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Sample records for manufacturing temperature sensitive

  1. Manufacturing Demonstration Facility: Low Temperature Materials Synthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graham, David E. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Moon, Ji-Won [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Armstrong, Beth L. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Datskos, Panos G. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Duty, Chad E. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Gresback, Ryan [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Ivanov, Ilia N. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Jacobs, Christopher B. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Jellison, Gerald Earle [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Jang, Gyoung Gug [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Joshi, Pooran C. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Jung, Hyunsung [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Meyer, III, Harry M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Phelps, Tommy [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-06-30

    The Manufacturing Demonstration Facility (MDF) low temperature materials synthesis project was established to demonstrate a scalable and sustainable process to produce nanoparticles (NPs) for advanced manufacturing. Previous methods to chemically synthesize NPs typically required expensive, high-purity inorganic chemical reagents, organic solvents and high temperatures. These processes were typically applied at small laboratory scales at yields sufficient for NP characterization, but insufficient to support roll-to-roll processing efforts or device fabrication. The new NanoFermentation processes described here operated at a low temperature (~60 C) in low-cost, aqueous media using bacteria that produce extracellular NPs with controlled size and elemental stoichiometry. Up-scaling activities successfully demonstrated high NP yields and quality in a 900-L pilot-scale reactor, establishing this NanoFermentation process as a competitive biomanufacturing strategy to produce NPs for advanced manufacturing of power electronics, solid-state lighting and sensors.

  2. UHF electromagnetic structures inkjet printed on temperature sensitive substrates: A comparative study of conductive inks and sintering methods to enable low cost manufacture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sanchez-Romaauera, V.; Wünscher, S.; Abbel, R.J.; Zial, M.A.; Oyeka, D.; Turki, B.M.M.; Batchelor, J.C.; Parker, E.A.; Schubert, U.S.; Yeates, S.G.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we demonstrate the use of inkjet printing as a facile digital fabrication tool for the cost effective manufacture of UHF RFID transfer tattoo tags and Frequency Selective Surfaces on low-cost flexible and porous substrates. Electrical and morphological properties of conductive features

  3. UHF electromagnetic structures inkjet printed on temperature sensitive substrates: A comparative study of conductive inks and sintering methods to enable low cost manufacture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sanchez-Romaauera, V.; Wünscher, S.; Abbel, R.J.; Zial, M.A.; Oyeka, D.; Turki, B.M.M.; Batchelor, J.C.; Parker, E.A.; Schubert, U.S.; Yeates, S.G.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we demonstrate the use of inkjet printing as a facile digital fabrication tool for the cost effective manufacture of UHF RFID transfer tattoo tags and Frequency Selective Surfaces on low-cost flexible and porous substrates. Electrical and morphological properties of conductive features

  4. Temperature sensitive oscillator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinberg, L. L. (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    An oscillator circuit for sensing and indicating temperature by changing oscillator frequency with temperature comprises a programmable operational amplifier which is operated on the roll-off portion of its gain versus frequency curve and has its output directly connected to the inverting input to place the amplifier in a follower configuration. Its output is also connected to the non-inverting input by a capacitor with a crystal or other tuned circuit also being connected to the non-inverting input. A resistor is connected to the program input of the amplifier to produce a given set current at a given temperature, the set current varying with temperature. As the set current changes, the gain-bandwidth of the amplifier changes and, in turn, the reflected capacitance across the crystal changes, thereby providing the desired change in oscillator frequency by pulling the crystal. There is no requirement that a crystal employed with this circuit display either a linear frequency change with temperature or a substantial frequency change with temperature.

  5. Atmospheric Pressure Low Temperature Plasma System for Additive Manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnette, Matthew; Staack, David

    2016-09-01

    There is growing interest in using plasmas for additive manufacturing, however these methods use high temperature plasmas to melt the material. We have developed a novel technique of additive manufacturing using a low temperature dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) jet. The jet is attached to the head of a 3D printer to allow for precise control of the plasma's location. Various methods are employed to deposit the material, including using a vaporized precursor or depositing a liquid precursor directly onto the substrate or into the plasma via a nebulizer. Various materials can be deposited including metals (copper using copper (II) acetylacetonate), polymers (PMMA using the liquid monomer), and various hydrocarbon compounds (using alcohols or a 100% methane DBD jet). The rastering pattern for the 3D printer was modified for plasma deposition, since it was originally designed for thermoplastic extrusion. The design constraints for fill pattern selection for the plasma printer are influenced by substrate heating, deposition area, and precursor consumption. Depositions onto pressure and/or temperature sensitive substrates can be easily achieved. Deposition rates range up to 0.08 cm3/hr using tris(2-methoxyethoxy)(vinyl)silane, however optimization can still be done on the system to improve the deposition rate. For example higher concentration of precursor can be combined with faster motion and higher discharge powers to increase the deposition rate without overheating the substrate.

  6. Advances in High Temperature Materials for Additive Manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordin, Nurul Amira Binti; Johar, Muhammad Akmal Bin; Ibrahim, Mohd Halim Irwan Bin; Marwah, Omar Mohd Faizan bin

    2017-08-01

    In today’s technology, additive manufacturing has evolved over the year that commonly known as 3D printing. Currently, additive manufacturing have been applied for many industries such as for automotive, aerospace, medical and other commercial product. The technologies are supported by materials for the manufacturing process to produce high quality product. Plus, additive manufacturing technologies has been growth from the lowest to moderate and high technology to fulfil manufacturing industries obligation. Initially from simple 3D printing such as fused deposition modelling (FDM), poly-jet, inkjet printing, to selective laser sintering (SLS), and electron beam melting (EBM). However, the high technology of additive manufacturing nowadays really needs high investment to carry out the process for fine products. There are three foremost type of material which is polymer, metal and ceramic used for additive manufacturing application, and mostly they were in the form of wire feedstock or powder. In circumstance, it is crucial to recognize the characteristics of each type of materials used in order to understand the behaviours of the materials on high temperature application via additive manufacturing. Therefore, this review aims to provide excessive inquiry and gather the necessary information for further research on additive material materials for high temperature application. This paper also proposed a new material based on powder glass, which comes from recycled tempered glass from automotive industry, having a huge potential to be applied for high temperature application. The technique proposed for additive manufacturing will minimize some cost of modelling with same quality of products compare to the others advanced technology used for high temperature application.

  7. Theoretical study on ignition compensating temperature sensitivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingfang Liu

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Temperature sensitivity of the propellant has significant influence on the interior ballistic performance of guns. Many physical and chemical approaches are employed to decrease this temperature sensitivity of the propellant. In this article, it is proposed that the temperature sensitivity of the propellant is changed by altering the factors required to ignition. A one-dimensional two-phase flow interior ballistic model is established to analyze the relation between ignition factors and temperature sensitivity. The simulation results show that the propellant temperature sensitivity is changed by altering the ignition factors. That is, the interior ballistic performance is affected by altering the size of fire hole, breaking liner pressure, and ignition location. Based on the simulation results, the temperature sensitivity can be controlled by matching of charges and intelligent control ignition system.

  8. Development of High Temperature Capacitor Technology and Manufacturing Capability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2011-05-15

    The goal of the Development of High Temperature Capacitor Technology and Manufacturing Capability program was to mature a production-ready supply chain for reliable 250°C FPE (fluorinated polyester) film capacitors by 2011. These high-temperature film capacitors enable both the down hole drilling and aerospace industries by enabling a variety of benefits including: - Deeper oil exploration in higher temperature and pressure environments - Enabling power electronic and control equipment to operate in higher temperature environments - Enabling reduced cooling requirements of electronics - Increasing reliability and life of capacitors operating below rated temperature - Enabling capacitors to handle higher electrical losses without overheating. The key challenges to bringing the FPE film capacitors to market have been manufacturing challenges including: - FPE Film is difficult to handle and wind, resulting in poor yields - Voltage breakdown strength decreases when the film is wound into capacitors (~70% decrease) - Encapsulation technologies must be improved to enable higher perature operation - Manufacturing and test cycle time is very long As a direct result of this program most of the manufacturing challenges have been met. The FPE film production metalization and winding yield has increased to over 82% from 70%, and the voltage breakdown strength of the wound capacitors has increased 270% to 189 V/μm. The high temperature packaging concepts are showing significant progress including promising results for lead attachments and hermetic packages at 200°C and non-hermetic packages at 250°C. Manufacturing and test cycle time will decrease as the market for FPE capacitors develops.

  9. Manufacturing temperature and turbidity sensor based on ATMega 8535 microcontroller

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuzula, Nike Ika; Sakinah, Wazirotus; Endarko

    2017-01-01

    The manufacturing of temperature and turbidity measurement system based on ATMega 8535 microcontroller has been done. To measure temperature, this system uses LM35 and photodiode to measure water turbidity. The principle of LM35 sensor is comparing temperature based on its resistance. Thus temperature that is converted to voltage can be detected. The Turbidity system in this experiment is using Nephelometer method with the light scattered by suspended particles in fluid, with LED and photodiode parallel to each other. This system can measure turbidity in 1 NTU - 200 NTU with a close distance (1 inch) and a maximum relative error of 3.09% for the temperature measurement and also 3,12 % for turbidity measurement.

  10. Sensitivity analysis of geometric errors in additive manufacturing medical models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Jose Miguel; Arrieta, Cristobal; Andia, Marcelo E; Uribe, Sergio; Ramos-Grez, Jorge; Vargas, Alex; Irarrazaval, Pablo; Tejos, Cristian

    2015-03-01

    Additive manufacturing (AM) models are used in medical applications for surgical planning, prosthesis design and teaching. For these applications, the accuracy of the AM models is essential. Unfortunately, this accuracy is compromised due to errors introduced by each of the building steps: image acquisition, segmentation, triangulation, printing and infiltration. However, the contribution of each step to the final error remains unclear. We performed a sensitivity analysis comparing errors obtained from a reference with those obtained modifying parameters of each building step. Our analysis considered global indexes to evaluate the overall error, and local indexes to show how this error is distributed along the surface of the AM models. Our results show that the standard building process tends to overestimate the AM models, i.e. models are larger than the original structures. They also show that the triangulation resolution and the segmentation threshold are critical factors, and that the errors are concentrated at regions with high curvatures. Errors could be reduced choosing better triangulation and printing resolutions, but there is an important need for modifying some of the standard building processes, particularly the segmentation algorithms. Copyright © 2015 IPEM. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Manufacture and image characteristic changes observation by temperature of ultrasound tissue mimicking phantom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Sang Chull [Dept. of Radiological science, ShinHan university, Dongdocheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    The purpose of this study is that in measures the acoustic propagate characteristics and temperature sensitivity of ultrasound tissue mimicking phantom(TM phantom). TM phantom manufacture according to the International Electronical Committee(IEC) guidelines for acoustic propagate characteristics of soft tissue. TM phantom was observed to have the image brightness and the image depth penetration decreases changes convergence which was the subject of ultrasound image characteristics in accordance with an external temperature hat the change is reduced in temperature below 22 .deg. C. This study provide a basis to create another TM Phantom and TM Phantom has been determined that it is appropriate for use in more than 22 .deg. C.

  12. A hot topic: temperature sensitive sodium channelopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egri, Csilla; Ruben, Peter C

    2012-01-01

    Perturbations to body temperature affect almost all cellular processes and, within certain limits, results in minimal effects on overall physiology. Genetic mutations to ion channels, or channelopathies, can shift the fine homeostatic balance resulting in a decreased threshold to temperature induced disturbances. This review summarizes the functional consequences of currently identified voltage-gated sodium (NaV) channelopathies that lead to disorders with a temperature sensitive phenotype. A comprehensive knowledge of the relationships between genotype and environment is not only important for understanding the etiology of disease, but also for developing safe and effective treatment paradigms.

  13. The experienced temperature sensitivity and regulation survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Someren, Eus J. W.; Dekker, Kim; Te Lindert, Bart H. W.; Benjamins, Jeroen S.; Moens, Sarah; Migliorati, Filippo; Aarts, Emmeke; van der Sluis, Sophie

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Individuals differ in thermosensitivity, thermoregulation, and zones of thermoneutrality and thermal comfort. Whereas temperature sensing and -effectuating processes occur in part unconsciously and autonomic, awareness of temperature and thermal preferences can affect thermoregulatory behavior as well. Quantification of trait-like individual differences of thermal preferences and experienced temperature sensitivity and regulation is therefore relevant to obtain a complete understanding of human thermophysiology. Whereas several scales have been developed to assess instantaneous appreciation of heat and cold exposure, a comprehensive scale dedicated to assess subjectively experienced autonomic or behavioral thermoregulatory activity has been lacking so far. We constructed a survey that specifically approaches these domains from a trait-like perspective, sampled 240 volunteers across a wide age range, and analyzed the emergent component structure. Participants were asked to report their thermal experiences, captured in 102 questions, on a 7-point bi-directional Likert scale. In a second set of 32 questions, participants were asked to indicate the relative strength of experiences across different body locations. Principal component analyses extracted 21 meaningful dimensions, which were sensitive to sex-differences and age-related changes. The questions were also assessed in a matched sample of 240 people with probable insomnia to evaluate the sensitivity of these dimensions to detect group differences in a case-control design. The dimensions showed marked mean differences between cases and controls. The survey thus has discriminatory value. It can freely be used by anyone interested in studying individual or group differences in thermosensitivity and thermoregulation. PMID:27227080

  14. Holistic Context-Sensitivity for Run-Time Optimization of Flexible Manufacturing Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Scholze

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Highly flexible manufacturing systems require continuous run-time (self- optimization of processes with respect to diverse parameters, e.g., efficiency, availability, energy consumption etc. A promising approach for achieving (self- optimization in manufacturing systems is the usage of the context sensitivity approach based on data streaming from high amount of sensors and other data sources. Cyber-physical systems play an important role as sources of information to achieve context sensitivity. Cyber-physical systems can be seen as complex intelligent sensors providing data needed to identify the current context under which the manufacturing system is operating. In this paper, it is demonstrated how context sensitivity can be used to realize a holistic solution for (self- optimization of discrete flexible manufacturing systems, by making use of cyber-physical systems integrated in manufacturing systems/processes. A generic approach for context sensitivity, based on self-learning algorithms, is proposed aiming at a various manufacturing systems. The new solution encompasses run-time context extractor and optimizer. Based on the self-learning module both context extraction and optimizer are continuously learning and improving their performance. The solution is following Service Oriented Architecture principles. The generic solution is developed and then applied to two very different manufacturing processes.

  15. Holistic Context-Sensitivity for Run-Time Optimization of Flexible Manufacturing Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholze, Sebastian; Barata, Jose; Stokic, Dragan

    2017-02-24

    Highly flexible manufacturing systems require continuous run-time (self-) optimization of processes with respect to diverse parameters, e.g., efficiency, availability, energy consumption etc. A promising approach for achieving (self-) optimization in manufacturing systems is the usage of the context sensitivity approach based on data streaming from high amount of sensors and other data sources. Cyber-physical systems play an important role as sources of information to achieve context sensitivity. Cyber-physical systems can be seen as complex intelligent sensors providing data needed to identify the current context under which the manufacturing system is operating. In this paper, it is demonstrated how context sensitivity can be used to realize a holistic solution for (self-) optimization of discrete flexible manufacturing systems, by making use of cyber-physical systems integrated in manufacturing systems/processes. A generic approach for context sensitivity, based on self-learning algorithms, is proposed aiming at a various manufacturing systems. The new solution encompasses run-time context extractor and optimizer. Based on the self-learning module both context extraction and optimizer are continuously learning and improving their performance. The solution is following Service Oriented Architecture principles. The generic solution is developed and then applied to two very different manufacturing processes.

  16. Additive Manufacturing of Advanced High Temperature Masking Fixtures for EBPVD TBC Coating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    List, III, Frederick Alyious [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Feuerstein, Albert [Praxair Surface Technologies, Inc., (United States); Dehoff, Ryan [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Kirka, Michael [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Carver, Keith [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-03-30

    The purpose of this Manufacturing Demonstration Facility (MDF) technical collaboration project between Praxair Surface Technologies, Inc. (PST) and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) was to develop an additive manufacturing process to fabricate next generation high temperature masking fixtures for coating of turbine airfoils with ceramic Thermal Barrier Coatings (TBC) by the Electron Beam Physical Vapor Deposition (EBPVD) process. Typical masking fixtures are sophisticated designs and require complex part manipulation in order to achieve the desired coating distribution. Fixtures are typically fabricated from high temperature nickel (Ni) based superalloys. The fixtures are fabricated from conventional processes by welding of thin sheet material into a complex geometry, to decrease the weight load for the manipulator and to reduce the thermal mass of the fixture. Recent attempts have been made in order to fabricate the fixtures through casting, but thin walled sections are difficult to cast and have high scrap rates. This project focused on understanding the potential for fabricating high temperature Ni based superalloy fixtures through additive manufacturing. Two different deposition processes; electron beam melting (EBM) and laser powder bed fusion were evaluated to determine the ideal processing route of these materials. Two different high temperature materials were evaluated. The high temperature materials evaluated were Inconel 718 and another Ni base alloy, designated throughout the remainder of this document as Alloy X, as the alloy composition is sensitive. Inconel 718 is a more widely utilized material for additive manufacturing although it is not currently the material utilized for current fixtures. Alloy X is the alloy currently used for the fixtures, but is not a commercially available alloy for additive manufacturing. Praxair determined it was possible to build the fixture using laser powder bed technology from Inconel 718. ORNL fabricated the fixture

  17. 自敏化硝酸铵的制造工艺%MANUFACTURING TECHNOLOGY OF SELF-SENSITIZED AMMONIUM NITRATE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈天云

    2002-01-01

    In this paper,a technology is introduced to manufacture self-sensitized ammonium nitrate under the surfactant and vacuum crystallizing process.The optimum technological parameters,including concentration, temperature and vacuum degree,vacuum period,are discussed in detail. The self-sensitized ammonium nitrate with honeycomb structure and lots of "micro-hole" is obtained. With its low hydroscopicity and caking, this kind of self-sensitized ammonium nitrate is could be used in more industrial fields.

  18. Global sensitivity analysis of bandpass and antireflection coating manufacturing by numerical space filling designs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasseur, Olivier; Cathelinaud, Michel; Claeys-Bruno, Magalie; Sergent, Michelle

    2011-03-20

    We present the effectiveness of global sensitivity analyses of optical coatings manufacturing to assess the robustness of filters by computer experiments. The most critical interactions of layers are determined for a 29 quarter-wave layer bandpass filter and for an antireflection coating with eight non-quarter-wave layers. Two monitoring techniques with the associated production performances are considered, and their influence on the interactions classification is discussed. Global sensitivity analyses by numerical space filling designs give clues to improve filter manufacturing against error effects and to assess the potential robustness of the coatings.

  19. Mechanics and chemical thermodynamics of a temperature-sensitive hydrogel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Shengqiang; Suo, Zhigang

    2011-03-01

    A temperature-sensitive hydrogel is a network of polymers containing monomers, whose interaction with water molecules can be tuned dramatically by changing temperature. In most cases, the swelling ratio of a temperature-sensitive hydrogel changes discontinuously upon heating above or cooling below a critical temperature, which is called volume phase transition. Interestingly, the coexistence of swollen phases and shrunk phases are frequently observed in the experiments for temperature-sensitive hydrogels and additionally, people have also discovered that a uniaxial force can induce phase transition in a temperature-sensitive gel bar .In order to understand these phenomena, we studied the mechanics and chemical thermodynamics of a temperature-sensitive hydrogel bar, by using the free-energy landscape of a bar made from PNIPAM gel. Following Gibbs, we plot the phase diagram of a temperature-sensitive hydrogel bar under uniaxial force. This work is supported by the NSF (CMMI-0800161) and by the MRSEC at Harvard University.

  20. Temperature sheets and aspect sensitive radar echoes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Luce

    Full Text Available here have been years of discussion and controversy about the existence of very thin and stable temperature sheets and their relationship to the VHF radar aspect sensitivity. It is only recently that very high-resolution in situ temperature observations have brought credence to the reality and ubiquity of these structures in the free atmosphere and to their contribution to radar echo enhancements along the vertical. Indeed, measurements with very high-resolution sensors are still extremely rare and rather difficult to obtain outside of the planetary boundary layer. They have only been carried out up to the lower stratosphere by Service d’A´ eronomie (CNRS, France for about 10 years. The controversy also persisted due to the volume resolution of the (Mesosphere-Stratosphere-Troposphere VHF radars which is coarse with respect to sheet thickness, although widely sufficient for meteorological or mesoscale investigations. The contribution within the range gate of many of these structures, which are advected by the wind, and decay and grow at different instants and could be distorted either by internal gravity waves or turbulence fields, could lead to radar echoes with statistical properties similar to those produced by anisotropic turbulence. Some questions thus remain regarding the manner in which temperature sheets contribute to VHF radar echoes. In particular, the zenithal and azimuthal angular dependence of the echo power may not only be produced by diffuse reflection on stable distorted or corrugated sheets, but also by extra contributions from anisotropic turbulence occurring in the stratified atmosphere. Thus, for several years, efforts have been put forth to improve the radar height resolution in order to better describe thin structures. Frequency interferometric techniques are widely used and have been recently further developed with the implementation of high-resolution data processings. We begin by reviewing briefly some characteristics

  1. Thermocouples--The Most Widely Used Temperature Sensor in Manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitts, Charles R.

    2006-01-01

    Researchers predict that future developments in nanotechnology will bring incredible, almost inconceivable, change to the manufacturing industry. For now, though, one of technology's most trusted tools remains very relevant: In the field of thermometry, thermocouples are a tried and true technology. As a consequence, material on thermocouples…

  2. Effect of Temperature on the Toughness of Locally Manufactured Low Alloy Steel SUP9 Used for Manufacturing Leaf Springs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Ishaque Abro

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The effect of heat treatment on locally manufactured low alloy steel grade SUP9 most frequently used in making leaf springs for automobiles was studied. While for determination of toughness and hardness Charpy impact testing machine and Rockwell hardness tester were used. The cryogenic test temperatures were achieved by soaking the samples in liquid nitrogen and temperature was measured using digital thermometer capable of reading the temperature from -40-200oC. Hardening, tempering and austempering treatments were conducted using muffle furnace and salt bath furnace. After heat treatment samples were quenched in oil. The results of present work confirmed that toughness and hardness are inversely related with each other and are highly dependent on the type of heat treatment employed. Highest toughness was measured after austempering at 450oC. Effect of test temperature revealed that toughness of the samples increased significantly with decreasing temperature. DBTT (Ductile to Brittle Transition Temperature of the austempered samples was observed at -10oC, whereas, that of tempered samples could not be determined. Based on the test results authors wish to recommend the 600oC tempering temperature in place of 450oC where normally tempering is practiced in Alwin industry Karachi during manufacturing of leaf spring.

  3. Sensitivity of stock market indices to oil prices: Evidence from manufacturing sub-sectors in Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eksi Halil Ibrahim

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Crude oil price is a critical cost factor for manufacturing industries that are of vital importance for economic growth. This study examines the relationship between crude oil prices and the indices of seven Turkish manufacturing sub-sectors over the period 1997:01-2009:12. The error correction model results reveal the long term causality from crude oil prices to chemical petroleum-plastic and basic metal sub-sectors indicating that these sub-sectors are highly sensitive to crude oil prices. We find no causal relationship for other sector indices for short or long time periods.

  4. The Experienced Temperature Sensitivity and Regulation Survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Someren, Eus; Dekker, Kim; te Lindert, Bart; Benjamins, J.S.; Moens, Sarah; Migliorati, Filippo; Aarts, Emmeke; van der Sluis, Sophie

    Individuals differ in thermosensitivity, thermoregulation, and zones of thermoneutrality and thermal comfort. Whereas temperature sensing and -effectuating processes occur in part unconsciously and autonomic, awareness of temperature as well as thermal preferences can affect thermoregulatory

  5. The experienced temperature sensitivity and regulation survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Someren, Eus J W; Dekker, Kim; Te Lindert, Bart H W; Benjamins, Jeroen S; Moens, Sarah; Migliorati, Filippo; Aarts, Emmeke; van der Sluis, Sophie

    2016-01-01

    Individuals differ in thermosensitivity, thermoregulation, and zones of thermoneutrality and thermal comfort. Whereas temperature sensing and -effectuating processes occur in part unconsciously and autonomic, awareness of temperature and thermal preferences can affect thermoregulatory behavior as

  6. Monitoring temperature and pressure over surfaces using sensitive paints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrero-Viramontes, J. Ascención; Moreno Hernández, David; Mendoza Santoyo, Fernando; Morán Loza, José Miguel; García Arreola, Alicia

    2007-03-01

    Two techniques for monitoring temperature and pressure variations over surfaces using sensitive paints are presented. The analysis is done by the acquisition of a set of images of the surface under analysis. The surface is painted by a paint called Pressure Sensitive Paint (PSP) for pressure measurements and Temperature Sensitive Paints (TSP) for temperature measurements. These kinds of paints are deposited over the surface under analysis. The recent experimental advances in calibration process are presented in this paper.

  7. Passive Wireless Temperature Sensors with Enhanced Sensitivity and Range Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This proposal describes the development of passive surface acoustic wave (SAW) temperature sensors with enhanced sensitivity and detection range for NASA application...

  8. Influence of the ambient temperature during heat pipe manufacturing on its function and heat transport ability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Čaja A.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Heat pipe is heat transfer device working at a minimum temperature difference of evaporator and condenser. Operating temperature of the heat pipe determine by properties of the working substance and pressure achieved during production. The contribution is focused on the determining the effect of the initial surrounding temperature where the heat pipe is manufactured and on the obtaining performance characteristics produced heat pipes in dependence of manufacturing temperature. Generally hold, that the boiling point of the working liquid decrease with decreasing ambient pressure. Based on this can be suppose that producing of lower ambient temperature during heat pipe manufacturing, will create the lower pressure, the boiling point of the working fluid will lower too and the heat pipe should be better performance characteristics.

  9. Articles for high temperature service and methods for their manufacture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarrafi-Nour, Reza; Meschter, Peter Joel; Johnson, Curtis Alan; Luthra, Krishan Lal; Rosenzweig, Larry Steven

    2016-06-14

    An article for use in aggressive environments is presented. In one embodiment, the article comprises a substrate and a self-sealing and substantially hermetic sealing layer comprising an alkaline-earth aluminosilicate disposed over the bondcoat. The substrate may be any high-temperature material, including, for instance, silicon-bearing ceramics and ceramic matrix composites. A method for making such articles is also presented. The method comprises providing a substrate; disposing a self-sealing alkaline-earth aluminosilicate layer over the substrate; and heating the sealing layer to a sealing temperature at which at least a portion of the sealing layer will flow.

  10. Ultrahigh temperature-sensitive silicon MZI with titania cladding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jong-Moo eLee

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available We present a possibility of intensifying temperature sensitivity of a silicon Mach-Zehnder interferometer (MZI by using a highly negative thermo-optic property of titania (TiO2. Temperature sensitivity of an asymmetric silicon MZI with a titania cladding is experimentally measured from +18pm/C to -340 pm/C depending on design parameters of MZI.

  11. ON SWELLING CHARACTERISTICS AND MECHANISM OF TEMPERATURE SENSITIVE HYDROGELS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Xisheng; TONG Shuixin; SUN Yishi

    1990-01-01

    A series of N-substituted acrylamide monomers and the temperature sensitive hydrogels of their copolymer with N, N ' methylene-bis -acrylamide (Bis) have been synthesized. The effects of monomer structures, composition of the initial monomer mixture, polymerization temperature, the extent of ionization of the network and the presence of acid, base, salt or organic compound on the formation and the swelling characteristics of the temperature sensitive hydrogels have been systematically studied. The mechanism of the temperature sensitive phase transformation of the hydrogels was also investigated.

  12. Magnetocaloric effect in temperature-sensitive magnetic fluids

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Kinnari Parekh; R V Upadhyay; R V Mehta

    2000-04-01

    The magnetocaloric properties of three different temperature-sensitive magnetic fluids were studied. The pyromagnetic coefficient for all the materials were obtained and it was found that this property depends on physical and magnetic properties like size, magnetization and Curie temperature. A theoretical model was developed to explain the behaviour of change in entropy with temperature.

  13. Dopamine modulates metabolic rate and temperature sensitivity in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taro Ueno

    Full Text Available Homeothermal animals, such as mammals, maintain their body temperature by heat generation and heat dissipation, while poikilothermal animals, such as insects, accomplish it by relocating to an environment of their favored temperature. Catecholamines are known to regulate thermogenesis and metabolic rate in mammals, but their roles in other animals are poorly understood. The fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, has been used as a model system for the genetic studies of temperature preference behavior. Here, we demonstrate that metabolic rate and temperature sensitivity of some temperature sensitive behaviors are regulated by dopamine in Drosophila. Temperature-sensitive molecules like dTrpA1 and shi(ts induce temperature-dependent behavioral changes, and the temperature at which the changes are induced were lowered in the dopamine transporter-defective mutant, fumin. The mutant also displays a preference for lower temperatures. This thermophobic phenotype was rescued by the genetic recovery of the dopamine transporter in dopamine neurons. Flies fed with a dopamine biosynthesis inhibitor (3-iodo-L-tyrosine, which diminishes dopamine signaling, exhibited preference for a higher temperature. Furthermore, we found that the metabolic rate is up-regulated in the fumin mutant. Taken together, dopamine has functions in the temperature sensitivity of behavioral changes and metabolic rate regulation in Drosophila, as well as its previously reported functions in arousal/sleep regulation.

  14. Adaptive Process Controls and Ultrasonics for High Temperature PEM MEA Manufacture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walczyk, Daniel F. [Rensselaer Polytechnic Inst., Troy, NY (United States)

    2015-08-26

    The purpose of this 5-year DOE-sponsored project was to address major process bottlenecks associated with fuel cell manufacturing. New technologies were developed to significantly reduce pressing cycle time for high temperature PEM membrane electrode assembly (MEA) through the use of novel, robust ultrasonic (U/S) bonding processes along with low temperature (<100°C) PEM MEAs. In addition, greater manufacturing uniformity and performance was achieved through (a) an investigation into the causes of excessive variation in ultrasonically and thermally bonded MEAs using more diagnostics applied during the entire fabrication and cell build process, and (b) development of rapid, yet simple quality control measurement techniques for use by industry.

  15. Fiber Grating Sensor with Enhanced Pressure and Temperature Sensitivity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Yun-Qi; GUO Zhuan-Yun; LIU Zhi-Guo; ZHAO Dong-Hui; GE Chun-Feng; DONG Xiao-Yi

    2000-01-01

    A technique is used to enhance the pressure and temperature sensitivity of a fiber Bragg grating sensor. The grating is packaged by using polymer jacket, which exhibits no significant chirp due to the adoption of the special technique. The measured pressure and temperature sensitivity of the structured grating is 6.28×10-5 / MPa and5.18×10-5/℃. The wavelength shift due to pressure and temperature can be enhanced about 31.5 times for pressure and 7.7 times for temperature.

  16. A yttrium-containing high-temperature titanium alloy additively manufactured by selective electron beam melting

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    逯圣路; 汤慧萍; 马前; 洪权; 曾立英

    2015-01-01

    A yttrium-containing high-temperature titanium alloy (Ti-6Al-2.7Sn-4Zr-0.4Mo-0.45Si-0.1Y, mass fraction, %) has been additively manufactured using selective electron beam melting (SEBM). The resulting microstructure and textures were studied using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD) and compared with the conventionally manufactured form. A notable distinct difference of microstructures is that additive manufacturing by SEBM enables homogeneous precipitation of fine Y2O3 dispersoids in the size range of 50−250 nm throughout the as-fabricated alloy, despite the presence of just trace levels of oxygen (7×10−4, mass fraction) and yttrium (10−3, mass fraction) in the alloy. In contrast, the conventionally manufactured alloy shows inhomogeneously distributed coarse Y2O3 precipitates, including cracked or debonded Y2O3 particles.

  17. Fiber Fabry-Perot interferometer with controllable temperature sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xinpu; Peng, Wei; Zhang, Yang

    2015-12-01

    We proposed a fiber taper based on the Fabry-Perot (FP) interferometer structure with controllable temperature sensitivity. The FP interferometer is formed by inserting a segment of tapered fiber tip into the capillary and subsequently splicing the other end of the capillary to a single-mode fiber (SMF), the tapered fiber endface, and the spliced face form the FP cavity. Through controlling the inserted tapered fiber length, a series of FP interferometers were made. Because the inserted taper tip has the degree of freedom along the fiber axial, when the FP interferometer is subjected to temperature variation, the thermal expansion of the fiber taper tip will resist the FP cavity length change caused by the evolution of capillary length, and we can control the temperature sensitivity by adjusting the inserted taper length. In this structure, the equivalent thermal expansion coefficient of the FP interferometer can be defined; it was used to evaluate the temperature sensitivity of the FP interferometer, which provides an effective method to eliminate the temperature effect and to enhance other measurement accuracy. We fabricated the FP interferometers and calibrated their temperature characters by measuring the wavelength shift of the resonance dips in the reflection spectrum. In a temperature range of 50°C to 150°C, the corresponding temperature sensitivities can be controlled between 0 and 1.97 pm/°C when the inserted taper is between 75 and 160 μm. Because of its controllable temperature sensitivity, ease of fabrication, and low cost, this FP interferometer can meet different temperature sensitivity requirements in various application areas, especially in the fields which need temperature insensitivity.

  18. The identification of a sensitizing component used in the manufacturing of an ink ribbon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Stacey E; Tapp, Loren; Durgam, Srinivas; Meade, B Jean; Jackson, Laurel G; Cohen, David E

    2012-01-01

    Skin diseases including dermatitis constitute ≈ 30% of all occupational illnesses, with a high incidence in the printing industry. An outbreak of contact dermatitis among employees at an ink ribbon manufacturing plant was investigated by scientists from the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH). Employees in the process areas of the plant were exposed to numerous chemicals and many had experienced skin rashes, especially after the introduction of a new ink ribbon product. To identify the causative agent(s) of the occupational dermatitis, the murine local lymph node assay (LLNA) was used to identify the potential of the chemicals used in the manufacture of the ink ribbon to induce allergic contact dermatitis. Follow-up patch testing with the suspected allergens was conducted on exposed employees. Polyvinyl butyral, a chemical component used in the manufacture of the ink ribbon in question and other products, tested positive in the LLNA, with an EC3 of 3.6%, which identifies it as a potential sensitizer; however, no employees tested positive to this chemical during skin patch testing. This finding has implications beyond those described in this report because of occupational exposure to polyvinyl butyral outside of the printing industry.

  19. Cryogenic fiber optic temperature sensor and method of manufacturing the same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kochergin, Vladimir (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    This invention teaches the fiber optic sensors temperature sensors for cryogenic temperature range with improved sensitivity and resolution, and method of making said sensors. In more detail, the present invention is related to enhancement of temperature sensitivity of fiber optic temperature sensors at cryogenic temperatures by utilizing nanomaterials with a thermal expansion coefficient that is smaller than the thermal expansion coefficient of the optical fiber but larger in absolute value than the thermal expansion coefficient of the optical fiber at least over a range of temperatures.

  20. Monitoring the effects of atmospheric ethylene near polyethylene manufacturing plants with two sensitive plant species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tonneijck, A.E.G.; Berge, W.F. ten; Jansen, B.P

    2003-05-01

    Atmospheric ethylene from polyethylene manufacturing plants adversely affected the number of flowers and growth of field-grown marigold and petunia. - Data of a multi-year (1977-1983) biomonitoring programme with marigold and petunia around polyethylene manufacturing plants was analysed to assess plant responses to atmospheric ethylene and to determine the area at risk for the phytotoxic effects of this pollutant. In both species, flower formation and growth were severely reduced close to the emission sources and plant performance improved with increasing distance. Plants exposed near the border of the research area had more flowers than the unexposed control while their growth was normal. Measurements of ethylene concentrations at a border site revealed that the growing season mean was 61.5 {mu}g m{sup -3} in 1982 and 15.6 {mu}g m{sup -3} in 1983. In terms of number of flowers, petunia was more sensitive than marigold and adverse effects were observed within ca. 400 m distance from the sources for marigold and within ca. 460 m for petunia. The area at risk (ca. 870 m) for ethylene-induced growth reduction was also limited to the industrial zone. Plants were more sensitive to ethylene in terms of growth reduction than in terms of inhibition of flowering. In the Netherlands, maximum permissible levels of ethylene are currently based on information from laboratory and greenhouse studies. Our results indicate that these levels are rather conservative in protecting field-grown plants against ethylene-induced injury near polyethylene manufacturing plants.

  1. Determination of temperature of moving surface by sensitivity analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Farhanieh, B

    2002-01-01

    In this paper sensitivity analysis in inverse problem solutions is employed to estimate the temperature of a moving surface. Moving finite element method is used for spatial discretization. Time derivatives are approximated using Crank-Nicklson method. The accuracy of the solution is assessed by simulation method. The convergence domain is investigated for the determination of the temperature of a solid fuel.

  2. Frequency-temperature sensitivity reduction with optimized microwave Bragg resonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Floch, J.-M.; Murphy, C.; Hartnett, J. G.; Madrangeas, V.; Krupka, J.; Cros, D.; Tobar, M. E.

    2017-01-01

    Dielectric resonators are employed to build state-of-the-art low-noise and high-stability oscillators operating at room and cryogenic temperatures. A resonator temperature coefficient of frequency is one criterion of performance. This paper reports on predictions and measurements of this temperature coefficient of frequency for three types of cylindrically symmetric Bragg resonators operated at microwave frequencies. At room temperature, microwave Bragg resonators have the best potential to reach extremely high Q-factors. Research has been conducted over the last decade on modeling, optimizing, and realizing such high Q-factor devices for applications such as filtering, sensing, and frequency metrology. We present an optimized design, which has a temperature sensitivity 2 to 4 times less than current whispering gallery mode resonators without using temperature compensating techniques and about 30% less than other existing Bragg resonators. Also, the performance of a new generation single-layered Bragg resonator, based on a hybrid-Bragg-mode, is reported with a sensitivity of about -12 ppm/K at 295 K. For a single reflector resonator, it achieves a similar level of performance as a double-Bragg-reflector resonator but with a more compact structure and performs six times better than whispering-gallery-mode resonators. The hybrid resonator promises to deliver a new generation of high-sensitivity sensors and high-stability room-temperature oscillators.

  3. Determining Concentrations and Temperatures in Semiconductor Manufacturing Plasmas via Submillimeter Absorption Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helal, Yaser H.; Neese, Christopher F.; De Lucia, Frank C.; Ewing, Paul R.; Agarwal, Ankur; Craver, Barry; Stout, Phillip J.; Armacost, Michael D.

    2016-06-01

    Plasmas used in the manufacturing processes of semiconductors are similar in pressure and temperature to plasmas used in studying the spectroscopy of astrophysical species. Likewise, the developed technology in submillimeter absorption spectroscopy can be used for the study of industrial plasmas and for monitoring manufacturing processes. An advantage of submillimeter absorption spectroscopy is that it can be used to determine absolute concentrations and temperatures of plasma species without the need for intrusive probes. A continuous wave, 500 - 750 GHz absorption spectrometer was developed for the purpose of being used as a remote sensor of gas and plasma species. An important part of this work was the optical design to match the geometry of existing plasma reactors in the manufacturing industry. A software fitting routine was developed to simultaneously fit for the background and absorption signal, solving for concentration, rotational temperature, and translational temperature. Examples of measurements made on inductively coupled plasmas will be demonstrated. We would like to thank the Texas Analog Center of Excellence/Semiconductor Research Corporation (TxACE/SRC) and Applied Materials for their support of this work.

  4. Greater temperature sensitivity of plant phenology at colder sites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prevey, Janet; Vellend, Mark; Ruger, Nadja

    2017-01-01

    Warmer temperatures are accelerating the phenology of organisms around the world. Temperature sensitivity of phenology might be greater in colder, higher latitude sites than in warmer regions, in part because small changes in temperature constitute greater relative changes in thermal balance...... at colder sites. To test this hypothesis, we examined up to 20 years of phenology data for 47 tundra plant species at 18 high-latitude sites along a climatic gradient. Across all species, the timing of leaf emergence and flowering was more sensitive to a given increase in summer temperature at colder than...... warmer high-latitude locations. A similar pattern was seen over time for the flowering phenology of a widespread species, Cassiope tetragona. These are among the first results highlighting differential phenological responses of plants across a climatic gradient and suggest the possibility of convergence...

  5. Temperature sensitivity of a numerical pollen forecast model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheifinger, Helfried; Meran, Ingrid; Szabo, Barbara; Gallaun, Heinz; Natali, Stefano; Mantovani, Simone

    2016-04-01

    Allergic rhinitis has become a global health problem especially affecting children and adolescence. Timely and reliable warning before an increase of the atmospheric pollen concentration means a substantial support for physicians and allergy suffers. Recently developed numerical pollen forecast models have become means to support the pollen forecast service, which however still require refinement. One of the problem areas concerns the correct timing of the beginning and end of the flowering period of the species under consideration, which is identical with the period of possible pollen emission. Both are governed essentially by the temperature accumulated before the entry of flowering and during flowering. Phenological models are sensitive to a bias of the temperature. A mean bias of -1°C of the input temperature can shift the entry date of a phenological phase for about a week into the future. A bias of such an order of magnitude is still possible in case of numerical weather forecast models. If the assimilation of additional temperature information (e.g. ground measurements as well as satellite-retrieved air / surface temperature fields) is able to reduce such systematic temperature deviations, the precision of the timing of phenological entry dates might be enhanced. With a number of sensitivity experiments the effect of a possible temperature bias on the modelled phenology and the pollen concentration in the atmosphere is determined. The actual bias of the ECMWF IFS 2 m temperature will also be calculated and its effect on the numerical pollen forecast procedure presented.

  6. Temperature sensitivity of organic compound destruction in SCWO process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Yaqin; Shen, Zhemin; Guo, Weimin; Ouyang, Chuang; Jia, Jinping; Jiang, Weili; Zhou, Haiyun

    2014-03-01

    To study the temperature sensitivity of the destruction of organic compounds in supercritical water oxidation process (SCWO), oxidation effects of twelve chemicals in supercritical water were investigated. The SCWO reaction rates of different compounds improved to varying degrees with the increase of temperature, so the highest slope of the temperature-effect curve (imax) was defined as the maximum ratio of removal ratio to working temperature. It is an important index to stand for the temperature sensitivity effect in SCWO. It was proven that the higher imax is, the more significant the effect of temperature on the SCWO effect is. Since the high-temperature area of SCWO equipment is subject to considerable damage from fatigue, the temperature is of great significance in SCWO equipment operation. Generally, most compounds (imax > 0.25) can be completely oxidized when the reactor temperature reaches 500°C. However, some compounds (imax > 0.25) need a higher temperature for complete oxidation, up to 560°C. To analyze the correlation coefficients between imax and various molecular descriptors, a quantum chemical method was used in this study. The structures of the twelve organic compounds were optimized by the Density Functional Theory B3LYP/6-311G method, as well as their quantum properties. It was shown that six molecular descriptors were negatively correlated to imax while other three descriptors were positively correlated to imax. Among them, dipole moment had the greatest effect on the oxidation thermodynamics of the twelve organic compounds. Once a correlation between molecular descriptors and imax is established, SCWO can be run at an appropriate temperature according to molecular structure.

  7. Escherichia coli mutants with a temperature-sensitive alcohol dehydrogenase.

    OpenAIRE

    Lorowitz, W; Clark, D.

    1982-01-01

    Mutants of Escherichia coli resistant to allyl alcohol were selected. Such mutants were found to lack alcohol dehydrogenase. In addition, mutants with temperature-sensitive alcohol dehydrogenase activity were obtained. These mutations, designated adhE, are all located at the previously described adh regulatory locus. Most adhE mutants were also defective in acetaldehyde dehydrogenase activity.

  8. Sensitivities and uncertainties of modeled ground temperatures in mountain environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Gubler

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Model evaluation is often performed at few locations due to the lack of spatially distributed data. Since the quantification of model sensitivities and uncertainties can be performed independently from ground truth measurements, these analyses are suitable to test the influence of environmental variability on model evaluation. In this study, the sensitivities and uncertainties of a physically based mountain permafrost model are quantified within an artificial topography. The setting consists of different elevations and exposures combined with six ground types characterized by porosity and hydraulic properties. The analyses are performed for a combination of all factors, that allows for quantification of the variability of model sensitivities and uncertainties within a whole modeling domain. We found that model sensitivities and uncertainties vary strongly depending on different input factors such as topography or different soil types. The analysis shows that model evaluation performed at single locations may not be representative for the whole modeling domain. For example, the sensitivity of modeled mean annual ground temperature to ground albedo ranges between 0.5 and 4 °C depending on elevation, aspect and the ground type. South-exposed inclined locations are more sensitive to changes in ground albedo than north-exposed slopes since they receive more solar radiation. The sensitivity to ground albedo increases with decreasing elevation due to shorter duration of the snow cover. The sensitivity in the hydraulic properties changes considerably for different ground types: rock or clay, for instance, are not sensitive to uncertainties in the hydraulic properties, while for gravel or peat, accurate estimates of the hydraulic properties significantly improve modeled ground temperatures. The discretization of ground, snow and time have an impact on modeled mean annual ground temperature (MAGT that cannot be neglected (more than 1 °C for several

  9. Reducing the temperature sensitivity of SOI waveguide-based biosensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gylfason, Kristinn B.; Mola Romero, Albert; Sohlström, Hans

    2012-06-01

    Label-free photonic biosensors fabricated on silicon-on-insulator (SOI) can provide compact size, high evanescent field strength at the silicon waveguide surface, and volume fabrication potential. However, due to the large thermo optic coefficient of water-based biosamples, the sensors are temperature-sensitive. Consequently, active temperature control is usually used. However, for low cost applications, active temperature control is often not feasible. Here, we use the opposite polarity of the thermo-optic coefficients of silicon and water to demonstrate a photonic slot waveguide with a distribution of power between sample and silicon that aims to give athermal operation in water. Based on simulations, we made three waveguide designs close to the athermal point, and asymmetric integrated Mach- Zehnder interferometers for their characterization. The devices were fabricated on SOI with a 220 nm device layer and 2 μm buried oxide, by electron beam lithography of hydrogen silsesquioxane (HSQ) resist, and etching in a Cl2/HBr/O2/He plasma. With Cargile 50350 fused silica matching oil as top cladding, the group index of the three guides varies from 1.9 to 2.8 at 1550 nm. The temperature sensitivity of the devices varied from -70 to -160 pm/K under the same conditions. A temperature sensitivity of -2 pm/K is projected with water as top cladding.

  10. Assessment of the use of temperature-sensitive microchips to determine core body temperature in goats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrao, N A; Hetem, R S; Meyer, L C R; Fick, L G

    2011-03-26

    Body temperature was measured at five different body sites (retroperitoneum, groin, semimembranosus muscle, flank and shoulder) using temperature-sensitive microchips implanted in five female goats, and compared with the core body and rectal temperatures. Body temperature was measured while the goats were kept in different ambient temperatures, with and without radiant heat, as well as during a fever induced experimentally by injection of bacterial lipopolysaccharide. Bland-Altman limit of agreement analysis was used to compare the temperature measurements at the different body sites during the different interventions. Temperatures measured by the microchip implanted in the retroperitoneum showed the closest agreement (mean 0.2 °C lower) with core and rectal temperatures during all interventions, whereas temperatures measured by the microchips implanted in the groin, muscle, flank and shoulder differed from core body temperature by up to 3.5 °C during the various interventions.

  11. Temperature sensitivity of soil organic matter decomposition was strongly affected by land use under low temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zang, Huadong; Blagodatskaya, Evgenia; Xu, Xingliang; Kuzyakov, Yakov

    2017-04-01

    The temperature sensitivity of soil organic matter (SOM) decomposition (often measured as Q10 value) is important for predicting global carbon (C) stocks under warming scenarios. However, the effects of land use and labile substrates on Q10 value remain unclear. We investigated CO2 emission from soils of three land use types (i.e. grassland, cropland and bare fallow) at five temperatures (0, 10, 20, 30 and 40 °C) with or without labile C (14C-glucose) addition. The CO2 efflux from SOM increased with temperature and was 43, 21 and 9 times higher at 40 °C than at 0 °C in grassland, cropland and bare fallow soils, respectively. High temperature strongly increased the cumulative priming effect (PE) in grassland soil (from 0.1 to 4.7 mg g-1 SOC), while the PE in cropland and bare fallow was not sensitive to warming. The Q10 of SOM (2.3-6) was higher at low temperature (0-10 °C) and decreased strongly to Q10 = 1.7-2.0 with temperature increase. The Q10 of SOM in grassland was 1.6 and 2.7 times higher than cropland and bare fallow at low temperature, respectively. Labile C addition decreased the Q10 of SOM in grassland and cropland, but increased it in bare fallow, especially under low temperature. Overall, temperature sensitivity of SOM was strongly affected by land use at low temperature and was relatively stable in high temperature (> 10°C). Labile C addition mainly affected temperature sensitivity of SOM at lower temperature, which decreased in grassland and cropland, and increased in bare fallow. These findings indicate that global warming may result in regionally variable responses in soil respiration, with colder climates being considerably more responsive to increased ambient temperatures.

  12. Validation of temperature-sensitive radio transmitters for measurement of body temperature in small animals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Williams, Joseph B.; Tieleman, B. I.; Shobrak, Mohammed

    2009-01-01

    As part of a study on the core body temperature (T(b)) of desert birds, we purposed to use temperature-sensitive implantable radio transmitters. Because of the difficulty in recapturing these birds, we needed to know if these electronic devices held their calibration over the duration of normal batt

  13. Parametric sensitivity analysis for temperature control in outdoor photobioreactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Darlan A; Rodrigues, Vinicius O; Gómez, Sonia V; Sales, Emerson A; Jorquera, Orlando

    2013-09-01

    In this study a critical analysis of input parameters on a model to describe the broth temperature in flat plate photobioreactors throughout the day is carried out in order to assess the effect of these parameters on the model. Using the design of experiment approach, variation of selected parameters was introduced and the influence of each parameter on the broth temperature was evaluated by a parametric sensitivity analysis. The results show that the major influence on the broth temperature is that from the reactor wall and the shading factor, both related to the direct and reflected solar irradiation. Other parameter which play an important role on the temperature is the distance between plates. This study provides information to improve the design and establish the most appropriate operating conditions for the cultivation of microalgae in outdoor systems.

  14. A high sensitive fiber-optic strain sensor with tunable temperature sensitivity for temperature-compensation measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jie; Huang, Hui; Bai, Min; Zhan, Tingting; Yang, Zhibo; Yu, Yan; Qu, Bo

    2017-02-01

    A high sensitive fiber-optic strain sensor, which consists of a cantilever, a tandem rod and a fiber collimator, was proposed. The tandem rod, which transfer the applied strain to the cantilever, was used for tuning the temperature sensitivity from ‑0.15 to 0.19 dB/°C via changing the length ratio of the rods. Moreover, due to the small beam divergence of the collimator, high strain sensitivity can be realized via incident-angle sensitive detection-mechanism. A strain detection-range of 1.1 × 103 με (with a sensing length of 21.5 mm), a detection limit of 5.7 × 10‑3 με, and a maximum operating frequency of 1.18 KHz were demonstrated. This sensor is promising for compensating the thermal-expansion of various target objects.

  15. Water Recycling removal using temperature-sensitive hydronen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rana B. Gupta

    2002-10-30

    The overall objective of this project was to study the proposed Water Recycling/Removal Using Temperature-Sensitive Hydrogels. The main element of this technology is the design of a suitable hydrogel that can perform needed water separation for pulp and paper industry. The specific topics studied are to answer following questions: (a) Can water be removed using hydrogel from large molecules such as lignin? (b) Can the rate of separation be made faster? (c) What are the molecular interactions with hydrogel surface? (d) Can a hydrogel be designed for a high ionic strength and high temperature? Summary of the specific results are given.

  16. Temperature sensitivity of organic-matter decay in tidal marshes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirwan, M. L.; Guntenspergen, G. R.; Langley, J. A.

    2014-09-01

    Approximately half of marine carbon sequestration takes place in coastal wetlands, including tidal marshes, where organic matter contributes to soil elevation and ecosystem persistence in the face of sea-level rise. The long-term viability of marshes and their carbon pools depends, in part, on how the balance between productivity and decay responds to climate change. Here, we report the sensitivity of labile soil organic-matter decay in tidal marshes to seasonal and latitudinal variations in temperature measured over a 3-year period. We find a moderate increase in decay rate at warmer temperatures (3-6% per °C, Q10 = 1.3-1.5). Despite the profound differences between microbial metabolism in wetlands and uplands, our results indicate a strong conservation of temperature sensitivity. Moreover, simple comparisons with organic-matter production suggest that elevated atmospheric CO2 and warmer temperatures will accelerate carbon accumulation in marsh soils, and potentially enhance their ability to survive sea-level rise.

  17. Manufacturing of a high-temperature resistojet heat exchanger by selective laser melting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romei, F.; Grubišić, A. N.; Gibbon, D.

    2017-09-01

    The paper presents the design, manufacturing and postproduction analysis of a novel high-temperature spacecraft resistojet heat exchanger manufactured through selective laser melting to validate the manufacturing approach. The work includes the analysis of critical features of a heat exchanger with integrated converging-diverging nozzle as a single piece element. The metrology of the component is investigated using optical analysis and profilometry to verify the integrity of components. High-resolution micro-Computed Tomography (CT) is applied as a tool for volumetric non-destructive inspection and conformity since the complex geometry of the thruster does not allow internal examination. The CT volume data is utilised to determine a surface mesh on which a novel perform coordinate measurement technique is applied for nominal/actual comparison and wall thickness analysis. A thin-wall concentric tubular heat exchanger design is determined to meet dimensional accuracy requirements. The work indicates the production of fine structures with feature sizes below 200 μm in 316L stainless via selective laser melting is feasible and opens up new possibilities for the future developments in multiple industries.

  18. Tracking thermal fronts with temperature-sensitive, chemically reactive tracers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robinson, B.A.; Birdsell, S.A.

    1987-01-01

    Los Alamos is developing tracer techniques using reactive chemicals to track thermal fronts in fractured geothermal reservoirs. If a nonadsorbing tracer flowing from the injection to production well chemically reacts, its reaction rate will be a strong function of temperature. Thus the extent of chemical reaction will be greatest early in the lifetime of the system, and less as the thermal front progresses from the injection to production well. Early laboratory experiments identified tracers with chemical kinetics suitable for reservoirs in the temperature range of 75 to 100/sup 0/C. Recent kinetics studies have focused on the kinetics of hydrolysis of derivatives of bromobenzene. This class of reactions can be used in reservoirs ranging in temperature from 150 to 275/sup 0/C, which is of greater interest to the geothermal industry. Future studies will include laboratory adsorption experiments to identify possibly unwanted adsorption on granite, development of sensitive analytical techniques, and a field demonstration of the reactive tracer concept.

  19. File list: His.Adl.10.AllAg.Temperature_sensitive_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  20. File list: His.Adl.50.AllAg.Temperature_sensitive_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  1. File list: His.Adl.20.AllAg.Temperature_sensitive_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  3. Sensitivities and uncertainties of modeled ground temperatures in mountain environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Gubler

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Before operational use or for decision making, models must be validated, and the degree of trust in model outputs should be quantified. Often, model validation is performed at single locations due to the lack of spatially-distributed data. Since the analysis of parametric model uncertainties can be performed independently of observations, it is a suitable method to test the influence of environmental variability on model evaluation. In this study, the sensitivities and uncertainty of a physically-based mountain permafrost model are quantified within an artificial topography consisting of different elevations and exposures combined with six ground types characterized by their hydraulic properties. The analyses performed for all combinations of topographic factors and ground types allowed to quantify the variability of model sensitivity and uncertainty within mountain regions. We found that modeled snow duration considerably influences the mean annual ground temperature (MAGT. The melt-out day of snow (MD is determined by processes determining snow accumulation and melting. Parameters such as the temperature and precipitation lapse rate and the snow correction factor have therefore a great impact on modeled MAGT. Ground albedo changes MAGT from 0.5 to 4°C in dependence of the elevation, the aspect and the ground type. South-exposed inclined locations are more sensitive to changes in ground albedo than north-exposed slopes since they receive more solar radiation. The sensitivity to ground albedo increases with decreasing elevation due to shorter snow cover. Snow albedo and other parameters determining the amount of reflected solar radiation are important, changing MAGT at different depths by more than 1°C. Parameters influencing the turbulent fluxes as the roughness length or the dew temperature are more sensitive at low elevation sites due to higher air temperatures and decreased solar radiation. Modeling the individual terms of the energy

  4. Additive Manufacturing of NiTiHf High Temperature Shape Memory Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benafan, Othmane; Bigelow, Glen S.; Elahinia, Mohammad; Moghaddam, Narges Shayesteh; Amerinatanzi, Amirhesam; Saedi, Soheil; Toker, Guher Pelin; Karaca, Haluk

    2017-01-01

    Additive manufacturing of a NiTi-20Hf high temperature shape memory alloy (HTSMA) was investigated. A selective laser melting (SLM) process by Phenix3D Systems was used to develop components from NiTiHf powder (of approximately 25-75 m particle fractions), and the thermomechanical response was compared to the conventionally vacuum induction skull melted counterpart. Transformation temperatures of the SLM material were found to be slightly lower due to the additional oxygen pick up from the gas atomization and melting process. The shape memory response in compression was measured for stresses up to 500 MPa, and transformation strains were found to be very comparable (Up to 1.26 for the as-extruded; up to 1.52 for SLM).

  5. The use of a very high temperature nuclear reactor in the manufacture of synthetic fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farbman, G. H.; Brecher, L. E.

    1976-01-01

    The three parts of a program directed toward creating a cost-effective nuclear hydrogen production system are described. The discussion covers the development of a very high temperature nuclear reactor (VHTR) as a nuclear heat and power source capable of producing the high temperature needed for hydrogen production and other processes; the development of a hydrogen generation process based on water decomposition, which can utilize the outputs of the VHTR and be integrated with many different ultimate hydrogen consuming processes; and the evaluation of the process applications of the nuclear hydrogen systems to assess the merits and potential payoffs. It is shown that the use of VHTR for the manufacture of synthetic fuels appears to have a very high probability of making a positive contribution to meeting the nation's energy needs in the future.

  6. WETTABILITY OF FIRE RETARDANT TREATED LAMINATED VENEER LUMBER (LVL MANUFACTURED FROM VENEERS DRIED AT DIFFERENT TEMPERATURES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeki Candan

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Wettability of the fire retardant treated (FRT laminated veneer lumber (LVL manufactured from wood veneers dried at different temperatures was investigated. Commercially manufactured veneer of beech wood (Fagus orientalis L. was treated with borax-boric acid (BX/BA, 1:1 by weight, monoammonium phosphate (MAP, and diammonium phosphate (DAP using a full-cell pressure process. The veneers were then dried at different temperatures (120, 140, 160, and 180°C, and experimental LVLs were made from these veneer sheets. The wettability of LVL was characterized by contact angle analysis. The lowest contact angle was obtained from LVL made from BX/BA-treated veneers, while the highest value was found for the control LVL. The CA values of these samples at each re-drying level were lower than LVLs made from untreated veneers. Re-drying of the treated veneers decreased the CA values of the LVL, while it was found higher for the LVL made from untreated veneer.

  7. Identification of a novel temperature sensitive promoter in cho cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hesse Friedemann

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Chinese hamster ovary (CHO expression system is the leading production platform for manufacturing biopharmaceuticals for the treatment of numerous human diseases. Efforts to optimize the production process also include the genetic construct encoding the therapeutic gene. Here we report about the successful identification of an endogenous highly active gene promoter obtained from CHO cells which shows conditionally inducible gene expression at reduced temperature. Results Based on CHO microarray expression data abundantly transcribed genes were selected as potential promoter candidates. The S100a6 (calcyclin and its flanking regions were identified from a genomic CHO-K1 lambda-phage library. Computational analyses showed a predicted TSS, a TATA-box and several TFBSs within the 1.5 kb region upstream the ATG start signal. Various constructs were investigated for promoter activity at 37°C and 33°C in transient luciferase reporter gene assays. Most constructs showed expression levels even higher than the SV40 control and on average a more than two-fold increase at lower temperature. We identified the core promoter sequence (222 bp comprising two SP1 sites and could show a further increase in activity by duplication of this minimal sequence. Conclusions This novel CHO promoter permits conditionally high-level gene expression. Upon a shift to 33°C, a two to three-fold increase of basal productivity (already higher than SV40 promoter is achieved. This property is of particular advantage for a process with reduced expression during initial cell growth followed by the production phase at low temperature with a boost in expression. Additionally, production of toxic proteins becomes feasible, since cell metabolism and gene expression do not directly interfere. The CHO S100a6 promoter can be characterized as cold-shock responsive with the potential for improving process performance of mammalian expression systems.

  8. Bhutan Rivers Runoff Sensitivity to Changes in Precipitation and Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonessa, M. Y.; Richey, J. E.; Lettenmaier, D. P.

    2012-12-01

    The Kingdom of Bhutan harnesses its water resources mostly for hydropower generation. Hydroelectricity represents 96% of the country's electricity generating capacity and 99.9% of its electricity generation. About 87% of the electricity generated within Bhutan is exported to India. Assessment of this crucial resource is vital for its proper usage and management especially in the light of potential land use and climate changes. A land surface hydrologic model, Variable Infiltration Capacity (VIC), was used to assess the hydrology of the country. The model was forced using data obtained from three sources: NCEP/NCAR, Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) and ERA Interim. The NCEP/NCAR forcing resulted in better flow simulation for most of the stations than WRF and ERA forcings. Thus, NCEP/NCAR forcing data was used to evaluate the runoff sensitivity to temperature and precipitation changes. In both steps, VIC was run at 1/24° latitude-longitude resolution. The modeled mean annual runoff elasticity which measures fractional change in annual runoff divided by fractional change in annual precipitation ranges from 1.08 to 2.16. The elasticity value is lower for higher reference precipitations and vice versa. The runoff sensitivity to temperature change computed as percentage change in annual runoff per 1°C change in temperature are all declines and ranges from -1.38 to -1.54. Spatially, both higher elasticity and sensitivity (big negatives) are towards the northern part the country where elevation is more than 5000 m above sea level.

  9. Brucella melitensis survival during manufacture of ripened goat cheese at two temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Méndez-González, Karla Y; Hernández-Castro, Rigoberto; Carrillo-Casas, Erika M; Monroy, Jorge F; López-Merino, Ahide; Suárez-Güemes, Francisco

    2011-12-01

    The aim of the current work was to assess the influence of two temperatures, 4°C and 24°C, on pH and water activity and their association with Brucella melitensis survival during the traditional manufacture of ripened goat cheese. Raw milk from a brucellosis-free goat herd was used for the manufacture of ripened cheese. The cheese was inoculated with 5×10(9) of the B. melitensis 16M strain during the tempering stage. The cheeses were matured for 5, 20, and 50 days at both temperatures. To assess Brucella survival, the pH and a(w) were recorded at each stage of the process (curd cutting, draining whey, immersion in brine, ripening I, ripening II, and ripening III). B. melitensis was detected at ripening stage III (1×10(3) colony-forming unit [CFU]/mL) from cheeses matured at 4°C with a pH of 5.0 and a(w) of 0.90, and at a ripening stage II (1×10(4) CFU/mL) from cheeses ripened at 24°C with a pH of 4.0 and a(w) of 0.89. The remaining stages were free from the inoculated pathogen. In addition, viable B. melitensis was recovered in significant amounts (1-2×10(6) CFU/mL) from the whey fractions of both types of cheese ripened at 24°C and 4°C. These results revealed the effects of high temperature (24°C vs. 4°C) on the low pH (4) and a(w) (0.89) that appeared to be associated with the suppression of B. melitensis at the early stages of cheese ripening. In the ripened goat cheeses, B. melitensis survived under a precise combination of temperature during maturation, ripening time, and a(w) in the manufacturing process.

  10. Temperature Sensitive Optical Phenomena in Heavy Metal Halide Films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-01-08

    Heavy - metal halides such as Pb!2 and HgI2 exhibit a strongly tempera- ture dependent absorption edge at visible frequencies. The shift in the absorption...AOb9 537 ROCKWELL INTERNATIONAL ANAHEIM CA ELECTRONICS RESEAR—— ETC FIG L u G TEMPERATURE SENSITIVE OPTICAL PHENOMENA IN HEAVY METAL HALIDE F—— ETC (U...PHENOMENA IN HEAVY METAL HALIDE F — ET C( U) ,JAN 79 J D MC*LLEN, D M HEINZ. F S STEARNS DAAK7O— 77—C—01 6 5 UNCLASSIFIED C79 1501 _ _ U SB

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    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  13. File list: DNS.Adl.20.AllAg.Temperature_sensitive_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  14. High Temperature Thermoplastic Additive Manufacturing Using Low-Cost, Open-Source Hardware

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, John M.; Stelter, Christopher J.; Yashin, Edward A.; Siochi, Emilie J.

    2016-01-01

    Additive manufacturing (or 3D printing) via Fused Filament Fabrication (FFF), also known as Fused Deposition Modeling (FDM), is a process where material is placed in specific locations layer-by-layer to create a complete part. Printers designed for FFF build parts by extruding a thermoplastic filament from a nozzle in a predetermined path. Originally developed for commercial printers, 3D printing via FFF has become accessible to a much larger community of users since the introduction of Reprap printers. These low-cost, desktop machines are typically used to print prototype parts or novelty items. As the adoption of desktop sized 3D printers broadens, there is increased demand for these machines to produce functional parts that can withstand harsher conditions such as high temperature and mechanical loads. Materials meeting these requirements tend to possess better mechanical properties and higher glass transition temperatures (Tg), thus requiring printers with high temperature printing capability. This report outlines the problems and solutions, and includes a detailed description of the machine design, printing parameters, and processes specific to high temperature thermoplastic 3D printing.

  15. Temperature uniformity mapping in a high pressure high temperature reactor using a temperature sensitive indicator

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grauwet, T.; Plancken, van der I.; Vervoort, L.; Matser, A.M.; Hendrickx, M.; Loey, van A.

    2011-01-01

    Recently, the first prototype ovomucoid-based pressure–temperature–time indicator (pTTI) for high pressure high temperature (HPHT) processing was described. However, for temperature uniformity mapping of high pressure (HP) vessels under HPHT sterilization conditions, this prototype needs to be optim

  16. Porosity evolution in additively manufactured aluminium alloy during high temperature exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, J.; Ding, H. L.; Gu, J. L.; Wang, X. S.; Qiu, H.

    2017-01-01

    A 2319 aluminum alloy is deposited by the Wire+Arc Additive Manufacturing technology with Cold Metal Transfer process. Porosity that are both existing in the as-deposited and as-heat treated state metal are revealed by optical microscopy and quantitatively analyzed. It explains the reason why the newly initiated pores are easily tend to gather between each layer around the fusion line zone for the WAAM metal after heat treatment. The inner morphology of the pores are demonstrated by Scanning Electron Microscopy. Porosity evolution and distribution during high temperature exposure are demonstrated. Thus two porosity growth and number increase mechanisms are proposed eventually, providing theoretical basis for related material design and process optimization.

  17. Possibility to sound the atmospheric ozone by a radiosonde equipped with two temperature sensors, sensitive and non-sensitive to the long wave radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitaoka, T.; Sumi, T.

    1994-01-01

    The sensitiveness of white coated thermistor sensors and non-sensitiveness of the gold coated over white thermistor sensors (which have been manufactured by a vacuum evaporation process) to long wave radiation were ascertained by some simple experiments in-room and also by analyses of some results of experimental soundings. From results of analyses on the temperature discrepancies caused by long wave radiation, the possibility to sound the atmospheric ozone partial pressure by a radiosonde equipped with two kinds of sensors, sensitive and non-sensitive to the long wave radiation was suggested, and the test results of the newly developed software for the deduction of ozone partial pressure in upper layers was also shown. However, it was found that the following is the necessary condition to realize the purpose. The sounding should be made by a radiosonde equipped with three sensors, instead of two, one being non-sensitive to the long wave radiation perfectly, and the other two also non-sensitive partially to the downward one, with two different angles of exposure upward. It is essential for the realization of the purpose to get two different values of temperature discrepancies simultaneously observed by the three sensors mentioned above and to avoid the troublesome effects of the upward long wave radiation.

  18. Foliar temperature acclimation reduces simulated carbon sensitivity to climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Nicholas G.; Malyshev, Sergey L.; Shevliakova, Elena; Kattge, Jens; Dukes, Jeffrey S.

    2016-04-01

    Plant photosynthesis and respiration are the largest carbon fluxes between the terrestrial biosphere and the atmosphere, and their parameterizations represent large sources of uncertainty in projections of land carbon uptake in Earth system models (ESMs). The incorporation of temperature acclimation of photosynthesis and foliar respiration, commonly observed processes, into ESMs has been proposed as a way to reduce this uncertainty. Here we show that, across 15 flux tower sites spanning multiple biomes at various locations worldwide (10° S-67° N), acclimation parameterizations improve a model's ability to reproduce observed net ecosystem exchange of CO2. This improvement is most notable in tropical biomes, where photosynthetic acclimation increased model performance by 36%. The consequences of acclimation for simulated terrestrial carbon uptake depend on the process, region and time period evaluated. Globally, including acclimation has a net effect of increasing carbon assimilation and storage, an effect that diminishes with time, but persists well into the future. Our results suggest that land models omitting foliar temperature acclimation are likely to overestimate the temperature sensitivity of terrestrial carbon exchange, thus biasing projections of future carbon storage and estimates of policy indicators such as the transient climate response to cumulative carbon emissions.

  19. Intelligent Detector of Internal Combustion Engine Cylinder Pressure and Sensitivity Temperature Coefficient Compensation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beirong Zheng

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The detecting device based on mechanical mechanism is far from the measurement of internal combustion engine cylinder explosion and compression pressure. This pressure detection is under the environment of pulsed gas (over 500 times per one minute and mechanical impactive vibration. Piezoresistive detection with silicon on insulator (SOI strain gauges to pressure seems to be a good solution to meet such special applications. In this work, separation by implanted oxygen (SIMOX wafer was used to fabricate the high temperature pressure sensor chip. For high accuracy and wide temperature range application, this paper also presents a novel pressure sensitivity temperature coefficient (TCS compensation method, using integrated constant current network. A quantitative compensation formula is introduced in mathematics. During experiments, the absolute value of the compensated TCS is easy to be 10 × 10−6/°C~100 × 10−6/°C by individual adjustment and calibration of each device’s temperature compensation. Therefore, the feasibility and practicability of this technology are tested. Again, the disadvantages are discussed after the research of the experiment data and the improvement methods are also given in the designing period. This technology exhibits the great potential practical value of internal combustion engine cylinder pressure with volume manufacturing.

  20. Neighborhood properties are important determinants of temperature sensitive mutations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svetlana Lockwood

    Full Text Available Temperature-sensitive (TS mutants are powerful tools to study gene function in vivo. These mutants exhibit wild-type activity at permissive temperatures and reduced activity at restrictive temperatures. Although random mutagenesis can be used to generate TS mutants, the procedure is laborious and unfeasible in multicellular organisms. Further, the underlying molecular mechanisms of the TS phenotype are poorly understood. To elucidate TS mechanisms, we used a machine learning method-logistic regression-to investigate a large number of sequence and structure features. We developed and tested 133 features, describing properties of either the mutation site or the mutation site neighborhood. We defined three types of neighborhood using sequence distance, Euclidean distance, and topological distance. We discovered that neighborhood features outperformed mutation site features in predicting TS mutations. The most predictive features suggest that TS mutations tend to occur at buried and rigid residues, and are located at conserved protein domains. The environment of a buried residue often determines the overall structural stability of a protein, thus may lead to reversible activity change upon temperature switch. We developed TS prediction models based on logistic regression and the Lasso regularized procedure. Through a ten-fold cross-validation, we obtained the area under the curve of 0.91 for the model using both sequence and structure features. Testing on independent datasets suggested that the model predicted TS mutations with a 50% precision. In summary, our study elucidated the molecular basis of TS mutants and suggested the importance of neighborhood properties in determining TS mutations. We further developed models to predict TS mutations derived from single amino acid substitutions. In this way, TS mutants can be efficiently obtained through experimentally introducing the predicted mutations.

  1. Sensitivity of Sump Water Temperature to Containment Integrity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Misuk; Kim, Seoung Rae [Nuclear Engineering Service and Solution, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    This paper is focused on the containment behavior analysis in the above described cases using GOTHIC-IST (generation of thermal-hydraulic information for containments, industry standard toolset). GOTHIC-IST version 7.2a is an integrated, general purpose thermal-hydraulics software package for design, licensing, safety and operating analysis of nuclear power plant containments and other confinement buildings. In this study, we perform the sensitivity the sump water temperature to containment integrity. For 35% RIH break accident with the malfunction of spray system, local air coolers, ECC(emergency core cooling) pump and heat exchanger, the peak pressure at boiler room do not exceed the design pressure 124kPa(g) of the containment and containment integrity is secured. If accompanied the malfunction of heat exchanger or pump in the time of low pressure safety injection, of ECCS, it will be one of the aggravating factors to the integrity of core and containment.

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  6. File list: Oth.Adl.20.AllAg.Temperature_sensitive_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  12. File list: Unc.Adl.10.AllAg.Temperature_sensitive_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  13. File list: Pol.Adl.10.AllAg.Temperature_sensitive_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  14. Influence of internal temperature development during manufacturing on thick laminates compression fatigue properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahuerta, F.; Nijssen, RPL

    2016-07-01

    Thick laminates (above 6 mm) are increasingly present in large composite structures such as wind turbine blades. Blade designs are based on static and fatigue coupon tests on 14mm thick laminates. However, a thickness effect has been observed, showing significantly shorter fatigue life in thick laminates. Different factors are suspected to be involved in the decreased static and dynamic performance of thick laminates. These include the effect of selfheating during fatigue testing, scaling effects, and the influence of residual stresses due to temperature gradients during manufacturing. This work studies the influence of the temperature gradients during resin infusion on the through-thickness fatigue properties in thick laminates. Coupons from thick laminates cured at different curing rates have been tested in fatigue. The work reports the compression fatigue properties of a thick laminate and relates the results with the curing rate. Safety factors between 1.23 and 1.60 regarding the influence of the curing cycles in thick laminates are reported.

  15. Temperature Sensitivity as a Microbial Trait Using Parameters from Macromolecular Rate Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlotte Jean Alster

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The activity of soil microbial extracellular enzymes is strongly controlled by temperature, yet the degree to which temperature sensitivity varies by microbe and enzyme type is unclear. Such information would allow soil microbial enzymes to be incorporated in a traits-based framework to improve prediction of ecosystem response to global change. If temperature sensitivity varies for specific soil enzymes, then determining the underlying causes of variation in temperature sensitivity of these enzymes will provide fundamental insights for predicting nutrient dynamics belowground. In this study, we characterized how both microbial taxonomic variation as well as substrate type affects temperature sensitivity. We measured β-glucosidase, leucine aminopeptidase, and phosphatase activities at six temperatures: 4, 11, 25, 35, 45, and 60°C, for seven different soil microbial isolates. To calculate temperature sensitivity, we employed two models, Arrhenius, which predicts an exponential increase in reaction rate with temperature, and Macromolecular Rate Theory (MMRT, which predicts rate to peak and then decline as temperature increases. We found MMRT provided a more accurate fit and allowed for more nuanced interpretation of temperature sensitivity in all of the enzyme × isolate combinations tested. Our results revealed that both the enzyme type and soil isolate type explain variation in parameters associated with temperature sensitivity. Because we found temperature sensitivity to be an inherent and variable property of an enzyme, we argue that it can be incorporated as a microbial functional trait, but only when using the MMRT definition of temperature sensitivity. We show that the Arrhenius metrics of temperature sensitivity are overly sensitive to test conditions, with activation energy changing depending on the temperature range it was calculated within. Thus, we propose the use of the MMRT definition of temperature sensitivity for accurate

  16. Temperature Sensitivity as a Microbial Trait Using Parameters from Macromolecular Rate Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alster, Charlotte J; Baas, Peter; Wallenstein, Matthew D; Johnson, Nels G; von Fischer, Joseph C

    2016-01-01

    The activity of soil microbial extracellular enzymes is strongly controlled by temperature, yet the degree to which temperature sensitivity varies by microbe and enzyme type is unclear. Such information would allow soil microbial enzymes to be incorporated in a traits-based framework to improve prediction of ecosystem response to global change. If temperature sensitivity varies for specific soil enzymes, then determining the underlying causes of variation in temperature sensitivity of these enzymes will provide fundamental insights for predicting nutrient dynamics belowground. In this study, we characterized how both microbial taxonomic variation as well as substrate type affects temperature sensitivity. We measured β-glucosidase, leucine aminopeptidase, and phosphatase activities at six temperatures: 4, 11, 25, 35, 45, and 60°C, for seven different soil microbial isolates. To calculate temperature sensitivity, we employed two models, Arrhenius, which predicts an exponential increase in reaction rate with temperature, and Macromolecular Rate Theory (MMRT), which predicts rate to peak and then decline as temperature increases. We found MMRT provided a more accurate fit and allowed for more nuanced interpretation of temperature sensitivity in all of the enzyme × isolate combinations tested. Our results revealed that both the enzyme type and soil isolate type explain variation in parameters associated with temperature sensitivity. Because we found temperature sensitivity to be an inherent and variable property of an enzyme, we argue that it can be incorporated as a microbial functional trait, but only when using the MMRT definition of temperature sensitivity. We show that the Arrhenius metrics of temperature sensitivity are overly sensitive to test conditions, with activation energy changing depending on the temperature range it was calculated within. Thus, we propose the use of the MMRT definition of temperature sensitivity for accurate interpretation of

  17. Warming and drought reduce temperature sensitivity of nitrogen transformations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novem Auyeung, Dolaporn S; Suseela, Vidya; Dukes, Jeffrey S

    2013-02-01

    Shifts in nitrogen (N) mineralization and nitrification rates due to global changes can influence nutrient availability, which can affect terrestrial productivity and climate change feedbacks. While many single-factor studies have examined the effects of environmental changes on N mineralization and nitrification, few have examined these effects in a multifactor context or recorded how these effects vary seasonally. In an old-field ecosystem in Massachusetts, USA, we investigated the combined effects of four levels of warming (up to 4 °C) and three levels of precipitation (drought, ambient, and wet) on net N mineralization, net nitrification, and potential nitrification. We also examined the treatment effects on the temperature sensitivity of net N mineralization and net nitrification and on the ratio of C mineralization to net N mineralization. During winter, freeze-thaw events, snow depth, and soil freezing depth explained little of the variation in net nitrification and N mineralization rates among treatments. During two years of treatments, warming and altered precipitation rarely influenced the rates of N cycling, and there was no evidence of a seasonal pattern in the responses. In contrast, warming and drought dramatically decreased the apparent Q10 of net N mineralization and net nitrification, and the warming-induced decrease in apparent Q10 was more pronounced in ambient and wet treatments than the drought treatment. The ratio of C mineralization to net N mineralization varied over time and was sensitive to the interactive effects of warming and altered precipitation. Although many studies have found that warming tends to accelerate N cycling, our results suggest that warming can have little to no effect on N cycling in some ecosystems. Thus, ecosystem models that assume that warming will consistently increase N mineralization rates and inputs of plant-available N may overestimate the increase in terrestrial productivity and the magnitude of an important

  18. Implementing high-temperature short-time media treatment in commercial-scale cell culture manufacturing processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohlscheidt, Michael; Charaniya, Salim; Kulenovic, Fikret; Corrales, Mahalia; Shiratori, Masaru; Bourret, Justin; Meier, Steven; Fallon, Eric; Kiss, Robert

    2014-04-01

    The production of therapeutic proteins by mammalian cell culture is complex and sets high requirements for process, facility, and equipment design, as well as rigorous regulatory and quality standards. One particular point of concern and significant risk to supply chain is the susceptibility to contamination such as bacteria, fungi, mycoplasma, and viruses. Several technologies have been developed to create barriers for these agents to enter the process, e.g. filtration, UV inactivation, and temperature inactivation. However, if not implemented during development of the manufacturing process, these types of process changes can have significant impact on process performance if not managed appropriately. This article describes the implementation of the high-temperature short-time (HTST) treatment of cell culture media as an additional safety barrier against adventitious agents during the transfer of a large-scale commercial cell culture manufacturing process. The necessary steps and experiments, as well as subsequent results during qualification runs and routine manufacturing, are shown.

  19. Engineering temperature sensitive live attenuated influenza vaccines from emerging viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Bin; Li, Yan; Speer, Scott D; Subba, Anju; Lin, Xudong; Wentworth, David E

    2012-05-21

    The licensed live attenuated influenza A vaccine (LAIV) in the United States is created by making a reassortant containing six internal genes from a cold-adapted master donor strain (ca A/AA/6/60) and two surface glycoprotein genes from a circulating/emerging strain (e.g., A/CA/7/09 for the 2009/2010 H1N1 pandemic). Technologies to rapidly create recombinant viruses directly from patient specimens were used to engineer alternative LAIV candidates that have genomes composed entirely of vRNAs from pandemic or seasonal strains. Multiple mutations involved in the temperature-sensitive (ts) phenotype of the ca A/AA/6/60 master donor strain were introduced into a 2009 H1N1 pandemic strain rA/New York/1682/2009 (rNY1682-WT) to create rNY1682-TS1, and additional mutations identified in other ts viruses were added to rNY1682-TS1 to create rNY1682-TS2. Both rNY1682-TS1 and rNY1682-TS2 replicated efficiently at 30°C and 33°C. However, rNY1682-TS1 was partially restricted, and rNY1682-TS2 was completely restricted at 39°C. Additionally, engineering the TS1 or TS2 mutations into a distantly related human seasonal H1N1 influenza A virus also resulted pronounced restriction of replication in vitro. Clinical symptoms and virus replication in the lungs of mice showed that although rNY1682-TS2 and the licensed FluMist(®)-H1N1pdm LAIV that was used to combat the 2009/2010 pandemic were similarly attenuated, the rNY1682-TS2 was more protective upon challenge with a virulent mutant of pandemic H1N1 virus or a heterologous H1N1 (A/PR/8/1934) virus. This study demonstrates that engineering key temperature sensitive mutations (PB1-K391E, D581G, A661T; PB2-P112S, N265S, N556D, Y658H) into the genomes of influenza A viruses attenuates divergent human virus lineages and provides an alternative strategy for the generation of LAIVs. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Sensitivity for Diagnosing Group A Streptococcal Pharyngitis from Manufacturers is 10% Higher than Reported in Peer-Reviewed Publications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vachhani, Raj; Patel, Toral; Centor, Robert M; Estrada, Carlos A

    2017-01-01

    Meta-analyses based on peer-reviewed publications report a sensitivity of approximately 85% for rapid antigen streptococcus tests to diagnose group A streptococcal (GAS) pharyngitis. Because these meta-analyses excluded package inserts, we examined the test characteristics of rapid antigen streptococcal tests and molecular methods that manufacturers report in their package inserts. We included tests available in the US market (Food and Drug Administration, period searched 1993-2015) and used package insert data to calculate pooled sensitivity and specificity. To examine quality, we used the Quality Assessment of Diagnostic Accuracy Studies-2. We excluded 26 tests having different trade names but identical methods and data. The study design was prospective in 41.7% (10 of 24). The pooled sensitivity of the most commonly used method, lateral flow/immunochromatographic, was 95% (95% confidence interval [CI] 94-96) and the pooled specificity was 98% (96-98); 7108 patients. The pooled sensitivity of the polymerase chain reaction or molecular methods was 98% (95% CI 96-98) and the pooled specificity was 96% (95% CI 95-97); 5685 patients. Package inserts include sponsored studies that overestimate the sensitivity of rapid tests to diagnose GAS pharyngitis by approximately 10%. Physicians should understand that package inserts overestimate diagnostic test utility; a negative test cannot be used to exclude GAS pharyngitis.

  1. The source of investment cash flow sensitivity in manufacturing firms: Is it asymmetric information or agency costs?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Makina

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In the literature, positive investment cash flow sensitivity is attributed to either asymmetric information induced financing constraints or the agency costs of free cash flow. Using data from a sample of 68 manufacturing firms listed on the South African JSE, this paper contributes to the literature by investigating the source of investment cash flow sensitivity. We have found that asymmetric information explains the positive investment cash flow sensitivity better than agency costs. Furthermore, asymmetric information has been observed to be more pronounced in low-dividend-paying firms and small firms. Despite South Africa’s having a developed financial system by international standards, small firms are seen to be financially constrained. We attribute the absence of investment cash flow sensitivity due to agency costs to good corporate governance of South African listed firms. Thus the paper provides further evidence in support of the proposition in the literature that the source of investment cash flow sensitivity may depend on the institutional setting of a country, such as its corporate governance.

  2. Innovative Processing Methods for the Affordable Manufacture of Multifunctional High Temperature Coatings Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Research is proposed to investigate the feasibility of using advanced manufacturing techniques to enable the affordable application of multi-functional high...

  3. Elevated Temperature, Residual Compressive Strength of Impact-Damaged Sandwich Structure Manufactured Out-of-Autoclave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimsley, Brian W.; Sutter, James K.; Burke, Eric R.; Dixon, Genevieve D.; Gyekenyesi, Thomas G.; Smeltzer, Stanley S.

    2012-01-01

    Several 1/16th-scale curved sandwich composite panel sections of a 10 m diameter barrel were fabricated to demonstrate the manufacturability of large-scale curved sections using minimum gauge, [+60/-60/0]s, toughened epoxy composite facesheets co-cured with low density (50 kilograms per cubic meters) aluminum honeycomb core. One of these panels was fabricated out of autoclave (OoA) by the vacuum bag oven (VBO) process using Cycom(Registered Trademark) T40-800b/5320-1 prepreg system while another panel with the same lay-up and dimensions was fabricated using the autoclave-cure, toughened epoxy prepreg system Cycom(Registered Trademark) IM7/977-3. The resulting 2.44 m x 2 m curved panels were investigated by non-destructive evaluation (NDE) at NASA Langley Research Center (NASA LaRC) to determine initial fabrication quality and then cut into smaller coupons for elevated temperature wet (ETW) mechanical property characterization. Mechanical property characterization of the sandwich coupons was conducted including edge-wise compression (EWC), and compression-after-impact (CAI) at conditions ranging from 25 C/dry to 150 C/wet. The details and results of this characterization effort are presented in this paper.

  4. Temperature Sensitivity as a Microbial Trait Using Parameters from Macromolecular Rate Theory

    OpenAIRE

    Charlotte Jean Alster; Peter Baas; Wallenstein, Matthew D.; Nels G. Johnson; von Fischer, Joseph C.

    2016-01-01

    The activity of soil microbial extracellular enzymes is strongly controlled by temperature, yet the degree to which temperature sensitivity varies by microbe and enzyme type is unclear. Such information would allow soil microbial enzymes to be incorporated in a traits-based framework to improve prediction of ecosystem response to global change. If temperature sensitivity varies for specific soil enzymes, then determining the underlying causes of variation in temperature sensitivity of these e...

  5. Dependence of protein recognition of temperature-sensitive imprinted hydrogels on preparation temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turan, Eylem; Ozçetin, Gökçen; Caykara, Tuncer

    2009-05-13

    Temperature-sensitive imprinted and non-imprinted hydrogels composed of N-isopropylacrylamide (NIPA) and 2-acrylamido-2-methyl-propanosulfonic acid (AMPS) have been prepared by free-radical crosslinking copolymerization in aqueous solution at three different temperatures: 10 degrees C (below the lower critical solution temperature, LCST), 33 degrees C (at the LCST), and 40 degrees C (above the LCST). Myoglobin (Mb, MW 17 kDa) is used as the template biomolecule. The effects of the initial concentration and adsorption time over the Mb adsorption capacity of the hydrogels have been analyzed and found to be strongly dependent on the preparation temperature (T(prep)). The maximum Mb adsorption for the imprinted hydrogel prepared at 10 degrees C is 97.40 +/- 2.35 mg Mb x g(-1) dry gel in 0.32 mg x mL(-1) Mb solution at 22 degrees C. Moreover, batch adsorption equilibrium and selectivity studies have been performed using a reference molecule, hemoglobin (Hb, MW 65 kDa). The imprinted hydrogels have a 2.8-3.3 times higher adsorption capacity for Mb than the non-imprinted hydrogels prepared at the same T(prep)s, and also have a 1.8-2.7 times higher selectivity for the imprinted molecule.

  6. Low-temperature fabrication of TiO2 nanocrystalline film electrodes for dye-sensitized solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shan, G.; Lee, K.E.; Charboneau, C.; Demopoulos, G.P.; Gauvin, R. [McGill Univ., Montreal, PQ (Canada). Dept. of Materials Engineering; Savadogo, O. [Ecole Polytechnique de Montreal, PQ (Canada). Dept. de Genie Chimique

    2008-07-01

    Dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) have the potential to render solar energy widely accessible. The deposition of titania nano-crystalline powders on a substrate is an important step in the manufacture of the DSSC. The deposition forms a mesoporous thin film that is followed by thermal treatment and sensitization. Usually titania films are deposited on glass by screen printing and then annealed at temperatures as high as 530 degrees C to provide a good electrical contact between the semiconductor particles and crystallization of the anatase phase. Several research and development efforts have focused on the deposition of titania film on flexible plastic substrates that will simplify the whole manufacturing process in terms of flexibility, weight, application and cost. Lower temperature processing is needed for the preparation of plastic-based titania film electrodes, but this has proven to be counterproductive when it comes to the cell's conversion efficiency. This paper presented a comprehensive evaluation of the different coating and annealing techniques at low temperature as well as important processing factors for improvement. To date, these techniques include pressing, hydrothermal process, electrodeposition, electrophoretic deposition, microwave or UV irradiation, and lift-off technique.

  7. Assessing the use of an infrared spectrum hyperpixel array imager to measure temperature during additive and subtractive manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitenton, Eric; Heigel, Jarred; Lane, Brandon; Moylan, Shawn

    2016-05-01

    Accurate non-contact temperature measurement is important to optimize manufacturing processes. This applies to both additive (3D printing) and subtractive (material removal by machining) manufacturing. Performing accurate single wavelength thermography suffers numerous challenges. A potential alternative is hyperpixel array hyperspectral imaging. Focusing on metals, this paper discusses issues involved such as unknown or changing emissivity, inaccurate greybody assumptions, motion blur, and size of source effects. The algorithm which converts measured thermal spectra to emissivity and temperature uses a customized multistep non-linear equation solver to determine the best-fit emission curve. Emissivity dependence on wavelength may be assumed uniform or have a relationship typical for metals. The custom software displays residuals for intensity, temperature, and emissivity to gauge the correctness of the greybody assumption. Initial results are shown from a laser powder-bed fusion additive process, as well as a machining process. In addition, the effects of motion blur are analyzed, which occurs in both additive and subtractive manufacturing processes. In a laser powder-bed fusion additive process, the scanning laser causes the melt pool to move rapidly, causing a motion blur-like effect. In machining, measuring temperature of the rapidly moving chip is a desirable goal to develop and validate simulations of the cutting process. A moving slit target is imaged to characterize how the measured temperature values are affected by motion of a measured target.

  8. File list: ALL.Adl.10.AllAg.Temperature_sensitive_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Adl.10.AllAg.Temperature_sensitive_cells dm3 All antigens Adult Temperature sen...811238 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/assembled/ALL.Adl.10.AllAg.Temperature_sensitive_cells.bed ...

  9. File list: ALL.Adl.20.AllAg.Temperature_sensitive_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Adl.20.AllAg.Temperature_sensitive_cells dm3 All antigens Adult Temperature sen...699108 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/assembled/ALL.Adl.20.AllAg.Temperature_sensitive_cells.bed ...

  10. File list: ALL.Adl.05.AllAg.Temperature_sensitive_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Adl.05.AllAg.Temperature_sensitive_cells dm3 All antigens Adult Temperature sen...699108 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/assembled/ALL.Adl.05.AllAg.Temperature_sensitive_cells.bed ...

  11. File list: ALL.Adl.50.AllAg.Temperature_sensitive_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Adl.50.AllAg.Temperature_sensitive_cells dm3 All antigens Adult Temperature sen...811237 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/assembled/ALL.Adl.50.AllAg.Temperature_sensitive_cells.bed ...

  12. Influence of temperature on the formation and encapsulation of gold nanoparticles using a temperature-sensitive template

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noel Peter Bengzon Tan

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This data article describes the synthesis of temperature-sensitive and amine-rich microgel particle as a dual reductant and template to generate smart gold/polymer nanocomposite particle. TEM images illustrate the influence of reaction temperature on the formation and in-site encapsulation of gold nanoparticles using the temperature-sensitive microgel template. Thermal stability of the resultant gold/polymer composite particles was also examined.

  13. Accuracy of critical-temperature sensitivity coefficients predicted by multilayered composite plate theories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noor, Ahmed K.; Burton, Scott

    1992-01-01

    An assessment is made of the accuracy of the critical-temperature sensitivity coefficients of multilayered plates predicted by different modeling approaches, based on two-dimensional shear-deformation theories. The sensitivity coefficients considered measure the sensitivity of the critical temperatures to variations in different lamination and material parameters of the plate. The standard of comparison is taken to be the sensitivity coefficients obtained by the three-dimensional theory of thermoelasticity. Numerical studies are presented showing the effects of variation in the geometric and lamination parameters of the plate on the accuracy of both the sensitivity coefficients and the critical temperatures predicted by the different modeling approaches.

  14. Passive Wireless Temperature Sensors with Enhanced Sensitivity and Range Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This proposal describes the development of a wireless multisensor system for NASA application to remote wireless sensing of temperature distributions in composite...

  15. Highly sensitive temperature sensor based on an isopropanol-filled photonic crystal fiber long period grating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Chao; Wang, Qi; Zhao, Yong; Li, Jin

    2017-03-01

    A high sensitivity measurement method for temperature has been proposed and investigated based on an isopropanol-filled photonic crystal fiber long period grating (PCF-LPG). Due to the high thermo-optic coefficient (TOC) of isopropanol, the sensitivity of the proposed temperature sensor could be effectively improved by filling isopropanol in the air waveguides of PCF. It can be found that the resonant dip will be split in two dips after filling isopropanol and the two dips have different sensitivities to surrounding temperature. Because of PCF-LPG is sensitive to the refractive index (RI) of internal filled liquid, the isopropanol-filled PCF-LPG temperature sensor has a high sensitivities of 1.356 nm/°C in the range of 20-50 °C. The simplicity and the excellent performance of our proposed device make it potential for the applications of high-precision temperature measurement is required.

  16. Homeostasis of the temperature sensitivity of respiration over a range of growth temperatures indicated by a modified Arrhenius model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noguchi, Ko; Yamori, Wataru; Hikosaka, Kouki; Terashima, Ichiro

    2015-07-01

    The temperature dependence of plant respiratory rate (R) changes in response to growth temperature. Here, we used a modified Arrhenius model incorporating the temperature dependence of activation energy (Eo ), and compared the temperature dependence of R between cold-sensitive and cold-tolerant species. We analyzed the temperature dependences of leaf CO2 efflux rate of plants cultivated at low (LT) or high temperature (HT). In plants grown at HT (HT plants), Eo at low measurement temperature varied among species, but Eo at growth temperature in HT plants did not vary and was comparable to that in plants grown at LT (LT plants), suggesting that the limiting process was similar at the respective growth temperatures. In LT plants, the integrated value of loge R, a measure of respiratory capacity, in cold-sensitive species was lower than that in cold-tolerant species. When plants were transferred from HT to LT, the respiratory capacity changed promptly after the transfer compared with the other parameters. These results suggest that a similar process limits R at different growth temperatures, and that the lower capacity of the respiratory system in cold-sensitive species may explain their low growth rate at LT.

  17. Shear failure characterization of time-temperature sensitive interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canestrari, Francesco; Ferrotti, Gilda; Graziani, Andrea

    2016-08-01

    Poor interlayer bonding can lead to early failures and thus to a reduction in service life of bituminous pavements. For this reason, it is important to identify the parameters influencing the interlayer shear failure and to characterize their effect by means of laboratory test. In particular, this study is focussed on the effects of test temperature and deformation rate on the interlayer shear strength (ISS) of double-layered asphalt concrete specimens. First, the ISS was measured at temperatures ranging from 0 °C to 30 °C and deformation rates ranging from 0.5 mm/min to 9 mm/min using the Ancona Shear Testing Research and Analysis (ASTRA) device. Then the experimental data were analyzed using a two-stage statistical modelling approach. In the first stage, the variation of ISS versus deformation rate, at each testing temperature, was modelled using both a power-law and a logarithmic function. In the investigated range of deformation rate, the models allowed to estimate the mean ISS with residual standard error varying from 0.062 MPa to 0.128 MPa. Moreover, the linear regression coefficients, which measure the influence of the deformation rate on ISS, changed with temperature. In the second stage, both temperature and deformation rate were used as joint predictors of ISS by using an approach based on the superposition of their effects. Results showed that the time-temperature superposition approach is applicable and a sigmoid-shaped master curve for ISS was obtained. The proposed approach was validated by using ISS measurements obtained on the same materials with different test devices.

  18. Temperature sensitivity of waveguide Mach-Zehnder interferometer

    OpenAIRE

    Sokolov, Viktor

    2013-01-01

    This thesis is part of a project that aims to develop a sensor for the detection of methane in the air and in water based on a waveguide Mach-Zehnder interferometer. The main application of this sensor is monitoring the environment and the ability to detect a leakage of methane. The development of a sensor includes analysis of operational conditions. In this project one of the greatest concerns is temperature. The temperature difference can reach several tens of degrees in the air, and severa...

  19. Fiber optic temperature sensing with enhanced sensitivity based on spectral interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Militky, J.; Kadulova, M.; Ciprian, D.; Hlubina, P.

    2017-01-01

    Temperature sensing with enhanced sensitivity based on the spectral interference of polarization modes in a highly birefringent (HB) fiber is proposed and demonstrated. A temperature sensor employs a tandem configuration of a birefringent quartz crystal and HB fiber placed between an analyzer and a polarizer. In the setup a modified channeled spectrum is generated, which shifts with the temperature change of the sensing part of the HB fiber. We analyze the measurement method theoretically and show that the sensitivity of the temperature sensing based on the wavelength interrogation is enhanced in comparison to a standard method with a fiber interferometer. We also demonstrate the enhancement of the temperature sensitivity for three HB fibers under test. Experimental results show that the temperature sensing can reach a sensitivity of -0.30 nm/K, which is enhanced in comparison to -0.10 nm/K reached for a standard measurement.

  20. Manufacturing And High Temperature Oxidation Properties Of Electro-Sprayed Fe-24.5% Cr-5%Al Powder Porous Metal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Kee-Ahn

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Fe-Cr-Al based Powder porous metals were manufactured using a new electro-spray process, and the microstructures and high-temperature oxidation properties were examined. The porous materials were obtained at different sintering temperatures (1350°C, 1400°C, 1450°C, and 1500°C and with different pore sizes (500 μm, 450 μm, and 200 μm. High-temperature oxidation experiments (TGA, Thermal Gravimetry Analysis were conducted for 24 hours at 1000°C in a 79% N2+ 21% O2, 100 mL/min. atmosphere. The Fe-Cr-Al powder porous metals manufactured through the electro-spray process showed more-excellent oxidation resistance as sintering temperature and pore size increased. In addition, the fact that the densities and surface areas of the abovementioned powder porous metals had the largest effects on the metal’s oxidation properties could be identified.

  1. Evaluation of the 8310-N-S manufactured by Sutron–Results of bench, temperature, and field deployment testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunkle, Gerald A.

    2016-01-07

    The Sutron 8310-N-S (8310) data collection platform (DCP) manufactured by Sutron Corporation was evaluated by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Hydrologic Instrumentation Facility (HIF) for conformance to the manufacturer’s specifications for recording and transmitting data. The 8310-N-S is a National Electrical Manufacturers Association (NEMA)-enclosed DCP with a built-in Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite transmitter that operates over a temperature range of −40 to 60 degrees Celsius (°C). The evaluation procedures followed and the results obtained are described in this report for bench, temperature chamber, and outdoor deployment testing. The three units tested met the manufacturer’s stated specifications for the tested conditions, but two of the units had transmission errors either during temperature chamber or deployment testing. During outdoor deployment testing, 6.72 percent of transmissions by serial number 1206109 contained errors, resulting in missing data. Transmission errors were also observed during temperature chamber testing with serial number 1208283, at an error rate of 3.22 percent. Overall, the 8310 has good logging capabilities, but the transmission errors are a concern for users who require reliable telemetered data.

  2. Snapshot of methanogen sensitivity to temperature in Zoige wetland from Tibetan plateau

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li eFu

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Zoige wetland in Tibetan plateau represents a cold environment at high altitude where significant methane emission has been observed. However, it remains unknown how the production and emission of CH4 from Zoige wetland will respond to a warming climate. Here we investigated the temperature sensitivity of methanogen community in a Zoige wetland soil under the laboratory incubation conditions. One soil sample was collected and the temperature sensitivity of the methanogenic activity, the structure of methanogen community and the methanogenic pathways were determined. We found that the response of methanogenesis to temperature could be separated into two phases, a high sensitivity in the low temperature range and a modest sensitivity under mesophilic conditions, respectively. The aceticlastic methanogens Methanosarcinaceae were the main methanogens at low temperatures, while hydrogenotrophic Methanobacteriales, Methanomicrobiales and Methanocellales were more abundant at higher temperatures. The total abundance of mcrA genes increased with temperature indicating that the growth of methanogens was stimulated. The growth of hydrogenotrophic methanogens, however, was faster than aceticlastic ones resulting in the shift of methanogen community. Determination of carbon isotopic signatures indicated that methanogenic pathway was also shifted from mainly aceticlastic methanogenesis to a mixture of hydrogenotrophic and aceticlastic methanogenesis with the increase of temperature. Collectively, the shift of temperature responses of methanogenesis was in accordance with the changes in methanogen composition and methanogenic pathway in this Zoige wetland sample. It appears that the aceticlastic methanogenesis dominated at low temperatures is more sensitive than the hydrogenotrophic one at higher temperatures.

  3. Temperature Sensitivity of Neural Tube Defects in Zoep Mutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Phyo; Swartz, Morgan R; Kindt, Lexy M; Kangas, Ashley M; Liang, Jennifer Ostrom

    2015-12-01

    Neural tube defects (NTD) occur when the flat neural plate epithelium fails to fold into the neural tube, the precursor to the brain and spinal cord. Squint (Sqt/Ndr1), a Nodal ligand, and One-eyed pinhead (Oep), a component of the Nodal receptor, are required for anterior neural tube closure in zebrafish. The NTD in sqt and Zoep mutants are incompletely penetrant. The penetrance of several defects in sqt mutants increases upon heat or cold shock. In this project, undergraduate students tested whether temperature influences the Zoep open neural tube phenotype. Single pairs of adults were spawned at 28.5°C, the normal temperature for zebrafish, and one half of the resulting embryos were moved to 34°C at different developmental time points. Analysis of variance indicated temperature and clutch/genetic background significantly contributed to the penetrance of the open neural tube phenotype. Heat shock affected the embryos only at or before the midblastula stage. Many factors, including temperature changes in the mother, nutrition, and genetic background, contribute to NTD in humans. Thus, sqt and Zoep mutants may serve as valuable models for studying the interactions between genetics and the environment during neurulation.

  4. Low-Cost Nanocellulose-Reinforced High-Temperature Polymer Composites for Additive Manufacturing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ozcan, Soydan [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Tekinalp, Halil L. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Love, Lonnie J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Kunc, Vlastimil [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Nelson, Kim [American Process Inc., Atlanta, GA (United States)

    2016-07-13

    ORNL worked with American Process Inc. to demonstrate the potential use of bio-based BioPlus® lignin-coated cellulose nanofibrils (L-CNF) as a reinforcing agent in the development of polymer feedstock suitable for additive manufacturing. L-CNF-reinforced polylactic acid (PLA) testing coupons were prepared and up to 69% increase in tensile strength and 133% increase in elastic modulus were demonstrated.

  5. Laboratory evaluation of the Level TROLL 100 manufactured by In-Situ Inc.: results of pressure and temperature tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carnley, Mark V.; Fulford, Janice M.; Brooks, Myron H.

    2013-01-01

    The Level TROLL 100 manufactured by In-Situ Inc. was evaluated by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Hydrologic Instrumentation Facility (HIF) for conformance to the manufacturer’s accuracy specifications for measuring pressure throughout the device’s operating temperature range. The Level TROLL 100 is a submersible, sealed, water-level sensing device with an operating pressure range equivalent to 0 to 30 feet of water over a temperature range of −20 to 50 degrees Celsius (°C). The device met the manufacturer’s stated accuracy specifications for pressure within its temperature-compensated operating range of 0 to 50 °C. The device’s accuracy specifications did not meet established USGS requirements for primary water-stage sensors used in the operation of streamgages, but the Level TROLL 100 may be suitable for other hydrologic data-collection applications. As a note, the Level TROLL 100 is not designed to meet USGS accuracy requirements. Manufacturer accuracy specifications were evaluated, and the procedures followed and the results obtained are described in this report. USGS accuracy requirements are routinely examined and reported when instruments are evaluated at the HIF.

  6. Low-Temperature Synthesis and Gas Sensitivity of Perovskite-Type LaCoO3 Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorenzo Gildo Ortiz

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available LaCoO3 nanoparticles with perovskite-type structure were prepared by a microwave-assisted colloidal method. Lanthanum nitrate, cobalt nitrate, and ethylenediamine were used as precursors and ethyl alcohol as solvent. The thermal decomposition of the precursors leads to the formation of LaCoO3 from a temperature of 500°C. The structural, morphological, and compositional properties of LaCoO3 nanoparticles were studied in this work by X-ray diffraction (XRD, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, transmission electron microscopy (TEM, and atomic force microscopy (AFM. Pellets were manufactured in order to test the gas sensing properties of LaCoO3 powders in carbon monoxide (CO and propane (C3H8 atmospheres. Agglomerates of nanoparticles with high connectivity, forming a porous structure, were observed from SEM and TEM analysis. LaCoO3 pellets presented a high sensitivity in both CO and C3H8 at different concentrations and operating temperatures. As was expected, sensitivity increased with the gas concentration and operation temperature increase.

  7. Temperature sensitivity of soil microbial communities: An application of macromolecular rate theory to microbial respiration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alster, Charlotte J.; Koyama, Akihiro; Johnson, Nels G.; Wallenstein, Matthew D.; Fischer, Joseph C.

    2016-06-01

    There is compelling evidence that microbial communities vary widely in their temperature sensitivity and may adapt to warming through time. To date, this sensitivity has been largely characterized using a range of models relying on versions of the Arrhenius equation, which predicts an exponential increase in reaction rate with temperature. However, there is growing evidence from laboratory and field studies that observe nonmonotonic responses of reaction rates to variation in temperature, indicating that Arrhenius is not an appropriate model for quantitatively characterizing temperature sensitivity. Recently, Hobbs et al. (2013) developed macromolecular rate theory (MMRT), which incorporates thermodynamic temperature optima as arising from heat capacity differences between isoenzymes. We applied MMRT to measurements of respiration from soils incubated at different temperatures. These soils were collected from three grassland sites across the U.S. Great Plains and reciprocally transplanted, allowing us to isolate the effects of microbial community type from edaphic factors. We found that microbial community type explained roughly 30% of the variation in the CO2 production rate from the labile C pool but that temperature and soil type were most important in explaining variation in labile and recalcitrant C pool size. For six out of the nine soil × inoculum combinations, MMRT was superior to Arrhenius. The MMRT analysis revealed that microbial communities have distinct heat capacity values and temperature sensitivities sometimes independent of soil type. These results challenge the current paradigm for modeling temperature sensitivity of soil C pools and understanding of microbial enzyme dynamics.

  8. Plant Temperature for Sterile Alteration of a Temperature-Sensitive Genic Male Sterile Rice, Peiai64S

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The forecast of sterile alteration for the temperature-sensitive genic male sterile (TGMS) line in two-line hybrid rice seed production was traditionally based on screen temperature determined by weather station. The article put forward a new approach based on plant temperature, which was more exact and direct than the traditional method. The result of the simulation of the self-seeded setting rate of a widely used TGMS line, Peiai64S, by several temperature parameters and durations, showed that the fertility was directly affected by the plant temperature at a height of 20 cm or the air temperature around it in three days duration. Using the stem temperature of three days at a height of 20 cm as the simulation parameter,the fertility of Peiai64S had the maximum, minimum and optimum temperatures as 22.8, 21.7 and 22.5℃, respectively,whereas 23.2, 21.5 and 21.8℃ when using the air temperature of three days around the height of 20 cm as the parameter.Such temperature indices can be used to conclude the sterile alteration of TGMS for safeguarding seed production of twoline hybrid rice. The article also established a statistic model to conclude plant temperature by water temperatures at inflow and outflow, and air temperature and cloudage from weather station.

  9. Predicting the sensitivity of butterfly phenology to temperature over the past century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kharouba, Heather M; Paquette, Sebastien R; Kerr, Jeremy T; Vellend, Mark

    2014-02-01

    Studies to date have documented substantial variation among species in the degree to which phenology responds to temperature and shifts over time, but we have a limited understanding of the causes of such variation. Here, we use a spatially and temporally extensive data set (ca. 48 000 observations from across Canada) to evaluate the utility of museum collection records in detecting broad-scale phenology-temperature relationships and to test for systematic differences in the sensitivity of phenology to temperature (days °C(-1) ) of Canadian butterfly species according to relevant ecological traits. We showed that the timing of flight season predictably responded to temperature both across space (variation in average temperature from site to site in Canada) and across time (variation from year to year within each individual site). This reveals that collection records, a vastly underexploited resource, can be applied to the quantification of broad-scale relationships between species' phenology and temperature. The timing of the flight season of earlier fliers and less mobile species was more sensitive to temperature than later fliers and more mobile species, demonstrating that ecological traits can account for some of the interspecific variation in species' phenological sensitivity to temperature. Finally, we found that phenological sensitivity to temperature differed across time and space implying that both dimensions of temperature will be needed to translate species' phenological sensitivity to temperature into accurate predictions of species' future phenological shifts. Given the widespread temperature sensitivity of flight season timing, we can expect long-term temporal shifts with increased warming [ca. 2.4 days °C(-1) (0.18 SE)] for many if not most butterfly species.

  10. Sensitivity of blackbody effective emissivity to wavelength and temperature: By genetic algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ejigu, E. K.; Liedberg, H. G.

    2013-09-01

    A variable-temperature blackbody (VTBB) is used to calibrate an infrared radiation thermometer (pyrometer). The effective emissivity (ɛeff) of a VTBB is dependent on temperature and wavelength other than the geometry of the VTBB. In the calibration process the effective emissivity is often assumed to be constant within the wavelength and temperature range. There are practical situations where the sensitivity of the effective emissivity needs to be known and correction has to be applied. We present a method using a genetic algorithm to investigate the sensitivity of the effective emissivity to wavelength and temperature variation. Two matlab® programs are generated: the first to model the radiance temperature calculation and the second to connect the model to the genetic algorithm optimization toolbox. The effective emissivity parameter is taken as a chromosome and optimized at each wavelength and temperature point. The difference between the contact temperature (reading from a platinum resistance thermometer or liquid in glass thermometer) and radiance temperature (calculated from the ɛeff values) is used as an objective function where merit values are calculated and best fit ɛeff values selected. The best fit ɛeff values obtained as a solution show how sensitive they are to temperature and wavelength parameter variation. Uncertainty components that arise from wavelength and temperature variation are determined based on the sensitivity analysis. Numerical examples are considered for illustration.

  11. A high sensitive fiber Bragg grating strain sensor with automatic temperature compensation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kuo Li; Zhen'an Zhou

    2009-01-01

    A high sensitive fiber Bragg grating (FBG) strain sensor with automatic temperature compensation is demonstrated. FBG is axially linked with a stick and their free ends are fixed to the measured object. When the measured strain changes, the stick does not change in length, but the FBG does. When the temperature changes, the stick changes in length to pull the FBG to realize temperature compensation. In experiments, 1.45 times strain sensitivity of bare FBG with temperature compensation of less than 0.1 nm Bragg wavelength drift over 100℃ shift is achieved.

  12. Sensitive temperature measurements based on Lorentzian and Fano resonance lineshapes of a silicon photonic crystal cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Chenyang; Fang, Liang; Yuan, Qinchen; Gan, Xuetao; Zhao, Jianlin

    2016-10-01

    We report a high-performance photonic temperature sensor by exploiting a silicon photonic crystal (PC) cavity. Since the PC cavity's spectra are very sensitive to the refractive index change, we observe remarkable variations of its resonant wavelength and output power under varying temperature levels. In a PC cavity with Lorentzian resonance lineshape, the sensor exhibits a linear spectrum-sensitivity of 70 pm/°, and the power-variation presents a high sensitivity as 1.28 dB/°. In addition, the Fano resonance lineshape generated by the PC cavity has also been employed to measure the temperature, which shows improved power sensitivity as 2.94 dB/ °. The demonstrated PC cavity-based sensor offers great potentials for low-cost, high sensitivity homogeneous sensing in chip-integrated devices.

  13. Temperature Sensitive Nanocapsule of Complex Structural Form for Methane Storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suyetin MV

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The processes of methane adsorption, storage and desorption by the nanocapsule are investigated with molecular-dynamic modeling method. The specific nanocapsule shape defines its functioning uniqueness: methane is adsorbed under 40 MPa and at normal temperature with further blocking of methane molecules the K@C601+ endohedral complex in the nanocapsule by external electric field, the storage is performed under normal external conditions, and methane desorption is performed at 350 K. The methane content in the nanocapsule during storage reaches 11.09 mass%. The nanocapsule consists of tree parts: storage chamber, junction and blocking chamber. The storage chamber comprises the nanotube (20,20. The blocking chamber is a short nanotube (20,20 with three holes. The junction consists of the nanotube (10,10 and nanotube (8,8; moreover, the nanotube (8,8 is connected with the storage chamber and nanotube (10,10 with the blocking chamber. The blocking chamber is opened and closed by the transfer of the K@C60 1+ endohedral complex under electrostatic field action.

  14. Improved Sterilization of Sensitive Biomaterials with Supercritical Carbon Dioxide at Low Temperature: e0129205

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Anne Bernhardt; Markus Wehrl; Birgit Paul; Thomas Hochmuth; Matthias Schumacher; Kathleen Schütz; Michael Gelinsky

    2015-01-01

    ... sterilization procedures like steam, ethylene oxide treatment or gamma irradiation. Supercritical CO2 (scCO2) treatment is a promising strategy for the terminal sterilization of sensitive biomaterials at low temperature...

  15. The Advanced High-Temperature Reactor (AHTR) for Producing Hydrogen to Manufacture Liquid Fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forsberg, C.W.; Peterson, P.F.; Ott, L.

    2004-10-06

    Conventional world oil production is expected to peak within a decade. Shortfalls in production of liquid fuels (gasoline, diesel, and jet fuel) from conventional oil sources are expected to be offset by increased production of fuels from heavy oils and tar sands that are primarily located in the Western Hemisphere (Canada, Venezuela, the United States, and Mexico). Simultaneously, there is a renewed interest in liquid fuels from biomass, such as alcohol; but, biomass production requires fertilizer. Massive quantities of hydrogen (H2) are required (1) to convert heavy oils and tar sands to liquid fuels and (2) to produce fertilizer for production of biomass that can be converted to liquid fuels. If these liquid fuels are to be used while simultaneously minimizing greenhouse emissions, nonfossil methods for the production of H2 are required. Nuclear energy can be used to produce H2. The most efficient methods to produce H2 from nuclear energy involve thermochemical cycles in which high-temperature heat (700 to 850 C) and water are converted to H2 and oxygen. The peak nuclear reactor fuel and coolant temperatures must be significantly higher than the chemical process temperatures to transport heat from the reactor core to an intermediate heat transfer loop and from the intermediate heat transfer loop to the chemical plant. The reactor temperatures required for H2 production are at the limits of practical engineering materials. A new high-temperature reactor concept is being developed for H2 and electricity production: the Advanced High-Temperature Reactor (AHTR). The fuel is a graphite-matrix, coated-particle fuel, the same type that is used in modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactors (MHTGRs). The coolant is a clean molten fluoride salt with a boiling point near 1400 C. The use of a liquid coolant, rather than helium, reduces peak reactor fuel and coolant temperatures 100 to 200 C relative to those of a MHTGR. Liquids are better heat transfer fluids than gases

  16. Low-Temperature Additive Manufacturing of Biomimic Three-Dimensional Hydroxyapatite/Collagen Scaffolds for Bone Regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Kai-Feng; He, Shu; Song, Yue; Wang, Chun-Mei; Gao, Yi; Li, Jun-Qin; Tang, Peng; Wang, Zheng; Bi, Long; Pei, Guo-Xian

    2016-03-23

    Low-temperature additive manufacturing (AM) holds promise for fabrication of three-dimensional (3D) scaffolds containing bioactive molecules and/or drugs. Due to the strict technical limitations of current approaches, few materials are suitable for printing at low temperature. Here, a low-temperature robocasting method was employed to print biomimic 3D scaffolds for bone regeneration using a routine collagen-hydroxyapatite (CHA) composite material, which is too viscous to be printed via normal 3D printing methods at low temperature. The CHA scaffolds had excellent 3D structure and maintained most raw material properties after printing. Compared to nonprinted scaffolds, printed scaffolds promoted bone marrow stromal cell proliferation and improved osteogenic outcome in vitro. In a rabbit femoral condyle defect model, the interconnecting pores within the printed scaffolds facilitated cell penetration and mineralization before the scaffolds degraded and enhanced repair, compared to nonprinted CHA scaffolds. Additionally, the optimal printing parameters for 3D CHA scaffolds were investigated; 600-μm-diameter rods were optimal in terms of moderate mechanical strength and better repair outcome in vivo. This low-temperature robocasting method could enable a variety of bioactive molecules to be incorporated into printed CHA materials and provides a method of bioprinting biomaterials without compromising their natural properties.

  17. Ultra-fast freezing and low storage temperatures are not necessary to maintain the functional properties of manufacturing beef.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farouk, M M; Wieliczko, K J; Merts, I

    2004-01-01

    The effects of freezing rates and subsequent storage temperatures on the functional properties of meat were assessed. In the first trial, 24 Semitendinosus muscles were allocated to four freezing treatments to determine the effect of freezing rate alone (no frozen storage) on the functional properties of thawed muscle proteins. In the second trial, the effect of freezing rate, storage temperature and time were determined: 24 semimembranosus muscles were assigned to 30 treatment combinations using an incomplete factorial design with two freezing rates × three storage temperatures × five storage times. All samples individually sealed in water impermeable bags were thawed in water at 10 °C and then analysed. The rate of freezing alone in both trials and for both muscles had no effect on protein solubility; sulphydryl content; surface hydrophobicity; emulsion activity index or meat colour. Slowly frozen semimembranosus had more drip than fast frozen muscles. Semimembranosus muscle sarcoplasmic protein solubility increased and myofibrillar protein solubility decreased with storage temperature below -18 °C. Storage temperature did not affect the other attributes measured. Functional properties were mainly affected by storage time and the interaction between storage time and freezing rate. It is concluded that the current practice of blast freezing and storage at -18 to 20 °C is sufficient to maintain the quality of manufacturing beef.

  18. Detection and Analysis of High Temperature Sensitivity of TGMS Lines in Rice Using AMMI Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FU Li-zhong; XUE Qing-zhong

    2004-01-01

    With the AMMI(additive main effects and multiplicative interaction)analysis model,the determination of the sensitivity to temperature among different TGMS(thermo-sensitive genic male sterile)lines was performed. To assess the genetic differences due to high temperature stress at. the fertility-sensitive stage(10- 20 d before heading),seven genotypes(six TGMS lines and the control Pei-Ai64S)were grown from May 4 at seven different stages with 10d intervals. The temperatures at. the fertility-sensitive stages involved twelve levels from < 20 to >30℃ under the regime natural conditions in Hangzhou,China. There was considerable variation in pollen fertility among genotypes in response to high temperature. Five genotypes identified as TGMS lines as their percentages of fertile pollens were lower than or close to that. of the. control except for the unstable line RTS19(V6). When the temperatures at. the fertility-sensitive stage were at Ⅰ -Ⅳ,Ⅴ-Ⅵ and Ⅶ-Ⅻ,the percentages of fertile pollens varied in the ranges of 46.46- 48.49%,19.62-22.79% and 3.49- 5.87%,respectively. The critical temperatures of sterility and fertility in the five TGMS lines were 25.1 and 23.0℃,respectively. Considering the amounts and directions of main effect and their IPCA(interaction principal components analysis),we can classify the lines and temperature levels into different groups,and describe the characteristics of genotyPe x temperature interaction,offering the information and tools for the development and utility of thermo-sensitive male sterile lines.Several TGMS rice lines with their reproductive sensitivity to high temperature that can be screened using the AMMI model may add valuable germplasm to the breeding program of hybrid rice.

  19. Low Temperature Preparation and Cold Manufacturing Techniques for Femoral Head of Al2O3 Ceramic

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    The hip joint femoral head prosthesis was prepared using the Al2O3 material, which was synthesized by high purity alumina micro-powder and Mg- Zr- Y composite additives, the cold manufacturing techniques of lathe turning, grade polishing and the matching size correction of the sintered femoral head were studied. The results showed, after being pressed under 200 MPa cold isostatic pressure and being pre-sintered at 1 150 ℃, the biscuit' s strength can meet the demands of lathe turning; After being grade polished by SiC micro-powder and diamond abrading agent and being size corrected by special instruments, the femoral head prosthesis of Al2O3 ceramic has good surface degree of finish and articulates tightly with femoral handle.

  20. Rational design of temperature-sensitive alleles using computational structure prediction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher S Poultney

    Full Text Available Temperature-sensitive (ts mutations are mutations that exhibit a mutant phenotype at high or low temperatures and a wild-type phenotype at normal temperature. Temperature-sensitive mutants are valuable tools for geneticists, particularly in the study of essential genes. However, finding ts mutations typically relies on generating and screening many thousands of mutations, which is an expensive and labor-intensive process. Here we describe an in silico method that uses Rosetta and machine learning techniques to predict a highly accurate "top 5" list of ts mutations given the structure of a protein of interest. Rosetta is a protein structure prediction and design code, used here to model and score how proteins accommodate point mutations with side-chain and backbone movements. We show that integrating Rosetta relax-derived features with sequence-based features results in accurate temperature-sensitive mutation predictions.

  1. Sensitivity-enhanced temperature sensor based on PDMS-coated long period fiber grating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qi; Du, Chao; Zhang, Jiaming; Lv, Riqing; Zhao, Yong

    2016-10-01

    A sensitivity-enhanced temperature sensor based on a poly-dimethylsiloxane (PDMS)-coated long period fiber grating (LPFG) has been proposed and experimentally investigated. By embedding the LPFG in a temperature-sensitive elastomeric polymer, the temperature sensitivity of the proposed sensor could be effectively improved by 4 times higher than those of the conventional bare LPFG sensors due to the high thermo-optic coefficient (TOC) of PDMS. It can be found that the temperature sensitivities of higher-order modes are higher than those of lower-order modes by analyzing transmission spectra characteristics of the sensor. Because of LPFG is sensitive to surrounding refractive index (RI), the PDMS-coated LPFG will have a high temperature sensitivities of 255.4 pm/°C in the range of 20-80 °C. Due to the high measurement resolution of 0.078 °C, the sensor is promising to be applied to the fields that high-precision temperature measurement is required.

  2. Sensitivity of photonic crystal fiber grating sensors: biosensing, refractive index, strain, and temperature sensing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rindorf, Lars Henning; Bang, Ole

    2008-01-01

    We study the sensitivity of fiber grating sensors in the applications of strain, temperature, internal label-free biosensing, and internal refractive index sensing. New analytical expressions for the sensitivities, valid for photonic crystal fibers are rigorously derived. These are generally valid...

  3. Temperature insensitive hysteresis free highly sensitive polymer optical fiber Bragg grating humidity sensor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Woyessa, Getinet; Nielsen, Kristian; Stefani, Alessio

    2016-01-01

    sensitivity and a high hysteresis in the humidity response, in particular when operated at high temperature. PMMA mPOFBGs annealed at high humidity show higher and more linear humidity sensitivity with negligible hysteresis. We also report how annealing at high humidity can blue-shift the FBG wavelength more...

  4. Climate change and river temperature sensitivity to warmer nighttime vs. warmer daytime air temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diabat, M.; Haggerty, R.; Wondzell, S. M.

    2011-12-01

    We investigated the July river temperature response to atmospheric warming over the diurnal cycle in a 36 km reach of the upper Middle Fork John Day River of Oregon, USA. The physical model Heat Source was calibrated and used to run 3 different cases of increased air temperature during July: 1) uniform increase over the whole day ("delta method"), 2) warmer daytime, and 3) warmer nighttime. All 3 cases had the same mean daily air temperatures - a 4 °C increase relative to 2002. Results show that the timing of air temperature increases has a significant effect on the magnitude, timing and duration of changes in water temperatures relative to current conditions. In all cases, river temperatures in the lower reach increased by at least 1.1 °C . For the delta case, water temperature increases never exceeded 2.3 °C. In contrast, under the warmer daytime case, water temperature increases exceeded 2.3 °C for 6.6 hours/day on average, with the largest increases occurring during mid-day. In the warmer night case the river temperature increases exceeded 2.3 °C for 4.3 hours/day on average with the largest increases occurring around midnight. In addition, an average increase of 4 °C in air temperature under the delta case increased the water temperature by an average of 1.9 °C uniformly during daytime and nighttime. Still, an average increase of 4 °C in air temperature under the warmer daytime case increased water temperature by an average of at least 1.6 °C during the daytime and by an average of up to 2.5 °C during the nighttime, while an average increase of 4 °C in air temperature under the warmer nighttime case increased the water temperature by an average of at least 1.4 °C during the nighttime and by an average of up to 2.4 °C during the daytime. The spatial response of temperature was different for each case. The lower 13 rkm warmed by at least 1.1 °C with the delta case, while only the lower 6 rkm warmed by at least 1.1 °C with the warmer daytime case

  5. Does phylogeny control U37K -temperature sensitivity? Implications for lacustrine alkenone paleothermometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Andrea, William J.; Theroux, Susanna; Bradley, Raymond S.; Huang, Xiaohui

    2016-02-01

    Alkenone paleothermometry (via the U37K and U37K‧ indices) has long been used to reconstruct sea surface temperature and has more recently been proven effective in lacustrine settings. Genetic analyses indicate that there is a diversity of different alkenone-producing lacustrine haptophytes, and differences among U37K -temperature calibrations suggest that unique calibrations might be required to quantify past temperature variation from individual lakes. The only term necessary to quantify U37K -inferred temperature relative to a reference period (e.g., modern temperature 20th Century mean) is the slope of the calibration regression, the U37K -temperature sensitivity (i.e., the change in U37K per °C temperature change). Here, we bring together all of the existing U37K -temperature calibrations in order to compare the variability among U37K -temperature sensitivities. We also report a new in situ U37K -temperature calibration along with environmental genomic analysis based on the 18S rRNA gene of an alkenone producing haptophyte from lake Vikvatnet in Norway. We propose and test the hypothesis that U37K -temperature sensitivity is controlled by phylogeny and that this term can be used to quantify past temperature variation from lake sediments if the genetic identity of the lake's alkenone-producer is known. Using the existing calibration data sets, we determine four phylotype-specific U37K -temperature sensitivities for use in cases where in situ calibration is unavailable but the phylogeny of the alkenone producers is known.

  6. Measurement depth effects on the apparent temperature sensitivity of soil respiration in field studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Graf

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available CO2 efflux at the soil surface is the result of respiration in different depths that are subjected to variable temperatures at the same time. Therefore, the temperature measurement depth affects the apparent temperature sensitivity of field-measured soil respiration. We summarize existing literature evidence on the importance of this effect, and describe a simple model to understand and estimate the magnitude of this potential error source for heterotrophic respiration. The model is tested against field measurements. We discuss the influence of climate (annual and daily temperature amplitude, soil properties (vertical distribution of CO2 sources, thermal and gas diffusivity, and measurement schedule (frequency, study duration, and time averaging. Q10 as a commonly used parameter describing the temperature sensitivity of soil respiration is taken as an example and computed for different combinations of the above conditions. We define conditions and data acquisition and analysis strategies that lead to lower errors in field-based Q10 determination. It was found that commonly used temperature measurement depths are likely to result in an underestimation of temperature sensitivity in field experiments. Our results also apply to activation energy as an alternative temperature sensitivity parameter.

  7. Measurement depth effects on the apparent temperature sensitivity of soil respiration in field studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Graf

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available CO2 efflux at the soil surface is the result of respiration in different depths that are subjected to variable temperatures at the same time. Therefore, the temperature measurement depth affects the apparent temperature sensitivity of field-measured soil respiration. We summarize existing literature evidence on the importance of this effect, and describe a simple model to understand and estimate the magnitude of this potential error source for heterotrophic respiration. The model is tested against field measurements. We discuss the influence of climate (annual and daily temperature amplitude, soil properties (vertical distribution of CO2 sources, thermal and gas diffusivity, and measurement schedule (frequency, study duration, and time averaging. Q10 as a commonly used parameter describing the temperature sensitivity of soil respiration is taken as an example and computed for different combinations of the above conditions. We define conditions and data acquisition and analysis strategies that lead to lower errors in field-based Q10 determination. It was found that commonly used temperature measurement depths are likely to result in an underestimation of temperature sensitivity in field experiments. Our results also apply to activation energy as an alternative temperature sensitivity parameter.

  8. Temperature sensitivity analysis of polarity controlled electrostatically doped tunnel field-effect transistor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nigam, Kaushal; Pandey, Sunil; Kondekar, P. N.; Sharma, Dheeraj

    2016-09-01

    The conventional tunnel field-effect transistors (TFETs) have shown potential to scale down in sub-22 nm regime due to its lower sub-threshold slope and robustness against short-channel effects (SCEs), however, sensitivity towards temperature variation is a major concern. Therefore, for the first time, we investigate temperature sensitivity analysis of a polarity controlled electrostatically doped tunnel field-effect transistor (ED-TFET). Different performance metrics and analog/RF figure-of-merits were considered and compared for both devices, and simulations were performed using Silvaco ATLAS device tool. We found that the variation in ON-state current in ED-TFET is almost temperature independent due to electrostatically doped mechanism, while, it increases in conventional TFET at higher temperature. Above room temperature, the variation in ION, IOFF, and SS sensitivity in ED-TFET are only 0.11%/K, 2.21%/K, and 0.63%/K, while, in conventional TFET the variations are 0.43%/K, 2.99%/K, and 0.71%/K, respectively. However, below room temperature, the variation in ED-TFET ION is 0.195%/K compared to 0.27%/K of conventional TFET. Moreover, it is analysed that the incomplete ionization effect in conventional TFET severely affects the drive current and the threshold voltage, while, ED-TFET remains unaffected. Hence, the proposed ED-TFET is less sensitive towards temperature variation and can be used for cryogenics as well as for high temperature applications.

  9. Optical Properties of High Sensitivity Fiber Bragg Grating on Temperature Sensor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    In this paper, the spectrum shift properties of the center reflection wavelength detected to be based on the FBG sensor with ambient temperature change. The basic theoretical methods and numerical simulation for the spectral properties of uniform Bragg grating is analyzed by using coupling mode theory which is optical properties of high sensitivity fiber Bragg grating on temperature sensor in accordance with experiment.

  10. Phase sensitivity to temperature of the guiding mode in polarization-maintaining photonic crystal fiber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Jingming; Sun, Kang; Li, Shuai; Cai, Wei

    2015-08-20

    The propagating phase changing of a polarization-maintaining photonic crystal fiber (PM-PCF) caused by temperature variation is theoretically studied, as well as compared with conventional PANDA fiber. As to verifying numerical analysis, a platform based on a Michelson interferometer for phase versus temperature measurement was built for both kinds of fiber. Experiments show that PM-PCF has similar temperature sensitivity with conventional polarization-maintaining fiber. With optimized PM-PCF design (thinner coating layer and coating material with smaller thermal expansion coefficient), the sensitivity could be further reduced to about 80% of the present level.

  11. Single-Crystal Tungsten Carbide in High-Temperature In-Situ Additive Manufacturing Characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kolopus, James A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Boatner, Lynn A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-05-18

    Nanoindenters are commonly used for measuring the mechanical properties of a wide variety of materials with both industrial and scientific applications. Typically, these instruments employ an indenter made of a material of suitable hardness bonded to an appropriate shaft or holder to create an indentation on the material being tested. While a variety of materials may be employed for the indenter, diamond and boron carbide are by far the most common materials used due to their hardness and other desirable properties. However, as the increasing complexity of new materials demands a broader range of testing capabilities, conventional indenter materials exhibit significant performance limitations. Among these are the inability of diamond indenters to perform in-situ measurements at temperatures above 600oC in air due to oxidation of the diamond material and subsequent degradation of the indenters mechanical properties. Similarly, boron carbide also fails at high temperature due to fracture. [1] Transition metal carbides possess a combination of hardness and mechanical properties at high temperatures that offer an attractive alternative to conventional indenter materials. Here we describe the technical aspects for the growth of single-crystal tungsten carbide (WC) for use as a high-temperature indenter material, and we examine a possible approach to brazing these crystals to a suitable mount for grinding and attachment to the indenter instrument. The use of a by-product of the recovery process is also suggested as possibly having commercial value.

  12. Temperature-sensitive mutant TS 082 of vesicular stomatitis virus. I. Rescue at nonpermissive temperature by uv-irradiated virus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deutsch, V.; Muel, B.; Brun, G.

    1979-02-01

    Temperature-sensitive mutant ts 082 of vesicular stomatitis virus efficiently complements with all the five known groups of ts mutants. This mutant is analyzed by its rescue at nonpermissive temperature with uv-irradiated virus. The existence of two targets of uv light is demonstrated that suggests rescue is mediated through two different complementation processes, gene/sup +/ survival and structural protein supply by the uv-irradiated virus. This last point is supported by rescue assays carried out in the absence of simultaneous protein synthesis. These features are also shared by the ts mutants of group II, suggesting that ts 082 might belong to complementation group II. The temperature-sensitive defect of ts 082 could be located in a domain different from the one which is mutated in the ts mutants previously classified in group II.

  13. File list: InP.Adl.05.AllAg.Temperature_sensitive_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available InP.Adl.05.AllAg.Temperature_sensitive_cells dm3 Input control Adult Temperature se...nsitive cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/assembled/InP.Adl.05.AllAg.Temperature_sensitive_cells.bed ...

  14. File list: InP.Adl.50.AllAg.Temperature_sensitive_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  15. File list: NoD.Adl.50.AllAg.Temperature_sensitive_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  16. File list: InP.Adl.10.AllAg.Temperature_sensitive_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  17. File list: NoD.Adl.10.AllAg.Temperature_sensitive_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  18. File list: InP.Adl.20.AllAg.Temperature_sensitive_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  19. File list: NoD.Adl.20.AllAg.Temperature_sensitive_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NoD.Adl.20.AllAg.Temperature_sensitive_cells dm3 No description Adult Temperature s...ensitive cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/assembled/NoD.Adl.20.AllAg.Temperature_sensitive_cells.bed ...

  20. Cavity-enhanced room-temperature high sensitivity optical Faraday magnetometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Hui; Lei, Yaohua; Fan, Shuangli; Zhang, Qiaolin; Guo, Hong

    2017-01-01

    We propose a cavity QED system with two-photon Doppler-free configuration for weak magnetic field detection with high sensitivity at room temperature based on cavity electromagnetically induced transparency. Owing to the destructive interference induced by the control and driving fields, two transparency channels are opened. The Faraday rotation within two transparency channels can be used to detect weak magnetic field with high sensitivity at room temperature. The sensitivity with single photon and multiphoton probe inputs is analyzed. With single photon measurement, our numerical calculations demonstrate that the sensitivity with 3.8nT/√{Hz} and 6.4nT/√{Hz} could be achieved. When we measure the magnetic field with multiphoton input, the sensitivity can be improved to 7.7fT/√{Hz} and 25.6fT/√{Hz} under the realistic experimental conditions.

  1. Coupling behavior of the pH/temperature sensitive hydrogels for the inhomogeneous and homogeneous swelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazaheri, H.; Baghani, M.; Naghdabadi, R.; Sohrabpour, S.

    2016-08-01

    In this work, a model is developed to continuously predict homogeneous and inhomogeneous swelling behavior of pH/temperature sensitive PNIPAM hydrogels. Employing the model, homogeneous swelling of the pH/temperature sensitive hydrogel is investigated for free and biaxial constrained swelling cases. Comparing the model results with the experimental data available in the literature, the validity of the model is confirmed. The model is then employed to investigate inhomogeneous swelling of a spherical shell on a hard core both analytically and numerically for pH or temperature variations. In this regard, numerical tools are developed via preparing a user defined subroutine in ABAQUS software. Then, the complicated problem of contact between the hydrogel shell and a micro-channel with rigid walls is also investigated. Considering the results, we can say that the model is applicable for solving engineering boundary value problem of pH/temperature sensitive hydrogels.

  2. The effect of temperature on the sensitivity of Daphnia magna to cyanobacteria is genus dependent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hochmuth, Jennifer D; De Schamphelaere, Karel A C

    2014-10-01

    In the present study, the authors investigated the effects of 6 different genera of cyanobacteria on multiple endpoints of Daphnia magna in a 21-d life table experiment conducted at 3 different temperatures (15 °C, 19 °C, and 23 °C). The specific aims were to test if the effect of temperature on Daphnia's sensitivity to cyanobacteria differed among different cyanobacteria and if the rank order from most to least harmful cyanobacteria to Daphnia reproduction changed or remained the same across the studied temperature range. Overall, the authors observed a decrease in harmful effects on reproduction with increasing temperature for Microcystis, Nodularia, and Aphanizomenon, and an increase in harmful effects with increasing temperature for Anabaena and Oscillatoria. No effect of temperature was observed on Daphnia sensitivity to Cylindrospermopsis. Harmful effects of Microcystis and Nodularia on reproduction appear to be mirrored by a decrease in length. On the other hand, harmful effects of Anabaena, Aphanizomenon, and Oscillatoria on reproduction were correlated with a decrease in intrinsic rate of natural increase, which was matched by a later onset of reproduction in exposures to Oscillatoria. In addition, the results suggest that the cyanobacteria rank order of harmfulness may change with temperature. Higher temperatures may increase the sensitivity of D. magna to the presence of some cyanobacteria (Anabaena and Oscillatoria) in their diet, whereas the harmful effects of others (Microcystis, Nodularia, and Aphanizomenon) may be reduced by higher temperatures.

  3. Regional and local scale modeling of stream temperatures and spatio-temporal variation in thermal sensitivities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilderbrand, Robert H; Kashiwagi, Michael T; Prochaska, Anthony P

    2014-07-01

    Understanding variation in stream thermal regimes becomes increasingly important as the climate changes and aquatic biota approach their thermal limits. We used data from paired air and water temperature loggers to develop region-scale and stream-specific models of average daily water temperature and to explore thermal sensitivities, the slopes of air-water temperature regressions, of mostly forested streams across Maryland, USA. The region-scale stream temperature model explained nearly 90 % of the variation (root mean square error = 0.957 °C), with the mostly flat coastal plain streams having significantly higher thermal sensitivities than the steeper highlands streams with piedmont streams intermediate. Model R (2) for stream-specific models was positively related to a stream's thermal sensitivity. Both the regional and the stream-specific air-water temperature regression models benefited from including mean daily discharge from regional gaging stations, but the degree of improvement declined as a stream's thermal sensitivity increased. Although catchment size had no relationship to thermal sensitivity, steeper streams or those with greater amounts of forest in their upstream watershed were less thermally sensitive. The subset of streams with three or more summers of temperature data exhibited a wide range of annual variation in thermal sensitivity at a site, with the variation not attributable to discharge, precipitation patterns, or physical attributes of streams or their watersheds. Our findings are a useful starting point to better understand patterns in stream thermal regimes. However, a more spatially and temporally comprehensive monitoring network should increase understanding of stream temperature variation and its controls as climatic patterns change.

  4. Temperature sensitivity of soil respiration is dependent on readily decomposable C substrate concentration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Larionova

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Temperature acclimation of soil organic matter (SOM decomposition is one of the major uncertainties in predicting soil CO2 efflux by the increase in global mean temperature. A reasonable explanation for an apparent acclimation proposed by Davidson and colleagues (2006 based on Michaelis-Menten kinetics suggests that temperature sensitivity decreases when both maximal activity of respiratory enzymes (Vmax and half- saturation constant (Ks cancel each other upon temperature increase. We tested the hypothesis of the canceling effect by the mathematical simulation of the data obtained in the incubation experiments with forest and arable soils. Our data confirm the hypothesis and suggest that concentration of readily decomposable C substrate as glucose equivalent is an important factor controlling temperature sensitivity. The highest temperature sensitivity was observed when C substrate concentration was much lower than Ks. Increase of substrate content to the half-saturation constant resulted in temperature acclimation associated with the canceling effect. Addition of the substrate to the level providing respiration at a maximal rate Vmax leads to the acclimation of the whole microbial community as such. However, growing microbial biomass was more sensitive to the temperature alterations. This study improves our understanding of the instability of temperature sensitivity of soil respiration under field conditions, explaining this phenomenon by changes in concentration of readily decomposable C substrate. It is worth noting that this pattern works regardless of the origin of C substrate: production by SOM decomposition, release into the soil by rhizodeposition, litter fall or drying-rewetting events.

  5. SENSITIVITY TEMPERATURE DEPENDENCE RESEARCH OF TV-CAMERAS BASED ON SILICON MATRIXES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexey N. Starchenko

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Subject of Research. The research is dedicated to the analysis of sensitivity change patterns of the cameras based on silicon CMOS-matrixes in various ambient temperatures. This information is necessary for the correct camera application for photometric measurements in-situ. The paper deals with studies of sensitivity variations of two digital cameras with different silicon CMOS matrixes in visible and near IR regions of the spectrum at temperature change. Method. Due to practical restrictions the temperature changes were recorded in separate spectral intervals important for practical use of the cameras. The experiments were carried out with the use of a climatic chamber, providing change and keeping the temperature range from minus 40 to plus 50 °C at a pitch of 10 о С. Two cameras were chosen for research: VAC-135-IP with OmniVision OV9121 matrix and VAC-248-IP with OnSemiconductor VITA2000 matrix. The two tested devices were placed in a climatic chamber at the same time and illuminated by one radiation source with a color temperature about 3000 K in order to eliminate a number of methodological errors. Main Results. The temperature dependence of the signals was shown to be linear and the matrixes sensitivities were determined. The results obtained are consistent with theoretical views, in general. The coefficients of thermal sensitivity were computed by these dependencies. It is shown that the greatest affect of temperature on the sensitivity occurs in the area (0.7–1.1 mkm. Temperature coefficients of sensitivity increase with the downward radiation wavelength increase. The experiments carried out have shown that it is necessary to take into account the changes in temperature sensitivity of silicon matrixes in the red and near in IR regions of the spectrum. The effect reveals itself in a clearly negative way in cameras with an amplitude resolution of 10-12 bits used for aerospace and space spectrozonal photography. Practical Relevance

  6. Fabricating a pearl/PLGA composite scaffold by the low-temperature deposition manufacturing technique for bone tissue engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu Mingen; Li Yanlei; Suo Hairui; Wang Qiujun; Ge Yakun; Xu Ying [Center Laboratory of Biomanufacture and Tissue Engineering, Hang Zhou Dianzi University, Hangzhou 310018 (China); Yan Yongnian; Liu Li, E-mail: xumingen@tsinghua.edu.c, E-mail: xumingen@hdu.edu.c [Key Laboratory for Advanced Materials Processing Technology, Ministry of Education and Center of Organ Manufacturing, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2010-06-15

    Here we developed a composite scaffold of pearl/poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (pearl/PLGA) utilizing the low-temperature deposition manufacturing (LDM). LDM makes it possible to fabricate scaffolds with designed microstructure and macrostructure, while keeping the bioactivity of biomaterials by working at a low temperature. Process optimization was carried out to fabricate a mixture of pearl powder, PLGA and 1,4-dioxane with the designed hierarchical structures, and freeze-dried at a temperature of -40 deg. C. Scaffolds with square and designated bone shape were fabricated by following the 3D model. Marrow stem cells (MSCs) were seeded on the pearl/PLGA scaffold and then cultured in a rotating cell culture system. The adhesion, proliferation and differentiation of MSCs into osteoblasts were determined using scanning electronic microscopy, WST-1 assay, alkaline phosphatase activity assay, immunofluorescence staining and real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. The results showed that the composite scaffold had high porosity (81.98 +- 3.75%), proper pore size (micropores: <10 mum; macropore: 495 +- 54 mum) and mechanical property (compressive strength: 0.81 +- 0.04 MPa; elastic modulus: 23.14 +- 0.75 MPa). The pearl/PLGA scaffolds exhibited better biocompatibility and osteoconductivity compared with the tricalcium phosphate/PLGA scaffold. All these results indicate that the pearl/PLGA scaffolds fulfill the basic requirements of bone tissue engineering scaffold.

  7. Highly sensitive H2S sensors based on Cu2O/Co3O4 nano/microstructure heteroarrays at and below room temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Guangliang; Zhang, Pinhua; Chen, Li; Wang, Xiaoli; Li, Jianfu; shi, Changmin; Wang, Dongchao

    2017-01-01

    Gas sensors with high sensitivity at and below room temperature, especially below freezing temperature, have been expected for practical application. The lower working temperature of gas sensor is better for the manufacturability, security and environmental protection. Herein, we propose a H2S gas sensor with high sensitivity at and below room temperature, even as low as −30 °C, based on Cu2O/Co3O4 nano/microstructure heteroarrays prepared by 2D electrodeposition technique. This heteroarray was designed to be a multi-barrier system, and which was confirmed by transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and scanning probe microscopy. The sensor demonstrates excellent sensitivity, sub-ppm lever detection, fast response, and high activity at low temperature. The enhanced sensing property of sensor was also discussed with the Cu2O/Co3O4 p-p heterojunction barrier modulation and Cu2S conductance channel. We realize the detection of the noxious H2S gas at ultra-low temperature in a more security and environmental protection way. PMID:28252012

  8. Highly sensitive H2S sensors based on Cu2O/Co3O4 nano/microstructure heteroarrays at and below room temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Guangliang; Zhang, Pinhua; Chen, Li; Wang, Xiaoli; Li, Jianfu; Shi, Changmin; Wang, Dongchao

    2017-03-01

    Gas sensors with high sensitivity at and below room temperature, especially below freezing temperature, have been expected for practical application. The lower working temperature of gas sensor is better for the manufacturability, security and environmental protection. Herein, we propose a H2S gas sensor with high sensitivity at and below room temperature, even as low as -30 °C, based on Cu2O/Co3O4 nano/microstructure heteroarrays prepared by 2D electrodeposition technique. This heteroarray was designed to be a multi-barrier system, and which was confirmed by transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and scanning probe microscopy. The sensor demonstrates excellent sensitivity, sub-ppm lever detection, fast response, and high activity at low temperature. The enhanced sensing property of sensor was also discussed with the Cu2O/Co3O4 p-p heterojunction barrier modulation and Cu2S conductance channel. We realize the detection of the noxious H2S gas at ultra-low temperature in a more security and environmental protection way.

  9. Complex interactions between climate change and toxicants: evidence that temperature variability increases sensitivity to cadmium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimberly, David A; Salice, Christopher J

    2014-07-01

    The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change projects that global climate change will have significant impacts on environmental conditions including potential effects on sensitivity of organisms to environmental contaminants. The objective of this study was to test the climate-induced toxicant sensitivity (CITS) hypothesis in which acclimation to altered climate parameters increases toxicant sensitivity. Adult Physa pomilia snails were acclimated to a near optimal 22 °C or a high-normal 28 °C for 28 days. After 28 days, snails from each temperature group were challenged with either low (150 μg/L) or high (300 μg/L) cadmium at each temperature (28 or 22 °C). In contrast to the CITS hypothesis, we found that acclimation temperature did not have a strong influence on cadmium sensitivity except at the high cadmium test concentration where snails acclimated to 28 °C were more cadmium tolerant. However, snails that experienced a switch in temperature for the cadmium challenge, regardless of the switch direction, were the most sensitive to cadmium. Within the snails that were switched between temperatures, snails acclimated at 28 °C and then exposed to high cadmium at 22 °C exhibited significantly greater mortality than those snails acclimated to 22 °C and then exposed to cadmium at 28 °C. Our results point to the importance of temperature variability in increasing toxicant sensitivity but also suggest a potentially complex cost of temperature acclimation. Broadly, the type of temporal stressor exposures we simulated may reduce overall plasticity in responses to stress ultimately rendering populations more vulnerable to adverse effects.

  10. Ion temperature measurement using an ion sensitive probe in the LHD divertor plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ezumi, N. E-mail: ezumi@ec.nagano-nct.ac.jp; Masuzaki, S.; Ohno, N.; Uesugi, Y.; Takamura, S

    2003-03-01

    The first reliable measurement of ion temperature in the divertor plasma of the Large Helical Device has been done by using an ion sensitive probe. The satisfactory current-voltage characteristics of the ion collector for evaluating the ion temperature were obtained at the outer part of the divertor leg. Furthermore, simultaneous ion and electron temperature measurements were successfully done in this part. The results show that the ion temperature is higher than the electron temperature in the part. There is a possibility that the profiles of the evaluated ion temperature which shows relatively higher than the electron temperature at the outside of divertor leg are qualitatively explained by particle's orbits around the edge and divertor region.

  11. Examining the Physical Drivers of Photosynthetic Temperature Sensitivity Within a Sub-alpine Mixed Conifer Forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, J.; Barron-Gafford, G.; Minor, R.; Heard, M.

    2013-12-01

    Current projections of climate change in the southwestern U.S. suggest increasing temperatures and reduced summer precipitation. High temperature and water deficits have major influence on ecosystem functioning by restricting plant growth and productivity. However, there are limited data on what influences plant sensitivity to temperature, and these dynamics are not often captured in ecosystem models. Understanding the sensitivities, linkages, and feedbacks among biotic processes and abiotic forces is especially important within Critical Zone Sciences, which seeks to integrate among disciplines. Here, we analyzed several potential drivers of photosynthetic temperature sensitivity, including differences in soil parent material, aspect, and seasonality within a suite of species. Each of these variables captures a different physical driver: (i) soil parent material influences water holding capacity of the soil; (ii) aspect influences how incoming energy drives evaporative loss of soil water, creating warmer and drier environments on south/east faces; and (iii) seasonality captures temporal patterns of soil moisture recharge. Our research was conducted within two V shaped zero-order catchment basins of the Santa Catalina Critical Zone Observatory in southern Arizona, one with schist bedrock and the other with granite. We used leaf-level gas exchange measurements on 24 trees across a range of temperatures to quantify this plant temperature sensitivity during the dry pre-monsoon and wet monsoon seasons. Preliminary results show that maximum photosynthetic rate was 51% higher during the monsoon than pre-monsoon season. Optimal photosynthetic temperature decreased 25% while the span of functional temperatures (Ω50) was 21% higher following the onset of monsoon rains. During the rainy season, soil parent material became an important factor. The greater water holding capacity of schist soils yielded greater maximum photosynthesis and reduced tree sensitivity to higher

  12. Fano resonance-based highly sensitive, compact temperature sensor on thin film lithium niobate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Wentao; Ndao, Abdoulaye; Vila, Venancio Calero; Salut, Roland; Courjal, Nadège; Baida, Fadi Issam; Bernal, Maria-Pilar

    2016-03-15

    In this Letter, we report a Fano resonance-based highly sensitive and compact temperature sensor fabricated on thin film lithium niobate (TFLN) Suzuki phase lattice (SPL) photonic crystal. The experimental sensitivity is estimated to be 0.77 nm/°C with a photonic crystal size of only 25  μm × 24  μm. This sensitivity is 38 times larger than the intrinsic one of lithium niobate which is 0.02 nm/°C. The demonstrated sharp and high extinction ratio characteristics of the Fano lineshape resonance could be an excellent candidate in developing a high sensitivity temperature sensor, electric field sensor, etc.

  13. Sensitivity of grapevine phenology to water availability, temperature and CO2 concentration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johann Martínez-Lüscher

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available In recent decades, mean global temperatures have increased in parallel with a sharp rise in atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2 levels, with apparent implications for precipitation patterns. The aim of the present work is to assess the sensitivity of different phenological stages of grapevine to temperature and to study the influence of other factors related to climate change (water availability and CO2 concentration on this relationship. Grapevine phenological records from 9 plantings between 42.75°N and 46.03°N consisting of dates for budburst, flowering and fruit maturity were used. In addition, we used phenological data collected from two years of experiments with grapevine fruit-bearing cuttings with two grapevine varieties under two levels of water availability, two temperature regimes and two levels of CO2. Dormancy breaking and flowering were strongly dependent on spring temperature, while neither variation in temperature during the chilling period nor precipitation significantly affected budburst date. The time needed to reach fruit maturity diminished with increasing temperature and decreasing precipitation. Experiments under semi-controlled conditions revealed great sensitivity of berry development to both temperature and CO2. Water availability had significant interactions with both temperature and CO2; however, in general, water deficit delayed maturity when combined with other factors. Sensitivities to temperature and CO2 varied widely, but higher sensitivities appeared in the coolest year, particularly for the late ripening variety, ‘White Tempranillo’. The knowledge gained in whole plant physiology and multi stress approaches is crucial to predict the effects of climate change and to design mitigation and adaptation strategies allowing viticulture to cope with climate change.

  14. Simultaneous strain and temperature measurement with enhanced intrinsic sensitivity using etched polymer fibre Bragg gratings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhowmik, Kishore; Peng, Gang-Ding; Luo, Yanhua; Ambikairajah, Eliathamby; Rajan, Ginu

    2015-09-01

    A PMMA based single-mode polymer optical fibre is etched to different diameter and it is observed that etching can lead to change in the material properties of the fibre such as Young's modulus and thermal expansion coefficient. This can play a vital role in improving the intrinsic sensing capabilities based on etched polymer optical fibre. Thus, exploiting the different strain and temperature sensitivities exhibited by the etched and un-etched polymer FBGs and by using an FBG array, strain and temperature can be measured simultaneously and also with very high sensitivity.

  15. Fully printed, highly sensitive multifunctional artificial electronic whisker arrays integrated with strain and temperature sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harada, Shingo; Honda, Wataru; Arie, Takayuki; Akita, Seiji; Takei, Kuniharu

    2014-04-22

    Mammalian-mimicking functional electrical devices have tremendous potential in robotics, wearable and health monitoring systems, and human interfaces. The keys to achieve these devices are (1) highly sensitive sensors, (2) economically fabricated macroscale devices on flexible substrates, and (3) multifunctions beyond mammalian functions. Although highly sensitive artificial electronic devices have been reported, none have been fabricated using cost-effective macroscale printing methods and demonstrate multifunctionalities of artificial electronics. Herein we report fully printed high-sensitivity multifunctional artificial electronic whiskers (e-whisker) integrated with strain and temperature sensors using printable nanocomposite inks. Importantly, changing the composition ratio tunes the sensitivity of strain. Additionally, the printed temperature sensor array can be incorporated with the strain sensor array beyond mammalian whisker functionalities. The sensitivity for the strain sensor is impressively high (∼59%/Pa), which is the best sensitivity reported to date (>7× improvement). As the proof-of-concept for a truly printable multifunctional artificial e-whisker array, two- and three-dimensional space and temperature distribution mapping are demonstrated. This fully printable flexible sensor array should be applicable to a wide range of low-cost macroscale electrical applications.

  16. Isolation, characterization, and utilization of a temperature-sensitive allele of a Pseudomonas replicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silo-Suh, Laura A.; Elmore, Brett; Ohman, Dennis E.; Suh, Sang-Jin

    2009-01-01

    In order to facilitate genetic study of the opportunistic bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa, we isolated a conditional, temperature-sensitive plasmid origin of replication. We mutagenized the popular Pseudomonas stabilizing fragment from pRO1610 in vitro using the Taq thermostable DNA polymerase in a polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Out of approximately 23,000 potential clones, 48 temperature-sensitive mutants were isolated. One mutant was further characterized and the origin of replication was designated as mSFts1. The mutations that resulted in a temperature-sensitive phenotype in mSFts1 were localized to the 1.2 kb of minimum sequence required for replication in P. aeruginosa. The DNA sequence analysis revealed two mutations within the coding sequence of the Replication control (Rep) protein. Growth of P. aeruginosa carrying the temperature-sensitive plasmid at the non-permissive temperature of 42°C resulted in loss of the plasmid by greater than 99.9999% of the cells after 16 hours of growth. In order to facilitate its utilization, the mSFts1 was converted into a genetic cassette flanked by mirrored restriction endonuclease digestion sites of a pUC1918 derivative. We demonstrate utilization of the mSFts1 for genetic studies involving complementation and regeneration of a mutant in P. aeruginosa research. PMID:19615413

  17. Ambient temperature does not affect the tactile sensitivity of mystacial vibrissae in harbour seals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehnhardt, G; Mauck, B; Hyvärinen, H

    1998-11-01

    Vibrissae provide pinnipeds with tactile information primarily in the aquatic environment, which is characterized by its high thermal conductivity and large potential cooling power. Since studies of thermal effects on human tactile sensitivity have revealed that cooling below normal skin temperature impairs sensitivity, the present study investigates the tactile sensitivity of the vibrissal system of harbour seals at varying ambient temperatures. Using plates bearing gratings of alternating grooves and ridges, the texture difference thresholds of two adult seals were determined under water. We took advantage of the natural difference in ambient temperature between summer and winter. Mean water temperature was 1. 2 degreesC during the winter and 22 degreesC during the summer. During the cold season, the thermal status of both seals was examined using an infrared-sensitive camera system. The texture difference threshold of both seals remained the same (0.18 mm groove width difference) under both test conditions. The thermographic examination revealed that the skin areas of the head where the mystacial and supraorbital vibrissae are located show a substantially higher degree of thermal emission than do adjacent skin areas. This suggests that, in the vibrissal follicles of harbour seals, no vasoconstriction occurs during cold acclimation, so that the appropriate operating temperature for the mechanoreceptors is maintained.

  18. Isolation and characterization of temperature-sensitive mutants of cyanophage N-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarma, T A; Singh, R

    1994-02-01

    Optimal conditions for the induction of temperature-sensitive (ts) mutants of cyanophage N-1 were established after mutagenesis with N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG). A treatment with MNNG (400 micrograms/ml) for 2 hrs at pH 8.0 induced ts-mutants at a maximum frequency of 1.46 x 10(-3). A characterization of 10 such ts-mutants with regard to adsorption, one-step growth and temperature-shift experiments with Nostoc muscorum as host bacterium led to the identification of temperature-sensitive steps in the phage multiplication at the restrictive temperature (37 degrees C). All the mutants were found to be conditionally lethal at 37 degrees C since they resumed growth upon shifting to 28 degrees C.

  19. Spectral and Concentration Sensitivity of Multijunction Solar Cells at High Temperature: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friedman, Daniel J.; Steiner, Myles A.; Perl, Emmett E.; Simon, John

    2017-06-14

    We model the performance of two-junction solar cells at very high temperatures of ~400 degrees C and beyond for applications such as hybrid PV/solar-thermal power production, and identify areas in which the design and performance characteristics behave significantly differently than at more conventional near-room-temperature operating conditions. We show that high-temperature operation reduces the sensitivity of the cell efficiency to spectral content, but increases the sensitivity to concentration, both of which have implications for energy yield in terrestrial PV applications. For other high-temperature applications such as near-sun space missions, our findings indicate that concentration may be a useful tool to enhance cell efficiency.

  20. Influence of Temperature Variation on Optical Receiver Sensitivity and its Compensation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Prokes

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available In the paper, the influence of temperature variation on the sensitivity of an avalanche-photodiode-based optical receiver applied in the free space optical communication link is discussed. Communication systems of this type are exposed to a wide range of operating temperatures, which markedly affect many photodiode and preamplifier parameters. The paper presents a receiver sensitivity calculation, taking into consideration the temperature dependence of avalanche photodiode gain, excess noise factor, dark current and thermal noise of preamplifier resistances, and describes the compensation of temperature effects on photodiode gain based on a corresponding change in the reverse voltage applied to the diode. The calculations are demonstrated on the connection of a small-area silicon APD operating in the wavelength range from 820 to 1150 nm with a transimpedance preamplifier using a bipolar junction transistor.

  1. High-Temperature Oxidation of Fe3Al Intermetallic Alloy Prepared by Additive Manufacturing LENS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radosław Łyszkowski

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The isothermal oxidation of Fe-28Al-5Cr (at% intermetallic alloy microalloyed with Zr and B (<0.08 at% in air atmosphere, in the temperature range of 1000 to 1200 °C, was studied. The investigation was carried out on the thin-walled (<1 mm elements prepared by Laser Engineered Net Shaping (LENS from alloy powder of a given composition. Characterization of the specimens, after the oxidation, was conducted using X-ray diffraction (XRD and scanning electron microscopy (SEM, with back-scatter detector (BSE and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS attachments. The investigation has shown, that the oxidized samples were covered with a thin, homogeneous α-Al2O3 oxide layers. The intensity of their growth indicates that the material lost its resistance to oxidation at 1200 °C. Structural analysis of the thin-walled components’ has not shown intensification of the oxidation process at the joints of additive layers.

  2. Temperature-driven processing techniques for manufacturing fully interconnected porous scaffolds in bone tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guarino, V; Ambrosio, L

    2010-12-01

    The development of structures with a predefined multiscale pore network is a major challenge in designing tissue engineering (TE) scaffolds. To address this, several strategies have been investigated to provide biocompatible, biodegradable porous materials that would be suitable for use as scaffolds, and able to guide and facilitate the cell activity involved in the generation of new tissue regeneration. This study seeks to provide an overview of different temperature-driven process technologies for developing scaffolds with tailored porosity, in which pore size distribution is strictly defined and pores are fully interconnected. Here, three-dimensional (3D) porous composite scaffolds based on poly(epsilon-caprolactone) (PCL) were fabricated by thermally induced phase separation (TIPS) and by melt co-continuous polymer blending (MCPB). The combination of these processes with a salt leaching technique enables the establishment of bimodal porosity within the polymer network. This feature may be exploited in the development of substrates with fully interconnected pores, which can be used effectively for tissue regeneration. Various combinations of the proposed techniques provide a range of procedures for the preparation of porous scaffolds with an appropriate combination of morphological and mechanical properties to reproduce the requisite features of the extracellular matrix (ECM) of hard tissues such as bone.

  3. Low temperature carving of ZnO nanorods into nanotubes for dye-sensitized solar cell application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dehghan Nayeri, Fatemeh, E-mail: F.d.nayeri@ut.ac.ir; Kolahdouz, Mohammadreza; Asl-Soleimani, Ebrahim; Mohajerzadeh, S.

    2015-06-05

    Highlights: • Large scale arrays of highly oriented ZnO NTs have been fabricated and investigated. • The DSSCs made of these 2.5 μm NRs and NTs resulted in conversion efficiencies of 0.34% and 0.9%, respectively. • EIS measurements have demonstrated that the NTs could acquire a higher electron lifetime compared to NRs. • Twofold electron lifetime electron accompanied by half electron transport time for ZnO NTs compared to NRs. - Abstract: High aspect ratio zinc oxide (ZnO) nanotubes (NT) were synthesized based on a two-steps approach. In the first step, ZnO nanorod (NR) arrays were prepared by chemical bath deposition from an aqueous of zinc nitrate. In the second step, the cores of ZnO NRs were carved selectively in a KCl solution, resulting in the formation of a tubular structure. The influence of KCL concentration, temperature, and immersion time on the ZnO NT formation process was completely characterized and investigated. 12.5 μm NRs and NTs have been utilized to manufacture dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) and as a result, conversion efficiencies of 1.06% and 2.87% were obtained, respectively. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy measurements have demonstrated that the NTs could acquire a higher electron lifetime compared to NRs which causes a faster electron collection. The overall improvement in NT-based DSSC performance demonstrates a new approach to enhance the efficiency of dye-sensitized solar cells.

  4. The Sensitivity of Regional Precipitation to Global Temperature Change and Forcings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tebaldi, C.; O'Neill, B. C.; Lamarque, J. F.

    2016-12-01

    Global policies are most commonly formulated in terms of climate targets, like the much talked about 1.5° and 2°C warming thresholds identified as critical by the recent Paris agreements. But what does a target defined in terms of a globally averaged quantity mean in terms of expected regional changes? And, in particular, what should we expect in terms of significant changes in precipitation over specific regional domains for these and other incrementally different global goals? In this talk I will summarize the result of an analysis that aimed at characterizing the sensitivity of regional temperatures and precipitation amounts to changes in global average temperature. The analysis uses results from a multi-model ensemble (CMIP5), which allows us to address structural uncertainty in future projections, a type of uncertainty particularly relevant when considering precipitation changes. I will show what type of changes in global temperature and forcing levels bring about significant and pervasive changes in regional precipitation, contrasting its sensitivity to that of regional temperature changes. Because of the large internal variability of regional precipitation, I will show that significant changes in average regional precipitation can be detected only for fairly large separations (on the order of 2.5° or 3°C) in global average temperature levels, differently from the much higher sensitivity shown by regional temperatures.

  5. Impacts of Temperature on the Stability of Tropical Plant Pigments as Sensitizers for Dye Sensitized Solar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aiman Yusoff

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Natural dyes have become a viable alternative to expensive organic sensitizers because of their low cost of production, abundance in supply, and eco-friendliness. We evaluated 35 native plants containing anthocyanin pigments as potential sensitizers for DSSCs. Melastoma malabathricum (fruit pulp, Hibiscus rosa-sinensis (flower, and Codiaeum variegatum (leaves showed the highest absorption peaks. Hence, these were used to determine anthocyanin content and stability based on the impacts of storage temperature. Melastoma malabathricum fruit pulp exhibited the highest anthocyanin content (8.43 mg/L followed by H. rosa-sinensis and C. variegatum. Significantly greater stability of extracted anthocyanin pigment was shown when all three were stored at 4∘C. The highest half-life periods for anthocyanin in M. malabathricum, H. rosa-sinensis, and C. variegatum were 541, 571, and 353 days at 4∘C. These were rapidly decreased to 111, 220, and 254 days when stored at 25∘C. The photovoltaic efficiency of M. malabathricum was1.16%, while the values for H. rosa-sinensis and C. variegatum were 0.16% and 1.08%, respectively. Hence, M. malabathricum fruit pulp extracts can be further evaluated as an alternative natural sensitizer for DSSCs.

  6. Histamine development and bacterial diversity in microbially-challenged tonggol (Thunnus tonggol) under temperature abuse during canning manufacture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hongpattarakere, Tipparat; Buntin, Nirunya; Nuylert, Aem

    2016-01-01

    Histamine formation and bacteriological changes caused by temperature abuse commonly occurring in the manufacturing process of standard canned tuna was assessed in microbiologically challenged tonggol (Thunnus tonggol). The in situ challenge was performed by water-soaking at 26-28 °C for 7 h to ensure the multiplication and active phase of fish microflora. Right after pre-cooking to back-bone temperature (BBT) of 50-52 °C, histamine dropped to 5.17 ± 2.71 ppm, and slowly reached 6.84 ± 1.69 ppm at 16 h abuse. On the contrary, histamine was reduced to 2.87 ± 1.23 ppm and eventually reached 5.01 ± 1.32 ppm at 24 h abuse in the pre-cooked fish previously frozen. The numbers of total aerobic bacteria, Enterobactericeae, psychrotroph, histamine forming bacteria (HFB) and diversity of fish microflora were revealed by cultural and nested PCR-Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE) techniques. Interestingly, frozen storage effectively halted histamine formation in raw fish throughout 16 h abuse despite the presence of HFB. These included the prolific strains of Morganella morganii, Proteus penneri, Proteus mirabilin, Citrobacter spp. The nested PCR-DGGE profile confirmed the presence of M. morganii and Citrobacter spp. in raw fish. These prolific strains were hardly observed in the precooked fish previously frozen. Frozen storage did not only promote even histamine distribution throughout fish muscle but also enhanced histamine loss during thawing and pre-cooking. Therefore, pre-cooking and frozen storage were proven to be the effective combined hurdles not only to reduce but also prolong histamine formation of the challenged toggol throughout 24 h of temperature abuse during canning process.

  7. Preparation and Properties of Hydroxyethyl Methacrylate Chemically Modified Temperature-Sensitive Microgels

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马晓梅; 席靖宇; 赵喜安; 唐小真

    2004-01-01

    A novel series of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-co-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) (p(NIPAM-co-HEMA)) microgels were prepared through precipitation polymerization. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy (UV) and dynamic light scattering (DLS) were employed to characterize the microgels. The experimental results indicate that the prepared microgels with narrow distribution remain good temperature sensitivity after incorporation of functional -OH groups. In marked contrast to the general rule, incorporation of hydrophilic HEMA makes the volume-phase-transition temperature shift to the lower temperature due to the strong intermolecular H-bonding between amide and -OH groups, -OH and -OH groups.

  8. Gene expression profiling of a temperature-sensitive strain of Neospora caninum

    Science.gov (United States)

    To understand the genetic basis of virulence, gene expression profiles of a temperature-sensitive clone (NCts-8, relatively avirulent) and its wild type (NC-1) of Neospora caninum were characterized and compared using a high-density microarray with approximately 63,000 distinct oligonucleotides. Thi...

  9. Extreme Sensitivity of Room-Temperature Photoelectric Effect for Terahertz Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Zhiming; Zhou, Wei; Tong, Jinchao; Huang, Jingguo; Ouyang, Cheng; Qu, Yue; Wu, Jing; Gao, Yanqing; Chu, Junhao

    2016-01-01

    Extreme sensitivity of room-temperature photoelectric effect for terahertz (THz) detection is demonstrated by generating extra carriers in an electromagnetic induced well located at the semiconductor, using a wrapped metal-semiconductor-metal configuration. The excellent performance achieved with THz detectors shows great potential to open avenues for THz detection.

  10. Preparation and anti-bacterial properties of a temperature sensitive gel containing silver nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    The purpose of this study was to prepare a novel temperature-sensitive spray gel containing silver nanoparticles and investigate its anti-bacterial properties in vitro. Methods: The aqueous complex gel was prepared by Pluronic F127 (18-22%) and Pluronic F68 (3-9%) through a cold method to obtain a p...

  11. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay antibody responses to a temperature-sensitive mutant of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    OpenAIRE

    Sordelli, D. O.; Rojas, R A; Cerquetti, M C; Hooke, A M; Degnan, P J; Bellanti, J A

    1985-01-01

    The serum immunoglobulin G and M responses induced by immunization of mice with temperature-sensitive mutant A/10/25 of Pseudomonas aeruginosa were evaluated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. These antibody responses were immunotype specific, and the immunoglobulin G antibody level, although low, was still significant by day 52 after vaccination.

  12. Highly Sensitive Liquid Core Temperature Sensor Based on Multimode Interference Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel A. Fuentes-Fuentes

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available A novel fiber optic temperature sensor based on a liquid-core multimode interference device is demonstrated. The advantage of such structure is that the thermo-optic coefficient (TOC of the liquid is at least one order of magnitude larger than that of silica and this, combined with the fact that the TOC of silica and the liquid have opposite signs, provides a liquid-core multimode fiber (MMF highly sensitive to temperature. Since the refractive index of the liquid can be easily modified, this allows us to control the modal properties of the liquid-core MMF at will and the sensor sensitivity can be easily tuned by selecting the refractive index of the liquid in the core of the device. The maximum sensitivity measured in our experiments is 20 nm/°C in the low-temperature regime up to 60 °C. To the best of our knowledge, to date, this is the largest sensitivity reported for fiber-based MMI temperature sensors.

  13. Is resistant soil organic matter more sensitive to temperature than the labile organic matter?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Fang

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available A recent paper by Knorr et al. (2005a suggested that the decomposition of resistant soil organic matter is more temperature sensitive than labile organic matter. In Knorr et al.'s (2005a model, the reference decay rate was presumed to be same for all pools of soil carbon. We refit Knorr et al.'s (2005a model but allow both the activation energy and the reference decay rate to vary among soil C pools. Under these conditions, a similar fit to measured data can be obtained without invoking the assumption that the resistant C pool is more temperature sensitive than the labile pool. Other published evidence does not unequivocally support Knorr et al.'s (2005a hypothesis of increased temperature sensitivity of resistant pools of soil carbon. Because of the lack of experimental data, Knorr et al.'s (2005a conclusion that the decomposition of the resistant SOM is more temperature sensitive than the labile pool is premature.

  14. Isolation of temperature-sensitive mutants of 16 S rRNA in Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Triman, K; Becker, E; Dammel, C;

    1989-01-01

    Temperature-sensitive mutants have been isolated following hydroxylamine mutagenesis of a plasmid containing Escherichia coli rRNA genes carrying selectable markers for spectinomycin resistance (U1192 in 16 S rRNA) and erythromycin resistance (G2058 in 23 S rRNA). These antibiotic resistance alle...

  15. Design and Synthesis of an MOF Thermometer with High Sensitivity in the Physiological Temperature Range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Dian; Rao, Xingtang; Yu, Jiancan; Cui, Yuanjing; Yang, Yu; Qian, Guodong

    2015-12-07

    An important result of research on mixed-lanthanide metal-organic frameworks (M'LnMOFs) is the realization of highly sensitive ratiometric luminescent thermometers. Here, we report the design and synthesis of the new M'LnMOF Tb0.80Eu0.20BPDA with high relative sensitivity in the physiological temperature regime (298-318 K). The emission intensity and luminescence lifetime were investigated and compared to those of existing materials. It was found that the temperature-dependent luminescence properties of Tb0.80Eu0.20BPDA are strongly associated with the distribution of the energy levels of the ligand. Such a property can be useful in the design of highly sensitive M'LnMOF thermometers.

  16. Temperature Sensitivity of an Atomic Vapor Cell-Based Dispersion-Enhanced Optical Cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myneni, K.; Smith, D. D.; Chang, H.; Luckay, H. A.

    2015-01-01

    Enhancement of the response of an optical cavity to a change in optical path length, through the use of an intracavity fast-light medium, has previously been demonstrated experimentally and described theoretically for an atomic vapor cell as the intracavity resonant absorber. This phenomenon may be used to enhance both the scale factor and sensitivity of an optical cavity mode to the change in path length, e.g. in gyroscopic applications. We study the temperature sensitivity of the on-resonant scale factor enhancement, S(sub o), due to the thermal sensitivity of the lower-level atom density in an atomic vapor cell, specifically for the case of the Rb-87 D(sub 2) transition. A semi-empirical model of the temperature-dependence of the absorption profile, characterized by two parameters, a(sub o)(T) and gamma(sub a)(T) allows the temperature-dependence of the cavity response, S(sub o)(T) and dS(sub o)/dT to be predicted over a range of temperature. We compare the predictions to experiment. Our model will be useful in determining the useful range for S(sub o), given the practical constraints on temperature stability for an atomic vapor cell.

  17. Estimation of Pressure Index and Temperature Sensitivity Coefficient of Solid Rocket Propellants by Static Evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Himanshu Shekhar

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Burning rate of a solid rocket propellant depends on pressure and temperature. Conventional strand burner and Crawford bomb test on propellant strands was conducted to assess these dependent parameters. However, behaviour of propellant in rocket motor is different from its behaviour in strand form. To overcome this anomaly, data from static evaluation of rocket motor was directly used for assessment of these burningrate controlling parameters. The conventional empirical power law (r=aoexp[p{T-To}]Pn was considered and a method was evolved for determination of pressure index (n and temperature sensitivity coefficient (p of burning rate for solid rocket propellants from static evaluation data. Effect of pressure index and temperature sensitivity coefficient on firing curve is also depicted. Propellant grain was fired in progressive mode to cover a very wide pressure range of 50 kg/cm2 to 250 kg/cm2 and propellant burning rate index was calculated to be 0.32 in the given pressure range. Propellant grain was fired at +35 °C and –20 °C temperatures and temperature sensitivity coefficient of burning rate was calculated to be 0.27 % per °C. Since both the values were evaluated from realised static evaluation curves, these are more realistic and accurate compared to data generated by conventional methods.Defence Science Journal, 2009, 59(6, pp.666-669, DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.14429/dsj.59.1573

  18. Silicone rubber-coated highly sensitive optical fiber sensor for temperature measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhardwaj, Vanita; Gangwar, Rahul Kumar; Singh, Vinod Kumar

    2016-12-01

    A silicone rubber-coated Mach-Zehnder interferometer (MZI) is proposed and applied to temperature measurement. The MZI is fabricated by splicing single mode fiber between a short section of no-core fiber (NCF) and the ultra-abrupt taper region. The sensing length of MZI is coated with liquid silicone rubber to enhance the temperature sensitivity. Here, NCF is used to excite the higher order cladding mode, the ultra-abrupt taper region acts as a optical fiber coupler, and the silicone rubber coating on sensing length is used as solid cladding material instead of liquid. The enhancement of the sensitivity of a device is due to the high refractive index (1.42) and thermo-optic coefficient (-1.4×10-4/°C) of silicone rubber as compared to liquid cladding temperature sensors. The experiment was performed for both coated and uncoated MZI and the results were compared. The MZI exhibits a high temperature sensitivity of 253.75 and 121.26 pm/°C for coated and uncoated sensing probes, respectively, in the temperature range from 30°C to 75°C.

  19. THERMOGRAPHIC APPLICATIONS OF TEMPERATURE SENSITIVE FLUORESCENCE OF SrS:Cu PHOSPHORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. PUROHIT

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The present work aims at investigating the temperature sensitive fluoro-optic behaviour of Cu-activated strontium sulphide (SrS phosphors and its possible application in thermography. Accordingly, SrS (Cu phosphors have been synthesized and painted with the help of adhesive on silica substrate. The excitation and emission spectra of such phosphor coatings have been recorded at room temperature (25C. The temperature dependence of fluorescence intensity and the lifetime of phosphorescence have also been studied. From the systematic variation of these two parameters with temperature, it appears that these phosphors are good candidates for thermographic application, at least, in the temperature range of investigation (25-150C.

  20. PBX-9502 Shock Sensitivity Correlation with Specific Heat and Reactive Temperature Magnitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billingsley, James

    2005-07-01

    This work is a supplementary follow-on to papers [1 and 2], presented in two previous SCCM conferences, that related plane impact shock sensitivity of CHNO energetic materials to specific heat (Cp per average atom) magnitude and reactive temperature (TR) conditions. More specifically, plane impact shock energy input that is equal to the thermal vibratory energy increment (the area under the Cp versus temperature data curve between an experimental temperature, TEXP, and a reactive temperature) is sufficient to cause shock induced reactions, up to and including detonation, in CHNO energetic materials. This statement is demonstratively verified at four different test temperatures for PBX-9502 in this proposed paper. *Billingsley, J. P., paper in Shock Compression of Condensed Matter -- 1995, AIP Conference Proceedings 370, Part I, pages 429 -- 432. *Billingsley, J. P., paper in Shock Compression of Condensed Matter -- 1999, AIP Conference Proceedings, 505, Part II, pages 899 -- 902.

  1. Sensitivity-enhanced temperature sensor with cascaded fiber optic Sagnac interferometers based on Vernier-effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Li-Yang; Luo, Yuan; Zhang, Zhiyong; Zou, Xihua; Luo, Bin; Pan, Wei; Yan, Lianshan

    2015-02-01

    A novel fiber optic temperature sensor has been proposed and experimentally demonstrated with ~9 times sensitivity enhancement by using two cascaded Sagnac interferometers. These two Sagnac interferometers consist of the same type of polarization maintaining fibers with slightly different lengths. The working principle is analogous to a Vernier scale. One interferometer acts as filter, while the other is for temperature sensing. The envelope of the cascaded sensor shifts much more than single one with a certain enhancement factor, which related to the free space range difference between the filter and sensor interferometers. Experimental results show that the temperature sensitivity is enhanced from -1.46 nm/°C based on single Sagnac configuration to -13.36 nm/°C.

  2. Surgical implantation of temperature-sensitive transmitters and data-loggers to record body temperature in koalas (Phascolarctos cinereus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adam, D; Johnston, S D; Beard, L; Nicholson, V; Lisle, A; Gaughan, J; Larkin, R; Theilemann, P; Mckinnon, A; Ellis, W

    2016-01-01

    Under predicted climate change scenarios, koala distribution in Australia is expected to be adversely affected. Recent studies have attempted to identify suitable habitat, based on models of bioclimatic regions, but to more accurately reflect the thermal tolerance and behavioural adaptations of the various regional populations, the koala's response to periods of heat stress will need to be investigated at the individual animal level. To explore the safety and suitability of temperature-sensitive intra-abdominal implants for monitoring core body temperature in the koala. A temperature-sensitive radio transmitter and thermal iButton data-logger, waxed together as a package, were surgically implanted into the abdominal cavity of four captive koalas. In one animal the implant was tethered and in the other three, it was left free-floating. After 3 months, the implants were removed and all four koalas recovered without complications. The tethering of the package in the one koala resulted in minor inflammation and adhesion, so this practice was subsequently abandoned. The free-floating deployments were complication-free and revealed a diurnal body temperature rhythm, with daily ranges of 0.4-2.8°C. The minimum recorded body temperature was 34.2°C and the maximum was 37.7°C. The difference in the readings obtained from the transmitters and iButtons never exceeded 0.3°C. The suitability of the surgical approach was confirmed, from both the animal welfare and data collection points of view. © 2016 Australian Veterinary Association.

  3. A Lower Temperature FDM 3D Printing for the Manufacture of Patient-Specific Immediate Release Tablets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okwuosa, Tochukwu C; Stefaniak, Dominika; Arafat, Basel; Isreb, Abdullah; Wan, Ka-Wai; Alhnan, Mohamed A

    2016-11-01

    The fabrication of ready-to-use immediate release tablets via 3D printing provides a powerful tool to on-demand individualization of dosage form. This work aims to adapt a widely used pharmaceutical grade polymer, polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP), for instant on-demand production of immediate release tablets via FDM 3D printing. Dipyridamole or theophylline loaded filaments were produced via processing a physical mixture of API (10%) and PVP in the presence of plasticizer through hot-melt extrusion (HME). Computer software was utilized to design a caplet-shaped tablet. The surface morphology of the printed tablet was assessed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The physical form of the drugs and its integrity following an FDM 3D printing were assessed using x-ray powder diffractometry (XRPD), thermal analysis and HPLC. In vitro drug release studies for all 3D printed tablets were conducted in a USP II dissolution apparatus. Bridging 3D printing process with HME in the presence of a thermostable filler, talc, enabled the fabrication of immediate release tablets at temperatures as low as 110°C. The integrity of two model drugs was maintained following HME and FDM 3D printing. XRPD indicated that a portion of the loaded theophylline remained crystalline in the tablet. The fabricated tablets demonstrated excellent mechanical properties, acceptable in-batch variability and an immediate in vitro release pattern. Combining the advantages of PVP as an impeding polymer with FDM 3D printing at low temperatures, this approach holds a potential in expanding the spectrum of drugs that could be used in FDM 3D printing for on demand manufacturing of individualised dosage forms.

  4. Highly Sensitive Rayleigh Wave Hydrogen Sensors with WO3 Sensing Layers at Room Temperature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Cheng; FAN Li; ZHANG Shu-Yi; YANG Yue-Tao; ZHOU Ding-Mao; SHUI Xiu-Ji

    2011-01-01

    Rayleigh wave hydrogen sensors based on 128° YX-LiNbO3 substrates with WO3 sensing layers operating at room temperature are studied.The experimental results indicate that the WO3 layers obtained by a sol-gel method have much higher sensitivities because the sensing layers produced by the sol-gel method have small grains and high roughness and porosity.It is also confirmed that in the sol-gel method,keeping WO3 solutions at low temperature and/or decreasing the viscosity of the solutions can decrease the grain sizes and increase the hydrogen-absorbability of the sensing layer.Under the optimized preparation conditions,the high sensitivity of the hydrogen sensors at room temperature is obtained,in which 1% hydrogen in natural air induces the frequency shift of 72 kHz at the operating frequency of 124.2 MHz.Surface acoustic wave (SAW) hydrogen sensors have attracted a great deal of attention so far,in which the sensors have achieved high sensitivity as the sensors were often operated at high temperature,such as higher than 100℃.[1-4] However,in these experiments,a heater and a thermostat were required,which induced the sensors to be more complicated and unfavorable for miniaturization,and limited their application at room temperature.Furthermore,the heater can induce extra power loss and risks of fire and explosion.%Rayleigh wave hydrogen sensors based on 128° YX-LiNbO3 substrates with WO3 sensing layers operating at room temperature are studied. The experimental results indicate that the WO3 layers obtained by a sol-gel method have much higher sensitivities because the sensing layers produced by the sol-gel method have small grains and high roughness and porosity. It is also confirmed that in the sol-gel method, keeping WO3 solutions at low temperature and/or decreasing the viscosity of the solutions can decrease the grain sizes and increase the hydrogen-absorbability of the sensing layer. Under the optimized preparation conditions, the high sensitivity of the

  5. Organic particulate material levels in the atmosphere: conditions favoring sensitivity to varying relative humidity and temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pankow, James F

    2010-04-13

    This study examines the sensitivity in predicted levels of atmospheric organic particulate matter (M(o), microg m(-3)) as those levels may potentially be affected by changes in relative humidity and temperature. In a given system, for each partitioning compound, f(g) and f(p) represent the gaseous and particulate fractions (f(g) + f(p) = 1). Sensitivity in the M(o) levels becomes dampened as the compounds contributing significantly to M(o) are increasingly found in the particle phase (f(p) --> 1). Thus, although local maxima in sensitivity can be encountered as M(o) levels increase, because as M(o) increases each f(p) --> 1, then increasing M(o) levels generally tend to reduce sensitivity in M(o) levels to changes in relative humidity and temperature. Experiments designed to elucidate the potential magnitudes of the effects of relative humidity and temperature on M(o) levels must be carried out at M(o) levels that are relevant for the ambient atmosphere: The f(p) values for the important partitioning compounds must not be elevated above ambient-relevant values. Systems in which M(o) levels are low (e.g., 1-2 microg m(-3)) and/or composed of unaged secondary organic aerosol are the ones most likely to show sensitivity to changing relative humidity and temperature. Results from two published chamber studies are examined in the above regard: [Warren B, et al. (2009) Atmos Environ 43:1789-1795] and [Prisle NL, et al. (2010) Geophys Res Lett 37:L01802].

  6. Design optimization of high pressure and high temperature piezoresistive pressure sensor for high sensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Zhe; Zhao, Yulong; Tian, Bian

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes a design method for optimizing sensitivity of piezoresistive pressure sensor in high-pressure and high-temperature environment. In order to prove the method, a piezoresistive pressure sensor (HPTSS) is designed. With the purpose of increasing sensitivity and to improve the measurement range, the piezoresistive sensor adopts rectangular membrane and thick film structure. The configuration of piezoresistors is arranged according to the characteristic of the rectangular membrane. The structure and configuration of the sensor chip are analyzed theoretically and simulated by the finite element method. This design enables the sensor chip to operate in high pressure condition (such as 150 MPa) with a high sensitivity and accuracy. The silicon on insulator wafer is selected to guarantee the thermo stability of the sensor chip. In order to optimize the fabrication and improve the yield of production, an electric conduction step is devised. Series of experiments demonstrates a favorable linearity of 0.13% and a high accuracy of 0.48%. And the sensitivity of HTPSS is about six times as high as a conventional square-membrane sensor chip in the experiment. Compared with the square-membrane pressure sensor and current production, the strength of HPTTS lies in sensitivity and measurement. The performance of the HPTSS indicates that it could be an ideal candidate for high-pressure and high-temperature sensing in real application.

  7. Design optimization of high pressure and high temperature piezoresistive pressure sensor for high sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Zhe; Zhao, Yulong; Tian, Bian

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes a design method for optimizing sensitivity of piezoresistive pressure sensor in high-pressure and high-temperature environment. In order to prove the method, a piezoresistive pressure sensor (HPTSS) is designed. With the purpose of increasing sensitivity and to improve the measurement range, the piezoresistive sensor adopts rectangular membrane and thick film structure. The configuration of piezoresistors is arranged according to the characteristic of the rectangular membrane. The structure and configuration of the sensor chip are analyzed theoretically and simulated by the finite element method. This design enables the sensor chip to operate in high pressure condition (such as 150 MPa) with a high sensitivity and accuracy. The silicon on insulator wafer is selected to guarantee the thermo stability of the sensor chip. In order to optimize the fabrication and improve the yield of production, an electric conduction step is devised. Series of experiments demonstrates a favorable linearity of 0.13% and a high accuracy of 0.48%. And the sensitivity of HTPSS is about six times as high as a conventional square-membrane sensor chip in the experiment. Compared with the square-membrane pressure sensor and current production, the strength of HPTTS lies in sensitivity and measurement. The performance of the HPTSS indicates that it could be an ideal candidate for high-pressure and high-temperature sensing in real application.

  8. Novel chitosan derivative for temperature and ultrasound dual-sensitive liposomal microbubble gel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Daquan; Yu, Hongyun; Mu, Hongjie; Wei, Junhua; Song, Zhenkun; Shi, Hong; Liang, Rongcai; Sun, Kaoxiang; Liu, Wanhui

    2013-04-15

    In this study, a novel liposome-loaded microbubble gel based on N-cholesteryl hemisuccinate-O-sulfate chitosan (NCHOSC) was designed. The structure of the NCHOSC was characterized by FTIR and (1)H NMR. The liposomal microbubble gel based on NCHOSC with a high encapsulation efficiency of curcumin was formed and improved the solubility of curcumin. The diameter of most liposomal microbubble was about 950 nm. The temperature-sensitive CS/GP gel could be formulated at room temperature and would form a gel at body temperature. Simultaneously, the ultrasound-sensitive induced release of curcumin was 85% applying ultrasound. The results of cytotoxicity assay indicated that encapsulated curcumin in Cur-LM or Cur-LM-G was less toxic. The anti-tumor efficacy in vivo suggested that Cur-LM-G by ultrasound suppressed tumor growth most efficiently. These findings have shed some light on the potential NCHOSC material used to liposome-loaded microbubble gel for temperature and ultrasound dual-sensitive drug delivery.

  9. Root border cell development is a temperature-insensitive and Al-sensitive process in barley.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Jian-Wei; Ye, Dan; Wang, Li-Ling; Hua, Jing; Zhao, Gu-Feng; Pan, Wei-Huai; Han, Ning; Zhu, Mu-Yuan

    2004-06-01

    In vivo and in vitro experiments showed that border cell (BC) survival was dependent on root tip mucigel in barley (Hordeum vulgare L. cv. Hang 981). In aeroponic culture, BC development was an induced process in barley, whereas in hydroponic culture, it was a kinetic equilibrium process during which 300-400 BCs were released into water daily. The response of root elongation to temperatures (10-35 degrees C) was very sensitive but temperature changes had no great effect on barley BC development. At 35 degrees C, the root elongation ceased whereas BC production still continued, indicating that the two processes might be regulated independently under high temperature (35 degrees C) stress. Fifty microM Al could inhibit significantly BC development by inhibiting pectin methylesterase activity in the root cap of cv. 2000-2 (Al-sensitive) and cv. Humai 16 (Al-tolerant), but 20 microM Al could not block BC development in cv. Humai 16. BCs and their mucigel of barley had a limited role in the protection of Al-induced inhibition of root elongation, but played a significant role in the prevention of Al from diffusing into the meristems of the root tip and the root cap. Together, these results suggested that BC development was a temperature-insensitive but Al-sensitive process, and that BCs and their mucigel played an important role in the protection of root tip and root cap meristems from Al toxicity.

  10. Soil organic matter decomposition and temperature sensitivity after forest fire in permafrost regions in Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aaltonen, Heidi; Palviainen, Marjo; Köster, Kajar; Berninger, Frank; Pumpanen, Jukka

    2017-04-01

    On the Northern Hemisphere, 24% of soils are underlain by permafrost. These soils contain 50% of the global soil carbon pool. The Northern Hemisphere is also the region which is predicted to be most affected by climate warming and this causes uncertainties over the future of the permafrost. It has been estimated that 25% of permafrost might thaw by 2100, exposing previously frozen carbon pools to decomposition. In addition, global warming is expected to cause increase in the frequency of wild fires, which further increase permafrost melting by removing the insulating organic surface layer. The amount of released soil carbon from permafrost soils after forest fire is affected by degradability and temperature sensitivity of the soil organic matter, as well as soil depth and the stage of succession. Yet the common effect of these factors remains unclear. We studied how soil respiration and its temperature sensitivity (Q10) vary in different depths and within time by taking soil samples from different fire chronosequence areas (burned 3, 25, 46 and 100 years ago) from permafrost region in Northern Canada (Yukon and Northwest Territories, along Dempster Highway). The samples from three different depths (5, 10 and 30 cm) were incubated in four different temperatures (1, 7, 13 and 19°C) over 24h. Our results showed that the CO2 fluxes followed the stages of succession, with recently burned sites having lowest rates. The organic matter at 5 cm depth proved to be more labile and temperature sensitive than in deeper depths. The Q10 values, however, did not differ between sites, excluding 30 cm at the most recently burned site that had a significantly higher Q10 value than the other sites. The results implicate that heterotrophic soil respiration decreases on permafrost regions during the first stages after forest fire. At the same time the temperature sensitivity in deeper soil layers may increase.

  11. Triggered release of doxorubicin from temperature-sensitive poly(N-(2-hydroxypropyl)-methacrylamide mono/dilactate) grafted liposomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Elk, Merel; Deckers, Roel; Oerlemans, Chris; Shi, Yang; Storm, Gerrit; Vermonden, Tina; Hennink, Wim E.

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to design temperature-sensitive liposomes with tunable release characteristics that release their content at an elevated temperature generated by high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) exposure. To this end, thermosensitive polymers of

  12. The sensitivity of multiple equilibria in a cloud resolving model to sea surface temperature changes in weak temperature gradient simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sentic, Stipo; Sessions, Sharon

    2012-10-01

    In the tropics, gravity waves quickly redistribute buoyancy anomalies, which leads to approximately weak temperature gradients (WTG) in the horizontal. In our cloud resolving model (CRM), the WTG approximation is enforced by relaxing potential temperature perturbations to a reference profile which represents the mean state of the atmosphere. To obtain reference profiles, the model is run in a non-WTG mode until radiative convective equilibrium (RCE). RCE vertical profiles of temperature and moisture are then used as reference profiles for WTG simulations. Continuing the work of Sessions et al (2010), we investigate the sensitivity of multiple equilibria in a CRM to changes in sea surface temperatures (SST). Multiple equilibria refers to a precipitating or non-precipitating steady state under identical forcing conditions. Specifically, we run RCE simulations for different SSTs to generate reference profiles representing different large scale environments for WTG simulations. We then perform WTG experiments for each SST with varying surface wind speeds. The model domain is initialized either with a completely dry troposphere, or with a RCE moisture profile. We find that the range of wind speeds maintaining both a dry and a precipitating steady state is strongly dependent on SST.

  13. Temperature dependence of sensitized Er(3+) luminescence in silicon-rich oxynitride films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Lingbo; Li, Si; Jin, Lu; Li, Dongsheng; Yang, Deren

    2014-01-01

    The temperature dependence of sensitized Er(3+) emission via localized states and silicon nanoclusters has been studied to get an insight into the excitation and de-excitation processes in silicon-rich oxynitride films. The thermal quenching of Er(3+) luminescence is elucidated by terms of decay time and effective excitation cross section. The temperature quenching of Er(3+) decay time demonstrates the presence of non-radiative trap states, whose density and energy gap between Er(3+) (4) I 13/2 excited levels are reduced by high-temperature annealing. The effective excitation cross section initially increases and eventually decreases with temperature, indicating that the energy transfer process is phonon assisted in both samples.

  14. Quantification of the temperature sensitivity of three substrate-enzyme pairings of soil-ecological relevance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmeier, C.; Ballantyne, F.; Billings, S. A.

    2011-12-01

    Soil microbes obtain resources from substrates exhibiting variation in structural complexity, carbon to nitrogen ratio (C:N), and energy requirements for decomposition. Theory of enzyme kinetics predicts that the activation energy required for substrate decomposition decreases with increasing temperature, and that the magnitude of the decrease increases with structural complexity of the substrate. However, the temperature sensitivity of important substrate-enzyme reactions at soil-relevant temperatures is largely unknown. Predicting soil organic matter (SOM) decay with rising temperature may be further complicated by changing microbial resource uptake due to 1) direct physiological responses to temperature shifts and 2) altered C and N availability imposed by changing patterns of enzymatic SOM decomposition. This could generate departures from expectations of the overall temperature response of SOM decay. Thus, quantification of both factors (changes in single reaction rates and in microbial community functioning) is important to understand the mechanisms governing soil-atmosphere CO2 fluxes with rising temperature. Here, we quantify the temperature sensitivity of substrate-enzyme pairings relevant to global soil biogeochemistry: (1) β-D-cellobioside (BC) and β-Glucosidase (BGase); (2) N-acetyl-β-D-glucosaminide (NAG) and β-N-Acetyl glucosaminidase (NAGase) and (3) 3,4-Dihydroxy-L-phenylalanine (L-Dopa) and peroxidase (representative of breakdown products of cellulose, chitin and lignin and associated enzymes, respectively). We assessed reaction rates of BC/BGase and NAG/NAGase with fluorophotometric techniques. Both pairings exhibited Michaelis-Menten-like kinetics. When neither enzyme nor substrate was limiting, maximum specific activity (Vmax) of BGase was 28 μmol h-1 unit -1 at 27 °C, approximately three orders of magnitude higher than NAGase (2.5 nmol h-1 unit-1 at 25 °C). Spectrophomometric measurements of L-Dopa degradation rates did not yield

  15. Hot experience for cold-adapted microorganisms: temperature sensitivity of soil enzymes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shibin; Razavidezfuly, Baharsadat; Kuzyakov, Yakov

    2016-04-01

    The temperature sensitivity of enzymes responsible for organic matter decomposition in cold environment soil, where warming is expected to be greatest is crucial. Based on Michaelis-Menten kinetics and Arrhenius function, we hypothesized that cold-adapted microorganisms will produce high efficient enzymes at cold temperatures (enzymes with lower apparent activation energy (Ea) at cold temperature ranges). To test our hypothesis, 30 g soil of Tibetan Plateau (4100 m a.s.l., annual temperature 2.4 °C) in 4 replicates were incubated for one month over a temperature range of 0-40 °C (with 5 °C steps) and determined the kinetic parameters of six enzymes involved in decomposing organics: cellobiohydrolase and β-glucosidase, which are commonly measured as enzymes responsible for consecutive stages of cellulose degradation; xylanase, which is responsible for breaking down hemicelluloses; acid phosphatase, which mineralizes organic P to phosphate by hydrolyzing phosphoric (mono) ester bonds under acidic conditions. Activities of leucine aminopeptidase and tyrosine aminopeptidase were analyzed to assess the hydrolysis of L-peptide bonds. The apparent activation energy varied between enzymes from 42 (phosphatase) to 54 (cellobiohydrolase) kJ mol-1 corresponding to the Q10 values of the enzyme reactions of 1.8-2.3. The increase of substrate affinity (Km) with temperature was gradual for most tested enzymes from 0-20 °C (enzymes involved in C cycle), (proteases) and 0-40 °C (phosphatase). However, within a high range of temperatures (25-40 °C) the hydrolytic activity was governed by enzymes with nearly constant substrate affinity. Overall, for enzymes involved in C cycle and proteases, a strong increase (30-40%) in Km at high temperatures (25 °C) reflects an expression of multiple isoenzymes each with different temperature optima and probable shift of microbial community. The general trend of catalytic efficiency (Vmax/Km) demonstrated a gradual increase with

  16. Flood forecast sensitivity to temperature using ECMWF ensembles for 145 catchments in Norway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahr Hegdahl, Trine; Engeland, Kolbjørn; Grønbech, Bård Johan; Steinsland, Ingelin; Merete Tallaksen, Lena

    2017-04-01

    The Norwegian flood forecasting service is based on a flood-forecasting model run on 145 basins. The basins are located all across Norway and differ in both size and hydrological regime. Current flood forecasting system is based on deterministic meteorological forecasts, and uses an auto-regressive procedure to achieve probabilistic forecasts. An alternative approach is to use meteorological and hydrological ensemble forecasts to quantify the uncertainty in forecasted streamflow. The aim of our study is to establish and assess the performance of both meteorological and hydrological ensembles for 145 catchments in Norway, which differ in size, elevation and hydrological regime. We identify regional differences and improvements in performance for preprocessed meteorological forecasts. A separate study further investigates the sensitivity to forecasted temperature for specific snowmelt induced floods. In Norway, snowmelt and combined rain and snowmelt floods are frequent. Hence, temperature is important for correct calculations of snowmelt. Temperature and precipitation ensembles are derived from ECMWF covering a period of nearly three years (01.03.2013 to 31.12.2015). To improve the spread and reduce bias we used standard methods provided by the Norwegian Meteorological Institute. Precipitation is corrected applying a zero-adjusted gamma distribution method (correcting the spread), and temperature is bias corrected using a quantile-quantile mapping (using Hirlam (RCM) 5 km temperature grid as a reference). Observed temperature and precipitation data are station data for all of Norway, interpolated to a 1×1 km2 grid (SeNorge.no). Streamflow observations are available from the NVE database. The hydrological model is the flood-forecasting operational HBV model, run with daily catchment average values. The results show that the methods applied to meteorological ensemble data reduce the cold bias present in the ECMWF temperature ensembles. Catchments on the western coast

  17. Sensitivity of Asian Summer Monsoon precipitation to tropical sea surface temperature anomalies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Lei; Shin, Sang-Ik; Liu, Zhengyu; Liu, Qinyu

    2016-10-01

    Sensitivity of Asian Summer Monsoon (ASM) precipitation to tropical sea surface temperature (SST) anomalies was estimated from ensemble simulations of two atmospheric general circulation models (GCMs) with an array of idealized SST anomaly patch prescriptions. Consistent sensitivity patterns were obtained in both models. Sensitivity of Indian Summer Monsoon (ISM) precipitation to cooling in the East Pacific was much weaker than to that of the same magnitude in the local Indian-western Pacific, over which a meridional pattern of warm north and cold south was most instrumental in increasing ISM precipitation. This indicates that the strength of the ENSO-ISM relationship is due to the large-amplitude East Pacific SST anomaly rather than its sensitivity value. Sensitivity of the East Asian Summer Monsoon (EASM), represented by the Yangtze-Huai River Valley (YHRV, also known as the meiyu-baiu front) precipitation, is non-uniform across the Indian Ocean basin. YHRV precipitation was most sensitive to warm SST anomalies over the northern Indian Ocean and the South China Sea, whereas the southern Indian Ocean had the opposite effect. This implies that the strengthened EASM in the post-Niño year is attributable mainly to warming of the northern Indian Ocean. The corresponding physical links between these SST anomaly patterns and ASM precipitation were also discussed. The relevance of sensitivity maps was justified by the high correlation between sensitivity-map-based reconstructed time series using observed SST anomaly patterns and actual precipitation series derived from ensemble-mean atmospheric GCM runs with time-varying global SST prescriptions during the same period. The correlation results indicated that sensitivity maps derived from patch experiments were far superior to those based on regression methods.

  18. Continuous rainfall generation for a warmer climate using observed temperature sensitivities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasko, Conrad; Sharma, Ashish

    2017-01-01

    Continuous rainfall sequences are often used as inputs in hydrologic modeling, particularly where a probabilistic assessment is required. Continuous rainfall sequences provide a means for accounting of all aspects of rainfall that produce flooding, for example, not just the design rainfall event but also the rainfall prior to the extreme rainfall event. With the advent of climate change, higher temperatures have been associated with changes in rainfall, in particular intensifying rainfall extremes with less uniform temporal patterns. Given these demonstrated changes to extreme rainfall with temperature rise, there is a need to modify continuous rainfall generators to account for current and likely future changes in temperature. In this work we propose a novel method for simulating continuous rainfall sequences for a future warmer climate by conditioning parameters on their historical sensitivity with temperature. To demonstrate the proposed technique we use a one-dimensional Neyman-Scott Rectangular Pulses model at two locations across Australia. The statistics used in the parameter estimation are conditioned on their historical sensitivity to average monthly temperature to simulate rainfall for a change in temperature. The results are validated by comparing the simulated rainfall against observations originating from differing temperatures and it is shown that the model captures the relative difference in the mean monthly rainfall and monthly maxima. Encouraged by these results we simulate rainfall for higher temperatures and capture expected changes to annual maxima and design temporal patterns for a warmer climate. While we demonstrate our methodology in the simulation of sub-daily rainfall using a specific model, the approach presented here can be applied to all weather generation schemes for projection in a warmer climate.

  19. High-temperature sensitivity and its acclimation for photosynthetic electron transport reactions of desert succulents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chetti, M B; Nobel, P S

    1987-08-01

    Photosynthetic electron transport reactions of succulent plants from hot deserts are able to tolerate extremely high temperatures and to acclimate to seasonal increases in temperature. In this study, we report the influence of relatively long, in vivo, high-temperature treatments on electron transport reactions for two desert succulents, Agave deserti and Opuntia ficus-indica, species which can tolerate 60 degrees C. Whole chain electron transport averaged 3 degrees C more sensitive to a 1-hour high-temperature treatment than did PSII (Photosystem II) which in turn averaged 3 degrees C more sensitive than did PSI. For plants maintained at day/night air temperatures of 30 degrees C/20 degrees C, treatment at 50 degrees C caused these reactions to be inhibited an average of 39% during the first hour, an additional 31% during the next 4 hours, and 100% by 12 hours. Upon shifting the plants from 30 degrees C/20 degrees C to 45 degrees C/35 degrees C, the high temperatures where activity was inhibited 50% increased 3 degrees C to 8 degrees C for the three electron transport reactions, the half-times for acclimation averaging 5 days for A. deserti and 4 days for O. ficus-indica. For the 45 degrees C/35 degrees C plants treated at 60 degrees C for 1 hour, PSI activity was reduced by 54% for A. deserti and 36% for O. ficus-indica. Acclimation leads to a toleration of very high temperatures without substantial disruption of electron transport for these desert succulents, facilitating their survival in hot deserts. Indeed, the electron transport reactions of these species tolerate longer periods at higher temperatures than any other vascular plant so far reported.

  20. High-temperature sensitivity and its acclimation for photosynthetic electron reactions of desert succulents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chetti, M.B.; Nobel, P.S. (Univ. of California, Los Angeles (USA))

    1987-08-01

    Photosynthetic electron reactions of succulent plants from hot deserts are able to tolerate extremely high temperatures and to acclimate to seasonal increase in temperature. In this study, we report the influence of relatively long, in vivo, high-temperature treatments on electron transport reactions for two desert succulents, Agave deserti and Opuntia ficus-indica, species which can tolerate 60{degree}C. Whole chain electron transport averaged 3{degree}C more sensitive to a 1-hour high-temperature treatment than did PSII (Photosystem II) which in turn averaged 3{degree}C more sensitive than did PSI. For plants maintained at day/night air temperatures of 30{degree}C/20{degree}C, treatment at 50{degree}C cause these reactions to be inhibited an average of 39% during the first hour, an additional 31% during the next 4 hours, and 100% by 12 hours. Upon shifting the plants from 30{degree}C/20{degree}C to 45{degree}C/35{degree}C, the high temperatures where activity was inhibited 50% increased 3{degree}C to 8{degree}C for the three electron transport reactions, the half-times for acclimation averaging 5 days for A. deserti and 4 days for O. ficus-indica. For the 45{degree}C/35{degree}C plants treated at 60{degree}C for 1 hour, PSI activity was reduced by 54% for A. deserti and 36% for O. ficus-indica. Acclimation leads to a toleration of very high temperatures without substantial disruption of electron transport for these desert succulents, facilitating their survival in hot deserts. Indeed, the electron transport reactions of these species tolerate longer periods at higher temperatures than any other vascular plants so far reported.

  1. Soil warming increases metabolic quotients of soil microorganisms without changes in temperature sensitivity of soil respiration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marañón-Jiménez, Sara; Soong, Jenniffer L.; Leblans, Niki I. W.; Sigurdsson, Bjarni D.; Dauwe, Steven; Fransen, Erik; Janssens, Ivan A.

    2017-04-01

    Increasing temperatures can accelerate soil organic matter (SOM) decomposition and release large amounts of CO2 to the atmosphere, potentially inducing climate change feedbacks. Alterations to the temperature sensitivity and metabolic pathways of soil microorganisms in response to soil warming can play a key role in these soil carbon (C) losses. Here, we present results of an incubation experiment using soils from a geothermal gradient in Iceland that have been subjected to different intensities of soil warming (+0, +1, +3, +5, +10 and +20 °C above ambient) over seven years. We hypothesized that 7 years of soil warming would led to a depletion of labile organic substrates, with a subsequent decrease of the "apparent" temperature sensitivity of soil respiration. Associated to this C limitation and more sub-optimal conditions for microbial growth, we also hypothesized increased microbial metabolic quotients (soil respiration per unit of microbial biomass), which is associated with increases in the relative amount of C invested into catabolic pathways along the warming gradient. Soil respiration and basal respiration rates decreased with soil warming intensity, in parallel with a decline in soil C availability. Contrasting to our first hypothesis, we did not detect changes in the temperature sensitivity of soil respiration with soil warming or on the availability of nutrients and of labile C substrates at the time of incubation. However, in agreement to our second hypothesis, microbial metabolic quotients (soil respiration per unit of microbial biomass) increased at warmer temperatures, while the C retained in biomass decreased as substrate became limiting. Long-term (7 years) temperature increases thus triggered a change in the metabolic functioning of the soil microbial communities towards increasing energy costs for maintenance or resource acquisition, thereby lowering the capacity of C retention and stabilization of warmed soils. These results highlight the need

  2. Thermal analysis of optical reference cavities for low sensitivity to environmental temperature fluctuations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Xiaojiao; Jiang, Yanyi; Hang, Chao; Bi, Zhiyi; Ma, Longsheng

    2015-02-23

    The temperature stability of optical reference cavities is significant in state-of-the-art ultra-stable narrow-linewidth laser systems. In this paper, the thermal time constant and thermal sensitivity of reference cavities are analyzed when reference cavities respond to environmental perturbations via heat transfer of thermal conduction and thermal radiation separately. The analysis as well as simulation results indicate that a reference cavity enclosed in multiple layers of thermal shields with larger mass, higher thermal capacity and lower emissivity is found to have a larger thermal time constant and thus a smaller sensitivity to environmental temperature perturbations. The design of thermal shields for reference cavities may vary according to experimentally achievable temperature stability and the coefficient of thermal expansion of reference cavities. A temperature fluctuation-induced length instability of reference cavities as low as 6 × 10(-16) on a day timescale can be achieved if a two-layer thermal shield is inserted between a cavity with the coefficient of thermal expansion of 1 × 10(-10) /K and an outer vacuum chamber with temperature fluctuation amplitude of 1 mK and period of 24 hours.

  3. An alphavirus temperature-sensitive capsid mutant reveals stages of nucleocapsid assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Yan, E-mail: yzheng15@students.kgi.edu; Kielian, Margaret, E-mail: margaret.kielian@einstein.yu.edu

    2015-10-15

    Alphaviruses have a nucleocapsid core composed of the RNA genome surrounded by an icosahedral lattice of capsid protein. An insertion after position 186 in the capsid protein produced a strongly temperature-sensitive growth phenotype. Even when the structural proteins were synthesized at the permissive temperature (28 °C), subsequent incubation of the cells at the non-permissive temperature (37 °C) dramatically decreased mutant capsid protein stability and particle assembly. Electron microscopy confirmed the presence of cytoplasmic nucleocapsids in mutant-infected cells cultured at the permissive temperature, but these nucleocapsids were not stable to sucrose gradient separation. In contrast, nucleocapsids isolated from mutant virus particles had similar stability to that of wildtype virus. Our data support a model in which cytoplasmic nucleocapsids go through a maturation step during packaging into virus particles. The insertion site lies in the interface between capsid proteins in the assembled nucleocapsid, suggesting the region where such a stabilizing transition occurs. - Highlights: • We characterize an alphavirus capsid insertion mutation. • These capsid mutants are highly temperature sensitive for growth. • The insertion affects nucleocapsid stability. • Results suggest that the nucleocapsid is stabilized during virus budding.

  4. Array of 12 coils to measure the position, alignment, and sensitivity of magnetic sensors over temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husstedt, Hendrik; Ausserlechner, Udo; Kaltenbacher, Manfred

    2012-04-01

    A measurement setup is presented that allows one to determine the position, alignment, and sensitivity of magnetic sensors over temperature. To this end, an array of 12 coils is used where the number of coils is larger than the number of unknowns to increase accuracy, and to ensure an adequate measurement signal for an arbitrary orientation of the magnetic sensors. With this coil array, a 3D sensing system is analyzed which is used during the testing of automotive magnetic sensors. In particular, the influence of assembly tolerances, and the variation of temperature are examined.

  5. Growth and immunity conferred by a Plasmodium falciparum temperature sensitive mutant in Panamanian owl monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inselburg, J; Rossan, R N; Escajadillo, A

    1989-05-01

    We have compared the growth of the wild type Plasmodium falciparum strain Honduras 1 and a previously isolated temperature sensitive mutant of it, AP1-16, in Panamanian owl monkeys. We examined serially infected splenectomized and normal animals that were initially infected with cultured parasites that had been grown in a mixture of owl monkey and human erythrocytes. Initial infections in splenectomized monkeys were marked by multiple recrudescences. The mutant grew less well than the wild type in the splenectomized monkeys, as determined by lower peak and total parasitemias. In the splenectomized monkeys tested by rechallenge with the wild type parasite, the mutant stimulated a comparable degree of protection. That protection was manifested in 2 ways. There was a marked reduction in the level of the primary parasitemia in the rechallenged monkeys and an absence of recrudescent parasitemias after the primary parasitemia. The potential value of generating and studying temperature sensitive P. falciparum strains that show attenuated growth is considered.

  6. Escherichia coli K-12 mutant forming a temperature-sensitive D-serine deaminase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFall, E

    1975-03-01

    A single-site mutant of Escherichia coli K-12 able to grow in minimal medium in the presence of D-serine at 30 C but not at 42 C was isolated. The mutant forms a D-serine deaminase that is much more sensitive to thermal denaturation in vitro at temperatures above but not below 47 C than that of the wild type. No detectable enzyme is formed by the mutant at 42 C, however, and very little is formed at 37 C. The mutant enzyme is probably more sensitive to intracellular inactivation at high temperatures than the wild-type enzyme. The mutation lies in the dsdA region. The mutant also contains a dsdO mutation, which does not permit hyperinduction of D-serine deaminase synthesis.

  7. Shot-noise-limited magnetometer with sub-picotesla sensitivity at room temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucivero, Vito Giovanni; Anielski, Pawel; Gawlik, Wojciech; Mitchell, Morgan W

    2014-11-01

    We report a photon shot-noise-limited (SNL) optical magnetometer based on amplitude modulated optical rotation using a room-temperature (85)Rb vapor in a cell with anti-relaxation coating. The instrument achieves a room-temperature sensitivity of 70 fT / √Hz at 7.6 μT. Experimental scaling of noise with optical power, in agreement with theoretical predictions, confirms the SNL behaviour from 5 μT to 75 μT. The combination of best-in-class sensitivity and SNL operation makes the system a promising candidate for application of squeezed light to a state-of-the-art atomic sensor.

  8. APPLICATION OF NONIONIC TEMPERATURE SENSITIVE HYDROGEL FOR CONCENTRATION OF PROTEIN AQUEOUS SOLUTION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Yishi; QIU Zhiyong; HONG Yaoliang

    1992-01-01

    Six different N-alkyl substituted acrylamide nonionic hydrogels were prepared and their swelling characteristics were measured. Poly N-isopropyl acrylamide (PNIPA) and poly N-n-propylacrylamide (PNNPA) temperature sensitive hydrogels were chosen as the nonionic temperature sensitive hydrogels for concentration of very dilute aqueous protein solution. The separation properties of PNIPA and PNNPA hydrogels with different network dimensions were studied and the modification of the hydrogels was surveyed in order to decrease their surface adsorption of protein molecules. The experimental results of the concentration of BSA (Bovin serum albumin) dilute aqueous solution by hydroxylpropyl methacrylate (HPMA) copolymerized PNIPA hydrogel were given. The value and the limitation of concentration of dilute aqueous protein solution by this method was evaluated.

  9. Sensitivity of CO2 migration estimation on reservoir temperature and pressure uncertainty

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jordan, Preston; Doughty, Christine

    2008-11-01

    The density and viscosity of supercritical CO{sub 2} are sensitive to pressure and temperature (PT) while the viscosity of brine is sensitive primarily to temperature. Oil field PT data in the vicinity of WESTCARB's Phase III injection pilot test site in the southern San Joaquin Valley, California, show a range of PT values, indicating either PT uncertainty or variability. Numerical simulation results across the range of likely PT indicate brine viscosity variation causes virtually no difference in plume evolution and final size, but CO{sub 2} density variation causes a large difference. Relative ultimate plume size is almost directly proportional to the relative difference in brine and CO{sub 2} density (buoyancy flow). The majority of the difference in plume size occurs during and shortly after the cessation of injection.

  10. Temperature sensitivity of circadian clocks is conserved across Drosophila species melanogaster, malerkotliana and ananassae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabhakaran, Priya M; Sheeba, Vasu

    2014-11-01

    Light and temperature are the major environmental cycles that can synchronize circadian rhythms in a variety of organisms. Previously, we have shown that under light/dark cycles of various photoperiods, the Drosophila species ananassae exhibits unimodal activity pattern with a prominent morning activity peak in contrast with Drosophila melanogaster and Drosophila malerkotliana, which show bimodal activity pattern with morning and evening activity peaks. Here we report that circadian clocks controlling activity/rest rhythm of these two less-studied species D. malerkotliana and D. ananassae can be synchronized by temperature cycles and that even under temperature cycles D. ananassae exhibits only a pronounced morning (thermophase onset) activity peak. Although D. melanogaster and D. ananassae exhibit differences in the phase of activity/rest rhythm under temperature cycles, circadian clocks of both show similar sensitivity to warm temperature pulses. Circadian period of activity/rest rhythm of D. ananassae differs from the other two species at some moderate-range temperatures; however, in conditions that are more extreme, circadian clocks of D. melanogaster, D. malerkotliana and D. ananassae appear to be largely temperature compensated.

  11. Transposition of Tn5096 from a temperature-sensitive transducible plasmid in Streptomyces spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McHenney, M A; Baltz, R H

    1991-09-01

    Transposon Tn5096 was inserted into a derivative of the temperature-sensitive plasmid pMT660 containing the bacteriophage FP43 pac site. The resulting plasmid, pRHB126, was transduced by FP43 into several Streptomyces species. Tn5096 transposed from pRHB126 into different sites in the genomes of Streptomyces ambofaciens, Streptomyces cinnamonensis, Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2), Streptomyces fradiae, Streptomyces griseofuscus, and Streptomyces thermotolerans.

  12. Transposition of Tn5096 from a temperature-sensitive transducible plasmid in Streptomyces spp.

    OpenAIRE

    McHenney, M A; Baltz, R H

    1991-01-01

    Transposon Tn5096 was inserted into a derivative of the temperature-sensitive plasmid pMT660 containing the bacteriophage FP43 pac site. The resulting plasmid, pRHB126, was transduced by FP43 into several Streptomyces species. Tn5096 transposed from pRHB126 into different sites in the genomes of Streptomyces ambofaciens, Streptomyces cinnamonensis, Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2), Streptomyces fradiae, Streptomyces griseofuscus, and Streptomyces thermotolerans.

  13. Sensitivity of cold acclimation to elevated autumn temperature in field-grown Pinus strobus seedlings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Yao-Yun Chang

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Climate change will increase autumn air temperature, while photoperiod decrease will remain unaffected. We assessed the effect of increased autumn air temperature on timing and development of cold acclimation and freezing resistance in Eastern white pine (EWP, Pinus strobus under field conditions. For this purpose we simulated projected warmer temperatures for southern Ontario in a Temperature Free-Air-Controlled Enhancement (T-FACE experiment and exposed EWP seedlings to ambient (Control or elevated temperature (ET, +1.5°C/+3°C during day/night. Photosynthetic gas exchange, chlorophyll fluorescence, photoprotective pigments, leaf non-structural carbohydrates (NSC, and cold hardiness were assessed over two consecutive autumns. Nighttime temperature below 10°C and photoperiod below 12h initiated downregulation of assimilation in both treatments. When temperature further decreased to 0°C and photoperiod became shorter than 10h, downregulation of the light reactions and upregulation of photoprotective mechanisms occurred in both treatments. While ET seedlings did not delay the timing of the downregulation of assimilation, stomatal conductance in ET seedlings was decreased by 20-30% between August and early October. In both treatments leaf NSC composition changed considerably during autumn but differences between Control and ET seedlings were not significant. Similarly, development of freezing resistance was induced by exposure to low temperature during autumn, but the timing was not delayed in ET seedlings compared to Control seedlings. Our results indicate that EWP is most sensitive to temperature changes during October and November when downregulation of photosynthesis , enhancement of photoprotection, synthesis of cold-associated NSCs and development of freezing resistance occur. However, we also conclude that the timing of the development of freezing resistance in EWP seedlings is not affected by moderate temperature increases used in our

  14. Role of temperature in the recombination reaction on dye-sensitized solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maçaira, J; Mesquita, I; Andrade, L; Mendes, A

    2015-09-21

    The performance of photovoltaic (PV) devices as a function of temperature is crucial for technical development and for accurate commercial information. Along with solar irradiance, temperature is the most important operating factor of the PV device performance. Normally, it is widely accepted that dye sensitized solar cells (DSC) show minimal energy efficiency dependence with temperature (20-60 °C). The energy efficiency in DSCs depends on the light absorption, charge transport (ohmic resistances) and recombination rates. In this study, the recombination reaction kinetics was studied within a wide temperature range. A unique laser assisted sealing technique that allows studying the temperature effect between -5 °C and 105 °C without electrolyte leakage or external contamination was used. To the best of our knowledge, this is the highest operating temperature ever considered in kinetic studies of liquid state DSCs. The electrochemical reaction between electrons and triiodide/iodide ions was shown to be the most important factor for determining the energy efficiency of DSCs as a function of temperature. It was concluded that the activation energy of the recombination reactions depends on the interface where it happens - TiO2/electrolyte and SnO2-F/electrolyte - and on the temperature. It was found that in addition to temperature having a deep influence on the recombination reaction rate, the energy of the injecting electron is also critical. These conclusions should provide solid ground for further developments in the DSCs and perovskite solar cells, and allow a better comparison of the energy efficiency of different PV technologies over a range of operating temperatures.

  15. Temperature modulates coccolithophorid sensitivity of growth, photosynthesis and calcification to increasing seawater pCO₂.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sett, Scarlett; Bach, Lennart T; Schulz, Kai G; Koch-Klavsen, Signe; Lebrato, Mario; Riebesell, Ulf

    2014-01-01

    Increasing atmospheric CO₂ concentrations are expected to impact pelagic ecosystem functioning in the near future by driving ocean warming and acidification. While numerous studies have investigated impacts of rising temperature and seawater acidification on planktonic organisms separately, little is presently known on their combined effects. To test for possible synergistic effects we exposed two coccolithophore species, Emiliania huxleyi and Gephyrocapsa oceanica, to a CO₂ gradient ranging from ∼0.5-250 µmol kg⁻¹ (i.e. ∼20-6000 µatm pCO₂) at three different temperatures (i.e. 10, 15, 20°C for E. huxleyi and 15, 20, 25°C for G. oceanica). Both species showed CO₂-dependent optimum-curve responses for growth, photosynthesis and calcification rates at all temperatures. Increased temperature generally enhanced growth and production rates and modified sensitivities of metabolic processes to increasing CO₂. CO₂ optimum concentrations for growth, calcification, and organic carbon fixation rates were only marginally influenced from low to intermediate temperatures. However, there was a clear optimum shift towards higher CO₂ concentrations from intermediate to high temperatures in both species. Our results demonstrate that the CO₂ concentration where optimum growth, calcification and carbon fixation rates occur is modulated by temperature. Thus, the response of a coccolithophore strain to ocean acidification at a given temperature can be negative, neutral or positive depending on that strain's temperature optimum. This emphasizes that the cellular responses of coccolithophores to ocean acidification can only be judged accurately when interpreted in the proper eco-physiological context of a given strain or species. Addressing the synergistic effects of changing carbonate chemistry and temperature is an essential step when assessing the success of coccolithophores in the future ocean.

  16. Temperature modulates coccolithophorid sensitivity of growth, photosynthesis and calcification to increasing seawater pCO₂.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scarlett Sett

    Full Text Available Increasing atmospheric CO₂ concentrations are expected to impact pelagic ecosystem functioning in the near future by driving ocean warming and acidification. While numerous studies have investigated impacts of rising temperature and seawater acidification on planktonic organisms separately, little is presently known on their combined effects. To test for possible synergistic effects we exposed two coccolithophore species, Emiliania huxleyi and Gephyrocapsa oceanica, to a CO₂ gradient ranging from ∼0.5-250 µmol kg⁻¹ (i.e. ∼20-6000 µatm pCO₂ at three different temperatures (i.e. 10, 15, 20°C for E. huxleyi and 15, 20, 25°C for G. oceanica. Both species showed CO₂-dependent optimum-curve responses for growth, photosynthesis and calcification rates at all temperatures. Increased temperature generally enhanced growth and production rates and modified sensitivities of metabolic processes to increasing CO₂. CO₂ optimum concentrations for growth, calcification, and organic carbon fixation rates were only marginally influenced from low to intermediate temperatures. However, there was a clear optimum shift towards higher CO₂ concentrations from intermediate to high temperatures in both species. Our results demonstrate that the CO₂ concentration where optimum growth, calcification and carbon fixation rates occur is modulated by temperature. Thus, the response of a coccolithophore strain to ocean acidification at a given temperature can be negative, neutral or positive depending on that strain's temperature optimum. This emphasizes that the cellular responses of coccolithophores to ocean acidification can only be judged accurately when interpreted in the proper eco-physiological context of a given strain or species. Addressing the synergistic effects of changing carbonate chemistry and temperature is an essential step when assessing the success of coccolithophores in the future ocean.

  17. Sensitivity of polar stratospheric cloud formation to changes in water vapour and temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khosrawi, F.; Urban, J.; Lossow, S.; Stiller, G.; Weigel, K.; Braesicke, P.; Pitts, M. C.; Rozanov, A.; Burrows, J. P.; Murtagh, D.

    2016-01-01

    More than a decade ago it was suggested that a cooling of stratospheric temperatures by 1 K or an increase of 1 ppmv of stratospheric water vapour could promote denitrification, the permanent removal of nitrogen species from the stratosphere by solid polar stratospheric cloud (PSC) particles. In fact, during the two Arctic winters 2009/10 and 2010/11 the strongest denitrification in the recent decade was observed. Sensitivity studies along air parcel trajectories are performed to test how a future stratospheric water vapour (H2O) increase of 1 ppmv or a temperature decrease of 1 K would affect PSC formation. We perform our study based on measurements made during the Arctic winter 2010/11. Air parcel trajectories were calculated 6 days backward in time based on PSCs detected by CALIPSO (Cloud Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder satellite observations). The sensitivity study was performed on single trajectories as well as on a trajectory ensemble. The sensitivity study shows a clear prolongation of the potential for PSC formation and PSC existence when the temperature in the stratosphere is decreased by 1 K and water vapour is increased by 1 ppmv. Based on 15 years of satellite measurements (2000-2014) from UARS/HALOE, Envisat/MIPAS, Odin/SMR, Aura/MLS, Envisat/SCIAMACHY and SCISAT/ACE-FTS it is further investigated if there is a decrease in temperature and/or increase of water vapour (H2O) observed in the polar regions similar to that observed at midlatitudes and in the tropics. Performing linear regression analyses we derive from the Envisat/MIPAS (2002-2012) and Aura/MLS (2004-2014) observations predominantly positive changes in the potential temperature range 350 to 1000 K. The linear changes in water vapour derived from Envisat/MIPAS observations are largely insignificant, while those from Aura/MLS are mostly significant. For the temperature neither of the two instruments indicate any significant changes. Given the strong inter-annual variation observed in

  18. Limits to global and Australian temperature change this century based on expert judgment of climate sensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grose, Michael R.; Colman, Robert; Bhend, Jonas; Moise, Aurel F.

    2016-07-01

    The projected warming of surface air temperature at the global and regional scale by the end of the century is directly related to emissions and Earth's climate sensitivity. Projections are typically produced using an ensemble of climate models such as CMIP5, however the range of climate sensitivity in models doesn't cover the entire range considered plausible by expert judgment. Of particular interest from a risk-management perspective is the lower impact outcome associated with low climate sensitivity and the low-probability, high-impact outcomes associated with the top of the range. Here we scale climate model output to the limits of expert judgment of climate sensitivity to explore these limits. This scaling indicates an expanded range of projected change for each emissions pathway, including a much higher upper bound for both the globe and Australia. We find the possibility of exceeding a warming of 2 °C since pre-industrial is projected under high emissions for every model even scaled to the lowest estimate of sensitivity, and is possible under low emissions under most estimates of sensitivity. Although these are not quantitative projections, the results may be useful to inform thinking about the limits to change until the sensitivity can be more reliably constrained, or this expanded range of possibilities can be explored in a more formal way. When viewing climate projections, accounting for these low-probability but high-impact outcomes in a risk management approach can complement the focus on the likely range of projections. They can also highlight the scale of the potential reduction in range of projections, should tight constraints on climate sensitivity be established by future research.

  19. Evaluation of the Storm 3 data logger manufactured by WaterLOG/Xylem Incorporated—Results of bench, temperature, and field deployment testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunkle, Gerald A.

    2016-05-04

    The Storm 3 is a browser-based data logger manufactured by WaterLOG/Xylem Incorporated that operates over a temperature range of −40 to 60 degrees Celsius (°C). A Storm logger with no built-in telemetry (Storm3-00) and a logger with built-in cellular modem (Storm3-03) were evaluated by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Hydrologic Instrumentation Facility (HIF) for conformance to the manufacturer’s specifications with bench tests, for recording data over the device’s operating temperature range with temperature chamber tests, and for field performance with an outdoor deployment test.

  20. Shock Sensitivity of LX-04 Containing Delta Phase HMX at Elevated Temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urtiew, P A; Forbes, J W; Tarver, C M; Vandersall, K S; Garcia, F; Greenwood, D W; Hsu, P C; Maienschein, J L

    2003-07-11

    LX-04 is a widely used HMX-based plastic bonded explosive, which contains 85 weight % HMX and 15 weight % Viton binder. The sensitivity of LX-04 to a single stimulus such as heat, impact, and shock has been previously studied. However, hazard scenarios can involve multiple stimuli, such as heating to temperatures close to thermal explosion conditions followed by fragment impact, producing a shock in the hot explosive. The sensitivity of HMX at elevated temperatures is further complicated by the beta to delta solid-state phase transition, which occurs at approximately 165 C. This paper presents the results of shock initiation experiments conducted with LX-04 preheated to 190 C, as well as density measurements and small scale safety test results of the {delta} phase HMX at room temperature. This work shows that LX-04 at 190 C is more shock sensitive than LX-04 at 150 C or 170 C due to the volume increase during the {beta} to {delta} solid phase transition, which creates more hot spots, and the faster growth of reaction during shock compression.

  1. Sensitive biomolecule detection in lateral flow assay with a portable temperature-humidity control device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jane Ru; Hu, Jie; Feng, Shangsheng; Wan Abas, Wan Abu Bakar; Pingguan-Murphy, Belinda; Xu, Feng

    2016-05-15

    Lateral flow assays (LFAs) have currently attracted broad interest for point-of-care (POC) diagnostics, but their application has been restricted by poor quantification and limited sensitivity. While the former has been currently solved to some extent by the development of handheld or smartphone-based readers, the latter has not been addressed fully, particularly the potential influences of environmental conditions (e.g., temperature and relative humidity (RH)), which have not yet received serious attention. The present study reports the use of a portable temperature-humidity control device to provide an optimum environmental requirement for sensitivity improvement in LFAs, followed by quantification by using a smartphone. We found that a RH beyond 60% with temperatures of 55-60°C and 37-40°C produced optimum nucleic acid hybridization and antigen-antibody interaction in LFAs, respectively representing a 10-fold and 3-fold signal enhancement over ambient conditions (25°C, 60% RH). We envision that in the future the portable device could be coupled with a fully integrated paper-based sample-to-answer biosensor for sensitive detection of various target analytes in POC settings.

  2. Single-shot temperature- and pressure-sensitive paint measurements on an unsteady helicopter blade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Disotell, Kevin J.; Peng, Di; Juliano, Thomas J.; Gregory, James W.; Crafton, Jim W.; Komerath, Narayanan M.

    2014-02-01

    Unsteady pressure-sensitive paint (PSP) measurements were acquired on an articulated model helicopter rotor of 0.26 m diameter in edgewise flow to simulate forward flight conditions. The rotor was operated at advance ratios (free stream velocity normalized by hover tip speed) of 0.15 and 0.30 at a cycle-averaged tip chord Reynolds number of 1.1 × 105, with collective and longitudinal cyclic pitch inputs of 10° and 2.5°, respectively. A single-shot data acquisition technique allowed a camera to record the paint luminescence after a single pulse of high-energy laser excitation, yielding sufficient signal-to-noise ratio to avoid image averaging. Platinum tetra(pentafluorophenyl) porphyrin (PtTFPP) in a porous polymer/ceramic binder served as the PSP. To address errors caused by image blurring and temperature sensitivity, a previously reported motion deblurring algorithm was implemented and the temperature correction was made using temperature-sensitive paint measurements on a second rotor blade. Instantaneous, unsteady surface pressure maps at a rotation rate of 82 Hz captured different aerodynamic responses between the two sides of the rotor disk and were compared to the nominally steady hover case. Cycle-to-cycle variations in tip unsteadiness on the retreating blade were also observed, causing oblique pressure features which may be linked to three-dimensional stall.

  3. Variability of temperature sensitivity of extreme precipitation from a regional-to-local impact scale perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeer, K.; Kirchengast, G.

    2016-12-01

    Relating precipitation intensity to temperature is a popular approach to assess potential changes of extreme events in a warming climate. Potential increases in extreme rainfall induced hazards, such as flash flooding, serve as motivation. It has not been addressed whether the temperature-precipitation scaling approach is meaningful on a regional to local level, where the risk of climate and weather impact is dealt with. Substantial variability of temperature sensitivity of extreme precipitation has been found that results from differing methodological assumptions as well as from varying climatological settings of the study domains. Two aspects are consistently found: First, temperature sensitivities beyond the expected consistency with the Clausius-Clapeyron (CC) equation are a feature of short-duration, convective, sub-daily to sub-hourly high-percentile rainfall intensities at mid-latitudes. Second, exponential growth ceases or reverts at threshold temperatures that vary from region to region, as moisture supply becomes limited. Analyses of pooled data, or of single or dispersed stations over large areas make it difficult to estimate the consequences in terms of local climate risk. In this study we test the meaningfulness of the scaling approach from an impact scale perspective. Temperature sensitivities are assessed using quantile regression on hourly and sub-hourly precipitation data from 189 stations in the Austrian south-eastern Alpine region. The observed scaling rates vary substantially, but distinct regional and seasonal patterns emerge. High sensitivity exceeding CC-scaling is seen on the 10-minute scale more than on the hourly scale, in storms shorter than 2 hours duration, and in shoulder seasons, but it is not necessarily a significant feature of the extremes. To be impact relevant, change rates need to be linked to absolute rainfall amounts. We show that high scaling rates occur in lower temperature conditions and thus have smaller effect on absolute

  4. Development of High Temperature/High Sensitivity Novel Chemical Resistive Sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Chonglin; Nash, Patrick; Ma, Chunrui; Enriquez, Erik; Wang, Haibing; Xu, Xing; Bao, Shangyong; Collins, Gregory

    2013-08-13

    The research has been focused to design, fabricate, and develop high temperature/high sensitivity novel multifunctional chemical sensors for the selective detection of fossil energy gases used in power and fuel systems. By systematically studying the physical properties of the LnBaCo{sub 2}O{sub 5+d} (LBCO) [Ln=Pr or La] thin-films, a new concept chemical sensor based high temperature chemical resistant change has been developed for the application for the next generation highly efficient and near zero emission power generation technologies. We also discovered that the superfast chemical dynamic behavior and an ultrafast surface exchange kinetics in the highly epitaxial LBCO thin films. Furthermore, our research indicates that hydrogen can superfast diffuse in the ordered oxygen vacancy structures in the highly epitaxial LBCO thin films, which suggest that the LBCO thin film not only can be an excellent candidate for the fabrication of high temperature ultra sensitive chemical sensors and control systems for power and fuel monitoring systems, but also can be an excellent candidate for the low temperature solid oxide fuel cell anode and cathode materials.

  5. Temperature-sensitive mutants of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae induce protection in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrd, W; Hooke, A M

    1997-01-01

    Temperature-sensitive mutants of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae 4074, serotype 1, were isolated after treatment with nitrosoguanidine and enrichment with penicillin and D-cycloserine. Of the four temperature-sensitive mutants evaluated in mice, one (A-1) had a tight phenotype (i.e., it ceased replication immediately after transfer to the nonpermissive temperature [37 degrees C]) and three (1-2, 4-1, and 12-1) were coasters that continued replication for up to three generations after transfer to 37 degrees C. The reversion frequencies ranged from 10(-6) to 10(-9), and cutoff temperatures ranged from 33 to 35 degrees C. No major changes were detected in the biochemical profiles; agglutination reactions; electrophoretic profiles of the lipopolysaccharides, outer membrane proteins, and hemolysin proteins; hemolytic titers; or CAMP factor reactions of the mutants and the wild-type bacteria. Groups of 3- to 5-week-old, female ICR mice were immunized intranasally with three doses of 3.5 x 10(6) CFU of the mutants over 3 weeks and subsequently challenged intranasally with 5 50% lethal doses of the parental wild-type. Protection was induced by both the tight and the coaster mutants, with the 4-1 and 12-1 coasters eliciting greater protection (67 and 82%, respectively) than that induced by the A-1 tight mutant (57%). Intranasal immunization with both phenotypes induced serum antibody responses against the surface antigens and the hemolysin protein. PMID:9169752

  6. Differences in sensitivity of native and exotic fish species to changes in river temperature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    R.S.E.W. LEUVEN; A.J. HENDRIKS; M.A.J. HULJBREGTS; H.J.R. LENDERS; J. MATTHEWS; G. VAN DER VELDE

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes the effects that temperature changes in the Rhine river distributaries have on native and exotic fish diversity.Site-specific potentially affected fractions (PAFs) of the regional fish species pool were derived using species sensitivity distributions (SSDs) for water temperature.The number of fish species in the river distributaries has changed remarkably over the last century.The number of native rheophilous species declined up until 1980 due to anthropogenic disturbances such as commercial fishing,river regulation,migration barriers,habitat deterioration and water pollution.In spite of progress in river rehabilitation,the native rheophilous fish fauna has only partially recovered thus far.The total number of species has strongly increased due to the appearance of more exotic species.After the opening of the Rhine-Main-Danube waterway in 1992,many fish species originating from the Ponto-Caspian area colonized the Rhine basin.The yearly minimum and maximum river temperatures at Lobith have increased by circa 4 ℃ over the period 1908-2010.Exotic species show lower PAFs than native species at both ends of the temperature range.The interspecific variation in the temperature tolerance of exotic fish species was found to be large.Using temporal trends in river temperature allowed past predictions of PAFs to demonstrate that the increase in maximum river temperature negatively affected a higher percentage of native fish species than exotic species.Our results support the hypothesis that alterations of the river Rhine's temperature regime caused by thermal pollution and global warming limit the full recovery of native fish fauna and facilitate the establishment of exotic species which thereby increases competition between native and exotic species.Thermal refuges are important for the survival of native fish species under extreme summer or winter temperature conditions [Current Zoology 57 (6):852-862,2011].

  7. Increase of ozone concentrations, its temperature sensitivity and the precursor factor in South China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. C. Lee

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Concerns have been raised about the possible connections between the local and regional photochemical problem and global warming. The current study assesses the trend of ozone in Hong Kong and the Pearl River Delta (PRD in South China and investigates the interannual changes of sensitivity of ozone to air temperature, as well as the trends in regional precursors. Results reveal, at the three monitoring sites from the mid-1990s to 2010, an increase in the mean ozone concentrations from 1.0 to 1.6 µg m−3 per year. The increase occurred in all seasons, with the highest rate in autumn. This is consistent with trends and temperature anomalies in the region. The increase in the sensitivity of ozone to temperature is clearly evident from the correlation between ozone (OMI [Ozone Monitoring Instrument] column amount and surface air temperature (from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder displayed in the correlation maps for the PRD during the prominently high ozone period of July–September. It is observed to have increased from 2005 to 2010, the latter being the hottest year on record globally. To verify this temporal change in sensitivity, the ground-level trends of correlation coefficients/regression slopes are analysed. As expected, results reveal a statistically significant upward trend over a 14-year period (1997–2010. While the correlation revealed in the correlation maps is in agreement with the corresponding OMI ozone maps when juxtaposed, temperature sensitivity of surface ozone also shows an association with ozone concentration, with R=0.5. These characteristics of ozone sensitivity are believed to have adverse implications for the region. As shown by ground measurements and/or satellite analyses, the decrease in nitrogen oxides (NO2 and NOx in Hong Kong is not statistically significant while NO2 of the PRD has only very slightly changed. However, carbon dioxide has remarkably declined in the whole region. While these observations concerning

  8. Analyzing the temperature sensitivity of Fabry-Perot sensor using multilayer graphene diaphragm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Cheng; Liu, Qianwen; Peng, Xiaobin; Fan, Shangchun

    2015-10-19

    A miniature Fabry-Perot interferometric sensor with an ultra-high temperature sensitivity was constructed by using an approximate 8-layer graphene diaphragm. The extremely thin diaphragm was transferred onto the endface of a ferrule with an inner diameter of 125 μm, and van der Waals interactions between the graphene diaphragm and its substrate created a low finesse Fabry-Perot interferometer with a cavity length of 42.86 μm. Temperature testing demonstrated a temperature-induced cavity length change of 352 nm/°C with a good linearity in the range of 20-60 °C. The result conformed well to the proposed analytical models relating to thermal expansion of trapped gas, thermal-optical property of graphene diaphragm and deflection behavior of bulged graphene blister. However, the ultra-thin diaphragm exhibited a small deflection deformation characteristic due to the applied higher loads.

  9. Uncertainty of Wheat Water Use: Simulated Patterns and Sensitivity to Temperature and CO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cammarano, Davide; Roetter, Reimund P.; Asseng, Senthold; Ewert, Frank; Wallach, Daniel; Martre, Pierre; Hatfield, Jerry L.; Jones, James W.; Rosenzweig, Cynthia E.; Ruane, Alex C.; Boote, Kenneth J.; Thorburn, Peter J.; Kersebaum, Kurt Christian; Aggarwal, Pramod K.; Angulo, Carlos; Basso, Bruno; Bertuzzi, Patrick; Biernath, Christian; Brisson, Nadine; Challinor, Andrew J.; Doltra, Jordi; Gayler, Sebastian; Goldberg, Richie; Heng, Lee; Steduto, Pasquale

    2016-01-01

    Projected global warming and population growth will reduce future water availability for agriculture. Thus, it is essential to increase the efficiency in using water to ensure crop productivity. Quantifying crop water use (WU; i.e. actual evapotranspiration) is a critical step towards this goal. Here, sixteen wheat simulation models were used to quantify sources of model uncertainty and to estimate the relative changes and variability between models for simulated WU, water use efficiency (WUE, WU per unit of grain dry mass produced), transpiration efficiency (Teff, transpiration per kg of unit of grain yield dry mass produced), grain yield, crop transpiration and soil evaporation at increased temperatures and elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations ([CO2]). The greatest uncertainty in simulating water use, potential evapotranspiration, crop transpiration and soil evaporation was due to differences in how crop transpiration was modelled and accounted for 50 of the total variability among models. The simulation results for the sensitivity to temperature indicated that crop WU will decline with increasing temperature due to reduced growing seasons. The uncertainties in simulated crop WU, and in particularly due to uncertainties in simulating crop transpiration, were greater under conditions of increased temperatures and with high temperatures in combination with elevated atmospheric [CO2] concentrations. Hence the simulation of crop WU, and in particularly crop transpiration under higher temperature, needs to be improved and evaluated with field measurements before models can be used to simulate climate change impacts on future crop water demand.

  10. Effect of electrode material and design on sensitivity and selectivity for high temperature impedancemetric NOx sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woo, L Y; Glass, R S; Novak, R F; Visser, J H

    2009-09-23

    Solid-state electrochemical sensors using two different sensing electrode compositions, gold and strontium-doped lanthanum manganite (LSM), were evaluated for gas phase sensing of NO{sub x} (NO and NO{sub 2}) using an impedance-metric technique. An asymmetric cell design utilizing porous YSZ electrolyte exposed both electrodes to the test gas (i.e., no reference gas). Sensitivity to less than 5 ppm NO and response/recovery times (10-90%) less than 10 s were demonstrated. Using an LSM sensing electrode, virtual identical sensitivity towards NO and NO{sub 2} was obtained, indicating that the equilibrium gas concentration was measured by the sensing electrode. In contrast, for cells employing a gold sensing electrode the NO{sub x} sensitivity varied depending on the cell design: increasing the amount of porous YSZ electrolyte on the sensor surface produced higher NO{sub 2} sensitivity compared to NO. In order to achieve comparable sensitivity for both NO and NO{sub 2}, the cell with the LSM sensing electrode required operation at a lower temperature (575 C) than the cell with the gold sensing electrode (650 C). The role of surface reactions are proposed to explain the differences in NO and NO{sub 2} selectivity using the two different electrode materials.

  11. Sensitivity of polar stratospheric cloud formation to changes in water vapour and temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Khosrawi

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available More than a decade ago it was suggested that a cooling of stratospheric temperatures by 1 K or an increase of 1 ppmv of stratospheric water vapour could promote denitrification, the permanent removal of nitrogen species from the stratosphere by solid polar stratospheric cloud (PSC particles. In fact, during the two Arctic winters 2009/10 and 2010/11 the strongest denitrification in the recent decade was observed. Sensitivity studies along air parcel trajectories are performed to test how a future stratospheric water vapour (H2O increase of 1 ppmv or a temperature decrease of 1 K would affect PSC formation. We perform our study based on measurements made during the Arctic winter 2010/11. Air parcel trajectories were calculated 6 days backward in time based on PSCs detected by CALIPSO (Cloud Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder satellite observations. The sensitivity study was performed on single trajectories as well as on a trajectory ensemble. The sensitivity study shows a clear prolongation of the potential for PSC formation and PSC existence when the temperature in the stratosphere is decreased by 1 K and water vapour is increased by 1 ppmv. Based on 15 years of satellite measurements (2000–2014 from UARS/HALOE, Envisat/MIPAS, Odin/SMR, Aura/MLS, Envisat/SCIAMACHY and SCISAT/ACE-FTS it is further investigated if there is a decrease in temperature and/or increase of water vapour (H2O observed in the polar regions similar to that observed at midlatitudes and in the tropics. Although in the polar regions no significant trend is found in the lower stratosphere, we found from the observations a correlation between cold winters and enhanced water vapour mixing ratios.

  12. Cooling-sensitive TRPM8 is thermostat of skin temperature against cooling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koji Tajino

    Full Text Available We have shown that cutaneous cooling-sensitive receptors can work as thermostats of skin temperature against cooling. However, molecule of the thermostat is not known. Here, we studied whether cooling-sensitive TRPM8 channels act as thermostats. TRPM8 in HEK293 cells generated output (y when temperature (T was below threshold of 28.4°C. Output (y is given by two equations: At T >28.4°C, y = 0; At T <28.4°C, y  =  -k(T - 28.4°C. These equations show that TRPM8 is directional comparator to elicits output (y depending on negative value of thermal difference (ΔT  =  T - 28.4°C. If negative ΔT-dependent output of TRPM8 in the skin induces responses to warm the skin for minimizing ΔT recursively, TRPM8 acts as thermostats against cooling. With TRPM8-deficient mice, we explored whether TRPM8 induces responses to warm the skin against cooling. In behavioral regulation, when room temperature was 10°C, TRPM8 induced behavior to move to heated floor (35°C for warming the sole skin. In autonomic regulation, TRPM8 induced activities of thermogenic brown adipose tissue (BAT against cooling. When menthol was applied to the whole trunk skin at neutral room temperature (27°C, TRPM8 induced a rise in core temperature, which warmed the trunk skin slightly. In contrast, when room was cooled from 27 to 10°C, TRPM8 induced a small rise in core temperature, but skin temperature was severely reduced in both TRPM8-deficient and wild-type mice by a large heat leak to the surroundings. This shows that TRPM8-driven endothermic system is less effective for maintenance of skin temperature against cooling. In conclusion, we found that TRPM8 is molecule of thermostat of skin temperature against cooling.

  13. A method to account for the temperature sensitivity of TCCON total column measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niebling, Sabrina G.; Wunch, Debra; Toon, Geoffrey C.; Wennberg, Paul O.; Feist, Dietrich G.

    2014-05-01

    The Total Carbon Column Observing Network (TCCON) consists of ground-based Fourier Transform Spectrometer (FTS) systems all around the world. It achieves better than 0.25% precision and accuracy for total column measurements of CO2 [Wunch et al. (2011)]. In recent years, the TCCON data processing and retrieval software (GGG) has been improved to achieve better and better results (e. g. ghost correction, improved a priori profiles, more accurate spectroscopy). However, a small error is also introduced by the insufficent knowledge of the true temperature profile in the atmosphere above the individual instruments. This knowledge is crucial to retrieve highly precise gas concentrations. In the current version of the retrieval software, we use six-hourly NCEP reanalysis data to produce one temperature profile at local noon for each measurement day. For sites in the mid latitudes which can have a large diurnal variation of the temperature in the lowermost kilometers of the atmosphere, this approach can lead to small errors in the final gas concentration of the total column. Here, we present and describe a method to account for the temperature sensitivity of the total column measurements. We exploit the fact that H2O is most abundant in the lowermost kilometers of the atmosphere where the largest diurnal temperature variations occur. We use single H2O absorption lines with different temperature sensitivities to gain information about the temperature variations over the course of the day. This information is used to apply a posteriori correction of the retrieved gas concentration of total column. In addition, we show that the a posteriori temperature correction is effective by applying it to data from Lamont, Oklahoma, USA (36,6°N and 97,5°W). We chose this site because regular radiosonde launches with a time resolution of six hours provide detailed information of the real temperature in the atmosphere and allow us to test the effectiveness of our correction. References

  14. Array high-sensitivity room temperature coil system for SNMR detection in shallow depth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Tingting; Xie, Kunyu; Zhang, Siyuan; Zhao, Jing; Lin, Jun

    2017-01-01

    The noninvasive method of surface nuclear magnetic resonance (SNMR) is a geophysical technique that is directly sensitive to hydrogen protons, besides it can exploit the NMR phenomenon for a quantitative determination of the subsurface groundwater distribution. Traditionally, SNMR utilizes large surface coils for both transmitting excitation pulses and recording the groundwater response. While, in recent research, a low Tc-SQUIDs is taken as a new sensor to replace the large receiving coil (Rx), which performing the best sensitivity for the shallow depth. Nevertheless, SQUID is with the problems of flux trapping and operational difficulties. In this paper, we introduce a room temperature coil system. A Cu coil with diameter of 1 m and a low noise preamplifier was systematically investigated and reached a sensitivity of 0.2fT/Hz1/2.Four preamplifiers are chosen for optimizing the pickup coils. The resolution studies for the array coil systems were performed, and the optimum distance between the adjacent pickup coils to achieve a better experimental results especially for the shallow depth. Our study enable the further use of the room temperature coil for SNMR shallow depth detections.

  15. The sensitivity of OMI-derived nitrogen dioxide to boundary layer temperature inversions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Julie; Kanaroglou, Pavlos

    We assess the sensitivity of tropospheric nitrogen dioxide (NO 2) derived from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI), to episodes of temperature inversion in the lower boundary layer. Vertical temperature data were obtained from a 91-m meteorological tower located in the study area, which is centered on the Hamilton Census Metropolitan Area, Ontario, Canada. Hamilton is an industrial city with high traffic volumes, and is therefore subjected to high levels of pollution. Pollution buildup is amplified by frequent temperature inversions which are commonly radiative, but are also induced by local physiography, proximity to Lake Ontario, and regional meteorology. The four-year period from January 2005 to December 2008 was investigated. Ground-level data for validation were obtained from in situ air quality monitors located in the study area. The results indicate that OMI is sensitive to changes in the NO 2 levels during temperature inversions, and exhibits changes which roughly parallel those of in situ monitors. Overall, an 11% increase in NO 2 was identified by OMI on inversion days, compared to a 44% increase measured by in situ monitors. The weekend effect was clearly exhibited under both normal and inversion scenarios with OMI. Seasonal and wind direction patterns also correlated fairly well with ground-level data. Temperature inversions have resulted in poor air quality episodes which have severely compromised the health of susceptible populations, sometime leading to premature death. The rationale for this study is to further assess the usefulness of OMI for population exposure studies in areas with sparse resources for ground-level monitoring.

  16. Temperature-sensitive Mutants of Sindbis Virus: Biochemical Correlates of Complementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burge, Boyce W.; Pfefferkorn, E. R.

    1967-01-01

    Temperature-sensitive mutants of Sindbis virus fail to grow at a temperature that permits growth of the wild type, but when certain pairs of these mutants, mixed together, infect cells at that temperature, viral growth (i.e., complementation) occurs. The yield from this complementation, however, is of the same order of magnitude as the infectivity in the inoculum. Since in animal virus infections the protein components of the virion probably enter the cell with the viral nucleic acid, it was necessary to demonstrate that the observed complementation required synthesis of new viral protein and nucleic acid rather than some sort of rearrangement of the structural components of the inoculum. To demonstrate that complementation does require new biosynthesis, three biochemical events of normal virus growth have been observed during complementation and correlated with the efficiency of viral growth seen in complementation. These events include: (i) entrance of parental viral ribonucleic acid (RNA) into a double-stranded form; (ii) subsequent synthesis of viral RNA; and (iii) synthesis and subsequent incorporation of viral protein(s) into cell membranes where they were detected by hemadsorption. Although the infecting single-stranded RNA genome of the wild type was converted to a ribonuclease-resistant form, the genome of a mutant (ts-11) incapable of RNA synthesis at a nonpermissive temperature was not so converted. However, during complementation with another mutant also defective in viral RNA synthesis, some of the RNA of mutant ts-11 was converted to a ribonuclease-resistant form, and total synthesis of virus-specific RNA was markedly enhanced. The virus-specific alteration of the cell surface, detected by hemadsorption, was also extensively increased during complementation. These observations support the view that complementation between temperature-sensitive mutants and replication of wild-type virus are similar processes. PMID:5630228

  17. Low-Temperature Crystalline Titanium Dioxide by Atomic Layer Deposition for Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Chandiran, Aravind Kumar

    2013-04-24

    Low-temperature processing of dye-sensitized solar cells (DSCs) is crucial to enable commercialization with low-cost, plastic substrates. Prior studies have focused on mechanical compression of premade particles on plastic or glass substrates; however, this did not yield sufficient interconnections for good carrier transport. Furthermore, such compression can lead to more heterogeneous porosity. To circumvent these problems, we have developed a low-temperature processing route for photoanodes where crystalline TiO2 is deposited onto well-defined, mesoporous templates. The TiO2 is grown by atomic layer deposition (ALD), and the crystalline films are achieved at a growth temperature of 200 C. The ALD TiO2 thickness was systematically studied in terms of charge transport and performance to lead to optimized photovoltaic performance. We found that a 15 nm TiO2 overlayer on an 8 μm thick SiO2 film leads to a high power conversion efficiency of 7.1% with the state-of-the-art zinc porphyrin sensitizer and cobalt bipyridine redox mediator. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  18. Applicability of low-melting-point microcrystalline wax to develop temperature-sensitive formulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Kohei; Kimura, Shin-Ichiro; Iwao, Yasunori; Itai, Shigeru

    2017-10-30

    Low-melting-point substances are widely used to develop temperature-sensitive formulations. In this study, we focused on microcrystalline wax (MCW) as a low-melting-point substance. We evaluated the drug release behavior of wax matrix (WM) particles using various MCW under various temperature conditions. WM particles containing acetaminophen were prepared using a spray congealing technique. In the dissolution test at 37°C, WM particles containing low-melting-point MCWs whose melting was starting at approx. 40°C (Hi-Mic-1045 or 1070) released the drug initially followed by the release of only a small amount. On the other hand, in the dissolution test at 20 and 25°C for WM particles containing Hi-Mic-1045 and at 20, 25, and 30°C for that containing Hi-Mic-1070, both WM particles showed faster drug release than at 37°C. The characteristic drug release suppression of WM particles containing low-melting-point MCWs at 37°C was thought attributable to MCW melting, as evidenced by differential scanning calorimetry analysis and powder X-ray diffraction analysis. Taken together, low-melting-point MCWs may be applicable to develop implantable temperature-sensitive formulations that drug release is accelerated by cooling at administered site. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Effect of Surface Microstructure on the Temperature sensitivity of Burning Rate of Ammonium Perchlorate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Kishore

    1997-04-01

    Full Text Available Considering Vielle's law and the new thermodynamic model which the authors have developed recently the true dependence of temperature sensitivity of burning rate of ammonium perchlorate (AP on pressure is resolved and experimentally verified for bellet burning. The value of decreases with pressure steeply in regime I' (below 20 atm, but gently in regime I (above 20 atm. The value of powder AP has been determined and it is observed that (powder > (pellet, which clearly suggests that of is innuenced by the surface temperature sensitive parameter and hence by the surface/subsurface microstructure. In powder burning, the buoyant lifting of the particles into the gas phase occurs, Which constitutes the so-called 'free board region' (FER extending just above the true surface. Consequent to the decomposition of AP particles in FER, the condensed phase heat release gets curtailed and (powder becomes larger. A general relationship for in terms of density and surface temperature is suggested, which is applicable to both pellet and powder AP.

  20. Temperature- and pH-sensitive wearable materials for monitoring foot ulcers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvo, Pietro; Calisi, Nicola; Melai, Bernardo; Dini, Valentina; Paoletti, Clara; Lomonaco, Tommaso; Pucci, Andrea; Di Francesco, Fabio; Piaggesi, Alberto; Romanelli, Marco

    2017-01-01

    Foot ulcers account for 15% of comorbidities associated with diabetes. Presently, no device allows the status of foot ulcers to be continuously monitored when patients are not hospitalized. In this study, we describe a temperature and a pH sensor capable of monitoring diabetic foot and venous leg ulcers developed in the frame of the seventh framework program European Union project SWAN-iCare (smart wearable and autonomous negative pressure device for wound monitoring and therapy). Temperature is measured by exploiting the variations in the electrical resistance of a nanocomposite consisting of multiwalled carbon nanotubes and poly(styrene-b-(ethylene-co-butylene)-b-styrene). The pH sensor used a graphene oxide (GO) layer that changes its electrical potential when pH changes. The temperature sensor has a sensitivity of ~85 Ω/°C in the range 25°C–50°C and a high repeatability (maximum standard deviation of 0.1% over seven repeated measurements). For a GO concentration of 4 mg/mL, the pH sensor has a sensitivity of ~42 mV/pH and high linearity (R2=0.99). PMID:28203074

  1. Rendering poly(amidoamine) or poly(propylenimine) dendrimers temperature sensitive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haba, Yasuhiro; Harada, Atsushi; Takagishi, Toru; Kono, Kenji

    2004-10-13

    The poly(amidoamine) dendrimers having terminal isobutyramide (IBAM) groups were prepared by the reaction of isobutyric acid and the amine-terminated poly(amidoamine) dendrimers with generations (G) of 2 to 5 by using a condensing agent, 1,3-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide. 1H and 13C NMR revealed that an IBAM group was attached to essentially every chain end of the dendrimers. While the IBAM-terminated G2 dendrimer was soluble in water, the IBAM-terminated G3, G4, and G5 dendrimers exhibited the lower critical solution temperatures (LCSTs) at 75, 61, and 43 degrees C, respectively. Because the density of the terminal IBAM groups in the periphery of the dendrimer progressively increases with increasing dendrimer generation, the interaction of the IBAM groups might take place more efficiently, resulting in a remarkable decrease in the LCST. In addition, attachment of IBAM groups to poly(propylenimine) dendrimers could give the temperature-sensitive property, indicating that this is an efficient method to render dendrimers temperature sensitive.

  2. Nonlinear temperature sensitivity of enzyme kinetics explains canceling effect - a case study on loamy haplic Luvisol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahar S. eRazavi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The temperature sensitivity of enzymes responsible for organic matter decomposition in soil is crucial for predicting the effects of global warming on the carbon cycle and sequestration. We tested the hypothesis that differences in temperature sensitivity of enzyme kinetic parameters Vmax and Km will lead to a canceling effect: strong reduction of temperature response of catalytic reactions. Short-term temperature response of Vmax and Km of three hydrolytic enzymes responsible for decomposition of cellulose (β-glucosidase, cellobiohydrolase and hemicelluloses (xylanase were analyzed in situ from 0 to 40 °C. The apparent activation energy varied between enzymes from 20.7 to 35.2 kJ mol-1 corresponding to the Q10 values of the enzyme activities of 1.4–1.9 (with Vmax-Q10 1.0–2.5 and Km-Q10 0.94–2.3. Temperature response of all tested enzymes fitted well to the Arrhenius equation. Despite that, the fitting of Arrhenius model revealed the non-linear increase of two cellulolytic enzymes activities with two distinct thresholds at 10–15 °C and 25–30 °C, which were less pronounced for xylanase. The nonlinearity between 10 and 15 °C was explained by 30–80% increase in Vmax. At 25–30 °C, however, the abrupt decrease of enzyme-substrate affinity was responsible for non-linear increase of enzyme activities. Our study is the first demonstrating nonlinear response of Vmax and Km to temperature causing canceling effect, which was most strongly pronounced at low substrate concentrations and at temperatures above 15 °C. Under cold climate, however, the regulation of hydrolytic activity by canceling in response to warming is negligible because canceling was never observed below 10 °C. The canceling, therefore, can be considered as natural mechanism reducing the effects of global warming on decomposition of soil organics at moderate temperatures. The non-linearity of enzyme responses to warming and the respective thresholds should therefore be

  3. Sensitivity of surface air temperature change to land use/cover types in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG XuChao; ZHANG YiLi; LIU LinShan; ZHANG Wei; DING MingJun; WANG ZhaoFeng

    2009-01-01

    Using CRU high resolution grid observational temperature and ERA40 reanalysie surface air temperature data during 1960--1999, we investigated the sensitivity of surface air temperature change to land use/cover types in China by subtracting the reanalysis from the observed surface air temperature (observation minus reanalysis, OMR). The results show that there is a stable and systemic impact of land use/cover types on surface air temperature. The surface warming of each land use/cover type reacted differently to global warming. The OMR trends of unused land (≥0.17℃/decade), mainly comprised by sandy land, Gobi and bare rock gravel land, are obviously larger than those of the other land use/cover types. The OMR over grassland, farmland and construction land shows a moderate decadal a significant warming trend (0.06"C/decade). The overall assessment indicates that the surface warming is larger for areas that are barren and anthropogenically developed. The better the vegetation cover, the smaller the OMR warming trend. Responses of surface air temperature to land use/cover types with similar physical and chemical properties and biological processes have no significant difference. The surface air temperature would not react significantly until the intensity of land cover changes reach a certain degree. Within the same land use/cover type, areas in eastern China with intensive human activities exhibit larger warming trend. The results provide observational evidence for modeling research on the impact of land use/cover change on regional climate. Thus, projecting further surface climate of China in regional scale should not only take greenhouse gas increase into account, but also consider the impact of land use/cover types and land cover change.

  4. Sensitivity of surface air temperature change to land use/cover types in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Using CRU high resolution grid observational temperature and ERA40 reanalysis surface air temperature data during 1960-1999, we investigated the sensitivity of surface air temperature change to land use/cover types in China by subtracting the reanalysis from the observed surface air temperature (observation minus reanalysis, OMR). The results show that there is a stable and systemic impact of land use/cover types on surface air temperature. The surface warming of each land use/cover type reacted differently to global warming. The OMR trends of unused land (≥0.17℃/decade), mainly comprised by sandy land, Gobi and bare rock gravel land, are obviously larger than those of the other land use/cover types. The OMR over grassland, farmland and construction land shows a moderate decadal warming about 0.12℃ /decade, 0.10℃/decade, 0.12 ℃ /decade, respectively. Woodland areas do not show a significant warming trend (0.06 ℃ /decade). The overall assessment indicates that the surface warming is larger for areas that are barren and anthropogenically developed. The better the vegetation cover, the smaller the OMR warming trend. Responses of surface air temperature to land use/cover types with similar physical and chemical properties and biological processes have no significant difference. The surface air temperature would not react significantly until the intensity of land cover changes reach a certain degree. Within the same land use/cover type, areas in eastern China with intensive human activities exhibit larger warming trend. The results provide observational evidence for modeling research on the impact of land use/cover change on regional climate. Thus, projecting further surface climate of China in regional scale should not only take greenhouse gas increase into account, but also consider the impact of land use/cover types and land cover change.

  5. Microsystem with integrated capillary leak to mass spectrometer for high sensitivity temperature programmed desorption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Quaade, Ulrich; Jensen, Søren; Hansen, Ole

    2004-01-01

    Temperature programmed desorption (TPD) is a method for obtaining information about quantities and binding properties of adsorbed species on a surface. A microfabricated flow system for TPD with an integrated capillary leak to a mass spectrometer is presented. The use of an integrated capillary l.......5 cm2 of platinum foil gives a clear desorption peak. By using the microfabricated flow system, TPD experiments can be performed in a carrier gas with a sensitivity approaching that of TPD experiments in vacuum. ©2004 American Institute of Physics...... leak minimizes dead volumes in the system, resulting in increased sensitivity and reduced response time. These properties make the system ideal for TPD experiments in a carrier gas. With CO desorbing from platinum as model system, it is shown that CO desorbing in 105 Pa of argon from as little as 0...

  6. Temperature sensitivity of wormlike micelles in poly(oxyethylene) surfactant solution: importance of hydrophilic-group size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Toufiq; Aramaki, Kenji

    2009-08-01

    We have studied the temperature sensitivity of the rheology of the wormlike micellar solutions formed in poly(oxyethylene) cholesteryl ether (ChEO(m), m=15 and 30) upon addition of tri(ethyleneglycol) mono n-dodecyl ether (C(12)EO(3)) and monolaurin. We have found that increasing the poly(oxyethylene) chain length of ChEO(m) greatly reduces the temperature-sensitivity of the viscosity of the solution. In the viscous region small changes in the cosurfactant composition can subtly change the temperature sensitivity depending on the temperature range and type of cosurfactant. For, C(12)EO(3), which is a poly(oxyethylene) surfactant, the temperature sensitivity is lower at lower temperatures and higher at higher temperatures if the cosurfactant mixing fraction is high and vice versa if the mixing fraction is low. For monolaurin, the temperature sensitivity increases with cosurfactant mixing fraction in the viscous region. In the ChEO(30)-monolaurin system viscous solutions are not formed at any temperature that we studied. We have discussed these results in terms of the reduction of the average curvature of micellar interface with temperature due to dehydration of the poly(oxyethylene) chain and formation of branches in long micelles. We indicate the scientific and technical significance of our findings.

  7. Fabrication of Polymeric Antireflection Film Manufactured by Anodic Aluminum Oxide Template on Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenn-Kai Tsai

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available In this study, high energy conversion efficient dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs were successfully fabricated by attaching a double anti-reflection (AR layer, which is composed of a subwavelength moth-eye structured polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA film and a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS film. An efficiency of up to 6.79% was achieved. The moth-eye structured PMMA film was fabricated by using an anodic aluminum oxide (AAO template which is simple, low-cost and scalable. The nano-pattern of the AAO template was precisely reproduced onto the PMMA film. The photoanode was composed of Titanium dioxide (TiO2 nanoparticles (NPs with a diameter of 25 nm deposited on the fluorine-doped tin oxide (FTO glass substrate and the sensitizer N3. The double AR layer was proved to effectively improve the short-circuit current density (JSC and conversion efficiency from 14.77 to 15.79 mA/cm2 and from 6.26% to 6.79%, respectively.

  8. Fabrication of ultra-high sensitive and selective CH4 room temperature gas sensing of TiO2nanorods: Detailed study on the annealing temperature

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Tshabalala, Zamaswazi P

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Applications of ultra-highly sensitive and selective methane (CH(sub4)) room temperature gas sensors are important for various operations especially in underground mining environment. Therefore, this study is set out to investigate the effect...

  9. Temperature-sensitive PSII: a novel approach for sustained photosynthetic hydrogen production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayro-Kaiser, Vinzenz; Nelson, Nathan

    2016-12-01

    The need for energy and the associated burden are ever growing. It is crucial to develop new technologies for generating clean and efficient energy for society to avoid upcoming energetic and environmental crises. Sunlight is the most abundant source of energy on the planet. Consequently, it has captured our interest. Certain microalgae possess the ability to capture solar energy and transfer it to the energy carrier, H2. H2 is a valuable fuel, because its combustion produces only one by-product: water. However, the establishment of an efficient biophotolytic H2 production system is hindered by three main obstacles: (1) the hydrogen-evolving enzyme, [FeFe]-hydrogenase, is highly sensitive to oxygen; (2) energy conversion efficiencies are not economically viable; and (3) hydrogen-producing organisms are sensitive to stressful conditions in large-scale production systems. This study aimed to circumvent the oxygen sensitivity of this process with a cyclic hydrogen production system. This approach required a mutant that responded to high temperatures by reducing oxygen evolution. To that end, we randomly mutagenized the green microalgae, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, to generate mutants that exhibited temperature-sensitive photoautotrophic growth. The selected mutants were further characterized by their ability to evolve oxygen and hydrogen at 25 and 37 °C. We identified four candidate mutants for this project. We characterized these mutants with PSII fluorescence, P700 absorbance, and immunoblotting analyses. Finally, we demonstrated that these mutants could function in a prototype hydrogen-producing bioreactor. These mutant microalgae represent a novel approach for sustained hydrogen production.

  10. Remembering Obaid Siddiqi, a pioneer in the study of temperature-sensitive paralytic mutants in Drosophila

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Barry Ganetzky; Chun-Fang Wu

    2014-09-01

    Although Obaid Siddiqi’s major research focus in neurogenetics was on chemosensation and olfaction in Drosophila, he made seminal contributions to the study of temperature-sensitive paralytic mutants that paved the way for research that we and many other investigators have continued to pursue. Here we recount Siddiqi’s investigation and the impact it had on our own studies especially at a formative stage of our careers. We acknowledge our debt to Obaid Siddiqi and remember him fondly as an inspired and inspiring scientist, mentor, role model and human being.

  11. Spiral-path high-sensitivity silicon photonic wire molecular sensor with temperature-independent response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Densmore, A; Xu, D-X; Janz, S; Waldron, P; Mischki, T; Lopinski, G; Delâge, A; Lapointe, J; Cheben, P; Lamontagne, B; Schmid, J H

    2008-03-15

    We demonstrate a new silicon photonic wire waveguide evanescent field (PWEF) sensor that exploits the strong evanescent field of the transverse magnetic mode of this high-index-contrast, submicrometer-dimension waveguide. High sensitivity is achieved by using a 2 mm long double-spiral waveguide structure that fits within a compact circular area of 150 microm diameter, facilitating compatibility with commercial spotting apparatus and the fabrication of densely spaced sensor arrays. By incorporating the PWEF sensor element into a balanced waveguide Mach-Zehnder interferometer circuit, a minimum detectable mass of approximately 10 fg of streptavidin protein is demonstrated with near temperature-independent response.

  12. Particle image velocimetry for an automatic cooling device using temperature-sensitive magnetic fluid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    An automatic cooling device has been developed by using a temperature-sensitive magnetic fluid as the coolant. A particle image velocimetry (PIV) system was used to measure the flow velocity of the fluid inside the loop. The efficiency of the device under varying conditions such as the heat load and the power of cooling were ex- perimentally investigated. The effect of cooperation between external magnetic field and thermal field on the performance of the device was studied. As expected, a continuous flow induced by the thermal and magnetic field was observed in the loop, where heat was transferred by the circulating magnetic fluid. The synergic effect between the magnetic field and the temperature gradient has impact on the performance of the device.

  13. Implication of potassium trimolybdate nanowires as highly sensitive and selective ammonia sensor at room temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Aditee C.; Gangal, S. A.

    2016-09-01

    Potassium trimolybdate nanowires are demonstrated as unique and highly selective NH3 sensing materials at room temperature. The nanowires were synthesized by using chemical route under normal ambient conditions and subsequently characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and x-ray diffraction (XRD). Gas sensors based on nanowires were fabricated by isolating and aligning nanowires between microspaced electrodes using dielectrophoresis. Room temperature gas sensing studies for different vapors indicated excellent selectivity for NH3 and capability to detect NH3 at concentrations down to ppb level. The sensors exhibited higher sensitivity for concentration range much below toxic limit of NH3 from 500 ppb up to 25 ppm. Since nanowires are isolated and aligned, the gas sensing reaction is rapid, and the availability of abundant oxide and hydroxyl surface groups on nanowires surface makes the reaction significantly prominent and selective with highly reducing nature of NH3.

  14. Particle image velocimetry for an automatic cooling device using temperature-sensitive magnetic fluid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIAN WenLei; LI Qiang; XUAN YiMin

    2008-01-01

    An automatic cooling device has been developed by using a temperature-sensitive magnetic fluid as the coolant. A particle image velocimetry (PIV) system was used to measure the flow velocity of the fluid inside the loop. The efficiency of the device under varying conditions such as the heat load and the power of cooling were ex-perimentally investigated. The effect of cooperation between external magnetic field and thermal field on the performance of the device was studied. As expected, a continuous flow induced by the thermal and magnetic field was observed in the loop, where heat was transferred by the circulating magnetic fluid. The synergic effect between the magnetic field and the temperature gradient has impact on the performance of the device.

  15. Isolation and characterization of a temperature-sensitive mutant of avian myeloblastosis virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moscovici, M G; Moscovici, C

    1983-01-01

    A temperature-sensitive (ts) mutant, GA 907/7, was isolated after mutagen treatment of avian myeloblastosis virus. When bone marrow cells or secondary yolk sac macrophages were infected with GA 907/7, the expression of transformation was greatly reduced at 41 degrees C. The results of temperature-shift experiments suggest that in GA 907/7 the putative v-myb gene product is functional only at 35.5 degrees C. Moreover, when ts-induced transformed cells were shifted to 41 degrees C, a partial morphological conversion to macrophage-like cells was obtained, while the majority of the cells underwent senescence and lysis. No leukemia was obtained when GA 907/7 was injected in 1-day-old chickens. Finally, a continuous cell line releasing genetically stable mutant virus was obtained after transformation of secondary yolk sac cells. Images PMID:6298790

  16. Data indicating temperature response of Ti–6Al–4V thin-walled structure during its additive manufacture via Laser Engineered Net Shaping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garrett J. Marshall

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available An OPTOMEC Laser Engineered Net Shaping (LENS™ 750 system was retrofitted with a melt pool pyrometer and in-chamber infrared (IR camera for nondestructive thermal inspection of the blown-powder, direct laser deposition (DLD process. Data indicative of temperature and heat transfer within the melt pool and heat affected zone atop a thin-walled structure of Ti–6Al–4V during its additive manufacture are provided. Melt pool temperature data were collected via the dual-wavelength pyrometer while the dynamic, bulk part temperature distribution was collected using the IR camera. Such data are provided in Comma Separated Values (CSV file format, containing a 752×480 matrix and a 320×240 matrix of temperatures corresponding to individual pixels of the pyrometer and IR camera, respectively. The IR camera and pyrometer temperature data are provided in blackbody-calibrated, raw forms. Provided thermal data can aid in generating and refining process-property-performance relationships between laser manufacturing and its fabricated materials.

  17. Cohort removal induces changes in body temperature, pain sensitivity, and anxiety-like behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keizo eTakao

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Mouse behavior is analyzed to elucidate the effects of various experimental manipulations, including gene mutation and drug administration. When the effect of a factor of interest is assessed, other factors, such as age, sex, temperature, apparatus, and housing, are controlled in experiments by matching, counterbalancing, and/or randomizing. One such factor that has not attracted much attention is the effect of sequential removal of animals from a common cage (cohort removal. Here we evaluated the effects of cohort removal on rectal temperature, pain sensitivity, and anxiety-like behavior by analyzing the combined data of a large number of C57BL/6J mice that we collected using a comprehensive behavioral test battery. Rectal temperature increased in a stepwise manner according to the position of sequential removal from the cage, consistent with previous reports. In the hot plate test, the mice that were removed first from the cage had a significantly longer latency to show the first paw response than the mice removed later. In the elevated plus maze, the mice removed first spent significantly less time on the open arms compared to the mice removed later. The results of the present study demonstrated that cohort removal induces changes in body temperature, pain sensitivity, and anxiety-like behavior in mice. Cohort removal also increased the plasma corticosterone concentration in mice. Thus, the ordinal position in the sequence of removal from the cage should be carefully counterbalanced between groups when the effect of experimental manipulations, including gene manipulation and drug administration, are examined using behavioral tests.

  18. Process-based modelling of biogenic monoterpene emissions: sensitivity to temperature and light

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Schurgers

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Monoterpenes, primarily emitted by terrestrial vegetation, can influence atmospheric ozone chemistry, and can form precursors for secondary organic aerosol. The short-term emissions of monoterpenes have been well studied and understood, but their long-term variability, which is particularly important for atmospheric chemistry, has not. This understanding is crucial for the understanding of future changes.

    In this study, two algorithms of terrestrial biogenic monoterpene emissions, the first one based on the short-term volatilization of monoterpenes, as commonly used for temperature-dependent emissions, and the second one based on long-term production of monoterpenes (linked to photosynthesis combined with emissions from storage, were compared and evaluated with measurements from a Ponderosa pine plantation (Blodgett Forest, California. The measurements were used to parameterize the long-term storage of monoterpenes, which takes place in specific storage organs and which determines the temporal distribution of the emissions over the year. The difference in assumptions between the first (emission-based method and the second (production-based method, which causes a difference in upscaling from instantaneous to daily emissions, requires roughly a doubling of emission capacities to bridge the gap to production capacities. The sensitivities to changes in temperature and light were tested for the new methods, the temperature sensitivity was slightly higher than that of the short-term temperature dependent algorithm.

    Applied on a global scale, the first algorithm resulted in annual total emissions of 29.6 Tg C a−1, the second algorithm resulted in 31.8 Tg C a−1 when applying the correction factor 2 between emission capacities and production capacities. However, the exact magnitude of such a correction is spatially varying and hard to determine as a global average.

  19. Cohort Removal Induces Changes in Body Temperature, Pain Sensitivity, and Anxiety-Like Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takao, Keizo; Shoji, Hirotaka; Hattori, Satoko; Miyakawa, Tsuyoshi

    2016-01-01

    Mouse behavior is analyzed to elucidate the effects of various experimental manipulations, including gene mutation and drug administration. When the effect of a factor of interest is assessed, other factors, such as age, sex, temperature, apparatus, and housing, are controlled in experiments by matching, counterbalancing, and/or randomizing. One such factor that has not attracted much attention is the effect of sequential removal of animals from a common cage (cohort removal). Here we evaluated the effects of cohort removal on rectal temperature, pain sensitivity, and anxiety-like behavior by analyzing the combined data of a large number of C57BL/6J mice that we collected using a comprehensive behavioral test battery. Rectal temperature increased in a stepwise manner according to the position of sequential removal from the cage, consistent with previous reports. In the hot plate test, the mice that were removed first from the cage had a significantly longer latency to show the first paw response than the mice removed later. In the elevated plus maze, the mice removed first spent significantly less time on the open arms compared to the mice removed later. The results of the present study demonstrated that cohort removal induces changes in body temperature, pain sensitivity, and anxiety-like behavior in mice. Cohort removal also increased the plasma corticosterone concentration in mice. Thus, the ordinal position in the sequence of removal from the cage should be carefully counterbalanced between groups when the effect of experimental manipulations, including gene manipulation and drug administration, are examined using behavioral tests.

  20. Investigation the cause of plasma treatment for low temperature annealed dye-sensitized solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zen, Shungo; Komatsu, Yuta; Ono, Ryo

    2015-09-01

    Dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) require annealing of TiO2photoelectrodes at 450 C to 550 C. However, such high-temperature annealing is unfavorable because it limits the use of materials that cannot withstand high temperatures, such as plastic substrates. In our previous paper, a low temperature annealing technique of TiO2 photoelectrodes using ultraviolet light and dielectric barrier discharge treatments was proposed to reduce the annealing temperature from 450 C to 150 C for a TiO2 paste containing an organic binder. Here, we investigated the cause of plasma treatment via the Nyquist diagram (Cole-Cole plot) of DSSCs. The Nyquist diagram was masured with a frequency response analyzer (NF Corporation, FRA5022) under 100 mW/cm2 illumination of a calibrated xenon lamp (Hamamatsu L2274, 150W). The lifetime of the electrons, the effective electron diffusion coefficient, and the electron diffusion length of TiO2 photoelectrodes were determined by analyzing the Nyquist diagrams. As a result of analyzing the Nyquist diagrams, it was shown that plasma treatment can reduce the electron transport resistance and promote the necking of Hot UV annealed TiO2 nanoparticles. This work was supported by Grant-in-Aid for JSPS Fellows.

  1. Anomalies of autogamy in Paramecium tetraurelia temperature sensitive mutant induced by heat treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prajer, M; Iftode, F

    2001-01-01

    The run of autogamy in temperature sensitive mutant ts401, carrying also the mutation of trichocysts nd3a, at permissive (26 degrees C) and non-permissive temperature (35 degrees C) was studied and compared with this process in wild d4-2 stock of Paramecium tetraurelia. The effect of heat treatment on programmed nuclear and cortical events was investigated using cytological silver impregnation Fernandez-Galiano method and immunofluorescence technique with the application of two anti-alpha-tubulin antibodies. The appearance of cells with some large macronuclear fragments and an excess number of micronuclei suggests that nuclear differentiation is inhibited at restrictive temperature and that macronuclear regeneration takes place in this thermosensitive mutant. In such cells impaired oral reorganization was observed. After slight refeeding at the late autogamy, cells stopped at first postautogamous division were induced by heat treatment. The most striking feature of these abnormal divisions was the lack of a basal body duplication wave, which suggests that production of gamma-tubulin, structural protein being the essential component of the microtubule organizing centres, is disturbed at high temperature.

  2. P450 aromatase expression in the temperature-sensitive sexual differentiation of salamander (Hynobius retardatus) gonads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakata, Natsuko; Tamori, Yoichiro; Wakahara, Masami

    2005-01-01

    Sex differentiation of gonads in amphibians is believed to be controlled genetically, but altered epigenetically or environmentally. When larvae of the salamander Hynobius retardatus were reared at defined temperatures from hatching to metamorphic stages, a high temperature (28 degrees C) induced exclusively female gonads (ovaries), whereas intermediate (20 and 23 degrees C) or lower (16 degrees C) temperatures produced a 1:1 sex ratio of the morphological gonads. The thermosensitive period was determined to be restricted from 15 to 30 days after hatching, just before or when sexual differentiation occurred. Hynobius P450 aromatase (P450arom) cDNA was isolated from adult gonads and the partial nucleotide or deduced amino acid sequences were determined, showing a high level of identity with various vertebrate species. The P450arom gene was expressed predominantly in the adult ovary and brain, weakly in testis, but not in other somatic organs. A typical sexual dimorphism in P450arom expression was detected in normally developing larvae by a quantitative competitive RT-PCR; strong expression in the female gonads but very weak in male gonads. The dimorphism was detected much earlier than the morphological sexual differentiation of the gonads. When larvae were reared at the female-producing temperature (28 degrees C), strong expression was detected in all the temperature-treated larvae, suggesting that P450arom was up-regulated, even in genetic males. Our results confirm the importance of the P450arom regulation in the sexual differentiation of gonads and demonstrate that an up-regulation of P450arom is involved in the process of temperature-sensitive sex reversal in this species.

  3. Examining moisture and temperature sensitivity of soil organic matter decomposition in a temperate coniferous forest soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. E. Gabriel

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Temperature and moisture are primary environmental drivers of soil organic matter (SOM decomposition, and the development of a better understanding fo their roles in this process through depth in soils is needed. The objective of this research is to independently assess the roles of temperature and moisture in driving heterotrophic soil respiration for shallow and deep soils in a temperate red spruce forest. Minimally disturbed soil cores from shallow (0–25 cm and deep (25–50 cm layers were extracted from a 20 yr old red spruce stand and were then transferred to a climate chamber where they were incubated for 3 months under constant and diurnal temperature regimes. Soils were subjected to different watering treatments representing a full range of water contents. Temperature, moisture, and CO2 surface flux were assessed daily for all soils and continuously on a subset of the microcosms. The results from this study indicate that shallow soils dominate the contribution to surface flux (90% and respond more predictably to moisture than deep soils. An optimum moisture range of 0.15 to 0.60 water-filled pore space was observed for microbial SOM decomposition in shallow cores across which a relatively invariant temperature sensitivity was observed. For soil moisture conditions experienced by most field sites in this region, flux-temperature relationships alone can be used to reasonably estimate heterotrophic respiration, as in this range moisture does not alter flux, with the exception of rewetting events along the lower part of this optimal range. Outside this range, however, soil moisture determines SOM decomposition rates.

  4. Measurement of bovine body and scrotal temperature using implanted temperature sensitive radio transmitters, data loggers and infrared thermography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallage, A L; Gaughan, J B; Lisle, A T; Beard, L; Collins, C W; Johnston, S D

    2017-03-23

    Synchronous and continuous measurement of body (BT) and scrotal temperature (ST) without adverse welfare or behavioural interference is essential for understanding thermoregulation of the bull testis. This study compared three technologies for their efficacy for long-term measurement of the relationship between BT and ST by means of (1) temperature sensitive radio transmitters (RT), (2) data loggers (DL) and (3) infrared imaging (IRI). After an initial pilot study on two bulls to establish a surgical protocol, RTs and DLs were implanted into the flank and mid-scrotum of six Wagyu bulls for between 29 and 49 days. RT frequencies were scanned every 15 min, whilst DLs logged every 30 min. Infrared imaging of the body (flank) and scrotum of each bull was recorded hourly for one 24-h period and compared to RT and DL data. After a series of subsequent heat stress studies, bulls were castrated and testicular tissue samples processed for evidence of histopathology. Radio transmitters were less reliable than DLs; RTs lost >11 % of data, whilst 11 of the 12 DLs had 0 % data loss. IRI was only interpretable in 35.8 % of images recorded. Pearson correlations between DL and RT were strong for both BT (r > 0.94, P  0.80, P < 0.001). Surgery produced temporary minor inflammation and scrotal hematoma in two animals post-surgery. Whilst scar tissue was observed at all surgical sutured sites when bulls were castrated, there was no evidence of testicular adhesion and normal active spermatogenesis was observed in six of the eight implanted testicles. There was no significant correlation of IRI with either DL or RT. We conclude that DLs provided to be a reliable continuous source of data for synchronous measurement of BT and ST.

  5. Measurement of bovine body and scrotal temperature using implanted temperature sensitive radio transmitters, data loggers and infrared thermography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallage, A. L.; Gaughan, J. B.; Lisle, A. T.; Beard, L.; Collins, C. W.; Johnston, S. D.

    2017-07-01

    Synchronous and continuous measurement of body (BT) and scrotal temperature (ST) without adverse welfare or behavioural interference is essential for understanding thermoregulation of the bull testis. This study compared three technologies for their efficacy for long-term measurement of the relationship between BT and ST by means of (1) temperature sensitive radio transmitters (RT), (2) data loggers (DL) and (3) infrared imaging (IRI). After an initial pilot study on two bulls to establish a surgical protocol, RTs and DLs were implanted into the flank and mid-scrotum of six Wagyu bulls for between 29 and 49 days. RT frequencies were scanned every 15 min, whilst DLs logged every 30 min. Infrared imaging of the body (flank) and scrotum of each bull was recorded hourly for one 24-h period and compared to RT and DL data. After a series of subsequent heat stress studies, bulls were castrated and testicular tissue samples processed for evidence of histopathology. Radio transmitters were less reliable than DLs; RTs lost >11 % of data, whilst 11 of the 12 DLs had 0 % data loss. IRI was only interpretable in 35.8 % of images recorded. Pearson correlations between DL and RT were strong for both BT ( r > 0.94, P 0.80, P < 0.001). Surgery produced temporary minor inflammation and scrotal hematoma in two animals post-surgery. Whilst scar tissue was observed at all surgical sutured sites when bulls were castrated, there was no evidence of testicular adhesion and normal active spermatogenesis was observed in six of the eight implanted testicles. There was no significant correlation of IRI with either DL or RT. We conclude that DLs provided to be a reliable continuous source of data for synchronous measurement of BT and ST.

  6. Influence of pre-deformation, sensitization and oxidation in high temperature water on corrosion resistance of AISI 304 stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lv, Jinlong, E-mail: ljltsinghua@126.com [Beijing Key Laboratory of Fine Ceramics, Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology, Tsinghua University, Zhongguancun Street, Haidian District, Beijing 100084 (China); State Key Lab of New Ceramic and Fine Processing, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Liang, Tongxiang [Beijing Key Laboratory of Fine Ceramics, Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology, Tsinghua University, Zhongguancun Street, Haidian District, Beijing 100084 (China); State Key Lab of New Ceramic and Fine Processing, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Luo, Hongyun [Key Laboratory of Aerospace Materials and Performance (Ministry of Education), School of Materials Science and Engineering, Beijing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Xueyuan Road 37, Beijing 100191 (China)

    2016-12-01

    Highlights: • The pre-strain accelerated desensitization and sensitization for austenitic stainless steels. • Low temperature sensitization (carbide precipitation) induced α′-martensite. • The sensitization level could affect directly corrosion resistance of the oxide film. - Abstract: The effects of pre-deformation on sensitization of AISI 304 stainless steel were investigated by the double loop electrochemical potentiokinetic reactivation test. The effects of pre-deformation and sensitization on high temperature oxidized film formed in high temperature water were analyzed by a XRD and SEM. The electrochemical impedance spectroscopy at room temperature was used to study corrosion resistance of oxidized film. The point defect density of oxidized film was calculated by Mott–Schottky plots. The results showed that the value of the degree of sensitization first decreased and then slight increased with the increasing of engineering strain. Moreover, low temperature promoted to form sensitization induced “secondary” α′-martensite. The sample with 20% engineering strain had higher impedance value than other samples. The result was supported by further Mott–Schottky experiments. Considering increased α′-martensite with the increasing of strain, the results of the impedance were more consistent with values of the degree of sensitization.

  7. Temperature Sensitivity of the Hypersensitive Response of Bell Pepper to Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. vesicatoria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, A M; Kousik, C S; Ritchie, D F

    2002-02-01

    ABSTRACT When bacterial spot-resistant pepper plants carrying resistance gene Bs2 and infiltrated with incompatible strains of Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. vesicatoria carrying a functional avrBs2 gene (races P1 and P3) were incubated at 32 degrees C, they exhibited an electrolyte leakage and bacterial multiplication pattern in planta similar to that obtained with a compatible strain (race P4) carrying a nonfunctional avrBs2 gene. They also developed disease-like symptoms. Pretreatment of incompatible bacteria at 32 degrees C before infiltration caused a delay in electrolyte leakage less pronounced than that caused by exposing plants to 32 degrees C. Also, plants had to be exposed to 32 degrees C for an hour prior to inoculation to increase symptom expression. These data suggest that the Bs2 gene is temperature sensitive. In other experiments, the avrBs1-Bs1 interaction appeared to be the most heat tolerant and thus the least likely to revert to compatible, whereas the avrBs3-Bs3 interaction had an intermediate sensitivity to elevated temperatures.

  8. High-sensitivity in situ QCLAS-based ammonia concentration sensor for high-temperature applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, W. Y.; Sur, R.; Strand, C. L.; Spearrin, R. M.; Jeffries, J. B.; Hanson, R. K.

    2016-07-01

    A novel quantum cascade laser (QCL) absorption sensor is presented for high-sensitivity in situ measurements of ammonia (hbox {NH}_3) in high-temperature environments, using scanned wavelength modulation spectroscopy (WMS) with first-harmonic-normalized second-harmonic detection (scanned WMS-2 f/1 f) to neutralize the effect of non-absorption losses in the harsh environment. The sensor utilized the sQ(9,9) transition of the fundamental symmetric stretch band of hbox {NH}_3 at 10.39 {\\upmu }hbox {m} and was sinusoidally modulated at 10 kHz and scanned across the peak of the absorption feature at 50 Hz, leading to a detection bandwidth of 100 Hz. A novel technique was used to select an optimal WMS modulation depth parameter that reduced the sensor's sensitivity to spectral interference from hbox {H}_2hbox {O} and hbox {CO}_2 without significantly sacrificing signal-to-noise ratio. The sensor performance was validated by measuring known concentrations of hbox {NH}_3 in a flowing gas cell. The sensor was then demonstrated in a laboratory-scale methane-air burner seeded with hbox {NH}_3, achieving a demonstrated detection limit of 2.8 ± 0.26 ppm hbox {NH}_3 by mole at a path length of 179 cm, equivalence ratio of 0.6, pressure of 1 atm, and temperatures of up to 600 K.

  9. Changes in spring arrival dates and temperature sensitivity of migratory birds over two centuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolářová, Eva; Matiu, Michael; Menzel, Annette; Nekovář, Jiří; Lumpe, Petr; Adamík, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Long-term phenological data have been crucial at documenting the effects of climate change in organisms. However, in most animal taxa, time series length seldom exceeds 35 years. Therefore, we have limited evidence on animal responses to climate prior to the recent warm period. To fill in this gap, we present time series of mean first arrival dates to Central Europe for 13 bird species spanning 183 years (1828-2010). We found a uniform trend of arrival dates advancing in the most recent decades (since the late 1970s). Interestingly, birds were arriving earlier during the cooler early part of the nineteenth century than in the recent warm period. Temperature sensitivity was slightly stronger in the warmest 30-year period (-1.70 ± SD 0.47 day °C-1) than in the coldest period (-1.42 ± SD 0.89 day °C-1); however, the difference was not statistically significant. In the most recent decades, the temperature sensitivity of both short- and long-distance migrants significantly increased. Our results demonstrate how centennial time series can provide a much more comprehensive perspective on avian responses to climate change.

  10. High temperature probe sensor with high sensitivity based on Michelson interferometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Na; Fu, Haiwei; Shao, Min; Yan, Xu; Li, Huidong; Liu, Qinpeng; Gao, Hong; Liu, Yinggang; Qiao, Xueguang

    2015-05-01

    A novel Michelson interferometer based on a bi-taper is achieved. Such a device is fabricated by splicing a section of thin core fiber (TCF) at one end of single-mode fiber (SMF). Due to the fiber bi-taper at the splicing point of SMF and TCF, the light is coupled into the fiber core and cladding from lead in fiber core. The light will be reflected at the end of the fiber and then will be recoupled back into the lead out fiber core by the fiber bi-taper. While the light returns back to the lead out fiber, the intermodal interference will occur for the optical path difference between core mode and cladding mode. A high temperature sensitivity of 0.140 nm/°C is achieved from 30 to 800 °C, and the linearity is 99.9%. The configuration features the advantages of easy fabrication, a compact size, high sensitivity, wide sensing range and high mechanical strength, making it a good candidate for distant temperature sensing and oil prospecting.

  11. Computational design and characterization of a temperature-sensitive plasmid replicon for gram positive thermophiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olson Daniel G

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Temperature-sensitive (Ts plasmids are useful tools for genetic engineering, but there are currently none compatible with the gram positive, thermophilic, obligate anaerobe, Clostridium thermocellum. Traditional mutagenesis techniques yield Ts mutants at a low frequency, and therefore requires the development of high-throughput screening protocols, which are also not available for this organism. Recently there has been progress in the development of computer algorithms which can predict Ts mutations. Most plasmids currently used for genetic modification of C. thermocellum are based on the replicon of plasmid pNW33N, which replicates using the RepB replication protein. To address this problem, we set out to create a Ts plasmid by mutating the gene coding for the RepB replication protein using an algorithm designed by Varadarajan et al. (1996 for predicting Ts mutants based on the amino-acid sequence of the protein. Results A library of 34 mutant plasmids was designed, synthesized and screened, resulting in 6 mutants which exhibited a Ts phenotype. Of these 6, the one with the most temperature-sensitive phenotype (M166A was compared with the original plasmid. It exhibited lower stability at 48°C and was completely unable to replicate at 55°C. Conclusions The plasmid described in this work could be useful in future efforts to genetically engineer C. thermocellum, and the method used to generate this plasmid may be useful for others trying to make Ts plasmids.

  12. Differential chromosomal and mitochondrial DNA synthesis in temperature-sensitive mutants of Ustilago maydis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unrau, P.

    1977-01-01

    The amount and type of residual DNA synthesis was determined in eight temperature-sensitive mutants of the smut fungus Ustilago maydis after incubation at the restrictive temperature (32/sup 0/C) for eight hours. Mutants ts-220, ts-207, ts-432 and ts-346 were found to have an overall reduction in the synthesis of both nuclear and mitochondrial DNA in comparison to the wild-type. In mutants ts-20, tsd 1-1, ts-84 and pol 1-1 nuclear DNA synthesis was depressed relative to mitochondrial synthesis. The DNA-polymerase mutant pol 1-1 had persistent nuclear synthesis at about 50% of the rate of synthesis of mitochondrial DNA and similar behavior was observed in a diploid homozygous strain. Mutant ts-84 had an initial burst of DNA synthesis which was reduced for nuclear but not mitochondrial synthesis after three hours preincubation at 32/sup 0/C. tsd 1-1 and ts-20 had nuclear residual synthesis amounting to about 25% of the relative rate of mitochondrial synthesis which correlates to increasing UV sensitivity of these strains on incubation at 32/sup 0/C. A pol 1-1 ts-84 double mutant had an additive loss of nuclear DNA synthesis which indicates that the steps of replication involved may be sequential.

  13. The clear-sky greenhouse effect sensitivity to a sea surface temperature change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duvel, J. PH.; Breon, F. M.

    1991-01-01

    The clear-sky greenhouse effect response to a sea surface temperature (SST or Ts) change is studied using outgoing clear-sky longwave radiation measurements from the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment. Considering geographical distributions for July 1987, the relation between the SST, the greenhouse effect (defined as the outgoing infrared flux trapped by atmospheric gases), and the precipitable water vapor content (W), estimated by the Special Sensor Microwave Imager, is analyzed first. A fairly linear relation between W and the normalized greenhouse effect g, is found. On the contrary, the SST dependence of both W and g exhibits nonlinearities with, especially, a large increase for SST above 25 C. This enhanced sensitivity of g and W can be interpreted in part by a corresponding large increase of atmospheric water vapor content related to the transition from subtropical dry regions to equatorial moist regions. Using two years of data (1985 and 1986), the normalized greenhouse effect sensitivity to the sea surface temperature is computed from the interannual variation of monthly mean values.

  14. Changes in spring arrival dates and temperature sensitivity of migratory birds over two centuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolářová, Eva; Matiu, Michael; Menzel, Annette; Nekovář, Jiří; Lumpe, Petr; Adamík, Peter

    2017-07-01

    Long-term phenological data have been crucial at documenting the effects of climate change in organisms. However, in most animal taxa, time series length seldom exceeds 35 years. Therefore, we have limited evidence on animal responses to climate prior to the recent warm period. To fill in this gap, we present time series of mean first arrival dates to Central Europe for 13 bird species spanning 183 years (1828-2010). We found a uniform trend of arrival dates advancing in the most recent decades (since the late 1970s). Interestingly, birds were arriving earlier during the cooler early part of the nineteenth century than in the recent warm period. Temperature sensitivity was slightly stronger in the warmest 30-year period (-1.70 ± SD 0.47 day °C-1) than in the coldest period (-1.42 ± SD 0.89 day °C-1); however, the difference was not statistically significant. In the most recent decades, the temperature sensitivity of both short- and long-distance migrants significantly increased. Our results demonstrate how centennial time series can provide a much more comprehensive perspective on avian responses to climate change.

  15. Temperature can influence gastric accommodation and sensitivity in functional dyspepsia with epigastric pain syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Rui-Feng; Wang, Zhi-Feng; Ke, Mei-Yun; Fang, Xiu-Cai; Sun, Xiao-Hong; Zhu, Li-Ming; Zhang, Jing

    2013-09-01

    Functional dyspepsia-epigastric pain syndrome (FD-EPS) is characterized pathophysiologically by visceral hypersensitivity, but the effect of the temperature stimulation on gastric function has been seldom studied. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of liquid nutrients at different temperatures on the gastric accommodation, sensitivity, and gastric-wall compliance of healthy subjects (HS) and FD-EPS patients. Ten FD-EPS patients (Roma III criteria) and ten HS were recruited into the study. Intragastric pressure (IGP) and gastric perfusion were measured and compared following the administration of liquid nutrients at 37 °C on day 1 and at 8 °C on day 2. Seven patients developed abdominal discomfort or abdominal pain after being given cold liquid nutrient. The administration of liquid nutrient at 8 °C resulted in an increase of IGP in HS (P=0.044), a significant decrease in gastric perfusion (PIGP (P=0.015), and a dramatic reduction in gastric wall compliance (P=0.012) in patients compared to the effects of liquid nutrient at 37 °C. In addition, IGP in patients was lower than that in HS at 37 °C liquid nutrient (P=0.036), and the gastric perfusion volume in patients at maximal satiety was also significantly reduced at 8 °C liquid nutrient compared with HS (P=0.017). Cold stimulation can increase the IGP in HS and FD-EPS patients, elevate the visceral sensitivity and reduce the gastric volume of FD-EPS patients. FD-EPS patients who are sensitive to cold may develop epigastric discomfort or pain.

  16. Immobilization of alpha-amylase to a composite temperature-sensitive membrane for starch hydrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, J P; Sun, Y M; Chu, D H

    1998-01-01

    A composite membrane was made by casting hydrogel onto a nonwoven polyester support and used for enzyme immobilization. The hydrogel consists of N-isopropylacrylamide, cross-linker N, N'-methylenebis(acrylamide), 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate, soluble starch, and N-(acryloxy)succinimide (NAS). The composite membrane is temperature-sensitive with a lower critical solution temperature (LCST) around 35 degreesC. It responds to temperature change by swelling below the LCST and shrinking above the LCST, corresponding to opening and closing of the membrane pores. alpha-Amylase was immobilized to the membrane by covalent bonds through reacting with the high reactive ester groups in NAS. The membrane-immobilized enzyme retained 32% of specific activity toward soluble starch when compared with that of free enzyme, and its properties were characterized and compared with those of the free enzyme. The immobilized enzyme was more thermally stable than the free enzyme. Kinetic constants, (Km) and the activation energy of the immobilized enzyme were both larger than those of the free enzyme. Starch hydrolysis with the immobilized enzyme was investigated in two-compartment permeation cells with a composite membrane between the cells. Reaction was carried out by hydrolyzing soluble starch in the donor side and collecting the hydrolyzed products in the receptor side. This reactor could be operated with temperature cycling to enhance the reaction and facilitate separation of products from the substrate. The best operating condition is cycling the temperature between 50 and 20 degrees C every 5 min. The membrane reactor was operated up to eight times for successive starch hydrolysis.

  17. Bohr effect and temperature sensitivity of hemoglobins from highland and lowland deer mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Birgitte; Storz, Jay F; Fago, Angela

    2016-05-01

    An important means of physiological adaptation to environmental hypoxia is an increased oxygen (O2) affinity of the hemoglobin (Hb) that can help secure high O2 saturation of arterial blood. However, the trade-off associated with a high Hb-O2 affinity is that it can compromise O2 unloading in the systemic capillaries. High-altitude deer mice (Peromyscus maniculatus) have evolved an increased Hb-O2 affinity relative to lowland conspecifics, but it is not known whether they have also evolved compensatory mechanisms to facilitate O2 unloading to respiring tissues. Here we investigate the effects of pH (Bohr effect) and temperature on the O2-affinity of high- and low-altitude deer mouse Hb variants, as these properties can potentially facilitate O2 unloading to metabolizing tissues. Our experiments revealed that Bohr factors for the high- and low-altitude Hb variants are very similar in spite of the differences in O2-affinity. The Bohr factors of deer mouse Hbs are also comparable to those of other mammalian Hbs. In contrast, the high- and low-altitude variants of deer mouse Hb exhibited similarly low temperature sensitivities that were independent of red blood cell anionic cofactors, suggesting an appreciable endothermic allosteric transition upon oxygenation. In conclusion, high-altitude deer mice have evolved an adaptive increase in Hb-O2 affinity, but this is not associated with compensatory changes in sensitivity to changes in pH or temperature. Instead, it appears that the elevated Hb-O2 affinity in high-altitude deer mice is compensated by an associated increase in the tissue diffusion capacity of O2 (via increased muscle capillarization), which promotes O2 unloading.

  18. Linking temperature sensitivity of soil organic matter decomposition to its molecular structure, accessibility, and microbial physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagai, Rota; Kishimoto-Mo, Ayaka W; Yonemura, Seiichiro; Shirato, Yasuhito; Hiradate, Syuntaro; Yagasaki, Yasumi

    2013-04-01

    Temperature sensitivity of soil organic matter (SOM) decomposition may have a significant impact on global warming. Enzyme-kinetic hypothesis suggests that decomposition of low-quality substrate (recalcitrant molecular structure) requires higher activation energy and thus has greater temperature sensitivity than that of high-quality, labile substrate. Supporting evidence, however, relies largely on indirect indices of substrate quality. Furthermore, the enzyme-substrate reactions that drive decomposition may be regulated by microbial physiology and/or constrained by protective effects of soil mineral matrix. We thus tested the kinetic hypothesis by directly assessing the carbon molecular structure of low-density fraction (LF) which represents readily accessible, mineral-free SOM pool. Using five mineral soil samples of contrasting SOM concentrations, we conducted 30-days incubations (15, 25, and 35 °C) to measure microbial respiration and quantified easily soluble C as well as microbial biomass C pools before and after the incubations. Carbon structure of LFs (soil was measured by solid-state (13) C-NMR. Decomposition Q10 was significantly correlated with the abundance of aromatic plus alkyl-C relative to O-alkyl-C groups in LFs but not in bulk soil fraction or with the indirect C quality indices based on microbial respiration or biomass. The warming did not significantly change the concentration of biomass C or the three types of soluble C despite two- to three-fold increase in respiration. Thus, enhanced microbial maintenance respiration (reduced C-use efficiency) especially in the soils rich in recalcitrant LF might lead to the apparent equilibrium between SOM solubilization and microbial C uptake. Our results showed physical fractionation coupled with direct assessment of molecular structure as an effective approach and supported the enzyme-kinetic interpretation of widely observed C quality-temperature relationship for short-term decomposition. Factors

  19. Low temperature plasma vapor treatment of thermo-sensitive poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) and its application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Y.; Tang, X. L.; Chen, B. T.; Qiu, G.

    2013-03-01

    In this study, the novel methods of depositing poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAAm) coatings on the surface of glass slides and PS petri dish by plasma polymerization are provided. PNIPAAm can be obtained by plasma polymerization of N-isopropylacrylamide by using the self-made equipment of plasma vapor treatment. The samples were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and water contact angle. SEM analysis has revealed that the poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAAm) coatings were formed on the surface of the smooth glass slides. Further evaluation by using XPS, it has shown the presence of PNIPAAm. The wettability can be significantly modified by changing of the temperatures at above and below of the lower critical solution temperature (LCST) from the data of the contact angle test. These results have advantage for further application on the thermo-sensitive textile materials. On the deposition of PNIPAAm onto Polybutylene Terephthalate (PBT) melt-blown nonwovens in atmospheric pressure plasma, water permeability was significantly modified at around LCST. Due to the LCST is close to the temperature of human body, it has advantage on application of PBT melt-blown nonwovens.

  20. Differences in SOM decomposition and temperature sensitivity among soil aggregate size classes in a temperate grasslands.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing Wang

    Full Text Available The principle of enzyme kinetics suggests that the temperature sensitivity (Q10 of soil organic matter (SOM decomposition is inversely related to organic carbon (C quality, i.e., the C quality-temperature (CQT hypothesis. We tested this hypothesis by performing laboratory incubation experiments with bulk soil, macroaggregates (MA, 250-2000 μm, microaggregates (MI, 53-250 μm, and mineral fractions (MF, MF>bulk soil >MI(P <0.05. The Q10 values were highest for MA, followed (in decreasing order by bulk soil, MF, and MI. Similarly, the activation energies (Ea for MA, bulk soil, MF, and MI were 48.47, 33.26, 27.01, and 23.18 KJ mol-1, respectively. The observed significant negative correlations between Q10 and C quality index in bulk soil and soil aggregates (P<0.05 suggested that the CQT hypothesis is applicable to soil aggregates. Cumulative C emission differed significantly among aggregate size classes (P <0.0001, with the largest values occurring in MA (1101 μg g-1, followed by MF (976 μg g-1 and MI (879 μg g-1. These findings suggest that feedback from SOM decomposition in response to changing temperature is closely associated withsoil aggregation and highlights the complex responses of ecosystem C budgets to future warming scenarios.

  1. Highly sensitive optical temperature sensor based on a SiN micro-ring resonator with liquid crystal cladding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chun-Ta; Wang, Cheng-Yu; Yu, Jui-Hao; Kuo, I-Tun; Tseng, Chih-Wei; Jau, Hung-Chang; Chen, Yung-Jui; Lin, Tsung-Hsien

    2016-01-25

    This work develops a sensitivity-enhanced optical temperature sensor that is based on a silicon nitride (SiN) micro-ring resonator that incorporates nematic liquid crystal (NLC) cladding. As the ambient temperature changes, the refractive index of the NLCs, which have a large thermal-optical coefficient, dramatically varies. The change in the refractive index of the NLC cladding that is caused by the temperature shift can alter the effective refractive index of the micro-ring resonator and make the resonance wavelength very sensitive to the ambient temperature. The temperature-sensitivity of the device with 5CB cladding for TM-polarized light was measured to be as high as 1nm/°C between 25 and 33 °C and over 2nm/°C at temperatures close to clearing temperature of the 5CB cladding. The temperature-sensitivity of the proposed device is at least 55 times that of the micro-ring resonator with air cladding, whose temperature-dependent wavelength shift for TM-polarized light is 18pm/ °C.

  2. Glow discharge electrolysis plasma initiated preparation of temperature/pH dual sensitivity reed hemicellulose-based hydrogels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wenming; Zhu, Sha; Bai, Yunping; Xi, Ning; Wang, Shaoyang; Bian, Yang; Li, Xiaowei; Zhang, Yucang

    2015-05-20

    The temperature/pH dual sensitivity reed hemicellulose-based hydrogels have been prepared through glow discharge electrolysis plasma (GDEP). The effect of different discharge voltages on the temperature and pH response performance of reed hemicellulose-based hydrogels was inspected, and the formation mechanism, deswelling behaviors of reed hemicellulose-based hydrogels were also discussed. At the same time, infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), scanning differential thermal analysis (DSC) and scanning electron microscope (SEM) were adopted to characterize the structure, phase transformation behaviors and microstructure of hydrogels. It turned out to be that all reed hemicellulose-based hydrogels had a double sensitivity to temperature and pH, and their phase transition temperatures were all approximately 33 °C, as well as the deswelling dynamics met the first model. In addition, the hydrogel (TPRH-3), under discharge voltage 600 V, was more sensitive to temperature and pH and had higher deswelling ratio.

  3. In situ monitoring and optimization of room temperature ultra-fast sensitization for dye-sensitized solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Matthew L; Watson, Trystan M; Holliman, Peter J; Connell, Arthur; Worsley, David A

    2014-10-25

    We describe the fastest dyeing of TiO2 photo-electrodes for dye-sensitized solar cells reported to date (12 h using the same dye mixture (η = 5.5%). Time-lapse photography has been used to monitor the ultra-fast co-sensitization. The data show significantly different dye uptake between passive and pump dyeing reflecting competitive sorption between a Ru complex (N719) and an organic dye (SQ1).

  4. Influence of stimulus and oral adaptation temperature on gustatory responses in central taste-sensitive neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jinrong; Lemon, Christian H

    2015-04-01

    The temperature of taste stimuli can modulate gustatory processing. Perceptual data indicate that the adapted temperature of oral epithelia also influences gustation, although little is known about the neural basis of this effect. Here, we electrophysiologically recorded orosensory responses (spikes) to 25°C (cool) and 35°C (warm) solutions of sucrose (0.1 and 0.3 M), NaCl (0.004, 0.1, and 0.3 M), and water from taste-sensitive neurons in the nucleus of the solitary tract in mice under varied thermal adaptation of oral epithelia. Conditions included presentation of taste stimuli isothermal to adaptation temperatures of 25°C (constant cooling) and 35°C (constant warming), delivery of 25°C stimuli following 35°C adaptation (relative cooling), and presentation of 35°C stimuli following 25°C adaptation (relative warming). Responses to sucrose in sucrose-oriented cells (n = 15) were enhanced under the constant and relative warming conditions compared with constant cooling, where contiguous cooling across adaptation and stimulus periods induced the lowest and longest latency responses to sucrose. Yet compared with constant warming, cooling sucrose following warm adaptation (relative cooling) only marginally reduced activity to 0.1 M sucrose and did not alter responses to 0.3 M sucrose. Thus, warmth adaptation counteracted the attenuation in sucrose activity associated with stimulus cooling. Analysis of sodium-oriented (n = 25) neurons revealed adaptation to cool water, and cooling taste solutions enhanced unit firing to 0.004 M (perithreshold) NaCl, whereas warmth adaptation and stimulus warming could facilitate activity to 0.3 M NaCl. The concentration dependence of this thermal effect may reflect a dual effect of temperature on the sodium reception mechanism that drives sodium-oriented cells.

  5. Photo-sensitive Ge nanocrystal based films controlled by substrate deposition temperature

    KAUST Repository

    Stavarache, Ionel

    2017-07-21

    Lowering the temperature of crystallization by deposition of thin films on a heated substrate represents the easiest way to find new means to develop and improve new working devices based on nanocrystals embedded in thin films. The improvements are strongly related with the increasing of operation speed, substantially decreasing the energy consumption and reducing unit fabrication costs of the respective semiconductor devices. This approach avoids major problems, such as those related to diffusion or difficulties in controlling of nanocrystallites size, which appear during thermal treatments at high temperatures after deposition. It is reported here the significant progress introduced by synthesis procedure to the in-situ structuring of Ge nanocrystallites in SiO2 thin films by heating the substrate at low temperature, 400 °C during co-deposition of Ge and SiO2 by magnetron sputtering. As a proof-of-concept, a Si/Ge-NCs:SiO2 photo-sensitive structure was fabricated thereof and characterized. The structure shows superior performance on broad operation bandwidth from visible to near-infrared, as strong rectification properties in dark, significant current rise in the inversion mode when illuminated, high responsivity, high photo-detectivity of 1014 Jones, quick response and significant conversion efficiency of 850 %. This simple preparation approach brings an important contribution to the efort of structuring Ge nanocrystallites in SiO2 thin films at a lower temperature for the purpose of using these materials for devices in optoelectronics, solar cells and electronics on flexible substrates.

  6. Sensitivity Analysis of Fuel Centerline Temperatures in SuperCritical Water-cooled Reactors (SCWRs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdalla, Ayman

    SuperCritical Water-cooled Reactors (SCWRs) are one of the six nuclear-reactor concepts currently being developed under the Generation-IV International Forum (GIF). A main advantage of SCW Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs) is that they offer higher thermal efficiencies compared to those of current conventional NPPs. Unlike today's conventional NPPs, which have thermal efficiencies between 30 - 35%, SCW NPPs will have thermal efficiencies within a range of 45 - 50%, owing to high operating temperatures and pressures (i.e., coolant temperatures as high as 625°C at 25 MPa pressure). The use of current fuel bundles with UO2 fuel at the high operating parameters of SCWRs may cause high fuel centerline temperatures, which could lead to fuel failure and fission gas release. Studies have shown that when the Variant-20 (43-element) fuel bundle was examined at SCW conditions, the fuel centerline temperature industry limit of 1850°C for UO2 and the sheath temperature design limit of 850°C might be exceeded. Therefore, new fuel-bundle designs, which comply with the design requirements, are required for future use in SCWRs. The main objective of this study to conduct a sensitivity analysis in order to identify the main factors that leads to fuel centerline temperature reduction. Therefore, a 54-element fuel bundle with smaller diameter of fuel elements compared to that of the 43-element bundle was designed and various nuclear fuels are examined for future use in a generic Pressure Tube (PT) SCWR. The 54-element bundle consists of 53 heated fuel elements with an outer diameter of 9.5 mm and one central unheated element of 20-mm outer diameter which contains burnable poison. The 54-element fuel bundle has an outer diameter of 103.45 mm, which is the same as the outer diameter of the 43-element fuel bundle. After developing the 54-element fuel bundle, one-dimensional heat-transfer analysis was conducted using MATLAB and NIST REFPROP programs. As a result, the Heat Transfer

  7. Long-term fertilization of a boreal Norway spruce forest increases the temperature sensitivity of soil organic carbon mineralization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coucheney, Elsa; Strömgren, Monika; Lerch, Thomas Z; Herrmann, Anke M

    2013-12-01

    Boreal ecosystems store one-third of global soil organic carbon (SOC) and are particularly sensitive to climate warming and higher nutrient inputs. Thus, a better description of how forest managements such as nutrient fertilization impact soil carbon (C) and its temperature sensitivity is needed to better predict feedbacks between C cycling and climate. The temperature sensitivity of in situ soil C respiration was investigated in a boreal forest, which has received long-term nutrient fertilization (22 years), and compared with the temperature sensitivity of C mineralization measured in the laboratory. We found that the fertilization treatment increased both the response of soil in situ CO2 effluxes to a warming treatment and the temperature sensitivity of C mineralization measured in the laboratory (Q10). These results suggested that soil C may be more sensitive to an increase in temperature in long-term fertilized in comparison with nutrient poor boreal ecosystems. Furthermore, the fertilization treatment modified the SOC content and the microbial community composition, but we found no direct relationship between either SOC or microbial changes and the temperature sensitivity of C mineralization. However, the relation between the soil C:N ratio and the fungal/bacterial ratio was changed in the combined warmed and fertilized treatment compared with the other treatments, which suggest that strong interaction mechanisms may occur between nutrient input and warming in boreal soils. Further research is needed to unravel into more details in how far soil organic matter and microbial community composition changes are responsible for the change in the temperature sensitivity of soil C under increasing mineral N inputs. Such research would help to take into account the effect of fertilization managements on soil C storage in C cycling numerical models.

  8. Temperature-dependent strain and temperature sensitivities of fused silica single mode fiber sensors with pulse pre-pump Brillouin optical time domain analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Yi; Chen, Genda

    2016-06-01

    This paper reports a distributed temperature and strain sensor based on pulse pre-pump Brillouin optical time domain analysis. An uncoated, telecom-grade fused silica single-mode fiber as a distributed sensor was calibrated for its sensitivity coefficients under various strains and temperatures up to 800 °C. The Brillouin frequency of fiber samples changed nonlinearly with temperature and linearly with strain. The temperature sensitivity decreased from 1.113 to 0.830 MHz /°C in the range of 22-800 °C. The strain sensitivity was reduced from 0.054 to 0.042 MHz /μɛ as the temperature increased from 22 to 700 °C and became unstable at higher temperatures due to creep effect. The strain measurement range was reduced from 19 100 to 6000 μɛ in the temperature range of 22-800 °C due to fused silica’s degradation. The calibrated fiber optic sensor demonstrated adequate accuracy and precision for strain and temperature measurements and stable performance in heating-cooling cycles. It was validated in an application setting.

  9. Numerical Investigation on Heat and Flow Characteristics of Temperature-Sensitive Ferrofluid in a Square Cavity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moo-Yeon Lee

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this paper is numerically to study the heat and flow characteristics of temperature-sensitive ferrofluid in the square cavity with and without the magnetic intensity. The numerical model was developed to predict the behavior of the ferrofluid using finite element method (FEM and showed good agreement with the existing data within 5% at all Rayleigh number ranges from 103 to 106. Natural convection and heat transfer characteristics of the ferrofluids within the tested cavity were found to depend on both magnetic intensity and magnetic volume fractions of magnetite. In addition, the mean Nusselt numbers and mean velocity of the ferrofluid in a square cavity were increased with the rise of the magnetic intensities and increased by 23.2% and 143.7%, respectively, at both magnetic intensity of H = 10000 A/m and the elapsed time of t = 30000 seconds.

  10. Sensitivity of summer precipitation to tropical sea surface temperatures over East Asia in the GRIMs GMP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Eun-Chul; Yeh, Sang-Wook; Hong, Song-You; Wu, Renguang

    2013-05-01

    In this study, uncoupled atmospheric general circulation model experiments are conducted to examine the sensitivity of tropical Ocean basins from the Indian Ocean to the tropical Pacific Ocean on the summer precipitation variability over East Asia. It is remarkable that the Indian Ocean basin sea surface temperature (SST) and the tropical Pacific basin SST act on summer precipitation variability over Northeast Asia and southern China quite differently. That is, SST warming in the Indian Ocean largely contributes to the increase in the amount of summer precipitation over East Asia, which is in contrast to the warming of the western tropical Pacific Ocean. Our further analysis indicates that an altered large-scale atmospheric circulation over the western tropical Pacific contributes to contrasting atmospheric motion over East Asia due to the tropics-East Asia teleconnections, which results in changes in the amount of summer precipitation due to the warming of the Indian and western tropical Pacific Oceans.

  11. Synthesis and characterization of asymmetric polymer/inorganic nanocomposites with pH/temperature sensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xinjie; Gao, Chunmei; Liu, Mingzhu; Huang, Yinjuan; Yu, Xiyong; Ding, Enyong

    2013-01-01

    An easy, comprehensive and inexpensive method is demonstrated to produce asymmetric polymer/inorganic nanocomposites in a large quantity. With the aid of Pickering emulsion, unmodified particles aggregate on the surface of emulsion droplets and are fixed in place when the wax solidifies. The exposed surfaces of immobilized SiO2 particles are modified chemically by 2-(dimethylamino) ethylmethacrylate (DMAEMA). With the removal of wax, the exposed side of particles can be further modified chemically by N-isopropylacrylamide (NIPAAm). Based on these procedures, dual responsive asymmetric nanocomposite particles are achieved with both pH and temperature sensitivities. Due to their dual-stimuli and asymmetric structure, these particles have potential applications in molecule targeting, drug delivery and as building blocks for the assembly of complex nanostructure.

  12. Gene Expression Proifling Related to Hyphal Growth in a Temperature- Sensitive Mutant ofMagnaporthe oryzae

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Xue-song; XU Fei; WANG Hong-kai; and LIN Fu-cheng

    2013-01-01

    The rice blast, caused by fungusMagnaporthe oryzae, is a major constraint to the world food security. Hyphal growth is the foundation of fungal development and proliferation of fungi. To investigate genes involved in hyphal growth of this fungus, digital gene expression tag proifling was used to compare a previously generated temperature-sensitive mutant which defect at hyphae growth and reduction on pathogenicity, with its related wildtype strain. 416 genes were detected as differential expression, 178 of which were speciifcally expressed in Guy-11 but down-regulated expression in the mutant. Functional classiifcation analysis revealed the phenotype mutation may be mainly caused by a defection in translational and vacuole-related processes. The results and the protocol used will improve our knowledge on morphogenesis and promote the further study onM. oryzae pathogenesis.

  13. Temperature-sensitive mutants of fowl plague virus: isolation and genetic characterization. [UV radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almond, J.W.; McGeoch, D.; Barry, R.D.

    1979-01-30

    Forty-nine temperature-sensitive mutants of fowl plague virus (FPV) strain Rostock and four ts mutants of FPV-strain Dobson were isolated by utilizing two methods of plaque screening, after either spontaneous or chemically induced mutagenesis. Twenty-nine of the FPV-Rostock mutants were further characterized by genetic recombination studies and were found to fall into six high frequency recombination groups. The genome segment carrying the ts mutation in each group was identified by analyzing the gene composition of ts/sup +/ recombinants generated from crosses between representatives of each group and ts mutants of FPV-Dobson. It was concluded that the six groups correspond to mutations in six different genome segments, namely, those coding for the P/sub 1/, P/sub 2/, P/sub 3/, HA, NP, and NS proteins.

  14. Method of correlation function for analyzing cross-sensitivity of strain and temperature in fiber grating sensors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HAN Gui-hua; ZHANG Wei-gang

    2007-01-01

    A novel method of correlation function for analyzing cross-sensitivity between strain and temperature is reported for the first time in this paper. Using the new method, the correlative characteristics between strain and temperature of fiber Bragg grating sensors are studied both theoretically and experimentally The experimental results accord with the theoretical calculations.

  15. Some influences of approximate values for velocity, density and total temperature sensitivities on hot wire anemometer results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stainback, P. C.

    1986-01-01

    There is a renewed interest in hot wire anemometry at transonic speeds. Recent results were published which indicate that at transonic speeds a heated wire is sensitive only to mass flow and total temperature, results similar to those obtained for supersonic flows. Other results were obtained to show that the sensitivity is a function of velocity, density, and total temperature, results in agreement with many of those obtained in the 1950s. An analysis of anemometry results was made to evaluate possible errors when various assumptions were made concerning the sensitivity of a heated wire to fluid flow variables.

  16. Enhancement of Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung clearance after local immunization with a temperature-sensitive mutant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sordelli, D O; Cerquetti, M C; Hooke, A M; Bellanti, J A

    1983-01-01

    We investigated the capacity of the temperature-sensitive mutant strain A/10/25 of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (ts-Psa) to induce enhancement of lung defenses against wild type P. aeruginosa (wt-Psa). Mice of the DBA/2J inbred strain were immunized by aerosolization with a single dose of 2 x 10(5) to 4 x 10(5) CFU of ts-Psa and were challenged 7, 14, and 21 days later with wt-Psa. The uncleared bacteria ratio was determined 4 h after aerosol exposure; significant enhancement in lung clearance of wt-Psa (P less than 0.01) was evident as early as 7 days after immunization and detectable for at least 21 days. Aerosol immunization with Staphylococcus aureus did not enhance lung clearance of wt-Psa; however, slight but significant enhancement in S. aureus clearance was observed in mice immunized 7 days before with ts-Psa. No enhancement of S. aureus clearance was seen in ts-Psa immunized animals after 14 and 21 days. Analysis of the cell composition of lung lavage fluids revealed a transient cell response characterized by rapid increase in the absolute number of polymorphonuclear leukocytes, followed later by an increase in alveolar macrophages. The characteristics of lung lavages returned to base-line values 6 days after aerosol immunization, and a second exposure to a ts-Psa aerosol produced a response of similar magnitude and quality. We conclude that aerosol immunization with a temperature-sensitive mutant of P. aeruginosa enhances specific pulmonary defense mechanisms against the parental pathogen in mice. PMID:6404822

  17. Temperature-sensitiveFerriteinWideTemperatureRangeandItsApplication Devices%宽温系列温敏铁氧体及其应用器件

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    颜陶; 龙克文; 颜天宝

    2013-01-01

    本文分析了国内外对温敏铁氧体及应用器件的开发背景,从宽温系列温敏铁氧体材及器件的应用需求着手,提出温敏铁氧体材料温度范围拓展的方向,优化了现有温敏磁控开关的结构用以实现-80℃~+280℃宽温系列温敏铁氧体器件的开发和应用,有助于标准化的简化和统一原则。%This paper analyzes development background of temperature-sensitive ferrite at home and abroad and its application devices. Start from these information, the development direction of temperature-sensitive ferrite materials’ temperature range are proposed. The structure of existing temperature-sensitive reed switches is optimized to realize the development and application of -80℃~+280℃ wide temperature range temperature-sensitive ferrite devices. It helps to simplify the standardization and integrates the principles.

  18. Dye-sensitized solar cells with ZnO nanoparticles fabricated at low temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Sungjae; Moon, Byungjoon; Son, Dongick [Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Wanju (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, Byoungwook; Choi, Wonkook [Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-11-15

    The authors investigated the microstructural and the electrical properties of ZnO based dyesensitized solar cells (DSSCs) fabricated using a low-temperature-processed(200 .deg. C) dye-sensitized ZnO-nanoparticle thin film and a Pt catalyst deposited on ITO/glass by using RF magnetron sputtering. A hydropolymer containing PEG (poly(ethylene glycol)) and PEO (poly ethylene oxide) was used to make uniformly-distributed ZnO nanoparticle layer that form a nano-porous ZnO network after heat treatment and was then dye sensitized and sandwiched between two electrodes in an electrolyte to make a DSSC device. The highest measured parameters, the short circuit current density (J{sub sc}), the open circuit potential(V{sub oc}), the fill factor(FF), and the power conversion efficiency (η), of the DSSC fabricated under optimized conditions were observed to be 4.93 mA/cm{sup 2}, 0.56 V, 0.40, and 1.12%, respectively.

  19. Enhanced sensitivity of temperature-compensated SAW-based current sensor using the magnetostrictive effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wen; Jia, Yana; Liu, Xinlu; Liang, Yong; Xue, Xufeng; Du, Zaofu

    2017-02-01

    A temperature-compensated surface acoustic wave (SAW)-based current sensor was proposed in this contribution, composed of a sensor chip made by SAW delay line patterns on a SiO2/128° YX LiNbO3 piezoelectric substrate, a magnetostrictive FeCo film deposited on the SAW propagation path, and a corresponding differential oscillation configuration. The FeCo coating produced magnetostrictive strain under the magnetic field generated by the applied current, leading to linearity changes in the SAW propagation in the form of velocity change. The corresponding differential oscillation frequency shift was used to evaluate the tested current. By solving the coupled electromechanical field equation in a layered structure while considering the magnetostrictive effect, the optimal FeCo film thickness, and sensor operation frequency yielding high current sensitivity, were determined, and then confirmed experimentally by evaluating the developed SAW current sensor system utilizing a Helmholtz coil. A high sensitivity of 16.6 KHz A-1 (8.3 KHz m-1 T-1), excellent linearity, and lower detection limit (˜0.2 mA) were achieved with our 300 MHz SAW sensor with a 500 nm FeCo coating and aspect ratio of 2:1.

  20. Vibration Sensitivity of a Wide-Temperature Electronically Scanned Pressure Measurement (ESP) Module

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuckerwar, Allan J.; Garza, Frederico R.

    2001-01-01

    A vibration sensitivity test was conducted on a Wide-Temperature ESP module. The test object was Module "M4," a 16-channel, 4 psi unit scheduled for installation in the Arc Sector of NTF. The module was installed on a vibration exciter and loaded to positive then negative full-scale pressures (+/-2.5 psid). Test variables were the following: Vibration frequencies: 20, 55, 75 Hz. Vibration level: 1 g. Vibration axes: X, Y, Z. The pressure response was measured on each channel, first without and then with the vibration turned on, and the difference analyzed by means of the statistical t-test. The results show that the vibration sensitivity does not exceed 0.01% Full Scale Output per g (with the exception of one channel on one axis) to a 95 percent confidence level. This specification, limited by the resolution of the pressure source, lies well below the total uncertainty specification of 0.1 percent Full Scale Output.

  1. Flowering time of butterfly nectar food plants is more sensitive to temperature than the timing of butterfly adult flight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kharouba, Heather M; Vellend, Mark

    2015-09-01

    1. Variation among species in their phenological responses to temperature change suggests that shifts in the relative timing of key life cycle events between interacting species are likely to occur under climate warming. However, it remains difficult to predict the prevalence and magnitude of these shifts given that there have been few comparisons of phenological sensitivities to temperature across interacting species. 2. Here, we used a broad-scale approach utilizing collection records to compare the temperature sensitivity of the timing of adult flight in butterflies vs. flowering of their potential nectar food plants (days per °C) across space and time in British Columbia, Canada. 3. On average, the phenology of both butterflies and plants advanced in response to warmer temperatures. However, the two taxa were differentially sensitive to temperature across space vs. across time, indicating the additional importance of nontemperature cues and/or local adaptation for many species. 4. Across butterfly-plant associations, flowering time was significantly more sensitive to temperature than the timing of butterfly flight and these sensitivities were not correlated. 5. Our results indicate that warming-driven shifts in the relative timing of life cycle events between butterflies and plants are likely to be prevalent, but that predicting the magnitude and direction of such changes in particular cases is going to require detailed, fine-scale data.

  2. Insights on the High-Temperature Operational Limits of ZrO2-Y2O3 TBCs Manufactured via Air Plasma Spray

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Rogerio S.; Marple, Basil R.

    2017-02-01

    The effective high-temperature operation limit of a ZrO2-7-8 wt.%Y2O3 (YSZ) thermal barrier coating (TBC) manufactured via air plasma spray (APS) is considered to be 1300 °C. This is related to the metastable tetragonal t'-phase formed during the rapid quenching of the YSZ particles during spraying. The t'-phase transforms into the equilibrium tetragonal and cubic phases at temperatures ≥ 1300 °C, which can lead to the formation of the monoclinic phase of YSZ upon cooling to room temperature. This formation of the monoclinic phase is accompanied by a volume expansion that leads to TBC failure due to extensive micro-cracking. To further investigate this limitation, an APS YSZ TBC was sprayed on a CMSX-4 substrate. By using a thermal (laser) gradient cyclic testing, a temperature gradient was generated across the TBC/substrate system. The YSZ T-front and substrate backside T-back temperature levels were 1500 and 1000 °C, respectively. In cycle conditions (5-min or 1-h hot and 2-min cool), no TBC failure has been observed. This behavior was partially attributed to the unexpected absence of the monoclinic phase of the YSZ in the cycled coatings. Although preliminary, these results are promising regarding increasing the effective high-temperature operational limits of APS YSZ TBCs.

  3. OPTIMIZATION OF THE TEMPERATURE CONTROL SCHEME FOR ROLLER COMPACTED CONCRETE DAMS BASED ON FINITE ELEMENT AND SENSITIVITY ANALYSIS METHODS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huawei Zhou

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Achieving an effective combination of various temperature control measures is critical for temperature control and crack prevention of concrete dams. This paper presents a procedure for optimizing the temperature control scheme of roller compacted concrete (RCC dams that couples the finite element method (FEM with a sensitivity analysis method. In this study, seven temperature control schemes are defined according to variations in three temperature control measures: concrete placement temperature, water-pipe cooling time, and thermal insulation layer thickness. FEM is employed to simulate the equivalent temperature field and temperature stress field obtained under each of the seven designed temperature control schemes for a typical overflow dam monolith based on the actual characteristics of a RCC dam located in southwestern China. A sensitivity analysis is subsequently conducted to investigate the degree of influence each of the three temperature control measures has on the temperature field and temperature tensile stress field of the dam. Results show that the placement temperature has a substantial influence on the maximum temperature and tensile stress of the dam, and that the placement temperature cannot exceed 15 °C. The water-pipe cooling time and thermal insulation layer thickness have little influence on the maximum temperature, but both demonstrate a substantial influence on the maximum tensile stress of the dam. The thermal insulation thickness is significant for reducing the probability of cracking as a result of high thermal stress, and the maximum tensile stress can be controlled under the specification limit with a thermal insulation layer thickness of 10 cm. Finally, an optimized temperature control scheme for crack prevention is obtained based on the analysis results.

  4. Temperature-sensitive mutants of Pseudomonas aeruginosa: isolation and preliminary immunological evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooke, A M; Arroyo, P J; Oeschger, M P; Bellanti, J A

    1982-01-01

    The immunogenicity of two temperature-sensitive (ts) mutants of Pseudomonas aeruginosa immunotype 1, isolated and characterized for the development of a safe, live vaccine strain, was evaluated in a mouse protection model. One mutant, A/10/25, had a limited "coasting" property (i.e., continued replication for two divisions) at the nonpermissive temperature (36 degrees C), whereas the other mutant, E/9/9, continued replication for five generations after transfer to 36 degrees C. Groups of 3- to 5-week-old ICR mice were immunized intraperitoneally with various doses of the two ts mutants; at various times thereafter, the mice were challenged intraperitoneally with lethal doses of the parental wild type. The more extensive coaster, E/9/9, induced 100% protection at immunizing doses lower than those required for A/10/25 to induce the same protection (1 x 10(8) to 2 x 10(8) and 6 x 10(8) colony-forming units, respectively). Both ts strains induced significant protection for up to 5 weeks after immunization. The results of these studies suggest that the use of P. aeruginosa ts mutants might provide a novel approach to the prevention of P. aeruginosa colonization of patients with cystic fibrosis. PMID:6815088

  5. Low-Temperature Processing of Titanium Oxide Nanoparticles Photoanodes for Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naji Al Dahoudi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Using the low-temperature processing of different organofunctional silanes like TEOS, GPTS, and MPTS to incorporate within TiO2 network, dye-sensitized solar cells (DSCs processed at low temperatures were obtained. The UV-cured MPTS-modified layer exhibited better performance over the TEOS and GPTS, where better mechanical stable layer is achieved in addition to better interconnection between the TiO2 nanoparticles. The J-V characteristics of the DSC composed of silane-based layer showed that the improved cell performance was due to the high photocurrent density accompanied with more dye adsorption and higher charge injection from TiO2 to FTO substrate resulting from the formation of an ohmic contact with the substrate. The highest conversion efficiency attained for MPTS-TiO2 layer cured with UV and followed by heating at 300∘C was 3.75±0.07%, which is 2.8 times better than the GPTS-based layer.

  6. Evaluation of latent period of temperature sensitivity in traditional and unilateral spinal anesthesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lakhin R.E.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: evaluation of the differences in the level of temperature, sensory and motor blockade during the various techniques of spinal anesthesia. Materials and Methods. Prospectively the randomized study included 70 patients. In the group with conventional spinal anesthesia (n=35 15mg of bupivacaine injected quickly. In the group with unilateral spinal anesthesia (n=35 7.5mg of bupivacaine administered slowly, at a rate of 1 ml per minute. We studied the level of temperature and time, sensory and motor blockade. The data are statistically processed. Results. Reduced thermal sensitivity recorded in an average of 48 seconds as a unilateral spinal anesthesia group and the control group. Subarachnoid administration of 7.5 mg of hyperbaric bupivacaine resulted in the development of a complete motor blockade underlying lower extremity in only 16 patients (45.7%. Conclusion. Using lower dosages of bupivacaine for unilateral spinal anesthesia lowers the threshold concentration of the local anesthetic in the subarachnoid space, resulting in slower motor neuron blockade and it is not total in more than 50% of cases.

  7. On the sensitivities of idealized moist baroclinic waves to environmental temperature and moist convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirshbaum, Daniel; Merlis, Timothy; Gyakum, John; McTaggart-Cowan, Ron

    2017-04-01

    The impact of cloud diabatic heating on baroclinic life cycles has been studied for decades, with the nearly universal finding that this heating enhances the system growth rate. However, few if any studies have systematically addressed the sensitivity of baroclinic waves to environmental temperature. For a given relative humidity, warmer atmospheres contain more moisture than colder atmospheres. They also are more prone to the development of deep moist convection, which is itself a major source of diabatic heating. Thus, it is reasonable to expect faster baroclinic wave growth in warmer systems. To address this question, this study performs idealized simulations of moist baroclinic waves in a periodic channel, using initial environments with identical relative humidities, dry stabilities, and dry available potential energies but varying environmental temperatures and moist instabilities. While the dry versions of these simulations exhibit virtually identical wave growth, the moist versions exhibit major differences in life cycle. Counter-intuitively, despite slightly faster initial wave growth, the warmer and moister waves ultimately develop into weaker baroclinic systems with an earlier onset of the decay phase. An energetics analysis reveals that the reduced wave amplitude in the warmer cases stems from a reduced transfer of available potential energy into eddy potential energy. This reduced energy transfer is associated with an unfavorable phasing of mid-to-upper-level thermal and vorticity anomalies, which limits the meridional heat flux.

  8. Studies on the Relation between the Composition of Thermal Sensitive MnZn Ferrite and Curie Temperature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Thermal sensitive MnZn ferrite is a kind of soft magnetic ferrite material with lower Curie temperature (Tc) and can be used to make many kinds of magnetic thermal sensitive sensors with high sensitivity. In this paper, the relation between the composition of thermal sensitive ferrite and Tc was studied. It was found that Tc changes linearly with ZnO extent when the content of Fe2O3 is fixed. Based on lots of experiments, an experimential formula to determine Tc was given out.

  9. Late Quaternary glacier sensitivity to temperature and precipitation distribution in the Southern Alps of New Zealand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ann V. Rowan; Simon H. Brocklehurst; David M. Schultz; Mitchell A. Plummer; Leif S. Anderson; Neil F. Glasser

    2014-05-01

    Glaciers respond to climate variations and leave geomorphic evidence that represents an important terrestrial paleoclimate record. However, the accuracy of paleoclimate reconstructions from glacial geology is limited by the challenge of representing mountain meteorology in numerical models. Precipitation is usually treated in a simple manner and yet represents difficult-to-characterize variables such as amount, distribution, and phase. Furthermore, precipitation distributions during a glacial probably differed from present-day interglacial patterns. We applied two models to investigate glacier sensitivity to temperature and precipitation in the eastern Southern Alps of New Zealand. A 2-D model was used to quantify variations in the length of the reconstructed glaciers resulting from plausible precipitation distributions compared to variations in length resulting from change in mean annual air temperature and precipitation amount. A 1-D model was used to quantify variations in length resulting from interannual climate variability. Assuming that present-day interglacial values represent precipitation distributions during the last glacial, a range of plausible present-day precipitation distributions resulted in uncertainty in the Last Glacial Maximum length of the Pukaki Glacier of 17.1?km (24%) and the Rakaia Glacier of 9.3?km (25%), corresponding to a 0.5°C difference in temperature. Smaller changes in glacier length resulted from a 50% decrease in precipitation amount from present-day values (-14% and -18%) and from a 50% increase in precipitation amount (5% and 9%). Our results demonstrate that precipitation distribution can produce considerable variation in simulated glacier extents and that reconstructions of paleoglaciers should include this uncertainty.

  10. Preparation, fabrication and biocompatibility of novel injectable temperature-sensitive chitosan/glycerophosphate/collagen hydrogels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Kedong; Qiao, Mo; Liu, Tianqing; Jiang, Bo; Macedo, Hugo M; Ma, Xuehu; Cui, Zhanfeng

    2010-10-01

    This paper introduces a novel type of injectable temperature-sensitive chitosan/glycerophosphate/collagen (C/GP/Co) hydrogel that possesses great biocompatibility for the culture of adipose tissue-derived stem cells. The C/GP/Co hydrogel is prepared by mixing 2.2% (v/v) chitosan with 50% (w/w) β-glycerophosphate at different proportions and afterwards adding 2 mg/ml of collagen. The gelation time of the prepared solution at 37°C was found to be of around 12 min. The inner structure of the hydrogel presented a porous spongy structure, as observed by scanning electron microscopy. Moreover, the osmolality of the medium in contact with the hydrogel was in the range of 310-330 mmol kg(-1). These analyses have shown that the C/GP/Co hydrogels are structurally feasible for cell culture, while their biocompatibility was further examined. Human adipose tissue-derived stem cells (ADSCs) were seeded into the developed C/GP and C/GP/Co hydrogels (The ratios of C/GP and C/GP/Co were 5:1 and 5:1:6, respectively), and the cellular growth was periodically observed under an inverted microscope. The proliferation of ADSCs was detected using cck-8 kits, while cell apoptosis was determined by a Live/Dead Viability/Cytotoxicity kit. After 7 days of culture, cells within the C/GP/Co hydrogels displayed a typical adherent cell morphology and good proliferation with very high cellular viability. It was thus demonstrated that the novel C/GP/Co hydrogel herein described possess excellent cellular compatibility, representing a new alternative as a scaffold for tissue engineering, with the added advantage of being a gel at the body's temperature that turns liquid at room temperature.

  11. Sensitivity of tropical cyclone characteristics to the radial distribution of sea surface temperature

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Deepika Rai; S Pattnaik; P V Rajesh

    2016-06-01

    Sea Surface Temperature (SST) is crucial for the development and maintenance of a tropical cyclone(TC) particularly below the storm core region. However, storm data below the core region is the mostdifficult to obtain, hence it is not clear yet that how sensitive the radial distribution of the SST impactthe storm characteristic features such as its inner-core structures, translational speed, track, rainfalland intensity particularly over the Bay of Bengal. To explore the effects of radial SST distributionon the TC characteristics, a series of numerical experiments were carried out by modifying the SSTat different radial extents using two-way interactive, triply-nested, nonhydrostatic Advanced WeatherResearch and Forecast (WRF-ARW) model. It is found that not only the SST under the eyewall (coreregion) contribute significantly to modulate storm track, translational speed and intensity, but also thoseoutside the eyewall region (i.e., 2–2.5 times the radius of maximum wind (RMW)) play a vital role indefining the storm’s characteristics and structure. Out of all the simulated experiments, storm wherethe positive radial change of SST inducted within the 75 km of the storm core (i.e., P75) produced thestrongest storm. In addition, N300 (negative radial changes at 300 km) produced the weakest storm.Further, it is found that SST, stronger within 2–2.5 times of the RMW for P75 experiment, plays adominant role in maintaining 10 m wind speed (WS10), surface entropy flux (SEF) and upward verticalvelocity (w) within the eyewall with warmer air temperature (T) and equivalent potential temperature(θe) within the storm’s eye compared to other experiments.

  12. Weak hydrological sensitivity to temperature change over land, independent of climate forcing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samset, Bjorn H.

    2017-04-01

    As the global surface temperature changes, so will patterns and rates of precipitation. Theoretically, these changes can be understood in terms of changes to the energy balance of the atmosphere, caused by introducing drivers of climate change such as greenhouse gases, aerosols and altered insolation. Climate models, however, disagree strongly in their prediction of precipitation changes, both for historical and future emission pathways, and per degree of surface warming in idealized experiments. The latter value, often termed the apparent hydrological sensitivity, has also been found to differ substantially between climate drivers. Here, we present the global and regional hydrological sensitivity (HS) to surface temperature changes, for perturbations to CO2, CH4, sulfate and black carbon concentrations, and solar irradiance. Based on results from 10 climate models participating in the Precipitation Driver and Response Model Intercomparison Project (PDRMIP), we show how modeled global mean precipitation increases by 2-3 % per kelvin of global mean surface warming, independent of driver, when the effects of rapid adjustments are removed. Previously reported differences in response between drivers are therefore mainly ascribable to rapid atmospheric adjustment processes. All models show a sharp contrast in behavior over land and over ocean, with a strong surface temperature driven (slow) ocean HS of 3-5 %/K, while the slow land HS is only 0-2 %/K. Separating the response into convective and large-scale cloud processes, we find larger inter-model differences, in particular over land regions. Large-scale precipitation changes are most relevant at high latitudes, while the equatorial HS is dominated by convective precipitation changes. Black carbon stands out as the driver with the largest inter-model slow HS variability, and also the strongest contrast between a weak land and strong sea response. Convective precipitation in the Arctic and large scale precipitation

  13. Comparison of electron beam and laser beam powder bed fusion additive manufacturing process for high temperature turbine component materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dryepondt, Sebastien N [ORNL; Kirka, Michael M [ORNL; Pint, Bruce A [ORNL; Ryan, Daniel [Solar Turbines, Inc.

    2016-04-01

    The evolving 3D printer technology is now at the point where some turbine components could be additive manufactured (AM) for both development and production purposes. However, this will require a significant evaluation program to qualify the process and components to meet current design and quality standards. The goal of the project was to begin characterization of the microstructure and mechanical properties of Nickel Alloy X (Ni-22Cr-18Fe-9Mo) test bars fabricated by powder bed fusion (PBF) AM processes that use either an electron beam (EB) or laser beam (LB) power source. The AM materials produced with the EB and LB processes displayed significant differences in microstructure and resultant mechanical properties. Accordingly, during the design analysis of AM turbine components, the specific mechanical behavior of the material produced with the selected AM process should be considered. Comparison of the mechanical properties of both the EB and LB materials to those of conventionally processed Nickel Alloy X materials indicates the subject AM materials are viable alternatives for manufacture of some turbine components.

  14. Effects of precipitation on soil respiration and its temperature/moisture sensitivity in three subtropical forests in Southern China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Jiang

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Both long-term observation data and model simulations suggest an increasing chance of serious drought in the dry season and extreme flood in the wet season in Southern China, yet little is known about how changes in precipitation pattern will affect soil respiration in the region. We conducted a field experiment to study the responses of soil respiration to precipitation manipulations – precipitation exclusion to mimic drought, double precipitation to simulate flood, and ambient precipitation (Abbr. EP, DP and AP, respectively – in three subtropical forests in Southern China. The three forests include Masson pine forest (PF, coniferous and broadleaved mixed forest (MF and monsoon evergreen broadleaved forest (BF. Our observations showed that altered precipitation can strongly influence soil respiration, not only through the well-known direct effects of soil moisture, but also by modification on both moisture and temperature sensitivity of soil respiration. In the dry season, soil respiration and its temperature sensitivity in the three forests showed rising trends with precipitation increase, and its moisture sensitivity showed an opposite trend. In the wet season, the EP treatment also decreased soil respiration and its temperature sensitivity, and enhanced moisture sensitivity in all three forests. Soil respiration under the DP treatment increased significantly in the PF only, and no significant change was found for either moisture or temperature sensitivity. However, the DP treatment in the MF and BF reduced temperature sensitivity significantly. Our results indicated that soil respiration would decrease in the three subtropical forests if soil moisture continues to decrease in the future. More rainfall in the wet season could have limited effect on the response of soil respiration to the rising of temperature in the BF and MF.

  15. Responses of soil respiration and its temperature/moisture sensitivity to precipitation in three subtropical forests in southern China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Jiang

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Both long-term observation data and model simulations suggest an increasing chance of serious drought in the dry season and extreme flood in the wet season in southern China, yet little is known about how changes in precipitation pattern will affect soil respiration in the region. We conducted a field experiment to study the responses of soil respiration to precipitation manipulations – precipitation exclusion to mimic drought, double precipitation to simulate flood, and ambient precipitation as control (abbr. EP, DP and AP, respectively – in three subtropical forests in southern China. The three forest sites include Masson pine forest (PF, coniferous and broad-leaved mixed forest (MF and monsoon evergreen broad-leaved forest (BF. Our observations showed that altered precipitation strongly influenced soil respiration, not only through the well-known direct effects of soil moisture on plant and microbial activities, but also by modification of both moisture and temperature sensitivity of soil respiration. In the dry season, soil respiration and its temperature sensitivity, as well as fine root and soil microbial biomass, showed rising trends with precipitation increases in the three forest sites. Contrarily, the moisture sensitivity of soil respiration decreased with precipitation increases. In the wet season, different treatments showed different effects in three forest sites. The EP treatment decreased fine root biomass, soil microbial biomass, soil respiration and its temperature sensitivity, but enhanced soil moisture sensitivity in all three forest sites. The DP treatment significantly increased soil respiration, fine root and soil microbial biomass in the PF only, and no significant change was found for the soil temperature sensitivity. However, the DP treatment in the MF and BF reduced soil temperature sensitivity significantly in the wet season. Our results indicated that soil respiration would decrease in the three subtropical

  16. ENZYMATIC HYDROLYSIS LIGNIN DERIVED FROM CORN STOVER AS AN INTRINSTIC BINDER FOR BIO-COMPOSITES MANUFACTURE: EFFECT OF FIBER MOISTURE CONTENT AND PRESSING TEMPERATURE ON BOARDS’ PROPERTIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guanben Du

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Binderless fiberboards from enzymatic hydrolysis lignin (EHL and cotton stalk fibers were prepared under various manufacturing conditions, and their physico-mechanical properties were evaluated. Full factorial experimental design was used to assess the effect of fiber moisture content and pressing temperature on boards’ properties. In addition, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC was used to obtain the glass transition temperature (Tg of EHL. We found that both fiber moisture content and pressing temperature had significant effects on binderless fiberboards’ properties. High fiber moisture content and pressing temperature are suggested to contribute to the self-bonding improvement among fibers with lignin-rich surface mainly by thermal softening enzymatic hydrolysis lignin. In this experiment, the optimized pressing temperature applied in binderless fiberboard production should be as high as 190°C in accordance with the EHL Tg value of 189.4°C, and the fiber moisture content should be limited to less than 20% with a higher board density of 950 kg/m3 to avoid the delamination of boards during hot pressing.

  17. Development of Manufacturing Methods for Low-Cost, High-Temperature Sensors Applicable to Hypersonic Research Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Routine installation and use of high-temperature optical sensors for characterization of advanced materials critical to NASA hypersonic programs are difficult due to...

  18. Twist Sensitivity of Cladding-Mode Resonances and Its Cross-Sensitivity to Strain and Temperature in a Mechanically Induced Long-Period Fiber Grating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Anitha S.; Sudeep Kumar, V. P.; Joe, Hubert

    2014-09-01

    Twist sensitivity of cladding-mode resonances in a mechanically induced long-period fiber grating formed over a single-mode fiber is experimentally demonstrated and theoretically analyzed. Of the two usual cladding-mode resonances corresponding to LP11 and LP12, higher-order mode LP12 is more sensitive to twist in comparison with the lower-order mode LP11. The extent of down-shifting of resonant wavelengths depends on twist-induced circular birefringence and the modal field distribution of the cladding-modes inside the fiber. When the fiber is severely twisted to 3.5 rad/cm, a shift sensitivity is observed of 1 nm/(rad/cm) for the LP11 mode and 4.23 nm/(rad/cm) for the LP12 mode. The fiber breaks when the twist rate exceeds 3.5 rad/cm. In comparison with LP12, the LP11 resonance is almost independent of the axial strain variation with an ultra-low sensitivity of 0.18 pm/με, and it is also almost insensitive to the temperature variation with a coefficient of 35 pm/°C. Forming the LP11 resonance far away from its cut-off wavelength, a widely tunable band-pass filter is also demonstrated with a very high twist sensitivity of 8.75 nm/(rad/cm) and negligible cross-sensitivity to strain and temperature. The experimental and theoretical results are very useful in selecting sensitive and stable cladding-mode resonances in the design of new mechanically induced long-period fiber gratings based torsion sensors and tunable band-pass filters.

  19. Disentangling residence time and temperature sensitivity of microbial decomposition in a global soil carbon model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Exbrayat, J.-F.; Pitman, A. J.; Abramowitz, G.

    2014-12-01

    Recent studies have identified the first-order representation of microbial decomposition as a major source of uncertainty in simulations and projections of the terrestrial carbon balance. Here, we use a reduced complexity model representative of current state-of-the-art models of soil organic carbon decomposition. We undertake a systematic sensitivity analysis to disentangle the effect of the time-invariant baseline residence time (k) and the sensitivity of microbial decomposition to temperature (Q10) on soil carbon dynamics at regional and global scales. Our simulations produce a range in total soil carbon at equilibrium of ~ 592 to 2745 Pg C, which is similar to the ~ 561 to 2938 Pg C range in pre-industrial soil carbon in models used in the fifth phase of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP5). This range depends primarily on the value of k, although the impact of Q10 is not trivial at regional scales. As climate changes through the historical period, and into the future, k is primarily responsible for the magnitude of the response in soil carbon, whereas Q10 determines whether the soil remains a sink, or becomes a source in the future mostly by its effect on mid-latitude carbon balance. If we restrict our simulations to those simulating total soil carbon stocks consistent with observations of current stocks, the projected range in total soil carbon change is reduced by 42% for the historical simulations and 45% for the future projections. However, while this observation-based selection dismisses outliers, it does not increase confidence in the future sign of the soil carbon feedback. We conclude that despite this result, future estimates of soil carbon and how soil carbon responds to climate change should be more constrained by available data sets of carbon stocks.

  20. Improved Sterilization of Sensitive Biomaterials with Supercritical Carbon Dioxide at Low Temperature.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Bernhardt

    Full Text Available The development of bio-resorbable implant materials is rapidly going on. Sterilization of those materials is inevitable to assure the hygienic requirements for critical medical devices according to the medical device directive (MDD, 93/42/EG. Biopolymer-containing biomaterials are often highly sensitive towards classical sterilization procedures like steam, ethylene oxide treatment or gamma irradiation. Supercritical CO₂ (scCO₂ treatment is a promising strategy for the terminal sterilization of sensitive biomaterials at low temperature. In combination with low amounts of additives scCO₂ treatment effectively inactivates microorganisms including bacterial spores. We established a scCO₂ sterilization procedure under addition of 0.25% water, 0.15% hydrogen peroxide and 0.5% acetic anhydride. The procedure was successfully tested for the inactivation of a wide panel of microorganisms including endospores of different bacterial species, vegetative cells of gram positive and negative bacteria including mycobacteria, fungi including yeast, and bacteriophages. For robust testing of the sterilization effect with regard to later application of implant materials sterilization all microorganisms were embedded in alginate/agarose cylinders that were used as Process Challenge Devices (PCD. These PCD served as surrogate models for bioresorbable 3D scaffolds. Furthermore, the impact of scCO₂ sterilization on mechanical properties of polysaccharide-based hydrogels and collagen-based scaffolds was analyzed. The procedure was shown to be less compromising on mechanical and rheological properties compared to established low-temperature sterilization methods like gamma irradiation and ethylene oxide exposure as well as conventional steam sterilization. Cytocompatibility of alginate gels and scaffolds from mineralized collagen was compared after sterilization with ethylene oxide, gamma irradiation, steam sterilization and scCO₂ treatment. Human

  1. Temperature sensitivity of soil respiration: Synthetic effects of nitrogen and phosphorus fertilization on Chinese Loess Plateau.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Rui; Sun, Qiqi; Wang, Ying; Liu, Qingfang; Du, Lanlan; Zhao, Man; Gao, Xin; Hu, Yaxian; Guo, Shengli

    2017-01-01

    Nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) fertilization has the potential to alter soil respiration temperature sensitivity (Q10) by changing soil biochemical and crop physiological process. A four-year field experiment was conducted to determine how Q10 responded to these biochemical and physiological changes in rain-fed agro-ecosystems on the semi-arid Loess Plateau. Soil respiration, as well as biotic and abiotic factors were measured in winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.), with three fertilization treatments: (no fertilization (CK), 160kgNhm(-1) (N), and 160kgNha(-1) with 39kgPha(-1) (N+P). Mean annual soil respiration rate (calculated by averaging the four years) in the N treatment and N+P treatment was 18% and 48% higher than that in the CK treatment, respectively; and it was increased by 26% (14%-48%) in the N+P treatment as compared with that in the N treatment. The decrease of Q10 in the N and N+P treatments against the CK treatment was not stable for each year, ranging from 0.01 to 0.28. The maximum decrease of Q10 in the N and N+P treatments was 10% and 15% in 2014-2015, while in other years the decrease of Q10 was numerical but not significant. Soil microbial biomass carbon (SMBC) was increased by 10% and 50%, dissolved organic carbon (DOC) was increased by 6% and 21%, and photosynthesis rate was increased ranging from 6% to 33% with N and N+P fertilization. The relative abundance of Acidobacteria, Actinobacteria and Chloroflexi were significantly higher by 32.9%-54.1% in N addition soils (N and N+P) compared to CK treatment, whereas additional P application into soils increased the relative abundance of the family Micrococcaceae, Nocardioidaceae and Chitinophagaceae. Soil respiration was positively related to SMBC, DOC and photosynthesis rate (paffect soil respiration and temperature sensitivity differently. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Soil organic matter mineralization of permafrost peat lands and sensitivity to temperature and lack of oxygen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamprecht, Richard E.; Diáková, Kateřina; Voigt, Carolina; Šantrůčková, Hana; Martikainen, Pertti; Biasi, Christina

    2017-04-01

    Globally, a significant pool of soil organic carbon (SOC) (Tarnocai et al. 2009) is stored in arctic peatlands where extensive permafrost prevents the decomposition of old soil organic matter (SOM). Vulnerability of ancient organic depositions in changing environment becomes a considerable issue in future climate models. Palsa mires, a typical cryogenic peatland type in subarctic tundra, are not only an important SOC pool but also have been reported as a source of nitrous oxide (N2O) (Marushchak et al. 2011). Microbial SOM mineralization and its sensitivity to changing environmental conditions are crucial to understand future C losses and greenhouse gas (GHG) fluxes in this abundant landform of subarctic region. The purpose of this experiment was to determine potential SOM mineralization in different layers of deep soil cores from an Arctic peatland. First, we aimed to define a response of C losses and GHG exchange rates to temperature and aerobic/anaerobic conditions in different peat layers down to the permafrost and beyond. Secondly, we sought for relations among SOM mineralization, nutrient availability and parameters of indigenous microbial community. Finally, we attempted to link the potential SOM mineralization of the different peat layers with surface GHG fluxes from a proceeding study conducted with the same, intact soil cores. Five deep peat soil cores were separated into five layers (0 20, 20 40, 40 60 cm, permafrost interface and permafrost layer). Homogenized peat was incubated in a factorial set-up of three temperatures (4, 10, and 16 °C) under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. At the beginning and the end of the total 5.5-months incubation period, we determined C and N availability, microbial biomass and potential activities of extracellular enzymes. Heterotrophic respiration (CO2), methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions were monitored weekly at the initial phase and biweekly later during the incubation. First results show that C-loss from

  3. Soil respiration sensitivities to water and temperature in a revegetated desert

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhi-Shan; Dong, Xue-Jun; Xu, Bing-Xin; Chen, Yong-Le; Zhao, Yang; Gao, Yan-Hong; Hu, Yi-Gang; Huang, Lei

    2015-04-01

    Soil respiration in water-limited ecosystems is affected intricately by soil water content (SWC), temperature, and soil properties. Eight sites on sand-fixed dunes that revegetated in different years since 1950s, with several topographical positions and various biological soil crusts (BSCs) and soil properties, were selected, as well as a moving sand dune (MSD) and a reference steppe in the Tengger Desert of China. Intact soil samples of 20 cm in depth were taken and incubated randomly at 12 levels of SWC (0 to 0.4 m3 m-3) and at 9 levels of temperature (5 to 45°C) in a growth chamber; additionally, cryptogamic and microbial respirations (RM) were measured. Total soil respiration (RT, including cryptogamic, microbial, and root respiration) was measured for 2 years at the MSD and five sites of sand-fixed dunes. The relationship between RM and SWC under the optimal SWC condition (0.25 m3 m-3) is linear, as is the entire range of RT and SWC. The slope of linear function describes sensitivity of soil respiration to water (SRW) and reflects to soil water availability, which is related significantly to soil physical properties, BSCs, and soil chemical properties, in decreasing importance. Inversely, Q10 for RM is related significantly to abovementioned factors in increasing importance. However, Q10 for RT and respiration rate at 20°C are related significantly to soil texture and depth of BSCs and subsoil only. In conclusion, through affecting SRW, soil physical properties produce significant influences on soil respiration, especially for RT. This indicates that a definition of the biophysical meaning of SRW is necessary, considering the water-limited and coarse-textured soil in most desert ecosystems.

  4. Induction of interferon by temperature-sensitive mutants of Newcastle disease virus. [Uv radiation, chick embryos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kowal, K.J.; Youngner, J.S.

    1978-10-01

    Spontaneously selected and mutagen-induced temperature-sensitive (ts) mutants of Newcastle disease virus (NDV) were used to study interferon induction in chick embryo (CE) cells at temperatures permissive (37/sup 0/) and nonpermissive (42/sup 0/) for virus replication. Both infectious and uv-irradiated virus were tested for interferon-inducing ability in cells pretreated or not pretreated with homologous interferon. At 37/sup 0/, only uv-irradiated NDV was capable of inducing interferon in cells not treated with interferon before infection. In cells pretreated with interferon, on the other hand, both unirradiated and uv-irradiated virus stimulated the production of interferon. At 42/sup 0/, the interferon-inducing phenotype for some uv-irradiated ts mutants was dependent on whether or not cells were pretreated with interferon. For example, out of 10 mutants examined, one uv-irradiated ts mutant induced interferon in both untreated and interferon pretreated cells; 7 mutants failed to induce in untreated cells but induced from 25 to 100 percent of the wild-type level of interferon in cells pretreated with interferon; and two mutants failed to induce interferon in both types of cells. In addition, one mutant (NDV/sub 0/ ts-100) induced low or undetectable levels of interferon at both 37 and 42/sup 0/, conditions under which wild-type virus (NDV/sub 0/) produced significant levels of interferon. Co-infection of cells with uv-irradiated ts-100 and a preparation of NDV/sub 0/ exposed to prolonged irradiation resulted in considerable production of interferon. These results suggest the possibility that more than one virus function may be involved in interferon induction by NDV in CE cells.

  5. Temperature-sensitive splicing is an important molecular regulation mechanism of thermosensitive genie male sterility in rice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN RongZhi; PAN YuFang; WANG Yang; ZHU LiLi; HE GuangCun

    2009-01-01

    Photoperiod and temperature-sensitive genetic male sterility (PGMS and TGMS) plants have a number of desirable characteristics for hybrid production. Two-line hybrids developed using the PGMS/TGMS system now account for a large proportion of rice production in China. In this paper, we summarize recent advances on molecular regulation mechanisms and genetics of PGMS/TGMS in rice. We suggest that temperature-sensitive splicing, an important posttranscriptional regulatory mechanism in modulating gene expression and eventually development and differentiation, is also an important molecular regulation mechanism of TGMS in rice. We review those factors involved in temperature-sensitive splicing like cis splice site, snRNA, trans pre-mRNA splicing protein and SR proteins, and delineate that splicing could be regulated by a complex cell signaling pathway. These might shed light on other unknown molecular PGMS/TGMS mechanisms.

  6. Highly Sensitive Temperature Sensors Based on Fiber-Optic PWM and Capacitance Variation Using Thermochromic Sensing Membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Md Rajibur Rahaman; Kang, Shin-Won

    2016-07-09

    In this paper, we propose a temperature/thermal sensor that contains a Rhodamine-B sensing membrane. We applied two different sensing methods, namely, fiber-optic pulse width modulation (PWM) and an interdigitated capacitor (IDC)-based temperature sensor to measure the temperature from 5 °C to 100 °C. To the best of our knowledge, the fiber-optic PWM-based temperature sensor is reported for the first time in this study. The proposed fiber-optic PWM temperature sensor has good sensing ability; its sensitivity is ~3.733 mV/°C. The designed temperature-sensing system offers stable sensing responses over a wide dynamic range, good reproducibility properties with a relative standard deviation (RSD) of ~0.021, and the capacity for a linear sensing response with a correlation coefficient of R² ≈ 0.992 over a wide sensing range. In our study, we also developed an IDC temperature sensor that is based on the capacitance variation principle as the IDC sensing element is heated. We compared the performance of the proposed temperature-sensing systems with different fiber-optic temperature sensors (which are based on the fiber-optic wavelength shift method, the long grating fiber-optic Sagnac loop, and probe type fiber-optics) in terms of sensitivity, dynamic range, and linearity. We observed that the proposed sensing systems have better sensing performance than the above-mentioned sensing system.

  7. Upconverting PAAm/PNIPAM/NaYF{sub 4}:Yb:Er hydrogel with enhanced luminescence temperature sensitivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Jiachang; He, Benzhao; Cheng, Zehong; Zhou, Li, E-mail: zhouli@glut.edu.cn

    2015-04-15

    We present a one-step approach to combine the functional features of upconverting NaYF{sub 4}:Yb:Er nanoparticles and thermosensitive poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAM) for luminescence thermometry. Dual-functional hydrogel that simultaneously possesses strong upconversion luminescence (UL) and temperature responsibility was fabricated based on the crosslinking of poly(acrylamide) in the presence of PNIPAM and NaYF{sub 4}:Yb:Er nanoparticles. The obtained hydrogel exhibited reversibly temperature-dependent UL and highly enhanced sensibility. The luminescence temperature sensitivity reached 1.9% per °C and 0.7% per °C in the range of 27–33 °C and 35–45 °C, respectively. The maximum sensitivity could even reach 26.5% per °C in the range of 33–35 °C. Considering the facile fabrication process and fine luminescence thermometry performance, this study thus opens up new opportunities for preparing highly sensitive temperature sensors. - Highlights: • One-step fabrication of upconverting and thermosensitve PAAm/PNIPAM/NaYF{sub 4}:Yb:Er hydrogel is reported. • The combination of functional features of NaYF{sub 4}:Yb:Er upconversion nanoparticles (UCNPs) and thermosensitve PNIPAM can efficiently enhance the luminescence temperature sensitivity of UCNPs. • The luminescence temperature sensitivity of hydrogel can respectively reach 1.9% per °C and 0.7% per °C in the range of 27–33 °C and 35–45 °C. • The maximum sensitivity can even reach 26.5% per °C in range of 33–35 °C.

  8. Locally Targeted Delivery of a Micron-Size Radiation Therapy Source Using Temperature-Sensitive Hydrogel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Yusung, E-mail: yusung-kim@uiowa.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa (United States); Seol, Dong Rim [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa (United States); Mohapatra, Sucheta [Department of Biomedical Engineering, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa (United States); Sunderland, John J. [Department of Radiology, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa (United States); Schultz, Michael K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa (United States); Department of Radiology, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa (United States); Domann, Frederick E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa (United States); Department of Surgery, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa (United States); Lim, Tae-Hong [Department of Biomedical Engineering, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa (United States)

    2014-04-01

    Purpose: To propose a novel radiation therapy (RT) delivery modality: locally targeted delivery of micron-size RT sources by using temperature-sensitive hydrogel (RT-GEL) as an injectable vehicle. Methods and Materials: Hydrogel is a water-like liquid at room temperature but gels at body temperature. Two US Food and Drug Administration-approved polymers were synthesized. Indium-111 (In-111) was used as the radioactive RT-GEL source. The release characteristics of In-111 from polymerized RT-GEL were evaluated. The injectability and efficacy of RT-GEL delivery to human breast tumor were tested using animal models with control datasets of RT-saline injection. As proof-of-concept studies, a total of 6 nude mice were tested by injecting 4 million tumor cells into their upper backs after a week of acclimatization. Three mice were injected with RT-GEL and 3 with RT-saline. Single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and CT scans were performed on each mouse at 0, 24, and 48 h after injection. The efficacy of RT-GEL was determined by comparison with that of the control datasets by measuring kidney In-111 accumulation (mean nCi/cc), representing the distant diffusion of In-111. Results: RT-GEL was successfully injected into the tumor by using a 30-gauge needle. No difficulties due to polymerization of hydrogel during injection and intratumoral pressure were observed during RT-GEL injection. No back flow occurred for either RT-GEL or RT-saline. The residual tumor activities of In-111 were 49% at 24 h (44% at 48 h, respectively) for RT-GEL and 29% (22%, respectively) for RT-saline. Fused SPECT-CT images of RT-saline showed considerable kidney accumulation of In-111 (2886%, 261%, and 262% of RT-GEL at 0, 24, and 48 h, respectively). Conclusions: RT-GEL was successfully injected and showed much higher residual tumor activity: 170% (200%, respectively), than that of RT-saline at 24 h (48 h, respectively) after injection with a minimal accumulation of In-111 to the

  9. Low-pressure systems and extreme precipitation in central India: sensitivity to temperature changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sørland, Silje Lund; Sorteberg, Asgeir

    2016-07-01

    Extreme rainfall events in the central Indian region are often related to the passage of synoptic scale monsoon low-pressure systems (LPS). This study uses the surrogate climate change method on ten monsoon LPS cases connected to observed extreme rainfall events, to investigate how sensitive the precipitation and runoff are to an idealized warmer and moister atmosphere. The ten cases are simulated with three different initial and lateral boundary conditions: the unperturbed control run, and two sets of perturbed runs where the atmospheric temperature is increased uniformly throughout the atmosphere, the specific humidity increased according to Clausius Clapeyron's relation, but the large-scale flow is unchanged. The difference between the control and perturbed simulations are mainly due to the imposed warming and feedback influencing the synoptic flow. The mean precipitation change with warming in the central Indian region is 18-20 %/K, with largest changes at the end of the LPS tracks. The LPS in the warmer runs are bringing more moisture further inland that is released as precipitation. In the perturbed runs the precipitation rate is increasing at all percentiles, and there is more frequent rainfall with very heavy intensities. This leads to a shift in which category that contributes most to the total precipitation: more of the precipitation is coming from the category with very heavy intensities. The runoff changes are similar to the precipitation changes, except the response in intensity of very heavy runoff, which is around twice the change in intensity of very heavy precipitation.

  10. Spatial patterns in temperature sensitivity of soil respiration in China: Estimation with inverse modeling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Tao; SHI PeiJun; HUI DaFeng; LUO YiQi

    2009-01-01

    Temperature sensitivity of soil respiration (Q_(10)) is an important parameter in modeling the effects of global warming on ecosystem carbon release. Experimental studies of soil respiration have ubiquitously indicated that Q_(10) has high spatial heterogeneity. However, most biogeochemical models still use a constant Q_(10) in projecting future climate change and no spatial pattern of Q_(10) values at large scales has been derived. In this study, we conducted an inverse modeling analysis to retrieve the spatial pattern of Q_(10) in China at 8 km spatial resolution by assimilating data of soil organic carbon into a process-based terrestrial carbon model (CASA model). The results indicate that the optimized Q_(10) values are spatially heterogeneous and consistent to the values derived from soil respiration observations. The mean Q_(10). values of different soil types range from 1.09 to 2.38, with the highest value in volcanic soil,and the lowest value in cold brown calcic soil. The spatial pattern of Q_(10) is related to environmental factors, especially precipitation and top soil organic carbon content. This study demonstrates that inverse modeling is a useful tool in deriving the spatial pattern of Q_(10) at large scales, with which being incorporated into biogeochemical models, uncertainty in the projection of future carbon dynamics could be potentially reduced.

  11. Mass Rearing of Temperature Sensitive Genetic Sexing Strains in the Mediterranean Fruit Fly (Ceratitis Capitata)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caceres, C. [FAO/IAEA Agriculture and Biotechnology Laboratory, Entomology Unit, A-2444 Seibersdorf (Austria)]. E-mail: c.caceres@iaea.org

    2002-09-15

    Genetic sexing strains (GSS) based on the temperature sensitive lethal(tsl) mutation are being used to produce sterile male medflies for large scale sterile insect technique (SIT) programmes for this pest. The use of male-only strains increases the overall efficiency of the technique. Currently more than 1.4 billion sterile male-only pupae are produced per week in different facilities around the world. Due to the mutations used to construct these strains, that is, translocations and selectable markers, they require different and more careful mass rearing procedures than do bisexual strains (BSS). The basic rearing technology has been developed and can be used to produce only males on a predictable basis to a level of 99.9% accuracy. If specific rearing procedures are followed, then tsl-based GSS has a rearing efficiency that is equal to that of a BSS and it is already know that males produced by the tsl-based GSS are of equal quality to males produced by BSS. Based on current rearing technology the cost of production of male pupae is about the same for both types of strain. This is due to the large colony that is required for the tsl-based GSS. This paper discusses the considerations that need to be taken into account during mass rearing of GSS and identifies the most efficient production processes that are currently available. (author)

  12. Spatial patterns in temperature sensitivity of soil respiration in China: Estimation with inverse modeling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Temperature sensitivity of soil respiration (Q10) is an important parameter in modeling the effects of global warming on ecosystem carbon release. Experimental studies of soil respiration have ubiquitously indicated that Q10 has high spatial heterogeneity. However, most biogeochemical models still use a constant Q10 in projecting future climate change and no spatial pattern of Q10 values at large scales has been derived. In this study, we conducted an inverse modeling analysis to retrieve the spatial pattern of Q10 in China at 8 km spatial resolution by assimilating data of soil organic carbon into a proc-ess-based terrestrial carbon model (CASA model). The results indicate that the optimized Q10 values are spatially heterogeneous and consistent to the values derived from soil respiration observations. The mean Q10 values of different soil types range from 1.09 to 2.38, with the highest value in volcanic soil, and the lowest value in cold brown calcic soil. The spatial pattern of Q10 is related to environmental factors, especially precipitation and top soil organic carbon content. This study demonstrates that inverse modeling is a useful tool in deriving the spatial pattern of Q10 at large scales, with which being incorporated into biogeochemical models, uncertainty in the projection of future carbon dynamics could be potentially reduced.

  13. The effect of temperature and moisture on electrical resistance, strain sensitivity and crack sensitivity of steel fiber reinforced smart cement composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teomete, Egemen

    2016-07-01

    Earthquakes, material degradations and other environmental factors necessitate structural health monitoring (SHM). Metal foil strain gages used for SHM have low durability and low sensitivity. These factors motivated researchers to work on cement based strain sensors. In this study, the effects of temperature and moisture on electrical resistance, compressive and tensile strain gage factors (strain sensitivity) and crack sensitivity were determined for steel fiber reinforced cement based composite. A rapid increase of electrical resistance at 200 °C was observed due to damage occurring between cement paste, aggregates and steel fibers. The moisture—electrical resistance relationship was investigated. The specimens taken out of the cure were saturated with water and had a moisture content of 9.49%. The minimum electrical resistance was obtained at 9% moisture at which fiber-fiber and fiber-matrix contact was maximum and the water in micro voids was acting as an electrolyte, conducting electrons. The variation of compressive and tensile strain gage factors (strain sensitivities) and crack sensitivity were investigated by conducting compression, split tensile and notched bending tests with different moisture contents. The highest gage factor for the compression test was obtained at optimal moisture content, at which electrical resistance was minimum. The tensile strain gage factor for split tensile test and crack sensitivity increased by decreasing moisture content. The mechanisms between moisture content, electrical resistance, gage factors and crack sensitivity were elucidated. The relations of moisture content with electrical resistance, gage factors and crack sensitivities have been presented for the first time in this study for steel fiber reinforced cement based composites. The results are important for the development of self sensing cement based smart materials.

  14. Cold-Adapted Viral Attenuation (CAVA): Highly Temperature Sensitive Polioviruses as Novel Vaccine Strains for a Next Generation Inactivated Poliovirus Vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Barbara P; de Los Rios Oakes, Isabel; van Hoek, Vladimir; Bockstal, Viki; Kamphuis, Tobias; Uil, Taco G; Song, Yutong; Cooper, Gillian; Crawt, Laura E; Martín, Javier; Zahn, Roland; Lewis, John; Wimmer, Eckard; Custers, Jerome H H V; Schuitemaker, Hanneke; Cello, Jeronimo; Edo-Matas, Diana

    2016-03-01

    The poliovirus vaccine field is moving towards novel vaccination strategies. Withdrawal of the Oral Poliovirus Vaccine and implementation of the conventional Inactivated Poliovirus Vaccine (cIPV) is imminent. Moreover, replacement of the virulent poliovirus strains currently used for cIPV with attenuated strains is preferred. We generated Cold-Adapted Viral Attenuation (CAVA) poliovirus strains by serial passage at low temperature and subsequent genetic engineering, which contain the capsid sequences of cIPV strains combined with a set of mutations identified during cold-adaptation. These viruses displayed a highly temperature sensitive phenotype with no signs of productive infection at 37°C as visualized by electron microscopy. Furthermore, decreases in infectious titers, viral RNA, and protein levels were measured during infection at 37°C, suggesting a block in the viral replication cycle at RNA replication, protein translation, or earlier. However, at 30°C, they could be propagated to high titers (9.4-9.9 Log10TCID50/ml) on the PER.C6 cell culture platform. We identified 14 mutations in the IRES and non-structural regions, which in combination induced the temperature sensitive phenotype, also when transferred to the genomes of other wild-type and attenuated polioviruses. The temperature sensitivity translated to complete absence of neurovirulence in CD155 transgenic mice. Attenuation was also confirmed after extended in vitro passage at small scale using conditions (MOI, cell density, temperature) anticipated for vaccine production. The inability of CAVA strains to replicate at 37°C makes reversion to a neurovirulent phenotype in vivo highly unlikely, therefore, these strains can be considered safe for the manufacture of IPV. The CAVA strains were immunogenic in the Wistar rat potency model for cIPV, inducing high neutralizing antibody titers in a dose-dependent manner in response to D-antigen doses used for cIPV. In combination with the highly productive

  15. Cold-Adapted Viral Attenuation (CAVA): Highly Temperature Sensitive Polioviruses as Novel Vaccine Strains for a Next Generation Inactivated Poliovirus Vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Barbara P.; de los Rios Oakes, Isabel; van Hoek, Vladimir; Bockstal, Viki; Kamphuis, Tobias; Uil, Taco G.; Song, Yutong; Cooper, Gillian; Crawt, Laura E.; Martín, Javier; Zahn, Roland; Lewis, John; Wimmer, Eckard; Custers, Jerome H. H. V.; Schuitemaker, Hanneke; Cello, Jeronimo; Edo-Matas, Diana

    2016-01-01

    The poliovirus vaccine field is moving towards novel vaccination strategies. Withdrawal of the Oral Poliovirus Vaccine and implementation of the conventional Inactivated Poliovirus Vaccine (cIPV) is imminent. Moreover, replacement of the virulent poliovirus strains currently used for cIPV with attenuated strains is preferred. We generated Cold-Adapted Viral Attenuation (CAVA) poliovirus strains by serial passage at low temperature and subsequent genetic engineering, which contain the capsid sequences of cIPV strains combined with a set of mutations identified during cold-adaptation. These viruses displayed a highly temperature sensitive phenotype with no signs of productive infection at 37°C as visualized by electron microscopy. Furthermore, decreases in infectious titers, viral RNA, and protein levels were measured during infection at 37°C, suggesting a block in the viral replication cycle at RNA replication, protein translation, or earlier. However, at 30°C, they could be propagated to high titers (9.4–9.9 Log10TCID50/ml) on the PER.C6 cell culture platform. We identified 14 mutations in the IRES and non-structural regions, which in combination induced the temperature sensitive phenotype, also when transferred to the genomes of other wild-type and attenuated polioviruses. The temperature sensitivity translated to complete absence of neurovirulence in CD155 transgenic mice. Attenuation was also confirmed after extended in vitro passage at small scale using conditions (MOI, cell density, temperature) anticipated for vaccine production. The inability of CAVA strains to replicate at 37°C makes reversion to a neurovirulent phenotype in vivo highly unlikely, therefore, these strains can be considered safe for the manufacture of IPV. The CAVA strains were immunogenic in the Wistar rat potency model for cIPV, inducing high neutralizing antibody titers in a dose-dependent manner in response to D-antigen doses used for cIPV. In combination with the highly productive

  16. Evolution of vertebrate transient receptor potential vanilloid 3 channels: opposite temperature sensitivity between mammals and western clawed frogs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shigeru Saito

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Transient Receptor Potential (TRP channels serve as temperature receptors in a wide variety of animals and must have played crucial roles in thermal adaptation. The TRP vanilloid (TRPV subfamily contains several temperature receptors with different temperature sensitivities. The TRPV3 channel is known to be highly expressed in skin, where it is activated by warm temperatures and serves as a sensor to detect ambient temperatures near the body temperature of homeothermic animals such as mammals. Here we performed comprehensive comparative analyses of the TRPV subfamily in order to understand the evolutionary process; we identified novel TRPV genes and also characterized the evolutionary flexibility of TRPV3 during vertebrate evolution. We cloned the TRPV3 channel from the western clawed frog Xenopus tropicalis to understand the functional evolution of the TRPV3 channel. The amino acid sequences of the N- and C-terminal regions of the TRPV3 channel were highly diversified from those of other terrestrial vertebrate TRPV3 channels, although central portions were well conserved. In a heterologous expression system, several mammalian TRPV3 agonists did not activate the TRPV3 channel of the western clawed frog. Moreover, the frog TRPV3 channel did not respond to heat stimuli, instead it was activated by cold temperatures. Temperature thresholds for activation were about 16 °C, slightly below the lower temperature limit for the western clawed frog. Given that the TRPV3 channel is expressed in skin, its likely role is to detect noxious cold temperatures. Thus, the western clawed frog and mammals acquired opposite temperature sensitivity of the TRPV3 channel in order to detect environmental temperatures suitable for their respective species, indicating that temperature receptors can dynamically change properties to adapt to different thermal environments during evolution.

  17. Relationships between Irritable Bowel Syndrome Pain, Skin Temperature Indices of Autonomic Dysregulation, and Sensitivity to Thermal Cutaneous Stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fong Wong

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated relationships between irritable bowel syndrome (IBS pain, sympathetic dysregulation, and thermal pain sensitivity. Eight female patients with diarrhea-predominant IBS and ten healthy female controls were tested for sensitivity to thermal stimulation of the left palm. A new method of response-dependent thermal stimulation was used to maintain pain intensity at a predetermined level (35% by adjusting thermal stimulus intensity as a function of pain ratings. Clinical pain levels were assessed prior to each testing session. Skin temperatures were recorded before and after pain sensitivity testing. The temperature of palmar skin dropped (1.5∘C when the corresponding location on the opposite hand of control subjects was subjected to prolonged thermal stimulation, but this response was absent for IBS pain patients. The patients also required significantly lower stimulus temperatures than controls to maintain a 35% pain rating. Baseline skin temperatures of patients were significantly correlated with thermode temperatures required to maintain 35% pain ratings. IBS pain intensity was not significantly correlated with skin temperature or pain sensitivity. The method of response-dependent stimulation revealed thermal hyperalgesia and increased sympathetic tone for chronic pain patients, relative to controls. Similarly, a significant correlation between resting skin temperatures and thermal pain sensitivity for IBS but not control subjects indicates that tonic sympathetic activation and a thermal hyperalgesia were generated by the chronic presence of visceral pain. However, lack of a significant relationship between sympathetic tone and ratings of IBS pain casts doubt on propositions that the magnitude of IBS pain is determined by psychological stress.

  18. Thermal aging of traditional and additively manufactured foams: analysis by time-temperature-superposition, constitutive, and finite-element models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maiti, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Weisgraber, T. H. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Small, W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Lewicki, J. P. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Duoss, E. B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Spadaccini, C. M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Pearson, M. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Chinn, S. C. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Wilson, T. S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Maxwell, R. S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-12-08

    Cellular solids or foams are a very important class of materials with diverse applications ranging from thermal insulation and shock absorbing support cushions, to light-weight structural and floatation components, and constitute crucial components in a large number of industries including automotive, aerospace, electronics, marine, biomedical, packaging, and defense. In many of these applications the foam material is subjected to long periods of continuous stress, which can, over time, lead to a permanent change in structure and a degradation in performance. In this report we summarize our modeling efforts to date on polysiloxane foam materials that form an important component in our systems. Aging of the materials was characterized by two measured quantities, i.e., compression set and load retention. Results of accelerated aging experiments were analyzed by an automated time-temperaturesuperposition (TTS) approach, which creates a master curve that can be used for long-term predictions (over decades) under ambient conditions. When comparing such master curves for traditional (stochastic) foams with those for recently 3D-printed (i.e., additively manufactured, or AM) foams, it became clear that AM foams have superior aging behavior. To gain deeper understanding, we imaged the microstructure of both foams using X-ray computed tomography, and performed finite-element analysis of the mechanical response within these microstructures. This indicates a wider stress variation in the stochastic foam with points of more extreme local stress as compared to the 3D printed material.

  19. Computational manufacturing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents a general framework for computational manufacturing. The methodology of computational manufacturing aims at integrating computational geometry, machining principle, sensor information fusion, optimization, computational intelligence and virtual prototyping to solve problems of the modeling, reasoning, control, planning and scheduling of manufacturing processes and systems. There are three typical problems in computational manufacturing, i.e., scheduling (time-domain), geometric reasoning (space-domain) and decision- making (interaction between time-domain and space-domain). Some theoretical fundamentals of computational manufacturing are also discussed.

  20. Behavioural thermoregulation in a temperature-sensitive coral reef fish, the five-lined cardinalfish (Cheilodipterus quinquelineatus)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nay, Tiffany J.; Johansen, Jacob L.; Habary, Adam

    2015-01-01

    provide a strategy to cope with changing conditions. A temperature-sensitive coral reef cardinalfish (Cheilodipterusquinquelineatus) was exposed to 28 °C (average at collection site) or 32 °C (predicted end-of-century) for 6 weeks. Tpref was determined using a shuttlebox system, which allowed fish...... than night-time movements. Understanding temperature-mediated movements is imperative for predicting how ocean warming will influence coral reef species and distribution patterns....

  1. Skin Sensitive Difference of Human Body Sections under Clothing-Smirnov Test of Skin Surface Temperatures' Dynamic Changing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Jun; WU Hai-yan; WANG Yun-yi

    2004-01-01

    Skin sensitive difference of human body sections under clothing is the theoretic foundation of thermal insulation clothing design.By a new method of researching on clothing comfort perception,the skin temperature live changing procedure of human body sections affected by the same cold stimulation is inspected.Furthermore with the Smirnov test the skin temperatures dynamic changing patterns of main human body sections are obtained.

  2. Precision manufacturing

    CERN Document Server

    Dornfeld, David

    2008-01-01

    Today there is a high demand for high-precision products. The manufacturing processes are now highly sophisticated and derive from a specialized genre called precision engineering. Precision Manufacturing provides an introduction to precision engineering and manufacturing with an emphasis on the design and performance of precision machines and machine tools, metrology, tooling elements, machine structures, sources of error, precision machining processes and precision process planning. As well as discussing the critical role precision machine design for manufacturing has had in technological developments over the last few hundred years. In addition, the influence of sustainable manufacturing requirements in precision processes is introduced. Drawing upon years of practical experience and using numerous examples and illustrative applications, David Dornfeld and Dae-Eun Lee cover precision manufacturing as it applies to: The importance of measurement and metrology in the context of Precision Manufacturing. Th...

  3. Influence of Heat Input on Microstructure and Toughness Properties in Simulated CGHAZ of X80 Steel Manufactured Using High-Temperature Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Zhixiong; Han, Jian; Li, Huijun

    2015-11-01

    To determine and demonstrate the weldability of high-Nb high-temperature processed (HTP) steels and provide extremely valuable information for future line pipe steel design and general steel manufacture, in the current study the toughness in simulated coarse-grained heat-affected zone (CGHAZ) of an X80 grade steel manufactured using HTP was evaluated. The simulated CGHAZs subjected to thermal cycles with various heat inputs (HIs) (0.8 to 5.0 kJ/mm) were produced using a Gleeble 3500 simulator. The microstructures and corresponding mechanical properties were investigated by means of optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, electron backscatter diffraction, hardness testing, and Charpy V-notch (CVN) testing. The microstructural examination shows that the simulated CGHAZs consisted of a bainite-dominant microstructure and relatively low amount (testing suggest that superior toughness can be achieved in the studied range of HIs (0.8 to 5 kJ/mm). This is thought to be associated with the combined effects of bainitic microstructure and low M-A fraction as well as comparatively fine austenite grain size in the studied CGHAZs.

  4. Poliovirus temperature-sensitive mutant containing a single nucleotide deletion in the 5'-noncoding region of the viral RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Racaniello, V R; Meriam, C

    1986-12-01

    The effect on viral replication of deleting nucleotide 10 of the poliovirus RNA genome was determined. This deletion, which removes a base pair from a predicted hairpin structure in the viral RNA, was introduced into full-length cDNA. Virus recovered after transfection of HeLa cells with the mutated cDNA contained the expected deletion and was temperature sensitive for plaque formation. Analysis of viral replication by one-step growth experiments indicated that mutant virus production at the nonpermissive temperature was at least 100 times less than that of wild type virus, and release of virus from mutant-infected cells was delayed. The synthesis of positive- and negative-strand viral RNA in mutant virus-infected cells was temperature sensitive. Virus-specific protein synthesis in mutant virus-infected cells was not temperature sensitive but occurred at a slower rate than that of wild type virus at permissive and nonpermissive temperatures. Replication of the mutant virus was sensitive to actinomycin D, in contrast to the wild type parent virus, which was resistant to the drug. Mutant virus stocks contained a small percentage of ts+ viruses that were able to form plaques at the nonpermissive temperature. Nucleotide sequence analysis of genomic RNA from these ts+ viruses revealed a single base change at position 34 from a G to U. In the positive RNA strand, the effect of this mutation is to restore to the hairpin structure the single base pair whose formation was prevented by the original deletion. The ts+ pseudorevertants replicated to similar titers as wild type virus at 33 and 38.5 degrees and were partially sensitive to actinomycin D.

  5. Enzymatic- and temperature-sensitive controlled release of ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxides (USPIOs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ortega Ryan A

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Drug and contrast agent delivery systems that achieve controlled release in the presence of enzymatic activity are becoming increasingly important, as enzymatic activity is a hallmark of a wide array of diseases, including cancer and atherosclerosis. Here, we have synthesized clusters of ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxides (USPIOs that sense enzymatic activity for applications in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. To achieve this goal, we utilize amphiphilic poly(propylene sulfide-bl-poly(ethylene glycol (PPS-b-PEG copolymers, which are known to have excellent properties for smart delivery of drug and siRNA. Results Monodisperse PPS polymers were synthesized by anionic ring opening polymerization of propylene sulfide, and were sequentially reacted with commercially available heterobifunctional PEG reagents and then ssDNA sequences to fashion biofunctional PPS-bl-PEG copolymers. They were then combined with hydrophobic 12 nm USPIO cores in the thin-film hydration method to produce ssDNA-displaying USPIO micelles. Micelle populations displaying complementary ssDNA sequences were mixed to induce crosslinking of the USPIO micelles. By design, these crosslinking sequences contained an EcoRV cleavage site. Treatment of the clusters with EcoRV results in a loss of R2 negative contrast in the system. Further, the USPIO clusters demonstrate temperature sensitivity as evidenced by their reversible dispersion at ~75°C and re-clustering following return to room temperature. Conclusions This work demonstrates proof of concept of an enzymatically-actuatable and thermoresponsive system for dynamic biosensing applications. The platform exhibits controlled release of nanoparticles leading to changes in magnetic relaxation, enabling detection of enzymatic activity. Further, the presented functionalization scheme extends the scope of potential applications for PPS-b-PEG. Combined with previous findings using this polymer platform that

  6. Disentangling residence time and temperature sensitivity of microbial decomposition in a global soil carbon model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.-F. Exbrayat

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies have identified the first-order parameterization of microbial decomposition as a major source of uncertainty in simulations and projections of the terrestrial carbon balance. Here, we use a reduced complexity model representative of the current state-of-the-art parameterization of soil organic carbon decomposition. We undertake a systematic sensitivity analysis to disentangle the effect of the time-invariant baseline residence time (k and the sensitvity of microbial decomposition to temperature (Q10 on soil carbon dynamics at regional and global scales. Our simulations produce a range in total soil carbon at equilibrium of ~ 592 to 2745 Pg C which is similar to the ~ 561 to 2938 Pg C range in pre-industrial soil carbon in models used in the fifth phase of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project. This range depends primarily on the value of k, although the impact of Q10 is not trivial at regional scales. As climate changes through the historical period, and into the future, k is primarily responsible for the magnitude of the response in soil carbon, whereas Q10 determines whether the soil remains a sink, or becomes a source in the future mostly by its effect on mid-latitudes carbon balance. If we restrict our simulations to those simulating total soil carbon stocks consistent with observations of current stocks, the projected range in total soil carbon change is reduced by 42% for the historical simulations and 45% for the future projections. However, while this observation-based selection dismisses outliers it does not increase confidence in the future sign of the soil carbon feedback. We conclude that despite this result, future estimates of soil carbon, and how soil carbon responds to climate change should be constrained by available observational data sets.

  7. Optical temperature sensor with enhanced sensitivity by employing hybrid waveguides in a silicon Mach-Zehnder interferometer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guan, Xiaowei; Wang, Xiaoyan; Frandsen, Lars Hagedorn

    2016-01-01

    of the fabricated sensor with silicon/polymer hybrid waveguides is measured to be 172 pm/°C, which is two times larger than a conventional all-silicon optical temperature sensor (∼80 pm/°C). Moreover, a design with silicon/titanium dioxide hybrid waveguides is by calculation expected to have a sensitivity as high...

  8. Influence of annealing temperature and organic dyes as sensitizers on sol–gel derived TiO{sub 2} films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rani, Mamta; Abbas, Saeed J.; Tripathi, S.K., E-mail: surya@pu.ac.in

    2014-09-15

    Highlights: • Preparation of rice shaped TiO{sub 2} nanorods with anatase structure by sol–gel method. • Effect of post deposition annealing on structural properties of TiO{sub 2} is studied. • Unlike individual dye, absorption of Cocktail dye with TiO{sub 2} nanorods is broader. • Cocktail dye sensitized TiO{sub 2} film has more photosensitivity than EY, RB, AO. • Increase in photosensitivity up to optimum temperature is due to hole passivation. - Abstract: Five different organic dyes and reported cocktail dye composed of these dyes are used as sensitizer for titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}). Rice shaped (TiO{sub 2}) nanorods are prepared by using sol–gel method. The films annealed at 673 K and above are crystalline with anatase structure. The effect of post annealing temperature is studied on various structural parameters. Cocktail dye shows broader absorption with TiO{sub 2} nanorods in visible region compared with five dyes. Maximum photosensitivity is obtained with RhB dye, followed by FGF and cocktail dye sensitized TiO{sub 2} films. Increase in photosensitivity is due to passivating some hole traps on the surface up to some optimum temperature, above which photosensitivity decreases due to a higher photo activation energy compared to dark conductivity in low temperature region and also may be due to damage of the dye molecule. This work may prove its worth for understanding the electron transport in dye sensitized nanodevices.

  9. Selective laser melting additive manufactured Inconel 718 superalloy parts: High-temperature oxidation property and its mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Qingbo; Gu, Dongdong

    2014-10-01

    This work presented a comprehensive study of high-temperature oxidation behaviors and mechanisms of Selective laser melting (SLM) processed Inconel 718 superalloy parts using different methods including isothermal oxidation testing, X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The experimental results revealed that the oxidation process of the tested parts processed at a lower volumetric laser energy density experienced the severe spallation. On reasonably increasing the applied volumetric laser energy density, the oxidation kinetics of the as-produced parts obeyed a parabolic law, exhibiting the significantly improved oxidation resistance performance. The constitutional phases within the oxidation film were identified and the corresponding formation mechanisms were elucidated in detail according to the thermodynamic principles. The cross-sectional morphologies of oxidized Inconel 718 parts indicated that the oxidation microstructure mainly consisted of an external oxidation layer and an internal oxidation zone. The oxidation process was controlled by the outward diffusion of oxide forming elements and inward penetration of oxygen, by which the interaction mechanisms between the microstructures and internal oxidation zones were clarified. On the basis of the experimental results and theoretical analyses, the physical oxidation mechanisms were accordingly established to illustrate the oxidation behaviors of SLM-processed Inconel 718 parts at elevated operative temperatures.

  10. Thermal Error Modeling Method with the Jamming of Temperature-Sensitive Points' Volatility on CNC Machine Tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    MIAO, Enming; LIU, Yi; XU, Jianguo; LIU, Hui

    2017-03-01

    Aiming at the deficiency of the robustness of thermal error compensation models of CNC machine tools, the mechanism of improving the models' robustness is studied by regarding the Leaderway-V450 machining center as the object. Through the analysis of actual spindle air cutting experimental data on Leaderway-V450 machine, it is found that the temperature-sensitive points used for modeling is volatility, and this volatility directly leads to large changes on the collinear degree among modeling independent variables. Thus, the forecasting accuracy of multivariate regression model is severely affected, and the forecasting robustness becomes poor too. To overcome this effect, a modeling method of establishing thermal error models by using single temperature variable under the jamming of temperature-sensitive points' volatility is put forward. According to the actual data of thermal error measured in different seasons, it is proved that the single temperature variable model can reduce the loss of forecasting accuracy resulted from the volatility of temperature-sensitive points, especially for the prediction of cross quarter data, the improvement of forecasting accuracy is about 5 μm or more. The purpose that improving the robustness of the thermal error models is realized, which can provide a reference for selecting the modeling independent variable in the application of thermal error compensation of CNC machine tools.

  11. Sensitivity of soil respiration to variability in soil moisture and temperature in a humid tropical forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tana Wood; M. Detto; W.L. Silver

    2013-01-01

    Precipitation and temperature are important drivers of soil respiration. The role of moisture and temperature are generally explored at seasonal or inter-annual timescales; however, significant variability also occurs on hourly to daily time-scales. We used small (1.54 m2), throughfall exclusion shelters to evaluate the role soil moisture and temperature as temporal...

  12. A novel diamond anvil cell for x-ray diffraction at cryogenic temperatures manufactured by 3D printing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, H.; Woodall, C. H.; Wang, X.; Parsons, S.; Kamenev, K. V.

    2017-03-01

    A new miniature high-pressure diamond anvil cell was designed and constructed using 3D micro laser sintering technology. This is the first application of the use of rapid prototyping technology to construct high-pressure apparatus. The cell is specifically designed for use as an X-ray diffraction cell that can be used with commercially available diffractometers and open-flow cryogenic equipment to collect data at low temperature and high pressure. The cell is constructed from stainless steel 316L and is about 9 mm in diameter and 7 mm in height, giving it both small dimensions and low thermal mass, and it will fit into the cooling envelope of a standard CryostreamTM cooling system. The cell is clamped using a customized miniature buttress thread of diameter 7 mm and pitch of 0.5 mm enabled by 3D micro laser sintering technology; such dimensions are not attainable using conventional machining. The buttress thread was used as it has favourable uniaxial load properties allowing for higher pressure and better anvil alignment. The clamp can support the load of at least 1.5 kN according to finite element analysis (FEA) simulations. FEA simulations were also used to compare the performance of the standard thread and the buttress thread, and demonstrate that stress is distributed more uniformly in the latter. Rapid prototyping of the pressure cell by the laser sintering resulted in a substantially higher tensile yield strength of the 316L stainless steel (675 MPa compared to 220 MPa for the wrought type of the same material), which increased the upper pressure limit of the cell. The cell is capable of reaching pressures of up to 15 GPa with 600 μm diameter culets of diamond anvils. Sample temperature and pressure changes on cooling were assessed using X-ray diffraction on samples of NaCl and HMT-d12.

  13. Competitive Enzymatic Fluorescence Immunoassay for Human IgG by Using a Temperature-Sensitive Phase Separating Polymer with Regulated Phase Transition Temperature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIN Peng; WANG Yi-Lei; FENG Jian-Jun; ZOU Zhi-Hua; YANG Qian

    2008-01-01

    A new enzymatic fluorescence immunoassay for human IgG was developed using a temperature-sensitive polymer, poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-co-acrylamide) [P(NIP-AA)], as a carrier. The lower critical solution temperature of the P(NIP-AA) containing molar fraction of 8% for AA was 37 ℃. In a competitive immunoassay, immobilized IgG and the standard IgG (or sample) competed for binding to a horseradish peroxidase labeled antibody at 33 ℃ in homogeneous format. After changing the temperature to separate the polymer-immune complex, the complex precipitate was re-dissolved and determined by coupling with the fluorescence reaction of hydrogen peroxide and p-hydroxyphenylacetic acid. The calibration graph for human IgG was linear over the range of 100-1000 ng/mL with a detection limit of 2.0 ng/mL. The method is rapid, sensitive and simple. The immune reaction efficiency was improved. In addition, the sensitivity of this method was close to that using traditional microtitration plates as carriers. However, the assay was much faster (the assay time decreased from 100-120 to 30 min). The method has been applied to the determination of the human IgG levels in human sera with satisfactory results.

  14. Temperature sensitivity and enzymatic mechanisms of soil organic matter decomposition along an altitudinal gradient on Mount Kilimanjaro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blagodatskaya, Еvgenia; Blagodatsky, Sergey; Khomyakov, Nikita; Myachina, Olga; Kuzyakov, Yakov

    2016-02-01

    Short-term acceleration of soil organic matter decomposition by increasing temperature conflicts with the thermal adaptation observed in long-term studies. Here we used the altitudinal gradient on Mt. Kilimanjaro to demonstrate the mechanisms of thermal adaptation of extra- and intracellular enzymes that hydrolyze cellulose, chitin and phytate and oxidize monomers (14C-glucose) in warm- and cold-climate soils. We revealed that no response of decomposition rate to temperature occurs because of a cancelling effect consisting in an increase in half-saturation constants (Km), which counteracts the increase in maximal reaction rates (Vmax with temperature). We used the parameters of enzyme kinetics to predict thresholds of substrate concentration (Scrit) below which decomposition rates will be insensitive to global warming. Increasing values of Scrit, and hence stronger canceling effects with increasing altitude on Mt. Kilimanjaro, explained the thermal adaptation of polymer decomposition. The reduction of the temperature sensitivity of Vmax along the altitudinal gradient contributed to thermal adaptation of both polymer and monomer degradation. Extrapolating the altitudinal gradient to the large-scale latitudinal gradient, these results show that the soils of cold climates with stronger and more frequent temperature variation are less sensitive to global warming than soils adapted to high temperatures.

  15. Sensitivity experiments on the response of Vb cyclones to sea surface temperature and soil moisture changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messmer, Martina; José Gómez-Navarro, Juan; Raible, Christoph C.

    2017-07-01

    Extratropical cyclones of type Vb, which develop over the western Mediterranean and move northeastward, are major natural hazards that are responsible for heavy precipitation over central Europe. To gain further understanding in the governing processes of these Vb cyclones, the study explores the role of soil moisture and sea surface temperature (SST) and their contribution to the atmospheric moisture content. Thereby, recent Vb events identified in the ERA-Interim reanalysis are dynamically downscaled with the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model. Results indicate that a mean high-impact summer Vb event is mostly sensitive to an increase in the Mediterranean SSTs and rather insensitive to Atlantic SSTs and soil moisture changes. Hence, an increase of +5 K in Mediterranean SSTs leads to an average increase of 24 % in precipitation over central Europe. This increase in precipitation is mainly induced by larger mean upward moisture flux over the Mediterranean with increasing Mediterranean SSTs. This further invokes an increase in latent energy release, which leads to an increase in atmospheric instability, i.e. in convective available potential energy. Both the increased availability of atmospheric moisture and the increased instability of the atmosphere, which is able to remove extra moisture from the atmosphere due to convective processes, are responsible for the strong increase in precipitation over the entire region influenced by Vb events. Precipitation patterns further indicate that a strong increase in precipitation is found at the eastern coast of the Adriatic Sea for increased Mediterranean SSTs. This premature loss in atmospheric moisture leads to a significant decrease in atmospheric moisture transport to central Europe and the northeastern flanks of the Alpine mountain chain. This leads to a reduction in precipitation in this high-impact region of the Vb event for an increase in Mediterranean SSTs of +5 K. Furthermore, the intensity of the Vb

  16. Cold-tolerant crop species have greater temperature homeostasis of leaf respiration and photosynthesis than cold-sensitive species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamori, Wataru; Noguchi, Ko; Hikosaka, Kouki; Terashima, Ichiro

    2009-02-01

    Some plant species show constant rates of respiration and photosynthesis measured at their respective growth temperatures (temperature homeostasis), whereas others do not. However, it is unclear what species show such temperature homeostasis and what factors affect the temperature homeostasis. To analyze the inherent ability of plants to acclimate respiration and photosynthesis to different growth temperatures, we examined 11 herbace-ous crops with different cold tolerance. Leaf respiration (R(area)) and photosynthetic rate (P(area)) under high light at 360 microl l(-1) CO(2) concentrations were measured in plants grown at 15 and 30 degrees C. Cold-tolerant species showed a greater extent of temperature homeostasis of both R(area) and P(area) than cold-sensitive species. The underlying mechanisms which caused differences in the extent of temperature homeostasis were examined. The extent of temperature homeostasis of P(area) was not determined by differences in leaf mass and nitrogen content per leaf area, but by differences in photosynthetic nitrogen use efficiency (PNUE). Moreover, differences in PNUE were due to differences in the maximum catalytic rate of Rubisco, Rubisco contents and amounts of nitrogen invested in Rubisco. These findings indicated that the temperature homeostasis of photosynthesis was regulated by various parameters. On the other hand, the extent of temperature homeostasis of R(area) was unrelated to the maximum activity of the respiratory enzyme (NAD-malic enzyme). The R(area)/P(area) ratio was maintained irrespective of the growth temperatures in all the species, suggesting that the extent of temperature homeostasis of R(area) interacted with the photosynthetic rate and/or the homeostasis of photosynthesis.

  17. TRPA1 channels in Drosophila and honey bee ectoparasitic mites share heat sensitivity and temperature-related physiological functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guangda Peng

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The transient receptor potential cation channel, subfamily A, member 1 (TRPA1 is conserved between many arthropods, and in some has been shown to function as a chemosensor for noxious compounds. Activation of arthropod TRPA1 channels by temperature fluctuations has been tested in only a few insect species, and all of them were shown to be activated by heat. The recent identification of chemosensitive TRPA1 channels from two honey bee ectoparasitic mite species (VdTRPA1 and TmTRPA1 have provided an opportunity to study the temperature-dependent activation and the temperature-associated physiological functions of TRPA1 channels in non-insect arthropods. We found that both mite TRPA1 channels are heat sensitive and capable of rescuing the temperature-related behavioral defects of a Drosophila melanogaster trpA1 mutant. These results suggest that heat-sensitivity of TRPA1 could be conserved between many arthropods despite its amino acid sequence diversity. Nevertheless, the ankyrin repeats (ARs 6 and 7 are well-conserved between six heat-sensitive arthropod TRPA1 channels and have critical roles for the heat activation of VdTRPA1.

  18. TRPA1 Channels in Drosophila and Honey Bee Ectoparasitic Mites Share Heat Sensitivity and Temperature-Related Physiological Functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Guangda; Kashio, Makiko; Li, Tianbang; Dong, Xiaofeng; Tominaga, Makoto; Kadowaki, Tatsuhiko

    2016-01-01

    The transient receptor potential cation channel, subfamily A, member 1 (TRPA1) is conserved between many arthropods, and in some has been shown to function as a chemosensor for noxious compounds. Activation of arthropod TRPA1 channels by temperature fluctuations has been tested in only a few insect species, and all of them were shown to be activated by heat. The recent identification of chemosensitive TRPA1 channels from two honey bee ectoparasitic mite species (VdTRPA1 and TmTRPA1) have provided an opportunity to study the temperature-dependent activation and the temperature-associated physiological functions of TRPA1 channels in non-insect arthropods. We found that both mite TRPA1 channels are heat sensitive and capable of rescuing the temperature-related behavioral defects of a Drosophila melanogaster trpA1 mutant. These results suggest that heat-sensitivity of TRPA1 could be conserved between many arthropods despite its amino acid sequence diversity. Nevertheless, the ankyrin repeats (ARs) 6 and 7 are well-conserved between six heat-sensitive arthropod TRPA1 channels and have critical roles for the heat activation of VdTRPA1. PMID:27761115

  19. Manufacturing technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-09-01

    The Manufacturing Technologies Center is an integral part of Sandia National Laboratories, a multiprogram engineering and science laboratory, operated for the Department of Energy (DOE) with major facilities at Albuquerque, New Mexico, and Livermore, California. Our Center is at the core of Sandia`s Advanced Manufacturing effort which spans the entire product realization process.

  20. Manufacturing Interfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Houten, van F.J.A.M.

    1992-01-01

    The paper identifies the changing needs and requirements with respect to the interfacing of manufacturing functions. It considers the manufacturing system, its components and their relationships from the technological and logistic point of view, against the background of concurrent engineering. Desi

  1. Behavioural thermoregulation in a temperature-sensitive coral reef fish, the five-lined cardinalfish ( Cheilodipterus quinquelineatus)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nay, Tiffany J.; Johansen, Jacob L.; Habary, Adam; Steffensen, John F.; Rummer, Jodie L.

    2015-12-01

    As global temperatures increase, fish populations at low latitudes are thought to be at risk as they are adapted to narrow temperature ranges and live at temperatures close to their thermal tolerance limits. Behavioural movements, based on a preference for a specific temperature ( T pref), may provide a strategy to cope with changing conditions. A temperature-sensitive coral reef cardinalfish ( Cheilodipterus quinquelineatus) was exposed to 28 °C (average at collection site) or 32 °C (predicted end-of-century) for 6 weeks. T pref was determined using a shuttlebox system, which allowed fish to behaviourally manipulate their thermal environment. Regardless of treatment temperature, fish preferred 29.5 ± 0.25 °C, approximating summer average temperatures in the wild. However, 32 °C fish moved more frequently to correct their thermal environment than 28 °C fish, and daytime movements were more frequent than night-time movements. Understanding temperature-mediated movements is imperative for predicting how ocean warming will influence coral reef species and distribution patterns.

  2. Ultra-Sensitive Chip-Based Photonic Temperature Sensor Using Ring Resonator Structures

    CERN Document Server

    Xu, Haitan; Fan, J; Taylor, J M; Strouse, G F; Ahmed, Zeeshan

    2013-01-01

    Resistance thermometry provides a time-tested method for taking temperature measurements. However, fundamental limits to resistance-based approaches has produced considerable interest in developing photonic temperature sensors to leverage advances in frequency metrology and to achieve greater mechanical and environmental stability. Here we show that silicon-based optical ring resonator devices can resolve temperature differences of 1 mK using the traditional wavelength scanning methodology. An even lower noise floor of 80 microkelvin for measuring temperature difference is achieved in the side-of-fringe, constant power mode measurement.

  3. Genetic variation during persistent reovirus infection: isolation of cold-sensitive and temperature-sensitive mutants from persistently infected L cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, R; Kauffman, R S; Fields, B N

    1983-11-01

    We have examined the evolution of reovirus in two independently established persistently infected (p.i.) cell lines. We found that reovirus undergoes extensive mutation during persistent infection in L cells. However, there was no consistent pattern of virus evolution; in one p.i. cell line temperature-sensitive (ts) mutants were selected, whereas cold-sensitive (cs) mutants were isolated from the second p.i. culture. Neither the cs nor the ts mutants isolated from the carrier cultures expressed their defect at 37 degrees, the temperature at which the p.i. cells were maintained, indicating that the cs and ts phenotypes were nonselected markers. These results emphasize the point that emergence of the ts or cs mutants during persistent infection only signifies that the virus has changed; it does not necessarily imply that the particular mutant is essential for the maintenance of the persistent infection. Given the high mutation rate of viruses, and the wide spectrum of viral mutants present in carrier cultures, it is essential to distinguish the relevant changes from those which may simply represent an epiphenomenon. In the accompanying paper (R. S. Kauffman, R. Ahmed, and B. N. Fields Virology, 130, 79-87, 1983), we show that by using a genetic approach, it is possible to identify the viral gene(s) which are critical for the maintenance of persistent reovirus infection.

  4. Probability and Sensitivity Nonlinear Analysis of the Hermetic Cover of Main Shut-off Valve under Extreme Pressure and Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Králik Juraj

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the probabilistic nonlinear analysis of the containment hermetic cover of main shut-off valve (MSV under an extreme internal overpressure and temperature. The scenario of the hard accident in NPP and the methodology of the calculation of the fragility curve of the failure overpressure using the probabilistic safety assessment PSA 2 level are presented. The elasto-plastic behavior of steel material dependent on temperature was considered in software ANSYS. The method of central composite design sampling (CCD of the response surface methodology (RSM was used to probability and sensitivity analysis of the hermetic cover reliability.

  5. High-sensitivity temperature sensor using the ultrahigh order mode-enhanced Goos-Hänchen effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xianping; Yin, Cheng; Sun, Jingjing; Li, Honggen; Wang, Yang; Ran, Maowu; Cao, Zhuangqi

    2013-06-03

    A high-sensitivity temperature sensor based on the enhanced Goos-Hänchen effect in a symmetrical metal-cladding waveguide is theoretically proposed and experimentally demonstrated. Owing to the high sensitivity of the ultrahigh-order modes, any minute variation of the refractive index and thickness in the guiding layer induced by the thermo-optic and thermal expansion effects will easily give rise to a dramatic change in the position of the reflected light. In our experiment, a series of Goos-Hänchen shifts are measured at temperatures varying from 50.0 °C to 51.2 °C with a step of 0.2 °C. The sensor exhibits a good linearity and a high resolution of approximately 5×10(-3) °C. Moreover, there is no need to employ any complicated optical equipment and servo techniques, since our transduction scheme is irrelevant to the light source fluctuation.

  6. Single site suppressors of a fission yeast temperature-sensitive mutant in cdc48 identified by whole genome sequencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina N Marinova

    Full Text Available The protein called p97 in mammals and Cdc48 in budding and fission yeast is a homo-hexameric, ring-shaped, ubiquitin-dependent ATPase complex involved in a range of cellular functions, including protein degradation, vesicle fusion, DNA repair, and cell division. The cdc48+ gene is essential for viability in fission yeast, and point mutations in the human orthologue have been linked to disease. To analyze the function of p97/Cdc48 further, we performed a screen for cold-sensitive suppressors of the temperature-sensitive cdc48-353 fission yeast strain. In total, 29 independent pseudo revertants that had lost the temperature-sensitive growth defect of the cdc48-353 strain were isolated. Of these, 28 had instead acquired a cold-sensitive phenotype. Since the suppressors were all spontaneous mutants, and not the result of mutagenesis induced by chemicals or UV irradiation, we reasoned that the genome sequences of the 29 independent cdc48-353 suppressors were most likely identical with the exception of the acquired suppressor mutations. This prompted us to test if a whole genome sequencing approach would allow us to map the mutations. Indeed genome sequencing unambiguously revealed that the cold-sensitive suppressors were all second site intragenic cdc48 mutants. Projecting these onto the Cdc48 structure revealed that while the original temperature-sensitive G338D mutation is positioned near the central pore in the hexameric ring, the suppressor mutations locate to subunit-subunit and inter-domain boundaries. This suggests that Cdc48-353 is structurally compromized at the restrictive temperature, but re-established in the suppressor mutants. The last suppressor was an extragenic frame shift mutation in the ufd1 gene, which encodes a known Cdc48 co-factor. In conclusion, we show, using a novel whole genome sequencing approach, that Cdc48-353 is structurally compromized at the restrictive temperature, but stabilized in the suppressors.

  7. Boundary-Layer Detection at Cryogenic Conditions Using Temperature Sensitive Paint Coupled with a Carbon Nanotube Heating Layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Kyle Z; Lipford, William E; Watkins, Anthony Neal

    2016-12-03

    Detection of flow transition on aircraft surfaces and models can be vital to the development of future vehicles and computational methods for evaluating vehicle concepts. In testing at ambient conditions, IR thermography is ideal for this measurement. However, for higher Reynolds number testing, cryogenic facilities are often used, in which IR thermography is difficult to employ. In these facilities, temperature sensitive paint is an alternative with a temperature step introduced to enhance the natural temperature change from transition. Traditional methods for inducing the temperature step by changing the liquid nitrogen injection rate often change the tunnel conditions. Recent work has shown that adding a layer consisting of carbon nanotubes to the surface can be used to impart a temperature step on the model surface with little change in the operating conditions. Unfortunately, this system physically degraded at 130 K and lost heating capability. This paper describes a modification of this technique enabling operation down to at least 77 K, well below the temperature reached in cryogenic facilities. This is possible because the CNT layer is in a polyurethane binder. This was tested on a Natural Laminar Flow model in a cryogenic facility and transition detection was successfully visualized at conditions from 200 K to 110 K. Results were also compared with the traditional temperature step method.

  8. [Impacts of land-use types on soil C mineralization and temperature sensitivity of forests in Qianyanzhou, Jiangxi Province, China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jie; Wei, Xue-Hong; Chai, Hua; Wang, Ruo-Meng; Wang, Dan; He, Nian-Peng

    2014-07-01

    Decomposition of soil organic matter plays an important role in the regulation of carbon (C) cycles at ecosystem or regional scales, and is closely related to temperature, moisture, and land-use types. The influences of soil temperature, moisture, and land-use types on soil C mineralization in Citrus reticulata and Pinus elliottii forests were investigated at the Qianyanzhou Ecological Experiment Station, Chinese Academy of Sciences, by conducting incubation experiments at 5-level temperatures (5, 10, 15, 20 and 25 degrees C) and 3-level moistures (30%, 60% and 90% saturated soil moisture, SSM). The results showed that soil temperature, moisture, and land-use types had significant effects on soil C mineralization and they had significant interaction effects. Soil C mineralization was positively correlated with incubation temperature in the two forests, and the maximum of soil C mineralization was in the 60% SSM treatment. The accumulation of soil C mineralization was higher in the C. reticulata forest than in the P. elliottii forest under the same temperature and moisture conditions. The temperature sensitivity (Q10) of soil C mineralization was influenced by land-use type and soil moisture. Q10 increased with the increasing soil moisture in both C. reticulata and P. elliottii forests at incubation 7 and 42 d. Q10 in the C. reticulata forest was higher than in the P. elliottii forest in the same moisture level, and the deviation increased with the increasing soil moisture. The model including temperature and moisture could depict the response of soil C mineralization to temperature and moisture. Temperature and moisture together explained 79.9% -91.9% of the variation in soil C mineralization.

  9. Micro Manufacturing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Hans Nørgaard

    2003-01-01

    . If a micro manufacturing system isn’t designed rationally and correctly, it will be high-cost, unreliable, and not robust. For micro products and systems it is a continuously increasing challenge to create the operational basis for an industrial production. As the products through product development...... processes are made applicable to a large number of customers, the pressure in regard to developing production technologies that make it possible to produce the products at a reasonable price and in large numbers is growing. The micro/nano manufacturing programme at the Department of Manufacturing...

  10. Interspecific Differences in Metabolic Rate and Metabolic Temperature Sensitivity Create Distinct Thermal Ecological Niches in Lizards (Plestiodon)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Charles M.; Burggren, Warren W.

    2016-01-01

    Three congeneric lizards from the southeastern United States (Plestiodon fasciatus, P. inexpectatus, and P. laticeps) exhibit a unique nested distribution. All three skink species inhabit the US Southeast, but two extend northward to central Ohio (P. fasciatus and P. laticeps) and P. fasciatus extends well into Canada. Distinct interspecific differences in microhabitat selection and behavior are associated with the cooler temperatures of the more Northern ranges. We hypothesized that interspecific differences in metabolic temperature sensitivity locally segregates them across their total range. Resting oxygen consumption was measured at 20°, 25° and 30°C. Plestiodon fasciatus, from the coolest habitats, exhibited greatly elevated oxygen consumption compared to the other species at high ecologically-relevant temperatures (0.10, 0.17 and 0.83 ml O2. g-1. h-1 at 20°, 25° and 30°C, respectively). Yet, P. inexpectatus, from the warmest habitats, exhibited sharply decreased oxygen consumption compared to the other species at lower ecologically-relevant temperatures (0.09, 0.27 and 0.42 ml O2. g-1. h-1 at 20°, 25° and 30°C, respectively). Plestiodon laticeps, from both open and closed microhabitats and intermediate latitudinal range, exhibited oxygen consumptions significantly lower than the other two species (0.057, 0.104 and 0.172 ml O2. g-1. h-1 at 20°, 25° and 30°C, respectively). Overall, Plestiodon showed metabolic temperature sensitivities (Q10s) in the range of 2–3 over the middle of each species’ normal temperature range. However, especially P. fasciatus and P. inexpectatus showed highly elevated Q10s (9 to 25) at the extreme ends of their temperature range. While morphologically similar, these skinks are metabolically distinct across the genus’ habitat, likely having contributed to their current distribution. PMID:27760215

  11. In situ gelling pH- and temperature-sensitive biodegradable block copolymer hydrogels for drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Narendra K; Lee, Doo Sung

    2014-11-10

    Stimuli-sensitive injectable polymeric hydrogels have been extensively investigated during the past decade as bioactive agent delivery vehicles and for tissue engineering applications. An aqueous solution of these polymers undergoes a sol-to-gel phase transition in response to external stimuli such as pH, temperature, salt, light, biomolecules, electromagnetic field, etc. Bioactive molecules or cells can be mixed into the low-viscosity state of the polymer solution and injected into the body at a target site, forming an in situ hydrogel depot, which can then serve as bioactive-molecule-releasing carriers or a cell-growing microenvironment. This review systematically summarizes the recent progress in biodegradable and injectable block copolymer hydrogels, giving special attention to the novel and promising pH- and temperature-sensitive injectable block copolymer hydrogels for biomedical applications. The gelation mechanism, formation of ionic complexes, and biodegradation are highlighted as key factors responsible for controlled protein/drug delivery. The advantages and perspectives of pH- and temperature-sensitive injectable block copolymer hydrogels are also highlighted.

  12. High regional climate sensitivity over continental China constrained by glacial-recent changes in temperature and the hydrological cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eagle, Robert A; Risi, Camille; Mitchell, Jonathan L; Eiler, John M; Seibt, Ulrike; Neelin, J David; Li, Gaojun; Tripati, Aradhna K

    2013-05-28

    The East Asian monsoon is one of Earth's most significant climatic phenomena, and numerous paleoclimate archives have revealed that it exhibits variations on orbital and suborbital time scales. Quantitative constraints on the climate changes associated with these past variations are limited, yet are needed to constrain sensitivity of the region to changes in greenhouse gas levels. Here, we show central China is a region that experienced a much larger temperature change since the Last Glacial Maximum than typically simulated by climate models. We applied clumped isotope thermometry to carbonates from the central Chinese Loess Plateau to reconstruct temperature and water isotope shifts from the Last Glacial Maximum to present. We find a summertime temperature change of 6-7 °C that is reproduced by climate model simulations presented here. Proxy data reveal evidence for a shift to lighter isotopic composition of meteoric waters in glacial times, which is also captured by our model. Analysis of model outputs suggests that glacial cooling over continental China is significantly amplified by the influence of stationary waves, which, in turn, are enhanced by continental ice sheets. These results not only support high regional climate sensitivity in Central China but highlight the fundamental role of planetary-scale atmospheric dynamics in the sensitivity of regional climates to continental glaciation, changing greenhouse gas levels, and insolation.

  13. Sensitivity of Inferred Electron Temperature from X-ray Emission of NIF Cryogenic DT Implosions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klem, Michael [Univ. of Dallas, Irving, TX (United States)

    2015-05-01

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory seeks to achieve thermonuclear ignition through inertial confinement fusion. The accurate assessment of the performance of each implosion experiment is a crucial step. Here we report on work to derive a reliable electron temperature for the cryogenic deuteriumtritium implosions completed on the NIF using the xray signal from the Ross filter diagnostic. These Xrays are dominated by bremsstrahlung emission. By fitting the xray signal measured through each of the individual Ross filters, the source bremsstrahlung spectrum can be inferred, and an electron temperature of the implosion hot spot inferred. Currently, each filter is weighted equally in this analysis. We present work quantifying the errors with such a technique and the results from investigating the contribution of each filter to the overall accuracy of the temperature inference. Using this research, we also compare the inferred electron temperature against other measured implosion quantities to develop a more complete understanding of the hotspot physics.

  14. Temperature sensitivity of Cu K(alpha) imaging efficiency using a spherical Bragg reflecting crystal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akli, K U; Key, M H; Chung, H K; Hansen, S B; Freeman, R R; Chen, M H; Gregori, G; Hatchett, S; Hey, D; Izumi, N; King, J A; Kuba, J; Norreys, P; Mackinnon, A J; Murphy, C D; Snavely, R; Stepehens, R; Stoeckel, C; Theobald, W; Zhang, B

    2006-08-07

    The Vulcan laser facility at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory was used to study the interaction of a 75 J 10 ps, high intensity laser beam with low-mass solid, Cu targets. Two instruments were fielded as diagnostics of the Cu K-shell emission from the targets: A single photon counting CCD spectrometer provided the absolute K{sub {alpha}} yield and a spherically bent Bragg crystal recorded 2D monochromatic images with a spatial resolution of 10 {micro}m. Due to the shifting and broadening of the K{sub {alpha}} spectral lines with increasing temperature, there is a temperature dependence of the crystal collection efficiency. This provides a temperature diagnostic when cross calibrated against a single hit CCD spectrometer, and it affects measurements of the spatial pattern of electron transport. The experimental data showing changing collection efficiency are presented. The results are discussed in light of modeling of the temperature-dependent spectrum of Cu K-shell emission.

  15. Modelling the firn thickness evolution during the last deglaciation: constrains on sensitivity to temperature and impurities

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    The transformation of snow into ice is a complex phenomenon difficult to model. Depending on surface temperature and accumulation rate, it may take several decades to millennia for air to be entrapped in ice. The air is thus always younger that the surrounding ice. The resulting gas-ice age difference is essential to document the phasing between CO2 and temperature changes especially during deglaciations. The air trapping depth can be inferred in the past using a firn densification model, or ...

  16. The Sensitivity of African Easterly Waves to Eastern Tropical Atlantic Sea-Surface Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Druyan, Leonard M.; Fulakeza, Matthew

    2011-01-01

    The results of two regional atmospheric model simulations are compared to assess the influence of the eastern tropical Atlantic sea-surface temperature maximum on local precipitation, transient easterly waves and the West African summer monsoon. Both model simulations were initialized with reanalysis 2 data (US National Center for Environmental Prediction and Department of Energy) on 15 May 2006 and extended through 6 October 2006, forced by synchronous reanalysis 2 lateral boundary conditions introduced four times daily. One simulation uses 2006 reanalysis 2 sea-surface temperatures, also updated four times daily, while the second simulation considers ocean forcing absent the sea-surface temperature maximum, achieved here by subtracting 3 K at every ocean grid point between 0 and 15 N during the entire simulation. The simulation with 2006 sea-surface temperature forcing produces a realistic distribution of June-September mean precipitation and realistic westward propagating swaths of maximum rainfall, based on validation against Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) estimates. The simulation without the sea-surface temperature maximum produces only 57% of the control June-September total precipitation over the eastern tropical Atlantic and about 83% of the Sahel precipitation. The simulation with warmer ocean temperatures generates generally stronger circulation, which in turn enhances precipitation by increasing moisture convergence. Some local precipitation enhancement is also attributed to lower vertical thermal stability above the warm water. The study shows that the eastern tropical Atlantic sea-surface temperature maximum enhances the strength of transient easterly waves and broadens the spatial extent of associated precipitation. However, large-scale circulation and its interaction with the African continent, and not sea-surface temperatures, control the timing and trajectories of the waves.

  17. Micro Manufacturing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Hans Nørgaard

    2003-01-01

    Manufacturing deals with systems that include products, processes, materials and production systems. These systems have functional requirements, constraints, design parameters and process variables. They must be decomposed in a systematic manner to achieve the best possible system performance....... If a micro manufacturing system isn’t designed rationally and correctly, it will be high-cost, unreliable, and not robust. For micro products and systems it is a continuously increasing challenge to create the operational basis for an industrial production. As the products through product development...... processes are made applicable to a large number of customers, the pressure in regard to developing production technologies that make it possible to produce the products at a reasonable price and in large numbers is growing. The micro/nano manufacturing programme at the Department of Manufacturing...

  18. Smart Manufacturing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Jim; Edgar, Thomas; Graybill, Robert; Korambath, Prakashan; Schott, Brian; Swink, Denise; Wang, Jianwu; Wetzel, Jim

    2015-01-01

    Historic manufacturing enterprises based on vertically optimized companies, practices, market share, and competitiveness are giving way to enterprises that are responsive across an entire value chain to demand dynamic markets and customized product value adds; increased expectations for environmental sustainability, reduced energy usage, and zero incidents; and faster technology and product adoption. Agile innovation and manufacturing combined with radically increased productivity become engines for competitiveness and reinvestment, not simply for decreased cost. A focus on agility, productivity, energy, and environmental sustainability produces opportunities that are far beyond reducing market volatility. Agility directly impacts innovation, time-to-market, and faster, broader exploration of the trade space. These changes, the forces driving them, and new network-based information technologies offering unprecedented insights and analysis are motivating the advent of smart manufacturing and new information technology infrastructure for manufacturing.

  19. Changes in Temperature Sensitivity and Activation Energy of Soil Organic Matter Decomposition in Different Qinghai-Tibet Plateau Grasslands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jie; He, Nianpeng; Wei, Xuehong; Gao, Yang; Zuo, Yao

    2015-01-01

    Qinghai-Tibet Plateau grasslands are unique geographical regions and store substantial soil organic matter (SOM) in the soil surface, which make them very sensitive to global climate change. Here, we focused on three main grassland types (alpine meadow, steppe, and desert) and conducted a soil incubation experiment at five different temperatures (5, 10, 15, 20, and 25°C) to investigate SOM decomposition rates (R), temperature sensitivity (Q10), and activation energy (Ea). The results showed that grassland type and incubation temperature had significant impact on R (P alpinesteppe > alpine desert. The Q10 values differed significantly among different grasslands, and the overall trends were as follows: alpine meadow (1.56 ± 0.09) < alpine steppe (1.88 ± 0.23) < alpine desert (2.39 ± 0.32). Moreover, the Ea values differed significantly across different grassland types (P < 0.001) and increased with increasing incubation time. The exponential negative correlations between Ea and R at 20°C across all grassland types (all Ps < 0.001) indicated that the substrate-quality temperature hypothesis is applicable to the alpine grasslands. Our findings provide new insights for understanding the responses of SOM decomposition and storage to warming scenarios in this Plateau.

  20. Virus-Specific Proteins Synthesized in Cells Infected with RNA+ Temperature-Sensitive Mutants of Sindbis Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheele, Christina M.; Pfefferkorn, E. R.

    1970-01-01

    All Sindbis virus temperature-sensitive mutants defective in “late” functions were systematically surveyed by acrylamide-gel electrophoresis for similarities and differences in the intracellular pattern of virus-specific proteins synthesized at the permissive and nonpermissive temperatures. Only cells infected with mutants of complementation group C showed an altered pattern. At the nonpermissive temperature, these mutants failed to induce the synthesis of a polypeptide corresponding to the nucleocapsid protein and instead overproduced a protein of higher molecular weight than either viral structural protein. This defect was shown to be irreversible by the finding that 3H-leucine incorporated at 41.5 C specifically failed to appear in the nucleocapsid of virions subsequently released at 29 C. Attempts to demonstrate a precursor protein in wild-type infections were inconclusive. PMID:5461887

  1. Cross-sensitivity of metal oxide gas sensor to ambient temperature and humidity: Effects on gas distribution mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamarudin, K.; Bennetts, V. H.; Mamduh, S. M.; Visvanathan, R.; Yeon, A. S. A.; Shakaff, A. Y. M.; Zakaria, A.; Abdullah, A. H.; Kamarudin, L. M.

    2017-03-01

    Metal oxide gas sensors have been widely used in robotics application to perform remote and mobile gas sensing. However, previous researches have indicated that this type of sensor technology is cross-sensitive to environmental temperature and humidity. This paper therefore investigates the effects of these two factors towards gas distribution mapping and gas source localization domains. A mobile robot equipped with TGS2600 gas sensor was deployed to build gas distribution maps of indoor environment, where the temperature and humidity varies. The results from the trials in environment with and without gas source indicated that there is a strong relation between the fluctuation of the mean and variance map with respect to the variations in the temperature and humidity maps.

  2. Sensitivity of the atmospheric temperature profile to the aerosol absorption in the presence of dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Amo, J. L.; di Sarra, A.; Meloni, D.

    2014-12-01

    Radiative transfer simulations in the shortwave (SW) and longwave (LW) spectral regions have been carried out to investigate the time evolution of the atmospheric heating/cooling rates and their influence on the temperature profiles under different vertical distributions of the aerosol absorption. The case study is based on measurements made at Rome, Italy, on 20 June 2007, when a dust layer was present above the urban boundary layer (BL) and the column aerosol optical depth at 550 nm was about 0.37. Column-integrated aerosol optical depth and single scattering albedo, as well as vertical profiles of aerosol extinction and meteorological variables have been derived from observations and used in the simulations. Different profiles of the aerosol absorption are considered by varying the absorption of the BL aerosols and of the desert dust, without changing the overall columnar properties. Three scenarios have been considered, with absorbing (ABL) or scattering (SBL) particles in the BL, and with a vertically homogeneous case (HL), which is taken as the reference. Calculations show that, for the selected case, about 25% of the SW heating is offset by the LW cooling within the dust layer. Different longwave/all-wave contributions are observed in the BL, depending on the BL aerosol absorption. Changes of atmospheric temperature induced by aerosol-radiation interactions only, have been investigated, while interactions with the surface through changes of the latent and sensible heat flux have been neglected. The evolution of temperature is similar for the three scenarios within the dust layer, with a daytime increase and a smaller nighttime decrease. After 24 h, the increase of the atmospheric temperature due to the aerosol radiative processes is about 1 K. In the BL, the increase of temperature is strongly dependent on the aerosol absorption capability. The oscillatory behaviour of the temperature with time in the dust layer, and the different evolution in the BL are

  3. Plant responses to elevated temperatures: a field study on phenological sensitivity and fitness responses to simulated climate warming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Springate, David A; Kover, Paula X

    2014-01-01

    Significant changes in plant phenology have been observed in response to increases in mean global temperatures. There are concerns that accelerated phenologies can negatively impact plant populations. However, the fitness consequence of changes in phenology in response to elevated temperature is not well understood, particularly under field conditions. We address this issue by exposing a set of recombinant inbred lines of Arabidopsis thaliana to a simulated global warming treatment in the field. We find that plants exposed to elevated temperatures flower earlier, as predicted by photothermal models. However, contrary to life-history trade-off expectations, they also flower at a larger vegetative size, suggesting that warming probably causes acceleration in vegetative development. Although warming increases mean fitness (fruit production) by ca. 25%, there is a significant genotype-by-environment interaction. Changes in fitness rank indicate that imminent climate change can cause populations to be maladapted in their new environment, if adaptive evolution is limited. Thus, changes in the genetic composition of populations are likely, depending on the species’ generation time and the speed of temperature change. Interestingly, genotypes that show stronger phenological responses have higher fitness under elevated temperatures, suggesting that phenological sensitivity might be a good indicator of success under elevated temperature at the genotypic level as well as at the species level. PMID:24130095

  4. Plant responses to elevated temperatures: a field study on phenological sensitivity and fitness responses to simulated climate warming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Springate, David A; Kover, Paula X

    2014-02-01

    Significant changes in plant phenology have been observed in response to increases in mean global temperatures. There are concerns that accelerated phenologies can negatively impact plant populations. However, the fitness consequence of changes in phenology in response to elevated temperature is not well understood, particularly under field conditions. We address this issue by exposing a set of recombinant inbred lines of Arabidopsis thaliana to a simulated global warming treatment in the field. We find that plants exposed to elevated temperatures flower earlier, as predicted by photothermal models. However, contrary to life-history trade-off expectations, they also flower at a larger vegetative size, suggesting that warming probably causes acceleration in vegetative development. Although warming increases mean fitness (fruit production) by ca. 25%, there is a significant genotype-by-environment interaction. Changes in fitness rank indicate that imminent climate change can cause populations to be maladapted in their new environment, if adaptive evolution is limited. Thus, changes in the genetic composition of populations are likely, depending on the species' generation time and the speed of temperature change. Interestingly, genotypes that show stronger phenological responses have higher fitness under elevated temperatures, suggesting that phenological sensitivity might be a good indicator of success under elevated temperature at the genotypic level as well as at the species level.

  5. Analysis of the temperature sensitivity of Japanese rubella vaccine strain TO-336.vac and its effect on immunogenicity in the guinea pig.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, Kiyoko; Ami, Yasushi; Suzaki, Yuriko; Otsuki, Noriyuki; Sakata, Masafumi; Takeda, Makoto; Mori, Yoshio

    2016-04-01

    The marker of Japanese domestic rubella vaccines is their lack of immunogenicity in guinea pigs. This has long been thought to be related to the temperature sensitivity of the viruses, but supporting evidence has not been described. In this study, we generated infectious clones of TO-336.vac, a Japanese domestic vaccine, TO-336.GMK5, the parental virus of TO-336.vac, and their mutants, and determined the molecular bases of their temperature sensitivity and immunogenicity in guinea pigs. The results revealed that Ser(1159) in the non-structural protein-coding region was responsible for the temperature sensitivity of TO-336.vac dominantly, while the structural protein-coding region affected the temperature sensitivity subordinately. The findings further suggested that the temperature sensitivity of TO-336.vac affected the antibody induction in guinea pigs after subcutaneous inoculation.

  6. High sensitivity of diesel soot morphological and optical properties to combustion temperature in a shock tube.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Chong; Khalizov, Alexei F; Hogan, Brian; Petersen, Eric L; Zhang, Renyi

    2014-06-03

    Carbonaceous particles produced from combustion of fossil fuels have strong impacts on air quality and climate, yet quantitative relationships between particle characteristics and combustion conditions remain inadequately understood. We have used a shock tube to study the formation and properties of diesel combustion soot, including particle size distributions, effective density, elemental carbon (EC) mass fraction, mass-mobility scaling exponent, hygroscopicity, and light absorption and scattering. These properties are found to be strongly dependent on the combustion temperature and fuel equivalence ratio. Whereas combustion at higher temperatures (∼2000 K) yields fractal particles of a larger size and high EC content (90 wt %), at lower temperatures (∼1400 K) smaller particles of a higher organic content (up to 65 wt %) are produced. Single scattering albedo of soot particles depends largely on their organic content, increasing drastically from 0.3 to 0.8 when the particle EC mass fraction decreases from 0.9 to 0.3. The mass absorption cross-section of diesel soot increases with combustion temperature, being the highest for particles with a higher EC content. Our results reveal that combustion conditions, especially the temperature, may have significant impacts on the direct and indirect climate forcing of atmospheric soot aerosols.

  7. Thermomechanics of a temperature sensitive covalent adaptable polymer with bond exchange reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, XiaoHao; Wu, HengAn; Long, Rong

    2016-11-04

    We study a covalent adaptable polymer that can rearrange its network topology through thermally activated bond exchange reactions. When the polymer is deformed, such a network rearrangement leads to macroscopic stress relaxation, which allows the polymer to be thermoformed without a mold. Based on a previously developed constitutive model, we investigate thermal-mechanical behaviors of this material under a non-uniform and evolving temperature field through numerical simulations. Our focus is on the complex coupling between mechanical deformation, heat conduction and bond exchange reactions. Several examples are presented to illustrate the effects of non-uniform heating: uniaxial tension under heat conduction, torsion of a thin strip with local heating and thermal imprinting. Our results show that during non-uniform heating the material in the high temperature region creeps. This causes a redistribution of the deformation field and thus results in a final shape that deviates from the prescribed shape. The final shapes after thermoforming can be tuned by controlling the extent of heat conduction through different combinations of heating temperature and time. For example, with high temperature and a short heating time, it is possible to approximately confine stress relaxation and thus shape fixity within the local heating region. This is not the case if low temperature and a long heating time are used. These results can be utilized to design the temporal and spatial sequences of local heating during thermoforming to achieve various complex final shapes.

  8. Mechanics and chemical thermodynamics of phase transition in temperature-sensitive hydrogels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Shengqiang; Suo, Zhigang

    2011-11-01

    This paper uses the thermodynamic data of aqueous solutions of uncrosslinked poly( N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAM) to study the phase transition of PNIPAM hydrogels. At a low temperature, uncrosslinked PNIPAM can be dissolved in water and form a homogenous liquid solution. When the temperature is increased, the solution separates into two liquid phases with different concentrations of the polymer. Covalently crosslinked PNIPAM, however, does not dissolve in water, but can imbibe water and form a hydrogel. When the temperature is changed, the hydrogel undergoes a phase transition: the amount of water in the hydrogel in equilibrium changes with temperature discontinuously. While the aqueous solution is a liquid and cannot sustain any nonhydrostatic stress in equilibrium, the hydrogel is a solid and can sustain nonhydrostatic stress in equilibrium. The nonhydrostatic stress can markedly affect various aspects of the phase transition in the hydrogel. We adopt the Flory-Rehner model, and show that the interaction parameter as a function of temperature and concentration obtained from the PNIPAM-water solution can be used to analyze diverse phenomena associated with the phase transition of the PNIPAM hydrogel. We analyze free swelling, uniaxially and biaxially constrained swelling of a hydrogel, swelling of a core-shell structure, and coexistent phases in a rod. The analysis is related to available experimental observations. Also outlined is a general theory of coexistent phases undergoing inhomogeneous deformation.

  9. Nitrogen-14 nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR): dramatic sensitivity enhancement by large and fast temperature lowering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari, Maude; Retournard, Alain; Canet, Daniel

    2007-10-01

    We have observed that, when going rapidly from ambient temperature down to liquid nitrogen temperature, the nitrogen-14 NQR signal (for transitions involving the m=0 spin state, nitrogen-14 being a quadrupolar nucleus of spin I=1) is increased by a factor of ca. 10(2). While Boltzmann statistics cannot explain this enhancement, the strong temperature dependence of the quadrupolar interaction is very likely to be at the origin of this phenomenon. Indeed, the quadrupolar Hamiltonian becomes time dependent and is prone to induce transitions toward the spin state associated with m=0. Its binding and slow relaxing properties result in a durable increased population and consequently in an increased intensity of NQR lines originating from the state m=0.

  10. Effects of non-uniform core flow on peak cladding temperature: MOXY/SCORE sensitivity calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, S.C.

    1979-08-15

    The MOXY/SCORE computer program is used to evaluate the potential effect on peak cladding temperature of selective cooling that may result from a nonuniform mass flux at the core boundaries during the blowdown phase of the LOFT L2-4 test. The results of this study indicate that the effect of the flow nonuniformity at the core boundaries will be neutralized by a strong radial flow redistribution in the neighborhood of core boundaries. The implication is that the flow nonuniformity at the core boundaries has no significant effect on the thermal-hydraulic behavior and cladding temperature at the hot plane.

  11. Temperature sensitivity of soil carbon dioxide and nitrous oxide emissions in mountain forest and meadow ecosystems in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Junjun; Peng, Changhui; Zhu, Qiuan; Xue, Wei; Shen, Yan; Yang, Yanzheng; Shi, Guohua; Shi, Shengwei; Wang, Meng

    2016-10-01

    An incubation experiment was conducted at three temperature levels (8, 18 and 28 °C) to quantify the response of soil CO2 and N2O emissions to temperature in three ecosystems (pine forest, oak forest, and meadow) located in the Qinling Mountains of China, which are considered to be susceptible to disturbance and climate changes, especially global warming. The soil CO2 emission rates increased with temperature and decreased with soil depth; they were the highest in the oak forest (broadleaf forest) and were lower in the pine forest (coniferous forest) and the meadow ecosystem. However, there was no significant difference in the soil N2O emission rates among the three ecosystems. The temperature sensitivity of CO2 and N2O was higher in the forest than in the meadow ecosystem. The Q10 values (temperature sensitivity coefficient) for CO2 and N2O were 1.07-2.25 and 0.82-1.22, respectively, for the three ecosystems. There was also evidence that the CO2 and N2O emission rates were positively correlated. The soil characteristics exhibited different effects on CO2 and N2O emissions among different ecosystems at the three temperature levels. Moreover, the soil dissolved organic carbon (DOC), specific ultraviolet absorbance (SUVA) and nitrate (NO3-) were important factors for CO2 emissions, whereas the soil ammonium (NH4+) and pH were the major controllers of N2O emissions. Unexpectedly, our results indicated that CO2 emissions are more sensitive to increasing temperature than N2O, noting the different feedback of CO2 and N2O emissions to global warming in this region. The different responses of greenhouse gas emissions in different forest types and a meadow ecosystem suggest that it is critical to conduct a comprehensive investigation of the complex mountain forest and meadow ecosystem in the transitional climate zone under global warming. Our research results provide new insight and advanced understanding of the variations in major greenhouse gas emissions (CO2 and N2O

  12. Effect of incubation temperature on the diagnostic sensitivity of the glanders complement fixation test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, I; Wieler, L H; Saqib, M; Melzer, F; Santana, V L D A; Neubauer, H; Elschner, M C

    2014-12-01

    The complement fixation test (CFT) is the only serological test prescribed by the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE) for the diagnosis of glanders in international trading of equids. However, false-positive reactions have caused financial losses to the animal owners in the past, and false-negative tests have resulted in the introduction of glanders into healthy equine populations in previously glanders-free areas. Both warm (incubation at 37°C for 1 h) and cold (overnight incubation at 4°C) procedures are recommended by the OIE for serodiagnosis of glanders. In a comparison of the sensitivity and specificity of the two techniques, using the United States Department of Agriculture antigen, warm CFT was found to be significantly less sensitive (56.8%; p glanders but a lower diagnostic specificity has to be accepted. The immunoblot was used as the gold standard.

  13. Temperature-pH Sensitive IPN Hydrogels Composed of Silk Sericin and Poly (N-isopropylacrylamide)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Interpenetrating polymer network (IPN) composed of silk sericin (SS) and poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAAm) was prepared. The morphology of the IPNs, in which the SS phase was stained with ammonium cuprate, was examined with TEM and a relative homogeneous distribution of the two polymers was exhibited. The swelling behavior of the IPN hydrogels showed both temperature and pH dependences.

  14. Global synthesis of the temperature sensitivity of leaf litter breakdown in streams and rivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennifer J. Follstad Shah; John S. Kominoski; Marcelo Ardón; Walter K. Dodds; Mark O. Gessner; Natalie A. Griffiths; Charles P. Hawkins; Sherri L. Johnson; Antoine Lecerf; Carri J. LeRoy; David W. P. Manning; Amy D. Rosemond; Robert L. Sinsabaugh; Christopher M. Swan; Jackson R. Webster; Lydia H. Zeglin

    2017-01-01

    Streams and rivers are important conduits of terrestrially derived carbon (C) to atmospheric and marine reservoirs. Leaf litter breakdown rates are expected to increase as water temperatures rise in response to climate change. The magnitude of increase in breakdown rates is uncertain, given differences in litter quality and microbial and detritivore community...

  15. Measurement of ion and electron temperatures in plasma blobs by using an improved ion sensitive probe system and statistical analysis methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okazaki, K; Tanaka, H; Ohno, N; Ezumi, N; Tsuji, Y; Kajita, S

    2012-02-01

    We have measured ion temperature as well as electron temperature in plasma blobs observed in a linear plasma device by using an improved ion sensitive probe. Current-voltage characteristics of the ion sensitive probe inside and outside plasma blobs were re-constructed with a conditional sampling method. It is clearly found that both ion and electron temperatures in plasma blobs decrease more slowly in a cross-field direction than those in a bulk plasma without plasma blobs.

  16. Measurement of ion and electron temperatures in plasma blobs by using an improved ion sensitive probe system and statistical analysis methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okazaki, K.; Tanaka, H.; Ohno, N.; Tsuji, Y. [Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya University, Nagoya, Aichi 464-8603 (Japan); Ezumi, N. [Nagano National College of Technology, Nagano 381-8550 (Japan); Kajita, S. [EcoTopia Science Institute, Nagoya University, Nagoya, Aichi 464-8603 (Japan)

    2012-02-15

    We have measured ion temperature as well as electron temperature in plasma blobs observed in a linear plasma device by using an improved ion sensitive probe. Current-voltage characteristics of the ion sensitive probe inside and outside plasma blobs were re-constructed with a conditional sampling method. It is clearly found that both ion and electron temperatures in plasma blobs decrease more slowly in a cross-field direction than those in a bulk plasma without plasma blobs.

  17. Cluster analysis of midlatitude oceanic cloud regimes: mean properties and temperature sensitivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. D. Gordon

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Clouds play an important role in the climate system by reducing the amount of shortwave radiation reaching the surface and the amount of longwave radiation escaping to space. Accurate simulation of clouds in computer models remains elusive, however, pointing to a lack of understanding of the connection between large-scale dynamics and cloud properties. This study uses a k-means clustering algorithm to group 21 years of satellite cloud data over midlatitude oceans into seven clusters, and demonstrates that the cloud clusters are associated with distinct large-scale dynamical conditions. Three clusters correspond to low-level cloud regimes with different cloud fraction and cumuliform or stratiform characteristics, but all occur under large-scale descent and a relatively dry free troposphere. Three clusters correspond to vertically extensive cloud regimes with tops in the middle or upper troposphere, and they differ according to the strength of large-scale ascent and enhancement of tropospheric temperature and humidity. The final cluster is associated with a lower troposphere that is dry and an upper troposphere that is moist and experiencing weak ascent and horizontal moist advection.

    Since the present balance of reflection of shortwave and absorption of longwave radiation by clouds could change as the atmosphere warms from increasing anthropogenic greenhouse gases, we must also better understand how increasing temperature modifies cloud and radiative properties. We therefore undertake an observational analysis of how midlatitude oceanic clouds change with temperature when dynamical processes are held constant (i.e., partial derivative with respect to temperature. For each of the seven cloud regimes, we examine the difference in cloud and radiative properties between warm and cold subsets. To avoid misinterpreting a cloud response to large-scale dynamical forcing as a cloud response to temperature, we require horizontal and vertical

  18. Temperature stress differentially modulates transcription in meiotic anthers of heat-tolerant and heat-sensitive tomato plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pezzotti Mario

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fluctuations in temperature occur naturally during plant growth and reproduction. However, in the hot summers this variation may become stressful and damaging for the molecular mechanisms involved in proper cell growth, impairing thus plant development and particularly fruit-set in many crop plants. Tolerance to such a stress can be achieved by constitutive gene expression or by rapid changes in gene expression, which ultimately leads to protection against thermal damage. We have used cDNA-AFLP and microarray analyses to compare the early response of the tomato meiotic anther transcriptome to moderate heat stress conditions (32°C in a heat-tolerant and a heat-sensitive tomato genotype. In the light of the expected global temperature increases, elucidating such protective mechanisms and identifying candidate tolerance genes can be used to improve breeding strategies for crop tolerance to heat stress. Results The cDNA-AFLP analysis shows that 30 h of moderate heat stress (MHS alter the expression of approximately 1% of the studied transcript-derived fragments in a heat-sensitive genotype. The major effect is gene down-regulation after the first 2 h of stress. The microarray analysis subsequently applied to elucidate early responses of a heat-tolerant and a heat-sensitive tomato genotype, also shows about 1% of the genes having significant changes in expression after the 2 h of stress. The tolerant genotype not only reacts with moderate transcriptomic changes but also exhibits constitutively higher expression levels of genes involved in protection and thermotolerance. Conclusion In contrast to the heat-sensitive genotype, the heat-tolerant genotype exhibits moderate transcriptional changes under moderate heat stress. Moreover, the heat-tolerant genotype also shows a different constitutive gene expression profile compared to the heat-sensitive genotype, indicating genetic differences in adaptation to increased temperatures. In

  19. Post-deposition annealing temperature dependence TiO2-based EGFET pH sensor sensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zulkefle, M. A.; Rahman, R. A.; Yusoff, K. A.; Abdullah, W. F. H.; Rusop, M.; Herman, S. H.

    2016-07-01

    EGFET pH sensor is one type of pH sensor that is used to measure and determine pH of a solution. The sensing membrane of EGFET pH sensor plays vital role in the overall performance of the sensor. This paper studies the effects of different annealing temperature of the TiO2 sensing membranes towards sensitivity of EGFET pH sensor. Sol-gel spin coating was chosen as TiO2 deposition techniques since it is cost-effective and produces thin film with uniform thickness. Deposited TiO2 thin films were then annealed at different annealing temperatures and then were connected to the gate of MOSFET as a part of the EGFET pH sensor structure. The thin films now act as sensing membranes of the EGFET pH sensor and sensitivity of each sensing membrane towards pH was measured. From the results it was determined that sensing membrane annealed at 300 °C gave the highest sensitivity followed by sample annealed at 400 °C and 500 °C.

  20. On-demand antimicrobial release from a temperature-sensitive polymer - comparison with ad libitum release from central venous catheters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjollema, Jelmer; Dijkstra, Rene J B; Abeln, Caroline; van der Mei, Henny C; van Asseldonk, Dirk; Busscher, Henk J

    2014-08-28

    Antimicrobial releasing biomaterial coatings have found application for instance in the fixation of orthopedic joint prostheses and central venous catheters. Most frequently, the release kinetics is such that antimicrobially-effective concentrations are only reached within the first days to weeks after implantation, leaving no local antimicrobial release available when a biomaterial-associated infection occurs later. Here we compare the ad libitum release of chlorhexidine and silver-sulfadiazine from a central venous catheter with their release from a new, on-demand release coating consisting of a temperature-sensitive copolymer of styrene and n-butyl (meth)acrylate. The copolymer can be loaded with an antimicrobial, which is released when the temperature is raised above its glass transition temperature. Ad libitum release of chlorhexidine and silver-sulfadiazine from a commercially-purchased catheter and associated antimicrobial efficacy against Staphylococcus aureus was limited to 16days. Consecutive temperature-triggers of our on-demand coating yielded little or no antimicrobial efficacy of silver-acetate release, but antimicrobially-effective chlorhexidine concentrations were observed over a time period of 60-80days. This attests to the clear advantage of on-demand coatings above ad libitum releasing coatings, that may have released their antimicrobial content before it is actually needed. Importantly, glass transition temperature of chlorhexidine loaded copolymers was lower (48°C) than of silver loaded ones (61°C), facilitating their clinical use.

  1. Low-Temperature Thermally Reduced Molybdenum Disulfide as a Pt-Free Counter Electrode for Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Che-Hsien; Tsai, Chuen-Horng; Tseng, Fan-Gang; Yu, Yang-Yen; Wu, Hsuan-Chung; Hsieh, Chien-Kuo

    2015-11-01

    A two-dimensional nanostructure of molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) thin film exposed layered nanosheet was prepared by a low-temperature thermally reduced (TR) method on a fluorine-doped tin oxide (FTO) glass substrate as a platinum (Pt)-free and highly electrocatalytic counter electrode (CE) for dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) results show that the MoS2 sulfidization temperature was approximately 300 °C. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), and X-ray diffraction (XRD) indicate that the stoichiometry and crystallization of MoS2 were more complete at higher temperatures; however, these temperatures reduce the number of edge-plane active sites in the short-range-order nanostructure. Accordingly, the DSSCs with 300 °C annealed TR-MoS2 CE exhibited an excellent photovoltaic conversion efficiency (PCE) of 6.351 %, up to 91.7 % of which is obtained using the conventional TD-Pt CE (PCE = 6.929 %). The temperature of thermal reaction and the molar ratio of reaction precursors were found to significantly influence the resulting stoichiometry and crystallization of MoS2 nanosheets, thus affecting DSSCs' performance.

  2. How Sensitive Is the Elasticity of Hydroxyapatite-Nanoparticle-Reinforced Chitosan Composite to Changes in Particle Concentration and Crystallization Temperature?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kean Wang

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Hydroxyapatite (HA nanoparticle-reinforced chitosan composites are biocompatible and biodegradable structural materials that are used as biomaterials in tissue engineering. However, in order for these materials to function effectively as intended, e.g., to provide adequate structural support for repairing damaged tissues, it is necessary to analyse and optimise the material processing parameters that affect the relevant mechanical properties. Here we are concerned with the strength, stiffness and toughness of wet-spun HA-reinforced chitosan fibres. Unlike previous studies which have addressed each of these parameters as singly applied treatments, we have carried out an experiment designed using a two-factor analysis of variance to study the main effects of two key material processing parameters, namely HA concentration and crystallization temperature, and their interactions on the respective mechanical properties of the composite fibres. The analysis reveals that significant interaction occurs between the crystallization temperature and HA concentration. Starting at a low HA concentration level, the magnitude of the respective mechanical properties decreases significantly with increasing HA concentration until a critical HA concentration is reached, at around 0.20–0.30 (HA mass fraction, beyond which the magnitude of the mechanical properties increases significantly with HA concentration. The sensitivity of the mechanical properties to crystallization temperature is masked by the interaction between the two parameters—further analysis reveals that the dependence on crystallization temperature is significant in at least some levels of HA concentration. The magnitude of the mechanical properties of the chitosan composite fibre corresponding to 40 °C is higher than that at 100 °C at low HA concentration; the reverse applies at high HA concentration. In conclusion, the elasticity of the HA nanoparticle-reinforced chitosan composite fibre is

  3. Biodegradable pH/temperature-sensitive oligo(β-amino ester urethane) hydrogels for controlled release of doxorubicin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huynh, Cong Truc; Nguyen, Minh Khanh; Lee, Doo Sung

    2011-08-01

    An injectable biodegradable pH/temperature-sensitive oligo(β-amino ester urethane) (OAEU) was synthesized. The OAEU was synthesized by addition polymerization between the isocyanate groups of 1,6-diisocyanato hexamethylene and the hydroxyl groups of a synthesized monomer piperazine dihydroxyl amino ester (monomer PDE) in chloroform in the presence of dibutyltin dilaurate as a catalyst. The synthesized OAEU was characterized by (1)H NMR spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and gel permeation chromatography. The aqueous solutions of OAEU showed a sol-to-gel-to-sol phase transition as a function of temperature and pH. The gel window covered the physiological conditions (37°C, pH 7.4) and could be controlled by changing the OAEU concentration. After a subcutaneous injection of the OAEU solution into Sprague-Dawley rats, a gel formed rapidly in situ and remained in the body for more than 2 weeks. The in vitro cytotoxicity test and in vitro degradation showed that the OAEU hydrogel was non-cytotoxic and biodegradable. The in vitro release of doxorubicin from this OAEU hydrogel was sustained for more than 10 days. This injectable biodegradable pH/temperature-sensitive OAEU hydrogel is a potential candidate as a drug/protein carrier and in biomedical applications.

  4. A recessive gene controlling male sterility sensitive to short daylength/low temperature in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-dong CHEN; Dong-fa SUN; De-fu RONG; Jun-hua PENG; Cheng-dao LI

    2011-01-01

    Utilization of a two-line breeding system via photoperiod-thermo sensitive male sterility has a great potential for hybrid production in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.).337S is a novel wheat male sterile line sensitive to both short daylength/low temperature and long daylength/high temperature.Five F2 populations derived from the crosses between 337S and five common wheat varieties were developed for genetic analysis.All F1's were highly fertile while segregation occurred in the F2 populations with a ratio of 3 fertile:1 sterile under short daylength/low temperature.It is shown that male sterility in 337S was controlled by a single recessive gene,temporarily designated as wptms3.Bulked segregant analysis (BSA) coupled with simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers was applied to map the sterile gene using one mapping population.The wptms3 gene was mapped to chromosome arm 1BS and flanked by Xgwm413 and Xgwm182 at a genetic distance of 3.2 and 23.5 cM,respectively.The accuracy and efficiency of marker-assisted selection were evaluated and proved essential for identifying homozygous recessive male sterile genotypes of the wptms3 gene in F2 generation.

  5. Development of a piezo-cantilever transducer and measuring method for evaluation of a temperature-sensitive polymer gel membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fenlan; Jiang, Zhongwei

    2007-06-01

    This paper is concerned with the development of a cantilever transducer patched with a piezoelectric element for evaluating the characteristics of a temperature-sensitive polymer gel membrane. The transducer consists of an aluminum cantilever beam patched with a piezoelectric ceramic and a probe coated by a polymer gel membrane. The probe can be easily attached to the cantilever transducer with double-sided sticky tape. The piezo-cantilever transducer is first simulated with the aid of a finite element method and the relation between the natural frequency change of the transducer and the absorbed mass on the polymer gel membrane is obtained theoretically. For measuring the temperature characteristics of the polymer gel membrane, the experiments are conducted in liquid and out of liquid. The temperature-sensitive poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) gel membrane hydrophilic-hydrophobic characteristics can be explained clearly by the results. Furthermore, two kinds of membrane coating method were proposed. The results indicate that the coating gel membrane has a better effect than the pasted gel membrane. The results also show that the piezo-cantilever transducer has a potential application for detecting polymer gel membrane characteristics conveniently and accurately.

  6. Nonlinear temperature sensitivity of enzyme kinetics explains canceling effect—a case study on loamy haplic Luvisol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razavi, Bahar S.; Blagodatskaya, Evgenia; Kuzyakov, Yakov

    2015-01-01

    The temperature sensitivity of enzymes responsible for organic matter decomposition in soil is crucial for predicting the effects of global warming on the carbon cycle and sequestration. We tested the hypothesis that differences in temperature sensitivity of enzyme kinetic parameters Vmax and Km will lead to a canceling effect: strong reduction of temperature response of catalytic reactions. Short-term temperature response of Vmax and Km of three hydrolytic enzymes responsible for decomposition of cellulose (β-glucosidase, cellobiohydrolase) and hemicelluloses (xylanase) were analyzed in situ from 0 to 40°C. The apparent activation energy varied between enzymes from 20.7 to 35.2 kJ mol−1 corresponding to the Q10 values of the enzyme activities of 1.4–1.9 (with Vmax-Q10 1.0–2.5 and Km-Q10 0.94–2.3). Temperature response of all tested enzymes fitted well to the Arrhenius equation. Despite that, the fitting of Arrhenius model revealed the non-linear increase of two cellulolytic enzymes activities with two distinct thresholds at 10–15°C and 25–30°C, which were less pronounced for xylanase. The nonlinearity between 10 and 15°C was explained by 30–80% increase in Vmax. At 25–30°C, however, the abrupt decrease of enzyme-substrate affinity was responsible for non-linear increase of enzyme activities. Our study is the first demonstrating nonlinear response of Vmax and Km to temperature causing canceling effect, which was most strongly pronounced at low substrate concentrations and at temperatures above 15°C. Under cold climate, however, the regulation of hydrolytic activity by canceling in response to warming is negligible because canceling was never observed below 10°C. The canceling, therefore, can be considered as natural mechanism reducing the effects of global warming on decomposition of soil organics at moderate temperatures. The non-linearity of enzyme responses to warming and the respective thresholds should therefore be investigated for

  7. Rational design of a thermalresponsive-polymer-switchable FRET system for enhancing the temperature sensitivity of upconversion nanophosphors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Qingbo; Li, Yanfang; Li, Fujin; Zhang, Mengxin; Zhang, Zhijun; Lin, Hongzhen

    2014-08-01

    Here we propose a thermoresponsive polymer PNIPAM modulated fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) system to enhance the temperature sensitivity of upconversion nanophosphors (UCNPs). By utilizing red/near-infrared dual emitting NaLuF4:Mn2+,Ln3+ (Ln3+ = Yb3+, Er3+, Tm3+) UCNPs as the energy donor and Au nanoparticles as the acceptor, the temperature resolution of the UCNPs is significantly increased from 3.1 °C to 0.9 °C in the physiological temperature range. Conjugating the UCNPs and acceptors into discrete nanocomposites in our samples facilitates reversible regulation of the emission intensity of UCNPs, which thus would extend their application range in biosensing, especially for probing the dynamic changes of local micro-environments in biological tissues. As there are a broad variety of stimuli to which smart polymers can reversibly respond, our experiments are also extendable to various external conditions in local micro-environments, such as pH values, metal ions, glucose, and tissue-specific enzymes.Here we propose a thermoresponsive polymer PNIPAM modulated fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) system to enhance the temperature sensitivity of upconversion nanophosphors (UCNPs). By utilizing red/near-infrared dual emitting NaLuF4:Mn2+,Ln3+ (Ln3+ = Yb3+, Er3+, Tm3+) UCNPs as the energy donor and Au nanoparticles as the acceptor, the temperature resolution of the UCNPs is significantly increased from 3.1 °C to 0.9 °C in the physiological temperature range. Conjugating the UCNPs and acceptors into discrete nanocomposites in our samples facilitates reversible regulation of the emission intensity of UCNPs, which thus would extend their application range in biosensing, especially for probing the dynamic changes of local micro-environments in biological tissues. As there are a broad variety of stimuli to which smart polymers can reversibly respond, our experiments are also extendable to various external conditions in local micro

  8. Effects of incubation at various 'room' temperatures on the sensitivity and specificity of Microstix-3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akriotis, V J; Arbus, G S

    1982-01-01

    The feasibility of room temperature incubation of Microstix-3 specimens to detect urinary tract infection was studied. This procedure, if successful, would allow home monitoring of patients and eliminate the need for an incubator. Four Microstix-3 strips were dipped into each of 1,241 urine specimens and incubated at 18, 22, 27 or 37 degree C. Results after incubation for 24 h at 27 degree C and after 48 h at 22 degree C were comparable to those after incubation for 18-24 h at 37 degree C. However, even after 72 h, incubation at 18 degree C did not produce results comparable to those obtained at 37 degree C. It appears that the incubator can be successfully eliminated at the higher temperatures tested if the limits of time outlined are observed.

  9. Enhanced Sensitivity in a Superluminal Single Mode DPAL Cavity at Room Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abi-Salloum, Tony; Yablon, Joshua; Tseng, Shih; Shahriar, Selim

    2012-06-01

    The note beat between two counter-propagating beams in a cavity is used to measure the effective change of the length of the cavity or interferometer for applications such as optical gyroscopes, vibrometers, and gravitational wave detectors. We show in this talk how a superluminal single mode laser cavity can enhance the measured note beat dramatically. We consider the inhomogeneous broadening case and study the dependence of the enhancement factor on few key parameters. We also show how Diode Pump Alkali Lasers (DPAL) are excellent candidates for such devices. Using a Rubidium based DPAL, we study the characteristics of these lasers and their effect on the proposed enhanced sensitivity.

  10. Temperature-sensitive swelling of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) brushes with low molecular weight and grafting density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bittrich, Eva; Burkert, Sina; Müller, Martin; Eichhorn, Klaus-Jochen; Stamm, Manfred; Uhlmann, Petra

    2012-02-21

    Temperature-sensitive poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAAm) brushes with different molecular weights M(n) and grafting densities σ were prepared by the "grafting-to" method. Changes in their physicochemical properties according to temperature were investigated with the help of in situ spectroscopic ellipsometry and in situ attenuated total reflection Fourier-transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy. Brush criteria indicate a transition between a brush conformation below the lower critical solution temperature (LCST) and an intermediate to mushroom conformation above the LCST. By in situ ellipsometry distinct changes in the brush layer parameters (wet thickness, refractive index, buffer content) were observed. A broadening of the temperature region with maximum deswelling occurred with decreasing grafting density. The brush layer properties were independent of the grafting density below the LCST, but showed a virtually monotonic behavior above the LCST. The midtemperature ϑ(half) of the deswelling process increased with increasing grafting density. Thus grafting density-dependent design parameters for such functional films were presented. For the first time, ATR-FTIR spectroscopy was used to monitor segment density and hydrogen bonding changes of these very thin PNIPAAm brushes as a function of temperature based on significant variations of the methyl stretching, Amide I, as well as Amide II bands with respect to intensity and wavenumber position. No dependence on M(n) and σ in the wavenumber shift of these bands above the LCST was found. The temperature profile of these band intensities and thus segment density was found to be rather step-like, exceeding temperatures around the LCST, while the respective profile of their wavenumber positions suggested continuous structural and hydration processes. Remaining buffer amounts and residual intermolecular segment/water interaction in the collapsed brushes above the LCST could be confirmed by both in situ methods.

  11. In situ-forming hydrogels--review of temperature-sensitive systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruel-Gariépy, Eve; Leroux, Jean-Christophe

    2004-09-01

    In the past few years, an increasing number of in situ-forming systems have been reported in the literature for various biomedical applications, including drug delivery, cell encapsulation, and tissue repair. There are several possible mechanisms that lead to in situ gel formation: solvent exchange, UV-irradiation, ionic cross-linkage, pH change, and temperature modulation. The thermosensitive approach can be advantageous for particular applications as it does not require organic solvents, co-polymerization agents, or an externally applied trigger for gelation. In the last 2 decades, several thermosensitive formulations have been proposed. This manuscript focuses on aqueous polymeric solutions that form implants in situ in response to temperature change, generally from ambient to body temperature. It mainly reviews the characterization and use of polysaccharides, N-isopropylacrylamide copolymers, poly(ethylene oxide-b-propylene oxide-b-ethylene oxide) (poloxamer) and its copolymers, poly(ethylene oxide)/(D,L-lactic acid-co-glycolic acid) copolymers, and thermosensitive liposome-based systems.

  12. Ammonia oxidation kinetics and temperature sensitivity of a natural marine community dominated by Archaea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horak, Rachel E A; Qin, Wei; Schauer, Andy J; Armbrust, E Virginia; Ingalls, Anitra E; Moffett, James W; Stahl, David A; Devol, Allan H

    2013-01-01

    Archaeal ammonia oxidizers (AOAs) are increasingly recognized as prominent members of natural microbial assemblages. Evidence that links the presence of AOA with in situ ammonia oxidation activity is limited, and the abiotic factors that regulate the distribution of AOA natural assemblages are not well defined. We used quantitative PCR to enumerate amoA (encodes α-subunit of ammonia monooxygenase) abundances; AOA amoA gene copies greatly outnumbered ammonia-oxidizing bacteria and amoA transcripts were derived primarily from AOA throughout the water column of Hood Canal, Puget Sound, WA, USA. We generated a Michaelis–Menten kinetics curve for ammonia oxidation by the natural community and found that the measured Km of 98±14 nmol l−1 was close to that for cultivated AOA representative Nitrosopumilus maritimus SCM1. Temperature did not have a significant effect on ammonia oxidation rates for incubation temperatures ranging from 8 to 20 °C, which is within the temperature range for depths of measurable ammonia oxidation at the site. This study provides substantial evidence, through both amoA gene copies and transcript abundances and the kinetics response, that AOA are the dominant active ammonia oxidizers in this marine environment. We propose that future ammonia oxidation experiments use a Km for the natural community to better constrain ammonia oxidation rates determined with the commonly used 15NH4+ dilution technique. PMID:23657360

  13. Latitudinal variation in sensitivity of flower bud formation to high temperature in Japanese Taraxacum officinale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshie, Fumio

    2014-05-01

    Control of flowering time plays a key role in the successful range expansion of plants. Taraxacum officinale has expanded throughout Japan during the 110 years after it was introduced into a cool temperate region. The present study tested a hypothesis that there is a genetic difference in the bud formation time in relation to temperature along latitudinal gradient of T. officinale populations. In Experiment 1, plants from three populations at different latitudes (26, 36, and 43°N) were grown at three temperatures. Time to flower bud appearance did not significantly differ among the three populations when plants were grown at 14 °C, whereas it increased with increasing latitude when grown at 19 and 24 °C. Rosette diameter was not different among the populations, indicating that the variation in bud formation time reflected a difference in genetic control rather than size variation. The latitudinal variation in bud appearance time was confirmed by Experiment 2 in which plants from 17 population were used. In Experiment 3, the size of plants that exhibited late-flowering was studied to test a hypothesis that the variation in flowering time reflects dormancy of vegetative growth, but the late-flowering plants were found to continue growth, indicating that vegetative dormancy was not the cause of the variation. The results clearly indicate that the degree of suppression of flower bud formation at high temperature decreases with latitude from north to south, which is under genetic control.

  14. [Temperature sensitivity of soil organic carbon mineralization and β-glucosidase enzymekinetics in the northern temperate forests at different altitudes, China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Jin-juan; Li, Dan-dan; Zhang, Xin-yu; He, Nian-peng; Bu, Jin-feng; Wang, Qing; Sun, Xiao-min; Wen, Xue-fa

    2016-01-01

    Soil samples, which were collected from three typical forests, i.e., Betula ermanii forest, coniferous mixed broad-leaved forest, and Pinus koraiensis forest, at different altitudes along the southern slope of Laotuding Mountain of Changbai Mountain range in Liaoning Province of China, were incubated over a temperature gradient in laboratory. Soil organic carbon mineralization rates (Cmin), soil β-1,4-glucosidase (βG) kinetics and their temperature sensitivity (Q₁₀) were measured. The results showed that both altitude and temperature had significant effects on Cmin · Cmin increased with temperature and was highest in the B. ermanii forest. The temperature sensitivity of Cmin [Q₁₀(Cmin)] ranked in order of B. ermanii forest > P. koraiensis forest > coniferous mixed broad-leaved forest, but did not differ significantly among the three forests. Both the maximum activity (Vmax) and the Michaelis constant (Km) of the βG responded positively to temperature for all the forests. The temperature sensitivity of Vmax [Q₁₀(Vmax)] ranged from 1.78 to 1.90, and the temperature sensitivity of Km [Q₁₀(Km)] ranged from 1.79 to 2.00. The Q₁₀(Vmax)/Q10(Km) ratios were significantly greater in the B. ermanii soil than in the other two forest soils, suggesting that the βG kinetics-dependent impacts of the global warming or temperature increase on the decomposition of soil organic carbon were temperature sensitive for the forests at the higher altitudes.

  15. Sensitivity of high-temperature weather to initial soil moisture: a case study with the WRF model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, X.-M.; Wang, B.; Zhang, Y.; Song, S.; Huang, X.; Zheng, Y.; Chen, C.; Wang, G.

    2014-05-01

    Using the Weather Research and Forecasting model (WRF), we investigate the sensitivity of simulated short-range high-temperature weather to initial soil moisture for the East China extremely hot event in late July 2003 via a succession of 24 h simulations. The initial soil moisture (SMOIS) in the Noah land surface scheme is prescribed for five groups of designed simulations, i.e., relative to the control run (CTL), SMOIS is changed by -25, -50, +25 and +50% in the DRY25, DRY50, WET25 and WET50 groups, respectively, with ten 24 h-long integrations performed in each group. We focus on above-35 °C (standard of so-called "high-temperature" event in China) 2 m surface air temperature (SAT) at 06:00 UTC (roughly 12:00 LT in the study domain) to analyze the occurrence of the high-temperature event. Ten-day mean results show that the 06:00 UTC SAT (SAT06) is sensitive to the SMOIS change, i.e., SAT06 exhibits an apparent rising with the SMOIS decrease (e.g., compared with CTL, DRY25 results in a 1 °C SAT06 rising in general over land surface of East China), areas with above-35 °C SAT06 are most affected, and the simulations are found to be more sensitive to the SMOIS decrease than to the SMOIS increase, suggesting that hot weather can be amplified under low soil moisture conditions. With regard to the mechanism of influencing the extreme high SAT06, sensible heat flux shows to directly heat the lower atmosphere, latent heat flux is found to be more sensitive to the SMOIS change and results in the overall increase of surface net radiation due to the increased greenhouse effect (e.g., with the SMOIS increase of 25% from DRY25 to CTL, the ten-day mean net radiation is increased by 5 W m-2), and a negative (positive) feedback is found between regional atmospheric circulation and air temperature in the lower atmosphere (mid-troposphere) due to the unique dynamic nature of the western Pacific subtropical high. Using a method based on an analogous temperature relationship, a

  16. Ultra-sensitive and selective NH3 room temperature gas sensing induced by manganese-doped titanium dioxide nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tshabalala, Zamaswazi P; Shingange, Katekani; Cummings, Franscious R; Ntwaeaborwa, Odireleng M; Mhlongo, Gugu H; Motaung, David E

    2017-10-15

    The study of the fabrication of ultra-high sensitive and selective room temperature ammonia (NH3) and nitrogen dioxide (NO2) gas sensors remains an important scientific challenge in the gas sensing field. This is motivated by their harmful impact on the human health and environment. Therefore, herein, we report for the first time on the gas sensing properties of TiO2 nanoparticles doped with various concentrations of manganese (Mn) (1.0, 1.5, 2.0, 2.5 and 3.0mol.% presented as S1, S2, S3, S4 and S5, respectively), synthesized using hydrothermal method. Structural analyses showed that both undoped and Mn-doped TiO2 crystallized in tetragonal phases. Optical studies revealed that the Mn doped TiO2 nanoparticles have enhanced UV→Vis emission with a broad shoulder at 540nm, signifying induced defects by substituting Ti(4+) ions with Mn(2+). The X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and the electron paramagnetic resonance studies revealed the presence of Ti(3+) and singly ionized oxygen vacancies in both pure and Mn doped TiO2 nanoparticles. Additionally, a hyperfine split due to Mn(2+) ferromagnetic ordering was observed, confirming incorporation of Mn ions into the lattice sites. The sensitivity, selectivity, operating temperature, and response-recovery times were thoroughly evaluated according to the alteration in the materials electrical resistance in the presence of the target gases. Gas sensing studies showed that Mn(2+) doped on the TiO2 surface improved the NH3 sensing performance in terms of response, sensitivity and selectivity. The S1 sensing material revealed higher sensitivity of 127.39 at 20 ppm NH3 gas. The sensing mechanism towards NH3 gas is also proposed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Temperature-Sensitive Microemulsion Gel: An Effective Topical Delivery System for Simultaneous Delivery of Vitamins C and E

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    Microemulsions (ME)—nanostructured systems composed of water, oil, and surfactants—have frequently been used in attempts to increase cutaneous drug delivery. The primary objective addressed in this work has been the development of temperature-sensitive microemulsion gel (called gel-like ME), as an effective and safe delivery system suitable for simultaneous topical application of a hydrophilic vitamin C and a lipophilic vitamin E. By changing water content of liquid o/w ME (o/w ME), a gel-lik...

  18. Temperature-sensitive polymer-coated magnetic nanoparticles as a potential drug delivery system for targeted therapy of thyroid cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koppolu, Bhanuprasanth; Bhavsar, Zarna; Wadajkar, Aniket S; Nattama, Sivaniarvindpriya; Rahimi, Maham; Nwariaku, Fiemu; Nguyen, Kytai T

    2012-12-01

    The objective of this work was to develop and investigate temperature-sensitive poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-acrylamide-allylamine)-coated iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles (TPMNPs) as possible targeted drug carriers for treatments of advanced thyroid cancer (ATC). These nanoparticles were prepared by free radical polymerization of monomers on the surface of silane-coupled iron oxide nanoparticles. In vitro studies demonstrated that TPMNPs were cytocompatible and effectively taken up by cancer cells in a dose-dependent manner. An external magnetic field significantly increased nanoparticle uptake, especially when cells were exposed to physiological flow conditions. Drug loading and release studies using doxorubicin confirmed the temperature-responsive release of drugs from nanoparticles. In addition, doxorubicin-loaded nanoparticles significantly killed ATC cells when compared to free doxorubicin. The in vitro results indicate that TPMNPs have potential as targeted and controlled drug carriers for thyroid cancer treatment.

  19. Using Temperature-Sensitive Smart Polymers to Regulate DNA-mediated Nanoassembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamner, Kristen L.

    Nanoparticle (NP) self-assembly has been proven as an effective route to organize nanoscale building blocks into ordered structures for potential technological applications. In order to successfully exploit the self-assembly processes a high level of direction and control is required. In my dissertation research, I synthesized a temperature responsive copolymer (p) to modify gold nanoparticles (AuNP) for controlling self-assembly. The copolymers' ability to regulate DNA-mediated NP self-assembly is a particular focus. In Chapter 2, the results show that by the addition of the p to create thermally responsive NP interfaces allows for controlled aggregation behavior and interparticle distances defined by the transition temperature (TC) of the p, to aid in NP assembly and help to regulate DNA-mediated interactions between NP. The work in Chapter 3 revealed that the reconfigurable conformation of the p sterically regulates the assembly: at T TC, assembly was observed, due the hydrophobic collapse of the p and the subsequent exposure of the complementary DNA bases. In Chapter 4, to gain insight into the mechanism, the rate of assembly was monitored, with DNA lengths that had hydrodynamic diameters more comparable to that of the p, and found the p was capable of slowing the kinetics. I further investigated to find that the addition of p extended the interparticle distances while disrupting the long range ordering. Finally, how the temperature responsive behavior of the p acted on the interparticle distances was probed, and it was found that without p, the interparticle distances expanded, while the addition of p compressed the interparticle distances.

  20. Region-specific sensitivity of anemophilous pollen deposition to temperature and precipitation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timme H Donders

    Full Text Available Understanding relations between climate and pollen production is important for several societal and ecological challenges, importantly pollen forecasting for pollinosis treatment, forensic studies, global change biology, and high-resolution palaeoecological studies of past vegetation and climate fluctuations. For these purposes, we investigate the role of climate variables on annual-scale variations in pollen influx, test the regional consistency of observed patterns, and evaluate the potential to reconstruct high-frequency signals from sediment archives. A 43-year pollen-trap record from the Netherlands is used to investigate relations between annual pollen influx, climate variables (monthly and seasonal temperature and precipitation values, and the North Atlantic Oscillation climate index. Spearman rank correlation analysis shows that specifically in Alnus, Betula, Corylus, Fraxinus, Quercus and Plantago both temperature in the year prior to (T-1, as well as in the growing season (T, are highly significant factors (TApril rs between 0.30 [P<0.05[ and 0.58 [P<0.0001]; TJuli-1 rs between 0.32 [P<0.05[ and 0.56 [P<0.0001] in the annual pollen influx of wind-pollinated plants. Total annual pollen prediction models based on multiple climate variables yield R2 between 0.38 and 0.62 (P<0.0001. The effect of precipitation is minimal. A second trapping station in the SE Netherlands, shows consistent trends and annual variability, suggesting the climate factors are regionally relevant. Summer temperature is thought to influence the formation of reproductive structures, while temperature during the flowering season influences pollen release. This study provides a first predictive model for seasonal pollen forecasting, and also aides forensic studies. Furthermore, variations in pollen accumulation rates from a sub-fossil peat deposit are comparable with the pollen trap data. This suggests that high frequency variability pollen records from natural

  1. The Sensitivity of Simulated Storm Structure and Intensity to the Temperature at the Lifted Condensation Level

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCaul, Eugene W., Jr.; Cohen, Charles; Kirkpatrick, Cody

    2004-01-01

    Prior parameter space studies of simulated deep convection are extended to embrace variations in the ambient temperature at the Lifted Condensation Level (LCL). Within the context of the parameter space study design, changes in LCL temperature are roughly equivalent to changes in the ambient precipitable water. Two series of simulations are conducted, one with a warm LCL that is associated with approximately 60 mm of precipitable water, and another with LCL temperatures 8 C cooler, so that PW is reduced to roughly 30 mm. The sets of simulations include tests of the impact of changes in the buoyancy and shear profile shapes and of changes in mixed and moist layer depths, all of which have been shown to be important in prior work. Simulations discussed here feature values of bulk convective available potential energy (CAPE) of 800, 2000, or 3200 Joules per kilogram, and a single semicircular hodograph having radius of 12 meters per second, but with variable vertical shear. The simulations reveal a consistent trend toward stronger peak updraft speeds for the cooler LCL temperature (reduced PW) cases, if all other environmental parameters are held constant. Roughly comparable increases in updraft speeds are noted for all combinations of LCL and level of free convection heights. These increases in updraft strength are evidently the result of both the reduction of condensate loading aloft and the lower altitudes at which the latent heat release by freezing and deposition commences in the cooler, low-PW environments. Because the latent heat of fusion adds relatively more energy to the updrafts at low CAPE, those storms show more strengthening at low PW than do the larger CAPE storms. As expected, maximum storm precipitation rates tend to diminish as PW is decreased, but only slightly, and by amounts not proportionate to the decrease in PW. The low-PW cases thus actually feature larger environment-relative precipitation efficiency than do the high-PW cases. In addition

  2. Mouse polyoma virus and adenovirus replication in mouse cells temperature-sensitive in DNA synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheinin, R; Fabbro, J; Dubsky, M

    1985-01-01

    Mouse adenovirus multiplies, apparently without impediment, in temperature-inactivated ts A1S9, tsC1 and ts2 mouse fibroblasts. Thus, the DNA of mouse adenovirus can replicate in the absence of functional DNA topoisomerase II, a DNA-chain-elongation factor, and a protein required for traverse of the G1/S interface, respectively, encoded in the ts A1S9, tsC1 and ts2 genetic loci. These results are compared with those obtained with polyoma virus.

  3. Design, Fabrication and Temperature Sensitivity Testing of a Miniature Piezoelectric-Based Sensor for Current Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven B. Lao

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Grid capacity, reliability, and efficient distribution of power have been major challenges for traditional power grids in the past few years. Reliable and efficient distribution within these power grids will continue to depend on the development of lighter and more efficient sensing units with lower costs in order to measure current and detect failures across the grid. The objective of this paper is to present the development of a miniature piezoelectric-based sensor for AC current measurements in single conductors, which are used in power transmission lines. Additionally presented in this paper are the thermal testing results for the sensor to assess its robustness for various operating temperatures.

  4. Linking temperature sensitivity of soil CO2 release to substrate, environmental, and microbial properties across alpine ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Jinzhi; Chen, Leiyi; Zhang, Beibei; Liu, Li; Yang, Guibiao; Fang, Kai; Chen, Yongliang; Li, Fei; Kou, Dan; Ji, Chengjun; Luo, Yiqi; Yang, Yuanhe

    2016-09-01

    Our knowledge of fundamental drivers of the temperature sensitivity (Q10) of soil carbon dioxide (CO2) release is crucial for improving the predictability of soil carbon dynamics in Earth System Models. However, patterns and determinants of Q10 over a broad geographic scale are not fully understood, especially in alpine ecosystems. Here we addressed this issue by incubating surface soils (0-10 cm) obtained from 156 sites across Tibetan alpine grasslands. Q10 was estimated from the dynamics of the soil CO2 release rate under varying temperatures of 5-25°C. Structure equation modeling was performed to evaluate the relative importance of substrate, environmental, and microbial properties in regulating the soil CO2 release rate and Q10. Our results indicated that steppe soils had significantly lower CO2 release rates but higher Q10 than meadow soils. The combination of substrate properties and environmental variables could predict 52% of the variation in soil CO2 release rate across all grassland sites and explained 37% and 58% of the variation in Q10 across the steppe and meadow sites, respectively. Of these, precipitation was the best predictor of soil CO2 release rate. Basal microbial respiration rate (B) was the most important predictor of Q10 in steppe soils, whereas soil pH outweighed B as the major regulator in meadow soils. These results demonstrate that carbon quality and environmental variables coregulate Q10 across alpine ecosystems, implying that modelers can rely on the "carbon-quality temperature" hypothesis for estimating apparent temperature sensitivities, but relevant environmental factors, especially soil pH, should be considered in higher-productivity alpine regions.

  5. Sensitivity analysis of recovery efficiency in high-temperature aquifer thermal energy storage with single well

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeon, Jun-Seo; Lee, Seung-Rae; Pasquinelli, Lisa

    2015-01-01

    ., it is getting more attention as these issues are gradually alleviated. In this study, a sensitivity analysis of recovery efficiency in two cases of HT-ATES system with a single well is conducted to select key parameters. For a fractional factorial design used to choose input parameters with uniformity......, the optimal Latin hypercube sampling with an enhanced stochastic evolutionary algorithm is considered. Then, the recovery efficiency is obtained using a computer model developed by COMSOL Multiphysics. With input and output variables, the surrogate modeling technique, namely the Gaussian-Kriging method...... and it is confirmed that key parameters vary with the experiment domain of hydraulic and thermal properties as well as the number of input variables....

  6. Sensitivity of Horn of Africa Rainfall to Regional Sea Surface Temperature Forcing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zewdu T. Segele

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The Abdus Salam International Center for Theoretical Physics (ICTP version 4.4 Regional Climate Model (RegCM4 is used to investigate the rainfall response to cooler/warmer sea surface temperature anomaly (SSTA forcing in the Indian and Atlantic Oceans. The effect of SSTA forcing in a specific ocean basin is identified by ensemble, averaging 10 individual simulations in which a constant or linearly zonally varying SSTA is prescribed in individual basins while specifying the 1971–2000 monthly varying climatological sea surface temperature (SST across the remaining model domain. The nonlinear rainfall response to SSTA amplitude also is investigated by separately specifying +1K, +2K, and +4K SSTA forcing in the Atlantic and Indian Oceans. The simulation results show that warm SSTs over the entire Indian Ocean produce drier conditions across the larger Blue Nile catchment, whereas warming ≥ +2K generates large positive rainfall anomalies exceeding 10 mm·day−1 over drought prone regions of Northeastern Ethiopia. However, the June–September rainy season tends to be wetter (drier when the SST warming (cooling is limited to either the Northern or Southern Indian Ocean. Wet rainy seasons generally are characterized by deepening of the monsoon trough, east of 40°E, intensification of the Mascarene high, strengthening of the Somali low level jet and the tropical easterly jet, enhanced zonal and meridional vertically integrated moisture fluxes, and steeply vertically decreasing moist static energy. The opposite conditions hold for dry monsoon seasons.

  7. Sensitivity of a prairie wetland to increased temperature and seasonal precipitation changes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poiani, K.A. [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States); Johnson, W.C. [South Dakota State Univ., Brookings, SD (United States); Kittel, T.G.F. [Univ. Corp. for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO (United States)]|[Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States)

    1995-04-01

    We assessed the potential effects of increased temperature and changes in amount and seasonal timing of precipitation on the hydrology and vegetation of a semi-permanent prairie wetland in North Dakota using a spatially-defined, rule-based simulation model. Simulations were run with increased temperatures of 2{degree}C combined with a 10 percent increase or decrease in total growing season precipitation. Changes in precipitation were applied either evenly across all months or to individual seasons (spring, summer, or fall). The response of semi-permanent wetland P1 was relatively similar under most of the seasonal scenarios. A 10 percent increase in total growing season precipitation applied to summer months only, to fall months only, and over all months produced lower water levels compared to those resulting from the current climate due to increased evapotranspiration. Wetland hydrology was most affected by changes in spring precipitation and runoff. Vegetation response was relatively consistent across scenarios. Seven of the eight seasonal scenarios produced drier conditions with no open water and greater vegetation cover compared to those resulting from the current climate. Only when spring precipitation increased did the wetland maintain an extensive open water area (49 percent). 36 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  8. Generation and thermally adjustable catalysis of silver nanoparticle immobilized temperature-sensitive nanocomposite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jun; Zhou, Tao; Jia, Lei; Shen, Xiaoke; Li, Xiaohui; Li, Huijun; Xu, Zhouqing; Cao, Jianliang

    2017-03-01

    The rise in environmental issues due to the catalytic degradation of pollutants in water has received much attention. In this report, a facile method was developed for the generation of a novel thermosensitive Ag-decorated catalyst, SiO2@PNIPAM@Ag (the average particle size is around 540 nm), through atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) and mild reducing reactions. First, poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAM) was used to create a shell around mercapto-silica spheres that allowed for enhanced catalyst support dispersion into water. Second, through a mild reducing reaction, these Ag nanoparticles (NPs) were then anchored to the surface of SiO2@PNIPAM spheres. The resulting catalyst revealed catalytic activity to degrade various nitrobenzenes and organic dyes in an aqueous solution with sodium borohydride (NaBH4) at ambient temperature. The catalytic activity can be adjusted in different temperatures through the aggregation or dispersion of Ag catalyst on the polymer supporters, which is due to the thermosensitive PNIPAM shell. The ease of preparation and efficient catalytic activity of the catalyst can make it a promising candidate for the use in degrading organic pollutants for environmental remediation.

  9. Temperature-Sensitive Gels for Intratumoral Delivery of β-Lapachone: Effect of Cyclodextrins and Ethanol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcilio S. S. Cunha-Filho

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This work evaluated the potential of Pluronics (varieties F127 and P123 in combination with solubilizing agents to be used as syringeable in situ gelling depots of intratumoral β-lapachone (βLAP. Pluronic dispersions prepared at various concentrations in the absence and the presence of ethanol and randomly methylated β-cyclodextrin (RMβCD were characterized regarding their rheological properties, drug solubilization capacity, and in vitro release. Pluronic F127 (18–23% formulations combined high ability to solubilize βLAP (enhancement solubility factor up to 50, adequate gel temperature range (over 25°C, and gel strength at 37°C enough to guarantee the permanence of the formulation in the administration site for a period of time. βLAP release rate was finely tuned by the concentration of the polymer and the addition of RMβCD (diffusion coefficient ranging between 9 and 69 μg·cm−2. The ethanol increases βLAP release rate but simultaneously led to weak gels. This paper shows that βLAP formulations involving temperature-reversible Pluronic gels may be suitable for intratumoral drug delivery purposes.

  10. Effects of compression at elevated temperature for electrophorically deposited TiO2-based dye-sensitized solar cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamimul Haque Choudhury, Md.; Kishi, Naoki; Soga, Tetsuo

    2016-01-01

    In this investigation, dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) were prepared by electrophoretic deposition (EPD) of commercially available nanometer-sized titanium oxide (TiO2) nanoparticles (anatase, ST01) on fluorine-doped tin oxide (FTO) glass substrates. The rate of cathodic electrophoretic deposition of TiO2 nanoparticle agglomerates and the density of the obtained films were explored as a function of the applied electric field, keeping optimized suspension compositions, such as the particle concentration and the type of solvent. Optimized deposition conditions were found to result in homogeneous, well-controlled, mesoporous TiO2 thick-film photoanodes. Compression of the prepared glass substrate TiO2 photoanode at elevated temperature was commenced as a promising postdeposition surface treatment. The photovoltaic performance characteristics of DSSC prepared by this method were found to be considerably improved compared with those of DSSCs prepared by high-temperature postannealing and compression at room temperature. Surface morphologies were observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and significant improvement was observed after compression as well as compression at elevated temperature.

  11. Cytoskeletal regulation dominates temperature-sensitive proteomic changes of hibernation in forebrain of 13-lined ground squirrels.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allyson G Hindle

    Full Text Available 13-lined ground squirrels, Ictidomys tridecemlineatus, are obligate hibernators that transition annually between summer homeothermy and winter heterothermy - wherein they exploit episodic torpor bouts. Despite cerebral ischemia during torpor and rapid reperfusion during arousal, hibernator brains resist damage and the animals emerge neurologically intact each spring. We hypothesized that protein changes in the brain underlie winter neuroprotection. To identify candidate proteins, we applied a sensitive 2D gel electrophoresis method to quantify protein differences among forebrain extracts prepared from ground squirrels in two summer, four winter and fall transition states. Proteins that differed among groups were identified using LC-MS/MS. Only 84 protein spots varied significantly among the defined states of hibernation. Protein changes in the forebrain proteome fell largely into two reciprocal patterns with a strong body temperature dependence. The importance of body temperature was tested in animals from the fall; these fall animals use torpor sporadically with body temperatures mirroring ambient temperatures between 4 and 21°C as they navigate the transition between summer homeothermy and winter heterothermy. Unlike cold-torpid fall ground squirrels, warm-torpid individuals strongly resembled the homeotherms, indicating that the changes observed in torpid hibernators are defined by body temperature, not torpor per se. Metabolic enzymes were largely unchanged despite varied metabolic activity across annual and torpor-arousal cycles. Instead, the majority of the observed changes were cytoskeletal proteins and their regulators. While cytoskeletal structural proteins tended to differ seasonally, i.e., between summer homeothermy and winter heterothermy, their regulatory proteins were more strongly affected by body temperature. Changes in the abundance of various isoforms of the microtubule assembly and disassembly regulatory proteins

  12. Sensitivity of high-temperature weather to initial soil moisture: a case study using the WRF model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, X.-M.; Wang, B.; Zhang, Y.; Song, S.; Huang, X.; Zheng, Y.; Chen, C.; Wang, G.

    2014-09-01

    Using a succession of 24 h Weather Research and Forecasting model (WRF) simulations, we investigate the sensitivity to initial soil moisture of a short-range high-temperature weather event that occurred in late July 2003 in East China. The initial soil moisture (SMOIS) in the Noah land surface scheme is adjusted (relative to the control run, CTL) for four groups of simulations: DRY25 (-25%), DRY50 (-50%), WET25 (+25%) and WET50 (+50%). Ten 24 h integrations are performed in each group. We focus on 2 m surface air temperature (SAT) greater than 35 °C (the threshold of "high-temperature" events in China) at 06:00 UTC (roughly 14:00 LT in the study domain) to analyse the occurrence of the high-temperature event. The 10-day mean results show that the 06:00 UTC SAT (SAT06) is sensitive to the SMOIS change; specifically, SAT06 exhibits an apparent increase with the SMOIS decrease (e.g. compared with CTL, DRY25 generally results in a 1 °C SAT06 increase over the land surface of East China), areas with 35 °C or higher SAT06 are the most affected, and the simulations are more sensitive to the SMOIS decrease than to the SMOIS increase, which suggests that hot weather can be amplified under low soil moisture conditions. Regarding the mechanism underlying the extremely high SAT06, sensible heat flux has been shown to directly heat the lower atmosphere, and latent heat flux has been found to be more sensitive to the SMOIS change, resulting in an overall increase in surface net radiation due to the increased greenhouse effect (e.g. with the SMOIS increase from DRY25 to CTL, the 10-day mean net radiation increases by 5 W m-2). Additionally, due to the unique and dynamic nature of the western Pacific subtropical high, negative feedback occurs between the regional atmospheric circulation and the air temperature in the lower atmosphere while positive feedback occurs in the mid-troposphere. Using a method based on an analogous temperature relationship, a detailed analysis of the

  13. Combination of differential growth at two different temperatures with a quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction to determine temperature-sensitive phenotype of Mycoplasma synoviae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahid, Muhammad A; Ghorashi, Seyed A; Agnew-Crumpton, Rebecca; Markham, Philip F; Marenda, Marc S; Noormohammadi, Amir H

    2013-04-01

    Mycoplasma synoviae infections result in significant economic losses in the chicken and turkey industries. A commercially available live temperature-sensitive (ts (+)) vaccine strain MS-H has been found to be effective in controlling M. synoviae infections in commercial layer and broiler breeder farms in various countries, including Australia. Detection and differentiation of MS-H from field strains (ts (-)) and from ts (-) MS-H reisolates in vaccinated flocks is vital in routine flock status monitoring. At present microtitration is the only available technique to determine the ts phenotype of M. synoviae. This technique is time consuming and not amenable to automation. In the present study, a quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (Q-PCR) was combined with simultaneous culturing of M. synoviae at two different temperatures (33°C and 39.5°C) to determine the ts phenotype of 22 Australian M. synoviae strains/isolates. The M. synoviae type strain WVU-1853 was also included for comparison. A ratio of the copy numbers of the variable lipoprotein haemagglutinin (vlhA) gene at the two temperatures was calculated and a cut-off value was determined and used to delineate the ts phenotype. In all M. synoviae strains/isolates tested in this study, the ts phenotype determined using Q-PCR was in agreement with that determined using conventional microtitration. Combination of Q-PCR with differential growth at two different temperatures is a rapid, reliable and accurate technique that could be used as an effective tool in laboratories actively involved in ts phenotyping of M. synoviae strains/isolates.

  14. Temporal shifts and temperature sensitivity of avian spring migratory phenology: a phylogenetic meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usui, Takuji; Butchart, Stuart H M; Phillimore, Albert B

    2017-03-01

    There are wide reports of advances in the timing of spring migration of birds over time and in relation to rising temperatures, though phenological responses vary substantially within and among species. An understanding of the ecological, life-history and geographic variables that predict this intra- and interspecific variation can guide our projections of how populations and species are likely to respond to future climate change. Here, we conduct phylogenetic meta-analyses addressing slope estimates of the timing of avian spring migration regressed on (i) year and (ii) temperature, representing a total of 413 species across five continents. We take into account slope estimation error and examine phylogenetic, ecological and geographic predictors of intra- and interspecific variation. We confirm earlier findings that on average birds have significantly advanced their spring migration time by 2·1 days per decade and 1·2 days °C(-1) . We find that over time and in response to warmer spring conditions, short-distance migrants have advanced spring migratory phenology by more than long-distance migrants. We also find that larger bodied species show greater advance over time compared to smaller bodied species. Our results did not reveal any evidence that interspecific variation in migration response is predictable on the basis of species' habitat or diet. We detected a substantial phylogenetic signal in migration time in response to both year and temperature, suggesting that some of the shifts in migratory phenological response to climate are predictable on the basis of phylogeny. However, we estimate high levels of species and spatial variance relative to phylogenetic variance, which is consistent with plasticity in response to climate evolving fairly rapidly and being more influenced by adaptation to current local climate than by common descent. On average, avian spring migration times have advanced over time and as spring has become warmer. While we are able to

  15. Sensitivity of the Greenland Ice Sheet to Pliocene sea surface temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Daniel J.; Dolan, Aisling M.; Haywood, Alan M.; Hunter, Stephen J.; Stoll, Danielle K.

    2010-01-01

    The history of theGrIS (Greenland Ice Sheet), particularly in warm climates of the pre-Quaternary, is poorly known. IRD (ice-rafted debris) records suggest that the ice sheet has existed, at least transiently, since theMiocene and potentially since as long ago as the Eocene. As melting of the GrIS is a key uncertainty in future predictions of climate and sea-level, understanding its behaviour and role within the climate system during pastwarm periods could provide important constraints. The Pliocene has been identified as a key period for understanding warmer than modern climates. Detailed micropalaeontological analyses of the mid-Piacenzian Warm Period (3.264-3.025 Ma) have produced a series of SST (sea-surface temperature) reconstructions (PRISM2-AVE, PRISM2-MAX, PRISM2-MIN and

  16. Hydration, phase separation and nonlinear rheology of temperature-sensitive water-soluble polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Fumihiko; Koga, Tsuyoshi; Kaneda, Isamu; Winnik, Françoise M

    2011-07-20

    The collapse of a poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAM) chain upon heating and the phase diagrams of aqueous PNIPAM solutions with a very flat lower critical solution temperature (LCST) phase separation line are theoretically studied on the basis of cooperative dehydration (simultaneous dissociation of bound water molecules in a group of correlated sequence), and compared with the experimental observation of temperature-induced coil-globule transition by light scattering methods. The transition becomes sharper with the cooperativity parameter σ of hydration. The reentrant coil-globule-coil transition and cononsolvency in a mixed solvent of water and methanol are also studied from the viewpoint of competitive hydrogen bonds between polymer-water and polymer-methanol. The downward shift of the cloud-point curves (LCST cononsolvency) with the mol fraction of methanol due to the competition is calculated and compared with the experimental data. Aqueous solutions of hydrophobically modified PNIPAM carrying short alkyl chains at both chain ends (telechelic PNIPAM) are theoretically and experimentally studied. The LCST of these solutions is found to shift downward along the sol-gel transition curve as a result of end-chain association (association-induced phase separation), and separate from the coil-globule transition line. Associated structures in the solution, such as flower micelles, mesoglobules, and higher fractal assembly, are studied by ultra small-angle neutron scattering with theoretical modeling of the scattering function. Dynamic-mechanical modulus, nonlinear stationary viscosity, and stress build-up in start-up shear flows of the associated networks are studied on the basis of the affine and non-affine transient network theory. The molecular conditions for thickening, strain hardening, and stress overshoot are found in terms of the nonlinear amplitude A of the chain tension and the tension-dissociation coupling constant g.

  17. Sensitivity of interglacial Greenland temperature and δ18O: ice core data, orbital and increased CO2 climate simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Swingedouw

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The sensitivity of interglacial Greenland temperature to orbital and CO2 forcing is investigated using the NorthGRIP ice core data and coupled ocean-atmosphere IPSL-CM4 model simulations. These simulations were conducted in response to different interglacial orbital configurations, and to increased CO2 concentrations. These different forcings cause very distinct simulated seasonal and latitudinal temperature and water cycle changes, limiting the analogies between the last interglacial and future climate. However, the IPSL-CM4 model shows similar magnitudes of Arctic summer warming and climate feedbacks in response to 2 × CO2 and orbital forcing of the last interglacial period (126 000 years ago. The IPSL-CM4 model produces a remarkably linear relationship between TOA incoming summer solar radiation and simulated changes in summer and annual mean central Greenland temperature. This contrasts with the stable isotope record from the Greenland ice cores, showing a multi-millennial lagged response to summer insolation. During the early part of interglacials, the observed lags may be explained by ice sheet-ocean feedbacks linked with changes in ice sheet elevation and the impact of meltwater on ocean circulation, as investigated with sensitivity studies. A quantitative comparison between ice core data and climate simulations requires stability of the stable isotope – temperature relationship to be explored. Atmospheric simulations including water stable isotopes have been conducted with the LMDZiso model under different boundary conditions. This set of simulations allows calculation of a temporal Greenland isotope-temperature slope (0.3–0.4‰ per °C during warmer-than-present Arctic climates, in response to increased CO2, increased ocean temperature and orbital forcing. This temporal slope appears half as large as the modern spatial gradient and is consistent with other ice core estimates. It may, however, be model-dependent, as indicated by

  18. Temperature-sensitive modification of PET fabrics by low temperature plasma%涤纶纺织品的低温等离子体温敏改性

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邓黎明; 李永强; 刘今强

    2011-01-01

    为制备具有温敏效应的智能型涤纶纺织品,运用低温等离子体引发涤纶织物接枝聚合N-异丙基丙烯酰胺(NIPAAm)凝胶.通过对织物的水通时间、纤维化学结构以及干湿状态织物表面形态的测试,表征了改性前后织物结构及性能的变化,并探讨了改性后织物增重率和"开关效应"的关系.结果表明:NIPAAm已被引入涤纶织物表面;经接枝聚合后的涤纶织物在32℃附近水通时间急剧增加,表现出明显的温敏性能;织物增重率为20.1%时,织物"开关效应"效果最佳.%Temperature-sensitive smart textile was prepared by plasma-induced graft polymerization of poly (N-isopropyl acrylamide) (PNIPAAm) hydrogel onto PET fabric. The water permeation time and molecular structure as well as morphology of the fabric in wet and dry states were analyzed to characterize the structure and propertie changes before and after the graft modification. The relationship between weight gain rate and “switching effect” was investigated. The results showed that the PNIPAAm monomers were introduced onto the fabrics' surface and the water permeation time of the grafted PET fabric showed a sharp increase around 32 ℃, which exhibited obvious temperature-sensitivity. When the weight gain ratio is 20. 1%, the best "switching effect" can be obtained.

  19. Sensitivity analysis of effective fluid and rock bulk modulus due to changes in pore pressure, temperature and saturation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhakta, Tuhin; Avseth, Per; Landrø, Martin

    2016-12-01

    Fluid substitution plays a vital role in time-lapse seismic modeling and interpretation. It is, therefore, very important to quantify as exactly as possible the changes in fluid bulk modulus due to changes in reservoir parameters. In this paper, we analyze the sensitivities in effective fluid bulk modulus due to changes in reservoir parameters like saturation, pore-pressure and temperature. The sensitivities are analyzed for two extreme bounds, i.e. the Voigt average and the Reuss average, for various fluid combinations (i.e. oil-water, gas-water and gas-oil). We quantify that the effects of pore-pressure and saturation changes are highest in the case of gas-water combination, while the effect of temperature is highest for oil-gas combination. Our results show that sensitivities vary with the bounds, even for same amount of changes in any reservoir parameter. In 4D rock physics studies, we often neglect the effects of pore-pressure or temperature changes assuming that those effects are negligible compare to the effect due to saturation change. Our analysis shows that pore-pressure and temperature changes can be vital and sometimes higher than the effect of saturation change. We investigate these effects on saturated rock bulk modulus. We first compute frame bulk modulus using the Modified Hashin Shtrikman (MHS) model for carbonate rocks and then perform fluid substitution using the Gassmann equation. We consider upper bound of the MHS as elastic behavior for stiffer rocks and lower bound of the MHS as elastic behavior for softer rocks. We then investigate four various combinations: stiff rock with upper bound (the Voigt bound) as effective fluid modulus, stiff rock with lower bound (Reuss bound) as effective fluid modulus, soft rock with upper bound as effective fluid modulus and soft rock with lower bound as effective fluid modulus. Our results show that the effect of any reservoir parameter change is highest for soft rock and lower bound combination and lowest

  20. Temperature-Sensitive Mutants of Fujinami Sarcoma Virus: Tumorigenicity and Reversible Phosphorylation of the Transforming p140 Protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Wen-Hwa; Bister, Klaus; Moscovici, Carlo; Duesberg, Peter H.

    1981-01-01

    Several clones of Fujinami sarcoma virus (FSV) isolated from a laboratory stock or from mutagenized virus were temperature sensitive (ts) in transformation of cells in culture. When shifted from the permissive (37°C) to the nonpermissive (41.5°C) temperature, the cellular phenotype reverted to normal within 2 h, but it required about 48 h at 37°C to revert back to the transformed morphology. A temperature-resistant (tr) FSV clone was isolated from a tumor of an animal. All ts mutants were tumorigenic in animals but induced tumors only after latent periods of 12 to 25 days, compared to 5 to 6 days with tr virus. The ts lesions of the FSV mutants affected 90% of the phosphorylation of the nonstructural, gag-related 140,000-kilodalton phosphoprotein coded by FSV (p140), but did not affect virus replication or the synthesis of p140. Upon shifting from the permissive to the nonpermissive temperature, p140 was 90% dephosphorylated with an approximate 32P half-life of 20 min. When shifted back to the permissive temperature, the preexisting p140 was rephosphorylated in the absence of protein synthesis within a 90-min test period. Likewise, most of the phosphate of fully phosphorylated p140 was exchanged at the permissive temperature within 30 to 90 min even when protein synthesis was inhibited. However, the protein structure of p140 had a half-life of 5 h at both temperatures. These results prove p140 to be a substrate of reversible phosphorylation. Superinfection and transformation of ts FSV-infected cells maintained at the nonpermissive temperature with acute leukemia virus MC29 failed to phosphorylate p140. It would follow that in vivo phosphorylation of ts p140 is controlled by an FSV-specific mechanism and is a prerequisite, not a consequence, of transformation. p140 of ts FSV recovered from cells maintained at 41.5°C with anti-gag serum was over 10 times less phosphorylated by associated kinase than the same protein recovered from cells at 37°C if assayed in

  1. Discrimination between temperature- and brefeldin A-sensitive steps in the sulfation, phosphorylation, and cleavage of progastrin and its derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varro, A; Henry, J; Vaillant, C; Dockray, G J

    1994-08-12

    Maturation of the acid-stimulating hormone gastrin involves precursor cleavage, tyrosine sulfation, serine phosphorylation, and COOH-terminal amidation. We have used brefeldin A and incubation at 22 degrees C to determine where and when these modifications occur. Immunogold studies of gastrin cells incubated at 22 degrees C revealed swollen Golgi cisternae, the terminal regions of which were associated with an accumulation of progastrin immunoreactivity. At 22 degrees C, [3H]tyrosine and [35S]sulfate were incorporated into progastrin, but Arg94-Arg95 cleavage, and Ser96 phosphorylation, were inhibited. When pulse labeling at 22 degrees C for 120 min was followed by a chase at 37 degrees C, [35S]progastrin was cleaved at Arg94-Arg95 with a t1/2 of about 10 min, compared with about 20 min for [3H]progastrin. Approximately 60% of the COOH-terminal cleavage fragment was phosphorylated, but there was little or no incorporation of [32P]phosphate into progastrin. Addition of brefeldin A during the chase substantially inhibited cleavage of [3H]progastrin, but not [35S]progastrin. However, when pulse labeling was limited to 20 min at 22 degrees C, the presence of brefeldin A in a subsequent chase at 37 degrees C completely inhibited cleavage of [35S]progastrin. The data indicate that progastrin sulfation occurs in the trans-Golgi network, exit from which involves passage through first a brefeldin A-sensitive and then a temperature-sensitive step. Cleavage at Arg94-Arg95 and Ser phosphorylation are closely linked, occur distal to the temperature-sensitive step, and are followed by amidation in secretory granules. It is known that mature secretory granules do not phosphorylate progastrin-derived peptides, and so phosphorylation appears to coincides with, and may provide a marker for, delivery of peptide from trans-Golgi work to immature secretory granules in gastrin cells.

  2. Rescue at nonpermissive temperature of complementation group II temperature-sensitive mutants of vesicular stomatitis virus by uv-irradiated VSV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deutsch, V.; Brun, G.

    1978-06-01

    Rescue is group-characteristic. The helper virus can be either the wt strain or a mutant belonging to any group of ts mutants except group II. With regard to genotype, the rescue progeny virus is temperature-sensitive and belongs to group II, and its ts II parent (ts O52(II)) can be characterized. As for phenotype, the in vitro thermal stability of rescue virions is intermediate between that of parental ts O52(II) and uv-irradiated wt virus, suggesting incorporation of some wt protein II molecules in the rescue virions. Different slopes (zero or different from zero) were seen in dose-effect curves representing rescue obtained by structural protein molecules, suggesting that protein II structural role could be distinguished from its functional role(s) by uv sensitivity. Differences in efficiency of the rescue of ts O52(II) by ts I mutants irradiated with low uv fluence may reflect their different transcribing capabilities at 39.6/sup 0/. The results are discussed taking into account the fact that the phenotype of group II mutants is characterized by an unstable nucleocapsid.

  3. Local structure of temperature and pH-sensitive colloidal microgels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nigro, Valentina, E-mail: nigro@fis.uniroma3.it; Bruni, Fabio; Ricci, Maria Antonietta [Dipartimento di Scienze, Sezione di Nanoscienze, Università degli Studi Roma Tre, Via della Vasca Navale 84, I-00146 Roma (Italy); Angelini, Roberta; Ruzicka, Barbara [Istituto dei Sistemi Complessi del Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche (ISC-CNR) UOS Sapienza and Dipartimento di Fisica, Sapienza Università, Pz.le Aldo Moro 5, I-00185 Roma (Italy); Bertoldo, Monica [Istituto per i Processi Chimico-Fisici del Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche (IPCF-CNR), Area della Ricerca, Via G. Moruzzi 1, I-56124 Pisa (Italy); Castelvetro, Valter [Dipartimento di Chimica e Chimica Industriale, Università di Pisa, via G. Moruzzi 3, I-56126 Pisa (Italy); Rogers, Sarah [ISIS-STFC, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, Oxon OX11 0QX (United Kingdom)

    2015-09-21

    The temperature dependence of the local intra-particle structure of colloidal microgel particles, composed of interpenetrated polymer networks, has been investigated by small-angle neutron scattering at different pH and concentrations, in the range (299÷315) K, where a volume phase transition from a swollen to a shrunken state takes place. Data are well described by a theoretical model that takes into account the presence of both interpenetrated polymer networks and cross-linkers. Two different behaviors are found across the volume phase transition. At neutral pH and T ≈ 307 K, a sharp change of the local structure from a water rich open inhomogeneous interpenetrated polymer network to a homogeneous porous solid-like structure after expelling water is observed. Differently, at acidic pH, the local structure changes almost continuously. These findings demonstrate that a fine control of the pH of the system allows to tune the sharpness of the volume-phase transition.

  4. A Polynucleotide Repeat Expansion Causing Temperature-Sensitivity Persists in Wild Irish Accessions of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabib, Amanda; Vishwanathan, Sailaja; Seleznev, Andrei; McKeown, Peter C; Downing, Tim; Dent, Craig; Sanchez-Bermejo, Eduardo; Colling, Luana; Spillane, Charles; Balasubramanian, Sureshkumar

    2016-01-01

    Triplet repeat expansions underlie several human genetic diseases such as Huntington's disease and Friedreich's ataxia. Although such mutations are primarily known from humans, a triplet expansion associated genetic defect has also been reported at the IIL1 locus in the Bur-0 accession of the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. The IIL1 triplet expansion is an example of cryptic genetic variation as its phenotypic effects are seen only under genetic or environmental perturbation, with high temperatures resulting in a growth defect. Here we demonstrate that the IIL1 triplet expansion associated growth defect is not a general stress response and is specific to particular environmental perturbations. We also confirm and map genetic modifiers that suppress the effect of IIL1 triplet repeat expansion. By collecting and analyzing accessions from the island of Ireland, we recover the repeat expansion in wild populations suggesting that the repeat expansion has persisted at least 60 years in Ireland. Through genome-wide genotyping, we show that the repeat expansion is present in diverse Irish populations. Our findings indicate that even deleterious alleles can persist in populations if their effect is conditional. Our study demonstrates that analysis of groups of wild populations is a powerful tool for understanding the dynamics of cryptic genetic variation.

  5. Simulated sensitivity of the tropical cyclone eyewall replacement cycle to the ambient temperature profile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xulin; He, Jie; Ge, Xuyang

    2017-09-01

    In this study, the impacts of the environmental temperature profile on the tropical cyclone eyewall replacement cycle are examined using idealized numerical simulations. It is found that the environmental thermal condition can greatly affect the formation and structure of a secondary eyewall and the intensity change during the eyewall replacement cycle. Simulation with a warmer thermal profile produces a larger moat and a prolonged eyewall replacement cycle. It is revealed that the enhanced static stability greatly suppresses convection, and thus causes slow secondary eyewall formation. The possible processes influencing the decay of inner eyewall convection are investigated. It is revealed that the demise of the inner eyewall is related to a choking effect associated with outer eyewall convection, the radial distribution of moist entropy fluxes within the moat region, the enhanced static stability in the inner-core region, and the interaction between the inner and outer eyewalls due to the barotropic instability. This study motivates further research into how environmental conditions influence tropical cyclone dynamics and thermodynamics.

  6. HYDRATION AND PHASE SEPARATION OF TEMPERATURE-SENSITIVE WATER-SOLUBLE POLYMERS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fumihiko Tanaka; Tsuyoshi Koga; Hiroyuki Kojima; Francoise M. Winnik

    2011-01-01

    Collapse of a poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAM) chain upon heating and phase diagrams of aqueous PNIPAM solutions with very flat LCST phase separation line are theoretically studied on the basis of cooperative dehydration (simultaneous dissociation of bound water molecules in a group of correlated sequence), and compared with the experimental observation of temperature-induced coil-globule transition by light scattering methods. The transition becomes sharper with the cooperativity parameter σ of hydration. Reentrant coil-globule-coil transition in mixed solvent of water and methanol is also studied from the viewpoint of competitive hydrogen bonds between polymer-water and polymer-methanol. The downward shift of the cloud-point curves (LCST cononsolvency) with the mole fraction of methanol due to the competition is calculated and compared with the experimental data. Aqueous solutions of hydophobically-modified PNIPAM carrying short alkyl chains at both chain ends (telechelic PNIPAM) are theoretically and experimentally studied. The LCST of these solutions is found to shift downward along the sol-gel transition curve as a result of end-chain association (association-induced phase separation), and separate from the coil-globule transition line. Associated structures in the solution, such as flower micelles, mesoglobules and higher fractal assembly, are studied by USANS with theoretical modeling of the scattering function.

  7. Enzymatically degradable temperature-sensitive polypeptide as a new in-situ gelling biomaterial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Yuri; Joo, Min Kyung; Bahk, Kyung Hyun; Choi, Yun Young; Kim, Ho-Tae; Kim, Won-Ki; Lee, Hwa Jeong; Sohn, Youn Soo; Jeong, Byeongmoon

    2009-07-01

    We are reporting a poly (ethylene glycol)-block-poly(alanine-co-phenyl alanine) (PEG-PAF) aqueous solution that undergoes sol-to-gel transition as the temperature increases. The sol-to-gel transition was observed at as low a concentration as 3.0-7.0 wt.%. Micellar aggregation accompanying small conformational changes of the peptide from random coils to beta-sheets is suggested as the sol-to-gel transition mechanism of the PEG-PAF aqueous solution. The PEG-PAF is stable in phosphate buffered saline, however, it degraded in the subcutaneous layer of rats. In vitro study showed that proteolytic enzymes such as cathepsin B, cathepsin C, and elastase that are present in the subcutaneous layer of the mammalian tissue might be responsible for the degradation of the polymer in rats. As a feasibility study of this material, a single shot of an aqueous insulin formulation (13.8 mg insulin/kg) showed a hypoglycemic effect over 18 days in rats. The current functional polypeptide may be very promising as an in-situ gelling system for tissue engineering, cell/stem cell therapy, and drug delivery.

  8. Sensitivity of the Upper Ocean Temperature and Circulation in the Equatorial Pacific to Solar Radiation Penetration Due to Phytoplankton

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIN Pengfei; LIU Hailong; ZHANG Xuehong

    2007-01-01

    Solar radiation penetration in the upper ocean is strongly modulated by phytoplankton, which impacts the upper ocean temperature structure, especially in the regions abundant with phytoplankton. In the paper,a new solar radiation penetration scheme, based on the concentration of chlorophyll-a, was introduced into the LASG/IAP (State Key Laboratory of Numerical Modeling for Atmospheric Sciences and Geophysical Fluid Dynamics/Institute of Atmospheric Physics) Climate system Ocean Model (LICOM). By comparing the simulations using this new scheme with those using the old scheme that included the constant e-folding attenuation depths in LICOM, it was found that the sea surface temperature (SST) and circulation in the central and eastern equatorial Pacific were both sensitive to the amount of phytoplankton present. Distinct from other regions, the increase of chlorophyll-a concentration would lead to SST decrease in the central and eastern equatorial Pacific. The higher chlorophyll-a concentration at the equator in comparison to the off-equator regions can enlarge the subsurface temperature gradient, which in turn strengthens the upper current near the equator and induces an enhancing upwelling. The enhancing upwelling can then lead to a decrease in the SST in the central and eastern equatorial Pacific. The results of these two sensitive experiments testify to the fact that the meridional gradient in the chlorophyll-a concentration can result in an enhancement in the upper current and a decrease in the SST, along with the observation that a high chlorophyll-a concentration at the equator is one of the predominant reasons leading to a decrease in the SST. This study points out that these results can be qualitatively different simply because of the choice of the solar radiation penetration schemes for comparison. This can help explain previously reported contradictory conclusions.

  9. Vegetation types alter soil respiration and its temperature sensitivity at the field scale in an estuary wetland.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guangxuan Han

    Full Text Available Vegetation type plays an important role in regulating the temporal and spatial variation of soil respiration. Therefore, vegetation patchiness may cause high uncertainties in the estimates of soil respiration for scaling field measurements to ecosystem level. Few studies provide insights regarding the influence of vegetation types on soil respiration and its temperature sensitivity in an estuary wetland. In order to enhance the understanding of this issue, we focused on the growing season and investigated how the soil respiration and its temperature sensitivity are affected by the different vegetation (Phragmites australis, Suaeda salsa and bare soil in the Yellow River Estuary. During the growing season, there were significant linear relationships between soil respiration rates and shoot and root biomass, respectively. On the diurnal timescale, daytime soil respiration was more dependent on net photosynthesis. A positive correlation between soil respiration and net photosynthesis at the Phragmites australis site was found. There were exponential correlations between soil respiration and soil temperature, and the fitted Q10 values varied among different vegetation types (1.81, 2.15 and 3.43 for Phragmites australis, Suaeda salsa and bare soil sites, respectively. During the growing season, the mean soil respiration was consistently higher at the Phragmites australis site (1.11 µmol CO2 m(-2 s(-1, followed by the Suaeda salsa site (0.77 µmol CO2 m(-2 s(-1 and the bare soil site (0.41 µmol CO2 m(-2 s(-1. The mean monthly soil respiration was positively correlated with shoot and root biomass, total C, and total N among the three vegetation patches. Our results suggest that vegetation patchiness at a field scale might have a large impact on ecosystem-scale soil respiration. Therefore, it is necessary to consider the differences in vegetation types when using models to evaluate soil respiration in an estuary wetland.

  10. A new sensor for ammonia based on cyanidin-sensitized titanium dioxide film operating at room temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiao-wei, Huang [School of Food and Biological Engineering, Jiangsu University, 301 Xuefu Road, 212013 Zhenjiang, Jiangsu (China); Xiao-bo, Zou, E-mail: zou_xiaobo@ujs.edu.cn [School of Food and Biological Engineering, Jiangsu University, 301 Xuefu Road, 212013 Zhenjiang, Jiangsu (China); Key Laboratory of Modern Agricultural Equipment and Technology, 301 Xuefu Road, 212013 Zhenjiang, Jiangsu (China); Ji-yong, Shi; Jie-wen, Zhao; Yanxiao, Li [School of Food and Biological Engineering, Jiangsu University, 301 Xuefu Road, 212013 Zhenjiang, Jiangsu (China); Limin, Hao; Jianchun, Zhang [The Research Center of China Hemp Materials, Beijing (China)

    2013-07-17

    Graphical abstract: -- Highlights: •TiO{sub 2} was prepared by sol–gel method film and then functionalized with the cyanidin dye. •The morphology and the absorption spectra of films were examined. •The hybrid organic–inorganic formed film here can detect ammonia reversibly at room temperature. •The low humidity could promote the sensitivity of the sensors. -- Abstract: Design and fabrication of an ammonia sensor operating at room temperature based on pigment-sensitized TiO{sub 2} films was described. TiO{sub 2} was prepared by sol–gel method and deposited on glass slides containing gold electrodes. Then, the film immersed in a 2.5 × 10{sup −4} M ethanol solution of cyanidin to absorb the pigment. The hybrid organic–inorganic formed film here can detect ammonia reversibly at room temperature. The relative change resistance of the films at a potential difference of 1.5 V is determined when the films are exposed to atmospheres containing ammonia vapors with concentrations over the range 10–50 ppm. The relative change resistance, S, of the films increased almost linearly with increasing concentrations of ammonia (r = 0.92). The response time to increasing concentrations of the ammonia is about 180–220 s, and the corresponding values for decreasing concentrations 240–270 s. At low humidity, ammonia could be ionized by the cyanidin on the TiO{sub 2} film and thereby decrease in the proton concentration at the surface. Consequently, more positively charged holes at the surface of the TiO{sub 2} have to be extracted to neutralize the adsorbed cyanidin and water film. The resistance response to ammonia of the sensors was nearly independent on temperature from 10 to 50 °C. These results are not actually as good as those reported in the literature, but this preliminary work proposes simpler and cheaper processes to realize NH{sub 3} sensor for room temperature applications.

  11. Manufacturing technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leonard, J.A.; Floyd, H.L.; Goetsch, B.; Doran, L. [eds.

    1993-08-01

    This bulletin depicts current research on manufacturing technology at Sandia laboratories. An automated, adaptive process removes grit overspray from jet engine turbine blades. Advanced electronic ceramics are chemically prepared from solution for use in high- voltage varistors. Selective laser sintering automates wax casting pattern fabrication. Numerical modeling improves performance of photoresist stripper (simulation on Cray supercomputer reveals path to uniform plasma). And mathematical models help make dream of low- cost ceramic composites come true.

  12. Temperature-sensitivity and cell biocompatibility of freeze-dried nanocomposite hydrogels incorporated with biodegradable PHBV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Qingsong, E-mail: zqs8011@163.com; Chen, Li, E-mail: chenlis@tjpu.edu.cn; Dong, Youyu; Lu, Si

    2013-04-01

    The structure, morphology, thermal behaviors and cytotoxicity of novel hydrogels, composed of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide)(PNIPAM) and biodegradable polyester poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyvalerate) (PHBV) under nanoclay hectorite “Laponite XLG” severed as physical cross-linker, were characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, gravimetric method, differential scanning calorimetry, and cell culture experiments. It was found that, due to the introduction of hydrophobic PHBV, the homogeneity of interior pore in the pure PNIPAM nanocomposite hydrogel was disrupted, the transparency and swelling degree gradually decreased. Although the weight ratio between PHBV and NIPAM increased from 5 to 40 wt.%, the volume phase transition temperature (VPTTs) of hydrogel were not altered compared with the pure PNIPAM nanocomposite hydrogel. No matter what PHBV content, the PHBV/PNIPAM/Hectorite hydrogels always exhibit good stimuli-responsibility. In addition, human hepatoma cells(HepG2) adhesion and spreading on the surface of PHBV-based hydrogels was greatly improved than that of pure PNIPAM nanocomposite hydrogel at 37 °C due to the introduction of PHBV. Highlights: ► Thermo-responsive and cell biocompatible hydrogels incorporated PHBV was synthesized. ► The introduction of PHBV decreases the transparency of nanocomposite hydrogel. ► The introduction of PHBV has a little shift on VPTTs of nanocomposite hydrogel. ► The HepG2 cells could adhere and spread on the surface of PHBV-based hydrogels. ► Cell sheet could be detached simultaneously from the surface of hydrogels.

  13. On the sensitivity of Land Surface Temperature estimates in arid irrigated lands using MODTRAN

    KAUST Repository

    Rosas, Jorge

    2015-11-29

    Land surface temperature (LST) derived from thermal infrared (TIR) satellite data has been reliably used as a remote indicator of evapotranspiration (ET) and surface moisture status. However, in order to retrieve the ET with an accuracy approaching 10%, LST should be retrieved to within 1 ◦C or better, disregarding other elements of uncertainty. The removal of atmospheric effects is key towards achieving a precise estimation of LST and it requires detailed information on water vapor. The Thermal Infrared Sensor (TIRS) onboard Landsat 8 captures data in two long wave thermal bands with 100-meter resolution. However, the US Geological Survey has reported a calibration problem of TIRS bands caused by stray light, resulting in a higher bias in one of its two bands (4% in band 11, 2% in band 10). Therefore, split-window algorithms for the estimation of LST might not be reliable. Our work will focus on the impact of using different atmospheric profiles (e.g. weather prediction models, satellite) for the estimation of LST derived from MODTRAN by using one of the TIRS bands onboard Landsat 8 (band 10). Sites with in-situ measurements of LST are used as evaluation sources. Comparisons between the measured LST and LST derived based on different atmospheric profile inputs to MODTRAN are carried out from 2 Landsat-overpass days (DOY 153 and 160 2015). Preliminary results show a mean absolute error of around 3 ◦C between in-situ and estimated LST over two different crops (alfalfa and carrot) and bare soil.

  14. Giant Temperature Coefficient of Resistivity and Cryogenic Sensitivity in Silicon with Galvanically Displaced Gold Nanoparticles in Freeze-Out Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seung-Hoon; Hwang, Seongpil; Jang, Jae-Won

    2017-02-28

    The temperature coefficient of resistivity (TCR) and cryogenic sensitivity (Sv) of p-type silicon (p-Si) in the low-temperature region (10-30 K) are remarkably improved by increasing the coverage of galvanically displaced Au nanoparticles (NPs). By increase of the galvanic displacement time from 10 to 30 s, the average surface roughness (Ra) of the samples increases from 0.31 to 2.31 nm and the coverage rate of Au NPs increases from 3.1% to 21.9%. In the freeze-out region of the sample, an up to 103% increase of TCR and dramatically improved Sv of p-Si (∼5813%) are observed with Au coverage of 21.9% compared to p-Si without galvanically displaced Au NPs. By means of a finite element method (FEM) simulation study, it was found that the increase of surface roughness and a number of Au NPs on p-Si results in a higher temperature gradient and thermoelectric power to cause the unusual TCR and Sv values in the samples.

  15. A novel route to prepare pH- and temperature-sensitive nanogels via a semibatch process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qingsong; Zha, Liusheng; Ma, Jinghong; Liang, Borun

    2009-02-15

    A novel method via a semibatch process in the absence of surfactant has been adopted to prepare pH- and temperature-sensitive nanogels. The shape, charge distribution, temperature, and pH-induced volume phase transition behavior of the latexes were investigated by scanning electronic microscopy, zeta potentials, dynamic laser light scattering, and UV/vis spectroscopy. It was found that, in the absence of surfactant, with increasing the amount of AAc from 5 to 20 mol% of N-isopropylacrylamide (NIPAM), the hydrodynamic diameters (D(H)) decrease from 230 to 60 nm. With increasing pH value from 3 to 11, the D(H) values increase slightly, which is different than the dramatic increase seen when using a conventional batch method with a range from 680 to 1700 nm. However, at pH 3, the turbidity curves of these kinds of particles increase dramatically at temperatures between 33 and 37 degrees C, while remaining constant at first and then increasing directly at pH 11. Furthermore, the distribution of carboxylic groups located not only on the interior but also on the exterior of colloidal particles as a result of adoption of the semibatch method, other than simple surface distribution of poly(NIPAM-co-AAc) latexes via the batch method.

  16. Efficient low-temperature transparent electrocatalytic layers based on graphene oxide nanosheets for dye-sensitized solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Seon Hee; Jeong, Eun Ji; Han, Joong Tark; Kang, Hyon Chol; Cha, Seung I; Lee, Dong Yoon; Lee, Geon-Woong

    2015-05-27

    Electrocatalytic materials with a porous structure have been fabricated on glass substrates, via high-temperature fabrication, for application as alternatives to platinum in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSCs). Efficient, nonporous, nanometer-thick electrocatalytic layers based on graphene oxide (GO) nanosheets were prepared on plastic substrates using electrochemical control at low temperatures of ≤100 °C. Single-layer, oxygen-rich GO nanosheets prepared on indium tin oxide (ITO) substrates were electrochemically deoxygenated in acidic medium within a narrow scan range in order to obtain marginally reduced GO at minimum expense of the oxygen groups. The resulting electrochemically reduced GO (E-RGO) had a high density of residual alcohol groups with high electrocatalytic activity toward the positively charged cobalt-complex redox mediators used in DSCs. The ultrathin, alcohol-rich E-RGO layer on ITO-coated poly(ethylene terephthalate) was successfully applied as a lightweight, low-temperature counter electrode with an extremely high optical transmittance of ∼97.7% at 550 nm. A cobalt(II/III)-mediated DSC employing the highly transparent, alcohol-rich E-RGO electrode exhibited a photovoltaic power conversion efficiency of 5.07%. This is superior to that obtained with conventionally reduced GO using hydrazine (3.94%) and even similar to that obtained with platinum (5.10%). This is the first report of a highly transparent planar electrocatalytic layer based on carbonaceous materials fabricated on ITO plastics for application in DSCs.

  17. Green Manufacturing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patten, John

    2013-12-31

    Green Manufacturing Initiative (GMI): The initiative provides a conduit between the university and industry to facilitate cooperative research programs of mutual interest to support green (sustainable) goals and efforts. In addition to the operational savings that greener practices can bring, emerging market demands and governmental regulations are making the move to sustainable manufacturing a necessity for success. The funding supports collaborative activities among universities such as the University of Michigan, Michigan State University and Purdue University and among 40 companies to enhance economic and workforce development and provide the potential of technology transfer. WMU participants in the GMI activities included 20 faculty, over 25 students and many staff from across the College of Engineering and Applied Sciences; the College of Arts and Sciences' departments of Chemistry, Physics, Biology and Geology; the College of Business; the Environmental Research Institute; and the Environmental Studies Program. Many outside organizations also contribute to the GMI's success, including Southwest Michigan First; The Right Place of Grand Rapids, MI; Michigan Department of Environmental Quality; the Michigan Department of Energy, Labor and Economic Growth; and the Michigan Manufacturers Technical Center.

  18. Low temperature (150 °C) fabrication of high-performance TiO{sub 2} films for dye-sensitized solar cells using ultraviolet light and plasma treatments of TiO{sub 2} paste containing organic binder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zen, Shungo, E-mail: zen@streamer.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp; Ono, Ryo, E-mail: ryo-ono@k.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Department of Advanced Energy, The University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba 227-8568 (Japan); Inoue, Yuki [Department of Electrical Engineering, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan)

    2015-03-14

    Dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) require annealing of TiO{sub 2} photoelectrodes at 450 °C to 550 °C. However, such high-temperature annealing is unfavorable because it limits the use of materials that cannot withstand high temperatures, such as plastic substrates. In our previous paper, a low-temperature annealing technique of TiO{sub 2} photoelectrodes using ultraviolet light and dielectric barrier discharge treatments was proposed to reduce the annealing temperature from 450 °C to 150 °C for a TiO{sub 2} paste containing an organic binder. Here, we measure the electron diffusion length in the TiO{sub 2} film, the amount of dye adsorption on the TiO{sub 2} film, and the sheet resistance of a glass substrate of samples manufactured with the 150 °C annealing method, and we discuss the effect that the 150 °C annealing method has on those properties of DSSCs.

  19. Determination of heat transfer into a wedge model in a hypersonic flow using temperature-sensitive paint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risius, Steffen; Beck, Walter H.; Klein, Christian; Henne, Ulrich; Wagner, Alexander

    2017-09-01

    Heat loads on spacecraft traveling at hypersonic speed are of major interest for their designers. Several tests using temperature-sensitive paints (TSP) have been carried out in long duration shock tunnels to determine these heat loads; generally paint layers were thin, so that certain assumptions could be invoked to enable a good estimate of the thermal parameter ρck (a material property) to be obtained—the value of this parameter is needed to determine heat loads from the TSP. Very few measurements have been carried out in impulse facilities [viz. shock tunnels such as the High Enthalpy Shock Tunnel Göttingen (HEG)], where test times are much shorter. Presented here are TSP temperature measurements and subsequently derived heat loads on a ramp model placed in a hypersonic flow in HEG (specific enthalpy h 0 = 3.3 MJ kg-1, Mach number M = 7.4, temperature T ∞ = 277 K, density ρ ∞ = 11 g m-3). A number of fluorescence intensity images were acquired, from which, with the help of calibration data, temperature field data on the model surface were determined. From these the heat load into the surface was calculated, using an assumption of a 1D, semi-infinite heat transfer model. ρck for the paint was determined using an insitu calibration with a Medtherm coaxial thermocouple mounted on the model; Medtherm ρck is known. Finally presented are sources of various measurement uncertainties, arising from: (1) estimation of ρck; (2) intensity measurement in the chosen interrogation area; (3) paint time response.

  20. A re-evaluation of geological timescale benchmarks and temperature sensitivity of fission-track annealing in apatites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luijendijk, Elco; Andriessen, Paul

    2016-04-01

    Current models of the temperature sensitivity of fission track annealing in apatites have been calibrated using fission track data from boreholes, with the assumption that these samples are currently at maximum burial depth and temperatures. The most detailed data-set comes from boreholes located in the Otway basin, Australia. However, several lines of evidence suggest that these samples are not at their maximum burial depth and temperature and consequently the cooling temperature of the apatite fission track thermochronometer would then be higher than previously assumed. Significant late Cenozoic exhumation in the Otway Basin was suggested by earlier studies that document a major late-Miocene erosional unconformity, folding and trusting of underlying sediments and elevated strandlines along the coast. In addition, anomalously young apatite (U-Th)/He ages in several boreholes in the basin suggest that the basin's sediments have been exhumed and cooled in the late Cenozoic. We explore the effects of late Cenozoic exhumation on fission track data in the Otway basin using a 1D model of burial and thermal history. We show that simulating several 100s of meters of exhumation in the basin results in significant misfit between current annealing models and observed fission track data. The additional exhumation reconciles the Otway basin data with a second detailed fission track dataset from boreholes in Southern Texas with a well-constrained thermal and burial history. We combine vitrinite reflectance data and U-Th/He data from the Otway basin to recalibrate the burial history of the Otway basin. Subsequently we combine the new thermal history of the Otway basin with the Southern Texas dataset to recalibrate the fission track annealing algorithm. The results suggest that fission-track annealing in apatites is underestimated by approximately 20°C by current annealing models, with significant implications for studies that use apatite fission track thermochronology to

  1. Effects of different tree species on soil organic matter composition, decomposition rates and temperature sensitivities in boreal forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segura, Javier; Nilsson, Mats B.; Erhagen, Björn; Sparrman, Tobias; Ilstedt, Ulrik; Schleucher, Jürgen; Öquist, Mats

    2017-04-01

    High-latitude ecosystems store a large proportion of the global soil organic matter (SOM) and its mineralization constitutes a major carbon flux to the atmosphere. It has been suggested that different tree species can significantly influence organo-chemical composition of SOM, and rate and temperature sensitivity of SOM decomposition. In this study we used surface soil samples (top 5 cm) from a field experiment where five different tree species (Pinus silvestrys L, Picea abies (L.) H. Karst., Larix decidua Mill., Betula pendula Roth, and Pinus contorta Douglas) were planted on a grass meadow in a randomized block design (n=3) ca. 40 years ago. The samples were incubated at 4, 9, 14, and 19 °C at a soil water potential of -25 kPa (previously determined as optimal water content for decomposition). CO2 production rates were measured hourly for 13 days. CO2 production rates were consequently lowest in the control plots and increased in the order Meadow< Contorta < Betula < Larix < Pinus < Picea. The values ranged between 0.03-0.1, 0.06-0.154, 0.1-0.24 and 0.13-0.36 mg CO2 g-1 OM (dw) h-1 at 4, 9, 14 and 19°C respectively. The temperature response of CO2 production corresponded to Q10s of 2.22 (±0.11), 2.22(±0.15), 2.66 (±0.18), 2.09 (±0.33), 2.38 (±0.31) and 2.31 (±0.09) for meadow, contorta, betula, larix, pinus and picea respectively. Only betula resulted in significantly higher Q10s as compared to the control plots, picea, contorta and larix treatments. These differences in tree species effects on SOM decomposition and its temperature sensitivity will be further discussed in relation to the organo-chemical composition of SOM as determined by pyrolysis gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (Py-GC-MS) and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) techniques. We conclude that the temperature response of SOM decomposition rates is likely coupled to tree species composition and may have important implications for soil C dynamics. This finding can have

  2. High sensitivity ethanol gas sensor based on Sn - doped ZnO under visible light irradiation at low temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Peishuo; Pan, Guofeng; Zhang, Bingqiang; Zhen, Jiali; Sun, Yicai, E-mail: pgf@hebut.edu.cn [Institute of Microelectronic, Hebei University of Technology, Tianjin (China)

    2014-07-15

    Pure ZnO and 5at%, 7at%, 9at% Sn - doped ZnO materials are prepared by the chemical co - precipitation method. They were annealed by furnace at temperature range of 300 - 700ºC in air for 1h. The ZnO materials are characterized by X - ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The results show that the Sn - doped ZnO materials appear rough porous structures. The maximum sensitivity can be achieved by doping the amount of 7 at%. It has much better sensing performance towards ethanol vapor under visible light irradiation. The response and recovery time are ~1s and ~5s, respectively. The mechanism for the improvement in the sensing properties can be explained with the surface adsorption theory and the photoactivation theory. (author)

  3. Optimization of the TiO2-surface modification temperature for performance enhancement of dye-sensitized solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Su Kyung; Bae, Jae Young; Kim, Jae Hong; Ahn, Kwang-Soon; Lee, Do Kyung; Han, Yoon Soo

    2014-08-01

    A nanoporous TiO2 electrode was modified with magnesium salts (MSs), MgCO3 and Mg(CH3COO)2, by simple dip coating process at varied temperatures, and then applied to dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). When the surface treatment was conducted at 40 °C, the DSSC with MS-modified TiO2 layer showed an increase in short circuit current (JSC) and open circuit voltage (VOC), resulting in a power conversion efficiency of 8.52%, compared to that (7.02%) of reference device with bare TiO2. The improved JSC value was attributed to the increased dye adsorption. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and dark current-voltage studies revealed that the VOC enhancement was caused by the suppression of charge recombination between injected electrons and I3(-) ions.

  4. Effects of Ultrasound Power, Temperature and Flow Rate of Solvent on Decontamination of Sensitive Equipment by Extraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marek Andrle

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The solvent extraction process is regarded amongst other known methods to be applicable for decontamination of sensitive equipment components, especially in cases the components are contaminated in-depth with chemical warfare agents. Viability of the solvent extraction method was evaluated on coupons of butadiene rubber contaminated by sulphur mustard before decontamination by the solvent extraction. The contaminated coupons were extracted in a flow cell, which the solvent (ethoxynonafluorobutane passed through. Three following specific operational factors, namely the temperature, the flow rate, and the power of ultrasound bath, were assessed for the extent of influencing upon the respective observed extraction efficiencies. The paper describes the results of the evaluation of the solvent extraction effectiveness.Defence Science Journal, 2014, 64(2, pp. 168-172. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.14429/dsj.64.3887

  5. Effect of Li+ ion sensitization and optical temperature sensing in Gd2O3: Ho3+/Yb3+

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Priyam; Shahi, P. K.; Rai, Anita; Bahadur, A.; Rai, S. B.

    2016-08-01

    Ho3+/Yb3+ codoped Gd2O3 phosphor has been synthesized by solution combustion method. The concentrations of Ho3+ and Yb3+ were optimized to be 0.3 and 2.0 mol% respectively for maximum emission intensity. The effect of Li+ ion co-doping on phase structure and photo luminescence were investigated. It is found that there is no change in phase of the sample due to Li+ ion co-doping. However the Upconversion (UC) and Downshifting (DS) emission show a remarkable enhancement in intensity. It is concluded that, this enhancement in the emission intensity is mainly due to the change in crystal field around the Ho3+ ion and reduction in quenching centers. The optimum doping concentration of Li+ ion was found to be 20 mol%. We have further explored the temperature sensing behavior using the FIR technique. The maximum sensitivity is found to be 0.0092 K-1 at 505 K.

  6. Time-dependent edge notch sensitivity of Inconel 718 sheet in the temperature range 900 to 1400 F (482 to 760 C)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, D. J.

    1972-01-01

    Time-dependent notch sensitivity of Inconel 718 sheet occurred at 900 to 1200 F when notched specimens were loaded below the yield strength, and tests on smooth specimens showed that small amounts of creep consumed large fractions of creep-rupture life. The severity of the notch sensitivity decreased with decreasing solution treatment temperature and increasing time and/or temperature of the aging treatment. Elimination of the notch sensitivity was correlated with a change in the dislocation mechanism from shearing to by-passing precipitate particles.

  7. A novel bisulfite-microfluidic temperature gradient capillary electrophoresis platform for highly sensitive detection of gene promoter methylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Huidan; Shan, Lianfeng; Wang, Xiaonan; Ma, Qian; Fang, Jin

    2013-04-15

    The hypermethylated tumor suppressor gene promoters are widely recognized as promising markers for cancer screening and ideal targets for cancer therapy, however, a major obstacle in their clinical study is highly sensitive screening. To address this limitation, we developed a novel bisulfite-microfluidic temperature gradient capillary electrophoresis (bisulfite-μTGCE) platform for gene methylation analysis by comb