WorldWideScience

Sample records for mantra 2002-2004 stratospheric

  1. Summertime stratospheric processes at northern mid-latitudes: comparisons between MANTRA balloon measurements and the Canadian Middle Atmosphere Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. M. L. Melo

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we report on a study conducted using the Middle Atmospheric Nitrogen TRend Assessment (MANTRA balloon measurements of stratospheric constituents and temperature and the Canadian Middle Atmosphere Model (CMAM in order to evaluate the ability of the model to reproduce the measured fields and to thereby test our ability to describe mid-latitude summertime stratospheric processes. The MANTRA measurements used here are vertical profiles of ozone, temperature, N2O, CH4, HNO3, and HCl obtained during four campaigns, involving the launch of both ozonesondes and large balloons from Vanscoy, Saskatchewan, Canada (52° N, 107° W. The campaigns were conducted in August and September 1998, 2000, 2002 and 2004. During late summer at mid-latitudes, the stratosphere is close to photochemical control, providing an ideal scenario for the study reported here. From this analysis we found that: (1 reducing the value for the vertical diffusion coefficient in CMAM to a more physically reasonable value results in the model better reproducing the measured profiles of long-lived species; (2 the existence of compact correlations among the constituents, as expected from independent measurements in the literature and from models, confirms the self-consistency of the MANTRA measurements; and (3 the 1998 ozone measurements show a narrow layer of low ozone centered near 25 km that is consistent with fossil debris from the polar vortex, suggesting that localized springtime ozone anomalies can persist through summer, affecting ozone levels at mid-latitudes.

  2. The "magical" language of Mantra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burchett, Patton E

    2008-01-01

    This paper aims to illuminate the phenomenon of mantras and to critique the category of magic through an examination of mantra as magical language. Mantras have often been referred to as "magic formulas" or "spells," yet one searches the scholarly literature in vain for a worthy explanation of precisely why mantra should or should not be considered magical. This essay addresses this lack, (a) explaining how mantra's conflict with modern Western understandings of language has led scholars to conceive of mantra as magic and (b) showing just what is at stake in such characterizations. This examination of mantra will demonstrate how "magic" and related terms have consistently been used not so much to describe as to marginalize and de-authorize that to which they refer. While the issue is partly about flawed terms and categories, the question of mantra as magic ultimately leads to an unsettling confrontation with the limits of our own modern rationalist perspective.

  3. Alkoholi tootmine ja turg : [2002-2004] / Katrin Karolin

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Karolin, Katrin

    2005-01-01

    Ilmunud ka: Agriculture and the development of rural life : overview 2004/2005. - Tallinn, 2005, lk. 45-47. 2004. a. 9 kuu alkoholi jaekäive ulatus 2,2 mld kroonini, mis on 13% suurem kui eelmise aasta samal perioodil. Tabelid: Alkohoolsete jookide tootmine Eestis (9 kuud 2002-2004); Alkoholi tarbimine elanike hinnangute alusel

  4. Alkoholi tootmine ja turg : [2002-2004] / Katrin Karolin

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Karolin, Katrin

    2005-01-01

    Ilmunud ka: Agriculture and the development of rural life : overview 2004/2005. - Tallinn, 2005, lk. 45-47. 2004. a. 9 kuu alkoholi jaekäive ulatus 2,2 mld kroonini, mis on 13% suurem kui eelmise aasta samal perioodil. Tabelid: Alkohoolsete jookide tootmine Eestis (9 kuud 2002-2004); Alkoholi tarbimine elanike hinnangute alusel

  5. Progress on Space Solar Telescope in 2002-2004

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    AI Guoxiang; YAN Yihua; JIN Shengzhen

    2004-01-01

    The progress on Chinese Space Solar Telescope (SST) in 2002-2004 is introduced. The documentations on plans and outlines based on the standards of Chinese aerospace industry for SST mission has been fulfilled. The key technical problems of SST satellite platform and payloads are tackled during pre-study stage of the mission. The laboratory assembly and calibration of the main optical telescope of 1.2 m spherical mirror and 1 m plain mirror have been carried out with the accuracy of λ/40 and λ/30, respectively. The prototype at 17.1 nm for extreme ultraviolet telescope is under development and manufacture with a diameter of 13 cm. Its primary and secondary mirrors have a manufacturing error of 5nm with a roughness degree of less than 0.5 nm and a multiplayer reflection factor of better than 20%. The on-board scientific data processing unit has been developed. Prototypes for other payloads such as H and white light telescope, wide band spectroscopy in high energy and solar and interplanetary radio spectrometer have been developed accordingly.

  6. Temperature, salinity, oxygen, nutrients from USCGC Healy in the Arctic Ocean, 2002 - 2004 (NODC Accession 0059576)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Bottle data from 7 cruises on the USCGC Healy, 2002-2004. Included cruises: 32H10201 32H10203 32H10303 32H10304 32H10402 32H10403 32H10404

  7. The Cost-Effectiveness of Military Advertising: Evidence from 2002-2004

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    time these data were collected. In addition, gathering historic information on marketing programs, especially when the identities of advertising ...very least, there is a significant market expansion. However, the Army-only model also indicates that other Services’ advertising draws enlistments...TITLE AND SUBTITLE The Cost-Effectiveness of Military Advertising : Evidence from 2002?2004 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT

  8. Mantra meditation as a bedside spiritual intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Roxane Raffin

    2014-01-01

    The increased acceptance of integrative care allows nurses to investigate their role as active providers of spiritual care at the bedside. Lack of clear role expectations and interventions support the need for a simple, flexible spiritual bedside intervention. The use of a meditation mantra is discussed.

  9. KEPERCAYAAN KEPADA KEKUATAN GAIB DALAM MANTRA MASYARAKAT MUSLIM BANTEN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayatullah Humaeni

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses various forms, functions, and meanings of mantra (magical formula of Bantenese. How Bantenese understands mantra, what kinds of mantra used, and how Bantenese make use of various kinds of mantra in their life become three main focuses. It is the result of a field research using ethnographic method with the descriptive qualitative design based on anthropological perspective. To analyze the data, structural-functional approach is employed. Library research, participant-observation, and in depth interview are used to collect the data. The mantra tradition in Banten is a part of verbal folklore. Mantra is a tribal sacred prayer containing supernatural powers. The Bantenese mantra is a cultural product of the syncretic elements between local belief and religious traditions. For Bantenese, mantra is one of  oral tradition treasures integrated to other cultural treasures. Its existence is still needed by Bantenese up to the present. In certain cases, the tradition of Bantenese mantra is an alternative of the traditional social institution when the formal institution is no longer able to accommodate their interests and practical needs. The use mantra for various purposes becomes a portrait of the pragmatical life style of Bantenese who still believe in magical powers.

  10. Research Data MANTRA: A Labour of Love

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robin Rice

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Research Data MANTRA (or Management Training is a labour of love. It has been an integral part of the University of Edinburgh's Research Data Management (RDM programme since 2012. The staff at EDINA and Data Library at the University of Edinburgh has been curating this resource, based on internal and external feedback and has just published its fourth release since 2011. MANTRA is an open, web-based training course intended for self-paced learning by PhD students and early career researchers or others who manage digital data as part of a research project. It informs about good practice in research data management with real life stories. MANTRA’s approach is to be fun, relevant, useful, interactive and timely (FRUIT!. Librarians’ training needs are catered for through a companion resource, the DIY RDM Training Kit for Librarians.

  11. Mantra : an open method for object and movement tracking

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mathot, Sebastiaan; Theeuwes, Jan

    2011-01-01

    Mantra is a free and open-source software package for object tracking. It is specifically designed to be used as a tool for response collection in psychological experiments and requires only a computer and a camera (a webcam is sufficient). Mantra is compatible with widely used software for creating

  12. Radioactive discharges and environmental monitoring at the Swedish nuclear facilities 2002-2004; Utslaepps- och omgivningskontroll vid de kaerntekniska anlaeggningarna 2002-2004

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luening, Maria

    2005-11-15

    the years 2002-2004 for the Swedish NPPs, Studsvik and Westinghouse Electric Sweden AB, are given in Annex D. Apart from these tables some more data and graphs are given for Oskarshamn, Studsvik, Forsmark and Ringhals. This is due to the fact that during the time period 2002-2004 an extended sampling has taken place. The data from environment samples shows that the discharges give low but measurable concentrations of radionuclides in samples taken in the marine vicinity of the outlet. The concentrations of radionuclides are very low. Measurements of e.g. Co-60 shows varying low concentrations for the time interval 1983-2004 and no long-time trend can be discerned. SSI undertakes a number of checks of the measurements performed by the operator, concerning gamma emitters, alpha emitters, tritium and strontium-90. Pooled and stabilised annual samples from each monitored waste water stream shall be sent to the SSI within three months after the end of the discharge year. In addition a number of randomly chosen monthly samples of waste water are analysed by SSI. The annual samples are measured concerning gamma emitters and tritium by the SSI and the results are compared with the data submitted by the operators. These measurements are conducted at the SSI laboratories. Control measurements of Sr-90 and alpha-emitting radionuclides are performed on a case by case basis at independent external laboratories. Aerosol filters shall be sent to the SSI for control measurements on request. Normally, this exercise is performed once a year, and the filters are subjected to gamma-spectrometric analyses. Environmental measurements are checked by the SSI. A total number of up to 50 samples, obtained as sub-samples of the material analysed by the operator or the laboratory contracted by the operator, is analysed annually. All tables and all graphs have captions in both Swedish and English.

  13. Food consumption by young adults living in Ribeirão Preto, SP, 2002/2004

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.C. Molina

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available There is evidence showing a close relationship between diet and the occurrence of non-communicable chronic diseases. The present study assessed food consumption in a 2002/2004 cohort of young adults born in 1978/79 in Ribeirão Preto, SP, Brazil. The composition of the habitual diet consumed by a sample of 2063 individuals aged 23-25 years was analyzed using a validated semi-quantitative food frequency questionnaire based on studies of prevention of non-communicable chronic diseases. The Dietsys software was used for dietary calculations. In terms of WHO/2003 recommendations, there was a high mean daily consumption of energy from fat (consumption: 35.4%; recommendation: 15-30%, a low mean intake of energy from carbohydrates (47.5%; 55-75% and a low mean consumption of total fibers (15.2 g; >25 g. Mean intake of energy from fatty acids (10%; <10% and protein (15.6%; 10-15% was within recommended limits. When compared to the recommendations of the food pyramid adapted to the Brazilian population, adequate intake was observed only regarding the meat group (consumption: 1.9 portions; recommended: 1-2. There was a low consumption of vegetables (2.9; 4-5, fruits (1.2; 3-5, breads (3.6; 6-9, and dairy products (1.7; 3, with excessive fat and sugar intake (5.7; 1-2. We conclude that the inadequate food consumption observed in this young population may be associated with the development of excess weight and may contribute to the triggering of non-communicable chronic diseases.

  14. Local seismic network at the Olkiluoto site. Annual report 2002-2004

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saari, J. [Enprima Oy, Vantaa (Finland)

    2005-09-15

    In Olkiluoto, Posiva Oy has operated a local seismic network since February 2002. In the beginning, the network consisted of six seismic stations. Later, in June 2004, the seismic network was expanded with two new seismic stations. At that time started the excavation of the underground characterisation facility (the ONKALO) and the basic operation procedure was changed more suitable for the demands of the new situation. The purpose of the microearthquake measurements at Olkiluoto is to improve understanding of the structure, behaviour and long term stability of the bedrock. The studies include both tectonic and excavation-induced microearthquakes. An additional task of monitoring is related to safeguarding of the ONKALO. This report gives the results of microseismic monitoring during the years 2002 - 2004. Also the changes in the structure and the operation procedure of the network are described. The network has operated nearly continuously. The longest interruption occurred 16.-17.6.2004, when two new seismic stations were installed in the network and the operation procedure was changed. Altogether 757 events have been located in the Olkiluoto area. The magnitudes of the observed events range from ML = -3.5 to ML = 1.2. All of them are explosions or other artificial events. So far, none of the 757 observed events can be classified as microearthquakes. Five of the events have characteristics that make the origin of the recorded signal uncertain. They are quite unlikely microearthquakes, but they are not typical examples of artificial seismic signals either. When the experience and the data set of the Olkiluoto microearthquakes increase the identification of events will be more definite. Evidence of activity that would has influence on the safety of the ONKALO, have not found. (orig.)

  15. Effect of mantras on human beings and plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karnick, C R

    1983-01-01

    The classic texts of Indian origin record the influence of Mantras on plants and animals. Ayurveda also recognises the importance of this realm of medicine. The author during his various experiments on plants found that these from the stage of seedling to the maturity are effected by certain types of sound waves, especially the Mantras. This study reveals that the plants have shown a positive response to this type of particular sound waves regarding the growth. their efficacy in curing the diseases etc.

  16. Individual Radiation Protection Monitoring in the Marshall Islands: Enewetak Atoll (2002-2004)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamilton, T F; Kehl, S; Hickman, D; Brown, T; Marchetti, A A; Martinelli, R; Johannes, K; Henry, D

    2006-01-17

    radiological surveillance programs are helping meet the informational needs of the U.S. DOE and the Republic of the Marshall Islands. Our updated environmental assessments provide a strong scientific basis for predicting future change in exposure conditions especially in relation to changes in lifestyle, diet and/or land-use patterns. This information has important implications in addressing questions about existing (and future) radiological conditions on the islands, in determining the cost and estimating the effectiveness of potential remedial measures, and in general policy support considerations. Perhaps most importantly, the recently established individual radiological surveillance programs provide affected atoll communities with an unprecedented level of radiation protection monitoring where, for the first time, local resources are being made available to monitor resettled and resettling populations on a continuous basis. As a hard copy supplement to Marshall Islands Program website (http://eed.llnl.gov/mi/), this document provides an overview of the individual radiation protection monitoring program established for the Enewetak Atoll population group along with a full disclosure of all verified measurement data (2002-2004). Readers are advised that an additional feature of the associated web site is a provision where users are able calculate and track doses delivered to volunteers (de-identified information only) participating in the Marshall Islands Radiological Surveillance Program.

  17. Individual Radiation Protection Monitoring in the Marshall Islands: Rongelap Atoll (2002-2004)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamilton, T F; Kehl, S; Hickman, D; Brown, T; Marchetti, A A; Martinelli, R; Arelong, E; Langinbelik, S

    2006-01-17

    programs are helping meet the informational needs of the U.S. DOE and the Republic of the Marshall Islands. Our updated environmental assessments provide a strong scientific basis for predicting future change in exposure conditions especially in relation to changes in lifestyle, diet and/or land-use patterns. This information has important implications in addressing questions about existing (and future) radiological conditions on the islands, in determining as well as the implementation, cost and effectiveness of potential intervention options, and in general policy support considerations. Perhaps most importantly, the recently established individual radiological surveillance programs provide affected atoll communities with an unprecedented level of radiation protection monitoring where, for the first time, local resources are being made available to monitor resettled and resettling populations on a continuous basis. As a hard copy supplement to Marshall Islands Program website (http://eed.llnl.gov/mi/), this document provides an overview of the individual radiation protection monitoring program established for resettlement workers living on Rongelap Island along with a full disclosure of all verified measurement data (2002-2004). Readers are advised that an additional feature of the associated web site is a provision where users are able calculate and track doses delivered to volunteers (de-identified information only) participating the Marshall Islands Radiological Surveillance Program.

  18. Aasta Parim noorte bänd on Mantra Gora

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2004-01-01

    Üle-eestilise noorte ansamblite konkursi "Music Center 2004" finaalvõistluse 3. dets. Von Krahli teatris võitis Tallinna noorte ansambel Mantra Gora, teise koha sai Tartu jazzbänd Tuulest Toodud ja kolmanda koha Tartu bänd The Sank

  19. Mantra and yantra in Indian medicine and alchemy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosu, A

    1988-07-01

    This paper was presented at the International Workshop on mantras and ritual diagrams in Hinduism, held in Paris, 21-22 June1984. The complete text in French, which appeared in the Journal asiatique 1986, p.203, is based upon an analysis of Ayurvedc literature from ancient times down to the present and of numerous Sanskrit sources concerning he specialized sciences: alchemy and latrochemisry, veterinary medicine as well as agricultural and horticulture techniques.

  20. "War on Terror" Is a Curative: Recontextualization and Political Myth-Making in Gloria Macapagal-Arroyo's 2002-2004 State of the Nation Addresses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navera, Gene Segarra

    2011-01-01

    The article examines the State of the Nation addresses (SONA) delivered by Philippine President Gloria Macapagal-Arroyo (2001-2010) from 2002-2004, during which time she actively invoked the need to engage in the U.S. government-led "global war on terror." It specifically investigates how these presidential speeches recontextualized the…

  1. "War on Terror" Is a Curative: Recontextualization and Political Myth-Making in Gloria Macapagal-Arroyo's 2002-2004 State of the Nation Addresses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navera, Gene Segarra

    2011-01-01

    The article examines the State of the Nation addresses (SONA) delivered by Philippine President Gloria Macapagal-Arroyo (2001-2010) from 2002-2004, during which time she actively invoked the need to engage in the U.S. government-led "global war on terror." It specifically investigates how these presidential speeches recontextualized the…

  2. Bayer HealthCare Delivers a Dose of Reality for Cloud Payoff Mantras in Multinationals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winkler, Till J.; Benlian, Alexander; Piper, Marc

    2014-01-01

    Cloud services provide high cost advantages” is one of several often-quoted assertions (called mantras in this article) about payoffs from cloud computing. These mantras, however, have their origins in the experiences of small and mid-size companies, but, as the case of Bayer HealthCare’s cloud...

  3. Evidence for the co-circulation of dengue virus type 3 genotypes III and V in the Northern region of Brazil during the 2002-2004 epidemics

    OpenAIRE

    Meri Bordignon Nogueira; Vanessa Stella; Juliano Bordignon; Weber Cheli Batista; Luana de Borba; Luis Hildebrando Pereira da Silva; Federico Guillermo Hoffmann; Christian Macagnan Probst; Claudia Nunes Duarte dos Santos

    2008-01-01

    The reintroduction of dengue virus type 3 (DENV-3) in Brazil in 2000 and its subsequent spread throughout the country was associated with genotype III viruses, the only DENV-3 genotype isolated in Brazil prior to 2002. We report here the co-circulation of two different DENV-3 genotypes in patients living in the Northern region of Brazil during the 2002-2004 epidemics. Complete genomic sequences of viral RNA were determined from these epidemics, and viruses belonging to genotypes V (Southeast ...

  4. Prevalence of antimicrobial resistance among bacterial pathogens isolated from cattle in different European countries: 2002-2004.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendriksen, Rene S; Mevius, Dik J; Schroeter, Andreas; Teale, Christopher; Meunier, Danièle; Butaye, Patrick; Franco, Alessia; Utinane, Andra; Amado, Alice; Moreno, Miguel; Greko, Christina; Stärk, Katharina; Berghold, Christian; Myllyniemi, Anna-Liisa; Wasyl, Dariusz; Sunde, Marianne; Aarestrup, Frank M

    2008-07-08

    The project "Antibiotic resistance in bacteria of animal origin - II" (ARBAO-II) was funded by the European Union (FAIR5-QLK2-2002-01146) for the period 2003-2005, with the aim to establish a continuous monitoring of antimicrobial susceptibility among veterinary laboratories in European countries based on validated and harmonised methodologies. Available summary data of the susceptibility testing of the bacterial pathogens from the different laboratories were collected. Antimicrobial susceptibility data for several bovine pathogens were obtained over a three year period (2002-2004). Each year the participating laboratories were requested to fill in excel-file templates with national summary data on the occurrence of antimicrobial resistance from different bacterial species.A proficiency test (EQAS - external quality assurance system) for antimicrobial susceptibility testing was conducted each year to test the accuracy of antimicrobial susceptibility testing in the participating laboratories. The data from this testing demonstrated that for the species included in the EQAS the results are comparable between countries. Data from 25,241 isolates were collected from 13 European countries. For Staphylococcus aureus from bovine mastitis major differences were apparent in the occurrence of resistance between countries and between the different antimicrobial agents tested. The highest frequency of resistance was observed for penicillin. For Mannheimia haemolytica resistance to ampicillin, tetracycline and trimethoprim/sulphonamide were observed in France, the Netherlands and Portugal. All isolates of Pasteurella multocida isolated in Finland and most of those from Denmark, England (and Wales), Italy and Sweden were susceptible to the majority of the antimicrobials. Streptococcus dysgalactiae and Streptococcus uberis isolates from Sweden were fully susceptible. For the other countries some resistance was observed to tetracycline, gentamicin and erythromycin. More resistance

  5. Bayer HealthCare Delivers a Dose of Reality for Cloud Payoff Mantras in Multinationals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winkler, Till J.; Benlian, Alexander; Piper, Marc

    2014-01-01

    Cloud services provide high cost advantages” is one of several often-quoted assertions (called mantras in this article) about payoffs from cloud computing. These mantras, however, have their origins in the experiences of small and mid-size companies, but, as the case of Bayer HealthCare’s cloud-b......-based CRM rollout program shows, may not always be true for large multinational companies. To ensure payoffs from the cloud, multinationals must adopt strategies for coping with the inhibitors identified in this article.......Cloud services provide high cost advantages” is one of several often-quoted assertions (called mantras in this article) about payoffs from cloud computing. These mantras, however, have their origins in the experiences of small and mid-size companies, but, as the case of Bayer HealthCare’s cloud...

  6. Evidence for the co-circulation of dengue virus type 3 genotypes III and V in the Northern region of Brazil during the 2002-2004 epidemics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meri Bordignon Nogueira

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available The reintroduction of dengue virus type 3 (DENV-3 in Brazil in 2000 and its subsequent spread throughout the country was associated with genotype III viruses, the only DENV-3 genotype isolated in Brazil prior to 2002. We report here the co-circulation of two different DENV-3 genotypes in patients living in the Northern region of Brazil during the 2002-2004 epidemics. Complete genomic sequences of viral RNA were determined from these epidemics, and viruses belonging to genotypes V (Southeast Asia/South Pacific and III were identified. This recent co-circulation of different DENV-3 genotypes in South America may have implications for pathological and epidemiological dynamics.

  7. Stratospheric dryness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Lelieveld

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available The mechanisms responsible for the extreme dryness of the stratosphere have been debated for decades. A key difficulty has been the lack of models which are able to reproduce the observations. Here we examine results from a new atmospheric chemistry general circulation model (ECHAM5/MESSy1 together with satellite observations. Our model results match observed temperatures in the tropical lower stratosphere and realistically represent recurrent features such as the semi-annual oscillation (SAO and the quasi-biennual oscillation (QBO, indicating that dynamical and radiation processes are simulated accurately. The model reproduces the very low water vapor mixing ratios (1–2 ppmv periodically observed at the tropical tropopause near 100 hPa, as well as the characteristic tape recorder signal up to about 10 hPa, providing evidence that the dehydration mechanism is well-captured, albeit that the model underestimates convective overshooting and consequent moistening events. Our results show that the entry of tropospheric air into the stratosphere at low latitudes is forced by large-scale wave dynamics; however, radiative cooling can regionally limit the upwelling or even cause downwelling. In the cold air above cumulonimbus anvils thin cirrus desiccates the air through the sedimentation of ice particles, similar to polar stratospheric clouds. Transport deeper into the stratosphere occurs in regions where radiative heating becomes dominant, to a large extent in the subtropics. During summer the stratosphere is moistened by the monsoon, most strongly over Southeast Asia.

  8. Mantra, music and reaction times: a study of its applied aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Varun Malhotra, Rinku Garg, Usha Dhar, Neera Goel, Yogesh Tripathy, Iram Jaan, Sachit Goyal, Sumit Arora

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Aims &Objectives: The mechanism of the effects of music is still under scientific study and needs to be understood in a better way. We designed this study to see how music affects reaction time and concentration. The aim of our study was to study the effect of Gayatri mantra on reaction time. Material and Methods: 30 healthy subjects were selected for the study. Baseline record of Visual online Reaction time test was taken. Online visual reaction time was measured during listening to Gayatri Mantra was taken. Results:The reaction times decreased significantly p<0.001. Conclusion: Listening to music at work area reduces distractions, helps increase concentration and delays fatigue. It can be used to heal tinnitus, as an educational tool to develop children with special needs, Alzheimers disease, to improve motor skills in Parkinsonism and help alleviate pain after surgery.

  9. Mantra, music and reaction times: a study of its applied aspects

    OpenAIRE

    Varun Malhotra, Rinku Garg, Usha Dhar, Neera Goel, Yogesh Tripathy, Iram Jaan, Sachit Goyal, Sumit Arora

    2014-01-01

    Aims &Objectives: The mechanism of the effects of music is still under scientific study and needs to be understood in a better way. We designed this study to see how music affects reaction time and concentration. The aim of our study was to study the effect of Gayatri mantra on reaction time. Material and Methods: 30 healthy subjects were selected for the study. Baseline record of Visual online Reaction time test was taken. Online visual reaction time was measured during listening to Gayatri...

  10. Stratospheric ozone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Gil

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Stratospheric ozone acquired a huge importance two decades ago because of the discovery of strong anomalies above the Antarctica due to gases of anthropogenic origin. From that date, stratosphere has become one of the research lines receiving more funding. A result, an important progress in the development of observational techniques, the understanding of the dynamics of the polar regions and, above all, in understanding of the chemical interactions among the species that influence the chemical-radiative balance of ozone. In this article a general revision is made of the distribution of the ozone in the stratosphere, the mechanisms that determine its equilibrium, the gases that contribute to its destruction, the present situation and the forecast of the health state of the layer.

  11. Sudden Stratospheric Warming Compendium

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Sudden Stratospheric Warming Compendium (SSWC) data set documents the stratospheric, tropospheric, and surface climate impacts of sudden stratospheric warmings. This...

  12. Discurso de Posesión del Académico Dr. Juan Mendoza Vega como Presidente de la Academia Nacional de Medicina (2002-2004

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Mendoza Vega

    2002-04-01

    émico Dr. Juan Mendoza-Vega como Presidente de la Academia Nacional de Medicina (2002-2004 Sesión solemne de marzo 21 de 2002 de la Medicina, un período de avances y cambios tan profundos y abundantes como jamás se había vivido; con rapidez creciente, pasamos del examen clínico visual, táctil y auditivo, los Rayos X y las pruebas de laboratorio elementales, a un acervo tecnológico integrado alrededor de los computadores y que hoy nos permite ver, literalmente, el interior del cuerpo vivo y analizar sus funciones con un grado de precisión que llega al nivel de las moléculas. El propio genoma humano, la clave de aquello que nos da caracteres especiales y únicos como especie que piensa, se analiza a sí misma y se comunica con especial finura, está entregando sus secretos a los sabios que lo estudian.

    Si eso fuera todo, podríamos celebrar la llegada de nuevo poder para ayudar a nuestros semejantes en el cuidado de su salud, la mejora en su calidad de vida, el combate contra la enfermedad. Pero, al tiempo con los conocimientos científicos y las novedades tecnológicas, han aparecido cambios sociales que construyen un escenario igualmente nuevo para el ejercicio de la Medicina y, al menos en nuestro país, un intento más o menos soterrado para privarnos de nuestra condición de profesionales y ponernos a desempeñar un oficio sujeto a condiciones de actividad comercial; esto, por razones obvias, nos causa profunda preocupación.

    Al estudiar la situación en Colombia durante los últimos ocho o diez años, hemos visto que es posible enfocar la Medicina de dos modos bien distintos:

    – Como un oficio, es decir, atendiendo sobre todo a la aplicación de conocimientos y habilidades para conseguir una “obra” que cumpla ciertas normas y llene las expectativas de quien “recibe” esa “obra”, que sería el cliente.

    – O, de otro lado, como una profesión, que se estructura alrededor de un compromiso, de base ética, que el profesional

  13. Stratospheric aircraft: Impact on the stratosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnston, H.

    1992-02-01

    The steady-state distribution of natural stratospheric ozone is primarily maintained through production by ultraviolet photolysis of molecular oxygen, destruction by a catalytic cycle involving nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}), and relocation by air motions within the stratosphere. Nitrogen oxides from the exhausts of a commercially viable fleet of supersonic transports would exceed the natural source of stratospheric nitrogen oxides if the t should be equipped with 1990 technology jet engines. This model-free comparison between a vital natural global ingredient and a proposed new industrial product shows that building a large fleet of passenger stratospheric aircraft poses a significant global problem. NASA and aircraft industries have recognized this problem and are studying the redesign of jet aircraft engines in order to reduce the nitrogen oxides emissions. In 1989 atmospheric models identified two other paths by which the ozone destroying effects of stratospheric aircraft might be reduced or eliminated: (1) Use relatively low supersonic Mach numbers and flight altitudes. For a given rate of nitrogen oxides injection into the stratosphere, the calculated reduction of total ozone is a strong function of altitude, and flight altitudes well below 20 kilometers give relatively low calculated ozone reductions. (2) Include heterogeneous chemistry in the two-dimensional model calculations. Necessary conditions for answering the question on the title above are to improve the quality of our understanding of the lower stratosphere and to broaden our knowledge of hetergeneous stratospheric chemistry. This article reviews recently proposed new mechanisms for heterogeneous reactions on the global stratospheric sulfate aerosols.

  14. Stratospheric aircraft: Impact on the stratosphere?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnston, H.

    1992-02-01

    The steady-state distribution of natural stratospheric ozone is primarily maintained through production by ultraviolet photolysis of molecular oxygen, destruction by a catalytic cycle involving nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}), and relocation by air motions within the stratosphere. Nitrogen oxides from the exhausts of a commercially viable fleet of supersonic transports would exceed the natural source of stratospheric nitrogen oxides if the t should be equipped with 1990 technology jet engines. This model-free comparison between a vital natural global ingredient and a proposed new industrial product shows that building a large fleet of passenger stratospheric aircraft poses a significant global problem. NASA and aircraft industries have recognized this problem and are studying the redesign of jet aircraft engines in order to reduce the nitrogen oxides emissions. In 1989 atmospheric models identified two other paths by which the ozone destroying effects of stratospheric aircraft might be reduced or eliminated: (1) Use relatively low supersonic Mach numbers and flight altitudes. For a given rate of nitrogen oxides injection into the stratosphere, the calculated reduction of total ozone is a strong function of altitude, and flight altitudes well below 20 kilometers give relatively low calculated ozone reductions. (2) Include heterogeneous chemistry in the two-dimensional model calculations. Necessary conditions for answering the question on the title above are to improve the quality of our understanding of the lower stratosphere and to broaden our knowledge of hetergeneous stratospheric chemistry. This article reviews recently proposed new mechanisms for heterogeneous reactions on the global stratospheric sulfate aerosols.

  15. Benzylpiperizine-based party pills' impact on the Auckland City Hospital Emergency Department Overdose Database (2002-2004) compared with ecstasy (MDMA or methylene dioxymethamphetamine), gamma hydroxybutyrate (GHB), amphetamines, cocaine, and alcohol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theron, Lynn; Jansen, Karl; Miles, Jennifer

    2007-02-16

    To examine the impact of 'party pills' (PP; herbal highs) on the Auckland City Hospital Emergency Department Overdose Database 2002-2004, and to present figures for five other substances in that database. Auckland City Hospital's Emergency Department's overdose database was reviewed for 2002, 2003, and 2004 for 'herbal ingestions' and 'party pills' (PP), ecstasy, methamphetamine, GHB, cocaine, and alcohol. Adverse effects attributed to PP were examined. In 2002, 1 patient presented with PP ingestion; 4 presented in 2003 and 21 in 2004 respectively (poverdose database for 2004. 'Party pills' appeared to have a minor impact on the overdose database at Auckland City Hospital between 2002 and 2004. There was a significant decrease in GHB presentations from 2003 to 2004 (poverdose presentations.

  16. Sustentabilidade: mantra ou escolha moral? uma abordagem ecológico-econômica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clóvis Cavalcanti

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Qual é o tamanho ótimo da escala econômica que a natureza pode admitir? A questão requer que se esteja falando de uma situação em que a economia seja vista como subsistema do ecossistema. É assim que a economia ecológica percebe a realidade e é nessa óptica que se configura o conceito de sustentabilidade ecológica. O impacto ambiental do crescimento sobre os recursos e sumidouros da natureza tem que ser contido dentro de limites. A noção usual de sustentabilidade, porém, dá a impressão de se ter convertido numa espécie de mantra da atualidade, sem maior compromisso. Mudanças no sistema econômico são inevitáveis como forma de adaptação às restrições que o processo econômico confronta. Cabe indagar o que é que se deseja sustentar e em que escala de tempo. À sociedade cumpre escolher a mudança a se fazer: uma escolha moral.What is the optimum scale of the economy compatible with nature? This question asks for consideration of the economy as a subsystem of the ecosystem. Ecological economics adopts that perspective permitting that the concept of environmental sustainability be established. This implies that the environmental impact of growth on the source and sink functions of nature be contained within limits. The usual notion of sustainability, however, gives the impression of having been transformed into a kind of today's mantra, without serious obligations. Changes in the economic system are unavoidable as a means of adaptation to the restrictions that the economic process encounters. This requires knowing what it is to be sustained and in within which time scale. The duty of choosing the changes to be made must be ascribed to society: a moral choice.

  17. Intercomparison of ground-based ozone and NO2 measurements during the MANTRA 2004 campaign

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Strong

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available The MANTRA (Middle Atmosphere Nitrogen TRend Assessment 2004 campaign took place in Vanscoy, Saskatchewan, Canada (52° N, 107° W from 3 August to 15 September, 2004. In support of the main balloon launch, a suite of five zenith-sky and direct-Sun-viewing UV-visible ground-based spectrometers was deployed, primarily measuring ozone and NO2 total columns. Three Fourier transform spectrometers (FTSs that were part of the balloon payload also performed ground-based measurements of several species, including ozone. Ground-based measurements of ozone and NO2 differential slant column densities from the zenith-viewing UV-visible instruments are presented herein. They are found to partially agree within NDACC (Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change standards for instruments certified for process studies and satellite validation. Vertical column densities of ozone from the zenith-sky UV-visible instruments, the FTSs, a Brewer spectrophotometer, and ozonesondes are compared, and found to agree within the combined error estimates of the instruments (15%. NO2 vertical column densities from two of the UV-visible instruments are compared, and are also found to agree within combined error (15%.

  18. Unraveling the Skilled Mobility for Sustainable Development Mantra: An Analysis of China-EU Academic Mobility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maggi W.H. Leung

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available In the name of sustainable development, skilled persons including scholars, researchers and students have become incorporated in the “sustainable development” visions and strategies of institutions, city centers and nation-states near and far from where these potentially mobile brains are. Policies and programs have widely been implemented to foster move-in move-out mobility of these talents sans frontières who should contribute to the competitiveness of their affiliated institutions and structures in the global knowledge economy. This paper unravels this emergent academic mobility for sustainable development mantra. It unpacks the meanings of “sustainable development” and “sustainability” as used in relation to temporary (often circulatory mobility of students and academics in different contexts. An analysis of European and specifically China-EU academic mobility initiatives illustrates the multi-fold meanings of sustainability in this policy terrain. Zooming into the Chinese-German case, the paper highlights the common dominance of economic and environmental elements in the current “academic mobility for sustainability” construct that sidelines important social components such as equity and diversity. Statistical data and narratives will be provided to illustrate the stark gender and disciplinary bias in the Chinese-German staff academic mobility field. The paper argues for conscious, affirmative efforts by policy-makers and funding agencies to correct existing imbalances.

  19. How stratospheric are deep stratospheric intrusions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trickl, T.; Vogelmann, H.; Giehl, H.; Scheel, H.-E.; Sprenger, M.; Stohl, A.

    2014-09-01

    Preliminary attempts of quantifying the stratospheric ozone contribution in the observations at the Zugspitze summit (2962 m a.s.l.) next to Garmisch-Partenkirchen in the German Alps had yielded an approximate doubling of the stratospheric fraction of the Zugspitze ozone during the time period 1978 to 2004. These investigations had been based on data filtering by using low relative humidity (RH) and elevated 7Be as the criteria for selecting half-hour intervals of ozone data representative of stratospheric intrusion air. To quantify the residual stratospheric component in stratospherically influenced air masses, however, the mixing of tropospheric air into the stratospheric intrusion layers must be taken into account. In fact, the dewpoint mirror instrument at the Zugspitze summit station rarely registers RH values lower than 10% in stratospheric air intrusions. Since 2007 a programme of routine lidar sounding of ozone, water vapour and aerosol has been conducted in the Garmisch-Partenkirchen area. The lidar results demonstrate that the intrusion layers are drier by roughly one order of magnitude than indicated in the in situ measurements. Even in thin layers RH values clearly below 1% have frequently been observed. These thin, undiluted layers present an important challenge for atmospheric modelling. Although the ozone values never reach values typical of the lower-stratosphere it becomes, thus, obvious that, without strong wind shear or convective processes, mixing of stratospheric and tropospheric air must be very slow in most of the free troposphere. As a consequence, the analysis the Zugspitze data can be assumed to be more reliable than anticipated. Finally, the concentrations of Zugspitze carbon monoxide rarely drop inside intrusion layers and normally stay clearly above full stratospheric values. This indicates that most of the CO, and thus the intrusion air mass, originates in the shallow "mixing layer" around the thermal tropopause. The CO mixing ratio in

  20. How stratospheric are deep stratospheric intrusions?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Trickl

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Preliminary attempts of quantifying the stratospheric ozone contribution in the observations at the Zugspitze summit (2962 m a.s.l. next to Garmisch-Partenkirchen in the German Alps had yielded an approximate doubling of the stratospheric fraction of the Zugspitze ozone during the time period 1978 and 2004. These investigations had been based on data filtering by using low relative humidity and elevated 7Be as the criteria for selecting half-hour intervals of ozone data representative of stratospheric intrusion air. For quantifying the residual stratospheric component in stratospherically influenced air masses, however, the mixing of tropospheric air into the stratospheric intrusion layers must be taken into account. In fact, the dew-point-mirror instrument at the Zugspitze summit station rarely registers relative humidity (RH values lower than 10% in stratospheric air intrusions. Since 2007 a programme of routine lidar sounding of ozone, water vapour and aerosol has been conducted in the Garmisch-Partenkirchen area. The lidar results demonstrate that the intrusion layers are dryer by roughly one order of magnitude than indicated in the in-situ measurements. Even in thin layers frequently RH values clearly below 1% have been observed. These thin, undiluted layers present an important challenge for atmospheric modelling. Although the ozone values never reach values typical of the lower-stratosphere it becomes, thus, obvious that, without strong wind shear or convective processes, mixing of stratospheric and tropospheric air must be very slow in most of the free troposphere. As a consequence, the analysis the Zugspitze data can be assumed to be more reliable than anticipated. Finally, the concentrations of Zugspitze carbon monoxide rarely drop inside intrusion layers and normally stay clearly above full stratospheric values. This indicates that most of the CO and, thus, the intrusion air mass originate in the shallow "mixing layer" around the

  1. How stratospheric are deep stratospheric intrusions?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Trickl

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Preliminary attempts of quantifying the stratospheric ozone contribution in the observations at the Zugspitze summit (2962 m a.s.l. next to Garmisch-Partenkirchen in the German Alps had yielded an approximate doubling of the stratospheric fraction of the Zugspitze ozone during the time period 1978 to 2004. These investigations had been based on data filtering by using low relative humidity (RH and elevated 7Be as the criteria for selecting half-hour intervals of ozone data representative of stratospheric intrusion air. To quantify the residual stratospheric component in stratospherically influenced air masses, however, the mixing of tropospheric air into the stratospheric intrusion layers must be taken into account. In fact, the dewpoint mirror instrument at the Zugspitze summit station rarely registers RH values lower than 10% in stratospheric air intrusions. Since 2007 a programme of routine lidar sounding of ozone, water vapour and aerosol has been conducted in the Garmisch-Partenkirchen area. The lidar results demonstrate that the intrusion layers are drier by roughly one order of magnitude than indicated in the in situ measurements. Even in thin layers RH values clearly below 1% have frequently been observed. These thin, undiluted layers present an important challenge for atmospheric modelling. Although the ozone values never reach values typical of the lower-stratosphere it becomes, thus, obvious that, without strong wind shear or convective processes, mixing of stratospheric and tropospheric air must be very slow in most of the free troposphere. As a consequence, the analysis the Zugspitze data can be assumed to be more reliable than anticipated. Finally, the concentrations of Zugspitze carbon monoxide rarely drop inside intrusion layers and normally stay clearly above full stratospheric values. This indicates that most of the CO, and thus the intrusion air mass, originates in the shallow "mixing layer" around the thermal tropopause. The

  2. Erametsandus : [2002-2004] / Monika Lublo

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Lublo, Monika, 1976-

    2005-01-01

    Ilmunud ka: Agriculture and the development of rural life : overview 2004/2005. - Tallinn, 2005, lk. 112-118. 2001. a põllumajandusloenduse andmeil kuulus metsamaast 91% füüsilistele ja 9% juriidilistele isikutele. Tabelid

  3. Summary of CNCOSPAR Activities 2002-2004

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Secretariat of Chinese Committee on Space Research

    2004-01-01

    @@ 1 In Brief In this report, we summarize the major activities of CNCOSPAR from the year 2002to 2004. During this period, many things happened such as Beijing won the 2006COSPAR scientific assembly, the first Chinese Committee of COSPAR handed over its responsibility to the second committee, etc. During this period, the space science activities developed also very fast. China has sent its first scientific satellite, the first satellite TC-1 of the Double Star Program, into space. China also has a major break through in the manned space flight by a very successful mission of Shenzhou manned space flight. On board of this spacecraft, is the first Chinese astronaut Mr. Liwei Yang. This made China the third country in the world who has the ability that the launch manned space missions independently.

  4. Space Astronomy in China:2002-2004

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAN Weiqun; XUE Suijian

    2004-01-01

    More and more proposals, or potential projects have been proposed in recent two years. We try to briefly outline these new proposals, although most of them are in fact only in their conception studies. The progress of previously mentioned projects, like Space Solar Telescope (SST), the Hard X-ray Modulation Telescope (HXMT), as well as newly initiated LUnar Resource Explorer (LUREX), will be introduced elsewhere.

  5. Dehydration of the stratosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Schoeberl

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Domain filling, forward trajectory calculations are used to examine the global dehydration processes that control stratospheric water vapor. As with most Lagrangian models of this type, water vapor is instantaneously removed from the parcel to keep the relative humidity with respect to ice from exceeding saturation or a specified super-saturation value. We also test a simple parameterization of stratospheric convective moistening through ice lofting and the effect of gravity waves as a mechanism that can augment dehydration. Comparing diabatic and kinematic trajectories, we find, in agreement with previous authors, that the additional transport due to the vertical velocity "noise" in the kinematic calculation creates too dry a stratosphere and a too diffuse a water-vapor tape recorder signal compared observations. The diabatic simulations, on the other hand, produce stratospheric water vapor mixing ratios very close to that observed by Aura's Microwave Limb Sounder. Convective moistening, which will increases stratospheric HDO, also increases stratospheric water vapor while gravity waves do the opposite. We find that while the Tropical West Pacific is the dominant dehydration location, dehydration over Tropical South America is also important. Antarctica also makes a contribution to the overall stratospheric water vapor budget by releasing very dry air into the Southern Hemisphere stratosphere following the break up of the winter vortex.

  6. Normal mode Rossby waves and their effects on chemical composition in the late summer stratosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Pendlebury

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available During past MANTRA campaigns, ground-based measurements of several long-lived chemical species have revealed quasi-periodic fluctuations on time scales of several days. These fluctuations could confound efforts to detect long-term trends from MANTRA, and need to be understood and accounted for. Using the Canadian Middle Atmosphere Model, we investigate the role of dynamical variability in the late summer stratosphere due to normal mode Rossby waves and the impact of this variability on fluctuations in chemical species. Wavenumber~1, westward travelling waves are considered with average periods of 5, 10 and 16 days. Time-lagged correlations between the temperature and nitrous oxide, methane and ozone fields are calculated in order to assess the possible impact of these waves on the chemical species, although transport may be the dominant effect. Using Fourier-wavelet decomposition and correlating the fluctuations between the temperature and chemical fields, we determine that variations in the chemical species are well-correlated with the 5-day wave and the 10-day wave between 30 and 60 km. Interannual variability of the waves is also examined.

  7. Stratospheric Deployment Parafoil Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Stratospheric Deployment Parafoil is a proposed technology that will be designed and tested to provide a greatly superior parachute precision delivery system...

  8. Stratospheric Aerosol Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pueschel, Rudolf, F.; Gore, Warren J. (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    Stratospheric aerosols affect the atmospheric energy balance by scattering and absorbing solar and terrestrial radiation. They also can alter stratospheric chemical cycles by catalyzing heterogeneous reactions which markedly perturb odd nitrogen, chlorine and ozone levels. Aerosol measurements by satellites began in NASA in 1975 with the Stratospheric Aerosol Measurement (SAM) program, to be followed by the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE) starting in 1979. Both programs employ the solar occultation, or Earth limb extinction, techniques. Major results of these activities include the discovery of polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) in both hemispheres in winter, illustrations of the impacts of major (El Chichon 1982 and Pinatubo 1991) eruptions, and detection of a negative global trend in lower stratospheric/upper tropospheric aerosol extinction. This latter result can be considered a triumph of successful worldwide sulfur emission controls. The SAGE record will be continued and improved by SAGE III, currently scheduled for multiple launches beginning in 2000 as part of the Earth Observing System (EOS). The satellite program has been supplemented by in situ measurements aboard the ER-2 (20 km ceiling) since 1974, and from the DC-8 (13 km ceiling) aircraft beginning in 1989. Collection by wire impactors and subsequent electron microscopic and X-ray energy-dispersive analyses, and optical particle spectrometry have been the principle techniques. Major findings are: (1) The stratospheric background aerosol consists of dilute sulfuric acid droplets of around 0.1 micrometer modal diameter at concentration of tens to hundreds of monograms per cubic meter; (2) Soot from aircraft amounts to a fraction of one percent of the background total aerosol; (3) Volcanic eruptions perturb the sulfuric acid, but not the soot, aerosol abundance by several orders of magnitude; (4) PSCs contain nitric acid at temperatures below 195K, supporting chemical hypotheses

  9. Prevalence and patterns of use of mantra, mindfulness and spiritual meditation among adults in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Adam; Lam, Chun Nok; Stussman, Barbara; Yang, Hui

    2017-06-15

    Despite a growing body of scientific literature exploring the nature of meditation there is limited information on the characteristics of individuals who use it. This is particularly true of comparative studies examining prevalence and predictors of use of various forms of meditation. A secondary analysis was conducted using data from the 2012 National Health Interview Survey (n = 34,525). Three popular forms of meditation were compared-mantra, mindfulness, and spiritual-to determine lifetime and 12-month use related to key sociodemographic, health behavior, health status, and healthcare access variables. The 12-month prevalence for meditation practice was 3.1% for spiritual meditation, 1.9% for mindfulness meditation, and 1.6% for mantra meditation. This represents approximately 7.0, 4.3, and 3.6 million adults respectively. A comparison across the three meditation practices found many similarities in user characteristics, suggesting interest in meditation may be more related to the type of person meditating than to the type of practice selected. Across meditation styles use was more prevalent among respondents who were female, non-Hispanic White, college educated, physically active; who used other complementary health practices; and who reported depression. Higher utilization of conventional healthcare services was one of the strongest predictors of use of all three styles. In addition to similarities, important distinctions were observed. For example, spiritual meditation practice was more prevalent among former drinkers. This may reflect use of spiritual meditation practices in support of alcohol treatment and sobriety. Reasons for use of meditation were examined using the sample of respondents who practiced mindfulness meditation. Wellness and prevention (74%) was a more common reason than use to treat a specific health condition (30%). Common reasons for use included stress management (92%) and emotional well-being (91%), and to support other health

  10. Comparación empírica de técnicas estadísticas para tablas de tres entradas: la construcción en Castilla y León en el período 2002-2004

    OpenAIRE

    María Jesús Mures Quintana; María Eva Vallejo Pascual; Ana García Gallego

    2006-01-01

    El objetivo de este trabajo es comparar las técnicas estadísticas más conocidas para el tratamiento de tablas de tres entradas. Para ello, se toman los ratios económico-financieros de las mayores empresas constructoras de la Comunidad Autónoma de Castilla y León (España) en el periodo 2002-2004. Aunque existen diferencias teóricas, las técnicas consideradas no arrojan resultados significativamente diferentes. Por otro lado, el estudio también demuestra ta utilidad de este tipo de técnicas cua...

  11. Comparación empírica de técnicas estadísticas para tablas de tres entradas: la construcción en Castilla y León en el período 2002-2004

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Jesús Mures Quintana

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available El objetivo de este trabajo es comparar las técnicas estadísticas más conocidas para el tratamiento de tablas de tres entradas. Para ello, se toman los ratios económico-financieros de las mayores empresas constructoras de la Comunidad Autónoma de Castilla y León (España en el periodo 2002-2004. Aunque existen diferencias teóricas, las técnicas consideradas no arrojan resultados significativamente diferentes. Por otro lado, el estudio también demuestra ta utilidad de este tipo de técnicas cuando se trabaja con información relativa a diferentes años.The target of this paper is the comparison of the best known statistical techniques for the treatment of Three-mode tables. Accordingly, the economic-financial ratios of the main building companies in the Autonomous Region of Castille and Leon (Spain for the period 2002-2004 are taken into account. Although there are theoretical differences, the considered techniques do not release substantial different results. On the other hand, the study also shows the usefulness of this kind of techniques when working with information related to different years.

  12. Maintenance of polar stratospheric clouds in a moist stratosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. B. Kirk-Davidoff

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Previous work has shown that polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs could have acted to substantially warm high latitude regions during past warm climates such as the Eocene (55 Ma. Using a simple model of stratospheric water vapor transport and polar stratospheric cloud (PSC formation, we investigate the dependence of PSC optical depth on tropopause temperature, cloud microphysical parameters, stratospheric overturning, and tropospheric methane. We show that PSC radiative effects can help slow removal of water from the stratosphere via self-heating. However, we also show that the ability of PSCs to have a substantial impact on climate depends strongly on the PSC particle number density and the strength of the overturning circulation. Thus even a large source of stratospheric water vapor (e.g. from methane oxidation will not result in substantial PSC radiative effects unless PSC ice crystal number density is high, and stratospheric overturning (which modulates polar stratospheric temperatures is low. These results are supported by analysis of a series of runs of the NCAR WACCM model with methane concentrations varying up to one thousand times present levels.

  13. Maintenance of polar stratospheric clouds in a moist stratosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. B. Kirk-Davidoff

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Previous work has shown that polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs could have acted to substantially warm high latitude regions during past warm climates such as the Eocene (55 Ma. Using a simple model of stratospheric water vapor transport and polar stratospheric cloud (PSC formation, we investigate the dependence of PSC optical depth on tropopause temperature, cloud microphysical parameters, stratospheric overturning, and tropospheric methane. We show that PSC radiative effects can help slow removal of water from the stratosphere via self-heating. However, we also show that the ability of PSCs to have a substantial impact on climate depends strongly on the PSC particle number density and the strength of the overturning circulation. Thus even a large source of stratospheric water vapor (e.g. from methane oxidation will not result in substantial PSC radiative effects unless PSC ice crystal number density is high compared to most current observations, and stratospheric overturning (which modulates polar stratospheric temperatures is low. These results are supported by analysis of a series of runs of the NCAR WACCM model with methane concentrations varying up to one thousand times present levels.

  14. Saturn's Stratospheric Oxygen Compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romani, Paul N.; Delgado Díaz, Héctor E.; Bjoraker, Gordon; Hesman, Brigette; Achterberg, Richard

    2016-10-01

    There are three known oxygenated species present in Saturn's upper atmosphere: H2O, CO and CO2. The ultimate source of the water must be external to Saturn as Saturn's cold tropopause effectively prevents any internal water from reaching the upper atmosphere. The carbon monoxide and dioxide source(s) could be internal, external, produced by the photochemical interaction of water with Saturn's stratospheric hydrocarbons or some combination of all of these. At this point it is not clear what the external source(s) are.Cassini's Composite InfraRed Spectrometer (CIRS) has detected emission lines of H2O and CO2 (Hesman et al., DPS 2015, 311.16 & Abbas et al. 2013, Ap. J. doi:10.1088/0004-637X/776/2/73) on Saturn. CIRS also retrieves the temperature of the stratosphere using CH4 lines at 7.7 microns. Using CIRS retrieved temperatures, the mole fraction of H2O at the 0.5-5 mbar level can be retrieved and the CO2 mole fraction at ~1-10 mbar. Coupled with ground based observations of CO (Cavalié et al., 2010, A&A, DOI: 10.1051/0004-6361/200912909) these observations provide a complete oxygen compound data set to test photochemical models.Preliminary results will be presented with an emphasis on upper limit analysis to determine the percentage of stratospheric CO and CO2 that can be produced photochemically from CIRS observational constraints on the H2O profile.

  15. ORISON, a stratospheric project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz Moreno, Jose Luis; Mueller, Thomas; Duffard, Rene; Juan Lopez-Moreno, Jose; Wolf, Jürgen; Schindler, Karsten; Graf, Friederike

    2016-07-01

    Astronomical research based on satellites is extremely expensive, complex, requires years of development, and the overall difficulties are immense. The ORISON project addresses the feasibility study and the design of a global solution based on platforms on-board stratospheric balloons, which allows overcoming the limitations of the Earth's atmosphere, but at a much lower cost and with fewer complications than on satellite platforms. The overall idea is the use of small low-cost stratospheric balloons, either individually or as a fleet, equipped with light-weight medium-sized telescopes and other instruments to perform specific tasks on short-duration missions. They could carry different payloads for specific "experiments" too, and should be configurable to some degree to accommodate variable instrumentation. These balloon-based telescopes should be designed to be launched from many sites on Earth, not necessarily from remote sites such as Antarctica or near the North Pole, and at low cost. This project has received funding from the European Union's Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme under grant agreement No 690013.

  16. Stratospheric aerosol geoengineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robock, Alan [Department of Environmental Sciences, Rutgers University, 14 College Farm Road, New Brunswick, NJ 08901 (United States)

    2015-03-30

    The Geoengineering Model Intercomparison Project, conducting climate model experiments with standard stratospheric aerosol injection scenarios, has found that insolation reduction could keep the global average temperature constant, but global average precipitation would reduce, particularly in summer monsoon regions around the world. Temperature changes would also not be uniform; the tropics would cool, but high latitudes would warm, with continuing, but reduced sea ice and ice sheet melting. Temperature extremes would still increase, but not as much as without geoengineering. If geoengineering were halted all at once, there would be rapid temperature and precipitation increases at 5–10 times the rates from gradual global warming. The prospect of geoengineering working may reduce the current drive toward reducing greenhouse gas emissions, and there are concerns about commercial or military control. Because geoengineering cannot safely address climate change, global efforts to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and to adapt are crucial to address anthropogenic global warming.

  17. Stratospheric aerosol geoengineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robock, Alan

    2015-03-01

    The Geoengineering Model Intercomparison Project, conducting climate model experiments with standard stratospheric aerosol injection scenarios, has found that insolation reduction could keep the global average temperature constant, but global average precipitation would reduce, particularly in summer monsoon regions around the world. Temperature changes would also not be uniform; the tropics would cool, but high latitudes would warm, with continuing, but reduced sea ice and ice sheet melting. Temperature extremes would still increase, but not as much as without geoengineering. If geoengineering were halted all at once, there would be rapid temperature and precipitation increases at 5-10 times the rates from gradual global warming. The prospect of geoengineering working may reduce the current drive toward reducing greenhouse gas emissions, and there are concerns about commercial or military control. Because geoengineering cannot safely address climate change, global efforts to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and to adapt are crucial to address anthropogenic global warming.

  18. Thermal modeling of stratospheric airships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jiangtao; Fang, Xiande; Wang, Zhenguo; Hou, Zhongxi; Ma, Zhenyu; Zhang, Helei; Dai, Qiumin; Xu, Yu

    2015-05-01

    The interest in stratospheric airships has increased and great progress has been achieved since the late 1990s due to the advancement of modern techniques and the wide range of application demands in military, commercial, and scientific fields. Thermal issues are challenging for stratospheric airships, while there is no systematic review on this aspect found yet. This paper presents a comprehensive literature review on thermal issues of stratospheric airships. The main challenges of thermal issues on stratospheric airships are analyzed. The research activities and results on the main thermal issues are surveyed, including solar radiation models, environmental longwave radiation models, external convective heat transfer, and internal convective heat transfer. Based on the systematic review, guides for thermal model selections are provided, and topics worthy of attention for future research are suggested.

  19. Universal stratospheric balloon gradiometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsvetkov, Yury; Filippov, Sergey; Brekhov, Oleg; Nikolaev, Nikolay

    The study of the interior structure of the Earth and laws of its evolution is one of the most difficult problems of natural science. Among the geophysical fields the anomaly magnetic field is one of the most informational in questions of the Earth’s crust structure. Many important parameters of an environment are expedient for measuring at lower altitudes, than satellite ones. So, one of the alternatives is stratospheric balloon survey. The balloon flight altitudes cover the range from 20 to 50 km. At such altitudes there are steady zone air flows due to which the balloon flight trajectories can be of any direction, including round-the-world (round-the-pole). For investigation of Earth's magnetic field one of the examples of such sounding system have been designed, developed and maintained at IZMIRAN and MAI during already about 25 years. This system consists of three instrumental containers uniformly placed along a vertical 6 km line. Up today this set has been used only for geomagnetic purposes. So we describe this system on example of the measuring of the geomagnetic field gradient. System allows measuring a module and vertical gradient of the geomagnetic field along the whole flight trajectory and so one’s name is - stratospheric balloon magnetic gradiometer (SMBG). The GPS-receivers, located in each instrumental container, fix the flight coordinates to within several tens meters. Process of SBMG deployment, feature of the exit of rope from the magazine at the moment of balloon launching has been studied. Used magazine is cellular type. The hodograph of the measuring base of SBMG and the technique of correction of the deviations of the measuring base from the vertical line (introduction of the amendments for the deviation) during the flight have been investigated. It is shown that estimation of the normal level of values of the vertical gradient of the geomagnetic field is determined by the accuracy of determining the length of the measuring base SBMG

  20. Superpressure stratospheric vehicle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chocol, C.; Robinson, W.; Epley, L.

    1990-09-15

    Our need for wide-band global communications, earth imaging and sensing, atmospheric measurements and military reconnaissance is extensive, but growing dependence on space-based systems raises concerns about vulnerability. Military commanders require space assets that are more accessible and under local control. As a result, a robust and low cost access to space-like capability has become a national priority. Free floating buoyant vehicles in the middle stratosphere can provide the kind of cost effective access to space-like capability needed for a variety of missions. These vehicles are inexpensive, invisible, and easily launched. Developments in payload electronics, atmospheric modeling, and materials combined with improving communications and navigation infrastructure are making balloon-borne concepts more attractive. The important milestone accomplished by this project was the planned test flight over the continental United States. This document is specifically intended to review the technology development and preparations leading up to the test flight. Although the test flight experienced a payload failure just before entering its assent altitude, significant data were gathered. The results of the test flight are presented here. Important factors included in this report include quality assurance testing of the balloon, payload definition and characteristics, systems integration, preflight testing procedures, range operations, data collection, and post-flight analysis. 41 figs., 5 tabs.

  1. Impacts of stratospheric ozone depletion and recovery on wave propagation in the boreal winter stratosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Dingzhu; Tian, Wenshou; Xie, Fei; Wang, Chunxiao; Zhang, Jiankai

    2015-08-01

    This paper uses a state-of-the-art general circulation model to study the impacts of the stratospheric ozone depletion from 1980 to 2000 and the expected partial ozone recovery from 2000 to 2020 on the propagation of planetary waves in December, January, and February. In the Southern Hemisphere (SH), the stratospheric ozone depletion leads to a cooler and stronger Antarctic stratosphere, while the stratospheric ozone recovery has the opposite effects. In the Northern Hemisphere (NH), the impacts of the stratospheric ozone depletion on polar stratospheric temperature are not opposite to that of the stratospheric ozone recovery; i.e., the stratospheric ozone depletion causes a weak cooling and the stratospheric ozone recovery causes a statistically significant cooling. The stratospheric ozone depletion leads to a weakening of the Arctic polar vortex, while the stratospheric ozone recovery leads to a strengthening of the Arctic polar vortex. The cooling of the Arctic polar vortex is found to be dynamically induced via modulating the planetary wave activity by stratospheric ozone increases. Particularly interesting is that stratospheric ozone changes have opposite effects on the stationary and transient wave fluxes in the NH stratosphere. The analysis of the wave refractive index and Eliassen-Palm flux in the NH indicates (1) that the wave refraction in the stratosphere cannot fully explain wave flux changes in the Arctic stratosphere and (2) that stratospheric ozone changes can cause changes in wave propagation in the northern midlatitude troposphere which in turn affect wave fluxes in the NH stratosphere. In the SH, the radiative cooling (warming) caused by stratospheric ozone depletion (recovery) produces a larger (smaller) meridional temperature gradient in the midlatitude upper troposphere, accompanied by larger (smaller) zonal wind vertical shear and larger (smaller) vertical gradients of buoyancy frequency. Hence, there are more (fewer) transient waves

  2. Condensed Acids In Antartic Stratospheric Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pueschel, R. F.; Snetsinger, K. G.; Toon, O. B.; Ferry, G. V.; Starr, W. L.; Oberbeck, V. R.; Chan, K. R.; Goodman, J. K.; Livingston, J. M.; Verma, S.; Fong, W.

    1992-01-01

    Report dicusses nitrate, sulfate, and chloride contents of stratospheric aerosols during 1987 Airborne Antarctic Ozone Experiment. Emphasizes growth of HNO3*3H2O particles in polar stratospheric clouds. Important in testing theories concerning Antarctic "ozone hole".

  3. Filamentous Biological Entities Obtained from the Stratosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wainwright, Milton; Rose, Christopher E.; Baker, Alexander J.; Wickramasinghe, N. Chandra

    2013-03-01

    We previously reported the presence of large, non-filamentous, biological entities including a diatom fragment in the stratosphere at heights of between 22-27km. Here we report clear evidence for the presence of filamentous entities associated with a relatively large particle mass collected from the stratosphere. Although viable fungi have previously been isolated from the stratosphere, this is the first report of a filamentous microorganism being observed in situ on a stratospheric particle mass.

  4. How stratospheric are deep stratospheric intrusions? LUAMI 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trickl, Thomas; Vogelmann, Hannes; Fix, Andreas; Schäfler, Andreas; Wirth, Martin; Calpini, Bertrand; Levrat, Gilbert; Romanens, Gonzague; Apituley, Arnoud; Wilson, Keith M.; Begbie, Robert; Reichardt, Jens; Vömel, Holger; Sprenger, Michael

    2016-07-01

    A large-scale comparison of water-vapour vertical-sounding instruments took place over central Europe on 17 October 2008, during a rather homogeneous deep stratospheric intrusion event (LUAMI, Lindenberg Upper-Air Methods Intercomparison). The measurements were carried out at four observational sites: Payerne (Switzerland), Bilthoven (the Netherlands), Lindenberg (north-eastern Germany), and the Zugspitze mountain (Garmisch-Partenkichen, German Alps), and by an airborne water-vapour lidar system creating a transect of humidity profiles between all four stations. A high data quality was verified that strongly underlines the scientific findings. The intrusion layer was very dry with a minimum mixing ratios of 0 to 35 ppm on its lower west side, but did not drop below 120 ppm on the higher-lying east side (Lindenberg). The dryness hardens the findings of a preceding study ("Part 1", Trickl et al., 2014) that, e.g., 73 % of deep intrusions reaching the German Alps and travelling 6 days or less exhibit minimum mixing ratios of 50 ppm and less. These low values reflect values found in the lowermost stratosphere and indicate very slow mixing with tropospheric air during the downward transport to the lower troposphere. The peak ozone values were around 70 ppb, confirming the idea that intrusion layers depart from the lowermost edge of the stratosphere. The data suggest an increase of ozone from the lower to the higher edge of the intrusion layer. This behaviour is also confirmed by stratospheric aerosol caught in the layer. Both observations are in agreement with the idea that sections of the vertical distributions of these constituents in the source region were transferred to central Europe without major change. LAGRANTO trajectory calculations demonstrated a rather shallow outflow from the stratosphere just above the dynamical tropopause, for the first time confirming the conclusions in "Part 1" from the Zugspitze CO observations. The trajectories qualitatively explain

  5. Stratospheric sudden warming and lunar tide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamazaki, Yosuke; Kosch, Michael

    2016-07-01

    A stratospheric sudden warming is a large-scale disturbance in the middle atmosphere. Recent studies have shown that the effect of stratospheric sudden warnings extends well into the upper atmosphere. A stratospheric sudden warming is often accompanied by an amplification of lunar tides in the ionosphere/theremosphere. However, there are occasionally winters when a stratospheric sudden warming occurs without an enhancement of the lunar tide in the upper atmosphere, and other winters when large lunar tides are observed without a strong stratospheric sudden warming. We examine the winters when the correlation breaks down and discuss possible causes.

  6. Saturn's Stratospheric Water Vapor Distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesman, B. E.

    2015-12-01

    Water is a sought after commodity in the solar system. It is used as an indication of life, planetary formation timescales, and signatures of past cometary impacts. In Saturn's atmosphere there are two sources of water: an internal primordial reservoir that is confined to the troposphere, and an external source of unknown origin that delivers water to the stratosphere. Potential sources of stratospheric water include: Saturn's main rings (via neutral infall and/or ions transported along magnetic field lines - "Ring Rain"), interplanetary dust particles, and the E-ring that is supplied with water from the plumes of Enceladus. Measuring the latitudinal and seasonal variation of H2O on Saturn will constrain the source of Saturn's stratospheric water. Cassini's Composite InfraRed Spectrometer (CIRS) has detected emission lines of H2O on Saturn at wavelengths of 40 and 50 microns. CIRS also retrieves the temperature of the stratosphere using CH4 lines at 7.7 microns. Using our retrieved temperatures, we derive the mole fraction of H2O at the 0.5-5 mbar level for comparison with water-source models. The latitudinal variation of stratospheric water vapor between 2004-2009 will be presented as a first step in understanding the external source of water on Saturn. The observed local maximum near Saturn's equator supports either a neutral infall from the rings or a source in the E-ring. We will look for secondary maxima at mid-latitudes to determine whether "Ring Rain" also contributes to the inventory of water in Saturn's upper atmosphere.

  7. Barber's Point, Oahu, Hawaii Drift Card Study 2002-2004

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Drift cards were be released from Barber's Point, Oahu, approximately once a month during the two year span to get an idea of the distribution of card drift under...

  8. 2002-2004 Aquatic Turtle Collection Spreadsheet Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Data tables that includes the times, locations and dates that surveys were conducted. Any turtle that was captured during a survey was measured, sexed, and weighed...

  9. Premarital HIV screening in Johor--(2002-2004).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khebir, B V; Adam, M A; Daud, A R; Shahrom, C M D

    2007-03-01

    A descriptive study was conducted on premarital HIV screening programme in Johor over a three year period. HIV screenings were done at government clinics and confirmed by accredited laboratories. As a result, 123 new HIV cases were detected (0.17%) from 74,210 respondents. In 2004, 24 cases (64.9%) advanced to marriage (n = 37) after they underwent counselling and six of them married among themselves. Positivity rate from this programme (0.17%) is higher than antenatal screening (0.05%). Despite the implementation of the premarital HIV screening programme, marriage application in Johor rose 2.8% in 2004 compared with 2002. This programme had partly contributed to public awareness against HIV and provides another option in early detection of the disease.

  10. International Consensus on Nasal Polyposis 2002-2004.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mladina, R; Clement, P; Lopatin, A; Mann, W; Passali, D

    2005-06-01

    Seventeen well-known experts in rhinosinusology from various countries tried to achieve consensus on the etiology, conservative approach and surgical approach to nasal polyposis. A Digi-Vote electronic system was used for an immediate computer analysis of expert answers to 23 questions related to the problem of nasal polyposis.

  11. US-IALE Presidency: The Gustafson administration, 2002-2004

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eric Gustafson

    2010-01-01

    The focus of the Gustafson administration was 1) advancing the Society into the digital age, 2) improving the administration and organization of our annual meetings and 3) strategic and tactical planning and implementation.

  12. Mortality in 272 European regions, 2002-2004: an update

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bonneux, L.G.A.; Huisman, C.C.; de Beer, J.A.A.

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a comprehensive update of life expectancy and mortality in 2002–2004 in the modern European Union (EU-27) and EFTA countries. We focus on causes of death at younger ages (0–64 year). EUROSTAT delivered updated population numbers and mortality data by sex, age and cause of death

  13. A sudden stratospheric warming compendium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Amy H.; Sjoberg, Jeremiah P.; Seidel, Dian J.; Rosenlof, Karen H.

    2017-02-01

    Major, sudden midwinter stratospheric warmings (SSWs) are large and rapid temperature increases in the winter polar stratosphere are associated with a complete reversal of the climatological westerly winds (i.e., the polar vortex). These extreme events can have substantial impacts on winter surface climate, including increased frequency of cold air outbreaks over North America and Eurasia and anomalous warming over Greenland and eastern Canada. Here we present a SSW Compendium (SSWC), a new database that documents the evolution of the stratosphere, troposphere, and surface conditions 60 days prior to and after SSWs for the period 1958-2014. The SSWC comprises data from six different reanalysis products: MERRA2 (1980-2014), JRA-55 (1958-2014), ERA-interim (1979-2014), ERA-40 (1958-2002), NOAA20CRv2c (1958-2011), and NCEP-NCAR I (1958-2014). Global gridded daily anomaly fields, full fields, and derived products are provided for each SSW event. The compendium will allow users to examine the structure and evolution of individual SSWs, and the variability among events and among reanalysis products. The SSWC is archived and maintained by NOAA's National Centers for Environmental Information (NCEI, http://dx.doi.org/10.7289/V5NS0RWP" target="_blank">doi:10.7289/V5NS0RWP).

  14. Impact of lower stratospheric ozone on seasonal prediction systems

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mathole, K

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available stratospheric ozone in the OAGCM was relaxed to the observed climatology and increasing greenhouse gas concentrations were neglected. In the reanalysis, lower stratospheric ozone fields were better represented than in the OAGCM. The spring lower stratospheric...

  15. Atmospheric responses to stratospheric aerosol geoengineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferraro, Angus; Highwood, Eleanor; Charlton-Perez, Andrew

    2013-04-01

    Stratospheric aerosol geoengineering, also called solar radiation management (SRM), involves the injection of aerosol into the stratosphere to increase the planetary albedo. It has been conceieved as a policy option in response to human-induced global warming. It is well-established from modelling studies and observations following volcanic eruptions that stratospheric sulphate aerosols cause global cooling. Some aspects of the climate response, especially those involving large-scale dynamical changes, are more uncertain. This work attempts to identify the physical mechanisms operating in the climate response to stratospheric aerosol geoengineering using idealised model experiments. The radiative forcing produced by the aerosol depends on its type (species) and size. Aerosols absorb terrestrial and solar radiation, which drives stratospheric temperature change. The stratospheric temperature change also depends on aerosol type and size. We calculate the stratospheric temperature change due to geoengineering with sulphate, titania, limestone and soot in a fixed-dynamical-heating radiative model. Sulphate produces tropical heating of up to ~6 K. Titania produces much less heating, whereas soot produces much more. Most aerosols increase the meridional temperature gradient in the lower stratosphere which, by thermal wind balance, would be expected to intensify the zonal winds in the polar vortex. An intermediate-complexity general circulation model is used to investigate the dynamical response to geoengineering aerosols. Atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations are quadrupled. The carbon dioxide forcing is then balanced using stratospheric sulphate aerosol. We assess dynamical changes in the stratosphere, for example, the frequency of stratospheric sudden warmings and the strength of the Brewer-Dobson overturning circulation. We also assess changes in the strength and position of the tropospheric jets. We compare results for sulphate with those for titania.

  16. Total Ozone Prediction: Stratospheric Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackman, Charles H.; Kawa, S. Ramdy; Douglass, Anne R.

    2003-01-01

    The correct prediction of total ozone as a function of latitude and season is extremely important for global models. This exercise tests the ability of a particular model to simulate ozone. The ozone production (P) and loss (L) will be specified from a well- established global model and will be used in all GCMs for subsequent prediction of ozone. This is the "B-3 Constrained Run" from M&MII. The exercise mostly tests a model stratospheric dynamics in the prediction of total ozone. The GCM predictions will be compared and contrasted with TOMS measurements.

  17. Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy

    CERN Document Server

    Hamidouche, M; Marcum, P; Krabbe, A

    2010-01-01

    We present one of the new generations of observatories, the Stratospheric Observatory For Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA). This is an airborne observatory consisting of a 2.7-m telescope mounted on a modified Boeing B747-SP airplane. Flying at an up to 45,000 ft (14 km) altitude, SOFIA will observe above more than 99 percent of the Earth's atmospheric water vapor allowing observations in the normally obscured far-infrared. We outline the observatory capabilities and goals. The first-generation science instruments flying on board SOFIA and their main astronomical goals are also presented.

  18. Homicídios de homens de quinze a 29 anos e fatores relacionados no estado do Paraná, de 2002 a 2004 Homicides between men aged 15 to 29 years and related factors in the State of Paraná, Brazil, 2002/2004

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selma Maffei de Andrade

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Os homicídios constituem-se a primeira causa de morte não natural no Brasil e seu estudo pode subsidiar medidas para seu controle. O objetivo deste estudo foi verificar a mortalidade por homicídios e intervenções legais de homens jovens no estado do Paraná, e identificar características municipais correlacionadas. Foi realizado estudo ecológico, com os municípios do Paraná como unidades de análise. Foram calculados os coeficientes de mortalidade por homicídios e intervenções legais de homens de quinze a 29 anos, de 2002 a 2004 e obtidos dados socioeconômicos e demográficos municipais. O coeficiente de mortalidade do estado foi de 94,8 por cem mil. O tamanho da população, a proporção de jovens de quinze a 24 anos, a proporção de matrículas no ensino superior e o índice de Gini foram os indicadores mais correlacionados à mortalidade por homicídios (pHomicides are the main cause of non-natural death in Brazil and studies about them may contribute to their control. The objective of this study was to verify mortality rates due to homicides and legal interventions among young men in the State of Paraná, Brazil, and to identify correlated municipal characteristics. An ecological study was conducted, having the municipalities of the State as units of analysis. Mortality rates of homicides and legal interventions among men from 15 to 29 years of age were calculated for the years 2002-2004 and demographic and social municipal indicators were obtained. Mortality rate in the State was 94.8 per one hundred thousand. The size of the population, the proportion of young people aged 15 to 24 years, the proportion of enrollments in universities and the Gini index were the main indicators correlated to homicide mortality (p<0.0001. Mortality rates were highest in municipalities of metropolitan regions, in those located at the border with Paraguay and in those located in the way between them and the Southeast Region of Brazil. Mortality

  19. Is there a stratospheric fountain?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.-P. Pommereau

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available The impact of convection on the thermal structure of the Tropical Tropopause Layer (TTL was investigated from a series of four daily radiosonde ascents and weather S-band radar observations carried out during the HIBISCUS campaign in the South Atlantic Convergence Zone in Southeast Brazil in February 2004. The temperature profiles display a large impact of convective activity on the thermal structure of the TTL. Compared to non-active periods, convection is observed to result in a cooling of 4.5°C to 7.5°C at the Lapse Rate Tropopause at 16 km, propagating up to 19 km or 440 K potential temperature levels in the stratosphere in most intense convective cases. Consistent with the diurnal cycle of echo top heights seen by a S-band weather radar, a systematic temperature diurnal cycle is observed in the layer, displaying a rapid cooling of 3.5°C on average (–9°, –2°C extremes during the development phase of convection in the early afternoon during the most active period. Since the cooling occurs during daytime within a timescale of 6-h, its maximum amplitude is at the altitude of the Cold Point Tropopause at 390 K and temperature fluctuations associated to gravity waves do not display significant diurnal change, the afternoon cooling of the TTL cannot be attributed to radiation, advection, gravity waves or adiabatic lofting. It implies a fast insertion of adiabatically cooled air parcels by overshooting turrets followed by mixing with the warmer environment. During most intense convective days, the overshoot is shown to penetrate the stratosphere up to 450 K potential temperature level. Such fast updraft offers an explanation for the presence of ice crystals, and enhanced water vapour layers observed up to 18–19 km (410–430 K in the same area by the HIBISCUS balloons and the TROCCINOX Geophysica aircraft, as well as high tropospheric chemical species concentrations in the TTL over land observed from space. Overall, injection of cold air

  20. Injection of iodine to the stratosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saiz-Lopez, Alfonso; Baidar, Sunil; Cuevas, Carlos A.; Koening, Theodore; Fernandez, Rafael P.; Dix, Barbara; Kinnison, Douglas E.; Lamarque, Jean-Francois; Rodriguez-Lloveras, Xavier; Campos, Teresa L.; Volkamer, Rainer

    2016-04-01

    There are still many uncertainties about the influence of iodine chemistry in the stratosphere, as the real amount of reactive iodine injected to this layer the troposphere and the partitioning of iodine species are still unknown. In this work we report a new estimation of the injection of iodine into the stratosphere based on novel daytime (SZA layer (TORERO campaign) and a 3D global chemistry-climate model (CAM-Chem) with the most recent knowledge about iodine photochemistry. The results indicate that significant levels of total reactive iodine (0.25-0.7 pptv), between 2 and 5 times larger than the accepted upper limits, could be injected into the stratosphere via tropical convective outflow. At these iodine levels, modelled iodine catalytic cycles account for up to 30% of the contemporary ozone loss in the tropical lower stratosphere and can exert a stratospheric ozone depletion potential equivalent or even larger than that of very short-lived bromocarbons. Therefore, we suggest that iodine sources and chemistry need to be considered in assessments of the historical and future evolution of the stratospheric ozone layer.

  1. Seasonal Stratospheric Chemistry on Uranus and Neptune

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moses, Julianne I.; Greathouse, Thomas K.; Orton, Glenn S.; Hue, Vincent; Poppe, Andrew R.; Luszcz-Cook, Statia H.; Moullet, Arielle

    2016-10-01

    We use a time-variable photochemical model to study the change in stratospheric constituent abundances as a function of altitude, latitude, and season on Uranus and Neptune. In the absence of meridional transport, the results for Neptune are similar to those predicted for Saturn: seasonal variations in the abundances of observable hydrocarbons such as C2H2, C2H4, C2H6, C3H4, C3H8, and C4H2 are large in the upper stratosphere but become increasingly damped with depth due to increased dynamical and chemical time scales. We also find that latitude gradients in hydrocarbon abundances would be maintained on Neptune in the absence of atmospheric circulation. On Uranus, however, the more stagnant, poorly mixed stratosphere leads to a lower-altitude homopause, with methane being photolyzed relatively deep in the stratosphere, at which point both diffusion and chemical time constants have become longer than a Uranian year. Seasonal variations in stratospheric constituents on Uranus are therefore muted, despite the planet's large obliquity. We compare our model results to global-average observations from Spitzer and to spatially-resolved infrared observations from the ground. The model-data comparisons have implications with respect to the importance and strength of meridional transport, the origin of stratospheric oxygen-bearing species, and the dust and cometary influx rates on Uranus and Neptune.

  2. Curing of epoxy matrix composite in stratosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondyurin, Alexey; Kondyurina, Irina; Bilek, Marcela

    Large structures for habitats, greenhouses, space bases, space factories are needed for next stage of space exploitation. A new approach enabling large-size constructions in space relies on the use of the polymerization technology of fiber-filled composites with a curable polymer matrix applied in the free space environment. The polymerisation process is proposed for the material exposed to high vacuum, dramatic temperature changes, space plasma, sun irradiation and atomic oxygen (in low Earth orbit), micrometeorite fluence, electric charging and microgravitation. The stratospheric flight experiments are directed to an investigation of the curing polymer matrix under the stratospheric conditions on. The unique combination of low atmospheric pressure, high intensity UV radiation including short wavelength UV and diurnal temperature variations associated with solar irradiation strongly influences the chemical processes in polymeric materials. The first flight experiment with uncured composites was a part of the NASA scientific balloon flight program realised at the NASA stratospheric balloon station in Alice Springs, Australia. A flight cassette installed on payload was lifted with a “zero-pressure” stratospheric balloon filled with Helium. Columbia Scientific Balloon Facility (CSBF) provided the launch, flight telemetry and landing of the balloon and payload. A cassette of uncured composite materials with an epoxy resin matrix was exposed 3 days in the stratosphere (40 km altitude). The second flight experiment was realised in South Australia in 2012, when the cassette was exposed in 27 km altitude. An analysis of the chemical structure of the composites showed, that the space irradiations are responsible for crosslinking of the uncured polymers exposed in the stratosphere. The first prepreg in the world was cured successfully in stratosphere. The investigations were supported by Alexander von Humboldt Foundation, NASA and RFBR (12-08-00970) grants.

  3. Connecting Stratospheric and Ionospheric Anomalies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spraggs, M. E.; Goncharenko, L. P.; Zhang, S.; Coster, A. J.; Benkevitch, L. V.

    2014-12-01

    This study investigates any relationship between lunar phases and ionospheric anomalies that appear at low latitudes concurrently with sudden stratospheric warmings (SSWs). The study utilizes World-wide GPS Receiver Network Total Electron Content (TEC) data spanning 13 years (2001-2014) and focuses on the changes in the equatorial ionization anomaly the Western hemisphere. TEC is highly variable due to the influences of solar flux, geomagnetic activity, and seasonal variation and these influences are removed by the use of model. This empirical TEC model is a combination of linear dependencies of solar flux (F10.7) and geomagnetic activity (Ap3) with a third degree polynomial dependency for day-of-year (DOY). With such dependencies removed, the remaining TEC variation could be resolved and attributed to an appropriate mechanism. Lunar phase and apside was investigated in particular, especially the new and full moon phases during perigees when tidal forcing would be most powerful. Lunar tidal forcing on planetary waves is also examined as being physically responsible for setting up conditions that may give rise to SSWs and ionospheric anomalies. Preliminary results suggest that such anomalies may be enhanced in intensity during the full or new moon and even more so during perigee by different amounts depending on whether the SSW is a major (40-60%) or minor (20-45%) event.

  4. Mantras and medicine for development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drucker, D

    1977-01-01

    In Nepal there are 2 cultures of sickness and treatment, the traditional one of the indigenous healer and that of the modern doctor. The people do not see bacteria, water, or viruses as causes of illness, but regard sickness as one of a series of misfortunes with evil influences as the cause which needs to be propitiated. They use a passive and eating terminology to describe sickness rather than the more active and military terms of the West. Village healers are not paid in cash, and are paid only after the cure takes place. Trainees who spent several months in a village were from Katmandu and represented the fields of child care, nutrition, and public health. Difficulties in approaching the indigenous healers were encountered, as well as difficulties in securing information from them. Needed are strategies for introducing modern methods according to the social and conceptual condition of the community approached. This would mean training the indigenous healers. When modern facilities are available, the reputation and status of the old healers must be left intact so they can be pastoral aids and deal with social aspects, still playing a valuable part in the community. All health workers, including the old healers, should be involved in a task group associated with the village panchayat to implement health projects, take surveys of problems and needs, channel resources, and provide for training. In time, they could also help formulate policy at higher levels.

  5. Stratospheric solar geoengineering without ozone loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keith, David W.; Weisenstein, Debra K.; Dykema, John A.; Keutsch, Frank N.

    2016-12-01

    Injecting sulfate aerosol into the stratosphere, the most frequently analyzed proposal for solar geoengineering, may reduce some climate risks, but it would also entail new risks, including ozone loss and heating of the lower tropical stratosphere, which, in turn, would increase water vapor concentration causing additional ozone loss and surface warming. We propose a method for stratospheric aerosol climate modification that uses a solid aerosol composed of alkaline metal salts that will convert hydrogen halides and nitric and sulfuric acids into stable salts to enable stratospheric geoengineering while reducing or reversing ozone depletion. Rather than minimizing reactive effects by reducing surface area using high refractive index materials, this method tailors the chemical reactivity. Specifically, we calculate that injection of calcite (CaCO3) aerosol particles might reduce net radiative forcing while simultaneously increasing column ozone toward its preanthropogenic baseline. A radiative forcing of ‑1 Wṡm‑2, for example, might be achieved with a simultaneous 3.8% increase in column ozone using 2.1 Tgṡy‑1 of 275-nm radius calcite aerosol. Moreover, the radiative heating of the lower stratosphere would be roughly 10-fold less than if that same radiative forcing had been produced using sulfate aerosol. Although solar geoengineering cannot substitute for emissions cuts, it may supplement them by reducing some of the risks of climate change. Further research on this and similar methods could lead to reductions in risks and improved efficacy of solar geoengineering methods.

  6. Stratospheric dryness: model simulations and satellite observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Lelieveld

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The mechanisms responsible for the extreme dryness of the stratosphere have been debated for decades. A key difficulty has been the lack of comprehensive models which are able to reproduce the observations. Here we examine results from the coupled lower-middle atmosphere chemistry general circulation model ECHAM5/MESSy1 together with satellite observations. Our model results match observed temperatures in the tropical lower stratosphere and realistically represent the seasonal and inter-annual variability of water vapor. The model reproduces the very low water vapor mixing ratios (below 2 ppmv periodically observed at the tropical tropopause near 100 hPa, as well as the characteristic tape recorder signal up to about 10 hPa, providing evidence that the dehydration mechanism is well-captured. Our results confirm that the entry of tropospheric air into the tropical stratosphere is forced by large-scale wave dynamics, whereas radiative cooling regionally decelerates upwelling and can even cause downwelling. Thin cirrus forms in the cold air above cumulonimbus clouds, and the associated sedimentation of ice particles between 100 and 200 hPa reduces water mass fluxes by nearly two orders of magnitude compared to air mass fluxes. Transport into the stratosphere is supported by regional net radiative heating, to a large extent in the outer tropics. During summer very deep monsoon convection over Southeast Asia, centered over Tibet, moistens the stratosphere.

  7. Sources and sinks of stratospheric water vapor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ellsaesser, H.W.

    1979-11-01

    A tutorial review of the understanding of stratospheric H/sub 2/O and the processes controlling it is presented. Paradoxes posed by currently available observational data are cited and suggestions made as to how they might be resolved. Such resolution appears to require: that the bulk of our current data provides unrepresentative and misleading vertical and latitudinal H/sub 2/O gradients immediately downstream from the tropical tropopause; and, that there exists within the troposphere a mechanism different from or in addition to the tropical tropopause cold trap for drying air to the mixing ratios found in the lower stratosphere. Satisfaction of these requirements will reconcile much heretofore puzzling observational data and will obviate the necessity for a stratospheric sink for H/sub 2/O.

  8. Sources of particulates in the upper stratosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigg, E. Keith

    2011-10-01

    The dominant forms of particles collected at altitudes of 39, 42 and 45km during three balloon flights over Australia were aggregates having components with diameters typically 40 to 50nm. Their partial electron transparency suggested an organic composition and all were accompanied by a volatile liquid that could be stabilised by reaction with a thin copper film. They closely resembled particles called "fluffy micrometeorites" collected earlier in the mesosphere from rockets and their properties were consistent with those of particles collected from a comet by a recent spacecraft experiment. Particles in the upper stratosphere included some that resembled viruses and cocci, the latter being one of the organisms cultured from upper stratospheric air in a recent experiment. A plausible source of the stratospheric, mesospheric and cometary aggregates is consistent with the "panspermia" theory, that microorganisms present in space at the birth of the solar system could have reproduced in water within comets and brought life to Earth.

  9. Solid particles in the tropical lowest stratosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. K. Nielsen

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available We report in situ and remote observations proving occasional occurrence of solid particles in the tropical lowest stratosphere, 200 km from deep convective events. The particles were found during field campaigns in Southeast Brazil (49.03 W 22.36 S. They occur in the altitude range from 17.5 to 20.8 km, at temperatures up to at least 10 K above the expected frost point temperature. While stability of ice particles at these altitudes is unexpected from a theoretical point of view, it is argued that these observations are indications of tropospheric air masses penetrating into the stratosphere during convective overshoots. It is argued that the intrusion of tropospheric air must have carried a large amount of water with it, which effectively hydrated the lowest stratosphere, and consequently suppressed sublimation. This conclusion is further supported by a separate water vapor mixing ratio profile obtained at the same observation site.

  10. New stratospheric UV/visible radiance measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. J. Marceau

    Full Text Available A stratospheric balloon was launched on 12 October 1986 from the "CNES" base at Aire sur l'Adour (France to record twilight radiance in the stratosphere. The near-UV and visible radiances were continuously monitored by a photometer during sunrise. Some observations are presented for different viewing azimuthal planes and viewing elevation angles. They show the influence of aerosols layers and clouds which can be also seen on related photographs. The results as a whole may be used for testing some radiative models, especially for twilight conditions.

  11. SSTs, nitrogen fertiliser and stratospheric ozone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turco, R. P.; Whitten, R. C.; Poppoff, I. G.; Capone, L. A.

    1978-01-01

    A recently revised model of the stratosphere is used to show that a substantial enhancement in the ozone layer could accompany worldwide SST fleet operations and that water vapor may be an important factor in SST assessments. Revised rate coefficients for various ozone-destroying reactions are employed in calculations which indicate a slight increase in the total content of stratospheric ozone for modest-sized fleets of SSTs flying below about 25 km. It is found that water-vapor chemical reactions can negate in large part the NOx-induced ozone gains computed below 25 km and that increased use of nitrogen fertilizer might also enhance the ozone layer.

  12. Composite materials with uncured epoxy matrix exposed in stratosphere during NASA stratospheric balloon flight

    CERN Document Server

    Kondyurin, Alexey; Bilek, Marcela

    2010-01-01

    A cassette of uncured composite materials with an epoxy resin matrix was exposed in the stratosphere (40 km altitude) over 3 days. Temperature variations of -76...+32.50C and pressure up to 2.1 Torr were recorded during flight. An analysis of the chemical structure of the composites showed, that the polymer matrix exposed in the stratosphere becomes crosslinked, while the ground control materials react by way of polycondensation reaction of epoxy groups. The space irradiations are considered to be responsible for crosslinking of the uncured polymers exposed in the stratosphere. The composites were cured on Earth after landing. Analysis of the cured composites showed, that the polymer matrix remains active under stratospheric conditions. The results can be used for predicting curing processes of polymer composite in a free space environment during an orbital space flight.

  13. Composite Materials With Uncured Epoxy Matrix Exposed in Stratosphere During NASA Stratospheric Balloon Flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondyurin, Alexey; Kondyurina, Irina; Bilek, Marcela; de Groh, Kim K.

    2013-01-01

    A cassette of uncured composite materials with epoxy resin matrixes was exposed in the stratosphere (40 km altitude) over three days. Temperature variations of -76 to 32.5C and pressure up to 2.1 torr were recorded during flight. An analysis of the chemical structure of the composites showed, that the polymer matrix exposed in the stratosphere becomes crosslinked, while the ground control materials react by way of polymerization reaction of epoxy groups. The space irradiations are considered to be responsible for crosslinking of the uncured polymers exposed in the stratosphere. The composites were cured on Earth after landing. Analysis of the cured composites showed that the polymer matrix remains active under stratospheric conditions. The results can be used for predicting curing processes of polymer composites in a free space environment during an orbital space flight.

  14. Recent Increases in Stratospheric HCl: Stratospheric Dynamics versus the Montreal Protocol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chipperfield, Martyn; Mahieu, Emmanuel; Notholt, Justus

    2014-05-01

    Long-lived chlorine-containing source gases, such as chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), are transported into the stratosphere where they decompose and cause ozone depletion. Increases in chlorine during the 1970s-1990s resulted in long-term ozone decreases, especially in the polar regions. Following the implementation of the Montreal Protocol, the near-surface chlorine loading was observed to peak in 1993 and, since then, to decrease in line with expectations. After release from source gases in the stratosphere, chlorine mainly forms the reservoir HCl, providing an alternative method for monitoring the progress of the Montreal Protocol. A maximum in stratospheric HCl was observed around 1996, followed by decay at a rate close to 1%/year, consistent with the tropospheric chlorine peak and known transport timescales. However, we will present total column observations from ground-based FTIR instruments which show an unexpected and significant upturn in stratospheric HCl around 2007 in the northern hemisphere. Height-resolved observations from satellite instruments (HALOE, MLS, ACE) confirm this increase and show that it occurs in the lower stratosphere. These observations contrast with the ongoing monotonic decrease of near-surface chlorine source gases. Using 3-D model simulations (TOMCAT/SLIMCAT and KASIMA) we attribute this trend anomaly to a slowdown in the NH atmospheric circulation, causing air in the lower stratosphere to become more aged with a larger relative conversion of source gases to HCl. An important conclusion is that the Montreal Protocol is still on track and will still lead to long-term decreases in stratospheric chlorine. This dynamical variability could also significantly affect the evolution of stratospheric ozone and must be accounted for when searching for signs of ozone recovery.

  15. Stratospheric aerosol—Observations, processes, and impact on climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kremser, Stefanie; Thomason, Larry W.; Hobe, Marc; Hermann, Markus; Deshler, Terry; Timmreck, Claudia; Toohey, Matthew; Stenke, Andrea; Schwarz, Joshua P.; Weigel, Ralf; Fueglistaler, Stephan; Prata, Fred J.; Vernier, Jean-Paul; Schlager, Hans; Barnes, John E.; Antuña-Marrero, Juan-Carlos; Fairlie, Duncan; Palm, Mathias; Mahieu, Emmanuel; Notholt, Justus; Rex, Markus; Bingen, Christine; Vanhellemont, Filip; Bourassa, Adam; Plane, John M. C.; Klocke, Daniel; Carn, Simon A.; Clarisse, Lieven; Trickl, Thomas; Neely, Ryan; James, Alexander D.; Rieger, Landon; Wilson, James C.; Meland, Brian

    2016-06-01

    Interest in stratospheric aerosol and its role in climate have increased over the last decade due to the observed increase in stratospheric aerosol since 2000 and the potential for changes in the sulfur cycle induced by climate change. This review provides an overview about the advances in stratospheric aerosol research since the last comprehensive assessment of stratospheric aerosol was published in 2006. A crucial development since 2006 is the substantial improvement in the agreement between in situ and space-based inferences of stratospheric aerosol properties during volcanically quiescent periods. Furthermore, new measurement systems and techniques, both in situ and space based, have been developed for measuring physical aerosol properties with greater accuracy and for characterizing aerosol composition. However, these changes induce challenges to constructing a long-term stratospheric aerosol climatology. Currently, changes in stratospheric aerosol levels less than 20% cannot be confidently quantified. The volcanic signals tend to mask any nonvolcanically driven change, making them difficult to understand. While the role of carbonyl sulfide as a substantial and relatively constant source of stratospheric sulfur has been confirmed by new observations and model simulations, large uncertainties remain with respect to the contribution from anthropogenic sulfur dioxide emissions. New evidence has been provided that stratospheric aerosol can also contain small amounts of nonsulfate matter such as black carbon and organics. Chemistry-climate models have substantially increased in quantity and sophistication. In many models the implementation of stratospheric aerosol processes is coupled to radiation and/or stratospheric chemistry modules to account for relevant feedback processes.

  16. Stratospheric Aerosol--Observations, Processes, and Impact on Climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kresmer, Stefanie; Thomason, Larry W.; von Hobe, Marc; Hermann, Markus; Deshler, Terry; Timmreck, Claudia; Toohey, Matthew; Stenke, Andrea; Schwarz, Joshua P.; Weigel, Ralf; Fueglistaler, Stephan; Prata, Fred J.; Vernier, Jean-Paul; Schlager, Hans; Barnes, John E.; Antuna-Marrero, Juan-Carlos; Fairlie, Duncan; Palm, Mathias; Mahieu, Emmanuel; Notholt, Justus; Rex, Markus; Bingen, Christine; Vanhellemont, Filip; Bourassa, Adam; Plane, John M. C.; Klocke, Daniel; Carn, Simon A.; Clarisse, Lieven; Trickl, Thomas; Neeley, Ryan; James, Alexander D.; Rieger, Landon; Wilson, James C.; Meland, Brian

    2016-01-01

    Interest in stratospheric aerosol and its role in climate have increased over the last decade due to the observed increase in stratospheric aerosol since 2000 and the potential for changes in the sulfur cycle induced by climate change. This review provides an overview about the advances in stratospheric aerosol research since the last comprehensive assessment of stratospheric aerosol was published in 2006. A crucial development since 2006 is the substantial improvement in the agreement between in situ and space-based inferences of stratospheric aerosol properties during volcanically quiescent periods. Furthermore, new measurement systems and techniques, both in situ and space based, have been developed for measuring physical aerosol properties with greater accuracy and for characterizing aerosol composition. However, these changes induce challenges to constructing a long-term stratospheric aerosol climatology. Currently, changes in stratospheric aerosol levels less than 20% cannot be confidently quantified. The volcanic signals tend to mask any nonvolcanically driven change, making them difficult to understand. While the role of carbonyl sulfide as a substantial and relatively constant source of stratospheric sulfur has been confirmed by new observations and model simulations, large uncertainties remain with respect to the contribution from anthropogenic sulfur dioxide emissions. New evidence has been provided that stratospheric aerosol can also contain small amounts of nonsulfatematter such as black carbon and organics. Chemistry-climate models have substantially increased in quantity and sophistication. In many models the implementation of stratospheric aerosol processes is coupled to radiation and/or stratospheric chemistry modules to account for relevant feedback processes.

  17. Stratospheric solar geoengineering without ozone loss?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keutsch, F. N.; Keith, D.; Weisenstein, D.; Dykema, J. A.

    2016-12-01

    Injecting sulfate aerosol into the stratosphere, a form of solar geoengineering, may reduce some climate risks, but it also entails new risks including ozone loss and heating of the lower tropical stratosphere which in turn increases water vapor concentration causing additional ozone loss and surface warming. Selection of a solid aerosol such as alumina or diamond for geoengineering purposes was found to minimize stratospheric heating for a given shortwave forcing, though ozone depletion via heterogeneous surface activation remains a potential problem. Here we investigate the use of solid aerosols composed of alkaline metal salts whose surfaces would convert halogens, nitric and sulfuric acid into stable salts, reducing the ozone depletion potential of these ubiquitous stratospheric substances and preventing heterogeneous activation on the geoengineering particles. Specifically, injection of calcite (CaCO3) aerosol might reduce net radiative forcing while simultaneously increasing column ozone towards its pre-anthropogenic baseline. A radiative forcing of -1 Wm-2, for example, might be achieved with a simultaneous 3.8% increase in column ozone using 2.1 Tg yr-1 of 275 nm radius calcite aerosol with ten-fold less radiative heating compared to sulfate aerosol. Geoengineering injection of reactive alkali metal salts in combination with another high refractive index material may also enable solar geoengineering with lower risk than with sulfates.

  18. Benefits, risks, and costs of stratospheric geoengineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robock, Alan; Marquardt, Allison; Kravitz, Ben; Stenchikov, Georgiy

    2009-10-01

    Injecting sulfate aerosol precursors into the stratosphere has been suggested as a means of geoengineering to cool the planet and reduce global warming. The decision to implement such a scheme would require a comparison of its benefits, dangers, and costs to those of other responses to global warming, including doing nothing. Here we evaluate those factors for stratospheric geoengineering with sulfate aerosols. Using existing U.S. military fighter and tanker planes, the annual costs of injecting aerosol precursors into the lower stratosphere would be several billion dollars. Using artillery or balloons to loft the gas would be much more expensive. We do not have enough information to evaluate more exotic techniques, such as pumping the gas up through a hose attached to a tower or balloon system. Anthropogenic stratospheric aerosol injection would cool the planet, stop the melting of sea ice and land-based glaciers, slow sea level rise, and increase the terrestrial carbon sink, but produce regional drought, ozone depletion, less sunlight for solar power, and make skies less blue. Furthermore it would hamper Earth-based optical astronomy, do nothing to stop ocean acidification, and present many ethical and moral issues. Further work is needed to quantify many of these factors to allow informed decision-making.

  19. Stratospheric General Circulation with Chemistry Model (SGCCM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rood, Richard B.; Douglass, Anne R.; Geller, Marvin A.; Kaye, Jack A.; Nielsen, J. Eric; Rosenfield, Joan E.; Stolarski, Richard S.

    1990-01-01

    In the past two years constituent transport and chemistry experiments have been performed using both simple single constituent models and more complex reservoir species models. Winds for these experiments have been taken from the data assimilation effort, Stratospheric Data Analysis System (STRATAN).

  20. Chlorine Monoxide in the Antarctic Spring Stratosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaramillo-Ayerbe, Mauricio

    1988-06-01

    A series of observations of stratospheric chlorine monoxide (ClO) were carried out during the austral springs of 1986 and 1987 in McMurdo Station, Antarctica, as part of two experimental campaigns sent to investigate the seasonal decrease in ozone over the antarctic continent (the ozone "hole"). Measurements of the vertical distribution of ClO were obtained by high resolution ground-based emission spectroscopy at 278 GHz, using the Stony Brook mm-wave receiver. They show the presence of an anomalous layer of lower stratospheric ClO which is not observed at other latitudes. This anomalous layer is centered at ~20 km altitude and exhibits a pronounced diurnal variation, reaching a maximum at midday and disappearing at night. During the period of Sep. 20-24, 1987, the lower-stratospheric ClO had a maximum volume mixing ratio of 1.8_sp{+0cdot5}{ -0cdot9} ppbv. A normal ClO layer centered at ~36 km was also observed, with concentrations and diurnal behavior similar to those seen in tropical latitudes. These findings are evidence of anomalous chlorine chemistry taking place in the lower stratosphere during the antarctic spring, and indicate that increasing anthropogenic chlorine is a prime causative agent in the formation of the ozone hole.

  1. Benefits, risks, and costs of stratospheric geoengineering

    KAUST Repository

    Robock, Alan

    2009-10-02

    Injecting sulfate aerosol precursors into the stratosphere has been suggested as a means of geoengineering to cool the planet and reduce global warming. The decision to implement such a scheme would require a comparison of its benefits, dangers, and costs to those of other responses to global warming, including doing nothing. Here we evaluate those factors for stratospheric geoengineering with sulfate aerosols. Using existing U.S. military fighter and tanker planes, the annual costs of injecting aerosol precursors into the lower stratosphere would be several billion dollars. Using artillery or balloons to loft the gas would be much more expensive. We do not have enough information to evaluate more exotic techniques, such as pumping the gas up through a hose attached to a tower or balloon system. Anthropogenic stratospheric aerosol injection would cool the planet, stop the melting of sea ice and land-based glaciers, slow sea level rise, and increase the terrestrial carbon sink, but produce regional drought, ozone depletion, less sunlight for solar power, and make skies less blue. Furthermore it would hamper Earth-based optical astronomy, do nothing to stop ocean acidification, and present many ethical and moral issues. Further work is needed to quantify many of these factors to allow informed decision-making.

  2. Intraseasonal oscillations of stratospheric ozone above Switzerland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Studer, Simone; Hocke, Klemens; Kämpfer, Niklaus

    2012-01-01

    GROMOS, the ground-based millimeter-wave ozone spectrometer, continuously measures the stratospheric ozone profile between the altitudes of 20 and 65 km above Bern (46°57‧N, 7°27‧E) since November 1994. Characteristics of intraseasonal oscillations of stratospheric ozone are derived from the long-term data set. Spectral analysis gives evidence for a dominant oscillation period of about 20 days in the lower and middle stratosphere during winter time. A strong 20-day wave is also found in collocated geopotential height measurements of the microwave limb sounder onboard the Aura satellite (Aura/MLS) confirming the ground-based observations of GROMOS and underlining the link between ozone and dynamics. Remarkably, the ozone series of GROMOS show an interannual variability of the strength of intraseasonal oscillations of stratospheric ozone. The interannual variability of ozone fluctuations is possibly due to influences of planetary wave forcing and the quasi-biennial oscillation (QBO) on the meridional Brewer-Dobson circulation of the middle atmosphere. In detail, time series of the mean amplitude of ozone fluctuations with periods ranging from 10 to 60 days are derived at fixed pressure levels. The mean amplitude series are regarded as a measure of the strength of intraseasonal oscillations of stratospheric ozone above Bern. After deseasonalizing the mean amplitude series, we find QBO-like amplitude modulations of the intraseasonal oscillations of ozone. The amplitudes of the intraseasonal oscillations are enhanced by a factor of 2 in 1997, 2001, 2003, and 2005. QBO-like variations of intraseasonal oscillations are also present in wind, temperature and other parameters above Bern as indicated by meteorological reanalyses of the European Centre for Medium-range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF). Further, intercomparisons of interannual variability of intraseasonal tropospheric and stratospheric oscillations are performed where the NAO index (North-Atlantic oscillation

  3. Stratospheric experiments on curing of composite materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chudinov, Viacheslav; Kondyurin, Alexey; Svistkov, Alexander L.; Efremov, Denis; Demin, Anton; Terpugov, Viktor; Rusakov, Sergey

    2016-07-01

    Future space exploration requires a large light-weight structure for habitats, greenhouses, space bases, space factories and other constructions. A new approach enabling large-size constructions in space relies on the use of the technology of polymerization of fiber-filled composites with a curable polymer matrix applied in the free space environment on Erath orbit. In orbit, the material is exposed to high vacuum, dramatic temperature changes, plasma of free space due to cosmic rays, sun irradiation and atomic oxygen (in low Earth orbit), micrometeorite fluence, electric charging and microgravitation. The development of appropriate polymer matrix composites requires an understanding of the chemical processes of polymer matrix curing under the specific free space conditions to be encountered. The goal of the stratospheric flight experiment is an investigation of the effect of the stratospheric conditions on the uncured polymer matrix of the composite material. The unique combination of low residual pressure, high intensity UV radiation including short-wave UV component, cosmic rays and other aspects associated with solar irradiation strongly influences the chemical processes in polymeric materials. We have done the stratospheric flight experiments with uncured composites (prepreg). A balloon with payload equipped with heater, temperature/pressure/irradiation sensors, microprocessor, carrying the samples of uncured prepreg has been launched to stratosphere of 25-30 km altitude. After the flight, the samples have been tested with FTIR, gel-fraction, tensile test and DMA. The effect of cosmic radiation has been observed. The composite was successfully cured during the stratospheric flight. The study was supported by RFBR grants 12-08-00970 and 14-08-96011.

  4. Stratospheric Impacts on Arctic Sea Ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichler, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    Long-term circulation change in the stratosphere can have substantial effects on the oceans and their circulation. In this study we investigate whether and how sea ice at the ocean surface responds to intraseasonal stratospheric variability. Our main question is whether the surface impact of stratospheric sudden warmings (SSWs) is strong and long enough to affect sea ice. A related question is whether the increased frequency of SSWs during the 2000s contributed to the rapid decrease in Arctic sea ice during this time. To this end we analyze observations of sea ice, NCEP/NCAR reanalysis, and a long control integration with a stratospherically-enhanced version of the GFDL CM2.1 climate model. From both observations and the model we find that stratospheric extreme events have a demonstrable impact on the distribution of Arctic sea ice. The areas most affected are near the edge of the climatological ice line over the North Atlantic, North Pacific, and the Arctic Ocean. The absolute changes in sea ice coverage amount to +/-10 %. Areas and magnitudes of increase and decrease are about the same. It is thus unlikely that the increased SSW frequency during the 2000s contributed to the decline of sea ice during that period. The sea ice changes are consistent with the impacts of a negative NAO at the surface and can be understood in terms of (1) dynamical change due to altered surface wind stress and (2) thermodynamical change due to altered temperature advection. Both dynamical and thermodynamical change positively reinforce each other in producing sea change. A simple advection model is used to demonstrate that most of the sea ice change can be explained from the sea ice drift due to the anomalous surface wind stress. Changes in the production or melt of sea ice by thermodynamical effects are less important. Overall, this study adds to an increasing body of evidence that the stratosphere not only impacts weather and climate of the atmosphere but also the surface and

  5. How does downward planetary wave coupling affect polar stratospheric ozone in the Arctic winter stratosphere?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubis, Sandro W.; Silverman, Vered; Matthes, Katja; Harnik, Nili; Omrani, Nour-Eddine; Wahl, Sebastian

    2017-02-01

    It is well established that variable wintertime planetary wave forcing in the stratosphere controls the variability of Arctic stratospheric ozone through changes in the strength of the polar vortex and the residual circulation. While previous studies focused on the variations in upward wave flux entering the lower stratosphere, here the impact of downward planetary wave reflection on ozone is investigated for the first time. Utilizing the MERRA2 reanalysis and a fully coupled chemistry-climate simulation with the Community Earth System Model (CESM1(WACCM)) of the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR), we find two downward wave reflection effects on ozone: (1) the direct effect in which the residual circulation is weakened during winter, reducing the typical increase of ozone due to upward planetary wave events and (2) the indirect effect in which the modification of polar temperature during winter affects the amount of ozone destruction in spring. Winter seasons dominated by downward wave reflection events (i.e., reflective winters) are characterized by lower Arctic ozone concentration, while seasons dominated by increased upward wave events (i.e., absorptive winters) are characterized by relatively higher ozone concentration. This behavior is consistent with the cumulative effects of downward and upward planetary wave events on polar stratospheric ozone via the residual circulation and the polar temperature in winter. The results establish a new perspective on dynamical processes controlling stratospheric ozone variability in the Arctic by highlighting the key role of wave reflection.

  6. Modeling Nitrogen Oxides in the Lower Stratosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawa, S. Randy; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This talk will focus on the status of current understanding (not a historical review) as regards modeling nitrogen oxides (NOy) in the lower stratosphere (LS). The presentation will be organized around three major areas of process understanding: 1) NOy sources, sinks, and transport to the LS, 2) NOy species partitioning, and 3) polar multiphase processes. In each area, process topics will be identified with an estimate of the degree of confidence associated with their representation in numerical models. Several exotic and/or speculative processes will also be discussed. Those topics associated with low confidence or knowledge gaps, weighted by their prospective importance in stratospheric chemical modeling, will be collected into recommendations for further study. Suggested approaches to further study will be presented for discussion.

  7. The potential for ozone depletion in the Arctic polar stratosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brune, W. H.; Anderson, J. G.; Toohey, D. W.; Fahey, D. W.; Kawa, S. R.; Poole, L. R.

    1991-01-01

    The nature of the Arctic polar stratosphere is observed to be similar in many respects to that of the Antarctic polar stratosphere, where an ozone hole has been identified. Most of the available chlorine (CHl and ClONO2) was converted by reactions on polar stratospheric clouds to reactive ClO and Cl2O2 thoroughout the Arctic polar vortex before midwinter. Reactive nitrogen was converted to HNO3, and some, with spatial inhomogeneity, fell out of the stratosphere. These chemical changes ensured characteristic ozone losses of 10 to 15 percent at altitudes inside the polar vortex where polar stratospheric clouds had occurred. These local losses can translate into 5 to 8 percent losses in the vertical column abundance of ozone. As the amount of stratospheric chlorine inevitably increases by 50 percent over the next two decades, ozone losses recognizable as an ozone hole may well appear.

  8. Quantifying transport into the Arctic lowermost stratosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Werner

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In-situ measurements of the long-lived trace gases N2O, CFC-11 (CCl3F, H-1211 (CBrClF2, CH4, O3 and H2O performed in the Arctic winter 2003 on board the high-altitude aircraft M55 Geophysica are presented and used to study transport into the lowermost stratosphere (LMS. Fractions of air in the LMS originating in i the troposphere, ii the extra-vortex stratosphere above 400 K and iii the Arctic vortex above 400 K are determined using a simple mass balance calculation. The analysis exhibits a strong tropospheric influence of 50% or more in the lowest 20 K of the high-latitude LMS. Above this region the LMS is dominated by air masses having descended from above 400 K. Below the Arctic vortex region at potential temperatures above 360 K, air in the LMS is a mixture of extra-vortex stratospheric and vortex air masses. The vortex fraction increases from about 40% at 360 K to 100% at 400 K for equivalent latitudes >70° N. This influence of air masses descending through the bottom of the polar vortex increases over the course of the winter. By the end of winter a significant fraction of 30% vortex air in the LMS is found even at an equivalent latitude of 40° N. Since the chemical and dynamical history of vortex air is distinct from that of mid-latitude stratospheric air masses, this study implies that the composition of the mid- to high-latitude LMS during late winter and spring is significantly influenced by the Arctic vortex.

  9. HiSentinel: A Stratospheric Airship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, I.; Lew, T.; Perry, W.; Smith, M.

    On December 4 2005 a team led by Southwest Research Institute SwRI successfully demonstrated powered flight of the HiSentinel stratospheric airship at an altitude of 74 000 feet The development team of Aerostar International the Air Force Research Laboratory AFRL and SwRI launched the airship from Roswell N M for a five-hour technology demonstration flight The 146-foot-long airship carried a 60-pound equipment pod and propulsion system when it became only the second airship in history to achieve powered flight in the stratosphere Designed for launch from remote sites these airships do not require large hangars or special facilities Unlike most stratospheric airship concepts HiSentinel is launched flaccid with the hull only partially inflated with helium As the airship rises the helium expands until it completely inflates the hull to the rigid aerodynamic shape required for operation A description of previous Team development results of the test flight plans for future development and applicability to future science missions will be presented

  10. Seasonal radiative modeling of Titan's stratosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bézard, Bruno; Vinatier, Sandrine; Achterberg, Richard

    2016-10-01

    We have developed a seasonal radiative model of Titan's stratosphere to investigate the time variation of stratospheric temperatures in the 10-3 - 5 mbar range as observed by the Cassini/CIRS spectrometer. The model incorporates gas and aerosol vertical profiles derived from Cassini/CIRS spectra to calculate the heating and cooling rate profiles as a function of time and latitude. In the equatorial region, the radiative equilibrium profile is warmer than the observed one. Adding adiabatic cooling in the energy equation, with a vertical velocity profile decreasing with depth and having w ≈ 0.4 mm sec-1 at 1 mbar, allows us to reproduce the observed profile. The model predicts a 5 K decrease at 1 mbar between 2008 and 2016 as a result of orbit eccentricity, in relatively good agreement with the observations. At other latitudes, as expected, the radiative model predicts seasonal variations of temperature larger than observed, pointing to latitudinal redistribution of heat by dynamics. Vertical velocities seasonally varying between -0.4 and 1.2 mm sec-1 at 1 mbar provide adiabatic cooling and heating adequate to reproduce the time variation of 1-mbar temperatures from 2005 to 2016 at 30°N and S. The model is also used to investigate the role of the strong compositional changes observed at high southern latitudes after equinox in the concomitant rapid cooling of the stratosphere.

  11. COS in the stratosphere. [sulfuric acid aerosol precursor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inn, E. C. Y.; Vedder, J. F.; Tyson, B. J.; Ohara, D.

    1979-01-01

    Carbonyl sulfide (COS) has been detected in the stratosphere, and mixing ratio measurements are reported for altitudes of 15.2 to 31.2 km. A large volume, cryogenic sampling system mounted on board a U-2 aircraft has been used for lower stratosphere measurements and a balloon platform for measurement at 31.2 km. These observations and measurements strongly support the concept that stratospheric COS is an important precursor in the formation of sulfuric acid aerosols.

  12. Denitrification and polar stratospheric cloud formation during the Arctic winter 2009/2010

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    F. Khosrawi; J. Urban; M. C. Pitts; P. Voelger; P. Achtert; M. Kaphlanov; M. L. Santee; G. L. Manney; D. Murtagh; K.-H. Fricke

    2011-01-01

    The sedimentation of HNO3 containing Polar Stratospheric Cloud (PSC) particles leads to a permanent removal of HNO3 and thus to a denitrification of the stratosphere, an effect which plays an important role in stratospheric ozone depletion...

  13. Exposing Microorganisms in the Stratosphere for Planetary Protection Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, David J. (Compiler)

    2015-01-01

    Earths stratosphere is similar to the surface of Mars: rarified air which is dry, cold, and irradiated. E-MIST is a balloon payload that has 4 independently rotating skewers that hold known quantities of spore-forming bacteria isolated from spacecraft assembly facilities at NASA. Knowing the survival profile of microbes in the stratosphere can uniquely contribute to NASA Planetary Protection for Mars.Objectives 1. Collect environmental data in the stratosphere to understand factors impacting microbial survival. 2. Determine of surviving microbes (compared to starting quantities). 3. Examine microbial DNA mutations induced by stratosphere exposure.

  14. Millimeter wave spectroscopic measurements of stratospheric and mesospheric constituents over the Italian Alps: stratospheric ozone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Romaniello

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Measurements of rotational lines emitted by middle atmospheric trace gases have been carried out from the Alpine station of Testa Grigia (45.9°N, 7.7°E, elev. 3500 m by means of a Ground-Based Millimeter-wave Spectrometer (GBMS. Observations of species such as O3, HNO3, CO, N2O, HCN, and HDO took place during 4 winter periods, from February 2004 to March 2007, for a total of 116 days of measurements grouped in about 18 field campaigns. By studying the pressure-broadened shape of emission lines the vertical distribution of the observed constituents is retrieved within an altitude range of ?17-75 km, constrained by the 600 MHz pass band and the 65 kHz spectral resolution of the back-end spectrometer. This work discusses the behavior of stratospheric O3 during the entire period of operation at Testa Grigia. Mid-latitude O3 columnar content as estimated using GBMS measurements can vary by large amounts over a period of very few days, with the largest variations observed in December 2005, February 2006, and March 2006, confirming that the northern winter of 2005-2006 was characterized by a particularly intense planetary wave activity. The largest rapid variation from maximum to minimum O3 column values over Testa Grigia took place in December 2006 and reached a relative value of 72% with respect to the average column content for that period. During most GBMS observation times much of the variability is concentrated in the column below 20 km, with tropospheric weather systems and advection of tropical tropospheric air into the lower stratosphere over Testa Grigia having a large impact on the observed variations in column contents. Nonetheless, a wide variability is also found in middle stratospheric GBMS O3 measurements, as expected for mid-latitude ozone. We find that O3 mixing ratios at ?32 km are very well correlated with the solar illumination experienced by air masses over the previous ?15 days, showing that already at 32 km

  15. The impact of the stratosphere on tropospheric climate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hinssen, Y.B.L.

    2010-01-01

    The stratospheric potential vorticity (PV) field in the current climate, its variations around the occurrence of a sudden stratospheric warming, and possible future changes are examined. The PV presents a compact way to describe the state of the atmosphere, and is linked to all other dynamical field

  16. Stratospheric aluminum oxide. [possibly from solid-fuel rocket exhausts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brownlee, D. E.; Tomandl, D.; Ferry, G. V.

    1976-01-01

    Balloons and U-2 aircraft were used to collect micrometer-sized stratospheric aerosols. It was discovered that for the past 6 years at least, aluminum oxide spheres have been the major stratospheric particulate in the size range from 3 to 8 micrometers. The most probable source of the spheres is the exhaust from solid-fuel rockets.

  17. A New Connection Between Greenhouse Warming and Stratospheric Ozone Depletion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salawitch, R.

    1998-01-01

    The direct radiative effects of the build-up of carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases have led to a gradual cooling of the stratosphere with largest changes in temperature occurring in the upper stratosphere, well above the region of peak ozone concentration.

  18. Detection of deep stratospheric intrusions by cosmogenic 35S

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Mang; Su, Lin; Shaheen, Robina; Fung, Jimmy C. H.; Thiemens, Mark H.

    2016-10-01

    The extent to which stratospheric intrusions on synoptic scales influence the tropospheric ozone (O3) levels remains poorly understood, because quantitative detection of stratospheric air has been challenging. Cosmogenic 35S mainly produced in the stratosphere has the potential to identify stratospheric air masses at ground level, but this approach has not yet been unambiguously shown. Here, we report unusually high 35S concentrations (7,390 atoms m-3; ˜16 times greater than annual average) in fine sulfate aerosols (aerodynamic diameter less than 0.95 µm) collected at a coastal site in southern California on May 3, 2014, when ground-level O3 mixing ratios at air quality monitoring stations across southern California (43 of 85) exceeded the recently revised US National Ambient Air Quality Standard (daily maximum 8-h average: 70 parts per billion by volume). The stratospheric origin of the significantly enhanced 35S level is supported by in situ measurements of air pollutants and meteorological variables, satellite observations, meteorological analysis, and box model calculations. The deep stratospheric intrusion event was driven by the coupling between midlatitude cyclones and Santa Ana winds, and it was responsible for the regional O3 pollution episode. These results provide direct field-based evidence that 35S is an additional sensitive and unambiguous tracer in detecting stratospheric air in the boundary layer and offer the potential for resolving the stratospheric influences on the tropospheric O3 level.

  19. Detection of deep stratospheric intrusions by cosmogenic 35S.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Mang; Su, Lin; Shaheen, Robina; Fung, Jimmy C H; Thiemens, Mark H

    2016-10-04

    The extent to which stratospheric intrusions on synoptic scales influence the tropospheric ozone (O3) levels remains poorly understood, because quantitative detection of stratospheric air has been challenging. Cosmogenic (35)S mainly produced in the stratosphere has the potential to identify stratospheric air masses at ground level, but this approach has not yet been unambiguously shown. Here, we report unusually high (35)S concentrations (7,390 atoms m(-3); ∼16 times greater than annual average) in fine sulfate aerosols (aerodynamic diameter less than 0.95 µm) collected at a coastal site in southern California on May 3, 2014, when ground-level O3 mixing ratios at air quality monitoring stations across southern California (43 of 85) exceeded the recently revised US National Ambient Air Quality Standard (daily maximum 8-h average: 70 parts per billion by volume). The stratospheric origin of the significantly enhanced (35)S level is supported by in situ measurements of air pollutants and meteorological variables, satellite observations, meteorological analysis, and box model calculations. The deep stratospheric intrusion event was driven by the coupling between midlatitude cyclones and Santa Ana winds, and it was responsible for the regional O3 pollution episode. These results provide direct field-based evidence that (35)S is an additional sensitive and unambiguous tracer in detecting stratospheric air in the boundary layer and offer the potential for resolving the stratospheric influences on the tropospheric O3 level.

  20. Odin stratospheric proxy NOy measurements and climatology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Murtagh

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Five years of OSIRIS (Optical Spectrograph and InfraRed Imager System NO2 and SMR (Sub-Millimetre Radiometer HNO3 observations from the Odin satellite, combined with data from a photochemical box model, have been used to construct a stratospheric proxy NOy data set including the gases: NO, NO2, HNO3, 2×N2O5 and CIONO2. This Odin NOy climatology is based on all daytime measurements and contains monthly mean and standard deviation, expressed as mixing ratio or number density, as function of latitude or equivalent latitude (5° bins on 17 vertical layers (altitude, pressure or potential temperature between 14 and 46 km. Comparisons with coincident NOy profiles from the Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment–Fourier Transform Spectrometer (ACE-FTS instrument were used to evaluate several methods to combine Odin observations with model data. This comparison indicates that the most appropriate merging technique uses OSIRIS measurements of NO2, scaled with model NO/NO2 ratios, to estimate NO. The sum of 2×N2O5 and CIONO2 is estimated from uncertainty-based weighted averages of scaled observations of SMR HNO3 and OSIRIS NO2. Comparisons with ACE-FTS suggest the precision (random error and accuracy (systematic error of Odin NOy profiles are about 15% and 20%, respectively. Further comparisons between Odin and the Canadian Middle Atmosphere Model (CMAM show agreement to within 20% and 2 ppb throughout most of the stratosphere except in the polar vortices. A particularly large disagreement within the Antarctic vortex in the upper stratosphere during spring indicates too strong descent of air in CMAM. The combination of good temporal and spatial coverage, a relatively long data record, and good accuracy and precision make this a valuable NOy product for various atmospheric studies and model assessments.

  1. On particles in the Arctic stratosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. S. Jørgensen

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Soon after the discovery of the Antarctic ozone hole it became clear that particles in the polar stratosphere had an infl uence on the destruction of the ozone layer. Two major types of particles, sulphate aerosols and Polar Stratospheric Clouds (PSCs, provide the surfaces where fast heterogeneous chemical reactions convert inactive halogen reservoir species into potentially ozone-destroying radicals. Lidar measurements have been used to classify the PSCs. Following the Mt. Pinatubo eruption in June 1991 it was found that the Arctic stratosphere was loaded with aerosols, and that aerosols observed with lidar and ozone observed with ozone sondes displayed a layered structure, and that the aerosol and ozone contents in the layers frequently appeared to be negatively correlated. The layered structure was probably due to modulation induced by the dynamics at the edge of the polar vortex. Lidar observations of the Mt. Pinatubo aerosols were in several cases accompanied by balloon-borne backscatter soundings, whereby backscatter measurements in three different wavelengths made it possible to obtain information about the particle sizes. An investigation of the infl uence of synoptic temperature histories on the physical properties of PSC particles has shown that most of the liquid type 1b particles were observed in the process of an ongoing, relatively fast, and continuous cooling from temperatures clearly above the nitric acid trihydrate condensation temperature (TNAT. On the other hand, it appeared that a relatively long period, with a duration of at least 1-2 days, at temperatures below TNAT provide the conditions which may lead to the production of solid type 1a PSCs.

  2. Titan's south polar stratospheric vortex evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teanby, Nicholas A.; Vinatier, Sandrine; Sylvestre, Melody; de Kok, Remco; Nixon, Conor; Irwin, Patrick Gerard Joseph

    2016-10-01

    Titan experienced northern spring equinox in August 2009 when the south polar region was plunged into perpetual darkness. Following equinox, the south pole experienced the most extreme changes in stratospheric behaviour ever observed: the global stratospheric circulation cell reversed direction (Teanby et al 2012), HCN ice clouds (de Kok et al 2014) and other exotic condensates appeared over the south pole (Jennings et al 2015, West et al 2016), and significant composition and temperature changes occurred (Vinatier et al 2015, Teanby et al 2015, Coustenis et al 2016). Here we use Cassini CIRS limb and nadir observations from 2004-2016 to investigate the evolution of south polar stratospheric temperature and composition in the post-equinox period. Reversal following equinox was extremely rapid, taking less than 6 months (1/60th of a Titan year), which resulted in an initial adiabatic polar hot spot and increased trace gas abundances (Teanby et al 2012). However, rather than develop this trend further as winter progressed, Titan's polar hot spot subsequently disappeared, with the formation of a polar cold spot. Recently in late 2015 / early 2016 a more subdued hotspot began to return with associated extreme trace gas abundances. This talk will reveal the rapid and significant changes observed so far and discuss implications for possible polar feedback mechanisms and Titan's atmospheric dynamics.Coustenis et al (2016), Icarus, 270, 409-420.de Kok et al (2014), Nature, 514, 65-67.Jennings et al (2015), ApJL, 804, L34.Teanby et al (2012), Nature, 491, 732-735.Teanby et al (2015), DPS47, National Harbor, 205.02.Vinatier et al (2015), Icarus, 250, 95-115.West et al (2016), Icarus, 270, 399-408.

  3. Stratospheric electric field measurements with transmediterranean balloons

    Science.gov (United States)

    de La Morena, B. A.; Alberca, L. F.; Curto, J. J.; Holzworth, R. H.

    1993-01-01

    The horizontal component of the stratospheric electric field was measured using a balloon in the ODISEA Campaign of Transmediterranean Balloon Program. The balloon flew between Trapani (Sicily) and El Arenosillo (Huelva, Spain) along the 39 deg N parallel at a height between 34 and 24 km. The high values found for the field on fair-weather and its quasi-turbulent variation, both in amplitude and direction, are difficult to explain with the classical electric field source. A new source, first described by Holzworth (1989), is considered as possibly causing them.

  4. Photochemistry of materials in the stratosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnston, H.S. [Lawrence Berkeley Laboratories, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    This research is concerned with global change in the atmosphere, including photochemical modeling and, in the past, experimental gas-phase photochemistry involving molecular dynamics and laboratory study of atmospheric chemical reactions. The experimental work on this project concluded in August 1991, but there is a back-log of several journal articles to be written and submitted for publication. The theoretical work involves photochemical modeling in collaboration with Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and advising the Upper Atmosphere Research Program on Atmospheric Effects of Stratospheric Aircraft, National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA).

  5. Condensation in Saturn's Stratospheric Haze Layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barth, Erika L.; Moses, Julianne I.

    2016-10-01

    Haze particles in Saturn's stratosphere can be seen in the visible limb images of Cassini's Imaging Science Subsystem (ISS). These hazes are likely a mix of particles, including solid organics formed as a result of methane photolysis and electron deposition, as well as the condensation of water and hydrocarbon ices. We have examined data from both Cassini and Voyager to study the detailed vertical structure of absorbing/scattering particulates in Saturn's stratosphere and developed a Saturn version of the Community Aerosol and Radiation Model for Atmospheres (CARMA), adding a large database of hydrocarbons that are observed or expected to be present in Saturn's atmosphere.Our modeling indicates that water ice condenses independently of the hydrocarbons to form a thin layer above the 0.1 mbar pressure level. Between about 5 and 50 mbar, the hydrocarbons reach their condensation levels (in order of increasing pressure level): C6H6, C5H12, C4H2, C4H10, and C2H2. Because of the proximity of their condensation levels and due to the gravitational settling of the particles, the hydrocarbons are likely condensing on one another and forming a thicker layer of mixed composition. Interestingly, butane (C4H10) has a triple point around 135 K which is much lower than most of the other condensing species we've explored. Given an approximate condensation level of 10 mbar and the observed temperature changes at this pressure level following the December 2010 northern-hemisphere storm (stratospheric temperatures were elevated by as much as 50-70 K in a region near 40° N latitude.), melting and further nucleation of droplets could be occurring.A number of factors including temperature profile, vapor pressure equation, volatile abundance, nucleation critical saturation, and coagulation efficiency will affect the altitudes of the individual ice layers. We will present a summary of results following the nucleation and growth of compounds in order to quantify the likely size and

  6. Helium and neon isotopes in stratospheric particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nier, A. O.; Schlutter, D. J.

    1990-01-01

    He and Ne isotope ratios were determined for 16 interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) collected in the stratosphere. The observed He concentration varied greatly from particle to particle, with the highest values approaching those found for lunar surface fines and some gas-rich meteorites. The average Ne-20/Ne-22 ratio was 12.0 + or - 0.5. The data suggest that the observed IDPs could have entered the atmosphere at relatively low velocities, and hence may be primarily of asteroidal rather than cometary origin.

  7. Stratospheric composition from balloon based measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mencaraglia, F.; Carli, B. [Ist. per le Ricerche sulle Onde Elettromagnetiche, Firenze (Italy); Bonetti, A.; Ciarpallini, P. [Univ. di Firenze (Italy); Carlotti, M.; Lepri, G. [Univ. di Bologna (Italy); Alboni, F.; Cortesi, U.; Ridolfi, M. [Fondazione per la Metereologia Applicata, Firenze (Italy)

    1995-12-31

    Measurements of the composition of the earth`s atmosphere is of fundamental importance for the study of atmospheric chemistry and for developing models that can predict the evolution of the atmosphere itself. Here, the chemical composition of the lower stratosphere has been measured using a polarizing interferometer operating in the far infrared and submillimetric spectral region. The instrument was flown three times (in 1992, 1993 and 1994) from the NSBF balloon base (Fort Sumner, New Mexico) in coincidence with overpasses of the UARS satellite, for a total of about 50 hours of measurements. In this paper the authors report some of the results obtained from the data analysis made up to now.

  8. Troposphere-stratosphere exchange - constraints from water vapour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Y.; Du, J.; Fueglistaler, S.; Haynes, P. H.

    2008-12-01

    Transport into the stratospheric 'overworld' is thought to occur predominantly across the tropical tropopause, whereas transport into the lowermost stratosphere may also occur through quasi-horizontal transport on isentropic levels between 300 and 380K potential temperature. The distribution of stratospheric water vapour is sensitively dependent upon the detailed temperature history of air parcel trajectories, and combined with a Lagrangian study can be used as a tracer for quantifying the relative importance of cross-isentropic mass flux and quasi-isentropic mass flux into the stratosphere. Here we combine measurements from the Microwave Limb Sounder on board of AURA satellite, with trajectory calculations to diagnose the pathways of troposphere-stratosphere exchange. Trajectories are calculated using winds and diabatic heating rates from the new interim reanalysis currently carried out at the European Centre for Medium-range Weather Forecast.

  9. Transport pathways from the Asian monsoon anticyclone to the stratosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garny, Hella; Randel, William

    2016-04-01

    The upper tropospheric Asian monsoon anticyclone emerges in response to persistent deep convection over India and southeast Asia in northern summer. The monsoon circulation is associated with rapid transport from the surface to the upper troposphere within convective updrafts, leading to tracer anomalies within the anticyclone. Possibly air is transported further into the stratosphere, but the exact pathways of air from the upper tropospheric anticyclone to the stratosphere are currently under debate. While air is thought to be confined to the anticyclone by its surrounding wind jets, large variability in the anticyclone results in shedding of air from the anticyclone to its surrounding, and possibly air might reach the extratropical lower stratosphere by isentropic mixing. On the other hand, positive vertical velocities in the anticyclone region suggests upward transport of air into the tropical lower stratosphere. In this study, we investigate transport pathways of air originating in the upper tropospheric Asian monsoon anticyclone based on isentropic and three-dimensional trajectories. Trajectories are driven by ERA-Interim reanalysis data, and three-dimensional results are based both on kinematic and diabatic transport calculations. Isentropic calculations show that air parcels are typically confined within the anticyclone for 10-20 days, and spread over the tropical belt within a month of their initialization. However, only few parcels (3 % at 360 K, 8 % at 380 K) reach the extratropical stratosphere by isentropic transport. When considering vertical transport we find that 31 % (48 %) of the trajectories reach the stratosphere within 60 days when using vertical velocities or diabatic heating rates to calculate vertical transport, respectively. In both cases, most parcels that reach the stratosphere are transported upward within the anticyclone and enter the stratosphere in the tropics, typically 10-20 days after their initialization at 360 K. This suggests

  10. Detection of Propene in Titan's Stratosphere

    CERN Document Server

    Nixon, Conor A; Bezard, Bruno; Vinatier, Sandrine; Teanby, Nicholas A; Sung, Keeyoon; Ansty, Todd M; Irwin, Patrick G J; Gorius, Nicolas; Cottini, Valeria; Coustenis, Athena; Flasar, F Michael

    2013-01-01

    The Voyager 1 flyby of Titan in 1980 gave a first glimpse of the chemical complexity of Titan's atmosphere, detecting many new molecules with the infrared spectrometer (IRIS). These included propane (C3H8) and propyne (CH3C2H), while the intermediate-sized C3Hx hydrocarbon (C3H6) was curiously absent. Using spectra from the Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS) on Cassini, we show the first positive detection of propene (C3H6) in Titan's stratosphere (5-sigma significance), finally filling the three-decade gap in the chemical sequence. We retrieve a vertical abundance profile from 100-250 km, that varies slowly with altitude from ~2 ppbv at 100 km, to ~5 ppbv at 200 km. The abundance of C3H6 is less than both C3H8 and CH3C2H, and we remark on an emerging paradigm in Titan's hydrocarbon abundances whereby: alkanes > alkynes > alkenes within the C2Hx and C3Hx chemical families in the lower stratosphere. More generally, there appears to be much greater ubiquity and relative abundance of triple-bonded species th...

  11. Modeling survey of ices in Titan's stratosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barth, Erika L.

    2017-03-01

    Processes in Titan's upper atmosphere, such as photochemical destruction of methane along with the destruction of nitrogen molecules from energetic electrons, result in the production of a number of hydrocarbon and nitrile compounds which are capable of condensing in the colder temperatures of Titan's mid to lower stratosphere. Stratospheric ices can contribute to the opacity of Titan's atmosphere as well as affect the chemistry of the more optically thick clouds seen in the troposphere, should they serve as condensation nuclei. We model the microphysics of a dozen trace species in Titan's atmosphere and show the resulting cloud properties. Clouds form and settle into layers between 50 and 80 km. Condensation timescales can be slow, with half the species only growing to a radius ≲ 1 μ m . Ethane cloud particles grow the largest with radii up to 20 μm. Factors such as the vapor pressure equation, nucleation rate, gas abundance, and temperature profile can have a significant effect on the appearance of the cloud particles. Though the data on optical constants is sparse for many of these ices, estimates show opacities of 10-5 -10-3 for visible wavelengths.

  12. Titan's zonal winds in its lower stratosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flasar, F. Michael; Schinder, Paul J.

    2016-10-01

    Titan's atmosphere near 80 km (20 mbar) marks the transition between lower altitudes, where radiative damping times are large and seasonal variations are muted, and higher higher altitudes, where the damping times are much smaller and temperatures and winds vary significantly over the year. Cassini radio occultation soundings at high northern latitudes in winter have indicated a sharp transition from a highly stable temperature profile in the lower stratosphere to a layer between 80 and 100 km where temperatures decrease with altitude. The cause of this destabilization may be associated with the enhanced infrared opacity of a cloud of organic ices. It is curious that 20 mbar is also the level where the Doppler Wind Experiment on the Huygens Probe at 10° S observed a deep minimum in the zonal wind profile. Application of the gradient wind relation to the altitude-pressure profiles obtained from the Cassini radio occultation soundings have shown that this minimum is global. More recent soundings, obtained as Titan's southern hemisphere moves toward winter, indicate that this structure persists. The cause of this peculiar behavior is not really understood, but the the deceleration of the zonal winds observed in the lower stratosphere may be caused by radiative damping of vertically propagating atmospheric waves in a region where the damping time decreases rapidly with altitude.

  13. Detection of Propene in Titan's Stratosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nixon, C. A.; Jennings, D. E.; Bézard, B.; Vinatier, S.; Teanby, N. A.; Sung, K.; Ansty, T. M.; Irwin, P. G. J.; Gorius, N.; Cottini, V.; Coustenis, A.; Flasar, F. M.

    2013-10-01

    The Voyager 1 flyby of Titan in 1980 gave a first glimpse of the chemical complexity of Titan's atmosphere, detecting many new molecules with the infrared interferometer spectrometer (IRIS). These included propane (C3H8) and propyne (CH3C2H), while the intermediate-sized C3H x hydrocarbon (C3H6) was curiously absent. Using spectra from the Composite Infrared Spectrometer on Cassini, we show the first positive detection of propene (C3H6) in Titan's stratosphere (5σ significance), finally filling the three-decade gap in the chemical sequence. We retrieve a vertical abundance profile from 100-250 km, that varies slowly with altitude from 2.0 ± 0.8 ppbv at 125 km, to 4.6 ± 1.5 ppbv at 200 km. The abundance of C3H6 is less than both C3H8 and CH3C2H, and we remark on an emerging paradigm in Titan's hydrocarbon abundances whereby alkanes > alkynes > alkenes within the C2H x and C3H x chemical families in the lower stratosphere. More generally, there appears to be much greater ubiquity and relative abundance of triple-bonded species than double-bonded, likely due to the greater resistance of triple bonds to photolysis and chemical attack.

  14. The contribution of ozone to future stratospheric temperature trends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maycock, Amanda

    2017-04-01

    The projected recovery of ozone from the effects of ozone depleting substances this century will modulate the stratospheric cooling due to CO2, thereby affecting the detection and attribution of stratospheric temperature trends. Here the impact of future ozone changes on stratospheric temperatures is quantified for three representative concentration pathways (RCPs) using simulations from the Fifth Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP5). For models with interactive chemistry, ozone trends offset 50% of the global annual mean upper stratospheric cooling due to CO2 for RCP4.5 and 20% for RCP8.5 between 2006-2015 and 2090-2099. For RCP2.6, ozone trends cause a net warming of the upper and lower stratosphere. The misspecification of ozone trends for RCP2.6/RCP4.5 in models that used the International Global Atmospheric Chemistry (IGAC)/Stratosphere-troposphere Processes and their Role in Climate (SPARC) Ozone Database causes anomalous warming (cooling) of the upper (lower) stratosphere compared to chemistry-climate models. The dependence of ozone chemistry on greenhouse gas concentrations should therefore be better represented in CMIP6.

  15. Stratospheric Response to Intraseasonal Changes in Incoming Solar Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garfinkel, Chaim; silverman, vered; harnik, nili; Erlich, caryn

    2016-04-01

    Superposed epoch analysis of meteorological reanalysis data is used to demonstrate a significant connection between intraseasonal solar variability and temperatures in the stratosphere. Decreasing solar flux leads to a cooling of the tropical upper stratosphere above 7hPa, while increasing solar flux leads to a warming of the tropical upper stratosphere above 7hPa, after a lag of approximately six to ten days. Late winter (February-March) Arctic stratospheric temperatures also change in response to changing incoming solar flux in a manner consistent with that seen on the 11 year timescale: ten to thirty days after the start of decreasing solar flux, the polar cap warms during the easterly phase of the Quasi-Biennal Oscillation. In contrast, cooling is present after decreasing solar flux during the westerly phase of the Quasi-Biennal Oscillation (though it is less robust than the warming during the easterly phase). The estimated composite mean changes in Northern Hemisphere upper stratospheric (~ 5hPa) polar temperatures exceed 8K, and are potentially a source of intraseasonal predictability for the surface. These changes in polar temperature are consistent with the changes in wave driving entering the stratosphere. Garfinkel, C.I., V. Silverman, N. Harnik, C. Erlich, Y. Riz (2015), Stratospheric Response to Intraseasonal Changes in Incoming Solar Radiation, J. Geophys. Res. Atmos., 120, 7648-7660. doi: 10.1002/2015JD023244.

  16. Processes Controlling Water Vapor in the Winter Arctic Stratospheric Middleworld

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfister, Leonhard; Selkirk, Henry; Jensen, Eric; Sachse, Glenn; Podolske, James; Schoeberl, Mark; Browell, Edward; Ismail, Syed; Hipskind, R. Stephen (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Water vapor in the winter arctic stratospheric middleworld is import-an: for two reasons: (1) the arctic middleworld is a source of air for the upper Troposphere because of the generally downward motion, and thus its water vapor content helps determine upper tropospheric water, a critical part of the earth's radiation budget; and (2) under appropriate conditions, relative humidities will be large, even to the point of stratospheric cirrus cloud formation, leading to the production of active chlorine species that could destroy ozone. On a number of occasions during SOLVE, clouds were observed in the stratospheric middleworld by the DC-8 aircraft. These tended to coincide with regions of low temperatures, though some cases suggest water vapor enhancements due to troposphere-to-stratosphere transport. The goal of this work is to understand the importance of processes in and at the edge of the arctic stratospheric middleworld in determining water vapor at these levels. Specifically, is water vapor at these levels determined largely by the descent of air from above, or are clouds both within and at the edge of the stratospheric middleworld potentially important? How important is troposphere-to-stratosphere transport of air in determining stratospheric middleworld water vapor content? To this end, we will first examine the minimum saturation mixing ratios along theta/EPV tubes during the SOLVE winter and compare these with DC-8 water vapor observations. This will be a rough indicator of how high relative humidities can get, and the likelihood of cirrus cloud formation in various parts of the stratospheric middleworld. We will then examine saturation mixing ratios along both diabatic and adiabatic trajectories, comparing these values with actual aircraft water vapor observations, both in situ and remote. Finally, we will attempt to actually predict water vapor using minimum saturation mixing ratios along trajectories, cloud injection (derived from satellite imagery) along

  17. Stratospheric BrONO2 observed by MIPAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Fischer

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available The first measurements of stratospheric bromine nitrate (BrONO2 are reported. Bromine nitrate has been clearly identified in atmospheric infrared emission spectra recorded with the Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding (MIPAS aboard the European Envisat satellite, and stratospheric concentration profiles have been determined for different conditions (day and night, different latitudes. The BrONO2 concentrations show strong day/night variations, with much lower concentrations during the day. Maximum volume mixing ratios observed during night are 20 to 25 pptv. The observed concentration profiles are in agreement with estimations from photochemical models and show that the current understanding of stratospheric bromine chemistry is generally correct.

  18. Stratospheric BrONO2 observed by MIPAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Fischer

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available The first measurements of stratospheric bromine nitrate (BrONO2 are reported. Bromine nitrate has been clearly identified in atmospheric infrared emission spectra recorded with the Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding (MIPAS aboard the European Envisat satellite, and stratospheric concentration profiles have been determined for different conditions (day and night, different latitudes. The BrONO2 concentrations show strong day/night variations, with much lower concentrations during the day. Maximum volume mixing ratios observed during night are 20 to 25 pptv. The observed concentration profiles are in agreement with estimations from photochemical models and show that the current understanding of stratospheric bromine chemistry is generally correct.

  19. A brief history of stratospheric ozone research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rolf Müller

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Ozone is one of the most important trace species in the atmosphere. Therefore, the history of research on ozone has also received a good deal of attention. Here a short overview of ozone research (with a focus on the stratosphere is given, starting from the first atmospheric measurements and ending with current developments. It is valuable to study the history of ozone research, because much can be learned for current research from an understanding of how previous discoveries were made. Moreover, since the 1970s, the history of ozone research has also encompassed also the history of the human impact on the ozone layer and thus the history of policy measures taken to protect the ozone layer, notably the Montreal Protocol and its amendments and adjustments. The history of this development is particularly important because it may serve as a prototype for the development of policy measures for the protection of the Earth's climate.

  20. Stratospheric Ozone: Transport, Photochemical Production and Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglass, A. R.; Kawa, S. R.; Jackman, C. H.

    2003-01-01

    Observations from various satellite instruments (e.g., Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS), Halogen Occultation Experiment (HALOE), Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS)) specify the latitude and seasonal variations of total ozone and ozone as a function of altitude. These seasonal variations change with latitude and altitude partly due to seasonal variation in transport and temperature, partly due to differences in the balance between photochemical production and loss processes, and partly due to differences in the relative importance of the various ozone loss processes. Comparisons of modeled seasonal ozone behavior with observations test the following: the seasonal dependence of dynamical processes where these dominate the ozone tendency; the seasonal dependence of photochemical processes in the upper stratosphere; and the seasonal change in the balance between photochemical and dynamical processes.

  1. Polar stratospheric clouds and ozone depletion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toon, Owen B.; Turco, Richard P.

    1991-01-01

    A review is presented of investigations into the correlation between the depletion of ozone and the formation of polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs). Satellite measurements from Nimbus 7 showed that over the years the depletion from austral spring to austral spring has generally worsened. Approximately 70 percent of the ozone above Antarctica, which equals about 3 percent of the earth's ozone, is lost during September and October. Various hypotheses for ozone depletion are discussed including the theory suggesting that chlorine compounds might be responsible for the ozone hole, whereby chlorine enters the atmosphere as a component of chlorofluorocarbons produced by humans. The three types of PSCs, nitric acid trihydrate, slowly cooling water-ice, and rapidly cooling water-ice clouds act as important components of the Antarctic ozone depletion. It is indicated that destruction of the ozone will be more severe each year for the next few decades, leading to a doubling in area of the Antarctic ozone hole.

  2. Stratonauts pioneers venturing into the stratosphere

    CERN Document Server

    Ehrenfried, Manfred "Dutch"

    2014-01-01

    Stratonauts chronicles humankind’s quest for ever higher altitudes from ancient times to the present. It is based upon history, science and technology, and tells some interesting and fascinating stories along the way. It pays tribute to those killed while attempting to reach the stratosphere over the past several centuries.   “Dutch” von Ehrenfried uses his personal experience as a NASA sensor operator on the RB-57F, flying to an altitude of 70,000 feet, as well as the input and experience from other RB-57F, U-2, A-12, SR-71 and F-104 pilots. Although many of the aircraft and balloons are described, more emphasis is placed on the crews and what they went through. This book is intended for aviators of all kinds and flying enthusiasts in general.

  3. Stratospheric sulfate geoengineering impacts on global agriculture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, L.; Robock, A.; Lawrence, P.; Lombardozzi, D.

    2015-12-01

    Stratospheric sulfate geoengineering has been proposed to reduce the impacts of anthropogenic climate change. If it is ever used, it would change agricultural production, and so is one of the future climate scenarios for the third phase of the Global Gridded Crop Model Intercomparison. As an example of those impacts, we use the Community Land Model (CLM-crop 4.5) to simulate how climate changes from the G4 geoengineering scenario from the Geoengineering Modeling Intercomparison Project. The G4 geoengineering scenario specifies, in combination with RCP4.5 forcing, starting in 2020 daily injections of a constant amount of SO2 at a rate of 5 Tg SO2 per year at one point on the Equator into the lower stratosphere. Eight climate modeling groups have completed G4 simulations. We use the crop model to simulate the impacts of climate change (temperature, precipitation, and solar radiation) on the global agriculture system for five crops - rice, maize, soybeans, cotton, and sugarcane. In general, without irrigation, compared with the reference run (RCP4.5), global production of cotton, rice and sugarcane would increase significantly due to the cooling effect. Maize and soybeans show different regional responses. In tropical regions, maize and soybean have a higher yield in G4 compared with RCP4.5, while in the temperate regions they have a lower yield under a geoengineered climate. Impacts on specific countries in terms of different crop production depend on their locations. For example, the United States and Argentina show soybean production reduction of about 15% under G4 compared to RCP4.5, while Brazil increases soybean production by about 10%.

  4. Odin stratospheric proxy NOy measurements and climatology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Murtagh

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Five years of OSIRIS (Optical Spectrograph and InfraRed Imager System NO2 and SMR (Sub-millimetre and Millimetre Radiometer HNO3 observations from the Odin satellite, combined with data from a photochemical box model, have been used to construct a stratospheric proxy NOy data set including the gases: NO, NO2, HNO3, 2×N2O5 and ClONO2. This Odin NOy climatology is based on all daytime measurements and contains monthly mean and standard deviation, expressed as mixing ratio or number density, as function of latitude or equivalent latitude (5° bins on 17 vertical layers (altitude, pressure or potential temperature between 14 and 46 km. Comparisons with coincident NOy profiles from the Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment-Fourier Transform Spectrometer (ACE-FTS instrument were used to evaluate several methods to combine Odin observations with model data. This comparison indicates that the most appropriate merging technique uses OSIRIS measurements of NO2, scaled with model NO/NO2 ratios, to estimate NO. The sum of 2×N2O5 and ClONO2 is estimated from uncertainty-based weighted averages of scaled observations of SMR HNO3 and OSIRIS NO2. Comparisons with ACE-FTS suggest the precision (random error and accuracy (systematic error of Odin NOy profiles are about 15% and 20%, respectively. Further comparisons between Odin and the Canadian Middle Atmosphere Model (CMAM show agreement to within 20% and 2 ppb throughout most of the stratosphere except in the polar vortices. The combination of good temporal and spatial coverage, a relatively long data record, and good accuracy and precision make this a valuable NOy product for various atmospheric studies and model assessments.

  5. Stratospheric Aerosols for Solar Radiation Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kravitz, Ben

    SRM in the context of this entry involves placing a large amount of aerosols in the stratosphere to reduce the amount of solar radiation reaching the surface, thereby cooling the surface and counteracting some of the warming from anthropogenic greenhouse gases. The way this is accomplished depends on the specific aerosol used, but the basic mechanism involves backscattering and absorbing certain amounts of solar radiation aloft. Since warming from greenhouse gases is due to longwave (thermal) emission, compensating for this warming by reduction of shortwave (solar) energy is inherently imperfect, meaning SRM will have climate effects that are different from the effects of climate change. This will likely manifest in the form of regional inequalities, in that, similarly to climate change, some regions will benefit from SRM, while some will be adversely affected, viewed both in the context of present climate and a climate with high CO2 concentrations. These effects are highly dependent upon the means of SRM, including the type of aerosol to be used, the particle size and other microphysical concerns, and the methods by which the aerosol is placed in the stratosphere. SRM has never been performed, nor has deployment been tested, so the research up to this point has serious gaps. The amount of aerosols required is large enough that SRM would require a major engineering endeavor, although SRM is potentially cheap enough that it could be conducted unilaterally. Methods of governance must be in place before deployment is attempted, should deployment even be desired. Research in public policy, ethics, and economics, as well as many other disciplines, will be essential to the decision-making process. SRM is only a palliative treatment for climate change, and it is best viewed as part of a portfolio of responses, including mitigation, adaptation, and possibly CDR. At most, SRM is insurance against dangerous consequences that are directly due to increased surface air

  6. Simulation of stratospheric water vapor trends: impact on stratospheric ozone chemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Stenke

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available A transient model simulation of the 40-year time period 1960 to 1999 with the coupled climate-chemistry model (CCM ECHAM4.L39(DLR/CHEM shows a stratospheric water vapor increase over the last two decades of 0.7 ppmv and, additionally, a short-term increase after major volcanic eruptions. Furthermore, a long-term decrease in global total ozone as well as a short-term ozone decline in the tropics after volcanic eruptions are modeled. In order to understand the resulting effects of the water vapor changes on lower stratospheric ozone chemistry, different perturbation simulations were performed with the CCM ECHAM4.L39(DLR/CHEM feeding the water vapor perturbations only to the chemistry part. Two different long-term perturbations of lower stratospheric water vapor, +1 ppmv and +5 ppmv, and a short-term perturbation of +2 ppmv with an e-folding time of two months were applied. An additional stratospheric water vapor amount of 1 ppmv results in a 5–10% OH increase in the tropical lower stratosphere between 100 and 30 hPa. As a direct consequence of the OH increase the ozone destruction by the HOx cycle becomes 6.4% more effective. Coupling processes between the HOx-family and the NOx/ClOx-family also affect the ozone destruction by other catalytic reaction cycles. The NOx cycle becomes 1.6% less effective, whereas the effectiveness of the ClOx cycle is again slightly enhanced. A long-term water vapor increase does not only affect gas-phase chemistry, but also heterogeneous ozone chemistry in polar regions. The model results indicate an enhanced heterogeneous ozone depletion during antarctic spring due to a longer PSC existence period. In contrast, PSC formation in the northern hemisphere polar vortex and therefore heterogeneous ozone depletion during arctic spring are not affected by the water vapor increase, because of the less PSC activity. Finally, this study shows that 10% of the global total ozone decline in the transient model run

  7. Natural and anthropogenic perturbations of the stratospheric ozone layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brasseur, Guy P.

    1992-01-01

    The paper reviews potential causes for reduction in the ozone abundance. The response of stratospheric ozone to solar activity is discussed. Ozone changes are simulated in relation with the potential development of a fleet of high-speed stratospheric aircraft and the release in the atmosphere of chlorofluorocarbons. The calculations are performed by a two-dimensional chemical-radiative-dynamical model. The importance of heterogeneous chemistry in polar stratospheric clouds and in the Junge layer (sulfate aerosol) is emphasized. The recently reported ozone trend over the last decade is shown to have been largely caused by the simultaneous effects of increasing concentrations of chlorofluorocarbons and heterogeneous chemistry. The possibility for a reduction in stratospheric ozone following a large volcanic eruption such as that of Mount Pinatubo in 1991 is discussed.

  8. Long-term evolution of upper stratospheric ozone at selected stations of the Network for the Detection of Stratospheric Change (NDSC)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steinbrecht, W; Claude, H; Schönenborn, F; McDermid, I S; Leblanc, T; Godin, S; Song, T; Swart, D P J; Meijer, Y J; Bodeker, G E; Connor, B J; Kämpfer, N; Hocke, K; Calisesi, Y; Schneider, N; Noë, J de la; Parrish, A D; Boyd, I S; Brühl, C; Steil, B; Giorgetta, M A; Manzini, E; Thomason, L W; Zawodny, J M; McCormick, M P; Russell, J M; Bhartia, P K; Stolarski, R S; Hollandsworth-Frith, S M

    2006-01-01

    The long-term evolution of upper stratospheric ozone has been recorded by lidars and microwave radiometers within the ground-based Network for the Detection of Stratospheric Change (NDSC), and by the space-borne Solar Backscatter Ultra-Violet instruments (SBUV), Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas

  9. Source regions of stratospheric VSLS in the Indian Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quack, Birgit; Hepach, Helmke; Atlas, Elliot; Bracher, Astrid; Endres, Sonja; Arevalo-Martinez, Damian; Bange, Hermann; Lennartz, Sinikka; Steinhoff, Tobias; Booge, Dennis; Zarvasky, Alexander; Marandino, Christa; Patey, Matt; Achterberg, Eric; Dengler, Markus; Fiehn, Alina; Tegtmeier, Susann; Krüger, Kirstin

    2016-04-01

    Halogenated very-short-lived substances (VSLS), which are naturally produced in the ocean, play a significant role in present day ozone depletion, in particular in combination with enhanced stratospheric sulfate aerosol, which is also partly derived from oceanic VSLS. The decline of anthropogenic chlorine in the stratosphere within the 21st century will increase the relative importance of the natural emissions on stratospheric ozone destruction. Especially, oceanic sources and source regions of the compounds need to be better constrained, in order to improve the future prediction. During boreal summer the Asian monsoon circulation transports air masses from the Indian Ocean to the stratosphere, while the contribution of VSLS from this ocean to stratospheric halogen and sulfur is unknown. During the research cruises SO 234/2 and SO 235 in July-August 2014 onboard RV SONNE oceanic and atmospheric halogenated VSLS such as bromoform (CHBr3), dibromomethane (CH2Br2) and methyl iodide (CH3I) were measured in the subtropical and tropical West Indian Ocean for the first time. Here we present the oceanic sources of the halogenated compounds and their relation to other biogeochemical parameters (short- and longlived trace gases, phytoplankton and nutrients) along the cruise track, which covered coastal, upwelling and open ocean regimes and the Seychelles-Chagos thermocline ridge as important source region for stratospheric bromine.

  10. Stratospheric Annular Modes Induced By Stationary Wave Forcing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Körnich, H.; Schmitz, G.

    The variability of the winter stratosphere shows distinguishable features in the north- ern and southern hemisphere. Since these differences are based on the different plan- etary waves of the underlying atmosphere, we explore the mechanism how stationary wave forcing in the troposphere can induce a stratospheric Annular Mode using a simple GCM. The model KMCM (Kühlungsborn Mechanistic Circulation Model) extends from the ground up to 60 km height and produces a reasonable winter climate. It takes into account the different large-scale wave forcings in the troposphere as prescribed pro- cesses. This allows us to examine the stratospheric Annular-Mode generation depend- ing on different wave forcings under perpetual January conditions. Principal com- ponent analysis is applied to identify the variability patterns of the geopotential and of the zonally averaged zonal wind. By this way, it is shown that the amplitude and composition of the orographic and thermal eddy forcing determines the stratospheric Annular Mode and the related downward propagation in the temperature field. Further model simplifications are introduced in order to understand the mechanism of the stratospheric AM-generation. Using a linear model version we illuminate the influence of the different wave forcing processes on the Annular Modes. Addition- ally, a constant-troposphere model is used to clarify the importance of transient and stationary waves. Finally, the Annular Mode is interpreted in terms of the dynamical coupling of the troposphere and stratosphere.

  11. The STRatospheric Estimation Algorithm from Mainz (STREAM): estimating stratospheric NO2 from nadir-viewing satellites by weighted convolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beirle, Steffen; Hörmann, Christoph; Jöckel, Patrick; Liu, Song; Penning de Vries, Marloes; Pozzer, Andrea; Sihler, Holger; Valks, Pieter; Wagner, Thomas

    2016-07-01

    The STRatospheric Estimation Algorithm from Mainz (STREAM) determines stratospheric columns of NO2 which are needed for the retrieval of tropospheric columns from satellite observations. It is based on the total column measurements over clean, remote regions as well as over clouded scenes where the tropospheric column is effectively shielded. The contribution of individual satellite measurements to the stratospheric estimate is controlled by various weighting factors. STREAM is a flexible and robust algorithm and does not require input from chemical transport models. It was developed as a verification algorithm for the upcoming satellite instrument TROPOMI, as a complement to the operational stratospheric correction based on data assimilation. STREAM was successfully applied to the UV/vis satellite instruments GOME 1/2, SCIAMACHY, and OMI. It overcomes some of the artifacts of previous algorithms, as it is capable of reproducing gradients of stratospheric NO2, e.g., related to the polar vortex, and reduces interpolation errors over continents. Based on synthetic input data, the uncertainty of STREAM was quantified as about 0.1-0.2 × 1015 molecules cm-2, in accordance with the typical deviations between stratospheric estimates from different algorithms compared in this study.

  12. Northern Hemisphere Stratospheric Polar Vortex Extremes in February under the Control of Downward Wave Flux in the Lower Stratosphere

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WEI Ke; CHEN Wen

    2012-01-01

    Using ECWMF ERA-40 and Interim reanalysis data, the planetary wave fluxes associated with the February extreme stratospheric polar vortex were studied. Using the three-dimensional Eliassen-Palm (EP) flux as a measure of the wave activity propagation, the authors show that the unusual warm years in the Arctic feature an anomalous weak stratosphere-troposphere coupling and weak downward wave flux at the lower stratosphere, especially over the North America and North Atlantic (NANA) region. The extremely cold years are characterized by strong stratosphere-troposphere coupling and strong downward wave flux in this region. The refractive index is used to examine the conception of planetary wave reflection, which shows a large refractive index (low reflection) for the extremely warm years and a small refractive index (high reflection) for the extremely cold years. This study reveals the importance of the downward planetary wave propagation from the stratosphere to the troposphere for explaining the unusual state of the stratospheric polar vortex in February.

  13. Impact of Stratospheric Ozone Distribution on Features of Tropospheric Circulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barodka, Siarhei; Krasouski, Aliaksandr; Mitskevich, Yaroslav; Shalamyansky, Arkady

    2016-04-01

    In this work we study connections between stratospheric ozone distribution and general circulation patterns in the troposphere and aim to investigate the causal relationship between them, including the practical side of the influence of stratospheric ozone on tropospheric medium-range weather and regional climate. Analysis of several decades of observational data, which has been performed at the A.I. Voeikov Main Geophysical Observatory, suggests a clear relation between the stratospheric ozone distribution, upper stratospheric temperature field and planetary-scale air-masses boundaries in the troposphere [1]. Furthermore, it has been shown that each global air-mass, which can be attributed to the corresponding circulation cell in a conceptual model of tropospheric general circulation, has a distinct "regime" of ozone vertical distribution in the stratosphere [1-3]. Proceeding from atmospheric reanalyses combined with satellite and ground-based observations, we study time evolution of the upper-level frontal zones (stationary fronts) with the relevant jet streams, which can be treated as boundaries of global air-masses, in connection with the tropopause height and distribution of ozone in the stratosphere. For that, we develop an algorithm for automated identification of jet streams, stationary fronts and tropopause surface from gridded data (reanalyses or modelling results), and apply it for several cases associated with rapid changes in the stratospheric temperature and ozone fields, including SSW events over Eastern Siberia. Aiming to study the causal relationship between the features of tropospheric circulation and changes in the stratospheric ozone field, we estimate the time lag between these categories of processes on different time scales. Finally, we discuss the possibility to use the elementary circulation mechanisms classification (by B.L. Dzerdzeevski) in connection with analysis of the stratospheric ozone field and the relevant stratosphere

  14. Stratosphere-troposphere coupling and the solar cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, R.; Whitesides, B.

    There is a surprisingly large amount of tropospheric climate variability that is linked to the solar cycle. This signal is manifested by annular temperature and wind anomaly structures in both the troposphere and stratosphere. The relatively strong variability in UV radiation observed during the solar cycle has focused attention on the impact of the solar cycle upon the stratosphere. This idea is confirmed in modeling studies which also indicate a climate response extending into the troposphere. Better knowledge of the dynamic linkages between the middle and lower atmosphere is essential in pursuing a mechanistic understanding of solar cycle-climate linkages. An overview is first provided of the key mechanisms that dynamically couple the stratosphere and troposphere. The direct and indirect means by which the stratosphere can influence tropospheric climate are emphasized. Direct downward influences include tropospheric circulation changes induced by latitudinal redistributions of mass and potential vorticity within the stratosphere. Indirect influences involve alterations in the vertical and meridional propagation of tropospheric Rossby waves, which in turn provide local wave forcings to the longitudinally averaged wind field. A statistical and diagnostic framework is then introduced for studying the dynamic coupling between the stratosphere and troposphere in association with the solar cycle. We hypothesize that the solar cycle provides dynamical influences to the tropospheric circulation via variations in the strength of the wintertime stratospheric polar vortex. Synoptic and dynamic atmospheric circulation structures linked to the solar cycle are first isolated using multivariate statistical analyses. Diagnostic analyses are then performed to answer the following questions: What are the relative importance of stratospheric and tropospheric dynamic structures in comprising tropospheric circulation anomalies? How do the propagation characteristics of tropospheric

  15. The Seasonal Timing of Stratospheric Sudden Warmings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horan, Matthew; Reichler, Thomas

    2017-04-01

    We aim to diagnose causes for the differences in the seasonal distribution of stratospheric sudden warmings (SSWs) between reanalysis and models. Observations over the past 60 years indicate that most SSWs occur during mid-winter (January), but climate models tend to simulate the maximum number of SSWs during late-winter or early-spring. This discrepancy has led to the speculation that models might be flawed and that the simulation of a January maximum represents a measure of model performance. However, the relatively short observational record and rare occurrence of SSWs also implies considerable uncertainty in the observation derived result. The goal of this work is to understand the seasonal distribution of SSWs using a simple statistical model, to test the model using a variety of data sets, and to answer the questions when SSWs are most likely to occur and what the reasons for it are. Our analysis is based on Charlton and Polvani's (2007) criteria for SSWs and on the assumption that the polar vortex wind approximately follows a normal distribution. The statistical model successfully predicts the day-to-day variations in the empirically derived occurrence frequency of SSWs, demonstrating that the seasonal distribution of SSWs can be almost entirely understood in terms of the climatological seasonal cycle of the polar vortex wind. The statistical model indicates that the maximum frequency of SSWs in climate models and reanalysis occurs during late-winter, and not during mid-winter as implied by the observations. This strongly suggests that sampling uncertainty is responsible for the January maximum seen in the reanalysis and that the simulation of a January maximum does not represent a metric of model performance. The reason for the late-winter maximum is the decreasing strength of the polar vortex, making it more likely that the winds of the polar vortex reach the zero-threshold required by the WMO definition for SSWs. This further suggests that climatological

  16. Down syndroom kansbepaling met de eerste trimester combinatietest 2002-2004

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schielen PCJI; van Leeuwen M; Elvers LH; Loeber JG; LIS

    2007-01-01

    Dit rapport is een eerste evaluatie van de eerste trimester combinatietest. Deze test is gericht op het bepalen van de kans op een zwangerschap van een kind met het Down syndroom. In het afgelopen jaar steeg het aantal aanvragen voor de test explosief van 341 aanvragen per half jaar (tweede helft

  17. Contaminants in the atmosphere. AMAP-Nuuk, West Greenland 2002-2004

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skov, H.; Bossi, S.; Waehlin, P. [and others

    2005-08-15

    This report presents the results of atmospheric monitoring in Nuuk, Greenland. A long series of heavy metals and persistent organic Pollutants (POPs) have been measured and model calculations have been carried out supporting the interpretation of the results. Financially, the Danish Environmental Protection Agency supported this work with means from the MIKA/DANCEA funds for Environmental Support to the Arctic Region and the work is part of the Danish contribution to Arctic Monitoring and Assessment Programme, AMAP. (au)

  18. Oral status and treatment needs among elderly within municipal long-term care 2002-2004.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaksson, Rita; Söderfeldt, Björn

    2007-01-01

    A supplementary regulation in the Swedish National Dental Health Care Insurance stipulates an increased economic support to those, who are dependent permanently due to disease or handicap. Once enlisted to care, they are entitled to an annual dental examination and individual prophylactic advice free of charge, and to necessary dental treatment, offered within the ordinary medical care, regulated and funded by the county council. A population of persons, > or = 65 years of age and enrolled in municipal long-term care (LTC) in a county in the south of Sweden, was followed regarding changes in oral status and treatment needs for two years. The number of persons examined the year 2002 was 2416 and the corresponding figure for 2004 was 2846. Totally 1170, i.e. 48.4%, of those examined 2002 were deceased two years after the initial examination. Only 914, assessed in 2002, were available for assessment with full data at follow up 2004 and the results are based upon assessments in this group. Analyzing the assessed variables (dental status, oral hygiene status, oral mucosal inflammation, oral mucosal friction) revealed a change during these two years. Significant impairments were recognised, regarding mucosal inflammation and mucosal friction. Regarding treatment needs assessed by a dentist and a dental hygienist, there was a maintained and even increased need for extensive treatment, both by the dentist and, to a greater extent, by the dental hygienist. In sum, prevention efforts both from the dental profession and from other care providers are important to achieve and maintain acceptable oral status.

  19. Studies of buffers behaviour in KBS-3H concept. Work during 2002-2004

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boergesson, Lennart; Sanden, Torbjoern; Faelth, Billy; Aakesson, Mattias [Clay Technology AB, Lund (Sweden); Lindgren, Erik [Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co., Stockholm (Sweden)

    2005-08-01

    In the KBS-3H concept, the deposition tunnels are replace by horizontal 300-m long circular deposition drifts which are excavated from a niche in the transport tunnel. About 40 disposal containers will be deposited in each drift. In order to make the deposition process easier the buffer material and one copper canister are assembled in a steel disposal container, which then is pushed into the deposition drift. The disposal container consists of a perforated steel cylinder in which the buffer material and one copper canister are assembled. Distance blocks of bentonite are placed between each disposal container. The purpose of the distance blocks is to seal off each canister position from the other and to prevent transport of water and bentonite along the drift. The distance blocks also separate one canister from the other in order to get the right temperature of the canister. The total thickness of the distance blocks between the disposal containers is mainly determined by the thermal conductivity of the rock and is expected to be in the range of 3-6 m. The main objective for the KBS-3H concept is that the method provides a more efficient way of depositing the canisters in the rock. The reason is that the deposition tunnels of the KBS-3V concept are not needed and the reduction of rock excavation is therefore about 50 percent. This leads to a lower environmental impact during the construction of the repository but also to a reduced disturbance on the hydro-geological situation in the rock mass. Furthermore, the reduction in rock excavation leads to a significant cost saving for the excavation phase and backfilling of the repository. KBS-3H and KBS-3V are very similar with respect to the behaviour of the bentonite buffer. However, there are some differences that require special attention. An early survey of the differences yielded that there are a number of processes and functions that needed to be investigated for evaluating the feasibility of the concept: 1. The function of the distance block. Scenario analyses of different concepts for design and installation of the distance blocks for finding critical issues. 2. Sealing ability of the distance plugs during water inflow. 3. Influence of rapid increase of water pressure inside the distance blocks. 4. Piping and erosion phenomena of the swelling bentonite during the installation phase and during the water saturation phase. 5. Mechanical interaction between the container and the buffer during the homogenisation of the bentonite and breakage of the container. 6. Near field thermal and hydraulic evolution. These processes have been studied by Clay Technology in a number of tests and analyses during 2002 to 2004. The studies can be structured in the following way: 1. Test scaled 1:10 of a simulated part of a deposition tunnel with two canisters. 2. Design and planning of a large-scale test of the interaction between the bentonite and the perforated deposition container and manufacturing of components (Big Bertha). 3. Investigation of sealing/piping/erosion phenomena during wetting of the buffer material. a) Basic laboratory tests. b) Study of processes and scenarios in the scale 1:10. c) Study of processes and scenarios in full scale. 4. Investigation of the effect of rapid water pressure increase inside the distance blocks by model tests in the scale 1:10 and in full scale. 4. Modelling a) Modelling of the interaction between the bentonite and the perforated deposition container. b) Modelling of temperature conditions for design and safety analysis purpose. c) Modelling of the water saturation phase and the influence of the hydraulic properties of the rock. d) Modelling of the wetting of the test scaled 1:10. e) Scenario analyses and conceptual modelling of the function of different distance block concepts. These studies and the results and conclusions reached will be presented in this report. The report should be considered a state of the art report at the end of 2004. The studies are planned to continue during the coming years.

  20. Epidemiology and mortality of hospitalized burn patients in Kohkiluye va Boyerahmad province (Iran): 2002-2004.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saadat, Mostafa

    2005-05-01

    The Kohkiluye va Boyerahmad province is located in the south of Iran. The population of the province is about 615,000, living in 14,261 km(2). The total number of patients in the study was 235. There were admitted to the burn unit of Shahid Beheshti hospital (Yasuj) between 18 July 2002 and 17 July 2004. Of these patients, 149 (63.4%) were accidental and 86 (36.6%) were self-inflicted burns. The hospitalization rates for accidental and self-inflicted burns were 12.1 and 7.0 per 100,000 person-years, respectively. There is a significant difference in the sex ratio (males:females) between accidental (1.40) and suicidal (0.13) patient groups (P((2))burns were 2.1 and 59.5%, respectively. The mortality rates for accidental and self-inflicted burns were 0.24 and 3.81 per 100,000 person-years, respectively. The overall mean and median ages for accidental patients were 19.4 and 13 years, and those for self-inflicted burns were 24.9 and 23 years, respectively. In the accidental patients, the BSA of the burns ranged from 5 to 95%, with a median of 15%. In the self-inflicted patients, the median of BSA was 65%. The majority of accidental burns were caused by scalds (43.2%) and of self-inflicted burns by kerosene (87.5%). The median hospital stay was 8 days with a range of 1-43 days for accidental patients. The median hospital stay was 4 days with a range from burning patients. In non-fatal self-burning cases, the median hospital stay was 20 days with a range of 4-53 days. There is significant difference between fatal and non-fatal self-burning cases for hospital stay (P((2))burns and seasons (P((2))>0.05). Most of the burns occurred at home.

  1. Meloquine Use and Hospitalizations Among US Service Members, 2002-2004

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    blood-forming organs (280-289); mental disorders (290-319); diseases of the skin and subcutaneous tissue (680-709); symptoms, signs, and ill-defined...818-819. 20. Hennequin C, Bouree P, Bazin N, Bisaro F, Feline A. Severe psychiatric side effects observed during prophylaxis and treatment with...Genitourinary system (580-629) 13 724 512 0.71 (0.40-1.26) 1.19 (0.67-2.13) Skin and subcutaneous tissues (680- 709) 9 272 294 0.88 (0.43-1.80) 1.31 (0.64

  2. Parasitic Infections (Helminth and Protozoa in Cases Referring to Yazd Central Laboratory, 2002-2004

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AA Dehghani

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Intestinal parasites have world wide prevalence and are considered to be as one of the leading hygienic and economic problems in the world. It can be said that there is nowhere in the world without parasitic infestations. The present study was conducted to determine the prevalence of intestinal parasites in patients referring to Yazd Central Laboratory in 2000-2002. Methods: The present study was a cross-sectional, analytic and descriptive study including 13388 stool specimens examined by two methods; Formalin-Ethyl Acetate and direct Method for intestinal parasites and Scotch tape method for Enterobius vermicularis. Results: 13388 samples examined included 6913 women and 6475 men. Parasites were observed in 1151 cases (8.6% including 618 (53.7% men and 533 (46.3% women, respectively. Of these, 98.6% were infected with protozoa and 1.4% with helminths. Giardia lambdia (41.05%, E.coli (27.45% and Blastocystis hominis (15.51% were the most common infecting organisms. Helminth infections were few, but the highest frequency was related to Hymenolepis nana and Enterobious vermicularis. Maximum frequency was reported in summer. There was a significant association between stool consistency and infestation by intestinal parasites (P=0.002. There was a significant relationship with sex, too (P=0.001 Conclusion: In the present study, the most common parasites were Giardia, E.coli and Blastocystis hominis (higher than five, but the prevalence was less as compared to previous similar studies in other regions, which could be because of the hot and dry weather, better personal hygiene and improved sewage system of Yazd.

  3. Manufacturing at the Nanoscale. Report of the National Nanotechnology Initiative Workshops, 2002-2004

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    nanomaterials • Occupational monitoring, engineering controls, personal protective equipment, occupational exposure limits, and administrative controls...thermoplastic polyolefin (TPO) resins that previously were reinforced with microscale talc particles, glass, or carbon fibers. New manufacturing...temperature ductile strength compared to traditional TPO composites (with 15-20% talc content) of the same cost. The nanocomposites display improved

  4. CRED Cumulative Map of Percent Scleractinian Coral Cover at Necker Island, 2002-2004

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This map displays optical validation observation locations and percent coverage of scleractinian coral overlaid on bathymetry.

  5. CRED Cumulative Map of Percent Scleractinian Coral Cover at Palmyra Atoll, 2002-2004

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This map displays optical validation observation locations and percent coverage of scleractinian coral overlaid on bathymetry.

  6. Department of Defense Chemical and Biological Defense Program. FY2002-2004 Performance Plan. Volume 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-04-01

    ability to protect against filoviruses (Marburg and Ebola viruses). Complete research studies for the development of vaccine candidates for WEE...identify novel antigens that show protection in mice against at least two encephalitic alphaviruses. Continue research for the development of vaccine candidates

  7. Department of Defense Chemical and Biological Defense Program. Volume 2: FY2002-2004 Performance Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-04-01

    Complete research studies for the development of vaccine candidates for WEE virus. Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) Program...encephalitic alphaviruses. Continue research for the development of vaccine candidates for EEE virus infection. Test promising vaccine candidates for

  8. Evaluation of the Norwegian Manifesto against Bullying, 2002-2004. A Summary of the Final Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tikkanen, Tarja I.

    2005-01-01

    This paper summarises the main results of the research-based evaluation of the Norwegian Manifesto against bullying. Besides schools, the evaluation was to include bullying also in kindergartens and publicly organised leisure activities. Furthermore, the work in Manifesto was to be covered on national, regional and local levels. The goal setting…

  9. CRED Cumulative Map of Percent Scleractinian Coral Cover at Pearl and Hermes Atoll, 2002-2004

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This map displays optical validation observation locations and percent coverage of scleractinian coral overlaid on bathymetry.

  10. Stratospheric temperature trends: impact of ozone variability and the QBO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dall' Amico, Mauro [University of Reading, NCAS Climate, Department of Meteorology, Reading (United Kingdom); Institut fuer Physik der Atmosphaere, Deutsches Zentrum fuer Luft-und Raumfahrt, Oberpfaffenhofen (Germany); Gray, Lesley J. [University of Reading, NCAS Climate, Department of Meteorology, Reading (United Kingdom); Rosenlof, Karen H. [NOAA Earth System Research Laboratory, Boulder, CO (United States); Scaife, Adam A.; Stott, Peter A. [Met Office Hadley Centre, Exeter (United Kingdom); Shine, Keith P. [University of Reading, Department of Meteorology, Reading (United Kingdom)

    2010-02-15

    In most climate simulations used by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change 2007 fourth assessment report, stratospheric processes are only poorly represented. For example, climatological or simple specifications of time-varying ozone concentrations are imposed and the quasi-biennial oscillation (QBO) of equatorial stratospheric zonal wind is absent. Here we investigate the impact of an improved stratospheric representation using two sets of perturbed simulations with the Hadley Centre coupled ocean atmosphere model HadGEM1 with natural and anthropogenic forcings for the 1979-2003 period. In the first set of simulations, the usual zonal mean ozone climatology with superimposed trends is replaced with a time series of observed zonal mean ozone distributions that includes interannual variability associated with the solar cycle, QBO and volcanic eruptions. In addition to this, the second set of perturbed simulations includes a scheme in which the stratospheric zonal wind in the tropics is relaxed to appropriate zonal mean values obtained from the ERA-40 re-analysis, thus forcing a QBO. Both of these changes are applied strictly to the stratosphere only. The improved ozone field results in an improved simulation of the stepwise temperature transitions observed in the lower stratosphere in the aftermath of the two major recent volcanic eruptions. The contribution of the solar cycle signal in the ozone field to this improved representation of the stepwise cooling is discussed. The improved ozone field and also the QBO result in an improved simulation of observed trends, both globally and at tropical latitudes. The Eulerian upwelling in the lower stratosphere in the equatorial region is enhanced by the improved ozone field and is affected by the QBO relaxation, yet neither induces a significant change in the upwelling trend. (orig.)

  11. Understanding Differences in Chemistry Climate Model Projections of Stratospheric Ozone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglass, A. R.; Strahan, S. E.; Oman, L. D.; Stolarski, R. S.

    2014-01-01

    Chemistry climate models (CCMs) are used to project future evolution of stratospheric ozone as concentrations of ozone-depleting substances (ODSs) decrease and greenhouse gases increase, cooling the stratosphere. CCM projections exhibit not only many common features but also a broad range of values for quantities such as year of ozone return to 1980 and global ozone level at the end of the 21st century. Multiple linear regression is applied to each of 14 CCMs to separate ozone response to ODS concentration change from that due to climate change. We show that the sensitivity of lower stratospheric ozone to chlorine change Delta Ozone/Delta inorganic chlorine is a near-linear function of partitioning of total inorganic chlorine into its reservoirs; both inorganic chlorine and its partitioning are largely controlled by lower stratospheric transport. CCMs with best performance on transport diagnostics agree with observations for chlorine reservoirs and produce similar ozone responses to chlorine change. After 2035, differences in Delta Ozone/Delta inorganic chlorine contribute little to the spread in CCM projections as the anthropogenic contribution to inorganic chlorine becomes unimportant. Differences among upper stratospheric ozone increases due to temperature decreases are explained by differences in ozone sensitivity to temperature change Delta Ozone/Delta T due to different contributions from various ozone loss processes, each with its own temperature dependence. Ozone decrease in the tropical lower stratosphere caused by a projected speedup in the Brewer-Dobson circulation may or may not be balanced by ozone increases in the middle- and high-latitude lower stratosphere and upper troposphere. This balance, or lack thereof, contributes most to the spread in late 21st century projections.

  12. Water vapour variability and trends in the Arctic stratosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thölix, Laura; Kivi, Rigel; Backman, Leif; Karpechko, Alexey

    2014-05-01

    Water vapour in the upper troposphere-lower stratosphere (UTLS) is a radiatively and chemically important trace gas. Stratospheric water vapour also affects ozone chemistry through odd-hydrogen chemistry and formation of polar stratospheric clouds (PSC). Both transport and chemistry contribute to the extratropical lower stratospheric water vapour distribution and trends. The main sources of stratospheric water vapour are intrusion through the tropical tropopause and production from oxidation of methane. Accurate observations of UTLS water vapour are difficult to obtain due to the strong gradient in the water vapour profile over the tropopause. However, modelling the stratospheric water vapour distribution is challenging and accurate measurements are needed for model validation. Trends in Arctic water vapour will be analysed and explained in terms of contribution from different processes (transport and chemistry), using observations and chemistry transport model (CTM) simulations. Accurate water vapour soundings from Sodankylä will be used to study water vapour within the Arctic polar vortex, including process studies on formation of PSCs and dehydration. Water vapour profiles measured during the LAPBIAT atmospheric sounding campaign in Sodankylä in January 2010 indicated formation of ice clouds and dehydration. Effects on ozone chemistry will also be studied. Global middle atmospheric simulations have been performed with the FinROSE-ctm using ERA-Interim winds and temperatures. The FinROSE-ctm is a global middle atmosphere model that produces the distribution of 30 long-lived species and tracers and 14 short-lived species. The chemistry describes around 110 gas phase reactions, 37 photodissociation processes and the main heterogeneous reactions related to aerosols and polar stratospheric clouds.

  13. Cryogenics on the stratospheric terahertz observatory (STO)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, G.; Young, A.; Dominguez, R.; Duffy, B.; Kulesa, C.; Walker, C.

    2015-12-01

    The Stratospheric TeraHertz Observatory (STO) is a NASA funded, Long Duration Balloon experiment designed to address a key problem in modern astrophysics: understanding the Life Cycle of the Interstellar Medium. STO surveys a section of the Galactic plane in the dominant interstellar cooling line at 1.9 THz and the important star formation tracer at 1.46 THz, at ∼1 arc minute angular resolution, sufficient to spatially resolve atomic, ionic, and molecular clouds at 10 kpc. The STO instrument package uses a liquid helium cryostat to maintain the THz receiver at < 9 K and to cool the low noise amplifiers to < 20 K. The first STO mission (STO-1) flew in January of 2012 and the second mission (STO-2) is planned for December 2015. For the STO-2 flight a cryocooler will be added to extend the mission lifetime. This paper discusses the integration of the STO instrument into an existing cryostat and the cryogenic aspects of the launch and operation of the STO balloon mission in the challenging Antarctic environment.

  14. Tropical stratospheric circulation and monsoon rainfall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikder, A. B.; Patwardhan, S. K.; Bhalme, H. N.

    1993-09-01

    Interannual variability of both SW monsoon (June September) and NE monsoon (October December) rainfall over subdivisions of Coastal Andhra Pradesh, Rayalaseema and Tamil Nadu have been examined in relation to monthly zonal wind anomaly for 10 hPa, 30 hPa and 50 hPa at Balboa (9°N, 80°W) for the 29 year period (1958 1986). Correlations of zonal wind anomalies to SW monsoon rainfall ( r=0.57, significant at 1% level) is highest with the longer lead time (August of the previous year) at 10 hPa level suggesting some predictive value for Coastal Andhra Pradesh. The probabilities estimated from the contingency table reveal non-occurrence of flood during easterly wind anomalies and near non-occurrence of drought during westerly anomalies for August of the previous year at 10 hPa which provides information for forecasting of performance of SW monsoon over Coastal Andhra Pradesh. However, NE monsoon has a weak relationship with zonal wind anomalies of 10 hPa, 30 hPa and 50 hPa for Coastal Andhra Pradesh, Rayalaseema and Tamil Nadu. Tracks of the SW monsoon storms and depressions in association with the stratospheric wind were also examined to couple with the fluctuations in SW monsoon rainfall. It is noted that easterly / westerly wind at 10 hPa, in some manner, suppresses / enhances monsoon storms and depressions activity affecting their tracks.

  15. Growth rates of stratospheric HCFC-22

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. P. Moore

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available The Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding onboard ENVISAT (MIPAS-E offers the opportunity to detect and spectrally resolve many atmospheric minor constituents affecting atmospheric chemistry. In this paper, we describe an algorithm produced to retrieve HCFC–22 profiles from MIPAS-E measurements made in 2003 and present results from this scheme between 300 and 50 mb. By comparison with ATMOS (AT–3 version 3 data, we find a mean Northern Hemisphere mid-latitude (20–50° N HCFC–22 growth rate between 1994 and 2003 of 5.4±0.7 pptv/yr in the lower stratosphere (LS and a mean LS Southern Hemisphere growth rate (60–80°S of 6.0±0.7 pptv/yr in the same period. We test the feasibility of using a global data set to estimate the chemical lifetime of HCFC–22 in the LS and we derive this for two regions; 20–50° N (259±38 years and 60–80° S (288±34 years. From these data we note a global LS lifetime of 274±25 years, significantly longer than previous estimates.

  16. A constitutive equation for stratospheric balloon materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rand, J.; Sterling, J.

    The selection of a suitable material for use as a reliable stratospheric balloon gas barrier and structural component is based on a variety of desired properties. In order to achieve the required combination of weight per unit area, helium permeation, strength, flexibility and toughness at low temperatures, low density polyethylene has been used for the last half century. During the last decade, linear low density polyethylene (LLDPE) has been found to have even better properties for this application. Thin films extruded from this type resin have been found to have time dependent properties which should be understood in order to make an intelligent analysis of the balloon. This paper describes the current effort to characterize a 38 micron coextrusion of LLDPE as a nonlinearly viscoelastic material. The resulting constitutive equation may be used to accurately describe the time dependent creep and/or relaxation of this film when subjected to a biaxial state of stress. Recent laboratory data have been used to modify an existing model of LLDPE to account for differences caused by the coextrusion process. The new model will facilitate structure design optimization and reliability assessment, and may further be utilized as a predictive tool to benefit in-flight operations. Unfortunately, current structural analysis techniques based on linear elastic properties will predict stresses in excess of those which actually exist. An example will be presented which demonstrates the magnitude of this error when nonlinear behavior is ignored.

  17. Towards constraining the stratosphere-troposphere exchange of radiocarbon: strategies of stratospheric 14CO2 measurements using AirCore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Huilin; Paul, Dipayan; Meijer, Harro; Miller, John; Kivi, Rigel; Krol, Maarten

    2016-04-01

    Radiocarbon (14C) plays an important role in the carbon cycle studies to understand both natural and anthropogenic carbon fluxes, but also in atmospheric chemistry to constrain hydroxyl radical (OH) concentrations in the atmosphere. Apart from the enormous 14C emissions from nuclear bomb testing in the 1950s and 1960s, radiocarbon is primarily produced in the stratosphere due to the cosmogenic production. To this end, better understanding the stratospheric radiocarbon source is very useful to advance the use of radiocarbon for these applications. However, stratospheric 14C observations have been very limited so that there are large uncertainties on the magnitude and the location of the 14C production as well as the transport of radiocarbon from the stratosphere to the troposphere. Recently we have successfully made stratospheric 14C measurements using AirCore samples from Sodankylä, Northern Finland. AirCore is an innovative atmospheric sampling system, which passively collects atmospheric air samples into a long piece of coiled stainless steel tubing during the descent of a balloon flight. Due to the relatively low cost of the consumables, there is a potential to make such AirCore profiling in other parts of the world on a regular basis. In this study, we simulate the 14C in the atmosphere and assess the stratosphere-troposphere exchange of radiocarbon using the TM5 model. The Sodankylä radiocarbon measurements will be used to verify the performance of the model at high latitude. Besides this, we will also evaluate the influence of different cosmogenic 14C production scenarios and the uncertainties in the OH field on the seasonal cycles of radiocarbon and on the stratosphere-troposphere exchange, and based on the results design a strategy to set up a 14C measurement program using AirCore.

  18. Impact of geoengineered aerosols on the troposphere and stratosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tilmes, S.; Garcia, Rolando R.; Kinnison, Douglas E.; Gettelman, A.; Rasch, Philip J.

    2009-06-27

    A coupled chemistry climate model, the Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model was used to perform a transient climate simulation to quantify the impact of geoengineered aerosols on atmospheric processes. In contrast to previous model studies, the impact on stratospheric chemistry, including heterogeneous chemistry in the polar regions, is considered in this simulation. In the geoengineering simulation, a constant stratospheric distribution of volcanic-sized, liquid sulfate aerosols is imposed in the period 2020–2050, corresponding to an injection of 2 Tg S/a. The aerosol cools the troposphere compared to a baseline simulation. Assuming an Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change A1B emission scenario, global warming is delayed by about 40 years in the troposphere with respect to the baseline scenario. Large local changes of precipitation and temperatures may occur as a result of geoengineering. Comparison with simulations carried out with the Community Atmosphere Model indicates the importance of stratospheric processes for estimating the impact of stratospheric aerosols on the Earth’s climate. Changes in stratospheric dynamics and chemistry, especially faster heterogeneous reactions, reduce the recovery of the ozone layer in middle and high latitudes for the Southern Hemisphere. In the geoengineering case, the recovery of the Antarctic ozone hole is delayed by about 30 years on the basis of this model simulation. For the Northern Hemisphere, a onefold to twofold increase of the chemical ozone depletion occurs owing to a simulated stronger polar vortex and colder temperatures compared to the baseline simulation, in agreement with observational estimates.

  19. Impact of major volcanic eruptions on stratospheric water vapour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löffler, Michael; Brinkop, Sabine; Jöckel, Patrick

    2016-05-01

    Volcanic eruptions can have a significant impact on the Earth's weather and climate system. Besides the subsequent tropospheric changes, the stratosphere is also influenced by large eruptions. Here changes in stratospheric water vapour after the two major volcanic eruptions of El Chichón in Mexico in 1982 and Mount Pinatubo on the Philippines in 1991 are investigated with chemistry-climate model simulations. This study is based on two simulations with specified dynamics of the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts Hamburg - Modular Earth Submodel System (ECHAM/MESSy) Atmospheric Chemistry (EMAC) model, performed within the Earth System Chemistry integrated Modelling (ESCiMo) project, of which only one includes the long-wave volcanic forcing through prescribed aerosol optical properties. The results show a significant increase in stratospheric water vapour induced by the eruptions, resulting from increased heating rates and the subsequent changes in stratospheric and tropopause temperatures in the tropics. The tropical vertical advection and the South Asian summer monsoon are identified as sources for the additional water vapour in the stratosphere. Additionally, volcanic influences on tropospheric water vapour and El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) are evident, if the long-wave forcing is strong enough. Our results are corroborated by additional sensitivity simulations of the Mount Pinatubo period with reduced nudging and reduced volcanic aerosol extinction.

  20. Stratospheric ozone: History and concepts and interactions with climate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bekki S.

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Although in relatively low concentration of a few molecules per million of e e air molecules, atmospheric ozone (trioxygen O3 is essential to sustaining life on the surface of the Earth. Indeed, by absorbing solar radiation between 240 and 320 nm, it shields living organisms including humans from the very harmful ultraviolet radiation UV-B. About 90% of the ozone resides in the stratosphere, a region that extends from the tropopause, whose altitude ranges from 7 km at the poles to 17 km in the tropics, to the stratopause located at about 50 km altitude. Stratospheric ozone is communally referred as the « ozone layer ». Unlike the atmosphere surrounding it, the stratosphere is vertically stratified and stable because the temperature increases with height within it. This particularity originates from heating produced by the absorption of UV radiation by stratospheric ozone. The present chapter describes the main mechanisms that govern the natural balance of ozone in the stratosphere, and its disruption under the influence of human activities.

  1. Microbial survival in the stratosphere and implications for global dispersal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, David J.; Griffin, Dale W.; McPeters, Richard D.; Ward, Peter D.; Schuerger, Andrew C.

    2011-01-01

    Spores of Bacillus subtilis were exposed to a series of stratosphere simulations. In total, five distinct treatments measured the effect of reduced pressure, low temperature, high desiccation, and intense ultraviolet (UV) irradiation on stratosphereisolated and ground-isolated B. subtilis strains. Environmental conditions were based on springtime data from a mid-latitude region of the lower stratosphere (20 km). Experimentally, each treatment consisted of the following independent or combined conditions: -70 °C, 56 mb, 10-12%relative humidity and 0.00421, 5.11, and 54.64 W/m2 of UVC (200-280 nm), UVB (280-315 nm), UVA (315-400 nm), respectively. Bacteria were deposited on metal coupon surfaces in monolayers of ~1 x 106 spores and prepared with palagonite (particle size< 20 μm). After 6 h of exposure to the stratosphere environment, 99.9% of B. subtilis spores were killed due to UV irradiation. In contrast, temperature, desiccation, and pressure simulations without UV had no effect on spore viability up through 96 h. There were no differences in survival between the stratosphere-isolated versus ground-isolated B. subtilis strains. Inactivation of most bacteria in our simulation indicates that the stratosphere can be a critical barrier to long-distance microbial dispersal and that survival in the upper atmosphere may be constrained by UV irradiation.

  2. The impact of tropospheric planetary wave variability on stratospheric ozone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McElroy, Michael B.; Schneider, Hans R.

    2002-06-25

    The goal of this project was to improve understanding of the role of the stratosphere in inducing long-term variations of the chemical composition of the troposphere. Changes in stratospheric transport occur on decadel timescales in response to changes in the structure of planetary wave patterns, forced in the troposphere. For many important tracers, such as column amounts of ozone, this variability of the transport leads to changes with signatures very similar to those induced by anthropogenic releases of chemicals into the atmosphere. During this project, a new interactive two-dimensional model of the dynamics, chemistry and radiation of the stratosphere was developed. The model was used to interpret available data of tracers. It was found that a fairly coherent picture of tracer distributions is obtained when a layer of reduced gravity wave drag is assumed for the lower stratosphere. The results suggest that the power of models to predict variability in tracer transport in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere is limited until current theories of gravity wave breaking have been refined.

  3. Impact of lower stratospheric ozone on seasonal prediction systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelebogile Mathole

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available We conducted a comparison of trends in lower stratospheric temperatures and summer zonal wind fields based on 27 years of reanalysis data and output from hindcast simulations using a coupled ocean-atmospheric general circulation model (OAGCM. Lower stratospheric ozone in the OAGCM was relaxed to the observed climatology and increasing greenhouse gas concentrations were neglected. In the reanalysis, lower stratospheric ozone fields were better represented than in the OAGCM. The spring lower stratospheric/ upper tropospheric cooling in the polar cap observed in the reanalysis, which is caused by a direct ozone depletion in the past two decades and is in agreement with previous studies, did not appear in the OAGCM. The corresponding summer tropospheric response also differed between data sets. In the reanalysis, a statistically significant poleward trend of the summer jet position was found, whereas no such trend was found in the OAGCM. Furthermore, the jet position in the reanalysis exhibited larger interannual variability than that in the OAGCM. We conclude that these differences are caused by the absence of long-term lower stratospheric ozone changes in the OAGCM. Improper representation or non-inclusion of such ozone variability in a prediction model could adversely affect the accuracy of the predictability of summer rainfall forecasts over South Africa.

  4. Tiny Ultraviolet Polarimeter for Earth Stratosphere from Space Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nevodovskyi, P. V.; Morozhenko, O. V.; Vidmachenko, A. P.; Ivakhiv, O.; Geraimchuk, M.; Zbrutskyi, O.

    2015-09-01

    One of the reasons for climate change (i.e., stratospheric ozone concentrations) is connected with the variations in optical thickness of aerosols in the upper sphere of the atmosphere (at altitudes over 30 km). Therefore, aerosol and gas components of the atmosphere are crucial in the study of the ultraviolet (UV) radiation passing upon the Earth. Moreover, a scrupulous study of aerosol components of the Earth atmosphere at an altitude of 30 km (i.e., stratospheric aerosol), such as the size of particles, the real part of refractive index, optical thickness and its horizontal structure, concentration of ozone or the upper border of the stratospheric ozone layer is an important task in the research of the Earth climate change. At present, the Main Astronomical Observatory of the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) of Ukraine, the National Technical University of Ukraine "KPI"and the Lviv Polytechnic National University are engaged in the development of methodologies for the study of stratospheric aerosol by means of ultraviolet polarimeter using a microsatellite. So fare, there has been created a sample of a tiny ultraviolet polarimeter (UVP) which is considered to be a basic model for carrying out space experiments regarding the impact of the changes in stratospheric aerosols on both global and local climate.

  5. Variability of water vapour in the Arctic stratosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thölix, Laura; Backman, Leif; Kivi, Rigel; Karpechko, Alexey Yu.

    2016-04-01

    This study evaluates the stratospheric water vapour distribution and variability in the Arctic. A FinROSE chemistry transport model simulation covering the years 1990-2014 is compared to observations (satellite and frost point hygrometer soundings), and the sources of stratospheric water vapour are studied. In the simulations, the Arctic water vapour shows decadal variability with a magnitude of 0.8 ppm. Both observations and the simulations show an increase in the water vapour concentration in the Arctic stratosphere after the year 2006, but around 2012 the concentration started to decrease. Model calculations suggest that this increase in water vapour is mostly explained by transport-related processes, while the photochemically produced water vapour plays a relatively smaller role. The increase in water vapour in the presence of the low winter temperatures in the Arctic stratosphere led to more frequent occurrence of ice polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) in the Arctic vortex. We perform a case study of ice PSC formation focusing on January 2010 when the polar vortex was unusually cold and allowed large-scale formation of PSCs. At the same time a large-scale persistent dehydration was observed. Ice PSCs and dehydration observed at Sodankylä with accurate water vapour soundings in January and February 2010 during the LAPBIAT (Lapland Atmosphere-Biosphere facility) atmospheric measurement campaign were well reproduced by the model. In particular, both the observed and simulated decrease in water vapour in the dehydration layer was up to 1.5 ppm.

  6. Global Stratosphere-Troposphere Exchange in Modern Reanalyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boothe, A.; Homeyer, C. R.

    2015-12-01

    Stratosphere-troposphere exchange (STE) has important and significant impacts on the chemical and radiative properties of the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere. This study presents a 15-year climatology of global large-scale STE from four modern reanalyses: ERA-Interim, JRA-55, MERRA, and NCEP-CFSR. We use a 3-D trajectory model to initialize a dense grid of particles throughout the troposphere and stratosphere each day, advect them forward in time, and identify those crossing the tropopause to compute STE. Exchanged particles are separated into four categories for analysis to identify the significance of known transport mechanisms in each reanalysis: 1) vertical stratosphere-to-troposphere transport (STT), 2) vertical troposphere-to-stratosphere transport (TST), 3) lateral STT (that occurring between tropics and extratropics and across the tropopause "break"), and 4) lateral TST. We will present and discuss similarities and differences amongst the four reanalysis systems, focusing on the seasonal and annual cycle and geographic distribution of the four transport categories.

  7. Stratospheric winds: longitudinal distribution and long-term trends

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Kozubek

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The wind is very important parameter of the stratospheric dynamics which can be affected by many factors like tropospheric North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO or El Nino Southern Oscillation (ENSO, stratospheric Quasi-biennial Oscillation (QBO or Sudden Stratospheric Warming (SSW and solar activity. Due to lack of direct observations we have to use reanalysis data, here NCEP/NCAR reanalysis. The behaviour and trends of wind and its meridional component is analysed in this paper. The influence of NAO on trend in wind is significant in the lower stratosphere (100 hPa in Atlantic sector; the trend is also affected by QBO, whereas influence of SSW is rather minor and observable only in the middle stratosphere (10 hPa. The most interesting result seems to be the longitudinal distribution of the meridional wind component. We identify two-core structure of strong but opposite winds, one at each hemisphere at 10 hPa, and a four-core structure at 100 hPa. These structures are not associated with tides. However, they appear to be related to the well-pronounced Aleutian pressure high at the 10 hPa level.

  8. Stratospheric Water and OzOne Satellite Homogenized (SWOOSH) data set

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Stratospheric Water and Ozone Satellite Homogenized (SWOOSH) data set is a merged record of stratospheric ozone and water vapor measurements taken by a number of...

  9. SWIFT: Semi-empirical and numerically efficient stratospheric ozone chemistry for global climate models

    OpenAIRE

    Kreyling, Daniel; Wohltmann, Ingo; Lehmann, Ralph; Rex, Markus

    2015-01-01

    The SWIFT model is a fast yet accurate chemistry scheme for calculating the chemistry of stratospheric ozone. It is mainly intended for use in Global Climate Models (GCMs), Chemistry Climate Models (CCMs) and Earth System Models (ESMs). For computing time reasons these models often do not employ full stratospheric chem- istry modules, but use prescribed ozone instead. This can lead to insufficient representation between stratosphere and troposphere. The SWIFT stratospheric ozone chem...

  10. A Preliminary Study of the Potential to Kinetic Energy Conversion Process in the Stratosphere

    OpenAIRE

    White, Robert M.; Nolan, George F.

    2011-01-01

    The potential to kinetic energy conversion process in the lower stratosphere associated with the vertical exchange of warm and cold air is evaluated using adiabatically derived vertical velocities for the North American region for a five-day period. Preliminary results suggest the possibility that on the average the kinetic energy of stratospheric motions may not result from a conversion of potential energy within the stratosphere by this process. The further implication is that stratospheric...

  11. Stratospheric background aerosol and polar cloud observations by laser backscattersonde within the framework of the European project "Stratospheric Regular Sounding"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Adriani

    Full Text Available The Stratospheric Regular Sounding project was planned to measure regularly the vertical profiles of several tracers like ozone, water vapor, NOx, ClOx and BrOx radicals, aerosol, pressure and temperature, at three latitudes, to discriminate between the transport and photochemical terms which control their distribution. As part of this project, the "Istituto di Fisica dell'Atmosfera" launched nine laser backscattersondes (LABS on board stratospheric balloons to make observations of background aerosol and PSCs. LABS was launched with an optical particle counter operated by the University of Wyoming. Observations have been performed in the arctic, mid-latitudes and tropical regions in different seasons. Polar stratospheric clouds have been observed in areas inside and outside the polar vortex edge. A background aerosol was observed both in mid-latitudes and in arctic regions with a backscattering ratio of 1.2 at 692 nm. Very stratified aerosol layers, possibly transported into the lower stratosphere by deep convective systems, have been observed in the lower stratosphere between 20 and 29 km in the tropics in the Southern Hemisphere.

    Key words. Atmospheric composition and structure (aerosols and particles; middle atmosphere – composition and chemistry; instruments and techniques

  12. Vertical profile measurements of carbonylsulfide in the stratosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engel, A.; Schmidt, U.

    Measurements of COS in the altitude region between 17 and 30 km were made, using a whole air sampling technique with subsequent gaschromatographic analysis. The data show COS mixing-ratios from about 200 pptv at 17 km decreasing to less then 20 pptv at about 28 km. This behaviour is in qualitative agreement with the model-calculations by Turco et al. (1981). From the correlation with CFCl3 and CF2Cl2 the lifetime with respect to removal in the stratosphere is calculated to be 69±28 years. This corresponds to a sink of between 47 and 112 * 109 g of COS per year in the stratosphere. Comparing this number to the estimated fluxes needed to sustain the background sulfuric-acid aerosol confirms that most of the non-volcanic aerosol is produced by the oxidation of COS in the stratosphere.

  13. Lower stratospheric aerosols at a tropical latitude station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnamurthy, B. V.; Parameswaran, K.; Rose, K. O.; Satyanarayana, M.

    1989-01-01

    A pulsed ruby lidar has been in regular operation at the tropical station Trivandrum (8 deg 33 sec N, 76 deg 57 sec E) since October 1986. The lidar data were analyzed to obtain monthly mean aerosol extinction at lower stratospheric altitudes. The monthly mean variation of aerosol extinction shows a peak in March to April with a trough in the winter months. This behavior is compared with that of temperature at the same altitude, obtained from balloonsonde measurements at the same station. It is found that there is a negative correlation between the two with high extinction values corresponding to low temperature values and vice versa. This is attributed to the stratospheric aerosol microphysical processes. The association of stratospheric aerosol extinction with the tropopause altitude and temperature was studied along with the implications of these results.

  14. The arctic winter stratosphere: simulated with a 3-D chemistry transport model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broek, Martina Maria Petronella van den

    2004-01-01

    During the past two decades, the ozone layer has developed a “hole” each winter and spring above the Antarctic continent. Also in cold Arctic winters substantial stratospheric ozone depletion has been measured, although less than in the Antarctic stratosphere. In the Arctic winter stratosphere,

  15. Simulation of the Effect of Water-vapor Increase on Temperature in the Stratosphere

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BI Yun; CHEN Yuejuan; ZHOU Renjun; YI Mingjian; DENG Shumei

    2011-01-01

    To analyze the mechanism by which water vapor increase leads to cooling in the stratosphere, the effects of water-vapor increases on temperature in the stratosphere were simulated using the two-dimensional,interactive chemical dynamical radiative model (SOCRATES) of NCAR. The results indicate that increases in stratospheric water vapor lead to stratospheric cooling, with the extent of cooling increasing with height,and that cooling in the middle stratosphere is stronger in Arctic regions. Analysis of the radiation process showed that infiared radiative cooling by water vapor is a pivotal factor in niddle-lower stratospheric cooling. However. in the npper stratosphere (above 45 kn), infrared radiation is not a factor in cooling;there, cooling is caused by the decreased solar radiative heating rate resulting from ozone decrease due to increased stratospheric water vapor. Dynamical cooling is important in the middle-upper stratosphere,and dynamical feedback to temperature change is more distinct in the Northern Hemisphere middle-high latitudes than in other regions and significantly affects temperature and ozone in winter over Arctic regions.Increasing stratospheric water vapor will strengthen ozone depletion through the chemical process. However,ozone will increase in the middle stratosphere. The change in ozone due to increasing water vapor has an important effect on the stratospheric teinperature change.

  16. The arctic winter stratosphere: simulated with a 3-D chemistry transport model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broek, M.M.P. (Martina Maria Petronella) van den

    2004-01-01

    During the past two decades, the ozone layer has developed a “hole” each winter and spring above the Antarctic continent. Also in cold Arctic winters substantial stratospheric ozone depletion has been measured, although less than in the Antarctic stratosphere. In the Arctic winter stratosphere, the

  17. Impact of stratospheric variability on tropospheric climate change

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dall' Amico, Mauro [University of Reading, NCAS Climate, Reading (United Kingdom); Institut fuer Physik der Atmosphaere, Deutsches Zentrum fuer Luft- und Raumfahrt, Oberpfaffenhofen (Germany); Stott, Peter A.; Scaife, Adam A. [Met Office Hadley Centre, Exeter (United Kingdom); Gray, Lesley J. [University of Reading, NCAS Climate, Reading (United Kingdom); Rosenlof, Karen H. [NOAA Earth System Research Laboratory, Boulder, CO (United States); Karpechko, Alexey Yu. [University of East Anglia, Climatic Research Unit, School of Environmental Sciences, Norwich (United Kingdom)

    2010-02-15

    An improved stratospheric representation has been included in simulations with the Hadley Centre HadGEM1 coupled ocean atmosphere model with natural and anthropogenic forcings for the period 1979-2003. An improved stratospheric ozone dataset is employed that includes natural variations in ozone as well as the usual anthropogenic trends. In addition, in a second set of simulations the quasi biennial oscillation (QBO) of stratospheric equatorial zonal wind is also imposed using a relaxation towards ERA-40 zonal wind values. The resulting impact on tropospheric variability and trends is described. We show that the modelled cooling rate at the tropopause is enhanced by the improved ozone dataset and this improvement is even more marked when the QBO is also included. The same applies to warming trends in the upper tropical troposphere which are slightly reduced. Our stratospheric improvements produce a significant increase of internal variability but no change in the positive trend of annual mean global mean near-surface temperature. Warming rates are increased significantly over a large portion of the Arctic Ocean. The improved stratospheric representation, especially the QBO relaxation, causes a substantial reduction in near-surface temperature and precipitation response to the El Chichon eruption, especially in the tropical region. The winter increase in the phase of the northern annular mode observed in the aftermath of the two major recent volcanic eruptions is partly captured, especially after the El Chichon eruption. The positive trend in the southern annular mode (SAM) is increased and becomes statistically significant which demonstrates that the observed increase in the SAM is largely subject to internal variability in the stratosphere. The possible inclusion in simulations for future assessments of full ozone chemistry and a gravity wave scheme to internally generate a QBO is discussed. (orig.)

  18. Tropospheric and Stratospheric Ozone From Assimilation of Aura Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stajner, I.; Wargan, K.; Chang, L.; Hayashi, H.; Pawson, S.; Froidevaux, L.; Livesey, N.; Bhartia, P. K.; Bowman, K.

    2006-05-01

    Ozone is an atmospheric trace gas with multiple impacts on the environment. Global ozone fields are needed for air quality predictions, estimation of the ultraviolet radiation reaching the surface, climate-radiation studies, and ozone may also have an impact on longer-term weather predictions. We estimate global ozone fields in the stratosphere and troposphere by combining the data from the EOS Aura satellite with an ozone model using data assimilation. Ozone exhibits a large temporal variability in the lower stratosphere. Our previous work showed that assimilation of satellite data from limb-sounding geometry helps constrain ozone profiles in that region. We assimilated ozone data from the Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) and the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) into the ozone system at NASA's Global Modeling and Assimilation Office (GMAO). Ozone is transported within a general circulation model (GCM) which includes parameterizations for stratospheric photochemistry, tropospheric chemistry, and a simple scheme for heterogeneous ozone loss. The focus of this study is on the representation of ozone in the lower stratosphere and tropospheric ozone columns. We plan to extend studies of tropospheric ozone distribution through assimilation of ozone data from the Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES). Comparisons with ozone sondes and occultation data show that assimilation of Aura data provides a good representation of ozone gradients and variability in the lower stratosphere. We proceed by separating the contributions to temporal changes in the ozone field into those that are due to the model and those that are due to the assimilation of Aura data. We discuss the impacts of Aura data and their role in the representation of ozone variability in the lower stratosphere and troposphere.

  19. Is there a solar signal in lower stratospheric water vapour?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schieferdecker, Tobias; Lossow, Stefan; Stiller, Gabriele; von Clarmann, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    A merged time series of stratospheric water vapour built from the Halogen Occultation Instrument (HALOE) and the Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding (MIPAS) data between 60 deg S and 60 deg N and 15 to 30 km, and covering the years 1992 to 2012, was analysed by multivariate linear regression, including an 11-year solar cycle proxy. Lower stratospheric water vapour was found to reveal a phase-shifted anti-correlation with the solar cycle, with lowest water vapour after solar maximum. The phase shift is composed of an inherent constant time lag of about 2 years and a second component following the stratospheric age of air. The amplitudes of the water vapour response are largest close to the tropical tropopause (up to 0.35 ppmv) and decrease with altitude and latitude. Including the solar cycle proxy in the regression results in linear trends of water vapour being negative over the full altitude/latitude range, while without the solar proxy, positive water vapour trends in the lower stratosphere were found. We conclude from these results that a solar signal seems to be generated at the tropical tropopause which is most likely imprinted on the stratospheric water vapour abundances and transported to higher altitudes and latitudes via the Brewer-Dobson circulation. Hence it is concluded that the tropical tropopause temperature at the final dehydration point of air may also be governed to some degree by the solar cycle. The negative water vapour trends obtained when considering the solar cycle impact on water vapour abundances can possibly solve the "water vapour conundrum" of increasing stratospheric water vapour abundances despite constant or even decreasing tropopause temperatures.

  20. "Write Every Day!": A Mantra Dismantled

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sword, Helen

    2016-01-01

    Numerous books, blogs, and articles on research productivity exhort academics to "write every day" even during the busiest of teaching times. Ironically, however, this research-boosting advice hangs from a perilously thin research thread. This article scrutinises the key findings of Robert Boice, whose pioneering studies of…

  1. Human Health Effects of Ozone Depletion From Stratospheric Aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wey, Chowen (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This report presents EPA's initial response to NASA's request to advise on potential environmental policy issues associated with the future development of supersonic flight technologies. Consistent with the scope of the study to which NASA and EPA agreed, EPA has evaluated only the environmental concerns related to the stratospheric ozone impacts of a hypothetical HSCT fleet, although recent research indicates that a fleet of HSCT is predicted to contribute to climate warming as well. This report also briefly describes the international and domestic institutional frameworks established to address stratospheric ozone depletion, as well as those established to control pollution from aircraft engine exhaust emissions.

  2. Effects of El Chichon volcanic effluents on stratospheric aerosol dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pueschel, R. F.; Snetsinger, K. G.; Russell, P. B.; Oberbeck, V. R.; Livingston, J. M.

    1988-01-01

    The effects of El Chichon's April 1982 eruption on stratospheric aerosol dynamics are presently discussed in terms of log-normal size distributions over 15-20 km sample altitudes between 30 and 45 deg N over the contiguous U.S. After collection, samples were studied by SEM, and log-normal size distributions were fitted to the data-points obtained. It is found that stratospheric aerosol behavior is explainable by the laws of aerosol mechanics more easily than has been the case for tropospheric aerosol, for which the source-sink relationship is much more complex.

  3. Forcing of stratospheric chemistry and dynamics during the Dalton Minimum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. G. Anet

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The response of atmospheric chemistry and climate to volcanic eruptions and a decrease in solar activity during the Dalton Minimum is investigated with the fully coupled atmosphere-ocean-chemistry general circulation model SOCOL-MPIOM covering the time period 1780 to 1840 AD. We carried out several sensitivity ensemble experiments to separate the effects of (i reduced solar ultra-violet (UV irradiance, (ii reduced solar visible and near infrared irradiance, (iii enhanced galactic cosmic ray intensity as well as less intensive solar energetic proton events and auroral electron precipitation, and (iv volcanic aerosols. The introduced changes of UV irradiance and volcanic aerosols significantly influence stratospheric climate in the early 19th century, whereas changes in the visible part of the spectrum and energetic particles have smaller effects. A reduction of UV irradiance by 15% causes global ozone decrease below the stratopause reaching 8% in the midlatitudes at 5 hPa and a significant stratospheric cooling of up to 2 °C in the midstratosphere and to 6 °C in the lower mesosphere. Changes in energetic particle precipitation lead only to minor changes in the yearly averaged temperature fields in the stratosphere. Volcanic aerosols heat the tropical lower stratosphere allowing more water vapor to enter the tropical stratosphere, which, via HOx reactions, decreases upper stratospheric and mesospheric ozone by roughly 4%. Conversely, heterogeneous chemistry on aerosols reduces stratospheric NOx leading to a 12% ozone increase in the tropics, whereas a decrease in ozone of up to 5% is found over Antarctica in boreal winter. The linear superposition of the different contributions is not equivalent to the response obtained in a simulation when all forcing factors are applied during the DM – this effect is especially well visible for NOx/NOy. Thus, this study highlights the non-linear behavior of the coupled chemistry-climate system. Finally, we

  4. Free radicals in the stratosphere - A new observational technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, J. G.; Hazen, N. L.; Mclaren, B. E.; Rowe, S. P.; Schiller, C. M.; Schwab, M. J.; Solomon, L.; Thompson, E. E.; Weinstock, E. M.

    1985-01-01

    A new approach to in situ observations of trace reactive species in the stratosphere is described. A balloon-borne system, floating 40 kilometers above the earth's surface, successfully lowered and then retracted a cluster of instruments a distance of 12 kilometers on a filament of Kevlar. This instrument cluster is capable of detecting gas-phase free radicals at the part-per-trillion level. The suspended instrument array has excellent stability and has been used to measured atomic oxygen concentrations in the stratosphere.

  5. Two-dimensional monthly average ozone balance from limb infrared monitor of the stratosphere and stratospheric and mesospheric sounder data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackman, C. H.; Stolarski, R. S.; Kaye, J. A.

    1986-01-01

    For many years, atmospheric scientists have been concerned with the balance of ozone production and loss terms in the upper stratosphere. Crutzen and Schmailzl (1983) found that the ozone loss was higher than the ozone production in the upper stratosphere. In the present investigation, previous studies are used as a basis in the conduction of a two-dimensional calculation of the production and loss of ozone. The monthly and zonally averaged loss and production rates for ozone are computed using recent Nimbus 7 satellite measurements of stratospheric constituents and accepted reaction and photodissociation rates. It is found that ozone has a loss rate which is about 40-60 percent higher than the production in the photochemical region.

  6. Chemical analysis of refractory stratospheric aerosol particles collected within the arctic vortex and inside polar stratospheric clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebert, Martin; Weigel, Ralf; Kandler, Konrad; Günther, Gebhard; Molleker, Sergej; Grooß, Jens-Uwe; Vogel, Bärbel; Weinbruch, Stephan; Borrmann, Stephan

    2016-07-01

    Stratospheric aerosol particles with diameters larger than about 10 nm were collected within the arctic vortex during two polar flight campaigns: RECONCILE in winter 2010 and ESSenCe in winter 2011. Impactors were installed on board the aircraft M-55 Geophysica, which was operated from Kiruna, Sweden. Flights were performed at a height of up to 21 km and some of the particle samples were taken within distinct polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs). The chemical composition, size and morphology of refractory particles were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray microanalysis. During ESSenCe no refractory particles with diameters above 500 nm were sampled. In total 116 small silicate, Fe-rich, Pb-rich and aluminum oxide spheres were found. In contrast to ESSenCe in early winter, during the late-winter RECONCILE mission the air masses were subsiding inside the Arctic winter vortex from the upper stratosphere and mesosphere, thus initializing a transport of refractory aerosol particles into the lower stratosphere. During RECONCILE, 759 refractory particles with diameters above 500 nm were found consisting of silicates, silicate / carbon mixtures, Fe-rich particles, Ca-rich particles and complex metal mixtures. In the size range below 500 nm the presence of soot was also proven. While the data base is still sparse, the general tendency of a lower abundance of refractory particles during PSC events compared to non-PSC situations was observed. The detection of large refractory particles in the stratosphere, as well as the experimental finding that these particles were not observed in the particle samples (upper size limit ˜ 5 µm) taken during PSC events, strengthens the hypothesis that such particles are present in the lower polar stratosphere in late winter and have provided a surface for heterogeneous nucleation during PSC formation.

  7. Effects of a polar stratospheric cloud parameterization on ozone depletion due to stratospheric aircraft in a two-dimensional model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Considine, D.B. [Applied Research Corp., Landover, MD (United States); Douglass, A.R.; Jackman, C.H. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD (United States)

    1994-09-20

    A parameterization of Type 1 and 2 polar stratospheric cloud (PSC) formation is presented which is appropriate for use in two-dimensional (2-D) photochemical models of the stratosphere. The calculation of PSC frequency of occurrence and surface area density uses climatological temperature probability distributions obtained from National Meteorological Center data to avoid using zonal mean temperatures, which are not good predictors of PSC behavior. The parameterization does not attempt to model the microphysics of PSCs. The parameterization predicts changes in PSC formation and heterogeneous processing due to perturbations of stratospheric trace constituents. It is therefore useful in assessing the potential effects of a fleet of stratospheric aircraft (high speed civil transports, or HSCTs) on stratospheric composition. The model calculated frequency of PSC occurrence agrees well with a climatology based on stratospheric aerosol measurement (SAM) II observations. PSCs are predicted to occur in the tropics. Their vertical range is narrow, however, and their impact on model O{sub 3} fields is small. When PSC and sulfate aerosol heterogeneous processes are included in the model calculations, the O{sub 3} change for 1980-1990 is in substantially better agreement with the total ozone mapping spectrometer (TOMS) - derived O{sub 3} trend than otherwise. However, significant discrepancies in the northern midlatitudes remain. The overall changes in model O{sub 3} response to standard HSCT perturbation scenarios produced by the parameterization are small and tend to decrease the model sensitivity to the HSCT perturbation. However, in the southern hemisphere spring a significant increase in O{sub 3} sensitivity to HSCT perturbations is found. At this location and time, increased PSC formation leads to increased levels of active chlorine, which produce the O{sub 3} decrease. 38 refs., 13 figs., 3 tabs.

  8. Effects of a polar stratosphere cloud parameterization on ozone depletion due to stratospheric aircraft in a two-dimensional model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Considine, David B.; Douglass, Anne R.; Jackman, Charles H.

    1994-01-01

    A parameterization of Type 1 and 2 polar stratospheric cloud (PSC) formation is presented which is appropriate for use in two-dimensional (2-D) photochemical models of the stratosphere. The calculations of PSC frequency of occurrence and surface area density uses climatological temperature probability distributions obtained from National Meteorological Center data to avoid using zonal mean temperatures, which are not good predictors of PSC behavior. The parameterization does not attempt to model the microphysics of PSCs. The parameterization predicts changes in PSC formation and heterogeneous processing due to perturbations of stratospheric trace constituents. It is therefore useful in assessing the potential effects of a fleet of stratospheric aircraft (high speed civil transports, or HSCTs) on stratospheric composition. the model calculated frequency of PSC occurrence agrees well with a climatology based on stratospheric aerosol measurement (SAM) 2 observations. PSCs are predicted to occur in the tropics. Their vertical range is narrow, however, and their impact on model O3 fields is small. When PSC and sulfate aerosol heterogeneous processes are included in the model calculations, the O3 change for 1980 - 1990 is in substantially better agreement with the total ozone mapping spectrometer (TOMS)-derived O3 trend than otherwise. The overall changes in model O3 response to standard HSCT perturbation scenarios produced by the parameterization are small and tend to decrease the model sensitivity to the HSCT perturbation. However, in the southern hemisphere spring a significant increase in O3 sensitivity to HSCT perturbations is found. At this location and time, increased PSC formation leads to increased levels of active chlorine, which produce the O3 decreases.

  9. UV spectroscopy applied to stratospheric chemistry, methods and results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karlsen, K.

    1996-03-01

    The publication from the Norwegian Institute for Air Research (NILU) deals with an investigation done on stratospheric chemistry by UV spectroscopy. The scientific goals are briefly discussed, and it gives the results from the measuring and analysing techniques used in the investigation. 6 refs., 11 figs.

  10. The impact of geoengineering aerosols on stratospheric temperature and ozone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heckendorn, P; Luo, B P; Rozanov, E; Schraner, M; Peter, T [Institute for Atmospheric and Climate Science, ETH Zurich, 8092 Zurich (Switzerland); Weisenstein, D [AER, Lexington, MA (United States); Fueglistaler, S [DAMTP, University of Cambridge (United Kingdom); Thomason, L W, E-mail: patricia.heckendorn@env.ethz.c [NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, VA (United States)

    2009-10-15

    Anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions are warming the global climate at an unprecedented rate. Significant emission reductions will be required soon to avoid a rapid temperature rise. As a potential interim measure to avoid extreme temperature increase, it has been suggested that Earth's albedo be increased by artificially enhancing stratospheric sulfate aerosols. We use a 3D chemistry climate model, fed by aerosol size distributions from a zonal mean aerosol model, to simulate continuous injection of 1-10 Mt/a into the lower tropical stratosphere. In contrast to the case for all previous work, the particles are predicted to grow to larger sizes than are observed after volcanic eruptions. The reason is the continuous supply of sulfuric acid and hence freshly formed small aerosol particles, which enhance the formation of large aerosol particles by coagulation and, to a lesser extent, by condensation. Owing to their large size, these particles have a reduced albedo. Furthermore, their sedimentation results in a non-linear relationship between stratospheric aerosol burden and annual injection, leading to a reduction of the targeted cooling. More importantly, the sedimenting particles heat the tropical cold point tropopause and, hence, the stratospheric entry mixing ratio of H{sub 2}O increases. Therefore, geoengineering by means of sulfate aerosols is predicted to accelerate the hydroxyl catalyzed ozone destruction cycles and cause a significant depletion of the ozone layer even though future halogen concentrations will be significantly reduced.

  11. Effects of stratospheric radiations on human glioblastoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerù, Maria Paola; Amicarelli, Fernanda; Cristiano, Loredana; Colafarina, Sabrina; Aimola, Pierpaolo; Falone, Stefano; Cinque, Benedetta; Ursini, Ornella; Moscardelli, Roberto; Ragni, Pietro

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this work was to evaluate the effect of stratospheric radiations on neural tumour cells. ADF human glioblastoma cells were hosted on a stratospheric balloon within the 2002 biological experiment campaign of the Italian Space Agency. The flight at an average height of 37 km lasted about 24 hrs. Cell morphology, number and viability, cell cycle and apoptosis, some antioxidant enzymes and proteins involved in cell cycle regulation, DNA repair and gene expression were studied. Stratospheric radiations caused a significant decrease in cell number, as well as a block of proliferation, but not apoptosis or necrosis. Radiations also induced activation and induction of some antioxidant enzymes, increase in DNA repair-related proteins (p53 and Proliferating Cell Nuclear Antigen) and variations of the transcription factors Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptors. Morphologically, test cells exhibited more electron dense cytoplasm and less condensed chromatin than controls and modification of their surfaces. Our results indicate that glioblastoma cells, exposed to continuous stratospheric radiations for 24 hrs, show activation of cell cycle check point, decrease of cell number, variations of Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptors and increase of Reactive Oxygen Species-scavenging enzymes.

  12. Man's effect on stratospheric ozone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ellsaesser, H.W.

    1979-08-01

    Since McDonald, at the beginning of this decade, first proposed that water vapor from SST exhaust would lead to increases in skin cancer, about a dozen man-induced mechanisms have been suggested as threatening to modify our stratospheric ozone uv-shield. Possible thinning of the ozone layer has been attributed to one or more of the catalytic ozone destroyers, water vapor (HO/sub x/), oxides of nitrogen (NO/sub x/), chlorine (ClX); or bromine (BrX). The original catalyst, HO/sub x/, rather quickly lost its role to NO/sub x/. In an almost unique evolution, computed sensitivity of stratospheric ozone to NO/sub x/ progressively declined until a reversal of effect occurred. Models now compute a thickening of the ozone layer for any but high level or very massive injections of NO/sub x/. Meanwhile, computed sensitivity to ClX has fluctuated widely and in 1978 models increased to the point where comparisons with observations were becoming an embarrassment. The potential role of BrX has also increased but awaits a credible source of stratospheric bromine to bring it center stage. More recently the atmospheric build-up of carbon dioxide, by cooling the stratosphere and increasing the chemical equilibrium level of ozone, has also been recognized as a potential modifier of the ozone layer.

  13. Reduction of photosynthetically active radiation under extreme stratospheric aerosol loads

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerstl, S.A.W.; Zardecki, A.

    1981-08-01

    The recently published hypothesis that the Cretaceous-Tertiary extinctions might be caused by an obstruction of sunlight is tested by model calculations. First we compute the total mass of stratospheric aerosols under normal atmospheric conditions for four different (measured) aerosol size distributions and vertical profiles. For comparison, the stratospheric dust masses after four volcanic eruptions are also evaluated. Detailed solar radiative transfer calculations are then performed for artificially increased aerosol amounts until the postulated darkness scenario is obtained. Thus we find that a total stratospheric aerosol mass between 1 and 4 times 10/sup 1/ g is sufficient to reduce photosynthesis to 10/sup -3/ of normal. We also infer from this result tha the impact of a 0.4- to 3-km-diameter asteroid or a close encounter with a Halley-size comet may deposit that amount of particulates into the stratosphere. The darkness scenario of Alvarez et al. is thus shown to be a possible extinction mechanism, even with smaller size asteroids of comets than previously estimated.

  14. Bidirectional infrasonic ducts associated with sudden stratospheric warming events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assink, J. D.; Waxler, R.; Smets, P.; Evers, L. G.

    2014-02-01

    In January 2011, the state of the polar vortex in the midlatitudes changed significantly due to a minor sudden stratospheric warming event. As a result, a bidirectional duct for infrasound propagation developed in the middle atmosphere that persisted for 2 weeks. The ducts were due to two zonal wind jets, one between 30 and 50 km and the other around 70 km altitude. In this paper, using microbarom source modeling, a previously unidentified source region in the eastern Mediterranean is identified, besides the more well known microbarom source regions in the Atlantic Ocean. Infrasound data are then presented in which the above mentioned bidirectional duct is observed in microbarom signals recorded at the International Monitoring System station I48TN in Tunisia, from the Mediterranean region to the east and from the Atlantic Ocean to the west. While the frequency bands of the two sources overlap, the Mediterranean signal is coherent up to about 0.6 Hz. This observation is consistent with the microbarom source modeling; the discrepancy in the frequency band is related to differences in the ocean wave spectra for the two basins considered. This work demonstrates the sensitivity of infrasound to stratospheric dynamics and illustrates that the classic paradigm of a unidirectional stratospheric duct for infrasound propagation can be broken during a sudden stratospheric warming event.

  15. Bidirectional infrasonic ducts associated with sudden stratospheric warming events

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Assink, J.D.; Waxler, R.; Smets, P.S.M.; Evers, L.G.

    2014-01-01

    In January 2011, the state of the polar vortex in the midlatitudes changed significantly due to a minor sudden stratospheric warming event. As a result, a bidirectional duct for infrasound propagation developed in the middle atmosphere that persisted for 2 weeks. The ducts were due to two zonal wind

  16. Strong thermospheric cooling during the 2009 major stratosphere warming

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, H.; Doornbos, E.N.; Yamamoto, M.; Ram, S.T.

    2011-01-01

    Thermospheric density simultaneously observed by the CHAMP and GRACE satellites in both the pre‐dawn and afternoon local time sectors undergoes significant decrease across both hemispheres during the major stratospheric sudden warming (SSW) in January 2009. This decrease is largest in the equatorial

  17. Equatorial ionospheric electrodynamic perturbations during Southern Hemisphere stratospheric warming events

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olson, M. E.; Fejer, B. G.; Stolle, Claudia;

    2013-01-01

    We use ground-based and satellite measurements to examine, for the first time, the characteristics of equatorial electrodynamic perturbations measured during the 2002 major and 2010 minor Southern Hemisphere sudden stratospheric warming (SSW) events. Our data suggest the occurrence of enhanced qu...

  18. Vapor Measurements from the GSFC Stratospheric Ozone Lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGee, T.

    2003-01-01

    Water vapor measurements from the GSFC Stratospheric Ozone Lidar were made for the first time during a campaign at NOAA's Mauna Loa Observatory. Comparisons were made among the GSFC lidar, the NOAA Lidar and water vapor sondes which were flown from the observatory at times coincident with the lidar measurements.

  19. The Impact of Geoengineering Aerosols on Stratospheric Temperature and Ozone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heckendorn, P.; Weisenstein, D.; Fueglistaler, S.; Luo, B. P.; Rozanov, E.; Schraner, M.; Thomason, L. W.; Peter, T.

    2011-01-01

    Anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions are warming the global climate at an unprecedented rate. Significant emission reductions will be required soon to avoid a rapid temperature rise. As a potential interim measure to avoid extreme temperature increase, it has been suggested that Earth's albedo be increased by artificially enhancing stratospheric sulfate aerosols. We use a 3D chemistry climate model, fed by aerosol size distributions from a zonal mean aerosol model. to simulate continuous injection of 1-10 Mt/a into the lower tropical stratosphere. In contrast to the case for all previous work, the particles are predicted to grow to larger sizes than are observed after volcanic eruptions. The reason is the continuous supply of sulfuric acid and hence freshly formed small aerosol particles, which enhance the formation of large aerosol particles by coagulation and, to a lesser extent, by condensation. Owing to their large size, these particles have a reduced albedo. Furthermore, their sedimentation results in a non-linear relationship between stratospheric aerosol burden and annual injection, leading to a reduction of the targeted cooling. More importantly, the sedimenting particles heat the tropical cold point tropopause and, hence, the stratospheric entry mixing ratio of H2O increases. Therefore, geoengineering by means of sulfate aerosols is predicted to accelerate the hydroxyl catalyzed ozone destruction cycles and cause a significant depletion of the ozone layer even though future halogen concentrations will he significantly reduced.

  20. Stratospheric sulfate geoengineering could enhance the terrestrial photosynthesis rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, L.; Robock, A.; Tilmes, S.; Neely, R. R., III

    2016-02-01

    Stratospheric sulfate geoengineering could impact the terrestrial carbon cycle by enhancing the carbon sink. With an 8 Tg yr-1 injection of SO2 to produce a stratospheric aerosol cloud to balance anthropogenic radiative forcing from the Representative Concentration Pathway 6.0 (RCP6.0) scenario, we conducted climate model simulations with the Community Earth System Model - the Community Atmospheric Model 4 fully coupled to tropospheric and stratospheric chemistry (CAM4-chem). During the geoengineering period, as compared to RCP6.0, land-averaged downward visible (300-700 nm) diffuse radiation increased 3.2 W m-2 (11 %). The enhanced diffuse radiation combined with the cooling increased plant photosynthesis by 0.07 ± 0.02 µmol C m-2 s-1, which could contribute to an additional 3.8 ± 1.1 Gt C yr-1 global gross primary productivity without explicit nutrient limitation. This increase could potentially increase the land carbon sink. Suppressed plant and soil respiration due to the cooling would reduce natural land carbon emission and therefore further enhance the terrestrial carbon sink during the geoengineering period. This potentially beneficial impact of stratospheric sulfate geoengineering would need to be balanced by a large number of potential risks in any future decisions about the implementation of geoengineering.

  1. Man's effect on stratospheric ozone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ellsaesser, H.W.

    1979-08-01

    Since McDonald, at the beginning of this decade, first proposed that water vapor from SST exhaust would lead to increases in skin cancer, about a dozen man-induced mechanisms have been suggested as threatening to modify our stratospheric ozone uv-shield. Possible thinning of the ozone layer has been attributed to one or more of the catalytic ozone destroyers, water vapor (HO/sub x/), oxides of nitrogen (NO/sub x/), chlorine (ClX); or bromine (BrX). The original catalyst, HO/sub x/, rather quickly lost its role to NO/sub x/. In an almost unique evolution, computed sensitivity of stratospheric ozone to NO/sub x/ progressively declined until a reversal of effect occurred. Models now compute a thickening of the ozone layer for any but high level or very massive injections of NO/sub x/. Meanwhile, computed sensitivity to ClX has fluctuated widely and in 1978 models increased to the point where comparisons with observations were becoming an embarrassment. The potential role of BrX has also increased but awaits a credible source of stratospheric bromine to bring it center stage. More recently the atmospheric build-up of carbon dioxide, by cooling the stratosphere and increasing the chemical equilibrium level of ozone, has also been recognized as a potential modifier of the ozone layer.

  2. Lidar measurement of stratospheric dust from St. Augustine Volcano

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remsberg, E. E.; Browell, E. V.; Northam, G. B.

    1976-01-01

    The detection of a stratospheric dust layer of probable volcanic origin over Hampton, Va., on the evening of Jan. 28, 1976, with a 20-inch lidar system is reported. A digitized cathode-ray-tube trace of a return signal from altitudes of 12 to 24 km on January 28 is provided, and it is shown that 38% of the return was due to stratospheric aerosol. Noting that measurements on January 22 and February 2 showed no traces of this stratospheric dust layer, trajectories of dust-laden air parcels are followed from initiation at 0000 GMT on January 24 at the St. Augustine Volcano on Augustine Island, Alaska (59 deg N, 153 deg W). Analysis of the trajectories indicates that dust injected into the stratosphere at 59 deg N, 153 deg W could have been transported to Virginia in about 4 days. It is concluded that if the St. Augustine Volcano was the source of the dust, at least 23 deg of meridional transport from polar latitudes was observed.

  3. Strong thermospheric cooling during the 2009 major stratosphere warming

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, H.; Doornbos, E.N.; Yamamoto, M.; Ram, S.T.

    2011-01-01

    Thermospheric density simultaneously observed by the CHAMP and GRACE satellites in both the pre‐dawn and afternoon local time sectors undergoes significant decrease across both hemispheres during the major stratospheric sudden warming (SSW) in January 2009. This decrease is largest in the equatorial

  4. Stratospheric Ozone Reactive Chemicals Generated by Space Launches Worldwide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-11-01

    I ODCs). Their carbon - chlorine bond is severed in the stratosphere by solar photolysis or reaction. Once the carbon-chlorine bond is broken, the...include the Russian Proton and Energia , and the Chinese Long March series. Roughly half (seven per year) of the Ariane 4 launches use two solid strap-ons

  5. Sulfuric acid deposition from stratospheric geoengineering with sulfate aerosols

    KAUST Repository

    Kravitz, Ben

    2009-07-28

    We used a general circulation model of Earth\\'s climate to conduct geoengineering experiments involving stratospheric injection of sulfur dioxide and analyzed the resulting deposition of sulfate. When sulfur dioxide is injected into the tropical or Arctic stratosphere, the main additional surface deposition of sulfate occurs in midlatitude bands, because of strong cross-tropopause flux in the jet stream regions. We used critical load studies to determine the effects of this increase in sulfate deposition on terrestrial ecosystems by assuming the upper limit of hydration of all sulfate aerosols into sulfuric acid. For annual injection of 5 Tg of SO2 into the tropical stratosphere or 3 Tg of SO2 into the Arctic stratosphere, neither the maximum point value of sulfate deposition of approximately 1.5 mEq m−2 a−1 nor the largest additional deposition that would result from geoengineering of approximately 0.05 mEq m−2 a−1 is enough to negatively impact most ecosystems.

  6. Quantifying pollution transport from the Asian monsoon anticyclone into the lower stratosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Ploeger

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Pollution transport from the surface to the stratosphere within the Asian monsoon circulation may cause harmful effects on stratospheric chemistry and climate. Here, we investigate air mass transport from the monsoon anticyclone into the stratosphere using a Lagrangian chemistry transport model. We show how two main transport pathways from the anticyclone emerge: (i into the tropical stratosphere (tropical pipe, and (ii into the Northern Hemisphere (NH extratropical lower stratosphere. Maximum anticyclone air mass fractions reach around 5 % in the tropical pipe and 15 % in the extratropical lowermost stratosphere over the course of a year. The anticyclone air mass fraction correlates well with satellite hydrogen cyanide (HCN and carbon monoxide (CO observations, confirming that pollution is transported deep into the tropical stratosphere from the Asian monsoon anticyclone. Cross-tropopause transport occurs in a vertical chimney, but with the pollutants transported quasi-horizontally along isentropes above the tropopause into the tropics and NH.

  7. Observations and parameterization of the stratospheric electrical conductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Hua; Holzworth, Robert H.

    1996-12-01

    Simultaneous in situ measurements of the stratospheric electrical conductivity, made from multiple balloon platforms during the 1992-1993 Extended Life Balloon-Borne Observatories (ELBBO) experiment, have yielded the most comprehensive data set on the stratospheric electrical conductivity. The ELBBO project involved launches of five superpressure balloons into the stratosphere from Dunedin, New Zealand, beginning November 10, 1992, and lasting through March 18, 1993. Most of the balloons floated at a constant altitude of 26 km for over 3 months, covered a wide range of latitudes from the South Pole to 28°S, and circled around the southern hemisphere several times. On average, the positive polar conductivity (conductivity of positive ions alone) was about 15% higher than that of the negative conductivity, suggesting that differences may exist between the mobilities of positive and negative ions. Data from each polarity of polar conductivity also indicate persistent, apparently organized, short-term and localized variations, with amplitude within 30% of the mean value. In corrected geomagnetic (CGM) coordinates the conductivity variations were found to be a function of latitude but not of longitude. The total conductivity can increase 150% from low latitude to high latitude, and does remain nearly constant at latitudes above 55° (namely, the cosmic ray knee latitude). Calculations based on ionization theory demonstrate that the latitudinal variations in the conductivity measurements were mainly due to the latitudinal variations in incident galactic cosmic ray intensity, with only little effect from the air temperature variations. The calculations shown here also suggest that small ions (as opposed to large ions) provide the main contribution to the stratospheric conductivity. The comparisons between conductivity measurements and models show that commonly used models can underestimate the latitudinal variation by a factor of 2. In this paper the stratospheric

  8. The long-term evolution of hydrocarbons in Jupiter's stratosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melin, Henrik; Fletcher, Leigh N.; Greathouse, Thomas K.; Giles, Rohini Sara; Sinclair, James; Orton, Glenn S.; Irwin, Patrick Gerard Joseph

    2016-10-01

    We present the global distribution of hydrocarbons in Jupiter's stratosphere using ground-based mid-infrared R~15,000 TEXES observations from the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility (IRTF), obtained between 2013 and 2016. Ethane and acetylene are the primary products of methane photolysis in Jupiter's stratosphere, and their spatial distribution can be used to trace atmospheric circulation and the lifetimes of chemical constituents. Zonal mean distributions of these species have been previously studied from the Voyager and Cassini spacecraft (Nixon et al., 2010, doi: 10.1016/j.pss.2010.05.008), but the TEXES dataset now provides the opportunity to track the evolution of the hydrocarbons from Earth (Fletcher et al., 2016, doi:10.1016/j.icarus.2016.06.008 ). Global spectral maps of methane, ethane and acetylene emission are used to characterize the temporal evolution of large scale features in Jupiter's stratosphere (0.5-20 mbar?), including: equator to pole contrasts driven by large-scale stratospheric overturning; mid-latitude bands of elevated hydrocarbon emission; small-scale wave phenomena driven by meteorological activity in the underlying troposphere; and the tropical changes in emission related to Jupiter's Quasi-Quadrennial Oscillation. The NEMESIS spectral inversion tool (Irwin et al., 2008, doi: 10.1016/j.jqsrt.2007.11.006) is used to derive stratospheric temperatures and hydrocarbon abundances from spatially-resolved spectra at 744, 819, and 1247 cm-1. We use these to investigate the changes in the vertical temperature and ethane and acetylene distributions over time, with the aim of providing the global and temporal context for Juno's exploration of the jovian atmosphere in 2016/17.

  9. Indonesia Stratosphere and Troposphere Response to Solar Activity Variations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinambela, Wilson; Muh, La Ode; Musafar, K.; Sutastio, Heri

    2000-10-01

    Tropospheric and stratospheric response of Indonesia to the solar activity was analyzed based on the stratospheric total ozone concentrations above Watukosek station (07,6 deg S, 112,5 deg E) from 1979 to 1992, and tropospheric temperature at tropopause geopotential height, 500 mBar, 700 mbar above Cengkareng - Jakarta station (06 deg) 07 min 37 sec S, 106 deg 39 min 28 sec E) from 1986 to 1992, and ground surface air temperature above Polonia Median (03 deg 34 sec N, 98 deg 41 min E) and Kemayoran - Jakarta station (06 deg 09 min S 106 deg 51 min E) from 1979 - 1989. By using the moving average analysis of monthly average this tropospheric and stratospheric variable, were found that the behavior of the time series of the stratospheric ozone concentration, tropospheric temperature at geopotential height tropopause, 500 mBar, 700 mBar and ground surface air temperature above Indonesia showed a tendency to vary with a period of about 22 - 32 months. This is so - called " Quasi Biennial" (Q B 0). The behavior of the relative sunspot numbers and / or F 10,7 Cm solar radio flux as the measure of the solar activity also showed a tendency to vary Quasi - Biennially with a period about 27 - 30 months which was superimposed to the eleven - year solar cycle variations. The source of the variations was predicted from the inside of the sun, since the experiment showed that the neutrino flux from the sun varies with a period almost equal to the Quasi - Biennial variations of the solar activity. The Quasi - Biennial variations of the solar activity seems produce a similar variations on the earth atmospheric phenomena such as the stratospheric total ozone concentrations, mean tropospheric temperature at geopotential tropopause height, 500 mBar, 700 mBar, and mean ground surface air temperature above Indonesia.

  10. Stratospheric ozone depletion from future nitrous oxide increases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Wang

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available We have investigated the impact of the assumed nitrous oxide (N2O increases on stratospheric chemistry and dynamics using a series of idealized simulations with a coupled chemistry-climate model (CCM. In a future cooler stratosphere the net yield of NOy from N2O is shown to decrease in a reference run following the IPCC A1B scenario, but NOy can still be significantly increased by extra increases of N2O over 2001–2050. Over the last decade of simulations, 50% increases in N2O result in a maximal 6% reduction in ozone mixing ratios in the middle stratosphere at around 10 hPa and an average 2% decrease in the total ozone column (TCO compared with the control run. This enhanced destruction could cause an ozone decline in the first half of this century in the middle stratosphere around 10 hPa, while global TCO still shows an increase at the same time. The results from a multiple linear regression analysis and sensitivity simulations with different forcings show that the chemical effect of N2O increases dominates the N2O-induced ozone depletion in the stratosphere, while the dynamical and radiative effects of N2O increases are overall insignificant. The analysis of the results reveals that the ozone depleting potential of N2O varies with the time period and is influenced by the environmental conditions. For example, carbon dioxide (CO2 increases can strongly offset the ozone depletion effect of N2O.

  11. Early work on the stratospheric ozone depletion-CFC issue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina, M.

    2012-12-01

    I became involved with the atmospheric chemistry of chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) shortly after joining Sherry Rowland's research group at the University of California, Irvine, in 1973. CFCs had been detected in the troposphere by James Lovelock in 1971, and the question we set out to answer was the fate of these compounds of industrial origin in the environment, as well as possibly identifying any consequences of their accumulation in the atmosphere. After examining many potential sinks for these compounds we realized that because of their unusual stability the most likely destruction process was photolysis in the stratosphere. I carried out measurements of the absorption spectra of these compounds in the near ultraviolet; previous work involved only spectra in the far ultraviolet, not relevant for atmospheric chemistry. The results indicated that photolysis would take place in the upper stratosphere. I subsequently carried out calculations using one-dimensional atmospheric models to estimate their atmospheric residence times, which turned out to be many decades. We realized that the chlorine atoms generated by photolysis of the CFCs would participate in a catalytic chain reaction that would efficiently destroy ozone. Furthermore, we estimated that the amount of CFCs produced industrially was comparable to the amount of nitric oxide produced naturally in the stratosphere by the decomposition of nitrous oxide; work by Paul Crutzen and Harold Johnston had indicated that the abundance of ozone in the stratosphere was controlled by nitric oxide. We then formulated the hypothesis that the continued release of CFCs to the environment posed a threat to the stability of the ozone layer, and published our results in the journal Nature in 1974. The publication was noticed almost exclusively by the community of experts in stratospheric chemistry, and hence Sherry Rowland and I decided at that time that it was our responsibility to communicate this finding to society at large

  12. Age of stratospheric air in the ERA-Interim

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diallo, M.; Legras, B.; Chedin, A.

    2012-07-01

    The age of stratospheric air is calculated over 22 yr of the ERA-Interim reanalysis using an off-line Lagrangian transport model and heating rates. At low and mid-latitudes, the mean age of air is in good agreement with observed ages from aircraft flights, high altitude balloons and satellite observations of CO2 and SF6. The mid-latitude age spectrum in the lower stratosphere exhibits a long tail with a peak at 0.5 yr, which is maximum at the end of the winter, and a secondary flat maximum between 4 and 5 yr due to the combination of fast and slow branches of the Brewer-Dobson circulation and the reinforced barrier effect of the jet. At higher altitudes, the age spectrum exhibits the footprint of the annual modulation of the deep Brewer-Dobson circulation. The variability of the mean age is analysed through a decomposition in terms of annual cycle, QBO, ENSO and trend. The annual modulation is the dominating signal in the lower stratosphere and in the tropical pipe with amplitude up to one year. The phase of the oscillation is opposite in both hemisphere beyond 20° and is also reversed below and above 25 km with maximun arising in mid-March in the Northern Hemisphere and in mid-September in the Southern Hemisphere. The tropical pipe signal is in phase with the lower southern stratosphere and the mid northern stratosphere. The maximum amplitude of the QBO modulation is of about 0.5 yr and is mostly concentrated within the tropics between 25 and 35 km. It lags the QBO wind at 30 hPa by about 8 months. The ENSO signal is small and limited to the lower northen stratosphere. The trend is significant and negative, of the order of -0.3 to -0.5 yr dec-1, within the lower stratosphere in the Southern Hemisphere and under 40° N in the Northern Hemisphere below 25 km. It is positive (of the order of 0.3 yr dec-1) in the mid stratosphere but there is no region of consistent significance. This suggests that the shallow and deep Brewer-Dobson circulations may evolve in

  13. Lidar measurements of polar stratospheric clouds during the 1989 airborne Arctic stratospheric expedition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, Syed; Browell, Edward V.

    1991-01-01

    The Airborne Arctic Stratospheric Expedition (AASE) was conducted during January to February 1989 from the Sola Air Station, Norway. As part of this expedition, the NASA Langley Research Center's multiwavelength airborne lidar system was flown on the NASA Ames Research Center's DC-8 aircraft to measure ozone (O3) and aerosol profiles in the region of the polar vortex. The lidar system simultaneously transmitted laser beams at 1064, 603, 311, and 301.5 nm to measure atmospheric scattering, polarization and O3 profiles. Long range flights were made between Stavanger, Norway, and the North Pole, and between 40 deg W and 20 deg E meridians. Eleven flights were made, each flight lasting an average of 10 hours covering about 8000 km. Atmospheric scattering ratios, aerosol polarizations, and aerosol scattering ratio wavelength dependences were derived from the lidar measurements to altitudes above 27 km. The details of the aerosol scattering properties of lidar observations in the IR, VIS, and UV regions are presented along with correlations with the national meteorological Center's temperature profiles.

  14. The influence of the stratosphere on the tropospheric zonal wind response to CO2 doubling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. J. Bell

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The influence of a CO2 doubling on the stratospheric potential vorticity (PV is examined in two climate models. Subsequently, the influence of changes in the stratosphere on the tropospheric zonal wind response is investigated, by inverting the stratospheric PV. Radiative effects seem to dominate the stratospheric response to CO2 doubling in the Southern Hemisphere. These lead to a stratospheric PV increase at the edge of the polar vortex, resulting in an increased westerly influence of the stratosphere on the troposphere, increasing the midlatitude tropospheric westerlies in late winter. In the Northern Hemisphere, dynamical effects are also important. Both models show a reduced polar PV and an enhanced midlatitude PV in the Northern Hemisphere winter stratosphere. These PV changes are likely related to an enhanced wave forcing of the winter stratosphere, as measured by an increase in the 100 hPa eddy heat flux, and result in a reduced westerly influence of the stratosphere on the high latitude tropospheric winds. In one model, the high latitude PV decreases are, however, restricted to higher altitudes, and the tropospheric response due to the stratospheric changes is dominated by an increased westerly influence in the midlatitudes, related to the increase in midlatitude PV in the lower stratosphere. The tropospheric response in zonal wind due to the stratospheric PV changes is of the order of 0.5 to 1 m s−1. The total tropospheric response has a somewhat different spatial structure, but is of similar magnitude. This indicates that the stratospheric influence is of importance in modifying the tropospheric zonal wind response to CO2 doubling.

  15. The influence of the stratosphere on the tropospheric zonal wind response to CO2 doubling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. C. Siegmund

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The influence of a CO2 doubling on the stratospheric potential vorticity (PV is examined in two climate models. Subsequently, the influence of changes in the stratosphere on the tropospheric zonal wind response is investigated, by inverting the stratospheric PV. Radiative effects dominate the stratospheric response to CO2 doubling in the Southern Hemisphere. These lead to a stratospheric PV increase at the edge of the polar vortex, resulting in an increased westerly influence of the stratosphere on the tropospheric midlatitude winds in late winter. In the Northern Hemisphere, dynamical effects are also important. Both models show a reduced polar PV and an enhanced midlatitude PV in the Northern Hemisphere winter stratosphere. These PV changes are related to an enhanced wave forcing of the winter stratosphere, as measured by an increase in the 100 hPa eddy heat flux, and result in a reduced westerly influence of the stratosphere on the high latitude tropospheric winds. In one model, the high latitude PV decreases are, however, restricted to higher altitudes, and the tropospheric response due to the stratospheric changes is dominated by an increased westerly influence in the midlatitudes, related to the increase in midlatitude PV in the lower stratosphere. The tropospheric response in zonal wind due to the stratospheric PV changes is of the order of 0.5 to 1 m s−1. The total tropospheric response has a somewhat different spatial structure, but is of similar magnitude. This indicates that the stratospheric influence is of importance in modifying the tropospheric zonal wind response to CO2 doubling.

  16. Impacts of stratospheric sulfate geoengineering on tropospheric ozone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Xia

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available A range of solar radiation management (SRM techniques has been proposed to counter anthropogenic climate change. Here, we examine the potential effects of stratospheric sulfate aerosols and solar insolation reduction on tropospheric ozone and ozone at Earth's surface. Ozone is a key air pollutant, which can produce respiratory diseases and crop damage. Using a version of the Community Earth System Model from the National Center for Atmospheric Research that includes comprehensive tropospheric and stratospheric chemistry, we model both stratospheric sulfur injection and solar irradiance reduction schemes, with the aim of achieving equal levels of surface cooling relative to the Representative Concentration Pathway 6.0 scenario. This allows us to compare the impacts of sulfate aerosols and solar dimming on atmospheric ozone concentrations. Despite nearly identical global mean surface temperatures for the two SRM approaches, solar insolation reduction increases global average surface ozone concentrations, while sulfate injection decreases it. A fundamental difference between the two geoengineering schemes is the importance of heterogeneous reactions in the photochemical ozone balance with larger stratospheric sulfate abundance, resulting in increased ozone depletion in mid- and high latitudes. This reduces the net transport of stratospheric ozone into the troposphere and thus is a key driver of the overall decrease in surface ozone. At the same time, the change in stratospheric ozone alters the tropospheric photochemical environment due to enhanced ultraviolet radiation. A shared factor among both SRM scenarios is decreased chemical ozone loss due to reduced tropospheric humidity. Under insolation reduction, this is the dominant factor giving rise to the global surface ozone increase. Regionally, both surface ozone increases and decreases are found for both scenarios; that is, SRM would affect regions of the world differently in terms of air

  17. The ASSET intercomparison of stratosphere and lower mesosphere humidity analyses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. E. Thornton

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents results from the first detailed intercomparison of stratosphere-lower mesosphere water vapour analyses; it builds on earlier results from the EU funded framework V "Assimilation of ENVISAT Data" (ASSET project. Stratospheric water vapour plays an important role in many key atmospheric processes and therefore an improved understanding of its daily variability is desirable. With the availability of high resolution, good quality Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding (MIPAS water vapour profiles, the ability of four different atmospheric models to assimilate these data is tested. MIPAS data have been assimilated over September 2003 into the models of the European Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF, the Belgian Institute for Space and Aeronomy (BIRA-IASB, the French Service d'Aéronomie (SA-IPSL and the UK Met Office. The resultant middle atmosphere humidity analyses are compared against independent satellite data from the Halogen Occultation Experiment (HALOE, the Polar Ozone and Aerosol Measurement (POAM III and the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE II. The MIPAS water vapour profiles are generally well assimilated in the ECMWF, BIRA-IASB and SA systems, producing stratosphere-mesosphere water vapour fields where the main features compare favourably with the independent observations. However, the models are less capable of assimilating the MIPAS data where water vapour values are locally extreme or in regions of strong humidity gradients, such as the southern hemisphere lower stratosphere polar vortex. Differences in the analyses can be attributed to the choice of humidity control variable, how the background error covariance matrix is generated, the model resolution and its complexity, the degree of quality control of the observations and the use of observations near the model boundaries. Due to the poor performance of the Met Office analyses the results are not included in

  18. The Many Problems with Geoengineering Using Stratospheric Aerosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robock, Alan

    2009-05-01

    In response to the global warming problem, there has been a recent renewed call for geoengineering ``solutions'' involving injecting particles into the stratosphere or blocking sunlight with satellites between the Sun and Earth. While volcanic eruptions have been suggested as innocuous examples of stratospheric aerosols cooling the planet, the volcano analog actually argues against geoengineering because of ozone depletion and regional hydrologic and temperature responses. In this talk, I consider the suggestion to create an artificial stratospheric aerosol layer. No systems to conduct geoengineering now exist, but a comparison of different proposed stratospheric injection schemes, airplanes, balloons, artillery, and a space elevator, shows that using airplanes would not be that expensive. We simulated the climate response to both tropical and Arctic stratospheric injection of sulfate aerosol precursors using a comprehensive atmosphere-ocean general circulation model, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Goddard Institute for Space Studies ModelE. We simulated the injection of SO2 and the model converts it to sulfate aerosols, transports them and removes them through dry and wet deposition, and calculates the climate response to the radiative forcing from the aerosols. We conducted simulations of future climate with the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change A1B business-as-usual scenario both with and without geoengineering, and compare the results. We found that if there were a way to continuously inject SO2 into the lower stratosphere, it would produce global cooling. Acid deposition from the sulfate would not be enough to disturb most ecosystems. Tropical SO2 injection would produce sustained cooling over most of the world, with more cooling over continents. Arctic SO2 injection would not just cool the Arctic. But both tropical and Arctic SO2 injection would disrupt the Asian and African summer monsoons, reducing precipitation to the food supply

  19. Orbit control of a stratospheric satellite with parameter uncertainties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ming; Huo, Wei

    2016-12-01

    When a stratospheric satellite travels by prevailing winds in the stratosphere, its cross-track displacement needs to be controlled to keep a constant latitude orbital flight. To design the orbit control system, a 6 degree-of-freedom (DOF) model of the satellite is established based on the second Lagrangian formulation, it is proven that the input/output feedback linearization theory cannot be directly implemented for the orbit control with this model, thus three subsystem models are deduced from the 6-DOF model to develop a sequential nonlinear control strategy. The control strategy includes an adaptive controller for the balloon-tether subsystem with uncertain balloon parameters, a PD controller based on feedback linearization for the tether-sail subsystem, and a sliding mode controller for the sail-rudder subsystem with uncertain sail parameters. Simulation studies demonstrate that the proposed control strategy is robust to uncertainties and satisfies high precision requirements for the orbit flight of the satellite.

  20. Thermal performance of stratospheric airship with photovoltaic array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qiang; Yang, Yanchu; Cui, Yanxiang; Cai, Jingjing

    2017-03-01

    The increase of airship applications makes it necessary for a comprehensive understanding of the thermal performance of stratospheric airships. A numerical model was proposed to simulate the thermal performance of a stratospheric airship with photovoltaic array, an analysis code was developed based on the thermal model and was verified by experimental data. A further inspection into the temperature field and flow field distribution of the airship was analyzed in detail. The simulation results suggest that solar radiation can exert great influence on the thermal performance of the airship. The higher temperature Helium was gathered in the upper part inside of the airship, the flow of Helium was regular at nighttime but was chaotic in the middle and upper part of the airship at daytime. The temperature and velocity performance of fin was different from that of the hull and other fins due to the shadow of hull and other fins.

  1. Wind tunnel tests of stratospheric airship counter rotating propellers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaxi Chen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aerodynamic performance of the high-altitude propeller, especially the counter rotation effects, is experimentally studied. Influences of different configurations on a stratospheric airship, included 2-blade counter-rotating propeller (CRP, dual 2-blade single rotation propellers (SRPs and 4-blade SRP, are also indicated. This research indicates that the effect of counter rotation can greatly improve the efficiency. It shows that the CRP configuration results in a higher efficiency than the dual 2-blade SRPs configuration or 4-blade SRP configuration under the same advance ratio, and the CRP configuration also gains the highest efficiency whether under the situation of providing the same trust or absorbing the same power. It concludes that, for a stratospheric airship, the CRP configuration is better than the multiple SRPs configuration or a multi-blade SRP one.

  2. Eight years of stratospheric ozone observations at Marambio, Antarctica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Damski, J.; Taalas, P. [Finnish Meteorological Inst., Helsinki (Finland). Section of Ozone and UV Research

    1995-12-31

    In this work behaviour of the stratospheric ozone using the total ozone and ozone sounding measurements from Marambio (64 deg 14`S, 56 deg 37`W) at Antarctic Peninsula has been studied. The effects of depleted stratospheric ozone to the UV-B-radiation are investigated employing a radiative transfer model, and the Marambio total ozone measurements. The levels of UV-B radiation have been studied from the point of the erythemal UV-B-doses on the horizontal human epidermis. The low values of total ozone at Marambio are also reflected to the received UV-doses which have increased roughly 20-80% (compared to long term average) during austral spring and summer. In respective to the total amount of ozone, the model calculations show that during October the UV-B-doses can be at the same level they should be during normal summer

  3. Phosgene measurements in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, S. R.; Crutzen, P. J.; Schuster, G.; Griffith, D. W. T.; Helas, G.

    1988-08-01

    Industrial chlorofluorocarbons have now accumulated so much in the atmosphere that the ClOx radicals produced from their oxidation are causing substantial reductions in the ozone layer. Here we measure phosgene, which is one possible product from the oxidation of natural and industrial chlorinated hydrocarbons and which can oxidize further to form ClOx. Our measurements show a mixing ratio of 17 p.p.t.v. in the upper troposphere, and an average of 22 p.p.t.v. in the lower stratosphere. These values are substantially greater than those estimated with a model that only considers the photochemical breakdown of CCl4, indicating the possible significance of other more reactive chlorocarbon compounds, especially CHCl3, CH3CCl3, C2HCl3 and C2Cl4 and their oxidation products in supplying chlorine to the lower stratosphere.

  4. Solar UV radiation variations and their stratospheric and climatic effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnelly, R. F.; Heath, D. F.

    1985-01-01

    Nimbus-7 SBUV measurements of the short-term solar UV variations caused by solar rotation and active-region evolution have determined the amplitude and wavelength dependence for the active-region component of solar UV variations. Intermediate-term variations lasting several months are associated with rounds of major new active regions. The UV flux stays near the peak value during the current solar cycle variation for more than two years and peaks about two years later than the sunspot number. Nimbus-7 measurements have observed the concurrent stratospheric ozone variations caused by solar UV variations. There is now no doubt that solar UV variations are an important cause of short- and long-term stratospheric variations, but the strength of the coupling to the troposphere and to climate has not yet been proven.

  5. Studies on ultrasmall bacteria in relation to the presence of bacteria in the stratosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alshammari, Fawaz; Wainwright, Milton; Alabri, Khalid; Alharbi, Sulamain A.

    2011-04-01

    Recent studies confirm that bacteria exist in the stratosphere. It is generally assumed that these bacteria are exiting from Earth, although it is possible that some are incoming from space. Most stratospheric bacterial isolates belong to the spore-forming genus Bacillus, although non-spore formers have also been isolated. Theoretically, the smaller a bacterium is, the more likely it is to be carried from Earth to the stratosphere. Ultrasmall bacteria have been frequently isolated from Earth environments, but not yet from the stratosphere. This is an anomalous situation, since we would expect such small bacteria to be over represented in the stratosphere-microflora. Here, we show that ultrasmall bacteria are present in the environment on Earth (i.e. in seawater and rainwater) and discuss the paradox of why they have not been isolated from the stratosphere.

  6. Ascent trajectory optimization for stratospheric airship with thermal effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xiao; Zhu, Ming

    2013-09-01

    Ascent trajectory optimization with thermal effects is addressed for a stratospheric airship. Basic thermal characteristics of the stratospheric airship are introduced. Besides, the airship’s equations of motion are constructed by including the factors about aerodynamic force, added mass and wind profiles which are developed based on horizontal-wind model. For both minimum-time and minimum-energy flights during ascent, the trajectory optimization problem is described with the path and terminal constraints in different scenarios and then, is converted into a parameter optimization problem by a direct collocation method. Sparse Nonlinear OPTimizer(SNOPT) is employed as a nonlinear programming solver and two scenarios are adopted. The solutions obtained illustrate that the trajectories are greatly affected by the thermal behaviors which prolong the daytime minimum-time flights of about 20.8% compared with that of nighttime in scenario 1 and of about 10.5% in scenario 2. And there is the same trend for minimum-energy flights. For the energy consumption of minimum-time flights, 6% decrease is abstained in scenario 1 and 5% decrease in scenario 2. However, a few energy consumption reduction is achieved for minimum-energy flights. Solar radiation is the principal component and the natural wind also affects the thermal behaviors of stratospheric airship during ascent. The relationship between take-off time and performance of airship during ascent is discussed. it is found that the take-off time at dusk is best choice for stratospheric airship. And in addition, for saving energy, airship prefers to fly downwind.

  7. The annual cycle in lower stratospheric temperatures revisited

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Fueglistaler

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Observed lower stratospheric temperatures show a prominent annual cycle. The cycles in the tropics and Northern Hemisphere are in phase and the cycle in the Southern Hemisphere has the opposite phase. In an elegant and influential paper, Yulaeva, Holton and Wallace (1994 explained the observed pattern as a direct consequence of hemispheric asymmetries in the dynamical forcing of the stratospheric circulation. They showed that in Microwave Sounding Unit channel 4 (weighting centered in the lower stratosphere data the combined extratropical and the tropical temperature cycle nearly compensate and interpreted the out-of-phase temperature variations between tropics and extratropics as the temperature response to an annual cycle in the wave driven residual circulation. We show that the near-compensation of temperature variations observed by Yulaeva et al. (1994 is artefact of the weighting function of the MSU-4 channel and does not hold on individual pressure levels. We discuss in detail the conditions required that temperature variations compensate, and what insights can be obtained from analysis of tropical, extratropical and global mean temperature variations. Dynamically induced seasonal variations of lower stratospheric ozone lead to an amplification of the seasonal temperature cycle particularly in the tropics. The latitudinal structure of static stability also induces a significant deviation from compensation of tropical and combined extratropical temperature variations. In line with Yulaeva et al. (1994 we affirm that the see-saw pattern in the annual cycles of tropical and combined extratropical temperatures provides an important pointer to mechanistic models for interannual variability and trends, but additionally conclude that the feedback of dynamically induced ozone variations on temperatures and the latitudinal structure of static stability should be included as leading order processes in such models.

  8. The annual cycle in lower stratospheric temperatures revisited

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Fueglistaler

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Observed lower stratospheric temperatures show a prominent annual cycle. The cycles in the tropics and Northern Hemisphere are in phase and the cycle in the Southern Hemisphere has the opposite phase. In an elegant and influential paper, Yulaeva, Holton and Wallace (1994 explained the observed pattern as a direct consequence of hemispheric asymmetries in the dynamical forcing of the stratospheric circulation. They showed that in Microwave Sounding Unit channel 4 (weighting centered in the lower stratosphere data the combined extratropical and the tropical temperature cycle nearly compensate and interpreted the out-of-phase temperature variations between tropics and extratropics as the temperature response to an annual cycle in the wave driven residual circulation. We show that the near-compensation of temperature variations emphasised by Yulaeva et al. (1994 is artefact of the weighting function of the MSU-4 channel and does not hold on individual pressure levels. We discuss in detail the conditions required that temperature variations compensate, and what insights can be obtained from analysis of tropical, extratropical and global mean temperature variations. Dynamically induced seasonal variations of lower stratospheric ozone lead to an amplification of the seasonal temperature cycle particularly in the tropics. The latitudinal structure of thermal stratification also induces a significant deviation from compensation of tropical and combined extratropical temperature variations. In line with Yulaeva et al. (1994 we affirm that the see-saw pattern in the annual cycles of tropical and combined extratropical temperatures provides an important pointer to mechanistic models for interannual variability and trends, but additionally conclude that the latitudinal structure of stratification and the feedback of dynamically-induced ozone variations on temperatures should be included as leading order processes in such models.

  9. Effect of greenhouse gas emissions on stratospheric ozone depletion

    OpenAIRE

    Velders GJM; LLO

    1997-01-01

    The depletion of the ozone layer is caused mainly by the increase in emissions of chlorine- and bromine-containing compounds like CFCs, halons, carbon tetrachloride, methyl chloroform and methyl bromide. Emissions of greenhouse gases can affect the depletion of the ozone layer through atmospheric interaction. We studied the interactions in the atmosphere between the greenhouse effect and stratospheric ozone depletion from the point of view of past and future emissions of the anthropogenic com...

  10. Stratosphere-troposphere exchange in a summertime extratropical low: analysis

    OpenAIRE

    2006-01-01

    Ozone and carbone monoxide measurements sampled during two commercial flights in airstreams of a summertime midlatitude cyclone are analysed with a lagrangian-based study (backward trajectories and a Reverse Domain Filling technique) to gain a comprehensive understanding of transport effects on trace gas distributions. The study demonstrates that summertime cyclones can be associated with deep stratosphere-troposphere transport. A tropopause fold is sampled twice in its life cycle, once in th...

  11. Effect of greenhouse gas emissions on stratospheric ozone depletion

    OpenAIRE

    Velders GJM; LLO

    1997-01-01

    The depletion of the ozone layer is caused mainly by the increase in emissions of chlorine- and bromine-containing compounds like CFCs, halons, carbon tetrachloride, methyl chloroform and methyl bromide. Emissions of greenhouse gases can affect the depletion of the ozone layer through atmospheric interaction. We studied the interactions in the atmosphere between the greenhouse effect and stratospheric ozone depletion from the point of view of past and future emissions of the anthropogenic com...

  12. Validation of GOMOS ozone precision estimates in the stratosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. F. Sofieva

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Accurate information about uncertainties is required in nearly all data analyses (inter-comparisons, data assimilation, combined use, etc.. Validation of precision estimates (viz., the random component of estimated uncertainty is important for remote sensing measurements, which provide the information about atmospheric parameters via solving an inverse problem. For the Global Ozone Monitoring by Occultation of Stars (GOMOS instrument, it is of a real challenge, due to dependence of signal-to-noise ratio (and thus precision estimates on stellar properties, small number of self-collocated measurements, and uncertainty estimates growing with time due to instrument ageing. Estimated uncertainties of ozone retrievals are small in the stratosphere for bright stars, which results in additional complexity of detecting them on the background of natural ozone variability. In this paper, we discuss different methods for geophysical validation of precision estimates and their applicability to GOMOS data. We propose a simple method for validation of GOMOS precision estimates for ozone in the stratosphere. This method is based on comparisons of difference in sample variance with the difference in uncertainty estimates for measurements from different stars selected in a region of small natural variability. For GOMOS, the difference in sample variances for different stars at altitudes 25–45 km is well explained by the difference in squared precisions, if stars are not dim. Since it is observed for several stars, and since normalized χ2 is close to 1 in these occultations in the stratosphere, we can conclude that GOMOS precision estimates are realistic in occultations of sufficiently bright stars. For dim stars, errors are overestimated due to improper accounting for the dark charge correction uncertainty in the error budget. The proposed method can also be applied to stratospheric ozone data from other instruments, including multi-instrument analyses.

  13. Trace Gas Trends in the Stratosphere: 1991-2005

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elkins, J. W.; Moore, F. L.; Dutton, G. S.; Hurst, D. F.; Ray, E. A.; Montzka, S. A.; Butler, J. H.; Fahey, D. W.; Hall, B. H.; Atlas, E.; Wofsy, S. C.; Romashkin, P. A.

    2005-05-01

    The first NOAA airborne gas chromatograph measured chlorofluorocarbon-11 (CFC-11) and CFC-113 during the Arctic Airborne Stratospheric Experiment in 1991-1992. In 1994, we added nitrous oxide (N2O), sulfur hexafluoride (SF6), CFC-12, halon-1211, methyl chloroform, carbon tetrachloride, methane, and hydrogen. NOAA scientists have since operated five airborne gas chromatographs on NASA airborne platforms, including the NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) balloon gondola and ER-2, WB-57F, DC-8, and NASA Altair Unmanned Air Vehicle (UAV) aircraft. Using these in situ measurements and tracer-tracer correlations from flask observations for the unmeasured halogen species (HCFCs and methyl halides including methyl chloride and bromide), we have estimated trends of total chlorine and bromine in the stratosphere. The determination of inorganic equivalent chlorine (Cl + 45*Br) requires the trend of tropospheric equivalent chlorine and the mean age of the parcel of stratospheric air. In general, there is good agreement between the mean age of the air mass calculations using carbon dioxide and SF6, except for regions of extreme down welling of mesospheric air where SF6 is consumed. Tropospheric trends of the methyl halides have been compiled against stable standards. We operated a airborne gas chromatograph on the Sage 3 Ozone Loss Validation Experiment (SOLVE-II) mission from Kiruna, Sweden during 2002. It measured the major HCFCs and methyl halides, so that these compounds do not have to be estimated from tracer-tracer correlations in the future. In 2005, we have added a new lightweight airborne instrument (measure CFC-11, CFC-12, halon-1211, SF6, N2O, and ozone. This instrument can operate on small or UAV aircraft and will be used for Aura satellite validation. This presentation will show trends for selected trace gases and our estimates of total equivalent chlorine stratospheric trends since 1991.

  14. Solar Signals in CMIP-5 Simulations: The Stratospheric Pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, D.M.; Misios, S.; Gray, L. J.; Tourpali, K.; Matthes, K.; Hood, L.; Schmidt, H.; Chiodo, G.; Thieblemont, R.; Rozanov, E.; hide

    2015-01-01

    The 11 year solar-cycle component of climate variability is assessed in historical simulations of models taken from the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project, phase 5 (CMIP-5). Multiple linear regression is applied to estimate the zonal temperature, wind and annular mode responses to a typical solar cycle, with a focus on both the stratosphere and the stratospheric influence on the surface over the period approximately 1850-2005. The analysis is performed on all CMIP-5 models but focuses on the 13 CMIP-5 models that resolve the stratosphere (high-top models) and compares the simulated solar cycle signature with reanalysis data. The 11 year solar cycle component of climate variability is found to be weaker in terms of magnitude and latitudinal gradient around the stratopause in the models than in the reanalysis. The peak in temperature in the lower equatorial stratosphere (approximately 70 hPa) reported in some studies is found in the models to depend on the length of the analysis period, with the last 30 years yielding the strongest response. A modification of the Polar Jet Oscillation (PJO) in response to the 11 year solar cycle is not robust across all models, but is more apparent in models with high spectral resolution in the short-wave region. The PJO evolution is slower in these models, leading to a stronger response during February, whereas observations indicate it to be weaker. In early winter, the magnitude of the modeled response is more consistent with observations when only data from 1979-2005 are considered. The observed North Pacific high-pressure surface response during the solar maximum is only simulated in some models, for which there are no distinguishing model characteristics. The lagged North Atlantic surface response is reproduced in both high- and low-top models, but is more prevalent in the former. In both cases, the magnitude of the response is generally lower than in observations.

  15. Trends and variability in stratospheric mixing: 1979–2005

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Garny

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Changes in climate are likely to drive changes in stratospheric mixing with associated implications for changes in transport of ozone from tropical source regions to higher latitudes, transport of water vapour and source gas degradation products from the tropical tropopause layer into the mid-latitude lower stratosphere, and changes in the meridional distribution of long-lived trace gases. To diagnose long-term changes in stratospheric mixing, global monthly fields of Lyapunov exponents were calculated on the 450 K, 550 K, and 650 K isentropic surfaces by applying a trajectory model to wind fields from NCEP/NCAR reanalyses over the period 1979 to 2005. Potential underlying geophysical drivers of trends and variability in these mixing fields were investigated by applying a least squares regression model, which included basis functions for a mean annual cycle, seasonally dependent linear trends, the quasi-biennial oscillation (QBO, the solar cycle, and the El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO, to zonal mean time series of the Lyapunov exponents.

    Long-term positive trends in mixing are apparent over southern middle to high latitudes at 450 K through most of the year, while negative trends over southern high latitudes are apparent at 650 K from May to August. Wintertime negative trends in mixing over northern mid-latitudes are apparent at 550 K and 650 K. Over low latitudes, within 40° of the equator, the QBO exerts a strong influence on mixing at all three analysis levels. This QBO influence is strongly modulated by the annual cycle and shows a phase shift across the subtropical mixing barrier. Solar cycle and ENSO influences on mixing are generally not significant. The diagnosed long-term changes in mixing should aid the interpretation of trends in stratospheric trace gases.

  16. Trends and variability in stratospheric mixing: 1979–2005

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Dameris

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Changes in climate are likely to drive changes in stratospheric mixing with associated implications for changes in transport of ozone from tropical source regions to higher latitudes, transport of water vapour and source gas degradation products from the tropical tropopause layer into the mid-latitude lower stratosphere, and changes in the meridional distribution of long-lived trace gases. To diagnose long-term changes in stratospheric mixing, global monthly fields of Lyapunov exponents were calculated on the 450 K, 550 K, and 650 K isentropic surfaces by applying a trajectory model to wind fields from NCEP/NCAR reanalyses over the period 1979 to 2005. Potential underlying geophysical drivers of trends and variability in these mixing fields were investigated by applying a least squares regression model, which included basis functions for a mean annual cycle, seasonally dependent linear trends, the quasi-biennial oscillation (QBO, the solar cycle, and the El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO, to zonal mean time series of the Lyapunov exponents. Long-term positive trends in mixing are apparent over southern middle to high latitudes at 450 K through most of the year, while negative trends over southern high latitudes are apparent at 650 K from May to August. Wintertime negative trends in mixing over northern mid-latitudes are apparent at 550 K and 650 K. Over low latitudes, within 40° of the equator, the QBO exerts a strong influence on mixing at all three analysis levels. This QBO influence is strongly modulated by the annual cycle and shows a phase shift across the subtropical mixing barrier. Solar cycle and ENSO influences on mixing are generally not significant. The diagnosed long-term changes in mixing should aid the interpretation of trends in stratospheric trace gases.

  17. Validation of AIRS high-resolution stratospheric temperature retrievals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Catrin I.; Hoffmann, Lars

    2014-10-01

    This paper focuses on stratospheric temperature observations by the Atmospheric InfraRed Sounder (AIRS) aboard NASA's Aqua satellite. We validate a nine-year record (2003 - 2011) of data retrieved with a scientific retrieval processor independent from the operational processor operated by NASA. The retrieval discussed here provides stratospheric temperature profiles for each individual AIRS footprint and has nine times better horizontal sampling than the operational data provided by NASA. The high-resolution temperature data are considered optimal for for gravity wave studies. For validation the high-resolution retrieval data are compared with results from the AIRS operational Level-2 data and the ERA-Interim meteorological reanalysis. Due to the large amount of data we performed statistical comparisons of monthly zonal mean cross-sections and time series. The comparisons show that the high-resolution temperature data are in good agreement with the validation data sets. The bias in the zonal averages is mostly within ±2K. The bias reaches a maximum of 7K to ERA-Interim and 4K to the AIRS operational data at the stratopause, it is related to the different resolutions of the data sets. Variability is nearly the same in all three data sets, having maximum standard deviations around the polar vortex in the mid and upper stratosphere. The validation presented here indicates that the high-resolution temperature retrievals are well-suited for scientific studies. In particular, we expect that they will become a valuable asset for future studies of stratospheric gravity waves.

  18. A new formulation of equivalent effective stratospheric chlorine (EESC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. A. Newman

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Equivalent effective stratospheric chlorine (EESC is a convenient parameter to quantify the effects of halogens (chlorine and bromine on ozone depletion in the stratosphere. We show, discuss, and analyze a new formulation of EESC that now includes the effects of age-of-air dependent fractional release values and an age-of-air spectrum. This EESC can be more appropriately applied to various parts of the stratosphere because of this dependence on mean age-of-air. This new formulation provides quantitative estimates of EESC that can be directly related to inorganic chlorine and bromine throughout the stratosphere. In this paper, we first provide a detailed description of the EESC calculation. We then use this EESC formulation to estimate that human-produced ozone depleting substances will recover to 1980 levels in 2041 in the midlatitudes, and 2067 over Antarctica. These recovery dates are based upon the assumption that the international agreements for regulating ozone-depleting substances are adhered to. In addition to recovery dates, we also estimate the uncertainties and possible problems in the estimated times of recovery. The midlatitude recovery of 2041 has a 95% confidence uncertainty from 2028 to 2049, while the 2067 Antarctic recovery has a 95% confidence uncertainty from 2056 to 2078. The principal uncertainties are from the estimated mean age-of-air and fractional release values, and the assumption that these quantities are time independent. Using other model estimates of age decrease due to climate change, we estimate that midlatitude recovery may be significantly accelerated.

  19. Stratospheric Impact on the Onset of the Mesospheric Ice Season

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiedler, J.; Baumgarten, G.; Berger, U.; Gabriel, A.; Latteck, R.; Luebken, F. J.

    2014-12-01

    Mesospheric ice layers, observed as noctilucent clouds (NLC) from ground, are the visible manifestation of extreme conditions in the polar summer mesopause region. Temperatures fall very low so that water vapor can freeze condence, which at 69°N usually occurs beginning of June. However, in 2013 the ALOMAR RMR lidar observed the first NLC on 21 May and the clouds reoccured during the following days. These were the earliest detections since 20 years and indicated an about 10 days earlier onset of the mesospheric ice season. This is supported by the colocated MAARSY radar which showed the occurrence rates of polar mesospheric summer echoes (PMSE) increasing faster than usual.The exceptional case was accompanied by ˜6 K lower temperatures and higher water vapor mixing ratios at NLC altitudes above ALOMAR from end of April until beginning of June as measured by the MLS instrument onboard the AURA satellite. Using MERRA reanalysis data we will show that the zonal mean temperature as well as the dynamic conditions in the Arctic middle atmosphere deviated in spring 2013 significantly from the mean conditions of the last 20 years. The planetary wave activity in the high latitude stratosphere was enhanced from 20 April to beginning of May. The colder and wetter upper mesosphere in May 2013 is attributed to this unusual late planetary wave activity in the stratosphere, introducing a strong upwelling in the mesosphere, lower temperatures and an upward transport of water vapor, which finally resulted into earlier existence conditions for mesospheric ice particles. For the southern hemisphere a high correlation between winter/summer transition in the stratosphere and onset of mesospheric ice is known as intra-hemispheric coupling. We regard the processes in the Arctic middle atmosphere in spring 2013 as a first evidence for intra-hemispheric coupling in the northern hemisphere, extending from the stratosphere into the mesopause region.

  20. Solar geoengineering using solid aerosol in the stratosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. K. Weisenstein

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Solid aerosol particles have long been proposed as an alternative to sulfate aerosols for solar geoengineering. Any solid aerosol introduced into the stratosphere would be subject to coagulation with itself, producing fractal aggregates, and with the natural sulfate aerosol, producing liquid-coated solids. Solid aerosols that are coated with sulfate and/or have formed aggregates may have very different scattering properties and chemical behavior than do uncoated non-aggregated monomers. We use a two-dimensional chemical transport model to capture the dynamics of interacting solid and liquid aerosols in the stratosphere. As an example, we apply the model to the possible use of alumina and diamond particles for solar geoengineering. For 240 nm radius alumina particles, for example, an injection rate of 4 Mt yr−1 produces a global-average radiative forcing of 1.3 W m−2 and minimal self-coagulation of alumina yet almost all alumina outside the tropics is coated with sulfate. For the same radiative forcing, these solid aerosols can produce less ozone loss, less stratospheric heating, and less forward scattering than do sulfate aerosols. Our results suggest that appropriately sized alumina, diamond or similar high-index particles may have less severe technology-specific risks than do sulfate aerosols. These results, particularly the ozone response, are subject to large uncertainties due the limited data on the rate constants of reactions on the dry surfaces.

  1. Stratospheric ozone measurement with an infrared heterodyne spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbas, M. M.; Kostiuk, T.; Mumma, M. J.; Buhl, D.; Kunde, V. G.; Brown, L. W.

    1978-01-01

    Measurements of a stratospheric ozone concentration profile are made by detecting infrared absorption lines with a heterodyne spectrometer. The infrared spectrometer is based on a line-by-line tunable CO2 lasers, a liquid-nitrogen cooled HgCdTe photomixer, and a 64-channel spectral line receiver. The infrared radiation from the source is mixed with local-oscillator radiation. The difference frequency signal in a bandwidth above and below the local-oscillator frequency is detected. The intensity in each sideband is found by subtracting sideband contributions. It is found that absolute total column density is 0.32 plus or minus 0.02 cm-atm with a peak mixing ratio at about 24 km. The (7,1,6)-(7,1,7) O3 line center frequency is identified as 1043.1772/cm. Future work will involve a number of ozone absorption lines and measurements of diurnal variation. Completely resolved stratospheric lines may be inverted to yield concentration profiles of trace constituents and stratospheric gases.

  2. An ultrahot gas-giant exoplanet with a stratosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Thomas M.; Sing, David K.; Kataria, Tiffany; Goyal, Jayesh; Nikolov, Nikolay; Wakeford, Hannah R.; Deming, Drake; Marley, Mark S.; Amundsen, David S.; Ballester, Gilda E.; Barstow, Joanna K.; Ben-Jaffel, Lotfi; Bourrier, Vincent; Buchhave, Lars A.; Cohen, Ofer; Ehrenreich, David; García Muñoz, Antonio; Henry, Gregory W.; Knutson, Heather; Lavvas, Panayotis; Etangs, Alain Lecavelier Des; Lewis, Nikole K.; López-Morales, Mercedes; Mandell, Avi M.; Sanz-Forcada, Jorge; Tremblin, Pascal; Lupu, Roxana

    2017-08-01

    Infrared radiation emitted from a planet contains information about the chemical composition and vertical temperature profile of its atmosphere. If upper layers are cooler than lower layers, molecular gases will produce absorption features in the planetary thermal spectrum. Conversely, if there is a stratosphere—where temperature increases with altitude—these molecular features will be observed in emission. It has been suggested that stratospheres could form in highly irradiated exoplanets, but the extent to which this occurs is unresolved both theoretically and observationally. A previous claim for the presence of a stratosphere remains open to question, owing to the challenges posed by the highly variable host star and the low spectral resolution of the measurements. Here we report a near-infrared thermal spectrum for the ultrahot gas giant WASP-121b, which has an equilibrium temperature of approximately 2,500 kelvin. Water is resolved in emission, providing a detection of an exoplanet stratosphere at 5σ confidence. These observations imply that a substantial fraction of incident stellar radiation is retained at high altitudes in the atmosphere, possibly by absorbing chemical species such as gaseous vanadium oxide and titanium oxide.

  3. Spectral signatures of polar stratospheric clouds and sulfate aerosol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Massie, S.T.; Bailey, P.L.; Gille, J.C. [National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO (United States); Lee, E.C. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States); Mergenthaler, J.L.; Roche, A.E.; Kumer, J.B. [Lockheed Palo Alto Research Lab., CA (United States); Fishbein, E.F.; Waters, J.W. [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA (United States); Lahoz, W.A. [Univ. of Reading (United Kingdom)

    1994-10-15

    Multiwavelength observations of Antarctic and midlatitude aerosol by the Cryogenic Limb Array Etalon Spectrometer (CLAES) experiment on the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite are used to demonstrate a technique that identifies the location of polar stratospheric clouds. The technique discussed uses the normalized area of the triangle formed by the aerosol extinctions at 925, 1257, and 1605 cm{sup {minus}1} (10.8, 8.0, and 6.2 {mu}m) to derive a spectral aerosol measure M of the aerosol spectrum. Mie calculations for spherical particles and T-matrix calculations for spheroidal particles are used to generate theoretical spectral extinction curves for sulfate and polar stratospheric cloud particles. The values of the spectral aerosol measure M for the sulfate and polar stratospheric cloud particles are shown to be different. Aerosol extinction data, corresponding to temperatures between 180 and 220 K at a pressure of 46 hPa (near 21-km altitude) for 18 August 1992, are used to demonstrate the technique. Thermodynamic calculations, based upon frost-point calculation and laboratory phase-equilibrium studies of nitric acid trihydrate, are used to predict the location of nitric acid trihydrate cloud particles. 47 refs., 22 figs., 3 tabs.

  4. Stratospheric sulfate geoengineering enhances terrestrial gross primary productivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, L.; Robock, A.; Tilmes, S.; Neely, R. R., III

    2015-09-01

    Stratospheric sulfate geoengineering could impact the terrestrial carbon cycle by enhancing the carbon sink. With an 8 Tg yr-1 injection of SO2 to balance a Representative Concentration Pathway 6.0 (RCP6.0) scenario, we conducted climate model simulations with the Community Earth System Model, with the Community Atmospheric Model 4 fully coupled to tropospheric and stratospheric chemistry (CAM4-chem). During the geoengineering period, as compared to RCP6.0, land-averaged downward visible diffuse radiation increased 3.2 W m-2 (11 %). The enhanced diffuse radiation combined with the cooling increased plant photosynthesis by 2.4 %, which could contribute to an additional 3.8 ± 1.1 Gt C yr-1 global gross primary productivity without nutrient limitation. This increase could potentially increase the land carbon sink. Suppressed plant and soil respiration due to the cooling would reduce natural land carbon emission and therefore further enhance the terrestrial carbon sink during the geoengineering period. This beneficial impact of stratospheric sulfate geoengineering would need to be balanced by a large number of potential risks in any future decisions about implementation of geoengineering.

  5. Solar geoengineering using solid aerosol in the stratosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisenstein, D. K.; Keith, D. W.; Dykema, J. A.

    2015-10-01

    Solid aerosol particles have long been proposed as an alternative to sulfate aerosols for solar geoengineering. Any solid aerosol introduced into the stratosphere would be subject to coagulation with itself, producing fractal aggregates, and with the natural sulfate aerosol, producing liquid-coated solids. Solid aerosols that are coated with sulfate and/or have formed aggregates may have very different scattering properties and chemical behavior than uncoated non-aggregated monomers do. We use a two-dimensional (2-D) chemistry-transport-aerosol model to capture the dynamics of interacting solid and liquid aerosols in the stratosphere. As an example, we apply the model to the possible use of alumina and diamond particles for solar geoengineering. For 240 nm radius alumina particles, for example, an injection rate of 4 Tg yr-1 produces a global-average shortwave radiative forcing of -1.2 W m-2 and minimal self-coagulation of alumina although almost all alumina outside the tropics is coated with sulfate. For the same radiative forcing, these solid aerosols can produce less ozone loss, less stratospheric heating, and less forward scattering than sulfate aerosols do. Our results suggest that appropriately sized alumina, diamond or similar high-index particles may have less severe technology-specific risks than sulfate aerosols do. These results, particularly the ozone response, are subject to large uncertainties due to the limited data on the rate constants of reactions on the dry surfaces.

  6. Stratospheric sulfate geoengineering enhances terrestrial gross primary productivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Xia

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Stratospheric sulfate geoengineering could impact the terrestrial carbon cycle by enhancing the carbon sink. With an 8 Tg yr−1 injection of SO2 to balance a Representative Concentration Pathway 6.0 (RCP6.0 scenario, we conducted climate model simulations with the Community Earth System Model, with the Community Atmospheric Model 4 fully coupled to tropospheric and stratospheric chemistry (CAM4-chem. During the geoengineering period, as compared to RCP6.0, land-averaged downward visible diffuse radiation increased 3.2 W m−2 (11 %. The enhanced diffuse radiation combined with the cooling increased plant photosynthesis by 2.4 %, which could contribute to an additional 3.8 ± 1.1 Gt C yr−1 global gross primary productivity without nutrient limitation. This increase could potentially increase the land carbon sink. Suppressed plant and soil respiration due to the cooling would reduce natural land carbon emission and therefore further enhance the terrestrial carbon sink during the geoengineering period. This beneficial impact of stratospheric sulfate geoengineering would need to be balanced by a large number of potential risks in any future decisions about implementation of geoengineering.

  7. Comparing Sudden Stratospheric Warming Definitions in Reanalysis Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmeiro, Froila M.; Barriopedro, David; García-Herrera, Ricardo; Calvo, Natalia

    2015-04-01

    Sudden Stratospheric Warmings (SSWs) are the main source of variability in the northern hemisphere polar stratosphere during winter. They are characterized by a dramatic warming of the polar stratosphere and weakening of the polar vortex circulation. SSWs can have an impact on surface weather, which makes them a potential tool for seasonal prediction. However, there is no consensus on the definition of SSWs, and multiple methods exist in the literature, yielding discrepancies on the detected events. In this presentation we compare the SSWs signatures of eight representative definitions for the 1958-2009 period and using three different reanalysis data (ERA, NCEP and JRA). The monthly distribution of SSWs is indistinguishable across definitions, with a common peak in January. However, the multi-decadal variability is method-dependent, with only three definitions displaying minimum frequencies in the 1990s. Comparison of several SSW benchmarks reveals negligible differences among methods due to the large case-to-case variability of events within a given definition. In the troposphere, the most robust signals across definitions before and after events are dominated by major SSWs, which are detected by most methods. Interestingly, minor SSWs represent the largest source of discrepancy in the surface signals of SSWs across definitions. Therefore, our results indicate that only major SSWs should be considered in future studies if robust tropospheric signals of SSWs want to be obtained regardless of the chosen method.

  8. Model Simulations of Ozone in the Summer Lower Stratosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglass, Anne R.; Kawa, S. R.

    1998-01-01

    The Goddard 3D chemistry and transport model (CTM) uses winds and temperatures from the Goddard Earth Observing System Data Assimilation System (GEOS DAS); thus CTM simulations can be compared directly with observations from satellite, balloon and aircraft. In general, aspects of these comparisons show remarkable agreement between observation and model. One significant difference is that the model ozone is high biased below the ozone peak. The bias is apparently largest at high latitudes during the summer months. At the same time, comparisons with HALOE observations show that at mid to high latitudes, the ozone mixing ratio peak appears persistently at a lower altitude than observed by HALOE; the peak mixing ratio is also overestimated by the model. Both transport and photochemistry are possible contributors to the biased ozone in the lower stratosphere - excessive downward motion would increase lower stratospheric ozone, as would a too large vertical gradient in ozone. On the other hand, comparisons of model N2O and NOy with observations suggest transport deficiencies in the opposite sense, i.e., model N2O can be high relative to observations (particularly during winter), suggesting the need for stronger downward transport. Sensitivity studies have been carried out using parameterizations for ozone production and loss, NOy production and loss, and N2O loss. The goal of these studies is to clarify how problems in the photochemical scheme at and above the ozone peak influence the lower stratospheric ozone.

  9. Stratospheric Temperature Changes and Ozone Recovery in the 21st Century

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU Yongyun; XIA Yan; GAO Mei; LU Daren

    2009-01-01

    Increasing greenhouse gases and likely ozone recovery will be the two most important factors influencing changes in stratospheric temperatures in the 21st century. The radiative effect of increasing greenhouse gases will cause cooling in the stratosphere, while ozone recovery will lead to stratospheric warming. To investigate how stratospheric temperatures change under the two opposite forcings in the 21st century, we use observed ozone and reanalysis data as well as simulation results from four coupled oceanic and atmospheric general circulation models (GISS-ER, GFDL-CM20, NCAR-CCSM3, and UKMO-HadCM3) used in the IPCC (Intergovernment Panel for Climate Change) Fourth Assessment Report (AR4). Observational analysis shows that total column ozone and lower stratospheric temperatures all show increasing in the past 10 years, while middle stratospheric temperatures demonstrate cooling. IPCC AR4 simulations show that greenhouse forcing alone will lead to stratospheric cooling. However, with forcing of both increasing greenhouse gases and ozone recovery, the middle stratosphere will be cooled, while the lower stratosphere will be warmed. Warming magnitudes vary from one model to another. UKMO-HadCM3 generates relatively strong warming for all three greenhouse scenarios, and warming extends to 40 hPa. GFDL-CM20 and NCAR-CCSM3 produce weak warming, and warming mainly exists at lower levels, below about 60 hPa. In addition, we also discuss the effect of temperature changes on ozone recovery.

  10. An overview of geoengineering of climate using stratospheric sulphate aerosols

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rasch, Philip J.; Tilmes, S.; Turco, Richard P.; Robock, Alan; Oman, Luke; Chen, Chih-Chieh; Stenchikov, Georgiy; Garcia, Rolando R.

    2010-01-01

    We provide an overview of geoengineering by stratospheric sulphate aerosols. The state of understanding about this topic as of early 2008 is reviewed, summarizing the past 30 years of work in the area, highlighting some very recent studies using climate models, and discussing methods used to deliver sulphur species to the stratosphere. The studies reviewed here suggest that sulphate aerosols can counteract the globally averaged temperature increase associated with increasing greenhouse gases, and reduce changes to some other components of the Earth system. There are likely to be remaining regional climate changes after geoengineering, with some regions experiencing significant changes in temperature or precipitation. The aerosols also serve as surfaces for heterogeneous chemistry resulting in increased ozone depletion. The delivery of sulphur species to the stratosphere in a way that will produce particles of the right size is shown to be a complex and potentially very difficult task. Two simple delivery scenarios are explored, but similar exercises will be needed for other suggested delivery mechanisms. While the introduction of the geoengineering source of sulphate aerosol will perturb the sulphur cycle of the stratosphere signicantly, it is a small perturbation to the total (stratosphere and troposphere) sulphur cycle. The geoengineering source would thus be a small contributor to the total global source of ‘acid rain’ that could be compensated for through improved pollution control of anthropogenic tropospheric sources. Some areas of research remain unexplored. Although ozone may be depleted, with a consequent increase to solar ultraviolet-B (UVB) energy reaching the surface and a potential impact on health and biological populations, the aerosols will also scatter and attenuate this part of the energy spectrum, and this may compensate the UVB enhancement associated with ozone depletion. The aerosol will also change the ratio of diffuse to direct energy

  11. Collection of Stratospheric Samples using Balloon-Borne Payload System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakash, Ajin; Safonova, Margarita; Murthy, Jayant; Sreejith, A. G.; Kumble, Sheshashayi; Mathew, Joice; Sarpotdar, Mayuresh; Kj, Nirmal; Suresh, Ambily; Chakravortty, Dipshikha; Rangarajan, Annapoorni

    2016-07-01

    Earth's atmosphere at stratospheric altitudes contains dust particles from soil lifted by weather, volcanic dust, man-made aerosols, IDP (Interplanetary Dust Particles) - remnants of comets and asteroids, and even interstellar dust. Satellite observations suggest that approximately 100--300 tons of cosmic dust enter Earth's atmosphere every day. However, very little is known about the microbial life in the upper atmosphere, where conditions are very much similar to that on Mars and possibly on some exoplanets. Stratosphere provides a good opportunity to study the existence or survival of biological life in these conditions. Despite the importance of this topic to astrobiology, stratospheric microbial diversity/survival remains largely unexplored, probably due to significant difficulties in the access and ensuring the absence of contamination of the samples. To conduct a detailed study into this, we are developing the balloon-borne payload system SAMPLE (Stratospheric Altitude Microbiology Probe for Life Existence) to collect dust samples from stratosphere and bring them in an hygienic and uncontaminated manner to a suitable laboratory environment, where further study will be conducted to establish the possibility of microbial life in the upper atmosphere. This balloon-borne payload system will rise through the atmosphere till it reaches an altitude of about 25-30 km above sea level. The payload consists of detachable pre-sterilized sampling chambers designed to collect and contain the dust samples and get them back to the surface without contamination during the flight, a microprocessor and a controller which will determine the altitude of the payload system to actively monitor the opening and closing of the sample collection chambers. For contamination control, we will have two extra chambers, one of which will fly but not open, and one will remain closed on the ground. Other onboard devices include environmental sensors, GPS tracking devices, cameras to monitor

  12. An overview of geoengineering of climate using stratospheric sulphate aerosols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasch, Philip J; Tilmes, Simone; Turco, Richard P; Robock, Alan; Oman, Luke; Chen, Chih-Chieh; Stenchikov, Georgiy L; Garcia, Rolando R

    2008-11-13

    We provide an overview of geoengineering by stratospheric sulphate aerosols. The state of understanding about this topic as of early 2008 is reviewed, summarizing the past 30 years of work in the area, highlighting some very recent studies using climate models, and discussing methods used to deliver sulphur species to the stratosphere. The studies reviewed here suggest that sulphate aerosols can counteract the globally averaged temperature increase associated with increasing greenhouse gases, and reduce changes to some other components of the Earth system. There are likely to be remaining regional climate changes after geoengineering, with some regions experiencing significant changes in temperature or precipitation. The aerosols also serve as surfaces for heterogeneous chemistry resulting in increased ozone depletion. The delivery of sulphur species to the stratosphere in a way that will produce particles of the right size is shown to be a complex and potentially very difficult task. Two simple delivery scenarios are explored, but similar exercises will be needed for other suggested delivery mechanisms. While the introduction of the geoengineering source of sulphate aerosol will perturb the sulphur cycle of the stratosphere signicantly, it is a small perturbation to the total (stratosphere and troposphere) sulphur cycle. The geoengineering source would thus be a small contributor to the total global source of 'acid rain' that could be compensated for through improved pollution control of anthropogenic tropospheric sources. Some areas of research remain unexplored. Although ozone may be depleted, with a consequent increase to solar ultraviolet-B (UVB) energy reaching the surface and a potential impact on health and biological populations, the aerosols will also scatter and attenuate this part of the energy spectrum, and this may compensate the UVB enhancement associated with ozone depletion. The aerosol will also change the ratio of diffuse to direct energy

  13. Stratospheric gravity wave observations of AIRS and HIRDLS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Catrin I.; Hoffmann, Lars; Ern, Manfred; Trinh, Thai

    2016-04-01

    The Atmospheric InfraRed Sounder (AIRS) aboard NASA's Aqua satellite provides stratospheric temperature observations for a variety of scientific analyses. However, the horizontal resolution of the operational temperature retrievals is generally not sufficient for studies of gravity waves. The AIRS high-resolution retrieval discussed here provides stratospheric temperature profiles for each individual satellite footprint and therefore has nine times better horizontal sampling than the operational data. The retrieval configuration is optimized so that the results provide a trade-off between spatial resolution and retrieval noise that is considered optimal for gravity wave analysis. To validate the AIRS data we performed an intercomparison with stratospheric temperature measurements of the High Resolution Dynamics Limb Sounder (HIRDLS). Selected case studies of gravity wave events are analyzed. AIRS and HIRDLS utilize rather different measurement geometries (nadir and limb) and have different sensitivities to gravity wave horizontal and vertical wavelengths, as indicated by their observational filters. Nevertheless, the wave structures found in the stratosphere in AIRS and HIRDLS data are often in remarkably good agreement. The three-dimensional temperature fields from AIRS allow us to derive the horizontal orientation of the phase fronts, which is a limiting factor for gravity wave analyses based on limb measurements today. In addition, a statistical comparison focuses on temperature variances due to stratospheric gravity wave activity at 20-60 km altitude. The analysis covers monthly zonal averages and time series for the HIRDLS measurement time period (January 2005-March 2008). We found good agreement in the seasonal and latitudinal patterns of gravity wave activity. Time series of gravity wave variances show a strong annual cycle at high latitudes with maxima during wintertime and minima during summertime. Largest variability is found at 60°S during austral

  14. Radiative effects of polar stratospheric clouds during the Airborne Antarctic Ozone Experiment and the Airborne Arctic Stratospheric Expedition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenfield, Joan E.

    1992-01-01

    Results are presented of a study of the radiative effects of polar stratospheric clouds during the Airborne Antarctic Ozone Experiment (AAOE) and the Airborne Arctic Stratospheric Expedition (AASE) in which daily 3D Type I nitric acid trihydrate (NAT) and Type II water ice polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) were generated in the polar regions during AAOE and the AASE aircraft missions. Mission data on particular composition and size, together with NMC-analyzed temperatures, are used. For AAOE, both Type I and Type II clouds were formed for the time period August 23 to September 17, after which only Type I clouds formed. During AASE, while Type I clouds were formed for each day between January 3 and February 10, Type II clouds formed on only two days, January 24 and 31. Mie theory and a radiative transfer model are used to compute the radiative heating rates during the mission periods, for clear and cloudy lower sky cases. Only the Type II water ice clouds have a significant radiative effect, with the Type I NATO PSCs generating a net heating or cooling of 0.1 K/d or less.

  15. The Plunger Hypothesis: an overview of a new theory of stratosphere-troposphere dynamic coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, S.; Baldwin, M. P.; Stephenson, D.

    2015-12-01

    I will demonstrate the advantages of a new method of quantifying polar stratosphere-troposphere coupling by considering large-scale movements of mass into and out of the polar stratosphere. This project aims to use these mass movements to explain pressure and temperature anomalies throughout the polar troposphere and lower stratosphere in the aftermath of extreme stratospheric events. We hypothesise that these mass movements are induced by deposition of momentum by breaking waves in the stratosphere, slowing the wintertime polar vortex, and so are associated with sudden stratospheric warmings (SSWs). Such a mass movement in the upper stratosphere acts to compress the polar atmosphere below it in the manner of a plunger. In this way the pressure anomaly in the upper polar stratosphere 'controls' the pressure and temperature anomalies below by adiabatic compression of the polar atmospheric column. Better understanding this method of control will allow us to use stratospheric data to improve medium-range forecasting ability in the troposphere. One of the key innovations featured in this project is considering pressure and temperature fields at fixed geopotential surfaces, allowing for the easy observation of mass movement into and out of a polar cap region (which we have defined as north of 65N) as a function of altitude. Reanalysis data considered in this manner demonstrates a relationship between tropospheric pressure anomalies and stratospheric anomalies in the polar cap, and so a way to predict tropospheric variability given stratospheric information. This work forms part of a three and a half year PhD project.

  16. Evolution of stratospheric chemistry in the Saturn storm beacon region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moses, Julianne I.; Armstrong, Eleanor S.; Fletcher, Leigh N.; Friedson, A. James; Irwin, Patrick G. J.; Sinclair, James A.; Hesman, Brigette E.

    2015-11-01

    The giant northern-hemisphere storm that erupted on Saturn in December 2010 triggered significant changes in stratospheric temperatures and species abundances that persisted for more than a year after the original outburst. The stratospheric regions affected by the storm have been nicknamed "beacons" due to their prominent infrared-emission signatures (Fletcher, L.N. et al. [2011]. Science 332, 1413). The two beacon regions that were present initially merged in April 2011 to form a single, large, anticyclonic vortex (Fletcher, L.N. et al. [2012]. Icarus 221, 560). We model the expected photochemical evolution of the stratospheric constituents in the beacons from the initial storm onset through the merger and on out to March 2012. The results are compared with longitudinally resolved Cassini/CIRS spectra from May 2011. If we ignore potential changes due to vertical winds within the beacon, we find that C2H2, C2H6, and C3H8 remain unaffected by the increased stratospheric temperatures in the beacon, the abundance of the shorter-lived CH3C2H decreases, and the abundance of C2H4 increases significantly due to the elevated temperatures, the latter most notably in a secondary mixing-ratio peak located near mbar pressures. The C4H2 abundance in the model decreases by a factor of a few in the 0.01-10 mbar region but has a significant increase in the 10-30 mbar region due to evaporation of the previously condensed phase. The column abundances of C6H6 and H2O above ∼30 mbar also increase due to aerosol evaporation. Model-data comparisons show that models that consider temperature changes alone underpredict the abundance of C2Hx species by a factor of 2-7 in the beacon core in May 2011, suggesting that other processes not considered by the models, such as downwelling winds in the vortex, are affecting the species profiles. Additional calculations indicate that downwelling winds of order - 10 cm s-1 near ∼0.1 mbar need to be included in the photochemical models in order to

  17. The effect of stratospheric sulfur from Mount Pinatubo on tropospheric oxidizing capacity and methane

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bândə, Narcisa; Krol, Maarten; Noije, Van Twan; Weele, Van Michiel; Williams, Jason E.; Sager, Philippe Le; Niemeier, Ulrike; Thomason, Larry; Röckmann, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    The eruption of Mount Pinatubo in 1991 injected a large amount of SO2 into the stratosphere, which formed sulfate aerosols. Increased scattering and absorption of UV radiation by the enhanced stratospheric SO2 and aerosols decreased the amount of UV radiation reaching the

  18. The effect of stratospheric sulfur from Mount Pinatubo on tropospheric oxidizing capacity and methane

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Banda, Narcissa|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/352222158; Krol, Maarten|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/078760410; van Noije, Twan; van Weele, Michiel; Williams, Jason E.; Sager, Philippe Le; Niemeier, Ulrike; Thomason, Larry; Röckmann, Thomas|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304838233

    2015-01-01

    The eruption of Mount Pinatubo in 1991 injected a large amount of SO2 into the stratosphere, which formed sulfate aerosols. Increased scattering and absorption of UV radiation by the enhanced stratospheric SO2 and aerosols decreased the amount of UV radiation reaching the troposphere, causing

  19. 'The plunger hypothesis' - predicting the tropospheric impact of extreme stratospheric events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Simon; Baldwin, Mark; Stephenson, David

    2016-04-01

    The coupling of events in the polar stratosphere to those in the polar troposphere is not currently understood. Extreme events in the stratosphere have been identified to have a lasting influence on the tropospheric circulation below for a period of up to 60 days. As such understanding the downward propagation of stratospheric circulation anomalies would be beneficial to surface forecasting. In this work we use the new 'plunger hypothesis', that mass fluxes into and out of the polar region compress the polar column of air - in a manner similar to a plunger - and cause pressure and temperature anomalies. We demonstrate how a quasigeostrophic assumption within this hypothesis allows for the prediction of mass fluxes across the boundary to the polar region given the pressure distribution at the boundary. This then allows for a prediction of how a given stratospheric event such as a sudden stratospheric warming (SSW) or a strong vortex event influences the polar troposphere. The performance of this hypothesis is tested; its usefulness in improving surface forecasts, its accuracy in response to stratospheric events, and its ability to predict downward propagation of Arctic Oscillation (AO) index in the aftermath of extreme stratospheric events. The link between this work and the PV inversion formulation of stratosphere-troposphere coupling is discussed. This work forms part of a three and a half year PhD project.

  20. Observations of Ozone-aerosol Correlated Behaviour in the Lower Stratosphere During the EASOE Campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Digirolamo, P.; Cacciani, M.; Disarra, A.; Fiocco, G.; Fua, D.; Joergensen, T. S.; Knudsen, B.; Larsen, N.

    1992-01-01

    The question of possible interactions between ozone and stratospheric aerosol has been open for a long time. Measurements carried out after the Mt. Agung and El Chicon eruptions showed evidence of negative correlations between the presence of volcanic stratospheric aerosols and ozone concentration. Evidence for negative correlations in the polar winter has been also found. It is only after the discovery of the Antarctic ozone hole that catalytic effects related to low temperature heterogeneous chemistry have become the object of much investigation, now extended to the role of volcanic aerosol in the ozone reduction. These phenomena can be the object of various interpretations, not mutually exclusive, including the effect of transport, diffuse radiation as well as heterogeneous chemistry. The present paper provides preliminary results of simultaneous measurements of ozone and aerosol, carried out at Thule, Greenland, during the winter 1991-92. The European Stratospheric Ozone Experiment (EASOE) was aimed at monitoring the winter Arctic stratosphere in order to obtain a deeper insight of the ozone destruction processes taking place in the polar regions. A large amount of aerosol was injected into the lower stratosphere by the recent eruption of Volcano Pinatubo. A lidar system, already operational in Thule since November 1990, has provided detailed measurements of the stratospheric aerosol concentration during EASOE. In the same period, a large number of ozonesondes were launched. Although no PSC formation was detected over Thule, the simultaneous measurement of the stratospheric aerosol and ozone profiles give the possibility to study interactions occurring in the stratosphere between these two constituents.

  1. Modification of Jupiter's Stratosphere Three Weeks After the 2009 Impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fast, Kelly E.; Kostiuk, Theodor; Livengood, Timothy A.; Hewagama, Tilak; Annen, John

    2011-01-01

    Infrared spectroscopy sensitive to thermal emission from Jupiter's stratosphere reveals effects persisting 23 days after the impact of a body in late July 2009. Measurements obtained on 2009 August II UT at the impact latitude of 56 S (planetocentric), using the Goddard Heterodyne Instrument for Planetary Wind and Composition mounted on the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility, reveal increased ethane abundance and the effects of aerosol opacity. An interval of reduced thermal continuum emission at 11. 744 lm is measured 60o-80 towards planetary east of the impact site, estimated to be at 3050 longitude (System Ill). Retrieved stratospheric ethane mole fraction in the near vicinity of the impact site is enhanced by up to -60% relative to quiescent regions at this latitude. Thermal continuum emission at the impact site, and somewhat west of it, is significantly enhanced in the same spectra that retrieve enhanced ethane mole fraction. Assuming that the enhanced continuum brightness near the impact site results from thermalized aerosol debris blocking contribution from the continuum formed in the upper troposphere and indicating the local temperature, then continuum emission by a haze layer can be approximated by an opaque surface inserted at the 45-60 mbar pressure level in the stratosphere in an unperturbed thermal profile, setting an upper limit on the pressure and therefore a lower limit on the altitude of the top of the impact debris at this time. The reduced continuum brightness east of the impact site can be modeled by an opaque surface near the cold tropopause, which is consistent with a lower altitude of ejecta/impactor-formed opacity or significantly lesser column density of opaque haze material. The physical extent of the observed region of reduced continuum implies a minimum average velocity of 21 m/s transporting material prograde (planetary east) from the impact.

  2. Intercomparison of stratospheric gravity wave observations with AIRS and IASI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Hoffmann

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Gravity waves are an important driver for the atmospheric circulation and have substantial impact on weather and climate. Satellite instruments offer excellent opportunities to study gravity waves on a global scale. This study focuses on observations from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS onboard the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Aqua satellite and the Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI onboard the European MetOp satellites. The main aim of this study is an intercomparison of stratospheric gravity wave observations of both instruments. In particular, we analyzed AIRS and IASI 4.3 μm brightness temperature measurements, which directly relate to stratospheric temperature. Three case studies showed that AIRS and IASI provide a clear and consistent picture of the temporal development of individual gravity wave events. Statistical comparisons based on a five-year period of measurements (2008–2012 showed similar spatial and temporal patterns of gravity wave activity. However, the statistical comparisons also revealed systematic differences of variances between AIRS and IASI (about 45% that we attribute to the different spatial measurement characteristics of both instruments. We also found differences between day- and nighttime data (about 30% that are partly due to the local time variations of the gravity wave sources. While AIRS has been used successfully in many previous gravity wave studies, IASI data are applied here for the first time for that purpose. Our study shows that gravity wave observations from different hyperspectral infrared sounders such as AIRS and IASI can be directly related to each other, if instrument-specific characteristics such as different noise levels and spatial resolution and sampling are carefully considered. The ability to combine observations from different satellites provides an opportunity to create a long-term record, which is an exciting prospect for future climatological

  3. Intercomparison of stratospheric gravity wave observations with AIRS and IASI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Hoffmann

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Gravity waves are an important driver for the atmospheric circulation and have substantial impact on weather and climate. Satellite instruments offer excellent opportunities to study gravity waves on a global scale. This study focuses on observations from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS onboard the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Aqua satellite and the Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI onboard the European MetOp satellites. The main aim of this study is an intercomparison of stratospheric gravity wave observations of both instruments. In particular, we analyzed AIRS and IASI 4.3 μm brightness temperature measurements, which directly relate to stratospheric temperature. Three case studies showed that AIRS and IASI provide a clear and consistent picture of the temporal development of individual gravity wave events. Statistical comparisons based on a 5-year period of measurements (2008–2012 showed similar spatial and temporal patterns of gravity wave activity. However, the statistical comparisons also revealed systematic differences of variances between AIRS and IASI that we attribute to the different spatial measurement characteristics of both instruments. We also found differences between day- and nighttime data that are partly due to the local time variations of the gravity wave sources. While AIRS has been used successfully in many previous gravity wave studies, IASI data are applied here for the first time for that purpose. Our study shows that gravity wave observations from different hyperspectral infrared sounders such as AIRS and IASI can be directly related to each other, if instrument-specific characteristics such as different noise levels and spatial resolution and sampling are carefully considered. The ability to combine observations from different satellites provides an opportunity to create a long-term record, which is an exciting prospect for future climatological studies of stratospheric

  4. Near Space Lab-Rat Experimentation using Stratospheric Balloon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buduru, Suneel Kumar; Reddy Vizapur, Anmi; Rao Tanneeru, Venkateswara; Trivedi, Dharmesh; Devarajan, Anand; Pandit Manikrao Kulkarni, MR..; Ojha, Devendra; Korra, Sakram; Neerudu, Nagendra; Seng, Lim; Godi, Stalin Peter

    2016-07-01

    First ever balloon borne lab-rat experiment up to near space stratospheric altitude levels carried out at TIFR Balloon Facility, Hydeabad using zero pressure balloons for the purpose of validating the life support system. A series of two balloon experiments conducted under joint collaboration with IN.Genius, Singapore in the year 2015. In these experiments, three lab-rats sent to stratosphere in a pressurized capsule designed to reach an altitude of 30 km by keeping constant pressure, temperature and maintained at a precise rate of oxygen supply inside the capsule. The first experiment conducted on 1 ^{st} February, 2015 with a total suspended weight of 225 kg. During the balloon ascent stage at 18 km altitude, sensors inside the capsule reported drastic drop in internal pressure while oxygen and temperatures maintained at correct levels resulted in premature fligt termination at 20.1 km. All the three lab-rats recovered without life due to the collapse of their lungs caused by the depressurization inside the capsule. The second experiment conducted on 14th March, 2015 using a newly developed capsule with rectification of depressurization fault by using improved sealing gaskets and hermitically sealed connectors for sending lab-rats again to stratosphere comprising a total suspended load of 122.3 kg. The balloon flight was terminated after reaching 29.5 km in 110 minutes and succesfully recovered all the three lab-rats alive. This paper focuses on lessons learnt of the development of the life support system as an integral pressurized vessel, flight control instrumentation, flight simulation tests using thermo-vaccum chamber with pre-flight operations.

  5. Arctic stratospheric dehydration – Part 2: Microphysical modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Engel

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Large areas of synoptic-scale ice PSCs (Polar Stratospheric Clouds distinguished the Arctic winter 2009/2010 from other years and revealed unprecedented evidence of water redistribution in the stratosphere. A unique snapshot of water vapor repartitioning into ice particles was observed under extremely cold Arctic conditions with temperatures around 183 K. Balloon-borne, aircraft and satellite-based measurements suggest that synoptic-scale ice PSCs and concurrent reductions and enhancements in water vapor are tightly linked with the observed de- and rehydration signatures, respectively. In a companion paper (Part 1, water vapor and aerosol backscatter measurements from the RECONCILE (Reconciliation of essential process parameters for an enhanced predictability of Arctic stratospheric ozone loss and its climate interactions and LAPBIAT-II (Lapland Atmosphere-Biosphere Facility field campaigns have been analyzed in detail. This paper uses a column version of the Zurich Optical and Microphysical box Model (ZOMM including newly developed NAT (Nitric Acid Trihydrate and ice nucleation parameterizations. Particle sedimentation is calculated in order to simulate the vertical redistribution of chemical species such as water and nitric acid. Accounting for small-scale temperature fluctuations along the trajectory is essential to reach agreement between simulated optical cloud properties and observations. Whereas modeling only homogeneous nucleation causes the formation of ice clouds with particle radii too small to explain the measured vertical redistribution of water, we show that the use of recently developed heterogeneous ice nucleation parameterizations allows the model to quantitatively reproduce the observed signatures of de- and rehydration.

  6. A Preliminary Study on Dust Grains in the Stratosphere

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄伯钧; 欧阳自远; 等

    1990-01-01

    Collected by means of a high-altitude scientific balloon and a self-made automatic sample collector,a total of 276 dust grains were selected for the study of shape,grain size and optical property.Some of the grains were examined by X-ray diffraction and electrom microprobe techniques,The stratospheric dust grains can be classified as 6 types:cosmic dusts,cosmic dusts(?),microtektite,natural pollutants,artificial pollutants and the unknown substances.The different types of dust grains have different characters and distinguishing symbols.Widespread in the space of the solar system,cosmic dusts are the initial substances of the solar system and ,to some degree,have recorded a great wealth of information on the early history of the solar system.So they have become one of the important objects in the field of cosmochemistry at present time,Since the 1960's,scholars of many countries have collected cosmic dusts both in the space near the earth(using rock ets,space probes and space shuttles)and in the stratosphere (using high-altitude balloons or U-2air planes).According to the shape(the scanning electron microimage),element composition(the energy-dispersive X-ray spectrum)and optical properties of dust grains,the substances in the stratosphere can be classified as 5 types:cosmic dusts,alumina spheroids,terrestrial artificial pollutants,terrestrial natural pollutants and unknown substances(CDPET,1982).

  7. A Model Simulation of Pinatubo Volcanic Aerosols in the Stratosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao , Jing-xia; Turco, Richard P.; Toon, Owen B.

    1995-01-01

    A one-dimensional, time-dependent model is used to study the chemical, microphysical, and radiative properties of volcanic aerosols produced by the Mount Pinatubo eruption on June 15, 1991. Our model treats gas-phase sulfur photochemistry, gas-to-particle conversion of sulfur, and the microphysics of sulfate aerosols and ash particles under stratospheric conditions. The dilution and diffusion of the volcanic eruption clouds are also accounted for in these conditions. Heteromolecular homogeneous and heterogeneous binary H2SO4/H2O nucleation, acid and water condensational growth, coagulation, and gravitational sedimentation are treated in detail in the model. Simulations suggested that after several weeks, the volcanic cloud was composed mainly of sulfuric acid/water droplets produced in situ from the SO2 emissions. The large amounts of SO2 (around 20 Mt) injected into the stratosphere by the Pinatubo eruption initiated homogeneous nucleation which generated a high concentration of small H2SO4/H2O droplets. These newly formed particles grew rapidly by condensation and coagulation in the first few months and then reach their stabilized sizes with effective radii in a range between 0.3 and 0.5 micron approximately one-half year after the eruption. The predicted volcanic cloud parameters reasonably agree with measurements in term of the vertical distribution and lifetime of the volcanic aerosols, their basic microphysical structures (e.g., size distribution, concentration, mass ratio, and surface area) and radiative properties. The persistent volcanic aerosols can produce significant anomalies in the radiation field, which have important climatic consequences. The large enhancement in aerosol surface area can result in measurable global stratospheric ozone depletion.

  8. Reducing Uncertainty in Chemistry Climate Model Predictions of Stratospheric Ozone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglass, A. R.; Strahan, S. E.; Oman, L. D.; Stolarski, R. S.

    2014-01-01

    Chemistry climate models (CCMs) are used to predict the future evolution of stratospheric ozone as ozone-depleting substances decrease and greenhouse gases increase, cooling the stratosphere. CCM predictions exhibit many common features, but also a broad range of values for quantities such as year of ozone-return-to-1980 and global ozone level at the end of the 21st century. Multiple linear regression is applied to each of 14 CCMs to separate ozone response to chlorine change from that due to climate change. We show that the sensitivity of lower atmosphere ozone to chlorine change deltaO3/deltaCly is a near linear function of partitioning of total inorganic chlorine (Cly) into its reservoirs; both Cly and its partitioning are controlled by lower atmospheric transport. CCMs with realistic transport agree with observations for chlorine reservoirs and produce similar ozone responses to chlorine change. After 2035 differences in response to chlorine contribute little to the spread in CCM results as the anthropogenic contribution to Cly becomes unimportant. Differences among upper stratospheric ozone increases due to temperature decreases are explained by differences in ozone sensitivity to temperature change deltaO3/deltaT due to different contributions from various ozone loss processes, each with their own temperature dependence. In the lower atmosphere, tropical ozone decreases caused by a predicted speed-up in the Brewer-Dobson circulation may or may not be balanced by middle and high latitude increases, contributing most to the spread in late 21st century predictions.

  9. Defining the Sudden Stratospheric Warming in Climate Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, J.; Son, S. W.; Gerber, E. P.; Park, H. S.

    2016-12-01

    A sudden stratospheric warming (SSW) is defined by the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) as zonal-mean zonal wind reversal at 10 hPa and 60°N, associated with a reversal of the climatological temperature gradient at this elevation. This wind criterion in particular has been applied to reanalysis data and climate model output during the last few decades. In the present study, it is shown that the application of this definition to models can be affected by model mean biases; i.e., more frequent SSW appears to occur in models with a weaker climatological polar vortex. In order to overcome this deficiency, a tendency-based definition, which is not sensitive to the model mean bias, is proposed and applied to the multi-model data sets archived for the Coupled Model Intercomparison Projection phase 5 (CMIP5). In this definition, SSW-like events are defined by sufficiently strong vortex deceleration. This approach removes a linear relationship between the SSW frequency and intensity of climatological polar vortex for both the low-top and high-top CMIP5 models. Instead, the resulting SSW frequency is strongly correlated with wave activity at 100 hPa. The two definitions detect quantitatively different SSW in terms of lower stratospheric wave activity and downward propagation of stratospheric anomalies to the troposphere. However, in both definitions, the high-top models generally exhibit more frequent SSW than the low-top models. Moreover, a hint of more frequent SSW in a warm climate is commonly found.

  10. Radiation chemistry in the Jovian stratosphere - Laboratory simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcdonald, Gene D.; Thompson, W. R.; Sagan, Carl

    1992-01-01

    The results of the present low-pressure/continuous-flow laboratory simulations of H2/He/CH4/NH3 atmospheres' plasma-induced chemistry indicate radiation yields of both hydrocarbon and N2-containing organic compounds which increase with decreasing pressure. On the basis of these findings, upper limits of 1 million-1 billion molecules/sq cm/sec are established for production rates of major auroral-chemistry species in the Jovian stratosphere. It is noted that auroral processes may account for 10-100 percent of the total abundances of most of the observed polar-region organic species.

  11. On the temperature dependence of polar stratospheric clouds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fiocco, G.; Cacciani, M.; Di Girolamo, P. (Univ. La Spaienza, Rome (Italy)); Fua, D. (Univ. La Spaienza, Rome (Italy) CNR/IFA, Rome (Italy)); De Luisi, J. (NOAA, Boulder, CO (United States))

    1991-03-01

    Polar stratospheric clouds were frequently observed by lidar at the Amundsen-Scott South Pole Station during May-October 1988. The dependence of the backscattering cross section on the temperature can be referred to transitions of the HNO{sub 3}/H{sub 2}O system: it appears possible to distinguish the pure trihydrate from the mixed ice-trihydrate phase in the composition of the aerosol and, in some cases, to bracket the HNO{sub 3} and H{sub 2}O content of the ambient gas, and to provide indications on the size of the particles.

  12. Antarctic stratospheric ozone and seasonal predictability over southern Africa

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Engelbrecht, FA

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available -latitude tropospheric circulation in summer (e.g. Thompson and Solomon, 2002). However, in most state- of-the-art seasonal forecasting or climate simulation systems applied to predict/simulate Southern Hemisphere climate variability, this form of time... stratospheric ozone and seasonal predictability over southern Africa Francois A. Engelbrecht1,2, Thando Ndarana1, Yushi Morioka3, Swadhin Behera3, Marcus Thatcher4 and John L. McGregor4 1CSIR Natural Resources and the Environment – Climate Studies...

  13. Mixing between a stratospheric intrusion and a biomass burning plume

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Brioude

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Ozone, carbon monoxide, aerosol extinction coefficient, acetonitrile, nitric acid and relative humidity measured from the NOAA P3 aircraft during the TexAQS/GoMACCS 2006 experiment, indicate mixing between a biomass burning plume and a stratospheric intrusion in the free troposphere above eastern Texas. Lagrangian-based transport analysis and satellite imagery are used to investigate the transport mechanisms that bring together the tropopause fold and the biomass burning plume originating in southern California, which may affect the chemical budget of tropospheric trace gases.

  14. Mixing between a stratospheric intrusion and a biomass burning plume

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Brioude

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Ozone, carbon monoxide, aerosol extinction coefficient, acetonitrile, nitric acid and relative humidity measured from the NOAA P3 aircraft during the TexAQS/GoMACCS 2006 experiment, indicate mixing between a biomass burning plume and a stratospheric intrusion in the free troposphere above eastern Texas. Lagrangian-based transport analysis and satellite imagery are used to investigate the transport mechanisms that bring together the tropopause fold and the biomass burning plume originating in southern California, which may affect the chemical budget of tropospheric trace gases.

  15. Threat of depletion of the stratosphere ozone layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1982-04-01

    On the basis of the current evidence, the threat of a considerable distortion of the ozone layer in the future is widely recognized. In view of this, the Commission for Atmospheric Sciences of the World Meteorological Organization was asked by the WMO Executive Committee to revise the second WMO statement on ozone. The resulting third WMO statement points out that the amount of ozone in the stratosphere is determined not only by photochemical reactions between oxygen atoms but also by interactions involving trace-gases, such as the oxides of nitrogen, hydrogen, and chlorine.

  16. Optimizing stratospheric sulfur geoengineering by seasonally changing sulfur injections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laakso, Anton; Partanen, Antti-Ilari; Kokkola, Harri; Lehtinen, Kari; Korhonen, Hannele

    2015-04-01

    Solar radiation management (SRM) by stratospheric sulfur injection has been shown to have potential in counteracting global warming if reducing of greenhouse gases has not been achieved fast enough and if climate warming will continue. Injecting large amounts of sulfate particles to the stratosphere would increase the reflectivity of the atmosphere and less sunlight would reach the surface. However, the effectivity (per injected sulphur mass unit) of this kind of geoengineering would decrease when amount of injected sulfur is increased. When sulfur concentration increases, stratospheric particles would grow to larger sizes which have larger gravitational settling velocity and which do not reflect radiation as efficiently as smaller particles. In many previous studies, sulfur has been assumed to be injected along the equator where yearly mean solar intensity is the highest and from where sulfur is spread equally to both hemispheres. However, the solar intensity will change locally during the year and sulfate has been assumed to be injected and spread to the hemisphere also during winter time, when the solar intensity is low. Thus sulfate injection could be expected to be more effective, if sulfur injection area is changed seasonally. Here we study effects of the different SRM injection scenarios by using two versions of the MPI climate models. First, aerosol spatial and temporal distributions as well as the resulting radiative properties from the SRM are defined by using the global aerosol-climate model ECHAM6.1-HAM2.2-SALSA. After that, the global and regional climate effects from different injection scenarios are predicted by using the Max Planck Institute's Earth System Model (MPI-ESM). We carried out simulations, where 8 Tg of sulfur is injected as SO2 to the stratosphere at height of 20-22 km in an area ranging over a 20 degree wide latitude band. Results show that changing the sulfur injection area seasonally would lead to similar global mean shortwave

  17. A lidar equipped with photon counter for measuring stratospheric aerosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jun; Hu, Huanling

    1991-01-01

    A large lidar system was developed at the Anhui Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics. It is composed of a high power frequency doubled Nd:YAG laser (120 mJ at 532 nm, 1 mrad), a 651 mm diameter receiving telescope, and a 64 channel photon counter. The lidar observations are controlled by an IBM PC/AT computer. One of the projects is to use the lidar system to make regular observations of stratospheric aerosols. Profiles of scattering ratio have been obtained since November 1989. Meanwhile, an Xe-Cl laser (308 nm wavelength) was assembled to allow the lidar to make measurements of vertical ozone distributions.

  18. A Circumpolar Stratospheric Telescope for Observations of Planets - FUJIN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taguchi, Makoto; Takahashi, Yukihiro; Shoji, Yasuhiro; Yoshida, Kazuya; Sakamoto, Yuji; Watanabe, Makoto; Nakano, Toshihiko; Maeda, Atsunori; Nakamoto, Junpei; Imai, Masataka; Gouda, Yuya

    It is important to conduct long-term continuous observations of time-dependent events in planetary atmospheres and plasmaspheres. The aim of the FUJIN project is to carry out continuous observations of planets using a telescope that is lifted by a balloon to the polar stratosphere. The FUJIN-1 experiment was organized at Taiki Aerospace Research Field in Taiki-cho, Hokkaido, Japan, from May to June 2013, but the experiment was canceled due to a failure found in the balloon operation system provided by JAXA. However, the results of various prelaunch ground tests clearly established the feasibility of the experiment. We have recently begun organizing the FUJIN-2 experiment, in which scientific observations of planets will be conducted in the Arctic. Wind speed in the stratosphere is very low during April and May. The FUJIN-2 experiment will be conducted during this period in 2015 at ESRANGE in Kiruna, Sweden, since this is when Venus will be in the most favorable position for observations. The gondola will be recovered somewhere in the Scandinavian peninsula after one or two days of continuous observations. In summer, an eastern circumpolar wind is dominant in the stratosphere. If a balloon is flown under these conditions, it will take a week to fly from Kiruna to Alaska and more than two weeks for it to fly back to Scandinavia along a constant-latitude path around the Earth. We are currently organizing another experiment (FUJIN-3) involving such a circumpolar flight that will be conducted in 2017 or later. The system used in FUJIN-2 will also be used for FUJIN-3, but with the inclusion of a high-sensitivity CCD camera and a liquid-crystal tunable filter. Venus, Jupiter, and Mercury will be the planets of interest for FUJIN-3. Moreover, a next-generation stratospheric telescope with a meter-class aperture, a mobile gondola to approach the center of the polar vortex, and a super-pressure balloon for year-round observations are being studied to upgrade the FUJIN system

  19. Particle size distribution of the stratospheric aerosol from SCIAMACHY limb measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozanov, Alexei; Malinina, Elizaveta; Rozanov, Vladimir; Hommel, Rene; Burrows, John

    2016-04-01

    Stratospheric aerosols are of a great scientific interest because of their crucial role in the Earth's radiative budget as well as their contribution to chemical processes resulting in ozone depletion. While the permanent aerosol background in the stratosphere is determined by the tropical injection of SO2, COS and sulphate particles from the troposphere, major perturbations of the stratospheric aerosol layer result form an uplift of SO2 after strong volcanic eruptions. Satellite measurements in the visible spectral range represent one of the most important sources of information about the vertical distribution of the stratospheric aerosol on the global scale. This study employs measurements of the scattered solar light performed in the limb viewing geometry from the space borne spectrometer SCIAMACHY, which operated onboard the ENVISAT satellite, from August 2002 to April 2012. A retrieval approach to obtain parameters of the stratospheric aerosol particle size distribution will be reported along with the sensitivity studies and first results.

  20. The Sectional Stratospheric Sulfate Aerosol module (S3A-v1) within the LMDZ general circulation model: description and evaluation against stratospheric aerosol observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinschmitt, Christoph; Boucher, Olivier; Bekki, Slimane; Lott, François; Platt, Ulrich

    2017-09-01

    Stratospheric aerosols play an important role in the climate system by affecting the Earth's radiative budget as well as atmospheric chemistry, and the capabilities to simulate them interactively within global models are continuously improving. It is important to represent accurately both aerosol microphysical and atmospheric dynamical processes because together they affect the size distribution and the residence time of the aerosol particles in the stratosphere. The newly developed LMDZ-S3A model presented in this article uses a sectional approach for sulfate particles in the stratosphere and includes the relevant microphysical processes. It allows full interaction between aerosol radiative effects (e.g. radiative heating) and atmospheric dynamics, including e.g. an internally generated quasi-biennial oscillation (QBO) in the stratosphere. Sulfur chemistry is semi-prescribed via climatological lifetimes. LMDZ-S3A reasonably reproduces aerosol observations in periods of low (background) and high (volcanic) stratospheric sulfate loading, but tends to overestimate the number of small particles and to underestimate the number of large particles. Thus, it may serve as a tool to study the climate impacts of volcanic eruptions, as well as the deliberate anthropogenic injection of aerosols into the stratosphere, which has been proposed as a method of geoengineering to abate global warming.

  1. Stratosphere-troposphere exchange in a summertime extratropical low: analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Brioude

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Ozone and carbon monoxide measurements sampled during two commercial flights in airstreams of a summertime midlatitude cyclone are analysed with a Lagrangian-based study (backward trajectories and a Reverse Domain Filling technique to gain a comprehensive understanding of transport effects on trace gas distributions. The study demonstrates that summertime cyclones can be associated with deep stratosphere-troposphere transport. A tropopause fold is sampled twice in its life cycle, once in the lower troposphere (O3≃100 ppbv; CO≃90 ppbv in the dry airstream of the cyclone, and again in the upper troposphere (O3≃200 ppbv; CO≃90 ppbv on the northern side of the large scale potential vorticity feature associated with baroclinic development. In agreement with the maritime development of the cyclone, the chemical composition of the anticyclonic portion of the warm conveyor belt outflow (O3≃40 ppbv; CO≃85 ppbv corresponds to the lowest mixing ratios of both ozone and carbon monoxide in the upper tropospheric airborne observations. The uncertain degree of confidence of the Lagrangian-based technique applied to a 100 km segment of upper level airborne observations with high ozone (200 ppbv and relatively low CO (80 ppbv observed northwest of the cyclone prevents identification of the ozone enrichment process of air parcels embedded in the cyclonic part of the upper level outflow of the warm conveyor belt. Different hypotheses of stratosphere-troposphere exchange are discussed.

  2. Stratosphere-troposphere exchange in a summertime extratropical low: analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Brioude

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Ozone and carbone monoxide measurements sampled during two commercial flights in airstreams of a summertime midlatitude cyclone are analysed with a lagrangian-based study (backward trajectories and a Reverse Domain Filling technique to gain a comprehensive understanding of transport effects on trace gas distributions. The study demonstrates that summertime cyclones can be associated with deep stratosphere-troposphere transport. A tropopause fold is sampled twice in its life cycle, once in the lower troposphere (O3≃100 ppbv; CO≃90 ppbv in the dry airstream of the cyclone, and again in the upper troposphere (O3≃200 ppbv; CO≃90 ppbv on the northern side of the large scale potential vorticity feature associated with baroclinic development. In agreement to the maritime development of the cyclone, the chemical composition of the anticyclonic part outflow of the warm conveyor belt (O3≃40 ppbv; CO≃85 ppbv corresponds to the lowest mixing ratios of both ozone and carbone monoxide in upper tropospheric airborne observations. The uncertain degree of confidence of the Lagrangian-based technique applied to a 100 km segment of upper level airborne observations with high ozone (200 ppbv and relatively low CO (80 ppbv observed northwest of the cyclone prevents to identify the ozone enrichment process of air parcels embedded in the cyclonic part of the upper level outflow of the warm conveyor belt. Different hypotheses of stratosphere-troposphere exchange are discussed.

  3. Transient Characteristics of Residual Meridional Circulation during Stratospheric Sudden Warming

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DENG Shumei; CHEN Yuejuan; HUANG Yong; LUO Tao; BI Yun

    2011-01-01

    The residual meridional circulation derived from the transformed Eulerian-mean thermodynamic equation and continuity equation can be separated into two parts, the slowly varying diabatic circulation and the transient circulation, as demonstrated by others. We calculated and composite-analyzed the transient and diabatic circulation for 14 stratospheric sudden warming (SSW) events from 1979-2002 by using the daily ECMWF reanalysis data. Specifically, the transient residual meridional circulation was calculated both with and without inclusion of the eddy heat transport term in the transformed Eulerian-mean thermodynamic equation to investigate the importance of the eddy heat transport term. The results showed that calculations of transient residual meridional circulation present rapid variations during SSWs, with or without inclusion of the eddy heat transport term. Although the patterns of transient residual meridional circulation with the eddy heat transport term were similar to that without the eddy heat transport term during SSW, the magnitudes in the upper stratosphere and high-latitude regions differed. As for the diabatic circulation, its daily variations were small during SSW events, and its patterns were in agreement with its monthly average.

  4. Transient Characteristics of Residual Meridional Circulation during Stratospheric Sudden Warming

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    The residual meridional circulation derived from the transformed Eulerian-mean thermodynamic equation and continuity equation can be separated into two parts,the slowly varying diabatic circulation and the transient circulation,as demonstrated by others.We calculated and composite-analyzed the transient and diabatic circulation for 14 stratospheric sudden warming(SSW) events from 1979-2002 by using the daily ECMWF reanalysis data.Specifically,the transient residual meridional circulation was calculated both with and without inclusion of the eddy heat transport term in the transformed Eulerian-mean thermodynamic equation to investigate the importance of the eddy heat transport term.The results showed that calculations of transient residual meridional circulation present rapid variations during SSWs,with or without inclusion of the eddy heat transport term.Although the patterns of transient residual meridional circulation with the eddy heat transport term were similar to that without the eddy heat transport term during SSW,the magnitudes in the upper stratosphere and high-latitude regions differed.As for the diabatic circulation,its daily variations were small during SSW events,and its patterns were in agreement with its monthly average.

  5. Merging the SAGE II and OSIRIS Stratospheric Aerosol Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieger, Landon; Bourassa, Adam; Degenstein, Doug

    2016-04-01

    The Optical Spectrograph and InfraRed Imaging System (OSIRIS) instrument on the Odin satellite, launched in 2001 and currently operational, measures limb-scattered sunlight from which profiles of stratospheric aerosol extinction at 750nm are retrieved. The Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas (SAGE) II instrument was operational from 1985 to 2005, and provided aerosol extinction at several visible and near infrared wavelengths. This work compares the SAGE II and OSIRIS aerosol extinction measurements during the four years of instrument overlap by interpolating the SAGE II data to 750nm using the 525 and 1020nm channels. Agreement is generally favourable in the tropics and mid-latitudes with differences less than 10% for the majority of the aerosol layer. However, near the UTLS and outside of the tropics agreement is poorer and reasons for this are investigated. Comparisons between the OSIRIS and SAGE II aerosol extinction measurements at 750nm are used to develop a merged aerosol climatology as a function of time, latitude and altitude at the native SAGE II wavelength of 525nm. Error due to assumptions in the OSIRIS retrieval and wavelength conversion are explored through simulation studies over a range of particle size distributions and is found to be approximately 20% for the majority of low-to-moderate volcanic loading conditions and OSIRIS geometries. Other sources of error such as cloud contamination in the UTLS are also explored.

  6. Asymmetric forcing from stratospheric aerosols impacts Sahelian rainfall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haywood, Jim M.; Jones, Andy; Bellouin, Nicolas; Stephenson, David

    2013-07-01

    The Sahelian drought of the 1970s-1990s was one of the largest humanitarian disasters of the past 50 years, causing up to 250,000 deaths and creating 10 million refugees. It has been attributed to natural variability, over-grazing and the impact of industrial emissions of sulphur dioxide. Each mechanism can influence the Atlantic sea surface temperature gradient, which is strongly coupled to Sahelian precipitation. We suggest that sporadic volcanic eruptions in the Northern Hemisphere also strongly influence this gradient and cause Sahelian drought. Using de-trended observations from 1900 to 2010, we show that three of the four driest Sahelian summers were preceded by substantial Northern Hemisphere volcanic eruptions. We use a state-of-the-art coupled global atmosphere-ocean model to simulate both episodic volcanic eruptions and geoengineering by continuous deliberate injection into the stratosphere. In either case, large asymmetric stratospheric aerosol loadings concentrated in the Northern Hemisphere are a harbinger of Sahelian drought whereas those concentrated in the Southern Hemisphere induce a greening of the Sahel. Further studies of the detailed regional impacts on the Sahel and other vulnerable areas are required to inform policymakers in developing careful consensual global governance before any practical solar radiation management geoengineering scheme is implemented.

  7. Stratospheric microbiology at 20 km over the Pacific Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, David J.; Griffin, Dale W.; Schuerger, Andrew C.

    2010-01-01

    An aerobiology sampling flight at 20 km was conducted on 28 April 2008 over the Pacific Ocean (36.5° N, 118–149° W), a period of time that coincided with the movement of Asian dust across the ocean. The aim of this study was to confirm the presence of viable bacteria and fungi within a transoceanic, atmospheric bridge and to improve the resolution of flight hardware processing techniques. Isolates of the microbial strains recovered were analyzed with ribosomal ribonucleic acid (rRNA) sequencing to identify bacterial species Bacillus sp., Bacillus subtilis, Bacillus endophyticus, and the fungal genus Penicillium. Satellite imagery and ground-based radiosonde observations were used to measure dust movement and characterize the high-altitude environment at the time of collection. Considering the atmospheric residency time (7–10 days), the extreme temperature regime of the environment (-75°C), and the absence of a mechanism that could sustain particulates at high altitude, it is unlikely that our samples indicate a permanent, stratospheric ecosystem. However, the presence of viable fungi and bacteria in transoceanic stratosphere remains relevant to understanding the distribution and extent of microbial life on Earth.

  8. Understanding and forecasting polar stratospheric variability with statistical models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Blume

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The variability of the north-polar stratospheric vortex is a prominent aspect of the middle atmosphere. This work investigates a wide class of statistical models with respect to their ability to model geopotential and temperature anomalies, representing variability in the polar stratosphere. Four partly nonstationary, nonlinear models are assessed: linear discriminant analysis (LDA; a cluster method based on finite elements (FEM-VARX; a neural network, namely a multi-layer perceptron (MLP; and support vector regression (SVR. These methods model time series by incorporating all significant external factors simultaneously, including ENSO, QBO, the solar cycle, volcanoes, etc., to then quantify their statistical importance. We show that variability in reanalysis data from 1980 to 2005 is successfully modeled. FEM-VARX and MLP even satisfactorily forecast the period from 2005 to 2011. However, internal variability remains that cannot be statistically forecasted, such as the unexpected major warming in January 2009. Finally, the statistical model with the best generalization performance is used to predict a vortex breakdown in late January, early February 2012.

  9. Equatorial winds on Saturn and the stratospheric oscillation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Liming; Jiang, Xun; Ingersoll, Andrew P.; Del Genio, Anthony D.; Porco, Carolyn C.; West, Robert A.; Vasavada, Ashwin R.; Ewald, Shawn P.; Conrath, Barney J.; Gierasch, Peter J.; Simon-Miller, Amy A.; Nixon, Conor A.; Achterberg, Richard K.; Orton, Glenn S.; Fletcher, Leigh N.; Baines, Kevin H.

    2011-11-01

    The zonal jets on the giant planets have been thought to be stable in time. A decline in the velocity of Saturn's equatorial jet has been identified, on the basis of a comparison of cloud-tracking data across two decades, but the differences in cloud speeds have since been suggested to stem from changes in cloud altitude in combination with vertical wind shear, rather than from temporal changes in wind strength at a given height. Here, we combine observations of cloud tracks and of atmospheric temperatures taken by two instruments on the Cassini spacecraft to reveal a significant temporal variation in the strength of the high-altitude equatorial jet on Saturn. Specifically, we find that wind speeds at atmospheric pressure levels of 60mbar, corresponding to Saturn's tropopause, increased by about 20ms-1 between 2004 and 2008, whereas the wind speed has been essentially constant over time in the southern equatorial troposphere. The observations further reveal that the equatorial jet intensified by about 60ms-1 between 2005 and 2008 in the stratosphere, that is, at pressure levels of 1-5mbar. Because the wind acceleration is weaker near the tropopause than higher up, in the stratosphere, we conclude that the semi-annual equatorial oscillation of Saturn's middle atmosphere is also damped as it propagates downwards.

  10. Status of the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA)

    CERN Document Server

    Gehrz, R D; de Buizer, J; Herter, T; Keller, L D; Krabbe, A; Marcum, P M; Roellig, T L; Sandell, G H L; Temi, P; Vacca, W D; Young, E T; Zinnecker, H

    2011-01-01

    The Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA), a joint U.S./German project, is a 2.5-meter infrared airborne telescope carried by a Boeing 747-SP that flies in the stratosphere at altitudes as high as 45,000 feet (13.72 km). This facility is capable of observing from 0.3 {\\mu}m to 1.6 mm with an average transmission greater than 80 percent. SOFIA will be staged out of the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center aircraft operations facility at Palmdale, CA. The SOFIA Science Mission Operations (SMO) will be located at NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA. First science flights began in 2010 and a full operations schedule of up to one hundred 8 to 10 hour flights per year will be reached by 2014. The observatory is expected to operate until the mid 2030's. SOFIAs initial complement of seven focal plane instruments includes broadband imagers, moderate-resolution spectrographs that will resolve broad features due to dust and large molecules, and high-resolution spectrometers capable of studying ...

  11. Stratospheric balloons from Esrange - current and future capabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norberg, O.

    Stratospheric balloon operations have been carried out at the Swedish Space Corporation's rocket, balloon and satellite operations base Esrange since 1974; approximately 550 stratospheric balloons have been launched during this period. The facility, located in northern Sweden at 68 degrees north, is fully equipped with a large launch pad, payload and flight train preparation hangars, telemetry stations, recovery helicopters, and supporting infrastructure. Many of the scientific balloons launched are CNES missions. This paper will present the possibilities for scientific and technical balloon missions at high latitudes and with a vast landing area in northern Sweden, Finland, and Russia. The proximity to the Arctic polar vortex makes Esrange an ideal base for studies of for example the ozone destruction process in the Arctic. A new option proposed by the Swedish Space Corporation and NASA is to perform week-long missions from the south of Sweden to western Canada. A newly developed line-of-sight telemetry system, E-LINK, for high bit-rates (> 2 Mbps both downlink and uplink) and based on the Ethernet communication standard is also described.

  12. Classification of hemispheric monthly mean stratospheric potential vorticity fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Huth

    Full Text Available Monthly mean NCEP reanalysis potential vorticity fields at the 650 K isentropic level over the Northern and Southern Hemispheres between 1979 and 1997 were studied using multivariate analysis tools. Principal component analysis in the T-mode was applied to demonstrate the validity of such statistical techniques for the study of stratospheric dynamics and climatology. The method, complementarily applied to both the raw and anomaly fields, was useful in determining and classifying the characteristics of winter and summer PV fields on both hemispheres, in particular, the well-known differences in the behaviour and persistence of the polar vortices. It was possible to identify such features as sudden warming events in the Northern Hemisphere and final warming dates in both hemispheres. The stratospheric impact of other atmospheric processes, such as volcanic eruptions, also identified though the results, must be viewed at this stage as tentative. An interesting change in behaviour around 1990 was detected over both hemispheres.

    Key words. Meteorology and atmospheric dynamics (middle atmosphere dynamics; general circulation; climatology

  13. Disentangling the Roles of Various Forcing Mechanisms on Stratospheric Temperature Changes Since 1979 with the NASA GEOSCCM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aquila, Valentina; Swartz, W.; Colarco, P.; Pawson, S.; Polvani, L.; Stolarski, R.; Waugh, D.

    2015-01-01

    Observations show that the cooling of global stratospheric temperatures from 1979 to 2015 took place in two major steps coincident with the 1982 El Chichon and 1991 Mount Pinatubo eruptions. In order to attribute the features of the global stratospheric temperature time series to the main forcing agents, we performed a set of simulations with the NASA Goddard Earth Observing System Chemistry Climate Model. Our results show that the characteristic step-like behavior is to be attributed to the effects of the solar cycle, except for the post-1995 flattening of the lower stratospheric temperatures, where the decrease in ozone depleting substances due to the Montreal Protocol slowed ozone depletion and therefore also the cooling of the stratosphere. Volcanic eruptions also caused a significant warming of the stratosphere after 1995. The observed general cooling is mainly caused by increasing ozone depleting substances in the lower stratosphere, and greenhouse gases in the middle and upper stratosphere.

  14. Stratospheric mean ages and transport rates from observations of CO{sub 2} and N{sub 2}O

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boering, K.A.; Wofsy, S.C.; Daube, B.C.; Schneider, H.R. [Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (United States). Div. of Engineering and Applied Sciences; Loewenstein, M.; Podolske, J.R. [NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA (United States); Conway, T.J. [National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Boulder, CO (United States)

    1997-12-31

    Measurements of CO{sub 2} and N{sub 2}O concentrations are reported and analyzed to investigate stratospheric transport rates. Temporal variations in tropospheric CO{sub 2} are observed to propagate into the stratosphere, showing that tropospheric air enters the lower tropical stratosphere continuously, ascends, and is transported rapidly (in less than 1 month) to both hemispheres. The mean age of stratospheric air determined from CO{sub 2} data is approximately 5 years in the mid-stratosphere. It is shown that the mean age is mathematically equivalent to a conserved tracer analogous to exhaust from stratospheric aircraft. Comparison of the mean age from models and observations indicates that current model simulations likely underestimate pollutant concentrations from proposed stratospheric aircraft by 25-100%. (author) 36 refs.

  15. Stratosphere-resolving CMIP5 models simulate different changes in the Southern Hemisphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rea, Gloria; Riccio, Angelo; Fierli, Federico; Cairo, Francesco; Cagnazzo, Chiara

    2017-06-01

    This work documents long-term changes in the Southern Hemisphere circulation in the austral spring-summer season in the Coupled Intercomparison Project Phase 5 models, showing that those changes are larger in magnitude and closer to ERA-Interim and other reanalyses if models include a dynamical representation of the stratosphere. Specifically, models with a high-top and included dynamical and—in some cases—chemical feedbacks within the stratosphere better simulate the lower stratospheric cooling observed over 1979-2001 and strongly driven by ozone depletion, when compared to the other models. This occurs because high-top models can fully capture the stratospheric large scale circulation response to the ozone-induced cooling. Interestingly, this difference is also found at the surface for the Southern Annular Mode (SAM) changes, even though all model categories tend to underestimate SAM trends over those decades. In this analysis, models including a proper dynamical stratosphere are more sensitive to lower stratospheric cooling in their tropospheric circulation response. After a brief discussion of two RCP scenarios, our study confirms that at least for large changes in the extratropical regions, stratospheric changes induced by external forcing have to be properly simulated, as they are important drivers of tropospheric climate variations.

  16. Stratospheric Sudden Warmings in the ECHAM5/MESSy CCMVal Ref.1 Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayarzagüena, B.; Langematz, U.; Kubin, A.; Brühl, C.; Baumgärtner, A.; Serrano, E.

    2009-04-01

    The northern stratosphere in wintertime is characterized by a large interannual variability, particularly the occurrence of large stratospheric warmings. This phenomenon consists of a rapid increase of temperature in the polar stratosphere, which leads to an abrupt weakness of the intensity of the stratospheric polar vortex (cyclonic circulation in polar latitudes) and occasionally even the reversal of the westerly circulation. In this study, we assess the ability of the chemistry-climate model ECHAM5/MESSy to simulate the northern stratospheric variability in the CCMVal Ref1 simulation of the years 1960 to 2000. An analysis of the stratospheric sudden warmings (SSWs) has been carried out by examining for example the intensity and seasonal distribution. Moreover, possible trends in the wintertime polar stratosphere, such as intensity and lifetime of the polar vortex, have been studied. Preliminary results show an agreement between the model simulation and the NCEP/NCAR reanalysis. In fact, ECHAM5/MESSy seems to be able to simulate quite accurately SSWs events but with some deficiencies in, for example, the distribution of vortex displacement and splits (bias towards displacement) and the seasonal distribution (too many SSWs in early winter). On the other hand, the modeled polar vortex tends to have a longer lifetime, being weaker in mid-winter and stronger in March, than in the reanalysis. However, all these tendencies are not statistically significant.

  17. C-IFS-CB05-BASCOE: stratospheric chemistry in the Integrated Forecasting System of ECMWF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huijnen, Vincent; Flemming, Johannes; Chabrillat, Simon; Errera, Quentin; Christophe, Yves; Blechschmidt, Anne-Marlene; Richter, Andreas; Eskes, Henk

    2016-09-01

    We present a model description and benchmark evaluation of an extension of the tropospheric chemistry module in the Integrated Forecasting System (IFS) of the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) with stratospheric chemistry, referred to as C-IFS-CB05-BASCOE (for brevity here referred to as C-IFS-TS). The stratospheric chemistry originates from the one used in the Belgian Assimilation System for Chemical ObsErvations (BASCOE), and is here combined with the modified CB05 chemistry module for the troposphere as currently used operationally in the Copernicus Atmosphere Monitoring Service (CAMS). In our approach either the tropospheric or stratospheric chemistry module is applied, depending on the altitude of each individual grid box with respect to the tropopause. An evaluation of a 2.5-year long C-IFS-TS simulation with respect to various satellite retrieval products and in situ observations indicates good performance of the system in terms of stratospheric ozone, and a general improvement in terms of stratospheric composition compared to the C-IFS predecessor model version. Possible issues with transport processes in the stratosphere are identified. This marks a key step towards a chemistry module within IFS that encompasses both tropospheric and stratospheric composition, and could expand the CAMS analysis and forecast capabilities in the near future.

  18. Net Influence of an Internally Generated Guasi-biennial Oscillation on Modelled Stratospheric Climate and Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurwitz, Margaret M.; Oman, Luke David; Newman, Paul A.; Song, InSun

    2013-01-01

    A Goddard Earth Observing System Chemistry- Climate Model (GEOSCCM) simulation with strong tropical non-orographic gravity wave drag (GWD) is compared to an otherwise identical simulation with near-zero tropical non-orographic GWD. The GEOSCCM generates a quasibiennial oscillation (QBO) zonal wind signal in response to a tropical peak in GWD that resembles the zonal and climatological mean precipitation field. The modelled QBO has a frequency and amplitude that closely resembles observations. As expected, the modelled QBO improves the simulation of tropical zonal winds and enhances tropical and subtropical stratospheric variability. Also, inclusion of the QBO slows the meridional overturning circulation, resulting in a generally older stratospheric mean age of air. Slowing of the overturning circulation, changes in stratospheric temperature and enhanced subtropical mixing all affect the annual mean distributions of ozone, methane and nitrous oxide. Furthermore, the modelled QBO enhances polar stratospheric variability in winter. Because tropical zonal winds are easterly in the simulation without a QBO, there is a relative increase in tropical zonal winds in the simulation with a QBO. Extratropical differences between the simulations with and without a QBO thus reflect the westerly shift in tropical zonal winds: a relative strengthening of the polar stratospheric jet, polar stratospheric cooling and a weak reduction in Arctic lower stratospheric ozone.

  19. Stratospheric polar vortex splits and displacements in the high-top CMIP5 climate models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seviour, William J. M.; Gray, Lesley J.; Mitchell, Daniel M.

    2016-02-01

    Sudden stratospheric warming (SSW) events can occur as either a split or a displacement of the stratospheric polar vortex. Recent observational studies have come to different conclusions about the relative impacts of these two types of SSW upon surface climate. A clearer understanding of their tropospheric impact would be beneficial for medium-range weather forecasts and could improve understanding of the physical mechanism for stratosphere-troposphere coupling. Here we perform the first multimodel comparison of stratospheric polar vortex splits and displacements, analyzing 13 stratosphere-resolving models from the fifth Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP5) ensemble. We find a wide range of biases among models in both the mean state of the vortex and the frequency of vortex splits and displacements, although these biases are closely related. Consistent with observational results, almost all models show vortex splits to occur barotropically throughout the depth of the stratosphere, while vortex displacements are more baroclinic. Vortex splits show a slightly stronger North Atlantic surface signal in the month following onset. However, the most significant difference in the surface response is that vortex displacements show stronger negative pressure anomalies over Siberia. This region is shown to be colocated with differences in tropopause height, suggestive of a localized response to lower stratospheric potential vorticity anomalies.

  20. Validation of stratospheric temperature profiles from a ground-based microwave radiometer with other techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navas, Francisco; Kämpfer, Niklaus; Haefele, Alexander; Keckhut, Philippe; Hauchecorne, Alain

    2016-04-01

    Vertical profiles of atmospheric temperature trends has become recognized as an important indicator of climate change, because different climate forcing mechanisms exhibit distinct vertical warming and cooling patterns. For example, the cooling of the stratosphere is an indicator for climate change as it provides evidence of natural and anthropogenic climate forcing just like surface warming. Despite its importance, our understanding of the observed stratospheric temperature trend and our ability to test simulations of the stratospheric response to emissions of greenhouse gases and ozone depleting substances remains limited. One of the main reason is because stratospheric long-term datasets are sparse and obtained trends differ from one another. Different techniques allow to measure stratospheric temperature profiles as radiosonde, lidar or satellite. The main advantage of microwave radiometers against these other instruments is a high temporal resolution with a reasonable good spatial resolution. Moreover, the measurement at a fixed location allows to observe local atmospheric dynamics over a long time period, which is crucial for climate research. This study presents an evaluation of the stratospheric temperature profiles from a newly ground-based microwave temperature radiometer (TEMPERA) which has been built and designed at the University of Bern. The measurements from TEMPERA are compared with the ones from other different techniques such as in-situ (radiosondes), active remote sensing (lidar) and passive remote sensing on board of Aura satellite (MLS) measurements. In addition a statistical analysis of the stratospheric temperature obtained from TEMPERA measurements during four years of data has been performed. This analysis evidenced the capability of TEMPERA radiometer to monitor the temperature in the stratosphere for a long-term. The detection of some singular sudden stratospheric warming (SSW) during the analyzed period shows the necessity of these

  1. Small volcanic eruptions and the stratospheric sulfate aerosol burden

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyle, David M.

    2012-09-01

    Understanding of volcanic activity and its impacts on the atmosphere has evolved in discrete steps, associated with defining eruptions. The eruption of Krakatau, Indonesia, in August 1883 was the first whose global reach was recorded through observations of atmospheric phenomena around the world (Symons 1888). The rapid equatorial spread of Krakatau's ash cloud revealed new details of atmospheric circulation, while the vivid twilights and other optical phenomena were soon causally linked to the effects of particles and gases released from the volcano (e.g. Stothers 1996, Schroder 1999, Hamilton 2012). Later, eruptions of Agung, Bali (1963), El Chichón, Mexico (1982) and Pinatubo, Philippines (1991) led to a fuller understanding of how volcanic SO2 is transformed to a long-lived stratospheric sulfate aerosol, and its consequences (e.g. Meinel and Meinel 1967, Rampino and Self 1982, Hoffman and Rosen 1983, Bekki and Pyle 1994, McCormick et al 1995). While our ability to track the dispersal of volcanic emissions has been transformed since Pinatubo, with the launch of fleets of Earth-observing satellites (e.g. NASA's A-Train; ESA's MetOp) and burgeoning networks of ground-based remote-sensing instruments (e.g. lidar and sun-photometers; infrasound and lightning detection systems), there have been relatively few significant eruptions. Thus, there have been limited opportunities to test emerging hypotheses including, for example, the vexed question of the role of 'smaller' explosive eruptions in perturbations of the atmosphere—those that may just be large enough to reach the stratosphere (of size 'VEI 3', Newhall and Self 1982, Pyle 2000). Geological evidence, from ice-cores and historical eruptions, suggests that small explosive volcanic eruptions with the potential to transport material into the stratosphere should be frequent (5-10 per decade), and responsible for a significant proportion of the long-term time-averaged flux of volcanic sulfur into the stratosphere

  2. Evolution of Jupiter's auroral-related stratospheric heating and chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinclair, James; Orton, Glenn S.; Greathouse, Thomas K.; Fletcher, Leigh N.; Moses, Julianne I.; Hue, Vincent; Irwin, Patrick Gerard Joseph; Melin, Henrik; Giles, Rohini Sara

    2016-10-01

    Auroral processes on Jupiter are evident over a large range of wavelengths. Emission at X-ray, UV and near-infrared wavelengths highlights the precipitation of charged particles in Jupiter's ionosphere. Jupiter's auroral regions also exhibit enhanced mid-infrared emission of CH4 (7.8-μm), C2H2 (13-μm), C2H4 (10.5-μm) and C2H6 (12.2-μm), which indicates auroral processes modify the thermal structure and chemistry of the neutral stratosphere at pressures from 10 mbar to 10 μbar. In Sinclair et al., 2016a (submitted), 2016b (in preparation), we investigated these processes further by performing a retrieval analysis of Voyager-IRIS (Infrared Interferometer Spectrometer) observations measured in November 1979, Cassini-CIRS (Composite Infrared Spectrometer) observations measured in January 2001 and IRTF-TEXES (Texas Echelon Cross Echelle Spectrograph on NASA's Infrared Telescope Facility) spectra measured in December 2014. These datasets however captured Jupiter at significantly different epochs and thus the overall global evolution of atmospheric conditions as well as differences in spatial sampling, spectral resolution (and therefore vertical resolution in the atmosphere) have made inferences of the temporal evolution in auroral regions a challenge. However, in April 2016, we acquired IRTF-TEXES observations of Jupiter's high latitudes, using observing parameters very similar to those in December 2014. By performing a similar analysis of these observations and comparing results between December 2014 and April 2016, we can investigate the evolution of the thermal structure and chemistry in Jupiter's auroral regions over a 15 month timescale. The magnitude of temperature/composition changes and the altitudes at which they occur will provide insights into how auroral processes in the ionosphere propagate to the stratosphere. In particular, we can assess whether the evolution of stratospheric conditions in auroral regions is related to the decrease in solar activity

  3. Hydrogen production by solar energy. Final report of the integrated project HYSOL (2002-2004); Production d'hydrogene par energie solaire. Rapport Final du Projet Integre HYSOL (2002-2004)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flamant, G.

    2004-07-01

    The HYSOL project aims to study three thermal processes using the solar energy at temperatures of more than 1000 C: hydrocarbons cracking, non catalytic reforming at high temperature and water decomposition by thermal-chemical cycles. This report presents the HYSOL project and the main results and gives a special part to the methane cracking. (A.L.B.)

  4. Use of satellite data and modeling to asses the influence of stratospheric processes on the troposphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nathan, Terrence R.; Yarger, Douglas N.

    1989-01-01

    The research is comprised of the following tasks: use of simple analytical and numerical models of a coupled troposphere-stratosphere system to examine the effects of radiation and ozone on planetary wave dynamics and the tropospheric circulation; use of satellite data obtained from the Nimbus 7 Limb Infrared Monitor of the Stratosphere (LIMS) instrument and Solar Backscattered Ultraviolet (SBUV) experiment, in conjunction with National Meteorological Center (NMC) data, to determine the planetary wave vertical structures, dominant wave spectra, ozone spectra, and time variations in diabatic heating rate; and synthesis of the modeling and observational results to provide a better understanding of the effects that stratospheric processes have on tropospheric dynamics.

  5. Towards a Theory of Tropical/Midlatitude Mass Exchange from the Earth's Surface through the Stratosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartley, Dana

    1998-01-01

    The main findings of this research project have been the following: (1) there is a significant feedback from the stratosphere on tropospheric dynamics, and (2) a detailed analysis of the interaction between tropical and polar wave breaking in controlling stratospheric mixing. Two papers are were written and are included. The first paper is titled, "A New Perspective on the Dynamical Link Between the Stratosphere and Troposphere." Atmospheric processes of tropospheric origin can perturb the stratosphere, but direct feedback in the opposite direction is usually assumed to be negligible, despite the troposphere's sensitivity to changes in the release of wave activity into the stratosphere. Here, however, we present evidence that such a feedback exists and can be significant. We find that if the wintertime Arctic polar stratospheric vortex is distorted, either by waves propagating upward from the troposphere or by eastward-travelling stratospheric waves, then there is a concomitant redistribution of stratospheric potential vorticity that induces perturbations in key meteorological fields in the upper troposphere. The feedback is large despite the much greater mass of the troposphere: it can account for up to half of the geopotential height anomaly at the tropopause. Although the relative strength of the feedback is partly due to a cancellation between contributions to these anomalies from lower altitudes, our results imply that stratospheric dynamics and its feedback on the troposphere are more significant for climate modelling and data assimilation than was previously assumed. The second article is titled "Diagnosing the Polar Excitation of Subtropical Waves in the Stratosphere". The poleward migration of planetary scale tongues of subtropical air has often been associated with intense polar vortex disturbances in the stratosphere. This question of vortex influence is reexamined from a potential vorticity (PV) perspective. Anomalous geopotential height and wind fields

  6. Airborne UV/Vis actinic measurements in the lower Antarctic stratosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostadinov, Ivan; Ravegnani, Fabrizio; Petritoli, Andrea; Bortoli, Daniele; Masieri, Samuele; Premuda, Margherita; Giovanelli, Giorgio

    2009-09-01

    The present work deals with UV/Vis up-welling and down-welling irradiation measurements carried out in the lower Antarctic stratosphere by means of GASCOD-A/4pi spectroradiometer on board the M55-Geophysica aircraft during the APE-GAIA campaign. Very few such measurements have been performed in the lower stratosphere. The experimental data are used for the calculation of NO2 photodissociation rate coefficients in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere along the altitude of the flight. A detailed description of the measurement method, instrumentation and calibration procedures is presented. Experimental results are presented and discussed too.

  7. Chemical Composition and Dynamics of the Upper Troposphere and the Lower Stratosphere: Overview of the Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sofieva, V. F.; Liu, C.; Huang, F.; Kyrola, E.; Liu, Y.; Ialongo, I.; Hakkarainen, J.; Zhang, Y.

    2016-08-01

    The DRAGON-3 cooperation study on the upper troposphere and the lower stratosphere (UTLS) is based on new satellite data and modern atmospheric models. The objectives of the project are: (i) assessment of satellite data on chemical composition in UTLS, (ii) dynamical and chemical structures of the UTLS and its variability, (iii) multi-scale variability of stratospheric ozone, (iv) climatology of the stratospheric aerosol layer and its variability, and (v) updated ozone climatology and its relation to tropopause/multiple tropopauses.In this paper, we present the main results of the project.

  8. Contributions of stratospheric water vapor to decadal changes in the rate of global warming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, Susan; Rosenlof, Karen H; Portmann, Robert W; Daniel, John S; Davis, Sean M; Sanford, Todd J; Plattner, Gian-Kasper

    2010-03-01

    Stratospheric water vapor concentrations decreased by about 10% after the year 2000. Here we show that this acted to slow the rate of increase in global surface temperature over 2000-2009 by about 25% compared to that which would have occurred due only to carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases. More limited data suggest that stratospheric water vapor probably increased between 1980 and 2000, which would have enhanced the decadal rate of surface warming during the 1990s by about 30% as compared to estimates neglecting this change. These findings show that stratospheric water vapor is an important driver of decadal global surface climate change.

  9. Global path following control for underactuated stratospheric airship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Zewei; Wu, Zhe

    2013-10-01

    This paper develops a nonlinear path following control method that drives an underactuated stratospheric airship onto a predefined planar path with a given speed profile. The dynamic model of the airship used for controller design is first introduced with kinematics and dynamics equations. In order to render good pilot behavior for the control action, a guidance controller by referring to the guidance-based path following principle is derived. Then the controller is extended to cope with the airship attitude and velocity by resorting to the backstepping and Lyapunov-based techniques. The designed control system finally possesses a cascaded structure which consists of guidance loop, attitude control loop and velocity control loop. Stability analysis shows that the controlled closed-loop system is globally asymptotically stable, and the sway velocity which cannot be directly controlled is bounded. Simulation results for the airship following typical paths are illustrated to verify effectiveness of the proposed approach.

  10. Stratospheric age-of-air trends: Reanalysis v. climate models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monge-Sanz, Beatriz; Dee, Dick; Hersbach, Hans; Simmons, Adrian; Parodi, Jose A.; Haenel, Florian; Stiller, Gabriele; Chipperfield, Martyn; Feng, Wuhu

    2017-04-01

    Knowing how the Brewer-Dobson circulation (BDC) has evolved in the recent past and will continue to evolve is crucial for atmospheric composition in the UTLS and stratosphere, as well as for feedbacks with climate. Most climate models have predicted an intensification of the stratospheric circulation with the increase in greenhouse gases concentrations, which translates into younger age-of-air (AoA) values modelled in the stratosphere. Nevertheless, balloon and satellite observations do not agree with the widespread modelled trend towards younger age-of-air for the recent past (Engel et al., 2009; Stiller et al., 2012; Haenel et al. 2015). Furthermore, a few recent studies with chemistry transport models (CTMs) driven by ERA-Interim reanalysis (Dee et al., 2011) have also shown agreement with the observed trends and not with those from climate models (e.g. Monge-Sanz et al., 2012; Diallo et al., 2012; Ploeger et al., 2015). To increase our confidence in climate-chemistry projections, the causes for the apparent disagreement in trends of age-of-air between observations and most climate models need to be identified. In this study we have carried out simulations with a CTM to assess the stratospheric circulation with the ERA-Interim dataset produced by the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF), as well as with data produced from an equivalent climate system. AoA trends from our model results with ERA-Interim fields are in good agreement with the recent age-of-air studies based on observations and differ from the results we obtain with the corresponding climate data. We will show that biases in the mean AoA values are also different for these datasets compared to observations. In addition we have used recent experimental datasets from the ECMWF system to identify potential causes for the differences in AoA distribution and trends. The validation of our model results has been performed against the new revised AoA dataset based on MIPAS SF6

  11. The increasing threat to stratospheric ozone from dichloromethane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossaini, Ryan; Chipperfield, Martyn P; Montzka, Stephen A; Leeson, Amber A; Dhomse, Sandip S; Pyle, John A

    2017-06-27

    It is well established that anthropogenic chlorine-containing chemicals contribute to ozone layer depletion. The successful implementation of the Montreal Protocol has led to reductions in the atmospheric concentration of many ozone-depleting gases, such as chlorofluorocarbons. As a consequence, stratospheric chlorine levels are declining and ozone is projected to return to levels observed pre-1980 later this century. However, recent observations show the atmospheric concentration of dichloromethane-an ozone-depleting gas not controlled by the Montreal Protocol-is increasing rapidly. Using atmospheric model simulations, we show that although currently modest, the impact of dichloromethane on ozone has increased markedly in recent years and if these increases continue into the future, the return of Antarctic ozone to pre-1980 levels could be substantially delayed. Sustained growth in dichloromethane would therefore offset some of the gains achieved by the Montreal Protocol, further delaying recovery of Earth's ozone layer.

  12. Enhancement of stratospheric aerosols after solar proton event

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. I. Shumilov

    Full Text Available The lidar measurements at Verhnetulomski observatory (68.6°N, 31.8°E at Kola peninsula detected a considerable increase of stratospheric aerosol concentration after the solar proton event of GLE (ground level event type on the 16/02/84. This increase was located at precisely the same altitude range where the energetic solar protons lost their energy in the atmosphere. The aerosol layer formed precipitated quickly (1–2 km per day during 18, 19, and 20 February 1984, and the increase of R(H (backscattering ratio at 17 km altitude reached 40% on 20/02/84. We present the model calculation of CN (condensation nuclei altitude distribution on the basis of an ion-nucleation mechanism, taking into account the experimental energy distribution of incident solar protons. The meteorological situation during the event was also investigated.

  13. Laboratory Studies of Halogen Oxides Important to Stratospheric Ozone Depletion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilmouth, D. M.; Klobas, J. E.; Anderson, J. G.

    2016-12-01

    Inorganic chlorine and bromine molecules are primarily responsible for stratospheric ozone destruction, with BrO, ClO, and ClOOCl comprising the two reaction cycles that cause most polar ozone losses. Despite comprehensive international treaties regulating CFCs and halons, seasonal polar ozone depletion will likely continue for decades to come. Accurate spectroscopic and kinetic measurements of inorganic bromine and chlorine molecules obtained in the laboratory are essential for reducing uncertainty in atmospheric models, better interpreting atmospheric field measurements, and forming trusted projections of future ozone changes. Here we present results from recent work in our laboratory using absorption spectroscopy and atomic resonance fluorescence detection to determine rate constants of halogen reactions, the equilibrium constant of ClO/ClOOCl, and absorption cross sections of several halogen oxides using a new cold trap-thermal desorption approach.

  14. Studies on Bacteria?Like Particles Sampled from the Stratosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wainwright, M; Weber, P; Smith, J; Hutcheon, I; Klyce, B; Wickramasinghe, N; Narlikar, J; Rajaratnam, P

    2004-07-16

    Bacteria-like particles recovered from the stratosphere and deposited on cellulose acetate membranes have been analyzed to confirm their bacterial nature. One particle appeared to be attached to an inorganic particle apparently by mucoid material typically produced by bacteria. A filamentous structure, morphologically similar to a fungal hypha, was also observed. EDS analysis showed that the particles were all non-mineral and therefore could be biological in nature. However, the composition several clumps of nanobacteria-sized particles were found, by SIMS analysis, to be inconsistent with that of bacteria. The results show that it is dangerous to assume that bacteria-like particles seen under scanning electron microscopy are necessarily bacteria.

  15. The stratospheric ozone hole a man-caused chemical instability

    CERN Document Server

    Crutzen, P J

    1997-01-01

    The discovery of the spring time stratospheric ozone hole by scientists of the British Antarctic Survey, led by Joe Farman, was one of the greatest surprises in the history of the atmospheric sciences and global change studies. After intensive research efforts by many international scientific teams it has clearly been demonstrated that the observed rapid ozone depletions are due to catalytic reactions involving CIO radicals, more than 80571130f which are produced by the photochemical breakdown of the industrial chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) gases. In this lecture I will present the course of events leading to the rapid ozone depletions. International agreements have been reached to forbid the production of the CFC gases. However, despite these measures, it will take almost 50 years before the ozone hole will have disappeared. I will also show that mankind has indeed been very lucky and that things could have been far worse.

  16. Visualization of stratospheric ozone depletion and the polar vortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treinish, Lloyd A.

    1995-01-01

    Direct analysis of spacecraft observations of stratospheric ozone yields information about the morphology of annual austral depletion. Visual correlation of ozone with other atmospheric data illustrates the diurnal dynamics of the polar vortex and contributions from the upper troposphere, including the formation and breakup of the depletion region each spring. These data require care in their presentation to minimize the introduction of visualization artifacts that are erroneously interpreted as data features. Non geographically registered data of differing mesh structures can be visually correlated via cartographic warping of base geometries without interpolation. Because this approach is independent of the realization technique, it provides a framework for experimenting with many visualization strategies. This methodology preserves the fidelity of the original data sets in a coordinate system suitable for three-dimensional, dynamic examination of atmospheric phenomena.

  17. Virtual Flight Demonstration of the Stratospheric Dual-Aircraft Platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engblom, W. A.; Decker, R. K.

    2016-01-01

    A baseline configuration for the dual-aircraft platform (DAP) concept is described and evaluated in a physics-based flight dynamics simulations for two month-long missions as a communications relay in the lower stratosphere above central Florida. The DAP features two unmanned aerial vehicles connected via a long adjustable cable which effectively sail back-and-forth using wind velocity gradients and solar energy. Detailed atmospheric profiles in the vicinity of 60,000-ft derived from archived data measured by the 50-Mhz Doppler Radar Wind Profiler at Cape Canaveral are used in the flight simulations. An overview of the novel guidance and flight control strategies are provided. The energy-usage of the baseline configuration during month-long stationkeeping missions (i.e., within 150-mile radius of downtown Orlando) is characterized and compared to that of a pure solar aircraft.

  18. Soundproof simulations of stratospheric gravity waves on unstructured meshes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smolarkiewicz, P.; Szmelter, J.

    2012-04-01

    An edge-based unstructured-mesh semi-implicit model is presented that integrates nonhydrostatic soundproof equations, inclusive of anelastic and pseudo-incompressible systems of partial differential equations. The model numerics employ nonoscillatory forward-in-time MPDATA methods [Smolarkiewicz, 2006, Int. J. Numer. Meth. Fl., 50, 1123-1144] using finite-volume spatial discretization and unstructured meshes with arbitrarily shaped cells. Implicit treatment of gravity waves benefits both accuracy and stability of the model. The unstructured-mesh solutions are compared to equivalent structured-grid results for intricate, multiscale internal-wave phenomenon of a non-Boussinesq amplification and breaking of deep stratospheric gravity waves. The departures of the anelastic and pseudo-incompressible results are quantified in reference to a recent asymptotic theory [Achatz et al., 2010, J. Fluid Mech., 663, 120-147].

  19. Fatigue Management Strategies for the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bendrick, Gregg

    2012-01-01

    Operation of the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy entails a great deal of night-time work, with the potential for both acute and chronic sleep loss, as well as circadian rhythm dysynchrony. Such fatigue can result in performance decrements, with an increased risk of operator error. The NASA Dryden Flight Research Center manages this fatigue risk by means of a layered approach, to include: 1) Education and Training 2) Work Schedule Scoring 3) Obtained Sleep Metrics 4) Workplace and Operational Mitigations and 5) Incident or Accident Investigation. Specifically, quantitative estimation of the work schedule score, as well as the obtained sleep metric, allows Supervisors and Managers to better manage the risk of fatigue within the context of mission requirements.

  20. MIPAS Ozone Validation by Stratospheric Balloon and Aircraft Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortesi, U.; Blom, C. E.; Camy-Peyret, C.; Chance, K.; Davies, J.; Goutail, F.; Kuttippurath, J.; McElroy, C. T.; Mencaraglia, F.; Oelhaf, H.; Petritoli, A.; Pirre, M.; Pommereau, J. P.; Ravegnani, F.; Renard, J. B.; Strong, K.

    2004-08-01

    A number of in situ and remote sensing techniques for the measurement of upper tropospheric and stratospheric O3 content was employed during dedicated experiments of the ESABC programme, aiming at the validation of the ENVISAT chemistry payload. In this paper, we will be focusing on the validation of MIPAS off-line products, by presenting the results of the intercomparison between MIPAS O3 vertical profiles and aircraft and balloon correlative measurements. First priority is given to the validation of processor v4.61 data, but individual results of 2002 and 2003 balloon observations are also compared with MIPAS O3 non operational data. Some general remarks are finally expressed, along with specific recommendation to fully exploit the available ESABC validation dataset

  1. Early Science with SOFIA, the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy

    CERN Document Server

    Young, E T; Marcum, P M; Roellig, T L; De Buizer, J M; Herter, T L; Güsten, R; Dunham, E W; Temi, P; Andersson, B -G; Backman, D; Burgdorf, M; Caroff, L J; Casey, S C; Davidson, J A; Erickson, E F; Gehrz, R D; Harper, D A; Harvey, P M; Helton, L A; Horner, S D; Howard, C D; Klein, R; Krabbe, A; McLean, I S; Meyer, A W; Miles, J W; Morris, M R; Reach, W T; Rho, J; Richter, M J; Roeser, H -P; Sandell, G; Sankrit, R; Savage, M L; Smith, E C; Shuping, R Y; Vacca, W D; Vaillancourt, J E; Wolf, J; Zinnecker, H; 10.1088/2041-8205/749/2/L17

    2012-01-01

    The Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA) is an airborne observatory consisting of a specially modified Boeing 747SP with a 2.7-m telescope, flying at altitudes as high as 13.7 km (45,000 ft). Designed to observe at wavelengths from 0.3 micron to 1.6 mm, SOFIA operates above 99.8 % of the water vapor that obscures much of the infrared and submillimeter. SOFIA has seven science instruments under development, including an occultation photometer, near-, mid-, and far-infrared cameras, infrared spectrometers, and heterodyne receivers. SOFIA, a joint project between NASA and the German Aerospace Center DLR, began initial science flights in 2010 December, and has conducted 30 science flights in the subsequent year. During this early science period three instruments have flown: the mid-infrared camera FORCAST, the heterodyne spectrometer GREAT, and the occultation photometer HIPO. This article provides an overview of the observatory and its early performance.

  2. Propagation of Acoustic Waves in Troposphere and Stratosphere

    CERN Document Server

    Kashyap, J M

    2016-01-01

    Acoustic waves are those waves which travel with the speed of sound through a medium. H. Lamb has derived a cutoff frequency for stratified and isothermal medium for the propagation of acoustic waves. In order to find the cutoff frequency many methods were introduced after Lamb's work. In this paper, we have chosen the method to determine cutoff frequencies for acoustic waves propagating in non-isothermal media. This turning point frequency method can be applied to various atmospheres like solar atmosphere, stellar atmosphere, earth's atmosphere etc. Here, we have analytically derived the cutoff frequency and have graphically analyzed and compared with the Lamb's cut-off frequencyfor earth's troposphere, lower and upper stratosphere.

  3. Measurements of gondola motion on a stratospheric balloon flight

    CERN Document Server

    Safonova, Margarita; Sreejith, A G; Sarpotdar, Mayuresh; Ambily, S; Prakash, Ajin; Mathew, Joice; Murthy, Jayant; Anand, Devarajan; Kapardhi, B V N; Kumar, B Suneel; Kulkarni, P M

    2016-01-01

    Balloon experiments are an economically feasible method of conducting observations in astronomy that are not possible from the ground. The astronomical payload may include a telescope, a detector, and a pointing/stabilization system. Determining the attitude of the payload is of primary importance in such applications, to accurately point the detector/telescope to the desired direction. This is especially important in generally unstable lightweight balloon flights. However, the conditions at float altitudes, which can be reached by zero pressure balloons, could be more stable, enabling accurate pointings. We have used the Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU), placed on a stratospheric zero pressure balloon, to observe 3-axis motion of a balloon payload over a fight time of 4.5 hours, from launch to the float altitude of 31.2 km. The balloon was launched under nominal atmospheric conditions on May 8th 2016, from a Tata Institute of Fundamental Research Balloon Facility, Hyderabad.

  4. Nitric acid trihydrate (NAT) in polar stratospheric clouds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voigt, C; Schreiner, J; Kohlmann, A; Zink, P; Mauersberger, K; Larsen, N; Deshler, T; Kröger, C; Rosen, J; Adriani, A; Cairo, F; Di Donfrancesco, G; Viterbini, M; Ovarlez, J; Ovarlez, H; David, C; Dörnbrack, A

    2000-12-01

    A comprehensive investigation of polar stratospheric clouds was performed on 25 January 2000 with instruments onboard a balloon gondola flown from Kiruna, Sweden. Cloud layers were repeatedly encountered at altitudes between 20 and 24 kilometers over a wide range of atmospheric temperatures (185 to 197 kelvin). Particle composition analysis showed that a large fraction of the cloud layers was composed of nitric acid trihydrate (NAT) particles, containing water and nitric acid at a molar ratio of 3:1; this confirmed that these long-sought solid crystals exist well above ice formation temperatures. The presence of NAT particles enhances the potential for chlorine activation with subsequent ozone destruction in polar regions, particularly in early and late winter.

  5. High solar cycle spectral variations inconsistent with stratospheric ozone observations

    CERN Document Server

    Ball, W T; Rozanov, E V; Kuchar, A; Sukhodolov, T; Tummon, F; Shapiro, A V; Schmutz, W

    2016-01-01

    Some of the natural variability in climate is understood to come from changes in the Sun. A key route whereby the Sun may influence surface climate is initiated in the tropical stratosphere by the absorption of solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation by ozone, leading to a modification of the temperature and wind structures and consequently to the surface through changes in wave propagation and circulation. While changes in total, spectrally-integrated, solar irradiance lead to small variations in global mean surface temperature, the `top-down' UV effect preferentially influences on regional scales at mid-to-high latitudes with, in particular, a solar signal noted in the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO). The amplitude of the UV variability is fundamental in determining the magnitude of the climate response but understanding of the UV variations has been challenged recently by measurements from the SOlar Radiation and Climate Experiment (SORCE) satellite, which show UV solar cycle changes up to 10 times larger than p...

  6. Direction-of-Arrival Estimation for Stratospheric Platforms Mobile Stations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasser Albagory

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a new approach for localizing mobile phone users using the promising technique of stratospheric platform (SP flying at altitudes 17-22 km high and a suitable Direction-of-Arrival technique (DOA. The proposed technique provides information about accurate locations for mobile stations - through high resolution DOA technique - which is very important for traffic control and rescue operations at emergency situations. The DOA estimation in this technique defines the user location using MUSIC algorithm which provides good accuracy comparable to the Global Positioning System (GPS techniques but without the need for GPS receivers. Several scenarios for users’ locations determination are tested and examined to define the robustness of the proposed technique.

  7. Effects of Zonal Wind on Stratospheric Ozone Variations over Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chidinma Okoro, Eucharia,

    2016-07-01

    The effects of zonal wind on stratospheric ozone variation over Nigeria have been studied. The areas covered in this study include; Maiduguri, Ikeja, Port-Harcourt, Calabar, Makurdi, Ilorin, Akure, Yola, Minna, Jos, Kano and Enugu in Nigeria, from 1986 to 2008. Zonal wind was computed from the iso-velocity map employing MATLAB software. The mean monthly variations of AAM and LOD at pressure levels of 20, 30 and 50 mb in the atmosphere depict a trend of maximum amplitude between April and September, and minimum amplitude between December and March. The trend observed in seasonal variation of O3 column data in the low latitude had maximum amount from May through August and minimum values from December through February. The mean monthly maximum O3 concentrations was found to be 284.70 Du (Kano) occurring in May 1989 while, an average monthly minimum O3 concentration was found to be 235.60 Du (Port-Harcourt and Calabar) occurring in January 1998. It has been established in this study that, the variation in atmospheric angular momentum (AAM) caused by variation of the universal time or length of day (LOD) transfer ozone (O3) by means of zonal wind from the upper troposphere to the lower stratosphere in the stations understudy. The strong effect of the pressure levels of the atmosphere on O3 variation could be attributed to its effect on the AAM and LOD. Variation in the LOD is significant in the tropics, suggesting that, the effects of the extra-tropical suction pump (ETSP) action is not the only driver responsible for O3 transportation from the tropics to extra-tropical zones. Consequently, these findings lead to a deduction that weather pattern alteration observed due to these changes could lead to climate change. Keywords: ozone variations; dynamical processes; harmattan wind; ETSP; and climatic variability

  8. Modeling Stratospheric Constituents: Reactive Species That Regulate Ozone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salawitch, Ross J.

    2000-01-01

    Photochemical loss of stratospheric ozone occurs primarily by catalytic cycles whose rates are limited by the concentration of OH, HO2, NO2, ClO, and/or BrO as well as the concentration of either atomic oxygen or of ozone itself. Once the concentrations of these gases are established, the photochemical loss rate of O3 depends on the rate coefficient of only a handful of key reactions. We have developed a method for testing our understanding of stratospheric ozone photochemistry by comparing measured and modeled concentrations of reactive hydrogen, nitrogen, chlorine and bromine radicals using a photochemical steady state model constrained by observed concentrations of long-lived precursors (e.g., NO(y), Cl(y), Br(y), O3, H2O, CH4) and environmental parameters such as ozone column, reflectivity, and aerosol surface area. We will show based on analyses of observations obtained by aircraft, balloon, and satellite platforms during the POLARIS campaign that our overall understanding of the processes that regulate these radical species is very good. The most notable current discrepancies are the tendency to underestimate observed NO2 by 15 to 30% for air masses that experience near continuous solar illumination over a 24 hour period and the tendency to underestimate observed OH and H02 by about 10 to 20% during midday and by much larger amounts at high solar zenith angle (SZA > 85). Possible resolutions to these discrepancies will be discussed. This study was carried out in close collaboration with many members of the POLARIS science team.

  9. An annual cycle of long lived stratospheric gases from MIPAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. N. Juckes

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available MIPAS, on ENVISAT, has made high quality observations of ozone, methane and water vapour. Gridded fields, at 4 hourly intervals and, have been calculated for all of 2003 using data assimilation with isentropic advection as a constraint. The gridded fields are validated against independent measurements (from 7 other instruments in the case of ozone, 3 for water vapour and one for methane. For ozone the results are in agreement with previously published results. For water vapour the bias relative to HALOE is below 10% between 20 and 48 km, and the standard deviation is below 12% in this range. Departures from SAGE II and POAM III are substantially larger. The methane analysis has a bias of less than 5% relative to HALOE between 23 and 40 km, with a standard deviation less than 10% in this height range. The water vapour field clearly reflects the upward motion in the lower tropical stratosphere, while both water vapour and methane show the signature of advection higher up. In the polar regions the descent in the vortex is clearly visible, with strong descent in autumn giving way to weaker descent through the winter. Descent rates of around 10−3ms are found during the formation of the polar vortices, slowing to around 3×10−4ms during the winter. Ascent of around 2×10−4ms in the tropics is revealed by the water vapour and total observed hydrogen fields (4 times the methane plus twice the water vapour concentration. The total observed hydrogen is depleted in the polar upper stratosphere when air is advected down from the upper mesosphere.

  10. Response of land carbon cycle to stratospheric aerosol geoengineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Q.; Ji, D.

    2016-12-01

    Stabilizing the climate through geoengineering aims to mitigate the climate change induced by increasing atmospheric CO2 and other green house gases. These impacts in climate affect terrestrial ecosystem considerably because terrestrial carbon fluxes are sensitivity to climate change. Here we analyzed the responses of land carbon cycle to GeoMIP G4 experiment from six Earth System Models (ESMs), in which negative radiative forcing is produced by an injection of SO2 into the stratosphere to compensate the global warming in RCP4.5. From the year 2020 to 2090, there was an increase in land carbon uptake with significant discrepancy among models (20 PgC to 260 PgC) for both G4 and RCP4.5 scenario, due to the CO2 fertilization effect. For comparison with RCP4.5, all of the models showed higher land carbon uptakes in G4 scenario (30 Pg C on average), with both increases in vegetation and soil carbon stores. These land carbon increases relative to RCP4.5 are mainly resulted from reduced heterotrophic respiration under cooler temperature, whilst changes in vegetation productivity only account a negligible part of land carbon changes. The models also varied in their sensitivities of carbon fluxes to changes in air temperature and precipitation. Partial correlation analysis shows that interannual sensitivities of NBP to temperature and precipitation increased by 2 folds in the G4 experiment, due to higher sensitivities of NPP and Rh, yet with large differences among ESMs and spatial heterogeneity. This work suggests that stratospheric aerosol engineering would have small and positive impact on land carbon uptake but could increase climate sensitivities of terrestrial carbon fluxes significantly.

  11. Modeling the plasma chemistry of stratospheric Blue Jet streamers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkler, Holger; Notholt, Justus

    2014-05-01

    Stratospheric Blue Jets (SBJs) are upward propagating discharges in the altitude range 15-40 km above thunderstorms. The currently most accepted theory associates SBJs to the development of the streamer zone of a leader. The streamers emitted from the leader can travel for a few tens of kilometers predominantly in the vertical direction (Raizer et al., 2007). The strong electric fields at the streamer tips cause ionisation, dissociation, and excitation, and give rise to chemical perturbations. While in recent years the effects of electric discharges occurring in the mesosphere (sprites) have been investigated in a number of model studies, there are only a few studies on the impact of SBJs. However, chemical perturbations due to SBJs are of interest as they might influence the stratospheric ozone layer. We present results of detailed plasma chemistry simulations of SBJ streamers for both day-time and night-time conditions. Any effects of the subsequent leader are not considered. The model accounts for more than 500 reactions and calculates the evolution of the 88 species under the influence of the breakdown electric fields at the streamer tip. As the SBJ dynamics is outside the scope of this study, the streamer parameters are prescribed. For this purpose, electric field parameters based on Raizer et al. (2007) are used. The model is applied to the typical SBJ altitude range 15-40 km. The simulations indicate that SBJ streamers cause significant chemical perturbations. In particular, the liberation of atomic oxygen during the discharge leads to a formation of ozone. At the same time, reactive nitrogen and hydrogen radicals are produced which will cause catalytic ozone destruction. Reference: Raizer et al. (2007), J. Atmos. Solar-Terr. Phys., 69 (8), 925-938.

  12. DETECTION OF PROPENE IN TITAN'S STRATOSPHERE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nixon, C. A.; Flasar, F. M. [Planetary Systems Laboratory, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Jennings, D. E. [Detector Systems Branch, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Bézard, B.; Vinatier, S.; Coustenis, A. [LESIA, Observatoire de Paris, CNRS, 5 Place Jules Janssen, F-92195 Meudon Cedex (France); Teanby, N. A. [School of Earth Sciences, University of Bristol, Wills Memorial Building, Queen' s Road, Bristol BS8 1RJ (United Kingdom); Sung, K. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, CA 91109 (United States); Ansty, T. M. [Department of Space Science, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Irwin, P. G. J. [Atmospheric, Oceanic and Planetary Physics, University of Oxford, Clarendon Laboratory, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PU (United Kingdom); Gorius, N. [IACS, Catholic University of America, Washington, DC 20064 (United States); Cottini, V. [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States)

    2013-10-10

    The Voyager 1 flyby of Titan in 1980 gave a first glimpse of the chemical complexity of Titan's atmosphere, detecting many new molecules with the infrared interferometer spectrometer (IRIS). These included propane (C{sub 3}H{sub 8}) and propyne (CH{sub 3}C{sub 2}H), while the intermediate-sized C{sub 3}H {sub x} hydrocarbon (C{sub 3}H{sub 6}) was curiously absent. Using spectra from the Composite Infrared Spectrometer on Cassini, we show the first positive detection of propene (C{sub 3}H{sub 6}) in Titan's stratosphere (5σ significance), finally filling the three-decade gap in the chemical sequence. We retrieve a vertical abundance profile from 100-250 km, that varies slowly with altitude from 2.0 ± 0.8 ppbv at 125 km, to 4.6 ± 1.5 ppbv at 200 km. The abundance of C{sub 3}H{sub 6} is less than both C{sub 3}H{sub 8} and CH{sub 3}C{sub 2}H, and we remark on an emerging paradigm in Titan's hydrocarbon abundances whereby alkanes > alkynes > alkenes within the C{sub 2}H {sub x} and C{sub 3}H {sub x} chemical families in the lower stratosphere. More generally, there appears to be much greater ubiquity and relative abundance of triple-bonded species than double-bonded, likely due to the greater resistance of triple bonds to photolysis and chemical attack.

  13. Morbilidad y mortalidad por traumatismo abdominal (2002 a 2004 Mortality and morbidity from abdominal trauma (2002-2004

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos A Sánchez Portela

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Se realizó un estudio retrospectivo, descriptivo y longitudinal entre el 1ro. de enero de 2002 y el 31 de diciembre de 2004, cuyo universo estuvo constituido por los 123 pacientes con el diagnóstico de traumatismo abdominal, ingresados en el Servicio de Cirugía General del Hospital General Universitario «Abel Santamaría Cuadrado» (Pinar del Río. Se tomaron los datos primarios de las historias clínicas y se utilizó el método de análisis porcentual y la frecuencia absoluta para todas las variables medidas. En el estudio predominaron las edades entre 21 y 30 años (54 pacientes; 39,4 %. El mecanismo de lesión productor de trauma de abdomen más frecuente fue el accidente de tránsito (57 pacientes; 46,54 % y existió, además, predominio del traumatismo abdominal cerrado. Los pacientes que llegaron al hospital durante la primera hora de ocurrido el traumatismo (90,24 % tuvieron una evolución satisfactoria y la menor mortalidad (4,07 %. La punción abdominal fue el medio diagnóstico de más valor (83,08 % de positividad. El hígado y el bazo fueron los órganos más lesionados en estos pacientes. El shock hipovolémico (48,18 % y la peritonitis generalizada (22,63 % fueron las complicaciones más observadas. El shock hipovolémico fue la principal causa de muerteA retrospective, longitudinal and descriptive was performed on 123 patients diagnosed with abdominal trauma from January 1st, 2002 to December 31st, 2004 and admitted to General Surgery service of “Abel Santamaría Cuadrado” general university hospital in Pínar del Río province. Primary data were taken from the medical histories, using the method of percentage analysis and absolute frequency for all measured variables. The 21-30 years age group was predominant (54 patients, 39,4 %. The most common mechanism of abdominal trauma-causing lesion was traffic accidents (57 patients; 46,54 %. Blunt abdominal trauma prevailed. The patients that arrived at the hospital within the first hour of the accident (90,24 % evolved satisfactorily and had the lowest mortality index (4,07 %. Abdominal puncture was the most useful diagnostic means (83,08 % positivity. Liver and spleen were the most injured organs. Hypovolemic shock (48,18 % and generalized peritonitis (22,63 % were the main complications whereas hypovolemic shock was the fundamental cause of death in these patients

  14. Prevalence of antimicrobial resistance among bacterial pathogens isolated from cattle in different European countries: 2002-2004

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendriksen, R.S.; Mevius, D.J.; Schroeter, A.; Teale, C.; Meunier, D.; Butaye, P.; Franco, A.; Utinane, A.; Amado, A.; Moreno, M.; Greko, C.; Stark, K.D.; Berghold, C.; Myllyniemi, A.L.; Wasyl, D.; Sunde, M.; Aerestrup, F.

    2008-01-01

    Background The project "Antibiotic resistance in bacteria of animal origin ¿ II" (ARBAO-II) was funded by the European Union (FAIR5-QLK2-2002-01146) for the period 2003¿2005, with the aim to establish a continuous monitoring of antimicrobial susceptibility among veterinary laboratories in European c

  15. The incidence of S. aureus bacteraemia in acute hospitals of the Mid-Western Area, Ireland, 2002-2004.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Whyte, D

    2005-05-01

    Concerns about healthcare-associated infections and the global crisis in antimicrobial resistance has combined to accentuate the fears around so-called "superbugs". In Ireland there is no single agreed indicator regarded as a true measure of the level of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in hospitals. The objective of this study was to compare two crude measures of MRSA--the percentage of bacteraemia caused by MRSA and the incidence rate (per 1000 bed days used) of MRSA bacteraemia in six acute hospitals. We examined all blood cultures positive for S. aureus (methicillin sensitive and resistant) from 2002 to 2004 in the Health Service Executive (HSE) Mid-Western Area of Ireland. Hospital In-Patient Enquiry (HIPE) data was used to determine monthly in-patient bed days used. Of 245 patient episodes of bacteraemia, 119 were MRSA. The trends in the percentage of isolates that were MRSA and the incidence rate calculated were compared. The incidence rate appears to be a more reliable and robust indicator of MRSA in hospitals than the percentage. Despite many difficulties in interpreting indicators of MRSA they should not preclude the regular publication of data at least at regional level in Ireland.

  16. Seasonal and spatial distribution patterns of finfish and selected invertebrates in coastal lagoons of northeastern Florida, 2002-2004

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turtora, Michael; Schotman, Elizabeth M.

    2010-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey conducted a survey of juvenile fisheries resources, in cooperation with the St. Johns River Water Management District and Volusia County, to establish baseline data on spatial and temporal distribution patterns of estuarine fish. The survey was conducted from November 2001 to March 2005 and the baseline data established for the survey in the Northern Coastal Basins were collected from January 2002 to December 2004. The study area included the bar-built estuaries ranging from just north of St. Augustine, Florida, south to Ponce de Leon Inlet. Sampling protocols developed by the Florida Fish and Wildlife Research Institute for their statewide Fisheries Independent Monitoring (FIM) program were replicated to allow for comparability with FIM program results. Samples were collected monthly from randomly selected stations based on a geographically stratified design. Finfish and selected invertebrates were collected using a 21.3-meter center-bag seine with a 3-millimeter mesh, and a 6.1-meter otter trawl with a 3-millimeter mesh liner. Total estimated fish and selected invertebrate densities were similar to estimates from FIM projects in adjacent areas and were characterized by similar dominant species. Preliminary analysis indicates that observed species distribution patterns were mainly a function of proximity to the three inlets within the study area. The two regions encompassing the northern Tolomato River and the Tomoka River and Basin are farthest from inlets and appear to function as oligohaline nursery areas. Those two areas had the greatest estimated densities of shellfish and juvenile sciaenid (drum) species associated with oligohaline waters (for example, Micropogonias undulatus, Sciaenops ocellatus and Cynoscion nebulosus). Samples near inlets, and between the two northern inlets, had greater estimated densities of species limited to euhaline waters, including juvenile clupeids collected at relatively high abundance and species of marine strays collected in low abundance. Based on correspondence analysis, seasonal variation dominated the ordination of seine samples and spatial variation dominated the ordination of trawl samples; this was due to differences in the number and timing of taxa found near inlets versus oligohaline regions. The absence of seagrass habitat in the Northern Coastal Basins is reflected by the absence of a seagrass-fish assemblage.

  17. Access to highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) for injecting drug users in the WHO European Region 2002-2004

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Donoghoe, Martin C; Bollerup, Annemarie R; Lazarus, Jeff

    2007-01-01

    Providing equitable access to highly active antiretroviral treatment (HAART) to injecting drug users (IDUs) is both feasible and desirable. Given the evidence that IDUs can adhere to HAART as well as non-IDUs and the imperative to provide universal and equitable access to HIV/AIDS treatment for all...... the injecting status of those initiating HAART and the use of opioid substitution therapy among HAART patients, and discuss how HAART might be better delivered to injecting drug users. Our data adds to the evidence that IDUs in Europe have poor and inequitable access to HAART, with only a relatively small...

  18. High prevalence of Taenia saginata taeniasis and status of Taenia solium cysticercosis in Bali, Indonesia, 2002-2004.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wandra, T; Sutisna, P; Dharmawan, N S; Margono, S S; Sudewi, R; Suroso, T; Craig, P S; Ito, A

    2006-04-01

    An epidemiological survey of taeniasis/cysticercosis was carried out in one semi-urban and two urban villages in three districts of Bali, Indonesia in 2002 and 2004. In total, 398 local people from 247 families were diagnosed by anamnesis and clinical examinations, and 60 residents were suspected to be taeniasis carriers. Among 60 suspected carriers, 56 persons expelled a total of 61 taeniid adult worms after praziquantel treatment. From 398 residents, 252 stool samples were available for analysis of taeniid eggs, coproantigens or copro-DNA for identification of taeniid species, and 311 serum samples were available for detection of antibodies against Taenia solium cysticercosis. Taeniasis prevalences were highly variable among three villages (1.1-27.5%), and only one case of cysticercosis due to T. solium infection was detected. All expelled tapeworms were confirmed to be Taenia saginata by mtDNA analysis. There was no Taenia asiatica human case in Bali. Case control analysis of 106 families chosen at random from 179 families in 2004 and another 106 families from non-endemic areas revealed that risk factors of T. saginata taeniasis for families were: level of education (P<0.01); consumption of beef lawar (P<0.01); and the source of lawar (P<0.01).

  19. Prevalence of antimicrobial resistance among bacterial pathogens isolated from cattle in different European countries: 2002-2004

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendriksen, R.S.; Mevius, D.J.; Schroeter, A.; Teale, C.; Meunier, D.; Butaye, P.; Franco, A.; Utinane, A.; Amado, A.; Moreno, M.; Greko, C.; Stark, K.D.; Berghold, C.; Myllyniemi, A.L.; Wasyl, D.; Sunde, M.; Aerestrup, F.

    2008-01-01

    Background The project "Antibiotic resistance in bacteria of animal origin ¿ II" (ARBAO-II) was funded by the European Union (FAIR5-QLK2-2002-01146) for the period 2003¿2005, with the aim to establish a continuous monitoring of antimicrobial susceptibility among veterinary laboratories in European

  20. Do split and displacement sudden stratospheric warmings have different annular mode signatures?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maycock, Amanda; Hitchcock, Peter

    2016-04-01

    Sudden stratospheric warmings (SSWs) contribute to intraseasonal tropospheric forecasting skill due to their surface impacts. Recent studies suggest these impacts depend upon whether the polar vortex splits or is displaced during the SSW. We analyse the annular mode signatures of SSWs in a 1000 year IPSL-CM5A-LR simulation. Although small differences in the mean surface Northern Annular Mode (NAM) index following splits and displacements are found, the sign is not consistent for two independent SSW algorithms, and over 50 events are required to distinguish the responses. We use the winter-time correlation between extratropical lower stratospheric wind anomalies and the surface NAM index as a metric for two-way stratosphere-troposphere coupling, and find that the differences between splits and displacements, and between classification methodologies, can be simply understood in terms of their mean stratospheric wind anomalies. Predictability studies should therefore focus on understanding the factors that determine the persistence of these anomalies following SSWs.

  1. NOAA Climate Data Record for Mean Layer Temperature (Upper Troposphere & Lower Stratosphere) from UCAR, Version 2

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Temperatures of Troposphere / Stratosphere (TTS) (AMSU channel 7 and MSU channel 3) CDR is generated by using National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration...

  2. Intercomparison of daytime stratospheric NO2 satellite retrievals and model simulations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Belmonte Rivas, M.; Veefkind, J.P.; Boersma, F.; Levelt, P.; Eskes, H.; Gille, J.

    2014-01-01

    This paper evaluates the agreement between stratospheric NO2 retrievals from infrared limb sounders (Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding (MIPAS) and High Resolution Dynamics Limb Sounder (HIRDLS)) and solar UV/VIS backscatter sensors (Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI), Scanning

  3. 2D photochemical modeling of Saturn's stratosphere. Part II: Feedback between composition and temperature

    CERN Document Server

    Hue, V; Cavalié, T; Dobrijevic, M; Hersant, F

    2015-01-01

    Saturn's axial tilt produces seasons in a similar way as on Earth. Both the stratospheric temperature and composition are affected by this latitudinally varying insolation along the seasons. The thermal structure is controlled and regulated by the amount of hydrocarbons in the stratosphere, which act as absorbers and coolants from the UV to the far-IR spectral range, and this structure influences the amount of hydrocarbons. We study here the feedback between the chemical composition and the thermal structure by coupling a latitudinal and seasonal photochemical model with a radiative seasonal model. Our results show that the seasonal temperature peak in the higher stratosphere, associated with the seasonal increase of insolation, is shifted earlier than the maximum insolation peak. This shift is increased with increasing latitudes and is caused by the low amount of stratospheric coolants in the spring season. At 80$^{\\circ}$ in both hemispheres, the temperature peak at 1d-2mbar is seen to occur half a season e...

  4. Potential Vorticity based parameterization for specification of Upper troposphere/lower stratosphere ozone in atmospheric models

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Potential Vorticity based parameterization for specification of Upper troposphere/lower stratosphere ozone in atmospheric models - the data set consists of 3D O3...

  5. NOAA Climate Data Record for Mean Layer Temperature (Lower Stratosphere) from UCAR, Version 2

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Temperatures in the Lower Stratosphere (TLS) (AMSU channel 9 and MSU channel 4) CDR is generated by using National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA),...

  6. Brief communication "Stratospheric winds, transport barriers and the 2011 Arctic ozone hole"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. J. Olascoaga

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The Arctic stratosphere throughout the late winter and early spring of 2011 was characterized by an unusually severe ozone loss, resulting in what has been described as an ozone hole. The 2011 ozone loss was made possible by unusually cold temperatures throughout the Arctic stratosphere. Here we consider the issue of what constitutes suitable environmental conditions for the formation and maintenance of a polar ozone hole. Our discussion focuses on the importance of the stratospheric wind field and, in particular, the importance of a high latitude zonal jet, which serves as a meridional transport barrier both prior to ozone hole formation and during the ozone hole maintenance phase. It is argued that stratospheric conditions in the boreal winter/spring of 2011 were highly unusual inasmuch as in that year Antarctic-like Lagrangian dynamics led to the formation of a boreal ozone hole.

  7. Robust response of the Amundsen Sea Low to stratospheric ozone depletion

    Science.gov (United States)

    England, Mark R.; Polvani, Lorenzo M.; Smith, Karen L.; Landrum, Laura; Holland, Marika M.

    2016-08-01

    The effect of stratospheric ozone depletion on the Amundsen Sea Low (ASL), a climatological low-pressure center important for the climate of West Antarctica, remains uncertain. Using state-of-the-art climate models, we here show that stratospheric ozone depletion can cause a statistically significant deepening of the ASL in summer with an amplitude of approximately 1 hPa per decade. We are able to attribute the modeled changes in the ASL to stratospheric ozone depletion by contrasting ensembles of historical integrations with and without a realistic ozone hole. In the presence of very large natural variability, the robustness of the ozone impact on the ASL is established by (1) examining ensembles of model runs to isolate the forced response, (2) repeating the analysis with two different climate models, and (3) considering the entire period of stratospheric ozone depletion, the beginning of which predates the satellite era by a couple of decades.

  8. Observations of stratospheric ozone above Ny-Ålesund in the Arctic, 2010-2011

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LUO Yuhan; SI Fuqi; LIU Wenqing; SUN Liguang; LIU Yi

    2015-01-01

    Stratosphere ozone depletion above the Arctic region has drawn increased attention recently. Here we present stratospheric ozone column densities above Ny-Ålesund in the Arctic during summer 2010 and 2011, based on a self-developed passive differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) technique. By analyzing the received scattered solar spectrum, daily variations of ozone vertical column densities (VCDs) were obtained and correlated with satellite-borne ozone monitoring results and ozone sonde data. The comparisons showed good correlation, conifrming the feasibility of DOAS in high-latitude Arctic regions. The preliminary analysis also demonstrated that abnormal low-level ozone columns found in spring 2011 had negative impacts on total ozone column densities over the entire year. The loss of stratospheric ozone may be correlated with low stratospheric temperatures, where heterogeneous atmospheric reactions were active.

  9. Modifications of the Quasi-biennial Oscillation by a Geoengineering Perturbation of the Stratospheric Aerosol Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aquila, V.; Garfinkel, C. I.; Newman, P. A.; Oman, L. D.; Waugh, D. W.

    2014-01-01

    This paper examines the impact of geoengineering via stratospheric sulfate aerosol on the quasi-biennial oscillation (QBO) using the NASA Goddard Earth Observing System (GEOS-5) Chemistry Climate Model. We performed four 30-year simulations with a continuous injection of sulfur dioxide on the equator at 0 degree longitude. The four simulations differ by the amount of sulfur dioxide injected (5Tg per year and 2.5 Tg per year) and the altitude of the injection (16km-25km and 22km-25km). We find that such an injection dramatically alters the quasi-biennial oscillation, prolonging the phase of easterly shear with respect to the control simulation. In the case of maximum perturbation, i.e. highest stratospheric aerosol burden, the lower tropical stratosphere is locked into a permanent westerly QBO phase. This locked QBO westerly phase is caused by the increased aerosol heating and associated warming in the tropical lower stratosphere.

  10. Climate Prediction Center (CPC) Stratospheric Sounding Unit Monthly Zonal Mean Temperature Anomaly

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — It is shown that radiance observations centered at four additional levels in the stratosphere and lower mesosphere can be synthesized utilizing the measured...

  11. Contrasting Effects of Central Pacific and Eastern Pacific El Nino on Stratospheric Water Vapor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garfinkel, Chaim I.; Hurwitz, Margaret M.; Oman, Luke D.; Waugh, Darryn W.

    2013-01-01

    Targeted experiments with a comprehensive chemistry-climate model are used to demonstrate that seasonality and the location of the peak warming of sea surface temperatures dictate the response of stratospheric water vapor to El Nino. In spring, El Nino events in which sea surface temperature anomalies peak in the eastern Pacific lead to a warming at the tropopause above the warm pool region, and subsequently to more stratospheric water vapor (consistent with previous work). However, in fall and in early winter, and also during El Nino events in which the sea surface temperature anomaly is found mainly in the central Pacific, the response is qualitatively different: temperature changes in the warm pool region are nonuniform and less water vapor enters the stratosphere. The difference in water vapor in the lower stratosphere between the two variants of El Nino approaches 0.3 ppmv, while the difference between the winter and spring responses exceeds 0.5 ppmv.

  12. Dynamics and transport in the stratosphere : Simulations with a general circulation mode

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aalst, M.K. (Maarten Krispijn) van

    2005-01-01

    The middle atmosphere is strongly affected by two of the world's most important environmental problems: global climate change and stratospheric ozone depletion, caused by anthropogenic emissions of greenhouse gases and chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), respectively. General circulation models with coup

  13. ISA-MIP: A co-ordinated intercomparison of Interactive Stratospheric Aerosol models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timmreck, Claudia; Mann, Graham; Aquila, Valentina; Bruehl, Christoph; Chin, Mian; Dohmse, Sandip; English, Jason; Lee, Lindsay; Mills, Michael; Hommel, Rene; Neely, Ryan; Schmidt, Anja; Sheng, Jianxiong; Toohey, Matthew; Weisenstein, Debra

    2016-04-01

    The SPARC activity, "Stratospheric Sulfur and its Role in Climate" (SSiRC) was initiated to coordinate international research activities on modelling and observation of stratospheric sulphate aerosols (and precursor gases) in order to assess its climate forcing and feedback. With several international activities to extend and improve observational stratospheric aerosol capabilities and data sets, and a growing number of global models treating stratospheric aerosol interactively, a new model intercomparison activity "ISA-MIP" has been established in the frame of SSIRC. ISA-MIP will compare interactive stratospheric aerosol (ISA) models using a range of observations to constrain and improve the models and to provide a sound scientific basis for future work. Four ISA-MIP experiments have been designed to assess different periods of the obervational stratospheric aerosol record, and to explore key processes which influence the formation and temporal development of stratospheric aerosol. The "Background" experiment will focus on the role of microphysical and transport processes under volcanically quiescent conditions, where the stratospheric aerosol size distribution is only modulated by seasonal circulations. The "Model intercomparison of Transient Aerosol Record" (MiTAR) experiment will focus on addressing the role of small- to moderate-magnitude volcanic eruptions and transport processes in the upper troposphere - lower stratosphere (UTLS) aerosols loading over the period 1998-2011. Background and MiTAR simulations will be compared to recent in-situ and satellite observations to evaluate the performances of the model and understand their strengths and weaknesses. Two further experiments investigate the radiative forcing from historical major eruptions. The Historical Eruptions SO2 Emission Assessment (HErSEA) will involve models carrying out mini-ensembles of the stratospheric aerosol perturbations from each of the 1963 Agung, 1982 El Chichon and 1991 Pinatubo

  14. SWIFT: Semi-empirical and numerically efficient stratospheric ozone chemistry for global climate models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreyling, Daniel; Wohltmann, Ingo; Lehmann, Ralph; Rex, Markus

    2015-04-01

    The SWIFT model is a fast yet accurate chemistry scheme for calculating the chemistry of stratospheric ozone. It is mainly intended for use in Global Climate Models (GCMs), Chemistry Climate Models (CCMs) and Earth System Models (ESMs). For computing time reasons these models often do not employ full stratospheric chemistry modules, but use prescribed ozone instead. This can lead to insufficient representation between stratosphere and troposphere. The SWIFT stratospheric ozone chemistry model, focuses on the major reaction mechanisms of ozone production and loss in order to reduce the computational costs. SWIFT consists of two sub-models. 1) Inside the polar vortex, the model calculates polar vortex averaged ozone loss by solving a set of coupled differential equations for the key species in polar ozone chemistry. 2) The extra-polar regime, which this poster is going to focus on. Outside the polar vortex, the complex system of differential equations of a full stratospheric chemistry model is replaced by an explicit algebraic polynomial, which can be solved in a fraction of the time needed by the full scale model. The approach, which is used to construct the polynomial, is also referred to as repro-modeling and has been successfully applied to chemical models (Turanyi (1993), Lowe & Tomlin (2000)). The procedure uses data from the Lagrangian stratospheric chemistry and transport model ATLAS and yields one high-order polynomial for global ozone loss and production rates over 24h per month. The stratospheric ozone change rates can be sufficiently described by 9 variables. Latitude, altitude, temperature, the overhead ozone abundance, 4 mixing ratios of ozone depleting chemical families (chlorine, bromine, nitrogen-oxides and hydrogen-oxides) and the ozone concentrations itself. The ozone change rates in the lower stratosphere as a function of these 9 variables yield a sufficiently compact 9-D hyper-surface, which we can approximate with a polynomial. In the upper

  15. A decadal satellite record of gravity wave activity in the lower stratosphere to study polar stratospheric cloud formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Lars; Spang, Reinhold; Orr, Andrew; Alexander, M. Joan; Holt, Laura A.; Stein, Olaf

    2017-02-01

    Atmospheric gravity waves yield substantial small-scale temperature fluctuations that can trigger the formation of polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs). This paper introduces a new satellite record of gravity wave activity in the polar lower stratosphere to investigate this process. The record is comprised of observations of the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) aboard NASA's Aqua satellite from January 2003 to December 2012. Gravity wave activity is measured in terms of detrended and noise-corrected 15 µm brightness temperature variances, which are calculated from AIRS channels that are the most sensitive to temperature fluctuations at about 17-32 km of altitude. The analysis of temporal patterns in the data set revealed a strong seasonal cycle in wave activity with wintertime maxima at mid- and high latitudes. The analysis of spatial patterns indicated that orography as well as jet and storm sources are the main causes of the observed waves. Wave activity is closely correlated with 30 hPa zonal winds, which is attributed to the AIRS observational filter. We used the new data set to evaluate explicitly resolved temperature fluctuations due to gravity waves in the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) operational analysis. It was found that the analysis reproduces orographic and non-orographic wave patterns in the right places, but that wave amplitudes are typically underestimated by a factor of 2-3. Furthermore, in a first survey of joint AIRS and Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding (MIPAS) satellite observations, nearly 50 gravity-wave-induced PSC formation events were identified. The survey shows that the new AIRS data set can help to better identify such events and more generally highlights the importance of the process for polar ozone chemistry.

  16. Seasonal persistence of ozone and zonal wind anomalies in the equatorial stratosphere

    OpenAIRE

    Tegtmeier, S.; V. E. Fioletov; Shepherd, T. G.

    2010-01-01

    Analysis of the variability of equatorial ozone profiles in the Satellite Aerosol and Gas Experiment-corrected Solar Backscatter Ultraviolet data set demonstrates a strong seasonal persistence of interannual ozone anomalies, revealing a seasonal dependence to equatorial ozone variability. In the lower stratosphere (40–25 hPa) and in the upper stratosphere (6–4 hPa), ozone anomalies persist from approximately November until June of the following year, while ozone anomalies in the layer between...

  17. Correcting the Science Record: Direct Stratospheric Injection vs. Asian Monsoon and the Solar Escalator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fromm, M. D.; Nedoluha, G. E.; Kablick, G. P.

    2012-12-01

    Two entries in the literature in 2012 make provocative but unsupportable claims regarding pollutant pathways from the Earth to the stratosphere. One claims the 13 June 2011 Nabro volcano (Eritrea) emitted gases and particles into the troposphere, and these constituents reached the stratosphere in great abundance via the Asian Monsoon circulation [Bourassa et al., 2012]. The other claims that smoke from the Black Saturday fire storms (Australia) was emitted into the troposphere, and was lofted ~15 km into the stratosphere by solar-induced diabatic heating [de Laat et al., 2012]. In both cases the stratospheric plumes attributed to these events spread around the globe and lasted for months. We will show that in both cases the postulated pathways are incorrect; the correct pathway is a direct convective injection by volcanic eruption and pyrocumulonimbus (pyroCb), respectively. We will present satellite data that will unambiguously reveal multiple, distinct stratospheric volcano-convection columns from Nabro connected to height-resolved volcanic SO2 and sulfate particles. In the case of Black Saturday we will characterize the pyroCb columns with ground-based radar and satellite imagery. The young pyroCb plume in the stratosphere will be characterized with a synergistic analysis of several NASA A-Train passive and active remote sensors. We will discuss the implications of our findings with respect to how satellite-based data are best used for tracking and characterizing point source injection plumes in the stratosphere. Bourassa et al. (2012), Large Volcanic Aerosol Load in the Stratosphere Linked to Asian Monsoon Transport, Science, 337, 78, DOI: 10:1126/Science.1219371 de Laat, et al. (2012), A solar escalator: Observational evidence of the self-lifting of smoke and aerosols by absorption of solar radiation in the February 2009 Australian Black Saturday plume, J. Geophys. Res., 117, D04204, doi:10.1029/2011JD017016.

  18. Multiple subtropical stratospheric intrusions over Reunion Island: Observational, Lagrangian, and Eulerian numerical modeling approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vérèmes, H.; Cammas, J.-P.; Baray, J.-L.; Keckhut, P.; Barthe, C.; Posny, F.; Tulet, P.; Dionisi, D.; Bielli, S.

    2016-12-01

    Signatures of multiple stratospheric intrusions were observed on simultaneous and collocated ozone and water vapor profiles retrieved by lidars and radiosondes at the Maïdo Observatory, Reunion Island (21°S, 55°E, 2160 m above sea level), during MAïdo LIdar Calibration CAmpaign in April 2013. A singular structure of the ozone vertical profile with three peaks (in excess of 90 ppbv, at 8, 10, and 13 km altitude) embedded in a thick dry layer of air suggested stratospheric intrusions with multiple origins. The hypothesis is corroborated by a synoptic analysis based on re-analyses. European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts ERA-Interim temporal series associated with 5 days Lagrangian back trajectories initialized on each ozone peak allows to capture their stratospheric origin. The ozone peak at the lowest altitude is associated with an irreversible tropopause folding process along the polar jet stream during an extratropical cutoff low formation. Simultaneous lidar water vapor profiles of this peak show that the anticorrelation with ozone has been removed, due to mixing processes. Back trajectories indicate that the two other ozone peaks observed at higher altitudes are associated with the dynamics of the subtropical jet stream and the lower stratosphere. The observations confirm the recent stratospheric origins. The highest ozone peak is explained by the horizontal distribution of the intrusion. Use of a Lagrangian Reverse Domain Filling model and of the Meso-NH Eulerian mesoscale model with a passive stratospheric tracer allow to further document the stratosphere-troposphere transport processes and to describe the detailed potential vorticity and ozone structures in which are embedded in the observed multiple stratospheric intrusions.

  19. Impact of Increasing Stratospheric Water Vapor on Ozone Depletion and Temperature Change

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TIAN Wenshou; Martyn P. CHIPPERFIELD; L(U) Daren

    2009-01-01

    Using a detailed, fully coupled chemistry climate model (CCM), the effect of increasing stratospheric H2O on ozone and temperature is investigated. Different CCM time-slice runs have been performed to investigate the chemical and radiative impacts of an assumed 2 ppmv increase in H2O. The chemical effects of this H2O increase lead to an overall decrease of the total column ozone (TCO) by ~1% in the tropics and by a maximum of 12% at southern high latitudes. At northern high latitudes, the TCO is increased by only up to 5% due to stronger transport in the Arctic. A 2-ppmv H2O increase in the model's radiation scheme causes a cooling of the tropical stratosphere of no more than 2 K, but a cooling of more than 4 K at high latitudes. Consequently, the TCO is increased by about 2%-6%. Increasing stratospheric H2O, therefore, cools the stratosphere both directly and indirectly, except in the polar regions where the temperature responds differcntly due to feedbacks between ozone and H2O changes. The combined chemical and radiative effects of increasing H2O may give rise to more cooling in the tropics and middle latitudes but less cooling in the polar stratosphere. The combined effects of H2O increases on ozone tend to offset each other, except in the Arctic stratosphere where both the radiative and chemical impacts give rise to increased ozone. The chemical and radiative effects of increasing H2O cause dynamical responses in the stratosphere with an evident hemispheric asymmetry. In terms of ozone recovery, increasing the stratospheric H2O is likely to accelerate the recovery in the northern high latitudcs and delay it in the southern high latitudes. The modeled ozone recovery is more significant between 2000-2050 than between 2050-2100, driven mainly by the larger relative change in chlorine in the earlier period.

  20. Effects of stratospheric variability on El Niño teleconnections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, J. H.; Deser, C.; Sun, L.

    2015-12-01

    The effects of the tropical Pacific El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) phenomenon are communicated to the rest of the globe via atmospheric teleconnections. Traditionally, ENSO teleconnections have been viewed as tropospheric phenomena, propagating to higher latitudes as Rossby waves. Recent studies, however, suggest an influence of the stratosphere on extra-tropical ENSO teleconnections. The stratosphere is highly variable: in the tropics, the primary mode of variability is the quasi-biennial oscillation (QBO), and in the extra-tropics sudden stratospheric warmings (SSWs) regularly perturb the mean state. Here, we conduct a 10-member ensemble of simulations with a stratosphere-resolving atmospheric general circulation model forced with the observed evolution of sea surface temperatures during 1952-2001 to examine the effects of the QBO and SSWs on the zonal-mean circulation and temperature response to El Niño, with a focus on the northern extra-tropics during winter. We find that SSWs have a larger impact than the QBO on the composite El Niño responses. During El Niño winters with SSWs, the polar stratosphere shows positive temperature anomalies that propagate downward to the surface where they are associated with increased sea-level pressure over the Arctic. During El Niño winters without SSWs, the stratosphere and upper troposphere show negative temperature anomalies but these do not reach the surface. The QBO modulates the El Niño teleconnection primarily in winters without SSWs: the negative temperature anomalies in the polar stratosphere and upper troposphere are twice as large during QBO West compared to QBO East years. In addition, El Niño winters that coincide with the QBO West phase show stronger positive sea-level pressure anomalies over the eastern Atlantic and Northern Europe than those in the QBO East phase. The results imply that the stratosphere imparts considerable variability to ENSO teleconnections.

  1. Response of the Antarctic Stratosphere to Warm Pool EI Nino Events in the GEOS CCM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurwitz, Margaret M.; Song, In-Sun; Oman, Luke D.; Newman, Paul A.; Molod, Andrea M.; Frith, Stacey M.; Nielsen, J. Eric

    2011-01-01

    A new type of EI Nino event has been identified in the last decade. During "warm pool" EI Nino (WPEN) events, sea surface temperatures (SSTs) in the central equatorial Pacific are warmer than average. The EI Nino signal propagates poleward and upward as large-scale atmospheric waves, causing unusual weather patterns and warming the polar stratosphere. In austral summer, observations show that the Antarctic lower stratosphere is several degrees (K) warmer during WPEN events than during the neutral phase of EI Nino/Southern Oscillation (ENSO). Furthermore, the stratospheric response to WPEN events depends of the direction of tropical stratospheric winds: the Antarctic warming is largest when WPEN events are coincident with westward winds in the tropical lower and middle stratosphere i.e., the westward phase of the quasi-biennial oscillation (QBO). Westward winds are associated with enhanced convection in the subtropics, and with increased poleward wave activity. In this paper, a new formulation of the Goddard Earth Observing System Chemistry-Climate Model, Version 2 (GEOS V2 CCM) is used to substantiate the observed stratospheric response to WPEN events. One simulation is driven by SSTs typical of a WPEN event, while another simulation is driven by ENSO neutral SSTs; both represent a present-day climate. Differences between the two simulations can be directly attributed to the anomalous WPEN SSTs. During WPEN events, relative to ENSO neutral, the model simulates the observed increase in poleward planetary wave activity in the South Pacific during austral spring, as well as the relative warming of the Antarctic lower stratosphere in austral summer. However, the modeled response to WPEN does not depend on the phase of the QBO. The modeled tropical wind oscillation does not extend far enough into the lower stratosphere and upper troposphere, likely explaining the model's insensitivity to the phase of the QBO during WPEN events.

  2. Development of a Climate Record of Tropospheric and Stratospheric Column Ozone from Satellite Remote Sensing: Evidence of an Early Recovery of Global Stratospheric Ozone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziemke, Jerald R.; Chandra, Sushil

    2012-01-01

    Ozone data beginning October 2004 from the Aura Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) and Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) are used to evaluate the accuracy of the Cloud Slicing technique in effort to develop long data records of tropospheric and stratospheric ozone and for studying their long-term changes. Using this technique, we have produced a 32-yr (1979-2010) long record of tropospheric and stratospheric column ozone from the combined Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) and OMI. Analyses of these time series suggest that the quasi-biennial oscillation (QBO) is the dominant source of inter-annual variability of stratospheric ozone and is clearest in the Southern Hemisphere during the Aura time record with related inter-annual changes of 30- 40 Dobson Units. Tropospheric ozone for the long record also indicates a QBO signal in the tropics with peak-to-peak changes varying from 2 to 7 DU. The most important result from our study is that global stratospheric ozone indicates signature of a recovery occurring with ozone abundance now approaching the levels of year 1980 and earlier. The negative trends in stratospheric ozone in both hemispheres during the first 15 yr of the record are now positive over the last 15 yr and with nearly equal magnitudes. This turnaround in stratospheric ozone loss is occurring about 20 yr earlier than predicted by many chemistry climate models. This suggests that the Montreal Protocol which was first signed in 1987 as an international agreement to reduce ozone destroying substances is working well and perhaps better than anticipated.

  3. Development of a climate record of tropospheric and stratospheric column ozone from satellite remote sensing: evidence of an early recovery of global stratospheric ozone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. R. Ziemke

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Ozone data beginning October 2004 from the Aura Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI and Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS are used to evaluate the accuracy of the Cloud Slicing technique in effort to develop long data records of tropospheric and stratospheric ozone and for studying their long-term changes. Using this technique, we have produced a 32-yr (1979–2010 long record of tropospheric and stratospheric column ozone from the combined Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS and OMI. Analyses of these time series suggest that the quasi-biennial oscillation (QBO is the dominant source of inter-annual variability of stratospheric ozone and is clearest in the Southern Hemisphere during the Aura time record with related inter-annual changes of 30–40 Dobson Units. Tropospheric ozone for the long record also indicates a QBO signal in the tropics with peak-to-peak changes varying from 2 to 7 DU. The most important result from our study is that global stratospheric ozone indicates signature of a recovery occurring with ozone abundance now approaching the levels of year 1980 and earlier. The negative trends in stratospheric ozone in both hemispheres during the first 15 yr of the record are now positive over the last 15 yr and with nearly equal magnitudes. This turnaround in stratospheric ozone loss is occurring about 20 yr earlier than predicted by many chemistry climate models. This suggests that the Montreal Protocol which was first signed in 1987 as an international agreement to reduce ozone destroying substances is working well and perhaps better than anticipated.

  4. Stratospheric Ozone Depletion: Its Impact on Tropospheric Chemistry and on Climate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Isaksen, I.S.A.

    1995-11-01

    This report discusses the main issues of the present concern about the depletion of the ozone layer. Observations have shown a long-term decrease in stratospheric ozone on a global scale during the last two decades. Over the southern polar region the reductions are large and evidently related to man-made emissions of CFCs. There is growing evidence that Northern Hemispheric ozone reductions observed since 1980 are also related to man-made emissions of CFCs. The reductions have been particularly large at mid and high northern latitudes after 1991, and they occur in the lower stratosphere during winter and spring. Model studies strongly suggest that a substantial fraction of the reduction is due to enhanced chemical loss through chemical reactions involving chlorine compounds. The enhanced ozone loss observed since 1991 coincides with enhanced particle formation in the stratosphere from volcanism and enhanced formation of polar stratospheric clouds. Observations have also shown that the 11 year solar cycle variation affects stratospheric ozone on a short-term scale. In contrast to stratospheric ozone reductions, observation from northern latitudes show ozone increases at most heights in the troposphere over the two last decades. This is caused mainly by enhanced emission of the ozone precursors NOx, CO and hydrocarbons. 20 refs., 6 figs.

  5. Lidar Observations of Stratospheric Aerosol Layer After the Mt. Pinatubo Volcanic Eruption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagai, Tomohiro; Uchino, Osamu; Fujimoto, Toshifumi

    1992-01-01

    The volcano Mt. Pinatubo located on the Luzon Island, Philippines, had explosively erupted on June 15, 1991. The volcanic eruptions such as volcanic ash, SO2 and H2O reached into the stratosphere over 30 km altitude by the NOAA-11 satellite observation and this is considered one of the biggest volcanic eruptions in this century. A grandiose volcanic eruption influences the atmosphere seriously and causes many climatic effects globally. There had been many impacts on radiation, atmospheric temperature and stratospheric ozone after some past volcanic eruptions. The main cause of volcanic influence depends on stratospheric aerosol, that stay long enough to change climate and other meteorological conditions. Therefore it is very important to watch stratospheric aerosol layers carefully and continuously. Standing on this respect, we do not only continue stratospheric aerosol observation at Tsukuba but also have urgently developed another lidar observational point at Naha in Okinawa Island. This observational station could be thought valuable since there is no lidar observational station in this latitudinal zone and it is much nearer to Mt. Pinatubo. Especially, there is advantage to link up these two stations on studying the transportation mechanism in the stratosphere. In this paper, we present the results of lidar observations at Tsukuba and Naha by lidar systems with Nd:YAG laser.

  6. Export of Ozone-Poor Air from the Lower Tropical Stratosphere to Mid-latitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spackman, J. R.; Weinstock, E. M.; Anderson, J. G.

    2002-05-01

    Analysis of ozonesonde profiles shows a decline in ozone of 7 to 9%/decade during the past 20 to 30 years in the northern mid-latitude lower stratosphere [Logan et al., 1999], exposing the large population at these latitudes to increased health risks. Heterogeneous processing leading to halogen-catalyzed ozone loss is not expected to occur in the mid-latitude lower stratosphere because in situ measurements indicate the air is consistently undersaturated and low in ClO in this region [Smith et al., 2001]. Furthermore, in situ measurements acquired aboard the NASA ER-2 aircraft during SOLVE (SAGE III Ozone Loss and Validation Experiment) suggest that equatorward mixing of ozone-depleted air from the Arctic vortex does not contribute significantly to declines in mid-latitude lower stratospheric ozone. Instead, tracer-tracer correlations from SOLVE indicate that rapid isentropic transport from the lower tropical stratosphere coupled with diabatic descent in mid-latitudes delivers very young, ozone-poor air to the lowermost stratosphere (θ Journal of Geophysical Research, 104, 26373-26399, 1999. Smith, J.B., et al., Mechanisms for midlatitude ozone loss: Heterogeneous chemistry in the lowermost stratosphere?, Journal of Geophysical Research, 106, 1297-1309, 2001.

  7. A method for establishing a long duration, stratospheric platform for astronomical research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fesen, Robert; Brown, Yorke

    2015-10-01

    During certain times of the year at middle and low latitudes, winds in the upper stratosphere move in nearly the opposite direction than the wind in the lower stratosphere. Here we present a method for maintaining a high-altitude balloon platform in near station-keeping mode that utilizes this stratospheric wind shear. The proposed method places a balloon-borne science platform high in the stratosphere connected by a lightweight, high-strength tether to a tug vehicle located in the lower or middle stratosphere. Using aerodynamic control surfaces, wind-induced aerodynamic forces on the tug can be manipulated to counter the wind drag acting on the higher altitude science vehicle, thus controlling the upper vehicle's geographic location. We describe the general framework of this station-keeping method, some important properties required for the upper stratospheric science payload and lower tug platforms, and compare this station-keeping approach with the capabilities of a high altitude airship and conventional tethered aerostat approaches. We conclude by discussing the advantages of such a platform for a variety of missions with emphasis on astrophysical research.

  8. Stratospheric ozone reduction and its relation to natural and man made sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Isaksen, I.S. [Oslo Univ. (Norway). Dept. of Geophysics

    1995-12-31

    Approximately 90 % of the total ozone mass is in the stratosphere (between approximately 12 and 50 km), the rest is in the troposphere (below 12 km). The global distribution of ozone in the stratosphere and its variation over time have been studied extensively over several decades. These studies include observations by ground based instruments (e.g. Dobson instruments), instruments on airborne platforms (e.g. ozone sondes) and on satellites, and model studies which simulate the chemical and dynamical behaviour of the stratosphere. These studies have given good information about the processes which determine the ozone distribution, and how man made emissions affect the distribution. Observations have revealed that there are large year to year variations in stratospheric ozone above a particular location. These variations are difficult to predict as they are connected to irregular weather patterns. However, the observations have shown that there has been a long term decrease in stratospheric ozone on a global scale during the last two decades. The decrease has been most pronounced during the last five to six years and is seen both in the Northern and the Southern Hemispheres. The strong decrease in stratospheric ozone over the Antarctic continent, which has been observed since the mid 80s, and which has reduced the total ozone column with more than 50 % compared with earlier observations, is proven to be a result of increased man made emissions of CFCs. There are also mounting evidences that Northern Hemispheric ozone reductions observed since 1980 are connected to man made emissions of CFCs

  9. Influence of Stratosphere Troposphere Exchange on the Ozone Levels in India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganguly, Nandita; Tzanis, Chris

    2012-07-01

    Decrease in stratospheric ozone will result in an amplification of the solar ultraviolet B radiation reaching the ground, which is a threat to the human society. On the other hand, ozone being toxic to the living system and an important contributor to anthropogenic global warming, high levels of tropospheric ozone will have adverse effects on the air quality and climate. Transport of ozone from the stratosphere to the troposphere will cause stratospheric ozone to decrease and tropospheric ozone to increase, which can in turn have serious consequences for life on earth. Stratosphere-Troposphere Exchange (STE) is regarded as an important factor controlling the budget of ozone in the troposphere and lower stratosphere. Study of STE events in India are so far restricted to coordinated campaigns and measurements over longer periods are relatively scarce. In the light of this observation, the paper is aimed to identify the Indian latitudes, which are most likely to be affected by STE, the frequency of occurrence of shallow and deep STE events and the depth up to which stratospheric ozone descends into the troposphere during these events over the period of 24 years. In addition, the contribution of STE events to the observed high surface ozone levels for cities covering from north to south of India will be presented.

  10. Sensitivity of Stratospheric Geoengineering with Black Carbon to Aerosol Size and Altitude of Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kravitz, Ben; Robock, Alan; Shindell, Drew T.; Miller, Mark A.

    2012-01-01

    Simulations of stratospheric geoengineering with black carbon (BC) aerosols using a general circulation model with fixed sea surface temperatures show that the climate effects strongly depend on aerosol size and altitude of injection. 1 Tg BC/a injected into the lower stratosphere would cause little surface cooling for large radii but a large amount of surface cooling for small radii and stratospheric warming of over 60 C. With the exception of small particles, increasing the altitude of injection increases surface cooling and stratospheric warming. Stratospheric warming causes global ozone loss by up to 50% in the small radius case. The Antarctic shows less ozone loss due to reduction of polar stratospheric clouds, but strong circumpolar winds would enhance the Arctic ozone hole. Using diesel fuel to produce the aerosols is likely prohibitively expensive and infeasible. Although studying an absorbing aerosol is a useful counterpart to previous studies involving sulfate aerosols, black carbon geoengineering likely carries too many risks to make it a viable option for deployment.

  11. Seasonal and inter-annual variability of lower stratospheric age of air spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ploeger, Felix; Birner, Thomas

    2016-08-01

    Trace gas transport in the lower stratosphere is investigated by analysing seasonal and inter-annual variations of the age of air spectrum - the probability distribution of stratospheric transit times. Age spectra are obtained using the Chemical Lagrangian Model of the Stratosphere (CLaMS) driven by ERA-Interim winds and total diabatic heating rates, and using a time-evolving boundary-impulse-response (BIER) method based on multiple tracer pulses. Seasonal age spectra show large deviations from an idealized stationary uni-modal shape. Multiple modes emerge in the spectrum throughout the stratosphere, strongest at high latitudes, caused by the interplay of seasonally varying tropical upward mass flux, stratospheric transport barriers and recirculation. Inter-annual variations in transport (e.g. quasi-biennial oscillation) cause significant modulations of the age spectrum shape. In fact, one particular QBO phase may determine the spectrum's mode during the following 2-3 years. Interpretation of the age spectrum in terms of transport contributions due to the residual circulation and mixing is generally not straightforward. It turns out that advection by the residual circulation represents the dominant pathway in the deep tropics and in the winter hemisphere extratropics above 500 K, controlling the modal age in these regions. In contrast, in the summer hemisphere, particularly in the lowermost stratosphere, mixing represents the most probable pathway controlling the modal age.

  12. Trends in stratospheric ozone derived from merged SAGE II and Odin-OSIRIS satellite observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. E. Bourassa

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Stratospheric ozone profile measurements from the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE II satellite instrument (1984–2005 are combined with those from the Optical Spectrograph and InfraRed Imager System (OSIRIS instrument on the Odin satellite (2001–Present to quantify interannual variability and decadal trends in stratospheric ozone between 60° S and 60° N. These data are merged into a multi-instrument, long-term stratospheric ozone record (1984–present by analyzing the measurements during the overlap period of 2002–2005 when both satellite instruments were operational. The variability in the deseasonalized time series is fit using multiple linear regression with predictor basis functions including the quasi-biennial oscillation, El Niño-Southern Oscillation index, solar activity proxy, and the pressure at the tropical tropopause, in addition to two linear trends (one before and one after 1997, from which the decadal trends in ozone are derived. From 1984–1997, there are statistically significant negative trends of 5–10% per decade throughout the stratosphere between approximately 30–50 km. From 1997–present, a statistically significant recovery of 3–8% per decade has taken place throughout most of the stratosphere with the notable exception between 40° S–40° N below approximately 22 km where the negative trend continues. The recovery is not significant between 25–35 km altitude when accounting for a conservative estimate of instrument drift.

  13. SPARC's Stratospheric Sulfur and its Role in Climate Activity (SSiRC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomason, Larry

    2015-01-01

    The stratospheric aerosol layer is a key component in the climate system. It affects the radiative balance of the atmosphere directly through interactions with solar and terrestrial radiation, and indirectly through its effect on stratospheric ozone. Because the stratospheric aerosol layer is prescribed in many climate models and Chemistry-Climate Models (CCMs), model simulations of future atmospheric conditions and climate generally do not account for the interaction between the aerosol-sulfur cycle and changes in the climate system. The present understanding of how the stratospheric aerosol layer may be affected by future climate change and how the stratospheric aerosol layer may drive climate change is, therefore, very limited. The purposes of SSiRC (Stratospheric Sulfur and its Role in Climate) include: (i) providing a coordinating structure for the various individual activities already underway in different research centers; (ii) encouraging and supporting new instrumentation and measurements of sulfur containing compounds, such as COS, DMS, and non-volcanic SO2 in the UT/LS globally; and (iii) initiating new model/data inter-comparisons. SSiRC is developing collaborations with a number of other SPARC activities including CCMI and ACAM. This presentation will highlight the scientific goals of this project and on-going activities and propose potential interactions between SSiRC and ACAM.

  14. Contributions to Future Stratospheric Climate Change: An Idealized Chemistry-Climate Model Sensitivity Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurwitz, M. M.; Braesicke, P.; Pyle, J. A.

    2010-01-01

    Within the framework of an idealized model sensitivity study, three of the main contributors to future stratospheric climate change are evaluated: increases in greenhouse gas concentrations, ozone recovery, and changing sea surface temperatures (SSTs). These three contributors are explored in combination and separately, to test the interactions between ozone and climate; the linearity of their contributions to stratospheric climate change is also assessed. In a simplified chemistry-climate model, stratospheric global mean temperature is most sensitive to CO2 doubling, followed by ozone depletion, then by increased SSTs. At polar latitudes, the Northern Hemisphere (NH) stratosphere is more sensitive to changes in CO2, SSTs and O3 than is the Southern Hemisphere (SH); the opposing responses to ozone depletion under low or high background CO2 concentrations, as seen with present-day SSTs, are much weaker and are not statistically significant under enhanced SSTs. Consistent with previous studies, the strength of the Brewer-Dobson circulation is found to increase in an idealized future climate; SSTs contribute most to this increase in the upper troposphere/lower stratosphere (UT/LS) region, while CO2 and ozone changes contribute most in the stratosphere and mesosphere.

  15. Overview of the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment II water vapor observations - Method, validation, and data characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rind, D.; Chiou, E.-W.; Chu, W.; Oltmans, S.; Lerner, J.; Larsen, J.; Mccormick, M. P.; Mcmaster, L.

    1993-01-01

    Results are presented of water vapor observations in the troposphere and stratosphere performed by the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment II solar occultation instrument, and the analysis procedure, the instrument errors, and data characteristics are discussed. The results are compared with correlative in situ measurements and other satellite data. The features of the data set collected between 1985 and 1989 include an increase in middle- and upper-tropospheric water vapor during northern hemisphere summer and autumn; minimum water vapor values of 2.5-3 ppmv in the tropical lower stratosphere; slowly increasing water vapor values with altitude in the stratosphere, reaching 5-6 ppmv or greater near the stratopause; extratropical values with minimum profile amounts occurring above the conventionally defined tropopause; and higher extratropical than tropical water vapor values throughout the stratosphere except in locations of possible polar stratospheric clouds.

  16. Design and Analysis of Optimal Ascent Trajectories for Stratospheric Airships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Joseph Bernard

    Stratospheric airships are lighter-than-air vehicles that have the potential to provide a long-duration airborne presence at altitudes of 18-22 km. Designed to operate on solar power in the calm portion of the lower stratosphere and above all regulated air traffic and cloud cover, these vehicles represent an emerging platform that resides between conventional aircraft and satellites. A particular challenge for airship operation is the planning of ascent trajectories, as the slow moving vehicle must traverse the high wind region of the jet stream. Due to large changes in wind speed and direction across altitude and the susceptibility of airship motion to wind, the trajectory must be carefully planned, preferably optimized, in order to ensure that the desired station be reached within acceptable performance bounds of flight time and energy consumption. This thesis develops optimal ascent trajectories for stratospheric airships, examines the structure and sensitivity of these solutions, and presents a strategy for onboard guidance. Optimal ascent trajectories are developed that utilize wind energy to achieve minimum-time and minimum-energy flights. The airship is represented by a three-dimensional point mass model, and the equations of motion include aerodynamic lift and drag, vectored thrust, added mass effects, and accelerations due to mass flow rate, wind rates, and Earth rotation. A representative wind profile is developed based on historical meteorological data and measurements. Trajectory optimization is performed by first defining an optimal control problem with both terminal and path constraints, then using direct transcription to develop an approximate nonlinear parameter optimization problem of finite dimension. Optimal ascent trajectories are determined using SNOPT for a variety of upwind, downwind, and crosswind launch locations. Results of extensive optimization solutions illustrate definitive patterns in the ascent path for minimum time flights across

  17. Simulation of the isotopic composition of stratospheric water vapour - Part 2: Investigation of HDO/H2O variations

    OpenAIRE

    Eichinger, Roland; Jöckel, Patrick; Lossow, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Studying the isotopic composition of water vapour in the lower stratosphere can reveal the driving mechanisms of changes in the stratospheric water vapour budget and therefore help to explain the trends and variations of stratospheric water vapour during recent decades. We equipped a global chemistry climate model with a description of the water isotopologue HDO, comprising its physical and chemical fractionation effects throughout the hydrological cycle. We use this m...

  18. Simulation of the isotopic composition of stratospheric water vapour – Part 2: Investigation of HDO / H2O variations

    OpenAIRE

    R. Eichinger; Jöckel, P.; S. Lossow

    2015-01-01

    Studying the isotopic composition of water vapour in the lower stratosphere can reveal the driving mechanisms of changes in the stratospheric water vapour budget and therefore help to explain the trends and variations of stratospheric water vapour during recent decades. We equipped a global chemistry climate model with a description of the water isotopologue HDO, comprising its physical and chemical fractionation effects throughout the hydrological cycle. We use this mode...

  19. Stratospheric cooling and polar ozone loss due to H2 emissions of a global hydrogen economy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feck, T.; Grooß, J.-U.; Riese, M.; Vogel, B.

    2009-04-01

    "Green" hydrogen is seen as a major element of the future energy supply to reduce greenhouse gas emissions substantially. However, due to the possible interactions of hydrogen (H2) with other atmospheric constituents there is a need to analyse the implications of additional atmospheric H2 that could result from hydrogen leakage of a global hydrogen infrastructure. Emissions of molecular H2 can occur along the whole hydrogen process chain which increase the tropospheric H2 burden. Across the tropical tropopause H2 reaches the stratosphere where it is oxidised and forms water vapour (H2O). This causes increased IR-emissions into space and hence a cooling of the stratosphere. Both effects, the increase of stratospheric H2O and the cooling, enhances the potential of chlorine activation on liquid sulfate aerosol and polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs), which increase polar ozone destruction. Hence a global hydrogen economy could provoke polar ozone loss and could lead to a substantial delay of the current projected recovery of the stratospheric ozone layer. Our investigations show that even if 90% of the current global fossil primary energy input could be replaced by hydrogen and approximately 9.5% of the product gas would leak to the atmosphere, the ozone loss would be increased between 15 to 26 Dobson Units (DU) if the stratospheric CFC loading would retain unchanged. A consistency check of the used approximation methods with the Chemical Lagrangian Model of the Stratosphere (CLaMS) shows that this additional ozone loss can probably be treated as an upper limit. Towards more realistic future H2 leakage rate assumptions (< 3%) the additional ozone loss would be rather small (? 10 DU). However, in all cases the full damage would only occur if stratospheric CFC-levels would retain unchanged. Due to the CFC-prohibition as a result of the Montreal Protocol the forecasts suggest a decline of the stratospheric CFC loading about 50% until 2050. In this case our calculations

  20. Signals of El Niño Modoki in the tropical tropopause layer and stratosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Xie

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The effects of El Niño Modoki events on the tropical tropopause layer (TTL and on the stratosphere were investigated using European Center for Medium Range Weather Forecasting (ECMWF reanalysis data, satellite observations from the Aura satellite Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS, oceanic El Niño indices, and general climate model outputs. El Niño Modoki events tend to depress convective activities in the western and eastern Pacific but enhance convective activities in the central and northern Pacific. Consequently, during Modoki events, negative water vapor anomalies occur in the western and eastern Pacific upper troposphere, whereas there are positive anomalies in the central and northern Pacific upper troposphere. The spatial patterns of the outgoing longwave radiation (OLR and upper tropospheric water vapor anomalies exhibit a tripolar form. The empirical orthogonal function (EOF analysis of the OLR and upper tropospheric water vapor anomalies reveals that canonical El Niño events are associated with the leading mode of the EOF, while El Niño Modoki events correspond to the second mode. El Niño Modoki activities tend to moisten the lower and middle stratosphere, but dry the upper stratosphere. It was also found that the canonical El Niño signal can overlay linearly on the QBO signal in the stratosphere, whereas the interaction between the El Niño Modoki and QBO signals is non-linear. Because of these non-linear interactions, El Niño Modoki events have a reverse effect on high latitudes stratosphere, as compared with the effects of typical Modoki events, i.e. the northern polar vortex is stronger and colder but the southern polar vortex is weaker and warmer during El Niño Modoki events. However, simulations suggest that canonical El Niño and El Niño Modoki activities actually have the same influence on high latitudes stratosphere, in the absence of interactions between QBO and ENSO signals. The present results also reveal that canonical

  1. Interannual variability of the stratospheric wave driving during northern winter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. J. Haklander

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The strength of the stratospheric wave driving during northern winter is often quantified by the January–February mean poleward eddy heat flux at 100 hPa, averaged over 40°–80° N (or a similar area and period. Despite the dynamical and chemical relevance of the wave driving, the causes for its variability are still not well understood. In this study, 45 years of ERA-40 reanalysis data are used to examine several factors that significantly affect the interannual variability of the wave driving. The total poleward heat flux at 100 hPa is poorly correlated with that in the troposphere, suggesting a decoupling between 100 hPa and the troposphere. However, the individual zonal wave-1 and wave-2 contributions to the wave driving at 100 hPa do exhibit a significant coupling with the troposphere, predominantly due to their stationary components. The stationary wave-1 contribution to the total wave driving significantly depends on the latitude of the stationary wave-1 source in the troposphere. The results suggest that this dependence is associated with the varying ability of stationary wave-1 activity to enter the tropospheric waveguide at mid- to subpolar latitudes. If composites of strong and weak wave-driving years are compared, we find significantly higher refractive index values in the midlatitude stratosphere for the strong composite than for the weak composite. Since wave activity tends to propagate towards higher refractive index values, this could explain part of the interannual variability of the wave driving. Finally, an alternative approach is taken, in which the wave driving anomalies are separated into three parts: one part due to anomalies in the zonal correlation between the eddy temperature and eddy meridional wind, another part due to anomalies in the zonal eddy temperature amplitude, and a third part due to anomalies in the zonal eddy meridional wind amplitude. It is found that year-to-year variability in the zonal correlation

  2. Global distribution of total ozone and lower stratospheric temperature variations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Steinbrecht

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available This study gives an overview of interannual variations of total ozone and 50 hPa temperature. It is based on newer and longer records from the 1979 to 2001 Total Ozone Monitoring Spectrometer (TOMS and Solar Backscatter Ultraviolet (SBUV instruments, and on US National Center for Environmental Prediction (NCEP reanalyses. Multiple linear least squares regression is used to attribute variations to various natural and anthropogenic explanatory variables. Usually, maps of total ozone and 50 hPa temperature variations look very similar, reflecting a very close coupling between the two. As a rule of thumb, a 10 Dobson Unit (DU change in total ozone corresponds to a 1 K change of 50 hPa temperature. Large variations come from the linear trend term, up to -30 DU or -1.5 K/decade, from terms related to polar vortex strength, up to 50 DU or 5 K (typical, minimum to maximum, from tropospheric meteorology, up to 30 DU or 3 K, or from the Quasi-Biennial Oscillation (QBO, up to 25 DU or 2.5 K. The 11-year solar cycle, up to 25 DU or 2.5 K, or El Niño/Southern Oscillation (ENSO, up to 10 DU or 1 K, are contributing smaller variations. Stratospheric aerosol after the 1991 Pinatubo eruption lead to warming up to 3 K at low latitudes and to ozone depletion up to 40 DU at high latitudes. Variations attributed to QBO, polar vortex strength, and to a lesser degree to ENSO, exhibit an inverse correlation between low latitudes and higher latitudes. Variations related to the solar cycle or 400 hPa temperature, however, have the same sign over most of the globe. Variations are usually zonally symmetric at low and mid-latitudes, but asymmetric at high latitudes. There, position and strength of the stratospheric anti-cyclones over the Aleutians and south of Australia appear to vary with the phases of solar cycle, QBO or ENSO.

  3. On the aliasing of the solar cycle in the lower stratospheric tropical temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuchar, Ales; Ball, William T.; Rozanov, Eugene V.; Stenke, Andrea; Revell, Laura; Miksovsky, Jiri; Pisoft, Petr; Peter, Thomas

    2017-09-01

    The double-peaked response of the tropical stratospheric temperature profile to the 11 year solar cycle (SC) has been well documented. However, there are concerns about the origin of the lower peak due to potential aliasing with volcanic eruptions or the El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) detected using multiple linear regression analysis. We confirm the aliasing using the results of the chemistry-climate model (CCM) SOCOLv3 obtained in the framework of the International Global Atmospheric Chemisty/Stratosphere-troposphere Processes And their Role in Climate Chemistry-Climate Model Initiative phase 1. We further show that even without major volcanic eruptions included in transient simulations, the lower stratospheric response exhibits a residual peak when historical sea surface temperatures (SSTs)/sea ice coverage (SIC) are used. Only the use of climatological SSTs/SICs in addition to background stratospheric aerosols removes volcanic and ENSO signals and results in an almost complete disappearance of the modeled solar signal in the lower stratospheric temperature. We demonstrate that the choice of temporal subperiod considered for the regression analysis has a large impact on the estimated profile signal in the lower stratosphere: at least 45 consecutive years are needed to avoid the large aliasing effect of SC maxima with volcanic eruptions in 1982 and 1991 in historical simulations, reanalyses, and observations. The application of volcanic forcing compiled for phase 6 of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP6) in the CCM SOCOLv3 reduces the warming overestimation in the tropical lower stratosphere and the volcanic aliasing of the temperature response to the SC, although it does not eliminate it completely.

  4. A~tropical West Pacific OH minimum and implications for stratospheric composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rex, M.; Wohltmann, I.; Ridder, T.; Lehmann, R.; Rosenlof, K.; Wennberg, P.; Weisenstein, D.; Notholt, J.; Krüger, K.; Mohr, V.; Tegtmeier, S.

    2014-05-01

    Most of the short-lived biogenic and anthropogenic chemical species that are emitted into the atmosphere break down efficiently by reaction with OH and do not reach the stratosphere. Here we show the existence of a pronounced minimum in the tropospheric column of ozone over the West Pacific, the main source region for stratospheric air, and suggest a corresponding minimum of the tropospheric column of OH. This has the potential to amplify the impact of surface emissions on the stratospheric composition compared to the impact when assuming globally uniform OH conditions. Specifically, the role of emissions of biogenic halogenated species for the stratospheric halogen budget and the role of increasing emissions of SO2 in Southeast Asia or from minor volcanic eruptions for the increasing stratospheric aerosol loading need to be reassessed in light of these findings. This is also important since climate change will further modify OH abundances and emissions of halogenated species. Our study is based on ozone sonde measurements carried out during the TransBrom cruise with the RV Sonne roughly along 140-150° E in October 2009 and corroborating ozone and OH measurements from satellites, aircraft campaigns and FTIR instruments. Model calculations with the GEOS-Chem Chemistry and Transport Model (CTM) and the ATLAS CTM are used to simulate the tropospheric OH distribution over the West Pacific and the transport pathways to the stratosphere. The potential effect of the OH minimum on species transported into the stratosphere is shown via modeling the transport and chemistry of CH2Br2 and SO2.

  5. Stratospheric water vapour as tracer for Vortex filamentation in the Arctic winter 2002/2003

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Müller

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Balloon-borne frost point hygrometers measured three high-resolution profiles of stratospheric water vapour above Ny-Ålesund, Spitsbergen during winter 2002/2003. The profiles obtained on 12 December 2002 and on 17 January 2003 provide an insight into the vertical distribution of water vapour in the core of the polar vortex. The water vapour sounding on 11 February 2003 was obtained within the vortex edge region of the lower stratosphere. Here, a significant reduction of water vapour mixing ratio was observed between 16 and 19 km. The stratospheric temperatures indicate that this dehydration was not caused by the presence of polar stratospheric clouds or earlier PSC particle sedimentation. Ozone observations on this day indicate a large scale movement of the polar vortex and show laminae in the same altitude range as the water vapour profile. The link between the observed water vapour reduction and filaments in the vortex edge region is indicated in the results of the semi-lagrangian advection model MIMOSA, which show that adjacent filaments of polar and mid latitude air can be identified above the Spitsbergen region. A vertical cross-section produced by the MIMOSA model reveals that the water vapour sonde flew through polar air in the lowest part of the stratosphere below 425 K, then passed through filaments of mid latitude air with lower water vapour concentrations, before it finally entered the polar vortex above 450 K. These results indicate that on 11 February 2003 the frost point hygrometer measured different water vapour concentrations as the sonde detected air with different origins. Instead of being linked to dehydration due to PSC particle sedimentation, the local reduction in the stratospheric water vapour profile was in this case caused by dynamical processes in the polar stratosphere.

  6. Study on the Trace Species in the Stratosphere and Their Impact on Climate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    The trace gases (O3,HCl,CH4,H2O,NO,NO2) in the stratosphere play an important role, not only in the photochemical processes in which the ozone layer destroyed, but also in the radiative processes. In this paper, we review the works on the distribution and variation of the trace gases in the stratosphere and their impact on climate, which have been carried out at the University of Science and Technology of China in the recent 20 years. The Halogen Occultation Experiment (HALOE) data were used to analyse the distribution and variation of the mixing ratio of these trace gases and the temperature trends in the stratosphere in the most recent decade. And the reanalyzed National Centers of Environmental Prediction (NCEP)/NCAR data were also used to give the temperature trends and compared with the results from HALOE data. Numerical simulations were also carried out to study the impact of ozone depletion on the global climate. In this review, the distributions of the trace gases, especially those over the Qinghai-Xizang Plateau, are discussed, and the variations and trends for the trace gases in various levels in the stratosphere have been given for the most recent decade. The temperature variation and the cooling trend obtained from HALOE data in the middle and lower stratosphere for the last 13 years are significant, which agree well with the results from NCEP/NCAR data. While the temperature trend in the upper stratosphere in this period do not seem to have much cooling. The numerical simulations show that either the Antarctic ozone hole or the ozone valley over Qinghai-Xizang Plateau affect not only the temperature and circulation in the stratosphere, but also the temperature, pressure and wind fields in the troposphere, then lead to the global climate change.

  7. Sensitivity of polar stratospheric cloud formation to changes in water vapour and temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Khosrawi

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available More than a decade ago it was suggested that a cooling of stratospheric temperatures by 1 K or an increase of 1 ppmv of stratospheric water vapour could promote denitrification, the permanent removal of nitrogen species from the stratosphere by solid polar stratospheric cloud (PSC particles. In fact, during the two Arctic winters 2009/10 and 2010/11 the strongest denitrification in the recent decade was observed. Sensitivity studies along air parcel trajectories are performed to test how a future stratospheric water vapour (H2O increase of 1 ppmv or a temperature decrease of 1 K would affect PSC formation. We perform our study based on measurements made during the Arctic winter 2010/11. Air parcel trajectories were calculated 6 days backward in time based on PSCs detected by CALIPSO (Cloud Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder satellite observations. The sensitivity study was performed on single trajectories as well as on a trajectory ensemble. The sensitivity study shows a clear prolongation of the potential for PSC formation and PSC existence when the temperature in the stratosphere is decreased by 1 K and water vapour is increased by 1 ppmv. Based on 15 years of satellite measurements (2000–2014 from UARS/HALOE, Envisat/MIPAS, Odin/SMR, Aura/MLS, Envisat/SCIAMACHY and SCISAT/ACE-FTS it is further investigated if there is a decrease in temperature and/or increase of water vapour (H2O observed in the polar regions similar to that observed at midlatitudes and in the tropics. Although in the polar regions no significant trend is found in the lower stratosphere, we found from the observations a correlation between cold winters and enhanced water vapour mixing ratios.

  8. Relationships among Brewer-Dobson circulation, double tropopauses, ozone and lower-stratospheric water vapor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castanheira, J. M.; Peevey, T. R.; Marques, C. A. F.; Olsen, M. A.

    2012-04-01

    This communication will discuss the statistical relationships between the variability of the area covered by double tropopause events and the variabilities of total column ozone and of lower-stratospheric water vapor. The QBO signal in double tropopause events statistics and the relationship between tropical upwelling and the near global (50oS - 50oN) lower stratospheric water vapour will be also presented. The analysis is based on both reanalysis data (ERA-Interim) and satellite data. Significant correlations were found between the area covered by double tropopause events in the latitudinal band 20 - 65oN and the gradient of total column ozone in the subtropical Northern Hemisphere. Significant correlations were also found between de global area of double tropopause events and the near global (50oS - 50oN) water vapour in the lower stratosphere. The relationship between double tropopause events and lower stratospheric ozone is detailed by a correlation analysis between the frequencies of ozone laminae and double tropopause events as found in the HIRDLS data. The correlations of DT variables with total column ozone and ozone laminae are both consistent with intrusion events of tropospheric tropical air into the lower extratropical stratosphere, with the tropical tropopause overlaying the extratropical one. The poleward excursions of the tropical tropopause are also consistent with the found negative correlation between the area extension of DTs and the near global lower stratospheric water vapour. Finally, we will show the existence of a significant negative correlation between the tropical upwelling, determined using the "downward control principle", and the near global lower stratospheric water vapor.

  9. Meteorological Necessities for the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houtas, Franzeska

    2011-01-01

    The Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA) is joint program with NASA and DLR (German Aerospace Center) of a highly modified Boeing 747-SP. The purpose of this modification is to include a 2.5 m infrared telescope in a rear bulkhead of the airplane, with a retractable door open to the atmosphere. The NASA Dryden Flight Research Center (DFRC) is responsible for verifying that the aerodynamics, acoustics, and flying qualities of the modified aircraft stay within safe limits. Flight testing includes determining meteorological limitations of the aircraft, which is done by setting strict temporary operating limits and verifying through data analysis, what conditions are acceptable. Line operations are calibration tests of various telescope instruments that are done on the ground prior to flights. The method in determining limitations for this type of operation is similar to that of flight testing, but the meteorological limitations are different. Of great concern are the particulates near the surface that could cause damage to the telescope, as well as condensation forming on the mirror. Another meteorological involvement for this program is the process of obtaining Reduced Vertical Separation Minimums (RVSM) Certification from the FAA. This heavily involves obtaining atmospheric data pertinent to the flight, analyzing data to actual conditions for validity, and computing necessary results for comparison to aircraft instrumentation.

  10. EARLY SCIENCE WITH SOFIA, THE STRATOSPHERIC OBSERVATORY FOR INFRARED ASTRONOMY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Young, E. T.; Becklin, E. E.; De Buizer, J. M.; Andersson, B.-G.; Casey, S. C.; Helton, L. A. [SOFIA Science Center, Universities Space Research Association, NASA Ames Research Center, MS 232, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States); Marcum, P. M.; Roellig, T. L.; Temi, P. [NASA Ames Research Center, MS 232, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States); Herter, T. L. [Astronomy Department, 202 Space Sciences Building, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853-6801 (United States); Guesten, R. [Max-Planck Institut fuer Radioastronomie, Auf dem Huegel 69, Bonn (Germany); Dunham, E. W. [Lowell Observatory, 1400 W. Mars Hill Rd., Flagstaff AZ 86001 (United States); Backman, D.; Burgdorf, M. [SOFIA Science Center, NASA Ames Research Center, MS 211-1, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States); Caroff, L. J.; Erickson, E. F. [NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States); Davidson, J. A. [School of Physics, The University of Western Australia (M013), 35 Stirling Highway, Crawley WA 6009 (Australia); Gehrz, R. D. [Minnesota Institute for Astrophysics, School of Physics and Astronomy, 116 Church Street, S. E., University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Harper, D. A. [Yerkes Observatory, University of Chicago, 373 W. Geneva St., Williams Bay, WI (United States); Harvey, P. M. [Astronomy Department, University of Texas at Austin, 1 University Station C1400, Austin, TX 78712-0259 (United States); and others

    2012-04-20

    The Stratospheric Observatory For Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA) is an airborne observatory consisting of a specially modified Boeing 747SP with a 2.7 m telescope, flying at altitudes as high as 13.7 km (45,000 ft). Designed to observe at wavelengths from 0.3 {mu}m to 1.6 mm, SOFIA operates above 99.8% of the water vapor that obscures much of the infrared and submillimeter. SOFIA has seven science instruments under development, including an occultation photometer, near-, mid-, and far-infrared cameras, infrared spectrometers, and heterodyne receivers. SOFIA, a joint project between NASA and the German Aerospace Center Deutsches Zentrum fuer Luft und-Raumfahrt, began initial science flights in 2010 December, and has conducted 30 science flights in the subsequent year. During this early science period three instruments have flown: the mid-infrared camera FORCAST, the heterodyne spectrometer GREAT, and the occultation photometer HIPO. This Letter provides an overview of the observatory and its early performance.

  11. JOVIAN STRATOSPHERE AS A CHEMICAL TRANSPORT SYSTEM: BENCHMARK ANALYTICAL SOLUTIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Xi; Shia Runlie; Yung, Yuk L., E-mail: xiz@gps.caltech.edu [Division of Geological and Planetary Sciences, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

    2013-04-20

    We systematically investigated the solvable analytical benchmark cases in both one- and two-dimensional (1D and 2D) chemical-advective-diffusive systems. We use the stratosphere of Jupiter as an example but the results can be applied to other planetary atmospheres and exoplanetary atmospheres. In the 1D system, we show that CH{sub 4} and C{sub 2}H{sub 6} are mainly in diffusive equilibrium, and the C{sub 2}H{sub 2} profile can be approximated by modified Bessel functions. In the 2D system in the meridional plane, analytical solutions for two typical circulation patterns are derived. Simple tracer transport modeling demonstrates that the distribution of a short-lived species (such as C{sub 2}H{sub 2}) is dominated by the local chemical sources and sinks, while that of a long-lived species (such as C{sub 2}H{sub 6}) is significantly influenced by the circulation pattern. We find that an equator-to-pole circulation could qualitatively explain the Cassini observations, but a pure diffusive transport process could not. For slowly rotating planets like the close-in extrasolar planets, the interaction between the advection by the zonal wind and chemistry might cause a phase lag between the final tracer distribution and the original source distribution. The numerical simulation results from the 2D Caltech/JPL chemistry-transport model agree well with the analytical solutions for various cases.

  12. Classifying the tropospheric precursor patterns of sudden stratospheric warmings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Ming; Tan, Xin; Hartmann, Dennis L.; Ceppi, Paulo

    2017-08-01

    Classifying the tropospheric precursor patterns of sudden stratospheric warmings (SSWs) may provide insight into the different physical mechanisms of SSWs. Based on 37 major SSWs during the 1958-2014 winters in the ERA reanalysis data sets, the self-organizing maps method is used to classify the tropospheric precursor patterns of SSWs. The cluster analysis indicates that one of the precursor patterns appears as a mixed pattern consisting of the negative-signed Western Hemisphere circulation pattern and the positive phase of the Pacific-North America pattern. The mixed pattern exhibits higher statistical significance as a precursor pattern of SSWs than other previously identified precursors such as the subpolar North Pacific low, Atlantic blocking, and the western Pacific pattern. Other clusters confirm northern European blocking and Gulf of Alaska blocking as precursors of SSWs. Linear interference with the climatological planetary waves provides a simple interpretation for the precursors. The relationship between the classified precursor patterns of SSWs and ENSO phases as well as the types of SSWs is discussed.

  13. The western Pacific pattern bridging stratospheric sudden warming and ENSO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Ying; Tan, Benkui

    2016-04-01

    Previous studies show that the stratospheric sudden warmings (SSWs) are closely linked to the low height anomalies (LHAs) over the North Pacific and the presence of the LHAs is independent of the phases of the El Nino-Southern Oscillation (ENSO). Based on the wintertime daily reanalysis data from 1958 to 2013, this study demonstrates that most of the LHAs which are linked to SSWs are the footprints left by the western Pacific patterns (WPs), few of them by the Pacific-North American patterns (PNAs), or by mixed WP-PNA patterns. This study also demonstrates that the WPs' LHAs, and therefore the SSWs, are strongly modulated by ENSO and the modulation effects changed over 1958-2013: before 1980, the WPs' LHAs have stronger intensity and longer duration in El Nino winters (EN) than La Nina winters (LN) and ENSO neutral winters (ENSON), and the SSWs occur twice as often during EN, compared to LN and ENSON. After 1980, the WPs' LHAs have stronger intensity in EN and larger frequency during LN than ENSON. Consistently, the SSWs occur nearly twice as often during both EN and LN for this period, compared to ENSON.

  14. Ab Initio Studies of Stratospheric Ozone Depletion Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Timothy J.; Head-Gordon, Martin; Langhoff, Stephen R. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    An overview of the current understanding of ozone depletion chemistry, particularly with regards the formation of the so-called Antarctic ozone hole, will be presented together with an outline as to how ab initio quantum chemistry can be used to further our understanding of stratospheric chemistry. The ability of modern state-of-the art ab initio quantum chemical techniques to characterize reliably the gas-phase molecular structure, vibrational spectrum, electronic spectrum, and thermal stability of fluorine, chlorine, bromine and nitrogen oxide species will be demonstrated by presentation of some example studies. The ab initio results will be shown to be in excellent agreement with the available experimental data, and where the experimental data are either not known or are inconclusive, the theoretical results are shown to fill in the gaps and to resolve experimental controversies. In addition, ab initio studies in which the electronic spectra and the characterization of excited electronic states of halogen oxide species will also be presented. Again where available, the ab initio results are compared to experimental observations, and are used to aid in the interpretation of experimental studies.

  15. Assimilation of stratospheric ozone in the chemical transport model STRATAQ

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Grassi

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available We describe a sequential assimilation approach useful for assimilating tracer measurements into a three-dimensional chemical transport model (CTM of the stratosphere. The numerical code, developed largely according to Kha00, uses parameterizations and simplifications allowing assimilation of sparse observations and the simultaneous evaluation of analysis errors, with reasonable computational requirements. Assimilation parameters are set by using χ2 and OmF (Observation minus Forecast statistics. The CTM used here is a high resolution three-dimensional model. It includes a detailed chemical package and is driven by UKMO (United Kingdom Meteorological Office analyses. We illustrate the method using assimilation of Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite/Microwave Limb Sounder (UARS/MLS ozone observations for three weeks during the 1996 antarctic spring. The comparison of results from the simulations with TOMS (Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer measurements shows improved total ozone fields due to assimilation of MLS observations. Moreover, the assimilation gives indications on a possible model weakness in reproducing polar ozone values during springtime.

  16. The Detector System for the Stratospheric Kinetic Inductance Polarimeter (SKIP)

    CERN Document Server

    Johnson, B R; Araujo, D; Bradford, K J; Chapman, D; Didier, J; Doyle, S; Eriksen, H K; Flanigan, D; Groppi, C; Hillbrand, S; Jones, G; Limon, M; Mauskopf, P; McCarrick, H; Miller, A; Mroczkowski, T; Reichborn-Kjennerud, B; Smiley, B; Sobrin, J; Wehus, I K; Zmuidzinas, J

    2013-01-01

    We discuss the detector system for the Stratospheric Kinetic Inductance Polarimeter (SKIP). SKIP is a proposed balloon-borne experiment designed to study the cosmic microwave background, the cosmic infrared background and Galactic dust emission by observing 1133 square degrees of sky in the Northern Hemisphere with launches from Kiruna, Sweden. The instrument contains 2317 single-polarization, horn-coupled, aluminum lumped-element kinetic inductance detectors (LEKIDs). The LEKIDs will be maintained at 100 mK with an adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator. The polarimeter operates in two configurations, one sensitive to a spectral band centered on 150 GHz and the other sensitive to 260 and 350 GHz bands. The detector readout system is based on the ROACH-1 board, and the detectors will be biased below 300 MHz. The detector array is fed by an F/2.4 crossed-Dragone telescope with a 500 mm aperture yielding a 15 arcmin FWHM beam at 150 GHz. To minimize detector loading and maximize sensitivity, the entire optical ...

  17. Mesosphere-to-stratosphere descent of odd nitrogen in February–March 2009 after sudden stratospheric warming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.-M. Salmi

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available We use the 3-D FinROSE chemistry transport model (CTM and Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment Fourier Transform Spectrometer (ACE-FTS observations to study connections between atmospheric dynamics and middle atmospheric NOx (NOx = NO + NO2 distribution. Two cases are considered in the northern polar regions: (1 descent of mesospheric NOx in February–March 2009 after a major sudden stratospheric warming (SSW and, for comparison, (2 early 2007 when no NOx descent occurred. The model uses the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF operational data for winds and temperature, and we force NOx at the model upper altitude boundary (80 km with ACE-FTS observations. We then compare the model results with ACE-FTS observations at lower altitudes. For the periods studied, geomagnetic indices are low, which indicates absence of local NOx production by particle precipitation. This gives us a good opportunity to study effects of atmospheric transport on polar NOx. The model results show no NOx descent in 2007, in agreement with ACE-FTS. In contrast, a large amount of NOx descends in February–March 2009 from the upper to lower mesosphere at latitudes larger than 60° N, i.e. inside the polar vortex. Both observations and model results suggest NOx increases of 150–200 ppb (i.e. by factor of 50 at 65 km due to the descent. However, the model underestimates the amount of NOx around 55 km by 40–60 ppb. According to the model results, chemical loss of NOx is insignificant during the descent period, i.e. polar NOx is mainly controlled by dynamics. The descent is terminated and the polar NOx amounts return to pre-descent levels in mid-March, when the polar vortex breaks. The break-up prevents the descending NOx from reaching the upper stratosphere, where it could

  18. Stratospheric impact on tropospheric ozone variability and trends: 1990–2009

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. G. Hess

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The influence of stratospheric ozone on the interannual variability and trends in tropospheric ozone is evaluated between 30 and 90° N from 1990–2009 using ozone measurements and a global chemical transport model, the Community Atmospheric Model with chemistry (CAM-chem. Long-term measurements from ozonesondes, at 150 and 500 hPa, and the Measurements of OZone and water vapour by in-service Airbus aircraft programme (MOZAIC, at 500 hPa, are analyzed over Japan, Canada, the Eastern US and Northern and Central Europe. The measurements generally emphasize northern latitudes, although the simulation suggests that measurements over the Canadian, Northern and Central European regions are representative of the large-scale interannual ozone variability from 30 to 90° N at 500 hPa. CAM-chem is run with input meteorology from the National Center for Environmental Prediction; a tagging methodology is used to identify the stratospheric contribution to tropospheric ozone concentrations. A variant of the synthetic ozone tracer (synoz is used to represent stratospheric ozone. Both the model and measurements indicate that on large spatial scales stratospheric interannual ozone variability drives significant tropospheric variability at 500 hPa and the surface. In particular, the simulation and the measurements suggest large stratospheric influence at the surface sites of Mace Head (Ireland and Jungfraujoch (Switzerland as well as many 500 hPa measurement locations. Both the measurements and simulation suggest the stratosphere has contributed to tropospheric ozone trends. In many locations between 30–90° N 500 hPa ozone significantly increased from 1990–2000, but has leveled off since (from 2000–2009. The simulated global ozone budget suggests global stratosphere-troposphere exchange increased in 1998–1999 in association with a global ozone anomaly. Discrepancies between the simulated and measured ozone budget include a large underestimation of

  19. Rapid Transport of Stratospheric Ozone into the Planetary Boundary Layer over the Rocky Mountains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skerlak, B.; Sprenger, M.; Pfahl, S.; Wernli, H.

    2013-12-01

    Stratosphere-troposphere exchange (STE) has important impacts on atmospheric chemistry: it changes the oxidative capacity of the troposphere and affects the climate system through the exchange of water vapor and ozone. Although a large part of tropospheric ozone is produced photochemically, significant amounts of stratospheric ozone can be brought into the troposphere during STE events. The relative importance of these two sources depends on the location of interest and transport characteristics. Of particular interest are so-called deep exchange events where ozone-rich stratospheric air reaches the planetary boundary layer (PBL) within a few days (deep STT). This rapid vertical transport can contribute to ozone concentrations at ground level which can impair plant and human physiology. It is therefore not only important to quantify the ozone flux across the tropopause but also to investigate the transport pathways after the crossing to identify affected areas at ground. Using a Lagrangian methodology and 33 years of ERA-Interim reanalysis data, we have compiled a global climatology of STE from which the mountainous areas in western North America can be identified as a 'hot spot' of deep STT, especially in boreal spring. To address the question of how the stratospheric air masses are transported into the PBL in more detail, we investigate case studies in this region with the mesoscale numerical weather prediction model COSMO. On this account, we initialize a passive tracer in the stratosphere using an elaborated 3D-labeling algorithm which applies the dynamical 2 pvu/380 K tropopause definition. This tracer is then advected by both resolved and parameterized processes and allows us to follow the stratospheric air masses along their journey into the mountainous PBL. Although this tracer does not directly represent a specific chemical species, its concentrations at the lowest model level can indicate when and where ozone levels at ground are likely to be influenced

  20. Simulation of the isotopic composition of stratospheric water vapour - Part 2: Investigation of HDO / H2O variations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichinger, R.; Jöckel, P.; Lossow, S.

    2015-06-01

    Studying the isotopic composition of water vapour in the lower stratosphere can reveal the driving mechanisms of changes in the stratospheric water vapour budget and therefore help to explain the trends and variations of stratospheric water vapour during recent decades. We equipped a global chemistry climate model with a description of the water isotopologue HDO, comprising its physical and chemical fractionation effects throughout the hydrological cycle. We use this model to improve our understanding of the processes which determine the patterns in the stratospheric water isotope composition and in the water vapour budget itself. The link between the water vapour budget and its isotopic composition in the tropical stratosphere is presented through their correlation in a simulated 21-year time series. The two quantities depend on the same processes; however, they are influenced with different strengths. A sensitivity experiment shows that fractionation effects during the oxidation of methane have a damping effect on the stratospheric tape recorder signal in the water isotope ratio. Moreover, the chemically produced high water isotope ratios overshadow the tape recorder in the upper stratosphere. Investigating the origin of the boreal-summer signal of isotopically enriched water vapour reveals that in-mixing of old stratospheric air from the extratropics and the intrusion of tropospheric water vapour into the stratosphere complement each other in order to create the stratospheric isotope ratio tape recorder signal. For this, the effect of ice lofting in monsoon systems is shown to play a crucial role. Furthermore, we describe a possible pathway of isotopically enriched water vapour through the tropopause into the tropical stratosphere.

  1. On the age of stratospheric air and inorganic chlorine and bromine release

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel, J. S.; Schauffler, S. M.; Pollock, W. H.; Solomon, S.; Weaver, A.; Heidt, L. E.; Garcia, R. R.; Atlas, E. L.; Vedder, J. F.

    1996-07-01

    We estimate the average transport time from the tropical tropopause to various regions of the northern hemisphere lower stratosphere (stratospheric age) using simultaneous mixing ratio measurements of CFC-115 and CO2 measured by the Whole Air Sampler (WAS) during Airborne Arctic Stratospheric Expedition II (AASE II). Our inferred ages are consistent with those presented in previous studies. We discuss sources of uncertainties that affect age estimates in general, as well as specific uncertainties arising from inferring ages using CO2 and CFC-115 abundances. We infer inorganic chlorine (Cly) and bromine (Bry) at various lower stratospheric locations using the WAS organic chlorine and bromine measurements in combination with modeled tropospheric halocarbon trends and with our estimated ages. Inferred Cly and Bry abundances generally increase with increasing latitude and altitude. For our analyzed locations inside the polar vortex, we estimate a maximum Cly abundance of about 2.7 parts per billion by volume (ppbv) and a maximum Bry abundance of about 13.7 parts per trillion by volume (pptv). The locations of these maxima correspond to an average N2O mixing ratio of about 100 ppbv, and to a fractional dissociation of organic chlorine and bromine of 0.85 and 0.90, respectively. Finally, we discuss the expected future limitations of using CFC-115 to estimate stratospheric age due to the production limitations prescribed by the amendments and adjustments to the Montreal Protocol.

  2. The radiative impact of major volcanic eruptions on stratospheric water vapour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löffler, Michael; Brinkop, Sabine; Jöckel, Patrick

    2016-04-01

    Volcanic eruptions can have significant impact on the earth's weather and climate system. Besides the subsequent tropospheric changes also the stratosphere is influenced by large eruptions. Here changes in stratospheric water vapour after the two major volcanic eruptions of El Chichón in Mexico in 1982 and Mount Pinatubo on the Philippines in 1991 are investigated with chemistry-climate model simulations. This study is based on two simulations with specified dynamics of the EMAC model, performed within the Earth System Chemistry integrated Modelling (ESCiMo) project, of which only one includes the volcanic forcing through prescribed aerosol optical properties. The results show a significant increase in stratospheric water vapour after the eruptions, resulting from increased heating rates and the subsequent changes in stratospheric and tropopause temperatures in the tropics. The tropical vertical advection and the South Asian summer monsoon are identified as important sources for the additional water vapour in the stratosphere. Additionally, volcanic influences on the tropospheric water vapour and ENSO are evident.

  3. Transport versus energetic particle precipitation: Northern polar stratospheric NOx and ozone in January-March 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Päivärinta, S.-M.; Verronen, P. T.; Funke, B.; Gardini, A.; Seppälä, A.; Andersson, M. E.

    2016-05-01

    In early 2012, a strong sudden stratospheric warming (SSW) took place, accompanied by several medium-scale solar proton events (SPEs). Here we use a chemistry transport model (CTM) in order to assess the relative contributions of (1) intensified downward transport of odd nitrogen (NOx) and (2) in situ production of NOx by protons, on stratospheric NOx and ozone during January-March 2012. The CTM is constrained by an upper boundary condition for reactive nitrogen (NOy) species, based on satellite observations from Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding (MIPAS) on board Envisat, and includes a new parameterization of the SPE-caused effects on NOy and odd hydrogen (HOx) species. We found that the amount of NOx increases due to both transport and in situ production effects, the intensified descent of NOx dominating the middle and upper stratospheric impact. The model results indicate NOx enhancements of 120-3300% (5-48 ppbv) between 38 and 50 km, caused by the transport of mesosphere/lower thermosphere NOx down to the stratosphere following the SSW. The SPEs increase NOx by up to 820-1200% (14-21 ppbv) at 33 to 50 km. The effect on the stratospheric ozone is larger following the downward transport of NOx than during and after the SPEs. The model predicts ozone losses of up to 17% and 9% at around 40 km due to transport and SPE effects, respectively.

  4. Research on Structural Safety of the Stratospheric Airship Based on Multi-Physics Coupling Calculation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Z.; Hou, Z.; Zang, X.

    2015-09-01

    As a large-scale flexible inflatable structure by a huge inner lifting gas volume of several hundred thousand cubic meters, the stratospheric airship's thermal characteristic of inner gas plays an important role in its structural performance. During the floating flight, the day-night variation of the combined thermal condition leads to the fluctuation of the flow field inside the airship, which will remarkably affect the pressure acted on the skin and the structural safety of the stratospheric airship. According to the multi-physics coupling mechanism mentioned above, a numerical procedure of structural safety analysis of stratospheric airships is developed and the thermal model, CFD model, finite element code and criterion of structural strength are integrated. Based on the computation models, the distributions of the deformations and stresses of the skin are calculated with the variation of day-night time. The effects of loads conditions and structural configurations on the structural safety of stratospheric airships in the floating condition are evaluated. The numerical results can be referenced for the structural design of stratospheric airships.

  5. Stratospheric water vapour in the vicinity of the Arctic polar vortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Maturilli

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available The stratospheric water vapour mixing ratio inside, outside, and at the edge of the polar vortex has been accurately measured by the FLASH-B Lyman-Alpha hygrometer during the LAUTLOS campaign in Sodankylä, Finland, in January and February 2004. The retrieved H2O profiles reveal a detailed view on the Arctic lower stratospheric water vapour distribution, and provide a valuable dataset for the validation of model and satellite data. Analysing the measurements with the semi-lagrangian advection model MIMOSA, water vapour profiles typical for the polar vortex' interior and exterior have been identified, and laminae in the observed profiles have been correlated to filamentary structures in the potential vorticity field. Applying the validated MIMOSA transport scheme to specific humidity fields from operational ECMWF analyses, large discrepancies from the observed profiles arise. Although MIMOSA is able to reproduce weak water vapour filaments and improves the shape of the profiles compared to operational ECMWF analyses, both models reveal a dry bias of about 1 ppmv in the lower stratosphere above 400 K, accounting for a relative difference from the measurements in the order of 20%. The large dry bias in the analysis representation of stratospheric water vapour in the Arctic implies the need for future regular measurements of water vapour in the polar stratosphere to allow the validation and improvement of climate models.

  6. Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment III on the International Space Station (SAGE III/ISS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasbarre, Joseph; Walker, Richard; Cisewski, Michael; Zawodny, Joseph; Cheek, Dianne; Thornton, Brooke

    2015-01-01

    The Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment III on the International Space Station (SAGE III/ISS) mission will extend the SAGE data record from the ideal vantage point of the International Space Station (ISS). The ISS orbital inclination is ideal for SAGE measurements providing coverage between 70 deg north and 70 deg south latitude. The SAGE data record includes an extensively validated data set including aerosol optical depth data dating to the Stratospheric Aerosol Measurement (SAM) experiments in 1975 and 1978 and stratospheric ozone profile data dating to the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE) in 1979. These and subsequent data records, notably from the SAGE II experiment launched on the Earth Radiation Budget Satellite in 1984 and the SAGE III experiment launched on the Russian Meteor-3M satellite in 2001, have supported a robust, long-term assessment of key atmospheric constituents. These scientific measurements provide the basis for the analysis of five of the nine critical constituents (aerosols, ozone (O3), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), water vapor (H2O), and air density using O2) identified in the U.S. National Plan for Stratospheric Monitoring. SAGE III on ISS was originally scheduled to fly on the ISS in the same timeframe as the Meteor-3M mission, but was postponed due to delays in ISS construction. The project was re-established in 2009.

  7. Stratospheric CH4 and CO2 profiles derived from SCIAMACHY solar occultation measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Noël

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Stratospheric profiles of methane (CH4 and carbon dioxide (CO2 have been derived from solar occultation measurements of the SCanning Imaging Absorption spectroMeter for Atmospheric CHartographY (SCIAMACHY. The retrieval is performed using a method called "Onion Peeling DOAS" (ONPD which combines an onion peeling approach with a weighting function DOAS (Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy fit. By use of updated pointing information and optimisation of the data selection and of the retrieval approach the altitude range for reasonable CH4 could be extended to about 17 to 45 km. Furthermore, the quality of the derived CO2 has been assessed such that now the first stratospheric profiles of CO2 from SCIAMACHY are available. Comparisons with independent data sets yield an estimated accuracy of the new SCIAMACHY stratospheric profiles of about 5–10 % for CH4 and 2–3 % for CO2. The accuracy of the products is currently mainly restricted by the appearance of unexpected vertical oscillations in the derived profiles which need further investigation. Using the improved ONPD retrieval, CH4 and CO2 stratospheric data sets covering the whole SCIAMACHY time series (August 2002–April 2012 and the latitudinal range between about 50 and 70° N have been derived. Based on these time series, CH4 and CO2 trends have been estimated, which are in reasonable agreement with total column trends for these gases. This shows that the new SCIAMACHY data sets can provide valuable information about the stratosphere.

  8. Causes and impacts of changes in the stratospheric meridional circulation in a chemistry-climate model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garny, Hella

    2011-05-13

    The stratospheric meridional circulation is projected to be subject to changes due to enhanced greenhouse-gas concentrations in the atmosphere. This study aims to diagnose and explain long-term changes in the stratospheric meridional circulation using the chemistry-climate model E39CA. The diagnosed strengthening of the circulation is found to be driven by increases in tropical sea surface temperatures which lead to a strengthening and upward shift of the subtropical jets. This enables enhanced vertical propagation of large scale waves into the lower stratosphere, and therefore stronger local wave forcing of the meridional circulation in the tropical lower stratosphere. The impact of changes in transport on the ozone layer is analysed using a newly developed method that allows the separation of the effects of transport and chemistry changes on ozone. It is found that future changes of mean stratospheric ozone concentrations are largely determined by changes in chemistry, while changes in transport of ozone play a minor role. (orig.)

  9. Low level of stratospheric ozone near the Jharia coal field in India

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Nandita D Ganguly

    2008-02-01

    The Indian reserve of coking coal is mainly located in the Jharia coal field in Jharkhand. Although air pollution due to oxides and dioxides of carbon, nitrogen and sulphur is reported to have increased in this area due to large-scale opencast mining and coal fires, no significant study on the possible impact of coal fires on the stratospheric ozone concentration has been reported so far. The possible impact of coal fires, which have been burning for more than 90 years on the current stratospheric ozone concentration has been investigated using satellite based data obtained from Upper Atmospheric Research Satellite (UARS MLS), Earth Observing System Microwave Limb Sounder (EOS MLS) and Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) in this paper. The stratospheric ozone values for the years 1992–2007, in the 28–36 km altitude range near Jharia and places to its north are found to be consistently lower than those of places lying to its south (up to a radius of 1000 km around Jharia) by 4.0–20%. This low stratospheric ozone level around Jharia is being observed and reported for the first time. However, due to lack of systematic ground-based measurements of tropospheric ozone and vertical ozone profiles at Jharia and other far off places in different directions, it is difficult to conclude strongly on the existence of a relationship between pollution from coal fires and stratospheric ozone depletion.

  10. Stratospheric Inorganic Bromine Loading Inferred from CONTRAST BrO and Organic Bromine Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salawitch, R. J.; Wales, P.; Nicely, J. M.; Anderson, D. C.; Canty, T. P.; Atlas, E. L.; Schauffler, S.; Donets, V.; Lueb, R.; Navarro, M. A.; Apel, E. C.; Blake, N. J.; Hills, A. J.; Hornbrook, R. S.; Riemer, D. D.; Chen, D.; Huey, L. G.; Tanner, D.; Volkamer, R. M.; Koenig, T. K.; Baidar, S.; Dix, B. K.; Weinheimer, A. J.; Wolfe, G.; Hanisco, T. F.; Hall, S. R.; Ullmann, K.; Fernandez, R.; Saiz-Lopez, A.; Kinnison, D. E.; Lamarque, J. F.; Honomichl, S.; Pan, L.

    2016-12-01

    The CONvective TRansport of Active Species in the Tropics (CONTRAST) and Airborne Tropical TRopopause EXperiment (ATTREX) aircraft campaigns sampled the tropical Western Pacific in the winter of 2014. In this region, strong convection provides an efficient pathway to transport very short lived (VSL) biogenic bromocarbons and their degradation products from the marine boundary layer to the stratosphere, where they contribute to ozone depletion. A stratospheric tracer-tracer relation will be developed based on CONTRAST and ATTREX whole air sampler observations of CFC-11, a commonly measured stratospheric tracer, and bromocarbons. This relation will be used to calculate the release of inorganic bromine both from VSL source gas injection and from long-lived bromocarbons as a function of CFC-11. Additionally, a photochemical box model will be used to infer inorganic bromine loading using CONTRAST BrO observations taken in the lower stratosphere using CIMS and DOAS instruments. The inferred inorganic bromine loading will be combined with the tracer-tracer relation to provide an estimate of VSL product gas injection. This work will provide an observations-based method for calculating stratospheric inorganic bromine loading from CFC-11 to be used in future modelling studies.

  11. Mechanisms and Feedbacks Causing Changes in Upper Stratospheric Ozone in the 21st Century

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oman, Luke; Waugh, D. W.; Kawa, S. R.; Stolarski, R. S.; Douglass, A. R.; Newman, P. A.

    2009-01-01

    Stratospheric ozone is expected to increase during the 21st century as the abundance of halogenated ozone-depleting substances decrease to 1960 values. However, climate change will likely alter this "recovery" of stratospheric ozone by changing stratospheric temperatures, circulation, and abundance of reactive chemical species. Here we quantity the contribution of different mechanisms to changes in upper stratospheric ozone from 1960 to 2100 in the Goddard Earth Observing System Chemistry-Climate Model (GEOS CCM), using multiple linear regression analysis applied to simulations using either Alb or A2 greenhouse gas (GHG) scenarios. In both these scenarios upper stratospheric ozone has a secular increase over the 21st century. For the simulation using the Alb GHG scenario, this increase is determined by the decrease in halogen amounts and the greenhouse gas induced cooling, with roughly equal contributions from each mechanism. There is a larger cooling in the simulation using the A2 GHG scenario, but also enhanced loss from higher NOy and HOx concentrations, which nearly offsets the increase due to cooler temperatures. The resulting ozone evolutions are similar in the A2 and Alb simulations. The response of ozone due to feedbacks from temperature and HOx changes, related to changing halogen concentrations, are also quantified using simulations with fixed halogen concentrations.

  12. The Effect of Climate Change on Ozone Depletion through Changes in Stratospheric Water Vapour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirk-Davidoff, Daniel B.; Hintsa, Eric J.; Anderson, James G.; Keith, David W.

    1999-01-01

    Several studies have predicted substantial increases in Arctic ozone depletion due to the stratospheric cooling induced by increasing atmospheric CO2 concentrations. But climate change may additionally influence Arctic ozone depletion through changes in the water vapor cycle. Here we investigate this possibility by combining predictions of tropical tropopause temperatures from a general circulation model with results from a one-dimensional radiative convective model, recent progress in understanding the stratospheric water vapor budget, modelling of heterogeneous reaction rates and the results of a general circulation model on the radiative effect of increased water vapor. Whereas most of the stratosphere will cool as greenhouse-gas concentrations increase, the tropical tropopause may become warmer, resulting in an increase of the mean saturation mixing ratio of water vapor and hence an increased transport of water vapor from the troposphere to the stratosphere. Stratospheric water vapor concentration in the polar regions determines both the critical temperature below which heterogeneous reactions on cold aerosols become important (the mechanism driving enhanced ozone depletion) and the temperature of the Arctic vortex itself. Our results indicate that ozone loss in the later winter and spring Arctic vortex depends critically on water vapor variations which are forced by sea surface temperature changes in the tropics. This potentially important effect has not been taken into account in previous scenarios of Arctic ozone loss under climate change conditions.

  13. Arctic stratospheric ozone depletion and increased UVB radiation: potential impacts to human health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Fabo, Edward C

    2005-12-01

    Contrary to popular belief, stratospheric ozone depletion, and the resultant increase in solar UV-B (280-320 nm), are unlikely to fully recover soon. Notwithstanding the success of the Montreal Protocol in reducing the amount of ozone destroying chemicals into the stratosphere, the life-times of these compounds are such that even with full compliance with the Protocol by all countries, it will be decades before stratospheric ozone could return to pre-1980 levels. This raises the question, therefore, of what will happen to biological processes essential to the maintenance of life on earth which are sensitive to damage by increased UV-B radiation, particularly those involved with human health? The polar regions, because of the vagaries of climate and weather, are the bellwether for stratospheric ozone depletion and will, therefore, be the first to experience impacts due to increases in solar UV-B radiation. The impacts of these are incompletely understood and cannot be predicted with certainty. While some UV-B impacts on human health are recognized, much is unknown, unclear and uncertain. Thus, this paper attempts, as a first approximation, to point out potential impacts to the health and welfare of human inhabitants of the Arctic due to increased solar UV-B radiation associated with stratospheric ozone depletion. As will be seen, much more data is critically needed before adequate risk assessment can occur.

  14. Ozone Depletion in the Arctic Lower Stratosphere; Timing and Impacts on the Polar Vortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rae, Cameron; Pyle, John

    2017-04-01

    There a strong link between ozone depletion in the Antarctic lower stratosphere and the strength/duration of the southern hemisphere polar vortex. Ozone depletion arising from enhanced levels of ODS in the lower stratosphere during the last few decades of the 20th century has been accompanied by a delay in the final warming date in the southern hemisphere. The delay in final warming is associated with anomalous tropospheric conditions. The relationship in the Arctic, however, is less clear as the northern hemisphere experiences relatively less intense ozone destruction in the Arctic lower stratosphere and the polar vortex is generally less stable. This study investigates the impacts of imposed lower stratospheric ozone depletion on the evolution of the polar vortex, particularly in the late-spring towards the end of its lifetime. A perpetual-year integration is compared with a series of near-identical seasonal integrations which differ only by an imposed artificial ozone depletion event, occurring a fixed number of days before the polar vortex final warming date each year. Any differences between the seasonal forecasts and perpetual year simulation are due to the timely occurrence of a strong ozone depletion event in the late-spring Arctic polar vortex. This ensemble of seasonal forecasts demonstrates the impacts that a strong ozone depletion event in the Arctic lower stratosphere will have on the evolution of the polar vortex, and highlights tropospheric impacts associated with this phenomenon.

  15. Prediction of thermal behavior and trajectory of stratospheric airships during ascent based on simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xixiang

    2016-06-01

    For designers, operators and users, the ability to accurately predict thermal behavior and trajectory of stratospheric airships is very important. Thermal models and dynamic models of stratospheric airships during ascent are developed, including solar radiation, infrared radiation, convection heat transfer and gas expulsion equation. Based on the model, performance parameters of a stratospheric airship during ascent are obtained, including film temperature, helium gas temperature, air temperature, pressure differential, altitude and ascent velocity, changing regulation for these parameters are discussed, and influence of initial helium gas volume and film radiation properties on thermal behavior is analyzed. Simulation results show that, (1) stratospheric airships experience supercooling during ascent, the maximum value is about 30 K, supercooling causes loss of net buoyancy, and affects ascent velocity and trajectory in the end, (2) stratospheric airships experience superheating at the floating altitude, and the maximum value is about 51 K, (3) initial volume ratio of helium gas and the solar radiation absorptivity of film have important effect on thermal behavior and trajectory during ascent, the larger the initial volume ratio is, the faster the ascent velocity will be, and the bigger the solar radiation absorptivity of film is, the smaller the temperature differential between helium gas and outside atmosphere will be.

  16. QBO Influence on Polar Stratospheric Variability in the GEOS Chemistry-Climate Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurwitz, M. M.; Oman, L. D.; Li, F.; Slong, I.-S.; Newman, P. A.; Nielsen, J. E.

    2010-01-01

    The quasi-biennial oscillation modulates the strength of both the Arctic and Antarctic stratospheric vortices. Model and observational studies have found that the phase and characteristics of the quasi-biennial oscillation (QBO) contribute to the high degree of variability in the Arctic stratosphere in winter. While the Antarctic stratosphere is less variable, recent work has shown that Southern Hemisphere planetary wave driving increases in response to "warm pool" El Nino events that are coincident with the easterly phase of the QBO. These events hasten the breakup of the Antarctic polar vortex. The Goddard Earth Observing System (GEOS) chemistry-climate model (CCM) is now capable of generating a realistic QBO, due a new parameterization of gravity wave drag. In this presentation, we will use this new model capability to assess the influence of the QBO on polar stratospheric variability. Using simulations of the recent past, we will compare the modeled relationship between QBO phase and mid-winter vortex strength with the observed Holton-Tan relation, in both hemispheres. We will use simulations of the 21 St century to estimate future trends in the relationship between QBO phase and vortex strength. In addition, we will evaluate the combined influence of the QBO and El Nino/Southern Oscillation (ENSO) on the timing of the breakup of the polar stratospheric vortices in the GEOS CCM. We will compare the influence of these two natural phenomena with trends in the vortex breakup associated with ozone recovery and increasing greenhouse gas concentrations.

  17. Stratospheric water vapour in the vicinity of the Arctic polar vortex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maturilli, M. [Alfred Wegener Institute for Polar and Marine Research, Potsdam (Germany); Fierli, F. [CNR (Italy). Inst. for Atmospheric Sciences and Climate; Yushkov, V.; Lukyanov, A.; Khaykin, S. [Central Aerological Observatory, Moscow (Russian Federation); Hauchecorne, A. [CNRS, Verrieres-le-Buisson (France). Service d' Aeronomie

    2006-07-01

    The stratospheric water vapour mixing ratio inside, outside, and at the edge of the polar vortex has been accurately measured by the FLASH-B Lyman-Alpha hygrometer during the LAUTLOS campaign in Sodankylae, Finland, in January and February 2004. The retrieved H{sub 2}O profiles reveal a detailed view on the Arctic lower stratospheric water vapour distribution, and provide a valuable dataset for the validation of model and satellite data. Analysing the measurements with the semi-lagrangian advection model MIMOSA, water vapour profiles typical for the polar vortex' interior and exterior have been identified, and laminae in the observed profiles have been correlated to filamentary structures in the potential vorticity field. Applying the validated MIMOSA transport scheme to specific humidity fields from operational ECMWF analyses, large discrepancies from the observed profiles arise. Although MIMOSA is able to reproduce weak water vapour filaments and improves the shape of the profiles compared to operational ECMWF analyses, both models reveal a dry bias of about 1 ppmv in the lower stratosphere above 400 K, accounting for a relative difference from the measurements in the order of 20%. The large dry bias in the analysis representation of stratospheric water vapour in the Arctic implies the need for future regular measurements of water vapour in the polar stratosphere to allow the validation and improvement of climate models. (orig.)

  18. Unexpected variations in the triple oxygen isotope composition of stratospheric carbon dioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiegel, Aaron A; Cole, Amanda S; Hoag, Katherine J; Atlas, Elliot L; Schauffler, Sue M; Boering, Kristie A

    2013-10-29

    We report observations of stratospheric CO2 that reveal surprisingly large anomalous enrichments in (17)O that vary systematically with latitude, altitude, and season. The triple isotope slopes reached 1.95 ± 0.05(1σ) in the middle stratosphere and 2.22 ± 0.07 in the Arctic vortex versus 1.71 ± 0.03 from previous observations and a remarkable factor of 4 larger than the mass-dependent value of 0.52. Kinetics modeling of laboratory measurements of photochemical ozone-CO2 isotope exchange demonstrates that non-mass-dependent isotope effects in ozone formation alone quantitatively account for the (17)O anomaly in CO2 in the laboratory, resolving long-standing discrepancies between models and laboratory measurements. Model sensitivities to hypothetical mass-dependent isotope effects in reactions involving O3, O((1)D), or CO2 and to an empirically derived temperature dependence of the anomalous kinetic isotope effects in ozone formation then provide a conceptual framework for understanding the differences in the isotopic composition and the triple isotope slopes between the laboratory and the stratosphere and between different regions of the stratosphere. This understanding in turn provides a firmer foundation for the diverse biogeochemical and paleoclimate applications of (17)O anomalies in tropospheric CO2, O2, mineral sulfates, and fossil bones and teeth, which all derive from stratospheric CO2.

  19. Enhanced stratospheric water vapor over the summertime continental United States and the role of overshooting convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herman, Robert L.; Ray, Eric A.; Rosenlof, Karen H.; Bedka, Kristopher M.; Schwartz, Michael J.; Read, William G.; Troy, Robert F.; Chin, Keith; Christensen, Lance E.; Fu, Dejian; Stachnik, Robert A.; Bui, T. Paul; Dean-Day, Jonathan M.

    2017-05-01

    The NASA ER-2 aircraft sampled the lower stratosphere over North America during the field mission for the NASA Studies of Emissions and Atmospheric Composition, Clouds and Climate Coupling by Regional Surveys (SEAC4RS). This study reports observations of convectively influenced air parcels with enhanced water vapor in the overworld stratosphere over the summertime continental United States and investigates three case studies in detail. Water vapor mixing ratios greater than 10 ppmv, which is much higher than the background 4 to 6 ppmv of the overworld stratosphere, were measured by the JPL Laser Hygrometer (JLH Mark2) at altitudes between 16.0 and 17.5 km (potential temperatures of approximately 380 to 410 K). Overshooting cloud tops (OTs) are identified from a SEAC4RS OT detection product based on satellite infrared window channel brightness temperature gradients. Through trajectory analysis, we make the connection between these in situ water measurements and OT. Back trajectory analysis ties enhanced water to OT 1 to 7 days prior to the intercept by the aircraft. The trajectory paths are dominated by the North American monsoon (NAM) anticyclonic circulation. This connection suggests that ice is convectively transported to the overworld stratosphere in OT events and subsequently sublimated; such events may irreversibly enhance stratospheric water vapor in the summer over Mexico and the United States. A regional context is provided by water observations from the Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS).

  20. Response of the Antarctic Stratosphere to Two Types of El Nino Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurwitz, M. M.; Newman, P. A.; Oman, L. D.; Molod, A. M.

    2010-01-01

    This study is the first to identify a robust El Nino/Southern Oscillation (ENSO) signal in the Antarctic stratosphere. El Nino events are classified as either conventional "cold tongue" events (positive SST anomalies in the Nino 3 region) or "warm pool" events (positive SST anomalies in the Nino 4 region). The ERA-40, NCEP and MERRA meteorological reanalyses are used to show that the Southern Hemisphere stratosphere responds differently to these two types of El Nino events. Consistent with previous studies, "cold tongue" events do not impact temperatures in the Antarctic stratosphere. During "warm pool" El Nino events, the poleward extension and increased strength of the South Pacific Convergence Zone (SPCZ) favor an enhancement of planetary wave activity during the SON season. On average, these conditions lead to higher polar stratospheric temperatures and a weakening of the Antarctic polar jet in November and December, as compared with neutral ENSO years. The phase of the quasi-biennial oscillation (QBO) modulates the stratospheric response to "warm pool" El Nino events: the strongest planetary wave driving events are coincident with the easterly phase of the QBO.

  1. Studies of temperature disturbances of lower and middle atmosphere during stratospheric warmings 2006-2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medvedev, Andrey; Medvedeva, Irina; Ratovsky, Konstantin; Tolstikov, Maxim

    This paper was devoted to study of sudden winter stratospheric warmings 2006-2013. Initial data were vertical temperature profiles obtained by the Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) aboard the spacecraft EOS Aura. Shown that the temperature disturbances, propagated during stratospheric warmings are result of interference of at least two waves. Two-wave interference model of stratospheric warming was developed. Characteristics of planetary waves were obtained by using this model. Periods of disturbances vary from 5 to 45 days. Vertical wave numbers range is 20-150 km. Amplitudes and horizontal wave numbers obtained by the two-wave model vary smoothly in space and time, forming vorticity-like structure. We compared warmings 2006-2013 by using global amplitude. Comparison of variations of ionospheric parameters and characteristics of planetary waves in the stratosphere during warmings was done. On the basis of regular, continuous observations of the Irkutsk ionosonde DSP-4, was shown that number of traveling ionospheric disturbances (TIDs) tend to increase during stratospheric warmings. Found correlations between the amount of traveling ionospheric disturbances and the temperature at 80 km, between the daily maximum electron concentration and global amplitude of wave with upward phase velocity between the ion temperature and the amplitude of wave with downward phase velocity over Irkutsk. The work was supported by Russian Foundation for Basic Research Grant 13-05-00153 and RF President Grant of Public Support for RF Leading Scientific Schools (NSh-2942.2014.5).

  2. Efficient transport of tropospheric aerosol into the stratosphere via the Asian summer monsoon anticyclone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Pengfei; Rosenlof, Karen H.; Liu, Shang; Telg, Hagen; Thornberry, Troy D.; Rollins, Andrew W.; Portmann, Robert W.; Bai, Zhixuan; Ray, Eric A.; Duan, Yunjun; Pan, Laura L.; Toon, Owen B.; Bian, Jianchun; Gao, Ru-Shan

    2017-07-01

    An enhanced aerosol layer near the tropopause over Asia during the June-September period of the Asian summer monsoon (ASM) was recently identified using satellite observations. Its sources and climate impact are presently not well-characterized. To improve understanding of this phenomenon, we made in situ aerosol measurements during summer 2015 from Kunming, China, then followed with a modeling study to assess the global significance. The in situ measurements revealed a robust enhancement in aerosol concentration that extended up to 2 km above the tropopause. A climate model simulation demonstrates that the abundant anthropogenic aerosol precursor emissions from Asia coupled with rapid vertical transport associated with monsoon convection leads to significant particle formation in the upper troposphere within the ASM anticyclone. These particles subsequently spread throughout the entire Northern Hemispheric (NH) lower stratosphere and contribute significantly (˜15%) to the NH stratospheric column aerosol surface area on an annual basis. This contribution is comparable to that from the sum of small volcanic eruptions in the period between 2000 and 2015. Although the ASM contribution is smaller than that from tropical upwelling (˜35%), we find that this region is about three times as efficient per unit area and time in populating the NH stratosphere with aerosol. With a substantial amount of organic and sulfur emissions in Asia, the ASM anticyclone serves as an efficient smokestack venting aerosols to the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere. As economic growth continues in Asia, the relative importance of Asian emissions to stratospheric aerosol is likely to increase.

  3. Winter Season Stratospheric Circulation in the SAMIL/LASG General Circulation Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    REN Rongcai; WU Guoxiong; Ming CAI; YU Jingjing

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we examine the performance of the 26-level version of the SAMIL/LASG GCM (R42/L26)in simulating the seasonal cycle and perpetual winter mean stratospheric circulation as well as its variability by comparing them with the NCEP/NCAR reanalysis. The results show that the model is capable of reproducing many key features of the climatology and seasonal variation of the stratospheric circulation despite that the model's mean polar vortex is stronger and more zonally symmetric compared to the observation. Further diagnosis of the results from a perpetual-January-run of the SAMIL/LASG GCM indicates that the dominant winter-season oscillation mode in the model's stratosphere exhibits a similar inter-seasonal timescale with similar spatial patterns as those inferred from the NCEP/NCAR reanalysis. In particular, the simulated polar vortex oscillation mode exhibits a dominant inter-seasonal timescale of about 120 days, and is accompanied with the simultaneous poleward and downward propagation of temperature anomalies in the stratosphere and the equatorward propagation of temperature anomalies in the troposphere. More encouragingly, the 26-layer version of the SAMIL/LASG GCM is able to produce three strong Stratospheric Sudden Warming events during the 1825 days of perpetual-January integration, with the polar westerly jet completely reversed for a few weeks without imposing any prescribed anomalous forcing at the lower boundary.

  4. Reflight of the Stratospheric TeraHertz Observatory: STO-2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernasconi, Pietro

    This is the Lead Proposal for the "Reflight of the Stratospheric TeraHertz Observatory: STO-2". STO-2 will address a key problem in modern astrophysics, understanding the Life Cycle of the Interstellar Medium (ISM). STO-2 will survey approximately 1/4 of the Southern Galactic plane in the dominant interstellar cooling line [CII] (158 μm) and the important star formation tracer [NII] (205 μm). With ~1 arcminute angular resolution, STO-2 will spatially resolve atomic, ionic and molecular clouds out to 10 kpc. Taking advantage of its enhanced, extended lifetime cryogenic receivers, the STO-2 survey will be conducted at unparalleled sensitivity levels. STO- 2 will uniquely probe the pivotal formative and disruptive stages in the life cycle of interstellar clouds and the relationship between global star formation rates and the properties of the ISM. Combined with previous HI and CO surveys, STO-2 will create 3-dimensional maps of the structure, dynamics, turbulence, energy balance, and pressure of the Milky Way's ISM, as well as the star formation rate. Once we gain an understanding of the relationship between ISM properties and star formation in the Milky Way, we can better interpret observations of nearby galaxies and the distant universe. The mission goals for these surveys are to: 1) Determine the life cycle of Galactic interstellar gas, 2) Study the creation and disruption of star-forming clouds in the Galaxy, 3) Determine the parameters that affect the star formation rate in the galaxy, and 4) Provide templates for star formation and stellar/interstellar feedback in other galaxies. STO-2 will re-use the 80cm telescope, gondola, and subsystems from STO-1. For the STO-2 flight, STO-1 s high spectral resolution (receiver system will be upgraded for extended cryogenic lifetime, enhanced sensitivity, and greater reliability. The flight receiver has eight, cryogenic HEB mixers; four optimized for the [CII] line and four for the [NII] line. STO-2 will also fly an

  5. Microphysical simulations of sulfur burdens from stratospheric sulfur geoengineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. M. English

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent microphysical studies suggest that geoengineering by continuous stratospheric injection of SO2 gas may be limited by the growth of the aerosols. We study the efficacy of SO2, H2SO4 and aerosol injections on aerosol mass and optical depth using a three-dimensional general circulation model with sulfur chemistry and sectional aerosol microphysics (WACCM/CARMA. We find increasing injection rates of SO2 in a narrow band around the equator to have limited efficacy while broadening the injecting zone as well as injecting particles instead of SO2 gas increases the sulfate burden for a given injection rate, in agreement with previous work. We find that injecting H2SO4 gas instead of SO2 does not discernibly alter sulfate size or mass, in contrast with a previous study using a plume model with a microphysical model. However, the physics and chemistry in aircraft plumes, which are smaller than climate model grid cells, need to be more carefully considered. We find equatorial injections increase aerosol optical depth in the Northern Hemisphere more than the Southern Hemisphere, potentially inducing regional climate changes. We also find significant perturbations to tropospheric aerosol for all injections studied, particularly in the upper troposphere and near the poles, where sulfate burden increases by up to 100 times. This enhanced burden could have implications for tropospheric radiative forcing and chemistry. These results highlight the need to mitigate greenhouse gas emissions through means other than geoengineering, and to further study geoengineering before it can be seriously considered as a climate intervention option.

  6. Microphysical simulations of sulfur burdens from stratospheric sulfur geoengineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. M. English

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Recent microphysical studies suggest that geoengineering by continuous stratospheric injection of SO2 gas may be limited by the growth of the aerosols. We study the efficacy of SO2, H2SO4 and aerosol injections on aerosol mass and optical depth using a three-dimensional general circulation model with sulfur chemistry and sectional aerosol microphysics (WACCM/CARMA. We find increasing injection rates of SO2 in a narrow band around the equator to have limited efficacy while broadening the injecting zone as well as injecting particles instead of SO2 gas increases the sulfate burden for a given injection rate, in agreement with previous work. We find that injecting H2SO4 gas instead of SO2 does not discernibly alter sulfate size or mass, in contrast with a previous study using a plume model with a microphysical model. However, the physics and chemistry in aircraft plumes, which are smaller than climate model grid cells, need to be more carefully considered. We also find significant perturbations to tropospheric aerosol for all injections studied, particularly in the upper troposphere and near the poles, where sulfate burden increases by up to 100 times. This enhanced burden could have implications for tropospheric radiative forcing and chemistry. These results highlight the need to mitigate greenhouse gas emissions rather than attempt to cool the planet through geoengineering, and to further study geoengineering before it can be seriously considered as a climate intervention option.

  7. Interannual variability of the stratospheric wave driving during northern winter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. M. Kelder

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available The strength of the stratospheric wave driving during northern winter is often quantified by the January–February mean poleward eddy heat flux at 100 hPa, averaged over 40°–80° N (or a similar area and period. Despite the dynamical and chemical relevance of the wave driving, the causes for its variability are still not well understood. In this study, ERA-40 reanalysis data for the period 1979–2002 are used to examine several factors that significantly affect the interannual variability of the wave driving. The total poleward heat flux at 100 hPa is poorly correlated with that in the troposphere, suggesting a decoupling between 100 hPa and the troposphere. However, the individual zonal wave-1 and wave-2 contributions to the wave driving at 100 hPa do exhibit a significant coupling with the troposphere, predominantly their stationary components. The stationary wave-1 contribution to the total wave driving significantly depends on the latitude of the stationary wave-1 source in the troposphere. The results suggest that this dependence is associated with the varying ability of stationary wave-1 activity to enter the tropospheric waveguide at mid-latitudes. The wave driving anomalies are separated into three parts: one part due to anomalies in the zonal correlation coefficient between the eddy temperature and eddy meridional wind, another part due to anomalies in the zonal eddy temperature amplitude, and a third part due to anomalies in the zonal eddy meridional wind amplitude. It is found that year-to-year variability in the zonal correlation coefficient between the eddy temperature and the eddy meridional wind is the most dominant factor in explaining the year-to-year variability of the poleward eddy heat flux.

  8. Radicals and Aerosols in the Troposphere and Lower Stratosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volkamer, Rainer; Koenig, Theodore; Dix, Barbara

    2016-06-01

    The remote tropical free troposphere (FT) is one of the most relevant atmospheric environments on Earth. About 75% of the global tropospheric O3 and CH4 loss occurs at tropical latitudes. Tropospheric bromine and iodine catalytically destroy tropospheric O3, oxidize atmospheric mercury, and modify oxidative capacity, and aerosols. Oxygenated VOCs (OVOC) modify HOx (= OH + HO2), NOx (= NO + NO2), tropospheric O3, aerosols, and are a sink for BrOx (= Br + BrO). Until recently, atmospheric models were untested for lack of vertically resolved measurements of BrO and IO radicals in the tropical troposphere. BrO and IO are highly reactive trace gases. Even very low concentrations (parts per trillion; 1 pptv = 10-12 volume mixing ratio) can significantly modify the lifetime of climate active gases, and determine (bromine) the rate limiting step of mercury oxidation in air (that is washed out, and subsequently bio-accumulates in fish). Analytical challenges arise when these radicals modify in sampling lines. Sensitive yet robust, portable, and inherently calibrated measurements directly in the open atmosphere have recently been demonstrated by means of limb-measurements of scattered solar photons by the University of Colorado Airborne Multi-AXis DOAS instrument (CU AMAX-DOAS) from research aircraft. The CU AMAX-DOAS instrument is optimized to (1) locate BrO, IO and glyoxal (a short lived OVOC) in the troposphere, (2) decouple stratospheric absorbers, (3) maximize sensitivity at instrument altitude, (4) facilitate altitude control and (5) enable observations over a wide range of solar zenith angles. Further, (6) the filling-in of Fraunhofer lines (Ring-effect) by Raman Scattering offers interesting opportunities for radiative closure studies to assess the effects of aerosols on Climate.

  9. Validation of Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment zone profiles and evaluation of stratospheric transport in a global chemistry transport model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laat, A.T.J.de; Landgraf, J.; Aben, I.; Hasekamp, O.; Bregman, B.

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents a validation of Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment (GOME) ozone (O3) profiles which are used to evaluate stratospheric transport in the chemistry transport model (CTM) Tracer Model version 5 (TM5) using a linearized stratospheric O3 chemistry scheme. A comparison of GOME O3 profi

  10. Observation-based assessment of stratospheric fractional release, lifetimes, and ozone depletion potentials of ten important source gases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laube, J.C.; Keil, A; Bönisch, H.; Engel, A.; Roeckmann, T.; Volk, C.M.; Sturges, W.T.

    2013-01-01

    Estimates of the recovery time of stratospheric ozone heavily rely on the exact knowledge of the processes that lead to the decomposition of the relevant halogenated source gases. Crucial parameters in this context are fractional release factors (FRFs) as well as stratospheric lifetimes and ozone

  11. Observation-based assessment of stratospheric fractional release, lifetimes, and ozone depletion potentials of ten important source gases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laube, J.C.; Keil, A; Bönisch, H.; Engel, A.; Roeckmann, T.; Volk, C.M.; Sturges, W.T.

    2013-01-01

    Estimates of the recovery time of stratospheric ozone heavily rely on the exact knowledge of the processes that lead to the decomposition of the relevant halogenated source gases. Crucial parameters in this context are fractional release factors (FRFs) as well as stratospheric lifetimes and ozone de

  12. The capability of satellite borne remote sensors to measure stratospheric trace constituents. Volume 2: Ozone and aerosol related missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keitz, E. L.

    1978-01-01

    Stratospheric trace constituent measurement requirements are separated into two somewhat overlapping areas. In the first area, it is assumed that the only problem of interest is ozone; its chemistry chain, environmental effects and measurement requirements. In like manner, in the second area it is assumed that the only problem of interest is stratospheric aerosols; their chemistry, effects and measurement requirements.

  13. Laboratory studies on the reactions between chlorine, sulfur dioxide, and oxygen - Implications for the Venus stratosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demore, W.B.; Leu, M.T.; Smith, R.H.; Yung, Y.L.

    1985-09-01

    Fourier transform IR spectrophotometry is used to monitor the reactants and products in a Venus stratosphere simulation study involving the photolysis of mixtures of Cl/sub 2/ and SO/sub 2/, with and without O/sub 2/ present in an atmosphere of N/sub 2/. When several speculative reactions inferred from these experiments are incorporated by the Yung and DeMore (1982) model of Venus stratospheric chemistry, it emerges that SO/sub 2/Cl/sub 2/ is a key reservoir species for chlorine, and that the reaction between Cl and SO/sub 2/ furnishes an important cycle for the destruction of O/sub 2/ and the conversion of SO/sub 2/ to H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/, thereby providing a possible solution to the photochemistry of the Venus stratosphere. 17 references.

  14. STRATOSPHERIC TEMPERATURES AND WATER LOSS FROM MOIST GREENHOUSE ATMOSPHERES OF EARTH-LIKE PLANETS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kasting, James F.; Kopparapu, Ravi K. [Department of Geosciences, The Pennsylvania State University, State College, PA 16801 (United States); Chen, Howard, E-mail: jfk4@psu.edu, E-mail: hwchen@bu.edu [Department of Astronomy, Boston University, 725 Commonwealth Ave., Boston, MA 02215 (United States)

    2015-11-01

    A radiative-convective climate model is used to calculate stratospheric temperatures and water vapor concentrations for ozone-free atmospheres warmer than that of modern Earth. Cold, dry stratospheres are predicted at low surface temperatures, in agreement with recent 3D calculations. However, at surface temperatures above 350 K, the stratosphere warms and water vapor becomes a major upper atmospheric constituent, allowing water to be lost by photodissociation and hydrogen escape. Hence, a moist greenhouse explanation for loss of water from Venus, or some exoplanet receiving a comparable amount of stellar radiation, remains a viable hypothesis. Temperatures in the upper parts of such atmospheres are well below those estimated for a gray atmosphere, and this factor should be taken into account when performing inverse climate calculations to determine habitable zone boundaries using 1D models.

  15. A connection from Arctic stratospheric ozone to El Niño-Southern oscillation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Fei; Li, Jianping; Tian, Wenshou; Fu, Qiang; Jin, Fei-Fei; Hu, Yongyun; Zhang, Jiankai; Wang, Wuke; Sun, Cheng; Feng, Juan; Yang, Yun; Ding, Ruiqiang

    2016-12-01

    Antarctic stratospheric ozone depletion is thought to influence the Southern Hemisphere tropospheric climate. Recently, Arctic stratospheric ozone (ASO) variations have been found to affect the middle-high latitude tropospheric climate in the Northern Hemisphere. This paper demonstrates that the impact of ASO can extend to the tropics, with the ASO variations leading El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) events by about 20 months. Using observations, analysis, and simulations, the connection between ASO and ENSO is established by combining the high-latitude stratosphere to troposphere pathway with the extratropical to tropical climate teleconnection. This shows that the ASO radiative anomalies influence the North Pacific Oscillation (NPO), and the anomalous NPO and induced Victoria Mode anomalies link to the North Pacific circulation that then influences ENSO. Our results imply that incorporating realistic and time-varying ASO into climate system models may help to improve ENSO predictions.

  16. Impact of H{sub 2} emissions of a global hydrogen economy on the stratosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grooss, Jens-Uwe; Feck, Thomas; Vogel, Baerbel; Riese, Martin [Forschungszentrum Juelich (Germany)

    2010-07-01

    ''Green'' hydrogen is seen as a major element of the future energy supply to reduce greenhouse gas emissions substantially. However, due to the possible interactions of hydrogen (H{sub 2}) with other atmospheric constituents there is a need to analyse the implications of additional atmospheric H{sub 2} that could result from hydrogen leakage of a global hydrogen infrastructure. Emissions of molecular H{sub 2} can occur along the whole hydrogen process chain which increase the tropospheric H{sub 2} burden. The impact of these emissions is investigated. Figure 1 is a sketch that clarifies the path way and impact of hydrogen in the stratosphere. The air follows the Brewer-Dobson circulation in which air enters the stratosphere through the tropical tropopause, ascends then to the upper stratosphere and finally descends in polar latitudes within a typical transport time frame of 4 to 8 years. (orig.)

  17. El Chichon volcanic ash in the stratosphere - Particle abundances and size distributions after the 1982 eruption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gooding, J. L.; Clanton, U. S.; Gabel, E. M.; Warren, J. L.

    1983-11-01

    Volcanic ash particles collected from the stratosphere after the March/April, 1982 explosive eruption of El Chichon volcano, Mexico, were mostly 2-40 micron vesicular shards of silicic volcanic glass that varied in abundance, at 16.8-19.2 km altitude, from 200 per cu m (30-49 deg N lat.) in May to 1.3 per cu m (45-75 deg N) in October. At the minimum, the ash cloud covered latitudes 10-60 deg N in July and 10 deg S-75 deg N in October. In May and July, ash particles were mostly free, individual shards (and clusters of shards) but, by October, were intimately associated with liquid droplets (presumably, sulfuric acid). In May 1982, the total stratospheric burden of ash was at least 240 tons (2.2 x 10 to the 8th g) although the total ash injected into the stratosphere by the eruption was probably 480-8400 tons.

  18. Reduced Southern Hemispheric circulation response to quadrupled CO2 due to stratospheric ozone feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiodo, Gabriel; Polvani, Lorenzo M.

    2017-01-01

    Due to computational constraints, interactive stratospheric ozone chemistry is commonly neglected in most climate models participating in intercomparison projects. The impact of this simplification on the modeled response to external forcings remains unexplored. In this work, we examine the importance of including interactive stratospheric ozone chemistry on the Southern Hemispheric circulation response to an abrupt quadrupling of CO2. We find that including interactive ozone significantly reduces (by 20%) the response of the midlatitude jet to CO2, even though it does not alter the surface temperature response. The reduction of the tropospheric circulation response is due to CO2 induced ozone changes and their effects on the meridional temperature gradient near the tropopause. Our findings suggest that neglecting this stratospheric ozone feedback results in an overestimate of the circulation response to increased CO2. This has important implications for climate projections of the Southern Hemispheric circulation response to CO2.

  19. Stratospheric Temperatures and Water Loss from Moist Greenhouse Atmospheres of Earth-like Planets

    CERN Document Server

    Kasting, James F; Kopparapu, Ravi Kumar

    2015-01-01

    A radiative-convective climate model is used to calculate stratospheric temperatures and water vapor concentrations for ozone-free atmospheres warmer than that of modern Earth. Cold, dry stratospheres are predicted at low surface temperatures, in agreement with recent 3-D calculations. However, at surface temperatures above 350 K, the stratosphere warms and water vapor becomes a major upper atmospheric constituent, allowing water to be lost by photodissociation and hydrogen escape. Hence, a 'moist greenhouse' explanation for loss of water from Venus, or some exoplanet receiving a comparable amount of stellar radiation, remains a viable hypothesis. Temperatures in the upper parts of such atmospheres are well below those estimated for a gray atmosphere, and this factor should be taken into account when performing 'inverse' climate calculations to determine habitable zone boundaries using 1-D models.

  20. More rapid polar ozone depletion through the reaction of HOCl with HCl on polar stratospheric clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prather, Michael J.

    1992-01-01

    The direct reaction of HOCl with HCl is shown here to play a critical part in polar ozone loss. Observations of high levels of OClO and ClO in the springtime Antarctic stratosphere confirm that most of the available chlorine is in the form of ClO(x). But current photochemical models have difficulty converting HCl to ClO(x) rapidly enough in early spring to account fully for the observations. Here, a chemical model is used to show that the direct reaction of HOCl with HCl provides the missing mechanism. As alternative sources of nitrogen-containing oxidants have been converted in the late autumn to inactive HNO3 by known reactions on the sulfate layer aerosols, the reaction of HOCl with HCl on polar stratospheric clouds becomes the most important pathway for releasing that stratospheric chlorine which goes into polar night as HCl.

  1. The dynamics of the stratospheric polar vortex and its relation to springtime ozone depletions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoeberl, Mark R.; Hartmann, Dennis L.

    1991-01-01

    Recent aircraft observations have determined the structure of polar vortices during winter and their relationship to polar ozone depletions, based on high dynamical isolation and the extremely low temperatures required for stratospheric cloud formation. The aircraft data reveal large gradients of potential vorticity and concentrations of conservative trace species at the transition from high-latitude to polar air, implying that the inward mixing of heat and constituents is strongly inhibited, and that the perturbed polar stratospheric chemistry associated with the ozone hole is isolated from the rest of the stratosphere until the vortex breaks up in late spring. It is therefore the overall polar vortex which limits the annual polar ozone depletions' maximum area-coverage.

  2. NOx Catalyzed Pathway of Stratospheric Ozone Depletion: A Coupled Cluster Investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Achintya Kumar; Vaval, Nayana; Pal, Sourav

    2012-06-12

    We report a theoretical investigation on the NOx catalyzed pathways of stratospheric ozone depletion using highly accurate coupled cluster methods. These catalytic reactions represent a great challenge to state-of-the-art ab initio methods, while their mechanisms remain unclear to both experimentalists and theoreticians. In this work, we have used the so-called "gold standard of quantum chemistry," the CCSD(T) method, to identify the saddle points on NOx-based reaction pathways of ozone hole formation. Energies of the saddle points are calculated using the multireference variants of coupled cluster methods. The calculated activation energies and rate constants show good agreement with available experimental results. Tropospheric precursors to stratospheric NOx radicals have been identified, and their potential importance in stratospheric chemistry has been discussed. Our calculations resolve previous conflicts between ab initio and experimental results for a trans nitro peroxide intermediate, in the NOx catalyzed pathway of ozone depletion.

  3. Optimizing an infrasound sensor network for measuring acoustic background noise and its inversion for stratospheric winds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcillo, O. E.; Arrowsmith, S.

    2013-12-01

    We demonstrate the design of an infrasound network (and the associated analysis) for measuring and inverting low-frequency acoustic background noise (microbaroms) for stratospheric winds. We developed a mathematical framework for the inversion of local stratospheric winds using microbaroms, and found theoretical constraints on the optimum sensor network topology. Based on these results, we deployed, over the winter months (January to March, 2013), a prototype sensor network comprising six infrasound stations separated between 5 and 70 km; the initial analysis shows periods of very high coherency (suitable for our inversion) lasting several hours with associated tropospheric and low stratospheric celerities. We are analyzing the coherency between signals with distance and relative azimuth. Following this pilot study, we are designing a denser sensor network further optimized to capture microbaroms and planning for its validation using independent measurements.

  4. Energetic particle precipitation: A major driver of the ozone budget in the Antarctic upper stratosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damiani, Alessandro; Funke, Bernd; Santee, Michelle L.; Cordero, Raul R.; Watanabe, Shingo

    2016-04-01

    Geomagnetic activity is thought to affect ozone and, possibly, climate in polar regions via energetic particle precipitation (EPP) but observational evidence of its importance in the seasonal stratospheric ozone variation on long time scales is still lacking. Here we fill this gap by showing that at high southern latitudes, late winter ozone series, covering the 1979-2014 period, exhibit an average stratospheric depletion of about 10-15% on a monthly basis caused by EPP. Daily observations indicate that every austral winter EPP-induced low ozone concentrations appear at about 45 km in late June and descend later to 30 km, before disappearing by September. Such stratospheric variations are coupled with mesospheric ozone changes also driven by EPP. No significant correlation between these ozone variations and solar ultraviolet irradiance has been found. This suggests the need of including the EPP forcing in both ozone model simulations and trend analysis.

  5. Total electron count variability and stratospheric ozone effects on solar backscatter and LWIR emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, John S.; Fiorino, Steven T.

    2017-05-01

    The development of an accurate ionospheric Total Electron Count (TEC) model is of critical importance to high frequency (HF) radio propagation and satellite communications. However, the TEC is highly variable and is continually influenced by geomagnetic storms, extreme UV radiation, and planetary waves. Being able to capture this variability is essential to improve current TEC models. The growing body of data involving ionospheric fluctuations and stratospheric variations has revealed a correlation. In particular, there is a marked and persistent association between increases in stratospheric ozone and variability of the TEC. The spectral properties of ozone show that it is a greenhouse gas that alters long wave emissions from Earth and interacts with the UV spectrum coming from the sun. This study uses the Laser Environment Effects Definition and Reference (LEEDR) radiative transfer and atmospheric characterization code to model the effects of changes in stratospheric ozone on solar backscatter and longwave (LWIR) terrestrial emissions and infer TEC and TEC variability.

  6. Possible existence and chemistry of ClO.O2 in the stratosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, S. S.

    1980-01-01

    The influence of the existence and chemistry of the possible atmospheric constituent ClO.O2 on current models of stratospheric photochemistry is discussed. It is suggested that the formation of an asymmetric ClO.O2 complex may explain the observed suppression of the quantum yield in the chlorine-photosensitized decomposition of ozone in the presence of O2, and that the presence of the ClO.O2 formed may account for the current discrepancy between measurements and theoretical predictions of stratospheric ClO mixing ratio profiles. The presence of stratospheric ClO.O2 is also invoked as a possible mitigating influence on present estimates of ozone destruction due to chlorofluoromethane release.

  7. Is there a stratospheric pacemaker controlling the daily cycle of tropical rainfall?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakazaki, T.; Hamilton, K.; Zhang, C.; Wang, Y.

    2017-02-01

    Rainfall in the tropics exhibits a large, 12 h Sun-synchronous variation with coherent phase around the globe. A long-standing, but unproved, hypothesis for this phenomenon is excitation by the prominent 12 h atmospheric tide, which itself is significantly forced remotely by solar heating of the stratospheric ozone layer. We investigated the relative roles of large-scale tidal forcing and more local effects in accounting for the 12 h variation of tropical rainfall. A model of the atmosphere run with the diurnal cycle of solar heating artificially suppressed below the stratosphere still simulated a strong coherent 12 h rainfall variation ( 50% of control run), demonstrating that stratospherically forced atmospheric tide propagates downward to the troposphere and contributes to the organization of large-scale convection. The results have implications for theories of excitation of tropical atmospheric waves by moist convection, for the evaluation of climate models, and for explaining the recently discovered lunar tidal rainfall cycle.

  8. The persistently variable "background" stratospheric aerosol layer and global climate change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, S; Daniel, J S; Neely, R R; Vernier, J-P; Dutton, E G; Thomason, L W

    2011-08-12

    Recent measurements demonstrate that the "background" stratospheric aerosol layer is persistently variable rather than constant, even in the absence of major volcanic eruptions. Several independent data sets show that stratospheric aerosols have increased in abundance since 2000. Near-global satellite aerosol data imply a negative radiative forcing due to stratospheric aerosol changes over this period of about -0.1 watt per square meter, reducing the recent global warming that would otherwise have occurred. Observations from earlier periods are limited but suggest an additional negative radiative forcing of about -0.1 watt per square meter from 1960 to 1990. Climate model projections neglecting these changes would continue to overestimate the radiative forcing and global warming in coming decades if these aerosols remain present at current values or increase.

  9. Laboratory Studies of Chemical and Photochemical Processes Relevant to Stratospheric Ozone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villalta, Peter W.; Zahniser, Mark S.; Nelson, David D.; Kolb, Charles E.

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this project is to reduce the uncertainty in several key gas-phase kinetic processes which impact our understanding of stratospheric ozone. The main emphasis of this work is on measuring rate coefficients and product channels for reactions of HO(x) and NO(x) species in the temperature range 200 K to 240 K relevant to the lower stratosphere. The results of these studies will improve models of stratospheric ozone chemistry and predictions of perturbations due to human influences. The second year's effort has focussed the design and construction of the proposed high pressure flow reactor on three separate areas: (1) the construction of the high pressure flow reactor; (2) characterization of the turbulent flow profile; and (3) demonstration of the instrument by measuring HO2 + NO2 and HO2 + NO reaction rate coefficients.

  10. Radiative and climate impacts of a large volcanic eruption during stratospheric sulfur geoengineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Laakso

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Both explosive volcanic eruptions, which emit sulfur dioxide into the stratosphere, and stratospheric geoengineering via sulfur injections can potentially cool the climate by increasing the amount of scattering particles in the atmosphere. Here we employ a global aerosol-climate model and an earth system model to study the radiative and climate impacts of an erupting volcano during solar radiation management (SRM. According to our simulations, the radiative impacts of an eruption and SRM are not additive: in the simulated case of concurrent eruption and SRM, the peak increase in global forcing is about 40 % lower compared to a corresponding eruption into a clean background atmosphere. In addition, the recovery of the stratospheric sulfate burden and forcing was significantly faster in the concurrent case since the sulfate particles grew larger and thus sedimented faster from the stratosphere. In our simulation where we assumed that SRM would be stopped immediately after a volcano eruption, stopping SRM decreased the overall stratospheric aerosol load. For the same reasons, a volcanic eruption during SRM lead to only about 1/3 of the peak global ensemble-mean cooling compared to an eruption under unperturbed atmospheric conditions. Furthermore, the global cooling signal was seen only for 12 months after the eruption in the former scenario compared to over 40 months in the latter. In terms of the global precipitation rate, we obtain a 36 % smaller decrease in the first year after the eruption and again a clearly faster recovery in the concurrent eruption and SRM scenario. We also found that an explosive eruption could lead to significantly different regional climate responses depending on whether it takes place during geoengineering or into an unperturbed background atmosphere. Our results imply that observations from previous large eruptions, such as Mt Pinatubo in 1991, are not directly applicable when estimating the potential consequences of a

  11. On the cryogenic removal of NOy from the Antarctic polar stratosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Smyshlyaev

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available We review current knowledge about the annual cycle of transport of nitrogen oxides to, and removal from, the polar stratosphere, with particular attention to Antarctica where the annual winter denitrifi cation process is both regular in occurrence and severe in effect. Evidence for a large downward fl ux of NOy from the mesosphere to the stratosphere, fi rst seen briefl y in the Limb Infrared Monitor of the Stratosphere (LIMS data from the Arctic winter of 1978-1979, has been found during the 1990s in both satellite and ground-based observations, though this still seems to be omitted from many atmospheric models. When incorporated in the Stony Brook- St. Petersburg two dimensional (2D transport and chemistry model, more realistic treatment of the NOy fl ux, along with sulfate transport from the mesosphere, sulfate aerosol formation where temperature is favorable, and the inclusion of a simple ion-cluster reaction, leads to good agreement with observed HNO3 formation in the mid-winter middle to upper stratosphere. To further emphasize the importance of large fl uxes of thermospheric and mesospheric NOy into the polar stratosphere, we have used observations, supplemented with model calculations, to defi ne new altitude dependent correlation curves between N2O and NOy. These are more suitable than those previously used in the literature to represent conditions within the Antarctic vortex region prior to and during denitrifi cation by Polar Stratospheric Cloud (PSC particles. Our NOy -N2O curves lead to a 40% increase in the average amount of NOy removed during the Antarctic winter with respect to estimates calculated using NOy-N2O curves from the Atmospheric Trace Molecule Spectroscopy (ATMOS/ATLAS-3 data set.

  12. On the composite response of the MLT to major sudden stratospheric warming events with elevated stratopause

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limpasuvan, Varavut; Orsolini, Yvan J.; Chandran, Amal; Garcia, Rolando R.; Smith, Anne K.

    2016-05-01

    Based on a climate-chemistry model (constrained by reanalyses below ~50 km), the zonal-mean composite response of the mesosphere and lower thermosphere (MLT) to major sudden stratospheric warming events with elevated stratopauses demonstrates the role of planetary waves (PWs) in driving the mean circulation in the presence of gravity waves (GWs), helping the polar vortex recover and communicating the sudden stratospheric warming (SSW) impact across the equator. With the SSW onset, strong westward PW drag appears above 80 km primarily from the dissipation of wave number 1 perturbations with westward period of 5-12 days, generated from below by the unstable westward polar stratospheric jet that develops as a result of the SSW. The filtering effect of this jet also allows eastward propagating GWs to saturate in the winter MLT, providing eastward drag that promotes winter polar mesospheric cooling. The dominant PW forcing translates to a net westward drag above the eastward mesospheric jet, which initiates downwelling over the winter pole. As the eastward polar stratospheric jet returns, this westward PW drag persists above 80 km and acts synergistically with the return of westward GW drag to drive a stronger polar downwelling that warms the pole adiabatically and helps reform the stratopause at an elevated altitude. With the polar wind reversal during the SSW onset, the westward drag by the quasi-stationary PW in the winter stratosphere drives an anomalous equatorial upwelling and cooling that enhance tropical stratospheric ozone. Along with equatorial wind anomalies, this ozone enhancement subsequently amplifies the migrating semidiurnal tide amplitude in the winter midlatitudes.

  13. Influence of Aerosol Heating on the Stratospheric Transport of the Mt. Pinatubo Eruption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aquila, Valentina; Oman, Luke D.; Stolarski, Richard S.

    2011-01-01

    On June 15th, 1991 the eruption of Mt. Pinatubo (15.1 deg. N, 120.3 Deg. E) in the Philippines injected about 20 Tg of sulfur dioxide in the stratosphere, which was transformed into sulfuric acid aerosol. The large perturbation of the background aerosol caused an increase in temperature in the lower stratosphere of 2-3 K. Even though stratospheric winds climatological]y tend to hinder the air mixing between the two hemispheres, observations have shown that a large part of the SO2 emitted by Mt. Pinatubo have been transported from the Northern to the Southern Hemisphere. We simulate the eruption of Mt. Pinatubo with the Goddard Earth Observing System (GEOS) version 5 global climate model, coupled to the aerosol module GOCART and the stratospheric chemistry module StratChem, to investigate the influence of the eruption of Mt. Pinatubo on the stratospheric transport pattern. We perform two ensembles of simulations: the first ensemble consists of runs without coupling between aerosol and radiation. In these simulations the plume of aerosols is treated as a passive tracer and the atmosphere is unperturbed. In the second ensemble of simulations aerosols and radiation are coupled. We show that the set of runs with interactive aerosol produces a larger cross-equatorial transport of the Pinatubo cloud. In our simulations the local heating perturbation caused by the sudden injection of volcanic aerosol changes the pattern of the stratospheric winds causing more intrusion of air from the Northern into the Southern Hemisphere. Furthermore, we perform simulations changing the injection height of the cloud, and study the transport of the plume resulting from the different scenarios. Comparisons of model results with SAGE II and AVHRR satellite observations will be shown.

  14. The isotopic composition of methane in the stratosphere: high-altitude balloon sample measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Röckmann

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The isotopic composition of stratospheric methane has been determined on a large suite of air samples from stratospheric balloon flights covering subtropical to polar latitudes and a time period of 16 yr. 154 samples were analyzed for δ13C and 119 samples for δD, increasing the previously published dataset for balloon borne samples by an order of magnitude, and more than doubling the total available stratospheric data (including aircraft samples published to date. The samples also cover a large range in mixing ratio from tropospheric values near 1800 ppb down to only 250 ppb, and the strong isotope fractionation processes accordingly increase the isotopic composition up to δ13C = −14‰ and δD = +190‰, the largest enrichments observed for atmospheric CH4 so far. When analyzing and comparing kinetic isotope effects (KIEs derived from single balloon profiles, it is necessary to take into account the residence time in the stratosphere in combination with the observed mixing ratio and isotope trends in the troposphere, and the range of isotope values covered by the individual profile. The isotopic composition of CH4 in the stratosphere is affected by both chemical and dynamical processes. This severely hampers interpretation of the data in terms of the relative fractions of the three important sink mechanisms (reaction with OH, O(1D and Cl. It is shown that a formal sink partitioning using the measured data severely underestimates the fraction removed by OH, which is likely due to the insensitivity of the measurements to the kinetic fractionation in the lower stratosphere. Full quantitative interpretation of the CH4 isotope data in terms of the three sink reactions requires a global model.

  15. NOGAPS-ALPHA model simulations of stratospheric ozone during the SOLVE2 campaign

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. P. McCormack

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents three-dimensional prognostic O3 simulations with parameterized gas-phase photochemistry from the new NOGAPS-ALPHA middle atmosphere forecast model. We compare 5-day NOGAPS-ALPHA hindcasts of stratospheric O3 with satellite and DC-8 aircraft measurements for two cases during the SOLVE II campaign: (1 the cold, isolated vortex during 11-16 January 2003; and (2 the rapidly developing stratospheric warming of 17-22 January 2003. In the first case we test three different photochemistry parameterizations. NOGAPS-ALPHA O3 simulations using the NRL-CHEM2D parameterization give the best agreement with SAGE III and POAM III profile measurements. 5-day NOGAPS-ALPHA hindcasts of polar O3 initialized with the NASA GEOS4 analyses produce better agreement with observations than do the operational ECMWF O3 forecasts of case 1. For case 2, both NOGAPS-ALPHA and ECMWF 114-h forecasts of the split vortex structure in lower stratospheric O3 on 21 January 2003 show comparable skill. Updated ECMWF O3 forecasts of this event at hour 42 display marked improvement from the 114-h forecast; corresponding updated 42-hour NOGAPS-ALPHA prognostic O3 fields initialized with the GEOS4 analyses do not improve significantly. When NOGAPS-ALPHA prognostic O3 is initialized with the higher resolution ECMWF O3 analyses, the NOGAPS-ALPHA 42-hour lower stratospheric O3 fields closely match the operational 42-hour ECMWF O3 forecast of the 21 January event. We find that stratospheric O3 forecasts at high latitudes in winter can depend on both model initial conditions and the treatment of photochemistry over periods of 1-5 days. Overall, these results show that the new O3 initialization, photochemistry parameterization, and spectral transport in the NOGAPS-ALPHA NWP model can provide reliable short-range stratospheric O3 forecasts during Arctic winter.

  16. The impact of planetary waves on the latitudinal displacement of sudden stratospheric warmings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Matthias

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The Northern Hemispheric winter is disturbed by large scale variability mainly caused by Planetary Waves (PWs, which interact with the mean flow and thus result in Sudden Stratospheric Warmings (SSWs. The effects of a SSW on the middle atmosphere are an increase of stratospheric and a simultaneous decrease of mesospheric temperature as well as a wind reversal to westward wind from the mesosphere to the stratosphere. In most cases these disturbances are strongest at polar latitudes, get weaker toward the south and vanish at mid-latitudes around 50° to 60° N as for example during the winter 2005/06. However, other events like in 2009, 2010 and 2012 show a similar or even stronger westward wind at mid- than at polar latitudes either in the mesosphere or in the stratosphere during the SSW. This study uses local meteor and MF-radar measurements, global satellite observations from the Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS and assimilated model data from MERRA (Modern-ERA Retrospective analysis for research and Applications. We compare differences in the latitudinal structure of the zonal wind, temperature and PW activity between a "normal" event, where the event in 2006 was chosen representatively, and the latitudinal displaced events in 2009, 2010 and 2012. A continuous westward wind band between the pole and 20° N is observed during the displaced events. Furthermore, distinctive temperature differences at mid-latitudes occur before the displaced warmings compared to 2006 as well as a southward extended stratospheric warming afterwards. These differences between the normal SSW in 2006 and the displaced events in 2009, 2010 and 2012 are linked to an increased PW activity between 30° N and 50° N and the changed stationary wave flux in the stratosphere around the displaced events compared to 2006.

  17. Particulate sulfur in the upper troposphere and lowermost stratosphere - sources and climate forcing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinsson, Bengt G.; Friberg, Johan; Sandvik, Oscar S.; Hermann, Markus; van Velthoven, Peter F. J.; Zahn, Andreas

    2017-09-01

    This study is based on fine-mode aerosol samples collected in the upper troposphere (UT) and the lowermost stratosphere (LMS) of the Northern Hemisphere extratropics during monthly intercontinental flights at 8.8-12 km altitude of the IAGOS-CARIBIC platform in the time period 1999-2014. The samples were analyzed for a large number of chemical elements using the accelerator-based methods PIXE (particle-induced X-ray emission) and PESA (particle elastic scattering analysis). Here the particulate sulfur concentrations, obtained by PIXE analysis, are investigated. In addition, the satellite-borne lidar aboard CALIPSO is used to study the stratospheric aerosol load. A steep gradient in particulate sulfur concentration extends several kilometers into the LMS, as a result of increasing dilution towards the tropopause of stratospheric, particulate sulfur-rich air. The stratospheric air is diluted with tropospheric air, forming the extratropical transition layer (ExTL). Observed concentrations are related to the distance to the dynamical tropopause. A linear regression methodology handled seasonal variation and impact from volcanism. This was used to convert each data point into stand-alone estimates of a concentration profile and column concentration of particulate sulfur in a 3 km altitude band above the tropopause. We find distinct responses to volcanic eruptions, and that this layer in the LMS has a significant contribution to the stratospheric aerosol optical depth and thus to its radiative forcing. Further, the origin of UT particulate sulfur shows strong seasonal variation. We find that tropospheric sources dominate during the fall as a result of downward transport of the Asian tropopause aerosol layer (ATAL) formed in the Asian monsoon, whereas transport down from the Junge layer is the main source of UT particulate sulfur in the first half of the year. In this latter part of the year, the stratosphere is the clearly dominating source of particulate sulfur in the UT

  18. Retrieval of stratospheric ozone profiles from OMPS measurements in limb viewing geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arosio, Carlo; Rozanov, Alexei; Eichmann, Kai-Uwe; Malinina, Elizaveta; Burrows, John P.; Jaross, Glenn; Bhartia, Pawan K.

    2017-04-01

    Due to its crucial role in the radiative budged of the stratosphere as well as its importance for the mankind as an absorber of biological-damaging UV radiation, a continuous monitoring of the vertical and spatial distribution of the stratospheric ozone has been a priority for the scientific community. At the beginning of 2012 the European ENVISAT satellite, carrying among others ozone-science relevant instruments as GOMOS, MIPAS and SCIAMACHY, ceased its operations: as a consequence, only a few older satellite missions, such as OSIRIS, MLS, ACE-FTS, and SMR have been still operating, contributing to the task of continuous monitoring stratospheric ozone distributions. At the end of 2011, just some months before the end of ENVISAT lifetime, SUOMI-NPP mission carrying OMPS instrument was launched. The OMPS suite enables the study of the vertical distribution of stratospheric ozone by analyzing the intensity of the scattered solar light at UV-VIS wavelengths in limb viewing geometry. The focus of our study is to adapt the algorithm developed at the University of Bremen for the retrieval of stratospheric ozone vertical distributions from SCIAMACHY limb measurements to OMPS limb observations, with the final aim to obtain a continuous data set from both instruments. The retrieval method is based on the optimal estimation technique in a 1D geometry; the settings account for the instrumental design by optimally exploiting different spectral ranges at UV wavelengths as well as in the visible region to retrieve ozone concentrations at different tangent heights. A cloud filter based on the Color Index Ratio is applied and surface albedo is retrieved simultaneously, accounting for stratospheric aerosol. The retrieval results over six months are compared in this poster with the NASA retrieval product and validated using MLS and ozonesondes collocated observations.

  19. Assimilation of stratospheric and mesospheric temperatures from MLS and SABER into a global NWP model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. W. Hoppel

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available The forecast model and three-dimensional variational data assimilation components of the Navy Operational Global Atmospheric Prediction System (NOGAPS have each been extended into the upper stratosphere and mesosphere to form an Advanced Level Physics High Altitude (ALPHA version of NOGAPS extending to ~100 km. This NOGAPS-ALPHA NWP prototype is used to assimilate stratospheric and mesospheric temperature data from the Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS and the Sounding of the Atmosphere using Broadband Radiometry (SABER instruments. A 60-day analysis period in January and February, 2006, was chosen that includes a well documented stratospheric sudden warming. SABER temperatures indicate that the SSW caused the polar winter stratopause at ~40 km to disappear, then reform at ~80 km altitude and slowly descend during February. The NOGAPS-ALPHA analysis reproduces this observed stratospheric and mesospheric temperature structure, as well as realistic evolution of zonal winds, residual velocities, and Eliassen-Palm fluxes that aid interpretation of the vertically deep circulation and eddy flux anomalies that developed in response to this wave-breaking event. The observation minus forecast (O-F standard deviations for MLS and SABER are ~2 K in the mid-stratosphere and increase monotonically to about 6 K in the upper mesosphere. Increasing O-F standard deviations in the mesosphere are expected due to increasing instrument error and increasing geophysical variance at small spatial scales in the forecast model. In the mid/high latitude winter regions, 10-day forecast skill is improved throughout the upper stratosphere and mesosphere when the model is initialized using the high-altitude analysis based on assimilation of both SABER and MLS data.

  20. Methane as a Diagnostic Tracer of Changes in the Brewer-Dobson Circulation of the Stratosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remsberg, E. E.

    2015-01-01

    This study makes use of time series of methane (CH4/ data from the Halogen Occultation Experiment (HALOE) to detect whether there were any statistically significant changes of the Brewer-Dobson circulation (BDC) within the stratosphere during 1992-2005. The HALOE CH4 profiles are in terms of mixing ratio versus pressure altitude and are binned into latitude zones within the Southern Hemisphere and the Northern Hemisphere. Their separate time series are then analyzed using multiple linear regression (MLR) techniques. The CH4 trend terms for the Northern Hemisphere are significant and positive at 10 N from 50 to 7 hPa and larger than the tropospheric CH4 trends of about 3%decade(exp -1) from 20 to 7 hPa. At 60 N the trends are clearly negative from 20 to 7 hPa. Their combined trends indicate an acceleration of the BDC in the middle stratosphere of the Northern Hemisphere during those years, most likely due to changes from the effects of wave activity. No similar significant BDC acceleration is found for the Southern Hemisphere. Trends from HALOE H2O are analyzed for consistency. Their mutual trends with CH4 are anti-correlated qualitatively in the middle and upper stratosphere, where CH4 is chemically oxidized to H2O. Conversely, their mutual trends in the lower stratosphere are dominated by their trends upon entry to the tropical stratosphere. Time series residuals for CH4 in the lower mesosphere also exhibit structures that are anti-correlated in some instances with those of the tracer-like species HCl. Their occasional aperiodic structures indicate the effects of transport following episodic, wintertime wave activity. It is concluded that observed multi-year, zonally averaged distributions of CH4 can be used to diagnose major instances of wave-induced transport in the middle atmosphere and to detect changes in the stratospheric BDC.

  1. Ionospheric disturbances in Asian region of Russia during sudden stratospheric warmings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurkin, Vladimir; Chernigovskaya, Marina; Medvedeva, Irina; Orlov, Igor

    This paper presents an investigation of the subauroral and mid-latitude ionosphere variations in the Asian region of Russia during stratospheric warmings in 2008, 2009 and 2010. We used the data from network of vertical and oblique-incidence sounding ionosounders of ISTP SB RAS. Irkutsk chirp-sounder (vertical incidence sounding) run every 1 minute on 24-hour basis for 30 days in winter of 2008, 2009 and 2010 to study small-scale and medium-scale distur-bances. The experiments on the radio paths Magadan-Irkutsk, Khabarovsk-Irkutsk and Norilsk -Irkutsk were conducted in order to study large-scale ionospheric disturbances. The frequency range was from 4 to 30 MHz, the sweep rate used 500 kHz/sec. To identify the stratospheric warming events the Berlin Meteorological University data (http://strat-www.met.fu-berlin.de) on stratospheric warming at standard isobaric levels and the atmospheric temperature height profiles measured by the Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) aboard the EOS Aura spacecraft were used. The increase of wave activity in upper ionosphere over Asian region of Russia has recorded during stratospheric warmings. Spectrums of multi-scale variations were derived from the data obtained during the prolonged experiments. The analysis of experimental data has revealed the amplitudes of planetary waves in ionosphere during stratospheric warmings in 2008 and 2010 larger than ones in winter 2009 as opposed to amplitude variations of temperature in stratosphere. This work was supported by Russian Foundation for Basic Research (grant 08-05-00658).

  2. A Semi-empirical Model of the Stratosphere in the Climate System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sodergren, A. H.; Bodeker, G. E.; Kremser, S.; Meinshausen, M.; McDonald, A.

    2014-12-01

    Chemistry climate models (CCMs) currently used to project changes in Antarctic ozone are extremely computationally demanding. CCM projections are uncertain due to lack of knowledge of future emissions of greenhouse gases (GHGs) and ozone depleting substances (ODSs), as well as parameterizations within the CCMs that have weakly constrained tuning parameters. While projections should be based on an ensemble of simulations, this is not currently possible due to the complexity of the CCMs. An inexpensive but realistic approach to simulate changes in stratospheric ozone, and its coupling to the climate system, is needed as a complement to CCMs. A simple climate model (SCM) can be used as a fast emulator of complex atmospheric-ocean climate models. If such an SCM includes a representation of stratospheric ozone, the evolution of the global ozone layer can be simulated for a wide range of GHG and ODS emissions scenarios. MAGICC is an SCM used in previous IPCC reports. In the current version of the MAGICC SCM, stratospheric ozone changes depend only on equivalent effective stratospheric chlorine (EESC). In this work, MAGICC is extended to include an interactive stratospheric ozone layer using a semi-empirical model of ozone responses to CO2and EESC, with changes in ozone affecting the radiative forcing in the SCM. To demonstrate the ability of our new, extended SCM to generate projections of global changes in ozone, tuning parameters from 19 coupled atmosphere-ocean general circulation models (AOGCMs) and 10 carbon cycle models (to create an ensemble of 190 simulations) have been used to generate probability density functions of the dates of return of stratospheric column ozone to 1960 and 1980 levels for different latitudes.

  3. 2D photochemical modeling of Saturn's stratosphere. Part II: Feedback between composition and temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hue, V.; Greathouse, T. K.; Cavalié, T.; Dobrijevic, M.; Hersant, F.

    2016-03-01

    Saturn's axial tilt of 26.7° produces seasons in a similar way as on Earth. Both the stratospheric temperature and composition are affected by this latitudinally varying insolation along Saturn's orbital path. The atmospheric thermal structure is controlled and regulated by the amount of hydrocarbons in the stratosphere, which act as absorbers and coolants from the UV to the far-IR spectral range, and this structure has an influence on the amount of hydrocarbons. We study here the feedback between the chemical composition and the thermal structure by coupling a latitudinal and seasonal photochemical model with a radiative seasonal model. Our results show that the seasonal temperature peak in the higher stratosphere, associated with the seasonal increase of insolation, is shifted earlier than the maximum insolation peak. This shift is increased with increasing latitudes and is caused by the low amount of stratospheric coolants in the spring season. At 80° in both hemispheres, the temperature peak at 10-2 mbar is seen to occur half a season (3-4 Earth years) earlier than was previously predicted by radiative seasonal models that assumed spatially and temporally uniform distribution of coolants. This shift progressively decreases with increasing pressure, up to around the 0.5 mbar pressure level where it vanishes. On the opposite, the thermal field has a small feedback on the abundance distributions. Accounting for that feedback modifies the predicted equator-to-pole temperature gradient. The meridional gradients of temperature at the mbar pressure levels are better reproduced when this feedback is accounted for. At lower pressure levels, Saturn's stratospheric thermal structure seems to depart from pure radiative seasonal equilibrium as previously suggested by Guerlet et al. (2014). Although the agreement with the absolute value of the stratospheric temperature observed by Cassini is moderate, it is a mandatory step toward a fully coupled GCM-photochemical model.

  4. The Effects of Interactive Stratospheric Chemistry on Antarctic and Southern Ocean Climate Change in an AOGCM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Feng; Newman, Paul; Pawson, Steven; Waugh, Darryn

    2014-01-01

    Stratospheric ozone depletion has played a dominant role in driving Antarctic climate change in the last decades. In order to capture the stratospheric ozone forcing, many coupled atmosphere-ocean general circulation models (AOGCMs) prescribe the Antarctic ozone hole using monthly and zonally averaged ozone field. However, the prescribed ozone hole has a high ozone bias and lacks zonal asymmetry. The impacts of these biases on model simulations, particularly on Southern Ocean and the Antarctic sea ice, are not well understood. The purpose of this study is to determine the effects of using interactive stratospheric chemistry instead of prescribed ozone on Antarctic and Southern Ocean climate change in an AOGCM. We compare two sets of ensemble simulations for the 1960-2010 period using different versions of the Goddard Earth Observing System 5 - AOGCM: one with interactive stratospheric chemistry, and the other with prescribed monthly and zonally averaged ozone and 6 other stratospheric radiative species calculated from the interactive chemistry simulations. Consistent with previous studies using prescribed sea surface temperatures and sea ice concentrations, the interactive chemistry runs simulate a deeper Antarctic ozone hole and consistently larger changes in surface pressure and winds than the prescribed ozone runs. The use of a coupled atmosphere-ocean model in this study enables us to determine the impact of these surface changes on Southern Ocean circulation and Antarctic sea ice. The larger surface wind trends in the interactive chemistry case lead to larger Southern Ocean circulation trends with stronger changes in northerly and westerly surface flow near the Antarctica continent and stronger upwelling near 60S. Using interactive chemistry also simulates a larger decrease of sea ice concentrations. Our results highlight the importance of using interactive chemistry in order to correctly capture the influences of stratospheric ozone depletion on climate

  5. Multi-Model Assessment of the Factors Driving Stratospheric Ozone Evolution Over the 21st Century

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oman, L. D.; Plummer, D. A.; Waugh, D. W.; Austin, J.; Scinocca, J.; Douglass, A. R.; Salawitch, R. J.; Canty, T.; Akiyoshi, H.; Bekki, S.; hide

    2010-01-01

    The evolution of stratospheric ozone from 1960 to 2100 is examined in simulations from fourteen chemistry-climate models. There is general agreement among the models at the broadest levels, showing column ozone decreasing at all latitudes from 1960 to around 2000, then increasing at all latitudes over the first half of the 21st century, and latitudinal variations in the rate of increase and date of return to historical values. In the second half of the century, ozone is projected to continue increasing, level off or even decrease depending on the latitude, resulting in variable dates of return to historical values at latitudes where column ozone has declined below those levels. Separation into partial column above and below 20 hPa reveals that these latitudinal differences are almost completely due to differences in the lower stratosphere. At all latitudes, upper stratospheric ozone increases throughout the 21st century and returns to 1960 levels before the end of the century, although there is a spread among the models in dates that ozone returns to historical values. Using multiple linear regression, we find decreasing halogens and increasing greenhouse gases contribute almost equally to increases in the upper stratospheric ozone. In the tropical lower stratosphere an increase in tropical upwelling causes a steady decrease in ozone through the 21st century, and total column ozone does not return to 1960 levels in all models. In contrast, lower stratospheric and total column ozone in middle and high latitudes increases during the 21st century and returns to 1960 levels.

  6. On geoengineering with sulphate aerosols in the tropical upper troposphere and lower stratosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tuck, A.F. [NOAA Earth System Research Laboratory, Boulder, CO (United States); Donaldson, D.J. [University of Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Hitchman, M.H. [University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Richard, E.C. [University of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States). Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics; Tervahattu, H. [Nordic Envicon Oy, Helsinki (Finland); Vaida, V. [University of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States). Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry; Wilson, J.C. [University of Denver, Denver, CO (United States). Department of Engineering

    2008-10-15

    This paper is in response to the Editorial Essay by Crutzen and the Editorial Comment by Cicerone in the August 2006 issue of Climatic Change. We reprise the evidence from atmospheric nuclear weapon testing in the 1950s and 1960s which is salient to the mooted maintenance of an artificial sulphate aerosol layer in the lower stratosphere, including a hitherto and now posthumous unpublished analysis of the {sup 185}W Hardtack data. We also review recent investigations by ourselves, which have considerable bearing on some relevant questions concerning meteorological dynamics, aerosol chemistry and physics and the photodissociation of stratospheric sulphuric acid.

  7. Inference of stratospheric aerosol composition and size distribution from SAGE II satellite measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Pi-Huan; Mccormick, M. P.; Fuller, W. H.; Yue, G. K.; Swissler, T. J.; Osborn, M. T.

    1989-01-01

    A method for inferring stratospheric aerosol composition and size distribution from the water vapor concentration and aerosol extinction measurements obtained in the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE) II and the associated temperature from the NMC. The aerosols are assumed to be sulfuric acid-water droplets. A modified Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm is used to determine model size distribution parameters based on the SAGE II multiwavelength aerosol extinctions. It is found that the best aerosol size information is contained in the aerosol radius range between about 0.25 and 0.80 micron.

  8. Spatial distribution of water in the stratosphere of Jupiter from observations with the Herschel space observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavalié, T.; Feuchtgruber, H.; Lellouch, E.; de Val-Borro, M.; Jarchow, C.; Moreno, R.; Hartogh, P.; Orton, G.; Greathouse, T. K.; Billebaud, F.; Dobrijevic, M.; Lara, L. M.; Gonzalez, A.; Sagawa, H.

    2013-09-01

    Water in the atmospheres of the outer planets has both an internal and an external source (e.g., [1] and [2] for Jupiter). These sources are separated by a condensation layer, the tropopause cold trap, which acts as a transport barrier between the troposphere and the stratosphere. Thus, the water vapor observed by the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) in the stratosphere of the giant planets has an external origin [3]. This external supply of water may have several sources: (i) a permanent flux from interplanetary dust particles produced from asteroid collisions and from comet activity [4], (ii) local sources from planetary environments (rings, satellites) [5], (iii) cometary "Shoemaker-Levy 9 (SL9) type" impacts [6]. In the past 15 years, several studies suggested that water in the stratosphere of Jupiter originated from the SL9 comet impacts in July 1994, but a direct proof was missing. We will report the first high S/N spatially resolved mapping observations of water in Jupiter's stratosphere carried out with the Heterodyne Instrument for the Far Infrared (HIFI) [7] and Photodetector Array Camera and Spectrometer (PACS) [8] instruments onboard the ESA Herschel Space Observatory [9]. These observations have been obtained in the framework of the Guaranteed Time Key Program "Water and related chemistry in the Solar System", also known as "Herschel Solar System Observations" (HssO) [10]. In parallel, we have monitored Jupiter's stratospheric temperature with the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility (IRTF) to separate temperature from water variability. We will present the results recently published by our team [11]. Water is found to be restricted to pressures lower than 2mbar. Its column density decreases by a factor of 2-3 between southern and northern latitudes (see Fig. 1), consistently between the HIFI and the PACS 66.4μm maps. Latitudinal temperature variability cannot explain the global north-south asymmetry in the water maps. From the latitudinal and vertical

  9. Lidar measurements of stratospheric aerosols from Mount Pinatubo at Camaguey, Cuba

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antuña, Juan Carlos

    Lidar measurements of stratospheric aerosols made at Camaguey, Cuba 21°N, six months after Mount Pinatubo eruption, show a very large increase in the stratospheric aerosol burden. Peak scattering ratios greater than 20 have been observed in early January 1992. In the same month integrated backscattering in the layer between 16 and 33 km shows a maximum value larger than 5 × 10 -3 sr -1. The course of those parameters such as the height of peaks and of the layer base between January 1992 and November 1993 is shown.

  10. The Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment III instrument proposed for EOS - A conceptual design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauldin, L. E.; Mccormick, M. P.; Zawodny, J. M.; Mcmaster, L. R.; Chu, W. P.; Gustafson, J. C.; Maddrea, G. L.

    1989-01-01

    This paper describes the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment III (SAGE III) instrument proposed for the Earth Observing System (EOS), which is designed to monitor the vertical distribution of stratospheric aerosols, ozone, water vapor, nitrogen dioxide, and temperature by measuring the extinction and scattering of solar radiation in the 03 to 1.6 micron range through the atmosphere. The SAGE III employs proven concepts which have evolved from the SAM II, SAGE, and SAGE II programs. The launch is scheduled for the summer of 1996. The SAGE II block diagram is included.

  11. Diurnal variation of stratospheric chlorine monoxide - A critical test of chlorine chemistry in the ozone layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, P. M.; De Zafra, R.; Parrish, A.; Barrett, J. W.

    1984-01-01

    Ground-based observations of a mm-wave spectral line at 278 GHz have yielded stratospheric chlorine monoxide column density diurnal variation records which indicate that the mixing ratio and column density of this compound above 30 km are about 20 percent lower than model predictions based on 2.1 parts/billion of total stratospheric chlorine. The observed day-to-night variation is, however, in good agreement with recent model predictions, both confirming the existence of a nighttime reservoir for chlorine and verifying the predicted general rate of its storage and retrieval.

  12. Decadal Variability of the Tropical Stratosphere: Secondary Influence of the El Nino-Southern Oscillation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-04

    solar cycle variation of ozone in the strato - sphere inferred from Nimbus 7 and NOAA 11 satellites, J. Geophys. Res., 99, 20,665- 20,671. Chipperfield...tropical lower stratosphere: The role of extratropical wave forcing, J. Atmos. Sci., 60, 2389-2403. Hoppel, K. W., N. L. Baker, L. Coy, S. D. Eckermann...solar cycle: Winter strato - pause and lower stratosphere, J. Geophys. Res., 101, 4749, doi:10.1029/2002JD002224. Labitzke, K. (2004), On the signal of

  13. Advances in atmospheric chemistry modeling: the LLNL impact tropospheric/stratospheric chemistry model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rotman, D A; Atherton, C

    1999-10-07

    We present a unique modeling capability to understand the global distribution of trace gases and aerosols throughout both the troposphere and stratosphere. It includes the ability to simulate tropospheric chemistry that occurs both in the gas phase as well as on the surfaces of solid particles. We have used this capability to analyze observations from particular flight campaigns as well as averaged observed data. Results show the model to accurately simulate the complex chemistry occurring near the tropopause and throughout the troposphere and stratosphere.

  14. Numerical studies of microphysical modulations of stratospheric aerosol within ROMIC-ROSA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hommel, René; von Savigny, Christian; Rozanov, Ale