total of 125 circuits are designed in 39 experiments from Power Supplies, Analog circuits, Digital circuits and Multi-channel analyzer sections. There is another set of schematic designs present in the package, which contains faulty circuits. This set is designed for the learners to exercise the troubleshooting. The integration and system-testing phase was carried out simultaneously. The Operation and Maintenance phase has been implemented by accomplishing it through some trainees and some undergraduate engineering students by allowing them to play with the software independently. (author)

  6. Rotatable spin-polarized electron source for inverse-photoemission experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stolwijk, S. D.; Wortelen, H.; Schmidt, A. B.; Donath, M.

    2014-01-01

    We present a ROtatable Spin-polarized Electron source (ROSE) for the use in spin- and angle-resolved inverse-photoemission (SR-IPE) experiments. A key feature of the ROSE is a variable direction of the transversal electron beam polarization. As a result, the inverse-photoemission experiment becomes sensitive to two orthogonal in-plane polarization directions, and, for nonnormal electron incidence, to the out-of-plane polarization component. We characterize the ROSE and test its performance on the basis of SR-IPE experiments. Measurements on magnetized Ni films on W(110) serve as a reference to demonstrate the variable spin sensitivity. Moreover, investigations of the unoccupied spin-dependent surface electronic structure of Tl/Si(111) highlight the capability to analyze complex phenomena like spin rotations in momentum space. Essentially, the ROSE opens the way to further studies on complex spin-dependent effects in the field of surface magnetism and spin-orbit interaction at surfaces

  7. Cost effective electronics for proportional and drift chambers of 'EPECUR' experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alekseev, I.G.; Andreev, V.A.; Budkovsky, P.E.; Filimonov, E.A.; Golubev, V.V.; Kanavets, V.P.; Kats, M.M.; Koroleva, L.I.; Kovalev, A.I.; Kozlenko, N.G.; Kozlov, V.S.; Krivshich, A.G.; Kulikov, V.V.; Morozov, B.V.; Nesterov, V.M.; Novinsky, D.V.; Ryltsov, V.V.; Sadler, M.E.; Sakharov, V.A.; Soboyede, D.; Sulimov, A.D.; Sumachev, V.V.; Svirida, D.N.; Trautman, V.Yu.; Walker, E.; Watson, S.

    2007-01-01

    The 'EPECUR' experimental setup is under construction at beam line 322 of the ITEP proton synchrotron. The experiment requires several large area drift chambers to provide reasonable acceptance and fine-pitch proportional chambers for beam particle tracking. The total number of electronic channels is about 7000. A new compact and cost effective readout system for these gaseous detectors was designed, prototyped and tested in the last two years. It is based on modern technologies in analog and digital electronics and data transfer protocols. This paper presents the functional description of the whole DAQ system, including test results as an illustration of its performance

  8. Conversion-electron experiment to characterize the decay of the 237Np shape isomer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henry, E.A.; Becker, J.A.; Bauer, R.W.; Gardner, D.G.; Decman, D.J.; Meyer, R.A.; Roy, N.; Sale, K.E.

    1987-01-01

    Conversion electrons from the decay of low-lying levels of 237 Np have been measured to detect the population of these levels by gamma-ray decay of the 237 Np shape isomer. Analysis of the 208-keV transition L conversion-electron peak gives an upper limit of about 17 μb for the population of the 3/2 - 267-keV level in 237 Np from the shape isomer decay. Model calculations are compared with the measured limit. Improvements are suggested for this experiment. 9 refs., 4 figs

  9. Experiments on ion space-charge neutralization with pulsed electron beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herleb, U; Riege, H [CERN LHC-Division, Geneva (Switzerland)

    1997-12-31

    The method of space-charge neutralization of heavy ion beams with electron beam pulses generated with electron guns incorporating ferroelectric cathodes was investigated experimentally. Several experiments are described, the results of which prove that the intensity of selected ion beam parts with defined charge states generated in a laser ion source can be increased by an order of magnitude. For elevated charge states the intensity amplification is more significant and may reach a factor of 4 for highly charged ions from an Al target. (author). 7 figs., 3 -refs.

  10. Wave excitation in electron beam experiment on Japanese satellite JIKIKEN (EXOS-B)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawashima, N.

    1982-01-01

    Beam-plasma interaction experiment has been made in the magnetosphere by emitting an electron beam (100-200 eV, 0.25-1.0 mA) from the satellite JIKIKEN (EXOS-B). Various types of wave emission are detected by LF and HF wave detectors. Waves near at upper-hybrid frequency and at electron cyclotron frequency are detected in a low L-value region, which will be useful diagnostic means for plasma density and magnetic field. Vehicle charging up to the beam energy is also observed outside the plasmapause

  11. Tester of the TRT front-end electronics for the ATLAS-experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Hajduk, Z; Kisielewski, B; Kotarba, A; Malecki, P; Natkaniec, Z; Olszowska, J; Ostrowicz, W; Krupinska, G

    2000-01-01

    The VME based tester for front-end electronics of the TRT (Transition Radiation Tracker) detector of the ATLAS-LHC experiment at CERN, Geneva, is described. The TRT read-out electronics for 424576 proportional tubes grouped on many thousands of cards requires stringent quality control after assembly and during installation. The tester provides all required data, pulses, timing and power supplies for tested cards. The essential part of the tester is its software that allows for device handling as well as facilitates functional and statistical tests. The prototype, present design as well as the new design for mass production tests are discussed. (17 refs).

  12. Electron-nucleon scattering experiments in the GeV range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glawe, U.B.

    1980-01-01

    In the framework of this thesis a computer code systems was developed which describes the inclusive electron scattering on bound nucleons in the impact approximation. It could be shown that the structure functions for the quasi-free scattering can be represented as an incoherent superposition of the structure functions of the free processes. The structure functions of the free processes were determined from experimental cross sections. From the comparison of the calculations with electron scattering experiments on the nuclei 6 Li, 9 Be, 12 C, 27 Al, and 28 Si in the kinematic range 0.0 2 2 and W [de

  13. Experiments on the nuclear interactions of pion and electrons. Final progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minehart, R.C.

    1998-05-01

    The work in this report is grouped into four categories. (1) The experiments in pion nucleus physics were primarily studies of pion absorption and scattering in light nuclei, carried out at the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF). (2) The experiments on fundamental particle properties were carried out at LAMPF and at the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI) in Switzerland, the pion-beta decay experiment is still under construction and will begin taking data in 1999. (3) The experiments in electro-nuclear physics were performed at the Stanford Linear Electron Accelerator (SLAC), at the Saclay Laboratory in France, at the LEGS facility at the Brookhaven National Laboratory, and at the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) at the Jefferson Laboratory. These experiments relate mainly to the question of the role of longitudinal and transverse strength for inelastic scattering from nuclei, measurements of fundamental nuclear properties with tagged polarized photons, and to the quark structure of the nucleon and its excited states. (4) Experiments on absorption of antiprotons in heavy nuclei, were carried out by K. Ziock primarily while on a sabbatical leave in Munich, Germany

  14. Internal electron transport barrier due to neoclassical ambipolarity in the Helically Symmetric Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lore, J.; Briesemeister, A.; Anderson, D. T.; Anderson, F. S. B.; Likin, K. M.; Talmadge, J. N.; Zhai, K.; Guttenfelder, W.; Deng, C. B.; Spong, D. A.

    2010-01-01

    Electron cyclotron heated plasmas in the Helically Symmetric Experiment (HSX) feature strongly peaked electron temperature profiles; central temperatures are 2.5 keV with 100 kW injected power. These measurements, coupled with neoclassical predictions of large 'electron root' radial electric fields with strong radial shear, are evidence of a neoclassically driven thermal transport barrier. Neoclassical transport quantities are calculated using the PENTA code [D. A. Spong, Phys. Plasmas 12, 056114 (2005)], in which momentum is conserved and parallel flow is included. Unlike a conventional stellarator, which exhibits strong flow damping in all directions on a flux surface, quasisymmetric stellarators are free to rotate in the direction of symmetry, and the effect of momentum conservation in neoclassical calculations may therefore be significant. Momentum conservation is shown to modify the neoclassical ion flux and ambipolar ion root radial electric fields in the quasisymmetric configuration. The effect is much smaller in a HSX configuration where the symmetry is spoiled. In addition to neoclassical transport, a model of trapped electron mode turbulence is used to calculate the turbulent-driven electron thermal diffusivity. Turbulent transport quenching due to the neoclassically predicted radial electric field profile is needed in predictive transport simulations to reproduce the peaking of the measured electron temperature profile [Guttenfelder et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 101, 215002 (2008)].

  15. Intense ion beam transport in magnetic quadrupoles: Experiments on electron and gas effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seidl, P.A.; Molvik, A.W.; Bieniosek, F.M.; Cohen, R.H.; Faltens, A.; Friedman, A.; Kireef Covo, M.; Lund, S.M.; Prost, L.; Vay, J-L.

    2004-01-01

    Heavy-ion induction linacs for inertial fusion energy and high-energy density physics have an economic incentive to minimize the clearance between the beam edge and the aperture wall. This increases the risk from electron clouds and gas desorbed from walls. We have measured electron and gas emission from 1 MeV K + incident on surfaces near grazing incidence on the High-Current Experiment (HCX) at LBNL. Electron emission coefficients reach values >100, whereas gas desorption coefficients are near 10 4 . Mitigation techniques are being studied: A bead-blasted rough surface reduces electron emission by a factor of 10 and gas desorption by a factor of 2. We also discuss the results of beam transport (of 0.03-0.18 A K + ) through four pulsed room-temperature magnetic quadrupoles in the HCX at LBNL. Diagnostics are installed on HCX, between and within quadrupole magnets, to measure the beam halo loss, net charge and expelled ions, from which we infer gas density, electron trapping, and the effects of mitigation techniques. A coordinated theory and computational effort has made significant progress towards a self-consistent model of positive-ion beam and electron dynamics. We are beginning to compare experimental and theoretical results

  16. Results and analysis of the TMX electron-beam injection experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poulsen, P.; Grubb, D.P.

    1980-01-01

    Electron beams (e-beams) were injected into the Tandem Mirror Experiment (TMX) plasma in order to investigate the effect on the ion cyclotron fluctuations of the plasma. The power level of the e-beams was comparable to that of the injected neutral beams. It was found that injection of the e-beams produced no significant effect on the ion cyclotron fluctuations, the measured plasma parameters, or the particle and power flow of the plasma. The increase in bulk electron temperature and the production of mirror-confined electrons found in previous experiments in which e-beams were injected into a mirror-confined plasma were not observed in this experiment. Analysis of the regions and frequencies of wave creation and absorption within the plasma shows that the plasma density and magnetic field profiles through the plasma strongly affect the resonances encountered by the waves. The steep axial density profiles produced by neutral-beam injection in the TMX experiment are not conducive to efficient coupling of the e-beam energy to the plasma

  17. Scex 3 and Electron Echo 7, a Comparison of Data from Two Rocket Experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bale, Stuart Douglas

    Results from two separate active sounding rocket experiments are presented and discussed. The SCEX III sounding rocket (NASA 39.002 UE) and Electron Echo 7 (NASA 36.015) were both launched from the Poker Flat Research Range (65.1^circ N, 147.5^circ W) near Fairbanks, Alaska, on 1 February, 1990 and 9 February, 1988, respectively. Each payload was equipped with an electron accelerator to study both natural and beam-related plasma phenomena. Data from the SCEX III retarding potential analyzer (RPA) and 3805 A and 3914 A photometers show evidence of a plasma discharge process occurring concomitant with operation of the electron gun. This appears as an enhanced electron current, nonlinear with gun injection current, in the RPA. The photometers register a sharp increase in luminosity during full current electron injection. This luminosity is an indicator of the ionizing electron-neutral collisions which liberate electrons and lead to the cascade-type discharge process. These observations are used to attempt to infer the mechanism of electron acceleration which leads to the discharge process. Before the electron gun was activated, the SCEX III payload flew through a region of auroral activity as evidenced by ground-based all-sky TV and energetic particle flux in the forward payload RPA. During this time, low frequency (10 Hz) electrostatic waves were observed in the DC receivers and Langmuir probe instrument. This data is analyzed, with a cross-spectral technique, and an approximate wave number is inferred. Comparison with theory suggests that the observed wave is the electrostatic ion cyclotron mode (EIC) operating on a heavy ion species (NO or O _2). The Echo 7 nose payload, carrying a plasma wave receiver, was ejected upfield of the main electron gun -equipped payload. Data from the swept frequency analyzer experiment provide wave amplitudes, at frequencies up to 15 MHz, as a function of separation of the main and nose payloads. These observations, and the wave modes

  18. Ring recognition and electron identification in the RICH detector of the CBM experiment at FAIR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lebedev, S; Hoehne, C; Ososkov, G

    2010-01-01

    The Compressed Baryonic Matter (CBM) experiment at the future FAIR facility at Darmstadt will measure dileptons emitted from the hot and dense phase in heavy-ion collisions. In case of an electron measurement, a high purity of identified electrons is required in order to suppress the background. Electron identification in CBM will be performed by a Ring Imaging Cherenkov (RICH) detector and Transition Radiation Detectors (TRD). In this contribution we will present algorithms and software which have been developed for electron identification in CBM. Efficient and fast ring recognition in the RICH detector is based on the Hough Transform method which has been accelerated considerably compared to a standard implementation. Ring quality selection is done using an Artificial Neural Network which also has been used for electron identification. Due to optical distortions ellipse fitting and radius corre ction routines are used for improved ring radius resolution. These methods allow for a high purity and efficiency of reconstructed electron rings. For momenta above 2 GeV/c the ring reconstruction efficiency for electrons embedded in central Au+Au collisions at 25 AGeV beam energy is 95% resulting in an electron identification efficiency of 90% at a pion suppression factor of 500. Including information from the TRD a pion suppression of 10 4 is reached at 80% efficiency. The developed algorithm is very robust to a high ring density environment. Current work focusses on detector layout studies in order to optimize the detector setup while keeping a high performance. All developed algorithms were tested on large statistics of simulated events and are included into the CBM software framework for common use.

  19. ``High energy Electron exPeriment (HEP)'' onboard the ERG satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitani, T.; Takashima, T.; Kasahara, S.; Miyake, W.; Hirahara, M.

    2017-12-01

    The Exploration of energization and Radiation in Geospace (ERG) satellite was successfully launched on December 20, 2016, and now explores how relativistic electrons in the radiation belts are generated during space storms. "High energy Electron exPeriment (HEP)" onboard the ERG satellite observes 70 keV - 2 MeV electrons and provides three-dimensional velocity distribution of electrons every spacecraft spin period. Electrons are observed by two types of camera designs, HEP-L and HEP-H, with regard to geometrical factor and energy range. HEP-L observes 0.1 - 1 MeV electrons and its geometrical factor (G-factor) is 10-3 cm2 str, and HEP-H observes 0.7 - 2 MeV and G-factor is 10-2 cm2 str. HEP-L and HEP-H each consist of three pin-hole type cameras, and each camera consist of mechanical collimator, stacked silicon semiconductor detectors and readout ASICs. HEP-H has larger opening angle of the collimator and more silicon detectors to observe higher energy electrons than HEP-L. The initial checkout in orbit was carried out in February 2017 and it was confirmed that there was no performance degradation by comparing the results of the initial checkout in orbit and the prelaunch function tests. Since late March, HEP has carried out normal observation. HEP observed losses and recovery of the outer radiation belt electrons several times up to now. In this presentation we introduce the HEP instrument design, prelaunch tests results and report the initial results in orbit.

  20. aCORN: An experiment to measure the electron-antineutrino correlation in neutron decay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wietfeldt, F.E., E-mail: few@tulane.ed [Department of Physics, Tulane University, New Orleans, LA 70118 (United States); Byrne, J. [University of Sussex (United Kingdom); Collett, B. [Physics Department, Hamilton College, Clinton, NY 13323 (United States); Dewey, M.S. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD 20899 (United States); Jones, G.L. [Physics Department, Hamilton College, Clinton, NY 13323 (United States); Komives, A. [Physics Department, DePauw University, Greencastle, IN 46135 (United States); Laptev, A. [Department of Physics, Tulane University, New Orleans, LA 70118 (United States); Nico, J.S. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD 20899 (United States); Noid, G.; Stephenson, E.J. [Indiana University Cyclotron Facility, Bloomington, IN 47408 (United States); Stern, I.; Trull, C. [Department of Physics, Tulane University, New Orleans, LA 70118 (United States); Yerozolimsky, B.G. [Physics Department, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States)

    2009-12-11

    The aCORN experiment is designed to make a precision (<1%) measurement of the electron-antineutrino angular correlation (a-coefficient) in neutron beta decay. It uses a new method proposed in 1996 by Yerozolimsky and Mostovoy. Electrons and recoil protons from neutron decay in a cold beam are detected in coincidence. The momenta of the particles are selected so that the protons form two kinematically distinct time-of-flight groups as a function of electron energy. The count rate asymmetry in these two groups is proportional to the a-coefficient. Precision spectroscopy of the protons is not required. The apparatus is currently under construction. It will be integrated and tested at the Indiana University Cyclotron Facility (IUCF) and then moved to the NIST Center for Neutron Research for the initial physics run.

  1. Recent Operating Experience involving Power Electronics Failure in Korea Nuclear Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jaedo

    2015-01-01

    Recently, modern power electronics devices for electrical component were steadily increased in electrical systems which used for main power control and protection. To upgrade the system reliability we recommended the redundancy for electrical equipment trip system. The past several years, Korean Nuclear power plants have changed the electrical control and protection systems (Auto Voltage Regulator, Power Protection Relay) for main generator and main power protection relay systems. In this paper we deal with operating experience involving modern solid state power electronics failure in Korean nuclear power plants. One of the failures we will discuss the degraded phenomenon of power electronics device for CEDMCS(Control Element Drive Mechanism Control System). As the result of the failure we concerned about the modification for trip source of main generator excitation systems and others. We present an interesting issue for modern solid state devices (IGBT, Thyristors). (authors)

  2. Possibility of experiments using radiation counters for test electron stability and Pauli principle violation in atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barabash, A.S.

    1989-01-01

    Capabilities of modern radiation detectors for investigation into electron stability and possible violation of Pauli principle in atoms are discussed. For experimental searches of electron instability the following low-background devices are used: scintillation NaI-detectors, semiconducting detectors of enriched germanium, emission chamber, multisection proportional counter and low-temperature detectors. It is ascertained that using modern low-background devices applying the earlier enumerated detectors, it is possible to achieve sensitivity of the order of 10 24 -10 25 years for the electron lifetime relatively to its decay and Pauli principle violation in atoms. Experiments with sensitivity of ∼ 10 26 -10 27 can be realized in massive low-temperature detectors, developed for neutrino physics. 28 refs; 1 fig

  3. Direct determination of exciton wavefunction amplitudes by the momentum-resolved photo-electron emission experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohnishi, Hiromasa; Tomita, Norikazu; Nasu, Keiichiro

    2018-03-01

    We study conceptional problems of a photo-electron emission (PEE) process from a free exciton in insulating crystals. In this PEE process, only the electron constituting the exciton is suddenly emitted out of the crystal, while the hole constituting the exciton is still left inside and forced to be recoiled back to its original valence band. This recoil on the hole is surely reflected in the spectrum of the PEE with a statistical distribution along the momentum-energy curve of the valence band. This distribution is nothing but the square of the exciton wavefunction amplitude, since it shows how the electron and the hole are originally bound together. Thus, the momentum-resolved PEE can directly determine the exciton wavefunction. These problems are clarified, taking the Γ and the saddle point excitons in GaAs, as typical examples. New PEE experiments are also suggested.

  4. A study of microwave interferometers for electron density measurements in REB-plasma experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saxena, A.C.; Paithankar, A.S.; Iyyengar, S.K.; Rohatgi, V.K.

    1981-01-01

    In order to select a suitable microwave interferometer for electron density measurements in Relativistic Electron Beam (REB)-Plasma Experiments, a study has been carried out of four types of interferometers, viz. simple interferometer, standing-wave interferometer, frequency and phase modulated interferometers. Various direct reading interferometers which give a voltage proportional to the phase shift, are also discussed. Systems have been analysed in terms of time resolution, phase sensitivity, system stability, ease of measurement etc. Theoretical and experimental limitations of various systems have been indicated. Summary of the various systems is presented in a table to aid the experimentalist to select the most appropriate system for the prevailina experimental conditions. Finally, an attempt has been made to find out the interferometer system best suited for REB-Plasma Experiments. (author)

  5. Low-cost electron-gun pulser for table-top maser experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grinberg, V.; Jerby, E.; Shahadi, A.

    1995-04-01

    A simple 10 kV electron-gun pulser for small-scale maser experiments is presented. This low-cost pulser has operated successfully in various table-top cyclotron-resonance maser (CRM) and free-electron maser (FEM) experiments. It consists of a low-voltage capacitor bank, an SCR control circuit and a transformer bank (car ignition coils) connected directly to the e-gun. The pulser produces a current of 3 A at 10 kV voltage in a Gaussian like shape of 1 ms pulse width. The voltage sweep during the pulse provides a useful tool to locate resonances of CRM and FEM interactions. Analytical expressions for the pulser design and experimental measurements are presented.

  6. An experiment to measure the electron neutrino mass using a cryogenic tritium source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fackler, O.; Jeziorski, B.; Kolos, W.; Monkhorst, H.; Mugge, M.; Sticker, H.; Szalewicz, K.; White, R.M.; Woerner, R.

    1985-01-01

    An experiment has been performed to determine the electron neutrino mass with the precision of a few eV by measuring the tritium beta decay energy distribution near the endpoint. Key features of the experiment are a 2 eV resolution electrostatic spectrometer and a high-activity frozen tritium source. It is important that the source have electronic wavefunctions which can be accurately calculated. These calculations have been made for tritium and the HeT + daughter ion and allow determination of branching fractions to 0.1% and energy of the excited states to 0.1 eV. The excited final molecular state calculations and the experimental apparatus are discussed. 4 refs., 5 figs

  7. Optical transition radiation measurements for the Los Alamos and Boeing Free-Electron Laser experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lumpkin, A.H.; Feldman, R.B.; Feldman, D.W.; Apgar, S.A.; Calsten, B.E.; Fiorito, R.B.; Rule, D.W.

    1988-01-01

    Optical transition radiation (OTR) measurements of the electron-beam emittance have been performed at a location just before the wiggler in the Los Alamos Free-Electron Laser (FEL) experiment. Beam profiles and beam divergence patterns from a single macropulse were recorded simultaneously using two intensified charge-injection device (CID) television cameras and an optical beamsplitter. Both single-foil OTR and two-foil OTR interference experiments were performed. Preliminary results are compared to a reference variable quadrupole, single screen technique. New aspects of using OTR properties for pointing the e-beam on the FEL oscillator axis, as well as measuring e-beam emittance are addressed. 7 refs., 9 figs.

  8. ELECTRONIC EDUCATION IN UNDERGRADUATE RADIOLOGY: THE EXPERIENCE OF THE UNIVERSITY OF MALAGA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Sendra Portero

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Since 1998, radiology teaching and learning electronic resources have been developed at the University of Málaga. Some experiences on undergraduate radiology education are presented in this paper: a self-conducted training on radiology called “A Walk through Radiology”, some projects to create and develop radiology consulting tools, a project about audio-recorded virtual lectures (AMERAM, started on 2005, and a Web portal to collect radiology education Internet resources. Finally, we conclude with some reflections about the experience along these years, which has contributed to improve the student’s radiology learning in our centre and has supplied educative tools to students and postgraduates of this and other cities. We consider that the European Space of Higher Education learning philosophy, student centered and self-learning based, gives a vital role to undergraduate electronic education tools.

  9. Observation of Flat Electron Temperature Profiles in the Lithium Tokamak Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyle, D. P.; Majeski, R.; Schmitt, J. C.; Auburn University, AL; Hansen, C.

    2017-01-01

    It has been predicted for over a decade that low-recycling plasma-facing components in fusion devices would allow high edge temperatures and flat or nearly flat temperature profiles. In recent experiments with lithium wall coatings in the Lithium Tokamak Experiment (LTX), a hot edge (> 200 eV) and flat electron temperature profiles have been measured following the termination of external fueling. In this work, reduced recycling was demonstrated by retention of ~ 60% of the injected hydrogen in the walls following the discharge. Electron energy confinement followed typical Ohmic confinement scaling during fueling, but did not decrease with density after fueling terminated, ultimately exceeding the scaling by ~ 200% . Lastly, achievement of the low-recycling, hot edge regime has been an important goal of LTX and lithium plasma-facing component research in general, as it has potentially significant implications for the operation, design, and cost of fusion devices.

  10. The relationship between past caries experience and tooth color determined by an opto-electronic method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerosuo, E; Kolehmainen, L

    1982-01-01

    The susceptibility of a tooth to dental caries has been proposed to depend on tooth color. So far there has, however, been no reliable method for tooth color determination. The aims of this study were to evaluate the reliability of an opto-electronic method and to examine the relationship between tooth color and past caries experience. The color of upper right central incisors of 64 school-children was determined using an opto-electronic tri-stimulus color comparator. The intra- and interexaminer reliability of the method was evaluated in vitro and in vivo being 85% and 83%, respectively. To assess the past caries experience the DMFS-index was calculated. Oral hygiene and dietary habits were also assessed. No significant difference in DMFS scores was obtained between the 'white teeth' group and the 'yellow teeth' group. The conclusion is, that the practical importance of possible colorrelated differences in caries resistance is negligible due to the multifaceted nature of dental caries.

  11. Circular waveguide systems for electron-cyclotron-resonant heating of the tandem mirror experiment-upgrade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Felker, B.; Calderon, M.O.; Chargin, A.K.

    1983-01-01

    Extensive use of electron cyclotron resonant heating (ECRH) in the Tandem Mirror Experiment-Upgrade (TMX-U) requires continuous development of components to improve efficiency, increase reliability, and deliver power to new locations with respect to the plasma. We have used rectangular waveguide components on the experiment and have developed, tested, and installed circular waveguide components. We replaced the rectangular with the circular components because of the greater transmission efficiency and power-handling capability of the circular ones. Design, fabrication, and testing of all components are complete for all systems. In this paper we describe the design criteria for the system

  12. Electronic ground support equipment for the Cluster Electric Field and Wave Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sten, T.A.

    1992-10-01

    In a collaboration between ESA and NASA, ionosphere plasma structures will be studied by four indentical space probes to be launched in 1995 from French Guiana. The Electric Field and Wave (EFW) experiment will be designed to measure electric field and density fluctations by means of four sensors, each deployed on a 50 meter wire boom. In order to perform comprehensive tests and calibrations of the EFW experiment, computer controlled electronic ground support equipment has been developed. This report describes the hardware of the equipment, produced and assembled at the University of Oslo. 15 figs

  13. Disruption simulation experiment using high-frequency rastering electron beam as the heat source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamazaki, S.; Seki, M.

    1987-01-01

    The disruption is a serious event which possibly reduces the lifetime of plasm interactive components, so the effects of the resulting high heat flux on the wall materials must be clearly identified. The authors performed disruption simulation experiments to investigate melting, evaporation, and crack initiation behaviors using an electron beam facility as the heat source. The facility was improved with a high-frequency beam rastering system which provided spatially and temporally uniform heat flux on wider test surfaces. Along with the experiments, thermal and mechanical analyses were also performed. A two-dimensional disruption thermal analysis code (DREAM) was developed for the analyses

  14. The source of monoenergetic electrons for the monitoring of spectrometer in the KATRIN neutrino experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Slezák, Martin

    The international project KATRIN (KArlsruhe TRItium Neutrino experiment) is a next-generation tritium $\\beta$-decay experiment. It is designed to measure the electron anti-neutrino mass by means of a unique electron spectrometer with sensitivity of 0.2 eV/c$^2$. This is an improvement of one order of magnitude over the last results. Important part of the measurement will rest in continuous precise monitoring of high voltage of the KATRIN main spectrometer. The monitoring will be done by means of conversion electrons emitted from a solid source based on $^{83}$Rb decay. Properties of several of these sources are studied in this thesis by means of the semiconductor $\\gamma$-ray spectroscopy. Firstly, measurement of precise energy of the 9.4 keV nuclear transition observed in $^{83}$Rb decay, from which the energy of conversion electrons is derived, is reported. Secondly, measurement of activity distribution of the solid sources by means of the Timepix detector is described. Finally, a report on measurement of r...

  15. Consumer Electronics Processors for Critical Real-Time Systems: a (Failed) Practical Experience

    OpenAIRE

    Fernandez , Gabriel; Cazorla , Francisco; Abella , Jaume

    2018-01-01

    International audience; The convergence between consumer electronics and critical real-time markets has increased the need for hardware platforms able to deliver high performance as well as high (sustainable) performance guarantees. Using the ARM big.LITTLE architecture as example of those platforms, in this paper we report our experience with one of its implementations (the Qualcomm SnapDragon 810 processor) to derive performance bounds with measurement-based techniques. Our theoretical and ...

  16. Experiments using electronic display information in the NASA terminal configured vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morello, S. A.

    1980-01-01

    The results of research experiments concerning pilot display information requirements and visualization techniques for electronic display systems are presented. Topics deal with display related piloting tasks in flight controls for approach-to-landing, flight management for the descent from cruise, and flight operational procedures considering the display of surrounding air traffic. Planned research of advanced integrated display formats for primary flight control throughout the various phases of flight is also discussed.

  17. Physics Accomplishments and Future Prospects of the BES Experiments at the Beijing Electron-Positron Collider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briere, Roy A.; Harris, Frederick A.; Mitchell, Ryan E.

    2016-10-01

    The cornerstone of the Chinese experimental particle physics program is a series of experiments performed in the τ-charm energy region. China began building e+e- colliders at the Institute for High Energy Physics in Beijing more than three decades ago. Beijing Electron Spectrometer (BES) is the common root name for the particle physics detectors operated at these machines. We summarize the development of the BES program and highlight the physics results across several topical areas.

  18. Study of a reconstruction algorithm for electrons in the ATLAS experiment in LHC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kerschen, N.

    2006-09-01

    The ATLAS experiment is a general purpose particle physics experiment mainly aimed at the discovery of the origin of mass through the research of the Higgs boson. In order to achieve this, the Large Hadron Collider at CERN will accelerate two proton beams and make them collide at the centre of the experiment. ATLAS will discover new particles through the measurement of their decay products. Electrons are such decay products: they produce an electromagnetic shower in the calorimeter by which they lose all their energy. The calorimeter is divided into cells and the deposited energy is reconstructed using an algorithm to assemble the cells into clusters. The purpose of this thesis is to study a new kind of algorithm adapting the cluster to the shower topology. In order to reconstruct the energy of the initially created electron, the cluster has to be calibrated by taking into account the energy lost in the dead material in front of the calorimeter. Therefore. a Monte-Carlo simulation of the ATLAS detector has been used to correct for effects of response modulation in position and in energy and to optimise the energy resolution as well as the linearity. An analysis of test beam data has been performed to study the behaviour of the algorithm in a more realistic environment. We show that the requirements of the experiment can be met for the linearity and resolution. The improvement of this new algorithm, compared to a fixed sized cluster. is the better recovery of Bremsstrahlung photons emitted by the electron in the material in front of the calorimeter. A Monte-Carlo analysis of the Higgs boson decay in four electrons confirms this result. (author)

  19. Reliability data bank in electronics: ITALTEL experience over 10 years of operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turconi, G.

    1986-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to show the Italtel Reliability Data Bank experience in electronics after ten years from data bank creation. Technological evolution on systems and equipment have originated a reliability data bank evolution in order to maintain and improve its performances. This paper will describe the concepts employed to design the today data bank features enabling it to be an important Company tool for reliability activities. (orig.)

  20. Results from the S-DALINAC: one year of operational experience from a superconducting electron accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graef, H.D.; Horn, J.; Hummel, K.D.; Luettge, C.; Richter, A.; Riedorf, T.; Ruehl, K.; Schardt, P.; Spamer, E.; Stiller, A.; Thomas, F.; Titze, O.; Toepper, J.; Weise, H.; Winkler, T.

    1992-01-01

    Since August 1991 the superconducting cw-electron accelerator S-DALINAC at Darmstadt has produced single and multi pass beam which is used for different experiments. At energies below 10 MeV investigations of channeling radiation production and nuclear resonance fluorescence experiments are performed. Single pass operation yielding beam energies up to 40 MeV has been used for tests of the Free Electron Laser (FEL) beamline and for the investigation of spontaneous emission from the undulator. Two and three pass operation at higher energies produces beam for electron scattering experiments,(e,e') and (e,e'x), as well as for the production of channeling radiation. True cw operation allows for energies up to 84 MeV limited by the capacity of the He refrigerator. At higher energies the duty factor has to be reduced and pulse length is on the order of seconds. The successful operation of the entire accelerator was the result of several developments: six accelerating cavities fabricated from RRR = 280 niobium raised the average field gradient to 6 MV/m; the control systems for gun, rf, cavity tuners, and the beam transport system including beam diagnostics have been integrated into a reliable remote control of the S-DALINAC; and computer controlled path length adjustments for the two recirculating beamlines were installed for optimization of the reinjection phase. (Author) fig., tab., 10 refs

  1. FWCD (fast wave current drive) and ECCD (electron cyclotron current drive) experiments on DIII-D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prater, R.; Austin, M.; Baity, F.W.

    1994-01-01

    Fast wave current drive and electron cyclotron current drive experiments have been performed on the DIII-D tokamak as part of the advanced tokamak program. The goal of this program is to develop techniques for controlling the profile of the current density in order to access regimes of improved confinement and stability. The experiments on fast wave current drive used a four strap antenna with 90deg phasing between straps. A decoupler was used to help maintain the phasing, and feedback control of the plasma position was used to keep the resistive loading constant. RF pickup loops demonstrate that the directivity of the antenna is as expected. Plasma currents up to 0.18 MA were driven by 1.5 MW of fast wave power. Electron cyclotron current drive experiments at 60 GHz have shown 0.1 MA of plasma current driven by 1 MW of power. New fast wave and electron cyclotron heating systems are in development for DIII-D, so that the goals of the advanced tokamak program can be carried out. (author)

  2. FELIX: A proposal for a free electron laser experiment at Daresbury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, D.J.

    1980-01-01

    Although the Stanford Group has clearly demonstrated the feasibility of the free electron laser (of the type working in the low current density regime), and a great deal of theoretical work has been done before and since that time, there is still very little experimental data on such devices and very little practical experience. One of the reasons for this is the cost of suitable electron beam sources. At Daresbury the NINA injector linac is in store and could be recommissioned at much less than the cost of a new machine. It is believed that there is a scientific case for infra-red sources of the FEL type, because of their high power and tunability and that they would complement a synchrotron radiation source which provides intense VUV and X-ray beams. FELIX is a free electron laser experiment using the NINA linac with an output tunable over the range 57-150 μm, proposed as a project to produce experimental data on FEL characteristics and provide practical experience which could lead to a new generation of infra-red sources. The paper will describe a design study which has been carried out and is presently under consideration by the Science Research Council. (orig.)

  3. Status of the proton and electron transfer lines for the AWAKE Experiment at CERN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, J.S., E-mail: janet.schmidt@cern.ch [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Bauche, J. [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Biskup, B. [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Czech Technical University, Prague (Czech Republic); Bracco, C.; Doebert, S.; Goddard, B.; Gschwendtner, E.; Jensen, L.K.; Jones, O.R.; Mazzoni, S.; Meddahi, M.; Pepitone, K.; Petrenko, A.; Velotti, F.M.; Vorozhtsov, A. [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland)

    2016-09-01

    The AWAKE project at CERN is planned to study proton driven plasma wakefield acceleration with an externally injected electron beam. Therefore two transfer lines are being designed in order to provide the proton beam from the SPS and the electron beam from an RF gun to the plasma cell. The commissioning of the proton line will take place in 2016 for the first phase of the experiment, which is focused on the self-modulation of a 12 cm long proton bunch in the plasma. The electron line will be added for the second phase of AWAKE in 2017, when the wakefield will be probed with an electron beam of 10–20 MeV/c. The challenge for these transfer lines lies in the parallel operation of the proton, electron and laser beam used to ionize the plasma and seed the self-modulation. These beams, of different characteristics, need to be synchronized and positioned for optimized injection conditions into the wakefield. This task requires great flexibility in the transfer line optics. The status of these designs will be presented in this paper.

  4. Fast response of electron-scale turbulence to auxiliary heating cessation in National Spherical Torus Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ren, Y.; Wang, W. X.; LeBlanc, B. P.; Guttenfelder, W.; Kaye, S. M.; Ethier, S.; Mazzucato, E.; Bell, R. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States); Lee, K. C. [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon 305-806 (Korea, Republic of); Domier, C. W. [University of California at Davis, Davis, California 95616 (United States); Smith, D. R. [University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Yuh, H. [Nova Photonics, Inc., Princeton, New Jersey 08540 (United States)

    2015-11-15

    In this letter, we report the first observation of the fast response of electron-scale turbulence to auxiliary heating cessation in National Spherical Torus eXperiment [Ono et al., Nucl. Fusion 40, 557 (2000)]. The observation was made in a set of RF-heated L-mode plasmas with toroidal magnetic field of 0.55 T and plasma current of 300 kA. It is observed that electron-scale turbulence spectral power (measured with a high-k collective microwave scattering system) decreases significantly following fast cessation of RF heating that occurs in less than 200 μs. The large drop in the turbulence spectral power has a short time delay of about 1–2 ms relative to the RF cessation and happens on a time scale of 0.5–1 ms, much smaller than the energy confinement time of about 10 ms. Power balance analysis shows a factor of about 2 decrease in electron thermal diffusivity after the sudden drop of turbulence spectral power. Measured small changes in equilibrium profiles across the RF cessation are unlikely able to explain this sudden reduction in the measured turbulence and decrease in electron thermal transport, supported by local linear stability analysis and both local and global nonlinear gyrokinetic simulations. The observations imply that nonlocal flux-driven mechanism may be important for the observed turbulence and electron thermal transport.

  5. Electron beam effects on the spectroscopy of satellite lines in aluminum X-pinch experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdallah, J. Jr.; Csanak, G.; Clark, R.E.H.; Faenov, A.Ya.; Hammer, D.A.; Pikuz, S.A.; Romanova, P.N.; Shelkovenko, T.A.

    1996-01-01

    Aluminum wire X-pinch experiments performed at the Cornell University XP pulsed power generator and at the Lebedev Institute BIN generator show detailed high resolution spectra for satellite lines of Li-like, Be-like, B-like, and C-like ions. These lines, which correspond to transitions originating from autoionizing levels, are observed in the direction of the anode with respect to the bright X-pinch cross point. The intensities of these satellites are much smaller or absent in the direction of the cathode. Such transitions are caused by collisions of ions with energetic electrons (5-15 keV) which are created by the inductive voltage drop between the cross point and the anode. A collisional-radiative model was constructed using a non-Maxwellian electron energy distribution consisting of a thermal Maxwellian part plus a Gaussian part to represent the high energy electron beam. The shapes of the observed satellite structures are consistent with the calculated spectrum for electron temperatures between 30-100 eV, and beam densities of about 10 -7 times the plasma electron density. (author). 3 figs., 7 refs

  6. Electron beam effects on the spectroscopy of satellite lines in aluminum X-pinch experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdallah, J Jr; Csanak, G; Clark, R E.H. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, NM (United States); Faenov, A Ya [VNIIFTRI, Mendeleevo (Russian Federation); Hammer, D A [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States); Pikuz, S A; Romanova, P N; Shelkovenko, T A [P.N. Lebedev Physical Inst., Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1997-12-31

    Aluminum wire X-pinch experiments performed at the Cornell University XP pulsed power generator and at the Lebedev Institute BIN generator show detailed high resolution spectra for satellite lines of Li-like, Be-like, B-like, and C-like ions. These lines, which correspond to transitions originating from autoionizing levels, are observed in the direction of the anode with respect to the bright X-pinch cross point. The intensities of these satellites are much smaller or absent in the direction of the cathode. Such transitions are caused by collisions of ions with energetic electrons (5-15 keV) which are created by the inductive voltage drop between the cross point and the anode. A collisional-radiative model was constructed using a non-Maxwellian electron energy distribution consisting of a thermal Maxwellian part plus a Gaussian part to represent the high energy electron beam. The shapes of the observed satellite structures are consistent with the calculated spectrum for electron temperatures between 30-100 eV, and beam densities of about 10{sup -7} times the plasma electron density. (author). 3 figs., 7 refs.

  7. High-energy electron experiments (HEP) aboard the ERG (Arase) satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitani, Takefumi; Takashima, Takeshi; Kasahara, Satoshi; Miyake, Wataru; Hirahara, Masafumi

    2018-05-01

    This paper reports the design, calibration, and operation of high-energy electron experiments (HEP) aboard the exploration of energization and radiation in geospace (ERG) satellite. HEP detects 70 keV-2 MeV electrons and generates a three-dimensional velocity distribution for these electrons in every period of the satellite's rotation. Electrons are detected by two instruments, namely HEP-L and HEP-H, which differ in their geometric factor (G-factor) and range of energies they detect. HEP-L detects 70 keV-1 MeV electrons and its G-factor is 9.3 × 10-4 cm2 sr at maximum, while HEP-H observes 0.7-2 MeV electrons and its G-factor is 9.3 × 10-3 cm2 sr at maximum. The instruments utilize silicon strip detectors and application-specific integrated circuits to readout the incident charge signal from each strip. Before the launch, we calibrated the detectors by measuring the energy spectra of all strips using γ-ray sources. To evaluate the overall performance of the HEP instruments, we measured the energy spectra and angular responses with electron beams. After HEP was first put into operation, on February 2, 2017, it was demonstrated that the instruments performed normally. HEP began its exploratory observations with regard to energization and radiation in geospace in late March 2017. The initial results of the in-orbit observations are introduced briefly in this paper.[Figure not available: see fulltext.

  8. Measurements of fast electron beams and soft X-ray emission from plasma-focus experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surała Władysław

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper reports results of the recent experimental studies of pulsed electron beams and soft X-rays in plasma-focus (PF experiments carried out within a modified PF-360U facility at the NCBJ, Poland. Particular attention was focused on time-resolved measurements of the fast electron beams by means of two different magnetic analyzers, which could record electrons of energy ranging from about 41 keV to about 715 keV in several (6 or 8 measuring channels. For discharges performed with the pure deuterium filling, many strong electron signals were recorded in all the measuring channels. Those signals were well correlated with the first hard X-ray pulse detected by an external scintillation neutron-counter. In some of the analyzer channels, electron spikes (lasting about dozens of nanoseconds and appearing in different instants after the current peculiarity (so-called current dip were also recorded. For several discharges, fast ion beams, which were emitted along the z-axis and recorded with nuclear track detectors, were also investigated. Those measurements confirmed a multibeam character of the ion emission. The time-integrated soft X-ray images, which were taken side-on by means of a pinhole camera and sensitive X-ray films, showed the appearance of some filamentary structures and so-called hot spots. The application of small amounts of admixtures of different heavy noble gases, i.e. of argon (4.8% volumetric, krypton (1.6% volumetric, or xenon (0.8% volumetric, decreased intensity of the recorded electron beams, but increased intensity of the soft X-ray emission and showed more distinct and numerous hot spots. The recorded electron spikes have been explained as signals produced by quasi-mono-energetic microbeams emitted from tiny sources (probably plasma diodes, which can be formed near the observed hot spots.

  9. The Electronic Logbook for the Information Storage of ATLAS Experiment at LHC (ELisA)

    CERN Document Server

    Corso-Radu, A; The ATLAS collaboration; Magnoni, L

    2012-01-01

    A large experiment like ATLAS at LHC (CERN), with over three thousand members and a shift crew of 15 people running the experiment 24/7, needs an easy and reliable tool to gather all the information concerning the experiment development, installation, deployment and exploitation over its lifetime. With the increasing number of users and the accumulation of stored information since the experiment start-up, the electronic logbook actually in use, ATLOG, started to show its limitations in terms of speed and usability. Its monolithic architecture makes the maintenance and implementation of new functionality a hard-to-almost-impossible process. A new tool ELisA has been developed to replace the existing ATLOG. It is based on modern web technologies: the Spring framework using a Model-View-Controller architecture was chosen, thus helping building flexible and easy to maintain applications. The new tool implements all features of the old electronic logbook with increased performance and better graphics: it uses the ...

  10. The Electronic Logbook for the Information Storage of ATLAS Experiment at LHC (ELisA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corso Radu, A; Lehmann Miotto, G; Magnoni, L

    2012-01-01

    A large experiment like ATLAS at LHC (CERN), with over three thousand members and a shift crew of 15 people running the experiment 24/7, needs an easy and reliable tool to gather all the information concerning the experiment development, installation, deployment and exploitation over its lifetime. With the increasing number of users and the accumulation of stored information since the experiment start-up, the electronic logbook actually in use, ATLOG, started to show its limitations in terms of speed and usability. Its monolithic architecture makes the maintenance and implementation of new functionality a hard-to-almost-impossible process. A new tool ELisA has been developed to replace the existing ATLOG. It is based on modern web technologies: the Spring framework using a Model-View-Controller architecture was chosen, thus helping building flexible and easy to maintain applications. The new tool implements all features of the old electronic logbook with increased performance and better graphics: it uses the same database back-end for portability reasons. In addition, several new requirements have been accommodated which could not be implemented in ATLOG. This paper describes the architecture, implementation and performance of ELisA, with particular emphasis on the choices that allowed having a scalable and very fast system and on the aspects that could be re-used in different contexts to build a similar application.

  11. Hot-electron plasma formation and confinement in the tandem mirror experiment-upgrade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ress, D.B.

    1988-06-01

    The tandem mirror experiment-upgrade (TMX-U) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is the first experiment to investigate the thermal-barrier tandem-mirror concept. One attractive feature of the tandem magnetic mirror as a commercial power reactor is that the fusion reactions occur in an easily accessible center-cell. On the other hand, complicated end-cells are necessary to provide magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) stability and improved particle confinement of the center-cell plasma. In these end-cells, enhanced confinement is achieved with a particular axial potential profile that is formed with electron-cyclotron range-of-frequency heating (ECRF heating, ECRH). By modifying the loss rates of electrons at spatially distinct locations within the end-cells, the ECRH can tailor the plasma potential profile in the desired fashion. Specifically, the thermal-barrier concept requires generation of a population of energetic electrons near the midplane of each end-cell. To be effective, the transverse (to the magnetic field) spatial structure of the hot-electron plasma must be fairly uniform. In this dissertation we characterize the spatial structure of the ECRH-generated plasma, and determine how the structure builds up in time. Furthermore, the plasma should efficiently absorb the ECRF power, and a large fraction of the electrons must be well confined near the end-cell midplane. Therefore, we also examine in detail the ECRH power balance, determining how the ECRF power is absorbed by the plasma, and the processes through which that power is confined and lost. 43 refs., 69 figs., 6 tabs

  12. ICRF power deposition profile and determination of the electron thermal diffusivity by modulation experiments in JET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gambier, D.J.; Evrard, M.P.; Adam, J.

    1990-01-01

    The power deposition profile in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) has been investigated experimentally in JET by means of a square wave modulated RF perturbation. The study has been conducted in D(H) and D( 3 He) plasmas for two heating scenarios. In D( 3 He) plasmas and for central heating in a scenario where mode conversion to Bernstein waves is accessible, the direct power deposition profile on electrons has been derived. It accounts for 15% of the total coupled power and extends over 25% of the minor radius. Outside the RF power deposition zone, the electron thermal diffusivity χ e inside the inversion radius surface (r i ) can be estimated through observation of the diffusive electronic transport. In discharges without monster sawteeth and for a low central temperature gradient (∇T e (r ≤ r i ) ≤ ∇T e (r ≥ r i ) approx. = 5 keV·m -1 ) the value obtained is small (approx. =0.24 +- 0.05 m 2 · s -1 ), typically ten times lower than χ e values deduced from heat pulse propagation in similar discharges at radii larger than the inversion radius. For the D(H) minority heating scheme, a large fraction of the ICRF modulated power is absorbed by minority ions, and the minority tail is modulated with a characteristic ion-electron (i-e) slowing-down time. In this scheme, electron heating occurs only through collisions with the minority ion tail and no modulation of the electron temperature is observed in sawtoothing discharges. This is interpreted as a consequence of the long i-e equipartition time, acting as an integrator for the modulated ICRF signal. Finally, a correlation between the time of the sawtooth crash and the periodic turn-off of the ICRF power is found and its consequence for modulation experiments is reviewed. (author). 22 refs, 16 figs

  13. Wave excitation in electron beam experiment on Japanese satellite JIKIKEN (EXOS-B)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawashima, N.

    1982-01-01

    This chapter reports on a beam-plasma interaction experiment conducted in the magnetosphere by emitting an electron beam (100-200 eV, 0.25-1.0 mA) from the JIKIKEN satellite. Topics considered include instrumentation, wave excitation, and the charging of the satellite. Various types of wave emission are detected by low frequency and high frequency wave detectors. Waves near upper-hybrid frequency and at electron cyclotron frequency are detected in a low L-value region, which will be useful diagnostic means for plasma density and magnetic field. Vehicle charging up to the beam energy is observed outside the plasmapause. The main objectives of the Controlled Beam Experiment (CBE) are to control the satellite potential by an electron beam emission, and to study the wave excitation (linear and non-linear wave phenomena due to the beam-plasma interaction). It is concluded that waves excited in the beamplasma interaction are strongly dependent on plasma and other parameters in the magnetosphere so that it will provide important knowledge of the magnetosphere plasma processes

  14. Physics design of a 28 GHz electron heating system for the National Spherical Torus experiment upgrade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, G.; Bertelli, N.; Ellis, R. A.; Gerhardt, S. P.; Hosea, J. C.; Poli, F. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States); Harvey, R. W. [CompX, Del Mar, California 92014 (United States); Raman, R. [University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States); Smirnov, A. P. [M.V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2014-02-12

    A megawatt-level, 28 GHz electron heating system is being designed to support non-inductive (NI) plasma current (I{sub p}) start-up and local heating and current drive (CD) in H-mode discharges in the National Spherical Torus Experiment Upgrade (NSTX-U). The development of fully NI I{sub p} start-up and ramp-up is an important goal of the NSTXU research program. 28 GHz electron cyclotron (EC) heating is predicted to rapidly increase the central electron temperature (T{sub e}(0)) of low density NI plasmas generated by Coaxial Helicity Injection (CHI). The increased T{sub e}(0) will significantly reduce the I{sub p} decay rate of CHI plasmas, allowing the coupling of fast wave heating and neutral beam injection. Also 28 GHz electron Bernstein wave (EBW) heating and CD can be used during the I{sub p} flat top in NSTX-U discharges when the plasma is overdense. Ray tracing and Fokker-Planck numerical simulation codes have been used to model EC and EBW heating and CD in NSTX-U. This paper presents a pre-conceptual design for the 28 GHz heating system and some of the results from the numerical simulations.

  15. Comparisons between MCNP, EGS4 and experiment for clinical electron beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeraj, R; Keall, P J; Ostwald, P M

    1999-03-01

    Understanding the limitations of Monte Carlo codes is essential in order to avoid systematic errors in simulations, and to suggest further improvement of the codes. MCNP and EGS4, Monte Carlo codes commonly used in medical physics, were compared and evaluated against electron depth dose data and experimental backscatter results obtained using clinical radiotherapy beams. Different physical models and algorithms used in the codes give significantly different depth dose curves and electron backscattering factors. The default version of MCNP calculates electron depth dose curves which are too penetrating. The MCNP results agree better with experiment if the ITS-style energy-indexing algorithm is used. EGS4 underpredicts electron backscattering for high-Z materials. The results slightly improve if optimal PRESTA-I parameters are used. MCNP simulates backscattering well even for high-Z materials. To conclude the comparison, a timing study was performed. EGS4 is generally faster than MCNP and use of a large number of scoring voxels dramatically slows down the MCNP calculation. However, use of a large number of geometry voxels in MCNP only slightly affects the speed of the calculation.

  16. Comparisons between MCNP, EGS4 and experiment for clinical electron beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeraj, R.; Keall, P.J.; Ostwald, P.M.

    1999-01-01

    Understanding the limitations of Monte Carlo codes is essential in order to avoid systematic errors in simulations, and to suggest further improvement of the codes. MCNP and EGS4, Monte Carlo codes commonly used in medical physics, were compared and evaluated against electron depth dose data and experimental backscatter results obtained using clinical radiotherapy beams. Different physical models and algorithms used in the codes give significantly different depth dose curves and electron backscattering factors. The default version of MCNP calculates electron depth dose curves which are too penetrating. The MCNP results agree better with experiment if the ITS-style energy-indexing algorithm is used. EGS4 underpredicts electron backscattering for high- Z materials. The results slightly improve if optimal PRESTA-I parameters are used. MCNP simulates backscattering well even for high- Z materials. To conclude the comparison, a timing study was performed. EGS4 is generally faster than MCNP and use of a large number of scoring voxels dramatically slows down the MCNP calculation. However, use of a large number of geometry voxels in MCNP only slightly affects the speed of the calculation. (author)

  17. Major results of the electron cyclotron heating experiment in the PDX tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsuan, H.; Bol, K.; Bowen, N.

    1984-07-01

    Electron Cyclotron Heating (ECH) experiments on PDX have been carried out with two 60 GHz pulsed gyrotrons each yielding up to approximately 100 kW. The ECH system used two waveguide runs each about 30 meters long. One run included 5 bends and the other, 7 bends. Predetermined waveguide modes were transmitted. The electron cyclotron waves were launched in narrow beams from both the high field and the low field sides of the plasma torus. The major new physics results are: (1) efficient central electron heating for both ohmic and neutral beam heated target plasmas; (2) alteration of MHD behavior using ECH; (3) identification of the trapped electron population with ECH; and (4) signature of velocity-space time evolution during ECH. In the best heating results obtained, Thomson scattering data indicated a central temperature increase from less than or equal to 1.5 keV to greater than or equal to 2.5 keV. This occurred with an average density of about 10 13 cm -3 and approximately 80 kW outside-launch ordinary-mode heating

  18. Extraction of High Charge Electron Bunch from the ELSA RF Injector Comparison Between Simulation and Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Lemaire, J; Binet, A; Lagniel, J M; Le Flanchec, V; Pichoff, N

    2004-01-01

    A new scheme based on a photoinjector and a RF linear accelerator operating at 352 MHz has been recently proposed as a versatile radiographic facility. Beam pulses of 60 ns duration contain 20 succesive electron bunches which will be extracted at 2.5 MeV from a photoinjector then accelerated through the next structure to the final energy of 51 MeV. Bunches carrying 100 nC are required for this purpose. As a first demonstrating step, 50 nC electron bunches have been produced and accelerated to 2.5 MeV with the 144 MHz ELSA photoinjector at Bruyères le Chatel. For this experiment, we compare the results and the numerical simulations made with PARMELA, MAGIC and MAFIA codes.

  19. Measurements of electron density and temperature profiles in a gas blanket experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuthy, A.

    1979-02-01

    Radial profiles of electron density, temperature and H sub(β) intensity are presented for the rotating plasma device F-1. The hydrogen filling pressure, the average magnetic field strength at the midplane, and the power input to the discharge have been varied in the ranges 10-100 mTorr, 0.25-0.5 Tesla, and 0.1 to 1.5 MW, respectively. These experiments have been performed with the main purpose of studying the gas blanket (cold-mantle) state of the plasma. It is shown, that a simple spectroscopic method can be used to derive the radial distribution of the electron temperature in such plasmas. The observed peak temperatures and densities are in agreement with earlier theoretical estimates. (author)

  20. Trigger electronics of the new Fluorescence Detectors of the Telescope Array Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tameda, Yuichiro; Taketa, Akimichi; Smith, Jeremy D.; Tanaka, Manobu; Fukushima, Masaki; Jui, Charles C.H.; Kadota, Ken'ichi; Kakimoto, Fumio; Matsuda, Takeshi; Matthews, John N.; Ogio, Shoichi; Sagawa, Hiroyuki; Sakurai, Nobuyuki; Shibata, Tatsunobu; Takeda, Masahiro; Thomas, Stanton B.; Tokuno, Hisao; Tsunesada, Yoshiki

    2009-01-01

    The Telescope Array Project is an experiment designed to observe Ultra High Energy Cosmic Rays via a 'hybrid' detection technique utilizing both fluorescence light detectors (FDs) and scintillator surface particle detectors (SDs). We have installed three FD stations and 507 SDs in the Utah desert, and initiated observations from March 2008. The northern FD station reuses 14 telescopes from the High Resolution Fly's Eye, HiRes-I station. Each of the two southern FD stations contains 12 new telescopes utilizing new FADC electronics. Each telescope is instrumented with a camera composed of 256 PMTs. Since the detectors are composed of many PMTs and each PMT detects fluorescence photons together with the vast amount of night sky background, a sophisticated triggering system is required. In this paper, we describe the trigger electronics of these new FD stations. We also discuss performance of the FDs with this triggering system, in terms of efficiencies and apertures for various detector configurations.

  1. The SAMPLE experiment: Parity-violating electron scattering from the proton and deuteron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pitt, M.; Arrington, J.; Beck, D.; Beise, E.; Candell, E.; Cardman, L.; Carr, R.; Dodson, G.; Dow, K.; Duncan, F.; Farkhondeh, M.; Filippone, B.; Forest, T.; Gao, H.; Korsch, W.; Kowalski, S.; Lung, A.; McKeown, R.; Mohring, R.; Mueller, B.; Napolitano, J.; Simicevic, N.; Terburg, B.; Witkowski, M.

    1995-01-01

    Recent experimental evidence on nucleon structure has provided indications that some strange quark matrix elements can be comparable to those involving up and down quarks. The SAMPLE experiment will determine the strange magnetic form factor G s M at Q 2 =0.1 (GeV/c) 2 from a measurement of the asymmetry in the scattering of polarized electrons from the proton. The error on the extraction of G s M is ultimately limited by a theoretical uncertainty---the uncertain electroweak hadronic radiative correction to the axial form factor, R T=1 A . To address this issue, the collaboration is also approved to measure the asymmetry in parity-violating quasielastic electron scattering from the deuteron. The combination of the proton and deuteron measurements will yield a value of G s M that is almost completely free of the uncertainty in R T=1 A

  2. Subharmonic buncher for the Los Alamos free-electron laser oscillator experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fraser, J.S.

    1983-01-01

    A high efficiency free-electron laser oscillator experiment is being constructed at Los Alamos National Laboratory. A buncher system has been designed to deliver 30-ps, 5-nC electron bunches to a 20-MeV standing-wave linac at the 60th subharmonic of the 1300-MHz accelerator frequency. The first 108.3-MHz buncher cavity accepts a 5-ns, 5-A peak current pulse from a triode gun. Following a 120-cm drift space, a second 108.3-MHz cavity is used, primarily to enhance the bunching of the trailing half of the bunch. A 1300-MHz cavity with 20-cm drift spaces at the each end completes the beamline components. The bunching process continues into the linac's first three accelerating cells. Two thin iron-shielded lenses and several large-diameter solenoids provide axial magnetic fields for radial focusing

  3. An extreme ultraviolet Michelson interferometer for experiments at free-electron lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hilbert, Vinzenz; Fuchs, Silvio; Paulus, Gerhard G.; Zastrau, Ulf; Blinne, Alexander; Feigl, Torsten; Kämpfer, Tino; Rödel, Christian; Uschmann, Ingo; Wünsche, Martin; Förster, Eckhart

    2013-01-01

    We present a Michelson interferometer for 13.5 nm soft x-ray radiation. It is characterized in a proof-of-principle experiment using synchrotron radiation, where the temporal coherence is measured to be 13 fs. The curvature of the thin-film beam splitter membrane is derived from the observed fringe pattern. The applicability of this Michelson interferometer at intense free-electron lasers is investigated, particularly with respect to radiation damage. This study highlights the potential role of such Michelson interferometers in solid density plasma investigations using, for instance, extreme soft x-ray free-electron lasers. A setup using the Michelson interferometer for pseudo-Nomarski-interferometry is proposed

  4. An extreme ultraviolet Michelson interferometer for experiments at free-electron lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilbert, Vinzenz; Blinne, Alexander; Fuchs, Silvio; Feigl, Torsten; Kämpfer, Tino; Rödel, Christian; Uschmann, Ingo; Wünsche, Martin; Paulus, Gerhard G; Förster, Eckhart; Zastrau, Ulf

    2013-09-01

    We present a Michelson interferometer for 13.5 nm soft x-ray radiation. It is characterized in a proof-of-principle experiment using synchrotron radiation, where the temporal coherence is measured to be 13 fs. The curvature of the thin-film beam splitter membrane is derived from the observed fringe pattern. The applicability of this Michelson interferometer at intense free-electron lasers is investigated, particularly with respect to radiation damage. This study highlights the potential role of such Michelson interferometers in solid density plasma investigations using, for instance, extreme soft x-ray free-electron lasers. A setup using the Michelson interferometer for pseudo-Nomarski-interferometry is proposed.

  5. Experiments on continuum electron capture in atomic hydrogen and collisional interaction of trapped ions. Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sellin, I.A.; Elston, S.B.

    1981-01-01

    This section describes the background and scope of as well as progress made on experiments designed to test the present theory of charge exchange to continuum for the case of bare nuclei on atomic hydrogen. The charge transfer process is well known to be an essential ingredient of any attempt to understand the ionization of gaseous media traversed by highly-charged energetic ions. Surprisingly, a sometimes dominant contribution to such ionization remained undiscovered until the past decade. This process, known as charge transfer to the continuum, involves the ionization of electrons from the target species into unbound states closely matched in exit direction and speed to the charged particles which generate them. Subsequent measurements of the resultant forward electron production, performed by University of Tennessee searchers at Oak Ridge and Brookhaven National Laboratories, were unique in employing more highly charged projectiles than previously

  6. Integrated Numerical Experiments (INEX) and the Free-Electron Laser Physical Process Code (FELPPC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thode, L.E.; Chan, K.C.D.; Schmitt, M.J.; McKee, J.; Ostic, J.; Elliott, C.J.; McVey, B.D.

    1990-01-01

    The strong coupling of subsystem elements, such as the accelerator, wiggler, and optics, greatly complicates the understanding and design of a free electron laser (FEL), even at the conceptual level. To address the strong coupling character of the FEL the concept of an Integrated Numerical Experiment (INEX) was proposed. Unique features of the INEX approach are consistency and numerical equivalence of experimental diagnostics. The equivalent numerical diagnostics mitigates the major problem of misinterpretation that often occurs when theoretical and experimental data are compared. The INEX approach has been applied to a large number of accelerator and FEL experiments. Overall, the agreement between INEX and the experiments is very good. Despite the success of INEX, the approach is difficult to apply to trade-off and initial design studies because of the significant manpower and computational requirements. On the other hand, INEX provides a base from which realistic accelerator, wiggler, and optics models can be developed. The Free Electron Laser Physical Process Code (FELPPC) includes models developed from INEX, provides coupling between the subsystem models, and incorporates application models relevant to a specific trade-off or design study. In other words, FELPPC solves the complete physical process model using realistic physics and technology constraints. Because FELPPC provides a detailed design, a good estimate for the FEL mass, cost, and size can be made from a piece-part count of the FEL. FELPPC requires significant accelerator and FEL expertise to operate. The code can calculate complex FEL configurations including multiple accelerator and wiggler combinations

  7. Electronics, trigger, data acquisition, and computing working group on future B physics experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geer, S.

    1993-01-01

    Electronics, trigger, data acquisition, and computing: this is a very broad list of topics. Nevertheless in a modern particle physics experiment one thinks in terms of a data pipeline in which the front end electronics, the trigger and data acquisition, and the offline reconstruction are linked together. In designing any piece of this pipeline it is necessary to understand the bigger picture of the data flow, data rates and volume, and the input rate, output rate, and latencies for each part of the pipeline. All of this needs to be developed with a clear understanding of the requirements imposed by the physics goals of the experiment; the signal efficiencies, background rates, and the amount of recorded information that needs to be propagated through the pipeline to select and analyse the events of interest. The technology needed to meet the demanding high data volume needs of the next round of B physics experiments appears to be available, now or within a couple of years. This seems to be the case for both fixed target and collider B physics experiments. Although there are many differences between the various data pipelines that are being proposed, there are also striking similarities. All experiments have a multi-level trigger scheme (most have levels 1, 2, and 3) where the final level consists of a computing farm that can run offline-type code and reduce the data volume by a factor of a few. Finally, the ability to reconstruct large data volumes offline in a reasonably short time, and making large data volumes available to many physicists for analysis, imposes severe constraints on the foreseen data pipelines, and a significant uncertainty in evaluating the various approaches proposed

  8. Experiments on melting in classical and quantum two dimensional electron systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, F.I.B.

    1991-01-01

    ''Two dimensional electron system'' (2DES) here refers to electrons whose dynamics is free in 2 dimensions but blocked in the third. Experiments have been performed in two limiting situations: the classical, low density, limit realised by electrons deposited on a liquid helium surface and the quantum, high density, limit realised by electrons at an interface between two epitaxially matched semiconductors. In the classical system, where T Q c so that the thermodynamic state is determined by the competition between the temperature and the Coulomb interaction, melting is induced either by raising the temperature at constant density or by lowering the density at finite temperature. In the quantum system, it is not possible to lower the density below about 100n W without the Coulomb interaction losing out to the random field representing the extrinsic disorder imposed by the semiconductor host. Instead one has to induce crystallisation with the help of the Lorentz force, by applying a perpendicular magnetic field B [2] . As the quantum magnetic length l c = (Planck constant c/eB) 1/2 is reduced with respect to the interelectronic spacing a, expressed by the filling factor ν 2l c 2 /a 2 , the system exhibits the quantum Hall effect (QHE), first for integer then for fractional values of ν. The fractional quantum Hall effect (FQHE) is a result of Coulomb induced correlation in the quantum liquid, but as ν is decreased still further the correlations are expected to take on long-range crystal-like periodicity accompanied by elastic shear rigidity. Such a state can nonetheless be destroyed by the disordering effect of temperature, giving rise to a phase boundary in a (T, B) plane. The aim of experiment is first to determine the phase diagram and then to help elucidate the mechanism of the melting. (author)

  9. Investigation of Electron Density Profile in the ionospheric D and E region by Kagoshima rocket experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashihara, Y.; Ishisaka, K.; Miyake, T.; Okada, T.; Nagano, I.; Abe, T.; Ono, T.

    2007-12-01

    The radio wave propagation characteristic in the lower ionosphere is important because of its effect on commercial radio communication, navigation, and broadcast services. The electron density is of primary interest in this region because the high ion-neutral collision frequencies result in radio wave absorption. In order to investigate the ionization structure in the ionospheric D and E region by using the propagation characteristics of MF-band and LF-band radio waves, S-310-37 and S-520-23 sounding rocket experiments have been carried out at Uchinoura Space Center (USC). S-310-37 sounding rocket was launched at 11:20 LT on January 16, 2007. The apex of rocket trajectory was about 138 km. Then S-520-23 sounding rocket was launched at 19:20 LT on September 2, 2007. The apex was about 279 km. As a common measurement, these sounding rockets measure the fields intensities and the waveform of radio waves from NHK Kumamoto broadcasting station (873kHz, 500kW) and JJY signals from Haganeyama LF radio station (60kHz, 50kW). The approximate electron density profile can be determined from the comparison between these experimental results and propagation characteristics calculated by the full wave method. We will get the most probable electron density profile in the ionosphere. In presentation, we will show the propagation characteristic of LF/MF radio waves measured by two sounding rocket experiments. Then we will discuss the analysis method and the estimated electron density profile in the ionosphere.

  10. Plasma heating by relativistic electron beams: correlations between experiment and theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thode, L.E.; Godfrey, B.B.

    1975-01-01

    The streaming instability is the primary heating mechanism in most, if not all, experiments in which the beam is injected into partially or fully ionized gas. In plasma heating experiments, the relativistic beam must traverse an anode foil before interacting with the plasma. The linear theory for such a scattered beam is discussed, including a criterion for the onset of the kinetic interaction. A nonlinear model of the two-stream instability for a scattered beam is developed. Using this model, data from ten experiments are unfolded to obtain the following correlations: (i) for a fixed anode foil, the dependence of the plasma heating on the beam-to-plasma density ratio is due to anode foil scattering, (ii) for a fixed beam-to-plasma density ratio, the predicted change in the magnitude of plasma heating as a function of the anode foil is in agreement with experiment, and (iii) the plasma heating tentatively appears to be proportional to the beam kinetic energy density and beam pulse length. For a fixed anode foil, theory also predicts that the energy deposition is improved by increasing the beam electron energy γmc 2 . Presently, no experiment has been performed to confirm this aspect of the theory

  11. Excitation of rare gases in an electron-beam-controlled discharge: report on preliminary experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bingham, F.W.

    1976-05-01

    Data from the preliminary phase of a study of rare-gas-excimer production in an electron-beam-controlled discharge are presented. The results indicate that it is possible to maintain an arc-free discharge in preionized Ar and Xe gas for a period of several microseconds at applied external E/p values up to 5 V/cm/Torr. In these experiments ultraviolet radiation emitted during the discharge signaled the presence of excited rare-gas molecules. Application of the external electric field significantly enhanced the ultraviolet intensity from xenon-gas discharges but produced little enhancement from argon-gas discharges

  12. Conceptual design of a laser-plasma accelerator driven free-electron laser demonstration experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seggebrock, Thorben

    2015-01-01

    Up to now, short-wavelength free-electron lasers (FEL) have been systems on the scale of hundreds of meters up to multiple kilometers. Due to the advancements in laser-plasma acceleration in the recent years, these accelerators have become a promising candidate for driving a fifth-generation synchrotron light source - a lab-scale free-electron laser. So far, demonstration experiments have been hindered by the broad energy spread typical for this type of accelerator. This thesis addresses the most important challenges of the conceptual design for a first lab-scale FEL demonstration experiment using analytical considerations as well as simulations. The broad energy spread reduces the FEL performance directly by weakening the microbunching and indirectly via chromatic emittance growth, caused by the focusing system. Both issues can be mitigated by decompressing the electron bunch in a magnetic chicane, resulting in a sorting by energies. This reduces the local energy spread as well as the local chromatic emittance growth and also lowers performance degradations caused by the short bunch length. Moreover, the energy dependent focus position leads to a focus motion within the bunch, which can be synchronized with the radiation pulse, maximizing the current density in the interaction region. This concept is termed chromatic focus matching. A comparison shows the advantages of the longitudinal decompression concept compared to the alternative approach of transverse dispersion. When using typical laser-plasma based electron bunches, coherent synchrotron radiation and space-charge contribute in equal measure to the emittance growth during decompression. It is shown that a chicane for this purpose must not be as weak and long as affordable to reduce coherent synchrotron radiation, but that an intermediate length is required. Furthermore, the interplay of the individual concepts and components is assessed in a start-to-end simulation, confirming the feasibility of the

  13. Perampanel: An audit of clinical experience using the epilepsy electronic patient record.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ryan, E

    2016-07-01

    Perampanel is a non-competitive antagonist of AMPA glutamate receptors on post synaptic neurons. The aim of this study was to conduct an audit of the experience of perampanel treatment in Ireland based on the interrogation of the national epilepsy electronic patient record (EPR). A retrospective audit was compiled which reviewed the progress of patients who had been treated across two regional epilepsy centres. The EPR was used to identify patients and collect information relevant to their perampanel therapy. Collected data was entered into a statistical package for social sciences for analysis using descriptive statistics.\\r\

  14. Conceptual design of a laser-plasma accelerator driven free-electron laser demonstration experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seggebrock, Thorben

    2015-07-08

    Up to now, short-wavelength free-electron lasers (FEL) have been systems on the scale of hundreds of meters up to multiple kilometers. Due to the advancements in laser-plasma acceleration in the recent years, these accelerators have become a promising candidate for driving a fifth-generation synchrotron light source - a lab-scale free-electron laser. So far, demonstration experiments have been hindered by the broad energy spread typical for this type of accelerator. This thesis addresses the most important challenges of the conceptual design for a first lab-scale FEL demonstration experiment using analytical considerations as well as simulations. The broad energy spread reduces the FEL performance directly by weakening the microbunching and indirectly via chromatic emittance growth, caused by the focusing system. Both issues can be mitigated by decompressing the electron bunch in a magnetic chicane, resulting in a sorting by energies. This reduces the local energy spread as well as the local chromatic emittance growth and also lowers performance degradations caused by the short bunch length. Moreover, the energy dependent focus position leads to a focus motion within the bunch, which can be synchronized with the radiation pulse, maximizing the current density in the interaction region. This concept is termed chromatic focus matching. A comparison shows the advantages of the longitudinal decompression concept compared to the alternative approach of transverse dispersion. When using typical laser-plasma based electron bunches, coherent synchrotron radiation and space-charge contribute in equal measure to the emittance growth during decompression. It is shown that a chicane for this purpose must not be as weak and long as affordable to reduce coherent synchrotron radiation, but that an intermediate length is required. Furthermore, the interplay of the individual concepts and components is assessed in a start-to-end simulation, confirming the feasibility of the

  15. Study of the thermal and suprathermal electron density fluctuations of the plasma in the Focus experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jolas, A.

    1981-10-01

    An experiment on Thomson scattering of ruby laser light by the electrons of a plasma produced by an intense discharge between the electrodes of a coaxial gun in a gas at low pressure has been carried out. It is shown that the imploding plasma is made up of layers with different characteristics: a dense plasma layer where the density fluctuations are isotropic and have a thermal level, and a tenuous plasma layer where the fluctuations are anisotropic, and strongly suprathermal. The suprathermal fluctuations are attributed to microscopic instabilities generated by the electric current circulating in the transition zone where the magnetic field penetrates the plasma [fr

  16. Valence electronic structure of the indene molecule: Experiment vs. GW calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Umari, P.; Stenuit, G. [CNR-IOM DEMOCRITOS Theory Elettra Group, Basovizza, Trieste (Italy); Castellarin-Cudia, C.; Feyer, V.; Di Santo, G.; Goldoni, A. [Sincrotrone Trieste S.C.p.A., Basovizza, Trieste (Italy); Borghetti, P.; Sangaletti, L. [Dipartimento di Matematica e Fisica, Universita Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Brescia (Italy)

    2011-04-15

    We investigate the valence electronic properties in the gas phase of the indene molecule, which is one of the simplest polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, with photoemission spectroscopy using synchrotron light and through first-principles calculations using a many-body perturbation theory GW approach. We found an excellent agreement between theory and experiment. This allows us to assign to the peaks appearing in the photoemission spectrum the calculated molecular orbitals. (Copyright copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  17. Experiments on resonator concept of plasma wakefield accelerator driven by a train of relativistic electron bunches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiselev, V.A.; Linnik, A.F.; Mirny, V. I; Onishchenko, I.N.; Uskov, V.V.

    2008-01-01

    The experimental installation was elaborated to increase plasma wakefield amplitude by means of using plasma resonator that allows all bunches of the train to participate in wakefield build-up contrary to waveguide case, in which due to group velocity effect only a part of the bunches participates. Experiments on plasma producing with resonant density, at which a coincidence of the plasma frequency and bunch repetition frequency is provided, are carried out. The first results of the measurements of beam energy loss on plasma wakefield excitation and energy gain by accelerated electrons are presented

  18. Interference experiment with asymmetric double slit by using 1.2-MV field emission transmission electron microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harada, Ken; Akashi, Tetsuya; Niitsu, Kodai; Shimada, Keiko; Ono, Yoshimasa A; Shindo, Daisuke; Shinada, Hiroyuki; Mori, Shigeo

    2018-01-17

    Advanced electron microscopy technologies have made it possible to perform precise double-slit interference experiments. We used a 1.2-MV field emission electron microscope providing coherent electron waves and a direct detection camera system enabling single-electron detections at a sub-second exposure time. We developed a method to perform the interference experiment by using an asymmetric double-slit fabricated by a focused ion beam instrument and by operating the microscope under a "pre-Fraunhofer" condition, different from the Fraunhofer condition of conventional double-slit experiments. Here, pre-Fraunhofer condition means that each single-slit observation was performed under the Fraunhofer condition, while the double-slit observations were performed under the Fresnel condition. The interference experiments with each single slit and with the asymmetric double slit were carried out under two different electron dose conditions: high-dose for calculation of electron probability distribution and low-dose for each single electron distribution. Finally, we exemplified the distribution of single electrons by color-coding according to the above three types of experiments as a composite image.

  19. Experiment study on four button electrode used to monitor position of high current electron-beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Tiezheng; Wang Huacen; Xie Yutong; Zhang Wenwei

    2004-01-01

    The button electrode is one that widely used in high energy accelerators, such as storage ring, and the button electrode has many merit like high accuracy, high resolution, resisting magnetic field, simple machinery, without magnetic core and low cost, etc. It's helpful that the button electrode is used as the beam position monitor in the linear induction accelerator. The experimental facilities have been designed and set up and it can simulate the beam of linear induction accelerator. The button electrode beam position monitor experiment have been done on the experimental facilities. The result of the experiment prove that the button electrode has an accuracy of 0.5 mm, and can reflect the wave of electron-beam accurately

  20. First lasing of a high-gain harmonic generation free-electron laser experiment.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Babzien, M.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Biedron, S. G.; DiMauro, L. F.; Douryan, A.; Galayda, J. N.; Gluskin, E.; Graves, W.; Jagger, J.; Johnson, E.; Krinsky, S.; Malone, R.; Pogorelsky, I.; Rakowsky, G.; Sajaev, V.; Skaritka, J.; Solomon, L.; Vasserman, I.; Wang, X. L.; Woodle, M.; Yakimenko, V.; Yu, L.-H.

    1999-09-11

    We report on the first lasing of a high-gain harmonic generation (HGHG) free-electron laser (FEL). The experiment was conducted at the Accelerator Test Facility (ATF) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). This is a BNL experiment in collaboration with the Advanced Photon Source (APS) at Argonne National Laboratory. A preliminary measurement gives a high-gain harmonic generation (HGHG) pulse energy that is 2 x 10{sup 7} times larger than the spontaneous radiation, In a purely self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE) mode of operation, the signal was measured as 10 times larger than the spontaneous radiation in the same distance ({approximately}2 m) through the same wiggler. This means the HGHG signal is 2 x 10{sup 6} times larger than the SASE signal. To obtain the same saturated output power by the SASE process, the radiator would have to be 3 times longer (6 m).

  1. Observing Muon Neutrino to Electron Neutrino Oscillations in the NOνA Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xin, Tian [Iowa State U.

    2016-01-01

    Neutrino oscillations offers an insight on new physics beyond the Standard Model. The three mixing angles (θ12, θ13 and θ23) and the two mass splittings (Δm2 and Αm2 ) have been measured by different neutrino oscillation experiments. Some other parameters including the mass ordering of different neutrino mass eigenstates and the CP violation phase are still unknown. NOνA is a long-baseline accelerator neutrino experiment, using neutrinos from the NuMI beam at Fermilab. The experiment is equipped with two functionally identical detectors about 810 kilometers apart and 14 mrad off the beam axis. In this configuration, the muon neutrinos from the NuMI beam reach the disappearance maximum in the far detector and a small fraction of that oscillates into electron neutrinos. The sensitivity to the mass ordering and CP viola- tion phase determination is greately enhanced. This thesis presents the νeappearance analysis using the neutrino data collected with the NOνA experiment between February 2014 and May 2015, which corresponds to 3.45 ×1020 protons-on-target (POT). The νe appearance analysis is performed by comparing the observed νe CC-like events to the estimated background at the far detector. The total background is predicted to be 0.95 events with 0.89 originated from beam events and 0.06 from cosmic ray events. The beam background is obtained by extrapolating near detector data through different oscillation channels, while the cosmic ray background is calculated based on out-of-time NuMI trigger data. A total of 6 electron neutrino candidates are observed in the end at the far detector which represents 3.3 σ excess over the predicted background. The NOνA result disfavors inverted mass hierarchy for δcp ϵ [0, 0.6π] at 90% C.L.

  2. Cryogenic systems for proof of the principle experiment of coherent electron cooling at RHIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Yuenian; Belomestnykh, Sergey; Brutus, Jean Clifford; Lederle, Dewey; Orfin, Paul; Skaritka, John; Soria, Victor; Tallerico, Thomas; Than, Roberto [Collider Accelerator Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States)

    2014-01-29

    The Coherent electron Cooling (CeC) Proof of Principle (PoP) experiment is proposed to be installed in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) to demonstrate proton and ion beam cooling with this new technique that may increase the beam luminosity in certain cases, by as much as tenfold. Within the scope of this project, a 112 MHz, 2MeV Superconducting Radio Frequency (SRF) electron gun and a 704 MHz 20MeV 5-cell SRF cavity will be installed at IP2 in the RHIC ring. The superconducting RF electron gun will be cooled in a liquid helium bath at 4.4 K. The 704 MHz 5-cell SRF cavity will be cooled in a super-fluid helium bath at 2.0 K. This paper discusses the cryogenic systems designed for both cavities. For the 112 MHz cavity cryogenic system, a condenser/boiler heat exchanger is used to isolate the cavity helium bath from pressure pulses and microphonics noise sources. For the 704 MHz 5-cell SRF cavity, a heat exchanger is also used to isolate the SRF cavity helium bath from noise sources in the sub-atmospheric pumping system operating at room temperature. Detailed designs, thermal analyses and discussions for both systems will be presented in this paper.

  3. Electronically excited states of chloroethylenes: Experiment and DFT calculations in comparison

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khvostenko, O.G.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • B3LYP/6-311 + G(d,p) calculations of chloroethylenes molecules were performed. • Calculations were correlated with experiment on the molecules ground and excited states. • The general pattern of electron structure of chloroethylenes was obtained. • Necessity of this data for chloroethylenes negative ions study was noted. - Abstract: B3LYP/6-311 + G(d,p) calculations of ground and electronically excited states of ethylene, chloroethylene, 1,1-dichloroethylene, 1,2-dichloroethylene-cis, 1,2-dichloroethylene-trans trichloroethylene and tetrachloroethylene molecules have been performed. Molecular orbitals images and orbital correlation diagram are given. The calculation results for chloroethylenes electronically excited states were compared with experimental data from the energy-loss spectra obtained and generally considered previously by C.F. Koerting, K.N. Walzl and A. Kupperman. Several new additional triplet and singlet transitions were pointed out in these spectra considering the calculation results. The finding of the additional transitions was supported by the UV absorption spectrum of trichloroethylene recorded in big cuvette (10 cm), where the first three triplet and two low-intensive forbidden singlet transitions were registered. The first triplet of this compound was recorded to be at the same energy as was found with the energy-loss spectroscopy

  4. Electronically excited states of chloroethylenes: Experiment and DFT calculations in comparison

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khvostenko, O.G., E-mail: khv@mail.ru

    2014-08-15

    Highlights: • B3LYP/6-311 + G(d,p) calculations of chloroethylenes molecules were performed. • Calculations were correlated with experiment on the molecules ground and excited states. • The general pattern of electron structure of chloroethylenes was obtained. • Necessity of this data for chloroethylenes negative ions study was noted. - Abstract: B3LYP/6-311 + G(d,p) calculations of ground and electronically excited states of ethylene, chloroethylene, 1,1-dichloroethylene, 1,2-dichloroethylene-cis, 1,2-dichloroethylene-trans trichloroethylene and tetrachloroethylene molecules have been performed. Molecular orbitals images and orbital correlation diagram are given. The calculation results for chloroethylenes electronically excited states were compared with experimental data from the energy-loss spectra obtained and generally considered previously by C.F. Koerting, K.N. Walzl and A. Kupperman. Several new additional triplet and singlet transitions were pointed out in these spectra considering the calculation results. The finding of the additional transitions was supported by the UV absorption spectrum of trichloroethylene recorded in big cuvette (10 cm), where the first three triplet and two low-intensive forbidden singlet transitions were registered. The first triplet of this compound was recorded to be at the same energy as was found with the energy-loss spectroscopy.

  5. A Low Cost Implementation of an Existing Hands-on Laboratory Experiment in Electronic Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clement Onime

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In engineering the pedagogical content of most formative programmes includes a significant amount of practical laboratory hands-on activity designed to deliver knowledge acquisition from actual experience alongside traditional face-to-face classroom based lectures and tutorials; this hands-on aspect is not always adequately addressed by current e-learning platforms. An innovative approach to e-learning in engineering, named computer aided engineering education (CAEE is about the use of computer aids for the enhanced, interactive delivery of educational materials in different fields of engineering through two separate but related components; one for classroom and another for practical hands-on laboratory work. The component for hands-on laboratory practical work focuses on the use of mixed reality (video-based augmented reality tools on mobile devices/platforms. This paper presents the computer aided engineering education (CAEE implementation of a laboratory experiment in micro-electronics that highlights some features such as the ability to closely implement an existing laboratory based hands-on experiment with lower associated costs and the ability to conduct the experiment off-line while maintaining existing pedagogical contents and standards.

  6. Very large solid angle spectrometer for single arm electron scattering experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leconte, P.

    1981-01-01

    Major information about short range behavior of nuclear forces should be obtained through electron scattering experiments at high momentum transfer. Cross sections will be very low as is usually the case in electron scattering. In order to reach them, the solid angle of the detection system will have to be enlarged. Traditional optics cannot give correct answer to the problem. For very large apertures, it is impossible to obtain good focussing properties which provide accurate momentum/position correlation with no dependence on the entrance angles. Furthermore, the experiment will require the measurement of these angles. It means that the final system will be equipped with a complete set of position sensitive detectors able to measure positions and angles of trajectories in both planes. Then, the question arises: is it really necessary to provide good focussing, or more precisely: is it possible to get all the required information without the help of a sophisticated predetermined magnetic optics. We try to answer this question and then to sketch from a new point of view the best spectrometer we could think of

  7. Comments on advanced, time-resolved imaging techniques for free-electron laser (FEL) experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lumpkin, A.H.

    1992-01-01

    An extensive set of time-resolved imaging experiments has been performed on rf-linac driven free-electron lasers (FELs) over the past few years. These experiments have addressed both micropulse and macropulse timescales on both the charged-particle beam and the wiggler/undulator outputs (spontaneous emission and lasing). A brief review of first measurements on photoinjecter micropulse elongation, submacropulse phase slew in drive lasers, submacropulse wavelength shifts in lasers, etc. is presented. This is followed by discussions of new measurements of 35-MeV electron beam micropulse bunch length (<10 ps) using optical transition radiation, some of the first single bend synchrotron radiation beam profile measurements at gamma <80, and comments on the low-jitter synchroscan streak camera tuner. These techniques will be further developed on the 200-650 MeV linac test stand at the Advanced Photon Source (APS) in the next few years. Such techniques should be adaptable to many of the present FEL designs and to some aspects of the next generation of light sources.

  8. Comments on advanced, time-resolved imaging techniques for free-electron laser (FEL) experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lumpkin, A.H.

    1992-11-01

    An extensive set of time-resolved imaging experiments has been performed on rf-linac driven free-electron lasers (FELs) over the past few years. These experiments have addressed both micropulse and macropulse timescales on both the charged-particle beam and the wiggler/undulator outputs (spontaneous emission and lasing). A brief review of first measurements on photoinjecter micropulse elongation, submacropulse phase slew in drive lasers, submacropulse wavelength shifts in lasers, etc. is presented. This is followed by discussions of new measurements of 35-MeV electron beam micropulse bunch length (<10 ps) using optical transition radiation, some of the first single bend synchrotron radiation beam profile measurements at gamma <80, and comments on the low-jitter synchroscan streak camera tuner. These techniques will be further developed on the 200-650 MeV linac test stand at the Advanced Photon Source (APS) in the next few years. Such techniques should be adaptable to many of the present FEL designs and to some aspects of the next generation of light sources.

  9. Vehicle charging and return current measurements during electron-beam emission experiments from the Shuttle Orbiter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hawkins, J.G.

    1988-01-01

    The prime objective of this research was to investigate the electro-dynamic response of the Shuttle Orbiter during electron beam emission from the payload bay. This investigation has been conducted by examining data collected by the Vehicle Charging And Potential (VCAP) Experiment. The VCAP experiment has flown on two Shuttle missions with a Fast Pulse Electron Generator (FPEG) capable of emitting a 100 mA beam of 1 keV electrons. Diagnostics of the charging and return current during beam emission were provided by a combined Charge and Current Probe (CCP) located in the payload bay of the Orbiter. The CCP measurements were used to conduct a parametric study of the vehicle charging and return current as a function of vehicle attitude, ambient plasma parameters, and emitted beam current. In particular, the CCP measurements were found to depend strongly on the ambient plasma density. The vehicle charging during a 100 mA beam emission was small when the predicted ambient plasma density was greater than 3 x 10 5 cm -3 , but appreciable charging occurred when the density was less than this value. These observations indicated that the effective current-collecting area of the Orbiter is approximately 42 m 2 , consistent with estimates for the effective area of the Orbiter's engine nozzles. The operation of the Orbiter's Reaction Control System thrusters can create perturbations in the Orbiter's neutral and plasma environment that affect the CCP measurements. The CCP signatures of thruster firings are quite complex, but in general they are consistent with the depletion of plasma density in the ram direction and the enhancement of plasma density in the Orbiter's wake

  10. A silicon microstrip detector in a magnetic spectrometer for high-resolution electron scattering experiments at the S-DALINAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lenhardt, A.W.; Bonnes, U.; Burda, O.; Neumann-Cosel, P. von; Platz, M.; Richter, A.; Watzlawik, S.

    2006-01-01

    A silicon microstrip detector was developed as focal plane detector of the 169.7 deg. magic angle double-focussing spectrometer at the superconducting Darmstadt electron linear accelerator (S-DALINAC). It allows experiments with minimum ionizing electrons at data rates up to 100 kHz, utilizing the maximum resolution of the spectrometer achievable in dispersion-matching mode

  11. The capacitor banks for the text diagnostic neutral beam and electron cyclotron heating experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelin, K.; Jagger, J.; Baker, M.; Ourou, A.; De Turk, P.

    1986-01-01

    The Texas Experimental Tokamak (TEXT) has been operational since November of 1980. Since that time, many experimental systems have been added to the machine. Currently, two major experiments are being added to compliment the diagnostics already online. These systems, the Diagnostic Neutral Beam (DNB) and the Electron Cyclotron Heating (ECH) experiments are described in separate papers. A set of five modular, bipolar capacitor banks are used to power both the DNB and the ECH. The total capacitance of the banks is 92μF. The stored energy is about 500kJ at+or-100kV. The banks are built as five identical, interchangeable modules. One module is adequate to run the DNB. Up to four banks are used to power the ECH. The banks are portable so that they can be moved to the open end of the laboratory for maintenance. This gives much better access for repair work and allows the experiments to continue to run with the remaining banks. Due to budgetary constraints, these banks were constructed in the most economical manner possible consistent with worker safety and long term reliability. The capacitors themselves are on loan from Los Alamos National Labs. They are rated at 1.85μF at 60kV. Our application requires that they be used in a series/parallel configuration with a peak voltage of 50kV each. This paper describes the electrical, mechanical and control design considerations required to achieve a working set of banks

  12. Web based electronic logbook and experiment run database viewer for Alcator C-Mod

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fredian, T.W.; Stillerman, J.A.

    2006-01-01

    Since 1991, the scientists and engineers at the Alcator C-Mod experiment at MIT have been recording text entries about the experiments being performed in an electronic logbook. In addition, separate documents such as run plans, run summaries and experimental proposals have been created and stored in a variety of formats in computer files. This information has now been organized and made available via any modern web browser. The new web based interface permits the user to browse through all the logbook entries, run information and even view some key data traces of the experiment. Since this information is being catalogued by Internet search engines, these tools can also be used to quickly locate information. The web based logbook and run information interface provides some additional capabilities. Once logged into the web site, users can add, delete or modify logbook entries directly from their browser. The logbook window on their browser also provides dynamic updating when any new logbook entries are made. There is also live C-Mod operation status information with optional audio announcements available. The user can receive the same state change announcements such as 'entering init' or 'entering pulse' as they would if they were sitting in the C-Mod control room. This paper will describe the functionality of the web based logbook and how it was implemented

  13. Phased-array antenna system for electron Bernstein wave heating and current drive experiments in QUEST

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Idei, H.; Sakaguchi, M.; Kalinnikova, E.I.

    2010-11-01

    The phased-array antenna system for Electron Bernstein Wave Heating and Current Drive (EBWH/CD) experiments has been developed in the QUEST. The antenna was designed to excite a pure O-mode wave in the oblique injection for the EBWH/CD experiments, and was tested at a low power level. The measured two orthogonal fields were in excellent agreements with the fields evaluated by a developed Kirchhoff code. The heat load and thermal stress in CW 200 kW operation were analyzed with finite element codes. The phased array has been fast scanned [∼10 4 degree/s] to control the incident polarization and angle to follow time evolutions of the plasma current and density. The RF startup and sustainment experiments were conducted using the developed antenna system. The plasma current (< ∼15 kA) with an aspect ratio of 1.5 was started up and sustained by only RF injection. The long pulse discharge of 10 kA was attained for 40 s with the 30 kW injection. (author)

  14. Behavioral aspects of Lutzomyia longipalpis (Diptera: Psychodidae) in urban area endemic for visceral leishmaniasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Oliveira, E F; Silva, E A; Casaril, A E; Fernandes, C E S; Paranhos Filho, A C; Gamarra, R M; Ribeiro, A A; Brazil, R P; Oliveira, A G

    2013-03-01

    The study of some of the behavioral aspects of the main vector of Leishmania infantum chagasi Cunha & Chagas in the Americas, Lutzomyia longipalpis (Lutz & Neiva), such as dispersion, population size, and vector survival rates, is important for the elucidation of the mechanisms of visceral leishmaniasis transmission. These parameters were studied by means of capture-mark-release-recapture experiments in an urban area of Campo Grande municipality, an endemic area of visceral leishmaniasis, situated in Mato Grosso do Sul state, Brazil. Six capture-mark-release-recapture experiments were undertaken between November 2009 and November 2010 and once in January 2012 with a view to assessing the population size and survival rate of Lu. longipalpis. The insects were released in a peridomicile surrounded by 13 residences. The recaptures were undertaken with automatic light traps for four consecutive weeks after release in the surrounding area. In total, 3,354 sand flies were captured, marked, and released. The overall recapture rate during the capture-mark-release-recapture experiments was 4.23%, of which 92.45% were recaptured at the release site, indicating limited dispersal. The greatest distance recorded from the release site was 165 m for males and 241 m for females. The male daily survival rate, calculated on the basis of regressions from the numbers of marked recaptured insects during the 15 successive days after release was 0.897. The estimated male population size measured by the Lincoln Index was 10,947.127. Though Lu. longipalpis presented a limited dispersion the physical barriers typical of urban environments did not prevent the sand flies from flying long distances.

  15. Electron electric dipole moment experiment using electric-fieldquantized slow cesium atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amini, Jason M.; Munger Jr., Charles T.; Gould, Harvey.

    2007-04-05

    A proof-of-principle electron electric dipole moment (e-EDM)experiment using slow cesium atoms, nulled magnetic fields, and electricfield quantization has been performed. With the ambient magnetic fieldsseen by the atoms reduced to less than 200 pT, an electric field of 6MV/m lifts the degeneracy between states of unequal lbar mF rbar and,along with the low (approximately 3 m/s) velocity, suppresses thesystematic effect from the motional magnetic field. The low velocity andsmall residual magnetic field have made it possible to induce transitionsbetween states and to perform state preparation, analysis, and detectionin regions free of applied static magnetic and electric fields. Thisexperiment demonstrates techniques that may be used to improve the e-EDMlimit by two orders of magnitude, but it is not in itself a sensitivee-EDM search, mostly due to limitations of the laser system.

  16. A long electromagnetic wiggler for the paladin free-electron laser experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deis, G.A.; Harvey, A.R.; Parkison, C.D.; Prosnitz, D.; Rego, J.; Scharlemann, E.T.; Halbach, K.

    1987-01-01

    We have designed, built, and tested a 25.6-m-long wiggler for a free-electron-laser (FEL) experiment. It is a DC iron-core electromagnetic wiggler that incorporates a number of important and unique features. Permanent magnets are used to suppress saturation in the iron and extend the linear operating range. Steering-free excitation allows real-time adjustment of the field taper without causing beam steering. Wiggle-plane focusing is produced by curved pole tips. The magnitude of random pole-to-pole field errors is minimized by a mechanical design concept that reduces tolerance stackup in critical locations. To date, we have tested 15 m of this wiggler, and our measurements have shown exceptionally low levels of random errors. 8 refs

  17. Spectrometer for X-ray emission experiments at FERMI free-electron-laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poletto, L.; Frassetto, F.; Miotti, P.; Di Cicco, A.; Iesari, F.; Finetti, P.; Grazioli, C.; Kivimäki, A.; Stagira, S.; Coreno, M.

    2014-01-01

    A portable and compact photon spectrometer to be used for photon in-photon out experiments, in particular x-ray emission spectroscopy, is presented. The instrument operates in the 25–800 eV energy range to cover the full emissions of the FEL1 and FEL2 stages of FERMI. The optical design consists of two interchangeable spherical varied-lined-spaced gratings and a CCD detector. Different input sections can be accommodated, with/without an entrance slit and with/without an additional relay mirror, that allow to mount the spectrometer in different end-stations and at variable distances from the target area both at synchrotron and at free-electron-laser beamlines. The characterization on the Gas Phase beamline at ELETTRA Synchrotron (Italy) is presented

  18. An Ensemble of Neural Networks for Online Electron Filtering at the ATLAS Experiment.

    CERN Document Server

    Da Fonseca Pinto, Joao Victor; The ATLAS collaboration

    2018-01-01

    In 2017 the ATLAS experiment implemented an ensemble of neural networks (NeuralRinger algorithm) dedicated to improving the performance of filtering events containing electrons in the high-input rate online environment of the Large Hadron Collider at CERN, Geneva. The ensemble employs a concept of calorimetry rings. The training procedure and final structure of the ensemble are used to minimize fluctuations from detector response, according to the particle energy and position of incidence. A detailed study was carried out to assess profile distortions in crucial offline quantities through the usage of statistical tests and residual analysis. These details and the online performance of this algorithm during the 2017 data-taking will be presented.

  19. First results of the University of Maryland electron beam transport experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Namkung, W.; Loschialpo, P.; Reiser, M.; Suter, J.; Lawson, J.D.

    1981-01-01

    A study is made of emittance growth in periodically focused intense beams. For initial studies, the electron gun consists of a 1-cm diam., dispenser-type cathode and an anode covered with a wire mesh. To avoid neutralization, 5 /mu/s, 60 Hz pulses are used and the current is 230 mA at 5 kV. By varying the voltage from 10 kV to 500 volts the space charge depression, /omega/sub //omega/sub //o, of the particle oscillation frequencies in the focusing channel can be changed from approximately 0.04 to approximately 0.2. Further increase of /omega/sub //omega/sub //o should be possible with modified guns and the use of emittance control grids. Four prototype solenoids have been built, and the results of experiments with the first two are presented. 8 refs

  20. Low voltage powering of on-detector electronics for HL-LHC experiments upgrades

    CERN Document Server

    Bobillier, Vincent; Vasey, Francois; Karmakar, Sabyasachi; Maity, Manas; Roy, Subhasish; Kundu, Tapas Kumar

    2018-01-01

    All LHC experiments will be upgraded during the next LHC long shutdowns (LS2 and LS3). The increase in resolution and luminosity and the use of more advanced CMOS technology nodes typically implies higher current consumption of the on-detector electronics. In this context, and in view of limiting the cable voltage drop, point-of-load DC-DC converters will be used on detector. This will have a direct impact on the existing powering scheme, implying new AC-DC and/or DC-DC stages as well as changes in the power cabling infrastructure. This paper presents the first results obtained while evaluating different LV powering schemes and distribution layouts for HL-LHC trackers. The precise low voltage power source requirements are being assessed and understood using the CMS tracker upgrade as a use-case.

  1. Emittance growth caused by bends in the Los Alamos free-electron laser energy recovery experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlsten, B.E.

    1987-01-01

    Experimentally transporting the beam from the wiggler to the decelerators in the energy recovery experiment (ERX) at the Los Alamos National Laboratory free-electron laser was more difficult than expected because of the large initial emittance in the beam. This emittance was apparently caused in an early 60 0 achromatic bend. To get this beam through subsequent bends without wall interception, the quadrupole focusing had to be changed from the design amount; as a result, the emittance grew further. This paper discusses various mechanisms for this emittance growth in the 60 0 bend, including effects caused by path changes in the bend resulting from wake-field-induced energy changes of particles in the beam and examines emittance filters, ranging from a simple aperture near a beam crossover to more complicated telescope schemes designed to regain the original emittance before the 60 0 bend

  2. A search for muon neutrino to electron neutrino oscillations in the MINOS Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ochoa Ricoux, Juan Pedro [California Inst. of Technology (CalTech), Pasadena, CA (United States)

    2009-01-01

    We perform a search for vμ → ve oscillations, a process which would manifest a nonzero value of the θ13 mixing angle, in the MINOS long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiment. The analysis consists of searching for an excess of ve charged-current candidate events over the predicted backgrounds, made mostly of neutral-current events with high electromagnetic content. A novel technique to select electron neutrino events is developed, which achieves an improved separation between the signal and the backgrounds, and which consequently yields a better reach in θ13. The backgrounds are predicted in the Far Detector from Near Detector measurements. An excess is observed in the Far Detector data over the predicted backgrounds, which is consistent with the background-only hypothesis at 1.2 standard deviations.

  3. Beam experiments with the Grenoble test electron cyclotron resonance ion source at iThemba LABS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomae, R., E-mail: rthomae@tlabs.ac.za; Conradie, J.; Fourie, D.; Mira, J.; Nemulodi, F. [iThemba LABS, P.O. Box 722, Somerset West 7130 (South Africa); Kuechler, D.; Toivanen, V. [CERN, BE/ABP/HSL, 1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland)

    2016-02-15

    At iThemba Laboratory for Accelerator Based Sciences (iThemba LABS) an electron cyclotron ion source was installed and commissioned. This source is a copy of the Grenoble Test Source (GTS) for the production of highly charged ions. The source is similar to the GTS-LHC at CERN and named GTS2. A collaboration between the Accelerators and Beam Physics Group of CERN and the Accelerator and Engineering Department of iThemba LABS was proposed in which the development of high intensity argon and xenon beams is envisaged. In this paper, we present beam experiments with the GTS2 at iThemba LABS, in which the results of continuous wave and afterglow operation of xenon ion beams with oxygen as supporting gases are presented.

  4. Experiments on electron temperature profile resilience in FTU tokamak with continuous and modulated ECRH

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cirant, S.

    2002-01-01

    Experiments performed on FTU tokamak, aiming at validation of physics-based transport models of the electron temperature profile resilience, are presented. ECRH is used to probe transport features, both in steady-state and in response to perturbations, while ECCD and LHCD are used for current density profile shaping. Observed confinement behaviour shows agreement with a critical temperature gradient length modelling. Central, low gradient plasma is characterized by low stiffness and low electron thermal diffusivity. Strong stiffness and high conduction are found in the confinement region. Resilience is experimentally characterized by an index of the resistance of the profile to adapt its shape to localized ECRH, while the diffusivity and its low-high transition are measured both by power balance and heat pulse propagation analysis. A particular attention is given to the investigation of the transition layer between low-high diffusivity and low-high stiffness regions. A dependence of LTc on magnetic shear, similar to what found in Tore Supra, and consistent with ETG based anomalous transport, is found. (author)

  5. VME as a front-end electronics system in high energy physics experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohska, T.K.

    1990-01-01

    It is only a few years since the VME became a standard system, yet the VME system is already so much more popular than other systems. The VME system was developed for industrial applications and not for the scientific research, and high energy physics field is a tiny market when compared with the industrial market. Considerations made here indicate that the VME system would be a good one for a rear-end system, but would not be a good candidate for front-end electronics in physics experiments. Furthermore, there is a fear that the VXI bus could become popular in this field of instrumentation since the VXI system is backed up by major suppliers of instrumentation in the high energy physics field. VXI would not be an adequate system for front-end electronics, yet advertised to be one. It would be worse to see the VXI system to become a standard system for high energy physics instrumentation than the VME system to be one. The VXI system would do a mediocre job so that people might be misled to think that the VXI system can be used as front-end system. (N.K.)

  6. Runaway electron mitigation by 3D fields in the ASDEX-Upgrade experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gobbin, M.; Li, L.; Liu, Y. Q.; Marrelli, L.; Nocente, M.; Papp, G.; Pautasso, G.; Piovesan, P.; Valisa, M.; Carnevale, D.; Esposito, B.; Giacomelli, L.; Gospodarczyk, M.; McCarthy, P. J.; Martin, P.; Suttrop, W.; Tardocchi, M.; Teschke, M.; the ASDEX Upgrade Team; the EUROfusion MST1 Team

    2018-01-01

    Disruption-generated runaway electron (RE) beams represent a severe threat for tokamak plasma-facing components in high current devices like ITER, thus motivating the search of mitigation techniques. The application of 3D fields might aid this purpose and recently was investigated also in the ASDEX Upgrade experiment by using the internal active saddle coils (termed B-coils). Resonant magnetic perturbations (RMPs) with dominant toroidal mode number n = 1 have been applied by the B-coils, in a RE specific scenario, before and during disruptions, which are deliberately created via massive gas injection. The application of RMPs affects the electron temperature profile and seemingly changes the dynamics of the disruption; this results in a significantly reduced current and lifetime of the generated RE beam. A similar effect is observed also in the hard-x-ray (HXR) spectrum, associated to RE emission, characterized by a partial decrease of the energy content below 1 MeV when RMPs are applied. The strength of the observed effects strongly depends on the upper-to-lower B-coil phasing, i.e. on the poloidal spectrum of the applied RMPs, which has been reconstructed including the plasma response by the code MARS-F. A crude vacuum approximation fails in the interpretation of the experimental findings: despite the relatively low β (< 0.5 % ) of these discharges, a modest amplification (factor of 2) of the edge kink response occurs, which has to be considered to explain the observed suppression effects.

  7. IN-SITU EXPERIMENTS OF VACUUM DISCHARGE USING SCANNING ELECTRON MICROSCOPES

    CERN Document Server

    Muranaka, T; Leifer, K; Ziemann, V

    2011-01-01

    The fundamental understanding of vacuum discharge mechanisms and induced surface damage is indispensable for the CLIC feasibility study. We have been conducting dc sparc experiments inside a Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) at Uppsala university in order to investigate localized breakdown phenomena. By using a SEM, we achieve the resolution of the electron probe in the few-nm range, which is of great advantage as the surface roughness of the polished accelerating structures is in the same scale. The high accelerating field of 1 GV/m is realized by biasing an electrode with 1 kV set above the sample with a gap of sub μm. Furthermore, a second SEM equipped with a Focused Ion Beam (FIB) is used to modify the topography of sample surfaces thus the geometrical dependence of field emissions and vacuum discharges can be studied. The FIB can be used for the surface damage analysis as well. We have demonstrated subsurface damage observations by using FIB to sputter a rectangular recess into the sample in the breakd...

  8. Electron Bernstein wave emission based diagnostic on National Spherical Torus Experiment (invited)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diem, S.; Taylor, G.; Caughman, John B.; Efthimion, P.C.; Kugel, H.; LeBlanc, B.; Preinhaelter, J.; Sabbagh, S.A.; Urban, J.

    2008-01-01

    National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) is a spherical tokamak (ST) that operates with n(e) up to 10(20) m(-3) and B-T less than 0.6 T, cutting off low harmonic electron cyclotron (EC) emission widely used for T-e measurements on conventional aspect ratio tokamaks. The electron Bernstein wave (EBW) can propagate in ST plasmas and is emitted at EC harmonics. These properties suggest thermal EBW emission (EBE) may be used for local T-e measurements in the ST. Practically, a robust T-e(R,t) EBE diagnostic requires EBW transmission efficiencies of >90% for a wide range of plasma conditions. EBW emission and coupling physics were studied on NSTX with an obliquely viewing EBW to O-mode (B-X-O) diagnostic with two remotely steered antennas, coupled to absolutely calibrated radiometers. While T-e(R,t) measurements with EBW emission on NSTX were possible, they were challenged by several issues. Rapid fluctuations in edge n(e) scale length resulted in >20% changes in the low harmonic B-X-O transmission efficiency. Also, B-X-O transmission efficiency during H modes was observed to decay by a factor of 5-10 to less than a few percent. The B-X-O transmission behavior during H modes was reproduced by EBE simulations that predict that EBW collisional damping can significantly reduce emission when T-e < 30 eV inside the B-X-O mode conversion (MC) layer. Initial edge lithium conditioning experiments during H modes have shown that evaporated lithium can increase T-e inside the B-X-O MC layer, significantly increasing B-X-O transmission.

  9. Electron Bernstein Wave Emission Based Diagnostic on National Spherical Torus Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diem, S.; Taylor, G.; Caughman, John B.; Efthimion, P.C.; Kugel, H.; LeBlanc, B.; Preinhaelter, J.; Sabbagh, S.A.; Urban, J.; Wilgen, John B.

    2008-01-01

    National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) is a spherical tokamak (ST) that operates with n(e) up to 10(20) m(-3) and B(T) less than 0.6 T, cutting off low harmonic electron cyclotron (EC) emission widely used for T(e) measurements on conventional aspect ratio tokamaks. The electron Bernstein wave (EBW) can propagate in ST plasmas and is emitted at EC harmonics. These properties suggest thermal EBW emission (EBE) may be used for local T(e) measurements in the ST. Practically, a robust T(e)(R,t) EBE diagnostic requires EBW transmission efficiencies of >90% for a wide range of plasma conditions. EBW emission and coupling physics were studied on NSTX with an obliquely viewing EBW to O-mode (B-X-O) diagnostic with two remotely steered antennas, coupled to absolutely calibrated radiometers. While T(e)(R,t) measurements with EBW emission on NSTX were possible, they were challenged by several issues. Rapid fluctuations in edge n(e) scale length resulted in >20% changes in the low harmonic B-X-O transmission efficiency. Also, B-X-O transmission efficiency during H modes was observed to decay by a factor of 5-10 to less than a few percent. The B-X-O transmission behavior during H modes was reproduced by EBE simulations that predict that EBW collisional damping can significantly reduce emission when T(e)< 30 eV inside the B-X-O mode conversion (MC) layer. Initial edge lithium conditioning experiments during H modes have shown that evaporated lithium can increase T(e) inside the B-X-O MC layer, significantly increasing B-X-O transmission.

  10. Building a national electronic medical record exchange system - experiences in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yu-Chuan Jack; Yen, Ju-Chuan; Chiu, Wen-Ta; Jian, Wen-Shan; Syed-Abdul, Shabbir; Hsu, Min-Huei

    2015-08-01

    There are currently 501 hospitals and about 20,000 clinics in Taiwan. The National Health Insurance (NHI) system, which is operated by the NHI Administration, uses a single-payer system and covers 99.9% of the nation's total population of 23,000,000. Taiwan's NHI provides people with a high degree of freedom in choosing their medical care options. However, there is the potential concern that the available medical resources will be overused. The number of doctor consultations per person per year is about 15. Duplication of laboratory tests and prescriptions are not rare either. Building an electronic medical record exchange system is a good method of solving these problems and of improving continuity in health care. In November 2009, Taiwan's Executive Yuan passed the 'Plan for accelerating the implementation of electronic medical record systems in medical institutions' (2010-2012; a 3-year plan). According to this plan, a patient can, at any hospital in Taiwan, by using his/her health insurance IC card and physician's medical professional IC card, upon signing a written agreement, retrieve all important medical records for the past 6 months from other participating hospitals. The focus of this plan is to establish the National Electronic Medical Record Exchange Centre (EEC). A hospital's information system will be connected to the EEC through an electronic medical record (EMR) gateway. The hospital will convert the medical records for the past 6 months in its EMR system into standardized files and save them on the EMR gateway. The most important functions of the EEC are to generate an index of all the XML files on the EMR gateways of all hospitals, and to provide search and retrieval services for hospitals and clinics. The EEC provides four standard inter-institution EMR retrieval services covering medical imaging reports, laboratory test reports, discharge summaries, and outpatient records. In this system, we adopted the Health Level 7 (HL7) Clinical Document

  11. Angle selective backscattered electron contrast in the low-voltage scanning electron microscope: Simulation and experiment for polymers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wan, Q., E-mail: qwan2@sheffield.ac.uk [Department of Material Science and Engineering, University of Sheffield, Western Bank, Sheffield S10 2TN (United Kingdom); Masters, R.C. [Department of Material Science and Engineering, University of Sheffield, Western Bank, Sheffield S10 2TN (United Kingdom); Lidzey, D. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Sheffield, Western Bank, Sheffield S10 2TN (United Kingdom); Abrams, K.J. [Department of Material Science and Engineering, University of Sheffield, Western Bank, Sheffield S10 2TN (United Kingdom); Dapor, M. [European Centre for Theoretical Studies in Nuclear Physics and Related Areas (ECT-FBK) and Trento Institute for Fundamental Physics and Applications (TIFPA-INFN), via Sommarive 18, I-38123 Trento (Italy); Plenderleith, R.A. [Department of Material Science and Engineering, University of Sheffield, Western Bank, Sheffield S10 2TN (United Kingdom); Rimmer, S. [Department of Chemistry, University of Sheffield, Western Bank, Sheffield S10 2TN (United Kingdom); Claeyssens, F.; Rodenburg, C. [Department of Material Science and Engineering, University of Sheffield, Western Bank, Sheffield S10 2TN (United Kingdom)

    2016-12-15

    Recently developed detectors can deliver high resolution and high contrast images of nanostructured carbon based materials in low voltage scanning electron microscopes (LVSEM) with beam deceleration. Monte Carlo Simulations are also used to predict under which exact imaging conditions purely compositional contrast can be obtained and optimised. This allows the prediction of the electron signal intensity in angle selective conditions for back-scattered electron (BSE) imaging in LVSEM and compares it to experimental signals. Angle selective detection with a concentric back scattered (CBS) detector is considered in the model in the absence and presence of a deceleration field, respectively. The validity of the model prediction for both cases was tested experimentally for amorphous C and Cu and applied to complex nanostructured carbon based materials, namely a Poly(N-isopropylacrylamide)/Poly(ethylene glycol) Diacrylate (PNIPAM/PEGDA) semi-interpenetration network (IPN) and a Poly(3-hexylthiophene-2,5-diyl) (P3HT) film, to map nano-scale composition and crystallinity distribution by avoiding experimental imaging conditions that lead to a mixed topographical and compositional contrast - Highlights: • An optimised model for nano-scale analysis of beam sensitive materials by LVSEM. • Simulation and separation of composition and topography in a CBS detector. • Selective angle backscattered electron collection for mapping of polymers.

  12. Angle selective backscattered electron contrast in the low-voltage scanning electron microscope: Simulation and experiment for polymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wan, Q.; Masters, R.C.; Lidzey, D.; Abrams, K.J.; Dapor, M.; Plenderleith, R.A.; Rimmer, S.; Claeyssens, F.; Rodenburg, C.

    2016-01-01

    Recently developed detectors can deliver high resolution and high contrast images of nanostructured carbon based materials in low voltage scanning electron microscopes (LVSEM) with beam deceleration. Monte Carlo Simulations are also used to predict under which exact imaging conditions purely compositional contrast can be obtained and optimised. This allows the prediction of the electron signal intensity in angle selective conditions for back-scattered electron (BSE) imaging in LVSEM and compares it to experimental signals. Angle selective detection with a concentric back scattered (CBS) detector is considered in the model in the absence and presence of a deceleration field, respectively. The validity of the model prediction for both cases was tested experimentally for amorphous C and Cu and applied to complex nanostructured carbon based materials, namely a Poly(N-isopropylacrylamide)/Poly(ethylene glycol) Diacrylate (PNIPAM/PEGDA) semi-interpenetration network (IPN) and a Poly(3-hexylthiophene-2,5-diyl) (P3HT) film, to map nano-scale composition and crystallinity distribution by avoiding experimental imaging conditions that lead to a mixed topographical and compositional contrast - Highlights: • An optimised model for nano-scale analysis of beam sensitive materials by LVSEM. • Simulation and separation of composition and topography in a CBS detector. • Selective angle backscattered electron collection for mapping of polymers.

  13. Electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    International Acer Incorporated, Hsin Chu, Taiwan Aerospace Industrial Development Corporation, Taichung, Taiwan American Institute of Taiwan, Taipei, Taiwan...Singapore and Malaysia .5 - 4 - The largest market for semiconductor products is the high technology consumer electronics industry that consumes up...Singapore, and Malaysia . A new semiconductor facility costs around $3 billion to build and takes about two years to become operational

  14. ELSA - one year of experience with the Bonn Electron Stretcher Accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Althoff, K.H.; Drachenfels, W.v.; Dreist, A.; Husmann, D.; Neckenig, M.; Nuhn, H.D.; Schillo, M.; Schittko, F.J.; Wermelskirchen, C.

    1990-01-01

    One and a half year ago the Bonn Electron Stretcher Accelerator ELSA came into operation. Since then detailed machine studies have been performed between 0.5 and 2 GeV. The control system proved to be a valuable tool for operating the machine. Injection into ELSA including the fast extraction out of the 2.5 GeV booster-synchrotron has been investigated. The adjustment of dipoles and quadrupoles has been checked by closed orbit measurements. The slow extraction at a third integer resonance has been studied in detail. Extraction times up to 200 msec with a duty factor of about 35% are possible. For synchrotron radiation experiments the accumulation and storage of high currents up to 275 mA in ELSA was tested. The beam lifetime (1/e point) at 30 mA is in the order of 15 min. (due to vacuum limitations). Since one year the three experiments have been supplied with external beams. (author) 3 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab

  15. Studies of scintillator optical properties, electronics simulation and data analysis for the BOREXINO neutrino experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewke, Timo

    2013-01-01

    Borexino is a state-of-the-art low-energy neutrino detector. Many results, like the first real-time measurement of 7 Be neutrinos and the detection of pep neutrinos, could be reported. However, still some parts of the solar neutrino spectrum remain unseen. With a better detector understanding and monitoring these unexploited regions could be investigated. The results achieved in course of the present thesis account for accomplishing these improvements. First, the ionization quenching for electrons in liquid scintillators is investigated using a specially designed and build experiment. This effect is especially interesting for low-energy events and, therefore, has a direct influence on the possibility to detect CNO and pp neutrinos. With a coincidence circuit and the properties of Compton scattering the quenching is analysed. Further, the so-called Birks factor kB is measured for the scintillator used in the running Borexino experiment. As the Birks factor is also an important input parameter to simulations of the future large scale neutrino experiment LENA, the Birks factor of LENA's most probable scintillator is determined as well. Second, as muons are responsible for a large amount of background, an excellent working muon veto is essential. During this thesis, it was achieved to monitor the muon tagging stability and efficiency for a long period of time. Further, to verify the muon track reconstruction Monte Carlo simulations are needed. For the Inner Detector of Borexino the simulation is fully operable. In course of this thesis the complete electronics system of the Outer Detector is included into the simulation tool. In this way, a functioning simulation mimicking real physical events is generated. In addition, the output of the simulation can now be accessed and evaluated by the normal data handling system of Borexino. A comparison to real data and, therefore, validating the muon track reconstruction is now possible. Last, to check the neutron tagging, CNGS

  16. Studies of scintillator optical properties, electronics simulation and data analysis for the BOREXINO neutrino experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewke, Timo

    2013-10-18

    Borexino is a state-of-the-art low-energy neutrino detector. Many results, like the first real-time measurement of {sup 7}Be neutrinos and the detection of pep neutrinos, could be reported. However, still some parts of the solar neutrino spectrum remain unseen. With a better detector understanding and monitoring these unexploited regions could be investigated. The results achieved in course of the present thesis account for accomplishing these improvements. First, the ionization quenching for electrons in liquid scintillators is investigated using a specially designed and build experiment. This effect is especially interesting for low-energy events and, therefore, has a direct influence on the possibility to detect CNO and pp neutrinos. With a coincidence circuit and the properties of Compton scattering the quenching is analysed. Further, the so-called Birks factor kB is measured for the scintillator used in the running Borexino experiment. As the Birks factor is also an important input parameter to simulations of the future large scale neutrino experiment LENA, the Birks factor of LENA's most probable scintillator is determined as well. Second, as muons are responsible for a large amount of background, an excellent working muon veto is essential. During this thesis, it was achieved to monitor the muon tagging stability and efficiency for a long period of time. Further, to verify the muon track reconstruction Monte Carlo simulations are needed. For the Inner Detector of Borexino the simulation is fully operable. In course of this thesis the complete electronics system of the Outer Detector is included into the simulation tool. In this way, a functioning simulation mimicking real physical events is generated. In addition, the output of the simulation can now be accessed and evaluated by the normal data handling system of Borexino. A comparison to real data and, therefore, validating the muon track reconstruction is now possible. Last, to check the neutron

  17. Electron microprobe analyses of selected samples from deep rock disposal experiment No. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hlava, P.F.; Chambers, W.F.

    1976-04-01

    Deep Rock Disposal Experiment No. 1 was designed to provide information about the interaction between a molten, glass-based, nuclear waste simulant and rock material. Selected samples from this experiment were examined by optical microscopy and electron probe microanalysis. Analysis of the homogenized material in the convection cell that was created in the central portion of the melt region shows that an amount of rock equal to about one-half of the original amount of waste simulant was incorporated in the melt during the experiment. Stagnant melt at the sides of the cell formed a glass with large compositional gradients. A white band separated the convected and stagnant materials. The color of the band is attributed to light scattering by small crystallites formed during cooling. Four types of crystallites grew from the melt: two oxides, a Mg--Fe borate, and a silicate. Spinel (MgO, Cr 2 O 3 , FeO (Fe 2 O 3 ), and NiO) was the most common crystallite in the glass. The spinel crystallites found within the convection cell displayed skeletal morphology and oscillatory zoning which indicates growth at varying temperatures as they were carried along by convection. A single cluster of nonskeletal (Fe,Cr) 2 O 3 crystallites was found at the bottom of the melt zone where convection did not occur. Mg--Fe borate crystallites grew in clusters in the central portion of the convection cell after convection ceased. A silicate similar to Fe-rich diopside (CaMgSi 2 O 6 ) with unusual amounts of Ce 2 O 3 and other heavy metal oxides formed as larger crystallites in the stagnant melt at the side of the convection cell and as many very small crystallites in the white band

  18. ON EXPERIENCE OF THE ELECTRONIC DOCUMENT MANAGEMENT SYSTEM IMPLEMENTATION IN THE MEDICAL UNIVERSITY

    OpenAIRE

    A. V. Semenets; V. Yu. Kovalok

    2015-01-01

    An importance of the application of the electronic document management to the Ukraine healthcare is shown. The electronic document management systems market overview is presented. Example of the usage of the open-source electronic document management system in the Ternopil State Medical University by I. Ya. Horbachevsky is shown. The implementation capabilities of the electronic document management system within a cloud services are shown. The electronic document management features of the Mi...

  19. The experiments of high power electron beam emission by the K-9M-57 and K-9M-58 rockets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaneko, Osamu; Sasaki, Susumu; Yamori, Akira; Hagiwara, Michinobu; Kawashima, Nobuki

    1977-01-01

    Active experiments have been conducted to obtain the precise picture of the ionosphere and magnetosphere. As the turbulence source of the active experiment by the authors, electron beam was employed, and the variation of the rocket potential, wave excitation and turbulence of peripheral plasma were investigated. The rated voltage and current of the present electron gun were 6 kV and 500 mA, respectively. The Langmuir probe, floating probe, optical detector and wave receiver were used for the measurement of various phenomena associated with electron beam emission. The experimental data on the voltage-current characteristics of the electron gun, the rocket potential, total light emission and plasma density and temperature were obtained by the K-9M-57 and K-9M-58 rockets. (Yoshimori, M.)

  20. The role of secondary electrons in some experiments determining fluorescence emission from nitrogen C3Πu levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blanco, F.; Arqueros, F.

    2005-01-01

    The processes involved in fluorescence emission from C 3 Π u levels of N 2 molecule by electron impact are studied. Secondary electrons are shown to play an important role in typical experiments for the measurement of emission cross sections and fluorescence yields, dominating at high impact energies. A simple model is proposed which accounts for fluorescence measurements in a wide range of experimental conditions, and in particular for some recent results up to 1 GeV energies

  1. Wave excitation in the experiment with an electron beam at the Dzhajkiken Exos-B Japanese satellite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kavashima, N.

    1985-01-01

    An experiment on investigation of beam-plasma interaction in the magnetosphere is carried out at the ''Dzhajkiken (Exos-B)'' japanese satellite. 100-200 eV and 0.25-1 μA electron beam was injected into the magnetosphere. Using LF and HF detectors in low altitude range waves with the frequencies close to the upper hybrid and electron frequencies are recorded. Beyond the plasmapause the satellite was charged to the potential corresponding to the beam energy

  2. ON EXPERIENCE OF THE ELECTRONIC DOCUMENT MANAGEMENT SYSTEM IMPLEMENTATION IN THE MEDICAL UNIVERSITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Semenets

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available An importance of the application of the electronic document management to the Ukraine healthcare is shown. The electronic document management systems market overview is presented. Example of the usage of the open-source electronic document management system in the Ternopil State Medical University by I. Ya. Horbachevsky is shown. The implementation capabilities of the electronic document management system within a cloud services are shown. The electronic document management features of the Microsoft Office 365 and Google Apps For Education are compared. Some results of the usage of the Google Apps For Education inTSMUas electronic document management system are presented.

  3. Physicians’ experience adopting the electronic transfer of care communication tool: barriers and opportunities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Grood C

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Chloe de Grood, Katherine Eso, Maria Jose Santana Department of Community Health Sciences, W21C Research and Innovation Centre, Institute of Public Health, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada Purpose: The purpose of this study was to assess physicians' perceptions on a newly developed electronic transfer of care (e-TOC communication tool and identify barriers and opportunities toward its adoption. Participants and methods: The study was conducted in a tertiary care teaching center as part of a randomized controlled trial assessing the efficacy of an e-TOC communication tool. The e-TOC technology was developed through iterative consultation with stakeholders. This e-TOC summary was populated by acute care physicians (AcPs and communicated electronically to community care physicians (CcPs. The AcPs consisted of attending physicians, resident trainees, and medical students rotating through the Medical Teaching Unit. The CcPs were health care providers caring for patients discharged from hospital to the community. AcPs and CcPs completed validated surveys assessing their experience with the newly developed e-TOC tool. Free text questions were added to gather general comments from both groups of physicians. Units of analysis were individual physicians. Data from the surveys were analyzed using mixed methods. Results: AcPs completed 138 linked pre- and post-rotation surveys. At post-rotation, each AcP completed an average of six e-TOC summaries, taking an average of 37 minutes per e-TOC summary. Over 100 CcPs assessed the quality of the TOC summaries, with an overall rating of 8.3 (standard deviation: 1.48; on a scale of 1–10. Thematic analyses revealed barriers and opportunities encountered by physicians toward the adoption of the e-TOC tool. While the AcPs highlighted issues with timeliness, usability, and presentation, the CcPs identified barriers accessing the web-based TOC summaries, emphasizing that the summaries were timely and the

  4. Lower hybrid heating data on the Wega experiment revisited using ion stochastic heating and electron Landau damping theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gormezano, C.; Hess, W.; Ichtchenko, G.

    1980-07-01

    The already obtained data on the Wega Tokamak by lower hybrid heating (f=500 MHz - Psub(HF)=130 KW) are revisited in the light of recent theories on ion stochastic heating and quasi-linear electron Landau damping. It is possible to correctly estimate with these theories the fast ion mean energy, the H.F. power density coupled to the ions and that coupled to the electrons. The values of the parallel index of refraction, Nsub(//), which are necessary to obtain a good quantitative agreement between experiment and theoretical estimates, are the same for the ions and for the electrons, even though at higher values than expected

  5. Elastic and inelastic electrons in the double-slit experiment: A variant of Feynman's which-way set-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frabboni, Stefano; Gazzadi, Gian Carlo; Grillo, Vincenzo; Pozzi, Giulio

    2015-07-01

    Modern nanotechnology tools allowed us to prepare slits of 90 nm width and 450 nm spacing in a screen almost completely opaque to 200 keV electrons. Then by covering both slits with a layer of amorphous material and carrying out the experiment in a conventional transmission electron microscope equipped with an energy filter we can demonstrate that the diffraction pattern, taken by selecting the elastically scattered electrons, shows the presence of interference fringes, but with a bimodal envelope which can be accounted for by taking into account the non-constant thickness of the deposited layer. However, the intensity of the inelastically scattered electrons in the diffraction plane is very broad and at the limit of detectability. Therefore the experiment was repeated using an aluminum film and a microscope also equipped with a Schottky field emission gun. It was thus possible to observe also the image due to the inelastically scattered electron, which does not show interference phenomena both in the Fraunhofer or Fresnel regimes. If we assume that inelastic scattering through the thin layer covering the slits provides the dissipative process of interaction responsible for the localization mechanism, then these experiments can be considered a variant of the Feynman which-way thought experiment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. A function-behavior-structure framework for quantification and reproduction of emotional haptic experience in using an electronic device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bae, Il Ju; Lee, Soo Hong; Ok, Hyung Seok; Lee, Jae In

    2013-01-01

    A user's haptic experience in using an electronic device is related to the continuous and dynamic variances of the structural state of the device. Since the changes of the structural component cause complex changes of the dynamics, it is difficult to predict the user's experience. We propose a function-behavior-structure framework to predict and improve the user's experience. The framework consists of the function layer model, the behavior layer model, and the structure layer model. Especially, the independent behavior model to the device is based on a physical phenomenon. Finally, an optimized structure which produces an ideal haptic experience for a cell phone is suggested.

  7. Controlled molecules for X-ray diffraction experiments at free-electron lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stern, Stephan

    2013-12-01

    X-ray diffractive imaging is at the very heart of materials science and has been utilized for decades to solve unknown molecular structures. Nowadays, it serves as the key method of structural biology to solve molecular structures of large biological molecules comprising several thousand or even millions of atoms. However, X-ray diffraction from isolated molecules is very weak. Therefore, the regular and periodic arrangement of a huge number of identical copies of a certain molecule of interest within a crystal lattice has been a necessary condition in order to exploit Bragg diffraction of X-rays. This results in a huge increase in scattered signal and a strongly improved signal-to-noise ratio compared to diffraction from non-crystalline samples. The major bottleneck of structural biology is that many of biologically interesting molecules refuse to form crystals of sufficient size to be used at synchrotron X-ray lightsources. However, novel X-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs), which became operational very recently, promise to address this issue. X-ray pulses provided by XFELs are many orders of magnitude more intense than X-ray pulses from a synchrotron source and at the same time as short as only several tens of femtoseconds. Combined with wavelengths in the nm-pm range, XFELs are well-suited to study ultrafast atomic and molecular dynamics. Additionally, the ultrashort pulses can be utilized to circumvent the damage threshold which set a limit to the incident intensity in X-ray diffraction experiments before. At XFELs, though eventually destroying the investigated sample, no significant sample deterioration happens on the ultrashort timescale of the XFEL pulse and the measured diffraction pattern is due to an (almost) unharmed sample. In the framework of this thesis, the approach of utilizing the highly intense XFEL pulses for X-ray diffraction of weakly-scattering non-crystalline samples was taken to the limit of small isolated molecules. X-ray diffraction was

  8. Pharmacy Customers’ Experiences With Electronic Prescriptions: Cross-Sectional Survey on Nationwide Implementation in Finland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timonen, Johanna; Ahonen, Riitta

    2018-01-01

    Background One of the forerunners in electronic health, Finland has introduced electronic prescriptions (ePrescriptions) nationwide by law. This has led to significant changes for pharmacy customers. Despite the worldwide ambition to develop ePrescription services, there are few reports of nationally adopted systems and particularly on the experiences of pharmacy customers. Objective The aim of this study was to investigate Finnish pharmacy customers’ (1) experiences with purchasing medicines with ePrescriptions; (2) experiences with renewing ePrescriptions and acting on behalf of someone else at the pharmacy; (3) ways in which customers keep up to date with their ePrescriptions; and (4) overall satisfaction with ePrescriptions. Methods Questionnaires were distributed to 2913 pharmacy customers aged ≥18 years purchasing prescription medicines for themselves with an ePrescription in 18 community pharmacies across Finland in autumn 2015. Customers’ experiences were explored with 10 structured questions. The data were stored in SPSS for Windows and subjected to descriptive analysis, chi-square, Fisher exact, Kolmogorov-Smirnov, the Mann-Whitney U, and Kruskal-Wallis tests. Results Completed questionnaires were returned by 1288 customers, a response rate of 44.19% (1288/2913). The majority of the respondents did not encounter any problems during pharmacy visits (1161/1278, 90.85%) and were informed about the current status of their ePrescriptions after their medication was dispensed (1013/1276, 79.44%). Over half of the respondents had usually received a patient instruction sheet from their physician (752/1255, 59.92%), and nearly all of them regarded its content as clear (711/724, 98.2%). Half of the respondents had renewed their ePrescriptions through the pharmacy (645/1281, 50.35%), and one-third of them had acted on behalf of someone else with ePrescriptions (432/1280, 33.75%). Problems were rarely encountered in the renewal process (49/628, 7.8%) or when

  9. Pharmacy Customers' Experiences With Electronic Prescriptions: Cross-Sectional Survey on Nationwide Implementation in Finland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lämsä, Elina; Timonen, Johanna; Ahonen, Riitta

    2018-02-23

    One of the forerunners in electronic health, Finland has introduced electronic prescriptions (ePrescriptions) nationwide by law. This has led to significant changes for pharmacy customers. Despite the worldwide ambition to develop ePrescription services, there are few reports of nationally adopted systems and particularly on the experiences of pharmacy customers. The aim of this study was to investigate Finnish pharmacy customers' (1) experiences with purchasing medicines with ePrescriptions; (2) experiences with renewing ePrescriptions and acting on behalf of someone else at the pharmacy; (3) ways in which customers keep up to date with their ePrescriptions; and (4) overall satisfaction with ePrescriptions. Questionnaires were distributed to 2913 pharmacy customers aged ≥18 years purchasing prescription medicines for themselves with an ePrescription in 18 community pharmacies across Finland in autumn 2015. Customers' experiences were explored with 10 structured questions. The data were stored in SPSS for Windows and subjected to descriptive analysis, chi-square, Fisher exact, Kolmogorov-Smirnov, the Mann-Whitney U, and Kruskal-Wallis tests. Completed questionnaires were returned by 1288 customers, a response rate of 44.19% (1288/2913). The majority of the respondents did not encounter any problems during pharmacy visits (1161/1278, 90.85%) and were informed about the current status of their ePrescriptions after their medication was dispensed (1013/1276, 79.44%). Over half of the respondents had usually received a patient instruction sheet from their physician (752/1255, 59.92%), and nearly all of them regarded its content as clear (711/724, 98.2%). Half of the respondents had renewed their ePrescriptions through the pharmacy (645/1281, 50.35%), and one-third of them had acted on behalf of someone else with ePrescriptions (432/1280, 33.75%). Problems were rarely encountered in the renewal process (49/628, 7.8%) or when acting on behalf of another person (25

  10. Controlled molecules for X-ray diffraction experiments at free-electron lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stern, Stephan

    2013-12-15

    X-ray diffractive imaging is at the very heart of materials science and has been utilized for decades to solve unknown molecular structures. Nowadays, it serves as the key method of structural biology to solve molecular structures of large biological molecules comprising several thousand or even millions of atoms. However, X-ray diffraction from isolated molecules is very weak. Therefore, the regular and periodic arrangement of a huge number of identical copies of a certain molecule of interest within a crystal lattice has been a necessary condition in order to exploit Bragg diffraction of X-rays. This results in a huge increase in scattered signal and a strongly improved signal-to-noise ratio compared to diffraction from non-crystalline samples. The major bottleneck of structural biology is that many of biologically interesting molecules refuse to form crystals of sufficient size to be used at synchrotron X-ray lightsources. However, novel X-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs), which became operational very recently, promise to address this issue. X-ray pulses provided by XFELs are many orders of magnitude more intense than X-ray pulses from a synchrotron source and at the same time as short as only several tens of femtoseconds. Combined with wavelengths in the nm-pm range, XFELs are well-suited to study ultrafast atomic and molecular dynamics. Additionally, the ultrashort pulses can be utilized to circumvent the damage threshold which set a limit to the incident intensity in X-ray diffraction experiments before. At XFELs, though eventually destroying the investigated sample, no significant sample deterioration happens on the ultrashort timescale of the XFEL pulse and the measured diffraction pattern is due to an (almost) unharmed sample. In the framework of this thesis, the approach of utilizing the highly intense XFEL pulses for X-ray diffraction of weakly-scattering non-crystalline samples was taken to the limit of small isolated molecules. X-ray diffraction was

  11. A study of muon neutrino to electron neutrino oscillations in the MINOS experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Tingjun [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)

    2009-03-01

    The observation of neutrino oscillations (neutrino changing from one flavor to another) has provided compelling evidence that the neutrinos have non-zero masses and that leptons mix, which is not part of the original Standard Model of particle physics. The theoretical framework that describes neutrino oscillation involves two mass scales (Δmatm2 and Δmsol2), three mixing angles (θ12, θ23, and θ13) and one CP violating phase (δCP). Both mass scales and two of the mixing angles (θ12 and θ23) have been measured by many neutrino experiments. The mixing angle θ13, which is believed to be very small, remains unknown. The current best limit on θ13 comes from the CHOOZ experiment: θ13 < 11° at 90% C.L. at the atmospheric mass scale. δCP is also unknown today. MINOS, the Main Injector Neutrino Oscillation Search, is a long baseline neutrino experiment based at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory. The experiment uses a muon neutrino beam, which is measured 1 km downstream from its origin in the Near Detector at Fermilab and then 735 km later in the Far Detector at the Soudan mine. By comparing these two measurements, MINOS can obtain parameters in the atmospheric sector of neutrino oscillations. MINOS has published results on the precise measurement of Δmatm2 and θ23 through the disappearance of muon neutrinos in the Far Detector and on a search for sterile neutrinos by looking for a deficit in the number of neutral current interactions seen in the Far Detector. MINOS also has the potential to improve the limit on the neutrino mixing angle θ13 or make the first measurement of its value by searching for an electron neutrino appearance signal in the Far Detector. This is the focus of the study presented in this thesis. We developed a neural network based algorithm to

  12. Pixel array detector for X-ray free electron laser experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Philipp, Hugh T., E-mail: htp2@cornell.edu [Department of Physics, Laboratory of Solid State Physics, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Hromalik, Marianne [Electrical and Computer Engineering, SUNY Oswego, Oswego, NY 13126 (United States); Tate, Mark; Koerner, Lucas [Department of Physics, Laboratory of Solid State Physics, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Gruner, Sol M. [Department of Physics, Laboratory of Solid State Physics, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Wilson Laboratory, Cornell University, CHESS, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States)

    2011-09-01

    X-ray free electron lasers (XFELs) promise to revolutionize X-ray science with extremely high peak brilliances and femtosecond X-ray pulses. This will require novel detectors to fully realize the potential of these new sources. There are many current detector development projects aimed at the many challenges of meeting the XFEL requirements . This paper describes a pixel array detector (PAD) that has been developed for the Coherent X-ray Imaging experiment at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) at the SLAC National Laboratory . The detector features 14-bit in-pixel digitization; a 2-level in-pixel gain setting that can be used to make an arbitrary 2-D gain pattern that is adaptable to a particular experiment; the ability to handle instantaneous X-ray flux rates of 10{sup 17} photons per second; and continuous frames rates in excess of 120 Hz. The detector uses direct detection of X-rays in a silicon diode. The charge produced by the diode is integrated in a pixilated application specific integrated circuit (ASIC) which digitizes collected holes with single X-ray photon capability. Each ASIC is 194x185 pixels, each pixel is 110{mu}mx110{mu}m on a side. Each pixel can detect up to 2500 X-rays per frame in low-gain mode, yet easily detects single photons at high-gain. Cooled, single-chip detectors have been built and meet all the required specifications. SLAC National Laboratory is engaged in constructing a tiled, multi-chip 1516x1516 pixel detector.

  13. Introducing sexual orientation and gender identity into the electronic health record: one academic health center's experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callahan, Edward J; Sitkin, Nicole; Ton, Hendry; Eidson-Ton, W Suzanne; Weckstein, Julie; Latimore, Darin

    2015-02-01

    Many U.S. populations experience significant health disparities. Increasing health care providers' awareness of and education about sexual orientation (SO) and gender identity (GI) diversity could help reduce health disparities among lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) patients. The authors share the University of California, Davis, Health System's (UCDHS's) experience as it became the first U.S. academic health center to formally introduce patient SO/GI demographic data into its electronic health record (EHR) as a step toward reducing LGBT health disparities. Adding these data to the EHR initially met with resistance. The authors, members of the UCDHS Task Force for Inclusion of SO/GI in the EHR, viewed this resistance as an invitation to educate leaders, providers, and staff about LGBT health disparities and to expose providers to techniques for discussing SO/GI with patients. They describe the strategies they employed to effect institutional culture change, including involvement of senior leadership, key informant interviews, educational outreach via grand rounds and resident workshops, and creation of a patient safety net through inviting providers to self-identify as welcoming LGBT patients. The ongoing cultural change process has inspired spin-off projects contributing to an improved climate for LGBT individuals at UCDHS, including an employee organization supporting SO/GI diversity, support for and among LGBT medical learners through events and listservs, development and implementation of an LGBT health curriculum, and creation of peer navigator programs for LGBT patients with cancer. The authors reflect on lessons learned and on institutional pride in and commitment to providing quality care for LGBT patients.

  14. Injection Methods and Instrumentation for Serial X-ray Free Electron Laser Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Daniel

    Scientists have used X-rays to study biological molecules for nearly a century. Now with the X-ray free electron laser (XFEL), new methods have been developed to advance structural biology. These new methods include serial femtosecond crystallography, single particle imaging, solution scattering, and time resolved techniques. The XFEL is characterized by high intensity pulses, which are only about 50 femtoseconds in duration. The intensity allows for scattering from microscopic particles, while the short pulses offer a way to outrun radiation damage. XFELs are powerful enough to obliterate most samples in a single pulse. While this allows for a "diffract and destroy" methodology, it also requires instrumentation that can position microscopic particles into the X-ray beam (which may also be microscopic), continuously renew the sample after each pulse, and maintain sample viability during data collection. Typically these experiments have used liquid microjets to continuously renew sample. The high flow rate associated with liquid microjets requires large amounts of sample, most of which runs to waste between pulses. An injector designed to stream a viscous gel-like material called lipidic cubic phase (LCP) was developed to address this problem. LCP, commonly used as a growth medium for membrane protein crystals, lends itself to low flow rate jetting and so reduces the amount of sample wasted significantly. This work discusses sample delivery and injection for XFEL experiments. It reviews the liquid microjet method extensively, and presents the LCP injector as a novel device for serial crystallography, including detailed protocols for the LCP injector and anti-settler operation.

  15. Meaningful Use of Electronic Health Records: Experiences From the Field and Future Opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slight, Sarah Patricia; Berner, Eta S; Galanter, William; Huff, Stanley; Lambert, Bruce L; Lannon, Carole; Lehmann, Christoph U; McCourt, Brian J; McNamara, Michael; Menachemi, Nir; Payne, Thomas H; Spooner, S Andrew; Schiff, Gordon D; Wang, Tracy Y; Akincigil, Ayse; Crystal, Stephen; Fortmann, Stephen P; Bates, David W

    2015-09-18

    With the aim of improving health care processes through health information technology (HIT), the US government has promulgated requirements for "meaningful use" (MU) of electronic health records (EHRs) as a condition for providers receiving financial incentives for the adoption and use of these systems. Considerable uncertainty remains about the impact of these requirements on the effective application of EHR systems. The Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ)-sponsored Centers for Education and Research in Therapeutics (CERTs) critically examined the impact of the MU policy relating to the use of medications and jointly developed recommendations to help inform future HIT policy. We gathered perspectives from a wide range of stakeholders (N=35) who had experience with MU requirements, including academicians, practitioners, and policy makers from different health care organizations including and beyond the CERTs. Specific issues and recommendations were discussed and agreed on as a group. Stakeholders' knowledge and experiences from implementing MU requirements fell into 6 domains: (1) accuracy of medication lists and medication reconciliation, (2) problem list accuracy and the shift in HIT priorities, (3) accuracy of allergy lists and allergy-related standards development, (4) support of safer and effective prescribing for children, (5) considerations for rural communities, and (6) general issues with achieving MU. Standards are needed to better facilitate the exchange of data elements between health care settings. Several organizations felt that their preoccupation with fulfilling MU requirements stifled innovation. Greater emphasis should be placed on local HIT configurations that better address population health care needs. Although MU has stimulated adoption of EHRs, its effects on quality and safety remain uncertain. Stakeholders felt that MU requirements should be more flexible and recognize that integrated models may achieve information

  16. DAQ system for testing RPC front-end electronics of the INO experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hari Prasad, K.; Sukhwani, Menka; Kesarkar, Tushar A.; Kumar, Sandeep; Chandratre, V.B.; Das, D.; Shinde, R.R.; Satyanarayana, B.

    2015-01-01

    The Resistive Plate Chamber (RPC) is the active detector element in the INO experiment. The in-house developed ANUSPARSH-III ASICs are being used as front-end electronics of the detector. The 2 m X 2 m RPC being used has 64-readout channels on X-side and 64-readout channels on Y-side. In order to test and validate the FE along with the RPC, a 64-channel DAQ system has been designed and developed. The detector parameters to be measured are noise rate, efficiency, hit pattern register and time resolution. The salient features of the DAQ system are: 64-channel LVDS receiver in FPGA, FPGA based parameter calculations and a micro controller for acquiring the processed data from FPGAs and sent through Ethernet and USB interfaces. The DAQ system consists of following parts: Two FPGAs each receiving 32 LVDS channels, FPGA firm-ware, micro controller firm-ware, Ethernet interface, embedded web server hosting data analysis software, USB interface, and Lab-windows based data analysis software. The DAQ system has been tested at TIFR with 1 m X 1 m RPC

  17. Smart Trigger Pre-Processor Custom Electronics for the PHENIX Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagle, James L.

    2003-01-01

    OAK-B135 The document provides a final technical report on activities and accomplishments of the experimental relativistic heavy ion physics group at the University of Colorado at Boulder as supported by the Outstanding Junior Investigator Program, Division of Nuclear Physics at the Department of Energy. All of the goals of the grant proposal were achieved during this last year of the Outstanding Junior Investigator funding period. The development of a Smart Trigger Pre-Processor module for fast trigger primitive calculations in the PHENIX experiment has been completed. We finalized the board design, constructed and tested two prototype modules, and with additional funding from the PHENIX project, we fabricated a full set of 15 modules for the Muon Tracking system. During Run-4 at RHIC:, we have begun the process of integrating these modules into the PHENIX data acquisition system, Additionally, we put a large Effort into developing new trigger and fast-track analysis methods for J j J data filtering and reconstruction. These algorithms make use of the trigger primitivE∼s generated via the new electronics

  18. Refrigerant flow through electronic expansion valve: Experiment and neural network modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao, Xiang; Li, Ze-Yu; Shao, Liang-Liang; Zhang, Chun-Lu

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Experimental data from different sources were used in comparison of EEV models. • Artificial neural network in EEV modeling is superior to literature correlations. • Artificial neural network with 4-4-1 structure and S function is recommended. • Artificial neural network is flexible for EEV mass flow rate and opening prediction. - Abstract: Electronic expansion valve (EEV) plays a crucial role in controlling refrigerant mass flow rate of refrigeration or heat pump systems for energy savings. However, complexities in two-phase throttling process and geometry make accurate modeling of EEV flow characteristics more difficult. This paper developed an artificial neural network (ANN) model using refrigerant inlet and outlet pressures, inlet subcooling, EEV opening as ANN inputs, refrigerant mass flow rate as ANN output. Both linear and nonlinear transfer functions in hidden layer were used and compared to each other. Experimental data from multiple sources including in-house experiments of one EEV with R410A were used for ANN training and test. In addition, literature correlations were compared with ANN as well. Results showed that the ANN model with nonlinear transfer function worked well in all cases and it is much accurate than the literature correlations. In all cases, nonlinear ANN predicted refrigerant mass flow rates within ±0.4% average relative deviation (A.D.) and 2.7% standard deviation (S.D.), meanwhile it predicted the EEV opening at 0.1% A.D. and 2.1% S.D.

  19. Measuring $\\theta_{13}$ via Muon Neutrino to Electron Neutrino Oscillations in the MINOS Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toner, Ruth B. [Univ. of Cambridge (United Kingdom). Pembroke College

    2011-01-01

    One of the primary goals in neutrino physics at the present moment is to make a measurement of the neutrino oscillation parameter $\\theta_{13}$. This parameter, in addition to being unknown, could potentially allow for the introduction of CP violation into the lepton sector. The MINOS long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiment has the ability to make a measurement of this parameter, by looking for the oscillation of muon neutrinos to electron neutrinos between a Near and Far Detector over a distance of 735 km. This thesis discusses the development of an analysis framework to search for this oscillation mode. Two major improvements to pre-existing analysis techniques have been implemented by the author. First, a novel particle ID technique based on strip topology, known as the Library Event Matching (LEM) method, is optimized for use in MINOS. Second, a multiple bin likelihood method is developed to fit the data. These two improvements, when combined, increase MINOS' sensitivity to $\\sin^2(2\\theta_{13})$ by 27\\% over previous analyses. This thesis sees a small excess over background in the Far Detector. A Frequentist interpretation of the data rules out $\\theta_{13}=0$ at 91\\%. A Bayesian interpretation of the data is also presented, placing the most stringent upper boundary on the oscillation parameter to date, at $\\sin^2(2\\theta_{13})<0.09(0.015)$ for the Normal (Inverted) Hierarchy and $\\delta_{CP}=0$.

  20. Electronic Health Record (EHR) Organizational Change: Explaining Resistance Through Profession, Organizational Experience, and EHR Communication Quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Ashley K

    2018-04-01

    The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act passed by the U.S. government in 2009 mandates that all healthcare organizations adopt a certified electronic health record (EHR) system by 2015. Failure to comply will result in Medicare reimbursement penalties, which steadily increase with each year of delinquency. There are several repercussions of this seemingly top-down, rule-bound organizational change-one of which is employee resistance. Given the penalties for violating EHR meaningful use standards are ongoing, resistance to this mandate presents a serious issue for healthcare organizations. This study surveyed 345 employees in one healthcare organization that recently implemented an EHR. Analysis of variance results offer theoretical and pragmatic contributions by demonstrating physicians, nurses, and employees with more experience in their organization are the most resistant to EHR change. The job characteristics model is used to explain these findings. Hierarchical regression analyses also demonstrate the quality of communication surrounding EHR implementation-from both formal and informal sources-is negatively associated with EHR resistance and positively associated with perceived EHR implementation success and EHR's perceived relative advantage.

  1. 1-MeV electron beam propagation experiments in neutral gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greenspan, M.A.; Rose, E.A.

    1984-01-01

    Experiments were performed studying the propagation of a 1-MeV, 10-ns electron beam at currents of 2-8 kA. Propagation was studied in a 7.6-cm-diam glass guide tube, the same tube with a conducting screen inside, and in a 3.4-m-diam chamber. In the guide tube with the screen, ion-focused propagation is observed at low pressures (≤ 40 Pa) with net current equal to beam current. At higher pressures (55-130 Pa), a notch in beam current is observed for pressure time products of ≅ 100 Pa-ns. Between 270 Pa and 1070 Pa, good propagation is again observed with net currents of 50-70% of the beam current. The net current fraction of beam current increases with increasing pressure and with decreasing beam current. At pressure above 1070 Pa, hose instability occurs, and net current nearly equal to beam current is observed. The hose frequency is in reasonable accord with theory. Nose erosion is minimized at pressures for 1000-2000 Pa depending on beam current, and increases at lower and higher pressures

  2. Development of a high repetition rate laser-plasma accelerator for ultra-fast electron diffraction experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beaurepaire, B.

    2009-01-01

    Electronic microscopy and electron diffraction allowed the understanding of the organization of atoms in matter. Using a temporally short source, one can measure atomic displacements or modifications of the electronic distribution in matter. To date, the best temporal resolution for time resolved diffraction experiments is of the order of a hundred femto-seconds (fs). Laser accelerators are good candidates to reach the femtosecond temporal resolution in electron diffraction experiments. Such accelerators used to work at a low repetition rate, so that it was necessary to develop a new one operating at a high repetition rate in order to accumulate a large amount of data. In this thesis, a laser-plasma accelerator operating at the kHz repetition rate was developed and built. This source generates electron bunches at 100 keV from 3 mJ and 25 fs laser pulses. The physics of the acceleration has been studied, and the effect of the laser wavefront on the electron transverse distribution has been demonstrated. (author)

  3. Experiments on the injection, confinement, and ejection of electron clouds in a magnetic mirror

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eckhouse, S.; Fisher, A.; Rostoker, N.

    1978-01-01

    A cloud of (5 to 10 keV) electrons is injected into a magnetic mirror field. The magnetic field rises in 40--120 μsec to a maximum of 10 kG. Two methods of injection were tried: In the first, the injector is located at the mirror midplane and electrons are injected perpendicular to the magnetic field lines. In the second scheme, the injector is located near the mirror maximum. Up to about 10 11 electrons were trapped in both schemes with a mean kinetic energy of 0.3 MeV. Measured confinement time is limited only by the magnetic field decay time. The compressed electron cloud executes electrostatic oscillations. The frequency of the oscillation is proportional to the number of electrons trapped, and it is independent of the value of the magnetic field and the initial electron energy. The electron cloud was ejected along the mirror axis and properties of the ejected electron cloud were measured by x-ray pulses from bremstrahlung of electrons on the vacuum system wall and by collecting electrons on a Faraday cup

  4. Nonlinear two-stream interaction between a cold, relativistic electron beam and a collisional plasma-Astron experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newberger, B.S.; Thode, L.E.

    1979-05-01

    Experiments on the two-stream instability of a relativistic electron beam propagating through a neutral gas, carried out with the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory Astron beam, have been analyzed using a nonlinear saturation model for a cold beam. The behavior of the observed microwave emission due to the instability is in good agreement with that of the beam energy loss. Collisions on the plasma electrons weaken the nonlinear state of the instability but do not stabilize the mode. The beam essentially acts as if it were cold, a result substantiated by linear theory for waves propagating along the beam. In order to predict the effect of both beam momentum scatter and plasma electron collisions on the stability of the mode in future experiments a full two-dimensional linear theory must be developed

  5. Measurement of the polarisation of Jefferson Laboratory electron beam by Compton effect for the HAPPEX parity violation experiment in elastic electron-proton scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baylac, Maud

    2000-01-01

    This research thesis reports and describes the first measurements of polarisation of the Jlab electron beam by using the Compton polarimeter, and the exploitation of these measurements by the HAPPEX experiment which aims at determining the contribution of strange quarks to nucleon electromagnetic shape factors. The author first presents these shape factors and their compositions in terms of quarks. He describes the experimental installation used by the HAPPEX experiment for the measurement of the parity violation asymmetry. He presents the principle of Compton polarimetry and the experimental installation used at Jlab. Then, he addresses the main part of his research work which addresses the processing and analysis of data acquired during the HAPPEX experiment: measurement of the experimental asymmetry, and determination of the analysis power. HAPPEX results are finally presented and discussed [fr

  6. First observations of acceleration of injected electrons in a laser plasma beatwave experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ebrahim, N.A.; Martin, F.; Bordeur, P.; Heighway, E.A.; Matte, J.P.; Pepin, H.; Lavigne, P.

    1986-01-01

    The first experimental observations of acceleration of injected electrons in a laser driven plasma beatwave are presented. The plasma waves were excited in an ionized gas jet, using a short pulse high intensity CO 2 laser with two collinearly propagating beams (at λ = 9.6 μm and 10.6 μm) to excite a fast wave (v/sub p/ = c). The source of electrons was a laser plasma produced on an aluminum slab target by a third, synchronized CO 2 laser beam. A double-focusing dipole magnet was used to energy select and inject electrons into the beatwave, and a second magnetic spectrograph was used to analyze the accelerated electrons. Electron acceleration was only observed when the appropriate resonant plasma density was produced (∼ 10 17 cm -3 ), the two laser lines were incident on the plasma, and electrons were injected into this plasma from an external source

  7. Computer experiments on the imaging of point defects with the conventional transmission electron microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krakow, W [Xerox Corp., Rochester, N.Y. (USA)

    1978-02-01

    To aid in the interpretation of high resolution electron micrographs of defect structures in crystals, computer-simulated dark-field electron micrographs have been obtained for a variety of point defects in metals. Interpretation of these images in terms of atomic positions and atom correlations becomes straightforward, and it is a simple matter to distinguish between real structural information and image artifacts produced by the phase contrast mechanism in the electron optical imaging process.

  8. Pharmacy customers' experiences with the national online service for viewing electronic prescriptions in Finland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lämsä, Elina; Timonen, Johanna; Mäntyselkä, Pekka; Ahonen, Riitta

    2017-01-01

    To investigate (1) Finnish pharmacy customers' familiarity with My Kanta, the national online service for viewing electronic prescriptions (ePrescriptions), (2) how commonly My Kanta is used, (3) who the typical users are, and (4) users' experiences of the usability of My Kanta. A survey was conducted among pharmacy customers (aged ≥18) purchasing medicines for themselves. Questionnaires (N=2915) were distributed from 18 community pharmacies across Finland in autumn 2015. The data obtained was stored in SPSS for Windows and subjected to descriptive analysis, chi-square tests and logistic regression analysis. In total, 1288 respondents were included (response rate 44%). Most (62%) of the customers were familiar with My Kanta. The majority of them (78%) were using it to view their ePrescriptions. My Kanta was perceived as clear, easy to use and to provide a good overall picture of the prescribed medications. Familiarity with My Kanta was associated with a higher education than basic school, regular use of prescription medicines, and sufficient information received about ePrescriptions. Men used My Kanta more often than women. Respondents aged 75 or older were less likely to be familiar with and to use the service compared to 18-34year olds. Most of the Finnish pharmacy customers were familiar with the national online service, My Kanta, for viewing ePrescriptions. Service users perceived it as easy to use and beneficial in managing their overall medication. Customers under 75, those educated beyond basic school, those using prescription medicines regularly, and those who had obtained sufficient information about ePrescriptions were most likely to be familiar with My Kanta. Men and customers under 75 were the typical users of the service. Some customers, however, were unaware of the service, or unable or reluctant to use it. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Electronic data capture in a rural African setting: evaluating experiences with different systems in Malawi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Carina; Hall, Jenny; Banda, Masford; Beard, James; Bird, Jon; Kazembe, Peter; Fottrell, Ed

    2014-01-01

    As hardware for electronic data capture (EDC), such as smartphones or tablets, becomes cheaper and more widely available, the potential for using such hardware as data capture tools in routine healthcare and research is increasing. We aim to highlight the advantages and disadvantages of four EDC systems being used simultaneously in rural Malawi: two for Android devices (CommCare and ODK Collect), one for PALM and Windows OS (Pendragon), and a custom-built application for Android (Mobile InterVA--MIVA). We report on the personal field and development experience of fieldworkers, project managers, and EDC system developers. Fieldworkers preferred using EDC to paper-based systems, although some struggled with the technology at first. Highlighted features include in-built skip patterns for all systems, and specifically the 'case' function that CommCare offers. MIVA as a standalone app required considerably more time and expertise than the other systems to create and could not be customised for our specific research needs; however, it facilitates standardised routine data collection. CommCare and ODK Collect both have user-friendly web-interfaces for form development and good technical support. CommCare requires Internet to build an application and download it to a device, whereas all steps can be done offline with ODK Collect, a desirable feature in low connectivity settings. Pendragon required more complex programming of logic, using a Microsoft Access application, and generally had less technical support. Start-up costs varied between systems, and all were considered more expensive than setting up a paper-based system; however running costs were generally low and therefore thought to be cost-effective over the course of our projects. EDC offers many opportunities for efficient data collection, but brings some issues requiring consideration when designing a study; the decision of which hardware and software to use should be informed by the aim of data collection

  10. Computer Cataloging of Electronic Journals in Unstable Aggregator Databases: The Hong Kong Baptist University Library Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yiu-On; Leung, Shirley W.

    2001-01-01

    Discussion of aggregator databases focuses on a project at the Hong Kong Baptist University library to integrate full-text electronic journal titles from three unstable aggregator databases into its online public access catalog (OPAC). Explains the development of the electronic journal computer program (EJCOP) to generate MARC records for…

  11. Theory, simulation and experiments for precise deflection control of radiotherapy electron beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Figueroa, R.; Leiva, J.; Moncada, R.; Rojas, L.; Santibanez, M.; Valente, M.; Young, H. [Universidad de la Frontera, Centro de Fisica e Ingenieria en Medicina, Av. Francisco Salazar 1145, Casilla 54-D, Temuco (Chile); Velasquez, J. [Universidad de la Frontera, Departamento de Ciencias Fisicas, Av. Francisco Salazar 1145, Casilla 54-D, Temuco (Chile); Zelada, G. [Clinica Alemana de Santiago, Av. Vitacura 5951, 13132 Vitacura, Santiago (Chile); Astudillo, R., E-mail: rodolfo.figueroa@ufrontera.cl [Hospital Base de Valdivia, C. Simpson 850, XIV Region de los Rios, Valdivia (Chile)

    2017-10-15

    Conventional radiotherapy is mainly applied by linear accelerators. Although linear accelerators provide dual (electron/photon) radiation beam modalities, both of them are intrinsically produced by a megavoltage electron current. Modern radiotherapy treatment techniques are based on suitable devices inserted or attached to conventional linear accelerators. Thus, precise control of delivered beam becomes a main key issue. This work presents an integral description of electron beam deflection control as required for novel radiotherapy technique based on convergent photon beam production. Theoretical and Monte Carlo approaches were initially used for designing and optimizing devices components. Then, dedicated instrumentation was developed for experimental verification of electron beam deflection due to the designed magnets. Both Monte Carlo simulations and experimental results support the reliability of electrodynamics models used for predict megavoltage electron beam control. (Author)

  12. Theory, simulation and experiments for precise deflection control of radiotherapy electron beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Figueroa, R.; Leiva, J.; Moncada, R.; Rojas, L.; Santibanez, M.; Valente, M.; Young, H.; Velasquez, J.; Zelada, G.; Astudillo, R.

    2017-10-01

    Conventional radiotherapy is mainly applied by linear accelerators. Although linear accelerators provide dual (electron/photon) radiation beam modalities, both of them are intrinsically produced by a megavoltage electron current. Modern radiotherapy treatment techniques are based on suitable devices inserted or attached to conventional linear accelerators. Thus, precise control of delivered beam becomes a main key issue. This work presents an integral description of electron beam deflection control as required for novel radiotherapy technique based on convergent photon beam production. Theoretical and Monte Carlo approaches were initially used for designing and optimizing devices components. Then, dedicated instrumentation was developed for experimental verification of electron beam deflection due to the designed magnets. Both Monte Carlo simulations and experimental results support the reliability of electrodynamics models used for predict megavoltage electron beam control. (Author)

  13. First spin-resolved electron distributions in crystals from combined polarized neutron and X-ray diffraction experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maxime Deutsch

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Since the 1980s it has been possible to probe crystallized matter, thanks to X-ray or neutron scattering techniques, to obtain an accurate charge density or spin distribution at the atomic scale. Despite the description of the same physical quantity (electron density and tremendous development of sources, detectors, data treatment software etc., these different techniques evolved separately with one model per experiment. However, a breakthrough was recently made by the development of a common model in order to combine information coming from all these different experiments. Here we report the first experimental determination of spin-resolved electron density obtained by a combined treatment of X-ray, neutron and polarized neutron diffraction data. These experimental spin up and spin down densities compare very well with density functional theory (DFT calculations and also confirm a theoretical prediction made in 1985 which claims that majority spin electrons should have a more contracted distribution around the nucleus than minority spin electrons. Topological analysis of the resulting experimental spin-resolved electron density is also briefly discussed.

  14. First spin-resolved electron distributions in crystals from combined polarized neutron and X-ray diffraction experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deutsch, Maxime; Gillon, Béatrice; Claiser, Nicolas; Gillet, Jean-Michel; Lecomte, Claude; Souhassou, Mohamed

    2014-05-01

    Since the 1980s it has been possible to probe crystallized matter, thanks to X-ray or neutron scattering techniques, to obtain an accurate charge density or spin distribution at the atomic scale. Despite the description of the same physical quantity (electron density) and tremendous development of sources, detectors, data treatment software etc., these different techniques evolved separately with one model per experiment. However, a breakthrough was recently made by the development of a common model in order to combine information coming from all these different experiments. Here we report the first experimental determination of spin-resolved electron density obtained by a combined treatment of X-ray, neutron and polarized neutron diffraction data. These experimental spin up and spin down densities compare very well with density functional theory (DFT) calculations and also confirm a theoretical prediction made in 1985 which claims that majority spin electrons should have a more contracted distribution around the nucleus than minority spin electrons. Topological analysis of the resulting experimental spin-resolved electron density is also briefly discussed.

  15. Indication of Electron Neutrino Appearance in the T2K experiment and its long-term implications

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2011-01-01

    T2K (Tokai-to-Kamioka) is a long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiment primarily searching for oscillations of muon neutrinos into electron neutrinos. T2K will also make precise measurements of the atmospheric oscillation parameters via muon neutrino disappearance. The experiment uses 30 GeV protons from the new J-PARC Main Ring accelerator, located in Tokai, Japan, to generate a conventional neutrino beam to the Super-Kamiokande far detector. The hadron production measurements of the NA61 experiment at CERN were used to predict the neutrino fluxes at the near and far detectors. The T2K oscillation analysis compares the rates of observed and predicted muon and electron neutrino candidates in the far detector. We present first results based on data accumulated from January 2010 to March 2011. Six electron neutrino events pass the selection criteria for electron appearance at Super-Kamiokande, whereas the expected number of background events is 1.5±0.3. The probability of a fluctuation of the back...

  16. The MOLLER Experiment: ``An Ultra-precise Measurement of the Weak Charge of the Electron using moller Scattering''

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beminiwattha, Rakitha; Moller Collaboration

    2017-09-01

    Parity Violating Electron Scattering (PVES) is an extremely successful precision frontier tool that has been used for testing the Standard Model (SM) and understanding nucleon structure. Several generations of highly successful PVES programs at SLAC, MIT-Bates, MAMI-Mainz, and Jefferson Lab have contributed to the understanding of nucleon structure and testing the SM. But missing phenomena like matter-antimatter asymmetry, neutrino flavor oscillations, and dark matter and energy suggest that the SM is only a `low energy' effective theory. The MOLLER experiment at Jefferson Lab will measure the weak charge of the electron, QWe = 1 - 4sin2θW , with a precision of 2.4 % by measuring the parity violating asymmetry in electron-electron () scattering and will be sensitive to subtle but measurable deviations from precisely calculable predictions from the SM. The MOLLER experiment will provide the best contact interaction search for leptons at low OR high energy makes it a probe of physics beyond the Standard Model with sensitivities to mass-scales of new PV physics up to 7.5 TeV. Overview of the experiment and recent pre-R&D progress will be reported.

  17. A novel technique for determining luminosity in electron-scattering/positron-scattering experiments from multi-interaction events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, A.; O'Connor, C.; Bernauer, J. C.; Milner, R.

    2018-01-01

    The OLYMPUS experiment measured the cross-section ratio of positron-proton elastic scattering relative to electron-proton elastic scattering to look for evidence of hard two-photon exchange. To make this measurement, the experiment alternated between electron beam and positron beam running modes, with the relative integrated luminosities of the two running modes providing the crucial normalization. For this reason, OLYMPUS had several redundant luminosity monitoring systems, including a pair of electromagnetic calorimeters positioned downstream from the target to detect symmetric Møller and Bhabha scattering from atomic electrons in the hydrogen gas target. Though this system was designed to monitor the rate of events with single Møller/Bhabha interactions, we found that a more accurate determination of relative luminosity could be made by additionally considering the rate of events with both a Møller/Bhabha interaction and a concurrent elastic ep interaction. This method was improved by small corrections for the variance of the current within bunches in the storage ring and for the probability of three interactions occurring within a bunch. After accounting for systematic effects, we estimate that the method is accurate in determining the relative luminosity to within 0.36%. This precise technique can be employed in future electron-proton and positron-proton scattering experiments to monitor relative luminosity between different running modes.

  18. Radar observations of the overdense ionospheric ionization created by the artificial electron beam in the 'Zarnitza-2' experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhulin, I.A.; Kustov, A.V.; Uspensky, M.V.; Miroshnikova, T.V.

    1980-01-01

    This work contains an analysis of experimental radar data obtained in the 'Zarnitza-2' experiment when the artificial electron beam was injected into the ionosphere below 100 km. The signals observed just after switching off the electron gun are interpreted as radio echoes of overdense secondary ionization produced by the beam. The size of the secondary ionization torch is estimated and distributions of ionization over the cross-section of the torch are calculated and represented at different time moments, taking into account the motion of the rocket. The azimuth dependence of the echo amplitudes is discussed. The obtained Doppler velocity distribution can be interpreted as a height profile of ionospheric winds

  19. On electron and pion identification using a multilayer perceptron in the transition radiation detector of the CBM experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akishina, T.P.; Denisova, O.Yu.; Ivanov, V.V.

    2009-01-01

    The problem of pion-electron identification based on their energy losses in the TRD is considered in the frame of the CBM experiment. For particles identification an artificial neural network (ANN) was used, a multilayer perceptron realized in JETNET and ROOT packages. It is demonstrated that, in order to get correct and comparable results, it is important to define the network structure correctly. The recommendations for such a selection are given. In order to achieve an acceptable level of pions suppression, the energy losses need to be transformed to more 'effective' variables. The dependency of ANN output threshold for a fixed portion of electron loss on the particle momentum is presented

  20. Suitability of high-current standing-wave linac technology for ultra-relativistic electron beam propagation experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moir, D.C.; Faehl, R.J.; Newberger, B.S.; Thode, L.E.

    1981-01-01

    Near-term development of the existing PHERMEX standing-wave linac would provide a 40 to 60 MeV electron beam with a current of 3 kA capable of answering a number of fundamental issues concerning endoatmospheric, ultra-relativistic electron beam propagation. Inherent high-repetition rate and multiple-pulse capability would allow alternative propagation scenarios to be investigated. Much of the theoretical expertise required to support the technology development and time-resolved beam propagation experiments presently resides within the Theoretical Applications Division

  1. Systematic effects in the HfF+-ion experiment to search for the electron electric dipole moment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrov, A. N.

    2018-05-01

    The energy splittings for J =1 , F =3 /2 , | mF|=3 /2 hyperfine levels of the 3Δ1 electronic state of 180Hf+19F ion are calculated as functions of the external variable electric and magnetic fields within two approaches. In the first one, the transition to the rotating frame is performed, whereas in the second approach, the quantization of rotating electromagnetic field is performed. Calculations are required for understanding possible systematic errors in the experiment to search for the electron electric dipole moment (e EDM ) with the 180Hf+19F ion.

  2. Nurses' Experiences of an Initial and Reimplemented Electronic Health Record Use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chi-Ping; Lee, Ting-Ting; Liu, Chia-Hui; Mills, Mary Etta

    2016-04-01

    The electronic health record is a key component of healthcare information systems. Currently, numerous hospitals have adopted electronic health records to replace paper-based records to document care processes and improve care quality. Integrating healthcare information system into traditional nursing daily operations requires time and effort for nurses to become familiarized with this new technology. In the stages of electronic health record implementation, smooth adoption can streamline clinical nursing activities. In order to explore the adoption process, a descriptive qualitative study design and focus group interviews were conducted 3 months after and 2 years after electronic health record system implementation (system aborted 1 year in between) in one hospital located in southern Taiwan. Content analysis was performed to analyze the interview data, and six main themes were derived, in the first stage: (1) liability, work stress, and anticipation for electronic health record; (2) slow network speed, user-unfriendly design for learning process; (3) insufficient information technology/organization support; on the second stage: (4) getting used to electronic health record and further system requirements, (5) benefits of electronic health record in time saving and documentation, (6) unrealistic information technology competence expectation and future use. It concluded that user-friendly design and support by informatics technology and manpower backup would facilitate this adoption process as well.

  3. Comparative study of the electron density profiles in the compact torus plasma merging experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashiya, Hitoshi; Asaka, Takeo; Katsurai, Makoto

    2003-01-01

    Following two previous papers on the comparative studies of the electron density distributions for a single compact torus (CT) and a spherical tokamak (ST), and for the a single ST and a merged ST, a comparative study on the dynamics of the electron density profile and after the CT and ST plasma merging process was performed. The sharpness of the peak in the electron density profile around the mid-plane just after the merging of CT with a low safety factor (q value) such as RFP or spheromak is found to be related to the speed of the magnetic axis during the plasma merging process. It is also found that the electron density gradient near the plasma edge in a high q ST is larger than that of a low q CT. High q ST is found to be provided with the magnetic structure which is able to sustain a large thermal pressure by a strong j x B force. Despite these differences in the electron density profile between CT and ST during merging, the confinement characteristics evaluated from the number of electrons confined within the magnetic separatrix after the completion of the merging is almost similar between in the merging CT and in the merging ST. For all configurations, the electron density profiles after the completion of the merging are analogous to those of the corresponding single configuration produced without the merging process. (author)

  4. Suppressing Electron Turbulence and Triggering Internal Transport Barriers with Reversed Magnetic Shear in the National Spherical Torus Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Jayson Luc

    2011-10-01

    Observations in the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) have found electron temperature gradients that greatly exceed the linear threshold for the onset for electron temperature gradient-driven (ETG) turbulence. These discharges, deemed electron internal transport barriers (e-ITBs), coincide with a reversal in the shear of the magnetic field and with a reduction in electron-scale density fluctuations, qualitatively consistent with earlier gyrokinetic predictions. To investigate this phenomenon further, we numerically model electron turbulence in NSTX reversed-shear plasmas using the gyrokinetic turbulence code GYRO. These first-of-a-kind nonlinear gyrokinetic simulations of NSTX e-ITBs confirm that reversing the magnetic shear can allow the plasma to reach electron temperature gradients well beyond the critical gradient for the linear onset of instability. This effect is very strong, with the nonlinear threshold for significant transport approaching three times the linear critical gradient in some cases, in contrast with moderate shear cases, which can drive significant ETG turbulence at much lower gradients. In addition to the experimental implications of this upshifted nonlinear critical gradient, we explore the behavior of ETG turbulence during reversed shear discharges. This work is supported by the SciDAC Center for the Study of Plasma Microturbulence, DOE Contract DE-AC02-09CH11466, and used the resources of NCCS at ORNL and NERSC at LBNL. M. Ono et al., Nucl. Fusion 40, 557 (2000).

  5. Experiences in troubleshooting of neutron rem monitor electronics and its subsequent calibration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maithani, Atul; Dash, Amit Kumar; Vijayasekaran, P.; Mathews, Geo; Ajoy, K.C.; Dhanasekaran, A.

    2014-01-01

    This paper deals with the troubleshooting of the signal processing and counting electronics of two no's of Neutron Rem monitors and its subsequent calibration. Electronics servicing with respect to detection of fault in the circuit board, replacement of faulty ICs, circuits (Analog and Digital) tracing and installation of new rechargeable battery pack was done. Electronic calibration using Test pulse generator was carried out for dose rate measurements, amplitude measurements and discriminator level setting. Serial communication settings were checked with both HyperTerminal and software for the monitors. Neutron Source calibration was also carried out for both the monitors. (author)

  6. Non-equilibrium between ions and electrons inside hot spots from National Ignition Facility experiments

    OpenAIRE

    Zhengfeng Fan; Yuanyuan Liu; Bin Liu; Chengxin Yu; Ke Lan; Jie Liu

    2017-01-01

    The non-equilibrium between ions and electrons in the hot spot can relax the ignition conditions in inertial confinement fusion [Fan et al., Phys. Plasmas 23, 010703 (2016)], and obvious ion-electron non-equilibrium could be observed by our simulations of high-foot implosions when the ion-electron relaxation is enlarged by a factor of 2. On the other hand, in many shots of high-foot implosions on the National Ignition Facility, the observed X-ray enhancement factors due to ablator mixing into...

  7. Electronic data capture in a rural African setting: evaluating experiences with different systems in Malawi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carina King

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: As hardware for electronic data capture (EDC, such as smartphones or tablets, becomes cheaper and more widely available, the potential for using such hardware as data capture tools in routine healthcare and research is increasing. Objective: We aim to highlight the advantages and disadvantages of four EDC systems being used simultaneously in rural Malawi: two for Android devices (CommCare and ODK Collect, one for PALM and Windows OS (Pendragon, and a custom-built application for Android (Mobile InterVA – MIVA. Design: We report on the personal field and development experience of fieldworkers, project managers, and EDC system developers. Results: Fieldworkers preferred using EDC to paper-based systems, although some struggled with the technology at first. Highlighted features include in-built skip patterns for all systems, and specifically the ‘case’ function that CommCare offers. MIVA as a standalone app required considerably more time and expertise than the other systems to create and could not be customised for our specific research needs; however, it facilitates standardised routine data collection. CommCare and ODK Collect both have user-friendly web-interfaces for form development and good technical support. CommCare requires Internet to build an application and download it to a device, whereas all steps can be done offline with ODK Collect, a desirable feature in low connectivity settings. Pendragon required more complex programming of logic, using a Microsoft Access application, and generally had less technical support. Start-up costs varied between systems, and all were considered more expensive than setting up a paper-based system; however running costs were generally low and therefore thought to be cost-effective over the course of our projects. Conclusions: EDC offers many opportunities for efficient data collection, but brings some issues requiring consideration when designing a study; the decision of which hardware

  8. Observation of Electron Neutrino Appearance in the NuMI Beam with the NOvA Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niner, Evan David [Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States)

    2015-01-01

    NOvA is a long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiment that uses two functionally identical detectors separated by 810 kilometers at locations 14 milliradians off-axis from the NuMI muon neutrino beam at Fermilab. At these locations the beam energy peaks at 2 GeV. This baseline is the longest in the world for an accelerator-based neutrino oscillation experiment, which enhances the sensitivity to the neutrino mass ordering. The experiment studies oscillations of the muon neutrino and anti-neutrino beam that is produced. Both detectors completed commissioning in the summer of 2014 and continue to collect data. One of the primary physics goals of the experiment is the measurement of electron neutrino appearance in the muon neutrino beam which yields measurements of the oscillation parameters sin213, δ , and the neutrino mass ordering within the standard model of neutrino oscillations. This thesis presents the analysis of data collected between February 2014 and May 2015, corresponding to 3.52 X 1020 protons-on-target. In this first analysis NOvA recorded 6 electron neutrino candidates, which is a 3.3σ observation of electron neutrino appearance. The T2K experiment performs the same measurement on a baseline of 295 kilometers and has a 1 σ preference for the normal mass ordering over the inverted ordering over the phase space of the CP violating parameter δ, which is also weakly seen in the NOvA result. By the summer of 2016 NOvA will triple its statistics due to increased beam power and a completed detector. If electron neutrinos continue to be observed at the current rate NOvA will be able to establish a mass ordering preference at a similar confidence level to T2K.

  9. Backscattered electron emission after proton impact on carbon and gold films: Experiments and simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hespeels, F.; Heuskin, A.C. [University of Namur, PMR, 61 rue de Bruxelles, B-5000 Namur (Belgium); Scifoni, E. [TIFPA-INFN, Trento Institute for Fundamental Physics and Applications, Via Sommarive 14, I-38123 Trento (Italy); GSI-Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung, Biophysik, Max Planck-Strasse 1, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Kraemer, M. [GSI-Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung, Biophysik, Max Planck-Strasse 1, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Lucas, S., E-mail: stephane.lucas@unamur.be [University of Namur, PMR, 61 rue de Bruxelles, B-5000 Namur (Belgium)

    2017-06-15

    This work aims at measuring the proton induced secondary electron energy spectra from nanometer thin films. Backscattered electron energy spectra were measured within an energy range from 0 to 600 eV using a Retarding Field Analyser (RFA). This paper presents energy spectra obtained for proton (0.5 MeV; 1 MeV; 1.5 MeV; 2 MeV) irradiation of thin carbon films (50 and 100 nm thick) and thin gold film (200 nm). These experimental spectra were compared with Monte Carlo simulations based on TRAX code and Geant4 simulation toolkit. Good agreement between experimental, TRAX and Geant4 results were observed for the carbon target. For the gold target, we report major differences between both Monte Carlo environments. Limitation of Geant4 models for low energy electron emission was highlighted. On the contrary, TRAX simulations present encouraging results for the modeling of low-energy electron emission from gold target.

  10. Comparison of ONETRAN calculations of electron beam dose profiles with Monte Carlo and experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garth, J.C.; Woolf, S.

    1987-01-01

    Electron beam dose profiles have been calculated using a multigroup, discrete ordinates solution of the Spencer-Lewis electron transport equation. This was accomplished by introducing electron transport cross-sections into the ONETRAN code in a simple manner. The authors' purpose is to ''benchmark'' this electron transport model and to demonstrate its accuracy and capabilities over the energy range from 30 keV to 20 MeV. Many of their results are compared with the extensive measurements and TIGER Monte Carlo data. In general the ONETRAN results are smoother, agree with TIGER within the statistical error of the Monte Carlo histograms and require about one tenth the running time of Monte Carlo

  11. Japan’s experience of flue gas treatment by electron beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Machi, S.

    2011-01-01

    The electron beam flue gas treatment technology was invented in Japan in 1970's. The paper presents the outlook of the Japanese activities on the development and present state of EBFGT technology. (author)

  12. Japan’s experience of flue gas treatment by electron beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Machi, S.

    2011-07-01

    The electron beam flue gas treatment technology was invented in Japan in 1970's. The paper presents the outlook of the Japanese activities on the development and present state of EBFGT technology. (author)

  13. The measurement of internal conversion electrons of selected nuclei: A physics undergraduate laboratory experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagy, P.; Duggan, J.L.; Desmarais, D.

    1992-01-01

    Thin sources are now commercially available for a wide variety of isotopes that have measurable internal conversion coefficients. The authors have used standard surface barrier detectors, NIM electronics, and a personal computer analyzer to measure conversion electrons from a few of these sources. Conversion electrons energy and intensity were measured for 113 Sn, 133 Ba, 137 Cs, and 207 Bi. From the measured spectra the innershell binding energies of the K ampersand L Shell electrons from the daughter nuclei were determined and compared to theory. The relative conversion coefficients a k /a L and the K/L ration were also measured. The spin and parity change of the transitions will also be assigned based on the selection rules of the transitions

  14. A high performance Front End Electronics for drift chamber readout in MEG experiment upgrade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiarello, G. [Dipartimento di Matematica e Fisica “Ennio De Giorgi” – Universitá del Salento, Via Arnesano, Lecce (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare Sez. Lecce, Via Arnesano, Lecce (Italy); Chiri, C.; Corvaglia, A.; Grancagnolo, F. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare Sez. Lecce, Via Arnesano, Lecce (Italy); Panareo, M. [Dipartimento di Matematica e Fisica “Ennio De Giorgi” – Universitá del Salento, Via Arnesano, Lecce (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare Sez. Lecce, Via Arnesano, Lecce (Italy); Pepino, A., E-mail: aurora.pepino@le.infn.it [Dipartimento di Matematica e Fisica “Ennio De Giorgi” – Universitá del Salento, Via Arnesano, Lecce (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare Sez. Lecce, Via Arnesano, Lecce (Italy); Pinto, C.; Tassielli, G. [Dipartimento di Matematica e Fisica “Ennio De Giorgi” – Universitá del Salento, Via Arnesano, Lecce (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare Sez. Lecce, Via Arnesano, Lecce (Italy)

    2016-07-11

    Front End (FE) Electronics plays an essential role in Drift Chambers (DC) for time resolution and, therefore, spatial resolution. The use of cluster timing techniques, by measuring the timing of all the individual ionization clusters after the first one, may enable to reach resolutions even below 100 μm in the measurement of the impact parameter. To this purpose, a Front End Electronics with a wide bandwidth and low noise is mandatory in order to acquire and amplify the drift chamber signals.

  15. A high performance Front End Electronics for drift chamber readout in MEG experiment upgrade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiarello, G.; Chiri, C.; Corvaglia, A.; Grancagnolo, F.; Panareo, M.; Pepino, A.; Pinto, C.; Tassielli, G.

    2016-01-01

    Front End (FE) Electronics plays an essential role in Drift Chambers (DC) for time resolution and, therefore, spatial resolution. The use of cluster timing techniques, by measuring the timing of all the individual ionization clusters after the first one, may enable to reach resolutions even below 100 μm in the measurement of the impact parameter. To this purpose, a Front End Electronics with a wide bandwidth and low noise is mandatory in order to acquire and amplify the drift chamber signals.

  16. Present status of storage ring free electron laser experiment at ETL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamazaki, T.; Nakamura, T.; Tomimasu, T.; Sugiyama, S.; Noguchi, T.

    1988-01-01

    Outline is described of the present status of the ETL storage-ring free electron laser project. The structure and the performance of the ETL-type transverse optical klystron are given. A modification of the dispersive section has decreased the degradation of the shape of the spontaneous-emission spectrum due to energy spread of the electron beam. Relevant parameters of the stored beam are presented. Measurement of the optical-cavity loss is under way. (author)

  17. Non-equilibrium between ions and electrons inside hot spots from National Ignition Facility experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhengfeng Fan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The non-equilibrium between ions and electrons in the hot spot can relax the ignition conditions in inertial confinement fusion [Fan et al., Phys. Plasmas 23, 010703 (2016], and obvious ion-electron non-equilibrium could be observed by our simulations of high-foot implosions when the ion-electron relaxation is enlarged by a factor of 2. On the other hand, in many shots of high-foot implosions on the National Ignition Facility, the observed X-ray enhancement factors due to ablator mixing into the hot spot are less than unity assuming electrons and ions have the same temperature [Meezan et al., Phys. Plasmas 22, 062703 (2015], which is not self-consistent because it can lead to negative ablator mixing into the hot spot. Actually, this non-consistency implies ion-electron non-equilibrium within the hot spot. From our study, we can infer that ion-electron non-equilibrium exists in high-foot implosions and the ion temperature could be ∼9% larger than the equilibrium temperature in some NIF shots.

  18. Charged particle measurements from a rocket-borne electron accelerator experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duprat, G.R.J.; McNamara, A.G.; Whalen, B.A.

    1982-01-01

    This chapter presents charged particle observations which relate to the spatial distribution of energetic (keV) charged particles surrounding the accelerator during gun firings, the energy distribution of energetic electrons produced in the plasma by the electron beam, and the dependence of these characteristics on the beam energy, current, and injection angle. The primary objective of the flight of the Nike Black Brant rocket (NUB-06) was to use an electron beam to probe the auroral field lines for electric fields parallel to the magnetic field. The secondary objectives were to study electron beam interactions in the ionosphere and spacecraft charging effects. It is demonstrated that during high current (greater than or equal to 10ma electron beam firings, an intense suprathermal as well as energetic electron population is created on flux tubes near the beam. Certain similarities exist between these measurements and corresponding ones made in the Houston vacuum tank suggesting that the same instability observed in the laboratory is occurring at high altitudes in the ionosphere

  19. Suppressing electron turbulence and triggering internal transport barriers with reversed magnetic shear in the National Spherical Torus Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peterson, J. L. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Bell, R.; Guttenfelder, W.; Hammett, G. W.; Kaye, S. M.; LeBlanc, B.; Mikkelsen, D. R. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States); Candy, J. [General Atomics, San Diego, California 92186 (United States); Smith, D. R. [Department of Engineering Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Yuh, H. Y. [Nova Photonics Inc., Princeton, New Jersey 08540 (United States)

    2012-05-15

    The National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) [M. Ono et al., Nucl. Fusion 40, 557 (2000)] can achieve high electron plasma confinement regimes that are super-critically unstable to the electron temperature gradient driven (ETG) instability. These plasmas, dubbed electron internal transport barriers (e-ITBs), occur when the magnetic shear becomes strongly negative. Using the gyrokinetic code GYRO [J. Candy and R. E. Waltz, J. Comput. Phys. 186, 545 (2003)], the first nonlinear ETG simulations of NSTX e-ITB plasmas reinforce this observation. Local simulations identify a strongly upshifted nonlinear critical gradient for thermal transport that depends on magnetic shear. Global simulations show e-ITB formation can occur when the magnetic shear becomes strongly negative. While the ETG-driven thermal flux at the outer edge of the barrier is large enough to be experimentally relevant, the turbulence cannot propagate past the barrier into the plasma interior.

  20. Design of a water based cooling system to take out electronics heat load of MUCH detector in CBM experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jain, Vikas; Saini, J.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Dubey, A.K.

    2015-01-01

    A GEM based detector system is being developed at VECC, Kolkata for use as muon tracker in the Compressed Baryonic Matter (CBM) experiment at the upcoming FAIR facility in Germany. The Muon Chambers (MUCH) consists of alternating layers of six absorbers and detector stations. Out of the six stations, VECC has taken responsibility to build the detectors and related readout electronics for the first two stations where each station consists of three detector layers. MUCH will be use a custom built self-triggering ASIC, which will provide both timing and energy information for each incoming signal in its channel. MUCH uses the sensitive electronics where the desired operating temperature range is 25-30 °C. Temperature going above these limits will drift the biasing scheme and further increase may lead to damage of Front End Electronics (FEE) board itself

  1. The utilisation experience of the enhanced electronic signature when managing orders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavel A. Muzychkin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Major universities with a number of branches, located throughout the country, have joined Plekhanov Russian University of Economics and there was a problem of operational coordination of managerial decision-making, coordination of command and control of their implementation. The problem needed to be solved very quickly as many orders have to be issued in a short period. It was necessary to develop and introduce the electronic document flow system to provide coordination of the projects’ orders on the number of students at the university branches on higher education programmes, postgraduate and vocational secondary education, and ensuring legal validity of the electronic documents.Cryptography techniques, encryption standard (National State Standard, Russian Federation legislation, university’s corporate network, electronic document flow system “DELO”, enhanced electronic signature services such as Crypto Pro CSP, CARMA and EDSIGN.Electronic approval technology between the head University and its branches with the use of the enhanced unqualified electronic signature was suggested. Two ways of exchanging documents were developed and implemented in order to make the scheme work:1 Sending documents via the corporate e-mail, using National State Standard encryption.2 Document exchange via “DELO”, electronic document flow system. The first stage has provided the document exchange, using the enciphered information with the enhanced electronic signature. At the same time, the problem of creating secure data channels between the remote university branches was solved. During the second stage, when the branches were introduced into the university’s corporate network through the secure data channels, they also gained access to the “DELO”, electronic document flow system. From the end of December 2014 up to November 2016, around 3000 orders, concerning the students were entered into the system.This method was applied not only at the

  2. A function-behavior-structure framework for quantification and reproduction of emotional haptic experience in using an electronic device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bae, Il Ju; Lee, Soo Hong [Yonsei University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Ok, Hyung Seok; Lee, Jae In [LG Electronics Inc, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-08-15

    A user's haptic experience in using an electronic device is related to the continuous and dynamic variances of the structural state of the device. Since the changes of the structural component cause complex changes of the dynamics, it is difficult to predict the user's experience. We propose a function-behavior-structure framework to predict and improve the user's experience. The framework consists of the function layer model, the behavior layer model, and the structure layer model. Especially, the independent behavior model to the device is based on a physical phenomenon. Finally, an optimized structure which produces an ideal haptic experience for a cell phone is suggested.

  3. A comparison of experiment, CEPXS/ONETRAN, TIGERP, and TIGER net electron emission coefficients for various bremsstrahlung spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ballard, W.P.; Lorence, L.J. Jr.; Snowden, D.P.; Van Lint, V.A.J.; Beale, E.S.

    1987-01-01

    This work compares a carefully designed experiment to measure photoemission with the predictions of three different codes (CEPXS/ONETRAN, TIGERP, and TIGER) for the complex bremsstrahlung spectra typical of very intense pulsed power x-ray generators. The Monte Carlo codes TIGER and TIGERP can calculate the net photon-induced electron emission but accurate results may require that statistical error be minimized. CEPXS/ONETRAN is a new deterministic coupled electron/photon transport code that is faster than Monte Carlo and is not subject to statistical error. The comparison of net yields is a sensitive test of the relative accuracy and efficiency of these various codes. The authors find that all of the codes substantially agree with the experiments for the forward net yields. However, for reverse net yields from high-Z materials, the codes overpredict relative to measurements

  4. Electron beam test of key elements of the laser-based calibration system for the muon g - 2 experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anastasi, A., E-mail: antonioanastasi89@gmail.com [Laboratori Nazionali Frascati dell' INFN, Via E. Fermi 40, 00044 Frascati (Italy); Dipartimento MIFT, Università di Messina, Messina (Italy); Basti, A.; Bedeschi, F.; Bartolini, M. [INFN, Sezione di Pisa (Italy); Cantatore, G. [INFN, Sezione di Trieste e G.C. di Udine (Italy); Università di Trieste, Trieste (Italy); Cauz, D. [INFN, Sezione di Trieste e G.C. di Udine (Italy); Università di Udine, Udine (Italy); Corradi, G. [Laboratori Nazionali Frascati dell' INFN, Via E. Fermi 40, 00044 Frascati (Italy); Dabagov, S. [Laboratori Nazionali Frascati dell' INFN, Via E. Fermi 40, 00044 Frascati (Italy); Lebedev Physical Institute and NRNU MEPhI, Moscow (Russian Federation); Di Sciascio, G. [INFN, Sezione di Roma Tor Vergata, Roma (Italy); Di Stefano, R. [INFN, Sezione di Napoli (Italy); Università di Cassino, Cassino (Italy); Driutti, A. [INFN, Sezione di Trieste e G.C. di Udine (Italy); Università di Udine, Udine (Italy); Escalante, O. [Università di Napoli, Napoli (Italy); Ferrari, C. [Laboratori Nazionali Frascati dell' INFN, Via E. Fermi 40, 00044 Frascati (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Ottica del C.N.R., UOS Pisa, via Moruzzi 1, 56124, Pisa (Italy); Fienberg, A.T. [University of Washington, Box 351560, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Fioretti, A.; Gabbanini, C. [Laboratori Nazionali Frascati dell' INFN, Via E. Fermi 40, 00044 Frascati (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Ottica del C.N.R., UOS Pisa, via Moruzzi 1, 56124, Pisa (Italy); Gioiosa, A. [INFN, Sezione di Lecce (Italy); Università del Molise, Pesche (Italy); Hampai, D. [Laboratori Nazionali Frascati dell' INFN, Via E. Fermi 40, 00044 Frascati (Italy); Hertzog, D.W. [University of Washington, Box 351560, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); and others

    2017-01-11

    We report the test of many of the key elements of the laser-based calibration system for muon g - 2 experiment E989 at Fermilab. The test was performed at the Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati's Beam Test Facility using a 450 MeV electron beam impinging on a small subset of the final g - 2 lead-fluoride crystal calorimeter system. The calibration system was configured as planned for the E989 experiment and uses the same type of laser and most of the final optical elements. We show results regarding the calorimeter's response calibration, the maximum equivalent electron energy which can be provided by the laser and the stability of the calibration system components.

  5. Operational Experience with Radioactive Source Calibration of the CMS Hadron Endcap Calorimeter Wedges with Phase I Upgrade Electronics

    CERN Document Server

    Bilki, Burak

    2017-01-01

    The Phase I Upgrade of the CMS Hadron Endcap Calorimeters consists of new photodetectors and front-end electronics. The upgrade will allow the elimination of the high amplitude noise and drifting response of the Hybrid Photo-Diodes, at the same time enabling the mitigation of the radiation damage of the scintillators and the wavelength shifting fibers with a larger spectral acceptance of the Silicon Photomultipliers. The upgrade will also allow increasing the longitudinal segmentation of the readout to be beneficial for pile-up mitigation and recalibration due to depth-dependent radiation damage. As a realistic operational exercise, the responses of the Hadron Endcap Calorimeter wedges were calibrated with a 60Co radioactive source both with current and upgrade electronics. The exercise provided significant experience towards the full upgrade during the Year End Technical Stop 2017-2018. Here we describe the instrumentation details and the operational experiences related to the sourcing exercise.

  6. Electronic-structure Fermi-liquid theory of high-Tc superconductors: Comparison of predictions with experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, Jaejun; Freeman, A.J.

    1991-01-01

    Predictions of local density functional (LDF) calculations of the electronic structure and transport properties of high T(sub c) superconductors are presented. As evidenced by the excellent agreement with both photoemission and positron annihilation experiments, a Fermi liquid nature of the 'normal' state of the high T(sub c) superconductors become clear for the metallic phase of these oxides. In addition, LDF predictions on the normal state transport properties are qualitatively in agreement with experiments on single crystals. It is emphasized that the signs of the Hall coefficients for the high T(sub c) superconductors are not consistent with the types of dopants (e.g., electron-doped or hole-doped) but are determined by the topology of the Fermi surfaces obtained from the LDF calculations

  7. Electron beam test of key elements of the laser-based calibration system for the muon g - 2 experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anastasi, A.; Basti, A.; Bedeschi, F.; Bartolini, M.; Cantatore, G.; Cauz, D.; Corradi, G.; Dabagov, S.; Di Sciascio, G.; Di Stefano, R.; Driutti, A.; Escalante, O.; Ferrari, C.; Fienberg, A. T.; Fioretti, A.; Gabbanini, C.; Gioiosa, A.; Hampai, D.; Hertzog, D. W.; Iacovacci, M.; Karuza, M.; Kaspar, J.; Liedl, A.; Lusiani, A.; Marignetti, F.; Mastroianni, S.; Moricciani, D.; Pauletta, G.; Piacentino, G. M.; Raha, N.; Rossi, E.; Santi, L.; Venanzoni, G.

    2017-01-01

    We report the test of many of the key elements of the laser-based calibration system for muon g - 2 experiment E989 at Fermilab. The test was performed at the Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati's Beam Test Facility using a 450 MeV electron beam impinging on a small subset of the final g - 2 lead-fluoride crystal calorimeter system. The calibration system was configured as planned for the E989 experiment and uses the same type of laser and most of the final optical elements. We show results regarding the calorimeter's response calibration, the maximum equivalent electron energy which can be provided by the laser and the stability of the calibration system components.

  8. Proceedings of the FSC Topical Session on Experience with Electronic, Web and Internet Platforms for Communicating on Radioactive Waste Management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    The Forum on Stakeholder Confidence (FSC) was created to facilitate the sharing of international experience in addressing the societal dimension of radioactive waste management. Particularly it explores means of ensuring an effective dialogue with the public. This forum deals with the use of the web and internet platforms as ways of informing stakeholders and the public on radioactive waste management, and improving their knowledge in this area. The responses of various FSC members to a questionnaire dedicated to the use of electronic communication are synthesised and commented. Moreover various organisations like the Scottish Executive, Andra (National Agency for the Management of Radioactive Wastes, France), NDA (Nuclear Decommissioning Authority, United Kingdom), and NucNet (a news agency on nuclear issues, Switzerland) have shared their own experience on electronic communication

  9. THERMAL RESPONSE OF A SOLAR-LIKE ATMOSPHERE TO AN ELECTRON BEAM FROM A HOT JUPITER: A NUMERICAL EXPERIMENT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gu, P.-G.; Suzuki, Takeru K.

    2009-01-01

    We investigate the thermal response of the atmosphere of a solar-type star to an electron beam injected from a hot Jupiter by performing a one-dimensional MHD numerical experiment with nonlinear wave dissipation, radiative cooling, and thermal conduction. In our experiment, the stellar atmosphere is non-rotating and is modeled as a one-dimensional open flux tube expanding super-radially from the stellar photosphere to the planet. An electron beam is assumed to be generated from the reconnection site of the planet's magnetosphere. The effects of the electron beam are then implemented in our simulation as dissipation of the beam momentum and energy at the base of the corona where the Coulomb collisions become effective. When the sufficient energy is supplied by the electron beam, a warm region forms in the chromosphere. This warm region greatly enhances the radiative fluxes corresponding to the temperature of the chromosphere and transition region. The warm region can also intermittently contribute to the radiative flux associated with the coronal temperature due to the thermal instability. However, owing to the small area of the heating spot, the total luminosity of the beam-induced chromospheric radiation is several orders of magnitude smaller than the observed Ca II emissions from HD 179949.

  10. Electron acceleration observed by the FAST satellite within the IAR during a 3 Hz modulated EISCAT heater experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. R. Cash

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available A quantitative analysis is presented of the FAST satellite electric field and particle flux data during an EISCAT heating experiment run on 8 October 1998. Radio frequency heating, modulated at 3 Hz, launched ULF waves from the ionosphere into the lower magnetosphere. The ULF waves were observed in FAST data and constituted the first satellite detection of artificially excited Alfvénic ULF waves. The downward electron flux data for this event contain the first observations of electrons undergoing acceleration within the Ionospheric Alfvén Resonator (IAR due to parallel electric fields associated with an artificially stimulated Alfvén wave. The time history and spectral content of the observed down-ward electron fluxes is investigated by considering the effects of a localised parallel electric field. Furthermore, it is demonstrated that a power law electron energy distribution describes the time-variable observed fluxes better than a Maxwellian distribution.Key words. Ionosphere (active experiments; particle acceleration – Magnetospheric physics (electric fields

  11. Electron acceleration observed by the FAST satellite within the IAR during a 3 Hz modulated EISCAT heater experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. R. Cash

    Full Text Available A quantitative analysis is presented of the FAST satellite electric field and particle flux data during an EISCAT heating experiment run on 8 October 1998. Radio frequency heating, modulated at 3 Hz, launched ULF waves from the ionosphere into the lower magnetosphere. The ULF waves were observed in FAST data and constituted the first satellite detection of artificially excited Alfvénic ULF waves. The downward electron flux data for this event contain the first observations of electrons undergoing acceleration within the Ionospheric Alfvén Resonator (IAR due to parallel electric fields associated with an artificially stimulated Alfvén wave. The time history and spectral content of the observed down-ward electron fluxes is investigated by considering the effects of a localised parallel electric field. Furthermore, it is demonstrated that a power law electron energy distribution describes the time-variable observed fluxes better than a Maxwellian distribution.

    Key words. Ionosphere (active experiments; particle acceleration – Magnetospheric physics (electric fields

  12. A New Chicane Experiment In PEP-II to Test Mitigations of the Electron Cloud Effect for Linear Colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pivi, M

    2008-01-01

    Beam instability caused by the electron cloud has been observed in positron and proton storage rings, and it is expected to be a limiting factor in the performance of future colliders [1-3]. The effect is expected to be particularly severe in magnetic field regions. To test possible mitigation methods in magnetic fields, we have installed a new 4-dipole chicane experiment in the PEP-II Low Energy Ring (LER) at SLAC with both bare and TiN-coated aluminum chambers. In particular, we have observed a large variation of the electron flux at the chamber wall as a function of the chicane dipole field. We infer this is a new high order resonance effect where the energy gained by the electrons in the positron beam depends on the phase of the electron cyclotron motion with respect to the bunch crossing, leading to a modulation of the secondary electron production. Presumably the cloud density is modulated as well and this resonance effect could be used to reduce its magnitude in future colliders. We present the experimental results obtained during January 2008 until the April final shut-down of the PEP-II machine

  13. A P&T Committee's Transition to a Complete Electronic Meeting System-A Multisite Institution Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Jedai, Ahmed H; Algain, Roaa A; Alghamidi, Said A; Al-Jazairi, Abdulrazaq S; Amin, Rashid; Bin Hussain, Ibrahim Z

    2017-10-01

    In the last few decades, changes to formulary management processes have taken place in institutions with closed formulary systems. However, many P&T committees continued to operate using traditional paper-based systems. Paper-based systems have many limitations, including confidentiality, efficiency, open voting, and paper wastage. This becomes more challenging when dealing with a multisite P&T committee that handles formulary matters across the whole health care system. In this paper, we discuss the implementation of the first paperless, completely electronic, Web-based formulary management system across a large health care system in the Middle East. We describe the transitioning of a multisite P&T committee in a large tertiary care institution from a paper-based to an all-electronic system. The challenges and limitations of running a multisite P&T committee utilizing a paper system are discussed. The design and development of a Web-based committee floor management application that can be used from notebooks, tablets, and hand-held devices is described. Implementation of a flexible, interactive, easy-to-use, and efficient electronic formulary management system is explained in detail. The development of an electronic P&T committee meeting system that encompasses electronic document sharing, voting, and communication could help multisite health care systems unify their formularies across multiple sites. Our experience might not be generalizable to all institutions because this depends heavily on system features, existing processes and workflow, and implementation across different sites.

  14. Origins and Scaling of Hot-Electron Preheat in Ignition-Scale Direct-Drive Inertial Confinement Fusion Experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, M J; Solodov, A A; Myatt, J F; Seka, W; Michel, P; Hohenberger, M; Short, R W; Epstein, R; Regan, S P; Campbell, E M; Chapman, T; Goyon, C; Ralph, J E; Barrios, M A; Moody, J D; Bates, J W

    2018-02-02

    Planar laser-plasma interaction (LPI) experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) have allowed access for the first time to regimes of electron density scale length (∼500 to 700  μm), electron temperature (∼3 to 5 keV), and laser intensity (6 to 16×10^{14}  W/cm^{2}) that are relevant to direct-drive inertial confinement fusion ignition. Unlike in shorter-scale-length plasmas on OMEGA, scattered-light data on the NIF show that the near-quarter-critical LPI physics is dominated by stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) rather than by two-plasmon decay (TPD). This difference in regime is explained based on absolute SRS and TPD threshold considerations. SRS sidescatter tangential to density contours and other SRS mechanisms are observed. The fraction of laser energy converted to hot electrons is ∼0.7% to 2.9%, consistent with observed levels of SRS. The intensity threshold for hot-electron production is assessed, and the use of a Si ablator slightly increases this threshold from ∼4×10^{14} to ∼6×10^{14}  W/cm^{2}. These results have significant implications for mitigation of LPI hot-electron preheat in direct-drive ignition designs.

  15. Origins and Scaling of Hot-Electron Preheat in Ignition-Scale Direct-Drive Inertial Confinement Fusion Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, M. J.; Solodov, A. A.; Myatt, J. F.; Seka, W.; Michel, P.; Hohenberger, M.; Short, R. W.; Epstein, R.; Regan, S. P.; Campbell, E. M.; Chapman, T.; Goyon, C.; Ralph, J. E.; Barrios, M. A.; Moody, J. D.; Bates, J. W.

    2018-01-01

    Planar laser-plasma interaction (LPI) experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) have allowed access for the first time to regimes of electron density scale length (˜500 to 700 μ m ), electron temperature (˜3 to 5 keV), and laser intensity (6 to 16 ×1014 W /cm2 ) that are relevant to direct-drive inertial confinement fusion ignition. Unlike in shorter-scale-length plasmas on OMEGA, scattered-light data on the NIF show that the near-quarter-critical LPI physics is dominated by stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) rather than by two-plasmon decay (TPD). This difference in regime is explained based on absolute SRS and TPD threshold considerations. SRS sidescatter tangential to density contours and other SRS mechanisms are observed. The fraction of laser energy converted to hot electrons is ˜0.7 % to 2.9%, consistent with observed levels of SRS. The intensity threshold for hot-electron production is assessed, and the use of a Si ablator slightly increases this threshold from ˜4×10 14 to ˜6 ×1014 W /cm2 . These results have significant implications for mitigation of LPI hot-electron preheat in direct-drive ignition designs.

  16. Observations at the planet Mercury by the plasma electron experiment, Mariner 10

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogilvie, K. W.; Scudder, J. D.; Vasyliunas, V. M.; Hartle, R. E.; Siscoe, G. L.

    1976-01-01

    Plasma electron observations made onboard Mariner 10 are reported. Three encounters with the planet Mercury show that the planet interacts with the solar wind to form a bow shock and a permanent magnetosphere. The observations provide a determination of the dimensions and properties of the magnetosphere, independently of and in general agreement with magnetometer observations. The magnetosphere of Mercury appears to be similar in shape to that of the Earth but much smaller in relation to the size of the planet. Electron populations similar to those found in the Earth's magnetotail, within the plasma sheet and adjacent regions, were observed at Mercury; both their spatial location and the electron energy spectra within them bear qualitative and quantitative resemblance to corresponding observations at the Earth. The magnetosphere of Mercury resembles to a marked degree a reduced version of that of the Earth, with no significant differences of structure.

  17. Observations at the planet Mercury by the plasma electron experiment, Mariner 10

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogilvie, K.W.; Scudder, J.D.; Vasyliunas, V.M.; Hartle, R.E.; Siscoe, G.L.

    1976-09-01

    Plasma electron observations made onboard Mariner 10 are reported. Three encounters with the planet Mercury show that the planet interacts with the solar wind to form a bow shock and a permanent magnetosphere. The observations provide a determination of the dimensions and properties of the magnetosphere, independently of and in general agreement with magnetometer observations. The magnetosphere of Mercury appears to be similar in shape to that of the Earth but much smaller in relation to the size of the planet. Electron populations similar to those found in the Earth's magnetotail, within the plasma sheet and adjacent regions, were observed at Mercury; both their spatial location and the electron energy spectra within them bear qualitative and quantitative resemblance to corresponding observations at the Earth. The magnetosphere of Mercury resembles to a marked degree a reduced version of that of the Earth, with no significant differences of structure

  18. Single-shot electro-optic experiments for electron bunch diagnostics at Tsinghua Accelerator Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Wei; Du, Yingchao; Yan, Lixin; Hua, Jianfei; Zhang, Zhen; Zhou, Zheng [Accelerator Laboratory, Department of Engineering Physics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Key Laboratory of Particle and Radiation Imaging, Tsinghua University, Ministry of Education, Beijing 100084 (China); Huang, Wenhui, E-mail: huangwh@mail.tsinghua.edu.cn [Accelerator Laboratory, Department of Engineering Physics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Key Laboratory of Particle and Radiation Imaging, Tsinghua University, Ministry of Education, Beijing 100084 (China); Tang, Chuanxiang [Accelerator Laboratory, Department of Engineering Physics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Key Laboratory of Particle and Radiation Imaging, Tsinghua University, Ministry of Education, Beijing 100084 (China); Li, Ming [Institute of Applied Electronics, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China)

    2016-10-21

    The electro-optic (EO) technique detects the Coulomb electric field distribution of relativistic electron bunches to obtain the associated longitudinal profile. This diagnostic method allows the direct time-resolved single-shot measurement and thus the real-time monitoring of the bunch profile and beam arrival time in a non-destructive way with sub-picosecond temporal resolution. In this paper, we report the measurement of the longitudinal profile of an electron bunch through electro-optic spectral decoding detection, in which the bunch profile is encoded into the spectra of the linearly chirped laser pulse. The experimental setup and measurement results of a 40 MeV electron bunch are presented, with a temporal profile length of 527 fs rms (~1.24 ps FWHM) and a beam arrival time jitter of 471 fs rms. Temporal resolution and future experimental improvement are also discussed.

  19. An experience of electron beam (EB) irradiated gemstones in Malaysian nuclear agency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Idris, Sarada, E-mail: sarada@nuclearmalaysia.gov.my; Hairaldin, Siti Zulaiha, E-mail: sarada@nuclearmalaysia.gov.my; Tajau, Rida, E-mail: sarada@nuclearmalaysia.gov.my; Karim, Jamilah, E-mail: sarada@nuclearmalaysia.gov.my; Jusoh, Suhaimi, E-mail: sarada@nuclearmalaysia.gov.my; Ghazali, Zulkafli, E-mail: sarada@nuclearmalaysia.gov.my [Malaysian Nuclear Agency, Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia); Ahmad, Shamshad [School of Chemicals and Material Engineering, NUST Islamabad (Pakistan)

    2014-02-12

    In Nuclear Malaysia, a study on gemstone irradiation using beta particle is conducted. The purpose of the study is to evaluate the gemstone colour enhancement by using different kind of precious and non-precious gemstones. By using irradiation technique, selected gemstones are exposed to highly ionizing radiation electron beam to knock off electrons to generate colour centres culminating in the introduction of deeper colours. The colour centres may be stable or unstable depending on the nature of colour centre produced. The colour change of irradiated stones were measured by HunterLab colour measurement. At 50 kGy, Topaz shows changes colour from colourless to golden. Meanwhile pearl shows changes from pale colour to grey. Kunzite and amethyst shows colour changes from colorless to green and pale colour to purple. Gamma survey meter measurement confirmed that irradiation treatment with 3 MeV electron beam machine does not render any activation that activate the gems to become radioactive.

  20. An experience of electron beam (EB) irradiated gemstones in Malaysian nuclear agency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idris, Sarada; Hairaldin, Siti Zulaiha; Tajau, Rida; Karim, Jamilah; Jusoh, Suhaimi; Ghazali, Zulkafli; Ahmad, Shamshad

    2014-02-01

    In Nuclear Malaysia, a study on gemstone irradiation using beta particle is conducted. The purpose of the study is to evaluate the gemstone colour enhancement by using different kind of precious and non-precious gemstones. By using irradiation technique, selected gemstones are exposed to highly ionizing radiation electron beam to knock off electrons to generate colour centres culminating in the introduction of deeper colours. The colour centres may be stable or unstable depending on the nature of colour centre produced. The colour change of irradiated stones were measured by HunterLab colour measurement. At 50 kGy, Topaz shows changes colour from colourless to golden. Meanwhile pearl shows changes from pale colour to grey. Kunzite and amethyst shows colour changes from colorless to green and pale colour to purple. Gamma survey meter measurement confirmed that irradiation treatment with 3 MeV electron beam machine does not render any activation that activate the gems to become radioactive.

  1. An experience of electron beam (EB) irradiated gemstones in Malaysian nuclear agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Idris, Sarada; Hairaldin, Siti Zulaiha; Tajau, Rida; Karim, Jamilah; Jusoh, Suhaimi; Ghazali, Zulkafli; Ahmad, Shamshad

    2014-01-01

    In Nuclear Malaysia, a study on gemstone irradiation using beta particle is conducted. The purpose of the study is to evaluate the gemstone colour enhancement by using different kind of precious and non-precious gemstones. By using irradiation technique, selected gemstones are exposed to highly ionizing radiation electron beam to knock off electrons to generate colour centres culminating in the introduction of deeper colours. The colour centres may be stable or unstable depending on the nature of colour centre produced. The colour change of irradiated stones were measured by HunterLab colour measurement. At 50 kGy, Topaz shows changes colour from colourless to golden. Meanwhile pearl shows changes from pale colour to grey. Kunzite and amethyst shows colour changes from colorless to green and pale colour to purple. Gamma survey meter measurement confirmed that irradiation treatment with 3 MeV electron beam machine does not render any activation that activate the gems to become radioactive

  2. The use of electron beam for production of tough materials: The Italian experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lavalle, M.

    2004-01-01

    The Institute for the Organic Synthesis and Photoreactivity (Bologna, Italy) of the National Research Council is involved in activities carried out together with other scientific institutions (Department of Chemical Engineering, Processing and Materials of the University of Palermo) and an aerospace and defense company (Proel Tecnologie, Firenze, Italy). The research activity is related to: - study of the electron beam curing process of resins in order to better understand the curing mechanism and the influences of the processing parameters, e.g. the electron pulse frequency, which is related to the delivered dose rate; and - study of the electron beam polymerization of MMA in the presence of rubber as an alternative and innovative way to produce tough materials as compared to conventional blending (both physical and chemical). The activity carried out with private companies is related to the irradiation of single items and prototypes to be used for mechanical testing and characterization or for particular applications. (author)

  3. Impact of Flavour Variability on Electronic Cigarette Use Experience: An Internet Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantinos E. Farsalinos

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: A major characteristic of the electronic cigarette (EC market is the availability of a large number of different flavours. This has been criticised by the public health authorities, some of whom believe that diverse flavours will attract young users and that ECs are a gateway to smoking. At the same time, several reports in the news media mention that the main purpose of flavour marketing is to attract youngsters. The importance of flavourings and their patterns of use by EC consumers have not been adequately evaluated, therefore, the purpose of this survey was to examine and understand the impact of flavourings in the EC experience of dedicated users. Methods: A questionnaire was prepared and uploaded in an online survey tool. EC users were asked to participate irrespective of their current smoking status. Participants were divided according to their smoking status at the time of participation in two subgroups: former smokers and current smokers. Results: In total, 4,618 participants were included in the analysis, with 4,515 reporting current smoking status. The vast majority (91.1% were former smokers, while current smokers had reduced smoking consumption from 20 to 4 cigarettes per day. Both subgroups had a median smoking history of 22 years and had been using ECs for 12 months. On average they were using three different types of liquid flavours on a regular basis, with former smokers switching between flavours more frequently compared to current smokers; 69.2% of the former subgroup reported doing so on a daily basis or within the day. Fruit flavours were more popular at the time of participation, while tobacco flavours were more popular at initiation of EC use. On a scale from 1 (not at all important to 5 (extremely important participants answered that variability of flavours was “very important” (score = 4 in their effort to reduce or quit smoking. The majority reported that restricting variability will make ECs less

  4. Measurement of heavy flavour production at LEP by their electron decay in ALEPH experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monnier, E.

    1991-12-01

    In a first theoretical part, this thesis presents the main results about the Z o decays in heavy flavours, deduced from the Standard Model. Quark fragmentation are briefly developed. Semileptonic decays are explained and finally, the main models that are used to describe decay processes. In the experimental second part, ALEPH detector is described, electron identification means and methods, presented and the electromagnetic calorimeter calibration, studied. In the last part, the bidimensional distribution of momentum-transverse momentum of selected electrons is analysed and simulated. The monitoring of background noise and systematic errors are also presented. Finally, the physical results that have been obtained in this study, are given and discussed

  5. Experience and development program for the I.V. Kurchatov Atomic Energy Institute electron linear accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aref'ev, A.V.; Blokhov, M.V.; Gerasimov, V.F.

    1981-01-01

    A program of physical investigations and the corresponding requirements to accelerated beam parameters are discussed in brief. The state and working capacity of separate units and the accelerator as a whole for the 8-year operating period are analyzed. The aim and principal program points of linear electron accelerator modernization are defined. The program of accelerator modernization assumes: electron beam energy increase up to 100-120 MeV; mounting of three additional accelerating sections; clystron efficiency increase; development of a highly reliable modulator; stabilized power supply sources; a system of synchronous start-up; a focusing system; a beam separation system and etc [ru

  6. Gender disparities in the experience, effects and reporting of electronic aggression among secondary school students in Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olumide, Adesola O; Adebayo, Emmanuel; Oluwagbayela, Babatunde

    2016-01-01

    Electronic aggression is the use of electronic communication technologies to harass others. It is a problem among adolescents and young people worldwide. There is a dearth of information on this problem in developing countries in spite of the increasing use of electronic media technology in these countries. To explore gender differences in the prevalence, effects and reporting of electronic aggression among secondary school students in Oyo state, Nigeria. A cross-sectional study was conducted using mixed methods (a quantitative survey of 653 students and 18 in-depth interviews with victims and/or perpetrators). Survey students were selected using multi-stage sampling and in-depth interviewees were selected purposively. History of electronic aggression (as a perpetrator and/or victim) in the 3 months preceding the study was obtained. Respondents also provided information on the effects of the last incident of bullying on them and whether or not they reported this incident. 25.8% of males and 22.1% of females had perpetrated electronic aggression, while 42.7% of females were victims compared to 36.8% of males. More females (58.1%) than males (40.3%) perpetrated electronic aggression via phone calls and more males (33.8%) than females (22.6%) perpetrated electronic aggression via chatrooms. 45.4% of male victims and 39.4% of female victims felt angry following the last cyberbully incident. Findings from the in-depth interviewees corroborated the survey findings and a male victim reported feeling very sad and even tried to stay away from school following repeated episodes of electronic aggression. More female (59.1%) than male (42.7%) victims reported the incident to someone (p=0.035). Incidents of electronic aggression were common and the experiences of male and female students were comparable, although more female victims reported the incidents they had experienced. Victims, especially males, should be encouraged to report incidents so that the relevant authorities

  7. Advances in Transmission Electron Microscopy : In Situ Straining and In Situ Compression Experiments on Metallic Glasses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Hosson, Jeff Th. M.

    In the field of transmission electron microscopy (TEM), fundamental and practical reasons still remain that hamper a straightforward correlation between microscopic structural information and deformation mechanisms in materials. In this article, it is argued that one should focus in particular on in

  8. Simulations and experiments on external electron injection for laser wakefield acceleration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijk, van W.

    2010-01-01

    Laser wake field acceleration is a technique that can be used to accelerate electrons using electric fields that are several orders of magnitude higher than those available in conventional accelerators. With these higher fields, it is possible to drastically reduce the length of accelerator needed

  9. Probing electronic coupling between adenine bases in RNA strands from synchrotron radiation circular dichroism experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Lisbeth Munksgård; Hoffmann, Søren Vrønning; Nielsen, Steen Brøndsted

    2012-01-01

    Circular dichroism spectra (176–330 nm) of RNA adenine oligomers, (rA)n (n = 1–10, 12, 15, and 20), reveal electronic coupling between two bases in short strands. The number of interacting bases in long strands is more and larger than that reported previously for the corresponding DNA strands....

  10. One of several 'toys' for smoking: young adult experiences with electronic cigarettes in New York City.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Emily Anne; Ling, Pamela M

    2015-11-01

    This qualitative research explores the use of electronic cigarettes and other similar 'vapor' delivery devices among young adults in New York City. We employed 17 focus groups followed by 12 semistructured interviews to understand the beliefs, opinions and practices related to the use of electronic cigarettes among young adult smokers (N=87). Participants were mainly daily (52%) and non-daily (41%) smokers. While experimentation with electronic cigarette devices was frequently reported, participants related an overall lack of information about the devices and what they did know often reflected messages in e-cigarette marketing campaigns. Participants also used their own bodily sensations as a way to gauge potential risks and benefits of the products. Finally, young adults, steeped in a culture of personal technologies, perceived e-cigarettes as one more 'toy' among other technologies integrated into their everyday lives. E-cigarettes were also frequently used with other tobacco products, including conventional cigarettes. Our research indicates that public health campaigns may be needed to counter current industry marketing and inform the public that electronic cigarettes are currently unregulated, understudied and contain toxicants and carcinogens. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  11. Electron Bernstein wave-bootstrap current synergy in the National Spherical Torus Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harvey, R.W.; Taylor, G.

    2005-01-01

    Current driven by electron Bernstein waves (EBW) and by the electron bootstrap effect are calculated separately and concurrently with a kinetic code to determine the degree of synergy between them. A target β=40% NSTX [M. Ono, S. Kaye, M. Peng et al., Proceedings of the 17th IAEA Fusion Energy Conference, edited by M. Spak (IAEA, Vienna, Austria, 1999), Vol. 3, p. 1135] plasma is examined. A simple bootstrap model in the collisional-quasilinear CQL3D Fokker-Planck code (National Technical Information Service document No. DE93002962) is used in these studies: the transiting electron distributions are connected in velocity space at the trapped-passing boundary to trapped-electron distributions that are displaced radially by a half-banana-width outwards/inwards for the co-passing/counter-passing regions. This model agrees well with standard bootstrap current calculations over the outer 60% of the plasma radius. Relatively small synergy net bootstrap current is obtained for EBW power up to 4 MW. Locally, bootstrap current density increases in proportion to increased plasma pressure, and this effect can significantly affect the radial profile of driven current

  12. Cross-national social work case analysis: learning from international experience within an electronic environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. Kloppenburg; V. Gevorgianiene; V. Jakutiene; Peter Hendriks

    2008-01-01

    This article presents the results of a pilot of a cross-national learning process within the context of social work education. The pilot was carried out in the electronic environment by students from four European universities (Hogeschool Utrecht, Sheffield, Tartu and Vilnius). The analysis of the

  13. Carbon-fiber tips for scanning probe microscopes and molecular electronics experiments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rubio-Bollinger, G.; Castellanos-Gomez, A.; Bilan, S.; Zotti, L.A.; Arroyo, C.R.; Agraït, N.; Cuevas, J.

    2012-01-01

    We fabricate and characterize carbon-fiber tips for their use in combined scanning tunneling and force microscopy based on piezoelectric quartz tuning fork force sensors. An electrochemical fabrication procedure to etch the tips is used to yield reproducible sub-100-nm apex. We also study electron

  14. dE/dx electronics for MARK II experiment at SLAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernstein, D.; Boyarski, A.; Coupal, D.; Feldman, G.; Paffrath, L.

    1985-10-01

    This paper describes a 100 MHz pulse digitizer for dE/dx measurements on the MARK II drift chamber at SLAC. The electronics provides the read-out of the detector's 5832 sense based on a 16-channel FASTBUS module. The basic element of the module is the TRW 6-bit Flash-ADC

  15. Advanced electron cyclotron heating and current drive experiments on the stellarator Wendelstein 7-X

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stange Torsten

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available During the first operational phase (OP 1.1 of Wendelstein 7-X (W7-X electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH was the exclusive heating method and provided plasma start-up, wall conditioning, heating and current drive. Six gyrotrons were commissioned for OP1.1 and used in parallel for plasma operation with a power of up to 4.3 MW. During standard X2-heating the spatially localized power deposition with high power density allowed controlling the radial profiles of the electron temperature and the rotational transform. Even though W7-X was not fully equipped with first wall tiles and operated with a graphite limiter instead of a divertor, electron densities of n e > 3·1019 m-3 could be achieved at electron temperatures of several keV and ion temperatures above 2 keV. These plasma parameters allowed the first demonstration of a multipath O2-heating scenario, which is envisaged for safe operation near the X-cutoff-density of 1.2·1020 m-3 after full commissioning of the ECRH system in the next operation phase OP1.2.

  16. Experience with the Alderson Rando phantom. [17-MeV electrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Somerwil, A; Kleffens, H.J. Van [Rotterdams Radio Therapeutisch Instituut (Netherlands)

    1977-04-01

    The dose delivered to the spinal cord is of particular interest in electron beam therapy of medulloblastoma. Lithium fluoride thermoluminescent dosimetry has been used in an assessment of the dose distributions from a 17 MeV electron beam in an Alderson Rando Phantom (Alderson, S.W., Lanzl, L.H., Rollins, M., and Spira, J., 1962, American J. of Roentgenology, Radium Therapy and Nuclear Medicine, vol. 87, 185). Measurements were also made on three autopsy specimens immersed in water. There were substantial differences between the two sets of results. The density of the bony part of the phantom seemed to be markedly lower than that of the water; radiographs of various parts of the phantom confirmed that large areas of low density existed. The manufacturers have stated that in order to simulate true in vivo conditions, an artificial skeleton would have to be introduced into the tissue-like material of the phantom, and that the real skeletons now used appear to be unsuitable for electron beam dosimetry. It is therefore doubtful whether this electron beam dosimetry justifies the expense associated with the insertion of these unsatisfactory skeletons into the soft tissue-equivalent material.

  17. Electron measurements and search for Higgs bosons in multi-lepton channels with the CMS experiment at LHC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broutin, C.

    2011-07-01

    This thesis presents three years of work with the CMS experiment, in the context of the first LHC collisions. Electron objects were studied in particular, as major tools for multi-lepton analyses, in particular the H → ZZ(*) → 4l analysis. During the first months of collisions, we took part in the validation of data registered by the electromagnetic calorimeter. We also measured the efficiency of the level-1 electron and photon trigger during the whole 2010 year. The plateau efficiency is of 99.6% (resp. 98.5 %) on electrons in the barrel part (resp. in the end cap part) of the calorimeter. In order to optimize the discovery potential, we built a new electron charge measurement algorithm. In CMS, this measurement is affected by the large amount of material present in the inner tracker. The performance of this algorithm was measured on 2010 data, for electrons from Z boson decay passing a standard selection. The probability of charge mis-identification is of 1.06% (0.19% with a specific selection), in agreement with the simulation. The physics analysis that was built during this PhD searches doubly charged Higgs bosons decaying into lepton pairs. For the amount of data registered in 2010, one background event is expected to pass the selection, while the amount of signal events depends on the mass hypothesis and on the model. One event was found on data, in agreement with the background expectation, hence the signal was excluded on larger mass ranges than previous experiments: a mass limit was set between 122 GeV/c 2 and 176 GeV/c 2 , depending on the model. (author)

  18. Study of the appearance of oscillating electron neutrinos issued from muon neutrino beam in the K2K experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Argyriades, J.

    2006-05-01

    The work presented in this thesis has been done in the K2K experiment. His principle consists in the use of a beam of muon neutrinos, which flux has been measured at short and long distances. Those data enable us to study the effects of neutrino oscillation, particularly by measuring ν μ disappearance. Although this is not an appearance experiment, electronic neutrinos oscillation has been searched. In spite of no signal of appearance, this study enables to constrain oscillation parameters (Δm 23 2 , sin 2 2θ 13 ). With one event for 1,07 expected event from background, the exclusion area edges are close to the best actual limits, provided by Chooz experiment. By setting Δm 23 2 .= 2,8.10 -3 eV 2 , a limit at 90% confident level is reached: sin 2 2θ 13 < 0,2. (author)

  19. Jitter-correction for IR/UV-XUV pump-probe experiments at the FLASH free-electron laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Savelyev, Evgeny; Boll, Rebecca; Bomme, Cedric; Schirmel, Nora; Redlin, Harald

    2017-01-01

    In pump-probe experiments employing a free-electron laser (FEL) in combination with a synchronized optical femtosecond laser, the arrival-time jitter between the FEL pulse and the optical laser pulse often severely limits the temporal resolution that can be achieved. Here, we present a pump-probe experiment on the UV-induced dissociation of 2,6-difluoroiodobenzene C 6 H 3 F 2 I) molecules performed at the FLASH FEL that takes advantage of recent upgrades of the FLASH timing and synchronization system to obtain high-quality data that are not limited by the FEL arrival-time jitter. Here, we discuss in detail the necessary data analysis steps and describe the origin of the time-dependent effects in the yields and kinetic energies of the fragment ions that we observe in the experiment.

  20. Experience with high-energy electron beam therapy at the University of Chicago

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griem, M.L.; Kuchnir, F.T.; Lanzl, L.H.; Skaggs, L.S.; Sutton, H.G.; Tokars, R.

    1979-01-01

    Current utilization of the linear accelerator as well as 5-year cumulative experience in radiotherapy is presented. Cutaneous lymphomas and mammary gland carcinomas were the prime experience region; however, cancers at other locations were treated with mixed-beam therapy; employing fast neutrons and photon beams. The technique appears promising for abdominal tumors and deep-seated malignancies. Carcinoma of the pancreas responds favorably to this technique

  1. Supporting information retrieval from electronic health records: A report of University of Michigan's nine-year experience in developing and using the Electronic Medical Record Search Engine (EMERSE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanauer, David A; Mei, Qiaozhu; Law, James; Khanna, Ritu; Zheng, Kai

    2015-06-01

    This paper describes the University of Michigan's nine-year experience in developing and using a full-text search engine designed to facilitate information retrieval (IR) from narrative documents stored in electronic health records (EHRs). The system, called the Electronic Medical Record Search Engine (EMERSE), functions similar to Google but is equipped with special functionalities for handling challenges unique to retrieving information from medical text. Key features that distinguish EMERSE from general-purpose search engines are discussed, with an emphasis on functions crucial to (1) improving medical IR performance and (2) assuring search quality and results consistency regardless of users' medical background, stage of training, or level of technical expertise. Since its initial deployment, EMERSE has been enthusiastically embraced by clinicians, administrators, and clinical and translational researchers. To date, the system has been used in supporting more than 750 research projects yielding 80 peer-reviewed publications. In several evaluation studies, EMERSE demonstrated very high levels of sensitivity and specificity in addition to greatly improved chart review efficiency. Increased availability of electronic data in healthcare does not automatically warrant increased availability of information. The success of EMERSE at our institution illustrates that free-text EHR search engines can be a valuable tool to help practitioners and researchers retrieve information from EHRs more effectively and efficiently, enabling critical tasks such as patient case synthesis and research data abstraction. EMERSE, available free of charge for academic use, represents a state-of-the-art medical IR tool with proven effectiveness and user acceptance. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Some experiments on the primary electron acceptor in reaction centres from Rhodopseudomanas sphaeroides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wraight, C A; Cogdell, R J; Clayton, R K

    1975-01-01

    The bacterial reaction center absorbance change at 450 nm (A-450), assigned to an anionic semiquinone, has been suggested as a candidate for the reduced form of the primary electron acceptor in bacterial photosynthesis. In reaction centers of Rhodopseudomonas sphaeroides we have found kinetic discrepancies between the decay of A-450 and the recovery of photochemical competence. In addition, no proton uptake is measurable on the first turnover, although subsequent ones elicit one proton bound per electron. These results are taken to indicate that the acceptor reaction after a long dark period may be different for the first turnover than for subsequent ones. It is suggested that A-450 is still a likely candidate for the acceptor function but that in reaction centers, additional quinone may act as an adventitious primary acceptor when the ''true'' primary acceptor is reduced. Alternatively, the primary acceptor may act in a ''ping-pong'' fashion with respect to subsequent photoelectrons.

  3. First experiments with the 200 keV electron beam ion trap at LLNL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marrs, R.E.; Knapp, D.A.; Elliott, S.

    1993-01-01

    A high-energy electron beam ion trap (Super EBIT) is operating at electron energies up to 200 keV and currents up to 200 mA. Highly charged ions up to Li-like U 89+ and H-like Pb 81+ have been produced and studied. Ionization cross sections for H-like Dy 66+ at E e = 170 keV have been measured with respect to radiative recombination from the observed Dy 66+ /Dy 67+ equilibrium ionization balance. A Bragg crystal spectrometer has been used to measure 2s 1/2 -2p 3/2 transition energies in Li-like U 82+ with respect to the Lymann-series transitions in lower-Z hydrogenic ions

  4. Antenna loading and electron heating experiments of ICRF wave in TNT-A tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shinohara, Shunjiro; Asakura, Nobuyuki; Naito, Masahiro; Miyamoto, Kenro

    1984-01-01

    Antenna loading resistance and electron heating effects of ICRF wave were investigated in TNT-A tokamak. Lodaing resistance increased with the mean plasma density and decreased with the input power. The effect of the distance between the plasma and antenna surface on loading resistance was studied and had good agreements with the calculated results. The increase in the soft Xray emissivity was larger in the presence of ion-ion hybrid and/or ion cyclotron resonance layer in the plasma than that in the absence of them. With the absorbed power up to two times of the ohmic power, the central electron temperature increased by 20%, the soft Xray emissivity increased by 80% and the mean plasma density decreased by 10%, while the total radiation loss increased slightly (by 15%). (author)

  5. New results of the high-gain harmonic generation free-electron laser experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doyuran, A.; Babzien, M.; Shaftan, T.; Biedron, S.G.; Yu, L.H.; Ben-Zvi, I.; DiMauro, L.F.; Graves, W.; Johnson, E.; Krinsky, S.; Malone, R.; Pogorelsky, I.; Skaritka, J.; Rakowsky, G.; Wang, X.J.; Woodle, M.; Yakimenko, V.; Jagger, J.; Sajaev, V.; Vasserman, I.

    2001-01-01

    We report on the experimental investigation of high-gain harmonic generation carried out at the Accelerator Test Facility at Brookhaven National Laboratory. A seed CO 2 laser at a wavelength of 10.6 μm was used to generate FEL output at a 5.3-μm wavelength. The duration of the output pulse was measured using a second-harmonic intensity autocorrelator, and the coherence length was measured using an interferometer. We also measured the energy distribution of the electron beam after it exited the second undulator, observing behavior consistent with that is expected at saturation. The intensity of the harmonic components of the output at 2.65 and 1.77 μm was determined relative to that of the 5.3-μm fundamental. Finally, using a corrector magnet upstream of the radiator, steering effects on the trajectories of the electron and light beams were studied

  6. Observations at the planet Mercury by the plasma electron experiment - Mariner 10

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogilvie, K. W.; Scudder, J. D.; Vasyliunas, V. M.; Hartle, R. E.; Siscoe, G. L.

    1977-01-01

    Two nightside encounters with Mercury's magnetosphere by Mariner 10 revealed bow shock and magnetosheath signatures in the plasma electron data that are entirely consistent with the geometry expected for an interaction between a planet-centered magnetic dipole and the solar wind. The geometrically determined distance between the planet's center and the solar wind stagnation point is 1.4 plus or minus 0.1 R sub M. Both diffuse and sharp shock crossings were observed on the two magnetosphere encounters.

  7. Extreme Ultraviolet Imaging of Electron Heated Targets in Petawatt Laser Experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma, T.; MacPhee, A.; Key, M.; Akli, K.; Mackinnon, A.; Chen, C.; Barbee, T.; Freeman, R.; King, J.; Link, A.; Offermann, D.; Ovchinnikov, V.; Patel, P.; Stephens, R.; VanWoerkom, L.; Zhang, B.; Beg, F.

    2007-01-01

    The study of the transport of electrons, and the flow of energy into a solid target or dense plasma, is instrumental in the development of fast ignition inertial confinement fusion. An extreme ultraviolet (XUV) imaging diagnostic at 256 eV and 68 eV provides information about heating and energy deposition within petawatt laser-irradiated targets. XUV images of several irradiated solid targets are presented

  8. The TAPin electronic libraries project and the experience at the University of Birmingham

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tracy K. Mulvaney

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available The TAPin Project and its implementation at the University of Birmingham is described. Local issues and key features of a hybrid approach to Networked Learner Support are addressed. The methods of NLS adopted included electronic mail and the Internet. The key role in NLS played by subject librarians is stressed. Transfer of skills to learners by means of targeted individual training and a web guide is discussed.

  9. Electronic structure, charge transfer, and intrinsic luminescence of gadolinium oxide nanoparticles: Experiment and theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zatsepin, D. A.; Boukhvalov, D. W.; Zatsepin, A. F.; Kuznetsova, Yu. A.; Mashkovtsev, M. A.; Rychkov, V. N.; Shur, V. Ya.; Esin, A. A.; Kurmaev, E. Z.

    2018-04-01

    The cubic (c) and monoclinic (m) polymorphs of Gd2O3 were studied using the combined analysis of several materials science techniques - X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy. Density functional theory (DFT) based calculations for the samples under study were performed as well. The cubic phase of gadolinium oxide (c-Gd2O3) synthesized using a precipitation method exhibits spheroidal-like nanoclusters with well-defined edges assembled from primary nanoparticles with an average size of 50 nm, whereas the monoclinic phase of gadolinium oxide (m-Gd2O3) deposited using explosive pyrolysis has a denser structure compared with natural gadolinia. This phase also has a structure composed of three-dimensional complex agglomerates without clear-edged boundaries that are ∼21 nm in size plus a cubic phase admixture of only 2 at.% composed of primary edge-boundary nanoparticles ∼15 nm in size. These atomic features appear in the electronic structure as different defects ([Gd…Osbnd OH] and [Gd…Osbnd O]) and have dissimilar contributions to the charge-transfer processes among the appropriate electronic states with ambiguous contributions in the Gd 5р - O 2s core-like levels in the valence band structures. The origin of [Gd…Osbnd OH] defects found by XPS was well-supported by PL analysis. The electronic and atomic structures of the synthesized gadolinias calculated using DFT were compared and discussed on the basis of the well-known joint OKT-van der Laan model, and good agreement was established.

  10. Elastic and inelastic electrons in the double-slit experiment: A variant of Feynman's which-way set-up

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frabboni, Stefano [Department FIM, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Via G. Campi 213/a, 41125 Modena (Italy); CNR-Institute of Nanoscience-S3, Via G. Campi 213/a, 41125 Modena (Italy); Gazzadi, Gian Carlo [CNR-Institute of Nanoscience-S3, Via G. Campi 213/a, 41125 Modena (Italy); Grillo, Vincenzo [CNR-Institute of Nanoscience-S3, Via G. Campi 213/a, 41125 Modena (Italy); CNR-IMEM, Parco delle Scienze 37a, 43100 Parma (Italy); Pozzi, Giulio [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Bologna, Viale B. Pichat 6/2, 40127 Bologna (Italy)

    2015-07-15

    Modern nanotechnology tools allowed us to prepare slits of 90 nm width and 450 nm spacing in a screen almost completely opaque to 200 keV electrons. Then by covering both slits with a layer of amorphous material and carrying out the experiment in a conventional transmission electron microscope equipped with an energy filter we can demonstrate that the diffraction pattern, taken by selecting the elastically scattered electrons, shows the presence of interference fringes, but with a bimodal envelope which can be accounted for by taking into account the non-constant thickness of the deposited layer. However, the intensity of the inelastically scattered electrons in the diffraction plane is very broad and at the limit of detectability. Therefore the experiment was repeated using an aluminum film and a microscope also equipped with a Schottky field emission gun. It was thus possible to observe also the image due to the inelastically scattered electron, which does not show interference phenomena both in the Fraunhofer or Fresnel regimes. If we assume that inelastic scattering through the thin layer covering the slits provides the dissipative process of interaction responsible for the localization mechanism, then these experiments can be considered a variant of the Feynman which-way thought experiment. - Highlights: • Fabrication by focused ion beam and electron beam induced deposition of two slits covered by electron transparent materials. • Two slits interference experiment with elastic and inelastic electrons. • Analysis of Fraunhofer and Fresnel images of the two slits formed with elastic and inelastic (plasmon loss) electrons.

  11. Low-energy-electron interactions with DNA: approaching cellular conditions with atmospheric experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alizadeh, E.; Sanche, L.

    2014-01-01

    A novel technique has been developed to investigate low energy electron (LEE)-DNA interactions in the presence of small biomolecules (e.g., N 2 , O 2 , H 2 O) found near DNA in the cell nucleus, in order to simulate cellular conditions. In this technique, LEEs are emitted from a metallic surface exposed by soft X-rays and interact with DNA thin films at standard ambient temperature and pressure (SATP). Whereas atmospheric N 2 had little effect on the yields of LEE-induced single and double strand breaks, both O 2 and H 2 O considerably modified and increased such damage. The highest yields were obtained when DNA is embedded in a combined O 2 and H 2 O atmosphere. In this case, the amount of additional double strand breaks was supper-additive. The effect of modifying the chemical and physical stability of DNA by platinum-based chemotherapeutic agents (Pt-drugs) including cisplatin, carboplatin and oxaliplatin was also investigated with this technique. The results obtained provide information on the role played by subexcitation-energy electrons and dissociative electron attachment in the radiosensitization of DNA by Pt-drugs, which is an important step to unravel the mechanisms of radiosensitization of these agents in chemo-radiation cancer therapy. (authors)

  12. Low-energy-electron interactions with DNA: approaching cellular conditions with atmospheric experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alizadeh, Elahe; Sanche, Léon

    2014-04-01

    A novel technique has been developed to investigate low energy electron (LEE)-DNA interactions in the presence of small biomolecules (e.g., N2, O2, H2O) found near DNA in the cell nucleus, in order to simulate cellular conditions. In this technique, LEEs are emitted from a metallic surface exposed by soft X-rays and interact with DNA thin films at standard ambient temperature and pressure (SATP). Whereas atmospheric N2 had little effect on the yields of LEE-induced single and double strand breaks, both O2 and H2O considerably modified and increased such damage. The highest yields were obtained when DNA is embedded in a combined O2 and H2O atmosphere. In this case, the amount of additional double strand breaks was supper-additive. The effect of modifying the chemical and physical stability of DNA by platinum-based chemotherapeutic agents (Pt-drugs) including cisplatin, carboplatin and oxaliplatin was also investigated with this technique. The results obtained provide information on the role played by subexcitation-energy electrons and dissociative electron attachment in the radiosensitization of DNA by Pt-drugs, which is an important step to unravel the mechanisms of radiosensitisation of these agents in chemoradiation cancer therapy.

  13. Observation at the planet Mercury by the plasma electron experiment: Mariner Mariner 10

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogilvie, K.W.; Scudder, J.D.; Vasyliunas, V.M.; Hartle, R.E.; Siscoe, G.L.

    1977-01-01

    Plasma electron observations made on board Mariner 10 during its three encounters with the planet Mercury show that the planet interacts with the solar wind to form a bow shock and a permanent magnetosphere. The observations provide a determination of the dimensions and properties of the magnetosphere, independently of and in general agreement with magnetometer observations. The magnetosphere of Mercury appears to be similar in shape to that of the earth but much smaller in relation to the size of the planet. The average distance from the center of Mercury to the subsolar point of the magnetopause is approx.1.4 planetary radii. Electron populations similar to those found in the earth's magneto-tail, within the plasma sheet and adjacent regions, were observed at Mercury; both their spatial location and the electron energy spectra within them bear qualitative and quantitative resemblance to corresponding observations at the earth. In general, the magnetosphere of Mercury resembles to a marked degree a reduced version of that of the earth, there being no significant differences of structure revealed by the Mariner 10 observations. Quantities in the two magnetospheres are related by simple scaling laws. The size of Mercury relative to its magnetosphere precludes, however, the existence of stably trapped particle belts and of inner magnetosphere (Lapproximately-less-than8 at the earth) phenomena generally

  14. Net current measurements and secondary electron emission characteristics of the Voyager plasma science experiment and their impact on data interpretation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcnutt, Ralph L., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    The Voyager Plasma Science (PLS) instrument is capable of returning integral (DC) current measurements, similar in some respects to measurements made with a Langmuir probe or a retarding potential analyzer, although there are significant differences. The integral measurements were made during a calibration sequence in the solar wind, during Cruise Science Maneuvers, and within the magnetospheres of Jupiter and Saturn by Voyager 1. After the failure of the PLS experiment following the Saturn encounter, that instrument was placed in the DC return mode returning possibly usable data from early 1981 through early 1985. The DC return measurements are difficult to interpret and are above threshold values only for relatively large fluxes; the determination of the measured current level is dependent on the operating temperature of the preamplifiers which further complicates the interpretation. Nevertheless, these measurements can be used to determine the efficiency of the suppressor grid at preventing the loss of secondary electrons off the collector plate. Some DC return measurements have been invaluable in aiding in the interpretation of some electron plasma measurements not previously understood. It is found that electron spectra can be significantly modified by the presence of second generation secondary electrons produced by either first generation secondaries or photoelectrons on the support ring of the negative high voltage modulator grid within the instrument housing.

  15. Operational Experience with Radioactive Source Calibration of the CMS Hadron Endcap Calorimeter Wedges with Phase I Upgrade Electronics

    CERN Document Server

    Bilki, Burak

    2017-01-01

    The Phase I Upgrade of the CMS Hadron Endcap Calorimeters consist of new photodetectors (Silicon Photomultipliers in place of Hybrid Photo-Diodes) and front-end electronics (QIE11). The upgrade will allow the elimination of the high amplitude noise and drifting response of the Hybrid Photo-Diodes, at the same time enabling the mitigation of the radiation damage of the scintillators and the wavelength shifting fibers with a larger spectral acceptance of the Silicon Photomultipliers. The upgrade will also allow to increase the longitudinal segmentation of the readout to be beneficial for pile-up mitigation and recalibration due to depth-dependent radiation damage.As a realistic operational exercise, the responses of the Hadron Endcap Calorimeter wedges are being calibrated with a $^{60}$Co radioactive source both with current and upgrade electronics. The exercise will provide a manifestation of the benefits of the upgrade. Here we describe the instrumentation details and the operational experiences related to t...

  16. Analytic Electron Trajectories in an Extremely Relativistic Helical Wiggler an Application to the Proposed SLAC E166 Experiment.

    CERN Document Server

    ThomasDonohue, John

    2004-01-01

    The proposed experiment SLAC E166 intends to generate circularly polarized gamma rays of energy 10 MeV by passing a 15 GeV electron beam through a meter long wiggler with approximately 400 periods. Using an analytic model formulated by Rullier and me, I present calculations of electron trajectories. At this extremely high energy the trajectories are described quite well by the model, and an extremely simple picture emerges, even for trajectories that that fail to encircle the axis of the wiggler. Our calculations are successfully compared with standard numerical integration of the Lorentz force equations of motion. In addition, the calculation of the spectrum and angular distribution of the radiated photons is easily carried out.

  17. Colliding pulse injection experiments in non-collinear geometry for controlled laser plasma wakefield acceleration of electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toth, Carl B.; Esarey, Eric H.; Geddes, Cameron G.R.; Leemans, Wim P.; Nakamura, Kei; Panasenko, Dmitriy; Schroeder, Carl B.; Bruhwiler, D.; Cary, J.R.

    2007-01-01

    An optical injection scheme for a laser-plasma based accelerator which employs a non-collinear counter-propagating laser beam to push background electrons in the focusing and acceleration phase via ponderomotive beat with the trailing part of the wakefield driver pulse is discussed. Preliminary experiments were performed using a drive beam of a 0 = 2.6 and colliding beam of a 1 = 0.8 both focused on the middle of a 200 mu m slit jet backed with 20 bar, which provided ∼ 260 mu m long gas plume. The enhancement in the total charge by the colliding pulse was observed with sharp dependence on the delay time of the colliding beam. Enhancement of the neutron yield was also measured, which suggests a generation of electrons above 10 MeV

  18. A Ku band pulsed electron paramagnetic resonance spectrometer using an arbitrary waveform generator for quantum control experiments at millikelvin temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yap, Yung Szen, E-mail: yungszen@utm.my [Graduate School of Engineering Science, Osaka University, 1-3 Machikaneyama-cho, Toyonaka-shi, Osaka 560-8531 (Japan); Faculty of Science, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, 81310 UTM Johor Bahru, Johor (Malaysia); Tabuchi, Yutaka [Research Center for Advanced Science and Technology (RCAST), The University of Tokyo, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 153-8904 (Japan); Negoro, Makoto; Kagawa, Akinori; Kitagawa, Masahiro, E-mail: kitagawa@ee.es.osaka-u.ac.jp [Graduate School of Engineering Science, Osaka University, 1-3 Machikaneyama-cho, Toyonaka-shi, Osaka 560-8531 (Japan)

    2015-06-15

    We present a 17 GHz (Ku band) arbitrary waveform pulsed electron paramagnetic resonance spectrometer for experiments down to millikelvin temperatures. The spectrometer is located at room temperature, while the resonator is placed either in a room temperature magnet or inside a cryogen-free dilution refrigerator; the operating temperature range of the dilution unit is from ca. 10 mK to 8 K. This combination provides the opportunity to perform quantum control experiments on electron spins in the pure-state regime. At 0.6 T, spin echo experiments were carried out using γ-irradiated quartz glass from 1 K to 12.3 mK. With decreasing temperatures, we observed an increase in spin echo signal intensities due to increasing spin polarizations, in accordance with theoretical predictions. Through experimental data fitting, thermal spin polarization at 100 mK was estimated to be at least 99%, which was almost pure state. Next, to demonstrate the ability to create arbitrary waveform pulses, we generate a shaped pulse by superposing three Gaussian pulses of different frequencies. The resulting pulse was able to selectively and coherently excite three different spin packets simultaneously—a useful ability for analyzing multi-spin system and for controlling a multi-qubit quantum computer. By applying this pulse to the inhomogeneously broadened sample, we obtain three well-resolved excitations at 8 K, 1 K, and 14 mK.

  19. Electron cyclotron current drive experiments in LHCD plasmas using a remote steering antenna on the TRIAM-1M tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Idei, H.; Hanada, K.; Zushi, H.; Ohkubo, K.; Hasegawa, M.; Kubo, S.; Nishi, S.; Fukuyama, A.; Sato, K.N.; Nakamura, K.; Sakamoto, M.; Iyomasa, A.; Kawasaki, S.; Nakashima, H.; Higashijima, A.; Notake, T.; Shimozuma, T.; Ito, S.; Hoshika, H.; Maezono, N.; Nakashima, K.; Ogawa, M.

    2006-01-01

    A remote steering antenna was recently developed for electron cyclotron heating and current drive (ECH/ECCD) experiments on the TRIAM-1M tokamak. This is the first application of the remote steering antenna concept for ECH/ECCD experiments, which have conditions relevant to the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). Fundamental ECH and ECCD experiments were conducted in the ITER frequency from the low field using this antenna system. In addition to the angles near 0 0 , the launcher was a symmetric direction antenna with an extended steering-angle capability of ±(8 0 -19 0 ). The output beam from the antenna was a well-defined Gaussian with a proper steering angle. The Gaussian content and the steering-angle accuracy were 0.85 and -0.5 0 , respectively. The high power tests measured the antenna transmission efficiency at 0.90-0.94. The efficiencies obtained in the low and high power tests were consistent with the calculations using higher-order modes. In order to excite the pure O/X-modes in the oblique injection, two polarizers were used to control the elliptical polarization of the incident beam for the ECCD experiments. The fundamental O/X-mode ECH/ECCD was applied to lower hyrid current drive plasmas at the optimized incident polarization. In the X-mode experiment, at medium density (∼1 x 10 19 m -3 ), clear differences in the plasma current and the hard x-ray intensity were observed between the co- and counter-steering injections due to the ECCD effect on the coupling of forward fast electrons

  20. Design and Construction of Experiment for Direct Electron Irradiation of Uranyl Sulfate Solution: Bubble Formation and Thermal Hydraulics Studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chemerisov, Sergey [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Gromov, Roman [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Makarashvili, Vakho [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Heltemes, Thad [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Sun, Zaijing [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Wardle, Kent E. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Bailey, James [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Quigley, Kevin [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Stepinski, Dominique [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Vandegrift, George [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2014-10-01

    Argonne is assisting SHINE Medical Technologies in developing SHINE, a system for producing fission-product 99Mo using a D/T-accelerator to produce fission in a non-critical target solution of aqueous uranyl sulfate. We have developed an experimental setup for studying thermal-hydraulics and bubble formation in the uranyl sulfate solution to simulate conditions expected in the SHINE target solution during irradiation. A direct electron beam from the linac accelerator will be used to irradiate a 20 L solution (sector of the solution vessel). Because the solution will undergo radiolytic decomposition, we will be able to study bubble formation and dynamics and effects of convection and temperature on bubble behavior. These experiments will serve as a verification/ validation tool for the thermal-hydraulic model. Utilization of the direct electron beam for irradiation allows homogeneous heating of a large solution volume and simplifies observation of the bubble dynamics simultaneously with thermal-hydraulic data collection, which will complement data collected during operation of the miniSHINE experiment. Irradiation will be conducted using a 30-40 MeV electron beam from the high-power linac accelerator. The total electron-beam power will be 20 kW, which will yield a power density on the order of 1 kW/L. The solution volume will be cooled on the front and back surfaces and central tube to mimic the geometry of the proposed SHINE solution vessel. Also, multiple thermocouples will be inserted into the solution vessel to map thermal profiles. The experimental design is now complete, and installation and testing are in progress.

  1. Study of the characteristics of gas electron multipliers for the FAIR experiment CBM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biswas, S.; Abuhoza, A.; Frankenfeld, U.; Hehner, J.; Schmidt, C.J.; Traeger, M.; Schmidt, H.R.; Colafranceschi, S.; Marinov, A.; Sharma, A.

    2011-01-01

    The Compressed Baryonic Matter (CBM) experiment at the future Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) in Darmstadt, Germany will use proton and heavy ion beams to study matter at extreme conditions. The CBM experiment at FAIR is designed to explore the QCD phase diagram in the region of high baryon densities. With CBM we will enter a new era of nuclear matter research by measuring rare diagnostic probes never observed before at FAIR energies, and thus CBM has a unique discovery potential. This will only be possible with the application of advanced instrumentation, including highly segmented and fast gaseous detectors

  2. Resonance effects in elastic cross sections for electron scattering on pyrimidine: Experiment and theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regeta, Khrystyna; Allan, Michael; Winstead, Carl; McKoy, Vincent; Mašín, Zdeněk; Gorfinkiel, Jimena D

    2016-01-14

    We measured differential cross sections for elastic (rotationally integrated) electron scattering on pyrimidine, both as a function of angle up to 180(∘) at electron energies of 1, 5, 10, and 20 eV and as a function of electron energy in the range 0.1-14 eV. The experimental results are compared to the results of the fixed-nuclei Schwinger variational and R-matrix theoretical methods, which reproduce satisfactorily the magnitudes and shapes of the experimental cross sections. The emphasis of the present work is on recording detailed excitation functions revealing resonances in the excitation process. Resonant structures are observed at 0.2, 0.7, and 4.35 eV and calculations for different symmetries confirm their assignment as the X̃(2)A2, Ã(2)B1, and B̃(2)B1 shape resonances. As a consequence of superposition of coherent resonant amplitudes with background scattering the B̃(2)B1 shape resonance appears as a peak, a dip, or a step function in the cross sections recorded as a function of energy at different scattering angles and this effect is satisfactorily reproduced by theory. The dip and peak contributions at different scattering angles partially compensate, making the resonance nearly invisible in the integral cross section. Vibrationally integrated cross sections were also measured at 1, 5, 10 and 20 eV and the question of whether the fixed-nuclei cross sections should be compared to vibrationally elastic or vibrationally integrated cross section is discussed.

  3. Electronic, web and internet platforms for communicating on radioactive waste management: the experience of ANDRA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eymard, J.

    2006-01-01

    ANDRA has been using e-tools and has had its own web-site since 1997. The site has been through 5 major upgrades since then. All the Agency's documents can be consulted and downloaded. Thus, electronic or web communication play a more and more important role as compared to classical instruments: 151453 hits in 2005, that is 37% up on 2004 and 119% up on 2003. One person, assigned from the communications division looks after the site. Assessments and analyses of the web-site use are performed through web surveys, online questionnaires and comments made by surfers

  4. Electronic data capture in a rural African setting: evaluating experiences with different systems in Malawi

    OpenAIRE

    King, Carina; Hall, Jenny; Banda, Masford; Beard, James; Bird, Jon; Kazembe, Peter; Fottrell, Ed

    2014-01-01

    Background\\ud \\ud As hardware for electronic data capture (EDC), such as smartphones or tablets, becomes cheaper and more widely available, the potential for using such hardware as data capture tools in routine healthcare and research is increasing.\\ud \\ud Objective\\ud \\ud We aim to highlight the advantages and disadvantages of four EDC systems being used simultaneously in rural Malawi: two for Android devices (CommCare and ODK Collect), one for PALM and Windows OS (Pendragon), and a custom-b...

  5. Effects of resistive magnetic field on fast electron divergence measured in experiment

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Yang, H.X.; Zhuo, H.B.; Ma, Y.Y.; Xu, H.; Yu, T.P.; Zou, D.B.; Ge, Z.Y.; Xu, B.B.; Zhu, Q.J.; Shao, F.Q.; Borghesi, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 57, č. 2 (2015), s. 025011 ISSN 0741-3335 R&D Projects: GA MŠk ED1.1.00/02.0061; GA MŠk EE2.3.20.0279 Grant - others:ELI Beamlines(XE) CZ.1.05/1.1.00/02.0061; LaserZdroj (OP VK 3)(XE) CZ.1.07/2.3.00/20.0279 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : fast electron * divergence measument * resistive magnetic field * laser-plasma interactions * short-pulse * acceleration Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 2.404, year: 2015

  6. Structure and conformational dynamics of molecules in the excited electronic states: theory and experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Godunov, I.A.; Bataev, V.A.; Maslov, D.V.; Yakovlev, N.N.

    2017-01-01

    The structure of conformational non-rigid molecules in the excited electronic states are investigated by joint theoretical and experimental methods. The theoretical part of work consist of two stages. In first stage the ab initio quantum-chemical calculations are carried out using high level methods. In second stage the vibrational problems of the various dimensions are solved by variational method for vibrations of large amplitude. In experimental part of work the vibronic spectra are investigated: gas-phase absorption and also, fluorescence excitation spectra of jet-cooled molecules. Some examples are considered.

  7. [Experiment studies of electron-positron interactions at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hertzbach, S.S.; Kofler, R.R.

    1993-01-01

    The High Energy Physics group at the University of Massachusetts has continued its' program of experimental studies of electron-positron interactions at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). The group activities have included: analysis of data taken between 1982 and 1990 with the TPC detector at the PEP facility, continuing data collection and data analysis using the SLC/SLD facility, planning for the newly approved B-factory at SLAC, and participation in design studies for future high energy linear colliders. This report will briefly summarize these activities

  8. Electron non-linearities in Langmuir waves with application to beat-wave experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bell, A.R.; Gibbon, P.

    1988-01-01

    Non-linear Langmuir waves are examined in the context of the beat-wave accelerator. With a background of immobile ions the waves in one dimension are subject to the relativistic non-linearity of Rosenbluth, M.N. and Liu, C.S., Phys. Rev. Lett., 1972, 29, 701. In two or three dimensions, other electron non-linearities occur which involve electric and magnetic fields. The quasi-linear equations for these non-linearities are developed and solved numerically in a geometry representative of laser-driven beat waves. (author)

  9. Independence and Interdependence: An Analysis of Pre-Service Candidates' Use of Focused Assignments on an Electronic Discussion Forum during the Initial Field Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisch, Audrey A.; Bennett, Deborah J.

    2011-01-01

    This article describes a case study using an electronic learning platform for creating an interactive learning community through asynchronous discussion to enhance the initial field experience of secondary math and English teacher candidates enrolled in Field Experience. We identified three problems with the field experience course--lack of…

  10. Who Wants to Be an E-tailpreneur? Experiences from an Electronic Retailing Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Archana; Mukherjee, Avinandan; McGinnis, John

    2015-01-01

    This paper outlines the experiences of developing a new hands-on marketing course. The objective of the course was to simulate the real-world scenario of starting an online retailing business and let students become entrepreneurs. Students were challenged to assimilate and apply relevant e-retailing knowledge while being responsible for designing,…

  11. Involving People with Lived Experience of Homelessness in Electronic Health Records Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serena Luchenski

    2017-04-01

    Using a participatory and dynamic approach to involve people with lived experience of homelessness and exclusion is an effective public engagement methodology for complex topics such as EHR research and data linkage. Information provided in the workshop was useful for interpreting findings, identifying strengths and gaps in health and social services, and developing research and practice recommendations.

  12. Status of the free-electron laser experiment at Los Alamos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warren, R.W.; Brau, C.A.; Newnam, B.E.; Stein, W.E.; Winston, J.G.; Young, L.M.

    1981-01-01

    Main design parameters are presented for the accelerator, the laser, and the wiggler. Four sections are presented that discuss unusual or different features in the design, construction, alignment, and diagnostic parts of the experiment. Up-to-date performance characteristics of the components are described

  13. Strange Quark Contributions to Parity-Violating Asymmetries in the Forward G0 Electron-Proton Scattering Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David Armstrong; Francois Arvieux; Razmik Asaturyan; Todd Averett; Stephanie Bailey; Guillaume Batigne; Douglas Beck; Elizabeth Beise; Jay Benesch; Louis Bimbot; James Birchall; Angela Biselli; Peter Bosted; Elodie Boukobza; Herbert Breuer; Roger Carlini; R. Carr; Nicholas Chant; Yu-Chiu Chao; Swapan Chattopadhyay; Russell Clark; Silviu Covrig; Anthony Cowley; Daniel Dale; C. Davis; Willie Falk; John Finn; Tony Forest; Gregg Franklin; Christophe Furget; David Gaskell; Joseph Grames; Keith Griffioen; Klaus Grimm; Benoit Guillon; Hayko Guler; Lars Hannelius; R. Hasty; A. Hawthorne Allen; Tanja Horn; Kathleen Johnston; Mark Jones; Peter Kammel; Reza Kazimi; Paul King; Ameya Kolarkar; Elie Korkmaz; Wolfgang Korsch; Serge Kox; Joachim Kuhn; Jeff Lachniet; Lawrence Lee; Jason Lenoble; Eric Liatard; J. Liu; Berenice Loupias; A. Lung; Glen MacLachlan; Dominique Marchand; J.W. Martin; Kenneth McFarlane; Daniella Mckee; Robert McKeown; Fernand Merchez; Hamlet Mkrtchyan; Bryan Moffit; M. Morlet; Itaru Nakagawa; Kazutaka Nakahara; Melissa Nakos; Retief Neveling; Silvia Niccolai; S. Ong; Shelley Page; Vassilios Papavassiliou; Stephen Pate; Sarah Phillips; Mark Pitt; Benard Poelker; Tracy Porcelli; Gilles Quemener; Brian Quinn; William Ramsay; Aamer Rauf; Jean-Sebastien Real; Julie Roche; Philip Roos; Gary Rutledge; Jeffery Secrest; Neven Simicevic; G.R. Smith; Damon Spayde; Samuel Stepanyan; Marcy Stutzman; Vincent Sulkosky; Vardan Tadevosyan; Raphael Tieulent; Jacques Van de Wiele; Willem van Oers; Eric Voutier; William Vulcan; G. Warren; S.P. Wells; Steven Williamson; S.A. Wood; Chen Yan; Junho Yun; Valdis Zeps

    2005-06-01

    We have measured parity-violating asymmetries in elastic electron-proton scattering over the range of momentum transfers 0.12 < Q{sup 2} < 1.0 GeV{sup 2}. These asymmetries, arising from interference of the electromagnetic and neutral weak interactions, are sensitive to strange quark contributions to the currents of the proton. The measurements were made at JLab using a toroidal spectrometer to detect the recoiling protons from a liquid hydrogen target. The results indicate non-zero, Q{sup 2} dependent, strange quark contributions and provide new information beyond that obtained in previous experiments.

  14. An Electron Fixed Target Experiment to Search for a New Vector Boson A' Decaying to e+e-

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Essig, Rouven; Schuster, Philip; /SLAC; Toro, Natalia; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Wojtsekhowski, Bogdan; /Jefferson Lab

    2010-06-11

    We describe an experiment to search for a new vector boson A' with weak coupling {alpha}' {approx}> 6 x 10{sup -8} {alpha} to electrons ({alpha} = e{sup 2}/4{pi}) in the mass range 65 MeV < m{sub A'} < 550 MeV. New vector bosons with such small couplings arise naturally from a small kinetic mixing of the 'dark photon' A' with the photon - one of the very few ways in which new forces can couple to the Standard Model - and have received considerable attention as an explanation of various dark matter related anomalies. A' bosons are produced by radiation off an electron beam, and could appear as narrow resonances with small production cross-section in the trident e{sup +}e{sup -} spectrum. We summarize the experimental approach described in a proposal submitted to Jefferson Laboratory's PAC35, PR-10-009. This experiment, the A' Experiment (APEX), uses the electron beam of the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility at Jefferson Laboratory (CEBAF) at energies of {approx} 1-4 GeV incident on 0.5-10% radiation length Tungsten wire mesh targets, and measures the resulting e{sup +}e{sup -} pairs to search for the A' using the High Resolution Spectrometer and the septum magnet in Hall A. With a {approx} 1 month run, APEX will achieve very good sensitivity because the statistics of e{sup +}e{sup -} pairs will be {approx} 10,000 times larger in the explored mass range than any previous search for the A' boson. These statistics and the excellent mass resolution of the spectrometers allow sensitivity to {alpha}'/{alpha} one to three orders of magnitude below current limits, in a region of parameter space of great theoretical and phenomenological interest. Similar experiments could also be performed at other facilities, such as the Mainz Microtron.

  15. Electron-beam generation, transport, and transverse oscillation experiments using the REX injector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlson, R.L.; Allison, P.W.; Kauppila, T.J.; Moir, D.C.; Ridlon, R.N.

    1991-01-01

    The REX machine at LANL is being used as a prototype to generate a 4-MV, 4.5-kA, 55-ns flat-top electron beam as a source for injection into a linear induction accelerator of the 16-MeV Dual-Axis Radiographic Hydrotest facility. The pulsed-power sources drives a planar velvet cathode producing a beam that is accelerated through a foilless anode aperture and transported by an air core magnetic lens for injection into the first of 48 linear induction cells. Extensive measurements of the time-resolved (<1-ns) properties of the beam using a streak camera and high-speed electronic diagnostics have been made. These parameters include beam current, voltage, current density, emittance, and transverse beam motion. The effective cathode temperature is 117 eV, corresponding to a Lapostolle emittance of 0.96 mm-rad. Transverse oscillations of the transported beam have been observed via a differenced B technique to be about ±100 μm at 245 MHz. This beam motion has been correlated via detailed rf measurements of asymmetric transverse cavity modes in the A-K gap. 7 refs., 6 figs

  16. Experiments in high voltage electron microscopy. Progress report, October 31, 1976--August 1977

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitchell, T.E.; Hobbs, L.W.; Howitt, D.G.; Barnard, R.; Ro, H.

    1977-07-01

    High voltage electron microscopy (HVEM) is being used to study the effects of irradiation on a variety of materials. The vacancies and interstitials produced by displacement can aggregate to form dislocation loops and voids, annihilate at sinks, or enhance various diffusion processes such as precipitation and recrystallization. Threshold displacement energies, E/sub d/, have been determined for a number of fcc, bcc and hcp metals and for various oxides. In MgO, E/sub d/ is less along (100) than (110); also, E/sub d/ decreases with increasing temperature, possibly due to thermally activated escape of interstitials from recombination volumes or softening of saddle points. The effects of electron irradiation on precipitation in Al--Cu, Al--Si and Ni--Al alloys have been investigated. Precipitation respectively of theta', Si and γ' is enhanced and growth rates are explicable in terms of theories of radiation-enhanced diffusion, with D/sub rad/ approx. 10 -15 cm 2 sec -1 . In oxides, damage gives rise to interstitial dislocation loop nucleation and growth in all cases, perfect [110] loops in MgO faulted basal and prismatic loops in Al 2 O 3 . Quantitative analysis of loop growth rates in MgO gives a migration energy of 3.3 eV for anion vacancies. Other radiation effects include sublimation of MgO and decomposition of MgAl 2 O 4 and Mg 2 SiO 4 into MgO plus other phases

  17. Experiments in high voltage electron microscopy. Progress report, October 31, 1975--August 1976

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitchell, T.E.; Das, G.; Barnard, R.; Ro, D.

    1976-08-01

    High voltage electron microscopy (HVEM) is being used to study the effects of irradiation on a variety of materials. The vacancies and interstitials produced by displacement can agglomerate to form dislocation loops and voids, annihilate at sinks, or enhance various diffusion processes such as precipitation and recrystallization. Threshold displacement energies, E/sub d/, have been determined for a number of fcc, bcc, and hcp metals. Directions for minimum E/sub d/ have been correlated with the crystal structure and the magnitude of E/sub d/ has been related to the sublimation energy. The effects of electron irradiation on precipitation in Al--Cu, Al--Si and Ni--Al alloys have been investigated. Precipitation respectively of theta', Si and γ' is enhanced and growth rates are being related quantitatively to theories of radiation-enhanced diffusion. Results on radiation damage in oxides (quartz, alumina, and magnesia) have also been obtained. Displacement damage gives rise to dislocation loop nucleation and growth in all cases, including multi-layer loops in Al 2 O 3 . In SiO 2 , ionization damage also occurs, which destroys the crystallinity. Threshold displacement and temperature effects have also been investigated

  18. Electron-beam generation, transport, and transverse oscillation experiments using the REX injector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlson, R.L.; Allison, P.W.; Kauppila, T.J.; Moir, D.C.; Ridlon, R.N.

    1991-01-01

    The REX machine at LANL is being used as a prototype to generate a 4-MV, 4.5-kA, 55-ns flat-top electron beam as a source for injection into a linear induction accelerator of the 16-MeV Dual Axis Radiographic Hydrotest facility. The pulsed-power source drives a planar velvet cathode producing a beam that is accelerated through a foilless anode aperture and transported by an air core magnetic lens for injection into the first 48 linear induction cells. Extensive measurements of the time-resolved (<1-ns) properties of the beam using a streak camera and high-speed electronic diagnostics have been made. These parameters include beam current, voltage, current density, emittance, and transverse beam motion. The effective cathode temperature is 117 eV, corresponding to a Lapostolle emittance of 0.96 mm-rad. Transverse oscillations of the transported beam have been observed via a differenced B-dot technique to be about ±100 μ at 245 MHz. This beam motion has been correlated via detailed rf measurements of asymmetric transverse cavity modes in the A-K gap

  19. Application of electron-beam ionized discharges to switches - a comparison of experiment with theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hallada, M.R.; Bailey, W.F.; Bletzinger, P.

    1982-01-01

    A theoretical investigation of high-pressure discharges ionized by an external electron beam (e-beam) was conducted. Only when secondary emission from the cathode and electron-impact ionization of metastable states were included in the analysis did calculated current-voltage (I-V) characteristics for argon and methane discharges compare well with experimental data. The I-V characteristics obtained reveal a sharp rise in the current at a certain threshold voltage. This threshold voltage and the entire I-V characteristic are shifted to lower voltages when metastable ionization is significant. Below the threshold voltage and at low external ionization source strengths, a region of negative differential conductivity is obtained. In the high-current region, the I-V slope is controlled by the secondary emission coefficient. The additional cathode sheath ionization from secondary emission and ionization from metastable states significantly reduces the discharge voltage. This important effect can be used to reduce e-beam switch losses and increase lifetime through judicious gas mixture selection and proper cathode conditioning

  20. Tailoring of the electronic properties of ZnO-polyacrylonitrile nanofibers: Experiment and theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iatsunskyi, Igor, E-mail: igoyat@amu.edu.pl [NanoBioMedical Centre, Adam Mickiewicz University in Poznan, Umultowska 85, 61-614, Poznan (Poland); Vasylenko, Andrij, E-mail: A.Vasylenko@warwick.ac.uk [Department of Physics, University of Warwick, Gibbet Hill Road, Coventry CV4 7AL (United Kingdom); Institute for Condensed Matter Physics NAS Ukraine, 1 Sventsitskogo str. 79011 Lviv (Ukraine); Viter, Roman, E-mail: roman.viter@lu.lv [Institute of Atomic Physics and Spectroscopy, University of Latvia, 19 Raina Blvd., LV 1586, Riga (Latvia); Kempiński, Mateusz; Nowaczyk, Grzegosz [NanoBioMedical Centre, Adam Mickiewicz University in Poznan, Umultowska 85, 61-614, Poznan (Poland); Jurga, Stefan [NanoBioMedical Centre, Adam Mickiewicz University in Poznan, Umultowska 85, 61-614, Poznan (Poland); Department of Macromolecular Physics, Adam Mickiewicz University, Umultowska, 85, 61-614 Poznan (Poland); Bechelany, Mikhael, E-mail: mikhael.bechelany@univ-montp2.fr [European Institute of Membranes (IEM, ENSCM-UM-CNRS, UMR 5635), University of Montpellier, Place Eugène Bataillon, F-34095, Montpellier (France)

    2017-07-31

    Highlights: • ZnO-polyacrylonitrile (ZnO-PAN) nanofibers were obtained by electrospinning method and atomic layer deposition. • Relation between structural and electronic properties of ZnO-PAN nanofibers were established. • DFT for calculation of ZnO work function was performed. - Abstract: We report the study of ZnO-polyacrylonitrile (ZnO-PAN) nanofibers fabricated by the combination of electrospinning and atomic layer deposition. The latter technique enables us to control the size of the surface of ZnO 1D nanostructures and hence its effectiveness for energy and biosensor applications. We observe the tendency of ZnO to form nanograins with increase of the layer thickness, and investigate the influence of the grain size on the electronic properties of the nanofibers. It is demonstrated that the ZnO work function (Φ) is strongly affected by surface band bending in the ZnO layer. The observed change of Φ in ZnO layers results from the curvature of the grain surface as well as the presence of the hydroxyl and oxygen groups, adsorbed on ZnO surface and is in a good agreement with theoretical prediction.

  1. Instrumental Developments for In-situ Breakdown Experiments inside a Scanning Electron Microscope

    CERN Document Server

    Muranaka, T; Leifer, K; Ziemann, V

    2011-01-01

    Electrical discharges in accelerating structures are one of the key issues limiting the performance of future high energy accelerators such as the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC). Fundamental understanding of breakdown phenomena is an indispensable part of the CLIC feasibility study. The present work concerns the experimental study of breakdown using Scanning Electron Microscopes (SEMs). A SEM gives us the opportunity to achieve high electrical gradients of 1\\,kV/$\\mu$m which corresponds to 1\\,GV/m by exciting a probe needle with a high voltage power supply and controlling the positioning of the needle with a linear piezo motor. The gap between the needle tip and the surface is controlled with sub-micron precision. A second electron microscope equipped with a Focused Ion Beam (FIB) is used to create surface corrugations and to sharpen the probe needle to a tip radius of about 50\\,nm. Moreover it is used to prepare cross sections of a voltage breakdown area in order to study the geometrical surface damages as w...

  2. Channeling experiments at planar diamond and silicon single crystals with electrons from the Mainz Microtron MAMI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Backe, H.; Lauth, W.; Tran Thi, T. N.

    2018-04-01

    Line structures were observed for (110) planar channeling of electrons in a diamond single crystal even at a beam energy of 180 MeV . This observation motivated us to initiate dechanneling length measurements as function of the beam energy since the occupation of quantum states in the channeling potential is expected to enhance the dechanneling length. High energy loss signals, generated as a result of emission of a bremsstrahlung photon with about half the beam energy at channeling of 450 and 855 MeV electrons, were measured as function of the crystal thickness. The analysis required additional assumptions which were extracted from the numerical solution of the Fokker-Planck equation. Preliminary results for diamond are presented. In addition, we reanalyzed dechanneling length measurements at silicon single crystals performed previously at the Mainz Microtron MAMI at beam energies between 195 and 855 MeV from which we conclude that the quality of our experimental data set is not sufficient to derive definite conclusions on the dechanneling length. Our experimental results are below the predictions of the Fokker-Planck equation and somewhat above the results of simulation calculations of A. V. Korol and A. V. Solov'yov et al. on the basis of the MBN Explorer simulation package. We somehow conservatively conclude that the prediction of the asymptotic dechanneling length on the basis of the Fokker-Planck equation represents an upper limit.

  3. Photoelectron-Auger electron coincidence spectroscopy of free molecules: New experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ulrich, Volker; Barth, Silko; Lischke, Toralf; Joshi, Sanjeev; Arion, Tiberiu; Mucke, Melanie; Foerstel, Marko; Bradshaw, Alex M.; Hergenhahn, Uwe

    2011-01-01

    Photoelectron-Auger electron coincidence spectroscopy probes the dicationic states produced by Auger decay following the photoionization of core or inner valence levels in atoms, molecules or clusters. Moreover, the technique provides valuable insight into the dynamics of core hole decay. This paper serves the dual purpose of demonstrating the additional information obtained by this technique compared to Auger spectroscopy alone as well as of describing the new IPP/FHI apparatus at the BESSY II synchrotron radiation source. The distinguishing feature of the latter is the capability to record both the photoelectron and Auger electron with good energy and angle resolution, for which purpose a large hemispherical electrostatic analyser is combined with several linear time-of-flight spectrometers. New results are reported for the K-shell photoionization of oxygen (O 2 ) and the subsequent KVV Auger decay. Calculations in the literature for non-coincident O 2 Auger spectra are found to be in moderately good agreement with the new data.

  4. Reconstruction and identification of electrons in the Atlas experiment. Setup of a Tier 2 of the computing grid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Derue, F.

    2008-03-01

    The origin of the mass of elementary particles is linked to the electroweak symmetry breaking mechanism. Its study will be one of the main efforts of the Atlas experiment at the Large Hadron Collider of CERN, starting in 2008. In most cases, studies will be limited by our knowledge of the detector performances, as the precision of the energy reconstruction or the efficiency to identify particles. This manuscript presents a work dedicated to the reconstruction of electrons in the Atlas experiment with simulated data and data taken during the combined test beam of 2004. The analysis of the Atlas data implies the use of a huge amount of computing and storage resources which brought to the development of a world computing grid. (author)

  5. The MEGA [Muon decays into an Electron and a GAmma ray] experiment: A search for μ → eγ

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooper, M.D.

    1988-01-01

    The MEGA experiment is designed to search for the μ → eγ process with a branching ratio sensitivity of 10 -13 . This decay violates the empirically established rule of lepton family number conservation and lies outside the Standard Model of electroweak interactions. In order for the experiment to make a factor of 500 improvement over the existing limit, a new design was adopted that employs highly modular, fast detectors and state-of-the-art electronic readout. The detectors are contained in a 15 kG solenoidal field produced by a superconducting magnet. The central region is a positron spectrometer, and the outer region is four layers of pair spectrometers. Data taking is expected to commence in 1989. 6 refs., 3 figs

  6. High average power CW FELs [Free Electron Laser] for application to plasma heating: Designs and experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Booske, J.H.; Granatstein, V.L.; Radack, D.J.; Antonsen, T.M. Jr.; Bidwell, S.; Carmel, Y.; Destler, W.W.; Latham, P.E.; Levush, B.; Mayergoyz, I.D.; Zhang, Z.X.

    1989-01-01

    A short period wiggler (period ∼ 1 cm), sheet beam FEL has been proposed as a low-cost source of high average power (1 MW) millimeter-wave radiation for plasma heating and space-based radar applications. Recent calculation and experiments have confirmed the feasibility of this concept in such critical areas as rf wall heating, intercepted beam (''body'') current, and high voltage (0.5 - 1 MV) sheet beam generation and propagation. Results of preliminary low-gain sheet beam FEL oscillator experiments using a field emission diode and pulse line accelerator have verified that lasing occurs at the predicted FEL frequency. Measured start oscillation currents also appear consistent with theoretical estimates. Finally, we consider the possibilities of using a short-period, superconducting planar wiggler for improved beam confinement, as well as access to the high gain, strong pump Compton regime with its potential for highly efficient FEL operation

  7. The clinical trial of TOMOTRON - a new electronic device - and eight months' clinical experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kroepelin, T.; Billmann, P.; Wenz, W.; Baumann, H.

    1985-01-01

    We have been using digital tomography (TOMOTRON) clinically for eight months. Its advantages include savings in both time and dose, good image quality throug increased contrast, and improved magnification and image postprocessing compared with conventional tomography. However, lower image resolution and small image sections are the disadvantages of digital tomography. Weighing these advantages and disadvantages by our experience, the diagnostic accuracy of digital tomography is higher than conventional tomography, particularly in skeletal studies. (author)

  8. The Data Merger Readout Controller for the NA48 experiment data acquisition electronics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galagedera, S.B.; Brierton, B.; Halsall, R.

    1996-01-01

    The NA48 experiment at the CERN SPS offers a four fold improvement in statistical and systematic error over earlier measurements of the magnitude of the direct CP (Charge-Parity) violation of the neutral Kaon system. This requires maximum event readout efficiency, controlled event building and fast monitoring of run time errors. The event data flow in particular must be sustained at 100 Mbyte/s. The Data Merger Readout Controller presented in this paper offers this facility at minimal production cost

  9. First experience of electron microscopic and bacteriological examination of the prostate gland stones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. V. Vinogradov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The work is based on a study of prostate stones obtained by transurethral resection of the prostate in 5 patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia in combination with chronic calculous prostatitis. Stones have been investigated by scanning electron microscopy and X-ray microstructural analysis, as well as a comparative study of bacteriological swabs from the surface of the stones after ultrasonic treatment of stone and without it. Pretreatment ultrasound prostate stones before sowing on nutrient medium swabs improves bacteriological diagnosis, which may be due to the dispersion of biofilms and exit vegetative forms of bacteria from it. This feature can serve as ultrasound theoretical justification for its use to improve the efficiency of diagnosis of various forms of prostatitis.

  10. Computer programs for unit-cell determination in electron diffraction experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, X.Z.

    2005-01-01

    A set of computer programs for unit-cell determination from an electron diffraction tilt series and pattern indexing has been developed on the basis of several well-established algorithms. In this approach, a reduced direct primitive cell is first determined from experimental data, in the means time, the measurement errors of the tilt angles are checked and minimized. The derived primitive cell is then checked for possible higher lattice symmetry and transformed into a proper conventional cell. Finally a least-squares refinement procedure is adopted to generate optimum lattice parameters on the basis of the lengths of basic reflections in each diffraction pattern and the indices of these reflections. Examples are given to show the usage of the programs

  11. Electronic structure of α-SrB4O7: experiment and theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atuchin, V V; Kesler, V G; Zaitsev, A I; Molokeev, M S; Aleksandrovsky, A S; Kuzubov, A A; Ignatova, N Y

    2013-01-01

    The investigation of valence band structure and electronic parameters of constituent element core levels of α-SrB 4 O 7 has been carried out with x-ray photoemission spectroscopy. Optical-quality crystal α-SrB 4 O 7 has been grown by the Czochralski method. Detailed photoemission spectra of the element core levels have been recorded from the powder sample under excitation by nonmonochromatic Al Kα radiation (1486.6 eV). The band structure of α-SrB 4 O 7 has been calculated by ab initio methods and compared to XPS measurements. It has been found that the band structure of α-SrB 4 O 7 is weakly dependent on the Sr-related states. (paper)

  12. Electronic Sentinel Surveillance of Influenza-like Illness. Experience from a pilot study in New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adnan, Mehnaz; Peterkin, Donald; Lopez, Liza; Mackereth, Graham

    2017-02-01

    Electronic reporting of Influenza-like illness (eILI) from primary care was implemented and evaluated in three general medical practices in New Zealand during May to September 2015. To measure the uptake of eILI and to identify the system's strength and limitations. Analysis of transactional data from the eILI system; comparative study of influenza-like illness cases reported using manual methods and eILI; questionnaire administered to clinical and operational stakeholders. Over the study period 66% of total ILI cases were reported using eILI. Reporting timeliness improved significantly compared to manual reporting with an average of 24 minutes from submission by the clinician to processing in the national database. Users found the system to be user-friendly. eILI assists clinicians to report ILI cases to public health authorities within a stipulated time period and is associated with faster, more reliable and improved information transfer.

  13. Observation of neutrino-like interactions without muon or electron in the Gargamelle neutrino experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Hasert, F J; Krenz, W; Conta, C; Von Krogh, J; Lanske, D; Morfín, J G; Schultze, K; Weerts, H; Bertrand-Coremans, G H; Sacton, J; Van Doninck, W K; Vilain, P; Camerini, U; Cundy, Donald C; Baldi, R; Danilchenko, I A; Fry, W F; Haidt, Dieter; Natali, S; Musset, P; Osculati, B; Palmer, R; Pattison, John Bryan M; Perkins, Donald Hill; Pullia, Antonio; Rousset, A; Venus, W A; Wachsmuth, H W; Brisson, V; Degrange, B; Haguenauer, Maurice; Kluberg, L; Nguyen-Khac, U; Petiau, P; Belotti, E; Bonetti, S; Cavalli, D; Fiorini, Ettore; Rollier, M; Aubert, Bernard; Blum, D; Chounet, L M; Heusse, P; Lagarrigue, A; Lutz, A M; Orkin-Lecourtois, A; Vialle, J P; Bullock, F W; Esten, M J; Jones, T W; McKenzie, J; Michette, A G; Myatt, Gerald; Scott, W G

    1974-01-01

    Events induced by neutral particles and producing only hadrons, but no muon or electron, have been observed in the heavy liquid bubble chamber Gargamelle exposed to neutrino ( nu ) and antineutrino ( nu ) beams at CERN. A study of the various sources which could give rise to such events reveals that less than 20% could be attributed to neutrons or K/sub L/ degrees . The events behave as expected if they arise from neutral current processes induced by neutrinos and antineutrinos. The ratio of the number of these events to the number of corresponding events with charged lepton is 0.22+or-0.04 for nu and 0.43+or-0.12 for nu . (8 refs).

  14. Inhomogeneous free-electron distribution in InN nanowires: Photoluminescence excitation experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segura-Ruiz, J.; Molina-Sánchez, A.; Garro, N.; García-Cristóbal, A.; Cantarero, A.; Iikawa, F.; Denker, C.; Malindretos, J.; Rizzi, A.

    2010-09-01

    Photoluminescence excitation (PLE) spectra have been measured for a set of self-assembled InN nanowires (NWs) and a high-crystalline quality InN layer grown by molecular-beam epitaxy. The PLE experimental lineshapes have been reproduced by a self-consistent calculation of the absorption in a cylindrical InN NW. The differences in the PLE spectra can be accounted for the inhomogeneous electron distribution within the NWs caused by a bulk donor concentration (ND+) and a two-dimensional density of ionized surface states (Nss+) . For NW radii larger than 30 nm, ND+ and Nss+ modify the absorption edge and the lineshape, respectively, and can be determined from the comparison with the experimental data.

  15. New experimental limit on Pauli exclusion principle violation by electrons (VIP experiment)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartalucci, S [NFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Prascati, C.P. 13, Via E. Fermi 40, I-00044, Frascati (Italy); Bertolucci, S [NFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Prascati, C.P. 13, Via E. Fermi 40, I-00044, Frascati (Italy); Bragadireanu, M [NFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Prascati, C.P. 13, Via E. Fermi 40, I-00044, Frascati (Italy)] (and others)

    2007-05-15

    The Pauli exclusion principle (PEP) represents one of the basic principles of modern physics and, even if there are no compelling reasons to doubt its validity, it still spurs a lively debate, because an intuitive, elementary explanation is still missing, and because of its unique stand among the basic symmetries of physics. A new limit on the probability that PEP is violated by electrons was estabilished by the VIP (Violation of the Pauli exclusion principle) Collaboration, using the method of searching for PEP forbidden atomic transitions in copper. The preliminary value, 1/2{beta}{sup 2} < 4.5 x 10{sup -28}, represents an improvement of about two orders of magnitude of the previous limit. The goal of VIP is to push this limit at the level of 10{sup -30}.

  16. Low-energy electron diffraction experiment, theory and surface structure determination

    CERN Document Server

    Hove, Michel A; Chan, Chi-Ming

    1986-01-01

    Surface crystallography plays the same fundamental role in surface science which bulk crystallography has played so successfully in solid-state physics and chemistry. The atomic-scale structure is one of the most important aspects in the understanding of the behavior of surfaces in such widely diverse fields as heterogeneous catalysis, microelectronics, adhesion, lubrication, cor­ rosion, coatings, and solid-solid and solid-liquid interfaces. Low-Energy Electron Diffraction or LEED has become the prime tech­ nique used to determine atomic locations at surfaces. On one hand, LEED has yielded the most numerous and complete structural results to date (almost 200 structures), while on the other, LEED has been regarded as the "technique to beat" by a variety of other surface crystallographic methods, such as photoemission, SEXAFS, ion scattering and atomic diffraction. Although these other approaches have had impressive successes, LEED has remained the most productive technique and has shown the most versatility...

  17. Pumping experiment of water on B and LaB6 films with electron beam evaporator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mori, Takahiro; Hanaoka, Yutaka; Akaishi, Kenya; Kubota, Yusuke; Motojima, Osamu; Mushiaki, Motoi; Funato, Yasuyuki.

    1992-10-01

    Pumping characteristics of water vapor on boron and lanthanum hexaboride films formed with an electron beam evaporator have been investigated in high vacuum of a pressure region between 10 -4 and 10 -3 Pa. Measured initial maximum pumping speeds of water for fresh B and LaB 6 films on substrates with a deposition amount from 2.3 x 10 21 to 6.7 x 10 21 molecules·m -2 are 3.2 ∼ 4.9 m 3 ·s -1 ·m -2 , and maximum saturation amounts of adsorbed water on these films are 2.9 x 10 20 ∼ 1.3 x 10 21 H 2 O molecules·m -2 . (author)

  18. Experiments with highly charged ions up to bare U92+ on the electron beam ion trap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beiersdorfer, P.

    1994-07-01

    An overview is given of the current experimental effort to investigate the level structure of highly charged ions with the Livermore electron beam ion trap (EBIT) facility. The facility allows the production and study of virtually any ionization state of any element up to bare U 92+ . Precision spectroscopic measurements have been performed for a range of Δn = 0 and Δn = 1 transitions. Examples involving 3-4 and 2-3 as well as 3-3 and 2-2 transitions in uranium ions are discussed that illustrated some of the measurement and analysis techniques employed. The measurements have allowed tests of calculations of the the quantum electrodynamical contributions to the transitions energies at the 0.4% level in a regime where (Zα) ∼ 1

  19. The Radiation Tolerant Electronics for the LHC Cryogenic Controls: Basic Design and First Operational Experience

    CERN Document Server

    Casas-Cubillos, J; Rodríguez-Ruiz, M A

    2008-01-01

    The LHC optics is based in the extensive use of superconducting magnets covering 23 km inside the tunnel. The associated cryogenic system for keeping the magnets in nominal conditions is hence distributed all around the 27 km LHC tunnel and the cryogenic instrumentation submitted to the LHC radiation environment is composed of about 18’000 sensors and actuators. Radiation Tolerant (RadTol) electronics was designed and procured in order to keep the signals integrity against electromagnetic interference and to reduce cabling costs required in case of sending the analog signals into the 30 radiation protected areas. This paper presents the basic design, the qualification of the main RadTol components and the first operational results.

  20. Modular focusing ring imaging Cherenkov detector for electron-ion collider experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, C. P.; Alfred, M.; Allison, L.; Awadi, M.; Azmoun, B.; Barbosa, F.; Barion, L.; Bennett, J.; Brooks, W.; Butler, C.; Cao, T.; Chiu, M.; Cisbani, E.; Contalbrigo, M.; Datta, A.; Del Dotto, A.; Demarteau, M.; Durham, J. M.; Dzhygadlo, R.; Elder, T.; Fields, D.; Furletova, Y.; Gleason, C.; Grosse-Perdekamp, M.; Harris, J.; Haseler, T. O. S.; He, X.; van Hecke, H.; Horn, T.; Hruschka, A.; Huang, J.; Hyde, C.; Ilieva, Y.; Kalicy, G.; Kimball, M.; Kistenev, E.; Kulinich, Y.; Liu, M.; Majka, R.; McKisson, J.; Mendez, R.; Nadel-Turonski, P.; Park, K.; Peters, K.; Rao, T.; Pisani, R.; Qiang, Y.; Rescia, S.; Rossi, P.; Sarajlic, O.; Sarsour, M.; Schwarz, C.; Schwiening, J.; da Silva, C. L.; Smirnov, N.; Stien, H. D.; Stevens, J.; Sukhanov, A.; Syed, S.; Tate, A. C.; Toh, J.; Towell, C. L.; Towell, R. S.; Tsang, T.; Turisini, M.; Wagner, R.; Wang, J.; Woody, C.; Xi, W.; Xie, J.; Zhao, Z. W.; Zihlmann, B.; Zorn, C.

    2017-11-01

    A powerful new electron-ioncollider (EIC) has been recommended in the 2015 Long Range Plan for Nuclear Science for probing the partonic structure inside nucleons and nuclei with unprecedented precision and versatility [1]. EIC detectors are currently under development [2], all of which require hadron identification over a broad kinematic range. A prototype ring imaging Cherenkov detector has been developed for hadron identification in the momentum range from 3 GeV/c to 10 GeV/c. The key feature of this new detector is a compact and modular design, achieved by using aerogel as radiator and a Fresnel lens for ring focusing. In this paper, the results from a beam test of a prototype device at Fermilab are reported.

  1. Study of the experience feedback relating to ageing of electronic component and cables

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gauthier, G.; Henry, J.Y.

    1992-11-01

    This study was conducted on electronic components and electrical cables taken from the Brennilis EL4 reactor, during dismantling, after 18 years of operation. Its aim was to examine the state of the equipment taken from the site and thus to check its characteristics and in particular for cables: to check, whenever possible, the suitability of the accelerated ageing methods by comparing the characteristics observed on the samples from EL4 with test samples held in storage and previously subjected to similar accelerated ageing: predicting medium and long-term ageing by extrapolation from the selected mathematical model. The result of this initial work confirmed the need for extreme caution regarding the accelerated ageing methods. Further work on cables and polymers is underway and will enable the laws currently used for qualification tests to be evaluated. (author) [fr

  2. Study of the experience feedback relating to ageing of electronic components and cables

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gauthier, G.; Henry, J.Y.

    1992-11-01

    This study was conducted on electronic components and electrical cables taken from the Brennilis EL4 reactor, during dismantling, after 18 years of operation. Its aim was to examine the state of the equipment taken from the site and thus to check its characteristics and in particular for cables: to check, whenever possible, the suitability of the accelerated ageing methods by comparing the characteristics observed on the samples from EL4 with test samples held in storage and previously subjected to similar accelerated ageing: predicting medium and long-term ageing by extrapolation from the selected mathematical model. The result of this initial work confirmed the need for extreme caution regarding the accelerated ageing methods. Further work on cables and polymers is underway and will enable the laws currently used for qualification tests to be evaluated

  3. SU-E-T-447: Electronic Brachytherapy (EBT) Treatment of Cervical Cancer - First Clinical Experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, D; Johnson, M; Thompson, J; Ahmad, S [University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma (United States); Chan, L; Hausen, H [Xoft Inc., San Jose, CA (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To study the first trial patient in which an electronic brachytherapy (EBT) x-ray source is utilized for treatment of cervical cancer. Methods: During patient treatment, a miniaturized x-ray source was used in combination with a customized titanium tandem and ovoid applicator set. The semi-specialized source was modeled with formalisms outlined by AAMP Task Group 43. Multiple models were used to compensate for variable attenuation conditions as a function of source positions. Varian Brachyvision treatment planning software was utilized on CT data sets for dose calculations prior to treatment delivery. The dose was prescribed to “point A” as defined by American Brachytherapy society. Additional treatments plans were created from those clinically utilized in patient care and were recalculated for an existing Ir-192 source model. Dose volume histograms (DVH) and point dose calculations were compared between the modalities for the clinical condition present in patients treated with EBT. Results: Clinical treatment times, though longer than those typically experienced by Ir-192 users, were manageable. Instantaneous dose rates at personal positions within the treatment vault were lower than those measured during intra operative radiation therapy and breast EBT treatments. Due to lower average photon energy in EBT, dose gradients within the treatment plans were as expected steeper than those observed in Ir-192 based brachytherapy. DVH comparisons between Ir-192 and EBT treatments showed an expected decrease in the integral dose to normal tissues of interest for EBT. In comparing plans created for EBT delivery with those calculated for Ir-192, average dose values for EBT were more than 4%, 11%, and 9% lower at predefined bladder, rectum and “point B” positions, respectively. Conclusion: For the first time, we have demonstrated that the utilizing electronic brachytherapy system for tandem and ovoid based treatment of cancer of the cervix is feasible, and

  4. X-ray imaging studies of electron cyclotron microwave-heated plasmas in the Tandem Mirror Experiment-Upgrade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Failor, B.H.

    1986-02-01

    An x-ray pinhole camera designed to efficiently detect photons with energies between 5 and 250 keV was built to image bremsstrahlung emission from a microwave-heated hot electron plasma. This plasma is formed at one of the thermal barrier locations in the Tandem Experiment-Upgrade at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The instrument consists of a lead aperture, an x-ray converter in the form of a sodium-activated cesium iodide scintillator, light intensifier electronics, and a recording medium that may either be high speed film or a CCD array. The nominal spatial and temporal resolutions are one part in 40 and 17 msec, respectively. The component requirements for optimum performance were determined both analytically and by computer simulation, and were verified experimentally. The details of these results are presented. The instrument has been used to measure x-ray emission from the TMX-U west end cell. Data acquired with the x-ray camera has allowed us to infer the temporal evolution of the mirror-trapped electron radial profile

  5. SLAC's Polarized Electron Source LaserSystem and Minimization of Helicity Correlations for the E-158 Parity Violation Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Humensky, T

    2002-01-01

    SLAC E-158 is an experiment designed to make the first measurement of parity violation in Moeller scattering. E-158 will measure the right-left cross-section asymmetry, A sub L sub R sup M sup o sup e sup l sup l sup e sup r , in the elastic scattering of a 45-GeV polarized electron beam off unpolarized electrons in a liquid hydrogen target. E-158 plans to measure the expected Standard Model asymmetry of approx 10 sup - sup 7 to an accuracy of better than 10 sup - sup 8. To make this measurement, the polarized electron source requires for operation an intense circularly polarized laser beam and the ability to quickly switch between right- and left-helicity polarization states with minimal right-left helicity-correlated asymmetries in the resulting beam parameters (intensity, position, angle, spot size, and energy), sup b sup e sup a sup m A sub L sub R 's. This laser beam is produced by a unique SLAC-designed flashlamp-pumped Ti:Sapphire laser and is propagated through a carefully designed set of polarization...

  6. Optimization of the electron collection efficiency of a large area MCP-PMT for the JUNO experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Lin, E-mail: chenlin@opt.cn [State Key Laboratory of Transient Optics and Photonics, Xi’an Institute of Optics and Precision Mechanics (XIOPM), Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), Xi’an 710119 (China); Graduate School of Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), Beijing 100049 (China); Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an 710049 (China); Tian, Jinshou [Graduate School of Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), Beijing 100049 (China); Liu, Chunliang [Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an 710049 (China); Wang, Yifang; Zhao, Tianchi [Institute of High Energy Physics (IHEP) of CAS, Beijing 100049 (China); Liu, Hulin; Wei, Yonglin; Sai, Xiaofeng [Graduate School of Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), Beijing 100049 (China); Chen, Ping [State Key Laboratory of Transient Optics and Photonics, Xi’an Institute of Optics and Precision Mechanics (XIOPM), Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), Xi’an 710119 (China); Graduate School of Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), Beijing 100049 (China); Wang, Xing; Lu, Yu [Graduate School of Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), Beijing 100049 (China); Hui, Dandan; Guo, Lehui [State Key Laboratory of Transient Optics and Photonics, Xi’an Institute of Optics and Precision Mechanics (XIOPM), Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), Xi’an 710119 (China); Graduate School of Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), Beijing 100049 (China); Liu, Shulin; Qian, Sen; Xia, Jingkai; Yan, Baojun; Zhu, Na [Institute of High Energy Physics (IHEP) of CAS, Beijing 100049 (China); Sun, Jianning; Si, Shuguang [North Night Vision Technology (NNVT) CO., LTD, Nanjing 210110 (China); and others

    2016-08-11

    A novel large-area (20-inch) photomultiplier tube based on microchannel plate (MCP-PMTs) is proposed for the Jiangmen Underground Neutrino Observatory (JUNO) experiment. Its photoelectron collection efficiency C{sub e} is limited by the MCP open area fraction (A{sub open}). This efficiency is studied as a function of the angular (θ), energy (E) distributions of electrons in the input charge cloud and the potential difference (U) between the PMT photocathode and the MCP input surface, considering secondary electron emission from the MCP input electrode. In CST Studio Suite, Finite Integral Technique and Monte Carlo method are combined to investigate the dependence of C{sub e} on θ, E and U. Results predict that C{sub e} can exceed A{sub open}, and are applied to optimize the structure and operational parameters of the 20-inch MCP-PMT prototype. C{sub e} of the optimized MCP-PMT is expected to reach 81.2%. Finally, the reduction of the penetration depth of the MCP input electrode layer and the deposition of a high secondary electron yield material on the MCP are proposed to further optimize C{sub e}.

  7. Optimization of the electron collection efficiency of a large area MCP-PMT for the JUNO experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Lin; Tian, Jinshou; Liu, Chunliang; Wang, Yifang; Zhao, Tianchi; Liu, Hulin; Wei, Yonglin; Sai, Xiaofeng; Chen, Ping; Wang, Xing; Lu, Yu; Hui, Dandan; Guo, Lehui; Liu, Shulin; Qian, Sen; Xia, Jingkai; Yan, Baojun; Zhu, Na; Sun, Jianning; Si, Shuguang

    2016-01-01

    A novel large-area (20-inch) photomultiplier tube based on microchannel plate (MCP-PMTs) is proposed for the Jiangmen Underground Neutrino Observatory (JUNO) experiment. Its photoelectron collection efficiency C e is limited by the MCP open area fraction (A open ). This efficiency is studied as a function of the angular (θ), energy (E) distributions of electrons in the input charge cloud and the potential difference (U) between the PMT photocathode and the MCP input surface, considering secondary electron emission from the MCP input electrode. In CST Studio Suite, Finite Integral Technique and Monte Carlo method are combined to investigate the dependence of C e on θ, E and U. Results predict that C e can exceed A open , and are applied to optimize the structure and operational parameters of the 20-inch MCP-PMT prototype. C e of the optimized MCP-PMT is expected to reach 81.2%. Finally, the reduction of the penetration depth of the MCP input electrode layer and the deposition of a high secondary electron yield material on the MCP are proposed to further optimize C e .

  8. An electro-optical timing diagnostic for pump-probe experiments at the free-electron laser in Hamburg FLASH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azima, Armin

    2009-07-15

    Femtosecond pump-probe experiments have extensively been used to follow atomic and molecular motion in time. The very intense extreme ultraviolet XUV light of the Free electron LASer in Hamburg FLASH facility allows to investigate fundamental processes such as direct one or few photon inner shell ionizations. A supplementary Ti:Sapphire near infrared femtosecond laser system allows to perform two-color pump-probe experiments with FLASH involving intense laser fields of hugely different photon energies. Within this work a bunch arrival measurement system has been built, which assists these two-color pump-probe experiments to reduce the temporal jitter of FLASH and to increase the temporal resolution. The diagnostic is based upon an electro-optical detection scheme and measures the relative arrival time between the Ti:Sapphire femtosecond pulse and the electron bunch, which generates the self-amplified by stimulated emission SASE XUV pulse in the undulator section of FLASH. Key feature of the diagnostic is a 150 m long glass fiber pulse transport line, which inflicts non-linear dispersion. A dispersion control system to compensate for this higher order dispersion has been developed including the control and programming of a spatial light phase modulator. It was possible to transport a 90 fs FWHM short near infrared femtosecond laser pulse Fourier limited by the dispersion compensated glass fiber. The electro-optical signal induced by the FLASH electron bunch was generated, characterized and optimized. The signal features beside the designated bunch arrival timing capability the additional possibility to measure the longitudinal electron bunch density distribution of an arbitrary bunch of FLASH in a single shot with a temporal resolution of below 100 fs RMS. Timing and bunch analysis capabilities of the developed diagnostic have been cross-checked with other comparable diagnostics at FLASH like the transversal deflecting cavity structure named LOLA. Finally, the

  9. An electro-optical timing diagnostic for pump-probe experiments at the free-electron laser in Hamburg FLASH

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azima, Armin

    2009-07-01

    Femtosecond pump-probe experiments have extensively been used to follow atomic and molecular motion in time. The very intense extreme ultraviolet XUV light of the Free electron LASer in Hamburg FLASH facility allows to investigate fundamental processes such as direct one or few photon inner shell ionizations. A supplementary Ti:Sapphire near infrared femtosecond laser system allows to perform two-color pump-probe experiments with FLASH involving intense laser fields of hugely different photon energies. Within this work a bunch arrival measurement system has been built, which assists these two-color pump-probe experiments to reduce the temporal jitter of FLASH and to increase the temporal resolution. The diagnostic is based upon an electro-optical detection scheme and measures the relative arrival time between the Ti:Sapphire femtosecond pulse and the electron bunch, which generates the self-amplified by stimulated emission SASE XUV pulse in the undulator section of FLASH. Key feature of the diagnostic is a 150 m long glass fiber pulse transport line, which inflicts non-linear dispersion. A dispersion control system to compensate for this higher order dispersion has been developed including the control and programming of a spatial light phase modulator. It was possible to transport a 90 fs FWHM short near infrared femtosecond laser pulse Fourier limited by the dispersion compensated glass fiber. The electro-optical signal induced by the FLASH electron bunch was generated, characterized and optimized. The signal features beside the designated bunch arrival timing capability the additional possibility to measure the longitudinal electron bunch density distribution of an arbitrary bunch of FLASH in a single shot with a temporal resolution of below 100 fs RMS. Timing and bunch analysis capabilities of the developed diagnostic have been cross-checked with other comparable diagnostics at FLASH like the transversal deflecting cavity structure named LOLA. Finally, the

  10. A comparison of experiment, CEPXS/ONETRAN, TIGERP, and QUICKE2 net electron emission coefficients for various bremsstrahlung spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ballard, W.P.; Lorence, L.J. Jr.; Snowden, D.P.; van Lint, V.A.J.; Beale, E.S.

    1987-01-01

    This work compares a carefully designed experiment with the predictions of four different codes (CEPXS/ONETRAN, TIGERP, TIGER and QUICKE2) for the complex bremsstrahlung spectra typical of very intense pulsed power x-ray generators. Accurate calculation of net photon-induced electron emission yields at material interfaces using Monte Carlo codes can be particularly difficult if the forward and reverse partial yields are of similar magnitudes. In such a circumstance, the statistical error in the Monte Carlo solution (TIGER or TIGERP) must be kept to a minimum to accurately resolve the difference. CEPXS/ONETRAN is a new deterministic coupled electron/photon transport code that is faster than Monte Carlo and is not subject to statistical error. QUICKE2 evaluates an analytical approximation and is also much less expensive to run than the Monte Carlo codes. The comparison of net yields is a sensitive test of the relative accuracy and efficiency of these various codes. We find that all of the codes except QUICKE2 substantially agree with the experiments for the forward net yields. Howver, for reverse net yields from high-Z materials, all the codes overpredict relative to measurements

  11. Study of the material photon and electron background and the liquid argon detector veto efficiency of the CDEX-10 experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Su Jian; Zeng Zhi; Ma Hao

    2015-01-01

    The China Dark Matter Experiment (CDEX) is located at the China Jinping Underground Laboratory (CJPL) and aims to directly detect the weakly interacting massive particles (WIMP) flux with high sensitivity in the low mass region. Here we present a study of the predicted photon and electron backgrounds including the background contribution of the structure materials of the germanium detector, the passive shielding materials, and the intrinsic radioactivity of the liquid argon that serves as an anti-Compton active shielding detector. A detailed geometry is modeled and the background contribution has been simulated based on the measured radioactivities of all possible components within the GEANT4 program. Then the photon and electron background level in the energy region of interest (< 10 -2 events·kg 1 ·day -1 ·keV -1 (cpkkd)) is predicted based on Monte Carlo simulations. The simulated result is consistent with the design goal of the CDEX-10 experiment, 0.1cpkkd, which shows that the active and passive shield design of CDEX-10 is effective and feasible. (authors)

  12. An Examination of the Effects of Electronic Word of Mouth on Consumers’ Purchase Decision: Through the Lens of Experience Good and Search Good

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Zichen

    2013-01-01

    The prevailing of the Internet facilitates consumers to share information, opinions and experiences of products and services online. This new form of word of mouth communication is called electronic word of mouth (WOM). Nowadays, electronic word of mouth plays an important role in the consumers’ information search during the decision making process. A large number of managerial and academic attentions have been drawn to the effects of electronic WOM on consumer’s purchase decision. Factors wh...

  13. Cancer patients' attitudes and experiences of online access to their electronic medical records: A qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rexhepi, Hanife; Åhlfeldt, Rose-Mharie; Cajander, Åsa; Huvila, Isto

    2018-06-01

    Patients' access to their online medical records serves as one of the cornerstones in the efforts to increase patient engagement and improve healthcare outcomes. The aim of this article is to provide in-depth understanding of cancer patients' attitudes and experiences of online medical records, as well as an increased understanding of the complexities of developing and launching e-Health services. The study result confirms that online access can help patients prepare for doctor visits and to understand their medical issues. In contrast to the fears of many physicians, the study shows that online access to medical records did not generate substantial anxiety, concerns or increased phone calls to the hospital.

  14. Sleep-monitoring, experiment M133. [electronic recording system for automatic analysis of human sleep patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frost, J. D., Jr.; Salamy, J. G.

    1973-01-01

    The Skylab sleep-monitoring experiment simulated the timelines and environment expected during a 56-day Skylab mission. Two crewmembers utilized the data acquisition and analysis hardware, and their sleep characteristics were studied in an online fashion during a number of all night recording sessions. Comparison of the results of online automatic analysis with those of postmission visual data analysis was favorable, confirming the feasibility of obtaining reliable objective information concerning sleep characteristics during the Skylab missions. One crewmember exhibited definite changes in certain sleep characteristics (e.g., increased sleep latency, increased time Awake during first third of night, and decreased total sleep time) during the mission.

  15. The DarkSide-50 Experiment: Electron Recoil Calibrations and A Global Energy Variable

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hackett, Brianne Rae [Hawaii U.

    2017-01-01

    Over the course of decades, there has been mounting astronomical evidence for non-baryonic dark matter, yet its precise nature remains elusive. A favored candidate for dark matter is the Weakly Interacting Massive Particle (WIMP) which arises naturally out of extensions to the Standard Model. WIMPs are expected to occasionally interact with particles of normal matter through nuclear recoils. DarkSide-50 aims to detect this type of particle through the use of a two-phase liquid argon time projection chamber. To make a claim of discovery, an accurate understanding of the background and WIMP search region is imperative. Knowledge of the backgrounds is done through extensive studies of DarkSide-50's response to electron and nuclear recoils. The CALibration Insertion System (CALIS) was designed and built for the purpose of introduc- ing radioactive sources into or near the detector in a joint eort between Fermi National Laboratory (FNAL) and the University of Hawai'i at Manoa. This work describes the testing, installation, and commissioning of CALIS at the Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso. CALIS has been used in mul- tiple calibration campaigns with both neutron and sources. In this work, DarkSide-50's response to electron recoils, which are important for background estimations, was studied through the use of calibration sources by constructing a global energy variable which takes into account the anti- correlation between scintillation and ionization signals produced by interactions in the liquid argon. Accurately reconstructing the event energy correlates directly with quantitatively understanding the WIMP sensitivity in DarkSide-50. This work also validates the theoretically predicted decay spectrum of 39Ar against 39Ar decay data collected in the early days of DarkSide-50 while it was lled with atmospheric argon; a validation of this type is not readily found in the literature. Finally, we show how well the constructed energy variable can predict

  16. The electron-ion scattering experiment ELISe at the International Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR)-A conceptual design study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Antonov, A. N.; Gaidarov, M. K.; Ivanov, M. V.; Kadrev, D. N.; Aiche, M.; Barreau, G.; Czajkowski, S.; Jurado, B.; Belier, G.; Chatillon, A.; Granier, T.; Taieb, J.; Dore, D.; Letourneau, A.; Ridikas, D.; Dupont, E.; Berthoumieux, E.; Panebianco, S.; Farget, F.; Schmitt, C.; Audouin, L.; Khan, E.; Tassan-Got, L.; Aumann, T.; Beller, P.; Boretzky, K.; Dolinskii, A.; Egelhof, P.; Emling, H.; Franzke, B.; Geissel, H.; Kelic-Heil, A.; Kester, O.; Kurz, N.; Litvinov, Y.; Muenzenberg, G.; Nolden, F.; Schmidt, K. -H.; Scheidenberger, Ch.; Simon, H.; Steck, M.; Weick, H.; Enders, J.; Pietralla, N.; Richter, A.; Schrieder, G.; Zilges, A.; Distler, M. O.; Merkel, H.; Mueller, U.; Junghans, A. R.; Lenske, H.; Fujiwara, M.; Suda, T.; Kato, S.; Adachi, T.; Hamieh, S.; Harakeh, M. N.; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N.; Woertche, H.; Berg, G. P. A.; Koop, I. A.; Logatchov, P. V.; Otboev, A. V.; Parkhomchuk, V. V.; Shatilov, D. N.; Shatunov, P. Y.; Shatunov, Y. M.; Shiyankov, S. V.; Shvartz, D. I.; Skrinsky, A. N.; Chulkov, L. V.; Danilin, B. V.; Korsheninnikov, A. A.; Kuzmin, E. A.; Ogloblin, A. A.; Volkov, V. A.; Grishkin, Y.; Lisin, V. P.; Mushkarenkov, A. N.; Nedorezov, V.; Polonski, A. L.; Rudnev, N. V.; Turinge, A. A.; Artukh, A.; Avdeichikov, V.; Ershov, S. N.; Fomichev, A.; Golovkov, M.; Gorshkov, A. V.; Grigorenko, L.; Klygin, S.; Krupko, S.; Meshkov, I. N.; Rodin, A.; Sereda, Y.; Seleznev, I.; Sidorchuk, S.; Syresin, E.; Stepantsov, S.; Ter-Akopian, G.; Teterev, Y.; Vorontsov, A. N.; Kamerdzhiev, S. P.; Litvinova, E. V.; Karataglidis, S.; Alvarez Rodriguez, R.; Borge, M. J. G.; Ramirez, C. Fernandez; Garrido, E.; Sarriguren, P.; Vignote, J. R.; Fraile Prieto, L. M.; Lopez Herraiz, J.; Moya de Guerra, E.; Udias-Moinelo, J.; Amaro Soriano, J. E.; Rojo, A. M. Lallena; Caballero, J. A.; Johansson, H. T.; Jonson, B.; Nilsson, T.; Nyman, G.; Zhukov, M.; Golubev, P.; Rudolph, D.; Hencken, K.; Jourdan, J.; Krusche, B.; Rauscher, T.; Kiselev, D.; Trautmann, D.; Al-Khalili, J.; Catford, W.; Johnson, R.; Stevenson, P. D.; Barton, C.; Jenkins, D.; Lemmon, R.; Chartier, M.; Cullen, D.; Bertulani, C. A.; Heinz, A.

    2011-01-01

    The electron-ion scattering experiment ELISe is part of the installations envisaged at the new experimental storage ring at the International Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) in Darmstadt, Germany. It offers an unique opportunity to use electrons as probe in investigations of the

  17. The electron-ion scattering experiment ELISe at the International Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR)-A conceptual design study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antonov, A.N.; Gaidarov, M.K. [INRNE-BAS Sofia (Bulgaria); Ivanov, M.V. [Grupo de Physica Nuclear, Complutense University of Madrid (Spain); Kadrev, D.N. [INRNE-BAS Sofia (Bulgaria); Aiche, M.; Barreau, G.; Czajkowski, S.; Jurado, B. [Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires Bordeaux-Gradingnan (CENBG) (France); Belier, G.; Chatillon, A.; Granier, T.; Taieb, J. [CEA Bruyeres-le-Chatel (France); Dore, D.; Letourneau, A.; Ridikas, D.; Dupont, E.; Berthoumieux, E.; Panebianco, S. [CEA Saclay (France); Farget, F.; Schmitt, C. [GANIL Caen (France)

    2011-05-01

    The electron-ion scattering experiment ELISe is part of the installations envisaged at the new experimental storage ring at the International Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) in Darmstadt, Germany. It offers an unique opportunity to use electrons as probe in investigations of the structure of exotic nuclei. The conceptual design and the scientific challenges of ELISe are presented.

  18. The electron-ion scattering experiment ELISe at the International Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR)-A conceptual design study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antonov, A.N.; Gaidarov, M.K.; Ivanov, M.V.; Kadrev, D.N.; Aiche, M.; Barreau, G.; Czajkowski, S.; Jurado, B.; Belier, G.; Chatillon, A.; Granier, T.; Taieb, J.; Dore, D.; Letourneau, A.; Ridikas, D.; Dupont, E.; Berthoumieux, E.; Panebianco, S.; Farget, F.; Schmitt, C.

    2011-01-01

    The electron-ion scattering experiment ELISe is part of the installations envisaged at the new experimental storage ring at the International Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) in Darmstadt, Germany. It offers an unique opportunity to use electrons as probe in investigations of the structure of exotic nuclei. The conceptual design and the scientific challenges of ELISe are presented.

  19. Reduced model prediction of electron temperature profiles in microtearing-dominated National Spherical Torus eXperiment plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaye, S. M., E-mail: skaye@pppl.gov; Guttenfelder, W.; Bell, R. E.; Gerhardt, S. P.; LeBlanc, B. P.; Maingi, R. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States)

    2014-08-15

    A representative H-mode discharge from the National Spherical Torus eXperiment is studied in detail to utilize it as a basis for a time-evolving prediction of the electron temperature profile using an appropriate reduced transport model. The time evolution of characteristic plasma variables such as β{sub e}, ν{sub e}{sup ∗}, the MHD α parameter, and the gradient scale lengths of T{sub e}, T{sub i}, and n{sub e} were examined as a prelude to performing linear gyrokinetic calculations to determine the fastest growing micro instability at various times and locations throughout the discharge. The inferences from the parameter evolutions and the linear stability calculations were consistent. Early in the discharge, when β{sub e} and ν{sub e}{sup ∗} were relatively low, ballooning parity modes were dominant. As time progressed and both β{sub e} and ν{sub e}{sup ∗} increased, microtearing became the dominant low-k{sub θ} mode, especially in the outer half of the plasma. There are instances in time and radius, however, where other modes, at higher-k{sub θ}, may, in addition to microtearing, be important for driving electron transport. Given these results, the Rebut-Lallia-Watkins (RLW) electron thermal diffusivity model, which is based on microtearing-induced transport, was used to predict the time-evolving electron temperature across most of the profile. The results indicate that RLW does a good job of predicting T{sub e} for times and locations where microtearing was determined to be important, but not as well when microtearing was predicted to be stable or subdominant.

  20. Electron Bernstein wave experiments in a over-dense reversed field pinch plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forest, C. B.; Anderson, J.K.; Cengher, M.; Chattopadhyay, P.K.; Carter, M.; Harvey, R.W.; Pinsker, R.I.; Smirnov, A.P.

    2003-01-01

    Experiments and theoretical work show that it is possible to couple power to the EBW in an RFP, and that these waves may be suitable for driving current. The main results of our work thus far are: (1) A coupling theory for a phased array of waveguides is developed and compared to experiment. Both O and X mode polarizations can be used; in general coupling for both is optimized for obliquely launched waves. (2) The surface impedance and reflection coefficients have been measured for EBWs launched by waveguide antennas on the edge of MST. Emission and coupling measurements are both consistent with theoretical models and the measured density gradients at the plasma edge. In particular, the coupling showed a strong asymmetry in N Φ for X-mode launch. (3) Black-body levels of emission have been observed in the ECRF from over-dense MST plasmas, which by reciprocity indicate that coupling to the EBW is possible with external antennas. Emission is preferentially polarized in the X-mode and is affected by density fluctuations at the plasma edge. Mode conversion efficiencies as high as 75% have been observed. (4) Ray tracing of EBW waves, coupled to Fokker Planck calculations show that localized, efficient current drive is possible. Current drive is possible by choosing the poloidal angle of the launching antenna to control the N of the wave. (authors)