WorldWideScience

Sample records for major role transitions

  1. First freshwater coralline alga and the role of local features in a major biome transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Žuljević, A; Kaleb, S; Peña, V; Despalatović, M; Cvitković, I; De Clerck, O; Le Gall, L; Falace, A; Vita, F; Braga, Juan C; Antolić, B

    2016-01-21

    Coralline red algae are significant components of sea bottom and up to now considered as exclusively marine species. Here we present the first coralline alga from a freshwater environment, found in the Cetina River (Adriatic Sea watershed). The alga is fully adapted to freshwater, as attested by reproductive structures, sporelings, and an inability to survive brackish conditions. Morphological and molecular phylogenetic analyses reveal the species belongs to Pneophyllum and is described as P. cetinaensis sp. nov. The marine-freshwater transition most probably occurred during the last glaciation. The brackish-water ancestor was preadapted to osmotic stress and rapid changes in water salinity and temperature. The particular characteristics of the karst Cetina River, such as hard water enriched with dissolved calcium carbonate and a pH similar to the marine environment, favoured colonization of the river by a marine species. The upstream advance and dispersal is facilitated by exceptionally pronounced zoochory by freshwater gastropods. Pneophyllum cetinaensis defies the paradigm of Corallinales as an exclusively marine group.

  2. Some mechanistic requirements for major transitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuster, Peter

    2016-08-19

    reported here can be used to illustrate the interplay between competition and cooperation whereby we obtain a hint on the role that resources play in major transitions. Abundance of resources seems to be an indispensable prerequisite of radical innovation that apparently needs substantial investments. Economists often claim that scarcity is driving innovation. Our model sheds some light on this apparent contradiction. In a nutshell, the answer is: scarcity drives optimization and increase in efficiency but abundance is required for radical novelty and the development of new features.This article is part of the themed issue 'The major synthetic evolutionary transitions'. © 2016 The Author(s).

  3. Microscopic description of the three major bands in transitional nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pineda S, R.L.

    1986-01-01

    The author has extended the Coherent Phonon Model to the description of the three major bands in medium heavy transitional nuclei. The model assumes an axially symmetric deformed ground intrinsic state for the description of the low lying yrast levels of the ground band, while the excited bands are generated by intrinsic excitations of the ground band. Good angular momentum states are generated by the Peierls-Yoccoz angular momentum projection method

  4. The transition to adulthood: A game changer? Panel analyses of the impact of major life events on sport participation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Houten, J.M.A. van

    2017-01-01

    In this study, we investigated changes in and differences between the sport participation of individuals during the transition to adulthood, and the role of major life events that mark this transition. We employ a neo-Weberian theoretical framework related to changes in temporal and social resources

  5. Energy transition: the role of the gas vector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Renard, Suzanne; Mazzega, Anthony

    2013-01-01

    GrDF (Gaz de France network Distribution) takes on all the responsibility functions - technical, industrial and legal - for a natural gas distribution network of almost 200 000 km, the most extensive in Europe. In the course of France's national debate on energy transition, GrDF presented its scenario out to 2050. One of its main conclusions: gas infrastructures can play a major role, accommodating new production, while ensuring solidarity between regions. (authors)

  6. Symptomatic menopausal transition and subsequent bipolar disorder among midlife women with major depression: a nationwide longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Li-Chi; Yang, Albert C; Su, Tung-Ping; Bai, Ya-Mei; Li, Cheng-Ta; Chang, Wen-Han; Chen, Tzeng-Ji; Tsai, Shih-Jen; Chen, Mu-Hong

    2017-06-01

    Previous studies suggested that menopausal transition played an important role in the clinical course of major depression and bipolar disorder. However, the role of symptomatic menopausal transition in diagnostic conversion from major depression to bipolar disorder was still unknown. Using the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database, 50,273 midlife women aged between 40 and 60 years in 2002∼2008 with major depression were enrolled in our study and divided into two subgroups based on the presence (n = 21,120) or absence (n = 29,153) of symptomatic menopausal transition. Subjects who had subsequent bipolar disorder during the follow-up were identified. Midlife women with major depression and symptomatic menopausal transition had a higher incidence of the diagnostic conversion to bipolar disorder (7.3 vs. 6.6%, p = 0.003) than those with major depression alone. Cox regression analysis after adjusting for demographic data and psychiatric comorbidities further showed that symptomatic menopausal transition was associated with an increased risk of developing bipolar disorder (HR 1.14, 95% CI 1.07∼1.23) among midlife women with major depression. Sensitivity test after excluding the 1-year and 3-year observation exhibited the consistent findings (HR 1.18, 95% CI 1.09∼1.28; HR 1.20, 95% CI 1.08∼1.34). Midlife women with the dual diagnoses of major depression and symptomatic menopausal transition had an increased risk of the diagnostic conversion to bipolar disorder compared to those with major depression alone. Further studies may be required to investigate the underlying mechanisms among menopausal transition and the diagnostic conversion from major depression to bipolar disorder.

  7. The role of hydrocarbons in energy transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-11-01

    This publication presents some reflections and statements as well as data regarding the role of hydrocarbons in energy production and consumption, in order to better highlight the role hydrocarbons may have in energy transition. It outlines the still very important share of oil in primary and final energy, and more particularly in transports, and that, despite the development of other energies, an energy transition is always very slow. It discusses the perspectives for hydrocarbon reserves and production of oil and natural gas. It outlines that oil remains the most important energy for mobility, the benefits of conventional fuels, and that distribution infrastructures must be preserved and developed. It discusses the evolution of the economic situation of the refining activity (more particularly its margin). It outlines the high contribution of oil industry to economic activity and employment in France, discusses the French energy taxing policy and environmental taxing policy, discusses the issue of security of energy supply (with its different components: exploration-production, refining, logistics and depots, distribution and station network). It discusses the possible role shale hydrocarbons may have in the future. For each issue, the position and opinion of the UFIP (the French Union of oil industries) is stated. The second part of the document proposes a Power Point presentation with several figures and data on these issues

  8. "It's been a long journey": Exploring educationally mobile students' transition into STEM majors at a university

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arreygue, Aimee

    Today, one third of all college students are considered educationally "mobile," which means they will change institutions during their undergraduate careers. The concept of educational mobility challenges the traditional idea of students moving through an educational pipeline in a linear fashion, and recognizes that many of today's students, including those in STEM fields (Science, Technology, Engineering, Mathematics), will have multiple transition points. The purpose of this qualitative study was to examine the transitional experiences of educationally mobile students moving into and through the STEM disciplines at a public university. Students who move from one educational environment to another undergo a significant transition process, and understanding this process for individual students and the institution's role in supporting transition has implications for educational policy. Grounded in the conceptual framework guided by Schlossberg's Transition Theory, and Swail, Redd, and Perna's Geometric Model for Student Persistence and Achievement, this study explores the following research question: How do students who are educationally mobile experience academic, social, and institutional support while transitioning into and through STEM disciplines at a four-year public university? Eighteen science and mathematics majors participated in this study, all of whom attended at least one institution of higher education prior to their current attendance at Mountain View University, a four-year comprehensive Hispanic Serving Institution (HSI) in Southern California. Participants were interviewed utilizing a semi-structured interview protocol and completed a demographic questionnaire as well. Trustworthiness measures included member checking and peer debriefing. The findings of this study show that educationally mobile students are savvy agents of their education, and make personal and professional sacrifices in their pursuit of a STEM degree. They want to connect to like

  9. Exploring the Factors that Influence Nurse Practitioner Role Transition

    OpenAIRE

    Barnes, Hilary

    2015-01-01

    The transition from registered nurse (RN) to nurse practitioner (NP) is often a stressful career change. Data are lacking on the factors affecting NP role transition. This study examined the relationships between NP role transition, prior RN experience, and a formal orientation. From a sample of 352 NPs, only a formal orientation contributed significantly to the regression model indicating a positive relationship with NP role transition (b = 6.24, p < .001). Knowledge of the factors that expl...

  10. 78 FR 58855 - Presidential Determination on Major Drug Transit or Major Illicit Drug Producing Countries for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-25

    ..., commercial, and economic factors that allow drugs to transit or be produced, even if a government has carried... occurs in the southern and western parts of the country, especially Helmand Province. Instability in... Afghan security and regional stability. Afghanistan has continued to take greater responsibility to...

  11. Actor roles in transition: Insights from sociological perspectives

    OpenAIRE

    Wittmayer, Julia; Avelino, Flor; van Steenbergen, F.; Loorbach, Derk

    2016-01-01

    textabstractTo date, the field of transition research lacks a suitable vocabulary to analyse the (changing) interactions and relations of actors as part of a sustainability transition. This article addresses this knowledge gap by exploring the potential of the concept of 'roles' from social interaction research. The role concept is operationalized for transition research to allow the analysis of (changing) roles and relations between actor roles as indicative of changes in the social fabric a...

  12. Majority and minority influence: A dual role interpretation

    OpenAIRE

    de Vries, N.K.; de Dreu, C.; Gordijn, E.; Schuurman, M.

    1996-01-01

    This chapter offers an analysis of majority vs. minority influence using the Heuristic-Systematic Model of persuasion (HSM). We evaluate evidence for and against leading perspectives such as Conversion Theory. Next, research and theory is reviewed suggesting that majority vs. minority influence differentially affect the processing of persuasive arguments. A dual-role interpretation of majority and minority influence is presented. First, numerical support for discrepant messages affects the de...

  13. : Their role in choice of major and success at university

    OpenAIRE

    Nagy, Gabriel

    2010-01-01

    Student interests and abilities are crucial to career-related transitions (Swanson & Fouad, 1999): they are key determinants of individual choices (Humphreys & Yao, 2002), and the fit between abilities and demands as well as interest congruence (i.e., the fit between individual interests and environmental opportunities) contribute to the success of the career paths chosen (Lubinski & Benbow, 2000). The aim of the present research was to investigate the role of vocational interests (based ...

  14. The Role of Transitions in ESL Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinman, Linda

    2013-01-01

    Transitions in ESL contexts generally refer to those linking words placed between sentences and between paragraphs. Transitions in writing (and in speaking) are helpful; they facilitate coherence and cohesion when used correctly. Understanding them when reading allows us to join the writer in seeing why and how idea B follows idea A. In this…

  15. Rethinking Healthcare Transitions and Policies: Changing and Expanding Roles in Transitional Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreño, Patricienn K.

    2014-01-01

    The breakdown of care transitions between various healthcare facilities, providers, and services is a major issue in healthcare, and accounts for over US$15 billion in healthcare expenditures annually. The transition between inpatient care and home care is a very delicate period where, too often, chronically ill patients get worse and wind up back…

  16. Shift Work, Role Overload, and the Transition to Parenthood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry-Jenkins, Maureen; Goldberg, Abbie E.; Pierce, Courtney P.; Sayer, Aline G.

    2007-01-01

    This article examines how the work hours, work schedules, and role overload of working-class couples are related to depressive symptoms and relationship conflict across the transition to parenthood. Data are from 132 dual-earner couples interviewed 5 times across the transition. Multilevel modeling analyses revealed that working evening or night…

  17. Resident Transitions to Assisted Living: A Role for Social Workers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fields, Noelle LeCrone; Koenig, Terry; Dabelko-Schoeny, Holly

    2012-01-01

    This study explored key aspects of resident transitions to assisted living (AL), including the frequency and importance of preadmission resident education and the potential role of social workers in this setting. To examine the factors that may help or hinder resident transitions to AL, a written survey was administered to a statewide,…

  18. Actor roles in transition: Insights from sociological perspectives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.M. Wittmayer (Julia); F. Avelino (Flor); F. van Steenbergen; D.A. Loorbach (Derk)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractTo date, the field of transition research lacks a suitable vocabulary to analyse the (changing) interactions and relations of actors as part of a sustainability transition. This article addresses this knowledge gap by exploring the potential of the concept of 'roles' from social

  19. Final-year student nurses??? perceptions of role transition

    OpenAIRE

    Doody, Owen; Tuohy, Dympna; Deasy, Christine

    2012-01-01

    peer-reviewed Role transition can be both challenging and exciting. This study presents the findings of phase one of a two-part study conducted by Deasy et al (2011), which explored final-year student nurses??? (n=116) perceptions and expectations of role transition. The students were registered on four-year BSc nursing programmes at an Irish university. Data was analyzed using SPSS (version 16). A response rate of 84% was achieved. Over half of respondents said they were adequately ...

  20. Flow Orientation Analysis for Major Activity Regions Based on Smart Card Transit Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parul Singh

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Analyzing public movement in transportation networks in a city is significant in understanding the life of citizen and making improved city plans for the future. This study focuses on investigating the flow orientation of major activity regions based on smart card transit data. The flow orientation based on the real movements such as transit data can provide the easiest way of understanding public movement in the complicated transportation networks. First, high inflow regions (HIRs are identified from transit data for morning and evening peak hours. The morning and evening HIRs are used to represent major activity regions for major daytime activities and residential areas, respectively. Second, the directional orientation of flow is then derived through the directional inflow vectors of the HIRs to show the bias in directional orientation and compare flow orientation among major activity regions. Finally, clustering analysis for HIRs is applied to capture the main patterns of flow orientations in the city and visualize the patterns on the map. The proposed methodology was illustrated with smart card transit data of bus and subway transportation networks in Seoul, Korea. Some remarkable patterns in the distribution of movements and orientations were found inside the city. The proposed methodology is useful since it unfolds the complexity and makes it easy to understand the main movement patterns in terms of flow orientation.

  1. Risk management: Role of societal factors in major industrial accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hovden, J.; Rausand, M.; Sergeev, G.

    1995-01-01

    The paper discusses factors influencing the occurrence of major accidents in complex technological systems. Societal factors are identified as most significant in this context. Important types of societal factors are pin-pointed and discussed. The safety situation in the former Soviet Union and in today's Russian is described. The calamities at Chernobyl, Three Mile Island, and partly also Bhopal are discussed, and the role of societal factors identified. A main point of view is that it is not surprising that these catastrophes happened in the then existing conditions. What is surprising is that they did not happen earlier exclamation point

  2. Professional identity and role transitions in clinical managers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spehar, Ivan; Frich, Jan C; Kjekshus, Lars Erik

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to investigate how clinicians' professional background influences their transition into the managerial role and identity as clinical managers. The authors interviewed and observed 30 clinicians in managerial positions in Norwegian hospitals. A central finding was that doctors experienced difficulties in reconciling the role as health professional with the role as manager. They maintained a health professional identity and reported to find meaning and satisfaction from clinical work. Doctors also emphasized clinical work as a way of gaining legitimacy and respect from medical colleagues. Nurses recounted a faster and more positive transition into the manager role, and were more fully engaged in the managerial aspects of the role. The authors advance that health care organizations need to focus on role, identity and need satisfaction when recruiting and developing clinicians to become clinical managers. The study suggests that the inclusion of aspects from identity and need satisfaction literature expands on and enriches the study of clinical managers.

  3. Major Thought Restructuring: The Roles of Different Prefrontal Cortical Regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seyed-Allaei, Shima; Avanaki, Zahra Nasiri; Bahrami, Bahador; Shallice, Tim

    2017-07-01

    An important question for understanding the neural basis of problem solving is whether the regions of human prefrontal cortices play qualitatively different roles in the major cognitive restructuring required to solve difficult problems. However, investigating this question using neuroimaging faces a major dilemma: either the problems do not require major cognitive restructuring, or if they do, the restructuring typically happens once, rendering repeated measurements of the critical mental process impossible. To circumvent these problems, young adult participants were challenged with a one-dimensional Subtraction (or Nim) problem [Bouton, C. L. Nim, a game with a complete mathematical theory. The Annals of Mathematics, 3, 35-39, 1901] that can be tackled using two possible strategies. One, often used initially, is effortful, slow, and error-prone, whereas the abstract solution, once achieved, is easier, quicker, and more accurate. Behaviorally, success was strongly correlated with sex. Using voxel-based morphometry analysis controlling for sex, we found that participants who found the more abstract strategy (i.e., Solvers) had more gray matter volume in the anterior medial, ventrolateral prefrontal, and parietal cortices compared with those who never switched from the initial effortful strategy (i.e., Explorers). Removing the sex covariate showed higher gray matter volume in Solvers (vs. Explorers) in the right ventrolateral prefrontal and left parietal cortex.

  4. Partial inertia induces additional phase transition in the majority vote model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harunari, Pedro E; de Oliveira, M M; Fiore, C E

    2017-10-01

    Explosive (i.e., discontinuous) transitions have aroused great interest by manifesting in distinct systems, such as synchronization in coupled oscillators, percolation regime, absorbing phase transitions, and more recently, the majority-vote model with inertia. In the latter, the model rules are slightly modified by the inclusion of a term depending on the local spin (an inertial term). In such a case, Chen et al. [Phys Rev. E 95, 042304 (2017)2470-004510.1103/PhysRevE.95.042304] have found that relevant inertia changes the nature of the phase transition in complex networks, from continuous to discontinuous. Here we give a further step by embedding inertia only in vertices with degree larger than a threshold value 〈k〉k^{*}, 〈k〉 being the mean system degree and k^{*} the fraction restriction. Our results, from mean-field analysis and extensive numerical simulations, reveal that an explosive transition is presented in both homogeneous and heterogeneous structures for small and intermediate k^{*}'s. Otherwise, a large restriction can sustain a discontinuous transition only in the heterogeneous case. This shares some similarities with recent results for the Kuramoto model [Phys. Rev. E 91, 022818 (2015)PLEEE81539-375510.1103/PhysRevE.91.022818]. Surprisingly, intermediate restriction and large inertia are responsible for the emergence of an extra phase, in which the system is partially synchronized and the classification of phase transition depends on the inertia and the lattice topology. In this case, the system exhibits two phase transitions.

  5. The role of transit in the economy of Latvia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gžibovska Nataļja

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Transit is an important issue in the history of world economy, including the economy of Latvia. Transit makes a significant contribution to the budget of many transit countries, one of which is the Republic of Latvia. These countries do not have significant natural resources and prefer to focus on logistics and infrastructure in order to facilitate the transit process. This article focuses on the role of transit in the economy of Latvia, whose unique geographical position makes the country an effective transport corridor (bridge in both the west-east and north-south directions. The article presents the results of an opinion poll conducted at Latvian transit enterprises regarding their future development and offers an overview of the main seaports and the Rīga international airport. The author examines the issue of Russia’s accession to the World Trade Organization and its impact on the Latvian transit, the prolongation of EU sanctions against Belarus, and the use of Latvian transport infrastructure for handling the non-military cargo traffic to/from Afghanistan. In conclusion, a forecast of possible transit development in Latvia is provided.

  6. The Biological Big Bang model for the major transitions in evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koonin Eugene V

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Major transitions in biological evolution show the same pattern of sudden emergence of diverse forms at a new level of complexity. The relationships between major groups within an emergent new class of biological entities are hard to decipher and do not seem to fit the tree pattern that, following Darwin's original proposal, remains the dominant description of biological evolution. The cases in point include the origin of complex RNA molecules and protein folds; major groups of viruses; archaea and bacteria, and the principal lineages within each of these prokaryotic domains; eukaryotic supergroups; and animal phyla. In each of these pivotal nexuses in life's history, the principal "types" seem to appear rapidly and fully equipped with the signature features of the respective new level of biological organization. No intermediate "grades" or intermediate forms between different types are detectable. Usually, this pattern is attributed to cladogenesis compressed in time, combined with the inevitable erosion of the phylogenetic signal. Hypothesis I propose that most or all major evolutionary transitions that show the "explosive" pattern of emergence of new types of biological entities correspond to a boundary between two qualitatively distinct evolutionary phases. The first, inflationary phase is characterized by extremely rapid evolution driven by various processes of genetic information exchange, such as horizontal gene transfer, recombination, fusion, fission, and spread of mobile elements. These processes give rise to a vast diversity of forms from which the main classes of entities at the new level of complexity emerge independently, through a sampling process. In the second phase, evolution dramatically slows down, the respective process of genetic information exchange tapers off, and multiple lineages of the new type of entities emerge, each of them evolving in a tree-like fashion from that point on. This biphasic model

  7. The Biological Big Bang model for the major transitions in evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koonin, Eugene V

    2007-08-20

    Major transitions in biological evolution show the same pattern of sudden emergence of diverse forms at a new level of complexity. The relationships between major groups within an emergent new class of biological entities are hard to decipher and do not seem to fit the tree pattern that, following Darwin's original proposal, remains the dominant description of biological evolution. The cases in point include the origin of complex RNA molecules and protein folds; major groups of viruses; archaea and bacteria, and the principal lineages within each of these prokaryotic domains; eukaryotic supergroups; and animal phyla. In each of these pivotal nexuses in life's history, the principal "types" seem to appear rapidly and fully equipped with the signature features of the respective new level of biological organization. No intermediate "grades" or intermediate forms between different types are detectable. Usually, this pattern is attributed to cladogenesis compressed in time, combined with the inevitable erosion of the phylogenetic signal. I propose that most or all major evolutionary transitions that show the "explosive" pattern of emergence of new types of biological entities correspond to a boundary between two qualitatively distinct evolutionary phases. The first, inflationary phase is characterized by extremely rapid evolution driven by various processes of genetic information exchange, such as horizontal gene transfer, recombination, fusion, fission, and spread of mobile elements. These processes give rise to a vast diversity of forms from which the main classes of entities at the new level of complexity emerge independently, through a sampling process. In the second phase, evolution dramatically slows down, the respective process of genetic information exchange tapers off, and multiple lineages of the new type of entities emerge, each of them evolving in a tree-like fashion from that point on. This biphasic model of evolution incorporates the previously developed

  8. Final-year student nurses' perceptions of role transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doody, Owen; Tuohy, Dympna; Deasy, Christine

    Role transition can be both challenging and exciting. This study presents the findings of phase one of a two-part study conducted by Deasy et al (2011), which explored final-year student nurses' (n=116) perceptions and expectations of role transition. The students were registered on four-year BSc nursing programmes at an Irish university. Data was analyzed using SPSS (version 16). A response rate of 84% was achieved. Over half of respondents said they were adequately prepared for the post of registered nurse. Respondents generally perceived themselves to be competent across a range of domains: managing workloads; prioritizing care delivery; interpersonal skills; time management skills; ethical decision making; and providing health information and education. In contrast, not all were confident about their knowledge and many expected the transition to be problematic. Most expected to be supported and to receive constructive feedback. Recommendations include nurturing supportive work environments to reduce stress and increase confidence.

  9. The Lived Experiences of Nurses Transitioning to a Preceptor Role

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Janice Ampil

    2013-01-01

    This study explores the lived experiences of nurses who have transitioned to a nurse preceptor role and provides examples of how individuals learn in the workplace. Historically, nurses who agreed to become preceptors were chosen based on their availability and experience, not necessarily their teaching and learning abilities. Nursing research has…

  10. Spin-glass-like transition in the majority-vote model with anticonformists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krawiecki, Andrzej

    2018-03-01

    Majority-vote model on scale-free networks and random graphs is investigated in which a randomly chosen fraction p of agents (called anticonformists) follows an antiferromagnetic update rule, i.e., they assume, with probability governed by a parameter q (0 transition from a disordered (paramagnetic) state to a spin-glass-like state, characterized by a non-zero value of the spin-glass order parameter measuring the overlap of agents' opinions in two replicas of the system, and simultaneously by the magnetization close to zero. In the case of the model on scale-free networks the critical value of the parameter q weakly depends on the details of the degree distribution. As p is decreased, the critical value of q falls quickly to zero and only the disordered phase is observed. On the other hand, for p close to zero for decreasing q the usual ferromagnetic transition is observed.

  11. Predicting early transition from sub-syndromal presentations to major mental disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, Shane P M; Scott, Jan; Hickie, Ian B

    2017-09-01

    Transition from at-risk state to full syndromal mental disorders is underexplored for unipolar and bipolar disorders compared with psychosis. Prospective, trans-diagnostic study of rates and predictors of early transition from sub-threshold to full syndromal mental disorder. One-year outcome of 243 consenting youth aged 15-25 years with a sub-syndromal presentation of a potentially severe mental disorder. Survival analysis and odds ratio (OR) for predictors of transition identified from baseline clinical and demographic ratings. About 17% ( n =36) experienced transition to a major mental disorder. Independent of syndromal diagnosis, transition was significantly more likely in individuals who were NEET (not in education, employment or training), in females and in those with more negative psychological symptoms (e.g. social withdrawal). NEET status and negative symptoms are modifiable predictors of illness trajectory across diagnostic categories and are not specific to transition to psychosis. I.B.H. has been a Commissioner in Australia's National Mental Health Commission since 2012. He was a board member of headspace: National Youth Mental Health Foundation until January 2012. He has led a range of community-based and pharmaceutical industry-supported depression awareness and education and training programmes. He has led projects for health professionals and the community supported by governmental, community agency and pharmaceutical industry partners (Wyeth, Eli Lilly, Servier, Pfizer, AstraZeneca) for the identification and management of depression and anxiety. He has received honoraria for presentations of his own work at educational seminars supported by a number of non-government organisations and the pharmaceutical industry (including Servier, Pfizer, AstraZeneca and Eli Lilly). He is a member of the Medical Advisory Panel for Medibank Private and also a board member of Psychosis Australia Trust. He leads an investigator-initiated study of the effects of

  12. Resident transitions to assisted living: a role for social workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fields, Noelle LeCrone; Koenig, Terry; Dabelko-Schoeny, Holly

    2012-08-01

    This study explored key aspects of resident transitions to assisted living (AL), including the frequency and importance of preadmission resident education and the potential role of social workers in this setting. To examine the factors that may help or hinder resident transitions to AL, a written survey was administered to a statewide, geographically representative purposive sample of Medicaid Assisted Living Waiver providers (N = 28). Findings suggest a positive relationship between the availability of a social worker and the frequency and importance of resident preadmission education in several areas. Results also suggest a gap between what AL providers believe is important for resident transitions and what is actually happening in their facilities. Social workers may play a significant role in providing preadmission education and are well positioned to address the unmet psychosocial needs of residents and family members during the transition to AL. Future studies should specifically examine the contributing role of social workers during the period of adjustment to AL and the effect of social work services on the well-being of AL residents and families in AL settings.

  13. The role of quasiparticles in rotating transitional nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frauendorf, Stefan

    1984-01-01

    The yrast sequency of nuclei rotating about the symmetry axis is classified in analogy to class I and II superconductors, where the quasiparticles play the role of the quantized flux in metals. The experimental spectra show a class I behaviour. The ω-dependence of the quasiparticle excitation energy in collectively rotating nuclei is used as evidence for magnitude of the pair correlations and the occurrence of triaxial shapes. A transition from triaxial to oblate shape explains the experimental spectra and E2-transition probabilities in the N=88-90 nuclei. (author)

  14. MOTIVATION, A BRIDGE FOR NON-ENGLISH MAJOR FRESHMEN IN THEIR TRANSITION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    This study intends to examine the problems that affected non-English major freshmen’s motivation and the potential factors that could influence their motivation, intrinsic or extrinsic. Self-report data were collected from 188 freshmen selected randomly in Nanchang College by using a close-ended questionnaire. Qualitative results came from interviews with 8 freshmen and 5 teachers. Findings provide evidence that some problems, which emerge with the transition from middle school to college, will influence students’ motivation. Meanwhile, intrinsic motivation can be boosted if the factors of goal, attitude, self-confidence, self-determination, learning environment, learning strategies, teaching methods are valued by teachers.

  15. Northern Ireland in Transition: The Role of Justice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Mailhes

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available All post-conflict societies switching to constitutional liberal democracies have to deal with their past through transitional justice mechanisms that offer to hear the victims, try the perpetrators of all types of abuses, introduce peace and reconciliation schemes. It is time for state and non-state organs to account for past crimes. Several countries have successfully tested such mechanisms. Northern Ireland is the ideal ground for transitional justice to operate but it dispels foreign tailor-made models. However, a number of major reforms and projects have addressed sensitive issues in the wake of the Good Friday Agreement. Two key institutions, the police and the criminal justice system, whose responsibility in the conflict was undeniable, have been reformed. Law and lawyers are concerned with these changes and the introduction of a Human Rights culture in Northern Ireland. A clear break with the past must be achieved for transitional justice mechanisms to work successfully.

  16. Potential role of nuclear power in developing and transition economies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ganiage, D.; Dierstein, P.

    1995-01-01

    The potential role of nuclear power is different in developing or in transition economies; in developing countries such as China, the growth of electricity consumption is high and the construction of several standardized plants is economically justified; in transitional economies, such as Ukraine, the needs are uncertain, old and unsafe plants have to be decommissioned and uncompleted nuclear plants (due to financial problems) should be completed. Nuclear power may provide the developing and transition economies with several advantages such as energy independence and fuel supply security, minimal environmental pollution, support to local industry and employment. It also means the support of national authorities and the development of a suitable infrastructure for plant safety and waste management, financial help and local population acceptance

  17. Role of Student Affairs in International Student Transition and Success

    OpenAIRE

    Christina W. Yao; Chrystal A. George Mwangi

    2017-01-01

    International student mobility has grown significantly in recent years, with over 4.1 million students in 2013 who studied abroad around the world (Institute of International Education [IIE], 2016). With the changes in student demographics and increased mobility, student affairs professionals are in a unique role to support international student transition and success. Unfortunately, current research and practice in higher education tends to place a high level of respo...

  18. Family Roles in Transition. In a Changing Military.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-06-18

    and Management and Department of Psychology Dr. Larry Cummings College Park MD 20742 University of Wisconsin-Madison Graduate School of Business Dr. D...Graduate School of Management and Business University of Oregon Eugene OR 97403 Dr. James R. Terborg University of Houston Department of Psychology Houston...AD-A107 348 UNdITED STATES INTERNATIONAL UNIV SAN DIEGO CA FAMILY --ETC PIG 5/1l FAMILY ROLES IN TRANSITION IN A CHANGING MILITARY (U) JUN 81 E J

  19. Challenges associated with transition to caregiver role following diagnostic disclosure of Alzheimer disease: a descriptive study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ducharme, Francine; Lévesque, Louise; Lachance, Lise; Kergoat, Marie-Jeanne; Coulombe, Renée

    2011-09-01

    The prevalence of Alzheimer's disease is rising. The large number of new cases identified each year means that many new families will set upon a long trajectory of caring for a relative with dementia. Diagnostic disclosure of Alzheimer's disease marks the official transition to the caregiver role, yet this early period of the caregiver career have rarely been studied. Based on Meleis's theoretical framework for role transition, the objectives of this study were to document the characteristics of the caregiving context during the transition to the caregiver role following diagnostic disclosure of Alzheimer's disease and to compare these characteristics by caregiver gender and kinship tie to the relative. A descriptive design was used. Data were collected using standardized measures selected in accordance with the role transition theoretical framework. The sample recruited in Quebec (Canada) cognition clinics comprised 122 caregivers of an elderly relative diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease in the past nine months. Findings reveal the context of care to be marked by several challenges for caregivers. The majority of caregivers receives little informal support, has poor knowledge of available formal services, and has difficulty planning ahead for the relative's future care needs. Caregivers themselves report a lack of preparedness to provide care. Compared with men caregivers, women seem to have more problems controlling disturbing thoughts about their new caregiver role and to experience more family conflicts and psychological distress. Compared with offspring caregivers, spouse caregivers are less able to respond to the relative's disruptive behaviors, make less use of problem-solving strategies, and report fewer family conflicts. The challenges faced by caregivers during the transition to the caregiver role are sensitive to nursing interventions. Pro-active interventions from the outset of the caregiving career, such as early assessment of caregiver needs for

  20. Majority and minority influence: A dual role interpretation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, N.K.; de Dreu, C.; Gordijn, E.; Schuurman, M.

    1996-01-01

    This chapter offers an analysis of majority vs. minority influence using the Heuristic-Systematic Model of persuasion (HSM). We evaluate evidence for and against leading perspectives such as Conversion Theory. Next, research and theory is reviewed suggesting that majority vs. minority influence

  1. Addressing cancer patient and caregiver role transitions during home hospice nursing care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, Janella; Reblin, Maija; Clayton, Margaret F; Ellington, Lee

    2018-05-15

    Many family caregivers and hospice patients experience role changes resulting from advancing illness and the need for increased caregiver responsibility. Successful navigation of conflicts that arise because of these role transitions has been linked to higher quality of patient care and improved caregiver bereavement adjustment. Nursing communication with patients and their caregivers plays an important role in facilitating these transitions. Our objective is to describe patient-caregiver-nurse communication during transitions at end of life. A secondary, qualitative analysis was conducted on transcripts. Using an iterative process of constant comparison, coders inductively categorized nurse, caregiver, and patient communication behavior into overarching themes. Participants were home hospice nurses and cancer patient/spouse caregiver dyads; participants were >45 years of age, English speaking, and cognitively able to participate. Research took place in the home during nurse visits.ResultNineteen unique home hospice visits were analyzed. Patient-caregiver conflict occurred in two major content themes (1) negotiating transitions in patient independence and (2) navigating caregiver/patient emotions (e.g., frustration, sadness). Nurse responses to transition conflict included problem-solving, mediating, or facilitating discussions about conflicts. Nurse responses to emotional conflict included validation and reassurance.Significance of resultsOur findings provide insight into the topics and processes involved in patient and caregiver transitions in home hospice and the role hospice nursing communication plays in mediating potential conflict. Nurses are often asked to take on the role of mediator, often with little conflict resolution communication education; results can be used for nursing education.

  2. Adverse Childhood Experiences and Risk for First-Episode Major Depression During the Menopause Transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epperson, C Neill; Sammel, Mary D; Bale, Tracy L; Kim, Deborah R; Conlin, Sarah; Scalice, Stephanie; Freeman, Katharine; Freeman, Ellen W

    2017-03-01

    Stress exposures may have a differential impact on risk and resilience for depression depending on their timing across development. We sought to determine whether adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) and their onset with respect to puberty contribute to the increased risk observed in first-episode major depressive disorder (MDD) during the menopause transition. Participants were from the Penn Ovarian Aging Study cohort, which is composed of women from Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania, who underwent behavioral, cognitive, and endocrine evaluations approximately yearly from 1996 to 2012 and completed the Adverse Childhood Experiences Questionnaire at study end point (n = 243). ACEs that first occurred 2 or more years before menarche were considered prepubertal. Incident menopause MDD was defined as first observed onset of the disorder in the perimenopause to postmenopause transition using the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-III-R and the Primary Care Evaluation of Mental Disorders. Incident menopause MDD occurred in 48% of the 100 women who reported lifetime MDD. Women reporting ≥ 2 total ACEs were at significantly greater risk for lifetime MDD (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] = 2.05, P = .034) and incident menopause MDD (aOR = 2.58, P = .03) compared to those reporting 0 ACEs; women with ≥ 2 postpubertal ACEs were 2.3 times more likely to experience incidence menopause MDD (P = .024) after controlling for race, smoking, body mass index, and employment. Experiencing only 1 ACE in the prepubertal window, regardless of additional ACEs in postpuberty, was associated with reduced risk for lifetime and incident menopause MDD. Timing and number of adverse experiences with respect to puberty differentially impacted risk and resilience for MDD across the female life span and during the menopause transition in this community cohort. © Copyright 2017 Physicians Postgraduate Press, Inc.

  3. Inflexibility and independence: Phase transitions in the majority-rule model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crokidakis, Nuno; de Oliveira, Paulo Murilo Castro

    2015-12-01

    In this work we study opinion formation in a population participating in a public debate with two distinct choices. We consider three distinct mechanisms of social interactions and individuals' behavior: conformity, nonconformity, and inflexibility. The conformity is ruled by the majority-rule dynamics, whereas the nonconformity is introduced in the population as an independent behavior, implying the failure of attempted group influence. Finally, the inflexible agents are introduced in the population with a given density. These individuals present a singular behavior, in a way that their stubbornness makes them reluctant to change their opinions. We consider these effects separately and all together, with the aim to analyze the critical behavior of the system. We perform numerical simulations in some lattice structures and for distinct population sizes. Our results suggest that the different formulations of the model undergo order-disorder phase transitions in the same universality class as the Ising model. Some of our results are complemented by analytical calculations.

  4. Geography and major host evolutionary transitions shape the resource use of plant parasites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calatayud, Joaquín; Hórreo, José Luis; Madrigal-González, Jaime; Migeon, Alain; Rodríguez, Miguel Á; Magalhães, Sara; Hortal, Joaquín

    2016-08-30

    The evolution of resource use in herbivores has been conceptualized as an analog of the theory of island biogeography, assuming that plant species are islands separated by phylogenetic distances. Despite its usefulness, this analogy has paradoxically led to neglecting real biogeographical processes in the study of macroevolutionary patterns of herbivore-plant interactions. Here we show that host use is mostly determined by the geographical cooccurrence of hosts and parasites in spider mites (Tetranychidae), a globally distributed group of plant parasites. Strikingly, geography accounts for most of the phylogenetic signal in host use by these parasites. Beyond geography, only evolutionary transitions among major plant lineages (i.e., gymnosperms, commelinids, and eudicots) shape resource use patterns in these herbivores. Still, even these barriers have been repeatedly overcome in evolutionary time, resulting in phylogenetically diverse parasite communities feeding on similar hosts. Therefore, our results imply that patterns of apparent evolutionary conservatism may largely be a byproduct of the geographic cooccurrence of hosts and parasites.

  5. Which role for the nuclear in the energy transition?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramade, Francois

    2013-05-01

    After having outlined the almost unavoidable character of energy transition, the author shows that a combination of nuclear and renewable energies is the single possibility to maintain a sufficient level of energy production while avoiding a major climate change. He states that the decision to shut down the Fessenheim plant is not a good start for the debate on energy transition. He outlines that the risks evoked to justify this closure are not realistic. He discusses the technical and economic consequences of this closure, how Fessenheim could then be replaced in terms of energy supply. He discusses the relationship between employment on the one side, and nuclear or renewable energies on the other side. He briefly comments the German situation, outlines that nuclear energy is an alternative to the exhaustion of fossil hydrocarbon resources. He finally addresses the issue of definition of the energy mix

  6. Major Depressive Disorder in Adolescence: The Role of Subthreshold Symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgiades, Katholiki; Lewinsohn, Peter M.; Monroe, Scott M.; Seeley, John R.

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To examine the longitudinal association between individual subthreshold symptoms and onset of major depressive disorder (MDD) in adolescence. Method: Data for analysis come from the Oregon Adolescent Depression Project, a prospective epidemiological study of psychological disorders among adolescents, ages 14 to 18 years, from the…

  7. The role of Snell's law for a magnonic majority gate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanazawa, Naoki; Goto, Taichi; Sekiguchi, Koji; Granovsky, Alexander B; Ross, Caroline A; Takagi, Hiroyuki; Nakamura, Yuichi; Uchida, Hironaga; Inoue, Mitsuteru

    2017-08-11

    In the fifty years since the postulation of Moore's Law, the increasing energy consumption in silicon electronics has motivated research into emerging devices. An attractive research direction is processing information via the phase of spin waves within magnonic-logic circuits, which function without charge transport and the accompanying heat generation. The functional completeness of magnonic logic circuits based on the majority function was recently proved. However, the performance of such logic circuits was rather poor due to the difficulty of controlling spin waves in the input junction of the waveguides. Here, we show how Snell's law describes the propagation of spin waves in the junction of a Ψ-shaped magnonic majority gate composed of yttrium iron garnet with a partially metallized surface. Based on the analysis, we propose a magnonic counterpart of a core-cladding waveguide to control the wave propagation in the junction. This study has therefore experimentally demonstrated a fundamental building block of a magnonic logic circuit.

  8. Effective strategic leadership: Balancing roles during church transitions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noel J. Pearse

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available As part of their responsibilities of leading the organisation, strategic leaders are responsible for leading change. This article investigated the application of the strategic leadership of change within the church context. A Straussian approach to the grounded theory method was used to generate a substantive grounded theory of organisational change and leadership, particularly focusing on the manifestation and management of organisation inertia in churches within South Africa that were transitioning from a programme based to a cell based church design. This article reported on one aspect of this study and focused on the patterns of leadership roles. It further distinguished between effective and ineffective leadership patterns that either enhanced or compromised the credibility of the leader and by implication, affected the success of the change intervention. The results of the study were discussed from the perspective of social capital theory, thereby contributing to understanding the role of strategic leaders in building social capital within the context of organisation change.

  9. Major roles for minor bacterial lipids identified by mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrett, Teresa A

    2017-11-01

    Mass spectrometry of lipids, especially those isolated from bacteria, has ballooned over the past two decades, affirming in the process the complexity of the lipidome. With this has come the identification of new and interesting lipid structures. Here is an overview of several novel lipids, from both Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria with roles in health and disease, whose structural identification was facilitated using mass spectrometry. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Bacterial Lipids edited by Russell E. Bishop. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. The role of foreign direct investment in the nutrition transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkes, Corinna

    2005-06-01

    To examine the role of foreign direct investment (FDI) in the nutrition transition, focusing on highly processed foods. Data on FDI were identified from reports/databases and then compiled and analysed. A review of published literature on FDI into the food sector was conducted. The nutrition transition is a public health concern owing to its connection with the rising burden of obesity and diet-related chronic diseases in developing countries. Global health leaders are calling for action to address the threat. Highly processed foods often have considerable fat, sugar and salt content, and warrant closer examination. FDI into food processing, service and retail has risen rapidly since the 1980s, mainly from transnational food companies (TFCs) in developed countries. As FDI has risen, so has the proportion invested in highly processed foods for sale in the host market. FDI has proved more effective than trade in generating sales of highly processed foods, and enables TFCs to cut costs, gain market power and obtain efficiencies in distribution and marketing. The amount of FDI targeted at developing countries is increasing; while a disproportionate share enters the larger developing economies, foreign affiliates of TFCs are among the largest companies in low- and low- to middle-income countries. The effect of FDI is to make more highly processed foods available to more people. FDI has made it possible to lower prices, open up new purchasing channels, optimise the effectiveness of marketing and advertising, and increase sales. FDI has been a key mechanism in shaping the global market for highly processed foods. Notwithstanding the role of demand-side factors, it has played a role in the nutrition transition by enabling and promoting the consumption of these foods in developing countries. Empirical data on consumption patterns of highly processed foods in developing countries are critically needed, but since FDI is a long-term investment vehicle, it is reasonable to

  11. Boundary Management in Doctoral Supervision: How Supervisors Negotiate Roles and Role Transitions throughout the Supervisory Journey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benmore, Anne

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, boundary management illuminates understanding of the doctoral supervisory relationship. Boundary management is presented as a theoretical vehicle that helps to define and explain roles that supervisors employ at different junctures along the doctoral journey and how transitions between these are negotiated. The paper draws on the…

  12. The role of controlled attention on recall in major depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Alissa J; Wells, Tony T; Vanderlind, W Michael; Beevers, Christopher G

    2014-04-01

    Information processing biases are hallmark features of major depressive disorder (MDD). Depressed individuals display biased memory and attention for negative material. Given that memory is highly dependent on attention for initial encoding, understanding the interplay of these processes may provide important insight into mechanisms that produce memory biases in depression. In particular, attentional control-the ability to selectively attend to task-relevant information by both inhibiting the processing of irrelevant information and disengaging attention from irrelevant material-may be one area of impairment in MDD. In the current study, clinically depressed (MDD: n = 15) and never depressed (non-MDD: n = 22) participants' line of visual gaze was assessed while participants viewed positive and negative word pairs. For each word pair, participants were instructed to attend to one word (target) and ignore one word (distracter). Free recall of study stimuli was then assessed. Depressed individuals displayed greater recall of negatively valenced target words following the task. Although there were no group differences in attentional control in the context of negative words, attention to negative targets mediated the relationship between depression status and recall of negative words. Results suggest a stronger link between attention and memory for negative material in MDD.

  13. Eating Disorders and Major Depression: Role of Anger and Personality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbate-Daga Giovanni

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to evaluate comorbidity for MD in a large ED sample and both personality and anger as clinical characteristics of patients with ED and MD. We assessed 838 ED patients with psychiatric evaluations and psychometric questionnaires: Temperament and Character Inventory, Eating Disorder Inventory-2, Beck Depression Inventory, and State-Trait Anger Expression Inventory. 19.5% of ED patients were found to suffer from comorbid MD and 48.7% reported clinically significant depressive symptomatology: patients with Anorexia Binge-Purging and Bulimia Nervosa were more likely to be diagnosed with MD. Irritable mood was found in the 73% of patients with MD. High Harm Avoidance (HA and low Self-Directedness (SD predicted MD independently of severity of the ED symptomatology, several clinical variables, and ED diagnosis. Assessing both personality and depressive symptoms could be useful to provide effective treatments. Longitudinal studies are needed to investigate the pathogenetic role of HA and SD for ED and MD.

  14. The link between perceived maternal and paternal autonomy support and adolescent well-being across three major educational transitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duineveld, Jasper J; Parker, Philip D; Ryan, Richard M; Ciarrochi, Joseph; Salmela-Aro, Katariina

    2017-10-01

    To what extent does maternal and paternal autonomy support enhance well-being across the major transitions of high school? We tested the degree to which perceived autonomy supportive parenting facilitated positive changes in self-esteem and life satisfaction and buffered against negative changes in depressive symptoms and school related burnout in 3 Finnish longitudinal studies, each with a measurement point before and after a major transition (middle school, N1 = 760, 55.7% girls; high school, N2 = 214, 51.9% girls; post high school, N3 = 858, 47.8% girls). Results showed that perceived parental autonomy support was negatively related to depressive symptoms and positively related to self-esteem. The findings for the effects on depressive symptoms were replicated across all 3 transitions, while effects on self-esteem were only found for the high school and post high school transitions. Moreover, evidence of coregulation was found for depressive symptoms. Depressive symptoms before the transition were found to decrease autonomy support after the transition for both the high school and post high school transitions. Maternal and paternal autonomy support was of equal importance. Importantly, the effects on depressive symptoms increased as children developed, suggesting the continual importance of parents throughout high school and into emerging adulthood. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  15. Quantitative proteomics reveals protein profiles underlying major transitions in aspen wood development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obudulu, Ogonna; Bygdell, Joakim; Sundberg, Björn; Moritz, Thomas; Hvidsten, Torgeir R; Trygg, Johan; Wingsle, Gunnar

    2016-02-18

    Wood development is of outstanding interest both to basic research and industry due to the associated cellulose and lignin biomass production. Efforts to elucidate wood formation (which is essential for numerous aspects of both pure and applied plant science) have been made using transcriptomic analyses and/or low-resolution sampling. However, transcriptomic data do not correlate perfectly with levels of expressed proteins due to effects of post-translational modifications and variations in turnover rates. In addition, high-resolution analysis is needed to characterize key transitions. In order to identify protein profiles across the developmental region of wood formation, an in-depth and tissue specific sampling was performed. We examined protein profiles, using an ultra-performance liquid chromatography/quadrupole time of flight mass spectrometry system, in high-resolution tangential sections spanning all wood development zones in Populus tremula from undifferentiated cambium to mature phloem and xylem, including cell expansion and cell death zones. In total, we analyzed 482 sections, 20-160 μm thick, from four 47-year-old trees growing wild in Sweden. We obtained high quality expression profiles for 3,082 proteins exhibiting consistency across the replicates, considering that the trees were growing in an uncontrolled environment. A combination of Principal Component Analysis (PCA), Orthogonal Projections to Latent Structures (OPLS) modeling and an enhanced stepwise linear modeling approach identified several major transitions in global protein expression profiles, pinpointing (for example) locations of the cambial division leading to phloem and xylem cells, and secondary cell wall formation zones. We also identified key proteins and associated pathways underlying these developmental landmarks. For example, many of the lignocellulosic related proteins were upregulated in the expansion to the early developmental xylem zone, and for laccases with a rapid decrease

  16. Carbon outcomes of major land-cover transitions in SE Asia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ziegler, Alan D.; Phelps, Jacob; Yuen, Jia Qi

    2012-01-01

    Policy makers across the tropics propose that carbon finance could provide incentives for forest frontier communities to transition away from swidden agriculture (slash-and-burn or shifting cultivation) to other systems that potentially reduce emissions and/or increase carbon sequestration. However......-use regimes optimize or increase carbon sequestration. As some transitions may negatively impact other ecosystem services, food security, and local livelihoods, the entire carbon and noncarbon benefit stream should also be taken into account before prescribing transitions with ambiguous carbon benefits...

  17. The Link between Perceived Maternal and Paternal Autonomy Support and Adolescent Well-Being across Three Major Educational Transitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duineveld, Jasper J.; Parker, Philip D.; Ryan, Richard M.; Ciarrochi, Joseph; Salmela-Aro, Katariina

    2017-01-01

    To what extent does maternal and paternal autonomy support enhance well-being across the major transitions of high school? We tested the degree to which perceived autonomy supportive parenting facilitated positive changes in self-esteem and life satisfaction and buffered against negative changes in depressive symptoms and school related burnout in…

  18. Hitting the road to adulthood: short-term personality development during a major life transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bleidorn, Wiebke

    2012-12-01

    Previous research suggests that normative life transitions have the potential to trigger personality maturation. But what exactly happens during such a transitional stage? The present study examined personality trait changes in a sample of 910 German high school students during their transition from school to adult life. Despite the short observation period of three semiannual measurements, growth curve analyses revealed significant mean-level changes in personality traits. These changes occurred primarily in a positive direction, were strongest for the trait of conscientiousness, and most pronounced in those students who were directly confronted with this transitional experience. Bivariate growth curve models indicated that individual differences in personality change were substantially associated with changes in students' investments into achievement behavior. Supporting socioanalytic perspectives on personality development, these findings can be discussed with respect to process approaches to personality change assuming that consistent behavioral changes might lead to personality change in a bottom-up fashion.

  19. The role of product designers in the transition towards the circular economy : A reality check

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sumter, D.X.; Bakker, C.A.; Balkenende, A.R.; Bakker, C.; Mugge, R.

    2017-01-01

    This paper examines the role of product designers in the transition towards the circular economy. Both scientific and grey literature show remarkable optimism when it comes to role strategic and coordinating role designers could play in this transition process. However, there has been little

  20. The 2016 Transit of Mercury Observed from Major Solar Telescopes and Satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasachoff, Jay M.; Schneider, Glenn; Gary, Dale; Chen, Bin; Sterling, Alphonse C.; Reardon, Kevin P.; Dantowitz, Ronald; Kopp, Greg A.

    2016-10-01

    We report observations from the ground and space of the 9 May 2016 transit of Mercury. We build on our explanation of the black-drop effect in transits of Venus based on spacecraft observations of the 1999 transit of Mercury (Schneider, Pasachoff, and Golub, Icarus 168, 249, 2004). In 2016, we used the 1.6-m New Solar Telescope at the Big Bear Solar Observatory with active optics to observe Mercury's transit at high spatial resolution. We again saw a small black-drop effect as 3rd contact neared, confirming the data that led to our earlier explanation as a confluence of the point-spread function and the extreme solar limb darkening (Pasachoff, Schneider, and Golub, in IAU Colloq. 196, 2004). We again used IBIS on the Dunn Solar Telescope of the Sacramento Peak Observatory, as A. Potter continued his observations, previously made at the 2006 transit of Mercury, at both telescopes of the sodium exosphere of Mercury (Potter, Killen, Reardon, and Bida, Icarus 226, 172, 2013). We imaged the transit with IBIS as well as with two RED Epic IMAX-quality cameras alongside it, one with a narrow passband. We show animations of our high-resolution ground-based observations along with observations from XRT on JAXA's Hinode and from NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory. Further, we report on the limit of the transit change in the Total Solar Irradiance, continuing our interest from the transit of Venus TSI (Schneider, Pasachoff, and Willson, ApJ 641, 565, 2006; Pasachoff, Schneider, and Willson, AAS 2005), using NASA's SORCE/TIM and the Air Force's TCTE/TIM. See http://transitofvenus.info and http://nicmosis.as.arizona.edu.Acknowledgments: We were glad for the collaboration at Big Bear of Claude Plymate and his colleagues of the staff of the Big Bear Solar Observatory. We also appreciate the collaboration on the transit studies of Robert Lucas (Sydney, Australia) and Evan Zucker (San Diego, California). JMP appreciates the sabbatical hospitality of the Division of Geosciences and

  1. Immigration transition and depressive symptoms: four major ethnic groups of midlife women in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Im, Eun-Ok; Chang, Sun Ju; Chee, Wonshik; Chee, Eunice; Mao, Jun James

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the relationships between immigration transition and depressive symptoms among 1,054 midlife women in the United States. This was a secondary analysis of the data from two national Internet survey studies. Questions on background characteristics and immigration transition and the Depression Index for Midlife Women were used to collect the data. The data were analyzed using inferential statistics including multiple regressions. Immigrants reported lower numbers of symptoms and less severe symptoms than nonimmigrants (p immigration status were significant predictors of depressive symptoms (R(2) =.01, p <.05).

  2. THE TRANSITION FROM HISTORICAL COST TO FAIR-VALUE, A CHOICE WITH MAJOR IMPLICATIONS IN ACCOUNTING

    OpenAIRE

    ILIE RĂSCOLEAN; ILEANA-SORINA RAKOS

    2016-01-01

    This paper treats the importance of the transition from valuation at historical cost to valuation at fair value of the assets within an economic entity, and the contents of the result obtained in financial reporting. The work deals with the influence that the fair value assessment can have on the level of an entity’s economic performance. Starting from a few statements such as: fair value option evaluation to influence significantly the fair value; presentation of the elements on the ba...

  3. Highlight: Private sector could play a major role in feeding Africa ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2014-09-08

    Sep 8, 2014 ... Highlight: Private sector could play a major role in feeding Africa ... scale, we will need to involve the private sector," said IDRC President Jean Lebel. ... There is ample evidence that addressing gender inequalities and ...

  4. Life Expectancy and Economic Growth : The Role of the Demographic Transition

    OpenAIRE

    Cervellati, Matteo; Sunde, Uwe

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we investigate the causal effect of life expectancy on economic growth by explicitly accounting for the role of the demographic transition. In addition to focusing on issues of empirical identification, this paper emphasizes the role of the econometric specification. We present a simple theory of the economic and demographic transition where individuals' education and fertility decisions depend on their life expectancy. The theory predicts that before the demographic transition ...

  5. Politicization in the Name of the Majority: The Role of Cultural, Economic, and Political Grievances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernd Simon

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available The article reports two experiments that examined politicization in the name of the majority population and intergroup polarization as a function of perceived grievances of the majority population. To manipulate perceived majority grievances, we used three different injustice frames (cultural, economic, political, each of which targeted an important arena of societal participation and thus a typical breeding ground for societal injustices and psychological grievances. In addition, both experiments included a (no frame control condition. The samples recruited for the two experiments differed from each other in (left–right political orientation and consequently in their perceptions of and reactions to potential majority grievances. The most striking differential influences were observed for the cultural grievance symbolized by the political correctness norm. However, both experiments provided evidence that majority politicization mediates the effect of majority grievances on intergroup polarization and that, in contrast to the divisive role of majority politicization, majority solidarity likely fosters social inclusion.

  6. Fostering a Developmentally Responsive Middle-to-High School Transition: The Role of Transition Supports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellerbrock, Cheryl R.; Denmon, Jennifer; Owens, Ruchelle; Lindstrom, Krista

    2015-01-01

    This yearlong qualitative multisite case study investigated ways middle and high school transition supports foster a developmentally responsive transition for students. A total of 23 participants engaged in this study, including 4 students, 4 middle school teachers, 13 high school teachers, 1 middle school principal, and 1 high school principal.…

  7. NDH expression marks major transitions in plant evolution and reveals coordinate intracellular gene loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruhlman, Tracey A; Chang, Wan-Jung; Chen, Jeremy J W; Huang, Yao-Ting; Chan, Ming-Tsair; Zhang, Jin; Liao, De-Chih; Blazier, John C; Jin, Xiaohua; Shih, Ming-Che; Jansen, Robert K; Lin, Choun-Sea

    2015-04-11

    Key innovations have facilitated novel niche utilization, such as the movement of the algal predecessors of land plants into terrestrial habitats where drastic fluctuations in light intensity, ultraviolet radiation and water limitation required a number of adaptations. The NDH (NADH dehydrogenase-like) complex of Viridiplantae plastids participates in adapting the photosynthetic response to environmental stress, suggesting its involvement in the transition to terrestrial habitats. Although relatively rare, the loss or pseudogenization of plastid NDH genes is widely distributed across diverse lineages of photoautotrophic seed plants and mutants/transgenics lacking NDH function demonstrate little difference from wild type under non-stressed conditions. This study analyzes large transcriptomic and genomic datasets to evaluate the persistence and loss of NDH expression across plants. Nuclear expression profiles showed accretion of the NDH gene complement at key transitions in land plant evolution, such as the transition to land and at the base of the angiosperm lineage. While detection of transcripts for a selection of non-NDH, photosynthesis related proteins was independent of the state of NDH, coordinate, lineage-specific loss of plastid NDH genes and expression of nuclear-encoded NDH subunits was documented in Pinaceae, gnetophytes, Orchidaceae and Geraniales confirming the independent and complete loss of NDH in these diverse seed plant taxa. The broad phylogenetic distribution of NDH loss and the subtle phenotypes of mutants suggest that the NDH complex is of limited biological significance in contemporary plants. While NDH activity appears dispensable under favorable conditions, there were likely sufficiently frequent episodes of abiotic stress affecting terrestrial habitats to allow the retention of NDH activity. These findings reveal genetic factors influencing plant/environment interactions in a changing climate through 450 million years of land plant

  8. Role of multistability in the transition to chaotic phase synchronization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Postnov, D.E.; Vadivasova, T.E.; Sosnovtseva, Olga

    1999-01-01

    In this paper we describe the transition to phase synchronization for systems of coupled nonlinear oscillators that individually follow the Feigenbaum route to chaos. A nested structure of phase synchronized regions of different attractor families is observed. With this structure, the transition...... to nonsynchronous behavior is determined by the loss of stability for the most stable synchronous mode. It is shown that the appearance of hyperchaos and the transition from lag synchronization to phase synchronization are related to the merging of chaotic attractors from different families. Numerical examples...

  9. The Normative Dimension in Transdisciplinarity, Transition Management, and Transformation Sciences: New Roles of Science and Universities in Sustainable Transitioning

    OpenAIRE

    Scholz, Roland W.

    2017-01-01

    This paper discusses the role normative aspects play in different approaches of science–practice collaboration, in particular as action research, (Mode 2) Transdisciplinarity (Td), Transition Management (TM), and Transformative Science (TSc). We elaborate on the different roles that scientists in these processes play. They work as facilitators (or contribute to a facilitated Td process), as activists (i.e., activist researchers) in TM projects, and as catalysts in TSc. Td processes develop so...

  10. The Normative Dimension in Transdisciplinarity, Transition Management, and Transformation Sciences: New Roles of Science and Universities in Sustainable Transitioning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roland W. Scholz

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses the role normative aspects play in different approaches of science–practice collaboration, in particular as action research, (Mode 2 Transdisciplinarity (Td, Transition Management (TM, and Transformative Science (TSc. We elaborate on the different roles that scientists in these processes play. They work as facilitators (or contribute to a facilitated Td process, as activists (i.e., activist researchers in TM projects, and as catalysts in TSc. Td processes develop socially robust solutions for sustainable transitioning and impacts on the science system through mutual learning and by integrating epistemics (i.e., ways of knowing from science and practice and focusing on the empowerment of stakeholders. Science is viewed as a public good aiming to serve all key stakeholders. Researchers involved in TM projects strive to influence ongoing transition processes by actively engaging and participating in them, including lobbying for and empowering transformative changes toward sustainability based upon the researchers’ own analyses and world views. The TSc approach takes a catalyst perspective of the scientist’s role in inducing processes of strategic (societal transition when including certain stakeholder groups. The paper focuses on what roles normative aspects play in the different approaches and new societal demands imposed on science and universities. Based on this, we conclude that a new order of universities, public knowledge institutions, and boundary institutions is forthcoming.

  11. Identifying Major Transitions in the Evolution of Lithic Cutting Edge Production Rates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antoine Muller

    Full Text Available The notion that the evolution of core reduction strategies involved increasing efficiency in cutting edge production is prevalent in narratives of hominin technological evolution. Yet a number of studies comparing two different knapping technologies have found no significant differences in edge production. Using digital analysis methods we present an investigation of raw material efficiency in eight core technologies broadly representative of the long-term evolution of lithic technology. These are bipolar, multiplatform, discoidal, biface, Levallois, prismatic blade, punch blade and pressure blade production. Raw material efficiency is assessed by the ratio of cutting edge length to original core mass. We also examine which flake attributes contribute to maximising raw material efficiency, as well as compare the difference between expert and intermediate knappers in terms of cutting edge produced per gram of core. We identify a gradual increase in raw material efficiency over the broad sweep of lithic technological evolution. The results indicate that the most significant transition in efficiency likely took place with the introduction of small foliate biface, Levallois and prismatic blade knapping, all introduced in the Middle Stone Age / Middle Palaeolithic among early Homo sapiens and Neanderthals. This suggests that no difference in raw material efficiency existed between these species. With prismatic blade technology securely dated to the Middle Palaeolithic, by including the more recent punch and pressure blade technology our results dispel the notion that the transition to the Upper Palaeolithic was accompanied by an increase in efficiency. However, further increases in cutting edge efficiency are evident, with pressure blades possessing the highest efficiency in this study, indicating that late/epi-Palaeolithic and Neolithic blade technologies further increased efficiency.

  12. Superorganismality and caste differentiation as points of no return: how the major evolutionary transitions were lost in translation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boomsma, Jacobus J; Gawne, Richard

    2018-02-01

    More than a century ago, William Morton Wheeler proposed that social insect colonies can be regarded as superorganisms when they have morphologically differentiated reproductive and nursing castes that are analogous to the metazoan germ-line and soma. Following the rise of sociobiology in the 1970s, Wheeler's insights were largely neglected, and we were left with multiple new superorganism concepts that are mutually inconsistent and uninformative on how superorganismality originated. These difficulties can be traced to the broadened sociobiological concept of eusociality, which denies that physical queen-worker caste differentiation is a universal hallmark of superorganismal colonies. Unlike early evolutionary naturalists and geneticists such as Weismann, Huxley, Fisher and Haldane, who set out to explain the acquisition of an unmated worker caste, the goal of sociobiology was to understand the evolution of eusociality, a broad-brush convenience category that covers most forms of cooperative breeding. By lumping a diverse spectrum of social systems into a single category, and drawing attention away from the evolution of distinct quantifiable traits, the sociobiological tradition has impeded straightforward connections between inclusive fitness theory and the major evolutionary transitions paradigm for understanding irreversible shifts to higher organizational complexity. We evaluate the history by which these inconsistencies accumulated, develop a common-cause approach for understanding the origins of all major transitions in eukaryote hierarchical complexity, and use Hamilton's rule to argue that they are directly comparable. We show that only Wheeler's original definition of superorganismality can be unambiguously linked to irreversible evolutionary transitions from context-dependent reproductive altruism to unconditional differentiation of permanently unmated castes in the ants, corbiculate bees, vespine wasps and higher termites. We argue that strictly

  13. THE TRANSITION FROM HISTORICAL COST TO FAIR-VALUE, A CHOICE WITH MAJOR IMPLICATIONS IN ACCOUNTING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ILIE RĂSCOLEAN

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper treats the importance of the transition from valuation at historical cost to valuation at fair value of the assets within an economic entity, and the contents of the result obtained in financial reporting. The work deals with the influence that the fair value assessment can have on the level of an entity’s economic performance. Starting from a few statements such as: fair value option evaluation to influence significantly the fair value; presentation of the elements on the balance sheet at fair value leads to significant changes in the accounting of the economic entities, in data analysis was used a questionnaire based on the four questions whose results were analysed and which have led to carrying out this study. The research was supported by the information collected from individuals and companies within certain economic entities. The paper ends with the conclusions of authors related to the fair value assessment which, as if trying to address the shortcomings of historical cost, by aiming to correct cost of customer acquisition assets with market value, achieved through constant reevaluation of the balance sheet items. On the other hand, a concurrent evaluation of both historical cost and fair value, depending on the inherent characteristics of the elements of the balance sheet, resulting in getting relevant, reliable financial statements, in accordance with reality.

  14. Transition from the spouse dementia caregiver role: A change for the better?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Lynsey J; Bond, Malcolm J

    2016-07-01

    One in 15 Australians over 65 experience dementia, and are commonly supported by spouses. Evidence demonstrates declining wellbeing for these caregivers as their role continues. There are indications of improvement once caregivers transition out of the role (recovery) but alternate suggestions that caregiving stress may be too damaging to be appeased (wear and tear). It seems plausible that reason for transition (care recipient's move into residential care or death) will affect caregivers' outcomes. A synthetic cohort method compared caregivers' stress and wellbeing prior to, and one and two years post-transition. There was evidence of wear and tear for physical wellbeing but recovery for psychological wellbeing over time; with little difference based on reason for transition. Caregiver outcomes seem to be a function of the action rather than the reason for transition, but factors such as age must be considered when designing methods to support post-transition wellbeing. © The Author(s) 2014.

  15. Driving spin transition at interface: Role of adsorption configurations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yachao

    2018-01-01

    A clear insight into the electrical manipulation of molecular spins at interface is crucial to the design of molecule-based spintronic devices. Here we report on the electrically driven spin transition in manganocene physisorbed on a metallic surface in two different adsorption configurations predicted by ab initio techniques, including a Hubbard-U correction at the manganese site and accounting for the long-range van der Waals interactions. We show that the application of an electric field at the interface induces a high-spin to low-spin transition in the flat-lying manganocene, while it could hardly alter the high-spin ground state of the standing-up molecule. This phenomenon cannot be explained by either the molecule-metal charge transfer or the local electron correlation effects. We demonstrate a linear dependence of the intra-molecular spin-state splitting on the energy difference between crystal-field splitting and on-site Coulomb repulsion. After considering the molecule-surface binding energy shifts upon spin transition, we reproduce the obtained spin-state energetics. We find that the configuration-dependent responses of the spin-transition originate from the binding energy shifts instead of the variation of the local ligand field. Through these analyses, we obtain an intuitive understanding of the effects of molecule-surface contact on spin-crossover under electrical bias.

  16. Examining the influence of major life events as drivers of residential mobility and neighbourhood transitions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy Morris

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Residential mobility and internal migration have long been key foci of research across a range of disciplines. However, the analytical strategies adopted in many studies are unable to unpick the drivers of mobility in sufficient detail because of two issues prevalent within the literature: a lack of detailed information on the individual context of people's lives and a failure to apply longitudinal methods. Methods: Using detailed data from a UK birth cohort study, the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC, and a multilevel recurrent-event history analysis approach, this paper overcomes these two major limitations and presents a number of findings. Results: Most life events increase the likelihood of moving, even though there is little evidence that they precede upwards or downwards mobility into more or less deprived neighbourhoods. The findings also suggest that families living in poor homes and neighbourhoods are more likely to be stuck in place following certain negative life events than those in good environments. Conclusions: While broad demographic and socioeconomic characteristics reliably account for mobility patterns, the occurrence of life events and a person's attitudes towards their living environment are necessary for a full understanding of mobility patterns. Future studies should strive to account for such detailed data. Contribution: We demonstrate the important impact that a wide range of life events has on the mobility of families and provide evidence that studies unable to account for major life events likely do not suffer strong bias results through unobserved confounding.

  17. The role of the judiciary in Egypt's failed transition to democracy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abat Ninet, Antoni

    2016-01-01

    This essay illustrates the inter-institutional dynamics and the fundamental role a constitutional court can play in a transition, the challenges when the court is heavily involved or alternatively when it plays a more reserved role. The essay deals with the role that judges and more precisely the...

  18. Transition From Clinical to Educator Roles in Nursing: An Integrative Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritz, Elizabeth

    This review identified barriers to and facilitators of nurses' transition from clinical positions into nursing professional development and other nurse educator roles. The author conducted literature searches using multiple databases. Twenty-one articles met search criteria, representing a variety of practice settings. The findings, both barriers and facilitators, were remarkably consistent across practice settings. Four practice recommendations were drawn from the literature to promote nurses' successful transition to nursing professional development roles.

  19. The Impact of Leadership Roles and Internships on Undergraduate Business Major Field Test (MFT) Scores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Chris; Yates, Dan; Song, Joon Young

    2014-01-01

    It is often the goal or mission of higher education to prepare graduates for leadership roles in organizations and the community. Even if we are to assume that leadership skills can be developed, determining the appropriate ways to teach and measure leadership is often debated. Our study used quantitative data from the ETS Business Major Field…

  20. Prospective prediction of children's smoking transitions: role of parents' and older siblings' smoking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bricker, Jonathan B; Peterson, Arthur V; Leroux, Brian G; Andersen, M Robyn; Rajan, K Bharat; Sarason, Irwin G

    2006-01-01

    To use a novel social epidemic probability model to investigate longitudinally the extent to which parents' and older siblings' smoking predict children's smoking transitions. Parents' and older siblings' smoking status was assessed when children were in 3rd grade (baseline). Three smoking transitions were assessed over the period of child/adolescent smoking acquisition (up to 12th grade): (1) transition from never smoking to trying smoking, (2) transition from trying to monthly smoking and (3) transition from monthly to daily smoking. Forty Washington State school districts participating in the long term Hutchinson Smoking Prevention Project (HSPP). Participants were the 5520 families for whom data on both parents' and older siblings' baseline smoking status, as well as on children's smoking transitions, were available. The probability that a smoking parent influenced their child to make the first transition to trying smoking was 32% (95% CI: 27%, 36%); to make the second transition from trying to monthly smoking, 15% (95% CI: 10%, 19%); and to make the third transition from monthly to daily smoking, 28% (95% CI: 21%, 34%). The probability that an older sibling influenced a child to make the first transition to trying smoking was 29% (95% CI: 17%, 39%); to make the second transition from trying to monthly smoking, 0% (95% CI: 0%, 8%); and to make the third transition from monthly to daily smoking, 20% (95% CI: 4%, 33%). In contrast to previous research, the results provide new evidence suggesting that family smoking influences both initiation and escalation of children's smoking. Results also quantify, in terms of probabilities, the importance of parents' and older siblings' smoking on children's three major smoking transitions. Parents' smoking, as well as older siblings' smoking, are important behaviors to target in preventing adolescents from making smoking transitions.

  1. Potential role of nuclear power in developing and transitional economies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ganiage, D.; Dierstein, Ph.

    1996-01-01

    In some developing countries, such as Asia, the growth of electricity consumption is high, and a nuclear programme based on the construction of several standardised plants could be implemented and economically justified. In transitional economies, such as in Central and Eastern Europe countries, electricity authorities were forced to stop the construction of several nuclear plants, mainly because of financial problems. Nuclear power can provide the developing and transition economies with several advantages, such as energy independence and fuel supply security, minimal environmental pollution, support to local industry and employment. On the other hand, nuclear energy also means the support of national authorities and the development of a suitable infrastructure in order to check the enforcement of legal procedures, plants safety and waste management. Local population must understand and accept this commitment linked hand to hand with the choice of nuclear energy. Finally, nuclear industry is very capital-intensive. Therefore, financial resources are to be found by the local electricity authorities, along with the development of a suitable legal framework and the implementation of new tariff policies which must reflect the real costs of electricity. (R.P.)

  2. The pursuit of new role: A study of luxury products consumption during the liminal transition into first time employment

    OpenAIRE

    Chucherd, Sunong

    2008-01-01

    Consumer behaviour research on role transition has so far been limited to the negative life changes and the changes-specific consequences towards the consumption pattern. Moreover, although young adult customers have recently been the new target customer for many luxury brands, no research has been conducted concerning the impacts of role transition during the transition into first-time employment and the role of luxury products in dealing with those effects. Liminal transition is also a new ...

  3. Optimizing care transitions: the role of the community pharmacist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melody, Karleen T; McCartney, Elizabeth; Sen, Sanchita; Duenas, Gladys

    2016-01-01

    Transitions of care (TOC) refer to the movement of patients across institutions, among providers, between different levels of care, and to and from home. Medication errors that occur during TOC have the potential to result in medical complications that are serious for the patient and costly to the health care system. Positive outcomes have been demonstrated when pharmacists are involved in providing TOC services, including reducing preventable adverse drug reactions, medication-related problems, and rehospitalizations, as well as improving the discharge process. This review explores TOC models involving community pharmacy practice, the current impact of pharmacist interventions in TOC, and patient satisfaction with TOC services provided by community pharmacists. Common barriers and potential solutions to TOC services provided in the community pharmacy, such as patient identification, information gathering, standardization of services, administrative support, reimbursement, and time restraints, are also discussed. PMID:29354539

  4. The transit oil and gas pipeline and the role of bargaining: A non-technical discussion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Omonbude, Ekpen J.

    2007-01-01

    Transit oil and gas pipelines are growing in relevance, and face a number of topical problems. One of such issues is the problem of potential disruption from a number of sources, notably post-construction behaviour of the transit country. Present and future pipelines face the risk of continuous conflict over legal, economic and political issues. Once the pipeline is built and in operation, the threat of disruption of the pipeline by the transit country over disputed transit terms exists. This is due to two key problems: first, a shift in bargaining powers to the transit country upon construction and operation of the pipeline and, second, changes in the value of the throughput imply price changes that can affect the behaviour of the transit country. This paper discusses the role of basic bargaining principles in cross-border oil and gas pipelines involving transit through one or more countries. It finds that the motive behind the pipeline plays a key role in the prevention of potential disruptions to the pipeline due to rent squeezing. Also, although the potential of such disruptions does exist, there are a number of factors that could serve to mute the consequences of shifts in bargaining power to the transit countries

  5. Transitivity And The Narrator's Role In Selected TRC Testimonies

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Information Technology

    how the different narrators' roles and perspectives on the events shape their ... injustices committed in the past (Truth and Reconciliation of South Africa Report, Vol. ..... testimony, and CDS answers some additional questions from commissioners at .... self-explanatory: CDS construes the police as active participants bent on ...

  6. Transition to Employment: Role of the Family in Career Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindstrom, Lauren; Doren, Bonnie; Metheny, Jennifer; Johnson, Pam; Zane, Claire

    2007-01-01

    This study investigated the role of the family in career development and postschool employment outcomes for young adults with learning disabilities. Using a multiple-case study design, the authors examined a set of family structural and process variables. Fifty-nine in-depth interviews were conducted with young adults, parents, and school staff…

  7. Education and the Transition to Fatherhood: The Role of Selection Into Union.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trimarchi, Alessandra; Van Bavel, Jan

    2017-02-01

    Although advanced education has been found to be consistently associated with a later transition to parenthood for women, findings about education and the transition to parenthood have been much less consistent for men, and no stylized fact has emerged from the literature. We argue that the inconsistency of findings for men is due to the fact that the selection process involved in union formation has been disregarded in earlier studies. We hypothesize that men's educational attainment consistently and positively affects the transition to fatherhood via higher rates of union formation. We apply multiprocess event-history analysis to data from the Generations and Gender Surveys for 10 European countries. Our results show indeed a consistent positive effect of education on the transition to fatherhood, but it operates chiefly through selection into union. Failing to account for this selection process leads to a major underestimation of the salience of education for the transition to fatherhood.

  8. The Role of Avocados in Complementary and Transitional Feeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin B. Comerford

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Infant dietary patterns tend to be insufficient sources of fruits, vegetables, and fiber, as well as excessive in salt, added sugars, and overall energy. Despite the serious long-term health risks associated with suboptimal fruit and vegetable intake, a large percentage of infants and toddlers in the U.S. do not consume any fruits or vegetables on a daily basis. Since not all fruits and vegetables are nutritionally similar, guidance on the optimal selection of fruits and vegetables should emphasize those with the greatest potential for nutrition and health benefits. A challenge is that the most popularly consumed fruits for this age group (i.e., apples, pears, bananas, grapes, strawberries do not closely fit the current general recommendations since they tend to be overly sweet and/or high in sugar. Unsaturated oil-containing fruits such as avocados are nutritionally unique among fruits in that they are lower in sugar and higher in fiber and monounsaturated fatty acids than most other fruits, and they also have the proper consistency and texture for first foods with a neutral flavor spectrum. Taken together, avocados show promise for helping to meet the dietary needs of infants and toddlers, and should be considered for inclusion in future dietary recommendations for complementary and transitional feeding.

  9. The Role of Vitamin D and Vitamin D Receptor in Immunity to Leishmania major Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James P. Whitcomb

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Vitamin D signaling modulates a variety of immune responses. Here, we assessed the role of vitamin D in immunity to experimental leishmaniasis infection in vitamin D receptor-deficient mice (VDRKO. We observed that VDRKO mice on a genetically resistant background have decreased Leishmania major-induced lesion development compared to wild-type (WT mice; additionally, parasite loads in infected dermis were significantly lower at the height of infection. Enzymatic depletion of the active form of vitamin D mimics the ablation of VDR resulting in an increased resistance to L. major. Conversely, VDRKO or vitamin D-deficient mice on the susceptible Th2-biased background had no change in susceptibility. These studies indicate vitamin D deficiency, either through the ablation of VDR or elimination of its ligand, 1,25D3, leads to an increase resistance to L. major infection but only in a host that is predisposed for Th-1 immune responses.

  10. The role and meaning of vocations in the transition from education to work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Christian Helms

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to explore current patterns of transition from education to work in the Dual System of VET in Denmark. First it will explore some of the significant changes that have taken place in the transition process. Then it will discuss two dimensions of the role of vocations...... and occupations in the transition process. One dimension is to connect the edu-cational system with the employment system. The other is to offer imagined future identities for young people entering vocational education. The last part of the paper will present some findings from two research projects on the role...... and meaning of vocations in the transition from education to work in the Danish dual system....

  11. The digital brain switch: managing rapid transitions between role identities in a digital world

    OpenAIRE

    Symon, Gillian; Chamakiotis, Petros; Whiting, Rebecca; Roby, Helen; Whittle, Jon; Chong, Ming Ki; Ang, Chee Siang; Rashid, Umar

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we present initial findings from an EPSRC-sponsored multi-disciplinary research project investigating how digital technologies and social media affect role transitions across work-life domains. The research uses an innovative combination of visual diaries and narrative interviews to capture micro-transitions (‘switches’) and explore these with participants in the context of their overall lives. Findings from a pilot study with academics are reported here in terms of: emergent d...

  12. Selling in a Dying Business: An Analysis of Trends During a Period of Major Market Transition in the Funeral Industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beard, Virginia R; Burger, William C

    2017-01-01

    As a result of recent economic changes in the United States and cultural changes among the population, the funeral industry has experienced a "legitimation crisis." The objective of this research is to examine new advertising and marketing strategies engaged in by professionals in the funeral industry to respond to market and cultural changes that have affected both the funeral industry at large and the role of the funeral director as a participant in this industry. A meta-analysis of articles from issues of the industry trade journal American Funeral Director for the years 2008 through 2015 was conducted. Two major themes emerged from the data. First, that funeral home owners should respond to market changes by using their assets for diverse reasons and second that forms of community engagement can create feelings of goodwill that will increase usage and loyalty from families. Within each of these major themes, a variety of subthemes emerged from the data.

  13. Invited review: Role of bacterial endotoxins in the etiopathogenesis of periparturient diseases of transition dairy cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckel, Emily F; Ametaj, Burim N

    2016-08-01

    The dairy industry continues to suffer severe economic losses due to the increased disease incidence cows experience during the transition period. It has long been the classical view that the major contributing factor to the development of these periparturient diseases is the considerable increase in nutritional demands for milk production. This classical view, however, fails to account for the substantial correlation between both metabolic and infectious diseases and the detrimental effects that can occur with the provision of high-energy diets to support these nutritional demands. Currently, increasing evidence implicates bacterial endotoxins in the etiopathology of most periparturient diseases. Bacterial endotoxins are components of the outer cell wall of gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria that are highly immunostimulatory and can trigger proinflammatory immune responses. The ability of endotoxins to translocate from the mucosal tissues, including the gastrointestinal tract, mammary gland, and uterus, into the systemic circulation has been observed. Once they have entered the circulation, endotoxins potentially contribute to disease either directly, through eliciting an inflammatory response, or indirectly through other factors such as the overreaction of the natural protective mechanisms of the host. Although the evidence implicating a role of endotoxins in the pathogenesis of transition diseases continues to grow, our current knowledge of the host response to mucosal endotoxin exposure and pathogenic mechanisms remain largely unknown. Developing our understanding of the connection between endotoxemia and dairy cattle disease holds significant potential for the future development of preventative measures that could benefit the productivity of the dairy industry as well as animal welfare. Copyright © 2016 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Dual enrollment as a factor for women transitioning into STEM majors in Montana two-year colleges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakes, Penny Jane

    The purpose of this non-experimental, descriptive, quantitative study was to describe the impact high school dual enrollment coursework has had on initial enrollment of women with STEM majors in Montana two-year colleges. The study was designed to find whether or not differences existed for access (initial enrollment), persistence (to third semester), and success (associate's degree, certificate, or transfer to a four-year institution within 150% of program length). The literature review highlighted the need for studies to address the issue of few women in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) occupations. One goal of dual enrollment in Montana is to ease transitions from high school to college, including underrepresented populations such as women in STEM fields. The scope of this study was to collect, organize, and interpret data to describe the effect of that effort for women enrolling in STEM majors at two-year colleges in Montana. Baseline information established the demographics of young women who participated in dual enrollment in Montana high schools during 2007-2009. Data analysis described results using attributes of gender, dual enrollment, access, persistence, and success for those enrolled in STEM fields. Results indicated more young women than young men take advantage of dual enrollment in high school and more women than men with dual-enrollment credit initially enroll in college. More men than women major in a STEM field and more men persist and graduate within the STEM fields. Data indicated that 221 students enrolled in a Montana two-year college with DE/DC credit during 2007-2009. Of those, eight women chose STEM majors, six persisted to the third semester, and two completed. It is recommended that a mixed-methods study be conducted to give a deeper level of understanding for enrollment trends and career choice. Longitudinal studies should also be conducted as dual enrollment grows within the state of Montana. Further studies

  15. The role of nuclear energy in times of energy transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    Since the reactor catastrophe in Fukushima, the risk of nuclear power has once again become more evident to the public and has also led to a rethinking of politics in Europe. Slogans like ''Nuclear Power, No Thanks!'', ''Get Out of Euratom'' are making more and more the rounds. The phase-out of nuclear energy is the topic that is increasingly provoking people to think. But how should one handle this? What role will nuclear energy play in a distant future? Central factors such as the economic viability of renewable energy sources and the environmental and social compatibility of production and distribution must be taken into account, while at the same time the reduction of pollutants and greenhouse gases must continue. If this is done without nuclear energy, is the rapid abandonment of nuclear energy even necessary or does nuclear energy generation have to be used as a temporary solution? (roessner)

  16. Rol' tranzita v jekonomike Latvii [The role of transit in the economy of Latvia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gžibovska Nataļja

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Transit is an important issue in the history of world economy, including the economy of Latvia. Transit makes a significant contribution to the budget of many transit countries, one of which is the Republic of Latvia. These countries do not have significant natural resources and prefer to focus on logistics and infrastructure in order to facilitate the transit process. This article focuses on the role of transit in the economy of Latvia, whose unique geographical position makes the country an effective transport corridor (bridge in both the west-east and north-south directions. The article presents the results of an opinion poll conducted at Latvian transit enterprises regarding their future development and offers an overview of the main seaports and the Rīga international airport. The author examines the issue of Russia’s accession to the World Trade Organization and its impact on the Latvian transit, the prolongation of EU sanctions against Belarus, and the use of Latvian transport infrastructure for handling the non-military cargo traffic to/from Afghanistan. In conclusion, a forecast of possible transit development in Latvia is provided.

  17. TRANSIT

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Overview Graphics. TRANSIT. SYSTEM: DETERMINE 2D-POSITION GLOBALLY BUT INTERMITTENT (POST-FACTO). IMPROVED ACCURACY. PRINCIPLE: POLAR SATELLITES WITH INNOVATIONS OF: GRAVITY-GRADIENT ATTITUDE CONTROL; DRAG COMPENSATION. WORKS ...

  18. Parallels between major depressive disorder and Alzheimer's disease: role of oxidative stress and genetic vulnerability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Roberto; Petersen, Robert B; Perry, George

    2014-10-01

    The thesis of this review is that oxidative stress is the central factor in major depressive disorder (MDD) and Alzheimer's disease (AD). The major elements involved are inflammatory cytokines, the hypothalamic-pituitary axis, the hypothalamic-pituitary gonadal, and arginine vasopressin systems, which induce glucocorticoid and "oxidopamatergic" cascades when triggered by psychosocial stress, severe life-threatening events, and mental-affective and somatic diseases. In individuals with a genomic vulnerability to depression, these cascades may result in chronic depression-anxiety-stress spectra, resulting in MDD and other known depressive syndromes. In contrast, in subjects with genomic vulnerability to AD, oxidative stress-induced brain damage triggers specific antioxidant defenses, i.e., increased levels of amyloid-β (Aβ) and aggregation of hyper-phosphorylated tau, resulting in paired helical filaments and impaired functions related to the ApoEε4 isoform, leading to complex pathological cascades culminating in AD. Surprisingly, all the AD-associated molecular pathways mentioned in this review have been shown to be similar or analogous to those found in depression, including structural damage, i.e., hippocampal and frontal cortex atrophy. Other interacting molecular signals, i.e., GSK-3β, convergent survival factors (brain-derived neurotrophic factor and heat shock proteins), and transition redox metals are also mentioned to emphasize the vast array of intermediates that could interact via comparable mechanisms in both MDD and AD.

  19. The pivotal role of abscisic acid signaling during transition from seed maturation to germination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, An; Chen, Zhong

    2017-05-01

    Seed maturation and germination are two continuous developmental processes that link two distinct generations in spermatophytes; the precise genetic control of these two processes is, therefore, crucially important for the survival of the next generation. Pieces of experimental evidence accumulated so far indicate that a concerted action of endogenous signals and environmental cues is required to govern these processes. Plant hormone abscisic acid (ABA) has been suggested to play a predominant role in directing seed maturation and maintaining seed dormancy under unfavorable environmental conditions until antagonized by gibberellins (GA) and certain environmental cues to allow the commencement of seed germination when environmental conditions are favorable; therefore, the balance of ABA and GA is a major determinant of the timing of seed germination. Due to the advent of new technologies and system biology approaches, molecular studies are beginning to draw a picture of the sophisticated genetic network that drives seed maturation during the past decade, though the picture is still incomplete and many details are missing. In this review, we summarize recent advances in ABA signaling pathway in the regulation of seed maturation as well as the transition from seed maturation to germination, and highlight the importance of system biology approaches in the study of seed maturation.

  20. The role of oxidative and nitrosative stress in accelerated aging and major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurya, Pawan Kumar; Noto, Cristiano; Rizzo, Lucas B; Rios, Adiel C; Nunes, Sandra O V; Barbosa, Décio Sabbatini; Sethi, Sumit; Zeni, Maiara; Mansur, Rodrigo B; Maes, Michael; Brietzke, Elisa

    2016-02-04

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) affects millions of individuals and is highly comorbid with many age associated diseases such as diabetes mellitus, immune-inflammatory dysregulation and cardiovascular diseases. Oxidative/nitrosative stress plays a fundamental role in aging, as well as in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative/neuropsychiatric disorders including MDD. In this review, we critically review the evidence for an involvement of oxidative/nitrosative stress in acceleration of aging process in MDD. There are evidence of the association between MDD and changes in molecular mechanisms involved in aging. There is a significant association between telomere length, enzymatic antioxidant activities (SOD, CAT, GPx), glutathione (GSH), lipid peroxidation (MDA), nuclear factor κB, inflammatory cytokines with MDD. Major depression also is characterized by significantly lower concentration of antioxidants (zinc, coenzyme Q10, PON1). Since, aging and MDD share a common biological base in their pathophysiology, the potential therapeutic use of antioxidants and anti-aging molecules in MDD could be promising.

  1. Role of Peripheral Vascular Resistance for the Association Between Major Depression and Cardiovascular Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bouzinova, Elena; Wiborg, Ove; Aalkjær, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Major depression and cardiovascular diseases are 2 of the most prevalent health problems in Western society, and an association between them is generally accepted. Although the specific mechanism behind this comorbidity remains to be elucidated, it is clear that it has a complex multifactorial....... The changes in arterial structure, contractile and relaxing functions associated with depression symptoms are discussed, and the role of these abnormalities for the pathology of major depression and cardiovascular diseases are suggested....... character including a number of neuronal, humoral, immune, and circulatory pathways. Depression-associated cardiovascular abnormalities associate with cardiac dysfunctions and with changes in peripheral resistance. Although cardiac dysfunction in association with depression has been studied in detail...

  2. Gender equity in STEM: The role of dual enrollment science courses in selecting a college major

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persons, Christopher Andrew

    A disproportionately low number of women, despite rigorous high school preparation and evidenced interest in STEM through voluntary participation in additional coursework, declare a STEM-related college major. The result of this drop in participation in STEM-related college majors is a job market flooded with men and the support of an incorrect stereotype: STEM is for men. This research seeks to assess the effects, if any, that Dual Enrollment (DE) science courses have on students' self-identified intent to declare a STEM-related college major as well as the respective perceptions of both male and female students. Self-Determination Theory and Gender Equity Framework were used respectively as the theoretical frames. High school students from six schools in two district participated in an online survey and focus groups in this mixed methods study. The results of the research identified the role the DE course played in their choice of college major, possible interventions to correct the underrepresentation, and societal causes for the stereotype.

  3. Work-role transition: from staff nurse to clinical nurse educator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manning, Liz; Neville, Stephen

    2009-07-01

    This article presents the findings of a study describing Clinical Nurse Educators' experiences, as they recall their transition from staff nurse to the Clinical Nurse Educator role, within a New Zealand District Health Board. Nurse Educator roles influence clinical practice and professional development of nurses, and although designated as a senior role nationally, the complexities and size of the role are poorly understood. A qualitative descriptive methodology utilising transition theory as a conceptual framework underpinned the study. A sample of eight Clinical Nurse Educators from a New Zealand District Health Board were interviewed about their transition from experienced staff nurse to inexperienced senior nurse. Data were analysed using a general inductive approach. Participants found the Clinical Nurse Educator role was more complex than anticipated, with no preparation for the role and sub-optimal orientation periods being provided by the District Health Board. As a result, signs of stress were evident as the enormity of the role became apparent. Consequently, employers need to ensure that appropriate orientation programmes and mentorship are inherent in health care organisations.

  4. Sperm associated antigen 9 plays an important role in bladder transitional cell carcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepika Kanojia

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Majority of bladder cancer deaths are caused due to transitional cell carcinoma (TCC which is the most prevalent and chemoresistant malignancy of urinary bladder. Therefore, we analyzed the role of Sperm associated antigen 9 (SPAG9 in bladder TCC. METHODOLOGY AND FINDINGS: We examined SPAG9 expression and humoral response in 125 bladder TCC patients. Four bladder cancer cell lines were assessed for SPAG9 expression. In addition, we investigated the effect of SPAG9 ablation on cellular proliferation, cell cycle, migration and invasion in UM-UC-3 bladder cancer cells by employing gene silencing approach. Our SPAG9 gene and protein expression analysis revealed SPAG9 expression in 81% of bladder TCC tissue specimens. High SPAG9 expression (>60% SPAG9 positive cells was found to be significantly associated with superficial non-muscle invasive stage (P = 0.042 and low grade tumors (P = 0.002 suggesting SPAG9 putative role in early spread and tumorigenesis. Humoral response against SPAG9 was observed in 95% of patients found positive for SPAG9 expression. All four bladder cancer cell lines revealed SPAG9 expression. In addition, SPAG9 gene silencing in UM-UC-3 cells resulted in induction of G0-G1 arrest characterized by up-regulation of p16 and p21 and consequent down-regulation of cyclin E, cyclin D and cyclin B, CDK4 and CDK1. Further, SPAG9 gene silencing also resulted in reduction in cellular growth, and migration and invasion ability of cancer cells in vitro. CONCLUSIONS: Collectively, our data in clinical specimens indicated that SPAG9 is potential biomarker and therapeutic target for bladder TCC.

  5. A review of the role of social cognition in major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weightman, Michael James; Air, Tracy Michele; Baune, Bernhard Theodor

    2014-01-01

    Social cognition - the ability to identify, perceive, and interpret socially relevant information - is an important skill that plays a significant role in successful interpersonal functioning. Social cognitive performance is recognized to be impaired in several psychiatric conditions, but the relationship with major depressive disorder is less well understood. The aim of this review is to characterize the current understanding of: (i) the different domains of social cognition and a possible relationship with major depressive disorder, (ii) the clinical presentation of social cognition in acute and remitted depressive states, and (iii) the effect of severity of depression on social cognitive performance. Electronic databases were searched to identify clinical studies investigating social cognition in a major depressive disorder population, yielding 31 studies for this review. Patients with major depressive disorder appear to interpret social cognitive stimuli differently to healthy controls: depressed individuals may interpret emotion through a mood-congruent bias and have difficulty with cognitive theory of mind tasks requiring interpretation of complex mental states. Social cognitive performance appears to be inversely associated with severity of depression, whilst the bias toward negative emotions persists even in remission. Some deficits may normalize following effective pharmacotherapy. The difficulties with social interaction observed in major depressive disorder may, at least in part, be due to an altered ability to correctly interpret emotional stimuli and mental states. These features seem to persist even in remission, although some may respond to intervention. Further research is required in this area to better understand the functional impact of these findings and the way in which targeted therapy could aid depressed individuals with social interactions.

  6. A Review of the Role of Social Cognition in Major Depressive Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weightman, Michael James; Air, Tracy Michele; Baune, Bernhard Theodor

    2014-01-01

    Background: Social cognition – the ability to identify, perceive, and interpret socially relevant information – is an important skill that plays a significant role in successful interpersonal functioning. Social cognitive performance is recognized to be impaired in several psychiatric conditions, but the relationship with major depressive disorder is less well understood. The aim of this review is to characterize the current understanding of: (i) the different domains of social cognition and a possible relationship with major depressive disorder, (ii) the clinical presentation of social cognition in acute and remitted depressive states, and (iii) the effect of severity of depression on social cognitive performance. Methods: Electronic databases were searched to identify clinical studies investigating social cognition in a major depressive disorder population, yielding 31 studies for this review. Results: Patients with major depressive disorder appear to interpret social cognitive stimuli differently to healthy controls: depressed individuals may interpret emotion through a mood-congruent bias and have difficulty with cognitive theory of mind tasks requiring interpretation of complex mental states. Social cognitive performance appears to be inversely associated with severity of depression, whilst the bias toward negative emotions persists even in remission. Some deficits may normalize following effective pharmacotherapy. Conclusions: The difficulties with social interaction observed in major depressive disorder may, at least in part, be due to an altered ability to correctly interpret emotional stimuli and mental states. These features seem to persist even in remission, although some may respond to intervention. Further research is required in this area to better understand the functional impact of these findings and the way in which targeted therapy could aid depressed individuals with social interactions. PMID:25566100

  7. A review of the role of social cognition in major depressive disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael James Weightman

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Social cognition – the ability to identify, perceive and interpret socially-relevant information – is an important skill that plays a significant role in successful interpersonal functioning. Social cognitive performance is recognised to be impaired in several psychiatric conditions, but the relationship with major depressive disorder is less well understood. The aim of this review is to characterise the current understanding of (i the different domains of social cognition and a possible relationship with major depressive disorder, (ii the clinical presentation of social cognition in acute and remitted depressive states, and (iii the effect of severity of depression on social cognitive performance.Methods: Electronic databases were searched to identify clinical studies investigating social cognition in a major depressive disorder population, yielding 31 studies for this review.Results: Patients with major depressive disorder appear to interpret social cognitive stimuli differently to healthy controls: depressed individuals may interpret emotion through a mood-congruent bias and have difficulty with cognitive theory of mind tasks requiring interpretation of complex mental states. Social cognitive performance appears to be inversely associated with severity of depression, whilst the bias toward negative emotions persists even in remission. Some deficits may normalise following effective pharmacotherapy.Conclusions: The difficulties with social interaction observed in major depressive disorder may, at least in part, be due to an altered ability to correctly interpret emotional stimuli and mental states. These features seem to persist even in the remitted state, although some may respond to intervention. Further research is required in this area to better understand the functional impact of these findings and the way in which targeted therapy could aid depressed individuals with social interactions.

  8. The role of responsiveness within the self in transitions to university

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marsico, Giuseppina; Gomes, Ramon; Dazzani, Virginia

    2018-01-01

    Entering university is a complex psychosocial phenomenon that can create several new stressful situations that students need to face. The transition into university may be accompanied by some psychosocial problems such as reduced self-esteem and academic achievement, increased social anxiety......, and a critical rise in the probability of dropout. How does a person use cultural elements to cope with stress? Responding to this question requires an understanding of the multivocal and ambivalent self. The paper aims at introducing and discussing the concept of Educational Self and the role...... of the responsiveness for explaining the complexity of the transition to a new educational context in Cultural Psychology perspective. The notion of responsiveness plays a crucial role in the ‘‘reconfiguration’’ of the multivocal and ambivalent self in transition....

  9. Neurospora COP9 signalosome integrity plays major roles for hyphal growth, conidial development, and circadian function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhipeng Zhou

    Full Text Available The COP9 signalosome (CSN is a highly conserved multifunctional complex that has two major biochemical roles: cleaving NEDD8 from cullin proteins and maintaining the stability of CRL components. We used mutation analysis to confirm that the JAMM domain of the CSN-5 subunit is responsible for NEDD8 cleavage from cullin proteins in Neurospora crassa. Point mutations of key residues in the metal-binding motif (EX(nHXHX(10D of the CSN-5 JAMM domain disrupted CSN deneddylation activity without interfering with assembly of the CSN complex or interactions between CSN and cullin proteins. Surprisingly, CSN-5 with a mutated JAMM domain partially rescued the phenotypic defects observed in a csn-5 mutant. We found that, even without its deneddylation activity, the CSN can partially maintain the stability of the SCF(FWD-1 complex and partially restore the degradation of the circadian clock protein FREQUENCY (FRQ in vivo. Furthermore, we showed that CSN containing mutant CSN-5 efficiently prevents degradation of the substrate receptors of CRLs. Finally, we found that deletion of the CAND1 ortholog in N. crassa had little effect on the conidiation circadian rhythm. Our results suggest that CSN integrity plays major roles in hyphal growth, conidial development, and circadian function in N. crassa.

  10. Gender-Role Attitudes and Behavior across the Transition to Parenthood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz-Wise, Sabra L.; Priess, Heather A.; Hyde, Janet S.

    2010-01-01

    On the basis of social structural theory and identity theory, the current study examined changes in gender-role attitudes and behavior across the first-time transition to parenthood and following the birth of a second child for experienced mothers and fathers. Data were analyzed from the ongoing longitudinal Wisconsin Study of Families and Work.…

  11. Review of urban energy transition in the Netherlands and the role of smart energy management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Leeuwen, Richard Pieter; de Wit, J.B.; Smit, Gerardus Johannes Maria

    2017-01-01

    This paper gives a review of the most important backgrounds and trends of the present energy supply system in the Netherlands. Options are discussed for the integration of renewable energy and the present policies are reviewed that stimulate the energy transition. Last, the role of smart energy

  12. Social Identity and the Transition to Entrepreneurship: The Role of Group Identification with Workplace Peers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obschonka, Martin; Goethner, Maximilian; Silbereisen, Rainer K.; Cantner, Uwe

    2012-01-01

    What role does social identity play in the transition from employed work to entrepreneurship? It was expected that social identity affects the cognitive processes that, according to the theory of planned behavior (TPB), underlie the formation of entrepreneurial intentions. Focusing on academic scientists' intentions to commercialize research…

  13. Peer selection and socialization in adolescent depression: The role of school transitions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goodwin, N.P.; Mrug, S.; Borch, C.; Cillessen, A.H.N.

    2012-01-01

    Previous studies have indicated homophily in depressive symptoms among adolescent friends, resulting from both peer selection and socialization processes. However, developmental differences and the role of school transitions in these processes have not been elucidated. A sample of 367 (51% female)

  14. The role of major donors in health aid to the Democratic People's Republic of Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Haewon; Ahn, Deborah Y; Choi, Soyoung; Kim, Youngchan; Choi, Hyunju; Park, Sang Min

    2013-05-01

    We investigated the major trends in health aid financing in the Democratic People's Republic of Korea (DPRK) by identifying the primary donor organizations and examining several data sources to track overall health aid trends. We collected gross disbursements from bilateral donor countries and international organizations toward the DPRK according to specific health sectors by using the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development creditor reporting system database and the United Nations Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs financial tracking service database. We analyzed sources of health aid to the DPRK from the Republic of Korea (ROK) using the official records from the ROK's Ministry of Unification. We identified the ROK, United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF), World Health Organization (WHO), United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA), and The Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria (GFATM) as the major donor entities not only according to their level of health aid expenditures but also their growing roles within the health sector of the DPRK. We found that health aid from the ROK is comprised of funding from the Inter-Korean Cooperation Fund, private organizations, local governments, and South Korean branches of international organizations such as WHO and UNICEF. We also distinguished medical equipment aid from developmental aid to show that the majority of health aid from the ROK was developmental aid. This study highlights the valuable role of the ROK in the flow of health aid to the DPRK, especially in light of the DPRK's precarious international status. Although global health aid from many international organizations has decreased, organizations such as GFATM and UNFPA continue to maintain their focus on reproductive health and infectious diseases.

  15. The Role of Preschool Relational and Physical Aggression in the Transition to Kindergarten: Links with Social-Psychological Adjustment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gower, Amy L.; Lingras, Katherine A.; Mathieson, Lindsay C.; Kawabata, Yoshito; Crick, Nicki R.

    2014-01-01

    Research Findings: The transition to kindergarten has important ramifications for future achievement and psychosocial outcomes. Research suggests that physical aggression may be related to difficulty during school transitions, yet no studies to date have examined the role of relational aggression in these transitions. This article examines how…

  16. Gender Role Attitudes Across the Transition To Adolescent Motherhood in Mexican-Origin Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toomey, Russell B.; Updegraff, Kimberly A.; Umaña-Taylor, Adriana J.; Jahromi, Laudan B.

    2015-01-01

    Using longitudinal data collected at four time points from 191 dyads of Mexican-origin adolescent first-time mothers and their mother figures, we examined changes in and socialization of traditional gender role attitudes across the transition to parenthood using latent growth curve modeling (LGC) modeling and actor-partner interdependence modeling (APIM). Person-centered analyses indicated that adolescent mothers’, regardless of nativity status, and their foreign-born mother figures’ gender role attitudes became more egalitarian across adolescents’ transition to parenthood, spanning form the 3rd trimester of pregnancy to 36 months postpartum. Further, variable-centered analyses suggested that adolescents’ and their mother figures’ gender role attitudes during adolescents’ third trimester of pregnancy equally contributed to subsequent increases in one another’s gender role attitudes at 10 months postpartum. Importantly, this reciprocal socialization process was not moderated by adolescent mothers’ nor by their mother’ figures’ nativity status. Findings suggest that it is important to understand the cultural and intergenerational family processes that contribute to the development of gender role attitudes during the transition to parenthood for adolescent mothers and their mother figures in Mexican-origin families. PMID:25615441

  17. Gender role attitudes across the transition to adolescent motherhood in Mexican-origin families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toomey, Russell B; Updegraff, Kimberly A; Umaña-Taylor, Adriana J; Jahromi, Laudan B

    2015-06-01

    Using longitudinal data collected at four time points from 191 dyads of Mexican-origin adolescent first-time mothers and their mother figures, we examined changes in and socialization of traditional gender role attitudes across the transition to parenthood using latent growth curve modeling and actor-partner interdependence modeling. Longitudinal growth models indicated that, regardless of nativity status, adolescent mothers' and their foreign-born mother figures' gender role attitudes became more egalitarian across adolescents' transition to parenthood, spanning from the 3rd trimester of pregnancy to 36 months postpartum. Furthermore, actor-partner interdependence modeling suggested that adolescents' and their mother figures' gender role attitudes during adolescents' third trimester of pregnancy equally contributed to subsequent increases in one another's gender role attitudes at 10 months postpartum. Importantly, this reciprocal socialization process was not moderated by adolescent mothers' nor by their mother figures' nativity status. Findings suggest that it is important to understand the cultural and intergenerational family processes that contribute to the development of gender role attitudes during the transition to parenthood for adolescent mothers and their mother figures in Mexican-origin families. © 2015 Family Process Institute.

  18. The role of beta-endorphin in the pathophysiology of major depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegadoren, K M; O'Donnell, T; Lanius, R; Coupland, N J; Lacaze-Masmonteil, N

    2009-10-01

    A role for beta-endorphin (beta-END) in the pathophysiology of major depressive disorder (MDD) is suggested by both animal research and studies examining clinical populations. The major etiological theories of depression include brain regions and neural systems that interact with opioid systems and beta-END. Recent preclinical data have demonstrated multiple roles for beta-END in the regulation of complex homeostatic and behavioural processes that are affected during a depressive episode. Additionally, beta-END inputs to regulatory pathways involving feeding behaviours, motivation, and specific types of motor activity have important implications in defining the biological foundations for specific depressive symptoms. Early research linking beta-END to MDD did so in the context of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis activity, where it was suggested that HPA axis dysregulation may account for depressive symptoms in some individuals. The primary aims of this paper are to use both preclinical and clinical research (a) to critically review data that explores potential roles for beta-END in the pathophysiology of MDD and (b) to highlight gaps in the literature that limit further development of etiological theories of depression and testable hypotheses. In addition to examining methodological and theoretical challenges of past clinical studies, we summarize studies that have investigated basal beta-END levels in MDD and that have used challenge tests to examine beta-END responses to a variety of experimental paradigms. A brief description of the synthesis, location in the CNS and behavioural pharmacology of this neuropeptide is also provided to frame this discussion. Given the lack of clinical improvement observed with currently available antidepressants in a significant proportion of depressed individuals, it is imperative that novel mechanisms be investigated for antidepressant potential. We conclude that the renewed interest in elucidating the role of beta

  19. [Role transition and working adaption in new nursing graduates: a qualitative study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Hsueh-Hua; Liu, Pei-Fen; Hu, Hsiao-Chen; Huang, Su-Fei; Chen, Hsiao-Lien

    2010-12-01

    The role transition process is full of stresses and challenges for nurses. Between 35-61% nurses leave their job within the first year. Past cross-sectional quantitative studies have not provided deep descriptions of either the dynamic role transition or work adaption processes of new nurses. The purpose of this study was to understand the role transition experience of new nurses as they transitioned into clinical practice during their first three months on the job. A qualitative approach was used. Data were collected through a semi-structured interview from 50 new nurses. Data were analyzed using category-content analysis. Three stages were identified in the new nurse work adaption process over the first three-month period. These included (1) Understanding: New nurse knowledge and skills are insufficient to handle routine work, adapting to the role transition is difficult, feelings of anxiety emerge related to fears of incompetence, communication difficulties must be faced in the handover process, new nurses adopt feelings of attachment to their preceptors, they must work to adopt appropriate attitudes and approaches to nursing practice, and support is sought from family, teachers and friends; (2) Acclimation: Learning to care for patients independently, seeking role models, learning to adapt to night shifts, trying to identify with co-workers, and seeking support from colleagues, preceptors and head nurses; (3) Acceptance: Managing nursing work better in terms of time and organization, feeling gradual acceptance from co-workers, restoring personal enthusiasm for work, starting to consider other, non-work related matters, experiencing and appreciating the support of co-workers and head nurses. CONCLUSIONS/IMPLICATION: New nurses face a critical role transition process through their first three months on the job. Guidance and leadership from experienced nurses and multiple support systems can assist new nurses to acclimate to their role. Research results provide

  20. Histone deacetylases play a major role in the transcriptional regulation of the Plasmodium falciparum life cycle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balbir K Chaal

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The apparent paucity of molecular factors of transcriptional control in the genomes of Plasmodium parasites raises many questions about the mechanisms of life cycle regulation in these malaria parasites. Epigenetic regulation has been suggested to play a major role in the stage specific gene expression during the Plasmodium life cycle. To address some of these questions, we analyzed global transcriptional responses of Plasmodium falciparum to a potent inhibitor of histone deacetylase activities (HDAC. The inhibitor apicidin induced profound transcriptional changes in multiple stages of the P. falciparum intraerythrocytic developmental cycle (IDC that were characterized by rapid activation and repression of a large percentage of the genome. A major component of this response was induction of genes that are otherwise suppressed during that particular stage of the IDC or specific for the exo-erythrocytic stages. In the schizont stage, apicidin induced hyperacetylation of histone lysine residues H3K9, H4K8 and the tetra-acetyl H4 (H4Ac4 and demethylation of H3K4me3. Interestingly, we observed overlapping patterns of chromosomal distributions between H4K8Ac and H3K4me3 and between H3K9Ac and H4Ac4. There was a significant but partial association between the apicidin-induced gene expression and histone modifications, which included a number of stage specific transcription factors. Taken together, inhibition of HDAC activities leads to dramatic de-regulation of the IDC transcriptional cascade, which is a result of both disruption of histone modifications and up-regulation of stage specific transcription factors. These findings suggest an important role of histone modification and chromatin remodeling in transcriptional regulation of the Plasmodium life cycle. This also emphasizes the potential of P. falciparum HDACs as drug targets for malaria chemotherapy.

  1. Histone deacetylases play a major role in the transcriptional regulation of the Plasmodium falciparum life cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaal, Balbir K; Gupta, Archna P; Wastuwidyaningtyas, Brigitta D; Luah, Yen-Hoon; Bozdech, Zbynek

    2010-01-22

    The apparent paucity of molecular factors of transcriptional control in the genomes of Plasmodium parasites raises many questions about the mechanisms of life cycle regulation in these malaria parasites. Epigenetic regulation has been suggested to play a major role in the stage specific gene expression during the Plasmodium life cycle. To address some of these questions, we analyzed global transcriptional responses of Plasmodium falciparum to a potent inhibitor of histone deacetylase activities (HDAC). The inhibitor apicidin induced profound transcriptional changes in multiple stages of the P. falciparum intraerythrocytic developmental cycle (IDC) that were characterized by rapid activation and repression of a large percentage of the genome. A major component of this response was induction of genes that are otherwise suppressed during that particular stage of the IDC or specific for the exo-erythrocytic stages. In the schizont stage, apicidin induced hyperacetylation of histone lysine residues H3K9, H4K8 and the tetra-acetyl H4 (H4Ac4) and demethylation of H3K4me3. Interestingly, we observed overlapping patterns of chromosomal distributions between H4K8Ac and H3K4me3 and between H3K9Ac and H4Ac4. There was a significant but partial association between the apicidin-induced gene expression and histone modifications, which included a number of stage specific transcription factors. Taken together, inhibition of HDAC activities leads to dramatic de-regulation of the IDC transcriptional cascade, which is a result of both disruption of histone modifications and up-regulation of stage specific transcription factors. These findings suggest an important role of histone modification and chromatin remodeling in transcriptional regulation of the Plasmodium life cycle. This also emphasizes the potential of P. falciparum HDACs as drug targets for malaria chemotherapy.

  2. The role of conventional and unconventional gas in the energy transition in Asia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le, Minh Thong

    2017-01-01

    Energy and environmental issues are one of the main challenges for humanity in the 21. Century. Global growth in energy demand links to environmental concerns including pollution, global warming and reduction of CO 2 emissions. In particular, it is an urgent request in rapidly growing developing regions such as Asian countries. Using cleaner energy sources, renewable energy instead of traditional energy sources like coal and oil is an inevitable option in the future. In the current context, natural gas is seen as a clean energy source which plays a major role in the energy transition process towards a low-carbon economy. The consequences for natural gas markets are significant and the condition of this change is an abundant supply of natural gas. The development of unconventional gas, particularly shale gas, provides an opportunity to expand the global gas supply. This is illustrated by the 'shale gas revolution' in US which has profoundly changed the regional gas markets. However, this 'revolution' is hardly reproducible in other regions of the world. This thesis demonstrates particularly that apart from geological, institutional conditions (taxation, property rights), economic (prices, technologies) and organizational (free markets) are necessary for a large scale development of unconventional resources. This research also shows that most of these conditions are not met in Europe or Asia (especially in China). Therefore, an energy transition by natural gas to meet climate challenges in Asia will be solved through imports, rather than through regional production. From three scenarios of the POLES model based on assumptions about climate policy, shale gas development and rapid increase of demand for gas in the energy mix (particularly in Asia), two main conclusions emerge. The developments of shale gas with low cost in the USA make the global gas supply abundant and more competitive than other energies, particularly coal. Therefore, even without

  3. Demonstration of the role of turbulence-driven poloidal flow generation in the L-H transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, C.X.; Xu, Y.H.; Luo, J.R.; Mao, J.S.; Liu, B.H.; Li, J.G.; Wan, B.N.; Wan, Y.X.

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents the evidence for the role of turbulence-driven poloidal flow generation in the L-H transition induced by a turbulent heating pulse on the HT-6M tokamak. It is found that the poloidal flow υ θ plays a key role in developing the electric field E r and triggering the transition. The acceleration of υ θ across the transition is clearly correlated with the enhancement of the Reynolds stress gradient. (author)

  4. Minorities' acculturation and social adjustment: The moderator role of meta-perceptions of majority's acculturation attitudes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    António, João H C; Monteiro, Maria Benedicta

    2015-12-01

    Two studies addressed the role of Black meta-perception of acculturation attitudes on the relation between minority acculturation attitudes and their social adjustment (school achievement and perceived quality of intergroup relations). Participants in both studies were Black Lusophone adolescents living in Portugal. Study 1 (N = 140) indicated that participants' attitude regarding the host culture was positively correlated with their school achievement and to their evaluation of intergroup relations. It also indicated that participants' meta-perception of majority attitude add to the explained variance of participants' social adjustment. Study 2 (N = 62) manipulated the perceived majority high/low support of immigrants' learning the host culture. The dependent variable (DV) was perceived quality of intergroup relations. Only in the low support condition were participants' attitudes towards the host culture positively related to perceived quality of Black-White relationships. These results suggest that perceived social context is central to understand the relationship between minority adolescents' acculturation attitudes and key dimensions of their adjustment to host societies. © 2015 International Union of Psychological Science.

  5. Major role of microbes in carbon fluxes during Austral winter in the Southern Drake Passage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maura Manganelli

    Full Text Available Carbon cycling in Southern Ocean is a major issue in climate change, hence the need to understand the role of biota in the regulation of carbon fixation and cycling. Southern Ocean is a heterogeneous system, characterized by a strong seasonality, due to long dark winter. Yet, currently little is known about biogeochemical dynamics during this season, particularly in the deeper part of the ocean. We studied bacterial communities and processes in summer and winter cruises in the southern Drake Passage. Here we show that in winter, when the primary production is greatly reduced, Bacteria and Archaea become the major producers of biogenic particles, at the expense of dissolved organic carbon drawdown. Heterotrophic production and chemoautotrophic CO(2 fixation rates were substantial, also in deep water, and bacterial populations were controlled by protists and viruses. A dynamic food web is also consistent with the observed temporal and spatial variations in archaeal and bacterial communities that might exploit various niches. Thus, Southern Ocean microbial loop may substantially maintain a wintertime food web and system respiration at the expense of summer produced DOC as well as regenerate nutrients and iron. Our findings have important implications for Southern Ocean ecosystem functioning and carbon cycle and its manipulation by iron enrichment to achieve net sequestration of atmospheric CO(2.

  6. The role and meaning of vocations in the transition from education to work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Christian Helms

    discusses some of the properties of this regime and reports the results of two studies on school to work transition that have followed the former vocational student 6 years after they completed their educations. A special interest was given to the role of vocations both considered as social institutions......Paper for The 6th International Conference Researching Work and Learning Roskilde University, Denmark June 28 to Juli 1, 2009 Symposium 6 Vocational Education and Training - New models of apprenticeship The patterns of transition from education to work have generally become prolonged and more...... complex, and with growing problems of dropout and low retention rates. Secondary vocational education and training based on a Dual System and occupational labour markets are generally noted for having low levels of youth unemployment and a smooth transition to work. This is assumed to be an effect...

  7. The role of the environmental industry in Europe's ecological transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frerot, Antoine

    2013-01-01

    Europe must embark on a path leading to a virtuous ecological transition if it is to achieve further economic growth that does not harm the environment. This transition must address issues such as resource scarcity, the increasing complexity of pollution and the challenges posed by new ways of living in our cities. Environmental services have an important role to play by providing the operational solutions needed to make this transition and by creating new economic models that reward performance rather than volumes sold. Local and national governments have the ability and the duty to assist in the real-life deployment of such solutions by setting clear rules and targets, using the power of public procurement and helping to put financing in place. (author)

  8. Supporting transitions in medical career pathways: the role of simulation-based education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleland, Jennifer; Patey, Rona; Thomas, Ian; Walker, Kenneth; O'Connor, Paul; Russ, Stephanie

    2016-01-01

    Transitions, or periods of change, in medical career pathways can be challenging episodes, requiring the transitioning clinician to take on new roles and responsibilities, adapt to new cultural dynamics, change behaviour patterns, and successfully manage uncertainty. These intensive learning periods present risks to patient safety. Simulation-based education (SBE) is a pedagogic approach that allows clinicians to practise their technical and non-technical skills in a safe environment to increase preparedness for practice. In this commentary, we present the potential uses, strengths, and limitations of SBE for supporting transitions across medical career pathways, discussing educational utility, outcome and process evaluation, and cost and value, and introduce a new perspective on considering the gains from SBE. We provide case-study examples of the application of SBE to illustrate these points and stimulate discussion.

  9. Parents' Role in Adolescents' Decision on a College Major: A Weekly Diary Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietrich, Julia; Kracke, Barbel; Nurmi, Jari-Erik

    2011-01-01

    This study examined 39 adolescents during their transition to university. In standardized weekly diaries over several weeks (M=8.13) adolescents reported on engagement in career exploration (in-breadth and in-depth self and environmental exploration), their parents' transition-related involvement (frequency of conversations, support, and…

  10. New graduate registered nurse transition into primary health care roles: an integrative literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray-Parahi, Pauline; DiGiacomo, Michelle; Jackson, Debra; Davidson, Patricia M

    2016-11-01

    To summarise the literature describing new graduate nurse transition to professional practice within the primary health care (PHC) setting. There is a plethora of research literature spanning several decades about new graduate nurse transition in the acute care setting. Yet, the experiences of new graduate nurse in the PHC setting is unremarkable particularly considering the increasing demand for skilled health care workers and focus of health reform to provide care where people work and live. Electronic data bases, Academic Search Complete, EBSCO, Medline, PsycINFO, CINHAL, and ERIC were searched using a combination of terms and synonyms arising from three key concepts which identify the phenomenon; 'transition', 'new graduate registered nurse' and 'primary health care. An inclusive search strategy placed no limits on language or publication date. Of the 50 articles located and examined for relevance; 40 were sourced through databases and 10 from Google Scholar/Alerts and hand-searching references. None of the 19 articles retained for analysis addressed all key concepts. Some challenges of researching the professional transition of graduate nurses in PHC settings included, an absence of definitive transition models, a dearth of literature and deference to acute care research. Nursing in PHC settings, particularly the client's home is notably different to hospital settings because of higher levels of isolation and autonomy. Societal changes, health reform and subsequent demand for skilled workers in PHC settings has caused health care providers to question the logic that such roles are only for experienced nurses. Implications arise for education and health service providers who desire to close the theory practice gap and mitigate risk for all stakeholders when next generation nurses have limited opportunities to experience PHC roles as undergraduates and newly graduated registered nurses are already transitioning in this setting. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. DICER-LIKE2 plays a primary role in transitive silencing of transgenes in Arabidopsis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sizolwenkosi Mlotshwa

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Dicer-like (DCL enzymes play a pivotal role in RNA silencing in plants, processing the long double-stranded RNA (dsRNA that triggers silencing into the primary short interfering RNAs (siRNAs that mediate it. The siRNA population can be augmented and silencing amplified via transitivity, an RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RDR-dependent pathway that uses the target RNA as substrate to generate secondary siRNAs. Here we report that Arabidopsis DCL2-but not DCL4-is required for transitivity in cell-autonomous, post-transcriptional silencing of transgenes. An insertion mutation in DCL2 blocked sense transgene-induced silencing and eliminated accumulation of the associated RDR-dependent siRNAs. In hairpin transgene-induced silencing, the dcl2 mutation likewise eliminated accumulation of secondary siRNAs and blocked transitive silencing, but did not block silencing mediated by primary siRNAs. Strikingly, in all cases, the dcl2 mutation eliminated accumulation of all secondary siRNAs, including those generated by other DCL enzymes. In contrast, mutations in DCL4 promoted a dramatic shift to transitive silencing in the case of the hairpin transgene and enhanced silencing induced by the sense transgene. Suppression of hairpin and sense transgene silencing by the P1/HC-Pro and P38 viral suppressors was associated with elimination of secondary siRNA accumulation, but the suppressors did not block processing of the stem of the hairpin transcript into primary siRNAs. Thus, these viral suppressors resemble the dcl2 mutation in their effects on siRNA biogenesis. We conclude that DCL2 plays an essential, as opposed to redundant, role in transitive silencing of transgenes and may play a more important role in silencing of viruses than currently thought.

  12. Review of urban energy transition in the Netherlands and the role of smart energy management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leeuwen, R.P. van; Wit, J.B. de; Smit, G.J.M.

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Review of backgrounds and trends of the energy supply system in the Netherlands. • Review of Dutch governance policies to support the energy transition. • Review of increasing energy efficiency and options for supply and storage of renewable energy. • Individual and collective approaches to integrate renewable energy in the built environment. • The role of smart energy management to integrate renewable energy into existing infrastructures. - Abstract: This paper gives a review of the most important backgrounds and trends of the present energy supply system in the Netherlands. Options are discussed for the integration of renewable energy and the present policies are reviewed that stimulate the energy transition. Last, the role of smart energy management as part of the integration of renewable energy into existing infrastructures is discussed.

  13. The roles of users in shaping transitions to new energy systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schot, Johan; Kanger, Laur; Verbong, Geert

    2016-05-01

    Current government information policies and market-based instruments aimed at influencing the energy choices of consumers often ignore the fact that consumer behaviour is not fully reducible to individuals making rational conscious decisions all the time. The decisions of consumers are largely configured by shared routines embedded in socio-technical systems. To achieve a transition towards a decarbonized and energy-efficient system, an approach that goes beyond individual consumer choice and puts shared routines and system change at its centre is needed. Here, adopting a transitions perspective, we argue that consumers should be reconceptualized as users who are important stakeholders in the innovation process shaping new routines and enacting system change. We review the role of users in shifts to new decarbonized and energy-efficient systems and provide a typology of user roles.

  14. Cardiac Response to Chronic Intermittent Hypoxia with a Transition from Adaptation to Maladaptation: The Role of Hydrogen Peroxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xia Yin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA is a highly prevalent respiratory disorder of sleep, and associated with chronic intermittent hypoxia (CIH. Experimental evidence indicates that CIH is a unique physiological state with potentially “adaptive” and “maladaptive” consequences for cardio-respiratory homeostasis. CIH is also a critical element accounting for most of cardiovascular complications of OSA. Cardiac response to CIH is time-dependent, showing a transition from cardiac compensative (such as hypertrophy to decompensating changes (such as failure. CIH-provoked mild and transient oxidative stress can induce adaptation, but severe and persistent oxidative stress may provoke maladaptation. Hydrogen peroxide as one of major reactive oxygen species plays an important role in the transition of adaptive to maladaptive response to OSA-associated CIH. This may account for the fact that although oxidative stress has been recognized as a driver of cardiac disease progression, clinical interventions with antioxidants have had little or no impact on heart disease and progression. Here we focus on the role of hydrogen peroxide in CIH and OSA, trying to outline the potential of antioxidative therapy in preventing CIH-induced cardiac damage.

  15. Bacterial translational regulations: high diversity between all mRNAs and major role in gene expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Picard Flora

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In bacteria, the weak correlations at the genome scale between mRNA and protein levels suggest that not all mRNAs are translated with the same efficiency. To experimentally explore mRNA translational level regulation at the systemic level, the detailed translational status (translatome of all mRNAs was measured in the model bacterium Lactococcus lactis in exponential phase growth. Results Results demonstrated that only part of the entire population of each mRNA species was engaged in translation. For transcripts involved in translation, the polysome size reached a maximum of 18 ribosomes. The fraction of mRNA engaged in translation (ribosome occupancy and ribosome density were not constant for all genes. This high degree of variability was analyzed by bioinformatics and statistical modeling in order to identify general rules of translational regulation. For most of the genes, the ribosome density was lower than the maximum value revealing major control of translation by initiation. Gene function was a major translational regulatory determinant. Both ribosome occupancy and ribosome density were particularly high for transcriptional regulators, demonstrating the positive role of translational regulation in the coordination of transcriptional networks. mRNA stability was a negative regulatory factor of ribosome occupancy and ribosome density, suggesting antagonistic regulation of translation and mRNA stability. Furthermore, ribosome occupancy was identified as a key component of intracellular protein levels underlining the importance of translational regulation. Conclusions We have determined, for the first time in a bacterium, the detailed translational status for all mRNAs present in the cell. We have demonstrated experimentally the high diversity of translational states allowing individual gene differentiation and the importance of translation-level regulation in the complex process linking gene expression to protein

  16. The large universal Pantoea plasmid LPP-1 plays a major role in biological and ecological diversification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De Maayer Pieter

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pantoea spp. are frequently isolated from a wide range of ecological niches and have various biological roles, as plant epi- or endophytes, biocontrol agents, plant-growth promoters or as pathogens of both plant and animal hosts. This suggests that members of this genus have undergone extensive genotypic diversification. One means by which this occurs among bacteria is through the acquisition and maintenance of plasmids. Here, we have analyzed and compared the sequences of a large plasmid common to all sequenced Pantoea spp. Results and discussion The Large PantoeaPlasmids (LPP-1 of twenty strains encompassing seven different Pantoea species, including pathogens and endo-/epiphytes of a wide range of plant hosts as well as insect-associated strains, were compared. The LPP-1 plasmid sequences range in size from ~281 to 794 kb and carry between 238 and 750 protein coding sequences (CDS. A core set of 46 proteins, encompassing 2.2% of the total pan-plasmid (2,095 CDS, conserved among all LPP-1 plasmid sequences, includes those required for thiamine and pigment biosynthesis. Phylogenetic analysis reveals that these plasmids have arisen from an ancestral plasmid, which has undergone extensive diversification. Analysis of the proteins encoded on LPP-1 also showed that these plasmids contribute to a wide range of Pantoea phenotypes, including the transport and catabolism of various substrates, inorganic ion assimilation, resistance to antibiotics and heavy metals, colonization and persistence in the host and environment, pathogenesis and antibiosis. Conclusions LPP-1 is universal to all Pantoea spp. whose genomes have been sequenced to date and is derived from an ancestral plasmid. LPP-1 encodes a large array of proteins that have played a major role in the adaptation of the different Pantoea spp. to their various ecological niches and their specialization as pathogens, biocontrol agents or benign saprophytes found in many diverse

  17. Evaluating outcomes of the emergency nurse practitioner role in a major urban emergency department, Melbourne, Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennings, Natasha; O'Reilly, Gerard; Lee, Geraldine; Cameron, Peter; Free, Belinda; Bailey, Michael

    2008-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of the introduction of Emergency Nurse Practitioner Candidates (ENPC) on waiting times and length of stay of patients presenting to a major urban Emergency Department (ED) in Melbourne, Australia. As part of a Victorian state funded initiative to improve patient outcomes, the role of the Emergency Nurse Practitioner has been developed. The integration and implementation of this role, is not only new to the Alfred Emergency and Trauma Centre but to EDs in Melbourne, Australia, with aims of providing holistic and comprehensive care for patients. A retrospective case series of all patients with common ED diagnostic subgroups were included. The ENPC group (n = 572) included all patients managed by the ENPC and the Traditional Model (TM) group (n = 2584) included all patients managed by the traditional medical ED model of care. Outcome measures included waiting times and length of stay. Statistically significant differences were evident between the two groups in waiting times and length of stay in the ED. The overall median waiting time for emergency patients to be seen by the ENPC was less than for the TM group [median (IQR): ENPC 12 (5.5-28) minutes; TM 31 (11.5-76) minutes (Wilcoxon p times for ENPC shifts vs. non-ENPC shifts revealed significant differences [median (IQR): ENPC rostered 24 (9-52) minutes; ENPC not rostered 33 (13-80.5) minutes (Wilcoxon p Melbourne, Australia were associated with significantly reduced waiting times and length of stay for emergency patients. Emergency Nurse Practitioners should be considered as a potential long term strategy to manage increased service demands on EDs. Relevance to clinical practice. This study is the first in Australia with a significant sample size to vigorously compare ENPC waiting times and length of stay outcomes with the TM model of care in the ED. The study suggests that ENPCs can have a favourable impact on patient outcomes with regard to waiting times and length

  18. Quality of life in major depressive disorder: the role of pain and pain catastrophizing cognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Ka-Fai; Tso, Kwok-Chu; Yeung, Wing-Fai; Li, Wei-Hui

    2012-05-01

    Pain symptoms are frequent complaints in patients with major depressive disorder (MDD). Although it is known that pain intensity and pain-related cognition predict quality of life (QOL) in patients with chronic pain, limited studies have examined their roles in MDD. The study aimed to determine whether pain and pain catastrophizing were independent predictors of QOL in MDD after accounting for the impact of anxiety and depression. This is a prospective, naturalistic follow-up study. Ninety-one Chinese patients were enrolled during an acute episode of MDD, 82 of them were reassessed 3 months later using the same assessment on pain, anxiety, depression, and QOL. Pain intensity was evaluated using a verbal rating scale and a visual analog scale. Quality of life was assessed using the 36-item Short Form Health Survey. Pain-related cognition was assessed at baseline with the Pain Catastrophizing Scale. There was significant improvement in pain, anxiety, depression, and QOL from baseline to 3-month follow-up. Hierarchical regression analyses showed that pain intensity was significantly associated with QOL at baseline and 3 months. Pain complaint was more important than anxiety and depressive symptoms in predicting changes in both physical and psychosocial domains of QOL. After controlling for the severity of pain, anxiety, and depression, Pain Catastrophizing Scale score was independently associated with QOL in MDD. The study supports the specific role of pain and pain-related cognition in predicting QOL in depressed patients. Further studies targeting pain-related cognition for improving the outcome of MDD are necessary. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Immigration Transition and Depressive Symptoms: Four Major Ethnic Groups of Midlife Women in the U.S

    Science.gov (United States)

    Im, Eun-Ok; Rendell Endowed, Marjorie O.; Chang, Sun Ju; Chee, Wonshik; Chee, Eunice; Mao, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Our purpose of this study was to explore the relationships between immigration transition and depressive symptoms among 1,054 midlife women in the U.S. This was a secondary analysis of the data from two national Internet survey studies. Questions on background characteristics and immigration transition and the Depression Index for Midlife Women were used to collect the data. The data were analyzed using inferential statistics including multiple regressions. Immigrants reported lower numbers of and less severe symptoms than non-immigrants (p immigration status were significant predictors of depressive symptoms (R2=.01, p<.05). PMID:24875592

  20. Histolocalization and physico-chemical characterization of dihydrochalcones: Insight into the role of apple major flavonoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaucher, Matthieu; Dugé de Bernonville, Thomas; Lohou, David; Guyot, Sylvain; Guillemette, Thomas; Brisset, Marie-Noëlle; Dat, James F

    2013-06-01

    Flavonoids, like other metabolites synthesized via the phenylpropanoid pathway, possess a wide range of biological activities including functions in plant development and its interaction with the environment. Dihydrochalcones (mainly phloridzin, sieboldin, trilobatin, phloretin) represent the major flavonoid subgroup in apple green tissues. Although this class of phenolic compounds is found in very large amounts in some tissues (≈200mg/g of leaf DW), their physiological significance remains unclear. In the present study, we highlight their tissue-specific localization in young growing shoots suggesting a specific role in important physiological processes, most notably in response to biotic stress. Indeed, dihydrochalcones could constitute a basal defense, in particular phloretin which exhibits a strong broad-range bactericidal and fungicidal activity. Our results also indicate that sieboldin forms complexes with iron with strong affinity, reinforcing its antioxidant properties and conferring to this dihydrochalcone a potential for iron seclusion and/or storage. The importance of localization and biochemical properties of dihydrochalcones are discussed in view of the apple tree defense strategy against both biotic and abiotic stresses. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Secretome analysis defines the major role of SecDF in Staphylococcus aureus virulence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chantal Quiblier

    Full Text Available The Sec pathway plays a prominent role in protein export and membrane insertion, including the secretion of major bacterial virulence determinants. The accessory Sec constituent SecDF has been proposed to contribute to protein export. Deletion of Staphylococcus aureus secDF has previously been shown to reduce resistance, to alter cell separation, and to change the expression of certain virulence factors. To analyse the impact of the secDF deletion in S. aureus on protein secretion, a quantitative secretome analysis was performed. Numerous Sec signal containing proteins involved in virulence were found to be decreased in the supernatant of the secDF mutant. However, two Sec-dependent hydrolases were increased in comparison to the wild type, suggesting additional indirect, regulatory effects to occur upon deletion of secDF. Adhesion, invasion, and cytotoxicity of the secDF mutant were reduced in human umbilical vein endothelial cells. Virulence was significantly reduced using a Galleria mellonella insect model. Altogether, SecDF is a promising therapeutic target for controlling S. aureus infections.

  2. Role of Symmetry Breaking on the Optical Transitions in Lead-Salt Quantum Dots

    KAUST Repository

    Nootz, Gero

    2010-09-08

    The influence of quantum confinement on the one- and two-photon absorption spectra (1PA and 2PA) of PbS and PbSe semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) is investigated. The results show 2PA peaks at energies where only 1PA transitions are predicted and 1PA peaks where only 2PA transitions are predicted by the often used isotropic k•p four-band envelope function formalism. The first experimentally identified two-photon absorption peak coincides with the energy of the first one photon allowed transition. This first two-photon peak cannot be explained by band anisotropy, verifying that the inversion symmetry of the wave functions is broken and relaxation of the parity selection rules has to be taken into account to explain optical transitions in lead-salt QDs. Thus, while the band anisotropy of the bulk semiconductor plays a role in the absorption spectra, especially for the more anisotropic PbSe QDs, a complete model of the absorption spectra, for both 1PA and 2PA, must also include symmetry breaking of the quantum confined wave functions. These studies clarify the controversy of the origin of spectral features in lead-salt QDs. © 2010 American Chemical Society.

  3. The Role of Age and Social Motivation in Developmental Transitions in Young and Old Adulthood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jana eNikitin

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Two diary studies investigated the role of social approach and avoidance motivation in important developmental transitions in young and old adulthood. Study 1 comprised a sample of young adults (N = 93, M = 21.5 years who moved out of their parental homes. The sample of Study 2 consisted of older adults (N = 69, M = 76.95 years who moved into senior housing. In both studies, participants reported their habitual social approach and avoidance motives as well as their daily social experience and subjective well-being over the course of two weeks. In line with the literature, social approach motives and age were related to higher subjective well-being, whereas social avoidance motives were negatively associated with subjective well-being. Time since the transition was an important moderator of the association between social avoidance motives and negative outcomes. With increasing time from the transition, the negative effects of social avoidance motives decreased. The positive effects of social approach motives remained fairly stable over time. Importantly, age did not moderate any of the associations between social motivation and outcomes. Results are discussed in terms of transition-related instability and age-related stability.

  4. Role of Symmetry Breaking on the Optical Transitions in Lead-Salt Quantum Dots

    KAUST Repository

    Nootz, Gero; Padilha, Lazaro A.; Olszak, Peter D.; Webster, Scott; Hagan, David J.; Van Stryland, Eric W.; Levina, Larissa; Sukhovatkin, Vlad; Brzozowski, Lukasz; Sargent, Edward H.

    2010-01-01

    The influence of quantum confinement on the one- and two-photon absorption spectra (1PA and 2PA) of PbS and PbSe semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) is investigated. The results show 2PA peaks at energies where only 1PA transitions are predicted and 1PA peaks where only 2PA transitions are predicted by the often used isotropic k•p four-band envelope function formalism. The first experimentally identified two-photon absorption peak coincides with the energy of the first one photon allowed transition. This first two-photon peak cannot be explained by band anisotropy, verifying that the inversion symmetry of the wave functions is broken and relaxation of the parity selection rules has to be taken into account to explain optical transitions in lead-salt QDs. Thus, while the band anisotropy of the bulk semiconductor plays a role in the absorption spectra, especially for the more anisotropic PbSe QDs, a complete model of the absorption spectra, for both 1PA and 2PA, must also include symmetry breaking of the quantum confined wave functions. These studies clarify the controversy of the origin of spectral features in lead-salt QDs. © 2010 American Chemical Society.

  5. Gender-role attitudes and behavior across the transition to parenthood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz-Wise, Sabra L; Priess, Heather A; Hyde, Janet S

    2010-01-01

    On the basis of social structural theory and identity theory, the current study examined changes in gender-role attitudes and behavior across the first-time transition to parenthood and following the birth of a second child for experienced mothers and fathers. Data were analyzed from the ongoing longitudinal Wisconsin Study of Families and Work. Gender-role attitudes, work and family identity salience, and division of household labor were measured for 205 first-time and 198 experienced mothers and fathers across 4 time points from 5 months pregnant to 12 months postpartum. Multilevel latent growth curve analysis was used to analyze the data. In general, parents became more traditional in their gender-role attitudes and behavior following the birth of a child, women changed more than men, and first-time parents changed more than experienced parents. Findings suggest that changes in gender-role attitudes and behavior following the birth of a child may be attributed to both the process of transitioning to parenthood for the first time and that of negotiating the demands of having a new baby in the family. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2009 APA, all rights reserved).

  6. SafeMed: Using pharmacy technicians in a novel role as community health workers to improve transitions of care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, James E; Surbhi, Satya; Bell, Paula C; Jones, Angel M; Rashed, Sahar; Ugwueke, Michael O

    2016-01-01

    To describe the design, implementation, and early experience of the SafeMed program, which uses certified pharmacy technicians in a novel expanded role as community health workers (CPhT-CHWs) to improve transitions of care. A large nonprofit health care system serving the major medically underserved areas and geographic hotspots for readmissions in Memphis, TN. The SafeMed program is a care transitions program with an emphasis on medication management designed to use low-cost health workers to improve transitions of care from hospital to home for superutilizing patients with multiple chronic conditions and polypharmacy. CPhT-CHWs were given primary responsibility for patient outreach after hospital discharge with the use of home visits and telephone follow-up. SafeMed program CPhT-CHWs served as pharmacist extenders, obtaining medication histories, assisting in medication reconciliation and identification of potential drug therapy problems (DTPs), and reinforcing medication education previously provided by the pharmacist per protocol. CPhT-CHW training included patient communication skills, motivational interviewing, medication history taking, teach-back techniques, drug disposal practices, and basic disease management. Some CPhT-CHWs experienced difficulties adjusting to an expanded scope of practice. Nonetheless, once the Tennessee Board of Pharmacy affirmed that envisioned SafeMed CPhT-CHW roles were consistent with Board rules, additional responsibilities were added for CPhT-CHWs to enhance their effectiveness. Patient outreach teams including CPhT-CHWs achieved increases in home visit and telephone follow-up rates and were successful in helping identify potential DTPs. The early experience of the SafeMed program demonstrates that CPhT-CHWs are well suited for novel expanded roles to improve care transitions for superutilizing populations. CPhT-CHWs can identify and report potential DTPs to the pharmacist to help target medication therapy management. Critical

  7. NF-kappa B genes have a major role in Inflammatory Breast Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lerebours, Florence; Vacher, Sophie; Andrieu, Catherine; Espie, Marc; Marty, Michel; Lidereau, Rosette; Bieche, Ivan

    2008-01-01

    IBC (Inflammatory Breast cancer) is a rare form of breast cancer with a particular phenotype. New molecular targets are needed to improve the treatment of this rapidly fatal disease. Given the role of NF-κB-related genes in cell proliferation, invasiveness, angiogenesis and inflammation, we postulated that they might be deregulated in IBC. We measured the mRNA expression levels of 60 NF-κB-related genes by using real-time quantitative RT-PCR in a well-defined series of 35 IBCs, by comparison with 22 stage IIB and III non inflammatory breast cancers. Twenty-four distant metastases of breast cancer served as 'poor prognosis' breast tumor controls. Thirty-five (58%) of the 60 NF-κB-related genes were significantly upregulated in IBC compared with non IBC. The upregulated genes were NF-κB genes (NFKB1, RELA, IKBKG, NFKBIB, NFKB2, REL, CHUK), apoptosis genes (MCL1L, TNFAIP3/A20, GADD45B, FASLG, MCL1S, IER3L, TNFRSF10B/TRAILR2), immune response genes (CD40, CD48, TNFSF11/RANKL, TNFRSF11A/RANK, CCL2/MCP-1, CD40LG, IL15, GBP1), proliferation genes (CCND2, CCND3, CSF1R, CSF1, SOD2), tumor-promoting genes (CXCL12, SELE, TNC, VCAM1, ICAM1, PLAU/UPA) or angiogenesis genes (PTGS2/COX2, CXCL1/GRO1). Only two of these 35 genes (PTGS2/COX2 and CXCL1/GRO1)were also upregulated in breast cancer metastases. We identified a five-gene molecular signature that matched patient outcomes, consisting of IL8 and VEGF plus three NF-κB-unrelated genes that we had previously identified as prognostic markers in the same series of IBC. The NF-κB pathway appears to play a major role in IBC, possibly contributing to the unusual phenotype and aggressiveness of this form of breast cancer. Some upregulated NF-κB-related genes might serve as novel therapeutic targets in IBC

  8. Gold fillings unravel the vacancy role in the phase transition of GeTe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Jinlong; Xu, Meng; Wang, Xiaojie; Lin, Qi; Cheng, Xiaomin; Xu, Ming; Tong, Hao; Miao, Xiangshui

    2018-02-01

    Phase change memory (PCM) is an important candidate for future memory devices. The crystalline phase of PCM materials contains abundant intrinsic vacancies, which plays an important role in the rapid phase transition upon memory switching. However, few experimental efforts have been invested to study these invisible entities. In this work, Au dopants are alloyed into the crystalline GeTe to fill the intrinsic Ge vacancies so that the role of these vacancies in the amorphization of GeTe can be indirectly studied. As a result, the reduction of Ge vacancies induced by Au dopants hampers the amorphization of GeTe as the activation energy of this process becomes higher. This is because the vacancy-interrupted lattice can be "repaired" by Au dopants with the recovery of bond connectivity. Our results demonstrate the importance of vacancies in the phase transition of chalcogenides, and we employ the percolation theory to explain the impact of these intrinsic defects on this vacancy-ridden crystal quantitatively. Specifically, the threshold of amorphization increases with the decrease in vacancies. The understanding of the vacancy effect sheds light on the long-standing puzzle of the mechanism of ultra-fast phase transition in PCMs. It also paves the way for designing low-power-consumption electronic devices by reducing the threshold of amorphization in chalcogenides.

  9. Gene Expression Dynamics in Major Endocrine Regulatory Pathways along the Transition from Solitary to Social Life in a Bumblebee, Bombus terrestris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavel Jedlička

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the social evolution leading to insect eusociality requires, among other, a detailed insight into endocrine regulatory mechanisms that have been co-opted from solitary ancestors to play new roles in the complex life histories of eusocial species. Bumblebees represent well-suited models of a relatively primitive social organization standing on the mid-way to highly advanced eusociality and their queens undergo both, a solitary and a social phase, separated by winter diapause.In the present paper, we characterize the gene expression levels of major endocrine regulatory pathways across tissues, sexes, and life-stages of the buff-tailed bumblebee, Bombus terrestris, with special emphasis on critical stages of the queen’s transition from solitary to social life. We focused on fundamental genes of three pathways: (1 Forkhead box protein O and insulin/insulin-like signaling, (2 Juvenile hormone signaling, and (3 Adipokinetic hormone signaling. Virgin queens were distinguished by higher expression of forkhead box protein O and downregulated insulin-like peptides and juvenile hormone (JH signaling, indicated by low expression of methyl farnesoate epoxidase (MFE and transcription factor Krüppel homolog 1 (Kr-h1. Diapausing queens showed the expected downregulation of JH signaling in terms of low MFE and vitellogenin (Vg expressions, but an unexpectedly high expression of Kr-h1. By contrast, reproducing queens revealed an upregulation of MFE and Vg together with insulin signaling. Surprisingly, the insulin growth factor 1 (IGF-1 turned out to be a queen-specific hormone. Workers exhibited an expression pattern of MFE and Vg similar to that of reproducing queens. Males were characterized by high Kr-h1 expression and low Vg level. The tissue comparison unveiled an unexpected resemblance between the fat body and hypopharyngeal glands across all investigated genes, sexes, and life stages.

  10. The role of major depression in neurocognitive functioning in patients with posttraumatic stress disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirjam J. Nijdam

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD and major depressive disorder (MDD frequently co-occur after traumatic experiences and share neurocognitive disturbances in verbal memory and executive functioning. However, few attempts have been made to systematically assess the role of a comorbid MDD diagnosis in neuropsychological studies in PTSD. Objective: The purpose of the current study is to investigate neurocognitive deficits in PTSD patients with and without MDD. We hypothesized that PTSD patients with comorbid MDD (PTSD+MDD would have significantly lower performance on measures of verbal memory and executive functioning than PTSD patients without MDD (PTSD–MDD. Method: Participants included in this study were 140 treatment-seeking outpatients who had a diagnosis of PTSD after various single traumatic events and participated in a randomized controlled trial comparing different treatment types. Baseline neuropsychological data were compared between patients with PTSD+MDD (n=84 and patients with PTSD–MDD (n=56. Results: The PTSD+MDD patients had more severe verbal memory deficits in learning and retrieving words than patients with PTSD alone. There were no differences between the groups in recall of a coherent paragraph, recognition, shifting of attention, and cognitive interference. Conclusions: The results of this study suggest that a more impaired neurocognitive profile may be associated with the presence of comorbid MDD, with medium-sized group differences for verbal memory but not for executive functioning. From a clinical standpoint, being aware that certain verbal memory functions are more restricted in patients with comorbid PTSD and MDD may be relevant for treatment outcome of trauma-focused psychotherapy.

  11. Gender Role and Social Identifications: The Two Major Factors to Shape Turkish Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erden-Imamoglu, Seval

    2013-01-01

    The process of being a woman starts with biological gender but it is shaped by learning the social gender roles. Besides social gender role; age, education, marriage, and motherhood supply social roles and attributions and they have an impact on women identification and their interpersonal relationships. The aim of the study is to investigate…

  12. The role of the Indonesian bureacracy in the transition era: the struggle for democratisation / R. Siti Zuhro

    Trove (Australia)

    Zuhro, R. Siti

    2005-01-01

    ... . The purpose of the thesis is to examine the role of the bureaucracy in Indonesia in the transition era (1998-2001), with particular reference to the provinces of East Java and South Sulawesi ...

  13. The role of the Indonesian bureaucracy in the transition era : the struggle for democratisation / R. Siti Zuhro

    Trove (Australia)

    Zuhro, R. Siti

    2009-01-01

    ... . The purpose of the thesis is to examine the role of the bureaucracy in Indonesia in the transition era (1998-2001), with particular reference to the provinces of East Java and South Sulawesi ...

  14. EFFICIENCY OF THE TRANSITIONAL PROGRAM AT KING SAUD UNIVERSITY: A Comparative Study of Educational Achievement Among Female Students of the Transitional Program and University Female Students Majoring in Kindergarten, Special Education, and Psychology

    OpenAIRE

    ALJAAD, Nawal H.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify the efficiency of the transitional programs at the College of Applied Studies and Community Service at King Saud University. Data collection relied on the educational achievement rates of the female students enrolled in the College of Applied Studies and also the regular students at the College of Education, King Saud University, majoring in kindergarten, special education, and psychology. The study was conducted on the whole population of the fifth level...

  15. Linearized potential vorticity mode and its role in transition to baroclinic instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pieri, Alexandre; Salhi, Aziz; Cambon, Claude; Godeferd, Fabien

    2011-01-01

    Stratified shear flows have been studied using Rapid Distortion Theory (RDT) and DNS. If this flow is in addition subjected to vertical rotation, a slaved horizontal stratification is forced and baroclinic instability can occur. In this context, the RDT analysis shows an extention of the unstable domain up to a Richardson number Ri of 1. This work is completed here with new results on transition to baroclinic instability. Especially, the role of k x ≈ 0 modes (small streamwise wavenumbers) and the importance of coupling with the potential vorticity mode u (Ω pot ) is shown to be determinant for dramatic transient growth at intermediate times.

  16. THE ROLE OF EDUCATION IN THE NUTRITION TRANSITION AND ITS RELATION TO QUALITY OF LIFE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana María Dueñas Romero

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Education is a powerful tool to improve individuals quality of life; its role is evident by providing the necessary knowledge so that through autonomy, responsibility and a critical attitude, appropriate food choices are taken in order to provide welfare and health. In this paper, some factors affecting human nutrition will be discussed, the nutrition situation in Colombia, the importance of nutrition education and its relation to quality of life. It supports the idea that Colombia is currently experiencing a nutrition transition process and the problems it generates can be solved through education, affecting individuals quality of life.

  17. [The role of mitochondrial permeability transition pore in the occurrence of septic myocardial depression].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Shanzi; Wang, Sheng

    2016-08-01

    Sepsis is defined as life-threatening organ dysfunction caused by a dys-regulated host response to infection and septic myocardial depression (SMD) is a common complication. Pathogenesis of SMD is complicated and there is lack of specific treatment. Mitochondrial damage is an important pathological basis of SMD, and mitochondrial permeability transition pore (MPTP) plays an important role in maintaining the normal structure and function of the mitochondria. The change of MPTP during sepsis is summarized in this review so as to reveal the significant mechanism of MPTP in the occurrence of SMD.

  18. DETERMINANTS OF EARLY RETIREMENT TRANSITIONS OF TEACHERS IN POLAND. DOES REGIONAL HETEROGENEITY PLAY A ROLE?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Kopycka

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This article contributes to the literature on early retirement transitions by testing a line of explanations of this phenomenon in a specific context of public sector employment. It utilizes waves 2006 and 2007 of a longitudinal data set of employment histories of Polish teachers (SIO. Standard structural explanations of early retirement transitions, i.e. labor force restructuring and devaluation of human capital of older workers do not find support in the data. Multilevel logistic regression models show instead that the considerable variance in early retirement risks found in the data can to some degree be explained by labour mobility of prime aged teachers, supporting the thesis of a labor market as generational figuration. The analyses identify two early emploment groups among Polish teachers: 49–54, and 55–59 year olds. Whereas retirement transitions in the younger group are to a greater extent attributable to individual pull factors (like work commitment, regional variation plays a greater role in the older “early retirees” group indicating higher risks of involuntary early retirement in this group.

  19. Explaining the Public-Sector Pay Gap: The Role of Skill and College Major

    OpenAIRE

    Max Schanzenbach

    2015-01-01

    This paper reassesses the public-sector pay gap using AFQT score and college major as measures of skill. Among the college educated, there is strong evidence that those with lower skills enter the public sector. In contrast to the private sector, for college-educated public-sector workers, AFQT score is not correlated with pay, and college major is only weakly predictive of pay. Furthermore, simple controls for college major explain most of the public-private-sector pay gap. I conclude that t...

  20. High-latitude ocean ventilation and its role in Earth's climate transitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naveira Garabato, Alberto C; MacGilchrist, Graeme A; Brown, Peter J; Evans, D Gwyn; Meijers, Andrew J S; Zika, Jan D

    2017-09-13

    The processes regulating ocean ventilation at high latitudes are re-examined based on a range of observations spanning all scales of ocean circulation, from the centimetre scales of turbulence to the basin scales of gyres. It is argued that high-latitude ocean ventilation is controlled by mechanisms that differ in fundamental ways from those that set the overturning circulation. This is contrary to the assumption of broad equivalence between the two that is commonly adopted in interpreting the role of the high-latitude oceans in Earth's climate transitions. Illustrations of how recognizing this distinction may change our view of the ocean's role in the climate system are offered.This article is part of the themed issue 'Ocean ventilation and deoxygenation in a warming world'. © 2017 The Authors.

  1. Two-Year Institution Part-Time Nurse Faculty Experiences During Role Transition and Identity Development: A Phenomenological Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owens, Rhoda A

    This study explored two-year institution part-time nurse faculty's perceptions of their experiences during their role transitions from nurses in clinical practice to part-time clinical instructors. Part-time nurse faculty enter academia as expert clinicians, but most have little or no training in the pedagogy of effective student learning. A phenomenological study was used to explore the faculty role transition experiences. Findings support the proposition that six participants transitioned from their expert clinician to instructor identities; however, two continue in the process. Critical to this process are relationships with individuals in their environments, past and present experiences, the incentive to learn to be better instructors, and the importance of support and training. A model emerged, Process of Role Transition and Professional Identity Formation for Part-Time Clinical Instructors at Two-Year Institutions, that is potentially useful for administrators in developing individualized orientation and professional development programs.

  2. What is the role of autologous blood transfusion in major spine surgery?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Naresh; Chen, Yongsheng; Nath, Chinmoy; Liu, Eugene Hern Choon

    2012-06-01

    Major spine surgery is associated with significant blood loss, which has numerous complications. Blood loss is therefore an important concern when undertaking any major spine surgery. Blood loss can be addressed by reducing intraoperative blood loss and replenishing perioperative blood loss. Reducing intraoperative blood loss helps maintain hemodynamic equilibrium and provides a clearer operative field during surgery. Homologous blood transfusion is still the mainstay for replenishing blood loss in major spine surgery across the world, despite its known adverse effects. These significant adverse effects can be seen in up to 20% of patients. Autologous blood transfusion avoids the risks associated with homologous blood transfusion and has been shown to be cost-effective. This article reviews the different methods of autologous transfusion and focuses on the use of intraoperative cell salvage in major spine surgery. Autologous blood transfusion is a proven alternative to homologous transfusion in major spine surgery, avoiding most, if not all of these adverse effects. However, autologous blood transfusion rates in major spine surgery remain low across the world. Autologous blood transfusion may obviate the need for homologous transfusion completely. We encourage spine surgeons to consider autologous blood transfusion wherever feasible.

  3. The major outer membrane proteins of enterobacteriaceae. Their immunological relatedness and their possible role in bacterial opsonization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hofstra, Harmen

    1981-01-01

    This thesis deals with immunological investigations of the major outer membrane proteins of the Enterobacteriaceae as a new group of enterobacterial common envelope antigens, and with some aspects of the possible role of antibodies, prepared against these proteins, in host defense mechanisms. ...

  4. Substance use changes and social role transitions: proximal developmental effects on ongoing trajectories from late adolescence through early adulthood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staff, Jeremy; Schulenberg, John E; Maslowsky, Julie; Bachman, Jerald G; O'Malley, Patrick M; Maggs, Jennifer L; Johnston, Lloyd D

    2010-11-01

    Substance use changes rapidly during late adolescence and early adulthood. This time in the life course is also dense with social role changes, as role changes provide dynamic context for individual developmental change. Using nationally representative, multiwave longitudinal data from age 18 to 28, we examine proximal links between changes in social roles and changes in substance use during the transition to adulthood. We find that changes in family roles, such as marriage, divorce, and parenthood, have clear and consistent associations with changes in substance use. With some notable exceptions, changes in school and work roles have weaker effects on changes in substance use compared to family roles. Changes in socializing (i.e., nights out for fun and recreation) and in religiosity were found to mediate the relationship of social role transitions to substance use. Two time-invariant covariates, socioeconomic background and heavy adolescent substance use, predicted social role status, but did not moderate associations, as within-person links between social roles and substance use were largely equivalent across groups. This paper adds to the cascading effects literature by considering how, within individuals, more proximal variations in school, work, and family roles relate to variations in substance use, and which roles appear to be most influential in precipitating changes in substance use during the transition to adulthood.

  5. Substance Use Changes and Social Role Transitions: Proximal Developmental Effects on Ongoing Trajectories from Late Adolescence through Early Adulthood*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staff, Jeremy; Schulenberg, John E.; Maslowsky, Julie; Bachman, Jerald G.; O’Malley, Patrick M.; Maggs, Jennifer L.; Johnston, Lloyd D.

    2010-01-01

    Substance use changes rapidly during late adolescence and early adulthood. Not coincidentally, this time in the life course is also dense with social role changes, as role changes provide dynamic context for individual developmental change. Using nationally representative, multiwave longitudinal data from age 18 to 28, we examine proximal links between changes in social roles and changes in substance use during the transition to adulthood. We find that changes in family roles, such as marriage, divorce, and parenthood, have clear and consistent associations with changes in substance use. With some notable exceptions, changes in school and work roles have weaker effects on changes in substance use compared to family roles. Changes in socializing (i.e., nights out for fun and recreation) and in religiosity were found to mediate the relationship of social role transitions to substance use. Two time- invariant covariates, socioeconomic background and heavy adolescent substance use, predicted social role status, but did not moderate associations, as within-person links between social roles and substance use were largely equivalent across groups. This paper adds to the cascading effects literature by considering how, within individuals, more proximal variations in school, work, and family roles relate to variations in substance use; and which roles appear to be most influential in precipitating changes in substance use during the transition to adulthood. PMID:20883590

  6. An intensive primary-literature-based teaching program directly benefits undergraduate science majors and facilitates their transition to doctoral programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozeracki, Carol A; Carey, Michael F; Colicelli, John; Levis-Fitzgerald, Marc; Grossel, Martha

    2006-01-01

    UCLA's Howard Hughes Undergraduate Research Program (HHURP), a collaboration between the College of Letters and Science and the School of Medicine, trains a group of highly motivated undergraduates through mentored research enhanced by a rigorous seminar course. The course is centered on the presentation and critical analysis of scientific journal articles as well as the students' own research. This article describes the components and objectives of the HHURP and discusses the results of three program assessments: annual student evaluations, interviews with UCLA professors who served as research advisors for HHURP scholars, and a survey of program alumni. Students indicate that the program increased their ability to read and present primary scientific research and to present their own research and enhanced their research experience at UCLA. After graduating, they find their involvement in the HHURP helped them in securing admission to the graduate program of their choice and provided them with an advantage over their peers in the interactive seminars that are the foundation of graduate education. On the basis of the assessment of the program from 1998-1999 to 2004-2005, we conclude that an intensive literature-based training program increases student confidence and scientific literacy during their undergraduate years and facilitates their transition to postgraduate study.

  7. The role of upper mantle mineral phase transitions on the current structure of large-scale Earth's mantle convection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thoraval, C.

    2017-12-01

    Describing the large-scale structures of mantle convection and quantifying the mass transfer between upper and lower mantle request to account for the role played by mineral phase transitions in the transition zone. We build a density distribution within the Earth mantle from velocity anomalies described by global seismic tomographic models. The density distribution includes thermal anomalies and topographies of the phase transitions at depths of 410 and 660 km. We compute the flow driven by this density distribution using a 3D spherical circulation model, which account for depth-dependent viscosity. The dynamic topographies at the surface and at the CMB and the geoid are calculated as well. Within the range of viscosity profiles allowing for a satisfying restitution of the long wavelength geoid, we perform a parametric study to decipher the role of the characteristics of phase diagrams - mainly the Clapeyron's slopes - and of the kinetics of phase transitions, which may modify phase transition topographies. Indeed, when a phase transition is delayed, the boundary between two mineral phases is both dragged by the flow and interfere with it. The results are compared to recent estimations of surface dynamic topography and to the phase transition topographies as revealed by seismic studies. The consequences are then discussed in terms of structure of mantle flow. Comparisons between various tomographic models allow us to enlighten the most robust features. At last, the role played by the phase transitions on the lateral variations of mass transfer between upper and lower mantle are quantified by comparison to cases with no phase transitions and confronted to regional tomographic models, which reflect the variability of the behaviors of the descending slabs in the transition zone.

  8. Mild psychotic experiences among ethnic minority and majority adolescents and the role of ethnic density

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eilbracht, Lizzy; Stevens, Gonneke W. J. M.; Wigman, J. T. W.; van Dorsselaer, S.; Vollebergh, Wilma A. M.

    Despite evidence of the increased risk of psychotic disorders among ethnic minority adults, little is known about the effect of ethnic minority status to mild psychotic experiences among adolescents. This study investigated mild psychotic experiences in ethnic minority and majority adolescents in a

  9. Major role of nitrite-oxidizing bacteria in dark ocean carbon fixation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pachiadaki, M.G.; Sintes, E.; Bergauer, K.; Brown, J.M.; Record, N.R.; Swan, B.K.; Mathyer, M.E.; Hallam, S.J.; López-Garcìa, P.; Takaki, Y.; Nunoura, T.; Woyke, T.; Herndl, G.J.; Stepanauskas, R.

    2017-01-01

    Carbon fixation by chemoautotrophic microorganisms in the dark ocean has a major impact on global carbon cycling and ecological relationships in the ocean’s interior, but the relevant taxa and energy sources remain enigmatic.We show evidence that nitrite-oxidizing bacteria affiliated with the

  10. Perceptions of Business Teachers and Business Education Majors Regarding the Roles of Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Edward G.

    1975-01-01

    Findings revealed that: (1) male and female and black and white business teachers differed on some perceptual factor scores; (2) teachers with low and high family incomes differed from those with medium family incomes on some perceptual scores; and (3) business teachers and business education majors differed on only one score. (BP)

  11. Electroforming and Switching in Oxides of Transition Metals: The Role of Metal Insulator Transition in the Switching Mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chudnovskii, F. A.; Odynets, L. L.; Pergament, A. L.; Stefanovich, G. B.

    1996-02-01

    Electroforming and switching effects in sandwich structures based on anodic films of transition metal oxides (V, Nb, Ti, Fe, Ta, W, Zr, Hf, Mo) have been studied. After being electroformed, some materials exhibited current-controlled negative resistance with S-shapedV-Icharacteristics. For V, Fe, Ti, and Nb oxides, the temperature dependences of the threshold voltage have been measured. As the temperature increased,Vthdecreased to zero at a critical temperatureT0, which depended on the film material. Comparison of theT0values with the temperatures of metal-insulator phase transition for some compounds (Tt= 120 K for Fe3O4, 340 K for VO2, ∼500 K for Ti2O3, and 1070 K for NbO2) showed that switching was related to the transition in the applied electric field. Channels consisting of the above-mentioned lower oxides were formed in the initial anodic films during the electroforming. The possibility of formation of these oxides with a metal-insulator transition was confirmed by thermodynamic calculations.

  12. Choosing STEM College Majors: Exploring the Role of Pre-College Engineering Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phelps, L. Allen; Camburn, Eric M.; Min, Sookweon

    2018-01-01

    Despite the recent policy proclamations urging state and local educators to implement integrated science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) curricula, relatively little is known about the role and impact of pre-college engineering courses within these initiatives. When combined with appropriate mathematics and science courses, high…

  13. A Major Role for Perifornical Orexin Neurons in the Control of Glucose Metabolism in Rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yi, Chun-Xia; Serlie, Mireille J.; Ackermans, Mariette T.; Foppen, Ewout; Buijs, Ruud M.; Sauerwein, Hans P.; Fliers, Eric; Kalsbeek, Andries

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE-The hypothalamic neuropeptide orexin influences (feeding) behavior as well as energy metabolism. Administration of exogenous orexin-A into the brain has been shown to increase both food intake and blood glucose levels. In the present study, we investigated the role of endogenous

  14. What Makes Children Defy Majorities? The Role of Dissenters in Chinese and Spanish Preschoolers' Social Judgments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enesco, Ileana; Sebastián-Enesco, Carla; Guerrero, Silvia; Quan, Siyu; Garijo, Sonia

    2016-01-01

    When many people say the same thing, the individual is more likely to endorse this information than when just a single person says the same. Yet, the influence of consensus information may be modulated by many personal, contextual and cultural variables. Here, we study the sensitivity of Chinese ( N = 68) and Spanish ( N = 82) preschoolers to consensus in social decision making contexts. Children faced two different types of peer-interaction events, which involved (1) uncertain or ambiguous scenarios open to interpretation (social interpretation context), and (2) explicit scenarios depicting the exclusion of a peer (moral judgment context). Children first observed a video in which a group of teachers offered their opinion about the events, and then they were asked to evaluate the information provided. Participants were assigned to two conditions that differed in the type of consensus: Unanimous majority ( non-dissenter condition) and non-unanimous majority ( dissenter condition). In the dissenter condition, we presented the conflicting opinions of three teachers vs. one teacher. In the non-dissenter condition, we presented the unanimous opinion of three teachers. The general results indicated that children's sensitivity to consensus varies depending both on the degree of ambiguity of the social events and the presence or not of a dissenter: (1) Children were much more likely to endorse the majority view when they were uncertain (social interpretation context), than when they already had a clear interpretation of the situation (moral judgment context); (2) The presence of a dissenter resulted in a significant decrease in children's confidence in majority. Interestingly, in the moral judgment context, Chinese and Spanish children differed in their willingness to defy a majority whose opinion run against their own. While Spanish children maintained their own criteria regardless of the type of condition, Chinese children did so when an "allied" dissenter was present

  15. What makes children defy majorities? The role of dissenters in Chinese and Spanish preschoolers’ social judgments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ileana Enesco

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available When many people say the same thing, the individual is more likely to endorse this information than when just a single person says the same. Yet, the influence of consensus information may be modulated by many personal, contextual and cultural variables. Here, we study the sensitivity of Chinese (N = 68 and Spanish (N = 82 preschoolers to consensus in social decision making contexts. Children faced two different types of peer-interaction events, which involved (1 uncertain or ambiguous scenarios open to interpretation (social interpretation context, and (2 explicit scenarios depicting the exclusion of a peer (moral judgment context. Children first observed a video in which a group of teachers offered their opinion about the events, and then they were asked to evaluate the information provided. Participants were assigned to two conditions that differed in the type of consensus: Unanimous majority (non-dissenter condition and non-unanimous majority (dissenter condition. In the dissenter condition, we presented the conflicting opinions of three teachers vs. one teacher. In the non-dissenter condition, we presented the unanimous opinion of three teachers. The general results indicated that children’s sensitivity to consensus varies depending both on the degree of ambiguity of the social events and the presence or not of a dissenter: 1 Children were much more likely to endorse the majority view when they were uncertain (social interpretation context, than when they already had a clear interpretation of the situation (moral judgment context; 2 The presence of a dissenter resulted in a significant decrease in children’s confidence in majority. Interestingly, in the moral judgment context, Chinese and Spanish children differed in their willingness to defy a majority whose opinion run against their own. While Spanish children maintained their own criteria regardless of the type of condition, Chinese children did so when an allied dissenter was

  16. Multilocus phylogeny, divergence times, and a major role for the benthic-to-pelagic axis in the diversification of grunts (Haemulidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavera, Jose; Acero P, Arturo; Wainwright, Peter C

    2018-04-01

    We present a phylogenetic analysis with divergence time estimates, and an ecomorphological assessment of the role of the benthic-to-pelagic axis of diversification in the history of haemulid fishes. Phylogenetic analyses were performed on 97 grunt species based on sequence data collected from seven loci. Divergence time estimation indicates that Haemulidae originated during the mid Eocene (54.7-42.3 Ma) but that the major lineages were formed during the mid-Oligocene 30-25 Ma. We propose a new classification that reflects the phylogenetic history of grunts. Overall the pattern of morphological and functional diversification in grunts appears to be strongly linked with feeding ecology. Feeding traits and the first principal component of body shape strongly separate species that feed in benthic and pelagic habitats. The benthic-to-pelagic axis has been the major axis of ecomorphological diversification in this important group of tropical shoreline fishes, with about 13 transitions between feeding habitats that have had major consequences for head and body morphology. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. The role of major mergers in (obscured) black hole growth and galaxy evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treister, E.; Privon, G.; Ricci, C.; Bauer, F.; Schawinski, K.; MODA Collaboration

    2017-10-01

    A clear picture is emerging in which rapid supermassive black hole (SMBH) growth episodes (luminous AGN) are directly linked to major galaxy mergers. Here, we present the first results from our MODA program aimed to obtain optical and near-IR Integral Field Unit (IFU) spectroscopy and mm/sub-mm ALMA maps for a sample of confirmed nearby dual AGN (separation 10 kpc), including the archetypical galaxy NGC6240. Specifically, we will focus here on Mrk 463, a very rich system of two galaxies separated by 3.8 kpc hosting two SMBH growing simultaneously. Clear evidence for complex morphologies and kinematics, outflows and feedback effects can be seen in this system, evidencing the deep connection between major galaxy mergers, SMBH growth and galaxy evolution.

  18. Elucidating the Role of Neurotensin in the Pathophysiology and Management of Major Mental Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mona M Boules

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Neurotensin (NT is a neuropeptide that is closely associated with, and is thought to modulate, dopaminergic and other neurotransmitter systems involved in the pathophysiology of various mental disorders. This review outlines data implicating NT in the pathophysiology and management of major mental disorders such as schizophrenia, drug addiction, and autism. The data suggest that NT receptor analogs have the potential to be used as novel therapeutic agents acting through modulation of neurotransmitter systems dys-regulated in these disorders.

  19. Examining the Role of Primary Care Physicians and Challenges Faced When Their Patients Transition to Home Hospice Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shalev, Ariel; Phongtankuel, Veerawat; Lampa, Katherine; Reid, M C; Eiss, Brian M; Bhatia, Sonica; Adelman, Ronald D

    2018-04-01

    The transition into home hospice care is often a critical time in a patient's medical care. Studies have shown patients and caregivers desire continuity with their physicians at the end of life (EoL). However, it is unclear what roles primary care physicians (PCPs) play and what challenges they face caring for patients transitioning into home hospice care. To understand PCPs' experiences, challenges, and preferences when their patients transition to home hospice care. Nineteen semi-structured phone interviews with PCPs were conducted. Study data were analyzed using standard qualitative methods. Participants included PCPs from 3 academic group practices in New York City. Measured: Physician recordings were transcribed and analyzed using content analysis. Most PCPs noted that there was a discrepancy between their actual role and ideal role when their patients transitioned to home hospice care. Primary care physicians expressed a desire to maintain continuity, provide psychosocial support, and collaborate actively with the hospice team. Better establishment of roles, more frequent communication with the hospice team, and use of technology to communicate with patients were mentioned as possible ways to help PCPs achieve their ideal role caring for their patients receiving home hospice care. Primary care physicians expressed varying degrees of involvement during a patient's transition to home hospice care, but many desired to be more involved in their patient's care. As with patients, physicians desire to maintain continuity with their patients at the EoL and solutions to improve communication between PCPs, hospice providers, and patients need to be explored.

  20. Conference on the role of biomethane in the energy transition in France and in Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reizine, Stanislas; Edel, Matthias; Theobald, Olivier; Pierre, Frederic; Mestrel, Jean Marc; Grope, Johan; Scholwin, Frank; Eberlein, Jens; Renard, Suzanne; Trommler, Marcus; Demeusy, Tatiana; Chapelat, Nicolas; Lefebvre, Mathieu

    2015-01-01

    The French-German office for Renewable energies (OFAEnR) organised a conference on the role of biomethane in the energy transition in France and in Germany. In the framework of this French-German exchange of experience, about 110 participants exchanged views on the status of the legal framework and of the development of biomethane industry in the French and German energy transitions. This document brings together the available presentations (slides) made during this event: 1 - Biomethane injection in France - elaboration and implementation of the price structure (Stanislas Reizine); 2 - Biomethane framework conditions in Germany 3 - German Road-map for Biomethane (Matthias Edel); 4 - A vision for biomethane in France in 2030 - purified biogas injection in the natural gas network (Olivier Theobald); 5 - Biomethane produced by the Strasbourg-la Wantzenau waste water plant and injected into the GDS natural gas network (Frederic Pierre); 6 - Biomethane fuel in Lille city: 1995-2015 100% clean and renewable energy in transportation (Jean Marc Mestrel); 7 - Biomethane from organic waste and its utilisation (Johan Grope); 8 - Marketing of Biomethane to end consumers (Jens Eberlein); 9 - Developing new approaches to promote injection into the grid (Suzanne Renard); 10 - Demand driven power supply from Bioenergy - a balancing option for power distribution networks (Marcus Trommler); 11 - Flexible biogas production and its integration to power and gas grids (Tatiana Demeusy); 12 - A partnership for the development of Agricultural methanization plants around a single injection point (Nicolas Chapelat); 13 - Keynotes: biomethane development paths to favour (Mathieu Lefebvre)

  1. Role of oxygen disorder in the ferroelectric phase transitions for various materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pasciak, Marek; Goossens, Darren J.; Welberry, Richard T.

    2009-01-01

    Full text: The nature of ferroelectric phase transitions in many materials have been questioned for many years. Whereas some methods provide definitive evidence of mode softening, other methods, such as local structure probes, indicate the existence of disorder in the paraelectric phase [1]. It is now widely accepted, that the ferroelectric phase transition usually has two components - soft-mode displacive and order-disorder. The latter leads inevitably to some form of pretransitional clusters in the paraelectric phase [2]. In relaxor ferroelectrics, in which disorder drives the transformation, such polar clusters can exist over a wide range of temperatures. Diffuse scattering is a powerful tool for studying such disorder and also for studying short-range order correlations in atomic displacements [3]. In this work we concentrate on the role of oxygens in various materials. By different means of molecular simulations we build models in which the oxygens constitute a framework for short range order correlations. This leads to a discussion of the differences between x-ray and neutron diffuse scattering patterns that may arise due to the disorder of oxygens.

  2. The role of the excited impurity levels on the metal-non metal transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, M.S.F. da; Makler, S.S.; Anda, E.V.

    1983-01-01

    The electronic density of states for the impurity bands in doped semiconductors is calculated using the Green function method. The system is described by a Hamiltonian with local Coulomb interactions represented in a tight binding basis composed by two orbitals per site. The electronic correlation is treated in the CPA approximation. To calculate the configurational average for this structural disordered system a diagrammatic scheme is developed. It represents an extension of the Matsubara and Toyozawa method for the case of two hybridized bands in the presence of electronic correlation. The excited levels show to play a crutial role in the undestanding of the metal-non metal transition. This work represents an improvement of a previous result. The particular case of Si : P is analyzed. (author) [pt

  3. The role of the excited impurity levels on the metal-non metal transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, M.S.F. da; Makler, S.S.; Anda, E.V.

    1983-01-01

    The electronic density of states for the impurity bands in doped semiconductors is calculated using the Green function method. The system is described by a Hamiltonian with local Coulomb interactions represented in a tight binding basis composed by two orbitals per site. The electronic correlation is treated in the CPA approximation. To calculate the configurational average for this structural disordered system a diagrammatic scheme is developed. It represents an extension of the Matsubara and Toyozawa method for the case of two hybridized bands in the presence of electronic correlation. The excited levels shown to play a crutial role in the understanding of the metal-non metal transition. This work represents an improvement of a previous result. The particular case of Si:P is analyzed. (Author) [pt

  4. Alteration in Solid State Phosphorous With Depth in Sediments Along the Salinity Transition Zone of a Major Chesapeake Bay Tributary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartzell, J. L.; Jordan, T. E.

    2006-05-01

    Determining the fate of particulate phosphorus in estuaries is essential for addressing the widespread problem of estuarine eutrophication, and is key to understanding P cycling and developing accurate global P budgets. Prominent reservoirs of P in surficial sediments include particulate P associated with iron or organic C. However, the importance of these reservoirs changes with the decomposition of organic matter and the reduction of iron. Also, the importance of iron bound P may decrease with increasing salinity due to the formation of iron sulfides. To investigate estuarine P burial and its relationship to salinity, we collected sediment cores of one-meter depth along the salinity gradient of the Patuxent River estuary (Maryland, USA), a major tributary of Chesapeake Bay. The sediments were analyzed using a sequential sedimentary extraction procedure that quantifies five separate reservoirs of particulate P. Total phosphorus concentrations in freshwater sediments were significantly higher than those in more saline sediments at all depths. Conversely, porewater phosphate concentrations were significantly lower in freshwater sediments than in the more saline sediments. Total P in the saline sediment cores decreased with depth, correlating to a reduction in iron-bound P. However, we did not find a concurrent increase in authigenic apatite with depth. Our findings indicate that mechanisms controlling changes in P sorption to sediments change profoundly with salinity and may contribute to increased bioavailability of phosphates with increasing salinity.

  5. Shell's Role in the Future European Gas Scene - Is a Major Market Restructuring Under Way?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Segundo, Karen de

    1999-01-01

    The European gas market is being restructured by a combination of major global forces. Environmental considerations like the Kyoto Agreement favour the use of gas. But in the medium-term, supplies may be limited by low energy prices. The political drive for increased competition has manifested itself as the EU Gas Directive, which came into force in 1998. Shell believes that the European industry must progressively adapt to this restructuring. Flexible mechanisms like tradable emission permits should be used to generate investment capital for new gas supply projects. Moreover, both industry and regulators should take a positive and constructive approach towards increasing competition in the marketplace

  6. The role of the potassium channel gene KCNK2 in major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Congiu, Chiara; Minelli, Alessandra; Bonvicini, Cristian; Bortolomasi, Marco; Sartori, Riccardo; Maj, Carlo; Scassellati, Catia; Maina, Giuseppe; Trabucchi, Luigi; Segala, Matilde; Gennarelli, Massimo

    2015-02-28

    Six single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of the KCNK2 gene were investigated for their association with major depressive disorder (MDD) and treatment efficacy in 590 MDD patients and 441 controls. The A homozygotes of rs10779646 were significantly more frequent in patients than controls whereas G allele of rs7549184 was associated with the presence of psychotic symptoms and the severity of disease. Evaluating the Sequenced Treatment Alternatives to Relieve Depression (STAR*D) dataset, we confirmed our findings. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Knowledge-based treatment planning and its potential role in the transition between treatment planning systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masi, Kathryn; Archer, Paul; Jackson, William; Sun, Yilun; Schipper, Matthew; Hamstra, Daniel; Matuszak, Martha

    2017-11-22

    Commissioning a new treatment planning system (TPS) involves many time-consuming tasks. We investigated the role that knowledge-based planning (KBP) can play in aiding a clinic's transition to a new TPS. Sixty clinically treated prostate/prostate bed intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plans were exported from an in-house TPS and were used to create a KBP model in a newly implemented commercial application. To determine the benefit that KBP may have in a TPS transition, the model was tested on 2 groups of patients. Group 1 consisted of the first 10 prostate/prostate bed patients treated in the commercial TPS after the transition from the in-house TPS. Group 2 consisted of 10 patients planned in the commercial TPS after 8 months of clinical use. The KBP-generated plan was compared with the clinically used plan in terms of plan quality (ability to meet planning objectives and overall dose metrics) and planning efficiency (time required to generate clinically acceptable plans). The KBP-generated plans provided a significantly improved target coverage (p = 0.01) compared with the clinically used plans for Group 1, but yielded plans of comparable target coverage to the clinically used plans for Group 2. For the organs at risk, the KBP-generated plans produced lower doses, on average, for every normal-tissue objective except for the maximum dose to 0.1 cc of rectum. The time needed for the KBP-generated plans ranged from 6 to 15 minutes compared to 30 to 150 and 15 to 60 minutes for manual planning in Groups 1 and 2, respectively. KBP is a promising tool to aid in the transition to a new TPS. Our study indicates that high-quality treatment plans could have been generated in the newly implemented TPS more efficiently compared with not using KBP. Even after 8 months of the clinical use, KBP still showed an increase in plan quality and planning efficiency compared with manual planning. Copyright © 2017 American Association of Medical Dosimetrists. Published

  8. "Hit the ground running": perspectives of new nurses and nurse managers on role transition and integration of new graduates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chernomas, Wanda M; Care, W Dean; McKenzie, Jo-Ann Lapointe; Guse, Lorna; Currie, Jan

    2010-01-01

    The workplace for new graduates must be a constructive learning environment to facilitate their development. Nurse managers need new graduates who can "hit the ground running." Conflict between the needs of new nurses and the realities of the workplace often creates role confusion and tension in new graduates and threatens employers' ability to retain them. As part of a larger study that examined the effectiveness of a new strategy on new nurse retention and workplace integration, we conducted focus groups with new nurses and nurse managers. This paper discusses the perspectives of new nurses on their role transition from graduates to practising professionals and the perspectives of nurse managers on the workplace integration of new nurses. The thematic findings integrate new nurses' perspectives on their needs during role transition with the perspectives of nurse managers in meeting those needs. The discussion includes strategies to facilitate successful transition and integration of new nurses into the workplace within the context of recruitment and retention.

  9. A widespread chromosomal inversion polymorphism contributes to a major life-history transition, local adaptation, and reproductive isolation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David B Lowry

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The role of chromosomal inversions in adaptation and speciation is controversial. Historically, inversions were thought to contribute to these processes either by directly causing hybrid sterility or by facilitating the maintenance of co-adapted gene complexes. Because inversions suppress recombination when heterozygous, a recently proposed local adaptation mechanism predicts that they will spread if they capture alleles at multiple loci involved in divergent adaptation to contrasting environments. Many empirical studies have found inversion polymorphisms linked to putatively adaptive phenotypes or distributed along environmental clines. However, direct involvement of an inversion in local adaptation and consequent ecological reproductive isolation has not to our knowledge been demonstrated in nature. In this study, we discovered that a chromosomal inversion polymorphism is geographically widespread, and we test the extent to which it contributes to adaptation and reproductive isolation under natural field conditions. Replicated crosses between the prezygotically reproductively isolated annual and perennial ecotypes of the yellow monkeyflower, Mimulus guttatus, revealed that alternative chromosomal inversion arrangements are associated with life-history divergence over thousands of kilometers across North America. The inversion polymorphism affected adaptive flowering time divergence and other morphological traits in all replicated crosses between four pairs of annual and perennial populations. To determine if the inversion contributes to adaptation and reproductive isolation in natural populations, we conducted a novel reciprocal transplant experiment involving outbred lines, where alternative arrangements of the inversion were reciprocally introgressed into the genetic backgrounds of each ecotype. Our results demonstrate for the first time in nature the contribution of an inversion to adaptation, an annual/perennial life-history shift, and

  10. The Role of Self-Blaming Moral Emotions in Major Depression and Their Impact on Social-Economical Decision Making

    OpenAIRE

    Pulcu, Erdem; Zahn, Roland; Elliott, Rebecca

    2013-01-01

    People with major depressive disorder (MDD) are more prone to experiencing moral emotions related to self-blame, such as guilt and shame. DSM-IV-TR recognises excessive or inappropriate guilt as one of the core symptoms of current MDD, whereas excessive shame is not part of the criteria for MDD. However, previous studies specifically assessing shame suggested its involvement in MDD. In the first part of this review, we will consider literature discussing the role of self-blaming moral emotion...

  11. The Oft-Neglected Role of Parietal EEG Asymmetry and Risk for Major Depressive Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Jennifer L.; Towers, David N.; Coan, James A.; Allen, John J.B.

    2010-01-01

    Relatively less right parietal activity may reflect reduced arousal and signify risk for major depressive disorder (MDD). Inconsistent findings with parietal electroencephalographic (EEG) asymmetry, however, suggest issues such as anxiety comorbidity and sex differences have yet to be resolved. Resting parietal EEG asymmetry was assessed in 306 individuals (31% male) with (n = 143) and without (n = 163) a DSM-IV diagnosis of lifetime MDD and no comorbid anxiety disorders. Past MDD+ women displayed relatively less right parietal activity than current MDD+ and MDD- women, replicating prior work. Recent caffeine intake, an index of arousal, moderated the relationship between depression and EEG asymmetry for women and men. Findings suggest that sex differences and arousal should be examined in studies of depression and regional brain activity. PMID:20525011

  12. Disturbance of Oligodendrocyte Function Plays a Key Role in the Pathogenesis of Schizophrenia and Major Depressive Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shingo Miyata

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The major psychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia (SZ and major depressive disorder (MDD are thought to be multifactorial diseases related to both genetic and environmental factors. However, the genes responsible and the molecular mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of SZ and MDD remain unclear. We previously reported that abnormalities of disrupted-in-Schizophrenia-1 (DISC1 and DISC1 binding zinc finger (DBZ might cause major psychiatric disorders such as SZ. Interestingly, both DISC and DBZ have been further detected in oligodendrocytes and implicated in regulating oligodendrocyte differentiation. DISC1 negatively regulates the differentiation of oligodendrocytes, whereas DBZ plays a positive regulatory role in oligodendrocyte differentiation. We have reported that repeated stressful events, one of the major risk factors of MDD, can induce sustained upregulation of plasma corticosterone levels and serum/glucocorticoid regulated kinase 1 (Sgk1 mRNA expression in oligodendrocytes. Repeated stressful events can also activate the SGK1 cascade and cause excess arborization of oligodendrocyte processes, which is thought to be related to depressive-like symptoms. In this review, we discuss the expression of DISC1, DBZ, and SGK1 in oligodendrocytes, their roles in the regulation of oligodendrocyte function, possible interactions of DISC1 and DBZ in relation to SZ, and the activation of the SGK1 signaling cascade in relation to MDD.

  13. Mitochondrial permeability transition and cell death: the role of cyclophilin D

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabzali eJavadov

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondria serve as a powerhouse which provides near 90% of ATP necessary for cell life. However, recent studies provide strong evidence that mitochondria also play a central role in cell death. Irreversible mitochondrial permeability transition (mPT at high conductance in response to oxidative or other cellular stresses is accompanied by formation of pathological and non-specific mPT pores (mPTP in the inner membrane of mitochondria. Mitochondrial PTP can serve as a target to prevent cell death under pathological conditions such as cardiac and brain ischemia/reperfusion injury and diabetes. On the other hand, mPTP can be used as an executioner to specifically induce cell death thus blocking tumorigenesis in cancer diseases. Despite many studies, the molecular identity of the mPTP remains unclear. At present, cyclophilin D (CyP-D represents the only mPTP protein which plays an essential role in pore formation. This review will discuss direct and indirect mechanisms underlying CyP-D interaction with a target protein of the mPTP complex. Understanding of the mechanisms of mPTP formation will be helpful to further develop new pharmacological agents targeting mitochondria-mediated cell death.

  14. Role of mitochondrial permeability transition in human renal tubular epithelial cell death induced by aristolochic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qi Xinming; Cai Yan; Gong Likun; Liu Linlin; Chen Fangping; Xiao Ying; Wu Xiongfei; Li Yan; Xue Xiang; Ren Jin

    2007-01-01

    Aristolochic acid (AA), a natural nephrotoxin and carcinogen, can induce a progressive tubulointerstitial nephropathy. However, the mechanism by which AA causes renal injury remains largely unknown. Here we reported that the mitochondrial permeability transition (MPT) plays an important role in the renal injury induced by aristolochic acid I (AAI). We found that in the presence of Ca 2+ , AAI caused mitochondrial swelling, leakage of Ca 2+ , membrane depolarization, and release of cytochrome c in isolated kidney mitochondria. These alterations were suppressed by cyclosporin A (CsA), an agent known to inhibit MPT. Culture of HK-2 cell, a human renal tubular epithelial cell line for 24 h with AAI caused a decrease in cellular ATP, mitochondrial membrane depolarization, cytochrome c release, and increase of caspase 3 activity. These toxic effects of AAI were attenuated by CsA and bongkrekic acid (BA), another specific MPT inhibitor. Furthermore, AAI greatly inhibited the activity of mitochondrial adenine nucleotide translocator (ANT) in isolated mitochondria. We suggested that ANT may mediate, at least in part, the AAI-induced MPT. Taken together, these results suggested that MPT plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of HK-2 cell injury induced by AAI and implied that MPT might contribute to human nephrotoxicity of aristolochic acid

  15. Strengthening patient safety in transitions of care: an emerging role for local medical centres in Norway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kongsvik, Trond; Halvorsen, Kristin; Osmundsen, Tonje; Gjøsund, Gudveig

    2016-08-30

    Patient safety has gained less attention in primary care in comparison to specialised care. We explore how local medical centres (LMCs) can play a role in strengthening patient safety, both locally and in transitions between care levels. LMCs represent a form of intermediate care organisation in Norway that is increasingly used as a strategy for integrated care policies. The analysis is based on institutional theory and general safety theories. A qualitative design was applied, involving 20 interviews of nursing home managers, managers at local medical centres and administrative personnel. The LMCs mediate important information between care levels, partly by means of workarounds, but also as a result of having access to the different information and communications technology (ICT) systems in use. Their knowledge of local conditions is found to be a key asset. LMCs are providers of competence and training for the local level, as well as serving as quality assurers. As a growing organisational form in Norway, LMCs have to legitimise their role in the health care system. They represent an asset to the local level in terms of information, competence and quality assurance. As they have overlapping competencies, tasks and responsibilities with other parts of the health care system, they add to organisational redundancy and strengthen patient safety.

  16. The Major Roles Of Long Distance Bus Transport In Developing Countries With Emphasis On Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kassa Fekadu

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This article presents the major roles of long distance bus transport that radiates from Addis Ababa to the hinterland. The purpose is to assess and identify the major roles of Long Distance Bus Transport in Addis Ababa. The methodology is focused on both primary and secondary sources. The primary informants, who were principally distinguished from the passengers, operators, and key government officials from the transport office, include the head of bus terminal and Association, and selected experts. In terms of analysis, the qualitative approach was used by applying a thick description of the issue. The findings revealed that the availability of towns comes mainly because of the routes which give access and distribution of road passenger transport. The LDB (Long Distance Bus along the line has played a great role in the making of metropolitan linkage. The presence of these routes contributes more to the rise of urbanization and it has also played a role in the creation of towns and rural areas found around certain radius at the two sides of highways. Thus, it has a high probability for the expansion of urban sprawl and formation of conurbation in the future. The prescription for this study is to work with stakeholders to reduce the congestion of passengers in the terminals and the association also should serve the society 24/7 or 18/7.

  17. The Role of Attention to Emotion in Recovery from Major Depressive Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renee J. Thompson

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Major Depressive Disorder (MDD is characterized by several emotional disturbances. One possible but not well-examined disturbance is in attention to emotion, an important facet of emotional awareness. We examined whether attention to emotion predicted recovery from MDD. Fifty-three adults with current MDD completed a week of experience sampling (Time 1. At each prompt, participants reported attention to emotion, negative affect (NA, and positive affect (PA. Approximately one year later (Time 2, the depressive status of 27 participants was reassessed. Participants who had recovered from MDD (n=8 indicated paying less attention to their emotions at Time 1 than did participants who had not fully recovered (n=19. Attention to emotion was better predictor of recovery than was severity of MDD, NA, or PA at Time 1. Levels of attention to emotion at Time 1 in participants who recovered from MDD did not differ significantly from the levels reported by 53 never-depressed individuals who had participated in the experience sampling. Findings indicate that high levels of an otherwise adaptive emotional facet can adversely affect the course of MDD.

  18. The Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region: A major role in China's renewable energy future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee Kwan, Calvin

    2010-01-01

    Because the IMAR is China's second largest coal producing region and the entire nation depends on over half of its energy demand from coal, the issue about more coal becoming part of the energy supply is of grave concern to the region and central government. In addition to that, China has been building more structures that demand more and more energy. The options for energy in China are to dig for more coal, discover oil and gas or import these fossil fuels. However, consideration for the environment and climate change along with concern for national security has forced China to consider a non-fossil fuel option: conservation and efficiency along with renewable energy power generation. IMAR has vast regions and areas where wind and solar have already been installed. By 2009, almost 1 GW of renewable energy systems had been installed and operating in all of China. Most of the energy was generated by hydroelectricity, though wind power - a rapidly technology in China- accounted for almost one fourth. More GWs of energy are possible along with geothermal and related renewable power sources such as the run of river and bio-mass. Major energy companies in the region are now advancing and exploring these renewable energy options along with western companies as joint ventures that create new industries, create jobs and lessen both IMAR and China's dependency on fossil fuels. (author)

  19. Peripheral Immune Alterations in Major Depression: The Role of Subtypes and Pathogenetic Characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank Euteneuer

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Depression has been associated with peripheral inflammatory processes and alterations in cellular immunity. Growing evidence suggests that immunological alterations may neither be necessary nor sufficient to induce depression in general, but seem to be associated with specific features. Using baseline data from the Outcome of Psychological Interventions in Depression trial, this exploratory study examines associations between depression subtypes and pathogenetic characteristics (i.e., melancholic vs non-melancholic depression, chronic vs non-chronic depression, age of onset, cognitive-affective and somatic symptom dimensions with plasma levels of C-reactive protein (CRP, interleukin (IL-6, IL-10, and numbers of leukocyte subpopulations in 98 patients with major depression (MD and 30 age and sex-matched controls. Patients with MD exhibited higher CRP levels, higher neutrophil and monocyte counts, lower IL-10 levels, and an increased neutrophil to lymphocyte ratio (NLR than controls. Patient with later age of onset had higher levels of two inflammatory markers (CRP, NLR and lower cytotoxic T cell counts after adjusting for sociodemographics, lifestyle factors, and antidepressants. Furthermore, lower anti-inflammatory IL-10 levels were related to more severe somatic depressive symptoms. These results confirm and extend previous findings suggesting that increased levels of CRP are associated with a later onset of depression and demonstrate that also NLR as a subclinical inflammatory marker is related to a later onset of depression.

  20. Dual role of preputial gland secretion and its major components in sex recognition of mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jian-Xu; Liu, Ying-Juan; Zhang, Jin-Hua; Sun, Lixing

    2008-10-20

    This study was aimed at validating the sexual attractiveness of hexadecanol and hexadecyl acetate, two putative pheromone compounds, from preputial gland secretion of mice. These two compounds have been reported to be among the major components of preputial gland secretion in both sexes but higher in quantity in males than females. In this study, we show that castration suppressed the production of the two compounds, further suggesting their association with maleness. Adding preputial gland secretion and the synthetic analogs of the two compounds to castrated male urine at their physiological levels in intact males increased the attractiveness of castrated male urine to female mice, showing that the two compounds were indeed male pheromones. Furthermore, their sexual attractiveness disappeared upon removing the vomeronasal organs (VNOs) from female recipients. Replenishing castrated male urine with preputial gland secretion and the two compounds at their physiological levels in females increased the attractiveness of castrated male urine to males. Such a reversal of sexual attractiveness for hexadecanol and hexadecyl acetate suggests that they had opposing dual effects in sexual attractiveness in a dosage-dependent manner.

  1. Grasha-richmann college students’ learning styles of classroom participation: Role of gender and major

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ALI REZA BANESHI

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: This study aimed to investigate the male and female students’ learning styles of classroom participation and these styles’ differences between Humanities and Science majors. Methods: 1039 individuals were selected through the proportional stratified random sampling method among undergraduate and graduate students in Humanities (n=421 and Science (n=618 faculties of Tehran University. In the Humanities group, there were 285 females and 136 males, and in the Science group, there were 208 females and 410 males. The participants answered the Grasha-Riechmann student learning styles scale. Results: The findings indicated that the females obtained significantly higher means in collaborative, participative, and dependent styles than males, but in avoidant, and independent styles, the means for males were higher than those for females. Also, the science group’s means in collaborative, participative, dependent, and competitive styles were significantly higher than those for the humanities group. Conclusion: According to the findings, it seems that due to psychological characteristics, female students tend to collaborate with other students of the same sex and participate in their activities. In this way, they also are more dependent on their teacher and classroom, because otherwise they will face some problems such as anxiety. In addition, it seems that science students in comparison to humanities students are more participative and collaborative because they need more collaboration in their projects and course work.

  2. The Role of Attention to Emotion in Recovery from Major Depressive Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Renee J.; Mata, Jutta; Jaeggi, Susanne M.; Buschkuehl, Martin; Jonides, John; Gotlib, Ian H.

    2013-01-01

    Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) is characterized by several emotional disturbances. One possible but not well-examined disturbance is in attention to emotion, an important facet of emotional awareness. We examined whether attention to emotion predicted recovery from MDD. Fifty-three adults with current MDD completed a week of experience sampling (Time 1). At each prompt, participants reported attention to emotion, negative affect (NA), and positive affect (PA). Approximately one year later (Time 2), the depressive status of 27 participants was reassessed. Participants who had recovered from MDD (n = 8) indicated paying less attention to their emotions at Time 1 than did participants who had not fully recovered (n = 19). Attention to emotion was better predictor of recovery than was severity of MDD, NA, or PA at Time 1. Levels of attention to emotion at Time 1 in participants who recovered from MDD did not differ significantly from the levels reported by 53 never-depressed individuals who had participated in the experience sampling. Findings indicate that high levels of an otherwise adaptive emotional facet can adversely affect the course of MDD. PMID:23853719

  3. Role of miRNA Let-7 and Its Major Targets in Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siegfried Wagner

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer is worldwide the sixth leading cause of cancer related death in men thus early detection and successful treatment are still of major interest. The commonly performed screening of the prostate-specific antigen (PSA is controversially discussed, as in many patients the prostate-specific antigen levels are chronically elevated in the absence of cancer. Due to the unsatisfying efficiency of available prostate cancer screening markers and the current treatment outcome of the aggressive hormone refractory prostate cancer, the evaluation of novel molecular markers and targets is considered an issue of high importance. MicroRNAs are relatively stable in body fluids orchestrating simultaneously the expression of many genes. These molecules are currently discussed to bear a greater diagnostic potential than protein-coding genes, being additionally promising therapeutic drugs and/or targets. Herein we review the potential impact of the microRNA let-7 family on prostate cancer and show how deregulation of several of its target genes could influence the cellular equilibrium in the prostate gland, promoting cancer development as they do in a variety of other human malignant neoplasias.

  4. Accounting for biases in riboprofiling data indicates a major role for proline in stalling translation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artieri, Carlo G; Fraser, Hunter B

    2014-12-01

    The recent advent of ribosome profiling-sequencing of short ribosome-bound fragments of mRNA-has offered an unprecedented opportunity to interrogate the sequence features responsible for modulating translational rates. Nevertheless, numerous analyses of the first riboprofiling data set have produced equivocal and often incompatible results. Here we analyze three independent yeast riboprofiling data sets, including two with much higher coverage than previously available, and find that all three show substantial technical sequence biases that confound interpretations of ribosomal occupancy. After accounting for these biases, we find no effect of previously implicated factors on ribosomal pausing. Rather, we find that incorporation of proline, whose unique side-chain stalls peptide synthesis in vitro, also slows the ribosome in vivo. We also reanalyze a method that implicated positively charged amino acids as the major determinant of ribosomal stalling and demonstrate that it produces false signals of stalling in low-coverage data. Our results suggest that any analysis of riboprofiling data should account for sequencing biases and sparse coverage. To this end, we establish a robust methodology that enables analysis of ribosome profiling data without prior assumptions regarding which positions spanned by the ribosome cause stalling. © 2014 Artieri and Fraser; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  5. Strain diversity plays no major role in the varying efficacy of rotavirus vaccines: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velasquez, Daniel E; Parashar, Umesh D; Jiang, Baoming

    2014-12-01

    While a monovalent Rotarix® [RV1] and a pentavalent RotaTeq® [RV5] have been extensively tested and found generally safe and equally efficacious in clinical trials, the question still lingers about the evolving diversity of circulating rotavirus strains over time and their relationship with protective immunity induced by rotavirus vaccines. We reviewed data from clinical trials and observational studies that assessed the efficacy or field effectiveness of rotavirus vaccines against different rotavirus strains worldwide. RV1 provided broad clinical efficacy and field effectiveness against severe diarrhea due to all major circulating strains, including the homotypic G1P[8] and the fully heterotypic G2P[4] strains. Similarly, RV5 provided broad efficacy and effectiveness against RV5 and non-RV5 strains throughout different locations. Rotavirus vaccination provides broad heterotypic protection; however continuing surveillance is needed to track the change of circulating strains and monitor the effectiveness and safety of vaccines. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. Socio-technical transition as a co-evolutionary process: Innovation and the role of niche markets in the transition to motor vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birky, Alicia K.

    2008-10-01

    Significant reductions in greenhouse emissions from personal transportation will require a transition to an alternative technology regime based on renewable energy sources. Two bodies of research, the quasi-evolutionary (QE) model and the multi-level perspective (MLP) assert that processes within niches play a fundamental role in such transitions. This research asks whether the description of transitions based on this niche hypothesis and its underlying assumptions is consistent with the historical U.S. transition to motor vehicles at the beginning of the 20th century. Unique to this dissertation is the combination of the perspective of the entrepreneur with co-evolutionary approaches to socio-technical transitions. This approach is augmented with concepts from the industry life-cycle model and with a taxonomy of mechanisms of learning. Using this analytic framework, I examine specifically the role of entrepreneurial behavior and processes within and among firms in the co-evolution of technologies and institutions during the transition to motor vehicles. I find that niche markets played an important role in the development of the technology, institutions, and the industry. However, I also find that the diffusion of the automobile is not consistent with the niche hypothesis in the following ways: (1) product improvements and cost reductions were not realized in niche markets, but were achieved simultaneously with diffusion into mass markets; (2) in addition to learning-by-doing and learning-by-interacting with users, knowledge spillovers and interacting with suppliers were critical in this process; (3) cost reductions were not automatic results of expanding markets, but rather arose from the strategies of entrepreneurs based on personal perspectives and values. This finding supports the use of a behavioral approach with a micro-focus in the analysis of socio-technical change. I also find that the emergence and diffusion of the motor vehicle can only be understood by

  7. Sprint Acceleration Mechanics: The Major Role of Hamstrings in Horizontal Force Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morin, Jean-Benoît; Gimenez, Philippe; Edouard, Pascal; Arnal, Pierrick; Jiménez-Reyes, Pedro; Samozino, Pierre; Brughelli, Matt; Mendiguchia, Jurdan

    2015-01-01

    Recent literature supports the importance of horizontal ground reaction force (GRF) production for sprint acceleration performance. Modeling and clinical studies have shown that the hip extensors are very likely contributors to sprint acceleration performance. We experimentally tested the role of the hip extensors in horizontal GRF production during short, maximal, treadmill sprint accelerations. Torque capabilities of the knee and hip extensors and flexors were assessed using an isokinetic dynamometer in 14 males familiar with sprint running. Then, during 6-s sprints on an instrumented motorized treadmill, horizontal and vertical GRF were synchronized with electromyographic (EMG) activity of the vastus lateralis, rectus femoris, biceps femoris, and gluteus maximus averaged over the first half of support, entire support, entire swing and end-of-swing phases. No significant correlations were found between isokinetic or EMG variables and horizontal GRF. Multiple linear regression analysis showed a significant relationship (P = 0.024) between horizontal GRF and the combination of biceps femoris EMG activity during the end of the swing and the knee flexors eccentric peak torque. In conclusion, subjects who produced the greatest amount of horizontal force were both able to highly activate their hamstring muscles just before ground contact and present high eccentric hamstring peak torque capability. PMID:26733889

  8. Sprint acceleration mechanics: the major role of hamstrings in horizontal force production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Benoit eMORIN

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Recent literature supports the importance of horizontal ground reaction force (GRF production for sprint acceleration performance. Modeling and clinical studies have shown that the hip extensors are very likely contributors to sprint acceleration performance. We experimentally tested the role of the hip extensors in horizontal GRF production during short, maximal, treadmill sprint accelerations. Torque capabilities of the knee and hip extensors and flexors were assessed using an isokinetic dynamometer in 14 males familiar with sprint running. Then, during 6-s sprints on an instrumented motorized treadmill, horizontal and vertical GRF were synchronized with electromyographic (EMG activity of the vastus lateralis, rectus femoris, biceps femoris and gluteus maximus averaged over the first half of support, entire support, entire swing and end-of-swing phases. No significant correlations were found between isokinetic or EMG variables and horizontal GRF. Multiple linear regression analysis showed a significant relationship (P = 0.024 between horizontal GRF and the combination of biceps femoris EMG activity during the end of the swing and the knee flexors eccentric peak torque. In conclusion, subjects who produced the greatest amount of horizontal force were both able to highly activate their hamstring muscles just before ground contact and present high eccentric hamstring peak torque capability.

  9. How major restaurant chains plan their menus: the role of profit, demand, and health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glanz, Karen; Resnicow, Ken; Seymour, Jennifer; Hoy, Kathy; Stewart, Hayden; Lyons, Mark; Goldberg, Jeanne

    2007-05-01

    Increased away-from-home eating is associated with lower diet quality, and may contribute to the increasing prevalence of overweight and obesity. Healthier food choices in restaurants may help mitigate the rise in obesity and improve diet quality. This study sought to understand the views of executives at major U.S. restaurant chains regarding the process, motivation for, and challenges of offering healthier options on their menus. The Healthy Menu Study used in-depth structured telephone interviews with 41 senior menu development and marketing executives at leading casual dining and fast-food restaurant chains. The interview guide covered menu trends, influences on introduction and continuation of new menu items, and barriers to adding healthy foods. Data analysis included tabulation of responses, identification of themes, and examination of subgroup differences. Growing sales and increasing profits are the most important considerations, mentioned by 61% of respondents; health and nutrition were noted as important by 21%. Restaurants may try to avoid losing groups with a "health seeker" by offering healthier foods (low in fat and calories, more fruits and vegetables) (27% of chains), but operators believe demand for healthier foods is not widespread. Additional obstacles to including healthier menu items are short shelf life of produce (46%), increased preparation time, low sales, and high labor costs. Not surprisingly, profit margins are the primary determinants of why restaurants do or do not add and continue to serve healthier food options. Without an increase in consumer demand, it is unlikely the restaurant industry will increase their offering of healthy food choices. Insight into the restaurant industry perspective is important for developing promising strategies to encourage healthier eating patterns.

  10. Role of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids for the treatment of patients with major depression disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Al Hussain

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A rising number of studies have raised questions regarding the association of mental illness in a particular mood disorders such as depression with low intake of omega-3 fatty acids. Given all the side-effects that traditional antidepressants put patients at risk for, omega-3 is certainly a better alternative that might improve depressive symptoms and patient′s compliance to treatment by removing the stigma of psychiatric drugs. This study critically reviewed 12 relevant studies from PubMed published between 1992 - 2013 in order to determine whether omega-3 supplements or diet rich in fish were likely to show affectivity in reducing depressive symptoms. Most of the studies showed clear association between omega-3 and reduced depressive symptoms. Studies support the adjunctive role of omega-3 and high fish consumption in reducing depression. Omega-3 fatty acids have also shown to be safe when used during pregnancy to prevent postpartum depression. Although some studies showed mixed results of positive findings, the use of omega-3 supplements could not be an absolute substitute of antidepressants due to limitation in their studies. Minority of the studies reviewed did not correlate omega-3 with the improvement of depressive symptoms for many reasons such as the healthy life-style of subjects, etc. Given the fact that depression has various causes, this puts the testing of omega-3 in a lot of bias due to several variables such as dose, formula, period administered as well as the candidates′ state of health. Further research is definitely warranted on a larger sample size with close follow-up using proper assessment tools. Omega-3 has shown to have minimal or no side-effects at all, which makes it important for mental health professional to at least ensure that patients diagnosed with depression have adequate amounts of omega-3 fatty acids whether by supplementation or in their daily diet.

  11. Treating thalassemia major-related iron overload: the role of deferiprone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berdoukas V

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Vasilios Berdoukas,1 Kallistheni Farmaki,2 Susan Carson,1 John Wood,3 Thomas Coates11Division of Hematology/Oncology, Children's Hospital Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA, USA; 2Thalassemia Unit, General Hospital of Corinth, Corinth, Greece; 3Division of Cardiology, Children's Hospital Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA, USAAbstract: Over the last 20 years, management for thalassemia major has improved to the point where we predict that patients' life expectancy will approach that of the normal population. These outcomes result from safer blood transfusions, the availability of three iron chelators, new imaging techniques that allow specific organ assessment of the degree of iron overload, and improvement in the treatment of hepatitis. In October 2011, the Food and Drug Administration licensed deferiprone, further increasing the available choices for iron chelation in the US. The ability to prescribe any of the three chelators as well as their combinations has led to more effective reduction of total body iron. The ability to determine the amount of iron in the liver and heart by magnetic resonance imaging allows the prescription of the most appropriate chelation regime for patients and to reconsider what our aims with respect to total body iron should be. Recent evidence from Europe has shown that by normalizing iron stores not only are new morbidities prevented but also reversal of many complications such as cardiac failure, hypothyroidism, hypogonadism, impaired glucose tolerance, and type 2 diabetes can occur, improving survival and patients' quality of life. The most effective way to achieve normal iron stores seems to be with the combination of deferoxamine and deferiprone. Furthermore, outcomes should continue to improve in the future. Starting relative intensive chelation in younger children may prevent short stature and abnormal pubertal maturation as well as other iron-related morbidities. Also, further information should become available on the

  12. Role of entropy and structural parameters in the spin-state transition of LaCoO3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakrabarti, Bismayan; Birol, Turan; Haule, Kristjan

    2017-11-01

    The spin-state transition in LaCoO3 has eluded description for decades despite concerted theoretical and experimental effort. In this study, we approach this problem using fully charge self-consistent density functional theory + embedded dynamical mean field theory (DFT+DMFT). We show from first principles that LaCoO3 cannot be described by a single, pure spin state at any temperature. Instead, we observe a gradual change in the population of higher-spin multiplets with increasing temperature, with the high-spin multiplets being excited at the onset of the spin-state transition followed by the intermediate-spin multiplets being excited at the metal-insulator-transition temperature. We explicitly elucidate the critical role of lattice expansion and oxygen octahedral rotations in the spin-state transition. We also reproduce, from first principles, that the spin-state transition and the metal-insulator transition in LaCoO3 occur at different temperature scales. In addition, our results shed light on the importance of electronic entropy in driving the spin-state transition, which has so far been ignored in all first-principles studies of this material.

  13. The role of major forest fires on rock physical decay in a Mediterranean environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shtober-Zisu, Nurit; Tessler, Naama; Tsatskin, Alexander; Greenbaum, Noam

    2017-04-01

    Massive destruction of carbonate rocks occurred on the slopes of Mt. Carmel (Israel), during a severe forest fire in 2010. The bedrock surfaces exhibited extensive exfoliation into flakes and spalls covering up to 80%-100% of the exposed rocks; detached boulders were totally fractured or disintegrated. The fire affected six carbonate units—various types of chalk, limestone, and dolomite. The burned flakes show a consistent tendency towards flatness, in all lithologies, as 85%-95% of the flakes were detached in the form of blades, plates, and slabs. The extent of the physical disruption depends on rock composition: the most severe response was found in the chalk formations which are covered by calcrete (Nari crusts). These rocks reacted by extreme exfoliation, at an average depth of 7.7 to 9.6 cm and a maximum depth of 20 cm. Scorched and blackened faces under the upper layer of spalls provide strong evidence that chalk breakdown took place at an early stage of the fire. The extreme response of the chalks can be explained by the laminar structure of the Nari, which served as planes of weakness for the rock destruction. Three years after the fire, the rocks continue to exfoliate and break down internally. As the harder surface of the Nari was removed, the more brittle underlying chalk is exposed to erosion. These flakes seem to play an important role in reforming the soil after the fire, especially by increasing the coarse particles percentage. These, in spite of the absence of vegetation cover, improve soil infiltration and percolation rates and cause long-term changes to the hydrological regime. It is difficult to estimate the frequency of high-intensity fires in the Carmel region over the past 2-3 million years, as well as the extension and density of the vegetation. It is even harder to assess the frequency of fires (and the destruction) of a single rock outcrop. Our findings show that rock outcrop may lose even 20 cm of its thickness in a single fire. This

  14. Transition Management, Action Research and Actor Roles: Understanding local sustainability transitions : Transitiemanagement, actieonderzoek en rollen van actoren: lokale duurzaamheidstransities begrijpen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.M. Wittmayer (Julia)

    2016-01-01

    markdownabstractThis thesis is about the local scale of urban neighbourhoods, towns and cities and its interaction with global problems and sustainability questions. At this scale, we most notably interact with these problems and thereby question current role understandings, actor relations and

  15. PARALLELS BETWEEN MAJOR DEPRESSIVE DISORDER AND ALZHEIMER’S DISEASE: ROLE OF OXIDATIVE STRESS AND GENETIC VULNERABILITY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Roberto; Petersen, Robert B.

    2014-01-01

    The thesis of this review is that oxidative stress is the central factor in major depressive disorder (MDD) and Alzheimer’s disease (AD). The major elements involved are inflammatory cytokines, the hypothalamic pituitary axis, the hypothalamic pituitary gonadal, and arginine vasopressin systems, which induce glucocorticoid and “oxidopamatergic” cascades when triggered by psychosocial stress, severe life threatening events, and mental-affective and somatic diseases. In individuals with a genomic vulnerability to depression these cascades may result in chronic depression-anxiety-stress spectra, resulting in MDD and other known depressive syndromes. In contrast, in subjects with genomic vulnerability to Alzheimer’s disease, oxidative stress-induced brain damage triggers specific antioxidant defenses, i.e. increased levels of amyloid-β (Aβ) and aggregation of hyper-phosphorylated tau, resulting in paired helical filaments and impaired functions related to the ApoEε4 isoform, leading to complex pathological cascades culminating in AD. Surprisingly, all the AD associated molecular pathways mentioned in this review have been shown to be similar or analogous to those found in depression, including structural damage, i.e. hippocampal and frontal cortex atrophy. Other interacting molecular signals, i.e. GSK-3β, convergent survival factors (brain-derived neurotrophic factor and heat shock proteins), and transition-redox metals are also mentioned to emphasize the vast array of intermediates that could interact via comparable mechanisms in both MDD and AD. PMID:24927694

  16. The role of migration-specific and migration-relevant policies in migrant decision-making in transit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuschminder - de Guerre, Katie; Koser, Khalid

    2017-01-01

    This paper examines the role of migration-specific and migration-relevant policies in migrant decision-making factors for onwards migration or stay in Greece and Turkey. In this paper we distinguish migration-specific policies from migration-relevant policies in transit and destination countries,

  17. Understanding the role of social capital in adolescents' Big Five personality effects on school-to-work transitions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baay, Pieter E.; Van Aken, Marcel A G; De Ridder, Denise T D; Van der Lippe, Tanja

    2014-01-01

    The school-to-work transition constitutes a central developmental task for adolescents. The role of Big Five personality traits in this has received some scientific attention, but prior research has been inconsistent and paid little attention to mechanisms through which personality traits influence

  18. Smart homes in transition - Investigating the role of households in the development of smart grids in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nyborg, Sophie

    and black-outs, fuel security, fraud and inaccurate billing. The present PhD project aims to explore the role households play in a sustainable transition of the energy system and takes as its point of departure the Danish smart grid case. Here the smart grid is dominantly framed in relation to the political...

  19. Mighty Oaks from Little Acorns? The Role of Self-Assessment in Educational Transitions: Mediation and Moderation Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Tamás

    2018-01-01

    This paper investigates the transitions to secondary and to tertiary education. As a new contribution to prior scholarship, it focuses on the role of self-perceived ability (self-assessment), which might impel pupils to make costly efforts in education now, in order to have an uncertain payoff later on. The paper builds on the assumption that…

  20. PHOs fall short of expectations. Despite failings, networks may have role as a transition to vertical integration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaklevic, M C

    1995-10-09

    An estimated 3,000 physician-hospital organizations have formed since the early 1980s, most of them in the last two years. But their slow progress in managed-care contracting has many wondering if they're anything more than an expensive fad. Proponents argue that despite their failings, PHOs may have a role as a transition to vertical integration.

  1. Roles of Dietary Phytoestrogens on the Regulation of Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition in Diverse Cancer Metastasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Geum-A.; Hwang, Kyung-A.; Choi, Kyung-Chul

    2016-01-01

    Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) plays a key role in tumor progression. The cells undergoing EMT upregulate the expression of cell motility-related proteins and show enhanced migration and invasion. The hallmarks of EMT in cancer cells include changed cell morphology and increased metastatic capabilities in cell migration and invasion. Therefore, prevention of EMT is an important tool for the inhibition of tumor metastasis. A novel preventive therapy is needed, such as treatment of natural dietary substances that are nontoxic to normal human cells, but effective in inhibiting cancer cells. Phytoestrogens, such as genistein, resveratrol, kaempferol and 3,3′-diindolylmethane (DIM), can be raised as possible candidates. They are plant-derived dietary estrogens, which are found in tea, vegetables and fruits, and are known to have various biological efficacies, including chemopreventive activity against cancers. Specifically, these phytoestrogens may induce not only anti-proliferation, apoptosis and cell cycle arrest, but also anti-metastasis by inhibiting the EMT process in various cancer cells. There have been several signaling pathways found to be associated with the induction of the EMT process in cancer cells. Phytoestrogens were demonstrated to have chemopreventive effects on cancer metastasis by inhibiting EMT-associated pathways, such as Notch-1 and TGF-beta signaling. As a result, phytoestrogens can inhibit or reverse the EMT process by upregulating the expression of epithelial phenotypes, including E-cadherin, and downregulating the expression of mesenchymal phenotypes, including N-cadherin, Snail, Slug, and vimentin. In this review, we focused on the important roles of phytoestrogens in inhibiting EMT in many types of cancer and suggested phytoestrogens as prominent alternative compounds to chemotherapy. PMID:27231938

  2. Majoring in Selection, and Minoring in Socialization: The Role of the College Experience in Goal Change Post-High School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Patrick L; Jackson, Joshua J; Nagy, Nicole; Nagy, Gabriel; Roberts, Brent W; Lüdtke, Oliver; Trautwein, Ulrich

    2016-04-01

    Though it is frequently assumed that the college experience can influence our life goals, this claim has been relatively understudied. The current study examined the role of goals in college major selection, as well as whether major selection influences later goal change. In addition, we examined whether a person's perceptions of his or her peers' goals influence goal setting. Using a sample of German students (Mage  = 19 years; n = 3,023 at Wave 1), we assessed life goal levels and changes from high school into college across three assessment occasions. Participants reported their current aspirations, along with the perceived goals of their peers during the college assessments. Using latent growth curve models, findings suggest that life goals upon entering college significantly predict the majors students select. However, this major selection had limited influence on later changes in life goals. Stronger effects were found with respect to perceptions of peers' goals, with students tending to change their goals to better align with their peers. The current study provides evidence that life goals are relatively stable and yet can change during the emerging adult years, in ways that demonstrate the potential influence of the college experience. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Capturing transitions and trajectories: the role of socioeconomic status in later life disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Miles G

    2010-11-01

    Disability is conceptualized as a life course process and measured using either transitions or trajectories. Previous research does not simultaneously explore both aspects of disablement, accounting for timing and trajectory. The role of education is noted in disability research, but its independent effects over time have not been fully examined. I investigate the effects of education and income on disability onset and progression over a decade. I use a latent curve modeling approach with four waves of the Duke Established Populations for Epidemiologic Studies of the Elderly data to independently test the preventive and mediating effects education and income provide for disability. Education has a preventive effect for disability onset but no significant effect on progression once income is held constant. Income has both a preventive and mediating effect on disability, although preventive effects are stronger for education. Later life disability is measured here using both onset and trajectory. Findings are consistent with health research suggesting that education and income work through shared and independent mechanisms to affect disability over time. These findings also highlight the importance of modeling timing when studying health trajectories.

  4. Perceived role of marketing activities in the context of transitional economy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sigitas Urbonavičius

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The role and importance of various marketing activities within a company is a function of numerous internal and external factors, including those that are typical of transitional economies. These factors are integrated and shaped by managerial perceptions about their overall importance and suitability at a specific moment. Authors analyze opinions among managers of Lithuanian companies about the overall importance of the marketing function in their companies as well as about the importance of specific marketing activities. Special attention is paid to the specifics of managerial per ceptions and opinions during the period of economic uncertainty and recession. The research is based on a survey of 346 managers of primarily manufacturing and trading companies operating in Lithuania. The analysis showed a number of differences in the evaluation of the importance of marketing activities based on the characteristics of companies and their core strategic idea. The research revealed that the importance of pricing and communication activities is growing during a period of economic recession. It also confirmed the existence of a positive relationship between managerial evaluations of the importance of marketing activities and the growth of sales.

  5. The role of gas in the external dimension of the EU energy transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andoura, Sami; Oultremont, Clementine d'

    2013-01-01

    As an economically attractive option for investors, a potential backup source for renewables and the cleanest fossil fuel, natural gas is expected to play an important role in the European transition towards a low-carbon economy by 2050. At a time when European primary energy resources are being depleted and energy demand is growing, the gas import dependency of the EU will continue to grow significantly in the coming years. The EU is thus facing important challenges linked to its gas policy both internally, by attempting to create a competitive, interconnected and well-functioning internal market for gas; and externally, by struggling to develop a coherent and collective external strategy, which would allow it to both diversify and secure its gas supply from abroad. Meanwhile, new sources of unconventional gas could change the world's energy markets with potential consequences for the EU. However, many uncertainties remain regarding their development within the EU. In view of all these challenges, this Policy Paper concludes by laying out concrete recommendations on how the EU could strengthen its gas strategy both internally and externally

  6. Role of fluctuations in the phase transitions of coupled plaquette spin models of glasses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giulio Biroli, Charlotte Rulquin, Gilles Tarjus, Marco Tarzia

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available We study the role of fluctuations on the thermodynamic glassy properties of plaquette spin models, more specifically on the transition involving an overlap order parameter in the presence of an attractive coupling between different replicas of the system. We consider both short-range fluctuations associated with the local environment on Bethe lattices and long-range fluctuations that distinguish Euclidean from Bethe lattices with the same local environment. We find that the phase diagram in the temperature-coupling plane is very sensitive to the former but, at least for the $3$-dimensional (square pyramid model, appears qualitatively or semi-quantitatively unchanged by the latter. This surprising result suggests that the mean-field theory of glasses provides a reasonable account of the glassy thermodynamics of models otherwise described in terms of the kinetically constrained motion of localized defects and taken as a paradigm for the theory of dynamic facilitation. We discuss the possible implications for the dynamical behavior.

  7. Role of Chemical Reactivity and Transition State Modeling for Virtual Screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karthikeyan, Muthukumarasamy; Vyas, Renu; Tambe, Sanjeev S; Radhamohan, Deepthi; Kulkarni, Bhaskar D

    2015-01-01

    Every drug discovery research program involves synthesis of a novel and potential drug molecule utilizing atom efficient, economical and environment friendly synthetic strategies. The current work focuses on the role of the reactivity based fingerprints of compounds as filters for virtual screening using a tool ChemScore. A reactant-like (RLS) and a product- like (PLS) score can be predicted for a given compound using the binary fingerprints derived from the numerous known organic reactions which capture the molecule-molecule interactions in the form of addition, substitution, rearrangement, elimination and isomerization reactions. The reaction fingerprints were applied to large databases in biology and chemistry, namely ChEMBL, KEGG, HMDB, DSSTox, and the Drug Bank database. A large network of 1113 synthetic reactions was constructed to visualize and ascertain the reactant product mappings in the chemical reaction space. The cumulative reaction fingerprints were computed for 4000 molecules belonging to 29 therapeutic classes of compounds, and these were found capable of discriminating between the cognition disorder related and anti-allergy compounds with reasonable accuracy of 75% and AUC 0.8. In this study, the transition state based fingerprints were also developed and used effectively for virtual screening in drug related databases. The methodology presented here provides an efficient handle for the rapid scoring of molecular libraries for virtual screening.

  8. The Role and Challenges of Rural Tourism Development in Transition Countries: Montenegro Experiences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilija Moric

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Rural tourism is widely promoted as an efficient means of counteracting the social, economic and environmental challenges facing rural areas, primarily those associated with the decline of traditional agrarian industries. In line with this, the objective of this paper is to investigate the role and key challenges of rural tourism development in Montenegro as typical transitional economy. Using the extensive literature, available secondary and primary data collected from rural tourism operators, this paper throws light on the main components and issues about current situation in rural areas and rural tourism in Montenegro. Key findings indicate that three key factors of future success should be pulled out, as follows: support from government and international and/or national bodies/organizations, development of new and diversification of present tourist offers in rural areas and enhancement of government policy in the area of entrepreneurship and starting-up of new businesses in rural areas. Regarding practical implications, this paper provide the guidance and ideas for further rural and tourism development in Montenegro.

  9. Role of Transition Zone Index in the Prediction of Clinical Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammet Güzelsoy

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective The objective of this study was to determine the role of the transition zone (TZ index (TZI in the prediction of clinical benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH in patients who underwent transurethral prostatectomy (TUR-P and to analyze the correlation between the amount of resected tissue and TZ volume (TZV. Materials and Methods Twenty-six male clinical BPH patients with obstructive complaints and 17 male benign prostate enlargement (BPE patients without any complaints were included in the study. Both the groups were over the age of 50. Clinical BPH patients underwent complete TUR-P. Statistical analysis was done with SPSS. Sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values of TZI-as a method of assessing clinical BPH-were measured. Results There was a statistically significant difference in prostate volume, uroflowmetry patterns, prostate-specific antigen (PSA, International prostate symptom score (IPSS, TZV and TZI between the two groups. There was a correlation between TZV and the amount of resected tissue (r=0.97; p0.40 has a high level of sensitivity and specificity in the prediction of clinical BPH among patients who undergo TUR-P due to obstructive symptoms and reported as BPH. There is a strong correlation between the amount of resected tissue and TZV. TZI is a valuable tool in diagnosis, and TZV gives valuable information about the patient to the surgeon.

  10. Patterns, transitions and the role of leaders in the collective dynamics of a simple robotic flock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tarcai, Norbert; Virágh, Csaba; Ábel, Dániel; Nagy, Máté; Vásárhelyi, Gábor; Vicsek, Tamás; Várkonyi, Péter L

    2011-01-01

    We have developed an experimental setup of very simple self-propelled robots to observe collective motion emerging as a result of inelastic collisions only. A circular pool and commercial RC boats were the basis of our first setup, where we demonstrated that jamming, clustering, disordered and ordered motion are all present in such a simple experiment and showed that the noise level has a fundamental role in the generation of collective dynamics. Critical noise ranges and the transition characteristics between the different collective patterns were also examined. In our second experiment we used a real-time tracking system and a few steerable model boats to introduce intelligent leaders into the flock. We demonstrated that even a very small portion of guiding members can determine group direction and enhance ordering through inelastic collisions. We also showed that noise can facilitate and speed up ordering with leaders. Our work was extended with an agent-based simulation model, too, and close similarity between real and simulation results was observed. The simulation results show clear statistical evidence of three states and negative correlation between density and ordered motion due to the onset of jamming. Our experiments confirm the different theoretical studies and simulation results in the literature on the subject of collision-based, noise-dependent and leader-driven self-propelled particle systems

  11. Role of nuclear penetration effects in spin assignments. [J, transitions, internal conversion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sahota, H S [Punjabi Univ., Patiala (India). Dept. of Physics

    1976-04-01

    Nuclear penetrations have been found to affect the internal conversion process of the retarded magnetic dipole transitions. In all cases where the penetration coefficient has been found to be essentially different from unity the transition is 1-forbidden. This criterian has been applied to the case of 191 keV transition in /sup 197/Au where the spin of the 268 keV level could not be deduced uniquely by any of the existing methods. The result is that the 199 keV transition has a dynamic contribution to its internal conversion process with the penetration coefficient lambda = 5.5 +- 0.9. To illustrate the applicability of the criterian further two more cases namely that of the 92 keV transition in /sup 131/Cs and 182 keV transition in /sup 129/Cs are also included.

  12. Role of zonal flow predator-prey oscillations in triggering the transition to H-mode confinement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitz, L; Zeng, L; Rhodes, T L; Hillesheim, J C; Doyle, E J; Groebner, R J; Peebles, W A; Burrell, K H; Wang, G

    2012-04-13

    Direct evidence of zonal flow (ZF) predator-prey oscillations and the synergistic roles of ZF- and equilibrium E×B flow shear in triggering the low- to high-confinement (L- to H-mode) transition in the DIII-D tokamak is presented. Periodic turbulence suppression is first observed in a narrow layer at and just inside the separatrix when the shearing rate transiently exceeds the turbulence decorrelation rate. The final transition to H mode with sustained turbulence and transport reduction is controlled by equilibrium E×B shear due to the increasing ion pressure gradient.

  13. Transitioning Children from Psychiatric Hospitals to Schools: The Role of the Special Educator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Joan B.; Savina, Elena A.

    2010-01-01

    Over a quarter of a million U.S. students each year reside for a period of time in a psychiatric inpatient hospital setting to receive mental health treatment. Following inpatient treatment, most children are transitioned from the hospital into a regular school setting. Little is known about how these transitions are managed by hospital or school…

  14. Framing Young People's Educational Transitions: The Role of Local and Contemporary Economic Contexts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Ceryn

    2017-01-01

    Despite rates of participation in post-compulsory full-time education reaching approximately 84% in Wales, social class inequalities continue to shape young people's transitions from compulsory to post-compulsory education. This article draws upon data from a project which explored how young people's educational decisions and transitions in Wales,…

  15. Making Transitions: The Role of Interaction in Joining a Workplace Community of Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Janet

    2015-01-01

    In the process of transitioning from one institution or workplace to another, people often encounter new interactional norms and values. For those moving countries as well as workplaces, the transition may involve different cultural and societal norms and values; but even a move between organisations or workplace teams within a country may present…

  16. Transition conductivity study of high temperature superconductor compounds: the role of fluctuations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pagnon, V.

    1991-04-01

    This memory subject is the transition conductivity study of high temperature superconductors in corelation with their anisotropy. Systematic conductivity measurements were made on YBaCuO and BaSrCaCuO in relation with temperature from 4.2 K to 1200 K, and with a magnetic field up to 8 T in several directions. Oxygen order has an effect on the characteristics at YBaCuO transition conductivity. The activation energy for oxygen absorption is about 0.5eV. One method of analysis of the conductivity fluctuations about the transition temperature is proposed. Two separate rates are noticeable in YBaCuO compound. The 3 D fluctuations rate in the immediate neighbourghood of the transition lets place to the 2 D fluctuations rate at high temperature. Transitions temperatures governing each rate are different, that's incompatible with the formula proposed by Lawrence and Doniach. On the other hand, the analogy with quasi-2 D magnetic systems seems more relevant. A magnetic field application or a lowering of oxygen concentration removes the 3 D fluctuations rate. Non ohmic effects observed at the transition conductivity foot are analysis as a non-linear 2 D excitation manifestation of the supraconductive phase. Finally, by measurements on strontium doped YBaCuO crystals, we confirm a metal-insulator transition along the C-Axe when oxygen concentration reduces. This is connected with the specific heat jump. All these results uplighten the fundamental bidimensional character of high transition temperature superconductivity [fr

  17. Demystifying governance and its role for transitions in urban social–ecological systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    T.A. Muñoz-Erickson; L.K. Campbell; D.L. Childers; J.M. Grove; D.M. Iwaniec; S.T.A. Pickett; Michelle Romolini; Erika S. Svendsen

    2016-01-01

    Governance is key to sustainable urban transitions. Governance is a system of social, power, and decision-making processes that acts as a key driver of resource allocation and use, yet ecologists even urban ecologists–seldom consider governance concepts in their work. Transitions to more sustainable futures are becoming increasingly important to the management of many...

  18. The role of service design practices in enabling and embedding the servitization transition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Calabretta, G.; de Lille, C.S.H.; Beck, Caroline; Bohemia, E.; de Bont, C.; Svengren Holm, L.

    2017-01-01

    An increasing number of companies are embracing the transition from a product focus to a service focus in their offering in order to face the challenges of the experience economy. However such transition (i.e., servitization) is challenging, since it requires companies to change both their processes

  19. Role of Sn impurity on electronic topological transitions in 122 Fe-based superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghosh, Haranath, E-mail: hng@rrcat.gov.in [Homi Bhabha National Institute, Anushaktinagar, Mumbai 400 094 (India); Indus Synchrotrons Utilization Division, Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology, Indore 452013 (India); Sen, Smritijit [Homi Bhabha National Institute, Anushaktinagar, Mumbai 400 094 (India); Indus Synchrotrons Utilization Division, Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology, Indore 452013 (India)

    2016-08-25

    We show that only a few percentage of Sn doping at the Ba site on BaFe{sub 2}As{sub 2}, can cause electronic topological transition, namely, the Lifshitz transition. A hole like d{sub xy} band of Fe undergoes electron like transition due to 4% Sn doping. Lifshitz transition is found in BaFe{sub 2}As{sub 2} system around all the high symmetry points. Our detailed first principles simulation predicts absence of any Lifshitz transition in other 122 family compounds like SrFe{sub 2}As{sub 2}, CaFe{sub 2}As{sub 2} in agreement with experimental observations. This work bears practical significance due to the facts that a few percentage of Sn impurity is in-built in tin-flux grown single crystals method of synthesizing 122 materials and inter-relationship among the Lifshitz transition, magnetism and superconductivity. - Highlights: • Electronic topological transition due to Sn contamination in BaFe{sub 2}As{sub 2}. • Hole like Fe-d{sub xy} band converts into electron like in 3% Sn contaminated BaFe{sub 2}As{sub 2}. • Electron like Fe-d{sub xz}, d{sub yz} bands moves above Fermi Level at X,Y points. • No Lifshitz transition found in Sn-contaminated Sr-122, Ca-122 systems.

  20. Hot Electron Photoemission from Plasmonic Nanostructures: The Role of Surface Photoemission and Transition Absorption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Babicheva, Viktoriia; Zhukovsky, Sergei; Ikhsanov, Renat Sh

    2015-01-01

    We study mechanisms of photoemission of hot electrons from plasmonic nanoparticles. We analyze the contribution of "transition absorption", i.e., loss of energy of electrons passing through the boundary between different materials, to the surface mechanism of photoemission. We calculate photoemis......We study mechanisms of photoemission of hot electrons from plasmonic nanoparticles. We analyze the contribution of "transition absorption", i.e., loss of energy of electrons passing through the boundary between different materials, to the surface mechanism of photoemission. We calculate...... photoemission rate and transition absorption for nanoparticles surrounded by various media with a broad range of permittivities and show that photoemission rate and transition absorption follow the same dependence on the permittivity. Thus, we conclude that transition absorption is responsible...

  1. A network approach to the comorbidity between posttraumatic stress disorder and major depressive disorder: The role of overlapping symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afzali, Mohammad H; Sunderland, Matthew; Teesson, Maree; Carragher, Natacha; Mills, Katherine; Slade, Tim

    2017-01-15

    The role of symptom overlap between major depressive disorder and posttraumatic stress disorder in comorbidity between two disorders is unclear. The current study applied network analysis to map the structure of symptom associations between these disorders. Data comes from a sample of 909 Australian adults with a lifetime history of trauma and depressive symptoms. Data analysis consisted of the construction of two comorbidity networks of PTSD/MDD with and without overlapping symptoms, identification of the bridging symptoms, and computation of the centrality measures. The prominent bridging role of four overlapping symptoms (i.e., sleep problems, irritability, concentration problems, and loss of interest) and five non-overlapping symptoms (i.e., feeling sad, feelings of guilt, psychomotor retardation, foreshortened future, and experiencing flashbacks) is highlighted. The current study uses DSM-IV criteria for PTSD and does not take into consideration significant changes made to PTSD criteria in DSM-5. Moreover, due to cross-sectional nature of the data, network estimates do not provide information on whether a symptom actively triggers other symptoms or whether a symptom mostly is triggered by other symptoms. The results support the role of dysphoria-related symptoms in PTSD/MDD comorbidity. Moreover, Identification of central symptoms and bridge symptoms will provide useful targets for interventions that seek to intervene early in the development of comorbidity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. The Role of Conserved Waters in Conformational Transitions of Q61H K-ras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakash, Priyanka; Sayyed-Ahmad, Abdallah; Gorfe, Alemayehu A.

    2012-01-01

    To investigate the stability and functional role of long-residence water molecules in the Q61H variant of the signaling protein K-ras, we analyzed all available Ras crystal structures and conformers derived from a series of independent explicit solvent molecular dynamics (MD) simulations totaling 1.76 µs. We show that the protein samples a different region of phase space in the presence and absence of several crystallographically conserved and buried water molecules. The dynamics of these waters is coupled with the local as well as the global motions of the protein, in contrast to less buried waters whose exchange with bulk is only loosely coupled with the motion of loops in their vicinity. Aided by two novel reaction coordinates involving the distance (d) between the Cα atoms of G60 at switch 2 and G10 at the P-loop and the N-Cα-C-O dihedral (ξ) of G60, we further show that three water molecules located in lobe1, at the interface between the lobes and at lobe2, are involved in the relative motion of residues at the two lobes of Q61H K-ras. Moreover, a d/ξ plot classifies the available Ras x-ray structures and MD-derived K-ras conformers into active GTP-, intermediate GTP-, inactive GDP-bound, and nucleotide-free conformational states. The population of these states and the transition between them is modulated by water-mediated correlated motions involving the functionally critical switch 2, P-loop and helix 3. These results suggest that water molecules act as allosteric ligands to induce a population shift among distinct switch 2 conformations that differ in effector recognition. PMID:22359497

  3. Lumbosacral Transitional Vertebra: Possible Role in the Pathogenesis of Adolescent Lumbar Disc Herniation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bangke; Wang, Liang; Wang, Haibin; Guo, Qunfeng; Lu, Xuhua; Chen, Deyu

    2017-11-01

    To investigate the role of lumbosacral transitional vertebra (LSTV) in the pathogenesis of adolescent lumbar disc herniation (ALDH) and the association between LSTV type and the herniation level of ALDH. This study was a retrospective case-control analysis of roentgenographic images. All adolescent patients who received surgical treatment for L4/5 or L5/S1 single level lumbar disc herniation in our department from 2010 to 2015 were eligible for the ALDH group. All adolescent patients admitted to our hospital during the same period and who had ever undergone a plain anteroposterior radiologic examination of the abdomen and met the inclusion criteria that ensured the absence of any spinal disorders were selected into the control group. The anteroposterior lumbar or abdomen roentgenograms were collected to identify the LSTV. The incidence of LSTV in the ALDH group and the control group were compared. Among the ALDH group, the association between LSTV type (sacralization or lumbarization) and the herniation level of ALDH were evaluated. A total of 80 adolescent patients were included in the ALDH group and 92 asymptomatic adolescents were included in the control group. LSTV was found in 24 patients (30%) in ALDH group compared with 7 patients (7.6%) in the control group (P adolescent patients with sacralization, the L4/5 disc herniation was significantly more common than L5/S1 (81.3% vs. 18.7%; P = 0.019). The LSTV is associated with LDH in adolescents and the sacralization of L5 may contribute to the L4/5 disc herniation in adolescent patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. A positive role of cadherin in Wnt/β-catenin signalling during epithelial-mesenchymal transition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Howard

    Full Text Available The Wnt/β-catenin signalling pathway shares a key component, β-catenin, with the cadherin-based adhesion system. The signalling function of β-catenin is conferred by a soluble cytoplasmic pool that is unstable in the absence of a Wnt signal, whilst the adhesion function is based on a cadherin-bound, stable pool at the membrane. The cadherin complex is dynamic, allowing for cell-cell rearrangements such as epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT, where the complex turns over through internalisation. Potential interplay between the two pools remains poorly understood, but cadherins are generally considered negative regulators of Wnt signalling because they sequester cytoplasmic β-catenin. Here we explore how cellular changes at EMT affect the signalling capacity of β-catenin using two models of EMT: hepatocyte growth factor (HGF treatment of MDCK cells, and gastrulation in embryonic development. We show that EMT not only provides a pool of signalling-competent β-catenin following internalisation of cadherin, but also significantly facilitates activation of the Wnt pathway in response to both Wnt signals and exogenous β-catenin. We further demonstrate that availability of β-catenin in the cytoplasm does not necessarily correlate with Wnt/β-catenin pathway activity, since blocking endocytosis or depleting endogenous cadherin abolishes pathway activation despite the presence of β-catenin in the cytoplasm. Lastly we present data suggesting that cadherins are required for augmented activation of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway in vivo. This suggests that cadherins play a crucial role in β-catenin-dependent transcription.

  5. Determinants of epidemiologic transition in rural Africa: the role of socioeconomic status and drinking water source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelaer, Frouke M; Koopman, Jacob J E; van Bodegom, David; Eriksson, Ulrika K; Westendorp, Rudi G J

    2014-06-01

    Many African countries experience a protracted epidemiologic transition, different from the classical transition in western societies. The factors driving this protracted transition are largely unknown. In northeast Ghana, we studied an ongoing epidemiologic transition and investigated the effects of socioeconomic status and drinking water source on the transition. During a 9-year period, we followed a cohort of almost 30 000 individuals and collected information on mortality and fertility rates. In addition, using the standards set out by the WHO, we obtained the causes of death by verbal autopsy. Individuals were stratified according to their socioeconomic status and the households' use of an improved or unimproved drinking water source. Mortality rates decreased by -5.0% annually (pwater source. Factors other than socioeconomic status and drinking water source are responsible for the observed declines in mortality and fertility observed during the protracted epidemiologic transition. Identifying the specific determinants of the ongoing transition is of importance, as they could be targeted in order to further improve public health in rural African countries. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Motif-role-fingerprints: the building-blocks of motifs, clustering-coefficients and transitivities in directed networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark D McDonnell

    Full Text Available Complex networks are frequently characterized by metrics for which particular subgraphs are counted. One statistic from this category, which we refer to as motif-role fingerprints, differs from global subgraph counts in that the number of subgraphs in which each node participates is counted. As with global subgraph counts, it can be important to distinguish between motif-role fingerprints that are 'structural' (induced subgraphs and 'functional' (partial subgraphs. Here we show mathematically that a vector of all functional motif-role fingerprints can readily be obtained from an arbitrary directed adjacency matrix, and then converted to structural motif-role fingerprints by multiplying that vector by a specific invertible conversion matrix. This result demonstrates that a unique structural motif-role fingerprint exists for any given functional motif-role fingerprint. We demonstrate a similar result for the cases of functional and structural motif-fingerprints without node roles, and global subgraph counts that form the basis of standard motif analysis. We also explicitly highlight that motif-role fingerprints are elemental to several popular metrics for quantifying the subgraph structure of directed complex networks, including motif distributions, directed clustering coefficient, and transitivity. The relationships between each of these metrics and motif-role fingerprints also suggest new subtypes of directed clustering coefficients and transitivities. Our results have potential utility in analyzing directed synaptic networks constructed from neuronal connectome data, such as in terms of centrality. Other potential applications include anomaly detection in networks, identification of similar networks and identification of similar nodes within networks. Matlab code for calculating all stated metrics following calculation of functional motif-role fingerprints is provided as S1 Matlab File.

  7. Low vascularization of the nephrogenic zone of the fetal kidney suggests a major role for hypoxia in human nephrogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerosa, C; Fanni, D; Faa, A; Van Eyken, P; Ravarino, A; Fanos, V; Faa, G

    2017-09-01

    CD31 reactivity is generally utilized as a marker of endothelial cells. CD31 immunoreactivity in the developing human kidney revealed that fetal glomerular capillary endothelial cells change their immunohistochemical phenotype during maturation. The aim of this study was to analyze CD31 reactivity in the fetal human kidney in the different stages of intrauterine development: We observed different distribution of CD31-reactive vascular progenitors in the different areas of the developing kidney. In particular, the nephrogenic zone and the renal capsule were characterized by a scarcity of CD31-reactive cells at all gestational ages. These data suggest the hypothesis that nephrogenesis does not need high oxygen levels and confirms a major role of hypoxia in nephrogenesis.

  8. Fengycin produced by Bacillus subtilis 9407 plays a major role in the biocontrol of apple ring rot disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Haiyan; Ru, Jinjiang; Zhang, Yuanyuan; Wang, Qi; Li, Yan

    2017-06-01

    Apple ring rot, caused by Botryosphaeria dothidea, is a serious apple disease in China. Bacillus subtilis 9407 was isolated from healthy apples and showed strong antifungal activity against B. dothidea. To identify the primary antifungal compound of B. subtilis 9407 and determine its role in controlling apple ring rot, a transposon mutant library was constructed using TnYLB-1, and a mutant completely defective in antifungal activity was obtained. The gene inactivated in the antifungal activity mutant had 98.5% similarity to ppsB in B. subtilis subsp. subtilis str. 168, which encodes one of the five synthetases responsible for synthesizing fengycin. A markerless ppsB deletion mutant was constructed. Compared with the wild-type strain, lipopeptide crude extracts from ΔppsB showed almost no inhibition of B. dothidea mycelial growth. Furthermore, fengycin-like lipopeptides (retention factor 0.1-0.2) that exhibited antifungal activity against B. dothidea were observed in the wild-type strain by thin-layer chromatography (TLC)-bioautography analysis, but not in ΔppsB. Semipreparative reverse-phase high performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) detection revealed that ΔppsB lost the ability to synthesize fengycin. These results suggest that ppsB is responsible for synthesizing fengycin and that fengycin is the major antifungal compound produced by B. subtilis 9407 against B. dothidea. Moreover, a biocontrol assay showed that the control efficacy of ΔppsB was reduced by half compared with the wild-type strain, indicating that fengycin plays a major role in controlling apple ring rot disease. This is the first report on the use of a B. subtilis strain as a potential biological control agent to control apple ring rot disease by the production of fengycin. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  9. Role of secondary instability theory and parabolized stability equations in transition modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Hady, Nabil M.; Dinavahi, Surya P.; Chang, Chau-Lyan; Zang, Thomas A.

    1993-01-01

    In modeling the laminar-turbulent transition region, the designer depends largely on benchmark data from experiments and/or direct numerical simulations that are usually extremely expensive. An understanding of the evolution of the Reynolds stresses, turbulent kinetic energy, and quantifies in the transport equations like the dissipation and production is essential in the modeling process. The secondary instability theory and the parabolized stability equations method are used to calculate these quantities, which are then compared with corresponding quantities calculated from available direct numerical simulation data for the incompressible boundary-layer flow of laminar-turbulent transition conditions. The potential of the secondary instability theory and the parabolized stability equations approach in predicting these quantities is discussed; results indicate that inexpensive data that are useful for transition modeling in the early stages of the transition region can be provided by these tools.

  10. Majority rule on heterogeneous networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lambiotte, R

    2008-01-01

    We focus on the majority rule (MR) applied on heterogeneous networks. When the underlying topology is homogeneous, the system is shown to exhibit a transition from an ordered regime to a disordered regime when the noise is increased. When the network exhibits modular structures, in contrast, the system may also exhibit an asymmetric regime, where the nodes in each community reach an opposite average opinion. Finally, the node degree heterogeneity is shown to play an important role by displacing the location of the order-disorder transition and by making the system exhibit non-equipartition of the average spin

  11. An exploratory study of role transition from student to registered nurse (general, mental health and intellectual disability) in Ireland

    OpenAIRE

    Deasy, Christine; Doody, Owen; Tuohy, Dympna

    2011-01-01

    peer-reviewed 3rd International Nurse Education Conference Nursing Education in a Global Community Ireland has seen much change in nurse education resulting in four year degree programmes since 2002. A unique aspect of these programmes was the incorporation of rostered internship. This study explored role transition for a cohort of students at pre and post-registration. The sample consisted of fourth year students registered on BSc nursing programmes (general, mental health and intellec...

  12. Role of major resection in pulmonary metastasectomy for colorectal cancer in the Spanish prospective multicenter study (GECMP-CCR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández, J; Molins, L; Fibla, J J; Heras, F; Embún, R; Rivas, J J

    2016-05-01

    Patients with pulmonary metastases from colorectal cancer (CRC) may benefit from aggressive surgical therapy. The objective of this study was to determine the role of major anatomic resection for pulmonary metastasectomy to improve survival when compared with limited pulmonary resection. Data of 522 patients (64.2% men, mean age 64.5 years) who underwent pulmonary resections with curative intent for CRC metastases over a 2-year period were reviewed. All patients were followed for a minimum of 3 years. Disease-specific survival (DSS) and disease-free survival (DFS) were assessed with the Kaplan-Meier method. Factors associated with DSS and DFS were analyzed using a Cox proportional hazards regression model. A total of 394 (75.6%) patients underwent wedge resection, 19 (3.6%) anatomic segmentectomy, 5 (0.9%) lesser resections not described, 100 (19.3%) lobectomy, and 4 (0.8%) pneumonectomy. Accordingly, 104 (19.9%) patients were treated with major anatomic resection and 418 (80.1%) with lesser resection. Operations were carried out with video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS) in 93 patients. The overall DSS and DFS were 55 and 28.3 months, respectively. Significant differences in DSS and DFS in favor of major resection versus lesser resection (DSS median not reached versus 52.2 months, P = 0.03; DFS median not reached versus 23.9 months, P < 0.001) were found. In the multivariate analysis, major resection appeared to be a protective factor in DSS [hazard ratio (HR) 0.6, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.41-0.96, P = 0.031] and DFS (HR 0.5, 95% CI 0.36-0.75, P < 0.001). The surgical approach (VATS versus open surgical resection) had no effect on outcome. Major anatomic resection with lymphadenectomy for pulmonary metastasectomy can be considered in selected CRC patient with sufficient functional reserve to improve the DSS and DFS. Further prospective randomized studies are needed to confirm the present results. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press

  13. Industrial Upgrading in the Apparel Value Chain and the Role of Designer in the Transition: comparative analysis of Sri Lanka and Hong Kong

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sumith Gopura

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The apparel industry is a major export industry in Sri Lanka that depends upon labour intensive manufacturing. The Sri Lankan apparel industry is transitioning from Cut, Make, Trims (CMT assembly and Original Equipment Manufacturing (OEM to Original Design Manufacturing (ODM and Original Brand Manufacturing (OBM, experiencing the economic benefits of apparel product export. The transition relies on having expert professionals who can provide creative, commercial, technical, and leadership skills in the process. In order to identify the creative roles and responsibilities that can contribute to the industrial upgrading process in Sri Lanka, this paper first provides an analysis of the global apparel value chain and the journeys of the countries with newly industrialized economies (NIEs in the region. Second, a comparison of Hong Kong and Sri Lankan apparel industries contextualises the development of fashion design within each nation’s industry as a competitive advantage. In each country we examine three factors that demonstrate growth in fashion design: development of fashion design education; development of exportable own brands; and the establishment of local showcases to a global audience. The examples of both Hong Kong and Sri Lanka demonstrate the ways in which creative roles may act as a bridge between production and marketing networks, buyers and producers in maintaining and building industry value-adding for highly sophisticated and competitive fashion production systems. Although the Sri Lankan apparel industry has not progressed as far as Hong Kong in this arena, evidence suggests the industry is actively growing design capabilities

  14. Beyond war and PTSD: The crucial role of transition stress in the lives of military veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mobbs, Meaghan C; Bonanno, George A

    2018-02-01

    Although only a relatively small minority of military veterans develop Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD), mental health theory and research with military veterans has focused primarily on PTSD and its treatment. By contrast, many and by some accounts most veterans experience high levels of stress during the transition to civilian life, however transition stress has received scant attention. In this paper we attempt to address this deficit by reviewing the wider range of challenges, rewards, successes, and failures that transitioning veterans might experience, as well as the factors that might moderate these experiences. To illuminate this argument, we briefly consider what it means to become a soldier (i.e., what is required to transition into military service) and more crucially what kind of stressors veterans might experience when they attempt to shed that identity (i.e., what is required to transition out of military service). We end by suggesting how an expanded research program on veteran transition stress might move forward. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Transitions from hospital to community care: the role of patient-provider language concordance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rayan, Nosaiba; Admi, Hanna; Shadmi, Efrat

    2014-01-01

    Cultural and language discordance between patients and providers constitutes a significant challenge to provision of quality healthcare. This study aims to evaluate minority patients' discharge from hospital to community care, specifically examining the relationship between patient-provider language concordance and the quality of transitional care. This was a multi-method prospective study of care transitions of 92 patients: native Hebrew, Russian or Arabic speakers, with a pre-discharge questionnaire and structured observations examining discharge preparation from a large Israeli teaching hospital. Two weeks post-discharge patients were surveyed by phone, on the transition from hospital to community care (the Care Transition Measure (CTM-15, 0-100 scale)) and on the primary-care post-discharge visit. Overall, ratings on the CTM indicated fair quality of the transition process (scores of 51.8 to 58.8). Patient-provider language concordance was present in 49% of minority patients' discharge briefings. Language concordance was associated with higher CTM scores among minority groups (64.1 in language-concordant versus 49.8 in non-language-concordant discharges, P Language-concordant care, coupled with extensive discharge briefings and post-discharge explanations for ongoing care, are important contributors to the quality of care transitions of ethnic minority patients.

  16. A Major Role of DNA Polymerase δ in Replication of Both the Leading and Lagging DNA Strands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Robert E; Klassen, Roland; Prakash, Louise; Prakash, Satya

    2015-07-16

    Genetic studies with S. cerevisiae Polδ (pol3-L612M) and Polε (pol2-M644G) mutant alleles, each of which display a higher rate for the generation of a specific mismatch, have led to the conclusion that Polε is the primary leading strand replicase and that Polδ is restricted to replicating the lagging strand template. Contrary to this widely accepted view, here we show that Polδ plays a major role in the replication of both DNA strands, and that the paucity of pol3-L612M-generated errors on the leading strand results from their more proficient removal. Thus, the apparent lack of Polδ contribution to leading strand replication is due to differential mismatch removal rather than differential mismatch generation. Altogether, our genetic studies with Pol3 and Pol2 mutator alleles support the conclusion that Polδ, and not Polε, is the major DNA polymerase for carrying out both leading and lagging DNA synthesis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Role of depression severity and impulsivity in the relationship between hopelessness and suicidal ideation in patients with major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yan-yu; Jiang, Neng-zhi; Cheung, Eric F C; Sun, Hong-wei; Chan, Raymond C K

    2015-09-01

    Hopelessness, depression and impulsivity all contribute to the development of suicidal ideation in patients with major depressive disorder, but the pathway of these factors to suicidal ideation is not clear. This study examined the meditating effect of depression severity on the relationship between hopelessness and suicidal ideation and explored how this mediating effect was moderated by impulsivity. A total of 162 patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) completed a structured clinical diagnostic interview and a battery of scales assessing depression severity, hopelessness, suicidal ideation, and impulsivity. Regression analyses with bootstrapping methods were used to examine the mediating and moderating effects of various risk factors. Mediation analysis revealed a significant indirect effect of hopelessness on suicidal ideation, and the effect was fully mediated through depression severity. On moderation analysis, the moderating effects of the relationship between depression severity and suicidal ideation were significant in both the medium and high impulsivity groups. The present study was limited by the assessment of trait impulsivity and observer-rated depression severity, which might not fully reflect momentary impulsivity and feeling of depression when suicidal ideation occurs. Depression severity plays a mediator role in the relationship between hopelessness and suicidal ideation and this mechanism is contingent on the levels of impulsivity. MDD patients with higher impulsivity appear to be more likely to have suicidal ideations even when they are less depressed. These findings highlight the importance of impulsivity assessment and alleviation of depressive symptoms to prevent suicidality in patients with MDD. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Two Major Facilitator Superfamily Sugar Transporters from Trichoderma reesei and Their Roles in Induction of Cellulase Biosynthesis*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Weixin; Kou, Yanbo; Xu, Jintao; Cao, Yanli; Zhao, Guolei; Shao, Jing; Wang, Hai; Wang, Zhixing; Bao, Xiaoming; Chen, Guanjun; Liu, Weifeng

    2013-01-01

    Proper perception of the extracellular insoluble cellulose is key to initiating the rapid synthesis of cellulases by cellulolytic Trichoderma reesei. Uptake of soluble oligosaccharides derived from cellulose hydrolysis represents a potential point of control in the induced cascade. In this study, we identified a major facilitator superfamily sugar transporter Stp1 capable of transporting cellobiose by reconstructing a cellobiose assimilation system in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The absence of Stp1 in T. reesei resulted in differential cellulolytic response to Avicel versus cellobiose. Transcriptional profiling revealed a different expression profile in the Δstp1 strain from that of wild-type strain in response to Avicel and demonstrated that Stp1 somehow repressed induction of the bulk of major cellulase and hemicellulose genes. Two other putative major facilitator superfamily sugar transporters were, however, up-regulated in the profiling. Deletion of one of them identified Crt1 that was required for growth and enzymatic activity on cellulose or lactose, but was not required for growth or hemicellulase activity on xylan. The essential role of Crt1 in cellulase induction did not seem to rely on its transporting activity because the overall uptake of cellobiose or sophorose by T. reesei was not compromised in the absence of Crt1. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that orthologs of Crt1 exist in the genomes of many filamentous ascomycete fungi capable of degrading cellulose. These data thus shed new light on the mechanism by which T. reesei senses and transmits the cellulose signal and offers potential strategies for strain improvement. PMID:24085297

  19. Understanding the role of P2X7 in affective disorders – are glial cells the major players?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leanne eStokes

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The pathophysiology of several psychiatric disorders has been linked to biomarkers of inflammation generating a theory of major depressive disorder as an inflammatory disease and infection and autoimmunity as major risk factors for schizophrenia. The idea of pro-inflammatory cytokines altering behavior is now well accepted however many questions remain. Microglia can produce a plethora of inflammatory cytokines and these cells appear to be critical in the link between inflammatory changes and depressive disorders. Microglia play a known role in sickness behavior which has many components of depressive-like behavior such as social withdrawal, sleep alterations, and anorexia. Numerous candidate genes have been identified for psychiatric disorders in the last decade. Single nucleotide polymorphisms in the human P2X7 gene have been linked to bipolar disorder, depression, and to the severity of depressive symptoms. P2X7 is a ligand-gated cation channel expressed on microglia with lower levels found on astrocytes and on some neuronal populations. In microglia P2X7 is a major regulator of pro-inflammatory cytokines of the interleukin-1 family. Genetic deletion of P2X7 in mice is protective for depressive behavior in addition to inflammatory responses. P2X7-/- mice have been shown to demonstrate anti-depressive-like behavior in forced swim and tail suspension behavioral tests and stressor-induced behavioral responses were blunted. Both neurochemical (norepinephrine, serotonin, dopamine and inflammatory changes have been observed in the brains of P2X7-/- mice. This review will discuss the recent evidence for involvement of P2X7 in the pathophysiology of depressive disorders and propose mechanisms by which altered signaling through this ion channel may affect the inflammatory state of the brain.

  20. Transition to the new role of caregiving for families of patients with breast cancer: a qualitative descriptive exploratory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashemi-Ghasemabadi, Masoumeh; Taleghani, Fariba; Yousefy, Alireza; Kohan, Shahnaz

    2016-03-01

    Families, especially in Eastern and Muslim countries, routinely accept the responsibility of caring for cancer patients. This study describes the transition to the new role of caregiving from the perspective of family caregivers in Iran as part of the current trend of recognizing the experiences of family members of breast cancer patients from different cultural perspectives. A descriptive exploratory qualitative research approach was used to investigate the experiences of family caregivers of patients with breast cancer in the transition to caregiving. The subjects were 23 family caregivers of breast cancer patients referred to cancer centers at Isfahan University hospitals who were selected by purposive sampling. Data was gathered through in-depth interviews. Interview transcripts were analyzed using conventional content analysis with an inductive approach. Data analysis identified the following categories: grasping a new situation without preparation, perceived inefficiency, infinite absence, and abandoned in the role. Caregivers believed that they were not prepared for their new circumstances and did not have the necessary competence and capabilities to meet the challenges of caregiving. They experienced negative consequences resulting from the difficult responsibility of caregiving. Moreover, they believed that they received limited support from relatives, health-care providers, and the community. The transition to the new role of caregiving is affected by experiences specific to the conditions of the caretakers. When these conditions can be understood and identified, it is possible to provide detailed information for policymaking and planning for family-centered care.

  1. Plankton community structure and role of Oithona similis on the western coast of Greenland during the winter-spring transition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zamora-Terol, Sara; Nielsen, Torkel Gissel; Saiz, Enric

    2013-01-01

    The cyclopoid copepod Oithona similis is one of the most abundant copepods in the oceans, and has a potentially important role in pelagic food webs. However, there is a lack of knowledge on aspects of Oithona's biology and function in plankton communities. In the present study, we aimed to assess...... and compare its trophic role in Greenlandic coastal waters during the winter-spring transition, with a focus on its winter behaviour, when large calanoids are not present in the surface layer. Two locations were studied: waters offshore from Godthåbsfjord (Nuuk) in winter, and Qeqertarsuaq (Disko Bay...

  2. Understanding Students' Transition to High School: Demographic Variation and the Role of Supportive Relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benner, Aprile D; Boyle, Alaina E; Bakhtiari, Farin

    2017-10-01

    The transition to high school is disruptive for many adolescents, yet little is known about the supportive relational processes that might attenuate the challenges students face as they move from middle to high school, particularly for students from more diverse backgrounds. Identifying potential buffers that protect youth across this critical educational transition is important for informing more effective support services for youth. In this study, we investigated how personal characteristics (gender, nativity, parent education level) and changes in support from family, friends, and school influenced changes in socioemotional adjustment and academic outcomes across the transition from middle to high school. The data were drawn from 252 students (50% females, 85% Latina/o). The results revealed declines in students' grades and increases in depressive symptoms and feelings of loneliness across the high school transition, with key variation by student nativity and gender. Additionally, stable/increasing friend support and school belonging were both linked to less socioemotional disruptions as students moved from middle to high school. Increasing/stable school belonging was also linked to increases in school engagement across the high school transition. These findings suggest that when high school transitions disrupt supportive relationships with important others in adolescents' lives, adolescents' socioemotional well-being and, to a lesser extent, their academic engagement are also compromised. Thus, in designing transition support activities, particularly for schools serving more low-income and race/ethnic minority youth, such efforts should strive to acclimate new high school students by providing inclusive, caring environments and positive connections with educators and peers.

  3. Role of isospin in nuclear-matter liquid-gas phase transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ducoin, C.

    2006-10-01

    Nuclear matter presents a phase transition of the liquid-gas type. This well-known feature is due to the nuclear interaction profile (mean-range attractive, short-range repulsive). Symmetric-nuclear-matter thermodynamics is thus analogous to that of a Van der Waals fluid. The study shows up to be more complex in the case of asymmetric matter, composed of neutrons and protons in an arbitrary proportion. Isospin, which distinguishes both constituents, gives a measure of this proportion. Studying asymmetric matter, isospin is an additional degree of freedom, which means one more dimension to consider in the space of observables. The nuclear liquid-gas transition is associated with the multi-fragmentation phenomenon observed in heavy-ion collisions, and to compact-star physics: the involved systems are neutron rich, so they are affected by the isospin degree of freedom. The present work is a theoretical study of isospin effects which appear in the asymmetric nuclear matter liquid-gas phase transition. A mean-field approach is used, with a Skyrme nuclear effective interaction. We demonstrate the presence of a first-order phase transition for asymmetric matter, and study the isospin distillation phenomenon associated with this transition. The case of phase separation at thermodynamic equilibrium is compared to spinodal decomposition. Finite size effects are addressed, as well as the influence of the electron gas which is present in the astrophysical context. (author)

  4. Role of relativity in high-pressure phase transitions of thallium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotmool, Komsilp; Chakraborty, Sudip; Bovornratanaraks, Thiti; Ahuja, Rajeev

    2017-02-20

    We demonstrate the relativistic effects in high-pressure phase transitions of heavy element thallium. The known first phase transition from h.c.p. to f.c.c. is initially investigated by various relativistic levels and exchange-correlation functionals as implemented in FPLO method, as well as scalar relativistic scheme within PAW formalism. The electronic structure calculations are interpreted from the perspective of energetic stability and electronic density of states. The full relativistic scheme (FR) within L(S)DA performs to be the scheme that resembles mostly with experimental results with a transition pressure of 3 GPa. The s-p hybridization and the valence-core overlapping of 6s and 5d states are the primary reasons behind the f.c.c. phase occurrence. A recent proposed phase, i.e., a body-centered tetragonal (b.c.t.) phase, is confirmed with a small distortion from the f.c.c. phase. We have also predicted a reversible b.c.t. → f.c.c. phase transition at 800 GPa. This finding has been suggested that almost all the III-A elements (Ga, In and Tl) exhibit the b.c.t. → f.c.c. phase transition at extremely high pressure.

  5. The Role of Spirituality in Transition to Parenthood: Qualitative Research Using Transformative Learning Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klobučar, Nataša Rijavec

    2016-08-01

    This article presents results of a qualitative study of 12 adult couples making transition to parenthood. The aim of the study was to research the meaning of transition to parenthood through the lens of transformative learning theory. Transformative learning theory explains learning through meaning-making of that life experience. In this paper, the spiritual dimension of learning is emphasized. An important part of research methodology included biographical method, using semi-structured interviews before and after the birth of the first child. The research showed that transformative learning occurs in different spheres of life during transition to parenthood. This paper discusses the spiritual dimension of learning, meaning-making and presents results of the research.

  6. Dimer monomer transition and dimer re-formation play important role for ATM cellular function during DNA repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Du, Fengxia; Zhang, Minjie; Li, Xiaohua; Yang, Caiyun; Meng, Hao; Wang, Dong; Chang, Shuang; Xu, Ye; Price, Brendan; Sun, Yingli

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • ATM phosphorylates the opposite strand of the dimer in response to DNA damage. • The PETPVFRLT box of ATM plays a key role in its dimer dissociation in DNA repair. • The dephosphorylation of ATM is critical for dimer re-formation after DNA repair. - Abstract: The ATM protein kinase, is a serine/threonine protein kinase that is recruited and activated by DNA double-strand breaks, mediates responses to ionizing radiation in mammalian cells. Here we show that ATM is held inactive in unirradiated cells as a dimer and phosphorylates the opposite strand of the dimer in response to DNA damage. Cellular irradiation induces rapid intermolecular autophosphorylation of serine 1981 that causes dimer dissociation and initiates cellular ATM kinase activity. ATM cannot phosphorylate the substrates when it could not undergo dimer monomer transition. After DNA repair, the active monomer will undergo dephosphorylation to form dimer again and dephosphorylation is critical for dimer re-formation. Our work reveals novel function of ATM dimer monomer transition and explains why ATM dimer monomer transition plays such important role for ATM cellular activity during DNA repair

  7. Financial system development in transition economies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hermes, C.L.M.; Lensink, B.W.

    This paper provides an overview of the major issues with respect to financial system development in transition economies, which were discussed at a conference in Groningen, the Netherlands, December 1997. After a brief remark on the role of financial system design during economic transition, the

  8. Inducible Major Vault Protein Plays a Pivotal Role in Double-Stranded RNA- or Virus-Induced Proinflammatory Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Nanfang; Liu, Shi; Xia, Zhangchuan; Ren, Sheng; Feng, Jian; Jing, Mingzhen; Gao, Xin; Wiemer, Erik A C; Zhu, Ying

    2016-03-15

    Pathogen invasion triggers robust antiviral cytokine production via different transcription factor signaling pathways. We have previously demonstrated that major vault protein (MVP) induces type I IFN production during viral infection; however, little is known about the role of MVP in proinflammatory responses. In this study, we found in vitro that expression of MVP, IL-6, and IL-8 was inducible upon dsRNA stimulation or viral infection. Moreover, MVP was essential for the induction of IL-6 and IL-8, as impaired expression of IL-6 and IL-8 in MVP-deficient human PBMCs, human lung epithelial cells (A549), and THP-1 monocytes, as well as in murine splenocytes, peritoneal macrophages, and PBMCs from MVP-knockout (MVP(-/-)) mice, was observed. Upon investigation of the underlying mechanisms, we demonstrated that MVP acted in synergy with AP-1 (c-Fos) and CCAAT/enhancer binding protein (C/EBP)β-liver-enriched transcriptional activating protein to activate the IL6 and IL8 promoters. Introduction of mutations into the AP-1 and C/EBPβ binding sites on the IL6 and IL8 promoters resulted in the loss of synergistic activation with MVP. Furthermore, we found that MVP interacted with both c-Fos and C/EBPβ. The interactions promoted nuclear translocation and recruitment of these transcription factors to IL6 and IL8 promoter regions. In the MVP(-/-) mouse model, significantly decreased expression of early antiviral cytokines resulted in higher viral titer in the lung, higher mortality, and heavier lung damage after infection with lethal influenza A virus. Taken together, our findings help to delineate a novel role of MVP in host proinflammatory response. Copyright © 2016 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  9. Phenylalanine hydroxylase from Legionella pneumophila is a thermostable enzyme with a major functional role in pyomelanin synthesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marte I Flydal

    Full Text Available Legionella pneumophila is a pathogenic bacterium that can cause Legionnaires' disease and other non-pneumonic infections in humans. This bacterium produces a pyomelanin pigment, a potential virulence factor with ferric reductase activity. In this work, we have investigated the role of phenylalanine hydroxylase from L. pneumophila (lpPAH, the product of the phhA gene, in the synthesis of the pyomelanin pigment and the growth of the bacterium in defined compositions.Comparative studies of wild-type and phhA mutant corroborate that lpPAH provides the excess tyrosine for pigment synthesis. phhA and letA (gacA appear transcriptionally linked when bacteria were grown in buffered yeast extract medium at 37°C. phhA is expressed in L. pneumophila growing in macrophages. We also cloned and characterized lpPAH, which showed many characteristics of other PAHs studied so far, including Fe(II requirement for activity. However, it also showed many particular properties such as dimerization, a high conformational thermal stability, with a midpoint denaturation temperature (T(m = 79 ± 0.5°C, a high specific activity at 37°C (10.2 ± 0.3 µmol L-Tyr/mg/min and low affinity for the substrate (K(m (L-Phe = 735 ± 50 µM.lpPAH has a major functional role in the synthesis of pyomelanin and promotes growth in low-tyrosine media. The high thermal stability of lpPAH might reflect the adaptation of the enzyme to withstand relatively high survival temperatures.

  10. Supporting LGBTQ Students in High School for the College Transition: The Role of School Counselors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Ken

    2017-01-01

    This phenomenological study sought to understand how lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer (LGBTQ) college students described their high school experiences and their later transitions to college. The study data revealed five findings: (a) enduring unsupportive/hostile educational environments, (b) experiencing a lack of family and social…

  11. Transitioning to a New Facility: The Crucial Role of Employee Engagement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slosberg, Meredith; Nejati, Adeleh; Evans, Jennie; Nanda, Upali

    Transitioning to a new facility can be challenging for employees and detrimental to operations. A key aspect of the transition is employee understanding of, and involvement in, the design of the new facility. The literature lacks a comprehensive study of the impact of change engagement throughout the design, construction, and activation of a project as well as how that can affect perceptions, expectations, and, eventually, satisfaction of employees. The purpose of this research was to examine employee perceptions and satisfaction throughout a hospital design, construction, and activation process. Three pulse-point surveys were administered throughout the transition of a children's hospital emergency department and neonatal intensive care unit to a new facility. We also administered a postoccupancy survey 3 months after the move into the new facility. We received 544 responses and analyzed them to assess the relationship between involvement in design or change engagement initiatives and overall perceptions. The results revealed a strong relationship between employee engagement and their level of preparedness to move, readiness to adapt, and satisfaction. Early involvement in the design of a facility or new processes can significantly affect staff preparedness and readiness to adapt as well as employees' overall satisfaction with the building after occupancy. In addition, our findings suggest that keeping a finger on the pulse of employee perceptions and expectations throughout the design, construction, and activation phase is critical to employee preparedness and satisfaction in transitioning to a new facility.

  12. Theorizing power in transition studies: the role of creativity and novel practices in structural change

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoffman, J.

    2013-01-01

    An important theoretical challenge for theorizing about power dynamics in societal transitions is the transformation of power itself. In this respect, it is especially puzzling how agency at the level of novel practices can extend beyond the habitual, how it can draw on structures and destructure at

  13. Role of demonstration projects in innovation: transition to sustainable energy and transport

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klitkou, Antje; Coenen, Lars; Andersen, Per Dannemand

    2013-01-01

    from road transport, and climate changes caused by greenhouse gas emissions, all these crises have contributed to a sense of urgency in political statements on the need for transition towards a sustainable society. Politicians have developed different types of instruments to achieve a development...

  14. On Transitions between Representations: The Role of Contextual Reasoning in Calculus Problem Solving

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zazkis, Dov

    2016-01-01

    This article argues for a shift in how researchers discuss and examine students' uses and understandings of multiple representations within a calculus context. An extension of Zazkis, Dubinsky, and Dautermann's (1996) visualization/analysis framework to include contextual reasoning is proposed. Several examples that detail transitions between…

  15. The role of incentives in implementing successful transit-oriented development strategies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tan, W.G.Z.; Janssen-Jansen, L.B.; Bertolini, L.

    2014-01-01

    The pursuit of transit-oriented development strategies (TODS) is a worldwide phenomenon but knowledge of the process of implementation remains approximate. The ingredients for changing from a non-conducive to a conducive environment for TODS and how that change occurs remain unclear. In cases of

  16. The Role of Incentives in Implementing Successful Transit-Oriented Development Strategies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tan, Wendy G.Z.; Janssen-jansen, Leonie B.; Bertolini, Luca

    2014-01-01

    The pursuit of transit-oriented development strategies (TODS) is a worldwide phenomenon but knowledge of the process of implementation remains approximate. The ingredients for changing from a non-conducive to a conducive environment for TODS and how that change occurs remain unclear. In cases of

  17. Anxiety and Depression in Transgender Individuals: The Roles of Transition Status, Loss, Social Support, and Coping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budge, Stephanie L.; Adelson, Jill L.; Howard, Kimberly A. S.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of the current study was to examine facilitative and avoidant coping as mediators between distress and transition status, social support, and loss. Method: A total of 351 transgender individuals (n = 226 transgender women and n = 125 transgender men) participated in this study. Participants completed measures on transgender…

  18. Liquid Courage: The Role of Alcohol in Women's Transition to College

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Sandy; Vassalotti, Lauren

    2017-01-01

    This study examined the perceived benefits of drinking alcohol among freshmen women as they relate to the college transition. Using a sample of incoming freshman college students we examined the changes in alcohol use three weeks prior to college and again within a month of arriving. We also examined the relationship between perceived benefits of…

  19. The role of human development in the transition to democracy after the Arab Spring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rapanos, Grigorios

    2017-01-01

    Tunisia has had a rather smooth transition from dictatorship to democracy, in contrast to other countries where the uprisings either failed or led to civil wars (Syria and Libya) or there was a return to autocracy (Egypt). Our analysis shows that Tunisia had a much better performance in all human...

  20. Distress in the Transition Process: The Role of Loss, Community, and Coping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budge, Stephanie L.

    2011-01-01

    Given the extensiveness of rejection and discrimination that transgender individuals experience (Lombardi, Wilchins, Priesing, & Malouf, 2001), the purpose of the current study was to examine the process of coping and how this relates to well-being at different stages of the gender transition. A total of 357 transsexual individuals (n = 226…

  1. Rethinking College: Roles for School Psychologists in Transition Planning for Students with Intellectual Disability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilczenski, Felicia L.; Cook, Amy L.; Regal, Colleen P.

    2017-01-01

    Transition from high school to postsecondary education (PSE) and employment can be challenging for all youth, and particularly for youth with intellectual disability (ID) who are more likely to remain in poverty compared to their peers without disabilities (Mock and Love, "J Policy Pract Intellect Disabil," 9:289-297, 2012; Siperstein et…

  2. The role of institutional innovation and learning when pursuing transit-oriented development strategies : EURA 2013

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tan, Wendy

    2013-01-01

    Transit-oriented development strategies (TODS) are widely pursued by planners and policy makers. However, there is a lack of0clarity on how institutional innovation and learning accompanying0institutional change0facilitates an explicit shift towards a conducive context for TODS. This is evident in

  3. The Role of Organized Activities in Facilitating Social Adaptation across the Transition to College

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohnert, Amy M.; Aikins, Julie Wargo; Edidin, Jennifer

    2007-01-01

    This prospective study examined the relations between organized activity involvement, loneliness, and friendship quality across the transition to college. In all, 85 adolescents (54 females and 31 males) completed measures during the summer before their first year of college (Time 1) and 10 months later (Time 2). More intense involvement in…

  4. The Emerging Role of Polo-Like Kinase 1 in Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition and Tumor Metastasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng Fu

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Polo-like kinase 1 (PLK1 is a serine/threonine kinase that plays a key role in the regulation of the cell cycle. PLK1 is overexpressed in a variety of human tumors, and its expression level often correlates with increased cellular proliferation and poor prognosis in cancer patients. It has been suggested that PLK1 controls cancer development through multiple mechanisms that include canonical regulation of mitosis and cytokinesis, modulation of DNA replication, and cell survival. However, emerging evidence suggests novel and previously unanticipated roles for PLK1 during tumor development. In this review, we will summarize the recent advancements in our understanding of the oncogenic functions of PLK1, with a focus on its role in epithelial-mesenchymal transition and tumor invasion. We will further discuss the therapeutic potential of these functions.

  5. Roles of dynamical symmetry breaking in driving oblate-prolate transitions of atomic clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oka, Yurie; Yanao, Tomohiro; Koon, Wang Sang

    2015-01-01

    This paper explores the driving mechanisms for structural transitions of atomic clusters between oblate and prolate isomers. We employ the hyperspherical coordinates to investigate structural dynamics of a seven-atom cluster at a coarse-grained level in terms of the dynamics of three gyration radii and three principal axes, which characterize overall mass distributions of the cluster. Dynamics of gyration radii is governed by two kinds of forces. One is the potential force originating from the interactions between atoms. The other is the dynamical forces called the internal centrifugal forces, which originate from twisting and shearing motions of the system. The internal centrifugal force arising from twisting motions has an effect of breaking the symmetry between two gyration radii. As a result, in an oblate isomer, activation of the internal centrifugal force that has the effect of breaking the symmetry between the two largest gyration radii is crucial in triggering structural transitions into prolate isomers. In a prolate isomer, on the other hand, activation of the internal centrifugal force that has the effect of breaking the symmetry between the two smallest gyration radii is crucial in triggering structural transitions into oblate isomers. Activation of a twisting motion that switches the movement patterns of three principal axes is also important for the onset of structural transitions between oblate and prolate isomers. Based on these trigger mechanisms, we finally show that selective activations of specific gyration radii and twisting motions, depending on the isomer of the cluster, can effectively induce structural transitions of the cluster. The results presented here could provide further insights into the control of molecular reactions

  6. Striking role of non-bridging oxygen on glass transition temperature of calcium aluminosilicate glass-formers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouhadja, M.; Jakse, N.; Pasturel, A.

    2014-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations are used to study the structural and dynamic properties of calcium aluminosilicate, (CaO-Al 2 O 3 ) 1−x (SiO 2 ) x , glass formers along three joins, namely, R = 1, 1.57, and 3, in which the silica content x can vary from 0 to 1. For all compositions, we determined the glass-transition temperature, the abundances of the non-bridging oxygen, triclusters, and AlO 5 structural units, as well as the fragility from the temperature evolution of the α-relaxation times. We clearly evidence the role played by the non-bridging oxygen linked either to Al atoms or Si atoms in the evolution of the glass-transition temperature as well as of the fragility as a function of silica content along the three joins

  7. Major role of suckling stimulation for inhibition of estrous behaviors in lactating rabbits: acute and chronic effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Dalmán, Cipatli; González-Mariscal, Gabriela

    2012-01-01

    Lactation in rabbits induces anestrus: sexual receptivity and scent-marking (chinning) are reduced despite the brevity of suckling (one daily nursing bout, lasting around 3 min). The mechanisms underlying this effect are unknown but, as chinning, lordosis, and ambulation in an open field are immediately inhibited by the peripheral stimulation received during mating we hypothesized that, across lactation, suckling stimulation would provoke a similar effect. To test this possibility we provided litters of 1, 3, 5, or 10 pups across lactation days 1-15 and quantified chinning and ambulation frequencies, the lordosis quotient, and milk output. Baseline chinning frequency, determined before the daily nursing bout, was low across lactation days 1-15 in does nursing 3, 5 or 10 pups but it increased steadily across days 1-10 in rabbits suckling one pup. Yet, a single young was sufficient to abolish chinning for about 1h, after which this behavior rose again. Suckling litters of all sizes reduced (but did not abolish) ambulation frequency, both chronically (baseline levels declined across days 1-5) and acutely. Sexual receptivity was significantly reduced on lactation day 15 only in does that had nursed 10 pups. Large litter size promoted a larger milk output and a normal duration of nursing episodes. Results support a major role of suckling stimulation for the suppression of estrous behaviors and ambulation through as yet unidentified mechanisms. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  8. Leaving Home, Attending College, Partnership and Parenthood: The Role of Life Transition Events in Leisure Pattern Stability from Adolescence to Young Adulthood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raymore, Leslie A.; Barber, Bonnie L.; Eccles, Jacquelynne S.

    2001-01-01

    Used data from the Michigan Study of Adolescent Life Transitions to study the role that leaving home, going to college, having a committed partner, and becoming a parent played in intraindividual change and stability in leisure patterns. Data for 602 females and 352 males suggest that transition events are particularly useful in predicting female…

  9. The role of solid-solid phase transitions in mantle convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faccenda, Manuele; Dal Zilio, Luca

    2017-01-01

    With changing pressure and temperature conditions, downwelling and upwelling crustal and mantle rocks experience several solid-solid phase transitions that affect the mineral physical properties owing to structural changes in the crystal lattice and to the absorption or release of latent heat. Variations in density, together with phase boundary deflections related to the non-null reaction slope, generate important buoyancy forces that add to those induced by thermal perturbations. These buoyancy forces are proportional to the density contrast between reactant and product phases, their volume fraction, the slope and the sharpness of the reaction, and affect the style of mantle convection depending on the system composition. In a homogeneous pyrolitic mantle there is little tendency for layered convection, with slabs that may stagnate in the transition zone because of the positive buoyancy caused by post-spinel and post-ilmenite reactions, and hot plumes that are accelerated by phase transformations in the 600-800 km depth range. By adding chemical and mineralogical heterogeneities as on Earth, phase transitions introduce bulk rock and volatiles filtering effects that generate a compositional gradient throughout the entire mantle, with levels that are enriched or depleted in one or more of these components. Phase transitions often lead to mechanical softening or hardening that can be related to a different intrinsic mechanical behaviour and volatile solubility of the product phases, the heating or cooling associated with latent heat, and the transient grain size reduction in downwelling cold material. Strong variations in viscosity would enhance layered mantle convection, causing slab stagnation and plume ponding. At low temperatures and relatively dry conditions, reactions are delayed due to the sluggish kinetics, so that non-equilibrium phase aggregates can persist metastably beyond the equilibrium phase boundary. Survival of low-density metastable olivine

  10. Assessing students' knowledge regarding the roles and responsibilities of a pharmacist with focus on care transitions through simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serag-Bolos, Erini S; Miranda, Aimon C; Gelot, Shyam R; Dharia, Sheetal P; Shaeer, Kristy M

    2017-07-01

    To evaluate the impact of a pharmacist-focused transitions of care (TOC) simulation on students' perceptions and knowledge of pharmacist roles in the healthcare continuum. Educational Activity and Setting: Two simulations, highlighting pharmacist roles in various practice settings, were conducted within the Pharmaceutical Skills courses in the third-year doctor of pharmacy curriculum. Patient cases were built utilizing electronic medical records (EMR). Students' knowledge was assessed before and after the simulations regarding pharmacist involvement in medication reconciliation, reduction in patient readmissions, reduction of inappropriate medication use, roles and communication on an interprofessional team, and involvement with health information technology (HIT) during care transitions. Fifty-one third-year pharmacy students were anonymously evaluated prior to and following the simulation to assess changes in knowledge and perceptions during the fall semester. Thirty-two (62.7%) students completed the pre-simulation and 21 (41.2%) students completed the post-simulation assessments, respectively. In the spring semester, 40 (80%) students completed the pre-simulation and 23 (46%) students finished the post-simulation assessments. Students predominately had community pharmacy work experience (n=28, 55%). Overall, students enjoyed the variety of pharmacist-led encounters throughout the simulation and assessments demonstrated an increase in knowledge after the simulations. TOC simulations enhance students' understanding of the significant impact that pharmacists have in ensuring continuity of care as members of an interdisciplinary team. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. Latino Students' Transition to Middle School: Role of Bilingual Education and School Ethnic Context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Jan N; Im, MyungHee; Kwok, Oi-Man; Cham, Heining; West, Stephen G

    2015-09-01

    Participants were 204 academically at-risk Latino students recruited into a study when in first grade and followed for 9 years. Using piecewise latent growth curve analyses, we investigated trajectories of teacher-rated behavioral engagement and student-reported school belonging during elementary school and middle school and the association between trajectories and enrollment in bilingual education classes in elementary school and a change in school ethnic congruence across the transition to middle school. Overall, students experienced a drop in school belonging and behavioral engagement across the transition. A moderating effect of ethnic congruence on bilingual enrollment was found. A decline in ethnic congruence was associated with more positive trajectories for students previously enrolled in bilingual classes but more negative trajectories for non-bilingual students.

  12. Performance of Urban Transit in Jordan

    OpenAIRE

    Dr. Hashem R. Al-Masaeid; Amir Shtayat

    2016-01-01

    Urban public transit has essential and active role for sustainable and balanced socio-economic and environmental development. This study investigated the performance of urban public transit services in three major cities in Jordan, including Amman, Irbid, and Zarqa. Accessibility, mobility, productivity, punctuality, waiting time and comfort of public transit were investigated in the study. Data were obtained from Land Transport RegulatoryCommission of Jordan, municipalities, and ...

  13. The Role of Tax Depreciation for Investment Decisions: A Comparison of European Transition Countries

    OpenAIRE

    Chang Woon Nam; Doina Radulescu

    2003-01-01

    This study compares incentive effects of various tax depreciation methods currently adopted in European transition economies. In these countries straight-line, geometric-degressive and accelerated depreciation measures are quite popular in combination with different corporate tax rates. Their generosity is determined on the basis of Samuelson’s true economic depreciation. For this purpose, the present value model is applied under the particular consideration of different financial structure...

  14. Psychological distress after employment transitions: the role of subjective financial position as a mediator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Claudia; Benzeval, Michaela; Stansfeld, Stephen

    2007-01-01

    To explore the extent to which the mental health effects of transitions into unemployment, or other forms of non-employment, and vice versa, are mediated by financial changes. Longitudinal analysis of the British Household Panel Survey from 1991 to 2000. There were 89,264 person-years of observation from 14,686 individuals aged > or =16 years. Main outcome measure was psychological distress measured by the 12-item General Health Questionnaire. Transitions to unemployment were associated with increased risk of psychological distress for men (adjusted odds ratio (OR) 3.15 (95% confidence interval (CI) 2.50 to 3.98)) and for women (OR 2.60 (95% CI 1.97 to 3.43)). Women who left work to look after the family were also more likely to experience psychological distress (OR 1.72 (95% CI 1.45 to 2.05)). A reduced risk of psychological distress was seen for transitions from unemployment to paid employment for men (OR 0.52 (95% CI 0.41 to 0.68)) and for women (OR 0.68 (95% CI 0.69 to 1.40)). Financial difficulty partially mediated these relationships: men who became unemployed and were worse off financially were more likely to experience psychological distress (OR 4.19 (95% CI 3.20 to 5.50)) than men who were not (OR 1.48 (95% CI 0.95 to 2.33)). Conversely, the beneficial health effect for people who left unemployment and became employed was confined to those who were better off financially (OR 0.34 (0.25 to 0.48) for men). Changes in employment status have both direct and indirect effects, through changes in financial circumstances, on subsequent psychological distress. The results support the view that the direction of causation runs from employment transitions to financial difficulties and psychological distress.

  15. The role of responsiveness within the self in transitions to university

    OpenAIRE

    Marsico, Giuseppina; Gomes, Ramon; Dazzani, Virginia

    2018-01-01

    Entering university is a complex psychosocial phenomenon that can create several new stressful situations that students need to face. The transition into university may be accompanied by some psychosocial problems such as reduced self-esteem and academic achievement, increased social anxiety, and a critical rise in the probability of dropout.How does a person use cultural elements to cope with stress? Responding to thisquestion requires an understanding of the multivocal and ambivalent self. ...

  16. The Role of FDI in the Economic Development of Transition Countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jelena Tast

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available FDI are considered a key instrument in the process of transforming the former centrally planned economies and stimulate economic growth in the transition period. Economic theory suggests that FDI are an important factor for the economic growth of the host-country, while according to empirical research in general, there is a positive correlation between FDI and the economic growth, but the causality direction is not clear: FDI inflow stimulates economic growth, but in the same time FDI inflows grow with the country’s economic development. Therefore, the objective of research in the paper is the relationship between FDI and economic growth in SEE and CIS countries. The relationship between the FDI and the economic growth in transition countries is examined by linear regression correlation of the relevant variables, covering the period from 2004 to 2011. Through the Pierce coefficient and the coefficient of determination, the interaction between the relevant variables and the dependence intensity is examine, and in this context general conclusions are drawn about the effects of FDI in the SEE and CIS countries. At the same time, the beta-coefficient is used to examine the value of the change in each variable separately, in order to make a more detailed analysis of the results obtained. In order to determine the direction of causality between the FDI and the economic growth of the country, research is carried out the influence of the transition indicators on the FDI inflow in the SEE and CIS countries from 2004 to 2011.

  17. The role of human capital formation in the transition to modern economic growth, 1300-1900

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Pleijt, A.M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/375805621

    2016-01-01

    Economic models of the Industrial Revolution increasingly emphasize the key role of human capital in promoting economic growth, and empirical studies have shown that education is a strong predictor of per capita GDP. Contrary to the theory, however, economic historians have described the role of

  18. The role of self-blaming moral emotions in major depression and their impact on social-economical decision making

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erdem ePulcu

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available People with major depressive disorder (MDD are more prone to experiencing moral emotions related to self-blame, such as guilt and shame. DSM-IV-TR recognises excessive or inappropriate guilt as one of the core symptoms of current MDD, whereas excessive shame is not part of the criteria for MDD. However, previous studies specifically assessing shame suggested its involvement in MDD. In the first part of this review, we will consider literature discussing the role of self-blaming moral emotions in MDD. These self-blaming moral emotions have been purported to influence people when they make social and financial decisions in cognitive studies, particularly those using neuroeconomical paradigms. Such paradigms aim to predict social behaviour in activities of daily living, by using important resource tangibles (especially money in laboratory conditions. Previous literature suggests that guilt promotes altruistic behaviour via acting out reparative tendencies, whereas shame reduces altruism by means of increasing social and interpersonal distance. In the second part of this review, we will discuss the potential influence of self-blaming moral emotions on overt behaviour in MDD, reviewing clinical and experimental studies in social and financial decision-making, in which guilt and shame were manipulated. This is not a well-established area in the depression literature, however in this opinion paper we will argue that studies of moral emotions and their impact on behavioural decision-making are of potential importance in the clinical field, by linking specific symptoms of a disorder to a behavioural outcome which may lead to stratification of clinical diagnoses in the future.

  19. The role of self-blaming moral emotions in major depression and their impact on social-economical decision making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulcu, Erdem; Zahn, Roland; Elliott, Rebecca

    2013-01-01

    People with major depressive disorder (MDD) are more prone to experiencing moral emotions related to self-blame, such as guilt and shame. DSM-IV-TR recognizes excessive or inappropriate guilt as one of the core symptoms of current MDD, whereas excessive shame is not part of the criteria for MDD. However, previous studies specifically assessing shame suggested its involvement in MDD. In the first part of this review, we will consider literature discussing the role of self-blaming moral emotions in MDD. These self-blaming moral emotions have been purported to influence people when they make social and financial decisions in cognitive studies, particularly those using neuroeconomical paradigms. Such paradigms aim to predict social behavior in activities of daily living, by using important resource tangibles (especially money) in laboratory conditions. Previous literature suggests that guilt promotes altruistic behavior via acting out reparative tendencies, whereas shame reduces altruism by means of increasing social and interpersonal distance. In the second part of this review, we will discuss the potential influence of self-blaming moral emotions on overt behavior in MDD, reviewing clinical and experimental studies in social and financial decision-making, in which guilt, and shame were manipulated. This is not a well-established area in the depression literature, however in this opinion paper we will argue that studies of moral emotions and their impact on behavioral decision-making are of potential importance in the clinical field, by linking specific symptoms of a disorder to a behavioral outcome which may lead to stratification of clinical diagnoses in the future.

  20. Transcriptome analysis and RNA interference of cockroach phototransduction indicate three opsins and suggest a major role for TRPL channels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew S French

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Our current understanding of insect phototransduction is based on a small number of species, but insects occupy many different visual environments. We created the retinal transcriptome of a nocturnal insect, the cockroach, Periplaneta americana to identify proteins involved in the earliest stages of compound eye phototransduction, and test the hypothesis that different visual environments are reflected in different molecular contributions to function. We assembled five novel mRNAs: two green opsins, one UV opsin, and one each TRP and TRPL ion channel homologs. One green opsin mRNA (pGO1 was 100-1000 times more abundant than the other opsins (pGO2 and pUVO, while pTRPL mRNA was 10 times more abundant than pTRP, estimated by transcriptome analysis or quantitative PCR (qPCR. Electroretinograms were used to record photoreceptor responses. Gene-specific in vivo RNA interference (RNAi was achieved by injecting long (596-708 bp double-stranded RNA into head hemolymph, and verified by qPCR. RNAi of the most abundant green opsin reduced both green opsins by more than 97% without affecting UV opsin, and gave a maximal reduction of 75% in ERG amplitude seven days after injection that persisted for at least 19 days. RNAi of pTRP and pTRPL genes each specifically reduced the corresponding mRNA by 90%. Electroretinogram reduction by pTRPL RNAi was slower than for opsin, reaching 75% attenuation by 21 days, without recovery at 29 days. pTRP RNAi attenuated ERG much less; only 30% after 21 days. Combined pTRP plus pTRPL RNAi gave only weak evidence of any cooperative interactions. We conclude that silencing retinal genes by in vivo RNAi using long dsRNA is effective, that visible light transduction in Periplaneta is dominated by pGO1, and that pTRPL plays a major role in cockroach phototransduction.

  1. The Role of Self-Blaming Moral Emotions in Major Depression and Their Impact on Social-Economical Decision Making

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulcu, Erdem; Zahn, Roland; Elliott, Rebecca

    2013-01-01

    People with major depressive disorder (MDD) are more prone to experiencing moral emotions related to self-blame, such as guilt and shame. DSM-IV-TR recognizes excessive or inappropriate guilt as one of the core symptoms of current MDD, whereas excessive shame is not part of the criteria for MDD. However, previous studies specifically assessing shame suggested its involvement in MDD. In the first part of this review, we will consider literature discussing the role of self-blaming moral emotions in MDD. These self-blaming moral emotions have been purported to influence people when they make social and financial decisions in cognitive studies, particularly those using neuroeconomical paradigms. Such paradigms aim to predict social behavior in activities of daily living, by using important resource tangibles (especially money) in laboratory conditions. Previous literature suggests that guilt promotes altruistic behavior via acting out reparative tendencies, whereas shame reduces altruism by means of increasing social and interpersonal distance. In the second part of this review, we will discuss the potential influence of self-blaming moral emotions on overt behavior in MDD, reviewing clinical and experimental studies in social and financial decision-making, in which guilt, and shame were manipulated. This is not a well-established area in the depression literature, however in this opinion paper we will argue that studies of moral emotions and their impact on behavioral decision-making are of potential importance in the clinical field, by linking specific symptoms of a disorder to a behavioral outcome which may lead to stratification of clinical diagnoses in the future. PMID:23750148

  2. Role of major histocompatibility complex class II in resistance of mice to naturally acquired infection with Syphacia obvelata

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Patricia W.; Chapes, Stephen K.

    2003-01-01

    Genetics plays a substantial role in host resistance in many host-parasite interactions. We examined the prevalence of naturally acquired infection with Syphacia obvelata in a number of mouse strains housed in a non-barrier facility. These mice, which included cross-bred and congenic, inbred strains on various genetic backgrounds, differ in the loci for the immune function genes--major histocompatibility complex class II (MHCII), toll-like receptor 4 (Tlr4), and solute carrier family 11, member 1 (Slc11a1)--which allowed comparisons of the impact of these genes on resistance to pinworm infection. Male and female mice of various ages were sampled over an 18-month period; infection was determined by use of the cellophane tape test. Results indicated that mice that were MHCII+/+ had a significantly lower prevalence of infection than did mice that were MHCII-/-. Differences were not seen between male and female mice. Although MHCII+/+ mice had an age-associated decrease in infection prevalence, such decrease was not seen in MHCII-/- mice. In contrast, infection prevalence in mice with the normal Tlr4 gene (Tlr4(LPS-n/LPS-n)) gene did not differ significantly compared with that in mice that were homozygous for either the point mutation (Tlr4(LPS-d/LPS-d)) or deletion (Tlr4(LPS-del/LPS-del)) of that gene. Likewise, the presence (Sle11a1r/r) or absence (Slc11a1s/s) of functional alleles for Slc11a1 had no effect on the prevalence of infection with S. obvelata. In conclusion, presence of MHCII, but not Tlr4 or Slc11a1 significantly influences prevalence of naturally acquired infection with S. obvelata. These data justify further comprehensive analyses of the immune components that are involved in pinworm resistance.

  3. The role of pectoralis major and latissimus dorsi muscles in a biomechanical model of massive rotator cuff tear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Sean T; Ecklund, Kier J; Chu, Eileen H; McGarry, Michelle H; Gupta, Ranjan; Lee, Thay Q

    2014-08-01

    Superior migration of the humeral head after massive rotator cuff tear (mRCT) is thought to lead to cuff tear arthropathy. Previous biomechanical studies have demonstrated the ability of the pectoralis major and latissimus dorsi (PM/LD) muscles to resist this migration. This study examined the role of PM/LD muscles on glenohumeral joint forces and acromiohumeral contact pressures in a mRCT model. Six cadaveric shoulders were tested using a custom shoulder-testing system. Muscle insertions of the rotator cuff, deltoid, and PM/LD were preserved and used for muscle loading. Specimens were tested in 3 different humeral rotation positions at 0° abduction and 2 rotation positions at 60° abduction. Testing was performed for intact specimens, after supraspinatus removal, and after supraspinatus/infraspinatus/teres minor removal. PM/LD were loaded or unloaded to determine their effect. Humeral head kinematics, glenohumeral joint forces, and acromiohumeral contact area and pressure were measured. For the mRCT condition at 0° abduction, unloading the PM/LD resulted in superior shift of the humeral head. Acromiohumeral contact pressures were undetectable when the PM/LD were loaded but increased significantly after PM/LD unloading. After mRCT, superior joint forces were increased and compressive forces were decreased compared with intact; loading the PM/LD resolved these abnormal forces in some testing conditions. In mRCT, the PM and LD muscles are effective in improving glenohumeral kinematics and reducing acromiohumeral pressures. Strengthening or neuromuscular training of this musculature, or both, may delay the progression to cuff tear arthropathy. Published by Mosby, Inc.

  4. Role of Fluorescence yields, Coster–Kronig transitions and ionization theories on L X-ray intensity ratios of Au

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohan, Harsh; Kumar Jain, Arvind; Kaur, Gurpreet; Singh, Parjit S.; Sharma, Sunita

    2012-01-01

    The inner-shell vacancy decay process is consisting of radiative and non-radiative transitions. These investigations have been developing over the last four decades, resulting in close and stringent comparisons of the measured values with the predictions of theoretical models. In view of the current state of affairs, we report in this paper the role of Fluorescence yields, Coster–Kronig transitions and prevailing ionization theories on L X-ray production from Au using low energy protons. Their contribution to these phenomena and current growth will be highlighted. Prospects for supplementary effort will also be discussed. - Highlights: ► New data for L X-ray production from Au using low energy protons are reported. ► Effects of Fluorescence yields and Coster–Kronig transitions on it are analyzed. ► Stringent comparison of measured values with theoretical models has been presented.► Their contribution to these phenomena and current growth has been highlighted. ► Prospects for supplementary effort are discussed.

  5. Disentanglement of two qubits coupled to an XY spin chain: Role of quantum phase transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan Zigang; Li Shushen; Zhang Ping

    2007-01-01

    We study the disentanglement evolution of two spin qubits which interact with a general XY spin-chain environment. The dynamical process of the disentanglement is numerically and analytically investigated in the vicinity of a quantum phase transition (QPT) of the spin chain in both weak and strong coupling cases. We find that the disentanglement of the two spin qubits may be greatly enhanced by the quantum critical behavior of the environmental spin chain. We give a detailed analysis to facilitate the understanding of the QPT-enhanced decaying behavior of the coherence factor. Furthermore, the scaling behavior in the disentanglement dynamics is also revealed and analyzed

  6. The Role of Gas in the European Energy Transition: Challenges and Opportunities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cornot-Gandolphe, Sylvie

    2018-01-01

    Following difficult years for the European gas industry, natural gas is back to the front stage. Given its environmental credentials, its flexibility, its performance and the variety of its uses, gas has a key role to play in the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions, the improvement of air quality, the integration of intermittent renewable energy sources in the power mix. Its role will evolve in the longer term and one must distinguish the period 2015-2030 from the period 2030-2050

  7. Original article The other side of the mirror – the role of partner’s empathy in transition to parenthood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Kaźmierczak

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background The general objective of the project was to verify the role the partner’s empathy plays in the perceived adjustment to parenthood. Couple empathy and especially partner’s perspective-taking have been linked to better adaptation to parenthood, through increasing the quality of communication between parents or through reducing problems experienced during transition to parenthood. Empathy has been promoted among couples preparing for parenthood, for example during antenatal classes. Participants and procedure Two studies were conducted. The first study included 121 young mothers of children in their first year of life. They completed measures of adjustment to parenthood, postpartum depression, satisfaction with romantic relationship, and partner’s perceived empathy. In addition, women assessed factors associated with labour and midwife care. The second study involved 112 couples during transition to parenthood. Those couples were randomly assigned to experimental conditions using instructions in which they were asked to imagine a one’s own or b the partner’s situation after the child’s birth, and completed the questionnaire measuring expected adjustment to parenthood. Results Male perceived empathy, relational satisfaction and postpartum depression were predictors of adjustment to motherhood in Study 1. In addition, the more empathy females perceived in their partners, the lower was the level of postpartum depression they declared. Couples empathizing with the partner in Study 2 perceived the challenges of parenthood in a similar way. Future mothers perceived more parenthood problems only when assuming their own perspective. Conclusions The results of the studies indicate that empathy plays an important role in shaping adjustment to parenthood, especially motherhood. Low-dosage interventions might help couples to become aware of their mutual problems concerning transition to parenthood, when conducting longer programmes is

  8. Determinants and role of foreing direct investment in transition economies:with special look in FYR of Macedonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr.Sc. Merale Fetahu-Vehapi

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to provide clear insight about the determinants and role of FDI in transition country with particular reference in FYR of Macedonia. We are using a panel dataset for twenty seven - 27 transition countries over the period 1997 to 2009. Applying static and dynamic modeling, econometrics findings have driven as to dynamic models. Inthe same empirical investigations following variables have been tested: GDP of the host and source country, unit labour cost, trade inflation, legal environment, distance, dummy variables capturing the language, common border and colonizing effect. Empirical result confirms expectation of the chosen variables as well as the positive feedback effect of past FDI onto current FDI. While the negative and significant coefficient of distance indicates that FDI is determined by gravity factors, the positive relationship between FDI stock and unit labour cost is explained through the effect of the service sector on wages. In addition, countries having higher trading shares attract more FDI. Low inflation rate as well as efficient legal system should be taken as a good sign for attracting more FDI flows since it has a positive impact on foreign investors. Dummy for English language, which indicates countries where English language is official or widely spoken in that country, have less language difficulties and more FDI flows with FYR of Macedonia. At the same time, income level of the host country is found to be important determinant for foreign investors. Moreover, FDI role in FYR of Macedonia has been found as crucial in many aspects of country’s economic development and sustainability. Apart from accelerated growth, technical innovation and enterprise restructuring, FDI in this transition country gave considerable contribution to the financial potential improvement.

  9. Investigating chaotic wake dynamics past a flapping airfoil and the role of vortex interactions behind the chaotic transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bose, Chandan; Sarkar, Sunetra

    2018-04-01

    The present study investigates the complex vortex interactions in two-dimensional flow-field behind a symmetric NACA0012 airfoil undergoing a prescribed periodic pitching-plunging motion in low Reynolds number regime. The flow-field transitions from periodic to chaotic through a quasi-periodic route as the plunge amplitude is gradually increased. This study unravels the role of the complex interactions that take place among the main vortex structures in making the unsteady flow-field transition from periodicity to chaos. The leading-edge separation plays a key role in providing the very first trigger for aperiodicity. Subsequent mechanisms like shredding, merging, splitting, and collision of vortices in the near-field that propagate and sustain the disturbance have also been followed and presented. These fundamental mechanisms are seen to give rise to spontaneous and irregular formation of new vortex couples at arbitrary locations, which are the primary agencies for sustaining chaos in the flow-field. The interactions have been studied for each dynamical state to understand the course of transition in the flow-field. The qualitative changes observed in the flow-field are manifestation of changes in the underlying dynamical system. The overall dynamics are established in the present study by means of robust quantitative measures derived from classical and non-classical tools from the dynamical system theory. As the present analysis involves a high fidelity multi-unknown system, non-classical dynamical tools such as recurrence-based time series methods are seen to be very efficient. Moreover, their application is novel in the context of pitch-plunge flapping flight.

  10. Transitional processes and the role of cities in east and South-East Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stojkov Borislav

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The cities of Eastern and South East Europe, passing through dynamic and uncertain processes of social, economic and political transition, are being confronted with serious challenges in relation to more stabilized cities of Central and, especially, Western Europe. The former policy of centralization is faced with political, administrative and economic changes, as well as with aspirations towards decentralization, regionalization and polycentrism. The confronted tendencies still dominantly influence to the level of Eastern and South East cities' competitiveness. This urgently asks for orientation towards functional positioning of cities within wider metropolitan and regional frameworks. Another crucial orientation is presented by initial tendencies of metropolitan areas linking or networking in wider regional context. Both tendencies indicate the crucial problem of city governance quality level, according to contemporary criteria instead classical and hierarchical model of executing governmental power. Some examples of cities in Eastern and South East Europe are presented in the article, as well as of some cities in Central Europe where initial phase of transition has been completed.

  11. Metal-insulator transition in 2D: the role of interactions and disorder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kastrinakis, George

    2007-01-01

    We present a model for the metal-insulator transition in 2D, observed in the recent years. Our starting point consists of two ingredients only, which are ubiquitous in the experiments: Coulomb interactions and weak disorder spin scattering (coming from the interfaces of the heterostructures in question). In a diagramatic approach, we predict the existence of a characteristic temperature T 0 =T 0 (n,ω H ), n being the density of carriers, and ω H the Zeeman energy, below which these systems become metallic, due to the onset of strong spin-density correlations. This is in very good agreement with experiments, and corroborates the fact that varying n and ω H are equivalent ways into/out of the metallic regime. The conductivity, calculated as a function of temperature and ω H in the metallic state, compares favorably to experiment. Moreover, we give an explicit expression for the conventional weak disorder contributions to the conductivity in the frame of our model. We comment on the nature of the transition, we calculate the specific heat of the system and we discuss the fate of the metallic state in the limit of zero temperature

  12. From the clinical to the managerial domain: the lived experience of role transition from radiographer to radiology manager in South-East Queensland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Alarna M N; Henwood, Suzanne M

    2016-06-01

    This study seeks to add to current literature a descriptive account of the lived experience of radiographers' transition to, and experiences of, management roles and identifies additional resources and support that are perceived as being beneficial for this transition. This study employed a descriptive phenomenological stance. Using purposive sampling, six South-East Queensland based private practice radiology managers, who had held their position for longer than 3 months, participated in audiotape recorded in-depth interviews exploring their transition to, and experiences of management in radiology. Thematic analysis was used to describe and make meaning of the data. Overall, five central themes emerged through thematic analysis of the data. The results indicate that all participants' had an underlying drive to succeed during their role transition and highlight the importance of a comprehensive orientation by a mentor; the training and support to enable preparation for the role, especially in the area of people management skills and communication; the importance of access to networking opportunities and the importance of concise expectations from higher management. Role transition can be marred with uncertainty, however; key suggestions indicate the importance of having support mechanisms in place before, during and after transitioning to a managerial role.

  13. Leadership's Role in Recruitment and Retention of First Generation, Low-Income Latino Students into STEM Majors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Eliseo A.

    Fostering resiliency and educational success in students that are faced with adversity is not a simple task. The gap in educational success and achievement among low-income, first generation, traditionally marginalized students continues to be significant. California's educational system needs to stop the hemorrhaging from its educational pipeline, also known as the P-20 pipeline, of all students, especially those groups of students with larger gaps in educational attainment. One potential path towards fixing California's educational pipeline for all students is to form and keep partnerships with programs such as Upward Bound, AVID, and Math Engineering Science Achievement (MESA). In 2010-11, the California Department of Education (CDE) reported that over 51% of students enrolled in California's school system and 51% of all California high school seniors were Latino were Latino. Of the 231,231 Latino high school seniors, 79%, graduated. However, of those that graduated, only 26%, met University of California/California State University (UC/CSU) college entrance requirements. Even though 79% of Latinos graduated, 74% did not qualify to apply to a UC or CSU. If the majority of Latino students continue to fall through holes in the educational pipeline, companies will continue to look abroad to fill STEM jobs that remain unfilled by American workers (California Department of Education [CDE], 2012). Alongside the U.S.'s current economic woes, the lack of college preparedness and knowledge by parents and students has led to a decrease in first generation, low-income Latino students' higher education enrollment (Camacho & Lord, 2011). With strong and positive leadership from family, supplemented by the MESA program, these youths can exert their resiliency, face adversity, and overcome extraordinary barriers. Leaders in education such as teachers, coordinators, advisers, administrators, and parents are in the best position to teach students about resilience (Ginsburg, 2007

  14. Impact of Peer and Teacher Relations on Deaf Early Adolescents' Well-Being: Comparisons before and after a Major School Transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolters, Nina; Knoors, Harry; Cillessen, Antonius H. N.; Verhoeven, Ludo

    2012-01-01

    This study focused on the peer and teacher relationships of deaf children and the effects of these relationships on well-being in school during the transition from elementary school to junior high school. Differences due to gender and educational context were also considered. In Study 1, the predictive effects of peer acceptance, popularity, and…

  15. The role of the Courts sustaining democracy: An approach from transitional regimes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vicente F. Benítez R.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This article explores the political factors that enable or prevent the consolidation of an effective judicial review in transitional democracies such as the Colombian and the Venezuelan ones. These democracies, in turn, are likely to be victims of abusive constitutionalism attempts by powerful executives, which is a phenomenon typical of young democracies. This paper analyzes key cases of successful and unsuccessful experiences in Central Europe, Asia and Latin America in order to identify what kind of factors allow or hinder a Tribunal’s effective judicial review in new democracies. I argue that factors as judicial independence, separation of powers, Courts’ reputation, and judicial deference to other branches, are key elements to determine whether a Tribunal will be a successful institution.

  16. Role of transitional levels in 237Np (γ,f): Perspectives for studying highly deformed systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arruda-Neto, J. D. T.; Mesa, J.; Garcia, F.; Rodriguez, O.; Geraldo, L. P.; Garcia, C.; Guzman, F.; Rodrigues, T. E.; Shtejer, K.; Semmler, R.

    2006-01-01

    The transition levels at the top of the two 237 Np fission barriers were obtained for the first time by means of the so-called semimicroscopic combined method, which we have developed and implemented. To overcome the difficulties in dealing with large nuclear deformations, we used our developed BARRIER code, which calculates single-particle spectra in a deformed Woods-Saxon potential using a coordinate system based on Cassini ovaloids as nuclear shape parametrization. The results enabled us to describe the experimentally observed near-barrier photofission cross-section structures for 237 Np, as well as a subbarrier shelf, the latter being consistently interpreted in terms of the accumulation of levels at the top of the inner and outer double fission barrier of 237 Np

  17. The emerging role of exosomes in Epithelial-Mesenchymal-Transition in cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Jayne Vella

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Metastasis in cancer consists of multiple steps, including Epithelial-Mesenchymal-Transition (EMT, which is characterized by the loss of Epithelial-like characteristics and the gain of Mesenchymal-like attributes including cell migration and invasion. It is clear that the tumour microenvironment can promote the metastatic cascade and that intercellular communication is necessary for this to occur. Exosomes are small membranous vesicles secreted by most cell types into the extracellular environment and they are important communicators in the tumour microenvironment. They promote angiogenesis, invasion and proliferation in recipient cells to support tumour growth and a prometastatic phenotype. Although it is clear that exosomes contribute to cancer cell plasticity, experimental evidence to define exosome induced plasticity as EMT is only just coming to light. This review will discuss recent research on exosomal regulation of the EMT process in the tumour microenvironment.

  18. Aerodynamic heating in transitional hypersonic boundary layers: Role of second-mode instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yiding; Chen, Xi; Wu, Jiezhi; Chen, Shiyi; Lee, Cunbiao; Gad-el-Hak, Mohamed

    2018-01-01

    The evolution of second-mode instabilities in hypersonic boundary layers and its effects on aerodynamic heating are investigated. Experiments are conducted in a Mach 6 wind tunnel using fast-response pressure sensors, fluorescent temperature-sensitive paint, and particle image velocimetry. Calculations based on parabolic stability equations and direct numerical simulations are also performed. It is found that second-mode waves, accompanied by high-frequency alternating fluid compression and expansion, produce intense aerodynamic heating in a small region that rapidly heats the fluid passing through it. As the second-mode waves decay downstream, the dilatation-induced aerodynamic heating decreases while its shear-induced counterpart keeps growing. The latter brings about a second growth of the surface temperature when transition is completed.

  19. The Role of Everyday Life Products and Social Practices in Sustainable Transitions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Charlotte Louise; Remmen, Arne

    2011-01-01

    and the way we live. When opting for a low carbon society, the innovation dynamics of everyday life products as well as consumption and practice patterns become an important field of investigation. Hence, to approach consumption aspects of using and interacting with energy using products, it is important...... to kill (Røpke, 2009), so in order to make people change practice, alternate routines that work has to be proposed and accepted. Practice theory can help understanding how practices work, and thus clarifying what has to be included in a study of potentials for a sustainable transition. Social practices...... to understand what practices the products are a part of when in use. According to Røpke (2009) “Primarily, people are practitioners who indirectly, through the performance of various practices, draw on resources”. Therefore, in order to make consumers aware of their actions in an environmental perspective...

  20. The Role of Transition of Workforce between Companies in Transferring Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sedki Esmaeel Rezouki

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The transition of professionals between different sectors is considered as one of sources of acquisition of technology and will lead to add the practical experience to them. This experience depending on different factors like: the scientific degree and practical experience by the professionals, the technology possessed by the transferor sector, the duration that spent by experienced in transferor sector, the type of work performed by professional….etc. The research aims to verify the affect of these factors in technology transfer process. Research reached that the technology transfer process which is depending on the Iraqi competencies in work is unsatisfied level between Iraqi organizations because there are different obstacles behind this. Research diagnosed such obstacles as well as the procedures that followed-up by professionals to serve this process.

  1. Role of microRNA in epithelial to mesenchymal transition and metastasis and clinical perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Díaz-López, Antonio; Moreno-Bueno, Gema; Cano, Amparo

    2014-01-01

    The microRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of small, 20–22 nucleotides in length, endogenously expressed noncoding RNAs that regulate multiple targets posttranscriptionally. Interestingly, miRNAs have emerged as regulators of most physiological and pathological processes, including metastatic tumor progression, in part by controlling a reversible process called epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT). The activation of EMT increases the migratory and invasive properties fundamental for tumor cell spread while activation of the reverse mesenchymal-to-epithelial transition is required for metastasis outgrowth. The EMT triggering leads to the activation of a core of transcription factors (EMT-TFs) – SNAIL1/SNAIL2, bHLH (E47, E2-2, and TWIST1/TWIST2), and ZEB1/ZEB2 – that act as E-cadherin repressors and, ultimately, coordinate EMT. Recent evidence indicates that several miRNAs regulate the expression of EMT-TFs or EMT-activating signaling pathways. Interestingly, some miRNAs and EMT-TFs form tightly interconnected negative feedback loops that control epithelial cell plasticity, providing self-reinforcing signals and robustness to maintain the epithelial or mesenchymal cell status. Among the most significant feedback loops, we focus on the ZEB/miR-200 and the SNAIL1/miR-34 networks that hold a clear impact in the regulation of the epithelial-mesenchymal state. Recent insights into the p53 modulation of the EMT-TF/miRNA loops and epigenetic regulatory mechanisms in the context of metastasis dissemination will also be discussed. Understanding the regulation of EMT by miRNAs opens new avenues for the diagnosis and prognosis of tumors and identifies potential therapeutic targets that might help to negatively impact on metastasis dissemination and increasing patient survival

  2. THE ROLE OF CORPORATE GOVERNANCE IN TRANSITION ECONOMIES: CONTRIBUTION AND DEVELOPMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    OLIVERA GJORGIEVA-TRAJKOVSKA

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available With more evident process of globalization of the world market, the concept of corporate governance gains importance. The global economic crisis highlighted the problems of corporate governance both in developed countries and developing economies. Analyzing the effects of the global economic crisis, including striking collapse of many companies, the huge increase in unemployment and the increased number of people living on the poverty line and below, it can be concluded that some of these problems are result of various weaknesses and failures of corporate governance. Even though the introduction of a number of rules, codes and practices of corporate governance have been made, the global economic crisis has shown that more effective application of the standards of corporate governance is necessary. Corporate governance issues are especially important in transition economies, since these countries do not have the long-established financial institution infrastructure to deal with corporate governance issues. Before 1989 there was no need to discuss corporate governance issues, because all enterprises were owned by the state and there were no shareholders. All that has changed. This paper discusses the importance of corporate governance, with special reference to transition economies. Directors, owners and corporate managers have started to realize that there are benefits that can accrue from having a good corporate governance structure. Good corporate governance helps to increase share price and makes it easier to obtain capital. International investors are hesitant to lend money or buy shares in a corporation that does not subscribe to good corporate governance principles. Transparency, independent directors and a separate audit committee are especially important.

  3. Integrating Social-Contextual and Intrapersonal Mechanisms of "Maturing Out": Joint Influences of Familial-Role Transitions and Personality Maturation on Problem-Drinking Reductions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Matthew R; Ellingson, Jarrod M; Sher, Kenneth J

    2015-09-01

    "Maturing out" of problem drinking is associated with both role transitions (e.g., getting married) and personality development. However, little is known concerning how these 2 mechanisms jointly influence problem-drinking desistance. This study investigated whether salutary effects of role transitions and personality occur at different points in young-adult development and whether they mediate one another's effects. Participants were initially recruited as first-year undergraduates, with family history of alcoholism overrepresented by design (N = 489). Using 4 waves of data at roughly ages 21, 25, 29, and 34, cross-lagged panel models estimated prospective relations among familial-role transitions (marriage or parenthood), personality (disinhibition, conscientiousness, and neuroticism), and problem drinking. Mixed support was found for the prediction of roles being more strongly associated with earlier maturing out of problem drinking and personality being more strongly associated with later maturing out. Regarding mediation, no evidence was found for the expectation that role effects would be mediated by personality. However, results did support mediation of personality effects by role transitions. Specifically, lower disinhibition and higher conscientiousness in emerging adulthood predicted role adoption, which, in turn, predicted later problem-drinking reductions. Family history of alcoholism also distally influenced these mediation processes. The differential timing of role and personality effects is consistent with the notion of decreasing contextual influences and increasing intrapersonal influences across development. In light of role incompatibility theory, results suggest that, over the course of development, the association of familial roles with problem drinking may increasingly reflect problem-drinking effects on role entry (i.e., role selection) and decreasingly reflect role entry effects on problem drinking (i.e., role socialization). As emerging

  4. Examining the Relationship between Role Models and Leadership Growth during the Transition to Adulthood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowers, Jill R.; Rosch, David M.; Collier, Daniel A.

    2016-01-01

    Leadership and developmental scholars have highlighted the need to enhance youth leadership skills. Yet, research that explains youths' perceptions of how and when role models influences their leadership growth processes is limited. To address these gaps and begin to develop an understanding of youths' perspectives, we employed a qualitative,…

  5. Transition radiation and transition scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ginzburg, V.L.

    1982-01-01

    Transition radiation is a process of a rather general character. It occurs when some source, which does not have a proper frequency (for example, a charge) moves at a constant velocity in an inhomogeneous and (or) nonstationary medium or near such a medium. The simplest type of transition radiation takes place when a charge crosses a boundary between two media (the role of one of the media may be played by vacuum). In the case of periodic variation of the medium, transition radiation possesses some specific features (resonance transition radiation or transition scattering). Transition scattering occurs, in particular, when a permittivity wave falls onto an nonmoving (fixed) charge. Transition scattering is closely connected with transition bremsstrahlung radiation. All these transition processes are essential for plasma physics. Transition radiation and transition scattering have analogues outside the framework of electrodynamics (like in the case of Vavilov-Cherenkov radiation). In the present report the corresponding range of phenomena is elucidated, as far as possible, in a generally physical aspect. (Auth.)

  6. Role of Acclimatization in Weather-Related Human Mortality During the Transition Seasons of Autumn and Spring in a Thermally Extreme Mid-Latitude Continental Climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Freitas, Christopher R.; Grigorieva, Elena A.

    2015-01-01

    Human mortality is closely related to natural climate-determined levels of thermal environmental stress and the resulting thermophysiological strain. Most climate-mortality research has focused on seasonal extremes during winter and summer when mortality is the highest, while relatively little attention has been paid to mortality during the transitional seasons of autumn and spring. The body acclimatizes to heat in the summer and cold in winter and readjusts through acclimatization during the transitions between the two during which time the body experiences the thermophysiological strain of readjustment. To better understand the influences of weather on mortality through the acclimatization process, the aim here is to examine the periods that link very cold and very warms seasons. The study uses the Acclimatization Thermal Strain Index (ATSI), which is a comparative measure of short-term thermophysiological impact on the body. ATSI centers on heat exchange with the body’s core via the respiratory system, which cannot be protected. The analysis is based on data for a major city in the climatic region of the Russian Far East characterized by very hot summers and extremely cold winters. The results show that although mortality peaks in winter (January) and is at its lowest in summer (August), there is not a smooth rise through autumn nor a smooth decline through spring. A secondary peak occurs in autumn (October) with a smaller jump in May. This suggests the acclimatization from warm-to-cold produces more thermophysiological strain than the transition from cold-to-warm. The study shows that ATSI is a useful metric for quantifying the extent to which biophysical adaptation plays a role in increased strain on the body during re-acclimatization and for this reason is a more appropriate climatic indictor than air temperature alone. The work gives useful bioclimatic information on risks involved in transitional seasons in regions characterized by climatic extremes. This

  7. The Role of Statistics and Research Methods in the Academic Success of Psychology Majors: Do Performance and Enrollment Timing Matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freng, Scott; Webber, David; Blatter, Jamin; Wing, Ashley; Scott, Walter D.

    2011-01-01

    Comprehension of statistics and research methods is crucial to understanding psychology as a science (APA, 2007). However, psychology majors sometimes approach methodology courses with derision or anxiety (Onwuegbuzie & Wilson, 2003; Rajecki, Appleby, Williams, Johnson, & Jeschke, 2005); consequently, students may postpone…

  8. Role of microRNA in epithelial to mesenchymal transition and metastasis and clinical perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Díaz-López A

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Antonio Díaz-López,1 Gema Moreno-Bueno,1,2 Amparo Cano11Departamento de Bioquímica, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Instituto de Investigaciones Biomédicas “Alberto Sols” (CSIC-UAM, IdiPAZ, Madrid, Spain; 2Fundación MDAnderson Internacional, Madrid, SpainAbstract: The microRNAs (miRNAs are a class of small, 20–22 nucleotides in length, endogenously expressed noncoding RNAs that regulate multiple targets posttranscriptionally. Interestingly, miRNAs have emerged as regulators of most physiological and pathological processes, including metastatic tumor progression, in part by controlling a reversible process called epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT. The activation of EMT increases the migratory and invasive properties fundamental for tumor cell spread while activation of the reverse mesenchymal-to-epithelial transition is required for metastasis outgrowth. The EMT triggering leads to the activation of a core of transcription factors (EMT-TFs – SNAIL1/SNAIL2, bHLH (E47, E2-2, and TWIST1/TWIST2, and ZEB1/ZEB2 – that act as E-cadherin repressors and, ultimately, coordinate EMT. Recent evidence indicates that several miRNAs regulate the expression of EMT-TFs or EMT-activating signaling pathways. Interestingly, some miRNAs and EMT-TFs form tightly interconnected negative feedback loops that control epithelial cell plasticity, providing self-reinforcing signals and robustness to maintain the epithelial or mesenchymal cell status. Among the most significant feedback loops, we focus on the ZEB/miR-200 and the SNAIL1/miR-34 networks that hold a clear impact in the regulation of the epithelial-mesenchymal state. Recent insights into the p53 modulation of the EMT-TF/miRNA loops and epigenetic regulatory mechanisms in the context of metastasis dissemination will also be discussed. Understanding the regulation of EMT by miRNAs opens new avenues for the diagnosis and prognosis of tumors and identifies potential

  9. Causal role of thalamic interneurons on brain state transitions: a study using a neural mass model implementing synaptic kinetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Basabdatta Sen Bhattacharya

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Experimental studies on the Lateral Geniculate Nucleus (LGN of mammals and rodents show that the inhibitory interneurons (IN receive around 47.1% of their afferents from the retinal spiking neurons, and constitute around 20 - 25% of the LGN cell population. However, there is a definite gap in knowledge about the role and impact of IN on thalamocortical dynamics in both experimental and model-based research. We use a neural mass computational model of the LGN with three neural populations viz. IN, thalamocortical relay (TCR, thalamic reticular nucleus (TRN, to study the causality of IN on LGN oscillations and state-transitions. The synaptic information transmission in the model is implemented with kinetic modelling, facilitating the linking of low-level cellular attributes with high-level population dynamics. The model is parameterised and tuned to simulate both Local Field Potential (LFP of LGN and electroencephalogram (EEG of visual cortex in an awake resting state with eyes closed and dominant frequency within the alpha (8-13 Hz band. The results show that: First, the response of the TRN is suppressed in the presence of IN in the circuit; disconnecting the IN from the circuit effects a dramatic change in the model output, displaying high amplitude synchronous oscillations within the alpha band in both TCR and TRN. These observations conform to experimental reports implicating the IN as the primary inhibitory modulator of LGN dynamics in a cognitive state, and that reduced cognition is achieved by suppressing the TRN response. Second, the model validates steady state visually evoked potential response in humans corresponding to periodic input stimuli; however, when the IN is disconnected from the circuit, the output power spectra do not reflect the input frequency. This agrees with experimental reports underpinning the role of IN in efficient retino-geniculate information transmission. Third, a smooth transition from alpha to theta band is

  10. role of some transition metals and metalloproteins on oxidative stress formation among ionizing radiation exposed workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michael, M.I.

    2004-01-01

    this study was established to evaluate the role of working in radiation field for different prolonged periods on some oxidant/antioxidant parameters and to estimate the role of other additional factors such as age, smoking and inflammation on the progress of oxidative stress on the chosen volunteers. one hundred and twenty six male volunteers working in the nuclear research center and hot laboratories center were assessed in the present study, they were arranged as 70 radiation exposed workers and 56 control individuals. the radiation exposed workers were rearranged into 50 non-smokers, non-hypertensive and non-diabetics; 10 individuals were smokers, non-hypertensive, non-diabetic and other 10 volunteers with increased erythrocyte sedimentation rate (esr), non-smokers, non-hypertensive and non-diabetics

  11. Gender Roles in Transition: Career and Family Expectations of Accounting Students

    OpenAIRE

    Rebekah J. Maupin

    1993-01-01

    Quantitative data from a study of gender differentiation among accounting students are analyzed to discover if male and female accounting students have different attitudes, orientations, and expectations for career and family. Although some changes toward a more gender-equal population are found, the study results also indicate several potential conflicts which accounting students will have to face as they attempt to combine work and family roles. Both male and female accounting students have...

  12. Transitions in sensitive period attachment learning in infancy: the role of corticosterone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Regina M; Holman, Parker J

    2010-05-01

    Survival of altricial infants, including humans and rats, depends on attachment to the caregiver - a process that requires infants to recognize, learn, and remember their attachment figure. The demands of a dynamic environment combined with a maturing organism require frequent neurobehavioral reorganization. This restructuring of behavior and its supporting neural circuitry can be viewed through the unique lens of attachment learning in rats in which preference learning is enhanced and aversion learning is attenuated. Behavioral restructuring is well adapted to securing the crucial infant-caregiver relationship regardless of the quality of care. With maturation and the end of the infant-caregiver attachment learning period, the complex interplay of neural structures, hormones, and social behavior coordinates the developing rat's eventual transition to life outside of the nest. Nevertheless, early-life environmental and physiological stressors can alter the resilient nature of this system, particularly with respect to the amygdala, and these changes may provide important clues to understanding the lasting effects of early stress. (c) 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Nurses' role transition from the clinical ward environment to the critical care environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gohery, Patricia; Meaney, Teresa

    2013-12-01

    To explore the experiences of nurses moving from the ward environment to the critical care environment. Critical care areas are employing nurses with no critical care experience due to staff shortage. There is a paucity of literature focusing on the experiences of nurses moving from the ward environment to the critical care environment. A Heideggerian phenomenology research approach was used in this study. In-depth semi structured interviews, supported with an interview guide, were conducted with nine critical care nurses. Data analysis was guided by Van Manen (1990) approach to phenomenological analysis. Four main themes emerged: The highs and lows, you need support, theory-practice gap, struggling with fear. The participants felt ill prepared and inexperienced to work within the stressful and technical environment of critical care due to insufficient education and support. The study findings indicated that a variety of feelings and emotions are experienced by ward nurses who move into the stressful and technical environment of critical care due to insufficient skills and knowledge. More education and support is required to improve this transition process. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. The role of medium range order on phase transitions in chain silicates upon compression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serghiou, G; Chopelas, A; Boehler, R

    2004-01-01

    Raman spectroscopic measurements of the tetrahedrally coordinated crystal MnSiO 3 (rhodonite) in an argon pressure medium show that it becomes amorphous above 33 GPa. This observation consolidates our findings and explanation for the global structural trends exhibited by the extended chain silicate family AA'BO 3 (AA': Mg, Ca, Mn, Fe; B: Si) upon compression. In particular, crystals of this family are made of two types of building blocks coined P and C. Those crystals comprised solely of P blocks transform to dense higher coordinated crystalline phases; those comprised of P and C blocks, such as MnSiO 3 rhodonite, become amorphous; whereas those comprised solely of C blocks show both crystalline and amorphous regions upon compression. The reason that this medium range order length scale (building block scale) classification is correlated with the type of transitions taking place upon compression is due to the instability of C blocks and C-P interfaces with respect to P blocks and P-P interfaces at high pressures

  15. THE ROLE OF COOPERATION AND TEAMWORK BETWEEN PEOPLE WITH DIFFERENT NATIONALITIES IN TRANSITION COUNTRIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suada Ajdarpašić

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available A topic that tells a lot about us as human beings, about our abilities and virtues is the fact that shows and explains how much we are able to work together and make collective decisions in the operating process. How much people are willing to cooperate, plan, organize, coordinate, manage and control the situation, depends on many factors. In continuation of my work, I will explain how much people are willing to provide the support to their colleagues, friends and random people in teamwork when making decisions on a specific field, and also the cooperation process between the people on many stages in transition countries. This work comes down to personal study, where, I have based on the questionnaire dedicated to the students, academic and administrative staff at the different Universities and Secondary schools of Kosovo. What is their general perception about cooperation and teamwork, its quality, advantages and disadvantages, its reflection on success or failure, the significance of individual and collective decisions, current and future application of, friendships with other ethnicity, and many other issues, it is stated in the further work. According to the data collected it can be said that the interviewed people are familiar in a large % with the process of cooperation, whether in a small group but also in a large group. However, why is it applied or not you will read throughout this paper.

  16. The role of hydrogen in the energy transition. Development status and perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Altmann, Matthias; Buenger, Ulrich; Landinger, Hubert; Pschorr-Schoberer, Evi; Raksha, Tetyana; Wurster, Reinhold; Zerta, Martin

    2014-06-01

    Hydrogen and fuel cells have great potential and are currently at the threshold of commercialization. Baden-Wuerttemberg and German companies and research institutions have created a good starting point for participating in these growth markets internationally. With dwindling fossil resources, the phasing out of nuclear energy and international targets for reducing greenhouse gas emissions, the entire energy system is fundamentally changing and will be fully converted over the long term to renewable energy sources. While in the past chemical sources of energy dominated as the primary source of energy, in the future these will be superseded in particular by electricity as a renewable, largely fluctuating primary energy. At the same time, however, the easy storage and transportability of energy is also partially lost. An intelligent combination of electricity, gas (methane, hydrogen), heat and fuels for mobility is a prerequisite for a robust, sustainable and sustainable energy supply in Germany. The coordinated interaction between generation, transmission, distribution, storage and consumption of electrical energy enables the efficient integration of renewable energies into the energy supply system and a secure transition to the regenerative energy age. Germany needs a robust and flexible energy strategy that can provide long-term planning security for all market players. [de

  17. The role of the dendritic growth model dimensionality in predicting the Columnar to Equiaxed Transition (CET)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seredyński, M.; Rebow, M.; Banaszek, J.

    2017-06-01

    The dendrite tip kinetics model accuracy relies on the reliability of the stability constant used, which is usually experimentally determined for 3D situations and applied to 2D models. The paper reports authors` attempts to cure the situation by deriving 2D dendritic tip scaling parameter for aluminium-based alloy: Al-4wt%Cu. The obtained parameter is then incorporated into the KGT dendritic growth model in order to compare it with the original 3D KGT counterpart and to derive two-dimensional and three-dimensional versions of the modified Hunt's analytical model for the columnar-to-equiaxed transition (CET). The conclusions drawn from the above analysis are further confirmed through numerical calculations of the two cases of Al-4wt%Cu metallic alloy solidification using the front tracking technique. Results, including the porous zone-under-cooled liquid front position, the calculated solutal under-cooling, the average temperature gradient at a front of the dendrite tip envelope and a new predictor of the relative tendency to form an equiaxed zone, are shown, compared and discussed for two numerical cases. The necessity to calculate sufficiently precise values of the tip scaling parameter in 2D and 3D is stressed.

  18. First evidence of the role of zonal flows for the L-H transition at marginal input power in the EAST tokamak

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, G. S.; Wan, B. N.; Wang, H. Q.

    2011-01-01

    A quasiperiodic Er oscillation at a frequency of transition, has been observed for the first time in the EAST tokamak, using two...... toroidally separated reciprocating probes. Just prior to the L-H transition, the Er oscillation often evolves into intermittent negative Er spikes. The low-frequency Er oscillation, as well as the Er spikes, is strongly correlated with the turbulence-driven Reynolds stress, thus providing first evidence...... of the role of the zonal flows in the L-H transition at marginal input power. These new findings not only shed light on the underlying physics mechanism for the L-H transition, but also have significant implications for ITER operations close to the L-H transition threshold power....

  19. The Role of Nurse Leaders in Advancing Carer Communication Needs across Transitions of Care: A Call to Action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udod, Sonia A; Lobchuk, Michelle

    2017-01-01

    This paper focuses on the central role of senior nurse leaders in advancing organizational resources and support for communication between healthcare providers and carers that influences patient and carer outcomes during the transition from hospital to the community. A Think Tank (Lobchuk 2012) funded by the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) gathered interdisciplinary and intersectoral stakeholders from local, national and international levels to develop a Family Carer Communication Research Collaboration. Workshop stakeholders addressed critical challenges in meeting communication needs of carers as partners with clinicians in promoting safe care for the elderly, chronically or seriously ill or disabled individuals in the community. Key priority areas identified the need to uncover nurse leader perspectives at the system, nurse leader, healthcare provider and patient levels where communication with carers occurs. The overarching outcome from the workshop focuses on the need for nurse leaders to advocate for patients and their families in meeting carer communication needs. The authors' "call to action" requires commitment and investment from nurse leaders in the critical juncture of healthcare delivery to strengthen communication between healthcare providers and carers that influence patient and carer outcomes in seamless transitions of care.

  20. Role of epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC: is tumor budding the missing link?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva eKaramitopoulou

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC ranks as the fourth commonest cause of cancer death while its incidence is increasing worldwide. For all stages, survival at 5 years is <5%. The lethal nature of pancreatic cancer is attributed to its high metastatic potential to the lymphatic system and distant organs. Lack of effective therapeutic options contributes to the high mortality rates of PDAC. Recent evidence suggests that epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT plays an important role to the disease progression and development of drug resistance in PDAC. Tumor budding is thought to reflect the process of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT which allows neoplastic epithelial cells to acquire a mesenchymal phenotype thus increasing their capacity for migration and invasion and help them become resistant to apoptotic signals. In a recent study by our own group the presence and prognostic significance of tumor budding in PDAC were investigated and an association between high-grade budding and aggressive clinicopathological features of the tumors as well as worse outcome of the patients was found. The identification of EMT phenotypic targets may help identifying new molecules so that future therapeutic strategies directed specifically against them could potentially have an impact on drug resistance and invasiveness and hence improve the prognosis of PDAC patients. The aim of this short review is to present an insight on the morphological and molecular aspects of EMT and on the factors that are involved in the induction of EMT in PDAC.

  1. Sensory feedback plays a significant role in generating walking gait and in gait transition in salamanders: A simulation study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nalin eHarischandra

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Here, we use a three-dimensional, neuro-musculo-mechanical model of a salamander with realistic physical parameters in order to investigate the role of sensory feedback in gait generation and transition. Activation of limb and axial muscles were driven by neural output patterns obtained from a central pattern generator (CPG which is composed of simulated spiking neurons with adaptation. The CPG consists of a body CPG and four limb CPGs that are interconnected via synapses both ipsilateraly and contralaterally. We use the model both with and without sensory modulation and for different combinations of ipsilateral and contralateral coupling between the limb CPGs. We found that the proprioceptive sensory inputs are essential in obtaining a coordinated walking gait. The sensory feedback includes the signals coming from the stretch receptor like intraspinal neurons located in the girdle regions and the limb stretch receptors residing in the hip and scapula regions of the salamander. On the other hand, coordinated motor output patterns for the trotting gait were obtainable without the sensory inputs. We found that the gait transition from walking to trotting can be induced by increased activity of the descending drive coming from the mesencephalic locomotor region (MLR and is helped by the sensory inputs at the hip and scapula regions detecting the late stance phase. More neurophysiological experiments are required to identify the precise type of mechanoreceptors in the salamander and the neural mechanisms mediating the sensory modulation.

  2. Diagnosing the Role of Transpiration in the Transition from Dry to Wet Season Over the Amazon Using Satellite Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, J. S.; Fu, R.; Yin, L.; Chae, J.

    2013-12-01

    Reanalysis data indicates that land surface evapotranspiration plays a key role in determining the timing of wet season onset over the Amazon. Here, we use satellite observations of water vapor and its stable isotopes, carbon dioxide, leaf area index, and precipitation together with reanalysis data to explore the importance of transpiration in initiating the transition from dry season to wet season over the Amazon. The growth of vegetation in this region is primarily limited by the availability of sunlight rather than the availability of soil moisture, so that the increase of solar radiation during the dry season coincides with dramatic increases in leaf area index within forested ecosystems. This period of plant growth is accompanied by uptake of carbon dioxide and enrichment of heavy isotopes in water vapor, particularly near the land surface. Reanalysis data indicate that this pre-wet season enrichment of HDO is accompanied by sharp increases in the surface latent heat flux, which eventually triggers sporadic moist convection. The transport of transpiration-enriched near-surface air by this convection causes a dramatic increase in free-tropospheric HDO in late August and September. September also marks transition points in the annual cycles of leaf area index (maximum) and carbon dioxide (minimum). The increase in convective activity during this period creates convergence, enhancing moisture transport into the region and initiating the wet season.

  3. The hidden challenges in role transitions and how leadership coaching can help new leaders find solid ground.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinstock, Beth

    2011-01-01

    Leadership coaching is becoming an increasingly important intervention that helps individual nurse executives and managers develop and use the best of their strengths, gifts, and talents. As the need for leadership in nursing becomes urgent and brave souls move into the positions of greater authority and potential impact, they will face challenges as they move up in rank. This article identifies the hidden and often-overlooked challenges that are faced by new leaders as they transition into roles of increased responsibility, and it demonstrates how leadership coaching can help new leaders make successful transitions. As the current health care crisis creates opportunity for new leaders, those who opt for promotions and lateral shifts encounter both expected and surprising challenges. The expected challenges include mastering new content skills, learning new organizational structures, and getting to know new teams. The less obvious stressors include issues of self-esteem, assertiveness, self-consciousness, self-criticism, perfectionism, new boundaries, changing identities, and finding one's own leadership style. These important issues are often kept out of conscious awareness and overlooked at great cost to the individual leader and her institution. Leadership coaching can provide support and practical strategies for managing and overcoming these hidden challenges.

  4. Coagulopathy following major liver resection: the effect of rBPI21 and the role of decreased synthesis of regulating proteins by the liver

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, C.; Wiezer, M. J.; Hack, C. E.; Boelens, P. G.; Wedel, N. I.; Meijer, S.; Nijveldt, R. J.; Statius Muller, M. G.; Wiggers, T.; Zoetmulder, F. A.; Borel Rinkes, I. H.; Cuesta, M. A.; Gouma, D. J.; van de Velde, C. J.; Tilanus, H. W.; Scotté, M.; Thijs, L. G.; van Leeuwen, P. A.

    2001-01-01

    This prospective study investigated the role of reduced hepatic synthesis of regulating proteins in coagulopathy after partial hepatectomy (PH) compared with major abdominal surgery (MAS) without involvement of the liver. Furthermore, we studied the effect of rBPI21, an endotoxin-neutralizing agent,

  5. The Role of School in Educational Decisions during the Transition to High School Public Institutions in Mexico City context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Rodríguez Rocha

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This article analyzes the role of schools in educational choices in the transition to public high schools in Mexico City. Secondary schools have the potential to influence educational choices, through the development of certain educational functions. This influence comes in different ways, and is relatively independent of adscriptive characteristics and previous academic performance of students.  Schools serve i as agents contributing to decision making, facilitating continuity on educational trajectories ii or as instances that do not develop explicit actions aimed to link their students to any of the options offered in the post-secondary educational system. While some schools teaching resources are destined to accompany their students during their decision process, others lack of them, abandoning them in this crucial educational event. The article is based on data provided by an ethnographic study conducted in seven high schools in southern Mexico City between January and July 2012

  6. The role of epithelial-mesenchymal transition in squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zidar, Nina; Boštjančič, Emanuela; Malgaj, Marija; Gale, Nina; Dovšak, Tadej; Didanovič, Vojko

    2018-02-01

    Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) has emerged as a possible mechanism of cancer metastasizing, but strong evidence for EMT involvement in human cancer is lacking. Our aim was to compare oral spindle cell carcinoma (SpCC) as an example of EMT with oral conventional squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) with and without nodal metastases to test the hypothesis that EMT contributes to metastasizing in oral SCC. Thirty cases of oral SCC with and without nodal metastasis and 15 cases of SpCC were included. Epithelial (cytokeratin, E-cadherin), mesenchymal (vimentin, N-cadherin), and stem cell markers (ALDH-1, CD44, Nanog, Sox-2) and transcription repressors (Snail, Slug, Twist) were analyzed immunohistochemically. We also analyzed the expression of microRNAs miR-141, miR-200 family, miR-205, and miR-429. SpCC exhibited loss of epithelial markers and expression of mesenchymal markers or coexpression of both up-regulation of transcription repressors and down-regulation of the investigated microRNAs. SCC showed only occasional focal expression of mesenchymal markers at the invasive front. No other differences were observed between SCC with and without nodal metastases except for a higher expression of ALDH-1 in SCC with metastases. Our results suggest that SpCC is an example of true EMT but do not support the hypothesis that EMT is involved in metastasizing of conventional SCC. Regarding oral SCC progression and metastasizing, we have been facing a shift from the initial enthusiasm for the EMT concept towards a more critical approach with "EMT-like" and "partial EMT" concepts. The real question, though, is, is there no EMT at all?

  7. A problem-based learning curriculum in transition: the emerging role of the library.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eldredge, J D

    1993-07-01

    This case study describes library education programs that serve the University of New Mexico School of Medicine, known for its innovative problem-based learning (PBL) curricular track. The paper outlines the specific library instruction techniques that are integrated into the curriculum. The adaptation of library instruction to a PBL mode of medical education, including the use of case studies, is discussed in detail. Also addressed are the planning processes for the new PBL curriculum scheduled for implementation in 1993, including the activities of library faculty and staff and the probable new role of the library in the new curriculum.

  8. Role of cyclic AMP sensor Epac1 in masseter muscle hypertrophy and myosin heavy chain transition induced by β2-adrenoceptor stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohnuki, Yoshiki; Umeki, Daisuke; Mototani, Yasumasa; Jin, Huiling; Cai, Wenqian; Shiozawa, Kouichi; Suita, Kenji; Saeki, Yasutake; Fujita, Takayuki; Ishikawa, Yoshihiro; Okumura, Satoshi

    2014-12-15

    The predominant isoform of β-adrenoceptor (β-AR) in skeletal muscle is β2-AR and that in the cardiac muscle is β1-AR. We have reported that Epac1 (exchange protein directly activated by cAMP 1), a new protein kinase A-independent cAMP sensor, does not affect cardiac hypertrophy in response to pressure overload or chronic isoproterenol (isoprenaline) infusion. However, the role of Epac1 in skeletal muscle hypertrophy remains poorly understood. We thus examined the effect of disruption of Epac1, the major Epac isoform in skeletal muscle, on masseter muscle hypertrophy induced by chronic β2-AR stimulation with clenbuterol (CB) in Epac1-null mice (Epac1KO). The masseter muscle weight/tibial length ratio was similar in wild-type (WT) and Epac1KO at baseline and was significantly increased in WT after CB infusion, but this increase was suppressed in Epac1KO. CB treatment significantly increased the proportion of myosin heavy chain (MHC) IIb at the expense of that of MHC IId/x in both WT and Epac1KO, indicating that Epac1 did not mediate the CB-induced MHC isoform transition towards the faster isoform. The mechanism of suppression of CB-mediated hypertrophy in Epac1KO is considered to involve decreased activation of Akt signalling. In addition, CB-induced histone deacetylase 4 (HDAC4) phosphorylation on serine 246 mediated by calmodulin kinase II (CaMKII), which plays a role in skeletal muscle hypertrophy, was suppressed in Epac1KO. Our findings suggest that Epac1 plays a role in β2-AR-mediated masseter muscle hypertrophy, probably through activation of both Akt signalling and CaMKII/HDAC4 signalling. © 2014 The Authors. The Journal of Physiology © 2014 The Physiological Society.

  9. Functional role of the cytoplasmic tail domain of the major envelope fusion protein of group II baculoviruses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Long, G.; Pan, M.; Westenberg, M.; Vlak, J.M.

    2006-01-01

    F proteins from baculovirus nucleopolyhedrovirus (NPV) group II members are the major budded virus (BV) viral envelope fusion proteins. They undergo furin-like proteolysis processing in order to be functional. F proteins from different baculovirus species have a long cytoplasmic tail domain (CTD),

  10. Being Smart is not Enough: the role of psychlogical factors in study success of ethnic minority and ethnic majority students

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Meeuwisse (Marieke)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractIn the past decade(s), many studies have been conducted on the differences in study success between ethnic minority students and ethnic majority students to identify explanations for the less successful academic careers of ethnic minority students. This dissertation aimed to explain the

  11. Recruitment of Early STEM Majors into Possible Secondary Science Teaching Careers: The Role of Science Education Summer Internships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borgerding, Lisa A.

    2015-01-01

    A shortage of highly qualified math and science teachers pervades the U.S. public school system. Clearly, recruitment of talented STEM educators is critical. Previous literature offers many suggestions for how STEM teacher recruitment programs and participant selection should occur. This study investigates how early STEM majors who are not already…

  12. Social Integration and Religious Identity Expression among Dutch Muslims: The Role of Minority and Majority Group Contact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maliepaard, Mieke; Phalet, Karen

    2012-01-01

    Against the background of contrasting religious versus secular norms in immigrant communities and in Dutch society, this study examines how religious identity expression is related to the social integration of Dutch Muslims within (a) Turkish or Moroccan minority groups and (b) Dutch majority groups. Using nationally representative survey data (N…

  13. Role of major surface structures of Escherichia coli O157:H7 in initial attachment to biotic and abiotic surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Infection by human pathogens through fresh, minimally processed produce and solid plant-derived foods is a major concern of U.S. and global food industry and public health services. The enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157:H7 is a frequent and potent food borne pathogen that causes severe disease...

  14. How rich is Australia's minerals endowment and is it adequate to sustain a major role in meeting international demand?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, I. B.

    2012-04-01

    Dr Ian Lambert, Geoscience Australia and Secretary General 34th International Geological Congress Australia has comparative advantages in production of mineral commodities compared to most other countries. These stem from its rich and diverse mineral endowment; availability of regional scale (pre-competitive) geoscience information to lower the risks of exploration; advances in exploration, mining and processing technologies; skilled work force; generally benign physical conditions; and low population density. Building on these strengths, Australia is a major producer and exporter of a wide range of mineral and energy commodities to global markets. Given that demand for most major commodities is likely to continue, and that there will be growing markets for some other commodities, Australia needs to have a strategic view of what is likely to be available for mining. Further, Australia (and the world) needs to be attuned to issues that need to be faced in meeting international demand for commodities in the long term. This presentation outlines how Australia's national minerals inventory is compiled. It discusses trends for Australia's identified mineral resources for major commodities, and how these compare with other major mining nations. It then considers some significant issues in relation to sustaining a strong mining sector - in the medium to long term this requires a strategic approach to achieve goals such as more effective/lower risk exploration particularly in greenfields regions; well-Informed decisions on mining proposals; ongoing significant improvements in efficiencies of energy, water and land use.

  15. Epithelial-mesenchymal transition in breast epithelial cells treated with cadmium and the role of Snail.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Zhengxi; Shan, Zhongguo; Shaikh, Zahir A

    2018-04-01

    Epidemiological and experimental studies have implicated cadmium (Cd) with breast cancer. In breast epithelial MCF10A and MDA-MB-231 cells, Cd has been shown to promote cell growth. The present study examined whether Cd also promotes epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), a hallmark of cancer progression. Human breast epithelial cells consisting of non-cancerous MCF10A, non-metastatic HCC 1937 and HCC 38, and metastatic MDA-MB-231 were treated with 1 or 3 μM Cd for 4 weeks. The MCF10A epithelial cells switched to a more mesenchymal-like morphology, which was accompanied by a decrease in the epithelial marker E-cadherin and an increase in the mesenchymal markers N-cadherin and vimentin. In both non-metastatic HCC 1937 and HCC 38 cells, treatment with Cd decreased the epithelial marker claudin-1. In addition, E-cadherin also decreased in the HCC 1937 cells. Even the mesenchymal-like MDA-MB-231 cells exhibited an increase in the mesenchymal marker vimentin. These changes indicated that prolonged treatment with Cd resulted in EMT in both normal and cancer-derived breast epithelial cells. Furthermore, both the MCF10A and MDA-MB-231 cells labeled with Zcad, a dual sensor for tracking EMT, demonstrated a decrease in the epithelial marker E-cadherin and an increase in the mesenchymal marker ZEB-1. Treatment of cells with Cd significantly increased the level of Snail, a transcription factor involved in the regulation of EMT. However, the Cd-induced Snail expression was completely abolished by actinomycin D. Luciferase reporter assay indicated that the expression of Snail was regulated by Cd at the promotor level. Snail was essential for Cd-induced promotion of EMT in the MDA-MB-231 cells, as knockdown of Snail expression blocked Cd-induced cell migration. Together, these results indicate that Cd promotes EMT in breast epithelial cells and does so by modulating the transcription of Snail. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Transition metal impurities in fluorides: Role of electronic structure of fluorine on spectroscopic properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trueba, A.; Garcia-Fernandez, P.; García Lastra, Juan Maria

    2011-01-01

    This work examines the relation between optical properties of a MF6q− complex (M=transition–metal cation) and the chemical bonding paying especial attention to the role played by the electronic structure of fluorine. A main goal of the present study is to understand why if the effective Racah...... parameters, B and C, as well as the cubic splitting parameter, 10Dq, all depend on the covalency nevertheless the latter one is much more sensitive to a hydrostatic pressure than the former ones. The analysis carried out in this work, together with the results of ab initio calculations on CrF63− embedded...... detail. At the same time the reasons avoiding its measurement from optical spectra are pointed out as well. The present results stress that the microscopic origin of an optical parameter like 10Dq can certainly be very subtle....

  17. Women Progressive Educators: Their Role in The Transition Process of Educational Methods (1920-1940)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Øland, Trine; Haenggeli-Jenni, Beatrice; Mayer, Christine

    During the interwar years, the New Education Fellowship (NEF) assembled all those who thought that a large educational reform would be able to transform society towards peace and justice. This international association was the link between hundreds of professionals who worked as teachers......, educationalists, psychologists, biologists, medical doctors in order to better child’s education, teaching methods and school success. In order to create a common language and action, the NEF organized congresses every two years and published journals in several languages. Among its members, many women – teachers...... groups, and child welfare organizations. This panel will study some of these women who were deeply involved in promoting New Education at national and international levels. Through the analysis of their training, professional activity, social relations and editorial work, we will show their role...

  18. Transitioning to employment with a rheumatic disease: the role of independence, overprotection, and social support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jetha, Arif; Badley, Elizabeth; Beaton, Dorcas; Fortin, Paul R; Shiff, Natalie J; Rosenberg, Alan M; Tucker, Lori B; Mosher, Dianne P; Gignac, Monique A M

    2014-12-01

    To examine perceived independence, overprotection, and support, and their association with the employment participation of young adults with rheumatic disease. One hundred and forty-three young adults, ages 18 to 30 years, with systemic lupus erythematosus (54.5%) and juvenile arthritis (45.5%) completed a 30-min online questionnaire of their work and education experiences. Information collected was demographic, health (e.g., pain, fatigue, disease activity), work context (e.g., career satisfaction, helpfulness of job accommodation/benefits, and workplace activity limitations), and psychosocial (e.g., independence, social support, and overprotection). Log-Poisson regression analysis examined factors associated with employment status. Over half of respondents were employed (59%) and 26% were enrolled in school. Respondents reported moderate to high perceptions of independence and social support. However, 27% reported that "quite a bit" to "a great deal" of overprotection characterized their relationships with those closest to them. At the bivariate level, employed participants and those indicating greater perceived independence reported greater social support and less overprotection. Multivariable analysis revealed that being employed was associated with older age, more job accommodations/benefits perceived as being helpful, and greater perceived independence. This is one of the first studies examining the employment of young adults with rheumatic diseases. Findings highlight the importance of psychosocial perceptions such as independence and overprotection, in addition to support related to working. Additional research is needed to better understand the role of those close to young adults with rheumatic diseases in supporting independence and encouraging employment.

  19. Understanding motivation for substance use treatment: the role of social pressure during the transition to adulthood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Ilana; Peterson-Badali, Michele; Henderson, Joanna

    2011-06-01

    Research has shown that social pressure is related to treatment motivation and plays an important role in treatment engagement in adults with problematic substance use. Despite the shifts in autonomy and decision-making in emerging adulthood, the factors affecting treatment motivation (e.g., readiness to comply with treatment) during this period have been largely ignored. In this cross sectional study, 134 youth (83 males and 51 females) presenting to an outpatient substance abuse program completed questionnaires regarding substance use history, mental health, social pressure to reduce use and enter treatment, and treatment motivation. Age was positively related to identification of internal reasons for seeking treatment and negatively related to external coercive social pressures as a motivator for treatment. Peer pressure accounted for significant variance in Identified (e.g., personal choice and commitment to the program) and Introjected (e.g., guilt about continued substance use) treatment motivation. Family pressure was related only to External treatment motivation when peer pressure was considered in the regression model. These results highlight the importance of emerging adult peers as motivators of youths' treatment seeking. Limitations, directions for future research and treatment implications are discussed. Crown Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. The role of coal consumption in the economic growth of the Polish economy in transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gurgul, Henryk; Lach, Lukasz

    2011-01-01

    The main goal of this paper is an analysis of the causal links between quarterly coal consumption in the Polish economy and GDP. For the sake of accurate computation an additional variable - employment - was also taken into account. Computations conducted for the period Q1 2000 to Q4 2009 by means of recent causality techniques confirmed the neutrality of hard coal usage with respect to economic growth. On the other hand, calculations for the pairs lignite-GDP and total coal consumption-GDP showed the existence of a significant nonlinear causality from coal usage to economic growth. This is clear evidence for claiming that lignite plays an important role in the economic growth of the Polish economy. Furthermore, each coal-related variable was found to have a nonlinear causal impact on employment. Because of the relatively short length of available time series we additionally applied bootstrap critical values. The empirical results computed by both methods did not exhibit significant differences. These results have important policy implications. In general, our findings support the hypothesis that closing hard coal mines in Poland should have no significant repercussions on economic growth. However, this does not seem to be true for lignite mines. - Research highlights: → The reduction of hard coal consumption should not hamper economic growth in Poland. → Lignite consumption is an important factor determining economic growth in Poland. → The usage of lignite and hard coal has a causal impact on employment in Poland.

  1. The Role of Chemical Processes in the Transition to Sustainable Energy Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stucki, S.; Palumbo, R.; Baltensperger, U.; Boulouchos, K.; Haas, O.; Scherer, G.G.; Siegwolf, R.; Wokaun, A

    2002-01-01

    Chemical science and engineering play a central role in improving the eco- efficiency of energy services, be it by optimizing fossil fuel utilization from the source to the sinks, be it by exploring new ways of replacing fossil fuels with renewable ones. Catalytic fuel processing is required for providing clean and easy to convert inputs from contaminated and/or high molecular weight primary resources into efficient energy conversion systems such as advanced combustion engines and fuel cells. The switch from conventional fossil fuel resources to renewables such as solar or biomass requires new approaches in chemical engineering. Efficiency vs. emissions trade-offs for improving the eco-performance of combustion engines need to be optimized with improved understanding of the complex chemistry taking place in flames. New materials for fuel cells and batteries provide a means of making these devices applicable, thereby drastically cutting down on emissions from energy systems. Chemistry is not only involved in fuel processing and conversion, but it is also important at the end of the pipe, i.e. in catalytic emission control devices, in the treatment of hazardous residues from the incineration of waste materials, and in the complex interactions of air pollutants with the biosphere. (author)

  2. Deformation processes and weakening mechanisms within the frictional viscous transition zone of major crustal-scale faults: insights from the Great Glen Fault Zone, Scotland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, M.; Holdsworth, R. E.; Strachan, R. A.

    2000-05-01

    The Great Glen Fault Zone (GGFZ), Scotland, is a typical example of a crustal-scale, reactivated strike-slip fault within the continental crust. Analysis of intensely strained fault rocks from the core of the GGFZ near Fort William provides a unique insight into the nature of deformation associated with the main phase of (sinistral) movements along the fault zone. In this region, an exhumed sequence of complex mid-crustal deformation textures that developed in the region of the frictional-viscous transition (ca. 8-15 km depth) is preserved. Fault rock fabrics vary from mylonitic in quartzites to cataclastic in micaceous shear zones and feldspathic psammites. Protolith mineralogy exerted a strong control on the initial textural development and distribution of the fault rocks. At lower strains, crystal-plastic deformation occurred in quartz-dominated lithologies to produce mylonites simultaneously with widespread fracturing and cataclasis in feldspar- and mica-dominated rocks. At higher strains, shearing appears to increasingly localise into interconnected networks of cataclastic shear zones, many of which are strongly foliated. Textures indicative of fluid-assisted diffusive mass transfer mechanisms are widespread in such regions and suggest that a hydrous fluid-assisted, grainsize-controlled switch in deformation behaviour followed the brittle comminution of grains. The fault zone textural evolution implies that a strain-induced, fluid-assisted shallowing and narrowing of the frictional-viscous transition occurred with increasing strain. It is proposed that this led to an overall weakening of the fault zone and that equivalent processes may occur along many other long-lived, crustal-scale dislocations.

  3. Cultural differences in family, marital, and gender-role values among immigrants and majority members in the Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arends-Tóth, Judit; van de Vijver, Fons J R

    2009-06-01

    This study examined the size of differences in self-reported family, marital, and gender-role values in five cultural groups in the Netherlands (6338 Dutch mainstreamers and 422 Turkish, 369 Moroccan, 429 Surinamese, and 394 Antillean first- and second-generation immigrants). It was found that the three value scales were neither completely independent, nor could they be merged into a single value scale. The factor structures of all scales were identical for the five cultural groups, implying that the concepts can be compared. Age, sex, and notably education accounted for a substantial part of the cultural differences in all values. Cultural differences were larger for marital and family values than for gender-role values. Family and marital values yielded the same rank order of mean scores in the five cultural groups: Turks and Moroccans scored the lowest (having the most traditional values), followed by Surinamers, Antilleans, and Dutch mainstreamers. This rank order corresponds with the ethnic hierarchy of cultural groups that is based on the evaluation of ethnic groups by mainstreamers according to their liking of and likeness to ethnic groups. Generational differences were not found for family and gender-role values but first-generation immigrants in all groups had more traditional marital values than had second-generation immigrants. It was concluded that the theoretical framework based on a combination of three Hofstede dimensions (individualism-collectivism, power-distance, and femininity-masculinity), a model of the hierarchy of the ethnic groups in the Dutch society, and acculturation theory provided an adequate way to address family, marital, and gender-role value differences in the five cultural groups.

  4. A Combined Optogenetic-Knockdown Strategy Reveals a Major Role of Tomosyn in Mossy Fiber Synaptic Plasticity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoav Ben-Simon

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Neurotransmitter release probability (Pr largely determines the dynamic properties of synapses. While much is known about the role of presynaptic proteins in transmitter release, their specific contribution to synaptic plasticity is unclear. One such protein, tomosyn, is believed to reduce Pr by interfering with the SNARE complex formation. Tomosyn is enriched at hippocampal mossy fiber-to-CA3 pyramidal cell synapses (MF-CA3, which characteristically exhibit low Pr, strong synaptic facilitation, and pre-synaptic protein kinase A (PKA-dependent long-term potentiation (LTP. To evaluate tomosyn’s role in MF-CA3 function, we used a combined knockdown (KD-optogenetic strategy whereby presynaptic neurons with reduced tomosyn levels were selectively activated by light. Using this approach in mouse hippocampal slices, we found that facilitation, LTP, and PKA-induced potentiation were significantly impaired at tomosyn-deficient synapses. These findings not only indicate that tomosyn is a key regulator of MF-CA3 plasticity but also highlight the power of a combined KD-optogenetic approach to determine the role of presynaptic proteins.

  5. From green chemistry to nature: The versatile role of low transition temperature mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durand, Erwann; Lecomte, Jérôme; Villeneuve, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    In 1998, the concept of "green chemistry" was established through twelve principles with the aim of improving the eco-efficiency of chemical processes and to judge, whether or not, a chemical process is sustainable. Currently, numerous processes do not obey to most of these principles (large energy usage, formation of waste, usage of hazardous solvents and reagents, etc …), which have forced the scientists to develop and implement new strategies for upcoming researches. One of the most attractive challenges is finding, creating and developing new and green media. Over the last decades, the scientific community has mainly focused on two different classes of solvents (namely, Ionic liquids and Eutectic Solvents). These solvents share advantageous characteristics (low vapor pressure, thermally stable, non-flammable, etc …) making them an attractive option to implement sustainable chemistry and engineering. Mainly due to its environmental and economic features, DES are now growing much more interest. Indeed, although their ecotoxicological profile is still poorly known, DES are classified as "green" solvents because they are composed of molecules which are considered to be eco-friendly. The fast, numerous and broad scope of studies on these new liquids make the literature rather complex to understand. Here, we attempted to establish a succinct history and a presentation of these liquids with emphasis on their role, classification, importance and application in biological systems. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. and Société Française de Biochimie et Biologie Moléculaire (SFBBM). All rights reserved.

  6. FGFR4 role in epithelial-mesenchymal transition and its therapeutic value in colorectal cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Peláez-García

    Full Text Available Fibroblast growth factor receptor 4 (FGFR4 is vital in early development and tissue repair. FGFR4 expression levels are very restricted in adult tissues, except in several solid tumors including colorectal cancer, which showed overexpression of FGFR4. Here, FGFR4 mutation analysis discarded the presence of activating mutations, other than Arg(388, in different colorectal cancer cell lines and tumoral samples. Stable shRNA FGFR4-silencing in SW480 and SW48 cell lines resulted in a significant decrease in cell proliferation, adhesion, cell migration and invasion. This decrease in the tumorigenic and invasive capabilities of colorectal cancer cells was accompanied by a decrease of Snail, Twist and TGFβ gene expression levels and an increase of E-cadherin, causing a reversion to a more epithelial phenotype, in three different cell lines. In addition, FGFR4-signaling activated the oncogenic SRC, ERK1/2 and AKT pathways in colon cancer cells and promoted an increase in cell survival. The relevance of FGFR4 in tumor growth was supported by two different strategies. Kinase inhibitors abrogated FGFR4-related cell growth and signaling pathways at the same extent than FGFR4-silenced cells. Specific FGFR4-targeting using antibodies provoked a similar reduction in cell growth. Moreover, FGFR4 knock-down cells displayed a reduced capacity for in vivo tumor formation and angiogenesis in nude mice. Collectively, our data support a crucial role for FGFR4 in tumorigenesis, invasion and survival in colorectal cancer. In addition, FGFR4 targeting demonstrated its applicability for colorectal cancer therapy.

  7. FGFR4 Role in Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition and Its Therapeutic Value in Colorectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Sofía; Hernández-Varas, Pablo; Teixidó, Joaquín; Bonilla, Félix; de Herreros, Antonio Garcia; Casal, J. Ignacio

    2013-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factor receptor 4 (FGFR4) is vital in early development and tissue repair. FGFR4 expression levels are very restricted in adult tissues, except in several solid tumors including colorectal cancer, which showed overexpression of FGFR4. Here, FGFR4 mutation analysis discarded the presence of activating mutations, other than Arg388, in different colorectal cancer cell lines and tumoral samples. Stable shRNA FGFR4-silencing in SW480 and SW48 cell lines resulted in a significant decrease in cell proliferation, adhesion, cell migration and invasion. This decrease in the tumorigenic and invasive capabilities of colorectal cancer cells was accompanied by a decrease of Snail, Twist and TGFβ gene expression levels and an increase of E-cadherin, causing a reversion to a more epithelial phenotype, in three different cell lines. In addition, FGFR4-signaling activated the oncogenic SRC, ERK1/2 and AKT pathways in colon cancer cells and promoted an increase in cell survival. The relevance of FGFR4 in tumor growth was supported by two different strategies. Kinase inhibitors abrogated FGFR4-related cell growth and signaling pathways at the same extent than FGFR4-silenced cells. Specific FGFR4-targeting using antibodies provoked a similar reduction in cell growth. Moreover, FGFR4 knock-down cells displayed a reduced capacity for in vivo tumor formation and angiogenesis in nude mice. Collectively, our data support a crucial role for FGFR4 in tumorigenesis, invasion and survival in colorectal cancer. In addition, FGFR4 targeting demonstrated its applicability for colorectal cancer therapy. PMID:23696849

  8. Effect of BMAP-28 antimicrobial peptides on Leishmania major promastigote and amastigote growth: role of leishmanolysin in parasite survival.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miriam A Lynn

    Full Text Available Protozoan parasites, such as Leishmania, still pose an enormous public health problem in many countries throughout the world. Current measures are outdated and have some associated drug resistance, prompting the search into novel therapies. Several innovative approaches are under investigation, including the utilization of host defence peptides (HDPs as emerging anti-parasitic therapies. HDPs are characterised by their small size, amphipathic nature and cationicity, which induce permeabilization of cell membranes, whilst modulating the immune response of the host. Recently, members of the cathelicidin family of HDPs have demonstrated significant antimicrobial activities against various parasites including Leishmania. The cathelicidin bovine myeloid antimicrobial peptide 28 (BMAP-28 has broad antimicrobial activities and confers protection in animal models of bacterial infection or sepsis. We tested the effectiveness of the use of BMAP-28 and two of its isomers the D-amino acid form (D-BMAP-28 and the retro-inverso form (RI-BMAP-28, as anti-leishmanial agents against the promastigote and amastigote intracellular Leishmania major lifecycle stages.An MTS viability assay was utilized to show the potent antiparasitic activity of BMAP-28 and its protease resistant isomers against L. major promastigotes in vitro. Cell membrane permeability assays, caspase 3/7, Tunel assays and morphologic studies suggested that this was a late stage apoptotic cell death with early osmotic cell lysis caused by the antimicrobial peptides. Furthermore, BMAP-28 and its isomers demonstrated anti-leishmanial activities against intracellular amastigotes within a macrophage infection model.Interestingly, D-BMAP-28 appears to be the most potent antiparasitic of the three isomers against wild type L. major promastigotes and amastigotes. These exciting results suggest that BMAP-28 and its protease resistant isomers have significant therapeutic potential as novel anti-leishmanials.

  9. Shell's Role in the Future European Gas Scene - Is a Major Market Restructuring Under Way?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Segundo, Karen de

    1999-07-01

    The European gas market is being restructured by a combination of major global forces. Environmental considerations like the Kyoto Agreement favour the use of gas. But in the medium-term, supplies may be limited by low energy prices. The political drive for increased competition has manifested itself as the EU Gas Directive, which came into force in 1998. Shell believes that the European industry must progressively adapt to this restructuring. Flexible mechanisms like tradable emission permits should be used to generate investment capital for new gas supply projects. Moreover, both industry and regulators should take a positive and constructive approach towards increasing competition in the marketplace.

  10. Race Attribution Modifies the Association Between Daily Discrimination and Major Depressive Disorder Among Blacks: the Role of Gender and Ethnicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assari, Shervin; Watkins, Daphne C; Caldwell, Cleopatra H

    2015-06-01

    Although the association between discrimination and depression among Blacks is well-known, we do not know if this effect is influenced by race attribution. In this current study, we investigated the effect modification of race attribution on the association between everyday discrimination and major depressive disorder (MDD) among Blacks in the United States, and whether this effect modification is influenced by the intersection of ethnicity and gender. With a cross-sectional design, this study used data from the National Survey of American Life (NSAL), 2001-2003. The study included a nationally representative sample of Blacks (n = 5,008), composed of 3,570 African Americans and 1,438 Caribbean Blacks. Everyday discrimination, two single-item measures of race attribution (race as the major barrier against upward social mobility, and race as the main cause for being discriminated against) and 12-month MDD were measured. In the first step, we fit logistic regressions to the pooled sample. In the next step, we ran regressions specific to the intersections of ethnicity and gender. Interaction between race attribution and discrimination were also entered into the models. Among Caribbean Black men, the belief that race is a major barrier against one's own upward social mobility modified the association between exposure to daily discrimination and MDD. In this group, the association between discrimination and MDD was weaker among those who believed that race is a major barrier against one's own upward social mobility. Race attribution did not modify the association between discrimination and MDD among African American men, African American women, and Caribbean Black women. The other measure of race attribution (race as the main cause of being discriminated against) did not modify the association between discrimination and MDD in any ethnicity by gender subgroups. Among Caribbean Black men, the link between everyday discrimination and depression may depend on seeing

  11. The role of 3D microenvironmental organization in MCF-7 epithelial–mesenchymal transition after 7 culture days

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foroni, Laura [Pathology Unit, Department of Haematology, Oncology and Clinical Pathology, S. Orsola-Malpighi Hospital, Bologna University (Italy); Vasuri, Francesco, E-mail: vasurifrancesco@libero.it [Pathology Unit, Department of Haematology, Oncology and Clinical Pathology, S. Orsola-Malpighi Hospital, Bologna University (Italy); Chair of Vascular Surgery, Department of Specialistic Surgery and Anaesthesiological Sciences, S. Orsola-Malpighi Hospital, Bologna University (Italy); Valente, Sabrina [Pathology Unit, Department of Haematology, Oncology and Clinical Pathology, S. Orsola-Malpighi Hospital, Bologna University (Italy); Gualandi, Chiara [Department of Chemistry “G. Ciamician” and National Consortium of Materials Science and Technology (INSTM, RU Bologna), Bologna University (Italy); Focarete, Maria Letizia [Department of Chemistry “G. Ciamician” and National Consortium of Materials Science and Technology (INSTM, RU Bologna), Bologna University (Italy); Health Science and Technologies–Interdepartmental Center for Industrial Research (HST-ICIR), Bologna University (Italy); Caprara, Giacomo [Pathology Unit, Department of Haematology, Oncology and Clinical Pathology, S. Orsola-Malpighi Hospital, Bologna University (Italy); Scandola, Mariastella [Department of Chemistry “G. Ciamician” and National Consortium of Materials Science and Technology (INSTM, RU Bologna), Bologna University (Italy); D' Errico-Grigioni, Antonia; Pasquinelli, Gianandrea [Pathology Unit, Department of Haematology, Oncology and Clinical Pathology, S. Orsola-Malpighi Hospital, Bologna University (Italy)

    2013-06-10

    We present a multi-technique study on in vitro epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT) in human MCF-7 cells cultured on electrospun scaffolds of poly(L-lactic acid) (PLA), with random and aligned fiber orientations. Our aim is to investigate the morphological and genetic characteristics induced by extracellular matrix in tumor cells cultured in different 3D environments, and at different time points. Cell vitality was assessed with AlamarBlue at days 1, 3, 5 and 7. Scanning electron microscopy was performed at culture days 3 and 7. Immunohistochemistry (for E-cadherin, β-catenin, cytokeratins, nucleophosmin, tubulin, Ki-67 and vimentin), immunofluorescence (for F-actin) western blot (for E-cadherin, β-catenin and vimentin) and transmission electron microscopy were carried out at day 7. An EMT gene array followed by PCR analysis confirmed the regulation of selected genes. At day 7, scanning electron microscopy on aligned-PLA revealed spindle-shaped cells gathered in buds and ribbon-like structures, with a higher nucleolar/nuclear ratio and a loss in E-cadherin and β-catenin at immunohistochemistry and western blot. An up-regulation of SMAD2, TGF-β2, TFPI2 and SOX10 was found in aligned-PLA compared to random-PLA cultured cells. The topography of the extracellular matrix has a role in tumor EMT, and a more aggressive phenotype characterizes MCF-7 cells cultured on aligned-PLA scaffold. -- Highlights: • After 7 culture days an aligned-PLA scaffold induces a spindle shape to MCF-7 cells. • Despite these changes, the aligned MCF-7 cells keep an epithelial phenotype. • The extracellular environment alone influences the E-cadherin/β-catenin axis. • The extracellular environment can promote the epithelial–mesenchymal transition.

  12. Vital role for cyclophilin B (CypB) in asexual development, dimorphic transition and virulence of Beauveria bassiana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Zhen-Jian; Sun, Huan-Huan; Ying, Sheng-Hua; Feng, Ming-Guang

    2017-08-01

    Cyclophilin B (CypB) was previously revealed as one of many putative secretory proteins in the transcriptome of Beauveria bassiana infection to a lepidopteran pest. Here we show a main localization of CypB in hyphal cell walls and septa and its essential role in the in vitro and in vivo asexual cycles of the fungal insect pathogen. Deletion of cypB reduced colony growth by 16-42% on two rich media and 30 scant media with different carbon or nitrogen sources. The deletion mutant suffered a delayed conidiation on a standard medium and a final 47% reduction in conidial yield, accompanied with drastic transcript depression of several key genes required for conidiation and conidial maturation. The mutant conidia required 10h longer to germinate 50% at optimal 25°C than wild-type conidia. Intriguingly, cultivation of the mutant conidia in a trehalose-peptone broth mimic to insect hemolymph resulted in 83% reduction in blastospore yield but only slight decrease in biomass level, indicating severe defects in transition of hyphae to blastospores. LT 50 for the deletion mutant against Galleria mellonella larvae through normal cuticle infection was prolonged to 7.4d from a wild-type estimate of 4.7d. During colony growth, additionally, the deletion mutant displayed hypersensitivity to Congo red, menadione, H 2 O 2 and heat shock but increased tolerance to cyclosporine A and rapamycin. All of changes were restored by targeted gene complementation. Altogether, CypB takes part in sustaining normal growth, aerial conidiation, conidial germination, dimorphic transition, stress tolerance and pathogenicity in B. bassiana. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. The role of 3D microenvironmental organization in MCF-7 epithelial–mesenchymal transition after 7 culture days

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foroni, Laura; Vasuri, Francesco; Valente, Sabrina; Gualandi, Chiara; Focarete, Maria Letizia; Caprara, Giacomo; Scandola, Mariastella; D'Errico-Grigioni, Antonia; Pasquinelli, Gianandrea

    2013-01-01

    We present a multi-technique study on in vitro epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT) in human MCF-7 cells cultured on electrospun scaffolds of poly(L-lactic acid) (PLA), with random and aligned fiber orientations. Our aim is to investigate the morphological and genetic characteristics induced by extracellular matrix in tumor cells cultured in different 3D environments, and at different time points. Cell vitality was assessed with AlamarBlue at days 1, 3, 5 and 7. Scanning electron microscopy was performed at culture days 3 and 7. Immunohistochemistry (for E-cadherin, β-catenin, cytokeratins, nucleophosmin, tubulin, Ki-67 and vimentin), immunofluorescence (for F-actin) western blot (for E-cadherin, β-catenin and vimentin) and transmission electron microscopy were carried out at day 7. An EMT gene array followed by PCR analysis confirmed the regulation of selected genes. At day 7, scanning electron microscopy on aligned-PLA revealed spindle-shaped cells gathered in buds and ribbon-like structures, with a higher nucleolar/nuclear ratio and a loss in E-cadherin and β-catenin at immunohistochemistry and western blot. An up-regulation of SMAD2, TGF-β2, TFPI2 and SOX10 was found in aligned-PLA compared to random-PLA cultured cells. The topography of the extracellular matrix has a role in tumor EMT, and a more aggressive phenotype characterizes MCF-7 cells cultured on aligned-PLA scaffold. -- Highlights: • After 7 culture days an aligned-PLA scaffold induces a spindle shape to MCF-7 cells. • Despite these changes, the aligned MCF-7 cells keep an epithelial phenotype. • The extracellular environment alone influences the E-cadherin/β-catenin axis. • The extracellular environment can promote the epithelial–mesenchymal transition

  14. Calcineurin plays key roles in the dimorphic transition and virulence of the human pathogenic zygomycete Mucor circinelloides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Soo Chan; Li, Alicia; Calo, Silvia; Heitman, Joseph

    2013-01-01

    Many pathogenic fungi are dimorphic and switch between yeast and filamentous states. This switch alters host-microbe interactions and is critical for pathogenicity. However, in zygomycetes, whether dimorphism contributes to virulence is a central unanswered question. The pathogenic zygomycete Mucor circinelloides exhibits hyphal growth in aerobic conditions but switches to multi-budded yeast growth under anaerobic/high CO₂ conditions. We found that in the presence of the calcineurin inhibitor FK506, Mucor exhibits exclusively multi-budded yeast growth. We also found that M. circinelloides encodes three calcineurin catalytic A subunits (CnaA, CnaB, and CnaC) and one calcineurin regulatory B subunit (CnbR). Mutations in the latch region of CnbR and in the FKBP12-FK506 binding domain of CnaA result in hyphal growth of Mucor in the presence of FK506. Disruption of the cnbR gene encoding the sole calcineurin B subunit necessary for calcineurin activity yielded mutants locked in permanent yeast phase growth. These findings reveal that the calcineurin pathway plays key roles in the dimorphic transition from yeast to hyphae. The cnbR yeast-locked mutants are less virulent than the wild-type strain in a heterologous host system, providing evidence that hyphae or the yeast-hyphal transition are linked to virulence. Protein kinase A activity (PKA) is elevated during yeast growth under anaerobic conditions, in the presence of FK506, or in the yeast-locked cnbR mutants, suggesting a novel connection between PKA and calcineurin. cnaA mutants lacking the CnaA catalytic subunit are hypersensitive to calcineurin inhibitors, display a hyphal polarity defect, and produce a mixture of yeast and hyphae in aerobic culture. The cnaA mutants also produce spores that are larger than wild-type, and spore size is correlated with virulence potential. Our results demonstrate that the calcineurin pathway orchestrates the yeast-hyphal and spore size dimorphic transitions that contribute to

  15. Beta-Thalassemia Major and Female Fertility: The Role of Iron and Iron-Induced Oxidative Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roussou, Paraskevi; Tsagarakis, Nikolaos J.; Diamanti-Kandarakis, Evanthia

    2013-01-01

    Endocrine complications due to haemosiderosis are present in a significant number of patients with beta-thalassemia major (BTM) worldwide and often become barriers in their desire for parenthood. Thus, although spontaneous fertility can occur, the majority of females with BTM is infertile due to hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (HH) and need assisted reproductive techniques. Infertility in these women seems to be attributed to iron deposition and iron-induced oxidative stress (OS) in various endocrine organs, such as hypothalamus, pituitary, and female reproductive system, but also through the iron effect on other organs, such as liver and pancreas, contributing to the impaired metabolism of hormones and serum antioxidants. Nevertheless, the gonadal function of these patients is usually intact and fertility is usually retrievable. Meanwhile, a significant prooxidants/antioxidants imbalance with subsequent increased (OS) exists in patients with BTM, which is mainly caused by tissue injury due to overproduction of free radicals by secondary iron overload, but also due to alteration in serum trace elements and antioxidant enzymes. Not only using the appropriate antioxidants, essential trace elements, and minerals, but also regulating the advanced glycation end products, could probably reduce the extent of oxidative damage and related complications and retrieve BTM women's infertility. PMID:24396593

  16. Role of Defects and Adsorbed Water Film in Influencing the Electrical, Optical and Catalytic Properties of Transition Metal Oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qi

    Transition metal oxides (TMOs) constitute a large group of materials that exhibit a wide range of optical, electrical, electrochemical, dielectric and catalytic properties, and thus making them highly regarded as promising materials for a variety of applications in next generation electronic, optoelectronic, catalytic, photonic, energy storage and energy conversion devices. Some of the unique properties of TMOs are their strong electron-electron correlations that exists between the valence electrons of narrow d- or f-shells and their ability to exist in variety of oxidation states. This gives TMOs an enormous range of fascinating electronic and other physical properties. Many of these remarkable properties of TMOs arises from the complex surface charge transfer processes at the oxide surface/electrochemical redox species interface and non-stoichiometry due to the presence of lattice vacancies that may cause significant perturbation to the electronic structure of the material. Stoichiometry, oxidation state of the metal center and lattice vacancy defects all play important roles in affecting the physical properties, electronic structures, device behavior and other functional properties of TMOs. However, the underlying relationships between them is not clearly known. For instance, the exchange of electrons between adsorbates and defects can lead to the passivation of existing defect states or formation of new defects, both of which affect defect equilibria, and consequently, functional properties. In depth understanding of the role of lattice defects on the electrical, catalytic and optical properties of TMOs is central to further expansion of the technological applications of TMO based devices. The focus of this work is to elucidate the interactions of vacancy defects with various electrochemical adsorbates in TMOs. The ability to directly probe the interactions of vacancy defects with gas and liquid phase species under in-operando conditions is highly desirable to

  17. Oxytocin receptor (OXTR) does not play a major role in the aetiology of autism: genetic and molecular studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tansey, Katherine E; Brookes, Keeley J; Hill, Matthew J; Cochrane, Lynne E; Gill, Michael; Skuse, David; Correia, Catarina; Vicente, Astrid; Kent, Lindsey; Gallagher, Louise; Anney, Richard J L

    2010-05-03

    Oxytocin (OXT) has been hypothesized to play a role in aetiology of autism based on a demonstrated involvement in the regulation of social behaviours. It is postulated that OXT reduces activation of the amygdala, inhibiting social anxiety, indicating a neural mechanism for the effects of OXT in social cognition. Genetic variation at the oxytocin receptor gene (OXTR) has been reported to be associated with autism. We examined 18 SNPs at the OXTR gene for association in three independent autism samples from Ireland, Portugal and the United Kingdom. We investigated cis-acting genetic effects on OXTR expression in lymphocytes and amygdala region of the brain using an allelic expression imbalance (AEI) assay and by investigating the correlation between RNA levels and genotype in the amygdala region. No marker survived multiple correction for association with autism in any sample or in a combined sample (n=436). Results from the AEI assay performed in the lymphoblast cell lines highlighted two SNPs associated with relative allelic abundance in OXTR (rs237897 and rs237895). Two SNPs were found to be effecting cis-acting variation through AEI in the amygdala. One was weakly correlated with total gene expression (rs13316193) and the other was highlighted in the lymphoblast cell lines (rs237895). Data presented here does not support the role of common genetic variation in OXTR in the aetiology of autism spectrum disorders in Caucasian samples. 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Role of major histocompatibility complex class II in the development of autoimmune type 1 diabetes and thyroiditis in rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoi, N; Hidaka, S; Tanabe, S; Ohya, M; Ishima, M; Takagi, Y; Masui, N; Seino, S

    2012-01-01

    Although the MHC class II ‘u' haplotype is strongly associated with type 1 diabetes (T1D) in rats, the role of MHC class II in the development of tissue-specific autoimmune diseases including T1D and autoimmune thyroiditis remains unclear. To clarify this, we produced a congenic strain carrying MHC class II ‘a' and ‘u' haplotypes on the Komeda diabetes-prone (KDP) genetic background. The u/u homozygous animals developed T1D similar to the original KDP rat; a/u heterozygous animals did develop T1D but with delayed onset and low frequency. In contrast, none of the a/a homozygous animals developed T1D; about half of the animals with a/u heterozygous or a/a homozygous genotypes showed autoimmune thyroiditis. To investigate the role of genetic background in the development of thyroiditis, we also produced a congenic strain carrying Cblb mutation of the KDP rat on the PVG.R23 genetic background (MHC class II ‘a' haplotype). The congenic rats with homozygous Cblb mutation showed autoimmune thyroiditis without T1D and slight to severe alopecia, a clinical symptom of hypothyroidism such as Hashimoto's thyroiditis. These data indicate that MHC class II is involved in the tissue-specific development of autoimmune diseases, including T1D and thyroiditis. PMID:21918539

  19. Ultimate resources of drinking water in the event of a major pollution crisis: the role of bottled water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collin, J.J.; Comte, J.P.; Daum, J.R.; Lopoukhine, M.; Mesny, M.

    1995-01-01

    In the event of a serious and widespread pollution incident - on the level of the ''Chernobyl cloud'' - most of the drinking water resources in France could be contaminated : surface water immediately, ground water in a few days... or a few months. Therefore on the initiative of the Ministry of the Environment's Director for Defence, a study has been initiated as to what might be qualified as ''final emergency resources''. An inventory and map of protected resources have been prepared. In this context it seems reasonable to show bottled water as a resource meeting the necessary protection criteria. However it seems that these criteria are not all, nor always, relevant for defining a ''ultimate emergency resource'' not contaminated by a major incident. This article outlines a typology of situations and defines the main criteria necessary for bottled water to be able to constitute an ultimate resource

  20. The role of groundwater discharge fluxes on Si:P ratios in a major tributary to Lake Erie.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maavara, Taylor; Slowinski, Stephanie; Rezanezhad, Fereidoun; Van Meter, Kimberly; Van Cappellen, Philippe

    2018-05-01

    Groundwater discharge can be a major source of nutrients to river systems. Although quantification of groundwater nitrate loading to streams is common, the dependence of surface water silicon (Si) and phosphorus (P) concentrations on groundwater sources has rarely been determined. Additionally, the ability of groundwater discharge to drive surface water Si:P ratios has not been contextualized relative to riverine inputs or in-stream transformations. In this study, we quantify the seasonal dynamics of Si and P cycles in the Grand River (GR) watershed, the largest Canadian watershed draining into Lake Erie, to test our hypothesis that regions of Si-rich groundwater discharge increase surface water Si:P ratios. Historically, both the GR and Lake Erie have been considered stoichiometrically P-limited, where the molar Si:P ratio is greater than the ~16:1 phytoplankton uptake ratio. However, recent trends suggest that eastern Lake Erie may be approaching Si-limitation. We sampled groundwater and surface water for dissolved and reactive particulate Si as well as total dissolved P for 12months within and downstream of a 50-km reach of high groundwater discharge. Our results indicate that groundwater Si:P ratios are lower than the corresponding surface water and that groundwater is a significant source of bioavailable P to surface water. Despite these observations, the watershed remains P-limited for the majority of the year, with localized periods of Si-limitation. We further find that groundwater Si:P ratios are a relatively minor driver of surface water Si:P, but that the magnitude of Si and P loads from groundwater represent a large proportion of the overall fluxes to Lake Erie. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Role transitions and young adult maturing out of heavy drinking: evidence for larger effects of marriage among more severe premarriage problem drinkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Matthew R; Chassin, Laurie; MacKinnon, David P

    2015-06-01

    Research has shown a developmental process of "maturing out" of problem drinking beginning in young adulthood. Perhaps surprisingly, past studies suggest that young adult drinking reductions may be particularly pronounced among those exhibiting relatively severe forms of problem drinking earlier in emerging adulthood. This may occur because more severe problem drinkers experience stronger ameliorative effects of normative young adult role transitions like marriage. The hypothesis of stronger marriage effects among more severe problem drinkers was tested using 3 waves of data from a large ongoing study of familial alcohol disorder (N = 844; 51% children of alcoholics). Longitudinal growth models characterized (i) the curvilinear trajectory of drinking quantity from ages 17 to 40, (ii) effects of marriage on altering this age-related trajectory, and (iii) moderation of this effect by premarriage problem drinking levels (alcohol consequences and dependence symptoms). Results confirmed the hypothesis that protective marriage effects on drinking quantity trajectories would be stronger among more severe premarriage problem drinkers. Supplemental analyses showed that results were robust to alternative construct operationalizations and modeling approaches. Consistent with role incompatibility theory, findings support the view of role conflict as a key mechanism of role-driven behavior change, as greater problem drinking likely conflicts more with demands of roles like marriage. This is also consistent with the developmental psychopathology view of transitions and turning points. Role transitions among already low-severity drinkers may merely represent developmental continuity of a low-risk trajectory, whereas role transitions among higher-severity problem drinkers may represent developmentally discontinuous "turning points" that divert individuals from a higher- to a lower-risk trajectory. Practically, findings support the clinical relevance of role-related "maturing out

  2. Role Transitions and Young Adult Maturing Out of Heavy Drinking: Evidence for Larger Effects of Marriage among More Severe Pre-Marriage Problem Drinkers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Matthew R.; Chassin, Laurie; MacKinnon, David P.

    2015-01-01

    Background Research has shown a developmental process of “maturing out” of problem drinking beginning in young adulthood. Perhaps surprisingly, past studies suggests that young adult drinking reductions may be particularly pronounced among those exhibiting relatively severe forms of problem drinking earlier in emerging adulthood. This may occur because more severe problem drinkers experience stronger ameliorative effects of normative young adult role transitions like marriage. Methods The hypothesis of stronger marriage effects among more severe problem drinkers was tested using three waves of data from a large ongoing study of familial alcohol disorder (Chassin et al., 1992; N=844; 51% children of alcoholics). Results Longitudinal growth models characterized (1) the curvilinear trajectory of drinking quantity from ages 17-40, (2) effects of marriage on altering this age-related trajectory, and moderation of this effect by pre-marriage problem drinking levels (alcohol consequences and dependence symptoms). Results confirmed the hypothesis that protective marriage effects on drinking quantity trajectories would be stronger among more severe pre-marriage problem drinkers. Supplemental analyses showed that results were robust to alternative construct operationalizations and modeling approaches. Conclusions Consistent with role incompatibility theory, findings support the view of role conflict as a key mechanism of role-driven behavior change, as greater problem drinking likely conflicts more with demands of roles like marriage. This is also consistent with the developmental psychopathology view of transitions and turning points. Role transitions among already low-severity drinkers may merely represent developmental continuity of a low-risk trajectory, whereas role transitions among higher-severity problem drinkers may represent developmentally discontinuous “turning points” that divert individuals from a higher- to a lower-risk trajectory. Practically

  3. The maternal nucleolus plays a key role in centromere satellite maintenance during the oocyte to embryo transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulka, Helena; Langerova, Alena

    2014-04-01

    The oocyte (maternal) nucleolus is essential for early embryonic development and embryos originating from enucleolated oocytes arrest at the 2-cell stage. The reason for this is unclear. Surprisingly, RNA polymerase I activity in nucleolus-less mouse embryos, as manifested by pre-rRNA synthesis, and pre-rRNA processing are not affected, indicating an unusual role of the nucleolus. We report here that the maternal nucleolus is indispensable for the regulation of major and minor satellite repeats soon after fertilisation. During the first embryonic cell cycle, absence of the nucleolus causes a significant reduction in major and minor satellite DNA by 12% and 18%, respectively. The expression of satellite transcripts is also affected, being reduced by more than half. Moreover, extensive chromosome bridging of the major and minor satellite sequences was observed during the first mitosis. Finally, we show that the absence of the maternal nucleolus alters S-phase dynamics and causes abnormal deposition of the H3.3 histone chaperone DAXX in pronuclei of nucleolus-less zygotes.

  4. Relative Expression Levels Rather Than Specific Activity Plays the Major Role in Determining In Vivo AKT Isoform Substrate Specificity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel S. Lee

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The AKT protooncogene mediates many cellular processes involved in normal development and disease states such as cancer. The three structurally similar isoforms: AKT1, AKT2, and AKT3 exhibit both functional redundancy and isoform-specific functions; however the basis for their differential signalling remains unclear. Here we show that in vitro, purified AKT3 is ∼47-fold more active than AKT1 at phosphorylating peptide and protein substrates. Despite these marked variations in specific activity between the individual isoforms, a comprehensive analysis of phosphorylation of validated AKT substrates indicated only subtle differences in signalling via individual isoforms in vivo. Therefore, we hypothesise, at least in this model system, that relative tissue/cellular abundance, rather than specific activity, plays the dominant role in determining AKT substrate specificity in situ.

  5. The Case for Information Brokering During Major Change: The Experience of the Transition Support Office of the McGill University Health Centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klag, Malvina; Richer, Marie-Claire

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes the emergence of an "information brokerage" in the project management office of the McGill University Health Centre (MUHC) in Montreal. This process evolved during unprecedented transformation linked to a redevelopment project. Information brokering became a core function in the MUHC's context of major change. To develop an information brokering model, the paper draws upon the literature on knowledge brokering, applies Daft and Lengel's (1986) seminal framework on information processing in organizations, and builds on the MUHC experience. The paper proposes that knowledge brokering and information brokering are related, yet distinct in content, purpose and structure.

  6. The Role of Team Climate in Improving the Quality of Chronic Care Delivery: A Longitudinal Study among Professionals Working with Chronically Ill Adolescents in Transitional Care Programmes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.M. Cramm (Jane); M.M.H. Strating (Mathilde); A.P. Nieboer (Anna)

    2014-01-01

    markdownabstractAbstract Objectives:This study aimed to (1) evaluate the effectiveness of implementing transition programmes inimproving the quality of chronic care delivery and(2) identify the predictive role of (changes in) teamclimate on the quality of chronic care delivery over time.

  7. The role of off-farm employment in the rural energy consumption transition — A village-level analysis in Jiangxi Province, China

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shi, X.; Heerink, N.; Qu, F.

    2009-01-01

    Energy consumption in rural areas in China is characterized by high consumption of fuelwood, straw and other biomass. Off-farm employment can play an important role in the transition towards more sustainable sources of energy by increasing rural household incomes and reducing the amount of labor

  8. The Differential Role of Symptoms of Anxiety and Social Withdrawal in Chinese Children's Dependency on Their Teachers during the Transition to Nursery Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiao

    2015-01-01

    Research Findings: Based on a short-term longitudinal sample of Chinese children, the present study examined the role of symptoms of anxiety and social withdrawal in dependency on teachers during the transition to nursery care. Children's dependency on their teachers was assessed first at 3 months after nursery entry (Time 1) and then at the end…

  9. Horizontal gene transfer: essentiality and evolvability in prokaryotes, and roles in evolutionary transitions [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugene V. Koonin

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The wide spread of gene exchange and loss in the prokaryotic world has prompted the concept of ‘lateral genomics’ to the point of an outright denial of the relevance of phylogenetic trees for evolution. However, the pronounced coherence congruence of the topologies of numerous gene trees, particularly those for (nearly universal genes, translates into the notion of a statistical tree of life (STOL, which reflects a central trend of vertical evolution. The STOL can be employed as a framework for reconstruction of the evolutionary processes in the prokaryotic world. Quantitatively, however, horizontal gene transfer (HGT dominates microbial evolution, with the rate of gene gain and loss being comparable to the rate of point mutations and much greater than the duplication rate. Theoretical models of evolution suggest that HGT is essential for the survival of microbial populations that otherwise deteriorate due to the Muller’s ratchet effect. Apparently, at least some bacteria and archaea evolved dedicated vehicles for gene transfer that evolved from selfish elements such as plasmids and viruses. Recent phylogenomic analyses suggest that episodes of massive HGT were pivotal for the emergence of major groups of organisms such as multiple archaeal phyla as well as eukaryotes. Similar analyses appear to indicate that, in addition to donating hundreds of genes to the emerging eukaryotic lineage, mitochondrial endosymbiosis severely curtailed HGT. These results shed new light on the routes of evolutionary transitions, but caution is due given the inherent uncertainty of deep phylogenies.

  10. Role of Pectoralis Major Myocutanuos Flap in Salvage Laryngeal Surgery for Prophylaxis of Pharyngocutaneuos Fistula and Reconstruction of Skin Defect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mebeed, A.; Hussein, H.A.; Saber, T.Kh.; Zohairy, M.A.; Lotayef, M.

    2009-01-01

    This study was carried out to minimize the incidence of pharyngocutaneous fistula (PCF) following salvage laryngeal surgery using vascularized pedicle pectoralis major myocutaneous flap (PMMC) for enhancing wound healing, rapid intake of oral feeding, reconstruction of desqauamated irradiated skin, achieving short hospital stay and protection against catastrophic blow out mortality. Patients and Methods: This case series study of sixteen patients carried out from May 2005 to July 2009, at the National Cancer Institute, Cairo University where we applied PMMC flap in salvage laryngeal surgery for those with high risk to develop complications: Patients of poor general conditions (anemia, hypoproteinaemia, diabetics) and/or poor local conditions for healing (irradiated neck, extensive local or nodal recurrence with skin desquamation, infiltration or tumor fungation which need extensive resection). Five cases had been treated with primary cobalt radiotherapy laryngeal field only and 4 cases laryngeal field with draining neck nodes, while photon therapy was given in 4 cases as laryngeal field only and 3 cases laryngeal field with draining neck nodes. All cases were squamous cell carcinoma (13 cases grade 2, 2 cases grade 3 and one case grade 1) proved before radiotherapy. Supraglottic recurrence was detected in 7 cases (43.75%) and glottis in 9 cases (56.25%). Following salvage surgery, 11 cases were staged T3 NO, Nl and N2, 3 cases were T2 NO or Nl and 2 cases were T4 N2 with skin infiltration. Tracheostomy was there in 4 cases. Results: The study included fifteen males (93.75%) and one female (6.25%), age was between 38-73 years (mean=55.5 years). Five cases were operated on as total laryngectomy with excision of skin flaps + PMMC flap, 4 cases as total laryngectomy with skin flap excision + functional block neck dissection + PMMC flap and 7 cases as total laryngectomy -f block neck dissection with skin, excision (modified radical in 4 cases and radical in 3 cases

  11. Roles of major organizations in EC for decision making. EC no ishi kettei ni okeru shuyo kikan no yakuwari

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kodama, M.

    1992-12-01

    This paper considers authorization powers held by the major organizations in the EC, with the Maastricht Treaty kept in mind. One of the objectives of establishing the EC is to harmonize and develop the economic activities in the community on the whole, and promote making closer the relations among the member nations. The EC's supernationality has two aspects: finances (using financial sources from externally common tariffs as the EC's independent financial resources) and legislations (member nations delegating their own powers to the international organization). Organizations involving in the EC legislations are the European Assembly, the board of ministers, and the EC Committee. The Assembly has deciding powers at high levels on the EC budget decision, as well as vetoing power on the budget. The board of ministers is provided with deciding powers to assure achievement of the objectives defined in the official requirements. The Committee has a supernational character that each committee member can act independently free from being subjected to orders from his or her native country. Practically, however, the authorization relationship among the organizations has confrontations over the interests of the organizations and member nations. There have been such movements in this situation as the Luxemburg compromises, actions at the agricultural ministers meeting, and preparation of the unified European protocol. 2 figs., 4 tabs.

  12. Clarifying the role of neuroticism in suicidal ideation and suicide attempt among women with major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rappaport, L M; Flint, J; Kendler, K S

    2017-10-01

    Prior research consistently demonstrates that neuroticism increases risk for suicidal ideation, but the association between neuroticism and suicidal behavior has been inconsistent. Whereas neuroticism is recommended as an endophenotype for suicidality, the association of neuroticism with attempted suicide warrants clarification. In particular, prior research has not distinguished between correlates of attempted suicide, correlates of suicidal ideation, and correlates of comorbid psychopathology. The present study used the CONVERGE study, a sample of 5864 women with major depressive disorder (MD) and 5783 women without MD throughout China. Diagnoses, suicidal ideation, and attempted suicide were assessed with the Composite International Diagnostic Interview (CIDI). Neuroticism was assessed with the neuroticism portion of the Eysenck Personality Questionnaire. Results replicate prior findings on the correlates of suicidal ideation, particularly elevated neuroticism among individuals who report prior suicidal ideation. Moreover, as compared with individuals who reported having experienced only suicidal ideation, neuroticism was associated with decreased likelihood of having attempted suicide. The association of neuroticism with suicidality is more complicated than has been previously described. Whereas neuroticism increases risk for suicidal ideation, neuroticism may decrease risk for a suicide attempt among individuals with suicidal ideation. These results have implications for the assessment of risk for a suicide attempt among individuals who report suicidal ideation and addresses prior discordant findings by clarifying the association between neuroticism and attempted suicide.

  13. The teacher's role in college level classes for non-science majors: A constructivist approach for teaching prospective science teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbas, Abdullah Othman

    1997-12-01

    This interpretive research set out to investigate the characteristics of an exemplary college science instructor who endeavors to improve teaching and learning in a physical science course for prospective teachers. The course was innovative in the sense that it was designed to meet the specific needs of prospective elementary teachers who needed to have models of how to teach science in a way that employed materials and small group activities. The central purpose for this study is to understand the metaphors that Mark (a pseudonym), the chemistry instructor in the course, used as referents to conceptualize his roles and frame actions and interactions in the classroom. Within the theoretical frame of constructivism, human cognitive interests, and co-participation theories, an ethnographic research design, described by Erickson (1986), Guba and Lincoln (1989), and Gallagher (1991), was employed in the study. The main sources of data for this study were field notes, transcript analysis of interviews with the instructor and students, and analyses of videotaped excerpts. Additional data sources, such as student journals and the results of students' responses to the University/Community College Student Questionnaire which was developed by a group science education researchers at Florida State University, were employed to maximize that the assertions I constructed were consistent with the variety of data. Data analyses and interpretation in the study focused on identifying the aspects which the instructor and the researcher might find useful in reflecting to understand what was happening and why that was happening in the classroom. The analysis reveals how the instructor used constructivism as a referent for his teaching and the learning of his students. To be consistent with his beliefs and goals that prospective teachers should enjoy their journey of learning chemistry, Mark, the driver in the journey, used the roles of controller, facilitator, learner, and entertainer

  14. Transition probabilities in neutron-rich Se,8280 and the role of the ν g9 /2 orbital

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litzinger, J.; Blazhev, A.; Dewald, A.; Didierjean, F.; Duchêne, G.; Fransen, C.; Lozeva, R.; Verney, D.; de Angelis, G.; Bazzacco, D.; Birkenbach, B.; Bottoni, S.; Bracco, A.; Braunroth, T.; Cederwall, B.; Corradi, L.; Crespi, F. C. L.; Désesquelles, P.; Eberth, J.; Ellinger, E.; Farnea, E.; Fioretto, E.; Gernhäuser, R.; Goasduff, A.; Görgen, A.; Gottardo, A.; Grebosz, J.; Hackstein, M.; Hess, H.; Ibrahim, F.; Jolie, J.; Jungclaus, A.; Kolos, K.; Korten, W.; Leoni, S.; Lunardi, S.; Maj, A.; Menegazzo, R.; Mengoni, D.; Michelagnoli, C.; Mijatovic, T.; Million, B.; Möller, O.; Modamio, V.; Montagnoli, G.; Montanari, D.; Morales, A. I.; Napoli, D. R.; Niikura, M.; Pietralla, N.; Pollarolo, G.; Pullia, A.; Quintana, B.; Recchia, F.; Reiter, P.; Rosso, D.; Sahin, E.; Salsac, M. D.; Scarlassara, F.; Söderström, P.-A.; Stefanini, A. M.; Stezowski, O.; Szilner, S.; Theisen, Ch.; Valiente-Dobón, J. J.; Vandone, V.; Vogt, A.

    2018-04-01

    Transition probabilities of intermediate-spin yrast and non-yrast excitations in Se,8280 were investigated in a recoil distance Doppler-shift (RDDS) experiment performed at the Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro. The Cologne Plunger device for deep inelastic scattering was used for the RDDS technique and was combined with the AGATA Demonstrator array for the γ -ray detection and coupled to the PRISMA magnetic spectrometer for an event-by-event particle identification. In 80Se, the level lifetimes of the yrast (61+) and (81+) states and of a non-yrast band feeding the yrast 41+ state are determined. A spin and parity assignment of the head of this sideband is discussed based on the experimental results and supported by large-scale shell-model calculations. In 82Se, the level lifetimes of the yrast 61+ state and the yrare 42+ state and lifetime limits of the yrast (101+) state and of the 51- state are determined. Although the experimental results contain large uncertainties, they are interpreted with care in terms of large-scale shell-model calculations using the effective interactions JUN45 and jj44b. The excited states' wave functions are investigated and discussed with respect to the role of the neutron g9 /2 orbital.

  15. Change in Parenting Democracy during the Transition to Adolescence: The Roles of Young Adolescents’ Noncompliance and Mothers’ Perceived Influence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrissey, Rebecca A.; Gondoli, Dawn M.

    2012-01-01

    SYNOPSIS Objective This study assessed the direct relation between young adolescents’ regulated noncompliance and mothers’ democratic childrearing practices as well as the potential mediating role of mothers’ perceived influence during the transition to adolescence. Design Three years of self-reported adolescent noncompliance, perceived influence, and parenting democracy were gathered from 166 mothers and their firstborn children (55% female), ages 9 – 11 years at time 1. Results Longitudinal path analysis indicated a total effect between adolescents’ regulated noncompliance and higher maternal democracy. In addition, the total effect was mediated by mothers’ perceived influence, such that adolescents’ regulated noncompliance at time 1 was associated with greater perceptions of influence at time 2, which, in turn, was associated with greater maternal democracy at time 3. Conclusions Mothers with young adolescents who resist in a relatively mature, regulated manner tend to have more positive perceptions of their influence on their emerging adolescents’ behavior. In turn, mothers expecting to maintain their influence despite normative adolescent resistance are more likely to use democratic parenting strategies, granting their adolescents more input in decisions. PMID:22844228

  16. The Prognostic Role of NEDD9 and P38 Protein Expression Levels in Urinary Bladder Transitional Cell Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ola A. Harb

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The most common malignant tumor of the urinary bladder is transitional cell carcinoma (TCC. Neural precursor cell-expressed developmentally downregulated protein 9 (NEDD9 is found to be a cell adhesion mediator. P38 Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase is a serine/threonine kinases member which can mediate carcinogenesis through intracellular signaling. Methods. To assess their prognostic role; NEDD9 and p38 protein were evaluated in sections from 50 paraffin blocks of TCC. Results. The high expressions of NEDD9 and p38 protein were significantly associated with grade, stage, distant metastasis (p<0.001, number of tumors, lymph node metastasis, and tumor size (p<0.001, 0.002; 0.018, <0.001; and 0.004, 0.007, respectively. High NEDD9 and p38 detection had a worse 3-year OS (p=0.041 and <0.001, respectively. By multivariate analysis the NEDD9 and p38 protein expression levels and various clinicopathological criteria including gender, grade, stage of the tumor, and regional lymph node involvement were independent prognostic parameters of TCC of the urinary bladder patients’ outcome. Conclusion. NEDD9 and p38 protein expressions were poor prognostic markers of TCC.

  17. Understanding the role of social capital in adolescents' Big Five personality effects on school-to-work transitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baay, Pieter E; van Aken, Marcel A G; de Ridder, Denise T D; van der Lippe, Tanja

    2014-07-01

    The school-to-work transition constitutes a central developmental task for adolescents. The role of Big Five personality traits in this has received some scientific attention, but prior research has been inconsistent and paid little attention to mechanisms through which personality traits influence job-search outcomes. The current study proposed that the joint effects of Big Five personality traits and social capital (i.e., available resources through social relations) would shed more light on adolescents' job-search outcomes. Analyses on 685 Dutch vocational training graduates showed that extraversion and emotional stability were related to better job-search outcomes after graduation. Some relations between Big Five personality traits and job-search outcomes were explained by social capital, but no relations were dependent on social capital. Social capital had a direct relation with the number of job offers. Contrary to popular belief, this study shows that Big Five personality traits and social capital relate to job-search outcomes largely independently. Copyright © 2014 The Foundation for Professionals in Services for Adolescents. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. The cognitive roles of behavioral variability: idiosyncratic acts as the foundation of identity and as transitional, preparatory, and confirmatory phases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eilam, David

    2015-02-01

    Behavior in obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD), in habitual daily tasks, and in sport and cultural rituals is deconstructed into elemental acts and categorized into common acts, performed by all individuals completing a similar task, and idiosyncratic acts, not performed by all individuals. Never skipped, common acts establish the pragmatic part of motor tasks. Repetitive performance of a few common acts renders rituals a rigid form, whereby common acts may serve as memes for cultural transmission. While idiosyncratic acts are not pragmatically necessary for task completion, they fulfill important cognitive roles. They form a long preparatory phase in tasks that involve high stakes, and a long confirmatory phase in OCD rituals. Idiosyncratic acts also form transitional phases between motor tasks, and are involved in establishing identity and preserving the flexibility necessary for adapting to varying circumstances. Behavioral variability, as manifested in idiosyncrasy, thus does not seem to be a noise or by-product of motor activity, but an essential cognitive component that has been preserved in the evolution of behavioral patterns, similar to the genetic variability in biology. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Cell cycle effects of L-sulforaphane, a major antioxidant from cruciferous vegetables: The role of the anaphase promoting complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelley, Zhaoping; Royce, Simon G; Ververis, Katherine; Karagiannis, Tom C

    2014-01-01

    L-sulforaphane (LSF) is a natural isothiocyanate found in cruciferous vegetables particularly broccoli. LSF has been identified as a potent antioxidant and anti-cancer agent and is widely known to regulate phase II detoxifying enzymes and induce cell cycle arrest or apoptosis in malignant cells in vitro and in vivo. Previous studies have found significant G2/M cell cycle arrest in response to LSF in various model of cancer and results have mainly been attributed to increased cyclin B1 protein levels and increased p21expression. Using genome-wide mRNA-Seq analysis we provide insights into the molecular mechanisms of action of LSF to identify a key pathway in cell cycle progression - the role of the anaphase promoting complex (APC) pathway. We evaluated gene expression changes in human erythroleukemic K562 cells following treatment with 15 μM LSF for 48h and compared them to immortalized human keratinocytes, human microvascular endothelial cells (HMEC-1) cells and normal human umbilical endothelial cells (HUVEC). We identified disparate gene expression changes in response to LSF between malignant and normal cells and immortalized cell lines. The results highlight significant down-regulation of kinase CDK1 which is suggestive that the existence and activity of APC/CDC20 complex will be inhibited along with its associated down-stream degradation of key cell cycle regulators preventing cell cycle progression from mitotic exit.

  20. The Dual Role of Cerebral Autoregulation and Collateral Flow in the Circle of Willis After Major Vessel Occlusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy McConnell, Flora; Payne, Stephen

    2017-08-01

    Ischaemic stroke is a leading cause of death and disability. Autoregulation and collateral blood flow through the circle of Willis both play a role in preventing tissue infarction. To investigate the interaction of these mechanisms a one-dimensional steady-state model of the cerebral arterial network was created. Structural variants of the circle of Willis that present particular risk of stroke were recreated by using a network model coupled with: 1) a steady-state physiological model of cerebral autoregulation; and 2) one wherein the cerebral vascular bed was modeled as a passive resistance. Simulations were performed in various conditions of internal carotid and vertebral artery occlusion. Collateral flow alone is unable to ensure adequate blood flow ([Formula: see text] normal flow) to the cerebral arteries in several common variants during internal carotid artery occlusion. However, compared to a passive model, cerebral autoregulation is better able to exploit available collateral flow and maintain flows within [Formula: see text] of baseline. This is true for nearly all configurations. Hence, autoregulation is a crucial facilitator of collateral flow through the circle of Willis. Impairment of this response during ischemia will severely impact cerebral blood flows and tissue survival, and hence, autoregulation should be monitored in this situation.

  1. Pharmacometabolomics of response to sertraline and to placebo in major depressive disorder - possible role for methoxyindole pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongjie Zhu

    Full Text Available Therapeutic response to selective serotonin (5-HT reuptake inhibitors in Major Depressive Disorder (MDD varies considerably among patients, and the onset of antidepressant therapeutic action is delayed until after 2 to 4 weeks of treatment. The objective of this study was to analyze changes within methoxyindole and kynurenine (KYN branches of tryptophan pathway to determine whether differential regulation within these branches may contribute to mechanism of variation in response to treatment. Metabolomics approach was used to characterize early biochemical changes in tryptophan pathway and correlated biochemical changes with treatment outcome. Outpatients with MDD were randomly assigned to sertraline (n = 35 or placebo (n = 40 in a double-blind 4-week trial; response to treatment was measured using the 17-item Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HAMD17. Targeted electrochemistry based metabolomic platform (LCECA was used to profile serum samples from MDD patients. The response rate was slightly higher for sertraline than for placebo (21/35 [60%] vs. 20/40 [50%], respectively, χ(2(1  = 0.75, p = 0.39. Patients showing a good response to sertraline had higher pretreatment levels of 5-methoxytryptamine (5-MTPM, greater reduction in 5-MTPM levels after treatment, an increase in 5-Methoxytryptophol (5-MTPOL and Melatonin (MEL levels, and decreases in the (KYN/MEL and 3-Hydroxykynurenine (3-OHKY/MEL ratios post-treatment compared to pretreatment. These changes were not seen in the patients showing poor response to sertraline. In the placebo group, more favorable treatment outcome was associated with increases in 5-MTPOL and MEL levels and significant decreases in the KYN/MEL and 3-OHKY/MEL; changes in 5-MTPM levels were not associated with the 4-week response. These results suggest that recovery from a depressed state due to treatment with drug or with placebo could be associated with preferential utilization of serotonin for

  2. Roles of Polypyrimidine Tract Binding Proteins in Major Immediate-Early Gene Expression and Viral Replication of Human Cytomegalovirus▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosme, Ruth S. Cruz; Yamamura, Yasuhiro; Tang, Qiyi

    2009-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV), a member of the β subgroup of the family Herpesviridae, causes serious health problems worldwide. HCMV gene expression in host cells is a well-defined sequential process: immediate-early (IE) gene expression, early-gene expression, DNA replication, and late-gene expression. The most abundant IE gene, major IE (MIE) gene pre-mRNA, needs to be spliced before being exported to the cytoplasm for translation. In this study, the regulation of MIE gene splicing was investigated; in so doing, we found that polypyrimidine tract binding proteins (PTBs) strongly repressed MIE gene production in cotransfection assays. In addition, we discovered that the repressive effects of PTB could be rescued by splicing factor U2AF. Taken together, the results suggest that PTBs inhibit MIE gene splicing by competing with U2AF65 for binding to the polypyrimidine tract in pre-mRNA. In intron deletion mutation assays and RNA detection experiments (reverse transcription [RT]-PCR and real-time RT-PCR), we further observed that PTBs target all the introns of the MIE gene, especially intron 2, and affect gene splicing, which was reflected in the variation in the ratio of pre-mRNA to mRNA. Using transfection assays, we demonstrated that PTB knockdown cells induce a higher degree of MIE gene splicing/expression. Consistently, HCMV can produce more viral proteins and viral particles in PTB knockdown cells after infection. We conclude that PTB inhibits HCMV replication by interfering with MIE gene splicing through competition with U2AF for binding to the polypyrimidine tract in MIE gene introns. PMID:19144709

  3. Roles of polypyrimidine tract binding proteins in major immediate-early gene expression and viral replication of human cytomegalovirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosme, Ruth S Cruz; Yamamura, Yasuhiro; Tang, Qiyi

    2009-04-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV), a member of the beta subgroup of the family Herpesviridae, causes serious health problems worldwide. HCMV gene expression in host cells is a well-defined sequential process: immediate-early (IE) gene expression, early-gene expression, DNA replication, and late-gene expression. The most abundant IE gene, major IE (MIE) gene pre-mRNA, needs to be spliced before being exported to the cytoplasm for translation. In this study, the regulation of MIE gene splicing was investigated; in so doing, we found that polypyrimidine tract binding proteins (PTBs) strongly repressed MIE gene production in cotransfection assays. In addition, we discovered that the repressive effects of PTB could be rescued by splicing factor U2AF. Taken together, the results suggest that PTBs inhibit MIE gene splicing by competing with U2AF65 for binding to the polypyrimidine tract in pre-mRNA. In intron deletion mutation assays and RNA detection experiments (reverse transcription [RT]-PCR and real-time RT-PCR), we further observed that PTBs target all the introns of the MIE gene, especially intron 2, and affect gene splicing, which was reflected in the variation in the ratio of pre-mRNA to mRNA. Using transfection assays, we demonstrated that PTB knockdown cells induce a higher degree of MIE gene splicing/expression. Consistently, HCMV can produce more viral proteins and viral particles in PTB knockdown cells after infection. We conclude that PTB inhibits HCMV replication by interfering with MIE gene splicing through competition with U2AF for binding to the polypyrimidine tract in MIE gene introns.

  4. Interpersonal problems and impacts: further evidence for the role of interpersonal functioning in treatment outcome in major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quilty, Lena C; Mainland, Brian J; McBride, Carolina; Bagby, R Michael

    2013-09-05

    Empirical research has converged to support the concurrent association between social difficulties and psychiatric symptoms; yet, longitudinal associations between interpersonal problems and treatment outcome require clarification. The current investigation evaluated the influence of interpersonal problems assessed prior to treatment on interpersonal impacts assessed during treatment as well as on treatment outcome in outpatients with major depressive disorder (MDD). 125 participants with a primary diagnosis of MDD were randomized to receive cognitive behavioural therapy or interpersonal therapy. Participants completed the Beck Depression Inventory-II, Hamilton Depression Rating Scale, and Inventory of Interpersonal Problems Circumplex before and after treatment. Therapists completed the Impact Message Inventory during and after treatment. Interpersonal distress improved over the course of treatment; all other interpersonal changes were non-significant when distress was taken into account. Pre-treatment rigidity and agentic problems predicted less reduction in depressive symptoms, whereas agentic and communal impacts upon therapists during treatment predicted greater symptom change. Overall interpersonal distress was only indirectly associated with treatment response later in treatment, through its association with agentic style. Results did not differ across therapy type, and were replicated across self-report and interviewer-rated measures of depression severity. Limitations include the brief duration of treatment, lack of medication arm, and potentially restricted generalizability of patients in a randomized control trial to those in routine practice. Interpersonal style demonstrated a trait-like stability over treatment, and appears to fluctuate due to co-occurring distress. Yet, specific interpersonal styles were negative prognostic indicators, even within therapy specifically targeting interpersonal functioning. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights

  5. Herpes simplex virus type 1 and Alzheimer's disease: increasing evidence for a major role of the virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruth Frances Itzhaki

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available AbstractHSV1, when present in brain of carriers of the type 4 allele of the apolipoprotein E gene (APOE, has been implicated as a major factor in AD. It is proposed that virus is normally latent in many elderly brains but reactivates periodically (as in the peripheral nervous system under certain conditions, for example stress, immunosuppression, and peripheral infection, causing cumulative damage and eventually development of AD. Diverse approaches have provided data that explicitly support, directly or indirectly, these concepts. Several have confirmed HSV1 DNA presence in human brains, and the HSV1-APOE-ε4 association in AD. Further, studies on HSV1-infected APOE-transgenic mice have shown that APOE-e4 animals display a greater potential for viral damage. Reactivated HSV1 can cause direct and inflammatory damage, probably involving increased formation of beta amyloid (Aβ and of AD-like tau (P-tau - changes found to occur in HSV1-infected cell cultures. Implicating HSV1 further in AD is the discovery that HSV1 DNA is specifically localised in amyloid plaques in AD. Other relevant, harmful effects of infection include the following: dynamic interactions between HSV1 and amyloid precursor protein (APP, which would affect both viral and APP transport; induction of toll-like receptors in HSV1-infected astrocyte cultures, which has been linked to the likely effects of reactivation of the virus in brain. Several epidemiological studies have shown, using serological data, an association between systemic infections and cognitive decline, with HSV1 particularly implicated. Genetic studies too have linked various pathways in AD with those occurring on HSV1 infection. In relation to the potential usage of antivirals to treat AD patients, acyclovir (ACV is effective in reducing HSV1-induced AD-like changes in cell cultures, and valacyclovir, the bioactive form of ACV, might be most effective if combined with an antiviral that acts by a different

  6. RLIP76, a glutathione-conjugate transporter, plays a major role in the pathogenesis of metabolic syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jyotsana Singhal

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Characteristic hypoglycemia, hypotriglyceridemia, hypocholesterolemia, lower body mass, and fat as well as pronounced insulin-sensitivity of RLIP76⁻/⁻ mice suggested to us the possibility that elevation of RLIP76 in response to stress could itself elicit metabolic syndrome (MSy. Indeed, if it were required for MSy, drugs used to treat MSy should have no effect on RLIP76⁻/⁻ mice. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: Blood glucose (BG and lipid measurements were performed in RLIP76⁺/⁺ and RLIP76⁻/⁻ mice, using Ascensia Elite Glucometer® for glucose and ID Labs kits for cholesterol and triglycerides assays. The ultimate effectors of gluconeogenesis are the three enzymes: PEPCK, F-1,6-BPase, and G6Pase, and their expression is regulated by PPARγ and AMPK. The activity of these enzymes was tested by protocols standardized by us. Expressions of RLIP76, PPARα, PPARγ, HMGCR, pJNK, pAkt, and AMPK were performed by Western-blot and tissue staining. RESULTS: The concomitant activation of AMPK and PPARγ by inhibiting transport activity of RLIP76, despite inhibited activity of key glucocorticoid-regulated hepatic gluconeogenic enzymes like PEPCK, G6Pase and F-1,6-BP in RLIP76⁻/⁻ mice, is a salient finding of our studies. The decrease in RLIP76 protein expression by rosiglitazone and metformin is associated with an up-regulation of PPARγ and AMPK. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: All four drugs, rosiglitazone, metformin, gemfibrozil and atorvastatin failed to affect glucose and lipid metabolism in RLIP76⁻/⁻ mice. Studies confirmed a model in which RLIP76 plays a central role in the pathogenesis of MSy and RLIP76 loss causes profound and global alterations of MSy signaling functions. RLIP76 is a novel target for single-molecule therapeutics for metabolic syndrome.

  7. Spatial Factors Play a Major Role as Determinants of Endemic Ground Beetle Beta Diversity of Madeira Island Laurisilva

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boieiro, Mário; Carvalho, José C.; Cardoso, Pedro; Aguiar, Carlos A. S.; Rego, Carla; de Faria e Silva, Israel; Amorim, Isabel R.; Pereira, Fernando; Azevedo, Eduardo B.; Borges, Paulo A. V.; Serrano, Artur R. M.

    2013-01-01

    The development in recent years of new beta diversity analytical approaches highlighted valuable information on the different processes structuring ecological communities. A crucial development for the understanding of beta diversity patterns was also its differentiation in two components: species turnover and richness differences. In this study, we evaluate beta diversity patterns of ground beetles from 26 sites in Madeira Island distributed throughout Laurisilva – a relict forest restricted to the Macaronesian archipelagos. We assess how the two components of ground beetle beta diversity (βrepl – species turnover and βrich - species richness differences) relate with differences in climate, geography, landscape composition matrix, woody plant species richness and soil characteristics and the relative importance of the effects of these variables at different spatial scales. We sampled 1025 specimens from 31 species, most of which are endemic to Madeira Island. A spatially explicit analysis was used to evaluate the contribution of pure environmental, pure spatial and environmental spatially structured effects on variation in ground beetle species richness and composition. Variation partitioning showed that 31.9% of species turnover (βrepl) and 40.7% of species richness variation (βrich) could be explained by the environmental and spatial variables. However, different environmental variables controlled the two types of beta diversity: βrepl was influenced by climate, disturbance and soil organic matter content whilst βrich was controlled by altitude and slope. Furthermore, spatial variables, represented through Moran’s eigenvector maps, played a significant role in explaining both βrepl and βrich, suggesting that both dispersal ability and Madeira Island complex orography are crucial for the understanding of beta diversity patterns in this group of beetles. PMID:23724065

  8. Genetic models rule out a major role of beta cell glycogen in the control of glucose homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mir-Coll, Joan; Duran, Jordi; Slebe, Felipe; García-Rocha, Mar; Gomis, Ramon; Gasa, Rosa; Guinovart, Joan J

    2016-05-01

    Glycogen accumulation occurs in beta cells of diabetic patients and has been proposed to partly mediate glucotoxicity-induced beta cell dysfunction. However, the role of glycogen metabolism in beta cell function and its contribution to diabetes pathophysiology remain poorly understood. We investigated the function of beta cell glycogen by studying glucose homeostasis in mice with (1) defective glycogen synthesis in the pancreas; and (2) excessive glycogen accumulation in beta cells. Conditional deletion of the Gys1 gene and overexpression of protein targeting to glycogen (PTG) was accomplished by Cre-lox recombination using pancreas-specific Cre lines. Glucose homeostasis was assessed by determining fasting glycaemia, insulinaemia and glucose tolerance. Beta cell mass was determined by morphometry. Glycogen was detected histologically by periodic acid-Schiff's reagent staining. Isolated islets were used for the determination of glycogen and insulin content, insulin secretion, immunoblots and gene expression assays. Gys1 knockout (Gys1 (KO)) mice did not exhibit differences in glucose tolerance or basal glycaemia and insulinaemia relative to controls. Insulin secretion and gene expression in isolated islets was also indistinguishable between Gys1 (KO) and controls. Conversely, despite effective glycogen overaccumulation in islets, mice with PTG overexpression (PTG(OE)) presented similar glucose tolerance to controls. However, under fasting conditions they exhibited lower glycaemia and higher insulinaemia. Importantly, neither young nor aged PTG(OE) mice showed differences in beta cell mass relative to age-matched controls. Finally, a high-fat diet did not reveal a beta cell-autonomous phenotype in either model. Glycogen metabolism is not required for the maintenance of beta cell function. Glycogen accumulation in beta cells alone is not sufficient to trigger the dysfunction or loss of these cells, or progression to diabetes.

  9. Failure to demonstrate a major role for Kupffer cells and radiosensitive leukocytes in immunoglobulin-mediated elimination of Trypanosoma musculi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kongshavn, P.A.; Shaw, K.; Ghadirian, E.; Ulczak, O.

    1990-01-01

    Previous studies have indicated that elimination of parasitemia in Trypanosoma musculi infection is brought about by immunoglobulin G2a antibodies, C3, and an effector cell. Experiments were designed to identify the putative effector cell by using several approaches. Infected C5-deficient or C5-sufficient mice treated with silica particles or given 900 rads of radiation 3 days earlier effectively eliminated trypanosomes following administration of immune plasma (IP). Silica-treated, noninfected mice given T. musculi preincubated with IP also cleared the parasites. Radiolabeling studies revealed that uptake of the cleared trypanosomes by the liver in normal mice was relatively low and fell only slightly (19%) in silica-treated mice. In contrast, uptake of radiolabeled sheep erythrocytes by the liver was normally much higher and fell drastically (7%) in silica-treated mice. Mice were then immunocompromised by 900 rads of radiation, silica particles, and anti-platelet serum combined before IP-sensitized trypanosomes were given. Leukocyte and platelet counts were both reduced by 95% and sheep erythrocyte uptake by the liver fell from 77 to 5%; however, greater than 99% of the injected trypanosomes were cleared in these mice and uptake of radiolabeled trypanosomes by the liver was similar to that of normal mice. Lastly, in anesthetized mice in which Kupffer cells were excluded surgically from the circulation, greater than 99% of the IP-sensitized trypanosomes disappeared rapidly from the blood. Only 7% of the radiolabel was found in the liver versus 60% in sham-operated mice. The results are interpreted as showing that hepatic Kupffer cells play a minor role in the immune elimination of T. musculi. Likewise, radiosensitive leukocytes and platelets are unlikely to be sole candidates for the putative effector cell that mediates a cure of murine trypanosomiasis

  10. Role of spontaneous emission through operating transition in probe-field spectroscopy of two-level systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saprykin, E. G. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Automation and Electrometry, Siberian Branch (Russian Federation); Chernenko, A. A., E-mail: chernen@isp.nsc.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Rzhanov Institute of Semiconductor Physics, Siberian Branch (Russian Federation); Shalagin, A. M. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Automation and Electrometry, Siberian Branch (Russian Federation)

    2016-08-15

    Analytical and numerical investigations are carried out of the effect of spontaneous decay through operating transition on the shape of a resonance in the work of a probe field under a strong field applied to the transition. A narrow nonlinear resonance arising on transitions with long-living lower level in the work of a probe field can manifest itself in the form of a traditional minimum and a peak as a function of the first Einstein coefficient for the operating transition. The transformation of the resonance from a minimum to a peak is attributed to the specific character of relaxation of lower-level population beatings on a closed or almost closed transition (the decay of the upper level occurs completely or almost completely through the operating transition).

  11. Residential proximity to major roads and term low birth weight: the roles of air pollution, heat, noise, and road-adjacent trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dadvand, Payam; Ostro, Bart; Figueras, Francesc; Foraster, Maria; Basagaña, Xavier; Valentín, Antònia; Martinez, David; Beelen, Rob; Cirach, Marta; Hoek, Gerard; Jerrett, Michael; Brunekreef, Bert; Nieuwenhuijsen, Mark J

    2014-07-01

    Maternal residential proximity to roads has been associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes. However, there is no study investigating mediators or buffering effects of road-adjacent trees on this association. We investigated the association between mothers' residential proximity to major roads and term low birth weight (LBW), while exploring possible mediating roles of air pollution (PM(2.5), PM(2.5-10), PM(10), PM(2.5) absorbance, nitrogen dioxide, and nitrogen oxides), heat, and noise and buffering effect of road-adjacent trees on this association. This cohort study was based on 6438 singleton term births in Barcelona, Spain (2001-2005). Road proximity was measured as both continuous distance to and living within 200 m from a major road. We assessed individual exposures to air pollution, noise, and heat using, respectively, temporally adjusted land-use regression models, annual averages of 24-hour noise levels across 50 m and 250 m, and average of satellite-derived land-surface temperature in a 50-m buffer around each residential address. We used vegetation continuous fields to abstract tree coverage in a 200-m buffer around major roads. Living within 200 m of major roads was associated with a 46% increase in term LBW risk; an interquartile range increase in heat exposure with an 18% increase; and third-trimester exposure to PM(2.5), PM(2.5-10), and PM10 with 24%, 25%, and 26% increases, respectively. Air pollution and heat exposures together explained about one-third of the association between residential proximity to major roads and term LBW. Our observations on the buffering of this association by road-adjacent trees were not consistent between our 2 measures of proximity to major roads. An increased risk of term LBW associated with proximity to major roads was partly mediated by air pollution and heat exposures.

  12. Tyrosine-610 in the Receptor Kinase BAK1 Does Not Play a Major Role in Brassinosteroid Signaling or Innate Immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijayata Singh

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The plasma membrane-localized BRI1-ASSOCIATED KINASE1 (BAK1 functions as a co-receptor with several receptor kinases including the brassinosteroid (BR receptor BRASSINOSTEROID-INSENSITIVE 1 (BRI1, which is involved in growth, and the receptors for bacterial flagellin and EF-Tu, FLAGELLIN-SENSING 2 (FLS2 and EF-TU RECEPTOR (EFR, respectively, which are involved in immunity. BAK1 is a dual specificity protein kinase that can autophosphorylate on serine, threonine and tyrosine residues. It was previously reported that phosphorylation of Tyr-610 in the carboxy-terminal domain of BAK1 is required for its function in BR signaling and immunity. However, the functional role of Tyr-610 in vivo has recently come under scrutiny. Therefore, we have generated new BAK1 (Y610F transgenic plants for functional studies. We first produced transgenic Arabidopsis lines expressing BAK1 (Y610F-Flag in the homozygous bak1-4 bkk1-1 double null background. In a complementary approach, we expressed untagged BAK1 and BAK1 (Y610F in the bak1-4 null mutant. Neither BAK1 (Y610F transgenic line had any obvious growth phenotype when compared to wild-type BAK1 expressed in the same background. In addition, the BAK1 (Y610F-Flag plants responded similarly to plants expressing BAK1-Flag in terms of brassinolide (BL inhibition of root elongation, and there were only minor changes in gene expression between the two transgenic lines as monitored by microarray analysis and quantitative real-time PCR. In terms of plant immunity, there were no significant differences between plants expressing BAK1 (Y610F-Flag and BAK1-Flag in the growth of the non-pathogenic hrpA- mutant of Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000. Furthermore, untagged BAK1 (Y610F transgenic plants were as responsive as plants expressing BAK1 (in the bak1-4 background and wild-type Col-0 plants toward treatment with the EF-Tu- and flagellin-derived peptide epitopes elf18- and flg22, respectively, as measured by reactive

  13. The role of information systems in non-routine transit use of university students: Evidence from Brazil and Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaplan, Sigal; Monteiro, Mayara Moraes; Anderson, Marie Karen

    2017-01-01

    In this study we seek to understand the relation between travel information, transit use intentions and night travel. We hypothesize that transit use is related to the perceived usefulness and the ease-of-use of the system, which are related to information quality and real-time information...... and the latent constructs. The results show that: (i) information search quality and source explain transit use; (ii) information quality underlies level-of-service and familiarity; (iii) the use of real-time information links to information quality and familiarity; (iv) general transit use and non-routine use...

  14. Transit ridership, reliability, and retention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-10-01

    This project explores two major components that affect transit ridership: travel time reliability and rider : retention. It has been recognized that transit travel time reliability may have a significant impact on : attractiveness of transit to many ...

  15. Major depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Depression - major; Depression - clinical; Clinical depression; Unipolar depression; Major depressive disorder ... providers do not know the exact causes of depression. It is believed that chemical changes in the ...

  16. The role of peri-traumatic stress and disruption distress in predicting symptoms of major depression following exposure to a natural disaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Caroline J; Boden, Joseph M; Horwood, L John; Mulder, Roger T

    2017-07-01

    Few studies have examined the contribution of specific disaster-related experiences to symptoms of depression. The aims of this study were to do this by examining the roles of peri-traumatic stress and distress due to lingering disaster-related disruption in explaining linkages between disaster exposure and major depressive disorder symptoms among a cohort exposed to the 2010-2011 Canterbury (New Zealand) earthquakes. Structural equation models were fitted to data obtained from the Christchurch Health and Development Study at age 35 ( n = 495), 20-24 months following the onset of the disaster. Measures included earthquake exposure, peri-traumatic stress, disruption distress and symptoms of major depressive disorder. The associations between earthquake exposure and major depression were explained largely by the experience of peri-traumatic stress during the earthquakes (β = 0.180, p < 0.01) and not by disruption distress following the earthquakes (β = 0.048, p = 0.47). The results suggest that peri-traumatic stress has been under-recognised as a predictor of major depressive disorder.

  17. The Role of Residential Communities for the Academic and Social Success of Undergraduate Women in STEM Majors: The Case of a Public University in Ethiopia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wuhib, Frehiwot Wondimu

    This study is an exploratory case study which explored the residential environment of an Ethiopian public university on its role for the social and academic integration of undergraduate women in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) fields. It also explained how the social and academic integration of the women contributed for their overall college success. There were three groups of participants; undergraduate women in STEM, female resident proctors, and relevant officials from the university and the Ministry of Education of the Ethiopian government. Each of the participants were interviewed on a one-on-one basis and the interviews were transcribed and coded for the analysis. Supportive quantitative data about the enrollment, performance and retention of students were also gathered from the university's registrar office and analyzed quantitatively to support the qualitative data obtained through interviews. The study was framed by Tinto's Integration Model and data were interpreted using Third World feminist theory. The findings showed that due to the fact that all same-sex, same-major women living in the same rooms, and all who live in one dorm take similar courses throughout their program, and dormitories serving multiple roles, including being collaboration spaces, played a big role for better social and academic integration of the women. It is also found that their social and academic integration helped them to better perform in their majors by enhancing their sense of belonging in the male-dominated STEM majors, enhancing their commitment, and promoting peer encouragement. On the other hand, the findings also showed that there were some factors which have negative influence in the integration process such as negative stereotypes against the presence and good performance of women in STEM, lack of support system, and limited interaction with faculty. So, the study recommends that working on improving the negatively influencing factors will

  18. Social class and body weight among Chinese urban adults: the role of the middle classes in the nutrition transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnefond, Céline; Clément, Matthieu

    2014-07-01

    While a plethoric empirical literature addresses the relationship between socio-economic status and body weight, little is known about the influence of social class on nutritional outcomes, particularly in developing countries. The purpose of this article is to contribute to the analysis of the social determinants of adult body weight in urban China by taking into account the influence of social class. More specifically, we propose to analyse the position of the Chinese urban middle class in terms of being overweight or obese. The empirical investigations conducted as part of this research are based on a sample of 1320 households and 2841 adults from the China Health and Nutrition Survey for 2009. For the first step, we combine an economic approach and a sociological approach to identify social classes at household level. First, households with an annual per capita income between 10,000 Yuan and the 95th income percentile are considered as members of the middle class. Second, we strengthen the characterization of the middle class using information on education and employment. By applying clustering methods, we identify four groups: the elderly and inactive middle class, the old middle class, the lower middle class and the new middle class. For the second step, we implement an econometric analysis to assess the influence of social class on adult body mass index and on the probability of being overweight or obese. We use multinomial treatment regressions to deal with the endogeneity of the social class variable. Our results show that among the four subgroups of the urban middle class, the new middle class is the only one to be relatively well-protected against obesity. We suggest that this group plays a special role in adopting healthier food consumption habits and seems to be at a more advanced stage of the nutrition transition. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Cytoskeletal role in the transition from compensated to decompensated hypertrophy during adult canine left ventricular pressure overloading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tagawa, H.; Koide, M.; Sato, H.; Zile, M. R.; Carabello, B. A.; Cooper, G. 4th

    1998-01-01

    Increased microtubule density causes cardiocyte contractile dysfunction in right ventricular (RV) pressure-overload hypertrophy, and these linked phenotypic and contractile abnormalities persist and progress during the transition to failure. Although more severe in cells from failing than hypertrophied RVs, the mechanical defects are normalized in each case by microtubule depolymerization. To define the role of increased microtubule density in left ventricular (LV) pressure-overload hypertrophy and failure, in a given LV we examined ventricular mechanics, sarcomere mechanics, and free tubulin and microtubule levels in control dogs and in dogs with aortic stenosis both with LV hypertrophy alone and with initially compensated hypertrophy that had progressed to LV muscle failure. In comparing initial values with those at study 8 weeks later, dogs with hypertrophy alone had a very substantial increase in LV mass but preservation of a normal ejection fraction and mean systolic wall stress. Dogs with hypertrophy and associated failure had a substantial but lesser increase in LV mass and a reduction in ejection fraction, as well as a marked increase in mean systolic wall stress. Cardiocyte contractile function was equivalent, and unaffected by microtubule depolymerization, in cells from control LVs and those with compensated hypertrophy. In contrast, cardiocyte contractile function in cells from failing LVs was quite depressed but was normalized by microtubule depolymerization. Microtubules were increased only in failing LVs. These contractile and cytoskeletal changes, when assayed longitudinally in a given dog by biopsy, appeared in failing ventricles only when wall stress began to increase and function began to decrease. Thus, the microtubule-based cardiocyte contractile dysfunction characteristic of pressure-hypertrophied myocardium, originally described in the RV, obtains equally in the LV but is shown here to have a specific association with increased wall stress.

  20. Bleomycin-induced epithelial–mesenchymal transition in sclerotic skin of mice: Possible role of oxidative stress in the pathogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Cheng-Fan, E-mail: zhouchengfan@sohu.com [Institute of Dermatology, the First Affiliated Hospital, Anhui Medical University, Hefei, Anhui 230022 (China); Department of Occupational Health and Environmental Health, School of Public Health, Anhui Medical University, Hefei, Anhui 230032 (China); Zhou, Deng-Chuan [Department of Emergency Medicine and Critical Care Medicine, the First Affiliated Hospital, Anhui Medical University, Hefei, Anhui 230022 (China); Zhang, Jia-Xiang; Wang, Feng; Cha, Wan-Sheng [Department of Occupational Health and Environmental Health, School of Public Health, Anhui Medical University, Hefei, Anhui 230032 (China); Wu, Chang-Hao [Department of Biochemistry and Physiology, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Surrey (United Kingdom); Zhu, Qi-Xing, E-mail: zqxing@yeah.net [Institute of Dermatology, the First Affiliated Hospital, Anhui Medical University, Hefei, Anhui 230022 (China); Department of Occupational Health and Environmental Health, School of Public Health, Anhui Medical University, Hefei, Anhui 230032 (China)

    2014-06-15

    Epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT) derived myofibroblasts are partly responsible for the increased collagen synthesis and deposition that occur in tissue fibrosis; however EMT occurrence in skin fibrosis and its mechanism remain unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate whether epithelial cells undergo EMT and determine the role of oxidative stress in this process. BALB/c mice were subcutaneously injected with bleomycin (BLM) or phosphate buffer saline (PBS) into the shaved back daily for 2, 3, and 4 weeks. Skin collagen deposition was evaluated by histopathology and Western blotting. EMT characteristics in the skin were determined by histopathology and immunofluorescent staining for E-cadherin and vimentin, which were further evaluated by Western blotting and reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). To investigate the role of oxidative stress in EMT, the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine (NAC) was intraperitoneally (100 mg/kg body weight/day) injected daily for 3 weeks. The epithelial suprabasal cells were detached from the basement membrane zone (BMZ) in the sclerotic skin treated with BLM. Immunofluorescent staining indicated vimentin-positive epithelial cells frequently occurring in the thickened epidermis of BLM-treated mice. Western blotting and RT-PCR showed that the expression of E-cadherin was significantly decreased but that of vimentin significantly increased in the skin treated with BLM. NAC attenuated BLM induced oxidative damage, changes in E-cadherin and vimentin expressions and collagen deposition in the sclerotic skin of mice. This study provides the first evidence that BLM induces the EMT of the epithelial cells superficial to the basement membrane zone in the skin fibrosis. Oxidative stress may contribute, at least in part, to BLM induced EMT and skin fibrosis in mice. - Highlights: • We provided the first evidence that EMT occurred in BLM-induced skin fibrosis. • Epithelial cells superficial to the BMZ underwent

  1. Role of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and fibroblast function in cerium oxide nanoparticles-induced lung fibrosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma, Jane; Bishoff, Bridget; Mercer, R.R.; Barger, Mark; Schwegler-Berry, Diane; Castranova, Vincent

    2017-01-01

    The emission of cerium oxide nanoparticles (CeO 2 ) from diesel engines, using cerium compounds as a catalyst to lower the diesel exhaust particles, is a health concern. We have previously shown that CeO 2 induced pulmonary inflammation and lung fibrosis. The objective of the present study was to investigate the modification of fibroblast function and the role of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in CeO 2 -induced fibrosis. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to CeO 2 (0.15 to 7 mg/kg) by a single intratracheal instillation and sacrificed at various times post-exposure. The results show that at 28 days after CeO 2 (3.5 mg/kg) exposure, lung fibrosis was evidenced by increased soluble collagen in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, elevated hydroxyproline content in lung tissues, and enhanced sirius red staining for collagen in the lung tissue. Lung fibroblasts and alveolar type II (ATII) cells isolated from CeO 2 -exposed rats at 28 days post-exposure demonstrated decreasing proliferation rate when compare to the controls. CeO 2 exposure was cytotoxic and altered cell function as demonstrated by fibroblast apoptosis and aggregation, and ATII cell hypertrophy and hyperplasia with increased surfactant. The presence of stress fibers, expressed as α-smooth muscle actin (SMA), in CeO 2 -exposed fibroblasts and ATII cells was significantly increased compared to the control. Immunohistofluorescence analysis demonstrated co-localization of TGF-β or α-SMA with prosurfactant protein C (SPC)-stained ATII cells. These results demonstrate that CeO 2 exposure affects fibroblast function and induces EMT in ATII cells that play a role in lung fibrosis. These findings suggest potential adverse health effects in response to CeO 2 nanoparticle exposure. - Highlights: • CeO 2 exposure induced lung fibrosis. • CeO 2 were detected in lung tissue, alveolar type II (ATII) cells and fibroblasts. • CeO 2 caused ATII cell hypertrophy and hyperplasia and altered fibroblast function

  2. Bleomycin-induced epithelial–mesenchymal transition in sclerotic skin of mice: Possible role of oxidative stress in the pathogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Cheng-Fan; Zhou, Deng-Chuan; Zhang, Jia-Xiang; Wang, Feng; Cha, Wan-Sheng; Wu, Chang-Hao; Zhu, Qi-Xing

    2014-01-01

    Epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT) derived myofibroblasts are partly responsible for the increased collagen synthesis and deposition that occur in tissue fibrosis; however EMT occurrence in skin fibrosis and its mechanism remain unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate whether epithelial cells undergo EMT and determine the role of oxidative stress in this process. BALB/c mice were subcutaneously injected with bleomycin (BLM) or phosphate buffer saline (PBS) into the shaved back daily for 2, 3, and 4 weeks. Skin collagen deposition was evaluated by histopathology and Western blotting. EMT characteristics in the skin were determined by histopathology and immunofluorescent staining for E-cadherin and vimentin, which were further evaluated by Western blotting and reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). To investigate the role of oxidative stress in EMT, the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine (NAC) was intraperitoneally (100 mg/kg body weight/day) injected daily for 3 weeks. The epithelial suprabasal cells were detached from the basement membrane zone (BMZ) in the sclerotic skin treated with BLM. Immunofluorescent staining indicated vimentin-positive epithelial cells frequently occurring in the thickened epidermis of BLM-treated mice. Western blotting and RT-PCR showed that the expression of E-cadherin was significantly decreased but that of vimentin significantly increased in the skin treated with BLM. NAC attenuated BLM induced oxidative damage, changes in E-cadherin and vimentin expressions and collagen deposition in the sclerotic skin of mice. This study provides the first evidence that BLM induces the EMT of the epithelial cells superficial to the basement membrane zone in the skin fibrosis. Oxidative stress may contribute, at least in part, to BLM induced EMT and skin fibrosis in mice. - Highlights: • We provided the first evidence that EMT occurred in BLM-induced skin fibrosis. • Epithelial cells superficial to the BMZ underwent

  3. An additional role for the Brønsted acid-base catalysts of mandelate racemase in transition state stabilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagar, Mitesh; Bearne, Stephen L

    2015-11-10

    Mandelate racemase (MR) catalyzes the interconversion of the enantiomers of mandelate and serves as a paradigm for understanding the enzyme-catalyzed abstraction of an α-proton from a carbon acid substrate with a high pKa. The enzyme utilizes a two-base mechanism with Lys 166 and His 297 acting as Brønsted acid and base catalysts, respectively, in the R → S reaction direction. In the S → R reaction direction, their roles are reversed. Using isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), MR is shown to bind the intermediate/transition state (TS) analogue inhibitor benzohydroxamate (BzH) in an entropy-driven process with a value of ΔCp equal to -358 ± 3 cal mol(-1) K(-1), consistent with an increased number of hydrophobic interactions. However, MR binds BzH with an affinity that is ∼2 orders of magnitude greater than that predicted solely on the basis of hydrophobic interactions [St. Maurice, M., and Bearne, S. L. (2004) Biochemistry 43, 2524], suggesting that additional specific interactions contribute to binding. To test the hypothesis that cation-π/NH-π interactions between the side chains of Lys 166 and His 297 and the aromatic ring and/or the hydroxamate/hydroximate moiety of BzH contribute to the binding of BzH, site-directed mutagenesis was used to generate the MR variants K166M, K166C, H297N, and K166M/H297N and their binding affinity for various ligands determined using ITC. Comparison of the binding affinities of these MR variants with the intermediate/TS analogues BzH and cyclohexanecarbohydroxamate revealed that cation-π/NH-π interactions between His 297 and the hydroxamate/hydroximate moiety and the phenyl ring of BzH contribute approximately 0.26 and 0.91 kcal/mol to binding, respectively, while interactions with Lys 166 contribute approximately 1.74 and 1.74 kcal/mol, respectively. Similarly, comparison of the binding affinities of these mutants with substrate analogues revealed that Lys 166 contributes >2.93 kcal/mol to the binding of (R

  4. Role of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and fibroblast function in cerium oxide nanoparticles-induced lung fibrosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Jane [Health Effects Laboratory Division, NIOSH, Morgantown, WV (United States); Bishoff, Bridget [Mylan Pharmaceuticals, Morganntown, WV (United States); Mercer, R.R.; Barger, Mark; Schwegler-Berry, Diane [Health Effects Laboratory Division, NIOSH, Morgantown, WV (United States); Castranova, Vincent, E-mail: vcastran@hsc.wvu.edu [School of Pharmacy, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV (United States)

    2017-05-15

    The emission of cerium oxide nanoparticles (CeO{sub 2}) from diesel engines, using cerium compounds as a catalyst to lower the diesel exhaust particles, is a health concern. We have previously shown that CeO{sub 2} induced pulmonary inflammation and lung fibrosis. The objective of the present study was to investigate the modification of fibroblast function and the role of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in CeO{sub 2}-induced fibrosis. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to CeO{sub 2} (0.15 to 7 mg/kg) by a single intratracheal instillation and sacrificed at various times post-exposure. The results show that at 28 days after CeO{sub 2} (3.5 mg/kg) exposure, lung fibrosis was evidenced by increased soluble collagen in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, elevated hydroxyproline content in lung tissues, and enhanced sirius red staining for collagen in the lung tissue. Lung fibroblasts and alveolar type II (ATII) cells isolated from CeO{sub 2}-exposed rats at 28 days post-exposure demonstrated decreasing proliferation rate when compare to the controls. CeO{sub 2} exposure was cytotoxic and altered cell function as demonstrated by fibroblast apoptosis and aggregation, and ATII cell hypertrophy and hyperplasia with increased surfactant. The presence of stress fibers, expressed as α-smooth muscle actin (SMA), in CeO{sub 2}-exposed fibroblasts and ATII cells was significantly increased compared to the control. Immunohistofluorescence analysis demonstrated co-localization of TGF-β or α-SMA with prosurfactant protein C (SPC)-stained ATII cells. These results demonstrate that CeO{sub 2} exposure affects fibroblast function and induces EMT in ATII cells that play a role in lung fibrosis. These findings suggest potential adverse health effects in response to CeO{sub 2} nanoparticle exposure. - Highlights: • CeO{sub 2} exposure induced lung fibrosis. • CeO{sub 2} were detected in lung tissue, alveolar type II (ATII) cells and fibroblasts. • CeO{sub 2} caused ATII

  5. Transition conductivity study of high temperature superconductor compounds: the role of fluctuations; Etude de la transition resistive sur des composes supraconducteurs a haute temperature critique le role des fluctuations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pagnon, V

    1991-04-01

    This memory subject is the transition conductivity study of high temperature superconductors in corelation with their anisotropy. Systematic conductivity measurements were made on YBaCuO and BaSrCaCuO in relation with temperature from 4.2 K to 1200 K, and with a magnetic field up to 8 T in several directions. Oxygen order has an effect on the characteristics at YBaCuO transition conductivity. The activation energy for oxygen absorption is about 0.5eV. One method of analysis of the conductivity fluctuations about the transition temperature is proposed. Two separate rates are noticeable in YBaCuO compound. The 3 D fluctuations rate in the immediate neighbourghood of the transition lets place to the 2 D fluctuations rate at high temperature. Transitions temperatures governing each rate are different, that`s incompatible with the formula proposed by Lawrence and Doniach. On the other hand, the analogy with quasi-2 D magnetic systems seems more relevant. A magnetic field application or a lowering of oxygen concentration removes the 3 D fluctuations rate. Non ohmic effects observed at the transition conductivity foot are analysis as a non-linear 2 D excitation manifestation of the supraconductive phase. Finally, by measurements on strontium doped YBaCuO crystals, we confirm a metal-insulator transition along the C-Axe when oxygen concentration reduces. This is connected with the specific heat jump. All these results uplighten the fundamental bidimensional character of high transition temperature superconductivity.

  6. Body dissatisfaction and body mass in girls and boys transitioning from early to mid-adolescence: additional role of self-esteem and eating habits

    OpenAIRE

    Makinen, Mauno; Puukko-Viertomies, Leena-Riitta; Lindberg, Nina; Siimes, Martti A.; Aalberg, Veikko

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background In the transition from early to mid-adolescence, gender differences in pubertal development become significant. Body dissatisfaction is often associated with body mass, low self-esteem and abnormal eating habits. The majority of studies investigating body dissatisfaction and its associations have been conducted on female populations. However, some evidence suggests that males also suffer from these problems and that gender differences might already be observed in adolescen...

  7. Intensive care survivors' experiences of ward-based care: Meleis' theory of nursing transitions and role development among critical care outreach services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsay, Pam; Huby, Guro; Thompson, Andrew; Walsh, Tim

    2014-03-01

    To explore the psychosocial needs of patients discharged from intensive care, the extent to which they are captured using existing theory on transitions in care and the potential role development of critical care outreach, follow-up and liaison services. Intensive care patients are at an increased risk of adverse events, deterioration or death following ward transfer. Nurse-led critical care outreach, follow-up or liaison services have been adopted internationally to prevent these potentially avoidable sequelae. The need to provide patients with psychosocial support during the transition to ward-based care has also been identified, but the evidence base for role development is currently limited. Twenty participants were invited to discuss their experiences of ward-based care as part of a broader study on recovery following prolonged critical illness. Psychosocial distress was a prominent feature of their accounts, prompting secondary data analysis using Meleis et al.'s mid-range theory on experiencing transitions. Participants described a sense of disconnection in relation to profound debilitation and dependency and were often distressed by a perceived lack of understanding, indifference or insensitivity among ward staff to their basic care needs. Negotiating the transition between dependence and independence was identified as a significant source of distress following ward transfer. Participants varied in the extent to which they were able to express their needs and negotiate recovery within professionally mediated boundaries. These data provide new insights into the putative origins of the psychosocial distress that patients experience following ward transfer. Meleis et al.'s work has resonance in terms of explicating intensive care patients' experiences of psychosocial distress throughout the transition to general ward-based care, such that the future role development of critical care outreach, follow-up and liaison services may be more theoretically informed

  8. Quantitative cell polarity imaging defines leader-to-follower transitions during collective migration and the key role of microtubule-dependent adherens junction formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revenu, Céline; Streichan, Sebastian; Donà, Erika; Lecaudey, Virginie; Hufnagel, Lars; Gilmour, Darren

    2014-03-01

    The directed migration of cell collectives drives the formation of complex organ systems. A characteristic feature of many migrating collectives is a 'tissue-scale' polarity, whereby 'leader' cells at the edge of the tissue guide trailing 'followers' that become assembled into polarised epithelial tissues en route. Here, we combine quantitative imaging and perturbation approaches to investigate epithelial cell state transitions during collective migration and organogenesis, using the zebrafish lateral line primordium as an in vivo model. A readout of three-dimensional cell polarity, based on centrosomal-nucleus axes, allows the transition from migrating leaders to assembled followers to be quantitatively resolved for the first time in vivo. Using live reporters and a novel fluorescent protein timer approach, we investigate changes in cell-cell adhesion underlying this transition by monitoring cadherin receptor localisation and stability. This reveals that while cadherin 2 is expressed across the entire tissue, functional apical junctions are first assembled in the transition zone and become progressively more stable across the leader-follower axis of the tissue. Perturbation experiments demonstrate that the formation of these apical adherens junctions requires dynamic microtubules. However, once stabilised, adherens junction maintenance is microtubule independent. Combined, these data identify a mechanism for regulating leader-to-follower transitions within migrating collectives, based on the relocation and stabilisation of cadherins, and reveal a key role for dynamic microtubules in this process.

  9. The role of the state in sustainable energy transitions: A case study of large smart grid demonstration projects in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mah, Daphne Ngar-yin; Wu, Yun-Ying; Ip, Jasper Chi-man; Hills, Peter Ronald

    2013-01-01

    Smart grids represent one of the most significant evolutionary changes in energy management systems as they enable decentralised energy systems, the use of large-scale renewable energy as well as major improvements in demand-side-management. Japan is one of the pioneers in smart grid deployment. The Japanese model is characterised by a government-led, community-oriented, and business-driven approach with the launch of four large-scale smart-community demonstration projects. Our case study of large smart grid demonstration projects in Japan found that the Japanese government has demonstrated its high governing capacity in terms of leadership, recombinative capacity, institutional capacity, enabling capacity, and inducement capacity. However, the major limitations of the government in introducing some critical regulatory changes have constrained the smart grid deployment from advancing to a higher-order form of smart grid developments. This paper calls for more attention to be given to the importance of regulatory changes that are essential to overcome the technological lock-in, and the complementary roles of non-state actors such as the business sector and consumers to strengthen the governing capacity of the state. - Highlights: • Smart grids introduce evolutionary changes in energy management systems. • The Japanese model is government-led, community-oriented, and business-driven. • The Japanese government has demonstrated its high governing capacity. • But the limitations of the government have constrained the smart grid developments. • More attention needs to be given to regulatory changes and non-state actors

  10. The Roles and Needs of Families of Adolescents with ASD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Leann E.; Anderson, Kristy A.

    2014-01-01

    The transition of a student out of high school and into the adult world can be a stressful time for many families of high school students. This major life transition can be particularly challenging for students with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and their families. In this article, we first discuss the roles of families in the transition process…

  11. The Role of Parliaments in Times of Transition: The Impact of Participatory Politics on Social Cohesion and the Quality of Governance in Post-Authoritarian Settings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Afsah, Ebrahim

    The Role of Parliaments in Times of Transition: The Impact of Participatory Politics on Social Cohesion and the Quality of Governance in Post-Authoritarian Settings This contribution presents the theoretical basis for the normative preference given to electoral politics and investigates the insti......The Role of Parliaments in Times of Transition: The Impact of Participatory Politics on Social Cohesion and the Quality of Governance in Post-Authoritarian Settings This contribution presents the theoretical basis for the normative preference given to electoral politics and investigates...... the institutional prerequisites if competitive electoral politics are to lead to better governance outcomes and greater social stability. Examining why these preconditions are largely lacking in the Arab world, this contribution investigates what could be done to redress these shortcomings....

  12. The strategy role of transitional care units to support Integrated Care and Personalised pathways for frail persons

    OpenAIRE

    Morando, Verdiana; Tozzi, Valeria D.

    2017-01-01

    The paper presents a comparative analysis of three models of transitional care units that have been set up in Italy in the last three years within the processes of Regional Healthcare Services and healthcare organisations’ reforms. The comparative analysis is worth of providing interesting insights and generalizable lessons learnt from integrated care in practice. The three cases of transitional care units belong to a similar background wherein greater needs for care coordination across the s...

  13. The role of global in-use material stocks in the course of the socio-metabolic transition, from 1900 -2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiedenhofer, Dominik; Lauk, Christian; Fishman, Tomer; Tanikawa, Hiroki; Eisenmenger, Nina; Krausmann, Fridolin

    2014-05-01

    During the global socio-metabolic transition into the fossil fuelled age in the 20th century, annual material use increased nearly 10-fold (Krausmann et al. 2009). A substantial part of these materials were used to expand societal stocks such as infrastructure, buildings, factories or machinery. Long service-lifetimes lead to an ongoing accumulation of in-use stocks and determine the availability of materials for reuse and recycling. Systematic knowledge about material stock dynamics is crucial for understanding possible future resource use trends, the potential for increased recycling and thereby inform the development of strategies towards more sustainable resource use. In this presentation we explore the relationship between material use and stock accumulation, estimating global material stocks in infrastructures, buildings and durable goods from 1900 - 2009 based on a dynamic material stocks and flows model. We apply a top-down modelling approach, tracking annual cohorts of inflows of stock-building materials throughout the time period. We utilize a global material flow database and auxiliary data sources covering the time period 1850 - 2009 (Krausmann et al., 2009; Schaffartzik et al. 2013) to distinguish inputs of 11 major stock building materials: concrete, asphalt, bricks/stones/tiles, sand/gravel/crushed rocks, copper, steel, aluminum,other metals, solid-wood products, paper and plastics. Two types of functions are then used to model the lifetimes of the materials in use: A uniform distribution is applied for materials with short lifetimes, while a normal distribution is applied for materials with longer lifetimes. Furthermore, end-of-life waste is subject to recycling, thereby turning into additional input flows of non-virgin materials. Due to the inherent uncertainty in such an exercise, we perform Monte-Carlo simulations, applying uncertainty ranges for all model parameters and the material inflow data introduced above. This allows us to a) identify

  14. Role of isospin in nuclear-matter liquid-gas phase transition; Role de l'isospin dans la transition de phase liquide-gaz de la matiere nucleaire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ducoin, C

    2006-10-15

    Nuclear matter presents a phase transition of the liquid-gas type. This well-known feature is due to the nuclear interaction profile (mean-range attractive, short-range repulsive). Symmetric-nuclear-matter thermodynamics is thus analogous to that of a Van der Waals fluid. The study shows up to be more complex in the case of asymmetric matter, composed of neutrons and protons in an arbitrary proportion. Isospin, which distinguishes both constituents, gives a measure of this proportion. Studying asymmetric matter, isospin is an additional degree of freedom, which means one more dimension to consider in the space of observables. The nuclear liquid-gas transition is associated with the multi-fragmentation phenomenon observed in heavy-ion collisions, and to compact-star physics: the involved systems are neutron rich, so they are affected by the isospin degree of freedom. The present work is a theoretical study of isospin effects which appear in the asymmetric nuclear matter liquid-gas phase transition. A mean-field approach is used, with a Skyrme nuclear effective interaction. We demonstrate the presence of a first-order phase transition for asymmetric matter, and study the isospin distillation phenomenon associated with this transition. The case of phase separation at thermodynamic equilibrium is compared to spinodal decomposition. Finite size effects are addressed, as well as the influence of the electron gas which is present in the astrophysical context. (author)

  15. Functional aspects of distal oesophageal spasm: the role of onset velocity and contraction amplitude on bolus transit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohl, Daniel; Ciolino, Jody; Roberts, Jason; Savarino, Edoardo; Freeman, Janice; Nietert, Paul J; Tutuian, Radu; Castell, Donald

    2012-01-01

    Background Distal oesophageal spasm (DES) is a rare and under-investigated motility abnormality. Recent studies indicate effective bolus transit in varying percentages of DES patients. Aim Explore functional aspects including contraction onset velocity and contraction amplitude cut-off values for simultaneous contractions to predict complete bolus transit Methods We re-examined data from 107 impedance-manometry recordings with a diagnosis of DES. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was conducted, regarding effects of onset velocity on bolus transit taking into account distal oesophageal amplitude (DEA) and correcting for intra-individual repeated measures. Results Mean area under the ROC curve for saline and viscous swallows were 0.84±0.05 and 0.84±0.04, respectively. Velocity criteria of >30cm/s when DEA>100mmHg and 8cm/s when DEADEA>100mmHg and >7cm/s when DEAsensitivity of 75% and specificity of 80% to identify complete bolus transit. Using these criteria, final diagnosis changed in 44.9% of patients. Abnormal bolus transit was observed in 50.9% of newly diagnosed DES patients versus 7.5% of patients classified as normal. DES patients with DEA>100mmHg suffered twice as often from chest pain than those with DEA<100mmHg. Conclusion The proposed velocity cut-offs for diagnosing distal oesophageal spasm improve the ability to identify patients with spasm and abnormal bolus transit. PMID:22475443

  16. The Role of Regional Therapies for in-Transit Melanoma in the Era of Improved Systemic Options

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gabriel, Emmanuel [Department of Surgical Oncology, Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, NY 14263 (United States); Skitzki, Joseph, E-mail: joseph.skitzki@roswellpark.org [Department of Surgical Oncology, Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, NY 14263 (United States); Department of Immunology, Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, NY 14263 (United States)

    2015-07-01

    The incidence of melanoma has been increasing at a rapid rate, with 4%–11% of all melanoma recurrences presenting as in-transit disease. Treatments for in-transit melanoma of the extremity are varied and include surgical excision, lesional injection, regional techniques and systemic therapies. Excision to clear margins is preferred; however, in cases of widespread disease, this may not be practical. Historically, intralesional therapies were generally not curative and were often used for palliation or as adjuncts to other therapies, but recent advances in oncolytic viruses may change this paradigm. Radiation as a regional therapy can be quite locally toxic and is typically relegated to disease control and symptom relief in patients with limited treatment options. Regional therapies such as isolated limb perfusion and isolated limb infusion are older therapies, but offer the ability to treat bulky disease for curative intent with a high response rate. These techniques have their associated toxicities and can be technically challenging. Historically, systemic therapy with chemotherapies and biochemotherapies were relatively ineffective and highly toxic. With the advent of novel immunotherapeutic and targeted small molecule agents for the treatment of metastatic melanoma, the armamentarium against in-transit disease has expanded. Given the multitude of options, many different combinations and sequences of therapies can be offered to patients with in-transit extremity melanoma in the contemporary era. Reported response and survival rates of the varied treatments may offer valuable information regarding treatment decisions for patients with in-transit melanoma and provide rationale for these decisions.

  17. An effective Hamiltonian approach for Donor-Bridge-Acceptor electronic transitions: Exploring the role of bath memory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.R. Bittner

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available We present here a formally exact model for electronic transitions between an initial (donor and final (acceptor states linked by an intermediate (bridge state. Our model incorporates a common set of vibrational modes that are coupled to the donor, bridge, and acceptor states and serves as a dissipative bath that destroys quantum coherence between the donor and acceptor. Taking the memory time of the bath as a free parameter, we calculate transition rates for a heuristic 3-state/2 mode Hamiltonian system parameterized to represent the energetics and couplings in a typical organic photovoltaic system. Our results indicate that if the memory time of the bath is of the order of 10-100 fs, a two-state kinetic (i.e., incoherent hopping model will grossly underestimate overall transition rate.

  18. L-H bifurcations as phase transitions, the role of zonal flows and the spectral energy transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shats, M.G.; Punzmann, H.; Xia, H.; Solomon, W.M.

    2003-01-01

    An overview of new results related to the physics of confinement bifurcations in the H-1 heliac is presented. A macroscopic description of the transport modifications across L-H transitions in H-1 suggests several analogies between these bifurcations and phase transitions. Among them is the nucleation in phase transitions which is manifested in the plasma both in time and in space. A microscopic picture reveals the importance of zonal flows, or time-varying shear radial electric field in the spatio-temporal structure of confinement bifurcations. In particular, the effect of zonal flows on the fluctuation-driven transport in H-1 is discussed. Finally, new results on the mechanism of generation of large coherent structures and zonal flows are reviewed. It is shown that inverse energy cascades in turbulent spectra are responsible for the structure generation in H-1. (orig.)

  19. Fungal specificity and selectivity for algae play a major role in determining lichen partnerships across diverse ecogeographic regions in the lichen-forming family Parmeliaceae (Ascomycota).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leavitt, Steven D; Kraichak, Ekaphan; Nelsen, Matthew P; Altermann, Susanne; Divakar, Pradeep K; Alors, David; Esslinger, Theodore L; Crespo, Ana; Lumbsch, Thorsten

    2015-07-01

    Microbial symbionts are instrumental to the ecological and long-term evolutionary success of their hosts, and the central role of symbiotic interactions is increasingly recognized across the vast majority of life. Lichens provide an iconic group for investigating patterns in species interactions; however, relationships among lichen symbionts are often masked by uncertain species boundaries or an inability to reliably identify symbionts. The species-rich lichen-forming fungal family Parmeliaceae provides a diverse group for assessing patterns of interactions of algal symbionts, and our study addresses patterns of lichen symbiont interactions at the largest geographic and taxonomic scales attempted to date. We analysed a total of 2356 algal internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region sequences collected from lichens representing ten mycobiont genera in Parmeliaceae, two genera in Lecanoraceae and 26 cultured Trebouxia strains. Algal ITS sequences were grouped into operational taxonomic units (OTUs); we attempted to validate the evolutionary independence of a subset of the inferred OTUs using chloroplast and mitochondrial loci. We explored the patterns of symbiont interactions in these lichens based on ecogeographic distributions and mycobiont taxonomy. We found high levels of undescribed diversity in Trebouxia, broad distributions across distinct ecoregions for many photobiont OTUs and varying levels of mycobiont selectivity and specificity towards the photobiont. Based on these results, we conclude that fungal specificity and selectivity for algal partners play a major role in determining lichen partnerships, potentially superseding ecology, at least at the ecogeographic scale investigated here. To facilitate effective communication and consistency across future studies, we propose a provisional naming system for Trebouxia photobionts and provide representative sequences for each OTU circumscribed in this study. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Role of radial electric field in LH transition triggered by counter-NBI at low plasma density in the TUMAN-3M tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tukachinsky, A.S.; Askinazi, L.G.; Chernyshev, F.V. and others; Krupnik, L.I.; Rushkevich, A.A.

    2008-01-01

    Threshold power needed to attain H-mode in a tokamak is a critical parameter for designing of future devices and in particular fusion reactor ITER [1]. According to commonly accepted scaling [2] the threshold power P t hr increases with average density n e when the density exceeds some n em in at which P t hr is minimal. An increase in the P t hr towards low density was observed in many experiments [3-6], prevents the transition at lower n e as well. Physics of the threshold power increase at low ne is not well understood. Since the radial electric field E r and E r xB sheared flow play important roles in the LH transition one could expect these quantities effect the low n-bar e transitions. Toroidal rotation and radial electric field generation during counter-NBI have been studied in [7] and recently reconsidered theoretically in [8]. Thus, motivation for the presented study is to analyze effect of counter-NBI on the LH transition at low density

  1. Investigation of the Fusarium virguliforme Transcriptomes Induced during Infection of Soybean Roots Suggests that Enzymes with Hydrolytic Activities Could Play a Major Role in Root Necrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahu, Binod B; Baumbach, Jordan L; Singh, Prashant; Srivastava, Subodh K; Yi, Xiaoping; Bhattacharyya, Madan K

    2017-01-01

    Sudden death syndrome (SDS) is caused by the fungal pathogen, Fusarium virguliforme, and is a major threat to soybean production in North America. There are two major components of this disease: (i) root necrosis and (ii) foliar SDS. Root symptoms consist of root necrosis with vascular discoloration. Foliar SDS is characterized by interveinal chlorosis and leaf necrosis, and in severe cases by flower and pod abscission. A major toxin involved in initiating foliar SDS has been identified. Nothing is known about how root necrosis develops. In order to unravel the mechanisms used by the pathogen to cause root necrosis, the transcriptome of the pathogen in infected soybean root tissues of a susceptible cultivar, 'Essex', was investigated. The transcriptomes of the germinating conidia and mycelia were also examined. Of the 14,845 predicted F. virguliforme genes, we observed that 12,017 (81%) were expressed in germinating conidia and 12,208 (82%) in mycelia and 10,626 (72%) in infected soybean roots. Of the 10,626 genes induced in infected roots, 224 were transcribed only following infection. Expression of several infection-induced genes encoding enzymes with oxidation-reduction properties suggests that degradation of antimicrobial compounds such as the phytoalexin, glyceollin, could be important in early stages of the root tissue infection. Enzymes with hydrolytic and catalytic activities could play an important role in establishing the necrotrophic phase. The expression of a large number of genes encoding enzymes with catalytic and hydrolytic activities during the late infection stages suggests that cell wall degradation could be involved in root necrosis and the establishment of the necrotrophic phase in this pathogen.

  2. Antioxidants and Quality of Aging: Further Evidences for a Major Role of TXNRD1 Gene Variability on Physical Performance at Old Age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serena Dato

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress is a major determinant of human aging and common hallmark of age-related diseases. A protective role against free radicals accumulation was shown for thioredoxin reductase TrxR1, a key antioxidant selenoprotein. The variability of encoding gene (TXNRD1 was previously found associated with physical status at old age and extreme survival in a Danish cohort. To further investigate the influence of the gene variability on age-related physiological decline, we analyzed 9 tagging SNPs in relation to markers of physical (Activity of Daily Living, Hand Grip, Chair stand, and Walking and cognitive (Mini Mental State Examination status, in a Southern-Italian cohort of 64–107 aged individuals. We replicated the association of TXNRD1 variability with physical performance, with three variants (rs4445711, rs1128446, and rs11111979 associated with physical functioning after 85 years of age (p<0.022. In addition, we found two SNPs borderline influencing longevity (rs4964728 and rs7310505 in our cohort, the last associated with health status and survival in Northern Europeans too. Overall, the evidences of association in a different population here reported extend the proposed role of TXNRD1 gene in modulating physical decline at extreme ages, further supporting the investigation of thioredoxin pathway in relation to the quality of human aging.

  3. Antioxidants and Quality of Aging: Further Evidences for a Major Role of TXNRD1 Gene Variability on Physical Performance at Old Age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dato, Serena; De Rango, Francesco; Crocco, Paolina; Passarino, Giuseppe; Rose, Giuseppina

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative stress is a major determinant of human aging and common hallmark of age-related diseases. A protective role against free radicals accumulation was shown for thioredoxin reductase TrxR1, a key antioxidant selenoprotein. The variability of encoding gene (TXNRD1) was previously found associated with physical status at old age and extreme survival in a Danish cohort. To further investigate the influence of the gene variability on age-related physiological decline, we analyzed 9 tagging SNPs in relation to markers of physical (Activity of Daily Living, Hand Grip, Chair stand, and Walking) and cognitive (Mini Mental State Examination) status, in a Southern-Italian cohort of 64-107 aged individuals. We replicated the association of TXNRD1 variability with physical performance, with three variants (rs4445711, rs1128446, and rs11111979) associated with physical functioning after 85 years of age (p longevity (rs4964728 and rs7310505) in our cohort, the last associated with health status and survival in Northern Europeans too. Overall, the evidences of association in a different population here reported extend the proposed role of TXNRD1 gene in modulating physical decline at extreme ages, further supporting the investigation of thioredoxin pathway in relation to the quality of human aging.

  4. Treating the Synapse in Major Psychiatric Disorders: The Role of Postsynaptic Density Network in Dopamine-Glutamate Interplay and Psychopharmacologic Drugs Molecular Actions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmine Tomasetti

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Dopamine-glutamate interplay dysfunctions have been suggested as pathophysiological key determinants of major psychotic disorders, above all schizophrenia and mood disorders. For the most part, synaptic interactions between dopamine and glutamate signaling pathways take part in the postsynaptic density, a specialized ultrastructure localized under the membrane of glutamatergic excitatory synapses. Multiple proteins, with the role of adaptors, regulators, effectors, and scaffolds compose the postsynaptic density network. They form structural and functional crossroads where multiple signals, starting at membrane receptors, are received, elaborated, integrated, and routed to appropriate nuclear targets. Moreover, transductional pathways belonging to different receptors may be functionally interconnected through postsynaptic density molecules. Several studies have demonstrated that psychopharmacologic drugs may differentially affect the expression and function of postsynaptic genes and proteins, depending upon the peculiar receptor profile of each compound. Thus, through postsynaptic network modulation, these drugs may induce dopamine-glutamate synaptic remodeling, which is at the basis of their long-term physiologic effects. In this review, we will discuss the role of postsynaptic proteins in dopamine-glutamate signals integration, as well as the peculiar impact of different psychotropic drugs used in clinical practice on postsynaptic remodeling, thereby trying to point out the possible future molecular targets of “synapse-based” psychiatric therapeutic strategies.

  5. 'Even though a man takes the major role, he has no right to abuse': future male leaders' views on gender-based violence in Sri Lanka.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darj, Elisabeth; Wijewardena, Kumudu; Lindmark, Gunilla; Axemo, Pia

    2017-01-01

    Distinct gender roles influence gender inequality and build the foundation for gender-based violence. Violence against women is a major public health problem in all societies, and a violation of human rights. Prevalence surveys on gender-based violence have been published from Sri Lanka, but qualitative studies on men's perceptions are lacking. The aim of this study was to explore young educated Sri Lankan men's perceptions of violence against women. Seven focus-group discussions were held. Men at the end of their university studies were purposefully selected. A topic guide was used, covering various scenarios of violence against women. Qualitative content analysis was carried out. Four categories were developed through the analytic process: fixed gender roles - patriarchal values are accepted in society, female mobility control, and slowly changing attitudes; violence not accepted but still exists - sexual harassment exists everywhere, different laws for different people, female tolerance of violence, and men's right to punish; multiple factors cause violence - alcohol, violent behavior is inherited, violence culturally accepted, low education, and lack of communication; and prevention of violence against women - both parents must engage and socialize girls and boys equally, life skills education, premarital counselling, working places value clarification, and more women in politics and boards are suggested. Medical and management students, possible future male leaders of the country, have suggestions of prevention strategies in life skills to reduce gender-based violence and to increase knowledge of health consequences with the aim of changing attitudes.

  6. The impact of sex-role reversal on the diversity of the major histocompatibility complex: insights from the seahorse (Hippocampus abdominalis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahr, Angela; Wilson, Anthony B

    2011-05-10

    Both natural and sexual selection are thought to influence genetic diversity, but the study of the relative importance of these two factors on ecologically-relevant traits has traditionally focused on species with conventional sex-roles, with male-male competition and female-based mate choice. With its high variability and significance in both immune function and olfactory-mediated mate choice, the major histocompatibility complex (MHC/MH) is an ideal system in which to evaluate the relative contributions of these two selective forces to genetic diversity. Intrasexual competition and mate choice are both reversed in sex-role reversed species, and sex-related differences in the detection and use of MH-odor cues are expected to influence the intensity of sexual selection in such species. The seahorse, Hippocampus abdominalis, has an exceptionally highly developed form of male parental care, with female-female competition and male mate choice. Here, we demonstrate that the sex-role reversed seahorse has a single MH class II beta-chain gene and that the diversity of the seahorse MHIIβ locus and its pattern of variation are comparable to those detected in species with conventional sex roles. Despite the presence of only a single gene copy, intralocus MHIIβ allelic diversity in this species exceeds that observed in species with multiple copies of this locus. The MHIIβ locus of the seahorse exhibits a novel expression domain in the male brood pouch. The high variation found at the seahorse MHIIβ gene indicates that sex-role reversed species are capable of maintaining the high MHC diversity typical in most vertebrates.Whether such species have evolved the capacity to use MH-odor cues during mate choice is presently being investigated using mate choice experiments. If this possibility can be rejected, such systems would offer an exceptional opportunity to study the effects of natural selection in isolation, providing powerful comparative models for understanding the

  7. The impact of sex-role reversal on the diversity of the major histocompatibility complex: Insights from the seahorse (Hippocampus abdominalis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilson Anthony B

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Both natural and sexual selection are thought to influence genetic diversity, but the study of the relative importance of these two factors on ecologically-relevant traits has traditionally focused on species with conventional sex-roles, with male-male competition and female-based mate choice. With its high variability and significance in both immune function and olfactory-mediated mate choice, the major histocompatibility complex (MHC/MH is an ideal system in which to evaluate the relative contributions of these two selective forces to genetic diversity. Intrasexual competition and mate choice are both reversed in sex-role reversed species, and sex-related differences in the detection and use of MH-odor cues are expected to influence the intensity of sexual selection in such species. The seahorse, Hippocampus abdominalis, has an exceptionally highly developed form of male parental care, with female-female competition and male mate choice. Results Here, we demonstrate that the sex-role reversed seahorse has a single MH class II beta-chain gene and that the diversity of the seahorse MHIIβ locus and its pattern of variation are comparable to those detected in species with conventional sex roles. Despite the presence of only a single gene copy, intralocus MHIIβ allelic diversity in this species exceeds that observed in species with multiple copies of this locus. The MHIIβ locus of the seahorse exhibits a novel expression domain in the male brood pouch. Conclusions The high variation found at the seahorse MHIIβ gene indicates that sex-role reversed species are capable of maintaining the high MHC diversity typical in most vertebrates. Whether such species have evolved the capacity to use MH-odor cues during mate choice is presently being investigated using mate choice experiments. If this possibility can be rejected, such systems would offer an exceptional opportunity to study the effects of natural selection in isolation

  8. Cosmological phase transitions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolb, E.W.

    1993-10-01

    If modern ideas about the role of spontaneous symmetry breaking in fundamental physics are correct, then the Universe should have undergone a series of phase transitions early in its history. The study of cosmological phase transitions has become an important aspect of early-Universe cosmology. In this lecture I review some very recent work on three aspects of phase transitions: the electroweak transition, texture, and axions

  9. The Role of Student Burnout in Predicting Future Burnout: Exploring the Transition from University to the Workplace

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robins, Tamara G.; Roberts, Rachel M.; Sarris, Aspa

    2018-01-01

    Burnout is a significant problem in the workplace and recent research suggests burnout is also a growing concern for students. This study aimed to explore the transition from study to work, including exploring the impact of student burnout on work burnout. Australian health profession students (T1, n = 86; T2, n = 86; T3, n = 57) from the…

  10. Managing the Transition: The Role of Optimism and Self-Efficacy for First-Year Australian University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morton, Stephen; Mergler, Amanda; Boman, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Students making the transition from high school to university often encounter many stressors and new experiences. Many students adjust successfully to university; however, some students do not, often resulting in attrition from the university and mental health issues. The primary aim of the current study was to examine the effects that optimism,…

  11. Parental Divorce and Couples' Adjustment during the Transition to Parenthood: The Role of Parent-Adult Child Relationships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouchard, Genevieve; Doucet, Danielle

    2011-01-01

    In this study, the authors examined the associations between parental divorce, quality of relationships with parents, and dyadic adjustment during transition of 114 couples to parenthood. Data were collected during the third trimester of pregnancy and at 9 months postpartum. As predicted, the authors found that women from divorced families…

  12. Physical Activity in the Transition to University: The Role of Past Behavior and Concurrent Self-Regulatory Efficacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crozier, Alyson J.; Gierc, Madelaine S. H.; Locke, Sean R.; Brawley, Lawrence R.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Two studies were conducted to examine the relationship between past physical activity, concurrent self-regulatory efficacy (CSRE), and current physical activity during the transition to university. Participants: Study 1 included 110 first-year undergraduate students recruited during October/November of 2012. Study 2 involved 86…

  13. Academic Vulnerability and Resilience during the Transition to High School: The Role of Social Relationships and District Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langenkamp, Amy G.

    2010-01-01

    The transition to high school is a critical stage in students' academic trajectories and can be especially difficult for middle school students who struggle academically. Starting high school on a low academic track and with low academic performance often leads to dropping out of high school. This study investigates what might protect academically…

  14. A role for H2S in the microcirculation of newborns: the major metabolite of H2S (thiosulphate is increased in preterm infants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca M Dyson

    Full Text Available Excessive vasodilatation during the perinatal period is associated with cardiorespiratory instability in preterm neonates. Little evidence of the mechanisms controlling microvascular tone during circulatory transition exists. We hypothesised that hydrogen sulphide (H2S, an important regulator of microvascular reactivity and central cardiac function in adults and animal models, may contribute to the vasodilatation observed in preterm newborns. Term and preterm neonates (24-43 weeks gestational age were studied. Peripheral microvascular blood flow was assessed by laser Doppler. Thiosulphate, a urinary metabolite of H2S, was determined by high performance liquid chromatography as a measure of 24 hr total body H2S turnover for the first 3 days of postnatal life. H2S turnover was greatest in very preterm infants and decreased with increasing gestational age (p = 0.0001. H2S turnover was stable across the first 72 hrs of life in older neonates. In very preterm neonates, H2S turnover increased significantly from day 1 to 3 (p =0.0001; and males had higher H2S turnover than females (p = 0.04. A significant relationship between microvascular blood flow and H2S turnover was observed on day 2 of postnatal life (p = 0.0004. H2S may play a role in maintaining microvascular tone in the perinatal period. Neonates at the greatest risk of microvascular dysfunction characterised by inappropriate peripheral vasodilatation--very preterm male neonates--are also the neonates with highest levels of total body H2S turnover suggesting that overproduction of this gasotransmitter may contribute to microvascular dysfunction in preterms. Potentially, H2S is a target to selectively control microvascular tone in the circulation of newborns.

  15. Major Links.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Tona

    1995-01-01

    Provides electronic mail addresses for resources and discussion groups related to the following academic majors: art, biology, business, chemistry, computer science, economics, health sciences, history, literature, math, music, philosophy, political science, psychology, sociology, and theater. (AEF)

  16. Major Roads

    Data.gov (United States)

    Minnesota Department of Natural Resources — This data set contains roadway centerlines for major roads (interstates and trunk highways) found on the USGS 1:24,000 mapping series. These roadways are current...

  17. Water/ice phase transition: The role of zirconium acetate, a compound with ice-shaping properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcellini, Moreno; Fernandes, Francisco M.; Dedovets, Dmytro; Deville, Sylvain

    2017-04-01

    Few compounds feature ice-shaping properties. Zirconium acetate is one of the very few inorganic compounds reported so far to have ice-shaping properties similar to that of ice-shaping proteins, encountered in many organisms living at low temperature. When a zirconium acetate solution is frozen, oriented and perfectly hexagonal ice crystals can be formed and their growth follows the temperature gradient. To shed light on the water/ice phase transition while freezing zirconium acetate solution, we carried out differential scanning calorimetry measurements. From our results, we estimate how many water molecules do not freeze because of their interaction with Zr cations. We estimate the colligative properties of the Zr acetate on the apparent critical temperature. We further show that the phase transition is unaffected by the nature of the base which is used to adjust the pH. Our results provide thus new hints on the ice-shaping mechanism of zirconium acetate.

  18. The role of lock-in mechanisms in transition processes: The case of energy for road transport

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klitkou, Antje; Bolwig, Simon; Hansen, Teis

    2015-01-01

    This paper revisits the theoretical concepts of lock-in mechanisms to analyse transition processes in energy production and road transportation in the Nordic countries, focussing on three technology platforms: advanced biofuels, e-mobility and hydrogen and fuel cell electrical vehicles. The paper...... is based on a comparative analysis of case studies. The main lock-in mechanisms analysed are learning effects, economies of scale, economies of scope, network externalities, informational increasing returns, technological interrelatedness, collective action, institutional learning effects...... and the differentiation of power. We show that very different path dependencies have been reinforced by the lock-in mechanisms. Hence, the characteristics of existing regimes set the preconditions for the development of new transition pathways. The incumbent socio-technical regime is not just fossil-based, but may also...

  19. Termination or Transition: A 21st Century Perspective on the Military’s Role in Conflict Resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-05-01

    Director, Robert F. Baumann, Ph.D. Graduate Degree Programs iii Abstract TRANSITION OR TERMINATION: A 21 ST CENTURY...1992) and James Raymer , In Search of Lasting Results: Military War Termination Doctrine (Fort Leavenworth, KS: US Army Command and General Staff... Robert E. Baumann, and John T. Fishel, Invasion, Intervention, and “Intervasion”: A Concise History of the US Army in Operation Uphold Democracy

  20. Role of videocapillaroscopy in early detection of transition from primary to secondary Raynaud’s fenomenon in systemic sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Seriolo

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Patients initially diagnosed as having primary Raynaud’s phenomenon (PRP may shift to secondary (SRP during the follow-up. Nailfold videocapillaroscopy (NVC is a tool that allows to distinguish between PRP and SRP through the identification of the “early” scleroderma-pattern of microangiopathy. The aim of this study was to evaluate the transition from PRP to SRP in an Italian cohort of patients during their follow-up. 129 patients with PRP were identified and followed-up for 2721 months. The diagnosis of PRP was achieved as suggested by LeRoy. The NVC diagnosis of scleroderma-pattern was based on the presence of specific “early” capillary abnormalities (i.e. giant capillaries, microhaemorrhages, and/or slight reduction of capillary density. Based on the identification of the “early” scleroderma-pattern by NVC, 14% of patients changed from PRP to SRP during the follow-up. Interestingly, 4.6% of these patients showed at baseline a fully normal NVC pattern (transition from normal to scleroderma NVC pattern in 3427 months, and 10% showed slight and not-specific nailfold capillary abnormalities (i.e. dystrophic capillaries and/or enlarged capillaries at baseline (transition to scleroderma NVC pattern in 2515 months. Following a careful NVC analysis, we showed the progression from PRP to SRP in 14% of the analyzed patients. We suggest the capillaroscopic analysis twice a year in presence of PRP, in order to early detect the transition to SRP in patients showing at the beginning a normal pattern or not-specific nailfold capillary abnormalities, as assessed by NVC.

  1. Improving Care Transitions Management: Examining the Role of Accountable Care Organization Participation and Expanded Electronic Health Record Functionality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, Thomas P; Shortell, Stephen M; Rodriguez, Hector P

    2017-08-01

    Examine the extent to which physician organization participation in an accountable care organization (ACO) and electronic health record (EHR) functionality are associated with greater adoption of care transition management (CTM) processes. A total of 1,398 physician organizations from the third National Study of Physician Organization survey (NSPO3), a nationally representative sample of medical practices in the United States (January 2012-May 2013). We used data from the third National Study of Physician Organization survey (NSPO3) to assess medical practice characteristics, including CTM processes, ACO participation, EHR functionality, practice type, organization size, ownership, public reporting, and pay-for-performance participation. Multivariate linear regression models estimated the extent to which ACO participation and EHR functionality were associated with greater CTM capabilities, controlling for practice size, ownership, public reporting, and pay-for-performance participation. Approximately half (52.4 percent) of medical practices had a formal program for managing care transitions in place. In adjusted analyses, ACO participation (p risk-bearing arrangements across the country may improve the management of care transitions by physician organizations. © Health Research and Educational Trust.

  2. Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) variants in the European haplogroups HV, JT, and U do not have a major role in schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrell, Helena; Salas, Antonio; Abasolo, Nerea; Morén, Constanza; Garrabou, Glòria; Valero, Joaquín; Alonso, Yolanda; Vilella, Elisabet; Costas, Javier; Martorell, Lourdes

    2014-10-01

    It has been reported that certain genetic factors involved in schizophrenia could be located in the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). Therefore, we hypothesized that mtDNA mutations and/or variants would be present in schizophrenia patients and may be related to schizophrenia characteristics and mitochondrial function. This study was performed in three steps: (1) identification of pathogenic mutations and variants in 14 schizophrenia patients with an apparent maternal inheritance of the disease by sequencing the entire mtDNA; (2) case-control association study of 23 variants identified in step 1 (16 missense, 3 rRNA, and 4 tRNA variants) in 495 patients and 615 controls, and (3) analyses of the associated variants according to the clinical, psychopathological, and neuropsychological characteristics and according to the oxidative and enzymatic activities of the mitochondrial respiratory chain. We did not identify pathogenic mtDNA mutations in the 14 sequenced patients. Two known variants were nominally associated with schizophrenia and were further studied. The MT-RNR2 1811A > G variant likely does not play a major role in schizophrenia, as it was not associated with clinical, psychopathological, or neuropsychological variables, and the MT-ATP6 9110T > C p.Ile195Thr variant did not result in differences in the oxidative and enzymatic functions of the mitochondrial respiratory chain. The patients with apparent maternal inheritance of schizophrenia did not exhibit any mutations in their mtDNA. The variants nominally associated with schizophrenia in the present study were not related either to phenotypic characteristics or to mitochondrial function. We did not find evidence pointing to a role for mtDNA sequence variation in schizophrenia. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. The Role of Oxidative Stress in the Longevity and Insecticide Resistance Phenotype of the Major Malaria Vectors Anopheles arabiensis and Anopheles funestus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shüné V Oliver

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress plays numerous biological roles, both functional and pathological. The role of oxidative stress in various epidemiologically relevant biological traits in Anopheles mosquitoes is not well established. In this study, the effects of oxidative stress on the longevity and insecticide resistance phenotype in the major malaria vector species An. arabiensis and An. funestus were examined. Responses to dietary copper sulphate and hydrogen peroxide were used as proxies for the oxidative stress phenotype by determining the effect of copper on longevity and hydrogen peroxide lethal dose. Glutathione peroxidase and catalase activities were determined colorimetrically. Oxidative burden was quantified as protein carbonyl content. Changes in insecticide resistance phenotype were monitored by WHO bioassay. Insecticide resistant individuals showed an increased capacity for coping with oxidative stress, mediated by increased glutathione peroxidase and catalase activity. This effect was observed in both species, as well as in laboratory strains and F1 individuals derived from wild-caught An. funestus mothers. Phenotypic capacity for coping with oxidative stress was greatest in strains with elevated Cytochrome P450 activity. Synergism of oxidative stress defence enzymes by dietary supplementation with haematin, 3-Amino-1, 2, 4-triazole and Sodium diethyldithiocarbamate significantly increased pyrethroid-induced mortality in An. arabiensis and An. funestus. It is therefore concluded that defence against oxidative stress underlies the augmentation of the insecticide resistance phenotype associated with multiple blood-feeding. This is because multiple blood-feeding ultimately leads to a reduction of oxidative stress in insecticide resistant females, and also reduces the oxidative burden induced by DDT and pyrethroids, by inducing increased glutathione peroxidase activity. This study highlights the importance of oxidative stress in the longevity and

  4. Immune Cell-Mediated Protection against Vaginal Candidiasis: Evidence for a Major Role of Vaginal CD4+ T Cells and Possible Participation of Other Local Lymphocyte Effectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santoni, Giorgio; Boccanera, Maria; Adriani, Daniela; Lucciarini, Roberta; Amantini, Consuelo; Morrone, Stefania; Cassone, Antonio; De Bernardis, Flavia

    2002-01-01

    The protective roles of different lymphocyte subsets were investigated in a rat vaginal candidiasis model by adoptive transfer of vaginal lymphocytes (VL) or sorted, purified CD3+ T cells, CD4+ or CD8+ T cells, or CD3− CD5+ B cells from the vaginas of naïve or immune rats following three rounds of Candida albicans infection. The adoptive transfer of total VL from nonimmune animals did not alter the course of vaginal candidiasis of the recipient rats. In contrast, the animals receiving total VL or CD3+ T cells from immune rats showed a highly significant acceleration of fungus clearance compared with animals which received nonimmune VL. The animals with vaginal CD3− CD5+ B cells transferred from immune rats also had fewer Candida CFU than the controls, but fungal clearance was significantly retarded with respect to the animals administered immune T cells. Sorted, purified CD4+ and CD8+ vaginal T cells from immune rats were also adoptively transferred to naïve animals. Although both populations were seen to accelerate the clearance of the fungus from the vagina, CD4+ T cells were much more effective than CD8+ T cells. Overall, there was no difference between the antifungal effects of immune vaginal CD4+ T cells and those achievable with the transfer of whole, immune VL. Histological observations of the vaginal tissues of rats with adoptively transferred immune T cells demonstrated a remarkable accumulation of lymphocytes in the subepithelial lamina propria and also infiltrating the mucosal epithelium. These results strongly suggest that distinct vaginal lymphocyte subsets participate in the adaptive anti-Candida immunity at the vaginal level, with the vaginal CD4+ T cells probably playing a major role. PMID:12183521

  5. ‘Even though a man takes the major role, he has no right to abuse’: future male leaders’ views on gender-based violence in Sri Lanka

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darj, Elisabeth; Wijewardena, Kumudu; Lindmark, Gunilla; Axemo, Pia

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: Distinct gender roles influence gender inequality and build the foundation for gender-based violence. Violence against women is a major public health problem in all societies, and a violation of human rights. Prevalence surveys on gender-based violence have been published from Sri Lanka, but qualitative studies on men’s perceptions are lacking. Objectives: The aim of this study was to explore young educated Sri Lankan men’s perceptions of violence against women. Methods: Seven focus-group discussions were held. Men at the end of their university studies were purposefully selected. A topic guide was used, covering various scenarios of violence against women. Qualitative content analysis was carried out. Results: Four categories were developed through the analytic process: fixed gender roles – patriarchal values are accepted in society, female mobility control, and slowly changing attitudes; violence not accepted but still exists – sexual harassment exists everywhere, different laws for different people, female tolerance of violence, and men’s right to punish; multiple factors cause violence – alcohol, violent behavior is inherited, violence culturally accepted, low education, and lack of communication; and prevention of violence against women – both parents must engage and socialize girls and boys equally, life skills education, premarital counselling, working places value clarification, and more women in politics and boards are suggested. Conclusions: Medical and management students, possible future male leaders of the country, have suggestions of prevention strategies in life skills to reduce gender-based violence and to increase knowledge of health consequences with the aim of changing attitudes. PMID:28753081

  6. The Role of Oxidative Stress in the Longevity and Insecticide Resistance Phenotype of the Major Malaria Vectors Anopheles arabiensis and Anopheles funestus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, Shüné V; Brooke, Basil D

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative stress plays numerous biological roles, both functional and pathological. The role of oxidative stress in various epidemiologically relevant biological traits in Anopheles mosquitoes is not well established. In this study, the effects of oxidative stress on the longevity and insecticide resistance phenotype in the major malaria vector species An. arabiensis and An. funestus were examined. Responses to dietary copper sulphate and hydrogen peroxide were used as proxies for the oxidative stress phenotype by determining the effect of copper on longevity and hydrogen peroxide lethal dose. Glutathione peroxidase and catalase activities were determined colorimetrically. Oxidative burden was quantified as protein carbonyl content. Changes in insecticide resistance phenotype were monitored by WHO bioassay. Insecticide resistant individuals showed an increased capacity for coping with oxidative stress, mediated by increased glutathione peroxidase and catalase activity. This effect was observed in both species, as well as in laboratory strains and F1 individuals derived from wild-caught An. funestus mothers. Phenotypic capacity for coping with oxidative stress was greatest in strains with elevated Cytochrome P450 activity. Synergism of oxidative stress defence enzymes by dietary supplementation with haematin, 3-Amino-1, 2, 4-triazole and Sodium diethyldithiocarbamate significantly increased pyrethroid-induced mortality in An. arabiensis and An. funestus. It is therefore concluded that defence against oxidative stress underlies the augmentation of the insecticide resistance phenotype associated with multiple blood-feeding. This is because multiple blood-feeding ultimately leads to a reduction of oxidative stress in insecticide resistant females, and also reduces the oxidative burden induced by DDT and pyrethroids, by inducing increased glutathione peroxidase activity. This study highlights the importance of oxidative stress in the longevity and insecticide resistance

  7. Body dissatisfaction and body mass in girls and boys transitioning from early to mid-adolescence: additional role of self-esteem and eating habits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mäkinen, Mauno; Puukko-Viertomies, Leena-Riitta; Lindberg, Nina; Siimes, Martti A; Aalberg, Veikko

    2012-06-08

    In the transition from early to mid-adolescence, gender differences in pubertal development become significant. Body dissatisfaction is often associated with body mass, low self-esteem and abnormal eating habits. The majority of studies investigating body dissatisfaction and its associations have been conducted on female populations. However, some evidence suggests that males also suffer from these problems and that gender differences might already be observed in adolescence. To examine body dissatisfaction and its relationship with body mass, as well as self-esteem and eating habits, in girls and boys in transition from early to mid-adolescence. School nurses recorded the heights and weights of 659 girls and 711 boys with a mean age of 14.5 years. The Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale and the Body Dissatisfaction subscale of the Eating Disorder Inventory were used as self-appraisal scales. Eating data were self-reported. The girls were less satisfied with their bodies than boys were with theirs (mean score (SD): 30.6 (SD 12.2) vs. 18.9 (SD 9.5); p eating habits were less satisfied with their bodies than those describing normal eating habits (mean (SD): 33.0 (12.9) vs. 21.2 (10.2); p eating habits revealed a significant relationship with body dissatisfaction in the transitional phase from early to mid-adolescence in girls and boys, but significant gender differences were also found.

  8. Body dissatisfaction and body mass in girls and boys transitioning from early to mid-adolescence: additional role of self-esteem and eating habits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mäkinen Mauno

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the transition from early to mid-adolescence, gender differences in pubertal development become significant. Body dissatisfaction is often associated with body mass, low self-esteem and abnormal eating habits. The majority of studies investigating body dissatisfaction and its associations have been conducted on female populations. However, some evidence suggests that males also suffer from these problems and that gender differences might already be observed in adolescence. Aims To examine body dissatisfaction and its relationship with body mass, as well as self-esteem and eating habits, in girls and boys in transition from early to mid-adolescence. Methods School nurses recorded the heights and weights of 659 girls and 711 boys with a mean age of 14.5 years. The Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale and the Body Dissatisfaction subscale of the Eating Disorder Inventory were used as self-appraisal scales. Eating data were self-reported. Results The girls were less satisfied with their bodies than boys were with theirs (mean score (SD: 30.6 (SD 12.2 vs. 18.9 (SD 9.5; p  Conclusions Body mass, self-esteem and eating habits revealed a significant relationship with body dissatisfaction in the transitional phase from early to mid-adolescence in girls and boys, but significant gender differences were also found.

  9. The PAS domains of the major sporulation kinase in Bacillus subtilis play a role in tetramer formation that is essential for the autokinase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiehler, Brittany; Haggett, Lindsey; Fujita, Masaya

    2017-08-01

    Sporulation in Bacillus subtilis is induced upon starvation. In a widely accepted model, an N-terminal "sensor" domain of the major sporulation kinase KinA recognizes a hypothetical starvation signal(s) and autophosphorylates a histidine residue to activate the master regulator Spo0A via a multicomponent phosphorelay. However, to date no confirmed signal has been found. Here, we demonstrated that PAS-A, the most N-terminal of the three PAS domains (PAS-ABC), is dispensable for the activity, contrary to a previous report. Our data indicated that the autokinase activity is dependent on the formation of a functional tetramer, which is mediated by, at least, PAS-B and PAS-C. Additionally, we ruled out the previously proposed notion that NAD + /NADH ratio controls KinA activity through the PAS-A domain by demonstrating that the cofactors show no effects on the kinase activity in vitro. In support of these data, we found that the cofactors exist in approximately 1000-fold excess of KinA in the cell and the cofactors' ratio does not change significantly during growth and sporulation, suggesting that changes in the cofactor ratio might not play a role in controlling KinA activity. These data may refute the widely-held belief that the activity of KinA is regulated in response to an unknown starvation signal(s). © 2017 The Authors. MicrobiologyOpen published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Spatial Dynamics of the Communities and the Role of Major Countries in the International Rare Earths Trade: A Complex Network Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xibo; Ge, Jianping; Wei, Wendong; Li, Hanshi; Wu, Chen; Zhu, Ge

    2016-01-01

    Rare earths (RE) are critical materials in many high-technology products. Due to the uneven distribution and important functions for industrial development, most countries import RE from a handful of suppliers that are rich in RE, such as China. However, because of the rapid growth of RE exploitation and pollution of the mining and production process, some of the main suppliers have gradually tended to reduce the RE production and exports. Especially in the last decade, international RE trade has been changing in the trade community and trade volume. Based on complex network theory, we built an unweighted and weighted network to explore the evolution of the communities and identify the role of the major countries in the RE trade. The results show that an international RE trade network was dispersed and unstable because of the existence of five to nine trade communities in the unweighted network and four to eight trade communities in the weighted network in the past 13 years. Moreover, trade groups formed due to the great influence of geopolitical relations. China was often associated with the South America and African countries in the same trade group. In addition, Japan, China, the United States, and Germany had the largest impacts on international RE trade from 2002 to 2014. Last, some policy suggestions were highlighted according to the results.

  11. Internalized Racism and Past-Year Major Depressive Disorder Among African-Americans: the Role of Ethnic Identity and Self-Esteem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Drexler

    2017-08-01

    Although a large body of research focuses on discrimination as a risk for depression among African-Americans, only a dearth of research focuses on internalized racism (i.e., endorsement of negative stereotypes of one's racial group) as a risk factor. In addition, no studies have yet to examine mediators and/or moderators of the relationship between internalized racism and depression. To this end, the present study examined the mediating and moderating roles of (a) self-esteem and (b) ethnic identity on the relationship between internalized racism and past-year major depressive disorder (MDD), in a nationally representative sample of African-American adults (N = 3570) from the National Survey of American Life. Results from this study revealed an indirect association between internalized racism and past-year MDD via self-esteem, but no indirect relationship via ethnic identity. Further, results show that both self-esteem and ethnic identity individually moderate the relationship between internalized racism and past-year MDD. Collectively, these findings suggest a need to further investigate mechanisms through which internalized racism impacts mental health and factors that strengthen and/or weaken the association between internalized racism and depression.

  12. Identification of the roles of individual amino acid residues of the helix E of the major antenna of photosystem II (LHCII) by alanine scanning mutagenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Cheng; Rao, Yan; Zhang, Lei; Yang, Chunhong

    2014-10-01

    The functions of the helix E (W97-F105), an amphiphilic lumenal 310 helix of the major antenna of photosystem II (LHCII), are still unidentified. To elucidate the roles of individual amino acid residue of the helix E, alanine scanning mutagenesis has been performed to mutate every residue of this domain to alanine. The influence of every alanine substitution on the structure and function of LHCII has been investigated biochemically and spectroscopically. The results show that all mutations have little impact on the pigment binding and configuration. However, many mutants presented decreased thermo- or photo-stability compared with the wild type, highlighting the significance of this helix to the stability of LHCII. The most critical residue for stability is W97. The mutant W97A yielded very fragile trimeric pigment protein complexes. The structural analysis revealed that the hydrogen bonding and aromatic interactions between W97, F195, F194 and a water molecule contributed greatly to the stability of LHCII. Moreover, Q103A and F105A have been identified to be able to reinforce the tendency of aggregation in vitro. The structural analysis suggested that the enhancement in aggregation formation for Q103A and F105A might be attributed to the changing hydrophobicity of the region. © The Authors 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Japanese Biochemical Society. All rights reserved.

  13. Spatial Dynamics of the Communities and the Role of Major Countries in the International Rare Earths Trade: A Complex Network Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xibo Wang

    Full Text Available Rare earths (RE are critical materials in many high-technology products. Due to the uneven distribution and important functions for industrial development, most countries import RE from a handful of suppliers that are rich in RE, such as China. However, because of the rapid growth of RE exploitation and pollution of the mining and production process, some of the main suppliers have gradually tended to reduce the RE production and exports. Especially in the last decade, international RE trade has been changing in the trade community and trade volume. Based on complex network theory, we built an unweighted and weighted network to explore the evolution of the communities and identify the role of the major countries in the RE trade. The results show that an international RE trade network was dispersed and unstable because of the existence of five to nine trade communities in the unweighted network and four to eight trade communities in the weighted network in the past 13 years. Moreover, trade groups formed due to the great influence of geopolitical relations. China was often associated with the South America and African countries in the same trade group. In addition, Japan, China, the United States, and Germany had the largest impacts on international RE trade from 2002 to 2014. Last, some policy suggestions were highlighted according to the results.

  14. The role of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids eicosapentaenoic and docosahexaenoic acids in the treatment of major depression and Alzheimer's disease: Acting separately or synergistically?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Cai; Shieh, Chu-Hsin; Wu, Yi-Shyuan; Kalueff, Allan; Gaikwad, Siddharth; Su, Kuan-Pin

    2016-04-01

    Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3-PUFAs), mainly eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), may improve or prevent some psychiatric and neurodegenerative diseases in both experimental and clinical studies. As important membrane components, these PUFAs benefit brain health by modulating neuroimmune and apoptotic pathways, changing membrane function and/or competing with n-6 PUFAs, the precursors of inflammatory mediators. However, the exact role of each fatty acid in neuroimmune modulation and neurogenesis, the interaction between EPA and DHA, and the best EPA:DHA ratios for improving brain disorders, remain unclear. It is also unknown whether EPA, as a DHA precursor, acts directly or via DHA. Here, we discuss recent evidence of EPA and DHA effects in the treatment of major depression and Alzheimer's disease, as well as their potential synergistic action on anti-inflammatory, antioxidant and neurotrophic processes in the brain. We further analyze the cellular and molecular mechanisms by which EPA, DHA or their combination may benefit these diseases. We also outline the limitations of current studies and suggest new genetic models and novel approaches to overcome these limitations. Finally, we summarize future strategies for translational research in this field. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Persistent Disadvantages or New Opportunities? The Role of Agency and Structural Constraints for Low-Achieving Adolescents' School-to-Work Transitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holtmann, Anne Christine; Menze, Laura; Solga, Heike

    2017-10-01

    School leavers with low educational attainment face great difficulties in their school-to-work transitions. They are, however, quite heterogeneous in terms of their personal and social resources. These within-group differences may influence who shows initiative during the school-to-work transition period and thereby helps employers recognize their learning potential at labor market entry. Yet this recognition also depends on the ways employers select applicants, which may prevent them from discovering such within-group differences. We therefore investigate the interplay between agency and its constraints, that is, whether higher cognitive and noncognitive skills and more parental resources provide low-achieving school leavers with new opportunities in the school-to-work transition period or whether their low school attainment causes the persistency of their disadvantages. We use panel data from the German National Educational Panel Study (NEPS), which started in grade 9. The NEPS also includes school leavers from special-needs schools. Our sample consists of 3417 low-achieving adolescents (42% female), defined as adolescents who leave school with no or only a lower secondary school-leaving certificate. Their average school-leaving age is 16 to 17 years. Our key findings are that the transition period opens up new opportunities only for those low-achieving adolescents with better vocational orientation and higher career aspirations, leading them to make stronger application efforts. The success of youth's initiative varies considerably by school-leaving certificate and school type but not by competences, noncognitive characteristics, and parental background. Thus, the label of "having low qualifications" is a major obstacle in this transition period-especially for the least educated subgroup. Their poor school attainment strongly disadvantages them when accessing the required training to become economically independent and hence in their general transition to

  16. Phase transitions in nuclear physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moretto, L.G.; Phair, L.; Wozniak, G.J.

    1997-08-01

    A critical overview of the low energy phase transitions in nuclei is presented with particular attention to the 2nd (1st) order pairing phase transitions, and to the 1st order liquid-vapor phase transition. The role of fluctuations in washing out these transitions is discussed and illustrated with examples. A robust indicator of phase coexistence in multifragmentation is presented.

  17. Phase transitions in nuclear physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moretto, L.G.; Phair, L.; Wozniak, G.J.

    1997-08-01

    A critical overview of the low energy phase transitions in nuclei is presented with particular attention to the 2nd (1st) order pairing phase transitions, and to the 1st order liquid-vapor phase transition. The role of fluctuations in washing out these transitions is discussed and illustrated with examples. A robust indicator of phase coexistence in multifragmentation is presented

  18. THE TRANSITION MASS-LOSS RATE: CALIBRATING THE ROLE OF LINE-DRIVEN WINDS IN MASSIVE STAR EVOLUTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vink, Jorick S.; Graefener, Goetz, E-mail: jsv@arm.ac.uk [Armagh Observatory, College Hill, BT61 9DG Armagh (United Kingdom)

    2012-06-01

    A debate has arisen regarding the importance of stationary versus eruptive mass loss for massive star evolution. The reason is that stellar winds have been found to be clumped, which results in the reduction of unclumped empirical mass-loss rates. Most stellar evolution models employ theoretical mass-loss rates which are already reduced by a moderate factor of {approx_equal}2-3 compared to non-corrected empirical rates. A key question is whether these reduced rates are of the correct order of magnitude, or if they should be reduced even further, which would mean that the alternative of eruptive mass loss becomes necessary. Here we introduce the transition mass-loss rate M-dot{sub trans} between O and Wolf-Rayet stars. Its novelty is that it is model independent. All that is required is postulating the spectroscopic transition point in a given data set, and determining the stellar luminosity, which is far less model dependent than the mass-loss rate. The transition mass-loss rate is subsequently used to calibrate stellar wind strength by its application to the Of/WNh stars in the Arches cluster. Good agreement is found with two alternative modeling/theoretical results, suggesting that the rates provided by current theoretical models are of the right order of magnitude in the {approx}50 M{sub Sun} mass range. Our results do not confirm the specific need for eruptive mass loss as luminous blue variables, and current stellar evolution modeling for Galactic massive stars seems sound. Mass loss through alternative mechanisms might still become necessary at lower masses, and/or metallicities, and the quantification of alternative mass loss is desirable.

  19. THE TRANSITION MASS-LOSS RATE: CALIBRATING THE ROLE OF LINE-DRIVEN WINDS IN MASSIVE STAR EVOLUTION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vink, Jorick S.; Gräfener, Götz

    2012-01-01

    A debate has arisen regarding the importance of stationary versus eruptive mass loss for massive star evolution. The reason is that stellar winds have been found to be clumped, which results in the reduction of unclumped empirical mass-loss rates. Most stellar evolution models employ theoretical mass-loss rates which are already reduced by a moderate factor of ≅2-3 compared to non-corrected empirical rates. A key question is whether these reduced rates are of the correct order of magnitude, or if they should be reduced even further, which would mean that the alternative of eruptive mass loss becomes necessary. Here we introduce the transition mass-loss rate M-dot trans between O and Wolf-Rayet stars. Its novelty is that it is model independent. All that is required is postulating the spectroscopic transition point in a given data set, and determining the stellar luminosity, which is far less model dependent than the mass-loss rate. The transition mass-loss rate is subsequently used to calibrate stellar wind strength by its application to the Of/WNh stars in the Arches cluster. Good agreement is found with two alternative modeling/theoretical results, suggesting that the rates provided by current theoretical models are of the right order of magnitude in the ∼50 M ☉ mass range. Our results do not confirm the specific need for eruptive mass loss as luminous blue variables, and current stellar evolution modeling for Galactic massive stars seems sound. Mass loss through alternative mechanisms might still become necessary at lower masses, and/or metallicities, and the quantification of alternative mass loss is desirable.

  20. Shift work disorder, depression, and anxiety in the transition to rotating shifts: the role of sleep reactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalmbach, David A; Pillai, Vivek; Cheng, Philip; Arnedt, J Todd; Drake, Christopher L

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate premorbid sleep reactivity as a vulnerability to incident shift work disorder (SWD), and related changes in depression as well as anxiety following a transition to a rotating shifts work schedule. This is a longitudinal study with two waves of data collection. The community-based sample included normal sleeping non-shift workers (N = 96; 62.5% female; 47.9 ± 13.3 years) without a lifetime history of insomnia or baseline excessive daytime sleepiness who transitioned to rotating shift work one year later. Participants reported demographic characteristics, trait sleep reactivity on the Ford Insomnia Response to Stress Test, depression symptoms on the Quick Inventory of Depression Symptomatology, and anxiety symptoms on the Beck Anxiety Inventory. SWD was determined based on significant sleep disturbance and/or excessive sleepiness in the context of working in a rotating-shift schedule. Analyses revealed that the odds were over five times greater for highly sleep-reactive individuals to develop SWD after transitioning to rotating shifts (OR = 5.59, p = 0.04). Nearly 90% of participants who suffered from SWD were accurately identified as high risk at one year before disease onset. Furthermore, individuals who developed SWD reported greater increases in symptoms of depression and anxiety. Finally, analyses revealed significant indirect effects wherein high sleep reactivity increased risk for SWD, which led to greater severity of anxiety and depression symptoms. The Ford Insomnia Response to Stress Test (FIRST) accurately identifies a focused target population in which the premorbid psychobiological processes complicit in SWD onset and progression, as well as shift work-related depression and anxiety changes, can be better investigated, thus improving future preventative efforts. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Role of the mid-Holocene environmental transition in the decline of late Neolithic cultures in the deserts of NE China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Licheng; Xiong, Shangfa; Ding, Zhongli; Jin, Guiyun; Wu, Jiabin; Ye, Wei

    2018-06-01

    The mid-Holocene environmental transition was characterised by global cooling and the abrupt weakening of the Northern Hemisphere monsoon systems. It is generally considered the key driver of the collapse of several mid-Holocene agricultural societies, on a global scale. However, only a few previous studies have tried to verify the climatic origin of the collapse of these societies, using the compilation of spatiotemporal data at a large scale. Especially, the nature of mid-Holocene human-environment interactions in the climatically-sensitive margin of the East Asian summer monsoon front remains to be thoroughly understood. However, a systematic compilation of archaeological data at a regional scale can be used to verify the role the mid-Holocene environmental transition played in the collapse of late Neolithic cultures in China. Here, we present a regional compilation of Holocene records from sub-aerial sedimentary deposits, lake sediments, and archaeological sites in the deserts of NE China and the adjacent regions to explore human-environment interactions during the mid-Holocene. Comparison of the records of Holocene climate change with the evolution of archaeological sites reveals that the mid-Holocene environmental transition resulted in ecosystem degradation in the deserts of NE China, rendering these areas much less habitable. Faced with substantially increased environmental pressures, the late Neolithic inhabitants used several subsistence strategies to adapt to the environmental transition, including change in agricultural practices and ultimately migration. Overall, our results support the view that a widespread mid-Holocene drought destroyed the rain-fed agricultural and/or plant-based subsistence economies, ultimately contributing to the collapse of late Neolithic cultures in NE China.

  2. The role of team climate in improving the quality of chronic care delivery: a longitudinal study among professionals working with chronically ill adolescents in transitional care programmes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cramm, Jane M; Strating, Mathilde M H; Nieboer, Anna P

    2014-05-22

    This study aimed to (1) evaluate the effectiveness of implementing transition programmes in improving the quality of chronic care delivery and (2) identify the predictive role of (changes in) team climate on the quality of chronic care delivery over time. This longitudinal study was undertaken with professionals working in hospitals and rehabilitation units that participated in the transition programme 'On Your Own Feet Ahead!' in the Netherlands. A total of 145/180 respondents (80.6%) filled in the questionnaire at the beginning of the programme (T1), and 101/173 respondents (58.4%) did so 1 year later at the end of the programme (T2). A total of 90 (52%) respondents filled in the questionnaire at both time points. Two-tailed, paired t tests were used to investigate improvements over time and multilevel analyses to investigate the predictive role of (changes in) team climate on the quality of chronic care delivery. Transition programme. Quality of chronic care delivery measured with the Assessment of Chronic Illness Care Short version (ACIC-S). The overall ACIC-S score at T1 was 5.90, indicating basic or intermediate support for chronic care delivery. The mean ACIC-S score at T2 significantly improved to 6.70, indicating advanced support for chronic care. After adjusting for the quality of chronic care delivery at T1 and significant respondents' characteristics, multilevel regression analyses showed that team climate at T1 (pteam climate (pteam climate to enhance the quality of chronic care delivery to chronically ill adolescents. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  3. Trajectories of depressive symptoms in foster youth transitioning into adulthood: the roles of emotion dysregulation and PTSD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdez, Christine E; Bailey, Brenda E; Santuzzi, Alecia M; Lilly, Michelle M

    2014-01-01

    Foster youth often experience considerable adversity both in and out of foster care, including histories of abuse and/or neglect, and further stressors within the foster system. These adverse experiences often occur at key developmental periods that can compromise emotional functioning and lead to posttraumatic symptomatology, including posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and emotion dysregulation. In the face of difficult histories and ongoing mental health challenges, youth transitioning into adulthood may be particularly vulnerable to increases in depressive symptoms. We explored the trajectory of depressive symptoms in foster youth from age 17 to 19 using a piecewise linear growth model, examining the effects of PTSD and emotion dysregulation on youth's depressive symptoms over time. Results revealed depressive symptoms decreased from age 17 to 18 but increased from 18 to 19. PTSD and emotion dysregulation predicted greater baseline depressive symptoms and decreases in symptoms from age 17 to 18, whereas only PTSD predicted increases in depressive symptoms from 18 to 19. Females reported higher levels of depressive symptoms compared to males. Additionally, emotion dysregulation was a stronger predictor of depressive symptoms for females than males. Implications for service delivery for foster youth transitioning into adulthood are discussed. © The Author(s) 2014.

  4. The role of hospice in the transition from hospital to home for technology-dependent children-A qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Jayne; McCloskey, Sharon; Brazil, Kevin

    2018-01-01

    To report parent and professional perspectives of step-down care in assisting the transition from hospital to home, within one children's hospice in a constituent country of the United Kingdom. In recent years, increasing numbers of children-dependent on long term assisted ventilation have been noted. Meeting the complex physical, emotional and social needs of the child and family is challenging. Many of these children spend extended periods in hospital even when medically stable. This was a qualitative study using an inductive, semantic analytic approach within a realist epistemology. Data collection was carried out in 2013. Interviews took place with parents (n = 5) and focus groups with professionals (n = 26) who had experience of step-down care. Multiple benefits of step-down in the hospice were clear. Both sets of accounts suggested that for children and families life was "on hold" in hospital. Hospice was considered a home-like environment where the child and family could "live again". Parents reflected that, in hospice they were "living, not existing" while professionals highlighted hospice as nurturing and empowering the whole family, promoting the child's development while safely meeting their clinical needs. The study highlights a number of crucial benefits to the child and family both in the immediate and longer terms. The collective perspectives therefore endorse hospice as a potential viable choice for these children and their families during the always difficult, usually protracted transition from hospital to home. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Nutritional status of adolescents in the context of the Moroccan nutritional transition: the role of parental education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, Pilar Montero; Anzid, Karim; Cherkaoui, Mohamed; Baali, Abdellatif; Lopez, Santiago Rodriguez

    2012-07-01

    In Morocco, the beginning of the nutritional transition is closely linked to social and economic transformations and changes in behaviour and traditional lifestyles. The objective of this study is to describe the current pattern of food consumption and the nutritional status of adolescents in the province of Ouarzazate and its association with parents' educational level. The sample comprises 327 high school students from Ouarzazate: 135 (41.3%) boys and 192 (58.7%) girls (age range 15-20 years). For both boys and girls, the results show lower height and BMI z-scores than the WHO reference values. Adolescents whose parents have a low educational level have lower height/age and BMI/age z-scores than those whose fathers have a high educational level. No differences are observed in total daily energy intake depending on fathers' educational level, but the energy provided by lipids is higher in adolescents whose fathers have a high educational background. The quality of fats consumed (MUFA+PUFA/SFA) is better among those boys whose fathers have low education, but no differences are observed for girls. The process of nutritional transition is not uniform in the sample, but depends on the socioeconomic characteristics of population groups, which include, among others, accessibility of certain food, differences in habits and lifestyles related to energy expenditure, and higher prevalence of overweight and obesity in more favoured groups.

  6. Adult care transitioning for adolescents with special health care needs: a pivotal role for family centered care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duke, Naomi N; Scal, Peter B

    2011-01-01

    To examine the relationship between having a usual source of care, family centered care, and transition counseling for adolescents with special health care needs. Data are from 18,198 parents/guardians, of youth aged 12-17 years, who participated in the 2005-2006 National Survey of Children With Special Health Care Needs. Linear and logistic regression models were used to define relationships between parent report of identification of a usual place and provider of medical care for their child and counseling on four transition issues: transfer to adult providers, review of future health needs, maintaining health insurance in adulthood, and youth taking responsibility for care. The direct mediating effect of family centered care was evaluated. Youth having a usual source of care (vs. not) were more likely to receive counseling on future health needs (47.4 vs. 33.6%, P needs (56.3 vs. 39.6%, P needs and 94.9% of the effect of a usual source of care on encouragement to take responsibility for care. Study findings support the development of health care delivery models focusing on family centered care to the same degree as other health care access issues.

  7. Key Role of Nitrate in Phase Transitions of Urban Particles: Implications of Important Reactive Surfaces for Secondary Aerosol Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jiaxing; Liu, Lei; Xu, Liang; Wang, Yuanyuan; Wu, Zhijun; Hu, Min; Shi, Zongbo; Li, Yongjie; Zhang, Xiaoye; Chen, Jianmin; Li, Weijun

    2018-01-01

    Ammonium sulfate (AS) and ammonium nitrate (AN) are key components of urban fine particles. Both field and model studies showed that heterogeneous reactions of SO2, NO2, and NH3 on wet aerosols accelerated the haze formation in northern China. However, little is known on phase transitions of AS-AN containing haze particles. Here hygroscopic properties of laboratory-generated AS-AN particles and individual particles collected during haze events in an urban site were investigated using an individual particle hygroscopicity system. AS-AN particles showed a two-stage deliquescence at mutual deliquescence relative humidity (MDRH) and full deliquescence relative humidity (DRH) and three physical states: solid before MDRH, solid-aqueous between MDRH and DRH, and aqueous after DRH. During hydration, urban haze particles displayed a solid core and aqueous shell at RH = 60-80% and aqueous phase at RH > 80%. Most particles were in aqueous phase at RH > 50% during dehydration. Our results show that AS content in individual particles determines their DRH and AN content determines their MDRH. AN content increase can reduce MDRH, which indicates occurrence of aqueous shell at lower RH. The humidity-dependent phase transitions of nitrate-abundant urban particles are important to provide reactive surfaces of secondary aerosol formation in the polluted air.

  8. Critical role of γ-phosphate in structural transition of Na,K-ATPase upon ATP binding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrushanko, Irina Yu.; Mitkevich, Vladimir A.; Anashkina, Anastasia A.; Klimanova, Elizaveta A.; Dergousova, Elena A.; Lopina, Olga D.; Makarov, Alexander A.

    2014-06-01

    Active transport of sodium and potassium ions by Na,K-ATPase is accompanied by the enzyme conformational transition between E1 and E2 states. ATP and ADP bind to Na,K-ATPase in the E1 conformation with similar affinity but the properties of enzyme in complexes with these nucleotides are different. We have studied thermodynamics of Na,K-ATPase binding with adenine nucleotides at different temperatures using isothermal titration calorimetry. Our data indicate that β-phosphate is involved in complex formation by increasing the affinity of adenine nucleotides to Na,K-ATPase by an order of magnitude, while γ-phosphate does not affect it. ATP binding to Na,K-ATPase in contrast to ADP binding generates a structural transition in the enzyme, which is consistent with the movement of a significant portion of the surface area to a solvent-protected state. We propose that ATP binding leads to convergence of the nucleotide-binding and phosphorylation domains transferring the enzyme from the ``E1-open'' to ``E1-closed'' conformation ready for phosphorylation.

  9. The OPECST and the energy transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Deaut, Jean-Yves

    2014-01-01

    The OPECST is the French Parliamentary Office of Assessment of Scientific and Technological Choices. It has been created in 1983. Its activities and operational modality are presented. The next part comments OPECST activities related to energy transition, evokes some reports published on different topics: the future of the nuclear sector, the perspectives of non conventional hydrocarbons, the possibilities of the use of hydrogen for energy storage. Several aspects are notably addressed: the technical conditions to be met for a successful energy transition, the role of nuclear energy in energy transition, the extension of nuclear reactor service lifetime, the opinion of the OPECST on some prospective scenarios (ADEME and Negawatt). The improvement of buildings thermal insulation is commented as a major element in energy transition, but the complexity of regulations and problems for investors are outlined, as well as the cost of renovation for households

  10. Clonorchis sinensis omega-class glutathione transferases play major roles in the protection of the reproductive system during maturation and the response to oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jeong-Geun; Ahn, Chun-Seob; Kim, Seon-Hee; Bae, Young-An; Kwon, Na-Young; Kang, Insug; Yang, Hyun-Jong; Sohn, Woon-Mok; Kong, Yoon

    2016-06-13

    Clonorchis sinensis causes a major food-borne helminthic infection. This species locates in mammalian hepatobiliary ducts, where oxidative stressors and hydrophobic substances are profuse. To adapt to the hostile micromilieu and to ensure its long-term survival, the parasite continuously produces a diverse repertoire of antioxidant enzymes including several species of glutathione transferases (GSTs). Helminth GSTs play pertinent roles during sequestration of harmful xenobiotics since most helminths lack the cytochrome P-450 detoxifying enzyme. We isolated and analyzed the biochemical properties of two omega-class GSTs of C. sinensis (CsGSTo1 and CsGSTo2). We observed spatiotemporal expression patterns in accordance with the maturation of the worm's reproductive system. Possible biological protective roles of CsGSTos in these organs under oxidative stress were investigated. The full-length cDNAs of CsGSTo1 and 2 constituted 965 bp and 1,061 bp with open reading frames of 737 bp (246 amino acids) and 669 bp (223 amino acids). They harbored characteristic N-terminal thioredoxin-like and C-terminal α-helical domains. A cysteine residue, which constituted omega-class specific active site, and the glutathione-binding amino acids, were recognized in appropriate positions. They shared 44 % sequence identity with each other and 14.8-44.8 % with orthologues/homologues from other organisms. Bacterially expressed recombinant proteins (rCsGSTo1 and 2) exhibited dehydroascorbate reductase (DHAR) and thioltransferase activities. DHAR activity was higher than thioltransferase activity. They showed weak canonical GST activity toward 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene. S-hexylglutathione potently and competitively inhibited the active-site at nanomolar concentrations (0.63 and 0.58 nM for rCsGSTo1 and 2). Interestingly, rCsGSTos exhibited high enzyme activity toward mu- and theta-class GST specific substrate, 4-nitrobenzyl chloride. Expression of CsGSTo transcripts and proteins

  11. Role of damage-specific DNA polymerases in M13 phage mutagenesis induced by a major lipid peroxidation product trans-4-hydroxy-2-nonenal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janowska, Beata [Institute of Biochemistry and Biophysics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Pawinskiego 5a, 02-106 Warsaw (Poland); Kurpios-Piec, Dagmara [Department of Biochemistry, Medical University of Warsaw, Banacha 1, 02-097 Warsaw (Poland); Prorok, Paulina [Institute of Genetics and Biotechnology, Warsaw University, Pawinskiego 5a, 02-106 Warsaw (Poland); Szparecki, Grzegorz [Medical University of Warsaw, Zwirki i Wigury 61, 02-097 Warsaw (Poland); Komisarski, Marek [Institute of Biochemistry and Biophysics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Pawinskiego 5a, 02-106 Warsaw (Poland); Kowalczyk, Pawel [Interdisciplinary Centre for Mathematical and Computational Modelling, Warsaw University, Pawinskiego 5a, 02-106 Warsaw (Poland); Janion, Celina [Institute of Biochemistry and Biophysics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Pawinskiego 5a, 02-106 Warsaw (Poland); Tudek, Barbara, E-mail: tudek@ibb.waw.pl [Institute of Biochemistry and Biophysics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Pawinskiego 5a, 02-106 Warsaw (Poland); Institute of Genetics and Biotechnology, Warsaw University, Pawinskiego 5a, 02-106 Warsaw (Poland)

    2012-01-03

    One of the major lipid peroxidation products trans-4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (HNE), forms cyclic propano- or ethenoadducts bearing six- or seven-carbon atom side chains to G > C Much-Greater-Than A > T. To specify the role of SOS DNA polymerases in HNE-induced mutations, we tested survival and mutation spectra in the lacZ{alpha} gene of M13mp18 phage, whose DNA was treated in vitro with HNE, and which was grown in uvrA{sup -}Escherichia coli strains, carrying one, two or all three SOS DNA polymerases. When Pol IV was the only DNA SOS polymerase in the bacterial host, survival of HNE-treated M13 DNA was similar to, but mutation frequency was lower than in the strain containing all SOS DNA polymerases. When only Pol II or Pol V were present in host bacteria, phage survival decreased dramatically. Simultaneously, mutation frequency was substantially increased, but exclusively in the strain carrying only Pol V, suggesting that induction of mutations by HNE is mainly dependent on Pol V. To determine the role of Pol II and Pol IV in HNE induced mutagenesis, Pol II or Pol IV were expressed together with Pol V. This resulted in decrease of mutation frequency, suggesting that both enzymes can compete with Pol V, and bypass HNE-DNA adducts in an error-free manner. However, HNE-DNA adducts were easily bypassed by Pol IV and only infrequently by Pol II. Mutation spectrum established for strains expressing only Pol V, showed that in uvrA{sup -} bacteria the frequency of base substitutions and recombination increased in relation to NER proficient strains, particularly mutations at adenine sites. Among base substitutions A:T {yields} C:G, A:T {yields} G:C, G:C {yields} A:T and G:C {yields} T:A prevailed. The results suggest that Pol V can infrequently bypass HNE-DNA adducts inducing mutations at G, C and A sites, while bypass by Pol IV and Pol II is error-free, but for Pol II infrequent.

  12. Caltrans : transit funding manual : managing the delivery of transit projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-05-01

    This manual attempts to provide a step by step transit funding process. Included in this manual : is an overview of Caltrans Division of Mass Transportation, roles and responsibilities in : assisting local agencies to deliver transit projects. Transi...

  13. Roles of different IRES-dependent FGF2 isoforms in the acquisition of the major aggressive features of human metastatic melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreucci, Elena; Bianchini, Francesca; Biagioni, Alessio; Del Rosso, Mario; Papucci, Laura; Schiavone, Nicola; Magnelli, Lucia

    2017-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF2) is involved in many physiological and pathological processes. Fgf2 deregulation contributes to the acquisition of malignant features of melanoma and other cancers. FGF2 is an alternative translation product expressed as five isoforms, a low-molecular-weight (18 KDa) and four high-molecular-weight (22, 22.5, 24, 34 KDa) isoforms, with different subcellular distributions. An internal ribosomal entry site (IRES) in its mRNA controls the translation of all the isoforms with the exception for the cap-dependent 34 KDa. The 18-KDa isoform has been extensively studied, while very few is known about the roles of high molecular weight isoforms. FGF2 is known to promote melanoma development and progression. To disclose the differential contribution of FGF2 isoforms in melanoma, we forced the expression of IRES-dependent low-molecular-weight (LMW, 18 KDa) and high-molecular-weight (HMW, 22, 22.5, 24 KDa) isoforms in a human metastatic melanoma cell line. This comparative study highlights that, while LMW isoform confers stem-like features to melanoma cells and promotes angiogenesis, HMW isoforms induce higher migratory ability and contribute to tumor perfusion by promoting vasculogenic mimicry (VM) when endothelial cell-driven angiogenesis is lacking. To conclude, FGF2 isoforms mainly behave in specific, antithetical manners, but can cooperate in different steps of tumor progression, providing melanoma cells with major malignant features. FGF2 is an alternative translation product expressed as different isoforms termed LMW and HMW. FGF2 is involved in melanoma development and progression. HMW FGF2 isoforms enhance in vitro motility of melanoma cells. LMW FGF2 confers stem-like features and increases in vivo metastasization. LMW FGF2 promotes angiogenesis while HMW FGF2 induces vasculogenic mimicry.

  14. The role of clinical variables, neuropsychological performance and SLC6A4 and COMT gene polymorphisms on the prediction of early response to fluoxetine in major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gudayol-Ferré, Esteve; Herrera-Guzmán, Ixchel; Camarena, Beatriz; Cortés-Penagos, Carlos; Herrera-Abarca, Jorge E; Martínez-Medina, Patricia; Cruz, David; Hernández, Sandra; Genis, Alma; Carrillo-Guerrero, Mariana Y; Avilés Reyes, Rubén; Guàrdia-Olmos, Joan

    2010-12-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is treated with antidepressants, but only between 50% and 70% of the patients respond to the initial treatment. Several authors suggested different factors that could predict antidepressant response, including clinical, psychophysiological, neuropsychological, neuroimaging, and genetic variables. However, these different predictors present poor prognostic sensitivity and specificity by themselves. The aim of our work is to study the possible role of clinical variables, neuropsychological performance, and the 5HTTLPR, rs25531, and val108/58Met COMT polymorphisms in the prediction of the response to fluoxetine after 4weeks of treatment in a sample of patient with MDD. 64 patients with MDD were genotyped according to the above-mentioned polymorphisms, and were clinically and neuropsychologically assessed before a 4-week fluoxetine treatment. Fluoxetine response was assessed by using the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale. We carried out a binary logistic regression model for the potential predictive variables. Out of the clinical variables studied, only the number of anxiety disorders comorbid with MDD have predicted a poor response to the treatment. A combination of a good performance in variables of attention and low performance in planning could predict a good response to fluoxetine in patients with MDD. None of the genetic variables studied had predictive value in our model. The possible placebo effect has not been controlled. Our study is focused on response prediction but not in remission prediction. Our work suggests that the combination of the number of comorbid anxiety disorders, an attentional variable, and two planning variables makes it possible to correctly classify 82% of the depressed patients who responded to the treatment with fluoxetine, and 74% of the patients who did not respond to that treatment. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Structural analysis and mutant growth properties reveal distinctive enzymatic and cellular roles for the three major L-alanine transaminases of Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peña-Soler, Esther; Fernandez, Francisco J; López-Estepa, Miguel; Garces, Fernando; Richardson, Andrew J; Quintana, Juan F; Rudd, Kenneth E; Coll, Miquel; Vega, M Cristina

    2014-01-01

    In order to maintain proper cellular function, the metabolism of the bacterial microbiota presents several mechanisms oriented to keep a correctly balanced amino acid pool. Central components of these mechanisms are enzymes with alanine transaminase activity, pyridoxal 5'-phosphate-dependent enzymes that interconvert alanine and pyruvate, thereby allowing the precise control of alanine and glutamate concentrations, two of the most abundant amino acids in the cellular amino acid pool. Here we report the 2.11-Å crystal structure of full-length AlaA from the model organism Escherichia coli, a major bacterial alanine aminotransferase, and compare its overall structure and active site composition with detailed atomic models of two other bacterial enzymes capable of catalyzing this reaction in vivo, AlaC and valine-pyruvate aminotransferase (AvtA). Apart from a narrow entry channel to the active site, a feature of this new crystal structure is the role of an active site loop that closes in upon binding of substrate-mimicking molecules, and which has only been previously reported in a plant enzyme. Comparison of the available structures indicates that beyond superficial differences, alanine aminotransferases of diverse phylogenetic origins share a universal reaction mechanism that depends on an array of highly conserved amino acid residues and is similarly regulated by various unrelated motifs. Despite this unifying mechanism and regulation, growth competition experiments demonstrate that AlaA, AlaC and AvtA are not freely exchangeable in vivo, suggesting that their functional repertoire is not completely redundant thus providing an explanation for their independent evolutionary conservation.

  16. Evolution of a major drug metabolizing enzyme defect in the domestic cat and other felidae: phylogenetic timing and the role of hypercarnivory.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Binu Shrestha

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The domestic cat (Felis catus shows remarkable sensitivity to the adverse effects of phenolic drugs, including acetaminophen and aspirin, as well as structurally-related toxicants found in the diet and environment. This idiosyncrasy results from pseudogenization of the gene encoding UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT 1A6, the major species-conserved phenol detoxification enzyme. Here, we established the phylogenetic timing of disruptive UGT1A6 mutations and explored the hypothesis that gene inactivation in cats was enabled by minimal exposure to plant-derived toxicants. Fixation of the UGT1A6 pseudogene was estimated to have occurred between 35 and 11 million years ago with all extant Felidae having dysfunctional UGT1A6. Out of 22 additional taxa sampled, representative of most Carnivora families, only brown hyena (Parahyaena brunnea and northern elephant seal (Mirounga angustirostris showed inactivating UGT1A6 mutations. A comprehensive literature review of the natural diet of the sampled taxa indicated that all species with defective UGT1A6 were hypercarnivores (>70% dietary animal matter. Furthermore those species with UGT1A6 defects showed evidence for reduced amino acid constraint (increased dN/dS ratios approaching the neutral selection value of 1.0 as compared with species with intact UGT1A6. In contrast, there was no evidence for reduced amino acid constraint for these same species within UGT1A1, the gene encoding the enzyme responsible for detoxification of endogenously generated bilirubin. Our results provide the first evidence suggesting that diet may have played a permissive role in the devolution of a mammalian drug metabolizing enzyme. Further work is needed to establish whether these preliminary findings can be generalized to all Carnivora.

  17. Risk for Arrest: The Role of Social Bonds in Protecting Foster Youth Making the Transition to Adulthood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cusick, Gretchen Ruth; Havlicek, Judy R.; Courtney, Mark E.

    2012-01-01

    This study examines a sample of foster youth at the onset of the transition to adulthood and explores how social bonds are related to the risk of arrest during adulthood. Drawing from official arrest records, event history models are used to examine the time to arrest. Because individuals may be at risk for different types of crime, competing risk regression models are used to distinguish among arrests for drug-related, nonviolent, or violent crimes. Between the ages of 17–18 and 24, 46% of former foster youth experience an arrest. Arrests were evenly distributed across drug, nonviolent, and violent crimes columns. Although findings fail to support the significance of social bonds to interpersonal domains, bonds to employment and education are associated with a lower risk for arrest. Child welfare policy and practice implications for building connections and protections around foster youth are discussed. PMID:22239390

  18. Exploring the role of pendant amines in transition metal complexes for the reduction of N2 to hydrazine and ammonia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhattacharya, Papri; Prokopchuk, Demyan E.; Mock, Michael T.

    2017-03-01

    This review examines the synthesis and acid reactivity of transition metal dinitrogen complexes bearing diphosphine ligands containing pendant amine groups in the second coordination sphere. This manuscript is a review of the work performed in the Center for Molecular Electrocatalysis. This work was supported as part of the Center for Molecular Electrocatalysis, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (U.S. DOE), Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences. EPR studies on Fe were performed using EMSL, a national scientific user facility sponsored by the DOE’s Office of Biological and Environmental Research and located at PNNL. Computational resources were provided by the National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for the U.S. DOE.

  19. Divorce-Related Transitions, Adolescent Development, and the Role of the Parent-Child Relationship: A Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hines, Alice M.

    1997-01-01

    Reports on a literature review of adolescent development, family relationships, and the impact of divorce on adolescents. Results reveal that adolescents experience divorce differently than younger children and that a positive parent-adolescent relationship can ameliorate a divorce's negative effects. Identifies major gaps in the literature,…

  20. Changing food habits in a South Indian Hindu Brahmin community: a case of transitioning gender roles and family dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahadevan, Meena; Blair, Dorothy; Raines, Emily Rose

    2014-01-01

    This study was conducted to explore the perceptions of 20 South Indian Hindu Brahmin women on the factors influencing their food habits upon immigrating to America. The competing demands of juggling a new career and managing their family's nutritional needs at the same time, all without the support of extended family members, played an important role in steering these women away from cooking traditional healthy meals, and resorting to fast foods instead. Intervention strategies should be directed toward improving the barriers to eating healthy that were specifically identified within the confines of shifting gender roles and limited family support networks.