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Sample records for mandibular subcondyle fracture

  1. Overview of Mandibular Condyle Fracture

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Su-Seong; Lee, Keun-Cheol; Kim, Seok-Kwun

    2012-01-01

    The mandibular condyle is a region that plays a key role in the opening and closing of the mouth, and because fracture causes functional and aesthetic problems such as facial asymmetry, it is very important to perform accurate reduction. Traditionally, there has been disagreement on how to manage fracture of the mandibular condyle. This review explores the misunderstanding of mandibular condyle fracture treatment and modern-day treatment strategies.

  2. Overview of Mandibular Condyle Fracture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Su-Seong Park

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The mandibular condyle is a region that plays a key role in the opening and closing of the mouth, and because fracture causes functional and aesthetic problems such as facial asymmetry, it is very important to perform accurate reduction. Traditionally, there has been disagreement on how to manage fracture of the mandibular condyle. This review explores the misunderstanding of mandibular condyle fracture treatment and modern-day treatment strategies.

  3. Overview of Mandibular Condyle Fracture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Su-Seong Park

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The mandibular condyle is a region that plays a key role in the opening and closing ofthe mouth, and because fracture causes functional and aesthetic problems such as facialasymmetry, it is very important to perform accurate reduction. Traditionally, there has beendisagreement on how to manage fracture of the mandibular condyle. This review exploresthe misunderstanding of mandibular condyle fracture treatment and modern-day treatmentstrategies.

  4. Radiological classification of mandibular fractures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mihailova, H.

    2009-01-01

    Mandibular fractures present the biggest part (up to 97%) of the facial bone fractures. Method of choice for diagnosing of mandibular fractures is conventional radiography. The aim of the issue is to present an unified radiological classification of mandibular fractures for the clinical practice. This classification includes only those clinical symptoms of mandibular fracture which could be radiologically objectified: exact anatomical localization (F1-F6), teeth in fracture line (Ta,Tb), grade of dislocation (D I, D II), occlusal disturbances (O(+), O(-)). Radiological symptoms expressed by letter and number symbols are systematized in a formula - FTDO of mandibular fractures similar to TNM formula for tumours. FTDO formula expresses radiological diagnose of each mandibular fracture but it doesn't include neither the site (left or right) of the fracture, nor the kind and number of fractures. In order to express topography and number of fractures the radiological formula is transformed into a decimal fraction. The symbols (FTD) of right mandible fracture are written in the numerator and those of the left site - in the denominator. For double and multiple fractures between the symbols for each fracture we put '+'. Symbols for occlusal disturbances are put down opposite, the fractional line. So topographo-anatomical formula (FTD/FTD)xO is formed. In this way the whole radiological information for unilateral, bilateral, single or multiple fractures of the mandible is expressed. The information in the radiological topography anatomic formula, resp. from the unified topography-anatomic classification ensures a quick and exact X-ray diagnose of mandibular fracture. In this way contributes to get better, make easier and faster X-ray diagnostic process concerning mandibular fractures. And all these is a precondition for prevention of retardation of the diagnosis mandibular fracture. (author)

  5. Pediatric mandibular fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweinfurth, J M; Koltai, P J

    1998-01-01

    Over the last 20 years, a revolution in the management of facial fractures has taken place. Refinements in biocompatible materials of great delicacy and strength along with advances in our understanding of biomechanics of the face, have rendered complex injuries consistently amenable to accurate 3-dimensional reconstruction. Furthermore, with the availability of education in the techniques of internal rigid fixation, these advanced techniques have become routine practice in adults. However, the suitability of rigid internal fixation for children remains controversial. There are many concerns about the effect of implanted hardware in the mandible of a growing child. In addition, some evidence suggests that the elevation of functional matrix off of bone may result in alterations in development. The goal is to restore the underlying bony architecture to its pre-injury position in a stable fashion, with a minimal of aesthetic and functional impairment. However, in children the treatment of bony injuries is most easily accomplished by techniques that may adversely effect craniofacial development. While it is not entirely possible to resolve this dilemma, there exists an extensive body of experimental and clinical information on the appropriate management of pediatric mandibular fractures which can be used to formulate a rational treatment plan for most cases. This paper presents an overview of the contemporary understanding and application of these treatment principles.

  6. Mandibular ramus fractures: a rarity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kale, Tejraj Pundalik; Kotrashetti, S M; Louis, Archana; Lingaraj, J B; Sarvesh, B U

    2013-01-01

    To determine the incidence of mandibular ramus fractures in KLE's PK Hospital and to analyze the outcome of open reduction and internal fixation of these fractures. Using a retrospective study design, records of all trauma patients who reported to the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, KLE's PK Hospital Belgaum, between the years January 2006 to October 2011 was obtained from the medical records office. The data variables that were analyzed were the name, age, sex, cause of injury, pretreatment occlusion, treatment given, period of MMF and post-treatment occlusion. Total number of mandibular fracture cases was 298. Ramus fractures were 10 in number which accounted for 3.3% of fractures. The age range of these 10 patients was seen to be between 20 to 80 years with the average age being 35.6 years. Of these 10 patients, 9 were male and 1 was female and 7 patients were treated by open reduction and internal fixation and the remaining 3 by closed reduction. The average period of MMF was 3 days for the patients who underwent open reduction and internal fixation. There was improvement in occlusion in all 10 patients post-treatment and there was no complication reported in any of the cases. Ramus fractures accounted for 3.3% of all mandibular fractures. Open reduction and internal fixation of ramus fractures ensures adequate functional and anatomic reduction. This study makes an attempt to throw a light on the increasing incidence of ramus fractures and a successful management of these fractures by open reduction and internal fixation. How to cite this article: Kale TP, Kotrashetti SM, Louis A, Lingaraj JB, Sarvesh BU. Mandibular Ramus Fractures: A Rarity. J Contemp Dent Pract 2013;14(1):39-42. Source of support: Nil Conflict of interest: None declared.

  7. Radiological study of the mandibular fractures

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    Kim, Ju Won; Kim, Kyoung A; Koh, Kwang Jun [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, School of Dentistry, and Institute of Oral Bio Science, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-06-15

    To classify and evaluate mandibular fractures. The author classified mandibular fractures of 284 patients who were referred to the Chonbuk National University Dental Hospital during the period from March 2004 to June 2007. This study was based on the conventional radiographs as well as computed tomographs which were pertained to the 284 patients who have had the mandibular fractures including the facial bone fractures. And mandibular fractures were classified with respect to gender, age, site and type of the fractures. More frequently affected gender with mandibular fracture was male with the ratio of 3.3 : 1. The most frequently affected age with mandibular fracture was third decade (38%), followed by fourth decade (16%), second decade (15%), fifth decade (11%), sixth decade (7%), seventh decade (5%), eighth decade (4%), first decade (4%), and ninth decade (0.3%). The most frequent type of mandibular fracture was single fracture (58%), followed by double fracture (39%), triple fracture (3%). The most common site of mandibular fracture was mandibular condyle as 113 cases (27.7%) and the next was mandibular symphysis as 109 cases (26.7%), mandibular angle as 103 cases (25.3%), mandibular body as 83 cases (20.3%) in order. The sum of fracture sites were 408 sites and there were 1.4 fracture sites per one patient. The number of mandible fractures accompanied with facial bone fractures were 41 cases (14.4%). The results showed the most frequent type and common site of mandibular fracture was single fracture and mandibular condyle respectively.

  8. Radiological study of the mandibular fractures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Ju Won; Kim, Kyoung A; Koh, Kwang Jun

    2009-01-01

    To classify and evaluate mandibular fractures. The author classified mandibular fractures of 284 patients who were referred to the Chonbuk National University Dental Hospital during the period from March 2004 to June 2007. This study was based on the conventional radiographs as well as computed tomographs which were pertained to the 284 patients who have had the mandibular fractures including the facial bone fractures. And mandibular fractures were classified with respect to gender, age, site and type of the fractures. More frequently affected gender with mandibular fracture was male with the ratio of 3.3 : 1. The most frequently affected age with mandibular fracture was third decade (38%), followed by fourth decade (16%), second decade (15%), fifth decade (11%), sixth decade (7%), seventh decade (5%), eighth decade (4%), first decade (4%), and ninth decade (0.3%). The most frequent type of mandibular fracture was single fracture (58%), followed by double fracture (39%), triple fracture (3%). The most common site of mandibular fracture was mandibular condyle as 113 cases (27.7%) and the next was mandibular symphysis as 109 cases (26.7%), mandibular angle as 103 cases (25.3%), mandibular body as 83 cases (20.3%) in order. The sum of fracture sites were 408 sites and there were 1.4 fracture sites per one patient. The number of mandible fractures accompanied with facial bone fractures were 41 cases (14.4%). The results showed the most frequent type and common site of mandibular fracture was single fracture and mandibular condyle respectively.

  9. Clinical comparison between the retromandibular approach for reduction and fixation and endoscope-assisted open reduction and internal fixation for mandibular condyle fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogami, Shinnosuke; Takahashi, Tetsu; Yamauchi, Kensuke; Miyamoto, Ikuya; Kaneuji, Takeshi; Yamamoto, Noriaki; Yoshiga, Daigo; Yamashita, Yoshihiro

    2012-11-01

    Endoscope-assisted transoral open reduction and internal fixation (EAORIF) for mandibular condyle fractures has recently become popular because it is minimally invasive, provides excellent visibility without a large incision, and reduces surgical scarring and the risk of facial nerve injury. This report describes a retrospective clinical study that compared certain clinical parameters, including postoperative function, between the retromandibular (RM) approach and EAORIF. Fifteen patients were treated by the RM approach, whereas 15 underwent EAORIF between July 2006 and September 2011 at Kyushu Dental College, Japan. Clinical indices comprised fracture line, fracture type, number of plates used, surgical duration, bleeding amount, and functional items, including maximum interincisal opening, mandibular deviation on the opening pathway, malocclusion, facial paresthesia, and temporomandibular joint pain and clicking. The areas subjected to either approach included lower neck and subcondyle. The RM approach was used for mandibular condyle fractures with dislocation of a small bone segment. Both groups used 2 plates in all cases. Surgical duration, maximum interincisal opening, mandibular deviation, occlusion, and temporomandibular joint function at 6 months after surgery were comparable between groups. The average bleeding amount in the EAORIF group was greater than in the RM group. One patient from the RM group developed facial paresthesia that persisted for 6 months after surgery. It was concluded that surgical treatment was suitable for fractures of the lower neck and subcondylar. Both procedures showed good results in the functional items of this study.

  10. Management of Pediatric Mandibular Fracture Using Orthodontic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2017-05-22

    May 22, 2017 ... The pediatric patient is a challenge to manage and ... and osteosynthesis of the pediatric fracture with titanium ... impression material and surgical model prepared with ... circum-mandibular wire were removed under local.

  11. Repair of Bovine and Equine Mandibular Fractures

    OpenAIRE

    Murch, K. M.

    1980-01-01

    Clinical findings, surgical repair and postsurgical care of a unilateral fracture of the mandible of a bull and of a bilateral mandibular fracture in a horse are described. Compression plating limited the pain suffered by the animals and resulted in a quick return to function of the mandibles.

  12. Mandibular Condyle Fractures and Treatment Modalities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halil ibrahim Kisa

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Maxillofacial injuries are most commonly associated with falls, motor and vehicle accidents, sports-related trauma, and interpersonel violence. The complexity of mandibular condyle region and its anatomic proximity to other craniofacial structures complicate diagnosis and treatment. Thus, treatment approaches of mandibular condyle fracture are still controversial. In the literature, different success rates are reported about observation versus treatment, closed reduction versus open reduction and fixation methods. In the present article, controversial issues related to mandibular condyle fractures were reviewed under the light of current literature. In conclusion, the simplest way that can be done with the least risk of complication should be chosen during treatment planning. In addition, current adjunctive treatment methods accelerating healing of fracture should be considered. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2014; 23(4.000: 658-671

  13. Pediatric mandibular fractures: a free hand technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davison, S P; Clifton, M S; Davison, M N; Hedrick, M; Sotereanos, G

    2001-01-01

    The treatment of pediatric mandibular fractures is rare, controversial, and complicated by mixed dentition. To determine if open mandibular fracture repair with intraoral and extraoral rigid plate placement, after free hand occlusal and bone reduction, without intermaxillary fixation (IMF), is appropriate and to discuss postoperative advantages, namely, maximal early return of function and minimal oral hygiene issues. A group of 29 pediatric patients with a mandibular fracture were examined. Twenty pediatric patients (13 males and 7 females) with a mean age of 9 years (age range, 1-17 years) were treated using IMF. All patients were treated by the same surgeon (G.S.). Surgical time for plating was reduced by 1 hour, the average time to place patients in IMF. The patients who underwent open reduction internal fixation without IMF ate a soft mechanical diet by postoperative day 3 compared with postoperative day 16 for those who underwent IMF. Complication rates related to fixation technique were comparable at 20% for those who did not undergo IMF and 33% for those who did. We believe that free hand reduction is a valuable technique to reduce operative time for pediatric mandibular fractures. It maximizes return to function while minimizing the oral hygiene issues and hardware removal of intermaxillary function.

  14. Fixation of zygomatic and mandibular fractures with biodegradable plates

    OpenAIRE

    Degala, Saikrishna; Shetty, Sujeeth; Ramya, S

    2013-01-01

    Context: In this prospective study, 13 randomly selected patients underwent treatment for zygomatic?complex fractures (2 site fractures) and mandibular fractures using 1.5 / 2 / 2.5-mm INION CPS biodegradable plates and screws. Aims: To assess the fixation of zygomatic-complex and mandibular fractures with biodegradable copolymer osteosynthesis system. Materials and Methods: In randomly selected 13 patients, zygomatic-complex and mandibular fractures were plated using resorbable plates and sc...

  15. [A toddler with a mandibular fracture].

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Linden, E L; Bun, R J; van Os, E

    2017-01-01

    Mandibular fractures are rare in children. Symptoms of these fractures include preauricular pain and swelling, trismus and pain when opening the mouth, and they are often preceded by a fall on the chin. If the diagnosis is missed they may have serious consequences for the growth and development of the jaw. A 3-year-old boy was referred with a swelling in his left cheek, fever and vomiting. Two days earlier he had fallen on his chin. At physical examination he had severe preauricular pain on palpation and a trismus. The patient was admitted because of suspicion of a viral parotitis and the threat of dehydration. After discharge, he went to the dentist for examination of a molar that was painful to the touch. The dentist performed an orthopantomogram and discovered a fracture of the left mandibular collum. Any child with trauma to the chin should be observed for symptoms of a mandibular fracture, and if it seems necessary non-invasive radiographic examination should be performed.

  16. Complications and Reoperations in Mandibular Angle Fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Collin L; Zenga, Joseph; Patel, Ruchin; Branham, Gregory

    2018-05-01

    Mandible angle fractures can be repaired in a variety of ways, with no consensus on the outcomes of complications and reoperation rates. To analyze patient, injury, and surgical factors, including approach to the angle and plating technique, associated with postoperative complications, as well as the rate of reoperation with regard to mandible angle fractures. Retrospective cohort study analyzing the surgical outcomes of patients with mandible angle fractures between January 1, 2000, and December 31, 2015, who underwent open reduction and internal fixation. Patients were eligible if they were aged 18 years or older, had 3 or less mandible fractures with 1 involving the mandibular angle, and had adequate follow-up data. Patients with comminuted angle fractures, bilateral angle fractures, and multiple surgical approaches were excluded. A total of 135 patients were included in the study. All procedures were conducted at a single, large academic hospital located in an urban setting. Major complications and reoperation rates. Major complications included in this study were nonunion, malunion, severe malocclusion, severe infection, and exposed hardware. Of 135 patients 113 (83.7%) were men; median age was 29 years (range, 18-82 years). Eighty-seven patients (64.4%) underwent the transcervical approach and 48 patients (35.6%) received the transoral approach. Fifteen (17.2%) patients in the transcervical group and 9 (18.8%) patients in the transoral group experienced major complications (difference, 1%; 95% CI, -8% to 10%). Thirteen (14.9%) patients in the transcervical group and 8 (16.7%) patients in the transoral group underwent reoperations (difference, 2%; 95% CI, -13% to 17%). Active smoking had a significant effect on the rate of major complications (odds ratio, 4.04; 95% CI, 1.07 to 15.34; P = .04). During repair of noncomminuted mandibular angle fractures, both of the commonly used approaches-transcervical and transoral-can be used during treatment with equal

  17. Complaints related to mandibular function impairment after closed treatment of fractures of the mandibular condyle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niezen, E. T.; Bos, R. R. M.; de Bont, L. G. M.; Stegenga, B.; Dijkstra, P. U.

    This study analysed the relationship between complaints and mandibular function after closed treatment of fractures of the mandibular condyle in a prospective study. In a I-year follow-up, complaints were assessed during physical examination and function was assessed using the mandibular function

  18. Diagnostic ability of panoramic radiography for mandibular fractures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Ji Hyun; Jung, Yun Hoa; Cho Bong Hae; Hwang, Dae Seok

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic efficacy of panoramic radiographs for detection of mandibular fractures. The sample was comprised of 65 patients (55 fractured, 10 non-fractured) with 92 fracture sites confirmed by multi-detector computed tomography (CT). Panoramic radiographs were evaluated for mandibular fractures by six examiners; two oral and maxillofacial radiologists (observer A and B), two oral and maxillofacial surgeons (observer C and D), and two general dentists (observer E and F). Sensitivity of panoramic radiography for mandibular fractures was 95.7% in observer A and B, 93.5% in observer C and D and 80.4% in observer E and F. The lowest sensitivity was shown in symphyseal/parasymphyseal areas, followed by subcondylar/condylar regions. Panoramic radiography is adequate for detection of mandibular fractures. However, additional multidetector CT is recommended to ascertain some indecisive fractures of symphysis and condyle, and in complicated fractures.

  19. Diagnostic ability of panoramic radiography for mandibular fractures

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    Lee, Ji Hyun; Jung, Yun Hoa; Cho Bong Hae; Hwang, Dae Seok [School of Dentistry, Pusan National University, Pusan (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-03-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic efficacy of panoramic radiographs for detection of mandibular fractures. The sample was comprised of 65 patients (55 fractured, 10 non-fractured) with 92 fracture sites confirmed by multi-detector computed tomography (CT). Panoramic radiographs were evaluated for mandibular fractures by six examiners; two oral and maxillofacial radiologists (observer A and B), two oral and maxillofacial surgeons (observer C and D), and two general dentists (observer E and F). Sensitivity of panoramic radiography for mandibular fractures was 95.7% in observer A and B, 93.5% in observer C and D and 80.4% in observer E and F. The lowest sensitivity was shown in symphyseal/parasymphyseal areas, followed by subcondylar/condylar regions. Panoramic radiography is adequate for detection of mandibular fractures. However, additional multidetector CT is recommended to ascertain some indecisive fractures of symphysis and condyle, and in complicated fractures.

  20. Incomplete (bending) fractures of the mandibular condyle in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahrendt, D.; Swischuk, L.E.; Hayden, C.K. Jr.; Texas Univ., Galveston

    1984-01-01

    Incomplete, bending or bowing fractures of the mandibular condyle in children frequently go undetected. The reason is that the bending deformity often is subtle and passes for normal. This is especially true if the fractures are bilateral. (orig.)

  1. Prospective audit of mandibular fractures at the Charlotte Maxeke ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective. This study was a prospective cross-sectional clinical audit of patients with mandibular fractures at the Charlotte Maxeke Johannesburg Academic Hospital. Methods. Between 1 March and 31 August 2004, patients with mandibular fractures seen by one clinician had their details recorded. Results. The female:male ...

  2. Update on mandibular condylar fracture management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Joshua P; Sawhney, Raja

    2016-08-01

    Fractures of the mandibular condyle have provided a lasting source of controversy in the field of facial trauma. Concerns regarding facial nerve injury as well as reasonable functional outcomes with closed management led to a reluctance to treat with an open operative intervention. This article reviews how incorporating new technologies and surgical methods have changed the treatment paradigm. Multiple large studies and meta-analyses continue to demonstrate superior outcomes for condylar fractures when managed surgically. Innovations, including endoscopic techniques, three-dimensional miniplates, and angled drills provide increased options in the treatment of condylar fractures. The literature on pediatric condylar fractures is limited and continues to favor a more conservative approach. There continues to be mounting evidence in radiographic, quality of life, and functional outcome studies to support open reduction with internal fixation for the treatment of condylar fractures in patients with malocclusion, significant displacement, or dislocation of the temporomandibular joint. The utilization of three-dimensional trapezoidal miniplates has shown improved outcomes and theoretically enhanced biomechanical properties when compared with traditional fixation with single or double miniplates. Endoscopic-assisted techniques can decrease surgical morbidity, but are technically challenging, require skilled assistants, and utilize specialized equipment.

  3. Mandibular fracture cases in Pelotas, Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil

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    Rafael Silva da Silva

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To analyze the data in the literature, which show a high incidence of mandibular fractures. The aim of this research was to elucidate the context in which these fractures occur among patients attended at the first aid center of “Pronto Socorro Municipal de Pelotas”, Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. Methods: From the records referring to the period of June, 2001 to August, 2007, there were 1 345 patients with facial fractures. Of this total, 116 patients with mandibular fracture were selected for this study and the items analysed were: age, gender, mandibular fracture site, etiology and period of the year. Results: It was found that 86.2% of the sample were men. The most prevalent age was 20 to 29 years old representing 36.2%, and the most affected mandibular sites were the body, with 29 cases (25%, and the condyle, with 26 cases (22.4%. The most common cause of fractures was the physical aggression representing 37.1%. The period of the year with the highest incidence of mandibular fractures was the summer, with 38 cases (32.8%. Conclusion: It was therefore observed that the patients with mandibular fracture assisted at Pronto-Socorro Municipal de Pelotas, Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil, were generally men, 20 to 29 years old with mandibular body fracture and they were victims of physical aggression.

  4. Intermaxillary Fixation Screw Morbidity in Treatment of Mandibular Fractures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Florescu, Vlad-Andrei; Kofod, Thomas; Pinholt, Else Marie

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The aim of the present retrospective study was to investigate the morbidity of screws used for intermaxillary fixation (IMF) in the treatment of mandibular fractures. A review of the published data was also performed for a comparison of outcomes. Our hypothesis was that the use of screws...... for IMF of mandibular fractures would result in minimal morbidity. Materials and Methods Patients treated for mandibular fractures from 2007 to 2013, using screws for IMF, using the international diagnosis code for mandibular fracture, DS026, were anonymously selected (Department of Oral and Maxillofacial...... Surgery, Rigshospitalet, University Hospital of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark). The fracture type, radiographic findings, treatment modality, screw type and number, and root damage were recorded. For the outcome comparison, a review of the published data regarding iatrogenic dental root damage caused...

  5. Management of pediatric mandibular fracture: a case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Ravi M; Yeluri, Ramakrishna; Singh, Chanchal; Chaudhry, Kalpna; Munshi, Autar K

    2014-09-01

    A pediatric mandibular fracture can cause a child severe pain and the parent or caregiver extreme worry. While the pattern of fractures and associated injuries in children is similar to adults, the incidence is low. Due to a number of factors, including the anatomical complexity of the developing mandible in a child, management of such fractures differs from that of adults and can greatly challenge the pediatric dentist. Various treatment modalities of managing mandibular fracture are available, such as closed/open cap splint with circummandibular wiring, arch-bar fixation, and cementation of the cap splint. This article reviews 19 cases in the management of pediatric facial fracture using varied treatment methods.

  6. Pediatric mandibular fractures treated by rigid internal fixation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, G B

    1993-09-01

    Mandibular fractures in the pediatric patient population are relatively uncommon. These patients present with their own unique treatment requirements. Most fractures have been treated conservatively by dental splints. Closed reduction techniques with maxillomandibular fixation (MMF) in very young children can pose several concerns, including cooperation, compliance and adequate nutritional intake. Rigid internal fixation of unstable mandibular fractures using miniplates and screws circumvents the need for MMF and allows immediate jaw mobilization. At major pediatric trauma institutions, there has been an increasing trend toward the use of this treatment when open reduction is necessary. This article presents a report of a five-year-old child who presented with bilateral mandibular fractures and was treated by rigid internal fixation and immediate mandibular mobilization.

  7. Relationship between fracture of mandibular condyle and absence of unerupted mandibular third molar-a retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajan, Ritesh; Verma, Dinesh Kumar; Borle, R M; Yadav, Abhilasha

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of the present study was to find, if there exists, a co-relation between presence of unerupted mandibular third molar and fracture of mandibular condyle. A retrospective, multicenter study was done collecting the data of all mandibular condyle fractures treated from November 2006 till August 2015. Data was collected from the patient's records and radiographs for the following information: age, sex, etiology of fracture, presence and state of lower third molars, and associated fracture. The results were subjected to statistical analysis. Out of 180 patients of condylar fracture, unerupted third molars were present in 35 (19.44 %) cases compared to 145 (80.55 %) cases of condylar fracture where the unerupted third molars were not present. The difference was statistically significant (p fracture was seen in 4 (11.4 %) cases, bilateral condylar fracture associated with other mandibular fractures in 9 (25.7 %) cases, isolated unilateral condylar fracture in 0 (0.0 %) cases, and unilateral condylar fracture associated with other mandibular fractures in 17 (48.5 %) cases and condylar fracture associated with mid face fractures in 5 (14.2 %) cases. In the unerupted third molar absent group, isolated bilateral condylar fracture was seen in 5 (3.4 %) cases, bilateral condylar fracture associated with other mandibular fractures in 30 (20.6 %) cases, isolated unilateral condylar fracture in 24 (16.5 %) cases, unilateral condylar fracture associated with other mandibular fractures in 73 (50.34 %) cases, and condylar fracture associated with mid face fractures in 13(8.96 %) cases. The difference between the groups was statistically significant (p = 0.032). This study suggests that the fractures of mandibular condylar region have a significantly higher incidence in patients without an unerupted mandibular third molar.

  8. The application of the Risdon approach for mandibular condyle fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Seung Min; Lee, Jang Hyun; Kim, Jun Hyuk

    2013-07-06

    Many novel approaches to mandibular condyle fracture have been reported, but there is a relative lack of reports on the Risdon approach. In this study, the feasibility of the Risdon approach for condylar neck and subcondylar fractures of the mandible is demonstrated. A review of patients with mandibular condylar neck and subcondylar fractures was performed from March 2008 to June 2012. A total of 25 patients, 19 males and 6 females, had 14 condylar neck fractures and 11 subcondylar fractures. All of the cases were reduced using the Risdon approach. For subcondylar fractures, reduction and fixation with plates was done under direct vision. For condylar neck fractures, reduction and fixation was done with the aid of a trochar in adults and a percutaneous threaded Kirschner wire in children. There were no malunions or nonunions revealed in follow-up care. Mild transient neuropraxia of the marginal mandibular nerve was seen in 4 patients, which was resolved within 1-2 months. The Risdon approach is a technique for reducing the condylar neck and subcondylar fractures that is easy to perform and easy to learn. Its value in the reduction of mandibular condyle fractures should be emphasized.

  9. Algorithm of imaging modalities in cases of mandibular fractures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mihailova, H.

    2009-01-01

    Mandibular fracture is the most common bone fracture of maxillo-facial trauma. Up to now the main method for examination of the mandible is radiography. The aim of the issue is to present an algorithm of imaging modalities for investigation of patients in cases of mandibular trauma. It consists of series of X ray techniques and views of the facial skull named mandibulo-facial. This standardizes mandibulo-facial series includes exactly determined four projections done by conventional X ray techniques: posterior-anterior view of skull (PA or AP), oblique view of the left mandible; oblique view of the right mandible; occipito-mental view. Using these four planned radiograms is obligatory for each mandibular trauma. Panoramic X-ray is obligatory in cases of apparatus availability; this abolish only oblique views (left and right). Occipito-mental view of the skull gives anatomically better the coronoid process of the mandible, the zygoma complex, the orbital edges and maxillar sinus than Waters projection. So mandibulo-facial series of four planned radiograms is not only for diagnostic of mandibular fractures, but as a screening of mandibulo-facial trauma too. Thus using algorithm of imaging modalities in cases of mandibular fracture leads to optimization of diagnostic process in patients with mandibular trauma. (author)

  10. Functional Treatment of a Child with Extracapsular Mandibular Fracture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Cassi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Condylar fractures are among the most frequent fractures in the context of traumatic lesions of the face. The management of condylar fractures is still controversial, especially when fractures occur in children: if overlooked or inappropriately treated, these lesions may lead to severe sequelae, both cosmetic and functional. The therapy must be careful because severe long-term complications can occur. In this case report, the authors present a case of mandibular fracture in which the decision between surgical therapy and functional therapeutic regimen may be controversial due to the particular anatomy of the fracture line and the age of the patient.

  11. Factors contributing to the surgical retreatment of mandibular fractures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Gualberto de Cerqueira Luz

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this retrospective study was to evaluate contributing factors in patients requiring surgical retreatment of mandibular fractures. Of all the patients with mandibular fractures who were treated using internal fixation at a trauma hospital over a seven-year period, 20 patients (4.7% required a second surgery and thus composed the “reoperated” group. The control group comprised 42 consecutive patients with mandibular fractures who were treated at the same clinic and who healed without complications. Medical charts were reviewed for gender, age, substance abuse history, dental condition, etiology, location of fracture, degree of fragmentation, fracture exposure, teeth in the fracture line, associated facial fractures, polytrauma, time elapsed between trauma and initial treatment, surgical approach and fixation system. Statistical analyses were performed using the Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS version 20.0; descriptive statistics and the chi-squared test were used to determine differences between groups. Significant differences in substance abuse (p = 0.006, dental condition (p < 0.001, location of fracture (p = 0.010, degree of fragmentation (p = 0.003 and fracture exposure (p < 0.001 were found. With regard to age and time elapsed between trauma and initial treatment, older patients (31.4 years, SD = 11.1 and a delay in fracture repair (19.1 days, SD = 18.7 were more likely to be associated with reoperation. It was concluded that substance abuse, age, dental condition, location of fracture, degree of fragmentation, fracture exposure and the time between trauma and initial treatment should be considered contributing factors to the occurrence of complications that require surgical retreatment of mandibular fractures.

  12. Conservative orthodontic treatment of mandibular bilateral condyle fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gašpar, Goran; Brakus, Ivan; Kovačić, Ivan

    2014-09-01

    Maxillofacial trauma is rare in children younger than the age of 5 years (range 0.6%-1.2%), and they can require different clinical treatment strategies compared with fractures in the adult population because of concerns regarding mandibular growth and development of dentition. A 5-year-old girl with a history of falling from a bicycle 7 hours earlier was referred to the department of oral and maxillofacial surgery. Multislice computed tomographic examination demonstrated a bilateral fracture of the mandibular condyle neck associated with minimal fracture of the alveolar ridge of the maxilla. The multislice computed tomographic scan also demonstrated dislocation on the right condyle neck and, on the left side, a medial inclination of approximately 45 degrees associated with greenstick fracture of the right parasymphysis region. In this particular case, orthodontic rubber elastics in combination with fixed orthodontic brackets provided good results in the treatment of bilateral condyle neck fractures associated with greenstick fracture of parasymphysis.

  13. Endoscope-Assisted Transoral Fixation of Mandibular Condyle Fractures: Submandibular Versus Transoral Endoscopic Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Na-Hyun; Lee, Yoon-Hwan; You, Hi-Jin; Yoon, Eul-Sik; Kim, Deok-Woo

    2016-07-01

    In recent years, endoscope-assisted transoral approach for condylar fracture treatment has attracted much attention. However, the surgical approach is technically challenging: the procedure requires specialized instruments and the surgeons experience a steep learning curve. During the transoral endoscopic (TE) approach several instruments are positioned through a narrow oral incision making endoscope maneuvering very difficult. For this reason, the authors changed the entry port of the endoscope from transoral to submandibular area through a small stab incision. The aim of this study is to assess the advantage of using the submandibular endoscopic intraoral approach (SEI).The SEI approach requires intraoral incision for fracture reduction and fixation, and 4 mm size submandibular stab incision for endoscope and traction wires. Fifteen patients with condyle neck and subcondyle fractures were operated under the submandibular approach and 15 patients with the same diagnosis were operated under the standard TE approach.The SEI approach allowed clear visualization of the posterior margin of the ramus and condyle, and the visual axis was parallel to the condyle ramus unit. The TE approach clearly shows the anterior margin of the condyle and the sigmoid notch. The surgical time of the SEI group was 128 minutes and the TE group was 120 minutes (P >0.05). All patients in the TE endoscope group were fixated with the trocar system, but only 2 lower neck fracture patients in the SEI group required a trocar. The other 13 subcondyle fractures were fixated with an angulated screw driver (P <0.05). There were no differences in complication and surgical outcomes.The submandibular endoscopic approach has an advantage of having more space with good visualization, and facilitated the use of an angulated screw driver.

  14. Early Experience with Biodegradable Fixation of Pediatric Mandibular Fractures

    OpenAIRE

    Mazeed, Ahmed Salah; Shoeib, Mohammed Abdel-Raheem; Saied, Samia Mohammed Ahmed; Elsherbiny, Ahmed

    2014-01-01

    This clinical study aims to evaluate the stability and efficiency of biodegradable self-reinforced poly-l/dl-lactide (SR-PLDLA) plates and screws for fixation of pediatric mandibular fractures. The study included 12 patients (3–12 years old) with 14 mandibular fractures. They were treated by open reduction and internal fixation by SR-PLDLA plates and screws. Maxillomandibular fixation was maintained for 1 week postoperatively. Clinical follow-up was performed at 1 week, 6 weeks, 3 months, and...

  15. Application of biodegradable plates for treating pediatric mandibular fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Jingang; Jia, Pengcheng; Zhang, Yi; Gong, Xi; Han, Xiaodong; He, Yang

    2015-05-01

    We assessed the clinical results of a biodegradable plate system for the internal fixation of mandibular fractures in children, and observed the imaging features of fracture healing and bone changes around the biodegradable plates and screws during follow-up. We enrolled 39 patients (22 male, 17 female, average age 4 years 10 months) with different mandibular fractures. We used 2.0-mm resorbable plates to repair the fractures. Postoperative follow-up ranged from 6 months to 5 years; average follow-up was 1 year 2 months. The outcome measures identified and assessed included facial symmetry, mouth opening, occlusal relationship, infection, nonunion, malunion, and plate dehiscence. We fixed 42 fractures with 43 resorbable plates; the fracture site of one patient (aged 11 years 3 months) was fixed with two plates. Two patients developed small fistulas at the intraoral incision 2 months after surgery; the fistulas healed after 1 month without special treatment. In the other patients, the incision healed well, there was facial symmetry, mouth opening was >35 mm, and occlusion was good. Follow-up computed tomography examination data were available for 20 cases, and revealed different degrees of radiolucency indicating that osteolysis had occurred. Radiolucency was observed around the resorbable plates 1 month after the surgery. The extent and depth of the radiolucent region were obvious within 1 year of surgery. In the second year, there were obvious repairs, with the bony defect areas becoming shallower. After 2 years, the bony defect areas had almost disappeared. Biodegradable fixation devices are safe and efficient for treating pediatric mandibular fractures. Osteolysis commonly follows biodegradable fixation of pediatric mandibular fractures, and has no adverse effect on fracture healing. Copyright © 2015 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Feasibility of purely endoscopic intramedullary fixation of mandibular condyle fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frake, Paul C; Goodman, Joseph F; Joshi, Arjun S

    2015-01-01

    The investigators of this study hypothesized that fractures of the mandibular condyle can be repaired using short-segment intramedullary implants and purely endoscopic surgical technique, using a basic science, human cadaver model in an academic center. Endoscopic instrumentation was used through a transoral mucosal incision to place intramedullary implants of 2 cm in length into osteotomized mandibular condyles. The surgical maneuvers that required to insert these implants, including condyle positioning, reaming, implant insertion, and seating of the mandibular ramus, are described herein. Primary outcome was considered as successful completion of the procedure. Ten cadaveric mandibular condyles were successfully repaired with rigid intramedullary internal fixation without the use of external incisions. Both insertion of a peg-type implant and screwing a threaded implant into the condylar head were possible. The inferior portion of the implant remained exposed, and the ramus of the mandible was manipulated into position on the implant using retraction at the sigmoid notch. The results of this study suggest that purely endoscopic repair of fractures of the mandibular condyle is possible by using short-segment intramedullary titanium implants and a transoral endoscopic approach without the need for facial incisions or punctures. The biomechanical advantages of these intramedullary implants, including improved strength and resistance to mechanical failure compared with miniplates, have been recently established. The combination of improved implant design and purely endoscopic technique may allow for improved fixation and reduced surgical- and implant-related morbidity in the treatment of condylar fractures.

  17. Treatment of displaced mandibular condylar fracture with botulinum toxin A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbay, Ercan; Cevik, Cengiz; Damlar, Ibrahim; Altan, Ahmet

    2014-04-01

    The aim of this case report is to discuss the effect on condylar reduction of botulinum toxin A treatment used in a child with displaced fracture at condylar neck of mandible. A 3-years old boy was admitted to our clinic for incomplete fracture of mandibular symphysis and displaced condylar fracture at the left side. An asymmetrical occlusal splint with intermaxillary fixation was used instead of open reduction and internal fixation because of incomplete fracture of symphysis and possible complications of condyle surgery. However, it was observed that condylar angulation persisted despite this procedure. Thus, botulinum toxin A was administered to masseter, temporalis and pterygoideus medialis muscles. At the end of first month, it was seen that mandibular condyle was almost completely recovered and that fusion was achieved. In conclusion, Botulinum A toxin injection aiming the suppression of masticatory muscle strength facilitates the reduction in the conservative management of displaced condyle in pediatric patients. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Relationship between mandibular condyle and angle fractures and the presence of mandibular third molars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mah, Deuk-Hyun; Kim, Su-Gwan; Moon, Seong-Yong; Oh, Ji-Su; You, Jae-Seek

    2015-02-01

    We retrospectively evaluated the impact of mandibular third molars on the occurrence of angle and condyle fractures. This was a retrospective investigation using patient records and radiographs. The sample set consisted of 440 patients with mandibular fractures. Eruption space, depth and angulation of the third molar were measured. Of the 144 angle fracture patients, 130 patients had third molars and 14 patients did not. The ratio of angle fractures when a third molar was present (1.26 : 1) was greater than when no third molar was present (0.19 : 1; odds ratio, 6.58; Pcondyle fractures patients, the third molar was present in 84 patients and absent in 57 patients. The ratio of condyle fractures when a third molar was present (0.56 : 1) was lower than when no third molar was present (1.90 : 1; odds ratio, 0.30; Pfractures with third molars and the ratio of condyle fractures without a third molar were statistically significant. The occurrence of angle and condyle fractures was more affected by the continuity of the cortical bone at the angle than by the depth of a third molar. These results demonstrate that a third molar can be a determining factor in angle and condyle fractures.

  19. Fixation of zygomatic and mandibular fractures with biodegradable plates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degala, Saikrishna; Shetty, Sujeeth; Ramya, S

    2013-01-01

    In this prospective study, 13 randomly selected patients underwent treatment for zygomatic-complex fractures (2 site fractures) and mandibular fractures using 1.5 / 2 / 2.5-mm INION CPS biodegradable plates and screws. To assess the fixation of zygomatic-complex and mandibular fractures with biodegradable copolymer osteosynthesis system. In randomly selected 13 patients, zygomatic-complex and mandibular fractures were plated using resorbable plates and screws using Champy's principle. All the cases were evaluated clinically and radiologically for the type of fracture, need for the intermaxillary fixation (IMF) and its duration, duration of surgery, fixation at operation, state of reduction at operation, state of bone union after operation, anatomic reduction, paresthesia, occlusal discrepancies, soft tissue infection, immediate and late inflammatory reactions related to biodegradation process, and any need for the removal of the plates. Descriptives, Frequencies, and Chi-square test were used. In our study, the age group range was 5 to 55 years. Road traffic accidents accounted for the majority of patients six, (46.2%). Postoperative occlusal discrepancies were found in seven patients as mild to moderate, which resolved with IMF for 1-8 weeks. There were minimal complications seen and only as soft tissue infection. Use of biodegradable osteosynthesis system is a reliable alternative method for the fixation of zygomatic-complex and mandibular fractures. The biodegradable system still needs to be refined in material quality and handling to match the stability achieved with metal system. Biodegradable plates and screws is an ideal system for pediatric fractures with favorable outcome.

  20. Epidemiological analysis of mandibular fractures treated in Sao Paulo, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly Marinho

    2015-10-01

    Conclusion: The treatment of mandibular fractures should be aimed at restoring the occlusion and mastication function, with surgery being the most indicated treatment, using reduction and internal fixation with the use of a plates and screws system based on the experience of the authors. Knowledge of surgical techniques and methods of reduction and fixation of fractures, and periodic monitoring allow these patients to receive the appropriate treatment.

  1. Early Experience with Biodegradable Fixation of Pediatric Mandibular Fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazeed, Ahmed Salah; Shoeib, Mohammed Abdel-Raheem; Saied, Samia Mohammed Ahmed; Elsherbiny, Ahmed

    2015-09-01

    This clinical study aims to evaluate the stability and efficiency of biodegradable self-reinforced poly-l/dl-lactide (SR-PLDLA) plates and screws for fixation of pediatric mandibular fractures. The study included 12 patients (3-12 years old) with 14 mandibular fractures. They were treated by open reduction and internal fixation by SR-PLDLA plates and screws. Maxillomandibular fixation was maintained for 1 week postoperatively. Clinical follow-up was performed at 1 week, 6 weeks, 3 months, and 12 months postoperatively. Radiographs were done at 1 week, 3 months, and 12 months postoperatively to observe any displacement and fracture healing. All fractures healed both clinically and radiologically. No serious complications were reported in the patients. Normal occlusion was achieved in all cases. Biodegradable osteofixation of mandibular fractures offers a valuable clinical solution for pediatric patients getting the benefit of avoiding secondary surgery to remove plates, decreasing the hospital stay, further painful procedures, and psychological impact.

  2. Comminuted mandibular fracture in child victim of dog bite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Carvalho, Matheus Furtado; Hardtke, Luiz Augusto Paixão; de Souza, Max Filipe Cota; de Oliveira Araujo, Vasco

    2012-08-01

    Dog bites represent lesions commonly found in Hospital Emergency Clinic. This type of lesion may cause severe harm to patients, but it rarely affects the underlying bone structure causes facial fracture. This study aims to illustrate a rare clinical case in which a pediatric patient presented a comminuted fracture in the mandible which evolved into a unilateral avulsion of the mandibular condyle, body fractures as well as a mandibular ramus and hemiface that had been deformed, with multiple lacerations and loss of soft-tissue mass. Intermaxillary fixation was performed using the Ivy method, followed by internal rigid fixation using miniplates and screws in attempt to reconstruct the child's mandible. After 2 years of follow-up, a satisfactory esthetics and functional results could be observed. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  3. Function impairment and pain after closed treatment of fractures of the mandibular condyle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkstra, P.U.; Stegenga, B.; de Bont, L.G.; Bos, R.R.

    Background: To determine the prognosis of fractures of the mandibular condyle after closed treatment. Methods: Patients (n = 144) with a fracture of the mandibular condyle, all treated closed, were included in the study. Fracture types and position of the fracture parts were determined on

  4. Management of fractures of the mandibular body and symphysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodday, Reginald H B

    2013-11-01

    Mandibular fracture, specifically in the symphysis and body regions combined, is the most common facial fracture requiring hospitalization in North America. The primary treatment objective is to restore form and function by achieving anatomic reduction and placing fixation that eliminates mobility of the bone fragments. Several treatment options and surgical techniques are available for performing closed or open reduction. Special considerations are necessary when treating pediatric patients and fractures of the edentulous mandible. Complications relating to the tooth and denture-bearing regions of the mandible include infection, nonunion, and neurosensory changes. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Current Concepts in the Mandibular Condyle Fracture Management Part I: Overview of Condylar Fracture

    OpenAIRE

    Choi, Kang-Young; Yang, Jung-Dug; Chung, Ho-Yun; Cho, Byung-Chae

    2012-01-01

    The incidence of condylar fractures is high, but the management of fractures of the mandibular condyle continues to be controversial. Historically, maxillomandibular fixation, external fixation, and surgical splints with internal fixation systems were the techniques commonly used in the treatment of the fractured mandible. Condylar fractures can be extracapsular or intracapsular, undisplaced, deviated, displaced, or dislocated. Treatment depends on the age of the patient, the co-existence of ...

  6. Management of mandibular body fractures in pediatric patients: a case report with review of literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, Baby; John, Reena R; Stalin, A; Elango, Indumathi

    2010-10-01

    Mandibular fractures are relatively less frequent in children when compared to adults, which may be due to the child's protected anatomic features and infrequent exposure of children to alcohol related traffic accidents. Treatment principles of mandibular fractures differ from that of adults due to concerns regarding mandibular growth and development of dentition. A case of a 4.5-year-old boy with fractured body of mandible managed by closed reduction using open occlusal acrylic splint and circum mandibular wiring is presented. This article also provides a review of literature regarding the management of mandibular body fracture in young children.

  7. Management of mandibular body fractures in pediatric patients: A case report with review of literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baby John

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Mandibular fractures are relatively less frequent in children when compared to adults, which may be due to the child′s protected anatomic features and infrequent exposure of children to alcohol related traffic accidents. Treatment principles of mandibular fractures differ from that of adults due to concerns regarding mandibular growth and development of dentition. A case of a 4.5-year-old boy with fractured body of mandible managed by closed reduction using open occlusal acrylic splint and circum mandibular wiring is presented. This article also provides a review of literature regarding the management of mandibular body fracture in young children.

  8. Open versus closed reduction: diacapitular fractures of the mandibular condyle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chrcanovic, Bruno Ramos

    2012-09-01

    The purpose of the study was to review the literature regarding the evolution of current thoughts on management of diacapitular fractures (DFs) of the mandibular condyle. An electronic search in PubMed was undertaken in March 2012. The titles and abstracts from these results were read to identify studies within the selection criteria. Eligibility criteria included studies reporting clinical series of DFs, including both animal and human studies, without date or language restrictions. The search strategy initially yielded 108 references. Twenty-eight studies were identified without repetition within the selection criteria. Additional hand-searching of the reference lists of selected studies yielded three additional papers. The current indications for open reduction and internal fixation (ORIF) of DFs described in the literature are: (a) fractures affecting the lateral condyle with reduction of mandibular height; (b) fractures in which the proximal fragment dislocates laterally out of the glenoid fossa, which cannot be reduced by closed or open treatment of another part of the mandibular fracture. The indications for conservative treatment are: (a) fractures that do not shorten the condylar height (a fracture with displacement of the medial parts of the condyle); (b) undisplaced fractures; (c) comminution of the condylar head, when the bony fragments are too small for stable fixation; and (d) fractures in children. As the temporomandibular joint disk plays an important role as a barrier preventing ankylosis, it is important to reposition the disk (if displaced/dislocated) during the surgical treatment of DFs. The lateral pterygoid muscle should never be stripped from the medially displaced fragment because its desinsertion disrupts circulation to the medial bony fragment, and also because this muscle helps to restore the muscle function after surgery. ORIF of selected DFs improves prognosis by anatomical bone and soft tissue recovery when combined with physical

  9. Principles of pediatric mandibular fracture management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Patrick; Kaufman, Yoav; Izaddoost, Shayan; Hatef, Daniel A; Hollier, Larry

    2009-03-01

    Mandible fractures are commonplace in today's craniofacial practice; however, managing the infrequent, operative pediatric mandible injury requires a thorough knowledge base and thoughtful approach. Not only do these patients demonstrate variable anatomy due to differing stages of dental eruption, but condylar disruption may translate into long-term growth disturbance. In addition, patient immaturity often complicates cooperation, and both fixation strategies and postoperative planning must take this into account. As a supplement to the authors' video presentation, the present article focuses on repair of the symphyseal fracture and bilateral condylar injuries in the pediatric patient.

  10. Current Concepts in the Mandibular Condyle Fracture Management Part I: Overview of Condylar Fracture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jung-Dug; Chung, Ho-Yun; Cho, Byung-Chae

    2012-01-01

    The incidence of condylar fractures is high, but the management of fractures of the mandibular condyle continues to be controversial. Historically, maxillomandibular fixation, external fixation, and surgical splints with internal fixation systems were the techniques commonly used in the treatment of the fractured mandible. Condylar fractures can be extracapsular or intracapsular, undisplaced, deviated, displaced, or dislocated. Treatment depends on the age of the patient, the co-existence of other mandibular or maxillary fractures, whether the condylar fracture is unilateral or bilateral, the level and displacement of the fracture, the state of dentition and dental occlusion, and the surgeonnds on the age of the patient, the co-existence of othefrom which it is difficult to recover aesthetically and functionally;an appropriate treatment is required to reconstruct the shape and achieve the function ofthe uninjured status. To do this, accurate diagnosis, appropriate reduction and rigid fixation, and complication prevention are required. In particular, as mandibular condyle fracture may cause long-term complications such as malocclusion, particularly open bite, reduced posterior facial height, and facial asymmetry in addition to chronic pain and mobility limitation, great caution should be taken. Accordingly, the authors review a general overview of condyle fracture. PMID:22872830

  11. Current Concepts in the Mandibular Condyle Fracture Management Part I: Overview of Condylar Fracture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kang-Young Choi

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of condylar fractures is high, but the management of fractures of the mandibular condyle continues to be controversial. Historically, maxillomandibular fixation, external fixation, and surgical splints with internal fixation systems were the techniques commonly used in the treatment of the fractured mandible. Condylar fractures can be extracapsular or intracapsular, undisplaced, deviated, displaced, or dislocated. Treatment depends on the age of the patient, the co-existence of other mandibular or maxillary fractures, whether the condylar fracture is unilateral or bilateral, the level and displacement of the fracture, the state of dentition and dental occlusion, and the surgeonnds on the age of the patient, the co-existence of othefrom which it is difficult to recover aesthetically and functionally;an appropriate treatment is required to reconstruct the shape and achieve the function ofthe uninjured status. To do this, accurate diagnosis, appropriate reduction and rigid fixation, and complication prevention are required. In particular, as mandibular condyle fracture may cause long-term complications such as malocclusion, particularly open bite, reduced posterior facial height, and facial asymmetry in addition to chronic pain and mobility limitation, great caution should be taken. Accordingly, the authors review a general overview of condyle fracture.

  12. Management of mandibular body fractures in pediatric patients: A case report with review of literature

    OpenAIRE

    Baby John; Reena R John; A Stalin; Indumathi Elango

    2010-01-01

    Mandibular fractures are relatively less frequent in children when compared to adults, which may be due to the child's protected anatomic features and infrequent exposure of children to alcohol related traffic accidents. Treatment principles of mandibular fractures differ from that of adults due to concerns regarding mandibular growth and development of dentition. A case of a 4.5-year-old boy with fractured body of mandible managed by closed reduction using open occlusal acrylic splint and ci...

  13. Elderly patients with maxillofacial trauma: study of mandibular condyle fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogami, Shinnosuke; Yamauchi, Kensuke; Yamashita, Toshio; Kataoka, Yoshihiro; Hirayama, Bunichi; Tanaka, Kenko; Takahashi, Tetsu

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the trends and characteristic features of mandibular condyle fractures in elderly patients in terms of etiology, patterns, and treatment modalities. Records of 201 patients aged 65 years and older, who were treated for maxillofacial fractures at the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Kyushu Dental University, and Tohoku University from January 2002 to December 2013, were retrospectively analyzed. Patient records and radiographs were examined, with the following information: relevant medical history, cause of fracture, the presence and state of premolars and molars in the maxilla and mandible, number and location of mandible fracture, and method of treatment. As for the state of premolars and molars, premolars or molars in the mandible in contact with the maxilla were regarded as contacted. A fall was responsible for the majority of the fractures (173/201). With condyle fractures, there was a significant difference between the contacted and non-contacted group in regard to incidence. Furthermore, there was a significantly greater number of cases with symphysis and condyle combination fractures in the non-contacted group (70.9%) than in the contacted group (51.9%). As for the method of treatment, arthrocentesis was the most commonly employed. The present findings suggest that contacted molars in the maxilla and mandible have an influence on condyle fractures in elderly individuals. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Epidemiology of Surgically Managed Mandibular Condylar Fractures at a Tertiary Referral Hospital in Urban Southwest China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thapa, Swosti; Wang, Jun; Hu, Hong-Tao; Zhang, Fu-Gui; Ji, Ping

    2017-01-01

    Mandibular condylar fracture is one of the commonest maxillofacial fractures treated by maxillofacial surgeons. Demography of the patients, causation, and characteristics of the fracture depends on various socio-economic factors. Hence, maxillofacial surgeons should be familiar with epidemiology of mandibular condylar fracture. This study retrospectively describes the demography, etiology, fracture characteristics, and hospital utilization of surgically treated mandibular condylar fractures in a tertiary referral hospital in urban China in past five years. Data of all patients who underwent surgical management between 2011 and 2015 were collected. This included aetiology, characteristics of fracture, time, age, sex, associated injuries, and hospital utilization of 166 patients with 208 mandibular condylar fractures. These patients had undergone open reduction and internal fixation with either miniplates or lag screws. Among the fracture of head of mandibular condyle, 21.28% of the patients had the fracture segments removed. These data were statistically analyzed to describe the epidemiology of mandibular condylar fracture. Most of the patients had unilateral mandibular condylar fractures (74.7%). Male patients (76.51%) outnumbered female patients (23.49%) in this cohort. The average age of the patients was 37 years. The fractures were mostly caused by fall from height (60.84%) and were located at the condylar neck (53.61%). Most of the patients had other associated maxillofacial injuries (71.08%) which were mostly located at symphysis and parasymphysis (44.59%). It took 12.58 +/- 0.35 days of hospitalization for the treatment. Fall from height was the most prevalent cause of mandibular condylar injury in mountainous urban China. The people at highest risk were middle-aged men. Mandibular condylar fracture was mostly located at the condylar neck and was usually associated with fracture at the symphysis and parasymphysis.

  15. Impacted mandibular third molars and their influence on mandibular angle and condyle fractures--a retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaddipati, Rajasekhar; Ramisetty, Sudhir; Vura, Nandagopal; Kanduri, Rajeev Reddy; Gunda, Vinay Kumar

    2014-10-01

    Previous retrospective analyses prove that impacted mandibular third molars (M3s) increase the risk of angle fractures and decrease the risk of concomitant fractures to the condyle. A retrospective cohort was designed for patients reported to the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery from January 2011 till June 2013. The study variables are presence or absence of third molar, if it is present, their position, classified using the Pell and Gregory system; angulation, classified using Shiller's method. The outcome variables were angle and condyle fractures. Hospital records and panoramic radiographs were used to determine and classify these variables. The study sample comprised of 118 mandibular angle and condyle fractures in 110 patients. Database was constructed and analysed using SPSS version 10.0. This present retrospective study concluded that the presence of impacted third molar predisposes the angle to fracture and reduces the risk of a concomitant condylar fracture. However absence of impacted third molar increases the risk of condylar fracture. The highest incidence of angle fracture was observed in position A impacted mandibular third molars. And there is no significant relationship, concerning ramus position and angulation of impacted mandibular third molars with the angle fracture. Copyright © 2014 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Internal fixation of mandibular angle fractures: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regev, Eran; Shiff, Jacob S; Kiss, Alex; Fialkov, Jeffrey A

    2010-06-01

    The degree of rigidity of internal fixation required for the treatment of mandibular angle fractures has long been at the center of debate in the literature. A statistical comparison between rigid fixation and monocortical fixation has been difficult because of multiple terms, definitions, and technical variations. The purpose of this study was to use the meta-analysis tool to combine information from multiple studies and to compare complication rates for different fixation methods. An English language literature search was conducted for articles on mandibular angle fractures. Information was collected on four variables of interest: compression/noncompression technique, monocortical/bicortical screws, number of plates, and location of plates. Five outcome rates were analyzed: infection, reoperation, hardware removal, malunion, and nonunion. Meta-analyses were run using Comprehensive Meta Analysis, version 2.2.03. Twenty-four studies with relevant data on the variables and outcomes of interest met the inclusion criteria. Significantly higher rates of infection, reoperation, and hardware removal were found for compression compared with noncompression, two plates compared with one plate, and for plates located on both the inferior and superior borders as compared with superior or inferior only. There were also significantly higher infection rates for bicortical screws compared with monocortical screws and higher malunion rates for compression compared with noncompression plating techniques. The results of this meta-analysis found lower complication rates with the use of noncompression, monocortical, and single-plate fixation, supporting the trend toward a single, superiorly placed, monocortical miniplate for fixation of mandibular angle fractures.

  17. Treatment of mandibular symphyseal fracture combined with dislocated intracapsular condylar fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiaofeng; Shi, Jun; Xu, Bing; Dai, Jiewen; Zhang, Shilei

    2015-03-01

    To evaluate the treatment methods of mandibular symphyseal fracture combined with dislocated intracapsular condylar fractures (MSF&DICF) and to compare the effect of different treatment methods of condylar fractures. Twenty-eight patients with MSF&DICF were included in this study. Twenty-two sites were treated by open reduction, and all the medial condylar fragments were fixed with titanium screws; whereas the other 22 sites underwent close treatment. The surgical effect between these 2 groups was compared based on clinical examination and radiographic examination results. Seventeen of 22 condyle fractures were repositioned in the surgery group, whereas 4 of 22 condyle fractures were repositioned in the close treatment group. Statistical difference was observed between these 2 groups (P condyle fractures should be treated by surgical reduction with the maintenance of the attachment of lateral pterygoid muscle, which is beneficial to repositioning the dislocated condyle to its original physiological position, to closure of the mandibular lingual gap, to restore the mandibular width.

  18. Current Concepts in the Mandibular Condyle Fracture Management Part II: Open Reduction Versus Closed Reduction

    OpenAIRE

    Choi, Kang-Young; Yang, Jung-Dug; Chung, Ho-Yun; Cho, Byung-Chae

    2012-01-01

    In the treatment of mandibular condyle fracture, conservative treatment using closed reduction or surgical treatment using open reduction can be used. Management of mandibular condylar fractures remains a source of ongoing controversy in oral and maxillofacial trauma. For each type of condylar fracture,the treatment method must be chosen taking into consideration the presence of teeth, fracture height, patient'sadaptation, patient's masticatory system, disturbance of occlusal function, and de...

  19. Current Concepts in the Mandibular Condyle Fracture Management Part I: Overview of Condylar Fracture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kang-Young Choi

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of condylar fractures is high,but the management of fractures of the mandibularcondyle continues to be controversial. Historically, maxillomandibular fixation, externalfixation, and surgical splints with internal fixation systems were the techniques commonlyused in the treatment of the fractured mandible. Condylar fractures can be extracapsularor intracapsular, undisplaced, deviated, displaced, or dislocated. Treatment depends on theage of the patient, the co-existence of other mandibular or maxillary fractures, whether thecondylar fracture is unilateral or bilateral, the level and displacement of the fracture, thestate of dentition and dental occlusion, and the surgeonnds on the age of the patient, theco-existence of othefrom which it is difficult to recover aesthetically and functionally;anappropriate treatment is required to reconstruct the shape and achieve the function oftheuninjured status. To do this, accurate diagnosis, appropriate reduction and rigid fixation, andcomplication prevention are required. In particular, as mandibular condyle fracture may causelong-term complications such as malocclusion, particularly open bite, reduced posterior facialheight, and facial asymmetry in addition to chronic pain and mobility limitation, great cautionshould be taken. Accordingly, the authors review a general overview of condyle fracture.

  20. Retroauricular transmeatal approach to manage mandibular condylar head fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benech, Arnaldo; Arcuri, Francesco; Baragiotta, Nicola; Nicolotti, Matteo; Brucoli, Matteo

    2011-03-01

    There is a multitude of reported surgical approaches and technical variants with some unresolved technical problems to gain direct access to mandibular condylar head fractures; they can be divided into 2 groups: intraoral and extraoral. In 2005, Neff et al (Mund Kiefer Gesichtschir 2005;9:80), supported by a previous experimental work, reported a successful clinical study of condylar head fractures treated by a retroauricular approach; this article is in German, and the later English-language literature does not mention about this approach to open reduction and internal fixation of mandibular condylar fractures. The retroauricular transmeatal access, selected and performed by the senior author to treat 14 patients affected by highly located condylar head fracture, is illustrated in details. We collected data of 14 consecutive adult patients who, after the discussion about all options, had consented to have 16 mandibular condylar head fractures treated with open reduction and internal fixation by miniplates and screws via a retroauricular transmeatal approach. We exposed the temporomandibular joint area easily and better by dissecting via a retroauricular route with identification, ligation, and transection of the retromandibular vein; because of the posterior access, the frontal branch of the facial nerve and the auriculotemporal nerve are located and protected within the substance of the anteriorly retracted flap, superficial to the retromandibular vein. The follow-up clinical examination showed temporary weakness of the frontal branch of the facial nerve in 1 case with a recovery to normal function of 1.6 months; no patients had permanent weakness of the facial nerve or injury of the auriculotemporal nerve. There was absence of any salivary fistula, sialocele, and Frey syndrome; hearing was preserved in all cases, without any auditory stenosis or aesthetic deformity, and there was absence of any infections, hematoma, or scarring. Retroauricular approach provides

  1. Surgical treatment and a unique management of rostral mandibular fracture with cerclage wire in a horse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naddaf, Hadi; Sabiza, Soroush; Kavosi, Narges

    2015-01-01

    A 3-year-old Arabian colt was presented for a major gingiva wound at the right rostral part of mandible. After clinical assessments, rostral mandibular fracture was determined. Stabilization of fractured region was achieved via cerclage wire application under general anesthesia. Fixation wires were left in place for 6 weeks. A 3 -month follow up revealed complete fracture healing. The purpose of this case report was to give clinical information about rostral mandibular fractures and treatment of these fractures and nutrition protocol in a horse, as this fracture is of the most common type of jaw fracture sustained by young horses.

  2. Prevention of distal extension cantilever fracture in mandibular overdentures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quirynen, Thomas; Quirynen, Marc; Duyck, Joke

    2015-09-01

    Fractures of distal bar extensions, supporting a mandibular overdenture, do occur with significant functional and economic consequences for the patient. This study therefore aims to evaluate the effect of different bar cross-sectional shapes and surfaces, bar extension lengths and the placement of a support rib under the distal bar extension on fracture resistance. The 2nd moment area and static strength were calculated for 11 frequently used bar designs using finite element analysis (FEA). For two specific designs (Ackermann round Ø 1.8mm and Dolder-Y macro, the former with and without a support rib) additional physical static and fatigue strength tests were included. The FEA static strength data corresponded well to the 2nd moment area (a similar ranking when maximum allowed force was considered). The application of a rib support (Ackermann Ø 1.8mm) and limitations of the bar extension length (6mm for the Ackermann Ø 1.8mm, 8mm for the Dolder-Y macro) allowed the bars to exceed 5 × 10(6) cycles of 120 and 250N, respectively, before fracture. The region of highest stresses in FEA corresponded well with the locations of the fractures observed in static- and fatigue-testing. With some simple guidelines/modifications, the number of bar extension fractures can be reduced significantly. This study focusses on distal bar extensions which improve the positioning of an implant supported overdenture. By combining laboratory testing and finite element simulations we aim to: (1) explain why fractures occur (dependent on physical characteristics of the bar), and (2) give clinical guidelines on how to prevent such fractures. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Evaluation of surgical treatment in mandibular condyle fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vesnaver, Aleš; Ahčan, Uroš; Rozman, Janez

    2012-12-01

    In the past, fractures of the mandibular condylar process were, as a rule, treated conservatively. At the Department of Maxillofacial and Oral Surgery of the University Medical Centre Ljubljana, Slovenia, our doctrine was changed in 2002 on the basis of preliminary results and reports in the literature, and these fractures were started to be treated surgically by open reduction and internal fixation with miniplates and screws, which led to good results and a shorter rehabilitation period. The goal of this study was to determine the safety and efficiency of surgical treatment, as well as to compare long-term results of surgical and conservative treatment, as objectively as possible. Two groups of patients, which had all sustained a unilateral, extra-articular mandibular condyle fracture, were compared. In the test group, there were 42 surgically treated patients, and in the control group, 20 conservatively treated patients. Clinical parameters and X-ray images were assessed in both groups and compared by the two tailed Student t test, and in case of attributive variables by the χ(2) test. Within the surgically treated group, postoperative and intraoperative complications were noted: temporary facial nerve palsy, development of a parotid salivary fistula, disturbance of auricle sensibility due to injury of the greater auricular nerve, miniplate fracture, as well as intraoperative bleeding, postoperative haematoma formation, infection, reoperation due to fragment malposition and other complications. Postoperative scars were also assessed. Statistically significant differences between the surgically and conservatively treated patients were found when comparing clinical parameters as well as X-ray images, the results being better in the surgically treated group. Complications of surgical treatment were also noted, the most important among them temporary paresis of facial nerve branches, which occurred in 10 patients (24%). Plate fractures occurred in five patients (12

  4. A Rare Case Report of an Unusual Dislocation of Fractured Mandibular Condyle

    OpenAIRE

    Mishra, Madan; Singh, Gaurav

    2015-01-01

    Several cases have been reported regarding superolateral, posterior, or superior dislocation of mandibular condyle. The anteromedial dislocation of fractured condyle is the most common among all. This article reports an unusual and unique case of dislocated fractured mandibular condyle wherein the fractured left condylar head was dislocated to the left anatomic angle of mandible. We have not found a single such case in the world English literature published till date. The presented case falls...

  5. Conservative Management of Unilateral Fractures of the Mandibular Rami in Horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansson, Nicolai

    2016-11-01

    To report the outcome of conservative management of unilateral fractures of the mandibular rami in horses. Retrospective case series. 24 client-owned horses with unilateral mandibular fractures METHODS: Medical records (January 2000-January 2014) of horses with unilateral mandibular ramus fractures were retrieved. Only conservatively managed horses with follow-up information were included. Follow-up information on clinical outcome was retrieved from the medical records (n=11) or obtained by telephone interviews with the owners or trainers (n=13). Twenty-three horses (96%) returned to their previous or intended use and had no clinically evident masticatory or fracture healing-related problems at the time of follow-up. The owner of 1 horse (4%) reported it had tooth loosening, feed impaction, and masticatory problems. Conservative management of unilateral fractures of the mandibular rami is a treatment option in horses. © Copyright 2016 by The American College of Veterinary Surgeons.

  6. Additive Manufacturing for Surgical Planning of Mandibular Fracture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadja Maria da Silva Oliveira Brito

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Currently, imaging techniques such as Computed Tomography with three-dimensional reconstruction (3D and Magnetic Resonances are being routinely used in pre-surgical planning in all fields of medicine. Nowadays, virtual three-dimensional images, commonly displayed on two-dimensional surfaces, such as the computer screen, can be used to produce rapidly prototyped models, with excellent dimensional accuracy and fine reproduction of anatomical structures, providing professionals with the ability to use the biomodel in planning and simulating medical and dental procedures (oral and maxillofacial surgery, making individualized facial implants and prostheses, measurements and previous adaptations of prefabricated fixation plates, thus contributing to considerable reductions in surgical time and consequently the duration of anesthesia, minimizing infection risks and reducing hospital costs. In this report, we describe a case of surgical planning and treatment of bilateral atrophic mandibular fracture, in which, for surgical planning, authors used Rapid Prototyping as an adjunct tool, considering the advantages already outlined.

  7. Three-dimensional computerized tomography in mandibular condyle fractures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bermeo, Fausto; Salazar, Abad

    2003-01-01

    Now, car accidents are so commons, this associated to the high technology in produce automobiles make this type of accidents so serious and the consequences of mandibular condyle fractures are more commons and with more gravity, some of these patients, generally need a traqueostomy to be operated, that is why every second that we can save during the surgery is important. The normal exams as X rays and simple TAC give as an important idea but no complete, on the contrary the three-dimensional TAC permits to observe every damages and its exact location, this contribute to make a better surgery organization, the number and type of plates that we have to put and the better way to treat each case, that contribute to reduce time in operating theatre which is in benefit of the patient, diminishing risks in serious patients as they are, that is why we recommend the utilization of the three-dimensional TAC. (The author)

  8. A Complex Facial Trauma Case with Multiple Mandibular Fractures and Dentoalveolar Injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeliz Guven

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The principles of management of mandibular fractures differ in children when compared to adults and depend on the specific age-related status of the growing mandible and the developing dentition. This paper presents a case report with a complex facial trauma affecting the mandibular body and condyle region and dentoalveolar complex. Clinical examination revealed soft tissue injuries, limited mouth opening, lateral deviation of the mandible, an avulsed incisor, a subluxated incisor, and a fractured crown. CBCT examination revealed a nondisplaced fracture and an oblique greenstick fracture of the mandibular body and unilateral fracture of the condyle. Closed reduction technique was chosen to manage fractures of the mandible. Favorable healing outcomes on multiple fractures of the mandible throughout the 6-year follow-up period proved the success of the conservative treatment. This case report is important since it presents a variety of pathological sequelae to trauma within one case.

  9. Mandibular Fracture Patterns at a Medical Center in Central Taiwan: A 3-Year Epidemiological Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Fu-Yu; Wu, Chao-I; Cheng, Hsu-Tang

    2017-12-01

    Mandibular fractures constitute a major portion of maxillofacial trauma and may lead to considerable functional and aesthetic sequelae if treatment is inadequate or delayed. An epidemiology study on mandibular fractures may guide the preventive efforts of the Taiwan public health care system. Therefore, a retrospective review was conducted at a medical center in central Taiwan to evaluate the current mandibular fracture epidemiology.The medical records and digitized radiographs of 198 patients who received treatment for mandibular fractures during a 3-year period (from October 2010 to September 2013) at a medical center in central Taiwan were reviewed to obtain demographic and injury data.The average age was 29.4 years (3-82 years). Patients aged 21 to 30 years sustained the most mandibular fractures (62 patients, 31.3%). The overall sex distribution (male to female) ratio was 1.8. Motor-vehicle accidents (MVAs) were the most common mechanism of injury (162 patients, 82%), and scooter and motorcycle riders wearing partial-coverage helmets constituted the majority of patients. A chart review identified 198 patients with 335 mandibular fractures; 113 patients (57.1%) had multiple mandibular fractures. The most common fracture sites were the symphysis and parasymphysis regions (38.9%), followed by the condyle (26.0%), angle (14.3%), body (14.3%), and ramus (6.6%).MVAs are the major cause of mandibular fractures in central Taiwan, and patients aged Taiwan. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Stabilisation of a mandibular fracture in a cow by means of a pinless external fixator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lischer, C.J.; Fluri, E.; Auer, J.A.

    1997-01-01

    A four months pregnant, four-year-old Brown Swiss cow with mandibular fractures of the right horizontal ramus and the symphysis was treated surgically with a new pinless external fixator. Healing was complicated by the sequestration of bone at the fracture site. After the sequestrum had been removed a radiographic examination revealed that the fracture had healed completely

  11. [Comparative effectiveness of surgical and non-surgical treatment for pediatric mandibular condylar fractures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Min; Wang, Yanyi; Zhang, Lihai; Yao, Jun

    2010-12-01

    To compare the effectiveness of open reduction and conservative treatment for pediatric mandibular condylar fractures and to provide the evidence for the selection of clinical therapy. The clinical data were retrospectively analyzed from 25 patients with the mandibular condylar fractures between January 1988 and December 2006. Of them, 8 patients (11 fractures) were treated with surgical treatment (surgical group) and 17 patients (22 fractures) with non-surgical treatment (non-surgical group). In surgical group, there were 6 males (9 fractures) and 2 females (2 fractures) with an age range of 8-13 years; fracture was caused by tumbling in 7 cases and by traffic accident in 1 with an interval of 1-6 days between injury and hospitalization; and 5 cases were identified as unilateral condylar fractures (3 complicated by mental fractures) and 3 cases as bilateral condylar fractures complicated by mental fractures. In non-surgical group, there were 12 males (15 fractures) and 5 females (7 fractures) with an age range of 3-12 years; fracture was caused by falling from height in 4 cases, by tumbling in 10, and by traffic accident in 3 with an interval of 1-25 days between injury and hospitalization; and 12 cases were identified as unilateral condylar fractures (3 complicated by mental fractures) and 5 cases as bilateral condylar fractures (1 complicated by mental fracture). Incision healed by first intention in surgical group, and 25 cases were followed up 1-6 years with an average of 3.5 years. At 12 months after treatment, no temporomandibular joint pain, eating disorder, or limited mandibular movement occurred in 2 groups. No significant difference was observed in opening mouth extent, protrusive and lateral movements between 2 groups at 6 and 12 months (P > 0.05). During centric occlusion, mental point located at the midline with symmetric face figure. Two patients in surgical group and 3 in non-surgical group had slight snap when opening their mouths. Mandible

  12. A Simplified Way for the Stabilization of Pediatric Mandibular Fracture With an Occlusal Splint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demirkol, Mehmet; Demirkol, Nermin; Abdo, Omar Hasan; Aras, Mutan Hamdi

    2016-06-01

    The management of pediatric mandibular fractures is challenging for maxillofacial surgeons due to ongoing mandibular growth involving tooth buds. The treatment of such fractures has been a topic of much research. Generally accepted methods for the treatment of mandibular parasymphyseal or symphyseal fractures in children are conservative approaches involving the use of acrylic splints, lateral compression with an open-cap splint stabilized by circummandibular wiring, and maxillomandibular fixation with an arch bar and eyelet wiring. The aim of this technical note was to describe a straightforward approach to the treatment of pediatric mandibular fractures, in which an occlusal splint is secured to prevent trauma to the soft tissue, without the need for general anesthesia.

  13. Mandibular Angle Fractures: A Clinical and Biomechanical Comparison-the Works of Ellis and Haug.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haug, Richard H; Serafin, Bethany L

    2008-11-01

    In a series of articles spanning 8 years, Ed Ellis reviewed the clinical results of the treatment of 478 mandibular angle fractures managed by eight different techniques. During a series of benchtop investigations employing polyurethane synthetic mandible replicas, Rich Haug investigated the biomechanical behavior of approximately 15 different techniques designed to reconstruct mandibular angle fractures. This article reviews these two series of investigations in an attempt to gain insight into the biomechanical and biological factors that affect the successful reconstruction of mandibular angle fractures. It appears that the current techniques used to reconstruct mandibular angle fractures are sound from the standpoint of biomechanics within a range of forces encountered during clinical function. It also appears that an unsuccessful reconstruction is based on a biological result of a behavioral issue such as noncompliance, substance abuse, and/or nutritional or immune compromise.

  14. Use of monocortical miniplates for the intraoral treatment of mandibular fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiodo, Thomas A; Milles, Maano

    2009-03-01

    Fixation of mandibular fractures using rigid hardware has gained wide acceptance over the past 3 decades. The goal of rigid internal fixation is to allow for fracture healing with limited, or no, time in maxillo-mandibular fixation. There has been significant evolution in plate and screw materials and design over the past 30 years. The term miniplate is used to describe a fracture plate with a screw diameter of 2.0 mm or less. With correct diagnosis and understanding of the forces affecting mandible fractures, miniplates can be applied transorally in various situations, allowing for less invasive treatment with open reduction of mandible fractures. This article describes the use of monocortical miniplates for the intraoral treatment of mandibular fractures.

  15. A Conservative Method for Treating Severely Displaced Pediatric Mandibular Fractures: An Effective Alternative Technique

    OpenAIRE

    Sahand Samieirad; Saeedeh khajehahmadi; Elahe Tohidi; Meysam Pakravan

    2016-01-01

    Pediatric mandibular fractures have been successfully managed in various ways. The use of a lingual splint is an option. This article presents a 4-year old boy who was treated by an alternative conservative method with a combination of an arch bar plus a lingual splint, circum-mandibular wiring and IMF for the reduction, stabilization and fixation of a severely displaced bilateral man‌dibular body fracture. This technique is a reliable, noninvasive procedure; it also limits the discomfort and...

  16. The conservative treatment of pediatric mandibular fracture with prefabricated surgical splint: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocabay, Ceyda; Ataç, Mustafa Sancar; Oner, Burak; Güngör, Nadir

    2007-08-01

    The use of rigid fixation in children is controversial and may cause growth retardation along cranial suture lines. Intermaxillary fixation for mandibular fractures should be used cautiously as bony ankylosis in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) and trismus may develop. The high osteogenic potential of the pediatric mandible allows non-surgical management to be successful in younger patients with conservative approaches. In this case, successful conservative treatment of mandibular fracture of a 3-year-old patient is presented.

  17. X-cephalometric study of different parts of the upper airway space and changes in hyoid position following mandibular fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, L-J; Zhao, M-C; Pan, X-F; Wei, Y-Q; Wang, D-Y

    2013-09-01

    This study analyses the different parts of the upper airway space and the changes in hyoid position. The results provide a clinical reference for developing timely and effective treatment programmes for patients with mandibular fractures caused by maxillofacial trauma. Standard X-cephalometric measurements of the lateral skull of 210 subjects were taken. The subjects were divided into four fracture groups: condylar, mandibular angle, mandibular body, and parasymphyseal. The radiographs of the mandibular fracture groups were compared with the normal occlusion group to analyse the upper airway space and the changes in hyoid position. Different types of fractures have different effects on the upper airway space. Bilateral mandibular body fracture and the parasymphyseal fracture have a significant influence on the lower oropharyngeal and laryngopharyngeal airway spaces, with serious obstructions severely restricting the ventilatory function of patients. Fractures at different parts of the mandibular structure are closely related to the upper airway and hyoid position.

  18. Open versus closed reduction: mandibular condylar fractures in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chrcanovic, Bruno Ramos

    2012-09-01

    The purpose of the study was to review the literature regarding the evolution of current thoughts on management of mandibular condylar fractures (MCFs) in children. An electronic search in PubMed was undertaken in May 2012. The titles and abstracts from these results were read to identify studies within the selection criteria. Eligibility criteria included studies published in English or German from the last 20 years (from 1992 onwards) reporting clinical series of MCFs in children and adolescents until the age of 18. The search strategy initially identified 542 studies. The references from 1992 onwards totaled 339 articles. Twenty-seven studies were identified without repetition within the selection criteria. Additional hand-searching yielded two additional papers. Pediatric MCFs require thoughtful consideration in management to avoid significant growth disturbance. Early treatment is indicated in order to improve the chances for favorable development. Long-term follow-up is required, in order to properly treat late complications that may appear. Coronal computed tomography is helpful in substantiating the correct final diagnosis. Many studies show that conservative treatment (CTR) has satisfactory long-term outcome of jaw function, occlusion, and facial esthetics, despite a high frequency of radiological aberrations. Surgery before puberty should be reserved for exceptional cases such as missile injuries, in cases with extensive dislocation and lack of contact between the fragments, in cases with multiple midfacial fractures, in which the mandible has to serve as a guide to reposition the midfacial bones, and in cases which the dislocation of the fractured stump creates a functional impediment that cannot be resolved by CTR. As the craniofacial skeleton becomes more adult-like in its form at about 12 years of age, the decreased remodeling capacity in the adolescents may occasionally result in abnormally shaped condylar heads or shortened ramus heights that may

  19. Management of pediatric mandibular fracture using orthodontic vacuum-formed thermoplastic splint: A case report and review of literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanu, O O; Ayodele, Aos; Akeredolu, M O

    2017-05-01

    Fractures of the mandible are relatively less frequent in children when compared to adults. The anatomic features of children are protected. Children have a higher adaptation to maxillofacial fractures compared to adults. Treatment principles of mandibular fractures in children differ from that of adults due to concerns regarding mandibular growth and the developing dentition. A case of a 6-year-old boy with fractured mandibular symphysis managed by closed reduction using a vacuum formed thermoplastic splint and circummandibular wiring is presented. This article also provides a review of the literature regarding the management of mandibular fracture in young children.

  20. A novel computer algorithm for modeling and treating mandibular fractures: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzi, Christopher J; Ortlip, Timothy; Greywoode, Jewel D; Vakharia, Kavita T; Vakharia, Kalpesh T

    2017-02-01

    To describe a novel computer algorithm that can model mandibular fracture repair. To evaluate the algorithm as a tool to model mandibular fracture reduction and hardware selection. Retrospective pilot study combined with cross-sectional survey. A computer algorithm utilizing Aquarius Net (TeraRecon, Inc, Foster City, CA) and Adobe Photoshop CS6 (Adobe Systems, Inc, San Jose, CA) was developed to model mandibular fracture repair. Ten different fracture patterns were selected from nine patients who had already undergone mandibular fracture repair. The preoperative computed tomography (CT) images were processed with the computer algorithm to create virtual images that matched the actual postoperative three-dimensional CT images. A survey comparing the true postoperative image with the virtual postoperative images was created and administered to otolaryngology resident and attending physicians. They were asked to rate on a scale from 0 to 10 (0 = completely different; 10 = identical) the similarity between the two images in terms of the fracture reduction and fixation hardware. Ten mandible fracture cases were analyzed and processed. There were 15 survey respondents. The mean score for overall similarity between the images was 8.41 ± 0.91; the mean score for similarity of fracture reduction was 8.61 ± 0.98; and the mean score for hardware appearance was 8.27 ± 0.97. There were no significant differences between attending and resident responses. There were no significant differences based on fracture location. This computer algorithm can accurately model mandibular fracture repair. Images created by the algorithm are highly similar to true postoperative images. The algorithm can potentially assist a surgeon planning mandibular fracture repair. 4. Laryngoscope, 2016 127:331-336, 2017. © 2016 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  1. Mandibular fracture caused by periodontal abscess: Radiological, US, CT and MRI findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazza, D; Marini, M; Tesei, J; Primicerio, P

    2006-09-01

    Mandibular fracture is a rare but possible outcome of a periodontal abscess. A case of complete fracture of the mandible with abscess infiltrating the surrounding soft tissues is described. The patient reported nor trauma, nor locoregional surgery. Ultrasonography and orthopantomography revealed the fracture of the mandible and the abscess at the masseter muscle. Further preoperative diagnostic examinations included CT and MRI. CT revealed the complete fracture line more clearly; MR the extension of the abscess.

  2. Interfragmental fixation of rostral mandibular fracture with cerclage wire in a thoroughbred English horse

    OpenAIRE

    ÇETİNKAYA, Mehmet Alper; DEMİRUTKU, Alper

    2014-01-01

    The patient in this study was a 20-year-old thoroughbred gelding. After clinical and radiographical assessments, a bilateral rostral mandibular body fracture was determined. Fracture stabilization was achieved via a bilateral interfragmentary cerclage wire application. The horse started to use its jaw within 24 h of surgery. Postoperative radiographs were taken until month 6, at different periods, and fracture healing was evaluated. Fixation materials were left in place. Fracture healing occu...

  3. Locking compression plate osteosynthesis of complicated mandibular fractures in six horses

    OpenAIRE

    Kümmerle, Jan M; Kummer, Martin R; Auer, Jörg A; Nitzl, Dagmar; Fürst, Anton

    2009-01-01

    Complicated mandibular fractures were recognised in one foal, one pony and four horses. The foal was two months old while the adult animals ranged in age from 12 to 24 years. Three horses had a unilateral horizontal ramus fracture. Two fractures were open and one was closed. Comminution was present in one of these patients while lthe other two horses had marked displacement of the fragments. Two suffered from comminuted fractures of the horizontal and vertical ramus of the mandible. One of th...

  4. Osteogenesis Imperfecta Diagnosed from Mandibular and Lower Limb Fractures: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Yoshikazu; Satoh, Koji; Mizutani, Hideki

    2016-06-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is a congenital disease characterized by bone fragility and low bone mass. Despite the variety of its manifestation and severity, facial fractures occur very infrequently. Here, we report a case of an infant diagnosed with OI after mandibular and lower limb fractures. A boy aged 1 year and 3 months was brought to his neighboring hospital with a complaint of facial injury. He was transferred to our hospital to undergo operation 3 days later. Computed tomography images revealed multiple mandibular fractures including complete fracture in the symphysis and dislocated condylar fracture on the right side. Open reduction and internal fixation with absorbable implants was performed 7 days after injury. He fractured his right lower limb 2 months later. He was diagnosed with OI type IA by an orthopedist. He will be administered bone-modifying agents if he suffers from frequent fractures.

  5. Closed treatment of unilateral mandibular condyle fractures in adults : A systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rozeboom, A. V. J.; Dubois, L.; Bos, R. R. M.; Spijker, R.; de Lange, J.

    Of all mandibular fractures, 25-35% are condylar. Many studies have focused on whether to treat such fractures via open or closed modalities. A uniform protocol for closed treatment is lacking, but such a protocol could ensure good clinical practice. The aims of this systematic review were to

  6. Prognosis of teeth in the line of mandibular fracture: 5 - year clinical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The focus was on 96 teeth in the line of mandibular fracture retained after reduction and immobilization of the fracture by closed reduction technique. The clinical and radiological follow-up period of patients ranged between six months and 3.5 years. RESULTS: Majority of the patients 33 (53.2%) were in their third decade of ...

  7. Transosseous fixation of pediatric displaced mandibular fractures with polyglactin resorbable suture--a simplified technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandan, Sanjay; Halli, Rajshekhar; Joshi, Samir; Chhabaria, Gaurav; Setiya, Sneha

    2013-11-01

    Management of pediatric mandibular fractures presents a unique challenge to surgeons in terms of its numerous variations compared to adults. Both conservative and open methods have been advocated with their obvious limitations and complications. However, conservative modalities may not be possible in grossly displaced fractures, which necessitate the open method of fixation. We present a novel and simplified technique of transosseous fixation of displaced pediatric mandibular fractures with polyglactin resorbable suture, which provides adequate stability without any interference with tooth buds and which is easy to master.

  8. An indigenous method for closed reduction of pediatric mandibular parasymphysis fracture

    OpenAIRE

    Kumar, Naresh; Singh, Akhilesh Kumar; Pandey, Arun; Verma, Vishal

    2015-01-01

    Mandibular fractures in children are very rare as compared to adults due to protected anatomic features of child and less exposure to road traffic accidents. Management becomes complicated due to inherent dynamic nature, instability of mixed dentition and fear of surgery. Conservative management can be done with the help of acrylic cap splints along with circum-mandibular wiring, intermaxillary fixation with eyelet wires, arch wires or open reduction and internal fixation with bio-resorbable ...

  9. Use of orthodontic brackets for intermaxillary fixation for management of mandibular fracture in a pediatric patient

    OpenAIRE

    Rajeev Pandey; Anit Khatri; Rajat Gupta; Nitin Bhagat

    2017-01-01

    Fracture of mandible is relatively less common in pediatric population when compared to adults. Management of pediatric mandibular fracture is a very complex issue and requires accurate and early treatment. Although the general principles of treatment remain the same as adult but various factors which influence the choice of management: age, dentition status, site involved, amount of displacement, number of fractures, and socioeconomic status. This case report describes a conservative way of ...

  10. Changes in the main masticatory muscles in CT after mandibular condyle fracture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raustia, A.M.; Oikarinen, K.S.; Pyhtinen, J.

    1990-01-01

    The aim was to study changes in the main masticatory muscles after mandibular condyle fracture as seen by CT, comparing the densities and sizes of the masseter, medial pterygoid and lateral pterygoid muscles on the fractured side with those on the non-fractured side. More or less permanent muscular changes are detectable several years after the accident, especially in the lateral pterygoid muscle, which is attached to the condylar head. This muscle was statistically significantly smaller (p [de

  11. Use of rectangular grid miniplates for fracture fixation at the mandibular angle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hochuli-Vieira, Eduardo; Ha, Thi Khanh Linh; Pereira-Filho, Valfrido Antonio; Landes, Constantin Alexander

    2011-05-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical outcome of patients with mandibular angle fractures treated by intraoral access and a rectangular grid miniplate with 4 holes and stabilized with monocortical screws. This study included 45 patients with mandibular angle fractures from the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery São Paulo State University, Araraquara, Brazil, and from the Clinic of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery at the University of Frankfurt, Germany. The 45 fractures of the mandibular angle were treated with a rectangular grid miniplate of a 2.0-mm system by an intraoral approach with monocortical screws. Clinical evaluations were postoperatively performed at 15 and 30 days and 3 and 6 months, and the complications encountered were recorded and treated. The infection rate was 4.44% (2 patients), and in 1 patient it was necessary to replace hardware. This patient also had a fracture of the left mandibular body; 3 patients (6.66%) had minor occlusal changes that have been resolved with small occlusal adjustments. Before surgery, 15 patients (33.33%) presented with hypoesthesia of the inferior alveolar nerve; 4 (8.88%) had this change until the last clinical control, at 6 months. The rectangular grid miniplate used in this study was stable for the treatment of simple mandibular angle fractures through intraoral access, with low complication rates, easy handling, and easy adjustment, with a low cost. Concomitant mandibular fracture may increase the rate of complications. This plate should be indicated in fractures with sufficient interfragmentary contact. Copyright © 2011 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. A paediatric case of bilateral mandibular condyle fracture presenting with bloody otorrhoea following trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Yat Chun; Au-Yeung, Kwan Leong

    2017-04-22

    A 7-year-old boy presented to the emergency department with bilateral bloody otorrhoea after falling from his scooter. Skull base fracture was suspected. CT showed no evidence of skull base fracture but bilateral mandibular condyle and external acoustic canals fractures. We report this case to illustrate a rare possibility of bilateral external acoustic canal fracture associated with condylar fracture in trauma patients presented with bloody otorrhoea. © BMJ Publishing Group Ltd (unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  13. Changes in the main masticatory muscles in CT after mandibular condyle fracture

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    Raustia, A.M. (Oulu Univ. Central Hospital (Finland). Dept. of Prosthodontics and Stomatognathic Physiology); Oikarinen, K.S. (Oulu Univ. Central Hospital (Finland). Dept. of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery); Pyhtinen, J. (Oulu Univ. Central Hospital (Finland). Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology)

    1990-11-01

    The aim was to study changes in the main masticatory muscles after mandibular condyle fracture as seen by CT, comparing the densities and sizes of the masseter, medial pterygoid and lateral pterygoid muscles on the fractured side with those on the non-fractured side. More or less permanent muscular changes are detectable several years after the accident, especially in the lateral pterygoid muscle, which is attached to the condylar head. This muscle was statistically significantly smaller (p<0,001) on the fractured side. Examination of the masticatory muscles immediately after the fracture and at intervals afterwards could reveal more about the pathogenesis of the changes in these muscles. (orig.).

  14. Internal fixation of severely displaced mandibular condylar neck fracture with the aid of ramus osteotomy. A revised technique

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hillerup, S

    1997-01-01

    A technique is described whereby the mandibular condyle can be located, replaced and fixed in case of a severely displaced fracture with exarticulation of the condylar head.......A technique is described whereby the mandibular condyle can be located, replaced and fixed in case of a severely displaced fracture with exarticulation of the condylar head....

  15. Application of the Mandible Injury Severity Score to Pediatric Mandibular Fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanson, Edward W; Susarla, Srinivas M; Ghasemzadeh, Ali; Mundinger, Gerhard S; Redett, Richard J; Tufaro, Anthony P; Manson, Paul N; Dorafshar, Amir H

    2015-07-01

    The Mandible Injury Severity Score (MISS) has been used to evaluate adult mandibular fractures. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the MISS in a cohort of pediatric patients. This was a retrospective study of pediatric patients treated for mandibular fractures over a 20-year period. Patients were included if they had computed tomographic imaging available for review and had at least 1 post-treatment visit. The primary predictor variable was the MISS. Secondary predictors were demographic and injury-associated factors. The outcome was treatment-associated complications. Descriptive, bivariate, and multiple logistic regression statistics were computed. One hundred sixteen patients with mandibular fractures were identified; 73 (62.9%) met the inclusion criteria. The sample's mean age was 8.5 ± 4.1 years; 44% were girls. Motor vehicle collisions (60%) and falls (15.1%) were the most common mechanisms. More than 50% of patients had an extra-mandibular injury. The mean MISS was 13.5 ± 7.8. Forty-five percent of the sample underwent open reduction and internal fixation. Complications were noted in 20.5% of patients, of which malocclusion was the most common (8.2%). Increasing MISS was associated with complications (P pediatric patients with mandibular fractures, increased severity of injury is associated with complications, even after controlling for the effects of multiple confounders, including open treatment. Copyright © 2015 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Use of orthodontic brackets for intermaxillary fixation for management of mandibular fracture in a pediatric patient

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    Rajeev Pandey

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Fracture of mandible is relatively less common in pediatric population when compared to adults. Management of pediatric mandibular fracture is a very complex issue and requires accurate and early treatment. Although the general principles of treatment remain the same as adult but various factors which influence the choice of management: age, dentition status, site involved, amount of displacement, number of fractures, and socioeconomic status. This case report describes a conservative way of management of moderately displaced mandibular fracture with the help of closed reduction achieved using intermaxillary fixation (IMF with help of elastics using orthodontic brackets. A 9-year-old male child was treated for body of mandible fracture using this technique. The IMF was removed after 3 weeks and adequate bone union was demonstrated clinically and radiographically.

  17. Isolated tympanic plate fracture frequency and its relationship to mandibular trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altay, Canan; Erdoğan, Nezahat; Batkı, Ozan; Eren, Erdem; Altay, Sedat; Karasu, Sebnem; Mete, Berna; Uluç, Engin

    2014-11-01

    This study evaluated the prevalence of isolated tympanic fractures and their correlation with mandibular fractures by using maxillofacial computed tomography (CT). We retrospectively evaluated the maxillofacial CT of 1590 patients who presented to our emergency department with maxillofacial trauma between December 2010 and December 2012. Maxillofacial CT was used as the criterion standard for evaluating patients with maxillofacial fractures. The CT images were evaluated by using an electronic picture archiving and communications system and interpreted independently by 2 radiologists. The maxillofacial CT images revealed mandibular fractures in 167 of the patients and isolated tympanic plate fractures in 35 of these 167 patients. Four patients (11%) had a bilateral tympanic plate fracture, and 31 patients (89%) had unilateral tympanic plate fracture. Of all the tympanic plate fractures, 19 (54%) were on the right side and 16 (46%) were on the left side (P > .05). In our results, a significant correlation between the presence of a right-sided tympanic plate fracture and fracture of the ipsilateral condylar process was found (P = .036). However, a statistically significant difference between the presence of a tympanic plate fracture and other mandible fractures, additional soft-tissue findings, or the number of fractures was not determined (P > .05). Sex had no impact on the presence of tympanic plate fracture (P > .05). The frequency of isolated tympanic plate fractures in maxillofacial trauma is low, but it is an important anatomic location. Condyle fractures are significantly associated with isolated tympanic plate fractures. The presence of these injuries should raise suspicion of a concomitant isolated tympanic plate fracture. Copyright © 2014 Canadian Association of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. A Conservative Method for Treating Severely Displaced Pediatric Mandibular Fractures: An Effective Alternative Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sahand Samieirad

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Pediatric mandibular fractures have been successfully managed in various ways. The use of a lingual splint is an option. This article presents a 4-year old boy who was treated by an alternative conservative method with a combination of an arch bar plus a lingual splint, circum-mandibular wiring and IMF for the reduction, stabilization and fixation of a severely displaced bilateral man‌dibular body fracture. This technique is a reliable, noninvasive procedure; it also limits the discomfort and morbidity associated with maxillomandibular fixation or open reduction and internal fixation in pediatric patients

  19. Interpretation of mandibular condyle fractures using 2D- and 3D-computed tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Costa e Silva Adriana Paula de Andrade da

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Computed tomography (CT has been increasingly used in the examination of patients with craniofacial trauma. This technique is useful in the examination of the temporomandibular joint and allows the diagnosis of fractures of the mandibular condyle. Aiming to verify whether the three-dimensional reconstructed images from CT (3D-CT produce more effective visual information than the two-dimensional (2D-CT ones, we evaluated 2D-CT and 3D-CT examinations of 18 patients with mandibular condyle fractures. We observed that 2D-CT and 3D-CT reconstructed images produced similar information for the diagnosis of fractures of the mandibular condyle, although the 3D-CT allowed a better visualization of the position and displacement of bone fragments, as well as the comminution of fractures. These results, together with the possibility of refining and manipulating perspectives in 3D images, reinforce the importance of its use in the surgical planning and evaluation of treatment. We concluded that 3D-CT presented supplementary information for a more effective diagnosis of mandibular condyle fractures.

  20. [Extramedullary fixation combined with intramedullary fixation in the surgical reduction of sagittal mandibular condylar fractures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuanjun, Chen; Xiaoyang, Chen; Jing, Chen

    2016-10-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the clinical effect of extramedullary fixation combined with intramedullary fixation during the surgical reduction of sagittal mandibular condylar fractures. Twenty-four sagittal fractures of the mandibular condyle in18 patients were fixed by two appliances: intramedullary with one long-screw osteosynthesis or Kirschner wire and extramedullary with one micro-plate. The radiologically-recorded post-operative stability-associated com-plications included the screw/micro-plate loosening, micro-plate twisting, micro-plate fractures, and fragment rotation. The occluding relations, the maximalinter-incisal distances upon mouth opening, and the mandibular deflection upon mouth opening were evaluated based on follow-up clinical examination. Postoperative panoramic X-ray and CT scans showed good repositioning of the fragment, with no redislocation or rotation, no screw/plate loosening, and no plate-twisting or fracture. Clinical examination showed that all patients regained normal mandibular movements, ideal occlusion, and normal maximal inter-incisal distances upon mouth opening. Extramedullary fixation combined with intramedullary fixation is highly recommended for sagittal condylar fractures because of the anti-rotation effect of the fragment and the reasonable place-ment of the fixation appliances.

  1. Pathological (late) fractures of the mandibular angle after lower third molar removal: a case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutilli, Tommaso; Bourelaki, Theodora; Scarsella, Secondo; Fabio, Desiderio Di; Pontecorvi, Emanuele; Cargini, Pasqualino; Junquera, Luis

    2013-04-30

    Pathological (late) fracture of the mandibular angle after third molar surgery is very rare (0.005% of third molar removals). There are 94 cases reported in the literature; cases associated with osseous pathologies such as osteomyelitis or any local and systemic diseases that may compromise mandibular bone strength have not been included. We describe three new cases of pathological (late) fracture of the mandibular angle after third molar surgery. The first patient was a 27-year-old Caucasian man who had undergone surgical removal of a 3.8, mesioangular variety, class II-C third molar 20 days before admission to our clinic. The fracture of his left mandibular angle, complete and composed, occurred during chewing. The second patient was a 32-year-old Caucasian man. He had undergone surgical removal of a 3.8, mesioangular variety, class II-B third molar 22 days before his admission. The fracture, which occurred during mastication, was studied by computed tomography that showed reparative tissue in the fracture site. The third patient was a 36-year-old Caucasian man who had undergone surgical removal of a 3.8, vertical variety, class II-C third molar 25 days before the observation. In this case the fracture of his mandibular angle was oblique (unfavorable), complete and composed. The fracture had occurred during chewing. We studied the fracture by optical projection tomography and computed tomography.All of the surgical removals of the 3.8 third molars, performed by the patients' dentists who had more than 10 years of experience, were difficult. We treated the fractures with open surgical reduction, internal fixation by titanium miniplates and intermaxillary elastic fixation removed after 6 weeks. The literature indicates that the risk of pathological (late) fracture of the mandibular angle after third molar surgery for total inclusions (class II-III, type C) is twice that of partial inclusions due to the necessity of ostectomies more generous than those for partial

  2. Current Concepts in the Mandibular Condyle Fracture Management Part II: Open Reduction Versus Closed Reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jung-Dug; Chung, Ho-Yun; Cho, Byung-Chae

    2012-01-01

    In the treatment of mandibular condyle fracture, conservative treatment using closed reduction or surgical treatment using open reduction can be used. Management of mandibular condylar fractures remains a source of ongoing controversy in oral and maxillofacial trauma. For each type of condylar fracture,the treatment method must be chosen taking into consideration the presence of teeth, fracture height, patient'sadaptation, patient's masticatory system, disturbance of occlusal function, and deviation of the mandible. In the past, closed reduction with concomitant active physical therapy conducted after intermaxillary fixation during the recovery period had been mainly used, but in recent years, open treatment of condylar fractures with rigid internal fixation has become more common. The objective of this review was to evaluate the main variables that determine the choice of an open or closed method for treatment of condylar fractures, identifying their indications, advantages, and disadvantages, and to appraise the current evidence regarding the effectiveness of interventions that are used in the management of fractures of the mandibular condyle. PMID:22872831

  3. Current Concepts in the Mandibular Condyle Fracture Management Part II: Open Reduction Versus Closed Reduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kang-Young Choi

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available In the treatment of mandibular condyle fracture, conservative treatment using closed reduction or surgical treatment using open reduction can be used. Management of mandibular condylar fractures remains a source of ongoing controversy in oral and maxillofacial trauma. For each type of condylar fracture,the treatment method must be chosen taking into consideration the presence of teeth, fracture height, patient'sadaptation, patient's masticatory system, disturbance of occlusal function, and deviation of the mandible. In the past, closed reduction with concomitant active physical therapy conducted after intermaxillary fixation during the recovery period had been mainly used, but in recent years, open treatment of condylar fractures with rigid internal fixation has become more common. The objective of this review was to evaluate the main variables that determine the choice of an open or closed method for treatment of condylar fractures, identifying their indications, advantages, and disadvantages, and to appraise the current evidence regarding the effectiveness of interventions that are used in the management of fractures of the mandibular condyle.

  4. Comparison of various approaches for the treatment of fractures of the mandibular condylar process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handschel, Jörg; Rüggeberg, Tim; Depprich, Rita; Schwarz, Frank; Meyer, Ulrich; Kübler, Norbert R; Naujoks, Christian

    2012-12-01

    Fractures of the mandibular condyle process are the most common fractures of the lower jaw. Unfortunately, the type of treatment is still a matter of debate. The aim of this investigation was to compare the outcome of different treatment approaches regarding function and surgical side-effects. 111 fractures of the mandibular condyle representing all types according to the classification of Spiessl and Schroll were included. Both closed reduction (CR) and open reduction with internal fixation (ORIF) including the retromandibular/transparotid, submandibular, preauricular and intraoral approach were performed. The clinical examination included functional and aesthetic aspects at least 1 year after the fracture. The majority of fractures (45%) were classified into Type II and IV according to Spiessl and Schroll followed by fractures without any displacement or dislocation (29.7%). The submandibular approach showed the worst outcome regarding permanent palsy of the facial nerve and hypertrophic scarring. No significant differences between the various approaches were detected in the functional status in any diagnosis group. Inferior condylar neck fractures benefit from ORIF by an intraoral approach whereas in high condylar neck fractures the retromandibular/transparotid approach shows the best results. Fractures of the condylar head were almost all treated by CR and our results cannot contribute to the debate of CR vs. ORIF in this type of fracture. Copyright © 2012 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Does the titanium plate fixation of symphyseal fracture affect mandibular growth?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayram, Burak; Yilmaz, Alev Cetinsahin; Ersoz, Esra; Uckan, Sina

    2012-11-01

    The effect of metallic fixation on growth is a major concern in children and is not yet clear. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of metallic fixation of mandibular symphyseal fracture on mandibular growth.Eighteen 90-day-old growing white New Zealand rabbits weighing 1.6 to 2.5 kg were included in this study and divided into 2 groups of 9 subjects. In the experimental group, animals underwent mandibular osteotomy, simulating a symphyseal fracture on the midline of mandibular symphysis. The bone segments were fixed with microplates and microscrews (1.6 mm).In the control group, the same surgical incision without performing symphyseal osteotomy was conducted, and 2 screws were inserted on each side of the symphyseal midline.Digital cephalometric and submentovertex radiographs were taken before the operation and at postoperative 6 months for each animal in 2 groups, and cephalometric measurements were performed. The distance between the centers of the head of 2 screws measured at the end of surgery in the control group was compared with measurements at 6 months after surgery. Obtained data were statistically analyzed.There is no statistically significant difference between the 2 groups for growth amount of both sides of the mandible. Difference of ANS-Id (the most anterior points of nasal bone, the most anterior point on the alveolar bone between the lower incisors) and Cd-Id (the uppermost and most distal point of the mandibular condyle, the most anterior point on the alveolar bone between the lower incisors) values of the 2 groups is not statistically significant (P > 0.05).The distance between the 2 screws at the first application significantly increased at the postoperative sixth month (P mandibular symphyseal fracture does not affect the vertical and sagittal mandibular growth in growing rabbits.

  6. Seven-year retrospective clinical study evaluating efficacy of stainless steel mesh in mandibular fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Sudip; Ghosh, Samiran; Burman, Richi; Ray, Amit

    2011-10-01

    The use of titanium mesh in communited mandibular fractures has been substantially documented. However, the use of stainless steel mesh for routine fixation in mandibular fractures has not been widely reported. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the efficacy of stainless steel mesh for routine osteosynthesis of mandibular fractures. A total of 252 patients who had been diagnosed with 287 single or multiple mandibular fractures at Guru Nanak Institute of Dental Science and Research from 2002 to 2009 were selected for the present study. Those with condylar fractures and other maxillofacial injuries were excluded from the study. The patients were evaluated preoperatively, intraoperatively, and postoperatively at 1 day, 6 weeks, and 3 and 6 months. The local complications, occlusion (for static function), and chewing (for dynamic function) were evaluated postoperatively. The intraoperative time taken for implant fixation (from site exposure to fixation of the last screw) was 32 minutes. Of the 252 patients, 40 (15.8%) had local complications and 24 patients required implant removal. Of the 252 patients, 82% had bilaterally satisfactory occlusion according to the surgeon at 6 months postoperatively. Discomfort in chewing unilaterally or bilaterally was reported by 17% of the patients. The results of our study have shown that stainless steel mesh has acceptable complication rates and the ability to maintain occlusion and chewing postoperatively compared with the present standards of care of mandibular fractures using miniplates. The lower cost and versatile placement of screws were the principal advantages. However, placement near the mental foramen with an extraoral approach for certain sites is the primary disadvantage. Copyright © 2011 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Fate of third molar in line of mandibular angle fracture - Retrospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Preetha Balaji

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: The present study fails to identify any concrete factors that would predict the failure of the retained third molar that were involved in the line of mandibular fractures. The proof presented here, especially with low complication rates indicate that all impacted third molar along the line of fracture be removed and unless necessary, the partially erupted teeth would also be extracted. In such a situation, the rate of infection and survival of the third molar would have been entirely different.

  8. Recovery of mouth-opening after closed treatment of a fracture of the mandibular condyle: a longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niezen, E T; Stuive, I; Post, W J; Bos, R R M; Dijkstra, P U

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this retrospective study was to assess recovery of mouth opening after closed treatment of fractures of the mandibular condyle, and analyse which characteristics might influence recovery. We measured mouth opening in 142 patients (mean (SD) age 30 (14) years, 96 of whom were male) during follow-up at 3, 6, 13, 26, and 52 weeks after the injury. Fractures were assessed on radiographs. Data were analysed using a multilevel analysis. Half the fractures were of the low condylar neck (n=71). Thirty-seven patients had bilateral condylar fractures, 29 had dislocated fractures, and in 80 the fracture was displaced. One or more additional mandibular fractures were present in 68. During follow-up mean (SD) mouth opening increased to: 33.6 (9.6) at 3 weeks, 40.1 (10.0) at 6 weeks, 45.1 (9.6) at 13 weeks, 49.8 (9.5) at 26 weeks, and 52.6 (7.5) at 52 weeks. Older age, female sex, displaced fracture, bilateral fractures, additional mandibular fractures, and the interaction between follow-up time and additional mandibular fractures, were predictors of a less favourable recovery of mouth opening. Clinicians can use the results of this study to predict recovery of mouth opening after closed treatment of fractures of the mandibular condyle at first consultation. Copyright © 2014 The British Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. An analysis of postoperative complications and efficacy of 3-D miniplates in fixation of mandibular fractures

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    Sadhasivam Gokkulakrishnan

    2012-01-01

    Conclusions: It was seen that 3-D titanium miniplates were effective in the treatment of mandibular fractures and overall complication rates were lesser. In symphysis and parasymphysis regions, 3-D plating system uses lesser foreign material than the conventional miniplates using Champy′s principle.

  10. Managing a grossly comminuted and infected mandibular fracture using a maxillary extra-oral distractor as stabilizing agent: A clinical case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ding Ming Chao

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Facial fracture management dates as early as Hippocratic era. Comminuted mandibular fractures are one of the challenging clinical condition requiring high surgical expertise to achieve a good functional and esthetic outcome. In presence of infection and other facial fractures managing comminuted mandibular fracture becomes more challenging.Here we present a case of grossly comminuted and infected mandibular fracture with delayed presentation managed by using maxillary distractor as stabilizing agent. Using a maxillary distractor for managing a fractured mandible has been seldom reported in literature. Current case report gives idea to practicing clinician about the possibility of treatment beyond the established principles. Keywords: Mandibular fracture, Maxillary distractor, Infection

  11. Surgical Management of a Mandible Subcondylar Fracture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Hee Kang

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Open reduction and anatomic reduction can create better function for the temporomandibular joint, compared with closed treatment in mandible fracture surgery. Therefore, the double miniplate fixation technique via mini-retromandibular incision was used in order to make the most stable fixation when performing subcondylar fracture surgery. Those approaches provide good visualization of the subcondyle from the posterior edge of the ramus, allow the surgeon to work perpendicularly to the fracture, and enable direct fracture management. Understanding the biomechanical load in the fixation of subcondylar fractures is also necessary in order to optimize fixation methods. Therefore, we measured the biomechanical loads of four different plate fixation techniques in the experimental model regarding mandibular subcondylar fractures. It was found that the loads measured in the two-plate fixation group with one dynamic compression plate (DCP and one adaption plate showed the highest deformation and failure loads among the four fixation groups. The loads measured in the one DCP plate fixation group showed higher deformation and failure loads than the loads measured in the two adaption plate fixation group. Therefore, we conclude that the selection of the high profile plate (DCP is also important in order to create a stable load in the subcondylar fracture.

  12. Retrospective analysis of two hundred thirty-five pediatric mandibular fracture cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eskitascioglu, Teoman; Ozyazgan, Irfan; Coruh, Atilla; Gunay, Galip K; Yuksel, Esabil

    2009-11-01

    Maxillofacial fractures are encountered less commonly during childhood period due to anatomic, social, cultural, and environmental factors. Although the incidence of all maxillofacial fractures is 1% to 15% among pediatric and adolescent patients, this rate drops to less than 1% in children below 5 years age. Two hundred thirty-five cases (mandibular fracture were evaluated retrospectively. Patients records were examined in terms of age, gender, cause of fracture, fracture localization, number of fractures, fracture pattern, accompanying injuries, applied treatment methods, and complications. Mean age of cases was 9.2 years and 165 cases were male, 70 were female. Traffic accidents as the most common etiologic cause in all ages. Falls is the second most common cause which particularly affects children above age of 2 years. All cases had 333 fractures and the most common fracture localization was parasymphysis region (34%). The other most common fracture localizations were as follows: condyle (19%), corpus (13%), dentoalveolar region (12%), angulus (11%), symphysis region (9%), and ramus (2%). There was only a single fracture line in 145 cases, 40 cases had unilateral multiple and 50 cases had bilateral fracture lines. We applied symptomatic (conservative) treatment in 20 (8%) of our cases; fracture fixation with interdental wires or closed reduction methods were employed in 122 patients. Internal fixation with open reduction (OR) was performed on 51 (22%) patients. Both closed and OR techniques were carried out in 30 (13%) patients. Pediatric mandibular fractures, which are seen less frequently compared with those of adults, require a specific and different treatment. Although mostly less invasive methods are preferred, we believe that ORs should be considered when required.

  13. Conservative orthodontic fixed appliance management of pediatric mandibular bilateral condylar fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yanhua; Gong, Siew-Ging; Zhu, Fangyong; Li, Ming; Biao, Xu

    2016-07-01

    Management of mandibular condylar fractures is difficult in children with their inherently dynamic and unstable deciduous and mixed dentitions. We present a variation of the conservative fixed orthodontic approach that was used as an adjunct to aid in the reduction of a bilateral condylar fracture in a pediatric patient. A boy, aged 10 years 9 months, came with clinical signs and symptoms of mandibular fracture after being involved in a motor vehicle accident. A computed tomography scan showed a vertical fracture on the left condylar head, a displaced fracture of the right condylar neck, and a mandibular symphysis fracture. The patient was treated with an orthodontic fixed appliance instead of an arch bar splint, followed by elastic traction to achieve a proper occlusion and condylar remodeling. Follow-up appointments were made 2 weeks and 1, 2, 20, 37, and 49 months after treatment. Clinical recovery was observed 2 months after treatment. At the follow-up appointments at 20, 37, and 49 months, jaw function and occlusal relationship remained stable, and no ankylosis was observed. The computed tomography scans showed that the right condyle had remodeled, and the left condyle exhibited a slight curve in the head at 49 months posttreatment. The patient's satisfaction with these treatment results was high. Conservative treatment of a mandibular fracture by fixed orthodontic means is a viable treatment option that is relatively straightforward and cost-effective and has a high level of patient acceptance and comfort. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. [Latest trends in the surgical management of mandibular condyle fractures in France, 2005-2012].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trost, O; Péron, J-M

    2013-12-01

    The surgical treatment of mandibular condylar fractures is commonly performed. We had for aim to present the latest trends in the surgical management of condylar fractures in France, between 2005 and 2012. A survey was performed among the 49 members of the French college of oral and maxillofacial surgeons between January and September 2012, with a questionnaire sent by email. We analyzed the therapeutic management, the surgical indications; the techniques used according to the fracture, and the postoperative treatment protocols. The data was compared to that of a similar study performed in 2005. The overall reply rate was 86%. Low subcondylar fractures were operated on in all institutions (100%), compared to 76% in 2005. The most popular technique was the high submandibular approach with intraoral miniplate fixation osteosynthesis. High subcondylar and diacapitular fractures were operated on in respectively 82% and 35% of the cases compared to 29% and 10% in 2005 with various surgical techniques and postoperative management. French maxillofacial surgeons operated on more mandibular condylar fractures in 2012 than in 2005. As observed in 2005, the lower and the more dislocated the fractures were, the more they were operated on. The high submandibular approach has become the most popular approach. The use of miniplates for bone fixation has become common. Diacapitular fractures were usually treated functionally. The postoperative management varied greatly from one team to the other. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  15. A study of mandibular fractures over a 5-year period of time: A retrospective study

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    Ashish Vyas

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study aims to evaluate and compare with the existing literature on the etiology, pattern, gender, and anatomical distribution of mandibular fractures. Materials and Methods: The data of 225 cases were analyzed over a period of 5 years between March 2009 and November 2013. Of this 110 were unilateral, 23 bilateral, 18 symphysis and 74 multiple fractures. Results: Males are more affected than females.The peak incidence rate is occurring in 30-35 years of age group. The most common fracture site is parasymphysis and least common site is ramus of mandible. The most common etiological factor is road traffic accident (RTA (45.3% followed by falls (42.6%, assaults (8.9%, sport injuries (2.2%, and gunshot wounds (0.89%. Conclusion: Thus, we conclude that RTA is the leading cause of mandibular fractures and males are more affected. The most common site is parasymphysis fracture in association with angle fracture. We observed that gender was significantly associated with body and angle fracture (P = 0.04 and significant relationship between etiology with multiple site fracture such as (parasymphysis-angle, (body-condyle, (body-angle, and (symphysis-condyle was observed (P ≤ 0.05.

  16. Surgical treatment of sagittal fracture of mandibular condyle using long-screw osteosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Shufang; Li, Bo; Long, Xing; Deng, Mohong; Cai, Hengxing; Cheng, Yong

    2011-07-01

    The retrospective study evaluated long-screw (bicortical screw) osteosynthesis used in the surgical treatment of sagittal fracture of the mandibular condyle and compared it with titanium plates and removal of the condylar fragment. Ninety-five patients with sagittal fracture of the mandibular condyle received open surgical treatment from 1997 to 2008. Among these patients, the condylar fragments were fixed with long screws in 56 cases (group A), were fixed with titanium plates in 12 cases (group B), and were completely removed in 24 cases (group C). Follow-up was carried out clinically and radiologically. The clinical features included limitation of mandibular mobility, occlusion disturbance, lateral deviation on mouth opening, joint pain, clicking, facial asymmetry, and patient's subjective evaluation. The radiologic parameters consisted of degree of bony resorption, bony change, change of osteosynthesis material, and shortening of mandibular ramus height. Anatomic reduction and functional restoration were obtained and no severe complication was detected in group A. However, 3 of 14 patients had severe osteoarthrosis and 2 of 14 patients had ankylosis in group B. In group C 3 of 24 patients had mandibular retrusion, 4 of 24 patients had front teeth open bite, 4 of 24 patients had severe osteoarthrosis, and 1 of 24 patients had ankylosis. The long-screw fixation group had a more favorable prognosis than the titanium plate group and the group in which removal of the condylar fragment was performed. The long-screw fixation technique might be suitable for use in the surgical treatment of sagittal fractures of the mandibular condyle. Copyright © 2011 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Mandibular fractures in children: analysis of 61 cases and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glazer, Michael; Joshua, Ben Zion; Woldenberg, Yitzhak; Bodner, Lipa

    2011-01-01

    The purpose was to evaluate the incidence, etiology, site and patterns, management and treatment methods, and outcome of pediatric patients with mandibular fractures. Pediatric patients (1.5-16 years old) with mandibular fractures, treated at the Soroka University Medical Center were included in the study. Age, gender, etiology, site and type of fracture, associated injuries, mode of treatment, outcome, complications, and follow up were evaluated. The cases were divided into 3 age groups: Group A: 1.5-5 years, Group B: 6-11 years, and Group C: 12-16 years. Sixty one patients were included in the study. The male to female ratio was 2:1. Motor vehicle accident was the most common cause. Associated trauma was more common in young children. The condyle was involved in 54% of the fractures. Closed reduction and intermaxillary fixation was the most common treatment used. Complications were rare. Management of mandibular fracture in the pediatric age group is a challenge. The anatomical complexity of the developing mandible and teeth strongly suggest the use of surgical techniques that are different from those routinely used in adults. The conservative approach is recommended. Whenever possible closed reduction should be the treatment of choice. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Modified Risdon approach using periangular incision in surgical treatment of subcondylar mandibular fractures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolić Živorad S.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. No consensus has been reached yet on the surgical approach for treatment of condylar fractures. Objective. The aim of this study was to present modified Risdon approach (without facial nerve identification in the treatment of subcondylar mandibular fractures. Method. This is a retrospective study of a period 2005-2012. During this seven-year period, 25 condylar mandibular fractures in 22 men and three women (19-68 years old were treated by modified Risdon approach without identifying the facial nerve. The main inclusion criterion was subcondylar fracture according to Lindahl classification. Results. No additional morbidity related to postoperative complications, such as infection or salivary fistula, was observed in this series. Only two (8% patients developed temporary weakness of the marginal branch of the facial nerve, which resolved six weeks postoperatively. Each patient achieved good mouth opening postoperatively. Scar was camouflaged in the first cervical wrinkle. Two patients developed temporomandibular joint dysfunction. No patient had postoperative occlusal disturbance. In all of the patients good aesthetic result was achieved in a two-year follow-up. Conclusion. In comparison with techniques described in the literature, the main advantages of the modified Risdon approach are the following: no need for facial vessels identification; direct, fast, and safe approach to mandibular angle and subcondylar region; relatively simple surgical technique and good cosmetic result - due to aesthetically placed incision. This approach could be recommended for subcondylar fracture as a simplified and safe procedure. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 175075

  19. A conservative approach to pediatric mandibular fracture management: outcome and advantages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khatri, Amit; Kalra, Namita

    2011-01-01

    Pediatric mandibular fractures are rare and their treatment remains controversial. Management is extremely complicated in mixed dentition as it is inherently dynamic and unstable. Treatment options include soft diet, intermaxillary fixation with eyelet wires, arch bars, circummandibular wiring, or stents. Alternative options include open reduction and internal fixation through either an intraoral or extraoral approach. This case report describes and evaluates the conservative technique of acrylic splint in the treatment of pediatric mandible fracture in a 12-year-old female child. The patient with isolated mandibular fracture was treated with acrylic splint and interdental wiring followed by evaluation of clinical and radiographic healing as well as the somatosensory status. Patient demonstrated clinical union to her pre-injury occlusion by three to four weeks. Panoramic finding supported the finding of clinical examination throughout the study. High osteogenic potential of the pediatric mandible allowed conservative management to be successful in this case.

  20. A conservative approach to pediatric mandibular fracture management: Outcome and advantages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit Khatri

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Pediatric mandibular fractures are rare and their treatment remains controversial. Management is extremely complicated in mixed dentition as it is inherently dynamic and unstable. Treatment options include soft diet, intermaxillary fixation with eyelet wires, arch bars, circummandibular wiring, or stents. Alternative options include open reduction and internal fixation through either an intraoral or extraoral approach. This case report describes and evaluates the conservative technique of acrylic splint in the treatment of pediatric mandible fracture in a 12-year-old female child. The patient with isolated mandibular fracture was treated with acrylic splint and interdental wiring followed by evaluation of clinical and radiographic healing as well as the somatosensory status. Patient demonstrated clinical union to her pre-injury occlusion by three to four weeks. Panoramic finding supported the finding of clinical examination throughout the study. High osteogenic potential of the pediatric mandible allowed conservative management to be successful in this case.

  1. Ankylosis of the temporomandibular joint and mandibular growth disturbance caused by neglected condylar fracture in childhood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Endrajana Endrajana

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Fractures of the mandibular condyle may lead to complications such as disturbance of occlusal function, internal derangement of the joint, ankylosis and mandibular growth disturbance. When treating young patients with the history of mandible trauma, ankylosis of the temporomandibular joint and mandibular growth disturbance are two most important complications of condyle fracture that should be considered. Purpose: This case report attempts to emphasize the long term complication of neglected condylar fracture in children i.e. ankylosis of the temporomandibular joint and subsequently lead to mandibular growth disturbance. Case: A case of right temporo-mandibular joint ankylosis and mandibular growth disturbance in a 28 years old male patient is presented. He had a history of trauma to the mandible after a traffic accident when he was 8 years old. Since then, he experienced difficulty in mouth opening which eventually developed into severe trismus. Case management: The case was treated surgically with gap and interpositional arthroplasty using Mersilen mesh™. Conclusion: Mandibular fractures involving temporomandibular joint in young children should be examined thoroughly and treated adequately in order to prevent ankylosis of the TMJ and the subsequent mandibular growth disturbance.Latar belakang: Fraktur pada kondilus mandibula dapat menyebabkan beberapa komplikasi berupa: gangguan oklusi, internal derangement sendi, ankilosis serta gangguan pertumbuhan mandibula. Pada perawatan penderita usia muda dengan riwayat trauma pada mandibula, perlu diwaspadai dua macam komplikasi akibat fraktur pada kondilus, yaitu ankilosis sendi temporo mandibula dan adanya gangguan pertumbuhan mandibula. Tujuan: Laporan kasus ini bertujuan untuk menekankan bahwa fraktur kondilus pada anak-anak yang tidak mendapatkan perawatan yang semestinya akan mengakibatkan komplikasi jangka panjang berupa ankilosis sendi temporomandibula yang diikuti dengan

  2. Comparison of circummandibular wiring with resorbable bone plates in pediatric mandibular fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saikrishna, D; Gupta, Nimish

    2010-06-01

    Pediatric patients present a unique challenge to maxillofacial surgeons in terms of their treatment planning as well as in their functional and nutritional needs which are different from that of adult patients. Early literature has advocated conservative closed management of pediatric fractures to prevent complications. However recent advances in maxillofacial surgery has enabled us to use biodegradable plates and screws, which overcomes the limitations of metallic plates. We present a comparison of two cases of parasymphysis fracture treated with circum-mandibular wiring and biodegradable plate fixation their outcome in terms of fracture healing and functional stability.

  3. An institutional experience in the management of pediatric mandibular fractures: A study of 74 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, Neelam N; Choradia, Smriti; Sriram S, Ganapathy

    2015-09-01

    In maxillofacial surgery, children represent a special group of patients, as they have significant differences from adults as far as the facial skeleton is concerned. The etiology and epidemiology of pediatric trauma involving the facial skeleton has been reported in a large series of patients. Nevertheless, few of these reports review large numbers of pediatric patients, and little is known about treatment protocols for fractures in children. The aims of this study were to retrospectively analyze the treatment methods and outcomes of pediatric mandibular fractures in children and young adolescents up to the age of 15 years, to discuss the findings, and to propose treatment protocols for maxillofacial fractures in childhood. The present study retrospectively analyzed the treatment methods and outcome of the pediatric mandibular fractures in children and young adolescents' up to the age of 15 years over a period of 5 years. All patients were followed up for an average period of 18 months, with a maximum follow-up of 2 years. A total of 74 patients were treated for mandibular and dentoalveolar fractures in children upto the age of 15 years at the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery at Nair Hospital Dental College, Mumbai from 2007 to 2012. AND CONCLUSIONS: The treatment methods used at our centre had satisfactory outcomes at the end of a follow-up period of 2 years. Reported complications were minimal. Our results confirm the usefulness of open reduction and plate fixation in older children (>12 years of age) and a conservative approach in younger children (≤12 years of age) in treating mandibular fractures. Copyright © 2015 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Contemporary Management of Mandibular Fracture Nonunion-A Retrospective Review and Treatment Algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostrander, Benjamin T; Wang, Howard D; Cusano, Alessandro; Manson, Paul N; Nam, Arthur J; Dorafshar, Amir H

    2018-02-06

    Nonunion is an uncommon complication after mandibular fractures. The purpose of this investigation was to compare outcomes of patients with mandibular fracture nonunion who were treated with a 1- versus 2-stage approach and propose a pragmatic treatment algorithm for surgical management based on preoperative characteristics. The authors conducted a retrospective study consisting of patients who presented to 2 level 1 trauma centers for the management of mandibular fracture nonunion over a 10-year period. The primary predictor variable was 1- versus 2-stage treatment. Outcomes were examined to propose a treatment algorithm. Eighteen patients were included in the study. The sample's mean age was 44.0 ± 19.3 years and most were men (88.9%). Mandibular angle and body accounted for 77.8% of cases. A single-stage approach was used in 13 patients (72.2%). Bone grafts or vascularized bone flaps were required in 13 patients (72.2%). Patients who required 2-stage treatments had intraoral soft tissue defects. Mean length of follow-up was 13.3 ± 20.4 months. All patients achieved bony union, with complications occurring in 5 patients (27.8%). The authors' 10-year experience was used to formulate a treatment algorithm based on bony defect size and soft tissue status, which can be used to inform optimal surgical management. Nonunion of mandibular fractures is an infrequent and complex condition requiring careful and deliberate surgical management. A single-stage approach is appropriate in most cases and does not negatively affect outcomes. Bony defect size and soft tissue status are essential parameters for determining the approach and timing of reconstruction. Copyright © 2018 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Management of Mandibular Fracture in a Peripheral Health Setting ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hp 630 Dual Core

    and immobilization using intermaxillary fixation (IMF) to the more invasive surgical sopens reduction with internal ... normal anatomic positions7, and prevention of movement by immobilization (fixation) of the fractured bone thereby ... Appearance of the patient after healing of fracture occurred intra orally. Due to the limited ...

  6. Analysis of two different surgical approaches for fractures of the mandibular condyle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumaran, S; Thambiah, L J

    2012-01-01

    Fractures of the condyle account for one third of all the mandibular fractures. Different surgical approaches to the condyle described hitherto testify to the advantages and disadvantages of the different surgical techniques used for approaching the condyle in such cases of fractures. We have described and compared two of such surgical techniques in this study. The aim of this study is to compare the outcome of dealing with condylar fractures by two different surgical techniques: the mini retromandibular approach, and the preauricular approach. A prospective study of 31 patients who had suffered with mandibular condylar fractures was carried out. Of these, 26 patients had unilateral condylar fractures, and 5 patients had a bilateral fracture. Further, 19 of these patients were treated by the mini retromandibular approach and 12 by the preauricular approach. The treated patients were followed up and evaluated for a minimum period of 1 year and assessed for parameters such as the maximum mouth opening, lateral movement on the fractured side, mandibular movements such as protrusion, dental occlusion, scar formation, facial nerve weakness, salivary fistula formation and time taken for the completion of the surgical procedure. t- test was used for statistical analysis of the data obtained in the study. Dental occlusion was restored in all the cases, and good anatomical reduction was achieved. The mean operating time was higher 63.53 (mean) ± 18.12 minutes standard deviation (SD) in the preauricular approach compared to 45.22 (mean) ± 18.86 minutes SD in the mini retromandibular approach. Scar formation was satisfactory in almost all the cases.

  7. Condyle and mandibular bone change after unilateral condylar neck fracture in growing rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Y; Yang, H-f; Li, S; Chen, J-z; Luo, Y-w; Yang, C

    2012-08-01

    Unilateral fracture of the condylar neck in immature subjects might lead to mandible asymmetry and condyle remodelling. A rat model was used to investigate mandibular deviation and condylar remodelling associated with condyle fracture. 72 4-week-old male rats were randomly divided into three groups: an experimental group (unilateral transverse condylar fracture induced surgically), a sham operation group (surgical exposure but no fracture), and a non-operative control group (no operation). The rats were killed at intervals up to 9weeks after surgery, and outcomes were assessed using various measures of mandible deviation, histological and X-ray observation, and immunohistochemical measures of expression levels of connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) and type II collagen (Col II). The fracture led to the degeneration of mandibular size, associated with atrophy of fractured condylar process. Progressive remodelling of cartilage and increasing expression levels of CTGF and Col II were found. The authors conclude that condylar fracture can lead to asymmetries in mandible and condyle remodelling and expression of CTGF and Col II in condylar cartilage on both the ipsilateral and the contralateral sides. Copyright © 2012 International Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Current Concepts in the Mandibular Condyle Fracture Management Part II: Open Reduction Versus Closed Reduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kang-Young Choi

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available In the treatment of mandibular condyle fracture, conservative treatment using closedreduction or surgical treatment using open reduction can be used. Management of mandibularcondylar fractures remains a source of ongoing controversy in oral and maxillofacial trauma.For each type of condylar fracture,the treatment method must be chosen taking intoconsideration the presence of teeth, fracture height, patient’sadaptation, patient’s masticatorysystem, disturbance of occlusal function, and deviation of the mandible. In the past, closedreduction with concomitant active physical therapy conducted after intermaxillary fixationduring the recovery period had been mainly used, but in recent years, open treatment ofcondylar fractures with rigid internal fixation has become more common. The objectiveof this review was to evaluate the main variables that determine the choice of an open orclosed method for treatment of condylar fractures, identifying their indications, advantages,and disadvantages, and to appraise the current evidence regarding the effectiveness ofinterventions that are used in the management of fractures of the mandibular condyle.

  9. Experimental study on healing process of rat mandibular bone fracture examined by radiological procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iuchi, Yukio; Furumoto, Keiichi

    1994-01-01

    The healing process of rat mandibular fractures was stereoscopically observed daily, using plain roentgenography in the lateral-oblique and tooth axis directions and bone scintigraphy using 99m-Tc-methylene diphosphoric acid (Tc-99m-MDP). The findings were compared with microradiograms of regional polished specimens. X-ray findings included the following. Up to 3 days after bone fracture, the fracture mesiodistally showed distinct radiolucency, with sharp and irregular fracture stump. Radiopacity of the fracture site gradually increased 7 days or later, and bone trabecular formation by callus and stump bridging started to occur at 14 days. Findings similar to those in the control group were observed 49 days or later. The inside was difficult to differentiate, irrespective of the observation time. Bone scans in the mesiodistal and buccolingual planes revealed tracer uptake in the areas of mandibular and soft tissue damage one day after bone fracture. Tracer uptake began to be seen in the fracture site 3 days later, and became marked at 14 days. Then Tc-99m DMP began to be localized and returned to the findings similar to those at 49 days. Bone scanning tended to show wider areas earlier than roentgenography. Microradiographic mesiodistal examination revealed distinct radiopacy of the fracture line for 3 days after bone fracture. Seven days later, bone resorption cavity occurred in the cortical bone around the fracture stump, along with neogenesis of callus. Neogenesis and calcification began to occur gradually, and 14 days later, the fracture osteoremodeling of the internal bone trabeculae was observed. Bone trabecular formation within the bone, however, occurred later. (N.K.)

  10. How to improve retromandibular transmasseteric anteroparotid approach for mandibular condylar fractures: our clinical experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salgarelli, A C; Anesi, A; Bellini, P; Pollastri, G; Tanza, D; Barberini, S; Chiarini, L

    2013-04-01

    Fractures of the mandibular condyle are common and account for 25-35% of all mandibular fractures reported in the literature. Even with the development of a consensus on the preference for open reduction and internal fixation of these fractures, the clinician is still faced with a dilemma concerning the optimal approach to the ramus-condyle unit. Limited access and injury to the facial nerve are the most common problems. The most commonly used extraoral approaches are the submandibular, retromandibular and preauricular methods. In this study, we propose a modified cosmetic preauricular incision with a short end in the neck, to improve the transmasseteric anteroparotid (TMAP) approach previously described by Wilson et al. in 2005. We retrospectively analysed 13 patients treated in our department for mandibular condylar fractures. Post-operative complications, occlusal status, interincisal opening and joint tenderness were evaluated at 3 months after surgery. The wider skin incision described here provides a convenient approach for open reduction and rigid internal fixation, and good results were obtained. The follow-up ranged from 6 to 40 months. Copyright © 2013 International Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. A new method of CT scanning for the diagnosis of mandibular fractures; A preliminary report: diagnosis of condyle fractures

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    Tsukagoshi, Taku; Satoh, Kaneshige; Onizuka, Takuya (Showa Univ., Tokyo (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1990-08-01

    The condylar neck of the mandible is one of the most common fracture sites in the facial skeleton. Such a fracture is routinely diagnosed by A-P, lateral oblique, and Towne projection roentgenography or orthopantomography. Despite the combination of these films, fracture of the neck of the mandible is still difficult to diagnose definitely. Therefore, a new CT scanning method was developed for diagnosing fractures of the neck of the condylar mandible. The CT axis is projected along the length of the mandible, extending from the condyle to the symphysis. This projection visualizes both the condyle and the mandibular symphysis in the same plane. The patient is placed in a supine position with the head fully extended. The base line, a line extending from the midpoint of the glenoid fossa to the menton, is determined with a lateral facial cephalogram. CT scanning with a 5 mm window is performed in parallel with and 2 cm anterior to and 2 cm posterior to the base line. When CT scanning was performed in a healthy volunteer, the condition of the condyle and the condylar neck of the mandible was clearly shown, and the view extended from the condyle to the symphysis. For automobile accident patients in whom fracture of the neck of the mandible was associated with fracture of the symphysis, two fractures were found in the same plane. A newly developed CT scanning technique is useful in the diagnosis of fractures of the condylar neck of the mandible and in the identification of fractures at other mandibular sites. It also allows scanning of patients in a supine position, which may aid in managing patients with multiple traumas. (N.K.).

  12. Digital diagnosis and treatment of mandibular condylar fractures based on Extensible Neuro imaging Archive Toolkit (XNAT.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZhongWei Zhou

    Full Text Available The treatment of condylar fractures has long been controversial. In this paper, we established a database for accurate measurement, storage, management and analysis of patients' data, in order to help determine the best treatment plan.First of all, the diagnosis and treatment database was established based on XNAT, including 339 cases of condylar fractures and their related information. Then image segmentation, registration and three-dimensional (3D measurement were used to measure and analyze the condyle shapes. Statistical analysis was used to analyze the anatomical structure changes of condyle and the surrounding tissues at different stages before and after treatment. The processes of condylar fracture reestablishment at different stages were also dynamically monitored. Finally, based on all these information, the digital diagnosis and treatment plans for condylar fractures were developed.For the patients less than 18 years old with no significant dislocation, surgical treatment and conservative treatment were equally effective for intracapsular fracture, and had no significant difference for neck and basal fractures. For patients above 18 years old, there was no significant difference between the two treatment methods for intracapsular fractures; but for condylar neck and basal fractures, surgical treatment was better than conservative treatment. When condylar fracture shift angle was greater than 11 degrees, and mandibular ramus height reduction was greater than 4mm, the patients felt the strongest pain, and their mouths opening was severely restricted. There were 170 surgical cases with condylar fracture shift angel greater than 11 degrees, and 118 of them (69.4% had good prognosis, 52 of them (30.6% had complications such as limited mouth opening. There were 173 surgical cases with mandibular ramus height reduction more than 4mm, and 112 of them (64.7% had good prognosis, 61 of them (35.3% had complications such as limited mouth opening

  13. Mandibular fractures associated with domestic violence in Calabar ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    There was sig-nificant association between social class and type of fracture sustained (÷2 = 14.0, p= 0.0073). Patients in the lower social class were more likely to sustain mul-tiple fractures. The mechanisms of injury were by punching with the fist 41(56.2%), use of weapons 27(37.0%) and kicking with legs 5(6.8%). Majority ...

  14. Etiology and patterns of pediatric mandibular fractures in Portugal: a retrospective study of 10 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Pedro Costa; Amarante, José Manuel; Silva, Alvaro Catarino; Pereira, José Miguel; Cardoso, Maria Augusta; Rodrigues, Jorge Manuel

    2004-05-01

    To determine the pattern of occurrence of mandibular fractures in the pediatric population in Portugal. This retrospective study reviews the records of patients 18 years of age or younger from the 10-year period 1993 to 2002. Age, gender, anatomic site, cause of the accident, weekly and monthly variation, location and type of fractures, presence and location of associated injuries, treatment methods, and complications were reviewed. During this 10-year period, 521 patients with 681 mandibular fractures were treated. Motor-vehicle accident (MVA) was the most common (53.9% patients) cause of fracture. Almost half of the patients (48.8%) were in the oldest age group (16 to 18 years old). The condyle of the mandible was involved in 31.0% of the fractures. Maxillomandibular (MMF) fixation was used in 534 (78.4%) fractures. Overall mortality in this series was 0.6% (3 patients); mortality was caused by multiple traumas, mainly head trauma. There is a need to reinforce legislation aimed to prevent MVA and the total enforcement of existing laws to reduce maxillofacial injuries among children and adolescents.

  15. A Two-Year Prospective Analysis of Mandibular Fractures in Western Population of Maharashtra, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashwinirani Suragimath

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Trauma to the facial region causes injuries to hard and soft tissues of the face. Injuries to the maxillofacial region are increasing in frequency and severity because of the increased number of road traffic accidents (RTAs and increased number of violence. The purpose of this study was to evaluate age, gender distribution, etiology, and pattern of mandibular fractures in Western part of Maharashtra population. Materials and Methods: The study was conducted in the Department of Oral Medicine and Radiology for a period of two years from June 2013 to June 2015. Clinical examination of all trauma patients was done and diagnosis was made based on signs, clinical features, and confirmed by orthopantomographs. Results: Totally, 193 patients were detected with different types of mandibular fractures. Study group involved 77.2% males and 22.8% females with a male to female ratio of 3.3:1. Majority of patients were in the age group of 21–30 years followed by 31–40 years. Trauma due to RTAs were more common followed by assaults and fall. Parasymphyseal fractures were most common type followed by condylar fracture and fracture of angle of mandible. Conclusion: Males were most commonly affected by trauma than females with a predominant age group of 21–30 years. Majority of trauma were due to RTAs with parasymphyseal as most common type of fracture.

  16. Clinical and radiological outcomes of transoral endoscope-assisted treatment of mandibular condylar fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, H-J; Moon, K-C; Yoon, E-S; Lee, B-I; Park, S-H

    2016-03-01

    Fractures of the mandibular condyle are one of the most common craniofacial fractures. However, the diagnosis and treatment of these fractures is controversial because of the multiple surgical approaches available. The purposes of this study were to identify surgery-related technical tips for better outcomes and to evaluate the results as well as complications encountered during 7 years of endoscope use to supplement the limited intraoral approach in the treatment of mandibular condylar fractures. Between 2005 and 2012, 50 patients with condylar fractures underwent endoscope-assisted reduction surgery. Postoperative facial bone computed tomography and panoramic radiography demonstrated adequate reduction of the condylar fractures in all patients. No condylar resorption was detected, and most patients displayed a satisfactory functional and structural recovery. There was no facial nerve damage or transitory hypoesthesia, and there were no visible scars after the surgery. Transoral endoscope-assisted treatment is a challenging but reliable method with lower morbidity and a rapid recovery. Copyright © 2015 International Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Masticatory motion after surgical or nonsurgical treatment for unilateral fractures of the mandibular condylar process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Throckmorton, Gaylord S; Ellis, Edward; Hayasaki, Haruaki

    2004-02-01

    We sought to compare mandibular motion during mastication in patients treated in either an open or a closed fashion for unilateral fractures of the mandibular condylar process. Eighty-one male patients with unilateral condylar process fractures were treated either with (n = 37) or without (n = 44) surgical reduction and rigid fixation of their condylar process fractures. At 6 weeks, 6 months, 1 year, and 2 years after treatment, the subjects' chewing cycles were recorded using a magnetic sensor array (Sirognathograph; Siemens Corp, Bensheim, Germany) while chewing Gummi-Bears (HARIBO, Bonn, Germany) unilaterally on the same side as the fracture and on the opposite side. The chewing cycles were analyzed using a custom computer program, and the duration, excursive ranges, and 3-dimensional cycle shape were compared between the 2 treatment groups at each time interval using multilevel linear modeling statistics. The 2 treatment groups did not differ significantly for any measure of cycle duration or any excursive range (except lateral excursions at 1 year post-treatment) at any of the time intervals. However, the 3-dimensional cycle shapes of the 2 groups did differ significantly at all time intervals. Surgical correction of unilateral condylar process fractures has relatively little effect on the more standard measures (duration and excursive ranges) of masticatory function. However, surgical correction better normalizes opening incisor pathways during mastication on the side opposite the fracture.

  18. Collagenases and gelatinases in bone healing. The focus on mandibular fractures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kurzepa Jacek

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Due to high amount of collagen fibres in the structure of bone, the enzymes capable of collagen digestion play a key role in bone remodelling. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs, prevailing extracellular endopeptideses, can digest extracellularly located proteins, e.g. collagen, proteoglycans, elastin or fibronectin. Among MMPs, collagenases (MMP-1, MMP-8 and MMP-13 and gelatinases (MMP-2 and MMP-9 can cleave collagen particles to forms that are able to undergo further steps of catabolism intracellularly. In addition, activity of the gelatinases (as an activation of proinflammatory cytokines facilitates spreading inflammation that is necessary during the first stage of bone healing. Further studies related to the role of various MMPs in mandibular fractures should precisely explain their function in the bone healing and evaluate the influence of MMPs inhibitors on that process. This review provides the basic information about two groups among MMPs family, collagenases and gelatinases, and their role in repairing processes after mandibular fractures.

  19. A conservative approach to pediatric mandibular fracture management: Outcome and advantages

    OpenAIRE

    Amit Khatri; Namita Kalra

    2011-01-01

    Pediatric mandibular fractures are rare and their treatment remains controversial. Management is extremely complicated in mixed dentition as it is inherently dynamic and unstable. Treatment options include soft diet, intermaxillary fixation with eyelet wires, arch bars, circummandibular wiring, or stents. Alternative options include open reduction and internal fixation through either an intraoral or extraoral approach. This case report describes and evaluates the conservative technique of acr...

  20. Aneurysmal bone cyst of the mandibular condyle with condylar neck fracture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jeong Hoon [Department of Biomedical Engineering, College of Medicine and Healthcare Industry Research Institute, Kyung Hee University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yu, Jae Jung; Kang, Ju Han; Kim, Gyu Tae; Choi, Yong Suk; Hwang, Eui Hwan [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, School of Dentistry and Institute of Oral Biology, Kyung Hee University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-12-15

    Aneurysmal bone cyst (ABC) is relatively rare, non-neoplastic expansible lesion of bone. The case of a 15-year-old male with a ABC of the left mandibular condyle is presented. Panoramic radiograph showed a unilocular radiolucency with thinned coritces and a subcondylar fracture which was due to the trauma. Computed tomography (CT) revealed expansible lesion which had similar attenuation soft tissue. The patient was treated surgically including iliac crestal bone graft.

  1. Aneurysmal bone cyst of the mandibular condyle with condylar neck fracture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jeong Hoon; Yu, Jae Jung; Kang, Ju Han; Kim, Gyu Tae; Choi, Yong Suk; Hwang, Eui Hwan

    2009-01-01

    Aneurysmal bone cyst (ABC) is relatively rare, non-neoplastic expansible lesion of bone. The case of a 15-year-old male with a ABC of the left mandibular condyle is presented. Panoramic radiograph showed a unilocular radiolucency with thinned coritces and a subcondylar fracture which was due to the trauma. Computed tomography (CT) revealed expansible lesion which had similar attenuation soft tissue. The patient was treated surgically including iliac crestal bone graft.

  2. A novel technique for preventing skin pressure sores using a rubber tube during surgical treatment of mandibular condyle fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawase-Koga, Yoko; Mori, Yoshiyuki; Hoshi, Kazuhito; Takato, Tsuyoshi

    2013-11-01

    Craniofacial surgery occasionally results in sores and necrosis of the facial skin because of pressure from surgical instruments. During surgical treatment of mandibular condylar process fractures, the main mandibular fragment is routinely retracted downward using a wire to achieve a satisfactory anatomic reduction. This procedure may injure the facial skin. This potential complication is easily overlooked by medical staff, but it is easily preventable. We herein describe a method of using a rubber tube to avoid causing pressure sores of the facial skin during surgical treatment of mandibular condylar process fractures.

  3. Mandibular fractures: a comparative analysis between young and adult patients in the southeast region of Turkey

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    Serhat Atilgan

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to review and compare the differences between mandibular fractures in young and adult patients. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Patients treated at the Oral and Maxillofacial Department of Dicle University during a five-year period between 2000 and 2005 were retrospectively evaluated with respect to age groups, gender, etiology, localization and type of fractures, treatment methods and complications. RESULTS: 532 patients were included in the study, 370 (70% males and 162 (30% females, with a total of 744 mandibular fractures. The mean age of young patients was 10, with a male-female ratio of 2:1. The mean age of adult patients was 28, with a male-female ratio of 3:1. The most common causes of injury were falls (65% in young patients and traffic accidents (38% in adults. The most common fracture sites were the symphysis (35% and condyle (36% in young patients, and the symphysis in adults (36%. Mandibular fractures were generally treated by arch bar and maxillomandibular fixation in both young (67% and adult (39% patients, and 43% of the adult patients were treated by open reduction and internal fixation. CONCLUSION: There was a similar gender, monthly and type of treatment distribution in both young and adult patients in the southeast region of Turkey. However, there were differences regarding age, etiology and fracture site. These findings between young and adult patients are broadly similar to those from other studies. Analysis of small differences may be an important factor in assessing educational and socioeconomic environments.

  4. Impairment of wound healing after operative treatment of mandibular fractures, and the influence of dexamethasone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snäll, Johanna; Kormi, Eeva; Lindqvist, Christian; Suominen, Anna Liisa; Mesimäki, Karri; Törnwall, Jyrki; Thorén, Hanna

    2013-12-01

    Our aim was to clarify the incidence of impaired wound healing after open reduction and ostheosynthesis of mandibular fractures, and to find out whether the use of dexamethasone during the operation increased the risk. Patients were drawn from a larger group of healthy adult dentate patients who had participated in a single-blind, randomised study, the aim of which was to clarify the benefits of operative dexamethasone after treatment of facial fractures. The present analysis comprised 41 patients who had had open reduction and fixation of mandibular fractures with titanium miniplates and monocortical screws through one or 2 intraoral approaches. The outcome variable was impaired healing of the wound. The primary predictive variable was the perioperative use of dexamethasone; other potential predictive variables were age, sex, smoking habit, type of fracture, delay in treatment, and duration of operation. Wound healing was impaired in 13/41 patients (32%) (13/53 of all fractures). The incidence among patients who were given dexamethasone and those who were not did not differ significantly. Only age over 25 was significantly associated with delayed healing (p=0.02). The use of dexamethasone 30 mg perioperatively did not significantly increase the risk of impaired wound healing in healthy patients with clinically uninfected mandibular fractures fixed with titanium miniplates through an intraoral approach. Older age is a significant predictor of impaired healing, which emphasises the importance of thorough anti-infective care in these patients during and after the operation. Copyright © 2013 The British Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Rostral mandibular fracture repair in a pet bearded dragon (Pogona vitticeps).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nau, Melissa R; Eshar, David

    2018-04-15

    CASE DESCRIPTION A 2-year-old male bearded dragon (Pogona vitticeps) was evaluated because of a traumatic mandibular fracture. CLINICAL FINDINGS An open comminuted fracture of the rostral aspect of the right mandible was evident, with a fragment of bone exposed and dorsally displaced. Whole-body radiography revealed no evidence of additional injury. Other findings were unremarkable, except for moderate anemia (PCV, 19%). TREATMENT AND OUTCOME The fracture fragments were stabilized with 2 crossed 36-gauge interfragmentary wire loops. An external fixator device was fashioned from four 25-gauge needles inserted at alternating angles through the fracture fragments; plastic IV fluid line tubing filled with dental acrylic was used as a connecting bar. One day after surgery, the lizard had regained its typical activity level and appetite. Body weight was measured and the external fixator was inspected 1 week after surgery and monthly thereafter. Three months after initial injury, the fracture was stable, radiography revealed bony callus formation at the fracture site, and the external fixator was removed. Recheck radiography performed 5.5 months after initial injury revealed complete osseous union of the fracture fragments, and the interfragmentary wires were removed. CLINICAL RELEVANCE Surgical management of the traumatic comminuted mandibular fracture in this bearded dragon by means of a combination of internal and external fixation resulted in complete healing of the mandible and restoration of function. Management of this complicated fracture was achieved with the aid of readily available and inexpensive supplies in a clinical setting, which may be useful to other clinicians in the management of similar cases.

  6. A new method of CT scanning for the diagnosis of mandibular fractures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsukagoshi, Taku; Satoh, Kaneshige; Onizuka, Takuya

    1990-01-01

    The condylar neck of the mandible is one of the most common fracture sites in the facial skeleton. Such a fracture is routinely diagnosed by A-P, lateral oblique, and Towne projection roentgenography or orthopantomography. Despite the combination of these films, fracture of the neck of the mandible is still difficult to diagnose definitely. Therefore, a new CT scanning method was developed for diagnosing fractures of the neck of the condylar mandible. The CT axis is projected along the length of the mandible, extending from the condyle to the symphysis. This projection visualizes both the condyle and the mandibular symphysis in the same plane. The patient is placed in a supine position with the head fully extended. The base line, a line extending from the midpoint of the glenoid fossa to the menton, is determined with a lateral facial cephalogram. CT scanning with a 5 mm window is performed in parallel with and 2 cm anterior to and 2 cm posterior to the base line. When CT scanning was performed in a healthy volunteer, the condition of the condyle and the condylar neck of the mandible was clearly shown, and the view extended from the condyle to the symphysis. For automobile accident patients in whom fracture of the neck of the mandible was associated with fracture of the symphysis, two fractures were found in the same plane. A newly developed CT scanning technique is useful in the diagnosis of fractures of the condylar neck of the mandible and in the identification of fractures at other mandibular sites. It also allows scanning of patients in a supine position, which may aid in managing patients with multiple traumas. (N.K.)

  7. Early diagnostics of temporomandibular joint structural elements injures caused by traumatic mandibular bone fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohranychna, Kh R; Stasyshyn, A R; Matolych, U D

    2017-06-30

    A rapidly increasing number of mandibular condylar fractures and some complications related to injuries of temporomandibular elements make this study important. Intra-articular disorders lead to secondary pathological findings such as osteoarthritis, deforming osteoarthrosis, and temporomandibular joint ankylosis that limits mouth opening, mastication, swallowing, breathing, and decreased/lost working capacity or disability. Early diagnosis of intra-articular disorders can prevent from long-lasting functional complications caused by temporomandibular joint injuries. This study was performed for the purpose of early detection and investigation of organic pathological changes in the cartilaginous and osseous tissues of the temporomandibular joint caused by traumatic fractures of the mandibular condyle. Twenty patients underwent a general clinical examination, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and immune-enzyme testing for biochemical markers of connective tissue injury (pyridinoline and deoxypyridinoline) in urine. Disk dislocation, deformation, adhesion, perforation or squeeze, tension or disruption of ligaments, and injury of articular surfaces are among complications of mandibular fractures that can be revealed on MRI. As regards biochemical findings, we revealed a sharp rise in the levels of pyridinoline and deoxypyridinoline before treatment and a lack of stabilization within 21 days of treatment.

  8. Strength of titanium intramedullary implant versus miniplate fixation of mandibular condyle fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frake, Paul C; Howell, Rebecca J; Joshi, Arjun S

    2012-07-01

    To test the strength of internal fixation of mandibular condyle fractures repaired with titanium miniplates versus titanium intramedullary implants. Prospective laboratory experimentation in urethane mandible models and human cadaveric mandibles. Materials testing laboratory at an academic medical center. Osteotomies of the mandibular condyle were created in 40 urethane hemimandible models and 24 human cadaveric specimens. Half of the samples in each group were repaired with traditional miniplates, and the other half were repaired with intramedullary titanium implants. Anteroposterior and mediolateral loads were applied to the samples, and the displacement was measured with reference to the applied force. Titanium intramedullary implants demonstrated statistically significant improved strength and stiffness versus miniplates in the urethane model experimental groups. Despite frequent plastic deformation and mechanical failures of the miniplates, a 1.6-mm-diameter titanium intramedullary pin did not mechanically fail in any of the cases. Intramedullary implantation failures were due to secondary fracture of the adjacent cortical bone or experimental design limitations including rotation of the smooth pin implant. Mechanical implant failures that were encountered with miniplate fixation were not seen with titanium intramedullary implants. These intramedullary implants provide stronger and more rigid fixation of mandibular condyle fractures than miniplates in this in vitro model.

  9. The role of 3D plating system in mandibular fractures: A prospective study

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    Rajendra Prasad

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of our study was to evaluate the advantages and disadvantages of 3D plating system in the treatment of mandibular fractures. Patients and Methods: 20 mandibular fractures in 18 patients at various anatomic locations and were treated by open reduction and internal fixation using 3D plates. All patients were followed at regular intervals of 4 th , 8 th and 12 th weeks respectively. Patients were assessed post-operatively for lingual splay and occlusal stability. The incidence of neurosensory deficit, infection, masticatory difficulty, non-union, malunion was also assessed. Results: A significant reduction in lingual splay (72.2% and occlusal stability (72.2% was seen. The overall complication rate was (16.6% which included two patients who developed post-operative paresthesia of lip, three patients had infection and two cases of masticatory difficulty which later subsided by higher antibiotics and 4 weeks of MMF. No evidence of non-union, malunion was noted. Conclusion: A single 3D 2 mm miniplate with 2 mm × 8 mm screws is a reliable and an effective treatment modality for mandibular fracture.

  10. [SCREW-BASED INTERMAXILLARY TRACTION COMBINED WITH OCCLUSAL SPLINT FOR TREATMENT OF PEDIATRIC MANDIBULAR CONDYLAR FRACTURE].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yang; Long, Xing; Deng, Mohong; Cai, Hengxing; Meng, Qinggong; Li, Bo

    2015-04-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of the screw-based intermaxillary traction combined with occlusal splint in the treatment of pediatric mandibular condylar fracture. Between June 2005 and December 2013, 35 pediatric patients with 49 mandibular condylar fractures were treated, and the clinical data were retrospectively reviewed. There were 25 boys and 10 girls, aged 3-13 years (mean, 7.3 years). The injury causes included falling (18 cases), traffic accident (14 cases), and violence (3 cases). The time between injury and treatment was 2-30 days (mean, 6.8 days). Restricted mouth opening was observed, and the maximal mouth opening was (22.74 +/- 7.22) mm except 3 patients who were too young to measure. Condylar fractures were located at the left (12 cases), at the right (9 cases), at bilateral (14 cases) based on the sites; and fractures were classified as intracapsular (35 fractures), neck (10 fractures), and subcondylar (4 fractures) based on the fracture line. Four self-drilling titanium screws were inserted into the alveolar bone of both maxilla and mandible. After screw inserting, an occlusal splint with a fulcrum was used on the affected side and elastic band was put to perform anterior intermaxillary traction. After 1 month, the screws and splint were removed. Follow-up examinations were carried out on schedule. All the patients were followed up from 6 months to 8 years and 10 months (median, 71 months). No screw-related complication occurred in the others except one case of screw loosening. The postoperative maximal mouth opening was (38.82 +/- 2.02) nim. Mild joint noise was found in 4 cases and opening deviation occurred in 6 cases. Radiographic results demonstrated complete condyle remodeling was achieved in 24 cases (32 fractures), and moderate remodeling in 11 cases (17 fractures) at last follow-up. The screw-based intermaxillary traction combined with occlusal splint might be an effective method for pediatric mandibular condylar fracture. The screw

  11. The lingual splint: an often forgotten method for fixating pediatric mandibular fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binahmed, Abdulaziz; Sansalone, Claudio; Garbedian, Justin; Sándor, George K B

    2007-01-01

    Maxillofacial fractures are uncommon in the pediatric population, and their treatment is unique due to the psychological, physiological, developmental and anatomical characteristics of children. We present the case of a boy who was treated in an outpatient dental clinic using a lingual splint for the reduction, stabilization and fixation of a mandibular body fracture. This technique is a reliable, noninvasive procedure that dentists may consider in selected cases by referral to an oral and maxillofacial surgeon. It also limits the discomfort and morbidity that can be associated with maxillomandibular fixation or open reduction and internal fixation in pediatric patients.

  12. Transoral versus extraoral approach for mandibular angle fractures: A comparative study

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    Sathya Kumar Devireddy

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Mandibular fractures represent approximately two-thirds of all the maxillofacial fractures (nearly 70% out of which fractures of mandibular angle represent for 26-35%. Aim of the Study: The aim of this study is to compare the transoral and extraoral (submandibular approaches for fixation of mandibular angle fractures. Objectives of Study: The objectives of the following study are to evaluate ease of accessibility, time taken for the procedure, ease of anatomic reduction and complications. Materials and Methods: A prospective study was carried out in 30 patients reporting to the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial surgery, Narayana Dental College and Hospital, Nellore, Andhra Pradesh during the period of months from November 2011 to August 2013 who were randomly divided in two groups based on computer generated simple randomization chart. Group I patients underwent transoral reduction and fixation and Group II patients underwent extraoral reduction and fixation. The ease of accessibility was analysed by visual analogue scale by the operating surgeon, time taken from incision to closure with digital clock, difficulty level index of surgeon based on the time taken for the procedure and approach related complications. Results: The ease of accessibility in Group I was good in 53.3% while in Group II patients approached extraorally it was good in 86.7%. Group I patients approached transorally showed a mean of 49.7 min while that of Group II patients approached extraorally showed a mean of 73.4 min. Group I had a minimum difficulty level index in 60%, moderate difficulty level in 33.3% and severe difficulty level in 6.7% while Group II had a minimum and moderate difficulty level in 46.7% and severe difficulty level in 6.7%. There was 1 (6.7% complication reported in each group. Conclusion: The statistical analysis of this study concludes that fracture line starting anterior to mandibular third molar and ending at anteroinferior border of

  13. Locking compression plate osteosynthesis of complicated mandibular fractures in six horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuemmerle, J M; Kummer, M; Auer, J A; Nitzl, D; Fürst, A E

    2009-01-01

    Complicated mandibular fractures were recognised in one foal, one pony and four horses. The foal was two months old while the adult animals ranged in age from 12 to 24 years. Three horses had a unilateral horizontal ramus fracture. Two fractures were open and one was closed. Comminution was present in one of these patients while the other two horses had marked displacement of the fragments. Two suffered from comminuted fractures of the horizontal and vertical ramus of the mandible. One of these patients had open and infected fractures. One foal had a bilateral horizontal ramus fracture with marked periosteal 'new bone' formation and malalignement which required corrective osteotomy. Each horse underwent locking compression plate (LCP) osteosynthesis consisting of open fracture reduction and application of one to three 4.5/5.0 mm LCP at the ventral, lateral or caudal aspect of the mandible under fluoroscopic control. Two 3.5 mm LCP were used in the foal. Plate fixation was supported by application of a cerclage wire construct between the incisor and premolar teeth in most patients. Complete fracture healing, with an excellent functional and cosmetic outcome, was achieved in all of the patients. Complications encountered included seroma formation, screw and wire breakage, as well as implant and apical tooth root infections. The LCP was removed after fracture healing had occurred in four patients.

  14. The use of a single titanium microplate in displaced pediatric parasymphysial mandibular fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdullah, Walid A

    2009-07-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the use of one titanium microplate in the fixation of displaced pediatric parasymphysial mandibular fractures. The study was conducted on 7 children in the mixed dentition stage with displaced parasymphysial fracture. Patients' age ranged between 5 years 9 months and 8 years 4 months with an average of 7 years 1 month. Fractured bone segments were exposed, reduced and then fixed using 1.5 linear microplates at the inferior border of the mandible using monocortical screws, with 1.5 mm in diameter and 5 mm in length. Stainless steel wire was used as a tension band by ligating the teeth around the fracture line. Patients were followed up for occlusion and stability clinically and radiographically (panoramic X-ray and CT). According to clinical and radiographic post-operative follow-up, none of the patients showed displacement of the fixed bony segments. The present study concluded that using one microplate with 1.5 monocortical microscrews and dental tension band by a stainless steel wire could be adequate for fixing displaced pediatric parasymphysial mandibular fractures. This technique has the following advantages: decreases the amount of titanium used, decreases the risk of injury of the roots and teeth buds, and decreases the cost and time of surgery.

  15. Oral-motor and electromyographic characterization of patients submitted to open a nd closed reductions of mandibular condyle fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Amanda Pagliotto da; Sassi, Fernanda Chiarion; Andrade, Claudia Regina Furquim de

    To characterize the oral-motor system of adults with mandibular condyle facture comparing the performance of individuals submitted to open reduction with internal fixation (ORIF) and closed reduction with mandibulomaxillary fixation (CRMMF). Study participants were 26 adults divided into three groups: G1 - eight individuals submitted to ORIF for correction of condyle fracture; G2 - nine individuals submitted to CRMMF for correction of condyle fracture; CG - nine healthy volunteers with no alterations of the orofacial myofunctional system. All participants underwent the same clinical protocol: assessment of the orofacial myofunctional system; evaluation of the mandibular range of motion; and surface electromyography (sEMG) of the masticatory muscles. Results indicated that patients with condyle fractures from both groups presented significant differences compared with those from the control group in terms of mobility of the oral-motor organs, mastication, and deglutition. Regarding the measures obtained for mandibular movements, participants with facial fractures from both groups showed significant differences compared with those from the control group, indicating greater restrictions in mandibular motion. As for the analysis of sEMG results, G1 patients presented more symmetrical masseter activation during the task of maximal voluntary teeth clenching. Patients with mandibular condyle fractures present significant deficits in posture, mobility, and function of the oral-motor system. The type of medical treatment does not influence the results of muscle function during the first six months after fracture reduction. Individuals submitted to ORIF of the condyle fracture present more symmetrical activation of the masseter muscle.

  16. [Evaluation of the clinical results of non-surgical treatment for pediatric sagittal fracture of mandibular condyle].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chang-kui; Tan, Xin-ying; Xu, Juan; Liu, Hua-wei; Liu, San-xia; Hu, Min

    2013-11-01

    To investigate the clinical results of occlusal splint in the treatment of sagittal fracture of mandibular condyle (SFMC) in children. Thirty-nine patients (48 condyles)aged 3-8 years with sagittal fracture of mandibular condyle were included in this study. All the patients were treated by occlusal splint.Slight open occlusion was maintained by occlusal splint for 3-6 months. Clinical and radiological examination was performed six mouths and every year after treatment. Good mandibular function was observed in 39 patients. Maximal mouth opening over 35 mm was achieved at 6 months. But 11 of the 39 patients presented with deviation on mouth opening at 6 months. The radiology showed an complete remodeling in 32 condyles (28 patients) and partial remodeling in 16 condyles (11 patients). Poor remodelling was not observed in any patients. Good clinical results can be obtained by using occlusal splint in the treatment of pediatric sagittal fracture of mandibular condyle.

  17. Osteosíntesis intraoral asistida por endoscopia en las fracturas del proceso condilar de la mandíbula: revisión de 53 casos Endoscopically assisted intraoral osteosynthesis in mandibular condylar process fractures: a review of 53 cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Cristobal Goizueta-Adame

    2012-12-01

    fractures treated using open reduction and rigid internal fixation by an exclusively endoscopically assisted intraoral access. Material and methods: The purpose of the surgery was the anatomical reduction and internal fixation by means of rigid osteosynthesis via an intraoral incision. A review is presented of the cases where this procedure was used between 2007 and 2011. Results: Thirty five sub-condyle fractures and 20 condylar neck fractures repairs were made using this method. Over half of the fractures (55% had one or more associated fractures. The correction or improved alignment of the fragments were observed in 51 (92% using orthopantomography. Inter-maxillary fixation was avoided in 37 (69.8% of the patients. In these patients the oral aperture recovered at five and a half weeks form the surgery. In the rest, the period was almost 9 weeks after the removal of the block. Five patients had occlusal changes, while one patient had an oral aperture limitation. Conclusions: Open reduction with rigid internal fixation of extracapsular mandibular condyle fractures using an endoscopically assisted intraoral approach is an effective, safe, and reproducible treatment.

  18. A financial analysis of maxillomandibular fixation versus rigid internal fixation for treatment of mandibular fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, B L; Kearns, G; Gordon, N; Kaban, L B

    2000-11-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the cost-effectiveness of mandibular fracture treatment by closed reduction with maxillomandibular fixation (CRF) with open reduction and rigid internal fixation (ORIF). This was a retrospective study of 85 patients admitted to the Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Service at San Francisco General Hospital and treated for mandibular fractures from January 1 to December 31, 1993. The patients were divided into 2 groups: 1) those treated with CRF and 2) those treated with ORIF. The outcome variables were length of hospital stay, duration of anesthesia, and time in operating room. The charge for primary fracture treatment included the fees for the operation and hospitalization without any complications. Within the group of 85 patients treated for mandibular fractures in 1993, 10 patients treated with CRF and 10 patients treated with ORIF were randomly selected, and hospital billing statements were used to estimate the average charge of primary treatment. The average charge to manage a major postoperative infection also was estimated based on the billing statements of 10 randomly selected patients treated in 1992 (5 treated with CRF, 5 with ORIF) who required hospital admission for the management of a complication. The average total charge was computed by using the average charge for primary treatment plus the incidence of postoperative infection multiplied by the average charge for management of that complication. Eighty-five patients were included in the study. The average charge for primary treatment was $10,100 for the CRF group and $28,362 for the ORIF group. The average charge for the inpatient management of a major postoperative infection was $26,671 for the CRF group and $39,213 for the ORIF group. The average total charge for management of a mandible fracture with CRF was $10,927; the total charge for the ORIF group was $34,636. The results of this retrospective study suggest that the use of CRF in the management of mandibular

  19. An alternative method in mandibular fracture treatment: bone graft use instead of a plate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alagöz, Murat Sahin; Uysal, Ahmet Cagri; Sensoz, Omer

    2008-03-01

    In the treatment of the mandibular fractures, one of the main principles is to use the least amount of foreign material. We present an alternative technique that the bone grafts harvested from the fracture borders or from the iliac crest were used instead of plates and the fixation was done with screws. In the study including 24 mandible fractures, the bone grafts harvested from the fracture borders were used in the 10 favorable fractures and the bone grafts harvested from the iliac crest were used in the 14 unfavorable fractures. In the combined mandible fractures, four fractures were fixated with titanium plates and the other side with the bone graft. The patients, who were followed up for 12 to 20 months, were evaluated with macroscopic occlusion, panoramic graphs, and three-dimensional computerized tomographs. The advantage of this technique of fixation with the autogenous tissue is reduced infection rates and reduced operation costs. In the pediatric patients, the second session operation of plate removal is not necessary.

  20. [Topographological-anatomic changes in the structure of temporo-mandibular joint in case of fracture of the mandible condylar process at cervical level].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volkov, S I; Bazhenov, D V; Semkin, V A

    2011-01-01

    Pathological changes in soft tissues surrounding the fracture site as well as in the structural elements of temporo-mandibular joint always occured in condylar process fracture with shift at cervical mandibular jaw level. Other changes were also seen in the joint on the opposite normal side. Modelling of condylar process fracture at mandibular cervical level by means of three-dimensional computer model of temporo-mandibular joint contributed to proper understanding of this pathology emergence as well as to prediction and elimination of disorders arising in adjacent to the fracture site tissues.

  1. Considerations of mandibular angle fractures during and after surgery for removal of third molars: a review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chrcanovic, Bruno Ramos; Custódio, Antônio Luís Neto

    2010-06-01

    Angle fractures are quite common considering that the angle of the mandible forms an area of lower resistance which contains a thicker upper border, a thin basilar bone, and the presence of an impacted mandibular third molar. Common complications of mandibular third molar surgery include alveolar osteitis (dry socket), secondary infection, nerve dysfunction, and hemorrhage. Reports of mandibular fracture during and after third molar removal are uncommon. The purpose of this paper is to discuss the risk and predisposing factors that should be analyzed regarding the possibility of immediate and late mandibular angle fractures and their need for surgical treatment as a means through which to remove impacted molars. This study is based on a thorough review of the literature as well as on one immediate and one late mandibular angle fracture as described by the authors' own personal experience. The danger of an immediate jaw fracture can be avoided by means of proper instrumentation and by refraining from excessive force on the bone. The tooth should be sectioned in such a way as to minimize the extent of bone removal and force caused by instrumentation. The danger of a late jaw fracture can be avoided by precise diagnosis in cases of patients over 25 years of age, particularly men, whose tooth roots are superimposed on or adjacent to the inferior alveolar canal on a panoramic image, any local pathology and systemic disease or medications which may impair bone strength, and patients who present bruxism and are active athletes.

  2. [Outcome of endoscopically assisted surgical treatment of mandibular condyle fractures: a retrospective study of 22 patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prade, V; Seguin, P; Boutet, C; Alix, T

    2014-12-01

    The condylar region is a frequent localization of mandibular fractures; there are various types of management. Mini-invasive endoscopic surgery is an alternative to open reduction. We had as goal to evaluate the outcome of this technique. We performed a monocentric retrospective study of patients consecutively operated for a condylar fracture (type II to V in the Spiessl and Schroll classification) with intraoral route and endoscopic assistance, during 30 months. We assessed the functional and radiological outcomes, and the complications. Twenty-two patients (25 fractures) were included. Seventeen patients (19 fractures) could be followed (mean follow-up: 16.7 months). The mean values were: interincisal opening, 45mm (±8.4); protrusion, 8.3mm (±1.9); ipsilateral excursion of the jaw: 8.6mm (±2); contralateral excursion: 8.7mm (±4). Three routes were used combined with a preauricular approach. The fracture reduction was good for 10 of the 19 fractures and poor for 3. The complications were: 3 cases of infection, 1 case of fixation failure with good consolidation; for combined approaches: 2 cases of temporary facial palsy and 2 cases of Frey syndrome. Endoscopic assistance for the surgical management of the fracture of mandibular condyle is a reliable technique, with a good functional outcome, and a low rate of specific complications, especially for facial nerve lesion or esthetic outcome. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. Epidemiology and treatment outcome of surgically treated mandibular condyle fractures. A five years retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zrounba, Hugues; Lutz, Jean-Christophe; Zink, Simone; Wilk, Astrid

    2014-09-01

    Surgical management of mandibular condyle fractures is still controversial. Although it provides better outcome than closed treatment questions still remain about the surgical approach and the osteosynthesis devices to be used. Between 2005 and 2010, we managed 168 mandibular condyle fractures with open treatment. Two surgical approaches were used in this study, a pre-auricular and a high submandibular approach (one or the other or as a combined approach). Internal fixation was performed using TCP(®) plates (Medartis, Basel, Switzerland) or with two lag screws (15 and 17 mm). Delta plates were used in 15 cases (8.9%). We report the epidemiology of these fractures and the outcomes of the surgical treatment. We assessed the complications related to the surgical procedure and those related to the osteosynthesis material. The facial nerve related complication rate was very low and the osteosynthesis materials used proved to be strong enough to realize a stable fixation. The two approaches used in this study appeared to be safe with good aesthetic results. Most of the surgical procedure failures occurred in high subcondylar fractures especially when bilateral. Copyright © 2014 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Mandibular condylar fractures and acute atlanto-axial subluxation Part 2 A physiopathological factor for the cervical spine sprain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutilli, T; Corbacelli, A

    2009-05-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the physiopathology of the acute cervical injure in the event of mandibular condylar fractures. As in the Part 1, 25 non-consecutive cases of condylar mandibular fractures (16 males and 9 females, mean age: 22.96/range 14-36 years) observed and treated in the Maxillofacial Surgery Department of the University of L'Aquila, have been studied. Types of fractures examined included: unilateral: 19 cases (solitary: 12; associated with other mandibular fractures: 7, homolateral: 2); bilateral: 6 cases (equivalent: 2, not equivalent: 4). A control group was constituted of 10 patients, 5 males and 5 females, aged from 19 to 24 years (mean range: 21.6) suffering from acute isolated cervical distorsion (whiplash). The study has been performed by means of the analysis of X-ray and computed tomography (CT)-CT/3D of the mandibular condylar regions, the occipital-atlanto-axial structures and the cervical region. In all the patients the following constant alterations that link up with these fractures have been observed: the rotation of atlas, the atlanto-axial subluxation and the derangement of the occipital-atlanto-epistropheal joint, homolateral to the side of the mandibular condylar fracture. The cervical spine shows the constant loss of physiological lordosis with hinge between C3 and C4. In the whiplash, as the authors have been able to assess in the control group, there are no alterations of occipital-atlanto-axial joint and the kinetic vector is placed on the longitudinal plane. In the mandibular condylar fractures the kinetic mechanism is completely different regarding the whiplash. The point of entry is the chin and the kinetic vector is oriented down-up, sometimes oblique in the opposite side. Subsequently the kinetic force is transmitted throughout the mandibular structure and causes the condylar or bicondylar fracture. The kinetic vector is placed before on the vertical plane, then on the horizontal plane and later on the vertical

  5. Facilitation of bone resorption activities in synovial lavage fluid patients with mandibular condyle fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takano, H; Takahashi, T; Nakata, A; Nogami, S; Yusa, K; Kuwajima, S; Yamazaki, M; Fukuda, M

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the bone resorption effect of the mediators delivered in joint cavity of patients with mandibular condyle fractures by detecting osteoclast markers using cellular biochemistry methods, and by analysing bone resorption activities via inducing osteoclast differentiation of the infiltrated cells from arthrocentesis. Sixteen joints in 10 patients with mandibular condyle fractures were evaluated. The control group consisted of synovial fluid (SF) samples from seven joints of four volunteers who had no clinical signs or symptoms involving the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) or disc displacement. We collected SF cells from all patients during therapeutic arthrocentesis. The infiltrating cells from TMJ SF were cultured, differentiated into tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP)-positive osteoclast-like cells and examined bone resorption activities. We also investigated factors related to osteoclast induction of SF, using ELISA procedures. Osteoclast-like cells were induced from the SF cells obtained from all patients with condylar fractures. These multinucleated giant cells were positive for TRAP and actin, and had the ability to absorb dentin slices. The levels of macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF), prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), soluble form of receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (sRANKL) and osteoprotegerin (OPG), in SF samples from the patients, were significantly higher than in the controls. These findings indicate that bone resorption activities in SF from patients with mandibular condyle fractures were upregulated and may participate in the pathogenesis and wound healing. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Oral Rehabilitation Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. An indigenous method for closed reduction of pediatric mandibular parasymphysis fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Naresh; Singh, Akhilesh Kumar; Pandey, Arun; Verma, Vishal

    2015-01-01

    Mandibular fractures in children are very rare as compared to adults due to protected anatomic features of child and less exposure to road traffic accidents. Management becomes complicated due to inherent dynamic nature, instability of mixed dentition and fear of surgery. Conservative management can be done with the help of acrylic cap splints along with circum-mandibular wiring, intermaxillary fixation with eyelet wires, arch wires or open reduction and internal fixation with bio-resorbable plates. Different methods have various pros and cons. The choice of anesthesia is also very crucial sometimes. This case report describes a new method of closed reduction with 18 gauge needle simulated as an arch bar performed under local anaesthesia.

  7. Treatment of mandibular condyle fractures using a modified transparotid approach via the parotid mini-incision: experience with 31 cases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Shi

    Full Text Available Surgery for mandibular condyle fractures must allow direct vision of the fracture, reduce surgical trauma and achieve reduction and fixation while avoiding facial nerve injury. This prospective study was conducted to introduce a new surgical approach for open reduction and internal fixation of mandibular condyle fractures using a modified transparotid approach via the parotid mini-incision, and surgical outcomes were evaluated. The modified transparotid approach via the parotid mini-incision was applied and rigid internal fixation using a small titanium plate was carried out for 36 mandibular condyle fractures in 31 cases. Postoperative follow-up of patients ranged from 3 to 26 months; in the first 3 months after surgery, outcomes for all patients were analyzed by evaluating the degree of mouth opening, occlusal relationship, facial nerve function and results of imaging studies. The occlusal relationships were excellent in all patients and none had symptoms of intraoperative ipsilateral facial nerve injury. The mean degree of mouth opening was 4.0 (maximum 4.8 cm, minimum 3.0 cm. No mandibular deviations were noted in any patient during mouth opening. CT showed complete anatomical reduction of the mandibular condyle fracture in all patients. The modified transparotid approach via the smaller, easily concealed parotid mini-incision is minimally invasive and achieves anatomical reduction and rigid internal fixation with a simplified procedure that directly exposes the fracture site. Study results showed that this procedure is safe and feasible for treating mandibular condyle fracture, and offers a short operative path, protection of the facial nerve and satisfactory aesthetic outcomes.

  8. Finite element analysis of three patterns of internal fixation of fractures of the mandibular condyle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aquilina, Peter; Chamoli, Uphar; Parr, William C H; Clausen, Philip D; Wroe, Stephen

    2013-06-01

    The most stable pattern of internal fixation for fractures of the mandibular condyle is a matter for ongoing discussion. In this study we investigated the stability of three commonly used patterns of plate fixation, and constructed finite element models of a simulated mandibular condylar fracture. The completed models were heterogeneous in the distribution of bony material properties, contained about 1.2 million elements, and incorporated simulated jaw-adducting musculature. Models were run assuming linear elasticity and isotropic material properties for bone. This model was considerably larger and more complex than previous finite element models that have been used to analyse the biomechanical behaviour of differing plating techniques. The use of two parallel 2.0 titanium miniplates gave a more stable configuration with lower mean element stresses and displacements over the use of a single miniplate. In addition, a parallel orientation of two miniplates resulted in lower stresses and displacements than did the use of two miniplates in an offset pattern. The use of two parallel titanium plates resulted in a superior biomechanical result as defined by mean element stresses and relative movement between the fractured fragments in these finite element models. Copyright © 2012 The British Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Analysis of patterns and treatment strategies for mandibular condyle fractures: review of 175 condyle fractures with review of literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, N Viveka V; Reddy, P Bhaskar; Rajan, Ritesh; Ganti, Srinivas; Jhawar, D K; Potturi, Abhinand; Pradeep

    2013-09-01

    This study aims to evaluate incidence, patterns and epidemiology of mandibular condylar fractures (MCF) to propose a treatment strategy for managing MCF and analyze the factors which influence the outcome. One hundred and seventy-five MCF's were evaluated over a four year period and their pattern was recorded in terms of displacement, level of fracture, age of incidence and dental occlusion. Of the 2,718 facial bone fractures, MCF incidence was the third most common at 18.39 %. Of 175 MCF 58.8 % were unilateral and 41.12 % were bilateral. 67 % of bilateral fractures and 43.8 % of unilateral fractures were associated with midline symphysis and contralateral parasymphysis fractures respectively. Most of the MCF was seen in the age group of above 16 years and 50 % of them were at subcondylar level (below the neck of the condyle). Majority of MCF sustained due to inter personal violence were undisplaced (72.7 %) and contrary to this majority of MCF sustained during road traffic accident were displaced. 62.9 % of total fractures required open reduction and rigid fixation and 37.1 % were managed with closed reduction. 80 % of MCF managed with closed reduction were in the age group of below 16 years. From this study it can be concluded that the treatment algorithm proposed for managing MCF is reliable and easy to adopt. We observed that absolute indication for open reduction of MCF is inability to achieve satisfactory occlusion by closed method and absolute contraindication for open reduction is condylar head fracture irrespective of the age of the patient.

  10. Lateral compression open cap splint with circummandibular wiring for management of pediatric mandibular fractures: a retrospective audit of 10 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhola, Nitin; Jadhav, Anendd; Borle, Rajiv; Khemka, Gaurav; Adwani, Nitin; Bhattad, Mayur

    2014-03-01

    Mandibular fractures are relatively less frequent in children when compared to adults. Pediatric patients present a unique challenge to maxillofacial surgeons in terms of their treatment planning and in their functional needs. We currently describe our experience with lateral compression open cap splint with circummandibular wiring as a treatment modality which involves fewer risks in treating pediatric symphysis/parasymphysis/body mandibular fractures. A retrospective analysis of pediatric patients with mandibular symphysis/parasymphysis/body fractures operated from January 2007 to January 2012 was performed. Clinical photographs and orthopantomogram assessment at the time of presentation, after treatment, and at 6 months postoperatively were evaluated. All the 10 patients were followed up until the period of 6 months, and none of them had any major complications. Postoperatively, there was satisfactory healing and union of fracture fragments in all the patients. Only one patient developed infection at submental region. The 6-month follow-up showed good occlusion, without interference in teeth eruption and no signs of temporomandibular joint problems. Lateral compression open cap splints for treatment of pediatric mandibular symphysis/parasymphysis/body fractures are reliable treatment modalities with regard to occlusion-guided fracture reduction.

  11. Consensus or controversy? The classification and treatment decision-making by 491 maxillofacial surgeons from around the world in three cases of a unilateral mandibular condyle fracture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kommers, S.C.; Boffano, P.; Forouzanfar, T.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Many studies are available in the literature on both classification and treatment of unilateral mandibular condyle fractures. To date however, controversy regarding the best treatment for unilateral mandibular condyle fractures remains. Material and methods In this study, an attempt was made

  12. Radiographic and computed tomography monitoring of a fractured needle fragment in the mandibular branch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Oliveira e Britto Villalobos, Maria Isabel; Leite, Thaisa Cristina Gomes Ferreira; Barra, Samila Goncalves; Da Cunha Werneche, Daniela Teresa Pinto; Manzi, Flavio Ricardo; E Alves Cardoso, Claudia Assuncao

    2017-01-01

    Some complications can arise with the usage of local anesthesia for dental procedures, including the fracture of needles in the patient. This is a rare incident, usually caused by the patient's sudden movements during anesthetic block. Its complications are not common, but can include pain, trismus, inflammation in the region, difficulty in swallowing, and migration of the object, which is the least common but has the ability to cause more serious damage to the patient. This report describes a case in which, after the fracture of the anesthetic needle used during alveolar nerve block for exodontia of the left mandibular third molar, the fragment moved significantly in the first 2 months, before stabilizing after the third month of radiographic monitoring

  13. Radiographic and computed tomography monitoring of a fractured needle fragment in the mandibular branch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Oliveira e Britto Villalobos, Maria Isabel; Leite, Thaisa Cristina Gomes Ferreira; Barra, Samila Goncalves; Da Cunha Werneche, Daniela Teresa Pinto; Manzi, Flavio Ricardo; E Alves Cardoso, Claudia Assuncao [Dept. of Dentistry, Pontificial Catholic University of Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte (Brazil)

    2017-03-15

    Some complications can arise with the usage of local anesthesia for dental procedures, including the fracture of needles in the patient. This is a rare incident, usually caused by the patient's sudden movements during anesthetic block. Its complications are not common, but can include pain, trismus, inflammation in the region, difficulty in swallowing, and migration of the object, which is the least common but has the ability to cause more serious damage to the patient. This report describes a case in which, after the fracture of the anesthetic needle used during alveolar nerve block for exodontia of the left mandibular third molar, the fragment moved significantly in the first 2 months, before stabilizing after the third month of radiographic monitoring.

  14. THE MANAGEMENT OF LIMITED MANDIBULAR MOVEMENT CAUSED BY CONDYLAR FRACTURE WITH REPOSITIONING SPLINT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ira Tanti

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Fractures of the neck of condyle usually are the result of a blow to the mandible. A lateral blow to the body of the mandible commonly causes a contralateral condyle fracture. There are many signs and symptoms of a condylar fracture, for example crepitation, deviation of the mandible to the side of injury, and spasm of the associated group of muscles. These will result in a functional disability, which is usually seen as a limited mandibular movement. This paper reported a patient with a fracture of the condylar neck. Patient had been treated with closed reduction and immobilization for 2 months. After that, she felt that her bite was changed, she could not occlude her teeth well, and she had clicking sound in the right joint when she opened her mouth. Besides that, patient had difficulties to move the mandible to the left side, and she could not open her mouth widely. The patient was treated with a repositioning splint and she had to do some jaw exercises. The purposes were to regain the position of condyle, to reduce the muscle spasm and finally got the normal jaw movement.

  15. Implant-supported rehabilitation after treatment of atrophic mandibular fractures: report of two cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Leandro Benetti de; Gabrielli, Marisa Aparecida Cabrini; Gabrielli, Mario Francisco Real; Pereira-Filho, Valfrido Antonio Pereira

    2015-12-01

    The objective of this article is to present options of rehabilitation with dental implants in two cases of severely atrophic mandibles (fractures. Two patients who sustained fractures in severely atrophic mandibles with less than 10 mm of bone height were treated by open reduction and internal fixation through a transcervical access. Internal fixation was obtained with 2.4-mm locking reconstruction plates. The first patient presented satisfactory bone height at the area between the mental foramens and after 2 years, received flapless guided implants in the anterior mandible and an immediate protocol prosthesis. The second patient received a tent pole iliac crest autogenous graft after 2 years of fracture treatment and immediate implants. After 5 months, a protocol prosthesis was installed in the second patient. In both cases, the internal fixation followed AO principles for load-bearing osteosynthesis. Both prosthetic devices were Branemark protocol prosthesis. The mandibular reconstruction plates were not removed. Both patients are rehabilitated without complications and satisfied with esthetic and functional results. With the current techniques of internal fixation, grafting, and guided implants, the treatment of atrophic mandible fractures can achieve very good results, which were previously not possible.

  16. Clinical Features and Treatment Modes of Mandibular Fracture at the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Shimane University Hospital, Japan.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroto Tatsumi

    Full Text Available The number of elderly patients with maxillofacial trauma is rapidly increasing due to active lifestyles and longevity. Shimane prefecture has the fastest growing proportion of elderly individuals in Japan. The aim of this study was to reveal the distinctive features and treatment modes of mandibular fracture treatment mode in patients requiring hospitalization at the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Shimane University Hospital, Japan.Patient age, sex, period between injury and first consultation, years since injury, cause of injury, fracture site, treatment, and duration of hospitalization were evaluated. Univariate Poisson regression, relative risk with 95% confidence interval based on the Wald test, Fisher's exact test, and Kruskal-Wallis test were used to explore associations among clinical and demographic variables.In total, 305 patients were diagnosed with and hospitalized for mandibular fracture from 1980 to 2010. Younger age increased the risk for mandibular fracture. Incidence was higher in males than females, particularly in the young, but the male to female ratio decreased with age. The period until first hospital consultation decreased progressively over the study period. Fall was a much more frequent cause in patients aged ≥60 than in those aged <60 years. Mandibular fracture with condyle, symphysis, and angle involvement were most common and were associated with sex, age, and treatment mode. Length of hospitalization has decreased since 1980.In our department, patients aged ≥60 years accounted for a greater proportion of mandibular fracture cases than in many previous studies, reflecting the greater proportion of elderly residents in Shimane prefecture.

  17. Surgical treatment on displaced and dislocated sagittal fractures of the mandibular condyle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, Jie; Han, Yu; Song, Yu; Wan, Yingbiao

    2011-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of surgical treatment on displaced and dislocated sagittal fractures of the mandibular condyle (SFMC). Twenty-four patients with 28 displaced and dislocated SFMCs were distinguished into type M, type C, and type L fractures according the location of the fracture line. The fractured fragment was reduced and fixated with two 0.6-mm 4-hole micro-plates via a preauricular temporal incision. The fragment was extirpated when it was too small to be fixated. The postoperative position and profile of the fragment was examined by orthopantomogram radiograph or computed tomography (CT). The function of the temporal and zygomatic branches of the facial nerve was inspected. The occluding relation was surveyed, the interincisal distance at maximum mouth opening was measured, and the deviation from the midline during mouth opening was recorded. Twenty-three condyles (82%) suffered dislocated fractures with the condylar fragment out of the glenoid fossa. Five condyles (18%) were displaced, but not dislocated. There were 2 (7%) type M, 19 (68%) type C (3 comminuted), and 7 (25%) type L fractures (1 comminuted), respectively. Twenty-one (75%) fractured fragments received free-graft procedures with 2 micro-plates. Four (14%) fragments were reduced and fixated without being dissected free of their attachments. Three (11%) fragments were extirpated. There were no permanent facial never branch injuries. Micro-plate removal was necessary because of postoperative infection and necrosis of the fractured fragment in 1 condylar process. No other patients could be found with obvious postoperative bone resorption. The average postoperative maximum mouth opening and deviation at 6 months were improved significantly. The postoperative occlusion was good in 22 cases. Access with the preauricular incision, and the dislocated and displaced fragment can be reduced and fixated to its normal position easily. Free-graft procedure is a suitable

  18. IMF-screws or arch bars as conservative treatment for mandibular condyle fractures: Quality of life aspects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Bergh, B.; van Otterloo, J.J.D.M.; van der Ploeg, T.; Tuinzing, D.B.; Forouzanfar, T.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Arch bars as treatment for a fractured mandibular condyle are inconvenient to patients and lead to lowered quality of life (QOL). To overcome these inconveniences, IMF-screws (IMFS) to facilitate intermaxillary fixation during surgery have been developed. The purpose of the present study

  19. Conservative treatment of a mandibular condyle fracture: comparing intermaxillary fixation with screws or arch bar. A randomised clinical trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Bergh, B.; Blankestijn, J.; van der Ploeg, T.; Tuinzing, D.B.; Forouzanfar, T.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction A mandibular condyle fracture can be treated conservatively by intermaxillary fixation (IMF) or by open reposition and internal fixation (ORIF). Many IMF-modalities can be chosen, including IMF-screws (IMFS). This prospective multi-centre randomised clinical trial compared the use of

  20. Conservative treatment of a mandibular condyle fracture: Comparing intermaxillary fixation with screws or arch bar. A randomised clinical trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Bergh, B.; Blankestijn, J.; van der Ploeg, T.; Tuinzing, D.B.; Forouzanfar, T.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction A mandibular condyle fracture can be treated conservatively by intermaxillary fixation (IMF) or by open reposition and internal fixation (ORIF). Many IMF-modalities can be chosen, including IMF-screws (IMFS). This prospective multi-centre randomised clinical trial compared the use of

  1. Recovery of mouth-opening after closed treatment of a fracture of the mandibular condyle : a longitudinal study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niezen, E. T.; Stuive, I.; Post, W. J.; Bos, R. R. M.; Dijkstra, P. U.

    The aim of this retrospective study was to assess recovery of mouth opening after closed treatment of fractures of the mandibular condyle, and analyse which characteristics might influence recovery. We measured mouth opening in 142 patients (mean (SD) age 30 (14) years, 96 of whom were male) during

  2. IMF-screws or arch bars as conservative treatment for mandibular condyle fractures: quality of life aspects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Bergh, B.; de Mol van Otterloo, J.J.; van der Ploeg, T.; Tuinzing, D.B.; Forouzanfar, T.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Arch bars as treatment for a fractured mandibular condyle are inconvenient to patients and lead to lowered quality of life (QOL). To overcome these inconveniences, IMF-screws (IMFS) to facilitate intermaxillary fixation during surgery have been developed. The purpose of the present study

  3. Facial nerve injuries associated with the retromandibular transparotid approach for reduction and fixation of mandibular condyle fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Dan; Patil, Pavan Manohar; Gupta, Ritika

    2015-04-01

    To document facial nerve (FN) injuries after surgical treatment of mandibular condylar fractures using the retromandibular transparotid approach and to identify risk factors associated with these injuries. A retrospective study of patients surgically treated for mandibular condylar fractures using the retromandibular transparotid approach over seven years was conducted. The primary study variable was the postoperative change in FN function after fracture fixation. Risk factors were categorized as demographic, anatomic, experience of the operator, fracture displacement/dislocation and number of miniplates placed at the fracture site. Appropriate statistics were computed. Ninety patients with 102 fractures were analysed. Thirty two fractures (31%) were located in the condylar neck and 70 fractures (69%) were subcondylar (located below the sigmoid notch). The condylar segment was undisplaced in twelve cases (12%), displaced medially in thirty five (34%), laterally displaced in thirty (29%) and dislocated in 25 (24.5%). In 18 fractures (18%), postoperative examination revealed various degrees of damage to the FN. All nerve injuries recovered completely in 8-24 weeks. In a multivariate model, condylar neck fractures, fracture dislocation and operator inexperience were associated with a statistically significant risk of postoperative deterioration of FN function (P ≤ 0.05). The majority of facial nerve injuries after surgical treatment of condylar fractures by the retromandibular transparotid approach are transient in nature. Condylar neck fractures, fracture dislocation and operator inexperience were associated with an increased risk for FN injury. Copyright © 2014 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Closed treatment of unilateral mandibular condyle fractures in adults: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozeboom, A V J; Dubois, L; Bos, R R M; Spijker, R; de Lange, J

    2017-04-01

    Of all mandibular fractures, 25-35% are condylar. Many studies have focused on whether to treat such fractures via open or closed modalities. A uniform protocol for closed treatment is lacking, but such a protocol could ensure good clinical practice. The aims of this systematic review were to provide an overview of the published studies exclusively pertaining to closed treatment and to summarize the existing modalities for closed treatment and their clinical outcomes. Sixteen studies were selected for detailed analysis. The treatments given were highly variable, ranging from doing nothing to applying maxillomandibular fixation with stainless steel wires. The results of the different studies and the treatment modalities used were difficult to interpret; however no clear differences in the outcome measures were seen between the treatment modalities applied. Complications encountered after closed treatment included malocclusion, limited mouth opening, reduced range of motion, and persistent pain. Due to the heterogeneity between groups, high loss-to-follow-up, poor descriptions of the treatments given, and variability in outcome measurement methods, no clear associations between adverse outcomes and the treatments applied could be determined. This review suggests that due to the high level of methodological variability in the relevant studies published to date, there are currently no uniform standards for the closed treatment of condylar fractures that can be expected to yield good clinical results. The establishment of such standards could potentially improve treatment outcomes. Copyright © 2016 International Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. A Method for Direct Fabrication of a Lingual Splint for Management of Pediatric Mandibular Fractures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerardo P. Romeo, DDS, MD

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Pediatric mandibular fractures have successfully been managed in various ways. The use of a lingual splint is one such option. The typical indirect method for acrylic lingual splint fabrication involves obtaining dental impressions. Dental models are produced from those impressions so that model surgery may be performed. The splint is then made on those models using resin powder and liquid monomer in a wet laboratory and transferred to the patient. Obvious limitations to this technique exist for both patient and operator. We present a technique for direct, intraoperative, fabrication of a splint using commercially available light-cured material that avoids some of the shortcomings of the indirect method. Recommendations are made based on available material safety information.

  6. Clinical efficacy of open reduction and semirigid internal fixation in management of displaced pediatric mandibular fractures: A series of 10 cases and surgical guidelines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samir Joshi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To evaluate the efficacy of open reduction and semirigid internal fixation in the management of displaced pediatric mandibular fractures. Method: Ten patients with displaced mandibular fractures treated with 1.5 mm four holed titanium mini-plate and 4 mm screws which were removed within four month after surgery. Results: All cases showed satisfactory bone healing without any growth disturbance. Conclusion: Open reduction and rigid internal fixation (ORIF with 1.5 mm titanium mini- plates and 4 mm screws is a reliable and safe method in treatment of displaced paediatric mandibular fractures.

  7. Clinical efficacy of open reduction and semirigid internal fixation in management of displaced pediatric mandibular fractures: a series of 10 cases and surgical guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Samir; Kshirsagar, Rajesh; Mishra, Akshay; Shah, Rahul

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of open reduction and semirigid internal fixation in the management of displaced pediatric mandibular fractures. Ten patients with displaced mandibular fractures treated with 1.5 mm four holed titanium mini-plate and 4 mm screws which were removed within four month after surgery. All cases showed satisfactory bone healing without any growth disturbance. Open reduction and rigid internal fixation (ORIF) with 1.5 mm titanium mini- plates and 4 mm screws is a reliable and safe method in treatment of displaced paediatric mandibular fractures.

  8. Treatment of mandibular angle fracture with a 2mm, 3 dimensional rectangular grid compression miniplates: A prospective clinical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansuri, Samir; Abdulkhayum, Abdul Mujeeb; Gazal, Giath; Hussain, Mohammed Abid Zahir

    2013-12-01

    Surgical treatment of fracture mandible using an internal fixation has changed in the last decades to achieve the required rigidity, stability and immediate restoration of function. The aim of the study was to do a Prospective study of 10 patients to determine the efficacy of rectangular grid compression miniplates in mandibular fractures. This study was carried out using 2.0 rectangular grid compression miniplates and 8 mm multidirectional screws as a rigid internal fixation in 10 patients without post operative intermaxillary fixation (IMF). Follow up was done for period of 6 months. All fractures were healed with an absolute stability in post operative period. None of the patient complained of post operative difficulty in occlusion. Within the limits of this study, it can be concluded that rectangular grid compression miniplates was rigid, reliable and thus can be recommended for the treatment of mandibular angle fractures. How to cite this article: Mansuri S, Abdulkhayum AM, Gazal G, Hussain MA. Treatment of mandibular angle fracture with a 2mm, 3 dimensional rectangular grid compression miniplates: A prospective clinical study. J Int Oral Health 2013;5(6):93-100 .

  9. Fracture of mandibular condyle—to open or not to open: an attempt to settle the controversy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rastogi, Sanjay; Sharma, Siddharth; Kumar, Sanjeev; Reddy, Mahendra P; Niranjanaprasad Indra, B

    2015-06-01

    To compare the outcome of the open method versus the closed method of treatment for mandibular condylar fracture. Fifty patients with fractures of the mandibular condylar processes were evaluated. All fractures were displaced, with a degree of deviation between the condylar fragment and the ascending ramus of 10 to 45 degrees (mediolaterally). The patients were randomly divided into two groups, with group 1 receiving open reduction internal fixation and group 2 receiving closed reduction. The follow-up was done over the period of 6 months. Statistically significant improvement was seen in group 1 compared with group 2 in terms of anatomic reduction of the condyle, shortening of the ascending ramus, occlusal status, and deviation on mouth opening. A statistically significant difference was seen in the patients treated with the open method, with improved temporomandibular joint functions and fewer short- and long-term complications compared with those treated with the closed method. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. [Using dynamic magnetotherapy and transdermal electroneurostimulation in the combined treatment of patients with mandibular fractures and concomitant periodontal inflammatory diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepilin, A V; Erokina, N L; Rogatina, T V; Khlusov, I Iu

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare results of dynamic magnetotherapy (DMT), transdermal electroneurostimulation (TDENS), and traditional ultrahigh frequency (UHF) therapy in 473 patients with mandibular fractures and concomitant inflammatory diseases of paradontium. The parameters measured in the study included hygienic and paradontal indices, microcirculation patterns (using laser Doppler flowmetry), and the degree of mandibular fragment consolidation. It was shown that combined treatment with DMT and TDENS using an AMO-ATOS-E apparatus permits to eliminate clinical symptoms of paradontal inflammatory diseases twice as fast as traditional ultrahigh frequency therapy and ensures a two-fold reduction in the frequency of complications.

  11. Clinical efficacy of open reduction and semirigid internal fixation in management of displaced pediatric mandibular fractures: A series of 10 cases and surgical guidelines

    OpenAIRE

    Samir Joshi; Rajesh Kshirsagar; Akshay Mishra; Rahul Shah

    2015-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the efficacy of open reduction and semirigid internal fixation in the management of displaced pediatric mandibular fractures. Method: Ten patients with displaced mandibular fractures treated with 1.5 mm four holed titanium mini-plate and 4 mm screws which were removed within four month after surgery. Results: All cases showed satisfactory bone healing without any growth disturbance. Conclusion: Open reduction and rigid internal fixation (ORIF) with 1.5 mm titanium mini- plate...

  12. THE CONDITION OF PERIODONTAL TISSUES IN PATIENTS WITH MANDIBULAR FRACTURES IN COMBINATION WITH INFLAMMATORY DISEASES OF PERIODONTIUM IN DYNAMICS OF TREATMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H.U. Bisultanov

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available The immobilization of broken fragments by two-jaw anchor splints in patients with the mandibular fractures in a combination with inflammatory diseases ofperiodontium usually causes the exacerbation and progression of the diseases and growing progressively worsening ofperiodontium status. The intensity of these conditions depends on an initial status ofperiodontal tissue. The posttraumatic suppurative inflammatory complications of the mandibular fractures frequency depending on the initial stage of periodontal disease are marked.

  13. Modified Labial Button Technique for Maintaining Occlusion After Caudal Mandibular Fracture/Temporomandibular Joint Luxation in the Cat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Alice E; Carmichael, Daniel T

    2016-03-01

    Maxillofacial trauma in cats often results in mandibular symphyseal separation in addition to injuries of the caudal mandible and/or temporomandibular joint (TMJ). Caudal mandibular and TMJ injuries are difficult to access and stabilize using direct fixation techniques, thus indirect fixation is commonly employed. The immediate goals of fixation include stabilization for return to normal occlusion and function with the long-term objective of bony union. Indirect fixation techniques commonly used for stabilization of caudal mandibular and temporomandibular joint fracture/luxation include maxillomandibular fixation (MMF) with acrylic composite, interarcade wiring, tape muzzles, and the bignathic encircling and retaining device (BEARD) technique. This article introduces a modification of the previously described "labial reverse suture through buttons" technique used by Koestlin et al and the "labial locking with buttons" technique by Rocha et al. In cases with minimally displaced subcondylar and pericondylar fractures without joint involvement, the labial button technique can provide sufficient stabilization for healing. Advantages of the modified labial button technique include ease of application, noninvasive nature, and use of readily available materials. The construct can remain in place for a variable of amount of time, depending on its intended purpose. It serves as an alternative to the tape muzzle, which is rarely tolerated by cats. This technique can be easily used in conjunction with other maxillomandibular repairs, such as cerclage wire fixation of mandibular symphyseal separation. The purpose of this article is to demonstrate a modified labial button technique for maintaining occlusion of feline caudal mandibular fractures/TMJ luxations in a step-by-step fashion.

  14. Open reduction and internal fixation of intra-articular fractures of the mandibular condyle: our first experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vesnaver, Ales

    2008-10-01

    Treatment of intra-articular fractures of the mandibular condyle head is conservative at most institutions dealing with facial fractures. Recently, reports had been published about benefits of surgical treatment in these fractures. From July 2004 until the end of June 2006, 13 patients with 16 displaced intra-articular fractures of the mandibular condyle were treated with open reduction and internal fixation at the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery in Ljubljana, Slovenia, using the preauricular approach and the lag screw technique. Twelve of the 13 patients could open their mouths for 40 mm or more, and 10 had a deflection of the chin of less than 2 mm upon maximal opening. None of the patients experienced pain upon rest, palpation, or chewing. Occlusion was not noted as altered in any of the cases, neither subjectively, nor on examination. There were no cases of postoperative weakness of the temporal branch of the facial nerve. Surgical treatment of intra-articular condyle fractures using the preauricular approach achieves a good exposure and enables proper reduction. Stable fixation of fractured bony fragments can be achieved using the lag screw technique. Another benefit of open exposure is revision and repair of TMJ soft tissues. With the appropriate surgical technique, the surgical procedure is safe and leads to good results.

  15. Closed reduction of displaced or dislocated mandibular condyle fractures in children using threaded Kirschner wire and external rubber traction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, J H; Nam, D H

    2015-10-01

    Most surgeons agree that closed treatment provides the best results for condylar fractures in children. Nevertheless, treatment of the paediatric mandibular condyle fracture that is severely displaced or dislocated is controversial. The purpose of this study was to investigate the long-term clinical and radiological outcomes following the treatment of displaced or dislocated condylar fractures in children using threaded Kirschner wire and external rubber traction. This procedure can strengthen the advantage of closed reduction and make up for the shortcomings of open reduction. From March 1, 2005 to December 25, 2011, 11 children aged between 4 and 12 years with displaced or dislocated mandibular condyle fractures were treated using threaded Kirschner wire and external rubber traction under portable C-arm fluoroscopy. All patients had unilateral displaced or dislocated condylar fractures. The follow-up period ranged from 24 to 42 months (mean 29.3 months). Normal occlusion and pain-free function of the temporomandibular joint, without deviation or limitation of jaw opening, was achieved in all patients. This closed reduction technique in displaced or dislocated condylar fractures in children offers a reliable solution in preventing the unfavourable sequelae of closed treatment and the open technique, such as altered morphology, functional disturbances, and facial nerve damage. Copyright © 2015 International Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Preauricular transmasseteric anteroparotid approach for extracorporeal fixation of mandibular condyle fractures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajasekhar Gali

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Free grafting or extracorporeal fixation of traumatically displaced mandibular condyles is sometimes required in patients with severe anteromedial displacement of condylar head. Majority of the published studies report the use of a submandibular, retromandibular or preauricular incisions for the access which have demerits of limited visibility, access and potential to cause damage to facial nerve and other parotid gland related complications. Purpose: This retrospective clinical case record study was done to evaluate the preauricular transmasseteric anteroparotid (P-TMAP approach for open reduction and extracorporeal fixation of displaced and dislocated high condylar fractures of the mandible. Patients and Methods: This retrospective study involved search of clinical case records of seven patients with displaced and dislocated high condylar fractures treated by open reduction and extracorporeal fixation over a 3-year period. The parameters assessed were as follows: a the ease of access for retrieval, reimplantation and fixation of the proximal segment; b the postoperative approach related complications; c the adequacy of anatomical reduction and stability of fixation; d the occlusal changes; and the e TMJ function and radiological changes. Results: Accessibility and visibility were good. Accurate anatomical reduction and fixation were achieved in all the patients. The recorded complications were minimal and transient. Facial nerve (buccal branch palsy was noted in one patient with spontaneous resolution within 3 months. No cases of sialocele or Frey's syndrome were seen. Conclusion: The P-TMAP approach provides good access for open reduction and extracorporeal fixation of severely displaced condylar fractures. It facilitates retrieval, transplantation, repositioning, fixing the condyle and also reduces the chances of requirement of a vertical ramus osteotomy. It gives straight-line access to condylar head and ramus thereby

  17. Preauricular transmasseteric anteroparotid approach for extracorporeal fixation of mandibular condyle fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gali, Rajasekhar; Devireddy, Sathya Kumar; Venkata, Kishore Kumar Rayadurgam; Kanubaddy, Sridhar Reddy; Nemaly, Chaithanyaa; Dasari, Mallikarjuna

    2016-01-01

    Free grafting or extracorporeal fixation of traumatically displaced mandibular condyles is sometimes required in patients with severe anteromedial displacement of condylar head. Majority of the published studies report the use of a submandibular, retromandibular or preauricular incisions for the access which have demerits of limited visibility, access and potential to cause damage to facial nerve and other parotid gland related complications. This retrospective clinical case record study was done to evaluate the preauricular transmasseteric anteroparotid (P-TMAP) approach for open reduction and extracorporeal fixation of displaced and dislocated high condylar fractures of the mandible. This retrospective study involved search of clinical case records of seven patients with displaced and dislocated high condylar fractures treated by open reduction and extracorporeal fixation over a 3-year period. The parameters assessed were as follows: a) the ease of access for retrieval, reimplantation and fixation of the proximal segment; b) the postoperative approach related complications; c) the adequacy of anatomical reduction and stability of fixation; d) the occlusal changes; and the e) TMJ function and radiological changes. Accessibility and visibility were good. Accurate anatomical reduction and fixation were achieved in all the patients. The recorded complications were minimal and transient. Facial nerve (buccal branch) palsy was noted in one patient with spontaneous resolution within 3 months. No cases of sialocele or Frey's syndrome were seen. The P-TMAP approach provides good access for open reduction and extracorporeal fixation of severely displaced condylar fractures. It facilitates retrieval, transplantation, repositioning, fixing the condyle and also reduces the chances of requirement of a vertical ramus osteotomy. It gives straight-line access to condylar head and ramus thereby permitting perpendicular placement of screws with minimal risk of damage to the facial

  18. An experimental study of mandibular fracture wound healing in the calcium deficient rat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Sang Hoon; Wang, Eui Hwan; Lee, Sang Rae

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate effects of osteoporosis on fracture wound healing in the calcium deficient rat. To research the experiment some ten-week old Wistar strain rats with approximately 300 gms weight were selected. Then, the rats were divided into two groups : Normal diet group (rats given a normal diet before and after bone fracture) and Low calcium diet group (rats given a low calcium diet before and after bone fracture). Both groups had been provided with each diet for three weeks. When the rats became thirteen weeks old, the mandibular angle of rats in both groups was artificially fractured for test. The healing of fracture wounds was reviewed by using soft x-ray radiography and 99m Tc-MDP bone scan and also histopathologic examination. The obtained results were as follows : 1. The radiolucency of the fracture site for the Normal diet group started to decrease from the 14th day since the experiment was made, while the Low calcium diet group began decrease in the radiolucency from the 21st day of the experiment . The radiolucency for the normal diet group disappeared at the 42nd day, but one for the Low calcium diet group disappeared at the 56th day of the experiment. 2. The highest uptake rate of 99m Tc-MDP stood at the 14th day of the experiment in the Normal diet group and the Low calcium diet group's maximum rate was recorded at the 21st day of the experiment. These both groups were gradually experiencing decrease in the uptake rate as the experiment time was going on. However, the uptake rate in the Low calcium diet group was lower than one in the Normal diet group. 3. For the Normal diet group, the newly formed trabecular, which were similar to one of the surrounding bone, were seen at the 42nd day of the experiment. On the other hand, the Low claium diet group showed at the 56th day of the experiment that the osteoporotic findings looked weak, irregular trabecular, and also large bone marrow space were observed clearly. As a result

  19. Dissection of the internal carotid artery and stroke after mandibular fractures: a case report and review of the literature

    OpenAIRE

    Tveita, Ingrid Aune; Madsen, Martin Ragnar Skjerve; Nielsen, Erik Waage

    2017-01-01

    Source at https://doi.org/10.1186/s13256-017-1316-1 Background: We present a report of a patient with blunt trauma and mandibular fractures who developed a significant cerebral infarction due to an initially unrecognized injury of her left internal carotid artery. We believe that increased knowledge of this association will facilitate early recognition and hence prevention of a devastating outcome. Case presentation: A 41-year-old ethnic Norwegian woman presented to our Emerg...

  20. Consensus or controversy? The classification and treatment decision-making by 491 maxillofacial surgeons from around the world in three cases of a unilateral mandibular condyle fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kommers, Sofie C; Boffano, Paolo; Forouzanfar, Tymour

    2015-12-01

    Many studies are available in the literature on both classification and treatment of unilateral mandibular condyle fractures. To date however, controversy regarding the best treatment for unilateral mandibular condyle fractures remains. In this study, an attempt was made to quantify the level of agreement between a sample of maxillofacial surgeons worldwide, on the classification and treatment decisions in three different unilateral mandibular condyle fracture cases. In total, 491 of 3044 participants responded. In all three mandibular condyle fracture cases, a fairly high level of disagreement was found. Only in the case of a subcondylar fracture, assuming dysocclusion was present, more than 81% of surgeons agreed that the best treatment would be open reduction and internal fixation. Based on the study results, there is considerable variation among surgeons worldwide with regard to treatment of unilateral mandibular condyle fracture. 3D imaging in higher fractures tends to lead to more invasive treatment decisions. Copyright © 2015 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. [Biomechanical analysis on healing process of sagittal fracture of the mandibular condyle after rigid fixation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, Jie; Qu, Ai-li; Ding, Xiao-mei; Hei, Yu-na

    2015-04-01

    To analyze the biomechanical healing process on rigid fixation of sagittal fracture of the mandibular condyle (SFMC), and to provide guidelines for surgical treatment. Three-dimensional finite element model (3D-FEAM) of mandible and condyle was established. The right condyle was simulated as SFMC with 0.1 mm space across the condyle length ways. The 3D-FEAM of rigid fixation was established. The biomechanical factors such as stress distribution of condylar surface, displacement around fracture, stress on the plate and stress shielding were calculated during 0, 4, 8 and 12-week after rigid fixation. The maximum equivalent stress of normal condyle was located at the area of middle 1/3 of condylar neck. The maximum equivalent stress at 0-week after fixation was 23 times than that on normal condyle. They were located at the condylar stump and the plate near inferior punctual areas of fracture line. There were little stress on the other areas. The maximum equivalent stress at 4, 8 and 12-week was approximately 6 times than that on normal condyle. They were located at the areas same as the area at 0-week. There were little stress on the other areas at the condyle. The maximum total displacement and maximum total corner were increased 0.57-0.75 mm and 0.01-0.09° respectively during healing process. The maximum equivalent stress at 0-week on the condylar trump was 5-6 times compared with that at 4, 8, and 12-week. The maximum equivalent stress, maximum total displacement and maximum total corner on the fractured fragment were not changed significantly during healing process. The maximum equivalent stress at 0-week on the plate was 7-9 times compared with that at 4, 8, 12-week. The stress of the condyle and stress shielding of the plate may be the reasons of absorbing and rebuilding on the condyle in healing process of SFMC. The biomechanical parameters increase obviously at 4-week after fixation. Elastic intermaxillary traction is necessary to decrease total displacement

  2. [Application of immunomodulators in the treatment of mandibular fractures in elderly patients with incomplete secondary adentia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abramov, A V; Parfenov, S A; Belov, V G; Parfenov, Iu A

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the work was to study the experience of using complex pharmacotherapy in the treatment of mandibular fractures in elderly patients with incomplete secondary periodontitis, which were divided into two groups. In the first group, patients (n = 46; average age 69.0 ± 3.6) were treated using the authors' original device combined with application of antimicrobial MetrogilDenta gel onto gums two times a day during ten days. Patients in the second group (n = 52; average age 61.0 ± 3.1) were treated with the same device combined with (i) application of MetrogilDenta antimicrobial gel onto gums two times a day during ten days, (ii) application of 1.5 ml of Cycloferon 5% liniment by cotton pellet for 20 min during the same 10 days (30 minutes after the antimicrobial gel), and (iii) intramuscular injections of 6 mg of synthetic immunomodulator Polyoxidonium once a day for 3 days, then once every two days (for a total of 17 days). It is established that the use of the combination of interferon inducers of immunomodulator group--Cycloferon in the form of liniment and synthetic immunomodulator Polyoksidonium together with MetrogilDenta antimicrobial gel--led to the most pronounced regression of inflammatory and destructive processes in periodontal tissues (in 7.1%, đ = 0.05), optimized the state of local immunity of the oral cavity, and normalized microflora in periodontal pockets in elderly patients with incomplete secondary adentia.

  3. Ankylosis Due Sequel Of Fracture Of The Mandibular Condyle: Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alina Alencar Ferreira Gomes

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The Ankylosis of the Temporomandibular joint (TMJ is a disorder of craniofacial complex that results in the merger between the condyle and the mandibular fossa, causing partial or complete immobilization of the mandible. The etiological factors are local and systemic inflammation, infection in the area of TMJ, rheumatic diseases and neoplasms, having the trauma as the main etiologic factor. The traumas are responsible for 31% to 98% of cases of ankylosis. The diagnosis is made from the anamnesis and imaging scans (computed tomography pointing to the union of joint components. The treatment of ankylosis is a big challenge due the high rate of recurrence that can be affected by factors such as type of ankylosis, surgical technique, age of the patient, post-operative physiotherapy and systematic follow-up of the patient. The various forms of treatment require careful analysis of type of ankylosis if it is intra or extra-articular, unilateral or bilateral and if it is bony or fibrous, There is no consensus in current literature regarding the best treatment. The aim of this work is to present through the report of a clinical case, a surgical treatment of Unilateral Temporomandibular joint Ankylosis, due to sequel of condylar fracture with re-establishment of the stomatognathic functions in postoperative follow-up.

  4. IMF-screws or arch bars as conservative treatment for mandibular condyle fractures: Quality of life aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Bergh, B; de Mol van Otterloo, J J; van der Ploeg, T; Tuinzing, D B; Forouzanfar, T

    2015-09-01

    Arch bars as treatment for a fractured mandibular condyle are inconvenient to patients and lead to lowered quality of life (QOL). To overcome these inconveniences, IMF-screws (IMFS) to facilitate intermaxillary fixation during surgery have been developed. The purpose of the present study is to investigate and compare QOL for patients treated for a fractured mandibular condyle with either IMFS or arch bars. This research trial was conducted from 2010 to 2014 as part of an earlier prospective, multicenter, randomized clinical trial in which the use of IMFS was compared to the use of arch bars in the treatment of mandibular condylar fractures. In total, 50 patients were included: 30 (60%) male patients and 20 (40%) female patients (mean age: 31.8 years, standard deviation [SD] = 13.9 years, range = 18-64 years). A total of 24 (48%) patients were allocated in the IMFS group, and 26 (52%) patients were assigned to the arch-bars control group. Significant results were observed in the subscales social isolation, possibility to eat and vary diet, influence on sleep, and satisfaction with the given treatment, all in favour of IMFS. In conclusion, using IMFS as a method for conservative treatment of condylar fractures led to a higher QOL during the 6-week period of fracture healing. In comparison to arch bars, patients treated with IMFS experienced less social isolation, had fewer problems with eating, and express the feeling they are able to continue their normal diet. Furthermore it seems that the use of IMFS has a lower negative impact on social and financial aspects of the patient. Copyright © 2015 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. The mandibular symphysis as a starting point for the occlusal-level reconstruction of panfacial fractures with bicondylar fractures and interruption of the maxillary and mandibular arches: report of two cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pau, Mauro; Reinbacher, Knut Ernst; Feichtinger, Matthias; Navysany, Kawe; Kärcher, Hans

    2014-06-01

    Panfacial fractures represent a challenge, even for experienced maxillofacial surgeons, because all references for reconstructing the facial skeleton are missing. Logical reconstructive sequencing based on a clear understanding of the correlation between projection and the widths and lengths of facial subunits should enable the surgeon to achieve correct realignment of the bony framework of the face and to prevent late deformity and functional impairment. Reconstruction is particularly challenging in patients presenting with concomitant fractures at the Le Fort I level and affecting the palate, condyles, and mandibular symphysis. In cases without bony loss and sufficient dentition, we believe that accurate fixation of the mandibular symphysis can represent the starting point of a reconstructive sequence that allows successful reconstruction at the Le Fort I level. Two patients were treated in our department by reconstruction starting in the occlusal area through repair of the mandibular symphysis. Both patients considered the postoperative facial shape and profile to be satisfactory and comparable to the pre-injury situation. Copyright © 2013 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Autotransplantation of Mandibular Third Molar with Buccal Cortical Plate to Replace Vertically Fractured Mandibular Second Molar: A Novel Technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zufía, Juan; Abella, Francesc; Trebol, Ivan; Gómez-Meda, Ramón

    2017-09-01

    Tooth replacement often leads to inadequate vertical volume in the recipient site bone when a tooth has been extracted because of a vertical root fracture (VRF). This case report presents the autotransplantation of a mandibular third molar (tooth #32) with the attached buccal cortical plate to replace a mandibular second molar (tooth #31) diagnosed with a VRF. After extraction of tooth #31, the recipient socket was prepared based on the size measured in advance with cone-beam computed tomographic imaging. The precise and calculated osteotomy of the cortical bone of tooth #32 allowed for the exact placement of the donor tooth in the position of tooth #31. The total extraoral time was only 25 minutes. The block was fixed to the recipient socket with an osteosynthesis screw and splinted with a double resin wire for 8 weeks. At the 6-month follow-up, the screw was removed, and the stability of the tooth and the regeneration obtained throughout the vestibular area were confirmed. At the 2-year follow-up, the transplanted tooth was asymptomatic and maintained a normal bone level. Advantages of autotransplantation over dental implants include maintenance of proprioception, possible orthodontic movements, and a relatively low cost. This case report demonstrates that an autotransplantation of a third molar attached to its buccal cortical plate is a viable option to replace teeth with a VRF. Copyright © 2017 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. [Pathomorphology of regenerative processes in mandibular fracture after sodium succinate treatment and laser magnetotherapy in an experimental setting].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faustov, L A; Nedel'ko, N A; Morozova, M V

    2001-01-01

    Morphological reactions in tissue adjacent to mandibular angular fracture were studied in guinea pigs treated with sodium succinate and laser magnetotherapy. Due to succinate therapy the exudative component of inflammation was less expressed in comparison with the control, macrophagal reaction and neoangiogenesis were activated, the volume of damaged muscle tissue and the incidence of suppurations decreased. The number of osteoblasts increased and new bone structures acquired a lamellar pattern earlier than in the control. Sodium succinate therapy in combination with laser magnetotherapy had a more pronounced positive effect as regards activation of macrophagal reaction and neoangiogenesis and a decrease in the area of fibrosclerotic changes in the zone of damaged muscles, where newly formed myosymplasts differentiated into myotubes and even in muscle fibers. Suppuration of the wound was prevented. Bone tissue in the fracture zone formed without preliminary formation of cartilaginous tissue, which resulted in more rapid osteogenesis (lamellar bone growth in the fracture zone).

  8. Internal fixation of mandibular angle fractures using one miniplate in Greek children: a 5-year retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iatrou, Ioannis; Theologie-Lygidakis, Nadia; Tzermpos, Fotios; Kamperos, Georgios

    2015-01-01

    Treatment modalities of mandibular angle fractures (MAFs) have been analyzed in several studies mainly referring to adult populations. The aim of this study was to retrospectively present and discuss our experience and literature findings regarding the treatment of MAFs in children. Data were retrieved from the files of the Oral and Maxillofacial department, at the Children's Hospital ''P. & A. Kyriakou'' of Athens, during a 5 years period (2009-2013). Demographic features, treatment methods, outcome and follow-up of all patients with mandibular angle fractures were recorded. 6 boys, 5-14 years old (mean age 10 years), were included in the study. They were all treated intraorally with open reduction and fixation via one monocortical titanium plate osteosynthesis at the external oblique line of the mandible, followed by 1 week of intermaxillary fixation (IMF). Plates were removed 3-12 months post-operatively. Follow-up period ranged from 12 to 18 months (mean 14.7 months). All fractures healed uneventfully and the patients tolerated well both the operation and the post-operative period. Osteosynthesis via intraoral approach combined with short duration IMF is adequate in treating MAFs in children. Copyright © 2014 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Comparison of Neck Screw and Conventional Fixation Techniques in Mandibular Condyle Fractures Using 3-Dimensional Finite Element Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conci, Ricardo Augusto; Tomazi, Flavio Henrique Silveira; Noritomi, Pedro Yoshito; da Silva, Jorge Vicente Lopes; Fritscher, Guilherme Genehr; Heitz, Claiton

    2015-07-01

    To compare the mechanical stress on the mandibular condyle after the reduction and fixation of mandibular condylar fractures using the neck screw and 2 other conventional techniques according to 3-dimensional finite element analysis. A 3-dimensional finite element model of a mandible was created and graphically simulated on a computer screen. The model was fixed with 3 different techniques: a 2.0-mm plate with 4 screws, 2 plates (1 1.5-mm plate and 1 2.0-mm plate) with 4 screws, and a neck screw. Loads were applied that simulated muscular action, with restrictions of the upper movements of the mandible, differentiation of the cortical and medullary bone, and the virtual "folds" of the plates and screws so that they could adjust to the condylar surface. Afterward, the data were exported for graphic visualization of the results and quantitative analysis was performed. The 2-plate technique exhibited better stability in regard to displacement of fractures, deformity of the synthesis materials, and minimum and maximum tension values. The results with the neck screw were satisfactory and were similar to those found when a miniplate was used. Although the study shows that 2 isolated plates yielded better results compared with the other groups using other fixation systems and methods, the neck screw could be an option for condylar fracture reduction. Copyright © 2015 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Clinical and radiological outcomes after treatment of sagittal fracture of mandibular condyle (SFMC) by using occlusal splint in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chang-Kui; Meng, Fan-Wen; Tan, Xin-Ying; Xu, Juan; Liu, Hua-Wei; Liu, San-Xia; Huang, Hai-Tao; Yan, Rong-Zeng; Hu, Min; Hu, Kai-Jin

    2014-02-01

    This study was designed to investigate the effects of occlusal splints in the treatment of sagittal fractures of the mandibular condyle in children. From January 1995 to December 2011, 37 sagittal fractures of the mandibular condyle in 30 patients aged 4-8 years old were included in this study. All the patients were treated with 1-2mm occlusal splints in the molar region. The mouths of the patients were kept slightly open by the occlusal splints for 3-6 months, and we reviewed the clinical and radiological remodelling of the affected condyles after treatment. Excellent (n=20) and good (n=10) clinical outcomes were achieved with full radiological remodelling seen in 19 and partial remodelling in 11. Treatment with occlusal splints is effective in delivering good results and function with minimal morbidity in children with sagittal fractures of the condyle, while permitting ongoing remodelling and growth in the short term. Copyright © 2013 The British Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Open Reduction With K-Wire Stabilization of Fracture Dislocations of the Mandibular Condyle: A Retrospective Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haghighi, Kayvon; Manolakakis, Manolis G; Balog, Connor

    2017-06-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the feasibility of direct transcortical stabilization of fracture dislocations of the mandibular condyle (FDMCs) using narrow-diameter non-threaded Kirschner wire (K-wire). This retrospective review reports on the treatment outcomes for 12 patients (15 fractures) with FDMCs treated with open reduction using transcortical 0.027-inch K-wire stabilization. Postoperative parameters of relevance included infection, facial nerve function, hardware removal, mandibular range of motion, and radiographic determination of fracture union. Three patients had bilateral FDMCs and 9 had unilateral FDMCs (age range at time of injury, 14 to 72 yr; mean age, 32 yr). Postoperative follow-up ranged from 6 weeks to 2 years. Four patients required removal of K-wire hardware for different reasons. K-wires were removed because of infection in 1 patient. Another patient required removal because of migration of the pin into the joint space. One pin was removed electively and another was removed for nonspecific postoperative symptoms that resolved after pin removal. Persistent facial nerve deficit was observed in 1 patient. Open reduction with transcortical K-wire stabilization can achieve satisfactory outcomes for the treatment of FDMC. Further investigation is needed in determining the efficacy of this fixation technique in the management of FDMC. Copyright © 2017 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Superolateral dislocation of the intact mandibular condyle associated with panfacial fracture: a case report and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaral, Márcio Bruno; Bueno, Sebastião Cristian; Silva, Alice Araújo Ferreira; Mesquita, Ricardo Alves

    2011-06-01

    Superolateral dislocation of the intact mandibular condyle (SDIMC) is rare. This case report focuses on a 15-year-old teenager who was involved in a motor vehicle accident as well a literature review regarding the SDIMC. Clinical examination demonstrated a diffuse edema in the midfacial area and a left lateral deflection of the mandible, including an open bite and a crepitation in the symphyseal region. Three-dimensional computed tomography scans were taken, which presented a superolateral dislocation of the left mandibular condyle as well as panfacial fracture. The patient was set in intermaxillary fixation for 2 weeks and underwent subsequent active jaw physiotherapy, the evaluation of which presented satisfactory results. This case study also presents a literature review, which demonstrated 21 well-documented cases of SDIMC. The patients' mean age was of 29 years. The male gender proved to be more prevalent, with road traffic collisions representing the most common form of accident. Type II, with unilateral dislocation, proved to be the most common. The mean reduction time was 7 days. The open methods were the most commonly used reduction methods. Mandible fracture was associated with dislocation in 82% of the cases, with other facial fractures appearing in only 23% of the cases. Patient follow up presented satisfactory results in 59% of the cases. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  13. Use of a Multivector Mandibular Distractor for Treatment of Pediatric Proximal Interphalangeal Joint Pilon Fractures: A Case-Based Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedreira, Rachel; Cho, Brian H; Geer, Angela; DeJesus, Ramon A

    2018-04-01

    The difficulties in surgical treatment of pilon fractures of the finger include fragment reconstitution and posthealing stiffness. In adults, external fixation with traction and early active range of motion (AROM)/passive range of motion (PROM) during healing is considered necessary for avoiding joint stiffness and attaining realignment. The authors present a unique approach to pediatric pilon fractures that uses open reduction and multivector external fixation with delayed AROM/PROM. Initial immobilization and significant traction allowed for joint realignment and prevented noncompliance with staged distraction. The authors believe this immobilization leads to a superior outcome because, unlike adults, children tend to avoid stiffness and a larger distraction force allowed for sufficient joint realignment to regain range of motion (ROM). A right-handed 13-year-old boy sustained a right ring finger fracture and presented 12 days later. Radiographs revealed a comminuted Salter-Harris 4 fracture of the middle phalanx. The patient underwent open reduction and placement of multivector external fixation using a pediatric mandibular distractor/fixator. Significant traction was applied to distract the finger to length. Hardware was removed 6 weeks postoperatively and AROM was initiated after splinting. The patient started PROM 8 weeks postoperatively. Strengthening was initiated 2 weeks later. ROM improved and rehabilitation was continued. The patient exhibited nearly equal grip strength 12 weeks postoperatively. At 14 months follow-up, radiographs showed complete healing and joint realignment. There was no deformity or pain and finger length was restored. Management of pediatric pilon fractures is rarely described and presents unique considerations. Early-stage traction and immobilization using a multivector mandibular fixator/distractor is suitable in a child because noncompliance is avoided and there is a decreased risk for stiffness. Combining early immobilization

  14. A customized fixation plate with novel structure designed by topological optimization for mandibular angle fracture based on finite element analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yun-Feng; Fan, Ying-Ying; Jiang, Xian-Feng; Baur, Dale A

    2017-11-15

    The purpose of this study was to design a customized fixation plate for mandibular angle fracture using topological optimization based on the biomechanical properties of the two conventional fixation systems, and compare the results of stress, strain and displacement distributions calculated by finite element analysis (FEA). A three-dimensional (3D) virtual mandible was reconstructed from CT images with a mimic angle fracture and a 1 mm gap between two bone segments, and then a FEA model, including volume mesh with inhomogeneous bone material properties, three loading conditions and constraints (muscles and condyles), was created to design a customized plate using topological optimization method, then the shape of the plate was referenced from the stress concentrated area on an initial part created from thickened bone surface for optimal calculation, and then the plate was formulated as "V" pattern according to dimensions of standard mini-plate finally. To compare the biomechanical behavior of the "V" plate and other conventional mini-plates for angle fracture fixation, two conventional fixation systems were used: type A, one standard mini-plate, and type B, two standard mini-plates, and the stress, strain and displacement distributions within the three fixation systems were compared and discussed. The stress, strain and displacement distributions to the angle fractured mandible with three different fixation modalities were collected, respectively, and the maximum stress for each model emerged at the mandibular ramus or screw holes. Under the same loading conditions, the maximum stress on the customized fixation system decreased 74.3, 75.6 and 70.6% compared to type A, and 34.9, 34.1, and 39.6% compared to type B. All maximum von Mises stresses of mandible were well below the allowable stress of human bone, as well as maximum principal strain. And the displacement diagram of bony segments indicated the effect of treatment with different fixation systems. The

  15. Diagnostic performance of dental students in identifying mandibular condyle fractures by panoramic radiography and the usefulness of reference images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Bong Hae

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic performance of dental students in detection of mandibular condyle fractures and the effectiveness of reference panoramic images. Forty-six undergraduates evaluated 25 panoramic radiographs for condylar fractures and the data were analyzed through receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis. After a month, they were divided into two homogeneous groups based on the first results and re-evaluated the images with (group A) or without (group B) reference images. Eight reference images included indications showing either typical condylar fractures or anatomic structures which could be confused with fractures. Paired t-test was used for statistical analysis of the difference between the first and the second evaluations for each group, and student's t-test was used between the two groups in the second evaluation. The intra- and inter-observer agreements were evaluated with Kappa statistics. Intra- and inter-observer agreements were substantial (k=0.66) and moderate (k=0.53), respectively. The area under the ROC curve (Az) in the first evaluation was 0.802. In the second evaluation, it was increased to 0.823 for group A and 0.814 for group B. The difference between the first and second evaluations for group A was statistically significant (p<0.05), however there was no statistically significant difference between the two groups in the second evaluation. Providing reference images to less experienced clinicians would be a good way to improve the diagnostic ability in detecting condylar fracture.

  16. Conservative treatment of a mandibular condyle fracture: Comparing intermaxillary fixation with screws or arch bar. A randomised clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Bergh, B; Blankestijn, J; van der Ploeg, T; Tuinzing, D B; Forouzanfar, T

    2015-06-01

    A mandibular condyle fracture can be treated conservatively by intermaxillary fixation (IMF) or by open reposition and internal fixation (ORIF). Many IMF-modalities can be chosen, including IMF-screws (IMFS). This prospective multi-centre randomised clinical trial compared the use of IMFS with the use of arch bars in the treatment of mandibular condyle fractures. The study population consisted of 50 patients (mean age: 31.8 years). Twenty-four (48%) patients were allocated in the IMFS group. Twenty-six (52%) patients were assigned to the arch bars group. In total 188 IMF-screws were used (5-12 screws per patient, mean 7.83 screws per patient). All pain scores were lower in the IMFS group. Three patients developed a malocclusion (IFMS-group: one patient, arch bars-group: two patients). Mean surgical time was significantly shorter in the IMFS group (59 vs. 126 min; pfractured on insertion (0.53%), one (0.53%) screw was inserted into a root. Six (3.2%) screws loosened spontaneously in four patients. Mucosal disturbances were seen in 22 patients, equally divided over both groups. Considering the advantages and the disadvantages of IMFS, and observing the results of this study, the authors conclude that IMFS provide a superior method for IMF. IMFS are safer for the patients and surgeons. Copyright © 2015 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. The role of the lateral pterygoid muscle in the sagittal fracture of mandibular condyle (SFMC) healing process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chng-Kui; Liu, Ping; Meng, Fan-Wen; Deng, Bang-Lian; Xue, Yang; Mao, Tian-Qiu; Hu, Kai-Jin

    2012-06-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the role of the lateral peterygoid muscle in the reconstruction of the shape of the condyle during healing of a sagittal fracture of the mandibular condyle. Twenty adult sheep were divided into 2 groups: all had a unilateral operation on the right side when the anterior and posterior attachments of the discs were cut, and an oblique vertical osteotomy was made from the lateral pole of the condyle to the medial side of the condylar neck. Ten sheep had the lateral pterygoid muscle cut, and the other 10 sheep did not. Sheep were killed at 4 weeks (n=2 from each group), 12 weeks (n=4), and 24 weeks (n=4) postoperatively. Computed tomograms (CT) were taken before and after operations. We dissected the joints, and recorded with the naked eye the shape, degree of erosion, and amount of calcification of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). In the group in which the lateral peterygoid muscle had not been cut the joints showed overgrowth of new bone and more advanced ankylosis. Our results show that the lateral pterygoid muscle plays an important part in reconstructing the shape of the condyle during the healing of a sagittal fracture of the mandibular condyle, and combined with the dislocated and damaged disc is an important factor in the aetiology of traumatic ankylosis of the TMJ. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  18. [An in vitro study of the fracture strength of tooth preparations for Empress 2 veneers and crowns and mandibular incisors restored with Empress 2 veneers and crowns].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Xue; Li, Yan

    2009-12-01

    To compare the fracture resistance of mandibular incisors' preparations for veneers and crowns, mandibular incisors restored with Empress 2 veneers and crowns. 50 human mandibular incisors were randomly divided into five groups. Each group consisted of ten teeth and the treatment obtained as follows: A, tooth preparations for veneers; B, tooth preparations for crowns; C, teeth restored with veneers; D, teeth restored with crowns; E, untreated group. The teeth received standardized preparation and the restorations were manufactured with Empress 2 system and cemented with resin luting agent. The fracture resistances of teeth were measured by Instron universal testing machine and statistically analyzed with one-way ANOVA. The fracture resistances of A, B, C, D, E were (576.11 +/- 91.53), (204.13 +/- 85.88), (451.50 +/- 116.81), (386.16 +/- 117.75) and (566.05 +/- 121.37) N, respectively. The statistical analysis demonstrated significant differences between five groups. There were no significant differences between group A and E, group C and D. Tooth preparations for veneers did not significantly reduce the fracture resistance of mandibular incisor. The fracture resistance of teeth restored with Empress 2 veneers and crowns did not significantly differ from each other.

  19. The effect of methotrexate on the bone healing of mandibular condylar process fracture: an experimental study in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavalcanti, Samantha Cristine Santos X B; Corrêa, Luciana; Mello, Suzana Beatriz Veríssimo; Luz, João Gualberto C

    2014-10-01

    Methotrexate (MTX) is an anti-metabolite used in rheumatology and oncology. High doses are indicated for oncological treatment, whereas low doses are indicated for chronic inflammatory diseases. This study evaluated the effect of two MTX treatment schedules on the bone healing of the temporomandibular joint fracture in rats. Seventy-five adult male Wistar rats were used to generate an experimental unilateral medially rotated condylar fracture model that allows an evaluation of bone healing and the articular structures. The animals were subdivided into three groups that each received one of the following treatments intraperitoneally: saline (1 mL/week), low-dose MTX (3 mg/kg/week) and high-dose MTX (30 mg/kg). The histological study comprised fracture site and temporomandibular joint evaluations and bone neoformation was evaluated by histomorphometric analysis. A biochemical parameter of bone formation was also assessed. When compared with saline, high-dose MTX delayed bone fracture repairs. In this latter group, after 90 days, the histological analysis revealed atrophy of the fibrocartilage and the presence of fibrous tissue in the joint space. The histomorphometric analysis revealed diminished bone neoformation. The alkaline phosphatase levels also decreased after MTX treatment. It was concluded that high-dose MTX impaired mandibular condyle repair and induced degenerative articular changes. Copyright © 2014 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Comparative study of the prognosis of an extracorporeal reduction and a closed treatment in mandibular condyle head and/or neck fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jung-Min; Jang, Yong-Wook; Kim, Seong-Gon; Park, Young-Wook; Rotaru, Horatiu; Baciut, Grigore; Hurubeanu, Lucia

    2010-12-01

    The objective of this study was a comparison of the prognosis between an extracorporeal reduction technique and closed treatment of a mandibular condyle fracture. The relationship between condylar resorption and several clinical variables was also studied. Seventy-one patients who had a mandibular condyle fracture took part in this study. Thirty-five patients (female: 7, male: 28, age: 30.46 ± 14.27 years) were treated by extracorporeal reduction, and 36 patients (male: 24, female: 12, age: 24.28 ± 9.99 years) were treated using a closed treatment. The presence of complications such as condylar resorption, malocclusion, nerve disorder, and disc displacement was evaluated with panoramic radiographs and clinical examinations 12 months after treatment. The relationships between the complications and other clinical variables were evaluated statistically. The anatomic site and fracture type were closely related to condyle resorption in the bivariate analysis. Condylar head fractures showed significantly higher condyle resorption than condylar neck fractures (P = .023). A complex or compound fracture showed significantly higher condyle resorption compared with a simple fracture (P = .006). Patients who had a complex/compound fracture were 34.366 times more likely to have condyle resorption compared with those who had a simple fracture (P = .002). The patient's age and treatment method were also significant predictors for condyle resorption. Fracture type was the strongest predictor of condylar resorption. Because treatment method and patient age were also related to the prognosis, the optimal treatment for mandibular condylar head and/or neck fractures should be individualized according to the patient's condition. Copyright © 2010 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. An in vivo evaluation of PLLA/PLLA-gHA nano-composite for internal fixation of mandibular bone fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Weihai; Zheng, Wei; Shi, Kai; Wang, Wangshu; Shao, Ying; Zhang, Duo

    2015-11-09

    Internal fixation of bone fractures using biodegradable poly(L-lactic-acid) (PLLA)-based materials has attracted the attention of many researchers. In the present study, 36 male beagle dogs were randomly assigned to two groups: PLLA/PLLA-gHA (PLLA-grafted hydroxyapatite) group and PLLA group. PLLA/PLLA-gHA and PLLA plates were embedded in the muscular bags of the erector spinae and also implanted to fix mandibular bone fractures in respective groups. At 1, 2, 3, 6, 9, and 12 months postoperatively, the PLLA/PLLA-gHA and PLLA plates were evaluated by adsorption and degradation tests, and the mandibles were examined through radiographic analysis, biomechanical testing, and histological analysis. The PLLA/PLLA-gHA plates were non-transparent and showed a creamy white color, and the PLLA plates were transparent and faint yellow in color. At all time points following surgery, adsorption and degradation of the PLLA/PLLA-gHA plates were significantly less than those of the PLLA plates, and the lateral and longitudinal bending strengths of the surgically treated mandibles of the beagle dogs in the PLLA/PLLA-gHA group were significantly greater than those of the PLLA group and reached almost the value of intact mandibles at 12 months postoperatively. Additionally, relatively rapid bone healing was observed in the PLLA/PLLA-gHA group with the formation of new lamellar bone tissues at 12 months after the surgery. The PLLA/PLLA-gHA nano-composite can be employed as a biodegradable material for internal fixation of mandibular bone fractures.

  2. An in vivo evaluation of PLLA/PLLA-gHA nano-composite for internal fixation of mandibular bone fractures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng, Weihai; Shi, Kai; Wang, Wangshu; Shao, Ying; Zhang, Duo; Zheng, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Internal fixation of bone fractures using biodegradable poly(L-lactic-acid) (PLLA)-based materials has attracted the attention of many researchers. In the present study, 36 male beagle dogs were randomly assigned to two groups: PLLA/PLLA-gHA (PLLA-grafted hydroxyapatite) group and PLLA group. PLLA/PLLA-gHA and PLLA plates were embedded in the muscular bags of the erector spinae and also implanted to fix mandibular bone fractures in respective groups. At 1, 2, 3, 6, 9, and 12 months postoperatively, the PLLA/PLLA-gHA and PLLA plates were evaluated by adsorption and degradation tests, and the mandibles were examined through radiographic analysis, biomechanical testing, and histological analysis. The PLLA/PLLA-gHA plates were non-transparent and showed a creamy white color, and the PLLA plates were transparent and faint yellow in color. At all time points following surgery, adsorption and degradation of the PLLA/PLLA-gHA plates were significantly less than those of the PLLA plates, and the lateral and longitudinal bending strengths of the surgically treated mandibles of the beagle dogs in the PLLA/PLLA-gHA group were significantly greater than those of the PLLA group and reached almost the value of intact mandibles at 12 months postoperatively. Additionally, relatively rapid bone healing was observed in the PLLA/PLLA-gHA group with the formation of new lamellar bone tissues at 12 months after the surgery. The PLLA/PLLA-gHA nano-composite can be employed as a biodegradable material for internal fixation of mandibular bone fractures. (paper)

  3. Dissection of the internal carotid artery and stroke after mandibular fractures: a case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tveita, Ingrid Aune; Madsen, Martin Ragnar Skjerve; Nielsen, Erik Waage

    2017-06-02

    We present a report of a patient with blunt trauma and mandibular fractures who developed a significant cerebral infarction due to an initially unrecognized injury of her left internal carotid artery. We believe that increased knowledge of this association will facilitate early recognition and hence prevention of a devastating outcome. A 41-year-old ethnic Norwegian woman presented to our Emergency Room after a bicycle accident that had caused a direct blow to her chin. At admittance, her Glasgow Coma Scale was 15. Initial trauma computed tomography showed triple fractures of her mandible, but no further pathology. She was placed in our Intensive Care Unit awaiting open reduction of her mandibular fractures. During the following 9 hours, she showed recurrent episodes of confusion and a progressive right-sided hemiparesis. Repeated cerebral computed tomography revealed no further pathology compared to the initial scan. She had magnetic resonance angiography 17 hours after admittance, which showed dissection and thrombus formation in her left internal carotid artery, total occlusion of her left medial cerebral artery, and left middle cerebral artery infarction was detected. Carotid artery dissection is a rare but life-threatening condition that can develop after trauma to the head and neck. There should be a high index of suspicion in patients with a mechanism of injury that places the internal carotid artery at risk because blunt vascular injury may show delayed onset with no initial symptoms of vascular damage. By implementing an algorithm for early detection and treatment of these injuries, serious brain damage may be avoided.

  4. SURGICAL TREATMENT OF MANDIBULAR CONDYLE FRACTURES USING THE TRANSPAROTID FACELIFT APPROACH – INTRODUCING A NEW METHOD OF TREATMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleš Vesnaver

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Background. In the past, fractures of the mandibular condylar process were treated almost exclusively conservatively at our institution, by means of a three week period of intermaxillary fixation (IMF, followed by excercises and a soft diet. In the last three years, we started treating these fractures surgically with increasing frequency by open reduction and internal fixation with mini plates and screws. Our goal was to determine the safety and efficiency of surgical treatment as the results of conservative treatment were often unsatisfactory.Patients and methods. So far, 34 patients with 36 extraarticular condyle fractures were treated surgically by a periauricular transparotid approach. The operative procedure is demanding. Namely, branches of the facial nerve have to be identified, dissected and retracted, in order to reach the fracture site. The fracture was reduced and fixed with one or two mini plates. Patients were carefully followed up and were asked to answer a survey paper, which was completed by 32 patients.Results. All of the patients were able to open their mouth immediately postoperatively. The postoperative IMF lasted 1 week at maximum and the facial symetry was achieved in all cases. Pre-traumatic occlusion was achieved in 31 out of 33 dentate patients (94%. Eight out of 36 cases (22% had transitory weakness of the facial nerve branches, most often the buccal and zygomatic branch. Of these, 5 resolved completely at 2–8 weeks, while a mild degree of weakness is still present in the lower eyelid and half of the upper lip in a female patient, 13 months postoperatively. The cosmetic effect is good as the periauricular facelift incision leaves a barely perceptible scar. According to the postoperative survey completed by 32 patients, 30 of them (94% were very satisfied with the outcome of treatment.Conclusion. The procedure is safe with a careful surgical technique and the results of operative treatment are excellent.

  5. Diagnostic performance of dental students in identifying mandibular condyle fractures by panoramic radiography and the usefulness of reference images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Bong Hae [School of Dentistry, Pusan National University, Pusan (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-06-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic performance of dental students in detection of mandibular condyle fractures and the effectiveness of reference panoramic images. Forty-six undergraduates evaluated 25 panoramic radiographs for condylar fractures and the data were analyzed through receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis. After a month, they were divided into two homogeneous groups based on the first results and re-evaluated the images with (group A) or without (group B) reference images. Eight reference images included indications showing either typical condylar fractures or anatomic structures which could be confused with fractures. Paired t-test was used for statistical analysis of the difference between the first and the second evaluations for each group, and student's t-test was used between the two groups in the second evaluation. The intra- and inter-observer agreements were evaluated with Kappa statistics. Intra- and inter-observer agreements were substantial (k=0.66) and moderate (k=0.53), respectively. The area under the ROC curve (Az) in the first evaluation was 0.802. In the second evaluation, it was increased to 0.823 for group A and 0.814 for group B. The difference between the first and second evaluations for group A was statistically significant (p<0.05), however there was no statistically significant difference between the two groups in the second evaluation. Providing reference images to less experienced clinicians would be a good way to improve the diagnostic ability in detecting condylar fracture.

  6. Management of pediatric mandibular fractures using bioresorbable plating system - Efficacy, stability, and clinical outcomes: Our experiences and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Mahinder; Singh, R K; Passi, Deepak; Aggarwal, Mohit; Kaur, Guneet

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the efficacy and stability of the biodegradable fixation system for treatment of mandible fractures in pediatric patients by measuring the bite force. Sixty pediatric patients with mandibular fractures (36 males, 24 females) were included in this study. The 2.5-mm resorbable plates were adapted along Champy's line of ideal osteosynthesis and secured with four 2.5 mm diameter monocortical resorbable screws, 8 mm in length. All patients were followed for 10 months. Clinical parameters, such as soft tissue infection, nonunion, malunion, implant exposure, malocclusion, nerve injury, and bite force for stability, were prospectively assessed. Adequate fixation and primary bone healing was achieved in 100% of the cases. Six minor complications (10%) were observed: 2 soft tissue infections (3%), 1 plate dehiscence (2%), 1 malocclusion (2%), and 2 paresthesia (3%). 2.5-mm resorbable plating system along Champy's line of ideal osteosynthesis is a good treatment modality for mandible fractures in pediatric patients.

  7. Management of pediatric mandibular fractures using bioresorbable plating system – Efficacy, stability, and clinical outcomes: Our experiences and literature review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Mahinder; Singh, R.K.; Passi, Deepak; Aggarwal, Mohit; Kaur, Guneet

    2015-01-01

    Aims The purpose of this study was to determine the efficacy and stability of the biodegradable fixation system for treatment of mandible fractures in pediatric patients by measuring the bite force. Methods Sixty pediatric patients with mandibular fractures (36 males, 24 females) were included in this study. The 2.5-mm resorbable plates were adapted along Champy's line of ideal osteosynthesis and secured with four 2.5 mm diameter monocortical resorbable screws, 8 mm in length. All patients were followed for 10 months. Clinical parameters, such as soft tissue infection, nonunion, malunion, implant exposure, malocclusion, nerve injury, and bite force for stability, were prospectively assessed. Results Adequate fixation and primary bone healing was achieved in 100% of the cases. Six minor complications (10%) were observed: 2 soft tissue infections (3%), 1 plate dehiscence (2%), 1 malocclusion (2%), and 2 paresthesia (3%). Conclusion 2.5-mm resorbable plating system along Champy's line of ideal osteosynthesis is a good treatment modality for mandible fractures in pediatric patients. PMID:27195206

  8. Is The Late Mandibular Fracture From Third Molar Extraction a Risk Towards Malpractice? Case Report with the Analysis of Ethical and Legal Aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weuler dos Santos Silva

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The present study reports a case of late mandibular fracture due to third molar extraction and highlights the inherent clinical, ethical and legal aspects related to this surgical complication. Material and Methods: A female patient underwent surgical procedure for the extraction of the mandibular right third molar. Two days after the surgery the patient reported pain and altered occlusion in the right side of the mandible. After clinical and radiographic re-examination, the diagnosis of late mandibular fracture was established. A second surgery, under general anaesthesia, was performed for the fixation of the mandibular bone. Results: The fractured parts were reduced and fixed with locking plate systems and 2 mm screws following load-sharing principles. The masticatory function showed optimal performance within 7 and 21 days after the surgery. Complete bone healing was observed within 1 year of follow-up. Conclusions: For satisfactory surgical outcomes, adequate surgical planning and techniques must be performed. Signed informed consents explaining the risks and benefits of the treatment must be used to avoid ethical and legal disputes in dentistry.

  9. Characterization and Management of Mandibular Fractures: Lessons Learned from Iraq and Afghanistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-01

    interdental splints and intermaxillary fixation.4 Thomas Brian Gunning4 showed the importance of dentistry in treating these fractures by restoring occlusion...Fractures in children with developing dentitionsdAvoiding damage to the developing teeth is key. If placement of arch bars is impossible

  10. Clinical outcomes of three different types of hardware for the treatment of mandibular angle fractures: a comparative retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsayed, S A; Mohamed, F I; Khalifa, G A

    2015-10-01

    A retrospective study was conducted to compare the clinical outcomes of three different types of hardware that are used in mandibular angle fracture fixation. Thirty patients were selected from the hospital database. The patients were categorized into the following groups: group A, in which a single 2.0-mm locking miniplate was used; group B, in which a single rigid 2.3-mm plate was used; and group C, in which a single lag screw was inserted. All patients were followed for 6 months. With regard to intraoperative variables, significant differences were found among the groups in the duration of surgery and cost. Group C had the shortest surgical time, followed by group A and then group B. Two patients, one in group A and one in group B, suffered an occlusal discrepancy after surgery. Of the group A patients, two exhibited wound dehiscence and one had an infection. One patient in group B had an exposed plate. Sensory nerve involvement was noted in three group C patients and one group B patient. The lag screw was associated with the fewest complications and exhibited all of the advantages of plating systems in the treatment of angle fracture. The lag screw involved the least hardware and a short operating time, however the differences were not significant. Copyright © 2015 International Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Development plates for stable internal fixation: Study of mechanical resistance in simulated fractures of the mandibular condyle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celegatti Filho, Tóride Sebastião; Rodrigues, Danillo Costa; Lauria, Andrezza; Moreira, Roger William Fernandes; Consani, Simonides

    2015-01-01

    To develop Y-shaped plates with different thicknesses to be used in simulated fractures of the mandibular condyle. Ten plates were developed in Y shape, containing eight holes, and 30 synthetic polyurethane mandible replicas were developed for the study. The load test was performed on an Instron Model 4411 universal testing machine, applying load in the mediolateral and anterior-posterior positions on the head of the condyle. Two-way ANOVA with Tukey testing with a 5% significance level was used. It was observed that when the load was applied in the medial-lateral plate of greater thickness (1.5 mm), it gave the highest strength, while in the anteroposterior direction, the plate with the highest resistance was of the lesser thickness (0.6 mm). A plate with a thickness of 1.5 mm was the one with the highest average value for all displacements. In the anteroposterior direction, the highest values of resistance were seen in the displacement of 15 mm. After comparing the values of the biomechanical testing found in the scientific literature, it is suggested that the use of Y plates are suitable for use in subcondylar fractures within the limitations of the study. Copyright © 2014 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Biodegradable fixation of mandibular fractures in children: stability and early results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yerit, Kaan C; Hainich, Sibylle; Enislidis, Georg; Turhani, Dritan; Klug, Clemens; Wittwer, Gert; Ockher, Michael; Undt, Gerhard; Kermer, Christian; Watzinger, Franz; Ewers, Rolf

    2005-07-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the safety and efficiency of biodegradable self-reinforced (SR-PLDLA) bone plates and screws in open reduction and internal fixation of mandible fractures in children. Thirteen patients (5 female, 8 male; mean age 12 years, range 5-16 years) were operated on various fractures of the mandible (2 symphyseal, 6 parasymphyseal, 4 body, 3 angle, 1 ramus, 2 condylar fractures). The mean follow-up time was 26.4 months (range 10.9-43.4 months). Intermaxillary fixation was applied in cases with concomitant condylar fractures up to 3 weeks. Primary healing of the fractured mandible was observed in all patients. Postoperative complications were minor and transient. The outcome of the operations was not endangered. Adverse tissue reactions to the implants, malocclusion, and growth restrictions did not occur during the observation period. Pediatric patients benefit from the advantages of resorbable materials, especially from faster mobilization and the avoidance of secondary removal operations. Based on these preliminary results, self-reinforced fixation devices are safe and efficient in the treatment of pediatric mandible fractures. However, further clinical investigations are necessary to evaluate the long-term reliability.

  13. Open treatment of unilateral mandibular condyle fractures in adults : A systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rozeboom, A.; Dubois, L.; Bos, R.; Spijker, R.; de Lange, J.

    2017-01-01

    Since the introduction of rigid internal fixation devices, more and more surgeons favour an open approach to treating condylar fractures of the mandible in adult patients. Different indications for open treatment have been published. Open treatment is associated with surgical complications because

  14. The influence of secondary reconstruction slice thickness on NewTom 3G cone beam computed tomography-based radiological interpretation of sheep mandibular condyle fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirin, Yigit; Guven, Koray; Horasan, Sinan; Sencan, Sabri; Bakir, Baris; Barut, Oya; Tanyel, Cem; Aral, Ali; Firat, Deniz

    2010-11-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the diagnostic accuracy of the different secondary reconstruction slice thicknesses of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) on artificially created mandibular condyle fractures. A total of 63 sheep heads with or without condylar fractures were scanned with a NewTom 3G CBCT scanner. Multiplanar reformatted (MPR) views in 0.2-mm, 1-mm, 2-mm, and 3-mm secondary reconstruction slice thicknesses were evaluated by 7 observers. Inter- and intraobserver agreements were calculated with weighted kappa statistics. The receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis was used to statistically compare the area under the curve (AUC) of each slice thickness. The kappa coefficients varied from fair and to excellent. The AUCs of 0.2-mm and 1-mm slice thicknesses were found to be significantly higher than those of 2 mm and 3 mm for some type of fractures. CBCT was found to be accurate in detecting all variants of fractures at 0.2 mm and 1 mm. However, 2-mm and 3-mm slices were not suitable to detect fissure, complete, and comminuted types of mandibular condyle fractures. Copyright © 2010 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Comparison of circummandibular wiring with resorbable bone plates in pediatric mandibular fractures

    OpenAIRE

    Saikrishna, D.; Gupta, Nimish

    2010-01-01

    Pediatric patients present a unique challenge to maxillofacial surgeons in terms of their treatment planning as well as in their functional and nutritional needs which are different from that of adult patients. Early literature has advocated conservative closed management of pediatric fractures to prevent complications. However recent advances in maxillofacial surgery has enabled us to use biodegradable plates and screws, which overcomes the limitations of metallic plates. We present a compar...

  16. Prevalence and etiology for mandibular and mid-face bone fractures in a tertiary care hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arakkal Nellissery Chakkappan John

    2017-12-01

    Conclusion: The mandible was the single most common site of bone fracture because of RTAs in males 19-29 years of age. This emphasizes the need for public health awareness so that people follow general traffic rules and road safety measures. Prevalence was found to vary based on socioeconomic, cultural, and behavioral variations among the populations. [Arch Clin Exp Surg 2017; 6(4.000: 183-188

  17. Open treatment of unilateral mandibular condyle fractures in adults: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozeboom, A; Dubois, L; Bos, R; Spijker, R; de Lange, J

    2017-10-01

    Since the introduction of rigid internal fixation devices, more and more surgeons favour an open approach to treating condylar fractures of the mandible in adult patients. Different indications for open treatment have been published. Open treatment is associated with surgical complications because of the technique employed. The aim of this systematic review was to provide an overview of the studies published exclusively on open treatment, and to summarize the existing open treatment modalities and their clinical outcomes. A total of seventy studies were selected for detailed analysis. Most studies reported good results with regard to the outcome measures of open treatment. Surgical complications including hematoma, wound infection, weakness of the facial nerve, sialocele, salivary fistula, sensory disturbance of the great auricular nerve, unsatisfactory scarring, and fixation failure were reported in the studies. This review suggests that because of the high level of methodological variance in the relevant studies published to date, among other factors, there are currently no evidence-based conclusions or guidelines that can be formulated with regard to the most appropriate open treatment. Establishment of such standards could potentially improve treatment outcomes. Copyright © 2017 International Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. A lower border augmentation technique to allow implant placement after a bilateral mandibular fracture as a complication of vertical distraction osteogenesis: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perdijk, F B T; Meijer, G J; Soehardi, A; Koole, R

    2013-07-01

    As with other techniques, vertical distraction osteogenesis (VDO) can also induce complications. The case of a patient with a residual alveolar ridge in the symphyseal area of 8 mm is presented. After performing VDO, the patient returned at 1-day postoperatively complaining of pain and dislocation of the distractor device, due to a fracture of the lower mandibular segment on the right side. After removal of the distractor device and application of osteosynthesis plates, the patient returned 2 weeks later due to a second fracture of the lower segment, yet on the left side. After removing the osteosynthesis material, stabilization of the mandible was achieved with an acrylic splint, which was fixated with peri-mandibular wiring. Finally, reconstruction was accomplished by lower border onlay grafting, limited to the symphyseal area, in preparation for implant insertion. Ultimately, after a healing period of 5 months, two endosseous implants were installed. The patient's function has remained satisfactory for 3 years. Reinforcement of the extreme resorbed edentulous mandible after fracture healing by lower border bone augmentation can be a reliable method to allow implant installation in a second stage. Copyright © 2013 International Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Study on imaging analysis using three-dimensional CT system for mandibular condylar fracture. Establishing quantitative classification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurokawa, Hideto

    1997-01-01

    We examined 13 patients with fractures of the condylar process (7 men, 6 women) by using 3-dimensional images. A break-down of 15 examined joints revealed 11 patients with unilateral and 2 patients with bilateral fractures of the condylar process. Eight joints of healthy control individual (2 men and 2 women) were used as controls. Fractures of the condylar process and healthy controls were compared, which comparison led to the following conclusions: Bone fragments of deviated fractures may move slightly within the joint, preferentially internally and medially; following displaced fractures, internal and downward movement of bone fragments within the joint is observed; after the occurrence of deviated dislocation fractures, bone fragments protrude from the joint and clearly move internally and inferiorly, showing a rotation of the bone fragments; after the occurrence of displaced dislocation fractures, bone fragments also protrude from the joint and clearly move anteriorly and inferiorly; sometimes an internal rotation of the bone fragments is observed; and with linear fractures there is only minimal overall increase in, and characteristic changes are not observed. Regarding diagnosis, the classical classification of fractures of the condylar process does not provide a classification for linear fractures. Thus, this type has to be newly added to the common classification: Fissure fractures (type I), Deviated fractures (type II), Displaced fractures (type III), Deviated dislocation fractures (type IV), Displaced dislocation fractures (type V), Longitudinal (type VI). (author)

  20. Surgical treatment of mandibular condyle fractures using the retromandibular anterior transparotid approach and a triangular-positioned double miniplate osteosynthesis technique: A clinical and radiological evaluation of 124 fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalla Torre, Daniel; Burtscher, Doris; Widmann, Gerlig; Pichler, Albina; Rasse, Michael; Puelacher, Wolfgang

    2015-07-01

    Different modalities have been described regarding the treatment of mandibular condyle fractures. The most advantageous and safest one is still a topic of discussion. The present analysis describes the combination of a retromandibular, transparotideal approach combined to a triangular-positioned double-miniplate osteosynthesis, with a special regard for the patients' long term outcomes. Clinical data of 102 patients with 124 condyle fractures treated with the mentioned surgical procedure were evaluated. Functional parameters such as the maximal interincisal distance, deviations/deflections, facial nerve function, occlusion as well as complications regarding the parotid gland, osteosynthesis, and esthetics were evaluated 1 week, 2 weeks, 3 months, and 6 months postoperatively. The mean maximal interincisal distance ranged from 38 mm after 1 week to 45 mm after 6 months. Deviations/deflections were seen in 22.5% of the cases 1 week postoperatively and decreased to 2% at 6 months postoperatively. A temporary facial palsy was diagnosed in 3.9% during the first follow-up, whereas no impairment was recorded after 3 or 6 months. At the same time, no patient had occlusional disturbances or complications regarding the parotid gland or the osteosynthesis 6 months postoperatively. Direct fracture visualization and a stable three-dimensional fracture stabilization are the main advantages of the presented combination of a surgical approach and osteosynthesis technique. Additionally, the absence of long-term complications confirms the safety of the procedure. Therefore, it may be considered as a successful treatment option for mandibular condyle fractures. Copyright © 2015 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. A Comparative Study of 3-Dimensional Titanium Versus 2-Dimensional Titanium Miniplates for Open Reduction and Fixation of Mandibular Parasymphysis Fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittal, Yogesh; Varghese, K George; Mohan, S; Jayakumar, N; Chhag, Somil

    2016-03-01

    Three dimensional titanium plating system was developed by Farmand in 1995 to meet the requirements of semi rigid fixation with lesser complication. The purpose of this in vivo prospective study was to evaluate and compare the clinical effectiveness of three dimensional and two dimensional Titanium miniplates for open reduction and fixation of mandibular parasymphysis fracture. Thirty patients with non-comminuted mandibular parasymphysis fractures were divided randomly into two equal groups and were treated with 2 mm 3D and 2D miniplate system respectively. All patients were systematically monitored at 1st, 2nd, 3rd, 6th week, 3rd and 6th month postoperatively. The outcome parameters recorded were severity of pain, infection, mobility, occlusion derangement, paresthesia and implant failure. The data so collected was analyzed using independent t test and Chi square test (α = .05). The results showed that one patient in each group had post-operative infection, occlusion derangement and mobility (p > .05). In Group A, one patient had paresthesia while in Group B, two patients had paresthesia (p > .05). None of the patients in both the groups had implant failure. There was no statistically significant difference between 3D and 2D miniplate system in all the recorded parameters at all the follow-ups (p > .05). 3D miniplates were found to be better than 2D miniplates in terms of cost, ease of surgery and operative time. However, 3D miniplates were unfavorable for cases where fracture line was oblique and in close proximity to mental foramen, where they were difficult to adapt and more chances for tooth-root damage and inadvertent injury to the mental nerve due to traction.

  2. Short-term effect of zoledronic acid upon fracture resistance of the mandibular condyle and femoral head in an animal model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camacho-Alonso, Fabio; López-Jornet, Pía; Vicente-Hernández, Ascensión

    2013-05-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the effects in terms of resistance to fracture of the mandibular condyle and femoral head following different doses of zoledronic acid in an animal model. A total of 80 adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were included in a prospective randomized study. The animals were randomly divided into four groups of 20 rats each. Group 1 (control) received sterile saline solution, while groups 2, 3 and 4 received a accumulated dose of 0.2 mg, 0.4 mg and 0.6 mg of zoledronic acid, respectively. The animals were sacrificed 28 days after the last dose, and the right hemimandible and the right femur were removed. The fracture strength was measured (in Newtons) with a universal test machine using a 1 kN load connected to a metal rod with one end angled at 30 degrees. The cross-head speed was 1 mm/min. Later, the specimens were observed under a scanning electron microscope with backscattered electron imaging (SEM-BSE). At last, chemical analysis and elemental mapping of the mineral bone composition were generated using a microanalytical system based on energy-dispersive and X-ray spectrometry (EDX). A total of 160 fracture tests were performed. The fracture resistance increased in mandible and femur with a higher accumulated dose of zoledronic acid. Statistically significant differences were recorded versus the controls with all the studies groups. The chemical analysis in mandible showed a significantly increased of calcium and phosphorous to compare the control with all of the study groups; however, in femur no statistically significant differences between the four study groups were observed. The administration of bisphosphonates increases the fracture resistance in mandible and femur.

  3. Self-reinforced bioresorbable poly-L/DL-lactide [SR-P(L/DL)LA] 70/30 miniplates and miniscrews are reliable for fixation of anterior mandibular fractures: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ylikontiola, Leena; Sundqvuist, Kai; Sàndor, George K B; Törmälä, Pertti; Ashammakhi, Nureddin

    2004-03-01

    Bioresorbable osteofixation devices are being increasingly used in orthognathic surgery and in cases of trauma to avoid problems associated with conventional metal osteofixation devices. The aim of this clinical study was to assess the reliability and efficacy of bioresorbable self-reinforced poly-L/DL-lactide (SR-P(L/DL)LA 70/30) plates and screws in the fixation of mandibular fractures in adults. Ten patients (20 to 49 years old) with isolated anterior mandibular parasymphyseal fractures were treated by means of open reduction and internal fixation using SR-P(L/DL)LA 70/30 bioresorbable plates and screws. During the minimum of 6 months of follow-up, no problems were encountered except for 1 case where a plate became exposed intraorally and infected. This required debridement and later excision of the exposed part of the plate. Despite this setback the fractured bone healed well. SR-P(L/DL)LA 70/30 plates and screws are reliable for internal fixation of anterior mandibular fractures in adults. Proper soft tissue coverage should be ensured to avoid plate exposure. Should implant exposure occur, it might be necessary to excise the exposed part after fracture healing (6-8 weeks postoperatively).

  4. Miniplacas de titânio na redução de fraturas mandibulares em cães e gatos: estudo de seis casos Titanium miniplates in mandibular fracture repair in dogs and cats: study of 6 cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiano Gomes

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Fraturas de mandíbula e maxila são comuns em cães e gatos, correspondendo a cerca de 3 a 6% de todas as fraturas. Muitos tratamentos são propostos para a correção desse defeito, como o uso de pino intramedular, a fixação esquelética externa, a cerclagem e o uso de acrílicos e placas ósseas. Este estudo teve como objetivo avaliar o uso das mini e microplacas de titânio do sistema 2,0 e 1,5mm no tratamento de fraturas mandibulares, em cães e gatos, respectivamente. Os parafusos e as miniplacas utilizadas são compostos de titânio, e o formato dependeu da localização e do tipo de fratura. No total, foram avaliados seis casos, dos quais quatro apresentaram completa consolidação, sendo as placas utilizadas como método único ou associado com fio de aço ou imobilização com focinheira. As causas de insucesso foram a quebra da placa em um dos casos e a contaminação do enxerto, com posterior osteomielite em decorrência da deiscência dos pontos em outro caso. O emprego das miniplacas de titânio mostrou-se eficaz na maioria dos casos testados, promovendo fixação rígida e retorno funcional adequado, sendo utilizado como método único ou associado com outras técnicas de osteossíntese.Jaw and maxilla fractures are common in dogs and cats, representing 3-6% of all fractures. Numerous techniques are proposed to reduce the defect such as intramedullary pin, percutaneous skeletal fixation, circumferential wiring, acrylic splints and bone plating. This study aimed to evaluate the use of 2.0mm and 1.5mm titanium microplates in the treatment of mandibular fractures in dogs and cats, respectively. The screws and the mini and microplates used were composed of titanium and their format depended on the location and type of fracture. A total of 6 cases were selected and 4 of them had complete consolidation using the mini microplate method alone or associated with steel wire or tie with noseband. In one case the failure occurred due to

  5. Prevalence of mandibular fractures reported at C.S.M.S.S Dental College, aurangabad from february 2008 to september 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghodke, Monali H.; Bhoyar, Subhash C.; Shah, Seemit V.

    2013-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study is to determine the etiology, frequency of mandibular fractures among different age and sex, to determine the frequency of anatomic distribution, and to report the different modalities of treatment provided to the patients reported at our institution from February 2008 to September 2009. Materials and Methods: All patients fulfilling the selection criteria and having mandible fracture were selected for the study. Patient information was collected by means of a medical data form specifically designed for the present study. The values were subjected to Z and Chi-square tests. Results: Out of 35 patients, thirty one were males (88.57%) and four were females (11.43%) with a male:female ratio of 8:1. We found a peak occurrence in young adults, aged 21-30 years (n = 15, 42.86%). In case of etiology of fracture, road traffic accidents (RTAs) was the most common (n = 25, 71.43%) and condyle was most frequently involved site (n = 19, 38.78%). In most (n = 16, 45.71%) of the patients, an open reduction and rigid internal fixation using bone plate and screws was done. Conclusion: In the present study, the prevalence of mandible fractures was more prevalent in male patients, especially during the 3rd decade of life. The most common cause was road traffic accident and the more frequently affected region was condyle of the mandible. Open reduction and rigid internal fixation using miniplates and screws was the most commonly used treatment. PMID:24778980

  6. Comparative evaluation of 2.3 mm locking plate system vs conventional 2.0 mm non locking plate system for mandibular condyle fracture fixation: a seven year retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, J; Wang, X; Wu, R-H; Zhuang, Q-W; Gu, Q P; Meng, J

    2015-01-01

    This retrospective study evaluated the efficacy of a 2.3 mm locking plate/screw system compared with a 2.0-mm non-locking plate/screw system in fixation of isolated non comminuted mandibular condyle fractures. Surgical records of 101 patients who received either a 2.3 mm locking plate (group A, n = 51) or 2.0 mm non locking plate (group B, n = 50) were analyzed. All patients were followed up to a minimum of 6 months postoperatively and evaluated for hardware related complications, occlusal stability, need for and duration of MMF and mandibular functional results. Four complications occurred in the locking group and eighteen in the non locking group with complication rates equalling 8% and 36% respectively. When comparing the overall results according to plates used, the χ2 test showed a statistically significant difference between the locking and non locking plates (p Mandibular condyle fractures treated with a 2.3 mm locking plate exhibited stable osteosynthesis, were associated with minimal complications and resulted in acceptable mandibular range of motion compared with a 2.0 mm non locking plate.

  7. Effect of interfragmentary gap on the mechanical behavior of mandibular angle fracture with three fixation designs: A finite element analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Russell; Liu, Yunfeng; Wang, Joanne Helen; Baur, Dale Allen

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this study was to simulate stress and strain distribution numerically on a normal mandible under physiological occlusal loadings. The results were compared with those of mandibles that had an angle fracture stabilized with different fixation designs under the same loadings. The amount of displacement at two interfragmentary gaps was also studied. A three-dimensional (3D) virtual mandible was reconstructed with an angle fracture that had a fracture gap of either 0.1 or 1 mm. Three types of plate fixation designs were used: Type I, a miniplate was placed across the fracture line following the Champy technique; Type II, two miniplates were used; and Type III, a reconstruction plate was used on the inferior border of the mandible. Loads of 100 and 500 N were applied to the models. The maximum von Mises stress, strain, and displacement were computed using finite element analysis. The results from the control and experimental groups were analyzed and compared. The results demonstrated that high stresses and strains were distributed to the condylar and angular areas regardless of the loading position. The ratio of the plate/bone average stress ranged from 215% (Type II design) to 848% (Type I design) irrespective of the interfragmentary gap size. With a 1-mm fracture gap, the ratio of the plate/bone stress ranged from 204% (Type II design) to 1130% (Type I design). All strains were well below critical bone strain thresholds. Displacement on the cross-sectional mapping at fracture interface indicated that uneven movement occurred in x, y, and z directions. Interfragmentary gaps between 0.1 and 1 mm did not have a substantial effect on the average stress distribution to the fractured bony segments; however, they had a greater effect on the stress distribution to the plates and screws. Type II fixation was the best mechanical design under bite loads. Type I design was the least stable system and had the highest stress distribution and the largest displacement

  8. COMPUTER-AIDED OPTIMIZATION OF CHOICE AND POSITIONING OF BONE PLATES AND SCREWS USED FOR INTERNAL-FIXATION OF MANDIBULAR FRACTURES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ROZEMA, FR; BOS, RRM; BOERING, G; VANWILLIGEN, JD

    1992-01-01

    The present study describes a biomechanical integrated model of the mandibular system in which the maxilla and mandible, the masticatory muscles, and the temporomandibular joints are regarded as one system. In this model, strains in plate-osteosynthesis devices for internal fixation of mandibular

  9. Surgical Management of a Mandible Subcondylar Fracture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Hee Kang

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Open reduction and anatomic reduction can create better function for the temporomandibularjoint, compared with closed treatment in mandible fracture surgery. Therefore, the doubleminiplate fixation technique via mini-retromandibular incision was used in order to makethe most stable fixation when performing subcondylar fracture surgery. Those approachesprovide good visualization of the subcondyle from the posterior edge of the ramus, allow thesurgeon to work perpendicularly to the fracture, and enable direct fracture management.Understanding the biomechanical load in the fixation of subcondylar fractures is alsonecessary in order to optimize fixation methods. Therefore, we measured the biomechanicalloads of four different plate fixation techniques in the experimental model regardingmandibular subcondylar fractures. It was found that the loads measured in the two-platefixation group with one dynamic compression plate (DCP and one adaption plate showed thehighest deformation and failure loads among the four fixation groups. The loads measuredin the one DCP plate fixation group showed higher deformation and failure loads than theloads measured in the two adaption plate fixation group. Therefore, we conclude that theselection of the high profile plate (DCP is also important in order to create a stable load in thesubcondylar fracture.

  10. Mandibular ameloblastomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masip, M.J.; Arana, E.; Beltran, J.; Garcia, J.L.; Cifrian, C.; Aparisi, F.

    1995-01-01

    We present a retrospective review of 39 cases of mandibular ameloblastoma that were assessed in terms of patient age and sex, duration and clinical signs at the time of diagnosis. The associated plain radiology, CT and MR signs are also reviewed. It usually presented as a slowly growing, painless mass. According to radiological findings, most of the ameloblastomas studied were extensive, involving the mandibular branch, angle and molar area; the lesions were expanding, unilocular or multilocular, with erosion of the dental apex. CT disclosed cystic areas of low attenuation. The images of the three patients studied by MR presented low signal intensity in T1-weighed sequences and hyperintense signal in t2-weighted sequences. 9 refs

  11. Biomechanical analysis of titanium plate systems in mandibular condyle fractures: a systematized literature review Análise biomecânica de sistemas de placas de titânio em fraturas de côndilo mandibular: uma revisão sistematizada da literatura

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fábio Wildson Gurgel Costa

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To conduct a systematized review of the literature about the main methodologies used to evaluate the biomechanical fixation systems with titanium plates in fractures of the mandibular condyle. METHODS: A systematized review of literature was performed in the electronic databases PubMed, EMBASE, LILACS and MEDLINE without restriction of the publication date. The eligibility criteria were laboratory studies involving mandibular condyle fractures, studies using titanium plates, biomechanical studies, in vitro and computational studies involving the finite element method (FEM. RESULTS: Eleven articles that met the eligibility criteria were selected, including seven articles involving in vitro studies and four studies with biomechanical analysis by using FEM. CONCLUSION: Although few articles have used the finite element method, the results of in vitro studies were similar to those found in computational studies, regarding to the stable use of two titanium miniplates.OBJETIVO: Realizar uma revisão sistematizada da literatura sobre as principais metodologias empregadas na avaliação biomecânica de sistemas de fixação com placas de titânio em fraturas de côndilo mandibular. MÉTODOS: Foi realizada uma revisão sistematizada da literatura nas bases de dados eletrônicas PubMed, EMBASE, LILACS e MEDLINE sem restrição quanto à data de publicação. Os critérios de elegibilidade foram estudos laboratoriais envolvendo fraturas de côndilo mandibular, estudos utilizando placas de titânio, estudos biomecânicos, estudos in vitro e estudos computacionais envolvendo o método de elementos finitos (MEF. RESULTADOS: Foram selecionados 11 artigos que se enquadraram nos critérios de elegibilidade, incluindo sete artigos envolvendo estudos in vitro e quatro utilizando análise biomecânica através do MEF. CONCLUSÃO: Embora poucos artigos tenham utilizado o método de elementos finitos, os resultados das pesquisas in vitro assemelham-se aos

  12. Eosinophilic granuloma of the mandibular condyle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huh, Kyung Hoe; Yi, Won Jin; Oh, Sung Won; Lee, Sam Sun; Choi, Mun Kyung

    2008-01-01

    The present study reports a case of eosinophilic granuloma of the mandibular condyle. Eosinophilic granulomas on the mandibular condyle are very rare, but there are several common clinical and radiographic presentations. The clinical presentations involve swelling on preauricular area, limitation of opening, TMJ pain, etc. The radiographic presentations involve radiolucent lytic condylar lesion with or without pathologic fracture. Sometimes new bone formations are observed. The purpose of the article is to add new cases to the literatures.

  13. Eosinophilic granuloma of the mandibular condyle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huh, Kyung Hoe; Yi, Won Jin; Oh, Sung Won; Lee, Sam Sun [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, and Dental Research Institute, School of Dentistry, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Mun Kyung [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, College of Medicine, Inje University Sanggye Paik Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-03-15

    The present study reports a case of eosinophilic granuloma of the mandibular condyle. Eosinophilic granulomas on the mandibular condyle are very rare, but there are several common clinical and radiographic presentations. The clinical presentations involve swelling on preauricular area, limitation of opening, TMJ pain, etc. The radiographic presentations involve radiolucent lytic condylar lesion with or without pathologic fracture. Sometimes new bone formations are observed. The purpose of the article is to add new cases to the literatures.

  14. Fractura patológica de la mandíbula asociada a quiste radicular: Reporte de 3 casos clínicos Mandibular pathologic fracture associated with radicular cyst: Report of three clinical cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Bouguila

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Introducción. El quiste radicular es el quiste más común de los maxilares. Su tamaño puede variar desde una lesión que abarca el proceso alveolar hasta uno extenso que oblitera el espacio antral maxilar o causa una fractura patológica mandibular. Reporte de casos. Se reportan tres casos con fractura patológica mandibular asociados a quiste radicular ocurridos después de trauma facial. El diagnóstico fue sugerido por un estudio clínico, radiografía panorámica y confirmado por el estudio histopatológico de la pieza operatoria. El tratamiento consistió en enucleación quística seguido por inmovilización de fragmentos con osteosíntesis o bloqueo intermaxilar. El resultado clínico y radiológico a corto plazo fue favorable. Discusión. Se discuten aspectos propios de la patología y su terapia. Conclusión. El éxito del tratamiento depende de una adecuada terapia en que sus principios más importantes son la remoción de la lesión mediante enucleación y una fijación estable.Introduction. Radicular cyst is the most common cyst of the oral cavity. It may range in size from a small periapical lesion to one that can obliterate the antral space or cause mandibular fracture. Case reports. We report three cases of radicular cyst complicated by mandibular fracture that occurred after maxillofacial trauma. The diagnosis was strongly suggested by panoramic radiography and confirmed by pathology examination of the operative specimen. Treatment consisted in cyst enucleation followed by immobilization of fragments by osteosynthesis or maxillomandibular fixation. The clinical and radiologic outcome was favorable. Discussion. The particularities and treatment are discussed. Conclusion. Treatment success is dependent on adequate therapy, the principles of which are removing the lesion and providing stable fixation.

  15. Pearls of mandibular trauma management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koshy, John C; Feldman, Evan M; Chike-Obi, Chuma J; Bullocks, Jamal M

    2010-11-01

    Mandibular trauma is a common problem seen by plastic surgeons. When fractures occur, they have the ability to affect the patient's occlusion significantly, cause infection, and lead to considerable pain. Interventions to prevent these sequelae require either closed or open forms of reduction and fixation. Physicians determining how to manage these injuries should take into consideration the nature of the injury, background information regarding the patient's health, and the patient's comorbidities. Whereas general principles guide the management of the majority of injuries, special consideration must be paid to the edentulous patient, complex and comminuted fractures, and pediatric patients. These topics are discussed in this article, with a special emphasis on pearls of mandibular trauma management.

  16. Pearls of Mandibular Trauma Management

    OpenAIRE

    Koshy, John C.; Feldman, Evan M.; Chike-Obi, Chuma J.; Bullocks, Jamal M.

    2010-01-01

    Mandibular trauma is a common problem seen by plastic surgeons. When fractures occur, they have the ability to affect the patient's occlusion significantly, cause infection, and lead to considerable pain. Interventions to prevent these sequelae require either closed or open forms of reduction and fixation. Physicians determining how to manage these injuries should take into consideration the nature of the injury, background information regarding the patient's health, and the patient's comorbi...

  17. Miniplacas de titânio na redução de fraturas mandibulares em cães e gatos: estudo de seis casos Titanium miniplates in mandibular fracture repair in dogs and cats: study of 6 cases

    OpenAIRE

    Cristiano Gomes; Aline Silva Gouvêa; Marcelo Meller Alievi; Emerson Antonio Contesini; Ney Luis Pippi

    2010-01-01

    Fraturas de mandíbula e maxila são comuns em cães e gatos, correspondendo a cerca de 3 a 6% de todas as fraturas. Muitos tratamentos são propostos para a correção desse defeito, como o uso de pino intramedular, a fixação esquelética externa, a cerclagem e o uso de acrílicos e placas ósseas. Este estudo teve como objetivo avaliar o uso das mini e microplacas de titânio do sistema 2,0 e 1,5mm no tratamento de fraturas mandibulares, em cães e gatos, respectivamente. Os parafusos e as miniplacas ...

  18. Does the surgical approach for treating mandibular condylar fractures affect the rate of seventh cranial nerve injuries? A systematic review and meta-analysis based on a new classification for surgical approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Moraissi, Essam Ahmed; Louvrier, Aurélien; Colletti, Giacomo; Wolford, Larry M; Biglioli, Federico; Ragaey, Marwa; Meyer, Christophe; Ellis, Edward

    2018-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the rate of facial nerve injury (FNI) when performing (ORIF) of mandibular condylar fractures by different surgical approaches. A systematic review and meta-analysis were performed that included several databases with specific keywords, a reference search, and a manual search for suitable articles. The inclusion criteria were all clinical trials, with the aim of assessing the rate of facial nerve injuries when (ORIF) of mandibular condylar fractures was performed using different surgical approaches. The main outcome variable was transient facial nerve injury (TFNI) and permanent facial nerve injury (PFNI) according to the fracture levels, namely: condylar head fractures (CHFs), condylar neck fractures (CNFs), and condylar base fractures (CBFs). For studies where there was no delineation between CNFs and CBFs, the fractures were defined as CNFs/CBFs. The dependent variables were the surgical approaches. A total of 3873 patients enrolled in 96 studies were included in this analysis. TFNI rates reported in the literature were as follows: A) For the transoral approach: a) for strictly intraoral 0.72% (1.3 in CNFs and 0% for CBFs); b) for the transbuccal trocar instrumentation 2.7% (4.2% in CNFs and 0% for CBFs); and c) for endoscopically assisted ORIF 4.2% (5% in CNFs, and 4% in CBFs). B) For low submandibular approach 15.3% (26.1% for CNFs, 11.8% for CBFs, and 13.7% for CNFs/CBFs). C) For the high submandibular/angular subparotid approach with masseter transection 0% in CBFs. D) For the high submandibular/angular transmassetric anteroparotid approach 0% (CNFs and CBFs). E) For the transparotid retromandibular approach a) with nerve facial preparation 14.4% (23.9% in CNFs, 11.8% in CBFs and 13.7% for CNFs/CBFs); b) without facial nerve preparation 19% (24.3% for CNFs and 10.5% for CBFs). F) For retromandibular transmassetric anteroparotid approach 3.4% in CNFs/CBFs. G) For retromandibular transmassetric anteroparotid

  19. Mandibular osteosynthesis in a Boa constrictor snake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Luiz Costa Castro

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays are observed an increase in the finding of certain wild animals in urban areas, due to environmental changes caused by deforestation and economic use of natural areas. It causes disappearance of usual prey and forces these animals, including snakes, to migrate to urban areas, becoming vulnerable to injuries caused by aggressions, car accidents and capture. Mandibular and maxillar fractures are common in many animal species, representing about 3-6% of all bone fractures in dogs and cats. Mandibular trauma usually occurs as a result of fights, car accidents and improper handling and/or restraint, and fractures can be closed or open, clean or contaminated. The jaw is a flat bone with differences from the long bones that should be taken into consideration for successful treatment, being minimal muscle coverage and need to maintain occlusion factors that influence the definition of the best ostheosynthesis method. The methods of stabilization include using intramedullary pins, wires, external skeletal fixation, bone plate, and acrylic resin. Conventional bone plates are efficient but related to some complications, such as the necessity of muscular elevation and high risk of injuries to mandibular structures. This article describes the successful results of the application of plate and screws in the ostheosynthesis of a mandibular fracture in a female Boa constrictor snake with weight of 8.0 kg and length of 1.80 m, at the RIOZOO Foundation (Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brazil.

  20. Transoral open reduction and fixation of mandibular condylar base and neck fractures in children and young teenagers--a beneficial treatment option?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiel, Sebastian; Mayer, Peter; Probst, Florian; Otto, Sven; Cornelius, Carl-Peter

    2013-07-01

    To evaluate the possible benefits of open surgery, endoscopically assisted reduction and fixation using a transoral route was used in a selected series of pediatric patients with displaced condylar base and neck fractures. A cohort of 6 patients (1 male and 5 female; age range, 7 to 15 yr; mean, 13.4 yr) with displaced condylar base and neck fractures (n = 9) were included. Inclusion criteria were age younger than 16 years, fracture of the condylar base or neck, and displacement of the fracture by at least 45°. Fractures were classified using conventional radiography, cone-beam computed tomography, or computed tomography. Patients underwent transoral endoscopically assisted open reduction and fixation using miniplate osteosynthesis. Postoperatively, patients were followed clinically and radiographically for 18 months. Complete follow-up varied from 18 to 35 months (median, 24.5 months). All patients showed normal occlusion and pain-free unrestricted function of the temporomandibular joint at 3, 6, 12, and 18 months postoperatively. There were no signs of incomplete remodeling or deformation of the condyles. Transoral endoscopically assisted surgical treatment of severely displaced condylar base and neck fractures in children and young teenagers offers a reliable solution to preclude the sequelae of closed treatment, such as altered morphology and functional disturbances, eliminates visible scars, and lowers the risk of facial nerve damage compared with open reduction using an extraoral approach. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Fracture of the styloid process associated with the mandible fracture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K N Dubey

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Fracture of the styloid process (SP of temporal bone is an uncommon injuries. Fracture of the SP can be associated with the facial injuries including mandible fracture. However, injury to the SP may be concealed and missed diagnosis may lead to the improper or various unnecessary treatments. A rare case of SP fracture associated with the ipsilateral mandibular fracture and also the diagnostic and management considerations of the SP fracture are discussed.

  2. Is the Lingual Fracture Line Influenced by the Mandibular Canal or the Mylohyoid Groove During a Bilateral Sagittal Split Osteotomy? A Human Cadaveric Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mensink, Gertjan; Gooris, Peter J. J.; Bergsma, Eelco J.; Frank, Michael H.; van Gemert, Jan T. M.; van Merkesteyn, J. P. Richard

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Although the bilateral sagittal split osteotomy (BSSO) is a routinely performed procedure, exact control of the lingual fracture line remains problematic. The purpose of this study was to determine the various lingual splitting patterns in cadaveric human mandibles after a BSSO and the

  3. Mandibular trauma treatment: A comparison of two protocols

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boffano, P.; Kommers, S.C.; Roccia, F.; Forouzanfar, T.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate the treatment of mandibular fractures treated in two European centre in 10 years. Study Design: This study is based on 2 systematic computer-assisted databases that have continuously recorded patients hospitalized with maxillofacial fractures in two

  4. Fraturas odontomaxilares e mandibulares em eqüídeos tratados por diferentes técnicas de osteossíntese Odontomaxillares and mandibularies fractures in equides treated with different osteosynthesis techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.E.S. Alves

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Oito eqüinos e um muar com fraturas odontomaxilares e mandibulares foram tratados com diferentes técnicas de osteossíntese modificadas, consistindo de cerclagens associadas ou não a bandas de tensão, placa de neutralização e pino intraosseo, sendo este aplicado com metodologia não encontrada na literatura consultada. Os procedimentos cirúrgicos nos eqüideos foram realizados com os animais em estação mediante contenção física, em brete, e química, com sedação ou neuroleptoanalgesia associada a bloqueios anestésicos regionais. Os animais apresentaram capacidade de mastigação e ingestão voluntária no pós-operatório imediato e recuperação óssea adequada.Eight equines and one mule with odontomaxillaries and mandibularies fractures were treated with different osteosynthesis modified techniques, consisting of cerclages with or without tension bands, neutralization plates, and intraosseous pin applied by a methodology which was not found in the literature. The surgery procedures in equides were performed with the animals in stand position under physical contention, sedation, or neuroleptoanalgesy and regional nerve block. All animals were able to eat voluntarily in the immediate post-operatory time and had good bone recuperation.

  5. Superolateral dislocation of an intact mandibular condyle into the temporal fossa: case report and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Divashree; Khasgiwala, Ankit; Maheshwari, Bharat; Singh, Charanpreet; Shakya, Neelam

    2017-02-01

    Temporomandibular joint dislocation refers to the dislodgement of mandibular condyle from the glenoid fossa. Anterior and anteromedial dislocations of the mandibular condyle are frequently reported in the literature, but superolateral dislocation is a rare presentation. This report outlines a case of superolateral dislocation of an intact mandibular condyle that occurred in conjunction with an ipsilateral mandibular parasymphysis fracture. A review of the clinical features of superolateral dislocation of the mandibular condyle and the possible techniques of its reduction ranging from the most conservative means to extensive surgical interventions is presented. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Early Loaded Single Implant Reinforced Mandibular Overdenture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Nischal

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Rehabilitating atrophied mandible with two-implant supported denture is a common treatment modality for implant retained removable overdenture in mandible. This paper aims to design a treatment modality where single implant reinforced overdenture is fabricated for a severely atrophied mandibular ridge with early loading protocol. Results of studies have shown that a single implant mandibular overdenture significantly increases the satisfaction and quality of life of patients with edentulism. Midline fracture of the prosthesis is the most common complication related to single implant and two-implant retained mandibular overdentures. To manage such complication, a thin metal mesh is used to reinforce the overdenture and also to make the prostheses lighter and cost effective as compared to conventional cast metal framework.

  7. Mandibular Deformity Correction by Distraction Osteogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md Asaduzzaman

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Distraction osteogenesis (DO is a biological process of new bone formation. It could be used as an alternative treatment method for the correction of mandibular hypoplastic deformity. Modern distraction osteogenesis evolved primarily from the work of Gavriel llizarov. DO has been first applied to craniofacial region since McCarthy et al. In this case report, the patient was 17 years old male with bird face deformity due to hypoplasia of mandible resulted from bilateral TMJ ankylosis due to the fracture of both condyle at the age of 4 years. Patient’s intraincisal opening was absent 1 year back. He underwent condylectomy in both sides to release the ankylosis and to increase intraincisal opening. His mandibular length was markedly short. To increase his mandibular antero-posterior length, mandibular body distraction was done in Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery department, BSMMU. Through this procedure length of the body of mandibule was increased by 10 mm, occlusion was edge to edge and his lower facial appearance increased markedly. Mandibular body distraction osteogenesis was considerably effective when performed in a hypoplastic mandible to facilitate post-operative functional and esthetic restoration. Long term follow-up is necessary to evaluate relapse and complications. DOI: 10.3329/bsmmuj.v3i2.7061BSMMU J 2010; 3(2: 103-106

  8. Mandibular Kondil Kırıkları ve Tedavi Yöntemleri

    OpenAIRE

    Kısa, Halil İbrahim; Tatlı, Ufuk; Kürkcü, Mehmet

    2014-01-01

    Maxillofacial injuries are most commonly associated with falls, motor and vehicle accidents, sports-related trauma, and interpersonel violence. The complexity of mandibular condyle region and its anatomic proximity to other craniofacial structures complicate diagnosis and treatment. Thus, treatment approaches of mandibular condyle fracture are still controversial. In the literature, different success rates are reported about observation versus treatment, closed reduction versus open reduction...

  9. Fraturas do côndilo mandibular: análise clínica retrospectiva das indicações e do tratamento Evaluation of condylar fractures treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Fausto de Andrade Filho

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Analisamos 40 pacientes com fraturas no processo condilar da mandíbula, tratados pelo método fechado (bloqueio maxilomandibular ou conservador ou aberto (redução direta no foco de fratura com ou sem osteossíntese, no período de janeiro de 1993 a janeiro de 1999 no Setor de Trauma Maxilofacial da Disciplina de Cirurgia Plástica da UNIFESP-EPM. MÉTODO: Avaliamos clinicamente estes pacientes através da palpação da articulação têmporomandibular, observação da simetria mandibular, oclusão dentária, desvio à abertura de boca e abertura máxima interincisal; além de questionário sobre queixas na ATM, disfunção mastigatória e satisfação do tratamento realizado. RESULTADOS: Foi encontrado um índice de resultados satisfatórios de no mínimo 70% nos pacientes submetidos ao bloqueio. No método conservador esse índice foi de no mínimo 42,9%, e nos submetidos à redução com fio de aço de no mínimo 28,6%, sem diferença significante entre os diversos exames clínicos. O índice de dor na ATM entre os pacientes tratados pelo método fechado foi de 3,7% e pelo aberto de 15,4%. A disfunção mastigatória foi de 22,2% no método fechado e 15,4% no aberto; sendo que foram encontrados somente 7,1% de pacientes insatisfeitos com o tratamento fechado. Não houve diferença significante entre os resultados dos métodos. CONCLUSÃO: Os métodos fechado (BMM e conservador e aberto, com redução e osteossíntese com fio de aço, trouxeram resultados clínicos satisfatórios em avaliação superior a seis meses. Concluiu-se também que não há diferença entre os resultados de queixas após o tratamento aberto ou fechado, na opinião dos pacientes.BACKGROUND: We analysed 40 patients with mandibular condylar process fractures, treated through the closed (intermaxilary fixation or conservatively or open methods (wire internal fixation,titanium miniplates, bone reduction or articular exploration, from January 1993 to January

  10. Osteossíntese mandibular em jiboia (Boa constrictor)

    OpenAIRE

    Castro, Jorge Luiz Costa; Pontíficia Universidade Católica do Paraná; Santalucia, Sérgio; Universidade Federal de Santa Maria; Pachaly, José Ricardo; Universidade Paranaense; Villanova Junior, José Ademar; Pontífica Universidade Católica do Paraná; Castro, Verônica Souza Paiva; Universidade Federal de Santa Maria; Balthazar, Daniel Almeida; Fundação RIOZOO - RJ.; Spadetti, Alex Lucas; Fundação Parque Jardim Zoológico; Souza, Wilker Nazareth; Universidade Castelo Branco; Fedullo, Luiz Paulo Luzes; Fundação RIOZOO - RJ; Raiser, Alceu Gaspar; Universidade Federal de Santa Maria

    2014-01-01

    Nowadays are observed an increase in the finding of certain wild animals in urban areas, due to environmental changes caused by deforestation and economic use of natural areas. It causes disappearance of usual prey and forces these animals, including snakes, to migrate to urban areas, becoming vulnerable to injuries caused by aggressions, car accidents and capture. Mandibular and maxillar fractures are common in many animal species, representing about 3-6% of all bone fractures in dogs and ca...

  11. RADIOLOGICAL TIPS Coronal views of the paediatric mandibular ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    imaging. None of the cases subsequently revealed any evidence of traumatic brain injury on CTB but they all demonstrated mandibular condyle fractures best appreciated on coronal views. Axial (Fig. 1) ... T Peedikayil, MB ChB. Department of Radiology, Red Cross War Memorial Children's Hospital, Cape Town.

  12. Modified endaural approach for the treatment of condylar fractures: A review of 75 cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S M Balaji

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: Surgery for mandibular condyle fractures with modified approach allows direct vision of the fracture and reduces surgical trauma to the site while avoiding permanent facial nerve injury. Hence, the author's modified Al-Kayat Bramley incision via endaural approach could be considered as the best approach for open reduction and internal fixation of condylar neck and subcondylar mandibular fractures.

  13. Measuring mandibular ridge reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steen, W.H.A.

    1984-01-01

    This thesis investigates the mandibular reduction in height of complete denture wearers and overdenture wearers. To follow this reduction in the anterior region as well as in the lateral sections of the mandible, an accurate and reproducible measuring method is a prerequisite. A radiologic technique offers the best chance. A survey is given of the literature concerning the resorption process after the extraction of teeth. An oblique cephalometric radiographic technique is introduced as a promising method to measure mandibular ridge reduction. The reproducibility and the accuracy of the technique are determined. The reproducibility in the positioning of the mandible is improved by the introduction of a mandibular support which permits a precise repositioning of the edentulous jaw, even after long periods of investigation. (Auth.)

  14. Endodontic and periodontal treatments of a geminated mandibular first premolar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aryanpour, S; Bercy, P; Van Nieuwenhuysen, J-P

    2002-02-01

    To describe a rare case of gemination involving a mandibular first premolar. The complex morphology of geminated teeth renders their endodontic and periodontal management difficult. Root canal and periodontal treatments were performed on a geminated mandibular first premolar with three canals. Clinical examination showed two separated crowns with united roots. Radiographically, two distinct pulp chambers with two joined and a third independent canal were seen. Conventional root canal treatment resulted in complete healing of the apical lesion. However, the occurrence of a vertical fracture led to the extraction of the mesial segment. At the follow-up visit, the distal segment was clinically healthy and continued to satisfy functional demands.

  15. Posttraumatic Mandibular Asymmetry Presenting in a Young Adult

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahnaz Sheikhi, DDS,MS

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available One of the most common sites of injury of the facial skeleton is mandibular condyle. However, it is the least diagnosed site of trauma in the head and neck regions. A trauma to the mandible and specifically condylar zone during childhood, may lead to asymmetry or mandibular bilateral distortion, which is usually manifested in the second decade of life when the etiology is unknown to most people. This report is about an adult male complaining about facial asymmetry with an unknown source. Obvious clicking at the right side and shorter right ramus and condyle's head deviation directed us to a childhood trauma and fracture.

  16. Fratura de mandíbula: análise de 293 pacientes tratados no Hospital de Clínicas da Universidade Federal de Uberlândia Mandibular fracture: analysis of 293 patients treated in the Hospital of Clinics, Federal University of Uberlândia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucas Gomes Patrocínio

    2005-10-01

    foi tratamento mais comumente empregado. A complicação mais freqüente foi a osteomielite.Mandibular fracture is the second most common facial fracture and there has been a significant increase in number of cases in the last years. Misidentification and inadequate treatment can take to permanent aesthetic or functional deformity. AIM: Evaluate cases of mandibular fracture reduction in the Hospital of Clinics of the Federal University of Uberlândia, from January of 1974 to December of 2002. STUDY DESIGN: historical cohort. PATIENT AND METHOD: Two hundred and ninety-three cases of reduction of mandibular fractures were retrospectively analyzed according to factors related to: patient, trauma, signs and symptoms, and surgical treatment. RESULTS: There has been a clear tendency of increase of the number of mandibular fractures along the years. There was higher prevalence in male (4:1, with occurrence peak between 20 to 29 years old. The principal causes of fracture in this study were traffic accidents and violence, representing 72.4%. One hundred and thirty-five patients presented only one fracture. The most injured sites were, in decreasing order, symphysis, condyle, angle, body, ramus, and coronoid. We performed closed reduction (28, open reduction (213 and association of the two (11 patients; 56.8% of the patients were treated within the first 3 days; and, 50.4% were discharged from the hospital until the first postoperative day. About 10% of the patients presented complications, being osteomyelitis the most frequent one. CONCLUSION: The incidence of mandibular fractures was remarkably larger in the male sex, during the third decade of life. The most common cause was traffic accident, and symphysis and condyle were the most injured sites. Isolated fractures occurred in over half of the cases. Most of the patients were treated in the first three days and were discharged until the first postoperative visit. Closed reduction was the treatment most commonly employed

  17. Treatment of Pediatric Condylar Fractures: A 20-Year Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghasemzadeh, Ali; Mundinger, Gerhard S; Swanson, Edward W; Utria, Alan F; Dorafshar, Amir H

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to define patterns of injury and treatment for condylar and subcondylar fractures and evaluate short-term outcomes in the pediatric population. A retrospective chart review was performed on pediatric patients with mandibular condylar fractures who presented between 1990 and 2010. Computed tomographic imaging was reviewed for all patients to assess fracture characteristics. Mandibular fractures were codified using the Strasbourg Osteosynthesis Research Group and Lindahl classification methods. Sixty-four patients with 92 condylar fractures were identified. Of these patients, 29 had isolated condylar fracture and 35 had a condylar fracture associated with an additional mandibular arch fracture. The most common fracture patterns were diacapitular fracture in the Strasbourg Osteosynthesis Research Group system (n = 46) and vertical condylar head fracture in the Lindahl system (n = 14). Condylar fracture with additional mandibular arch fractures were treated with maxillomandibular fixation more often than patients with condylar fracture [n = 40 (74.1 percent) versus n = 14 (25.9 percent); p = 0.004]. No condylar fracture was treated in an open fashion. Forty-three patients returned for follow-up. The median follow-up period was 81 days (interquartile range, 35 to 294 days). Ten patients had complications (23.3 percent). The most common complication was malocclusion (n = 5). Nine of 10 patients with complications had condylar fracture with an additional mandibular arch fracture. Closed treatment of condylar fractures yields satisfactory results in pediatric patients. Pediatric patients with condylar fractures combined with additional arch fractures experience a higher rate of unfavorable outcomes.

  18. Mandibular incisive canal in relation to periapical surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kani Bilginaylar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present paper is to emphasize the importance of the mandibular interforaminal neurovascular bundle with a case and make a warning to dentists and surgeons during oral and maxillofacial surgeries, such as implant replacement, bone harvesting, genioplasty, open reduction of a mandibular fracture, and cyst enucleations at this region. In this paper, we present a 58-year-old male who referred with pain and a tingling sensation on the left lower lip. After radiographical, extraoral and intraoral examinations, findings indicated the lesion to be a cyst which was related with a periapical lesion of the canine tooth and extracted socket of first premolar tooth. After removal of a cyst, the mandibular incisive nerve was documented which was in relation to cyst cavity.

  19. Osteochondroma involving mandibular condyle

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    Latika Bachani

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Osteochondroma is defined as an osteocartilagenous exostosis with cartilage capped exophytic lesion that arises from the bone cortex. It is a slow growing benign tumor that is rarely seen in the maxillofacial region. Osteochondroma of the mandibular condyle is a relatively rare condition that causes a progressive enlargement of the condyle, usually resulting in facial asymmetry, temporomandibular joint (TMJ dysfunction and malocclusion. Radiographically, there is a unilaterally enlarged condyle usually with an exophytic growth of the tumor from the condylar head. The treatment of osteochondroma is primarily surgical resection of the tumor. This paper reports a case of osteochondroma of the right mandibular condyle presenting as a painless restricted mouth opening.

  20. Superolateral Dislocation of Intact Mandibular Condyle: A Case Report and Review of Literature

    OpenAIRE

    Saikrishna, Degala; Shyam Sundar, S.; Mamata, K. S.

    2015-01-01

    Anteromedial fracture dislocation of the mandibular condyle is common but a superolateral dislocation of an intact condyle is quite rare. This type of dislocation is often misdiagnosed or completely overlooked and hence inadequately addressed. We report a case of a 41-year-old male patient who experienced superolateral dislocation of the intact condyle with symphysis fracture and panfacial fracture following a road-traffic accident, and review of literature of superolateral dislocations from ...

  1. The Psychological Status of Patients with Acute Mandibular Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. N. Pudov

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to define the specific features of the psychological status of patients with acute mandibular injury, to compare a psychological reaction to injury in different age groups and in persons with signs of alcohol addiction. Subjects and methods. The study enrolled 37 patients of both sexes over 15 years of age. The patients were distributed by age and chronic alcohol intoxication. Psychological parameters were determined using personality questionnaires: Spielberg-Hanin, Zung, GHQ-28, and Wein ones. Results. The patients with mandibular injury were found to have higher levels of situational and personality anxiety. A state of depression as a response to acute mandibular injury of reactive genesis was found in 29.8% of cases. Autonomic dysfunction occurred in 62.2% of the patients with mandibular fractures. Occult pathopsychological states were detected in 35.1% of the study group patients. Conclusion. The main found peculiarities of the psychological status of the patients with acute mandibular injury were high anxiety and the considerable incidence of autonomic dysfunction syndrome. There were no great age differences in psychological status and the direction of reactions. The patients with chronic alcohol intoxication more frequently developed a depressive state, but the autonomic dysfunction syndrome was just less often encountered and pathopsychological states were less frequently found. Key words: acute low anxiety depression alcohol abuse, psychological status.

  2. Simplified Technique for Incorporating a Metal Mesh into Record Bases for Mandibular Implant Overdentures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godoy, Antonio; Siegel, Sharon C

    2015-12-01

    Mandibular implant-retained overdentures have become the standard of care for patients with mandibular complete edentulism. As part of the treatment, the mandibular implant-retained overdenture may require a metal mesh framework to be incorporated to strengthen the denture and avoid fracture of the prosthesis. Integrating the metal mesh framework as part of the acrylic record base and wax occlusion rim before the jaw relation procedure will avoid the distortion of the record base and will minimize the chances of processing errors. A simplified method to incorporate the mesh into the record base and occlusion rim is presented in this technique article. © 2015 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  3. A case of osteomyelitis of mandibular bone in Kimura's disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kinugawa, Hiroshi; Shimada, Fumihiko; Sai, Yoshikazu; Amakata, Yoshikuni; Yoshitake, Kazusada [Shiga Univ. of Medical Science, Otsu (Japan)

    1991-07-01

    We experienced a case of osteomyelitis of mandibular bone in Kimura's disease. The patient received radiation therapy to head and neck area against the same disease. Bone tissue which received radiation therapy had developed malnutrition as side effect of radiation, and osteomyelitis was induced by infection from the teeth. Even in the benign soft tissue disease like Kimura's disease, especially after radiation therapy, pathologic fracture of bone may happen due to bone damage caused by radiation. (author).

  4. Mandibular pseudocarcinomatous hyperplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warter, A; Walter, P; Meyer, C; Barrière, P; Galatir, L; Wilk, A

    2000-08-01

    Three unusual cases of pseudocarcinomatous (pseudoepitheliomatous) hyperplasia (PH) affecting chronic osteomyelitic mandibular sequestra are reported to highlight the differences with the various squamous neoplasms which occur in that site. In two patients carrying a mandibular graft following the excision of an ameloblastoma, mucosal ulcers resulted in chronic osteomyelitis. In a third patient, an apical dental infection was associated with fistulated osteomyelitis. Histology of the three sequestra showed an intraosseous squamous proliferation. It was characterized by a peripheral involvement of medullary spaces, the more mature epithelial layer covering the bone trabeculae without intervening stroma, and the basal type epithelial layer surrounding a central fibrovascular core. There were no histological or cytological signs of malignancy. PH shows an inverted pattern when compared with the centro-medullary tumoural islands seen in the various oral or odontogenic squamous neoplasms which occur in the jaws. The lack of signs of malignancy distinguish PH from common squamous cell carcinomas. A short clinical course is an important feature in the distinction of PH from the well differentiated squamous cell carcinomas which may develop in fistulated chronic osteomyelitis.

  5. Orthodontic treatment for oral rehabilitation after multiple maxillofacial bone fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Yoshiki; Ogino, Tomoko Kuroiwa; Hirashita, Ayao

    2008-09-01

    We present the orthodontic treatment of a patient with occlusal dysfunction after plastic surgery for multiple maxillofacial bone fractures caused by a traffic accident. The patient had mandibular deviation to the right because of inappropriate repositioning and fixation of the fractured bone and complete avulsion of both mandibular central incisors. The bilateral mandibular incisors, canines, and premolars were also suspected of partial avulsion or alveolar bone fracture. Several tests, including percussion and dental computed tomography, were performed on these teeth to rule out ankylosis and confirm tooth movement. Camouflage orthodontic treatment was carried out with expansion of the maxillary arch, alignment of both arches, and space closure between the mandibular lateral incisors to improve the occlusion. Good occlusion and interdigitation were obtained. Orthodontic treatment is useful for the rehabilitation of occlusal dysfunction caused by multiple maxillofacial bone fractures.

  6. Radiologic assessment of maxillofacial, mandibular, and skull base trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schuknecht, Bernhard; Graetz, Klaus

    2005-01-01

    Cranio-maxillofacial injuries affect a significant proportion of trauma patients either in isolation or concurring with other serious injuries. Contrary to maxillofacial injuries that result from a direct impact, central skull base and lateral skull base (petrous bone) fractures usually are caused by a lateral or sagittal directed force to the skull and therefore are indirect fractures. The traditional strong role of conventional images in patients with isolated trauma to the viscerocranium is decreasing. Spiral multislice CT is progressively replacing the panoramic radiograph, Waters view, and axial films for maxillofacial trauma, and is increasingly being performed in addition to conventional films to detail and classify trauma to the mandible as well. Imaging thus contributes to accurately categorizing mandibular fractures based on location, into alveolar, mandibular proper, and condylar fractures - the last are subdivided into intracapsular and extracapsular fractures. In the midface, CT facilitates attribution of trauma to the categories central, lateral, or combined centrolateral fractures. The last frequently encompass orbital trauma as well. CT is the imaging technique of choice to display the multiplicity of fragments, the degree of dislocation and rotation, or skull base involvement. Transsphenoid skull base fractures are classified into transverse and oblique types; lateral base (temporal bone) trauma is subdivided into longitudinal and transverse fractures. Supplementary MR examinations are required when a cranial nerve palsy occurs in order to recognize neural compression. Early and late complications of trauma related to the orbit, anterior cranial fossa, or lateral skull base due to infection, brain concussion, or herniation require CT to visualize the osseous prerequisites of complications, and MR to define the adjacent brain and soft tissue involvement. (orig.)

  7. Malignant mandibular tumors: two case reports of rare mandibular ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Arun Kumar Agnihotri

    2014-02-26

    Feb 26, 2014 ... present two cases of rare malignant mandibular tumors in a single institution. KEY WORDS: .... Spiculated osteoblastic periosteal reaction was noted with mild ... displacement of right 2nd premolar and 2nd molar teeth were ...

  8. Orthodontic Extraction of High-Risk Impacted Mandibular Third Molars in Close Proximity to the Mandibular Canal: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalantar Motamedi, Mahmood Reza; Heidarpour, Majid; Siadat, Sara; Kalantar Motamedi, Alimohammad; Bahreman, Ali Akbar

    2015-09-01

    Extraction of mandibular third molars (M3s) in close proximity to the mandibular canal has some inherent risks to adjacent structures, such as neurologic damage to teeth, bone defects distal to the mandibular second molar (M2), or pathologic fractures in association with enlarged dentigerous cysts. The procedure for extrusion and subsequent extraction of high-risk M3s is called orthodontic extraction. This is a systematic review of the available approaches for orthodontic extraction of impacted mandibular M3s in close proximity to the mandibular canal and their outcomes. The PubMed, Scopus, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), DOAJ, Google Scholar, OpenGrey, Iranian Science Information Database (SID), Iranmedex, and Irandoc databases were searched using specific keywords up to June 2, 2014. Studies were evaluated based on predetermined eligibility criteria, treatment approaches, and their outcomes. Thirteen articles met the inclusion criteria. A total of 123 impacted teeth were extracted by orthodontic extraction and 2 cases were complicated by transient paresthesia. Three types of biomechanical approaches were used: 1) using the posterior maxillary region as the anchor for orthodontic extrusion of lower M3s, 2) simple cantilever springs attached to the M3 buttonhole, and 3) cantilever springs tied to a bonded orthodontic bracket on the M3 plus multiple-loop spring wire for distal movement of the M3. Osteo-periodontal status of M2s also improved uneventfully. Despite the drawbacks of orthodontic extraction, removal of deeply impacted M3s using the described techniques is safe with regard to mandibular nerve injury and neurologic damage. Orthodontic extraction is recommended for extraction of impacted M3s that present a high risk of postoperative osteo-periodontal defects on the distal surface of the adjacent M2 and those associated with dentigerous cysts. Copyright © 2015 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by

  9. Mandibular reconstruction with composite microvascular tissue transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coleman, J.J. III; Wooden, W.A.

    1990-01-01

    Microvascular free tissue transfer has provided a variety of methods of restoring vascularized bone and soft tissue to difficult defects created by tumor resection and trauma. Over 7 years, 26 patients have undergone 28 free flaps for mandibular reconstruction, 15 for primary squamous cell carcinoma of the floor of the mouth or tongue, 7 for recurrent tumor, and 6 for other reasons [lymphangioma (1), infection (1), gunshot wound (1), and osteoradionecrosis (3)]. Primary reconstruction was performed in 19 cases and secondary in 9. All repairs were composite flaps including 12 scapula, 5 radial forearm, 3 fibula, 2 serratus, and 6 deep circumflex iliac artery. Mandibular defects included the symphysis alone (7), symphysis and body (5), symphysis-body-ramus condyle (2), body or ramus (13), and bilateral body (1). Fourteen patients had received prior radiotherapy to adjuvant or curative doses. Eight received postoperative radiotherapy. All patients had initially successful vascularized reconstruction by clinical examination (28) and positive radionuclide scan (22 of 22). Bony stability was achieved in 25 of 26 patients and oral continence in 24 of 26. One complete flap loss occurred at 14 days. Complications of some degree developed in 22 patients including partial skin necrosis (3), orocutaneous fistula (3), plate exposure (1), donor site infection (3), fracture of reconstruction (1), and fracture of the radius (1). Microvascular transfer of bone and soft tissue allows a reliable reconstruction--despite previous radiotherapy, infection, foreign body, or surgery--in almost every situation in which mandible and soft tissue are absent. Bony union, a healed wound, and reasonable function and appearance are likely despite early fistula, skin loss, or metal plate or bone exposure

  10. Mandibular reconstruction with composite microvascular tissue transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coleman, J.J. III; Wooden, W.A. (Emory Univ. School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA (USA))

    1990-10-01

    Microvascular free tissue transfer has provided a variety of methods of restoring vascularized bone and soft tissue to difficult defects created by tumor resection and trauma. Over 7 years, 26 patients have undergone 28 free flaps for mandibular reconstruction, 15 for primary squamous cell carcinoma of the floor of the mouth or tongue, 7 for recurrent tumor, and 6 for other reasons (lymphangioma (1), infection (1), gunshot wound (1), and osteoradionecrosis (3)). Primary reconstruction was performed in 19 cases and secondary in 9. All repairs were composite flaps including 12 scapula, 5 radial forearm, 3 fibula, 2 serratus, and 6 deep circumflex iliac artery. Mandibular defects included the symphysis alone (7), symphysis and body (5), symphysis-body-ramus condyle (2), body or ramus (13), and bilateral body (1). Fourteen patients had received prior radiotherapy to adjuvant or curative doses. Eight received postoperative radiotherapy. All patients had initially successful vascularized reconstruction by clinical examination (28) and positive radionuclide scan (22 of 22). Bony stability was achieved in 25 of 26 patients and oral continence in 24 of 26. One complete flap loss occurred at 14 days. Complications of some degree developed in 22 patients including partial skin necrosis (3), orocutaneous fistula (3), plate exposure (1), donor site infection (3), fracture of reconstruction (1), and fracture of the radius (1). Microvascular transfer of bone and soft tissue allows a reliable reconstruction--despite previous radiotherapy, infection, foreign body, or surgery--in almost every situation in which mandible and soft tissue are absent. Bony union, a healed wound, and reasonable function and appearance are likely despite early fistula, skin loss, or metal plate or bone exposure.

  11. Malunited fracture of the body and condyle of the mandible : A Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Ramakrishna Yeluri; Sudhindra Baliga; Autar Krishen Munshi

    2010-01-01

    Mandibular fractures are the most common facial fractures seen in hospitalized children and their incidence increases with age. Treatment options include soft diet, intermaxillary fixation with eyelet wires, arch bars, circummandibular wiring, or stents. Alternative options include open reduction and internal fixation through either an intraoral or extraoral approach. Many factors complicate the management of pediatric mixed-dentition mandibular fractures: tooth eruption, short roots, develop...

  12. An Atypical Variant of Superolateral Dislocation of the Mandibular Condyle: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, Kapil; Debnath, Subhas C; Adhyapok, Apurba K; Hazarika, Kriti

    2017-10-01

    Dislocation of the mandibular condyle from the glenoid fossa can occur in anterior, posterior, lateral, and superior directions. Posterior, lateral, and superior dislocations are rare. Superolateral dislocation is seldom encountered in clinical practice. It is generally associated with fracture of the anterior or contralateral side of the mandible. The occurrence of superolateral dislocation of the condyle hooked above the zygomatic arch with an associated fracture of the medial pole of the condyle is rare and has been reported only once in the literature. This report describes another case in which the patient had superolateral dislocation of the mandibular condyle with a fractured medial pole without any associated fracture of the anterior or contralateral side of the mandible. The condyle was hooked laterally above the zygomatic arch. Open reduction of the dislocated condyle was performed and a good outcome was obtained. Copyright © 2017 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Mandibular tori are associated with mechanical stress and mandibular shape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortes, Arthur Rodriguez Gonzalez; Jin, Zhaoyu; Morrison, Matthew Daniel; Arita, Emiko Saito; Song, Jun; Tamimi, Faleh

    2014-11-01

    The influence of mechanical stimulation on the formation of torus mandibularis (TM) is still poorly understood. We sought to understand the etiology of TMs by investigating the role of parafunctional activity and mandibular morphology on the formation of TMs. We designed a case-control study for patients attending the dental clinic of the present study (University of São Paulo School of Dentistry, São Paulo, SP, Brazil). Patients presenting with TMs were defined as cases, and those without TMs were defined as controls. Finite element analysis (FEA) was used in 3-dimensional mandibular models to examine the stress distribution in the mandibles with and without TMs. In addition, the associations of mandibular arch shape, mandibular cortical index, and parafunctional activity with the presence of T were assessed using odds ratio analysis. A total of 10 patients with TMs and 37 without TMs were selected (22 men and 25 women, mean age 54.3 ± 8.4 years). FEA showed a stress concentration in the region in which TMs form during simulation of parafunctional activity. The radiographic assessment showed that those with TMs were more likely to have a square-shaped mandible with sharp angles (P = .001) and a normal mandibular cortex (P = .03). The subjects without TMs had a round-shaped mandible with obtuse angles and an eroded mandibular cortex. Parafunctional activity could be causing the formation of TMs by concentrating mechanical stress in the region in which TMs usually form. Thus, mandibular geometries that favor stress concentration, such as square-shaped mandibles, will be associated with a greater prevalence of TMs. Copyright © 2014 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Fracture Mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jang, Dong Il; Jeong, Gyeong Seop; Han, Min Gu

    1992-08-01

    This book introduces basic theory and analytical solution of fracture mechanics, linear fracture mechanics, non-linear fracture mechanics, dynamic fracture mechanics, environmental fracture and fatigue fracture, application on design fracture mechanics, application on analysis of structural safety, engineering approach method on fracture mechanics, stochastic fracture mechanics, numerical analysis code and fracture toughness test and fracture toughness data. It gives descriptions of fracture mechanics to theory and analysis from application of engineering.

  15. Mandibular reconstruction in adults: a review.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goh, B.T.; Lee, S.; Tideman, H.; Stoelinga, P.J.W.

    2008-01-01

    Mandibular defects may result from trauma, inflammatory disease and benign or malignant tumours. Mastication, speech and facial aesthetics are often severely compromised without reconstruction. The goal of mandibular reconstruction is to restore facial form and function, implying repair of

  16. Treatment of Mandibular Prognathism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong-Po Chang

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Mandibular prognathism (MP or skeletal Class III malocclusion with a prognathic mandible is one of the most severe maxillofacial deformities. Facial growth modification can be an effective method of resolving skeletal Class III jaw discrepancies in growing children with dentofacial orthopedic appliances including the chincup, face mask, maxillary protraction combined with chincup traction and the Fränkel functional regulator III appliance. Orthognathic surgery in conjunction with orthodontic treatment is required for the correction of adult MP. The two most commonly applied surgical procedures to correct MP are sagittal split ramus osteotomy (SSRO and intraoral vertical ramus osteotomy. Both procedures are suitable for patients in whom a desirable occlusal relationship can be obtained with a setback of the mandible, and each has its own advantages and disadvantages. In bilateral SSRO, the intentional ostectomy of the posterior part of the distal segment can offer long-term positioned stability. This may be attributable to reduction of tension in the pterygomasseteric sling that applies force in the posterior mandible. While various environmental factors have been found to contribute to the development of MP, heredity plays a substantial role. The relative contributions of genetic and environmental components in the etiology of MP are unclear. The recent identification of the genetic susceptibilities to MP constitutes the first step toward understanding the molecular pathogenesis of MP. Further studies in molecular biology are needed to identify the gene-environment interactions associated with the phenotypic diversity of MP and the heterogenic developmental mechanisms thought to be responsible for them.

  17. [Evaluation of the results of high-speed handpiece and minimally invasive extraction in impacted mandibular third molar extraction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ying-yang; DU, Sheng-nan; Lv, Zong-kai

    2015-08-01

    To compare the results of high-speed handpiece and minimally invasive extraction in impacted mandibular third molar extraction. From May 2011 to May 2014, 83 patients undergoing impacted mandibular third molar extraction were enrolled into the study and randomly divided into 2 groups: 42 patients in group A (experimental group) and 41 patients in group B (control group). Group B underwent extraction with traditional method and group A underwent high-speed handpiece and minimally invasive extraction of the impacted mandibular third molar. The occurrences of the root fracture, gingival laceration, tooth mobility, lingual bone plate fracture, jaw fracture and dislocation of temporomandibular joint during operation and lower lip numbness, dry socket, facial swelling and limitation of mouth opening after operation were observed and compared between 2 groups. The operation time, integrity of extraction sockets, VAS pain score and satisfaction from patients were collected and compared. SPSS 19.0 software package was used for statistical analysis. The occurrences of root fracture, gingival laceration, tooth mobility, lingual bone plate fracture, jaw fracture, and dislocation of temporomandibular joint during operation in group A significantly decreased compared with group B (Pextraction sockets, VAS pain scores and satisfaction scores in group A improved significantly compared with group B (Phandpiece and minimally invasive extraction should be widely used in impacted mandibular third molar extraction, due to the advantages of simple operation, high efficiency, minimal trauma, and few perioperative complications.

  18. Neurovascular structures of the mandibular angle and condyle: a comprehensive anatomical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hun-Mu; Won, Sung-Yoon; Kim, Hee-Jin; Hu, Kyung-Seok

    2015-11-01

    Various surgical interventions including esthetic surgery, salivary gland excision, and open reduction of fracture have been performed in the area around the mandibular angle and condyle. This study aimed to comprehensively review the anatomy of the neurovascular structures on the angle and condyle with recent anatomic and clinical research. We provide detailed information about the branching and distributing patterns of the neurovascular structures at the mandibular angle and condyle, with reported data of measurements and proportions from previous anatomical and clinical research. Our report should serve to help practitioners gain a better understanding of the area in order or reduce potential complications during local procedures. Reckless manipulation during mandibular angle reduction could mutilate arterial branches, not only from the facial artery, but also from the external carotid artery. The transverse facial artery and superficial temporal artery could be damaged during approach and incision in the condylar area. The marginal mandibular branch of the facial nerve can be easily damaged during submandibular gland excision or facial rejuvenation treatment. The main trunk of the facial nerve and its upper and lower distinct divisions have been damaged during parotidectomy, rhytidectomy, and open reductions of condylar fractures. By revisiting the information in the present study, surgeons will be able to more accurately prevent procedure-related complications, such as iatrogenic vascular accidents on the mandibular angle and condyle, complete and partial facial palsy, gustatory sweating (Frey syndrome), and traumatic neuroma after parotidectomy.

  19. Dislocation of the mandibular condyle into the middle cranial fossa causing an epidural haematoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Struewer, Johannes; Kiriazidis, Ilias; Figiel, Jens; Dukatz, Thomas; Frangen, Thomas; Ziring, Ewgeni

    2012-07-01

    Dislocation of the mandibular condyle into the middle cranial fossa is a rare complication of mandibular trauma due to anatomical and biomechanical factors. Owing to the proximity of the temporal glenoid fossa to the middle meningeal artery, there is the risk of serious sequelae in case of trauma. The authors report the case of a 36-year-old male patient, who was beaten up in a family dispute and presented with complex mandibular and maxillofacial fractures, including mandibular condyle intrusion into the middle cranial fossa causing extensive meningeal bleeding. The patient underwent immediate surgery, with evacuation of the epidural haematoma via a temporal approach. In addition open reduction and reconstruction of the temporal glenoid fossa via anatomic reduction of the fragments was performed. A functional occlusion was re-established via miniplate reconstruction of the complex mandibular body and ramus fractures. Prompt diagnosis and a multidisciplinary approach are essential to minimize the complications. Advanced imaging modalities of computed tomography are indicated. Treatment options should be individualized in particular in case of suspected neurological injury. Copyright © 2011 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Osteochondroma of the mandibular condyle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashish Kumar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Osteochondroma (OC of the mandibular condyle is a relatively rare condition that causes a progressive enlargement of the condyle, usually resulting in facial asymmetry, temporomandibular joint (TMJ dysfunction, and malocclusion. Radiographically, there is a unilaterally enlarged condyle usually with an exophytic outgrowth of the tumor from the condylar head. We present a case of a left mandibular condylar OC that created a major facial asymmetry, malocclusion, and TMJ dysfunction. Discussion includes the rationale for treatment and the method used in this case. In actively growing OCs, surgical intervention is indicated to remove the tumor stopping the benign growth process and improve facial symmetry, occlusion, and jaw function.

  1. Pediatric facial fractures: evolving patterns of treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posnick, J C; Wells, M; Pron, G E

    1993-08-01

    This study reviews the treatment of facial trauma between October 1986 and December 1990 at a major pediatric referral center. The mechanism of injury, location and pattern of facial fractures, pattern of facial injury, soft tissue injuries, and any associated injuries to other organ systems were recorded, and fracture management and perioperative complications reviewed. The study population consisted of 137 patients who sustained 318 facial fractures. Eighty-one patients (171 fractures) were seen in the acute stage, and 56 patients (147 fractures) were seen for reconstruction of a secondary deformity. Injuries in boys were more prevalent than in girls (63% versus 37%), and the 6- to 12-year cohort made up the largest group (42%). Most fractures resulted from traffic-related accidents (50%), falls (23%), or sports-related injuries (15%). Mandibular (34%) and orbital fractures (23%) predominated; fewer midfacial fractures (7%) were sustained than would be expected in a similar adult population. Three quarters of the patients with acute fractures required operative intervention. Closed reduction techniques with maxillomandibular fixation were frequently chosen for mandibular condyle fractures and open reduction techniques (35%) for other regions of the facial skeleton. When open reduction was indicated, plate-and-screw fixation was the preferred method of stabilization (65%). The long-term effects of the injuries and the treatment given on facial growth remain undetermined. Perioperative complication rates directly related to the surgery were low.

  2. Post-traumatic changes of the temporo-mandibular joint by bone scintigraphy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harris, S.A.; Rood, J.P.; Testa, H.J.

    1988-01-01

    13 patients who sustained mandibular trauma were investigated with radiographs and scintiscans. The scintiscans showed abnormal uptake of radiopharmaceutical in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). In patients with a long history of traumatic arthrosis, there was more positive correlation between the scintiscans, and clinical symptoms and histology than between radiographs, and symptoms and histology. In patients with mandibular body fractures and no TMJ symptoms, the scans showed abnormal uptake in the TMJ in 7/8 joints, in the absence of radiographic abnormality. The significance of the abnormal uptake and the value of scintigraphy is discussed.

  3. Post-traumatic changes of the temporo-mandibular joint by bone scintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harris, S.A.; Rood, J.P.; Testa, H.J.

    1988-01-01

    13 patients who sustained mandibular trauma were investigated with radiographs and scintiscans. The scintiscans showed abnormal uptake of radiopharmaceutical in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). In patients with a long history of traumatic arthrosis, there was more positive correlation between the scintiscans, and clinical symptoms and histology than between radiographs, and symptoms and histology. In patients with mandibular body fractures and no TMJ symptoms, the scans showed abnormal uptake in the TMJ in 7/8 joints, in the absence of radiographic abnormality. The significance of the abnormal uptake and the value of scintigraphy is discussed. (author)

  4. Number of implants for mandibular implant overdentures: a systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jeong-Yol; Kim, Ha-Young; Bryant, S. Ross

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE The aim of this systematic review is to address treatment outcomes of Mandibular implant overdentures relative to implant survival rate, maintenance and complications, and patient satisfaction. MATERIALS AND METHODS A systematic literature search was conducted by a PubMed search strategy and hand-searching of relevant journals from included studies. Randomized Clinical Trials (RCT) and comparative clinical trial studies on mandibular implant overdentures until August, 2010 were selected. Eleven studies from 1098 studies were finally selected and data were analyzed relative to number of implants. RESULTS Six studies presented the data of the implant survival rate which ranged from 95% to 100% for 2 and 4 implant group and from 81.8% to 96.1% for 1 and 2 implant group. One study, which statistically compared implant survival rate showed no significant differences relative to the number of implants. The most common type of prosthetic maintenance and complications were replacement or reattaching of loose clips for 2 and 4 implant group, and denture repair due to the fracture around an implant for 1 and 2 implant groups. Most studies showed no significant differences in the rate of prosthetic maintenance and complication, and patient satisfaction regardless the number of implants. CONCLUSION The implant survival rate of mandibular overdentures is high regardless of the number of implants. Denture maintenance is likely not inflenced substantially by the number of implants and patient satisfaction is typically high again regardless os the number of implants. PMID:23236572

  5. A clinico-radiologic study of bony remodeling of the fractured condyles in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Jeong Shin; Park, Chang Seo

    1995-01-01

    Bony remodeling pattern of condyle fractures in children are different from in adult for growing of condyle, also might affect treatment and prognosis of the condyle fracture. Subjects of this clinical and radiologic study were 26 temporomandibular joints diagnosed as condyle fracture in 23 patients under 15 years old age, They were treated with conservative method at Dental Hospital of Yonsei University from Jan., 1986 to Oct., 1994. Bony remodeling related with fracture pattern was evaluated. The results obtained are as follows: 1. The ratio of male to female in patients with condyle fracture was 1 : 0.9 and the difference of sex ratio was not noted. Comparing with preschool-age group and school-age group, age frequency was higher in preschool-age group (83%). 2. Fallen down (54%) was the most frequent cause of condyle fractures. Traffic accident and slip down were followed. 3. The most common clinical sign of condyle fractures was tenderness to palpation (19 cases). Mouth opening limitation (17 cases), swelling (7 cases), malocclusion (3 cases) were next in order. 4. According to sites of condyle fractures, unilateral fractures were in 20 patients and bilateral fractures in 3 patients, therefore total 23 patients-26 cases of condyle fracture were observed. According to fracture distribution, condyle fractures were in 10 patients (44%). Condyle fractures with symphysis fracture (9 patients, 39%), condyle fractures with ascending ramus fracture (2 patients, 9%), condyle fracture with mandibular body fracture (1 patient, 4%), and condyle fractures with mandibular angle fracture (1 patient, 4%) were followed. 5. In displacement pattern of fractured fragment of mandibular condyle, displacement (17 cases, 66%) was most common. Dislocation (5 cases, 19%) and deviation (4 cases, 15%) were next in order. 6. During the observation period of fractured condyles, remodeling patterns of fracture sites related with articular fossa were observed with usual congealer shape in 23

  6. A clinico-radiologic study of bony remodeling of the fractured condyles in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Jeong Shin; Park, Chang Seo [Department of Dentistry, The Graduate School, Yonsei University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-08-15

    Bony remodeling pattern of condyle fractures in children are different from in adult for growing of condyle, also might affect treatment and prognosis of the condyle fracture. Subjects of this clinical and radiologic study were 26 temporomandibular joints diagnosed as condyle fracture in 23 patients under 15 years old age, They were treated with conservative method at Dental Hospital of Yonsei University from Jan., 1986 to Oct., 1994. Bony remodeling related with fracture pattern was evaluated. The results obtained are as follows: 1. The ratio of male to female in patients with condyle fracture was 1 : 0.9 and the difference of sex ratio was not noted. Comparing with preschool-age group and school-age group, age frequency was higher in preschool-age group (83%). 2. Fallen down (54%) was the most frequent cause of condyle fractures. Traffic accident and slip down were followed. 3. The most common clinical sign of condyle fractures was tenderness to palpation (19 cases). Mouth opening limitation (17 cases), swelling (7 cases), malocclusion (3 cases) were next in order. 4. According to sites of condyle fractures, unilateral fractures were in 20 patients and bilateral fractures in 3 patients, therefore total 23 patients-26 cases of condyle fracture were observed. According to fracture distribution, condyle fractures were in 10 patients (44%). Condyle fractures with symphysis fracture (9 patients, 39%), condyle fractures with ascending ramus fracture (2 patients, 9%), condyle fracture with mandibular body fracture (1 patient, 4%), and condyle fractures with mandibular angle fracture (1 patient, 4%) were followed. 5. In displacement pattern of fractured fragment of mandibular condyle, displacement (17 cases, 66%) was most common. Dislocation (5 cases, 19%) and deviation (4 cases, 15%) were next in order. 6. During the observation period of fractured condyles, remodeling patterns of fracture sites related with articular fossa were observed with usual congealer shape in 23

  7. An Alternative Method of Intermaxillary Fixation for Simple Pediatric Mandible Fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farber, Scott J; Nguyen, Dennis C; Harvey, Alan A; Patel, Kamlesh B

    2016-03-01

    Mandibular fractures represent a substantial portion of facial fractures in the pediatric population. Pediatric mandibles differ from their adult counterparts in the presence of mixed dentition. Avoidance of injury to developing tooth follicles is critical. Simple mandibular fractures can be treated with intermaxillary fixation (IMF) using arch bars or bone screws. This report describes an alternative to these methods using silk sutures and an algorithm to assist in treating simple mandibular fractures in the pediatric population. A retrospective chart review was performed and the records of 1 surgeon were examined. Pediatric patients who underwent treatment for a mandibular fracture in the operating room from 2011 to 2015 were identified using Common Procedural Terminology codes. Data collected included age, gender, type of fracture, type of treatment used, duration of fixation, and presence of complications. Five patients with a mean age of 6.8 years at presentation were identified. Fracture types were unilateral fractures of the condylar neck (n = 3), bilateral fractures of the condylar head (n = 1), and a unilateral fracture of the condylar head with an associated parasymphyseal fracture (n = 1). IMF was performed in 4 patients using silk sutures, and bone screw fixation was performed in the other patient. No post-treatment complications or malocclusion were reported. Average duration of IMF was 18.5 days. An algorithm is presented to assist in the treatment of pediatric mandibular fractures. Silk suture fixation is a viable and safe alternative to arch bars or bone screws for routine mandibular fractures. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. [Temporo-mandibular ankylosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bénateau, H; Chatellier, A; Caillot, A; Diep, D; Kün-Darbois, J-D; Veyssière, A

    2016-09-01

    Ankylosis of the temporomandibular joint is defined as a permanent constriction of the jaws with less than 30mm mouth opening measured between the incisors, occurring because of bony, fibrous or fibro-osseous fusion. Resulting complications such as speech, chewing, swallowing impediment and deficient oral hygiene may occur. The overall incidence is decreasing but remains significant in some developing countries. The most frequent etiology in developed countries is the post-traumatic ankylosis occurring after condylar fracture. Other causes may be found: infection (decreasing since the advent of antibiotics), inflammation (rheumatoid arthritis and ankylosing spondylitis mainly) and congenital diseases (very rare). Management relies on surgery: resection of the ankylosis block in combination with bilateral coronoidectomy… The block resection may be offset by the interposition temporal fascia flap, a costochondral graft or a TMJ prosthesis according to the loss of height and to the impact on dental occlusion. Postoperative rehabilitation is essential and has to be started early, to be intense and prolonged. Poor rehabilitation is the main cause of ankylosis recurrence. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. The pediatric mandible: II. Management of traumatic injury or fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smartt, James M; Low, David W; Bartlett, Scott P

    2005-08-01

    After studying this article, the participant should be able to: 1. Describe the changing epidemiology of mandibular fractures in children and adolescents. 2. Discuss the appropriate use of internal fixation in the treatment of pediatric mandibular fractures. 3. Describe the difficulties posed by the deciduous dentition in the use of interdental wiring. 4. Understand reasons why techniques specific to adult fractures may not be applicable to the growing mandible. 5. Understand the etiology and epidemiology of pediatric mandibular fractures. 6. Understand the reasons for conservative (closed) versus aggressive (open) treatment of mandibular injury. Fractures of the pediatric mandible are complicated by the anatomic complexity of the developing mandible, particularly by the presence of tooth buds and the eruption of deciduous and permanent teeth. Traditional methods of fracture reduction and fixation employed in adults have little applicability in the pediatric population. The authors describe the surgical techniques that have been used at their institution and those that can be used safely in the pediatric setting. In most cases, "conservative" management is the preferred option, especially in the treatment of condylar fractures. In cases requiring surgical intervention, interdental wiring, drop wires in combination with circummandibular wires, and acrylic splints are suited well to specific phases of dental maturation. Open reduction and internal fixation using monocortical screws and microplates or resorbable plates and screws are acceptable techniques in the pediatric patient, but they require special safeguards. Algorithms are presented to simplify management of these complicated injuries.

  10. Fractures of the growing mandible.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kushner, George M; Tiwana, Paul S

    2009-03-01

    Oral and maxillofacial surgeons must constantly weigh the risks of surgical intervention for pediatric mandible fractures against the wonderful healing capacity of children. The majority of pediatric mandibular fractures can be managed with closed techniques using short periods of maxillomandibular fixation or training elastics alone. Generally, the use of plate- and screw-type internal fixation is reserved for difficult fractures. This article details general and special considerations for this surgery including: craniofacial growth & development, surgical anatomy, epidemiology evaluation, various fractures, the role rigid internal fixation and the Risdon cable in pediatric maxillofacial trauma. It concludes with suggestions concerning long-term follow-up care in light of the mobility, insurance obstacles, and family dynamics facing the patient population.

  11. Roentgenographic study of the mandibular canal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahn, Hyung Kyu

    1980-01-01

    The mandibular canal must be considered carefully during the surgical treatment, especially surgical extraction of the impacted tooth and intraosseous implant, because it contains the important inferior alveolar nerve and vessels. The author investigated the curvature of the mandibular canal and its relation to the mandibular molars and positional relation between the mental foramen and the mandibular premolars in orthopantomogram. The materials consisted of 441 orthopantomograms divided four groups; Group I consisted of 56 males and 44 females from 1 to 6 years of age, Group II consisted of 58 males and 45 females from 7 to 12 years of age, Group III consisted of 65 males and 33 females from 13 to 18 years of age, Group IV consisted of 86 males and 54 females over 19 years of age. The results were as followings; 1. The curvature of mandibular canal was 144.50 .deg. in Group II, 148.11 .deg. in Group III, 147.33 .deg. in Group IV. 2. The curvature of mandibular canal was located most frequently on the area between mandibular 1st molar and mandibular 2nd molar in Group I (42%) and on the mandibular 2nd molar area in Group II (54%), Group III (59%), Group IV (53%). 3. The position of mental foramen was most frequently below the mandibular 1st premolar in Group I (58%), between the mandibular 1st premolar and the 2nd premolar in Group II (62%), Group III (47%), and below the mandibular 2nd premolar in Group IV (58%).

  12. Radiologic study of mandibular foramen of mandibular prognathism by three-dimensional computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Seung Hun; Moon, Cheol Hyun; Im, Jeong Soo; Seo, Hwa Jeong [Graduate School of Public Health and Social Welfare, Gachon University of Medicine and Science, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-06-15

    This study is aimed to evaluate the position of mandibular foramen of mandibular prognathism patients using 3-dimensional CT images in order to reduce the chance of an anesthetic failure of the mandibular nerve and to prevent the damage to the inferior alveolar nerve during the orthognathic surgery. The control group consist of 30 patients with class I occlusion. The experimental group consist of 44 patients with class III malocclusion. Three-dimensional computed tomography was used to evaluate the position of the mandibular foramina. The distance between mandibular plane and mandibular foramen, class I was 25.385 mm, class III was 23.628 mm. About the distance between occlusal plane and mandibular foramen, class I was 1.478 mm, class III was 5.144 mm. The distance between posterior border plan of mandibular ramus and mandibular foramen had not statistically significant. About the distance between sagittal plane of mandible and mandibular foramen did not also showed statistically significant. The result of this study could help the clinicians to apprehend more accurate anatomical locations of the foramina on the mandible with various facial skeletal types. Thereby to perform more accurate block anesthesia of the mandibular nerve and osteotomy with minimal nerve damage. In addition, this study could provide fundamental data for any related researches about the location of the mandibular foramina for other purposes.

  13. Radiologic study of mandibular foramen of mandibular prognathism by three-dimensional computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Seung Hun; Moon, Cheol Hyun; Im, Jeong Soo; Seo, Hwa Jeong

    2010-01-01

    This study is aimed to evaluate the position of mandibular foramen of mandibular prognathism patients using 3-dimensional CT images in order to reduce the chance of an anesthetic failure of the mandibular nerve and to prevent the damage to the inferior alveolar nerve during the orthognathic surgery. The control group consist of 30 patients with class I occlusion. The experimental group consist of 44 patients with class III malocclusion. Three-dimensional computed tomography was used to evaluate the position of the mandibular foramina. The distance between mandibular plane and mandibular foramen, class I was 25.385 mm, class III was 23.628 mm. About the distance between occlusal plane and mandibular foramen, class I was 1.478 mm, class III was 5.144 mm. The distance between posterior border plan of mandibular ramus and mandibular foramen had not statistically significant. About the distance between sagittal plane of mandible and mandibular foramen did not also showed statistically significant. The result of this study could help the clinicians to apprehend more accurate anatomical locations of the foramina on the mandible with various facial skeletal types. Thereby to perform more accurate block anesthesia of the mandibular nerve and osteotomy with minimal nerve damage. In addition, this study could provide fundamental data for any related researches about the location of the mandibular foramina for other purposes.

  14. Proximal mandibular nerve block using electrolocation in 10 dogs undergoing mandibular surgery: a case series report.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuliano Ravasio

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Peripheral nerve block performed using electrical stimulation (i.e. electrolocation is widely used for perioperative pain management during several surgical procedures in dogs (Campoy 2008, but few data are reported concerning its application to invasive maxillofacial surgery (Carotenuto et al 2011. The aim of this case series report is to evaluate the efficacy of proximal mandibular nerve block (PMNB in perioperative pain management in dogs undergoing mandibulectomy. Ten dogs of various breeds, (six spayed females and four neutered males of 10.353.09 years and mean weight of 19.5615.19 kg presenting either neoplasia or mandibular fracture and scheduled for mandibulectomy were premedicated with intramuscular acepromazine maleate (0.02 mg/kg; after induction of general anaesthesia, bilateral PMNB was performed with ropivacaine 0.75% (2 mg/kg inserting the stimulated needle in temporomandibular joint direction. Whenever intraoperative nociception occurred, intravenous rescue analgesia was provided (fentanyl 3 g/kg. Carprofen was administered subcutaneously as a sole postoperative treatment (3 mg/kg and postoperative analgesia was assessed for at least 24 hours by a blind operator, accordingly to the Glasgow composite pain scale (Reid et al 2007; when it overcame a threshold of 5/24, intravenous rescue analgesia was administered (methadone, 0.2 mg/kg. In eight out of ten dogs no intraoperative nociception was shown, while in two dogs a single intravenous fentanyl administration was sufficient to provide additional analgesia. No acute and medium term complications were observed and postoperative analgesia lasted for 20.5±6.1 hours. PMNB seems to provide effective perioperative long-lasting analgesia leading to a reduction in intra- and postoperative drug administration.

  15. Malunited fracture of the body and condyle of the mandible : A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeluri, Ramakrishna; Baliga, Sudhindra; Munshi, Autar Krishen

    2010-07-01

    Mandibular fractures are the most common facial fractures seen in hospitalized children and their incidence increases with age. Treatment options include soft diet, intermaxillary fixation with eyelet wires, arch bars, circummandibular wiring, or stents. Alternative options include open reduction and internal fixation through either an intraoral or extraoral approach. Many factors complicate the management of pediatric mixed-dentition mandibular fractures: tooth eruption, short roots, developing tooth buds and growth issues. One major factor is the inherent instability of the occlusion in the mixed deciduous-permanent tooth phase. This case report documents a child in mixed dentition period with a complication arising due to direct fixation of the fractured mandible.

  16. Pharyngeal airway changes following mandibular setback surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babu Ramesh

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Treatment of dentofacial deformities with jaw osteotomies has an effect on airway anatomy and therefore mandibular setback surgery has the potential to diminish airway size. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of mandibular setback surgery on airway size. 8 consecutive patients were examined prospectively. All patients underwent mandibular setback surgery. Cephalometric analysis was performed preoperatively and 3 months post operatively with particular attention to pharyngeal airway changes. Pharyngeal airway size decreased considerably in all, patients thus predisposing to development of obstructive sleep apnea. Therefore, large anteroposterior discrepancies should be corrected by combined maxillary and mandibular osteotomies.

  17. Risk Factors and Surgical Refinements of Postresective Mandibular Reconstruction: A Retrospective Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akiko Sakakibara

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Postresective mandibular reconstruction is common in cases of oral and mandibular tumors. However, complications such as infection, plate exposure, or plate fracture can occur. We identified several significant risk factors of complications after reconstructive surgery and compared the effectiveness of different surgical techniques for reducing the incidence of complications. Methods. This study is a retrospective analysis of 28 oromandibular cancer cases that required reconstructive surgery between January 1999 and December 2011 at Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine in Japan. All cases were classified using Hashikawa’s CAT and Eichner’s classification methods. Then, we determined whether these classifications and different treatment or surgical methods were significantly related to complications. Results. Complications after mandibular reconstruction occurred in 10/28 patients (36%. Specifically, five patients had plate fractures, four had plate exposures, and one had an infection. Radiation therapy and closure without any flaps were significantly related to infection or plate exposure. The wrap-around technique of securing reconstruction plates was used in 14 cases, whereas the run-through technique was used in two cases. Conclusions. The success of mandibular reconstruction depends on both mechanical and biological factors, such as the location of defects, presence of occlusions, and the amount of vascularization of the flap.

  18. Open Reduction in Pediatric Condylar Fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa, Alexandre Agostini; Mariano, Ronaldo Célio

    2017-05-01

    Facial fractures in children are rare. Lack of pneumatization, fat pockets, mixed dentition, contribute to the elasticity and bone stability. When mandibular fractures occur in children, most often involve the condyle by indirect trauma. Such fractures are the center of discussion on the form of treatment if this should be performed conservatively, or held the reduction and fixation of the fracture with surgical exposure of the fragments. In condylar fractures in children, in most patients, the proposed treatment is closed reduction. Treatment with open reduction and fixation has its specific indications. In this case, the authors report a patient cycling accident victim, with cut-contusion injury in ment with limited mouth opening and left condylar fracture with medial rotation. The treatment was the reduction and fixation of fragments by open process.

  19. Teeth in the Line of Fracture: To Retain or Remove?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samson, Jimson; John, Reena; Jayakumar, Shalini

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze mandibular fracture site, relationship of the fracture line to the periodontium, vitality of teeth, displacement of the fracture segments and their implications, and determine whether to retain or remove the teeth in the fracture line. Fifty patients with 62 fractures were involved in this study. An electric pulp tester was used to measure the pulpal response. The degree of fracture displacement and the relationship of the fracture line to the periodontium were evaluated using panoramic radiographs. Fractures of the parasymphysis region constituted a majority of 60.87% in the gross displacement category. Four of 50 patients showed no response presurgically and minimal response postoperatively on pulp vitality testing. Patients with teeth in the fracture line showing no response on pulp vitality testing should be advised extraction to avoid further complications. PMID:22132255

  20. Pediatric maxillary fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jack; Dinsmore, Robert; Mar, Philip; Bhatt, Kirit

    2011-07-01

    Pediatric craniofacial structures differ from those of adults in many ways. Because of these differences, management of pediatric craniofacial fractures is not the same as those in adults. The most important differences that have clinical relevance are the mechanical properties, craniofacial anatomy, healing capacity, and dental morphology. This article will review these key differences and the management of pediatric maxillary fractures. From the mechanical properties' perspective, pediatric bones are much more resilient than adult bones; as such, they undergo plastic deformation and ductile failure. From the gross anatomic perspective, the relative proportion of the cranial to facial structures is much larger for the pediatric patients and the sinuses are not yet developed. The differences related to dentition and dental development are more conical crowns, larger interdental spaces, and presence of permanent tooth buds in the pediatric population. The fracture pattern, as a result of all the above, does not follow the classic Le Fort types. The maxillomandibular fixation may require circum-mandibular wires, drop wires, or Ivy loops. Interfragmentary ligatures using absorbable sutures play a much greater role in these patients. The use of plates and screws should take into consideration the future development with respect to growth centers and the location of the permanent tooth buds. Pediatric maxillary fractures are not common, require different treatments, and enjoy better long-term outcomes.

  1. Mandibular advancement appliance for obstructive sleep apnoea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petri, Niels; Svanholt, Palle; Solow, Beni

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this trial was to evaluate the efficacy of a mandibular advancement appliance (MAA) for obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA). Ninety-three patients with OSA and a mean apnoea-hypopnoea index (AHI) of 34.7 were centrally randomised into three, parallel groups: (a) MAA; (b) mandibular non...

  2. Ultrasound and multidetector computed tomography of mandibular ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Because of local invasivity and high metastatic potential, preoperative imaging evaluation of mandibular region and tumoral staging is essential along with biopsy sampling. The present manuscript describes the ultrasound and computed tomographic imaging findings of mandibular gland adenocarcinoma in two dogs and ...

  3. Influence of mandibular length on mouth opening

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkstra, PU; Hof, AL; Stegenga, B; De Bont, LGM

    Theoretically, mouth opening not only reflects the mobility of the temporomandibular joints (TMJs) but also the mandibular length. Clinically, the exact relationship between mouth opening, mandibular length, and mobility of TMJs is unclear. To study this relationship 91 healthy subjects, 59 women

  4. A New Method for Surgical Treatment of Subcondylar Fractures: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gholamreza Shirani

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available AbstractSubcondylar fractures are common in the maxillofacial region following direct trauma to the mandibular ramus. The literature is replete with articles written on the treatment of subcondylar fractures, encompassing a plethora of various surgical approaches; however, the best treatment procedure has remained controversial. Such fractures are either treated by open reduction with internal fixation or closed reduction with maxillomandibular fixation. In this article, we describe a new surgical method for treatment of subcondylar fractures.

  5. Cerebro-costo-mandibular syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flodmark, P.; Wattsgaard, C.

    2001-01-01

    Cerebro-costo-mandibular syndrome is a rare disorder characterized by rib malformations, various degrees of cerebral maldevelopment, mental deficiency, palatal defects, and micrognatia. This syndrome was first described in 1966. The majority of cases are sporadic, but a few instances of familial occurrence have been reported, some with an autosomal recessive pattern of inheritance. Mortality in early age has been high, probably mostly due to respiratory insufficiency secondary to rib abnormalities and flail chest. We report a mother and son with this disorder, suggesting autosomal dominant transmission. (orig.)

  6. Finite element analysis and clinical complications in mandibular implant-overdentures opposing maxillary dentures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khuder, Tameem; Yunus, Norsiah; Sulaiman, Eshamsul; Dabbagh, Ali

    2017-11-01

    Denture fracture is a common clinical complication caused by improper material selection, design, or fabrication technique. This study aimed to investigate the effect of two attachment systems on fracture risk of the implant-overdentures (IOD) via finite element analysis (FEA), using the force distributions obtained from patients' occlusal analyses and to compare the obtained results with the clinical complications associated with these attachments. A three-dimensional jaw model comprised of the edentulous bones was constructed. Three types of mandibular prostheses including complete denture (CD) (model LCD), IOD with Locator attachment (model LID-L), and IOD with telescopic attachment (model LID-T), as well as a maxillary CD (model UCD) were assembled. The vertical occlusal forces at anterior and posterior quadrants were obtained from the patients wearing mandibular CDs or IODs. The FEA results were further compared with the mechanical failures of different prostheses observed at patient recalls. In overall, the fracture risk of mandibular prostheses was lower than the maxillary compartments. The UCD opposing LCD underwent higher strains than that opposing LID-L and LID-T, which was mostly concentrated at the anterior mid-palatal polished surface. On the other hand, LID-L showed the lowest strain, followed by LID-T, and LCD. The obtained results were consistent with the clinical complications observed in the patient recalls. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. [Long-term follow-up study of titanium implant impact on pediatric mandibular growth and development].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yun; Li, Wei; Chen, Qi; Song, Fumin; Tang, Wei; Wang, Hang

    2015-08-01

    To explore the impact of titanium implant on the growth and development of pediatric mandible after suffering from mandibular fracture and undergoing open reduction and internal fixation (ORIF) compared with those that underwent titanium plate removal postoperatively. Fifteen pediatric patients with mandibular fracture who underwent ORIF were included in this study. Eight patients did not undergo titanium implant removal postoperatively, whereas the other seven patients underwent the routine. The postoperative data of the pediatrics were collected for comparative analysis by taking the patients' frontal and lateral photos, recording the inter-incisor distance, and measuring the height of mandibular ramus, length of the mandibular body, and combined length of the mandible in three-dimensional reconstruction image. All patients had acceptable facial contour, mouth opening, and occlusion, without obvious abnormalities. The radiography showed no significant difference between the bilateral mandibular lengths in the two groups of patients (P>0.05). The titanium plants have no significant impact on the growth and development of pediatric mandible postoperatively; hence, the question on whether the titanium plates should be removed or not may be neglected. The removal operation may lead to secondary trauma; thus, performing titanium plate removal routinely is not recommended.

  8. Biomechanical considerations in mandibular incisor extraction cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rachala, Madhukar Reddy; Aileni, Kaladhar Reddy; Dasari, Arun Kumar; Sinojiya, Jay

    2015-01-01

    Mandibular incisor extraction can be regarded as a valuable treatment option in certain malocclusions to obtain excellence in orthodontic results in terms of function, aesthetics and stability. This treatment alternative is indicated in clinical situations like mild to moderate class III malocclusion, mild anterior mandibular tooth size excess, periodontally compromised teeth, ectopic eruption of mandibular incisor and minimal openbite tendencies. Unlike in premolar extraction cases, space closure in mandibular incisor extraction cases is unique in which the extraction space will be in the middle of the arch. The end result of space closure in these cases should be well aligned, upright, anterior teeth with parallel roots and the goal can be achieved with the bodily tooth movement through proper application of biomechanics. The purpose of this article is to explain the biomechanics of space closure in mandibular incisor extraction cases.

  9. Isolated Fracture of the Coracoid Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Güleç

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Coracoid fractures are rarely seen fractures. In the shoulder girdle, coracoid process fractures generally accompany dislocation of the acromioclavicular joint or glenohumeral joint, scapula corpus, clavicula, humerus fracture, or rotator cuff tear. Coracoid fractures can be missed and the treatment for coracoid process fractures is still controversial. In this paper, a 34-year-old male manual labourer presented to the emergency department with complaints of pain and restricted movement in the left shoulder following a traffic accident. On direct radiographs and computerised tomography images a fragmented fracture was observed on the base of the coracoid process. In addition to the coracoid fracture, a mandibular fracture was determined. The patient was admitted for surgery on both fractures. After open reduction, fixation was made with a 3.5 mm cannulated screw and washer. At the postoperative 6th week, bone union was determined. The patient returned to his previous occupation pain-free and with a full range of joint movement. In conclusion, in the current case of isolated fragmented coracoid process fracture showing minimal displacement in a patient engaged in heavy manual work, surgery was preferred as it was thought that nonunion might be encountered particularly because of the effect of forces around the coracoid.

  10. Mandibular Fractures at Veer Chandra Singh Garhwali Government ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    fights and assault (08/121‑6.6%) and industrial accidents (02/121‑1.6%). In our study .... geography, social trends, road traffic legislation and seasons. In urban areas in .... take care of the house hold and do laborious work. It is in common ...

  11. [The temporo-mandibular articulation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dargaud, J; Vinkka-Puhakka, H

    2004-04-01

    The standing posture of humans has created both morphological and functional adaptations in the temporo-mandibular joint and the masticatory function. This biped state is the one of the most important characteristic of human evolution. It is furthermore the agent determining most of the functional changes in the whole body. This survey will be carried out in several levels including, a descriptive anatomy, biomechanics, radiological imaging, functioning in the articulation of TMJ. The descriptive anatomic picture will be obtained by the traditional dissection techniques. 20 TMJ joints are dissected from 10 cadavers: 7 cadavers, 65-75 year old, 3 cadavers, 60-65 year old. The x-rays are lateral view and the subjects of the radiological imaging are young's, adults and olds: 1, 3 y-old Male; 1, 7 y-old Female; 1, 14 y-old Female; 10, 19-23 y-old Male; 1, 26 y-old Female; 1, 34 y-old Male; 1, 75 y-old Female. The anatomic elements in the TMJ well resembled the ones described in the literature of the capsule, the ligament, the masticator muscles (masseter, temporal, medial and lateral pterygoids). The temporo-mandibular ligament proved to be difficult to separate from the capsule in some of the specimens. Sometimes it was not always found after a dissection.

  12. Quality of Postoperative Pain Management After Maxillofacial Fracture Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peisker, Andre; Meissner, Winfried; Raschke, Gregor F; Fahmy, Mina D; Guentsch, Arndt; Schiller, Juliane; Schultze-Mosgau, Stefan

    2018-05-01

    Effective pain management is an essential component in the perioperative care of surgical patients. However, postoperative pain after maxillofacial fracture repair and its optimal therapy has not been described in detail. In a prospective cohort study, 95 adults rated their pain on the first postoperative day after maxillofacial fracture repair using the questionnaire of the Quality Improvement in Postoperative Pain Management (QUIPS) project. Quality Improvement in Postoperative Pain Management allowed for a standardized assessment of patients' characteristics and pain-related parameters. Overall, the mean maximal pain and pain on activity (numeric rating scales) were significantly higher in patients with mandibular fractures than in patients with midface fractures (P = 0.002 and P = 0.045, respectively). In patients with mandibular fractures, a longer duration of surgery was significantly associated with higher satisfaction with pain intensity (P = 0.015), but was more frequently associated with postoperative vomiting (P = 0.023). A shorter duration of surgery and an absence of preoperative pain counseling in these patients were significantly correlated to desire for more pain medication (P = 0.049 and P = 0.004, respectively). Patients with mandibular fractures that received opioids in the recovery room had significantly higher strain-related pain (P = 0.017). In patients with midface fractures, a longer duration of surgery showed significantly higher levels of decreased mobility (P = 0.003). Patients receiving midazolam for premedication had significantly less minimal pain (P = 0.021). Patients with mandibular fractures seem to have more postoperative pain than patients with midface fractures. Monitoring of postsurgical pain and a procedure-specific pain-treatment protocol should be performed in clinical routine.

  13. Endodontic therapy for a fused mandibular molar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotstein, I; Moshonov, J; Cohenca, N

    1997-06-01

    Variations in tooth morphology present a clinical challenge when endodontic treatment is required. A case of conservative endodontic therapy for a fused mandibular second and third molar is presented.

  14. Mandibular incisor apicoectomy in a Canadian Beaver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steenkamp, Gerhard; Venter, Leon; Crossley, David; Buss, Peter

    2009-01-01

    A 52-month-old Canadian beaver was presented for treatment of lip trauma resulting from overgrowth of the right mandibular incisor tooth following earlier loss of the right maxillary incisor tooth. Extraction of the affected tooth was considered, but rejected due to the length of the embedded portion of rodent mandibular incisor teeth. The lip injury was managed by crown reduction (odontoplasty) of the overgrowing incisor tooth pending a more permanent treatment plan. A 2-cm apicoectomy of the right mandibular incisor tooth was performed to arrest growth of the tooth when the beaver was 82-months-old. The remainder of the tooth continued to erupt and was completely expelled during a 9-month period with one additional odontoplasty being required. The beaver continued to feed normally with just the left maxillary and mandibular incisor teeth until its death at 118-months, with odontoplasty performed twice on the remaining incisor teeth during the 30-months following exfoliation.

  15. Hip Fracture

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... hip fractures in people of all ages. In older adults, a hip fracture is most often a result of a fall from a standing height. In people with very weak bones, a hip fracture can occur simply by standing on the leg and twisting. Risk factors The rate of hip fractures increases substantially with ...

  16. Morphologic and Morphometric Analysis of Lingula in Localizing Mandibular Foramen with its Surgical Importance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phalguni Srimani

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Morphologic and morphometric evaluation of mandible is clinically important. Considering the close relationship of lingula with neurovascular structures entering through mandibular foramen, lingula is often used as an important bony landmark during oral and maxillofacial surgical approach and inferior alveolar nerve block anaesthesia. Inadequate anatomical knowledge may result various intra operative complications like haemorrhge, fractures and nerve injury. Also, structural variations of lingula followed by inaccurate localization of mandibular foramen have been implicated as causative factor for unsuccessful inferior alveolar nerve block anaesthesia. Aim: To determine morphological and morphometric variations related to lingula of mandible in localizing mandibular foramen and to compare the results with similar type of osteological studies performed earlier on different population group. Materials and Methods: The study was performed on 36 adult dry human mandibles on both sides to categorize lingula according to its various shapes and determine the location of lingula based on surrounding mandibular landmarks by using Vernier caliper as 5 distances from tip of lingula as follows: i to anterior border of ramus of mandible; ii to posterior border of ramus of mandible; iii to centre of mandibular notch; iv to the alveolar socket of second molar tooth; and v to the base of mandible. The present study also indicated bilingual distance between tips of lingula of both sides. Data collected were analyzed statistically. Results: The most common shape of lingula was observed as triangular (51.39% followed by truncated (23.61%, then nodular (20.83% and assimilated (4.17% as least prevalent type. The average distances of tip of lingula from anterior and posterior borders of ramus of mandible were 18.21±1.50 mm and 16.33±1.21 mm respectively. On average, the tip of lingula was situated at 18.17±1.51 mm, 33.40±2.11 mm and 32.07±2.68 mm

  17. Locating Mandibular Foramen in Children with Mandibular Retrognathism in Mixed Dentition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehrsa Paryab

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and aims. One of the most common reasons forthe inferior alveolar nerve block anesthesia failure is the variation in mandibular foramen location. The aim of this study was to assess the location of mandibular foramen in chil-dren with mandibular retrognathism in comparison to children with normal skeletal occlusion in the mixed dentition. Materials and methods. One hundred and twenty panoramic radiographs of patients in mixed dentition period, undergo-ing orthodontic treatment, were selected based on inclusion criteria, skeletal occlusion and stage of dental development. The radiographs were divided into two groups: I: 60 panoramic radiographs of patients with normal skeletal occlusion (15 in each of the Hellman dental age stages; II: 60 panoramic radiographs of patients with mandibular retrognathism (15 in each of the Hellman dental age stages. The radiographs were traced and the linear distance from the mandibular foramen to the borders of the mandibular ramus and its angular position were identified. The measurements were compared between the two groups and among the four dental age groups by t-test, ANOVA and post hoc tests. Results. No statistically significant differences werefound between the patients with normal skeletal occlusion and patients with mandibular retrognathism (P>0.05. Statistical tests showed significant differences in the vertical location of mandibu-lar foramen and gonial angle between the four dental age groups (P<0.05. Conclusion. Mandibular retrognathism does not have a significant impact on the location of the mandibular foramen in the mixed dentition period. The child’s dental age would be considered in the localization of the mandibular foramen.

  18. [Orthodontic treatment of Class III patients with mandibular asymmetry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Yin-Zhong; Huo, Na; Chen, Lei; Chen, Xue-Peng; Lin, Yang

    2008-12-01

    To investigate the treatment outcome of Class III patients with dental, functional and mild skeletal mandibular asymmetry. Thirty-five patients (14 males and 21 females) with dental, functional and mild skeletal mandibular asymmetry were selected. The age range of the patients was 7 - 22 years with a mean age of 16.5 years. Dental mandibular asymmetry was treated with expansion of maxillary arch to help the mandible returning to normal position. Functional mandibular asymmetry was treated with activator or asymmetrical protraction and Class III elastics. Mild skeletal mandibular asymmetry was treated with camouflage treatment. Good occlusal relationships were achieved and facial esthetics was greatly improved after orthodontic treatment in patients with dental and functional mandibular asymmetry. However, patients with skeletal mandibular asymmetry should be treated with both extraction and genioplasty. Orthodontic treatment was suitable for patients with dental and functional mandibular asymmetry, while combined orthodontics and surgery could get good results in patients with skeletal mandibular asymmetry.

  19. Mandibulectomy for treatment of fractures associated with severe periodontal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Carina Marchiori; Rahal, Sheila Canevese; Dos Reis Mesquita, Luciane; Castilho, Maíra Sales; Kano, Washington Takashi; Mamprim, Maria Jaqueline

    2015-03-01

    Six cases of mandibular fractures associated with severe periodontal disease that had been treated by mandibulectomy, due to intense bone loss, were evaluated retrospectively. The dogs were mainly older, small breed dogs that had suffered a traumatic event. Four dogs had a bilateral mandibulectomy and 2 a unilateral mandibulectomy.

  20. Mandibulectomy for treatment of fractures associated with severe periodontal disease

    OpenAIRE

    Carvalho, Carina Marchiori; Rahal, Sheila Canevese; dos Reis Mesquita, Luciane; Castilho, Maíra Sales; Kano, Washington Takashi; Mamprim, Maria Jaqueline

    2015-01-01

    Six cases of mandibular fractures associated with severe periodontal disease that had been treated by mandibulectomy, due to intense bone loss, were evaluated retrospectively. The dogs were mainly older, small breed dogs that had suffered a traumatic event. Four dogs had a bilateral mandibulectomy and 2 a unilateral mandibulectomy.

  1. Maxillofacial fracture experiences: a review of 152 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydin, Osman Enver; Tan, Onder; Algan, Said; Kuduban, Selma Denktas; Barin, Ensar Zafer; Cinal, Hakan; Sarici, Murat; Avsar, Umit

    2012-12-01

    The fractures of facial structures lead to great morbidity. Cross-sectional studies are needed to evaluate the current state of maxillofacial traumas. Thus, this study aims to evaluate these experiences and to compare these results with the current literature. The medical records of the maxillofacial fracture cases hospitalized between January 2004 and November 2011 were examined. The age, sex, etiology, fracture localization and treatment method for each case were documented. The affected facial bones were grouped as mandible, maxilla, zygoma, naso-orbitoethmoid complex (NOEC) and blow-out. Nasal fractures were excluded. The cases were assigned to 3 groups with respect to age (below 16, above 65 and between 17 and 64). The chi Square test was used to assess the significance of the difference in mandibular fracture rates in the pediatric population compared to others. The total number of cases was 152. The total number of fractures was 185. Of the 152 cases, 117 were male and 35 were female. The average age was 31.4 (±18.3), ranging between 2 and 81. Thirty-one cases were 16 years old or less. Nine cases were 65 years old or more. Mandibular and zygomatic fractures were the most prevalent fractures in the adult group. Mandibular fractures were significantly more common in the pediatric age group compared to rest of the population (X(2), pOpen reduction and internal fixation was the most frequently conducted treatment modality in all age groups. Retrospective studies are important for the projection of future prospects. In summary, our results indicate that pediatric fractures are mostly in the lower face and usually affect the condylar region, which is consistent with the literature.

  2. Evaluation of reference gene suitability for quantitative expression analysis by quantitative polymerase chain reaction in the mandibular condyle of sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Xin; Xue, Yang; Zhou, Hongzhi; Li, Shouhong; Zhang, Zongmin; Hou, Rui; Ding, Yuxiang; Hu, Kaijin

    2015-10-01

    Reference genes are commonly used as a reliable approach to normalize the results of quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR), and to reduce errors in the relative quantification of gene expression. Suitable reference genes belonging to numerous functional classes have been identified for various types of species and tissue. However, little is currently known regarding the most suitable reference genes for bone, specifically for the sheep mandibular condyle. Sheep are important for the study of human bone diseases, particularly for temporomandibular diseases. The present study aimed to identify a set of reference genes suitable for the normalization of qPCR data from the mandibular condyle of sheep. A total of 12 reference genes belonging to various functional classes were selected, and the expression stability of the reference genes was determined in both the normal and fractured area of the sheep mandibular condyle. RefFinder, which integrates the following currently available computational algorithms: geNorm, NormFinder, BestKeeper, and the comparative ΔCt method, was used to compare and rank the candidate reference genes. The results obtained from the four methods demonstrated a similar trend: RPL19, ACTB, and PGK1 were the most stably expressed reference genes in the sheep mandibular condyle. As determined by RefFinder comprehensive analysis, the results of the present study suggested that RPL19 is the most suitable reference gene for studies associated with the sheep mandibular condyle. In addition, ACTB and PGK1 may be considered suitable alternatives.

  3. Masticatory System Biomechanical Photoelastic Simulation fot the Comparision of the Conventional and Uni-Lock Systems in Mandibular Osteosynthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose Luis Cebrian Carretero

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The biomechanical consequences of the interaction between titanium trauma plates and screws and the fractured mandible are still a matter of investigation. The mathematical and biomechanical models that have been developed show limitations and the experimental studies are not able to reproduce muscle forces and internal stress distributions in the bone-implant interface and mandibular structure. In the present article we show a static simulator of the masticatory system to demonstrate in epoxy resin mandibular models, by means of 3D (three-dimensional photoelasticity, the stress distribution using different osteosynthesis methods in the mandibular angle fractures. The results showed that the simulator and 3D photoelasticity were a useful method to study interactions between bone and osteosynthesis materials. The “Lock” systems can be considered the most favourable method due to their stress distribution in the epoxy resin mandible. 3D photoelasticity in epoxy resin models is a useful method to evaluate stress distribution for biomechanical studies. Regarding to mandibular osteosynthesis, “lock” plates offer the most favourable stress distribution due to being less aggressive to the bone

  4. The effects of orthognathic surgery on mandibular movements in patients with mandibular prognathism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sinobad Vladimir

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Mandibular prognathism, one of the most severe dentofacial deformities, affects the person’s appearance, psychological health and the quality of life in the most sensitive age period. Objective. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of sagittal split ramus osteotomy on the range of mandibular border movements in the early postoperative period. Methods. The study was conducted on 20 patients, of mean age 20.8 years, with mandibular prognathism. All patients included in this study were operated on by bilateral sagittal spliting ramus osteotomy according to Obwegeser and Dal Pont followed by mandibular immobilization during eight weeks. In all patients mandibular border movements were recorded before and six months after surgery using the computerized pantograph Arcus-Digma (KaVo EWL GmbH, Leutkirch, Germany. Results. The analysis of the chosen kinematic parameters revealed that sagittal split ramus osteotomy followed by eight weeks of mandibular immobilization had severe effects on the mouth opening. Six months after surgery the range of maximal mouth opening decreased for approximately 13.9 mm in relation to the preoperative stage. On the contrary, the ranges of maximal protrusion and the border of laterotrusive excursions increased significantly after surgery. Conclusion. In patients with mandibular prognathism where enormous mandibular growth was the main causal factor of the deformity, the sagittal split ramus osteotomy yielded good results. The rigid fixation of bone fragments and reduced period of mandibular immobilization followed by appropriate physical therapy could considerably contribute to a more rapid recovery of mandibular kinematics in the postoperative period.

  5. Evidence-based medicine: Mandible fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrow, Brad T; Samson, Thomas D; Schubert, Warren; Mackay, Donald R

    2014-12-01

    After studying this article, the participant should be able to: 1. Describe the anatomy and subunits of the mandible. 2. Review the cause and epidemiology of mandible fractures. 3. Discuss the preoperative evaluation and diagnostic imaging. 4. Understand the principles and techniques of mandible fracture reduction and fixation. The management of mandibular fractures has undergone significant improvement because of advancements in plating technology, imaging, and instrumentation. As the techniques in management continue to evolve, it is imperative for the practicing physician to remain up-to-date with the growing body of scientific literature. The objective of this Maintenance of Certification article is to present a review of the literature so that the physician may make treatment recommendation based on the best evidence available. Pediatric fractures have been excluded from this article.

  6. Apexification of nonvital immature mandibular premolars using two different techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping-Han Wen

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this report was to present two cases of mandibular premolars with necrotic pulp and open apices treated with two different techniques. The first case was a 20-year-old female whose teeth 35 and 45 were diagnosed with pulpal necrosis and chronic apical periodontitis, possibly resulting from dens evaginatus. Traditional apexification with Ca(OH2 was chosen; however, teeth 35 and 45 fractured after 2 and 9 months, respectively. The second case was an 11-year-old boy whose tooth 45 was diagnosed with necrotic pulp and a chronic apical abscess, possibly resulting from dens evaginatus. The mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA barrier technique was performed after short-term Ca(OH2 dressing, and the remaining space of the canal was filled with light-cured composite resin. The tooth remained healthy and functional at 1-year follow-up. The apical barrier technique using MTA has the advantages of a reduced treatment time, lower chance of tooth fracture, and fewer visits to the dental office. This report demonstrates that the MTA barrier technique followed by light-cured composite resin filling can be a good alternative treatment to traditional apexification.

  7. Four osteotomy methods with piezosurgery to remove complicated mandibular third molars: a retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Jing; Yang, Chi; Zheng, Jia-Wei; He, Dong-Mei; Zheng, Ling-Yan; Hu, Ying-Kai

    2014-11-01

    Piezosurgery has been used widely in oral and maxillofacial surgery, but there has been no report systematically describing an osteotomy method with piezosurgery for complicated mandibular third molar removal. The aim of this study was to introduce 4 osteotomy methods using piezosurgery and evaluate their effects. A retrospective study was conducted of patients with a complicated impacted mandibular third molar requiring extraction. The predictor variable was the extraction technique. Four osteotomy methods using piezosurgery were tested according to different impaction types: method 1 involved complete bone removal; method 2 involved segmental bone removal; method 3 involved bone removal combined with tooth splitting; and method 4 involved block bone removal. Outcome variables were success rate, operative time, major complications (including nerve injury, mandible fracture, severe hematoma, or severe edema), and serious pyogenic infection. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics. The study was composed of 55 patients with 74 complicated impacted mandibular third molars. All impacted mandibular third molars were removed successfully. The average surgical time was 15 minutes (range, 8 to 26 minutes). Thirty-eight molars (51.4%) were extracted by method 1, 18 molars (24.3%) by method 2, 12 molars (16.2%) by method 3, and 6 molars (8.1%) by method 4. Two cases (2.7%) developed postoperative infections and recovered within 1 week using drainage and antibiotic administration. The 4 osteotomy methods with piezosurgery provide effective ways of removing complicated impacted mandibular third molars. Copyright © 2014 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Rotational Distraction for the Treatment of Severe Mandibular Retrognathia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Osamu; Mitsugi, Masaharu; Alcalde, Rafael E; Yano, Tomoyuki; Uemura, Noriko; Okazaki, Mutsumi

    2015-07-01

    The main problem with intraoral distraction of the mandible is the inability to achieve the three-dimensional mandibular correction as planned preoperatively. We developed a technique that allows spontaneous changes in the direction of mandibular elongation using an intraoral distractor. After mandibular osteotomy, the distractor is fixed to the distal segment of the mandible using a single bicortical screw, allowing anterior-posterior, vertical and limited lateromedial changes in the vector of distraction. Mandibular lengthening is performed while keeping the maxilla and mandible in class I occlusion with intermaxillary fixation. As the distraction device is activated allowing mandibular elongation, the proximal segment, guided by the surrounding soft tissues, moves and rotates posterosuperiorly. Mandibular lengthening is continued until the condylar head reaches an adequate position in the mandibular fossa as confirmed clinically and radiographically. Thirty-three patients with mandibular retrognathia received this treatment and good results were obtained.

  9. Variant Root Morphology of Third Mandibular Molar in Normal and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    isaac kipyator

    2017-11-12

    Nov 12, 2017 ... ABSTRACT. The mandibular third molar poses a challenge to dental surgeons due to it's unpredictable morphology ... treatment in the School of Dental Sciences since 2010. ... mandibular third molar include presence of three.

  10. Rib Fractures

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Video) Achilles Tendon Tear Additional Content Medical News Rib Fractures By Thomas G. Weiser, MD, MPH, Associate Professor, ... Tamponade Hemothorax Injury to the Aorta Pulmonary Contusion Rib Fractures Tension Pneumothorax Traumatic Pneumothorax (See also Introduction to ...

  11. Root fractures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Jens Ove; Christensen, Søren Steno Ahrensburg; Tsilingaridis, Georgios

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze tooth loss after root fractures and to assess the influence of the type of healing and the location of the root fracture. Furthermore, the actual cause of tooth loss was analyzed....

  12. Minimally invasive approach of panfacial fractures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yudi Wijaya

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background. Panfacial fractures involves fractures of several bones of face. They are associated with malocclusion, dish face deformity, enopthalmos, diplopia, cerebrospinal fluid leak and soft tissue injuries. Purpose. The purpose of this paper is to present a case of minimizing surgical wound and morbidity. Case. A 40 year old female presented with severe maxillofacial injuries caused by motor vehicle collisions about 5 days prior to admission. The assessment of the patient is mild head injury, panfacial fractures, lacerated wound at face,  rupture of globe of occular sinistra. An open reduction and internal fixation  (ORIF and enucleation of globe occular sinistra was performed.  Intraoral vestibular incision is made in the upper and lower vestibular region. Mucoperiosteal flap elevation of vestibular will exposure of the anterior maxilla and mandibular fractures. Intermaksilary fixation within 3 week and restore aesthetic with prosthesis fitting eyeball and denture. Discusion. The goal of  treatment of  panfacial fracture is to restore both the functions and pre-injury 3-dimensional facial contours. To achieve this goal two common  sequences of management of Panfacial fractures are proposed, “Bottom up and inside out” or “Top down and outside in”. Other sequences exist but there are variations of these two major approaches. Conclusion. A minimally invasive approach to  the fracture site is an alternative method  to manage panfacial fracture with a simple, effective and lower complication rate.

  13. Stress Fractures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stress fractures Overview Stress fractures are tiny cracks in a bone. They're caused by repetitive force, often from overuse — such as repeatedly jumping up and down or running long distances. Stress fractures can also arise from normal use of ...

  14. Congenitally missing mandibular second premolars: clinical options.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokich, Vincent G; Kokich, Vincent O

    2006-10-01

    Congenital absence of mandibular second premolars affects many orthodontic patients. The orthodontist must make the proper decision at the appropriate time regarding management of the edentulous space. These spaces can be closed or left open. If the space will be left open for an eventual restoration, the keys during orthodontic treatment are to create the correct amount of space and to leave the alveolar ridge in an ideal condition for a future restoration. If the space will be closed, the clinician must avoid any detrimental alterations to the occlusion and the facial profile. Some early decisions that the orthodontist makes for a patient whose mandibular second premolars are congenitally missing will affect his or her dental health for a lifetime. Therefore, the correct decision must be made at the appropriate time. In this article, we present and discuss various treatment alternatives for managing orthodontic patients with at least 1 congenitally missing mandibular second premolar.

  15. A new technique for mandibular osteotomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puricelli Edela

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Sagittal split osteotomy (SSO is a surgical technique largely employed for mandibular mobilizations in orthognatic procedures. However, the traditional design of buccal osteotomy, located at the junction of mandibular ramus and body, may prevent more extensive sliding between the bone segments, particularly on the advance, laterality and verticality of the mandibular body. The author proposes a new technical and conceptual solution, in which osteotomy is performed in a more distal region, next to the mental formamen. Technically, the area of contact between medullary-cancellous bone surfaces is increased, resulting in larger sliding rates among bone segments; it also facilitates the use of rigid fixation systems, with miniplates and monocortical screws. Conceptually, it interferes with the resistance arm of the mandible, seen as an interpotent lever of the third gender.

  16. Evaluation of clinical use of indigenously developed delta plate in management of subcondylar fracture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anroop Anirudhan

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Condylar fractures account for 25-35% of mandibular fractures and deserve a special consideration apart from rest of the mandible due to their anatomical differences and healing potential. Previous clinical and biomechanical studies have recommended using two miniplates for fixation of condyle fractures. Two miniplates require a certain size of the proximal condyle fragment and thus are applicable mainly in cases involving low fractures. The present study evaluates the clinical use of indigenously developed titanium delta-shaped miniplate in open reduction and internal fixation of subcondylar fracture.

  17. Circummandibular Wiring of Symphysis Fracture in a Five-Year-Old Child

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krishna Priya Vellore

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The treatment of pediatric maxillofacial fractures is unique due to the psychological, physiological, developmental, and anatomical characteristics of children. Method. This case report describes the management of symphysis fracture of mandible in a 5-year-old boy. The fracture was treated by acrylic splint with circummandibular wiring. Results. The splint was removed after 3 weeks. The patient had no complaints, and radiograph revealed a healed fracture. Conclusion. The clinical outcome in the present case indicates the management of mandibular fractures in pediatric patients using acrylic splint with circummandibular wiring.

  18. 21 CFR 872.3960 - Mandibular condyle prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3960 Mandibular condyle prosthesis. (a) Identification. A mandibular condyle prosthesis is a device that is intended to be implanted in the human jaw to... requirement for premarket approval for any mandibular condyle prosthesis intended to be implanted in the human...

  19. Fracture patterns in the maxillofacial region: a four-year retrospective study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The facial bones are the most noticeable area in the human body, and facial injuries can cause significant functional, aesthetic, and psychological complications. Continuous study of the patterns of facial bone fractures and changes in trends is helpful in the prevention and treatment of maxillofacial fractures. The purpose of the current clinico-statistical study is to investigate the pattern of facial fractures over a 4-year period. Materials and Methods A retrospective analysis of 1,824 fracture sites was carried out in 1,284 patients admitted to SMG-SNU Boramae Medical Center for facial bone fracture from January 2010 to December 2013. We evaluated the distributions of age/gender/season, fracture site, cause of injury, duration from injury to treatment, hospitalization period, and postoperative complications. Results The ratio of men to women was 3.2:1. Most fractures occurred in individuals aged between teens to 40s and were most prevalent at the middle and end of the month. Fractures occurred in the nasal bone (65.0%), orbital wall (29.2%), maxillary wall (15.3%), zygomatic arch (13.2%), zygomaticomaxillary complex (9.8%), mandibular symphysis (6.5%), mandibular angle (5.9%), mandibular condyle (4.9%), and mandibular body (1.9%). The most common etiologies were fall (32.5%) and assault (26.0%). The average duration of injury to treatment was 6 days, and the average hospitalization period was 5 days. Eighteen postoperative complications were observed in 17 patients, mainly infection and malocclusion in the mandible. Conclusion This study reflects the tendency for trauma in the Seoul metropolitan region because it analyzes all facial fracture patients who visited our hospital regardless of the specific department. Distinctively, in this study, midfacial fractures had a much higher incidence than mandible fractures. PMID:26734557

  20. Mandibular reconstruction using bone allografts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang Joon Yim

    1999-01-01

    . Combinations of allografts and autografts for mandibular reconstruction have enjoyed great success since their introduction in the late 1960's and early 1970's. Due to its high osteogenic potential, marrow and cancellous bone was used for reconstruction of the mandible. For reconstruction of large defects, surgeons used a scaffold to support the cancellous bone. This practice led to the use of allogeneic bone crib in which the cancellous bone could be packed. Reconstruction of the mandible by this combination is now very commonplace

  1. Anterior mandibular apical base augmentation in the surgical orthodontic treatment of mandibular retrusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brusati, R; Giannì, A B

    2005-12-01

    The authors describe a surgical technique alternative to traditional pre-surgical orthodontics in order to increase the apical base in mandibular retrusion (class II, division I). This subapical osteotomy, optimizing inferior incisal axis without dental extractions and a long orthodontic treatment, associated to genioplasty permits to obtain an ideal labio-dento-mental morphology. This procedure avoids in some cases the need of a mandibular advancement and, if necessary, it reduces his entity with obvious advantages.

  2. Acetabular Fracture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chad Correa

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available History of present illness: A 77-year-old female presented to her primary care physician (PCP with right hip pain after a mechanical fall. She did not lose consciousness or have any other traumatic injuries. She was unable to ambulate post-fall, so X-rays were ordered by her PCP. Her X-rays were concerning for a right acetabular fracture (see purple arrows, so the patient was referred to the emergency department where a computed tomography (CT scan was ordered. Significant findings: The non-contrast CT images show a minimally displaced comminuted fracture of the right acetabulum involving the acetabular roof, medial and anterior walls (red arrows, with associated obturator muscle hematoma (blue oval. Discussion: Acetabular fractures are quite rare. There are 37 pelvic fractures per 100,000 people in the United States annually, and only 10% of these involve the acetabulum. They occur more frequently in the elderly totaling an estimated 4,000 per year. High-energy trauma is the primary cause of acetabular fractures in younger individuals and these fractures are commonly associated with other fractures and pelvic ring disruptions. Fractures secondary to moderate or minimal trauma are increasingly of concern in patients of advanced age.1 Classification of acetabular fractures can be challenging. However, the approach can be simplified by remembering the three basic types of acetabular fractures (column, transverse, and wall and their corresponding radiologic views. First, column fractures should be evaluated with coronally oriented CT images. This type of fracture demonstrates a coronal fracture line running caudad to craniad, essentially breaking the acetabulum into two halves: a front half and a back half. Secondly, transverse fractures should be evaluated by sagittally oriented CT images. By definition, a transverse fracture separates the acetabulum into superior and inferior halves with the fracture line extending from anterior to posterior

  3. Patient satisfaction and prosthetic aspects with mini-implants retained mandibular overdentures. A 5-year prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsyad, Moustafa Abdou

    2016-07-01

    This study aimed to evaluate patient satisfaction and prosthetic aspects during a 5-year prospective clinical study of mini dental implants (MDIs) retaining mandibular overdentures. This observational prospective clinical study was conducted on a group of completely edentulous patients (n = 28) with retention problems of conventional mandibular dentures. All patients received new maxillary and mandibular conventional dentures. A total of 112 MDIs (four per patient) were inserted using the flapless surgical approach and immediately loaded by the new mandibular dentures (overdentures). Patients indicated satisfaction with their prosthesis using a questionnaire and a visual analogue scale (VAS). Patient satisfaction and prosthetic complications were recorded 6 months (T6 m ), 1 (T1), 3 (T3), and 5 (T5) years after overdenture insertion. The patient satisfaction with eating (hard/soft) food (P teeth (n = 10), overdentures relines (n = 10), detachment of the metal housings (n = 9), and fracture of mandibular overdentures (n = 8). Mucositis, soreness, and decubitis ulcer under overdenture occurred most often at T6 m and decreased significantly with time (P = 0.002, 0.005, and 0.024, respectively). Within the limitations of this clinical study, patient satisfaction with mini-implant retained mandibular overdentures increased significantly with time. However, this treatment required a considerable amount of prosthetic maintenance and repair after 5 years of service. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Active Shape Analysis of Mandibular Growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hilger, Klaus Baggesen; Larsen, Rasmus; Kreiborg, Sven

    2003-01-01

    This work contains a clinical validation using biological landmarks of a Geometry Constrained Diffusion registration of mandibular surfaces. Canonical Correlations Analysis is extended to analyse 3D landmarks and the correlations are used as similarity measures for landmark clustering. A novel Ac...

  5. Mandibular asymmetry and the fourth dimension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaban, Leonard B

    2009-03-01

    This paper represents more than 30 years of discussion and collaboration with Drs Joseph Murray and John Mulliken in an attempt to understand growth patterns over time (ie, fourth dimension) in patients with hemifacial microsomia (HFM). This is essential for the development of rational treatment protocols for children and adults with jaw asymmetry. Traditionally, HFM was thought of as a unilateral deformity, but it was recognized that 20% to 30% of patients had bilateral abnormalities. However, early descriptions of skeletal correction addressed almost exclusively lengthening of the short (affected) side of the face. Based on longitudinal clinical observations of unoperated HFM patients, we hypothesized that abnormal mandibular growth is the earliest skeletal manifestation and that restricted growth of the mandible plays a pivotal role in progressive distortion of both the ipsilateral and contralateral facial skeleton. This hypothesis explains the progressive nature of the asymmetry in patients with HFM and provides the rationale for surgical lengthening of the mandible in children to prevent end-stage deformity. During the past 30 years, we have learned that this phenomenon of progressive distortion of the adjacent and contralateral facial skeleton occurs with other asymmetric mandibular undergrowth (tumor resection, radiation therapy, or posttraumatic defects) and overgrowth (mandibular condylar hyperplasia) conditions. In this paper, I describe the progression of deformity with time in patients with mandibular asymmetry as a result of undergrowth and overgrowth. Understanding these concepts is critical for the development of rational treatment protocols for adults with end-stage asymmetry and for children to minimize secondary deformity.

  6. Unexpected complications of bonded mandibular lingual retainers.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Katsaros, C.; Livas, C.; Renkema, A.M.

    2007-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The flexible spiral wire (FSW) retainer is the most frequently used type of fixed retainer bonded on all 6 anterior teeth. Our aim in this article was to demonstrate unexpected posttreatment changes in the labiolingual position of the mandibular anterior teeth associated with the use

  7. External and internal anatomy of mandibular molars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha, L F; Sousa Neto, M D; Fidel, S R; da Costa, W F; Pécora, J D

    1996-01-01

    The external and internal anatomy of 628 extracted, mandibular first and second molars was studied. The external anatomy was studied by measuring each tooth and by observing the direction of the root curvatures from the facial surface. The internal anatomy of the pulp cavity was studied by a method of making the teeth translucent.

  8. Cerebro-costo-mandibular syndrome with consanguinity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clarke, E.A.; Nguyen, V.D.

    1985-01-01

    The cerebro-costo-mandibular syndrome is a rare disorder characterized by unique posterior rib defectes, micrognathia, and mental deficiency. The mode of transmission is undetermined. This report describes the first case with documented parental consanguinity as well as hitherto undescribed CT and skeletal findings. (orig.)

  9. Oro-mandibular manifestations of primary hyperparathyroidism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sachin Rai

    2012-01-01

    Conclusion : Loss of lamina dura, ground glass appearance, and mandibular cortical width reduction are common findings in primary hyperparathyroidism and these are significantly correlated with elevated parathormone and alkaline phosphatase. However, the presence of brown tumors and oral tori are less commonly encountered features.

  10. Ultrasound stimulation of mandibular bone defect healing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schortinghuis, Jurjen

    2004-01-01

    The conclusions of the experimental work presented in this thesis are: 1. Low intensity pulsed ultrasound is not effective in stimulating bone growth into a rat mandibular defect, either with or without the use of osteoconductive membranes. 2. Low intensity pulsed ultrasound does not seem to have an

  11. Diagnosis and root canal treatment in a mandibular premolar with three canals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Lanuce Rosa; Arruda, Marcos; de Arruda, Marcos Pôrto; Rangel, Andréa Leão; Takano, Edson; de Carvalho Júnior, Jacy Ribeiro; Saquy, Paulo Cesar

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a case report of a left mandibular second premolar with three canals and three different apical foramina. A 39-year-old male patient presented to our clinic with pain in the mandibular left second premolar. Initially, pain was caused by cold stimulus and later was spontaneously. The intraoral clinical examination revealed a fractured amalgam restoration with occlusal caries. Percussion and cold (Endo-Frost) tests were positive. The radiographic examination showed the presence of two roots. The probable diagnosis was an acute pulpitis. After access cavity, it was observed remaining roof of the pulp chamber and mild bleeding in the tooth lingual area, indicating the possible presence of a third canal. The endodontic treatment was completed in a single session using Root ZX apex locator and K3 NiTi rotary system with surgical diameter corresponding to a .02/45 file in the three canals and irrigation with 1% sodium hypochlorite. The canals were obtured with gutta-percha cones and Sealer 26 using the lateral condensation technique. After 1 year of follow-up, the tooth was asymptomatic and periapical repair was observed radiographically. Internal alterations should be considered during the endodontic treatment of mandibular second premolars. The correct diagnosis of these alterations by the analysis of preoperative radiographs can help the location of two or more canals, thereby avoiding root therapy failure.

  12. A comparison of mandibular denture base deformation with different impression techniques for implant overdentures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsyad, Moustafa Abdou; El-Waseef, Fatma Ahmad; Al-Mahdy, Yasmeen Fathy; Fouad, Mohammed Mohammed

    2013-08-01

    This study aimed to evaluate mandibular denture base deformation along with three impression techniques used for implant-retained overdenture. Ten edentulous patients (five men and five women) received two implants in the canine region of the mandible and three duplicate mandibular overdentures which were constructed with mucostatic, selective pressure, and definitive pressure impression techniques. Ball abutments and respective gold matrices were used to connect the overdentures to the implants. Six linear strain gauges were bonded to the lingual polished surface of each duplicate overdenture at midline and implant areas to measure strain during maximal clenching and gum chewing. The strains recorded at midline were compressive while strains at implant areas were tensile. Clenching recorded significant higher strain when compared with gum chewing for all techniques. The mucostatic technique recorded the highest strain and the definite pressure technique recorded the lowest. There was no significant difference between the strain recorded with mucostatic technique and that registered with selective pressure technique. The highest strain was recorded at the level of ball abutment's top with the mucostatic technique during clenching. Definite pressure impression technique for implant-retained mandibular overdenture is associated with minimal denture deformation during function when compared with mucostatic and selective pressure techniques. Reinforcement of the denture base over the implants may be recommended to increase resistance of fracture when mucostatic or selective pressure impression technique is used. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  13. Predicting pathology in impacted mandibular third molars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aveek Mukherji

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The rising incidence of the impacted mandibular third molars and their association with pathologies is now considered a public health problem. Aims and Objectives: The objective of this study was to assess the position of impacted mandibular third molars that are prone to developing pathologies and to determine the frequency and type of pathological conditions associated with these impacted teeth to facilitate planning for their prophylactic removal. Materials and Methods: Consecutive panoramic radiographs and clinical examination of 300 patients with impacted mandibular third molars were collected. They were segregated according to Pell and Gregory’s classification, Winter’s classification, and according to their state of eruption. These were correlated with associated pathologies based on clinical and radiological criteria. Statistical Analysis Used: Descriptive statistics included computation of percentages, mean, and standard deviations. The statistical test applied for the analysis was Pearson’s Chi-square test (χ2. For this test, confidence interval and P value were set at 93% and ≤0.03, respectively. Results: The pathology most commonly associated with impacted third molars was pericoronitis, which had the highest frequency of occurrence in partially erupted, distoangular, and IA positioned (as per Pell and Gregory classification impacted teeth. Impacted mandibular third molars, which were in IA position, placed mesially, and partially erupted, were prone to develop pathologies such as dental caries and periodontitis. Conclusion: The clinical and radiographical features of impacted third molar may be correlated to the development of their pathological complications. The partially impacted mandibular third molars with mesioangularly aligned in IA position have the highest potential to cause pathological complications.

  14. Mandible Fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickrell, Brent B; Serebrakian, Arman T; Maricevich, Renata S

    2017-05-01

    Mandible fractures account for a significant portion of maxillofacial injuries and the evaluation, diagnosis, and management of these fractures remain challenging despite improved imaging technology and fixation techniques. Understanding appropriate surgical management can prevent complications such as malocclusion, pain, and revision procedures. Depending on the type and location of the fractures, various open and closed surgical reduction techniques can be utilized. In this article, the authors review the diagnostic evaluation, treatment options, and common complications of mandible fractures. Special considerations are described for pediatric and atrophic mandibles.

  15. Mini dental implants retaining mandibular overdentures: A dental practice-based retrospective analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwindling, Franz Sebastian; Schwindling, Franz-Peter

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the survival of mini dental implants (MDI) and to measure prosthetic maintenance needs in a dental practice-based setting. Patients with mandibular removable dentures were provided with MDI to improve denture retention. Complications and maintenance were analyzed by use of patient records and evaluated with Kaplan-Meier curves and the log rank test at a significance level of 0.05. Ninety-nine MDI were placed in 25 patients (mean age: 72 years). Two MDI fractured during placement and eight implants failed during the first weeks. No more implants were lost for up to seven years, resulting in 92% survival. Implant survival differed significantly depending on whether the maxilla was provided with complete dentures (94.9%) or with partial dentures (81%). All prostheses were in use at the time of data extraction. Denture base fractures were observed in six cases, an incidence of fractures of 24%. Some minor intervention was necessary: one resin tooth fractured, retention rings were changed in five cases, and repeated relining was required for 16% of the dentures. After mid-term observation, survival of MDI was good. However, the incidence of denture base fractures and of minor prosthetic complications should not be under-estimated. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  16. Dilemma in pediatric mandible fractures: resorbable or metallic plates?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylan Filinte, Gaye; Akan, İsmail Mithat; Ayçiçek Çardak, Gülçin Nujen; Özkaya Mutlu, Özay; Aköz, Tayfun

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the efficiency of resorbable and metallic plates in open reduction and internal fixation of mandible fractures in children. Thirty-one patients (mean age, 8.05 years; range 20 months-14 years) were operated on various fractures of the mandible (26 [60.4%] symphysis- parasymphysis, 12 [27.9%] condylar-subcondylar fractures, 5 [11.6%] angulus and ramus fractures). Twelve patients were treated with resorbable plates and 19 patients with metallic plates. Mean follow-up time was 41 months (11-74 months) in the metallic hardware group and was 22 months (8-35 months) in the resorbable plate group. Both groups were investigated for primary bone healing, complications, number of operations, and mandibular growth. The results were discussed below. Both groups demonstrated primary bone healing. Minor complications were similar in both groups. The metallic group involved secondary operations for plate removal. Mandibular growth was satisfactory in both groups. Resorbable plates cost more than the metallic ones; however, when the secondary operations are included in the total cost, resorbable plates were favourable. As mandibular growth and complication parameters are similar in both groups, resorbable plates are favored due to avoidance of potential odontogenic injury, elimination of long-term foreign body retention and provision of adequate stability for rapid bone healing. However, learning curve and concerns for decreased stability against heavy forces of mastication accompanied with the resorbable plates when compared to the metallic ones should be kept in mind.

  17. Piezosurgery for the Lingual Split Technique in Lingual Positioned Impacted Mandibular Third Molar Removal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Jing; Yang, Chi; Zheng, Jiawei; Qian, Wentao

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect and safety of lingual split technique using piezosurgery for the extraction of lingual positioned impacted mandibular 3rd molars with the goal of proposing a more minimally invasive choice for this common surgery. Eighty-nine consecutive patients with 110 lingual positioned impacted mandibular 3rd molars requiring extraction were performed the lingual split technique using piezosurgery. One sagittal osteotomy line and 2 transverse osteotomy line were designed for lingual and occlusal bone removal. The success rate, operative time, postoperative outcome, and major complications (including nerve injury, mandible fracture, severe hematoma or edema, and severe pyogenic infection) were documented and analyzed. All impacted mandibular 3rd molars were successfully removed (110/110). The average time of operation was 14.6 minutes (ranged from 7 to 28 minutes). One hundred and seven extraction sites (97.3%) were primary healing. Pain, mouth opening, swelling, and PoSSe scores on postoperative 7-day were 0.34 ± 0.63, 3.88 ± 0.66(cm), 2.4 ± 0.2(cm), and 23.7 ± 5.9, respectively. There were 6 cases (5.5%) had lingual nerve disturbance and 3 cases (2.7%) developed inferior alveolar nerve impairment, and achieved full recovery within 2 months by neurotrophic drug treatment. Our study suggested piezosurgery for lingual split technique provided an effective way for the extraction of lingual positioned and deeply impacted mandibular 3rd molar. PMID:27015214

  18. Facial Fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Rajarshi; Gopalkrishnan, Kulandaswamy

    2018-06-01

    The aim of this study is to retrospectively analyze the incidence of facial fractures along with age, gender predilection, etiology, commonest site, associated dental injuries, and any complications of patients operated in Craniofacial Unit of SDM College of Dental Sciences and Hospital. This retrospective study was conducted at the Department of OMFS, SDM College of Dental Sciences, Dharwad from January 2003 to December 2013. Data were recorded for the cause of injury, age and gender distribution, frequency and type of injury, localization and frequency of soft tissue injuries, dentoalveolar trauma, facial bone fractures, complications, concomitant injuries, and different treatment protocols.All the data were analyzed using statistical analysis that is chi-squared test. A total of 1146 patients reported at our unit with facial fractures during these 10 years. Males accounted for a higher frequency of facial fractures (88.8%). Mandible was the commonest bone to be fractured among all the facial bones (71.2%). Maxillary central incisors were the most common teeth to be injured (33.8%) and avulsion was the most common type of injury (44.6%). Commonest postoperative complication was plate infection (11%) leading to plate removal. Other injuries associated with facial fractures were rib fractures, head injuries, upper and lower limb fractures, etc., among these rib fractures were seen most frequently (21.6%). This study was performed to compare the different etiologic factors leading to diverse facial fracture patterns. By statistical analysis of this record the authors come to know about the relationship of facial fractures with gender, age, associated comorbidities, etc.

  19. Standardizing the evaluation criteria on treatment outcomes of mandibular implant overdentures: a systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ha-Young; Shin, Sang-Wan

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE The aim of this review was to analyze the evaluation criteria on mandibular implant overdentures through a systematic review and suggest standardized evaluation criteria. MATERIALS AND METHODS A systematic literature search was conducted by PubMed search strategy and hand-searching of relevant journals from included studies considering inclusion and exclusion criteria. Randomized clinical trials (RCT) and clinical trial studies comparing attachment systems on mandibular implant overdentures until December, 2011 were selected. Twenty nine studies were finally selected and the data about evaluation methods were collected. RESULTS Evaluation criteria could be classified into 4 groups (implant survival, peri-implant tissue evaluation, prosthetic evaluation, and patient satisfaction). Among 29 studies, 21 studies presented implant survival rate, while any studies reporting implant failure did not present cumulative implant survival rate. Seventeen studies evaluating peri-implant tissue status presented following items as evaluation criteria; marginal bone level (14), plaque Index (13), probing depth (8), bleeding index (8), attachment gingiva level (8), gingival index (6), amount of keratinized gingiva (1). Eighteen studies evaluating prosthetic maintenance and complication also presented following items as evaluation criteria; loose matrix (17), female detachment (15), denture fracture (15), denture relining (14), abutment fracture (14), abutment screw loosening (11), and occlusal adjustment (9). Atypical questionnaire (9), Visual analog scales (VAS) (4), and Oral Health Impact Profile (OHIP) (1) were used as the format of criteria to evaluate patients satisfaction in 14 studies. CONCLUSION For evaluation of implant overdenture, it is necessary to include cumulative survival rate for implant evaluation. It is suggested that peri-implant tissue evaluation criteria include marginal bone level, plaque index, bleeding index, probing depth, and attached gingiva

  20. Fracture sacrum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dogra A

    1995-04-01

    Full Text Available An extremely rare case of combined transverse and vertical fracture of sacrum with neurological deficit is reported here with a six month follow-up. The patient also had an L1 compression fracture. The patient has recovered significantly with conservative management.

  1. Fracture Mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Zehnder, Alan T

    2012-01-01

    Fracture mechanics is a vast and growing field. This book develops the basic elements needed for both fracture research and engineering practice. The emphasis is on continuum mechanics models for energy flows and crack-tip stress- and deformation fields in elastic and elastic-plastic materials. In addition to a brief discussion of computational fracture methods, the text includes practical sections on fracture criteria, fracture toughness testing, and methods for measuring stress intensity factors and energy release rates. Class-tested at Cornell, this book is designed for students, researchers and practitioners interested in understanding and contributing to a diverse and vital field of knowledge. Alan Zehnder joined the faculty at Cornell University in 1988. Since then he has served in a number of leadership roles including Chair of the Department of Theoretical and Applied Mechanics, and Director of the Sibley School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering.  He teaches applied mechanics and his research t...

  2. [Mandibular-driven simultaneous maxillo-mandibular distraction for hemifacial microsomia with rapid prototyping technology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Quan-Wen; Song, Hui-Feng; Xu, Ming-Huo; Liu, Chun-Ming; Chai, Jia-Ke

    2013-11-01

    To explore the clinical application of mandibular-driven simultaneous maxillo-mandihular distraction to correct hemifacial microsomia with rapid prototyping technology. The patient' s skull resin model was manufactured with rapid prototyping technology. The osteotomy was designed on skull resin model. According to the preoperative design, the patients underwent Le Fort I osteotomy and mandibular ramus osteotomy. The internal mandible distractor was embedded onto the osteotomy position. The occlusal titanium pin was implanted. Distraction were carried out by mandibular-driven simultaneous maxillo-mandihular distraction 5 days after operation. The distraction in five patients was complete as designed. No infection and dysosteogenesis happened. The longest distance of distraction was 28 mm, and the shortest distance was 16 mm. The facial asymmetry deformity was significantly improved at the end of distraction. The ocelusal plane of patients obviously improved. Rapid prototyping technology is helpful to design precisely osteotomy before operation. Mandibular-driven simultaneous maxillo-mandibular distraction can correct hemifacial microsomia. It is worth to clinical application.

  3. Nerve injury caused by mandibular block analgesia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hillerup, S; Jensen, Rigmor H

    2006-01-01

    Fifty-four injection injuries in 52 patients were caused by mandibular block analgesia affecting the lingual nerve (n=42) and/or the inferior alveolar nerve (n=12). All patients were examined with a standardized test of neurosensory functions. The perception of the following stimuli was assessed......: feather light touch, pinprick, sharp/dull discrimination, warm, cold, point location, brush stroke direction, 2-point discrimination and pain perception. Gustation was tested for recognition of sweet, salt, sour and bitter. Mandibular block analgesia causes lingual nerve injury more frequently than...... inferior alveolar nerve injury. All grades of loss of neurosensory and gustatory functions were found, and a range of persisting neurogenic malfunctions was reported. Subjective complaints and neurosensory function tests indicate that lingual nerve lesions are more incapacitating than inferior alveolar...

  4. Craniomaxillofacial fractures during recreational baseball and softball.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bak, Matthew J; Doerr, Timothy D

    2004-10-01

    Baseball and softball are leading causes of sports-related facial trauma in the United States. We review our institutional experience (Strong Memorial Hospital, Rochester, NY) with these injuries and discuss measures to reduce their incidence. We review our institutions experience with facial fractures sustained during the course of a softball or baseball game over a 12-year period. A total of 38 patients were identified and medical records analyzed for patient demographics, type of impact, and fracture location. The male-to-female ratio was 3.2:1; mean age was 24.2 years, with 17 (45%) of the injuries occurring in the pediatric population. The majority of the injuries were caused by direct impact with the ball (68%), while player-player collisions (18%) and impact from a swung bat (13%) were responsible for the remaining injuries. There were a total of 39 fractures; 18 fractures (46%) involved the midface (level 2), skull (level 1) fractures accounted for 12 (31%), while 9 (23%) were mandibular (level 3) fractures. With 68% of the injuries resulting from a ball impact, we endorse the recommendations of the Consumer Product Safety Commission for the use of low-impact National Operating Committee on Standards for Athletic Equipment-approved baseballs and softballs for youth and recreational leagues.

  5. Incidence and characteristics of mandibular accessory canals: A radiographic investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borgonovo, Andrea Enrico; Taschieri, Silvio; Vavassori, Virna; Re, Dino; Francetti, Luca; Corbella, Stefano

    2017-11-01

    The aim of the present study was to explore, through tridimensional reconstructions of cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) scans, the presence and the characteristics of mandibular accessory canals. For each included participant, the presence of accessory canals was recorded. The diameter of the canal, as well as the distance between the canal walls and the walls of the mandibular bone (lingual, buccal, cranial and caudal), were measured and recorded. Mandibular accessory canals could be found in 8.8% of participants. Retromolar canals were the most frequently found accessory mandibular canals. Accessory mandibular canals were found in a relatively high number of participants through the examination of CBCT scans and tridimensional reconstruction. The presence of such structures should be considered cautiously when planning and performing surgical interventions in mandibular area. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  6. [Temporo-mandibular joint. Morpho-functional considerations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scutariu, M D; Indrei, Anca

    2004-01-01

    The temporo-mandibular joint is distinguished from most other synovial joints of the body by two features: 1. the two jointed components carry teeth whose position and occlusion introduce a very strong influence on the movements of the temporo-mandibular joint and 2. its articular surfaces are not covered by hyaline cartilage, but by a dense, fibrous tissue. This paper describes the parts of the temporo-mandibular joint: the articular surfaces (the condylar process of the mandible and the glenoid part of the temporal bone), the fibrocartilaginous disc which is interposed between the mandibular and the temporal surface, the fibrous capsule of the temporo-mandibular joint and the ligaments of this joint. All these parts present a very strong adaptation at the important functions of the temporo-mandibular joint.

  7. Mandibular metastasis of cholangiocarcinoma: A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    You, Tae Min [Dept. of Advanced General Dentistry, Dankook University, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Kee Dong; Jeong, Ho Gui; Park, Won Se [Advanced General Dentistry, Dankook University, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-12-15

    Tumors metastasizing from distant regions to the oral and maxillofacial region are uncommon, comprising only 1%-2% of all malignancies. Cholangiocarcinoma is a malignancy that arises from cholangiocytes, which are epithelial cells that line the bile ducts. These cancers are difficult to diagnose and have a poor prognosis. In this paper, we report a rare case of mandibular metastasis of cholangiocarcinoma diagnosed at the primary site and discuss the radiographic findings observed in this case.

  8. Multiple myeloma presenting as mandibular pain

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Crowley, Miriam

    2016-10-01

    Introduction: Multiple myeloma (MM) is a systemic malignancy of plasma cells defined by monoclonal production of circulating immunoglobulins. Bone pain is a presenting feature in the majority of cases. Treatment may involve intravenous use of bisphosphonates, chemotherapy or haematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Here, we illustrate a first presentation of MM in a patient with mandibular pain and discuss radiographic, diagnostic and treatment challenges of orofacial issues in patients with MM.\\r\

  9. Malunited fracture of the body and condyle of the mandible : A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramakrishna Yeluri

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Mandibular fractures are the most common facial fractures seen in hospitalized children and their incidence increases with age. Treatment options include soft diet, intermaxillary fixation with eyelet wires, arch bars, circummandibular wiring, or stents. Alternative options include open reduction and internal fixation through either an intraoral or extraoral approach. Many factors complicate the management of pediatric mixed-dentition mandibular fractures: tooth eruption, short roots, developing tooth buds and growth issues. One major factor is the inherent instability of the occlusion in the mixed deciduous-permanent tooth phase. This case report documents a child in mixed dentition period with a complication arising due to direct fixation of the fractured mandible.

  10. The efficacy of supplemental intraosseous anesthesia after insufficient mandibular block

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samir Prohić

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available It is a well-known scientific fact that only a small percentage of infiltration of inferior alveolar nerve is clinically proven to be efficient. The objective of this study was to determine the anesthetic efficacy of supplemental intraosseous injection, used after the insufficient classical mandibular block that didn't provide deep pulp anesthesia of mandibular molar planed for extraction. The experimental teeth consisted of 98 mandibular molars with clinical indication for extraction. Based on the history of disease, we indicated the extraction of the tooth. After that each tooth was tested with a electric pulp tester P1. We tested the pulp vitality and precisely determined the level of vitality. After that, each patient received classical mandibular block, and the pulp vitality was tested again. If the pulp tester indicated negative vitality for the certain mandibular molar, and the patient didn't complain about pain or discomfort during the extraction, the molar was extracted and the result was added to anesthetic success rate for the classical mandibular block. If, five minutes after receiving the mandibular block, the pulp tester indicated positive vitality (parameters of vitality or the patient complained about pain or discomfort (parameters of pain and discomfort, we used the Stabident intraosseous anesthesia system. Three minutes after the application of supplemental intraosseous injection the molar was tested with the pulp tester again. The anesthetic solution used in both anesthetic techniques is lidocaine with 1:100.000 epinephrine. The results of this study indicate that the anesthetic efficacy of the mandibular block is 74.5%, and that supplemental intraosseous anesthesia, applied after the insufficient mandibular block, provides pulpal anesthesia in 94.9% of mandibular molars. The difference between anesthetic efficacy of the classical mandibular block and anesthetic efficacy of the supplemental intraosseous anesthesia, applied

  11. The efficacy of supplemental intraosseous anesthesia after insufficient mandibular block.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prohić, Samir; Sulejmanagić, Halid; Secić, Sadeta

    2005-02-01

    It is a well-known scientific fact that only a small percentage of infiltration of inferior alveolar nerve is clinically proven to be efficient. The objective of this study was to determine the anesthetic efficacy of supplemental intraosseous injection, used after the insufficient classical mandibular block that didn't provide deep pulp anesthesia of mandibular molar planed for extraction. The experimental teeth consisted of 98 mandibular molars with clinical indication for extraction. Based on the history of disease, we indicated the extraction of the tooth. After that each tooth was tested with a electric pulp tester P1. We tested the pulp vitality and precisely determined the level of vitality. After that, each patient received classical mandibular block, and the pulp vitality was tested again. If the pulp tester indicated negative vitality for the certain mandibular molar, and the patient didn't complain about pain or discomfort during the extraction, the molar was extracted and the result was added to anesthetic success rate for the classical mandibular block. If, five minutes after receiving the mandibular block, the pulp tester indicated positive vitality (parameters of vitality) or the patient complained about pain or discomfort (parameters of pain and discomfort), we used the Stabident intraosseous anesthesia system. Three minutes after the application of supplemental intraosseous injection the molar was tested with the pulp tester again. The anesthetic solution used in both anesthetic techniques is lidocaine with 1:100.000 epinephrine. The results of this study indicate that the anesthetic efficacy of the mandibular block is 74.5%, and that supplemental intraosseous anesthesia, applied after the insufficient mandibular block, provides pulpal anesthesia in 94.9% of mandibular molars. The difference between anesthetic efficacy of the classical mandibular block and anesthetic efficacy of the supplemental intraosseous anesthesia, applied after the

  12. Bifid mandibular canal: a rare or underestimated entity?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibrahim Nasseh

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available One of the rare anatomical variations that can be of significant importance for the dentist is the bifid mandibular canal. Many complications can occur from this condition such as failure of anesthesia when performing inferior alveolar nerve block, difficulties during the surgical extraction of the third mandibular molar, and during implants placement. Therefore, good knowledge of this condition is essential. In this report, we describe the radiographic finding of a unilateral bifid mandibular canal.

  13. Remedy for Repeated Implant Retained Denture Fracture-A Challenging Case Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy M, Ramu; Metta, Kiran Kumar; Charry N, Sudheer; B, Chittaranjan

    2014-01-01

    The most common site of fracture in a maxillary or a mandibular complete denture is along an anteroposterior line that coincides with the labial notch in in the denture which used to provide the frenum relief. Osseointegrated implants have been a boon to the patients who are completelly edentulous and are not satisfied with the conventional removable complete denture approach.Implant supported dentures have proven to provide superior retention and support for removable complete dentures. Nevertheless, fracture of the denture bases is a common complication of implant-supported mandibular overlay dentures,ecspecially when the artificial denture is opposing natural dentition. This article describes and illustrates a method of reinforcing implant-supported mandibular overdentures to overcome this problem. PMID:25584333

  14. Reliability of mandibular canines as indicators for sexual dichotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosmani, Jagadish V; Nayak, Ramakant S; Kotrashetti, Vijayalakshmi S; S, Pradeep; Babji, Deepa

    2013-02-01

    Amongst the various calcified structures in the human body, teeth have gained lot of popularity in estimating the sex of an individual as they are highly resistant to destruction and decomposition. Using permanent mandibular canines many researchers have predicted a high level of accuracy in identifying the sex correctly. The purpose of our study was to gauge the effectiveness of mandibular canines in discerning sex. Fifty dental casts each of males and females were utilized for the study. Mesio-distal dimension and inter-canine distance of mandibular right and left canine was recorded using digital vernier caliper and mandibular canine index was calculated. The mean value of mesio-distal dimensions of right and left mandibular canine was slightly greater in males compared to females. The mandibular canine index was equal in both sexes. Inter-canine distance was marginally higher in males compared to females. Despite of higher values in males none of the parameters were statistically significant. The results herein bolster contemporary studies that mesio-distal dimensions of mandibular canines and mandibular canine index do not reflect sexual dimorphism and that its application should be discontinued in sex prediction among Indian populations. How to cite this article: Hosmani J V, Nayak R S, Kotrashetti V S, Pradeep S, Babji D. Reliability of Mandibular Canines as Indicators for Sexual Dichotomy. J Int Oral Health 2013; 5(1):1-7.

  15. Experimental occlusal interferences. Part V. Mandibular rotations versus hemimandibular translations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, L V; Rassouli, N M

    1995-12-01

    Frontal plane mandibular rotations and corresponding hemimandibular translations were studied in vitro by using direct observations of a human cadaver mandible and in vivo by using the indirect observations of rotational electrognathography. A comparison between the two methods showed that rotational electrognathography erred in measuring the clinically relevant hemimandibular translations resulting from mandibular rotations having a unilateral molar point (simulated occlusal interference) as the pivot of frontal plane torque. In vitro frontal plane rotations about a unilateral mandibular molar tooth (simulated occlusal interference) suggested that the resulting hemimandibular upward translations of the lateral portion of the mandibular condyle, contralateral to the molar tooth, would cause considerable compressive loading of the temporomandibular joint disc.

  16. Fractured condyle in a 3-month-old infant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cambell, R L; Moore, R F

    1975-07-01

    A 3-month-old infant sustained trauma to the mandibular symphysis resulting in radiographic evidence of a fracture of the right condylar head. This presented the diffculty of performing a clinical examination and total reliance on history of a trauma and subsequent swelling. Multiple radiographs of the condyles were used to establish the diagnosis and rule out a film artifact. No definitive treatment was required other than muscle exercises and parental instruction as to potential problems.

  17. Observation of positional relation between mandibular third molars and the mandibular canal on limited cone beam computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashizume, Atsuko; Nakagawa, Yoichi; Ishii, Hisako; Kobayashi, Kaoru

    2004-01-01

    We describe the preoperative use of limited cone beam computed tomography (CT) with a dental CT scanner for the assessment of mandibular third molars before extraction. Cone beam CT provides 42.7-mm-high and 30-mm-wide rectangular solid images, with a resolution of less than 0.2 mm. The positional relationship between the mandibular third molars and the mandibular canal was examined by dental CT. Sixty-eight lower third molars of 62 patients whose teeth were superimposed on the mandibular canal on periapical or panoramic radiographs were studied. Dental CT scans clearly demonstrated the positional relationship between the mandibular canal and the teeth. The mandibular canal was located buccally to the roots of 16 teeth, lingually to the roots of 27 teeth, inferiorly to the roots of 23 teeth, and between the roots of 2 teeth. The presence of bone between the mandibular canal and the teeth was not noted in 7 of 16 buccal cases, 24 of 27 lingual cases, and 10 of 23 inferior cases on dental CT scans, suggesting that the canal was in contact with the teeth. Fifty-nine of the 68 mandibular third molars were surgically removed, and postoperative transient hypoesthesia occurred in 4 patients. Dental CT scans showed no bone between the mandibular canal and the teeth in all 4 patients. Hypoesthesia was not related to the bucco-lingual location of the mandibular canal or to the extent of bone loss between the canal and the teeth. However, hypoesthesia did not occur in patients with bone between the mandibular canal and the teeth. Thus, information on the distance between the canal and teeth on dental CT scans was useful for predicting the risk of inferior alveolar nerve damage. Because of its high resolution and low radiation dose, cone beam CT was useful for examination before mandibular third molar surgery. (author)

  18. Fracture resistance and histological findings of immature teeth treated with mineral trioxide aggregate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hatibovic-Kofman, S.; Raimundo, L.; Zheng, L.

    2008-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to test the hypothesis that the fracture strength of calcium hydroxide and mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA)-filled immature teeth decreased over time. Immature mandibular incisors from sheep were extracted and the pulps were extirpated using an apical approach...

  19. Fracture mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Perez, Nestor

    2017-01-01

    The second edition of this textbook includes a refined presentation of concepts in each chapter, additional examples; new problems and sections, such as conformal mapping and mechanical behavior of wood; while retaining all the features of the original book. The material included in this book is based upon the development of analytical and numerical procedures pertinent to particular fields of linear elastic fracture mechanics (LEFM) and plastic fracture mechanics (PFM), including mixed-mode-loading interaction. The mathematical approach undertaken herein is coupled with a brief review of several fracture theories available in cited references, along with many color images and figures. Dynamic fracture mechanics is included through the field of fatigue and Charpy impact testing. Explains computational and engineering approaches for solving crack-related problems using straightforward mathematics that facilitate comprehension of the physical meaning of crack growth processes; Expands computational understandin...

  20. Fracture analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ueng, Tzoushin; Towse, D.

    1991-01-01

    Fractures are not only the weak planes of a rock mass, but also the easy passages for the fluid flow. Their spacing, orientation, and aperture will affect the deformability, strength, heat transmittal, and fluid transporting properties of the rock mass. To understand the thermomechanical and hydrological behaviors of the rock surrounding the heater emplacement borehole, the location, orientation, and aperture of the fractures of the rock mass should be known. Borehole television and borescope surveys were performed to map the location, orientation, and aperture of the fractures intersecting the boreholes drilled in the Prototype Engineered Barrier System Field Tests (PEBSFT) at G-Tunnel. Core logging was also performed during drilling. However, because the core was not oriented and the depth of the fracture cannot be accurately determined, the results of the core logging were only used as reference and will not be discussed here

  1. Facial Fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricketts, Sophie; Gill, Hameet S; Fialkov, Jeffery A; Matic, Damir B; Antonyshyn, Oleh M

    2016-02-01

    After reading this article, the participant should be able to: 1. Demonstrate an understanding of some of the changes in aspects of facial fracture management. 2. Assess a patient presenting with facial fractures. 3. Understand indications and timing of surgery. 4. Recognize exposures of the craniomaxillofacial skeleton. 5. Identify methods for repair of typical facial fracture patterns. 6. Discuss the common complications seen with facial fractures. Restoration of the facial skeleton and associated soft tissues after trauma involves accurate clinical and radiologic assessment to effectively plan a management approach for these injuries. When surgical intervention is necessary, timing, exposure, sequencing, and execution of repair are all integral to achieving the best long-term outcomes for these patients.

  2. Pisiform fractures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fleege, M.A.; Jebson, P.J.; Renfrew, D.L.; El-Khoury, G.Y.; Steyers, C.M. Jr.

    1991-01-01

    Fractures of the pisiform are often missed due to improper radiographic evaluation and a tendency to focus on other, more obvious injuries. Delayed diagnosis may result in disabling sequelae. A high index of clinical suspicion and appropriate radiographic examination will establish the correct diagnosis. Ten patients with pisiform fracture are presented. The anatomy, mechanism of injury, clinical presentation, radiographic features, and evaluation of this injury are discussed. (orig.)

  3. Stress fractures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berquist, T.H.; Cooper, K.L.; Pritchard, D.J.

    1985-01-01

    The diagnosis of a stress fracture should be considered in patients presented with pain after a change in activity, especially if the activity is strenuous and the pain is in the lower extremities. Since evidence of the stress fracture may not be apparent for weeks on routine radiographs, proper use of other imaging techniques will allow an earlier diagnosis. Prompt diagnosis is especially important in the femur, where displacement may occur

  4. Anesthetic and Surgical Management of a Bilateral Mandible Fracture in a Patient With Charcot-Marie-Tooth Disease: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Jeffrey D; Minkin, Patton; Lindsey, Sean; Bovino, Brian

    2015-10-01

    This report describes the case of a 74-year-old man who had been diagnosed with Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease as a child. Because the patient had serious motor and sensory neuropathy associated with his disease, special anesthetic and surgical recommendations had to be considered before he underwent general anesthesia to repair his mandibular fracture. Repair of the mandible was performed under general anesthesia with a nasal endotracheal tube and the use of the nondepolarizing muscle relaxant rocuronium. Open reduction and internal fixation through extraoral approaches were used to fixate the displaced right subcondylar and symphyseal fractures. A closed reduction approach using maxillary fixation screws and a mandibular arch bar with light elastic guidance was used to treat a nondisplaced fracture of the left mandibular ramus. Rigid fixation allowed for avoidance of a period of intermaxillary fixation. General anesthesia and muscle relaxant were administered without complication. Treatment of bilateral mandibular fractures with combined open and closed approaches resulted in restoration of premorbid occlusion and masticatory function. Repair of mandibular fractures under general anesthesia appears to be a safe procedure in patients with Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease when appropriate anesthetic and surgical methods are used. Copyright © 2015 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Scaphoid Fracture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esther Kim, BS

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available History of present illness: A 25-year-old, right-handed male presented to the emergency department with left wrist pain after falling from a skateboard onto an outstretched hand two-weeks prior. He otherwise had no additional concerns, including no complaints of weakness or loss of sensation. On physical exam, there was tenderness to palpation within the anatomical snuff box. The neurovascular exam was intact. Plain films of the left wrist and hand were obtained. Significant findings: The anteroposterior (AP plain film of this patient demonstrates a full thickness fracture through the middle third of the scaphoid (red arrow, with some apparent displacement (yellow lines and subtle angulation of the fracture fragments (blue line. Discussion: The scaphoid bone is the most commonly fractured carpal bone accounting for 70%-80% of carpal fractures.1 Classically, it is sustained following a fall onto an outstretched hand (FOOSH. Patients should be evaluated for tenderness with palpation over the anatomical snuffbox, which has a sensitivity of 100% and specificity of 40%.2 Plain films are the initial diagnostic modality of choice and have a sensitivity of 70%, but are commonly falsely negative in the first two to six weeks of injury (false negative of 20%.3 The Mayo classification organizes scaphoid fractures as involving the proximal, mid, and distal portions of the scaphoid bone with mid-fractures being the most common.3 The proximal scaphoid is highly susceptible to vascular compromise because it depends on retrograde blood flow from the radial artery. Therefore, disruption can lead to serious sequelae including osteonecrosis, arthrosis, and functional impairment. Thus, a low threshold should be maintained for neurovascular evaluation and surgical referral. Patients with non-displaced scaphoid fractures should be placed in a thumb spica splint.3 Patients with even suspected scaphoid fractures should be placed in a thumb spica splint and re

  6. Three-dimensional assessment of unilateral subcondylar fracture using computed tomography after open reduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sathya Kumar Devireddy

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim was to assess the accuracy of three-dimensional anatomical reductions achieved by open method of treatment in cases of displaced unilateral mandibular subcondylar fractures using preoperative (pre op and postoperative (post op computed tomography (CT scans. Materials and Methods: In this prospective study, 10 patients with unilateral sub condylar fractures confirmed by an orthopantomogram were included. A pre op and post op CT after 1 week of surgical procedure was taken in axial, coronal and sagittal plane along with three-dimensional reconstruction. Standard anatomical parameters, which undergo changes due to fractures of the mandibular condyle were measured in pre and post op CT scans in three planes and statistically analysed for the accuracy of the reduction comparing the following variables: (a Pre op fractured and nonfractured side (b post op fractured and nonfractured side (c pre op fractured and post op fractured side. P < 0.05 was considered as significant. Results: Three-dimensional anatomical reduction was possible in 9 out of 10 cases (90%. The statistical analysis of each parameter in three variables revealed (P < 0.05 that there was a gross change in the dimensions of the parameters obtained in pre op fractured and nonfractured side. When these parameters were assessed in post op CT for the three variables there was no statistical difference between the post op fractured side and non fractured side. The same parameters were analysed for the three variables in pre op fractured and post op fractured side and found significant statistical difference suggesting a considerable change in the dimensions of the fractured side post operatively. Conclusion: The statistical and clinical results in our study emphasised that it is possible to fix the condyle in three-dimensional anatomical positions with open method of treatment and avoid post op degenerative joint changes. CT is the ideal imaging tool and should be used on

  7. Anquilosis mandibular: una frecuente secuela por Noma Mandibular ankylosis: a Noma frequent sequel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Fernández García-Guilarte

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Conocemos poco sobre el Noma o Enfermedad Cancrum Oris. Esta entidad afecta a niños con malnutrición crónica, poca higiene oral, poco desarrollo sanitario y enfermedades concurrentes debilitantes. Existe un consenso general sobre que el Noma empieza como una gingivitis; en su fase aguda, puede haber respuesta al tratamiento antibiótico, no obstante, las secuelas tras su curación incluyen daños estéticos y funcionales variables, que pueden requerir cirugía reconstructiva. Presentamos 3 casos de anquilosis mandibular que en el examen preoperatorio presentaron dimorfismo mandibular, fusión de hueso maxilar y mandibular y anquilosis de la articulación témporomandibular. La ortopantografía y la Tomografía Axial Computerizada (TAC fueron muy útiles en la planificación de la cirugía. El tratamiento quirúrgico consistió en todos los casos en la resección del hueso anquilótico y la reconstrucción con injerto condrocostal en uno de los casos. En el postoperatorio se siguió fisioterapia intensiva. Clínicamente todos los pacientes mostraron una gran mejoría en la masticación, la alimentación y el habla, obviamente debido a una buena oclusión. El problema más común fue la baja colaboración en la rehabilitación mandibular por parte de los pacientes.Little is known about Noma or Cancrum Oris Disease. This entity affects to children with chronic malnutrition, poor oral hygiene, poor environmental sanitation and debilitating concurrent illness. There is general consensus that noma starts as gingivitis. The acute stage responds readily to antibiotic treatment. The sequelae after healing include variable functional and aesthetic impairments, which require reconstructive surgery. We report 3 cases of mandibular ankylosis. Preoperative examination revealed mandibular dismorphism, fusion of maxilla and mandible and ankylosis of the temporomandibular joint. Orthopantography and Computed Thomography scan (TCS were very useful in planning

  8. Augmented mandibular bone structurally adapts to functional loading

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhoeven, J. W.; Ruijter, J. M.; Koole, R.; de Putter, C.; Terlou, M.; Cune, M. S.

    2013-01-01

    Long-term changes in trabecular bone structure during the 10 years following onlay grafting with simultaneous mandibular implant placement were studied. Extraoral radiographs of both mandibular sides in eight patients were taken regularly. Bone structure was analysed using a custom-written image

  9. Coronal views of the paediatric mandibular condyle on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This article highlights the importance of routinely reviewing the mandibular condyle on computerised tomography brain studies in a trauma setting, that often extends to involve the mandibular condyles in the scan parameters. We discuss 4 cases seen over the last 18 months at our institution, and review the relevant ...

  10. Cerebro-costo-mandibular syndrome: Report of two cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdalla, Wael; Panigrahy, Ashok; Bartoletti, Stefano C

    2011-01-01

    Cerebro-costo-mandibular syndrome (CCMS) is a rare syndrome that includes a constellation of mandibular hypoplasia and posterior rib defects as its basic features. Additional features can include hearing loss, tracheal cartilage abnormalities, scoliosis, elbow hypoplasia, and spina bifida. Here we report two cases of CCMS and discuss the reported long-term outcome of the disease.

  11. 21 CFR 874.3695 - Mandibular implant facial prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... made of materials such as stainless steel, tantalum, titanium, cobalt-chromium based alloy... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Mandibular implant facial prosthesis. 874.3695... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 874.3695 Mandibular implant...

  12. Cephalometric evaluation of surgical mandibular advancement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eloísa Marcantônio Boeck

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The treatment of Class II adult individuals with mandibular deficiency has been the combination of orthodontic treatment and orthognathic surgery. Therefore, a study was conducted in which cephalometric analysis was used to evaluate the influence of dentoalveolar decompensation in Class II patients submitted to orthodontic and surgical treatment for mandibular advancement, by bilateral osteotomy of the mandibular ramus. A sample of 15 leukoderma adult female patients were selected and three cephalometric radiographs of each patient, taken before the orthodontic treatment, before surgery and after at least 6 months postoperatively, were analyzed in a total of 45 roentgenograms. The tracings were made by the manual method and the points were digitalized using software. The results showed that values of SNB increased from 75.6 to 78.6°. The measures BNP and PGNP were reduced from -12.7 to -7.7 mm and -12.7 to -6.6 mm, respectively. For ANB there was a reduction of 3.23° (from 8.1° to 4.9°. Likewise, the values of AOBO were diminished by 6.3 mm (from 7.6 to 1.3 mm, and in the values of OJ there was a reduction of 5.7 mm (from 9 to 3.3 mm. It was concluded that the pre-surgical orthodontic treatment promoted minimal and variable dental and skeletal changes in the final result. The surgical treatment caused significant skeletal changes, especially in the measurements related to the mandible (SNB, BNP, PGNP and SNPM or indirectly to it (ANB, AOBO and OJ.

  13. Cephalometric evaluation of surgical mandibular advancement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boeck, Eloísa Marcantônio; Kuramae, Mayury; Lunardi, Nádia; Santos-Pinto, Ary dos; Mazzonetto, Renato

    2010-01-01

    The treatment of Class II adult individuals with mandibular deficiency has been the combination of orthodontic treatment and orthognathic surgery. Therefore, a study was conducted in which cephalometric analysis was used to evaluate the influence of dentoalveolar decompensation in Class II patients submitted to orthodontic and surgical treatment for mandibular advancement, by bilateral osteotomy of the mandibular ramus. A sample of 15 leukoderma adult female patients were selected and three cephalometric radiographs of each patient, taken before the orthodontic treatment, before surgery and after at least 6 months postoperatively, were analyzed in a total of 45 roentgenograms. The tracings were made by the manual method and the points were digitalized using software. The results showed that values of SNB increased from 75.6 to 78.6 degrees. The measures BNP and PGNP were reduced from -12.7 to -7.7 mm and -12.7 to -6.6 mm, respectively. For ANB there was a reduction of 3.23 degrees (from 8.1 degrees to 4.9 degrees). Likewise, the values of AOBO were diminished by 6.3 mm (from 7.6 to 1.3 mm), and in the values of OJ there was a reduction of 5.7 mm (from 9 to 3.3 mm). It was concluded that the pre-surgical orthodontic treatment promoted minimal and variable dental and skeletal changes in the final result. The surgical treatment caused significant skeletal changes, especially in the measurements related to the mandible (SNB, BNP, PGNP and SNPM) or indirectly to it (ANB, AOBO and OJ).

  14. Mandibular distraction in neonates: indications, technique, results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sesenna Enrico

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Pierre Robin Sequence features were first described by Robin in 1923 and include micrognathia, glossoptosis and respiratory distress with an incidence estimated as 1:8,500 to 1:20,000 newborns. Upper airway obstruction and feeding difficulties are the main concerns related to the pathology. Mandibular distraction should be considered a treatment option (when other treatments result inadequate. Patiants and methods Ten patients between the ages of 1 month and 2 years with severe micrognathia and airway obstruction were treated with Mandibular Distraction Osteogenesis (MDO. All patients underwent fibroscopic examination of the upper airway and a radiographic imaging and/or computed tomography scans to detect malformations and to confirm that the obstruction was caused by posterior tongue displacement. All patients were evaluated by a multidisciplinary team. Indications for surgery included frequent apneic episodes with severe desaturation (70%. Gavage therapy was employed in all patients since oral feeding was not possible. The two tracheotomy patients were 5 months and 2 years old respectively, and the distraction procedure was performed to remove the tracheotomy tube. All patients were treated with bilateral mandibular distraction: two cases with an external multivector distraction device, six cases with an internal non-resorbable device and two cases with an internal resorbable device. In one case, the patient with Goldenhar's Syndrome, the procedure was repeated. Results The resolution of symptoms was obtained in all patients, and, when present, tracheotomy was removed without complications. Of the two patients with pre-existing tracheotomies, in the younger patient (5 months old the tracheotomy was removed 7 days postoperatively. In the Goldenhar's syndrome case (2 years old a Montgomery device was necessary for 6 months due to the presence of tracheotomy-inducted tracheomalacia. Patients were discharged when the

  15. Mandibular molar with five root canals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barletta, Fernando Branco; Dotto, Sidney Ricardo; Reis, Magda de Sousa; Ferreira, Ronise; Travassos, Rosana Maria Coelho

    2008-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to demonstrate the importance of knowledge of the internal anatomy of root canals for the success of endodontic treatment. Lack of knowledge of anatomic variations and their characteristics in different teeth has been pointed out as one of the main causes of endodontic therapy failure. In this report, the authors describe the endodontic treatment of a mandibular first molar with five root canals, evaluate the rate of occurrence of this number of canals, and discuss the importance of their identification and treatment.

  16. [Temporo-mandibular joints and orthognathic surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouletreau, P

    2016-09-01

    Temporo-Mandibular Joints (TMJ) and orthognathic surgery are closely linked. In the past, some authors have even described (with mixed results) the correction of some dysmorphosis through direct procedures on the TMJs. Nowadays, performing orthognathic surgery involves the TMJ in three different occasions: (1) TMJ disorders potentially responsible for dento-maxillary dysmorphosis, (2) effects of orthognathic surgery on TMJs, and (3) condylar positioning methods in orthognathic surgery. These three chapters are developed in order to focus on the close relationships between TMJ and orthognathic surgery. Some perspectives close this article. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. Renal cell carcinoma presenting as mandibular metastasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan Ahmadnia

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Renal clear cell carcinoma (RCC has different manifestations, including uncommon metastasis and paraneoplastic syndromes. Here we report a rare case of RCC presenting as metastasis to the mandible. A 57-year-old patient with mandibular swelling was referred to the dentist. After necessary evaluations, an incisional biopsy of mandible showed metastatic RCC. The patient was referred to the urologist. The patient underwent right radical nephrectomy. Pathological examination showed clear renal cell carcinoma. Every abnormal bone lesion in the oral cavity should be evaluated carefully and the possibility of a malignant lesion should always be considered.

  18. Mandibular unilateral fusion in primary dentition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neena Eregowda

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Fusion is a developmental anomaly which occurs due to a union of one or more adjacent teeth during morphodifferentiation of the dental germs. The prevalence of tooth fusion is estimated at 0.5%–2.5% in the primary dentition. These anomalies may be unilateral or bilateral and may affect either dentition although the deciduous teeth are more commonly affected. Early diagnosis of such condition is important because it may cause clinical problems, such as esthetic concerns, and caries. This report describes a case of unilateral fusion of the primary mandibular lateral incisor and canine and aims to evaluate any associated pathology.

  19. Dimorfismo sexual mandibular en una coleccion formativa

    OpenAIRE

    Barboza, María Carolina; Mendonça, Osvaldo Juan; Bordach, María A.

    2005-01-01

    Muchas piezas óseas permiten la estimación sexual. En la mandíbula es mediante la observación de sectores morfoestructurales (gonion, mentón, rama, etc). La efectividad discriminatoria de esta estructura puede verse incremententada y/o complementada con nuevas propuestas técnico-metodológicas. Una de estas propuestas (Loth y Henneberg 1996), basada en la conformación anatómica de la inflexión del borde posterior de la rama mandibular, ha sido cuestionada en su eficiencia diagnóstica. Puesto q...

  20. Prosthodontic management of mandibular deviation using palatal ramp appliance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prince Kumar

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Segmental resection of the mandible generally results in deviation of the mandible to the defective side. This loss of continuity of the mandible destroys the balance of the lower face and leads to decreased mandibular function by deviation of the residual segment toward the surgical site. Prosthetic methods advocated to reduce or eliminate mandibular deviation include intermaxillary fixation, removable mandibular guide flange, palatal ramp, implant-supported prosthesis and palatal guidance restorations which may be useful in reducing mandibular deviation and improving masticatory performance and efficiency. These methods and restorations would be combined with a well organized mandibular exercise regimen. This clinical report describes the rehabilitation following segmental mandibulectomy using palatal ramp prosthesis.

  1. Mandibular kinematics after orthognathic surgical treatment a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sforza, Chiarella; Ugolini, Alessandro; Rocchetta, Davide; Galante, Domenico; Mapelli, Andrea; Giannì, Aldo Bruno

    2010-03-01

    We recorded three-dimensional mandibular movements, while the mouth was being opened and closed, using an optoelectronic motion analyser in 14 patients (5 skeletal Class II, 9 skeletal Class III) who were being assessed 7-49 months after orthognathic operations, and in 44 healthy subjects. All 14 patients had satisfactory healing on clinical examination, and function had been restored. Mandibular movement was divided into its rotational and translational components. On maximum mouth opening, the patients had significantly less total displacement of the mandibular interincisor point (p=0.05), and more mandibular movement that was explained by pure condylar rotation (p=0.006), than control subjects. There was no significant relation between maximum mouth opening and percentage rotation. While mandibular motion was well restored clinically by orthognathic surgery, the kinematics of the joint were modified. Larger studies and longitudinal investigations are necessary to appreciate the clinical relevance of the variations in condylar rotational and translational components.

  2. Mandibular condyle position in cone beam computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, Hyoung Joo; Kim, Gyu Tae; Choi, Yong Suk; Hwang, Eui Hwan [Kyung Hee Univ. School of Dentistry, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-06-15

    To evaluate position of the mandibular condyle within articular fossa in an asymptomatic population radiographically by a cone beam computed tomography. Cone beam computed tomography of 60 temporomandibular joints was performed on 15 males and 15 females with no history of any temporomandibular disorders, or any other orthodontic or photoconductors treatments. Position of mandibular condyle within articular fossa at centric occlusion was evaluated. A statistical evaluation was done using a SPSS. In the sagittal views, mandibular condyle within articular fossa was laterally located at central section. Mandibular condyles in the right and left sides were showed asymmetric positional relationship at medial, central, and lateral sections. Mandibular condyle within articular fossa in an asymptomatic population was observed non-concentric position in the sagittal and coronal views.

  3. Thin-plate spline analysis of mandibular growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franchi, L; Baccetti, T; McNamara, J A

    2001-04-01

    The analysis of mandibular growth changes around the pubertal spurt in humans has several important implications for the diagnosis and orthopedic correction of skeletal disharmonies. The purpose of this study was to evaluate mandibular shape and size growth changes around the pubertal spurt in a longitudinal sample of subjects with normal occlusion by means of an appropriate morphometric technique (thin-plate spline analysis). Ten mandibular landmarks were identified on lateral cephalograms of 29 subjects at 6 different developmental phases. The 6 phases corresponded to 6 different maturational stages in cervical vertebrae during accelerative and decelerative phases of the pubertal growth curve of the mandible. Differences in shape between average mandibular configurations at the 6 developmental stages were visualized by means of thin-plate spline analysis and subjected to permutation test. Centroid size was used as the measure of the geometric size of each mandibular specimen. Differences in size at the 6 developmental phases were tested statistically. The results of graphical analysis indicated a statistically significant change in mandibular shape only for the growth interval from stage 3 to stage 4 in cervical vertebral maturation. Significant increases in centroid size were found at all developmental phases, with evidence of a prepubertal minimum and of a pubertal maximum. The existence of a pubertal peak in human mandibular growth, therefore, is confirmed by thin-plate spline analysis. Significant morphological changes in the mandible during the growth interval from stage 3 to stage 4 in cervical vertebral maturation may be described as an upward-forward direction of condylar growth determining an overall "shrinkage" of the mandibular configuration along the measurement of total mandibular length. This biological mechanism is particularly efficient in compensating for major increments in mandibular size at the adolescent spurt.

  4. Mandibular canal branches supplying the mandibular third molar observed on cone beam computed tomographic images: Reports of four cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jae Seo; Yoon, Suk Ja; Kang, Byung Cheol [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, School of Dentistry, Dental Science Research Institute, Chonnam National University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-12-15

    Bifid mandibular canal can be an anatomic variation. This condition can lead to complication when performing mandibular anesthesia or during extraction of lower third molar, placement of implants and surgery in the mandible. Four patients underwent preoperative imaging for extraction of third molars using CBCT (CB Mercuray, Hitachi, Japan). The axial images were processed with CBworks program 2.1 (CyberMed Inc., Seoul, Korea). The branches for supplying the lower third molar were identified mainly on cross-sectional and panoramic images of CBCT. Since the location and configuration of mandibular canal variations are important in any mandibular surgical procedures, we report 4 cases of bifid mandibular canal with panoramic and the CBCT images.

  5. Trochanteric fractures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herrlin, K.; Stroemberg, T.; Lidgren, L.; Walloee, A.; Pettersson, H.; Lund Univ.

    1988-01-01

    Four hundred and thirty trochanteric factures operated upon with McLaughlin, Ender or Richard's osteosynthesis were divided into 6 different types based on their radiographic appearance before and immediately after reposition with special reference to the medial cortical support. A significant correlation was found between the fracture type and subsequent mechanical complications where types 1 and 2 gave less, and types 4 and 5 more complications. A comparison of the various osteosyntheses showed that Richard's had significantly fewer complications than either the Ender or McLaughlin types. For Richard's osteosynthesis alone no correlation to fracture type could be made because of the small number of complications in this group. (orig.)

  6. Fracture Blisters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uebbing, Claire M

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Fracture blisters are a relatively uncommon complication of fractures in locations of the body, such as the ankle, wrist elbow and foot, where skin adheres tightly to bone with little subcutaneous fat cushioning. The blister that results resembles that of a second degree burn.These blisters significantly alter treatment, making it difficult to splint or cast and often overlying ideal surgical incision sites. Review of the literature reveals no consensus on management; however, most authors agree on early treatment prior to blister formation or delay until blister resolution before attempting surgical correction or stabilization. [West J Emerg Med. 2011;12(1;131-133.

  7. Dynamic MR imaging of mandibular osteoradionecrosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Store, G.; Smith, H.J.; Larheim, T.A.

    2000-01-01

    Osteoradionecrotic bone has been characterised as hypovascular and metabolically inactive tissue with impaired perfusion. The present study was conducted to determine if dynamic contrast-enhanced MR imaging could provide additional information about the vascularity of radionecrotic mandibular bone. Dynamic contrast-enhanced MR imaging was performed on 10 patients with mandibular osteoradionecrosis (ORN), and on 6 patients, irradiated for oropharyngeal tumours, without symptoms or signs of ORN. Nine patients in the ORN group received a series of 20 hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) treatments, after which the dynamic MR investigation was repeated. Radiation per se did not lead to increased contrast enhancement, whereas all patients with ORN showed marked contrast enhancement of the osteoradionecrotic bone marrow. After HBO treatment, pathological contrast enhancement of the abnormal bone marrow could still be seen, but the rate of enhancement was less than before in 7 of 9 patients. Two patients had an increase in the enhancement rate. The findings suggest the existence of an increased and patent microvasculature

  8. Pyogenic granuloma associated with mandibular odontoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karla Ocampo

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: pyogenic granuloma is a kind of inflammatory hyperplasia of multifactorial origin, which is usually related to trauma or constant irritation, drug use, hormonal factors, among others. Meanwhile the odontoma is a benign tumor odontogenic composed of epithelial and mesenchymal cells, their development is usually associated with trauma, infections, inherited disorders or hyperactivity odontoblast. Objectives: The objective is to present the clinical case of a patient that presented a case of pyogenic granuloma related to the presence of a mandibular odontoma, and therapeutic management and postoperative results. Case report: The case shows a female patient of 32 years old with a history of multinodular goiter and hypothyroidism, developing a mandibular odontoma of the left side associated with pyogenic granuloma in the same area, which was treated with surgical excision and reconstructed affected tissues with lyophilized bone and collagen membrane. Favorable outcome after surgery without evidence of recurrence, with proper osseointegration of alloplastic materials and soft tissues. Conclusions: The irritant effect of the presence of a tumor (odontoma in developing confirmed pyogenic granuloma.

  9. Transmigration of mandibular canine – case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gruszka, Katarzyna; Różyło, T. Katarzyna; Różyło-Kalinowska, Ingrid; Denkiewicz, Katarzyna; Masłowska, Klaudia

    2014-01-01

    Transmigration is a phenomenon of movement of an unerupted tooth in the bone across the midline. This anomaly is not often found. Transmigration is more prevalent in females than in males, and more often encountered in the mandible than maxilla, it affects mostly canines. The aim of this study was to present a case report of a mandibular canine transmigration in a patient aged 12. Intraoral examination determined hypodontia of right second premolar and delayed eruption of left second premolar in maxilla, as well as persistent deciduous teeth: right second molar, left canine and second molar. The patient was referred for a Cone-Beam CT examination, which allowed precise visualization of the transmigrating canine as well as ruled out resorption of roots of mandibular incisors. The treatment with a maxillary fixed orthodontic appliance was finished after obtaining a satisfactory result. Proper alignment of the incisors in the anterior-posterior plane and correct midline position were accepted by the patient. Transmigrating canine after consultation with the surgeon was designed to further radiological observation

  10. Elbow Fractures

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... is also an important factor when treating elbow fractures. Casts are used more frequently in children, as their risk of developing elbow stiffness is small; however, in an adult, elbow stiffness is much more likely. Rehabilitation directed by your doctor is often used to ...

  11. Wrist Fractures

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... All Topics A-Z Videos Infographics Symptom Picker Anatomy Bones Joints Muscles Nerves Vessels Tendons About Hand Surgery What is a Hand Surgeon? What is a Hand Therapist? Media Find a Hand Surgeon Home Anatomy Wrist Fractures Email to a friend * required fields ...

  12. Shoulder Fractures

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... All Topics A-Z Videos Infographics Symptom Picker Anatomy Bones Joints Muscles Nerves Vessels Tendons About Hand Surgery What is a Hand Surgeon? What is a Hand Therapist? Media Find a Hand Surgeon Home Anatomy Shoulder Fractures Email to a friend * required fields ...

  13. Effects of occlusal inclination and loading on mandibular bone remodeling: a finite element study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rungsiyakull, Chaiy; Rungsiyakull, Pimdeun; Li, Qing; Li, Wei; Swain, Michael

    2011-01-01

    To provide a preliminary understanding of the biomechanics with respect to the effect of cusp inclination and occlusal loading on the mandibular bone remodeling. Three different cusp inclinations (0, 10, and 30 degrees) of a ceramic crown and different occlusal loading locations (central fossa and 1- and 2-mm offsets horizontally) were taken into account to explore the stresses and strains transferred from the crown to the surrounding dental bone through the implant. A strain energy density obtained from two-dimensional plane-strain finite element analysis was used as the mechanical stimulus to drive cancellous and cortical bone remodeling in a buccolingual mandibular section. Different ceramic cusp inclinations had a significant effect on bone remodeling responses in terms of the change in the average peri-implant bone density and overall stability. The remodeling rate was relatively high in the first few months of loading and gradually decreased until reaching its equilibrium. A larger cusp inclination and horizontal offset (eg, 30 degrees and 2-mm offset) led to a higher bone remodeling rate and greater interfacial stress. The dental implant superstructure design (in terms of cusp inclination and loading location) determines the load transmission pattern and thus largely affects bone remodeling activities. Although the design with a lower cusp inclination recommended in previous studies may reduce damage and fracture failure, it could, to a certain extent, compromise bone engagement and long-term stability.

  14. Six-year clinical outcome of single implant-retained mandibular overdentures--a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passia, Nicole; Wolfart, Stefan; Kern, Matthias

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this prospective pilot study was to evaluate the prosthodontic maintenance as well as the implant outcome of single implant-retained mandibular overdentures over an observation period of 6 years. Eleven edentulous patients received one single implant in the midline of the mandible. Denture bases were temporarily relined and 2 months later provided with a ball attachment for implant retention. Implant related parameters and prosthodontic maintenance interventions were assessed 4 weeks after implant loading and then once a year. Over a mean observation period of 75.9 months, no implant was lost. The most frequent prosthetic maintenance intervention was activation of the matrix due to loss of retention, followed by exchange of the female part. Eight denture bases had to be repaired after a fracture in the midline area. Within the limitations of this preliminary clinical study, the concept of a single midline implant to retain a mandibular complete denture was a successful treatment option for elderly edentulous patients. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Radiologic study of mandibular third molar of Korean youths

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahn, Hyung Kyu

    1982-01-01

    The author has made a study on the classification of the mandibular 3rd molars of Korean youths through dental radiography by means of Pell and Gregory's classification and on the prevalence of the dental caries of distal surface of the mandibular 2nd molar adjacent to the mandibular 3rd molars turned anteriorly. The results are as follow; 1. It was found that the largest case number was class I (272 cases, 52.9%) in the relation of the tooth to the ramus of the mandible and 2nd molar. 2. The mesio-angular position was the largest number (239 cases, 46.5%) in the relation of the long axis of the impacted mandibular 3rd molar to the long axis of the 2nd molar. 3. The mesio-angular position of class I was the largest number (140 cases, 27.2%) in the relation of the tooth to the ramus of the mandible and 2nd molar and the long axis of the impacted mandibular 3rd moral to the long axis of the 2nd molar. 4. The average angle of the long axis of mandibular 3rd molar in mesioangular position or horizontal position to the occlusal plane was 143 W 5. Mandibular 3rd molar with lesion such as dental cries or pericoronitis was 73 cases (14.2). 6. The caries incidence rate of the distal surface of the 2nd molar was about 3.1%.

  16. Skeletal maturity assessment using mandibular canine calcification stages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vildana Džemidžić

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The aims of this study were: to investigate the relationship between mandibular canine calcification stages and skeletal maturity; and to evaluate whether the mandibular canine calcification stages may be used as a reliable diagnostic tool for skeletal maturity assessment. Materials and methods. This study included 151 subjects: 81 females and 70 males, with ages ranging from 9 to 16 years (mean age: 12.29±1.86 years. The inclusion criteria for subjects were as follows: age between 9 and 16 years; good general health without any hormonal, nutritional, growth or dental development problems. Subjects who were undergoing or had previously received orthodontic treatment were not included in this study. The calcification stages of the left permanent mandibular canine were assessed according to the method of Demirjian, on panoramic radiographs. Assessment of skeletal maturity was carried out using the cervical vertebral maturation index (CVMI, as proposed by the Hassel-Farman method, on lateral cephalograms. The correlation between the calcification stages of mandibular canine and skeletal maturity was estimated separately for male and female subjects. Results. Correlation coefficients between calcification stages of mandibular canine and skeletal maturity were 0.895 for male and 0.701 for female subjects. Conclusions. A significant correlation was found between the calcification stages of the mandibular canine and skeletal maturity. The calcification stages of the mandibular canine show a satisfactory diagnostic performance only for assessment of pre-pubertal growth phase.

  17. [Congenital malformations of the temporo-mandibular joint and the mandibular ramus: Grafting vs distraction osteogenesis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallucci, A; Graillon, N; Foletti, J M; Chossegros, C; Cheynet, F

    2016-09-01

    Congenital deformities of the mandibular ramus and of the temporo-mandibular joint are treated by surgery since the early 20th century. However, morphological and functional results are often disappointing, accounting for iterative operations. Today, a clear consensus concerning the type of intervention to be proposed, and at what age it should be carried out does not yet exist. For mild cases, "conventional" orthognathic or osteogenic distraction procedures seem to work well, especially if they are carried out at the end of growth. In severe cases, it is often necessary to proceed in several surgical steps, usually starting with a chondrocostal graft, especially when interceptive surgery, performed before the end of growth, is preferred in order to improve the patient's quality of life. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. Topographical evaluation of the mandibular canal through panoramic radiograph

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingrid Macedo Oliveira

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The mandibular canal is located inside the body of the mandible and may have anatomical variations. The topographic knowledge of the mandibular canal by the Dental surgeons is fundamental to achieving success in surgical planning, anesthetics and clinical interventions involving the jaw. To study the anatomy of the mandibular canal through panoramic radiographs. A retrospective descriptive study, developed after review and approval by the Ethics and Research Committee with the number of opinion 431095. Were analyzed 252 panoramic radiographs of patients of male and female attended in dental clinics UNINOVAFAPI University Center, Teresina-Pi, Brazil. The radiographs were analyzed with the aid of a light box and each antimere the jaw was observed separately. The classification of Nortjé and Langlais for description of the topography of the mandibular canal were used. Descriptive statistical analysis was performed with SPSS version 18.0. There was a prevalence of 38.89% in both antimeres, of mandibular channel the Type II. The type IV was present in 25.4% in the right hemi-arch and 26.6% on the left. Mandibular canal with unilateral bifurcation was observed in 0.77% of the sample and molar straight channel has not been identified. We observed anatomical variations as for the number and path, of the mandibular canal with the highest prevalence of Types II and IV, and the absence of bifurcations. Most was mandibular channels showed no bifurcation. The panoramic radiograph showed up an aid important to identify the mandibular canal and its variations.

  19. Roles of Chondrocytes in Endochondral Bone Formation and Fracture Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinton, R.J.; Jing, Y.; Jing, J.; Feng, J.Q.

    2016-01-01

    The formation of the mandibular condylar cartilage (MCC) and its subchondral bone is an important but understudied topic in dental research. The current concept regarding endochondral bone formation postulates that most hypertrophic chondrocytes undergo programmed cell death prior to bone formation. Under this paradigm, the MCC and its underlying bone are thought to result from 2 closely linked but separate processes: chondrogenesis and osteogenesis. However, recent investigations using cell lineage tracing techniques have demonstrated that many, perhaps the majority, of bone cells are derived via direct transformation from chondrocytes. In this review, the authors will briefly discuss the history of this idea and describe recent studies that clearly demonstrate that the direct transformation of chondrocytes into bone cells is common in both long bone and mandibular condyle development and during bone fracture repair. The authors will also provide new evidence of a distinct difference in ossification orientation in the condylar ramus (1 ossification center) versus long bone ossification formation (2 ossification centers). Based on our recent findings and those of other laboratories, we propose a new model that contrasts the mode of bone formation in much of the mandibular ramus (chondrocyte-derived) with intramembranous bone formation of the mandibular body (non-chondrocyte-derived). PMID:27664203

  20. Proximal mandibular nerve block using electrolocation in 10 dogs undergoing mandibular surgery: a case series report.

    OpenAIRE

    Ravasio, Giuliano; D'Urso, Elisa Silvia; Macchioni, Chiara; Stefanello, Damiano

    2016-01-01

    Peripheral nerve block performed using electrical stimulation (i.e. electrolocation) is widely used for perioperative pain management during several surgical procedures in dogs (Campoy 2008), but few data are reported concerning its application to invasive maxillofacial surgery (Carotenuto et al 2011). The aim of this case series report is to evaluate the efficacy of proximal mandibular nerve block (PMNB) in perioperative pain management in dogs undergoing mandibulectomy. Ten dogs of various ...

  1. Mandibular thickness measurements in young dentate adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaty, Narlin B; Le, Thomas T

    2009-09-01

    To measure thicknesses in clinical landmark areas of the dentate mandibles of young men and women. Using standard radiologic software, we obtained mean (SD) thickness measurements at the inferior or posterior borders of the mandible at the following 7 surgically useful sites: (1) the symphysis, (2) a point halfway between the symphysis and the mental nerve, (3) the mental nerve, (4) a point halfway between the mental nerve and the facial artery notch, (5) the facial artery notch, (6) the angle vertex, and (7) the ramus-condylar neck border. University hospital. A total of 150 dentate men and 75 dentate women aged 18 to 30 years who had undergone computed tomography of the head and neck region during the period of December 20, 2006 to February 20, 2007. Thicknesses of 7 mandibular sites. Mean (SD) thicknesses at the 7 mandibular sites were as follows: symphysis, 14.03 (1.53) mm for men and 13.21 (1.46) mm for women; halfway between the symphysis and the mental nerve, 11.17 (1.37) mm for men and 10.00 (1.08) mm for women; mental nerve, 9.48 (1.28) mm for men and 8.72 (1.00) mm for women; halfway between the mental nerve and the facial artery notch, 10.33 (1.24) mm for men and 9.45 (0.92) mm for women; facial artery notch, 7.27 (0.82) mm for men and 7.10 (0.88) mm for women; angle vertex, 5.42 (0.90) mm for men and 5.39 (0.66) mm for women; and ramus-condylar neck border, 5.90 (0.86) mm for men and 5.85 (0.71) mm for women. Clinical landmark areas in young dentate mandibles have mean thicknesses with limited SDs. The thickness measurements obtained at the sites in this study provide practical reference information for mandibular reconstruction and bicortical screw length estimation.

  2. Endodontic Management of the Three-Rooted Mandibular First Permanent Molar: a Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Štamfelj, Iztok

    2014-09-01

    The distal root of the mandibular first permanent molar (MFPM) contains one or two canals. More rarely, the second/third distal canal is found in a separate root in a distolingual (DL) position - a radix entomolaris (RE). In Caucasians, this occurs in less than 4% of cases, but it is equally important to be aware of this possibility. Careful examination of the preoperative periapical radiographs (orthoradial and mesially angled) and inspection of the pulp chamber floor during endodontic management may indicate that this radicular variant is present. RE's lingual inclination and buccolingual curvature must be taken into account during cleaning and shaping of the canal within this root to avoid procedural errors, such as straightening and ledging of the root canal, perforation or instrument fracture. The aim of the present paper was to discuss a case report of a young patient, referred to an endodontic office after a ledge was created by inappropriate instrumentation of a buccolingually curved RE canal.

  3. Peripheral Osteoma of the Mandibular Notch: Report of a Case

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwai, Toshinori; Izumi, Toshiharu; Baba, Junichi; Maegawa, Jiro; Mitsudo, Kenji; Tohnai, Iwai

    2013-01-01

    Osteoma is a benign, slow-growing osteogenic tumor that sometimes arises from the craniomaxillofacial region, such as the sinus, temporal or jaw bones. Osteoma consists of compact or cancellous bone that may be peripheral, central or extraskeletal type. Peripheral osteoma arises from the periosteum and is commonly a unilateral, pedunculated mushroom-like mass. Peripheral osteoma of the mandible is relatively uncommon, and peripheral osteoma of the mandibular notch is extremely rare, although many cases arise from the mandibular body, angle, condyle, or coronoid process. We report here an unusual peripheral osteoma of the mandibular notch in a 78-year-old nonsyndromic female

  4. Bimalleolar ankle fracture with proximal fibular fracture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Colenbrander, R. J.; Struijs, P. A. A.; Ultee, J. M.

    2005-01-01

    A 56-year-old female patient suffered a bimalleolar ankle fracture with an additional proximal fibular fracture. This is an unusual fracture type, seldom reported in literature. It was operatively treated by open reduction and internal fixation of the lateral malleolar fracture. The proximal fibular

  5. A case of a massive mandibular schwannoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shishir Ram Shetty

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Schwannoma, a benign nerve sheath tumor is relatively rare in occurrence and even rarer in sites, such as jaw bones. There are only 45 reported cases of intraosseous schwannoma of the jaws reported in the literature. We report a rare case of mandibular schwannoma in a 50-year-old Indian male. The clinical features resembled that of a residual cyst, fibro-osseous lesion or an odontogenic tumor/cyst. Radiological differential diagnoses of ameloblastoma or odontogenic keratocyst was made based on the findings of the orthopantomogram. The lesion was examined histopathologically and a final diagnosis of schwannoma arising from the inferior alveolar nerve was made. The aim of this report is to add information to the existing sparse literature on intraosseous schwannomas of the jaw.

  6. Assessment of mandibular growth by skeletal scintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaban, L.B.; Cisneros, G.J.; Heyman, S.; Treves, S.

    1982-01-01

    Accurate assessment of facial skeletal growth remains a major problem in craniomaxillofacial surgery. Current methods include: (1) comparisons of chronologic age with growth histories of the patient and the family, (2) hand-wrist radiographs compared with a standard, and (3) serial cephalometric radiographs. Uptake of technetium-99m methylene diphosphonate into bone is a reflection of current metabolic activity and blood flow. Therefore, scintigraphy with this radiopharmaceutical might serve as a good method of assessing skeletal growth. Thirty-four patients, ranging in age from 15 months to 22 years, who were undergoing skeletal scintigrams for acute pathologic conditions of the extremities, were used to develop standards of uptake based on age and skeletal maturation. The results indicate that skeletal scintigraphy may be useful in evaluation of mandibular growth

  7. Radiographic study of morphology of mandibular condyle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahn, Hyung Kyu [Department of Oral Radiology, College of Dentistry, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1985-11-15

    Anatomical anomaly of temporo-mandibular joint and its dysfunction is becoming one of the important problem in dentistry because the number of these cases are increasing rapidly. Applying 'Lateral Transcranial Technic', 'Updegrave method' and 'Denar Accuard 100' to skull and adult with normal occlusion the author obtained following results: 1. Grewcock method combined with cephalos tat as one of 'Lateral Transcranial Technic' revealed clear picture but the image of condyle head was tend to incline downward. 2. Direction of central radiation in 'Updegrave method' should be 2 recommended inch upward from auditorial mearus. 3. For functional analysis and correct diagnosis 'Denar Accuard 100' should be highly recommended.

  8. Ceramic onlay for endodontically treated mandibular molar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roopadevi Garlapati

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Restoration of endodontically treated teeth is important for the success of endodontic treatment. In full coverage restorations, maximum amount of tooth structure is compromised, so as to conserve the amount of tooth structure partial coverage restorations, can be preferred. This case report is on fabrication of a conservative tooth colored restoration for an endodontically treated posterior tooth. A 22-year-old male patient presented with pain in the mandibular left first molar. After endodontic treatment, composite material was used as postendodontic restoration. The tooth was then prepared to receive a ceramic onlay and bonded with self-adhesive universal resin cement. Ceramic onlay restoration was periodically examined up to 2 years.

  9. Fracture mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miannay, D.P.

    1995-01-01

    This book entitle ''Fracture Mechanics'', the first one of the monograph ''Materiologie'' is geared to design engineers, material engineers, non destructive inspectors and safety experts. This book covers fracture mechanics in isotropic homogeneous continuum. Only the monotonic static loading is considered. This book intended to be a reference with the current state of the art gives the fundamental of the issues under concern and avoids the developments too complicated or not yet mastered for not making reading cumbersome. The subject matter is organized as going from an easy to a more complicated level and thus follows the chronological evolution in the field. Similarly the microscopic scale is considered before the macroscopic scale, the physical understanding of phenomena linked to the experimental observation of the material preceded the understanding of the macroscopic behaviour of structures. In this latter field the relatively recent contribution of finite element computations with some analogy with the experimental observation is determining. However more sensitive analysis is not skipped

  10. Piezosurgery for the Lingual Split Technique in Lingual Positioned Impacted Mandibular Third Molar Removal: A Retrospective Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Jing; Yang, Chi; Zheng, Jiawei; Qian, Wentao

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect and safety of lingual split technique using piezosurgery for the extraction of lingual positioned impacted mandibular 3rd molars with the goal of proposing a more minimally invasive choice for this common surgery.Eighty-nine consecutive patients with 110 lingual positioned impacted mandibular 3rd molars requiring extraction were performed the lingual split technique using piezosurgery. One sagittal osteotomy line and 2 transverse osteotomy line were designed for lingual and occlusal bone removal. The success rate, operative time, postoperative outcome, and major complications (including nerve injury, mandible fracture, severe hematoma or edema, and severe pyogenic infection) were documented and analyzed.All impacted mandibular 3rd molars were successfully removed (110/110). The average time of operation was 14.6 minutes (ranged from 7 to 28 minutes). One hundred and seven extraction sites (97.3%) were primary healing. Pain, mouth opening, swelling, and PoSSe scores on postoperative 7-day were 0.34 ± 0.63, 3.88 ± 0.66(cm), 2.4 ± 0.2(cm), and 23.7 ± 5.9, respectively. There were 6 cases (5.5%) had lingual nerve disturbance and 3 cases (2.7%) developed inferior alveolar nerve impairment, and achieved full recovery within 2 months by neurotrophic drug treatment.Our study suggested piezosurgery for lingual split technique provided an effective way for the extraction of lingual positioned and deeply impacted mandibular 3rd molar.

  11. Prediction of postoperative pain after mandibular third molar surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rudin, Asa; Eriksson, Lars; Liedholm, Rolf

    2010-01-01

    To evaluate the predictive potential of preoperative psychological and psychophysiological variables in estimating severity of postoperative pain following mandibular third molar surgery (MTMS). Methods: Following ethical committee approval and informed consent, 40 consecutive patients scheduled...

  12. Autotransplantation of Mandibular Third Molar: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pabbati Ravi kumar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Autogenous transplantation is a feasible, fast, and economical option for the treatment of nonsalvageable teeth when a suitable donor tooth is available. This paper presents successful autotransplantation of a mature mandibular left third molar (38 without anatomical variances is used to replace a mandibular left second molar (37. The mandibular second molar was nonrestorable due to extensive root caries and resorption of distal root. After extraction of mandibular second and third molars, root canal therapy was done for the third molar extraorally, and the tooth was reimplanted into the extracted socket of second molar site. After one year, clinical and radiographic examination revealed satisfactory outcome with no signs or symptoms suggestive of pathology. In selected cases, autogenous tooth transplantation, even after complete root formation of the donor tooth, may be considered as a practical treatment alternative to conventional prosthetic rehabilitation or implant treatment.

  13. Mandibular molar crown-topography, a biological predisposing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mandibular molar crown-topography, a biological predisposing factor to development of caries – a post-mortem analysis of 2500 extracted lower permanent molars at the dental centre, University of Benin teaching hospital.

  14. Impacted Mandibular Third Molars: Review of Literature and a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    were screened, and 50 articles were included in the review. Causes of ... impaction rate is higher for third molars when compared with other teeth. The mandibular .... Hence, the surgical extraction of these impacted teeth has become the most ...

  15. Occlusal plane rotation: aesthetic enhancement in mandibular micrognathia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, H M

    1993-06-01

    Patients afflicted with extreme degrees of mandibular micrognathia typically have vertically deficient rami as well as sagittally deficient mandibular bodies. This results in deficient posterior facial height, an obtuse gonial angle, excessively steep occlusal and mandibular planes, and a compensatory increase in anterior facial height. The entire maxillomandibular complex is overrotated in a clockwise direction. Standard orthognathic surgical correction fails to address this rotational deformity. As a consequence, the achieved projection of the lower face is inadequate, posterior facial height is further reduced, and occlusal and mandibular planes remain steep. Eleven patients with severe mandibular micrognathia underwent a surgical correction involving occlusal plane rotation to its normal orientation relative to Frankfort horizontal. This was accomplished by Le Fort I osteotomy to shorten the anterior maxilla (creating open bites in seven patients and making preexisting open bites worse in four patients) and sagittal split ramus osteotomies to advance and rotate the mandibular body counterclockwise, thus closing the surgically produced open bite. Counterclockwise rotation of the mandible afforded significantly greater sagittal displacement at the B point (mean 17 mm) than at the first molar (mean 10 mm) and produced adequate degrees of projection of the lower face when accompanied by a modest sliding genioplasty (mean 6.9 mm). Total advancement at the pogonion was a mean of 25.2 mm. In addition, posterior facial height was preserved, and mandibular and occlusal planes were normalized to mean angles of 27 and 10 degrees, respectively. At follow-up, which ranged from 9 to 24 months with a mean of 14.1 months, the mean sagittal relapse at the B point was 1.9 mm. Although heretofore considered unstable and therefore not clinically accepted, maxillomandibular counterclockwise rotation to normalize the occlusal plane rotational deformity provides stable, aesthetically

  16. Unusal canal configuration in maxillary and mandibular second molars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramachandran Ragunathan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This clinical article describes three different case reports of maxillary and mandibular second molars with the unusual anatomy of single root with a single canal and their endodontic management. An unusual case of bilateralism is observed in the first two cases in the form of single-rooted second mandibular molars in both the quadrant of the same patient. The presence of maxillary second molar with single root and single canal in the third case is unusual.

  17. Radiographic Localization of the Mental Foramen and Mandibular Canal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farzaneh Afkhami

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Accurately localizing the mental foramen and mandibular canal is important when administering local anesthesia and performing surgery; therefore, knowing the normal range of the possible locations is essential. Our purpose was to assess the location of the mental foramen and mandibular canal in an Iranian population using panoramic radiography.Materials and Methods: Standard panoramic radiographies were performed. The positions of 100 mental foramens were evaluated. The distances from the center of the mental foramen to the superior and inferior borders of the mandible and to the apexes of the first and second premolar were measured. The distance of the mental foramens from the mandibular midline and the diameter of the mandibular canal in the mental foramen connection were also measured.Results: Among 100 mental foramens, 6% were positioned under the first premolar, 24% were between the first and second premolars, 67% were under the second premolar, and the remaining 3% were behind the second premolar. The mean distance from the mental foramen to the mandibular midline was 27.77±3.20 mm. The mean diameter of the mandibular canal in the mental foramen connection was 3.09±0.69mm.Conclusion: The mental foramen was near the second premolar and the inferior border of the mandible. This information can be used to perform safer mental nerve blocks in surgical interventions.

  18. Chincup treatment modifies the mandibular shape in children with prognathism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alarcón, José Antonio; Bastir, Markus; Rosas, Antonio; Molero, Julia

    2011-07-01

    Although chincups are the preferred treatment for growing children with mandibular prognathism, the mechanism by which chincups improve this condition remains unclear. The aim of this study was to use geometric morphometrics to evaluate changes in the shape of the mandible of prognathic children treated with a chincup. Geometric morphometrics were used to evaluate the short-term mandibular shape changes in 50 prognathic children treated with chincups compared with 40 untreated matched controls. Twenty-one 2-dimensional mandibular landmarks from cephalograms taken before and after 36 months of treatment or observation were analyzed by Procrustes superimposition and thin plate spline. Permutation tests of the treated patients showed highly significant differences in the mandibular shapes before and after treatment, and compared with the control group after the observation period. The thin plate spline grid deformations indicated more rectangular mandibular configuration, forward condyle orientation, condyle neck compression, gonial area compression, and symphysis narrowing. Early chincup treatment widely modifies the mandibular shape of prognathic children to improve Class III malocclusion. Copyright © 2011 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Evaluation of mandibular morphology in different facial types

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajat Mangla

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to evaluate mandibular morphology in different facial types using various parameters. This study was conducted on lateral cephalograms of a total of 110 subjects, which included 55 males and 55 females between the age of 18-25 years having a mean of 22.3 years for males and 21.5 years for females. The sample was divided into normodivergent, hypodivergent, and hyperdivergent subgroups based on Jarabak′s ratio. Symphysis height, depth, ratio (height/depth and angle, antegonial notch depth, ramal height and width, mandibular depth, upper, lower, and total gonial angle, and mandibular arc angle were analyzed statistically and graphically. It was found that the mandible with the vertical growth pattern was associated with a symphysis with large height, small depth, large ratio, small angle, decreased ramus height and width, smaller mandibular depth, increased gonial angle, and decreased mandibular arc angle in contrast to mandible with a horizontal growth pattern. Sexual dichotomy was found with mean symphysis height and depth in the female sample being smaller than in the male sample, but symphysis ratio was larger in the female sample; males having greater ramus height and width, mandibular depth than females. The mandible seemed to have retained its infantile characteristics with all its processes underdeveloped in hyperdivergent group.

  20. Relationship between cervical vertebral maturation and mandibular growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, Gina; Woodside, Donald; Tompson, Bryan; Hunter, W Stuart; Posluns, James

    2011-05-01

    The cervical vertebrae have been proposed as a method of determining biologic maturity. The purposes of this study were to establish a pattern of mandibular growth and to relate this pattern to the stages of cervical vertebral maturation. Cephalometric radiographs, taken annually from ages 9 to 18 years, were evaluated for 90 boys from the Burlington Growth Center, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. Mandibular lengths were measured from articulare to gnathion, and incremental growth was determined. Cervical vertebral maturation stages were assessed by using a 6-stage method. Advanced, average, and delayed maturation groups were established. The prepubertal mandibular growth minimum velocity occurred during cervical stages 1 through 4 (P = 0.7327). Peak mandibular growth velocity occurred most frequently during stage 4 in all 3 maturation groups, with a statistical difference in the average and delayed groups (P cervical stages 1 through 6 does not occur annually; time spent in each stage varies depending on the stage and the maturation group. Cervical vertebral maturation stages cannot accurately identify the mandibular prepubertal growth minimum and therefore cannot predict the onset of the peak in mandibular growth. The cervical vertebral maturation stages should be used with other methods of biologic maturity assessment when considering both dentofacial orthopedic treatment and orthognathic surgery. Copyright © 2011 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Evaluation of the relationship between mandibular third molar and mandibular canal by different algorithms of cone-beam computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehdizadeh, Mojdeh; Ahmadi, Navid; Jamshidi, Mahsa

    2014-11-01

    Exact location of the inferior alveolar nerve (IAN) bundle is very important. The aim of this study is to evaluate the relationship between the mandibular third molar and the mandibular canal by cone-beam computed tomography. This was a cross-sectional study with convenience sampling. 94 mandibular CBCTs performed with CSANEX 3D machine (Soredex, Finland) and 3D system chosen. Vertical and horizontal relationship between the mandibular canal and the third molar depicted by 3D, panoramic reformat view of CBCT and cross-sectional view. Cross-sectional view was our gold standard and other view evaluated by it. There were significant differences between the vertical and horizontal relation of nerve and tooth in all views (p < 0.001). The results showed differences in the position of the inferior alveolar nerve with different views of CBCT, so CBCT images are not quite reliable and have possibility of error.

  2. Mandible Fracture Complications and Infection: The Influence of Demographics and Modifiable Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odom, Elizabeth B; Snyder-Warwick, Alison K

    2016-08-01

    Mandible fractures account for 36 to 70 percent of all facial fractures. Despite their high prevalence, the literature lacks a comprehensive review of demographics, fracture patterns, timing of management, antibiotic selection, and outcomes, particularly when evaluating pediatric versus adult patients. The authors aim to determine the complication and infection rates after surgical treatment of mandibular fractures and the bacterial isolates and antibiotic sensitivities from mandible infections after open reduction and internal fixation at their institution. Data were collected retrospectively for all mandible fractures treated at the authors' institution between 2003 and 2013. Patients were divided into pediatric (younger than 16 years) and adult (16 years or older) subgroups. Demographics, fracture location, fracture cause, comorbidities, antibiotic choice, and subsequent complications and infections were analyzed. Data were evaluated using appropriate statistical tests for each variable. Three hundred ninety-five patients were evaluated. Demographics and fracture cause were similar to those reported in current literature. Of the 56 pediatric patients, complications occurred in 5.6 percent. Time from injury to operative intervention did not affect outcome. The complication rate was 17.5 percent and the infection rate was 9.4 percent in the adult subgroup. Time from injury to operative intervention, sex, and edentulism were not significant predictors of complication or infection. Tobacco use, number of fractures, number of fractures fixated, and surgical approach were predictors of complication and infection. Perioperative ampicillin-sulbactam had a significantly lower risk of infection. Certain demographic and operative factors lead to significantly higher risks of complications after surgical management of mandibular fractures. Ampicillin-sulbactam provides effective antibiotic prophylaxis. Risk factor modification may improve outcomes. Risk, IV.

  3. To evaluate the efficacy of biodegradable plating system for fixation of maxillofacial fractures: A prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bali, Rishi K; Sharma, Parveen; Jindal, Shalu; Gaba, Shivani

    2013-07-01

    The present study was undertaken to evaluate the efficacy of biodegradable plating system for fixation of maxillofacial fractures and to study the morbidity associated with the use of biodegradable plates and screws. This prospective study consisted of 10 patients with maxillofacial fractures requiring open reduction and internal fixation. Fractures with infection, comminuted and pathological fractures were excluded. All were plated with biodegradable system (Inion CPS) using standard plating principles and observed for a total period of 24 weeks. Characteristics of the fractures, ease of use of bioresorbable plate/screw system and post operative complications were assessed. Of total 10 patients, eight patients were of midface fracture and two pediatric patients with mandibular fracture, with nine male and one female. The mean age was 32.8 years. Out of 20 plates and 68 screws applied to the 10 fractures sites; there were three incidences of screw breakage with no other intraoperative difficulties. Paresthesia of the infraorbital nerve was present in two patients, and recovered completely in four weeks after surgery. Fracture reduction was considered to be satisfactory in all cases. One patient developed postsurgical infection and was managed with oral antibiotics and analgesics. Favorable healing can be observed through the use of biodegradable plates and screws to stabilize selected midface fractures in patients of all ages, as well as mandible fractures in early childhood, however further studies with more sample size are required.

  4. Cirugía de torus mandibular

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Ramon Osorio Castillo

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available ResumenLos huesos maxilares no son ajenos a las patologías que se pueden presentar en el sistema esquelético. Algunas de esas condiciones y patologías son singulares por sus características clínicas, su distribución y prevalencia. Los torus palatinos, los torus mandibulares (TM y las exostosis de los maxilares son un claro ejemplo de ellos. Hasta la presente existen ideas especulativas acerca de su etiopatogenia, de los factores asociados, de su incidencia y prevalencia, de su necesidad de tratamiento, lo que puede crear confusión entre los clínicos tanto en diagnóstico como en el manejo.El torus como tumor óseo benigno puede localizarse en el maxilar a nivel del paladar, o en la mandíbula a nivel de las tablas internas; o puede aparecer en cualquier parte del esqueleto. El TM es una exostosis o crecimiento óseo en la superficie lingual de la mandíbula. Este crecimiento ocurre generalmente cerca de la línea milohioidea, opuesto a los premolares, pero se puede extender del canino al primer molar. La mucosa que los recubre tiende a ser fina y no tolera por lo general las fuerzas de las prótesis que se colocan encima de ellos. La incidencia del torus de la mandíbula es baja en el 6% a 12.5% entre caucásicos y en los habitantes de la llanura africana. De manera contraria, algunos autores reportan una prevalencia mucho más elevada en la Costa Atlántica Colombiana.Se presenta el caso de un paciente con torus mandibulares bilaterales, con muchos años de crecimiento, hasta que por situaciones tanto fonéticas como de ulceraciones repetitivas decidió someterse al acto quirúrgico de forma bilateral. Se presentan algunas consideraciones para el manejo de esta. (Duazary 2008; 111-114AbstractThe jawbone is not a strange to the pathologies that can occur in the skeletal system. Some of these terms and conditions are unique for their clinical features, distribution and prevalence. The torus palate, jawbone torus (TM in spanish and

  5. A patient with mandibular deviation and 3 mandibular incisors treated with asymmetrically bent improved superelastic nickel-titanium alloy wires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, Yuhei; Kokai, Satoshi; Ono, Takashi

    2018-01-01

    Skeletal and dental discrepancies cause asymmetric malocclusions in orthodontic patients. It is difficult to achieve adequate functional occlusion and guidance in patients with congenital absence of a mandibular incisor due to the tooth-size discrepancy. Here, we describe the orthodontic treatment of a 22-year-old woman with an asymmetric Angle Class II malocclusion, mandibular deviation to the left, and 3 mandibular incisors. The anterior teeth and maxillary canines were crowded. We used an improved superelastic nickel-titanium alloy wire (Tomy International, Tokyo, Japan) to compensate for the asymmetric mandibular arch and an asymmetrically bent archwire to move the maxillary molars distally. A skeletal anchorage system provided traction for intermaxillary elastics, and extractions were not needed. We alleviated the crowding and created an ideal occlusion with proper overjet, overbite, and anterior guidance with Class I canine and molar relationships. This method of treatment with an asymmetrically bent nickel-titanium alloy wire provided proper Class I occlusion and anterior guidance despite the mandibular deviation to the left and 3 mandibular incisors, without the need for extractions. Copyright © 2017 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Hip fracture - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... neck fracture repair - discharge; Trochanteric fracture repair - discharge; Hip pinning surgery - discharge ... in the hospital for surgery to repair a hip fracture, a break in the upper part of ...

  7. Repair of a pediatric bilateral condylar and symphyseal fracture using a transfacial Steinman pin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grow, Jacob N; Flores, Roberto L; Tholpady, Sunil S

    2014-01-01

    The proper management of complex pediatric mandibular fractures remains a topic of debate because of the relatively uncommon presentation of these fractures, combined with concerns related with deciduous teeth, tooth buds, and growth inhibition. In this current study, we present a novel approach to the repair of bilateral condylar fractures with concomitant symphyseal fracture in a 4-year-old girl. Manual closed reduction was first obtained, followed by placement of a transfacial Steinman pin through the angles of the mandible and placement of circummandibular wires. Maxillomandibular fixation remained for 2 weeks and the Steinman pin was removed after 11 weeks. At 3 months of postsurgical follow-up, the patient displayed class I occlusion, facial symmetry, full range of jaw motion, and absence of deviation or pain on full oral excursion. Radiographic findings also revealed complete resolution of the symphyseal fracture with appropriate condylar healing and alignment.

  8. Comparación biomecánica entre los sistemas convencionales y uni-lock en osteosíntesis del ángulo mandibular: Estudio fotoelástico Biomechanical comparison of the conventional and uni-lock systems for mandibular osteosynthesis: A photoelastic study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Luis Cebrián-Carretero

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Introducción: Las implicaciones biomecánicas de la interacción de las placas y tornillos de titanio con la mandíbula fracturada no son del todo conocidas. Los modelos matemáticos desarrollados hasta hoy en día muestran ciertas limitaciones, y los estudios experimentales han fracasado en reproducir las fuerzas musculares y la distribución de las tensiones internas en la interfaz entre mandíbula e implante. Material y métodos: En el presente estudio, empleamos un simulador estático del sistema músculo-esquelético masticatorio para demostrar en réplicas mandibulares de resina epoxi, por medio de la fotoelasticidad tridimensional, la distribución de tensiones que se produce en fracturas del cuerpo mandibular tras la aplicación de diferentes métodos de osteosíntesis. Resultados: Los resultados muestran que el simulador y la fotoelasticidad 3D son útiles para estudiar las interacciones entre el hueso y el material de osteosíntesis. Los sistemas «lock» o bloqueados reflejaron la distribución de tensiones más favorable en la mandíbula de resina epoxi fracturada. Conclusiones: La fotoelasticidad tridimensional en modelos de resina epoxi es un método útil para evaluar la distribución de tensiones en una estructura para estudios biomecánicos. En lo que se refiere a la osteosíntesis mandibular, las placas tipo «lock» mostraron ser las menos agresivas para el hueso.Introduction: The biomechanical effects of the interaction between titanium plates and screws and the fractured mandible are not well known. The mathematical models that have been developed to date show limitations and the experimental studies fail in reproducing muscle forces and internal stress distributions in the bone-implant interface with the mandibular structure. Material and methods: In the present study we use a static simulator of the masticatory system to show, in epoxy resin mandibular models, by means of 3D (three-dimensional photoelasticity, the stress

  9. Penetration of flomoxef into human maxillary and mandibular bones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igawa, H H; Sugihara, T; Yoshida, T; Kawashima, K; Ohura, T

    1995-09-01

    Penetration of flomoxef into the maxillary and mandibular bones was assayed clinically to provide data about its usefulness for the prevention of postoperative infection after maxillofacial surgery. Twenty-one patients undergoing maxillofacial surgery at our department were given flomoxef 2 g dissolved in 20 ml of physiological saline intravenously over 3 minutes during operation, and the serum, maxillary and mandibular concentrations were measured 1, 3, and 6 hours after injection by the band culture method using Escherichia coli 7437 as the indicator strain. The mean concentrations were 53.4, 16.1, and 2.6 micrograms/ml, respectively, in the serum, 17.6, 7.8, and 1.0 micrograms/g in maxillary bone, and 16.4, 4.2, and 0.9 micrograms/g in mandibular bone. The mean bone:serum ratios at 1, 3, and 6 hours were 33.0%, 48.2%, and 36.8%, respectively, for maxillary bone, and 30.7%, 26.2%, and 35.7% for mandibular bone. When compared with previously reported data on the bone:serum ratios in jaw of various other intravenous antibiotics, our results show that penetration of flomoxef into maxillary and mandibular bone is extremely high. As all the intramaxillary and intramandibular concentrations exceed its MIC80 values against clinical isolates of bacteria frequently isolated in cases of infection in the oral and maxillofacial region, it is apparent that one intravenous shot of flomoxef 2 g allows penetration of the drug into the maxillary and mandibular bones at effective concentrations. Flomoxef is therefore potentially useful for the prevention and treatment of infections in the oral and maxillofacial region, as it has excellent penetration into the maxillary and mandibular bones.

  10. Deoxycholic Acid and the Marginal Mandibular Nerve: A Cadaver Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blandford, Alexander D; Ansari, Waseem; Young, Jason M; Maley, Bruce; Plesec, Thomas P; Hwang, Catherine J; Perry, Julian D

    2018-06-04

    One of the rare but serious complications observed with deoxycholic acid administration is damage to the marginal mandibular nerve. In this study, we evaluated if deoxycholic acid directly induces histologic damage to fresh cadaveric marginal mandibular nerve. A segment of marginal mandibular nerve was harvested from 12 hemifaces of 6 fresh cadavers. The nerve specimen was exposed to either 0.9% sterile saline for 24 h, deoxycholic acid (10 mg/ml) for 20 min, or deoxycholic acid (10 mg/ml) for 24 h. The nerve specimens were then fixed in glutaraldehyde for a minimum of 24 h. Toluidine blue stained sections were evaluated for stain intensity using light microscopy and color deconvolution image analysis. Supraplatysmal fat was harvested as a positive control and exposed to the same treatments as the marginal mandibular nerve specimens, then evaluated using transmission electron microscopy. Toluidine blue staining was less in the marginal mandibular nerve exposed to deoxycholic acid when compared to saline. The specimen exposed to deoxycholic acid for 24 h showed less toluidine blue staining than that of the nerve exposed to deoxycholic acid for 20 min. Transmission electron microscopy of submental fat exposed to deoxycholic acid revealed disruption of adipocyte cell membrane integrity and loss of cellular organelles when compared to specimens only exposed to saline. Deoxycholic acid (10 mg/ml) damages the marginal mandibular nerve myelin sheath in fresh human cadaver specimens. Direct deoxycholic acid neurotoxicity may cause marginal mandibular nerve injury clinically. This journal requires that authors assign a level of evidence to each article. For a full description of these Evidence-Based Medicine ratings, please refer to the Table of Contents or the online Instructions to Authors www.springer.com/00266 .

  11. Long term results of mandibular distraction

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    Batra Puneet

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Mandibular distraction osteogenesis has become a popular surgical modality due to its many advantages over conventional orthognathic surgical procedures. However, in spite of the technique having been used for over 15 years, no concrete long term results are available regarding the stability of results. We discuss the various studies which have reported either in favour or against the stablility of results after distraction. We report a series of 6 cases (3 unilateral and 3 bilateral distraction where distraction was carried out before puberty and followed them up to seven years after removal of distractors. This case series shows that results achieved by distraction osteogenesis are unstable or best unpredictable with respect to producing a permanent size increase in the mandible. The role of the distraction osteogenesis in overcoming the pterygomassetric sling is questionable. We suggest a multicenter study with adequate patient numbers treated with a similar protocol and documented after growth cessation to have meaningful conclusions on the debate of distraction osteogenesis versus orthognathic surgery.

  12. Radiographic localization of unerupted mandibular anterior teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, S G

    2000-10-01

    The parallax method and the use of 2 radiographs taken at right angles to each other are the 2 methods generally used to accurately localize teeth. For the parallax method, the combination of a rotational panoramic radiograph with an occlusal radiograph is recommended. This combination involves a vertical x-ray tube shift. Three case reports are presented that illustrate: (1) how this combination can accurately localize unerupted mandibular anterior teeth, (2) how a deceptive appearance of the labiolingual position of the unerupted tooth can be produced in an occlusal radiograph, (3) how increasing the vertical angle of the tube for the occlusal radiograph makes the tube shift easier to discern, (4) why occlusal radiographs are preferable to periapical radiographs for tube shifts, and (5) how localization can also be carried out with 2 radiographs at right angles to each other, one of which is an occlusal radiograph taken with the x-ray tube directed along the long axis of the reference tooth.

  13. Diversity Of Mandibular Morphology In Some Carnivorans

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    Rahmat S. J.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Comparison of mandibular morphology of some aquatic (seals, walruses, and sea otters and terrestrial (hyenas and pandas carnivorans demonstrates a rather general pattern correlating size of condyloid angle, size of gape, and diet. Structural differences of carnivoran jaws reveal morphological and ecological adaptations that are directly correlated with availability of prey, diving depth, feeding competition and specialized feeding methods. Specifically, the inclination of the condyloid process relative to the axis of the alveolar row (= condyloid angle can be used to determine dietary preferences, including size of prey. Generally, carnivorans with a large condyloid angle feed on larger prey, while a low condyloid angle suggests feeding on small prey or can be an advantageous feeding mechanism. Mirounga angustirostris (Northern elephant seal displays sex-specific characters in cranial and postcranial elements. Likewise, significant sexually dimorphic differences in the size of condyloid angle imply that deeper-diving male Northern elephant seals have a feeding niche dissimilar to that of females. Morphological assessment of male M. angustirostris suggests they are bottom-feeding seals that utilize a suction-feeding mechanism to capture small prey and crush shells with their teeth, which become weaker as they age.

  14. [Three-dimensional modeling of mandibular distraction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgon, L A; Trunde, F; Coudert, J L; Disant, F

    2003-12-01

    Facial hemi-atrophy affects 1 in 4000 or 5000 children. We propose treating this deformation of the 1st branchial arch with the "bone distraction" lengthening technique first described by Ilizarov in the 1950s, which has already been employed with the mandible. We have modelled mandibular distraction in facial hemi-atrophy patients and discuss the benefits of such pre-surgical planning encompassing the assistance of pre- and post-operative as well as surgically coordinated orthodontic therapy. Using X scanner views of a 5 year-old girl patient, we have developed a distraction-simulation software, which makes the pathological side harmonious with the healthy side along the medial sagittal plane. In order to obtain facial symmetry, put bones in balance, and orient the occlusal plane horizontally, essential requisites of occlusal stability, it is necessary: to employ a 2 or 3-dimensional distractor, to pre-plan the distraction and screw positioning, to set up a fixed orthodontic treatment plan prior to beginning distraction therapy.

  15. Proximal femoral fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Lawrence X

    2002-01-01

    Fractures of the proximal femur include fractures of the head, neck, intertrochanteric, and subtrochanteric regions. Head fractures commonly accompany dislocations. Neck fractures and intertrochanteric fractures occur with greatest frequency in elderly patients with a low bone mineral density and are produced by low-energy mechanisms. Subtrochanteric fractures occur in a predominantly strong cortical osseous region which is exposed to large compressive stresses. Implants used to address these fractures must be able to accommodate significant loads while the fractures consolidate. Complications secondary to these injuries produce significant morbidity and include infection, nonunion, malunion, decubitus ulcers, fat emboli, deep venous thrombosis, pulmonary embolus, pneumonia, myocardial infarction, stroke, and death.

  16. Mandibular Reconstruction Using Pectoralis Major Myocutaneous Flap and Titanium Plates after Ablative Surgery for Locally Advanced Tumors of the Oral Cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Zohairy, M.A.F.; Mostafa, A.; Amin, A.; Abd El-Fattah, H.; Khalifa, Sh.

    2009-01-01

    The most common indication for mandible resection remains ablative surgery for cancer of the oral cavity and oropharynx. The use of vascularized bone grafts has become state-of-the-art for mandibular reconstruction. However, the high cost of such surgery may not be justified in patients with advanced disease and poor prognosis, or poor performance status. Objective: The purpose of this study was to evaluate outcomes of mandibular reconstruction using titanium plates covered with a pedicled pectoralis major myocutaneous flap after ablative surgery for locally advanced tumors of the oral cavity. Patients and methods: The study involves a total of 33 patients with locally advanced tumors of the oral cavity that were treated over 5 year period (2003-2008) at the National Cancer Institute, Cairo University, Egypt. Mandibular resections were performed for treatment of patients with primary oral cavity tumors invading the mandible followed by mandibular reconstruction using titanium plates covered with a pedicled pectoralis major myocutaneous flap. Results: Of 33 patients, 25 (75.75%) were males and 8 (24.25%) were females. The age ranged from 42 to 70 years (mean 52.3±5.9 years). Tongue cancer was the most common tumor, it affects 17 (51.5%) of the patients, 24 patients received post operative radiation therapy. The flap survival was 100%; partial necrosis of the flap skin was observed in 3 patients. One patient developed wound dehiscence. Oro-cutaneous fistula occurred in 5 patients that closed spontaneously. There were 4 cases of plate failure, one patient experienced plate fracture at 13 months after reconstruction. Three patients developed external plate exposure. All patients achieved good functional and acceptable aesthetic outcome. The overall cause-specific cumulative survival was 72.7% at one year and 56.1% at two years. Conclusions: Titanium plate and pedicled pectoralis major myocutaneous flap is a safe and reliable option for composite mandibular defects

  17. Assessment of temporomandibular joint dysfunction in condylar fracture of the mandible using the Helkimo index

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Suhas

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Condylar fractures of the mandible are functionally important fractures as the condyle of the mandible being a part of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ and can lead to TMJ dysfunction if not properly treated. Materials and Methods: This was a cross-sectional study of a total of 33 treated patients with fracture of the mandibular condyle who underwent examination as per the Helkimo index. Their dysfunction was quantified and clinicoepidemiological characteristics were assessed. It was found that majority of our patients were young males involved in a two-wheeler accident. All patients underwent intermaxillary fixation as the minimum treatment and 30% underwent open reduction and internal fixation in addition. Results: There was no statistically significant association between the degree of clinical dysfunction and factors such as age, mechanism of injury, type of condyle fracture, presence of other mandible fractures, and surgical procedure. However, dislocation of the mandibular condyle was found to be a negative prognostic factor and all these patients had some degree of dysfunction. Conclusion: The overall prevalence of TMJ dysfunction according to the Helkimo index was 90%. About 61% of patients had mild dysfunction (Di1 and 30% had moderate dysfunction (Di2. None of the patients had severe dysfunction. To conclude, the Helkimo index is a simple, effective, inexpensive, reliable screening index to assess TMJ dysfunction in condylar fractures of mandible.

  18. Fracture resistance of endodontically treated teeth restored with a bulkfill flowable material and a resin composite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isufi, Almira; Plotino, Gianluca; Grande, Nicola Maria; Ioppolo, Pietro; Testarelli, Luca; Bedini, Rossella; Al-Sudani, Dina; Gambarini, Gianluca

    2016-01-01

    To determine and compare the fracture resistance of endodontically treated teeth restored with a bulk fill flowable material (SDR) and a traditional resin composite. Thirty maxillary and 30 mandibular first molars were selected based on similar dimensions. After cleaning, shaping and filling of the root canals and adhesive procedures, specimens were assigned to 3 subgroups for each tooth type (n=10): Group A: control group, including intact teeth; Group B: access cavities were restored with a traditional resin composite (EsthetX; Dentsply-Italy, Rome, Italy); Group C: access cavities were restored with a bulk fill flowable composite (SDR; Dentsply-Italy), except 1.5 mm layer of the occlusal surface that was restored with the same resin composite as Group B. The specimens were subjected to compressive force in a material static-testing machine until fracture occurred, the maximum fracture load of the specimens was measured (N) and the type of fracture was recorded as favorable or unfavorable. Data were statistically analyzed with one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Bonferroni tests (Pcomposite and with a bulk fill flowable composite (SDR) was similar in both maxillary and mandibular molars and showed no significant decrease in fracture resistance compared to intact specimens. No significant difference was observed in the mechanical fracture resistance of endodontically treated molars restored with traditional resin composite restorations compared to bulk fill flowable composite restorations.

  19. Tympanic plate fractures in temporal bone trauma: prevalence and associated injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, C P; Hunt, C H; Bergen, D C; Carlson, M L; Diehn, F E; Schwartz, K M; McKenzie, G A; Morreale, R F; Lane, J I

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence of tympanic plate fractures, which are associated with an increased risk of external auditory canal stenosis following temporal bone trauma, is unknown. A review of posttraumatic high-resolution CT temporal bone examinations was performed to determine the prevalence of tympanic plate fractures and to identify any associated temporal bone injuries. A retrospective review was performed to evaluate patients with head trauma who underwent emergent high-resolution CT examinations of the temporal bone from July 2006 to March 2012. Fractures were identified and assessed for orientation; involvement of the tympanic plate, scutum, bony labyrinth, facial nerve canal, and temporomandibular joint; and ossicular chain disruption. Thirty-nine patients (41.3 ± 17.2 years of age) had a total of 46 temporal bone fractures (7 bilateral). Tympanic plate fractures were identified in 27 (58.7%) of these 46 fractures. Ossicular disruption occurred in 17 (37.0%). Fractures involving the scutum occurred in 25 (54.4%). None of the 46 fractured temporal bones had a mandibular condyle dislocation or fracture. Of the 27 cases of tympanic plate fractures, 14 (51.8%) had ossicular disruption (P = .016) and 18 (66.6%) had a fracture of the scutum (P = .044). Temporomandibular joint gas was seen in 15 (33%) but was not statistically associated with tympanic plate fracture (P = .21). Tympanic plate fractures are commonly seen on high-resolution CT performed for evaluation of temporal bone trauma. It is important to recognize these fractures to avoid the preventable complication of external auditory canal stenosis and the potential for conductive hearing loss due to a fracture involving the scutum or ossicular chain.

  20. Intraoperative monitoring of marginal mandibular nerve during neck dissection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tirelli, Giancarlo; Bergamini, Pier Riccardo; Scardoni, Alessandro; Gatto, Annalisa; Boscolo Nata, Francesca; Marcuzzo, Alberto Vito

    2018-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the efficacy of intraoperative nerve integrity monitoring (NIM) to prevent marginal mandibular nerve injuries during neck dissection. This prospective study compared 36 patients undergoing NIM-assisted neck dissection from July 2014 to March 2015 to a cohort of 35 patients subjected to neck dissection over an identical period of time before the technique was introduced. We also assessed possible correlations between marginal mandibular nerve injuries and other factors, such as anthropometric measurements, presence of clinical neck metastases, type of neck dissection, and site of primary tumor. The incidence of marginal mandibular nerve paralyses was significantly lower among the group of patients undergoing NIM-assisted neck dissection (P = .021). There was no significant difference in the duration of the procedure, and the technique resulted in a limited increase of cost. No other factor seemed to influence the onset of marginal mandibular nerve palsy. In our opinion, NIM is a valuable aid for preventing marginal mandibular nerve injuries during neck dissection. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Evaluation of mandibular condyles in children with unilateral posterior crossbite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illipronti-Filho, Edson; Fantini, Solange Mongelli de; Chilvarquer, Israel

    2015-01-01

    The relationship of mandibular condyle dimensions and its association with unilateral posterior crossbite (UPXB) has been suggested in the literature. The purpose of this prospective study was to evaluate mandibular condyles on the left and right sides and between crossed and non-crossed sides in the sagittal and coronal planes, using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). Twenty CBCT images of 40 temporo mandibular joints (TMJs) in individuals in mixed dentition phase, which included 9 males (mean 7.9 years) and 11 females (mean 8.2 years), with unilateral posterior crossbite without premature contacts and functional mandibular shifts and with transverse maxillary deficiency. The criteria for sample exclusion included the presence of painful symptoms, facial trauma history, systemic diseases such as juvenile rheumatoid arthritis, mouth opening limitation (anomalies, and skeletal asymmetries that may result in TMJ disorders. Dimensional measurements of the condyles between the right and left sides and crossed and non-crossed sides in sagittal and coronal view were made. There was no significant difference between the measurements of the crossed and non-crossed sides in both sagittal and coronal view. These findings suggest that the presence of unilateral posterior crossbite in children with UPXB did not result in changes between the mandibular condyles in the right and left sides or between the crossed and non-crossed sides in the coronal or sagittal plane.

  2. Evaluation of mandibular condyles in children with unilateral posterior crossbite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edson ILLIPRONTI-FILHO

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The relationship of mandibular condyle dimensions and its association with unilateral posterior crossbite (UPXB has been suggested in the literature. The purpose of this prospective study was to evaluate mandibular condyles on the left and right sides and between crossed and non-crossed sides in the sagittal and coronal planes, using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT. Twenty CBCT images of 40 temporo mandibular joints (TMJs in individuals in mixed dentition phase, which included 9 males (mean 7.9 years and 11 females (mean 8.2 years, with unilateral posterior crossbite without premature contacts and functional mandibular shifts and with transverse maxillary deficiency. The criteria for sample exclusion included the presence of painful symptoms, facial trauma history, systemic diseases such as juvenile rheumatoid arthritis, mouth opening limitation (< 40 mm, congenital or genetic anomalies, and skeletal asymmetries that may result in TMJ disorders. Dimensional measurements of the condyles between the right and left sides and crossed and non-crossed sides in sagittal and coronal view were made. There was no significant difference between the measurements of the crossed and non-crossed sides in both sagittal and coronal view. These findings suggest that the presence of unilateral posterior crossbite in children with UPXB did not result in changes between the mandibular condyles in the right and left sides or between the crossed and non-crossed sides in the coronal or sagittal plane.

  3. Bone changes of mandibular condyle using cone beam computed tomography

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    Lee, Ji Un; Kim, Hyung Seop; Song, Ju Seop; Kim, Kyoung A; Koh, Kwang Joon [Chonbuk National Univ., Chonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-09-15

    To assess bone changes of mandibular condyle using cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) in temporomandibualr disorder (TMD) patients. 314 temporomandibular joints (TMJs) images of 163 TMD patients were examined at the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, Chonbuk National University. The images were obtained by PSR9000N (Asahi Roentgen Co., Japan) and reconstructed by using Asahivision software (Asahi Roentgen Co., Japan). The CBCT images were examined three times with four weeks interval by three radiologists. Bone changes of mandibular condyle such as flattening, sclerosis, erosion and osteophyte formation were observed in sagittal, axial, coronal and 3 dimensional images of the mandibular condyle. The statistical analysis was performed using SPSS 12.0. Intra-and interobserver agreement were performed by 3 radiologists without the knowledge of clinical information. Osteopathy (2.9%) was found more frequently on anterior surface of the mandibular condyle. Erosion (31.8%) was found more frequently on anterior surface of the mandibular condyle. The intraobserver agreement was good to excellent (k=0.78{sub 0}.84), but interobserver agreement was fair (k=0.45). CBCT can provide high qualified images of bone changes of the TMJ with axial, coronal and 3 dimensional images.

  4. Bone changes of mandibular condyle using cone beam computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Ji Un; Kim, Hyung Seop; Song, Ju Seop; Kim, Kyoung A; Koh, Kwang Joon

    2007-01-01

    To assess bone changes of mandibular condyle using cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) in temporomandibualr disorder (TMD) patients. 314 temporomandibular joints (TMJs) images of 163 TMD patients were examined at the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, Chonbuk National University. The images were obtained by PSR9000N (Asahi Roentgen Co., Japan) and reconstructed by using Asahivision software (Asahi Roentgen Co., Japan). The CBCT images were examined three times with four weeks interval by three radiologists. Bone changes of mandibular condyle such as flattening, sclerosis, erosion and osteophyte formation were observed in sagittal, axial, coronal and 3 dimensional images of the mandibular condyle. The statistical analysis was performed using SPSS 12.0. Intra-and interobserver agreement were performed by 3 radiologists without the knowledge of clinical information. Osteopathy (2.9%) was found more frequently on anterior surface of the mandibular condyle. Erosion (31.8%) was found more frequently on anterior surface of the mandibular condyle. The intraobserver agreement was good to excellent (k=0.78 0 .84), but interobserver agreement was fair (k=0.45). CBCT can provide high qualified images of bone changes of the TMJ with axial, coronal and 3 dimensional images

  5. Lower molar and incisor displacement associated with mandibular remodeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumrind, S; Bravo, L A; Ben-Bassat, Y; Curry, S; Korn, E L

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to quantify the amount of alveolar modeling at the apices of the mandibular incisor and first molar specifically associated with appositional and resorptive changes on the lower border of the mandible during growth and treatment. Cephalometric data from superimpositions on anterior cranial base, mandibular implants of the Björk type, and anatomical "best fit" of mandibular border structures were integrated using a recently developed strategy, which is described. Data were available at annual intervals between 8.5 and 15.5 years for a previously described sample of approximately 30 children with implants. The average magnitudes of the changes at the root apices of the mandibular first molar and central incisor associated with modeling/remodeling of the mandibular border and symphysis were unexpectedly small. At the molar apex, mean values approximated zero in both anteroposterior and vertical directions. At the incisor apex, mean values approximated zero in the anteroposterior direction and averaged less than 0.15 mm/year in the vertical direction. Standard deviations were roughly equal for the molar and the incisor in both the anteroposterior and vertical directions. Dental displacement associated with surface modeling plays a smaller role in final tooth position in the mandible than in the maxilla. It may also be reasonably inferred that anatomical best-fit superimpositions made in the absence of implants give a more complete picture of hard tissue turnover in the mandible than they do in the maxilla.

  6. Maxillary advancement for mandibular prognathism: indications and rationale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, H M

    1991-05-01

    The surgical correction of mandibular prognathism has traditionally involved posterior repositioning of the mandibular body. This treatment approach corrects the skeletal disproportion at the expense of reducing facial skeletal volume and can unpredictably result in inadequately supported soft tissues with loss of skeletal definition. In an effort to avoid these sequelae of mandibular reduction, 18 patients diagnosed as having mandibular prognathism were treated with maxillary advancement surgery at the Le Fort I level. Mean patient SNB angle was 85.2 degrees, as compared with a normal 79 +/- 3 degrees. Maxillae were documented to be in normal position relative to both cranial base and Frankfort horizontal. The mean maxillary advancement was 6.9 mm, with a range of 4.5 to 8.8 mm. All patients required genioplasty to reduce vertical chin height and/or to laterally shift the chin. At the time of follow-up (mean 16.2 months), all patients retained cephalometric data suggestive of enlarged mandibles and excessive anterior facial divergence. However, maxillomandibular harmony and facial convexity had been restored without sacrificing skeletal volume. Treatment results demonstrated these faces to be skeletally well proportioned despite lower face protrusion that was beyond "normal." Postoperative appearances were characterized by a well-supported soft-tissue envelope and a highlighted skeletal foundation, creating angular, well-defined lower faces. These findings support the credibility of maxillary advancement as the procedure of choice in selected individuals with mandibular prognathism. Indications and an aesthetic rationale for this surgical approach are presented.

  7. Split-Framework in Mandibular Implant-Supported Prosthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danny Omar Mendoza Marin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available During oral rehabilitation of an edentulous patient with an implant-supported prosthesis, mandibular flexure must be considered an important biomechanical factor when planning the metal framework design, especially if implants are installed posterior to the interforaminal region. When an edentulous mandible is restored with a fixed implant-supported prosthesis connected by a fixed full-arch framework, mandibular flexure may cause needless stress in the overall restorative system and lead to screw loosening, poor fit of prosthesis, loss of the posterior implant, and patient’s discomfort due to deformation properties of the mandible during functional movements. The use of a split-framework could decrease the stress with a precise and passive fit on the implants and restore a more natural functional condition of the mandible, helping in the longevity of the prosthesis. Therefore, the present clinical report describes the oral rehabilitation of an edentulous patient by a mandibular fixed implant-supported prosthesis with a split-framework to compensate for mandibular flexure. Clinical Significance. The present clinical report shows that the use of a split-framework reduced the risk of loss of the posterior implants or screws loosening with acceptable patient comfort over the period of a year. The split-framework might have compensated for the mandibular flexure during functional activities.

  8. Occlusion and Temporomandibular Function among Subjects with Mandibular Distal Extension Removable Partial Dentures.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Creugers, N.H.J.; Witter, D.J.; Spijker, A. van 't; Gerritsen, A.E.; Kreulen, C.M.

    2010-01-01

    Objective. To quantify effects on occlusion and temporomandibular function of mandibular distal extension removable partial dentures in shortened dental arches. Methods. Subjects wearing mandibular extension removable partial dentures (n = 25) were compared with subjects with shortened dental arches

  9. Multicentre prospective evaluation of implant-assisted mandibular bilateral distal extension removable partial dentures: patient satisfaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wismeijer, D.; Tawse-Smith, A.; Payne, A.G.T.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To compare the levels of patient satisfaction with either conventional mandibular bilateral distal extension partial dentures or those assisted by bilateral distal implants. Materials and methods Forty-eight participants who were dissatisfied with their existing conventional mandibular

  10. Evaluation of Recurring Esthetic Dental Proportion in Natural Mandibular Anterior Dentition

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    Dipti S Shah

    2015-01-01

    Results: After calculating proportions in mandibular anterior teeth, P value was found to be statistically insignificant (P > 0.05. Conclusion: Within the limitations of the study, RED proportion was not seen in mandibular natural dentition.

  11. Signaling pathways regulating the expression of Prx1 and Prx2 in the Chick Mandibular Mesenchyme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doufexi, Aikaterini-El; Mina, Mina

    2009-01-01

    Prx1 and Prx2 are members of the aristaless-related homeobox genes shown to play redundant but essential roles in morphogenesis of the mandibular processes. To gain insight into the signaling pathways that regulate expression of Prx genes in the mandibular mesenchyme, we used the chick as a model system. We examined the patterns of gene expression in the face and the roles of signals derived from the epithelium on the expression of Prx genes in the mandibular mesenchyme. Our results demonstrated stage-dependent roles of mandibular epithelium on the expression of Prx in the mandibular mesenchyme and provide evidence for positive roles of members of the fibroblast and hedgehog families derived from mandibular epithelium on the expression of Prx genes in the mandibular mesenchyme. Our studies suggest that endothelin-1 signaling derived from the mesenchyme is involved in restricting the expression of Prx2 to the medial mandibular mesenchyme. PMID:18942149

  12. Fractures of the mandible and maxilla: A 10-year analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Estie Kruger

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background Previous analysis of jaw fracture hospitalisations in Western Australia (WA indicated disproportionately high rates of hospitalisations for Aboriginal people. This study was to follow-up on the earlier analysis to determine if inequalities in terms of jaw fracture hospitalisation rates between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal people have changed. Aims This study, done over a 10-year period from 1999/2000 to 2008/2009, aimed to determine rates of hospitalisations for jaw fractures in WA, trends over the 10–year period, and direct costs associated with these hospital admissions. Methods Hospitalisation data were obtained from the Western Australian Hospital Morbidity Data System (HMDS. Episodes were selected on the basis of an ICD10-AM code being S02.4 (Fracture of the malar and maxillary bones and S02.6 (Fracture of the mandible. Self-reported Aboriginality were used to compare Aboriginal to non-Aboriginal populations. Estimated cost of care was determined for each episode using the national standard diagnostic-related group (DRG average price. Results Our findings indicate that inequalities between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal people in terms of hospital admissions for jaw fractures exist in WA, and continued over a decade-long period. Higher fracture rates occurred amongst males, Aboriginal people, younger adult age-groups, those from low socioeconomic areas, and those from remote and very remote areas. The DRG cost per person for jaw fractures ranged between AUD $842 and $109,002, with a median cost of $4,965. Conclusion Hospital admission rates for the treatment of maxillary and mandibular fractures is very strongly divided along racial and socioeconomic lines in WA.

  13. The role of simultaneous gap arthroplasty and distraction osteogenesis in the management of temporo-mandibular joint ankylosis with mandibular deformity in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Krishna; Kumar, Sudhir; Kumar, Vijay; Singh, Arun Kumar; Bhatnagar, Sudhir Kumar

    2004-02-01

    Temporo-mandibular joint ankylosis is a common cause of acquired deformity in children. Surgical correction of the ankylosis only leaves the patient with an uncorrected mandibular deformity. This study was to evaluate the use of distraction osteogenesis for simultaneous correction of the mandibular deformity. This study was done on six children with temporo-mandibular joint ankylosis and mandibular deformity. Uniaxial double pin distractors with Schanz pins were used in this study. The patients underwent simultaneous gap arthroplasty and mandibular osteotomy (retromolar) with distractor insertion. Distraction was started on the fifth post-operative day. The patients were put on dynamic temporo-mandibular joint exercises on the first post-operative day. All patients had a satisfactory mouth opening on follow-up. Satisfactory cosmetic correction of the mandibular deformity was also achieved in all these patients. Some degree of malocclusion resulted from treatment due to which the patients were placed on orthodontic treatment. Distraction osteogenesis can be used simultaneously with gap arthroplasty in patients with temporo-mandibular ankylosis, for the correction of the mandibular deformity.

  14. Traumatic thoracolumbar spine fractures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Siebenga (Jan)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractTraumatic spinal fractures have the lowest functional outcomes and the lowest rates of return to work after injury of all major organ systems.1 This thesis will cover traumatic thoracolumbar spine fractures and not osteoporotic spine fractures because of the difference in fracture

  15. Fractures in multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stenager, E; Jensen, K

    1991-01-01

    In a cross-sectional study of 299 MS patients 22 have had fractures and of these 17 after onset of MS. The fractures most frequently involved the femoral neck and trochanter (41%). Three patients had had more than one fracture. Only 1 patient had osteoporosis. The percentage of fractures increase...

  16. Recurrent osteochondroma of the mandibular condyle: A case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwon, Young Eun; Choi, Karp Shik; An, Chang Hyeon; Choi, So Young; An, Seo Young; Lee, Jae Seo

    2017-01-01

    A 21-year-old woman presented with facial asymmetry. Crepitus and clicking of the temporomandibular joint were noted. The midline deviated 5.5 mm to the left, and secondary malocclusion was observed. Panoramic and cone-beam computed tomographic images showed an irregular and exophytic bony mass on the anteromedial surface of the right mandibular condyle. A 3-phase bone scan revealed increased tracer uptake on the affected side. The lesion was treated with excision and reshaping under the diagnosis of osteochondroma confirmed by a histopathological examination. The lesion recurred after 3 years, and the patient underwent condylectomy. Mandibular condylar osteochondroma is often resected because it causes functional and aesthetic problems, but it rarely recurs. To the best of our knowledge, only 2 cases of recurrent osteochondromas of the mandibular condyle have been reported previously. Surgical treatment of the osteochondroma should be performed considering the possibility of recurrence, and long-term follow-up is recommended

  17. Recurrent osteochondroma of the mandibular condyle: A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, Young Eun; Choi, Karp Shik; An, Chang Hyeon; Choi, So Young; An, Seo Young [School of Dentistry, Kyungpook National University, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jae Seo [Dept. of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, School of Dentistry, Chonnam National University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-03-15

    A 21-year-old woman presented with facial asymmetry. Crepitus and clicking of the temporomandibular joint were noted. The midline deviated 5.5 mm to the left, and secondary malocclusion was observed. Panoramic and cone-beam computed tomographic images showed an irregular and exophytic bony mass on the anteromedial surface of the right mandibular condyle. A 3-phase bone scan revealed increased tracer uptake on the affected side. The lesion was treated with excision and reshaping under the diagnosis of osteochondroma confirmed by a histopathological examination. The lesion recurred after 3 years, and the patient underwent condylectomy. Mandibular condylar osteochondroma is often resected because it causes functional and aesthetic problems, but it rarely recurs. To the best of our knowledge, only 2 cases of recurrent osteochondromas of the mandibular condyle have been reported previously. Surgical treatment of the osteochondroma should be performed considering the possibility of recurrence, and long-term follow-up is recommended.

  18. Two independent anion transport systems in rabbit mandibular salivary glands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Novak, I; Young, J A

    1986-01-01

    Cholinergically stimulated Cl and HCO3 transport in perfused rabbit mandibular glands has been studied with extracellular anion substitution and administration of transport inhibitors. In glands perfused with HCO3-free solutions, replacement of Cl with other anions supported secretion in the foll......Cholinergically stimulated Cl and HCO3 transport in perfused rabbit mandibular glands has been studied with extracellular anion substitution and administration of transport inhibitors. In glands perfused with HCO3-free solutions, replacement of Cl with other anions supported secretion...... stimulated secretion by about 30%, but when infused in addition to furosemide (0.1 mmol/l), it inhibited by about 20%. Amiloride (1.0 mmol/l) caused no inhibition. The results suggest that there are at least three distinct carriers in the rabbit mandibular gland. One is a furosemide-sensitive Na-coupled Cl...

  19. Surgical-prosthetic treatment of large mandibular cysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Džambas Ljubiša D.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a combined surgical-prosthetic procedure of reconstructing mandibular bone defect in a 53 year old patient, following enucleation of a mandibular cyst (Cystectomy Partsch II. After a thorough diagnostic evaluation, a surgical procedure was planned with the particular attention to the nature of the disease, patient’s condition, size and extension of the cyst, tissue loss, and the possibilities of prosthetic management of a mandibular bone defect with partial postresection dental prosthesis. It is of great importance to point to the significance of teamwork of a maxillofacial surgeon and a specialist in prosthodontics. This kind of cooperation provided very effective and less risky soft tissue, as well as bone tissue regeneration (osteogenesis. The patient’s recovery was fast, and he could return to his daily activities and work without significant changes regarding quality of life after surgery and prosthetic treatment.

  20. Cementoblastoma Relating to Right Mandibular Second Primary Molar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sivakumar Nuvvula

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cementoblastoma is a benign lesion of the odontogenic ectomesenchymal origin. It rarely occurs in primary dentition. This report describes a case of a cementoblastoma relating to the right mandibular second primary molar in a 7-year-old girl. Her panoramic radiograph revealed a well-defined radiopaque lesion with a radiolucent border extending from the distal surface of the mandibular right first primary molar to the distal surface of mandibular second primary molar. The tumor was attached to the mesial root of primary second molar and was excised along with the teeth involved and sent for histopathological evaluation, which showed irregular trabeculae of mineralized tissue interspersed with fibrovascular connective tissue, trabeculae of mineralized tissue with prominent reversal lines, and peripheral rimming of the mineralized tissue with blast cells. On a six-month follow-up, there has been no recurrence of the lesion.