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Sample records for malaysian peat soil

  1. Newly isolated Paenibacillus tyrfis sp. nov., from Malaysian tropical peat swamp soil with broad spectrum antimicrobial activity

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    Yoong Kit eAw

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Emergence of antimicrobial resistance coupled with the slowdown in discovery of new antimicrobial compounds points to serious consequences in human health. Therefore, scientists are looking for new antimicrobial compounds from unique and understudied ecosystem such as tropical peat swamp forests. Over the course of isolating antimicrobial producing bacteria from North Selangor tropical peat swamp forest, Malaysia, a Gram variable, rod shaped, endospore forming, facultative anaerobic novel strain MSt1T that exerts potent and broad spectrum antimicrobial activity was isolated. Phylogenetic analysis using 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that strain MSt1T belonged to the genus Paenibacillus with the highest similarity with Paenibacillus elgii SD17T (99.5%. Whole genome comparison between strain MSt1T with its closely related species using average nucleotide identity (ANI revealed that similarity between strain MSt1T with Paenibacillus elgii B69 (93.45% and Paenibacillus ehimensis A2 (90.42% was below the recommended threshold of 95%. Further analysis using in silico pairwise DDH also showed that similarity between strain MSt1T with P. elgii B69 (55.4% and P. ehimensis A2 (43.7% was below the recommended threshold of 70%. Strain MSt1T contained meso-diaminopilemic acid in the cell wall and MK-7 as the major menaquinone. The major fatty acids of strain MSt1T were anteiso-C15:0 (48.2% and C16:0 (29.0% whereas the polar lipid profile consisted of phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylethanolamine, diphosphatidylglycerol, one unknown lipid, two unknown glycolipids and one unknown phospholipid. Total DNA G+C content of strain MSt1T was 51.5 mol%. Extract from strain MSt1T exerted strong antimicrobial activity against Escherichia coli ATCC 25922 (MIC = 1.5 µg/mL, MRSA ATCC 700699 (MIC = 25 µg/mL and Candida albicans IMR (MIC = 12.5 µg/mL. Partially purified active fraction exerted strong effect against Escherichia coli ATCC 25922 resulting in cell rupture

  2. Complexity Analysis of Peat Soil Density Distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampurno, Joko; Diah Faryuni, Irfana; Dzar Eljabbar Latief, Fourier; Srigutomo, Wahyu

    2016-08-01

    The distributions of peat soil density have been identified using fractal analysis method. The study was conducted on 5 peat soil samples taken from a ground field in Pontianak, West Kalimantan, at the coordinates (0 ° 4 '2:27 "S, 109 ° 18' 48.59" E). In this study, we used micro computerized tomography (pCT Scanner) at 9.41 micro meter per pixel resolution under peat soil samples to provide 2-D high-resolution images L1-L5 (200 200 pixels) that were used to detect the distribution of peat soil density. The method for determining the fractal dimension and intercept was the 2-D Fourier analysis method. The method was used to obtain the log log-plot of magnitude with frequency. Fractal dimension was obtained from the straight regression line that interpolated the points in the interval with the largest coefficient determination. Intercept defined by the point of intersection on the -axis. The conclusion was that the distributions of peat soil density showing the fractal behaviour with the heterogeneity of the samples from the highest to the lowest were L5, L1, L4, L3 and L2. Meanwhile, the range of density values of the samples from the highest to the lowest was L3, L2, L4, L5 and L1. The study also concluded that the behaviour of the distribution of peat soil density was a weakly anisotropic.

  3. Potential Phosphorus Mobilisation in Peat Soils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Forsmann, Ditte M.; Kjærgaard, Charlotte

    2012-01-01

    for each location. This mobilisation was measured using intact soil cores (d: 6 cm; h: 15 cm) from the 10 locations set up in an anaerobic closed-flow system. Finally, the hydro- physical parameters like soil-water retention curves, break-through curves, air-filled porosity and bulk density were measured......Re-establishment of wetlands on peat soils containing phosphorus bound to iron(III)-oxides can lead to an undesirable phosphorus loss to the aquatic environment due to the reductive dissolution of iron(III)-oxides. Thus it is important to be able to assess the potential phosphorus mobilisation from...... peat soils before a re-establishment takes place. The potential phosphorus mobilisation from a peat soil depends not only on the geochemical characteristics but also on the redox conditions, the hydrological regime in the area as well as the hydro-physical properties of the soil. The hypothesis...

  4. Active Pore Volume in Danish Peat Soils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Forsmann, Ditte M.; Kjærgaard, Charlotte

    2012-01-01

    Phosphorus release within the soil matrix caused by the changed redox conditions due to re-establishment of a riparian wetland can be critical for the aquatic environment. However, phosphorous released in the soil will not always result in an immediate contribution to this loss to the aquatic...... is not actively transported out of the system, but is only transported via diffusion, which is a very slow process. Thus it is interesting to investigate the size of the active pore volume in peat soils. The hypothesis of this study is that the active pores volume of a peat soil can be expressed using bulk...

  5. Enzyme activity in forest peat soils

    OpenAIRE

    Błońska, Ewa

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the activity of dehydrogenases and urease in forest peat soils of different fertility. There were selected 23 experimental plots localised in central and northern Poland. The research was conducted on forest fens, transition bogs and raised bogs. The biggest differences in soil physical and chemical properties were detected between fen and raised bog soils while raised bog soils and transition bog soils differed the least. Statistically significant dif...

  6. Active Pore Volume in Danish Peat Soils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Forsmann, Ditte M.; Kjærgaard, Charlotte

    2012-01-01

    cm3 intact soil samples. Finally, breakthrough of tritium (3H2O) was used to construct breakthrough curves for each peat soil, which indicates the flow pattern in the soil. A mobile-immobile domain model (MIM-model) in CXTFIT was used to derive parameters describing the size of the immobile...... and mobile domains as well as the exchange between the two domains. Finally, the samples were dried in the own for determination of the bulk density. The bulk density was correlated to parameters from the MIM-model and to the macropore volume to determine, whether bulk density can be used as a key parameter....

  7. Effect of Converting Secondary Tropical Peat Swamp Forest into Oil Palm Plantation on Selected Peat Soil Physical Properties

    OpenAIRE

    Mohd S. Firdaus; Seca Gandaseca; Ahmed, Osumanu H.; Nik M.A. Majid

    2010-01-01

    Problem statement: The conversion of forest land into oil palm plantation is considered to be one of the causes of soil degradation and loss of tropical land forest in Southeast Asia. The objective of this study was to compare selected peat soil physical properties of secondary tropical peat swamp forest and oil palm plantation to determine the effect of forest conversion. Approach: Peat soil samples were collected from secondary tropical peat swamp forest and oil palm pla...

  8. Accumulation of heavy metals in oil-contaminated peat soils

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    Vodyanitskii, Yu. N.; Savichev, A. T.; Trofimov, S. Ya.; Shishkonakova, E. A.

    2012-10-01

    X-ray fluorescence and X-ray radiometry represent easy and simple methods to determine concentrations of heavy metals in the ash of peat soils contaminated with oil and can be applied for soil monitoring purposes. Oil spills on peat bogs produce two contamination zones differing in the composition of heavy metals. In the zone of primary contamination, the peat surface is covered by a bitumen crust with V, Ni, Sr, Ba, Ce, and La accumulating there. This zone adjoins the zone of secondary peat contamination, where heavy alkaline-earth metals (Sr, Ba) and lanthanides (Ce and La) are accumulated to a lesser extent. Biological preparations recommended for remediation of oil-contaminated peat soils should be tolerant to high concentrations of heavy metals, particularly, V, Ni, and Ba that are present in the oil contaminated soils in relatively high amounts.

  9. Organic matter loss from cultivated peat soils in Sweden

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    Berglund, Örjan; Berglund, Kerstin

    2015-04-01

    The degradation of drained peat soils in agricultural use is an underestimated source of loss of organic matter. Oxidation (biological degradation) of agricultural peat soils causes a loss of organic matter (OM) of 11 - 22 t ha-1 y-1 causing a CO2 emission of 20 - 40 t ha-1 y-1. Together with the associated N2O emissions from mineralized N this totals in the EU to about 98.5 Mton CO2 eq per year. Peat soils are very prone to climate change and it is expected that at the end of this century these values are doubled. The degradation products pollute surface waters. Wind erosion of peat soils in arable agriculture can cause losses of 3 - 30 t ha-1 y-1 peat also causing air pollution (fine organic particles). Subsidence rates are 1 - 2 cm per year which leads to deteriorating drainage effect and make peat soils below sea or inland water levels prone to flooding. Flooding agricultural peat soils is in many cases not possible without high costs, high GHG emissions and severe water pollution. Moreover sometimes cultural and historic landscapes are lost and meadow birds areas are lost. In areas where the possibility to regulate the water table is limited the mitigation options are either to increase biomass production that can be used as bioenergy to substitute some fossil fuel, try to slow down the break-down of the peat by different amendments that inhibit microbial activity, or permanent flooding. The negative effects of wind erosion can be mitigated by reducing wind speed or different ways to protect the soil by crops or fiber sheets. In a newly started project in Sweden a typical peat soil with and without amendment of foundry sand is cropped with reed canary grass, tall fescue and timothy to investigate the yield and greenhouse gas emissions from the different crops and how the sand effect the trafficability and GHG emissions.

  10. Greenhouse gas efflux from an impacted Malaysian tropical peat swamp (Invited)

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    Waldron, S.; Vihermaa, L. E.; Evers, S.; Garnett, M.; Newton, J.; Padfield, R.

    2013-12-01

    Tropical peatlands constitute ~11% of global peatland area and ~12% of the global peat C pool. Malaysia alone contains 10% of tropical peats. Due to rising global demands for food and biofuels, SE-Asia peat swamp forest ecosystems are threatened by increasing amounts of drainage, fire and conversion to plantation. These processes can change the GHG emissions and thus net ecosystem C balance. However, in comparison to temperate and boreal peatlands, there is a lack of data on terrestrial-aquatic-atmospheric carbon transfer from tropical peatlands, both those that are little disturbed and those facing anthropogenic pressures. Lateral transport of soil-respired carbon, and fluvial respiration or UV-oxidation of terrestrial DOC primes atmospheric carbon dioxide efflux. We now know that DOC lost from disturbed tropical peat swamp forests can be centuries to millennia old and originates deep within the peat column - this carbon may fuel efflux of old carbon dioxide and so anthropogenic land-use change renders the older, slower carbon cycles shorter and faster. Currently we have no knowledge of how significant ';older-slower' terrestrial-aquatic-atmospheric cycles are in disturbed tropical peatlands. Further, in some areas for commercial reasons, or by conservation bodies trying to minimise peat habitat loss, logged peats have been left to regenerate. Consequently, unpicking the legacy of multiple land uses on magnitude, age and source of GHG emissions is challenging but required to support land management decisions and projections of response to a changing climate. Here, we present the results of our first field campaign in July 2013 to the Raja Musa and Sungai Karang Peat Swamp Forest Reserves in North Selangor, Malaysia. This is one of Malaysia's largest oceanic peat swamps, and has been selectively logged and drained for 80 years, but is now subject to a 30 year logging ban to aid forest regeneration and build up wood stocks. From sites subject to different land use

  11. Laboratory evaporation experiments in undisturbed peat columns for determining peat soil hydraulic properties

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    Dettmann, U.; Frahm, E.; Bechtold, M.

    2013-12-01

    Knowledge about hydraulic properties of organic soils is crucial for the interpretation of the hydrological situation in peatlands. This in turn is the basis for designing optimal rewetting strategies, for assessing the current and future climatic water balance and for quantifying greenhouse gas emissions of CO2, CH4 and N2O, which are strongly controlled by the depth of the peat water table. In contrast to mineral soils, the hydraulic properties of organic soils differ in several aspects. Due to the high amount of organic components, strong heterogeneity, and shrinkage and swelling of peat, accompanied by changing soil volume and bulk density, the applicability of standard hydraulic functions developed for mineral soils for describing peat soil moisture dynamics is often questioned. Hence, the objective of this study was to investigate the applicability of the commonly applied van Genuchten-Mualem (VGM) parameterization and to evaluate model errors for various peat types. Laboratory column experiments with undisturbed peat soils (diameter: 30 cm, height: 20 cm) from 5 different peatlands in Germany were conducted. In numerical simulations using HYDRUS-1D the experimental data were used for an inverse estimation of the soil hydraulic parameters. Using the VGM parameterization, the model errors between observed and measured pressure heads were quantified with a root mean square error (RMSE) of 20 - 65 cm. The RMSE increased for soils with higher organic carbon content and higher porosity. Optimizing the VGM 'tortuosity' parameter (τ) instead of fixing it to its default of 0.5 strongly reduced the RMSE, especially for the soils that showed high pressure head gradients during the experiment. Due to the fact, that very negative pressure heads in peatlands occur rarely, we reduced the range of pressured heads in the inversion to a 'field-relevant' range from 0 to -200 cm which strongly reduced the RMSE to 6 - 12 cm and makes the VGM parameterization applicable for all

  12. Impact of water content and decomposition stage on the soil water repellency of peat soils

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    Dettmann, Ullrich; Sokolowsky, Liv; Piayda, Arndt; Tiemeyer, Bärbel; Bachmann, Jörg

    2017-04-01

    Soil water repellency is widely reported for all kinds of soils and mainly caused by hydrophobic organic compounds. It has a substantial influence on soil hydraulic processes such as water infiltration, preferential flow paths and evaporation and therefore on hydrological processes in general. The severity of soil water repellency strongly depends on the soil water content and the amount of soil organic carbon. Although peat soils are characterized by high soil organic carbon contents, studies about peat soils are rare and mostly available for horticultural substrates. Here, we present soil water repellency measurements for peat soils with varying porosities, bulk densities and stages of decomposition. The peat soils were sampled at two different sites in a bog complex. The sites have been drained for 1 and 100 years. Samples were taken from each soil layer and, additionally, in a vertical resolution of 0.03 m. To determine the soil water contents at which the peat becomes water repellent, we applied the commonly used water drop penetration time test on progressively dewatered samples. In order to identify the influence of the decomposition stage as determined by the depth within the soil profile and duration of drainage, the potential soil water repellency was measured at air-dried sieved samples by the sessile drop method. First results show that the soil water repellency of peat soils is strongly dependent on the soil water content. For air-dried peat samples, the influence of different decomposition stages of the bog peat is negligible. All air-dried samples are extremely water repellent with contact angles > 130°. However, comparing the results with the soil organic matter content shows a slightly tendency of increasing soil water repellency with increasing soil organic matter contents.

  13. Thermal properties of degraded lowland peat-moorsh soils

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    Gnatowski, Tomasz

    2016-04-01

    Soil thermal properties, i.e.: specific heat capacity (c), thermal conductivity (K), volumetric heat capacity (C) govern the thermal environment and heat transport through the soil. Hence the precise knowledge and accurate predictions of these properties for peaty soils with high amount of organic matter are especially important for the proper forecasting of soil temperature and thus it may lead to a better assessment of the greenhouse gas emissions created by microbiological activity of the peatlands. The objective of the study was to develop the predictive models of the selected thermal parameters of peat-moorsh soils in terms of their potential applicability for forecasting changes of soil temperature in degraded ecosystems of the Middle Biebrza River Valley area. Evaluation of the soil thermal properties was conducted for the parameters: specific heat capacity (c), volumetric heat capacities of the dry and saturated soil (Cdry, Csat) and thermal conductivities of the dry and saturated soil (Kdry, Ksat). The thermal parameters were measured using the dual-needle probe (KD2-Pro) on soil samples collected from seven peaty soils, representing total 24 horizons. The surface layers were characterized by different degrees of advancement of soil degradation dependent on intensiveness of the cultivation practises (peaty and humic moorsh). The underlying soil layers contain peat deposits of different botanical composition (peat-moss, sedge-reed, reed and alder) and varying degrees of decomposition of the organic matter, from H1 to H7 (von Post scale). Based on the research results it has been shown that the specific heat capacity of the soils differs depending on the type of soil (type of moorsh and type of peat). The range of changes varied from 1276 J.kg-1.K-1 in the humic moorsh soil to 1944 J.kg-1.K-1 in the low decomposed sedge-moss peat. It has also been stated that in degraded peat soils with the increasing of the ash content in the soil the value of specific heat

  14. Effect of Converting Secondary Tropical Peat Swamp Forest into Oil Palm Plantation on Selected Peat Soil Physical Properties

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    Mohd S. Firdaus

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: The conversion of forest land into oil palm plantation is considered to be one of the causes of soil degradation and loss of tropical land forest in Southeast Asia. The objective of this study was to compare selected peat soil physical properties of secondary tropical peat swamp forest and oil palm plantation to determine the effect of forest conversion. Approach: Peat soil samples were collected from secondary tropical peat swamp forest and oil palm plantation at Batang Igan, Sibu, Sarawak, Malaysia. Experimental plots of 300 m3 were set up in both sites and thirty peat soil samples were collected randomly in both sites at 0-15 cm depth using a peat auger. Undisturbed cores and bulk samples were collected for analysis of bulk density and moisture content. Fiber content of the total mass of organic materials was determined by wet sieving method. Soil bulk density, moisture content, organic matter, mineral content, soil porosity and particle density were determined by standard procedures. Hydraulic conductivity was measured in the field using Model 2800K1 Guelph Permeameter and soil strength was determined using Hand Operated Cone Penetrometer Eijkelkemp. Unpaired T-test was used to compare the variables of the two sites. Results: Both sites had similar degree of decomposition classified as hemic peat. No significant differences in fiber content, moisture content and particle density. Bulk density, mineral content and soil strength were significantly higher in the oil palm plantation while organic matter content, porosity and saturated hydraulic conductivity were significantly higher in the secondary tropical peat swamp forest. Conclusion: Conversion of secondary tropical peat swamp forest to oil palm plantation has significantly increased soil bulk density, mineral content and soil strength but significantly decreased organic matter content, porosity and saturated hydraulic conductivity. However, degree of

  15. Phenol oxidase activity in secondary transformed peat-moorsh soils

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    Styła, K.; Szajdak, L.

    2009-04-01

    The chemical composition of peat depends on the geobotanical conditions of its formation and on the depth of sampling. The evolution of hydrogenic peat soils is closely related to the genesis of peat and to the changes in water conditions. Due to a number of factors including oscillation of ground water level, different redox potential, changes of aerobic conditions, different plant communities, and root exudes, and products of the degradation of plant remains, peat-moorsh soils may undergo a process of secondary transformation conditions (Sokolowska et al. 2005; Szajdak et al. 2007). Phenol oxidase is one of the few enzymes able to degrade recalcitrant phenolic materials as lignin (Freeman et al. 2004). Phenol oxidase enzymes catalyze polyphenol oxidation in the presence of oxygen (O2) by removing phenolic hydrogen or hydrogenes to from radicals or quinines. These products undergo nucleophilic addition reactions in the presence or absence of free - NH2 group with the eventual production of humic acid-like polymers. The presence of phenol oxidase in soil environments is important in the formation of humic substances a desirable process because the carbon is stored in a stable form (Matocha et al. 2004). The investigations were carried out on the transect of peatland 4.5 km long, located in the Agroecological Landscape Park host D. Chlapowski in Turew (40 km South-West of Poznań, West Polish Lowland). The sites of investigation were located along Wyskoć ditch. The following material was taken from four chosen sites marked as Zbechy, Bridge, Shelterbelt and Hirudo in two layers: cartel (0-50cm) and cattle (50-100cm). The object of this study was to characterize the biochemical properties by the determination of the phenol oxidize activity in two layers of the four different peat-moors soils used as meadow. The phenol oxidase activity was determined spectrophotometrically by measuring quinone formation at λmax=525 nm with catechol as substrate by method of Perucci

  16. Dicyandiamide Sorption-Desorption Behavior on Soils and Peat Humus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Hai-Jun; WU Zhi-Jie; ZHOU Qi-Xing

    2004-01-01

    The sorption-desorption behavior of dicyandiamide (DCD) is an important chemical process that affects DCD fate and mobility in soils. Therefore, this study quantified DCD sorption-desorption on a phaeozem (Mollisol), a burozem (Alfisol), a soil with organic matter-removed and peat humus using the batch-equilibration procedure, and identified soil properties that influenced DCD sorption. The sorption on peat humus was higher than that on the phaeozem and the burozem, with much lower sorption observed on the soil with organic matter-removed, indicating that soil organic matter was the main carrier of DCD sorption. Due to its amphipathic property the DCD molecule sorption on the phaeozem and the burozem decreased as pH increased from about 2 to 5, but a further increase in pH led to a rise in DCD sorption.The DCD desorption hysteretic effect for peat humus was greater than that for the phaeozem and the burozem using 0.01 mol L-1 CaC12 as the background electrolyte, suggesting that the hydrophobic domains of organic matter may play an important role in DCD sorption.

  17. Peat fires as source of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsibart, Anna

    2013-04-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) arrive from pyrogenic sources including volcanism and the combustion of oil products and plant materials. The production of PAHs during the combustion of plant materials was considered in a number of publications, but their results were mainly obtained in laboratory experiments. Insufficient data are available on the hightemperature production of PAHs in environmental objects. For example, natural fires are frequently related to the PAH sources in landscapes, but very little factual data are available on this topic. On Polistovskii reserve (Russia, Pskov region) the soil series were separated depending on the damage to the plants; these series included soils of plots subjected to fires of different intensities, as well as soils of the background plots. The series of organic and organomineral soils significantly differed in their PAH distributions. In this series, the concentration of PAHs in the upper horizons of the peat soils little varied or slightly decreased, but their accumulation occurred at a depth of 5-10 or 10-20 cm in the soils after the fires. For example, in the series of high moor soils, the content of PAHs in the upper horizons remained almost constant; significant differences were observed in the subsurface horizons: from 2 ng/g in the background soil to 70 ng/g after the fire. In the upper horizons of the oligotrophic peat soils under pine forests, the total PAH content also varied only slightly. At the same time, the content of PAHs in the soil series increased from 15 to 90 ng/g with the increasing pyrogenic damage to the plot. No clear trends of the PAH accumulation were recorded in the organomineral soils. The content of PAHs in the soddy-podzolic soil subjected to fire slightly decreased (from 20 to 10 ng/g) compared to the less damaged soil. In peat fires, the access of oxygen to the fire zone is lower than in forest fires. The oxygen deficit acts as a factor of the organic fragments recombination and

  18. Uncertainty in peat volume and soil carbon estimated using ground-penetrating radar and probing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrew D. Parsekian; Lee Slater; Dimitrios Ntarlagiannis; James Nolan; Stephen D. Sebestyen; Randall K. Kolka; Paul J. Hanson

    2012-01-01

    Estimating soil C stock in a peatland is highly dependent on accurate measurement of the peat volume. In this study, we evaluated the uncertainty in calculations of peat volume using high-resolution data to resolve the three-dimensional structure of a peat basin based on both direct (push probes) and indirect geophysical (ground-penetrating radar) measurements. We...

  19. Overview of the Sustainable Uses of Peat Soil in Malaysia with Some Relevant Geotechnical Assessments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rashidah Adon

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Peat soil is an important ecosystem that provides a significant contribution to the global climate stability. In Malaysia, peat soils are considered as a soil with little economic benefit, apart from it being used for agricultural activity. The total world coverage of peat soil is about thirty million hectares with Canada and Russia having the largest distribution of peat (Zainorabiddin,2010. More than sixty percent of the world’s tropical peat lands are found in South-East Asia (Lette,2006. Most notable are the large peat land on the islands of Borneo (belonging to Indonesia, Malaysia and Brunei and Sumatra (Indonesia. However, there are also significant occurrences in other parts of Indonesia, Malaysia, Vietnam, Thailand and the Philippines. The main contributory functions and benefits of peat soil are within the engineering disciplines of hydrology, agriculture, social-economics, biodiversity habitats and carbon sequestration. Peat was used in temperate climates (especially in Finland, Ireland, Sweden and UK as a fuel to generate electricity and heat. Therefore peat can be considered as a renewable energy source but this will be very detrimental to the market of genuine renewables. The western coastal lowlands of Malaysia (such as Kukup are mangroves that represent the initiation of peat soil formation. Such areas provide the natural habitat of mangrove forests. It also fixes more carbon from the atmosphere than is released and approximately one-quarter of the carbon stored in land plants and soils. On the other hand, peat is one of the problematic or challenging foundation soil of poor quality due to it’s very high water content, high compressibility and low shear strength. Peat consists of decomposed plant fragments and the unfavourable characteristics of peat soil deposits make them unsuitable for making sustainable infrastructure development for varied engineering projects. This paper therefore gives an overview of the pros and cons

  20. POTENCY OF BIOCONTROL AGENTS ISOLATED FROM COMPOST AND PEAT SOIL OF TROPICAL PEAT SWAMP FOREST IN KALAMPANGAN ZONE, CENTRAL KALIMANTAN

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    Yuliar Yuliar

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Rhizoctonia solani is a soil pathogen that causes diseases in wide range of hosts of agricultural, horticultural and flower crops. Biological control is the most promising way for the diseases management and it is environment friendly too. The objective of this study was to isolate and screen the potency of soil bacteria as biological control from various local compost and peat soil of tropical peat swamp forest in Kalampangan Zone, Central Kalimantan. Forty seven isolates from peat soil and compost were screened for biocontrol agent of Rhizoctonia solani . R. Solani Seven out of thirteen peat soil isolates, and six out of thirty three compost isolates showed antagonistic activity against in Potato Dextrose Agar. The cultivation of the antagonistic isolates in Trypticase Soy Broth (TSB was extracted and analysed by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC column. The HPLC analyzes indicated that the antagonistic isolates produce an antifungal iturin A. Macroscopic observation of isolates colonies showed that form of their colonies were amuboid, myceloid, curled, circular, rhizoid, irregular and filamentous. These achievement indicate peat swamp forest not only offer a potential biocontrol agents of damping off but also provide a new source for production of antibiotics.

  1. Structural and functional changes with depth in microbial communities in a tropical Malaysian peat swamp forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Colin R; Liew, Kong Cheng; Yule, Catherine M

    2009-04-01

    Tropical peat swamp forests are important and endangered ecosystems, although little is known of their microbial diversity and ecology. We used molecular and enzymatic techniques to examine patterns in prokaryotic community structure and overall microbial activity at 0-, 10-, 20-, and 50-cm depths in sediments in a peat swamp forest in Malaysia. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis profiles of amplified 16S ribosomal ribonucleic acid (rRNA) gene fragments showed that different depths harbored different bacterial assemblages and that Archaea appeared to be limited to the deeper samples. Cloning and sequencing of longer 16S rRNA gene fragments suggested reduced microbial diversity in the deeper samples compared to the surface. Bacterial clone libraries were largely dominated by ribotypes affiliated with the Acidobacteria, which accounted for at least 27-54% of the sequences obtained. All of the sequenced representatives from the archaeal clone libraries were Crenarchaeota. Activities of microbial extracellular enzymes involved in carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorus cycling declined appreciably with depth, the only exception being peroxidase. These results show that tropical peat swamp forests are unusual systems with microbial assemblages dominated by members of the Acidobacteria and Crenarchaeota. Microbial communities show clear changes with depth, and most microbial activity is likely confined to populations in the upper few centimeters, the site of new leaf litter fall, rather than the deeper, older, peat layers.

  2. Soil-atmosphere trace gas exchange from tropical oil palm plantations on peat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arn Teh, Yit; Manning, Frances; Zin Zawawi, Norliyana; Hill, Timothy; Chocholek, Melanie; Khoon Kho, Lip

    2015-04-01

    Oil palm is the largest agricultural crop in the tropics, accounting for 13 % of all tropical land cover. Due to its large areal extent, oil palm cultivation may have important implications not only for terrestrial stores of C and N, but may also impact regional and global exchanges of material and energy, including fluxes of trace gases and water vapor. In particular, recent expansion of oil palm into tropical peatlands has raised concerns over enhanced soil C emissions from degradation of peat, and elevated N-gas fluxes linked to N fertilizer application. Here we report our preliminary findings on soil carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O) fluxes from a long-term, multi-scale project investigating the C, N and greenhouse gas (GHG) dynamics of oil palm ecosystems established on peat soils in Sarawak, Malaysian Borneo. Flux chamber measurements indicate that soil CO2, CH4 and N2O fluxes averaged 20.0 ± 16.0 Mg CO2-C ha-1 yr-1, 37.4 ± 29.9 kg CH4-C ha-1 yr-1 and 4.7 ± 4.2 g N2O-N ha-1 yr-1, respectively. Soil CO2 fluxes were on par with other drained tropical peatlands; whereas CH4 fluxes exceeded observations from similar study sites elsewhere. Nitrous oxide fluxes were in a similar range to fluxes from other drained tropical peatlands, but lower than emissions from mineral-soil plantations by up to three orders of magnitude. Fluxes of soil CO2 and N2O were spatially stratified, and contingent upon the distribution of plants, deposited harvest residues, and soil moisture. Soil CO2 fluxes were most heavily influenced by the distribution of palms and their roots. On average, autotrophic (root) respiration accounted for approximately 78 % of total soil CO2 flux, and total soil respiration declined steeply away from palms; e.g. soil CO2 fluxes in the immediate 1 m radius around palms were up to 6 times greater than fluxes in inter-palm spaces due to higher densities of roots. Placement of harvest residues played an important - but secondary

  3. Effect of soil properties and hydrology on Archaeal community composition in three temperate grasslands on peat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Görres, Carolyn-Monika; Conrad, Ralf; Petersen, Søren O

    2013-01-01

    Grasslands established on drained peat soils are regarded as negligible methane (CH4) sources; however, they can still exhibit considerable soil CH4 dynamics. We investigated archaeal community composition in two different fen peat soils and one bog peat soil under permanent grassland in Denmark....... We used terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) fingerprinting and clone libraries to characterize the soils' archaeal community composition to gain a better understanding of relationships between peat properties and land use, respectively, and CH4 dynamics. Samples were taken...... at three different depths and at four different seasons. Archaeal community composition varied considerably between the three peatlands and, to a certain degree, also with peat depth, but seemed to be quite stable at individual sampling depths throughout the year. Archaeal community composition was mainly...

  4. Actinomycetal complexes in drained peat soils of the taiga zone upon pyrogenic succession

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zenova, G. M.; Glushkova, N. A.; Bannikov, M. V.; Shvarov, A. P.; Pozdnyakov, A. I.; Zvyagintsev, D. G.

    2008-04-01

    The number and diversity of actinomycetes in peat soils vary in dependence on the stage of pyrogenic succession. In the cultivated peat soil, the number of actinomycetes after fires decreases by three-four times, mainly at the expense of acidophilic and neutrophilic groups. An increase in the number of mycelial prokaryotes (at the expense of alkaliphilic forms) is seen on the fifth year of functioning of the pyrogenic peat soil. The species diversity of streptomycetes in peat soils also decreases after fires. An increase in the range of streptomycetal species at the expense of neutrophilic and alkaliphilic forms takes place on the fifth year of the pyrogenic succession. Parameters of the actinomycetal complex—the population density, species composition, and ecological features—are the criteria whose changes allow us to judge the state of peat soils in the course of their pyrogenic succession.

  5. Experimental evaluation of drainage filters sealing in peat soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nevzorov Aleksandr Leonidovich

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with research results of the sealing of pores in drainage filters by organic particles. Permeability tests were carried out with the constant gradient 1.5. The water flow through the sample of soil was top-down.The tests were carried out with 2 types of samples: the first part of samples had layers (from up to down 300 mm peat and 2 layers of geotextile, the second part consisted of 250 mm peat, 200 mm fine sand and 2 layers of geotextile. Well decomposed peatsamples were used. Peat had the following characteristics: density is 1,05...1,06 g/cm3, specific density — 1,53...1,56 g/cm3, void ratio — 12,0...12,5. The duration of each test was 15 days. During testing the hydraulic conductivity of samples was decreased by 1.3...1.9.After completing the tests the hydraulic conductivity of sand and geotextile were measured. The content of organic matter in geotextile and fine sand was determined as well. Dry mass of organic matter in the first layer of geotextile in the first type of samples were 1,0…1,3 g per 75 cm2. The organic matter in the second layer of geotextile in the first type of samples and in the first layer of geotextile in the second type wasn’t exposed. Fine sands protected the drainage geotextile as a result of sealing of pore space of sands by organic matter.

  6. Carbon balance of rewetted and drained peat soils used for biomass production: A mesocosm study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karki, Sandhya; Elsgaard, Lars; Kandel, Tanka

    2016-01-01

    Rewetting of drained peatlands has been recommended to reduce CO2 emissions and to restore the carbon sink function of peatlands. Recently, the combination of rewetting and biomass production (paludiculture) has gained interest as a possible land use option in peatlands for obtaining such benefits...... of lower CO2 emissions without losing agricultural land. The present study quantified the carbon balance (CO2, CH4 and harvested biomass C) of rewetted and drained peat soils under intensively managed reed canary grass (RCG) cultivation. Mesocosms were maintained at five different ground water levels (GWL...... closed chamber methods. The average dry biomass yield was significantly lower from rewetted peat soils (12 Mg ha−1) than drained peat soils (15 Mg ha−1). Also, CO2 fluxes of gross primary production (GPP) and ecosystem respiration (ER) from rewetted peat soils were significantly lower than drained peat...

  7. Transport properties and pore-network structure in variably-saturated Sphagnum peat soil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hamamoto, Shoichiro; Dissanayaka, Shiromi Himalika; Kawamoto, K.

    2016-01-01

    indicated enhanced blocking effects of water on gas diffusion in the wetter region. For the peat layers within each soil, there was a linear relation between saturation exponents in the drier region for ka and Dg. The larger saturation exponent of the wetter region for kw in peat than in sand suggests......Gas and water transport in peat soil are of increasing interest because of their potentially large environmental and climatic effects under different types of land use. In this research, the water retention curve (WRC), gas diffusion coefficient (Dg) and air and water permeabilities (ka and kw....... For WRC in the very decomposed peat soil, the 2RAL saturation exponents (n) obtained for both the wetter (nw) and drier regions (nd) were smaller than those for the less decomposed peat. For Dg, the saturation exponent in the wetter region was larger than that in the drier one for all layers, which...

  8. How do peat type, sand addition and soil moisture influence the soil organic matter mineralization in anthropogenically disturbed organic soils?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Säurich, Annelie; Tiemeyer, Bärbel; Don, Axel; Burkart, Stefan

    2017-04-01

    Drained peatlands are hotspots of carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions from agriculture. As a consequence of both drainage induced mineralization and anthropogenic sand mixing, large areas of former peatlands under agricultural use contain soil organic carbon (SOC) at the boundary between mineral and organic soils. Studies on SOC dynamics of such "low carbon organic soils" are rare as the focus of previous studies was mainly either on mineral soils or "true" peat soil. However, the variability of CO2 emissions increases with disturbance and therefore, we have yet to understand the reasons behind the relatively high CO2 emissions of these soils. Peat properties, soil organic matter (SOM) quality and water content are obviously influencing the rate of CO2 emissions, but a systematic evaluation of the hydrological and biogeochemical drivers for mineralization of disturbed peatlands is missing. With this incubation experiment, we aim at assessing the drivers of the high variability of CO2 emissions from strongly anthropogenically disturbed organic soil by systematically comparing strongly degraded peat with and without addition of sand under different moisture conditions and for different peat types. The selection of samples was based on results of a previous incubation study, using disturbed samples from the German Agricultural Soil Inventory. We sampled undisturbed soil columns from topsoil and subsoil (three replicates of each) of ten peatland sites all used as grassland. Peat types comprise six fens (sedge, Phragmites and wood peat) and four bogs (Sphagnum peat). All sites have an intact peat horizon that is permanently below groundwater level and a strongly disturbed topsoil horizon. Three of the fen and two of the bog sites have a topsoil horizon altered by sand-mixing. In addition the soil profile was mapped and samples for the determination of soil hydraulic properties were collected. All 64 soil columns (including four additional reference samples) will be installed

  9. Effect of Logging Operation on Soil Carbon Storage of a Tropical Peat Swamp Forest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anton E. Satrio

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Since heavy machinery are used in the logging operation activity for extracting the logs on sensitive forest site with peat soil, environment destruction should be the other concern during its processes especially on its important function as soil carbon storage. The objective of this study was to determine whether logging operation affect soil carbon storage of a tropical peat swamp forest. Approach: Soil sampling was conducted before and after logging operation in a 0.3 ha plot to a depth of 15 cm. The soil samples were analyzed for acidity, organic matter content, total carbon, total nitrogen and total phosphorus. The humic acid extraction was also done and soil carbon storage values were obtained by calculation. Paired t-test was used to compare variables under the two treatments (before and after logging and correlation analysis was used to correlate variables such as soil pH, soil organic matter, total carbon, total nitrogen, total phosphorus, C/N ratio, C/P ratio, humic acid yield, unstable carbon and stable carbon. Results: The availability of unstable carbon and stable carbon controlled by soil acidity on undisturbed peat swamp forest as a result, the accumulation of unstable carbon as well as stable carbon occurred even if the soil pH declines and vice versa. However, stable carbon associated well with soil acidity. It was found that the C/P ratio positively correlated with humic acid and stable carbon of both before and after logging conditions. Nevertheless, that association was prominent on logged peat swamp forest. An indication that even though this peat swamp forest had been logged, humification was strongly maintained. However, the similarity of stable carbon of the logged peat swamp forest with stable carbon of undisturbed peat swamp forest indicate an ineffectiveness humification of logged peat swamp forest. Conclusion: Logging operation on sensitive forest with peat soil using heavy machinery increased the

  10. Effect of soil properties and hydrology on archaeal community composition in three temperate grasslands on peat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Görres, Carolyn-Monika; Conrad, Ralf; Petersen, Søren O

    2013-08-01

    Grasslands established on drained peat soils are regarded as negligible methane (CH4 ) sources; however, they can still exhibit considerable soil CH4 dynamics. We investigated archaeal community composition in two different fen peat soils and one bog peat soil under permanent grassland in Denmark. We used terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) fingerprinting and clone libraries to characterize the soils' archaeal community composition to gain a better understanding of relationships between peat properties and land use, respectively, and CH4 dynamics. Samples were taken at three different depths and at four different seasons. Archaeal community composition varied considerably between the three peatlands and, to a certain degree, also with peat depth, but seemed to be quite stable at individual sampling depths throughout the year. Archaeal community composition was mainly linked to soil pH. No methanogens were detected at one fen site with soil pH ranging from 3.2 to 4.4. The methanogenic community of the bog (soil pH 3.9-4.6) was dominated by hydrogenotrophs, whereas the second fen site (soil pH 5.0-5.3) comprised both aceticlastic and hydrogenotrophic methanogens. Overall, there seemed to be a significant coupling between peat type and archaeal community composition, with local hydrology modifying the strength of this coupling.

  11. Agricultural management impact on physical and chemical functions of European peat soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piayda, Arndt; Tiemeyer, Bärbel; Dettmann, Ullrich; Bechtold, Michel; Buschmann, Christoph

    2017-04-01

    Peat soils offer numerous functions from the global to the local scale: they constitute the biggest terrestrial carbon storage on the globe, form important nutrient filters for catchments and provide hydrological buffer capacities for local ecosystems. Peat soils represent a large share of soils suitable for agriculture in temperate and boreal Europe, pressurized by increasing demands for production. Cultivated peat soils, however, show extreme mineralization rates of the organic substance and turn into hotspots for green house gas emissions, are highly vulnerable to land surface subsidence, soil and water quality deterioration and thus crop failure. The aim of this study is to analyse the impact of past agricultural management on soil physical and chemical functions of peat soils in six European countries. We conducted standardized soil mapping, soil physical/chemical analysis, ground water table monitoring and farm business surveys across 7 to 10 sites in Germany, The Netherlands, Denmark, Estonia, Finland and Sweden. The results show a strong impact of past agricultural management on peat soil functions across Europe. Peat soil under intensive arable land use consistently offer lowest bearing capacities in the upper 10 cm compared to extensive and intensive grassland use, which is a major limiting factor for successful agricultural practice on peat soils. The difference can be explained by root mat stabilization solely, since soil compaction in the upper 25cm is highest under arable land use. A strong decrease of available water capacity and saturated hydraulic conductivity is consequently observed under arable land use, further intensifying hydrological problems like ponding, drought stress and reductions of hydrological buffer capacities frequently present on cultivated peat soils. Soil carbon stocks clearly decrease with increasing land use intensity, showing highest carbon stocks on extensive grassland. This is supported by the degree of decomposition, which

  12. Degradation of Malaysian peatlands decreases levels of phenolics in soil and in leaves of Macaranga pruinosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CATHERINE MARY YULE

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Indo-Malaysian tropical peat swamp forests (PSF sequester enormous stores of carbon in the form of phenolic compounds, particularly lignin as well as tannins. These phenolic compounds are crucial for ecosystem functioning in PSF through their inter-related roles in peat formation and plant defenses. Disturbance of PSF causes destruction of the peat substrate, but the specific impact of disturbance on phenolic compounds in peat and its associated vegetation has not previously been examined. A scale was developed to score peatland degradation based on the three major human impacts that affect tropical PSF – logging, drainage and fire. The objectives of this study were to compare the amount of phenolic compounds in Macaranga pruinosa, a common PSF tree, and in the peat substrate along a gradient of peatland degradation from pristine peat swamp forest to cleared, drained and burnt peatlands. We examined phenolic compounds in M. pruinosa and in peat and found that levels of total phenolic compounds and total tannins decrease in the leaves of M.pruinosa and also in the surface peat layers with an increase in peatland degradation. We conclude that waterlogged conditions preserve the concentration of phenolic compounds in peat, and that even PSF that has been previously logged but which has recovered a full canopy cover will have high levels of total phenolic content (TPC in peat. High levels of TPC in peat and in the flora are vital for the inhibition of decomposition of organic matter and this is crucial for the accretion of peat and the sequestration of carbon. Thus regional PSF flourish despite the phenolic rich, toxic, waterlogged, nutrient poor, conditions, and reversal of such conditions is a sign of degradation.

  13. Degradation of Malaysian peatlands decreases levels of phenolics in soil and in leaves of Macaranga pruinosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yule, Catherine; Lim, Yau; Lim, Tse

    2016-04-01

    Indo-Malaysian tropical peat swamp forests (PSF) sequester enormous stores of carbon in the form of phenolic compounds, particularly lignin as well as tannins. These phenolic compounds are crucial for ecosystem functioning in PSF through their inter-related roles in peat formation and plant defenses. Disturbance of PSF causes destruction of the peat substrate, but the specific impact of disturbance on phenolic compounds in peat and its associated vegetation has not previously been examined. A scale was developed to score peatland degradation based on the three major human impacts that affect tropical PSF - logging, drainage and fire. The objectives of this study were to compare the amount of phenolic compounds in Macaranga pruinosa, a common PSF tree, and in the peat substrate along a gradient of peatland degradation from pristine peat swamp forest to cleared, drained and burnt peatlands. We examined phenolic compounds in M. pruinosa and in peat and found that levels of total phenolic compounds and total tannins decrease in the leaves of M.pruinosa and also in the surface peat layers with an increase in peatland degradation. We conclude that waterlogged conditions preserve the concentration of phenolic compounds in peat, and that even PSF that has been previously logged but which has recovered a full canopy cover will have high levels of total phenolic content (TPC) in peat. High levels of TPC in peat and in the flora are vital for the inhibition of decomposition of organic matter and this is crucial for the accretion of peat and the sequestration of carbon. Thus regional PSF flourish despite the phenolic rich, toxic, waterlogged, nutrient poor, conditions, and reversal of such conditions is a sign of degradation.

  14. Spatial variation of peat soil properties in the oil-producing region of northeastern Sakhalin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipatov, D. N.; Shcheglov, A. I.; Manakhov, D. V.; Zavgorodnyaya, Yu. A.; Rozanova, M. S.; Brekhov, P. T.

    2017-07-01

    Morphology and properties of medium-deep oligotrophic peat, oligotrophic peat gley, pyrogenic oligotrophic peat gley, and peat gley soils on subshrub-cotton grass-sphagnum bogs and in swampy larch forests of northeastern Sakhalin have been studied. Variation in the thickness and reserves of litters in the studied bog and forest biogeocenoses has been analyzed. The profile distribution and spatial variability of moisture, density, ash, and pHKCl in separate groups of peat soils have been described. The content and spatial variability of petroleum hydrocarbons have been considered in relation to the accumulation of natural bitumoids by peat soils and the technogenic pressing in the oil-producing region. Variation of each parameter at different distances (10, 50, and 1000 m) has been estimated using a hierarchical sampling scheme. The spatial conjugation of soil parameters has been studied by factor analysis using the principal components method and Spearman correlation coefficients. Regression equations have been proposed to describe relationships of ash content with soil density and content of petroleum hydrocarbons in peat horizons.

  15. Estimating methane gas production in peat soils of the Florida Everglades using hydrogeophysical methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, William; Comas, Xavier

    2016-04-01

    The spatial and temporal variability in production and release of greenhouse gases (such as methane) in peat soils remains uncertain, particularly for low-latitude peatlands like the Everglades. Ground penetrating radar (GPR) is a hydrogeophysical tool that has been successfully used in the last decade to noninvasively investigate carbon dynamics in peat soils; however, application in subtropical systems is almost non-existent. This study is based on four field sites in the Florida Everglades, where changes in gas content within the soil are monitored using time-lapse GPR measurements and gas releases are monitored using gas traps. A weekly methane gas production rate is estimated using a mass balance approach, considering gas content estimated from GPR, gas release from gas traps and incorporating rates of diffusion, and methanotrophic consumption from previous studies. Resulting production rates range between 0.02 and 0.47 g CH4 m-2 d-1, falling within the range reported in literature. This study shows the potential of combining GPR with gas traps to monitor gas dynamics in peat soils of the Everglades and estimate methane gas production. We also show the enhanced ability of certain peat soils to store gas when compared to others, suggesting that physical properties control biogenic gas storage in the Everglades peat soils. Better understanding biogenic methane gas dynamics in peat soils has implications regarding the role of wetlands in the global carbon cycle, particularly under a climate change scenario.

  16. Effects of copper and aluminum on the adsorption of sulfathiazole and tylosin on peat and soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pei, Zhiguo; Yang, Shuang; Li, Lingyun; Li, Chunmei; Zhang, Shuzhen; Shan, Xiao-quan; Wen, Bei; Guo, Baoyuan

    2014-01-01

    Effects of copper (Cu) and aluminum (Al) on the adsorption of sulfathiazole (STZ) and tylosin (T) to peat and soil were investigated using a batch equilibration method. Results show that Cu suppressed STZ adsorption onto peat and soil at pH  5.0 due to the formation of STZ-Cu complexes and/or Cu bridge. In contrast, Al only decreased STZ adsorption at pH 6.0. As for T, both Cu and Al suppressed its adsorption over the entire pH range owing to three reasons: 1) electrostatic competition between Cu/Al and T(+); 2) Cu/Al adsorption made the soil and peat surface less negatively charged, which was unfavorable for T(+) adsorption; 3) the shrunken pore size of peat and soil retarded the diffusion of large-sized T into these pores. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Change in peat coverage in Danish cultivated soils during the past 35 years

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greve, Mogens Humlekrog; Christensen, Ole Fredslund; Greve, Mette Balslev

    2014-01-01

    samples were used. These databases contain partly categorical information on parent material (organic [peat, gytje] and mineral [sand, silt and clay]) and partly continuous data (soil organic carbon, in %) reclassified into organic and mineral soils (using 12% soil organic carbon as a cutoff value.......35. Results revealed there has been a total areal coverage loss of 35%(37,786 ha) of the Danish organic cultivated wetlands during a period of 35 years (map 1975 had 107,962-ha coverage of peat). The peat depletion is related to peat mining and agricultural drainage/tillage activities, rather than natural......Mapping the spatial and temporal changes of peatland in farming systems is crucial to the study of soil quality and productivity and the modeling of the global carbon cycle (in relation to climate change). This study compiles a contemporary map (2010) of peatland coverage (according to Kyoto...

  18. Dynamics of organic carbon stock of Estonian arable and grassland peat soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauer, Karin; Tammik, Kerttu; Penu, Priit

    2016-04-01

    Peat soils represent globally a major reserve of soil organic carbon (SOC). Estimation of changes in SOC stocks is important for understanding soil carbon sequestration and dynamics of greenhouse gas emissions. The aim of this study was to estimate the SOC stock of Estonian agricultural peat soils and SOC stock change depending on land use type (arable land and long-term grasslands (over 5 years)). The soils were classified as Histosols according to WRB classification. Generally the arable land was used for growing cereals, oilseed rape, legumes and used as ley in crop rotation. The main technique of soil cultivation was ploughing. During 2002-2015 the soil samples of 0-20 cm soil layer (one average soil sample per 1-5 ha) were collected. The SOC content was measured by NIRS method. The SOC stock was calculated by assuming that soil mean bulk density is 0.3 g cm-3. The SOC stock change in arable land was estimated during 3-13 years (N=91) and in grassland 4-13 year (N=163). The average SOC content of peat soils varied from 150.6 to 549.0 mg g-1. The initial SOC stock of arable land was 271.3 t ha-1 and of grassland 269.3 t ha-1. The SOC stock declined in arable peat soils faster (-2.57 t ha-1 y-1) compared to the changes in grassland peat soils (-0.67 t ha-1 y-1). According to the length of the study period the SOC stock change per year varied from -5.14 to 6.64 t ha-1 y-1 in grasslands and from -14.78 to 0.83 t ha-1 y-1 in arable land, although there was no clear relationship between the SOC stock change and the length of the study period. More detailed information about the properties of agricultural land and land use history is needed to analyse the causes of the SOC stock changes in agricultural peat soils. However, from the current research we can conclude that the SOC stock of arable and grassland peat soils is declining during the cultivation. These decreases are important to specify when considering the role of peat soils in atmospheric greenhouse gas

  19. Effectiveness of lime and peat applications on cadmium availability in a paddy soil under various moisture regimes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yanhui; Xie, Tuanhui; Liang, Qiaofeng; Liu, Mengjiao; Zhao, Mingliu; Wang, Mingkuang; Wang, Guo

    2016-04-01

    In paddy soils, amendments and moisture play important role in the immobilization of cadmium (Cd). The effects of applying lime, peat, and a combination of both on soil Eh, pH, and Cd availability in contaminated soils were investigated under wetted (80 ± 5 % of water holding capacity) and flooded (completely submerged) conditions. In wetted soils, there was little change in Eh, compared to flooded soils where Eh reduced rapidly. Amendments of lime only or in a mixture with peat increased soil pH to different degrees, depending on the lime application rate. However, peat addition only slightly affected soil pH. The decreased Cd availability in flooded soils was related to submergence duration and was significantly lower than that in wetted soils after 14 days. Liming wetted and flooded soils decreased exchangeable Cd and increased carbonates or Fe-Mn oxides bound fractions, while peat addition transformed Cd from carbonates to organic matter bound fractions. The combined application of peat and lime generally showed better inhibitory effects on the availability of Cd than separately application of lime or peat. Higher application rates of lime, peat, or their mixture were more effective at reducing Cd contamination in flooded soil. This indicates that application of peat and lime mixture under flooded conditions was most effective for in situ remediation of Cd-contaminated soils. Further studies are required to assess the long-term effectiveness of the peat and lime mixture on Cd availability in paddy soils.

  20. Saprophytic and Potentially Pathogenic Fusarium Species from Peat Soil in Perak and Pahang

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karim, Nurul Farah Abdul; Mohd, Masratulhawa; Nor, Nik Mohd Izham Mohd; Zakaria, Latiffah

    2016-01-01

    Isolates of Fusarium were discovered in peat soil samples collected from peat swamp forest, waterlogged peat soil, and peat soil from oil palm plantations. Morphological characteristics were used to tentatively identify the isolates, and species confirmation was based on the sequence of translation elongation factor-1α (TEF-1α) and phylogenetic analysis. Based on the closest match of Basic Local Alignment Search Tool (BLAST) searches against the GenBank and Fusarium-ID databases, five Fusarium species were identified, namely F. oxysporum (60%), F. solani (23%), F. proliferatum (14%), F. semitectum (1%), and F. verticillioides (1%). From a neighbour-joining tree of combined TEF-1α and β-tubulin sequences, isolates from the same species were clustered in the same clade, though intraspecies variations were observed from the phylogenetic analysis. The Fusarium species isolated in the present study are soil inhabitants and are widely distributed worldwide. These species can act as saprophytes and decomposers as well as plant pathogens. The presence of Fusarium species in peat soils suggested that peat soils could be a reservoir of plant pathogens, as well-known plant pathogenic species such F. oxysporum, F. solani, F. proliferatum, and F. verticillioides were identified. The results of the present study provide knowledge on the survival and distribution of Fusarium species. PMID:27019679

  1. Peat soils as a source of lead contamination to upland fluvial systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothwell, James J; Evans, Martin G; Daniels, Stephen M; Allott, Timothy E H

    2008-06-01

    Upland peat soils are generally regarded as effective sinks of atmospherically deposited lead. However, the physical process of erosion has the potential to transform peat soils from sinks to sources of lead contamination. Lead input and fluvial lead outputs (dissolved+particulate) were estimated for a contaminated and severely eroding peatland catchment in the southern Pennines, UK. Lead input to the catchment is 30.0+/-6.0gha(-1)a(-1) and the output from the catchment is 317+/-22.4gha(-1)a(-1). Suspended particulate matter accounts for 85% of lead export. Contaminated peat soils of the catchment are a significant source of lead to the fluvial system. This study has demonstrated strong coupling between the physical process of erosion and the mobilization of lead into the fluvial system. The process of peat erosion should therefore be considered when estimating lead outputs from peatland catchments, especially in the context of climate change.

  2. Polyphenols as enzyme inhibitors in different degraded peat soils: Implication for microbial metabolism in rewetted peatlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zak, Dominik; Roth, Cyril; Gelbrecht, Jörg; Fenner, Nathalie; Reuter, Hendrik

    2015-04-01

    Recently, more than 30,000 ha of drained minerotrophic peatlands (= fens) in NE Germany were rewetted to restore their ecological functions. Due to an extended drainage history, a re-establishment of their original state is not expected in the short-term. Elevated concentrations of dissolved organic carbon, ammonium and phosphate have been measured in the soil porewater of the upper degraded peat layers of rewetted fens at levels of one to three orders higher than the values in pristine systems; an indicator of increased microbial activity in the upper degraded soil layers. On the other hand there is evidence that the substrate availability within the degraded peat layer is lowered since the organic matter has formerly been subject to intense decomposition over the decades of drainage and intense agricultural use of the areas. Previously however, it was suggested that inhibition of hydrolytic enzymes by polyphenolic substances is suspended during aeration of peat soils mainly due to the decomposition of the inhibiting polyphenols by oxidising enzymes such as phenol oxidase. Accordingly we hypothesised a lack of enzyme inhibiting polyphenols in degraded peat soils of rewetted fens compared to less decomposed peat of more natural fens. We collected both peat samples at the soil surface (0-20 cm) and fresh roots of dominating vascular plants and mosses (as peat parent material) from five formerly drained rewetted sites and five more natural sites of NE Germany and NW Poland. Less decomposed peat and living roots were used to obtain an internal standard for polyphenol analysis and to run enzyme inhibition tests. For all samples we determined the total phenolic contents and in addition we distinguished between the contents of hydrolysable and condensed tannic substances. From a methodical perspective the advantage of internal standards compared to the commercially available standards cyanidin chloride and tannic acid became apparent. Quantification with cyanidin or

  3. Immobilization of Lead from Pb-Contaminated Soil Amended with Peat Moss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seul-Ji Lee

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Immobilization of lead (Pb using soil amendments can reduce Pb toxicity and bioavailability in soil. This study evaluated Pb immobilization in a Pb-contaminated soil by using peat moss through various tests. The Pb-contaminated soil (2000 mg Pb·kg−1 was amended with 1%, 5%, and 10% of peat moss to immobilize Pb in the soil. The immobilization properties of Pb in the contaminated soil were evaluated by a column leaching experiment, a microcosm test, and a batch incubation test. Peat moss significantly reduced the Pb leaching in all of the experiments and more effectively reduced mobility and toxicity of Pb in the column leaching and microcosm tests than bioavailability in the batch incubation test. The immobilized lead from the soils amended with 1%, 5%, and 10% of peat moss was 37.9%, 87.1%, and 95.4% from the column leaching test, 18.5%, 90.9%, and 96.4% from the microcosm test, and 2.0%, 36.9%, and 57.9% from the NH4NO3 extraction method, respectively, indicating that peat moss can be effectively used for the remediation of Pb-contaminated soil.

  4. Nitrogen loss from grassland on peat soils through nitrous oxide production.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koops, J.G.; Beusichem, van M.L.; Oenema, O.

    1997-01-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) in soils is produced through nitrification and denitrification. The N2O produced is considered as a nitrogen (N) loss because it will most likely escape from the soil to the atmosphere as N2O or N2. Aim of the study was to quantify N2O production in grassland on peat soils in rel

  5. Soil quality assessment for peat-mineral mix cover soil used in oil sands reclamation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojekanmi, A A; Chang, S X

    2014-09-01

    A soil quality (SQ) assessment and rating framework that is quantitative, iterative, and adaptable, with justifiable weighting for quality scores, is required for evaluating site-specific SQ at land reclamation sites. Such a framework needs to identify the minimum dataset that reflects the current knowledge regarding relationships between SQ indicators and relevant measures of ecosystem performance. Our objective was to develop nonlinear scoring functions for assessing the impact on SQ of peat-mineral mix (PMM) used as a cover soil at land reclamation sites. Soil functional indicators affected by PMM were extracted from existing databases and correlated with soil organic carbon (SOC). Based on defined objectives for SQ assessment, indicators with significant correlation ( soil nitrogen, and cation exchange capacity of PMM using SOC as input parameter. Application of the SQFs to an independent dataset produced ratings with mean differences similar to the treatment effects of mixing three levels of peat and mineral soil. These results show that derived ratings and weighing factors using SOC reflect the relationship between PMM treatment and other SQ indicators. Applying the developed SQFs to a long-term soil monitoring dataset shows that an increase or decrease in SOC from 10 to 20 g kg causes a significant change in SQ. This identifies the need for further nutrient and moisture management of PMM to support long-term SQ development in land reclamation.

  6. An easily installable groundwater lysimeter to determine waterbalance components and hydraulic properties of peat soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Schwaerzel

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available A simple method for the installation of groundwater lysimeters in peat soils was developed which reduces both time and financial effort significantly. The method was applied on several sites in the Rhinluch, a fen peat land 60 km northwest of Berlin, Germany. Over a two-year period, upward capillary flow and evapotranspiration rates under grassland with different groundwater levels were measured. The installation of tensiometers and TDR probes additionally allowed the in situ determination of the soil hydraulic properties (water retention and unsaturated hydraulic conductivity. The results of the measurements of the unsaturated hydraulic conductivity demonstrate that more than one single method has to be applied if the whole range of the conductivity function from saturation to highly unsaturated is to be covered. Measuring the unsaturated conductivity can be done only in the lab for an adequately wide range of soil moisture conditions. Keywords: peat soils, soil hydraulic properties, evapotranspiration, capillary flow, root distribution, unsaturated zone

  7. Resilient modulus characteristics of soil subgrade with geopolymer additive in peat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zain, Nasuhi; Hadiwardoyo, Sigit Pranowo; Rahayu, Wiwik

    2017-06-01

    Resilient modulus characteristics of peat soil are generally very low with high potential of deformation and low bearing capacity. The efforts to improve the peat subgrade resilient modulus characteristics is required, one among them is by adding the geopolymer additive. Geopolymer was made as an alternative to replace portland cement binder in the concrete mix in order to promote environmentally friendly, low shrinkage value, low creep value, and fire resistant material. The use of geopolymer to improve the mechanical properties of peat as a road construction subgrade, hence it becomes important to identify the effect of geopolymer addition on the resilient modulus characteristics of peat soil. This study investigated the addition of 0% - 20% geopolymer content on peat soil derived from Ogan Komering Ilir, South Sumatera Province. Resilient modulus measurement was performed by using cyclic triaxial test to determine the resilience modulus model as a function of deviator stresses and radial stresses. The test results showed that an increase in radial stresses did not necessarily lead to an increase in modulus resilient, and on the contrary, an increase in deviator stresses led to a decrease in modulus resilient. The addition of geopolymer in peat soil provided an insignificant effect on the increase of resilient modulus value.

  8. Geotechnical properties of peat soil stabilised with shredded waste tyre chips

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.A. Rahgozar

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available To accommodate major civil engineering projects in or in the vicinity of peatlands, it is essential to stabilise peat deposits. On the other hand, the accumulation of waste tyres in recent decades has caused environmental problems around the world. An effective remedy for both issues is to use scrap tyre material to stabilise problematic peat soils. This article reports an experimental investigation of the effects of adding shredded tyre chips on the stability and bearing capacity of peat soil. Peat soil samples from the Chaghakhor Wetland (Chaharmahal and Bakhtiari Province, Iran were mixed with sand at a constant dosage of 400 kg m-3 and different percentages (0 %, 5 %, 10 %, 15 % and 20 % by weight of shredded tyre chips. The unconfined compressive strength, effective cohesion, angle of internal friction and coefficient of permeability were measured for all of these mixtures. The results showed that adding shredded tyre chips significantly improved the geotechnical properties of the peat soil. The mixture with 10 % shredded tyre chips showed the highest unconfined compressive strength; the one with 15 % tyre chips exhibited the highest ductility; and adding 20 % shredded tyre chips provided the highest values for angle of internal friction, effective cohesion and coefficient of permeability. Scanning Electron Micrographs (SEM showed that the pore spaces in the stabilised peat were mostly filled with sand.

  9. Evaluation on the decomposability of tropical forest peat soils after conversion to an oil palm plantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangok, Faustina E; Maie, Nagamitsu; Melling, Lulie; Watanabe, Akira

    2017-06-01

    To understand the variations in the decomposability of tropical peat soil following deforestation for an oil palm plantation, a field incubation experiment was conducted in Sarawak, Malaysia. Peat soils collected from three types of primary forest, namely Mixed Peat Swamp (MPS; Gonystylus-Dactylocladus-Neoscrotechinia association), Alan Batu (ABt; Shorea albida-Gonstylus-Strenonurus association), and Alan Bunga (ABg; Shorea albida association), were packed in polyvinyl chloride pipes and installed in an oil palm plantation. Carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4) fluxes from soil were monthly measured for 3years. Environmental variables including soil temperature, soil moisture content, and groundwater table were also monitored. The pH, loss on ignition, and total carbon (C) content were similar among the three soils, while total N content was larger in the MPS than in the ABg soils. Based on (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, C composition of the MPS and ABg soils was characterized by the largest proportion of C present as alkyl C and O-alkyl C, respectively. The C composition of the ABt soil was intermediate between the MPS and ABg soils. The CO2 fluxes from the three soils ranged from 78 to 625mgCm(-2)h(-1) with a negative correlation to groundwater level. The CH4 fluxes ranged from -67 to 653μgCm(-2)h(-1). Both total CO2 and CH4 fluxes were larger in the order ABg>ABt>MPS (P<0.05). Annual rate of peat decomposition as was estimated from cumulative C loss differed up to 2 times, and the rate constant in exponential decay model was 0.033y(-1) for the MPS soil and 0.066y(-1) for the ABg soil. The field incubation results of the three forest peat soils seem to reflect the difference in the labile organic matter content, represented by polysaccharides.

  10. Effect of Skidding Operations on Soil Carbon Storage of a Tropical Peat Swamp Forest

    OpenAIRE

    Anton E. Satrio; Seca Gandaseca; Osumanu H. Ahmed; Nik M.A. Majid

    2009-01-01

    Problem statement: There is still lack of a study that compares the soil carbon storage of kuda-kuda skidding system and excavator skidding system in tropical peat swamp forests. The objective of this study was to determine whether skidding operations affects soil carbon storage of a tropical peat swamp forest. Approach: Soil sampling was conducted on two different plots (0.3 ha each plot) to a depth of 15 cm under different skidding systems at Sibu, Sarawak, Malaysia. Plots were in the same ...

  11. Methane and CO2 fluxes from peat soil, palm stems and field drains in two oil palm plantations in Sarawak, Borneo, on different tropical peat soil types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manning, Frances; Lip Khoon, Kho; Hill, Tim; Arn Teh, Yit

    2017-04-01

    Oil palm plantations have been expanding rapidly on tropical peat soils in the last 20 years, with 50 % of SE Asian peatlands now managed as industrial or small-holder plantations, up from 11% in 1990. Tropical peat soils are an important carbon (C) store, containing an estimated 17 % of total peatland C. There are large uncertainties as to the soil C dynamics in oil palm plantations on peat due to a shortage of available data. It is therefore essential to understand the soil C cycle in order to promote effective management strategies that optimise yields, whilst maintaining the high C storage capacity of the soil. Here we present CO2 and CH4 fluxes from two oil palm plantations in Sarawak, Malaysia on peat soils. Data were collected from different surface microforms within each plantation that experienced different surface management practices. These included the area next to the palm, in bare soil harvest paths, beneath frond piles, underneath cover crops, from the surface of drains, and from palm stems. Data were collected continuously over one year and analysed with different environmental variables, including soil temperature, WTD, O2, soil moisture and weather data in order to best determine the constraints on the dataset. Total soil respiration (Rtot) varied between 0.09 and 1.59 g C m-2 hr-1. The largest fluxes (0.59 - 1.59 g C m-2 hr-1) were measured next to the palms. Larger CO2 fluxes were observed beneath the cover crops than in the bare soil. This trend was attributed to priming effects from the input of fresh plant litter and exudates. Peat soil type was shown to have significantly different fluxes. The different plantations also had different environmental drivers best explaining the variation in Rtot - with soil moisture being the most significant variable on Sabaju series soil and soil temperature being the most significant environmental variable in the plantation with the Teraja series soil. Rtot was shown to reduce significantly with increasing

  12. Efficient resource management in dairy farming on peat and heavy clay soils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, de P.H.B.; Keulen, van H.; Lantinga, E.A.; Udo, H.M.J.

    2001-01-01

    Peat and heavy clay soils in the Netherlands are mainly used for permanent grassland to support dairy farming. As a result of intensification in dairy farming during the last decades, environmental quality is threatened by high emissions of N and P. Increased drainage of the wet soils has induced

  13. GIS-based examination of peats and soils in Surfers Paradise, Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al-Ani Haider

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The subsoil conditions of Surfers Paradise in Southeast Queensland of Australia have been examined in terms of soil stiffness by using geographic information system (GIS. Peat is a highly organic and compressible material. Surfers Paradise (as a study area has problematic peat layer due to its high water content, high compressibility, and low shear strength. This layer has various thicknesses at different locations ranging between R.L. . 10 to R.L. -19.6 m. Buildings in Surfers Paradise are using piled foundations to avoid the high compressibility and low shear strength peat layer. Spatial Analyst extension in the GIS ArcMap10 has been utilised to develop zonation maps for different depths in the study area. Each depth has been interpolated as a surface to create Standard Penetration Test SPT-N value GIS-based zonation maps for each depth. In addition, 8 interpolation techniques have been examined to evaluate which technique gives better representation for the Standard Penetration Test (SPT data. Inverse Distance weighing (IDW method in Spatial Analyst extension gives better representation for the utilised data with certain parameters. Two different cross sections have been performed in the core of the study area to determine the extent and the depth of the peat layer underneath already erected buildings. Physical and engineering properties of the Surfers Paradise peat have been obtained and showed that this peat falls within the category of tropical peat.

  14. Carbon leaching from tropical peat soils and consequences for carbon balances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rixen, Tim; Baum, Antje; Wit, Francisca; Samiaji, Joko

    2016-07-01

    Drainage and deforestation turned Southeast (SE) Asian peat soils into a globally important CO2 source, because both processes accelerate peat decomposition. Carbon losses through soil leaching have so far not been quantified and the underlying processes have hardly been studied. In this study, we use results derived from nine expeditions to six Sumatran rivers and a mixing model to determine leaching processes in tropical peat soils, which are heavily disturbed by drainage and deforestation. Here we show that a reduced evapotranspiration and the resulting increased freshwater discharge in addition to the supply of labile leaf litter produced by re-growing secondary forests increase leaching of carbon by ~200%. Enhanced freshwater fluxes and leaching of labile leaf litter from secondary vegetation appear to contribute 38% and 62% to the total increase, respectively. Decomposition of leached labile DOC can lead to hypoxic conditions in rivers draining disturbed peatlands. Leaching of the more refractory DOC from peat is an irrecoverable loss of soil that threatens the stability of peat-fringed coasts in SE Asia.

  15. Design and Performance of EPS Footing for Lightweight Farm Structure on Peat Soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Abdullah

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this research project was to find a potential replacement for the conventional pile foundation principally for peat soil. It is fundamentally meant for lightweight and impermanent agricultural farm structures. Preceding the design and development of the foundation the physical characteristics of the in-situ peat such as; peat depth, soil consolidation, soil compressibility, water table, liquid limit, soil moisture content, soil bulk density, loss on ignition, soil bearing capacity and soil shear strength were verified. Two types of foundation designs i.e. single shell and pad foundations were assessed. Both utilized Expanded Polystyrene (EPS as the footing material. They were conceptually designed as floating foundation employing the weight compensation technique. The soil bearing capacity, soil shear strength, self-load and the lateral wind-load are factors taken into consideration in the footing design. The total design load was considered at 100 kg per foundation. The water table fluctuation, soil surface subsidence, the foundation vertical movement and its stability were constantly monitored. After a scheduled period, the foundations continue to stay intact.

  16. Quantitative-qualitative structures of the soil fungi communities in three profiles of peat-muck soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zofia Tyszkiewicz

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The mycological investigations were performed on three soil profiles, which represent the slightly, moderately and strongly mucked peat-muck soils located in the Biebrza Valley. The aim of the study was the comparison of quantitative-qualitative structures of the fungi communities in the chosen peat-muck soils. The results indicate that soil fungi communities from compared soils reveal only small degree of similarity. The variety in quantitative and in qualitative structure increase with increasing mucking of organic deposits. These results may suggest that decreasing moisture of habitat stimulates the development of soil fungi. The most numerous soil fungi communities were observed in the turf layer and subturf layer of all soils.

  17. Reuse of Ablution Water to Improve Peat Soil Characteristics for Ornamental Landscape Plants Cultivation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radin Mohamed Radin Maya Saphira

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study aimed to reuse of ablution water for washing peat soil in order to reduce the concentrations of heavy metals in these soils which might effect negatively on the plant growth. The washing process design was similar to horizontal subsurface flow constructed wetlands (HSSFCW consist of layers of peat and sand soil and surrounded by gravel on both sides. Strelitzia sp. was used to detect the presence negative effect of the washing process on the morphological characteristics of the plants. The physical and chemical characteristics of ablution water was examined before and after the washing process by using Inductively Couple Plasma- Mass Spectrometer (ICP-MS Atomic Absorption Spectrometer (AAS. The characteristics of peat soil before and after the washing process were examined by using X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF. The results revealed that the percentage of FeO3in peat soil reduced from 45.80 to 1.01%. The percentage of SiO2 in sand soil dropped from 87.7 to 67.10%. Parameters of ablution water resulted from the washing process which including Biological Oxygen Demand (BOD5 and heavy metals have increased but still within the standard limits for the disposal of ablution water into the environment. No atrophy was observed in Strelitzia sp. leaves, indicating the ability of plant to grow normally. It can be concluded that the utilization of ablution water in the washing of peat soil has improve the characteristics of the soil without effect on their organic constitutes.

  18. Contrasting denitrifier communities relate to contrasting N2O emission patterns from acidic peat soils in arctic tundra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Katharina; Biasi, Christina; Horn, Marcus A

    2012-01-01

    Cryoturbated peat circles (that is, bare surface soil mixed by frost action; pH 3–4) in the Russian discontinuous permafrost tundra are nitrate-rich ‘hotspots' of nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions in arctic ecosystems, whereas adjacent unturbated peat areas are not. N2O was produced and subsequently consumed at pH 4 in unsupplemented anoxic microcosms with cryoturbated but not in those with unturbated peat soil. Nitrate, nitrite and acetylene stimulated net N2O production of both soils in anoxic microcosms, indicating denitrification as the source of N2O. Up to 500 and 10 μ nitrate stimulated denitrification in cryoturbated and unturbated peat soils, respectively. Apparent maximal reaction velocities of nitrite-dependent denitrification were 28 and 18 nmol N2O gDW−1 h−1, for cryoturbated and unturbated peat soils, respectively. Barcoded amplicon pyrosequencing of narG, nirK/nirS and nosZ (encoding nitrate, nitrite and N2O reductases, respectively) yielded ≈49 000 quality-filtered sequences with an average sequence length of 444 bp. Up to 19 species-level operational taxonomic units were detected per soil and gene, many of which were distantly related to cultured denitrifiers or environmental sequences. Denitrification-associated gene diversity in cryoturbated and in unturbated peat soils differed. Quantitative PCR (inhibition-corrected per DNA extract) revealed higher copy numbers of narG in cryoturbated than in unturbated peat soil. Copy numbers of nirS were up to 1000 × higher than those of nirK in both soils, and nirS nirK−1 copy number ratios in cryoturbated and unturbated peat soils differed. The collective data indicate that the contrasting N2O emission patterns of cryoturbated and unturbated peat soils are associated with contrasting denitrifier communities. PMID:22134649

  19. CO2 exchange and carbon balance in two grassland sites on eutrophic drained peat soils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veenendaal, E.M.; Kolle, O.; Leffelaar, P.A.; Schrier-Uijl, A.P.; Huissteden, van J.; Walsem, van J.D.; Moller, F.; Berendse, F.

    2007-01-01

    In this study we investigated the role of intensive and extensive dairy farm practices on CO2 exchange and the carbon balance of peatlands by means of eddy covariance (EC) measurements. Year long EC measurements were made in two adjacent farm sites on peat soil in the western part of the Netherlands

  20. Greenhouse gas emissions from managed peat soils: is the IPCC reporting guidance realistic?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Couwenberg

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Drainage of peatlands leads to the decomposition of peat, resulting in substantial losses of carbon and nitrogen to the atmosphere. The conservation and restoration of peatlands can provide a major contribution to the mitigation of climate change. Improvements to guidance and capacity for reporting of greenhouse gas emissions from peatlands will be valuable in the context of the current negotiations towards a post-2012 climate agreement. This article evaluates IPCC approaches to greenhouse gas emissions from managed organic (peat soils and presents a summary table comparing IPCC default values with best estimates based on recent literature. Inconsistencies are pointed out with regard to the IPCC definitions of organic soils and climate zones. The 2006 IPCC Guidelines use a definition of organic soil that is not totally consistent with FAO definitions, use climate zones that are not fully compatible, present default CO2 values that are substantially (often an order of magnitude too low, and present a default N2O value for tropical cropland that is also an order of magnitude too low. An update of IPCC default values is desirable. The IPCC Emission Factor Database offers a platform for establishing more accurate emission factors, but so far contains little information about emissions from peat soils.

  1. Dissolved Organic Carbon and Disinfection By-Product Precursor Release from Managed Peat Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleck, J.A.; Bossio, D.A.; Fujii, R.

    2004-01-01

    A wetland restoration demonstration project examined the effects of a permanently flooded wetland on subsidence of peat soils. The project, started in 1997, was done on Twitchell Island, in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta of California. Conversion of agricultural land to a wetland has changed many of the biogeochemical processes controlling dissolved organic carbon (DOC) release from the peat soils, relative to the previous land use. Dissolved organic C in delta waters is a concern because it reacts with chlorine, added as a disinfectant in municipal drinking waters, to form carcinogenic disinfection byproducts (DBPs), including trihalomethanes (THMs) and haloacetic acids (HAAs). This study explores the effects of peat soil biogeochemistry on DOC and DBP release under agricultural and wetland management. Results indicate that organic matter source, extent of soil organic matter decomposition, and decomposition pathways all are factors in THM formation. The results show that historical management practices dominate the release of DOC and THM precursors. However, within-site differences indicate that recent management decisions can contribute to changes in DOC quality and THM precursor formation. Not all aromatic forms of carbon are highly reactive and certain environmental conditions produce the specific carbon structures that form THMs. Both HAA and THM precursors are elevated in the DOC released under wetland conditions. The findings of this study emphasize the need to further investigate the roles of organic matter sources, microbial decomposition pathways, and decomposition status of soil organic matter in the release of DOC and DBP precursors from delta soils under varying land-use practices.

  2. Adsorption of nitrogen on thermally treated peat soils: the role of energetic and geometric heterogeneity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sokolowaka, Z.; Hajnos, M.; Borowko, M.; Sokolowski, S.

    1999-11-01

    The authors investigate adsorption isotherms of nitrogen at 80 K on several peat soils. In addition to natural soil samples they also study samples thermally treated at 50, 100, and 150 C. The experimental adsorption isotherms are used to evaluate the surface fractal dimension and the energy distribution functions. Moreover, for some samples they have also determined the pore size distributions from mercury intrusion data. The authors compare the surface fractal dimensions evaluated from the mercury intrusion data and from adsorption isotherms and discuss how the thermal treatment changes the energetic heterogeneity of the samples.

  3. Innovative biocatalytic production of soil substrate from green waste compost as a sustainable peat substitute.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazamias, Georgios; Roulia, Maria; Kapsimali, Ioanna; Chassapis, Konstantinos

    2017-12-01

    In the present work, a new simple and quick eco-friendly method is discussed to handle effectively the green wastes and produce a sustainable peat substitute of high quality on the large scale. Principal physicochemical parameters, i.e., temperature, moisture, specific weight, pH, electrical conductivity and, also, microorganisms, organic matter, humic substances, total Kjeldahl nitrogen and total organic carbon, C/N ratio, ash, metal content and phytotoxicity, were monitored systematically. Humic substances content values were interrelated to both C/N ratio and pH values and, similarly, bulk density, TOC, TKN, C/N, GI, ash and organic matter were found interconnected to each other. A novel biocatalyst, extremely rich in soil microorganisms, prepared from compost extracts and peaty lignite, accelerated the biotransformation. Zeolite was also employed. The compost does not demonstrate any phytotoxicity throughout the entire biotransformation process and has increased humic substances content. Both humic substances content and germination index can be employed as maturation indices of the compost. Addition of compost, processed for 60 days only, in cultivations of grass plants led to a significant increase in the stem mass and root size, annotating the significant contribution of the compost to both growth and germination. The product obtained is comparable to peat humus, useful as peat substitute and can be classified as a first class soil conditioner suitable for organic farming. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Fire effects on peat and organo-mineral soils of Meshchera plain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsibart, Anna; Koshovskii, Timur; Gamova, Natalia; Kovach, Roman

    2015-04-01

    The fire effects the soil properties depend on soil type and on their vulnerability to fires. The most of available data is devoted to changes in organo-mineral soils. But the peat fires can cause deeper changes in soil profiles, especially in case of drained peat soils. Now the lack of information exists in the sphere of the comparison of these fire types on soil cover. Meshchera plain (Moscow and Ryazan Regions, Russia) has different soil types. Moreover peatlands were partly drained, and the plain was affected by numerous fires of different time. So there is a need of detailed post-fire soil investigations in this region. During current research the soils Meshchera plain subjected by wildfires of 2002, 2007, 2010 and 2012 were studied. A total of 32 profiles including background and post-fire histosols, histic and sod podzols were investigated. Moreover the detailed description of vegetation cover was conducted. The samples were taken from genetic horizons. The morfological properties of soil profiles were sudied and the samples were analysed on organic carbon, pH, macroelements, magnetic susceptibility. After the wildfires changes in morfological and physico-chemical properties of soils were detected in most cases. The formation of ash and charry horizons was observed only in cases of peat soils affecetd by intense fires, and all post-fire drained peat soils had thick ash horizons even after 10 years after the fires. The significant loss of organic matter took place after burning. But almost immediately after the fires new stage of humus formation usually started. For instance, in post-fire histosols in 2 years after the burning the content of organic carbon reached to 10-12 % in upper horizons. ph values in background histosols were approximately 4-5. After the fire pH increased in these soil type to 8, and two years after the fire event pH decreased to 6-7. In podzols pH values returned to the pre-fire level 4-5 in two years. The magnetic susceptibility of

  5. Complexes of the antimicrobial ciprofloxacin with soil, peat, and aquatic humic substances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aristilde, Ludmilla; Sposito, Garrison

    2013-07-01

    Natural organic matter (NOM) is implicated in the binding of antibiotics by particles in soils and waters. The authors' previous computational study revealed structural rearrangement of both hydrophilic and hydrophobic moieties of NOM to favor H-bonding and other intermolecular interactions, as well as both competition with ion-exchange reactions and bridging interactions by NOM-bound divalent cations. The importance of these interactions was investigated using fluorescence-quenching spectroscopy to study the adsorption of ciprofloxacin (Cipro), a fluoroquinolone antibiotic, on 4 reference humic substances (HSs): Elliott soil humic acid (HA), Pahokee peat HA, and Suwannee river HA and fulvic acid. A simple affinity spectrum HS model was developed to characterize the cation-exchange capacity and the amount of H-bond donor moieties as a function of pH. The adsorption results stress the influence of both pH conditions and the type of HS: both soil HA and peat HA exhibited up to 3 times higher sorption capacity than the aquatic HS at pH ≥ 6, normalizing to the aromatic C content accounted for the differences among the terrestrial HS, and increasing the concentration of divalent cations led to a decrease in adsorption on aquatic HA but not on soil HA. In addition, the pH-dependent speciation models of the Cipro-HS complexes illustrate an increase in complexation due to an increase in deprotonation of HS ligands with increasing pH and, at circumneutral and alkaline pH, enhanced complexation of zwitterionic Cipro only in the presence of soil HA and peat HA. The findings of the present study imply that, in addition to electrostatic interactions, van der Waals interactions as facilitated by aromatic structures and H-bond donating moieties in terrestrial HS may facilitate a favorable binding environment. Environ Toxicol Chem 2013;32:1467-1478. © 2013 SETAC. Copyright © 2013 SETAC.

  6. Soil organic matter mineralization of permafrost peat lands and sensitivity to temperature and lack of oxygen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamprecht, Richard E.; Diáková, Kateřina; Voigt, Carolina; Šantrůčková, Hana; Martikainen, Pertti; Biasi, Christina

    2017-04-01

    Globally, a significant pool of soil organic carbon (SOC) (Tarnocai et al. 2009) is stored in arctic peatlands where extensive permafrost prevents the decomposition of old soil organic matter (SOM). Vulnerability of ancient organic depositions in changing environment becomes a considerable issue in future climate models. Palsa mires, a typical cryogenic peatland type in subarctic tundra, are not only an important SOC pool but also have been reported as a source of nitrous oxide (N2O) (Marushchak et al. 2011). Microbial SOM mineralization and its sensitivity to changing environmental conditions are crucial to understand future C losses and greenhouse gas (GHG) fluxes in this abundant landform of subarctic region. The purpose of this experiment was to determine potential SOM mineralization in different layers of deep soil cores from an Arctic peatland. First, we aimed to define a response of C losses and GHG exchange rates to temperature and aerobic/anaerobic conditions in different peat layers down to the permafrost and beyond. Secondly, we sought for relations among SOM mineralization, nutrient availability and parameters of indigenous microbial community. Finally, we attempted to link the potential SOM mineralization of the different peat layers with surface GHG fluxes from a proceeding study conducted with the same, intact soil cores. Five deep peat soil cores were separated into five layers (0 20, 20 40, 40 60 cm, permafrost interface and permafrost layer). Homogenized peat was incubated in a factorial set-up of three temperatures (4, 10, and 16 °C) under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. At the beginning and the end of the total 5.5-months incubation period, we determined C and N availability, microbial biomass and potential activities of extracellular enzymes. Heterotrophic respiration (CO2), methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions were monitored weekly at the initial phase and biweekly later during the incubation. First results show that C-loss from

  7. Simple and Rapid Method of Isolating Humic Acids from Tropical Peat Soils (Saprists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shamsuddin Rosliza

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem Statement: The isolation (extraction, fractionation and purification of humic acids (HA from soils is laborious, time consuming and expensive. The extraction, fractionation and purification periods of these substances vary from 12 h-7 days. In order to facilitate production of HA at competitive cost, this study was conducted to investigate whether a simple and rapid procedure could be developed for isolation of HA from well decomposed tropical peat soils (Saprists. Approach: A 0.1 M KOH was used to isolate HA of air dry peat soil at 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 12, 14, 16, 18, 20, 22, and 24 h extraction periods after which samples (liquid obtained after centrifugation at 16,211 G for 15 min were fractionated (using 6 M HCl at 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 12, 14, 16, 18, 20, 22, and 24 h. Samples were purified by washing them five times using distilled water instead of using HCl, HF, and an expensive process called dialysis that requires 1 to 7 days to purify HA. Each washing time was 10 min. Standard procedures were used to ascertain the purity (Ash, C, E4/E6, carboxylic, phenolic, total acidity, and K, Ca, Mg, and Na and quantity of HA yield. Statistical Analysis System (SAS was used for statistical analysis. Results: Although there was a linear relationship between extraction period and HA yield, there was no relationship between fractionation period and yield of HA. Distilled water used in this study was effective in purifying HA of the Saprists within 1 h without altering the true chemical nature of HA as it significantly reduced the mineral content of HA. Besides, C, E4/E6, carboxylic, phenolic, and total acidity of the isolated HA were typical of standard ones. Conclusion: The isolation of HA from peat soils can be reduced to 9 h (4 h extraction period, 4 h fractionation period and 1 h purification period instead of the existing range of 1 to 7 days.

  8. Correlation of methane production and functional gene transcriptional activity in a peat soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freitag, Thomas E; Prosser, James I

    2009-11-01

    The transcription dynamics of subunit A of the key gene in methanogenesis (methyl coenzyme M reductase; mcrA) was studied to evaluate the relationship between process rate (methanogenesis) and gene transcription dynamics in a peat soil ecosystem. Soil methanogen process rates were determined during incubation of peat slurries at temperatures from 4 to 37 degrees C, and real-time quantitative PCR was applied to quantify the abundances of mcrA genes and transcripts; corresponding transcriptional dynamics were calculated from mcrA transcript/gene ratios. Internal standards suggested unbiased recovery of mRNA abundances in comparison to DNA levels. In comparison to those in pure-culture studies, mcrA transcript/gene ratios indicated underestimation by 1 order of magnitude, possibly due to high proportions of inactive or dead methanogens. Methane production rates were temperature dependent, with maxima at 25 degrees C, but changes in abundance and transcription of the mcrA gene showed no correlation with temperature. However, mcrA transcript/gene ratios correlated weakly (regression coefficient = 0.76) with rates of methanogenesis. Methanogen process rates increased over 3 orders of magnitude, while the corresponding maximum transcript/gene ratio increase was only 18-fold. mcrA transcript dynamics suggested steady-state expression in peat soil after incubation for 24 and 48 h, similar to that in stationary-phase cultures. mcrA transcript/gene ratios are therefore potential in situ indicators of methanogen process rate changes in complex soil systems.

  9. Modeling relationships between water table depth and peat soil carbon loss in Southeast Asian plantations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Kimberly M.; Goodman, Lael K.; May-Tobin, Calen C.

    2015-07-01

    Plantation-associated drainage of Southeast Asian peatlands has accelerated in recent years. Draining exposes the upper peat layer to oxygen, leading to elevated decomposition rates and net soil carbon losses. Empirical studies indicate positive relationships between long-term water table (WT) depth and soil carbon loss rate in peatlands. These correlations potentially enable using WT depth as a proxy for soil carbon losses from peatland plantations. Here, we compile data from published research assessing WT depth and carbon balance in tropical plantations on peat. We model net carbon loss from subsidence studies, as well as soil respiration (heterotrophic and total) from closed chamber studies, as a function of WT depth. WT depth across all 12 studies and 59 sites is 67 ± 20 cm (mean ± standard deviation). Mean WT depth is positively related to net carbon loss, as well as soil respiration rate. Our models explain 45% of net carbon loss variation and 45-63% of soil respiration variation. At a 70 cm WT depth, the subsidence model suggests net carbon loss of 20 tC ha-1 yr-1 (95% confidence interval (CI) 18-22 tC ha-1 yr-1) for plantations drained for >2 yr. Closed chamber-measured total soil respiration at this depth is 20 tC-CO2 ha-1 yr-1 (CI 17-24 tC-CO2 ha-1 yr-1) while heterotrophic respiration is 17 tC-CO2 ha-1 yr-1 (CI 14-20 tC-CO2 ha-1 yr-1), ˜82% of total respiration. While land use is not a significant predictor of soil respiration, WT depths are greater at acacia (75 ± 16 cm) than oil palm (59 ± 15 cm) sample sites. Improved spatio-temporal sampling of the full suite of peat soil carbon fluxes—including fluvial carbon export and organic fertilizer inputs—will clarify multiple mechanisms leading to carbon loss and gain, supporting refined assessments of the global warming potential of peatland drainage.

  10. Transport, anoxia and energy control on anaerobic respiration and methanogenesis in anoxic peat soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonaiuti, Simona; Blodau, Christian; Knorr, Klaus-Holger

    2017-04-01

    In deep and permanently water saturated peat deposits, extremely low diffusive transport and concomitant build-up of metabolic end-products, i.e of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) and methane (CH4), have been found to slow-down anaerobic respiration and methanogenesis. Such accumulation of DIC and CH4 lowers the Gibbs free energy yield of terminal respiration and methanogenesis, which can inhibit the course of anaerobic metabolic processes. In particular, this affects terminal steps of the breakdown of organic carbon (C), such as methanogenesis, acetogenesis and fermentation processes, which occur near thermodynamic minimum energy thresholds. This effect is thus of critical importance for the long-term C sequestration, as the slow-down of decomposition ultimately regulates the long-term fate of C in deep peat deposits. The exact controls of this observed slow-down of organic matter mineralization are not yet fully understood. Moreover, altered patterns of water or gas transport due to predicted changes in climate may affect these controls in peat soils. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate how burial of peat leads to an inactivation of anaerobic decomposition and to investigate the effects of advective water transport and persistently anoxic conditions on anaerobic decomposition, temporal evolution of thermodynamic energy yields to methanogenesis and methanogenic pathways. To this end, we conducted a column experiment with homogenized, ombrotrophic peat over a period of 300 days at 20˚ C. We tested i) a control treatment under diffusive transport only, ii) an advective flow treatment with a flow of 10 mm d-1, and iv) an anoxic treatment to evaluate changes in decomposition in absence of oxygen in the unsaturated zone of the cores. A slow-down of anaerobic respiration and methanogenesis generally set in at larger depths after 150 days at CH4 concentrations of 0.6-0.9 mmol L-1 and DIC concentrations of 6-12 mmol L-1. This effect occurred at higher

  11. Genesis, classification and human modification of peat and mineral-organic soils, Hula Valley, Israel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.I. Litaor

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available In the last six decades, the pedosphere of the Hula Valley, Israel, has been subjected to major management changes that have led to intense soil alterations. From a thriving East Mediterranean wetland complex characterised by peat and mineral-organic soils, it was converted in the 1950s to intensively cultivated farmland. After four decades of cultivation with numerous agro-technical difficulties and environmental problems, the least fertile soils were re-flooded to form a small lake called Agmon. Construction of Lake Agmon raised the water table in the surrounding soils, creating new hydrogeochemical conditions that changed the pH, redox potential, adsorption-desorption characteristics, rate of organic matter oxidation and soil structure. In this article, we review the history of pedological research in this area, discuss the various soil classification schemes devised at different times before and after drainage, and present a case against an attempt to produce new soil maps because frequent land-use changes and continuous internal soil processes make them rapidly inaccurate. For future land use planning and management, we recommend adapting a probability-based approach that models the values of continuous soil attributes, produces probability maps and quantifies the acceptance of uncertainty.

  12. Performance assessment and parameterization of the SWAP-WOFOST model for peat soil under agricultural use in northern Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertram, Sascha; Bechtold, Michel; Hendriks, Rob; Piayda, Arndt; Regina, Kristiina; Myllys, Merja; Tiemeyer, Bärbel

    2017-04-01

    Peat soils form a major share of soil suitable for agriculture in northern Europe. Successful agricultural production depends on hydrological and pedological conditions, local climate and agricultural management. Climate change impact assessment on food production and development of mitigation and adaptation strategies require reliable yield forecasts under given emission scenarios. Coupled soil hydrology - crop growth models, driven by regionalized future climate scenarios are a valuable tool and widely used for this purpose. Parameterization on local peat soil conditions and crop breed or grassland specie performance, however, remains a major challenge. The subject of this study is to evaluate the performance and sensitivity of the SWAP-WOFOST coupled soil hydrology and plant growth model with respect to the application on peat soils under different regional conditions across northern Europe. Further, the parameterization of region-specific crop and grass species is discussed. First results of the model application and parameterization at deep peat sites in southern Finland are presented. The model performed very well in reproducing two years of observed, daily ground water level data on four hydrologically contrasting sites. Naturally dry and wet sites could be modelled with the same performance as sites with active water table management by regulated drains in order to improve peat conservation. A simultaneous multi-site calibration scheme was used to estimate plant growth parameters of the local oat breed. Cross-site validation of the modelled yields against two years of observations proved the robustness of the chosen parameter set and gave no indication of possible overparameterization. This study proves the suitability of the coupled SWAP-WOFOST model for the prediction of crop yields and water table dynamics of peat soils in agricultural use under given climate conditions.

  13. Study on the downward movement of carbofuran in two Malaysian soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farahani, G H N; Sahid, Ismail Bin; Zakaria, Zuriati; Kuntom, Aini; Omar, Dzolkifli

    2008-09-01

    The downward movement of carbofuran in two Malaysian soil types was studied using soil columns. The columns were filled with disturbed and undisturbed soils of either the Bagan Datoh soil (clay) or the Labu soil (sandy clay). The average total percentage of carbofuran in the leachate of the undisturbed Labu soil after 14 days of watering (80.8%) was approximately similar to that of the total amount from the disturbed soil (81.4%). However, carbofuran leaching was observed in the disturbed soil after the fourth day of watering whereas for the undisturbed soil, leaching occurred after the first watering. A similar trend was observed in the Bagan Datoh soil where the residue of carbofuran was detected after the first day of watering in the undisturbed soil column but only at the eighth day of watering in the disturbed soil column. The total percentage carbofuran in the leachate of disturbed and undisturbed soil columns from Bagan Datoh after 14 days of watering was 3.6% and 41.7%, respectively. The study showed that less leaching occurred in soil columns with high organic content such as the Bagan Datoh soil and especially so in disturbed soils where the organic matter was homogeneously mixed in all layers.

  14. High emissions of greenhouse gases from grasslands on peat and other organic soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiemeyer, Bärbel; Albiac Borraz, Elisa; Augustin, Jürgen; Bechtold, Michel; Beetz, Sascha; Beyer, Colja; Drösler, Matthias; Ebli, Martin; Eickenscheidt, Tim; Fiedler, Sabine; Förster, Christoph; Freibauer, Annette; Giebels, Michael; Glatzel, Stephan; Heinichen, Jan; Hoffmann, Mathias; Höper, Heinrich; Jurasinski, Gerald; Leiber-Sauheitl, Katharina; Peichl-Brak, Mandy; Roßkopf, Niko; Sommer, Michael; Zeitz, Jutta

    2016-12-01

    Drainage has turned peatlands from a carbon sink into one of the world's largest greenhouse gas (GHG) sources from cultivated soils. We analyzed a unique data set (12 peatlands, 48 sites and 122 annual budgets) of mainly unpublished GHG emissions from grasslands on bog and fen peat as well as other soils rich in soil organic carbon (SOC) in Germany. Emissions and environmental variables were measured with identical methods. Site-averaged GHG budgets were surprisingly variable (29.2 ± 17.4 t CO2 -eq. ha(-1)  yr(-1) ) and partially higher than all published data and the IPCC default emission factors for GHG inventories. Generally, CO2 (27.7 ± 17.3 t CO2  ha(-1)  yr(-1) ) dominated the GHG budget. Nitrous oxide (2.3 ± 2.4 kg N2 O-N ha(-1)  yr(-1) ) and methane emissions (30.8 ± 69.8 kg CH4 -C ha(-1)  yr(-1) ) were lower than expected except for CH4 emissions from nutrient-poor acidic sites. At single peatlands, CO2 emissions clearly increased with deeper mean water table depth (WTD), but there was no general dependency of CO2 on WTD for the complete data set. Thus, regionalization of CO2 emissions by WTD only will remain uncertain. WTD dynamics explained some of the differences between peatlands as sites which became very dry during summer showed lower emissions. We introduced the aerated nitrogen stock (Nair ) as a variable combining soil nitrogen stocks with WTD. CO2 increased with Nair across peatlands. Soils with comparatively low SOC concentrations showed as high CO2 emissions as true peat soils because Nair was similar. N2 O emissions were controlled by the WTD dynamics and the nitrogen content of the topsoil. CH4 emissions can be well described by WTD and ponding duration during summer. Our results can help both to improve GHG emission reporting and to prioritize and plan emission reduction measures for peat and similar soils at different scales.

  15. Effects of peat and weathered coal on the growth of Pinus sylvestris var. Mongolica seedlings on aeolian sandy soil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The experiment was conducted at the Ganqika Sandy Land Ecological Station in Ke'erqinzuoyihouqi County, Inner Mongolia, in a growing season from April 28 to October 28, 2001. Peat and weathered coal wereadded to the aeolian sandy soil in different ratios. Two-year-old Pinus sylvestris var. Mongolica seedlings and plastic pots wereused in the experiment. The experimental results indicat ed that: 1) the peat and weathered coal could significantly improve the physical and chemical properties of aeolian sandy soil, and thus promoted the growth of seedlings;2) the effect of peat on seedling growth, including height, base diam eter, root length and biomass, presented an order of 8%>10%>5%>2%>0 in terms of peat contents, and the effect of weathered coal on seedling growth presented an order of 5%>8%>10%>2%>0 in terms of weathered coal contents for height and basal diameter, 5%>8%>2% >10%>0 for root length, and 5%>2%>8% >10%>0 for biomass;3) the effects of peat were generally greater than that of weathered coal. Meanwhile, 8% peat was the best treatment to promote the growth of P. Sylvestris var. Mo ngolica seedlings.

  16. The effect of peat and iron supplements on the severity of potato common scab and bacterial community in tuberosphere soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarikhani, Ensyeh; Sagova-Mareckova, Marketa; Omelka, Marek; Kopecky, Jan

    2017-01-01

    The control of common scab (CS) of potatoes includes resistant cultivars, specific fertilization, increase of soil moisture and chemical treatments. Yet, these management practices do not have common or reproducible results at differing sites. In order to determine the effects of soil organic matter, iron and pH on CS development, peat and DTPA-chelated iron were supplemented to pots filled with soil conducive for CS. All results were compared with the same data obtained for a suppressive soil, which has naturally low severity of CS and occurs nearby. Bacteria, Actinobacteria and the txtB genes from the biosynthetic cluster of thaxtomin, which is responsible for the disease development, were quantified by qPCR in tuberosphere soil and potato periderm. Illumina amplicon sequencing of bacterial 16S rRNA genes was performed for tuberosphere soils. Both peat and iron supplements controlled potato scab, and the combination of the two supplements reduced CS most effectively. The bacterial community was modified by all treatments but the highest number of operational taxonomic units (OTUs) changed towards the suppressive soil after the combined peat and iron treatment. It seemed that iron supplement supported plant defense while both iron and peat additions changed the bacterial community in favor of CS suppression. © FEMS 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. A cost-efficient method to assess carbon stocks in tropical peat soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. W. Warren

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Estimation of belowground carbon stocks in tropical wetland forests requires funding for laboratory analyses and suitable facilities, which are often lacking in developing nations where most tropical wetlands are found. It is therefore beneficial to develop simple analytical tools to assist belowground carbon estimation where financial and technical limitations are common. Here we use published and original data to describe soil carbon density (kgC m−3; Cd as a function of bulk density (gC cm−3; Bd, which can be used to rapidly estimate belowground carbon storage using Bd measurements only. Predicted carbon densities and stocks are compared with those obtained from direct carbon analysis for ten peat swamp forest stands in three national parks of Indonesia. Analysis of soil carbon density and bulk density from the literature indicated a strong linear relationship (Cd = Bd × 495.14 + 5.41, R2 = 0.93, n = 151 for soils with organic C content > 40%. As organic C content decreases, the relationship between Cd and Bd becomes less predictable as soil texture becomes an important determinant of Cd. The equation predicted belowground C stocks to within 0.92% to 9.57% of observed values. Average bulk density of collected peat samples was 0.127 g cm−3, which is in the upper range of previous reports for Southeast Asian peatlands. When original data were included, the revised equation Cd = Bd × 468.76 + 5.82, with R2 = 0.95 and n = 712, was slightly below the lower 95% confidence interval of the original equation, and tended to decrease Cd estimates. We recommend this last equation for a rapid estimation of soil C stocks for well-developed peat soils where C content > 40%.

  18. Technical Note: Development of an automated lysimeter for the calculation of peat soil actual evapotranspiration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proulx-McInnis, S.; St-Hilaire, A.; Rousseau, A. N.; Jutras, S.; Carrer, G.; Levrel, G.

    2011-05-01

    A limited number of publications in the literature deal with the measurement of actual evapotranspiration (AET) from a peat soil. AET is an important parameter in the description of water pathways of an ecosystem. In peatlands, where the water table is near the surface and the vegetation is composed of nonvascular plants without stomatal resistance, the AET measurement represents a challenge. This paper discusses the development of an automated lysimeter installed between 12 and 27 July 2010, at a 11-ha bog site, Pont-Rouge (42 km west of Quebec City, Canada). This system was made of an isolated block of peat, maintained at the same water level as the surrounding water table by a system of submersible pressure transmitters and pumps. The change in water level in millimetres in the isolated block of peat was used to calculate the water lost through evapotranspiration (ET) while accounting the precipitation. The rates of AET were calculated for each day of the study period. Temperature fluctuated between 17.2 and 23.3 °C and total rainfall was 43.76 mm. AET rates from 0.6 to 6.9 mm day-1 were recorded, with a ΣAET/ΣP ratio of 1.38. The estimated potential ET (PET) resulting from Thornthwaite's semi-empirical formula suggested values between 2.8 and 3.9 mm day-1. The average AET/PET ratio was 1.13. According to the literature, the results obtained are plausible. This system, relatively inexpensive and simple to install, may eventually be used to calculate AET on peaty soils in the years to come.

  19. Annual sulfate budgets for Dutch lowland peat polders: The soil is a major sulfate source through peat and pyrite oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermaat, Jan E.; Harmsen, Joop; Hellmann, Fritz A.; van der Geest, Harm G.; de Klein, Jeroen J. M.; Kosten, Sarian; Smolders, Alfons J. P.; Verhoeven, Jos T. A.; Mes, Ron G.; Ouboter, Maarten

    2016-02-01

    Annual sulfate mass balances have been constructed for four low-lying peat polders in the Netherlands, to resolve the origin of high sulfate concentrations in surface water, which is considered a water quality problem, as indicated amongst others by the absence of sensitive water plant species. Potential limitation of these plants to areas with low sulfate was analyzed with a spatial match-up of two large databases. The peat polders are generally used for dairy farming or nature conservation, and have considerable areas of shallow surface water (mean 16%, range 6-43%). As a consequence of continuous drainage, the peat in these polders mineralizes causing subsidence rates generally ranging between 2 and 10 mm y-1. Together with pyrite oxidation, this peat mineralization the most important internal source of sulfate, providing an estimated 96 kg SO4 ha-1 mm-1 subsidence y-1. External sources are precipitation and water supplied during summer to compensate for water shortage, but these were found to be minor compared to internal release. The most important output flux is discharge of excess surface water during autumn and winter. If only external fluxes in and out of a polder are evaluated, inputs average 37 ± 9 and exports 169 ± 17 kg S ha-1 y-1. During summer, when evapotranspiration exceeds rainfall, sulfate accumulates in the unsaturated zone, to be flushed away and drained off during the wet autumn and winter. In some polders, upward seepage from early Holocene, brackish sediments can be a source of sulfate. Peat polders export sulfate to the regional water system and the sea during winter drainage. The available sulfate probably only plays a minor role in the oxidation of peat: we estimate that this is less than 10% whereas aerobic mineralization is the most important. Most surface waters in these polders have high sulfate concentrations, which generally decline during the growing season when aquatic sediments are a sink. In the sediment, this sulfur is

  20. Strategies to mitigate diffuse phosphorus pollution during rewetting of fen peat soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meissner, R; Rupp, H; Seeger, J; Leinweber, P

    2010-01-01

    The cultivation of fen peat soils (Eutric Histosols) for agricultural purposes, started in Europe about 250 years ago, resulting in decreased soil fertility, increased oxidation of peat and corresponding greenhouse gas fluxes to the atmosphere, nutrient transfer to aquatic ecosystems and losses in total area of the former native wetlands. To prevent these negative environmental effects set-aside programs and rewetting measures were promoted in recent years. Literature results and practical experiences showed that large scale rewetting of intensively used agricultural Histosols may result in mobilisation of phosphorus (P), its transport to adjacent surface waters and an accelerated eutrophication. The paper summarises results from an international European Community sponsored research project and demonstrates how results obtained at different scales and from different scientific disciplines were compiled to derive a strategy to carry out rewetting measures. Based on this findings a simple decision support system (DSS) for a hydrologically sensitive area in the Droemling catchment in north-eastern Germany was developed and since 2005 practically used to prevent freshwater resources from non point P pollution.

  1. A cost-efficient method to assess carbon stocks in tropical peat soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. W. Warren

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Estimation of soil carbon stocks in tropical wetlands requires costly laboratory analyses and suitable facilities, which are often lacking in developing nations where most tropical wetlands are found. It is therefore beneficial to develop simple yet robust analytical tools to assess soil carbon stocks where financial and technical limitations are common. Here we use published and original data to describe soil carbon density (gC cm−3; Cd as a function of bulk density (g dry soil cm−3; Bd, which can be used to estimate belowground carbon storage using Bd measurements only. Predicted carbon densities and stocks are compared with those obtained from direct carbon analysis for ten peat swamp forest stands in three national parks of Indonesia. Analysis of soil carbon density and bulk density from the literature indicated a strong linear relationship (Cd = Bd × 0.49 + 4.61, R2 = 0.96, n = 94 for soils with an organic C content >40%. As organic C content decreases, the relationship between Cd and Bd becomes less predictable as soil texture becomes an important determinant of Cd. The equation predicted soil C stocks to within 0.39% to 7.20% of observed values. When original data were included in the analysis, the revised equation: Cd = Bd × 0.48 + 4.28, R2 = 0.96, n = 678 was well within the 95% confidence intervals of the original equation, and tended to decrease Cd estimates slightly. We recommend this last equation for a rapid estimation of soil C stocks for well developed peat soils where C content >40%.

  2. Reductive transformation and inhibitory effect of ethylene under methanogenic conditions in peat-soil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elsgaard, Lars

    2013-01-01

    Ethylene (C2H4), which is a potent gaseous plant hormone, has often been found to accumulate in anoxic soils where pathways of anaerobic C2H4 oxidation are so far unknown and other C2H4 transformation processes are uncommon. The present study shows that ethylene was reduced almost...... stoichiometrically (89–92%) to ethane (C2H6) in peat-soil microcosms incubated under methanogenic conditions. Methanogenesis started after a prolonged anoxic lag-phase (>29 weeks) where added ethylene prevailed despite the availability of nitrate (NO3−) as an alternative electron acceptor. Methanogenesis, as well...... as ethylene reduction to ethane, was inhibited by 90% at 1% oxygen. Likewise, methanogenesis and ethane formation was gradually inhibited (to a similar extent) by increasing ethylene concentrations above 0.2%; this inhibition eventually reached 90–95% at 2.2–4.5% C2H4. The present results extend the known...

  3. Effect of Tropical Peat Swamp Forest Clearing on Soil Carbon Storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad S.M. Nuri

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem Statement: Forest clearing in Tropical Peat Swamp Forest (TPSF will affect forest soil carbon storage. Thus this study is essential to determine whether the effect of clearing of forest does to the nature of soil forest concentrating on soil carbon storage. The objectives of this study were to analyze carbon storage values in logged and clear cut TPSF and to compare these values to see whether clearing of forest will affect its soil in terms of carbon storage. Approach: Soil sampling was conducted in July 2009 on two different plots at Batang Igan, Sibu, Sarawak, Malaysia. The plots are secondary TPSF where this area has been logged but not been cleared while another plot is the clear cut area where the forest has been cut down and cleared for other land use. Soil samples were taken in each plot in the depth of 0-15 cm. Every sample was taken randomly by peat auger using bulking method. The soils were air dried, pounded using mortar and sieved. The bulk densities were determined by coring method. Total Carbon (TC, total Organic Matter (OM, Total Nitrogen (TN and stable C estimation per hectare were determined from bulk density. The soil pH was determined using pH meter by using water and KCl. SOM, TC and stable C in Humic Acid (HA were determined by loss-on ignition method. TN was determined using Micro-Kjeldahl method followed by steam distillation and titration. HA was extracted and purified using distilled water. Then, the HA were oven dried in 40oC. The E4/E6 ratio by using spectrometer was used. Total acidity of HA which consists of carboxylic (-COOH and phenolic (-OH functional group were analyzed. The statistical analysis and comparison was using t-test to compare between two means. Results: The variables that showing the significant differences between two plots were pH water and KCl, soil OM, total C and HA yield. The insignificant differences were bulk density, total N, C/N ratio, E4/E6, phenol, carboxyl

  4. The influence of aeration and temperature on the structure of bacterial complexes in high-moor peat soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kukharenko, O. S.; Pavlova, N. S.; Dobrovol'Skaya, T. G.; Golovchenko, A. V.; Pochatkova, T. N.; Zenova, G. M.; Zvyagintsev, D. G.

    2010-05-01

    The number and taxonomic structure of the heterotrophic block of aerobic and facultative anaerobic bacteria were studied in monoliths from a high-moor peat (stored at room temperature and in a refrigerator) and in the peat horizons mixed in laboratory vessels. The monitoring lasted for a year. In the T0 horizon, spirilla predominated at room and low temperatures; in the T1 and T2 horizons, bacilli were the dominants. The continuous mixing of the peat layers increased the oxygen concentration and the peat decomposition; hence, the shares of actinomycetes and bacilli (bacteria of the hydrolytic complex) increased. In the peat studied, the bacilli were in the active state; i.e., vegetative cells predominated, whose amount ranged from 65 to 90%. The representatives of the main species of bacilli (the facultative anaerobic forms prevailed) hydrolyzed starch, pectin, and carboxymethylcellulose. Thus, precisely sporiferous bacteria can actively participate in the decomposition of plant polysaccharides in high-moor peat soils that are characterized by low temperatures and an oxygen deficit. The development of actinomycetes is inhibited by low temperatures; they can develop only under elevated temperature and better aeration.

  5. Effectiveness of submerged drains in reducing subsidence of peat soils in agricultural use, and their effects on water management and nutrient loading of surface water: modelling of a case study in the western peat soil area of The Netherlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendriks, Rob F. A.; van den Akker, Jan J. A.

    2017-04-01

    Effectiveness of submerged drains in reducing subsidence of peat soils in agricultural use, and their effects on water management and nutrient loading of surface water: modelling of a case study in the western peat soil area of The Netherlands In the Netherlands, about 8% of the area is covered by peat soils. Most of these soils are in use for dairy farming and, consequently, are drained. Drainage causes decomposition of peat by oxidation and accordingly leads to surface subsidence and greenhouse gas emission. Submerged drains that enhance submerged infiltration of water from ditches during the dry and warm summer half year were, and are still, studied in The Netherlands as a promising tool for reducing peat decomposition by raising groundwater levels. For this purpose, several pilot field studies in the Western part of the Dutch peat area were conducted. Besides the effectiveness of submerged drains in reducing peat decomposition and subsidence by raising groundwater tables, some other relevant or expected effects of these drains were studied. Most important of these are water management and loading of surface water with nutrients nitrogen, phosphorus and sulphate. Because most of these parameters are not easy to assess and all of them are strongly depending on the meteorological conditions during the field studies some of these studies were modelled. The SWAP model was used for evaluating the hydrological results on groundwater table and water discharge and recharge. Effects of submerged drains were assessed by comparing the results of fields with and without drains. An empirical relation between deepest groundwater table and subsidence was used to convert effects on groundwater table to effects on subsidence. With the SWAP-ANIMO model nutrient loading of surface water was modelled on the basis of field results on nutrient concentrations . Calibrated models were used to assess effects in the present situation, as thirty-year averages, under extreme weather

  6. Effects of temperature on microbial C metabolism in peat and mineral soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagerty, S.; Dijkstra, P.; Miller, E.; Schwartz, E.; KOCH, G. W.; Hungate, B. A.

    2013-12-01

    Microbial metabolism, the main mechanism responsible for soil CO2 emissions, plays an important role in the global C cycle. Increased temperature generally stimulates decomposition and respiration, indicative of increased microbial C metabolism and possibly greater energy demand by microbes for growth and maintenance. Changes in microbial metabolism with temperature may manifest differently in microbial communities from soils with different C availability because it is generally expected that when more organic C is present, carbon use efficiency (CUE) will be lower and more CO2 will be released per unit C assimilated by microbes than when less C substrate is available. In this study we examined the effect of temperature on C processing in peat and mineral soil from the Marcel Experimental Forest in Minnesota. Samples were incubated for 7 days at 5, 10, 15, and 20°C. We used position-specific 13C-labeled tracers to model C flux through the central C metabolic network (i.e. glycolysis, pentose phosphate pathway, and the citric acid cycle) and to asses the CUE of microbial communities. We also measured total CO2 production and microbial biomass, and we calculated the metabolic quotient (qCO2), which is the rate of CO2, respired per unit of microbial biomass. We found that temperature and soil type did not affect CUE and patterns of C flow through the central C metabolic network. Increased temperature stimulated respiration and decreased qCO2 in peat more than the mineral soil. These results suggest temperature affects rate of C cycling, but does not alter the relative demand for energy production and biosynthesis per unit substrate-C. This implies, in contrast to expectations that at higher temperatures more substrate will be used to offset greater demand for maintenance energy, warmer temperatures will not alter the balance of growth and maintenance energy by soil microbes. Moreover, substrate availability did not result in ';wasteful' C use, but increased C cycling

  7. Peat Mining - A Moist Soil Management Plan for Pungo National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This plan outlines peat mining on Pungo National Wildlife Refuge. Peat is a non-compressed, partially carbonized organic matter formed by partial decomposition in...

  8. Geotechnical properties of peat soil stabilised with shredded waste tyre chips in combination with gypsum, lime or cement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Saberian

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Peat has a high content of water and organic substances. These weak components can cause low bearing capacity and high consolidation settlement under load, which means that peat deposits must usually be stabilised if they are to bear constructions such as buildings or roads. In this study we investigated the performance of waste tyre chips (10 % by weight and sand (400 kg m-3 supplemented with a pozzolanic binder (gypsum, lime or cement at a range of dosages (5 %, 10 % or 15 % by weight as a stabiliser for peat soil. Peat samples were taken from a fen peatland at Chaghakhor Wetland in Chahar Mahal and Bakhtiari Province, Iran. In total, 162 test specimens were prepared and subjected to laboratory strength testing (unconfined compression test and direct shear test. Additionally, the pH of each admixture was recorded immediately after mixing, elemental compositions were determined by X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF, and structures were examined using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM. It was observed that: (1 the total percentage of pozzolanic compounds in the peat soil was well below the minimum of 70 % set by the standard ASTM C 618 (ASTM 2000, so an additive such as cement, lime or gypsum would certainly be required; (2 specimens stabilised with gypsum or lime showed improvements in unconfined compressive strength (UCS, but those stabilised with ordinary Portland cement exhibited the greatest improvement in UCS (up to 12,200 % as well as improvements in the direct shear parameters c and φ; (3 according to the XRF tests, additives such as cement, lime and gypsum introduced considerable amounts of Si, Al, Ca and O, which are important for pozzolanic reactions in peat soils; and (4 on the basis of the results of UCS and direct shear tests, the optimum percentage of the additives tested would be 5 %.

  9. Carbon dioxide emissions from peat soils under potato cultivation in Uganda

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farmer, Jenny; Langan, Charlie; Smith, Jo

    2017-04-01

    Organic wetland soils in south western Uganda are found in valley bottom wetlands, surrounded by steep, mineral soil hill slopes. Land use change in these papyrus dominated wetlands has taken place over the past forty years, seeing wetland areas cleared of papyrus, rudimentary drainage channel systems dug, and soil cultivated and planted with crops, predominantly potatoes. There has been little research into the cultivation of organic wetlands soils in Uganda, or the impacts on soil carbon dynamics and associated carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions. This study used two rounds of farmer interviews to capture the land management practices on these soils and how they vary over the period of a year. Three potato fields were also randomly selected and sampled for CO2 emissions at four points in time during the year; 1) just after the potato beds had been dug, 2) during the potato growing period, 3) after the potato harvest, and 4) at the end of the fallow season. Carbon dioxide emissions, soil and air temperatures, water table depth, vegetation cover and land use were all recorded in situ in each field on each sampling occasion, from both the raised potato beds and the trenches in between them. There appeared to be a delay in the disturbance effect of digging the peat, with heterotrophic CO2 emissions from the raised beds not immediately increasing after being exposed to the air. Excluding these results, there was a significant linear relationship between mean emissions and water table depth from the raised beds and trenches in each field over time (pfundamental data gaps which need to be addressed with future studies.

  10. Development and testing of an improved model of the thermal behaviour of peat soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kettridge, N.; Baird, A.

    2004-05-01

    Many biogeochemical processes in peats are temperature-sensitive. Despite this, little work has been done on characterising the thermal behaviour of peats. Most existing studies have looked only at 1-D thermal behaviour using simple models in which the thermal properties are constant with depth, and the temperature variation at the surface is specified from field measurements or is assumed to follow a sine wave. We report on the development and application of a more realistic thermal model of peat soils in which heat transfer is described by a system of `capacitors' or nodes and `resistors'. Its features include: 1. A realistic surface boundary condition where convective (sensible and latent) and radiative (short- and long- wave) heat transfers are accounted for by nodes representing the air/atmosphere above the peatland surface. 2. The ability to vary thermal properties with depth in order to simulate, for example, the effect of an unsaturated zone above the water table on thermal behaviour. 3. The ability to simulate 3-D patterns of heat transfer in patterned peatlands consisting of hummocks, lawns, hollows, and pools (microforms). In order that the model can be applied to a 3-D system, the standard large-scale parameterisation of the Penman-Monteith equation, used to calculate convective heat fluxes, has been improved. First, aerodynamic resistance has been calculated from newly developed sensitive self-logging atmometers, enabling measurement of potential evaporation at high frequencies and at different positions on and surrounding a microform, either at the ground surface or within the plant canopy. Secondly, dual probe heat pulse sensors (DPHPS) have enabled the measurement of soil thermal properties and volumetric water content of a small volume of soil at regular time intervals. In combination with measured water-table fluctuations, a stack of DPHPS within the unsaturated zone has enabled the accurate measurement of actual evapotranspiration, without the

  11. Raman spectroscopic study of amorphous and crystalline hydrocarbons from soils, peats and lignite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jehlicka, J.; Edwards, H.G.M.; Villar, S.E.J.; Pokorny, J. [Charles University, Prague (Czech Republic). Inst. for Geochemical Mineral & Mineral Resources

    2005-08-01

    FT-Raman spectra were obtained from the natural hydrocarbon mixtures ozokerite and hatchettite as well as from the terpenoid minerals fichtelite (norabietane) and hartite (alpha-phyllocladane). Some of these hydrocarbons occur in soil and peat environments of Holocene age. However, hartite occurs in lignite, in fossilised Glyptostrobus (Taxodiaceae) trees and in pelosiderites of the Bilina Miocene series (about 20 Ma); it represents the accumulated and crystallised product of diagenetic transformation of precursor biogenic terpenoids. Raman spectra of earth waxes investigated confirm their dominantly aliphatic character and oxidative degradation (related to weathering and/or subaerial alteration in museum cabinets). Vibrational assignments are proposed and differences in Raman spectra of fichtelite and hartite discussed. Some of the individual features can be used for discrimination (e.g., hartite bands at 1480, 1310, 1287, 1041, 729 and 693 cm{sup -1} and fichtelite bands at 1302, 836, 717 and 533 cm{sup -1}).

  12. A new soil mechanics approach to quantify and predict land subsidence by peat compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koster, Kay; Erkens, Gilles; Zwanenburg, Cor

    2016-10-01

    Land subsidence threatens many coastal areas. Quantifying current and predicting future subsidence are essential to sustain the viability of these areas with respect to rising sea levels. Despite its scale and severity, methods to quantify subsidence are scarce. In peat-rich subsidence hot spots, subsidence is often caused by peat compression. We introduce the standard Cone Penetration Test (CPT) as a technique to quantify subsidence due to compression of peat. In a test in the Holland coastal plain, the Netherlands, we found a strong relationship between thickness reduction of peat and cone resistance, due to an increase in peat stiffness after compression. We use these results to quantify subsidence of peat in subsiding areas of Sacramento-San Joaquin delta and Kalimantan, and found values corresponding with previously made observations. These results open the door for CPT as a new method to document past and predict future subsidence due to peat compression over large areas.

  13. Secondary successions of biota in oil-polluted peat soil upon different biological remediation methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melekhina, E. N.; Markarova, M. Yu.; Shchemelinina, T. N.; Anchugova, E. M.; Kanev, V. A.

    2015-06-01

    The effects of different bioremediation methods on restoration of the oil-polluted peat soil (Histosol) in the northernmost taiga subzone of European Russia was studied. The population dynamics of microorganisms belonging to different trophic groups (hydrocarbon-oxidizing, ammonifying, nitrifying, and oligonitrophilic) were analyzed together with data on the soil enzyme (catalase and dehydrogenase) activities, population densities of soil microfauna groups, their structures, and states of phytocenoses during a sevenyear-long succession. The remediation with biopreparations Roder composed of oil-oxidizing microorganisms-Roder with Rhodococcus rubber and R. erythropolis and Universal with Rhodotorula glutinis and Rhodococcus sp.-was more efficient than the agrochemical and technical remediation. It was concluded that the biopreparations activate microbiological oil destruction, thereby accelerating restoration succession of phytocenosis and zoocenosis. The succession of dominant microfauna groups was observed: the dipteran larvae and Mesostigmata mites predominant at the early stages were replaced by collembolans at later stages. The pioneer oribatid mite species were Tectocepheus velatus, Oppiella nova, Liochthonius sellnicki, Oribatula tibialis, and Eupelops sp.

  14. Reduction of Ammonia Loss from Urea through Mixing with Humic Acids Isolated from Peat Soil (Saprists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regis Bernard

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Application of urea as a source of nitrogen fertilizer has an adverse effect on ammoniacal loss to the environment. This study was conducted to reduce ammonia loss from urea by mixing with Humic Acids (HA isolated from Saprists peat. Approach: The effects of urea amended with four different amounts of humic acids, 0.25, 0.50, 0.75 and 1.00 g were evaluated in laboratory conditions using a closed dynamic air flow system. The mineral soil that was used as medium for the study was Bekenu series (typic paleudults. Amnonia loss, soil pH, exchangeable ammonium, available nitrate, exchangeable K, Ca, Mg and Na were determined using standard procedures. Results: All the treatments with HA significantly reduced ammoinia loss compared to urea alone. Increasing the amount of HA also significantly retained soil exchangeable ammonium and available nitrate. Treatments with HA had no significant effect on the concentrations of Mg, K and Ca, except for Na. The effect of HA in the mixtures on ammonia loss was related to their effect on the formation of ammonium over ammonia. Conclusion: Surface-applied urea fertilizer efficiency could be increased when coated with 1.00 g of HA.

  15. A method for measuring losses of soil carbon by heterotrophic respiration from peat soils under oil palms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farmer, Jenny; Manning, Frances; Smith, Jo; Arn Teh, Yit

    2017-04-01

    The effects of drainage and deforestation of South East Asian peat swamp forests for the development of oil palm plantations has received considerable attention in both mainstream media and academia, and is the source of significant discussion and debate. However, data on the long-term carbon losses from these peat soils as a result of this land use change is still limited and the methods with which to collect this data are still developing. Here we present the ongoing evolution and implementation of a method for separating autotrophic and heterotrophic respiration by sampling carbon dioxide emissions at increasing distance from palm trees. We present the limitations of the method, modelling approaches and results from our studies. In 2011 we trialled this method in Sumatra, Indonesia and collected rate measurements over a six day period in three ages of oil palm. In the four year oil palm site there were thirteen collars that had no roots present and from these the peat based carbon losses were recorded to be 0.44 g CO2 m2 hr-1 [0.34; 0.57] (equivalent to 39 t CO2 ha-1 yr-1 [30; 50]) with a mean water table depth of 0.40 m, or 63% of the measured total respiration across the plot. In the two older palm sites of six and seven years, only one collar out of 100 had no roots present, and thus a linear random effects model was developed to calculate heterotrophic emissions for different distances from the palm tree. This model suggested that heterotrophic respiration was between 37 - 59% of total respiration in the six year old plantation and 39 - 56% in the seven year old plantation. We applied this method in 2014 to a seven year old plantation, in Sarawak, Malaysia, modifying the method to include the heterotrophic contribution from beneath frond piles and weed covered areas. These results indicated peat based carbon losses to be 0.42 g CO2 m2 hr-1 [0.27;0.59] (equivalent to 37 t CO2 ha-1 yr-1 [24; 52]) at an average water table depth of 0.35 m, 47% of the measured

  16. Imaging tropical peatlands in Indonesia using ground penetrating radar (GPR and electrical resistivity imaging (ERI: implications for carbon stock estimates and peat soil characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. Comas

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Current estimates of carbon (C storage in peatland systems worldwide indicate tropical peatlands comprise about 15% of the global peat carbon pool. Such estimates are uncertain due to data gaps regarding organic peat soil thickness and C content. Indonesian peatlands are considered the largest pool of tropical peat carbon (C, accounting for an estimated 65% of all tropical peat while being the largest source of carbon dioxide emissions from degrading peat worldwide, posing a major concern regarding long-term sources of greenhouse gases to the atmosphere. We combined a set of indirect geophysical methods (ground penetrating radar, GPR, and electrical resistivity imaging, ERI with direct observations from core samples (including C analysis to better understand peatland thickness in West Kalimantan (Indonesia and determine how geophysical imaging may enhance traditional coring methods for estimating C storage in peatland systems. Peatland thicknesses estimated from GPR and ERI and confirmed by coring indicated variation by less than 3% even for small peat-mineral soil interface gradients (i.e. below 0.02°. The geophysical data also provide information on peat matrix attributes such as thickness of organomineral horizons between peat and underlying substrate, the presence of wood layers, buttressed trees and soil type. These attributes could further constrain quantification of C content and aid responsible peatland management in Indonesia.

  17. Imaging tropical peatlands in Indonesia using ground penetrating radar (GPR) and electrical resistivity imaging (ERI): implications for carbon stock estimates and peat soil characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comas, X.; Terry, N.; Slater, L.; Warren, M.; Kolka, R.; Kristijono, A.; Sudiana, N.; Nurjaman, D.; Darusman, T.

    2015-01-01

    Current estimates of carbon (C) storage in peatland systems worldwide indicate tropical peatlands comprise about 15% of the global peat carbon pool. Such estimates are uncertain due to data gaps regarding organic peat soil thickness and C content. Indonesian peatlands are considered the largest pool of tropical peat carbon (C), accounting for an estimated 65% of all tropical peat while being the largest source of carbon dioxide emissions from degrading peat worldwide, posing a major concern regarding long-term sources of greenhouse gases to the atmosphere. We combined a set of indirect geophysical methods (ground penetrating radar, GPR, and electrical resistivity imaging, ERI) with direct observations from core samples (including C analysis) to better understand peatland thickness in West Kalimantan (Indonesia) and determine how geophysical imaging may enhance traditional coring methods for estimating C storage in peatland systems. Peatland thicknesses estimated from GPR and ERI and confirmed by coring indicated variation by less than 3% even for small peat-mineral soil interface gradients (i.e. below 0.02°). The geophysical data also provide information on peat matrix attributes such as thickness of organomineral horizons between peat and underlying substrate, the presence of wood layers, buttressed trees and soil type. These attributes could further constrain quantification of C content and aid responsible peatland management in Indonesia.

  18. Interactions of Marsh Orchid (Dactylorhiza spp.) and Soil Microorganisms in Relation to Extracellular Enzyme Activities in a Peat Soil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The nature of the interactions between microbes and roots of plants in a peaty soil were studied in a laboratorybased experiment by measuring activities of β-glucosidase, phosphatase, N-acetylglucosaminidase, and arylsulphatase. The experiment was based on control (autoclaved), bacteria-inoculated, and plant (transplanted with Dactylorhiza) treatments,and samples were collected over 4 sampling intervals. Higher enzyme activities were associated with the bacteria-inoculated treatment, suggesting that soil enzyme activities are mainly of microbial origin. For example, β-glucosidase activity varied between 25-30 μmol g-1 min-1 in the bacteria-inoculated samples whilst the activity of the control ranged between 4-12μmol g-1 min-1. A similar pattern was found for all other enzymes.At the end of the incubation, the microcosms were destructively sampled and the enzyme activities determined in bulk soil, rhizospheric soil, and on the root surface. Detailed measurement in different fractions of the peat indicated that higher activities were found in rhizosphere. However, the higher activities ofβ-glucosidase, N-acetylglucosaminidase, and arylsulphatase appeared to be associated with bacterial proliferation on the root surface, whilst a larger proportion of phosphatase appeared to be released from root surface.

  19. Potentiostatically Poised Electrodes Mimic Iron Oxide and Interact with Soil Microbial Communities to Alter the Biogeochemistry of Arctic Peat Soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Largus T. Angenent

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Dissimilatory metal-reducing bacteria are ubiquitous in soils worldwide, possess the ability to transfer electrons outside of their cell membranes, and are capable of respiring with various metal oxides. Reduction of iron oxides is one of the more energetically favorable forms of anaerobic respiration, with a higher energy yield than both sulfate reduction and methanogenesis. As such, this process has significant implications for soil carbon balances, especially in the saturated, carbon-rich soils of the northern latitudes. However, the dynamics of these microbial processes within the context of the greater soil microbiome remain largely unstudied. Previously, we have demonstrated the capability of potentiostatically poised electrodes to mimic the redox potential of iron(III- and humic acid-compounds and obtain a measure of metal-reducing respiration. Here, we extend this work by utilizing poised electrodes to provide an inexaustable electron acceptor for iron- and humic acid-reducing microbes, and by measuring the effects on both microbial community structure and greenhouse gas emissions. The application of both nonpoised and poised graphite electrodes in peat soils stimulated methane emissions by 15%–43% compared to soils without electrodes. Poised electrodes resulted in higher (13%–24% methane emissions than the nonpoised electrodes. The stimulation of methane emissions for both nonpoised and poised electrodes correlated with the enrichment of proteobacteria, verrucomicrobia, and bacteroidetes. Here, we demonstrate a tool for precisely manipulating localized redox conditions in situ (via poised electrodes and for connecting microbial community dynamics with larger ecosystem processes. This work provides a foundation for further studies examining the role of dissimilatory metal-reducing bacteria in global biogeochemical cycles.

  20. Effect of peat characteristics on P, N and DOC mobilization from re-wetted peat soils - a laboratory column study for the impacts of restoration on forestry-drained peatlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koskinen, Markku; Kaila, Annu; Asam, Zaki; Uusitalo, Risto; Smolander, Aino; Kiikkilä, Oili; Sarkkola, Sakari; Kitunen, Veikko; Fritze, Hannu; Nousiainen, Hannu; Tervahauta, Arja; Xiao, Liwen; Nieminen, Mika

    2016-04-01

    Peatlands are an integral part of the hydrological cycle in the boreal and temperate zones, providing ecosystem services such as water filtering. From the mid to late 1900's, over 15 ha of peatlands and wetlands were drained for forestry in the temperate and boreal zones, causing deterioration of biodiversity and loss of ecosystem services. They are now being restored in order to reverse this development. Restoration of pealands has been found to cause leaching of DOC and nutrients after water level rise and expansion of reducing conditions in the peat. A molar ratio between redox-sensitive Fe and P in the peat of < 10 has been previously suggested as a limit value indicating risk of high P export. The ratio, however, does not predict the level of P release well when the value is < 10. It has also been suggested that redox-sensitive Fe is involved in the export of DOC via consumption of protons during reduction reactions of Fe, which reduces the soil positive charge and makes the DOC molecules more electronegative, which makes them repeal each other. An incubation experiment was conducted to study factors affecting P, N and DOC release from inundated peat from forestry-drained peatlands of several fertility classes. It was discovered that in addition to Fe, a high ratio of Al to P in the peat reduces P export under reducing conditions. High peat Fe content was also found to predict high DOC export, suggesting that minerotrophic sites are susceptible to post-restoration DOC leaching due to the Fe in their peat. Microbial biomass and mineralization potential of the peat were not found to be important for the export of DOC or P. High NO3 content in the peat predicted high export of NH4 under reducing conditions.

  1. Streptomyces actinomycinicus sp. nov., isolated from soil of a peat swamp forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanasupawat, Somboon; Phongsopitanun, Wongsakorn; Suwanborirux, Khanit; Ohkuma, Moriya; Kudo, Takuji

    2016-01-01

    A novel actinomycete, strain RCU-197T, was isolated from soil of a peat swamp forest in Rayong Province, Thailand. Using a polyphasic approach, the strain was classified in the genus Streptomyces. It contained ll-diaminopimelic acid in the cell-wall peptidoglycan. No diagnostic sugars were detected in whole-cell hydrolysates and there was a lack of mycolic acids. The major menaquinones were MK-9(H6) and MK-9(H8). The predominant cellular fatty acids were iso-C14 : 0, iso-C15 : 0, anteiso-C15 : 0 and iso-C16 : 0. The polar lipids profile consisted of diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylinositol, phosphatidylglycerol and phosphatidylinositol mannoside, an unknown aminolipid and two unknown phospholipids. Phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences showed the strain formed distinct clade within the genus Streptomyces and was closely related to Streptomyces echinatus NBRC 12763T (98.78 % 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity). According to the polyphasic approach as well as DNA-DNA relatedness, the strain could be clearly differentiated from closely related species and represents a novel species of the genus Streptomyces, for which the name Streptomyces actinomycinicus sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is RCU-197T ( = JCM 30864T = TISTR 2208T = PCU 342T).

  2. Biogeochemistry of Metalliferous Peats: Sulfur Speciation and Depth Distributions of dsrAB Genes and Cd, Fe, Mn, S, and Zn in Soil Cores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez,C.; Yanez, C.; Yoon, S.; Bruns, M.

    2007-01-01

    Spatial relationships between concentrations of Cd, Fe, Mn, S, and Zn and bacterial genes for dissimilatory sulfate reduction were studied in soils of the Manning peatland region in western New York. Peat cores were collected within a field exhibiting areas of Zn phytotoxicity, and pH and elemental concentrations were determined with depth. The oxidation states of S were estimated using S-XANES spectroscopy. Soil microbial community DNA was extracted from peat soils for ribosomal RNA intergenic spacer analysis (RISA) of diversity profiles with depth. To assess the presence of sulfate-reducing microorganisms (SRM), DNA extracts were also used as templates for PCR detection of dsrAB genes coding for dissimilatory (bi)sulfite reductase. Elemental distributions, S redox speciation, and detection of dsrAB genes varied with depth and water content. The pH of peat soils increased with depth. The highest concentrations of Zn, Cd, and S occurred at intermediate depths, whereas Mn concentrations were highest in the topmost peat layers. Iron showed a relatively uniform distribution with depth. Concentrations of redox sensitive elements, S and Mn, but not Fe, seemed to respond to variations in water content and indicated vertical redox stratification in peat cores where topmost peats were typically acidic and oxidizing and deeper peats were typically circumneutral and reducing. Even then, S-XANES analyses showed that surface peats contained >50% of the total S in reduced forms while deep peats contained generally <5% of the total S in oxidized forms. While bacterial RISA profiles of the peats were diverse, dsrAB gene detection followed redox stratification chemistry closely. For the most part, dsrAB genes were detected in deeper peats, where S accumulation was evident, while they were not detected in topmost peat layers where Mn accumulation indicated oxic conditions. Combined chemical, spectroscopic, and microbiological analyses indicated that prolonged exposure to dry

  3. Factors affecting the mobilization of DOC and metals in a peat soil under a warmer scenario

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrera, Noela; Barreal, María. Esther; Briones, María. Jesús I.

    2010-05-01

    Most climate change models predict an increase of temperature of 3-5°C in Southern Europe by the end of this century (IPCC 2007). However, changes in summer precipitations are more uncertain, and although a decrease in rainfall inputs is forecasted by most models, the magnitude of this effect has not been assessed properly (Rowell & Jones 2006). Peatland areas are very sensitive to climate change. In Galicia they survive in upland areas where cold temperatures and continuous moisture supply allow their presence. Besides abiotic factors, alterations in soil fauna activities can also affect peat turnover. Among them, enchytraeids are usually the most numerous invertebrate group in these systems and both temperature and moisture content regulate their abundances and vertical distribution. Previous studies have demonstrated that changes in their populations associated to increasing temperatures can significantly affect metal mobilization, namely iron and aluminium, together with an important decline in the acidity of the soil solution, which possibly eliminates one of the critical mechanisms restricting DOC release (Carrera et al., 2009). In this study we investigated whether changes in water content of the peat soil and soil invertebrate activities associated to increasing temperatures could alter the mobilization rates of Fe and Al and in turn, DOC. 72 undisturbed soil cores (6 cm diameter x 10 cm deep) with their associated vegetation were taken from a blanket bog in Galicia (NW Spain). Back at the laboratory they were sliced horizontally into two layers, (0-5cm and 5-10cm) which were defaunated by means of a wet extraction. Thereafter, the two soil layers derived from the same core were introduced in each microcosm by placing them in their original position but separated by a 1 mm nylon mesh to allow the vertical movements of the organisms. Half of the experimental units were adjusted to the used moisture values observed in the field (80% SWC, H1), whereas in the

  4. CO2 exchange and Carbon balance in two grassland sites on eutrophic drained peat soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Möller

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available In this study we investigated the role of intensive and extensive dairy farm practices on CO2 exchange and the carbon balance of peatlands by means of eddy covariance (EC measurements. Year long EC measurements were made in two adjacent farm sites on peat soil in the western part of the Netherlands. One site (Stein is a new meadow bird reserve and is managed predominantly by mowing in June and August. The second site (Oukoop is an intensive dairy farm. Minimum ecosystem flux of the grass sward (range −2 to −34 μmol CO2 m−2 s−1 showed a close and similar linear relationship with Leaf Area Index (LAI; range 1 to 5 except in maturing hay meadows, where minimum ecosystem flux did not decrease further. Apparent quantum yield varied between −0.02 and −0.08 (mean −0.045 μmol CO2 μmol−1 photons at both sites and was significantly correlated with LAI during the growth season. Ecosystem Respiration at 10°C (R10 calculated from the year round data set was 3.47 μmol CO2 m−2 s−1 at Stein and 3.64 μmol CO2 m−2 s−1 at Oukoop. Both sites were a source of carbon in winter and a sink during summer, with net ecosystem exchange varying between 50 to 100 mmol CO2m−2 d−1 in winter to below −400 mmol CO2 m−2 d−1 in summer. Periodically both sites became a source after mowing. Net annual ecosystem exchange (NEE for Stein was −8.4 g C m−2 a−1 and for Oukoop 122.4 g C m−2 a−1, the difference between the sites was mainly due a difference in GEP (101 g C m−2 a−1. However when biomass removal, manure applications and estimates of methane emissions are taken into account, both eutrophic peat meadows are a strong source for C ((462 g C m−2 a−1 and 465 g C m−2 a−1 at Stein and Oukoop, respectively.

  5. Removal of humic acid from peat soils by using AlCl3 prior to DNA extraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustafa, Irfan; Hadiatullah, Sustiyah

    2017-05-01

    The amplification of environmental DNA is one of the main steps in microbial diversity profiling of environmental samples. To represent the microbial community in the soil, DNA extraction is initially needed. The major inhibitor in the soil is a humic acid which greatly inhibits the ability of enzymes to amplify DNA. The protocol provided with the commercial kit was not able to resolve the problem. We, therefore, introduced a modification for soil sample treatment with AlCl3 as a flocculating agent that is capable of removing the humic substance contained in peat soil. This technique was superior to the original instruction for extracting DNA with the FastDNA® Spin Kit for Soil (MP Bio, USA).

  6. Holocene Landscape Dynamics in the Ammer Rv. Catchment (Bavarian Alps) - Influence of extreme weather events and land use on soil erosion using peat bogs as geoarchives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwindt, Daniel; Manthe, Pierre; Völkel, Jörg

    2016-04-01

    Soil degradation and the loss of soil organic carbon (SOC) induced by erosion events significantly influence soils and fertility as parts of the ecosystem services and play an important role with regard to global carbon dynamics. Soil erosion is strongly correlated with anthropogenic land use since the Neolithic Revolution around 8.000 BP. Likewise the effect of extreme weather events on soil erosion is of great interest with regard to the recent climate change debate, predicting a strong increase of extreme weather events. Aim of this study is the reconstruction of the Holocene landscape dynamic as influenced by land use and climate conditions. In this study peat bogs containing layers of colluvial sediments directly correlated to soil erosion were used as geoarchives for landscape dynamics. A temporal classification of extreme erosion events was established by dating organic material via 14C within both, colluvial layers as well as their direct peat surroundings. Detection and characterization of peat bogs containing colluvial sediments was based on geomorphological mapping, the application of geophysical methods (ERT - electrical resistivity tomography, GPR - ground penetrating radar) and core soundings. Laboratory analysis included the analysis of particle sizes and the content of organic material. We investigated 16 peat bogs following the altitudinal gradient of the Ammer River from alpine and subalpine towards lowland environments. A deposition of colluvial material could be detected in 4 peat bogs, all situated in the lower parts of the catchment. The minerogenic entry into peat bogs occurred throughout the Holocene as revealed by radiocarbon dating. A distinct cluster of erosional events e.g. during the little ice age could not be detected. Therefore, soil erosion dynamics and the appearance of colluvial sediments within peat bogs must rather be regarded as an effect of land use, actually farming and crop cultivation, or small-scale morphodynamic like

  7. Diversity, distribution and comparative genomics of Microviridae in Sphagnum-peat soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Achim eQuaiser

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Microviridae, a family of bacteria-infecting ssDNA viruses, is a member of the still poorly characterized bacteriophages, even though they include phage PhiX174, one of the main models in virology for genomic and capsid structure studies. Recent studies suggest that they are diverse and well represented in marine and freshwater virioplankton as well as in human microbiomes. Despite previous knowledge, their diversity, abundance and ecological role are completely unknown in soil ecosystems. Here we present the comparative analysis of 17 completely assembled Microviridae genomes from 12 viromes of a Sphagnum-dominated peatland. Phylogenetic analysis of the conserved major capsid protein sequences revealed the affiliation to Gokushovirinae and Pichovirinae as well as to two newly defined subfamilies, the Aravirinae and Stokavirinae. Structural modeling of the Aravirinae major capsid protein showed similarities to Alpavirinae and Pichovirinae but revealed two additional variable regions potentially involved in phage-host recognition. Two new distinct prophages were identified in the genomes of Parabacteroides merdae and Parabacteroides distasonis representing a potential new subfamily of Microviridae. The differentiation of the subfamilies was confirmed by gene order and similarity analysis. Relative abundance analysis using the affiliation of the major capsid protein (VP1 revealed that Gokushovirinae, followed by Aravirinae, are the most abundant Microviridae in 11 out of 12 peat viromes. Sequences matching the Gokushovirinae and Aravirinae VP1 matching sequences respectively accounted for up to 4.19% and 0.65% of the total number of sequences in the corresponding virome, respectively. In this study we provide new genome information of Microviridae and pave the way towards quantitative estimations of Microviridae subfamilies.

  8. High Throughput Sequencing to Detect Differences in Methanotrophic Methylococcaceae and Methylocystaceae in Surface Peat, Forest Soil, and Sphagnum Moss in Cranesville Swamp Preserve, West Virginia, USA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evan Lau

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Northern temperate forest soils and Sphagnum-dominated peatlands are a major source and sink of methane. In these ecosystems, methane is mainly oxidized by aerobic methanotrophic bacteria, which are typically found in aerated forest soils, surface peat, and Sphagnum moss. We contrasted methanotrophic bacterial diversity and abundances from the (i organic horizon of forest soil; (ii surface peat; and (iii submerged Sphagnum moss from Cranesville Swamp Preserve, West Virginia, using multiplex sequencing of bacterial 16S rRNA (V3 region gene amplicons. From ~1 million reads, >50,000 unique OTUs (Operational Taxonomic Units, 29 and 34 unique sequences were detected in the Methylococcaceae and Methylocystaceae, respectively, and 24 potential methanotrophs in the Beijerinckiaceae were also identified. Methylacidiphilum-like methanotrophs were not detected. Proteobacterial methanotrophic bacteria constitute <2% of microbiota in these environments, with the Methylocystaceae one to two orders of magnitude more abundant than the Methylococcaceae in all environments sampled. The Methylococcaceae are also less diverse in forest soil compared to the other two habitats. Nonmetric multidimensional scaling analyses indicated that the majority of methanotrophs from the Methylococcaceae and Methylocystaceae tend to occur in one habitat only (peat or Sphagnum moss or co-occurred in both Sphagnum moss and peat. This study provides insights into the structure of methanotrophic communities in relationship to habitat type, and suggests that peat and Sphagnum moss can influence methanotroph community structure and biogeography.

  9. Peat prospectus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-07-01

    This publication contains a general discussion on the origin, distribution, harvesting, dewatering and energy applications of peat. Methods for the gasification of peat are briefly described. The environmental impacts are discussed. Also presented is a description of the Department of Energy program in peat gasification. (DMC)

  10. Peat bogs and their organic soils: Archives of atmospheric change and global environmentalsignificance (Philippe Duchaufour Medal Lecture)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shotyk, William

    2013-04-01

    A bog is much more than a waterlogged ecosystem where organic matter accumulates as peat. Peatlands such as bogs represent a critical link between the atmosphere, hydrosphere, and biosphere. Plants growing at the surface of ombrotrophic bogs receive nutrients exclusively from the atmosphere. Despite the variations in redox status caused by seasonal fluctuations in depth to water table, the low pHof the waters, and abundance of dissolved organic matter, bogs preserve a remarkably reproducible history of atmospheric pollution, climate change, landscape evolution and human history. For example, peat cores from bogs in Europe and North America have provided detailed reconstructions of the changing rates and sources of Ag, Cd, Hg, Pb, Sb, and Tl, providing new insights into the geochemical cycles of these elements, including the massive perturbations induced by human activities beginning many thousands of years ago. Despite the low pH, and perhaps because of the abundance of dissolved organic matter, bogs preserve many silicate and aluminosilicate minerals which renders them valuable archives of atmospheric dust deposition and the climate changes which drive them. In the deeper, basal peat layers of the bog, in the minerotrophic zone where pore waters are affected bymineral-water interactions in the underlying and surrounding soils and sediments, peat serves as animportant link to the hydrosphere, efficiently removing from the imbibed groundwaters such trace elements as As, Cu, Mo, Ni, Se, V, and U. These removal processes, while incompletely understood, are so effective that measuring the dissolved fraction of trace elements in the pore waters becomes a considerable challenge even for the most sophisticated analytical laboratories. While the trace elements listed above are removed from groundwaters (along with P and S), elements such as Fe and Mn are added to the waters because of reductive dissolution, an important first step in the formation of lacustrine Fe and Mn

  11. Are colorimetric assays appropriate for measuring phenol oxidase activity in peat soils?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magdalena M. Wiedermann; Evan S. Kane; Timothy J. Veverica; Erik A. Lilleskov

    2017-01-01

    The activity of extracellular phenol oxidases is believed to play a critical role in decomposition processes in peatlands. The water logged, acidic conditions, and recalcitrant litter from the peatland vegetation, lead to exceptionally high phenolics in the peat. In order to quantify the activity of oxidative enzymes involved in the modification and break down of...

  12. The sensitivity of peat soil and peatland vegetation to drought: release of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) on rewetting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritson, Jonathan; Graham, Nigel; Templeton, Michael; Freeman, Christopher; Clark, Joanna

    2015-04-01

    Organic rich peat soils are a major store of carbon worldwide. Their existence is predicated on high year-round water tables which create an anoxic environment, thus limiting decay, and also to the recalcitrance of plant litter (dead plant material) commonly found in peatland areas. Climate change threatens the stability of peat soils by altering the biogeochemical cycles which control plant decay, lowering water tables so that oxic degradation can occur and by changing habitat niches such that less recalcitrant species can thrive in peatlands. One of the major fluxes of carbon from peatlands is through dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in surface waters. As peatland areas in the UK are often used as source waters for drinking water supply this presents a problem to water utilities as DOC must be effectively removed to limit colour, odour and the formation of potentially carcinogenic by-products on disinfection. Changes in catchment vegetation may occur due to climate change, nutrient deposition and changing bioclimatic envelopes. How different peatland vegetation contribute to DOC flux and how this may change in the future is therefore of interest. A six week laboratory simulation was performed on typical peatland litter (Sphagnum spp., Calluna vulgaris, Molinea caerulea, Juncus effusus) and a peat soil collected from Exmoor National Park, UK. The simulation monitored DOC flux from the decaying litter/soil and considered the impact of different drought severities using the 50th, 25th, 10th and 5th percentiles of the mean July/August monthly rainfall for Exmoor. On rewetting following the drought, all sources produced significantly different amounts of DOC (Tukey HSD pJuncus>Calluna>Sphagnum>peat. The source also had a significant (ANOVA pdrinking water treatment, with Juncus DOC proving the easiest to remove whilst Sphagnum DOC was the most difficult. Sphagnum DOC had the lowest ratio of humic-like to protein-like fluorescence, which is indicative of DOC which is

  13. Temporal changes in abundance and composition of ammonia-oxidizing bacterial and archaeal communities in a drained peat soil in relation to N{sub 2}O emissions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andert, Janet [Swedish Univ. of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala (Sweden). Dept. of Microbiology; Max-Planck-Institute of Colloids and Interfaces, Potsdam (Germany); Wessen, Ella; Hallin, Sara [Swedish Univ. of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala (Sweden). Dept. of Microbiology; Boerjesson, Gunnar [Swedish Univ. of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala (Sweden). Dept. of Soil and Environment

    2011-12-15

    Boreal peat soils comprise about 3% of the terrestrial environments, and when drained, they become sources of the greenhouse gas nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O). Ammonia oxidation can result in N{sub 2}O emissions, either directly or by fuelling denitrification, but we know little about the ecology of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and archaea (AOA) in peat soils. Our aim was to determine temporal alterations in abundance and composition of these communities in a drained and forested peat soil in relation to N{sub 2}O emissions and ammonia oxidation activity. Materials and methods The peat was sampled at three different depths in the upper 0.5 m over a period of 9 months covering two summer and two winter samplings. Community composition and abundance were determined by T-RFLP and quantitative real-time PCR of the bacterial and archaeal amoA genes. Potential ammonia oxidation rates were measured using the chlorate inhibition technique, and in situ N{sub 2}O emission was determined using chambers. Results and discussion The soil parameters displayed little spatial and temporal heterogeneity, which probably explained why there were no depth-related effects on the abundance, composition, or activity of the ammonia oxidizers. In contrast to most terrestrial environments, the AOB dominated numerically over the AOA. Both groups changed in community composition between sampling occasions, although the AOB showed more significant seasonal signatures than the AOA. Temporal changes in abundance were only observed for the AOB, with a decrease in numbers from May to March. Such differences were not reflected by the activity or N{sub 2}O emissions. Conclusions The high ammonium concentrations in the peat soil likely favored the AOB over the AOA, and we hypothesize that they were more active than the AOA and therefore responded to climatic and environmental changes. However, other processes rather than ammonia oxidation were likely responsible for N{sub 2}O emissions at the site.

  14. An unceasing problem: soil-transmitted helminthiases in rural Malaysian communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Mekhlafi, M S Hesham; Atiya, A S; Lim, Y A L; Mahdy, A K Mohammed; Ariffin, W A Wan; Abdullah, H Che; Surin, Johari

    2007-11-01

    Despite great development in socioeconomic status throughout 50 years of independence, Malaysia is still plagued with soil-transmitted helminthiases (STH). STH continue to have a significant impact on public health particularly in rural communities. In order to determine the prevalence of STH among rural Orang Asli children and to investigate the possible risk factors affecting the pattern of this prevalence, fecal samples were collected from 292 Orang Asli primary schoolchildren (145 males and 147 females) age 7-12 years, from Pos Betau, Kuala Lipis, Pahang. The samples were examined by Kato-Katz and Harada Mori techniques. Socioeconomic data were collected using pre-tested questionnaires. The overall prevalence of ascariasis, trichuriasis, and hookworm infections were 67.8, 95.5 and 13.4%, respectively. Twenty-nine point eight percent of the children had heavy trichuriasis, while 22.3% had heavy ascariasis. Sixty-seven point seven percent of the children had mixed infections. Age > 10 years (p = 0.016), no toilet in the house (p = 0.012), working mother (p = 0.040), low household income (p = 0.033), and large family size (p = 0.028) were identified as risk factors for ascariasis. Logistic regression confirmed low income, no toilet in the house and working mother as significant risk factors for ascariasis. The prevalence of STH is still very high in rural Malaysian communities. STH may also contribute to other health problems such as micronutrient deficiencies, protein-energy malnutrition and poor educational achievement. Public health personnel need to reassess current control measures and identify innovative and integrated ways in order to reduce STH significantly in rural communities.

  15. Relocation of carbon from decomposition of {sup 14}C-labelled needle and fine root litter in peat soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Domish, T.; Laine, J.; Laiho, R. [Helsinki Univ. (Finland). Dept. of Forest Ecology; Finer, L. [Finnish Forest Research Inst. (Finland). Joensuu Research Station; Karsisto, M. [Finnish Forest Research Inst. (Finland). Dept. of Forest Ecology

    1996-12-31

    Drainage of peatlands promotes a shift of biomass and production from the ground vegetation to the trees. Thus, the above-ground (e.g. needles) and below-ground (roots) litter production of trees increases. Fine roots in particular are an important factor in the carbon and nutrient cycle in forest ecosystems. A major part of the annual net primary production of trees may be allocated below ground, the relative proportion being smaller on fertile sites than on less fertile ones. For modelling the carbon balance of drained peatlands, it is important to know the fate of carbon from newly introduced and decomposing litter. Newly added and fertilised tree litter material may be decomposed at a rate different than litter from the ground vegetation. The objectives of this study are to study the pathways of decomposing litter carbon in peat soil and to evaluate the use of the litterbag method in a controlled environment. (9 refs.)

  16. On the applicability of unimodal and bimodal van Genuchten-Mualem based models to peat and other organic soils under evaporation conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dettmann, Ullrich; Bechtold, Michel; Frahm, Enrico; Tiemeyer, Bärbel

    2014-07-01

    Soil moisture is one of the key parameters controlling biogeochemical processes in peat and other organic soils. To understand and accurately model soil moisture dynamics and peatland hydrological functioning in general, knowledge about soil hydraulic properties is crucial. As peat differs in several aspects from mineral soils, the applicability of standard hydraulic functions (e.g. van Genuchten-Mualem model) developed for mineral soils to peat soil moisture dynamics might be questionable. In this study, the hydraulic properties of five types of peat and other organic soils from different German peatlands have been investigated by laboratory evaporation experiments. Soil hydraulic parameters of the commonly-applied van Genuchten-Mualem model and the bimodal model by Durner (1994) were inversely estimated using HYDRUS-1D and global optimization. The objective function included measured pressure heads and cumulative evaporation. The performance of eight model set-ups differing in the degree of complexity and the choice of fitting parameters were evaluated. Depending on the model set-up, botanical origin and degree of peat decomposition, the quality of the model results differed strongly. We show that fitted ‘tortuosity’ parameters τ of the van Genuchten-Mualem model can deviate very much from the default value of 0.5 that is frequently applied to mineral soils. Results indicate a rather small decrease of the hydraulic conductivity with increasing suction compared to mineral soils. Optimizing τ did therefore strongly reduce the model error at dry conditions when high pressure head gradients occurred. As strongly negative pressure heads in the investigated peatlands rarely occur, we also reduced the range of pressure heads in the inversion to a ‘wet range’ from 0 to -200 cm. For the ‘wet range’ model performance was highly dependent on the inclusion of macropores. Here, fitting only the macropore fraction of the bimodal model as immediately drainable

  17. Remote Sensing of Wetland Types: Peat Swamps

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoekman, D.H.

    2017-01-01

    Deposits of peat underneath peat swamp forests are among the world’s largest reservoirs of carbon. Although tropical peatlands occupy only about 0.3 % of the global land surface, they could contain as much as 20 % of the global soil carbon stock, representing 63–148 Gt of carbon.

    Peat swamp

  18. Application of soil magnetometry on peat-bogs and soils in areas affected by historical and prehistoric ore mining and smelting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magiera, Tadeusz; Mendakiewicz, Maria; Szuszkiewicz, Marcin; Chrost, Leszak

    2015-04-01

    The valleys of upper Brynica and Stoła located in northern part of Upper Silesia were areas of historical human activities since prehistoric times. Historically confirmed mining and smelting of iron, silver and lead ores on this areas has been dated back to early Middle Ages, however recently some geochemical and radiometric analyses suggest even prehistoric time of such activities. The aim of this study was to check if it is possible to find any magnetic signal suggesting such activities in peat-bogs and soils of this area. This magnetic properties would be a result of presence of historical Technogenic Magnetic Particles (TMPs) arisen during the primitive smelting processes in the past. Many different types of TMPs were separated from the depth of 15-30 cm of soil profiles and also were present in deeper parts of peat-bogs accompanied by fine charcoal particles. The peat-bog horizons dated by radiocarbon (C14) for 2000 BC were contaminated by some heavy metals (Cu, Zn, Cd, Ag, Pb, Mn, Fe, Sr, Sc) and slightly increased magnetic susceptibility signal was also observed. On the base of soil surface magnetic measurement using MS2D Bartington sensor complemented by magnetic gradiometer system Grad 601-02 for the deeper soil penetration, some local magnetic anomalies were detected. In areas of local 'hot spots', the vertical cores up to 30 cm in depth were collected using the HUMAX core sampler. Vertical distribution of magnetic susceptibility along the cores was measured in the laboratory using the MS2C Bartington core sensor. The core section with increased susceptibility values were analyzed and TMPs were separated using a hand magnet. The separation of fine fraction of TMPs was carried out in an ultrasonic bath from the fine soil material suspended in isopropanol to avoid their coagulation. Irregular ceramic particles, ash and ore particles, as well as strong magnetic particles of metallic iron; all with diameter up to 10 mm and almost regular shape and rounded

  19. Peat surface GHG fluxes related to peat hydrology in various tropical peat land uses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jauhiainen, Jyrki; Silvennoinen, Hanna; Limin, Suwido; Vasander, Harri

    2010-05-01

    It is generally accepted that the gradual increase in the mean temperature of the Earth's surface is primarily due to rising concentrations of greenhouse gases (GHG), especially carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O) in the atmosphere. Tropical peatlands are an important component of the global peatland resource, contributing to terrestrial carbon storage in both their above-ground biomass (peat swamp forest) and underlying thick deposits of peat, which both participate soil-atmosphere carbon exchange processes. In their natural state, these forests have the ability to sequester carbon from the atmosphere during photosynthesis, retain this in plant biomass and store part of it in the peat. This process occurs mainly because of the frequent waterlogged condition of the peat, which reduces organic matter decomposition significantly and this causes the rate of organic matter production to exceed its breakdown. Peatland development, however, requires drainage, brings about changes in the vegetation type C-sequestration capacity and leads to changes in peat organic matter dynamics. Drainage promotes the depth of oxic conditions deeper in peat profile and thus speeds up peat stored organic matter mineralization. Aerobic conditions and high redox potentials created by drainage are known to favour microbial activity, which can enhance C and N losses by peat mineralization. Large areas of tropical peat have been drained, resulting in an abrupt and permanent shift in the ecosystem carbon balance from sink to source. Discussion of the current role of tropical peatlands in regional and global climate change processes is based mostly on circumstantial and secondary evidence, largely because total ecosystem carbon balance studies are very few and unsatisfactory. Peat surface GHG flux data are spatially very fragmented and have not usually been collected over entire diurnal or seasonal cycles. Interpretation of the impact of biophysical factors of tropical

  20. Growing peat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harpenslager, S.F.

    2015-01-01

    Peat formation is a slow process and the formation of thick peat layers in large parts of e.g. Russia, Canada and Indonesia has generally taken thousands of years. Due to degradation of peatlands throughout the world, as a result of changed land use and pollution, many ecosystem services provided by

  1. Phosphorus release from anaerobic peat soil during convective discharge – effect of soil Fe:P molar ratio and preferential flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Forsmann, Ditte M.; Kjærgaard, Charlotte

    2014-01-01

    was controlled by reductive Fe(III) dissolution, and was well predicted from the soil FeBD:PBD molar ratio. Continuous convective column discharge with oxygen-free deionised water at 1 mm h− 1 for 10 effluent pore volumes resulted in highly variable in situ redox potential (Eh from − 200 to 300 mV), effluent Fe...... influence of soil geochemistry and local scale active flow volume. Combining batch incubation experiments and continuous column discharge experiments, we investigated iron (Fe) reduction and P release from 10 anoxic Fe-dominated (oxalate extractable Fe (Feox) from ~ 5500 to 50,000 mg kg− 1) lowland peat......(II) concentrations (23 to 2000 μM) and effluent dissolved reactive phosphorus (DRP) concentrations (discharge (3...

  2. Determination of low methylmercury concentrations in peat soil samples by isotope dilution GC-ICP-MS using distillation and solvent extraction methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietilä, Heidi; Perämäki, Paavo; Piispanen, Juha; Starr, Mike; Nieminen, Tiina; Kantola, Marjatta; Ukonmaanaho, Liisa

    2015-04-01

    Most often, only total mercury concentrations in soil samples are determined in environmental studies. However, the determination of extremely toxic methylmercury (MeHg) in addition to the total mercury is critical to understand the biogeochemistry of mercury in the environment. In this study, N2-assisted distillation and acidic KBr/CuSO4 solvent extraction methods were applied to isolate MeHg from wet peat soil samples collected from boreal forest catchments. Determination of MeHg was performed using a purge and trap GC-ICP-MS technique with a species-specific isotope dilution quantification. Distillation is known to be more prone to artificial MeHg formation compared to solvent extraction which may result in the erroneous MeHg results, especially with samples containing high amounts of inorganic mercury. However, methylation of inorganic mercury during the distillation step had no effect on the reliability of the final MeHg results when natural peat soil samples were distilled. MeHg concentrations determined in peat soil samples after distillation were compared to those determined after the solvent extraction method. MeHg concentrations in peat soil samples varied from 0.8 to 18 μg kg(-1) (dry weight) and the results obtained with the two different methods did not differ significantly (p=0.05). The distillation method with an isotope dilution GC-ICP-MS was shown to be a reliable method for the determination of low MeHg concentrations in unpolluted soil samples. Furthermore, the distillation method is solvent-free and less time-consuming and labor-intensive when compared to the solvent extraction method. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Genome sequence of Roseomonas sp. strain B5, a quorum-quenching N-acylhomoserine lactone-degrading bacterium isolated from Malaysian tropical soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jian-Woon; Gan, Han Ming; Yin, Wai-Fong; Chan, Kok-Gan

    2012-12-01

    Roseomonas sp. strain B5 was isolated from Malaysian tropical soil that showed N-acylhomoserine lactone degradation. This is the first genome announcement of a member from the genus of Roseomonas and the first report on the quorum-quenching activity of Roseomonas spp.

  4. Genome Sequence of Roseomonas sp. Strain B5, a Quorum-Quenching N-Acylhomoserine Lactone-Degrading Bacterium Isolated from Malaysian Tropical Soil

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Jian-Woon; Gan, Han Ming; Yin, Wai-Fong; Chan, Kok-Gan

    2012-01-01

    Roseomonas sp. strain B5 was isolated from Malaysian tropical soil that showed N-acylhomoserine lactone degradation. This is the first genome announcement of a member from the genus of Roseomonas and the first report on the quorum-quenching activity of Roseomonas spp.

  5. Is it clean or contaminated soil? Using petrogenic versus biogenic GC-FID chromatogram patterns to mathematically resolve false petroleum hydrocarbon detections in clean organic soils: a crude oil-spiked peat microcosm experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly-Hooper, Francine; Farwell, Andrea J; Pike, Glenna; Kennedy, Jocelyn; Wang, Zhendi; Grunsky, Eric C; Dixon, D George

    2013-10-01

    The Canadian Council of Ministers of the Environment (CCME) reference method for the Canada-wide standard (CWS) for petroleum hydrocarbon (PHC) in soil provides chemistry analysis standards and guidelines for the management of contaminated sites. However, these methods can coextract natural biogenic organic compounds (BOCs) from organic soils, causing false exceedences of toxicity guidelines. The present 300-d microcosm experiment used CWS PHC tier 1 soil extraction and gas chromatography-flame ionization detector (GC-FID) analysis to develop a new tier 2 mathematical approach to resolving this problem. Carbon fractions F2 (C10-C16), F3 (C16-C34), and F4 (>C34) as well as subfractions F3a (C16-C22) and F3b (C22-C34) were studied in peat and sand spiked once with Federated crude oil. These carbon ranges were also studied in 14 light to heavy crude oils. The F3 range in the clean peat was dominated by F3b, whereas the crude oils had approximately equal F3a and F3b distributions. The F2 was nondetectable in the clean peat but was a significant component in crude oil. The crude oil–spiked peat had elevated F2 and F3a distributions. The BOC-adjusted PHC F3 calculation estimated the true PHC concentrations in the spiked peat. The F2:F3b ratio of less than 0.10 indicated PHC absence in the clean peat, and the ratio of greater than or equal to 0.10 indicated PHC presence in the spiked peat and sand. Validation studies are required to confirm whether this new tier 2 approach is applicable to real-case scenarios. Potential adoption of this approach could minimize unnecessary ecological disruptions of thousands of peatlands throughout Canada while also saving millions of dollars in management costs.

  6. Restoration of a Freshwater Wetland on Subsided Peat Soils: Potential Effects on Release of Dissolved Organic Carbon and Disinfection Byproduct Precursors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleck, J.; Fujii, R.; Bossio, D.

    2002-12-01

    In 1997, a wetland restoration demonstration project began on Twitchell Island in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta (Delta), California, to examine the effects of a permanently flooded, freshwater wetland on peat soil subsidence. Conversion from agriculture to wetland has changed many of the biogeochemical processes controlling dissolved organic carbon (DOC) production, release, and transport from the peat soils, relative to the previous agricultural land uses. This study explores the effects of agricultural and wetland management on peat soil biogeochemistry of DOC and disinfection byproduct (DBP) precursor release. DBPs [e.g. trihalomethanes (THMs)] form when chlorine reacts with the natural organic matter present in source drinking water. Many DBPs are carcinogenic and mutagenic and pose a potential threat to more than 22 million Californians whose drinking water is diverted from the Delta. Results indicate that previous drainage practices substantially affected the quantity of water-soluble DOC currently extractable from Delta peat soils and ranged from 0.40 mg C (carbon)/g soil for well-drained soils to 0.76 mg C/g soil for poorly drained soils. Present management also affects the propensity of this DOC to form DBPs. The following values for DBP formation were measured for a variety of soil types and depths (all values are medians in mmole THMs produced/mole C): well-drained agricultural field (7.7 plow layer, 7.9 below plow layer), poorly drained agricultural field (7.0 plow layer, 8.7 below plow layer), open-water wetland (12.8 sediment, 10.1 underlying soil), and vegetated wetland (11.3 sediment, 7.7 underlying soil). Sources of organic matter inputs and decomposition pathways seem to be important factors in DBP precursor formation and release when DOC loadings are of similar magnitude. These results indicate that soil conditions have a greater effect on DOC and DBP loadings than any differences caused by conversion from agriculture to wetland, which is of

  7. Modelling the effect of aggregates on N2O emission from denitrification in an agricultural peat soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Kabat

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Nitrous oxide (N2O emissions are highly variable in time, with high peak emissions lasting a few days to several weeks and low background emissions. This temporal variability is poorly understood which hampers the simulation of daily N2O emissions. In structured soils, like clay and peat, aggregates hamper the diffusion of oxygen, which leads to anaerobic microsites in the soil, favourable for denitrification. Diffusion of N2O out of the aggregates is also hampered, which leads to delayed emissions and increased reduction of N2O to N2. In this model simulation study we investigate the effect of aggregates in soils on the N2O emissions. We present a parameterization to simulate the effects of aggregates on N2O production by denitrification and on N2O reduction. The parameterization is based on the mobile-immobile model concept. It was implemented in a field-scale hydrological-biogeochemical model combination. We compared the simulated fluxes with observed fluxes from a fertilized and drained peat soil under grass. The results of this study show that aggregates strongly affect the simulated N2O emissions: peak emissions are lower, whereas the background emissions are slightly higher. Including the effect of aggregates caused a 40% decrease in the simulated annual emissions relative to the simulations without accounting for the effects of aggregates. The new parameterization significantly improved the model performance regarding simulation of observed daily N2O fluxes; r2 and RMSE improved from 0.11 and 198 g N2O-N ha−1 d−1 to 0.41 and 40 g N2O-N ha−1 d−1, respectively. Our analyses of the model results show that aggregates have a larger impact on the reduction than on the production of N2O. Reduction of N2O is more sensitive to changes in the drivers than production of N2O and is in that sense the key to understanding N2O emissions from denitrification. The effects of changing environmental conditions on reduction of N2O relative to N2O

  8. The impact of 90 years of drainage works on some chemical properties of raised peat bog organic soils - case study from valley of the Upper San river in Polish Bieszczady Mts. (Eastern Carpathians).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolarczyk, Mateusz

    2016-04-01

    Wetland ecosystems, including raised peat bogs are characterized by a specific water conditions and unique vegetation, which makes peatland highly important habitats due to protection of biodiversity. Transformation of peat bog areas is particularly related to changes in the environment e.g. according to reclamation works. Drainage of peatlands is directly associated to the decrease of groundwater levels and lead to a number of changes in the chemical and physical properties of peat material, included contents of exchangeable cations in the surface layers of peat soils in the decession phase of peat development and release above compounds from the soil to ground or surface waters. The aim of the research was to determine the impact of extended drainage works on chemical composition of sorption complex of raised peat bog organic soils and identification the potential environmental effects of alkaline cations leaching to the surface waters. Research was carried out on the peat bogs located in the Upper San valley in Polish Bieszczady Mts. (Eastern Carpathians). Soil samples used in this study were collected from 3 soil profiles in 10 or 20 cm intervals to the approximately 130 cm depth. Laboratory analyses included determination of basic properties of organic material such as the degree of peat decomposition, ash content, soil pH and carbon, hydrogen, nitrogen concentrations. Additionally the amount of alkaline cations, exchangeable and extractable acidity was determined. Furthermore, the degree of saturation of the sorption complex with alkaline cations (V) and cation exchange capacity (CEC) are calculated. In order to evaluate the impact of the examined peat bog to the environment, also water samples were collected and ions composition was measured. The obtained results show that studied organic soils are oligotrophic and strongly acidic. In the case of organic material related to decession phase of peat development, as a result of the lengthy drainage works

  9. Impact of electromagnetic microwaves on the germination of spores of Streptomyces xanthochromogenes in a peat soil and in a liquid nutrient medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komarova, A. S.; Likhacheva, A. A.; Lapygina, E. V.; Maksimova, I. A.; Pozdnyakov, A. I.

    2010-01-01

    The impact of microwaves on the germination of spores of Streptomyces xanthochromogenes in a liquid nutrient medium and in a peat soil was studied. The treatment of inoculums with microwave radiation affected the development of the microorganisms from the stage of spore germination to the stage of the formation of microcolonies of actinomycetes upon the spore cultivation in the liquid medium. Typical hypnum-herbaceous peat was used to study the rate of germination of the actinomycetal spores in soil. The study of the dynamics of the Streptomyces xanthochromogenes population in the control soil (without treatment with microwaves) showed that the most active development of the culture took place in the soil moistened to 60% of the maximum water capacity. When the soil was moistened to the minimum adsorption capacity, the streptomyces did not complete their full cycle of development. The stimulation of the spore germination and mycelium growth with microwaves in the soil medium required a longer period in comparison with that for the liquid medium. The stimulation of the spore germination was observed in the liquid nutrient medium in the case of 30-s treatment and in the soil in the case of 60-s treatment.

  10. Mycobiota of peat-gleyic soils during the process of recultivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibatullina, I.; Khabibullina, F.

    2009-04-01

    The experiments on the recultivation of oil-polluted soils and their self-rehabilitation were laid in 1995 at sites contaminated with oil in the area of Usinsk region, Komi Republic, Russia. There were taken different plots for the experiment with various amounts of contaminant. The investigations continued some years after the contamination. At this point, the concentration of residual oil in these areas significantly decreased. Microbiological activity increased 2-3 times in the most contaminated soil. We should note that the micromycets were marked only in the layer 0-5sm in contrast to background soil. There were 10 species of micromycets and most of them characterized as dark colored species, the dominants were Aspergillus fumigatus. Penicillium funiculosum, P. paxilli, P. lanosum, P. tardum, usual for contaminated anthropogenic soils. The same highly oil-polluted soil, where recultivation was held, is characterized with the wider specter of different physiological groups of microorganisms. Micobiota is quite reach, it represents 20 species from 8 types. In the composition of micromycets 40% are the representatives of Penicillium, sterile mycelium presents as dark colored forms so as light colored ones. But the micobiota is still reach in micromycets typical for disturbed anthropogenic soils. The most microbiologically active plot was a territory with low-contaminated self-recovered soil. The micobiota is represented of great amount of microorganisms and consists of 21 species, mostly formed with dark colored forms of sterile mycelium. During the process of recultivation the structure of micromyctes changed: regrouping of species and increase of biodiversity. We assume that a process of self-purification started. However we should notice that activation of biological processes doesn't occur deeper than 0-5sm. At the same time the roots of high plants are seen till the depth 7-10sm, they also participate in the cleaning of oil polluted soil. There was used a

  11. How does conversion from peat swamp forest to oil palm plantation affect emissions of nitrous oxide from the soil? A case study in Jambi, Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartill, Jodie; Hergoualc'h, Kristell; Comeau, Louis-Pierre; Jo, Smith; Lou, Verchot

    2017-04-01

    Half of the peatlands across Peninsular Malaysia, Borneo and Sumatra are 'managed'. Conversion of peat swamp forest to workable oil palm plantation requires a drastic, potentially irreversible, change to the landscape, to which fertilizers are then routinely applied. A combination of these factors is now widely thought to increase soil nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions, although there is high uncertainty due to gaps in the knowledge, both regionally and nationally. Despite the widespread use of fertilizers in plantations on peats, studies observing their effects remain very limited. Therefore, there is a need for in situ studies to evaluate how environmental parameters (edaphic properties, climate, soil moisture and N availability indicators) influence soil emissions. This 18 month study was located in plots local to each other, representing the start, intermediate and end of the land conversion process; namely mixed peat swamp forest, drained and logged forest and industrial oil palm plantation. Spatial variability was taken into account by differentiating the hollows and hummocks in the mixed peat swamp forest, and the fertilized zone and the zone without fertilizer addition in the oil palm plantation. Gas samples were collected each month from static chambers at the same time as key environmental parameters were measured. Intensive sampling was performed during a 35 day period following two fertilizer applications, in which urea was applied to palms at rates of 0.5 and 1 kg urea palm-1. Soil N2O emissions (kg N ha-1 y-1 ± SE) were low overall, but they were greater in the oil palm plantation (0.8 ± 0.1) than in the mixed peat swamp forest (0.3 ± 0.0) and the drained/logged forest (0.2 ± 0.0). In the mixed peat swamp forest, monthly average fluxes of N2O (g N ha-1 d-1 ± SE) were similar in the hollows (0.6 ± 0.2) and the hummocks (0.3 ± 0.1), whereas in the oil palm plantation they were consistently higher in the zone without fertilizer (2.5 ± 0.4) than in

  12. Determinants of spatial variability of methane emissions from wet grasslands on peat soil

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pol-Van Dasselaar, van den A.; Beusichem, van M.L.; Oenema, O.

    1999-01-01

    Methane (CH4) emissions from soils, representing the consequence of CH4 production, CH4 consumption and CH4 transport, are poorly characterised and show a large spatial variability. This study aimed to assess the determinants of field-scale spatial variability of CH4 emissions from wet grasslands on

  13. Metagenomic insights into anaerobic metabolism along an Arctic peat soil profile.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David A Lipson

    Full Text Available A metagenomic analysis was performed on a soil profile from a wet tundra site in northern Alaska. The goal was to link existing biogeochemical knowledge of the system with the organisms and genes responsible for the relevant metabolic pathways. We specifically investigated how the importance of iron (Fe oxides and humic substances (HS as terminal electron acceptors in this ecosystem is expressed genetically, and how respiratory and fermentative processes varied with soil depth into the active layer and into the upper permafrost. Overall, the metagenomes reflected a microbial community enriched in a diverse range of anaerobic pathways, with a preponderance of known Fe reducing species at all depths in the profile. The abundance of sequences associated with anaerobic metabolic processes generally increased with depth, while aerobic cytochrome c oxidases decreased. Methanogenesis genes and methanogen genomes followed the pattern of CH4 fluxes: they increased steeply with depth into the active layer, but declined somewhat over the transition zone between the lower active layer and the upper permafrost. The latter was relatively enriched in fermentative and anaerobic respiratory pathways. A survey of decaheme cytochromes (MtrA, MtrC and their homologs revealed that this is a promising approach to identifying potential reducers of Fe(III or HS, and indicated a possible role for Acidobacteria as Fe reducers in these soils. Methanogens appear to coexist in the same layers, though in lower abundance, with Fe reducing bacteria and other potential competitors, including acetogens. These observations provide a rich set of hypotheses for further targeted study.

  14. Effect of reed canary grass cultivation on greenhouse gas emission from peat soil at controlled rewetting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Karki

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Cultivation of bioenergy crops in rewetted peatland (paludiculture is considered as a possible land use option to mitigate greenhouse gas (GHG emissions. However, bioenergy crops like reed canary grass (RCG can have a complex influence on GHG fluxes. Here we determined the effect of RCG cultivation on GHG emission from peatland rewetted to various extents. Mesocosms were manipulated to three different ground water levels (GWL, i.e., 0, −10 and −20 cm below the soil surface in a controlled semi-field facility. Emissions of CO2 (ecosystem respiration, ER, CH4 and N2O from mesocosms with RCG and bare soil were measured at weekly to fortnightly intervals with static chamber techniques for a period of one year. Cultivation of RCG increased both ER and CH4 emissions, but decreased the N2O emissions. The presence of RCG gave rise to 69, 75 and 85% of total ER at −20, −10 and 0 cm GWL, respectively However, this difference was due to decreased soil respiration at the rising GWL as the plant-derived CO2 flux was similar at all three GWL. For methane, 70–95% of the total emission was due to presence of RCG, with the highest contribution at −20 cm GWL. In contrast, cultivation of RCG decreased N2O emission by 33–86% with the major reductions at −10 and −20 cm GWL. In terms of global warming potential, the increase in CH4 emissions due to RCG cultivation was more than off-set by the decrease in N2O emissions at −10 and −20 cm GWL; at 0 cm GWL the CH4 emissions was offset only by 23%. CO2 emissions from ER obviously were the dominant RCG-derived GHG flux, but above-ground biomass yields, and preliminary measurements of gross photosynthetic production, show that ER could be more than balanced due to the uptake of CO2 by RCG. Our results support that RCG cultivation could be a good land use option in terms of mitigating GHG emission from rewetted peatlands, potentially turning these ecosystems into a sink of atmospheric CO2.

  15. Contaminated lead environments of man: reviewing the lead isotopic evidence in sediments, peat, and soils for the temporal and spatial patterns of atmospheric lead pollution in Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bindler, Richard

    2011-08-01

    Clair Patterson and colleagues demonstrated already four decades ago that the lead cycle was greatly altered on a global scale by humans. Moreover, this change occurred long before the implementation of monitoring programs designed to study lead and other trace metals. Patterson and colleagues also developed stable lead isotope analyses as a tool to differentiate between natural and pollution-derived lead. Since then, stable isotope analyses of sediment, peat, herbaria collections, soils, and forest plants have given us new insights into lead biogeochemical cycling in space and time. Three important conclusions from our studies of lead in the Swedish environment conducted over the past 15 years, which are well supported by extensive results from elsewhere in Europe and in North America, are: (1) lead deposition rates at sites removed from major point sources during the twentieth century were about 1,000 times higher than natural background deposition rates a few thousand years ago (~10 mg Pb m(-2) year(-1) vs. 0.01 mg Pb m(-2) year(-1)), and even today (~1 mg Pb m(-2) year(-1)) are still almost 100 times greater than natural rates. This increase from natural background to maximum fluxes is similar to estimated changes in body burdens of lead from ancient times to the twentieth century. (2) Stable lead isotopes ((206)Pb/(207)Pb ratios shown in this paper) are an effective tool to distinguish anthropogenic lead from the natural lead present in sediments, peat, and soils for both the majority of sites receiving diffuse inputs from long range and regional sources and for sites in close proximity to point sources. In sediments >3,500 years and in the parent soil material of the C-horizon, (206)Pb/(207)Pb ratios are higher, 1.3 to >2.0, whereas pollution sources and surface soils and peat have lower ratios that have been in the range 1.14-1.18. (3) Using stable lead isotopes, we have estimated that in southern Sweden the cumulative anthropogenic burden of

  16. Evaluation of radionuclides transfer from soil-to-edible flora and estimation of radiological dose to the Malaysian populace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khandaker, Mayeen Uddin; Mohd Nasir, Noor Liyana; Asaduzzaman, Kh; Olatunji, Michael Adekunle; Amin, Yusoff Mohd; Kassim, Hasan Abu; Bradley, D A; Jojo, P J; Alrefae, Tareq

    2016-07-01

    Malaysia, a rapidly growing industrial country, is susceptible to pollution via large-scale industrial engagements and associated human activities. One particular concern is the potential impact upon the quality of locally resourced vegetables, foodstuffs that contain important nutrients necessary for good health, forming an essential part of the Malaysian diet. As a part of this, it is of importance for there to be accurate knowledge of radioactive material uptake in these vegetables, not least in respect of any public health detriment. Herein, using HPGe γ-ray spectrometry, quantification has been performed of naturally occurring radionuclides in common edible vegetables and their associated soils. From samples analyses, the soil activity concentration ranges (in units of Bq/kg) for (226)Ra, (232)Th and (40)K were respectively 1.33-30.90, 0.48-26.80, 7.99-136.5 while in vegetable samples the ranges were 0.64-3.80, 0.21-6.91, 85.53-463.8. Using the corresponding activities, the transfer factors (TFs) from soil-to-vegetables were estimated, the transfers being greatest for (40)K, an expected outcome given the essentiality of this element in support of vigorous growth. The TFs of (226)Ra and (232)Th were found to be in accord with available literature data, the values indicating the mobility of these radionuclides to be low in the studied soils. Committed effective dose and the associated life-time cancer risk was estimated, being found to be below the permissible limit proposed by UNSCEAR. Results for the studied media show that the prevalent activities and mobilities pose no significant threat to human health, the edible vegetables being safe for consumption. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Peat; La tourbe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hervio, J.M. [Federation des Conservatoires regionaux d' espaces Naturels, 45 - Orleans (France); Millet, M.; Taborin, J.; Barthelemy, F.; Richard, H.; Begeot, C.; Magny, M.; Bossuet, G.; Megnien, C.; Buffetaut, E.; Duffaut, P.

    1999-09-01

    Peat bogs represent 4 millions of km{sup 2}, i.e. 3% of the Earth's surface. 90% are located in temperate and cold regions of the northern hemisphere mainly in Russia, Canada, USA and Scandinavia. This dossier is entirely devoted to peat. After a recall of the historical development of peat uses, the different types of peat bogs are presented (mires or fen peats, raised bogs). Then, different aspects of peat bogs are presented successively: natural resources and fragile ecosystems of humid regions (peat bogs, peat, deposits, formation, typology, geographical distribution, physico-chemical characteristics and uses, production, prices, market and fluxes, evolution and perspectives); peat bogs as todays environmental models of humic coals (generalities, composition of peat, degradation and preservation of plants, the lignin bio-marker, geological evolution of peat); peat and the recording of climatic changes; the French national strategy of peat bogs conservation; the origin of peat bogs in Jura (France); Baupte: a French peat bog in exploitation; the Cerin lake peat bog (southern Jura, France); the Blackwater bog (Offaly county, Ireland): industrial exploitation, the ancient artisanal exploitation, cross section and archaeological discoveries; the tropical peat bogs (continental-type: genesis and evolution, mangrove-type); the Pleistocene Megaloceros deer; peat and the manufacturing of whisky; the paleontological study of a Canadian peat bog; the archaeological discoveries of Northern Europe peat bogs; the problem of building onto peat. (J.S.)

  18. What are the mechanisms controlling carbon flux from peat soils across slopes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boothroyd, I.; Worrall, F.; Allott, T.

    2012-04-01

    Peatlands are a globally important terrestrial carbon stock but carbon budget models need further improvement. The use of empirical observations to increase the accuracy of process based models has helped to constrain the error involved in accounting for peatland carbon balances, yet our understanding of peatland function needs to improve still further. Hydrology and topography are important controls on the carbon balance of peatlands. The hydrology of hillslopes has been studied, with runoff mechanisms and flow pathways dependent upon the topographic position. Topslope plateau areas have been observed to promote a large degree of surface runoff, acting as a shedding area delivering water downslope. Midslopes may experience fewer saturation runoff events due to the greater hydraulic gradient, with lower water tables likely to cause subsurface throughflow that is delivered downslope at the accumulation area at the bottom of the slope. This can help to maintain higher water tables at the foot of the slope and attenuate saturation runoff events (Holden and Burt 2003). The different hydrological mechanisms studied across the hillslope have not until recently been studied in the context of carbon cycling as well. The author has presented results elsewhere on the role that hillslope position has on carbon flux, finding that with water table drawdown observed on the midslopes, there is a concurrent increase in the rates of ecosystem respiration dependent upon the changing depth of the water table. There is also a decrease in the concentration of dissolved organic carbon concentration downslope. This poster presents preliminary results looking to constrain the explanations for the changing levels of respiration and dissolved organic carbon content across the slope. One metre deep soil cores were taken from an intact and an eroded hillslope in the Peak District, UK, across four hillslope positions: topslope, upper midslope, lower midslope and bottomslope. The cores were

  19. A Greener Arctic: Vascular Plant Litter Input in Subarctic Peat Bogs Changes Soil Invertebrate Diets and Decomposition Patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krab, E. J.; Berg, M. P.; Aerts, R.; van Logtestijn, R. S. P.; Cornelissen, H. H. C.

    2014-12-01

    Climate-change-induced trends towards shrub dominance in subarctic, moss-dominated peatlands will most likely have large effects on soil carbon (C) dynamics through an input of more easily decomposable litter. The mechanisms by which this increase in vascular litter input interacts with the abundance and diet-choice of the decomposer community to alter C-processing have, however, not yet been unraveled. We used a novel 13C tracer approach to link invertebrate species composition (Collembola), abundance and species-specific feeding behavior to C-processing of vascular and peat moss litters. We incubated different litter mixtures, 100% Sphagnum moss litter, 100% Betula leaf litter, and a 50/50 mixture of both, in mesocosms for 406 days. We revealed the transfer of C from the litters to the soil invertebrate species by 13C labeling of each of the litter types and assessed 13C signatures of the invertebrates Collembola species composition differed significantly between Sphagnum and Betula litter. Within the 'single type litter' mesocosms, Collembola species showed different 13C signatures, implying species-specific differences in diet choice. Surprisingly, the species composition and Collembola abundance changed relatively little as a consequence of Betula input to a Sphagnum based system. Their diet choice, however, changed drastically; species-specific differences in diet choice disappeared and approximately 67% of the food ingested by all Collembola originated from Betula litter. Furthermore, litter decomposition patterns corresponded to these findings; mass loss of Betula increased from 16.1% to 26.2% when decomposing in combination with Sphagnum, while Sphagnum decomposed even slower in combination with Betula litter (1.9%) than alone (4.7%). This study is the first to empirically show that collective diet shifts of the peatland decomposer community from mosses towards vascular plant litter may drive altered decomposition patterns. In addition, we showed that

  20. The Use of Ameliorant Fe3+ and Rock Phosphates in Peat Soil at Several Water Condition on the P Content of Plants Rice and Carbon Emission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelvia

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The addition of ameliorant Fe3+ and rock phosphates containing high Fe cation can reduce effect of toxic organic acids, increase peat stability through formation of complex compounds and reduce carbon emission. The research was conducted in the laboratory and green house of the Departement of Soil Science, Faculty of Agriculture, Bogor Agriculture University. Peat samples with hemic degree of decomposition were taken from Riau. Rock phosphates were taken from the rock phosphates of PT. Petrokimia Gresik, Christmas Island phosphates, and Huinan China and FeCl3.6H2O was used as the other Fe3+ source. The aims of the research were to study (a the effect of the applications of ameliorant Fe3+ and rock phosphates on the P content of plants dan (b the effect of the application ameliorant Fe3+ and the contribution of Fe cation in rock phosphates in the decrease of carbon emission. The results showed that the P content of plants rice increased 58 – 286% with the applications of ameliorant Fe3+ and rock phosphates. The estimation of carbon loss through CO2 and CH4 emissions from peats if planted continuously with rice was around 2.5, 2.2 and 2.6 Mg of C ha-1 year-1 respectively in field capacity condition, two times of field capacity condition, and 5 cm of saturated condition. The application of ameliorant Fe3+ and rock phosphates containing high Fe cation increased the stability of peats and reduced the carbon loss around 1.7 Mg of C ha-1 year-1 (64% in 5 cm of saturated condition, 1.3 Mg of C ha-1 year-1 (58% in two times of field capacity condition, and 1.0 Mg of C ha-1 year-1 (41% in field capacity condition.

  1. Utilization of subsurface microbial electrochemical systems to elucidate the mechanisms of competition between methanogenesis and microbial iron(III)/humic acid reduction in Arctic peat soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, E. S.; Miller, K.; Lipson, D.; Angenent, L. T.

    2012-12-01

    High-latitude peat soils are a major carbon reservoir, and there is growing concern that previously dormant carbon from this reservoir could be released to the atmosphere as a result of continued climate change. Microbial processes, such as methanogenesis and carbon dioxide production via iron(III) or humic acid reduction, are at the heart of the carbon cycle in Arctic peat soils [1]. A deeper understanding of the factors governing microbial dominance in these soils is crucial for predicting the effects of continued climate change. In previous years, we have demonstrated the viability of a potentiostatically-controlled subsurface microbial electrochemical system-based biosensor that measures microbial respiration via exocellular electron transfer [2]. This system utilizes a graphite working electrode poised at 0.1 V NHE to mimic ferric iron and humic acid compounds. Microbes that would normally utilize these compounds as electron acceptors donate electrons to the electrode instead. The resulting current is a measure of microbial respiration with the electrode and is recorded with respect to time. Here, we examine the mechanistic relationship between methanogenesis and iron(III)- or humic acid-reduction by using these same microbial-three electrode systems to provide an inexhaustible source of alternate electron acceptor to microbes in these soils. Chamber-based carbon dioxide and methane fluxes were measured from soil collars with and without microbial three-electrode systems over a period of four weeks. In addition, in some collars we simulated increased fermentation by applying acetate treatments to understand possible effects of continued climate change on microbial processes in these carbon-rich soils. The results from this work aim to increase our fundamental understanding of competition between electron acceptors, and will provide valuable data for climate modeling scenarios. 1. Lipson, D.A., et al., Reduction of iron (III) and humic substances plays a major

  2. Effects of Winter Flooding Peat Soils on Greenhouse Gas Emissions in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, F. E.; Pellerin, B. A.; Bergamaschi, B. A.; Sturtevant, C. S.; Verfaillie, J. G.; Knox, S. H.; Baldocchi, D. D.; Fujii, R.

    2013-12-01

    Harvested cornfields make up nearly 80% of cropland intentionally flooded during the winter (October through February) in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta to support waterfowl migration along the Pacific Flyway. This area is characterized by peat-rich islands that when flooded have the potential to be a source of methane production and emission, while reducing carbon dioxide respiration. Given the extent of winter flooding in the Delta, we evaluated the greenhouse gas emissions during this period and compared it to conventional winter fallow management. We constructed two eddy covariance towers on Staten Island, one in a cornfield flooded during the winter and the other one in a reference cornfield that remains fallow. Each tower included measurements of carbon dioxide, latent, sensible, and ground heat fluxes, as well as a suite of radiation measurements. A LI-COR Open Path Methane Analyzer (LI-7700) was initially installed at the flooded site and then alternated between the two sites every three to four weeks throughout the study. A second LI-7700 was deployed for continuous measurements at both towers in the winter of 2012/2013. Both fields have been under the same management for growing corn in the summer for the past twenty-five years. After harvest, the residual corn is chopped and then tilled into the soil before the winter season. Methane emissions slowly increased during the winter flooded period in 2011-2012, with maximum emissions (~234 mg-C m-2 day-1) occurring immediately following field drainage in mid-February. Methane emissions during the second winter period (e.g. 2012-2013) were similar to the first season in magnitude and timing, but showed two distinct events where emissions slowly increased followed by a maximum emission pulse and then a rapid decrease. Preliminary data analysis suggests the influence of strong Pacific storms occurring in the beginning of the second flooded season as a source of disturbance and agitating mechanism leading to

  3. Peat compaction in deltas : implications for Holocene delta evolution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Asselen, S.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304838101

    2010-01-01

    Many deltas contain substantial amounts of peat, which is the most compressible soil type. Therefore, peat compaction potentially leads to high amounts of subsidence in deltas. The main objective of this research was to quantify subsidence due to peat compaction in Holocene fluvial-deltaic settings

  4. Seasonal methane dynamics in three temperate grasslands on peat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schäfer, Carolyn; Elsgaard, Lars; Hoffmann, Carl Christian;

    2012-01-01

    Background and Aims Drained peatlands are considered to be insignificant CH4 sources, but the effect of drainage on CH4 dynamics has not been extensively studied. We investigated seasonal dynamics of CH4 in two fen peat soils and one bog peat soil under permanent grassland in Denmark. Methods Soil...... of aerenchymous plants should be considered before dismissing grasslands on peat as CH4 sources....

  5. Assessing Soil Biological Properties of Natural and Planted Forests in the Malaysian Tropical Lowland Dipterocarp Forest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daljit S. Karam

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: A study was conducted to evaluate and compare the soil biological properties of a natural forest and an 18-year-old stand of Shorea leprosula in Chikus Forest Reserve, Perak, Malaysia. Approach: Soils were sampled at depths of 0-15 cm (topsoil and 15-30 cm (subsoil in six subplots (20×20 m of natural forest (C1 and of a planted S. leprosula (C2 plot. Fresh composite soil samples were kept in UV-sterilized polyethylene bags prior to analysis in the laboratory. The microbial population count was determined using a spread-plate count technique. The microbial enzymatic activity was elucidated using a Fluorescein Diacetate (FDA hydrolysis assay; microbial biomass was extracted using a rapid chloroform fumigation extraction method. The Microbial Biomass C (MBC was determined by wet dichromate oxidation; Kjeldahl digestion and a distillation method were used for evaluation of Microbial Biomass N (MBN. Results: Results indicate that only the microbial biomass N and the population count in the soil at the 0-15 cm depth were found to be higher in C1 compared to C2. The higher microbial population count in the soil at the 0-15 cm depth of C1 compared to C2 was enhanced by the large amount of organic matter that serves as a suitable medium for soil microbial growth. The higher MBN in the C1 soil was also influenced by the high content of organic material available that encourages activities of decomposing bacteria to take place. Similarities in the soil biological properties of the plots with regard to enzymatic activity and microbial biomass Care believed to be influenced by the same topographic gradient. The higher MBC/MBN ratios found in soils of C2 compared to C1 were due to the low availability of N compared to C, might result from N utilization by soil microbes for organic material decomposition. Conclusion: There are similarities in microbial enzymatic activity and biomass C, but not in microbial population counts and biomass N

  6. Fiber Effects on Compressibility of Peat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johari, N. N.; Bakar, I.; Razali, S. N. M.; Wahab, N.

    2016-07-01

    Fibers found in the soil, especially in peaty soil play an important role in the determination of soil compressibility. Peat soils are the results from the decomposition of organic matter and the type of peat can be classified based on the fibrous material in the soil. In the engineering field, peat soil was mostly known as soils that has a serious settlement with high compressibility index. From the previous research, fibers in the soil were influenced in compressibility in terms of size, shape, fibric, soil arrangement and etc. Hence, this study attempts the determination of fibers effects on the compressibility of peat using a 1-D oedometer consolidation test. The reconstituted peat samples of different particle sizes were used to determine the consolidation parameters and the results obtained from reconstituted samples were also compared with the undisturbed sample. 1-D oedometer consolidation tests were performed on the samples by using the load increment method. The results shows, the higher particle size (R3.35), give higher moisture content (w = 401.20%) and higher initial void ratio (eo = 5.74). In settlement prediction, the higher the fiber content will results the higher the compression index, therefore, it will cause high of settlement.

  7. The effect of geocryological conditions and soil properties on the spatial variation in the CO2 emission from flat-topped peat mounds in the isolated permafrost zone of Western Siberia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobrik, A. A.; Goncharova, O. Yu.; Matyshak, G. V.; Ryzhova, I. M.; Makarov, M. I.

    2016-12-01

    The active layer thickness, CO2 emission, and contents of organic substances (including the total organic carbon, labile carbon, and the carbon of microbial biomass) in the soils of flat-topped peat mounds in the area of the Nadym Experimental Station in the north of Western Siberia (experimental site CALM R1) are characterized by considerable spatial variability. The low values of the CO2 emission are confined to the microelevations on the peatland surface. The high values of the emission (>200 mg CO2/(m2 h)) are typical of the soils with the highest content of the carbon of microbial biomass and the lowest content of the labile organic carbon. The soils of elevated flat-topped peat mounds statistically differ from the soils of waterlogged mires in the contents of total, labile, and microbial carbon and in the CO2 emission values. Though the soils of elevated flat-topped peat mounds are characterized by the high content of the carbon of microbial biomass (4260 ± 880 mg C/kg soil), the CO2 emission from them is low (158 ± 23 mg CO2/(m2 h)), which is explained by the structure of microbial communities in the cryogenic soils and by the effect of specific hydrothermic conditions.

  8. Influence of lime, peat and cation exchanger on the heavy-metal-uptake of vine (Vitis vinifera L. ) from contaminated soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohr, H.D.

    1980-10-01

    In pot experiments with heavy-metal-contaminated soils, the influence of different soil admixtures on growth and heavy-metal-uptake of vine cuttings was investigated. The following results were obtained: 1. The heavy metal uptake of vines from mixtures of soil and garbage-sewage-compost was strongly reduced by a cation exchanger. The heavy metal content of the roots decreased as follows: Cu68-77%; Zn36-74%; Cd29-81%; Mn20-45%; Pb13-52%; Cr7-58%. The Mn-, Zn- and Cu-content of wood, tendrils and leaves also decreased considerably. 2. Vine cuttings, which were cultivated on an acid, artificially Cd-contaminated soil, showed heavy damages and high Cd-contents. Admixtures of lime, cation exchanger or garbage-sewage-sludge-compost strongly reduced the injury of vines and their Cd-content. A combined addition of lime and cation exchanger was most effectful. On the contrary, the toxic effect of Cd was intensified by the acid reaction of peat.

  9. Properties and structure of raised bog peat humic acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klavins, Maris; Purmalis, Oskars

    2013-10-01

    Humic substances form most of the organic components of soil, peat and natural waters, and their structure and properties differ very much depending on their source. The aims of this study are to characterize humic acids (HAs) from raised bog peat, to evaluate the homogeneity of peat HAs within peat profiles, and to study peat humification impact on properties of HAs. A major impact on the structure of peat HAs have lignin-free raised bog biota (dominantly represented by bryophytes of different origin). On diagenesis scale, peat HAs have an intermediate position between the living organic matter and coal organic matter, and their structure is formed in a process in which more labile structures (carbohydrates, amino acids, etc.) are destroyed, while thermodynamically more stable aromatic and polyaromatic structures emerge as a result of abiotic synthesis. However, in comparison with soil, aquatic and other HAs, aromaticity of peat HAs is much lower. Comparatively, the raised bog peat HAs are at the beginning of the transformation process of living organic matter. Concentrations of carboxyl and phenolic hydroxyl groups change depending on the peat age and decomposition degree from where HAs have been isolated, and carboxylic acidity of peat HAs increases with peat depth and humification degree.

  10. The potential of utilizing wood ash and peat ash on organic soils in Sweden; Arealer foer skogsgoedsling med traeaska och torvaska paa organogena jordar i Sverige

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haanell, Bjoern [Swedish Univ. of Agricultural Sciences, Umeaa (Sweden). Dept. of Silviculture

    2004-01-01

    Nutrients removed from the forest when branches and treetops are harvested as fuel can be returned to the site by recycling the remaining wood ash after combustion. This compensation measure is presently not carried out to any appreciable extent, partly because there is no economic incentive for the landowner. In sites where this measure has been applied, only on mineral soils (e.g. moraine) until now, greater margins for sustainable maintenance of the long-term site productivity can be expected. The ash contains all elements required for tree growth except for nitrogen (N). Therefore the ash amendment does not result in increased stand growth on these soils because the most important element for a growth response (N) is missing. In contrast, on organic soils N is often abundant whereas the amounts of other mineral nutrients are small. Thus, the elements lacking in the soils of peatland forests are available in the ash. This is especially true for phosphorus (P) and potassium (K). This means that peatland forests provide an opportunity for ash amendment in order to increase forest production. Old fertilization trials using wood ash show that the growth increase can be very large. The aim of this study was to (i) calculate the area of peat covered land that with respect to stand growth responses could be regarded as most suitable for bio-ash (wood ash and peat ash) fertilization, and (ii) assess the amount of bio-ash needed for fertilizing this area. Peat ash, although not as much studied, also has potential to be used to provide nutrients for increasing peatland forest growth. Most of the area calculations were based on data from the National Forest Inventory (NFI) 1997-2001. Sites were selected with guidance from existing knowledge about ash fertilization effects on tree growth and with the aid of registrations made in NFI regarding peat depth, site productivity, drainage, condition of drains, dominating field vegetation, and degree of stand development

  11. Examination of soil contaminated by coal-liquids by size exclusion chromatography in 1-methyl-2-pyrrolidinone solution to evaluate interference from humic and fulvic acids and extracts from peat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, T J; Herod, A A; Brain, S A; Chambers, F M; Kandiyoti, R

    2005-11-18

    Soil from a redundant coke oven site has been examined by extraction of soluble materials using 1-methyl-2-pyrrolidinone (NMP) followed by size exclusion chromatography (SEC) of the extracted material. The extracted material was found to closely resemble a high temperature coal tar pitch. Standard humic and fulvic acids were also examined since these materials are very soluble in NMP and would be extracted with pitch if present in the soil. Humic substances derived from peat samples and NMP-extracts of peats were also examined. The results show that the humic and fulvic substances were not extracted directly by NMP from peats. They were extracted using caustic soda solution and were different from the peat extracts in NMP. These results indicate that humic and fulvic acids were soluble in NMP in the protonated polyelectrolyte form but not in the original native polyelectrolyte form. The extraction of soil using NMP followed by SEC appears to be a promising method for identifying contamination by coal-based industries.

  12. Spatial scaling effects on soil bacterial communities in Malaysian tropical forests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathi, Binu M; Lee-Cruz, Larisa; Kim, Mincheol; Singh, Dharmesh; Go, Rusea; Shukor, Noraini A A; Husni, M H A; Chun, Jongsik; Adams, Jonathan M

    2014-08-01

    Spatial scaling to some extent determines biodiversity patterns in larger organisms, but its role in microbial diversity patterns is much less understood. Some studies have shown that bacterial community similarity decreases with distance, whereas others do not support this. Here, we studied soil bacterial communities of tropical rainforest in Malaysia at two spatial scales: a local scale with samples spaced every 5 mover a 150-m transect, and a regional scale with samples 1 to 1,800 km apart. PCR-amplified soil DNA for the bacterial 16S rRNA gene targeting the V1–V3 region was pyrosequenced using Roche/454 GS FLX Titanium platform. A ranked partial Mantel test showed a weak correlation between spatial distance and whole bacterial community dissimilarity, but only at the local scale. In contrast, environmental distance was highly correlated with community dissimilarity at both spatial scales,stressing the greater role of environmental variables rather than spatial distance in determining bacterial community variation at different spatial scales. Soil pH was the only environmental parameter that significantly explained the variance in bacterial community at the local scale, whereas total nitrogen and elevation were additional important factors at the regional scale.We obtained similar results at both scales when only the most abundant OTUs were analyzed. A variance partitioning analysis showed that environmental variables contributed more to bacterial community variation than spatial distance at both scales. In total, our results support a strong influence of the environment in determining bacterial community composition in the rainforests of Malaysia. However, it is possible that the remaining spatial distance effect is due to some of the myriad of other environmental factors which were not considered here, rather than dispersal limitation.

  13. The history of the peat manufacturing industry in The Netherlands: Peat moss litter and active carbon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.A.W. Gerding

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available This article describes the development of three major forms of peat processing by the manufacturing industry in The Netherlands since the last quarter of the 19th century. At a time when peat as a fuel was gradually being replaced by coal, the first form was the peat moss litter industry. Peat moss litter was made from white peat that was ground and sieved in factories which were located mainly in bog areas in the south-east of the province of Drenthe. It served as excellent bedding for horses and cattle. The second form of industrial peat processing was the manufacture, from 1921 onwards, of active carbon made from black peat. The Purit (Norit factory, now part of the Cabot Corporation, is still the only active carbon factory using peat as a raw material. The third form of peat processing was the production of garden peat and potting soil. This is still a widespread activity in peat areas all over the world. The peat moss litter industry thrived from the 1880s until shortly after the First World War. The arrival of the horse-drawn tram in all of the major cities of Europe created a great demand for animal bedding to be used in the vast stables of the tramway companies. Peat moss litter was cleaner, healthier and easier to handle than straw. There was similar demand from the armies, which used millions of horses during the First World War. Owing to the development of motorised vehicles, the peat market collapsed after the war and this plunged the industry into a prolonged crisis which was not overcome until peat was found to be a suitable growing medium for horticulture in the 1950s. Living and working conditions in peatlands were harsh, earnings irregular and labourers’ rights limited. The peat manufacturing industry was the first to introduce collective labour agreements, medical benefits and pension plans. Nonetheless massive unemployment, poverty and the necessity to migrate to other parts of the country were clear signs that the era of

  14. Influences of Different Peat Ratios on Lawn Grass on Saline Soils%不同泥炭配比对盐碱土上草坪草的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李磊; 王绍华

    2014-01-01

    在实验室条件下,分析了不同泥炭配比使用后对盐碱土pH值、有机质、碱解氮、速效磷钾、土壤中微生物数量以及草坪草生长量的影响,探讨了施用不同泥炭配比对盐碱土上促进草坪生长在园林上的作用。结果表明:使用不同配比泥炭均能改善土壤pH 值,增加土壤中有机质含量,增加土壤中速效态氮、磷、钾的含量,土壤中微生物数量也增加,改善土壤的理化性质,尤其是 T4处理,使草坪草的生长量比对照增加1.59倍。%In laboratory conditions , this article analyzes the influences of using different proportion peat on saline alkali soil pH ,organic matter ,available nitrogen ,available phosphorus and potassium ,microbial quantity in soil , and the growth of lawn grass ,and investigates the effects of different peat proportion on saline alkali soil which is considered to promote grass growth in garden .The results show that using different proportion peat can improve soil pH value ,increase the content of organic matter in the soil ,raise the content of soil available nitrogen ,phosphorus , potassium ,add the number of microorganisms in the soil ,and improve the physical and chemical properties of soil , especially T4 treatment which makes the growth oflawn grass increase 1 .59 times .

  15. Changes of the content of oil products in the oil-polluted peat soil of a high-moor bog in a field experiment with application of lime and fertilizers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erkenova, M. I.; Tolpeshta, I. I.; Trofimov, S. Ya.; Aptikaev, R. S.; Lazarev, A. S.

    2016-11-01

    A field model experiment on stimulating the activity of native oil microorganisms-decomposers was performed on an oil-polluted area in a high-moor bog under its total flooding in the northern taiga (Western Siberia). For two summer months, the doses of lime and nitrogen, phosphorus, and potassium fertilizers applied have caused a decrease in the oil products (OP) content by 54% relative to their initial amount. The decrease of the OP content in the soil profiles was nonuniform, and at the depth of 30-50 cm it was accompanied by the acidification of peat. The stimulation of the activity of aboriginal microorganisms by applying lime and mineral fertilizers led to the development of migration processes with the participation of oil and products of its transformation. These processes differed from those in the soil without application of lime and fertilizers. An original technology of applying lime and fertilizers providing minimal disturbances the upper 50-cm peat layer is suggested.

  16. Study of stability of humic acids from soil and peat irradiated by gamma rays; Estudo da estabilidade de acidos humicos extraidos de solo e turfa, frente a radiacao ionizante gama

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Wilson Tadeu Lopes da

    1995-07-01

    Humic acids samples (one deriving from a sedimentary soil and other from a peat), in aqueous media, were irradiated with gamma rays, in doses of 10, 50 and 100 kGy, in order to understand their chemical behavior after the irradiation. The material, before and after irradiation, was analyzed by Elemental Analysis, Functional Groups (carboxylic acids and phenols), UV/Vis Spectroscopy (E{sub 4}/E{sub 6} ratio), IR spectroscopy, CO{sub 2} content and Gel permeation Chromatography (GPC) ). The Elemental Analysis showed the humic acid derived from a peat had a most percentage quantity of Carbon and Hydrogen than the material from a sedimentary soil. From the UV/Vis Spectroscopy, it was observed a decrease of E{sub 4}/E{sub 6} ratio with an increase of the applied dose. The data from GPC are in agreement with this. The results showed that the molecular weight of the material increased by exposing it to a larger radiolitical dose. The peat material was less affected by the gamma radiation than the soil material. The carboxylic groups were responsible by radiochemical behavior of the material. (author)

  17. The Influnece of Peat Layer on Hidrogen and Aluminium Concentration Originating from the Substratum Sulphidic Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benito Heru Purwanto

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Much of peatland in Indonesia has sulphidic materials as substratum. Soil acidity and metal elements in peatland may originate from the sulphidic materials which occur underneath of the peat layer. Peat soil buffering capacity and chelating ability of the peat materials regulate the soil acidity and metal solubility in the peatland. The study was aimed to examine the influence of peat thickness and land hydrological conditions on the concentrations of exchangeable aluminium (Al and hidrogen (H in the peatland. The study was carried out on peaty acid sulphate soil, deep peat, moderate peat and shallow peat. Exchangeable Al and H were observed in the wet season, transition from wet to dry season and dry season. The results showed that exchangeables of Al and H were mainly originated from sulphidic material which were occured underneath of the peat layer. Peat layer had an important role on the solubility of Al and H in the peatland. Peat thickness had influence on exchangeable-Al and H, 50 cm of the peat thickness (shallow peat was the critical for peat function to reduce the Al and H solubility in the peatland. Hydrological condition factor did not influence on the solubility of Al and H.

  18. Geochemical and Hydrological limitation of carbon sequestration and methane release in anoxic peat soil from the Luther Marsh, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonaiuti, Simona; Blodau, Christian

    2015-04-01

    In deep peat layers, anaerobic respiration showed a slow-down due to the lack of solute transport which causes an accumulation of metabolic end products (i.e. DIC and CH4). This accumulation can lower the Gibbs free energy levels available to the terminal respiration processes, potentially leading to an inhibition in the decomposition. In particular, this state can affect the methanogenesis, acetogenesis and fermentation processes which occur near thermodynamic minimum energy levels. We conducted a column experiments with an ombrothrophic bog peat over a period of 300 days at 20° C, to test the hypothesis that alteration in solute and gas transport rates can remove this biogeochemical inactivation of DIC and methane turnover rates. To this end, we tested a i) control treatment with no gas and solute transport, ii) advective flow treatment with a flow water of 10 mm d-1, iii) ebullition treatment with methane removal by conduit transport as surrogate for bubbling, and iv) an O2-free atmosphere treatment to test the effect of remote transport of electron on anaerobic decomposition, in absence of oxygen compared to the other treatment. We determined detailed concentration depth profiles of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), methane (CH4) and relevant decomposition intermediates (i.e. H2, Fe, nitrate, acetate, formiate and propionate), every 15 days at the beginning and every ca. 2 months after 75 days. CO2 and CH4 fluxes were measured using a static chamber approach. Net turnover of DIC and CH4 in depth layers was calculated for individual depth intervals from mass balance approach based on diffusive mass fluxes between adjacent depth layers and change in storage over time. Thermodynamic energy levels of relevant electron accepting processes were calculated over time. In the initial phase of the experiments, DIC and CH4 concentrations increased mostly below the water table level at 10 cm depth and over time in all treatments. After 45 days of incubation, CH4

  19. Towards robust subsidence-based soil carbon emission factors for peat soils in south-east Asia, with special reference to oil palm plantations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Couwenberg

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Oil palm and Acacia pulpwood plantations are being established at a rapid rate on drained peatland in south-east Asia. Accurate measurements of associated carbon losses are still scarce, however, due mainly to difficulties of excluding autotrophic carbon fluxes from chamber-based flux measurements and uncertainties about the extent of waterborne losses. Here, we demonstrate a simple approach to determining total net carbon loss from subsidence records that is applicable to steady state conditions under continuous land use. We studied oil palm and Acacia plantations that had been drained for 5–19 years. Very similar subsidence rates and dry bulk density profiles were obtained, irrespective of crop type or age of the plantation, indicating that the peat profiles were in a steady state. These are conditions that allow for the deduction of net carbon loss by multiplying the rate of subsidence by the carbon density of the peat below the water table. With an average subsidence rate of 4.2 cm y-1 and a carbon density of 0.043 g cm-3, we arrive at a net carbon loss of ~18 t ha-1 y-1 (~66 t CO2-eq ha-1 y-1 for typical oil palm and Acacia plantations more than five years after drainage, without large differences between the plantation types. The proposed method enables calculation of regional or project-specific carbon loss rates to feed into mitigation schemes of the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change.

  20. CO2 efflux from cleared mangrove peat.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine E Lovelock

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: CO(2 emissions from cleared mangrove areas may be substantial, increasing the costs of continued losses of these ecosystems, particularly in mangroves that have highly organic soils. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We measured CO(2 efflux from mangrove soils that had been cleared for up to 20 years on the islands of Twin Cays, Belize. We also disturbed these cleared peat soils to assess what disturbance of soils after clearing may have on CO(2 efflux. CO(2 efflux from soils declines from time of clearing from ∼10,600 tonnes km(-2 year(-1 in the first year to 3000 tonnes km(2 year(-1 after 20 years since clearing. Disturbing peat leads to short term increases in CO(2 efflux (27 umol m(-2 s(-1, but this had returned to baseline levels within 2 days. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Deforesting mangroves that grow on peat soils results in CO(2 emissions that are comparable to rates estimated for peat collapse in other tropical ecosystems. Preventing deforestation presents an opportunity for countries to benefit from carbon payments for preservation of threatened carbon stocks.

  1. 泥炭对Pb、Cd污染菜地土壤修复效果评价%Remediation Effects and Evaluation of Peat Amendment on Pb and Cd Contaminated in Vegetable Soil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杜瑞英; 王艳红; 唐明灯; 李盟军; 艾绍英

    2015-01-01

    珠江三角洲地区农田土壤重金属污染程度较为严重,泥炭作为一种富含有机质的碱性改良剂在修复重金属污染农田土壤方面具有很好的潜力。通过研究泥炭对珠三角地区Pb、Cd污染菜地土壤修复效果开展的连续盆栽试验,从生态学角度对泥炭的修复效果进行综合评价。试验结果表明:泥炭可以提高0.25~1.61个单位的土壤pH值,增加土壤有机质含量,显著降低土壤中Cd有效态含量。连续种植小白菜(Brassica chinensis)后泥炭处理的土壤Cd有效态含量仍显著低于对照,对土壤修复持效性好;但对土壤Pb有效态含量作用效果不显著。泥炭对小白菜有明显的增产效果,在种植第二茬时效果最明显,同时与对照比较泥炭处理显著降低小白菜中Cd含量,但对降低小白菜中Pb含量效果也不明显。泥炭可以显著提高土壤中微生物的活性和代谢多样性,种植小白菜后微生物活性提高更明显。综合判断,15 g·kg-1泥炭用量对修复珠三角地区Pb、Cd污染菜地土壤效果最好而且持效性好。整体来看,泥炭对降低土壤中Cd有效态含量的效果优于对Pb的。%Heavy metal pollution of agricultural land in the Pearl River Delta region is quite severe. As a kind of alkaline agent with rich organic matter, peat has great potential in the remediation of heavy metal contaminated soil. Peat was chosen as the amendment in batches of pot experiment: Studying the available contents of Pb and Cd in vegetable soil, the growth of Chinese cabbage (Brassica chinensis) and the absorbed and accumulated contents of Pb and Cd, the soil microbial activity. This article studied immobilization and remediation of heavy metals contaminated vegetable soil under different amounts of peat, and assessed immobilization effect. The results are as follows: Peat can improve the soil pH value of 0.25~1.61 units. The content of organic matter in soil

  2. The effects of salinization on aerobic and anaerobic decomposition and mineralization in peat meadows : the roles of peat type and land use

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouns, Karlijn; Verhoeven, Jos T A; Hefting, Mariet M

    2014-01-01

    Peat soils comprise a large part of the western and northern Netherlands. Drainage for agriculture has caused increased soil aeration which has stimulated decomposition and, hence, soil subsidence, currently amounting to 1-2 cm/yr. River water is supplied to these peat areas in summer to prevent dry

  3. Peat Mapping Associations of Airborne Radiometric Survey Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Beamish

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study considers recent airborne radiometric (gamma ray survey data, obtained at high-resolution, across various regions of the UK. The datasets all display a very evident attenuation of signal in association with peat, and intra-peat variations are observed. The geophysical response variations are examined in detail using example data sets across lowland areas (raised bogs, meres, fens and afforested peat and upland areas of blanket bog, together with associated wetland zones. The radiometric data do not map soils per se. The bedrock (the radiogenic parent provides a specific amplitude level. Attenuation of this signal level is then controlled by moisture content in conjunction with the density and porosity of the soil cover. Both soil and bedrock variations need to be jointly assessed. The attenuation theory, reviewed here, predicts that the behaviour of wet peat is distinct from most other soil types. Theory also predicts that the attenuation levels observed across wet peatlands cannot be generally used to map variations in peat thickness. Four survey areas at various scales, across England, Scotland, Wales and Ireland are used to demonstrate the ability of the airborne data to map peat zones. A 1:50 k national mapping of deep peat is used to provide control although variability in the definition of peat zones across existing databases is also demonstrated.

  4. The rhizosphere and PAH amendment mediate impacts on functional and structural bacterial diversity in sandy peat soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yrjaelae, Kim, E-mail: kim.yrjala@helsinki.f [Department of Biological and Environmental Sciences, General Microbiology, University of Helsinki, P.O. Box 56, (Biocenter 1C), 00014 Helsinki (Finland); Keskinen, Anna-Kaisa; Akerman, Marja-Leena; Fortelius, Carola [METROPOLIA University of Applied Science, Vantaa (Finland); Sipilae, Timo P. [Department of Biological and Environmental Sciences, General Microbiology, University of Helsinki, P.O. Box 56, (Biocenter 1C), 00014 Helsinki (Finland)

    2010-05-15

    To reveal the degradation capacity of bacteria in PAH polluted soil and rhizosphere we combined bacterial extradiol ring-cleavage dioxygenase and 16S rRNA analysis in Betula pubescens rhizoremediation. Characterisation of the functional bacterial community by RFLP revealed novel environmental dioxygenases, and their putative hosts were studied by 16S rRNA amplification. Plant rhizosphere and PAH amendment effects were detected by the RFLP/T-RFLP analysis. Functional species richness increased in the birch rhizosphere and PAH amendment impacted the compositional diversity of the dioxygenases and the structural 16S rRNA community. A shift from an Acidobacteria and Verrucomicrobia dominated to an Alpha- and Betaproteobacteria dominated community structure was detected in polluted soil. Clone sequence analysis indicated catabolic significance of Burkholderia in PAH polluted soil. These results advance our understanding of rhizoremediation and unveil the extent of uncharacterized functional bacteria to benefit bioremediation by facilitating the development of the molecular tool box to monitor bacterial populations in biodegradation. - The bacterial community analysis using 16S rRNA and extradiol dioxygenase marker genes in rhizoremediation revealed both a rhizosphere and a PAH-pollution effect.

  5. Peat resource estimation in South Carolina. Final report, Year 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holmes, M.; Andrejko, M.; Corvinus, D.; Tisdale, M.

    1982-01-01

    South Carolina has few indigenous energy resources. Most widely known and utilized are hydropower, wood, and solar. Peat is a material composed of partially decomposed organic matter that, after burial for long periods of time, may eventually become coal. Peat is utilized as an energy resource for the production of electricity and for home heating in Europe and the Soviet Union. There are peat deposits in South Carolina, but peat has never been used as an energy resource within the state. This report presents the results of the two years of a planned four-year study of the quantity and energy potential of peat in South Carolina. In this year's survey two activities were undertaken. The first was to visit highly probable peat deposits to confirm the presence of fuel-grade peat. The second was to survey and characterize in more detail the areas judged to be of highest potential as major resources. The factors carrying the greatest weight in our determination of priority areas were: (1) a description of peat deposits in the scientific literature or from discussions with state and federal soil scientists; (2) mention of organic soils on soil maps or in the literature; and (3) information from farmers and other local citizens.

  6. CELLULOSE DECOMPOSTION IN TROPICAL PEAT SWAMPS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hjh Dulima Jali

    2003-01-01

    Given that organic soil is a complex substrate and there are many environmental factors which directly or indirectly control its decomposition processes, the use of standard substrate simplify the system in that the effect of substrate quality could be eliminated and influence of certain environmental conditions such as edaphic factors, acidity and moisture could be focused on. In addition to the forest floor, decomposition potential down the peat profile can also be examined. Cotton strip assay was used to estimate decomposition potentials in tropical peat swamp occupied by different Shorea Albida peat swamp forest communities, The' Alan Batu' , the ' Alan Bunga' , the' Alan Padang' and the 'mixed Alan'forest communities. Greatest decay rates on the peat surface took place during the wet period. The moist condition of the wet months appeared to favour the growth and stimulate activities of decomposer population and soil invertebrates.Generally, 50% of cotton tensile loss is achieved after four weeks of exposure. The results suggest that cellulose decomposition is influenced by the environmental variables of hydrological regime, water-table fluctuation, aeration, moisture availability,waterlogging and the resultant anaerobiosis, peat depths, and micro-sites characteristics. Decomposition of cellulose is inhibited by waterlogging and the resultant anaerobiosis in thelower segment of the cotton strip during wet periods and under dry conditions in the surface segment of the cotton strip during periods of less rain.

  7. Approaches to estimating humification indicators for peat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Klavins

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Degree of decomposition is an important property of the organic matter in soils and other deposits which contain fossil carbon. It describes the intensity of transformation, or the humification degree (HD, of the original living organic matter. In this article, approaches to the determination of HD are thoroughly described and 14C dated peat columns extracted from several bogs in Latvia are investigated and compared. A new humification indicator is suggested, namely the quantity of humic substances as a fraction of the total amount of organic matter in the peat.

  8. Streptomyces malaysiense sp. nov.: A novel Malaysian mangrove soil actinobacterium with antioxidative activity and cytotoxic potential against human cancer cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ser, Hooi-Leng; Palanisamy, Uma Devi; Yin, Wai-Fong; Chan, Kok-Gan; Goh, Bey-Hing; Lee, Learn-Han

    2016-04-13

    Actinobacteria from the unique intertidal ecosystem of the mangroves are known to produce novel, bioactive secondary metabolites. A novel strain known as MUSC 136(T) (=DSM 100712(T) = MCCC 1K01246(T)) which was isolated from Malaysian mangrove forest soil has proven to be no exception. Assessed by a polyphasic approach, its taxonomy showed a range of phylogenetic and chemotaxonomic properties consistent with the genus of Streptomyces. Phylogenetically, highest similarity was to Streptomyces misionensis NBRC 13063(T) (99.6%) along with two other strains (>98.9% sequence similarities). The DNA-DNA relatedness between MUSC 136(T) and these type strains ranged from 22.7 ± 0.5% to 46.5 ± 0.2%. Overall, polyphasic approach studies indicated this strain represents a novel species, for which the name Streptomyces malaysiense sp. nov. is proposed. The potential bioactivities of this strain were explored by means of antioxidant and cytotoxic assays. Intriguingly, MUSC 136(T) exhibited strong antioxidative activities as evaluated by a panel of antioxidant assays. It was also found to possess high cytotoxic effect against HCT-116 cells, which probably mediated through altering p53 protein and intracellular glutathione levels. Chemical analysis of the extract using GC-MS further affirms that the strain produces chemopreventive related metabolites.

  9. Effect of New Type Fertilizers with Woody Peat on Sugarcane in Latosol Soil%木本泥炭新型肥料在砖红壤甘蔗上的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王亚彪; 陈迪文; 李健鹏; 周文灵; 黄莹; 江永; 谭钧; 邢文军; 黄振瑞

    2016-01-01

    The growth, agronomic characters, cane yield and sugar yield of planted cane (YT03-393), and soil fertility was studied in lotosol soil with the blank control; the recommended fertilization and recommended fertilization add 5 different woody peat fertilizers respectively. The results showed that woody peat biological fertilizer treatment significantly increased millable canes, compared with the recommended fertilization. Cane yield and sugar yield for all 5 woody peat fertilizer treatments were significantly higher than that of the recommended fertilization. Also the content of total nitrogen, total phosphorous, available phosphorous, total potassium and organic matter in soil were improved. Finally the economic benefits with woody peat fertilizers were higher than that of the recommended fertilization.%在粤西砖红壤上以粤糖03-393为供试品种,通过设置空白对照、常规推荐用肥、常规推荐用肥与分别添加5种木本泥炭肥料配施共7个处理的田间试验,研究了木本泥炭新型肥料对新植甘蔗农艺性状、蔗茎产量、理论产糖量及土壤肥力的影响。结果表明:与仅施常规推荐用肥相比,施用木本泥炭生物有机肥处理能显著增加甘蔗有效茎数。5个增施木本泥炭肥料处理的蔗茎产量和理论产糖量均比仅施推荐用肥处理显著增加,土壤中全氮、全磷、速效磷、全钾和有机质的含量也显著提高,经济效益相应得到增加。

  10. Spatial Analysis of Soil Subsidence in Peat Meadow Areas in Friesland in Relation to Land and Water Management, Climate Change, and Adaptation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouns, Karlijn; Eikelboom, Tessa; Jansen, Peter C; Janssen, Ron; Kwakernaak, Cees; van den Akker, Jan J H; Verhoeven, Jos T A

    2015-01-01

    Dutch peatlands have been subsiding due to peat decomposition, shrinkage and compression, since their reclamation in the 11th century. Currently, subsidence amounts to 1-2 cm/year. Water management in these areas is complex and costly, greenhouse gases are being emitted, and surface water quality is

  11. The effects of salinization on aerobic and anaerobic decomposition and mineralization in peat meadows: the roles of peat type and land use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brouns, Karlijn; Verhoeven, Jos T A; Hefting, Mariet M

    2014-10-01

    Peat soils comprise a large part of the western and northern Netherlands. Drainage for agriculture has caused increased soil aeration which has stimulated decomposition and, hence, soil subsidence, currently amounting to 1-2 cm/yr. River water is supplied to these peat areas in summer to prevent drying out of the peat soils. Saltwater intrusion and evaporation make this surface water slightly brackish during drought periods. In addition, brackish seepage can surface more easily during such dry periods. We performed an incubation experiment in which the effects of salinization on aerobic decomposition and mineralization of shallow peat samples and anaerobic decomposition and mineralization of deep peat samples were studied. We considered four different types of peat samples: peat sampled in agricultural peat meadows and in nature reserves, originally formed under either eutrophic or oligotrophic conditions. The aerobic decomposition was approximately reduced by 50% after salinization, whereas the anaerobic decomposition rates remained unchanged. Remarkably, the response to salinization did not differ between the peat types and land uses. Ammonium concentrations increased while nitrate concentrations decreased after salinization, probably as a result of reduced nitrification. Especially in the oligotrophic peat, ammonium concentrations increased substantially. Phosphate concentrations increased, possibly caused by changes in desorption and adsorption processes due to higher ion concentrations. DOC concentrations decreased in the brackish samples due to precipitation. Furthermore, the eutrophic peat samples showed increasing sulfate concentrations, both in oxic and anoxic incubations, which was attributed to pyrite oxidation. Independently of salinization, nitrification rates were higher in the agricultural, fertilized, peat soils. In conclusion, while salinization might reduce subsidence rates, it will have adverse effects on water quality.

  12. Lower Saxony and its peat industry. Die Torfindustrie in Niedersachsen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneekloth, H.

    1983-01-01

    During the past decade a complete cadastral survey (cf. Schneekloth und Mitarbeiter 1970-1983) has been made of the marshy soils of Niedersachsen. The results of the present report are based on peat plant visits which, subsequent to above survey, were made in 1982/83. Inquiries and inspections carried out in existing peat plants served to determine the present natural resource situation relative to production conditions as well as imaginable future requirements to be met in order to maintain peat industry. As per agreement, operational data of a plant must be treated confidentially. However, over against other industrial sectors, the industrial branch under review may be sufficiently structurally analyzed by overall evaluations. Large-scale commercial horticulture is one of the branches of trade that cannot dispense with the peat suppliers. Until now it has not been possible, qualitatively or quantitatively, to substitute peat by other substrates. The sectors concerned will therefore depend on peat resources for many decades hence. The availability of peat and other mineral resources is limited. We are therefore required to use and handle them with most careful and economical responsibility. The present evaluated data is intended to help economists, politicians and other decision making organizations to respond to the common interest in the case of peat resources. (orig./MOS).

  13. Investigation of smoldering combustion propagation of dried peat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palamba, Pither; Ramadhan, M. L.; Imran, F. A.; Kosasih, E. A.; Nugroho, Y. S.

    2017-03-01

    Smoldering is a form of combustion characterised by flameless burning of porous materials. Smoldering combustion of porous and organic soil such as peat, is considered as a major contributor to haze problem during wildland fires in Sumatra and Kalimantan, Indonesia. With almost half of tropical peatland worldwide, and vast area that resulted in its rich agricultural diversity, Indonesia possessed many variants of peat throughout the region. Thus, further highlighting the importance of characterizing the thermal properties of different varieties of peats for further analysis. An experimental test method was built to analyse the differences of varying peats from different parts of Indonesia, regarding its smoldering combustion propagation. In this case, peat from Papua and South Sumatera were analysed. A cylindrical wire meshed container of 190 cm3 in volume, was filled with dried peat. The temperature data and mass loss during the smoldering combustion was gathered using thermocouples and a DAQ system. After the experimental apparatus was set, a smoldering combustion of the dried peats was initiated at the top of the container using an electric heater. The results of the experiment showed a smoldering temperature of about 600°C and with a smoldering propagation rate of about 4.50 to 4.75 cm/h for both peat samples.

  14. Methods of Utilizing Tropical Peat Land for Housing Scheme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youventharan Duraisamy

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses some of the methods and recent technologies in utilizing cheap marginal land such as tropical peat for housing scheme. Buildings on peat are usually suspended on piles, but ground around it may still settle. Therefore a suitable method of construction should be tackle to overcome serious problem such as localized sinking and slip failure, massive primary and long term (creep settlement. With the ever increase in the cost of living and the decrease in suitable land for construction, avoidance of marginal tropical peat soil is never going to be the popular choice among the developers and town planners. This paper gives some insights on the construction methods that could be possibly employed to develop marginal ground such as tropical peat soil.

  15. Thermal analysis of peat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergner, K.; Albano, C. (Swedish University of Agricultural Science, Umea (Sweden))

    1993-02-01

    Thermal analysis has been performed on samples of plants, peat, chemical fractions of peat, and coal. Simultaneous thermogravimetry (TG) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) technique has proved to be useful in classifying and separating the samples. Due to probable redundant information in the TG and DSC signals the sampling frequency has been investigated. Quantitative predictions of 15 chemical and physical constituents in peat are performed using partial least squares regression (PLSR). Prediction properties are compared with near infrared reflectance spectroscopy (NIR) which shows that TG/DSC and NIR are comparable in predictability of investigated constituents. The use of simultaneous TG and DSC signals in predictions, compared using TG or DSC separately, shows that the combination leads to increases in the predictability, as shown by the use of standard error of prediction (SEP) values.

  16. Spatial Analysis of Soil Subsidence in Peat Meadow Areas in Friesland in Relation to Land and Water Management, Climate Change, and Adaptation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brouns, Karlijn; Eikelboom, Tessa; Jansen, Peter C.; Janssen, Ron; Kwakernaak, Cees; van den Akker, Jan J. H.; Verhoeven, Jos T. A.

    2015-02-01

    Dutch peatlands have been subsiding due to peat decomposition, shrinkage and compression, since their reclamation in the 11th century. Currently, subsidence amounts to 1-2 cm/year. Water management in these areas is complex and costly, greenhouse gases are being emitted, and surface water quality is relatively poor. Regional and local authorities and landowners responsible for peatland management have recognized these problems. In addition, the Netherlands Royal Meteorological Institute predicts higher temperatures and drier summers, which both are expected to enhance peat decomposition. Stakeholder workshops have been organized in three case study areas in the province of Friesland to exchange knowledge on subsidence and explore future subsidence rates and the effects of land use and management changes on subsidence rates. Subsidence rates were up to 3 cm/year in deeply drained parcels and increased when we included climate change in the modeling exercises. This means that the relatively thin peat layers in this province (ca 1 m) would shrink or even disappear by the end of the century when current practices continue. Adaptation measures were explored, such as extensive dairy farming and the production of new crops in wetter conditions, but little experience has been gained on best practices. The workshops have resulted in useful exchange of ideas on possible measures and their consequences for land use and water management in the three case study areas. The province and the regional water board will use the results to develop land use and water management policies for the next decades.

  17. Spatial analysis of soil subsidence in peat meadow areas in Friesland in relation to land and water management, climate change, and adaptation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brouns, Karlijn; Eikelboom, Tessa; Jansen, Peter C; Janssen, Ron; Kwakernaak, Cees; van den Akker, Jan J H; Verhoeven, Jos T A

    2015-02-01

    Dutch peatlands have been subsiding due to peat decomposition, shrinkage and compression, since their reclamation in the 11th century. Currently, subsidence amounts to 1-2 cm/year. Water management in these areas is complex and costly, greenhouse gases are being emitted, and surface water quality is relatively poor. Regional and local authorities and landowners responsible for peatland management have recognized these problems. In addition, the Netherlands Royal Meteorological Institute predicts higher temperatures and drier summers, which both are expected to enhance peat decomposition. Stakeholder workshops have been organized in three case study areas in the province of Friesland to exchange knowledge on subsidence and explore future subsidence rates and the effects of land use and management changes on subsidence rates. Subsidence rates were up to 3 cm/year in deeply drained parcels and increased when we included climate change in the modeling exercises. This means that the relatively thin peat layers in this province (ca 1 m) would shrink or even disappear by the end of the century when current practices continue. Adaptation measures were explored, such as extensive dairy farming and the production of new crops in wetter conditions, but little experience has been gained on best practices. The workshops have resulted in useful exchange of ideas on possible measures and their consequences for land use and water management in the three case study areas. The province and the regional water board will use the results to develop land use and water management policies for the next decades.

  18. Peat slope failure in Ireland

    OpenAIRE

    Boylan, Noel; Jennings, Paul; Long, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Recent peat failures in Ireland in the autumn of 2003 at Pollatomish, County Mayo and Derrybrien, County Galway have focused attention on such events. However, peat failures are not a recent phenomenon with possible evidence of peat failures in Ireland having been identified as far back as the Early Bronze Age. This paper summarises the issues surrounding peat failures in Ireland that would be of interest to an engineer\\engineering geologist assessing this geohazard. The distri...

  19. Chemical properties of peat used in balneology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szajdak, L.; Hładoń, T.

    2009-04-01

    The physiological activity of peats is observed in human peat-bath therapy and in the promotion of growth in some plants. Balneological peat as an ecologically clean and natural substance is perceived as being more 'human friendly' than synthetic compounds. Poland has a long tradition of using balneological peat for therapeutic purposes. Balneological peat reveals a physical effect by altering temperature and biochemical effects through biologically active substances. It is mainly used for the treatment of rheumatic diseases that are quite common in Poland. Peat represents natural product. Physico-chemical properties of peat in particular surface-active, sorption and ion exchanges, defining their biological function, depend mainly on the chemical composition and molecular structure of humic substances representing the major constituent of organic soil (peat). The carbon of organic matter of peats is composed of 10 to 20% carbohydrates, primarily of microbial origin; 20% nitrogen-containing constituents, such as amino acids and amino sugars; 10 to 20% aliphatic fatty acids, alkanes, etc.; with the rest of carbon being aromatic. For balneology peat should be highly decomposed (preferably H8), natural and clean. The content of humic acids should exceed 20% of dry weight, ash content will be less than 15 15% of dry weight, sulphur content less than 0.3% of dry weight and the amount of water more than 85%. It will not contain harmful bacteria and heavy metals. Humic substances (HS) of peat are known to be macromolecular polydisperse biphyllic systems including both hydrophobic domains (saturated hydrocarbon chains, aromatic structural units) and hydrophilic functional groups, i. e having amphiphilic character. Amphiphilic properties of FA are responsible for their solubility, viscosity, conformation, surfactant-like character and a variety of physicochemical properties of considerable biologically practical significance. The chemical composition of peats depends

  20. Substrate quality and nutrient availability influence CO2 production from tropical peat decomposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swails, E.; Jaye, D.; Verchot, L. V.; Hergoualc'h, K.; Wahyuni, N. S.; Borchard, N.; Lawrence, D.

    2015-12-01

    In Indonesia, peatlands are a major and growing source of greenhouse gas emissions due to increasing pressure from oil palm and pulp wood plantations. We are using a combination of field measures, laboratory experiments, and remote sensing to investigate relationships among land use, climatic factors and biogeochemical controls, and their influence on trace gas fluxes from tropical peat soils. Analysis of soils collected from peat sites on two major islands indicated substantial variation in peat substrate quality and nutrient content among land uses and geographic location. We conducted laboratory incubations to test the influence of substrate quality and nutrient availability on CO2 production from peat decomposition. Differences in peat characteristics attributable to land use change were tested by comparison of forest and oil palm peat samples collected from the same peat dome in Kalimantan. Regional differences in peat characteristics were tested by comparison of samples from Sumatra with samples from Kalimantan. We conducted additional experiments to test the influence of N and P availability and labile carbon on CO2 production. Under moisture conditions typical of oil palm plantations, CO2 production was higher from peat forest samples than from oil palm samples. CO2 production from Sumatra and Kalimantan oil palm samples was not different, despite apparent differences in nutrient content of these soils. N and P treatments representative of fertilizer application rates raised CO2 production from forest samples but not oil palm samples. Labile carbon treatments raised CO2 production in all samples. Our results suggest that decomposition of peat forest soils is nutrient limited, while substrate quality controls decomposition of oil palm soils post-conversion. Though fertilizer application could accelerate peat decomposition initially, fertilizer application may not influence long-term CO2 emissions from oil palm on peat.

  1. Temperature and peat type control CO2 and CH4 production in Alaskan permafrost peats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treat, C C; Wollheim, W M; Varner, R K; Grandy, A S; Talbot, J; Frolking, S

    2014-08-01

    Controls on the fate of ~277 Pg of soil organic carbon (C) stored in permafrost peatland soils remain poorly understood despite the potential for a significant positive feedback to climate change. Our objective was to quantify the temperature, moisture, organic matter, and microbial controls on soil organic carbon (SOC) losses following permafrost thaw in peat soils across Alaska. We compared the carbon dioxide (CO2 ) and methane (CH4 ) emissions from peat samples collected at active layer and permafrost depths when incubated aerobically and anaerobically at -5, -0.5, +4, and +20 °C. Temperature had a strong, positive effect on C emissions; global warming potential (GWP) was >3× larger at 20 °C than at 4 °C. Anaerobic conditions significantly reduced CO2 emissions and GWP by 47% at 20 °C but did not have a significant effect at -0.5 °C. Net anaerobic CH4 production over 30 days was 7.1 ± 2.8 μg CH4 -C gC(-1) at 20 °C. Cumulative CO2 emissions were related to organic matter chemistry and best predicted by the relative abundance of polysaccharides and proteins (R(2) = 0.81) in SOC. Carbon emissions (CO2 -C + CH4 -C) from the active layer depth peat ranged from 77% larger to not significantly different than permafrost depths and varied depending on the peat type and peat decomposition stage rather than thermal state. Potential SOC losses with warming depend not only on the magnitude of temperature increase and hydrology but also organic matter quality, permafrost history, and vegetation dynamics, which will ultimately determine net radiative forcing due to permafrost thaw.

  2. Construction of Infrastructure on Peat: Case Studies and Lessons Learned

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hua Ling Jen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Construction of infrastructures on peat land is a very challenging task due to its properties of low shear strength, high compressibility and high water content. This paper summarizes various solutions which could be adopted for the construction of infrastructure on peat, as reviewed by the experts and panels during IConCEES International Workshop 2015. Engineers could (a avoid peat, such as to transfer the load to the hard layers through end bearing piles or to replace the peat with the other soils, or (b construct on peat with special precautions, such as by reducing the weight of the construction materials and dewatering the peat to improve the engineering properties. This paper serves to generate new ideas and give insights of the problems commonly encountered by the industry. Some of the proposed solutions might never be tested on peat. This would rely on the researchers to take up the challenge to further investigate and address the technical issues outlined in this paper.

  3. Hydrological controls on rate of organic matter mineralization in peats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghezzehei, Teamrat; Arnold, Chelsea; Asefaw Berhe, Asmeret

    2016-04-01

    The predominant factor that ties together the formation and persistence of peat soils across regions is their dependence on localized hydrology. Hydrology also plays a dominant role in the relative strength of peatlands as sinks for atmospheric carbon dioxide and sources of methane, and thus on peatland net climate impact. Drying of peat soils by climate change and/or drainage is typically followed by reduction in methane emissions. However, this may easily be offset by the increase in carbon dioxide production. Therefore, mechanistic understanding of peatland hydrology and its association with carbon cycling is a prerequisite for assessing vulnerability of peats to disturbances and for incorporating the associated feedbacks in carbon-climate models. We will present physically based model that ties together the structure of peat soils (mainly pore size distribution and mechanical stability) to rates of aerobic and anaerobic decomposition over a wide range of soil water potentials. Peats consist of hierarchical structure with clear separation of the pores into a population of micropores within clumps of organic matter and/or soil aggregates and a group of macropores between clumps and/or aggregates. This essentially partitions the carbon stock in peat soils in to multiple pools that become mineralizable at disparate water potential ranges. While the carbon in macropores can readily be decomposed by aerobic microorganisms when the soil is only slightly drained, the carbon in fine pores remains largely protected from aerobic microbes until the water potential exceeds a threshold that lets in oxygen. In this presentation we will show the mathematical development of the model and illustrative examples that compare projections with data derived from the literature.

  4. Alfred P. Dachnowski and the scientific study of peats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landa, E.R.; Cohen, K.M.

    2011-01-01

    Botanist Alfred Paul Dachnowski (1875–1949) was a major contributor to efforts at mapping organic soils in the United States during the early 20th century. He began his career at The Ohio State University, and spent most of his professional life at the U.S. Department of Agriculture in Washington, DC. His work spanned a diversity of topics, including bog ecology and the ecosystem services provided by wetlands, the mapping and chemical characterization of peat, and the commercial applications of peat. We present a biography and overview of his work. Dachnowski is best known today for the peat sampler that bears his name. The details of its operation are described here, and its place in modern peat studies is discussed.

  5. WATER TABLE AND REDOX CONDITIONS IN DEEP TROPICAL PEAT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hajah Dulima Jali

    2007-01-01

    Redox potential in the well developed tropical peat swamp in Brunei was studied for a year. Generally the redox potential measurements showed a large variation, ranging from -234 mV to 727 mV. The expected rise in redox values did not take place following the drop of water table during the dry months of June to September. The redox value at 100 cm depth indicated that the soil remained reduced throughout the year in spite of the lowering of water table below 150 cm in all sites during dry period. Similarly the redox values did not decrease rapidly following flooding when the water table rose to the surface. This phenomenon could be attributed to the topography of the peat dome which facilitated the fast lateral movement of water and thus promoted oxygen supply down the peat profile, though not great enough to reach the 100 cm depth. The rapid lateral flow of water in the outer Alan batu site facilitated aeration, but in the inner sites remained which was reduced because of the slower water movement. The slower initiation of the reducing condition was likely due to the presence of nitrate which has accumulated as a result of ammonium oxidation during the relatively long aerobic period. Differences in the distribution of redox potential with depth are possibly explained by the different permeability of peat affecting flow patterns and residence time of water. The nature and compactibility of the peat might have slowed the diffusion rates of O2 into the lower layer. Though the bulk density of the peat was low, the composition of the peat might influence the peat permeability and hydraulic conductivity. The tree trunks are not decomposed or large branches must have lowered permeability compared to the other peat material.

  6. Global peat erosion risk assessment for the 21st Century

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Pengfei; Irvine, Brian; Holden, Joseph

    2015-04-01

    Many peatlands across the world are suffering from degradation and erosion exacerbated by human influences. Blanket peat erosion has adverse impacts on terrestrial and aquatic habitats, reservoir capacity and water quality, and also leads to accelerated carbon release. Bioclimatic modelling suggests that some areas, which are currently suitable for active peat growth, may be no longer under a climate supporting the accumulation of peat by the end of the century. Peat erosion in these marginal regions is thus more likely. A recently developed blanket peat erosion model, PESERA-PEAT, was established through significantly modifying the grid version of the Pan-European Soil Erosion Assessment model (PESERA-GRID) to explicitly include the freeze-thaw and desiccation processes, which appear to be the crucial drivers of peat erosion, and typical land management practices in blanket peatlands such as artificial drainage, grazing and managed burning. Freeze-thaw and desiccation are estimated based on climate (i.e. temperature) and soil moisture conditions. Land management practices interact with hydrology, erosion and vegetation growth via their influence on vegetation cover, biomass and soil moisture condition. The model has been demonstrated to be robust for blanket peat erosion modelling with riverine sediment flux data in the UK. In this paper, the PESERA-PEAT model is applied to investigate the impact of environmental change on the blanket peat erosion at a global scale. Climatic scenarios to the end of 21st Century were derived, as part of the QUEST-GSI initiative, from the outputs of seven global climate models: CGCM3 and CCCMA (Canada); CSIRO Mark III (Australia); IPSL (France); ECHAM5 (Germany); CCSM (US National Centre for Atmospheric Research (NCAR)); HadCM3 and HadGEM1 (UK). Land management practice such as artificial drainage is considered to examine if it is possible to buffer the impact of climate change on erosion through managing blanket peatlands in

  7. Isotope evidence for N2-fixation in Sphagnum peat bogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novak, Martin; Jackova, Ivana; Buzek, Frantisek; Stepanova, Marketa; Veselovsky, Frantisek; Curik, Jan; Prechova, Eva

    2016-04-01

    Waterlogged organic soils store as much as 30 % of the world's soil carbon (C), and 15 % of the world's soil nitrogen (N). In the era of climate change, wetlands are vulnerable to increasing temperatures and prolonged periods of low rainfall. Higher rates of microbial processes and/or changing availability of oxygen may lead to peat thinning and elevated emissions of greenhouse gases (mostly CO2, but also CH4 and N2O). Biogeochemical cycling of C and N in peat bogs is coupled. Under low levels of pollution by reactive nitrogen (NO3-, NH4+), increasing N inputs may positively affect C storage in peat. Recent studies in North America and Scandinavia have suggested that pristine bogs are characterized by significant rates of microbial N2 fixation that augments C storage in the peat substrate. We present a nitrogen isotope study aimed at corroborating these findings. We conducted an isotope inventory of N fluxes and pools at two Sphagnum-dominated ombrotrophic peat bogs in the Czech Republic (Central Europe). For the first time, we present a time-series of del15N values of atmospheric input at the same locations as del15N values of living Sphagnum and peat. The mean del15N values systematically increased in the order: input NH4+ (-10.0 ‰) < input NO3- (-7.9 ‰) < peat porewater (-5.6 ‰) < Sphagnum (-5.0 ‰) < shallow peat (-4.2 ‰) < deep peat (-2.2 ‰) < runoff (-1.4 ‰) < porewater N2O (1.4 ‰). Importantly, N of Sphagnum was isotopically heavier than N of the atmospheric input (p < 0.001). If partial incorporation of reactive N from the atmosphere into Sphagnum was isotopically selective, the residual N would have to be isotopically extremely light. Such N, however, was not identified anywhere in the ecosystem. Alternatively, Sphagnum may have contained an admixture of isotopically heavier N from atmospheric N2 (del15N N2 = 0 ‰). We conlude that the N isotope systematics at the two Czech sites is consistent with the concept of significant N2 fixation

  8. Multiple utilization of peat, a national treasure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rakovskii, V.E.; Guseva, M.V.

    1981-01-01

    Peat reserves in the USSR and the uses of peat as a fuel and in chemistry and agriculture are surveyed. It is shown that a basic process for treating peat to produce fuel and other products is the biochemical processing of Upland peat. The processing of the peat which begins with hydrolysis is outlined and the products obtained are listed. The problems involved in obtaining gas and liquid fuels from peat are discussed including the production of hydrogen by electrolysis. (In Russian)

  9. An overview of peat related chemistry

    OpenAIRE

    Guan, Ting

    2015-01-01

    Peat is a type of renewable resource that has usually been ignored. Nowadays, people mainly apply peat as the heating energy resource instead of other purposes. This thesis elaborates many studies such as peat used in chemistry, which were utilized by researchers, and the product has been made according to special characteristics of peat. The aim of thesis is to give a summary of the achievement of research, which had been studied of peat that applied in chemistry. Eight studies of peat- r...

  10. The legacy of wetland drainage on the remaining peat in the Sacramento San Joaquin Delta, California, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drexler, J.Z.; De Fontaine, C. S.; Deverel, S.J.

    2009-01-01

    Throughout the world, many extensive wetlands, such as the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta of California (hereafter, the Delta), have been drained for agriculture, resulting in land-surface subsidence of peat soils. The purpose of this project was to study the in situ effects of wetland drainage on the remaining peat in the Delta. Peat cores were retrieved from four drained, farmed islands and four relatively undisturbed, marsh islands. Core samples were analyzed for bulk density and percent organic carbon. Macrofossils in the peat were dated using radiocarbon age determination. The peat from the farmed islands is highly distinct from marsh island peat. Bulk density of peat from the farmed islands is generally greater than that of the marsh islands at a given organic carbon content. On the farmed islands, increased bulk density, which is an indication of compaction, decreases with depth within the unoxidized peat zone, whereas, on the marsh islands, bulk density is generally constant with depth except near the surface. Approximately 5580 of the original peat layer on the farmed islands has been lost due to land-surface subsidence. For the center regions of the farmed islands, this translates into an estimated loss of between 29005700 metric tons of organic carbon/hectare. Most of the intact peat just below the currently farmed soil layer is over 4000 years old. Peat loss will continue as long as the artificial water table on the farmed islands is held below the land surface. ?? 2009 The Society of Wetland Scientists.

  11. The legacy of wetland drainage on the remaining peat in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta, California, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drexler, Judith Z.; Christian S. de Fontaine,; Steven J. Deverel,

    2009-01-01

    Throughout the world, many extensive wetlands, such as the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta of California (hereafter, the Delta), have been drained for agriculture, resulting in land-surface subsidence of peat soils. The purpose of this project was to study the in situ effects of wetland drainage on the remaining peat in the Delta. Peat cores were retrieved from four drained, farmed islands and four relatively undisturbed, marsh islands. Core samples were analyzed for bulk density and percent organic carbon. Macrofossils in the peat were dated using radiocarbon age determination. The peat from the farmed islands is highly distinct from marsh island peat. Bulk density of peat from the farmed islands is generally greater than that of the marsh islands at a given organic carbon content. On the farmed islands, increased bulk density, which is an indication of compaction, decreases with depth within the unoxidized peat zone, whereas, on the marsh islands, bulk density is generally constant with depth except near the surface. Approximately 55–80% of the original peat layer on the farmed islands has been lost due to landsurface subsidence. For the center regions of the farmed islands, this translates into an estimated loss of between 2900-5700 metric tons of organic carbon/hectare. Most of the intact peat just below the currently farmed soil layer is over 4000 years old. Peat loss will continue as long as the artificial water table on the farmed islands is held below the land surface.

  12. An Overview on Japan and Malaysia Peat Relating to Geotechnical Characteristic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohd Khaidir Abu Talib

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Peat deposits distribution is extensive and can be found in many countries throughout the world when the conditions are favorable for their accumulation and formation at different climatic zones. These deposits represent the extreme form of soft soil and subject to instability and enormous primary as well as long-term settlement even when subjected to moderate load. Access to these superficial deposits is usually very difficult as the water table will be at near or above the ground surface. To sum up, peat is considered as unsuitable soils for supporting foundations or any construction works in its natural state. This paper presents some review of peat soil from Japan and Malaysia pertaining to geotechnical properties in order to develop and expand an understanding about tropical peats for future studies. The parameters studied were the moisture content, loss on ignition, unit weight, specific gravity (Gs, fiber contents, acidity, liquid limit (LL, plastic limit (PL, plastic index (PI and shear strength. Overall, Hokkaido peat that had been studied has many similarities of peat properties with Malaysia peat especially in West region including Johor peat.

  13. Evaluation of Leaf Total Nitrogen Content for Nitrogen Management in a Malaysian Paddy Field by Using Soil Plant Analysis Development Chlorophyll Meter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Gholizadeh

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Laboratory plant testing is usually time-consuming and high-costing. Hence, plant nutrient variability must be measured rapidly and the information made known to the farmers before the new season starts. Site-specific crop management, well-established in some developed countries, is now being considered in other places such as Malaysia. Approach: The application of site-specific management principles and techniques to diverse crops and small-scale farming systems in Malaysia will present new challenges. Describing within-field variability in typical Malaysian production settings is a fundamental first step toward determining the size of management zones and the inter-relationships between limiting factors, for establishment of site-specific management strategies. Results: Measurements of rice SPAD readings and nitrogen content were obtained in a Malaysian rice paddy field. SPAD reading data was manually collected on 80DAT and measured using a Minolta SPAD 502. Leaf samples were collected at 60 points at the same time to compare results from sampling with SPAD reading values. Samples nitrogen content was analyzed in a laboratory. Analysis of variance, variogram and kriging were conducted to determine the variability of the measured parameters and also their relationship. SPAD reading and nitrogen content maps were created on the interpretation of the data was investigated. Conclusion/Recommendations: Finally the research indicated that SPAD readings are closely related to leaf N content which means the potential for technology of precision farming to understand and control variation in Malaysian production fields and also SPAD chlorophyll meter ability to monitor the N status of rice and recommend the amount of N fertilization. Additional research is needed to confirm the results with data from other fields and crops.

  14. Link between DOC in near surface peat and stream water in an upland catchment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Joanna M; Lane, Stuart N; Chapman, Pippa J; Adamson, John K

    2008-10-15

    Hydrologic transport of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) from peat soils may differ to organo-mineral soils in how they responded to changes in flow, because of differences in soil profile and hydrology. In well-drained organo-mineral soils, low flow is through the lower mineral layer where DOC is absorbed and high flow is through the upper organic layer where DOC is produced. DOC concentrations in streams draining organo-mineral soils typically increase with flow. In saturated peat soils, both high and low flows are through an organic layer where DOC is produced. Therefore, DOC in stream water draining peat may not increase in response to changes in flow as there is no switch in flow path between a mineral and organic layer. To verify this, we conducted a high-resolution monitoring study of soil and stream water at an upland peat catchment in northern England. Our data showed a strong positive correlation between DOC concentrations at -1 and -5 cm depth and stream water, and weaker correlations between concentrations at -20 to -50 cm depth and stream water. Although near surface organic material appears to be the key source of stream water DOC in both peat and organo-mineral soils, we observed a negative correlation between stream flow and DOC concentrations instead of a positive correlation as DOC released from organic layers during low and high flow was diluted by rainfall. The differences in DOC transport processes between peat and organo-mineral soils have different implications for our understanding of long-term changes in DOC exports. While increased rainfall may cause an increase in DOC flux from peat due to an increase in water volume, it may cause a decrease in concentrations. This response is contrary to expected changes in DOC exports from organo-mineral soils, where increase rainfall is likely to result in an increase in flux and concentration.

  15. Malaysian Cinema, Asian Film

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heide, van der William

    2002-01-01

    This title series departs from traditional studies of national cinema by accentuating the intercultural and intertextual links between Malaysian films and Asian (as well as European and American) film practices. Using cross-cultural analysis, the author characterizes Malaysia as a pluralist society

  16. Ground-penetrating radar study of the Rahivere peat bog, eastern Estonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jüri Plado

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The current case study presents results of the ground-penetrating radar (GPR profiling at one of the Saadjärve drumlin field interstitial troughs, the Rahivere bog, eastern Estonia. The study was conducted in order to identify the bog morphology, and the thickness and geometry of the peat body. The method was also used to describe the applicability of GPR in the evaluation of the peat deposit reserve as the Rahivere bog belongs among the officially registered peat reserves. Fourteen GPR profiles, ~ 100 m apart and oriented perpendicular to the long axis of the depression, covering the bog and its surrounding areas, were acquired. In order to verify the radar image interpretation as well as to evaluate the velocity of electromagnetic waves in peat, a common source configuration was utilized and thirteen boreholes were drilled on the GPR profiles. A mean value of 0.036 m ns–1 corresponding to relative dielectric permittivity of 69.7 was used for the time–depth conversion. Radar images reveal major reflection from the peat–soil interface up to a depth of about 4 m, whereas drillings showed a maximum thickness of 4.5 m of peat. Minor reflections appear from the upper peat and mineral soil. According to the borehole data, undecomposed peat is underlain by decomposed one, but identifying them by GPR is complicated. Mineral soil consists of glaciolimnic silty sand in the peripheral areas of the trough, overlain by limnic clay in the central part. The calculated peat volumes (1 200 000 m3 were found to exceed the earlier estimation (979 000 m3 that was based solely on drilling data. Ground-penetrating radar, as a method that allows mapping horizontal continuity of the sub-peat interface in a non-destructive way, was found to provide detailed information for evaluating peat depth and extent.

  17. Age Determination of the Remaining Peat in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta, California, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drexler, Judith Z.; de Fontaine, Christian S.; Knifong, Donna L.

    2007-01-01

    Introduction The Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta of California was once a 1,400 square kilometer (km2) tidal marsh, which contained a vast layer of peat ranging up to 15 meters (m) thick (Atwater and Belknap, 1980). Because of its favorable climate and highly fertile peat soils, the majority of the Delta was drained and reclaimed for agriculture during the late 1800s and early 1900s. Drainage of the peat soils changed the conditions in the surface layers of peat from anaerobic (having no free oxygen present) to aerobic (exposed to the atmosphere). This change in conditions greatly increased the decomposition rate of the peat, which consists largely of organic (plant) matter. Thus began the process of land-surface subsidence, which initially was a result of peat shrinkage and compaction, and later largely was a result of oxidation by which organic carbon in the peat essentially vaporized to carbon dioxide (Deverel and others, 1998; Ingebritsen and Ikehara, 1999). Because of subsidence, the land-surface elevation on farmed islands in the Delta has decreased from a few meters to as much as 8 m below local mean sea level (California Department of Water Resources, 1995; Steve Deverel, Hydrofocus, Inc., written commun., 2007). The USGS, in collaboration with the University of California at Davis, and Hydrofocus Inc. of Davis, California, has been studying the formation of the Delta and the impact of wetland reclamation on the peat column as part of a project called Rates and Evolution of Peat Accretion through Time (REPEAT). The purpose of this report is to provide results on the age of the remaining peat soils on four farmed islands in the Delta.

  18. Short-column anion-exchange chromatography for soil and peat humic substances profiling by step-wise gradient of high pH aqueous sodium ethylenediaminetetraacetate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutta, Milan; Ráczová, Janka; Góra, Róbert; Pessl, Juraj

    2015-08-21

    Novel anion-exchange liquid chromatographic method with step gradient of aqueous EDTA(4-) based mobile phase elution has been developed to profile available Slovak soil humic substances and alkaline extracts of various soils. The method utilize short glass column (30mm×3mm) filled in with hydrolytically stable particles (60μm diameter) Separon HEMA-BIO 1000 having (diethylamino)ethyl functional groups. Step gradient was programmed by mixing mobile phase composed of aqueous solution of sodium EDTA (pH 12.0; 5mmolL(-1)) and mobile phase constituted of aqueous solution of sodium EDTA (pH 12.0, 500mmolL(-1)). The FLD of HSs was set to excitation wavelength 480nm and emission wavelength 530nm (λem). Separation mechanism was studied by use of selected aromatic acids related to humic acids with the aid of UV spectrophotometric detection at 280nm. The proposed method benefits from high ionic strength (I=5molL(-1)) of the end mobile phase buffer and provides high recovery of humic acids (98%). Accurate and reproducible profiling of studied humic substances, alkaline extracts of various types of soils enables straightforward characterization and differentiation of HSs in arable and forest soils. Selected model aromatic acids were used for separation mechanism elucidation.

  19. Peat, industrial chemistry and technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuchsman, C.H.

    1980-01-01

    This book is an attempt to enable chemists, engineers, and managers in North America and Western Europe to assess the industrial potential of peat. The chemical characteristics of peat, peat bitumens and peat carbohydrates are described. The technical matter concerns (1) solvent extraction processes, leading to the production of waxes and of by-products of potential interest in pharmaceutical chemistry; (2) acid hydrolysis, leading to the production of sugars supporting yeast products for high-protein livestock feed, and alcohol production, (3) pyrolysis, leading to the production of speciality high-production metallurgical coke, and activated carbon; and (4) the alkaline extraction of humic acids, leading to a variety of surface active agents, viscosity modifiers, and possible ingredients for the plastics and adhesive industries. The more important environmental aspects for man and nature are pointed out. (463 refs.)

  20. Properties and structure of peat humic acids depending on humification and precursor biota in bogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klavins, Maris; Purmalis, Oskars

    2013-04-01

    Humic substances form most of the organic component of soil, peat and natural waters, but their structure and properties very much differs depending on their source. The aim of this study is to characterize humic acids from raised bog peat profiles to evaluate the homogeneity of humic acids isolated from the bog bodies and study peat humification impact on properties of humic acids. A major impact on the structure of peat humic acids have raised bog biota (dominantly represented by bryophytes of different origin) void of lignin. For characterization of peat humic acids their elemental (CHNOS), functional (-COOH, phenolic OH) analysis, spectroscopic characterization (UV, fluorescence, FTIR, 1H NMR, CP/MAS 13C NMR, ESR) and degradation studies (Py-GC/MS) were done. Peat humic acids (HA) have an intermediate position between the living organic matter and coal organic matter and their structure is formed in a process in which more labile structures (carbohydrates, amino acids, etc.) are destroyed, but thermodynamically more stable aromatic and polyaromatic structures emerge. Comparatively, the studied peat HAs are at the start of the transformation process of living organic matter. Concentrations of carboxyl and phenolic hydroxyl groups changes depending on the depth of peat from which HAs have been isolated: and carboxylic acidity is increasing with depth of peat location and the humification degree. The ability to influence the surface tension of peat humic acids isolated from a well-characterized bog profile demonstrates dependence on age and humification degree. With increase of the humification degree and age of humic acids, their molecular complexity and ability to influence surface tension decreases; even so, the impact of the biological precursor (peat-forming bryophytes and plants) can be identified.

  1. Regional Haze Evolved from Peat Fires - an Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yuqi; Rein, Guillermo

    2016-04-01

    This work provides an overview of haze episodes, their cause, emissions and health effects found in the scientific literature. Peatlands, the terrestrial ecosystems resulting from the accumulation of partially decayed vegetation, become susceptible to smouldering fires because of natural droughts or anthropogenic-induced drainages. Once ignited, smouldering peat fires persistently consume large amounts of soil carbon in a flameless form. It is estimated that the average annual carbon gas emissions (mainly CO2 and CO) from peat fires are equivalent to 15% of manmade emissions, representing influential perturbation of global carbon circle. In addition to carbon emissions, smouldering peat fires emit substantial quantities of heterogeneous smoke, which is responsible for haze phenomena, has not yet been fully studied. Peat-fire-derived smoke is characterized by high concentration of particulate matter (PM), ranging from nano-scale ultrafine fraction (PM1, particle diameter disaster. Severe haze events continue to appear in Southeast Asia every few years due to periodical peat fires in this region. In addition, smouldering peat fires have been frequently reported in tropical, temperate and boreal regions (Botswana in 2000, North America in 2004, Scotland in 2006 and Central Russia in 2010 et al.), peat-fire-induced haze has become a regional seasonal phenomenon. Exposure to smoky haze results in deleterious physiologic responses, predominantly to the respiratory and cardiovascular systems. In 1997, an estimation of 100 million people in 5 countries in Southeast Asia were affected by Indonesia haze episode while 20 million people suffered from respiratory problems in Indonesia alone. Fine PM fraction generated from peat fires could penetrate into lower respiratory tracks and exacerbate respiratory diseases including chronic bronchitis, emphysema and asthma. Epidemiological studies show that direct exposure to haze pollution is associated with decreased pulmonary

  2. Malaysian Twin Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahanfar, Shayesteh; Jaffar, Sharifah Halimah

    2013-02-01

    The National Malaysian Twin Registry was established in Royal College of Medicine, Perak, University Kuala Lumpur (UniKL) in June 2008 through a grant provided by UniKL. The general objective is to facilitate scientific research involving participation of twins and their family members in order to answer questions of health and wellbeing relevant to Malaysians. Recruitment is done via mass media, poster, and pamphlets. We now have 266 adult and 204 children twins registered. Several research projects including reproductive health study of twins and the role of co-bedding on growth and development of children are carried out. Registry holds annual activities for twins and seeks to provide health-related information for twins. We seek international collaboration.

  3. Third technical contractors' conference on peat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-01-01

    The conference dealt with the estimation of US peat reserves, methods for the gasification of peat, including biogasification, techniques for dewatering peat, and the harvesting of peat. Separate abstracts were prepared for the individual papers. (CKK)

  4. Use of surface peat in growing media for landscaping and public gardens in Northern Finland. Pintaturpeen kaeyttoe viherrakentamisen kasvualustassa Pohjois-Suomessa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holappa, K.

    1989-01-01

    When preparing mires for peat mining it is necessary to remove the poorly humified surface which is unsuitable for fuel purposes. On the other hand, a survey of problems and development requirements regarding landscaping and the creation of pulic parks and gradens in Northern Finland in 1985 pointed to a shortage of suitable soils for use at such sites. On the basis of preliminary investigations, research was therefore initiated with the aim of developing means of utilizing surface peat for such purposes. Lawn cultivation experiments employing additional soil layers of different compositions and thicknesses were commenced the following year at the Ruukki and Apukka experimental stations of the Finnish Agricultural Research Centre. The soil mixtures used were subsoil improved with peat, a mixture of peat and sand, peat and limestone water purification sludge, peat and aluminium sulphate water purification sludge, bark chips and water purification sludge, and peat alone. Composting experiments were carried ou using five mixtures of peat, bark chips and sludge, and the resulting composts were mixed with mineral soil and used as substrates for the cultivation of Rosa rugosa and Pinus sylvestris. Blends of the various composts with sand were also tested as substrates for garden pansies (var. /sup A/bendglut/sup )/. Opinions were sought from peat users on the practical advantages and problems associated with its use and at the same time a survey was made of their practical quality requirements with respect to peat products. A new peat classification was constructed from the data acquired on the structure of peat, its properties and its possible practical applications. Finally, a set of instructions for the use of surface peat for soil improvement purposes were drawn up on the basis of the experimental and survey data.

  5. Measurements of CO2 exchange with an automated chamber system throughout the year: challenges in measuring night-time respiration on porous peat soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Koskinen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We built an automatic chamber system to measure greenhouse gas (GHG exchange in forested peatland ecosystems. We aimed to build a system robust enough which would work throughout the year and could measure through a changing snowpack in addition to producing annual GHG fluxes by integrating the measurements without the need of using models. The system worked rather well throughout the year, but it was not service free. Gap filling of data was still necessary. We observed problems in carbon dioxide (CO2 respiration flux estimation during calm summer nights, when a CO2 concentration gradient from soil/moss system to atmosphere builds up. Chambers greatly overestimated the night-time respiration. This was due to the disturbance caused by the chamber to the soil-moss CO2 gradient and consequent initial pulse of CO2 to the chamber headspace. We tested different flux calculation and measurement methods to solve this problem. The estimated flux was strongly dependent on (1 the starting point of the fit after closing the chamber, (2 the length of the fit, (3 the type of the fit (linear and polynomial, (4 the speed of the fan mixing the air inside the chamber, and (5 atmospheric turbulence (friction velocity, u*. The best fitting method (the most robust, least random variation for respiration measurements on our sites was linear fitting with the period of 120–240 s after chamber closure. Furthermore, the fan should be adjusted to spin at minimum speed to avoid the pulse-effect, but it should be kept on to ensure mixing. If night-time problems cannot be solved, emissions can be estimated using daytime data from opaque chambers.

  6. Measurements of CO2 exchange with an automated chamber system throughout the year: challenges in measuring nighttime respiration on porous peat soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Koskinen

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available We built an automatic chamber system to measure greehouse gas (GHG exchange in forested peatland ecosystems. We aimed to build a system robust enough which would work throughout the year and could measure through a changing snowpackin addition to producing annual GHG fluxes by integrating the measurements without the need of using models. The system worked rather well throughout the year, but it was not service free. Gap filling of data was still necessary. We observed problems in carbon dioxide (CO2 flux estimation during calm summer nights, when a CO2 concentration gradient from soil/moss system to atmosphere builds up. Chambers greatly overestimated the nighttime respiration. This was due to the disturbance caused by the chamber to the soil-moss CO2 gradient and consequent initial pulse of CO2 to the chamber headspace. We tested different flux calculation and measurement methods to solve this problem. The estimated flux was strongly dependent on (1 the type of the fit (linear and polynomial, (2 the starting point of the fit after closing the chamber, (3 the length of the fit, (4 the speed of the fan mixing the air inside the chamber, and (5 atmospheric turbulence (friction velocity, u*. The best fitting method (the most robust, least random variation was linear fitting with the period of 120–240 s after chamber closure. Furthermore, the fan should be adjusted to spin at minimum speed to avoid the pulse-effect, but it should be kept on to ensure mixing. If nighttime problems cannot be solved, emissions can be estimated using daytime data from opaque chambers.

  7. Excavation-drier method of energy-peat extraction reduces long-term climatic impact

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silvan, N.; Silvan, K.; Laine, J. [Finnish Forest Research Inst., Parkano (Finland)], e-mail: niko.silvan@metla.fi; Vaisanen, S.; Soukka, R. [Lappeenranta Univ.of Techology (Finland)

    2012-11-01

    Climatic impacts of energy-peat extraction are of increasing concern due to EU emissions trading requirements. A new excavation-drier peat extraction method has been developed to reduce the climatic impact and increase the efficiency of peat extraction. To quantify and compare the soil GHG fluxes of the excavation drier and the traditional milling methods, as well as the areas from which the energy peat is planned to be extracted in the future (extraction reserve area types), soil CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4} and N{sub 2}O fluxes were measured during 2006-2007 at three sites in Finland. Within each site, fluxes were measured from drained extraction reserve areas, extraction fields and stockpiles of both methods and additionally from the biomass driers of the excavation-drier method. The Life Cycle Assessment (LCA), described at a principal level in ISO Standards 14040:2006 and 14044:2006, was used to assess the long-term (100 years) climatic impact from peatland utilisation with respect to land use and energy production chains where utilisation of coal was replaced with peat. Coal was used as a reference since in many cases peat and coal can replace each other in same power plants. According to this study, the peat extraction method used was of lesser significance than the extraction reserve area type in regards to the climatic impact. However, the excavation-drier method seems to cause a slightly reduced climatic impact as compared with the prevailing milling method. (orig.)

  8. Enhancing Malaysian Teachers' Assessment Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lian, Lim Hooi; Yew, Wun Thiam; Meng, Chew Cheng

    2014-01-01

    Currently, in order to reform the Malaysian education system, there have been a number of education policy initiatives launched by the Malaysian Ministry of Education (MOE). All these initiatives have encouraged and inculcated teaching and learning for creativity, critical, innovative and higher-order thinking skills rather than conceptual…

  9. Mitigating Settlement of Structures founded on Peat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijeyesekera, D. C.; Numbikannu, L.; Ismail, T. N. H. T.; Bakar, I.

    2016-07-01

    Observations made of two common failures of structures founded on peat/organic soil in Johor, Malaysia is presented. Critical evaluation of current lightweight fill technology to mitigate such settlement is also discussed. Lightweight technology, such as Expanded Polystyrene (EPS), has been used in construction on soft yielding ground for decades. Regrettably, some published information of EPS failures to perform on construction sites are also cited in this paper. This paper outlines some concepts leading to the development of an alternative innovative lightweight fill is that the idealised cellular structure of the GCM permit free flow of water and complemented by the mat structure which evens out any differential settlement A further highlight of this paper is the monitoring of the field performance of this lightweight fill (GCM) as a feasible alternative to fill weight reduction on yielding ground.. Hence, a prime research objective was to compare the fill settlements observed with 1m high fill of surcharge loading on peat ground (comparison of the case of using a partial 0.6m high GCM and that of a total of 1m of conventional sand backfill).

  10. Fourth technical contractors' conference on peat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-01-01

    This conference reported the status of the US Department of Energy Peat Program. The papers presented dealt with peat dewatering, international peat programs, environmental and socio-economic factors, peat gasification, peat harvesting, and the state peat surveys for 14 states. Separate abstracts were prepared for the individual papers. (CKK)

  11. Characterizing peat palm forest degradation in the Peruvian Amazon from space and on the ground

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hergoualc'h, Kristell; Gutierrez-Velez, Victor Hugo; van Lent, Jeffrey; Verchot, Louis Vincent

    2016-04-01

    Peru has the second largest area of peatlands in the Tropics however little is known on how the biogeochemical cycle of its peat forests can be affected through anthropogenic intervention. The most representative land cover on peat is a Mauritia flexuosa-dominated palm swamp forest which has been under human pressure over decades due the high demand for the M. flexuosa fruit often collected by cutting down the entire palm. Degradation of these carbon-dense forests can severely affect emissions of greenhouse gases and contribute to climate change. The objectives of this research were to assess the impacts on soil trace gas fluxes and biomass carbon stocks of peat palm swamp forest degradation and to explore the potential of remote sensing methods combined with field measurements to map the distribution of peat palm swamp forest according degradation levels. Results suggest a shift in forest composition from palm- to woody-tree dominated forest following degradation. We also found that human intervention in peat palm swamp forest can translate into substantial reductions in tree carbon stocks with a decrease in initial biomass (above and below-ground) stocks (118.3 ± 1.1 Mg C ha-1) by 26 and 44% following medium and high degradation. Preliminary results suggest high and low soil CH4 and CO2 emission rates on average, as compared to Southeast Asian peat swamp forests whereas N2O emissions are of the same magnitude. Degradation seems to disrupt soil respiration mainly through micro-climatic changes induced by reduced canopy cover. The analysis indicates a good potential to discriminate areas of peat palm swamp forest with different levels of degradation from other land covers, suggesting the feasibility of monitoring peat palm swamp forest degradation using remote sensing analyses.

  12. SPRUCE Deep Peat Heating Manipulations: in situ Methods to Characterize the Response of Deep Peat to Warming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, P. J.; Riggs, J. S.; Barbier, C. N.; Nettles, W. R., IV; Phillips, J. R.; Hook, L.

    2014-12-01

    Deep soil heating infrastructure was completed in 2014 for a peatland whole-ecosystem warming study that will include air warming starting in 2015 (SPRUCE; http://mnspruce.ornl.gov). In June 2014, we initiated deep soil heating to test the responsiveness of deep peat carbon stocks, microbial communities and biogeochemical cycling processes to heating at 4 warming levels (+2.25, +4.5, +6.75 and +9 °C; 2 replicate plots) compared to fully-constructed control plots (+0 °C; 2 replicate plots). The warming treatments were deployed over eight 113 m2 areas using circular arrays of low-wattage (W) electrical resistance heaters. Perimeter heating was achieved by an exterior circle of 48 100W heaters that apply heat from the surface to a depth of 3 meters. Heating within the study area was accomplished utilizing three zones of 100W "deep only" heaters: an intermediate circle of 12 units, an interior circle of 6 units and one unit placed at the plot center. Heating elements inside the study area apply heat only from -2 to -3 m to keep active heater surfaces away from measured peat volumes. With an average peat depth of 2.5 meters this system was able to warm approximately 113 of the 282 m3 of peat within each target plot. In the absence of the air warming cap, in situ deep peat heating is only effective at sustaining warming in the deep peat layers. Warming levels at depth were achieved over a 25-day (+ 2.25 °C) to a 60-day (+9 °C) period depending on the target treatment temperatures in agreement with a priori energy balance model simulations. Homogeneous temperature distributions between heaters at a given depth interval continued to develop after these targets were reached. Biological and biogeochemical responses to these manipulations are being actively assessed. After one month of transient heating, data for ground-level surface flux of CO2 and CH4 had not shown changes from deep peat heating, but they continue to be tracked and will be summarized in this and related

  13. Carbon and Water Cycles in a New Zealand Peat Bog

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, D.; Smith, J.

    2001-12-01

    Peat soils represent globally significant stores of carbon and an understanding of carbon exchange processes between peat wetland ecosystems and the atmosphere is important for understanding the effects of, and impacts upon, global climate change. Eddy covariance measurements of CO2, water vapour and energy fluxes were made during 1999 and 2000 at a remnant oligotrophic raised peat bog in North Island, New Zealand. The bog's hydrology has been modified by drainage of surrounding agricultural land, so that the water table is relatively deep compared to that of unmodified bogs in the region. Vegetation is dominated by two indigenous species of rush-like vascular plants belonging to the Southern hemisphere family Restionaceae. Maximum daytime CO2 fluxes were commonly -9 {μ }mol m-2 s-1 and averaged -1.3 {μ }mol m-2 s-1 over the 24-hour period in summertime. The ecosystem was a sink of atmospheric carbon for most of the year, with wintertime characterised by 12--15 weeks of carbon neutrality or slight carbon loss. Average carbon uptake by the ecosystem was 196 gC m-2 yr-1 for the two-year period. Modelling suggests that the key factor determining inter-annual variability of the carbon budget is seasonal soil temperature, whereas ecosystem respiration is relatively insensitive to the position of the lowered water table. The bog vegetation acts as a major control over water vapour loss and energy partitioning favors sensible heat production with mean summertime Bowen ratios of approximately 2.0. Water use efficiency was highest in the morning, indicating that the vegetation maximizes CO2 assimilation while the saturation vapour pressure deficit and transpiration rates are low. The dense canopy structure also restricts penetration of solar radiation to the peat surface, which minimizes evaporation and soil respiration.

  14. Microbial activity and dissolved organic carbon production in drained and rewetted blanket peat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallage, Z. E.; Holden, J.; Jones, T.; McDonald, A. T.

    2009-04-01

    Heightened levels of degradation in response to environmental change have resulted in an increased loss of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in the drainage waters of many peatland catchments across Europe and North America. One significant threat to peatland sustainability has been the installation of artificial drainage ditches, and although recent restoration schemes have pursued drain blocking as a possible strategy for reducing degradation and fluvial carbon losses, little is known about how such processes influence the intimate biological systems operating within these soils. This paper investigates how disturbance, in the form of drainage and drain blocking, influences the rate of microbial activity within a peat soil, and the subsequent impact this has on DOC production potential. Peat samples were extracted from three treatment sites (intact peat, drained peat and drain-blocked peat) in an upland blanket peat catchment in the UK. Microbial activity was measured via laboratory experimentation that incorporated the use of an INT-Formazan dehydrogenase enzyme assay to assess the level of electron transport system (ETS) activity occurring within each treatment. Drainage significantly lowered the height of the water table relative to the intact peat, whilst drain blocking successfully rewetted the peat, having raised the height of the water table relative to the drained site. Mean microbial activity rates at the drained site were found to be 33 % greater than the undisturbed intact peat and almost double that of the restored, drain-blocked site. These results correspond well with previously published data observing significantly greater DOC concentrations in the pore waters of the drained site and significantly lower concentrations at the blocked site, relative to the intact peat. Data from the drain-blocked treatment also provides evidence contrary to the commonly quoted hypothesis that an enzyme-latch reaction may be sustained in drained peat, even once it has

  15. Peat and its modification products as sorbents for remeval of metals, metalloids and nonmetallic elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klavins, Maris; Ansone, Linda; Robalds, Artis; Dudare, Diana

    2013-04-01

    For remediation of soils and purification of waters biosorbents might be considered as an prospective group of materials and amongst them peat have a special role due to low cost, biodegradability, high number of functional groups, well developed surface area and combination of hydrophilic/hydrophobic structural elements. We have demonstrated the possibilities to use peat and its thermal treatment products for oil sorption. Peat as an oil sorbent has poor buoyancy characteristics, relatively low oil sorption capacity and low hydrophobicity. However, thermal treatment (low-temperature pyrolysis and synthesis of peat-based active coal) helps to significantly improve its sorptive characteristics. The processes and structural changes taking place during low-temperature pyrolysis have been studied by means of IR spectroscopy, thermogravimetry and scanning electron microscopy. Peat can be used also as an efficient sorbent for sorption of metallic elements as it has been demonstrated on example of Tl+, Cu2+, Cr3+, however sorption capacity in respect to nonmetallic (anionic species) elements is low. To develop such application possibilities peat, peat modified with iron compounds, iron humates were prepared and tested for sorption of arsenic and phosphorous compounds in comparison with weakly basic anionites. The highest sorption capacity was observed when peat sorbents modified with iron compounds were used. Sorption of different arsenic speciation forms onto iron-modified peat sorbents was investigated as a function of pH and temperature. It was established that sorption capacity increases with a rise in temperature, and the calculation of sorption process thermodynamic parameters indicates the spontaneity of sorption process and its endothermic nature.

  16. Long-term disturbance dynamics and resilience of tropical peat swamp forests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Lydia E S; Bhagwat, Shonil A; Willis, Katherine J

    2015-01-01

    1. The coastal peat swamp forests of Sarawak, Malaysian Borneo, are undergoing rapid conversion, predominantly into oil palm plantations. This wetland ecosystem is assumed to have experienced insignificant disturbance in the past, persisting under a single ecologically-stable regime. However, there is limited knowledge of the past disturbance regime, long-term functioning and fundamentally the resilience of this ecosystem to changing natural and anthropogenic perturbations through time. 2. In this study, long-term ecological data sets from three degraded peatlands in Sarawak were collected to shed light on peat swamp forest dynamics. Fossil pollen and charcoal were counted in each sedimentary sequence to reconstruct vegetation and investigate responses to past environmental disturbance, both natural and anthropogenic. 3. Results demonstrate that peat swamp forest taxa have dominated these vegetation profiles throughout the last c. 2000-year period despite the presence of various drivers of disturbance. Evidence for episodes of climatic variability, predominantly linked to ENSO events, and wildfires is present throughout. However, in the last c. 500 years, burning and indicators of human disturbance have elevated beyond past levels at these sites, concurrent with a reduction in peat swamp forest pollen. 4. Two key insights have been gained through this palaeoecological analysis: (i) peat swamp forest vegetation has demonstrated resilience to disturbance caused by burning and climatic variability in Sarawak in the late Holocene, however (ii) coincident with increased fire combined with human impact c. 500 years ago, these communities started to decline. 5.Synthesis. Sarawak's coastal peat swamps have demonstrated resilience to past natural disturbances, with forest vegetation persisting through episodes of fire and climatic variability. However, palaeoecological data presented here suggest that recent, anthropogenic disturbances are of a greater magnitude, causing

  17. Soils of peatlands: histosols and gelisols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randy Kolka; Scott D. Bridgham; Chien-Lu. Ping

    2016-01-01

    Peatlands are a subset of wetlands that have accumulated significant amounts of soil organic matter. Soils of peatlands are colloquially known as peat, with mucks referring to peats that are decomposed to the point that the original plant remains are altered beyond recognition (Chapter 6, SSSA 2008). Generally, soils with a surface organic layer >40 cm thick...

  18. Acceleration of peat drying by intensifying the heat and mass transfer; Turpeen kuivumisen nopeuttaminen laemmoen- ja aineensiirtoa tehostamalla

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hillebrand, K.

    1996-12-31

    The efficiency of peat production can be increased by intensifying peat drying. To intensify drying one has to know the effects of the different factors affecting the heat and mass transfer in the drying layer and in the soil. The objective of the study is to increase the degree of utilization of solar energy in drying of peat from the present level of 30% to 40% of the total incoming solar energy. In this way it is possible to reduce the peat production costs about 10%. A numerical drying model has been developed which describes the transfer of liquid water, water vapor and heat in the drying layer and in the soil. In addition, the interaction between the atmosphere and the drying layer, as well as the rainfall interception by the layer, infiltration, evaporation, and drainage have been taking into account. Daily input requirements include global solar radiation, air temperature and relative humidity, wind speed and precipitation. In addition to the weather data one has to know the characteristics of the drying layer and the soil. The numerical drying model was also used to study the effect of soil frost on peat drying and the possibilities to hinder the frost formation. Producing peat on the field which is still partly frozen, the drying of peat takes 10 - 25% longer time than under normal conditions, which means 5 - 25 hours longer drying period. By forming a porous, insulating layer on the top of the soil surface, one can hinder the frost formation significantly. Raising the groundwater level prevents, however, only a little the frost formation in peat soil

  19. Pore water chemistry in a disturbed and an undisturbed peat forests in Brunei Darussalam: Nutrient and carbon contents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandois, L.; Cobb, A.; Abu Salim, K.; Chieng Hei, I.; Lim Biaw Leng, L.; Corlett, R.; Harvey, C.

    2010-12-01

    Tropical peat swamp forests in their natural state are important reservoir of biodiversity, carbon and water. However, they are rapidly vanishing due to agricultural conversion (mainly to oil palms), logging, drainage and fire. Peat swamp forests constitute an important contribution to global and regional biodiversity, providing an habitat to rare and threatened species. They encompass a sequence of forest types from the perimeter to the center of mildely elevated domes, and at our site in Brunei, are host to Shorea Albida trees (Anderson, 1983). They constitute a large terrestrial carbon reservoir (tropical peat soils contain up to 70 Pg C, which accounts for 20% of global peat soil carbon and 2% of the global soil carbon (Hirano et al., 2007)). In tropical peat swamp forests, the most important factors controling organic matter accumulation, as well as the biodiversity and structure of the forest, are hydrology and nutrients availability (Page et al., 1999). Study of pore water in peat swamp forest can provide key information on carbon cycle, including biomass production, organic matter decomposition and leaching of carbon in draining water. However, data on pore water chemistry and nutrient concentrations in pristine tropical peatlands, as well as the effect of forest exploitation are scarce. The study area is located in the Belait district in Brunei Darussalam in Borneo Island. Brunei is perhaps the best of the regional guardians of peat forest systems; potentially irreversible damage to peat forest ecosystems has been widespread elsewhere. Two sites, one pristine dome and a logging concession, are being investigated. In order to assess the chemical status of the peat soil, pore water is sampled at different depth along the dome radius. The chemistry of pore water, including pH, conductivity, dissolved oxygen, concentration of major elements, as well as organic carbon content and properties are analyzed. References: Anderson, 1983. The tropical peat swamp of

  20. ``Missing'' cloud condensation nuclei in peat smoke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dusek, U.; Frank, G. P.; Helas, G.; Iinuma, Y.; Zeromskiene, K.; Gwaze, P.; Hennig, T.; Massling, A.; Schmid, O.; Herrmann, H.; Wiedensohler, A.; Andreae, M. O.

    2005-06-01

    We characterized particulate emissions from vegetation fires by burning Indonesian and German peat and other biomass fuels in a controlled laboratory setting. By measuring cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) both as a function of particle diameter (dp) and supersaturation (S), we discovered particles in peat smoke that were not activated to cloud droplets at high S (1.6%). These hydrophobic particles were present predominantly in the size range of dp > 200 nm, where typical wood burning particles are activated at S < 0.3%. Ambient measurements during the 1997 Indonesian peat fires suggested that peat smoke particles are highly soluble and therefore efficient CCN. Our CCN measurements performed on fresh smoke from peat samples of the same area suggest that these Indonesian smoke particles probably acquired soluble material through chemical processing in the atmosphere. Freshly emitted peat smoke particles are at least partially not very efficient CCN.

  1. Effects of Converting Secondary Forest on Peat to Oil Palm Plantation on Carbon Sequestration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chng H. Ywih

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Peat has been identified as one of the major groups of soils found in Malaysia. Sarawak as the largest state in Malaysia has the biggest reserve of peat-land. There are about 1.5 million ha of peat-land in Sarawak, which are relatively under developed. As is the case with any plant, oil palm trees do sequester carbon as they grow. Nevertheless, the process of clearing forest in order to establish a plantation may release more carbon. The carbon losses may be greater when the plantation established on peat-land, which store vast amounts of carbon but release it as they are drained. Little study has been done on the comparison of soil organic matter, soil organic carbon and yield of humic acids when secondary forest on peat soil is converted to oil palm plantation. The objectives of this study were to: (i Quantify Soil Organic Matter (SOM, Soil Organic Carbon (SOC, Humic Acids (HA and stable carbon upon the conversion of secondary forest on peat to different ages of oil palm plantation and (ii Compare carbon sequestration of a secondary forest with different ages of oil palm plantation. Approach: Soil samples were collected from the secondary forest, 1, 3, 4 and 5 year old oil palm plantation at the Tatau district. Ten samples were taken at random with a peat auger at 0-25 and 25-50 cm depths. The bulk densities at these depths were determined by the coring method. The bulk density method was used to quantify the total carbon, total organic carbon, total organic matter, total nitrogen, humic acids and stable carbon at the stated sampling depths on per hectare basis. Results: There were no significant differences in the amounts of stable C of both secondary forest and different ages of oil palm plantations at 0-25 and 25-50 cm. The amounts of stable C of secondary forest, 1, 3, 4 and 5 year old oil palm plantation at the depth of 0-25 cm were generally higher than those in the 25

  2. Selected Trace Element Concentrations in Peat Used for Cosmetic Production - A Case Study from Southern Poland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glina, Bartłomiej

    2016-12-01

    The aim of the study was to assess the concentration of selected trace elements in organic soils used as a source to obtain a unique peat extract for cosmetics production. Peat material for laboratory analysis were collected from fen peatland located in the Prosna River Valley (Borek village). Studied peatland is managed by "Torf Corporation" company as a source of material to obtain peat extract for cosmetics production. In the collected soil samples (four soil profiles) Zn, Cu and Pb concentrations were determined by using atomic absorption spectrometer SpectraAA 220 (Varian), after acid digestion. Obtained results showed that the highest concentrations of selected trace elements were recorded in the surface horizons of organic soils. This fact might be the results of Prosna river flooding or air deposition. Howevere, according to the new Polish regulations (Ordinance of the Minister for Environment 01.09.2016 - the way of conducting contamination assessment of the earth surface), the content of trace elements in the examined soils was greatly belowe the permissible limit for areas from group IV (mine lands). Thus, described soils are proper to obtain peat extract used as a component in cosmetic production.

  3. Impact of subjacent rocks at the water and air regime of the depleted peat deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakovich, V. A.

    2009-04-01

    At the depleted peat deposits (after peat extraction), where the residual layer of peat with the thickness of about 0,5 meters is laid at the well water permeable rocks, vegetation typical for dry conditions is developed in case of good drainage conditions; birch trees, willow, alder-trees and buckthorn prevail in this vegetation. Water and air regime is characterized here by good aeration with prevailing of oxidative processes. If water regime is regulated, these depleted peat areas are suitable for agricultural and forest lands; however, necessity of transformation of these depleted lands into forest and agricultural lands must be ecologically and economically justified. If the residual layer of peat with the thickness of 0,05-0,3 m is based at the sapropel or peat sapropel, contrast amphibiotic water and air regime with strong fluctuation of oxidative and restoration process depending on the weather conditions is formed; this regime is formed without artificial increase of the ground waters level. This does not allow bog vegetation or vegetation typical for dry conditions to develop. Thus, within 20 and more years after completion of peat extraction, such areas are not covered by vegetation in spite of favorable agro-chemical qualities of peat layer and favorable for vegetation chemical composition of soil and ground waters. Depleted peat deposits, that are based at the sapropel, are not suitable for agricultural use, because agricultural vegetation requires stable water and air regime with good aeration and oxidative and restoration potential within 400-750 mV. Contrast amphibiotic water and air regime of the depleted peat deposits that are based at sapropel excludes possibility to use them as agricultural lands. Because of this reason, areas with residual peat layer that are based at sapropel are not suitable for forest planting. Due to periodic increase of ground waters level, rot systems of the plants can not penetrate into the required depth, and mechanical

  4. Biosorption of Metallic Elements onto Fen Peat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krumins Janis

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Industrial development and anthropogenic activity have a huge impact on the environment, forcing society to find new and cost-effective environment treatment technologies. One of the most effective and environmentally friendly methods is the use of biosorbents, for which peat is one of the most cost-effective materials. The adsorption capabilities of peat sediments are well known; however, mainly raised bog peat is used for environmental treatment, and thus the abilities of fen peat are underestimated. The aim of this research was to assess the fen peat suitability as an adsorbent for metallic elements. In this study we have determined the sorption characteristics of Ca, Mg, K, Na, Cu and Pb and results show that fen peat deposits have a huge variability as a biosorbent due to their variable botanical composition and complex properties, for instance, under equal conditions, wood-sedge peat can have higher lead adsorption capacity than wood peat. However, due to its natural content of metallic elements, the sorption capacity overall is lower than it is for raised bog peat, although the high pH reaction encourage a high mobility metals.

  5. Recent atmospheric dust deposition in an ombrotrophic peat bog in Great Hinggan Mountain, Northeast China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Kunshan; Xing, Wei; Yu, Xiaofei; Zhao, Hongmei; McLaughlin, Neil; Lu, Xianguo; Wang, Guoping

    2012-08-01

    Recent deposition of atmospheric soil dust (ASD) was studied using (210)Pb-dated Sphagnum-derived peat sequences from Great Hinggan Mountain in northeast China. Physicochemical indices of peat including dry bulk density, water content, ash content, total organic carbon and mass magnetic susceptibility were measured. Acid-insoluble concentration of lithogenic metals (Al, Ca, Fe, Mn, V and Ti) were measured using ICP-AES. The basic physicochemical properties were used to assess the peat trophic status and indicated that the sections above 45-60 cm are rain-fed peat. A continuous record of ASD fluxes over the past 150 years was reconstructed based on the geochemical data obtained from the ombrotrophic zone, and the average input rate of ASD is 13.4-68.1 g m(-2) year(-1). The source of soil dust deposited in peat was dominated by the long-range transport of mineral aerosol from the drylands in north China and Mongolia. The temporal variation of ASD fluxes in the last 60 years coincides well with the meteorological records of dust storm frequency during 1954-2002 in north China. This suggests that the reconstructed sequence of atmospheric dust deposition is reliable and we can look back in time at the dust evolution before 1949. Dust storm events were observed occasionally in the late Qing dynasty, and their frequency and intensity were smaller than dust weather occurring in recent times. Four peaks of ASD fluxes were distinguished and correlated with the historical events at that time. This study presents the first atmospheric soil dust data in peat records in northeast China, and complements a global database of peat bog archives of atmospheric deposition. The results reflect the patterns of local environmental change over the past century in north China and will be helpful in formulating policies to achieve sustainable and healthy development.

  6. Microelements in Lowland Peat of the Northeastern Part of the Altai Mountains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shurova, M. V.; Larina, G. V.; Kozlova, S. A.; Shagaeva, L. L.

    2010-05-01

    The greatest areas of bogs are concentrated in the northeastern part of Altai Republic. This place due to a great amount of precipitation and a powerful accumulation of snow with a little drain in comparison with other areas has plenty of bogs. A quarter of all bogs of the Altai Mountains is concentrated here. The bogs develop mainly in the valleys of the rivers. The bogs have a modern origin and the process of bog formation goes at the present time by overgrowing of oxbow and valley lakes, and also by bogging of dry lands - woods and meadows. The area of bogs in relation to the general territory of highlands makes up 1%. Nevertheless, these territories are regarded as complex ecosystems which have economic and scientific value. Let's consider the content of heavy metals in different horizons of the peat under study. The samples of peat of the deposit being examined are characterized by a low total content of zinc: 6,21-44,12 mg/kg. The average amount of zinc in the soils of the Altai Mountains is much larger and makes up 70,3 mg/kg. Quite a significant amount of copper is washed away from peat thickness, its total amount is at the level of 1,58-10,73 mg/kg. The reason for it, probably, lies in the fact that there is a significant amount of fulvic acids in the composition of humic acids which enable the migration of copper beyond the limits of the peat ground in the conditions of the sour environment. A completely different situation is observed in the soils of the Altai mountain area. The biogeochemistry of copper in the soils of the Altai Mountains is thoroughly investigated by M.A.Malgin, A.V.Puzanov, O.A.Yelchininova. Its average amount in the soils of the Altai Mountains makes up 40,6 mg/kg which is twice as much as the abundance ratio in comparison with the world soils. The authors explain this fact as follows: copper is an inactive element in the soils since its ions are easily precipitated by sulfide-, carbonate-, and hydroxide ions, and also are taken up

  7. Malaysian perceptions of China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibrahim Abu Bakar

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Malasia que consistía en Malaya, Sabah, Sarawak y Singapur ganó su independencia de los Británicos el 16 de septiembre de 1963. Malaya ganó su independencia de los británicos el 31 de agosto de 1957. En 1965 Singapur era independiente de Malasia. Malasia es una democracia parlamentaria y capitalista. Por otra parte, es una nación multi-religiosa y multirracial. Malasia ha sido poblada por los Malays, los Chinos, los Indios y otros. Los Malays son musulmanes y el Islam es la religión de la federación de Malasia. La nación tiene una larga historia con China pero esa nunca colonizó ningún área en Malasia. Los estados occidentales, fundamentalmente Portugueses y Olandeses colonizaron ciertas áreas en Malasia y luego los Británicos colonizaron la entera región. La percepción malasiana de China está influenciada por muchos factores internos y externos tales como el factor ideologico-político, el desarrollo económico así como las relaciones y la diplomacia nacionales, regionales e internacionales. Este breve artículo presenta la percepción malasiana de China desde un punto de vista cultural, político y económico._____________ABSTRACT:Malaysia consisting of Malaya, Sabah, Sarawak and Singapore gained her independence from the British on 16 September 1963. Malaya gained her independence from the British on 31 August 1957. In 1965 Singapore was independent from Malaysia. Malaysia is a parliamentary democratic and capitalistic nation. Moreover, Malaysia is a multi-religious and multiracial nation. Malaysia has been populated by the Malays, Chinese, Indians and others. The Malays are Muslims and Islam is the religion of the Federation of Malaysia. Malaysia has a very long history with China but China never colonized any area in Malaysia. The Western nations namely the Portuguese and the Dutch colonized certain areas in Malaysia and then the British colonized the whole Malaysia. Malaysian perceptions of China are influenced by many

  8. Atmospheric mercury accumulation between 5900 and 800 calibrated years BP in the high arctic of Canada recorded by Peat Hummocks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Givelet, N.; Roos-Barraclough, F.; Goodsite, Michael Evan

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, we present the first comprehensive long-term record of preanthropogenic rates of atmospheric mercury accumulation in dated peat deposits for the High Arctic of Canada. Geochemical studies of two peat hummocks from Bathurst Island, Nunavut reveal substantial inputs from soil dust....... 1 microgram per square meter per year from 5900 to 800 calibrated years BP. These values are well within the range of the mercury fluxes reported from other Arctic locations, but also by peat cores from southern Canada that provide a record of atmospheric Hg accumulation extending back 8000 years...

  9. Peat hybrid sorbents for treatment of wastewaters and remediation of polluted environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klavins, Maris; Burlakovs, Juris; Robalds, Artis; Ansone-Bertina, Linda

    2015-04-01

    For remediation of soils and purification of polluted waters, wastewaters, sorbents might be considered as an prospective group of materials and amongst them peat have a special role due to low cost, biodegradability, high number of functional groups, well developed surface area and combination of hydrophilic/hydrophobic structural elements. Peat as sorbent have good application potential for removal of trace metals, and we have demonstrated peat sorption capacities, sorption kinetics, thermodynamics in respect to metals with different valencies - Tl(I), Cu(II), Cr(III). However peat sorption capacity in respect to nonmetallic (anionic species) elements is low. Also peat mechanical properties do not support application in large scale column processes. To expand peat application possibilities the approach of biomass based hybrid sorbents has been elaborated. The concept "hybrid sorbent" in our understanding means natural, biomass based sorbent modified, covered with another sorbent material, thus combining two types of sorbent properties, sorbent functionalities, surface properties etc. As the "covering layer" both inorganic substances, mineral phases (iron oxohydroxides, oxyapatite) both organic polymers (using graft polymerization) were used. The obtained sorbents were characterised by their spectral properties, surface area, elemental composition. The obtained hybrid sorbents were tested for sorption of compounds in anionic speciation forms, for example of arsenic, antimony, tellurium and phosphorous compounds in comparison with weakly basic anionites. The highest sorption capacity was observed when peat sorbents modified with iron compounds were used. Sorption of different arsenic speciation forms onto iron-modified peat sorbents was investigated as a function of pH and temperature. It was established that sorption capacity increases with a rise in temperature, and the calculation of sorption process thermodynamic parameters indicates the spontaneity of sorption

  10. Some Aspects of Thermochemical Decomposition of Peat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. A. Losiuk

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper considers peculiar features of thermochemical decomposition of peat as a result of quick pyrolysis. Evaluation of energy and economic expediency of the preliminary peat decomposition process for obtaining liquid and gaseous products has been made in the paper. The paper reveals prospects pertaining to application of the given technology while generating electric power and heat.

  11. Some Aspects of Thermochemical Decomposition of Peat

    OpenAIRE

    Y. A. Losiuk; S. V. Gibric; S. V. Korchinenko

    2008-01-01

    The paper considers peculiar features of thermochemical decomposition of peat as a result of quick pyrolysis. Evaluation of energy and economic expediency of the preliminary peat decomposition process for obtaining liquid and gaseous products has been made in the paper. The paper reveals prospects pertaining to application of the given technology while generating electric power and heat.

  12. Leaf size indices and structure of the peat swamp forest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.G. Aribal

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Leaf size indices of the tree species in the peatland of Agusan del Sur in Mindanao in Philippines was examined to deduce the variation of forest structure and observed forest zonation.  Using raunkiaer and webb’s leaf size classification, the leaf morphometrics of seven tree species consistently found on the established sampling plots were determined.  The species includes Ternstroemia philippinensis Merr., Polyscias aherniana Merr. Lowry and G.M. Plunkett, Calophyllum sclerophyllum Vesque, Fagraea racemosa Jack, Ilex cymosa Blume, Syzygium tenuirame (Miq. Merr. and Tristaniopsis micrantha Merr. Peter G.Wilson and J.T.Waterh.The LSI were correlated against the variables of the peat physico-chemical properties (such as bulk density, acrotelm thickness, peat depth, total organic carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus, and potassium, pH; water (pH, ammonium, nitrate, phosphate; and leaf tissue elements (nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium.  Result showed a decreasing leaf size indices and a three leaf size category consisting of mesophyllous, mesophyllous-notophyllous and microphyllous were observed which corresponds to the structure of vegetation i.e., from the tall-pole forest having the biggest average leaf area of 6,142.29 mm2 to the pygmy forest with average leaf area of 1,670.10 mm2.  Such decreased leaf size indices were strongly correlated to soil nitrogen, acrotelm thickness, peat depth, phosphate in water, nitrogen and phosphorus in the plant tissue.

  13. Perfecting technological schemes for peat extraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gatitskii, N.V.; Nikolaeva, S.M.; Gatitskii, V.N. (Uralgiprotorfa (USSR). Ural' skii Filial)

    1991-04-01

    Comparatively evaluates three methods for peat extraction used in the USSR: using the MTF-43A(B) equipment with a closed cycle of cutting and drying; using the PPF-6 equipment with separate peat drying; using the MTF-96 and VFS-1 equipment for separate peat cutting and drying, the MTG-17 loaders and the MTP-24V-1 transport system. Economic efficiency of the three extraction systems was comparatively evaluated on the basis of statistical data that characterize peat extraction in the Tomsk area. Extraction conditions are evaluated. The following information is analyzed: peat output, working time during a calendar year, number of mining cycles, number of personnel, operating cost, investment, profitability. Economic analysis showed that the analyzed methods are comparable.

  14. Lateral carbon fluxes and CO2 outgassing from a tropical peat-draining river

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Müller

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Tropical peatlands play an important role in the global carbon cycle due to their immense carbon storage capacity. However, pristine peat swamp forests are vanishing due to deforestation and peatland degradation, especially in Southeast Asia. CO2 emissions associated with this land use change might not only come from the peat soil directly, but also from peat-draining rivers. So far, though, this has been mere speculation, since there was no data from undisturbed reference sites. We present the first combined assessment of lateral organic carbon fluxes and CO2 outgassing from an undisturbed tropical peat-draining river. Two sampling campaigns were undertaken on the Maludam river in Sarawak, Malaysia. The river catchment is covered by protected peat swamp forest, offering a unique opportunity to study a peat-draining river in its natural state, without any influence from tributaries with different characteristics. The two campaigns yielded consistent results. Dissolved organic carbon (DOC concentrations ranged between 3222 and 6218 μmol L−1 and accounted for more than 99 % of the total organic carbon (TOC. Radiocarbon dating revealed that the riverine DOC was of recent origin, suggesting that it derives from the top soil layers and surface runoff. We observed strong oxygen depletion, implying high rates of organic matter decomposition and consequently CO2 production. The measured median pCO2 was 7795 and 8400 μatm during the two campaigns, respectively. Overall, we found that only 26 ± 15 % of the carbon was exported by CO2 evasion, while the rest was exported by discharge. CO2 outgassing seemed to be moderated by the short water residence time. Since most Southeast Asian peatlands are located at the coast, this is probably an important limiting factor for CO2 outgassing from most of its peat-draining rivers.

  15. Lateral carbon fluxes and CO2 outgassing from a tropical peat-draining river

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, D.; Warneke, T.; Rixen, T.; Müller, M.; Jamahari, S.; Denis, N.; Mujahid, A.; Notholt, J.

    2015-10-01

    Tropical peatlands play an important role in the global carbon cycle due to their immense carbon storage capacity. However, pristine peat swamp forests are vanishing due to deforestation and peatland degradation, especially in Southeast Asia. CO2 emissions associated with this land use change might not only come from the peat soil directly but also from peat-draining rivers. So far, though, this has been mere speculation, since there has been no data from undisturbed reference sites. We present the first combined assessment of lateral organic carbon fluxes and CO2 outgassing from an undisturbed tropical peat-draining river. Two sampling campaigns were undertaken on the Maludam River in Sarawak, Malaysia. The river catchment is covered by protected peat swamp forest, offering a unique opportunity to study a peat-draining river in its natural state, without any influence from tributaries with different characteristics. The two campaigns yielded consistent results. Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentrations ranged between 3222 and 6218 μmol L-1 and accounted for more than 99 % of the total organic carbon (TOC). Radiocarbon dating revealed that the riverine DOC was of recent origin, suggesting that it derives from the top soil layers and surface runoff. We observed strong oxygen depletion, implying high rates of organic matter decomposition and consequently CO2 production. The measured median pCO2 was 7795 and 8400 μatm during the first and second campaign, respectively. Overall, we found that only 32 ± 19 % of the carbon was exported by CO2 evasion, while the rest was exported by discharge. CO2 outgassing seemed to be moderated by the short water residence time. Since most Southeast Asian peatlands are located at the coast, this is probably an important limiting factor for CO2 outgassing from most of its peat-draining rivers.

  16. Lateral carbon fluxes and CO2 outgassing from a tropical peat-draining river

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Müller

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Tropical peatlands play an important role in the global carbon cycle due to their immense carbon storage capacity. However, pristine peat swamp forests are vanishing due to deforestation and peatland degradation, especially in Southeast Asia. CO2 emissions associated with this land use change might not only come from the peat soil directly but also from peat-draining rivers. So far, though, this has been mere speculation, since there has been no data from undisturbed reference sites. We present the first combined assessment of lateral organic carbon fluxes and CO2 outgassing from an undisturbed tropical peat-draining river. Two sampling campaigns were undertaken on the Maludam River in Sarawak, Malaysia. The river catchment is covered by protected peat swamp forest, offering a unique opportunity to study a peat-draining river in its natural state, without any influence from tributaries with different characteristics. The two campaigns yielded consistent results. Dissolved organic carbon (DOC concentrations ranged between 3222 and 6218 μmol L−1 and accounted for more than 99 % of the total organic carbon (TOC. Radiocarbon dating revealed that the riverine DOC was of recent origin, suggesting that it derives from the top soil layers and surface runoff. We observed strong oxygen depletion, implying high rates of organic matter decomposition and consequently CO2 production. The measured median pCO2 was 7795 and 8400 μatm during the first and second campaign, respectively. Overall, we found that only 32 ± 19 % of the carbon was exported by CO2 evasion, while the rest was exported by discharge. CO2 outgassing seemed to be moderated by the short water residence time. Since most Southeast Asian peatlands are located at the coast, this is probably an important limiting factor for CO2 outgassing from most of its peat-draining rivers.

  17. Substitution of peat, fertiliser and manure by compost in hobby gardening: user surveys and case studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Jacob K; Christensen, Thomas H; Scheutz, Charlotte

    2010-12-01

    Four user surveys were performed at recycle centres (RCs) in the Municipalities of Aarhus and Copenhagen, Denmark, to get general information on compost use and to examine the substitution of peat, fertiliser and manure by compost in hobby gardening. The average driving distance between the users' households and the RCs was found to be 4.3 km and the average amount of compost picked up was estimated at 800 kg per compost user per year. The application layer of the compost varied (between 1 and 50 cm) depending on the type of use. The estimated substitution (given as a fraction of the compost users that substitute peat, fertiliser and manure with compost) was 22% for peat, 12% for fertiliser and 7% for manure (41% in total) from the survey in Aarhus (n=74). The estimate from the survey in Copenhagen (n=1832) was 19% for peat, 24% for fertiliser and 15% for manure (58% in total). This is the first time, to the authors' knowledge, that the substitution of peat, fertiliser and manure with compost has been assessed for application in hobby gardening. Six case studies were performed as home visits in addition to the Aarhus surveys. From the user surveys and the case studies it was obvious that the total substitution of peat, fertiliser and manure was not 100%, as is often assumed when assigning environmental credits to compost. It was more likely around 50% and thus there is great potential for improvement. It was indicated that compost was used for a lot of purposes in hobby gardening. Apart from substitution of peat, fertiliser and manure, compost was used to improve soil quality and as a filling material (as a substitute for soil). Benefits from these types of application are, however, difficult to assess and thereby quantify.

  18. TARKKATURVE - Peat production on shallow fields; TARKKATURVE - mataloituvien soiden tuotantomenetelmien ja laitteiden kehittaeminen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nurminen, T. [Vapo Oy, Jyvaeskylae (Finland); Aho, V.J.; Tiihonen, I. [VTT Energy, Jyvaeskylae (Finland)

    1996-12-31

    It is important to produce the peat of the bogs under production as completely as possible when improving the efficiency and economy of milled peat production. Hence the service life of bog areas is being extended, and the investment costs per produced peat mass are decreased. Research, in which new planning, production and ditching methods, as well as production machines for production from shallowing fields, has been carried out in order to obtain the targets. Data obtained from charting of the bog, by which it is possible to take the regional differences of the production areas into account while planning and making of the production strips and ditching, is used in planning of the production fields. Stones are removed from the strips on the mineral soil areas during preparation of the fields, and peat is conveyed from the depleted areas into production strips, hence it is possible to make ditching with open ditches excavated into mineral soil. The new milled peat production machines are lighter than the older ones, and non-sparkling materials, e.g. plastics, are used in the construction of them in every phase of the production. The new machines are able to operate on strips of varying width and on the fields of poor load carrying capacity. Brushing technology is used in collection of peat. By this method it is possible to improve in addition to the fire safety, also the collecting accuracy, and hence the efficiency of the production. The new methods and equipment developed in the researches are now in wide utilization in Finnish peat production

  19. Development of an underdrained peat production field; Salaojitetun tuotantokentaen kehittaeminen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hillebrand, K.

    1996-12-31

    The objective of the study is to examine the possibilities to improve the drainage of a peat production field using a numerical groundwater model. The effects of the ditch spacing and the drainage method on the groundwater level are studied. The way of ditching for basic drainage of virgin peatland, and the calculation of possible additional ditching in peat production fields, including the shallow areas, are considered. Also, the possibility of increasing the customary ditch spacing of 20 m is examined. The objective for drainage techniques is to cut the time for peatland preparation in half, and to increase the space between open field ditches from the present 20 meters to 60 - 80 meters by making use of underdrains. In this way it is possible to reduce the peat production costs about 5%. In 1995 the numerical groundwater model has been validated at Pajusuo drainage area. According to the comparison of the groundwater level calculated with the model and measured at Pajusuo, the agreement was very satisfactory. Uncertainty in the calculations derived mainly from the difficulties of assessing the pF curve and the hydraulic conductivity of the soil, as well as the water-carrying capacity of the mole drains. In general one can predict the groundwater level with an accuracy of +- 10 cm. Also the possibility to increase the hydraulic conductivity of peat by a chemical additive was studied. Adding 3 kg chemical per 1 kg dry matter it was possible to increase the hydraulic conductivity over twenty fold. In this way it is possible to construct vertical underdrains to improve the infiltration after rainfall

  20. Peat - fossil matter or biomass. Turve - fossiilista ainetta vai biomassaa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lappalainen, E. (Geological Survey of Finland, Espoo (Finland))

    1992-01-01

    Peat is quite young geological deposit of Quaternary age in respect to petrified layers containing fossils. The fossils are still identifiable remnants of ancient organisms or their traces. The tissues of the organisms have only in few relatively young exceptions reamined as such. Usually the petrification has occurred so that silicic acid and lime containing silicates, carbonates and other mineral matter have precipitated into pores and cavities of hard parts of the organisms. Mineral matter can also have replaced the original organic matter totally. In some cases the replacement has ocurre molecule by molecule so that the original structure of the organism has been presrved microscopic accuracy. The fossilization process requires quite fast burial of the organism into the soil, or else the different mechanical, chemical and biological processes disintegrate the tissues of the organism shortly after the organisms death. In some cases the remnants of the organisms are preserved by other means than via burial into the sediments. These relatively young unmineralized remnants are called sub-fossils. The most well known are the mammoths preserved in the eternal frost of Siberian tundra, the insects preserved in the amber found on the southern coast of the Baltic sea, or the birds found in the asphalt lakes. The pollen in the peat deposits and the diatoms of the mud layers are also called sub-fossils. According to this definition peat itself can not be fossil matter. The continuously renewed matter, that utilizes solar energy as energy source and recycle carbon dioxide, is called biomass or bioenergy. According to this definitions peat belongs to renewable biomass.

  1. Examining the effect of pore size distribution and shape on flow through unsaturated peat using 3-D computed tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Rezanezhad

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available The hydraulic conductivity of unsaturated peat soils is controlled by the peat structure which affects the air-filled porosity, pore size distribution and shape. This study investigates how the size and shape of pores affects the flow of water through peat soils. In this study we used X-ray Computed Tomography (CT, at 45 µm resolution under 5 specific soil-water pressure head levels to provide 3-D, high-resolution images that were used to detect the inner pore structure of peat samples under a changing water regime. Pore structure and configuration were found to be irregular, which affected the rate of water transmission through peat soils. The 3-D analysis suggested that pore distribution is dominated by a single large pore-space. At low pressure head, this single large air-filled pore imparted a more effective flowpath compared to smaller pores. Smaller pores were disconnected and the flowpath was more tortuous than in the single large air-filled pore, and their contribution to flow was negligible when the single large pore was active. We quantify the pore structure of peat soil that affects the hydraulic conductivity in the unsaturated condition, and demonstrate the validity of our estimation of peat unsaturated hydraulic conductivity by making a comparison with a standard permeameter-based method. Estimates of unsaturated hydraulic conductivities were made for the purpose of testing the sensitivity of pore shape and geometry parameters on the hydraulic properties of peats and how to evaluate the structure of the peat and its affects on parameterization. We also studied the ability to quantify these factors for different soil moisture contents in order to define how the factors controlling the shape coefficient vary with changes in soil water pressure head. The relation between measured and estimated unsaturated hydraulic conductivity at various heads shows that rapid initial drainage, that changes the air-filled pore properties, creates a

  2. Examining the effect of pore size distribution and shape on flow through unsaturated peat using computed tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Rezanezhad

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available The hydraulic conductivity of unsaturated peat soil is controlled by the air-filled porosity, pore size and geometric distribution as well as other physical properties of peat materials. This study investigates how the size and shape of pores affects the flow of water through peat soils. In this study we used X-ray Computed Tomography (CT, at 45 μm resolution under 5 specific soil-water pressure head levels to provide 3-D, high-resolution images that were used to detect the inner pore structure of peat samples under a changing water regime. Pore structure and configuration were found to be irregular, which affected the rate of water transmission through peat soils. The 3-D analysis suggested that pore distribution is dominated by a single large pore-space. At low pressure head, this single large air-filled pore imparted a more effective flowpath compared to smaller pores. Smaller pores were disconnected and the flowpath was more tortuous than in the single large air-filled pore, and their contribution to flow was negligible when the single large pore was active. We quantify the pore structure of peat soil that affects the hydraulic conductivity in the unsaturated condition, and demonstrate the validity of our estimation of peat unsaturated hydraulic conductivity by making a comparison with a standard permeameter-based method. Estimates of unsaturated hydraulic conductivities were made for the purpose of testing the sensitivity of pore shape and geometry parameters on the hydraulic properties of peats and how to evaluate the structure of the peat and its affects on parameterization. We also studied the ability to quantify these factors for different soil moisture contents in order to define how the factors controlling the shape coefficient vary with changes in soil water pressure head. The relation between measured and estimated unsaturated hydraulic conductivity at various heads shows that rapid initial drainage, that changes the air

  3. Patterns and drivers of fungal community depth stratification in Sphagnum peat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louis J. Lamit; Karl J. Romanowicz; Lynette R. Potvin; Adam R. Rivers; Kanwar Singh; Jay T. Lennon; Susannah G. Tringe; Evan S. Kane; Erik A. Lilleskov

    2017-01-01

    Peatlands store an immense pool of soil carbon vulnerable to microbial oxidation due to drought and intentional draining. We used amplicon sequencing and quantitative PCR to (i) examine how fungi are influenced by depth in the peat profile, water table and plant functional group at the onset of a multiyear mesocosm experiment, and (ii) test if fungi are correlated with...

  4. The burden of moderate-to-heavy soil-transmitted helminth infections among rural malaysian aborigines: an urgent need for an integrated control programme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Abdulhamid

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Soil-transmitted helminth (STH infections, among the most common neglected tropical diseases, continue to be a major threat to the health and socioeconomic wellbeing of infected people especially children in developing countries. Methods A cross-sectional study among 254 aboriginal schoolchildren was conducted in order to determine the current prevalence and intensity of infections and to investigate the potential risk factors associated with moderate-to-heavy burden of STH infections among these children. Results Overall, 93.7% of children were found to be infected with one or more STH species. The prevalence of trichuriasis, ascariasis and hookworm infections were 84.6%, 47.6% and 3.9%, respectively. Almost half of the participants had heavy trichuriasis, one-quarter had heavy ascariasis whereas all hookworm infections were light infections. Overall, moderate-to-heavy STH infections accounted for 56.7% of the total infections. Univariate analysis revealed that those using untreated water supply (P = 0.013, living in houses without toilets (P = 0.027 and having domestic animals in the houses (P = 0.044 had significantly higher prevalence of moderate-to-heavy infections than others. Logistic regression analysis confirmed using untreated water for drinking (P = 0.001 and the absence of a toilet in the house (P = 0.003 as significant risk factors of moderate-to-heavy STH infections among these children. Conclusion The high proportion of moderate-to-heavy STH infections further confirms the need for serious attention towards these devastating diseases that has put lives and the future of aboriginal children in jeopardy. Introduction of more poverty alleviation schemes, proper sanitation, provision of clean and safe drinking water, health education, as well as the introduction of periodic school-based deworming programmes are imperative among these communities in order to curtail the transmission and morbidity caused by STH.

  5. Radionuclides in peat bogs and energy peat; Turvesoiden ja polttoturpeen radionuklidit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Helariutta, K.; Rantavaara, A. [Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority, Helsinki (Finland); Lehtovaara, J. [Vapo Oy, Jyvaeskylae (Finland)

    2000-06-01

    The study was aimed at improving the general view on radionuclides contents in energy peat produced in Finland. The annual harvest of fuel peat in 1994 was studied extensively. Also thirteen peat bogs used for peat production and one bog in natural condition were analysed for vertical distributions of several radionuclides. These distributions demonstrate the future change in radioactivity of energy peat. Both natural nuclides emitting gamma radiation ({sup 238}U, {sup 235}U, {sup 232}Th, {sup 226}Ra, {sup 40}K) and radiocaesium ({sup 137}Cs, {sup 134}Cs) origin in fallout from a nuclear power plant accident (1986) and in atmospheric nuclear weapon tests were analysed. The beta and alpha active natural nuclides of lead and polonium ({sup 210}Pb, {sup 210}Po) were determined on a set of peat samples. These nuclides potentially contribute to radiation exposure through inhalation when partially released to atmosphere during combustion of peat. The activity concentrations of natural radionuclides often increased towards the deepest peat bog layers whereas the radioactive caesium deposited from atmosphere was missing in the deep layers. In undisturbed surface layers of a natural bog and peat production bogs the contents of {sup 210}Pb and {sup 210}Po exceeded those of the deeper peat layers. The nuclides of the uranium series in the samples were generally not in radioactive equilibrium, as different environmental processes change their activity ratios in peat. Radiation exposure from handling and utilisation of peat ash was estimated with activity indices derived from the data for energy peat harvested in 1994. Intervention doses were exceeded in a minor selection of samples due to {sup 137}Cs, whereas natural radionuclides contributed very little to the doses. (orig.)

  6. Radionuclides in peat bogs and energy peat; Turvesoiden ja polttoturpeen radionuklidit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Helariutta, K.; Rantavaara, A. [Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority, Helsinki (Finland); Lehtovaara, J. [Vapo Oy, Jyvaeskylae (Finland)

    2000-06-01

    The study was aimed at improving the general view on radionuclides contents in energy peat produced in Finland. The annual harvest of fuel peat in 1994 was studied extensively. Also thirteen peat bogs used for peat production and one bog in natural condition were analysed for vertical distributions of several radionuclides. These distributions demonstrate the future change in radioactivity of energy peat. Both natural nuclides emitting gamma radiation ({sup 238}U, {sup 235}U, {sup 232}Th, {sup 226}Ra, {sup 40}K) and radiocaesium ({sup 137}Cs, {sup 134}Cs) origin in fallout from a nuclear power plant accident (1986) and in atmospheric nuclear weapon tests were analysed. The beta and alpha active natural nuclides of lead and polonium ({sup 210}Pb, {sup 210}Po) were determined on a set of peat samples. These nuclides potentially contribute to radiation exposure through inhalation when partially released to atmosphere during combustion of peat. The activity concentrations of natural radionuclides often increased towards the deepest peat bog layers whereas the radioactive caesium deposited from atmosphere was missing in the deep layers. In undisturbed surface layers of a natural bog and peat production bogs the contents of {sup 210}Pb and {sup 210}Po exceeded those of the deeper peat layers. The nuclides of the uranium series in the samples were generally not in radioactive equilibrium, as different environmental processes change their activity ratios in peat. Radiation exposure from handling and utilisation of peat ash was estimated with activity indices derived from the data for energy peat harvested in 1994. Intervention doses were exceeded in a minor selection of samples due to {sup 137}Cs, whereas natural radionuclides contributed very little to the doses. (orig.)

  7. MH17: the Malaysian experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoo, L S; Hasmi, A H; Abdul Ghani Aziz, S A; Ibrahim, M A; Mahmood, M S

    2016-04-01

    A disaster is a natural or man-made (or technological) hazard resulting in an event of substantial extent causing significant physical damage or destruction, loss of life, or drastic change to the environment. It is a phenomenon that can cause damage to life and property and destroy the economic, social and cultural life of the people; and overwhelms the capacity of the community to cope with the event. The recent tragic aviation accidents in 2014 involving Malaysia Airlines flights MH370 and MH17 shocked the world in an unprecedented manner. This paper focuses on the Malaysian experience in the MH17 mission in Ukraine as well as the first ever international Disaster Victim Identification (DVI) operation for the Malaysian DVI team. The DVI operations in Hilversum, the Netherlands were well described in stages. The Netherlands' Landelijk Team Forensische Opsporing as the lead DVI team in Hilversum operated systematically, ensuring the success of the whole mission. This paper discusses the lessons learned by the Malaysian team on proper DVI structure, inter- and intra-agency cooperation, facilities planning and set up, logistics and health and safety aspects, as well as effective communication and collaboration with other international delegates. Several issues and challenges faced by the Malaysian team were also documented. In addition, the authors shared views, opinions and recommendations for a more comprehensive DVI operation in the future.

  8. Inclusion in Malaysian Integrated Preschools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukumaran, Sailajah; Loveridge, Judith; Green, Vanessa A.

    2015-01-01

    Inclusive education has been introduced through a number of policy developments in Malaysia over the last 10 years but there is little research investigating the extent and nature of inclusive education for preschoolers with special educational needs (SEN). This study surveyed both regular and special education teachers in Malaysian integrated…

  9. Inclusion in Malaysian Integrated Preschools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukumaran, Sailajah; Loveridge, Judith; Green, Vanessa A.

    2015-01-01

    Inclusive education has been introduced through a number of policy developments in Malaysia over the last 10 years but there is little research investigating the extent and nature of inclusive education for preschoolers with special educational needs (SEN). This study surveyed both regular and special education teachers in Malaysian integrated…

  10. Environmental impact of peat mining. Development of storm water treatment methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kloeve, Bjoern

    1997-11-01

    The aim of this series of studies has been to develop methods to reduce the environmental impacts of peat mining, that function when the pollution load is high and that are economically viable for all peat mines. Sediment transport and nutrient leaving were studied with the purpose of establishing more efficient treatment alternatives. A controlled experiment was set up to measure the erosion of peat from the soil surface and from ditch beds during heavy rainfall and runoff events and to measure the settling characteristics of base soil peat and peat deposited in channels. The study demonstrates the importance of channel bed erosion as the main source of sediment during peak runoff. Sediment transport and nutrient leaching were further observed in the field during 1995 and 1996. The study showed that suspended solids (SS) is mainly generated during extreme events, such as flooding. These high flow events erode the material deposited on the channel bed during low flows. The leaching of nitrogen occurs after large rain events, while high phosphorous concentrations occur when the water table is low. Treatment alternatives were developed to improve removal of SS and nutrients. Different types of ponds were tested in a laboratory study. The study showed that the main factor affecting the settling of small peat particles is the depth of the settling basin. A mathematical model showed that in the case of bare soil erosion, the best treatment alternative would be to store the water in the large drainage network rather than in the sedimentation basin. Different structures suitable for peak runoff control were tested under laboratory and field conditions 54 refs, 11 figs

  11. Environmental impact of peat mining. Development of storm water treatment methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kloeve, Bjoern

    1997-11-01

    The aim of this series of studies has been to develop methods to reduce the environmental impacts of peat mining, that function when the pollution load is high and that are economically viable for all peat mines. Sediment transport and nutrient leaving were studied with the purpose of establishing more efficient treatment alternatives. A controlled experiment was set up to measure the erosion of peat from the soil surface and from ditch beds during heavy rainfall and runoff events and to measure the settling characteristics of base soil peat and peat deposited in channels. The study demonstrates the importance of channel bed erosion as the main source of sediment during peak runoff. Sediment transport and nutrient leaching were further observed in the field during 1995 and 1996. The study showed that suspended solids (SS) is mainly generated during extreme events, such as flooding. These high flow events erode the material deposited on the channel bed during low flows. The leaching of nitrogen occurs after large rain events, while high phosphorous concentrations occur when the water table is low. Treatment alternatives were developed to improve removal of SS and nutrients. Different types of ponds were tested in a laboratory study. The study showed that the main factor affecting the settling of small peat particles is the depth of the settling basin. A mathematical model showed that in the case of bare soil erosion, the best treatment alternative would be to store the water in the large drainage network rather than in the sedimentation basin. Different structures suitable for peak runoff control were tested under laboratory and field conditions 54 refs, 11 figs

  12. Second technical contractors' conference on peat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-01-01

    This conference reported the status of the US Department of Energy Peat Program. The program includes peat resource surveys of eleven states, peat gasification process and equipment studies, dewatering studies, and environmental and socioeconomic factors in the development of peat technology. Separate abstracts were prepared for selected papers. (CKK)

  13. Phosphorus mobilization in rewetted peat and sand at variable flow rate and redox regimes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærgaard, Charlotte; Heiberg, Lisa; Jensen, Henning S.

    2012-01-01

    important. Effluent Fe(II):PO4–P molar ratios ranged between 10 and 40 (peat) and b3 (sand). Phosphorus release rates and soil P fractions indicate that both of these soils can potentially release P for several decades, however, reoxidation and readsorption of P at the redox boundary should be considered......Despite the high priority of wetland restoration as the primary measure to reduce agricultural nutrient loads, it is also widely recognized that wetlands restored on former agricultural land could potentially release accumulated phosphorus (P) and become a source of eutrophication. Simulating...... regimes in the two soils during 21 or 67 days of continuous percolation at either 1 or 4 mm h−1. Anoxic conditions occurred in the peat soil at both low oxygen supply and anoxic infiltration, causing reductive Fe(III) dissolution with high Fe(II) and P effluent concentrations and total P (TP) release...

  14. The effect of pore structure on ebullition from peat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, Jorge A.; Baird, Andy J.; Coulthard, Tom J.

    2016-06-01

    The controls on methane (CH4) bubbling (ebullition) from peatlands are uncertain, but evidence suggests that physical factors related to gas transport and storage within the peat matrix are important. Variability in peat pore size and the permeability of layers within peat can produce ebullition that ranges from steady to erratic in time and can affect the degree to which CH4 bubbles bypass consumption by methanotrophic bacteria and enter the atmosphere. Here we investigate the role of peat structure on ebullition in structurally different peats using a physical model that replicates bubble production using air injection into peat. We find that the frequency distributions of number of ebullition events per time and the magnitude of bubble loss from the physical model were similar in shape to ebullition from peatlands and incubated peats. This indicates that the physical model could be a valid proxy for naturally occurring ebullition from peat. For the first time, data on bubble sizes from peat were collected to conceptualize ebullition, and we find that peat structure affects bubble sizes. Using a new method to measure peat macrostructure, we collected evidence that supports the hypothesis that structural differences in peat determine if bubble release is steady or erratic and extreme. Collected pore size data suggest that erratic ebullition occurs when large amounts of gas stored at depth easily move through shallower layers of open peat. In contrast, steady ebullition occurs when dense shallower layers of peat regulate the flow of gas emitted from peat.

  15. Seasonal variation in rates of methane production from peat of various botanical origins: effects of temperature and substrate quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergman; Klarqvist; Nilsson

    2000-09-01

    The methane produced in peat soils can vary over the growing season due to variations in the supply of available substrate, the activity of the microbial community or changes in temperature. Our aim was to study how these factors regulate the methane production over the season from five different peat types of different botanical origin. Peat samples were collected on seven occasions between June and September. After each sampling, the peat soils were incubated at five different temperatures (7, 10, 15, 20 and 25 degrees C) without added substrate, or at 20 degrees C with added substrate (glucose, or H(2)/CO(2), or starch). Rates of methane production averaged over the season differed significantly (Pmethane production from each plant community varied significantly (Ptemperature, explains the seasonal variation in methane production. However, addition of saturating amounts of glucose, H(2)/CO(2) or starch at 20 degrees C significantly reduced the seasonal variation (Pmethane production in peat from the minerotrophic lawn, wet carpet and mud-bottom plant communities. This suggests that substrate supply (e.g. root exudates) for the micro-organisms also varied over the season at these sites. Seasonal variation in methane production rates was apparent in peat from the hummock and ombrotrophic lawn plant communities even after addition of substrates, suggesting that the active biomass of the anaerobic microbial populations at these sites was regulated by other factors than the ones studied.

  16. Peat power: fuel by the bog

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aronson, R.B.

    1979-10-11

    The article reviews harvesting techniques and the use of peat in Europe, especially Russia, Ireland, and Finland. US peat reserves are estimated at 240 billion barrels of oil equivalent and DOE is researching new techniques for its harvesting and use. Advantages of peat are its low sulfur content (about 1%) and the fact that it is highly reactive, making it suitable for gasification. Disadvantages occur in reducing the water content from over 90% to below 50% and its low heating value relative to its bulk. Ash content varies from 2 to 70%. It looks at the first major attempt in the US to commercially harvest peat for fuel on about 150,000 acres near Creswell, NC.

  17. Radioactivity of peat mud used in therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpińska, Maria; Mnich, Krystian; Kapała, Jacek; Bielawska, Agnieszka; Kulesza, Grzegorz; Mnich, Stanisław

    2016-02-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the contents of natural and artificial isotopes in peat mud and to estimate the radiation dose absorbed via skin in patients during standard peat mud treatment. The analysis included 37 samples collected from 8 spas in Poland. The measurements of isotope concentration activity were conducted with the use of gamma spectrometry methods. The skin dose in a standard peat mud bath therapy is approximately 300 nSv. The effective dose of such therapy is considered to be 22 nSv. The doses absorbed during peat mud therapy are 5 orders of magnitude lower than effective annual dose absorbed from the natural radiation background by a statistical Pole (3.5 mSv). Neither therapeutic nor harmful effect is probable in case of such a small dose of ionising radiation.

  18. Uptake of caesium-137 from peat and compost mould by vegetables in a greenhouse experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malm, J.; Uusi-Rauva, A.; Paakkola, O. (Helsinki Univ. (Finland). Faculty of Agriculture and Forestry); Rantavaara, A. (Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety (STUK), Helsinki (Finland))

    1991-01-01

    A pot experiment was conducted to study the root uptake of {sup 137} Cs by vegetables grown in peat and composite mould in a greenhouse. The {sup 137}Cs in the growing media originated from Chernobyl fallout. The vegetables were cucumber (Cucumis sativus L. var. Farbio VDP SF 76), tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum L. Var. Virosa), parsley (Petroselinum crispum A.W. Hill var. Non plus ultra), radish (Raphanus Sativus L. var. Nondan) and lettuce (Lactuca sativa L. var Atraktion). The effect of adding potassium to the peat was also studied. The transfer factors (activity in plant dry weight/activity in soil dry weight) varied from 0.66 to 1.8 for peat and from 0.060 to 0.19 for compost mould. Addition of potassium did not have any clear effect on the transfer factors. (Author).

  19. Peat briquette production in the USSR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greshnov, L.S. (and others)

    1987-01-01

    An historical view of Soviet briquetting from the commissioning of the first 180,000 tonnes/year briquette factory in 1937 throughout its expansion to the current 5 million tonnes/year. Improvements being considered are: pneumatic transport of milled peat (instead of wagon tippler and elevators) combined with the removal of timber, etc., milled peat drying in a fluidised bed of inert particles (already satisfactorily tested in 1986-7); computer-controlled automated briquetting. 2 figs.

  20. Distribution of milled peat density in stockpiles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuntsevich, V.B. (and others)

    1987-01-01

    The interaction of pile density and spontaneous heating and/or combustion for a range of peat types and decomposition degrees was investigated. Up to a self-heating temperature of 75 degrees C, density distribution was normal throughout the pile but thereafter it increased locally with temperature and involved weight losses of 28-52% of the original peat in the semi-coke zone. The results are tabulated. 4 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  1. 3D modelling of mechanical peat properties in the Holocene coastal-deltaic sequence of the Netherlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koster, Kay; Stouthamer, Esther; Cohen, Kim; Stafleu, Jan; Busschers, Freek; Middelkoop, Hans

    2016-04-01

    Peat is abundantly present within the Holocene coastal-deltaic sequence of the Netherlands, where it is alternating with clastic fluvial, estuarine and lagoonal deposits. The areas that are rich in peat are vulnerable to land subsidence, resulting from consolidation and oxidation, due to loading by overlying deposits, infrastructure and buildings, as well as excessive artificial drainage. The physical properties of the peat are very heterogeneous, with variable clastic admixture up to 80% of its mass and rapid decrease in porosity with increasing effective stress. Mapping the spatial distribution of the peat properties is essential for identifying areas most susceptible to future land subsidence, as mineral content determines volume loss by oxidation, and porosity influences the rate of consolidation. Here we present the outline of a study focusing on mapping mechanical peat properties in relation to density and amount of admixed clastic constituents of Holocene peat layers (in 3D). In this study we use a staged approach: 1) Identifying soil mechanical properties in two large datasets that are managed by Utrecht University and the Geological Survey. 2) Determining relations between these properties and palaeogeographical development of the area by evaluating these properties against known geological concepts such as distance to clastic source (river, estuary etc.). 3) Implementing the obtained relations in GeoTOP, which is a 3D geological subsurface model of the Netherlands developed by the Geological Survey. The model will be used, among others, to assess the susceptibility of different areas to peat related land subsidence and load bearing capacity of the subsurface. So far, our analysis has focused stage 1, by establishing empirical relations between mechanical peat properties in ~70 paired (piezometer) cone penetration tests and continuously cored boreholes with LOI measurements. Results show strong correlations between net cone resistance (qn), excess pore

  2. Peat accumulation in drained thermokarst lake basins in continuous, ice-rich permafrost, northern Seward Peninsula, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Miriam C.; Grosse, Guido; Jones, Benjamin M.; Anthony, Katey Walter

    2012-01-01

    Thermokarst lakes and peat-accumulating drained lake basins cover a substantial portion of Arctic lowland landscapes, yet the role of thermokarst lake drainage and ensuing peat formation in landscape-scale carbon (C) budgets remains understudied. Here we use measurements of terrestrial peat thickness, bulk density, organic matter content, and basal radiocarbon age from permafrost cores, soil pits, and exposures in vegetated, drained lake basins to characterize regional lake drainage chronology, C accumulation rates, and the role of thermokarst-lake cycling in carbon dynamics throughout the Holocene on the northern Seward Peninsula, Alaska. Most detectable lake drainage events occurred within the last 4,000 years with the highest drainage frequency during the medieval climate anomaly. Peat accumulation rates were highest in young (50–500 years) drained lake basins (35.2 g C m−2 yr−1) and decreased exponentially with time since drainage to 9 g C m−2 yr−1 in the oldest basins. Spatial analyses of terrestrial peat depth, basal peat radiocarbon ages, basin geomorphology, and satellite-derived land surface properties (Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI); Minimum Noise Fraction (MNF)) from Landsat satellite data revealed significant relationships between peat thickness and mean basin NDVI or MNF. By upscaling observed relationships, we infer that drained thermokarst lake basins, covering 391 km2 (76%) of the 515 km2 study region, store 6.4–6.6 Tg organic C in drained lake basin terrestrial peat. Peat accumulation in drained lake basins likely serves to offset greenhouse gas release from thermokarst-impacted landscapes and should be incorporated in landscape-scale C budgets.

  3. Development of new peat based growing media by addition of pruning waste and biochars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieto, Aurora; Gascó, Gabriel; Paz-Ferreiro, Jorge; Plaza, César; Fernández, José Manuel; Méndez, Ana

    2015-04-01

    In the last years, several researches have been performed to find high quality and low cost substrates from different organic wastes in order to decrease peat consumption since the indiscriminate exploitation of peat lands is exhausting this non-renewable useful resource and destroying endangered wetland ecosystems worldwide. The use of organic wastes as soil amendments or possible peat substitute could be improved by pyrolysis treatment, leading to biochar, a carbon-rich material that has attached important attention. Our research group has been worked in the formulation of new based-growing media by peat substitution in 50 and 75 vol% of pruning waste (PW), commercial charcoal (CC), biochar from PW at 300°C (B300) and 500°C (B500). Growing media show adequate physicochemical and hydrophysical properties. Experiments performed with lettuce germination show that PW addition in a 75vol% reduces germination index probably due to their high content on phenolic compounds. Lettuce growing experiments were performed during 5 weeks and show that addition of PW and CC to peat decreases biomass production whereas; B300 and specially, B500 addition significantly increases the lettuce biomass.

  4. Microwave dielectric properties of horticultural peat products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Ayalew

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available The microwave dielectric properties of horticultural peat and compost peat were measured with a HP85107C network analyser in conjunction with a HP85070B open-ended coaxial dielectric probe for the frequency range 0.5–20 GHz. Loose samples had volumetric water contents ranging from 0.11 to 0.24 Mg m-3. For analysis, samples were compressed to 1.0× (no compression, 1.2×, 1.5× and 2.0× original bulk density, giving volumetric water contents ranging from 0.11 to 0.48 Mg m-3. The raw relative permittivity data exhibited a high degree of variability, but rank-based removal of outlier measurements helped to improve their coherence with volumetric water content. The difference between horticultural peat and compost peat was insignificant in terms of both the dielectric constant and the loss factor. The results suggest that relative permittivity data after the removal of outliers can be of sufficiently high quality for sensing applications in the horticultural peat industry such as dedicated water content monitoring, nutrient management, and foreign body detection systems for health and safety purposes, given the low-precision requirements that are appropriate for horticultural and compost peat as high-volume, low-value and non-critical commodities.

  5. Drainage and land use impacts on changes in selected peat properties and peat degradation in West Kalimantan Province, Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anshari, G. Z.; Afifudin, M.; Nuriman, M.; Gusmayanti, E.; Arianie, L.; Susana, R.; Nusantara, R. W.; Sugardjito, J.; Rafiastanto, A.

    2010-11-01

    Degradation of tropical peats is a global concern due to large Carbon emission and loss of biodiversity. The degradation of tropical peats usually starts when the government drains and clears peat forests into open peats used for food crops, oil palm and industrial timber plantations. Major properties of tropical peat forests are high in Water Contents (WC), Loss on Ignition (LOI) and Total Organic Carbon (TOC), and low in peat pH, Dry Bulk Density (DBD), and Total Nitrogen (TN). In this study, we investigated impacts of drainage and land use change on these properties. We collected peat samples from peat forests, logged over peat forest, industrial timber plantation, community agriculture, and oil palms. We used independent t-tests and oneway ANOVA to analyze mean differences of the research variables. We found that peat pH, DBD, and TN tend to increase. A significant decrease of C/N ratio in oil palm and agriculture sites importantly denotes a high rate of peat decompositions. Water contents, LOI, and TOC are relatively constants. We suggest that changes in pH, DBD, TN and atomic C/N ratio are important indicators for assessing tropical peat degradation. We infer that land use change from tropical peat forests into cleared and drained peats used for intensive timber harvesting, oil palms and industrial timber plantations in Indonesia has greatly degraded major ecological function of tropical peats as Carbon storage.

  6. Drainage and land use impacts on changes in selected peat properties and peat degradation in West Kalimantan Province, Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Z. Anshari

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Degradation of tropical peats is a global concern due to large Carbon emission and loss of biodiversity. The degradation of tropical peats usually starts when the government drains and clears peat forests into open peats used for food crops, oil palm and industrial timber plantations. Major properties of tropical peat forests are high in Water Contents (WC, Loss on Ignition (LOI and Total Organic Carbon (TOC, and low in peat pH, Dry Bulk Density (DBD, and Total Nitrogen (TN. In this study, we investigated impacts of drainage and land use change on these properties. We collected peat samples from peat forests, logged over peat forest, industrial timber plantation, community agriculture, and oil palms. We used independent t-tests and oneway ANOVA to analyze mean differences of the research variables. We found that peat pH, DBD, and TN tend to increase. A significant decrease of C/N ratio in oil palm and agriculture sites importantly denotes a high rate of peat decompositions. Water contents, LOI, and TOC are relatively constants. We suggest that changes in pH, DBD, TN and atomic C/N ratio are important indicators for assessing tropical peat degradation. We infer that land use change from tropical peat forests into cleared and drained peats used for intensive timber harvesting, oil palms and industrial timber plantations in Indonesia has greatly degraded major ecological function of tropical peats as Carbon storage.

  7. Origins of mineral matter in peat marsh and peat bog deposits, Spain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez-Buendia, A.M. [Unidad Tecnica del Marmol, AIDICO, Cami de Castella, 4, 03660 Novelda, Alicante (Spain); Whateley, M.K.G. [Rio Tinto Technical Services, Castlemead, Lower Castlemead, BS99 7YR Bristol (United Kingdom); Bastida, J.; Urquiola, M.M. [Dpto. Geologia, Univ. Valencia, Dr. Moliner 50. 46100 Burjasot, Valencia (Spain)

    2007-07-02

    The mineralogy of three back-barrier peat marshes (Torreblanca, Benicasim and Moncofar marshes) from Eastern Spain and one peat bog (Orihuela del Tremedal bog) from central east Spain have been investigated, using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electronic microscope (SEM) techniques. A combination of XRD methods was used to quantify the mineralogy of dried bulk peat samples. The water source in the peat marshes is both continental and marine. Water is highly mineralised. Water flow is both low and slow (accumulative system). The water source in the peat bog is continental, draining from the hill. The higher concentration of ions in the water of the back-barrier peat marshes leads to a higher concentration of authigenic minerals in the peat marshes compared to the peat bog. Three main mineral origins have been recognized, namely: detrital, syngenetic-epigenetic and biogenic. The more important contribution comes from the detrital system. Biogenic and bio-influenced minerals are the main non-detrital minerals in the peatlands. This paper discusses the biogenic origin of halite (and other minor halides and sulphates, such as, sylvite, carnalite, epsomite, glauberite, mirabilite and anhydrite?) from halophytic plants, as well as amorphous silica (opal-A) from sponge spicules and phytoliths of several plants. Pyrite in the peat bog has both syngenetic and epigenetic origins from plant decomposition and sulphur release. In the peat marsh the pyrite has a syngenetic origin from sulphate reduction (S{sub sulphate} {yields} S{sub pyritic}), and an epigenetic origin in the older peat, from plant decomposition (S{sub organic} {yields} S{sub pyritic}). (author)

  8. Determinants for grading Malaysian rice

    Science.gov (United States)

    ChePa, Noraziah; Yusoff, Nooraini; Ahmad, Norhayati

    2016-08-01

    Due to un-uniformity of rice grading practices in Malaysia, zones which actively producing rice in Malaysia are using their own way of grading rice. Rice grading is important in determining rice quality and its subsequent price in the market. It is an important process applied in the rice production industry with the purpose of ensuring that the rice produced for the market meets the quality requirements of consumer. Two important aspects that need to be considered in determining rice grades are grading technique and determinants to be used for grading (usually referred as rice attributes). This article proposes the list of determinants to be used in grading Malaysian rice. Determinants were explored through combination of extensive literature review and series of interview with the domain experts and practitioners. The proposed determinants are believed to be beneficial to BERNAS in improving the current Malaysian rice grading process.

  9. Precipitation-induced runoff and leaching from milled peat mining mires by peat types : a comparative method for estimating the loading of water bodies during peat pruduction

    OpenAIRE

    SvahnbÀck, Lasse

    2007-01-01

    Precipitation-induced runoff and leaching from milled peat mining mires by peat types: a comparative method for estimating the loading of water bodies during peat production. This research project in environmental geology has arisen out of an observed need to be able to predict more accurately the loading of watercourses with detrimental organic substances and nutrients from already existing and planned peat production areas, since the authorities capacity for insisting on such predicti...

  10. Uranium geochemistry in a calcareous peat: mineral-organic-microorganisms interactions and implications on uranium mobility in a contaminated soil; Geochimie de l'uranium dans une tourbe calcaire: interactions mineral - organique - micro-organismes et implications sur la mobilite de l'uranium dans un sol contamine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phrommavanh, V.; Descostes, M.; L' Orphelin, J.M.; Beaucaire, C. [CEA Saclay, DEN/DPC/SECR/Laboratoire de Mesure et Modelisation de la Migration des Radionucleides, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Gaudet, J.P. [LTHE/ENSHMG, 38 - St Martin d' Heres (France)

    2009-07-01

    The authors discuss the different approaches and techniques which have been implemented to study the behaviour of uranium in an as complex medium as a natural peat, in this case, a calcareous peat located on an old industrial site which was dedicated to uranium processing and which is now being decontaminated. They report and comment a chemical and mineralogical characterization of this peat, its hydrochemical characterization, and a microbial flora characterization

  11. The wettability of selected organic soils in Poland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Całka, A.; Hajnos, M.

    2009-04-01

    The wettability was measured in the laboratory by means of two methods: Water Drop Penetration Time (WDPT) test and Thin Column Wicking (TCW) method. WDPT is fast and simple method and was used to investigate potential water repellency of analyzed samples. TCW is an indirect method and was used to determine contact angles and surface free energy components. The measurement was performed in horizontal teflon chambers for thin-layer chromatography, adapted for tubes 10 cm long. The experiment was carried out on muck soils (samples were taken from two levels of soil profile: 0-20 cm and 20-40 cm) and peat soils. There were two types of peats: low-moor peats and high moor peats. Samples of low-moor peats were taken from level 25-75 cm (alder peat) and 75-125cm (sedge peat) and 25-75 cm (peloid peat). Samples of high moor peats from level 25-175 cm (sphagnum peat) and 175-225 cm (sphagnum peat with Eriophorum). There was found no variability in persistence of potential water repellency but there were differences in values of contact angles of individual soil samples. Both muck and peat samples are extremely water repellent soils. Water droplets persisted on the surface of soils for more than 24 hours. Contact angles and surface free energy components for all samples were differentiated. Ranges of water contact angles for organic soils are from 27,54o to 96,50o. The highest values of contact angles were for sphagnum peats, and the lowest for muck soil from 20-40 cm level. It means, that there are differences in wettability between these samples. Muck soil is the best wettable and sphagnum peats is the worst wettable soil. If the content of organic compounds in the soil exceeds 40% (like in peats), the tested material displays only dispersion-type interactions. Therefore for peat soils, the technique of thin column wicking could only be used to determine the dispersive component γiLW. For muck soils it was also determined electron-acceptor (Lewis acid) γ+ and

  12. Selected Trace Element Concentrations in Peat Used for Cosmetic Production – A Case Study from Southern Poland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glina Bartłomiej

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to assess the concentration of selected trace elements in organic soils used as a source to obtain a unique peat extract for cosmetics production. Peat material for laboratory analysis were collected from fen peatland located in the Prosna River Valley (Borek village. Studied peatland is managed by “Torf Corporation” company as a source of material to obtain peat extract for cosmetics production. In the collected soil samples (four soil profiles Zn, Cu and Pb concentrations were determined by using atomic absorption spectrometer SpectraAA 220 (Varian, after acid digestion. Obtained results showed that the highest concentrations of selected trace elements were recorded in the surface horizons of organic soils. This fact might be the results of Prosna river flooding or air deposition. Howevere, according to the new Polish regulations (Ordinance of the Minister for Environment 01.09.2016 - the way of conducting contamination assessment of the earth surface, the content of trace elements in the examined soils was greatly belowe the permissible limit for areas from group IV (mine lands. Thus, described soils are proper to obtain peat extract used as a component in cosmetic production.

  13. Soil Organic Matter and Soil Productivity: Searching for the Missing Link

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felipe G. Sanchez

    1998-01-01

    Soil-organic matter (SOM) is a complex array of components including soil fauna and flora at different stages of decomposition (Berg et al., 1982). Its concentration in soils can vary from 0.5% in mineral soils to almost 100% in peat soils (Brady, 1974). Organic matter (OM) in the surface mineral soil is considered a major determinant of forest ecosystem productivity...

  14. Sources of variability in peat composition and the role of peat age

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leifeld, Jens

    2016-04-01

    During peat formation decaying plant material undergoes partial decomposition that continuously transform its organic matter. As part of this transformation, aromatic moieties such as plant-borne polyphenols are considered to accumulate relative to more labile compounds such as carbohydrates. Here, 13C CPMAS-NMR data from 71 peat samples from sites across Europe (61°48' N - 46°49' N) are analyzed for their variability. Sites differ in their degree of peat disturbance and range from natural to long-term drained and thus strongly degraded. Application of a molecular mixing model to the NMR data indicated that, on average, peat consists by 27, 22, 21, 18, and 11 % of carbohydrates, aliphatics, aromatics, proteins, and char, respectively. Compositional variability was most pronounced for aromatics and carbohydrates. So far, half of the samples was age-dated using 14C. Calibrated 14C ages in the data set range from recent to c. 10000 years BP. Relationships between peat composition and age were non-linear and highly significant. Aromatic moieties accumulated with increasing peat age whereas O-containing moieties relatively declined, in line with a decrease in molar O/C ratios. The relative accumulation of aromatics was 250 % during 10000 years whereas O-containing moieties declined relatively by 65 %. About half of this selective accumulation and degradation occurred during the first 2000 years of peat accumulation, thereby reflecting higher microbial transformation rates during initial phases of built-up. Char content increased with peat age, possibly indicating selective preservation of char during peat formation. C/N ratios correlated significantly but bi-modal with age. The analysis shows that peat age is a reliable proxy for organic matter transformation in peatlands. Because rates and degree of transformation are derived from multiple sites, the found relationships seem to reveal a general pattern, at least for the studied boreal and temperate systems.

  15. Structured landscapes formed by competition between forest, peat forming wetlands, and rivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Velde, Ype; Temme, Arnaud

    2016-04-01

    Fresh water is crucial for society and ecosystems. However, our ability to secure fresh water resources under climatic and anthropogenic change is impaired by the complexity of interactions between human society, ecosystems, soils, and topography. These interactions cause landscape properties to co-evolve, continuously changing the flow paths of water through the landscape. Such co-evolution driven flow path changes are, to-date, poorly understood. In this presentation we investigate hydrological interactions and feedbacks within a boreal landscape with forests, peat forming wetlands and rivers during the holocene. We introduce a spatially distributed landscape co-evolution model that simulates interactions between vegetation, soil organic matter, groundwater and rivers under a wide range of climates. Typical interactions of this model are that a denser vegetation (forest) evaporates more than the low biomass vegetation of a wetland, making the forest dryer and the wetland wetter. Wet conditions favour peat formation with a high water content that further reduces groundwater fluctuations, making the landscape even more wet. At the same time these wet condition cause runoff creating incising rivers that drain the peat and favour tree growth. To understand how positive and stabilizing feedbacks within the model structure form complex landscape patterns of forests, peat forming wetlands and rivers, we stepwise increase spatial connectivity within the model. This setup allows us to untangle the effects of climate, groundwater flow and stream erosion on landscape patterns and better understand observed landscape patterns.

  16. Rhythmic patterning in Malaysian and Singapore English.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Rachel Siew Kuang; Low, Ee-Ling

    2014-06-01

    Previous work on the rhythm of Malaysian English has been based on impressionistic observations. This paper utilizes acoustic analysis to measure the rhythmic patterns of Malaysian English. Recordings of the read speech and spontaneous speech of 10 Malaysian English speakers were analyzed and compared with recordings of an equivalent sample of Singaporean English speakers. Analysis was done using two rhythmic indexes, the PVI and VarcoV. It was found that although the rhythm of read speech of the Singaporean speakers was syllable-based as described by previous studies, the rhythm of the Malaysian speakers was even more syllable-based. Analysis of the syllables in specific utterances showed that Malaysian speakers did not reduce vowels as much as Singaporean speakers in cases of syllables in utterances. Results of the spontaneous speech confirmed the findings for the read speech; that is, the same rhythmic patterning was found which normally triggers vowel reductions.

  17. A database and synthesis of northern peatland soil properties and Holocene carbon and nitrogen accumulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loisel, J.; Yu, Z.; Beilman, D.W.; Camill, P.; Alm, J.; Amesbury, M.J.; Anderson, D.; Andersson, S.; Bochicchio, C.; Barber, K.; Belyea, L.R.; Bunbury, J.; Chambers, F.M.; Charman, D.J.; De Vleeschouwer, F.; Fiałkiewicz-Kozieł, B.; Finkelstein, S.A.; Gałka, M.; Garneau, M.; Hammarlund, D; Hinchcliffe, W.; Holmquist, J.; Hughes, P.; Jones, M.C.; Klein, E.S.; Kokfelt, U.; Korhola, A.; Kuhry, P.; Lamarre, A.; Lamentowicz, M.; Large, D.; Lavoie, M.; Macdonald, G.; Magnan, G.; Mäkilä, M.; Mallon, G.; Mathijssen, P.; Mauquoy, D.; McCarroll, J.; Moore, T.R.; Nichols, J.; O'Reilly, B.; Oksanen, P.; Packalen, M.; Peteet, D.; Richard, P.J.H.; Robinson, S.; Ronkainen, T.; Rundgren, M.; Sannel, A.B.K.; Tarnocai, C.; Thom, T.; Tuittila, E.S.; Turetsky, M.; Väliranta, M.; van der Linden, M.; van Geel, B.; van Bellen, S.; Vitt, D.; Zhao, Y.; Zhou, W.

    2014-01-01

    Here, we present results from the most comprehensive compilation of Holocene peat soil properties with associated carbon and nitrogen accumulation rates for northern peatlands. Our database consists of 268 peat cores from 215 sites located north of 45°N. It encompasses regions within which peat carb

  18. Use of peat in wood adhesives. Turpeen kaeyttoe puuliimoissa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kilpelaeinen, H.; Lappi, M.; Wilen, C.; Thun, R. (Secretaria de Asentamientos Humanos y Obras Publicas, Mexico City (Mexico))

    1989-02-01

    In the first part of this research the composition, properties, the present utilization of peat as well as the possibilities for peat's utilization in wood adhesives were investigated on the basis of literature. The possibilities for the utilization of peat in adhesives are: the use of peat powder and the use of peat extracts; in this case the most reactive polyphenolic components are extracted from the peat. In the case of using peat powder in plywood adhesives, the quality requirements, production technology and costs of peat powder were investigated. Gluing experiments were carried out both in the laboatory and in one plywood mill. On the basis of the results, we can say that peat powder made from decomposed milled peat can substitute partially or totally for today's powder hardeners, extenders and fillers, like quebracho-extract, wheat flour wheat flour and wood dust. From peat extracts, the composition, amount and the extraction methods of the phenolic matters (lignin and humic substances) of peat were investigated on the basis of literature and extraction experiments were made. The extraction yields were 15-64% depending on the kind of peat and extraction conditions, the highest values being from strongly humified sedge peats. The reactivity of extracts were measured by using the formaldehyde up-take method. The differences in the reactivities between the different peat samples obtained under various extraction conditions were no systematic, though on average the most reactive extract originated from medium humified sedge peat. In gluing experiments a sufficient quality of glue-line was achieved by substituting part of the phenolic resin (11 weight parts) in plywood glue and half of resorcinol-phenolic resin in glue-lam glue for peat extract.

  19. Methods for the proximate analysis of peat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheppard, J.D.; Tibbetts, T.E.; Forgeron, D.W.

    1986-01-01

    An investigation was conducted into methods for determining the percentages of volatile matter and ash in peat. Experiments were performed on two types of sphagnum peat, a decomposed fuel peat and a commercial horticultural grade peat. The heating apparatus consisted of both a standard programmable furnace (Fisher Coal Analyser) and a thermogravimetric analyser with a module for differential scanning calorimetry (Mettler TA 3000 system). The results indicate that the seven minute test for volatile matter at either 900 C or 950 C does not fully differentiate volatiles from fixed carbon and, depending on the degree of decomposition, up to sixty minutes at 900 C may be required. The TGA system is very useful in discriminating between different fractions of volatile matter. The relative fractions are more important in determining burning characteristics than the total percentage of volatiles. Ashing must be performed under conditions sufficiently severe to ensure complete combustion of organics. The severity that is required is mainly dependent on the degree of decomposition and sample size. Use of TGA and DSC for studying the combustion of peat provides much more information than the standard proximate analysis. 14 refs.

  20. Characterization of peat and humic acid in the margins of Mogi-Guacu river, Sao Paulo state, Brazil; Caracterizacao da turfa e dos acidos humicos das margens do rio Mogi-Guacu, SP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prado, Alexandre G.S.; Rezende, Mara O. de O. [Sao Paulo Univ., Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil). Inst. de Quimica. Lab. de Radioquimica e Quimica Ambiental

    1999-07-01

    The slow chemical and microbiological decomposition of flooded soils form a material with high proportion of organic matter known as peat. The presence of favorable areas for peat formation is a characteristic of the Brazilian territory; even so, the potential of this material is seldom used. Peat can be used as a fertilizer complement in agriculture, as source of energy, and as a pollutant extractor. The peat samples studied were collected in the margins of the Mogi Guacu river, in Sao Paulo state. The peat samples and the humic acids extracted from peat were characterized by several techniques. The results showed that the material can be applied in agriculture and presents a great potential for removal of environmental contaminants, besides being a good source of humic acids. (author)

  1. Leaching and retention of nutrients and trace elements in peat nineteen years after wood ash application and afforestation of a terminated peat cutover area; Utlakning och retention av naeringsaemnen och spaaraemnen i torv nitton aar efter vedasktillfoersel och beskogning paa en avslutad torvtaekt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nilsson, Torbjoern; Lundin, Lars (Dept. of Forest Soils, Swedish Univ. of Agricultural Sciences, P.O. Box 7001, SE-750 07 Uppsala (Sweden))

    2008-04-15

    Ash application on peatlands for improved biomass production attracts great interest. On drained peatlands in forestry use, application of wood ash would increase the forest production. Before such activities starts on a large-scale, the existing knowledge in this field should be compiled, with the aim to illustrate positive and negative effects of such a measure and to suggest recommendations for wood ash application to drained and afforested peatlands. The aim of this project was to investigate how much of different nutrients and trace elements that was still left in the peat, 19 years after application of 23 tonnes of wood fly ash, 0.6 tonnes of raw phosphate and 0.25 tonnes of superphosphate per hectare to 14 hectares of a terminated peat cutover area. This area was located on a mire, Flakmossen, in west-central Sweden. As it was nearly 40 years since peat harvesting had terminated on this mire, the area was drained before the application of wood ash and phosphorus fertilizer. A tractor-driven cultivator mixed the applied fertilizers with the upper 30-40 cm of the remaining peat and afterwards different tree species were planted in the cultivated peat. Peat sampling, down to 80 cm depth, was carried out before soil treatment, one year after, three years after and 19 years after the soil treatment. Analyses of these peat samples showed that: - After the soil treatments an initial increase of pH in the upper peat layers (0-40 cm depth) was observed, but 19 years after the soil treatments pH had decreased to levels that were lower than before the treatments. This decrease in pH was probably due to an oxidation of sulphur compounds in the peat, which was a result of the drainage. This acidification of the peat could not be buffered by the large dose of applied wood ash. However, it should be observed that the main part of the peat in this field study consists of reed peat, that has a considerable higher sulphur content than other peat types. - Nineteen years after

  2. Fixed-bed gasification research using US coals. Volume 11. Gasification of Minnesota peat. [Peat pellets and peat sods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thimsen, D.; Maurer, R.E.; Pooler, A.R.; Pui, D.; Liu, B.; Kittelson, D.

    1985-05-01

    A single-staged, fixed-bed Wellman-Galusha gasifier coupled with a hot, raw gas combustion system and scrubber has been used to gasify numerous coals from throughout the United States. The gasification test program is organized as a coooperative effort by private industrial participants and governmental agencies. The consortium of participants is organized under the Mining and Industrial Fuel Gas (MIFGa) Group. This report is the eleventh volume in a series of reports describing the atmospheric pressure, fixed-bed gasification of US coals. This specific report describes the gasification of peat pellets and peat sods during 3 different test periods. 2 refs., 20 figs., 13 tabs.

  3. Nitrosation and Nitration of Fulvic Acid, Peat and Coal with Nitric Acid.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin A Thorn

    Full Text Available Nitrohumic acids, produced from base extraction of coals and peats oxidized with nitric acid, have received considerable attention as soil ammendments in agriculture. The nitration chemistry however is incompletely understood. Moreover, there is a need to understand the reaction of nitric acid with natural organic matter (NOM in general, in the context of a variety of environmental and biogeochemical processes. Suwannee River NOM, Suwannee River fulvic acid, and Pahokee Peat fulvic acid were treated with 15N-labeled nitric acid at concentrations ranging from 15% to 22% and analyzed by liquid and solid state 15N NMR spectroscopy. Bulk Pahokee peat and Illinois #6 coal were also treated with nitric acid, at 29% and 40% respectively, and analyzed by solid state 15N NMR spectroscopy. In addition to nitro groups from nitration of aromatic carbon, the 15N NMR spectra of all five samples exhibited peaks attributable to nitrosation reactions. These include nitrosophenol peaks in the peat fulvic acid and Suwannee River samples, from nitrosation of phenolic rings, and N-nitroso groups in the peat samples, from nitrosation of secondary amides or amines, the latter consistent with the peat samples having the highest naturally abundant nitrogen contents. Peaks attributable to Beckmann and secondary reactions of the initially formed oximes were present in all spectra, including primary amide, secondary amide, lactam, and nitrile nitrogens. The degree of secondary reaction product formation resulting from nitrosation reactions appeared to correlate inversely with the 13C aromaticities of the samples. The nitrosation reactions are most plausibly effected by nitrous acid formed from the reduction of nitric acid by oxidizable substrates in the NOM and coal samples.

  4. Peat-based organic growbags as a solution to the mineral wool waste problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Grunert

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available The vast amount of solid waste produced each year is one of the greatest problems associated with greenhouse horticulture in some European countries. In particular, the disposal of used growing media arising from the soil-less cultivation of vegetables in mineral wool creates serious difficulties. The non-biodegradability of these mainly inorganic substrates causes environmental concern and has prompted the search for alternative growing media such as cocos derivatives, perlite and resin foam (Fytocell®. Organic substrates in combination with biodegradable material such as plastic, rope and clippings have the advantage that re-use or recycling of the waste is easier, cheaper and more environmentally friendly than for mineral wool. However, the differing physical and chemical characteristics of the alternative substrates may affect yield significantly. Substrates based respectively on peat and peat with cocos derivatives were tested against a mineral wool control for the production of tomato in three consecutive years. Both organic substrates were placed in biodegradable plastic bags. Greenhouse experiments demonstrated that plants grown in the pure peat substrate rooted more easily than plants grown in the peat-cocos substrate or mineral wool, and that they developed less blossom-end rot in both peat substrates than in mineral wool. Due to the buffering capacity of the organic substrates, the electrical conductivity of the draining water appeared to be more stable during cultivation. The total yield of tomato fruits was similar for all substrates, and no differences between substrates could be observed in the quality of the fruits produced. On the other hand, flavour tests demonstrated that plants grown on peat substrate produced more tasty fruits under certain conditions. The results of this study show that organic growbags are promising and competitive alternatives to mineral wool.

  5. Nitrosation and nitration of fulvic acid, peat and coal with nitric acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorn, Kevin A.; Cox, Larry G.

    2016-01-01

    Nitrohumic acids, produced from base extraction of coals and peats oxidized with nitric acid, have received considerable attention as soil ammendments in agriculture. The nitration chemistry however is incompletely understood. Moreover, there is a need to understand the reaction of nitric acid with natural organic matter (NOM) in general, in the context of a variety of environmental and biogeochemical processes. Suwannee River NOM, Suwannee River fulvic acid, and Pahokee Peat fulvic acid were treated with 15N-labeled nitric acid at concentrations ranging from 15% to 22% and analyzed by liquid and solid state 15N NMR spectroscopy. Bulk Pahokee peat and Illinois #6 coal were also treated with nitric acid, at 29% and 40% respectively, and analyzed by solid state 15N NMR spectroscopy. In addition to nitro groups from nitration of aromatic carbon, the 15N NMR spectra of all five samples exhibited peaks attributable to nitrosation reactions. These include nitrosophenol peaks in the peat fulvic acid and Suwannee River samples, from nitrosation of phenolic rings, and N-nitroso groups in the peat samples, from nitrosation of secondary amides or amines, the latter consistent with the peat samples having the highest naturally abundant nitrogen contents. Peaks attributable to Beckmann and secondary reactions of the initially formed oximes were present in all spectra, including primary amide, secondary amide, lactam, and nitrile nitrogens. The degree of secondary reaction product formation resulting from nitrosation reactions appeared to correlate inversely with the 13C aromaticities of the samples. The nitrosation reactions are most plausibly effected by nitrous acid formed from the reduction of nitric acid by oxidizable substrates in the NOM and coal samples.

  6. Nitrosation and Nitration of Fulvic Acid, Peat and Coal with Nitric Acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorn, Kevin A; Cox, Larry G

    2016-01-01

    Nitrohumic acids, produced from base extraction of coals and peats oxidized with nitric acid, have received considerable attention as soil ammendments in agriculture. The nitration chemistry however is incompletely understood. Moreover, there is a need to understand the reaction of nitric acid with natural organic matter (NOM) in general, in the context of a variety of environmental and biogeochemical processes. Suwannee River NOM, Suwannee River fulvic acid, and Pahokee Peat fulvic acid were treated with 15N-labeled nitric acid at concentrations ranging from 15% to 22% and analyzed by liquid and solid state 15N NMR spectroscopy. Bulk Pahokee peat and Illinois #6 coal were also treated with nitric acid, at 29% and 40% respectively, and analyzed by solid state 15N NMR spectroscopy. In addition to nitro groups from nitration of aromatic carbon, the 15N NMR spectra of all five samples exhibited peaks attributable to nitrosation reactions. These include nitrosophenol peaks in the peat fulvic acid and Suwannee River samples, from nitrosation of phenolic rings, and N-nitroso groups in the peat samples, from nitrosation of secondary amides or amines, the latter consistent with the peat samples having the highest naturally abundant nitrogen contents. Peaks attributable to Beckmann and secondary reactions of the initially formed oximes were present in all spectra, including primary amide, secondary amide, lactam, and nitrile nitrogens. The degree of secondary reaction product formation resulting from nitrosation reactions appeared to correlate inversely with the 13C aromaticities of the samples. The nitrosation reactions are most plausibly effected by nitrous acid formed from the reduction of nitric acid by oxidizable substrates in the NOM and coal samples.

  7. Effects of carbon substrate lability on carbon mineralization dynamics of tropical peat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jauhiainen, Jyrki; Silvennoinen, Hanna; Könönen, Mari; Limin, Suwido; Vasander, Harri

    2016-04-01

    Extensive draining at tropical ombrotrophic peatlands in Southeast Asia has made them global 'hot spots' for greenhouse gas emissions. Management practises and fires have led to changed substrate status, which affects microbial processes. Here, we present the first data on how management practises affect carbon (C) mineralization processes at these soils. We compared the carbon mineralization potentials of pristine forest soils to those of drained fire affected soils at various depths, with and without additional labile substrates (glucose, glutamate and NO3-N) and in oxic and anoxic conditions by dedicated ex situ experiments. Carbon mineralization (CO2 and CH4 production) rates were higher in the pristine site peat, which contains more labile carbon due to higher input via vegetation. Production rates decreased with depth together with decreasing availability of labile carbon. Consequently, the increase in production rates after labile substrate addition was relatively modest from pristine site as compared to the managed site and from the top layers as compared to deeper layers. Methanogenesis had little importance in total carbon mineralization. Adding labile C and N enhanced heterotrophic CO2 production more than the sole addition of N. Surprisingly, oxygen availability was not an ultimate requirement for substantial CO2 production rates, but anoxic respiration yielded comparable rates, especially at the pristine soils. Flooding of these sites will therefore reduce, but not completely cease, peat carbon loss. Reintroduced substantial vegetation and fertilization in degraded peatlands can enrich recalcitrant peat with simple C and N compounds and thus increase microbiological activity.

  8. Effect of mixing geopolymer and peat on bearing capacity in Ogan Komering Ilir (OKI) by California bearing ratio (CBR) test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raharja, Danang S.; Hadiwardoyo, Sigit P.; Rahayu, Wiwik; Zain, Nasuhi

    2017-06-01

    Geopolymer is binder material that consists of solid material and the activator solution. Geopolymer material has successfully replaced cement in the manufacture of concrete with aluminosilicate bonding system. Geopolymer concrete has properties similar to cement concrete with high compressive strength, low shrinkage value, relatively low creep value, as well as acid-resistant. Based on these, the addition of polymers in peat soils is expected to improve the bearing capacity of peat soils. A study on the influence of geopolymer addition in peat soils was done by comparing before and after the peat soil was mixed with geopolymer using CBR (California Bearing Ratio) test in unsoaked and soaked conditions. 10% mixture content of the peat dry was used, weighted with a variety of curing time 4 hours, 5 days, and 10 days. There were two methods of mixing: first, peat was mixed with fly ash geopolymer activators and mixed solution (waterglass, NaOH, water), and second, peat was mixed with fly ash and mixed geopolymer (waterglass, NaOH, water, fly ash). Changes were observed in specific gravity, dry density, acidity (pH), and the microscopic structure with Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM). Curing time did not significantly affect the CBR value. It even shows a tendency to decline with longer curing time. The first type mixture obtained CBR value of: 5.4% for 4 hours curing, 4.6% for 5 days curing and 3.6% for 10 days curing. The second type mixture obtained CBR value of: 6.1% for 4 hours curing, 5.2% for 5 days curing and 5.2% for 10 days curing. Furthermore, the specific gravity value, dry density, pH near neutral and swelling percentage increased. From both variants, the second type mixture shows better results than the first type mixture. The results of SEM (Scanning Electron Microscopy) show the structure of the peat which became denser with the fly ash particles filling the peat microporous. Also, the reaction of fly ash with geopolymer is indicated by the solid

  9. Climate impact from peat utilisation in Sweden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uppenberg, S.; Zetterberg, L.; Aahman, M.

    2001-08-01

    The climate impact from the use of peat for energy production in Sweden has been evaluated in terms of contribution to atmospheric radiative forcing. This was done by attempting to answer the question 'What will be the climate impact if one would use 1 m{sup 2} of mire for peat extraction during 20 years?'. Two different methods of after-treatment were studied: afforestation and restoration of wetland. The climate impact from a peatland - wetland energy scenario and a peatland - forestry energy scenario was compared to the climate impact from coal, natural gas and forest residues. Sensitivity analyses were performed to evaluate which parameters that are important to take into consideration in order to minimize the climate impact from peat utilisation.

  10. Significance of peat on the western continental shelf of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Mascarenhas, A.

    that Mn and Fe are impoverished in peat as compared to overlying clastic sediments. These redox sensitive elements can easily be reduced iq anorganic~ rich environment and are partly eliminated in soluble form. In situ conditions that prevail in peat...

  11. Volatile and semivolatile organic compounds in laboratory peat fire emissions

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Supporting information Tables S3 and S4 list emission factors in g/kg of speciated volatile and particulate organic compounds emitted from peat burning. Peat samples...

  12. Growing reforestation conifer stock: Utilizing peat/sawdust medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janice K. Schaefer

    2009-01-01

    Western Forest Systems, Incorporated (WFS) (Lewiston, ID) has been utilizing a peat/sawdust blended mix as our growing medium for the past 10 years. Our decision to change from a peat/vermiculite blend to a peat/Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii) sawdust blend involved worker health and safety issues, seedling culture, seedling production, and...

  13. Atmospheric nitrogen deposition promotes carbon loss from peat bogs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bragazza, L.; Freeman, C.; Jones, T.; Rydin, H.; Limpens, J.; Fenner, N.; Ellis, T.; Gerdol, R.; Hajek, M.; Hajek, T.; Iacumin, P.; Kutnar, L.; Tahvanainen, T.; Toberman, H.

    2006-01-01

    Peat bogs have historically represented exceptional carbon (C) sinks because of their extremely low decomposition rates and consequent accumulation of plant remnants as peat. Among the factors favoring that peat accumulation, a major role is played by the chemical quality of plant litter itself, whi

  14. Effect of peat-based container media on establishment of Scots pine, Norway spruce and silver birch seedlings after transplanting in contrasting water conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heiskanen, Juha; Rikala, Risto [Finnish Forest Research Inst., Suonenjoki (Finland). Suonenjoki Research Station

    2000-07-01

    Container seedlings were grown in pure sphagnum peat and peat mixtures containing coarse perlite and/or fine sand 25% by volume. Soil-water availability and rooting of the seedlings into the surrounding sandy soil after transplanting were studied in contrasting soil-water conditions in a greenhouse and a field experiment. No clear benefit was found for seedling rooting and establishment after planting by adding the used constituents to peat container medium. In fact, rooting of pine and birch was greatest in pure peat medium. Weakened seedlings occurred most frequently in media containing fine sand with lower water retention (in the matric potential range - 1 to - 10 kPa) than in pure peat or peat containing perlite. Preplanting and postplanting watering clearly affected soil-water relations and seedling performance. Wet container media were found to release the most easily retained water into the soil within hours after planting. The amount of water released into coarse planting soil was less than that released into fine soil. Dry container media absorbed water from the soil for several days after planting, but still remained drier for a few days than those watered prior to planting. Preplanting watering decreased the mortality of conifer seedlings, and promoted their rooting into the soil, height growth and needle mass, but did not do so for birch. Postplanting watering did not affect mortality, but it promoted height growth and needle and leaf mass of all three species and rooting of birch. The results emphasize the importance of the water-retention characteristics of container media and of watering seedlings before outplanting for seedling establishment, especially in dry growth conditions.

  15. Enrichment of tropical peat with micronutrients for agricultural applications: evaluation of adsorption and desorption processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melo, Camila de A.; Oliveira, Lilian K. de; Fraceto, Leonardo F.; Rosa, Andre H., E-mail: ahrosa@sorocaba.unesp.br [Universidade Estadual Paulista Julio de Mesquita Filho (UNESP), Sorocaba, SP (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Ambiental; Goveia, Danielle [Universidade Estadual Paulista Julio de Mesquita Filho (UNESP), Araraquara, SP (Brazil). Inst. de Quimica

    2014-01-15

    The objective of this work was to evaluate the adsorption and desorption of micronutrients in tropical peats, from the perspective of potential agricultural applications. Adsorption experiments were performed at different pH values, using solutions containing individual and multiple metal ions. Maximum adsorption capacity occurred at pH 6.0, and the order of affinity was Cu > Fe > Co > Ni > Zn = Mn. Release of the micronutrients was evaluated at different pH values, using an aqueous medium as well as soil and plants. Release of the micronutrients was most efficient at pH 6.0, and followed the order: Fe > Zn > Mn > Co = Ni > Cu. Micronutrient release to the soil was accompanied by uptake by the plant. The use of tropical peat enriched with micronutrients could contribute to improved agricultural productivity, since the release profile of the micronutrients can effectively stimulate plant growth. (author)

  16. Lactose tolerance and intolerance in Malaysians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Michael Barling

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available This review explores the digestibility oflactose by Malaysians, and the value of milk and othermilk-derived products as sources of appropriate nutritionfor Malaysians. Increased calcium intake throughconsumption of milk is an effective mechanism forincreasing calcium uptake from the diet and therebyminimising the risk of development of osteoporosis inlater life. Detailed information about rates of lactoseintolerance, and adaptation to dietary lactose andits consequences for Malaysians, will help in theformulation of dietary advice, and improve commerialfood manufaturing practice and Government policydirected to the minimization of rates of osteoporosis,which presents a substantial morbidity risk to elderlyfemale Asians in particular.

  17. The influence of peat volume change and vegetation on the hydrology of a kettle-hole wetland in Southern Ontario, Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Whittington

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Links between local hydrology and vegetation type exist in wetlands, yet it is unclear what role peat volume change plays in these interactions. We measured peat volume change and hydraulic conductivity (Kfield at three contrasting sites located on the quaking vegetation mat of a kettle-hole peatland in southern Ontario. The three sites had visibly different plant communities and were named, according to their dominant vegetation, Sedge (Carex spp., Typha (Typha angustifolia and Carr (Cornus stolonifera. Peat was also collected for laboratory studies of peat volume change, vertical (Kv and horizontal (Kh hydraulic conductivity and the effect of compression on hydraulic conductivity (Kc.In the field, the water table rose throughout the study period, resulting in swelling of the peat. Peat volume change above the -100 cm layer was 11.2%, 6.0% and 3.8% at the Sedge, Typha, and Carr sites respectively. In laboratory samples, a falling water table caused compression of the peat below the structured surface mat, and relative peat volume change between the sites followed the same pattern as in the field. Kfield, Kv and Kh generally decreased with depth from ca. 10-2 to 10-6 cm s-1. In the surface layers (0 to -50cm K trended Carr>Typha>Sedge, whereas the reverse trend was observed in deeper peat. Artificial compression affected K only in the uppermost layers (0 to -15cm. The decline in Kc with compression also trended Sedge>Typha>Carr. Differences in peat volume change and K are probably related to differences in vegetation and soil structure, and may be important for maintaining suitable growing conditions within each community.

  18. Contributions to the knowledge of flora and vegetation of peat bog from Bihorului Mountains (NW Romania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petru BURESCU

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The oligotrophic peat bog of Bihorului Mountains are quartered in the valleys with northern exposure, of siliceous substrate, forming habitats with high conservation value, which are home to over 10 rare relict species. The phytocoenoses of the associations Sphagnetum magellanici, Sphagno cuspidati – Rhynchosporetum albae, Caricetum limosae were analyzed by us in terms of floristic composition, ecological spectra of the type of life forms and floristic elements, in terms of chart ecological factors: moisture, soil temperature and chemical reaction.

  19. A Preliminary Assessment of Peat Degradation in West Kalimantan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anshari, G. Z.

    2010-12-01

    Degradation of tropical peats is a global concern due to large Carbon emission and loss of biodiversity. The degradation of tropical peats usually starts when the government clears closed peat forests into open and drained peatlands for agricultural uses. The purpose of this paper is to assess the change of Total Organic Carbon (TOC) and Total Nitrogen (TN) from various peatland uses, and to analyze major factors that direct peat degradation. Data were collected from undrained peat forest, drained and logged peat forest, drained peats from oil palm plantations at different ages (< 5 yrs; 5-10 yrs; and 15-20 yrs), and drained peat for community agriculture. I analyzed a total of 331 subsamples for TOC and TN with elemental analyzer. I classified these data based on peat occurrences (i.e. coastal and inland peats), and peat layers (i.e. acrotelm and catotelm). I used SPSS version 17.0 in data analyses in order to compare means of TOC, TN, and atomic ratio between TOC and TN (Atomic C/N ratio). Results of analysis show that values of TOC are insignificantly different, and values of TN and Atomic C/N ratio are significantly different between coastal and inland peats, and between acrotelm and catotelm. Between land use groups, TOC values have smaller variability than TN values, which shows an increasing trend in drained peats. Hence, Atomic C/N ratio values are significantly lower in drained than undrained peats, comparing between 28.6 and 68.6, respectively. This study presently reckons that drainage is a major factor that enhances the rate of peat decomposition.

  20. Holocene elemental, lead isotope and charcoal record from peat in southern Poland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Tudyka

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available This article presents a mid-resolution elemental, isotopic and charcoal record from 10700 BC to AD 500 in a peat core located in Żyglin (southern Poland. The objective is to give insight into the proxies with emphasis on lead (Pb sources in this minerogenic peat deposit. During the Early Holocene (10700–7550 BC the average 206Pb/207Pb quotient was around 1.196. This isotopic signature is consistent with natural dust derived from long-distance soil and rock weathering. The Mid-Holocene period (7550–3200 BC shows a significant change in the peat accumulation conditions. The growth rate is approximately 0.04 mm yr-1 and the 206Pb/207Pb quotients are shifted toward values that are found in local galena ores. This is simultaneous with a significantly increased lead flux which further confirms local sources of material in this peat deposit. In the Late Holocene period (3200 BC–AD 500 a large quantity of charcoal particles with diameters ranging from 2 mm up to 3 cm is found; also, Pb, Zn and Cu fluxes reach their highest values. This period corresponds to the Eneolithic, Bronze and Iron Ages, and human impact is recorded as charcoal.

  1. Responsible management of peatlands in Canada, from peat industry to oil sands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rochefort, Line

    2013-04-01

    Canada harbors one third of the peat resources of the world. Peat is an accumulated organic matter composed of dead and partly decomposed plant material, forming huge deposit through time in wetlands like peatlands and boreal coniferous swamps. Peat is a valuable resource as a growing media and soil amendments, an eco-friendly absorbent, also used as biofilters, for body care and for wastewater treatment. Peatlands also offer valuable ecological services : for example, they are the most efficient terrestrial ecosystem to store carbon on a long-term basis. Their ability to "cool off" the planet warrants a good look at their management. The horticultural peat industry of Canada has invested 22 years in R&D in habitat restoration and is now a strong leader in managing industrial peatlands in a sustainable way. The oil sand industry, which is strongly impacting the wetland landscapes of northern Canada, does realize that it has to reduce its ecological footprint, which is heavily criticized around the world. Decommissioned open mines near Fort McMurray have already begun recreating peatland ecosystems, and some restoration attempts of former oil pads are underway in the Peace River region. But the restoration of the largely disturbed wetland landscape of the oil sands is commanding innovative solutions.

  2. Toxic gas emissions from the Kayseri peat deposit, central Anatolia, Turkey

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mehmet Şener; Mustafa Korkanç; M Furkan Şener; Selma Yaşar Korkanç; F Zafer Özgür

    2012-10-01

    Toxic gases evolving from the soil in urbanized peatland regions constitute a serious hazard since buildings may be subject to the direct ingress of volatiles into the structures. Peat formed in swamp and rarely exposed to subaerial conditions has been associated with the development of the folded foreland of the Quaternary Kayseri pull-apart basin. The peat deposit is extensively urbanized but so far no studies have evaluated the extent of the ground gas hazard. In this paper, the geology, petrography and chemical variation of the Kayseri peat deposit have been studied in order to predict the public health risk from the land gases’ behaviour, especially in soil gases. The main volatile species detected are methane (CH4), hydrogen sulphide (H2S) and carbon dioxide (CO2), all of which are highly toxic. The primary means of gas entry is directly from the ground through the floors, walls, and especially subsurface telephone cable pipes. Indoor vents emit 1000–70,000 ppm CH4, 330–49,000 ppm CO2 and 3.8–6.5 ppm H2S in soil and subsurface pipes; concentrations high enough to present an acute respiratory hazard to persons close to the vents.

  3. Macroeconomic determinants of Malaysian stock market

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Aisyah Abdul Rahman; Noor Zahirah Mohd Sidek; Fauziah Hanim Tafri

    2009-01-01

    .... Upon testing a vector error correction model, we show that changes in Malaysian stock market index do perform a co-integrating relationship with changes in money supply, interest rate, exchange rate...

  4. The Cultivation of Arabidopsis for Experimental Research Using Commercially Available Peat-Based and Peat-Free Growing Media.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiffany Drake

    Full Text Available Experimental research involving Arabidopsis thaliana often involves the quantification of phenotypic traits during cultivation on compost or other growing media. Many commercially-available growing media contain peat, but peat extraction is not sustainable due to its very slow rate of formation. Moreover, peat extraction reduces peatland biodiversity and releases stored carbon and methane into the atmosphere. Here, we compared the experimental performance of Arabidopsis on peat-based and several types of commercially-available peat-free growing media (variously formed from coir, composted bark, wood-fibre, and domestic compost, to provide guidance for reducing peat use in plant sciences research with Arabidopsis. Arabidopsis biomass accumulation and seed yield were reduced by cultivation on several types of peat-free growing media. Arabidopsis performed extremely poorly on coir alone, presumably because this medium was completely nitrate-free. Some peat-free growing media were more susceptible to fungal contamination. We found that autoclaving of control (peat-based growing media had no effect upon any physiological parameters that we examined, compared with non-autoclaved control growing media, under our experimental conditions. Overall, we conclude that Arabidopsis performs best when cultivated on peat-based growing media because seed yield was almost always reduced when peat-free media were used. This may be because standard laboratory protocols and growth conditions for Arabidopsis are optimized for peat-based media. However, during the vegetative growth phase several phenotypic traits were comparable between plants cultivated on peat-based and some peat-free media, suggesting that under certain circumstances peat-free media can be suitable for phenotypic analysis of Arabidopsis.

  5. Raising surface water levels in peat areas with dairy farming upscaling hydrological, agronomical and economic effects from farm-scale to local scale.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, de J.A.; Bakel, van P.J.T.; Hoving, I.E.; Smidt, R.A.

    2010-01-01

    Raising surface water levels in peat areas is a measure to reduce soil subsidence, to prevent decay of wooden foundations and to stimulate wet nature restoration and reduce greenhouse gas emissions. However, in these areas dairy farms are present and farming at wetter soils is difficult due to lower

  6. A preliminary assessment of peat degradation in West Kalimantan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Z. Anshari

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Degradation of tropical peats is a global concern due to large Carbon emission and loss of biodiversity. The degradation of tropical peats usually starts when the government clears closed peat forests into open and drained peatlands for agricultural uses. Tropical peats have high values of Water Contents (WC, Organic Matters (OM and Total Organic Carbon (TOC, and low values of Total Nitrogen (TN and Total Sulphur (TS. Dry Bulk Density (DBD is commonly less than 0.1 g cm−3. Decline of concentration values of OM (<90% and TOC (<40% indicate peat degradation. In disturbed peats, TN concentration tends to decrease and the concentration of TS slightly increases. Changes in OM, TOC, TN and TS are potentially important indicators for assessing peat degradation in the tropics.

  7. Local learning processes in Malaysian industry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wangel, Arne

    1999-01-01

    Local learning processes are a vital part of any dynamic assimilation of transferred technology. The paper raises the question about the interaction between the training paradigms, which transnational corporations introduce in their subsidiaries in Malaysia and the specific basis for learning...... of Malaysian labour. Experiences from Malaysian industry indicate that local learning processes are shaped, among other things, by the concept of knowledge in a particular training programme, labour market structures, and learning cultures....

  8. The Use of Hotspot Spatial Clustering and Multitemporal Satellite Imagery to Facilitate Peat Land Degradation in West Kalimantan, Indonesia (Case Study in Mensiku Miniwatershed of Kapuas River)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanuarsyah, I.; Suwarno, Y.; Hudjimartsu, S.

    2016-11-01

    Peat land in Indonesia is currently a matter of interest to economic activity. In addition to having the uniqueness of the ecosystem which is reserve a huge of biodiversity and carbon storage, peat land is grow an alternative expansion of agriculture and plantation. Mensiku miniwatershed is a subset of Kapuas Watershed with the domination of the peat soil type. It located in the upstream from the Kapuas River and supporting for the continuation of the river ecosystem. The research objective is to facilitate peat land degradation by using hotspot spatial clustering and multitemporal satellite imagery. There have three main processes which are image processing, geoprocessing and statistical process using DBSCAN to determine hotspot clustering. The trend of LUC changes for 14 years (2002 to 2016) shows that the downward occurred in secondary peat forest (0.9% per year) and swampy shrub (0.6% per year). The upward occurred in mixed farms (0.6% per year) and plantations (0.8% per year). degradation rate of peat land over 14 years about 4.6 km2 per year. Hotspot predominantly occurrence in secondary peat forest with 200-250 centimeter depth and Saprists type. DBSCAN clustering obtain 2 clusters in 2002, obtain 4 clusters in 2009 and obtain 1 clusters in 2016. Regarding LUC platform, average density value over 14 years about 0.063 hotspot per km2. DBSCAN is common used to examine the cluster and perform the distribution and density with spatial analysis

  9. Relating changes of organic matter composition of two German peats to climatic conditions during peat formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knicker, Heike; Nikolova, Radoslava; Rumpel, Cornelia; González-Vila, Francisco, J.; Drösler, Matthias

    2010-05-01

    Peatlands have been recognized as an important factor within the global C-cycle, since they store about one-third of the global terrestrial C-pool. Furthermore, peat deposits have the potential to record detailed paleoclimatic and - vegetational changes. They are formed in peculiar paleoecosystems where the slow biodegradation of plant residues depends on a series of pedo-climatic and hydromorphic factors leading to a progressive accumulation of organic matter stabilized in different evolutionary stages. Thus, its chemical composition should be applicable as a fingerprint of former prevailing environmental conditions and vegetation configurations. The aim of the present work was to identify this fingerprint in the cores of two German fens, one derived from the Havelland close to Berlin (Großer Bolchow) and the other derived from the alpine region of Bavaria (Kendlmühlfilzen) by investigating the organic matter transformation as a function of peat depths. The C/N ratios and δ13C values revealed several distinctive trends in the two profiles related to prevailing peat forming conditions. Compared to the other layers, at depths of 14-85 cm and 132-324 cm in the Kendlmühlfilzen fen, high C/N ratios and less depleted δ13C values, indicated that the accumulation of these two layers occurred during a humid and cold period. In the case of the "Großer Bolchow", algal contributions were clearly detected using δ13C values. Solid-state 13C NMR spectroscopy demonstrated loss of celluloses and accumulation of lipids and lignin derivatives during peatification, confirming that under the mostly O2-depleted conditions in peats, decomposition was selective. The results obtained by pyrolysis-GC/MS were in good agreement with the NMR data showing that processes ascribed to gradual biotransformation of the lignin occurred in both peats. However, the "Großer Bolchow" peat revealed a more advanced decomposition stage then the "Kendlmühlfilzen" peat, which is in agreement with

  10. Suicidal ideation among Malaysian adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, NoorAni; Cheong, Siew Man; Ibrahim, Nurashikin; Rosman, Azriman

    2014-09-01

    Adolescence is the time of greatest risk for the first onset of suicidal behaviors. This study aimed to identify the risk and protective factors associated with suicidal ideation among Malaysian adolescents. Data from the 2012 Malaysia Global School-based Student Health Survey, a nationwide study using a 2-stage cluster sampling design, were analyzed. The survey used a self-administered validated bilingual questionnaire and the Depression Anxiety and Stress Scale. The prevalence of suicidal ideation was 7.9%. Analysis revealed that suicidal ideation was positively associated with depression, anxiety, stress, substance use, being bullied, and being abused at home, either physically or verbally. In addition, suicidal ideation was significantly higher among females and among the Indians and Chinese. Having close friends and married parents were strongly protective against suicidal ideation. Understanding the risk and protective factors is important in providing comprehensive management for suicidal ideation. © 2014 APJPH.

  11. Thermal diffusivity of peat, sand and their mixtures at different water contents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gvozdkova, Anna; Arkhangelskaya, Tatiana

    2014-05-01

    Thermal diffusivity of peat, sand and their mixtures at different water contents was studied using the unsteady-state method described in (Parikh et al., 1979). Volume sand content in studied samples was 0 % (pure peat), 5, 10, 15, 20, 30, 40, 50, 55 and 62 % (pure sand). Thermal diffusivity of air-dry samples varied from 0.6×10-7m2s-1 for pure peat to 7.0×10-7m2s-1 for pure sand. Adding 5 and 10 vol. % of sand didn't change the thermal diffusivity of studied mixture as compared with that of the pure air-dry peat. Adding 15 % of sand resulted in significant increase of thermal diffusivity by approximately 1.5 times: from 0.6×10-7m2s-1 to 0.9×10-7m2s-1. It means that small amounts of sand with separate sand particles distributed within the peat don't contribute much to the heat transfer through the studied media. And there is a kind of threshold between the 10 and 15 vol. % of sand, after which the continuous sandy chains are formed within the peat, which can serve as preferential paths of heat transport. Adding 20 and 30 % of sand resulted in further increase of thermal diffusivity to 1.3×10-7m2s-1 and 1.7×10-7m2s-1, which is more than two and three times greater than the initial value for pure peat. Thermal diffusivity vs. moisture content dependencies had different shapes. For sand contents of 0 to 40 vol. % the thermal diffusivity increased with water content in the whole studied range from air-dry samples to the capillary moistened ones. For pure peat the experimental curves were almost linear; the more sand was added the more pronounced became the S-shape of the curves. For sand contents of 50 % and more the curves had a pronounced maximum within the range of water contents between 0.10 and 0.25 m3m-3 and then decreased. The experimental k(θ) curves, where k is soil thermal diffusivity, θ is water content, were parameterized with a 4-parameter approximating function (Arkhangelskaya, 2009, 2014). The suggested approximation has an advantage of clear

  12. Organic Matter Transformation in the Peat Column at Marcell Experimental Forest: Humification and Vertical Stratification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tfaily, Malak [Florida State University, Tallahassee; Cooper, Bill [Florida State University, Tallahassee; Kostka, [Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta; Chanton, Patrick R [ORNL; Schadt, Christopher Warren [ORNL; Hanson, Paul J [ORNL; Iversen, Colleen M [ORNL; Chanton, Jeff P [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    A large-scale ecosystem manipulation (Spruce and Peatland Responses under Climatic and Environmental Change, SPRUCE) is being constructed in the Marcell Experimental Forest, Minnesota, USA, to determine the effects of climatic forcing on ecosystem processes in northern peatlands. Prior to the initiation of the manipulation, we characterized the solid-phase peat to a depth of 2 meters using a variety of techniques, including peat C:N ratios, 13C and 15N isotopic composition, Fourier Transform Infrared (FT IR), and 13C Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectroscopy (13C NMR). FT IR determined peat humification-levels increased rapidly between and 75 cm, indicating a highly reactive zone. We observed a rapid drop in the abundance of O-alkyl-C, carboxyl-C, and other oxygenated functionalities within this zone and a concomitant increase in the abundance of alkyl- and nitrogen-containing compounds. Below 75-cm, minimal change was observed except that aromatic functionalities accumulated with depth. Incubation studies revealed the highest methane production rates and greatest CH4:CO2 ratios within this and 75 cm zone. Hydrology and surface vegetation played a role in belowground carbon cycling. Radiocarbon signatures of microbial respiration products in deeper porewaters resembled the signatures of dissolved organic carbon rather than solid phase peat, indicating that more recently photosynthesized organic matter fueled the bulk of subsurface microbial respiration. Oxygen-containing functionalities, especially O-alkyl-C, appear to serve as an excellent proxy for soil decomposition rate, and in addition should be a sensitive indicator of the response of the solid phase peat to the climatic manipulation.

  13. System Reliability Assessment of Existing Jacket Platforms in Malaysian Waters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.J. Kurian

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Reliability of offshore platforms has become a very important issue in the Malaysian Oil and Gas Industry as, majority of the jacket platforms in Malaysian waters to date, have exceeded their design life. Reliability of a jacket platform can be assessed through reliability index and probability of failure. Conventional metocean consideration uses 100 year return period wave height associated with 100 year return period current velocity and wind speed. However, recent study shows that for Malaysian waters, the proposed metocean consideration should be 100 year return period wave height associated with 10 year return period current velocity and wind speed. Hence, this research investigated the effect of different metocean consideration, to system-based reliability of jacket platforms in Malaysian waters. Prior to that, the effect of different metocean consideration to the pushover analysis has also been studied. Besides, the significance of Pile Soil Interaction (PSI, wave direction and platform geometry were analyzed in a sensitivity study. Pushover analysis was performed on three jacket platforms representing three water regions in Malaysia to obtain Reserve Strength Ratio (RSR as an indicator of the reliability of the jackets. Utilizing sensitivity study parameters mentioned above, seven different case studies were undertaken to study their significance on RSR. The RSR values of each case study were compared and incorporated as resistance model of reliability analysis. Besides, platform specific response model of each jacket has been generated using response surface technique which was later incorporated into the limit state function for reliability analysis. Reliability analysis using First Order Reliability Method (FORM has been conducted in MATLAB to obtain the reliability index and probability of failure. Results from the reliability analysis were compared to analyze the effect of different metocean consideration. In this study, an updated

  14. Physical and chemical properties of two Iranian peat types

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.A. Rahgozar

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Because peat has high organic content and high natural water content, it is potentially problematic for civil engineering projects involving construction on peatland. Therefore, it is important to understand the physical, chemical and geotechnical properties of the peat. The aim of the study reported here was to investigate the properties of two Iranian peat types. Peat and water samples were collected from sites within two extensive wetland areas (Chaghakhor Wetland and Gavkhuni Swamp where construction works are planned. Both sites had peat layers more than three metres thick, which were sampled at depths of 0.6, 1.2, 1.8, 2.4 and 3.0 metres below ground level with four replicates per site. Degree of humification was determined in the field. Laboratory tests were conducted to determine the pH of water and peat; and the natural (field moisture content, organic content, ash content, bulk density, dry density, density of solids, liquid limit, initial void ratio, linear shrinkage, unconfined compressive strength, shear strength and falling-head permeability of each peat sample. We also investigated the elemental compositions and microstructure of the peats using X-Ray fluorescence and scanning electron microscopy. The laboratory tests of physical and geotechnical properties indicated that, for construction purposes, Chaghakhor peat is weaker than Gavkhuni peat.

  15. Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emily Moghaddas; Ken Hubbert

    2014-01-01

    When managing for resilient forests, each soil’s inherent capacity to resist and recover from changes in soil function should be evaluated relative to the anticipated extent and duration of soil disturbance. Application of several key principles will help ensure healthy, resilient soils: (1) minimize physical disturbance using guidelines tailored to specific soil types...

  16. The geology of selected peat-forming environments in temperate and tropical latitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, C.C.; Palmer, C.A.; Esterle, J.S.

    1990-01-01

    We studied peat in several geologic and climatic settings: (1) a glaciated terrain in cold-temperate Maine and Minnesota, U.S.A.; (2) an island in a temperate maritime climate in the Atlantic Ocean off the coast of Maine, U.S.A., where sea level is rising rapidly and changing the environment of peat accumulation; (3) swamps along the warm-temperate U.S. Atlantic and Gulf Coastal Plains, where sea level has changed often, thus creating sites for accumulation; and (4) in a tropical climate along the coast of Sarawak, Malaysia, and the delta of the Batang Hari River, Sumatra, Indonesia (Figs. 1 and 2). With the exception of the deposits on the Atlantic and Gulf Coastal Plains, most of the deposits described are domed bogs in which peat accumulation continued above the surface of the surrounding soil. The bogs of the U.S. Atlantic and Gulf Coastal Plains have almost level surfaces. All domed bogs are not entirely ombrotrophic (watered only from precipitation); multidomed bogs that rise from irregular or hilly surfaces may be crossed by streams that supply water to the bogs. The geologic processes or organic sedimentation, namely terrestrialization and paludification, are similar in all peat deposits considered here. Differences in geomorphology affecting the quantity and that quality of peat that has ash contents of less than 25%, which are desirable for commercial purposes, depend chiefly on: (1) high humidity, which is favorable to luxuriant growth of peat-forming vegetation; (2) a depositional setting that permits extensive accumulation relatively free from inorganic contamination from sea water and streams and from dust and volcanic ash; and (3) a stable regional water table that controls the rate of decomposition under aerobic conditions and protects the deposit against the ravages of fire. Differences in peat textures are due to the type of vegetation and to the degree of decomposition. The rate of decomposition is largely the result of the amount of oxidation

  17. Morphology and properties of the soils of permafrost peatlands in the southeast of the Bol'shezemel'skaya tundra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaverin, D. A.; Pastukhov, A. V.; Lapteva, E. M.; Biasi, C.; Marushchak, M.; Martikainen, P.

    2016-05-01

    The morphology and properties of the soils of permafrost peatlands in the southeast of the Bol'shezemel'skaya tundra are characterized. The soils developing in the areas of barren peat circles differ from oligotrophic permafrost-affected peat soils (Cryic Histosols) of vegetated peat mounds in a number of morphological and physicochemical parameters. The soils of barren circles are characterized by the wellstructured surface horizons, relatively low exchangeable acidity, and higher rates of decomposition and humification of organic matter. It is shown that the development of barren peat circles on tops of peat mounds is favored by the activation of erosional and cryogenic processes in the topsoil. The role of winter wind erosion in the destruction of the upper peat and litter horizons is demonstrated. A comparative analysis of the temperature regime of soils of vegetated peat mounds and barren peat circles is presented. The soil-geocryological complex of peat mounds is a system consisting of three major layers: seasonally thawing layer-upper permafrost-underlying permafrost. The upper permafrost horizons of peat mounds at the depth of 50-90 cm are morphologically similar to the underlying permafrost. However, these layers differ in their physicochemical properties, especially in the composition and properties of their organic matter.

  18. Cone Penetration Testing, a new approach to quantify coastal-deltaic land subsidence by peat consolidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koster, Kay; Erkens, Gilles; Zwanenburg, Cor

    2016-04-01

    It is undisputed that land subsidence threatens coastal-deltaic lowlands all over the world. Any loss of elevation (on top of sea level rise) increases flood risk in these lowlands, and differential subsidence may cause damage to infrastructure and constructions. Many of these settings embed substantial amounts of peat, which is, due to its mechanically weak organic composition, one of the main drivers of subsidence. Peat is very susceptible to volume reduction by loading and drainage induced consolidation, which dissipates pore water, resulting in a tighter packing of the organic components. Often, the current state of consolidation of peat embedded within coastal-deltaic subsidence hotspots (e.g. Venice lagoon, Mississippi delta, San Joaquin delta, Kalimantan peatlands), is somewhere between its initial (natural) and maximum compressed stage. Quantifying the current state regarding peat volume loss, is of utmost importance to predict potential (near) future subsidence when draining or loading an area. The processes of subsidence often afflict large areas (>103 km2), thus demanding large datasets to assess the current state of the subsurface. In contrast to data describing the vertical motions of the actual surface (geodesy, satellite imagery), subsurface information applicable for subsidence analysis are often lacking in subsiding deltas. This calls for new initiatives to bridge that gap. Here we introduce Cone Penetration Testing (CPT) to quantify the amount of volume loss peat layers embedded within the Holland coastal plain (the Netherlands) experienced. CPT measures soil mechanical strength, and hundreds of thousands of CPTs are conducted each year on all continents. We analyzed 28 coupled CPT-borehole observations, and found strong empirical relations between volume loss and increased peat mechanical strength. The peat lost between ~20 - 95% of its initial thickness by dissipation of excess pore water. An increase in 0.1 - 0.4 MPa of peat strength is

  19. The role of peat in Finnish greenhouse gas balances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tolonen, J. [Ministry of Trade and Industry, Helsinki (Finland). Energy Dept

    2000-08-01

    An international team of three scientists have written a report on the role of peat in Finnish climate and energy policies. They define peat as a 'slowly renewable fuel' and presented several conclusions and topics of further research. Afterwards this report will be circulated and commented to help the Government to take a stand on the role and place of peat in Finland. (author)

  20. Only low methane production and emission in degraded peat extraction sites after rewetting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agethen, Svenja; Waldemer, Carolin; Knorr, Klaus-Holger

    2015-04-01

    In Central Europe rewetting of bogs after peat extraction is a wide spread technique to halt secondary aerobic decomposition and to reestablish plant species such as Sphagnum spp. and Eriophorum spp. that initialize accumulation of organic carbon in peat. Before extraction, such sites are often used for agriculture causing the aerobic degradation of peat and mobilization of phosphorus, ammonia, and dissolved organic matter (DOM). In nutrient poor ecosystems such as bogs, additional supply of P and N does not only trigger the establishment of uncharacteristic vegetation but also the formation of more labile plant litter and DOM that is readily degradable. Therefore, after rewetting and the development of anoxic conditions especially in initial stages high methane (CH4) emissions are reported for these systems compared to pristine bogs. Regarding the potential of methane production and emissions we investigated three common practices to prepare extraction fields for restoration (years since rewetting): i) Filling of drainage ditches, passive rewetting (1 site, Altendorfer Moor, Stade, NW-Germany, ca. 20 yr.), ii) Removal of upper 30 cm peat layer, removed peat used for construction of polder dikes (2 sites, Königsmoor, Leer, NW-Germany, 2 and 3 yr.), iii) Removal upper peat layer down to 50 cm grown peat, not extracted peat used as polder walls (2 sites, Benthullener Moor, Wardenburg, NW-Germany, 3 and 7 yr.). In each site two vegetated replicate mesocosms (diam. 30 cm, depth 40 cm) were sampled and placed in a greenhouse from May-October 2014 to maintain the water table at surface level. Pore water concentrations of ions, fermentation products and DOM, DOM electron acceptor capacity (EAC), soil gas concentrations of CO2, CH4 and H2, gas fluxes as well as element composition and organic matter quality of DOM and SOM were analyzed. We found out that practice i) with least efforts of nutrient removal in the peat produced the highest CH4 emissions (3.5 mmol m-2 d-1

  1. Effects of a raised water table on greenhouse gas emissions and celery yield from agricultural peat under climate warming conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matysek, Magdalena; Zona, Donatella; Leake, Jonathan; Banwart, Steven

    2017-04-01

    Peatlands are globally important areas for carbon preservation: covering only 3% of world's land, they store 30% of total soil carbon. At the same time, peat soils are widely utilised in agriculture: in Europe 14% of peatland area is under cultivation, 40% of UK peatlands have been drained for agricultural use and 24% of deep peat area in England is being farmed. One of the most important regions for crop production on lowland peats in the UK are the East Anglian Fenlands (the Fens): an area of drained peatlands in East England. 88% of the Fenland area is cultivated, sustaining around 4000 farms and supplying 37% of total vegetable production in England. The soils of the area are fertile (89% of agricultural land being classified as grade 1 or 2) and so crops with high nutritional demands tend to dominate. It is estimated that Fenland peats store 41 Tg of Carbon, which is lost from the ecosystem at a rate of 0.4 Tg C/yr. The Fens are at risk due to continued drainage-induced volume loss of the peat layer via shrinkage, compaction and oxidation, which are estimated to result in wastage rate of 2.1 cm/yr. Cultivation of peat soil requires drainage as most crops are intolerant of root-zone anoxia: this leads to creation of oxic conditions in which organic matter becomes vulnerable to mineralisation by aerobic microorganisms. It is, therefore, crucial to find a water table level which would minimise peat loss and at the same time allow for economically viable crop growth. Despite the importance of preservation of agricultural peats, there is a lack of studies which attempt to find water table level that strikes a balance between crop yield and greenhouse gas production. The future of the Fens is overshadowed by another uncertainty: increases in temperature brought by the climate change. It is estimated that average global temperature increase expected by the end of this century (relative to 1986-2005) would be within the range of 0.3-4.8°C, depending on the scenario

  2. Mapping peat morphology in sag pond with ground penetrating radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iryanti, Mimin; Nugraha, Harya Dwi; Setiawan, Tedy; Bijaksana, Satria

    2013-09-01

    In the tropics peat is commonly found in low-land areas. In certain condition, however, peat could also be found in high elevation, such as in sag ponds near fault zones. Information regarding thickness and morphology of peat in Sag Pond can be used to infer fault activities in the past. In this study, we attempt to identify the thickness and morphology of peat in a sag pond at Karyawangi Village near the Lembang fault, to the north of Bandung, West Java, Indonesia. We use ground penetrating radar (GPR) method with 250 Mhz antennae in several lines. The data were them processes using Reflexw software. The results show that in each survey line, peat layer is clearly identifiable. In some lines, the peat layer is continous while in some other, the peat layer is undulated. The peat layer in general in about 0.5 to 2 m thick. In conclusion, the GPR method with 250 Mhz antennae is suitable for mapping peat thickness and morphology in Sag Pond.

  3. Premaceral contents of peats correlated with proximate and ultimate analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cohen, A.D.; Andrejko, M.J.

    1983-01-01

    Preliminary correlations of petrographic characteristics of peats (i.e., peat types, premaceral proportions, and premaceral types) with proximate analysis, ultimate analysis, and Btu content are reported. These correlations suggest the following trends: (1) peats with the highest proportions of birefringent macerals tend to have highest volatile matter (and H and O contents); (2) fluorescence of macerals seems to correlate only slightly with proximate and ultimate analyses; (3) higher previtrinite contents tend to correlate with higher volatile matter contents; (4) peats with higher preinertinities, prephlobaphenites (and precorpocollinites), and presclerotinites have the highest fixed carbon; and (5) Btu correlates strongly with ash content and only slightly with maceral content. (BLM)

  4. Diffusion of gases dissolved in peat pore water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.S. Clymo

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Diffusion is usually thought to be ineffective at transporting solutes over distances of several metres – the depth of many peat deposits. But this is to neglect the importance of time. We derive equations that show that in peat that has accumulated over millennia then diffusion alone can remove to the air about 95 % of the gases carbon dioxide and methane generated by microbial decay within the main peat mass. Gas concentration profiles in simulations of peat grown slice-by-slice over 10,000 years have a smooth convex profile with concentration increasing downwards, as they do in Nature.

  5. ESTIMATION OF AGING EFFECTS OF PILES IN MALAYSIAN OFFSHORE LOCATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JERIN M. GEORGE

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available An increasing demand for extending life and subsequently higher loading requirements of offshore jacket platforms are among the key problems faced by the offshore industry. The Aging effect has been proved to increase the axial capacity of piles, but proper methods to estimate and quantify these effects have not been developed. Borehole data from ten different Malaysian offshore locations have been analysed and they were employed to estimate the setup factor for different locations using AAU method. The setup factors found were used in the Skov and Denver equation to calculate capacity ratios of the offshore piles. The study showed that there will be an average improvement in the axial capacity of offshore piles by 42.2% and 34.9% for clayey and mixed soils respectively after a time equal to the normal design life (25 years of a jacket platform.

  6. Impacts of Land Cover Change on the Carbon Dynamics in Indonesian Tropical Forested Wetlands- Mangroves and Peat Swamp Forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauffman, J. B.; Arifanti, V. B.; Basuki, I.; Kurnianto, S.; Novita, N.; Murdiyarso, D.

    2014-12-01

    Tropical wetland forests including mangroves and lowland peat swamp forests contain among the highest carbon stocks of any ecosystem on the planet. This is largely due to the accumulation of deep organic rich soils which have been sequestering carbon for millennia. Depth of organic layers (peats) can exceed 3 m in mangrove and 10 m in the peat swamp forests. The ecosystem carbon stocks may exceed 2000 Mg/ha in mangroves and 5000 Mg/ha in peat swamp forests. Ironically, rates of deforestation of these tropical forests are among the highest in the tropics. With land cover change comes dramatic shifts in carbon stocks, net ecosystem productivity, and greenhouse gas emissions. Land cover change results in carbon losses of practically all aboveground pools as well as losses arising from soil pools. Based upon studies where we have compared stock changes due to land use the carbon emissions arising from land cover change to shrimp ponds and oil palm have ranged from 800-3000 Mg CO2e/ha. The lowered carbon sequestration rates coupled with increased or similar emissions from decomposition results in an ecosystem shift from a carbon sink to a carbon source. Clearly the large carbon stocks, high rates of deforestation, and large emissions resulting from their degradation suggest that these ecosystems should receive great consideration in climate change mitigation and adaptation strategies.

  7. Comparison of different methods to determine the degree of peat decomposition in peat bogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biester, H.; Knorr, K.-H.; Schellekens, J.; Basler, A.; Hermanns, Y.-M.

    2014-05-01

    Peat humification or decomposition is a frequently used proxy to extract past time changes in hydrology and climate from peat bogs. During the past century several methods to determine changes in peat decomposition have been introduced. Most of these methods are operationally defined only and the chemical changes underlying the decomposition process are often poorly understood and lack validation. Owing to the chemically undefined nature of many humification analyses the comparison of results obtained by different methods is difficult. In this study we compared changes in peat decomposition proxies in cores of two peat bogs (Königsmoor, KK; Kleines Rotes Bruch, KRB) from the Harz Mountains (Germany) using C / N ratios, Fourier transform infrared spectra absorption (FTIR) intensities, Rock Eva® oxygen and hydrogen indices, δ13C and δ15N isotopic signatures and UV-absorption (UV-ABS) of NaOH peat extracts. In order to explain parallels and discrepancies between these methods, one of the cores was additionally analysed by pyrolysis gas chromatography mass spectrometry (pyrolysis-GC-MS). Pyrolysis-GC-MS data provide detailed information on a molecular level, which allows differentiation of both changes attributed to decomposition processes and changes in vegetation. Principal component analysis was used to identify and separate the effects of changes in vegetation pattern and decomposition processes because both may occur simultaneously upon changes in bog hydrology. Records of decomposition proxies show similar historical development at both sites, indicating external forcing such as climate as controlling the process. All decomposition proxies except UV-ABS and δ15N isotopes show similar patterns in their records and reflect to different extents signals of decomposition. The molecular composition of the KK core reveals that these changes are mainly attributed to decomposition processes and to a lesser extent to changes in vegetation. Changes in the molecular

  8. Managing Political Information: A Malaysian Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamilah Ahmad

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available In the development of democratization and the expression of civil and political rights of Malaysian citizens, the pattern of control developed by the regime that is currently in power (Barisan Nasional for the last 50 years in the mass media began to reap the resistance and tend to be ineffective. Malaysian citizens began to demand the Malaysian government to change the pattern of political information management. In addition, the mass media alone is expected to play a more significant role as an intermediary agent in supporting the process of transparency and accountability of government policy. This article shows that the openness of public information is a prerequisite for political democracy in Malaysia to help the government minimize the mis-management of governance policies, especially in finance and resource management.

  9. Repositioning Strategy for Malaysian Companies Internationalization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ismi Rajiani

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The rise of the emerging-market countries offers both developing and developed countries a unique opportunity to gain the benefits of a truly international economy. Consequently, it is imper- ative to advance our knowledge of emerging-market countries MNC emergence and competitive- ness including Malaysian firms on how will they position their products strategically. Based on the framework of Porter’s Generic Strategy, this paper is composed of price/ volume segments and im- pacts on product strategy theory. The aim is to identify crucial triggering cues and focus areas for Malaysian companies and measure what role these play in different segments. This study argues that some Malaysian companies will reposition themselves strategically when internationalizing and that they will focus on other factors or triggering cues when doing so not merely adapting the prevalent price leadership strategy.

  10. Halogens in pore water of peat bogs – the role of peat decomposition and dissolved organic matter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Biester

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Halogens are strongly enriched in peat and peatlands and such they are one of their largest active terrestrial reservoir. The enrichment of halogens in peat is mainly attributed to the formation of organohalogens and climatically controlled humification processes. However, little is known about release of halogens from the peat substrate and the distribution of halogens in the peat pore water. In this study we have investigated the distribution of chlorine, bromine and iodine in pore water of three pristine peat bogs located in the Magellanic Moorlands, southern Chile. Peat pore waters were collected using a sipping technique, which allows in situ sampling down to a depth greater than 6m. Halogens and halogen species in pore water were determined by ion-chromatography (IC (chlorine and IC-ICP-MS (bromine and iodine. Results show that halogen concentrations in pore water are 15–30 times higher than in rainwater. Mean concentrations of chlorine, bromine and iodine in pore water were 7–15 mg l−1, 56–123 μg l−1, and 10–20 μg l−1, which correspond to mean proportions of 10–15%, 1–2.3% and 0.5–2.2% of total concentrations in peat, respectively. Organobromine and organoiodine were the predominant species in pore waters, whereas chlorine in pore water was mostly chloride. Advection and diffusion of halogens were found to be generally low and halogen concentrations appear to reflect release from the peat substrate. Release of bromine and iodine from peat depend on the degree of peat degradation, whereas this relationship is weak for chlorine. Relatively higher release of bromine and iodine was observed in less degraded peat sections, where the release of dissolved organic carbon (DOC was also the most intensive. It has been concluded that the release of halogenated dissolved organic matter (DOM is the predominant mechanism of iodine and bromine release from peat.

  11. Malaysian Affordability Housing Policies Revisited

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samad Diwa

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Housing has always been a significant aspiration of family expression and distinctly priciest investment by household. It plays a momentous role in the country’s economy and so central to the societal well-being that is emplaced in the United Nation Universal declaration of Human rights. Yet in developed and developing world alike, cities struggle to provide decent housing for lower and middle income population. The provision of affordable housing is a major policy concern around the world with Malaysia being no exception; rising income hardly keep pace with price hike of housing unit and housing interventions has majorly concentrated on demand side leading to a non-responsive supply sector. Therefore, this paper highlights affordable housing issues pertaining Malaysia. It formulates Malaysian Map of affordability and conducts an evaluation of global housing schemes to better identify policy priorities for Malaysia. It’s significant to harmonize supply and demand side factors in the housing market to ensure that housing supply fits the needs of citizens based on the location, price and target group. In case of Malaysia supply oriented initiative are of urgency in short and medium run. This must be supported by long term demand side schemes in parallel. Convergence of these two factors is essential for a balanced equilibrium and obtaining affordability.

  12. Prediction of Malaysian monthly GDP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hin, Pooi Ah; Ching, Soo Huei; Yeing, Pan Wei

    2015-12-01

    The paper attempts to use a method based on multivariate power-normal distribution to predict the Malaysian Gross Domestic Product next month. Letting r(t) be the vector consisting of the month-t values on m selected macroeconomic variables, and GDP, we model the month-(t+1) GDP to be dependent on the present and l-1 past values r(t), r(t-1),…,r(t-l+1) via a conditional distribution which is derived from a [(m+1)l+1]-dimensional power-normal distribution. The 100(α/2)% and 100(1-α/2)% points of the conditional distribution may be used to form an out-of sample prediction interval. This interval together with the mean of the conditional distribution may be used to predict the month-(t+1) GDP. The mean absolute percentage error (MAPE), estimated coverage probability and average length of the prediction interval are used as the criterions for selecting the suitable lag value l-1 and the subset from a pool of 17 macroeconomic variables. It is found that the relatively better models would be those of which 2 ≤ l ≤ 3, and involving one or two of the macroeconomic variables given by Market Indicative Yield, Oil Prices, Exchange Rate and Import Trade.

  13. Sustainability in the Malaysian palm oil industry

    OpenAIRE

    Choong, CG; McKay, A

    2014-01-01

    With a rapidly growing world population, the demand for palm oil is increasing. In 2010, palm oil accounted for 36.5% of the world's vegetable oil production and it is projected to be the leading vegetable oil in the world by 2016. As the Malaysian palm oil industry is committed to delivering sustainable palm oil products to meet customer demand, this research was to enable identification and prioritisation of areas for improvement. As an example, the Roadmap of Malaysian Palm Oil Industry 20...

  14. Volatile and semivolatile organic compounds in laboratory peat fire emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speciated volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and organic fine particulate matter (PM2.5) mass emission factors were determined from laboratory peat fire experiments. Peat samples originated from two wildlife reserves located near the coast of North Carolina, U.S. Gas and particula...

  15. Biochar as growing media additive and peat substitute

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Steiner

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Environmental concerns raised the demand for alternative growing media substituting sphagnum peat. However growing media formulations still depend on peat and alternatives are limited. Biochar is carbonized plant material and could be an appropriate additive or even substitute for sphagnum peat. Freshly produced, it is free from pathogens, has a low nutrient content (if produced from nutrient poor feedstock, a very high structural stability and likely other favourable properties such as air capacity and water holding capacity. Preliminary tests were conducted to compare biochar with other growing media and growing media additives. The growth of a miniature sunflower, pH and electrical conductivity (EC was measured in different growing media such as biochar, perlite, clay granules, sphagnum peat and peat mixed with biochar in the ratios 1 : 4, 1 : 1 and 4 : 1 (25, 50 and 75%, by volume. Fresh biochar has a similar EC than peat which is even lower after rinsing with water. Due to the relatively high pH of biochar, it could be added to peat instead of lime in a concentration of up to 75%. The growth of the sunflower was similar in all growing media. Only the plant weight was slightly higher of plants that grew in perlite or peat. There is a large potential for optimization such as selection of particle size and feedstock for biochar production and growing media formulations for specific plant requirements.

  16. Np-237 in peat and lichen in Finland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salminen, S.; Paatero, J.; Roos, Per;

    2009-01-01

    Activity concentrations of 237Np in peat and lichen samples in Finland were determined and contributions from nuclear weapons testing in 1950–1960s and the Chernobyl accident were estimated. 237Np was determined with ICP-MS using 235Np as a tracer. Activity concentrations of 237Np in peat samples...

  17. Peat: A natural source for dermatocosmetics and dermatotherapeutics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wollina Uwe

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years the interest for natural substances in dermatotherapy and cosmetics has increased. Peat is a complex natural source of humic substances that are of potential interest in both dermatology and cosmetology. Humic substances in peat have been partially characterized and pharmacologic and biologic activities have been documented. Possible clinical applications are outlined.

  18. The cascade of C:N:P stoichiometry in an ombrotrophic peatland: from plants to peat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Meng; Moore, Tim R.; Talbot, Julie; Richard, Pierre J. H.

    2014-01-01

    Northern peatlands are important carbon (C) sinks and while the patterns of C accumulation have been frequently investigated, nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) accumulation are often neglected. Here we link the C:N:P stoichiometry from foliar plant tissues, through senescent litters to peat, and determine C, N and P accumulation rates at Mer Bleue Bog, eastern Canada. Average C:N:P ratios changed from 794:17:1 in the foliar tissues to 911:10:1 in litter and 1285:32:1 in acrotelm peat. The increase in C:N and C:P ratios from mature to senescent tissues is related to nutrient resorption. The increase in C:P and N:P ratios in peat, which was contrary to that observed in Canadian forest soils, may be related to plant/mycorrhizae uptake of P. The long-term apparent rates of C, N and P accumulation were 29.5 ± 2.1 (SE) g C, 0.87 ± 0.01 g N and 0.017 ± 0.002 g P m-2 yr-1, respectively. The significant correlation between the accumulation rates of N and P and that of C suggests more attention be placed on C:N:P stoichiometry in peatland biogeochemistry, in particular in understanding why C:P ratios are so large in the lower parts of the profile.

  19. Effect of granulated wood ash fertilization on N2O emissions in boreal peat forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liimatainen, Maarit; Martikainen, Pertti J.; Hytönen, Jyrki; Maljanen, Marja

    2016-04-01

    Peatlands cover one third of the land surface area in Finland and over half of that are drained for forestry. Natural peatlands are either small sources of nitrous oxide (N2O) or they can also act as a sinks of N2O. When peatlands are drained, oxygen concentration in the peat increases, organic matter decomposition accelerates and N2O emissions may increase significantly, especially in nutrient rich peat soils. Hence drainage and land-use changes can have a big impact on N2O fluxes in peatlands. The annual consumption of wood chips is to be increased to 13.5 M m3 from the present 8.7 M m3 in Finland. This will also increase the amount of wood ash in the power plants. Wood ash contains considerable amounts of mineral nutrients but lacks nitrogen. Therefore, it has been used as a fertilizer in nitrogen rich peatland forests lacking other nutrients. Recycling of ash would also return the nutrients lost during biomass harvesting back to the forests. We studied the effects of granulated wood ash as a fertilizer in peat soils drained for forestry. Ash is nowadays granulated mainly to facilitate its handling and spreading. Granulation also stabilizes the ash decreasing the solubility of most of the nutrients and minimizing harmful effects of ash spread over the vegetation. Granulated wood ash increases soil pH less than loose ash. Drainage of peatland forests increases microbial activity in the soil which is furthermore intensified with the addition of ash promoting organic matter decomposition and possibly affecting N2O emissions. We studied the effect of granulated wood ash on N2O fluxes in three different peat forests in Finland in both field and laboratory experiments. In the field, N2O emissions were not affected by granulated wood ash fertilization but the soil respiration rate increased. However, in the laboratory studies we observed a clear decrease in N2O production due to wood ash addition, although changes in pH values were only minor. We studied what could

  20. Malaysian water sector reform : policy and performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kim, C.T.

    2012-01-01

    One of the measures that can help developing countries in meeting Target 10 of the Millennium  Development Goals – halving the number of people without access to water and adequate sanitation  by 2015 – is through a water sector reform. In this research the Malaysian water sect

  1. Assessing conservation status of Peninsular Malaysian Begonias

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chua, L.S.L.; Kiew, R.; Chan, Y.M.

    2009-01-01

    Following the revision of Peninsular Malaysian Begonia, a project that involved extensive fieldwork, we now have sufficient data to assess their conservation status. Out of 54 taxa, 48 are endemic to Peninsular Malaysia. No fewer than 30 taxa are known from fewer than five localities; 24 taxa are Cr

  2. Ethical Issues in the Malaysian Education System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenayathulla, Husaina Banu

    2015-01-01

    Malaysia is a multi-ethnic country in which the government gives preferential treatment in education, employment, and ownership to its majority ethnic group: Bumiputera. However, affirmative action policies in the current Malaysian context should work according to John Rawls' Theory of Justice by being based on income rather than ethnicity.…

  3. Drivers for Cleaner Production in Malaysian Industry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wangel, Arne

    2003-01-01

    This working paper tries to piece together information on regulatory initiatives promoting cleaner production (CP) in Malaysian industry, as well as points of discussion on environmental performance in the sector. It draws upon initial data collection by the team of the research project ‘A Study ...

  4. Malaysian water sector reform : policy and performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kim, C.T.

    2012-01-01

    One of the measures that can help developing countries in meeting Target 10 of the Millennium  Development Goals – halving the number of people without access to water and adequate sanitation  by 2015 – is through a water sector reform. In this research the Malaysian water

  5. Transporting GOLDEN RICE to Malaysian Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naidu, Shashi

    2007-01-01

    This article evaluates the effectiveness of using a simulation in an English for Academic Purposes (EAP) class at a university in the United States and discusses the integration of simulations into the Malaysian curriculum. A new approach is needed in Malaysia wherein language learners are given maximum exposure to the language. The article…

  6. Ethical Issues in the Malaysian Education System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenayathulla, Husaina Banu

    2015-01-01

    Malaysia is a multi-ethnic country in which the government gives preferential treatment in education, employment, and ownership to its majority ethnic group: Bumiputera. However, affirmative action policies in the current Malaysian context should work according to John Rawls' Theory of Justice by being based on income rather than ethnicity.…

  7. Malaysian water sector reform : policy and performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kim, C.T.

    2012-01-01

    One of the measures that can help developing countries in meeting Target 10 of the Millennium  Development Goals – halving the number of people without access to water and adequate sanitation  by 2015 – is through a water sector reform. In this research the Malaysian water sect

  8. Entrepreneurship Education Programs in Malaysian Polytechnics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Othman, Norasmah; Nasrudin, Norfadhilah

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to evaluate students' views on the on-the-campus entrepreneurship programs in Malaysian polytechnics. Participation in the entrepreneurship programs is able to stimulate an interest in entrepreneurship, and improve the knowledge, skills, and entrepreneurial experience of its students.…

  9. Eclectic Model in the Malaysian Education System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Othman, Nooraini; Mohamad, Khairul Azmi; Ilmuwan, Yayasan

    2011-01-01

    The present work aims at analysing the adoption of eclectic model in the Malaysian education system. The analysis is specifically looked from the angle of Islam and the Muslims. Malaysia has a long history of education system developments, from pre to post independence of the country. From what was initially traditional, modernity later came to…

  10. Phrasal Verbs in Malaysian ESL Textbooks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarifi, Abdolvahed; Mukundan, Jayakaran

    2012-01-01

    It is often claimed that ELT textbook materials are mostly unwittingly intuitively- rather than empirically-based and that this bookish form of language is far from reflecting the real language use. The present study, by adopting a corpus-based approach, tends to shed light on the extent of agreement between the Malaysian ESL textbooks and the…

  11. Malaysian Children's Attitudes towards Learning Music

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghazali, Ghaziah Mohd.; McPherson, Gary E.

    2009-01-01

    A sample of 1060 Malaysian children were surveyed in order to examine differences in their motivation to study music in school and to learn a musical instrument outside of school. Adopting the expectancy-value motivation theory, the children were asked questions concerning their perception of music as being important, useful, interesting,…

  12. Peatlands and potatoes; organic wetland soils in Uganda

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farmer, Jenny; Langan, Charlie; Gimona, Alessandro; Poggio, Laura; Smith, Jo

    2017-04-01

    Land use change in Uganda's wetlands has received very little research attention. Peat soils dominate the papyrus wetlands of the south west of the country, but the areas they are found in have been increasingly converted to potato cultivation. Our research in Uganda set out to (a) document both the annual use of and changes to these soils under potato cultivation, and (b) the extent and condition of these soils across wetland systems. During our research we found it was necessary to develop locally appropriate protocols for sampling and analysis of soil characteristics, based on field conditions and locally available resources. Over the period of one year we studied the use of the peat soil for potato cultivation by smallholder farmers in Ruhuma wetland and measured changes to surface peat properties and soil nutrients in fields over that time. Farmer's use of the fields changed over the year, with cultivation, harvesting and fallow periods, which impacted on soil micro-topography. Measured soil properties changed over the course of the year as a result of the land use, with bulk density, nitrogen content, potassium and magnesium all reducing. Comparison of changes in soil carbon stocks over the study period were difficult to make as it was not possible to reach the bottom of the peat layer. However, a layer of fallow weeds discarded onto the soil prior to preparation of the raised potato beds provided a time marker which gave insight into carbon losses over the year. To determine the peatland extent, a spatial survey was conducted in the Kanyabaha-Rushebeya wetland system, capturing peat depths and key soil properties (bulk density, organic matter and carbon contents). Generalised additive models were used to map peat depth and soil characteristics across the system, and maps were developed for these as well as drainage and land use classes. Comparison of peat cores between the two study areas indicates spatial variability in peat depths and the influence of

  13. PEAT ACCRETION HISTORIES DURING THE PAST 6000 YEARS IN MARSHES OF THE SACRAMENTO - SAN JOAQUIN DELTA, CALIFORNIA, USA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drexler, J Z; de Fontaine, C S; Brown, T A

    2009-07-20

    Peat cores were collected in 4 remnant marsh islands and 4 drained, farmed islands throughout the Sacramento - San Joaquin Delta of California in order to characterize the peat accretion history of this region. Radiocarbon age determination of marsh macrofossils at both marsh and farmed islands showed that marshes in the central and western Delta started forming between 6030 and 6790 cal yr BP. Age-depth models for three marshes were constructed using cubic smooth spline regression models. The resulting spline fit models were used to estimate peat accretion histories for the marshes. Estimated accretion rates range from 0.03 to 0.49 cm yr{sup -1} for the marsh sites. The highest accretion rates are at Browns Island, a marsh at the confluence of the Sacramento and San Joaquin rivers. Porosity was examined in the peat core from Franks Wetland, one of the remnant marsh sites. Porosity was greater than 90% and changed little with depth indicating that autocompaction was not an important process in the peat column. The mean contribution of organic matter to soil volume at the marsh sites ranges from 6.15 to 9.25% with little variability. In contrast, the mean contribution of inorganic matter to soil volume ranges from 1.40 to 8.45% with much greater variability, especially in sites situated in main channels. These results suggest that marshes in the Delta can be viewed as largely autochthonous vs. allochthonous in character. Autochthonous sites are largely removed from watershed processes, such as sediment deposition and scour, and are dominated by organic production. Allochthonous sites have greater fluctuations in accretion rates due to the variability of inorganic inputs from the watershed. A comparison of estimated vertical accretion rates with 20th century rates of global sea-level rise shows that currently marshes are maintaining their positions in the tidal frame, yet this offers little assurance of sustainability under scenarios of increased sea-level rise in

  14. Craniofacial anthropometric norms of Malaysian Indians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ngeow W

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study was done to establish the craniofacial anthropometric norms of the young adult (18- 25 years Malaysian Indian. Materials and Methods: The study group consisted of convenient samples of 100 healthy volunteers, with equal number of female and male subjects who had no history of mixed racial-parentage. Twenty-two linear measurements were taken twice from 28 landmarks over six craniofacial regions. The methodology and evaluation of indices of the craniofacial region was adapted from Hajnis et al. Results: The minimum measurements are always contributed by the female Indian except for the nose height (n-sn, (left eye fissure length (ex-en, upper vermillion height (ls-sto, and lower vermillion height (sto-li. There is a gender difference in all the measurements except the (left eye fissure height (independent t-test; P < 0.05. The Malaysian Indians exhibit some North American White Caucasian (NAWC features in all regions. The cephalic index indicates a brachycephalic or relatively short wide head with a tendency towards mesocephaly. From the low nasal index, the Malaysian Indian female have a nose that is narrow or leptorrhin similar to the NAWCs. The lower value of the upper lip height to mouth width index in the Indian female indicates a relatively shorter upper lip height compared to the mouth width, also similar to the NAWC. Conclusion: This study establishes the craniofacial anthropometric norms of the Malaysian Indian over 22 parameters. Male in general has a significantly higher measurement than female. The Malaysian Indians do exhibit some NAWC features.

  15. Assessing the impact of tree plantations on Water and CO2 Cycles in the peat swamp forest, Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozan, O.

    2011-12-01

    The rapid deforestation in tropical countries contributes to the increase in the atmospheric concentration of carbon dioxide. On the other hand, the importance of bio-materials will be continuously increasing because of the demand of recyclable resources is increasing for the reduction of the consumption of fossil resources. We are trying to enhance the theoretical and empirical understanding of soil-vegetation -atmosphere exchanges of carbon dioxide (CO2), water (H2O), and energy balance components based on in situ observation and modeling in peat swamp forest, West Kalimantan. Our research targets are following three: 1. To estimate water budget using ground water level, rain gauge and water flux data. 2. To observe Carbon exchange processes (CO2 budget) during and after ecological succession from secondary forest to plantation forest. 3. To propose new method of ground water management to improve timber productivity and to reduce environmental load using observation data and hydrological modeling. CO2 flux monitoring is started cooperate with local company (Pt. WSL) since May 2010. Wetlands ecosystems act as a sink (photosynthetic uptake) and source (due to soil decomposition) of carbon. Our target area is revealed as a net carbon sink in 2010-2011 season. Soil release CO2 into atmosphere, however photosynthetic activity absorption is much more efficient. The amount of CO2 release from peat swamp depends on water level and surface soil moisture. One year observation data is not enough to discuss carbon budget in peat swamp. For example, 2010-2011 season is La Niña (rainy) year in Indonesia. CO2 flux and hydrological observation will be continued until 2015 for understanding long-term carbon budget. Keywords: CO2 Flux, eddy covariance, peat decomposition, hydrological modeling

  16. Use of CT imaging to examine the coarse roots, rhizomes, and peat associated with creek bank Spartina alterniflora in fertilized and control creeks in Plum Island (MA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    We used computer-aided tomography (CT) to quantify the wet mass, abundance, and diameter of coarse roots and rhizomes as well as the wet mass and particle density of marsh peat in 7-year fertilized and control creeks in Plum Island (MA). In shallow soils (0 – 10 cm) and at dep...

  17. Adsorção/dessorção do explosivo tetril em turfa e em argissolo vermelho amarelo Adsorption/desorption of the explosive tetryl in peat and yellow-red argissol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Zago Falone

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the study of adsorption/desorption of the explosive tetryl (2,4,6-trinitrophenylmethyl-nitramine in different matrices, such as in natura soil, roasted soil, humic acid of soil, in natura peat, roasted peat and humic acid of peat. The aim of the study is to evaluate the interaction capacity of those matrices with the explosive. The analytic technique used was HPLC (high performance liquid chromatography, with UV-detection at 230 nm. The Freundlich isotherms were utilized for the mathematical treatment of the data. The results indicated that in natura soil and in natura peat (with organic substances are excellent matrices for the retention of tetryl, adsorbing it and keeping it immovable, preventing it from contaminating the groundwater. The largest adsorption of the explosive ocurred in in natura soil, while the smallest desorption was observed in in natura peat. After the calcination of the matrices, the smallest adsorption was observed, indicating that the retention occurs in the organic substance.

  18. Mid and late Holocene dust deposition in western Europe: the Misten peat bog (Hautes Fagnes – Belgium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Allan

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Dust deposition in southern Belgium is estimated from the geochemical signature of an ombrotrophic peatland. The Rare Earth Elements (REE and lithogenic elements concentrations, as well as Nd isotopes, were determined by HR-ICP-MS and MC-ICP-MS respectively, in along a ~6 m peat section covering 5300 yr, from 30 BC to 5300 BC dated by the 14C method. Changes in REE concentration in the peat correlate with those of Ti, Al, Sc and Zr that are lithogenic conservative elements, suggesting that REE are immobile in the studied peat bogs and can be used as tracers of dust deposition. Peat humification and testate amoebae were used to evaluate hydroclimatic conditions. The range of dust deposition varied from 0.03 to 4.0 g m−2 yr−1. The highest dust fluxes were observed from 800 to 600 BC and from 3200 to 2800 BC and correspond to cold periods. The εNd values show a large variability of −5 to −13, identifying three major sources of dusts: local soils, distal volcanic and desert particles.

  19. Research on the direct liquefaction of peat at the Technical Research Centre of Finland (VTT). [Peat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKeough, P.; Solantausta, Y.

    1985-01-01

    At the Laboratory of Fuel Processing and Lubrication Technology, VTT, a process for the high-pressure liquefaction of peat into motor fuels is being developed. Because the different process steps are strongly interrelated, the production chain has to be optimized as a whole. The optimization is based on the results of both experimential investigations and techno-economic studies. To this date the research has concentrated on a process concept, where dry peat (10% moisture) is fed to the reactor as a slurry with recycle oil from the process. Promising results have been obtained in both experiments and economic evaluations of the process. Research on liquefaction via flash pyrolysis has also been initiated. In addition the Laboratory has participated in an International Energy Agency (IEA) co-operative project where several biomass liquefaction processes were examined.

  20. Formation process of Malaysian modern architecture under influence of nationalism

    OpenAIRE

    宇高, 雄志; 山崎, 大智

    2001-01-01

    This paper examines the Formation Process of Malaysian Modern Architecture under Influence of Nationalism,through the process of independence of Malaysia. The national style as "Malaysian national architecture" which hasengaged on background of political environment under the post colonial situation. Malaysian urban design is alsodetermined under the balance of both of ethnic culture and the national culture. In Malaysia, they decided to choosethe Malay ethnic culture as the national culture....

  1. Growing Tomato Plantlets on Various Mixtures of Peat and Sand or Peat and Perlite. Note 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonia Patruno

    Full Text Available Given the considerable interest in use of substrates derived from various mixtures in the nursery sector and in light of the enormous variety of possibilities offered by this technique, in contrast with the still small number of researches dedicated to this theme, this study was set out to examine in-depth the growing of tomato plantlets on peat-based substrates. Two series of peat mixtures were produced, one with sand and the other with perlite, with a volume ratio of the other two components with respect to the peat of 1:0, 2.5:1, 1:1 and 1:2.5. Tomato seedlings were cultivated for 30 or 25 days in small perforated pots containing these mixtures. The irrigation was calculated by weighing each pot daily, measuring the water lost by evaporation-transpiration, then just past an established lower threshold value bringing the water back up to a defined upper threshold. Two water regimes were compared in the sand series and three in the perlite series.

  2. Atmospheric Deposition of Trace Elements in Ombrotrophic Peat as a Result of Anthropic Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabio Lourençato, Lucio; Cabral Teixeira, Daniel; Vieira Silva-Filho, Emmanoel

    2014-05-01

    Ombrotrophic peat can be defined as a soil rich in organic matter, formed from the partial decomposition of vegetable organic material in a humid and anoxic environment, where the accumulation of material is necessarily faster than the decomposition. From the physical-chemical point of view, it is a porous and highly polar material with high adsorption capacity and cation exchange. The high ability of trace elements to undergo complexation by humic substances happens due to the presence of large amounts of oxygenated functional groups in these substances. Since the beginning of industrialization human activities have scattered a large amount of trace elements in the environment. Soil contamination by atmospheric deposition can be expressed as a sum of site contamination by past/present human activities and atmospheric long-range transport of trace elements. Ombrotrophic peat records can provide valuable information about the entries of trace metals into the atmosphere and that are subsequently deposited on the soil. These trace elements are toxic, non-biodegradable and accumulate in the food chain, even in relatively low quantities. Thus studies on the increase of trace elements in the environment due to human activities are necessary, particularly in the southern hemisphere, where these data are scarce. The aims of this study is to evaluate the concentrations of mercury in ombrotrophic peat altomontanas coming from atmospheric deposition. The study is conducted in the Itatiaia National Park, Brazilian conservation unit, situated between the southeastern state of Rio de Janeiro, São Paulo and Minas Gerais. An ombrotrophic peat core is being sampled in altitude (1980m), to measure the trace elements concentrations of this material. As it is conservation area, the trace elements found in the samples is mainly from atmospheric deposition, since in Brazil don't exist significant lithology of trace elements. The samples are characterized by organic matter content which

  3. Identification and Antimicrobial Properties of Malaysian Mangrove Actinomycetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suhaidi Ariffin

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The mangrove area is one of the more unique and less studied habitats for the discovery of biologically active secondary metabolites from potential actinomycetes. For this reason, isolation, characterization and screening of antimicrobial properties of actinomycetes from mangrove soils collected at the selected mangrove areas in Malaysia were conducted. A total of 73 actinomycetes were isolated. Of these, 9.6% (direct broth culture and 8.2% (ethyl acetate extract of these isolates demonstrated antimicrobial activities active against Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus subtilis, Candida albicans as well as Saccharomyces cerevisiae by disc diffusion assay. Hexane extracts, however, exhibited no activity. A modified microdilution plate assay showed that 16.4% (ethyl acetate extract of these strains were able to generate antimicrobial compounds active against Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus subtilis, and Candida albicans. In addition, morphological observations and 16S rRNA sequence analysis indicate the presence of representative species from at least 3 genera Streptomyces, Pseudonocardia and Saccharomonospora. Thus, Malaysian mangrove soils could be an interesting source to explore for antimicrobial secondary metabolites and considered to have a diversity of marine actinomycetes.

  4. Quantifying peat carbon accumulation in Alaska using a process-based biogeochemistry model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Sirui; Zhuang, Qianlai; Yu, Zicheng; Bridgham, Scott; Keller, Jason K.

    2016-08-01

    This study uses an integrated modeling framework that couples the dynamics of hydrology, soil thermal regime, and ecosystem carbon and nitrogen to quantify the long-term peat carbon accumulation in Alaska during the Holocene. Modeled hydrology, soil thermal regime, carbon pools and fluxes, and methane emissions are evaluated using observation data at several peatland sites in Minnesota, Alaska, and Canada. The model is then applied for a 10,000 year (15 ka to 5 ka; 1 ka = 1000 cal years before present) simulation at four peatland sites. We find that model simulations match the observed carbon accumulation rates at fen sites during the Holocene (R2 = 0.88, 0.87, 0.38, and -0.05 using comparisons in 500 year bins). The simulated (2.04 m) and observed peat depths (on average 1.98 m) were also compared well (R2 = 0.91). The early Holocene carbon accumulation rates, especially during the Holocene thermal maximum (HTM) (35.9 g C m- 2 yr- 1), are estimated up to 6 times higher than the rest of the Holocene (6.5 g C m- 2 yr- 1). Our analysis suggests that high summer temperature and the lengthened growing season resulted from the elevated insolation seasonality, along with wetter-than-before conditions might be major factors causing the rapid carbon accumulation in Alaska during the HTM. Our sensitivity tests indicate that, apart from climate, initial water table depth and vegetation canopy are major drivers to the estimated peat carbon accumulation. When the modeling framework is evaluated for various peatland types in the Arctic, it can quantify peatland carbon accumulation at regional scales.

  5. Precipitation-induced runoff and leaching from milled peat mining mires by peat types: A comparative method for estimating the loading of water bodies during peat production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Svahnbaeck, L.

    2007-07-01

    Finland has some 10 million hectares of peatland, accounting for almost a third of its total area. Macroclimatic conditions have varied in the course of the Holocene growth and development of this peatland, and with them the habitats of the peat-forming plants. Temperatures and moisture conditions have played a significant role in determining the dominant species of mire plants growing there at any particular time, the resulting mire types and the accumulation and deposition of plant remains to form the peat. While in a natural state the mires of Finland have functioned as carbon dioxide sinks throughout the post-glacial period, but the ditching of peatland for forestry and agriculture, amounting to some 5,7 million hectares in Finland, has affected their water balance, especially over the last hundred years, and has thereby altered the quantity and species composition of the mire vegetation. The invasion of trees and woody plants to replace the typical mire plants following ditching for forestry purposes has stimulated the decomposition of the already accumulated peat and promoted the humification of the microbiologically active root system layer. The above climatic, environmental and mire development factors, together with ditching, have contributed, and continue to contribute, to the existence of peat horizons that differ in their physical and chemical properties, leading to differences in material transport between peatlands in a natural state and mires that have been ditched or prepared for forestry and peat production. Watercourse loading from the ditching of mires or their use for peat production can have detrimental effects on river and lake environments and their recreational use, especially where oxygen-consuming organic solids and soluble organic substances and nutrients are concerned. It has not previously been possible, however, to estimate in advance the watercourse loading likely to arise from ditching and peat production on the basis of the

  6. Radiological emergency: Malaysian preparedness and response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusof, Mohd Abd Wahab; Ali, Hamrah Mohd

    2011-07-01

    Planning and preparation in advance for radiological emergencies can help to minimise potential public health and environmental threats if and when an actual emergency occurs. During the planning process, emergency response organisations think through how they would respond to each type of incident and the resources that will be needed. In Malaysia, planning, preparation for and response to radiological emergencies involve many parties. In the event of a radiological emergency and if it is considered a disaster, the National Security Council, the Atomic Energy Licensing Board and the Malaysian Nuclear Agency (Nuclear Malaysia) will work together with other federal agencies, state and local governments, first responders and international organisations to monitor the situation, contain the release, and clean up the contaminated site. Throughout the response, these agencies use their protective action guidelines. This paper discusses Malaysian preparedness for, and response to, any potential radiological emergency.

  7. Bringing back the rare - biogeochemical constraints of peat moss establishment in restored cut-over bogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raabe, Peter; Blodau, Christian; Hölzel, Norbert; Kleinebecker, Till; Knorr, Klaus-Holger

    2016-04-01

    Sphagnum sods compared to control plots suggesting a direct impact of hummock mosses on microsite soil moisture conditions. However, with an increase of water levels towards winter season accompanied by increase of ferrous iron and concurrent increase of phosphate in pore waters of the upper peat layers the vitality was strongly positively related to plant available phosphate. This suggests that actively transferred hummock mosses suffering temporarily from desiccation during the dry summer season are able to recover also under relatively higher trophic conditions as long as water level and redox state favour an optimal supply of required water nutrients.

  8. Drivers for Malaysian SMEs to Go Green

    OpenAIRE

    M. Krishna Moorthy; Peter a/l Yacob; Mahendra Kumar a/l Chelliah; Lawrence Arokiasamy

    2012-01-01

    Small and Medium Enterprises (SMEs) around the world have little knowledge about environmental management and do not understand the concept of environmental management. The concept of green is still very new to Malaysian SME owners/managers, although many green conferences, seminars and campaigns have been carried out for quite some time. The concept for green process and products in Malaysia is at the infancy stage. The drivers of environmental behavior in SMEs are relatively under-researche...

  9. Religiosity, Ethical Judgments and Malaysian Muslim Students

    OpenAIRE

    Rusnah Muhamad

    2014-01-01

    Culture is often cited as one of the powerful determinants in shaping the personality and behaviour of individuals. Religion, being an important element of culture, is seen as playing an important role in determining how people behave in certain situations. Various authors have suggested religion as an important dimension in Malaysian ethical behaviour studies especially for the Malays. Yet this construct is generally ignored or incorporated into other constructs. This study investigates the ...

  10. LAUGHING AT OURSELVES: REFLECTING MALAYSIAN ETHNIC DISPARITIES

    OpenAIRE

    SWAGATA SINHA ROY; KAVITHA SUBARAMANIAM

    2014-01-01

    Malaysia’s various ethnic groups make interesting study both sociologically and culturally. With such a heady mix of cultural elements to explore, it is often natural that the many groups stumble upon ‘rare gems’ that reflect their ‘Malaysianess’. Have Malaysians really ever appreciated the many and varied aspects of culture that they are seemingly suddenly thrown into? Do we embrace these happily or are we constantly rejecting them? Fortunately, through the medium of film, we are, from time ...

  11. The question of questions in Malaysian English

    OpenAIRE

    Asniah Alias; Radina Mohamad Deli

    2013-01-01

    This paper examined the forms that interrogatives and tag questions can take when used by young Malaysian speakers of English language in oral communication. It offers a description of the features for both question forms as produced by the respondents compared to those of Singapore English (SE) and Standard British English (SBE). The influence of domains and the issue of mother tongue interference in relation to the subjects’ usage of such features will also be investigated. Data were obtain...

  12. BASIN PEAT SORBTION CAPACITY IMPROVEMENT FOR OIL SPILL RESPONSE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CHUKHAREVA N.V.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This article is concerned with the investigation of basin peat sorption capacity in Tomsk field. Experimental results showed the thermal treatment efficiency of sorbent production for oil spill response.

  13. Fuel peat utilisation in Finland: resource use and emissions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leijting, J.

    1999-11-01

    The aim of the study was to inventorize the emissions and other stressors caused by fuel peat use in Finland. The life cycle approach was used to organise and compile the burdens associated with the fuel peat utilisation sector in the years 1994 and 1995. Fuel peat accounts for about 6.5 % of the total primary energy production in Finland. The study showed that most emissions out into the air occur during combustion of peat in energy plants. The emissions account for about 13 - 14 % of the CO{sub 2} emissions released by fossil fuel utilisation in Finland, for 12 % of the SO{sub 2} for 8 % of the N{sub 2}O and approximately 4 % of the NOR emissions released by anthropogenic sources in Finland. Phosphorus releases into waters contributes for about 0.2 % while nitrogen releases account for 0.3 % in the total anthropogenic discharge in Finland. (orig.) 88 refs.

  14. Drying of peat and wood biomass. Literature review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tapanainen, J. (Valtion Teknillinen Tutkimuskeskus, Espoo (Finland). Poltto- ja Voiteluainelaboratorio)

    1982-06-01

    Peat drying agrees with the typical drying curve of capillary porous materials, where a constant rate zone and a zone of decreasing rate of drying are distinguished. It depends on the way of water binding, how easily the moisure of pea can be removed. Wood is a hygroscopic porous material, and its drying can be described with the aid of diffusion theory. Milled peat is usually dried artificially in flash driers. Drum driers are also used for peat to some extent. The best known indirectly heated equipment is Peco-drier, where saturated steam and hot water are used as heat transfer media. A back-pressure drier developed in Sweden is also suitable for peat drying. In this equipment, indirect drying with back-pressure steam from the turbine is applied. Wood biomass (chips, bark) can be dried for example by hot-grinding, vibrating conveyor or drum drying methods. Cascade and pneumatic driers are also used for drying bark.

  15. Weeds optimally grow in peat swamp after burning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.D. Susanti

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available After clearing land by burning the peat, then the weeds and undergrowth will flourish. Even sometimes, the weeds are eventually burned again. Weed is known as a destroyer plant that has to be controlled. Through proper treatment, the existing weeds in peatlands can be potentiallly exploited. The purpose of this study was to determine the calorific value of briquettes as one of peatland weeds utilization. The results showed that the calorific value ranged from 2,492 cal/g to 5,230 cal/g. The lowest calorific value was on ‘teki kecil’ grass (Scirpus grossus Lf, while the highest calorific value was observed for ‘bantalaki grass’ (Hymenachne amplexicaulis Nees. The high calorific value of the peat weeds are potential for biomass briquettes raw materials. The utilization and use of peat weed briquettes as a raw materials expected can reduce land degradation due to peat swamp burning

  16. Peat Resources Of North Carolina A Progress Report

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This project is part of DOE Caroliina’s inventory of the peat resources of the United States. With support from DOE and the North Carolina Energy Institute we are...

  17. TEHOPALA - Intensification of peat production; TEHOPALA - palaturvetuotannon tehostaminen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nurminen, T.; Katainen, E. [Vapo Oy, Jyvaeskylae (Finland); Leinonen, A.; Aalto, J. [VTT Energy, Jyvaeskylae (Finland); Hoelttae, P. [Biomasters Oy, Oulu (Finland)

    1996-12-31

    The objective of the Tehopala project is to increase the hectare yield of sod peat by 50 % and to reduce the production costs by 30 % by developing the sod peat production methods and equipment. The main aim of the research is in machine development, the target of which is to develop a new efficient machine chain for ridge-drying method. A new more effective cutting disc, suitable for 600 mm nozzles for production wave-like sod, has been developed for PK-1S sod peat excavator. The RYT-MP excavator has been developed to operationally reliable stage, and a nozzle for production of wave-like sod has been constructed for it. Prototype machines have been developed for ridging and loading. The development work of these will be carried out further. Ridge-drying method and wave-like sod peat method have been proven to be more effective than the cylindrical sod technology and field-drying method

  18. Factors Affecting Hypertension among the Malaysian Elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sima Ataollahi Eshkoor

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Hypertension is a common chronic disease in the elderly. This study aimed to determine the effects of age, ethnicity, gender, education, marital status, nutritional parameters, and blood elements on the risk of high blood pressure in the Malaysian elderly. This research was conducted on a group of 2322 non-institutionalized Malaysian elderly. The hierarchy binary logistic regression analysis was applied to estimate the risk of hypertension in respondents. Approximately, 45.61% of subjects had hypertension. The findings indicated that the female gender (Odds ratio (OR = 1.54, an increase in body weight (OR = 1.61, and an increase in the blood levels of albumin (OR = 1.51, glucose (OR = 1.92, and triglycerides (OR = 1.27 significantly increased the risk of hypertension in subjects (p < 0.05. Conversely, an increase in both dietary carbohydrates (OR = 0.74, and blood cholesterol level (OR = 0.42 significantly reduced the risk of hypertension in samples (p < 0.05. Furthermore, the results showed that ethnicity was a non-relevant factor to increase the risk of hypertension in subjects. It was concluded that female gender, an increase in body weight, and an increase in the blood levels of glucose, triglycerides, and albumin enhanced the risk of high blood pressure in the Malaysian elderly. In addition, an increase in both dietary carbohydrates and blood cholesterol level decreased hypertension in subjects.

  19. LAUGHING AT OURSELVES: REFLECTING MALAYSIAN ETHNIC DISPARITIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SWAGATA SINHA ROY

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Malaysia’s various ethnic groups make interesting study both sociologically and culturally. With such a heady mix of cultural elements to explore, it is often natural that the many groups stumble upon ‘rare gems’ that reflect their ‘Malaysianess’. Have Malaysians really ever appreciated the many and varied aspects of culture that they are seemingly suddenly thrown into? Do we embrace these happily or are we constantly rejecting them? Fortunately, through the medium of film, we are, from time to time, allowed to reflect on our obvious similarities and even more apparent disparities. In this paper, we explore the culture and perceptions of people from the major ethnic groups that are the human base of this very country. When was it we have last laughed at ourselves … heartily? Nasi Lemak 2.0 provides an interesting, if not disturbing insight into the workings of the Malaysian ‘mind’. Nasi Lemak 2.0 was released on 8th September 2011 and impacted a whole generation of Malaysians. The characters have been well chosen and have done a wonderful job of being representations of the various communities in this nation. Ethnocentrism is a reality and often rears its head, ‘ugly’ or otherwise in several situations. Are we able to grapple with the levels of ethnocentrism that we encounter? These are some of the issues that will trigger much debate and discussion among ourselves and perhaps also reflect our cores.

  20. Are Malaysian Children Achieving Dietary Guideline Recommendations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koo, Hui Chin; Poh, Bee Koon; Lee, Shoo Thien; Chong, Kar Hau; Bragt, Marjolijn C E; Abd Talib, Ruzita

    2016-07-01

    A large body of epidemiological data has demonstrated that diet quality follows a sociodemographic gradient. Little is known, however, about food group intake patterns among Malaysian children. This study aimed to assess consumption pattern of 7 food groups, including cereals/grains, legumes, fruits, vegetables, fish, meat/poultry, and milk/dairy products, among children 7 to 12 years of age. A total of 1773 children who participated in SEANUTS Malaysia and who completed the Food Frequency Questionnaire were included in this study. A greater proportion of children aged 10 to 12 years have an inadequate intake of cereals/grains, meat/poultry, legumes, and milk/dairy products compared with children 7 to 9 years old. With the exception of meat/poultry, food consumption of Malaysian children did not meet Malaysian Dietary Guidelines recommendations for the other 6 food groups, irrespective of sociodemographic backgrounds. Efforts are needed to promote healthy and balanced dietary habits, particularly for foods that fall short of recommended intake level.

  1. Influence of porewater velocity and ionic strength on DOC concentrations in and losses from peat-sand mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfaffner, Nora; Tiemeyer, Bärbel; Fiedler, Sabine

    2015-04-01

    Organic soils play an important role in the global carbon cycle as they can act as a source or a sink for greenhouse gas emissions. The new IPCC Wetlands Supplement accounts for the first time for CO2 emissions from the decomposition of dissolved organic carbon (DOC). While there is a wealth of studies on "true" peat soils, knowledge on DOC losses from organic soils heavily disturbed by e.g. mixing with sand is fragmentary. Moreover, there are only a few studies on the influence of soil hydrological properties on DOC transport. This study investigates physico-chemical controls on the concentration and losses of DOC from a peat-sand mixture in a saturated column experiment with undisturbed columns. The soil originates from the study site "Grosses Moor" (Northern Germany) which is a former bog where peat layers remaining after peat mining were mixed with the underlying mineral soil. We studied the influence of the flow regime and the ionic strength of the irrigation solution on DOC concentrations and losses. Three different pumping rates and two different ionic strengths determined by different concentrations of a sodium chloride-calcium chloride mixture in the irrigation solution were applied. Transport properties of the soil were obtained by analyzing breakthrough curves (BTCs) of a conservative tracer (potassium bromide). For interpretation of the BTCs, the transport model STANMOD which is based on the two-region (mobile/immobile) non-equilibrium concept was fitted to the data. The shape of the BTCs and the STANMOD results showed that three of the four columns had a dual porosity structure, which affects the porewater velocity and the contact area. After a large initial peak, DOC concentrations equilibrated to nearly constant values. Increased porewater velocities decreased the concentration of DOC, but increased the losses. A new equilibrium concentration was reached after nearly all changes of the porewater velocity. At maximum pumping rates as determined from

  2. Constructing deposition chronologies for peat deposits using radiocarbon dating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Piotrowska

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Radiocarbon dating is one of the main methods used to establish peat chronologies. This article reviews the basis of the method and its application to dating of peat deposits. Important steps in the radiocarbon dating procedure are described, including selection and extraction of material (and fractions for dating, chemical and physical preparation of media suitable for measurements, measurements of 14C activity or concentration, calculations, calibration of results and age-depth modelling.

  3. Laboratory experiments on drought and runoff in blanket peat

    OpenAIRE

    Holden, J; Burt, T. P.

    2002-01-01

    Global warming might change the hydrology of upland blanket peats in Britain. We have therefore studied in laboratory experiments the impact of drought on peat from the North Pennines of the UK. Runoff was dominated by surface and near-surface flow; flow decreased rapidly with depth and differed from one type of cover to another. Infiltration depended on the intensity of rain, and runoff responded rapidly to rain, with around 50% of rainwater emerging as overland flow. Drought changed the str...

  4. Complete Genome Sequence of Phytopathogenic Pectobacterium atrosepticum Bacteriophage Peat1

    OpenAIRE

    Kalischuk, Melanie; Hachey, John; Kawchuk, Lawrence

    2015-01-01

    Pectobacterium atrosepticum is a common phytopathogen causing significant economic losses worldwide. To develop a biocontrol strategy for this blackleg pathogen of solanaceous plants, P. atrosepticum bacteriophage Peat1 was isolated and its genome completely sequenced. Interestingly, morphological and sequence analyses of the 45,633-bp genome revealed that phage Peat1 is a member of the family Podoviridae and most closely resembles the Klebsiella pneumoniae bacteriophage KP34. This is the fir...

  5. High CO2 fluxes from grassland on histic Gleysol along soil carbon and drainage gradients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leiber-Sauheitl, K.; Fuß, R.; Voigt, C.; Freibauer, A.

    2014-02-01

    Drained organic soils are anthropogenic emission hotspots of greenhouse gases (GHGs). Most studies have focused on deep peat soils and on peats with high organic carbon content. In contrast, histic Gleysols are characterized by shallow peat layers, which are left over from peat cutting activities or by peat mixed with mineral soil. It is unknown whether they emit less GHGs than deep Histosols when drained. We present the annual carbon and GHG balance of grasslands for six sites on nutrient-poor histic Gleysols with a shallow (30 cm) histic horizon or mixed with mineral soil in Northern Germany (soil organic carbon concentration (Corg) from 9 to 52%). The net GHG balance, corrected for carbon export by harvest, was around 4 t CO2-C-eq ha-1 yr-1 on soils with peat layer and little drainage (mean annual water table GHG inventories which are likely not to include histic Gleysols. The land area with GHG emission hotspots due to drainage is likely to be much higher than anticipated. Deeply drained histic Gleysols are GHG hotspots that have so far been neglected or underestimated. Peat mixing with sand does not mitigate GHG emissions. Our study implies that rewetting organic soils, including histic Gleysols, has a much higher relevance for GHG mitigation strategies than currently recognized.

  6. Volatile and semivolatile organic compounds in laboratory peat fire emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Ingrid J.; Black, Robert R.; Geron, Chris D.; Aurell, Johanna; Hays, Michael D.; Preston, William T.; Gullett, Brian K.

    2016-05-01

    In this study, volatile and semi-volatile organic compound (VOCs and SVOCs) mass emission factors were determined from laboratory peat fire experiments. The peat samples originated from two National Wildlife Refuges on the coastal plain of North Carolina, U.S.A. Gas- and particle-phase organic compounds were quantified by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and by high pressure liquid chromatography. Hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) accounted for a large fraction (∼60%) of the speciated VOC emissions from peat burning, including large contributions of acetaldehyde, formaldehyde, benzene, toluene, and chloromethane. In the fine particle mass (PM2.5), the following organic compound classes were dominant: organic acids, levoglucosan, n-alkanes, and n-alkenes. Emission factors for the organic acids in PM2.5 including n-alkanoic acids, n-alkenoic acids, n-alkanedioic acids, and aromatic acids were reported for the first time for peat burning, representing the largest fraction of organic carbon (OC) mass (11-12%) of all speciated compound classes measured in this work. Levoglucosan contributed to 2-3% of the OC mass, while methoxyphenols represented 0.2-0.3% of the OC mass on a carbon mass basis. Retene was the most abundant particulate phase polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH). Total HAP VOC and particulate PAH emissions from a 2008 peat wildfire in North Carolina were estimated, suggesting that peat fires can contribute a large fraction of state-wide HAP emissions.

  7. Effect of Peat on Physicomechanical Properties of Cemented Brick

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syed Mofachirul Islam

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The popularity of low cost, lightweight, and environmentally affable masonry unit in building industry carries the need to investigate more flexible and adaptable brick component as well as to retain the requirements confirmed in building standards. In this study, potential use of local materials used as lightweight building materials in solving the economic problems of housing has been investigated. Experimental studies on peat added bricks have been carried out. It demonstrates the physicomechanical properties of bricks and investigates the influence of peat, sand, and cement solid bricks to the role of various types of constructional applications. The achieved compressive strength, spitting strength, flexural strength, unit weight, and ultrasonic pulse velocity are significantly reduced and the water absorption is increased with percentage wise replacement of peat as aggregate in the samples. The maximum 20% of (% mass peat content meets the requirements of relevant well-known international standards. The experimental values illustrate that, the 44% volumetric replacement with peat did not exhibit any sudden brittle fracture even beyond the ultimate loads and a comparatively smooth surface is found. The application of peat as efficient brick substance shows a potential to be used for wall and a viable solution in the economic buildings design.

  8. Young Adult Literature in the Malaysian Secondary School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govindarajoo, Mallika V.; Mukundan, Jayakaran

    2013-01-01

    This article presents the results of a study on the experience of the Malaysian secondary school student with Young Adult Literature in the English language classroom. The study aimed to determine the extent to which the Malaysian secondary school student identified with the young adult protagonists and issues in the novels which have been…

  9. Lexical Borrowing from Chinese Languages in Malaysian English

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imm, Tan Siew

    2009-01-01

    This paper explores how contact between English and Chinese has resulted in the incorporation of Chinese borrowings into the lexicon of Malaysian English (ME). Using a corpus-based approach, this study analyses a comprehensive range of borrowed features extracted from the Malaysian English Newspaper Corpus (MEN Corpus). Based on the contexts of…

  10. Language Learning Motivation among Malaysian Pre-University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muftah, Muneera; Rafik-Galea, Shameem

    2013-01-01

    The study describes and examines Malaysian pre-university students' integrative and instrumental motivation toward learning English language. In this study, 182 non-English major students in one of the Malaysian public universities are selected to fill out a questionnaire reflecting their attitudes and motivation towards learning English. The…

  11. Malaysian English: An Instrumental Analysis of Vowel Contrasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillai, Stefanie; Don, Zuraidah Mohd.; Knowles, Gerald; Tang, Jennifer

    2010-01-01

    This paper makes an instrumental analysis of English vowel monophthongs produced by 47 female Malaysian speakers. The focus is on the distribution of Malaysian English vowels in the vowel space, and the extent to which there is phonetic contrast between traditionally paired vowels. The results indicate that, like neighbouring varieties of English,…

  12. National space legislation : future perspectives for Malaysian Space Law

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saari, Che Zuhaida Binti

    2014-01-01

    This research studies the future perspectives for Malaysian space law. It aims at demonstrating the development of Malaysian outer space activities inclusive of her status with respect to United Nations space conventions and her membership of international and regional space-related organizations. O

  13. Strategic Information Systems Planning in Malaysian Public Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, Noor Azizi; Raja Mohd Ali, Raja Haslinda; Mat Saat, Rafeah; Hsbollah, Hafizah Mohamad

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The paper's purpose is to investigate the current status, problems and benefits of strategic information systems planning implementation in Malaysian public universities. Design/methodology/approach: The study uses dual but mutually supportive strands of investigation, i.e. a questionnaire survey and interviews. Findings: Malaysian public…

  14. Malaysian English: An Instrumental Analysis of Vowel Contrasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillai, Stefanie; Don, Zuraidah Mohd.; Knowles, Gerald; Tang, Jennifer

    2010-01-01

    This paper makes an instrumental analysis of English vowel monophthongs produced by 47 female Malaysian speakers. The focus is on the distribution of Malaysian English vowels in the vowel space, and the extent to which there is phonetic contrast between traditionally paired vowels. The results indicate that, like neighbouring varieties of English,…

  15. A Pilot CAI Scheme for the Malaysian Secondary Education System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, A. Kanakaratnam; Rao, G. S.

    1982-01-01

    A multi-phase computer aided instruction (CAI) scheme for Malaysian Secondary Schools and Matriculation Centres attached to local universities is presented as an aid for improving instruction and for solving some problems presently faced by the Malaysian Secondary Education System. Some approaches for successful implementation of a CAI scheme are…

  16. Self-Access Language Learning for Malaysian University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tse, Andrew Yau Hau

    2012-01-01

    Just a few Malaysian universities offer self-access language learning activities to students. The objective of this study is to investigate if self-access learning can promote self-directed or autonomous learning in a public Malaysian technical university. Data collection is by means of interviewing the Director, lecturers, and students in a…

  17. The Quest for Strategic Malaysian Quality National Primary School Leaders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Hairuddin Mohd

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to investigate the nine-point strategic leadership characteristics of Malaysian Quality National Primary School Leaders (QNPSL) and to indicate the implications of these findings for the current educational management and leadership practices in their quest for Malaysian quality education.…

  18. A Career Success Model for Academics at Malaysian Research Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu Said, Al-Mansor; Mohd Rasdi, Roziah; Abu Samah, Bahaman; Silong, Abu Daud; Sulaiman, Suzaimah

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to develop a career success model for academics at the Malaysian research universities. Design/methodology/approach: Self-administered and online surveys were used for data collection among 325 academics from Malaysian research universities. Findings: Based on the analysis of structural equation modeling, the…

  19. National space legislation : future perspectives for Malaysian Space Law

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saari, Che Zuhaida Binti

    2014-01-01

    This research studies the future perspectives for Malaysian space law. It aims at demonstrating the development of Malaysian outer space activities inclusive of her status with respect to United Nations space conventions and her membership of international and regional space-related organizations. O

  20. Dates of publication of Malaysian phyto-taxonomical literature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    NN,

    1947-01-01

    Under this heading will be found information on the dates of publication of Malaysian botanical works or others of importance to Malaysian phytotaxonomy. Several of these are in the ”Journal of the Society for Bibliography of Natural History” an expensive serial of which 6 parts have appeared betwee

  1. Uranium/thorium dating of Late Pleistocene peat deposits in NW Europe, uranium/thorium isotope systematics and open-system behaviour of peat layers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijnis, H.; Plicht, J. van der

    1992-01-01

    The possibility of dating peat by the uranium-series disequilibrium method is discussed. In principle, this method can be used to date peat to approximately 350 ka. The application of the U/Th disequilibrium method (UTD) on peat provides us with the probability of constructing a new chronology for t

  2. Tropical organic soils ecosystems in relation to regional water resources in southeast Asia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Armentano, T. V.

    1982-01-01

    Tropical organic soils have functioned as natural sinks for carbon, nitrogen, slfur and other nutrients for the past 4000 years or more. Topographic evolution in peat swamp forests towards greater oligotrophy has concentrated storage of the limited nutrient stock in surface soils and biota. Tropical peat systems thus share common ecosystem characteristics with northern peat bogs and certain tropical oligotrophic forests. Organic matter accumulation and high cation-exchange-capacity limit nutrient exports from undisturbed organic soils, although nutrient retention declines with increasing eutrophy and wetland productivity. Peat swamps are subject to irreversible degradation if severely altered because disturbance of vegetation, surface peats and detritus can disrupt nuttrient cycles and reduce forest recovery capacity. Drainage also greatly increases exports of nitrogen, phosphorus and other nutrients and leads to downstream eutrophication and water quality degradation. Regional planning for clean water supplies must recognize the benefits provided by natural peatlands in balancing water supplies and regulating water chemistry.

  3. Factors affecting oxidative peat decomposition due to land use in tropical peat swamp forests in Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itoh, Masayuki; Okimoto, Yosuke; Hirano, Takashi; Kusin, Kitso

    2017-12-31

    The increasing frequency of fire due to drainage of tropical peatland has become a major environmental problem in Southeast Asia. To clarify the effects of changes in land use on carbon dioxide emissions, we measured oxidative peat decomposition (PD) at different stages of disturbance at three sites in Central Kalimantan, Indonesia: an undrained peat swamp forest (UF), a heavily drained peat swamp forest (DF), and a drained and burned ex-forest (DB). PD exhibited seasonality, being less in the wet season and greater in the dry season. From February 2014 to December 2015, mean PD (±SE) were 1.90±0.19, 2.30±0.33, and 1.97±0.25μmolm(-2)s(-1) at UF, DF, and DB, respectively. The groundwater level (GWL) was a major controlling factor of PD at all sites. At UF and DF, PD and GWL showed significant quadratic relationships. At DB, PD and GWL showed significant positive and negative relationships during the dry and wet seasons, respectively. Using these relationships, we estimated annual PD from GWL data for 2014 and 2015 as 698 and 745gCm(-2)yr(-1) at UF (mean GWL: -0.23 and -0.39m), 775 and 825gCm(-2)yr(-1) at DF (-0.55 and -0.59m), and 646 and 748gCm(-2)yr(-1) at DB (-0.22 and -0.62m), respectively. The annual PD was significantly higher in DF than in UF or DB, in both years. Despite the very dry conditions, the annual PD values at these sites were much lower than those reported for tropical peat at plantations (e.g., oil palm, rubber, and acacia). The differences in the relationship between PD and GWL indicate that separate estimations are required for each type of land. Moreover, our results suggest that PD can be enhanced by drainage both in forests and at burned sites. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Impact of catchment degree on peat properties in peat deposits of eutrophic bog

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inisheva, L. I.; Golubina, O. A.; Rodikova, A. V.; Shinkeeva, N. A.; Bubina, A. B.

    2010-05-01

    Fundamental works of many investigators show that according to the biophysical properties peat deposit (PD) is divided into 2 layers: active and inert. It is interesting to analyze the supposed changes in PD of eutrophic bog according to different data (physical, chemical and biological). The researches were carried out at two plots of one bog (points 1 and 2, positions 56° 21' NL, 84° 47' EL, Russia, Siberia). Agricultural afforestation (pine planting) was made at one of them (point 2) 60 years ago. Now this plot is absolutely identical in ground cover to 1 point, but other conditions are significantly changed. In spring bog water level is at the depth of 20cm at 2 point (at 1 point it is near water face), it lows up to 53 cm during summer time (at 1 point - up to 37 cm). According to redox conditions zone of anoxic-oxic conditions reaches meter depth at 2 points. PDs don't significantly differ in activity of ammonifiers but in activity of cellulose-lytic aerobic microflora it follows that it is more active at 2 point in PD active layer. In spite of good aeration, more favorable conditions were created also for anaerobic cellulose-fermenting microflora in PD of 2 point in comparison with 1 one. Activity analysis of denitrifying agents and microflora of other physiological groups also showed high activity of biota at the plot with afforestation amelioration. This fact was confirmed by high coefficient of mineralization. Time of drainage effect created by afforestation amelioration influenced group composition of peat organic matter which builds up PD of examined plots. According to fractional and group composition data fracture of hard-to-hydrolyze organic matters decreased during the process of microflora activating at the plot with afforestation amelioration but FA content increased. Fractional composition of nitrogen showed that content of mineral nitrogen compounds definitely increased. Thus, 60 years of surface drainage influenced composition change of peat

  5. Leadership in the Reform of Malaysian Universities: Analysing the Strategic Role of the Malaysian Qualifications Agency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajunid, Ibrahim Ahmad

    2011-01-01

    This paper addresses the contemporary development and reform challenges in tertiary education in Malaysia in both national and global contexts. The critical role exercised by the Malaysian Qualifications Agency in driving strategic change in higher education cultures, both in public and private universities is described and analysed. The paper…

  6. Leadership in the Reform of Malaysian Universities: Analysing the Strategic Role of the Malaysian Qualifications Agency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajunid, Ibrahim Ahmad

    2011-01-01

    This paper addresses the contemporary development and reform challenges in tertiary education in Malaysia in both national and global contexts. The critical role exercised by the Malaysian Qualifications Agency in driving strategic change in higher education cultures, both in public and private universities is described and analysed. The paper…

  7. Oxic and anoxic mineralization of simple carbon substrates in peat at low temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segura, Javier; Sparrman, Tobias; Nilsson, Mats; Schleucher, Jürgen; Öquist, Mats

    2016-04-01

    Northern peatlands store approximately one-quarter of the world's soil carbon and typically act as net carbon sinks. However a large fraction of the carbon fixed during the growing season can be emitted back to the atmosphere during winter as CO2 and CH4, despite low temperatures and frozen conditions, making low temperature biogeochemical processes crucial for the long-term net ecosystem carbon balance. However, the metabolic processes driving carbon mineralization under winter conditions are poorly understood and whether or not peat microbial communities can maintain metabolic activity at temperatures below freezing is uncertain. Here we present results from an incubation study aimed at elucidating the potential of peat microbial communities to mineralize simple carbon substrates to CO2 and CH4 at low temperatures. Peat samples from the acrotelm were amended with [13C]- glucose and incubated at -5 °C, -3 °C, +4 °C, and +9 °C under both oxic and anoxic conditions, and rates of CO2 and CH4 production were determined. In addition, incorporation of the labelled substrate into phospholipid fatty acids (PLFAs) were determined to account for microbial growth during mineralization and the metabolic partitioning between catabolic and anabolic activity. Biogenic [13C]-CO2 was produced from the added substrate in peat samples incubated both under oxic and anoxic conditions. Under oxic conditions the production rates were 3.5, 2.3, 0.3 and 0.07 mg CO2 g SOM-1day-1 at +9 °C, +4 °C, -3 °C and -5 °C, respectively, and corresponding rates for anoxic conditions were 1.1, 1.0, 0.03 and 0.01 mg CO2 g SOM-1day-1. Consequently the observed Q10 values of the temperature sensitivity under both oxic and anoxic conditions increased dramatically upon soil freezing. However, anoxic mineralization appears less sensitive to temperature as compared to when oxygen is present. Methane was also produced and detected across the range of the incubation temperatures in the anoxic

  8. Geotechnical characterization of peat-based landfill cover materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Afshin Khoshand; Mamadou Fall

    2016-01-01

    Natural methane (CH4) oxidation that is carried out through the use of landfill covers (biocovers) is a promising method for reducing CH4 emissions from landfills. Previous studies on peat-based landfill covers have mainly focused on their biochemical properties (e.g. CH4 oxidation capacity). However, the utilization of peat as a cover material also requires a solid understanding of its geotechnical properties (thermal, hydraulic, and mechanical), which are critical to the performance of any biocover. Therefore, the objective of this context is to investigate and assess the geotechnical properties of peat-based cover materials (peat, peat-sand mixture), including compaction, consolidation, and hydraulic and thermal conductivities. The studied materials show high compressibility to the increase of vertical stress, with compression index (Cc) values ranging from 0.16 to 0.358. The compressibility is a function of sand content such that the peat-sand mixture (1:3) has the lowest Cc value. Both the thermal and hydraulic conductivities are functions of moisture content, dry density, and sand content. The hydraulic conduc-tivity varies from 1.74 × 10-9 m/s to 7.35 × 10-9 m/s, and increases with the increase in sand content. The thermal conductivity of the studied samples varies between 0.54 W/(m K) and 1.41 W/(m K) and it in-creases with the increases in moisture and sand contents. Increases in sand content generally increase the mechanical behavior of peat-based covers; however, they also cause relatively high hydraulic and thermal conductivities which are not favored properties for biocovers.

  9. Non-destructive methods for peat layer assessment in oligotrophic peat bogs: a case study from Poiana Ştampei, Romania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iuliana F. Gheorghe

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Practices currently employed in the investigation and characterisation of peat deposits are destructive and may irremediable perturb peat bog development even in cases when exploitation is not carried out. We investigated the correlation between vegetation characteristics in the active area of Poiana Ştampei peat bog, Romania, and the underlying peat layer depth, aiming at establishing a non-destructive method of peat layer depth estimation. The presence of the Sphagneto-Eriophoretum vaginati association, dominated by Sphagnum fimbriatum, Eriophorum vaginatum, Andromeda polifolia, Vaccinium oxycoccos, V. myrtillus, V. vitis-idaea, Polytrichum commune, Picea excelsa, Pinus sylvestris and Betula verrucosa was found to predict the existence of the peat layer but not its depth. Out of the seven identified vegetation types, one type was associated with a very thin or no peat layer, one type was characterised by the presence of a thick (over 100 cm peat layer and five types indicated the presence of variable average depths of the peat layer. pH values correlated with peat layer depth only within the vegetation type associated with thick peat layers.

  10. Modeling the Impact of Forest and Peat Fires on Carbon-Isotopic Compositions of Cretaceous Atmosphere and Vegetation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finkelstein, D. B.; Pratt, L. M.

    2004-12-01

    Prevalence of wildfires or peat fires associated with seasonally dry conditions in the Cretaceous is supported by recent studies documenting the widespread presence of pyrolytic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and fusinite. Potential roles of CO2 emissions from fire have been overlooked in many discussions of Cretaceous carbon-isotope excursions (excluding K-P boundary discussions). Enhanced atmospheric CO2 levels could increase fire frequency through elevated lightning activity. When biomass or peat is combusted, emissions of CO2 are more negative than atmospheric CO2. Five reservoirs (atmosphere, vegetation, soil, and shallow and deep oceans), and five fluxes (productivity, respiration, litter fall, atmosphere-ocean exchange, and surface-deep ocean exchange) were modeled as a closed system. The size of the Cretaceous peat reservoir was estimated by compilation of published early Cretaceous coal resources. Initial pCO2 was assumed to be 2x pre-industrial atmospheric levels (P.A.L.). Critical variables in the model are burning efficiency and post-fire growth rates. Assuming 1% of standing terrestrial biomass is consumed by wildfires each year for ten years (without combustion of peat), an increase of atmospheric CO2 (from 2.0 to 2.2x P.A.L.) and a negative carbon isotope excursion (-1.2 ‰ ) are recorded by both atmosphere and new growth. Net primary productivity linked to the residence time of the vegetation and soil reservoirs results in a negative isotope shift followed by a broad positive isotope excursion. Decreasing the rate of re-growth dampens this trailing positive shift and increases the duration of the excursion. Post-fire pCO2 and new growth returned to initial values after 72 years. Both negative and positive isotope excursions are recorded in the model in surface ocean waters. Exchange of CO2 with the surface- and deep-ocean dampens the isotopic shift of the atmosphere. Excursions are first recorded in the atmosphere (and new growth), followed by

  11. RETENTION TIME EFFECT ON METAL REMOVAL BY PEAT COLUMNS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, E

    2007-02-28

    The potential use of a peat bed to treat the H-12 Outfall discharge to bring it to new compliance limits was previously investigated and reported utilizing a 7 hour retention time. The influence of retention time (contact time) of water with peat moss on the removal of copper from the water was investigated under laboratory conditions using vertical flow peat moss columns. Reduction of the necessary retention time has a large influence on the design sizing of any peat bed that would be constructed to treat the H-12 discharge on a full scale basis. Retention times of 5 hours, 3 hours and 1 hour were tested to determine the copper removal by the peat columns using vertical flow. Water samples were collected after 4, 8, 12, and 16 water volumes had passed through the columns and analyzed for a suite of metals, with quantitative emphasis on copper. Laboratory results indicated that copper removal was very high at each of the 3 retention times tested, ranging from 99.6 % removal at 5 and 3 hours to 98.8% removal at 1 hour. All these values are much lower that the new compliance limit for the outfall. The results also indicated that most divalent metals were removed to their normal reporting detection limit for the analytical methods used, including zinc. Lead levels in the H-12 discharge used in this study were below PQL in all samples analyzed. While each of the retention times studied removed copper very well, there were indications that 1 hour is probably too short for an operational, long-term facility. At that retention time, there was about 6% compaction of the peat in the column due to the water velocity, and this may affect long term hydraulic conductivity of the peat bed. At that retention time, copper concentration in the effluent was higher than the other times tested, although still very low. Because of the potential compacting and somewhat reduced removal efficiency at a 1 hour retention time, it would be prudent to design to at least a 3 hour retention

  12. Waqf (Endowment Practice in Malaysian Society

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NUR KHALIDAH DAHLAN

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Justice and equality are not identical in the sense that under certain circumstances, justice may only be achieved through inequality or unequal distribution of wealth. The two aspects of justice, which are corrective justice and distributive justice in this definition both comprehend of justice as a social concept as it incorporates social relations and would have little meaning if it were to apply to an individual in total isolation from society. Thus by comparing the pertinent literature on jurisdiction of the courts in terms of waqf and judicial decisions, this article seeks to describe the pros and cons of waqf practices and how it reflects justice to the Malaysian society.

  13. Revitalizing the Malaysian Trade Union Movement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wad, Peter

    2012-01-01

    organizations prefer non-partisan engagement. In order to revitalize themselves, the unions must demonstrate to the Malaysian public that they are both relevant and important for increased productivity and that they can play a significant role in enabling Malaysia to move beyond the middle-income ‘trap’ towards......The article takes an historic perspective on contemporary issues of trade union revival in Malaysia, focusing on the challenge of raising union density and analysing the process of organizing employees in the strategically important electronics industry. It concludes that the political support...

  14. Composição lignocelulósica e isótopica da vegetação e da matéria orgânica do solo de uma turfeira tropical: I - composição florística, fitomassa e acúmulo de carbono Lignocellulosic and isotopic composition of vegetation and soil organic matter of a tropical peat: I floristic composition, biomass and carbon stock

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinicius Evangelista Silva

    2013-02-01

    ção da do CLU. Os sinais isotópicos e a composição lignocelulósica da vegetação e da matéria orgânica do solo evidenciaram que a turfeira foi formada pela deposição de matéria orgânica da vegetação que a coloniza. O crescimento vertical e a taxa de acúmulo de C foram muito mais elevados sob a FES do que sob o CLU.Soil organic matter (SOM is one of the major reservoirs of carbon on Earth and is one of the key contributors to the carbon cycle. Peatlands are natural accumulators of organic matter commonly derived from decomposing plant residues in water-saturated environments, and represent an initial stage of a much longer pedogenic pathway leading to carbonification. The soil biomass markedly influences the global carbon cycle, accounting for approximately 85 % of all carbon on the Earth's surface. Plant tissues are mainly composed of lignin, cellulose and hemicelluloses, representing as much as 85 % of their dry biomass. Plants usually discriminate carbon differentially, according to their photosynthetic cycle (C3, C4 and CAM. The vegetation of the bogs in the southern domain of Serra do Espinhaço (SdEM; Brazil consists mostly of moist grassland (CLU and semideciduous forest (FES, with species of both C3 and C4 cycles. This study was designed to discriminate the contribution of these two vegetation types to the accumulation of soil organic matter by an analysis of the biomass and of the lignocellulosic and carbon isotopic composition and SOM. The studied peat is located in SdEM and covers an area of 81.75ha. Three 0.5x0.5m plots were marked per vegetation type, to delimit the sampling areas, for which biomass of CLU and FES were estimated. All plants per plot were cut and adequately stored to preserve as much of their fresh characteristics as possible. To characterize the isotopic and lignocellulosic composition of the vegetation, the species of each vegetation type were systematically identified according to their main botanic characteristics. Soil

  15. Excavation and drying of compressed peat; Tiivistetyn turpeen nosto ja kuivaus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erkkilae, A.; Frilander, P.; Hillebrand, K.; Nurmi, H.

    1996-12-31

    The target of this three year (1993 - 1995) project was to improve the peat product-ion efficiency by developing an energy economical excavation method for compressed peat, by which it is possible to obtain best possible degree of compression and load from the DS-production point of view. It is possible to improve the degree of utilization of solar radiation in drying from 30 % to 40 %. The main research areas were drying of the compressed peat and peat compression. The third sub-task for 1995 was demonstration of the main parts of the method in laboratory scale. Experimental compressed peat (Compeat) drying models were made for peats Carex-peat H7, Carex-peat H5 and Carex-Sphagnum-peat H7. Compeat dried without turning in best circumstances in 34 % shorter time than milled layer made of the same peat turned twice, the initial moisture content being 4 kgH2OkgDS-1. In the tests carried out in 1995 with Carex-peat the compression had not corresponding effect on intensifying of the drying of peat. Compression of Carex-Sphagnum peat H7 increased the drying speed by about 10 % compared with the drying time of uncompressed milled layer. In the sprinkling test about 30-50 % of the sprinkled water was sucked into the compressed peat layer, while about 70 % of the rain is sucked into the corresponding uncompressed milled layer. Use of vibration decreased the energy consumption of the steel-surfaced nozzles about 20 % in the maximum, but the effect depend on the rotation speed of the macerator and the vibration power. In the new Compeat method (production method for compressed peat), developed in the research, the peat is loosened from the field surface by milling 3-5 cm thick layer of peat of moisture content 75-80 %

  16. Microscopical investigation of the transformation (diagenesis) from peat to lignite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ting, F.T.C.

    1977-01-01

    A silicified Palaeocene peat layer discovered in a lignite bed in western North Dakota, U.S.A., has proved to be excellent material for studying the transformation from peat to lignite. Detailed anatomical structures are well preserved in the peat and similar to the level of preservation of Carboniferous coal balls. A compaction of 4:1 results when the peat is converted to lignite. Loss in volume is primarily caused by the loss of cellular cavities and intergranular spaces and consequent loss of redistribution of moisture. Huminite formed from secondary xylem and phloem sclereids differs in appearance under the microscope from huminite derived from periderms and young cortical tissues. Resinites are formed from fillings of resin canals, secretory cells and sclereids of secondary phloem and may also originate from resinous materials occurring in the palisade and spongy mesophyll of leaves. Cutinite can form from either cuticles or from compressed cortical tissues of young roots. Charred leaves and charred secondary xylem and phloem comprise an important portion of the fusinitic and semifusinitic fractions of the coal. Pyrinite grains tend to occupy the cell cavities of early wood and ray cells. Differences between collinite and telinite developed during the peat stage, while progressive coalification tends to accentuate the lack of structure in the collinite.

  17. Vegetation analyses of Sebangau peat swamp forest, Central Kalimantan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EDI MIRMANTO

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Mirmanto E (2010 Vegetation analyses of Sebangau peat swamp forest, Central Kalimantan. Biodiversitas 11: 82-88. The vegetation analysis study has been made in Sebangau peat-swamp forest, Central Kalimantan. Eight permanent plots of 50-m x 50-m were set-up distribute from close to the river with shallow peat-layer up to the inland with relatively deep peat-layer. Enumeration of trees (GBH > 15 cm was conducted in all of 8 plots. Overall there are 133 species (taxa were recorded within 8 plots belong to 34 families where Dipterocarpaceae, Clusiaceae, Myrtaceae and Sapotaceae were the most dominant family. Out of all species recorded, Combretocarpus rotundatus, Palaquium leiocarpum, Stemonurus scorpioides and Tristania whittiana were the most dominant species. Two community’s types namely Combretocarpus rotundatus-Shorea balangeran community and Palaquium leiocarpum-Eugenia densinervium community were recognized and they distributed in slightly different habitat condition. The sequence of these two communities’ shows significantly related to both distances to river and peat-depth. In addition there was indication the presence of habitat preference among tree species.

  18. Soil mycoflora of banana and cassava in peatland and alluvial soil in Bengkulu

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SUCIATMIH

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available In order to discover the diversity and population of soil fungi, a study was carried out at banana (Musa paradisiaca and cassava (Manihot utilissima plants where both those plants planted in peatland and alluvial soil. Soil fungi were isolated using serial dilution plate method and they were incubated at both room temperature (27-28oC and 45oC. This process was replicated two times for each sample. The result indicated that from 4 soil samples, 24 genera of fungi representing 4 Ascomycotina, 15 Deuteromycotina, and 5 Zygomycotina were detected. The highest soil fungi population was found in cassava planted in peat land and incubated at room temperature (8.5 105 cfu/ g dry soil, while the lower soil fungi population came from banana plant that was planted in peat land and incubated at 45oC (7.1 103 cfu/g dry soil.

  19. Dissolved organic carbon and major and trace elements in peat porewater of sporadic, discontinuous, and continuous permafrost zones of western Siberia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. V. Raudina

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Mobilization of dissolved organic carbon (DOC and related trace elements (TEs from the frozen peat to surface waters in the permafrost zone is expected to enhance under ongoing permafrost thaw and active layer thickness (ALT deepening in high-latitude regions. The interstitial soil solutions are efficient tracers of ongoing bio-geochemical processes in the critical zone and can help to decipher the intensity of carbon and metals migration from the soil to the rivers and further to the ocean. To this end, we collected, across a 640 km latitudinal transect of the sporadic to continuous permafrost zone of western Siberia peatlands, soil porewaters from 30 cm depth using suction cups and we analyzed DOC, dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC, and 40 major elements and TEs in 0.45 µm filtered fraction of 80 soil porewaters. Despite an expected decrease in the intensity of DOC and TE mobilization from the soil and vegetation litter to the interstitial fluids with the increase in the permafrost coverage and a decrease in the annual temperature and ALT, the DOC and many major and trace elements did not exhibit any distinct decrease in concentration along the latitudinal transect from 62.2 to 67.4° N. The DOC demonstrated a maximum of concentration at 66° N, on the border of the discontinuous/continuous permafrost zone, whereas the DOC concentration in peat soil solutions from the continuous permafrost zone was equal to or higher than that in the sporadic/discontinuous permafrost zone. Moreover, a number of major (Ca, Mg and trace (Al, Ti, Sr, Ga, rare earth elements (REEs, Zr, Hf, Th elements exhibited an increasing, not decreasing, northward concentration trend. We hypothesize that the effects of temperature and thickness of the ALT are of secondary importance relative to the leaching capacity of peat, which is in turn controlled by the water saturation of the peat core. The water residence time in peat pores also plays a role in enriching the

  20. CHARACTERIZATION OF HEADWATERS PEATS OF THE RIO ARAÇUAÍ, MINAS GERAIS STATE, BRAZIL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diêgo Faustolo Alves Bispo

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Peatlands are soil environments that accumulate water and organic carbon and function as records of paleo-environmental changes. The variability in the composition of organic matter is reflected in their morphological, physical, and chemical properties. The aim of this study was to characterize these properties in peatlands from the headwaters of the Rio Araçuaí (Araçuaí River in different stages of preservation. Two cores from peatlands with different vegetation types (moist grassland and semideciduous seasonal forest from the Rio Preto [Preto River] headwaters (conservation area and the Córrego Cachoeira dos Borges [Cachoeira dos Borges stream] (disturbed area were sampled. Both are tributaries of the Rio Araçuaí. Samples were taken from layers of 15 cm, and morphological, physical, and chemical analyses were performed. The 14C age and δ13C values were determined in three samples from each core and the vertical growth and organic carbon accumulation rates were estimated. Dendrograms were constructed for each peatland by hierarchical clustering of similar layers with data from 34 parameters. The headwater peatlands of the Rio Araçuaí have a predominance of organic material in an advanced stage of decomposition and their soils are classified as Typic Haplosaprists. The organic matter in the Histosols of the peatlands of the headwaters of the Rio Araçuaí shows marked differences with respect to its morphological, physical, and chemical composition, as it is influenced by the type of vegetation that colonizes it. The peat from the headwaters of the Córrego Cachoeira dos Borges is in a more advanced stage of degradation than the peat from the Rio Preto, which highlights the urgent need for protection of these ecosystems/soil environments.

  1. Metabolic and trophic interactions modulate methane production by Arctic peat microbiota in response to warming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tveit, Alexander Tøsdal; Urich, Tim; Frenzel, Peter; Svenning, Mette Marianne

    2015-05-12

    Arctic permafrost soils store large amounts of soil organic carbon (SOC) that could be released into the atmosphere as methane (CH4) in a future warmer climate. How warming affects the complex microbial network decomposing SOC is not understood. We studied CH4 production of Arctic peat soil microbiota in anoxic microcosms over a temperature gradient from 1 to 30 °C, combining metatranscriptomic, metagenomic, and targeted metabolic profiling. The CH4 production rate at 4 °C was 25% of that at 25 °C and increased rapidly with temperature, driven by fast adaptations of microbial community structure, metabolic network of SOC decomposition, and trophic interactions. Below 7 °C, syntrophic propionate oxidation was the rate-limiting step for CH4 production; above this threshold temperature, polysaccharide hydrolysis became rate limiting. This change was associated with a shift within the functional guild for syntrophic propionate oxidation, with Firmicutes being replaced by Bacteroidetes. Correspondingly, there was a shift from the formate- and H2-using Methanobacteriales to Methanomicrobiales and from the acetotrophic Methanosarcinaceae to Methanosaetaceae. Methanogenesis from methylamines, probably stemming from degradation of bacterial cells, became more important with increasing temperature and corresponded with an increased relative abundance of predatory protists of the phylum Cercozoa. We concluded that Arctic peat microbiota responds rapidly to increased temperatures by modulating metabolic and trophic interactions so that CH4 is always highly produced: The microbial community adapts through taxonomic shifts, and cascade effects of substrate availability cause replacement of functional guilds and functional changes within taxa.

  2. A 19-year long energy budget of an upland peat bog, northern England

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worrall, Fred; Clay, Gareth; Moody, Catherine; Burt, Timothy

    2015-04-01

    This study has estimated the long term evaporation record for a peat covered catchment in northern England. In this study, 19 years of daily evaporation were estimated for rain-free periods using White's methods. Net radiation was measured over the study period; soil heat flux was calculated from temperature profiles; and sensible heat flux was calculated assuming the energy budget was closed. The calculated time series was compared to available environmental information on the same time step and over the same time period. Over a 19-year period it was possible to calculate 1662 daily evaporation rates (26% of the period). The study showed that the energy flux to net primary productivity was a small, long-term sink of energy but this sink was a virtue of high carbon accumulation in peat catchments: in catchments where there is no long-term dry matter accumulation, net primary productivity must be a small net source of energy. The study showed that evaporation increased over the study period whilst sensible heat flux significantly declined with the ecosystem became a stronger heat sink reflecting an increased use of sensible heat energy to meet evaporative demand. The relatively small change in evaporative flux compared to other energy fluxes suggests that this system is a "near-equilibrium" system and not a "far-from-equilibrium" system.

  3. Suggested protocol for collecting, handling and preparing peat cores and peat samples for physical, chemical, mineralogical and isotopic analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Givelet, Nicolas; Le Roux, Gaël; Cheburkin, Andriy; Chen, Bin; Frank, Jutta; Goodsite, Michael E; Kempter, Heike; Krachler, Michael; Noernberg, Tommy; Rausch, Nicole; Rheinberger, Stefan; Roos-Barraclough, Fiona; Sapkota, Atindra; Scholz, Christian; Shotyk, William

    2004-05-01

    For detailed reconstructions of atmospheric metal deposition using peat cores from bogs, a comprehensive protocol for working with peat cores is proposed. The first step is to locate and determine suitable sampling sites in accordance with the principal goal of the study, the period of time of interest and the precision required. Using the state of the art procedures and field equipment, peat cores are collected in such a way as to provide high quality records for paleoenvironmental study. Pertinent field observations gathered during the fieldwork are recorded in a field report. Cores are kept frozen at -18 degree C until they can be prepared in the laboratory. Frozen peat cores are precisely cut into 1 cm slices using a stainless steel band saw with stainless steel blades. The outside edges of each slice are removed using a titanium knife to avoid any possible contamination which might have occurred during the sampling and handling stage. Each slice is split, with one-half kept frozen for future studies (archived), and the other half further subdivided for physical, chemical, and mineralogical analyses. Physical parameters such as ash and water contents, the bulk density and the degree of decomposition of the peat are determined using established methods. A subsample is dried overnight at 105 degree C in a drying oven and milled in a centrifugal mill with titanium sieve. Prior to any expensive and time consuming chemical procedures and analyses, the resulting powdered samples, after manual homogenisation, are measured for more than twenty-two major and trace elements using non-destructive X-Ray fluorescence (XRF) methods. This approach provides lots of valuable geochemical data which documents the natural geochemical processes which occur in the peat profiles and their possible effect on the trace metal profiles. The development, evaluation and use of peat cores from bogs as archives of high-resolution records of atmospheric deposition of mineral dust and trace

  4. Shallow peatland ecohydrology - the control of peat depth on moss productivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, Simon; Kettridge, Nicholas; Moore, Paul; Devito, Kevin; Tilak, Amey; Petrone, Rich; Mendoza, Carl; Waddington, Mike

    2017-04-01

    Northern peatlands represent an important sink in the global carbon cycle. Shallow peatlands and marginal connective wetlands can be essential components of many northern peatland landscape mosaics, playing a vital role in landscape connectivity and wider landscape hydrology. However the ecohydrological function of these shallow, marginal systems has been largely overlooked, with peatland hydrology research focused on relatively deep bog systems. In order to predict landscape scale wetland function and its vulnerability to climate change we need to understand how these shallow connective systems function. The balance between moss productivity and water loss provide a key component of these systems, as water use efficiency controls the rate of moss growth and thus controls the amount of atmospheric carbon sequestered in peat. Understanding how productivity of shallow peatland systems responds to changes in evaporative stress will aid predictions of peatland landscape hydrological function in a changing climate. To determine the factors influencing peat productivity, water balance simulations using Hydrus 1-D were conducted over annual growing seasons for different soil profile depths, compositions and antecedent moisture conditions. Our results demonstrate a bimodal distribution of peatland responses; either primarily conserving water by limiting evapotranspiration or, maximizing productivity. For sustained periods of evaporative stress, shallow marginal systems are least able to buffer periods of evaporative stress due to limited labile water storage, and will limit evaporation, conserve water and be less productive. Conversely, where present, both deep water storage and a shallow initial water table prolong the onset of high vegetative stress, thus maximizing moss productivity. However, a total depth of 0.8 m is identified as the threshold above which increasing peat depth has no further effect on changing vegetative stress response and thus landscape function

  5. Proficiency testing of growing media, soil improvers, soils, and nutrient solutions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kreij, de C.; Wever, G.

    2005-01-01

    At Applied Plant Research two (interlaboratory) proficiency tests for (peat-based) growing media, soil improvers, soil, and nutrient solution were being organized; one for the national and one for the European methods. Data were compiled according to ISO 5725. Reports containing all data, where the

  6. Peat deposits Of Dismal Swamp Pocosins, Camdem, Currituck, Gates, Pasquotank, And Perquimans Counties, North Carolina

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Peat is present in the Dismal Swamp of northeastern North Carolina and southeastern Virginia. In North Carolina the peat is in 4 separate deposits located west,...

  7. Influence of physical and chemcial properties on the low-frequency complex conductivity of peat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ponziani, M.; Slob, E.C.; Vanhala, H.; Tillard, D.J.M.

    2012-01-01

    Organic layers are heterogeneous in space and their composition changes over time. This poses challenges to ecohydrologists, subsurface hydrologists and ground engineers in characterizing subsurface peat structures and predicting their behaviour over time. Peat deposits can be characterized by perfo

  8. Peat 2003. Production, use, environmental impact; Torv 2003. Produktion, anvaendning, miljoeeffekter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2004-06-01

    This report discusses the use of peat for energy production and other purposes, laws and other regulations affecting peat production and use, environmental impact, market situation and international statistics regarding peat production. In Sweden, the extraction and use of peat for energy production is regulated by several laws. Harvesting concessions must be approved by the county council. All combustion plants must be reported, or verified by regional or central authorities, depending on the size of the plant. Most important in this process is to verify the maximum emission levels permitted for sulphur, nitrogen oxides, particles, etc. Since 1991, a law on municipal energy planning requires descriptions of environmental consequences. Thus, environmental considerations must govern energy planning. Energy taxation in Sweden was changed in 1993. At present, the sulphur tax on fuel peat amounts to SEK 30 per kg of sulphur. Nitrogen oxides are also subject to a tax of SEK 40 per emitted kg. For peat, energy and environmental taxes total SEK 0.02 per kWh, excluding VAT. Peat harvesting for the production of energy aroused interest in the early 1980s as a consequence of the increased energy prices. In 2003, about 2,628,000 cubic metres of fuel peat were harvested in Sweden. The fuel peat is used mainly for production of hot water in district heating plants. In 2003, the total use of fuel peat amounted to 4,0 TWh. In addition to fuel peat, about 1,825,000 cubic metres of peat litter (mainly for horticultural use) was produced. In 2003, imports amounted to 382,3000 metric tons or 1.3 million cubic metres of peat. Exports amounted to 103,000 metric tons, consisting primarily of peat for horticultural use. The peat market in Sweden is divided into the energy market and the cultivation market. Political decisions regarding combustion taxes have a great impact on the competitive advantages of different fuels. The major competitors to peat are coal, oil, and renewable energy

  9. Stable strontium isotopic ratios from archaeological organic remains from the Thorsberg peat bog

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nosch, Marie-Louise Bech; von Carnap-Bornheim, Claus; Grupe, Gisela;

    2007-01-01

    Pilot study analysing stable strontium isotopic ratios from Iron Age textile and leather finds from the Thorsberg peat bog.......Pilot study analysing stable strontium isotopic ratios from Iron Age textile and leather finds from the Thorsberg peat bog....

  10. Post Fukushima tsunami simulations for Malaysian coasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, Hock Lye; Teh, Su Yean; Abas, Mohd Rosaidi Che

    2014-10-01

    The recent recurrences of mega tsunamis in the Asian region have rekindled concern regarding potential tsunamis that could inflict severe damage to affected coastal facilities and communities. The 11 March 2011 Fukushima tsunami that crippled nuclear power plants in Northern Japan has further raised the level of caution. The recent discovery of petroleum reserves in the coastal water surrounding Malaysia further ignites the concern regarding tsunami hazards to petroleum facilities located along affected coasts. Working in a group, federal government agencies seek to understand the dynamics of tsunami and their impacts under the coordination of the Malaysian National Centre for Tsunami Research, Malaysian Meteorological Department. Knowledge regarding the generation, propagation and runup of tsunami would provide the scientific basis to address safety issues. An in-house tsunami simulation models known as TUNA has been developed by the authors to assess tsunami hazards along affected beaches so that mitigation measures could be put in place. Capacity building on tsunami simulation plays a critical role in the development of tsunami resilience. This paper aims to first provide a simple introduction to tsunami simulation towards the achievement of tsunami simulation capacity building. The paper will also present several scenarios of tsunami dangers along affected Malaysia coastal regions via TUNA simulations to highlight tsunami threats. The choice of tsunami generation parameters reflects the concern following the Fukushima tsunami.

  11. INDOOR ENVIRONMENTAL COMFORT IN MALAYSIAN URBAN HOUSING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaik-Wah Lim

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In Malaysia, terraced houses have been rapidly constructed since 50 years ago and account for 44% of the existing urban housings. However, these houses have very limited use of natural ventilation and daylighting due to openings with small window-to-floor ratio. The deep plan design causes gloomy indoor spaces, low air change rate and poor indoor air quality. Studies showed that indoor environments have major impact on occupants’ well-being. Thereby this study evaluates the effects of indoor comforts on occupants’ perceived health in Malaysian typical terraced houses. Survey of terraced houses in Johor Bahru, Malaysia was conducted using questionnaire. Various terraced houses were studied to identify the critical comfort and health issues in terraced housing. The relationships among occupants’ perceived comforts, health and behavior were studied. The variance of types of terraced house was also analyzed. The findings demonstrated significant linear relationships between indoor comfort and health. However, occupants’ behavior did not give significant impact on thermal comfort. This study concludes that it is very essential to improve indoor comfort in Malaysian typical terraced houses through tropical design strategies to enhance occupants’ well-being.

  12. Transcultural Diabetes Nutrition Algorithm: A Malaysian Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamdy, Osama; Chin Chia, Yook; Lin Lim, Shueh; Kumari Natkunam, Santha; Yeong Tan, Ming; Sulaiman, Ridzoni; Nisak, Barakatun; Chee, Winnie Siew Swee; Marchetti, Albert; Hegazi, Refaat A.; Mechanick, Jeffrey I.

    2013-01-01

    Glycemic control among patients with prediabetes and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D) in Malaysia is suboptimal, especially after the continuous worsening over the past decade. Improved glycemic control may be achieved through a comprehensive management strategy that includes medical nutrition therapy (MNT). Evidence-based recommendations for diabetes-specific therapeutic diets are available internationally. However, Asian patients with T2D, including Malaysians, have unique disease characteristics and risk factors, as well as cultural and lifestyle dissimilarities, which may render international guidelines and recommendations less applicable and/or difficult to implement. With these thoughts in mind, a transcultural Diabetes Nutrition Algorithm (tDNA) was developed by an international task force of diabetes and nutrition experts through the restructuring of international guidelines for the nutritional management of prediabetes and T2D to account for cultural differences in lifestyle, diet, and genetic factors. The initial evidence-based global tDNA template was designed for simplicity, flexibility, and cultural modification. This paper reports the Malaysian adaptation of the tDNA, which takes into account the epidemiologic, physiologic, cultural, and lifestyle factors unique to Malaysia, as well as the local guidelines recommendations. PMID:24385984

  13. Drivers for Malaysian SMEs to Go Green

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Krishna Moorthy

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Small and Medium Enterprises (SMEs around the world have little knowledge about environmental management and do not understand the concept of environmental management. The concept of green is still very new to Malaysian SME owners/managers, although many green conferences, seminars and campaigns have been carried out for quite some time. The concept for green process and products in Malaysia is at the infancy stage. The drivers of environmental behavior in SMEs are relatively under-researched (Worthington & Patton, 2005 and more needs to be done to help SME owner-managers adopt environmental initiatives (Hitchens et al., 2003 as poor environmental performance is not simply the outcome of negative attitudes by SME owner-managers to the environment. This study identifies five key drivers of environmental management practice for SMEs go green. The five drivers are: economic benefits, financial incentives, stakeholders demand, legislation, resources, motivation and knowledge. The Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB is considered as the most appropriate theory to study the drivers of green environment behavior and to investigate the owners’/managers’ perception and attitude towards Malaysian SMEs’ green concept.

  14. Transcultural Diabetes Nutrition Algorithm: A Malaysian Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zanariah Hussein

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Glycemic control among patients with prediabetes and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D in Malaysia is suboptimal, especially after the continuous worsening over the past decade. Improved glycemic control may be achieved through a comprehensive management strategy that includes medical nutrition therapy (MNT. Evidence-based recommendations for diabetes-specific therapeutic diets are available internationally. However, Asian patients with T2D, including Malaysians, have unique disease characteristics and risk factors, as well as cultural and lifestyle dissimilarities, which may render international guidelines and recommendations less applicable and/or difficult to implement. With these thoughts in mind, a transcultural Diabetes Nutrition Algorithm (tDNA was developed by an international task force of diabetes and nutrition experts through the restructuring of international guidelines for the nutritional management of prediabetes and T2D to account for cultural differences in lifestyle, diet, and genetic factors. The initial evidence-based global tDNA template was designed for simplicity, flexibility, and cultural modification. This paper reports the Malaysian adaptation of the tDNA, which takes into account the epidemiologic, physiologic, cultural, and lifestyle factors unique to Malaysia, as well as the local guidelines recommendations.

  15. Post Fukushima tsunami simulations for Malaysian coasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koh, Hock Lye, E-mail: kohhl@ucsiuniversity.edu.my [Office of Deputy Vice Chancellor for Research and Post Graduate Studies, UCSI University, Jalan Menara Gading, 56000 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Teh, Su Yean, E-mail: syteh@usm.my [School of Mathematical Sciences, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 11800 Pulau Pinang (Malaysia); Abas, Mohd Rosaidi Che [Malaysian Meteorological Department, MOSTI, Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia)

    2014-10-24

    The recent recurrences of mega tsunamis in the Asian region have rekindled concern regarding potential tsunamis that could inflict severe damage to affected coastal facilities and communities. The 11 March 2011 Fukushima tsunami that crippled nuclear power plants in Northern Japan has further raised the level of caution. The recent discovery of petroleum reserves in the coastal water surrounding Malaysia further ignites the concern regarding tsunami hazards to petroleum facilities located along affected coasts. Working in a group, federal government agencies seek to understand the dynamics of tsunami and their impacts under the coordination of the Malaysian National Centre for Tsunami Research, Malaysian Meteorological Department. Knowledge regarding the generation, propagation and runup of tsunami would provide the scientific basis to address safety issues. An in-house tsunami simulation models known as TUNA has been developed by the authors to assess tsunami hazards along affected beaches so that mitigation measures could be put in place. Capacity building on tsunami simulation plays a critical role in the development of tsunami resilience. This paper aims to first provide a simple introduction to tsunami simulation towards the achievement of tsunami simulation capacity building. The paper will also present several scenarios of tsunami dangers along affected Malaysia coastal regions via TUNA simulations to highlight tsunami threats. The choice of tsunami generation parameters reflects the concern following the Fukushima tsunami.

  16. Hula Valley peat: review of chemical and geochemical aspects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brenner, S.; Ikan, R.; Agron, N.A.; Nissenbaum, A.

    1978-04-01

    In the Hula Valley, Israel, four layers of peat of Middle Pleistocene to Holocene age, interbedded with limnic clays and marls, are found above 300-m depth. The main detrital minerals are kaolinite, montmorillonite, and illite. Average elemental values of organic matter of dry peat are: C, 15-29 percent; H, 1.8-3 percent; N, 0.8-1.2 percent; S, 2.3-5 percent. The ash content (on dry basis) is 36-59 percent. The average calorific value ranges from 1670 to 3400 cal/g. Organic constituents isolated from the upper layer (Peat Horizon One) include: C/sub 12/ to C/sub 26/ fatty acids, ..beta..-sitosterol, ..beta..-sitostanol, friedelin and friedelanol, ceryl alcohol, a series of hydrocarbons, among them the polycyclic hydrocarbon, perylene, 13 amino acids and a series of polysaccharides of molecular weight in the range of 40,000. A detailed quantitative investigation of the distribution with depth in the top peat layer of the humic, fulvic, and hymatomelanic acids, as well as of the ..beta..-humus and humin, showed humin to be the dominant fraction of the organic matter. Its amount increases from 62 percent of the organic matter (by weight) at the surface to 70 to 90 percent at 2-m depth. The fulvic acid and polysaccharides show rapid decrease with depth, accompanied by concomitant increase in the ..beta..-humus. The humic acid increases with depth. Analysis of the peat organic fractions for carbon and hydrogen stable isotopes shows that with depth the difference in delta C/sup 13/ between the humic and fulvic acids disappears and the delta C/sup 13/ stabilizes at around -18 parts per thousand. The isotope data indicate the dynamic nature of the fulvic acid in the peat. The delta D values were around -60 parts per thousand, but the data are too meager for any firm conclusion.

  17. Tracing of ca 800 yr old mining activity in peat bog using Pb elemental concentrations and isotope compositions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baron, S.; Carignan, J.; Ploquin, A.

    2003-04-01

    Sixty sites of slags have been documented on the Mont-Lozère in southern France. The petrographic analysis shows that slags are metallurgical wastes (800 to 850 yr BP) which certainly result from smelting activity for lead and silver extraction (Ploquin et al., 2001). The aims of this study are: 1) to trace the source of Pb ores which supplied the smelting sites, by using the Pb isotopic composition of several surrounding Pb deposits, 2) to evaluate the actual pollution caused by these slags, by using elemental and isotopic compositions of soils, water and vegetation, and 3) to document the pollution history of the region, by using elemental and isotopic compositions of peat bog cores collected in the neighbourhood of the historical smelting sites. The lead isotopic composition of galena collected in most surrounding ores is very similar to that of different slag samples. On the other hand, the high precision of the results allowed us to select the mineralised areas which were probably the ore sources. The Pb isotopic composition of slags is even more homogeneous: 208/206 Pb: 2.092±0.002; 206/207 Pb: 1.179±0.001; 208/204 Pb: 38.663±0.025; 207/204 Pb: 15.665±0.006; 206/204 Pb: 18.476±0.023, and will allow source tracing in the environment. The "Narses Mortes" peat bog, around which two smelting sites have been reported, is strongly minerotrophic and contains 8 to 60% ash. A 1.40 m core have been retrieved and divided into 58 individual samples. Minerotrophic peat bog records both atmospheric deposition, soils leaching and the grounwater influence. The measured metal concentrations are normalised to Al contents of peat bog samples and the metal/Al ratios are compared to that of the Mont-Lozère granite: relative excess in metal concentrations are found in peat bog samples. An increasing excess of most metals (Pb, Zn, Cd...) was measured for surface samples, from 55 cm depth to the top of the core (23 cm depth). This profil might be attributed to atmospheric

  18. Complete Genome Sequence of Phytopathogenic Pectobacterium atrosepticum Bacteriophage Peat1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalischuk, Melanie; Hachey, John; Kawchuk, Lawrence

    2015-08-13

    Pectobacterium atrosepticum is a common phytopathogen causing significant economic losses worldwide. To develop a biocontrol strategy for this blackleg pathogen of solanaceous plants, P. atrosepticum bacteriophage Peat1 was isolated and its genome completely sequenced. Interestingly, morphological and sequence analyses of the 45,633-bp genome revealed that phage Peat1 is a member of the family Podoviridae and most closely resembles the Klebsiella pneumoniae bacteriophage KP34. This is the first published complete genome sequence of a phytopathogenic P. atrosepticum bacteriophage, and details provide important information for the development of biocontrol by advancing our understanding of phage-phytopathogen interactions.

  19. MANGANESE SPECIATION IN SELECTED AGRICULTURAL SOILS OF PENINSULAR MALAYSIA

    OpenAIRE

    J. Habibah; J. Khairiah; Ismail, B.S.; M.D. Kadderi

    2014-01-01

    Manganese speciation in selected agricultural soils of Peninsular Malaysia is discussed in this study. Manganese concentration in the Easily Leacheable and Ion Exchangeable (ELFE), Acid Reducible (AR), Organic Oxidizable (OO) and Resistant (RR) fractions of soils developed on weathered rocks, soils of mixed nature, alluvium and peat deposits are described. The total manganese concentration in soils developed on weathered rocks was found to be higher than that in soils of mixed nature, alluviu...

  20. Study on Application of Cassava Waste in Potted Anthurium andraeanum L. Instead of Peat Reduction%木薯废弃物代替草炭减量在红掌盆栽基质上的研究应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋付平; 黎明; 刘实忠

    2016-01-01

    以红掌为试验材料,研究木薯废弃物加工生产的熟料基质替代草炭减量作为无土盆栽基质的可行性,结果表明:用木薯废弃物加工生产的熟料介质替代草炭,降低草炭含量的基质配方同样可以获得良好的栽培效果。初步筛选出适宜红掌生长开花的木薯废弃物加工生产的熟料基质优化组合体积配比为熟料介质40%+草炭60%。用该熟料介质替代草炭,使得草炭减量的红掌无土盆栽基质是可行的。%In this study, We had with A nthurium andrae anum L. as test material, study as the feasibility of cassava waste production and processing of the clinker medium alternative peat, and peat reduction soil culture medium. The results showed that cassava wastes production and processing of the clinker medium instead of peat, reduced the peat content of matrix formulations can also get good cultivation effect. Preliminary screening of suitable for growth and flowering of Anthurium andraeanum L., the optimum combination of proportion is: cassava wastes clinker medium 40%+ peat 60%. It was feasible the peat reduction of Anthurium andraeanum L. potted soil matrix, the cassava wastes clinker medium instead of peat.

  1. Palaeoecology of Holocene peat deposits from Nordvestø, north-west Greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bennike, Ole; Goodsite, Michael Evan; Heinemeier, Jan

    2008-01-01

    Two extensive peat deposits on Nordvestø, between Greenland and Canada, were examined for macroscopic remains of plants and animals. One of the peat deposits accumulated during the period from c. 7,100 to 5,100 cal. years BP. This peat is guanogenic and completely dominated by the coprophilous br...

  2. Study of the organic material in peat formations in Puerto de Tornos (Santander)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lobo, M.C.; Almendrus, G.; Dorado, E.; Polo, A.

    1985-01-01

    Different hydrophysical, agrochemical and biochemical features in a raised peat from Puerto de Tornos (Santander, Northern Spain) have been described. Correlations and affinities among data were studied in seven peat horizons. The studied peat was constituted by the alternance of humic and sapric layers, showing a very high content in extractable humic substances, and a low proportion of exchangeable cations, mainly in deeper layers.

  3. Ecological networks and nature policy in central Russia : peat bogs in central and northern Meshera

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Butovsky, R.O.; Reijnen, R.; Otchagov, D.M.; Aleshenko, G.M.; Melik-Bagdasarov, E.

    2001-01-01

    In central and northern Meshera, Russia, the habitat of many characteristic peat bog species now show a very fragmented pattern. Peat mining and other human influences are the most important causes. As a result the potentials for viable populations ofcharacteristic peat bog species have decreased co

  4. Emergency Management for Disasters in Malaysian Hotel Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AlBattat Ahmad Rasmi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to identify major emergencies that have the potential to place Malaysian hotels in emergency and disaster situations; investigate how hotels were prepared for emergencies, how they manage and overcome emergencies when occurred; and limitations and factors influencing successful emergency planning and adoption emergency management in Malaysian hotels. Face-to-face interview with managers from three, four and five star hotels from different backgrounds: local; regional; and International in Kuala Lumpur, Subang, and Putrajaya are undertaken. The result revealed that Malaysian hotels are exposed to a wide range of natural and man-made disasters. Malaysian hotels lack proactive emergency planning and a lot of constraints which impede successful emergency planning for disasters in the hotel industry in Malaysia, with emphasizing on the relevant authority’s role to demonstrate emergency management to hotels convincing them to adopt such practices, so they can be able to cope with emergencies effectively.

  5. SIMULATION OF FUEL ECONOMY FOR MALAYSIAN URBAN DRIVING

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    M A Abas; M F Muhamad Said; S F Zainal Abidin; I Zahari

    2015-01-01

    ... the residencies at the lower engine speed and load region. This paper presents the validation of the derived engine conditions representing Malaysian actual urban driving in an attempt to formulate representative fuel economy data...

  6. Malaysian diaspora strategies in a globalized Muslim market

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fischer, Johan

    2015-01-01

    by this effort. The empirical focus is on London because this city not only holds a special position in the Malaysian state’s halal vision but also historical linkages that evoke diaspora strategies. I argue that Malaysian diaspora strategies should be explored in the interfaces between Islam, state and market......This paper explores Malaysia’s efforts to develop and dominate a global market in halal (literally, ‘lawful or ‘permitted’) commodities as a diaspora strategy and how Malaysian state institutions, entrepreneurs, restaurants and middle-class groups in London respond to and are affected...... and practise Malaysian diaspora strategies in the globalized market for halal products and services. This paper is based on ethnographic material from fieldwork among state institutions, entrepreneurs, restaurants and middle-class groups in Kuala Lumpur and London, namely participant observation...

  7. System Reliability Assessment of Existing Jacket Platforms in Malaysian Waters

    OpenAIRE

    V.J. Kurian; M.C. Voon; M.M.A. Wahab; M.S. Liew

    2014-01-01

    Reliability of offshore platforms has become a very important issue in the Malaysian Oil and Gas Industry as, majority of the jacket platforms in Malaysian waters to date, have exceeded their design life. Reliability of a jacket platform can be assessed through reliability index and probability of failure. Conventional metocean consideration uses 100 year return period wave height associated with 100 year return period current velocity and wind speed. However, recent study shows that for Mala...

  8. Ethics Code Awareness, Usefulness and Professionalism of Malaysian Journalists

    OpenAIRE

    Quah Chun Hoo; Leong Shi Yeing; Guok Eng Chai

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to explore: a) how Malaysian journalists with idealistic and relativistic orientations perceive their ethical codes, the code’s usefulness and their professionalism? and b) is there any significant difference amongst Malaysian journalists from different language dailies and medium of education in terms of their idealism and relativism? Data was collected from 145 journalists from different dailies in Ipoh and Penang, within Peninsular Malaysia using “convenienc...

  9. Pile Spacing Optimization of Short Piled Raft Foundation System for Obtaining Minimum Settlement on Peat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suro, S. M.; Bakar, I.; Sulaeman, A.

    2016-07-01

    Short Piled Raft is a modified piled raft foundation system, which represents combination between raft foundation and pile foundation, but the length of pile is relatively shorter. The basic concept of the Short Piled Raft foundation system considers the passive soil pressure creating a stiff condition of slab-pile system. This means that the thin concrete slab floats on the supporting soil, while the piles serve as stiffeners concrete slab and also to reduce settlement of the foundation. Slab to pile ratio of such system has been mentioned by several researchers, however the optimum pile spacing of stability performance for obtaining minimum settlement on peat haven't been clearly discussed. In this study, finite element method to simulate the stability performance related to settlement of Short Piled Raft foundation system was used. Short Piled Raft foundation system with concrete slab of 7.0 m x 7.0 m square was assumed to be built on peat with the thickness of 3.5 m. The material properties of pile and raft were constant. The outer diameter of galvanized steel pipe as pile was 0.30 m; raft thickness was considered to be constant of 0.15 m and the length of pile was 3.0 m, while the pile spacing varied from 0.50 to 3.00 m. Point load varied from 0 to 100 kN with increment of 20 kN was also considered as a static load, acted on the centre of the concrete slab. Optimization was done by comparing each numerical result of simulations, thus conclusion can easily be drawn. The optimum pile spacing was 1.00 m which produced minimum settlement of 30.11 mm under the load of 100 kN.

  10. Peat Deposits Of Light Ground Pocosin, Pamlico County, North Carolina

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Light Ground Pocosin peat deposit is located in south central Pamlico County, 13 miles east of New Bern. Except for a narrow channel 8 to 12 feet deep, and two...

  11. A carbon fibre composite (CFC Byelorussian peat corer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.G. Franzén

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The design specification, development and manufacture of a Byelorussian (Russian peat corer constructed from carbon fibre composite (CFC are described. The availability of this new composite material introduces new possibilities for constructing field instruments that are as strong as, or stronger than, equipment made from steel and other metals. One advantage is a significant weight reduction. A 10.5 metre coring set in standard stainless and soft steel weighs around 16 kg, whereas the total weight of a similar CFC set is 5.2 kg, giving a weight reduction of almost 70%. The CFC sample chamber is 500 mm long with internal diameter 65 mm, and so contains almost twice the volume of peat that can be collected with a standard 45 mm diameter steel corer. The diameter of the rods is 30 mm, which improves ergonomics, and the CFC has better thermic properties for winter use. Another advantage is that the contamination of samples (notably by chromium and nickel associated with the use of steel corers is eliminated. The CFC sampler works well in soft peats such as Sphagnum and Carex types. It is less suitable for little-decomposed fibrous and forest peats (e.g. Polytrichum type and those containing hardwood remains, especially in the more compacted bottom layers. It should be totally satisfactory for organic lake sediments, but probably not for stiff and coarse mineral deposits.

  12. Peat Biomass Smoke Particle Exposure in Rats Decreases ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wildland fires, favored by prolonged drought and rising temperatures, generate significant amounts of ambient particulate matter (PM), which has been linked to adverse health outcomes. The eastern North Carolina peat fires of Pocosin Lake in 2008 and Pains Bay in 2011 were some of the more prominent recent wildland fires and were associated with increased cardiovascular hospitalizations. The biological impacts of peat biomass emissions and the specific mechanisms driving these responses are unclear. The purpose of this study was to investigate the cardiopulmonary responses of peat biomass smoke exposure in rats. We hypothesized that PM exposure would dose-dependently alter cardiopulmonary function. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to 30 µg (Lo PM) or 300 µg (Hi PM) of peat biomass smoke PM extracts suspended in 200 µL of saline, or saline vehicle alone by oropharyngeal aspiration (OA). Immediately following OA rats were placed in a whole-body plethysmograph and ventilatory data were recorded for 12 minutes. One day following OA, rats were anesthetized with isoflurane for ultrasound assessment of cardiovascular function. Hi PM caused decreases in expiratory timing as early as 4-6 minutes after exposure relative to Lo PM (p = 0.02) and Vehicle (p= 0.06), which resolved shortly thereafter. One day after OA, ultrasounds revealed that Hi PM exposure increased end diastolic volume (EDV) by 16% (p = 0.03) over Vehicle and 13% (p = 0.06) over Lo PM. In addition,

  13. DATING RECENT PEAT ACCUMULATION IN EUROPEAN OMBROTROPHIC BOGS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Plicht, Johannes; Yeloff, Dan; van der Linden, Marjolein; van Geel, Bas; Brain, Sally; Chambers, Frank M.; Webb, Julia; Toms, Phillip; Hatté, C.; Jull, A.J.T.

    2013-01-01

    This study compares age estimates of recent peat deposits in 10 European ombrotrophic (precipitation-fed) bogs produced using the C-14 bomb peak, Pb-210, Cs-137, spheroidal carbonaceous particles (SCPs), and pollen. At 3 sites, the results of the different dating methods agree well. In 5 cores, ther

  14. Dating recent peat accumulation in European ombrotrophic bogs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Plicht, J.; Yeloff, D.; van der Linden, M.; van Geel, B.; Brain, S.; Chambers, F.M.; Webb, J.; Toms, P.

    2013-01-01

    This study compares age estimates of recent peat deposits in 10 European ombrotrophic (precipitation-fed) bogs produced using the 14C bomb peak, 210Pb, 137Cs, spheroidal carbonaceous particles (SCPs), and pollen. At 3 sites, the results of the different dating methods agree well. In 5 cores, there i

  15. Peat Insulation Moderates the Sensitivity of Permafrost Carbon to Climate Warming in Arctic Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaglioti, B.; Mann, D. H.; Farquharson, L. M.; Jones, B. M.; Wooller, M. J.; Baughman, C. A.; Groves, P.; Kunz, M.; Pohlman, J.; Wiles, G. C.; Reanier, R.

    2016-12-01

    Continued warming in the Arctic may cause permafrost to thaw and release large amounts of soil carbon (C) both downstream and into the atmosphere. Understanding how permafrost C responded to prehistoric warming events can tell us how sensitive this process is. We investigated how soil and permafrost C budgets responded to paleo-warming events over the last 40,000 years in Arctic Alaska. In this presentation we first describe paleoclimatic changes using oxygen isotope ratios in ancient willow wood, which is a proxy for air temperature and sea-ice-extent. We then quantify how much permafrost C was released from watersheds using radiocarbon (14C) age-offsets in lake sediment. Stepped-temperature 14C analysis constrains both the age and quality of discreet organic matter sources that were vulnerable to thaw. Results showed that during the relatively warm Bølling-Allerød period (B-A; 14,700-12,800 cal years ago) and Holocene Thermal Maximum (HTM; 11,700-8500 cal years ago), 14C age-offsets were 2-3x their modern levels, and up to 10x more ancient C was being released, indicating significant permafrost thaw in the surrounding watershed. Deep, Yedoma C from ice age deposits was vulnerable to thaw during the BA period, but not during the HTM warming. This enhanced release of ancient C during the BA and HTM was interrupted during the cold and dry Younger Dryas interval (YD; 12,800-11,700 cal years ago) when age-offsets were reduced. Even though recent air temperatures are comparable to those estimated for the warm HTM, age-offsets today are relatively low, and similar to the cold YD. This pattern suggests that the insulating peat layer that has accumulated in the region since the early Holocene is stabilizing permafrost C in the face of recent warming. To estimate the capacity of this peat-buffering feedback to protect permafrost from thaw, we compare these paleo-results with permafrost modeling simulations involving peat covers varying in thickness and moisture content.

  16. Cenozoic ecological history of South East Asian peat mires based on the comparison of coals with present day and Late Quaternary peats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert J. Morley

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Tropical peat swamps are more widespread in Sundaland than in any other equatorial region. Also, Cenozoic deposits from the area are rich in coals. The developmental pattern of present day peat swamps from the region has often been used to help clarify that of coals in the geological record. This paper initially reviews the ecology of present day ombrotrophic, rheotrophic and brackish mangrove peat swamps, and their pattern and timing of development during the Holocene and latest Pleistocene based on palynological studies. Then, it attempts to examine the developmental pattern of the peats which led to the formation of Cenozoic coals across the region, based on both published and unpublished datasets generated during the course of hydrocarbon exploration programmes. It is concluded that Cenozoic coals reflect a greater variety of peat forming settings than occurs in the region today. Extensive brackish water peats formed during the Middle and Late Eocene and Middle and Late Miocene, these often being laterally very extensive. Rheotrophic peats also formed widely through most of the Cenozoic. Ombrotrophic kerapah type peats are first recognised in the Late Oligocene, based on their content of common Casuarina type and Dacrydium pollen, and were particularly common during the Early and Late Miocene in the Sunda shelf region. Kerapah peats sometimes developed great thickness. Basinal peats, on the other hand, increased in representation during the course of the Miocene. No convincing evidence for doming in Cenozoic peats has yet been noted, but on the other hand, no really thick coals, which may have been formed from basinal peats, have so far been studied. As a consequence, examples of doming in the rock record from this area are probably yet to be found.

  17. Effects land surface type, land use, and land use change on aquatic-atmosphere fluxes of carbon dioxide from tropical forests and peat lands of Borneo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oechel, W. C.; Abelleira Martínez, O.; Anshari, G.; Ikawa, H.; Lawrence, W. T.; Metz, M.; Neteler, M.; Nuriman, M.; Rocchini, D.; Zona, D.

    2011-12-01

    Tropical peat lands appear to be loosing huge amounts of carbon dioxide to the atmosphere due to patterns of land use and land use change including conversion of tropical forest peat lands to palm oil production and other agricultural endeavors and forest exploitation. Here, we look at the effect of land use patterns on the export of carbon to tropical river systems and the efflux from tropical rivers to the atmosphere. Levels of pcarbon dioxide, DOC and POC were measured in the Kapuas River, the longest river in Borneo. Patterns of land use and land use change were correlated with export rates of organic matter to the river as well as the vertical fluxes of carbon dioxide from the river and delta to the atmosphere. Land conversion of tropical forests on peat land soils to agriculture, including palm oil production, had some of the highest rates of lateral fluxes of organic carbon to the river system, and among the highest fluxes of carbon dioxide from the river to the atmosphere. This approach illustrates the utility of using a combination of methods: pcarbon dioxide measurement, water chemistry, temporal remote sensing, and modeling to understand and quantify the impact of land use change on GHG emissions from tropical peat lands. Boat based eddy covariance, developed and tested in the coastal zones of the Pacific Ocean, promises to provide a powerful addition to these approaches.

  18. Untangling climatic and autogenic signals in peat records

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Paul J.; Baird, Andrew J.; Young, Dylan M.; Swindles, Graeme T.

    2016-04-01

    Raised bogs contain potentially valuable information about Holocene climate change. However, autogenic processes may disconnect peatland hydrological behaviour from climate, and overwrite and degrade climatic signals in peat records. How can genuine climate signals be separated from autogenic changes? What level of detail of climatic information should we expect to be able to recover from peat-based reconstructions? We used an updated version of the DigiBog model to simulate peatland development and response to reconstructed Holocene rainfall and temperature reconstructions. The model represents key processes that are influential in peatland development and climate signal preservation, and includes a network of feedbacks between peat accumulation, decomposition, hydraulic structure and hydrological processes. It also incorporates the effects of temperature upon evapotranspiration, plant (litter) productivity and peat decomposition. Negative feedbacks in the model cause simulated water-table depths and peat humification records to exhibit homeostatic recovery from prescribed changes in rainfall, chiefly through changes in drainage. However, the simulated bogs show less resilience to changes in temperature, which cause lasting alterations to peatland structure and function and may therefore be more readily detectable in peat records. The network of feedbacks represented in DigiBog also provide both high- and low-pass filters for climatic information, meaning that the fidelity with which climate signals are preserved in simulated peatlands is determined by both the magnitude and the rate of climate change. Large-magnitude climatic events of an intermediate frequency (i.e., multi-decadal to centennial) are best preserved in the simulated bogs. We found that simulated humification records are further degraded by a phenomenon known as secondary decomposition. Decomposition signals are consistently offset from the climatic events that generate them, and decomposition

  19. Emission Factor from Small Scale Tropical Peat Combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setyawati, W.; Damanhuri, E.; Lestari, P.; Dewi, K.

    2017-03-01

    Peatfire in Indonesia recently had become an important issue regarding its global warming impact of green house gases emitted. Emission factor is one of important variables to determine total emission of carbon released by peatfire. But currently there were only a few studies about Indonesian peat fire emission factors. The previous studies of Indonesian peat fire emission factor reported the results from a very limited number of samples and during smoldering combustion stages only. Therefore this study attempts to quantify carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4) emission factors from laboratory peat combustion based on higher number of samples and taken both of combustion stages (flaming and smoldering) into consideration. Peats were sampled from five different districts in Pontianak, West Kalimantan. Ultimate analysis showed that pure peat composed of relatively high carbon content (52.85 - 59.43% dry basis). Laboratory experiments were carried out by burning small amout of peats in a mini furnace and measuring their CO2 and CH4 emission concentration during flaming and smoldering. CO2, CO and CH4 average emission factors and their related average MCE for flaming were found to be 2,088 ± 21 g/kg (n = 17), 3.104 ± 7.173 g/kg (n = 17), 0.143 ± 0.132 g/kg (n = 17) and 0.998 ± 0.005 (n = 17), respectively, while for smoldering were 1,831 ± 131 g/kg (n = 17), 138 ± 72 g/kg (n = 17), 17 ± 12 g/kg (n = 17) and 0.894 ± 0.055 g/kg (n = 17), respectively. This emission factors based on the laboratory combustion experiment can be conveniently used to estimate CO2 and CH4 emission from Indonesian peat fire. Equation models to correlate between MCE and emission factors for both flaming and smoldering were developed. MCE and CO2 emission factor during flaming was relatively higher than smoldering. On the contrary, CO and CH4 emission factors were relatively smaller during flaming than smoldering.

  20. Perception of masculinity amongst young Malaysian men: a qualitative study of university students

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Fazli Khalaf, Zahra; Low, Wah Yun; Ghorbani, Behzad; Merghati Khoei, Effat

    2013-01-01

    .... This research aimed to explore the meanings of masculinity among Malaysian university men. This qualitative study utilized in-depth interviews with 34 young Malaysian university men, aged 20-30 years from three main ethnic groups in Malaysia...

  1. Factors affecting commencement and cessation of betel quid chewing behaviour in Malaysian adults

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ghani, Wan M N; Razak, Ishak A; Yang, Yi-Hsin; Talib, Norain A; Ikeda, Noriaki; Axell, Tony; Gupta, Prakash C; Handa, Yujiro; Abdullah, Norlida; Zain, Rosnah B

    2011-01-01

    .... Unfortunately, data on Malaysian population is non-existent. This study aims to determine the factors associated with the inception and also cessation of betel quid chewing behaviour among Malaysian adults...

  2. Internet Activities among Malaysian Insurance Companies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tee Chee Kiat

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Many studies have been conducted to study Internet usage. Most of them focused on SMI/SME, individuals, services organisations including the financial sector. Previous studies on Internet usage in the financial sector in Malaysia were more focused towards the banking institutions. Not much information is available with regards to the Internet usage among insurance companies. Recognizing the potential of the Internet to insurance companies, the Central Bank of Malaysia (Bank Negara of Malaysia has established guidelines that allow insurers to offer their services online. This study describes the extent of Internet usage among Malaysian insurers. Some insurers have already begun to use the Internet to conduct their daily business transactions, some are in the midst of planning to use and some do not have plan to use at all. Many of them stated that security, customer readiness and cost of initial investment were important considerations when deciding to adopt Internet technologies.

  3. PRICE TRANSMISSION IN SELECTED MALAYSIAN FRUITS MARKETS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatimah Mohamed Arshad

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The market for fresh produce such as fruits in Malaysia is alleged to be inefficient due to poor flow of information between market levels and uncompetitive market particularly at the wholesale and retail levels. Due to these structural problems, pricing efficiency is questionable, in that they are not integrated. This study intends to examine the cointegration and causality relationships between the farm and retail prices in the Malaysian market of fruits. To that end, the bivariate cointegration approach, using Granger causality tests, is applied. The study uses monthly data from January 2000 through December 2010. The results show that there is evidence of long run bidirectional causal relationship between farm and retail prices for banana and watermelon. However, the analysis revealed a long run unidirectional relationship from farm prices to retail prices with no evidence of reverse or feedback causality running from farm price to retail prices for jackfruit and durian.

  4. Microbial liquefaction of peat for the production of synthetic fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gunasekaran, M.

    1988-01-01

    Objectives of this study were: to evaluate the potential of using various microorganisms to hydrolyse and liquify peat; to determine the optimal conditions for peat hydrolysis and liquefaction; to study the co-metabolizable substances; to separate the compounds present in liquified peat by alumina and silica acid chromatography and capillary gas chromatography; and to identify the compounds in liquified peat by capillary GC-Mass spectrometry. Organisms used in the study include: Coprinus comatus, Coriolus hirsutus, Ganoderma lucidum, Lentinus edodes, Lenzites trabea, Phanerochaete chrysosporium, Pleurotus ostreatus, P. sapidus, Polyporus adjustus, Neurospora sitophila, Rhizophus arrhizus, Bacillus subtilis, Acinetobacter sp. and Alcaligenes sp. The fungi were maintained and cultivated in potato dextrose agar at 30 C. The bacteria were maintained in nutrient agar at 30 C. We have also initiated work on coal solubilization in addition to the studies on peat liquefaction. A relatively new substratum or semi-solid base for culture media called Pluronic F-127, or Polyol (BASF, New Jersey). Objectives of this study were: (1) to study the growth patterns of Candida ML 13 on pluronic as substratum; (2) to determine the rate of microbial coal solubilization on pluronic F-127 amended in different growth media; (3) to separate the mycelial mat of Candida ML 13 from unsolubilized coal particles and solubilized coal products from pluronic F-127; (4) to determine the effects of pH on microbial coal solubilization in pluronic F-127 media; (5) the effect of concentration of pluronic F-127 in media on coal solubilization; and, (6) to study the role of extracellular factors secreted by Candida ML 13 on coal solubilization in pluronic F-127 media. Results are discussed. 4 refs.

  5. MORPHOLOGICAL CHARACTERISTICS OF MALAYSIAN NATIONAL CRICKET BATSMEN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Zia Ul Haq

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: The purpose of this study was to examine the morphological characteristics and physical strength of the Malaysian cricket batsmen. Methods: Twenty four top order batsmen from the Malaysian senior, under-19s and under-16s cricket team were recruited for the study. Twenty six anthropometric, four somatotype and two physical strength variables were measured from all participants. Stature were measured by using stadiometer, calipers for skin-fold, non-stretch tape for girth, sliding caliper for segmental lengths and circumferences (breadths and dynamometers for hand grip and back strength. Cater and heath (1990 equation was used to find the somatotype variables of height-weight ratio, endomorph, mesomorph and ectomorph. One way analysis of variance (ANOVA was used to analyses significant between group differences in the variables. Results: The senior batsmen were significantly higher than under-19s and under-16s in body mass, relax and flex arm girths, forearm girth, chest girth, waist girth, calf girth, bi-acromial breadth, transvers breadth and hand grip strength. Both senior and under-19s batsmen were significantly higher than under-16s batsmen in arm span, total arm length, humerus and femur breadths. The under-16s batsmen were also significantly lesser than senior in hip girths, hand lengths and bi-ilocrist breadth, and from under-19s in sitting height and total leg length. Conclusion: Senior batsmen were significantly higher in the anthropometric measurement of girths, breadth and lengths than U-16 because of 10 years age difference. Future research is essential to confirm the relationship between the anthropometric characteristics of batsmen with the batting technique and performance.

  6. Wave power potential in Malaysian territorial waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asmida Mohd Nasir, Nor; Maulud, Khairul Nizam Abdul

    2016-06-01

    Up until today, Malaysia has used renewable energy technology such as biomass, solar and hydro energy for power generation and co-generation in palm oil industries and also for the generation of electricity, yet, we are still far behind other countries which have started to optimize waves for similar production. Wave power is a renewable energy (RE) transported by ocean waves. It is very eco-friend